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1

Brazoria Offshore | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Brazoria Offshore Brazoria Offshore Jump to: navigation, search Name Brazoria Offshore Facility Brazoria Offshore Sector Wind energy Facility Type Offshore Wind Facility Status Proposed Owner Coastal Point Energy LLC Developer Coastal Point Energy LLC Location Gulf of Mexico TX Coordinates 28.764°, -95.33° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":28.764,"lon":-95.33,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

2

EIS-0487: Freeport LNG Liquefaction Project, Brazoria County, Texas |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

87: Freeport LNG Liquefaction Project, Brazoria County, Texas 87: Freeport LNG Liquefaction Project, Brazoria County, Texas EIS-0487: Freeport LNG Liquefaction Project, Brazoria County, Texas SUMMARY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) is preparing an EIS, with DOE as a cooperating agency, to analyze the potential environmental impacts of a proposal to construct and operate the Freeport Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) Liquefaction Project, which would expand an existing LNG import terminal on Quintana Island in Brazoria County, Texas, to enable the terminal to liquefy and export the LNG. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD July 25, 2012 EIS-0487: Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement Freeport LNG Liquefaction Project, Brazoria County, Texas

3

Matagorda County, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Matagorda County, Texas: Energy Resources Matagorda County, Texas: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 28.8204837°, -95.9832577° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":28.8204837,"lon":-95.9832577,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

4

Analysis of the Pass Cavallo shipwreck assemblage, Matagorda Bay, Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A survey conducted in February of 1998 located an anomaly originally believed to be the remains of L'Aimable. L'Aimable was one of four ships utilized by Rene-Robert Cavelier, Sieur de La Salle, for his voyage to colonize the Gulf Coast in 1684. The anomaly, a wrecked vessel with a heavy iron signature, was located outside the entrance to the historic pass into Matagorda Bay, Texas. Artifacts were extracted from the wreck site to aid in the identification of the vessel, which was subsequently determined to be more recent in origin. A preliminary examination of the artifacts indicates that the shipwreck dates to the first half of the 19th century. The survey recovered over two hundred artifacts. The assemblage of artifacts includes over 80 lead shot, over 40 examples of brass firearm furniture, over 15 firearm fragments, several pieces of copper sheathing, and iron bar stock. Almost two-thirds of the material is associated with small arms. The majority of the identifiable firearms are military arms of three patterns: the British Short Land Pattern, the British India Pattern, and the 1757 Spanish musket. Historical research has determined that these arms were circulating in Texas, New Orleans, and Mexico, as early as 1815. The British Pattern arms were both purchased for the Mexican army in the 1820s, and used by the British Infantry in the Battle of New Orleans in 1815. The 1757 Spanish musket was used chiefly by Spanish expeditionary forces in North America in the late 18th century. Evidence garnered from the artifacts suggest that the firearms were shipboard cargo onboard a small, wood-hulled sailing vessel that wrecked between the years 1815 and 1845. Archival and historical research isolated nine wreck candidates for this period. Historical research and artifact analysis suggest the Hannah Elizabeth as the primary candidate for this wreck site. The Hannah Elizabeth was a small merchant schooner from New Orleans laden with a munitions cargo for Texas troops stationed at Goliad. The vessel wrecked at the entrance of the historic Pass Cavallo while evading capture from a Mexican brig-of-war in November of 1835.

Borgens, Amy Anne

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

The effects of the Colorado River project on longshore sediment transport at Matagorda Peninsula, Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In 1968, federal authorization was given for the mouth of the Colorado River project in response to a need for a dependable, navigable channel connecting the Gulf Intracoastal Waterway to the Gulf of Mexico near the town of Matagorda, Texas. The project included the construction of jetties along Matagorda Peninsula at the channel entrance in 1985, and the diversion of Colorado River discharge from the Gulf into Matagorda Bay in 1992. An evaluation of project impacts on the natural sediment budget is performed within this study to determine the effectiveness of the project at preserving an open, navigable channel while preventing accelerated shoreline erosion. Evaluation is done through inspection of project impacts to longshore sediment transport, and includes both physical and numerical analysis of pre-and post-project conditions at the Colorado River mouth. Assessment of site data reveals that under the dredging schedule used during the first eight years following jetty completion, the project resulted in significant trapping and sorting of sediment transported alongshore. The original design project maintenance dredging plan is presented as a more effective maintenance schedule and is numerically tested based on pre-project objectives.

Heilman, Daniel Jon

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Wharton County Elec Coop, Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wharton County Elec Coop, Inc Wharton County Elec Coop, Inc Place Texas Utility Id 20472 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location TRE NERC ERCOT Yes ISO Ercot Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Commercial - LP3 Commercial Commercial and Small Power Service Commercial Flood Light Fixtures-1000 w Mercury, Metallic or HPS Lighting Flood Light Fixtures-400 w Mercury, Metallic or HPS Lighting Industrial - LP3 Industrial Irrigation and Seasonal Agricultural Service Commercial Large Industrial Industrial Large Industrial-Primary Voltage Industrial

7

Diagenetic controls on reservoir quality, Matagorda Island 623 field, offshore Texas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Matagorda Island 623 field is a large gas accumulation in overpressured, lower Miocene Siphonina davisi deltaic sandstones. Production is from fine, moderately well sorted sublitharenites deposited in distributary-mouth bars and channels. Reservoir depth is 10,000-14,000 ft (3050-4275 m) and bottom-hole temperatures approach 275/sup 0/F (135/sup 0/C). Pay-sand porosities range from 15 to 35% and permeabilities range from 10 to 3000 md. Between 60 and 85% of the porosity is primary intergranular. Porosity preservation is dependent upon the following: (1) early formation of chlorite grain coats, (2) a stable mineralogic framework, (3) overpressuring, and (4) entry of gas into the reservoir. Chlorite coats form as much as 8% of the rock and originated from a chemical decomposition of volcanic rock fragments (VRF). These coats inhibited quartz cementation and retarded compaction related to pressure solution. Secondary porosity originated mainly from feldspar and VRF dissolution. Although calcite cement is locally common, evidence is lacking that calcite leaching formed significant porosity. Evidence against large-scale carbonate dissolution includes the following: (1) unaltered carbonate lithoclasts, (2) reworked Cretaceous foraminifers, (3) preservation of delicate chlorite crystal morphology, and (4) the absence of pitted or serrated surfaces on quartz overgrowths, which formed prior to calcite cementation.

Thayer, P.A.

1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Environmental analysis of geopressured-geothermal prospect areas, Brazoria and Kenedy Counties, Texas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Preliminary environmental data, including current land use, substrate lithology, soils, natural hazards, water resources, biological assemblages, meteorological data, and regulatory considerations have been collected and analyzed for approximately 150 km/sup 2/ of land: (1) near Chocolate Bayou, Brazoria County, Texas, where a geopressured-geothermal test well was drilled in 1978, and (2) near the rural community of Armstrong, Kenedy County, Texas, where future geopressured-geothermal test well development may occur. The study was designed to establish an environmental data base and to determine, within spatial constraints set by subsurface reservoir conditions, environmentally suitable sites for geopressured-geothermal wells.

White, W.A.; McGraw, M.; Gustavson, T.C.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Award Recipient of ENERGY STAR Challenge for Industry JM Eagle Wharton Plastic Pipe Manufacturing Plant  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wharton Plastic Pipe Manufacturing Plant JM Eagle 10807 U.S. 59 Road Wharton, TX 77488 The Wharton Plastic Pipe Manufacturing Plant, located on an old cattle field, opened in 1985 by first manufacturing PVC pipe. The manufacturing of injection molding was added in 1988, corrugated pipe was added in 2009, and corrugated fittings were added in 2011. There are expectations for the plant to expand into manufacturing PE pipe fittings in the future. The Wharton plant achieved the ENERGY STAR Challenge for Industry in June 2010. The plant achieved a 15.5% reduction in energy intensity in the first year following its baseline. The success of achieving the Challenge for Industry came principally from an energy conservation program that focused on not operating equipment other than that needed for current production,

10

Geopressured-geothermal drilling and testing plan. General Crude Oil--Dept. of Energy Pleasant Bayou No. 1 well, Brazoria County, Texas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As a result of geopressured resource assessment studies in the Gulf Coast region, the Brazoria fairway, located in Brazoria County, Texas was determined to be an optimum area for additional studies. A plan is presented for drilling, completion, and testing of one geopressured-geothermal well and two disposal wells in Brazoria County, Texas. The objectives of the well drilling and testing program are to determine the following parameters: reservoir permeability, porosity, thickness, rock material properties, depth, temperature, and pressure; reservoir fluid content, specific gravity, resistivity, viscosity, and hydrocarbons in solution; reservoir fluid production rates, pressure, temperature, production decline, and pressure decline; geopressured well and surface equipment design requirements for high-volume production and possible sand production; specific equipment design for surface operations, hydrocarbons distribution, and effluent disposal; and possibilities of reservoir compaction and/or surface subsidence. (JGB)

Not Available

1978-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Economic analysis of geopressured resources: site specific consideration of geopressured methane gas at Brazoria. Final report, 1 March 1980-28 February 1981  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The current project is aimed first at narrowing the range of uncertainties in economic information of geopressured resource in light of the recently collected data on the Brazoria Fairway. Secondly, the project has developed a basic analytical framework for determining the investment potential of the geopressured resource at Brazoria. Thirdly, the project quantitatively evaluates the relative effectiveness of a number of financial incentives and other public policy initiatives designed to accelerate the commercialization of geopressured resources. Final results of this project are reported including: (1) a review of current estimates of important resource parameters at the Austin Bayou Project, (2) initial cash flow simulations of development of the Austin Bayou Prospect, (3) sensitivity analysis of these simulations and evaluation of the uncertainties' impact on measures of profitability and investment decision analysis, and (4) a brief review of the well-testing program.

Not Available

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

An intact chest from the 1686 French shipwreck La Belle, Matagorda Bay, Texas: artifacts from the La Salle colonization expedition to the Spanish Sea  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In 1995 Texas Historical Commission (THC) staff and a team of researchers discovered a shipwreck in the mud of Matagorda Bay. Preliminary artifact recovery included a decorated bronze cannon that identified the wreck as la Belle, the fourth and final vessel of the ill-fated venture to found a colony on the Texas coast by French explorer Robert Cavalier Sieur de La Salle. A full excavation of the site was conducted in the following years. Among the items recovered was an intact chest (Artifact No. 11500) which at the time became known as the Belle Mystery Chest. Initial inspection revealed that the chest was most likely a repository for various tools, but further work revealed a sundry collection of artifacts. Subsequent artifact analysis determined the tools to be instruments used in a variety of occupations ranging from that of French wine coopering to those of agricultural, military, and maritime endeavors. Historical research primarily using the firsthand reports from the expedition??s survivors suggest the chest was first boarded in France on one of La Salle??s other ship??s, l??Aimable, unloaded prior to that vessel??s wrecking at the mouth of Matagorda Bay, taken to the new settlement by way of la Belle, and eventually returned to the ship just prior to its sinking. Records verify that La Salle often claimed the possessions of the dead and that he ordered the ship reloaded with his personal goods and other supplies before it sank. Along with two artifacts with differing ownership initials and the sheer diversity of the chest??s contents, these clues suggest that the chest may have been a repository for various utilitarian items collected by La Salle before the loss of la Belle in January of 1686.

West, Michael Carl

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Environmental assessment of the brine pipeline replacement for the Strategic Petroleum Reserve Bryan Mound Facility in Brazoria County, Texas  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an environmental assessment (EA), DOE/EA-0804, for the proposed replacement of a deteriorated brine disposal pipeline from the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) Bryan Mound storage facility in Brazoria County, Texas, into the Gulf of Mexico. In addition, the ocean discharge outfall would be moved shoreward by locating the brine diffuser at the end of the pipeline 3.5 miles offshore at a minimum depth of 30 feet. The action would occur in a floodplain and wetlands; therefore, a floodplain/wetlands assessment has been prepared in conjunction with this EA. Based on the analyses in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969 (42 USC. 4321, et seg.). Therefore, the preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) is not required, and the Department is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI). This FONSI also includes a Floodplain Statement of Findings in accordance with 10 CFR Part 1022.

Not Available

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

PDF Document (387k)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

) ) " ) " ) " ) " ) ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! Houston Webb Duval Frio Kerr Edwards Uvalde Bee Bexar Zavala Kinney Dimmit La Salle Kimble Medina Matagorda Travis Lee Sutton Nueces Real Maverick DeWitt Kleberg Lavaca Calhoun Hays Goliad Atascosa Wharton

15

Pleasant Bayou Operations Brazoria County, Texas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project will demonstrate the Hybrid Cycle Concept for electricity generation using geopressured-geothermal resources. The test is scheduled to be a minimum of one year, which may be extended. The majority of the equipment came from the DOE facility at East Mesa, CA. The hybrid cycle has been designed for 10,800 BPD brine and 220,000 SCFD of gas. The power output will be about one megawatt, which will be sold to Houston Lighting and Power Company. An important research objective is to determine the size and ultimate production capability of the geopressured-geothermal reservoir. The long-term deliverability of these type reservoirs is a significant factor in determining the ultimate economic capability of these systems.

Eaton, B.A.; Featherston, C.R.; Meahl, T.E.

1989-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

16

Brazoria County Re-Leveling Pleasant Bayou Geopressured Well Site  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose is to conduct first order leveling surveys as part of an ongoing environmental monitoring program for geopressured-geothermal test wells. The scope is to Conduct First Order, Class I, leveling to monitor subsidence of previously installed and leveled bench marks, established by the National Geodetic Survey (NGS) and Vernon F. Meyer and Associates, Inc., in the area of the Pleasant Bayou geopressured test well. All leveling surveys to conform to NGS standards and specifications.

None

1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Brazoria County, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

County, Texas: Energy Resources County, Texas: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 29.2131857°, -95.4777811° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":29.2131857,"lon":-95.4777811,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

18

Wharton County, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

0932°, -96.1526985° 0932°, -96.1526985° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":29.3690932,"lon":-96.1526985,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

19

Award Recipient of the ENERGY STAR Challenge for Industry Wharton...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

manufacturing resources K-12 school resources Multifamily housing resources Restaurant resources Retail resources Senior care resources Small business resources State and...

20

Wharton, New Jersey: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

31546°, -74.5818254° 31546°, -74.5818254° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.8931546,"lon":-74.5818254,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "brazoria wharton matagorda" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

First order leveling: Pleasant Bayou geothermal test site, Brazoria County, Texas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

First order leveling to be conducted as part of an environmental monitoring program for a geopressured test well was reported. 39.43 kilometers of first order levels were run to NGS specifications. Twelve Class B type bench marks were set to NGS specifications. The adjusted elevation of bench mark C-1209 was used as a starting elevation and is based on a supplementary adjustment of April 6, 1979 by NGS. The closure for the loop around the well site is -0.65 millimeters. The distance around the loop is 1.29 kilometers, the allowable error of closure was 4.54 millimeters. The initial leveling of this well was performed in 1977. A thorough search for their monumentation was conducted. No monuments were found due to the lack of adequate monument descriptions. Therefore, an elevation comparison summary for this report is only available along the NGS lines outside the well area. The first order level tie to line No. 101 (BMA-1208) was +3.37 millimeters in 17.21 kilometers. The allowable error of closure was 12.44 millimeters.

Not Available

1984-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Visual kerogen and vitrinite reflectance analyses of the Pleasant Bayou No. 1 Well, Brazoria Co. , Texas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Based on the visual kerogen analyses, the Pleasant Bayou No. 1 Well can be subdivided into six zones and nine sub zones. The stratigraphic section ranges from immature at 2,894 feet to marginally mature at 16,500 feet. From 2,894 to 5,360 feet the organic matter suite is primarily an amorphous spore-pollen assemblage with secondary amounts of vitrinite. Below 6,080 feet the kerogenaceous debris is generally of a vitrinite, plant tissue, spore-pollen mixture with very little amorphous debris. Loss-of-circulation material, indicating drilling problems, is particularly abundant in cutting samples from 9,740 to 10,820 feet. There is a significant jump in the thermal maturation index, T.A.I., at the T-3 seismic horizon between 11,180 and 11,600 feet. As a result of the overall thermal immaturity and due to only fairquality organic matter, one can expect noncommercial accumulations of biogenic methane and/or wet gas.

Not Available

1979-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Strategic petroleum reserve seaway complex distribution enhancements, Brazoria, Galveston and Harris Counties, Texas. Revised environmental assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) of the US Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to construct and operate a 40-inch diameter, 46-mile long buried crude oil pipeline from existing facilities of the SPR Seaway Complex located near Freeport, Texas, to an existing commercial crude oil terminal near Texas City, Texas. In May 1984, DOE issued an Environmental Assessment ((EA); DOE/EA-0252) and a Finding of No Significant Impact for this action. The May 1985 EA addressed the construction and operation of a DOE-owned buried crude oil pipeline from Bryan Mound to the ARCO Terminal located in Texas City, Galveston County, Texas. The EA assessed three alternative alignments for outing the pipeline from Bryan Mound past Freeport to a common point near Stratton Ridge. From Stratton Ridge to Texas City, one route segment was considered. All three alternative alignments around Freeport were subsequently determined to be unsuitable for safe construction of a large-diameter buried pipeline, primarily because of crowded pipeline corridors and restricted pipeline rights-of-way (ROW). Therefore, the SPR identified and is herein considering a fourth alternative route segment from Bryan Mound through the City of Freeport, across the Old Brazos River and Dow Barge Canal, and northward to Stratton Ridge. The route is about 11 miles long, and is in or adjacent to existing utility and pipeline right-of-way for about 70% of its length. Crude oil throughput capacity for all cases is 1.10 million barrels per day. This revised EA addresses environmental impacts of construction and operation of the pipeline along the fourth subalternative route segment, as compared to impacts from the three previously considered alternative route segments. 11 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

Not Available

1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Pleasant Bayou geopressured/geothermal testing project, Brazoria County, Texas. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Phase II-B production testing of the Pleasant Bayou No. 2 well began September 22, 1982. The test plan was designed to evaluate the capabilities of the geopressured-geothermal reservoir during an extended flow period. Tests were conducted to determine reservoir areal extent; aquifer fluid properties; fluid property change with production; information on reservoir production drive mechanism; long-term scale and corrosion control methods; and disposal well operations. Operatinal aspects of geopressured-geothermal production were also evaluated. The test was discontinued prematurely in May 1983 because of a production tubing failure. Most of the production tubing was recovered from the well and cause of the failure was determined. Plans for recompletion of the well were prepared. However, the well was not recompleted because of funding constraints and/or program rescheduling. In March 1984, the Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV) directed that the site be placed in a standby-secured condition. In August 1984, the site was secured. Routine site maintenance and security was provided during the secured period.

Ortego, P.K.

1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Geopressurized/geothermal project, Pleasant Bayou well no. 2, Brazoria County, Texas: Workover summary, February 15, 1986-April 3, 1986  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A workover of the Pleasant Bayou well No. 2 to clear debris from the well and replace leaking 5.5'' production tubing is described. (ACR)

Not Available

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

EIS-0464: EPA Notice of Availability of the Draft Environmental Impact Statement  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Lake Charles Carbon Capture and Sequestration Project, Lake Charles, Louisiana and Brazoria County, Texas

27

EIS-0464: DOE Notice of Availability of the Draft Environmental Impact Statement  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Lake Charles Carbon Capture and Sequestration Project, Lake Charles, Louisiana and Brazoria County, Texas

28

Miocene structure of Mustang Island, Mustang Island East Addition and part of Matagorda Island, Outer Continental Shelf areas, Gulf of Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Understanding the Miocene structure of Mustang Island and the neighboring areas in the northwestern Gulf of Mexico helps to increase knowledge of the geology and hence contribute to petroleum exploration and production in the area. Interpretation of about 1465 miles of multifold, migrated seismic reflection data, integrated with 35 well log data, served to detail the Miocene structure and its evolution. Early Miocene sedimentation resulted in differential loading of mobile substrates of shale. This caused movement of the shale basinward. Further loading caused overlying sediments to yield, forming the Clemente-Tomas fault. This is a listric, down to the basin growth fault, lying on the seaward flanks of a shale ridge. Rollover anticlines characterize the hangingwall blocks of this fault especially in the southwestern part of the study area. These rollover anticlines could be potential hydrocarbon traps. Rapid sedimentation during the Middle Miocene was responsible for the formation of the contemporaneous growth faults of the Corsair-Wanda system. The Corsair fault is an extensive, listric, mostly concave up growth fault that diagonally runs through the area along a southwest-northeast trend. A salt withdrawal syncline separates the Wanda from the Corsair fault. This suggests that the Corsair formed as a result of primary salt withdrawal. Planar rotation of hangingwall blocks of the Corsair fault formed structural highs that are able to accumulate hydrocarbons. Continued sedimentation during the Middle-Upper Miocene caused the underlying salt to undergo secondary withdrawal. This withdrawal caused the overlying sediments to collapse into a half-turtle anticline upon which the Wanda fault appears to detach. The half-turtle anticlines and a series of horsts could be prospective zones of hydrocarbon accumulation. The Wanda fault zone appears to lie along the landward limit of salt deposition in this part of the Gulf of Mexico. The only salt diapir in the area lies immediately basinward of the Wanda fault.

Kasande, Robert

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Classification of Weather Patterns and Associated Trajectories of High-Ozone Episodes in the HoustonGalvestonBrazoria Area during the 2005/06 TexAQS-II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 850-hPa synoptic flow patterns over eastern Texas and adjacent states during the 2005/06 Second Texas Air Quality Studies (TexAQS-II) period were classified into six groups using a two-stage clustering method. This study identifies synoptic ...

Fong Ngan; Daewon Byun

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Final report for the geothermal well site restoration and plug and abandonment of wells: DOE Pleasant Bayou test site, Brazoria County, Texas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

For a variety of reasons, thousands of oil and gas wells have been abandoned in the Gulf Coast Region of the United States. Many of these wells penetrated geopressured zones whose resource potential for power generation was undervalued or ignored. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Geopressured-Geothermal Research Program was chartered to improve geothermal technology to the point where electricity could be commercially produced from a substantial number of geopressured resource sites. This research program focused on relatively narrow technical issues that are unique to geopressured resources such as the ability to predict reservoir production capacity based on preliminary flow tests. Three well sites were selected for the research program. These are the Willis Hulin and Gladys McCall sites in Louisiana, and the Pleasant Bayou site in Texas. The final phase of this research project consists of plug and abandonment (P&A) of the wells and site restoration.

Rinehart, Ben N.; Seigel, Ben H.

1994-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

31

EIS-0464: DOE Notice of Availability of the Draft Environmental...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE Notice of Availability of the Draft Environmental Impact Statement Lake Charles Carbon Capture and Sequestration Project, Lake Charles, Louisiana and Brazoria County,...

32

FC Master List.vp:CorelVentura 7  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

495726 Mustang Draw TX80 317 Martin 1971 OA 013905 Mustang Gulch TX30 039 Brazoria 1990 N 495788 Mustang Island TX40 355 Nueces 1949 ONA

33

Texas | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Carbon Capture and Sequestration Project, Lake Charles, Louisiana and Brazoria County, Texas April 25, 2013 EA-1939: Finding of No Significant Impact Center for Commercialization...

34

NIST WTC Public-Private Response Plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... IAFSS, ASME, LANL, MIT, Princeton, Northwestern, UT Austin, Georgia Tech, Penn State, Drexel, Wharton, Columbia, Lehigh, UMd, WPI, ...

2012-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

35

WTC Technical Conference  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... IAFSS, ASME, LANL, MIT, Princeton, Northwestern, UT Austin, Georgia Tech, Penn State, Drexel, Wharton, Columbia, Lehigh, UMd, WPI, ...

2011-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

36

No Slide Title  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... IAFSS, ASME, LANL, MIT, Princeton, Northwestern, UT Austin, Georgia Tech, Penn State, Drexel, Wharton, Columbia, Lehigh, UMd, WPI, ...

2011-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

37

Sea, Lake, and Overland Surges from Hurricanes (SLOSH) ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 0 60 0 87 After: :p:ps2:ps2:Matagorda Bay Texas New:-1 ... to a lake value (3). 2. The number of Intermediate (8) and ... 13325 East West HWY SSMC ...

2010-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

38

View / Download  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

University of Pennsylvania's School of. Engineering and Applied Science and the Wharton School. Her development of CermeTi has opened the door to many...

39

An Improved Algorithm for the Generalized Quadratic Assignment ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electrical and Systems Engineering, University of Pennsylvania ... Operations and Information Management, The Wharton School,. University .... feasible solution generators, Lagrangean relaxation, and subgradient optimization to solve hard.

40

Movements, site fidelity, and surfacing patterns of Bottlenose Dolphins on the central Texas coast  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Radio-tracking of 10 bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus), from 9 July 1992 to 13 September 1992, and photographic surveys of 35 freeze-branded dolphins, from May 1992 to June 1993, were conducted in the Matagorda Bay area of Texas, in response to a mass mortality event which occurred between Matagorda and Aransas Bays, Texas, during spring 1992. The primary goals of the study were to assess range size and site fidelity, as well as to initiate a long-term ecological study by collecting data on social and behavioral patterns. The Matagorda Bay dolphin population was found to be numerically robust, occupying all regions of the bay surveyed. Mean range size, based on radio telemetry, was 140 km2 (SD = 90.7, n = 10 dolphins). Males and females had similar range sizes though males visited the extremities of their ranges more frequently or for longer periods. Most, if not all 35 freeze-branded dolphins, appeared to be resident to the Matagorda-Espiritu Santo Bay area with much fluidity of group membership. Overall mark/recapture population size estimates from photo-identification suggested that 218 + 71.4 (95% CI) dolphins utilized an area of 312 km2 in Matagorda and Espiritu Santo Bays, similar to an estimate made in 1981. Dolphins spent longer times at the surface and dove less often at night, indicating lower activity levels at night. Observations of long-distance movement between Texas bays, and an autumn increase in dolphin numbers in the study area, suggested that the study animals were not an isolated population.

Lynn, Spencer Kendall

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "brazoria wharton matagorda" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

R&D Tax Policy During the 1980s: Success of Failure?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1992. "Tax Incentives for R&D: What Do the Data Tell Us?"Implicit Tax Effects of the R&D Tax Credit." Wharton School,on Canadian Industrial R&D Expenditures." Canadian Public

Hall, Bronwyn H.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Ecological Risk Assessment Guidance for Superfund: Process for...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Shari Stevens Region VII Steve Wharton Robert Koke Region III Barbara O'Korn Root Robert Davis Region VIII Gerry Henningsen, Ph.D.,D.V.M. Region IV Lynn Wellman Dale Hoff, Ph.D....

43

Microseismic monitoring of Chocolate Bayou, Texas: the Pleasant Bayou No. 2 geopressured/geothermal energy test well program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Brazoria seismic network, instrumentation, design, and specifications are described. The data analysis procedures are presented. Seismicity is described in relation to the Pleasant Bayou production history. Seismicity originating near the chemical plant east of the geopressured/geothermal well is discussed. (MHR)

Mauk, F.J.; Kimball, B.; Davis, R.A.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Annual Report Greetings From Dr. Walter Buchanan, Department Head  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Advanced Energy Industries Advantest America, Inc. AdventGX Analog Devices Applied Materials Brazoria address the workforce needs in the power and energy systems industries. In addition to the curriculum , as they are receiving increasing numbers of job offers from the power and energy systems industries! TECHNOLOGY

Behmer, Spencer T.

45

EIS-0487: Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement |  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7: Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact 7: Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0487: Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement Freeport LNG Liquefaction Project, Brazoria County, Texas As previously noticed on August 11, 2011, and supplemented herein, the staff of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC or Commission) will prepare an EIS that will discuss the environmental impacts of the Liquefaction Project involving construction and operation of facilities proposed by Freeport LNG Development, L.P., Freeport LNG Expansion, L.P, and FLNG Liquefaction LLC (collectively referred to as Freeport) in Brazoria County, Texas. This EIS will be used by the Commission in its decision-making process to determinewhether the project is in the public

46

Geothermal Energy Geopressure Subprogram, GCO-DOE, Pleasant Bayou No. 1  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This Environmental Assessment (EA) has been prepared to assess the environmental implications of the Department of Energy's proposal to drill, complete, and test one geopressure well located in Brazoria County on a 2 hectares (five acre) test site 64 km (40 mi) south of Houston, Abstract 107, Perry and Austin Survey, Brazoria County, TX. The test well is herein referred to as GCO-DOE Pleasant Bayou No. 1. A maximum of four disposal wells will be located within .8 km (1/2 mi) of the proposed well. The DOE and the University of Texas Center for Energy Studies propose to operate the test facility for three years to evaluate the geopressure potential of the subsurface. Tests to be conducted include flow rates, fluid composition, temperature, gas content, geologic characteristics, and the land subsidence potential for subsequent production.

none

1978-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Texas Senate Bill 5 Legislation for Reducing Pollution in Non-Attainment and Affected Areas: Procedures for Measuring Electricity Savings from the Adoption of the International Energy Conservation Code (IRC/IECC 2001) in New Residences  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Four areas in Texas have been designated by the EPA as non-attainment areas because ozone levels exceed the NAAQS maximum allowable limits, Beaumont-Port Arthur, El Paso, Dallas-Ft. Worth, and Houston-Galveston-Brazoria. These areas face severe sanctions if attainment is not reached by 2007. Four additional areas in the state are also approaching national ozone limits (i.e., affected areas), including: Austin, Corpus Christi, San Antonio, and the Longview-Tyler-Marshall area.

Haberl, J. S.; Culp, C.; Yazdani, B.; Fitzpatrick, T.; Turner, W. D.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Technical support for geopressured-geothermal well activities in Louisiana. Final report, September 27, 1978-December 31, 1980  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The data analysis is based on the Brazoria Texas well and the balance of the modeling work is theoretical. Progress in the regional assessment of the geopressured-geothermal resource in Louisiana is reported. Environmental monitoring effort established monitoring systems and baseline environmental measurements. Efforts to improve the technoeconomic model, improve the estimates of methane in solution, and to evaluate newly identified sites are described. (MHR)

Wrighton, F.M.; Bebout, D.; Carver, D.R.; Groat, C.C.; Johnson, A.E. Jr.

1981-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

49

Capturing Carbon Will it work to cool the world?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Capturing Carbon Will it work to cool the world? Speakers: Dr. Malcolm Wilson Chief Executive in Exploration Geophysics Department of Geoscience, University of Calgary Theme Leader for Secure Carbon Storage, Carbon Management Canada Don Wharton Vice-President, Sustainable Development TransAlta Corporation

Calgary, University of

50

{Timko Bio 09-11 w-pic.1 } As the Chief Technology & Strategy Officer for Pitney Bowes, Joe Timko leads a portfolio that  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and technology to this role. He joined Pitney Bowes in 2010 from McKinsey & Company where he was a Partner, and operations. Prior to McKinsey, Joe was a product manager and R&D leader for Bell Laboratories Bell and McKinsey, Joe was recognized as a people developer. Joe received an MBA from The Wharton

Lin, Xiaodong

51

Argonne Transportation Technology R&D Center - Lithium-ion Batteries,  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Alternative Fuels Autonomie Batteries Downloadable Dynamometer Database Engines Green Racing GREET Hybrid Electric Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Materials Modeling, Simulation & Software Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles PSAT Smart Grid Student Competitions Technology Analysis Transportation Research and Analysis Computing Center Working With Argonne Contact TTRDC Photo of battery developers that links to story Press Coverage What's New Multimedia Logo of the Wharton School of Business Dec. 13. Knowledge@Wharton. Green SPorts and Transportation: The Elephant in the Room Logo of Crain's Chicago Business Dec. 10. Crain's Chicago Business. Argonne chemist Pete Chupas named one of Crain's 2013 "40 under 40" Logo of the Sioux City Journal Dec. 2. Sioux City Journal. Ethanol Supporters Say the Numbers Support Their Industry

52

Draft Environmental Impact Statement for the Site Selection for the Expansion of the Strategic Petroleum Reserve  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 1 Summary and Chapters 1 - 7 May 2006 Draft Environmental Impact Statement for Site Selection for the Expansion of the Strategic Petroleum Reserve Document No. DOE/EIS-0385 Responsible Federal Agency: U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Petroleum Reserves Location: Potential new SPR storage sites are located in Lafourche Parish, Louisiana; Perry and Claiborne Counties, Mississippi; and Brazoria County, Texas. Existing Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) storage sites that could be expanded are located in Cameron, Calcasieu, and Iberville Parishes, Louisiana; and Jefferson County, Texas. Associated pipelines, marine terminals, and other facilities that might be developed are located in East Baton Rouge, East Feliciana, St. James, Terrebonne, West Baton

53

Geothermal resources: Frio Formation, Upper Texas Gulf Coast. Geological circular 76-3  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Major sand trends were identified in the Frio Formation, Upper Texas Gulf Coast as part of the evaluation of its potential for producing geothermal energy. Electrical logs from 465 wells spaced 5 to 10 miles apart were used in the study. Maps illustrating total net sand and total sand percentage of the Frio Formation are included. It was found that subsurface fluid temperatures of greater than 250/sup 0/F occur in the Frio sand bodies up to 100 ft thick downdip of the high-sand trends. LA broad band in Brazoria and Galveston Counties was delineated as having geothermal potential. (JGB)

Bebout, D.G.; Loucks, R.G.; Bosch, S.C.; Dorfman, M.H.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Factors controlling reservoir quality in tertiary sandstones and their significance to geopressured geothermal production. Annual report, May 1, 1979-May 31, 1980  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Differing extents of diagenetic modification is the factor primarily responsible for contrasting regional reservoir quality of Tertiary sandstones from the Upper and Lower Texas Gulf Coast. Detailed comparison of Frio sandstones from the Chocolate Bayou/Danbury Dome area, Brazoria County, and Vicksburg sandstones from the McAllen Ranch Field area, Hidalgo County, reveals that extent of diagenetic modification is most strongly influenced by (1) detrital mineralogy and (2) regional geothermal gradients. Vicksburg sandstones from the McAllen Ranch Field area are less stable, chemically and mechanically, than Frio sandstones from the Chocolate Bayou/Danbury dome area. Vicksburg sandstones are mineralogically immature and contain greater proportions of feldspars and rock fragments than do Frio sandstones. Thr reactive detrital assemblage of Vicksubrg sandstones is highly susceptible to diagenetic modification. Susceptibility is enhanced by higher than normal geothermal gradients in the McAllen Ranch Field area. Thus, consolidation of Vicksburg sandstones began at shallower depth of burial and precipitation of authigenic phases (especially calcite) was more pervasive than in Frio sandstones. Moreover, the late-stage episode of ferroan calcite precipitation that occluded most secondary porosity in Vicksburg sandstones did not occur significantly in Frio sandstones. Therefore, regional reservoir quality of Frio sandstones from Brazoria County is far better than that characterizing Vicksburg sandstones from Hidalgo County, especially at depths suitable for geopressured geothermal energy production.

Loucks, R.G.; Richmann, D.L.; Milliken, K.L.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Factors controlling reservoir quality in tertiary sandstones and their significance to geopressured geothermal production  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Variable intensity of diagenesis is the factor primarily responsible for contrasting regional reservoir quality of Tertiary sandstones from the upper and lower Texas coast. Detailed comparison of Frio sandstone from the Chocolate Bayou/Danbury Dome area, Brazoria County, and Vicksburg sandstones from the McAllen Ranch Field area, Hidalgo County, reveals that extent of diagenetic modification is most strongly influenced by (1) detrital mineralogy and (2) regional geothermal gradients. The regional reservoir quality of Frio sandstones from Brazoria County is far better than that characterizing Vicksburg sandstones from Hidalgo County, especially at depths suitable for geopressured geothermal energy production. However, in predicting reservoir quality on a site-specific basis, locally variable factors such as relative proportions for porosity types, pore geometry as related to permeability, and local depositional environment must also be considered. Even in an area of regionally favorable reservoir quality, such local factors can significantly affect reservoir quality and, hence, the geothermal production potential of a specific sandstone unit.

Loucks, R.G.; Richmann, D.L.; Milliken, K.L.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Office of Energy Efficiency and  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3, 2010 3, 2010 CX-001692: Categorical Exclusion Determination MacDonald Miller Financing Packages for Utility Based Energy Efficient Projects CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 04/13/2010 Location(s): Washington Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office April 13, 2010 CX-001689: Categorical Exclusion Determination American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) State Energy Program (SEP) Bay City and Van Vleck Independent School District (ISD) Wind Project CX(s) Applied: A9, A11 Date: 04/13/2010 Location(s): Matagorda County, Texas Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office April 13, 2010 CX-001686: Categorical Exclusion Determination American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) State Energy Program (SEP) - Austin Energy Solar Project

57

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

01 - 7210 of 31,917 results. 01 - 7210 of 31,917 results. Download CX-001629: Categorical Exclusion Determination Fort Worden State Park Energy Efficiency Improvements CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 04/14/2010 Location(s): Washington Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-001629-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-001689: Categorical Exclusion Determination American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) State Energy Program (SEP) Bay City and Van Vleck Independent School District (ISD) Wind Project CX(s) Applied: A9, A11 Date: 04/13/2010 Location(s): Matagorda County, Texas Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-001689-categorical-exclusion-determination

58

Categorical Exclusion (CX) Determinations By Date | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3, 2010 3, 2010 CX-001689: Categorical Exclusion Determination American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) State Energy Program (SEP) Bay City and Van Vleck Independent School District (ISD) Wind Project CX(s) Applied: A9, A11 Date: 04/13/2010 Location(s): Matagorda County, Texas Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office April 13, 2010 CX-001686: Categorical Exclusion Determination American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) State Energy Program (SEP) - Austin Energy Solar Project CX(s) Applied: A9, A11 Date: 04/13/2010 Location(s): Austin, Texas Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office April 13, 2010 CX-001676: Categorical Exclusion Determination Hoosier Efficiency Loan Program (HELP) CX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B5.1

59

CX-001689: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

89: Categorical Exclusion Determination 89: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-001689: Categorical Exclusion Determination American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) State Energy Program (SEP) Bay City and Van Vleck Independent School District (ISD) Wind Project CX(s) Applied: A9, A11 Date: 04/13/2010 Location(s): Matagorda County, Texas Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office The State of Texas will provide $1,784,808 in Recovery Act funds to the Bay City Independent School District (ISD) and Van Vleck ISD to install small wind turbines on eleven school campuses in the two ISDs. The wind turbines will serve educational purposes as well as to generate clean, renewable energy for campus use. DOCUMENT(S) AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD CX-001689.pdf More Documents & Publications

60

Evidence from the Natural Gas Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

country. It was founded in 1969 through a grant from Oppenheimer & Company in honor of its late partner, Rodney L. White. The Center receives support from its endowment and from annual contributions from its Members. The Center sponsors a wide range of financial research. It publishes a working paper series and a reprint series. It holds an annual seminar, which for the last several years has focused on household financial decision making. The Members of the Center gain the opportunity to participate in innovative research to break new ground in the field of finance. Through their membership, they also gain access to the Wharton Schools faculty

Christopher C. Geczy; Bernadette A. Minton; Catherine Schrand

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "brazoria wharton matagorda" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Latest Documents and Notices | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

December 6, 2013 December 6, 2013 EIS-0447: DOE Notice of Availability of Draft Environmental Impact Statement Champlain Hudson Power Express Transmission Line Project, New York November 22, 2013 EIS-0464: EPA Notice of Availability of Final Environmental Impact Statement Lake Charles Carbon Capture and Sequestration Project, Lake Charles, Louisiana and Brazoria County, Texas November 20, 2013 EIS-0469: Notice of Intent to Prepare a Supplemental Draft Environmental Impact Statement Proposed Wilton IV Wind Energy Center Project, Burleigh County, North Dakota November 15, 2013 EA-1752: Draft Environmental Assessment Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG&E) Compressed Air Energy Storage (CAES) Compression Testing Phase and Temporary Site Facilities, Kings Island, San Joaquin County, California

62

EIS-0385: EPA Notice of Availability of the Draft Environmental Impact  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

85: EPA Notice of Availability of the Draft Environmental 85: EPA Notice of Availability of the Draft Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0385: EPA Notice of Availability of the Draft Environmental Impact Statement Site Selection for the Expansion of the Strategic Petroleum Reserve Environmental Protection Agency Notice of Availability of Draft Environmental Impact Statements: Strategic Petroleum Reserve Expansion, Site Selection of Five New Sites: Chacahoula and Clovelly, in Lafourche Parish, LA; Burinsburg, Claiborne County, MS; Richton, Perry County, MS; and Stratton Ridge, Brazoria County, TX and Existing Site Bayou Choctaw, Iberville Parish, LA, West Hackberry, Cameron and Calcasieu Parishes, LA; and Big Hill, Jefferson County, TX DOE/EIS-0385, Draft Environmental Impact Statement for the Site Selection for the Expansion of the Strategic Petroleum Reserve

63

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

61 - 3370 of 26,777 results. 61 - 3370 of 26,777 results. Download EIS-0431: Extension of public comment period; Notice of public hearing; Correction Hydrogen Energy California's Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle and Carbon Capture and Sequestration Project, CA http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/eis-0431-extension-public-comment-period-notice-public-hearing-correction Download EIS-0464: EPA Notice of Availability of the Draft Environmental Impact Statement Lake Charles Carbon Capture and Sequestration Project, Lake Charles, Louisiana and Brazoria County, Texas http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/eis-0464-epa-notice-availability-draft-environmental-impact-statement Download EIS-0469: Notice of Intent to Prepare a Supplemental Draft Environmental Impact Statement Proposed Wilton IV Wind Energy Center Project, Burleigh County, North

64

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

11 - 8820 of 28,905 results. 11 - 8820 of 28,905 results. Download Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, September 2005 Welcome to the 44th quarterly report on lessons learned in the NEPA process. This issue completes our 11th year publishing LLQR, and as we go to press, we're preparing to mark an even more impressive milestone - our observance of the 35th anniversary of NEPA. We're busily working on all the details that will make this a great conference. We hope to see YOU there. http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/lessons-learned-quarterly-report-september-2005 Download EIS-0464: Record of Decision Lake Charles Carbon Capture and Sequestration Project, Lake Charles, Louisiana and Brazoria County, Texas http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/eis-0464-record-decision Download Draft Report Chapter 2: Generation Adequacy

65

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

61 - 9170 of 28,905 results. 61 - 9170 of 28,905 results. Download Draft Chapter 4: Transmission Adequacy http://energy.gov/oe/downloads/draft-chapter-4-transmission-adequacy Download EIS-0464: Draft Environmental Impact Statement Lake Charles Carbon Capture and Sequestration Project, Lake Charles, Louisiana and Brazoria County, Texas http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/eis-0464-draft-environmental-impact-statement Download Newsletter (May 2009).pub http://energy.gov/management/downloads/newsletter-may-2009pub Download Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 4A Baltimore, Maryland In addition to the ZIP file for each building type, you can directly view the "scorecard" spreadsheet that summarizes the inputs and results for each location. This Microsoft Excel spreadsheet is also included in the ZIP

66

EIS-0385: EPA Notice of Availability of the Draft Environmental Impact  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EPA Notice of Availability of the Draft Environmental EPA Notice of Availability of the Draft Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0385: EPA Notice of Availability of the Draft Environmental Impact Statement Site Selection for the Expansion of the Strategic Petroleum Reserve Environmental Protection Agency Notice of Availability of Draft Environmental Impact Statements: Strategic Petroleum Reserve Expansion, Site Selection of Five New Sites: Chacahoula and Clovelly, in Lafourche Parish, LA; Burinsburg, Claiborne County, MS; Richton, Perry County, MS; and Stratton Ridge, Brazoria County, TX and Existing Site Bayou Choctaw, Iberville Parish, LA, West Hackberry, Cameron and Calcasieu Parishes, LA; and Big Hill, Jefferson County, TX DOE/EIS-0385, Draft Environmental Impact Statement for the Site Selection for the Expansion of the Strategic Petroleum Reserve

67

CX-009588: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

588: Categorical Exclusion Determination 588: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-009588: Categorical Exclusion Determination Sologen Geothermal Co-Production Field Demonstration CX(s) Applied: A9, B1.31, B3.1, B4.12, B5.5, B5.12, B5.15 Date: 12/13/2012 Location(s): Texas Offices(s): Golden Field Office The U.S. DOE's National Renewable Energy Laboratory proposes to enter into a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement with Sologen Systems, LLC for a geothermal co-production field demonstration project at existing oil and gas wells in Brazoria County, Texas. The purpose of the field demonstration project is to collect data to reduce the uncertainty in performance and cost estimates for coproduced geothermal energy, and therefore lower the barrier for market uptake. CX-009588.pdf More Documents & Publications

68

EIS-0464: Draft Environmental Impact Statement | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Draft Environmental Impact Statement Draft Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0464: Draft Environmental Impact Statement Lake Charles Carbon Capture and Sequestration Project, Lake Charles, Louisiana and Brazoria County, Texas This draft Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) provides information about the potential environmental impacts associated with the Department of Energy's (DOE's) proposed action to provide financial assistance to Leucadia Energy, LLC (Leucadia) and with Leucadia's proposed Lake Charles Carbon Capture and Sequestration (CCS) project. DOE's proposed action would provide financial assistance to Leucadia under the Industrial Carbon Capture and Sequestration (ICCS) Program to support construction and operation of Leucadia's Lake Charles CCS project. DOE proposes to provide Leucadia with up to $261.4 million, which would constitute about 60

69

Record of Decision (ROD) | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Record of Decision (ROD) Record of Decision (ROD) Record of Decision (ROD) A concise public document that records a Federal agency's decision(s) concerning a proposed action for which the agency has prepared an environmental impact statement (See CEQ and DOE NEPA regulations at 40 CFR 1505.2 and 10 CFR 1021.315, respectively). If you have any trouble finding a specific document, please contact AskNEPA@hq.doe.gov for assistance. Documents Available for Download January 10, 2014 EIS-0464: Record of Decision Lake Charles Carbon Capture and Sequestration Project, Lake Charles, Louisiana and Brazoria County, Texas December 13, 2013 EIS-0391: Record of Decision Final Tank Closure and Waste Management Environmental Impact Statement for the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington October 1, 2013

70

EIS-0487: Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Assessment |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7: Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Assessment 7: Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Assessment EIS-0487: Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Assessment This FERC EA will evaluate the potential environmental impacts of a proposal, Liquefaction Project involving construction and operation of facilities proposed by Freeport LNG Development, LP, Freeport LNG Expansion, LP, and FLNG Liquefaction LLC (collectively referred to as Freeport) in Brazoria County, Texas. This EA will be used by the Commission in its decision-making process to determine whether the project is in the public convenience and necessity. DOE is a cooperating agency. EIS-0487-EANOI-2011.pdf More Documents & Publications EIS-0487: Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0488: Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement

71

EIS-0464: Final Environmental Impact Statement | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Final Environmental Impact Statement Final Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0464: Final Environmental Impact Statement Lake Charles Carbon capture and Sequestration Project, Lake Charles, Louisiana and Brazoria County, Texas This Final Environmental Impact Statement provides information about the potential environmental impacts associated with the Department of Energy's proposed action to provide financial assistance to Leucadia Energy, LLC (Leucadia) and with Leucadia's proposed Lake Charles Carbon Capture and Sequestration (CCS) project. DOE's proposed action would provide financial assistance to Leucadia under the Industrial Carbon Capture Sequestration Program to support construction and operation of Leucadia's Lake Charles CCS project. DOE proposes to provide Leucadia with up to $261.4 million, which would constitute about 60 percent of the

72

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

31 - 2140 of 26,777 results. 31 - 2140 of 26,777 results. Article Right Turn on Red! Read about a great example of how state and local governments can learn from each other - and how a very simple policy change can produce huge benefits for the country, helping us all save money by saving energy. http://energy.gov/articles/right-turn-red Download EA-0939: Final Environmental Assessment Blue Creek Winter Range: Wildlife Mitigation Project http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/ea-0939-final-environmental-assessment Download EIS-0464: Draft Environmental Impact Statement Lake Charles Carbon Capture and Sequestration Project, Lake Charles, Louisiana and Brazoria County, Texas http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/eis-0464-draft-environmental-impact-statement Download EA-1895: Draft Environmental Assessment

73

Environmental Impact Statements; Notice of Availability (1/16/04)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

93 93 Federal Register / Vol. 69, No. 11 / Friday, January 16, 2004 / Notices Liquefied Natural Gas to Shippers, Authorization of Site, Construction and Operation, Stratton Ridge Meter Station 2007, City of Freeport, Brazoria County, TX. Summary: EPA expressed environmental concern regarding wetland impacts/mitigation, Clean Water Act Section 402 permitting, vaporization water intake and discharge impacts, and conformity with the state's implementation plan for air quality. EPA requested additional information on these issues. ERP No. D-FRC-L05230-OR Rating LO, Pelton Round Butte Hydroelectric Project, (FERC No. 2030-036), Application for a New License for Existing 366.82-megawatt Project, Deschutes River, OR. Summary: EPA Region 10 used a screening tool to conduct a limited

74

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Error message Error message The page you requested does not exist. For your convenience, a search was performed using the query Flash2009 19. You are here Home » Page not found Page not found Oops! The page you are looking for doesn't seem to be available. Did you find a broken link? Tell us and we'll fix it. Or maybe you meant to go somewhere else? Use the search box or links below to help guide you. Enter terms Flash2009 19 Search Showing 3171 - 3180 of 9,640 results. Download EIS-0464: EPA Notice of Availability of Final Environmental Impact Statement Lake Charles Carbon Capture and Sequestration Project, Lake Charles, Louisiana and Brazoria County, Texas http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/eis-0464-epa-notice-availability-final-environmental-impact-statement Article The History of the Light Bulb

75

EIS-0487: Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Assessment |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EIS-0487: Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Assessment EIS-0487: Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Assessment EIS-0487: Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Assessment This FERC EA will evaluate the potential environmental impacts of a proposal, Liquefaction Project involving construction and operation of facilities proposed by Freeport LNG Development, LP, Freeport LNG Expansion, LP, and FLNG Liquefaction LLC (collectively referred to as Freeport) in Brazoria County, Texas. This EA will be used by the Commission in its decision-making process to determine whether the project is in the public convenience and necessity. DOE is a cooperating agency. EIS-0487-EANOI-2011.pdf More Documents & Publications EIS-0487: Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0488: Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement

76

Environmental baseline monitoring in the area of general crude oil - Department of Energy Pleasant Bayou Number 2: a geopressured geothermal test well, 1979. Annual report, Volume I  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A program to monitor baseline air and water quality, subsidence, microseismic activity, and noise in the vicinity of Brazoria County geopressured geothermal test wells, Pleasant Bayou No. 1 and No. 2, has been underway since March 1978. The initial report on environmental baseline monitoring at the test well contained descriptions of baseline air and water quality, a noise survey, an inventory of microseismic activity, and a discussion of the installation of a liquid tilt meter (Gustavson, 1979). The following report continues the description of baseline air and water quality of the test well site, includes an inventory of microseismic activity during 1979 with interpretations of the origin of the events, and discusses the installation and monitoring of a liquid tilt meter at the test well site. In addition, a brief description of flooding at the test site is presented.

Gustavson, T.C.; Howard, R.C.; McGookey, D.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Coring unconsolidated sands in the Gulf of Mexico  

SciTech Connect

Diamant Board Stratabit has achieved coring recovery rates in soft, unconsolidated formations as high as 99 percent. These rates are achieved using conventional coring equipment in a special configuration to minimize frictional resistance to the core as it passes through the bit and core catcher assembly and enters the inner barrel. This paper describes DBS's coring experience with its Maximum Core Protection System, which has been used at depths from 3000 ft to below 20,000 ft and in deviated holes up to 57 degrees. In the Gulf of Mexico, the system cored over 5800 ft from Matagorda Island to Charlotte Harbor, with an overall recovery rate of 93 percent. In most applications, the hole size dictates the core barrel and core size. Through 9 5/8-in. casing with an 8 1/2-in. by 4-in. core bit, the 6 3/4-in. by 4-in. by 30-ft conventional core barrel will be used with a Fibertube inner barrel to replace the steel inner barrel, allowing a full 4-in. core to be cut. In smaller hole sizes, other equipment with the Maximum Core Protection System will be used. With a top drive unit or long Kelly, a 45-ft or 60-ft barrel may be used. Many times an unconsolidated formation will not support more than 30 ft of core, therefore 30-ft barrels are normally used.

Wilcox, J.

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

W.A. Parish Post-Combustion CO2 Capture and Sequestration Project, Final Environmental Impact Statement (DOE/EIS-0473)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

W.A. W.A. Parish Post-Combustion CO 2 Capture and Sequestration Project Final Environmental Impact Statement Summary February 2013 DOE/EIS-0473 Office of Fossil Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK COVER SHEET Responsible Federal Agency: U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Title: W.A. Parish Post-Combustion CO 2 Capture and Sequestration Project, Final Environmental Impact Statement (DOE/EIS-0473) Location: Southeastern Texas, including Fort Bend, Wharton, and Jackson counties Contacts: For further information about this Environmental Impact Statement, contact: For general information on the DOE process for implementing the National Environmental Policy Act, contact: Mark W. Lusk U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory 3610 Collins Ferry Road Morgantown, WV 26507-0880 (304) 285-4145 or Mark.Lusk@netl.doe.gov

79

EIS-0473-DEIS-Summary-2012.pdf  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

W.A. Parish Post-Combustion CO W.A. Parish Post-Combustion CO 2 Capture and Sequestration Project Draft Environmental Impact Statement Summary September 2012 DOE/EIS-0473D Office of Fossil Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK COVER SHEET Responsible Federal Agency: U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Title: W.A. Parish Post-Combustion CO 2 Capture and Sequestration Project, Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DOE/EIS-0473D) Location: Southeastern Texas, including Fort Bend, Wharton, and Jackson Counties Contacts: For further information about this Environmental Impact Statement, contact: For general information on the DOE process for implementing the National Environmental Policy Act, contact: Mark W. Lusk U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory

80

Texas' Senate Bill 5 Legislation for Reducing Pollution in Non-Attainment and Affected Areas: Procedures for Measuring Electricity Savings from the Adoption of the International Energy Conservation Code (IRC/IECC 2001) in New Residences  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Four areas in Texas have been designated by the EPA as non-attainment areas because ozone levels exceed the NAAQS maximum allowable limits, Beaumont-Port Arthur, El Paso, Dallas-Ft. Worth, and Houston-Galveston-Brazoria. These areas face severe sanctions if attainment is not reached by 2007. Four additional areas in the state are also approaching national ozone limits (i.e., affected areas), including: Austin, Corpus Christi, San Antonio, and the Longview-Tyler-Marshall area. In 2001, the Texas State Legislature formulated and passed Senate Bill 5 to further reduce ozone levels by encouraging the reduction of emissions of NOx by sources that are currently not regulated by the TNRCC, including area sources (e.g., residential emissions), on-road mobile sources (e.g., all types of motor vehicles), and non-road mobile sources (e.g., aircraft, locomotives, etc.). An important part of this legislation is the evaluation of the State's energy efficiency programs, which includes reductions in energy use and demand that are associated with specific energy conservation measures. This paper outlines the procedures that are being developed to report the electricity savings associated with the adoption of the International Energy Conservation Code (IECC 2001) in residential construction in non-attainment and affected counties. These electricity savings will then be converted to NOx reductions using the appropriate

Haberl, J. S.; Culp, C.; Yazdani, B.; Fitzpatrick, T.; Turner, W. D.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "brazoria wharton matagorda" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Evaluation of NEPA-based environmental commitments at four geopressure design wells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The implementation of environmental mitigation and monitoring commitments made for four geopressure design well projects was evaluated. The evaluation was based on site visits conducted in August 1982 and April 1983 and on a review of monitoring and project activity reports provided by DOE contractors. The projects evaluated include: Pleasant Bayou No. 1 in Brazoria County, Texas; Dow Parcperdue in Vermilion Parish, Louisiana; and Gladys McCall and Sweet Lake No. 1 well sites in Cameron Parish, Louisiana. The contractors responsible for drilling and testing activities at the well sites have adequately implemented most of the mitigation measures described in each project's site-specific Environmental Assessment (EA). Exceptions include the lack of impermeable liners for drilling mud pits at the Dow Parcperdue, Gladys McCall, and Pleasant Bayou sites and the lack of a ring levee at the Pleasant Bayou site. Air and water quality and noise monitoring activities were not performed as strictly as outlined in the EAs. A review of the monitoring data collected to date indicates that no significant environmental degradation has occurred. This report recommends additional or future monitoring needs, especially with regard to soil contamination, subsidence, and microseismicity, and provides guidance for decommissioning.

Reed, A.W.; Hunsaker, D.B. Jr.; Roop, R.D.; Webb, J.W.

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Salinity variations and chemical compositions of waters in the Frio Formation, Texas Gulf Coast. Annual report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Waters produced from sandstone reservoirs of the deep Frio Formation exhibit spatial variations in chemical composition that roughly coincide with the major tectonic elements (Houston and Rio Grande Embayments, San Marcos Arch) and corresponding depositional systems (Houston and Norias deltas, Greta-Carancahua barrier/strandplain system) that were respectively active along the upper, lower, and middle Texas Coast during Frio deposition. Within an area, salinities are usually depth dependent, and primary trends closely correspond to pore pressure gradients and thermal gradients. Where data are available (mainly in Brazoria County) the increases in TDS and calcium with depth coincide with the zone of albitization, smectite-illite transition, and calcite decrease in shales. Waters have fairly uniform salinities when produced from the same sandstone reservoir within a fault block or adjacent fault blocks with minor displacement. In contrast, stratigraphically equivalent sandstones separated by faults with large displacement usually yield waters with substantially different salinities owing to the markedly different thermal and pressure gradients across the faults that act as barriers to fluid movement.

Morton, R.A.; Garrett, C.M. Jr.; Posey, J.S.; Han, J.H.; Jirik, L.A.

1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Preliminary reservoir and subsidence simulations for the Austin Bayou geopressured geothermal prospect  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

For the last several years, the University of Texas at Austin (UTA) has analyzed the geopressured tertiary sandstones along the Texas Gulf Coast with the objective of locating prospective reservoirs from which geothermal energy could be recovered. Of the ''geothermal fairways'' (areas with thick sandstone bodies and estimated temperatures in excess of 300 F), the Brazoria fairway appears most promising and the Austin Bayou Prospect has been developed within this fairway. A test well (DOE 1 Martin Ranch) is currently being drilled in this area. Pending the availability of actual well test data, estimated reservoir properties have been employed in numerical simulations to study the effects of variations in reservoir properties on the projected long-term behavior of the Austin Bayou Prospect. The simulations assess the sensitivity of the reservoir behavior to variations is estimated sandstone/shale distribution, shale compressibility, and vertical shale permeability. Further, hypothetical properties for the stress-deformation behavior of the rock formations were employed in a very preliminary study of the potential ground surface displacements that might accompany fluid production.

Garg, S.K.; Riney, T.D.; Brownell, D.H., Jr.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Operations research and systems analysis of geopressured/geothermal resources in Texas. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A preliminary resource assessment, based on the best available parameters, was made to identify potentially suitable fairways. Of those examined only the Brazoria Fairway in the Frio Formation was able to produce sufficient fluid to meet the minimum requirements. These requirements are based upon the need for a well to produce an initial flow rate of 40,000 bbl/day with a 6% decline rate over a 30 year production period. Next, a development planning analysis was done to determine the number of wells that would have to be drilled in the fairway, considering the probability of success, and the number of drilling rigs available. The results of this analysis provided a time phased scenario and costs of developing the fairway. These were next used in an economic analysis. The economic analysis was performed to determine the present worth of using the resource under a range of values for the key economic parameters. The results of this study indicate that the commercial development of geopressured, geothermal resource is highly dependent upon the pricing of natural gas in the US, the development of tax incentives to spur development, and a better understanding of the nature of the resource through additional well tests.

Lesso, W.G.; Zinn, C.D.; Cornwell, J.

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Annual Strategic Petroleum Reserve report  

SciTech Connect

The annual report on the Strategic Petroleum reserve for the period covering February 16, 1977 to February 18, 1978 contains the following: (1) a detailed statement of the status of the Strategic Petroleum Reserve; (2) a summary of the actions taken to develop and implement the Strategic Petroleum Reserve Plan and the Early Storage Reserve Plan; (3) an analysis of the impact and effectiveness of such actions on the vulnerability of the United States to interruption in supplies of petroleum products; (4) a summary of existing problems with respect to further implementation of the Early Storage Reserve Plan and the Strategic Petroleum Reserve Plan. Four sites with existing underground storage capacity were acquired in 1977. They are: (1) West Hackberry salt dome, Cameron Parish, Louisiana, with estimated existing capacity of 50 MMB; (2) Bryan Mound salt dome, Brazoria County, Texas, with estimated existing capacity of 62 MMB; (3) Bayou Choctaw salt dome, Iberville Parish, Louisiana, with estimated existing capacity of 74 MMB; and (4) Weeks Island salt mine, New Iberia Parish, Louisiana, with estimated existing capacity of 89 MMB. The status of each site is summarized.

1978-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

86

Economic feasibility of ethanol production from sweet sorghum juice in Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Environmental and political concerns centered on energy use from gasoline have led to a great deal of research on ethanol production. The goal of this thesis is to determine if it is profitable to produce ethanol in Texas using sweet sorghum juice. Four different areas, Moore, Hill, Willacy, and Wharton Counties, using two feedstock alternatives, sweet sorghum only and sweet sorghum and corn, will be analyzed using Monte Carlo simulation to determine the probability of economic success. Economic returns to the farmers in the form of a contract price for the average sweet sorghum yield per acre in each study area and to the ethanol plant buying sweet sorghum at the contract price will be simulated and ranked. The calculated sweet sorghum contract prices offered to farmers are $9.94, $11.44, $29.98, and $36.21 per ton in Wharton, Willacy, Moore, and Hill Counties, respectively. The contract prices are equal to the next most profitable crop returns or ten percent more than the total cost to produce sweet sorghum in the study area. The wide variation in the price is due to competing crop returns and the sweet sorghum growing season. Ethanol production using sweet sorghum and corn is the most profitable alternative analyzed for an ethanol plant. A Moore County ethanol plant has the highest average net present value of $492.39 million and is most preferred overall when using sweet sorghum and corn to produce ethanol. Sweet sorghum ethanol production is most profitable in Willacy County but is not economically successful with an average net present value of $-11.06 million. Ethanol production in Hill County is least preferred with an average net present value of $-712.00 and $48.40 million when using sweet sorghum only and sweet sorghum and corn, respectively. Producing unsubsidized ethanol from sweet sorghum juice alone is not profitable in Texas. Sweet sorghum ethanol supplemented by grain is more economical but would not be as profitable as producing ethanol from only grain in the Texas Panhandle. Farmers profit on average from contract prices for sweet sorghum when prices cover total production costs for the crop.

Morris, Brittany Danielle

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Source Contributions to VOC's to Ozone Formation in Southeast Texas Using a Source-oriented Air Quality Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Houston-Galveston-Brazoria area is in severe non-attainment status for ozone compliance. Source-oriented mechanistic modeling was used to determine the major sources of VOCs that contributes to ozone formation during the Texas Air Quality Study (TexAQS) from August 16, 2000 to September 7, 2000. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)?s Community Scale Air Quality Model (CMAQ) version 4.6 was used as a host model to include a revised Statewide Air Pollution Research Center (SAPRC99) photochemical mechanism with source-oriented extensions to track the contributions of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) emissions from diesel engines, biogenic sources, highway gasoline vehicles, fuel combustion, off-highway gasoline engines, solvent utilization and petrochemical industries to ozone formation in the atmosphere. Source-oriented emissions needed to drive the model were generated using a revised Sparse Matrix Operator Kernel Emissions (SMOKE) model version 2.4. VOC/NOx ratios are found to be a critical factor in the formation of ozone. Highest ozone formation rates were observed for ratios from 5-15. The contributions of VOC to ozone formation were estimated based on the linear relationship between the rate of NO to NO2 conversion due to radicals generated from VOC oxidation and the rate of net ozone formation. Petroleum and other industrial sources are the largest anthropogenic sources in the urban Houston region and contribute to 45% of the ozone formation in the HGB area. Highway gasoline vehicles make contributions of approximately 28% to ozone formation. Wildfires contribute to as much 11% of ozone formation on days of high wildfire activity. The model results show that biogenic emissions account for a significant amount of ozone formation in the rural areas. Both highway and off-highway vehicles contribute significantly to ozone formation especially in the downwind region. Diesel vehicles do not contribute significantly to ozone formation due to their low VOC emissions.

Krishnan, Anupama

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

An Introduction to Texas Senate Bill 5  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Four areas in Texas have been designated by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as non-attainment areas because ozone levels exceed the National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) maximum allowable limits: Beaumont-Port Arthur, El Paso, Dallas-Ft. Worth, and Houston-Galveston-Brazoria. The El Paso area also violates the NAAQS maximum allowable limits for carbon monoxide and respirable particulate matter. These areas face severe sanctions, such as loss of access to federal transportation funds, if attainment is not reached by 2007. Four additional areas in the state are also approaching national ozone limits, including: Austin, Corpus Christi, San Antonio, and the Longview-Tyler-Marshall area. Ozone is formed when oxides of nitrogen (NOx), volatile organic compounds (VOCs), and oxygen (O2) combine in the presence of strong sunlight. In response to this effort the Texas Natural Resource Conservation Commission (TNRCC) developed a strategy with the EPA that reduced VOCs from large regulated, stationary point sources by over 50 percent during the 1990 to 1996 period. Although this first strategy was very successful, levels of ozone failed to meet the national standards, and a second strategy had to be developed to achieve compliance with the ozone standard. In 2001, the Texas State Senate passed Senate Bill 5 (SB 5) to further reduce ozone levels by encouraging the reduction of emissions of NOx by sources that are currently not regulated by the TNRCC, including area sources (e.g., residential emissions), on-road mobile sources (e.g., all types of motor vehicles), and non-road mobile sources (e.g., aircraft, locomotives, etc.). This paper outlines the legislation, and responsibilities of the different government entities and the important role that private industry is being encouraged to play.

Haberl, J. S.; Culp, C.; Yazdani, B.; Fitzpatrick, T.; Turner, W. D.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Significant test results, energy potential, and geology of some Gulf Coast geopressured-geothermal sandstone reservoirs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Geopressured-geothermal reservoir found in the northern Gulf of Mexico basin represent a large potential future energy resource. Three reservoirs in various stages of developmental testing are of current interest. Over a four-year testing period the Gladys McCall 1 (Cameron Parish, Louisiana) produced 27.3 million bbl of brine and 676 million scf of gas at an average rate of 20,000 bbl/day from perforations between 15,158 and 15,490 ft. This lower Miocene sandstone section forms part of a genetic unit of interconnected channel and point-bar sandstones deposited in a lower shelf environment. Pleasant Bayou 2 well (Brazoria County, Texas) is currently being flow-tested at 20,000 bbl/day and has a gas/brine ratio of approximately 23 scf/stb and a temperature of 291/degrees/F. An electric energy conversion system being set up here will test potential for electric generation from geopressured-geothermal energy. Superior Hulin 1 (Vermilion Parish, Louisiana) is a deep (21,549 ft) former gas well proposed to be completed as a geopressured-geothermal well. Initial log analysis indicates that a 570-ft thick sandstone, of probable submarine fan origin, may contain free gas in addition to solution gas and may thus represent an economically feasible geopressured-geothermal well. Gas-separated brine is disposed by subsurface injection into disposal wells. However, in areas where hydrocarbon fields with wells penetrating geopressured sands are present, hot brines could be injected into depleted hydrocarbon zones to aid secondary recovery.

John, C.J.; Stevenson, D.A.

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Banks as Secret Keepers ?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Banks are optimally opaque institutions. They produce debt for use as a transaction medium (bank money), which requires that information about the backing assets not be revealed, so that bank money does not fluctuate in value, reducing its efficiency in trade. This need for opacity conflicts with the production of information about investment projects, necessary for allocative efficiency. How can information be produced and not revealed? Financial intermediaries exist to hide such information; they are created and structured to keep secrets. For the economy as a whole, this can be accomplished by a separation in how firms finance themselves; they divide into bank finance and capital market/stock market finance based on how well they can be used to maintain information away from liquidity markets. Firms with large projects, risky projects or projects easy to evaluate are less likely to be financed by banks. We thank Michael Woodford and seminar participants at Columbia, MIT, Rutgers, Universite de Montreal, Wharton and the SED Meetings at Cyprus for useful comments. The usual waiver of liability applies.

Tri Vi

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Foraging ecology of wintering wading birds along the Gulf of Mexico coast  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I studied flock composition, distribution and foraging ecology of wintering wading birds along the Gulf of Mexico coast. I focused on geographic variability in wintering wading bird assemblages, the processes that structured these assemblages and habitat use by wading birds. I found considerable variation among three sites, Aransas National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR), Texas; Marsh Island Wildlife Refuge (MIWR), Louisiana; and Chassahowitzka National Wildlife Refuge (CNWR), Florida. Species comprising wintering wading bird assemblages varied regionally. ANWR had the most species-rich assemblage, with eight species. MIWR had only six wading bird species. And CNWR had only three different species. Processes that structured wintering wading bird assemblages also varied regionally. In ANWR, Texas, the Random Fraction niche apportionment model (RF model) best explained the empirical abundance data for ANWR. For abundance data from MIWR a good fit was obtained with the MacArthur Fraction (MF) model and the Power Fraction (PF) models. None of the models fully explained the CNWR abundance data. I also examined patterns of habitat partitioning among wintering wading birds at three different scales at two sites, Matagorda Island National Wildlife Refuge (MINWR) and Laguna Atascosa National Wildlife Refuge (LANWR). At the macrohabitat level, wintering wading birds showed interspecific differences in macrohabitat use of both open water habitats and vegetated flats. At the mesohabitat level all species at MINWR used the category nearest the edge most often, alternatively, at LANWR wading birds were most often in the mesohabitat category of 8.1- 12 m. from the edge. In both locations wading birds partitioned habitat based on water depth. Finally, I found that Great Egrets and Snowy Egrets participated more often in flock foraging and derived more benefits from feeding in flocks than other species. Great Egrets feeding in flocks had a higher mean strike rate than those foraging alone, whereas Snowy Egrets had a higher success rate foraging in flocks than those foraging alone. In the case of the darkercolored species (e.g., Great Blue Herons, etc.) they either showed no difference in behaviors between birds foraging in flocks versus those foraging alone or they actually did worse when they foraged in flocks.

Sherry, Dawn Ann

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

The Conservation of Seventeenth Century Archaeological Glass  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The primary goal of the conservator is to stabilize and conserve artifacts with the best possible treatment available. Ideally, these treatments are noninvasive and reversible, and maintain the integrity of the object as a top priority. In this respect, it is the responsibility of the conservator to research other possible treatments when traditional methods prove to be insufficient to properly stabilize and conserve an object. Sometimes choosing to treat with a seemingly unorthodox method is the only chance for the objects survival. Though glass is considered one of the most stable archaeological materials, noninvasive, reversible treatments are not always possible given the level of deterioration glass objects undergo within the archaeological setting, specifically the underwater or waterlogged archaeological setting. This research is a consideration and investigation of the use of silicone polymers and silanes as consolidation materials for 17th-century glass recovered from aqueous environments. Working within the Conservation Research Laboratory and the Archaeological Preservation Research Laboratory at Texas A and M University, a newly developed polymer passivation technique utilizing materials acquired from the Dow Corning Corporation was applied to archaeological glass recovered from the 1686 shipwreck La Belle, excavated in Matagorda Bay off the coast of Texas by the Texas Historical Commission from 1996 to 1997. The successful application of a hydroxyl ended silicone polymer Q-1 3563, combined with a methyltrimethoxysilane intermediate crosslinker, Q-9 1315, at a 15% solution by weight and catalyzed with dibutyltin diacetate (DBTDA Fascat 4200) occurred in 1999. This project was the first large scale application of silicone polymers and silanes to 17th-century archaeological glass recovered from a marine site. Through this investigation we answered a number of questions regarding the use and application of the silicone technologies and confirmed that these materials are a viable resource for glass consolidation and conservation in terms of the suggested conservation guidelines of the IIC. The silicone technology was successfully applied to numerous types, forms, colors and degradation levels of glass. This included successful application to composite artifacts and the retreatment of objects unsuccessfully treated with a "traditional" method.

Arcak, Cory

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Characterizing marine mammal stranding events along the Texas coast  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Texas Marine Mammal Stranding Network (TMMSN) is a valuable data resource for the marine mammal community. Limitations of funding and personnel severely impact the ability of the Network to maintain impeccable databases. This research constructed an application to address database complications and focused on investigating the species identification, temporal and spatial trends for stranding events along the Texas coast. From 1980 to 2004, Tursiops truncatus accounted for approximately 80% of all stranding events. The remainder was 20 additional whale and dolphin species known to reside in the Gulf of Mexico. Tursiops truncatus strand along the entire coastline and are the only species stranding in the bays. All other species stranding are most dense along the southern coastline. The temporal scales of events revealed no linear patterns from 1980 to 2004. A unique cyclic fluctuation occurred from 1992 to 1998, including the highest yearly counts and one isolated mortality event in Port Aransas. Attempts to forecast stranding events beyond 2004 were inconclusive due to multiple factors influencing a stranding event. A bimodal seasonal trend was evident, with events peaking in the spring and fall months. Density distributions by decade isolated three frequent stranding areas: Sabine-Galveston-Brazoria counties, Galveston Shipping Channel, and Corpus Christi Shipping Channel. The final aspect analyzed spatial elaboration of events by creating six location values to describe the Texas coastline. Each event was assigned from the geographical location and the orientation of an event along the coastline. Analysis revealed the segregation of Tursiops truncatus in the bays and confirmed earlier results of density distributions. Examining the locations by time revealed a specific incident connected to a mortality event in 1992, accounting for 59% of the stranding events. Location categories were compared to the TMMSN stranding regions and the regions experienced different location frequencies. This study demonstrated how to construct a stronger database and the necessity for database accuracy. Study conclusions demonstrated the need to better isolate and research factors responsible for event distributions in time and space along the Texas coast to forecast the magnitude and location of stranding events to better aid the TMMSN response efforts.

Mullins, Ruth Louise

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Modeling urban growth and land use/land cover change in the Houston Metropolitan Area from 2002 - 2030  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Houston-Galveston-Brazoria Consolidated Metropolitan Statistical Area (Houston CMSA) has experienced rapid population growth during the past decades and is the only major US metropolitan area with no zoning regulations. We use SLEUTH, a spatially explicit cellular automata model, to simulate future (2002-2030) urban growth in the Houston metropolitan area, one of the fastest growing metropolises in the United States during the past decades. The model is calibrated with historical data for the period 1974-2002 that are extracted from a time series of satellite images. The dataset consists of four historical urban extents (1974, 1984, 1992, 2002), two land use layers (1992, 2002), five transportation layers (1974, 1984, 1990, 2002, 2025), slope layer, hillshade layer, and excluded layer. Future growth patterns are predicted based on growth coefficients derived during the calibration phase. After calibrating the model successfully, the spatial pattern of urban growth of the Houston CMSA for the period from 2002 to 2030 is predicted. Within SLEUTH, growth in the Houston CMSA is predominately "organic" with most growth occurring along the urban/rural fringe. Projected increases in urban area from 2002 to 2030 parallel projected increases in population growth within the Houston CMSA. We design three specific scenarios to simulate the spatial consequences of urban growth under different environmental conditions. The first scenario is to simulate the unmanaged growth with no restrictions. The second scenario is to project the moderate growth trend by taking into consideration environmental protection, specifically for agricultural areas, forests and wetlands. The last scenario is to simulate the managed growth with maximum environmental protection. Adjusting the level of protection for different land cover types was found to markedly affect the land use changes in the Houston CMSA. Without any protection on resource lands, Houston CMSA is estimated to lose 2,000 km2 of forest land by 2030, about 600 km2 of agricultural land, and approximately 400 km2 of wetland. Approximately half of all resource land could be saved by the third scenario, managed growth with maximum protection.

Oguz, Hakan

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Preliminary test results and geology of the DOE/Superior Hulin. number sign. 1 geopressured-geothermal well, Vermillion Parish, Louisiana  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The DOE/Superior Hulin {number sign}1 well is the most recent of the current three geopressured-geothermal prospects being tested by the Department of Energy (DOE) under its geopressured-geothermal program initiated in 1975. The other prospects under evaluation are Gladys McCall {number sign}1 (Cameron Parish, LA) and Pleasant Bayou {number sign}2 (Brazoria County, TX). The main objective of this research program is to evaluate the commercial viability of energy production from high temperature (275{degrees}+F.), geopressured, natural-gas-saturated brine sandstone aquifers occur-ring in the Gulf Coast area. The DOE/Superior Hulin {number sign}1 well is located 7.5 mi (12 km) south of the town of Erath, Louisiana. It was originally drilled and later sidetracked as an exploration well by Superior Oil Company to a depth of 21,549 ft (6,568 m) and completed in 1979. The well produced 0.3 bcf gas in 19 months from the interval between 21,059 and 21,094 ft (6,419-6,429 m). Later, owing to production problems caused by tubing/casing failure, Superior abandoned production and transferred the well to DOE for testing under the geopressured-geothermal program. The well has recently been cleaned and recompleted by Eaton Operating Company, Houston, Texas, and plugged back to 20,725 ft (6,317 m). This well penetrates the deepest known Gulf Coast geopressured-geothermal reservoir and has a maximum recorded temperature of 338{degrees}F with a 560 ft (171 m) thick sandstone. Regional geologic work indicates that the Hulin sandstone represents either a submarine canyon or an unstable shelf delta type of environment. The well is presently perforated at the bottom of the sandstone from 20,610 to 20,690 ft (6282-6306 m) for preliminary short-term testing now in progress. Initial testing indicates the gas-brine ratio to be 31 SCF/STB.

John, C.J.; Stevenson, D.A.; Groat, C.G. (Louisiana Geological Survey, Baton Rouge (USA))

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

The Demand for Homeowners Insurance with Bundled Catastrophe Coverages *  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we estimate demand for homeowner insurance in Florida. Since we are interested in a number of factors influencing demand, we approach the problem from two directions. Using 3SLS estimation, we first estimate two hedonic equations representing the price mark-up and the level of premiums per contract. We are interested in how the contracts are bundled and how the various terms influence the price mark-up and the overall level of premiums. Second, we estimate the demand for homeowners insurance using the ISO's indicated loss cost as our proxy forreal insurance services demanded. We assume that the demand for coverage is essentially a joint demand and thus we can estimate the demand for cat cover separately from the demand for non-cat cover. Two notable results are that cat coverage is more price sensitive than non-cat coverage and that cat coverage is an inferior good. This research is supported by the Wharton Project on Managing Catastrophic Risks. This paper will contribute to a report that will be jointly written and published by the Insurance Services Office (ISO) and the authors. We gratefully acknowledge the assistance of ISO in providing much of the data used in this analysis and of the companies who have allowed their exposure data to be used for this research project. The efforts of Michael Murray of ISO deserve particular recognition. James Ament, Howard Kunreuther, Neil Doherty, Michael Murray and Steven Nivin provided helpful comments on an earlier draft. This paper is still preliminary and many revisions still remain to be made. The Demand for Catastrophe Insurance with Bundled Catastrophic Coverages

Martin F. Grace; Robert W. Klein; Paul R. Kleindorfer

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Analysis of alternative-fuel price trajectories  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Findings are presented from a study to (1) acquire, analyze, and report alternative published price projections including both oil- and coal-price trajectories, and to (2) apply the fixed-annuity formula to the updated primary source projections (Energy Information Administration; Data Resources, Inc.; and Wharton Econometric Forecasting Associates, Inc.) and to the newly acquired price projections. This report also encompasses: comparisons of key assumptions underlying the price projections, and a discussion of the applicability of the fixed-annuity formula as used in the alternative-cost calculation. Section II contains graphic presentations of all updated and newly acquired coal and oil price forecasts and the corresponding calculated annuity equivalents, tabulated presentations and discussions of each forecast and underlying assumptions, and a description of how each forecast price series was transformed into input for the present-value formulas. Section III presents the fixed-annuity formula employed and discusses its appropriateness for this application. Section IV discusses the applicability of the net present value approach for comparing alternate-fuel price trajectories. Appendix A contains a listing of contacts as potential sources of price forecasts. Appendix B contains the raw forecast data from each forecast source and the coal and oil price series derived from the raw data which were actually input into the cost calculation procedure. Appendix C contains a description and listing of the computer program developed to implement the cost calculation procedure. Finally, Appendix D contains tabulations and discussions of other alternative world crude price forecasts that were identified, but for which no corresponding coal-price projections were available. (MCW)

Not Available

1980-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

98

Faculty, Staff, and Student Cooperators About Our Cover Spigelia marilandica, Indian Pink, is an  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in southern Kentucky (Wharton and Barbour 1971), it is found as a roadside plant on a variety of soil types. Over its rangeFlorida into east Texas, southeast Oklahoma, southwest Indiana, northwest Georgia, and east South Carolinait is common (Duncan and Duncan 1999). The red tubular flowers with five folded lobes showing the yellow interior color are stunning; they stop people dead in their tracks (Armitage 1997). An average of 13 (8-17 on 68 stems on a five-yearold division) of the 2-inch (5-cm) upright flowers are found on a one-sided cyme. The glossy ovate, opposite, sessile leaves add to the attractive appearance of the plant. West Kentucky plants grow 18-24 inches (46-61 cm) tall in sun or shade landscape environments. The bloom period starts in late May and continues through June; occasionally scattered blooms will occur in the fall. Rick Darke (2002) says they will re-bloom heavily if cut back after June flowering. Individual plants in the University of Kentucky Research and Education Center Botanical Garden, Princeton, KY are now seven years old and show signs of indefinite longevity. Spigelia marilandica is known to attract hummingbirds (Cullina 2000; Glick 2002). This characteristic, added to the beauty of the flowers, the size of the plant, its environmental and pest tolerances, and longevity in the landscape, indicate Spigelia marilandica is an plant that should be more widely used in landscapesin particular, Kentucky landscapes. A quick search of catalogs and nursery contacts indicate that the plant is much more available than in the past thanks to tissue culture propagation. Spigelia marilandica won Kentuckys 2010 Theodore Klein Plant Award (go to

unknown authors

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Carbon Capture and Sequestration (via Enhanced Oil Recovery) from a Hydrogen Production Facility in an Oil Refinery  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The project proposed a commercial demonstration of advanced technologies that would capture and sequester CO2 emissions from an existing hydrogen production facility in an oil refinery into underground formations in combination with Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR). The project is led by Praxair, Inc., with other project participants: BP Products North America Inc., Denbury Onshore, LLC (Denbury), and Gulf Coast Carbon Center (GCCC) at the Bureau of Economic Geology of The University of Texas at Austin. The project is located at the BP Refinery at Texas City, Texas. Praxair owns and operates a large hydrogen production facility within the refinery. As part of the project, Praxair would construct a CO2 capture and compression facility. The project aimed at demonstrating a novel vacuum pressure swing adsorption (VPSA) based technology to remove CO2 from the Steam Methane Reformers (SMR) process gas. The captured CO2 would be purified using refrigerated partial condensation separation (i.e., cold box). Denbury would purchase the CO2 from the project and inject the CO2 as part of its independent commercial EOR projects. The Gulf Coast Carbon Center at the Bureau of Economic Geology, a unit of University of Texas at Austin, would manage the research monitoring, verification and accounting (MVA) project for the sequestered CO2, in conjunction with Denbury. The sequestration and associated MVA activities would be carried out in the Hastings field at Brazoria County, TX. The project would exceed DOEs target of capturing one million tons of CO2 per year (MTPY) by 2015. Phase 1 of the project (Project Definition) is being completed. The key objective of Phase 1 is to define the project in sufficient detail to enable an economic decision with regard to proceeding with Phase 2. This topical report summarizes the administrative, programmatic and technical accomplishments completed in Phase 1 of the project. It describes the work relative to project technical and design activities (associated with CO2 capture technologies and geologic sequestration MVA), and Environmental Information Volume. Specific accomplishments of this Phase include: 1. Finalization of the Project Management Plan 2. Development of engineering designs in sufficient detail for defining project performance and costs 3. Preparation of Environmental Information Volume 4. Completion of Hazard Identification Studies 5. Completion of control cost estimates and preparation of business plan During the Phase 1 detailed cost estimate, project costs increased substantially from the previous estimate. Furthermore, the detailed risk assessment identified integration risks associated with potentially impacting the steam methane reformer operation. While the Phase 1 work identified ways to mitigate these integration risks satisfactorily from an operational perspective, the associated costs and potential schedule impacts contributed to the decision not to proceed to Phase 2. We have concluded that the project costs and integration risks at Texas City are not commensurate with the potential benefits of the project at this time.

Stewart Mehlman

2010-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

100

ConocoPhillips Sweeny IGCC/CCS Project  

SciTech Connect

Under its Industrial Carbon Capture and Sequestration (ICCS) Program, the United States (U.S.) Department of Energy (DOE) selected ConocoPhillips Company (ConocoPhillips) to receive funding through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) of 2009 for the proposed Sweeny Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC)/Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) Project (Project) to be located in Brazoria County, Texas. Under the program, the DOE is partnering with industry to demonstrate the commercial viability and operational readiness of technologies that would capture carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emissions from industrial sources and either sequester those emissions, or beneficially reuse them. The primary objective of the proposed Project was to demonstrate the efficacy of advanced technologies that capture CO{sub 2} from a large industrial source and store the CO{sub 2} in underground formations, while achieving a successful business venture for the entity (entities) involved. The Project would capture 85% of the CO{sub 2} produced from a petroleum coke (petcoke) fed, 703 MWnet (1,000 MWgross) IGCC power plant, using the ConocoPhillips (COP) proprietary and commercially proven E-Gas{trademark} gasification technology, at the existing 247,000 barrel per day COP Sweeny Refinery. In addition, a number of other commercially available technologies would be integrated into a conventional IGCC Plant in a unique, efficient, and reliable design that would capture CO{sub 2}. The primary destination for the CO{sub 2} would be a depleted natural gas field suitable for CO{sub 2} storage ('Storage Facility'). COP would also develop commercial options to sell a portion of the IGCC Plant's CO{sub 2} output to the growing Gulf Coast enhanced oil recovery (EOR) market. The IGCC Plant would produce electric power for sale in the Electric Reliability Council of Texas Houston Zone. The existing refinery effluent water would be treated and reused to fulfill all process water needs. The DOE ICCS program adopts a two-phase approach. During the 7-month Phase 1 period, ConocoPhillips further defined the Project by advancing the preliminary design, permits, and contracts. In addition, ConocoPhillips was developing a Phase 2 renewal application to seek continued DOE funding for the Project's design, construction, and early operations. The DOE and ConocoPhillips entered into a Phase1 Cooperative Agreement (DOE Award Number DE-FE0001859) on November 16, 2009, agreeing to share cost on a 50/50 basis during the Phase 1 period, with a DOE budget of $2,989,174. On April 7, 2010, ConocoPhillips informed the DOE that it would not participate in Phase 2 of the DOE ICCS program. The company believes that enabling legislation and regulations at both the federal and state levels will not be approved and implemented in time to make a final investment decision such that the Project would be substantially constructed by September 30, 2015, the end of the AARA funding period. Considering current price assumptions, the Project would not generate investment level returns. ConocoPhillips elected not to submit a Phase 2 renewal application, which was due on April 16, 2010. This Final Scientific/Technical Report provides an overview of the Project, including highlights and benefits of the proposed carbon capture and storage project scope, sites, and technologies. It also summarizes the work accomplishments during the Phase 1 period from November 16, 2009 to June 16, 2010. Due to ConocoPhillips decision not to submit the Phase 2 renewal application and not to enter into related agreements, certain information regarding the proposed CO{sub 2} storage facility cannot be publicly reported due to confidentiality agreements.

Paul Talarico; Charles Sugg; Thomas Hren; Lauri Branch; Joseph Garcia; Alan Rezigh; Michelle Pittenger; Kathleen Bower; Jonathan Philley; Michael Culligan; Jeremy Maslen; Michele Woods; Kevin Elm

2010-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

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101

Carbon Capture and Sequestration from a Hydrogen Production Facility in an Oil Refinery  

SciTech Connect

The project proposed a commercial demonstration of advanced technologies that would capture and sequester CO2 emissions from an existing hydrogen production facility in an oil refinery into underground formations in combination with Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR). The project is led by Praxair, Inc., with other project participants: BP Products North America Inc., Denbury Onshore, LLC (Denbury), and Gulf Coast Carbon Center (GCCC) at the Bureau of Economic Geology of The University of Texas at Austin. The project is located at the BP Refinery at Texas City, Texas. Praxair owns and operates a large hydrogen production facility within the refinery. As part of the project, Praxair would construct a CO2 capture and compression facility. The project aimed at demonstrating a novel vacuum pressure swing adsorption (VPSA) based technology to remove CO2 from the Steam Methane Reformers (SMR) process gas. The captured CO2 would be purified using refrigerated partial condensation separation (i.e., cold box). Denbury would purchase the CO2 from the project and inject the CO2 as part of its independent commercial EOR projects. The Gulf Coast Carbon Center at the Bureau of Economic Geology, a unit of University of Texas at Austin, would manage the research monitoring, verification and accounting (MVA) project for the sequestered CO2, in conjunction with Denbury. The sequestration and associated MVA activities would be carried out in the Hastings field at Brazoria County, TX. The project would exceed DOE?s target of capturing one million tons of CO2 per year (MTPY) by 2015. Phase 1 of the project (Project Definition) is being completed. The key objective of Phase 1 is to define the project in sufficient detail to enable an economic decision with regard to proceeding with Phase 2. This topical report summarizes the administrative, programmatic and technical accomplishments completed in Phase 1 of the project. It describes the work relative to project technical and design activities (associated with CO2 capture technologies and geologic sequestration MVA), and Environmental Information Volume. Specific accomplishments of this Phase include: 1. Finalization of the Project Management Plan 2. Development of engineering designs in sufficient detail for defining project performance and costs 3. Preparation of Environmental Information Volume 4. Completion of Hazard Identification Studies 5. Completion of control cost estimates and preparation of business plan During the Phase 1 detailed cost estimate, project costs increased substantially from the previous estimate. Furthermore, the detailed risk assessment identified integration risks associated with potentially impacting the steam methane reformer operation. While the Phase 1 work identified ways to mitigate these integration risks satisfactorily from an operational perspective, the associated costs and potential schedule impacts contributed to the decision not to proceed to Phase 2. We have concluded that the project costs and integration risks at Texas City are not commensurate with the potential benefits of the project at this time.

Engels, Cheryl; Williams, Bryan, Valluri, Kiranmal; Watwe, Ramchandra; Kumar, Ravi; Mehlman, Stewart

2010-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

102

Advanced Liquid Natural Gas Onboard Storage System  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Cummins Westport Incorporated (CWI) has designed and developed a liquefied natural gas (LNG) vehicle fuel system that includes a reciprocating pump with the cold end submerged in LNG contained in a vacuum-jacketed tank. This system was tested and analyzed under the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Advanced LNG Onboard Storage System (ALOSS) program. The pumped LNG fuel system developed by CWI and tested under the ALOSS program is a high-pressure system designed for application on Class 8 trucks powered by CWI's ISX G engine, which employs high-pressure direct injection (HPDI) technology. A general ALOSS program objective was to demonstrate the feasibility and advantages of a pumped LNG fuel system relative to on-vehicle fuel systems that require the LNG to be ''conditioned'' to saturation pressures that exceeds the engine fuel pressure requirements. These advantages include the capability to store more fuel mass in given-size vehicle and station tanks, and simpler lower-cost LNG refueling stations that do not require conditioning equipment. Pumped LNG vehicle fuel systems are an alternative to conditioned LNG systems for spark-ignition natural gas and port-injection dual-fuel engines (which typically require about 100 psi), and they are required for HPDI engines (which require over 3,000 psi). The ALOSS program demonstrated the feasibility of a pumped LNG vehicle fuel system and the advantages of this design relative to systems that require conditioning the LNG to a saturation pressure exceeding the engine fuel pressure requirement. LNG tanks mounted on test carts and the CWI engineering truck were repeatedly filled with LNG saturated at 20 to 30 psig. More fuel mass was stored in the vehicle tanks as well as the station tank, and no conditioning equipment was required at the fueling station. The ALOSS program also demonstrated the general viability and specific performance of the CWI pumped LNG fuel system design. The system tested as part of this program is designed to be used on Class 8 trucks with CWI ISX G HPDI engines. Extensive test cart and engineering truck tests of the pump demonstrated good durability and the high-pressure performance needed for HPDI application. The LNG tanks manufactured by Taylor-Wharton passed SAE J2343 Recommended Practice drop tests and accelerated road-load vibration tests. NER and hold-time tests produced highly consistent results. Additional tests confirmed the design adequacy of the liquid level sensor, vaporizer, ullage volume, and other fuel system components. While the testing work performed under this program focused on a high-pressure pumped LNG fuel system design, the results also validate the feasibility of a low-pressure pumped fuel system. A low-pressure pumped fuel system could incorporate various design refinements including a simpler and lighter-weight pump, which would decrease costs somewhat relative to a high-pressure system.

Greg Harper; Charles Powars

2003-10-31T23:59:59.000Z