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Sample records for brazoria wharton matagorda

  1. Matagorda County, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Zone Subtype A. Registered Energy Companies in Matagorda County, Texas Gulf Coast Green Energy Places in Matagorda County, Texas Bay City, Texas Blessing, Texas Markham, Texas...

  2. EIS-0487: Freeport LNG Liquefaction Project, Brazoria County, Texas

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) prepared an EIS to analyze the potential environmental impacts of a proposal to construct and operate the Freeport Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) Liquefaction Project, which would expand an existing LNG import terminal and associated facilities in Brazoria County, Texas, to enable the terminal to liquefy and export LNG. DOE, Office of Fossil Energy – a cooperating agency in preparing the EIS – has an obligation under Section 3 of the Natural Gas Act to authorize the import and export of natural gas, including LNG, unless it finds that the import or export is not consistent with the public interest.

  3. Environmental assessment of the brine pipeline replacement for the Strategic Petroleum Reserve Bryan Mound Facility in Brazoria County, Texas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-09-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an environmental assessment (EA), DOE/EA-0804, for the proposed replacement of a deteriorated brine disposal pipeline from the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) Bryan Mound storage facility in Brazoria County, Texas, into the Gulf of Mexico. In addition, the ocean discharge outfall would be moved shoreward by locating the brine diffuser at the end of the pipeline 3.5 miles offshore at a minimum depth of 30 feet. The action would occur in a floodplain and wetlands; therefore, a floodplain/wetlands assessment has been prepared in conjunction with this EA. Based on the analyses in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969 (42 USC. 4321, et seg.). Therefore, the preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) is not required, and the Department is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI). This FONSI also includes a Floodplain Statement of Findings in accordance with 10 CFR Part 1022.

  4. Cultural resources survey and assessment of the proposed Department of Energy Freeport to Texas City pipeline, Brazoria and Galveston Counties, Texas. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Castille, G.J.; Whelan, J.P. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    An intensive survey and testing program of selected segments of a proposed Department of Energy pipeline were conducted by Coastal Environments, Inc., Baton Rouge, Louisiana, during December 1985 and January 1986. The proposed pipeline runs from Texas City, Galveston County to Bryan Mound, Brazoria County. The pedestrian survey was preceded by historical records survey to locate possible historic sites within the DOE righ-of-way. Four prehistoric sites within the ROW (41BO159, 160, 161, 162) and one outside the ROW (41BO163) were located. All are Rangia cuneata middens. The survey results are discussed with particular reference to the environmental settings of the sites and the effectiveness of the survey procedure. Two of the sites located within the ROW were subjected to additional testing. The results of the backhoe testing program are included in the site descriptions, and the scientific value of the sites are presented. 52 refs., 20 figs., 10 tabs.

  5. Brazoria Offshore | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Proposed Owner Coastal Point Energy LLC Developer Coastal Point Energy LLC Location Gulf of Mexico TX Coordinates 28.764, -95.33 Show Map Loading map......

  6. Brazoria County, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Texas Hillcrest, Texas Holiday Lakes, Texas Iowa Colony, Texas Jones Creek, Texas Lake Jackson, Texas Liverpool, Texas Manvel, Texas Oyster Creek, Texas Pearland, Texas Quintana,...

  7. Village of Wharton, Ohio (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    - File1a1 EIA Form 861 Data Utility Id 20471 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location RFC NERC RFC Yes Activity Distribution Yes Activity Retail Marketing Yes This...

  8. EIS-0001: Strategic Petroleum Reserve, Bryan Mound Salt Dome, Brazoria County, Texas

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Strategic Petroleum Reserve prepared this SEIS to address the environmental impacts of construction and operation of two types of brine disposal systems and a new water supply system. This EIS supplements FES 76/77-6, Bryan Mound Storage Site.

  9. EIS-0487: Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Assessment...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Freeport LNG Liquefaction Project, Brazoria County, Texas This FERC EA will evaluate the ... FLNG Liquefaction LLC (collectively referred to as Freeport) in Brazoria County, Texas. ...

  10. EIS-0487: Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Freeport LNG Liquefaction Project, Brazoria County, Texas As previously noticed on August ... FLNG Liquefaction LLC (collectively referred to as Freeport) in Brazoria County, Texas. ...

  11. EIS-0487: EPA Notice of Availability of Draft Environmental Impact...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Project, Brazoria County, Texas EPA announces the availability of the Draft Environmental Impact Statement for the Freeport LNG Liquefaction Project, Brazoria County, Texas. ...

  12. EIS-0021: Strategic Petroleum Reserve, Seaway Group Salt Domes, Brazoria County, Texas (also see EIS-0075-S and EIS-0029)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Strategic Petroleum Reserve Office developed this statement to analyze the environmental impacts which would occur during site preparation and operation of oil storage facilities at each of five proposed candidate sites in the Seaway Group of salt domes.

  13. Geopressurized/geothermal project, Pleasant Bayou well no. 2, Brazoria County, Texas: Workover summary, February 15, 1986-April 3, 1986

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    A workover of the Pleasant Bayou well No. 2 to clear debris from the well and replace leaking 5.5'' production tubing is described. (ACR)

  14. EIS-0464: EPA Notice of Availability of the Draft Environmental Impact Statement

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Lake Charles Carbon Capture and Sequestration Project, Lake Charles, Louisiana and Brazoria County, Texas

  15. EIS-0464: EPA Notice of Availability of Final Environmental Impact Statement

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Lake Charles Carbon Capture and Sequestration Project, Lake Charles, Louisiana and Brazoria County, Texas

  16. EIS-0464: DOE Notice of Availability of the Draft Environmental Impact Statement

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Lake Charles Carbon Capture and Sequestration Project, Lake Charles, Louisiana and Brazoria County, Texas

  17. EIS-0464: Draft Environmental Impact Statement

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Lake Charles Carbon Capture and Sequestration Project, Lake Charles, Louisiana and Brazoria County, Texas

  18. EIS-0464: Final Environmental Impact Statement

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Lake Charles Carbon Capture and Sequestration Project, Lake Charles, Louisiana and Brazoria County, Texas

  19. EIS-0021: Final Environmental Impact Statement

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Strategic Petroleum Reserve, Seaway Group Salt Domes, Brazoria County, Texas (also see EIS-0075-S and EIS-0029)

  20. EIS-0464: DOE Notice of Availability of the Draft Environmental...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    EIS-0464: DOE Notice of Availability of the Draft Environmental Impact Statement Lake Charles Carbon Capture and Sequestration Project, Lake Charles, Louisiana and Brazoria County, ...

  1. EIS-0464: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Lake Charles Carbon Capture and Sequestration Project, Lake Charles, Louisiana and Brazoria County, Texas This Mitigation Action Plan (MAP) briefly describes the mitigation actions ...

  2. EIS-0464: EPA Notice of Availability of Final Environmental Impact...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    EPA Notice of Availability of Final Environmental Impact Statement Lake Charles Carbon Capture and Sequestration Project, Lake Charles, Louisiana and Brazoria County, Texas EPA...

  3. EIS-0464: EPA Notice of Availability of the Draft Environmental...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Notice of Availability of the Draft Environmental Impact Statement Lake Charles Carbon Capture and Sequestration Project, Lake Charles, Louisiana and Brazoria County, Texas The...

  4. EIS-0075: Strategic Petroleum Reserve Phase III Development, Texoma and Seaway Group Salt Domes (West Hackberry and Bryan Mound Expansion, Big Hill Development) Cameron Parish, Louisiana, and Brazoria and Jefferson Counties, Texas

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Also see EIS-0021 and EIS-0029. The Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) Office developed this EIS to assess the environmental impacts of expanding the existing SPR storage capacity from 538 million to 750 million barrels of storage and increasing the drawdown capability from 3.5 million to 4.5 million barrels per day. This EIS incorperates two previously issued EISs: DOE/EIS-0021, Seaway Group of Salt Domes, and DOE/EIS-0029, Texoma Group of Salt Domes.

  5. Project Profile: Design of Social and Economic Incentives and Information Campaigns to Promote Solar Technology Diffusion through Data-Driven Behavior Modeling

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Sandia National Laboratories, along with partners at the California Center for Sustainable Energy, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, the University of Pennsylvania Wharton School, and...

  6. Sandia National Laboratories: Global Insight, Inc. / Department...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    combining DRI (formerly Data Resources, Inc.) and WEFA (formerly Wharton Econometric Forecasting Associates). Due to copyrightdistribution laws being derived from a proprietary...

  7. Project Profile: Design of Social and Economic Incentives and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Pennsylvania Wharton School, and Vanderbilt University, under the Solar Energy Evolution and Diffusion Studies (SEEDS) program, developed powerful computer algorithms that ...

  8. EIS-0075: Final Environmental Impact Statement

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Petroleum Reserve Phase III Development, Texoma and Seaway Group Salt Domes (West Hackberry and Bryan Mound Expansion, Big Hill Development) Cameron Parish, Louisiana, and Brazoria and Jefferson Counties, Texas

  9. Pearland, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    OpenEI by expanding it. Pearland is a city in Brazoria County and Fort Bend County and Harris County, Texas. It falls under Texas's 14th congressional district and Texas's 22nd...

  10. EIS-0487: Draft Environmental Impact Statement | Department of...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    facilities in Brazoria County, Texas, to enable the terminal to liquefy and export LNG. DOE, Office of Fossil Energy, has an obligation under Section 3 of the Natural Gas ...

  11. EIS-0487: Notice of Availability of Draft Environmental Impact...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    facilities in Brazoria County, Texas, to enable the terminal to liquefy and export LNG. PDF icon EIS-0487-FERC-DEIS-NOA-2014.pdf More Documents & Publications EIS-0487: ...

  12. shaleusa9.pdf

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Bexar Zavala Kinney Dimmit La Salle Kimble Medina Matagorda Travis Lee Sutton Nueces Real ... Map Date :May 29, 2010 Mexico TX NM LA AR OK W e s t e r n G u l f B a s i n Mexico Eagle ...

  13. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Klein, P (1) Mishra, S (1) Newman, JF (1) Turner, DD (1) Wainwright, CE (1) Wharton, S (1) ... Klein, P ; Bonin, TA ; Newman, JF ; Turner, DD ; Chilson, P ; Blumberg, WG ; Mishra, ...

  14. LABLE: A multi-institutional, student-led, atmospheric boundary...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Authors: Klein, P. ; Bonin, T. A. ; Newman, J. F. ; Turner, D. D. ; Chilson, P. B. ; Wainwright, C. E. ; Blumberg, W. G. ; Mishra, S. ; Carney, M. ; Jacobsen, E. P. ; Wharton, ...

  15. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Carney, M (1) Chilson, P (1) Jacobsen, EP (1) Klein, P (1) Mishra, S (1) Newman, JF (1) Turner, DD (1) Wainwright, CE (1) Wharton, S (1) Save Results Save this search to My Library ...

  16. Lower Atmospheric Boundary Layer Experiment (LABLE) Final Campaign...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Authors: Klein, P 1 ; Bonin, TA ; Newman, JF 2 ; Turner, DD 3 ; Chilson, P 4 ; Blumberg, WG 4 ; Mishra, S ; Wainwright, CE ; Carney, M 1 ; Jacobsen, EP 4 ; Wharton, S ...

  17. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Assessment of Land Surface Model Performance in WRF for Simulating Wind at Heights Relevant to the Wind Energy Community Wharton, S ; Simpson, M ; Osuna, J ; Newman, J ; Biraud, S ...

  18. EA-1846: Final Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    6: Final Environmental Assessment EA-1846: Final Environmental Assessment Demonstration of Carbon Dioxide Capture and Sequestration of Steam Methane Reforming Process Gas Used for Large-Scale Hydrogen Production, Jefferson and Brazoria Counties, Texas PDF icon EA-1846-FEA-2011.pdf More Documents & Publications EIS-0464: Draft Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0464: Final Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0464: Record of Decision

  19. EM ARRA Best Practices and Lessons Learned Workshop: Field Manager's Top Issues

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Department of Energy Availability of Draft Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0487: Notice of Availability of Draft Environmental Impact Statement Freeport LNG Liquefaction Project, Brazoria County, Texas Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) announced the availability of a Draft EIS to analyze the potential environmental impacts of a proposal to construct and operate the Freeport Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) Liquefaction Project, which would expand an existing LNG import terminal and

  20. Revised Manuscript

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    UNAM 5 (1982) 1 1982DO01 K.G.R. Doss, P.D. Barnes, N. Colella, S.A. Dytman, R.A. Eisenstein, C. Ellegaard, F. Takeutchi, W.R. Wharton, J.F. Amann, R.H. Pehl et al, Phys. Rev....

  1. DESIGN AND TEST OF NON-EVACUATED SOLAR

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... C o l l a r e s - P e r e i r a , Nancy Goodman, P e r e t z Greenman, Peter Roothan, and ... Goodman, P r . Greenman, J. O'Gallagher, A. Rabl, L. Wharton and R. Winston, "Nonevacuated ...

  2. Sandia National Laboratories: Global Insight, Inc. / Department of Labor

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Facebook Twitter YouTube Flickr RSS Working with Sandia Global Insight, Inc. / Department of Labor Global Insight, Inc. (GII), was created by combining DRI (formerly Data Resources, Inc.) and WEFA (formerly Wharton Econometric Forecasting Associates). Due to copyright/distribution laws being derived from a proprietary service that Sandia pays for, Sandia can no longer provide GII factor information at this website. However, Sandia will continue to supply the DOL and the "combined key

  3. DOE/SC-ARM-14-034 Lower Atmospheric Boundary Layer Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4 Lower Atmospheric Boundary Layer Experiment (LABLE) Final Campaign Report P Klein WG Blumberg TA Bonin S Mishra JF Newman M Carney DD Turner EP Jacobsen PB Chilson S Wharton CE Wainwright RK Newsom November 2014 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy,

  4. Factors controlling reservoir quality in tertiary sandstones and their significance to geopressured geothermal production. Annual report, May 1, 1979-May 31, 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loucks, R.G.; Richmann, D.L.; Milliken, K.L.

    1980-07-01

    Differing extents of diagenetic modification is the factor primarily responsible for contrasting regional reservoir quality of Tertiary sandstones from the Upper and Lower Texas Gulf Coast. Detailed comparison of Frio sandstones from the Chocolate Bayou/Danbury Dome area, Brazoria County, and Vicksburg sandstones from the McAllen Ranch Field area, Hidalgo County, reveals that extent of diagenetic modification is most strongly influenced by (1) detrital mineralogy and (2) regional geothermal gradients. Vicksburg sandstones from the McAllen Ranch Field area are less stable, chemically and mechanically, than Frio sandstones from the Chocolate Bayou/Danbury dome area. Vicksburg sandstones are mineralogically immature and contain greater proportions of feldspars and rock fragments than do Frio sandstones. Thr reactive detrital assemblage of Vicksubrg sandstones is highly susceptible to diagenetic modification. Susceptibility is enhanced by higher than normal geothermal gradients in the McAllen Ranch Field area. Thus, consolidation of Vicksburg sandstones began at shallower depth of burial and precipitation of authigenic phases (especially calcite) was more pervasive than in Frio sandstones. Moreover, the late-stage episode of ferroan calcite precipitation that occluded most secondary porosity in Vicksburg sandstones did not occur significantly in Frio sandstones. Therefore, regional reservoir quality of Frio sandstones from Brazoria County is far better than that characterizing Vicksburg sandstones from Hidalgo County, especially at depths suitable for geopressured geothermal energy production.

  5. Role of Surface Energy Exchange Field Campaign Report

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    40 The Role of Surface Energy Exchange for Simulating Wind Inflow: An Evaluation of Multiple Land Surface Models in WRF for the Southern Great Plains Site Field Campaign Report S Wharton M Simpson J Osuna J Newman S Biraud May 2016 CLIMATE RESEARCH FACILITY Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability

  6. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Switch to Detail View for this search SciTech Connect Search Results Page 1 of 1 Search for: All records Creators/Authors contains: "Wharton, Sonia" × Sort by Relevance Sort by Date (newest first) Sort by Date (oldest first) Sort by Relevance « Prev Next » Everything8 Electronic Full Text4 Citations2 Multimedia0 Datasets2 Software0 Filter Results Filter by Subject carbon (4) carbon dioxide (4) ecosystems (4) resolution (4) biosphere (3) climates (3) satellites (3) disturbances (2)

  7. Using presence of calcite cap rock in shales to predict occurrence of reservoirs composed of leached secondary porosity in the geopressured zone. Annual report, June 1, 1980-October 31, 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaiser, W.R.; Magara, K.; Milliken, K.L.; Richmann, D.L.

    1981-01-01

    The distribution of high-resistivity shale in the Frio Formation between hydropressured and geopressured strata has been mapped along the Texas Gulf Coast. Two high-resistivity intervals more than 1000 ft thick have been mapped, one in Brazoria and Galveston Counties and the other in Kenedy County. They coincide with Frio delta systems and may be related to extraordinary quantities of CO/sub 2/ produced by deltaic sediments rich in woody and herbaceous matter. Beyond being calcareous, the nature of the high-resistivity interval is enigmatic and its relationship to deep secondary porosity problematic. Most of the contained carbonate is microscopically and isotopically skeletal in origin, revealing no evidence of diagenetic modification. Minor rhombs of iron-bearing carbonate tens of microns in size were identified. Detrital feldspar compositions are being established to test subsequent changes in feldspar composition resulting from progressive burial and albitization. Hydrolysis reactions for authigenic minerals and reactions between key pairs of minerals have been written. Thermodynamic functions for complex phyllosilicates at temperatures up to 200/sup 0/C have been calculated. From thermodynamic calculations it was predicted that ferroan calcite would be the favored authigenic carbonate in shales.

  8. Subsidence at Boling salt dome: results of multiple resource production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mullican, W.F. III

    1988-02-01

    Boling dome (Wharton and Fort Bend Counties) has experienced more overall subsidence and collapse than any other dome in Texas. These processes are directly related to production of sulfur and hydrocarbons from the southeastern quadrant of the dome. Greatest vertical movement due to subsidence and collapse is 35 ft (based on the Boling 7.5 min topographic map, last surveyed in 1953). Most of the subsidence (83%) is attributed to sulfur production, whereas only 11 to 12% can be linked to hydrocarbon production. Reservoir compaction is the dominant mechanism of land subsidence in areas of hydrocarbon production at Boling dome. Trough subsidence, chimneying, plug caving, and piping are the characteristic mechanisms over sulfur fields developed at the salt dome. The structural and hydrologic stability of the surface and subsurface at Boling dome is compromised by these active deformation processes. Damage to pipelines and well-casing strings may result in costly leaks which have the potential of being uncontrollable and catastrophic. Reduction in hydrologic stability may result if natural aquitards are breached and fresh water mixes with saline water or if hydrologic conduits to the diapir are opened, allowing unrestricted dissolution of the salt stock.

  9. QER- Comment of William Smith III

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Hello DOE, Thanks for accepting my comments on the Quadrennial Energy Review by e-mail. There will be those who wish to promote nuclear energy as a source of electricity for future use in the USA. I speak against this form of energy. Because it creates long-lived radioactive wastes, nuclear power is incompatible with the biological world in which we live and from which we evolved. The lasting nature of these wastes creates a moral quandry for us in this generation, as we leave behind such biological poisons for our descents to manage, in ways which we do not yet know. A further problem with nucler energy is that any fission reaction creates plutonium, the stuff of nuclear weapons. If nuclear power reactors were to be spread around the world, inevitably the proliferation of nuclear weapons would follow. So-called '4th generation' or 'thorium' reactors suffer from a similar problem, for although they may generate less plutonium, their fuel cycle involves creation of large amounts of U-233 which carries a similar proliferation risk to plutonium-239. I advocate crafting an energy future for our nation bsed on the natural flows of renewable energy, coupled with a diversified structure which generates electricity at many smaller sources. Implicit in any modern energy system is the increased efficiency of energy usage which will continue to lower the bulk amounts of energy, particularly electricity, which our society uses to satisfy our industrial, military, commercial, and personal needs. Clearly as a nation we must participate in the worldwide effort to control the buildup of carbon dioxide gases and other pollutants which threaten the stability of the earth's climate. I would like to bring to your attention these papers from the Rocky Mountain Institute which touch on the above issues: http://www.rmi.org/Knowledge-Center/Library/2009-09_FourNuclearMyths and http://www.rmi.org/Knowledge-Center/Library/2012-01_FarewellToFossilFuels and http://www.rmi.org/Knowledge-Center/Library/E05-14_NuclearPowerEconomics.... If you have not yet done so, I strongly urge you to contact the Rocky Mountain Institute and contract with them for their advice in consulting on the Quadrennial Energy Review. Sincerely, William Wharton Smith III

  10. ConocoPhillips Sweeny IGCC/CCS Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul Talarico; Charles Sugg; Thomas Hren; Lauri Branch; Joseph Garcia; Alan Rezigh; Michelle Pittenger; Kathleen Bower; Jonathan Philley; Michael Culligan; Jeremy Maslen; Michele Woods; Kevin Elm

    2010-06-16

    Under its Industrial Carbon Capture and Sequestration (ICCS) Program, the United States (U.S.) Department of Energy (DOE) selected ConocoPhillips Company (ConocoPhillips) to receive funding through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) of 2009 for the proposed Sweeny Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC)/Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) Project (Project) to be located in Brazoria County, Texas. Under the program, the DOE is partnering with industry to demonstrate the commercial viability and operational readiness of technologies that would capture carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emissions from industrial sources and either sequester those emissions, or beneficially reuse them. The primary objective of the proposed Project was to demonstrate the efficacy of advanced technologies that capture CO{sub 2} from a large industrial source and store the CO{sub 2} in underground formations, while achieving a successful business venture for the entity (entities) involved. The Project would capture 85% of the CO{sub 2} produced from a petroleum coke (petcoke) fed, 703 MWnet (1,000 MWgross) IGCC power plant, using the ConocoPhillips (COP) proprietary and commercially proven E-Gas{trademark} gasification technology, at the existing 247,000 barrel per day COP Sweeny Refinery. In addition, a number of other commercially available technologies would be integrated into a conventional IGCC Plant in a unique, efficient, and reliable design that would capture CO{sub 2}. The primary destination for the CO{sub 2} would be a depleted natural gas field suitable for CO{sub 2} storage ('Storage Facility'). COP would also develop commercial options to sell a portion of the IGCC Plant's CO{sub 2} output to the growing Gulf Coast enhanced oil recovery (EOR) market. The IGCC Plant would produce electric power for sale in the Electric Reliability Council of Texas Houston Zone. The existing refinery effluent water would be treated and reused to fulfill all process water needs. The DOE ICCS program adopts a two-phase approach. During the 7-month Phase 1 period, ConocoPhillips further defined the Project by advancing the preliminary design, permits, and contracts. In addition, ConocoPhillips was developing a Phase 2 renewal application to seek continued DOE funding for the Project's design, construction, and early operations. The DOE and ConocoPhillips entered into a Phase1 Cooperative Agreement (DOE Award Number DE-FE0001859) on November 16, 2009, agreeing to share cost on a 50/50 basis during the Phase 1 period, with a DOE budget of $2,989,174. On April 7, 2010, ConocoPhillips informed the DOE that it would not participate in Phase 2 of the DOE ICCS program. The company believes that enabling legislation and regulations at both the federal and state levels will not be approved and implemented in time to make a final investment decision such that the Project would be substantially constructed by September 30, 2015, the end of the AARA funding period. Considering current price assumptions, the Project would not generate investment level returns. ConocoPhillips elected not to submit a Phase 2 renewal application, which was due on April 16, 2010. This Final Scientific/Technical Report provides an overview of the Project, including highlights and benefits of the proposed carbon capture and storage project scope, sites, and technologies. It also summarizes the work accomplishments during the Phase 1 period from November 16, 2009 to June 16, 2010. Due to ConocoPhillips decision not to submit the Phase 2 renewal application and not to enter into related agreements, certain information regarding the proposed CO{sub 2} storage facility cannot be publicly reported due to confidentiality agreements.

  11. Carbon Capture and Sequestration from a Hydrogen Production Facility in an Oil Refinery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Engels, Cheryl; Williams, Bryan, Valluri, Kiranmal; Watwe, Ramchandra; Kumar, Ravi; Mehlman, Stewart

    2010-06-21

    The project proposed a commercial demonstration of advanced technologies that would capture and sequester CO2 emissions from an existing hydrogen production facility in an oil refinery into underground formations in combination with Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR). The project is led by Praxair, Inc., with other project participants: BP Products North America Inc., Denbury Onshore, LLC (Denbury), and Gulf Coast Carbon Center (GCCC) at the Bureau of Economic Geology of The University of Texas at Austin. The project is located at the BP Refinery at Texas City, Texas. Praxair owns and operates a large hydrogen production facility within the refinery. As part of the project, Praxair would construct a CO2 capture and compression facility. The project aimed at demonstrating a novel vacuum pressure swing adsorption (VPSA) based technology to remove CO2 from the Steam Methane Reformers (SMR) process gas. The captured CO2 would be purified using refrigerated partial condensation separation (i.e., cold box). Denbury would purchase the CO2 from the project and inject the CO2 as part of its independent commercial EOR projects. The Gulf Coast Carbon Center at the Bureau of Economic Geology, a unit of University of Texas at Austin, would manage the research monitoring, verification and accounting (MVA) project for the sequestered CO2, in conjunction with Denbury. The sequestration and associated MVA activities would be carried out in the Hastings field at Brazoria County, TX. The project would exceed DOE?s target of capturing one million tons of CO2 per year (MTPY) by 2015. Phase 1 of the project (Project Definition) is being completed. The key objective of Phase 1 is to define the project in sufficient detail to enable an economic decision with regard to proceeding with Phase 2. This topical report summarizes the administrative, programmatic and technical accomplishments completed in Phase 1 of the project. It describes the work relative to project technical and design activities (associated with CO2 capture technologies and geologic sequestration MVA), and Environmental Information Volume. Specific accomplishments of this Phase include: 1. Finalization of the Project Management Plan 2. Development of engineering designs in sufficient detail for defining project performance and costs 3. Preparation of Environmental Information Volume 4. Completion of Hazard Identification Studies 5. Completion of control cost estimates and preparation of business plan During the Phase 1 detailed cost estimate, project costs increased substantially from the previous estimate. Furthermore, the detailed risk assessment identified integration risks associated with potentially impacting the steam methane reformer operation. While the Phase 1 work identified ways to mitigate these integration risks satisfactorily from an operational perspective, the associated costs and potential schedule impacts contributed to the decision not to proceed to Phase 2. We have concluded that the project costs and integration risks at Texas City are not commensurate with the potential benefits of the project at this time.

  12. Carbon Capture and Sequestration (via Enhanced Oil Recovery) from a Hydrogen Production Facility in an Oil Refinery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stewart Mehlman

    2010-06-16

    The project proposed a commercial demonstration of advanced technologies that would capture and sequester CO2 emissions from an existing hydrogen production facility in an oil refinery into underground formations in combination with Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR). The project is led by Praxair, Inc., with other project participants: BP Products North America Inc., Denbury Onshore, LLC (Denbury), and Gulf Coast Carbon Center (GCCC) at the Bureau of Economic Geology of The University of Texas at Austin. The project is located at the BP Refinery at Texas City, Texas. Praxair owns and operates a large hydrogen production facility within the refinery. As part of the project, Praxair would construct a CO2 capture and compression facility. The project aimed at demonstrating a novel vacuum pressure swing adsorption (VPSA) based technology to remove CO2 from the Steam Methane Reformers (SMR) process gas. The captured CO2 would be purified using refrigerated partial condensation separation (i.e., cold box). Denbury would purchase the CO2 from the project and inject the CO2 as part of its independent commercial EOR projects. The Gulf Coast Carbon Center at the Bureau of Economic Geology, a unit of University of Texas at Austin, would manage the research monitoring, verification and accounting (MVA) project for the sequestered CO2, in conjunction with Denbury. The sequestration and associated MVA activities would be carried out in the Hastings field at Brazoria County, TX. The project would exceed DOE’s target of capturing one million tons of CO2 per year (MTPY) by 2015. Phase 1 of the project (Project Definition) is being completed. The key objective of Phase 1 is to define the project in sufficient detail to enable an economic decision with regard to proceeding with Phase 2. This topical report summarizes the administrative, programmatic and technical accomplishments completed in Phase 1 of the project. It describes the work relative to project technical and design activities (associated with CO2 capture technologies and geologic sequestration MVA), and Environmental Information Volume. Specific accomplishments of this Phase include: 1. Finalization of the Project Management Plan 2. Development of engineering designs in sufficient detail for defining project performance and costs 3. Preparation of Environmental Information Volume 4. Completion of Hazard Identification Studies 5. Completion of control cost estimates and preparation of business plan During the Phase 1 detailed cost estimate, project costs increased substantially from the previous estimate. Furthermore, the detailed risk assessment identified integration risks associated with potentially impacting the steam methane reformer operation. While the Phase 1 work identified ways to mitigate these integration risks satisfactorily from an operational perspective, the associated costs and potential schedule impacts contributed to the decision not to proceed to Phase 2. We have concluded that the project costs and integration risks at Texas City are not commensurate with the potential benefits of the project at this time.

  13. Advanced Liquid Natural Gas Onboard Storage System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greg Harper; Charles Powars

    2003-10-31

    Cummins Westport Incorporated (CWI) has designed and developed a liquefied natural gas (LNG) vehicle fuel system that includes a reciprocating pump with the cold end submerged in LNG contained in a vacuum-jacketed tank. This system was tested and analyzed under the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Advanced LNG Onboard Storage System (ALOSS) program. The pumped LNG fuel system developed by CWI and tested under the ALOSS program is a high-pressure system designed for application on Class 8 trucks powered by CWI's ISX G engine, which employs high-pressure direct injection (HPDI) technology. A general ALOSS program objective was to demonstrate the feasibility and advantages of a pumped LNG fuel system relative to on-vehicle fuel systems that require the LNG to be ''conditioned'' to saturation pressures that exceeds the engine fuel pressure requirements. These advantages include the capability to store more fuel mass in given-size vehicle and station tanks, and simpler lower-cost LNG refueling stations that do not require conditioning equipment. Pumped LNG vehicle fuel systems are an alternative to conditioned LNG systems for spark-ignition natural gas and port-injection dual-fuel engines (which typically require about 100 psi), and they are required for HPDI engines (which require over 3,000 psi). The ALOSS program demonstrated the feasibility of a pumped LNG vehicle fuel system and the advantages of this design relative to systems that require conditioning the LNG to a saturation pressure exceeding the engine fuel pressure requirement. LNG tanks mounted on test carts and the CWI engineering truck were repeatedly filled with LNG saturated at 20 to 30 psig. More fuel mass was stored in the vehicle tanks as well as the station tank, and no conditioning equipment was required at the fueling station. The ALOSS program also demonstrated the general viability and specific performance of the CWI pumped LNG fuel system design. The system tested as part of this program is designed to be used on Class 8 trucks with CWI ISX G HPDI engines. Extensive test cart and engineering truck tests of the pump demonstrated good durability and the high-pressure performance needed for HPDI application. The LNG tanks manufactured by Taylor-Wharton passed SAE J2343 Recommended Practice drop tests and accelerated road-load vibration tests. NER and hold-time tests produced highly consistent results. Additional tests confirmed the design adequacy of the liquid level sensor, vaporizer, ullage volume, and other fuel system components. While the testing work performed under this program focused on a high-pressure pumped LNG fuel system design, the results also validate the feasibility of a low-pressure pumped fuel system. A low-pressure pumped fuel system could incorporate various design refinements including a simpler and lighter-weight pump, which would decrease costs somewhat relative to a high-pressure system.