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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "breeze otherf factors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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1

The Sea-Breeze Front Analytical Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Analytical solutions to the nonlinear equations of motion are used to describe the sea breeze front.

Yizhak Feliks

1988-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

BreezElectric | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

BreezElectric Jump to: navigation, search Name BreezElectric Place San Diego, California Zip CA 92128 Sector Wind energy Product Electricity supplier for small grids on remote...

3

Changes related to "New England Breeze Solar and Wind Installers...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon Changes related to "New England Breeze Solar and Wind Installers" New England Breeze Solar and Wind Installers Jump to:...

4

Topographic Effects on the Tropical Land and Sea Breeze  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effect of an inland plateau on the tropical sea breeze is considered in terms of idealized numerical experiments, with a particular emphasis on offshore effects. The sea breeze is modeled as the response to an oscillating interior heat source ...

Tingting Qian; Craig C. Epifanio; Fuqing Zhang

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Pages that link to "New England Breeze Solar and Wind Installers...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon Pages that link to "New England Breeze Solar and Wind Installers" New England Breeze Solar and Wind Installers Jump to:...

6

Lidar Observations of Sea-Breeze and Land-Breeze Aerosol Structure on the Black Sea  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes results of a lidar study of sea-breeze behavior near Akhtopol in the southeastern corner of Bulgaria. The lidar site was a few hundred meters from the western shore of the Black Sea. Analyses are presented of vertical cross ...

I. Kolev; O. Parvanov; B. Kaprielov; E. Donev; D. Ivanov

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

The Effect of Latitude on the Sea Breeze  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Long-term (five-day) integrations of a nonlinear numerical model of the sea breeze at the equator, 20°N, 30°N and 45°N indicate the importance of latitude on the sea breeze circulation. During the hours of strong heating when friction is largest ...

Hong Yan; Richard A. Anthes

1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

The Surface Sea Breeze: Applicability of Haurwitz-Type Theory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Haurwitz sea-breeze theory, and modifications by Kusuda and Alpert, are not generally applicable to observed winds in coastal regions, in part because they make no allowance for spatial evolution of wind hodographs. This is demonstrated by ...

D. O. Staley

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Sea Breezes Shallow and Deep on the California Coast  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Analyses of Doppler lidar data reveal sea breezes occurring on two different depth and time scales at Monterey Bay, California, on a day with offshore gradient flow indicated before sunrise and after sunset. The lidar data used in this study ...

Robert M. Banta

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Helicopter Observations of the Sea Breeze over a Coastal Area  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Thermodynamical observations by a helicopter have been conducted to study the internal structure of the sea breeze blowing inland from Tosa Bay during three periods (September 1993, November 1994 and 1995). Inland-intrusion distances of the ...

Osamu Chiba; Fumiaki Kobayashi; Gen’ichi Naito; Koji Sassa

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Numerical Simulations of Sea-Breeze Circulations over Northwest Hawaii  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sea-breeze cases during 23–28 June 1978 over northwest Hawaii are simulated using the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) Mesoscale Spectral Model (MSM) coupled with an advanced Land Surface Model (LSM) with 3-km horizontal ...

Yongxin Zhang; Yi-Leng Chen; Thomas A. Schroeder; Kevin Kodama

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Designing and compiling functional Java for the Fresh Breeze architecture  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Fresh Breeze architecture is a novel approach to computing that aims to support a high degree of parallelism. Rather than striving for heroic complexity in order to support exceptional single-thread performance, as in ...

Jacobs, William J., M. Eng. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Observations of Fluxes and Inland Breezes over a Heterogeneous Surface  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Repeated aircraft runs at about 33 m over heterogeneous terrain are analyzed to study the spatial variability of the mesoscale flow and turbulent fluxes. An irrigated area, about 12 km across, generates a relatively cool moist inland breeze. As ...

L. Mahrt; Jielun Sun; Dean Vickers; J. I. Macpherson; J. R. Pederson; R. L. Desjardins

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Summertime Precipitation Regimes Associated with the Sea Breeze and Land Breeze in Southern Mississippi and Eastern Louisiana  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study assesses the monthly climatology of the timing and placement of convective precipitation events induced by sea and land breezes in the Louisiana–Mississippi–Alabama region, and determines possible reasons for the monthly differences. ...

Christopher M. Hill; Patrick J. Fitzpatrick; James H. Corbin; Yee H. Lau; Sachin K. Bhate

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Influence of the Synoptic-Scale Flow on Sea Breezes Observed during CaPE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mean sea-breeze characteristics were determined by analyzing a number of sea-breeze events during offshore, parallel, and onshore flow regimes during the Convection and Precipitation/Electrification Experiment (CaPE). It was observed that ...

Nolan T. Atkins; Roger M. Wakimoto

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

The Cape Canaveral Sea and River Breezes: Kinematic Structure and Convective Initiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study examines complex flow patterns associated with the Cape Canaveral sea breeze and sea-breeze front using dual-Doppler radar, sounding, and surface data collected on 26 July 1991 during the Convection and Precipitation/Electrification ...

Neil F. Laird; David A. R. Kristovich; Robert M. Rauber; Harry T. Ochs III; L. Jay Miller

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

New England Breeze Solar and Wind Installers | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Breeze Solar and Wind Installers Breeze Solar and Wind Installers Jump to: navigation, search Logo: New England Breeze Solar and Wind Installers Name New England Breeze Solar and Wind Installers Place Hudson, Massachusetts Zip 01749 Sector Renewable energy, Services, Solar, Wind energy Product Solar Panel and Wind Turbine Installation Year founded 2006 Number of employees 1-10 Phone number 978-567-9463 Website http://www.NewEnglandBreeze.co Coordinates 42.3917598°, -71.5661769° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.3917598,"lon":-71.5661769,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

18

Evolution of the Monterey Bay Sea-Breeze Layer As Observed by Pulsed Doppler Lidar  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of the Land/Sea Breeze Experiment (LASBEX) to study the sea breeze at Monterey Bay, the pulsed Doppler lidar of the NOAA/ERL Wave Propagation Laboratory performed vertical and nearly horizontal scans of the developing sea breeze on 12 ...

Robert M. Banta; Lisa D. Olivier; David H. Levinson

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Sea-Breeze Interactions along a Concave Coastline in Southern Australia: Observations and Numerical Modeling Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Observations and numerical modeling of the bay and ocean breezes of Port Phillip Bay show that the interaction of these two breezes produces features undocumented in previous sea-breeze studies. The first of these is the formation of a mesoscale ...

Deborah J. Abbs

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Blue Breezes I & II Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Blue Breezes I & II Wind Farm Blue Breezes I & II Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Blue Breezes I & II Wind Farm Facility Blue Breezes I & II Sector Wind energy Facility Type Community Wind Facility Status In Service Owner John Deere Wind Energy Developer Dan Moore/John Deere Wind Energy Energy Purchaser City of Blue Earth Location City of Blue Earth MN Coordinates 43.6352°, -94.0942° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.6352,"lon":-94.0942,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "breeze otherf factors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Lake Michigan Lake Breezes: Climatology, Local Forcing, and Synoptic Environment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method was developed to identify the occurrence of lake-breeze events along the eastern, western, and both shores of Lake Michigan during a 15-yr period (1982–96). Comparison with detailed observations from May through September of 1996–97 ...

Neil F. Laird; David A. R. Kristovich; Xin-Zhong Liang; Raymond W. Arritt; Kenneth Labas

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Further Studies of a Lake Breeze Part I: Observational Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The three-dimensional structure and behavior of a lake-land breeze circulation system induced by Lake Ontario for a selected 24 h period is presented. The structure is determined from observations made during the International Field Year of the ...

Mariano A. Estoque

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Further Studies of a Lake Breeze Part ll: Theoretical Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The three-dimensional structure and behavior of the lake-land breeze circulation which is induced by Lake Ontario is studied by means of a numerical model. The model is a primitive equation model which incorporates the effects of orography and ...

Mariano A. Estoque; James M. Gross

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Briny Breezes, Florida: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Briny Breezes, Florida: Energy Resources Briny Breezes, Florida: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 26.5084053°, -80.0508748° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":26.5084053,"lon":-80.0508748,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

25

MHK Projects/Breeze Point | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Breeze Point Breeze Point < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":31.1029,"lon":-91.6161,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:\/\/prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com\/w\/images\/7\/74\/Aquamarine-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

26

Application for presidential permit OE Docket No. PP-299 Sea Breeze Pacific  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

299 Sea Breeze 299 Sea Breeze Pacific Regional Transmission System Inc.: Federal Register Notice Volume 70, No. 33 - Feb. 18, 2005 Application for presidential permit OE Docket No. PP-299 Sea Breeze Pacific Regional Transmission System Inc.: Federal Register Notice Volume 70, No. 33 - Feb. 18, 2005 Application from Sea Breeze Pacific Regional Transmission System Inc to construct, operate, and maintain electric transmission facilities at the U.S-Canada border. - Federal Register Notice Application for presidential permit OE Docket No. PP-299 Sea Breeze Pacific Regional Transmission System Inc More Documents & Publications Application for Presidential Permit OE Docket No. PP-299 Sea Breeze Pacific Regional Transmission System, INC EIS-0183: DOE Notice of Availability of the Record of Decision

27

A Numerical Study on Sea/Land Breezes as a Gravity Current: Kelvin–Helmholtz Billows and Inland Penetration of the Sea-Breeze Front  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A two-dimensional, nonhydrostatic, compressible, and dry numerical model was developed. By using high spatial resolution and an appropriate turbulence model, fine structure and dynamics of the sea-breeze head were investigated.

Weiming Sha; Takeshi Kawamura; Hiromasa Ueda

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Sea breeze Initiated Rainfall over the east Coast of India during the Indian Southwest Monsoon  

SciTech Connect

Sea breeze initiated convection and precipitation is investigated along the east coast of India during the Indian southwest monsoon season. The sea breeze circulations are observed approximately 70 to 80% of the days during the summer months (June to August) along the Chennai coast. Observations of average sea breeze wind speeds are stronger at a rural location as compared to the wind speeds observed inside the urban region of Chennai. The sea breeze circulation is shown to be the dominant mechanism for initiating rainfall during the Indian southwest monsoon season. Roughly 80% of the total rainfall observed during the southwest monsoon over Chennai is directly related to the convection initiated by sea breeze circulation.

Simpson, M; Warrior, H; Raman, S; Aswathanarayana, P A; Mohanty, U C; Suresh, R

2006-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

29

A Numerical Modeling Study of the Propagation of Idealized Sea-Breeze Density Currents  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sea breezes are often modeled as a wave response to transient heating in a stratified environment. They occur, however, as density currents with well-defined fronts, the understanding of which rests primarily on experiments and theory that do not ...

F. J. Robinson; M. D. Patterson; S. C. Sherwood

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

On the Interaction between Sea Breeze and Summer Mistral at the Exit of the Rhône Valley  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The three-dimensional structure and dynamics of the combination of the sea breeze and the mistral at the Rhône Valley exit, in southeastern France, have been investigated experimentally and numerically on 22 June 2001. The mistral refers to a ...

Sophie Bastin; Philippe Drobinski; Vincent Guénard; Jean-Luc Caccia; Bernard Campistron; Alain M. Dabas; Patricia Delville; Oliver Reitebuch; Christian Werner

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Synoptic-Scale Controls on the Sea Breeze of the Central New England Coast  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using routinely available hourly surface observations and United States surface analyses for 2001, a method was developed for predicting sea-breeze events. The method is adaptable to any coastal region in the world where surface data are ...

Samuel T. K. Miller; Barry D. Keim

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

A Laboratory Experiment on the Dynamics of the Land and Sea Breeze  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The land and sea breeze (LSB) circulation was simulated in a laboratory using a temperature controlled water tank. Flow visualization by tellurium and phenolphthalein and velocity measurement by laser-Doppler velocimeter were carried out in ...

Shigeki Mitsumoto; Hiromasa Ueda; Hiroyuki Ozoe

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

An Observational and Numerical Study of the Nocturnal Sea Breeze. Part II: Chemical Transport  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Chemical transport at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in South Carolina during nocturnal sea-breeze passage is examined using simulations from a three-dimensional mesoscale dynamic model [(RAMS) Regional Atmospheric Modeling System] and a ...

Robert L. Buckley; Robert J. Kurzeja

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Patterns of Local Circulation in the Itaipu Lake Area: Numerical Simulations of Lake Breeze  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The lake-breeze circulation in the Itaipu region was investigated numerically using a nonhydrostatic version of the Topographic Vorticity Model. The area of study corresponds to a 100 km × 180 km rectangle, located on the Brazil–Paraguay border, ...

Sônia M. S. Stivari; Amauri P. de Oliveira; Hugo A. Karam; Jacyra Soares

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

An Observational and Numerical Study of the Nocturnal Sea Breeze. Part I: Structure and Circulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Characteristics of inland-penetrating nocturnal sea breezes at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in South Carolina are discussed. Detailed observations from an area tower network during the Stable Boundary Layer Experiment (STABLE) indicate passage ...

Robert L. Buckley; Robert J. Kurzeja

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

An Observational Study of Sea Breezes Along the Alaskan Beaufort Sea Coast: Part I  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Though sea breezes are not often associated with the arctic, atmospheric environmental data collected in August 1976, 1977 and 1979 along the Beaufort Sea Coast of Alaska offer both circumstantial and direct evidence of the existence of sea ...

Thomas L. Kozo

1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Scaling the Daytime Urban Heat Island and Urban-Breeze Circulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The urban-breeze circulation is a mesoscale response of the atmospheric flow that is related to horizontal variations in temperature associated, for dry conditions, with gradients in sensible heat flux densities. This local circulation is ...

Julia Hidalgo; Valéry Masson; Luis Gimeno

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

A Mathematical Model of Sea Breezes Along the Alaskan Beaufort Sea Coast: Part II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A nonlinear, time-dependent, two-dimensional sea breeze model allowing imposition of prevailing large-scale wind conditions has been developed. The model is an extension of Estoque's model with modifications in the treatment of the continuity ...

Thomas L. Kozo

1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

A Comparison of Cumulus Parameterizations in Idealized Sea-Breeze Simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Four cumulus parameterizations in the fifth-generation Pennsylvania State University–National Center for Atmospheric Research (Penn State–NCAR) Mesoscale Model (MM5) are compared in idealized sea-breeze simulations, with the aim of discovering ...

Charles Cohen

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Enhancement of Crosswind Pollutant Dispersion by Steadily Veering Winds in Sea Breezes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An estimate is given of the relative importance of wind veering and turbulent diffusion in the mean horizontal spread of pollutant plumes in the atmosphere. Documented veering rates in sea breezes are used to illustrate the effect, and it is ...

D. G. Steyn; M. Segal

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "breeze otherf factors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

A Statistical Sea-Breeze Prediction Algorithm for Charleston, South Carolina  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A simple and useful technique for prediction of sea breezes, based on readily available wind vector and air temperature predictions from synoptic models in conjunction with observed coastal sea surface temperatures, is presented for evaluation by ...

James R. Frysinger; B. Lee Lindner; Stephen L. Brueske

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Numerical Simulation of the Transport of Chemically Reactive Species under Land- and Sea-Breeze Circulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The characteristics of the transport of chemically reactive species under land- and sea-breeze (LSB) circulations are investigated using a detailed transport/chemistry model, which includes 84 gas-phase and 10 heterogeneous chemical reactions. ...

Toshihiro Kitada; Gregory R. Carmichael; Leonard K. Peters

1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

The Coriolis Force in Relation to the Sea and Land Breezes—A Historical Note  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The deflecting effect of the earth's rotation on winds has been known since the writings of Hadley in 1735, and observations of the clockwise diurnal directional turning of the sea and land breezes in the Northern Hemisphere have been published ...

J. Neumann

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Real-Time Prediction of the Lake Breeze on the Western Shore of Lake Michigan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A forecast verification study of the occurrence and inland penetration of the lake breeze on the western shore of Lake Michigan was conducted. A real-time version of The Pennsylvania State University–National Center for Atmospheric Research fifth-...

Paul J. Roebber; Mark G. Gehring

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

A Numerical Study of Sea-Breeze-Driven Ocean Poincare Wave Propagation and Mixing near the Critical Latitude  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Near the vicinity of 30° latitude, the coincidence of the period of sea breeze and the inertial period of the ocean leads to a maximum near-inertial ocean response to sea breeze. This produces a propagating inertial internal (Poincare) wave ...

Xiaoqian Zhang; David C. Smith IV; Steven F. DiMarco; Robert D. Hetland

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Comparisons between Mesoscale Model Terrain Sensitivity Studies and Doppler Lidar Measurements of the Sea Breeze at Monterey Bay  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A NOAA/Environmental Technology Laboratory Doppler lidar measured the life cycle of the land- and sea-breeze system at Monterey Bay, California, in 1987, during the Land–Sea Breeze Experiment (LASBEX). On days with offshore synoptic flow, the ...

Lisa S. Darby; Robert M. Banta; Roger A. Pielke Sr.

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Large-Eddy Simulation of the Onset of the Sea Breeze  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes results from a large-eddy simulation (LES) model used in an idealized setting to simulate the onset of the sea breeze. As the LES is capable of simulating boundary layer–scale, three-dimensional turbulence along with the ...

M. Antonelli; R. Rotunno

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Observed Structure of a Land Breeze Head in the Tokyo Metropolitan Area  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The penetration of a land breeze front and its turbulence structure was observed at the center of the Tokyo metropolitan area on 27–28 January 1983. A turbulence sonde, small tethersonde and an acoustic sounder were used for the experiment. The ...

Toshimasa Ohara; Itsushi Uno; Shinji Wakamatsu

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

An Analytical Model of the Diurnal Oscillation of the Inversion Base Due to the Sea Breeze  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The diurnal oscillation of the height of the inversion due to the sea breeze is studied analytically by use of a linear model. The base of the inversion over the sea moved downward during daytime and upward during nighttime. Over the land the ...

Yizhak Feliks

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Simulation of the New England Sea Breeze: The Effect of Grid Spacing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The fifth-generation Pennsylvania State University–National Center for Atmospheric Research (Penn State– NCAR) Mesoscale Model (MM5) was run for seven cases from 2001 in which a sea breeze develops along the eastern New England coast. The results ...

Frank P. Colby Jr.

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

A 7-Yr Climatological Study of Land Breezes over the Florida Spaceport  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Seven years of wind and temperature data from a high-resolution network of 44 towers at the Kennedy Space Center and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station were used to develop an objective method for identifying land breezes, which are defined as ...

Jonathan L. Case; Mark M. Wheeler; John Manobianco; Johnny W. Weems; William P. Roeder

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Sea-Breeze Circulation over Jakarta, Indonesia: A Climatology Based on Boundary Layer Radar Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Characteristics of sea-breeze circulation over the tropical site of Jakarta, Indonesia, have been documented based on analyses of satellite images and data from long-term L-band boundary layer radar measurements carried out at Serpong (6.4°S, ...

Tri W. Hadi; T. Horinouchi; T. Tsuda; H. Hashiguchi; S. Fukao

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Transformed Shoreline-following Horizontal Coordinates in a Mesoscale Model: A Sea?Land-Breeze Case Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A hydrostatic and incompressible mesoscale model with transformed horizontal coordinates is presented. The model is applied to study the sea-land-breeze circulation over Río de La Plata. One of the new coordinates is shoreline-following and the ...

Guillermo J. Berri; Mario N. Nuñez

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Sea-Breeze Circulations over Cape York Peninsula and the Generation of Gulf of Carpentaria Cloud Line Disturbances  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A numerical study of sea-breeze circulations over Cape York Peninsula in northern Australia is presented. Simulations using a two-dimensional version of the University of Virginia mesoscale model provide insight into the thermally induced ...

Julie A. Noonan; Roger K. Smith

1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Effect of Sea Breeze on Air Pollution in the Greater Athens Area. Part I: Numerical Simulations and Field Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Numerical simulations compared with field measurements are used to explain the effect of sea breezes on photochemical smog episodes in Athens during the Mediterranean Campaign of Photochemical Tracers on 12–14 September 1994. The numerical ...

Alain Clappier; Alberto Martilli; Paola Grossi; Philippe Thunis; Francesco Pasi; Bernd C. Krueger; Bertrand Calpini; Giovanni Graziani; Hubert van den Bergh

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Observations of the Sea-Breeze Front during CaPE. Part II: Dual-Doppler and Aircraft Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The three-dimensional kinematic structures of offshore and onshore flow sea-breeze fronts observed during the CaPE experiment are shown using high resolution dual-Doppler and aircraft data. The fronts interact with horizontal convective rolls (...

Nolan T. Atkins; Roger M. Wakimoto; Tammy M. Weckwerth

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

A Two-Dimensional Numerical Investigation of the interaction between Sea Breezes and Deep Convection over the Florida Peninsula  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Deep convection initiated by sea breezes over the Florida peninsula is simulated using a two-dimensional nonhydrostatic model. Reasonable agreement is obtained between model results and observations for the three types of undisturbed days ...

Melville E. Nicholls; Roger A. Pielke; William R. Cotton

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Relevance of Surface Energy Budget within Florida Sea-Breeze Front to Cross-Peninsula Rainwater Runoff Gradient  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Analysis of surface latent heat flux measurements taken within the sea-breeze front of the coast of Florida during active thunderstorm periods demonstrates an important effect of the timing of coastal storms on the seasonal surface water budget. ...

Harry J. Cooper; Eric A. Smith; Michael T. Rubes

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

The Characteristics of the Chicago Lake Breeze and Its Effects on Trace Particle Transport: Results from an Episodic Event Simulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The lake-breeze circulation that forms over Lake Michigan during the summer influences the Chicago, Illinois, metropolitan area’s weather in several ways. Of particular significance is the circulation’s effect on the dispersion of pollutants such ...

Lucas Harris; V. Rao Kotamarthi

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Numerical Simulation of the Interaction between the Sea-Breeze Front and Horizontal Convective Rolls. Part I: Offshore Ambient Flow  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A three-dimensional, cloud-resolving model is used to investigate the interaction between the sea-breeze circulation and boundary layer roll convection. Horizontal convective rolls (HCRs) develop over land in response to strong daytime surface ...

Peter S. Dailey; Robert G. Fovell

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "breeze otherf factors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Resonant Diurnal Oscillations and Mean Alongshore Flows Driven by Sea/Land Breeze Forcing in the Coastal Southern California Bight  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study presents observations of the cross-sectional structure of resonant response to sea/land breezes (SLBs) off Huntington Beach (HB) in the Southern California Bight (SCB). A resonant response to local diurnal wind stress fluctuations ...

SungHyun Nam; Uwe Send

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Effect of Sea Breeze on Air Pollution in the Greater Athens Area. Part II: Analysis of Different Emission Scenarios  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Mediterranean Campaign of Photochemical Tracers–Transport and Chemical Evolution that took place in the greater Athens area from 20 August to 20 September 1994 has confirmed the role of sea-breeze circulation in photochemical smog episodes ...

Paola Grossi; Philippe Thunis; Alberto Martilli; Alain Clappier

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Numerical Analysis of Air Pollution in a Combined Field of Land/Sea Breeze and Mountain/Valley Wind  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Air pollution in the presence of two types of local flows (i.e., land/sea breeze and mountain/valley wind) was studied by advection simulation of the cluster of hypothetical fluid particles, and transport/chemistry calculation employing a three-...

Toshihiro Kitada; Kiyomi Igarashi; Michio Owada

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Numerical Simulation Of Sea Breezes with Vertical Wind Shear during Dry Season at Cape of Three Points, West Africa  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The airflow over Cape of Three Points (Gulf of Guinea: 4.5°N, 2°W) has been simulated using a three-dimensional mesoscale model in order to investigate the sea breeze developing in synoptic vertical wind shears during the 1979 dry season. Two ...

S. Cautenet; R. Rosset

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Pre- and Post-Sea-Breeze Frontal Lines—A Meso-?-Scale Analysis over South Israel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A meso-?-scale observational analysis of the fine surface structure of the sea-breeze fronts (SBF) over the coast of southern Israel is presented. Objective criteria for the SBF passage are derived based on wind speed and direction, temperature, ...

P. Alpert; M. Rabinovich-Hadar

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Table 4.2 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2010  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(c) Natural Gas(d) NGL(e) Coal and Breeze Other(f) 327993 Mineral Wool 39 12 0 * 24 * 0 3 * 331 Primary Metals 1,328 412 1 9 537 3 23 291 53 331111 Iron and...

67

table5.1_02  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002; End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Fuel Oil Coal Net Residual and Natural LPG and (excluding Coal RSE NAICS Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(c) Gas(d) NGL(e) Coke and Breeze) Other(f) Row Code(a) End Use (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) (billion cu ft) (million bbl) (million short tons) (trillion Btu) Factors Total United States 311 - 339 ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES RSE Column Factors: 0.3 1 1 2.4 1.1 1.4 1 NF TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 16,273 832,257 33 24 5,641 26 53 6,006 3.4 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel -- 3,540 20 6

68

"Code(a)","End Use","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)"," Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coke and Breeze)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Relative Standard Errors for Table 5.3;" 3 Relative Standard Errors for Table 5.3;" " Unit: Percents." " "," " " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," " " "," ","Net Demand",,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" "NAICS"," ","for ","Residual","and","Natural","LPG and","(excluding Coal" "Code(a)","End Use","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)"," Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coke and Breeze)" ,,"Total United States" " 311 - 339","ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES" ,"TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION",2,3,6,2,4,9

69

table2.4_02.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 Number of Establishments by Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 2002; 4 Number of Establishments by Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 2002; Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes (3-Digit Only); Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Establishment Counts. Any Combustible RSE NAICS Energy Residual Distillate Natural LPG and Coke Row Code(a) Subsector and Industry Source(b) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(c) Gas(d) NGL(e) Coal and Breeze Other(f) Factors Total United States RSE Column Factors: 1.5 0.6 1.1 1 1.1 0.7 1 1.4 311 Food 406 W 152 185 0 0 4 83 9.6 311221 Wet Corn Milling W 0 W 0 0 0 0 W 0.8 31131 Sugar 6 0 W W 0 0 4 W 0.9 311421 Fruit and Vegetable Canning 14 W 6 0 0 0 0 9 5.6 312 Beverage and Tobacco Products 31 W 5 W 0 0 0 15 12.4 3121 Beverages Q W 5 0 0 0 0 12 31.9 3122 Tobacco W 0 0 W 0 0 0 W 0.8

70

table10.3_02.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch Natural Gas to Alternative Energy Sources, 2002; 3 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch Natural Gas to Alternative Energy Sources, 2002; Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Establishment Counts. Coal Coke RSE NAICS Total Not Electricity Distillate Residual and Row Code(a) Subsector and Industry Consumed(d) Switchable Switchable Receipts(e) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil Coal LPG Breeze Other(f) Factors Total United States RSE Column Factors: 0.6 1.1 0.7 1.2 1.1 1.1 1.2 1.1 0.9 1.1 311 Food 12,018 2,210 10,674 532 1,170 413 75 862 3 25 9.9 311221 Wet Corn Milling 47 16 39 4 6 W W 6 0 W 1 31131 Sugar 62 23 51 W 4 13 4 0 W 0 1 311421 Fruit and Vegetable Canning 416 113 337 4 67 49 W 32 W W 5.5 312 Beverage and Tobacco Products

71

table4.3_02.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2002; Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: Values of Shipments and Employment Sizes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Trillion Btu. RSE Economic Residual Distillate Natural LPG and Coke and Row Characteristic(a) Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(c) Gas(d) NGL(e) Coal Breeze Other(f) Factors Total United States RSE Column Factors: 0.6 0.6 1.3 2.2 0.7 1.4 1.5 0.6 1 Value of Shipments and Receipts (million dollars) Under 20 1,276 437 15 50 598 W 47 W 97 14.5 20-49 1,258 417 28 22 590 W 112 W 72 6.1 50-99 1,463 401 17 W 731 7 185 W 97 4.9 100-249 2,041 571 43 17 968 8 253 7 175 4.6 250-499 1,962 475 54 W 826 W 326 W 255 5.6 500 and Over 3,971 618 38 W 2,077 37 259 W 607 1.5 Total 11,970

72

table5.2_02  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002; 2 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Trillion Btu. Distillate Fuel Oil Coal RSE NAICS Net Residual and Natural LPG and (excluding Coal Row Code(a) End Use Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(c) Gas(d) NGL(e) Coke and Breeze) Other(f) Factors Total United States 311 - 339 ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES RSE Column Factors: 0.3 1 1 2.4 1.1 1.3 1 NF TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 16,273 2,840 208 141 5,794 103 1,182 6,006 3.3 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel -- 12 127 25 2,162 8 776 -- 5.5 Conventional Boiler Use -- 9 76 25 1,306 8 255 -- 5.6 CHP and/or Cogeneration Process -- 4 51 10 857 * 521 -- 3.7 Direct Uses-Total Process

73

table10.5_02.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch Residual Fuel Oil to Alternative Energy Sources, 2002; 5 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch Residual Fuel Oil to Alternative Energy Sources, 2002; Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Establishment Counts. Coal Coke RSE NAICS Total Not Electricity Natural Distillate and Row Code(a) Subsector and Industry Consumed(d) Switchable Switchable Receipts(e) Gas Fuel Oil Coal LPG Breeze Other(f) Factors Total United States RSE Column Factors: 1.3 1 1.5 0.7 1 0.8 0.6 1.2 1.4 0.8 311 Food 274 183 108 0 119 72 W Q 0 15 15.2 311221 Wet Corn Milling 3 W W 0 0 W 0 0 0 0 0.9 31131 Sugar 18 9 9 0 9 0 W 0 0 0 1 311421 Fruit and Vegetable Canning 38 26 30 0 26 W 0 0 0 0 8.1 312 Beverage and Tobacco Products 35 17 Q 0 17 6 W 0 0 0 8

74

table10.13_02.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch LPG to Alternative Energy Sources, 2002; 3 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch LPG to Alternative Energy Sources, 2002; Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Establishment Counts. Coal Coke RSE NAICS Total Not Electricity Natural Distillate Residual and Row Code(a) Subsector and Industry Consumed(d) Switchable Switchable Receipts(e) Gas Fuel Oil Fuel Oil Coal Breeze Other(f) Factors Total United States RSE Column Factors: 0.6 0.8 0.6 0.9 0.7 0.8 1 2.8 2.7 0.7 311 Food 3,159 793 2,492 570 533 147 225 22 20 21 21.9 311221 Wet Corn Milling 14 W W W W 0 0 0 0 W 1.4 31131 Sugar 31 W W W 0 0 0 W 0 W 1.1 311421 Fruit and Vegetable Canning 229 15 215 11 4 W W 0 0 0 5.3 312 Beverage and Tobacco Products

75

table10.9_02.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch Distillate Fuel Oil to Alternative Energy Sources, 2002; 9 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch Distillate Fuel Oil to Alternative Energy Sources, 2002; Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Establishment Counts. Coal Coke RSE NAICS Total Not Electricity Natural Residual and Row Code(a) Subsector and Industry Consumed(d) Switchable Switchable Receipts(e) Gas Fuel Oil Coal LPG Breeze Other(f) Factors Total United States RSE Column Factors: 1 1.3 1 0.9 1.2 1 0.8 1.3 0.8 0.9 311 Food 2,418 789 1,899 129 447 176 W 280 0 40 12.4 311221 Wet Corn Milling 20 7 15 W 4 0 W W 0 W 1 31131 Sugar 40 W W W W 0 0 0 0 0 0.9 311421 Fruit and Vegetable Canning 123 6 117 0 5 0 0 0 0 W 6.9 312 Beverage and Tobacco Products 251 30 227

76

table3.3_02.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Fuel Consumption, 2002; Fuel Consumption, 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: Values of Shipments and Employment Sizes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Trillion Btu. RSE Economic Net Residual Distillate Natural LPG and Coke and Row Characteristic(a) Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(c) Gas(d) NGL(e) Coal Breeze Other(f) Factors Total United States RSE Column Factors: 0.6 0.7 1.3 2.1 0.7 1.4 1.5 0.7 0.9 Value of Shipments and Receipts (million dollars) Under 20 1,312 436 15 50 598 W 47 W 132 13.9 20-49 1,465 407 28 22 590 W 112 W 289 6.9 50-99 1,598 394 17 W 731 7 185 W 237 4.5 100-249 2,385 561 43 17 972 8 253 7 525 4.2 250-499 2,598 458 57 W 826 W 326 W 906 5.4 500 and Over 6,914 584 47 21 2,077 55 259 530 3,342 1.5 Total 16,273 2,840

77

table4.2_02.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2002; Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Trillion Btu. RSE NAICS Residual Distillate Natural LPG and Coke Row Code(a) Subsector and Industry Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(c) Gas(d) NGL(e) Coal and Breeze Other(f) Factors Total United States RSE Column Factors: 0.8 0.8 1.1 1.6 0.9 1.8 0.7 0.7 1.2 311 Food 1,079 233 13 19 575 5 184 1 50 8 311221 Wet Corn Milling 217 24 * * 61 * 121 0 11 1.1 31131 Sugar 74 3 2 1 22 * 37 1 8 1 311421 Fruit and Vegetable Canning 47 7 1 1 36 Q 0 0 1 12.4 312 Beverage and Tobacco Products 104 27 2 2 46 1 17 0 9 4.3 3121 Beverages 84 22 1 2 42 1 8 0 9 5.9 3122 Tobacco 19 5 1 * 4 * 10 0 * 0.9 313 Textile Mills 206 87 4 2 74 2

78

table4.1_02.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2002; 1 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Coke Residual Distillate Natural LPG and Coal and Breeze RSE NAICS Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(c) Gas(d) NGL(e) (million (million Other(f) Row Code(a) Subsector and Industry (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) (billion cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) short tons) (trillion Btu) Factors Total United States RSE Column Factors: 0.8 0.8 1.1 1.6 0.9 1.8 0.7 0.7 1.2 311 Food 1,079 68,230 2 3 560 1 8 * 50 8 311221 Wet Corn Milling 217 7,098 * * 59 * 5 0 11 1.1 31131 Sugar 74 733 * * 22 * 2 * 8 1 311421 Fruit and Vegetable Canning 47 1,987 * * 35 * 0

79

"Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Source(b)","Electricity(c)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(d)","Natural Gas(e)","NGL(f)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(g)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3.4 Relative Standard Errors for Table 3.4;" 3.4 Relative Standard Errors for Table 3.4;" " Unit: Percents." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ","Any" "NAICS"," ","Energy","Net","Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke"," " "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Source(b)","Electricity(c)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(d)","Natural Gas(e)","NGL(f)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(g)" ,,"Total United States"

80

"Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Source(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Natural Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(f)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2.4 Relative Standard Errors for Table 2.4;" 2.4 Relative Standard Errors for Table 2.4;" " Unit: Percents." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ","Any Combustible" "NAICS"," ","Energy","Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke"," " "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Source(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Natural Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(f)" ,,"Total United States" 311,"Food",27.5,"X",42,39.5,62,"X",0,9.8

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "breeze otherf factors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

"Characteristic(a)","Total(b)","Electricity(c)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(d)","Natural Gas(e)","NGL(f)","Coal","Breeze","Other(g)","Produced Onsite(h)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1.3 Relative Standard Errors for Table 1.3;" 1.3 Relative Standard Errors for Table 1.3;" " Unit: Percents." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," ",," "," ",," "," ",," ","Shipments" "Economic",,"Net","Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke and"," ","of Energy Sources" "Characteristic(a)","Total(b)","Electricity(c)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(d)","Natural Gas(e)","NGL(f)","Coal","Breeze","Other(g)","Produced Onsite(h)"

82

"Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Source(b)","Electricity(c)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(d)","Natural Gas(e)","NGL(f)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(g)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4.4 Relative Standard Errors for Table 4.4;" 4.4 Relative Standard Errors for Table 4.4;" " Unit: Percents." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ","Any" "NAICS"," ","Energy",,"Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke"," " "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Source(b)","Electricity(c)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(d)","Natural Gas(e)","NGL(f)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(g)" ,,"Total United States" , 311,"Food",0.4,0.4,19.4,9,2,6.9,5.4,0,10.3

83

"Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Source(b)","Electricity(c)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(d)","Natural Gas(e)","NGL(f)","Coal","Breeze","Other(g)","Produced Onsite(h)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1.4 Relative Standard Errors for Table 1.4;" 1.4 Relative Standard Errors for Table 1.4;" " Unit: Percents." ,,"Any",,,,,,,,,"Shipments" "NAICS",,"Energy","Net","Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke and",,"of Energy Sources" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Source(b)","Electricity(c)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(d)","Natural Gas(e)","NGL(f)","Coal","Breeze","Other(g)","Produced Onsite(h)" ,,"Total United States" 311,"Food",0.4,0.4,19.4,8.9,2,6.9,5.4,0,10.1,9.1 3112," Grain and Oilseed Milling",0,0,21.1,14.7,8.4,13.3,7.9,"X",17.9,9.1

84

Table 5.2 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; 2 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Trillion Btu. Distillate Fuel Oil Coal NAICS Net Residual and LPG and (excluding Coal Code(a) End Use Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(c) Natural Gas(d) NGL(e) Coke and Breeze) Other(f) Total United States 311 - 339 ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 14,228 2,437 79 130 5,211 69 868 5,435 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel -- 27 46 19 2,134 10 572 -- Conventional Boiler Use -- 27 20 4 733 3 72 -- CHP and/or Cogeneration Process -- 0 26 15 1,401 7 500 -- Direct Uses-Total Process -- 1,912 26 54 2,623 29 289 -- Process Heating -- 297 25 14 2,362 24 280

85

Table 5.1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5.1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; 5.1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Coal Fuel Oil (excluding Coal Net Residual and Natural Gas(d) LPG and Coke and Breeze) NAICS Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(c) (billion NGL(e) (million Other(f) Code(a) End Use (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) (trillion Btu) Total United States 311 - 339 ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 14,228 714,166 13 22 5,064 18 39 5,435 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel -- 7,788 7 3 2,074 3 26 -- Conventional Boiler Use -- 7,788 3 1 712 1 3 -- CHP and/or Cogeneration Process

86

Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; 2 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Trillion Btu. Distillate Fuel Oil Coal NAICS Net Residual and LPG and (excluding Coal Code(a) End Use Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(c) Natural Gas(d) NGL(e) Coke and Breeze) Other(f) Total United States 311 - 339 ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 15,658 2,850 251 129 5,512 79 1,016 5,820 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel -- 41 133 23 2,119 8 547 -- Conventional Boiler Use -- 41 71 17 1,281 8 129 -- CHP and/or Cogeneration Process -- -- 62 6 838 1 417 -- Direct Uses-Total Process -- 2,244 62 52 2,788 39 412 -- Process Heating -- 346 59 19 2,487

87

Table 3.1 Fuel Consumption, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Fuel Consumption, 2010; 1 Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Coke Net Residual Distillate Natural Gas(d) LPG and Coal and Breeze NAICS Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(c) (billion NGL(e) (million (million Other(f) Code(a) Subsector and Industry (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) short tons) (trillion Btu) Total United States 311 Food 1,158 75,407 2 4 563 1 8 * 99 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 350 16,479 * * 118 * 6 0 45 311221 Wet Corn Milling 214 7,467 * * 51 * 5 0 25 31131 Sugar Manufacturing 107 1,218 * * 15 * 2 * 36 3114 Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Foods 143 9,203

88

Originally Released: July 2009  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4.1 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2006; 4.1 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Coke Residual Distillate Natural Gas(d) LPG and Coal and Breeze NAICS Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(c) (billion NGL(e) (million (million Other(f) Code(a) Subsector and Industry (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) short tons) (trillion Btu) Total United States 311 Food 1,124 73,551 4 3 618 1 7 * 45 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 316 15,536 * * 115 * 5 0 28 311221 Wet Corn Milling 179 6,801 * * 51 * 4 0 8 31131 Sugar Manufacturing 67 974 1 * 17 * 1 * 4 3114 Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Food 168 9,721

89

Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; 1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Coal Fuel Oil (excluding Coal Net Residual and Natural Gas(d) LPG and Coke and Breeze) NAICS Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(c) (billion NGL(e) (million Other(f) Code(a) End Use (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) (trillion Btu) Total United States 311 - 339 ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 15,658 835,382 40 22 5,357 21 46 5,820 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel -- 12,109 21 4 2,059 2 25 -- Conventional Boiler Use -- 12,109 11 3 1,245 2 6 -- CHP and/or Cogeneration Process

90

Table 4.1 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2010; 1 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Coke Residual Distillate Natural Gas(d) LPG and Coal and Breeze NAICS Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(c) (billion NGL(e) (million (million Other(f) Code(a) Subsector and Industry (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) short tons) (trillion Btu) Total United States 311 Food 1,113 75,673 2 4 563 1 8 * 54 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 346 16,620 * * 118 * 6 0 41 311221 Wet Corn Milling 214 7,481 * * 51 * 5 0 25 31131 Sugar Manufacturing 72 1,264 * * 15 * 2 * * 3114 Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Foods 142 9,258 * Q 97

91

Originally Released: July 2009  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Fuel Consumption, 2006; 1 Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources Unit: Physical Units or Btu Coke Net Residual Distillate Natural Gas(d) LPG and Coal and Breeze NAICS Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(c) (billion NGL(e) (million (million Other(f) Code(a) Subsector and Industry (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) short tons) (trillion Btu) Total United States 311 Food 1,186 73,440 4 3 618 1 7 * 107 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 317 15,464 * * 115 * 5 0 30 311221 Wet Corn Milling 179 6,746 * * 51 * 4 0 9 31131 Sugar Manufacturing 82 968 1 * 17 * 1 * 20 3114 Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Food 169 9,708 * * 123 * * 0 4 3115 Dairy Product

92

Conversion Factor  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Conversion Factor (Btu per cubic foot) Production Marketed... 1,110 1,106 1,105 1,106 1,109 Extraction Loss ......

93

Douglas Factors  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Merit Systems Protection Board in its landmark decision, Douglas vs. Veterans Administration, 5 MSPR 280, established criteria that supervisors must consider in determining an appropriate penalty to impose for an act of employee misconduct. These twelve factors are commonly referred to as “Douglas Factors” and have been incorporated into the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Personnel Management System and various FAA Labor Agreements.

94

Conversion factors for energy equivalents: All factors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Conversion factors for energy equivalents Return to online conversions. Next page of energy equivalents. Definition of uncertainty ...

95

Ocean Breeze Park, Florida: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

7.2402216°, -80.2258574° 7.2402216°, -80.2258574° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":27.2402216,"lon":-80.2258574,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

96

Lake-Breeze Fronts in the Salt Lake Valley  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Winds at the Salt Lake City International Airport (SLC) during the April–October period from 1948 to 2003 have been observed to shift to the north (up-valley direction) between late morning and afternoon on over 70% of the days without ...

Daniel E. Zumpfe; John D. Horel

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

On the Linear Theory of the Land and Sea Breeze  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Given that the earth's atmosphere may be idealized as a rotating, stratified fluid characterized by the Coriolis parameter f and the Brunt–V¨is¨l¨ frequency N, and that the diurnal cycle of heating and cooling of the land relative to the sea acts ...

Richard Rotunno

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Lab makes understanding the complexity of wind power "A breeze...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Understanding the Complexity of Wind Power Community Connections: Our link to Northern New Mexico Communities Latest Issue:September 2013 All Issues submit Lab makes...

99

Comprehensive Effect of Coke Breeze and Limestone Particle Size ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Chemical Enrichment of Precious Metals in Iron Sulfides Using Microwave Energy · Chloridizing ... Co-Gasification Behavior of Metallurgical Coke with High and Low Reactivity .... Thermal Plasma Torches for Metallurgical Applications.

100

Conversion factors for energy equivalents: All factors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Previous page of energy equivalents. Definition of uncertainty notation eg, 123(45) | Basis of conversion factors for energy equivalents. Top. ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "breeze otherf factors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Feasibility Study --Project Full Breeze By the Wind Energy Projects in Action (WEPA) Full Breeze Project team  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to aid the siting process for a potential small wind turbine on MIT's campus. Meetings were held-based small wind turbine. These included the open areas of Brigg's athletic fields as well as the green spaces........................................................................- 30 - B. Wind Turbine Interconnection and Monitoring

102

factor.mws - CECM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

... 0 "" {TEXT -1 61 "Be default \\+ factor factors over the field of rational numbers. ... {PARA 0 "> " 0 "" {MPLTEXT 1 0 36 "alias(beta=RootOf(x^5+x^3+x^2+x+1));" } ...

103

The Douglas Factors  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Douglas Factors Douglas Factors The Merit Systems Protection Board in its landmark decision, Douglas vs. Veterans Administration, 5 MSPR 280, established criteria that supervisors must consider in determining an appropriate penalty to impose for an act of employee misconduct. These twelve factors are commonly referred to as "Douglas Factors: (1) The nature and seriousness of the offense, and its relation to the employee's duties, position, and responsibilities, including whether the offense was intentional or technical or inadvertent, or was committed maliciously or for gain, or was frequently repeated; (2) the employee's job level and type of employment, including supervisory or fiduciary role,

104

Table 3.2 Fuel Consumption, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Fuel Consumption, 2010; 2 Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Trillion Btu. NAICS Net Residual Distillate LPG and Coke Code(a) Subsector and Industry Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(c) Natural Gas(d) NGL(e) Coal and Breeze Other(f) Total United States 311 Food 1,158 257 12 22 579 6 182 2 99 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 350 56 * 1 121 * 126 0 45 311221 Wet Corn Milling 214 25 * * 53 * 110 0 25 31131 Sugar Manufacturing 107 4 1 1 15 * 49 2 36 3114 Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Foods 143 31 1 Q 100 1 2 0 4 3115 Dairy Products 105 33 2 2 66 1 * 0 2 3116 Animal Slaughtering and Processing 212 69 5 3 125 2 Q 0 8 312 Beverage and Tobacco Products 86 29 1 1 38 1 10 0 7 3121 Beverages

105

Table 3.3 Fuel Consumption, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Fuel Consumption, 2010; 3 Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: Values of Shipments and Employment Sizes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Trillion Btu. Economic Net Residual Distillate LPG and Coke and Characteristic(a) Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(c) Natural Gas(d) NGL(e) Coal Breeze Other(f) Total United States Value of Shipments and Receipts (million dollars) Under 20 1,148 314 6 53 446 14 25 Q 291 20-49 1,018 297 13 22 381 18 97 5 185 50-99 1,095 305 7 13 440 6 130 9 186 100-249 1,728 411 16 11 793 7 131 7 353 250-499 1,916 391 16 11 583 3 185 5 722 500 and Over 7,323 720 21 21 2,569 21 300 348 3,323 Total 14,228 2,437 79 130 5,211 69 868 376 5,059 Employment Size Under 50 1,149 305 12 45 565 21 31

106

Level: National and Regional Data; Row: Values of Shipments and Employment Sizes;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3.3 Fuel Consumption, 2006; 3.3 Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: Values of Shipments and Employment Sizes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Trillion Btu. Economic Net Residual Distillate LPG and Coke and Characteristic(a) Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(c) Natural Gas(d) NGL(e) Coal Breeze Other(f) Total United States Value of Shipments and Receipts (million dollars) Under 20 1,139 367 23 45 535 14 21 3 131 20-49 1,122 333 13 19 530 8 93 5 122 50-99 1,309 349 22 17 549 10 157 8 197 100-249 2,443 607 25 19 994 11 263 10 512 250-499 2,092 413 53 13 633 4 244 3 730 500 and Over 7,551 781 115 17 2,271 31 240 344 3,752 Total 15,657 2,851 251 129 5,512 79 1,016 374 5,445 Employment Size Under 50 1,103 334 10 45 550 10

107

Conversion factors for energy equivalents  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Conversion factors for energy equivalents, For your convenience, you may convert energies online below. Or display factors as: ...

108

factors | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

36 36 Varnish cache server Browse Upload data GDR 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation: XID: 2142253836 Varnish cache server factors Dataset Summary Description This dataset is from the report Operational water consumption and withdrawal factors for electricity generating technologies: a review of existing literature (J. Macknick, R. Newmark, G. Heath and K.C. Hallett) and provides estimates of operational water withdrawal and water consumption factors for electricity generating technologies in the United States. Estimates of water factors were collected from published primary literature and were not modified except for unit conversions. Source National Renewable Energy Laboratory Date Released August 28th, 2012 (2 years ago)

109

FGF growth factor analogs  

SciTech Connect

The present invention provides a fibroblast growth factor heparin-binding analog of the formula: ##STR00001## where R.sub.1, R.sub.2, R.sub.3, R.sub.4, R.sub.5, X, Y and Z are as defined, pharmaceutical compositions, coating compositions and medical devices including the fibroblast growth factor heparin-binding analog of the foregoing formula, and methods and uses thereof.

Zamora, Paul O. (Gaithersburg, MD); Pena, Louis A. (Poquott, NY); Lin, Xinhua (Plainview, NY); Takahashi, Kazuyuki (Germantown, MD)

2012-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

110

Optimizing Power Factor Correction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The optimal investment for power factor correcting capacitors for Kansas Power and Light Company large power contract customers is studied. Since the billing capacity is determined by dividing the real demand by the power factor (the minimum billing capacity is based on 80 percent of the summer peak billing capacity) and the billing capacity is used to determine the number of kilowatt-hours billed at each pricing tier, the power factor affects both the demand and the energy charge. There is almost no information available in the literature concerning recommended power factor corrections for this situation. The general advice commonly given in the past has been that power factor should be corrected to above 0.9 if it is below that value to begin with, but that does not take into account the facts of the situation studied here. Calculations relevant to a commercial consumer of electricity were made for demands of 200, 400, 800, 1,600, 3,200, and 6,400 kW and monthly energy consumption periods of 100, 150, 200, 300, 400, and 500 hours for several capacitor purchase and installation costs. The results are displayed in a series of graphs that enable annual cost savings and payback periods to be readily determined over a range of commonly encountered parameter values. It is found that it is often economically advantageous to correct a power factor to near unity.

Phillips, R. K.; Burmeister, L. C.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

NIST Atomic Form Factors: Form factors and standard ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 2. Form Factors and Standard Definitions. ... with ? in, eg, Ångstroms; the "anomalous" scattering factor f? (depending on x-ray energy E and the ...

112

PQ Encyclopedia: Understanding Power Factor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This PQ Encylopedia offers a thorough understanding of what power factor is, what factors affect it, and what to be aware of when attempting to improve it. In particular, efforts to remedy power factor can sometimes worsen harmonics.

2009-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

113

ERYTHROPOIETIC FACTOR PURIFICATION  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is given for purifying and concentrating the blood plasma erythropoietic factor. Anemic sheep plasma is contacted three times successively with ion exchange resins: an anion exchange resin, a cation exchange resin at a pH of about 5, and a cation exchange resin at a pH of about 6. (AEC)

White, W.F.; Schlueter, R.J.

1962-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Thermal Conversion Factor Source Documentation  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

national annual quantity-weighted average conversion factors for conventional, reformulated, and oxygenated motor gasolines (see Table A3). The factor ...

115

Many Factors Affect MPG  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Many Factors Affect Fuel Economy Many Factors Affect Fuel Economy How You Drive Vehicle Maintenance Fuel Variations Vehicle Variations Engine Break-In Vehicles in traffic Quick acceleration and heavy braking can reduce fuel economy by up to 33 percent on the highway and 5 percent around town. New EPA tests account for faster acceleration rates, but vigorous driving can still lower MPG. Excessive idling decreases MPG. The EPA city test includes idling, but more idling will lower MPG. Driving at higher speeds increases aerodynamic drag (wind resistance), reducing fuel economy. The new EPA tests account for aerodynamic drag up to highway speeds of 80 mph, but some drivers exceed this speed. Cold weather and frequent short trips can reduce fuel economy, since your engine doesn't operate efficiently until it is warmed up. In colder

116

Human factoring administrative procedures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In nonnuclear business, administrative procedures bring to mind such mundane topics as filing correspondence and scheduling vacation time. In the nuclear industry, on the other hand, administrative procedures play a vital role in assuring the safe operation of a facility. For some time now, industry focus has been on improving technical procedures. Significant efforts are under way to produce technical procedure requires that a validated technical, regulatory, and administrative basis be developed and that the technical process be established for each procedure. Producing usable technical procedures requires that procedure presentation be engineered to the same human factors principles used in control room design. The vital safety role of administrative procedures requires that they be just as sound, just a rigorously formulated, and documented as technical procedures. Procedure programs at the Tennessee Valley Authority and at Boston Edison's Pilgrim Station demonstrate that human factors engineering techniques can be applied effectively to technical procedures. With a few modifications, those same techniques can be used to produce more effective administrative procedures. Efforts are under way at the US Department of Energy Nuclear Weapons Complex and at some utilities (Boston Edison, for instance) to apply human factors engineering to administrative procedures: The techniques being adapted include the following.

Grider, D.A.; Sturdivant, M.H.

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Human Factors Review Plan  

SciTech Connect

''Human Factors'' is concerned with the incorporation of human user considerations into a system in order to maximize human reliability and reduce errors. This Review Plan is intended to assist in the assessment of human factors conditions in existing DOE facilities. In addition to specifying assessment methodologies, the plan describes techniques for improving conditions which are found to not adequately support reliable human performance. The following topics are addressed: (1) selection of areas for review describes techniques for needs assessment to assist in selecting and prioritizing areas for review; (2) human factors engineering review is concerned with optimizing the interfaces between people and equipment and people and their work environment; (3) procedures review evaluates completeness and accuracy of procedures, as well as their usability and management; (4) organizational interface review is concerned with communication and coordination between all levels of an organization; and (5) training review evaluates training program criteria such as those involving: trainee selection, qualification of training staff, content and conduct of training, requalification training, and program management.

Paramore, B.; Peterson, L.R. (eds.)

1985-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Buildings and Energy in the 1980's  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

and Industry Total Net Electricity b Residual Fuel Oil Distillate Fuel Oil c Natural Gas d LPG Coal Coke and Breeze Other e RSE Row Factors Total United States RSE Column...

119

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

","Row" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Source(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Natural Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(f)","Factors" ,,"Total United States" ,"RSE...

120

Buildings and Energy in the 1980's  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Code a Industry Groups and Industry Total Residual Fuel Oil Distillate Fuel Oil b Natural Gas c LPG Coal Coke and Breeze Other d RSE Row Factors Total United States RSE Column...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "breeze otherf factors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Stress Intensification Factors and Flexibility Factors for Unreinforced Branch Connections  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides equations, based on analyses and test data, for determining the stress intensification factors and flexibility factors for branch connections. The report contains results of an investigation into the flexibility and stress intensification factors of unreinforced fabricated tees (and other similar configurations). It provides flexibility equations for a more accurate evaluation of these configurations.

1998-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

122

Factor Separation in Numerical Simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A simple method is developed for computing the interactions among various factors influencing the atmospheric circulations. It is shown how numerical simulations can be utilized to obtain the pure contribution of any factor to any predicted field,...

U. Stein; P. Alpert

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Anthrax Lethal Factor  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Thiang Yian Wong, Robert Schwarzenbacher and Robert C. Liddington Thiang Yian Wong, Robert Schwarzenbacher and Robert C. Liddington The Burnham Institute, 10901 North Torrey Pines Road, La Jolla, CA 92037. Anthrax Toxin is a major virulence factor in the infectious disease, Anthrax1. This toxin is produced by Bacillus anthracis, which is an encapsulated, spore-forming, rod-shaped bacterium. Inhalation anthrax, the most deadly form, is contracted through breathing spores. Once spores germinate within cells of the immune system called macrophages2, bacterial cells are released into the bloodstream. There they proliferate rapidly and secrete Anthrax Toxin, ultimately leading to septic shock and death. Although antibiotics may be used to kill the bacteria, the level of toxin has often become so high in the bloodstream that removing the bacteria alone is not sufficient to prevent death. Therefore, the design of anti-toxins offers the prospect of treatment in the advanced stages of infection. Together with collaborators from the NIH and Harvard Medical School, we are involved in the atomic resolution study of the Anthrax Toxin components and their complexes, including small molecules with therapeutic potential. Data collection at SSRL and other synchrotron radiation sources has been key to the advances made in this research so far and is expected to play a continuing role in the future.

124

Design Factors That Influence Corrosion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 3   Corrosion factors that can influence design considerations...Inhibitors Inspection Planned maintenance Source: Ref 25...

125

Electromagnetic form factors of hadrons  

SciTech Connect

A vector meson dominance model of the electromagnetic form factors of hadrons is developed which is based on the use of unstable particle propagators. Least-square fits are made to the proton, neutron, pion and kaon form factor data in both the space and time-like regions. A good fit to the low-energy nucleon form factor data is obtained using only rho, $omega$, and phi dominance, and leads to a determination of the vector meson resonance parameters in good agreement with experiment. The nucleon-vector meson coupling constants obey simple sum rules indicating that there exists no hard core contribution to the form factors within theoretical uncertainties. The prediction for the electromagnetic radii of the proton is in reasonable agreement with recent experiments. The pion and kaon charge form factors as deduced from the nucleon form factors assuming vector meson universality are compared to the data. The pion form factor agrees with the data in both the space and time-like regions. The pion charge radius is in agreement with the recent Dubna result, but the isovector P-wave pion-pion phase shift calculated from the theory disagrees with experiment. A possible contribution to the form factors from a heavy rho meson is also evaluated. (auth)

Zidell, V.S.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Comments on Form Factor Bounds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Improved model independent upper bounds on the weak transition form factors are derived using inclusive sum rules. Comparison of the new bounds with the old ones is made for the form factors h_{A_1} and h_V in B -> D* decays.

Chiang, C W

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Remarks on Form Factor Bounds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Improved model independent upper bounds on the weak transition form factors are derived using inclusive sum rules. Comparison of the new bounds with the old ones is made for the form factors h_{A_1} and h_V in B -> D* decays.

Cheng-Wei Chiang

1999-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

128

Community Discovery via Metagraph Factorization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This work aims at discovering community structure in rich media social networks through analysis of time-varying, multirelational data. Community structure represents the latent social context of user actions. It has important applications such as search ... Keywords: MetaFac, community discovery, dynamic social network analysis, metagraph factorization, nonnegative tensor factorization, relational hypergraph

Yu-Ru Lin; Jimeng Sun; Hari Sundaram; Aisling Kelliher; Paul Castro; Ravi Konuru

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Basis of conversion factors for energy equivalents  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Basis of conversion factors for energy equivalents Conversion factors for energy equivalents are derived from the following relations: ...

130

Factors of characteristic words: Location and decompositions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Let @a be an irrational number with 0Keywords: Characteristic word, Decomposition, Location, Overlap factor, Return words, Separate factor

Wai-Fong Chuan; Hui-Ling Ho

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Automatic Test Factoring for Java  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Test factoring creates fast, focused unit tests from slow system-widetests; each new unit test exercises only a subset of the functionalityexercised by the system test. Augmenting a test suite with factoredunit tests ...

Saff, David

2005-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

132

Human Factors Engineering Analysis Tool  

A new software tool enables the easy and quick selection of applicable regulatory guidelines as a starting point for human factors engineering (HFE) analyses.  Once selected, each guideline can be viewed on screen.  The software tracks and reports the ...

133

The Fermat factorization method revisited  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider the well known Fermat factorization method, we call the Fermat factorization equation the equation solved by it: P(x, y) = (x + 2R) 2 ? y 2 ? 4N = 0; where N = p q> 0 is a RSA modulus with primes p and q supposed of equal length. This equation is a bivariate integer polynomial equation and we propose to solve it directly using Coppersmith’s methods for bivariate integer polynomials. As we use them as a black box, our proofs will be brief. We show a first result: we can factor N in a polynomial time if |p ? q | < N 5/18. Using the fact that the Newton polygon of P(x, y) is in fact a lower triangle we show a better result: we can indeed factor N in a polynomial time if |p ? q | < N 1/3. We conclude with proposals for future works. 1

Robert Erra; Christophe Grenier

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

The effect of penetration factor, deposition, and environmental factors on  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The effect of penetration factor, deposition, and environmental factors on The effect of penetration factor, deposition, and environmental factors on the indoor concentration of pm2.5 sulfate, nitrate, and carbon Title The effect of penetration factor, deposition, and environmental factors on the indoor concentration of pm2.5 sulfate, nitrate, and carbon Publication Type Conference Proceedings Year of Publication 2002 Authors Thatcher, Tracy L., Melissa M. Lunden, Richard G. Sextro, Susanne V. Hering, and Nancy J. Brown Conference Name Proceedings of the Indoor Air 2002 Conference, Monterey, CA Volume 1 Pagination 846-851 Publisher Indoor Air 2002, Santa Cruz, CA Abstract Indoor exposure to particles of outdoor origin constitutes an important exposure pathway. We conducted an intensive set of indoor particle measurements in an unoccupied house under differing operating conditions. Real-time measurements were conducted both indoors and outdoors, including PM2.5 nitrate, sulfate, and carbon. Because the time-scale of the fluctuations in outdoor particle concentrations and meteorological conditions are often similar to the time constant for building air exchange, a steady state concentration may never be reached. The time-series experimental data were used to determine the effect of changes in air exchange rate and indoor/outdoor temperature and relative humidity differences on indoor particle concentrations. A multivariate regression was performed to investigate the difference between measured indoor concentrations and results from a simple time-dependent physical model. Environmental conditions had a significant effect on indoor concentrations of all three PM2.5 species, but did not explain all of the model variation

135

Common Risk Factors in Currency Markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We identify a “slope” factor in exchange rates. High interest rate currencies load more on this slope factor than low interest rate currencies. This factor accounts for most of the cross-sectional variation in average ...

Roussano, Nikolai

136

Primeless factoring-based cryptography  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Factoring-based public-key cryptosystems have an overall complexity which is dominated by the key-production algorithm, which requires the generation of prime numbers. This is most inconvenient in settings where the key-generation is not an one-off process, ...

Sonia Bogos, Ioana Boureanu, Serge Vaudenay

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

NESTED HIGH RESOLUTION SIMULATION AND LIDAR VALIDATION OF A LAND BREEZE CIRCULATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that ellipsoids can pack randomly more densely than spheres (Donev, et al., 2004). (a) Ra/Rb=1.0 (b) Ra/Rb=1.5 (c particles, Physical Review E, Vol. 55, No. 2, pp 1959-1978. Donev, A., Cisse, I. Sachs, D. Variano, E. A, Géotechnique, Vol. 47, No. 2, pp. 319-329. Man, W., Donev, A., Stillinger, F. H., Sullivan, M. T., Russel, W. B

Eloranta, Edwin W.

138

Vertical Structure of the Sea Breeze Penetrating through a Large Urban Complex  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A series of observations of the three-dimensional wind and thermal structure of the boundary layer was carried out during each summer season from 1986 to 1988 over the western portion of the Kanto plain. The data obtained during five selected ...

Hiroshi Yoshikado

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Numerical Study of the Daytime Urban Effect and Its Interaction with the Sea Breeze  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Under light gradient-wind conditions, the heat-island effect associated with large urban areas is characterized by a temperature rise after sunrise over the land (??L)and a temperature difference between the urban and rural areas (??) during the ...

Hiroshi Yoshik Ado

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

An Investigation of the Boundary Layer Dynamics of Sardinia Island under Sea-Breeze Conditions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A numerical mesoscale model is used to study the wind field and the boundary layer structure of the island of Sardinia during typical summer conditions. The numerical model is three-dimensional and employs a higher-order turbulence closure ...

Dimitrios Melas; Alfredo Lavagnini; Anna-Maria Sempreviva

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "breeze otherf factors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Further Considerations on Modeling the Sea Breeze with a Mixed-Layer Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mixed-layer models have been used to simulate low-level flows under a variety of situations, including flow over complex terrain and in the vicinity of coastal zones. The advantage of mixed-layer models compared to multilevel models is their ...

Richard A. Anthes; Daniel Keyser; J. W. Deardorff

1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Linear Theory Calculations for the Sea Breeze in a Background Wind: The Equatorial Case  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The equatorial coastal circulation is modeled in terms of the linear wave response to a diurnally oscillating heat source gradient in a background wind. A diurnal scaling shows that the solution depends on two parameters: a nondimensional coastal ...

Tingting Qian; Craig C. Epifanio; Fuqing Zhang

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Forecasting the New York City urban heat island and sea breeze during extreme heat events  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two extreme heat events impacting the New York City (NYC) metropolitan region 7-10 June 2011 and 21-24 July 2011 are examined in detail using a combination of models and observations. The Navy’s Coupled Ocean/Atmosphere Mesoscale Prediction System ...

Talmor Meir; Philip M. Orton; Julie Pullen; Teddy Holt; William T. Thompson; Mark F. Arend

144

Interaction between an Inland Urban Heat Island and a Sea-Breeze Flow: A Laboratory Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using laboratory experimental data taken from a temperature-controlled water tank, the basic features of the circulation associated with an inland urban heat island (UHI) of diameter D and surface heating rate H0 and its interaction with a sea-...

A. Cenedese; P. Monti

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Draft or breeze? preferences for air movement in office buildings and schools from the ASHRAE database  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Control, and Occupant Comfort. ASHRAE Transactions 110 (2):and schools from the ASHRAE database Tyler Hoyt * , Huihave been extracted from the ASHRAE database of indoor

Hoyt, Tyler; Zhang, Hui Ph.D; Arens, Edward

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Analysis of Airborne Doppler Lidar Measurements of the Extended California Sea Breeze  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The analysis of airborne Doppler lidar data taken by NASA near the top of the planetary boundary layer in the central valley of California is presented. These data include downward wan angles that intercept the ground. The maximum errors in the ...

John J. Carroll

1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

It Should Be a Breeze: Harnessing the Potential of Open Trade and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This working paper maps out the structure and value chains of the wind industry, analyzes the wind industry’s increasing global integration via cross-border trade and investment flows, and offers recommendations to policymakers for the design of investment and trade policies to help realize wind energy’s potential. We find that demand for wind energy through longterm government support policies creates the basis for local supply of wind capital equipment and services and associated local job creation; policies that put a price on carbon will further help to make wind energy more competitive and increase the overall demand for turbines and equipment. Cross-border investment rather than trade is the dominant mode of the wind industry’s global integration. Principal barriers to global integration are nontariff trade barriers and formal and informal barriers that distort firms ’ investment decisions. These include local content requirements, divergent national industrial standards and licensing demands, and in particular political expectations. Intellectual property accounts for only a very small part of cost in the wind industry, and wind technology is widely available for licensing. Intellectual property rights are correspondingly not a major impediment for market participation. Credible long-term commitments coupled with a reduction or elimination of existing barriers to cross-border trade and investment are necessary to harness the full potential of global integration in reducing wind industry prices and increase worldwide deployment of wind energy.

Jacob Funk Kirkegaard; Thilo Hanemann; Lutz Weischer

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Numerical Simulation of Land-Breeze-Induced Snowbands Along the Western Shore of Lake Michigan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Case studies are presented which describe a type of lake-effect snowband which forms along the western shore of Lake Michigan when a cold anticyclone to the north sets up an easterly gradient over the lake. Numerical simulations indicate that the ...

Robert J. Ballentine

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Numerical Simulation of Land-Breeze-Induced Snowbands Along the Western Shore of Lake Michigan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Case studies are presented which describe a type of lake-effect snowband which forms along the western shore of Lake Michigan when a cold anticyclone to the north sets up an easterly gradient over the lake. Numerical simulations indicate that the ...

Robert J. Ballentine

1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Mesoscale Features of the Michigan Land Breeze Using PAM II Temperature Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the period 16–20 December 1983, the northern United States was enduring a record-breaking cold air outbreak. The cold air brought temperatures as low as ?40°C to some areas while bringing considerable lake-effect snows to locations in the ...

Louis Michael Schoenberger

1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Factorization of a 512-bit RSA modulus  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper reports on the factorization of the 512-bit number RSA-155 by the Number Field Sieve factoring method (NFS) and discusses the implications for RSA.

Stefania Cavallar; Bruce Dodson; Arjen K. Lenstra; Walter Lioen; Peter L. Montgomery; Brian Murphy; Herman Te Riele; Karen Aardal; Jeff Gilchrist; Gérard Guillerm; Paul Leyland; Joël Marchand; François Morain; Alec Muffett; Chris Putnam; Craig Putnam; Paul Zimmermann

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Major Risk Factors Integrated Facility Disposition Project -...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

- Oak Ridge Summary - Major Risk Factors Integrated Facility Disposition Project (IFDP) Oak Ridge, TN More Documents & Publications Major Risk Factors to the Integrated...

153

FTCP Human Factors Engineering Supplemental Competencies  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Human Factors Engineering Functional Area Qualification Competencies Examples for DOE Defense Nuclear Facilities Technical Personnel

154

Electrical and Production Load Factors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Load factors are an important simplification of electrical energy use data and depend on the ratio of average demand to peak demand. Based on operating hours of a facility they serve as an important benchmarking tool for the industrial sector. The operating hours of small and medium sized manufacturing facilities are analyzed to identify the most common operating hour or shift work patterns. About 75% of manufacturing facilities fall into expected operating hour patterns with operating hours near 40, 80, 120 and 168 hours/week. Two types of load factors, electrical and production are computed for each shift classification within major industry categories in the U.S. The load factor based on monthly billing hours (ELF) increases with operating hours from about 0.4 for a nominal one shift operation, to about 0.7 for around-the-clock operation. On the other hand, the load factor based on production hours (PLF) shows an inverse trend, varying from about 1.4 for one shift operation to 0.7 for around-the-clock operation. When used as a diagnostic tool, if the PLF exceeds unity, then unnecessary energy consumption may be taking place. For plants operating at 40 hours per week, the ELF value was found to greater than the theoretical maximum, while the PLF value was greater than one, suggesting that these facilities may have significant energy usage outside production hours. The data for the PLF however, is more scattered for plants operating less than 80 hours per week, indicating that grouping PLF data based on operating hours may not be a reasonable approach to benchmarking energy use in industries. This analysis uses annual electricity consumption and demand along with operating hour data of manufacturing plants available in the U.S. Department of Energy’s Industrial Assessment Center (IAC) database. The annual values are used because more desirable monthly data are not available. Monthly data are preferred as they capture the load profile of the facility more accurately. The data there come from Industrial Assessment Centers which employ university engineering students, faculty and staff to perform energy assessments for small to medium-sized manufacturing plants. The nation-wide IAC program is sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy.

Sen, Tapajyoti

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Factors for Bioenergy Market Development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Focusing on the development of the whole bioenergy market rather than isolated projects, this paper contributes to the identification of barriers and drivers behind bioenergy technology implementation. It presents a framework for the assessment of the potentials for bioenergy market growth to be used by decision makers in administration and industry. The conclusions are based on case studies of operating bioenergy markets in Austria, US and Sweden. Six important factors for bioenergy market growth have been identified: (1) Integration with other business, e.g. for biomass procurement, (2) Scale effects of bioenergy market, (3) Competition on bioenergy market, (4) Competition with other business, (5) National policy, (6) Local policy and local opinion. Different applications of the framework are discussed.

Roos, A.; Hektor, B.; Graham, R.L.; Rakos, C.

1998-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

156

Form factors from lattice QCD  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Precision computation of hadronic physics with lattice QCD is becoming feasible. The last decade has seen precent-level calculations of many simple properties of mesons, and the last few years have seen calculations of baryon masses, including the nucleon mass, accurate to a few percent. As computational power increases and algorithms advance, the precise calculation of a variety of more demanding hadronic properties will become realistic. With this in mind, I discuss the current lattice QCD calculations of generalized parton distributions with an emphasis on the prospects for well-controlled calculations for these observables as well. I will do this by way of several examples: the pion and nucleon form factors and moments of the nucleon parton and generalized-parton distributions.

Dru Renner

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Capacity Factor Risk At Nuclear Power Plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We develop a model of the dynamic structure of capacity factor risk. It incorporates the risk that the capacity factor may vary widely from year-to-year, and also the risk that the reactor may be permanently shutdown prior ...

Du, Yangbo

158

Emission Factors from Brazilian Deforestation Fires Published  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of emission factors from 19 deforestation fires in Mato Grosso, Para, and Amazonas, Brazil. LBA-ECO TG-10 Fire Emission Factors in Mato Grosso, Para, and Amazonas, Brazil: 2004...

159

Definition: Distribution Factor | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Also Known As Transfer Distribution Factor Related Terms Interchange Transaction, transmission lines, facility, Interchange, transmission line, flowgate, smart grid...

160

Prime Factorization in the Duality Computer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We give algorithms to factorize large integers in the duality computer. We provide three duality algorithms for factorization based on a naive factorization method, the Shor algorithm in quantum computing, and the Fermat's method in classical computing. All these algorithms are polynomial in the input size.

Wan-Ying Wang; Bin Shang; Chuan Wang; Gui Lu Long

2006-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "breeze otherf factors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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161

Nonnegative matrix factorization with quadratic programming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nonnegative matrix factorization (NMF) solves the following problem: find such nonnegative matrices A@?R"+^I^x^J and X@?R"+^J^x^K that Y@?AX, given only Y@?R^I^x^K and the assigned index J (K@?I>=J). Basically, the factorization is achieved by alternating ... Keywords: Blind source separation, Nonnegative matrix factorization, Quadratic programming

Rafal Zdunek; Andrzej Cichocki

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Variational learning for rectified factor analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Linear factor models with non-negativity constraints have received a great deal of interest in a number of problem domains. In existing approaches, positivity has often been associated with sparsity. In this paper we argue that sparsity of the factors ... Keywords: Positive factor analysis, Source separation, Variational Bayes

Markus Harva; Ata Kabán

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Updating an LU Factorization with Pivoting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We show how to compute an LU factorization of a matrix when the factors of a leading principle submatrix are already known. The approach incorporates pivoting akin to partial pivoting, a strategy we call incremental pivoting. An implementation ... Keywords: LU factorization, linear systems, pivoting, updating

Enrique S. Quintana-Ortí; Robert A. Van De Geijn

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Appendix A Conversion Factors for Standard Units  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy, work, heat(a) joule J ... a utility-specific factor that has incorporated actual fuel mix ... Arizona Colorado Idaho Montana Nevada New Mexico Utah Wyoming

165

Factorization for hadronic heavy quarkonium production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We briefly review several models of heavy quarkonium production in hadronic collisions, and discuss the status of QCD factorization for these production models.

Jian-Wei Qiu

2006-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

166

Factors associated with participation restriction in community ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

May 26, 2007 ... restriction, after adjusting for age and gender in a logistic regression analysis. Health and disability factors most strongly and independently ...

167

OpenEI - electricity emission factors  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

http:en.openei.orgdatasetstaxonomyterm4650 en Hourly Energy Emission Factors for Electricity Generation in the United States http:en.openei.orgdatasetsnode488...

168

OpenEI - hourly emission factors  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

http:en.openei.orgdatasetstaxonomyterm4640 en Hourly Energy Emission Factors for Electricity Generation in the United States http:en.openei.orgdatasetsnode488...

169

politics factors into climate bill, too  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

06/2 - POLITICS FACTORS INTO CLIMATE BILL, TOO. In A 987-page bill, six committees with jurisdiction, a mammoth oil spill to consider, no bipartisan support, ...

170

Health Information Technology (IT), Human Factor Guidelines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... on a research program aimed at developing human factors guidelines for ... technical guidelines will help support safe, effective, error-free EHR use ...

2013-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

171

Factors that Predict Quality Classroom Technology Use.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Despite technological advancements intended to enhance teaching and learning in the 21st century, numerous teacher and school factors continue to impede quality classroom technology use.… (more)

Hastings, Tricia A.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Mini-Conference on Factorization Problems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, The University of Iowa, Iowa City. Non-Atomic Unique Factorization. 3:00-3:45 PM Franz Halter-Koch, Karl

Coykendall, James

173

Nucleon Form Factor Measurements and Interpretation  

SciTech Connect

The data base for the form factors of the nucleon obtained from elastic ep scattering is discussed, as well as some recent developments in their calculation.

Charles F. Perdrisat

2007-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

174

De-caf-einated : life without chromatin assembly factors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SACCHAROMYCES CEREVISIAE CHROMATIN ASSEMBLY FACTORS THAT ACTSaccharomyces cerevisiae chromatin- assembly factors thatSaccharomyces cerevisiae chromatin-assembly factors that act

Kats, Ellen Simona

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Distributed large-scale natural graph factorization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Natural graphs, such as social networks, email graphs, or instant messaging patterns, have become pervasive through the internet. These graphs are massive, often containing hundreds of millions of nodes and billions of edges. While some theoretical models ... Keywords: asynchronous algorithms, distributed optimization, graph algorithms, graph factorization, large-scale machine learning, matrix factorization

Amr Ahmed, Nino Shervashidze, Shravan Narayanamurthy, Vanja Josifovski, Alexander J. Smola

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Jet acollinearity and quark form factors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Perturbative Quantum Chromodynamic corrections involving the emission of gluons which are both soft and collinear are discussed for both hadronic production of lepton pairs and e/sup +/e/sup -/ annihilation. The result is an exponential, double logarithmic quark form factor. The effect of sub-leading corrections and the possible experimental observation of the form factor are discussed.

Stirling, W.J.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Gradient based variable forgetting factor RLS algorithm  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An accurate new variable forgetting factor recursive least-square adaptive algorithm is derived. An improved mean square behaviour analysis is presented, which shows that the theoretical analysis and the simulation results are close to each other. The ... Keywords: RLS algorithm, adaptive filters, variable forgetting factor

C. F. So; S. C. Ng; S. H. Leung

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

The Jacobian factor in free energy simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The role of Jacobian factors in free energy simulations is described. They provide a simple interpretation of ‘‘moment of inertia correction’’ and ‘‘dynamic stretch free energy’’ terms in such simulations. Since the relevant Jacobian factors can often be evaluated analytically by use of the configurational partition function of a polyatomic molecule

Stefan Boresch; Martin Karplus

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

IPCC Emission Factor Database | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

IPCC Emission Factor Database IPCC Emission Factor Database Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: IPCC Emission Factor Database Agency/Company /Organization: World Meteorological Organization, United Nations Environment Programme Resource Type: Dataset Website: www.ipcc-nggip.iges.or.jp/EFDB/main.php References: IPCC-EFDB[1] About "EFDB is meant to be a recognised library, where users can find emission factors and other parameters with background documentation or technical references that can be used for estimating greenhouse gas emissions and removals. The responsibility of using this information appropriately will always remain with the users themselves." References ↑ "IPCC-EFDB" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=IPCC_Emission_Factor_Database&oldid=367213"

180

NIST: Triatomic - Special Units, ... and Useful Conver. Factors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

5. Special Units, Fundamental Constants, and Useful Conversion Factors. 5.a. Special Units. ... 5.b. Fundamental Constants and Conversion Factors. ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "breeze otherf factors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Synthetic heparin-binding factor analogs  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention provides synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs having at least one peptide chain, and preferably two peptide chains branched from a dipeptide branch moiety composed of two trifunctional amino acid residues, which peptide chain or chains bind a heparin-binding growth factor receptor and are covalently bound to a non-signaling peptide that includes a heparin-binding domain, preferably by a linker, which may be a hydrophobic linker. The synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs are useful as pharmaceutical agents, soluble biologics or as surface coatings for medical devices.

Pena, Louis A. (Poquott, NY); Zamora, Paul O. (Gaithersburg, MD); Lin, Xinhua (Plainview, NY); Glass, John D. (Shoreham, NY)

2010-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

182

electricity emission factors | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

emission factors emission factors Dataset Summary Description Emissions from energy use in buildings are usually estimated on an annual basis using annual average multipliers. Using annual numbers provides a reasonable estimation of emissions, but it provides no indication of the temporal nature of the emissions. Therefore, there is no way of understanding the impact on emissions from load shifting and peak shaving technologies such as thermal energy storage, on-site renewable energy, and demand control. Source NREL Date Released April 11th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated April 11th, 2011 (3 years ago) Keywords buildings carbon dioxide emissions carbon footprinting CO2 commercial buildings electricity emission factors ERCOT hourly emission factors interconnect nitrogen oxides

183

Factors Causing Unexpected Variations in Ada Benchmarks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Benchmarks are often used to describe the performance of computer systems. This report considers factors that may cause Ada benchmarks to produce inaccurate results. Included are examples from the ongoing benchmarking efforts of the Ada Embedded Systems Testbed (AEST) Project using bare target computers with several Ada compilers. 1. Introduction One of the goals of the Ada Embedded Systems Testbed (AEST) Project is to assess the readiness of the Ada programming language and Ada tools for developing embedded systems. The benchmarking and instrumentation subgroup within the AEST Project is running various suites of Ada benchmarks to obtain data on the real-time performance of Ada on a number of different target systems. The purpose of this report is to categorize the factors which cause anomalous results to be produced by the benchmarks. Some of these factors have been observed, while others are more speculative in nature. All these factors should be understood if accurate, comparable,...

Neal Altman; Neal Altman

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Definition: Capacity factor | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

power)12 View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition The net capacity factor of a power plant is the ratio of its actual output over a period of time, to its potential output if...

185

CCG supertags in factored statistical machine translation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Combinatorial Categorial Grammar (CCG) supertags present phrase-based machine translation with an opportunity to access rich syntactic information at a word level. The challenge is incorporating this information into the translation process. Factored ...

Alexandra Birch; Miles Osborne; Philipp Koehn

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Spatial Ontology in Factored Statistical Machine Translation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a statistical phrase-based machine translation system which is enriched with semantic data coming from a spatial ontology. Paper presents the spatial ontology, how it is integrated in statistical machine translation system using factored ...

Raivis Skadi?š

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Gust Factors Applied to Hurricane Winds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An important consideration in the design of structures is their response to extreme winds. This is especially true in regions affected by hurricanes. In this research, gust factors derived from hurricane wind-speed records are compared with those ...

William R. Krayer; Richard D. Marshall

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Carbon Dioxide Emission Factors for Coal  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

The Energy Information Administration (EIA) has developed factors for estimating the amount of carbon dioxide emitted, accounting for differences among coals, to reflect the changing "mix" of coal in U.S. coal consumption.

William Watson

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

IV Estimation of Panels with Factor Residuals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. In microeconometric panels, the factor structure may capture different sources of unobserved individual-specific heterogeneity, the impact of which varies intertem- porally in an arbitrary way. For instance, in studies of production functions, the factor loadings may... supply, Euler equations for household consumption, and em- pirical growth models. In these models the coefficient of the lagged dependent variable captures inertia, habit formation and costs of adjustment and therefore it has structural significance (see...

Robertson, Donald; Sara dis, Vasilis

2013-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

190

Faster Quantum Number Factoring via Circuit Synthesis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A major obstacle to implementing Shor's quantum number-factoring algorithm is the large size of modular-exponentiation circuits. We reduce this bottleneck by customizing reversible circuits for modular multiplication to individual runs of Shor's algorithm. Our circuit-synthesis procedure exploits spectral properties of multiplication operators and constructs optimized circuits from the traces of the execution of an appropriate GCD algorithm. Empirically, gate counts are reduced by 4-5 times, and circuit latency is reduced by larger factors.

Igor L. Markov; Mehdi Saeedi

2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

191

Pricing Effect of Restaurant Industry Related Factors on Fama French Three Factor Model.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of the addition of restaurant industry-related factors on the accuracy and explanatory power of the… (more)

Denizci, Basak

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

EcoFactor Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

EcoFactor Inc EcoFactor Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name EcoFactor Inc Place Millbrae, California Zip 94030 Product California-based home energy management service provider. Coordinates 37.60276°, -122.395444° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.60276,"lon":-122.395444,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

193

Emission Factors (EMFAC) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Emission Factors (EMFAC) Emission Factors (EMFAC) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: EMFAC Agency/Company /Organization: California Environmental Protection Agency Sector: Energy Focus Area: Transportation Phase: Determine Baseline Topics: Baseline projection, GHG inventory Resource Type: Software/modeling tools, Online calculator User Interface: Spreadsheet Website: www.arb.ca.gov/msei/onroad/latest_version.htm Country: United States Cost: Free Northern America References: http://www.arb.ca.gov/msei/onroad/latest_version.htm The EMission FACtors (EMFAC) model is used to calculate emission rates from all motor vehicles, such as passenger cars to heavy-duty trucks, operating on highways, freeways and local roads in California. EMFAC2007 is the most recent version of this model.

194

miRNA as Bystander Effect Factor  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

miRNA as Bystander Effect Factor miRNA as Bystander Effect Factor L. Smilenov Columbia University Abstract miRNA are 21-23 mer RNA molecules which are essential for organism development and cell functions. They regulate gene expression by binding to the 3’UTR of mRNA, inducing either mRNA degradation or mRNA silencing. The most characteristic properties of miRNA are their multi-targeting potential (one miRNA may target many genes). This high information content of miRNAs makes them very important factors in cell reprogramming. Since these are small molecules which can potentially pass through gap junctions, it is logical to consider their role in cell to cell communication. We hypothesized that miRNA transfer between cells is likely to occur under stress conditions. To test this hypothesis we developed a system designed

195

Paramagnetic form factors from itinerant electron theory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Elastic neutron scattering experiments performed over the past two decades have provided accurate information about the magnetic form factors of paramagnetic transition metals. These measurements have traditionally been analyzed in terms of an atomic-like theory. There are, however, some cases where this procedure does not work, and there remains the overall conceptual problem of using an atomistic theory for systems where the unpaired-spin electrons are itinerant. We have recently developed computer codes for efficiently evaluating the induced magnetic form factors of fcc and bcc itinerant electron paramagnets. Results for the orbital and spin contributions have been obtained for Cr, Nb, V, Mo, Pd and Rh based on local density bands. By using calculated spin enhancement parameters, we find reasonable agreement between theory and neutron form factor data. In addition, these zero parameter calculations yield predictions for the bulk susceptibility on an absolute scale which are in reasonable agreement with experiment in all treated cases except palladium.

Cooke, J.F.; Liu, S.H.; Liu, A.J.

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

miRNA as Bystander Effect Factor  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

miRNA as Bystander Effect Factor miRNA as Bystander Effect Factor L. Smilenov 1 , M. Grad 2 , D. Attinger 2 and E.Hall 1 1 Center for Radiological Research, Columbia University 2 Department of Mechanical Engineering, Columbia University DOE Grant: DEPS0208ER0820 Abstract: miRNA are 21-23 mer RNA molecules which are essential for organism development and cell functions. They regulate gene expression by binding to the 3'UTR of mRNA, inducing either

197

Momentum compaction and phase slip factor  

SciTech Connect

Section 2.3.11 of the Handbook of Accelerator Physics and Engineering on Landau damping is updated. The slip factor and its higher orders are given in terms of the various orders of the momentum compaction. With the aid of a simplified FODO lattice, formulas are given for the alteration of the lower orders of the momentum compaction by various higher multipole magnets. The transition to isochronicity is next demonstrated. Formulas are given for the extraction of the first three orders of the slip factor from the measurement of the synchrotron tune while changing the rf frequency. Finally bunch-length compression experiments in semi-isochronous rings are reported.

Ng, K.Y.; /Fermilab

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Ccg supertags in factored statistical machine translation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Combinatorial Categorial Grammar (CCG) supertags present phrase-based machine translation with an opportunity to access rich syntactic information at a word level. The challenge is incorporating this information into the translation process. Factored translation models allow the inclusion of supertags as a factor in the source or target language. We show that this results in an improvement in the quality of translation and that the value of syntactic supertags in flat structured phrase-based models is largely due to better local reorderings. 1

Alexandra Birch; Miles Osborne

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Annotated bibliography of human factors applications literature  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This bibliography was prepared as part of the Human Factors Technology Project, FY 1984, sponsored by the Office of Nuclear Safety, US Department of Energy. The project was conducted by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, with Essex Corporation as a subcontractor. The material presented here is a revision and expansion of the bibliographic material developed in FY 1982 as part of a previous Human Factors Technology Project. The previous bibliography was published September 30, 1982, as Attachment 1 to the FY 1982 Project Status Report.

McCafferty, D.B.

1984-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

200

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Fuel Consumption, 1998;" 2. Fuel Consumption, 1998;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ",,,,,,,,,,"RSE" "NAICS"," "," ","Net","Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke"," ","Row" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Natural Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(f)","Factors"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "breeze otherf factors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

" Row: Selected SIC Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Fuel Consumption, 1998;" 2. Fuel Consumption, 1998;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: Selected SIC Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ",,,,,,,,,,"RSE" "SIC"," "," ","Net","Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke"," ","Row" "Code(a)","Major Group and Industry","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Natural Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(f)","Factors"

202

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Fuel Consumption, 2002;" 2 Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ",,,,,,,,,,"RSE" "NAICS"," "," ","Net","Residual","Distillate","Natural","LPG and",,"Coke"," ","Row" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(f)","Factors"

203

Table A4. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2" 2" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ","RSE" "SIC"," "," ","Net","Residual","Distillate"," "," "," ","Coke"," ","Row" "Code(a)","Industry Groups and Industry","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Natural Gas(d)","LPG","Coal","and Breeze","Other(e)","Factors"

204

Table A1. Total First Use (formerly Primary Consumption) of Energy for All Pu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2" 2" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," "," ",," "," ",," "," ",," ","Shipments","RSE" "SIC"," ",,"Net","Residual","Distillate",," ",,"Coke and"," ","of Energy Sources","Row" "Code(a)","Industry Group and Industry","Total(b)","Electricity(c)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(d)","Natural Gas(e)","LPG","Coal","Breeze","Other(f)","Produced Onsite(g)","Factors"

205

Table A3. Total First Use (formerly Primary Consumption) of Combustible Energ  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Nonfuel" Nonfuel" " Purposes by Census Region, Industry Group, and Selected Industries, 1994: Part 2" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu) " " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ","RSE" "SIC"," "," ","Residual","Distillate "," "," "," ","Coke "," ","Row" "Code(a)","Industry Group and Industry","Total","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","Natural Gas(c)","LPG","Coal","and Breeze","Other(d)","Factors"

206

Table 3.3 Fuel Consumption, 2002  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Fuel Consumption, 2002;" 3 Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: Values of Shipments and Employment Sizes;" " Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," ",," "," ",," "," ",," ","RSE" "Economic",,"Net","Residual","Distillate","Natural ","LPG and",,"Coke and"," ","Row" "Characteristic(a)","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coal","Breeze","Other(f)","Factors"

207

Table A1. Total Primary Consumption of Energy for All Purposes by Census  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2" 2" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ","RSE" "SIC"," ",,"Net","Residual","Distillate "," "," "," ","Coke"," ","Row" "Code(a)","Industry Groups and Industry"," Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Natural Gas(d)","LPG","Coal","and Breeze","Other(e)","Factors"

208

" Electricity Generation by Census Region, Industry Group, and Selected"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2" 2" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ","RSE" "SIC"," "," "," ","Residual","Distillate"," "," "," ","Coke"," ","Row" "Code(a)","Industry Groups and Industry","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Natural Gas(d)","LPG","Coal","and Breeze","Other(e)","Factors"

209

"Table A28. Total Expenditures for Purchased Energy Sources by Census Region"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Expenditures for Purchased Energy Sources by Census Region" Total Expenditures for Purchased Energy Sources by Census Region" " and Economic Characteristics of the Establishment, 1991" " (Estimates in Million Dollars)" " "," "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," ","RSE" " "," "," ","Residual","Distillate","Natural"," "," ","Coke"," ","Row" "Economic Characteristics(a)","Total","Electricity","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","Gas(c)","LPG","Coal","and Breeze","Other(d)","Factors"

210

The Impact of Anthropogenic Land-Cover Change on the Florida Peninsula Sea Breezes and Warm Season Sensible Weather  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the twentieth century, the natural landscape of the Florida peninsula was transformed extensively by agriculture, urbanization, and the diversion of surface water features. The purpose of this paper is to present a numerical modeling study ...

Curtis H. Marshall; Roger A. Pielke Sr.; Louis T. Steyaert; Debra A. Willard

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Combined Wind Profiler/Polarimetric Radar Studies of the Vertical Motion and Microphysical Characteristics of Tropical Sea-Breeze Thunderstorms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An experiment combining wind profiler and polarimetric radar analyses of intense, but shallow, tropical thunderstorms has been performed. These storms are important as they are very common along many tropical coasts and islands and are sometimes ...

Peter T. May; A. R. Jameson; Thomas D. Keenan; Paul E. Johnston; Chris Lucas

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Air Pollutant Transport in a Coastal Environment. Part I: Two-Dimensional Simulations of Sea-Breeze and Mountain Effects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Over the southern California coastal region, observations of the vertical distributions of pollutants show that maximum concentrations can occur within temperature inversion layers well above the surface. A mesoscale model is used to study the ...

Rong Lu; Richard P. Turco

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Factorization studies in SIDIS at Jlab  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Data for positive and negative pion electroproduction from both hydrogen and deuterium targets are found to satisfy factorization tests in the kinematic region Q{sup 2} > 2 GeV{sup 2}, 0.2 < 0.45, W > 2 GeV, M{sub x} > 1.5 GeV, and 0.3 < 0.6.

Peter Bosted; Rolf Ent; David Gaskell; Hamlet Mkrtchyan; Tigran Navasardyan; Varden Tadevosyan

2006-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

214

Community discovery using nonnegative matrix factorization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Complex networks exist in a wide range of real world systems, such as social networks, technological networks, and biological networks. During the last decades, many researchers have concentrated on exploring some common things contained in those large ... Keywords: Community discovery, Nonnegative matrix factorization

Fei Wang; Tao Li; Xin Wang; Shenghuo Zhu; Chris Ding

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Protein Synthesis Initiation Factors: Phosphorylation and Regulation  

SciTech Connect

The initiation of the synthesis of proteins is a fundamental process shared by all living organisms. Each organism has both shared and unique mechanisms for regulation of this vital process. Higher plants provide for a major amount of fixation of carbon from the environment and turn this carbon into food and fuel sources for our use. However, we have very little understanding of how plants regulate the synthesis of the proteins necessary for these metabolic processes. The research carried out during the grant period sought to address some of these unknowns in the regulation of protein synthesis initiation. Our first goal was to determine if phosphorylation plays a significant role in plant initiation of protein synthesis. The role of phosphorylation, although well documented in mammalian protein synthesis regulation, is not well studied in plants. We showed that several of the factors necessary for the initiation of protein synthesis were targets of plant casein kinase and showed differential phosphorylation by the plant specific isoforms of this kinase. In addition, we identified and confirmed the phosphorylation sites in five of the plant initiation factors. Further, we showed that phosphorylation of one of these factors, eIF5, affected the ability of the factor to participate in the initiation process. Our second goal was to develop a method to make initiation factor 3 (eIF3) using recombinant methods. To date, we successfully cloned and expressed 13/13 subunits of wheat eIF3 in E. coli using de novo gene construction methods. The final step in this process is to place the subunits into three different plasmid operons for co-expression. Successful completion of expression of eIF3 will be an invaluable tool to the plant translation community.

Karen S. Browning

2009-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

216

Study of Factors Affecting Shrub Establishment on the Monticello...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Study of Factors Affecting Shrub Establishment on the Monticello, Utah, Disposal Cell Cover Study of Factors Affecting Shrub Establishment on the Monticello, Utah, Disposal Cell...

217

Critical factors influencing employment of disabled persons in Malaysia.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This study examines key factors that affect opportunities for employment of disabled people in Malaysia. Four factors are covered by the study; these are namely,… (more)

Ramakrishnan, Prabha.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Factors affecting the indoor concentrations of carbonaceous aerosols...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Factors affecting the indoor concentrations of carbonaceous aerosols of outdoor origin Title Factors affecting the indoor concentrations of carbonaceous aerosols of outdoor origin...

219

Definition: Generator-To-Load Distribution Factor | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

on an identified transmission facility or Flowgate.1 Related Terms Load Shift Factor, transmission lines, Generator Shift Factor, transmission line, flowgate, smart grid...

220

table10.11_02.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch Coal to Alternative Energy Sources, 2002; 1 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch Coal to Alternative Energy Sources, 2002; Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Establishment Counts. RSE NAICS Total Not Electricity Natural Distillate Residual Row Code(a) Subsector and Industry Consumed(d) Switchable Switchable Receipts(e) Gas Fuel Oil Fuel Oil LPG Other(f) Factors Total United States RSE Column Factors: 1.5 1.2 1.5 0.7 1.1 0.8 1.1 1 0.5 311 Food 91 50 92 0 26 Q Q W W 10.7 311221 Wet Corn Milling 19 8 17 0 7 0 0 W W 0.9 31131 Sugar 24 13 22 0 11 0 4 0 W 0.9 311421 Fruit and Vegetable Canning 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 312 Beverage and Tobacco Products 17 8 12 0 7 W 5 0 0 5.3 3121 Beverages 9 5 5 0 W W W 0 0 8.5

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "breeze otherf factors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Using Two-Factor RSA Token  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Using Two-Factor RSA Token Using Two-Factor RSA Token with VPN User Guide November 2013 Using Your RSA token with WebVPN 1. Establish a connection to the Internet and connect to https://connect.doe.gov 2. Users who are using their RSA Token for the first time should follow the steps below for PIN creation. Others who have already set up their PIN and used their RSA token previously should enter their six digit numeric username and passcode; this is the PIN + the RSA token code. The result of this successful login will be Step 8 below. 3. A login page similar to the picture below will be displayed. Enter your VPN Username (six-digit numeric ID) and your Password by typing your generated RSA Token code and then click the Login button. Example; your generated RSA token code is 032848 (from above). In the Password box, you will enter

222

Reliability based investigation of design factors  

SciTech Connect

Second-moment probabilistic techniques are used to formulate structural resistances and loads and to derive reliability-based safety, load, and strength factors for design. Existing concepts of the second-moment reliability theory have been extended to the practical case of multiple load combinations. This development consistently includes the stochastic character of loads and the unpredictable nature of their combinations. For this purpose, a new technique for the evaluation of load combinations is presented, whereby the moments of the extreme of combined loads is obtained in terms of the moments of individual loads and parameters describing their random fluctuations in time. Reliability-based safety, load, and strength factors are derived in terms of the acceptable level of risk, the coefficients of variation of the loads and resistance, uncertainties associated with errors in modeling and estimation, and a set of parameters describing the stochastic nature of loads and their combinations.

1978-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

223

Factorization in B ---> V gamma decays  

SciTech Connect

The factorization properties of the radiative decays B {yields} V{gamma} are analyzed at leading order in 1/m{sub b} using the soft-collinear effective theory. It is shown that the decay amplitudes can be expressed in terms of a B {yields} V form factor evaluated at q{sup 2} = 0, light-cone distribution amplitudes of the B and V mesons, and calculable hard-scattering kernels. The renormalization-group equations in the effective theory are solved to resum perturbative logarithms of the different scales in the decay process. Phenomenological implications for the B {yields} K*{gamma} branching ratio, isospin asymmetry, and CP asymmetries are discussed, with particular emphasis on possible effects from physics beyond the Standard Model.

Becher, Thomas; /Fermilab; Hill, Richard J.; /SLAC; Neubert, Matthias; /Cornell U., LEPP

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Infinite Dimensional VARs and Factor Models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and any r 2 f1; ::;mg. ASSUMPTION 14 (Random factor loadings) isr = sr + #17;isr for s 2 f1; ::; kg , r 2 f1; ::;mg and any i 2 N, (69) where #17;isr #24; IID #0; 0; #27;2#17;sr #1; , isr does not change with N #21; i. #17;isr is independently... distributed of "r0t and ut for any s 2 f1; ::; kg ; r; r0 2 f1; ::;mg ; i 2 N and any t 2 Z. Furthermore, the third and the fourth moments of #17;isr are bounded. ASSUMPTION 15 (Non-random factor loadings) isr = O (1) for any i 2 N and any s 2 f1; ::; kg, r 2...

Chudik, Alexander; Pesaran, M Hashem

225

Predicting structure in nonsymmetric sparse matrix factorizations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many computations on sparse matrices have a phase that predicts the nonzero structure of the output, followed by a phase that actually performs the numerical computation. We study structure prediction for computations that involve nonsymmetric row and column permutations and nonsymmetric or non-square matrices. Our tools are bipartite graphs, matchings, and alternating paths. Our main new result concerns LU factorization with partial pivoting. We show that if a square matrix A has the strong Hall property (i.e., is fully indecomposable) then an upper bound due to George and Ng on the nonzero structure of L + U is as tight as possible. To show this, we prove a crucial result about alternating paths in strong Hall graphs. The alternating-paths theorem seems to be of independent interest: it can also be used to prove related results about structure prediction for QR factorization that are due to Coleman, Edenbrandt, Gilbert, Hare, Johnson, Olesky, Pothen, and van den Driessche.

Gilbert, J.R. (Xerox Palo Alto Research Center, CA (United States)); Ng, E.G. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States))

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Superintegrable Systems and Higher Rank Factorizations  

SciTech Connect

We consider a class of two-dimensional super-integrable systems that can be considered as the natural generalization of some well known one-dimensional factorized systems. Using standard methods to find the shape-invariant intertwining operators we find an so(6) dynamical algebra and its Hamiltonian hierarchies. In particular we consider those associated to unitary representations that can be displayed by means of three-dimensional polyhedral lattices.

Negro, Javier; Calzada, Juan A.; Olmo, Mariano A. del [Departamento de Fisica Teorica, Atomica y Optica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Valladolid, E-47011 Valladolid (Spain)

2006-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

227

Fukushima Daiichi Accident -- Technical Causal Factor Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On March 11, 2011, the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant experienced a seismic event and subsequent tsunami. The accident and the ensuing mitigation and recovery activities occurred over several days, involved a number of incidents, and might provide several opportunities for lessons learned. The objective of this report is to determine the fundamental causative factors for the loss of critical systems at the Fukushima Daiichi reactors that resulted in core damage and subsequent radioactive release. ...

2012-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

228

GROA AIRBORNE RELEASE DISPERSION FACTOR CALCULATION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this document is to calculate airborne release dispersion factors ({chi}/Q) for the surface and subsurface facilities at the Geological Repository Operations Area (GROA). The calculated {chi}/Q values may be used to estimate radiological consequences to workers for potential releases from normal operations and event sequences for License Application. The scope of this document is to provide estimates of {chi}/Q values at potential onsite receptors from facility releases, under normal operating conditions and event sequences.

J. Wang

2005-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

229

DETERMINATION OF RELATIVE IMPORTANCE OF NONPROLIFERATION FACTORS  

SciTech Connect

Methodologies to determine the proliferation resistance (PR) of nuclear facilities often rely on either expert elicitation, a resource-intensive approach without easily reproducible results, or numeric evaluations, which can fail to take into account the institutional knowledge and expert experience of the nonproliferation community. In an attempt to bridge the gap and bring the institutional knowledge into numeric evaluations of PR, a survey was conducted of 33 individuals to find the relative importance of a set of 62 nonproliferation factors, subsectioned into groups under the headings of Diversion, Transportation, Transformation, and Weaponization. One third of the respondents were self-described nonproliferation professionals, and the remaining two thirds were from secondary professions related to nonproliferation, such as industrial engineers or policy analysts. The factors were taken from previous work which used multi-attribute utility analysis with uniform weighting of attributes and did not include institutional knowledge. In both expert and non-expert groups, all four headings and the majority of factors had different relative importance at a confidence of 95% (p=0.05). This analysis and survey demonstrates that institutional knowledge can be brought into numeric evaluations of PR, if there is a sufficient investment of resources made prior to the evaluation.

Richard Metcalf

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- Parametric Analysis of the Factors...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Parametric Analysis of the Factors Controlling the Costs of Sedimentary Geothermal Systems - Preliminary Results (Poster)...

231

Field Derived Emission Factors For Formaldehyde and other ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Field Derived Emission Factors For Formaldehyde and other Volatile Organic Compounds in FEMA Temporary Housing Units ...

232

Graphical technique for interpolating shape factors for peripheral waterflood systems  

SciTech Connect

A method of interpolating the shape factors between already known sets of data can be utilized in peripheral waterflood systems. This graphical technique should provide reasonably reliable shape factors without necessitating further flow pattern evaluation. A set of interpolated shape factors for the constant pressure difference case is tabulated. These factors were derived from the shape factors previously determined using variation of width technique. A comparison of the interpolated shape factors and the shape factors obtained by the circling-in techniques are also shown. Good agreement was obtained in this comparison.

Kantar, K.; Helander, D.P.

1967-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Tropical Cyclogenesis Factors in a Warming Climate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Understanding the underlying causes of tropical cyclone formation is crucial to predicting tropical cyclone behavior in a warming environment, given the Earth's current warming trend. This study examines two sets of simulations from the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Community Atmosphere Model version 3.1 (CAM3): one with aerosol forcings and one without. We looked at how four factors known to be important to tropical cyclone formation vary as carbon dioxde and the ensuing temperature changes increase to very high levels. These factors include Maximum Potential Intensity (MPI), mid-tropospheric moisture content, 200-850 mb vertical wind shear, and 850 mb absolute vorticity. We considered different representations of mid-tropospheric moisture by examining both relative humidity and chi, a non-dimensional measure of the saturation entropy deficit at 600 mb. We also looked at different combinations of these factors, including several variations of a Genesis Potential Index (GPI) and an incubation parameter, gamma, that is related to the length of time required to saturate the middle troposphere and aid tropical cyclogenesis. Higher MPI, lower saturation deficits and higher relative humidity, lower wind shear, and higher absolute vorticity all act to enhance the GPI and lower the incubation time, meaning larger environmental support for tropical cyclone development and intensification. In areas where tropical cyclone development is prevalent today, we found that shear generally decreased, but MPI decreased, absolute vorticity decreased, and the saturation deficit increases. Thus, in today's prevalent tropical cyclone regions, conditions become less favorable for development and intensification as the climate warms. On the other hand, genesis regions tend to push northward into the subtropics, as conditions become much more favorable for development up to ~40 degrees North due to both decreased wind shear and much higher MPI values.

Cathey, Stephen Christopher

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Survey of nucleon electromagnetic form factors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There has been much activity in the measurement of the elastic electromagnetic proton and neutron form factors in the last decade, and the quality of the data has been greatly improved by performing double polarization experiments, in compar- ison with previous unpolarized data. Here we review the experimental data base in view of the new results for the proton, and neutron, obtained at MIT-Bates, MAMI, and JLab. The rapid evolution of phenomenological models triggered by these high-precision experiments will be discussed.

Perdrisat, Charles F. [William and Mary College; Punjabi, Vina A. [Norfolk State U.

2011-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

235

Physical Nucleon Form Factors from Lattice QCD  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We explore the possibility of extrapolating state of the art lattice QCD calculations of nucleon electromagnetic form factors to the physical regime. We find that the lattice results can be reproduced using the Light Front Cloudy Bag Model by letting its parameters be analytic functions of the quark mass. We then use the model to extrapolate the lattice result to the physical value of the pion mass, thereby allowing us to study how the predicted zero in GE(Q2)/GM(Q2) for proton varies as a function of quark mass.

Matevosyan, Hrayr H. [Louisiana State University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, 202 Nicholson Hall, Tower Dr., Baton Rouge, LA 70803 (United States); Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, 12000 Jefferson Ave., Newport News, VA 23606 (United States); Miller, Gerald A. [University of Washington, Department of Physics, Box 351560, Seattle, WA 98195-1560 (United States); Thomas, Anthony W. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, 12000 Jefferson Ave., Newport News, VA 23606 (United States)

2006-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

236

Resources required for topological quantum factoring  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We consider a hypothetical topological quantum computer composed of either Ising or Fibonacci anyons. For each case, we calculate the time and number of qubits (space) necessary to execute the most computationally expensive step of Shor's algorithm, modular exponentiation. For Ising anyons, we apply Bravyi's distillation method [S. Bravyi, Phys. Rev. A 73, 042313 (2006)] which combines topological and nontopological operations to allow for universal quantum computation. With reasonable restrictions on the physical parameters we find that factoring a 128-bit number requires approximately 10{sup 3} Fibonacci anyons versus at least 3x10{sup 9} Ising anyons. Other distillation algorithms could reduce the resources for Ising anyons substantially.

Baraban, M. [Department of Physics, Yale University, 217 Prospect Street, New Haven, Connecticut 06511 (United States); Bonesteel, N. E. [Department of Physics and National High Magnetic Field Laboratory, Florida State University, Tallahassee, Florida 32310 (United States); Simon, S. H. [Rudolf Peierls Centre for Theoretical Physics, Oxford University, 1 Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3NP (United Kingdom)

2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

237

Human factors engineering program review model  

SciTech Connect

The staff of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission is performing nuclear power plant design certification reviews based on a design process plan that describes the human factors engineering (HFE) program elements that are necessary and sufficient to develop an acceptable detailed design specification and an acceptable implemented design. There are two principal reasons for this approach. First, the initial design certification applications submitted for staff review did not include detailed design information. Second, since human performance literature and industry experiences have shown that many significant human factors issues arise early in the design process, review of the design process activities and results is important to the evaluation of an overall design. However, current regulations and guidance documents do not address the criteria for design process review. Therefore, the HFE Program Review Model (HFE PRM) was developed as a basis for performing design certification reviews that include design process evaluations as well as review of the final design. A central tenet of the HFE PRM is that the HFE aspects of the plant should be developed, designed, and evaluated on the basis of a structured top-down system analysis using accepted HFE principles. The HFE PRM consists of ten component elements. Each element in divided into four sections: Background, Objective, Applicant Submittals, and Review Criteria. This report describes the development of the HFE PRM and gives a detailed description of each HFE review element.

Not Available

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

hourly emission factors | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

60 60 Varnish cache server Browse Upload data GDR 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation: XID: 2142278660 Varnish cache server hourly emission factors Dataset Summary Description Emissions from energy use in buildings are usually estimated on an annual basis using annual average multipliers. Using annual numbers provides a reasonable estimation of emissions, but it provides no indication of the temporal nature of the emissions. Therefore, there is no way of understanding the impact on emissions from load shifting and peak shaving technologies such as thermal energy storage, on-site renewable energy, and demand control. Source NREL Date Released April 11th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated April 11th, 2011 (3 years ago)

239

Factors affecting home range of mallard pairs  

SciTech Connect

Certain habitat and social factors were investigated for their effect on home range size of mallard (Anas platyhynchos) pairs breeding in a forested region of north-central Minnesota during the spring of 1971--72. Data from 31 radio-marked hens and drakes were used, but primary emphasis was placed on 8 pairs (5 with both members of the pair marked). Pairs were radio-tracked on river marsh areas, river channels, and large sand lakes to provide comparative data for evaluating home range size differences. Home ranges varied from an average of 53 ha for pairs using primarily river habitat to 871 ha for pairs using only large sand lakes. River and lake shorelines varied considerably in species and density of vegetation. Interaction between pairs as well as density of flocked males appeared to be influenced by these habitat differences with resultant effects on home range sizes.

Riechmann, J.H.

1976-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Human Factors Aspects of Advanced Process Control  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy conservation practices, such as heat recovery and integration, require that many chemical and related processes use advanced control systems. Many of the more advanced process control strategies and algorithms can cause operator confusion, leading to incorrect operator actions and negating the advantages of the advanced control. If the operator makes a mistake and upsets the process, or fails to respond correctly to a process upset, the loss can exceed the possible savings of the advanced control. Further, the experience can result in the operator not using the control capability in the future. Display and man/machine interface techniques, based on an understanding of human factors and of an operator's typical analysis of a process, can be used to present information to the operator in a manner which will prevent confusion. This paper discusses techniques for selecting and displaying process and control information to the operator.

Shaw, J. A.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "breeze otherf factors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Factors Involved in Search Dog Training  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Events of significant impact as recent as hurricane Ike yielded a consistent disturbing truth: we lack sufficient numbers of competent search dog [Canis familiaris] teams. This study was conceived to provide information in identifying factors involved in training competent search dogs. Obedience training methods, age training was initiated, previous handler canine training experience, and handler perception and emotional attachment to their search dog were examined through a sixty-six question survey. Achievement of a national certification was used as a measure of performance success. Association between factors and performance success was evaluated through Chi-Square testing. Surveys were announced through the National Search Dog Alliance (NSDA) and were available online; 177 were fully completed by respondents and used in the data analysis. Seventy-two percent of nationally certified canine team respondents preferred positive reinforcement methods. Several statistically significant associations were detected: (a) female handlers preferred positive reinforcement training methods [x^2 = 8.504, d.f.=1, P = 0.004], (b) as dogs matured use of active training equipment increased [x^2 = 54.043, d.f.= 2, P training each week had a higher proportion of national certifications [x^2 = 16.379, d.f. = 1, P less than 0.001]. The data also indicated a trend for handlers to have previous canine training experience equal to or greater than search dog training experience [x^2 = 118.36, d.f. = 9, P =0.05]. The results warrant further research on the effects of early training, the effects of training time investment, and the interaction between canine selection and handler understanding of canine learning theory.

Alexander, Michael B.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Factors Controlling The Geochemical Evolution Of Fumarolic Encrustatio...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

factors controlled the formation and evolution of fumarolic encrustations on the 1912 ash-flow sheet in the Valley of Ten Thousand Smokes (VTTS). The six-factor solution model...

243

Factor Structure in Groups Selected on Observed Scores  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

corresponding to item format ('minor' answer key and 'other' answer key). There are two quantitative factors,into the full sample answer key factors (2 and 3). The five

Muthen, Bengt O.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

A New Approach to an Accurate Wind Chill Factor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Winter weather often shows a severity marked by low dry-bulb temperature combined with high wind speed. The wind chill factor is now a standard meteorological term to express this severity. This factor, or more appropriately the wind chill ...

Maurice Bluestein; Jack Zecher

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Shortwave Shape Factor Inversion of Earth Radiation Budget Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The shape factor technique is routinely used to invert wide-angle radiometric measurements at satellite altitude to flux at the top of the atmosphere. The derivation of a shortwave shape factor requires assumptions on both the viewed radiation ...

Richard N. Green; G. Louis Smith

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

EPRI-CRIEPI Joint Human Factors Program Summary Report: Joint EPRI-CRIEPI Human Factors Studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The EPRI-CRIEPI Joint Human Factors Program developed an array of intervention products that provide logical solutions to performance problems confronting nuclear power plant maintenance workers. These products, designed to reduce the incidence of errors and increase productivity, range from job performance cards to a software-based authoring system for training material.

1995-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

247

Factors Affecting the Dissolution of Resorbable Bioactive Glasses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Factors affecting dissolution are numerous: residual stress, composition, ... and manufacturing method on the dissolution behaviour of glasses with fixed overall ...

248

Experimental determination of the evolvability of a transcription factor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of gene regulation by transcription factors and micrornas. Nat Rev Genet 8:93­103. 35. Sparrow D, Guillen

Quake, Stephen R.

249

NIST Team Demystifies Utility of Power Factor Correction ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... M. Misakian, TL Nelson and WE Feero. Regarding Electric Energy Savings, Power Factors, and Carbon Footprints: A Primer. ...

2011-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

250

Probability based load factors for design of concrete containment structures  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes a procedure for developing probability-based load combinations for the design of concrete containments. The proposed criteria are in a load and resistance factor design (LRFD) format. The load factors and resistance factors are derived for use in limit states design and are based on a target limit state probability. In this paper, the load factors for accident pressure and safe shutdown earthquake are derived for three target limit state probabilities. Other load factors are recommended on the basis of prior experience with probability-based design criteria for ordinary building construction. 6 refs.

Hwang, H.; Kagami, S.; Reich, M.; Ellingwood, B.; Shinozuka, M.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Human Factors Aspects of Operating Small Reactors  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The nuclear-power community has reached the stage of proposing advanced reactor designs to support power generation for decades to come. They are considering small modular reactors (SMRs) as one approach to meet these energy needs. While the power output of individual reactor modules is relatively small, they can be grouped to produce reactor sites with different outputs. Also, they can be designed to generate hydrogen, or to process heat. Many characteristics of SMRs are quite different from those of current plants, and so may require a concept of operations (ConOps) that also is different. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has begun examining the human factors engineering- (HFE) and ConOps- aspects of SMRs; if needed, they will formulate guidance to support SMR licensing reviews. We developed a ConOps model, consisting of the following dimensions: Plant mission; roles and responsibilities of all agents; staffing, qualifications, and training; management of normal operations; management of off-normal conditions and emergencies; and, management of maintenance and modifications. We are reviewing information on SMR design to obtain data about each of these dimensions, and have identified several preliminary issues. In addition, we are obtaining operations-related information from other types of multi-module systems, such as refineries, to identify lessons learned from their experience. Here, we describe the project's methodology and our preliminary findings.

OHara, J.M.; Higgins, J.; Deem, R. (BNL); Xing, J.; DAgostino, A. (NRC)

2010-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

252

The interpretation of screen-factor measurements  

SciTech Connect

Screen-factor (SF) measurements are widely used in the petroleum industry to characterize polymer solutions. The measurements are easy to perform and provide information that is different from solution-viscosity measurements. However, there has been no quantitative explanation of what solution property is being measured by SF. The authors show that SF measures the elongational viscosity of a polymer solution. Experiments on a modified commercial screen viscometer show the relationship between SF measurements and elongational-flow measurements performed by Durst and coworkers. Durst has shown that the elongational flow field in a packed bed of spheres triggers a transition in the conformation of a flexible polymer molecule, such as polyacrylamide, from a coiled to a stretched state. This transition in conformation is accompanied by a jump in the resistance to flow by an order of magnitude. They show that conventional screen viscometers operate in the regime where the molecules are in the highly stretched state. On the basis of Durst's work, it is calculated that the SF measurement is sensitive to high-molecular-weight tails in the polymer molecular-weight distribution.

Lim, T.; Uhl, J.T.; Prud'homme, R.K.

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

A review of electrochromic window performance factors  

SciTech Connect

The performance factors which will influence the market acceptance of electrochromic windows are reviewed. A set of data representing the optical properties of existing and foreseeable electrochromic window devices was generated. The issue of reflective versus absorbing electrochromics was explored. This data was used in the DOE 2.1 building energy model to calculate the expected energy savings compared to conventional glazings. The effects of several different control strategies were tested. Significant energy and peak electric demand benefits were obtained for some electrochromic types. Use of predictive control algorithms to optimize cooling control may result in greater energy savings. Initial economic results considering annual savings, cooling equipment cost savings, and electrochromic window costs are presented. Calculations of thermal and visual comfort show additional benefits from electrochromics but more work is needed to quantify their importance. The design freedom and aesthetic possibilities of these dynamic glazings should provide additional market benefits, but their impact is difficult to assess at this time. Ultimately, a full assessment of the market viability of electrochromics must consider the impacts of all of these issues.

Selkowitz, S.E.; Rubin, M.; Lee, E.S.; Sullivan, R.; Finlayson, E.; Hopkins, D.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases Program - Electricity Factors  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Voluntary Reporting Program > Coefficients Voluntary Reporting Program > Coefficients Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases Program (Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases Program Fuel Carbon Dioxide Emission Coefficients) Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases Program Fuel Emission Coefficients Table 1: Carbon Dioxide Emission Factors for Stationary Combustion Table 2: Carbon Dioxide Emission Factors for Transportation Fuels Table 3: Generic Methane and Nitrous Oxide Emission Factors for Stationary Fuel Combustion Table 4: Specific Methane and Nitrous Oxide Emission Factors for Biogenic Fuel Sources Table 5: Methane and Nitrous Oxide Emissions Factors for Highway Vehicles Table 6: Methane and Nitrous Oxide Emission Factors for Alternative Fuel Vehicles Table 7: Methane and Nitrous Oxide Emission Factors for Non-Highway Mobile Combustion

255

Development of the Electricity Carbon Emission Factors for Russia | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

the Electricity Carbon Emission Factors for Russia the Electricity Carbon Emission Factors for Russia Jump to: navigation, search Name Development of the Electricity Carbon Emission Factors for Russia Agency/Company /Organization European Bank for Reconstruction and Development Sector Energy Focus Area Renewable Energy Topics GHG inventory Resource Type Publications Website http://www.lahmeyer.de/fileadm Country Russia Eastern Europe References Development of the Electricity Carbon Emission Factors for Russia[1] References ↑ "Development of the Electricity Carbon Emission Factors for Russia" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Development_of_the_Electricity_Carbon_Emission_Factors_for_Russia&oldid=383164" Category: Programs What links here Related changes Special pages

256

Dose factor entry and display tool for BNCT radiotherapy  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system for use in Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) radiotherapy planning where a biological distribution is calculated using a combination of conversion factors and a previously calculated physical distribution. Conversion factors are presented in a graphical spreadsheet so that a planner can easily view and modify the conversion factors. For radiotherapy in multi-component modalities, such as Fast-Neutron and BNCT, it is necessary to combine each conversion factor component to form an effective dose which is used in radiotherapy planning and evaluation. The Dose Factor Entry and Display System is designed to facilitate planner entry of appropriate conversion factors in a straightforward manner for each component. The effective isodose is then immediately computed and displayed over the appropriate background (e.g. digitized image).

Wessol, Daniel E. (Bozeman, MT); Wheeler, Floyd J. (Idaho Falls, ID); Cook, Jeremy L. (Greeley, CO)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Semiregular Factorization of Simple Graphs A. J. W. Hilton  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

]. A (d, d + 1)-graph is said to be semiregular. An (r, r + 1)-factorization of a graph is a decomposition of the graph into edge-disjoint (r, r + 1)-factors. We discuss here the state of knowledge about (r, r +1)-factorizations of d-regular graphs and of (d, d + 1)-graphs. For r, s 0, let (r, s) be the least integer

Wojciechowski, Jerzy

258

Factors Associated with Increasing Teacher Retention in Rural Schools.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This paper seeks to identify school-based factors associated with increasing teacher retention in rural public schools. Though there is a large body of research that… (more)

Rutenberg, David

259

Black Carbon Concentrations and Diesel Vehicle Emission Factors...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Black Carbon Concentrations and Diesel Vehicle Emission Factors Derived from Coefficient of Haze Measurements in California: 1967-2003 Title Black Carbon Concentrations and Diesel...

260

EIA highlights key factors in new energy and financial markets ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Yesterday, EIA launched a new web-based assessment highlighting key factors that can affect crude oil prices called "Energy and Financial Markets: What Drives Crude ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "breeze otherf factors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Heavy-to-light form factors on the light cone  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The light cone method provides a convenient non-perturbative tool to study the heavy-to-light form factors. We construct a light cone quark model utilizing the soft collinear effective theory. In the leading order of effective theory, the ten $B$ to light physical form factors are reduced to three universal form factors which can be calculated as overlaps of hadron light front wave functions in the light cone quark model. The numerical results show that the leading contribution is close to the results from other approaches. The $q^2$ dependence of the heavy-to-light form factors are also presented.

Cai-Dian Lu; Wei Wang; Zheng-Tao Wei

2007-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

262

Indoor Residential Chemical Emissions as Risk Factors for Children...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The identified risk factors include specific organic compounds such as formaldehyde, benzene, and phthalates, as well as indoor materials or finishes such as vinyl flooring,...

263

Field Derived Emission Factors For Formaldehyde and other ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Field Derived Emission Factors For Formaldehyde and other ... ORGANIC COMPOUNDS; PHENOL; PLASTICIZERS; ... of TMPB-DIB (a plasticizer found in vinyl . ...

264

DVD Production Process & Key Factors for Quality Discs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... wide market share for DVD +/- RW; #2 World-wide market share for CD ... Key factor - deep knowledge of forming thin metal film - optimization of ...

2006-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

265

Factors driving wind power development in the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

s Largest Purchase of Wind Power,” September 17, 2001.FACTORS DRIVING WIND POWER DEVELOPMENT IN THE UNITED STATESthe United States third in wind power capacity globally,

Bird, Lori A.; Parsons, Brian; Gagliano, Troy; Brown, Matthew H.; Wiser, Ryan H.; Bolinger, Mark

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

What are the major factors affecting natural gas prices? - FAQ ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

What are the major factors affecting natural gas prices? Natural gas prices are mainly a function of market supply and demand. Because there are ...

267

Factors affecting adoption of renewable and other electricity ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov Factors affecting adoption of renewable and other electricity generation technologies

268

Factors Affecting KM Implementation in the Chinese Community  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper reviews past research on KM to identify key factors affecting Chinese KM implementation. It begins with a chronological overview of 76 KM related publications, followed by two separate discussions of socio-cultural and non-socio-cultural factors ... Keywords: China, Chinese, KM Implementation, Knowledge Management

Yang Lin; Kimiz Dalkir

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Factors Associated with Photovoltaic System Costs (Topical Issues Brief)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A variety of factors can affect the cost of photovoltaic systems. This report analyses the relationship among such factors by using information entered into a voluntary registry of PV systems and performing regression analyses. The results showed statistically significant relationships between photovoltaic system cost and (a) grid connection, (b) installation year, (c) areas where the utility had entered into volume purchasing agreements.

Mortensen, J.

2001-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

270

The critical success factors of business process management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Although business process management ('BPM') is a popular concept, it has not yet been properly theoretically grounded. This leads to problems in identifying both generic and case-specific critical success factors of BPM programs. The paper proposes ... Keywords: Business process management, Contingency theory, Critical success factors, Dynamic capabilities, Task-technology fit

Peter Trkman

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Optimal filling factor of nanorod lenses for subwavelength imaging  

SciTech Connect

We analyze the effect of the filling factor on the imaging performance of metallic nanorod lenses. We observe that thicker nanorods allow lower reflection in the canalization regime and we find optimal values of the filling factor to achieve a transfer function with the characteristics of a perfect lens in a wide range of spatial frequencies.

Kosulnikov, Sergey Yu.; Yankovskaya, Elizaveta A. [Department of Photonics and Optoinformatics, St. Petersburg National Research University of Information Technologies, Mechanics and Optics, Kronverkskiy pr., 49, 197101 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Maslovski, Stanislav I. [Department of Electrical Engineering, Instituto de Telecomunicacoes, Universidade de Coimbra, Polo II, 3030-290 Coimbra (Portugal); Belov, Pavel A. [Department of Photonics and Optoinformatics, St. Petersburg National Research University of Information Technologies, Mechanics and Optics, Kronverkskiy pr., 49, 197101 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Queen Mary College, University of London, Mile End Road, London E1 4NS (United Kingdom); Kivshar, Yuri S. [Department of Photonics and Optoinformatics, St. Petersburg National Research University of Information Technologies, Mechanics and Optics, Kronverkskiy pr., 49, 197101 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); School of Electronic Engineering and Computer Science, Nonlinear Physics Centre, Australian National University, Canberra, Australian Capital Territory 0200 (Australia)

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

272

Identifying transcription factor targets using enhanced Bayesian classifier  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Finding transcription factors (TFs) to their target genes (TGs) is the first step to understand the transcriptional regulatory networks. Here we present a method which uses an enhanced Bayesian classifier to predict the TF-TG pairs in time-course expression ... Keywords: Bayesian classifier, Time-course expression data, Transcription factor targets

Dong He; Dao Zhou; Yanhong Zhou

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Agronomic and environmental factors influence weed composition and canola competitiveness  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Agronomic and environmental factors influence weed composition and canola competitiveness. C. 2006. Agronomic and environmental factors influence weed composition and canola competitiveness in southern Manitoba. Can. J. Plant Sci. 86: 591­599. Canola yield in Manitoba has reached a plateau in recent

Kenkel, Norm

274

The Determination of View-Factors in Urban Canyons  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An important aspect of longwave radiation exchange within urban canopies is the degree to which the sky is obscured by surrounding buildings, a concept which may be described by the sky view-factor (?s). Hitherto, expressions for sky view-factors ...

Glenn T. Johnson; Ian D. Watson

1984-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Artificial neural networks for electricity consumption forecasting considering climatic factors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This work develops Artificial Neural Networks (ANN) models applied to predict the consumption forecasting considering climatic factors. It is intended to verify the influence of climatic factors on the electricity consumption forecasting through the ... Keywords: artificial neural networks, electricity consumption forecasting

Francisco David Moya Chaves

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Predicting Missing Ratings in Recommender Systems: Adapted Factorization Approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The paper presents a factorization-based approach to make predictions in recommender systems. These systems are widely used in electronic commerce to help customers find products according to their preferences. Taking into account the customer's ratings ... Keywords: Factorization Technique, Recommender Systems, Singular Value Decomposition

Carme Julià; Angel Sappa; Felipe Lumbreras; Joan Serrat; Antonio López

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Using hardware vulnerability factors to enhance AVF analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fault tolerance is now a primary design constraint for all major microprocessors. One step in determining a processor's compliance to its failure rate target is measuring the Architectural Vulnerability Factor (AVF) of each on-chip structure. The AVF ... Keywords: architectural vulnerability factor, fault tolerance, reliability

Vilas Sridharan; David R. Kaeli

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Neutron Form Factor from Neutrino-Nucleus Coherent Elastic Scattering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We analyze the prospect of measuring the neutron form factor of a nucleus through the detection of neutrino-nucleus coherent elastic scattering. We predict numbers of events in a liquid noble nuclear recoil detector at a stopped pion neutrino source. We discuss the precision required to distinguish between different theoretical models for the form factor.

Philip S. Amanik; Gail C. McLaughlin

2007-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

279

NREL: Energy Analysis - Utility-Scale Energy Technology Capacity Factors  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Utility-Scale Energy Technology Capacity Factors Utility-Scale Energy Technology Capacity Factors This chart indicates the range of recent capacity factor estimates for utility-scale renewable energy technologies. The dots indicate the average, and the vertical lines represent the range: Average +1 standard deviation and average -1 standard deviation. If you are seeking utility-scale technology cost and performance estimates, please visit the Transparent Cost Database website for NREL's information regarding vehicles, biofuels, and electricity generation. Capital Cost (September 2013 Update) Operations & Maintenance (September 2013 Update) Utility-Scale Capacity Factors Useful Life Land Use by System Technology LCOE Calculator Capacity factor for energy technologies. For more information, please download supporting data for energy technology costs.

280

Operational water consumption and withdrawal factors for electricity  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

4047 4047 Varnish cache server Browse Upload data GDR 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation: XID: 2142254047 Varnish cache server Operational water consumption and withdrawal factors for electricity generating technologies Dataset Summary Description This dataset is from the report Operational water consumption and withdrawal factors for electricity generating technologies: a review of existing literature (J. Macknick, R. Newmark, G. Heath and K.C. Hallett) and provides estimates of operational water withdrawal and water consumption factors for electricity generating technologies in the United States. Estimates of water factors were collected from published primary literature and were not modified except for unit conversions. The water factors presented may be useful in modeling and policy analyses where reliable power plant level data are not available.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "breeze otherf factors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Analysis of IFR driver fuel hot channel factors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Thermal-hydraulic uncertainty factors for Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) driver fuels have been determined based primarily on the database obtained from the predecessor fuels used in the IFR prototype, Experimental Breeder Reactor II. The uncertainty factors were applied to the channel factors (HCFs) analyses to obtain separate overall HCFs for fuel and cladding for steady-state analyses. A ``semistatistical horizontal method`` was used in the HCFs analyses. The uncertainty factor of the fuel thermal conductivity dominates the effects considered in the HCFs analysis; the uncertainty in fuel thermal conductivity will be reduced as more data are obtained to expand the currently limited database for the IFR ternary metal fuel (U-20Pu-10Zr). A set of uncertainty factors to be used for transient analyses has also been derived.

Ku, J.Y.; Chang, L.K.; Mohr, D.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

An analysis of factors contributing to train-involved crashes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A railroad-highway grade crossing is a unique intersection in that two different modes of transportation (trains and vehicles) use the same physical space. Many factors can contribute to collisions between trains and vehicles at these crossings. Crashes involving trains and vehicles are a significant safety problem in Texas each year. This research attempts to identify and analyze contributing factors to train-involved accidents in Texas. Three years of accident data (1328 total accidents) were analyzed for the contributing factors. The contributing factors were classified into four categories: railroad factors, environmental factors, roadway factors, and driver/passenger factors. The accident data was analyzed using one and two-way classification tables. The frequency distributions for the accidents included in this study were compared to the corresponding frequency distributions for national or statewide accidents using a Chi-Square statistical test. Finally, research hypotheses were formulated based on a literature review of driver behavior and previous accident studies and then tested using population proportion tests. The results of the identification of contributing factors showed that tried to beat train, impaired driver, stuck, stalled, or stopped on tracks, driving around gates, and driver inattention were the five most frequent primary contributing factors. The Chi-Square comparison of frequency distributions for accidents included in this study showed that the protection type, time of day, light conditions, driver race and sex, accident severity, location type, and roadway class were statistically different compared to the corresponding national and statewide frequency distributions. The analysis of the research hypotheses showed that hypotheses 3, 8, and 10 were supported according to the population proportion testing.

Cooner, Scott Allen

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Lifestyle Factors in U.S. Residential Electricity Consumption  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A multivariate statistical approach to lifestyle analysis of residential electricity consumption is described and illustrated. Factor analysis of selected variables from the 2005 U.S. Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) identified five lifestyle factors reflecting social and behavioral choices associated with air conditioning, laundry usage, personal computer usage, climate zone of residence, and TV use. These factors were also estimated for 2001 RECS data. Multiple regression analysis using the lifestyle factors yields solutions accounting for approximately 40% of the variance in electricity consumption for both years. By adding the associated household and market characteristics of income, local electricity price and access to natural gas, variance accounted for is increased to approximately 54%. Income contributed only {approx}1% unique variance to the 2005 and 2001 models, indicating that lifestyle factors reflecting social and behavioral choices better account for consumption differences than income. This was not surprising given the 4-fold range of energy use at differing income levels. Geographic segmentation of factor scores is illustrated, and shows distinct clusters of consumption and lifestyle factors, particularly in suburban locations. The implications for tailored policy and planning interventions are discussed in relation to lifestyle issues.

Sanquist, Thomas F.; Orr, Heather M.; Shui, Bin; Bittner, Alvah C.

2012-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

284

Using partial safety factors in wind turbine design and testing  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper describes the relationship between wind turbine design and testing in terms of the certification process. An overview of the current status of international certification is given along with a description of limit-state design basics. Wind turbine rotor blades are used to illustrate the principles discussed. These concepts are related to both International Electrotechnical Commission and Germanischer Lloyd design standards, and are covered using schematic representations of statistical load and material strength distributions. Wherever possible, interpretations of the partial safety factors are given with descriptions of their intended meaning. Under some circumstances, the authors` interpretations may be subjective. Next, the test-load factors are described in concept and then related to the design factors. Using technical arguments, it is shown that some of the design factors for both load and materials must be used in the test loading, but some should not be used. In addition, some test factors not used in the design may be necessary for an accurate test of the design. The results show that if the design assumptions do not clearly state the effects and uncertainties that are covered by the design`s partial safety factors, outside parties such as test labs or certification agencies could impose their own meaning on these factors.

Musial, W.D.; Butterfield, C.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Lyndon words with a fixed standard right factor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Given a totally ordered alphabet A, a Lyndon word is a word that is strictly smaller, for the lexicographical order, than any of its conjugates (i.e., all words obtained by a circular permutation on the letters). Lyndon words were introduced by Lyndon [6] under the name of “standard lexicographic sequences ” in order to give a base for the free Lie algebra over A. The set of Lyndon words is denoted by L. For instance, with a binary alphabet A = {a, b}, the first Lyndon words until length five are L = {a, b,ab, aab, abb, aaab, aabb, abbb, aaaab, aaabb, aabab, aabbb, ababb, abbbb,...}. Note that a non-empty word is a Lyndon word if and only if it is strictly smaller than any of its proper suffixes. The standard (suffix) factorization of Lyndon words plays a central role in this framework (see [5], [7], [8]). For w ? L \\ A a Lyndon word not reduced to a letter, the pair (u, v) of Lyndon words such that w = uv and v of maximal length is called the standard factorization. The words u and v are called the left factor and right factor of the standard factorization. Equivalently, the right factor v of the standard factorization of a Lyndon word w which is not reduced to a letter can be defined as the smallest proper suffix of w for the lexicographical order. For instance we have the following standard factorizations: aaabaab = aaab · aab aaababb = a · aababb aabaabb = aab · aabb. One can then associate to a Lyndon word w a binary tree T(w) called its Lyndon tree recursively built in the following way: – if w is a letter, then T(w) is a leaf labeled by w, – otherwise T(w) is an internal node having T(u) and T(v) as children where u · v is the standard factorization of w.

Frédérique Bassino; Julien Clément; Cyril Nicaud

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Conditioning analysis of incomplete Cholesky factorizations with orthogonal dropping  

SciTech Connect

The analysis of preconditioners based on incomplete Cholesky factorization in which the neglected (dropped) components are orthogonal to the approximations being kept is presented. General estimate for the condition number of the preconditioned system is given which only depends on the accuracy of individual approximations. The estimate is further improved if, for instance, only the newly computed rows of the factor are modified during each approximation step. In this latter case it is further shown to be sharp. The analysis is illustrated with some existing factorizations in the context of discretized elliptic partial differential equations.

Napov, Artem

2012-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

287

Direct capture astrophysical S factors at low energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate the energy dependence of the astrophysical S factors for the reactions 7Be(p,gamma)8B, the primary source of high-energy solar neutrinos in the solar pp chain, and 16O(p,gamma)17F, an important reaction in the CNO cycle. Both of these reactions have predicted S factors which rise at low energies; we find the source of this behavior to be a pole in the S factor at a center-of-mass energy E = -E_B, the point where the energy of the emitted photon vanishes. The pole arises from a divergence of the radial integrals.

B. K. Jennings; S. Karataglidis; T. D. Shoppa

1998-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

288

Standardized method for developing stress intensification factors for piping components  

SciTech Connect

At present, neither the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code for Nuclear Power Plant Components (ASME B PV Code Section 3) nor the B31 codes for industrial piping provide a methodology for experimental determination of i-factors. This report examines the basis for the present Code fatigue rules and how the original i-factors were determined. It then provides a set of proposed additions to the code, Appendix 2, to guide users in developing i-factors. Such an appendix, with minor modification, can also be used by the B31 industrial piping codes.

Rodabaugh, E.C. (Rodabaugh (E.C.), Dublin, OH (United States))

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

An improved charge pump power factor correction electronic ballast  

SciTech Connect

An improved charge pump power factor correction (CPPFC) electronic ballast using the charge pump concept is proposed in this paper. Circuit derivation, principle of operation, and the conditions for achieving unity power factor are discussed. The proposed electronic ballast is implemented and tested with two 40-W fluorescent lamps. It is shown that 84% of overall efficiency and 1.6 of crest factor can be achieved with 200-V line input voltage. The measured line input current harmonics satisfy IEC 1000-3-2 Class C requirements. The lamp power variation range is automatically limited within {+-}15% for {+-}10% line input voltage variation without feedback control.

Qian, J.; Lee, F.C.; Yamauchi, T.

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Low dose ionizing radiation induces tumor growth promoting factors in  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ionizing radiation induces tumor growth promoting factors in ionizing radiation induces tumor growth promoting factors in stress-induced premature senescent fibroblasts David Boothman University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas Abstract Recent evidence suggest that the causes of cancer development are not limited to mutations within cancer cells, but also involve in alterations of cancer microenvironment. Senescent cells are irreversibly growth arrested, but remain metabolically active. Senescent cells, especially senescent fibroblasts in the stroma may provide a beneficial environment for tumor growth through secretion of certain factors. Accumulation of senescent cells in the stroma of patients repeatedly exposed to low doses of IR or low dose rates of IR, could be an important factor, causing alteration of the microenvironment that ultimately benefits tumor

291

New England Wind Forum: Determining Factors Influencing Wind Economics in  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Determining Factors Influencing Wind Economics in New England Determining Factors Influencing Wind Economics in New England Figure 1: Installed Wind Project Costs by Region: 2003 through 2006 Projects Only New England's high land values, smaller land parcels, varied terrain, and more moderate wind speeds make for projects of smaller scale and higher unit cost than those likely to be built in Texas or the Great Plains states. Click on the graph to view a larger version. New England's high land values, smaller land parcels, varied terrain, and more moderate wind speeds make for projects of smaller scale and higher unit cost than those likely to be built in Texas or the Great Plains states. View a larger version of the graph. Figure 2: 2006 Project Capacity Factors by Region: 2002 through 2005 Projects Only The chart depicts project capacity factor by region. Click on the graph to view a larger version.

292

Analysis Of Factors Affecting Natural Source Slf Electromagnetic  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Factors Affecting Natural Source Slf Electromagnetic Factors Affecting Natural Source Slf Electromagnetic Exploration At Geothermal Wells Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Analysis Of Factors Affecting Natural Source Slf Electromagnetic Exploration At Geothermal Wells Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: The Super Low Frequency (SLF) electromagnetic exploration was performed by using a nature source SLF electromagnetic detector at two geothermal wells in Peking University. The data of the SLF electromagnetic exploration at well JR-119 and JR-168 were obtained with the observation of continued five days and four times per day at well JR-119 and of one day at well JR-168. Based on these data, the influencing factors of the SI-F electromagnetic exploration were analyzed, which included the relationship

293

Field Derived Emission Factors For Formaldehyde and other Volatile Organic  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Field Derived Emission Factors For Formaldehyde and other Volatile Organic Field Derived Emission Factors For Formaldehyde and other Volatile Organic Compounds in FEMA Temporary Housing Units Title Field Derived Emission Factors For Formaldehyde and other Volatile Organic Compounds in FEMA Temporary Housing Units Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-4083E Year of Publication 2010 Authors Parthasarathy, Srinandini, Randy L. Maddalena, Marion L. Russell, and Michael G. Apte Publisher Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory City Berkeley Abstract Sixteen previously occupied temporary housing units (THUs) were studied to assess emissions of volatile organic compounds. The whole trailer emission factors were evaluated for 36 VOCs including formaldehyde. Indoor sampling was carried out in the THUs located in Purvis staging yard in Mississippi, USA. Indoor temperature and relative humidity (RH) were also measured in all the trailers during sampling. Indoor temperatures were varied (increased or decreased) in a selection of THUs using the

294

Hourly Energy Emission Factors for Electricity Generation in the United  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hourly Energy Emission Factors for Electricity Generation in the United Hourly Energy Emission Factors for Electricity Generation in the United States Dataset Summary Description Emissions from energy use in buildings are usually estimated on an annual basis using annual average multipliers. Using annual numbers provides a reasonable estimation of emissions, but it provides no indication of the temporal nature of the emissions. Therefore, there is no way of understanding the impact on emissions from load shifting and peak shaving technologies such as thermal energy storage, on-site renewable energy, and demand control. This project utilized GridViewTM, an electric grid dispatch software package, to estimate hourly emission factors for all of the eGRID subregions in the continental United States. These factors took into account electricity imports and exports

295

Factors Impacting Gasoline Prices and Areas for Further Study  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Factors Impacting Gasoline Prices and Areas for Further Study Factors Impacting Gasoline Prices and Areas for Further Study 8/10/01 Click here to start Table of Contents Factors Impacting Gasoline Prices and Areas for Further Study Different Factors Impact Different Aspects of Gasoline Price Correlation of Price to Inventory Levels Crude Prices Strongly Related to OECD.Crude & Product Inventories Gasoline Prices Also Influenced by Regional Gasoline Product Markets Tight Product Balance Pushes Up Product Spread (Spot Product - Crude Price) Retail Price Changes Lag Spot Prices Cumulative Gasoline Price Pass-through Illustration of How Lag Effect Dampens and Slows Retail Price Changes from Wholesale Recent Weekly Retail Price Changes Have Been as Expected Summary: Most Gasoline Price Movement Can Be Explained As Rational Market Behavior Author: Joanne Shore

296

Limiting Factors for Convective Cloud Top Height in the Tropics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Limiting Factors for Convective Cloud Top Limiting Factors for Convective Cloud Top Height in the Tropics M. P. Jensen and A. D. Del Genio National Aeronautics and Space Administration Goddard Institute for Space Studies Columbia University New York, New York Introduction Populations of tropical convective clouds are mainly comprised of three types: shallow trade cumulus, mid-level cumulus congestus and deep convective clouds (Johnson et al. 1999). Each of these cloud types has different impacts on the local radiation and water budgets. For climate model applications it is therefore important to understand the factors which determine the type of convective cloud that will occur. In this study, we concentrate on describing the factors that limit the cloud-top heights of mid-

297

Energy Factors, Leasing Structure and the Market Price of Office...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Factors, Leasing Structure and the Market Price of Office Buildings in the U.S. Speaker(s): Nancy Wallace Date: June 15, 2011 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar HostPoint...

298

Separability and ground state factorization in quantum spin systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate the existence and the properties of fully separable (fully factorized) ground states in quantum spin systems. Exploiting techniques of quantum information and entanglement theory we extend a recently introduced method and construct a general, self-contained theory of ground state factorization in frustration-free quantum spin models defined on lattices in any spatial dimension and for interactions of arbitrary range. We show that, quite generally, non exactly solvable models in external field admit exact, fully factorized ground state solutions. Unentangled ground states occur at finite values of the Hamiltonian parameters satisfying well defined balancing conditions between external fields and interaction strengths. These conditions are analytically determined together with the type of magnetic orderings compatible with factorization and the corresponding values of the fundamental observables such as energy and magnetization. The method is applied to a series of examples of increasing complexi...

Giampaolo, S M; Illuminati, F

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Bounding the Greybody Factors for Non-rotating Black Holes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Semiclassical black holes emit radiation called Hawking radiation. Such radiation, as seen by an asymptotic observer far outside the black hole, differs from original radiation near the horizon of the black hole by a redshift factor and the so-called "greybody factor". In this paper, we concentrate on the greybody factor-various bounds for the greybody factors of non-rotating black holes are obtained, concentrating on charged Reissner-Nordstrom and Reissner-Nordstrom-de Sitter black holes. These bounds can be derived by using a 2x2 transfer matrix formalism. It is found that the charges of black holes act as efficient barriers. Furthermore, adding extra dimensions to spacetime can shield Hawking radiation. Finally, the cosmological constant can increase the emission rate of Hawking radiation.

Tritos Ngampitipan; Petarpa Boonserm

2012-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

300

Assessing phylogenetic motif models for predicting transcription factor binding sites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Motivation: A variety of algorithms have been developed to predict transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs) within the genome by exploiting the evolutionary information implicit in multiple alignments of the genomes of related species. One such ...

John Hawkins; Charles Grant; William Stafford Noble; Timothy L. Bailey

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "breeze otherf factors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Hourly Energy Emission Factors for Electricity Generation in...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hourly Energy Emission Factors for Electricity Generation in the United States

Emissions from energy use in buildings are usually estimated on an annual...

302

Factors influencing German private equity investment in US real estate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis identifies and ranks in order of importance the key factors influencing high net-worth German investors' decisions about US real estate private equity investments. Through research and in-depth interviews with ...

Paelmo, Kay L. (Kay Lee), 1977-

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Real-Time Sky-View Factor Calculation and Approximation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Previously, the acquisition of sky-view factor data for climate studies has been time consuming and dependent on postprocessing. However, advances in technology now mean that techniques using fish-eye imagery can be algorithmically processed in ...

L. Chapman; J. E. Thornes

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

A Parameterization of Broadband Conversion Factors for METEOSAT Visible Radiances  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The conversion of radiances measured by the METEOSAT visible channel into broadband radiances can be performed as long as the appropriate conversion factors are known. A simple model allowing a spectral description of the optical properties of ...

J. Stum; B. Pinty; D. Ramond

1985-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Factors for the Simulation of Convectively Coupled Kelvin Waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study investigates the major factors for the realistic simulation of convectively coupled Kelvin waves (CCKWs) using the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) Climate Forecast System (CFS) models. CFS simulations employing ...

Kyong-Hwan Seo; Jin-Ho Choi; Sang-Dae Han

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Advanced Methods for Characterizing the Immersion Factor of Irradiance Sensors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two new immersion factor methods are evaluated by comparing them with the so-called traditional (or incremental) method. For the first method, the optical measurements taken at discrete water depths are substituted by continuous profiles created ...

Stanford B. Hooker; Giuseppe Zibordi

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Sequence analysis of chromatin immunoprecipitation data for factors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) experiments allow the location of transcription factors to be determined across the genome. Subsequent analysis of the sequences of the identified regions allows binding to be localized ...

MacIsaac, Kenzie Daniel

308

A Computer Program for Calculating Tetroon Inflation-Factor Nomographs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A slow but steady increase in the use of tetroons for tracing atmospheric air trajectories has prompted the development of an automatic method for calculating accurate tetroon inflation factors to float tetroons at desired elevations. The ...

Walter H. Hoecker

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Factors Influencing Skill Improvements in the ECMWF Forecasting System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the past 30 years the skill in ECMWF numerical forecasts has steadily improved. There are three major contributing factors: 1) improvements in the forecast model, 2) improvements in the data assimilation, and 3) the increased number of ...

Linus Magnusson; Erland Källén

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Factors Affecting Heat Transport in an Ocean General Circulation Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A global ocean general circulation model with idealized geometry and coupled to a simple representation of atmospheric energy fluxes is used to investigate which physical factors determine meridional heat transport. A particular focus is on ...

Igor Kamenkovich; Jochem Marotzke; Peter H. Stone

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Factors Controlling ERBE Longwave Clear Sky and Cloud Forcing Fluxes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The factors controlling the Earth Radiation Budget satellite (ERBS) longwave clear sky and cloud-forcing fluxes are investigated using statistical analyses of the ERBS fluxes with International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) cloud ...

Bryan C. Weare

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Factors Governing the Total Rainfall Yield from Continental Convective Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Several important factors that govern the total rainfall from continental convective clouds were investigated by tracking thousands of convective cells in Israel and South Africa. The rainfall volume yield (Rvol) of the individual cells that ...

Daniel Rosenfeld; Abraham Gagin

1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Factor estimation using MCMC-based Kalman filter methods  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An exact MCMC-based solution for the Kalman filter with Markov switching and GARCH components is proposed. To motivate the solution, an international equity market model incorporating common Markovian regimes and GARCH residuals in a persistent factor ...

Sarantis Tsiaplias

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

R&D Activity Investments and Macroeconomic Determinant Factors.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Investments in R&D activities are essential to firms. Decisions to increase or decrease R&D investments may rely according to changes in macroeconomic factors. The… (more)

Gardell, Pierre

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Atmospheric Turbidity Analyzed by Means of Standardized Linke's Turbidity Factor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The concept of standardized Linke's turbidity factor TLAM2 allows the conversion of the usual TL values, which exhibit virtual diurnal variations into new ones, which are strictly representative of the atmospheric turbidity caused by both water ...

J. C. Grenier; A. De La Casinière; T. Cabot

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Factors Controlling The Geochemical Evolution Of Fumarolic Encrustations,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Controlling The Geochemical Evolution Of Fumarolic Encrustations, Controlling The Geochemical Evolution Of Fumarolic Encrustations, Valley Of Ten Thousand Smokes, Alaska Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Factors Controlling The Geochemical Evolution Of Fumarolic Encrustations, Valley Of Ten Thousand Smokes, Alaska Details Activities (3) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Factor and canonical correlation analysis of geochemical data from eight fossil fumaroles suggest that six major factors controlled the formation and evolution of fumarolic encrustations on the 1912 ash-flow sheet in the Valley of Ten Thousand Smokes (VTTS). The six-factor solution model explains a large proportion (low of 74% for Ni to high of 99% for Si) of the individual element data variance. Although the primary fumarolic

317

Theory of ground state factorization in quantum cooperative systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We introduce a general analytic approach to the study of factorization points and factorized ground states in quantum cooperative systems. The method allows to determine rigorously existence, location, and exact form of separable ground states in a large variety of, generally non-exactly solvable, spin models belonging to different universality classes. The theory applies to translationally invariant systems, irrespective of spatial dimensionality, and for spin-spin interactions of arbitrary range.

S. M. Giampaolo; G. Adesso; F. Illuminati

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Theory of ground state factorization in quantum cooperative systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We introduce a general analytic approach to the study of factorization points and factorized ground states in quantum cooperative systems. The method allows to determine rigorously existence, location, and exact form of separable ground states in a large variety of, generally non-exactly solvable, spin models belonging to different universality classes. The theory applies to translationally invariant systems, irrespective of spatial dimensionality, and for spin-spin interactions of arbitrary range.

Giampaolo, S M; Illuminati, F

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Factorizations of Cunningham numbers with bases 13 to 99  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This Report updates the tables of factorizations of a^n +- 1 for 13 June 1992) and updated in CWI Report NM-R9419 (Update 1, September 1994) and CWI Report NM-R9609 (Update 2, March 1996). A total of 951 new entries in the tables are given here. The factorizations are now complete for n < 76, and there are no composite cofactors smaller than 10^102.

Brent, Richard P; Riele, Herman J J te

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Charm and bottom hadronic form factors with QCD sum rules  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a brief review of some calculations of form factors and coupling constants in vertices with charm and bottom mesons in the framework of QCD sum rules. We first discuss the motivation for this work, describing possible applications of these form factors to charm and bottom decays processes. We first make a summarize of the QCD sum rules method. We give special attention to the uncertainties of the method introducing by the intrinsic variation of the parameters. Finally we conclude.

Bracco, M. E. [Faculdade de Tecnologia, Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Rod. Presidente Dutra Km 298, Polo Industrial, 27537-000, Resende, RJ (Brazil); Rodrigues, B. O.; Cerqueira, A. Jr. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Rua Sao Francisco Xavier 524, 20550-900, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

2013-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "breeze otherf factors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Bounds on Heavy-to-Heavy Baryonic Form Factors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Upper and lower bounds are established on the Lambda_b -> Lambda_c semileptonic decay form factors by utilizing inclusive heavy-quark-effective-theory sum rules. These bounds are calculated to leading order in Lambda_QCD/m_Q and alpha_s. The O(alpha_s^2 beta_0) corrections to the bounds at zero recoil are also presented. Several form factor models used in the literature are compared with our bounds.

Cheng-Wei Chiang

1999-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

322

Bounds on Heavy-to-Heavy Baryonic Form Factors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Upper and lower bounds are established on the Lambda_b -> Lambda_c semileptonic decay form factors by utilizing inclusive heavy-quark-effective-theory sum rules. These bounds are calculated to leading order in Lambda_QCD/m_Q and alpha_s. The O(alpha_s^2 beta_0) corrections to the bounds at zero recoil are also presented. Several form factor models used in the literature are compared with our bounds.

Chiang, C W

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Human factors aspects of advanced instrumentation in the nuclear industry  

SciTech Connect

An important consideration in regards to the use of advanced instrumentation in the nuclear industry is the interface between the instrumentation system and the human. A survey, oriented towards identifying the human factors aspects of digital instrumentation, was conducted at a number of United States (US) and Canadian nuclear vendors and utilities. Human factors issues, subsumed under the categories of computer-generated displays, controls, organizational support, training, and related topics were identified. 20 refs., 2 tabs.

Carter, R.J.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Measurement of Black Carbon and Particle Number Emission Factors from  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Measurement of Black Carbon and Particle Number Emission Factors from Measurement of Black Carbon and Particle Number Emission Factors from Individual Heavy-Duty Trucks Title Measurement of Black Carbon and Particle Number Emission Factors from Individual Heavy-Duty Trucks Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2009 Authors Ban-Weiss, George, Melissa M. Lunden, Thomas W. Kirchstetter, and Robert A. Harley Journal Environmental Science and Technology Abstract Emission factors for black carbon (BC) and particle number (PN) were measured from 226 individual heavy-duty (HD) diesel-fueled trucks driving through a 1 km-long California highway tunnel in August 2006. Emission factors were based on concurrent increases in BC, PN, and COB2B concentrations (measured at 1 Hz) that corresponded to the passage of individual HD trucks. The distributions of BC and PN emission factors from individual HD trucks are skewed, meaning that a large fraction of pollution comes from a small fraction of the in-use vehicle fleet. The highest-emitting 10% of trucks were

325

HYPERPERFECT NUMBERS WITH FIVE AND SIX DIFFERENT PRIME FACTORS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A natural number N is hyperperfect if there exists an integer k such that N ?1 = k[?(N)? N ? 1], where ?(N) is the sum of the positive divisors of N. The classical perfect numbers are hyperperfect numbers corresponding to k = 1. In this paper we exhibit several hyperperfect numbers with five different prime factors and the first known hyperperfect number with six different prime factors. A natural number N is said to be hyperperfect if there exists an integer k such that N ? 1 = k[?(N) ? N ? 1], where ?(N) is the sum of the positive divisors of N. The ordinary perfect numbers, for which ?(N) = 2 · N, correspond to the case where k = 1. Hyperperfect numbers have been studied by Minoli [2], [3], [4], Bear [2], te Riele [6], [7], [8], McCranie, [1], and Nash [5]. Several examples have been found of hyperperfect numbers with two, three and four different prime factors and one such number with five different prime factors was discovered be te Riele [8]. In this paper we include some new hyperperfect numbers with five different prime factors and the first known example with six different prime factors as well. These numbers were

Mariano Garcia

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

November 2010CAPACITY FACTOR RISK AT NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We develop a model of the dynamic structure of capacity factor risk. It incorporates the risk that the capacity factor may vary widely from year-to-year, and also the risk that the reactor may be permanently shutdown prior to the end of its anticipated useful life. We then fit the parameters of the model to the IAEA’s PRIS dataset of historical capacity factors on reactors across the globe. The estimated capacity factor risk is greatest in the first year of operation. It then quickly declines over the next couple of years, after which it is approximately constant. Whether risk is constant or increasing in later years depends significantly on the probability of a premature permanent shutdown of the reactor. Because these should be very rare events, the probability is difficult to estimate reliably from the small historical sample of observations. Our base case is parameterized with a conservatively low probability of a premature permanent shutdown which yields the approximately constant variance. Our model, combined with the global historical dataset, also yields relatively low estimates for the expected level of the capacity factor through the life of the plant. Our base case estimate is approximately 74%. Focusing on alternative subsets of the data raises the estimated mean capacity factor marginally, but not significantly, unless the sample chosen is restricted to selected countries over select years. This emphasizes the need for judgment in exploiting the historical data to project future probabilities.

Yangbo Du; John E. Parsons; Yangbo Du; John E. Parsons

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Table 2.2 Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 2002  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 2002;" 2 Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ",,,,,,,,,"RSE" "NAICS"," "," ","Residual","Distillate","Natural","LPG and",,"Coke"," ","Row" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Total","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(e)","Factors"

328

" Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" 2 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," "," " " "," ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal",,"RSE" "NAICS"," "," ","Net","Residual","and","Natural ","LPG and","(excluding Coal"," ","Row" "Code(a)","End Use","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coke and Breeze)","Other(f)","Factors"

329

" Row: NAICS Codes (3-Digit Only); Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 1998;" 2. Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 1998;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes (3-Digit Only); Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ",,,,,,,,,"RSE" "NAICS"," "," ","Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke"," ","Row" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Total","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","Natural Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(e)","Factors"

330

"Table A37. Total Expenditures for Purchased Energy Sources by Census Region,"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7. Total Expenditures for Purchased Energy Sources by Census Region," 7. Total Expenditures for Purchased Energy Sources by Census Region," " Census Division, and Economic Characteristics of the Establishment, 1994" " (Estimates in Million Dollars)" " "," "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," ","RSE" " "," "," ","Residual","Distillate","Natural"," "," ","Coke"," ","Row" "Economic Characteristics(a)","Total","Electricity","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","Gas(c)","LPG","Coal","and Breeze","Other(d)","Factors"

331

" Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 1998;" 2. End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 1998;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," "," " " ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal",,"RSE" " "," ","Net","Residual","and",,"LPG and","(excluding Coal"," ","Row" "End Use","Total","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","Natural Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coke and Breeze)","Other(e)","Factors"

332

Table A11. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generatio  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1" 1" " (Estimates in Btu or Physical Units)" ,,,,"Distillate",,,"Coal" ,,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"(excluding" ,,"Net","Residual","and Diesel",,,"Coal Coke",,"RSE" ,"Total","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Fuel(b)","Natural Gas(c)","LPG","and Breeze)","Other(d)","Row" "End-Use Categories","(trillion Btu)","(million kWh)","(1000 bbls)","(1000 bbls)","(billion cu ft)","(1000 bbls)","(1000 short tons)","(trillion Btu)","Factors" ,,,,,,,,,,, ,"Total United States"

333

" Row: End Uses;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" 8 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," " " ","Net Demand",,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal","RSE" " ","for ","Residual","and","Natural ","LPG and","(excluding Coal","Row" "End Use","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coke and Breeze)","Factors"

334

" Energy Sources by Industry Group, Selected Industries, and Selected"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5. Capability to Switch from Distillate Fuel Oil to Alternative" 5. Capability to Switch from Distillate Fuel Oil to Alternative" " Energy Sources by Industry Group, Selected Industries, and Selected" " Characteristics, 1991" " (Estimates in Thousand Barrels)" ,," Distillate Fuel Oil ",,," Alternative Types of Energy(b)" ,,"-","-","-------------","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","RSE" ,,"Total"," ","Not","Electricity","Natural","Residual",,,"Coal Coke",,"Row" ,,"Consumed(c)","Switchable","Switchable","Receipts(d)","Gas","Fuel Oil","Coal","LPG","and Breeze","Other(e)","Factors"

335

" Sources by Industry Group, Selected Industries, and Selected Characteristics,"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6. Capability to Switch from Residual Fuel Oil to Alternative Energy" 6. Capability to Switch from Residual Fuel Oil to Alternative Energy" " Sources by Industry Group, Selected Industries, and Selected Characteristics," 1991 " (Estimates in Thousand Barrels)" ,," Residual Fuel Oil",,," Alternative Types of Energy(b)" ," ","-","-","-------------","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","RSE" ,,"Total",,"Not","Electricity","Natural","Distillate",,,"Coal Coke",,"Row" ,,"Consumed(c)","Switchable","Switchable","Receipts(d)","Gas","Fuel Oil","Coal","LPG","and Breeze","Other(e)","Factors"

336

Table 7.9 Expenditures for Purchased Energy Sources, 2002  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9 Expenditures for Purchased Energy Sources, 2002;" 9 Expenditures for Purchased Energy Sources, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Million U.S. Dollars." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ",,,,,,,,,,"RSE" "NAICS"," "," ",,"Residual","Distillate","Natural ","LPG and",,"Coke"," ","Row" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Total","Electricity","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(e)","Factors"

337

Table A38. Selected Combustible Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1" 1" " (Estimates in Btu or Physical Units)",,,,,,,"Coal" ,,,,"Distillate",,,"(excluding" ,,"Net Demand",,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal Coke" ,,"for","Residual","and","Natural Gas(d)",,"and Breeze)","RSE" "SIC",,"Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","(billion","LPG","(1000 short","Row" "Code(a)","End-Use Categories","(million kWh)","(1000 bbls)","(1000 bbls)","cu ft)","(1000 bbls)","tons)","Factors" "20-39","ALL INDUSTRY GROUPS"

338

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2002;" 2 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ",,,,,,,,,,"RSE" "NAICS"," "," ",,"Residual","Distillate","Natural","LPG and",,"Coke"," ","Row" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(f)","Factors"

339

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 Number of Establishments by Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2002;" 4 Number of Establishments by Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Establishment Counts." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ","Any",,,,,,,,,"RSE" "NAICS"," ","Energy",,"Residual","Distillate","Natural","LPG and",,"Coke"," ","Row" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Source(b)","Electricity(c)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(d)","Gas(e)","NGL(f)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(g)","Factors"

340

Table A36. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,,,,,,,,"Coal" ,,,,,,,,"Coal" " Part 1",,,,,,,,"(excluding" " (Estimates in Btu or Physical Units)",,,,,"Distillate",,,"Coal Coke" ,,,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"and" ,,,"Net","Residual","and Diesel","Natural Gas",,"Breeze)",,"RSE" "SIC",,"Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel","(billion","LPG","(1000 Short","Other","Row" "Code(a)","End-Use Categories","(trillion Btu)","(million kWh)","(1000 bbls)","(1000 bbls)","cu ft)","(1000 bbls)","tons)","(trillion Btu)","Factors",

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "breeze otherf factors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Table 2.3 Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 2002  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 2002;" 3 Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: Values of Shipments and Employment Sizes;" " Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," "," "," ",," "," ",," ","RSE" "Economic",,"Residual","Distillate","Natural ","LPG and",,"Coke and"," ","Row" "Characteristic(a)","Total","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coal","Breeze","Other(e)","Factors"

342

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 Number of Establishments by Fuel Consumption, 2002;" 4 Number of Establishments by Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Establishment Counts." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ","Any",,,,,,,,,"RSE" "NAICS"," ","Energy","Net","Residual","Distillate","Natural","LPG and",,"Coke"," ","Row" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Source(b)","Electricity(c)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(d)","Gas(e)","NGL(f)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(g)","Factors"

343

" Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" 6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," "," " " ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal",,"RSE" " "," ","Net","Residual","and","Natural ","LPG and","(excluding Coal"," ","Row" "End Use","Total","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coke and Breeze)","Other(e)","Factors"

344

" Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 1998;" 2. End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 1998;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," "," " " "," ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal",,"RSE" "NAICS"," "," ","Net","Residual","and",,"LPG and","(excluding Coal"," ","Row" "Code(a)","End Use","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","Natural Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coke and Breeze)","Other(f)","Factors"

345

Table A12. Selected Combustible Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Type and End Use," Type and End Use," " 1994: Part 1" " (Estimates in Btu or Physical Units)" ,,,,,,,"Coal" ,,,,"Distillate",,,"(excluding" ,,"Net Demand",,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal Coke" ,,"for","Residual","and","Natural Gas(d)",,"and Breeze)","RSE" "SIC",,"Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","(billion","LPG","(1000 short","Row" "Code(a)","End-Use Categories","(million kWh)","(1000 bbls)","(1000 bbls)","cu ft)","(1000 bbls)","tons)","Factors"

346

Table A67. Capability to Switch from Electricity to Alternative Energy Source  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7. Capability to Switch from Electricity to Alternative Energy Sources" 7. Capability to Switch from Electricity to Alternative Energy Sources" " by Industry Group, Selected Industries, and Selected Characteristics," " 1994: Part 1" " (Estimates in Million Kilowatthours)" ,,,"Electricity Receipts",,,," Alternative Types of Energy(b)" ,,,,,,,,,,"Coal Coke",,"RSE" "SIC"," ","Total"," ","Not","Natural","Distillate","Residual",,,"and",,"Row" "Code(a)","Industry Group and Industry","Receipts(c)","Switchable","Switchable","Gas","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil","Coal","LPG","Breeze","Other(d)","Factors"," "

347

"Table A36. Total Expenditures for Purchased Energy Sources by Census Region,"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6. Total Expenditures for Purchased Energy Sources by Census Region," 6. Total Expenditures for Purchased Energy Sources by Census Region," " Census Division, Industry Group, and Selected Industries, 1994" " (Estimates in Million Dollars)" ,,,,,,,,,,,"RSE" "SIC"," "," "," ","Residual","Distillate ","Natural"," "," ","Coke"," ","Row" "Code(a)","Industry Group and Industry","Total","Electricity","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","Gas(c)","LPG","Coal","and Breeze","Other(d)","Factors" ,,"Total United States"

348

" Sources by Industry Group, Selected Industries, and Selected Characteristics,"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4. Capability to Switch from Natural Gas to Alternative Energy" 4. Capability to Switch from Natural Gas to Alternative Energy" " Sources by Industry Group, Selected Industries, and Selected Characteristics," 1991 " (Estimates in Billion Cubic Feet)" ,," Natural Gas",,," Alternative Types of Energy(b)" ,,"-","-","-------------","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","RSE" ,,"Total"," ","Not","Electricity","Distillate","Residual",,,"Coal Coke",,"Row" ,,"Consumed(c)","Switchable","Switchable","Receipts(d)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil","Coal","LPG","and Breeze","Other(e)","Factors"

349

" Row: Selected SIC Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 1998;" 2. Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 1998;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: Selected SIC Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ",,,,,,,,,"RSE" "SIC"," "," ","Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke"," ","Row" "Code(a)","Major Group and Industry","Total","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","Natural Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(e)","Factors"

350

" Electricity Generation by Census Region, Industry Group, and Selected"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1" 1" " (Estimates in Btu or Physical Units)" " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ","Coke"," "," " " "," "," "," ","Residual","Distillate","Natural Gas(d)"," ","Coal","and Breeze"," ","RSE" "SIC"," ","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","(billion","LPG","(1000","(1000","Other(e)","Row" "Code(a)","Industry Groups and Industry","(trillion Btu)","(million kWh)","(1000 bbls)","(1000 bbls)","cu ft)","(1000 bbls)","short tons)","short tons)","(trillion Btu)","Factors"

351

Table E3.1. Fuel Consumption, 1998  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

E3.1. Fuel Consumption, 1998;" E3.1. Fuel Consumption, 1998;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: Values of Shipments and Employment Sizes;" " Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," ",," "," ",," "," ",," ","RSE" "Economic",,"Net","Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke and"," ","Row" "Characteristic(a)","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Natural Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coal","Breeze","Other(f)","Factors"

352

Table A4. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 " 1 " " (Estimates in Btu or Physical Units)" " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ","Coke"," "," " " "," "," ","Net","Residual","Distillate","Natural Gas(d)"," ","Coal","and Breeze"," ","RSE" "SIC"," ","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","(billion","LPG","(1000","(1000","Other(e)","Row" "Code(a)","Industry Groups and Industry","(trillion Btu)","(million kWh)","(1000 bbls)","(1000 bbls)","cu ft)","(1000 bbls)","short tons)","short tons)","(trillion Btu)","Factors"

353

Table A58. Capability to Switch from LPG to Alternative Energy Sources by  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8. Capability to Switch from LPG to Alternative Energy Sources by" 8. Capability to Switch from LPG to Alternative Energy Sources by" " Industry Group, Selected Industries, and Selected Characteristics, 1991" " (Estimates in Thousand Barrels)" ,," LPG",,," Alternative Types of Energy(b)" ,,"-","-","-------------","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","RSE" ,,"Total"," ","Not","Electricity",,,,,,,"Row" ,,"Consumed(b)","Switchable","Switchable","Receipts(d)","Gas","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil","Coal","and Breeze","Other(e)","Factors"

354

" Sources by Industry Group, Selected Industries, and Selected Characteristics,"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. Capability to Switch from Electricity to Alternative Energy" 3. Capability to Switch from Electricity to Alternative Energy" " Sources by Industry Group, Selected Industries, and Selected Characteristics," 1991 " (Estimates in Million Kilowatthours)" ,," Electricity Receipts",,," Alternative Types of Energy(b)" ,,"-","-","-----------","-","-","-","-","-","-","-" ,,,,,,,,,,"Coal",,"RSE" ,,"Total"," ","Not","Natural","Distillate","Residual",,,"Coke and",,"Row" ,,"Receipts(c)","Switchable","Switchable","Gas","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil","Coal","LPG","Breeze","Other(d)","Factors"," "

355

Table A37. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1",,,,,,,"Coal" 1",,,,,,,"Coal" " (Estimates in Btu or Physical Units)",,,,,,,"(excluding" ,,,,"Distillate",,,"Coal Coke" ,,"Net",,"Fuel Oil",,,"and" ,,"Electricity(a)","Residual","and Diesel","Natural Gas",,"Breeze)",,"RSE" ,"Total","(million","Fuel Oil","Fuel","(billion","LPG","(1000 short","Other","Row" "End-Use Categories","(trillion Btu)","kWh)","(1000 bbls)","(1000 bbls)","cu ft)","(1000 bbls)","tons)","(trillion Btu)","Factors"

356

" Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" 4 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," " " "," ","Net Demand",,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal","RSE" "NAICS"," ","for ","Residual","and","Natural ","LPG and","(excluding Coal","Row" "Code(a)","End Use","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coke and Breeze)","Factors"

357

Table 4.3 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2002  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2002;" 3 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: Values of Shipments and Employment Sizes;" " Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," ",," "," ",," "," ",," ","RSE" "Economic",,,"Residual","Distillate","Natural ","LPG and",,"Coke and"," ","Row" "Characteristic(a)","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coal","Breeze","Other(f)","Factors"

358

Separability and ground state factorization in quantum spin systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate the existence and the properties of fully separable (fully factorized) ground states in quantum spin systems. Exploiting techniques of quantum information and entanglement theory we extend a recently introduced method and construct a general, self-contained theory of ground state factorization in frustration free quantum spin models defined on lattices in any spatial dimension and for interactions of arbitrary range. We show that, quite generally, non exactly solvable translationally invariant models in presence of an external uniform magnetic field can admit exact, fully factorized ground state solutions. Unentangled ground states occur at finite values of the Hamiltonian parameters satisfying well defined balancing conditions between the applied field and the interaction strengths. These conditions are analytically determined together with the type of magnetic orderings compatible with factorization and the corresponding values of the fundamental observables such as energy and magnetization. The method is applied to a series of examples of increasing complexity, including translationally-invariant models with short, long, and infinite ranges of interaction, as well as systems with spatial anisotropies, in low and higher dimensions. We also illustrate how the general method, besides yielding a large series of novel exact results for complex models in any dimension, recovers, as particular cases, the results previously achieved on simple models in low dimensions exploiting direct methods based on factorized mean-field ansatz.

S. M. Giampaolo; G. Adesso; F. Illuminati

2009-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

359

Human factors evaluation of teletherapy: Literature review. Volume 5  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A series of human factors evaluations were undertaken to better understand the contributing factors to human error in the teletherapy environment. Teletherapy is a multidisciplinary methodology for treating cancerous tissue through selective exposure to an external beam of ionizing radiation. A team of human factors specialists, assisted by a panel of radiation oncologists, medical physicists, and radiation therapists, conducted site visits to radiation oncology departments at community hospitals, university centers, and free-standing clinics. A function and task analysis was performed initially to guide subsequent evaluations in the areas of workplace environment, system-user interfaces, procedures, training, and organizational practices. To further acquire an in-depth and up-to-date understanding of the practice of teletherapy in support of these evaluations, a systematic literature review was conducted. Factors that have a potential impact on the accuracy of treatment delivery were of primary concern. The present volume is the literature review. The volume starts with an overview of the multiphased nature of teletherapy, and then examines the requirement for precision, the increasing role of quality assurance, current conceptualizations of human error, and the role of system factors such as the workplace environment, user-system interfaces, procedures, training, and organizational practices.

Henriksen, K.; Kaye, R.D.; Jones, R. [Hughes Training, Inc., Falls Church, VA (United States); Morisseau, D.S.; Serig, D.L. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States). Div. of Systems Technology

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Property:Geothermal/LoadFactor | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

LoadFactor LoadFactor Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Number. Pages using the property "Geothermal/LoadFactor" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) 4 4 UR Guest Ranch Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility + 0.76 + A Ace Development Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility + 0.8 + Agua Calientes Trailer Park Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility + 0.29 + Alive Polarity's Murrietta Hot Spring Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility + 0.8 + Americulture Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility + 0.81 + Aq Dryers Agricultural Drying Low Temperature Geothermal Facility + 0.25 + Aqua Caliente County Park Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility + 0.68 +

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "breeze otherf factors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Indoor Residential Chemical Emissions as Risk Factors for Children's  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Indoor Residential Chemical Emissions as Risk Factors for Children's Indoor Residential Chemical Emissions as Risk Factors for Children's Respiratory Health Speaker(s): Mark Mendell Date: February 23, 2007 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Most research into the effects of residential indoor air exposures on asthma and allergies has focused on exposures to biologic allergens, moisture and mold, endotoxin, or combustion byproducts. A growing body of research suggests that chemical emissions from common indoor materials and finishes have adverse effects, including increased risk of asthma, allergies, and pulmonary infections. The identified risk factors include specific organic compounds such as formaldehyde, benzene, and phthalates, as well as indoor materials or finishes such as vinyl flooring, carpet, paint, and plastics. This presentation presents a brief review of studies

362

Development of the Electricity Carbon Emission Factors for Ukraine | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ukraine Ukraine Jump to: navigation, search Name Development of the Electricity Carbon Emission Factors for Ukraine Agency/Company /Organization European Bank for Reconstruction and Development Sector Energy Topics GHG inventory, Policies/deployment programs, Co-benefits assessment, Pathways analysis Resource Type Publications Website http://www.lahmeyer.de/fileadm Country Ukraine UN Region Eastern Europe References Development of the Electricity Carbon Emission Factors for Ukraine[1] "The study project "Development of the Electricity Carbon Emission Factors for Ukraine" was assigned by the European Bank for Development and Reconstruction (EBRD) to the consultant Lahmeyer International with Perspective as subcontractor on 16 July 2009. It is a baseline study with the overall goal to calculate reliable carbon

363

Assess Site Factors That Affect Employee Commuting Options for Greenhouse  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Assess Site Factors That Affect Employee Commuting Options for Assess Site Factors That Affect Employee Commuting Options for Greenhouse Gas Profile Assess Site Factors That Affect Employee Commuting Options for Greenhouse Gas Profile October 7, 2013 - 1:52pm Addthis YOU ARE HERE: Step 2 After establishing an employee commuting behavior baseline for evaluating a greenhouse gas (GHG) profile, analyze the specific characteristics of the agency's major worksites to help determine which alternative commute methods and work arrangements are viable and what types of strategies may be most effective for promoting those alternatives. It is recommended that worksite-level data collection focus on worksites with the: Largest number of employees, or clusters of worksites with large employee populations in an area with diverse commuting infrastructure

364

Decentralized Rural Electrification: the Critical Success Factors | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Decentralized Rural Electrification: the Critical Success Factors Decentralized Rural Electrification: the Critical Success Factors Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Decentralized Rural Electrification: the Critical Success Factors Agency/Company /Organization: Ray Holland, Lahiru Perera, Teodoro Sanchez, Dr Rona Wilkinson Sector: Energy Focus Area: Renewable Energy Phase: Create a Vision Topics: - Energy Access Resource Type: Publications User Interface: Website Website: cdn1.practicalaction.org/r/u/4d927f75-6660-426f-941e-13a02e33baf9.pdf? Cost: Free Language: English This review of recent practice draws on ITDG's twenty years experience of supporting off-grid solutions in Sri Lanka, Nepal, Zimbabwe and Peru in particular, and on work by other organisations in other countries, such as Indonesia, Kenya, Vietnam, South Africa.

365

Wildlife Exposure Factors Handbook - Appendix: Literature Review Database  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wildlife Wildlife Exposure Factors Handbook Appendix: Literature Review Database Volume II of II United States Office of Research EPA/600/R-93/187 Environmental Protection and Development December 1993 Agency (8603) Wildlife Exposure Factors Handbook Appendix: Literature Review Database Volume II of II EPA/600/R-93/187 December 1993 WILDLIFE EXPOSURE FACTORS HANDBOOK APPENDIX: LITERATURE REVIEW DATABASE Volume II of II Office of Health and Environmental Assessment Office of Research and Development U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Washington, D.C. 20460 Additional major funding for this Handbook was provided by the Office of Emergency and Remedial Response, Office of Solid Waste and Emergency Response and by the Office of Science and Technology, Office of Water U.S. Environmental Protection Agency

366

Wind turbine cost of electricity and capacity factor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wind turbines are currently designed to minimize the cost of electricity at the wind turbine (the busbar cost) in a given wind regime, ignoring constraints on the capacity factor (the ratio of the average power output to the maximum power output). The trade-off between these two quantities can be examined in a straightforward fashion; it is found that the capacity factor can be increased by a factor of 30 percent above its value at the cost minimum for a ten percent increase in the busbar cost of electricity. This has important implications for the large-scale integration of wind electricity on utility grids where the cost of transmission may be a significant fraction of the cost of delivered electricity, or where transmission line capacity may be limited.

Cavallo, A.J. [Cavallo (A.J.), Princeton, NJ (United States)

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Portfolio Manager Technical Reference: Thermal Conversion Factors | ENERGY  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Thermal Conversion Factors Thermal Conversion Factors Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In This Section Campaigns Commercial building design Communications resources Energy management guidance Financial resources Portfolio Manager Products and purchasing Recognition Research and reports Service and product provider (SPP) resources Success stories Target Finder

368

Solar Correction Factors of Building Envelope in Tebei  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Tebei has very rich solar energy in China and needs heating in winter,but the present energy building design code has no solar correction factor for the overall heat transfer coefficient of building envelope for Tebei. Based on the typical year weather data, this paper compares the solar energy of a typical city, Lassa, in Tebei with that of another city that has the same degree-days of heating period, calculates the heating energy for the building, and proposes the solar correction factors for an overall heat transfer coefficient of building envelope in Tebei.

Wang, D.; Tang, M.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Frustration, entanglement, and factorization in quantum spin systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate the separability properties of quantum ground states in frustrated spin systems. We prove that the existence of fully factorized ground states is compatible with increasing degrees of frustration up to a critical threshold above which only entangled ground states are permitted. The separability threshold identifies a frustration-driven transition between classical-like and entanglement-dominated regimes. We determine the critical degree of frustration and the form of the exact factorized ground-state solutions in various classes of non exactly solvable frustrated quantum spin models with finite-range as well as infinite-range interactions.

Giampaolo, Salvatore M; Illuminati, Fabrizio

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Mechanism Based Anticancer Drugs that Degrade Sp Transcription Factors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Curcumin is the active component of tumeric, and this polyphenolic compound has been extensively investigated as an anticancer drug that modulates multiple pathways and genes. We demonstrated that curcumin inhibited 253JB-V and KU7 bladder cancer cell growth, and this was accompanied by induction of apoptosis and decreased expression of the proapoptotic protein survivin and the angiogenic proteins vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and VEGF receptor 1 (VEGFR1). Since expression of survivin, VEGF and VEGFR1 are dependent on specificity protein (Sp) transcription factors, we also investigated the effects of curcumin on downregulation of Sp protein expression as an underlying mechanism for the apoptotic and antiangiogenic activity of this compound. Curcumin decreases expression of Sp1, Sp3 and Sp4 in blader cancer cells indicating that the cancer chemotherapeutic activity of curcumin is due, in part, to decreased expression of Sp transcription factors and Sp-dependent genes. Betulinic acid (BA) and curcumin are phytochemical anticancer agents, and we hypothesized that both compounds decrease EGFR expression in bladder cancer through downregulation of specificity protein (Sp) transcription factors. BA and curcumin decreased expression of EGFR, Sp1, Sp3, Sp4 and Sp-dependent proteins in 253JB-V and KU7 cells; EGFR was also decreased in cells transfected with a cocktail (iSp) containing small inhibitory RNAs for Sp1, Sp3 and Sp4 showing that EGFR is an Sp-regulated gene. Methyl 2-cyano-3,11-dioxo-18?-olean-1,12- dien-30-oate (CDODA-Me) is a synthetic triterpenoid derived from glycyrrhetinic acid which inhibits proliferation of KU7 and 253JB-V bladder cancer cells. CDODA-Me also decreased expression of specificity protein-1 (Sp1), Sp3 and Sp4 transcription factors. Similar results were observed for a structurally-related triterpenoid, methyl 2-cyano-3,12-dioxooleana-1,9-dien-28-oate (CDDO-Me), which is currently in clinical trials for treatment of leukemia. Celastrol, a naturally occurring triterpenoid acid from an ivy-like vine exhibits anticancer activity against bladder cancer cells. Celastrol decreased cell proliferation, induced apoptosis and decreased expression of specificity protein (Sp) transcription factors Sp1, Sp3 and Sp4 and several Sp-dependent genes like Fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3). In vivo studies using KU7 cells as xenografts showed that celastrol represents novel class of anticancer drugs that acts, in part, through targeting downregulation of Sp transcription factors.

Chadalapaka, Gayathri

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Performance analysis of parallel supernodal sparse LU factorization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We investigate performance characteristics for the LU factorization of large matrices with various sparsity patterns. We consider supernodal right-looking parallel factorization on a bi-dimensional grid of processors, making use of static pivoting. We develop a performance model and we validate it using the implementation in SuperLU-DIST, the real matrices and the IBM Power3 machine at NERSC. We use this model to obtain performance bounds on parallel computers, to perform scalability analysis and to identify performance bottlenecks. We also discuss the role of load balance and data distribution in this approach.

Grigori, Laura; Li, Xiaoye S.

2004-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

372

Dehumidification Performance of Air Conditioning Systems in Supermarkets: Field Demonstration with Heat Pipe Heat Exchangers in Delchamps Supermarket, Gulf Breeze, Florida  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lower humidity in supermarkets translates to reduced operational cost from refrigeration equipment. A demonstration project at a Florida supermarket showed that use of a heat pipe heat exchanger (HPHX) improved the HVAC system's dehumidification performance; but lower airflow rates, with or without an HPHX, also provided significant dehumidification enhancements.

1996-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

373

Geometry of Interaction V: Logic in the hyperfinite factor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Geometry of Interaction is a transcendental syntax developed in the framework of operator algebras. This fifth installment of the program takes place inside a von Neumann algebra, the hyperfinite factor. It provides a built-in interpretation of cut-elimination ... Keywords: Complexity theory, Light logics, Linear logic, Operator algebras, Proof-theory

Jean-Yves Girard

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Gust Factors and Turbulence Intensities for the Tropical Cyclone Environment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gust factors are used to convert peak wind speeds averaged over a relatively short period (e.g., 3 s) to mean wind speeds averaged over a relatively long reference period (e.g., 1 h) or vice versa. Such conversions are needed for engineering, ...

Bo Yu; Arindam Gan Chowdhury

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Factors that Impact Implementing a System Development Methodology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract¿This paper presents the findings of empirical research from 61 companies, mostly from the United States, to identify the factors that may impact implementation of a system development methodology (SDM). The study uses a survey instrument to ... Keywords: Systems development methodology, analysis and design, project management, life cycle, managers, implementation.

Tom L. Roberts, Jr.; Michael L. Gibson; Kent T. Fields; R. Kelly Rainer, Jr.

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Deletion discussions in Wikipedia: decision factors and outcomes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Deletion of articles is a common process in Wikipedia, in order to ensure the overall quality of the encyclopedia. Yet, there is a need to better understand the procedures in order to promote the best decisions without unnecessary community work. In ... Keywords: Wikipedia, articles for deletion, collaboration and conflict, decision-making, factors analysis, novices, online argumentation, values

Jodi Schneider; Alexandre Passant; Stefan Decker

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Factorization law for two lower bounds of concurrence  

SciTech Connect

We study the dynamics of two lower bounds of concurrence in bipartite quantum systems when one party goes through an arbitrary channel. We show that these lower bounds obey the factorization law similar to that of [Konrad et al., Nat. Phys. 4, 99 (2008)]. We also discuss the application of this property in an example.

Mirafzali, Sayyed Yahya; Sargolzahi, Iman; Ahanj, Ali; Javidan, Kurosh; Sarbishaei, Mohsen [Department of Physics, Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, Mashhad (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Khayyam Institute of Higher Education, Mashhad, Iran and School of Physics, Institute for Research in Fundamental Science (IPM), P. O. Box 19395-5531, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Physics, Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, Mashhad (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

378

Predictive discrete latent factor models for large scale dyadic data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We propose a novel statistical method to predict large scale dyadic response variables in the presence of covariate information. Our approach simultaneously incorporates the effect of covariates and estimates local structure that is induced by interactions ... Keywords: co-clustering, dyadic data, generalized linear regression, latent factor modeling

Deepak Agarwal; Srujana Merugu

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

The orientation of buildings: a catalogue of the conditioning factors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The livability and comfort of a house is determined by the relation of the house to the family and the house to the site. In consideration of livability and comfort the Architect designs with space, mechanical equipment and building materials as his tools. If there are influences that affect the orientation of these tools, then mastering the conditioning factors of the influences is as important as the ability to integrate mechanical equipment and building materials into space. When the space of the interior and the space of the exterior are a compliment to each other, each contributing to the livability and comfort of the building, then the orientation of the building is complete. The dissimilarity of people yields dissimilarity in buildings; it is this constant variation in buildings plus the constant variation in building sites that requires each orientation problem/\\be considered separately. Since orientation is the relation of the building to the points of the compass, then any factor that influences the relation is an orientation factor. The primary factors, because they are the most obvious and desirable, are Sun, Wind, and View; but the Architect must consider all for complete orientation.

Moseley, Hal Millard

1950-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Fast structure learning in generalized stochastic processes with latent factors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Understanding and quantifying the impact of unobserved processes is one of the major challenges of analyzing multivariate time series data. In this paper, we analyze a flexible stochastic process model, the generalized linear auto-regressive process ... Keywords: generalized linear models, latent factors, time series analysis

Mohammad Taha Bahadori, Yan Liu, Eric P. Xing

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "breeze otherf factors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Extracting Key Factors to Design Applications in Ambient Intelligence Environment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In an ambient intelligence environment, the design of applications influences the users behavior heavily. The purpose of this paper is to provide key factors considered necessary in developing those applications. We developed four applications applied ... Keywords: ambient feedback, persuasive technology, behavior modification, emotional engagement

Hiroaki Kimura; Tatsuo Nakajima

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Motivational factors in educational MMORPGs: some implications for education  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Studies have shown that motivation is an important factor positively related to learning outcomes. Thus, educators have tried to combine digital games with teaching materials to motivate students participating in learning activities for the past two ... Keywords: MMORPG, educational MMORPG, motivation

Kuo-Hsun Hung; Charles Kinzer; Cheng-Ling Alice Chen

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Total factor productivity growth in Uganda's telecommunications industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The telecommunication sector is usually thought to be characterized by high productivity growth rates arising from increasing returns to scale. The actual productivity patterns in the sector, however, need to be empirically determined. A panel data set ... Keywords: Data envelopment analysis, Malmquist, Telecommunications, Total factor productivity

Eria Hisali; Bruno Yawe

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

UPDATE AND ENHANCEMENT OF ODOT'S CRASH REDUCTION FACTORS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

systems, Research, Traffic engineering, Crash Reduction Factors 18. Distribution Statement Copies.454 kilograms kg TEMPERATURE (exact) T short tons (2000 lb) 0.907 megagrams Mg °C Celsius temperature 1.8 + 32................................................................18 3.1.6 Add two-way left-turn lane

Bertini, Robert L.

385

Enhancing the Thermoelectric Power Factor by Using Invisible Dopants  

SciTech Connect

Nanoparticle dopants that are invisible to conduction electrons and have sharp dips in their electron scattering rate versus electron energy close to the Fermi level. Replacement of such dopants with traditional impurities results in simultaneous enhancement of the Seebeck coefficient and the electron mobility and therefore a large enhancement in the thermoelectric power factor can be achieved.

Zebarjadi, Mona; Liao, B L; Esfarjani, Keivan; Dresselhaus, M S; Chen, Gang

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Heavy Hadron Form Factor Relations for $m_c\  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

First order power corrections to current matrix elements between heavy meson or $\\Lambda_\\Q$ baryon states are shown to vanish at the zero recoil point to all orders in QCD. Five relations among the six form factors that parametrize the semileptonic decay $\\Lambda_b \\to \\Lambda_c e \\overline{\

Peter Cho; Benjamin Grinstein

1992-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

387

Time and Energy Efficient Matrix Factorization using FPGAs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

/O bandwidth independent of the problem size. High level models for energy profiling are built and the energyTime and Energy Efficient Matrix Factorization using FPGAs Seonil Choi and Viktor K. Prasanna Electrical Engineering-Systems University of Southern California, Los Angeles, USA {seonilch, prasanna

Hwang, Kai

388

FRIGERATION OF FISH -PART 3 FACTORS TO BE CONSIDERED  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. REFRIGERATION OF FISH - PART THREE FACTORS TO BE CONSIDERED IN THE FREEZING AND COLD STORAGE OF FISHERY PRODUCTS Storage Design and Refr igeration Equipment Fishery Leaflet 428 - Handling Fresh Fish Fishery Leaflet 430 of Commercial Fisheries, ashington, D. ., and edite by Joseph ',:. Slavin, Refrigeration Engineer, Fi shery

389

Online idea contests: identifying factors for user retention  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Current literature about idea contests has emphasized individuals' motives for joining volunteer idea contests. However, explanation of why people stay or leave in the long run is rare. We identify factors that motivate users to participate repeatedly ... Keywords: motivation, multiple idea contests, open innovation, user retention

Stefan Richter, Stefan Perkmann Berger, Giordano Koch, Johann Füller

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Two-photon exchange corrections to the pion form factor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We compute two-photon exchange corrections to the electromagnetic form factor of the pion, taking into account the finite size of the pion. Compared to the soft-photon approximation for the infrared-divergent contribution, which neglects hadron structure effects, the corrections are found to be or approx.1 GeV{sup 2} at extreme backward angles.

Blunden, P. G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3T 2N2 (Canada); Jefferson Lab, 12000 Jefferson Avenue, Newport News, Virginia 23606 (United States); Melnitchouk, W. [Jefferson Lab, 12000 Jefferson Avenue, Newport News, Virginia 23606 (United States); Tjon, J. A. [Physics Department, University of Utrecht, NL-3508 TC Utrecht (Netherlands)

2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

391

Measurement of Gamma Knife registered helmet factors using MOSFETs  

SciTech Connect

The relative dose rate for the different Gamma Knife registered helmets (4, 8, 14, and 18 mm) is characterized by their respective helmet factors. Since the plateau of the dose profile for the 4 mm helmet is at most 1 mm wide, detector choices are limited. Traditionally helmet factors have been measured using 1x1x1 mm{sup 3} thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs). However, these are time-consuming, cumbersome measurements. This article investigates the use of metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistors (MOSFETs) (active area of 0.2x0.2 mm{sup 2}) as a more accurate and convenient dosimeter. Their suitability for these measurements was confirmed by basic characterization measurements. Helmet factors were measured using both MOSFETs and the established TLD approach. A custom MOSFET cassette was designed in analogy to the Elekta TLD cassette (Elekta Instruments AB) for use with the Elekta dosimetry sphere. Although both dosimeters provided values within 3% of the manufacturer's suggestion, MOSFETs provided superior accuracy and precision, in a fraction of the time required for the TLD measurements. Thus, MOSFETs proved to be a reasonable alternative to TLDs for performing helmet factor measurements.

Kurjewicz, Laryssa; Berndt, Anita [Department of Physics, University of Winnipeg, 515 Portage Avenue, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3B 2E9 (Canada); Division of Medical Physics, CancerCare Manitoba, 675 McDermot Avenue, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3E 0V9 (Canada); Winnipeg Centre for Gamma Knife Surgery, Health Sciences Centre, Winnipeg Regional Health Authority, Winnipeg MB R3E 0V9 (Canada); Section of Neurosurgery, Department of Surgery, Department of Radiology, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg MB R3E 0V9 (Canada) and Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg MB R3E 0V9 (Canada)

2007-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

392

CHI '11 Extended Abstracts on Human Factors in Computing Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Over the last year or so, we have been blessed with the challenge, the opportunity, and the distinct pleasure of organizing the CHI 2011 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, the premier international conference for the field of human-computer ...

Desney Tan; Bo Begole; Wendy A. Kellogg

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Dynamic load balancing with adaptive factoring methods in scientific applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To improve the performance of scientific applications with parallel loops, dynamic loop scheduling methods have been proposed. Such methods address performance degradations due to load imbalance caused by predictable phenomena like nonuniform data distribution ... Keywords: Adaptive weighted factoring, Dynamic load balancing

Ricolindo L. Cariño; Ioana Banicescu

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Electronic and Nuclear Factors in Charge and Excitation Transfer  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We report the and/or state of several subprojects of our DOE sponsored research on Electronic and Nuclear Factors in Electron and Excitation Transfer: (1) Construction of an ultrafast Ti:sapphire amplifier. (2) Mediation of electronic interactions in host-guest molecules. (3) Theoretical models of electrolytes in weakly polar media. (4) Symmetry effects in intramolecular excitation transfer.

Piotr Piotrowiak

2004-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

395

Key website factors in e-business strategy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The design of a quality website, as part of e-business strategy, has become a key element for success in the online market. This article analyzes the main factors that must be taken into account when designing a commercial website, concentrating on the ... Keywords: Accessibility, Content, Navigability, Speed, Web Assessment Index (WAI), Website

Blanca HernáNdez; Julio JiméNez; M. José MartíN

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Determining size-specific emission factors for environmental tobacco smoke  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Determining size-specific emission factors for environmental tobacco smoke Determining size-specific emission factors for environmental tobacco smoke particles Title Determining size-specific emission factors for environmental tobacco smoke particles Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2003 Authors Klepeis, Neil E., Michael G. Apte, Lara A. Gundel, Richard G. Sextro, and William W. Nazaroff Journal Aerosol Science & Technology Volume 37 Start Page Chapter Pagination 780-790 Date Published October 2003 Abstract Because size is a major controlling factor for indoor airborne particle behavior, human particle exposure assessments will benefit from improved knowledge of size-specific particle emissions. We report a method of inferring size-specific mass emission factors for indoor sources that makes use of an indoor aerosol dynamics model, measured particle concentration time series data, and an optimization routine. This approach provides -- in addition to estimates of the emissions size distribution and integrated emission factors -- estimates of deposition rate, an enhanced understanding of particle dynamics, and information about model performance. We applied the method to size-specific environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) particle concentrations measured every minute with an 8-channel optical particle counter (PMS-LASAIR; 0.1-2+ micrometer diameters) and every 10 or 30 min with a 34-channel differential mobility particle sizer (TSI-DMPS; 0.01-1+ micrometer diameters) after a single cigarette or cigar was machine-smoked inside a low air-exchange rate 20m^3 chamber. The aerosol dynamics model provided good fits to observed concentrations when using optimized values of mass emission rate and deposition rate for each particle size range as input. Small discrepancies observed in the first 1-2 hours after smoking are likely due to the effect of particle evaporation, a process neglected by the model. Size-specific ETS particle emission factors were fit with log-normal distributions, yielding an average mass median diameter of 0.2 micrometers and an average geometric standard deviation of 2.3 with no systematic differences between cigars and cigarettes. The equivalent total particle emission rate, obtained by integrating each size distribution, was 0.2-0.7 mg/min for cigars and 0.7-0.9 mg/min for cigarettes

397

Northeast Regional Cancer Institute's Cancer Surveillance and Risk Factor Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

OBJECTIVES The Northeast Regional Cancer Institute is conducting a program of ongoing epidemiologic research to address cancer disparities in northeast Pennsylvania. Of particular concern are disparities in the incidence of, stage at diagnosis, and mortality from colorectal cancer. In northeast Pennsylvania, age-adjusted incidence and mortality rates for colorectal cancer are higher, and a significantly smaller proportion of new colorectal cancer cases are diagnosed with local stage disease than is observed in comparable national data. Further, estimates of the prevalence of colorectal cancer screening in northeast Pennsylvania are lower than the US average. The Northeast Regional Cancer Institute’s research program supports surveillance of common cancers, investigations of cancer risk factors and screening behaviors, and the development of resources to further cancer research in this community. This project has the following specific objectives: I. To conduct cancer surveillance in northeast Pennsylvania. a. To monitor incidence and mortality for all common cancers, and colorectal cancer, in particular, and b. To document changes in the stage at diagnosis of colorectal cancer in this high-risk, underserved community. II. To conduct a population-based study of cancer risk factors and screening behavior in a six county region of northeast Pennsylvania. a. To monitor and document changes in colorectal cancer screening rates, and b. To document the prevalence of cancer risk factors (especially factors that increase the risk of colorectal cancer) and to identify those risk factors that are unusually common in this community. APPROACH Cancer surveillance was conducted using data from the Northeast Regional Cancer Institute’s population-based Regional Cancer Registry, the Pennsylvania Cancer Registry, and NCI’s SEER program. For common cancers, incidence and mortality were examined by county within the region and compared to data for similar populations in the US. For colorectal cancer, the stage at diagnosis of cases diagnosed in northeast Pennsylvania was compared to data from prior years. A population-based interview study of healthy adults was conducted to document the status of cancer screening and to estimate the prevalence of established cancer risk factors in this community. This study is similar in design to that used by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS). EXPERIMENTAL METHODS AND PROCEDURES: This program includes two distinct but related projects. The first project uses existing data to conduct cancer surveillance in northeast Pennsylvania, and the second is a population-based study of cancer risk factors and cancer screening behaviors in this same population. HUMAN SUBJECTS CONSIDERATIONS This program includes two projects: cancer surveillance and a population-based study of cancer risk factors and screening behavior. The cancer surveillance project involves only the use of existing aggregate data or de-identified data. As such, the surveillance project is exempt from human subjects considerations. The study of cancer risk factors and screening behaviors includes data from a random sample of adult residents of northeast Pennsylvania who are 18 or more years of age. All races, ethnicities and both sexes are included in proportion to their representation in the population. Subjects are interviewed anonymously by telephone; those who are unable to complete an interview in English are ineligible. This project has been reviewed and approved by the Scranton-Temple Residency Program IRB (IRB00001355), which is the IRB for the Northeast Regional Cancer Institute.

Lesko, Samuel M.

2007-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

398

Deriving the shape factor of a fractured rock matrix  

SciTech Connect

Fluid flow from a fractured rock matrix was investigated for accurately predicting oil recovery from fractured reservoirs. To relate the oil rate with rock geometry and average rock matrix pressure, a shape factor is used in the mathematical model of fractured reservoirs. The shape factor in the transfer function was derived by solving the three-dimensional diffusivity equation of a rock matrix block under unsteady-state production, in contrast to the quasi-steady-state condition assumed by most previous studies denoted in the literature. The diffusivity equation in the x, y, and z coordinate was solved in four cases by assuming different boundary conditions of (1) constant fracture pressure; (2) constant flow rate; (3) constant fracture pressure followed by linearly declining fracture pressure; and (4) linearly declining fracture pressure followed by constant fracture pressure. Shape factor values are high at the initial depletion stage under an unsteady-state condition. When the fracture pressure is constant, the shape factor converges to {pi}{sup 2}/L{sup 2}, 2{pi}{sup 2}/L{sup 2}, and 3{pi}{sup 2}/L{sup 2} for one-, two-, and three-dimensional rock matrix, respectively, at the dimensionless time ({tau}) of about 0.1. When the flow rate between the rock matrix and the fracture is constant, the fracture pressure varies with location on the rock surface. Based on the average fracture pressure, the shape factor decreases with production time until a {tau} value of 0.1 is reached. The boundary conditions of constant fracture pressure followed by a constant decline in fracture pressure are equivalent to the condition of a constant fracture pressure followed by a period of constant flow rate.

Chang, Ming-Ming

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Forward osmosis for desalination and water treatment : a study of the factors influencing process performance.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis explores various factors that have significant impacts on FO process performance in desalination and water treatment. These factors mainly include working temperatures, solution… (more)

Zhao, Shuaifei

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Energy Factors, Leasing Structure and the Market Price of Office Buildings in the U.S.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

local-level wholesale energy market price dynamics and localare included. Energy factor market prices, the shape of theare included. Energy factor market prices, the shape of the

Jaffee, Dwight M.; Stanton, Richard; Wallace, Nancy E.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "breeze otherf factors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Energy Factors, Leasing Structure and the Market Price of Office Buildings in the U.S.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

local-level wholesale energy market price dynamics and localare included. Energy factor market prices, the shape of theare included. Energy factor market prices, the shape of the

Jaffee, Dwight; Stanton, Richard; Wallace, Nancy

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

NIST X-Ray Form Factor, Atten Scatt. Tables, Sec. 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 2. Form Factors and Standard Definitions. ... form factor (f 0 +f?), of magnitude f NT = -Z 2 m/M, with small (negligible) energy and momentum ...

403

Step Complexity Measure for Emergency Operating Procedures - Determining Weighting Factors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In complex systems, such as nuclear power plants (NPPs) or airplane control systems, human error has been regarded as the primary cause of many events. Therefore, to ensure system safety, extensive effort has been made to identify the significant factors that can cause human error. According to related studies, written manuals or operating procedures are revealed as one of the important factors, and the understandability is pointed out as one of the major reasons for procedure-related human errors.Many qualitative checklists have been suggested to evaluate emergency operating procedures (EOPs) of NPPs so as to minimize procedure-related human errors. However, since qualitative evaluations using checklists have some drawbacks, a quantitative measure that can quantify the complexity of EOPs is indispensable.From this necessity, Park et al. suggested the step complexity (SC) measure to quantify the complexity of procedural steps included in EOPs. To verify the appropriateness of the SC measure, averaged step performance time data obtained from emergency training records of the loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) and the excess steam demand event were compared with estimated SC scores. However, although averaged step performance time data and estimated SC scores show meaningful correlation, some important issues such as determining proper weighting factors have to be clarified to ensure the appropriateness of the SC measure. These were not properly dealt with due to a lack of backup data.In this paper, to resolve one of the important issues, emergency training records are additionally collected and analyzed in order to determine proper weighting factors. The total number of collected records is 66, and the training scenarios cover five emergency conditions including the LOCA, the steam generator tube rupture, the loss of all feedwater, the loss of off-site power, and the station blackout. From these records, average step performance time data are retrieved, and new weighting factors are determined by using a nonlinear regression analysis. The results show that the SC scores quantified by the new weighting factors show statistically meaningful correlation with averaged step performance time data. Thus, it can be concluded that the SC measure can represent the complexity of procedural steps included in EOPs.

Park, Jinkyun; Jung, Wondea; Kim, Jaewhan; Ha, Jaejoo [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (Korea, Republic of)

2003-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

404

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Genetic Factors Affecting  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Genetic Factors Affecting Susceptibility to Low-Doses of Ionizing Genetic Factors Affecting Susceptibility to Low-Doses of Ionizing Radiation. Authors: William F. Morgan, Pat Concannon & John H.J. Petrini The goal of this program is to test the hypothesis that mice heterozygous for the NBS1 gene are genetically susceptible to low doses of ionizing radiation. Patients with Nijmegen Breakage Syndrome (NBS) are radiation sensitive, because of defects in cellular responses to radiation induced genetic damage. It is unclear whether humans heterozygous for the mutations associated with NBS are radiation sensitive and results from cell culture experiments give conflicting results. In collaboration with John Petrini at the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in New York City we developed a mouse model of this disorder and are directly testing the hypothesis

405

Geological and Anthropogenic Factors Influencing Mercury Speciation in Mine  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Geological and Anthropogenic Factors Influencing Mercury Speciation Geological and Anthropogenic Factors Influencing Mercury Speciation in Mine Wastes Christopher S. Kim,1 James J. Rytuba,2 Gordon E. Brown, Jr.3 1Department of Physical Sciences, Chapman University, Orange, CA 92866 2U.S. Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA 94025 3Department of Geological and Environmental Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 Introduction Figure 1. Dr. Christopher Kim collects a mine waste sample from the Oat Hill mercury mine in Northern California. The majority of mercury mine wastes at these sites are present as loose, unconsolidated piles, facilitating the transport of mercury-bearing material downstream into local watersheds. Mercury (Hg) is a naturally occurring element that poses considerable health risks to humans, primarily through the consumption of fish which

406

Probing Quantum Frustrated Systems via Factorization of the Ground State  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The existence of definite orders in frustrated quantum systems is related rigorously to the occurrence of fully factorized ground states below a threshold value of the frustration. Ground-state separability thus provides a natural measure of frustration: strongly frustrated systems are those that cannot accommodate for classical-like solutions. The exact form of the factorized ground states and the critical frustration are determined for various classes of nonexactly solvable spin models with different spatial ranges of the interactions. For weak frustration, the existence of disentangling transitions determines the range of applicability of mean-field descriptions in biological and physical problems such as stochastic gene expression and the stability of long-period modulated structures.

Salvatore M. Giampaolo; Gerardo Adesso; Fabrizio Illuminati

2009-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

407

Friction Factor Measurements in an Equally Spaced Triangular Tube Array  

SciTech Connect

Friction factor data for adiabatic cross-flow of water in a staggered tube array was obtained over a Reynolds number range (based on hydraulic diameter and gap velocity) of about 10,000 to 250,000. The tubes were 12.7mm (0.5 inch) outer diameter, in a uniformly spaced triangular arrangement with a pitch-to-diameter ratio of 1.5. The friction factor was compared to several literature correlations, and was found to be best matched by the Idelchik correlation. Other correlations were found to vary significantly from the test data. Based on the test data, a new correlation is proposed for this tube bundle geometry which covers the entire Reynolds number range tested.

Vassallo P, Symolon P

2007-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

408

Measurement of the gamma gamma* -> pi0 transition form factor  

SciTech Connect

We study the reaction e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} e{sup +}e{sup -}{pi}{sup 0} in the single tag mode and measure the differential cross section d{sigma}/dQ{sup 2} and the {gamma}{gamma}* {yields} {pi}{sup 0} transition form factor in the mometum transfer range from 4 to 40 GeV{sup 2}. At Q{sup 2} > 10 GeV{sup 2} the measured form factor exceeds the asymptotic limit predicted by perturbative QCD. The analysis is based on 442 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity collected at PEP-II with the BABAR detector at e{sup +}e{sup -} center-of-mass energies near 10.6 GeV.

Aubert, B.

2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

409

Factors driving wind power development in the United States  

SciTech Connect

In the United States, there has been substantial recent growth in wind energy generating capacity, with growth averaging 24 percent annually during the past five years. About 1,700 MW of wind energy capacity was installed in 2001, while another 410 MW became operational in 2002. This year (2003) shows promise of significant growth with more than 1,500 MW planned. With this growth, an increasing number of states are experiencing investment in wind energy projects. Wind installations currently exist in about half of all U.S. states. This paper explores the key factors at play in the states that have achieved a substantial amount of wind energy investment. Some of the factors that are examined include policy drivers, such as renewable portfolio standards (RPS), federal and state financial incentives, and integrated resource planning; as well as market drivers, such as consumer demand for green power, natural gas price volatility, and wholesale market rules.

Bird, Lori A.; Parsons, Brian; Gagliano, Troy; Brown, Matthew H.; Wiser, Ryan H.; Bolinger, Mark

2003-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

410

Greenhouse window U-factors under field conditions  

SciTech Connect

Field measurements of U-factor are reported for two projecting greenhouse windows, each paired with a picture window of comparable insulation level during testing. A well-known calorimetric field test facility was used to make the measurements. The time-varying U-factors obtained are related to measurements of exterior conditions. For one of the greenhouse windows, which was the subject of a published laboratory hotbox test and simulation study, the results are compared with published test and simulation data and found to be in disagreement. Data on interior and exterior film coefficients are presented, and it is shown that the greenhouse window has a significantly lower interior film coefficient than a conventional window under the same interior conditions. This is advanced as a possible explanation of the disagreement.

Klems, J.H.

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Revisiting $K?$ puzzle in the pQCD factorization approach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, we calculated the branching ratios and direct CP violation of the four $B\\to K\\pi$ decays with the inclusion of all currently known next-to-leading order (NLO) contributions by employing the perturbative QCD (pQCD) factorization approach. We found that (a) Besides the 10% enhancement from the NLO vertex corrections, the quark-loops and magnetic penguins, the NLO contributions to the form factors can provide an additional $\\sim 15%$ enhancement to the branching ratios, and lead to a very good agreement with the data; (b) The NLO pQCD predictions are $\\acp^{dir}(B^0\\to K^+\\pi^-)=(-6.5\\pm 3.1)%$ and $\\acp^{dir}(B^+\\to K^+ \\pi^0)=(2.2\\pm 2.0)%$, become well consistent with the data due to the inclusion of the NLO contributions.

Wei Bai; Min Liu; Ying-Ying Fan; Wen-Fei Wang; Shan Cheng; Zhen-Jun Xiao

2013-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

412

Key Factors in Displacement Ventilation Systems for Better IAQ  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper sets up a mathematical model of three-dimensional steady turbulence heat transfer in an air-conditioned room of multi-polluting heat sources. Numerical simulation helps identify key factors in displacement ventilation systems that affect air-quality in rooms of multi-polluting heat sources. Results show that it is very important to determine the suitable air-intemperature , air-inflow, and heat source quantity and dispersion, to obtain better displacement ventilation results.

Wang, X.; Chen, J.; Li, Y.; Wang, Z.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Bounds on Heavy-to-Heavy Weak Decay Form Factors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We provide upper and lower bounds on the semileptonic weak decay form factors for $B \\to D^(*)$ and $\\Lambda_b \\to \\Lambda_c$ decays by utilizing inclusive heavy quark effective theory sum rules. These bounds are calculated to second order in $\\Lambda_{QCD}/m_Q$ and first order in $\\alpha_s$. The $O(\\alpha_s^2 \\beta_0)$ corrections to the bounds at zero recoil are also presented.

Chiang, C W

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Bounds on Heavy-to-Heavy Weak Decay Form Factors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We provide upper and lower bounds on the semileptonic weak decay form factors for $B \\to D^(*)$ and $\\Lambda_b \\to \\Lambda_c$ decays by utilizing inclusive heavy quark effective theory sum rules. These bounds are calculated to second order in $\\Lambda_{QCD}/m_Q$ and first order in $\\alpha_s$. The $O(\\alpha_s^2 \\beta_0)$ corrections to the bounds at zero recoil are also presented.

Cheng-Wei Chiang

2000-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

415

Simulation: Moving from Technology Challenge to Human Factors Success  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recognition of the many limitations of traditional apprenticeship training is driving new approaches to learning medical procedural skills. Among simulation technologies and methods available today, computer-based systems are topical and bring the benefits of automated, repeatable, and reliable performance assessments. Human factors research is central to simulator model development that is relevant to real-world imaging-guided interventional tasks and to the credentialing programs in which it would be used.

Gould, Derek A., E-mail: dgould@liv.ac.uk [Royal Liverpool University NHS Trust, Radiology Department (United Kingdom); Chalmers, Nicholas [Manchester Royal Infirmary, Department of Radiology (United Kingdom); Johnson, Sheena J. [University of Manchester, Manchester Business School (United Kingdom); Kilkenny, Caroline [University of Hull, Psychology Department (United Kingdom); White, Mark D. [University of Liverpool, School of Engineering (United Kingdom); Bech, Bo [University Hospital of Skane, Vascular Center Malmoe (Sweden); Lonn, Lars [National University Hospital of Denmark, Department of Radiology and Vascular Surgery (Denmark); Bello, Fernando [Imperial College London, Clinical Skills Centre, Department of Surgery and Cancer (United Kingdom)

2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

416

Legal factors affecting the financing of small scale hydroelectric projects  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An introduction to the major business organizational options open to small-scale hydroelectric (SSH) projects is given. The major federal income tax treatments of these options are compared. Significant general federal income tax factors affecting SSH projects are reintroduced and explained. Some of the special federal income tax problem areas in SSH development are isolated. Tax benefit flow through or transfer mechanisms are discussed. Tax exempt financing opportunities for private SSH projects are reviewed. (MHR)

Wilson, W.H.; Ringo, M.J.; Forgione, N.

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Method for factor analysis of GC/MS data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The method of the present invention provides a fast, robust, and automated multivariate statistical analysis of gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy (GC/MS) data sets. The method can involve systematic elimination of undesired, saturated peak masses to yield data that follow a linear, additive model. The cleaned data can then be subjected to a combination of PCA and orthogonal factor rotation followed by refinement with MCR-ALS to yield highly interpretable results.

Van Benthem, Mark H; Kotula, Paul G; Keenan, Michael R

2012-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

418

Direct measurement of the negative-kaon form factor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The electromagnetic form factor of the negative kaon has been measured by direct scattering of 250 GeV/c kaons from the stationary electrons of a liquid-hydrogen target. The deviation of the measured elastic scattering cross section from the point cross section may be characterized by a root-mean-square kaon radius of /sup 1/2/=0.53 +- 0.05 fm.

Dally, E.B.; Hauptman, J.M.; Kubic, J.; Stork, D.H.; Watson, A.B.; Guzik, Z.; Nigmanov, T.S.; Riabtsov, V.D.; Tsyganov, E.N.; Vodopianov, A.S.; Beretvas, A.; Grigorian, A.; Tompkins, J.C.; Toohig, T.E.; Wehmann, A.A.; Poirier, J.A.; Rey, C.A.; Volk, J.T.; Rapp, P.D.; Shepard, P.F.

1980-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

419

The proton form factor ratio results from Jefferson Lab  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ratio of the proton form factors, GE p/GMp, has been measured extensively, from Q2 of 0.5 GeV2 to 8.5 GeV2, at the Jefferson Laboratory, using the polarization transfer method. This ratio is extracted directly from the measured ratio of the transverse and longitudinal polarization components of the recoiling proton in elastic electron-proton scattering. The polarization transfer results are of unprecedented high precision and accuracy, due in large part to the small systematic uncertainties associated with the experimental technique. There is an approved experiment at JLab, GEP(5), to continue the ratio measurements to 12 GeV2. A dedicated experimental setup, the Super Bigbite Spectrometer (SBS), will be built for this purpose. It will be equipped with a focal plane polarimeter to measure the polarization of the recoil protons. The scattered electrons will be detected in an electromagnetic calorimeter. In this presentation, I will review the status of the proton elastic electromagnetic form factors and discuss a number of theoretical approaches to describe nucleon form factors.

Vina Punjabi

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Strange vector form factors from parity-violating electron scattering  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The simplest models might describe the nucleon as 3 light quarks, but this description would be incomplete without inclusion of the sea of glue and qbar q pairs which binds it. Early indications of a particularly large contribution from strange quarks in this sea to the spin and mass of the nucleon motivated an experimental program examining the role of these strange quarks in the nucleon vector form factors. The strangeness form factors can be extracted from the well-studied electromagnetic structure of the nucleon using parity-violation in electron-nuclear scattering to isolate the effect of the weak interaction. With high luminosity and polarization, and a very stable beam due to its superconducting RF cavities, CEBAF at Jefferson Lab is a precision instrument uniquely well suited to the challenge of measurements of the small parity-violating asymmetries. The techniques and results of the two major Jefferson Lab experimental efforts in parity-violation studies, HAPPEX and G0, as well as efforts to describe the strange form factors in QCD, will be reviewed.

Kent Paschke, Anthony Thomas, Robert Michaels, David Armstrong

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "breeze otherf factors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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421

The Exposure Rate Conversion Factor for Nuclear Fallout  

SciTech Connect

Nuclear fallout is comprised of approximately 2000 radionuclides. About 1000 of these radionuclides are either primary fission products or activated fission products that are created during the burn process. The exposure rate one meter above the surface produced by this complex mixture of radionuclides varies rapidly with time since many of the radionuclides are short-lived and decay numerous times before reaching a stable isotope. As a result, the mixture of radionuclides changes rapidly with time. Using a new code developed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, the mixture of radionuclides at any given point in time can be calculated. The code also calculates the exposure rate conversion factor (ECF) for all 3864 individual isotopes contained in its database based on the total gamma energy released per decay. Based on the combination of isotope mixture and individual ECFs, the time-dependent variation of the composite exposure rate conversion factor for nuclear fallout can be easily calculated. As example of this new capability, a simple test case corresponding to a 10 kt, uranium-plutonium fuel has been calculated. The results for the time-dependent, composite ECF for this test case are shown in Figure 1. For comparison, we also calculated the composite exposure rate conversion factor using the conversion factors found in Federal Guidance Report No.12 (FGR-12) published by ORNL, which contains the conversion factors for approximately 1000 isotopes. As can be noted from Figure 1, the two functions agree reasonably well at times greater than about 30 minutes. However, they do not agree at early times since FGR-12 does not include all of the short-lived isotopes that are produced in nuclear fallout. It should also be noted that the composite ECF at one hour is 19.7 R/hr per Ci/m{sup 2}. This corresponds to 3148 R/hr per 1 kt per square mile, which agrees reasonably well with the value of 3000 R/hr per 1 kt per square mile as quoted by Glasstone. We have also tabulated the top 50 contributors to the exposure rate at various points in time following a detonation. These major contributors are given in Table 1.

Spriggs, G D

2009-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

422

Effective dose and several factors of its identification. (Assessment of radiation hazard in space flights)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Effective dose and several factors of its identification. (Assessment of radiation hazard in space flights)

Farber, Yu V; Grigoriev, Yu G; Tabakova, L A

1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

2009 Guidelines to Defra / DECC's GHG Conversion Factors for Company Reporting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(ANNEX 1) 5 Previous Approach 5 New Fuel Emission Factors 5 III. ELECTRICITY CONVERSION FACTORS (ANNEX 3) 6 UK Grid Electricity 6 CHP Electricity 9 IV. CONVERSION FACTORS FOR PROCESS EMISSIONS (ANNEX 4) 11 EMISSION FACTORS (ANNEX 6) 24 Passenger Cars 24 Taxis 31 Vans 32 Buses 33 Motorcycles 34 Passenger Rail 36

424

Breast Cancer and Personal Environmental Risk Factors in Marin County --  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Breast Cancer and Personal Environmental Risk Factors in Marin County -- Breast Cancer and Personal Environmental Risk Factors in Marin County -- Pilot Study Title Breast Cancer and Personal Environmental Risk Factors in Marin County -- Pilot Study Publication Type Report Year of Publication 2003 Authors Erdmann, Christine A., Georgianna Farren, Kimberly Baltzell, Terri Chew, Cynthia Clarkson, Ruth Fleshman, Colin Leary, Mary Mizroch, Fern Orenstein, Marion L. Russell, Virginia Souders-Mason, and Margaret Wrensch Abstract The purpose of the Personal Environmental Risk Factor Study (PERFS) pilot project was to develop methodologies and a questionnaire for a future population-based case-control study to investigate the role of selected environmental exposures in breast cancer development. Identification of etiologically relevant exposures during a period of potential vulnerability proximate to disease onset offers the possibility of clinical disease prevention even when disease initiation may have already occurred many years earlier. Certain personal environmental agents or combinations of agents may influence disease promotion. Therefore, this pilot study focused on exposures that occurred during the ten-year period prior to diagnosis for cases and the last ten years for controls, rather than more historic exposures. For this pilot study, we used a community-based research approach. In our collaborative efforts, community members participated with academic researchers in all phases of the research, including research question identification, study design, development of research tools, development of the human subjects protocol, and report writing. Community member inclusion was based upon the concept that community participation could improve the relevance of scientific studies and ultimate success of the research by encouraging an ongoing dialogue between community members and academic representatives. Early activities of this project focused on the collection of input from the community regarding the possible role of environmental factors in the incidence of breast cancer in Marin County. The intent was to inform the scientists of community concerns, enhance the research team's understanding of the community being studied, and provide interested community members with a better understanding of the strengths and weaknesses of traditional research methods through active participation in the research process. This pilot study identified specific testable hypotheses through review of the literature and consultation with relevant experts and the affected community. Initially, the study was to focus on modifiable personal environmental exposures that are associated with breast tumor promotion and higher socioeconomic status (SES). However, little information was available in the scientific literature regarding the putative mechanism by which some of the suspected environmental factors may act (i.e., initiator vs. promoter). Likewise, little is known about the distribution of personal environmental risk factors by socioeconomic status. Therefore, tumor promotion involvement and association with SES were not very useful as selection criteria, and selection of topics was based primarily on published scientific findings of human studies and community input. This study was approved by the Institutional Review Boards at the University of California at San Francisco (Committee on Human Research) and at the University of California at Berkeley (Committee for the Protection of Human Subjects)

425

An air pollution trajectory model for Southeast Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Amounts of ozone for the Houston area are the second-highest within the United States. As a result of Houston's high ozone problem a task of finding new ways to control the ozone concentration was necessary for the Southeast Texas area (Lambeth et al. 1994). A hybrid Eulerian-Lagrangian model was optimized to examine the southeast Texas coastal region for high ozone development. Verification of the optinuzed air pollution model was performed by a case study for a day with high ozone concentration and a day with low ozone concentration having similar meteorological setup for the Houston area. The model chosen for study was the Hybrid Single-Particle Lagrangiank Model (HY-SPLIT). The verification used enhanced meteorological data sources for researching the phenomena which developed the ozone concentration problem. The meteorology of these case studies generated trajectories to observe the ozone distribution trends for the Texas coastal area.The analysis of the trajectories generated suggested that either the Nested Grid Model (NGM) or gridded rawinsonde data could be used for the HY-SPLIT model input. However for mesoscale features, the gridded rawinsonde data produced moreinput. However for mesoscale features, the gridded rawinsonde data produced more accurate trajectory tracings for study of ozone concentrations. As a result of this case study, mesoscale flow was determined to be a key factor in origination and distribution of source pollutants. The development of the sea breeze and its air content was crucial in determining the ozone content for the Southeast Texas region. Mixing associated with strong sea breeze and land breeze flows found low ozone concentrations in the region of interest. This strong sea breeze flow produced large parcel movement associated with the trajectories computed for this study. However with light winds, stable conditions, wann temperatures and high photochemical activity high ozone and shorter trajectories were seen for the Houston area.

Walters, Tamera Ann

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Factors affecting expanded electricity trade in North America  

SciTech Connect

The authors explore factors that affect electricity trade between enterprises in the US and Canada and the US and Mexico. They look to those underlying policy and institutional factors that affect the relative costs of producing electricity in the three countries. In particular, they consider six factors that appear to have a significant impact on electricity trade in North America: differences in the types of economic regulation of power leading to differences in cost recovery for wholesale and retail power and wheeling charges; changing regulatory attitudes, placing more emphasis on demand-side management and environmental concerns; differences in energy and economic policies; differences in national and subnational environmental policies; changing organization of electric power industries which may foster uncertainty, change historical relationships, and provide other potentially important sources of power for distribution utilities; and differences in the ability of enterprises to gain access to electric power markets because of restrictions placed on transmission access. In Section 2, the authors discuss the regulation of electricity trade in North America and provide an overview of the recent trading experience for electricity between Canada and the US and between Mexico and the US, including the volume of that trade over the past decade and existing transmission capacity between regions of the three countries. In Section 3, they look at the benefits that accrue to trading counties and what those benefits are likely to be for the three countries. The discussion in Section 4 centers on the relevant provisions of the Canada Free Trade Agreement and the proposed North American Free Trade Agreement. In Section 5, they set the stage for the discussion of policy and institutional differences presented in Section 6 by outlining differences in the organization of the electric power sectors of Canada, the US, and Mexico. The study is synthesized in Section 7.

Hill, L.J.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Major Risk Factors to the Integrated Facility Disposition Project  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Oak Ridge Reservation Tennessee Major Risk Factors to the Integrated Facility Disposition Project (IFDP) Challenge The scope of the Integrated Facility Disposition Project (IFDP) needs to comprehensively address a wide range of environmental management risks at the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORO). These include: environmental remediation, regulatory compliance, deactivation and decommissioning (D&D) activities, and disposition of legacy materials and waste, along with the ongoing modernization, reindustrialization, and reconfiguration initiatives at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory and at the Y-12 National Security Complex. The balancing of the broad nature of these activities and issues at ORO are a key challenge for the IFDP especially since their interrelationship is not always obvious.

428

Factors Associated with Occuptional Socialization in Rural Nepal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

be due to the poor econom ie condition of their parents. In this regard, Cabriles' study (1978:43) showcd that in the Philippines a financial problem was the major reason fur dropping out of school. Other factors, listed in order uf frequency, were lack... 's developed skills can be utilized. 104 REFERENCES Cabriles, David C. 1978 "Youth Resources Mobilization: A Development Strategy in Maramag." Unpublished M.S. Thesis. Bukidnon: UPLB College, Laguana. Coombs, et. al. 1972 New Path to Learning for Children...

Upadhyay, Kiran Dutta

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Physical factors controlling the ductility of bulk metallic glasses  

SciTech Connect

In order to identify key physical factor controlling the deformation and fracture behavior of bulk metallic glasses (BMGs), we compiled and analyzed the elastic moduli and compressive ductility for BMGs. In addition, new modulus data were generated in the critical ranges in order to facilitate the analysis. We have found that the intrinsic ductility of BMGs can be correlated with the bulk-to-shear modulus ratio B/G according to Pugh's [Philos. Mag. 45, 823 (1954) ] rule. In some individual BMG systems, for example, Fe based, the relationship seems to be very clear. The physical meaning of this correlation is discussed in terms of atomic bonding and connectivity.

Liu, Y. [Central South University, China; Liu, Chain T [ORNL; Zhang, Z. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Keppens, V. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Factors Affecting Zebra Mussel Kill by the Bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens  

SciTech Connect

The specific purpose of this research project was to identify factors that affect zebra mussel kill by the bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens. Test results obtained during this three-year project identified the following key variables as affecting mussel kill: treatment concentration, treatment duration, mussel siphoning activity, dissolved oxygen concentration, water temperature, and naturally suspended particle load. Using this latter information, the project culminated in a series of pipe tests which achieved high mussel kill inside power plants under once-through conditions using service water in artificial pipes.

Daniel P. Molloy

2004-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

431

Utility & Regulatory Factors Affecting Cogeneration & Independent Power Plant Design & Operation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In specifying a cogeneration or independent power plant, the owner should be especially aware of the influences which electric utilities and regulatory bodies will have on key parameters such as size, efficiency, design, reliability/ availability, operating capabilities and modes, etc. This paper will note examples of some of the major factors which could impact the project developer and his economics, as well as discuss potential mitigation measures. Areas treated include wheeling, utility ownership interests, dispatchability, regulatory acceptance and other considerations which could significantly affect the plant definition and, as a result, its attendant business and financing structure. Finally, suggestions are also made for facilitating the process of integration with the electric utility.

Felak, R. P.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Factorization and Transverse Momentum in SIDIS at Jlab  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Data for pion electroproduction from both hydrogen and deuterium targets satisfy factorization tests in the kinematic region Q{sup 2} > 1 GeV{sup 2}, 0.15 < x < 0.45, W > 2 GeV, M{sub x} > 1.5 GeV, and 0.3 < z < 0.6, for both spin-averaged and spin-dependent scattering. The {pi}{sup +}/{pi}{sup -} ratio of polarized SIDIS is found to exhibit a surprisingly large p{sub t} dependence.

Peter Bosted

2006-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

433

Harmonic mean, the Gamma factor and Speed of Light  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The relationship between the harmonic mean and special relativity is concisely elucidated. The arguments in favor and against SRT are explored. It is shown that the ratio of the speed of light to the harmonic mean of the onward and return speeds of light in a moving frame under Newtonian mechanics, when equitably distributed between space and time as a correction, leads to the Lorentz transformation. This correction implies an apparent contraction of objects and time dilation. However, the symmetry of the onward and inverse transformations give a different meaning to the gamma factor

Chandru Iyer

2008-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

434

The Dose Rate Conversion Factors for Nuclear Fallout  

SciTech Connect

In a previous paper, the composite exposure rate conversion factor (ECF) for nuclear fallout was calculated using a simple theoretical photon-transport model. The theoretical model was used to fill in the gaps in the FGR-12 table generated by ORNL. The FGR-12 table contains the individual conversion factors for approximate 1000 radionuclides. However, in order to calculate the exposure rate during the first 30 minutes following a nuclear detonation, the conversion factors for approximately 2000 radionuclides are needed. From a human-effects standpoint, it is also necessary to have the dose rate conversion factors (DCFs) for all 2000 radionuclides. The DCFs are used to predict the whole-body dose rates that would occur if a human were standing in a radiation field of known exposure rate. As calculated by ORNL, the whole-body dose rate (rem/hr) is approximately 70% of the exposure rate (R/hr) at one meter above the surface. Hence, the individual DCFs could be estimated by multiplying the individual ECFs by 0.7. Although this is a handy rule-of-thumb, a more consistent (and perhaps, more accurate) method of estimating the individual DCFs for the missing radionuclides in the FGR-12 table is to use the linear relationship between DCF and total gamma energy released per decay. This relationship is shown in Figure 1. The DCFs for individual organs in the body can also be estimated from the estimated whole-body DCF. Using the DCFs given FGR-12, the ratio of the organ-specific DCFs to the whole-body DCF were plotted as a function of the whole-body DCF. From these plots, the asymptotic ratios were obtained (see Table 1). Using these asymptotic ratios, the organ-specific DCFs can be estimated using the estimated whole-body DCF for each of the missing radionuclides in the FGR-12 table. Although this procedure for estimating the organ-specific DCFs may over-estimate the value for some low gamma-energy emitters, having a finite value for the organ-specific DCFs in the table is probably better than having no value at all. A summary of the complete ECF and DCF values are given in Table 2.

Spriggs, G D

2009-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

435

Factors influencing trace element composition in human teeth  

SciTech Connect

The authors recently compiled and reviewed the literature published in or after 1978 for 45 major, minor, and trace elements in human teeth as a part of an International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) study. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the various factors that influence the concentration levels of certain trace elements in human teeth. The sampling practices and analytical techniques that are applicable for trace element analysis are also discussed. It is also our intention to identify reference range of values, where data permit such conclusions. The scrutiny was designed to identify only the healthy permanent teeth, and values from teeth with fillings, caries, or periodontal diseases were eliminated.

Tandon, L. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Iyengar, G.V. [Biomineral Sciences International, Inc., Bethesda, MD (United States)

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Factors affecting potential market penetration of laser fusion power plants  

SciTech Connect

A mini-model has been constructed to estimate the optimal size of laser fusion power plants and to estimate the allowable cost of the first such plant in relation to the next best alternative. In estimating the costs of laser fusion, the mini-model incorporates such factors as market penetration, learning, economies of scale, system size, transmission costs, reserve requirements, development and licensing costs and site costs. The results of the mini-model simulations indicate that the optimal laser fusion plant size is approximately 3 GWe; risk considerations unincorporated in the mini-model suggest an optimal size closer to 2.5 GWe.

Deonigi, D.E.; Fraley, D.W.

1979-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Factor Intensity, Product Switching, and Productivity: Evidence from Chinese Exporters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper analyzes how a …rm’s specialization in its core products after exporting a¤ects its factor intensity and productivity. Using Chinese manufacturing …rm data over the period of 1998-2007, we …nd that …rms become less capital-intensive but more productive after exporting, compared to non-exporters that share similar ex ante characteristics. To rationalize these …ndings that contrast with existing studies, we develop a variant of the model by Bernard, Redding, and Schott (2010, 2011) to consider …rms producing multiple products with varying capital intensity. The model predicts that when a …rm in a labor-abundant country starts exporting, it specializes in its core competencies by allocating more resources to produce labor-intensive products. Firm ex ante productivity is associated with a smaller decline in capital intensity after exporting. A sharper post-exporting decline in capital intensity is associated with a larger increase in measured total factor productivity. We …nd …rm-level evidence supporting these predictions. Using transaction-level data for the period over 2000-2006, we …nd that Chinese exporters continuously add new products that are less capital-intensive than their existing products

Yue Ma Y; Heiwai Tang Z; Yifan Zhang X; Peter Schott; Robert Staiger; Jo Van Biesebroeck

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Medium modification of the proton form-factor  

SciTech Connect

I argue that the double ratio of proton-recoil polarization-transfer coefficients, P{prime}{sub x} and P{prime}{sub z}, of the quasielastic {sup 4}He(e,e{prime}p){sup 3}H reaction with respect to the elastic {sup 1}H(e,e{prime}p) reaction is sensitive to possible medium modifications of the proton form factor in {sup 4}He. Recent measurements at both Mainz and Jefferson Lab of this double ratio at four-momentum transfers squared between 0.4 (GeV/c){sup 2} and 2.6 (GeV/c){sup 2} are discussed. I show that the data challenge state-of-the-art conventional meson-nucleon calculations, as these are unable to describe the results. The data hint at the need to include medium modifications of the proton form factor, as predicted by a quark-meson-coupling model, in the calculations. A recently approved follow-up experiment at a Q{sup 2} of 0.8 (GeV/c){sup 2} and 1.3 (GeV/c){sup 2} with unprecedented precision will provide one of the most stringent tests of the applicability of various calculations.

Steffen Strauch

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Investor clienteles and industry factor-price exposure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The authors thank The Global Association of Risk Professionals (GARP) for funding. We are especially grateful to Brian Bushee for providing his data on institutional ownership classifications. We thank Paul Zarowin and seminar participants at New York University, the London Business School, INSEAD, the University of Rochester, and Southern Methodist University for helpful suggestions on an earlier version of the paper, and David Barker, Matt Billett, Brian Bushee, Eric Lie, Anand Vijh, and seminar participants at the University of Iowa for comments on this version. Minton acknowledges financial support from the Dice Center for Research in Financial Economics. Investor clienteles and industry factor-price exposure We find robust evidence of investor clienteles for industry factor-price exposure: Investor interest, measured using share turnover and the number of institutions that hold a firm’s stock, is positively associated with stocks ’ industry exposure, and institutional investors systematically overweight (underweight) high (low) industry exposure stocks in their portfolios. Clientele effects are most pronounced in industries in which return correlation with the aggregate market is low, where the benefits from learning about industry risk and from substituting investment in high-exposure stocks for investment in the industry assets are greatest. Clientele effects are

Phil Davies; Bernadette A. Minton; Catherine Schrand

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Environmental Factors Altering Thyroid Function and Their Assessment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chronic ingestion of modest doses of dietary iodine, radiation, and polyhalogenated biphenyls (PCB's and PBB's) are environmental factors with known or suspected adverse effects on the human thyroid. Iodine consumption in the United States is approaching 1 mg daily for a large segment of the population. Data are reviewed which support the need for concern regarding the long-term adverse effects of dietary iodine on thyroid function, particularly in certain susceptible individuals. Environmental sources of radiation pose a significant risk of thyroid cancer and hypothyroidism under certain circumstances which may be intentional, inadvertent, or accidental. Exposure to polyhalogenated biphenyls during manufacture or as industrial pollutants are hazardous to man and to wildlife in moderate or large quantities and perhaps also in small amounts. The need to investigate the potential harm posed by these factors in the quantities commonly encountered is emphasized. A wide variety of environmental agents adversely affect the thyroid gland. Some have been precisely identified while others are not well characterized. Some are known to alter thyroid function

Charles P. Barsano*t

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "breeze otherf factors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Emission factors for ammonia and particulate matter from broiler Houses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Total suspended particulate (TSP) concentrations, ammonia (NH?) concentrations, and ventilation rates were measured in four commercial, tunnel ventilated broiler houses in June through December of 2000 in Brazos County, Texas. Particle size distributions were developed from TSP samplers collected and used to determine the mass fraction of PM?? in the TSP samples collected. Concentrations of TSP and ammonia measured were multiplied by the ventilation rates measured to obtain emission factors for PM?? and ammonia from tunnel ventilated commercial broiler houses. TSP and NH? concentrations ranged from 7,387 to 11,387 []g/m³ and 2.02 to 45 ppm, respectively. Ammonia concentration exhibited a correlation with the age of the birds. Mass median diameters (MMD) found using particle size analysis with a Coulter Counter Multisizer were between 24.0 and 26.7 mm aerodynamic equivalent diameter. MMD increased with bird age. The mass fraction of PM?? in the TSP samples was between 2.72% and 8.40% with a mean of 5.94%. Ventilation rates were measured between 0.58 and 89 m³/s. Ammonia emission rates varied from 38 to 2105 g/hr. TSP emission rates and PM?? emission rates ranged from 7.0 to 1673 g/hr 0.58 to 99 g/hr respectively. Emission rates for ammonia and particulate matter increased with the age of the birds. Error and sensitivity analysis was conducted using Monte Carlo simulation for the calculation of emission rates. Error for ammonia emission rates was 99 g/hr during tunnel ventilation and 6 g/hr during sidewall ventilation. Error for TSP emission rates was 79 g/hr and 11 g/hr for tunnel and sidewall ventilation respectively. Sensitivity analysis showed that ventilation rate measurements and measurement of ammonia concentration had the most effect on the emission rates. Emission factors of NH? and PM?? estimated for these buildings were 1.32 ± 0.472 g/bird and 22.8 ± 9.28 g/bird, respectively. These emission factors take into account the variation of PM?? and NH? concentrations and ventilation rates with the age of the birds.

Redwine, Jarah Suzanne

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Epstein-Barr Virus Lytic Infection Is Required for Efficient Production of the Angiogenesis Factor Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Although Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-associated malignancies are primarily composed of cells with one of the latent forms of EBV infection, a small subset of tumor cells containing the lytic form of infection is often observed. Whether the rare lytically infected tumor cells contribute to the growth of the latently infected tumor cells is unclear. Here we have investigated whether the lytically infected subset of early-passage lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) could potentially contribute to tumor growth through the production of angiogenesis factors. We demonstrate that supernatants from early-passage LCLs infected with BZLF1-deleted virus (Z-KO LCLs) are highly impaired in promoting endothelial cell tube formation in vitro compared to wild-type (WT) LCL supernatants. Furthermore, expression of the BZLF1 gene product in trans in Z-KO LCLs restored angiogenic capacity. The supernatants of Z-KO LCLs, as well as supernatants from LCLs derived with a BRLF1-deleted virus (R-KO LCLs), contained much less vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in comparison to WT LCLs. BZLF1 gene expression in Z-KO LCLs

In Lymphoblastoid Cell Lines; Gregory K. Hong; Pawan Kumar; Ling Wang; Blossom Damania; Margaret L. Gulley; Henri-jacques Delecluse; Peter J. Polverini; Shannon C. Kenney

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Revision of the APGEMS Dose Conversion Factor File Using Revised Factors from Federal Guidance Report 12 and 13.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Air Pollutant Graphical Environmental Monitoring System (APGEMS) is used by the Hanford Emergency Operation Center (EOC) to provide refined plume modeling of releases involving radionuclides. The dose conversion factors (DCFs) used by APGEMS to convert air concentration to dose are stored in a file called HUDUFACT.dat; the DCFs are based primarily on ICRP 30 compiled in the late 1980’s. This report updates the DCFs using more recent values reported in the Environmental Protection Agencies (EPAs) Federal Guidance Report (FGR) 12 and 13. FGR 12 provides external exposure (air submersion) DCFs for radionuclides in air; FGR 13 provides DCFs for radionuclides from inhalation. DCFs were updated for only those radionuclides listed in the original HUDUFACT.dat file. Since FGR 13 provides inhalation dose conversion factors as a function of age, revised DCF files were created for APGEMS for each age group. The “adult” DCF file is the most relevant to compare to the original DCF file being used in APGEMS; these DCF values are compared in this report.

Hay, Tristan R.; Rishel, Jeremy P.

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

444

Different Factors Impact Different Aspects of Gasoline Price  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 Notes: In order to illustrate and quantify, to a large extent, the various market forces driving gasoline prices, we begin by decomposing those factors according to their location within the supply chain, i.e., the international crude market, U.S. wholesale gasoline markets, and the retail segment. Historically, variation in gasoline prices usually stems from changes in crude oil prices. As the major feedstock in the production of gasoline, shifts in the balance between supply and demand in crude markets explain a large portion of observed movements at the retail level. But shifts in the wholesale gasoline supply/demand balance also contribute to price pressure or movements at both the wholesale and retail levels beyond that stemming from crude oil markets.

445

Factors Controlling the Solubility of Mercury Adsorbed on Fly Ash  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

N:\R&D_Projects_Partial\FlyAsh&CCBs\Meetings\2005_04_WorldOfCoalAsh\AnnKim\HgSol N:\R&D_Projects_Partial\FlyAsh&CCBs\Meetings\2005_04_WorldOfCoalAsh\AnnKim\HgSol ubility_Paper.doc Factors Controlling the Solubility of Mercury Adsorbed on Fly Ash Ann G. Kim 1 and Karl Schroeder 2 1 ORISE Research Fellow, National Energy Technology Laboratory, U.S. Department of Energy, 626 Cochrans Mill Rd., Pittsburgh, PA 15236-0940 2 Research Group Leader, National Energy Technology Laboratory, U.S. Department of Energy, 626 Cochrans Mill Rd., Pittsburgh, PA 15236-0940 KEYWORDS Coal Utilization By-Products, leaching, activated carbon, pH ABSTRACT It is expected that increased controls on Hg emissions will shift the environmental burden from the flue gas to the solid coal utilization by-products (CUB), such as fly ash and flue-gas

446

LEDSGP/DIA-Toolkit/Factors | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » LEDSGP/DIA-Toolkit/Factors < LEDSGP‎ | DIA-Toolkit Jump to: navigation, search LEDSGP Logo.png Development Impacts Assessment Toolkit Home Tools Request Assistance Development Impacts Assessment Dia goals actions.png Governments set national goals and priorities-social, economic, and environmental-that establish the context for government policies and programs. At the same time, many countries have defined low emission development strategies (LEDS) as a guiding framework for development. The purpose of development impacts assessment (DIA) is to identify and assess the impacts, including both positive impacts (e.g., improved air or

447

Use power factor correction to cut SCR rig fuel bills  

SciTech Connect

When drilling with SCR-powered drilling rigs, there are specific instances on every well when the kVA capacity of the AC generators prohibits efficient engine loading. It then becomes necessary to run another engine-generator set to provide sufficient kVA to power the load, even though the kW required by the load can be furnished by existing engine(s) on line. The practice of running one more engine than can be fully loaded causes all engines on line to run at a less efficient point on the brake specific fuel consumption curve (BSFC) and therefore costs more in terms of engine hours, fuel and maintenance costs. This article presents a study of the load represented by the mud pump and drawworks along with a graphical representation that shows the effect of these loads on the engine generator system both with and without a power factor correction device.

Logan, R.T.

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Modulated Ground State of Gravity Theories with Stabilized Conformal Factor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We discuss the stabilization of the conformal factor by higher derivative terms in a conformally reduced $R+R^2$ Euclidean gravity theory. The flat spacetime is unstable towards the condensation of modes with nonzero momentum, and they "condense" in a modulated phase above a critical value of the coupling $\\beta$ of the $R^2$ term. By employing a combination of variational, numerical and lattice methods we show that in the semiclassical limit the corresponding functional integral is dominated by a single nonlinear plane wave of frequency $\\approx 1/\\sqrt{\\beta} \\lp$. We argue that the ground state of the theory is characterized by a spontaneous breaking of translational invariance at Planckian scales.

Bonanno, Alfio

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Factors affecting quality of dried low-rank coals  

SciTech Connect

The chemical and physical properties of coal are strongly affected by the upgrading process employed. For high-moisture coals, upgrading involves thermal dehydration to improve the calorific value of the coal on mass basis. This study evaluates the feasibility of upgrading a low-rank/grade coal using the oven drying method. The objective of this research work is to study the drying characteristics of low-rank coals and to understand the factors affecting the quality of dried low-rank coals. This article describes laboratory experiments conducted on the characterization of the low-rank coals before and after the drying process. The results on drying kinetics, re-absorption of coal samples, and proximate analysis of coal samples before and after drying are discussed. It was found that the upgrading process produced coal with better heating value and combustion characteristics than those of the raw coal samples.

Karthikeyan, M.; Kuma, J.V.M.; Hoe, C.S.; Ngo, D.L.Y. [National University of Singapore, (Singapore)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Technical Change, Factor Demand and Interfactor/Interfuel Substitution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: With its rapid economic growth, China’s primary energy consumption has exceeded domestic energy production since 1994, leading to a substantial expansion in energy imports, particularly of oil. China’s energy demand has an increasingly significant impact on global energy markets. In this paper Allen partial elasticities of factor and energy substitution, and price elasticities of energy demand, are calculated for China using a two-stage translog cost function approach. The results suggest that energy is substitutable with both capital and labour. Coal is significantly substitutable with electricity and complementary with diesel while gasoline and electricity are substitutable with diesel. China’s energy intensity is increasing during the study period (1995-2004) and the major driver appears to be due to the increased use of energy intensive technology. Keywords: China; Interfactor/interfuel substitution; Technology; Energy intensity decomposition

Hengyun Ma; Les Oxley; John Gibson; Bongguen Kim; Hengyun Ma; Les Oxley; John Gibson; Bongguen Kim

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

kt-factorization for Hard Processes in Nuclei  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two widely proposed kt-dependent gluon distributions in the small-x saturation regime are investigated using two particle back-to-back correlations in high energy scattering processes. The Weizsacker-Williams gluon distribution, interpreted as the number density of gluon inside the nucleus, is studied in the quark-antiquark jet correlation in deep inelastic scattering. On the other hand, the unintegrated gluon distribution, defined as the Fourier transform of the color-dipole cross section, is probed in the direct photon-jet correlation in pA collisions. Dijet-correlation in pA collisions depends on both gluon distributions through combination and convolution in the large Nc limit. We calculate these processes in two approaches: the transverse momentum dependent factorization approach and the color-dipole/color glass condensate formalism, and they agree with each other completely.

Dominguez, Fabio; Xiao, Bo-Wen; Yuan, Feng

2010-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

452

The electric and magnetic form factors of the proton  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The paper describes a precise measurement of electron scattering off the proton at momentum transfers of $0.003 \\lesssim Q^2 \\lesssim 1$\\ GeV$^2$. The average point-to-point error of the cross sections in this experiment is $\\sim$ 0.37%. These data are used for a coherent new analysis together with all world data of unpolarized and polarized electron scattering from the very smallest to the highest momentum transfers so far measured. The extracted electric and magnetic form factors provide new insight into their exact shape, deviating from the classical dipole form, and of structure on top of this gross shape. The data reaching very low $Q^2$ values are used for a new determination of the electric and magnetic radii. An empirical determination of the Two-Photon-Exchange (TPE) correction is presented. The implications of this correction on the radii and the question of a directly visible signal of the pion cloud are addressed.

A1 Collaboration; J. C. Bernauer; M. O. Distler; J. Friedrich; Th. Walcher; P. Achenbach C. Ayerbe Gayoso; R. Böhm; L. Debenjak; L. Doria; A. Esser; H. Fonvieille; M. Gómez Rodrígues de la Paz; J. M. Friedrich; M. Makek; H. Merkel; D. G. Middleton; U. Müller; L. Nungesser; J. Pochodzalla; M. Potokar; S. Sánchez Majos; B. S. Schlimme; S. Širca; M. Weinriefer

2013-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

453

Connecting Chromatin Modifying Factors to DNA Damage Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: Cells are constantly damaged by factors that can induce DNA damage. Eukaryotic cells must rapidly load DNA repair proteins onto damaged chromatin during the DNA damage response (DDR). Chromatin-remodeling complexes use the energy from ATP hydrolysis to remodel nucleosomes and have well-established functions in transcription. Emerging lines of evidence indicate that chromatin-remodeling complexes are important and may remodel nucleosomes during DNA damage repair. New studies also reveal that ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling is involved in cell cycle progression, signal transduction pathways, and interaction and modification of DDR-related proteins that are specifically and intimately connected with the process of DNA damage. This article summarizes the recent advances in our understanding of the interplay between chromatin remodeling and DNA damage response.

Weiwei Lai; Hongde Li; Shuang Liu; Yongguang Tao

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Factors relevant to utility integration of intermittent renewable technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study assesses factors that utilities must address when they integrate intermittent renewable technologies into their power-supply systems; it also reviews the literature in this area and has a bibliography containing more than 350 listings. Three topics are covered: (1) interface (hardware and design-related interconnection), (2) operability/stability, and (3) planning. This study finds that several commonly held perceptions regarding integration of intermittent renewable energy technologies are not valid. Among findings of the study are the following: (1) hardware and system design advances have eliminated most concerns about interface; (2) cost penalties have not occurred at low to moderate penetration levels (and high levels are feasible); and (3) intermittent renewable energy technologies can have capacity values. Obstacles still interfering with intermittent renewable technologies are also identified.

Wan, Yih-huei; Parsons, B.K.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Forecasting the Bayes factor of a future observation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I present a new procedure to forecast the Bayes factor of a future observation by computing the Predictive Posterior Odds Distribution (PPOD). This can assess the power of future experiments to answer model selection questions and the probability of the outcome, and can be helpful in the context of experiment design. As an illustration, I consider a central quantity for our understanding of the cosmological concordance model, namely the scalar spectral index of primordial perturbations, n_S. I show that the Planck satellite has over 90% probability of gathering strong evidence against n_S = 1, thus conclusively disproving a scale-invariant spectrum. This result is robust with respect to a wide range of choices for the prior on n_S.

Roberto Trotta

2007-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

456

Human factors assessments of D and D technologies  

SciTech Connect

On April 2, 1997, the US Secretary of Energy directed the US Assistant Secretary of Environmental Management and of Safety and Health to require field input of appropriate data to ensure that safety and health considerations were properly addressed in the Accelerating Cleanup: Focus on 2006 Plan. The US Department of Energy (DOE) field managers have committed to the Secretary that they will fully implement integrated safety management systems (ISMSs) at their respective sites by the end of fiscal year 1999. The Secretary has further directed that headquarters safety and health guidance be developed to support consistent and comprehensive project baseline summaries from the field. The Secretary has committed to institutionalizing ISMS as an integral component of the way the DOE conducts its business. The Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board continues to oversee and closely monitor the DOE's commitment to the safety and health of its workers. The DOE is committed to a management system approach to ensure that work is performed in a manner that protects the worker, public, and environment. The Deactivation and Decommissioning Focus Area (DDFA) is actively addressing the need to incorporate environmental safety and health (ES and H) considerations in developing technologies. The DDFA is partnered with the Operating Engineers National Hazmat Program (OENHP) to evaluate the ES and H considerations of the innovative and improved decontamination and decommissioning technologies. Part of the implementation of the ES and H work practices in the field is through a cooperative agreement between the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) and the OENHP. The objective of this program is to establish an International Environmental Technology and Training Center to conduct human factors assessments and protocols on environmental technologies. The intent of the human factors assessments is to enhance the effectiveness and efficiency of the technologies and to enhance desirable human values, including job satisfaction and improved quality of worker life. An important part of the effort is to develop ES and H training tools for each evaluated technology.

Carpenter, C.P.; Evans, T.T.; McCabe, B.

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Recoil polarization measurements of the proton electromagnetic form factor ratio to high momentum transfer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The electromagnetic form factors of the nucleon characterize the effect of its internal structure on its response to an electromagnetic probe as studied in elastic electronnucleon scattering. These form factors are functions ...

Puckett, Andrew James Ruehe

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Do internal factors of cooperation influence computer-mediated distance activity?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On the one hand, researchers have studied factors that influence collaboration and on the other, researchers have proposed models of collaborative problem solving. However, we have not found research on the relation between these factors and the dimensions ...

Kristine Lund; Céline Rossetti; Stéphanie Metz

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Regulation of osteoclast differentiation by transcription factors MITF, PU.1 and EOS.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF), a basic helix-loop-helix leucine zipper (bHLH-Zip) transcription factor, regulates distinct target genes in several cell types including osteoclasts. Osteoclasts are… (more)

Hu, Rong

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Induction of growth factor RNA expression in human malignant melanoma: markers of transformation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Alteration in the expression of growth factors is widely accepted as being one of several critical defects in the generation of the malignant cell. In the present study, 19 human metastatic melanoma cell lines were compared to 14 normal human foreskin melanocyte cell lines for the production of RNA transcripts specific for 11 different growth factors. Using the extremely sensitive technique of polymerase chain reaction to amplify growth factor-specific complementary DNAs, we analyzed the following: transforming growth factor (TGF) types a, fi,, ti¡.and /i.,,acidic (a) fibroblast growth factor (FGF), basic (b) FGF, FGF-5, keratinocyte growth factor (KGF), HST, and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) types A and B. There were clear distinctions among the patterns of growth factor RNA expression by normal melanocytes and malignant melanoma cells. The prototypic melanocyte pattern of expression in cluded TGF0!, TGF/Sj, and KGF. A subset of melanocyte cell lines also

Anthony P. Albino; Brigid M. Davis; David M. Nanus; Contact The Aacr Publications; Anthony P. Albino; Brigid M. Davis; David M. Nanus

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "breeze otherf factors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

A Model for Water Factor Measurements With Fission-Neutron Logging...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

A Model for Water Factor Measurements With Fission-Neutron Logging Tools (May 1983) A Model for Water Factor Measurements With Fission-Neutron Logging Tools (May 1983) A Model for...

462

Computing and Mapping Thiessen Weighting Factors from Digitized District Boundaries and Climatological Station Latitudes and Longitudes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A set of procedures, including computer software, which derive weighting factors for reducing point weather data to an areal district basis, are described and demonstrated. Areal estimates obtained by applying such weighting factors can be used, ...

H. N. Hayhoe; G. D. V. Williams

1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

The neutron electric form factor to Q² = 1.45 (GeV/c)²  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The nucleon elastic electromagnetic form factors are fundamental quantities needed for an understanding of nucleon and nuclear electromagnetic structure. The evolution of the Sachs electric and magnetic form factors with ...

Plaster, Bradley R. (Bradley Robert), 1976-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

N and N to Delta transition form factors from Lattice QCD  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present recent lattice QCD results on nucleon form factors and N to Delta transition form factors. We predict the parity violating asymmetry in N to Delta and check the off-diagonal Goldberger-Treiman relation.

C. Alexandrou

2006-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

465

Some social factors of software engineering: the maverick, community and technical practices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

While the importance of 'people factors' in software engineering has been recognised for over 25 years, few specific factors, and their impact on software engineering, have been identified. 'People factors' covers a wide and diverse set of issues. In ... Keywords: community, ethnography, maverick

Helen Sharp; Hugh Robinson

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Evaluation criteria for blog design and analysis of causal relationships using factor analysis and DEMATEL  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this study is to find the key factors influencing blog design, and explore the causal relationships between the criteria for each factor. Since design is a multiple criteria decision-making (MCDM) problem, this study adopts a model which ... Keywords: Blog design, DEMATEL, Factor analysis, Multiple criteria decision-making (MCDM)

Chun-Cheng Hsu

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Extracellular nonmitogenic angiogenesis factor and method of isolation thereof from wound fluid  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nonmitogenic angiogenesis factor is isolated from wound fluid by dialysis to include materials in the molecular size range of 2,000 to 14,000, lyophilization, and chromatography. The nonmitogenic angiogenesis factor is identified by activity by corneal implant assay and by cell migration assay. The angiogenesis factor is also characterized by inactivity by mitogenesis assay.

Banda, Michael J. (San Francisco, CA); Werb, Zena (San Francisco, CA); Knighton, David R. (San Francisco, CA); Hunt, Thomas K. (San Francisco, CA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Human factors engineering as the methodological babel fish: translating user needs into software design  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The aim of this paper is to show, by way of two case studies, the value of including Human Factors in interaction and interface design specification. It is argued that Human Factors offers and unique and useful perspective and contributes positively ... Keywords: case study, human factors methods, requirements specification

Neville A. Stanton

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs Guidelines to Defra's Greenhouse Gas Conversion Factors for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs Guidelines to Defra's Greenhouse Gas Conversion Factors for Company Reporting June 2008 What are Greenhouse Gas Conversion Factors? These conversion factors allow companies and individuals to calculate greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from a range

470

Decommissioning Cost Estimating Factors And Earned Value Integration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Rocky Flats 771 Project progressed from the planning stage of decommissioning a plutonium facility, through the strip-out of highly-contaminated equipment, removal of utilities and structural decontamination, and building demolition. Actual cost data was collected from the strip-out activities and compared to original estimates, allowing the development of cost by equipment groupings and types and over time. Separate data was developed from the project control earned value reporting and compared with the equipment data. The paper discusses the analysis to develop the detailed factors for the different equipment types, and the items that need to be considered during characterization of a similar facility when preparing an estimate. The factors are presented based on direct labor requirements by equipment type. The paper also includes actual support costs, and examples of fixed or one-time start-up costs. The integration of the estimate and the earned value system used for the 771 Project is also discussed. The paper covers the development of the earned value system as well as its application to a facility to be decommissioned and an existing work breakdown structure. Lessons learned are provided, including integration with scheduling and craft supervision, measurement approaches, and verification of scope completion. In summary: The work of decommissioning the Rocky Flats 771 Project process equipment was completed in 2003. Early in the planning process, we had difficulty in identifying credible data and implementing processes for estimating and controlling this work. As the project progressed, we were able to collect actual data on the costs of removing plutonium contaminated equipment from various areas over the life of this work and associate those costs with individual pieces of equipment. We also were able to develop and test out a system for measuring the earned value of a decommissioning project based on an evolving estimate. These were elements that would have been useful to us in our early planning process, and we would expect that they would find application elsewhere as the DOE weapons complex and some commercial nuclear facilities move towards closure. (authors)

Sanford, P.C.; Cimmarron, E. [Englewood, CO, B. Skokan, Office of Project Management Oversight, EM-53, United States Department of Energy, Washington, DC (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Table A12. Selected Combustible Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Type" Type" " and End Use, 1994: Part 2" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" ,,,,,,,"Coal" ,,,"Residual","Distillate",,,"(excluding","RSE" "SIC",,"Net Demand","Fuel","Fuel Oil and","Natural",,"Coal Coke","Row" "Code(a)","End-Use Categories","for Electricity(b)","Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","Gas(d)","LPG","and Breeze)","Factors" "20-39","ALL INDUSTRY GROUPS" ,"RSE Column Factors:",0.5,1.4,1.4,0.8,1.2,1.2 ,"TOTAL INPUTS",3132,441,152,6141,99,1198,2.4

472

" Electricity Sales/Transfers Out",96,4  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4. Total First Use (formerly Primary Consumption) of Energy for All Purposes" 4. Total First Use (formerly Primary Consumption) of Energy for All Purposes" " by Selected Energy Sources, 1994" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" ,,"RSE" ,,"Row" "Selected Energy Sources","Total","Factors" ,"Total United States" "RSE Column Factor:",1 "Coal ",2105,4 "Natural Gas",6835,3 "Net Electricity",2656,2 " Purchased Electricity",2689,1 " Transfers In",53,4 " Generation from Noncombustible",," " " Renewable Resources",10,10 " Electricity Sales/Transfers Out",96,4 "Coke and Breeze",449,8 "Residual Fuel Oil",490,3

473

Table A37. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2" 2" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" ,,,,,,,"Coal" ,,,,"Distillate",,,"(excluding" ,,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal Coke",,"RSE" ,,"Net","Residual","and Diesel",,,"and",,"Row" "End-Use Categories","Total","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Fuel(b)","Natural Gas(c)","LPG","Breeze)","Other(d)","Factors" "Total United States" "RSE Column Factors:","NF",0.4,1.6,1.5,0.7,1,1.6,"NF" "TOTAL INPUTS",15027,2370,414,139,5506,105,1184,5309,3 "Boiler Fuel","--","W",296,40,2098,18,859,"--",3.6

474

Table A39. Selected Combustible Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9. Selected Combustible Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and" 9. Selected Combustible Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and" " Electricity Generation and Net Demand for Electricity by Fuel Type, Census" " Region, and End Use, 1991: Part 2" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" ,,,"Distillate",,,"Coal" ,"Net Demand",,"Fuel Oil",,,"(excluding","RSE" ,"for","Residual","and",,,"Coal Coke","Row" "End-Use Categories","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","Natural Gas(c)","LPG","and Breeze)","Factors" "Total United States" "RSE Column Factors:",0.4,1.7,1.5,0.7,1,1.6

475

"Table A24. Total Expenditures for Purchased Energy Sources by Census Region,"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4. Total Expenditures for Purchased Energy Sources by Census Region," 4. Total Expenditures for Purchased Energy Sources by Census Region," " Industry Group, and Selected Industries, 1991" " (Estimates in Million Dollars)" ,,,,,,,,,,,"RSE" "SIC"," "," "," ","Residual","Distillate ","Natural"," "," ","Coke"," ","Row" "Code(a)","Industry Groupsc and Industry","Total","Electricity","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","Gas(c)","LPG","Coal","and Breeze","Other(d)","Factors" ,,"Total United States" ,"RSE Column Factors:","0.6 ",0.6,1.3,1.3,0.7,1.2,1.2,1.5,1.1

476

Table A38. Selected Combustible Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2" 2" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" ,,,,,,,"Coal" ,,"Net Demand","Residual","Distillate",,,"(excluding","RSE" "SIC",,"for Electri-","Fuel","Fuel Oil and","Natural",,"Coal Coke","Row" "Code","End-Use Categories","city(b)","Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","Gas(d)","LPG","and Breeze)","Factors" "20-39","ALL INDUSTRY GROUPS" ,"RSE Column Factors:",0.4,1.7,1.5,0.7,1,1.6 ,"TOTAL INPUTS",2799,414,139,5506,105,1184,3 ,"Boiler Fuel",32,296,40,2098,18,859,3.6 ,"Total Process Uses",2244,109,34,2578,64,314,4.1

477

Table A11. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generatio  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2" 2" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" ,,,,,,,"Coal" ,,,,"Distillate",,,"(excluding" ,,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal Coke",,"RSE" ,,"Net","Residual","and Diesel",,,"and",,"Row" "End-Use Categories","Total","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Fuel(b)","Natural Gas(c)","LPG","Breeze)","Other(d)","Factors" ,"Total United States" "RSE Column Factors:"," NF",0.5,1.3,1.4,0.8,1.2,1.2," NF" "TOTAL INPUTS",16515,2656,441,152,6141,99,1198,5828,2.7 "Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel"," --",28,313,42,2396,15,875," --",4

478

Handbook of Emission Factors for Road Transport (HBEFA) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

of Emission Factors for Road Transport (HBEFA) of Emission Factors for Road Transport (HBEFA) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Handbook of Emission Factors for Road Transport (HBEFA) Focus Area: Clean Transportation Topics: Policy, Deployment, & Program Impact Website: www.hbefa.net/e/index.html Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/handbook-emission-factors-road-transp Language: "English,French,German" is not in the list of possible values (Abkhazian, Achinese, Acoli, Adangme, Adyghe; Adygei, Afar, Afrihili, Afrikaans, Afro-Asiatic languages, Ainu, Akan, Akkadian, Albanian, Aleut, Algonquian languages, Altaic languages, Amharic, Angika, Apache languages, Arabic, Aragonese, Arapaho, Arawak, Armenian, Aromanian; Arumanian; Macedo-Romanian, Artificial languages, Assamese, Asturian; Bable; Leonese; Asturleonese, Athapascan languages, Australian languages, Austronesian languages, Avaric, Avestan, Awadhi, Aymara, Azerbaijani, Balinese, Baltic languages, Baluchi, Bambara, Bamileke languages, Banda languages, Bantu (Other), Basa, Bashkir, Basque, Batak languages, Beja; 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Castilian, Sranan Tongo, Sukuma, Sumerian, Sundanese, Susu, Swahili, Swati, Swedish, Swiss German; Alemannic; Alsatian, Syriac, Tagalog, Tahitian, Tai languages, Tajik, Tamashek, Tamil, Tatar, Telugu, Tereno, Tetum, Thai, Tibetan, Tigre, Tigrinya, Timne, Tiv, Tlingit, Tok Pisin, Tokelau, Tonga (Nyasa), Tonga (Tonga Islands), Tsimshian, Tsonga, Tswana, Tumbuka, Tupi languages, Turkish, Turkmen, Tuvalu, Tuvinian, Twi, Udmurt, Ugaritic, Uighur; Uyghur, Ukrainian, Umbundu, Uncoded languages, Undetermined, Upper Sorbian, Urdu, Uzbek, Vai, Venda, Vietnamese, Volapük, Votic, Wakashan languages, Walamo, Walloon, Waray, Washo, Welsh, Western Frisian, Wolof, Xhosa, Yakut, Yao, Yapese, Yiddish, Yoruba, Yupik languages, Zande languages, Zapotec, Zaza; Dimili; Dimli; Kirdki; Kirmanjki; Zazaki, Zenaga, Zhuang; Chuang, Zulu, Zuni) for this property.

479

FORM FACTORS FOR RADIATIVE PION AND KAON DECAYS Updated August  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

August August 2009 by W. Bertl (Paul Scherrer Inst.) The radiative decays, π ± → l ± νγ and K ± → l ± νγ, with l standing for an e or a µ, and γ for a real or virtual photon (e + e - pair), provide a powerful tool to investigate the hadronic structure of pions and kaons. The structure-dependent part SD i of the amplitude describes the emission of photons from virtual hadronic states, and is parametrized in terms of form factors F i , with i = V, A (vector, axial vector), in the standard description [1,2]. Exotic, non-standard contributions like i = T, S (tensor, scalar) have also been considered, and we shall discuss them below. Apart from the SD terms, the decay amplitude depends also on Inner Bremsstrahlung IB from the weak decay π ± (K ± ) → l ± ν accompanied by the photon radiated from the external charged particles. Naturally, experiments try to optimize their kinematics so as to minimize

480

Highly Efficient Small Form Factor LED Retrofit Lamp  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes work to develop a high efficiency LED-based MR16 lamp downlight at OSRAM SYLVANIA under US Department of Energy contract DE-EE0000611. A new multichip LED package, electronic driver, and reflector optic were developed for these lamps. At steady-state, the lamp luminous flux was 409 lumens (lm), luminous efficacy of 87 lumens per watt (LPW), CRI (Ra) of 87, and R9 of 85 at a correlated color temperature (CCT) of 3285K. The LED alone achieved 120 lumens per watt efficacy and 600 lumen flux output at 25 C. The driver had 90% electrical conversion efficiency while maintaining excellent power quality with power factor >0.90 at a power of only 5 watts. Compared to similar existing MR16 lamps using LED sources, these lamps had much higher efficacy and color quality. The objective of this work was to demonstrate a LED-based MR16 retrofit lamp for replacement of 35W halogen MR16 lamps having (1) luminous flux of 500 lumens, (2) luminous efficacy of 100 lumens per watt, (3) beam angle less than 40{sup o} and center beam candlepower of at least 1000 candelas, and (4) excellent color quality.

Steven Allen; Fred Palmer; Ming Li

2011-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

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481

Factors controlling pathogen destruction during anaerobic digestion of biowastes  

SciTech Connect

Anaerobic digestion is the principal method of stabilising biosolids from urban wastewater treatment in the UK, and it also has application for the treatment of other types of biowaste. Increasing awareness of the potential risks to human and animal health from environmental sources of pathogens has focused attention on the efficacy of waste treatment processes at destroying pathogenic microorganisms in biowastes recycled to agricultural land. The degree of disinfection achieved by a particular anaerobic digester is influenced by a variety of interacting operational variables and conditions, which can often deviate from the ideal. Experimental investigations demonstrate that Escherichia coli and Salmonella spp. are not damaged by mesophilic temperatures, whereas rapid inactivation occurs by thermophilic digestion. A hydraulic, biokinetic and thermodynamic model of pathogen inactivation during anaerobic digestion showed that a 2 log{sub 10} reduction in E. coli (the minimum removal required for agricultural use of conventionally treated biosolids) is likely to challenge most conventional mesophilic digesters, unless strict maintenance and management practices are adopted to minimise dead zones and by-pass flow. Efficient mixing and organic matter stabilisation are the main factors controlling the rate of inactivation under mesophilic conditions and not a direct effect of temperature per se on pathogenic organisms.

Smith, S.R. [Centre for Environmental Control and Waste Management, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Imperial College London, South Kensington Campus, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: s.r.smith@imperial.ac.uk; Lang, N.L. [Centre for Environmental Control and Waste Management, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Imperial College London, South Kensington Campus, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Cheung, K.H.M. [Centre for Environmental Control and Waste Management, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Imperial College London, South Kensington Campus, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Spanoudaki, K. [Centre for Environmental Control and Waste Management, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Imperial College London, South Kensington Campus, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

The Transcription Factor PU.1 Regulates cd T Cell  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Background: T cell development results in the generation of both mature ab and cd T cells. While ab T cells predominate in secondary lymphoid organs, cd T cells are more abundant in mucosal tissues. PU.1, an Ets family transcription factor, also identified as the spleen focus forming virus proviral integration site-1 (Sfpi1) is essential for early stages of T cell development, but is down regulated during the DN T-cell stage. Methodology/Principal Findings: In this study, we show that in mice specifically lacking PU.1 in T cells using an lck-Cre transgene with a conditional Sfpi1 allele (Sfpi1 lck2/2) there are increased numbers of cd T cells in spleen, thymus and in the intestine when compared to wild-type mice. The increase in cd T cell numbers in PU.1-deficient mice is consistent in cd T cell subsets identified by TCR variable regions. PU.1-deficient cd T cells demonstrate greater proliferation in vivo and in vitro. Conclusions/Significance: The increase of cd T cell numbers in Lck-Cre deleter strains, where deletion occurs after PU.1 expression is diminished, as well as the observation that PU.1-deficient cd T cells have greater proliferative responses than wild type cells, suggests that PU.1 effects are not developmental but rather at the level of homeostasis. Thus, our data

Rukhsana Jabeen; Hua-chen Chang; Ritobrata Goswami; Stephen L. Nutt; Mark H. Kaplan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

Knowledge Elecitation for Factors Affecting Taskforce Productivity using a Questionnaire  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we present the process of Knowledge Elicitation through a structured questionnaire technique. This is an effort to depict a problem domain as Investigation of factors affecting taskforce productivity. The problem has to be solved using the expert system technology. This problem is the very first step how to acquire knowledge from the domain experts. Knowledge Elicitation is one of the difficult tasks in knowledge base formation which is a key component of expert system. The questionnaire was distributed among 105 different domain experts of Public and Private Organizations (i.e. Education Institutions, Industries and Research etc) in Pakistan. A total 61 responses from these experts were received. All the experts were well qualified, highly experienced and has been remained the members for selection committees a number of times for different posts. Facts acquired were analyzed from which knowledge was extracted and elicited. A standard shape was given to the questionnaire for further research as a knowledge learning tool. This tool may be used as a standard document for selection and promotion of employees.

Muhammad Sohail; Abdur Rashid Khan

2009-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

484

Nucleon Form Factors and Hidden Symmetry in Holographic QCD  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The vector dominance of the electromagnetic form factors both for mesons and baryons arises naturally in holographic QCD, where both the number of colors and the 't Hooft coupling are taken to be very large, offering a bona-fide derivation of the notion of vector dominance. The crucial ingredient for this is the infinite tower of vector mesons in the approximations made which share features that are characteristic of the quenched approximation in lattice QCD. We approximate the infinite sum by contributions from the lowest four vector mesons of the tower which turn out to saturate the charge and magnetic moment sum rules within a few percent and compute them totally free of unknown parameters for momentum transfers Q^2 less than 1GeV^2. We identify certain observables that can be reliably computed within the approximations and others that are not, and discuss how the improvement of the latter can enable one to bring holographic QCD closer to QCD proper.

Deog Ki Hong; Mannque Rho; Ho-Ung Yee; Piljin Yi

2007-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

485

Nucleon form factors and hidden symmetry in holographic QCD  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The vector dominance of the electromagnetic form factors both for mesons and baryons arises naturally in holographic QCD, where both the number of colors and the 't Hooft coupling are taken to be very large, offering a bona-fide derivation of the notion of vector dominance. The crucial ingredient for this is the infinite tower of vector mesons in the approximations made which share features that are characteristic of the quenched approximation in lattice QCD. We approximate the infinite sum by contributions from the lowest four vector mesons of the tower which turn out to saturate the charge and magnetic moment sum rules within a few percent and compute them totally free of unknown parameters for momentum transfers Q{sup 2} < or approx. 1 GeV{sup 2}. We identify certain observables that can be reliably computed within the approximations and others that are not, and discuss how the improvement of the latter can enable one to bring holographic QCD closer to QCD proper.

Hong, Deog Ki [Department of Physics, Pusan National University, Busan 609-735 (Korea, Republic of); Rho, Mannque [Service de Physique Theorique, CEA Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Yee, Ho-Ung [School of Physics, Korea Institute for Advanced Study, Seoul 130-722 (Korea, Republic of); Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics, Strada Costiera 11, 34014, Trieste (Italy); Yi, Piljin [School of Physics, Korea Institute for Advanced Study, Seoul 130-722 (Korea, Republic of)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

Neutron charge radius and the neutron electric form factor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For nearly forty years, the Galster parametrization has been employed to fit existing data for the neutron electric form factor, G{sub E}{sup n}, vs the square of the four-momentum transfer, Q{sup 2}. Typically this parametrization is constrained to be consistent with experimental data for the neutron charge radius. However, we find that the Galster form does not have sufficient freedom to accommodate reasonable values of the radius without constraining or compromising the fit. In addition, the G{sub E}{sup n} data are now at sufficient precision to motivate a two-parameter fit (or three parameters if we include thermal neutron data). Here we present a modified form of a two-dipole parametrization that allows this freedom and fits both G{sub E}{sup n} (including recent data at both low and high four-momentum transfer) and the charge radius well with simple, well-defined parameters. Analysis reveals that the Galster form is essentially a two-parameter approximation to the two-dipole form but becomes degenerate if we try to extend it naturally to three parameters.

Gentile, T. R. [Stop 8461, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 (United States); Crawford, C. B. [University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky 40506 (United States)

2011-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

487

Major Risk Factors Integrated Facility Disposition Project - Oak Ridge  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

O O O f f f f i i c c e e o o f f E E n n v v i i r r o o n n m m e e n n t t a a l l M M a a n n a a g g e e m m e e n n t t ( ( E E M M ) ) E E n n g g i i n n e e e e r r i i n n g g a a n n d d T T e e c c h h n n o o l l o o g g y y External Technical Review (ETR) Report Major Risk Factors Integrated Facility Disposition Project (IFDP) Oak Ridge, TN AUGUST 1, 2008 Acknowledgement The External Technical Review of the Integrated Facility Disposition Project was conducted simultaneous to other assessments and visits. The ETR Team wishes to note the outstanding support received from all parties involved in the review, including the DOE Oak Ridge Office, the National Nuclear Security Administration Y-12 Site Office, UT-Battelle, B&W Y-12, and the Professional Project Services, Inc. (Pro2Serve). The ETR Team feels compelled to note, and

488

Abstract--Distribution factors play a key role in many system security analysis and market applications. The injection shift  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Abstract-- Distribution factors play a key role in many system security analysis and market of the other distribution factors. The line outage distribution factors (LODFs) may be computed using the ISFs distribution factors, line outage distribution factors, multiple-line outages, system security. I. INTRODUCTION

489

Radium concentration factors and their use in health and environmental risk assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radium is known to be taken up by aquatic animals, and tends to accumulate in bone, shell and exoskeleton. The most common approach to estimating the uptake of a radionuclide by aquatic animals for use in health and environmental risk assessments is the concentration factor method. The concentration factor method relates the concentration of a contaminant in an organism to the concentration in the surrounding water. Site specific data are not usually available, and generic, default values are often used in risk assessment studies. This paper describes the concentration factor method, summarizes some of the variables which may influence the concentration factor for radium, reviews reported concentration factors measured in marine environments and presents concentration factors derived from data collected in a study in coastal Louisiana. The use of generic default values for the concentration factor is also discussed.

Meinhold, A.F.; Hamilton, L.D.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

Radium concentration factors and their use in health and environmental risk assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radium is known to be taken up by aquatic animals, and tends to accumulate in bone, shell and exoskeleton. The most common approach to estimating the uptake of a radionuclide by aquatic animals for use in health and environmental risk assessments is the concentration factor method. The concentration factor method relates the concentration of a contaminant in an organism to the concentration in the surrounding water. Site specific data are not usually available, and generic, default values are often used in risk assessment studies. This paper describes the concentration factor method, summarizes some of the variables which may influence the concentration factor for radium, reviews reported concentration factors measured in marine environments and presents concentration factors derived from data collected in a study in coastal Louisiana. The use of generic default values for the concentration factor is also discussed.

Meinhold, A.F.; Hamilton, L.D.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

491

Characterizing the interplay betwen mulitple levels of organization within bacterial sigma factor regulatory networks  

SciTech Connect

Bacteria contain multiple sigma factors, each targeting diverse, but often overlapping sets of promoters, thereby forming a complex network. The layout and deployment of such a sigma factor network directly impacts global transcriptional regulation and ultimately dictates the phenotype. Here we integrate multi-omic data sets to determine the topology, the operational, and functional states of the sigma factor network in Geobacter sulfurreducens, revealing a unique network topology of interacting sigma factors. Analysis of the operational state of the sigma factor network shows a highly modular structure with sN being the major regulator of energy metabolism. Surprisingly, the functional state of the network during the two most divergent growth conditions is nearly static, with sigma factor binding profiles almost invariant to environmental stimuli. This first comprehensive elucidation of the interplay between different levels of the sigma factor network organization is fundamental to characterize transcriptional regulatory mechanisms in bacteria.

Yu, Qiu [University of California, San Diego; Nagarajan, Harish [University of California, San Diego; Embree, Mallory [University of California, San Diego; Shieu, Wendy [University of California, San Diego; Abate, Elisa [University of California, San Diego; Juarez, Katy [Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico (UNAM); Cho, Byung-Kwan [University of California, San Diego; Elkins, James G [ORNL; Nevin, Kelly P. [University of Massachusetts, Amherst; Barrett, Christian [University of California, San Diego; Lovley, Derek [University of Massachusetts, Amherst; Palsson, Bernhard O. [University of California, San Diego; Zengler, Karsten [University of California, San Diego

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

492

The effects of transcription factor competition on gene regulation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Transcription factor (TF) molecules translocate by facilitated diffusion (a combination of 3D diffusion around and 1D random walk on the DNA). Despite the attention this mechanism received in the last 40 years, only a few studies investigated the influence of the cellular environment on the facilitated diffusion mechanism and, in particular, the influence of `other' DNA binding proteins competing with the TF molecules for DNA space. Molecular crowding on the DNA is likely to influence the association rate of TFs to their target site and the steady state occupancy of those sites, but it is still not clear how it influences the search in a genome-wide context, when the model includes biologically relevant parameters (such as: TF abundance, TF affinity for DNA and TF dynamics on the DNA). We performed stochastic simulations of TFs performing the facilitated diffusion mechanism, and considered various abundances of cognate and non-cognate TFs. We show that, for both obstacles that move on the DNA and obstacles that are fixed on the DNA, changes in search time are not statistically significant in case of biologically relevant crowding levels on the DNA. In the case of non-cognate proteins that slide on the DNA, molecular crowding on the DNA always leads to statistically significant lower levels of occupancy, which may confer a general mechanism to control gene activity levels globally. When the `other' molecules are immobile on the DNA, we found a completely different behaviour, namely: the occupancy of the target site is always increased by higher molecular crowding on the DNA. Finally, we show that crowding on the DNA may increase transcriptional noise through increased variability of the occupancy time of the target sites.

Nicolae Radu Zabet; Boris Adryan

2013-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

493

Applying Human Factors during the SIS Life Cycle  

SciTech Connect

Safety Instrumented Systems (SIS) are widely used in U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) nonreactor nuclear facilities for safety-critical applications. Although use of the SIS technology and computer-based digital controls, can improve performance and safety, it potentially introduces additional complexities, such as failure modes that are not readily detectable. Either automated actions or manual (operator) actions may be required to complete the safety instrumented function to place the process in a safe state or mitigate a hazard in response to an alarm or indication. DOE will issue a new standard, Application of Safety Instrumented Systems Used at DOE Nonreactor Nuclear Facilities, to provide guidance for the design, procurement, installation, testing, maintenance, operation, and quality assurance of SIS used in safety significant functions at DOE nonreactor nuclear facilities. The DOE standard focuses on utilizing the process industry consensus standard, American National Standards Institute/ International Society of Automation (ANSI/ISA) 84.00.01, Functional Safety: Safety Instrumented Systems for the Process Industry Sector, to support reliable SIS design throughout the DOE complex. SIS design must take into account human-machine interfaces and their limitations and follow good human factors engineering (HFE) practices. HFE encompasses many diverse areas (e.g., information display, user-system interaction, alarm management, operator response, control room design, and system maintainability), which affect all aspects of system development and modification. This paper presents how the HFE processes and principles apply throughout the SIS life cycle to support the design and use of SIS at DOE nonreactor nuclear facilities.

Avery, K.

2010-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

494

Sociopsychological factors affecting the human response to noise exposure  

SciTech Connect

Community noise is reported to be the most often mentioned undesirable neighborhood condition in a recent US Census survey. Understanding community response to noise involves the measurement of a number of complex acoustic and nonacoustic variables and establishing the chain of relationships between physical exposure, perception, annoyance, and acceptability responses and finally complaint behavior. The perceived loudness of a noise is the most important acoustic parameter influencing annoyance and complaints, and the simple dBA unit can be used to integrate spectral characteristics of complex sounds in community studies. Although energy averaging such as Leq or Ldn can be used to describe multiple noise exposures over time, the variable trade-off relationships between number and level of exposures are somewhat obscured by such summary measures. However, they are still the best available descriptors and, until more accurate ones are developed, can be used to measure community noise environments. Perception of an identical noise exposure can vary according to the physiological noise sensitivity of a person and the activity context in which the noise is heard. Although the acoustic quality of the noise itself usually explains about 10 to 25 per cent of the variability in annoyance responses, sociopsychological variables measured in field studies account for 35 to 50 per cent of the variations in human annoyance responses. Three of the most important nonacoustic factors are the connotative fear effects of the noise signal, the feeling that those responsible for the noise are misfeasant in not reducing the noise, and the feeling that harmful health effects are produced by the noise.

Borsky, P.N.

1979-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

495

Human Factors Considerations in New Nuclear Power Plants: Detailed Analysis.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) sponsored study has identified human-performance issues in new and advanced nuclear power plants. To identify the issues, current industry developments and trends were evaluated in the areas of reactor technology, instrumentation and control technology, human-system integration technology, and human factors engineering (HFE) methods and tools. The issues were organized into seven high-level HFE topic areas: Role of Personnel and Automation, Staffing and Training, Normal Operations Management, Disturbance and Emergency Management, Maintenance and Change Management, Plant Design and Construction, and HFE Methods and Tools. The issues where then prioritized into four categories using a 'Phenomena Identification and Ranking Table' methodology based on evaluations provided by 14 independent subject matter experts. The subject matter experts were knowledgeable in a variety of disciplines. Vendors, utilities, research organizations and regulators all participated. Twenty issues were categorized into the top priority category. This Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) technical report provides the detailed methodology, issue analysis, and results. A summary of the results of this study can be found in NUREG/CR-6947. The research performed for this project has identified a large number of human-performance issues for new control stations and new nuclear power plant designs. The information gathered in this project can serve as input to the development of a long-term strategy and plan for addressing human performance in these areas through regulatory research. Addressing human-performance issues will provide the technical basis from which regulatory review guidance can be developed to meet these challenges. The availability of this review guidance will help set clear expectations for how the NRC staff will evaluate new designs, reduce regulatory uncertainty, and provide a well-defined path to new nuclear power plant licensing.

OHara,J.; Higgins, J.; Brown, W.; Fink, R.

2008-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

496

Analysis of a Splice Array Experiment Elucidates Roles of Chromatin Elongation Factor Spt4-5 in Splicing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Elucidates Roles of Chromatin Elongation Factor Spt4-5 incapping enzyme, and the chromatin elongation factors Spt4-5,found evidence that the chromatin elongation factors, Spt4

Xiao, Yuanyuan; Yang, Yee Hwa; Burckin, Todd A; Shiue, Lily; Hartzog, Grant A; Segal, Mark R

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

497

Calculation of extremity neutron fluence-to-dose equivalent conversion factors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Neutron fluence-to-dose equivalent conversion factors are calculated for three types of finger and wrist extremity phantoms: (1) the polymethyl methacrylate models specified by the U.S. Department of Energy Laboratory Accreditation Program for Personnel Dosimetry Systems (DOELAP); (2) the tissue-and-bone phantoms suggested by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory; and (3) the Radiology Support Devices (RSD) Inc. RS-122T an-n/shoulder phantom. Extremity factors are determined at shallow surface and bone levels for bare, D20moderated and polyethylene moderated 112Cf. The DOELAP free-field calibration geometry and a realistic glovebox scenario are simulated using a Monte Carlo neutron and photon transport code. Calculated DOELAP and RSD extremity fluence-to-dose equivalent conversion factors for the free-field calibration geometry are 1 to 9 percent lower than the calculated whole-body conversion factor. The tissue-and-bone phantoms exhibit conversion factors 1 to 10 percent greater than the whole-body factor. Glovebox fluence-to-dose equivalent conversion factors range from 12 percent less than to 128 percent greater than calculated free-field whole-body conversion factors. A preliminary evaluation of the application of the calculated fluence-to-dose equivalent conversion factors to Los Alamos National Laboratory extremity dosimeter correction factors is performed.

Wood-Zika, Annmarie Ruth

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

498

Intense Summer Heat in Tokyo and Its Suburban Areas Related with Variation in the Synoptic-Scale Pressure Field: A Statistical Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Intense summer heat in Tokyo and its suburban areas between 1990 and 2010 was statistically analyzed. Sample days were selected from among days with a sea breeze and sufficient sunshine duration, because sea breeze is the dominant summertime ...

Hiroshi Yoshikado

499

Key Response Planning Factors for the Aftermath of Nuclear Terrorism  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Despite hundreds of above-ground nuclear tests and data gathered from Hiroshima and Nagasaki, the effects of a ground-level, low-yield nuclear detonation in a modern urban environment are still the subject of considerable scientific debate. Extensive review of nuclear weapon effects studies and discussions with nuclear weapon effects experts from various federal agencies, national laboratories, and technical organizations have identified key issues and bounded some of the unknowns required to support response planning for a low-yield, ground-level nuclear detonation in a modern U.S. city. This study, which is focused primarily upon the hazards posed by radioactive fallout, used detailed fallout predictions from the advanced suite of three-dimensional (3-D) meteorology and plume/fallout models developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), including extensive global Key Response Planning Factors for the Aftermath of Nuclear Terrorism geographical and real-time meteorological databases to support model calculations. This 3-D modeling system provides detailed simulations that account for complex meteorology and terrain effects. The results of initial modeling and analysis were presented to federal, state, and local working groups to obtain critical, broad-based review and feedback on strategy and messaging. This effort involved a diverse set of communities, including New York City, National Capitol Regions, Charlotte, Houston, Portland, and Los Angeles. The largest potential for reducing casualties during the post-detonation response phase comes from reducing exposure to fallout radiation. This can be accomplished through early, adequate sheltering followed by informed, delayed evacuation.B The response challenges to a nuclear detonation must be solved through multiple approaches of public education, planning, and rapid response actions. Because the successful response will require extensive coordination of a large number of organizations, supplemented by appropriate responses by local responders and the general population within the hazard zones, regional planning is essential to success. The remainder of this Executive Summary provides summary guidance for response planning in three areas: (1) Public Protection Strategy details the importance of early, adequate shelter followed by informed evacuation. (2) Responder Priorities identify how to protect response personnel, perform regional situational assessment, and support public safety. (3) Key Planning Considerations refute common myths and provide important information on planning how to respond in the aftermath of nuclear terrorism.

Buddemeier, B R; Dillon, M B

2009-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

500

Shape factor, C /SUB A/ , expressed as skin, S /SUB CA/  

SciTech Connect

This work presents the conversion of the shape factor, C /SUB A/ , to a pseudosteady-state skin term, S /SUB CA/ . When the shape factor is expressed as a skin term, it becomes easier to see the effect that a well placement in a given drainage area will have on the well's performance. Skin factors for published drainage shapes and well locations are given.

Fetkovich, M.J.; Vienot, M.E.

1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z