Sample records for branch tmb conducted

  1. State of Alaska v. Lubchenco, et al. Case No. 3:10-CV-00271-TMB

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , ) ) DEFENDANTS' FIRST v. ) STATUS REPORT JANE LUBCHENCO, et al. ) ) Case 3:10-cv-00271-TMB Document 158 Filed 06 Order. A Notice of Intent to prepare an environmental impact statement (EIS) and a request for comments was published in the Federal Register on April 17, 2012, 77 Fed Reg. 22750-53. The scoping period for the EIS

  2. Orbital Branching

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Nov 15, 2006 ... allowing a flexible branching rule. ..... flexibility in the choice of branching entity. ..... Column generation for solving huge integer programs.

  3. Interdiction Branching

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Sep 29, 2011 ... of partitioning the search space, referred to as the branching scheme. .... standard branch-and-bound both in terms of size of the enumeration tree and ...... of the fractional variable to be selected to enter at each iteration of the.

  4. Branched Polymers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richard Kenyon; Peter Winkler

    2007-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Building on and from the work of Brydges and Imbrie, we give an elementary calculation of the volume of the space of branched polymers of order $n$ in the plane and in 3-space. Our development reveals some more general identities, and allows exact random sampling. In particular we show that a random 3-dimensional branched polymer of order $n$ has diameter of order $\\sqrt{n}$.

  5. Melons are branched polymers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Razvan Gurau; James P. Ryan

    2013-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Melonic graphs constitute the family of graphs arising at leading order in the 1/N expansion of tensor models. They were shown to lead to a continuum phase, reminiscent of branched polymers. We show here that they are in fact precisely branched polymers, that is, they possess Hausdorff dimension 2 and spectral dimension 4/3.

  6. Radioiodinated branched carbohydrates

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Goodman, Mark M. (Knoxville, TN); Knapp, Jr., Furn F. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A radioiodinated branched carbohydrate for tissue imaging. Iodine-123 is stabilized in the compound by attaching it to a vinyl functional group that is on the carbohydrate. The compound exhibits good uptake and retention and is promising in the development of radiopharmaceuticals for brain, heart and tumor imaging.

  7. Branched Polymers and Hyperplane Arrangements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Postnikov, Alexander

    We generalize the construction of connected branched polymers and the notion of the volume of the space of connected branched polymers studied by Brydges and Imbrie (Ann Math, 158:1019–1039, 2003), and Kenyon and Winkler ...

  8. Holographic Coulomb branch vevs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kostas Skenderis; Marika Taylor

    2008-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We compute holographically the vevs of all chiral primary operators for supergravity solutions corresponding to the Coulomb branch of N=4 SYM and find exact agreement with the corresponding field theory computation. Using the dictionary between 10d geometries and field theory developed to extract these vevs, we propose a gravity dual of a half supersymmetric deformation of N=4 SYM by certain irrelevant operators.

  9. BRANCHED POLYMERS AND HYPERPLANE ARRANGEMENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Postnikov, Alexander

    BRANCHED POLYMERS AND HYPERPLANE ARRANGEMENTS KAROLA M´ESZ´AROS ALEXANDER POSTNIKOV Abstract. We of connected branched polymers studied by Brydges and Imbrie [BI], and Kenyon and Winkler [KW] to any hyperplane arrangement A. The volume of the resulting configuration space of connected branched polymers

  10. Technology and Consumer Products Branch: program plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary objective of the Technology and Consumer Products Branch (TCP) is to encourage the development and commercialization of energy-efficient technologies and equipment used in buildings and purchased by consumers. The TCP program conducts technical research, development, and demonstration efforts jointly funded with private industry, educational institutions, utilities, and other Federal and state agencies as appropriate. All contracts, grants, or interagency agreements have the major thrust of developing products and disseminating information that will accelerate commercial availability of energy-efficient, low-cost, reliable technologies, techniques, and products suitable for use by consumers and design professionals in the residential and commercial building sectors. Specifically, the technologies pursued by the branch include heating and cooling systems, consumer appliances, lighting design, and systems. Projects for each of these areas are summarized briefly, and publications resulting from the activities are listed.

  11. energy company opens American branch

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, C.-Y. Cynthia

    in clean-energy investment and delivering unique projects and innovative products and servicesenergy company opens American branch in West Sacramento Substainible energy for sustainable energy supply. Ecostream markets such things as solar roof panel installations and other long

  12. Conductive Polymers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bohnert, G.W.

    2002-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Electroluminescent devices such as light-emitting diodes (LED) and high-energy density batteries. These new polymers offer cost savings, weight reduction, ease of processing, and inherent rugged design compared to conventional semiconductor materials. The photovoltaic industry has grown more than 30% during the past three years. Lightweight, flexible solar modules are being used by the U.S. Army and Marine Corps for field power units. LEDs historically used for indicator lights are now being investigated for general lighting to replace fluorescent and incandescent lights. These so-called solid-state lights are becoming more prevalent across the country since they produce efficient lighting with little heat generation. Conductive polymers are being sought for battery development as well. Considerable weight savings over conventional cathode materials used in secondary storage batteries make portable devices easier to carry and electric cars more efficient and nimble. Secondary battery sales represent an $8 billion industry annually. The purpose of the project was to synthesize and characterize conductive polymers. TRACE Photonics Inc. has researched critical issues which affect conductivity. Much of their work has focused on production of substituted poly(phenylenevinylene) compounds. These compounds exhibit greater solubility over the parent polyphenylenevinylene, making them easier to process. Alkoxy substituted groups evaluated during this study included: methoxy, propoxy, and heptyloxy. Synthesis routes for production of alkoxy-substituted poly phenylenevinylene were developed. Considerable emphasis was placed on final product yield and purity.

  13. Molecular Genetic Analysis of Maize Starch Branching Isoforms: Modulation of Starch Branching Enzyme Isoform Activities in Maize to Produce Starch with Novel Branching Architecture and Properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guiltinan, Mark J.; Thompson, Donald

    2009-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Modulation of Starch Branching enzyme Isoform Activities in Maize to Produce Starch with Novel Branching Architecture and Properties.

  14. BRANCHED ALKANES FROM BLUE-GREEN ALGAE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Han, Jerry; Calvin, Melvin.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ~ BRANCHED ALKANES FROM BLUE-GREEN ALGAE RECEIV r -· LAWREWBranched Alkanes From Blue-Green Algae by Jerry Han and Oep~Branched alkanes from blue-green algae were separated on a

  15. Branched Silver Nanowires as Controllable Plasmon Routers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Wei Hua

    Branched Silver Nanowires as Controllable Plasmon Routers Yurui Fang, Zhipeng Li, Yingzhou Huang scattering spectroscopy, we investigate plasmon propagation on branched silver nanowires. By controlling the polarization of the incident laser light, the wire plasmons can be routed into different wire branches

  16. The branching programme of mouse lung development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klein, Ophir

    ARTICLES The branching programme of mouse lung development Ross J. Metzger1 {, Ophir D. Klein2 {, Gail R. Martin2 & Mark A. Krasnow1 Mammalian lungs are branched networks containing thousands by three geometrically simple local modes of branching used in three different orders throughout the lung

  17. Walker Branch Watershed Ecosystems Data

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    These projects have all contributed to a more complete understanding of how forest watersheds function and have provided insights into the solution of energy-related problems associated with air pollution, contaminant transport, and forest nutrient dynamics. This is one of a few sites in the world characterized by long-term, intensive environmental studies. The Walker Branch Watershed website at http://walkerbranch.ornl.gov/ provides maps, photographs, and data on climate, precipitation, atmospheric deposition, stream discharge and runoff, stream chemistry, and vegetation. [Taken from http://walkerbranch.ornl.gov/ABOUTAAA.HTM

  18. Dynamic coupling drives conformational evolution of branched...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Materials Characterization Dynamic coupling drives conformational evolution of branched polymers in solutions March 06, 2015 Inter-particle collision time (filled circles) and...

  19. Regulation of Branching by Phytochrome and Phytohormones

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krishnareddy, Srirama R.

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    ratios (R:FR) perceived by phytochromes serve as a warning signal about impending competition for light resources and lead to shade avoidance responses (SARs), including reduced branching. The R:FR regulates branching in both a bud autonomous and non...

  20. Updated 7-11 Elliott B. Branch

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Corporation, and the Departments of Defense, Energy, Justice and State. #12;Updated 7-11 Prior to that, heUpdated 7-11 Elliott B. Branch Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Navy (Acquisition and Procurement activity in approximately 75 agencies. Mr. Branch spent time in the private sector, where he specialized

  1. FY 1990 Applied Sciences Branch annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keyes, B.M.; Dippo, P.C. [eds.

    1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Applied Sciences Branch actively supports the advancement of DOE/SERI goals for the development and implementation of the solar photovoltaic technology. The primary focus of the laboratories is to provide state-of-the-art analytical capabilities for materials and device characterization and fabrication. The branch houses a comprehensive facility which is capable of providing information on the full range of photovoltaic components. A major objective of the branch is to aggressively pursue collaborative research with other government laboratories, universities, and industrial firms for the advancement of photovoltaic technologies. Members of the branch disseminate research findings to the technical community in publications and presentations. This report contains information on surface and interface analysis, materials characterization, development, electro-optical characterization module testing and performance, surface interactions and FTIR spectroscopy.

  2. MOMENT ASYMPTOTICS FOR MULTITYPE BRANCHING RANDOM WALKS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    König, Wolfgang

    of Montenegro 29 October, 2013 Abstract. We study a discrete time multitype branching random walk on a finite of Montenegro, Cetinjska 2, 81 000 Podgorica, Montenegro, ozrens@t-com.me AMS 2010 Subject Classification: 60J80

  3. MOMENT ASYMPTOTICS FOR MULTITYPE BRANCHING RANDOM WALKS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    König, Wolfgang

    of Montenegro 29 October, 2013 Abstract. We study a discrete time multitype branching random walk on a #28;nite of Montenegro, Cetinjska 2, 81 000 Podgorica, Montenegro, ozrens@t-com.me AMS 2010 Subject Classi#28;cation: 60J

  4. Microbial production of wax esters from highly branched alkanes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bogan, William W.; Sullivan, Wendy R.; Paterek, James R.

    2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A microbial culture and method for producing wax esters using highly branched alkanes. In accordance with one embodiment, the highly branched alkane is squalane.

  5. Electrochemical Branched-DNA Assay for Polymerase Chain Reaction...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Branched-DNA Assay for Polymerase Chain Reaction-Free Detection and Quantification of Oncogenes in Messenger RNA Electrochemical Branched-DNA Assay for Polymerase Chain...

  6. artery branch rupture: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Key words: Computational complexity; Branching programs; Time versus space; Lower bounds; Expander graphs; Ramanujan graphs 1 Jukna, Stasys 406 Branching, Capping, and Severing in...

  7. A Case Study: Using Integrated Approach to Design a Net-Zero Bank Branch

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Athalye, Rahul A.; Xie, YuLong; Liu, Bing; Baechler, Michael C.

    2012-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes a real life project conducted by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and PNC Financial Services Group's design team. This is a demonstration project supported by the U.S. Department of Energy's Commercial Partnerships Program, the goal of which is to design and construct a new-zero energy bank branch in Fort Lauderdale, Florida.

  8. Journal of Engineering Mathematics Optimal discharging in a branched estuary Optimal discharging in a branched estuary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    that returns to the discharge site is less polluted than would 1 #12;Journal of Engineering Mathematics OptimalJournal of Engineering Mathematics Optimal discharging in a branched estuary Optimal discharging the proximity of the discharge site to the branching and upon how the rate of discharge is adjusted. Explicit

  9. -delayed proton emission branches in 43Cr

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pomorski, M. [University of Warsaw; Miernik, K. [University of Warsaw; Dominik, W. [University of Warsaw; Janas, Z. [University of Warsaw; Pfutzner, M. [University of Warsaw; Bingham, C. R. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Czyrkowski, H. [University of Warsaw; Cwiok, Mikolaj [Warsaw University; Darby, Iain [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Dabrowski, Ryszard [Warsaw University; Ginter, T. N. [Michigan State University, East Lansing; Grzywacz, Robert Kazimierz [ORNL; Karny, M. [University of Warsaw; Korgul, A. [University of Warsaw; Kusmierz, W. [University of Warsaw; Liddick, Sean [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Rajabali, M. M. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Rykaczewski, Krzysztof Piotr [ORNL; Stolz, A. [Michigan State University, East Lansing

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The + decay of very neutron-deficient 43Cr was studied by means of an imaging time projection chamber that allowed recording tracks of charged particles. Events of -delayed emission of one, two, and three protons were clearly identified. The absolute branching ratios for these channels were determined to be (81 4)%, (7.1 0.4)%, and (0.08 0.03)%, respectively. 43Cr is thus established as the second case in which the -3p decay occurs. Although the feeding to the proton-bound states in 43V is expected to be negligible, the large branching ratio of (12 4)% for decays without proton emission is found.

  10. Vegetation survey of Pen Branch and Four Mile Creek wetlands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One hundred-fifty plots were recently sampled (vegetational sampling study) at the Savannah River Site (SRS). An extensive characterization of the vascular flora, in four predetermined strata (overstory, Understory, shrub layer, and ground cover), was undertaken to determine dominance, co-dominance, and the importance value (I.V.) of each species. These results will be used by the Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) to evaluate the environmental status of Four Mile Creek, Pen Branch, and two upland pine stands. Objectives of this study were to: Describe in detail the plant communities previously mapped with reference to the topography and drainage, including species of plants present: Examine the successional trends within each sampling area and describe the extent to which current vegetation communities have resulted from specific earlier vegetation disturbances (e.g., logging and grazing); describe in detail the botanical field techniques used to sample the flora; describe the habitat and location of protected and/or rare species of plants; and collect and prepare plant species as herbarium quality specimens. Sampling was conducted at Four Mile Creek and Pen Branch, and in two upland pine plantations of different age growth.

  11. Vegetation survey of Pen Branch and Four Mile Creek wetlands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One hundred-fifty plots were recently sampled (vegetational sampling study) at the Savannah River Site (SRS). An extensive characterization of the vascular flora, in four predetermined strata (overstory, Understory, shrub layer, and ground cover), was undertaken to determine dominance, co-dominance, and the importance value (I.V.) of each species. These results will be used by the Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) to evaluate the environmental status of Four Mile Creek, Pen Branch, and two upland pine stands. Objectives of this study were to: Describe in detail the plant communities previously mapped with reference to the topography and drainage, including species of plants present: Examine the successional trends within each sampling area and describe the extent to which current vegetation communities have resulted from specific earlier vegetation disturbances (e.g., logging and grazing); describe in detail the botanical field techniques used to sample the flora; describe the habitat and location of protected and/or rare species of plants; and collect and prepare plant species as herbarium quality specimens. Sampling was conducted at Four Mile Creek and Pen Branch, and in two upland pine plantations of different age growth.

  12. The Effect of Sedimentation on Plutonium Transport in Fourmile Branch

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, K.F.

    2002-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The major mechanisms of radioactive material transport and fate in surface water are sources, dilution, advection and dispersion of radionuclides by flow and surface waves, radionuclide decay, and interaction between sediment and radionuclides. STREAM II, an aqueous transport module of the Savannah River Site emergency response WIND system, accounts for the source term, and the effects of dilution, advection and dispersion. Although the model has the capability to account for nuclear decay, due to the short time interval of interest for emergency response, the effect of nuclear decay is very small and so it is not employed. The interactions between the sediment and radionuclides are controlled by the flow conditions and physical and chemical characteristics of the radionuclides and the sediment constituents. The STREAM II version used in emergency response must provide results relatively quickly; it therefore does not model the effects of sediment deposition/resuspension. This study estimates the effects of sediment deposition/resuspension on aqueous plutonium transport in Fourmile Branch. There are no measured data on plutonium transport through surface water available for direct model calibration. Therefore, a literature search was conducted to find the range of plutonium partition coefficients based on laboratory experiments and field measurements. A sensitivity study of the calculated plutonium peak concentrations as a function of the input parameter of partition coefficient was then performed. Finally, an estimation of the plutonium partition coefficient was made for the Fourmile Branch.

  13. PARALLEL ALGORITHM DESIGN FOR BRANCH AND BOUND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bader, David A.

    Chapter 5 PARALLEL ALGORITHM DESIGN FOR BRANCH AND BOUND David A. Bader Department of Electrical & Computer Engineering, University of New Mexico dbader@ece.unm.edu William E. Hart Discrete Mathematics communication net- work enables synchronous inter-processor communication. Grid com- pute platforms exemplify

  14. Improved strategies for branching on general disjunctions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Jul 21, 2008 ... [1] used basis reduction to find good branching directions for certain classes of difficult integer ..... first, the size of the linear systems may become unmanageable in practice, and second, if we add up too many ...... Management Science 51(11), 1720–1732 (2005) ... ILOG: ILOG CPLEX 11.0 User's Manual.

  15. Influence of branch content on the microstructure of blends of linear and octene-branched polyethylene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hussein, Ibnelwaleed A.

    experimental densities of the two polymer melts. Initially, chains of LLDPE and HDPE were completely mixed POLYMER JOURNAL #12;short chain branching (SCB) [26]. Few studies have made use of m-LLDPE in blend

  16. annual fourmile branch: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    space, referred to as the branching scheme. .... standard branch-and-bound both in terms of size of the enumeration tree and ...... of the fractional variable to be selected...

  17. abnormal branching pattern: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    space, referred to as the branching scheme. .... standard branch-and-bound both in terms of size of the enumeration tree and ...... of the fractional variable to be selected...

  18. Stochastic and deterministic causes of streamer branching in liquid dielectrics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jadidian, Jouya

    Streamer branching in liquid dielectrics is driven by stochastic and deterministic factors. The presence of stochastic causes of streamer branching such as inhomogeneities inherited from noisy initial states, impurities, ...

  19. Electrically conductive composite material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Clough, R.L.; Sylwester, A.P.

    1988-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

    An electrically conductive composite material is disclosed which comprises a conductive open-celled, low density, microcellular carbon foam filled with a non-conductive polymer or resin. The composite material is prepared in a two-step process consisting of first preparing the microcellular carbon foam from a carbonizable polymer or copolymer using a phase separation process, then filling the carbon foam with the desired non-conductive polymer or resin. The electrically conductive composites of the present invention has a uniform and consistent pattern of filler distribution, and as a result is superior over prior art materials when used in battery components, electrodes, and the like. 2 figs.

  20. Electrically conductive composite material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Clough, R.L.; Sylwester, A.P.

    1989-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

    An electrically conductive composite material is disclosed which comprises a conductive open-celled, low density, microcellular carbon foam filled with a non-conductive polymer or resin. The composite material is prepared in a two-step process consisting of first preparing the microcellular carbon foam from a carbonizable polymer or copolymer using a phase separation process, then filling the carbon foam with the desired non-conductive polymer or resin. The electrically conductive composites of the present invention has a uniform and consistent pattern of filler distribution, and as a result is superior over prior art materials when used in battery components, electrodes, and the like. 2 figs.

  1. Electrically conductive composite material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Clough, Roger L. (Albuquerque, NM); Sylwester, Alan P. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An electrically conductive composite material is disclosed which comprises a conductive open-celled, low density, microcellular carbon foam filled with a non-conductive polymer or resin. The composite material is prepared in a two-step process consisting of first preparing the microcellular carbon foam from a carbonizable polymer or copolymer using a phase separation process, then filling the carbon foam with the desired non-conductive polymer or resin. The electrically conductive composites of the present invention has a uniform and consistant pattern of filler distribution, and as a result is superior over prior art materials when used in battery components, electrodes, and the like.

  2. Cermet fuel thermal conductivity 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alvis, John Mark

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    particles of low conductivity dispersed in a metal matrix of high conductivity. A computer code was developed in order to compute the conductivity of cermet fuels as predicted by existing models and an additional model derived in this work... gas release from the fuel particle and contact resistance at the fuel-matrix interface. A description of the methodology used to construct the model is given in Chapter 3. Comparisons between the analytic predictions and the experimental data...

  3. Electrically conductive cellulose composite

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Evans, Barbara R.; O'Neill, Hugh M.; Woodward, Jonathan

    2010-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

    An electrically conductive cellulose composite includes a cellulose matrix and an electrically conductive carbonaceous material incorporated into the cellulose matrix. The electrical conductivity of the cellulose composite is at least 10 .mu.S/cm at 25.degree. C. The composite can be made by incorporating the electrically conductive carbonaceous material into a culture medium with a cellulose-producing organism, such as Gluconoacetobacter hansenii. The composites can be used to form electrodes, such as for use in membrane electrode assemblies for fuel cells.

  4. Characterization of the conduction phase of a plasma opening switch using a hydrogen plasma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Characterization of the conduction phase of a plasma opening switch using a hydrogen plasma J. J Pulsed Power Physics Branch, Plasma Physics Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, D.C. 20375 Y 2004; published online 7 January 2005) Plasma opening switch (POS) experiments were conducted

  5. Data Summary Report for the Semiannual Tritium Survey for Fourmile Branch and the F- and H-Area Seeplines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koch, J. II [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States) Exploration Resources

    1996-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents a summary of the definitive data validation and verification for the Semiannual Tritium Survey for Fourmile Branch and the F- and H-Area Seeplines. The survey was performed at the request of the WSRC ERD and conducted by WSRC/ESS. This report was prepared under the direction of EPD/EMS.

  6. Electrically conductive diamond electrodes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Swain, Greg (East Lansing, MI); Fischer, Anne (Arlington, VA),; Bennett, Jason (Lansing, MI); Lowe, Michael (Holt, MI)

    2009-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

    An electrically conductive diamond electrode and process for preparation thereof is described. The electrode comprises diamond particles coated with electrically conductive doped diamond preferably by chemical vapor deposition which are held together with a binder. The electrodes are useful for oxidation reduction in gas, such as hydrogen generation by electrolysis.

  7. Annual report, Basic Sciences Branch, FY 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the progress of the Basic Sciences Branch of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) from October 1, 1990, through September 30, 1991. Seven technical sections of the report cover these main areas of NREL's in-house research: Semiconductor Crystal Growth, Amorphous Silicon Research, Polycrystalline Thin Films, III-V High-Efficiency Photovoltaic Cells, Solid-State Theory, Solid-State Spectroscopy, and Superconductivity. Each section explains the purpose and major accomplishments of the work in the context of the US Department of Energy's National Photovoltaic Research Program plans.

  8. Radiative Levitation in Hot Horizontal Branch Stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. Landsman

    1999-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

    There is now considerable evidence that horizontal branch (HB) stars hotter than about 11,500 K experience an enormous enhancement of their photospheric iron abundance due to radiative levitation. In globular clusters, the photospheric iron abundance can reach values of [Fe/H] ~ +0.3, or up to two orders of magnitude higher than the cluster iron abundance. Model atmospheres which take into account the iron overabundance are needed for understanding the appearance of the HB in globular cluster color-magnitude diagrams (CMDs), for the derivation of accurate luminosities, gravities and masses, and for the ultraviolet spectral synthesis of old, metal-poor stellar populations.

  9. Annual report, Materials Science Branch, FY 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Padilla, S. [ed.

    1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the progress of the Materials Science Branch of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) from October 1, 1991, through September 30, 1992. Six technical sections of the report cover these main areas of NREL`s in-house research: Crystal Growth, Amorphous Silicon, III-V High-Efficiency Photovoltaic Cells, Solid State Theory, Solid State Spectroscopy, and Program Management. Each section explains the purpose and major accomplishments of the work in the context of the US Department of Energy`s National Photovoltaic Research Program plans.

  10. Hawaii Wastewater Branch Webpage | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetec AG|Information OpenEI ReferenceNoiseInformation StateBranch

  11. The branch with the furthest reach Z. Wei, S. Mandre and L. Mahadevan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mahadevan, L.

    sunlight. However, in the presence of gravity, branches droop: the droop is small for short stubby branches

  12. Conduct of Operations

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2010-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This Order defines the requirements for establishing and implementing Conduct of Operations Programs at Department of Energy (DOE), including National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), facilities and projects. Cancels DOE O 5480.19. Admin Chg 1, 6-25-13

  13. Electrically conductive material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Singh, J.P.; Bosak, A.L.; McPheeters, C.C.; Dees, D.W.

    1993-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

    An electrically conductive material is described for use in solid oxide fuel cells, electrochemical sensors for combustion exhaust, and various other applications possesses increased fracture toughness over available materials, while affording the same electrical conductivity. One embodiment of the sintered electrically conductive material consists essentially of cubic ZrO[sub 2] as a matrix and 6-19 wt. % monoclinic ZrO[sub 2] formed from particles having an average size equal to or greater than about 0.23 microns. Another embodiment of the electrically conductive material consists essentially at cubic ZrO[sub 2] as a matrix and 10-30 wt. % partially stabilized zirconia (PSZ) formed from particles having an average size of approximately 3 microns. 8 figures.

  14. Dissecting holographic conductivities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richard A. Davison; Blaise Goutéraux

    2015-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The DC thermoelectric conductivities of holographic systems in which translational symmetry is broken can be efficiently computed in terms of the near-horizon data of the dual black hole. By calculating the frequency dependent conductivities to the first subleading order in the momentum relaxation rate, we give a physical explanation for these conductivities in the simplest such example, in the limit of slow momentum relaxation. Specifically, we decompose each conductivity into the sum of a coherent contribution due to momentum relaxation and an incoherent contribution, due to intrinsic current relaxation. This decomposition is different from those previously proposed, and is consistent with the known hydrodynamic properties in the translationally invariant limit. This is the first step towards constructing a consistent theory of charged hydrodynamics with slow momentum relaxation.

  15. Information-Based Branching Schemes for Binary Linear Mixed ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

    For example, the first branching policy 0-0-0 performs ... We expected poor performance of this policy as it weights each active clause .... Hyderabad, India.

  16. Mr. John Kinneman, Chief Nuclear Materfals Branch Nuclear Regulatory...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    111989 Mr. John Kinneman, Chief Nuclear Materfals Branch Nuclear Regulatory Commission Region I 475 Allendale Road King of Prussia. Pennsylvania 19406 Dear Mr. Kinneman: -;' .-. 'W...

  17. age horizontal branch: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Stars as an Age Indicator Astrophysics (arXiv) Summary: Surface temperature distribution of horizontal-branch (HB) stars is very sensitive to age in old stellar systems,...

  18. Optimization Online - A branch and bound algorithm for the global ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jaroslav Fowkes

    2011-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Dec 5, 2011 ... A branch and bound algorithm for the global optimization of Hessian ... with a Lipschitz continuous Hessian over a compact, convex set.

  19. Fresh look at randomly branched polymers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hans-Karl Janssen; Olaf Stenull

    2009-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We develop a new, dynamical field theory of isotropic randomly branched polymers, and we use this model in conjunction with the renormalization group (RG) to study several prominent problems in the physics of these polymers. Our model provides an alternative vantage point to understand the swollen phase via dimensional reduction. We reveal a hidden Becchi-Rouet-Stora (BRS) symmetry of the model that describes the collapse ($\\theta$-)transition to compact polymer-conformations, and calculate the critical exponents to 2-loop order. It turns out that the long-standing 1-loop results for these exponents are not entirely correct. A runaway of the RG flow indicates that the so-called $\\theta^\\prime$-transition could be a fluctuation induced first order transition.

  20. Low thermal conductivity skutterudites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fleurial, J.P.; Caillat, T.; Borshchevsky, A.

    1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent experimental results on semiconductors with the skutterudite crystal structure show that these materials possess attractive transport properties and have a good potential for achieving ZT values substantially larger than for state-of-the-art thermoelectric materials. Both n-type and p-type conductivity samples have been obtained, using several preparation techniques. Associated with a low hole effective mass, very high carrier mobilities, low electrical resistivities and moderate Seebeck coefficients are obtained in p-type skutterudites. For a comparable doping level, the carrier mobilities of n-type samples are about an order of magnitude lower than the values achieved on p-type samples. However, the much larger electron effective masses and Seebeck coefficients on p-type samples. However, the much larger electron effective masses and Seebeck coefficients make n-type skutterudite promising candidates as well. Unfortunately, the thermal conductivities of the binary skutterudites compounds are too large, particularly at low temperatures, to be useful for thermoelectric applications. Several approaches to the reduction of the lattice thermal conductivity in skutterudites are being pursued: heavy doping, formation of solid solutions and alloys, study of novel ternary and filled skutterudite compounds. All those approaches have already resulted in skutterudite compositions with substantially lower thermal conductivity values in these materials. Recently, superior thermoelectric properties in the moderate to high temperature range were achieved for compositions combining alloying and filling of the skutterudite structure. Experimental results and mechanisms responsible for low thermal conductivity in skutterudites are discussed.

  1. Conduct of Operations

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2010-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This Order defines the requirements for establishing and implementing Conduct of Operations Programs at Department of Energy (DOE), including National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), facilities and projects. Cancels DOE O 5480.19. Admin Chg 1, dated 6-25-13, cancels DOE O 422.1. Certified 12-3-14.

  2. Conduct of Operations

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2010-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This Order defines the requirements for establishing and implementing Conduct of Operations Programs at Department of Energy (DOE), including National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), facilities and projects. Cancels DOE O 5480.19. Admin Chg 2, dated 12-3-14, cancels Admin Chg 1.

  3. Lithium ion conducting electrolytes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Angell, C. Austen (Tempe, AZ); Liu, Changle (Tempe, AZ)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A liquid, predominantly lithium-conducting, ionic electrolyte having exceptionally high conductivity at temperatures of 100.degree. C. or lower, including room temperature, and comprising the lithium salts selected from the group consisting of the thiocyanate, iodide, bromide, chloride, perchlorate, acetate, tetrafluoroborate, perfluoromethane sulfonate, perfluoromethane sulfonamide, tetrahaloaluminate, and heptahaloaluminate salts of lithium, with or without a magnesium-salt selected from the group consisting of the perchlorate and acetate salts of magnesium. Certain of the latter embodiments may also contain molecular additives from the group of acetonitrile (CH.sub.3 CN) succinnonitrile (CH.sub.2 CN).sub.2, and tetraglyme (CH.sub.3 --O--CH.sub.2 --CH.sub.2 --O--).sub.2 (or like solvents) solvated to a Mg.sup.+2 cation to lower the freezing point of the electrolyte below room temperature. Other particularly useful embodiments contain up to about 40, but preferably not more than about 25, mol percent of a long chain polyether polymer dissolved in the lithium salts to provide an elastic or rubbery solid electrolyte of high ambient temperature conductivity and exceptional 100.degree. C. conductivity. Another embodiment contains up to about but not more than 10 mol percent of a molecular solvent such as acetone.

  4. Lithium ion conducting electrolytes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Angell, C.A.; Liu, C.

    1996-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A liquid, predominantly lithium-conducting, ionic electrolyte is described having exceptionally high conductivity at temperatures of 100 C or lower, including room temperature, and comprising the lithium salts selected from the group consisting of the thiocyanate, iodide, bromide, chloride, perchlorate, acetate, tetrafluoroborate, perfluoromethane sulfonate, perfluoromethane sulfonamide, tetrahaloaluminate, and heptahaloaluminate salts of lithium, with or without a magnesium-salt selected from the group consisting of the perchlorate and acetate salts of magnesium. Certain of the latter embodiments may also contain molecular additives from the group of acetonitrile (CH{sub 3}CN), succinnonitrile (CH{sub 2}CN){sub 2}, and tetraglyme (CH{sub 3}--O--CH{sub 2}--CH{sub 2}--O--){sub 2} (or like solvents) solvated to a Mg{sup +2} cation to lower the freezing point of the electrolyte below room temperature. Other particularly useful embodiments contain up to about 40, but preferably not more than about 25, mol percent of a long chain polyether polymer dissolved in the lithium salts to provide an elastic or rubbery solid electrolyte of high ambient temperature conductivity and exceptional 100 C conductivity. Another embodiment contains up to about but not more than 10 mol percent of a molecular solvent such as acetone. 2 figs.

  5. Lithium ion conducting electrolytes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Angell, Charles Austen (Mesa, AZ); Liu, Changle (Midland, MI); Xu, Kang (Montgomery Village, MD); Skotheim, Terje A. (Tucson, AZ)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates generally to highly conductive alkali-metal ion non-crystalline electrolyte systems, and more particularly to novel and unique molten (liquid), rubbery, and solid electrolyte systems which are especially well suited for use with high current density electrolytic cells such as primary and secondary batteries.

  6. Information-theoretic Approaches to Branching in Search Andrew Gilpin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sandholm, Tuomas W.

    constraints over sets of variables. 1 Introduction Search is a fundamental technique for problem solving in AIInformation-theoretic Approaches to Branching in Search Andrew Gilpin Computer Science Department of search algorithms. We introduce the information-theoretic paradigm for branching question selection

  7. INTRODUCTION Branched tubular epithelial structures are found in most

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krasnow, Mark A.

    (respiratory) system, a branched tubular epithelium, is similarly amenable to cellular and genetic analysis to define the mechanisms of branching morphogenesis in vivo. The tracheal system delivers oxygen directly © The Company of Biologists Limited 1996 DEV7471 The tracheal (respiratory) system of Drosophila melanogaster

  8. PowerAware Branch Prediction: Characterization and Design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skadron, Kevin

    , pipeline gating yields little or no energy savings. Keywords Low­power design, energy­aware systems­point benchmarks to explore the role of branch predictor organization in power/energy/performance tradeoffs, to reduce overall energy consumption in the processor it is worthwhile to spend more power in the branch

  9. Power-Aware Branch Prediction: Characterization and Design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skadron, Kevin

    , pipeline gating yields little or no energy savings. Keywords Low-power design, energy-aware systems-point benchmarks to explore the role of branch predictor organization in power/energy/performance tradeoffs, to reduce overall energy consumption in the processor it is worthwhile to spend more power in the branch

  10. Radiolabeled dimethyl branched long chain fatty acid for heart imaging

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Knapp, Jr., Furn F. (Oak Ridge, TN); Goodman, Mark M. (Knoxville, TN); Kirsch, Gilbert (Woippy, FR)

    1988-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A radiolabeled long chain fatty acid for heart imaging that has dimethyl branching at one of the carbons of the chain which inhibits the extent to which oxidation can occur. The closer to the carboxyl the branching is positioned, the more limited the oxidation, thereby resulting in prolonged retention of the radiolabeled compound in the heart.

  11. Solving A Stochastic Generalized Assignment Problem with Branch and Price

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morton, David

    tree, it was found that the linear programming relaxation of the master problem associated with column words: stochastic integer programming, generalized assignment problem, branch and price #12Solving A Stochastic Generalized Assignment Problem with Branch and Price David P. Morton Graduate

  12. Coupling a branching process to an infinite dimensional epidemic process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barbour, Andrew

    Coupling a branching process to an infinite dimensional epidemic process A. D. Barbour Universit¨at Z¨urich To Cindy Greenwood, for her 70th. Abstract Branching process approximation to the initial stages of an epi- demic process has been used since the 1950's as a technique for pro- viding stochastic

  13. Super ionic conductive glass

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Susman, Sherman (Park Forest, IL); Volin, Kenneth J. (Fort Collins, CO)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An ionically conducting glass for use as a solid electrolyte in a power or secondary cell containing an alkali metal-containing anode and a cathode separated by an alkali metal ion conducting glass having an ionic transference number of unity and the general formula: A.sub.1+x D.sub.2-x/3 Si.sub.x P.sub.3-x O.sub.12-2x/3, wherein A is a network modifier for the glass and is an alkali metal of the anode, D is an intermediate for the glass and is selected from the class consisting of Zr, Ti, Ge, Al, Sb, Be, and Zn and X is in the range of from 2.25 to 3.0. Of the alkali metals, Na and Li are preferred and of the intermediate, Zr, Ti and Ge are preferred.

  14. Cermet fuel thermal conductivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alvis, John Mark

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ? ) is expressed by k ( + + ) (3 21) where llg? gap conductance (W/mz-'K) kg? ? conductivity of the gas mixture (W/m-'K) d = actual gap dimension (m) gt gz= temperature jump distances at the fuel and cladding surfaces (cm) The value of d in Equation 3. 21...- ?, )+ ( ") 3 (I- ?, ) - ( ? ) 3 1 yvM trMT b 1+ vF g?T a 1-v?a 1-vF (3. 31) and finally, 2aFBF T 2EMC3M 1 1-2va 1-va 1+vM a (3, 32) 21 Once the constants have been determined, Equation 3. 28 can be solved at the fuel particle outer radius to determine...

  15. Electrically conductive alternating copolymers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Aldissi, M.; Jorgensen, B.S.

    1987-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Polymers which are soluble in common organic solvents and are electrically conductive, but which also may be synthesized in such a manner that they become nonconductive. Negative ions from the electrolyte used in the electrochemical synthesis of a polymer are incorporated into the polymer during the synthesis and serve as a dopant. A further electrochemical step may be utilized to cause the polymer to be conductive. The monomer repeat unit is comprised of two rings, a pyrrole molecule joined to a thienyl group, or a furyl group, or a phenyl group. The individual groups of the polymers are arranged in an alternating manner. For example, the backbone arrangement of poly(furylpyrrole) is -furan-pyrrole-furan-pyrrole- furan-pyrrole. An alkyl group or phenyl group may be substituted for either or both of the hydrogen atoms of the pyrrole ring.

  16. Oxygen ion conducting materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carter, J. David; Wang, Xiaoping; Vaughey, John; Krumpelt, Michael

    2004-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

    An oxygen ion conducting ceramic oxide that has applications in industry including fuel cells, oxygen pumps, oxygen sensors, and separation membranes. The material is based on the idea that substituting a dopant into the host perovskite lattice of (La,Sr)MnO.sub.3 that prefers a coordination number lower than 6 will induce oxygen ion vacancies to form in the lattice. Because the oxygen ion conductivity of (La,Sr)MnO.sub.3 is low over a very large temperature range, the material exhibits a high overpotential when used. The inclusion of oxygen vacancies into the lattice by doping the material has been found to maintain the desirable properties of (La,Sr)MnO.sub.3, while significantly decreasing the experimentally observed overpotential.

  17. Oxygen ion conducting materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vaughey, John; Krumpelt, Michael; Wang, Xiaoping; Carter, J. David

    2005-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

    An oxygen ion conducting ceramic oxide that has applications in industry including fuel cells, oxygen pumps, oxygen sensors, and separation membranes. The material is based on the idea that substituting a dopant into the host perovskite lattice of (La,Sr)MnO.sub.3 that prefers a coordination number lower than 6 will induce oxygen ion vacancies to form in the lattice. Because the oxygen ion conductivity of (La,Sr)MnO.sub.3 is low over a very large temperature range, the material exhibits a high overpotential when used. The inclusion of oxygen vacancies into the lattice by doping the material has been found to maintain the desirable properties of (La,Sr)MnO.sub.3, while significantly decreasing the experimentally observed overpotential.

  18. Oxygen ion conducting materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vaughey, John (Elmhurst, IL); Krumpelt, Michael (Naperville, IL); Wang, Xiaoping (Downers Grove, IL); Carter, J. David (Bolingbrook, IL)

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An oxygen ion conducting ceramic oxide that has applications in industry including fuel cells, oxygen pumps, oxygen sensors, and separation membranes. The material is based on the idea that substituting a dopant into the host perovskite lattice of (La,Sr)MnO.sub.3 that prefers a coordination number lower than 6 will induce oxygen ion vacancies to form in the lattice. Because the oxygen ion conductivity of (La,Sr)MnO.sub.3 is low over a very large temperature range, the material exhibits a high overpotential when used. The inclusion of oxygen vacancies into the lattice by doping the material has been found to maintain the desirable properties of (La,Sr)MnO.sub.3, while significantly decreasing the experimentally observed overpotential.

  19. Optimal branching asymmetry of hydrodynamic pulsatile trees

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florens, Magali; Filoche, Marcel

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Most of the studies on optimal transport are done for steady state regime conditions. Yet, there exists numerous examples in living systems where supply tree networks have to deliver products in a limited time due to the pulsatile character of the flow. This is the case for mammals respiration for which air has to reach the gas exchange units before the start of expiration. We report here that introducing a systematic branching asymmetry allows to reduce the average delivery time of the products. It simultaneously increases its robustness against the unevitable variability of sizes related to morphogenesis. We then apply this approach to the human tracheobronchial tree. We show that in this case all extremities are supplied with fresh air, provided that the asymmetry is smaller than a critical threshold which happens to fit with the asymmetry measured in the human lung. This could indicate that the structure is adjusted at the maximum asymmetry level that allows to feed all terminal units with fresh air.

  20. High conductivity composite metal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zhou, R.; Smith, J.L.; Embury, J.D.

    1998-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Electrical conductors and methods of producing them are disclosed, where the conductors possess both high strength and high conductivity. Conductors are comprised of carbon steel and a material chosen from a group consisting of copper, nickel, silver, and gold. Diffusion barriers are placed between these two materials. The components of a conductor are assembled and then the assembly is subjected to heat treating and mechanical deformation steps. 10 figs.

  1. High conductivity composite metal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zhou, Ruoyi (Los Alamos, NM); Smith, James L. (Los Alamos, NM); Embury, John David (Hamilton, CA)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electrical conductors and methods of producing them, where the conductors possess both high strength and high conductivity. Conductors are comprised of carbon steel and a material chosen from a group consisting of copper, nickel, silver, and gold. Diffusion barriers are placed between these two materials. The components of a conductor are assembled and then the assembly is subjected to heat treating and mechanical deformation steps.

  2. Conduction cooled tube supports

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Worley, Arthur C. (Mt. Tabor, NJ); Becht, IV, Charles (Morristown, NJ)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In boilers, process tubes are suspended by means of support studs that are in thermal contact with and attached to the metal roof casing of the boiler and the upper bend portions of the process tubes. The support studs are sufficiently short that when the boiler is in use, the support studs are cooled by conduction of heat to the process tubes and the roof casing thereby maintaining the temperature of the stud so that it does not exceed 1400.degree. F.

  3. Using EPR To Compare PEG-branch-nitroxide "Bivalent-Brush Polymers" and Traditional PEG Bottle-Brush Polymers: Branching

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turro, Nicholas J.

    Using EPR To Compare PEG-branch-nitroxide "Bivalent-Brush Polymers" and Traditional PEG Bottle-Brush Polymers: Branching Makes a Difference Alan O. Burts, Yongjun Li, Aleksandr V. Zhukhovitskiy, Paresma R-brush random and block copolymers. Our results demonstrate that bivalent bottle-brush polymers have greater

  4. TRANSPORT INVOLVING CONDUCTING FIBERS IN A NON-CONDUCTING MATRIX

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, D. Greg

    to sev- eral applications including flexible thin-film transistors, PEM fuel cells, and direct energy, particularly Peltier devices, high electrical conductivity and low thermal conductivity are preferred

  5. Scaling exponents for a monkey on a tree - fractal dimensions of randomly branched polymers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hans-Karl Janssen; Olaf Stenull

    2012-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We study asymptotic properties of diffusion and other transport processes (including self-avoiding walks and electrical conduction) on large randomly branched polymers using renormalized dynamical field theory. We focus on the swollen phase and the collapse transition, where loops in the polymers are irrelevant. Here the asymptotic statistics of the polymers is that of lattice trees, and diffusion on them is reminiscent of the climbing of a monkey on a tree. We calculate a set of universal scaling exponents including the diffusion exponent and the fractal dimension of the minimal path to 2-loop order and, where available, compare them to numerical results.

  6. Adsorption of annealed branched polymers on curved surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wagner, Jef; Zandi, Roya

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The behavior of annealed branched polymers near adsorbing surfaces plays a fundamental role in many biological and industrial processes. Most importantly single stranded RNA in solution tends to fold up and self-bind to form a highly branched structure. Using a mean field theory, we both perturbatively and numerically examine the adsorption of branched polymers on surfaces of several different geometries in a good solvent. Independent of the geometry of the wall, we observe that as branching density increases, surface tension decreases. However, we find a coupling between the branching density and curvature in that a further lowering of surface tension occurs when the wall curves towards the polymer, but the amount of lowering of surface tension decreases when the wall curves away from the polymer. We find that for branched polymers confined into spherical cavities, most of branch-points are located in the vicinity of the interior wall and the surface tension is minimized for a critical cavity radius. For bra...

  7. Enhanced Thermal Conductivity Oxide Fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alvin Solomon; Shripad Revankar; J. Kevin McCoy

    2006-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

    the purpose of this project was to investigate the feasibility of increasing the thermal conductivity of oxide fuels by adding small fractions of a high conductivity solid phase.

  8. Lateral conduction infrared photodetector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kim, Jin K. (Albuquerque, NM); Carroll, Malcolm S. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2011-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A photodetector for detecting infrared light in a wavelength range of 3-25 .mu.m is disclosed. The photodetector has a mesa structure formed from semiconductor layers which include a type-II superlattice formed of alternating layers of InAs and In.sub.xGa.sub.1-xSb with 0.ltoreq.x.ltoreq.0.5. Impurity doped regions are formed on sidewalls of the mesa structure to provide for a lateral conduction of photo-generated carriers which can provide an increased carrier mobility and a reduced surface recombination. An optional bias electrode can be used in the photodetector to control and vary a cut-off wavelength or a depletion width therein. The photodetector can be formed as a single-color or multi-color device, and can also be used to form a focal plane array which is compatible with conventional read-out integrated circuits.

  9. Establishment report: Reforestation of the Pen Branch corridor and delta

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, E.A.; Dulohery, N.J.; Bunton, C.S.; Trettin, C.C.; McKee, W.H. Jr.

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the role of the USDA Forest Service in the reforestation of the Pen Branch floodplain and delta. The report focuses upon the reforestation activities and monitoring to characterize the sites.

  10. Upper limit on branching ratio the decay B. Bassalleck,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    National Laboratory (BNL). The decay forbidden angular momentum conservation neutrinos purely massless left## # cosmological constraints neutrino masses imply more stringent limits. branching 0 ## case massive Majorana Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New 11973, USA TRIUMF, 4004 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, British Columbia

  11. Gas Code of Conduct (Connecticut)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Gas Code of Conduct sets forth the standard of conduct for transactions, direct or indirect, between gas companies and their affiliates. The purpose of these regulations is to promote...

  12. Thermal Conductivity of Coated Paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kerr, Lei L [ORNL; Pan, Yun-Long [Smart Papers, Hamilton, OH 45013; Dinwiddie, Ralph Barton [ORNL; Wang, Hsin [ORNL; Peterson, Robert C. [Miami University, Oxford, OH

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we introduce a method for measuring the thermal conductivity of paper using a hot disk system. To the best of our knowledge, few publications are found discussing the thermal conductivity of a coated paper although it is important to various forms of today s digital printing where heat is used for imaging as well as for toner fusing. This motivates us to investigate the thermal conductivity of paper coating. Our investigation demonstrates that thermal conductivity is affected by the coat weight and the changes in the thermal conductivity affect ink gloss and density. As the coat weight increases, the thermal conductivity increases. Both the ink gloss and density decrease as the thermal conductivity increases. The ink gloss appears to be more sensitive to the changes in the thermal conductivity.

  13. Conductive lithium storage electrode

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chiang, Yet-Ming (Framingham, MA); Chung, Sung-Yoon (Seoul, KR); Bloking, Jason T. (Cambridge, MA); Andersson, Anna M. (Uppsala, SE)

    2008-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A compound comprising a composition A.sub.x(M'.sub.1-aM''.sub.a).sub.y(XD.sub.4).sub.z, A.sub.x(M'.sub.1-aM''.sub.a).sub.y(DXD.sub.4).sub.z, or A.sub.x(M'.sub.1-aM''.sub.a).sub.y(X.sub.2D.sub.7).sub.z, and have values such that x, plus y(1-a) times a formal valence or valences of M', plus ya times a formal valence or valence of M'', is equal to z times a formal valence of the XD.sub.4, X.sub.2D.sub.7, or DXD.sub.4 group; or a compound comprising a composition (A.sub.1-aM''.sub.a).sub.xM'.sub.y(XD.sub.4).sub.z, (A.sub.1-aM''.sub.a).sub.xM'.sub.y(DXD.sub.4).sub.z(A.sub.1-aM''.sub.a).s- ub.xM'.sub.y(X.sub.2D.sub.7).sub.z and have values such that (1-a).sub.x plus the quantity ax times the formal valence or valences of M'' plus y times the formal valence or valences of M' is equal to z times the formal valence of the XD.sub.4, X.sub.2D.sub.7 or DXD.sub.4 group. In the compound, A is at least one of an alkali metal and hydrogen, M' is a first-row transition metal, X is at least one of phosphorus, sulfur, arsenic, molybdenum, and tungsten, M'' any of a Group IIA, IIIA, IVA, VA, VIA, VIIA, VIIIA, IB, IIB, IIIB, IVB, VB, and VIB metal, D is at least one of oxygen, nitrogen, carbon, or a halogen, 0.0001conductivity at 27.degree. C. of at least about 10.sup.-8 S/cm. The compound can be a doped lithium phosphate that can intercalate lithium or hydrogen. The compound can be used in an electrochemical device including electrodes and storage batteries and can have a gravimetric capacity of at least about 80 mAh/g while being charged/discharged at greater than about C rate of the compound.

  14. Conductive lithium storage electrode

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chiang, Yet-Ming (Framingham, MA); Chung, Sung-Yoon (Incheon, KR); Bloking, Jason T. (Mountain View, CA); Andersson, Anna M. (Vasteras, SE)

    2012-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A compound comprising a composition A.sub.x(M'.sub.1-aM''.sub.a).sub.y(XD.sub.4).sub.z, A.sub.x(M'.sub.1-aM''.sub.a).sub.y(DXD.sub.4).sub.z, or A.sub.x(M'.sub.1-aM''.sub.a).sub.y(X.sub.2D.sub.7).sub.z, and have values such that x, plus y(1-a) times a formal valence or valences of M', plus ya times a formal valence or valence of M'', is equal to z times a formal valence of the XD.sub.4, X.sub.2D.sub.7, or DXD.sub.4 group; or a compound comprising a composition (A.sub.1-aM''.sub.a).sub.xM'.sub.y(XD.sub.4).sub.z, (A.sub.1-aM''.sub.a).sub.xM'.sub.y(DXD.sub.4).sub.z (A.sub.1-aM''.sub.a).sub.xM'.sub.y(X.sub.2D.sub.7).sub.z and have values such that (1-a).sub.x plus the quantity ax times the formal valence or valences of M'' plus y times the formal valence or valences of M' is equal to z times the formal valence of the XD.sub.4, X.sub.2D.sub.7 or DXD.sub.4 group. In the compound, A is at least one of an alkali metal and hydrogen, M' is a first-row transition metal, X is at least one of phosphorus, sulfur, arsenic, molybdenum, and tungsten, M'' any of a Group IIA, IIIA, IVA, VA, VIA, VIIA, VIIIA, IB, IIB, IIIB, IVB, VB, and VIB metal, D is at least one of oxygen, nitrogen, carbon, or a halogen, 0.0001conductivity at 27.degree. C. of at least about 10.sup.-8 S/cm. The compound can be a doped lithium phosphate that can intercalate lithium or hydrogen. The compound can be used in an electrochemical device including electrodes and storage batteries and can have a gravimetric capacity of at least about 80 mAh/g while being charged/discharged at greater than about C rate of the compound.

  15. Quantum vs. Classical Read-once Branching Programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin Sauerhoff

    2005-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper presents the first nontrivial upper and lower bounds for (non-oblivious) quantum read-once branching programs. It is shown that the computational power of quantum and classical read-once branching programs is incomparable in the following sense: (i) A simple, explicit boolean function on 2n input bits is presented that is computable by error-free quantum read-once branching programs of size O(n^3), while each classical randomized read-once branching program and each quantum OBDD for this function with bounded two-sided error requires size 2^{\\Omega(n)}. (ii) Quantum branching programs reading each input variable exactly once are shown to require size 2^{\\Omega(n)} for computing the set-disjointness function DISJ_n from communication complexity theory with two-sided error bounded by a constant smaller than 1/2-2\\sqrt{3}/7. This function is trivially computable even by deterministic OBDDs of linear size. The technically most involved part is the proof of the lower bound in (ii). For this, a new model of quantum multi-partition communication protocols is introduced and a suitable extension of the information cost technique of Jain, Radhakrishnan, and Sen (2003) to this model is presented.

  16. FY 1991 Measurements and Characterization Branch annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Osterwald, C.R.; Dippo, P.C. [eds.

    1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Measurements and Characterization Branch of the National Renewable Laboratory (NREL) provides comprehensive photovoltaic (PV) materials, devices, characterization, measurement, fabrication, modeling research, and support for the international PV research community, in the context of the US Department of Energy`s Photovoltaic Research Program goals. This report summarizes the progress of the Branch from 31 January 1991 through 31 January 1992. The eight technical sections present a succinct overview of the capabilities and accomplishments of each group in the Branch. The Branch is comprised of the following groups: Surface and interface Analysis; Materials Characterization; Device Development; Electro-optical Characterization; Advanced PV module Performance and Reliability Research; Cell Performance Characterization; Surface Interactions, Modification, and Stability; and FTIR Spectroscopic Research. The including measurements and tests of PV materials, cells, submodules, and modules. The report contains a comprehensive bibliography of 77 branch originated journal and conference publications, which were authored in collaboration with, or in support of, approximately 135 university, industrial, government, and in-house research groups.

  17. FY 1991 Measurements and Characterization Branch annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Osterwald, C.R.; Dippo, P.C. (eds.)

    1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Measurements and Characterization Branch of the National Renewable Laboratory (NREL) provides comprehensive photovoltaic (PV) materials, devices, characterization, measurement, fabrication, modeling research, and support for the international PV research community, in the context of the US Department of Energy's Photovoltaic Research Program goals. This report summarizes the progress of the Branch from 31 January 1991 through 31 January 1992. The eight technical sections present a succinct overview of the capabilities and accomplishments of each group in the Branch. The Branch is comprised of the following groups: Surface and interface Analysis; Materials Characterization; Device Development; Electro-optical Characterization; Advanced PV module Performance and Reliability Research; Cell Performance Characterization; Surface Interactions, Modification, and Stability; and FTIR Spectroscopic Research. The including measurements and tests of PV materials, cells, submodules, and modules. The report contains a comprehensive bibliography of 77 branch originated journal and conference publications, which were authored in collaboration with, or in support of, approximately 135 university, industrial, government, and in-house research groups.

  18. Coulomb Branch and The Moduli Space of Instantons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stefano Cremonesi; Giulia Ferlito; Amihay Hanany; Noppadol Mekareeya

    2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The moduli space of instantons on C^2 for any simple gauge group is studied using the Coulomb branch of N=4 gauge theories in three dimensions. For a given simple group G, the Hilbert series of such an instanton moduli space is computed from the Coulomb branch of the quiver given by the over-extended Dynkin diagram of G. The computation includes the cases of non-simply-laced gauge groups G, complementing the ADHM constructions which are not available for exceptional gauge groups. Even though the Lagrangian description for non-simply laced Dynkin diagrams is not currently known, the prescription for computing the Coulomb branch Hilbert series of such diagrams is very simple. For instanton numbers one and two, the results are in agreement with previous works. New results and general features for the moduli spaces of three and higher instanton numbers are reported and discussed in detail.

  19. Coulomb Branch and The Moduli Space of Instantons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cremonesi, Stefano; Hanany, Amihay; Mekareeya, Noppadol

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The moduli space of instantons on C^2 for any simple gauge group is studied using the Coulomb branch of N=4 gauge theories in three dimensions. For a given simple group G, the Hilbert series of such an instanton moduli space is computed from the Coulomb branch of the quiver given by the over-extended Dynkin diagram of G. The computation includes the cases of non-simply-laced gauge groups G, complementing the ADHM constructions which are not available for exceptional gauge groups. Even though the Lagrangian description for non-simply laced Dynkin diagrams is not currently known, the prescription for computing the Coulomb branch Hilbert series of such diagrams is very simple. For instanton numbers one and two, the results are in agreement with previous works. New results and general features for the moduli spaces of three and higher instanton numbers are reported and discussed in detail.

  20. Beta-decay branching ratios of 62Ga

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Bey; B. Blank; G. Canchel; C. Dossat; J. Giovinazzo; I. Matea; V. Elomaa; T. Eronen; U. Hager; M. Hakala; A. Jokinen; A. Kankainen; I. Moore; H. Penttila; S. Rinta-Antila; A. Saastamoinen; T. Sonoda; J. Aysto; N. Adimi; G. De France; J. C. Thomas; G. Voltolini; T. Chaventré

    2008-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Beta-decay branching ratios of 62Ga have been measured at the IGISOL facility of the Accelerator Laboratory of the University of Jyvaskyla. 62Ga is one of the heavier Tz = 0, 0+ -> 0+ beta-emitting nuclides used to determine the vector coupling constant of the weak interaction and the Vud quark-mixing matrix element. For part of the experimental studies presented here, the JYFLTRAP facility has been employed to prepare isotopically pure beams of 62Ga. The branching ratio obtained, BR= 99.893(24)%, for the super-allowed branch is in agreement with previous measurements and allows to determine the ft value and the universal Ft value for the super-allowed beta decay of 62Ga.

  1. Measurement of Prominent {eta}-Decay Branching Fractions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lopez, A.; Mehrabyan, S.; Mendez, H.; Ramirez, J. [University of Puerto Rico, Mayaguez, Puerto Rico 00681 (Puerto Rico); Ge, J. Y.; Miller, D. H.; Sanghi, B.; Shipsey, I. P. J.; Xin, B. [Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); Adams, G. S.; Anderson, M.; Cummings, J. P.; Danko, I.; Hu, D.; Moziak, B.; Napolitano, J. [Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York 12180 (United States); He, Q.; Insler, J.; Muramatsu, H.; Park, C. S. [University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14627 (United States)] (and others)

    2007-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The decay {psi}(2S){yields}{eta}J/{psi} is used to measure, for the first time, all prominent {eta}-meson branching fractions with the same experiment in the same dataset, thereby providing a consistent treatment of systematics across branching fractions. We present results for {eta} decays to {gamma}{gamma}, {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}, 3{pi}{sup 0}, {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{gamma} and e{sup +}e{sup -}{gamma}, accounting for 99.9% of all {eta} decays. The precision of several of the branching fractions and their ratios is improved. Two channels, {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{gamma} and e{sup +}e{sup -}{gamma}, show results that differ at the level of three standard deviations from those previously determined.

  2. Renormalized field theory of collapsing directed randomly branched polymers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hans-Karl Janssen; Frank Wevelsiep; Olaf Stenull

    2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a dynamical field theory for directed randomly branched polymers and in particular their collapse transition. We develop a phenomenological model in the form of a stochastic response functional that allows us to address several interesting problems such as the scaling behavior of the swollen phase and the collapse transition. For the swollen phase, we find that by choosing model parameters appropriately, our stochastic functional reduces to the one describing the relaxation dynamics near the Yang-Lee singularity edge. This corroborates that the scaling behavior of swollen branched polymers is governed by the Yang-Lee universality class as has been known for a long time. The main focus of our paper lies on the collapse transition of directed branched polymers. We show to arbitrary order in renormalized perturbation theory with $\\varepsilon$-expansion that this transition belongs to the same universality class as directed percolation.

  3. Higgs branch localization of 3d N=2 theories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masashi Fujitsuka; Masazumi Honda; Yutaka Yoshida

    2014-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We study N=2 supersymmetric gauge theories on squashed 3-sphere and S^1xS^2. Recent studies have shown that the partition functions in a class of N=2 theories have factorized forms in terms of vortex and anti-vortex partition functions by explicitly evaluating matrix integrals obtained from Coulomb branch localization. We directly derive this structure by performing Higgs branch localization. It turns out that more general N=2 theories have this factorization property. We also discuss the factorization of supersymmetric Wilson loop.

  4. Optical Conductivity with Holographic Lattices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gary T. Horowitz; Jorge E. Santos; David Tong

    2012-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We add a gravitational background lattice to the simplest holographic model of matter at finite density and calculate the optical conductivity. With the lattice, the zero frequency delta function found in previous calculations (resulting from translation invariance) is broadened and the DC conductivity is finite. The optical conductivity exhibits a Drude peak with a cross-over to power-law behavior at higher frequencies. Surprisingly, these results bear a strong resemblance to the properties of some of the cuprates.

  5. RADIONUCLIDE INVENTORY AND DISTRIBUTION: FOURMILE BRANCH, PEN BRANCH, AND STEEL CREEK IOUS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hiergesell, R.; Phifer, M.

    2014-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    As a condition to the Department of Energy (DOE) Low Level Waste Disposal Federal Facility Review Group (LFRG) review team approving the Savannah River Site (SRS) Composite Analysis (CA), SRS agreed to follow up on a secondary issue, which consisted of the consolidation of several observations that the team concluded, when evaluated collectively, could potentially impact the integration of the CA results. This report addresses secondary issue observations 4 and 21, which identify the need to improve the CA sensitivity and uncertainty analysis specifically by improving the CA inventory and the estimate of its uncertainty. The purpose of the work described herein was to be responsive to these secondary issue observations by re-examining the radionuclide inventories of the Integrator Operable Units (IOUs), as documented in ERD 2001 and Hiergesell, et. al. 2008. The LFRG concern has been partially addressed already for the Lower Three Runs (LTR) IOU (Hiergesell and Phifer, 2012). The work described in this investigation is a continuation of the effort to address the LFRG concerns by re-examining the radionuclide inventories associated with Fourmile Branch (FMB) IOU, Pen Branch (PB) IOU and Steel Creek (SC) IOU. The overall approach to computing radionuclide inventories for each of the IOUs involved the following components: • Defining contaminated reaches of sediments along the IOU waterways • Identifying separate segments within each IOU waterway to evaluate individually • Computing the volume and mass of contaminated soil associated with each segment, or “compartment” • Obtaining the available and appropriate Sediment and Sediment/Soil analytical results associated with each IOU • Standardizing all radionuclide activity by decay-correcting all sample analytical results from sample date to the current point in time, • Computing representative concentrations for all radionuclides associated with each compartment in each of the IOUs • Computing the radionuclide inventory of each DOE-added radionuclide for the compartments of each IOU by applying the representative, central value concentration to the mass of contaminated soil • Totaling the inventory for all compartments associated with each of the IOUs Using this approach the 2013 radionuclide inventories for each sub-compartment associated with each of the three IOUs were computed, by radionuclide. The inventories from all IOU compartments were then rolled-up into a total inventory for each IOU. To put the computed estimate of radionuclide activities within FMB, PB, and SC IOUs into context, attention was drawn to Cs-137, which was the radionuclide with the largest contributor to the calculated dose to a member of the public at the perimeter of SRS within the 2010 SRS CA (SRNL 2010). The total Cs-137 activity in each of the IOUs was calculated to be 9.13, 1.5, and 17.4 Ci for FMB, PB, and SC IOUs, respectively. Another objective of this investigation was to address the degree of uncertainty associated with the estimated residual radionuclide activity that is calculated for the FMB, PB, and SC IOUs. Two primary contributing factors to overall uncertainty of inventory estimates were identified and evaluated. The first related to the computation of the mass of contaminated material in a particular IOU compartment and the second to the uncertainty associated with analytical counting errors. The error ranges for the mass of contaminated material in each IOU compartment were all calculated to be approximately +/- 9.6%, or a nominal +/-10%. This nominal value was added to the uncertainty associated with the analytical counting errors that were associated with each radionuclide, individually. This total uncertainty was then used to calculate a maximum and minimum estimated radionuclide inventories for each IOU.

  6. Appendix C Conducting Structured Walkthroughs

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1997-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This guide describes how to conduct a structured walkthroughs during the lifecycle stages of software engineering projects, regardless of hardware platform.

  7. TRIBAND BRANCH LINE COUPLER USING DOUBLE-LORENTZ

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nam, Sangwook

    TRIBAND BRANCH LINE COUPLER USING DOUBLE-LORENTZ TRANSMISSION LINES Hanseung Lee and Sangwook Nam) transmission lines (TL) provides two additional degrees of freedom in realizing triband microwave devices-Lorentz; transmission lines; triband; directional couplers 1. INTRODUCTION The concept of artificial TLs having

  8. Continuum Cascade Model: Branching Random Walk for Traveling Wave

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yoshiaki Itoh

    2015-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The food web is a directed graph in which nodes label species and directed links represent the predation between species. Cascade models generate random food webs. The recursion to obtain the probability distribution of the longest chain length has the solution with traveling wave. We consider a branching random walk to study the asymptotic probability on the wave front.

  9. The Polymerase Chain Reaction and Branching Processes Fengzhu Sun

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, Fengzhu - Sun, Fengzhu

    The Polymerase Chain Reaction and Branching Processes Fengzhu Sun Department of Mathematics, DRB is studied. We also study the distribution of the Hamming distance between two randomly chosen sequences long. The double-stranded DNA molecules are heated to near boiling temperature so that the double

  10. Power-Aware Branch Prediction: Characterization and Design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skadron, Kevin

    or no energy savings. Index Terms--Low-power design, energy-aware systems, processor architecture, branch organization in power/energy/performance trade offs for processor design. Even though the direction predictor, the PPD reduces local predictor power and energy dissipation by about 31 percent and overall processor

  11. A BRANCH-AND-PRICE ALGORITHM AND NEW TEST PROBLEMS ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Next, we describe several branching strategies, their effect on the pricing problem, and then ..... Sun Blade 2000 with 8.0 GB of memory and 2 Sun UltraSPARC-III+ CPUs running at 900 MHz ..... In Proceedings of IJCAI-99, Stockholm, Sweden,.

  12. Extending the Cell SPE with Energy Efficient Branch Prediction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuzmanov, Georgi

    Extending the Cell SPE with Energy Efficient Branch Prediction Martijn Briejer1 , Cor Meenderinck1 , and Ben Juurlink2 1 Delft University of Technology, Delft, the Netherlands cor@ce.et.tudelft.nl 2 Technische Universit¨at Berlin, Berlin, Germany juurlink@cs.tu-berlin.de Abstract. Energy-efficient dynamic

  13. More Branch-and-Bound Experiments in Convex Nonlinear Integer ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    pierre

    Sep 29, 2011 ... Department of Industrial Engineering and Management Sciences, Northwestern University,. Evanston, IL 60208 ... chooses the “best” one as the actual branching variable. “Reliability .... mean that all selection strategies perform similarly in practice. Indeed ...... User manual for filterSQP, 1998. University of ...

  14. How important are branching decisions: fooling MIP solvers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Apr 21, 2014 ... building Gk by adding one P1 and k ? 1 P2's in a disconnected fashion. ... row permutations (to reduce the impact of performance variability [11]). ... cost branching is a history-based rule that tries to predict the score that strong.

  15. Gas compressor with side branch absorber for pulsation control

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Harris, Ralph E. (San Antonio, TX); Scrivner, Christine M. (San Antonio, TX); Broerman, III, Eugene L. (San Antonio, TX)

    2011-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and system for reducing pulsation in lateral piping associated with a gas compressor system. A tunable side branch absorber (TSBA) is installed on the lateral piping. A pulsation sensor is placed in the lateral piping, to measure pulsation within the piping. The sensor output signals are delivered to a controller, which controls actuators that change the acoustic dimensions of the SBA.

  16. Electrical Transport through a Single Nanoscale Semiconductor Branch Point

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cui, Yi

    such as light- emitting diodes10-12 and solar cells.13,14 Already, the incor- poration of branched nanostructures has yielded significant improvements in nanorod/polymer solar cells, where the specific pathways) while keeping the third arm floating are presented in the main panel of Figure 1. The I-V curves show

  17. Convergence in gradient systems with branching of equilibria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Galaktionov, V A [University of Bath (United Kingdom); Pohozaev, Stanislav I [Steklov Mathematical Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences (Russian Federation); Shishkov, A E [Institute of Applied Mathematics and Mechanics of the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Donetsk (Ukraine)

    2007-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The basic model is a semilinear elliptic equation with coercive C{sup 1} non-linearity: {delta}{psi}+f({psi})=0 in {omega}, {psi}=0 on {partial_derivative}{omega}, where {omega} subset of R{sup N} is a bounded smooth domain. The main hypothesis (H{sub R}) about resonance branching is as follows: if a branching of equilibria occurs at a point {psi} with k-dimensional kernel of the linearized operator {delta}+f'({psi})I, then the branching subset S{sub k} at {psi} is a locally smooth k-dimensional manifold. For N=1 the first result on the stabilization to a single equilibrium is due to Zelenyak (1968). It is shown that Zelenyak's approach, which is based on the analysis of Lyapunov functions, can be extended to general gradient systems in Hilbert spaces with smooth resonance branching. The case of asymptotically small non-autonomous perturbations of such systems is also considered. The approach developed here represents an alternative to Hale's stabilization method (1992) and other similar techniques in the theory of gradient systems. Bibliography: 32 titles.

  18. Enhancement of Topological Insulators Surface Conduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Xinxin

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Enhancement of Topological Insulators Surface Conduction AEnhancement of Topological Insulators Surface Conduction byTopological Insulator

  19. Conductive polymer-based material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McDonald, William F. (Utica, OH); Koren, Amy B. (Lansing, MI); Dourado, Sunil K. (Ann Arbor, MI); Dulebohn, Joel I. (Lansing, MI); Hanchar, Robert J. (Charlotte, MI)

    2007-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed are polymer-based coatings and materials comprising (i) a polymeric composition including a polymer having side chains along a backbone forming the polymer, at least two of the side chains being substituted with a heteroatom selected from oxygen, nitrogen, sulfur, and phosphorus and combinations thereof; and (ii) a plurality of metal species distributed within the polymer. At least a portion of the heteroatoms may form part of a chelation complex with some or all of the metal species. In many embodiments, the metal species are present in a sufficient concentration to provide a conductive material, e.g., as a conductive coating on a substrate. The conductive materials may be useful as the thin film conducting or semi-conducting layers in organic electronic devices such as organic electroluminescent devices and organic thin film transistors.

  20. Experimental thermal conductivity and contact conductance of graphite composites 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson, Marian Christine

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Graphite fiber organic matrix composites were reviewed ics. for potential heat sink applications in the electronics packaging determined the effective transverse and longitudinal thermal industry. This experimental investigation conductivity...

  1. Experimental thermal conductivity and contact conductance of graphite composites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson, Marian Christine

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Graphite fiber organic matrix composites were reviewed ics. for potential heat sink applications in the electronics packaging determined the effective transverse and longitudinal thermal industry. This experimental investigation conductivity...

  2. TOPAZ: a computer code for modeling heat transfer and fluid flow in arbitrary networks of pipes, flow branches, and vessels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Winters, W.S.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An overview of the computer code TOPAZ (Transient-One-Dimensional Pipe Flow Analyzer) is presented. TOPAZ models the flow of compressible and incompressible fluids through complex and arbitrary arrangements of pipes, valves, flow branches and vessels. Heat transfer to and from the fluid containment structures (i.e. vessel and pipe walls) can also be modeled. This document includes discussions of the fluid flow equations and containment heat conduction equations. The modeling philosophy, numerical integration technique, code architecture, and methods for generating the computational mesh are also discussed.

  3. A New Analysis of X-Ray Adsorption Branching Ratios: Use ofRussell...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Analysis of X-Ray Adsorption Branching Ratios: Use of Russell-Saunders Coupling . A New Analysis of X-Ray Adsorption Branching Ratios: Use of Russell-Saunders Coupling . Abstract:...

  4. aureobasidium-derived soluble branched: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    space, referred to as the branching scheme. .... standard branch-and-bound both in terms of size of the enumeration tree and ...... of the fractional variable to be selected...

  5. Characterization of sparsely long chain branched polycarbonate by a combination of solution, rheology and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keunings, Roland

    Characterization of sparsely long chain branched polycarbonate by a combination of solution branched polycarbonate and fractions thereof by a combination of solution and rheological techniques the model is calibrated for polydisperse linear polycarbonate, discrepancies between the predicted

  6. CONDUCTANCE OF NANOSYSTEMS WITH INTERACTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramsak, Anton

    -beam lithography or small metallic grains,[1] semiconductor quantum dots,[2] or a single large molecule of an atomic-size bridge that forms in the break,[3] or even measure the conductance of a single hydrogen

  7. Continuous production of conducting polymer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gaige, Terry A. (Terry Alden), 1981-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A device to continuously produce polypyrrole was designed, manufactured, and tested. Polypyrrole is a conducting polymer which has potential artificial muscle applications. The objective of continuous production was to ...

  8. Relevance of complex branch points for partial wave analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ceci, S.; Svarc, A. [Rudjer Boskovic Institute, Bijenicka 54, HR-10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Doering, M. [HISKP (Theorie), Universitaet Bonn, Nussallee 14-16, D-53115 Bonn (Germany); Hanhart, C.; Krewald, S. [Institut fuer Kernphysik and Juelich Center for Hadron Physics, Forschungszentrum Juelich, D-52425 Juelich (Germany); Institute for Advanced Simulation, Forschungszentrum Juelich, D-52425 Juelich (Germany); Meissner, U.-G. [HISKP (Theorie), Universitaet Bonn, Nussallee 14-16, D-53115 Bonn (Germany); Institut fuer Kernphysik and Juelich Center for Hadron Physics, Forschungszentrum Juelich, D-52425 Juelich (Germany); Institute for Advanced Simulation, Forschungszentrum Juelich, D-52425 Juelich (Germany)

    2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A central issue in hadron spectroscopy is to deduce--and interpret--resonance parameters, namely, pole positions and residues, from experimental data, for those are the quantities to be compared to lattice QCD or model calculations. However, not every structure in the observables derives from a resonance pole: the origin might as well be branch points, either located on the real axis (when a new channel composed of stable particles opens) or in the complex plane (when at least one of the intermediate particles is unstable). In this paper we demonstrate first the existence of such branch points in the complex plane and then show on the example of the {pi}N P{sub 11} partial wave that it is not possible to distinguish the structures induced by the latter from a true pole signal based on elastic data alone.

  9. Branching Fraction Measurement of B to omega l nu decays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; /Annecy, LAPP; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; /Barcelona U., ECM; Palano, A.; /Bari U. /INFN, Bari; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; /Bergen U.; Brown, D.N.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; /Ruhr U., Bochum; Asgeirsson, D.J.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T.S.; McKenna, J.A.; So, R.Y.; /British Columbia U.; Khan, A.; /Brunel U.; Blinov, V.E.; /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Indian Inst. Tech., Guwahati /Harvard U. /Harvey Mudd Coll. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa State U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U., Comp. Sci. Dept. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U.; /more authors..

    2012-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a measurement of the B{sup +} {yields} {omega}{ell}{sup +}{nu} branching fraction based on a sample of 467 million B{bar B} pairs recorded by the BABAR detector at the SLAC PEP-II e{sup +}e{sup -} collider. We observe 1041 {+-} 133 signal decays, corresponding to a branching fraction of {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} {omega}{ell}{sup +}{nu}) = (1.15 {+-} 0.15 {+-} 0.12) x 10{sup -4}, where the first error is statistical and the second is systematic. The dependence of the decay rate on q{sup 2}, the momentum transfer squared to the lepton system, is compared to QCD predictions of the form factors based on a quark model and light-cone sum rules.

  10. Measurement of the branching fractions of ?(+)(c)?pKn(?)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baringer, Philip S.

    1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    PHYSICAL REVIEW D 1 APRIL 1998VOLUME 57, NUMBER 7Measurement of the branching fractions of Lc1?pK¯ n?p? M. S. Alam,1 S. B. Athar,1 Z. Ling,1 A. H. Mahmood,1 H. Severini,1 S. Timm,1 F. Wappler,1 A. Anastassov,2 J. E. Duboscq,2 D. Fujino,2,* K. K. Gan...6 le Physics, Canada , Que´bec, Canada H3A 2T8 le Physics, Canada a, New York 14850 wrence, Kansas 66045 neapolis, Minnesota 55455 ublished 18 February 1998! SR, we report new measurements of the branching into pK2p1p0, pK¯ 0, pK¯ 0p1p2, and pK¯ 0p0...

  11. The genealogy of branching Brownian motion with absorption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Julien Berestycki; Nathanaël Berestycki; Jason Schweinsberg

    2013-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider a system of particles which perform branching Brownian motion with negative drift and are killed upon reaching zero, in the near-critical regime where the total population stays roughly constant with approximately N particles. We show that the characteristic time scale for the evolution of this population is of order $(\\log N)^3$, in the sense that when time is measured in these units, the scaled number of particles converges to a variant of Neveu's continuous-state branching process. Furthermore, the genealogy of the particles is then governed by a coalescent process known as the Bolthausen-Sznitman coalescent. This validates the nonrigorous predictions by Brunet, Derrida, Muller and Munier for a closely related model.

  12. The genealogy of extremal particles of Branching Brownian Motion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arguin, Louis-Pierre; Kistler, Nicola

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Branching Brownian Motion describes a system of particles which diffuse in space and split into offsprings according to a certain random mechanism. In virtue of the groundbreaking work by M. Bramson on the convergence of solutions of the Fisher-KPP equation to traveling waves, the law of the rightmost particle in the limit of large times is rather well understood. In this work, we address the full statistics of the extremal particles (first-, second-, third- etc. largest). In particular, we prove that in the large $t-$limit, such particles descend with overwhelming probability from ancestors having split either within a distance of order one from time $0$, or within a distance of order one from time $t$. The approach relies on characterizing, up to a certain level of precision, the paths of the extremal particles. As a byproduct, a heuristic picture of Branching Brownian Motion ``at the edge'' emerges, which sheds light on the still unknown limiting extremal process.

  13. The genealogy of branching Brownian motion with absorption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berestycki, Julien; Schweinsberg, Jason

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider a system of particles which perform branching Brownian motion with negative drift and are killed upon reaching zero, in the near-critical regime where the total population stays roughly constant with approximately N particles. We show that the characteristic time scale for the evolution of this population is of order (log N)^3, in the sense that when time is measured in these units, the scaled number of particles converges to a variant of Neveu's continuous-state branching process. Furthermore, the genealogy of the particles is then governed by a coalescent process known as the Bolthausen-Sznitman coalescent. This validates the non-rigorous predictions by Brunet, Derrida, Muller, and Munier for a closely related model.

  14. Branch dependence in the "consistent histories" approach to quantum mechanics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas Müller

    2006-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

    In the consistent histories formalism one specifies a family of histories as an exhaustive set of pairwise exclusive descriptions of the dynamics of a quantum system. We define branching families of histories, which strike a middle ground between the two available mathematically precise definitions of families of histories, viz., product families and Isham's history projector operator formalism. The former are too narrow for applications, and the latter's generality comes at a certain cost, barring an intuitive reading of the ``histories''. Branching families retain the intuitiveness of product families, they allow for the interpretation of a history's weight as a probability, and they allow one to distinguish two kinds of coarse-graining, leading to reconsidering the motivation for the consistency condition.

  15. ? b ? ? ? + ? ? form factors and differential branching fraction from lattice QCD

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Detmold, William; Lin, C.-J. David; Meinel, Stefan; Wingate, Matthew

    2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the first lattice QCD determination of the ?b?? transition form factors that govern the rare baryonic decays ?b??l?l? at leading order in heavy-quark effective theory. Our calculations are performed with 2+1 flavors of domain-wall fermions, at two lattice spacings and with pion masses down to 227 MeV. Three-point functions with a wide range of source-sink separations are used to extract the ground-state contributions. The form factors are extrapolated to the physical values of the light-quark masses and to the continuum limit. We use our results to calculate the differential branching fractions for ?b??l?l? with l=e, ?, ? within the standard model. We find agreement with a recent CDF measurement of the ?b?????? differential branching fraction.

  16. Plasma conductivity at finite coupling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Babiker Hassanain; Martin Schvellinger

    2011-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    By taking into account the full order(\\alpha'^3) type IIB string theory corrections to the supergravity action, we compute the leading finite 't Hooft coupling order(\\lambda^{-3/2}) corrections to the conductivity of strongly-coupled SU(N) {\\cal {N}}=4 supersymmetric Yang-Mills plasma in the large N limit. We find that the conductivity is enhanced by the corrections, in agreement with the trend expected from previous perturbative weak-coupling computations.

  17. Mixed Conduction in Rare-Earth Phosphates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ray, Hannah Leung

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Conduction  in  Rare-­Earth  Phosphates   by   Hannah  Conduction  in  Rare-­?Earth  Phosphates   by   Hannah  conduction  in  rare  earth  phosphates.  Specifically,  

  18. Central Limit Theorem for Branching Random Walks in Random Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nobuo Yoshida

    2007-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider branching random walks in $d$-dimensional integer lattice with time-space i.i.d. offspring distributions. When $d \\ge 3$ and the fluctuation of the environment is well moderated by the random walk, we prove a central limit theorem for the density of the population, together with upper bounds for the density of the most populated site and the replica overlap. We also discuss the phase transition of this model in connection with directed polymers in random environment.

  19. The genealogy of branching Brownian motion with absorption by Julien Berestycki

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berestycki, Julien

    The genealogy of branching Brownian motion with absorption by Julien Berestycki , Nathana-state branching process. Furthermore, the genealogy of the particles is then governed by a coalescent process . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64 7.2 Flows describing the genealogy of branching Brownian motion . . . . . . . . . . . . 65 7

  20. Interior-Branch and Bootstrap Tests of Phylogenetic Trees Tatyana Sitnikova, Andrey Rzhetsky, and Masatoshi Nei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nei, Masatoshi

    Interior-Branch and Bootstrap Tests of Phylogenetic Trees Tatyana Sitnikova, Andrey Rzhetsky University We have compared statistical properties of the interior-branch and bootstrap tests of phylogenetic of a predetermined topology, the interior- branch and bootstrap tests provide the confidence values, PC and PB

  1. A BreakEven Formulation for Evaluating Branch Predictor Energy Efficiency #

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Co, Michele

    demonstrated that a better branch pre­ dictor can increase the energy­efficiency of the system, even if the new a simple, effective metric for eval­ uating the tradeoff between processor energy­efficiency and branch and an energy­efficiency target, we are able to evaluate the energy­efficiency of several existing branch

  2. Dimensional Reduction and Crossover to Mean-Field Behavior for Branched Polymers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dimensional Reduction and Crossover to Mean-Field Behavior for Branched Polymers John Z. Imbrie will review recent results on dimensional reduction for branched polymers, and discuss implications for critical phenomena. Parisi and Sourlas argued in [PS81] that branched polymers fall into the universal- ity

  3. REU PROJECT ON BRANCH POLYMERS SARA BILLEY, TOM BOOTHBY, MORGAN EICHWALD, AND CHRIS FOX

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Billey, Sara

    REU PROJECT ON BRANCH POLYMERS SARA BILLEY, TOM BOOTHBY, MORGAN EICHWALD, AND CHRIS FOX 1. A branched polymer of order n in R2 is obtained by plac- ing these disks in the plane in any configuration so at the origin. Branched polymers have been studied in con- nection with molecular chemistry, statistical physics

  4. SURVIVAL PROBABILITY OF THE BRANCHING RANDOM WALK KILLED BELOW A LINEAR BOUNDARY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    SURVIVAL PROBABILITY OF THE BRANCHING RANDOM WALK KILLED BELOW A LINEAR BOUNDARY JEAN B´ERARD, JEAN on the asymptotic behavior of the survival probability of the branching random walk killed below a linear boundary- Derrida theory of stochastic fronts are discussed. 1. Introduction Consider a real-valued branching random

  5. Branching morphogenesis of the lung: new molecular insights into an old

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chuang, Pao-Tien

    Branching morphogenesis of the lung: new molecular insights into an old problem Pao-Tien Chuang1 It has been known for decades that branching morpho- genesis of the lung is mediated through reciprocal between major signaling path- ways during branching morphogenesis of the lung in mice. It has been known

  6. A Conceptual Restoration Plan and Tidal Hydrology Assessment for Reconnecting Spring Branch Creek to Suisun Marsh, Solano County, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olson, Jessica J.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for Reconnecting Spring Branch Creek to Suisun Marsh, SolanoFramework CHAPTER 2. SPRING BRANCH CREEK SITE ASSESSMENT 2.1Model for Spring Branch Creek Following Reconnection CHAPTER

  7. A Tidal Hydrology Assessment for Reconnecting Spring Branch Creek to Suisun Marsh, Solano County CA: Predicting the Impact to the Federally Listed Plant Soft Bird's Beak

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olson, Jessica J.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    population in Spring Branch Creek has experienced decline inand up the Spring Branch Creek gradient on its own. Withor up the Spring Branch Creek gradient is necessary. 12

  8. Electrically Conductive Bacterial Nanowires Produced by Shewanella...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Conductive Bacterial Nanowires Produced by Shewanella Oneidensis Strain MR-1 and Other Microorganisms . Electrically Conductive Bacterial Nanowires Produced by Shewanella...

  9. Optical conductivity of curved graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. J. Chaves; T. Frederico; O. Oliveira; W. de Paula; M. C. Santos

    2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We compute the optical conductivity for an out-of-plane deformation in graphene using an approach based on solutions of the Dirac equation in curved space. Different examples of periodic deformations along one direction translates into an enhancement of the optical conductivity peaks in the region of the far and mid infrared frequencies for periodicities $\\sim100\\,$nm. The width and position of the peaks can be changed by dialling the parameters of the deformation profiles. The enhancement of the optical conductivity is due to intraband transitions and the translational invariance breaking in the geometrically deformed background. Furthemore, we derive an analytical solution of the Dirac equation in a curved space for a general deformation along one spatial direction. For this class of geometries, it is shown that curvature induces an extra phase in the electron wave function, which can also be explored to produce interference devices of the Aharonov-Bohm type.

  10. Low-mass evolution from HE ignition to beyond the horizontal branch

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Despain, K.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The evolution of an 0.6 M/sub solar mass/ stellar model during core helium burning is presented. Following the off-center ignition of helium in the core flash, the star remains on the red giant branch for > 10/sup 6/ years, undergoing twelve additional flashes. After leaving the giant branch, the star evolves on the horizontal branch for 8.15 x 10/sup 7/ years before returning to the giant branch and undergoing strong helium-shell flashes. The implications for horizontal branch and RR Lyrae stars are discussed.

  11. Conductive Channel for Energy Transmission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Apollonov, Victor V. [A.M. Prokhorov General Physics Institute, Vavilov Str. 38, Moscow, 119991 (Russian Federation)

    2011-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    For many years the attempts to create conductive channels of big length were taken in order to study the upper atmosphere and to settle special tasks, related to energy transmission. There upon the program of creation of 'Impulsar' represents a great interest, as this program in a combination with high-voltage high repetition rate electrical source can be useful to solve the above mentioned problems (N. Tesla ideas for the days of high power lasers). The principle of conductive channel production can be shortly described as follows. The 'Impulsar' - laser jet engine vehicle - propulsion take place under the influence of powerful high repetition rate pulse-periodic laser radiation. In the experiments the CO{sub 2}-laser and solid state Nd:YAG laser systems had been used. Active impulse appears thanks to air breakdown (<30 km) or to the breakdown of ablated material on the board (>30 km), placed in the vicinity of the focusing mirror-acceptor of the breakdown waves. With each pulse of powerful laser the device rises up, leaving a bright and dense trace of products with high degree of ionization and metallization by conductive nano-particles due to ablation. Conductive dust plasma properties investigation in our experiments was produced by two very effective approaches: high power laser controlled ablation and by explosion of wire. Experimental and theoretical results of conductive canal modeling will be presented. The estimations show that with already experimentally demonstrated figures of specific thrust impulse the lower layers of the Ionosphere can be reached in several ten seconds that is enough to keep the high level of channel conductivity and stability with the help of high repetition rate high voltage generator. Some possible applications for new technology are highlighted.

  12. Lithium ion conducting ionic electrolytes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Angell, C.A.; Xu, K.; Liu, C.

    1996-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A liquid, predominantly lithium-conducting, ionic electrolyte is described which has exceptionally high conductivity at temperatures of 100 C or lower, including room temperature. It comprises molten lithium salts or salt mixtures in which a small amount of an anionic polymer lithium salt is dissolved to stabilize the liquid against recrystallization. Further, a liquid ionic electrolyte which has been rubberized by addition of an extra proportion of anionic polymer, and which has good chemical and electrochemical stability, is described. This presents an attractive alternative to conventional salt-in-polymer electrolytes which are not cationic conductors. 4 figs.

  13. Lithium ion conducting ionic electrolytes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Angell, C. Austen (Mesa, AZ); Xu, Kang (Tempe, AZ); Liu, Changle (Tulsa, OK)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A liquid, predominantly lithium-conducting, ionic electrolyte is described which has exceptionally high conductivity at temperatures of 100.degree. C. or lower, including room temperature. It comprises molten lithium salts or salt mixtures in which a small amount of an anionic polymer lithium salt is dissolved to stabilize the liquid against recrystallization. Further, a liquid ionic electrolyte which has been rubberized by addition of an extra proportion of anionic polymer, and which has good chemical and electrochemical stability, is described. This presents an attractive alternative to conventional salt-in-polymer electrolytes which are not cationic conductors.

  14. Electroosmosis in conducting nanofluidic channels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Cunlu

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Theoretical modeling of electroosmosis through conducting (ideally polarizable) nanochannels is reported. Based on the theory of induced charge electrokinetics, a novel nanofluidic system which possesses both adjustable ion selective characteristics and flexible flow control is proposed. Such nanofluidic devices operate only with very low gate control voltage applied on the conductive walls of nanochannels, and thus even can be energized by normal batteries. We believe that it is possible to use such metal-electrolyte configurations to overcome the difficulties met with conventional metal-isolator-electrolyte systems for nanofluidic applications.

  15. Electrically conductive rigid polyurethane foam

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Neet, T.E.; Spieker, D.A.

    1983-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A rigid, moldable polyurethane foam comprises about 2 to 10 weight percent, based on the total foam weight, of a carbon black which is CONDUCTEX CC-40-220 or CONDUCTEX SC, whereby the rigid polyurethane foam is electrically conductive and has essentially the same mechanical properties as the same foam without carbon black added.

  16. Conducting Your Own Energy Audit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phillips, J.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Why should you or anyone be interested in conducting a time intensive energy audit. What equipment is needed? When should you get started? Who should do it? The answer to Why is that energy costs are cutting into a company’s profit every minute...

  17. Electrically conductive rigid polyurethane foam

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Neet, Thomas E. (Grandview, MO); Spieker, David A. (Olathe, KS)

    1985-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A rigid, polyurethane foam comprises about 2-10 weight percent, based on the total foam weight, of a carbon black which is CONDUCTEX CC-40-220 or CONDUCTEX SC, whereby the rigid polyurethane foam is electrically conductive and has essentially the same mechanical properties as the same foam without carbon black added.

  18. Thin film ion conducting coating

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Goldner, Ronald B. (Lexington, MA); Haas, Terry (Sudbury, MA); Wong, Kwok-Keung (Watertown, MA); Seward, George (Arlington, MA)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Durable thin film ion conducting coatings are formed on a transparent glass substrate by the controlled deposition of the mixed oxides of lithium:tantalum or lithium:niobium. The coatings provide durable ion transport sources for thin film solid state storage batteries and electrochromic energy conservation devices.

  19. An algorithm for solving branching, multi-stage optimization systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burns, Jack Patton

    1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    August 1972 ABSTRACT An Algor1thm For Solv1ng Branching, Multistage Optimization Systems. (August, 1972) Jack Patton Burns, B. S. , University of Arizona; B. S. , Texas A&M Un1versity Directed by: Dr. Wilbur L. Meier In recent years, the concern... or continuous and the stage returns and transition functions can be linear or nonlinear. For cont1nuous systems, the algorithm uses a Fibonacc1 search routine. A cho1ce of three optional outputs 1s available depending on the information des1red by the user...

  20. Farmers Branch, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model,DOEHazelPennsylvania: EnergyExolisFairway, Kansas:Maine:FarinelloBranch, Texas:

  1. Hawaii Department of Health Clean Air Branch Webpage | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetec AG| OpenInformationHartsville,NewOpenInformation Clean Air Branch

  2. Conduction at a ferroelectric interface

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Marshall, Matthew S. J.; Malashevich, Andrei; Disa, Ankit S.; Han, Myung-Guen; Chen, Hanghui; Zhu, Yimei; Ismail-Beigi, Sohrab; Walker, Frederick J.; Ahn, Charles H.

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Typical logic elements utilizing the field effect rely on the change in carrier concentration due to the field in the channel region of the device. Ferroelectric-field-effect devices provide a nonvolatile version of this effect due to the stable polarization order parameter in the ferroelectric. In this work, we describe an oxide/ oxide ferroelectric heterostructure device based on (001)-oriented PbZr??.?Ti?.?O?-LaNiO? where the dominant change in conductivity is a result of a significant mobility change in the interfacial channel region. The effect is confined to a few atomic layers at the interface and is reversible by switching the ferroelectric polarization. More interestingly,more »in one polarization state, the field effect induces a 1.7-eV shift of the interfacial bands to create a new conducting channel in the interfacial PbO layer of the ferroelectric.« less

  3. Conduction at a ferroelectric interface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marshall, Matthew S. J. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Malashevich, Andrei [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Disa, Ankit S. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Han, Myung-Guen [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Chen, Hanghui [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Zhu, Yimei [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Ismail-Beigi, Sohrab [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Walker, Frederick J. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Ahn, Charles H. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States);

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Typical logic elements utilizing the field effect rely on the change in carrier concentration due to the field in the channel region of the device. Ferroelectric-field-effect devices provide a nonvolatile version of this effect due to the stable polarization order parameter in the ferroelectric. In this work, we describe an oxide/ oxide ferroelectric heterostructure device based on (001)-oriented PbZr??.?Ti?.?O?-LaNiO? where the dominant change in conductivity is a result of a significant mobility change in the interfacial channel region. The effect is confined to a few atomic layers at the interface and is reversible by switching the ferroelectric polarization. More interestingly, in one polarization state, the field effect induces a 1.7-eV shift of the interfacial bands to create a new conducting channel in the interfacial PbO layer of the ferroelectric.

  4. Electrically conductive polymer concrete coatings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fontana, J.J.; Elling, D.; Reams, W.

    1990-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A sprayable electrically conductive polymer concrete coating for vertical d overhead applications is described. The coating is permeable yet has low electrical resistivity (<10 ohm-cm), good bond strength to concrete substrates, and good weatherability. A preferred formulation contains about 60 wt % calcined coke breeze, 40 wt % vinyl ester with 3.5 wt % modified bentonite clay. Such formulations apply evenly and provide enough rigidity for vertical or overhead structures so there is no drip or sag.

  5. Electrically conductive polymer concrete coatings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fontana, Jack J. (Shirley, NY); Elling, David (Centereach, NY); Reams, Walter (Shirley, NY)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A sprayable electrically conductive polymer concrete coating for vertical d overhead applications is described. The coating is permeable yet has low electrical resistivity (<10 ohm-cm), good bond strength to concrete substrates, and good weatherability. A preferred formulation contains about 60 wt % calcined coke breeze, 40 wt % vinyl ester with 3.5 wt % modified bentonite clay. Such formulations apply evenly and provide enough rigidity for vertical or overhead structures so there is no drip or sag.

  6. Electrically conductive polymer concrete coatings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fontana, J.J.; Elling, D.; Reams, W.

    1988-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A sprayable electrically conductive polymer concrete coating for vertical and overhead applications is described. The coating is permeable yet has low electrical resistivity (<10 ohm-cm), good bond strength to concrete substrates, and good weatherability. A preferred formulation contains about 60 wt% calcined coke breeze, 40 wt% vinyl ester resin with 3.5 wt% modified bentonite clay. Such formulations apply evenly and provide enough rigidity for vertical or overhead structures so there is no drip or sag. 4 tabs.

  7. Advanced Branching Control and Characterization of Inorganic Semiconducting Nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hughes, Steven Michael

    2007-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The ability to finely tune the size and shape of inorganic semiconducting nanocrystals is an area of great interest, as the more control one has, the more applications will be possible for their use. The first two basic shapes develped in nanocrystals were the sphere and the anistropic nanorod. the II_VI materials being used such as Cadmium Selenide (CdSe) and Cadmium Telluride (CdTe), exhibit polytypism, which allows them to form in either the hexagonally packed wurtzite or cubically packed zinc blende crystalline phase. The nanorods are wurtzite with the length of the rod growing along the c-axis. As this grows, stacking faults may form, which are layers of zinc blende in the otherwise wurtzite crystal. Using this polytypism, though, the first generation of branched crystals were developed in the form of the CdTe tetrapod. This is a nanocrystal that nucleates in the zincblend form, creating a tetrahedral core, on which four wurtzite arms are grown. This structure opened up the possibility of even more complex shapes and applications. This disseration investigates the advancement of branching control and further understanding the materials polytypism in the form of the stacking faults in nanorods.

  8. Arcing fault in sub-distribution branch circuits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parise, G.; Grasseli, U.; Luozzo, V. Di (Univ. di Roma, Rome (Italy). Dept. di Ingegneria Elettrica)

    1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It's well known the importance of short-circuit current evaluation for the design of any power system. Every system is subject to faults, moreover short-circuits and ground faults can be expected in any point. Even if the maximum and minimum values are generally defined with reference at a bolted-fault, bolted short-circuits are rare and the fault usually involves arcing and burning; particularly the limit value of minimum short-circuit depends really on arcing-fault. In earlier experimental investigations into the functional simulation of insulation loss, in branch circuit conductors, the authors chose to normalize the arcing-fault simulation to be used in laboratory tests. This conventional simulation allows characterization of this intrinsically random phenomenon by means of a probabilistic approach, in order to define in statistical terms the expected short circuit value. The authors examine more closely the arcing-fault in the design of sub distribution branch-circuits as weak points of the installation. In fact, what they propose are straightforward criteria, whether in the structure of the system or in the coordination of protection, which afford a more rational control on arcing-fault.

  9. TERZAN 5: AN ALTERNATIVE INTERPRETATION FOR THE SPLIT HORIZONTAL BRANCH

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D'Antona, F.; Ventura, P.; Carini, R.; Di Criscienzo, M. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Roma, via Frascati 33, I-00040 Monteporzio (Italy); Caloi, V. [INAF-IASF-Roma, via Fosso del Cavaliere 100, I-00133 Roma (Italy); D'Ercole, A. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Bologna, via Ranzani 1, I-40127 Bologna (Italy); Vesperini, E. [Department of Physics, Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States)

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the horizontal branch (HB) of the globular cluster Terzan 5, recently shown to be split into two parts, the fainter one ({delta}M{sub K} {approx} 0.3 mag) having a lower metallicity than the more luminous. Both features show that it contains at least two stellar populations. The separation in magnitude has been ascribed to an age difference of {approx}6 Gyr and interpreted as the result of an atypical evolutionary history for this cluster. We show that the observed HB morphology is also consistent with a model in which the bright HB is composed of second generation stars that are metal enriched and with a helium mass fraction larger (by {delta}Y {approx} 0.07) than that of first generation stars populating the fainter part of the HB. Terzan 5 would therefore be anomalous, compared to most 'normal' clusters hosting multiple populations, only because its second generation is strongly contaminated by supernova ejecta; the previously proposed prolonged period of star formation, however, is not required. The iron enrichment of the bright HB can be ascribed either to contamination from Type Ia supernova ejecta of the low-iron, helium-rich, ejecta of the massive asymptotic giant branch stars of the cluster, or to its mixing with gas, accreting on the cluster from the environment, that has been subject to fast metal enrichment due to its proximity with the galactic bulge. The model proposed here requires only a small age difference of {approx}100 Myr.

  10. Hydraulic Conductivity Measurements Barrow 2014

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Katie McKnight; Tim Kneafsey; Craig Ulrich; Jil Geller

    Six individual ice cores were collected from Barrow Environmental Observatory in Barrow, Alaska, in May of 2013 as part of the Next Generation Ecosystem Experiment (NGEE). Each core was drilled from a different location at varying depths. A few days after drilling, the cores were stored in coolers packed with dry ice and flown to Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) in Berkeley, CA. 3-dimensional images of the cores were constructed using a medical X-ray computed tomography (CT) scanner at 120kV. Hydraulic conductivity samples were extracted from these cores at LBNL Richmond Field Station in Richmond, CA, in February 2014 by cutting 5 to 8 inch segments using a chop saw. Samples were packed individually and stored at freezing temperatures to minimize any changes in structure or loss of ice content prior to analysis. Hydraulic conductivity was determined through falling head tests using a permeameter [ELE International, Model #: K-770B]. After approximately 12 hours of thaw, initial falling head tests were performed. Two to four measurements were collected on each sample and collection stopped when the applied head load exceeded 25% change from the original load. Analyses were performed between 2 to 3 times for each sample. The final hydraulic conductivity calculations were computed using methodology of Das et al., 1985.

  11. Precise Application of Transparent Conductive Oxide Coatings...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Application of Transparent Conductive Oxide Coatings for Flat Panel Displays and Photovoltaic Cells Technology available for licensing: New transparent conducting oxide (TCO)...

  12. Water-soluble conductive polymers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Aldissi, M.

    1988-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Polymers which are soluble in water and are electrically conductive. The monomer repeat unit is a thiophene or pyrrole molecule having an alkyl group substituted for the hydrogen atom located in the beta position of the thiophene or pyrrole ring and having a surfactant molecule at the end of the alkyl chain. Polymers of this class having 8 or more carbon atoms in the alkyl chain exhibit liquid crystalline behavior, resulting in high electrical anisotropy. The monomer-to-monomer bonds are located between the carbon atoms which are adjacent to the sulfur or nitrogen atoms. The number of carbon atoms in the alkyl group may vary from 1 to 20 carbon atoms. The surfactant molecule consists of a sulfonate group, or a sulfate group, or a carboxylate group, and hydrogen or an alkali metal. Negative ions from a supporting electrolyte which may be used in the electrochemical synthesis of a polymer may be incorporated into the polymer during the synthesis and serve as a dopant to increase the conductivity.

  13. Water-soluble conductive polymers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Aldissi, Mahmoud (Sante Fe, NM)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Polymers which are soluble in water and are electrically conductive. The monomer repeat unit is a thiophene or pyrrole molecule having an alkyl group substituted for the hydrogen atom located in the beta position of the thiophene or pyrrole ring and having a surfactant molecule at the end of the alkyl chain. Polymers of this class having 8 or more carbon atoms in the alkyl chain exhibit liquid crystalline behavior, resulting in high electrical anisotropy. The monomer-to-monomer bonds are located between the carbon atoms which are adjacent to the sulfur or nitrogen atoms. The number of carbon atoms in the alkyl group may vary from 1 to 20 carbon atoms. The surfactant molecule consists of a sulfonate group, or a sulfate group, or a carboxylate group, and hydrogen or an alkali metal. Negative ions from a supporting electrolyte which may be used in the electrochemical synthesis of a polymer may be incorporated into the polymer during the synthesis and serve as a dopant to increase the conductivity.

  14. Advances in inherently conducting polymers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aldissi, M.

    1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The discovery of polyacetylene as the prototype material led to extensive research on its synythesis and characterization. The techniques that emerged as the most important and promising ones are those that dealt with molecular orientation and that resulted in conductivities almost as high as that of copper. The study of dozens of other materials followed. Interest in conducting polymers stems from their nonclassical optical and electronic properties as well as their potential technological applications. However, some of the factors currently limiting their use are the lack of long-term stability and the need to develop conventional low-cost techniques for easy processing. Therefore, research was extended toward solving these problems, and progress has been recently made in that direction. The synthesis of new materials such as stable and easily processable alkylthiophenes, water-soluble polymers, and multicomponent systems, including copolymers and composites, constitutes an important step forward in the area of synthetic metals. However, a full understanding of materials chemistry and properties requires more work in the years to come. Although, few small-scale applications have proven to be successful, long-term stability and applicability tests are needed before their commercial use becomes reality.

  15. Water-soluble conductive polymers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Aldissi, Mahmoud (Sante Fe, NM)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Polymers which are soluble in water and are electrically conductive. The monomer repeat unit is a thiophene or pyrrole molecule having an alkyl group substituted for the hydrogen atom located in the beta position of the thiophene or pyrrole ring and having a surfactant molecule at the end of the alkyl chain. Polymers of this class having 8 or more carbon atoms in the alkyl chain exhibit liquid crystalline behavior, resulting in high electrical anisotropy. The monomer-to-monomer bonds are located between the carbon atoms which are adjacent to the sulfur or nitrogen atoms. The number of carbon atoms in the alkyl group may vary from 1 to 20 carbon atoms. The surfactant molecule consists of a sulfonate group, or a sulfate group, or a carboxylate group, and hydrogen or an alkali metal. Negative ions from a supporting electrolyte which may be used in the electrochemical synthesis of a polymer may be incorporated into the polymer during the synthesis and serve as a dopant to increase the conductivity.

  16. Branching Restrictions, Financial Market Integration, and Firm Growth: Evidence from U.S. Banking Deregulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krishnamurthy, Prasad

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Calomiris, Charles, U.S. Banking Deregulation in HistoricalEvidence From Bank Branch Deregulation," Quarterly JournalStrahan, \\What Drives Deregulation: Economics and Politics

  17. A Branch and Price Approach to the k-Clustering Minimum Biclique ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

    aDipartimento di Matematica, Universit`a degli Studi di Pavia, Via Ferrata 1, 27100, ... work by developing a Branch and Price algorithm that embeds a new ...

  18. Electrodeposition of InSb branched nanowires: Controlled growth with structurally tailored properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Das, Suprem R.; Mohammad, Asaduzzaman; Janes, David B., E-mail: janes@ecn.purdue.edu [School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); Birck Nanotechnology Center, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); Akatay, Cem [School of Materials Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); Birck Nanotechnology Center, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); Khan, Mohammad Ryyan; Alam, Muhammad A. [School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); Maeda, Kosuke [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259 Nagatsuta–cho, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-8502 (Japan); Advanced Device Laboratory, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Deacon, Russell S.; Ishibashi, Koji [Advanced Device Laboratory, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); RIKEN Center for Emergent Matter Science (CEMS), 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Chen, Yong P. [School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); Birck Nanotechnology Center, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); Sands, Timothy D. [School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); School of Materials Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); Birck Nanotechnology Center, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States)

    2014-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

    In this article, electrodeposition method is used to demonstrate growth of InSb nanowire (NW) arrays with hierarchical branched structures and complex morphology at room temperature using an all-solution, catalyst-free technique. A gold coated, porous anodic alumina membrane provided the template for the branched NWs. The NWs have a hierarchical branched structure, with three nominal regions: a “trunk” (average diameter of 150?nm), large branches (average diameter of 100?nm), and small branches (average diameter of sub-10?nm to sub-20?nm). The structural properties of the branched NWs were studied using scanning transmission electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, and Raman spectroscopy. In the as-grown state, the small branches of InSb NWs were crystalline, but the trunk regions were mostly nanocrystalline with an amorphous boundary. Post-annealing of NWs at 420?°C in argon produced single crystalline structures along ?311? directions for the branches and along ?111? for the trunks. Based on the high crystallinity and tailored structure in this branched NW array, the effective refractive index allows us to achieve excellent antireflection properties signifying its technological usefulness for photon management and energy harvesting.

  19. Localization for Branching Random Walks in Random Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yueyun Hu; Nobuo Yoshida

    2007-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider branching random walks in $d$-dimensional integer lattice with time-space i.i.d. offspring distributions. This model is known to exhibit a phase transition: If $d \\ge 3$ and the environment is "not too random", then, the total population grows as fast as its expectation with strictly positive probability. If,on the other hand, $d \\le 2$, or the environment is ``random enough", then the total population grows strictly slower than its expectation almost surely. We show the equivalence between the slow population growth and a natural localization property in terms of "replica overlap". We also prove a certain stronger localization property, whenever the total population grows strictly slower than its expectation almost surely.

  20. Oscillating side-branch enhancements of thermoacoustic heat exchangers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Swift, Gregory W.

    2003-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A regenerator-based engine or refrigerator has a regenerator with two ends at two different temperatures, through which a gas oscillates at a first oscillating volumetric flow rate in the direction between the two ends and in which the pressure of the gas oscillates, and first and second heat exchangers, each of which is at one of the two different temperatures. A dead-end side branch into which the gas oscillates has compliance and is connected adjacent to one of the ends of the regenerator to form a second oscillating gas flow rate additive with the first oscillating volumetric flow rate, the compliance having a volume effective to provide a selected total oscillating gas volumetric flow rate through the first heat exchanger. This configuration enables the first heat exchanger to be configured and located to better enhance the performance of the heat exchanger rather than being confined to the location and configuration of the regenerator.

  1. Q-branch Raman scattering and modern kinetic thoery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Monchick, L. [The Johns Hopkins Univ., Laurel, MD (United States)

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The program is an extension of previous APL work whose general aim was to calculate line shapes of nearly resonant isolated line transitions with solutions of a popular quantum kinetic equation-the Waldmann-Snider equation-using well known advanced solution techniques developed for the classical Boltzmann equation. The advanced techniques explored have been a BGK type approximation, which is termed the Generalized Hess Method (GHM), and conversion of the collision operator to a block diagonal matrix of symmetric collision kernels which then can be approximated by discrete ordinate methods. The latter method, which is termed the Collision Kernel method (CC), is capable of the highest accuracy and has been used quite successfully for Q-branch Raman scattering. The GHM method, not quite as accurate, is applicable over a wider range of pressures and has proven quite useful.

  2. Pen Branch stream corridor and Delta Wetlands change assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blohm, J.D.

    1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Airborne multispectral scanner data from 1987 to 1991 covering the Pen Branch corridor and delta at SRS were utilized to provide a detailed change detection analysis. The multispectral data were geo-referenced to a Universal Transverse Mercator projection using finite element registration. Each year was then classified into eleven different landcover categories, and the yearly changes in each landcover category were analyzed. The decrease in operations of K Reactor in 1988 has resulted in drying of the corridor and delta. This has led to the decline of nonpersistent vegetation and the increase of persistent vegetation. Cattails, willow, and bottomland hardwoods, in particular, have grown to dominate the corridor and most of the delta.

  3. State of Alaska v. Lubchenco, et al. Case No. 3:10-CV-00271-TMB

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in the Defendants' First Status Report (Docket 158), the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) published a notice in the Federal Register of the intent to prepare an environmental impact statement (EIS) and the initiation background on the development of the EIS and scoping issues that have been identified. The public will have

  4. State of Alaska v. Lubchenco, et al. Case No. 3:10-CV-00271-TMB

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    as shown in Defendants First, Second, and Third Status Reports (Dockets 158, 160 & 163), the following the preliminary draft environmental impact statement (EIS) for North Pacific Fishery Management Council Case 3 Committee, and the Advisory Panel. In addition, the Council posted the preliminary draft EIS

  5. State of Alaska v. Lubchenco, et al. Case No. 3:10-CV-00271-TMB

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    with ¶¶ a, b, c, and d thereof, at 12. As noted in the Defendants' First Status Report (Docket 158 to prepare an environmental impact statement (EIS) and the initiation of the scoping process regarding Management Area (EIS). This meeting was held in coordination with the North Pacific Fishery Management

  6. State of Alaska v. Lubchenco, et al. Case No. 3:10-CV-00271-TMB

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Management Area Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) to the North Pacific Fishery Management Council (Council). NMFS revised the preliminary draft EIS to address the comments from the Council to the extent possible, and released a draft EIS for public review and comment. The Notice of Availability of the draft EIS

  7. Results of the quarterly tritium survey of Fourmile Branch and its seeplines in the F- and H-Areas of SRS: September 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dixon, K.L.; Rogers, V.A.; Looney, B.B.

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Environmental Sciences Section (ESS) established a quarterly monitoring program of the Fourmile Branch (FMB) seepline down gradient from the F- and H-Area seepage basins. The program surveys and tracks changes in tritium, specific conductivity, and pH for the seepline water. Measurements from the sixth quarterly survey (September 1993) showed higher tritium and conductivity measurements and higher pH values (pH 5 - 6) than measurements from previous studies. Increased tritium concentrations and conductivity values, as compared to previous surveys, were attributed to decreased rainfall prior to the sampling event However, overall results of the tritium survey and stream monitoring data (Looney et al., 1993) suggest that the tritium plume is flushing from the FMB system.

  8. Addresses and business hours of Rabobank Eindhoven-Veldhoven Branch Witte Dame (Emmasingel 4), Eindhoven

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Franssen, Michael

    Addresses and business hours of Rabobank Eindhoven-Veldhoven Branch Witte Dame (Emmasingel 4), Eindhoven Monday: 12.00 ­ 17.00 hrs Tuesday till Thursday: 09.30 ­ 17.00 hrs Friday: 09.30 ­ 18.00 hrs Saturday 10.00 ­ 13.00 hrs Branch Winkelcentrum Woensel 400, Eindhoven Monday: 12.00 ­ 17.00 hrs Tuesday

  9. Predicting Extinction or Explosion in a Galton-Watson Branching Process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of

    sizes of an endangered species whose survival is deemed essential. Case 2. Extinction is undesirablePredicting Extinction or Explosion in a Galton-Watson Branching Process Peter Guttorp and Michael D generations of a discrete- parameter Galton-Watson branching process, one wishes to predict whether extinction

  10. Div ision of T echnology, Industry & Economics Energy Branch Deploying renewable energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Canet, Léonie

    Div ision of T echnology, Industry & Economics Energy Branch Deploying renewable energy, Industry & Economics Energy Branch 1. Policy landscape 2. Helping transition to Renewable Energy 3 governments are promoting renewable energy. Renewable energy ­ Policy Landscape #12;Div ision of T echnology

  11. Recovery of Free Energy Branches in Single Molecule Experiments Ivan Junier,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ritort, Felix

    Recovery of Free Energy Branches in Single Molecule Experiments Ivan Junier,1 Alessandro Mossa,2 19 February 2009) We present a method for determining the free energy of coexisting states from use optical tweezers to determine the free energy branches of the native and unfolded states of a two

  12. A Branch and Bound Algorithm for the Protein Folding Problem in the HP Lattice Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Istrail, Sorin

    Article A Branch and Bound Algorithm for the Protein Folding Problem in the HP Lattice Model Mao tool for the protein folding problem. Key words: protein folding, HP model, branch and bound, lattice Introduction The protein folding problem, or the protein struc- ture prediction problem, is one of the most

  13. Eciency of the Incomplete Enumeration algorithm for Monte-Carlo simulation of linear and branched polymers.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dhar, Deepak

    polymers. Sumedha #3; and Deepak Dhar y Department Of Theoretical Physics Tata Institute Of Fundamental algorithm for linear and branched polymers. There is a qualitative di#11;erence in the eÆciency in these two for linear polymers, but as exp(cn #11; ) for branched (undirected and directed) polymers, where 0

  14. Applying Decay Strategies to Branch Predictors for Leakage Energy Savings Zhigang Hu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martonosi, Margaret

    Applying Decay Strategies to Branch Predictors for Leakage Energy Savings Zhigang HuÝ Philo Juang@cs.virginia.edu doug@cs.princeton.edu Abstract With technology advancing toward deep submicron, leak- age energy--already shown to reduce leakage energy for caches--to branch-prediction structures. Due to the structural

  15. M. Shepherd et al.Branch architecture QTL for pine hybrids Original article

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    M. Shepherd et al.Branch architecture QTL for pine hybrids Original article Branch architecture QTL Crossa , Mark J. Dietersb and Robert Henrya a Cooperative Research Centre for Sustainable Production, Australia b Cooperative Research Centre for Sustainable Production Forestry, Queensland Forestry Research

  16. A NEW VALUE BASED BRANCH PREDICTOR FOR SMT PROCESSORS LIQIANG HE and ZHIYONG LIU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vintan, Lucian N.

    A NEW VALUE BASED BRANCH PREDICTOR FOR SMT PROCESSORS LIQIANG HE and ZHIYONG LIU Institute@ict.ac.cn and zliu@nsfc.gov.cn ABSTRACT Simultaneous Multithreaded (SMT) processors improve the instruction important role in improving the performance of an SMT processor. Although the existing branch predictors

  17. Process Switches and Branch Prediction Accuracy David Chen, Bennett Lau, Jeffrey Shafer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rixner, Scott

    Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering Rice University Abstract There were several hypotheses to "repair" the destructive aliasing in the branch history table after a process switch, both combine by [9], is central to this research project. Analogous to memory caches, aliasing in branch prediction

  18. Fluid transport in branched structures with temporary closures: A model for quasistatic lung inflation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alencar, Adriano Mesquita

    Fluid transport in branched structures with temporary closures: A model for quasistatic lung a model system relevant to the inflation of a mammalian lung, an asymmetric bifurcating structure description of the underlying branching structure of the lung, by analyzing experimental pressure-volume data

  19. Sox9 plays multiple roles in the lung epithelium during branching morphogenesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sander, Maike

    Sox9 plays multiple roles in the lung epithelium during branching morphogenesis Briana E. Rockicha, Durham, NC, and approved October 2, 2013 (received for review June 21, 2013) Lung branching morphogenesis lung. Intricate regulation of signaling pathways, tran- scription factors, and epithelial

  20. Defining the Termination of the Asymptotic Giant Branch

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Noam Soker

    2007-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

    I suggest a theoretical quantitative definition for the termination of the asymptotic giant branch (AGB) phase and the beginning of the post-AGB phase. I suggest that the transition will be taken to occur when the ratio of the dynamical time scale to the the envelope thermal time scale, Q, reaches its maximum value. Time average values are used for the different quantities, as the criterion does not refer to the short time-scale variations occurring on the AGB and post-AGB, e.g., thermal pulses (helium shell flashes) and magnetic activity. Along the entire AGB the value of Q increases, even when the star starts to contract. Only when a rapid contraction starts does the value of Q start to decrease. This criterion captures the essence of the transition from the AGB to the post AGB phase, because Q is connected to the stellar effective temperature, reaching its maximum value at T~4000-6000 K, it is related to the mass loss properties, and it reaches its maximum value when rapid contraction starts and envelope mass is very low.

  1. Electronically conductive polymer composites and microstructures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Dyke, L.S.

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Composites of electronically conductive polymers with insulating host materials are investigated. A template synthesis method was developed for the production of electronically conductive polymer microstructures. In template synthesis the pores of a porous host membrane act as templates for the polymerization of a conductive polymer. The template synthetic method can be used to form either solid microfibrils or hollow microtubules. The electrochemical properties of conductive polymers produced via the template synthesis method are superior to those of conventionally synthesized conductive polymers. Electronically conductive polymers are used to impart conductivity to non-conductive materials. Two different approaches are used. First, thin film composites of conductive polymers with fluoropolymers are made by the polymerization of conductive polymers onto fluoropolymer films. Modification of the fluoropolymer surface prior to conductive polymer polymerization is necessary to obtain good adhesion between the two materials. The difference in adhesion of the conductive polymer to the modified and unmodified fluoropolymer surfaces can be used to pattern the conductive polymer coating. Patterning of the conductive polymer coating can alternatively be done via UV laser ablation of the conductive polymer. The second method by which conductive polymers were used to impart conductivity to an insulating polymer was via the formation of a graft copolymer. In this approach, heterocyclic monomers grafted to an insulating polyphosphazene backbone were polymerized to yield semiconductive materials. Finally the measurement of electrolyte concentration in polypyrrole and the effects of hydroxide anion on the electrochemical and electrical properties of polypyrrole are described. It is shown that treatment of polypyrrole with hydroxide anion increases the potential window over which polypyrrole is a good electronic conductor.

  2. CONDUCTIVE POLYCARBONATE NANOCOMPOSITES with HYBRID NANOFILLERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, Gary S.

    CONDUCTIVE POLYCARBONATE NANOCOMPOSITES with HYBRID NANOFILLERS Catherine Smith, Brooks Lively, Wei of polymers. Emerging technologies have demonstrated the crucial need for highly conductive polymer combination between polycarbonate (PC) and hybrid concentrations of CNT and GNP nanofillers was investigated

  3. Distribution and origin of ethyl-branched alkanes in a Cenomanian transgressive shale of the Western Interior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kenig, Fabien

    Note Distribution and origin of ethyl-branched alkanes in a Cenomanian transgressive shale hydrocarbon fraction of the basal Graneros Shale (Cenomanian, Western Interior Seaway, USA). On the basis rights reserved. Keywords: Monoethylalkanes; Branched alkanes; Black shales; Cenomanian; Graneros Shale

  4. Organic conductive films for semiconductor electrodes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Frank, A.J.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    According to the present invention, improved electrodes overcoated with conductive polymer films and preselected catalysts are provided. The electrodes typically comprise an inorganic semiconductor over-coated with a charge conductive polymer film comprising a charge conductive polymer in or on which is a catalyst or charge-relaying agent.

  5. Ecological effects of contaminants in McCoy Branch, 1989-1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ryon, M.G. [ed.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 1984 Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) required assessment of all current and former solid waste management units. Such a RCRA Facility Investigation (RFI) was required of the Y-12 Plant for their Filled Coal Ash Pond on McCoy Branch. Because the disposal of coal ash in the ash pond, McCoy Branch, and Rogers Quarry was not consistent with the Tennessee Water Quality Act, several remediation steps were implemented or planned for McCoy Branch to address disposal problems. The McCoy Branch RFI plan included provisions for biological monitoring of the McCoy Branch watershed. The objectives of the biological monitoring were to: (1) document changes in biological quality of McCoy Branch after completion of a pipeline and after termination of all discharges to Rogers Quarry, (2) provide guidance on the need for additional remediation, and (3) evaluate the effectiveness of implemented remedial actions. The data from the biological monitoring program will also determine if the classified uses, as identified by the State of Tennessee, of McCoy Branch are being protected and maintained. This report discusses results from toxicity monitoring of snails fish community assessment, and a Benthic macroinvertebrate community assessment.

  6. Proposal for the award of a contract for the provision of maintenance services for CERN's telephone branch exchange

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Proposal for the award of a contract for the provision of maintenance services for CERN's telephone branch exchange

  7. Chemoembolization Via Branches from the Splenic Artery in Patients with Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choi, Jin Woo; Kim, Hyo-Cheol, E-mail: angiointervention@gmail.com; Chung, Jin Wook; Kim, Ji Dae; Kim, Gyoung Min; Lee, In Joon; Jae, Hwan Jun; Park, Jae Hyung [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: This study was designed to evaluate the radiologic findings and imaging response of chemoembolization via branches of the splenic artery in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Methods: From January 2001 to July 2010, we observed tumor staining supplied by branches of the splenic artery in 34 (0.6%) of 5,413 patients with HCC. Computed tomography (CT) scans and digital subtraction angiograms of these patients were retrospectively reviewed in consensus by two investigators. Results: A total of 39 tumor feeding-vessels in 34 patients were identified: omental branches from the left gastroepiploic artery (n = 5), branches from the short gastric artery (n = 9), and omental branches directly from the splenic artery (n = 25). Branches of the splenic artery that supplied tumors were revealed on the celiac angiogram in 29 (85%) of 34 patients and were detected on pre-procedure CT images in 27 (79%) of 34 patients. Selective chemoembolization was achieved in 38 of 39 tumor-feeding vessels. Complete or partial response of the tumor fed by branches of the splenic artery, as depicted on follow-up CT scans, was achieved in 21 (62%) patients. No patient developed severe complications directly related to chemoembolization via branches of the splenic artery. Conclusions: Omental branches directly from the splenic artery are common tumor-feeding vessels of the splenic artery in cases of advanced HCC with multiple previous chemoembolizations. Tumor-feeding vessels of the splenic artery are usually visualized on the celiac angiogram or CT scan, and chemoembolization through them can be safely performed in most patients.

  8. Molecular Design of Branched and Binary Molecules at Ordered Interfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirsten Larson Genson

    2005-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

    This study examined five different branched molecular architectures to discern the effect of design on the ability of molecules to form ordered structures at interfaces. Photochromic monodendrons formed kinked packing structures at the air-water interface due to the cross-sectional area mismatch created by varying number of alkyl tails and the hydrophilic polar head group. The lower generations formed orthorhombic unit cell with long range ordering despite the alkyl tails tilted to a large degree. Favorable interactions between liquid crystalline terminal groups and the underlying substrate were observed to compel a flexible carbosilane dendrimer core to form a compressed elliptical conformation which packed stagger within lamellae domains with limited short range ordering. A twelve arm binary star polymer was observed to form two dimensional micelles at the air-water interface attributed to the higher polystyrene block composition. Linear rod-coil molecules formed a multitude of packing structures at the air-water interface due to the varying composition. Tree-like rod-coil molecules demonstrated the ability to form one-dimensional structures at the air-water interface and at the air-solvent interface caused by the preferential ordering of the rigid rod cores. The role of molecular architecture and composition was examined and the influence chemically competing fragments was shown to exert on the packing structure. The amphiphilic balance of the different molecular series exhibited control on the ordering behavior at the air-water interface and within bulk structures. The shell nature and tail type was determined to dictate the preferential ordering structure and molecular reorganization at interfaces with the core nature effect secondary.

  9. Thermal conductivity of sputtered amorphous Ge films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhan, Tianzhuo; Xu, Yibin; Goto, Masahiro; Tanaka, Yoshihisa; Kato, Ryozo; Sasaki, Michiko; Kagawa, Yutaka [National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba 305-0047 (Japan)] [National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba 305-0047 (Japan)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We measured the thermal conductivity of amorphous Ge films prepared by magnetron sputtering. The thermal conductivity was significantly higher than the value predicted by the minimum thermal conductivity model and increased with deposition temperature. We found that variations in sound velocity and Ge film density were not the main factors in the high thermal conductivity. Fast Fourier transform patterns of transmission electron micrographs revealed that short-range order in the Ge films was responsible for their high thermal conductivity. The results provide experimental evidences to understand the underlying nature of the variation of phonon mean free path in amorphous solids.

  10. Disappearance of criticality in a branched-chain thermal explosion with heat loss

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Okoya, S.S. [Department of Mathematics, Obafemi Awolowo University, Ile-Ife, 220005 (Nigeria)

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Branched-chain thermal explosions involving simplified initiation, branching, and termination of chains, as well as heat exchange with the surroundings, are considered, but it is assumed that consumption of fuel is negligible for combustion in a mixture of H{sub 2}+O{sub 2} that covers nth Arrhenius kinetics for the chain-branching step. In particular, the effect of heat loss on the problem is considered, Mostly analytical investigations of the simplified model are presented using standard Semenov's techniques. The analytical method provides expressions for criticality and the transition points. Also, the different qualitative effects of varying the dimensionless parameters are investigated.

  11. A Break-Even Formulation for Evaluating Branch Predictor Energy Michele Co, Dee A.B. Weikle, and Kevin Skadron

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Co, Michele

    demonstrated that a better branch pre- dictor can increase the energy-efficiency of the system, even if the new a simple, effective metric for eval- uating the tradeoff between processor energy-efficiency and branch and an energy-efficiency target, we are able to evaluate the energy-efficiency of several existing branch

  12. A Framework to Model Branch Prediction for Worst Case Execution Time Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roychoudhury, Abhik

    execution history. This allows the program execution to proceed by speculating the control flow. Branch with an external environment in a timely fashion. Many embedded systems are safety critical, e.g., automobiles

  13. A branch and bound algorithm for the global optimization of Hessian ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Nov 1, 2011 ... Heuristic Algorithm 2.1 (LH) 5s. 485s. 2×10?2† 1×10?1†. Table 3: Run times of the different convex constrained branch and bound algorithms ...

  14. Measurement of the inclusive semileptonic branching fraction B(B?s?X-l+?l) at Belle

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Oswald, C.; Urquijo, P.; Dingfelder, J.; Adachi, I.; Aihara, H.; Arinstein, K.; Asner, D. M.; Aushev, T.; Bakich, A. M.; Belous, K.; et al

    2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report a measurement of the inclusive semileptonic B0s branching fraction in a 121 fb?¹ data sample collected near the ?(5S) resonance with the Belle detector at the KEKB asymmetric energy e?e? collider. Events containing B?(*)sB¯¯¯?(*)s pairs are selected by reconstructing a tag side D?s and identifying a signal side lepton l? (l=e, ?) that is required to have the same-sign charge to ensure that both originate from different B?s mesons. The B?s?X?l??l branching fraction is extracted from the ratio of the measured yields of D?s mesons and D?sl? pairs and the known production and branching fractions. The inclusive semileptonicmore »branching fraction is measured to be [10.6±0.5(stat)±0.7(syst)]%.« less

  15. Branched peptide amphiphiles, related epitope compounds and self assembled structures thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stupp, Samuel I. (Chicago, IL); Guler, Mustafa O. (Evanston, IL)

    2008-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Branched peptide amphiphilic compounds incorporating one or residues providing a pendant amino group for coupling one or more epitope sequences thereto, such compounds and related compositions for enhanced epitope presentation.

  16. Epicormic branching on Central Appalachian hardwoods 10 years after deferment cutting. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, G.W.

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Epicormic branching as monitored over a 10-year period following deferment cutting in four central Appalachian hardwood stands in West Virginia. Data from 545 codominant residual trees indicated that the average number of epicormic branches on the butt and second 16-food log sections increased significantly for the first 2 years after treatment. For upper log sections of basswood, northern red oak, and black cherry, significant increases continued from the second to the tenth year. The net effect on quality was that 11 percent of residual trees exhibited a reduction in butt-log grade due to epicormic branching. Of the few grade reductions observed, white oak, northern red oak, and black cherry were the most susceptible. Less than 1 percent of yellow-poplar trees had lower grades due to epicormic branching.

  17. Branch-and-Cut for Linear Programs with Overlapping SOS1 ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tobias Fischer and Marc E. Pfetsch

    2015-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Apr 1, 2015 ... also investigate ways to strengthen the resulting subproblems by adding .... the left and the right branching node are not necessarily disjoint, ...... A multi-hop wireless network consists of a set N of transmission nodes that may.

  18. Determination of the deuterium-tritium branching ratio based on inertial confinement fusion implosions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosenberg, Michael Jonathan

    The deuterium-tritium (D-T) ?-to-neutron branching ratio [[superscript 3]H(d,?)[superscript 5]He/[superscript 3]H(d,n)[superscript 4]He] was determined under inertial confinement fusion (ICF) conditions, where the ...

  19. Glucagon-Induced Vasospasm of Hepatic Artery Branches During Visceral Angiography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dziedzic, T. Scott; Smith, Tony P., E-mail: smith146@mc.duke.ed [Duke University Medical Center, Department of Radiology (United States)

    2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Glucagon is often used in radiology to decrease bowel motility for enhanced imaging, including visceral digital subtraction angiography. We present a case in which branch hepatic artery vasospasm followed the intravenous administration of glucagon during visceral angiography.

  20. Measurement of the inclusive semileptonic branching fraction B(Bs0?X-?+??) at Belle

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Oswald, C.; Urquijo, P.; Dingfelder, J.; Adachi, I.; Aihara, H.; Arinstein, K.; Asner, D. M.; Aushev, T.; Bakich, A. M.; Belous, K.; Bhardwaj, V.; Bhuyan, B.; Bondar, A.; Bonvicini, G.; Bozek, A.; Bra?ko, M.; Browder, T. E.; Chang, P.; Chekelian, V.; Chen, A.; Chen, P.; Cheon, B. G.; Chilikin, K.; Chistov, R.; Cho, K.; Chobanova, V.; Choi, S.-K.; Choi, Y.; Cinabro, D.; Dalseno, J.; Doležal, Z.; Drásal, Z.; Drutskoy, A.; Dutta, D.; Eidelman, S.; Esen, S.; Farhat, H.; Fast, J. E.; Gaur, V.; Gabyshev, N.; Ganguly, S.; Gillard, R.; Goh, Y. M.; Golob, B.; Haba, J.; Hayasaka, K.; Hayashii, H.; Horii, Y.; Hoshi, Y.; Hou, W.-S.; Hyun, H. J.; Iijima, T.; Ishikawa, A.; Itoh, R.; Iwasaki, Y.; Kah, D. H.; Kang, J. H.; Kato, E.; Kawasaki, T.; Kiesling, C.; Kim, H. J.; Kim, H. O.; Kim, J. B.; Kim, K. T.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, Y. J.; Kinoshita, K.; Klucar, J.; Ko, B. R.; Korpar, S.; Kouzes, R. T.; Križan, P.; Krokovny, P.; Kronenbitter, B.; Kuhr, T.; Kumita, T.; Kwon, Y.-J.; Lee, S.-H.; Li, J.; Li, Y.; Libby, J.; Liu, C.; Liu, Y.; Liu, Z. Q.; Liventsev, D.; Louvot, R.; Lutz, O.; Matvienko, D.; Miyabayashi, K.; Miyata, H.; Mizuk, R.; Mohanty, G. B.; Moll, A.; Muramatsu, N.; Nagasaka, Y.; Nakano, E.; Nakao, M.; Nedelkovska, E.; Nisar, N. K.; Nishida, S.; Nitoh, O.; Nozaki, T.; Ogawa, S.; Ohshima, T.; Okuno, S.; Olsen, S. L.; Ostrowicz, W.; Pakhlov, P.; Pakhlova, G.; Park, H.; Park, H. K.; Pedlar, T. K.; Pestotnik, R.; Petri?, M.; Piilonen, L. E.; Prim, M.; Prothmann, K.; Ritter, M.; Röhrken, M.; Rozanska, M.; Ryu, S.; Sahoo, H.; Saito, T.; Sakai, Y.; Sandilya, S.; Santelj, L.; Sanuki, T.; Sato, Y.; Schneider, O.; Schnell, G.; Schwanda, C.; Schwartz, A. J.; Senyo, K.; Seon, O.; Sevior, M. E.; Shapkin, M.; Shen, C. P.; Shibata, T.-A.; Shiu, J.-G.; Shwartz, B.; Sibidanov, A.; Simon, F.; Smerkol, P.; Sohn, Y.-S.; Sokolov, A.; Solovieva, E.; Stari?, M.; Sumiyoshi, T.; Tatishvili, G.; Teramoto, Y.; Trabelsi, K.; Tsuboyama, T.; Uchida, M.; Uehara, S.; Uglov, T.; Unno, Y.; Uno, S.; Van Hulse, C.; Vanhoefer, P.; Varner, G.; Varvell, K. E.; Wang, C. H.; Wang, M.-Z.; Wang, P.; Watanabe, M.; Watanabe, Y.; Williams, K. M.; Won, E.; Yamamoto, H.; Yamashita, Y.; Zhang, C. C.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhilich, V.; Zupanc, A.

    2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report a measurement of the inclusive semileptonic B0s branching fraction in a 121 fb?¹ data sample collected near the ?(5S) resonance with the Belle detector at the KEKB asymmetric energy e?e? collider. Events containing B?(*)sB¯¯¯?(*)s pairs are selected by reconstructing a tag side D?s and identifying a signal side lepton ?? (?=e, ?) that is required to have the same-sign charge to ensure that both originate from different B?s mesons. The B?s?X????? branching fraction is extracted from the ratio of the measured yields of D?s mesons and D?s?? pairs and the known production and branching fractions. The inclusive semileptonic branching fraction is measured to be [10.6±0.5(stat)±0.7(syst)]%.

  1. Blood Flow At Arterial Branches: Complexities To Resolve For The Angioplasty Suite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laidlaw, David

    in the 1970s [1, 2] led to a large increase of interest in the possible role of fluid dynamics Tubes Branched tubes were fabricated by machining - drilling, reaming, and chloroform- polishing - of 3

  2. Holographic conductivity of zero temperature superconductors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. A. Konoplya; A. Zhidenko

    2010-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Using the recently found by G. Horowitz and M. Roberts (arXiv:0908.3677) numerical model of the ground state of holographic superconductors (at zero temperature), we calculate the conductivity for such models. The universal relation connecting conductivity with the reflection coefficient was used for finding the conductivity by the WKB approach. The dependence of the conductivity on the frequency and charge density is discussed. Numerical calculations confirm the general arguments of (arXiv:0908.3677) in favor of non-zero conductivity even at zero temperature. In addition to the Horowitz-Roberts solution we have found (probably infinite) set of extra solutions which are normalizable and reach the same correct RN-AdS asymptotic at spatial infinity. These extra solutions (which correspond to larger values of the grand canonical potential) lead to effective potentials that also vanish at the horizon and thus correspond to a non-zero conductivity at zero temperature.

  3. Thermal conductivity and heat transfer in superlattices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, G.; Neagu, M.; Borca-Tasciuc, T.

    1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Understanding the thermal conductivity and heat transfer processes in superlattice structures is critical for the development of thermoelectric materials and devices based on quantum structures. This work reports progress on the modeling of thermal conductivity of superlattice structures. Results from the models established based on the Boltzmann transport equation could explain existing experimental results on the thermal conductivity of semiconductor superlattices in both in plane and cross-plane directions. These results suggest the possibility of engineering the interfaces to further reduce thermal conductivity of superlattice structures.

  4. Sandia National Laboratories: electronic conducting transition...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    electronic conducting transition metal oxides Joint Hire Increases Materials Science Collaboration for Sandia, UNM On September 16, 2014, in Advanced Materials Laboratory,...

  5. Conducting polymer actuator enhancement through microstructuring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pillai, Priam Vasudevan

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electroactive conducting polymers, such as polypyrrole, polyaniline, and polythiophenes are currently studied as novel biologically inspired actuators. The actuation mechanisms in these materials are based on the diffusion ...

  6. Fabrication and characterization of conducting polymer microwires

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saez, Miguel Angel

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Flexible microwires fabricated from conducting polymers have a wide range of potential applications, including smart textiles that incorporate sensing, actuation, and data processing. The development of garments that ...

  7. Low temperature proton conducting oxide devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Armstrong, Timothy R. (Clinton, TN); Payzant, Edward A. (Oak Ridge, TN); Speakman, Scott A. (Oak Ridge, TN); Greenblatt, Martha (Highland Park, NJ)

    2008-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A device for conducting protons at a temperature below 550.degree. C. includes a LAMOX ceramic body characterized by an alpha crystalline structure.

  8. Conducting polymer nanostructures for biological applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berdichevsky, Yevgeny

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Electronically Conductive Polymer Nanostructures,” Acc.et al. , “Conjugated-Polymer Micro- and Milliactuators for3. Y. Berdichevsky, Y. -H. Lo, “Polymer Microvalve Based on

  9. Industrial Energy Audit Guidebook: Guidelines for Conducting...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Industry Resource Type: Guidemanual Website: china.lbl.govsiteschina.lbl.govfilesLBNL-3991E.Industrial%20Energy Industrial Energy Audit Guidebook: Guidelines for Conducting...

  10. EPA -- Addressing Children's Health through Reviews Conducted...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Addressing Children's Health through Reviews Conducted Pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act and Section 309 of the Clean Air Act EPA -- Addressing Children's Health...

  11. Operational restoration of the Pen Branch bottomland hardwood and swamp wetlands - the research setting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, E.A.

    2000-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The Savannah River Swamp is a 3020 Ha forested wetland on the floodplain of the Savannah River and is located on the Department of Energy's Savannah River Site (SRS) near Aiken, SC. Historically the swamp consisted of approximately 50 percent bald cypress-water tupelo stands, 40 percent mixed bottomland hardwood stands, and 10 percent shrub, marsh, and open water. Creek corridors were typical of Southeastern bottomland hardwood forests. The hydrology was controlled by flooding of the Savannah River and by flow from four creeks that drain into the swamp prior to flow into the Savannah River. Upstream dams have caused some alteration of the water levels and timing of flooding within the floodplain. Major impacts to the swamp hydrology occurred with the completion of the production reactors and one coal-fired powerhouse at the SRS in the early 1950's. Water was pumped from the Savannah River, through secondary heat exchangers of the reactors, and discharged into three of the tributary streams that flow into the swamp. Flow in one of the tributaries, Pen Branch, was typically 0.3 m3 s-1 (10-20) cfs prior to reactor pumping and 11.0 m3 s-1 (400 cfs) during pumping. This continued from 1954 to 1988 at various levels. The sustained increases in water volume resulted in overflow of the original stream banks and the creation of additional floodplains. Accompanying this was considerable erosion of the original stream corridor and deposition of a deep silt layer on the newly formed delta. Heated water was discharged directly into Pen Branch and water temperature in the stream often exceeded 65 degrees C. The nearly continuous flooding of the swamp, the thermal load of the water, and the heavy silting resulted in complete mortality of the original vegetation in large areas of the floodplain. In the years since pumping was reduced, early succession has begun in some affected areas. Most of this has been herbs, grasses, and shrubs. Areas that have seedlings are generally willow thickets that support a lower diversity of wildlife. No volunteer seedlings of heavy-seeded hardwoods or cypress have been found in the corridor areas. Research was conducted to determine methods to reintroduce tree species characteristic of more mature forested wetlands. Three restoration strategies were formulated to deal with the differing conditions of the Upper Corridor, the Lower Corridor, and the Delta regions of the impacted area. Site preparation and planting of each area with mixtures of tree species were carried out to speed the restoration of the ecosystem. Species composition and selection were altered based on the current and expected hydrological regimes that the reforestation areas will be experiencing. Because of the operational design of the restoration project, a research program naturally followed to document the success. Many of those efforts are detailed here.

  12. Proton conducting membrane for fuel cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Colombo, Daniel G.; Krumpelt, Michael; Myers, Deborah J.; Kopasz, John P.

    2005-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    An ion conducting membrane comprising dendrimeric polymers covalently linked into a network structure. The dendrimeric polymers have acid functional terminal groups and may be covalently linked via linking compounds, cross-coupling reactions, or copolymerization reactions. The ion conducting membranes may be produced by various methods and used in fuel cells.

  13. Proton conducting membrane for fuel cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Colombo, Daniel G.; Krumpelt, Michael; Myers, Deborah J.; Kopasz, John P.

    2007-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

    An ion conducting membrane comprising dendrimeric polymers covalently linked into a network structure. The dendrimeric polymers have acid functional terminal groups and may be covalently linked via linking compounds, cross-coupling reactions, or copolymerization reactions. The ion conducting membranes may be produced by various methods and used in fuel cells.

  14. Flexible moldable conductive current-limiting materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shea, John Joseph (Pittsburgh, PA); Djordjevic, Miomir B. (Milwaukee, WI); Hanna, William Kingston (Pittsburgh, PA)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A current limiting PTC device (10) has two electrodes (14) with a thin film of electric conducting polymer material (20) disposed between the electrodes, the polymer material (20) having superior flexibility and short circuit performance, where the polymer material contains short chain aliphatic diepoxide, conductive filler particles, curing agent, and, preferably, a minor amount of bisphenol A epoxy resin.

  15. NUMBER: 1530 TITLE: Code of Student Conduct

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . For the purposes of this Code, the term "University Official" is inclusive of "Faculty Member" as defined in IV 1530 1 NUMBER: 1530 TITLE: Code of Student Conduct APPROVED: August 27, 1970; Revised June 14, 2012 I. BASIS AND RATIONALE FOR A CODE OF STUDENT CONDUCT Old Dominion University

  16. Selected factors influencing GCL hydraulic conductivity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petrov, R.J. [Trow Consulting Engineers Ltd., Brampton, Ontario (Canada); Rowe, R.K.; Quigley, R.M. [Univ. of Western Ontario, London, Ontario (Canada)

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A series of confined swell and hydraulic conductivity tests were conducted on a needle-punched geosynthetic clay liner (GCL) with water as the hydrating medium and reference permeant. Increases in the static confining stress and the needle-punching both restricted GCL swell and contributed to lower bulk GCL void ratios and hence significantly lower hydraulic conductivity values. A well defined linear-log relationship is found between the bulk void ratio and hydraulic conductivity. The number of pore volumes of permeant flow and consequently the level of chemical equilibrium is shown to have a significant effect on the hydraulic conductivity. It is shown that there is a decrease in hydraulic conductivity for small amounts of permeant flow for all ethanol/water mixtures examined. At or near chemical equilibrium, low concentration mixtures (25 and 50% ethanol) continued to produce relative decreases in GCL hydraulic conductivity due to the increased viscosity of the permeant; however, highly concentrated mixtures (75 and 100% ethanol) produced relative increases in GCL hydraulic conductivity arising from double layer contraction. The implications are discussed.

  17. An Innovative High Thermal Conductivity Fuel Design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jamil A. Khan

    2009-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermal conductivity of the fuel in today's Light Water Reactors, Uranium dioxide, can be improved by incorporating a uniformly distributed heat conducting network of a higher conductivity material, Silicon Carbide. The higher thermal conductivity of SiC along with its other prominent reactor-grade properties makes it a potential material to address some of the related issues when used in UO2 [97% TD]. This ongoing research, in collaboration with the University of Florida, aims to investigate the feasibility and develop a formal methodology of producing the resultant composite oxide fuel. Calculations of effective thermal conductivity of the new fuel as a function of %SiC for certain percentages and as a function of temperature are presented as a preliminary approach. The effective thermal conductivities are obtained at different temperatures from 600K to 1600K. The corresponding polynomial equations for the temperature-dependent thermal conductivities are given based on the simulation results. Heat transfer mechanism in this fuel is explained using a finite volume approach and validated against existing empirical models. FLUENT 6.1.22 was used for thermal conductivity calculations and to estimate reduction in centerline temperatures achievable within such a fuel rod. Later, computer codes COMBINE-PC and VENTURE-PC were deployed to estimate the fuel enrichment required, to maintain the same burnup levels, corresponding to a volume percent addition of SiC.

  18. The Generalized Switched Accounting or Conduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Generalized Switched Accounting or Conduction Isaac Zafrany1 1 Technical Support Avant modeling and simulation of PWM converters was extended to include conduction losses. The method covers losses due to the inductor's resistance and due to the voltage drops across the switch and the diode

  19. Proton conducting ceramic membranes for hydrogen separation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Elangovan, S. (South Jordan, UT); Nair, Balakrishnan G. (Sandy, UT); Small, Troy (Midvale, UT); Heck, Brian (Salt Lake City, UT)

    2011-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A multi-phase proton conducting material comprising a proton-conducting ceramic phase and a stabilizing ceramic phase. Under the presence of a partial pressure gradient of hydrogen across the membrane or under the influence of an electrical potential, a membrane fabricated with this material selectively transports hydrogen ions through the proton conducting phase, which results in ultrahigh purity hydrogen permeation through the membrane. The stabilizing ceramic phase may be substantially structurally and chemically identical to at least one product of a reaction between the proton conducting phase and at least one expected gas under operating conditions of a membrane fabricated using the material. In a barium cerate-based proton conducting membrane, one stabilizing phase is ceria.

  20. The Organic Chemistry of Conducting Polymers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tolbert, Laren Malcolm [Georgia Institute of Technology

    2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For the last several years, we have examined the fundamental principles of conduction in one-dimensional systems, i.e., molecular “wires”. It is, of course, widely recognized that such systems, as components of electronically conductive materials, function in a two- and three-dimensional milieu. Thus interchain hopping and grain-boundary resistivity are limiting conductivity factors in highly conductive materials, and overall conductivity is a function of through-chain and boundary hopping. We have given considerable attention to the basic principles underlying charge transport (the “rules of the game”) in two-dimensional systems by using model systems which allow direct observation of such processes, including the examination of tunneling and hopping as components of charge transfer. In related work, we have spent considerable effort on the chemistry of conjugated heteropolymers, most especially polythiophens, with the aim of using these most efficient of readily available electroactive polymers in photovoltaic devices.

  1. Thermal conductivity measurements of Summit polycrystalline silicon.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clemens, Rebecca; Kuppers, Jaron D.; Phinney, Leslie Mary

    2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A capability for measuring the thermal conductivity of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) materials using a steady state resistance technique was developed and used to measure the thermal conductivities of SUMMiT{trademark} V layers. Thermal conductivities were measured over two temperature ranges: 100K to 350K and 293K to 575K in order to generate two data sets. The steady state resistance technique uses surface micromachined bridge structures fabricated using the standard SUMMiT fabrication process. Electrical resistance and resistivity data are reported for poly1-poly2 laminate, poly2, poly3, and poly4 polysilicon structural layers in the SUMMiT process from 83K to 575K. Thermal conductivity measurements for these polysilicon layers demonstrate for the first time that the thermal conductivity is a function of the particular SUMMiT layer. Also, the poly2 layer has a different variation in thermal conductivity as the temperature is decreased than the poly1-poly2 laminate, poly3, and poly4 layers. As the temperature increases above room temperature, the difference in thermal conductivity between the layers decreases.

  2. Increased thermal conductivity monolithic zeolite structures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Klett, James (Knoxville, TN); Klett, Lynn (Knoxville, TN); Kaufman, Jonathan (Leonardtown, MD)

    2008-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A monolith comprises a zeolite, a thermally conductive carbon, and a binder. The zeolite is included in the form of beads, pellets, powders and mixtures thereof. The thermally conductive carbon can be carbon nano-fibers, diamond or graphite which provide thermal conductivities in excess of about 100 W/mK to more than 1,000 W/mK. A method of preparing a zeolite monolith includes the steps of mixing a zeolite dispersion in an aqueous colloidal silica binder with a dispersion of carbon nano-fibers in water followed by dehydration and curing of the binder is given.

  3. Electrical and thermal conductivities in dense plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Faussurier, G., E-mail: gerald.faussurier@cea.fr; Blancard, C.; Combis, P.; Videau, L. [CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France)

    2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Expressions for the electrical and thermal conductivities in dense plasmas are derived combining the Chester-Thellung-Kubo-Greenwood approach and the Kramers approximation. The infrared divergence is removed assuming a Drude-like behaviour. An analytical expression is obtained for the Lorenz number that interpolates between the cold solid-state and the hot plasma phases. An expression for the electrical resistivity is proposed using the Ziman-Evans formula, from which the thermal conductivity can be deduced using the analytical expression for the Lorenz number. The present method can be used to estimate electrical and thermal conductivities of mixtures. Comparisons with experiment and quantum molecular dynamics simulations are done.

  4. Thermal conductivity of bulk nanostructured lead telluride

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hori, Takuma [Department of Mechanical Engineering, The University of Tokyo, Bunkyo, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Chen, Gang [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Shiomi, Junichiro, E-mail: shiomi@photon.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Department of Mechanical Engineering, The University of Tokyo, Bunkyo, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); PRESTO, Japan Science and Technology Agency, Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan)

    2014-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermal conductivity of lead telluride with embedded nanoinclusions was studied using Monte Carlo simulations with intrinsic phonon transport properties obtained from first-principles-based lattice dynamics. The nanoinclusion/matrix interfaces were set to completely reflect phonons to model the maximum interface-phonon-scattering scenario. The simulations with the geometrical cross section and volume fraction of the nanoinclusions matched to those of the experiment show that the experiment has already reached the theoretical limit of thermal conductivity. The frequency-dependent analysis further identifies that the thermal conductivity reduction is dominantly attributed to scattering of low frequency phonons and demonstrates mutual adaptability of nanostructuring and local disordering.

  5. Characterization of macro-length conducting polymers and the development of a conducting polymer rotary motor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmid, Bryan D. (Bryan David), 1981-

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Conducting polymers are a subset of materials within the electroactive polymer class that exhibit active mechanical deformations. These deformations induce stresses and strains that allow for conducting polymers to be used ...

  6. M. Bahrami ENSC 388 (F09) Steady Conduction Heat Transfer 1 Steady Heat Conduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bahrami, Majid

    of the material. In the limiting case where x0, the equation above reduces to the differential form: W dx dT k is the only energy interaction; the energy balance for the wall can be expressed: dt dE QQ wall outin). Thermal Conductivity Thermal conductivity k [W/mK] is a measure of a material's ability to conduct heat

  7. Modeling tensorial conductivity of particle suspension networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tyler Olsen; Ken Kamrin

    2015-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Significant microstructural anisotropy is known to develop during shearing flow of attractive particle suspensions. These suspensions, and their capacity to form conductive networks, play a key role in flow-battery technology, among other applications. Herein, we present and test an analytical model for the tensorial conductivity of attractive particle suspensions. The model utilizes the mean fabric of the network to characterize the structure, and the relationship to the conductivity is inspired by a lattice argument. We test the accuracy of our model against a large number of computer-generated suspension networks, based on multiple in-house generation protocols, giving rise to particle networks that emulate the physical system. The model is shown to adequately capture the tensorial conductivity, both in terms of its invariants and its mean directionality.

  8. Synthesis and characterization of conducting polymer actuators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vandesteeg, Nathan A. (Nathan Alan)

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Conducting polymers are known to mechanically respond to electrochemical stimuli and have been utilized as linear actuators. To date, the most successful mechanism for actuation is ionic ingress and egress, though mechanisms ...

  9. LE JOURNAL DE PHYSIQUE LA CONDUCTION LECTRIQUE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    LE JOURNAL DE PHYSIQUE ET LE RADIUM LA CONDUCTION ÉLECTRIQUE DES HYDROCARBURES LIQUIDES EN COUCHES hydrocarbures liquides en couches minces, signalé dans un précédent mémoire. Les expériences, faites dans des

  10. Thermal conductivity of thermal-battery insulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guidotti, R.A.; Moss, M.

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The thermal conductivities of a variety of insulating materials used in thermal batteries were measured in atmospheres of argon and helium using several techniques. (Helium was used to simulate the hydrogen atmosphere that results when a Li(Si)/FeS{sub 2} thermal battery ages.) The guarded-hot-plate method was used with the Min-K insulation because of its extremely low thermal conductivity. For comparison purposes, the thermal conductivity of the Min-K insulating board was also measured using the hot-probe method. The thermal-comparator method was used for the rigid Fiberfrax board and Fiberfrax paper. The thermal conductivity of the paper was measured under several levels of compression to simulate the conditions of the insulating wrap used on the stack in a thermal battery. The results of preliminary thermal-characterization tests with several silica aerogel materials are also presented.

  11. November 15, 2012 Conducting and managing documents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaji, Hajime

    1 November 15, 2012 Conducting and managing documents #12;2 Agenda 1. Basics of copyright 2. Necessary information for citing materials 3. Citation Manager #12;1.Basics of copyright 3 #12;Definitions

  12. Large displacement fast conducting polymer actuators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Angela Y. (Angela Ying-Ju), 1982-

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Conducting polymers are a promising class of electroactive materials that undergo volumetric changes under applied potentials, which make them particularly useful for many actuation applications. Polypyrrole , is one of ...

  13. Electrical conductivity of segregated network polymer nanocomposites 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Yeon Seok

    2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    . The composites made using the emulsion with higher modulus show lower percolation threshold and higher conductivity. Higher modulus causes tighter packing of carbon black between the polymer particles. When the drying temperature was increased to 80°C...

  14. Conducting polymer nanostructures for biological applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berdichevsky, Yevgeny

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Synthesis and characterization of conducting copolymer nanofibrils of pyrrolepolypyrrole synthesis was 0.1 M pyrrole monomer dissolved insynthesis Polypyrrole was electropolymerized from a solution of 0.1 M pyrrole (

  15. Development and characterization of conducting polymer actuators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pillai, Priam Vasudevan

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Conducting polymers such as polypyrrole, polythiophene and polyaniline are currently studied as novel biologically inspired actuators. The actuation mechanism of these materials depends upon the motion of ions in and out ...

  16. California: Conducting Polymer Binder Boosts Storage Capacity...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    - 10:17am Addthis Working with Nextval, Inc., Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) developed a Conducting Polymer Binder for high-capacity lithium-ion batteries. With a...

  17. Nanopatterned Electrically Conductive Films of Semiconductor Nanocrystals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mentzel, Tamar

    We present the first semiconductor nanocrystal films of nanoscale dimensions that are electrically conductive and crack-free. These films make it possible to study the electrical properties intrinsic to the nanocrystals ...

  18. Finite Heat conduction in 2D Lattices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lei Yang; Yang Kongqing

    2001-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper gives a 2D hamonic lattices model with missing bond defects, when the capacity ratio of defects is enough large, the temperature gradient can be formed and the finite heat conduction is found in the model. The defects in the 2D harmonic lattices impede the energy carriers free propagation, by another words, the mean free paths of the energy carrier are relatively short. The microscopic dynamics leads to the finite conduction in the model.

  19. Transparent conducting oxides and production thereof

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gessert, Timothy A.; Yoshida, Yuki; Coutts, Timothy J.

    2014-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Transparent conducting oxides and production thereof are disclosed. An exemplary method of producing a transparent conducting oxide (TCO) material may comprise: providing a TCO target doped with either a high-permittivity oxide or a low-permittivity oxide in a process chamber. The method may also comprise depositing a metal oxide on the target in the process chamber to form a thin film having enhanced optical properties without substantially decreasing electrical quality.

  20. Transparent conducting oxides and production thereof

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gessert, Timothy A; Yoshida, Yuki; Coutts, Timothy J

    2014-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Transparent conducting oxides and production thereof are disclosed. An exemplary method of producing a transparent conducting oxide (TCO) material may comprise: providing a TCO target (110) doped with either a high-permittivity oxide or a low-permittivity oxide in a process chamber (100). The method may also comprise depositing a metal oxide on the target (110) to form a thin film having enhanced optical properties without substantially decreasing electrical quality.

  1. High quality transparent conducting oxide thin films

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gessert, Timothy A. (Conifer, CO); Duenow, Joel N. (Golden, CO); Barnes, Teresa (Evergreen, CO); Coutts, Timothy J. (Golden, CO)

    2012-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A transparent conducting oxide (TCO) film comprising: a TCO layer, and dopants selected from the elements consisting of Vanadium, Molybdenum, Tantalum, Niobium, Antimony, Titanium, Zirconium, and Hafnium, wherein the elements are n-type dopants; and wherein the transparent conducting oxide is characterized by an improved electron mobility of about 42 cm.sup.2/V-sec while simultaneously maintaining a high carrier density of .about.4.4e.times.10.sup.20 cm.sup.-3.

  2. Conductive polymeric compositions for lithium batteries

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Angell, Charles A. (Mesa, AZ); Xu, Wu (Tempe, AZ)

    2009-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Novel chain polymers comprising weakly basic anionic moieties chemically bound into a polyether backbone at controllable anionic separations are presented. Preferred polymers comprise orthoborate anions capped with dibasic acid residues, preferably oxalato or malonato acid residues. The conductivity of these polymers is found to be high relative to that of most conventional salt-in-polymer electrolytes. The conductivity at high temperatures and wide electrochemical window make these materials especially suitable as electrolytes for rechargeable lithium batteries.

  3. Search for the decay Bs0 ? ?? and a measurement of the branching fraction for Bs0 ? ??

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dutta, Deepanwita; Bhuyan, Bipul; Abdesselam, A.; Adachi, I.; Aihara, H.; Al Said, S.; Arinstein, K.; Asner, David M.; Aulchenko, V.; Aushev, T.; Ayad, R.; Aziz, T.; Bahinipati, S.; Bakich, A. M.; Bansal, Vikas; Bhardwaj, V.; Bobrov, A.; Bonvicini, Giovanni; Bracko, Marko; Browder, Thomas E.; Cervenkov, D.; Chen, A.; Cheon, B. G.; Chilikin, K.; Chistov, R.; Cho, K.; Chobanova, V.; Choi, Y.; Cinabro, David A.; Dalseno, J.; Dolezal, Z.; Drasal, Z.; Drutskoy, A.; Dutta, K.; Eidelman, S.; Farhat, H.; Fast, James E.; Frost, O.; Gaur, Vipin; Ganguly, Sudeshna; Garmash, Alexey; Getzkow, D.; Goh, Y. M.; Golob, B.; Hayashii, H.; He, X. H.; Hou, W. S.; Iijima, T.; Ishikawa, A.; Iwasaki, Y.; Jaegle, Igal; Joffe, D.; Kang, K. H.; Kato, E.; Kiesling, C.; Kim, D. Y.; Kim, J. B.; Kim, J. H.; Kim, K. T.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. J.; Kinoshita, Kay; Ko, Byeong Rok; Kodys, P.; Korpar, S.; Krizan, P.; Krokovny, Pavel; Kuhr, Thomas; Kuzmin, A.; Kwon, Y. J.; Lange, J. S.; Lee, I. S.; Lewis, P.; Li, Y.; Li Gioi, L.; Libby, J.; Liventsev, Dmitri; Matvienko, D.; Miyata, H.; Mizuk, R.; Mohanty, G. B.; Moll, A.; Mori, T.; Mussa, R.; Nakano, E.; Nakao, M.; Nanut, T.; Nayak, Minakshi; Nisar, N. K.; Nishida, S.; Ogawa, S.; Okuno, S.; Pakhlov, P.; Pakhlova, Galina; Pedlar, Todd K.; Pestotnik, Rok; Petric, Marko; Piilonen, Leo E.; Ribezl, Eva; Ritter, M.; Rostomyan, A.; Sakai, Y.; Sandilya, Saurabh; Santelj, Luka; Sanuki, T.; Sato, Y.; Savinov, Vladimir; Schneider, O.; Schnell, G.; Schwanda, C.; Schwartz, A. J.; Semmler, D.; Shebalin, V.; Shibata, T. A.; Shiu, Jing-Ge; Shwartz, B.; Sibidanov, A.; Simon, F.; Sohn, Y. S.; Sokolov, A.; Solovieva, E.; Staric, M.; Sumihama, M.; Sumiyoshi, T.; Teramoto, Y.; Trabelsi, K.; Uchida, M.; Unno, Yuji; Uno, S.; Usov, Y.; Van Hulse, C.; Vanhoefer, P.; Varner, G.; Vinokurova, A.; Vossen, Anslem G.; Wagner, M. N.; Wang, C. H.; Wang, P.; Watanabe, Y.; Wehle, S.; Williams, K. M.; Won, E.; Yamamoto, H.; Yamaoka, J.; Yashchenko, S.; Yusa, Y.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhilich, V.; Zupanc, A.

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We search for the decay B0s??? and measure the branching fraction for B0s??? using 121.4~fb-1 of data collected at the ?(5S) resonance with the Belle detector at the KEKB asymmetric-energy e+e- collider. The B0s??? branching fraction is measured to be (3.6±0.5(stat.)±0.3(syst.)±0.6(fs))×10-5, where fs is the fraction of Bs(*)B¯s(*) in bb¯ events. Our result is in good agreement with the theoretical predictions as well as with a recent measurement from LHCb. We observe no statistically significant signal for the decay B0s??? and set a 90% confidence-level upper limit on its branching fraction at 3.1×10-6. This constitutes a significant improvement over the previous result.

  4. Measurement of Lambda(C) Branching Fractions of Cabibbo-Suppressed Decay Modes in the BABAR Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saleem, Muhammad; /SUNY, Albany

    2006-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation reports on a study of the relative branching fraction measurement of the charmed baryon {Lambda}{sub c} decaying to the Cabibbo-suppressed modes.

  5. A Conceptual Restoration Plan and Tidal Hydrology Assessment for Reconnecting Spring Branch Creek to Suisun Marsh, Solano County, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olson, Jessica J.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    EDAW 2007. Potrero Hills Landfill FEIR Volume 1. Solanothe headwaters at Potrero Hills Landfill is the headwatersBranch Creek, Potrero Hills Landfill and a private rancher

  6. Data acquisition with a VAX 11/780 and MBD branch driver

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    King, S.E. (Duke Univ., Durham, NC); Lau, Y.C.; Gould, C.R.

    1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have designed and implemented a general purpose data acquisition system, XSYS, for the Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory VAX-11/780. The interface is a CAMAC Branch Highway connected to a Microprogrammed Branch Driver (MBD-11). A single general reentrant MBD program handles CAMAC operations and data transfers to and from the VAX using a DMA transfer. Each of the eight MBD channels is controlled by an independent subprocess in the VAX which communicates with the MBD via the UNIBUS. Data are double buffered and are sorted by VAX user written EVAL codes after the MBD wakes a hibernating subprocess image. Scalar operations and control of external devices are also supported.

  7. Delayed-neutron branching ratios of precursors in the fission product region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rudstam, G.; Aleklett, K.; Sihver, L. (Studsvik Neutron Research Lab., Nykoeping (Sweden))

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Delayed-neutron branching ratios in the fission product region have been tabulated, and average values have been determined. In order to provide data complementary to published values an experiment covering the mass range 79-150 has been carried out at the OSIRIS isotope-separator on-line facility at Studsvik. This experiment has resulted in branching ratios for some precursors ([sup 84]Ge, [sup 133]Sn, and [sup 150]La) for which such data have not been reported before. In several other cases the new results are accurate than older determinations. 19 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Assessment of Pen Branch delta and corridor vegetation changes using multispectral scanner data 1992--1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Airborne multispectral scanner data were used to monitor natural succession of wetland vegetation species over a three-year period from 1992 through 1994 for Pen Branch on the Savannah River Site in South Carolina. Image processing techniques were used to identify and measure wetland vegetation communities in the lower portion of the Pen Branch corridor and delta. The study provided a reliable means for monitoring medium- and large-scale changes in a diverse environment. Findings from the study will be used to support decisions regarding remediation efforts following the cessation of cooling water discharge from K reactor at the Department of Energy`s Savannah River Site in South Carolina.

  9. Measurement of branching fractions and rate asymmetries in the rare decays B?K(*)l?l?

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Palano, A.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Brown, D. N.; Kerth, L. T.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Lynch, G.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; Asgeirsson, D. J.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T. S.; McKenna, J. A.; Khan, A.; Blinov, V. E.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Druzhinin, V. P.; Golubev, V. B.; Kravchenko, E. A.; Onuchin, A. P.; Serednyakov, S. I.; Skovpen, Yu. I.; Solodov, E. P.; Todyshev, K. Yu.; Yushkov, A. N.; Bondioli, M.; Kirkby, D.; Lankford, A. J.; Mandelkern, M.; Atmacan, H.; Gary, J. W.; Liu, F.; Long, O.; Vitug, G. M.; Campagnari, C.; Hong, T. M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Richman, J. D.; West, C. A.; Eisner, A. M.; Kroseberg, J.; Lockman, W. S.; Martinez, A. J.; Schumm, B. A.; Seiden, A.; Chao, D. S.; Cheng, C. H.; Echenard, B.; Flood, K. T.; Hitlin, D. G.; Ongmongkolkul, P.; Porter, F. C.; Rakitin, A. Y.; Andreassen, R.; Huard, Z.; Meadows, B. T.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Sun, L.; Bloom, P. C.; Ford, W. T.; Gaz, A.; Nauenberg, U.; Smith, J. G.; Wagner, S. R.; Ayad, R.; Toki, W. H.; Spaan, B.; Schubert, K. R.; Schwierz, R.; Bernard, D.; Verderi, M.; Clark, P. J.; Playfer, S.; Bettoni, D.; Bozzi, C.; Calabrese, R.; Cibinetto, G.; Fioravanti, E.; Garzia, I.; Luppi, E.; Munerato, M.; Negrini, M.; Piemontese, L.; Santoro, V.; Baldini-Ferroli, R.; Calcaterra, A.; de Sangro, R.; Finocchiaro, G.; Patteri, P.; Peruzzi, I. M.; Piccolo, M.; Rama, M.; Zallo, A.; Contri, R.; Guido, E.; Lo Vetere, M.; Monge, M. R.; Passaggio, S.; Patrignani, C.; Robutti, E.; Bhuyan, B.; Prasad, V.; Lee, C. L.; Morii, M.; Edwards, A. J.; Adametz, A.; Uwer, U.; Lacker, H. M.; Lueck, T.; Dauncey, P. D.; Behera, P. K.; Mallik, U.; Chen, C.; Cochran, J.; Meyer, W. T.; Prell, S.; Rubin, A. E.; Gritsan, A. V.; Guo, Z. J.; Arnaud, N.; Davier, M.; Derkach, D.; Grosdidier, G.; Le Diberder, F.; Lutz, A. M.; Malaescu, B.; Roudeau, P.; Schune, M. H.; Stocchi, A.; Wormser, G.; Lange, D. J.; Wright, D. M.; Chavez, C. A.; Coleman, J. P.; Fry, J. R.; Gabathuler, E.; Hutchcroft, D. E.; Payne, D. J.; Touramanis, C.; Bevan, A. J.; Di Lodovico, F.; Sacco, R.; Sigamani, M.; Cowan, G.; Brown, D. N.; Davis, C. L.; Denig, A. G.; Fritsch, M.; Gradl, W.; Griessinger, K.; Hafner, A.; Prencipe, E.; Barlow, R. J.; Jackson, G.; Lafferty, G. D.; Behn, E.; Cenci, R.; Hamilton, B.; Jawahery, A.; Roberts, D. A.; Dallapiccola, C.; Cowan, R.; Dujmic, D.; Sciolla, G.; Cheaib, R.; Lindemann, D.; Patel, P. M.; Robertson, S. H.; Biassoni, P.; Neri, N.; Palombo, F.; Stracka, S.; Cremaldi, L.; Godang, R.; Kroeger, R.; Sonnek, P.; Summers, D. J.; Nguyen, X.; Simard, M.; Taras, P.; De Nardo, G.; Monorchio, D.; Onorato, G.; Sciacca, C.; Martinelli, M.; Raven, G.; Jessop, C. P.; LoSecco, J. M.; Wang, W. F.; Honscheid, K.; Kass, R.; Brau, J.; Frey, R.; Sinev, N. B.; Strom, D.; Torrence, E.; Feltresi, E.; Gagliardi, N.; Margoni, M.; Morandin, M.; Posocco, M.; Rotondo, M.; Simi, G.; Simonetto, F.; Stroili, R.; Akar, S.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bomben, M.; Bonneaud, G. R.; Briand, H.; Calderini, G.; Chauveau, J.; Hamon, O.; Leruste, Ph.; Marchiori, G.; Ocariz, J.; Sitt, S.; Biasini, M.; Manoni, E.; Pacetti, S.; Rossi, A.; Angelini, C.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Carpinelli, M.; Casarosa, G.; Cervelli, A.; Forti, F.; Giorgi, M. A.; Lusiani, A.; Oberhof, B.; Paoloni, E.; Perez, A.; Rizzo, G.; Walsh, J. J.; Lopes Pegna, D.; Olsen, J.; Smith, A. J. S.; Telnov, A. V.; Anulli, F.; Faccini, R.; Ferrarotto, F.; Ferroni, F.; Gaspero, M.; Li Gioi, L.; Mazzoni, M. A.; Piredda, G.; Bünger, C.; Grünberg, O.; Hartmann, T.; Leddig, T.; Schröder, H.; Voss, C.; Waldi, R.; Adye, T.; Olaiya, E. O.; Wilson, F. F.; Emery, S.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Vasseur, G.; Yèche, Ch.; Aston, D.; Bard, D. J.; Bartoldus, R.; Benitez, J. F.; Cartaro, C.; Convery, M. R.; Dorfan, J.; Dubois-Felsmann, G. P.; Dunwoodie, W.; Ebert, M.; Field, R. C.; Franco Sevilla, M.; Fulsom, B. G.; Gabareen, A. M.; Graham, M. T.; Grenier, P.; Hast, C.; Innes, W. R.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kim, P.; Kocian, M. L.; Leith, D. W. G. S.; Lewis, P.; Lindquist, B.; Luitz, S.; Luth, V.; Lynch, H. L.; MacFarlane, D. B.; Muller, D. R.; Neal, H.; Nelson, S.; Perl, M.; Pulliam, T.; Ratcliff, B. N.; Roodman, A.; Salnikov, A. A.; Schindler, R. H.; Snyder, A.; Su, D.; Sullivan, M. K.; Va’vra, J.; Wagner, A. P.; Wisniewski, W. J.; Wittgen, M.; Wright, D. H.; Wulsin, H. W.; Young, C. C.; Ziegler, V.; Park, W.; Purohit, M. V.; White, R. M.; Wilson, J. R.; Randle-Conde, A.; Sekula, S. J.; Bellis, M.; Burchat, P. R.; Miyashita, T. S.; Alam, M. S.; Ernst, J. A.; Gorodeisky, R.; Guttman, N.; Peimer, D. R.; Soffer, A.; Lund, P.; Spanier, S. M.; Ritchie, J. L.; Ruland, A. M.; Schwitters, R. F.; Wray, B. C.; Izen, J. M.; Lou, X. C.; Bianchi, F.; Gamba, D.; Lanceri, L.; Vitale, L.; Martinez-Vidal, F.; Oyanguren, A.; Ahmed, H.; Albert, J.

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In a sample of 471×10? BB¯¯¯ events collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II e?e? collider we study the rare decays B?K(*)l?l?, where l?l? is either e?e? or ????. We report results on partial branching fractions and isospin asymmetries in seven bins of dilepton mass-squared. We further present CP and lepton-flavor asymmetries for dilepton masses below and above the J/? resonance. We find no evidence for CP or lepton-flavor violation. The partial branching fractions and isospin asymmetries are consistent with the Standard Model predictions and with results from other experiments.

  10. Liquid Propane Injection Technology Conductive to Today's North...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Technology Conductive to Today's North American Specification Liquid Propane Injection Technology Conductive to Today's North American Specification Liquid propane injection...

  11. X-ray resonant magnetic scattering and x-ray magnetic circular dichroism branching ratios, L[subscript 3] / L[subscript 2], for heavy rare earths

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Yongbin; Kim, Jong-Woo; Goldman, Alan I.; Harmon, Bruce N. (Iowa State)

    2010-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

    In this study we have used first principles electronic structure methods to investigate the detailed contributions to the L{sub 3}/L{sub 2} branching ratio in the heavy rare earth elements. The calculations use the full potential, relativistic, linear augmented plane wave method with the LSDA+U approach for consideration of the local 4f electronic orbitals. With no spin orbit coupling (SOC) in the conducting bands, and with the same radial function for the 2p{sub 3/2} and 2p{sub 1/2} core states, the branching ratio (BR) is exactly 1:-1 for the x-ray magnetic circular dichroism spectra of the ferromagnetic heavy rare earth metals. However, with full SOC the BR ranges from 1.5 to 6.0 in going from Gd to Er. The energy and spin dependence of the 5d radial functions are important. The results point to problems with modified atomic models which have been proposed to explain the BR. Recent x-ray resonant magentic scattering experiments on (Gd,Tb,Dy,Ho,Er,Tm)Ni{sub 2}Ge{sub 2} are discussed.

  12. Acetonitrile Drastically Boosts Conductivity of Ionic Liquids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chaban, Vitaly V; Kalugin, Oleg N; Prezhdo, Oleg V

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We apply a new methodology in the force field generation (PCCP 2011, 13, 7910) to study the binary mixtures of five imidazolium-based room-temperature ionic liquids (RTILs) with acetonitrile (ACN). The investigated RTILs are composed of tetrafluoroborate (BF4) anion and dialkylimidazolium cations, where one of the alkyl groups is methyl for all RTILs, and the other group is different for each RTILs, being ethyl (EMIM), butyl (BMIM), hexyl (HMIM), octyl (OMIM), and decyl (DMIM). Specific densities, radial distribution functions, ionic cluster distributions, heats of vaporization, diffusion constants, shear viscosities, ionic conductivities, and their correlations are discussed. Upon addition of ACN, the ionic conductivity of RTILs is found to increase by more than 50 times, that significantly exceeds an impact of most known solvents. Remarkably, the sharpest conductivity growth is found for the long-tailed imidazolium-based cations. This new fact motivates to revisit an application of these binary systems as a...

  13. Gas storage carbon with enhanced thermal conductivity

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Burchell, Timothy D. (Oak Ridge, TN); Rogers, Michael Ray (Knoxville, TN); Judkins, Roddie R. (Knoxville, TN)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A carbon fiber carbon matrix hybrid adsorbent monolith with enhanced thermal conductivity for storing and releasing gas through adsorption and desorption is disclosed. The heat of adsorption of the gas species being adsorbed is sufficiently large to cause hybrid monolith heating during adsorption and hybrid monolith cooling during desorption which significantly reduces the storage capacity of the hybrid monolith, or efficiency and economics of a gas separation process. The extent of this phenomenon depends, to a large extent, on the thermal conductivity of the adsorbent hybrid monolith. This invention is a hybrid version of a carbon fiber monolith, which offers significant enhancements to thermal conductivity and potential for improved gas separation and storage systems.

  14. Thermal Conductivity of Ordered Molecular Water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    W Evans; J Fish; P Keblinski

    2006-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

    We use molecular dynamics simulation to investigate thermal transport characteristics of water with various degree of orientational and translational order induced by the application of an electric field. We observe that orientational ordering of the water dipole moments has a minor effect on the thermal conductivity. However, electric-field induced crystallization and associated translational order results in approximately a 3-fold increase of thermal conductivity with respect to the base water, i.e., to values comparable with those characterizing ice crystal structures.

  15. Thermoelectric DC conductivities from black hole horizons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aristomenis Donos; Jerome P. Gauntlett

    2014-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    An analytic expression for the DC electrical conductivity in terms of black hole horizon data was recently obtained for a class of holographic black holes exhibiting momentum dissipation. We generalise this result to obtain analogous expressions for the DC thermoelectric and thermal conductivities. We illustrate our results using some holographic Q-lattice black holes as well as for some black holes with linear massless axions, in both $D=4$ and $D=5$ bulk spacetime dimensions, which include both spatially isotropic and anisotropic examples. We show that some recently constructed ground states of holographic Q-lattices, which can be either electrically insulating or metallic, are all thermal insulators.

  16. Electrically conductive connection for an electrode

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hornack, T.R.; Chilko, R.J.

    1986-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

    An electrically conductive connection for an electrode assembly of an electrolyte cell in which aluminum is produced by electrolysis in a molten salt is described. The electrode assembly comprises an electrode flask and a conductor rod. The flask has a collar above an area of minimum flask diameter. The electrically conductive connection comprises the electrode flask, the conductor rod and a structure bearing against the collar and the conductor rod for pulling the conductor rod into compressive and electrical contact with the flask. 2 figs.

  17. CLNS 05/1914 Measurement of Absolute Hadronic Branching Fractions of D

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    a double tag technique. Among measurements for three D 0 and six D + modes, we obtain reference branching fractions B(D 0 ! K \\Gamma Ã? + ) = (3:91 \\Sigma 0:08 \\Sigma 0:09)% and B(D + ! K \\Gamma Ã? + Ã? + ) = (9:5 \\Sigma 0:2 \\Sigma 0:3)%, where the uncertainties are stati

  18. Fractal branching organizations of Ediacaran rangeomorph fronds reveal a lost Proterozoic body plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cambridge, University of

    Fractal branching organizations of Ediacaran rangeomorph fronds reveal a lost Proterozoic body plan, using parametric Lindenmayer systems, a first formal model of rangeomorph morphologies reveals a fractal-filling strategies. The fractal body plan of rangeomorphs is shown to maximize surface area, consistent

  19. THESIS FOR THE DEGREE OF LICENTIATE OF PHILOSOPHY Branching of some

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patriksson, Michael

    THESIS FOR THE DEGREE OF LICENTIATE OF PHILOSOPHY Branching of some holomorphic representations Göteborg, Sweden 2002 #12; Abstract In this licentiate thesis we consider a family of Hilbert spaces with his time. He suggested the topic of this licentiate thesis and I have since then bene#28;ted from his

  20. Side branch absorber for exhaust manifold of two-stroke internal combustion engine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Harris, Ralph E. (San Antonio, TX); Broerman, III, Eugene L. (San Antonio, TX); Bourn, Gary D. (Laramie, WY)

    2011-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of improving scavenging operation of a two-stroke internal combustion engine. The exhaust pressure of the engine is analyzed to determine if there is a pulsation frequency. Acoustic modeling is used to design an absorber. An appropriately designed side branch absorber may be attached to the exhaust manifold.

  1. BOCA RATON DANIA BEACH DAVIE FORT LAUDERDALE HARBOR BRANCH JUPITER PORT ST. LUCIE Educational Plant Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    BOCA RATON DANIA BEACH DAVIE FORT LAUDERDALE HARBOR BRANCH JUPITER PORT ST. LUCIE Educational Plant Survey 2011/2012 ­ 2016/2017 Approved by FAU BOT on June 15, 2011 #12;EDUCATIONAL PLANT SURVEY Florida ...................................................................................................................... ii Educational Plant Survey Team

  2. Distinguishing between linear and branched wormlike micelle solutions using extensional rheology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rothstein, Jonathan

    available to branched micelles which appear to be extremely efficient in extensional flows. These stress of tails, the charge on the surfactant, the salinity of the solution, and the flow conditions Israelachvili, lubricants and emulsifiers. Further, these micelle solutions are extensively used in agrochemical spraying

  3. Branch-cut singularities in the thermodynamics of Fermi liquid systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fominov, Yakov

    #12;Search for non analyticity: If f is smooth and regular in the vicinity of f=0, the standard-analyticities associated with branch-cuts enter via ring diagrams, i.e., ladders which are closed onto themselves p+q p -p, the dominant terms are generated in the thermodynamic potential. In ladders the non- analyticities associated

  4. A Grid-enabled Branch and Bound Algorithm for Solving Challenging Combinatorial Optimization Problems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    crucial issues, mainly dynamic adaptive load balancing, fault tolerance, global informa- tion sharing NP-hard and complex. The Branch and Bound (B&B) algorithm is one of the most popular methods to solve to the characteristics of the model itself and the properties of the grids. The major of these issues are load balancing

  5. Biodegradable branched poly(ethylenimine sulfide) for gene delivery Heebeom Koo 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, Jong-Sang

    Biodegradable branched poly(ethylenimine sulfide) for gene delivery Heebeom Koo 1 , Geun-woo Jin 1 , Hyunseo Kang, Yan Lee, Kihoon Nam, Cheng Zhe Bai, Jong-Sang Park* School of Chemistry & Molecular October 2009 Keywords: Gene transfer Biodegradation Cytotoxicity Cell viability Biocompatibility a b s t r

  6. Harbor Branch researcher on top of bottom life ahead of oil spill

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Belogay, Eugene A.

    Harbor Branch researcher on top of bottom life ahead of oil spill By Ed Killer Saturday, June 12 like if touched by an underwater plume of oil. No doubt, much of it would be gone forever. Reed inhabiting the reefs, Reed hoped the oil would not be swept around the tip of Florida and onto the fragile

  7. Revised Final Independent External Peer Review Report for the East Branch Dam, Clarion River,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    was assigned a Dam Safety Action Classification (DSAC) rating of II, generally indicating that failure couldRevised Final Independent External Peer Review Report for the East Branch Dam, Clarion River, Elk County, Pennsylvania: Dam Safety Modification Report Prepared by Battelle Memorial Institute Prepared

  8. 2554 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON POWER SYSTEMS, VOL. 28, NO. 3, AUGUST 2013 Branch Flow Model: Relaxations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Low, Steven H.

    2554 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON POWER SYSTEMS, VOL. 28, NO. 3, AUGUST 2013 Branch Flow Model: Relaxations--Convex relaxation, load flow control, optimal power flow, phase control, power system management. I. INTRODUCTION A and operation of power systems. One of the motivations for our work is the optimal power flow (OPF) problem. OPF

  9. Modeling branching effects on source-sink relationships of the cotton plant , Vronique Letort2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    -structural models simulate the architectural development and physiological functioning of plants. Most of them to trace back the dynamics of the source-sink relationship within the plant [12]. A few studies have beenModeling branching effects on source-sink relationships of the cotton plant Dong Li1 , Véronique

  10. PARETO GENEALOGIES ARISING FROM A POISSON BRANCHING EVOLUTION MODEL WITH SELECTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    PARETO GENEALOGIES ARISING FROM A POISSON BRANCHING EVOLUTION MODEL WITH SELECTION THIERRY E processes (and their scaling limits) may be viewed as the genealogical processes of some forward in time the reproduction step. Running title: Pareto genealogies in a Poisson evolution model with se- lection. Keywords

  11. US Green Building Council Keys Branch Presents: Designing Mosquito Free Cisterns

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Craig A.

    US Green Building Council Keys Branch Presents: Designing Mosquito Free Cisterns For Contractors their return to popularity. Overview of the City of Key Wests' BPAS Ordinance and Green Building. By Allison Design, Inc., ARCSA AP The role of Green Sustainability Organizations and the potential "Tipping Point

  12. SENSE: A WIRELESS SENSOR NETWORK Gilbert Chen, Joel Branch, Michael J. Pflug, Lijuan Zhu, and Boleslaw

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Varela, Carlos

    Chapter 1 SENSE: A WIRELESS SENSOR NETWORK SIMULATOR Gilbert Chen, Joel Branch, Michael J. Pflug Abstract A new network simulator, called SENSE, has been developed for simulating wireless sensor networks for sensor network research. Keywords: Wireless Sensor Networks, Network Simulation, Component-Based Sim

  13. VEGETATED ROOFS FOR URBAN ECOSYSTEM REMEDIATION: PERFORMANCE AND POLICY IN THE TANYARD BRANCH WATERSHED

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosemond, Amy Daum

    VEGETATED ROOFS FOR URBAN ECOSYSTEM REMEDIATION: PERFORMANCE AND POLICY IN THE TANYARD BRANCH the urbanization process. This study evaluated the performance and feasibility of using vegetated or green roof systems for urban ecosystem remediation. The stormwater retention performance of a thin-layer green roof

  14. Branching Reactions in Polycarbonate: A Density Functional Study J. Akola and R. O. Jones*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Branching Reactions in Polycarbonate: A Density Functional Study J. Akola and R. O. Jones* Institut on the properties of polymers, and bisphenol A polycarbonate (BPA-PC) is no exception. We describe here the results and rubbers, where the entire system may be viewed as a single cross-linked molecule.2 Polycarbonates (PC

  15. A Branch-and-Bound Algorithm for the Quadratic Assignment Problem Based on the Hungarian Method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the Linear Assignment Problem. Our DP solves the QAP in certain cases, i.e., for some small problems (N Assignment Problem, Branch-and-bound, Quadratic Programming, Integer Programming, Mathematical Programming, which has roots in the Hungarian algorithm (see Munkres [21]) which solves the linear assignment problem

  16. PPPL-3137 -Preprint Date: November1995, UC-420, 426 Observation of new branch of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . M. McGuire, R. Majeski, C. K. Phillips, G. Schilling, G Taylor, and J. R. Wilson Princeton Plasma Eigenmodes in TFTR E Fredrickson, R Budny, Z Chang, C Z Cheng, G Y Fu, E Mazzucato, R Nazikian, A. Janos, K eigenmodes as reported by Taylor et al. Phys. Fluids B 5 2437 (1993). The new branch has so far only been

  17. PPPL3137 Preprint Date: November1995, UC420, 426 Observation of new branch of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . M. McGuire, R. Majeski, C. K. Phillips, G. Schilling, G Taylor, and J. R. Wilson Princeton Plasma Eigenmodes in TFTR E Fredrickson, R Budny, Z Chang, C Z Cheng, G Y Fu, E Mazzucato, R Nazikian, A. Janos, K eigenmodes as reported by Taylor et al. Phys. Fluids B 5 2437 (1993). The new branch has so far only been

  18. High Speed Max-Log-MAP Turbo SISO Decoder Implementation Using Branch Metric Normalization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arslan, Tughrul

    High Speed Max-Log-MAP Turbo SISO Decoder Implementation Using Branch Metric Normalization J. H.Erdogan@ee.ed.ac.uk, Tughrul.Arslan@ee.ed.ac.uk Abstract The authors present a turbo soft-in soft-out (SISO) decoder based. The turbo decoder with the proposed technique has been synthesized to evaluate its power consumption

  19. A stepped leader model for lightning including charge distribution in branched channels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shi, Wei; Zhang, Li [School of Electrical Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan 250061 (China); Li, Qingmin, E-mail: lqmeee@ncepu.edu.cn [Beijing Key Lab of HV and EMC, North China Electric Power University, Beijing 102206 (China); State Key Lab of Alternate Electrical Power System with Renewable Energy Sources, Beijing 102206 (China)

    2014-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The stepped leader process in negative cloud-to-ground lightning plays a vital role in lightning protection analysis. As lightning discharge usually presents significant branched or tortuous channels, the charge distribution along the branched channels and the stochastic feature of stepped leader propagation were investigated in this paper. The charge density along the leader channel and the charge in the leader tip for each lightning branch were approximated by introducing branch correlation coefficients. In combination with geometric characteristics of natural lightning discharge, a stochastic stepped leader propagation model was presented based on the fractal theory. By comparing simulation results with the statistics of natural lightning discharges, it was found that the fractal dimension of lightning trajectory in simulation was in the range of that observed in nature and the calculation results of electric field at ground level were in good agreement with the measurements of a negative flash, which shows the validity of this proposed model. Furthermore, a new equation to estimate the lightning striking distance to flat ground was suggested based on the present model. The striking distance obtained by this new equation is smaller than the value estimated by previous equations, which indicates that the traditional equations may somewhat overestimate the attractive effect of the ground.

  20. Analysis of the HVAC System at the Willow Branch Intermediate School

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wei, G.

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    was built in 1983. It was recently expanded in 1994 and renamed the Willow Branch Intermediate School. It now has a total floor area of 88,617 square feet. The system under investigation is a water-loop heat pump system which provides the HVAC needs...

  1. Potential for Branch Predictor Adaptation at the Program and Phase Level for Performance and Energy-Efficiency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Co, Michele

    Potential for Branch Predictor Adaptation at the Program and Phase Level for Performance and Energy-Efficiency savings were performed. The performance and energy- efficiency of an 8-wide issue, out-of-order processor of the branch predictor configuration to improve overall processor energy- efficiency. The results

  2. Extremal structures of multiphase heat conducting composites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cherkaev, Andrej

    Extremal structures of multiphase heat conducting composites A.V. Cherkaev \\Lambda L.V. Gibiansky y April 19, 1995 Abstract In this paper we construct microstructures of multiphase composites with un be easily gen­ eralized for the three­dimensional composites with arbitrary number of phases. 1 Introduction

  3. Conduct of Operations Requirements for DOE Facilities

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1990-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

    "To provide requirements and guidelines for Departmental Elements, including the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), to use in developing directives, plans, and/or procedures relating to the conduct of operations at DOE facilities. The implementation of these requirements and guidelines should result in improved quality and uniformity of operations. Change 2, 10-23-2001. Canceled by DOE O 422.1.

  4. Code of Conduct Etiquette at Utrecht University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utrecht, Universiteit

    Code of Conduct Etiquette at Utrecht University What principles underpin our behaviour of Utrecht University. The Code describes the values that govern the way people work and study for sanctions. How is Utrecht University different from other universities? What do we wish to achieve? MISSION

  5. Mössbauer study of conductive oxide glass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matsuda, Koken; Kubuki, Shiro [Tokyo Metropolitan University, Hachi-Oji, Tokyo 192-0397 (Japan); Nishida, Tetsuaki, E-mail: nishida@fuk.kindai.ac.jp [Kinki University, Iizuka, Fukuoka 820-8555 (Japan)

    2014-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Heat treatment of barium iron vanadate glass, BaO?Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}?V{sub 2}O{sub 5}, at temperatures higher than crystallization temperature causes a marked decrease in resistivity (?) from several M?cm to several ?cm. {sup 57}Fe Mössbauer spectrum of heat-treated vanadate glass shows a marked decrease in quadrupole splitting (?) of Fe{sup III}, reflecting a structural relaxation, i.e., an increased symmetry of 'distorted' FeO{sub 4} and VO{sub 4} tetrahedra which are connected to each other by sharing corner oxygen atoms. Structural relaxation of 3D-network of vanadate glass accompanies a decrease in the activation energy for the conduction, reflecting a decreased energy gap between the donor level and conduction band. A marked increase in the conductivity was observed in CuO- or Cu{sub 2}O-containing barium iron vanadate glass after heat treatment at 450 °C for 30 min or more. 'n-type semiconductor model combined with small polaron hopping theory' was proposed in order to explain the high conductivity.

  6. How to Conduct an Energy Efficiency Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biles, J. E.

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes how to organize a team of specialists in order to conduct an energy efficiency study in a totally unfamiliar plant. In-plant data gathering techniques are presented as well as methods for obtaining ideas and information from...

  7. Faculty and Staff Commute Report Conducted by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Zong-Liang

    Faculty and Staff Commute Report July 2008 Conducted by #12;Executive Summary The price of gasoline at Austin is $91.35 per month. With no relief in sight to rising gasoline prices, employees are increasingly there was no correlation between average work commute and salary, considering the price of gas, getting to work can

  8. Heat conductivity of a pion gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Antonio Dobado Gonzalez; Felipe J. Llanes-Estrada; Juan M. Torres Rincon

    2007-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We evaluate the heat conductivity of a dilute pion gas employing the Uehling-Uehlenbeck equation and experimental phase-shifts parameterized by means of the SU(2) Inverse Amplitude Method. Our results are consistent with previous evaluations. For comparison we also give results for an (unphysical) hard sphere gas.

  9. Conducting a Wildland Visual Resources Inventory1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    Conducting a Wildland Visual Resources Inventory1 James F. Palmer 2/ 1/ Submitted to the National of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003. Abstract: This paper describes a procedure for system- atically inventorying- tion and description of each inventoried scene are recorded on U.S. Geological Survey topographic maps

  10. Metal nanoparticles as a conductive catalyst

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Coker, Eric N. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2010-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A metal nanocluster composite material for use as a conductive catalyst. The metal nanocluster composite material has metal nanoclusters on a carbon substrate formed within a porous zeolitic material, forming stable metal nanoclusters with a size distribution between 0.6-10 nm and, more particularly, nanoclusters with a size distribution in a range as low as 0.6-0.9 nm.

  11. Application of conducting polymers to electroanalysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Josowicz, M.A.

    1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Conducting polymers can be used as sensitive layers in chemical microsensors leading to new applications of theses devices. They offer the potential for developing material properties that are critical to the sensor sensitivity, selectivity and fabrication. The advantages and limitations of the use of thin polymer layers in electrochemical sensors are discussed.

  12. Fig. 1 A 1 2 Conductance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hasegawa, Shuji

    were direct electrical conductivity measurements with monolithic microscopic four-point probes and four. The probe spacing (a side of the square) was 60 µm. Experimental data are fitted by a function described of monolithic MFPP measurements with 8-µm spacing probes (A) on a step-bunching region and (B) a step-free re

  13. Code of Official Conduct Student Government Association

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Long, Nicholas

    Code of Official Conduct Student Government Association Stephen F. Austin State University Section, the Student Government Association of Stephen F. Austin State University has adopted this Code of Official Association officials who may be elected, appointed, or employed comply with both the Letter and the Spirit

  14. Carbon Nanotube Assemblies for Transparent Conducting Electrodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garrett, Matthew P [ORNL] [ORNL; Gerhardt, Rosario [ORNL] [ORNL

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this chapter is to introduce readers to the fundamental and practical aspects of nanotube assemblies made into transparent conducting networks and discuss some practical aspects of their characterization. Transparent conducting coatings (TCC) are an essential part of electro-optical devices, from photovoltaics and light emitting devices to electromagnetic shielding and electrochromic widows. The market for organic materials (including nanomaterials and polymers) based TCCs is expected to show a growth rate of 56.9% to reach nearly 20.3billionin2015,whilethemarketfortraditionalinorganictransparentelectronicswillexperiencegrowthwithratesof6.7103 billion in 2015. Emerging flexible electronic applications have brought additional requirements of flexibility and low cost for TCC. However, the price of indium (the major component in indium tin oxide TCC) continues to increase. On the other hand, the price of nanomaterials has continued to decrease due to development of high volume, quality production processes. Additional benefits come from the low cost, nonvacuum deposition of nanomaterials based TCC, compared to traditional coatings requiring energy intensive vacuum deposition. Among the materials actively researched as alternative TCC are nanoparticles, nanowires, and nanotubes with high aspect ratio as well as their composites. The figure of merit (FOM) can be used to compare TCCs made from dissimilar materials and with different transmittance and conductivity values. In the first part of this manuscript, we will discuss the seven FOM parameters that have been proposed, including one specifically intended for flexible applications. The approach for how to measure TCE electrical properties, including frequency dependence, will also be discussed. We will relate the macroscale electrical characteristics of TCCs to the nanoscale parameters of conducting networks. The fundamental aspects of nanomaterial assemblies in conducting networks will also be addressed. We will review recent literature on TCCs composed of carbon nanotubes of different types in terms of the FOM.

  15. Nuclear fission as resonance-mediated conductance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. F. Bertsch

    2014-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

    For 75 years the theory of nuclear fission has been based on the existence of a collective coordinate associated with the nuclear shape, an assumption required by the Bohr-Wheeler formula as well as by the R-matrix theory of fission. We show that it is also possible to formulate the theory without the help of collective coordinates. In the new formulation, fission is facilitated by individual states in the barrier region rather than channels over the barrier. In a certain limit the theory reduces to a formula closely related to the formula for electronic conductance through resonant tunneling states. In contrast, conduction through channels gives rise to a staircase excitation function that is well-known in nanoscale electronics but has never been seen in nuclear fission.

  16. Helicopter magnetic survey conducted to locate wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Veloski, G.A.; Hammack, R.W.; Stamp, V. (Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center); Hall, R. (Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center); Colina, K. (Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center)

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A helicopter magnetic survey was conducted in August 2007 over 15.6 sq mi at the Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3’s (NPR-3) Teapot Dome Field near Casper, Wyoming. The survey’s purpose was to accurately locate wells drilled there during more than 90 years of continuous oilfield operation. The survey was conducted at low altitude and with closely spaced flight lines to improve the detection of wells with weak magnetic response and to increase the resolution of closely spaced wells. The survey was in preparation for a planned CO2 flood for EOR, which requires a complete well inventory with accurate locations for all existing wells. The magnetic survey was intended to locate wells missing from the well database and to provide accurate locations for all wells. The ability of the helicopter magnetic survey to accurately locate wells was accomplished by comparing airborne well picks with well locations from an intense ground search of a small test area.

  17. Micro-machined thermo-conductivity detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yu, Conrad (Antioch, CA)

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A micro-machined thermal conductivity detector for a portable gas chromatograph. The detector is highly sensitive and has fast response time to enable detection of the small size gas samples in a portable gas chromatograph which are in the order of nanoliters. The high sensitivity and fast response time are achieved through micro-machined devices composed of a nickel wire, for example, on a silicon nitride window formed in a silicon member and about a millimeter square in size. In addition to operating as a thermal conductivity detector, the silicon nitride window with a micro-machined wire therein of the device can be utilized for a fast response heater for PCR applications.

  18. Multiterminal Conductance of a Floquet Topological Insulator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. E. F. Foa Torres; P. M. Perez-Piskunow; C. A. Balseiro; G. Usaj

    2014-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on simulations of the dc conductance and quantum Hall response of a Floquet topological insulator using Floquet scattering theory. Our results reveal that laser-induced edge states in graphene lead to quantum Hall plateaus once imperfect matching with the non-illuminated leads is lessened. But the magnitude of the Hall plateaus is not directly related to the number and chirality of all the edge states at a given energy as usual. Instead, the plateaus are dominated only by those edge states adding to the dc density of states. Therefore, the dc quantum Hall conductance of a Floquet topological insulator is not directly linked to topological invariants of the full the Floquet bands.

  19. Fracture Conductivity of the Eagle Ford Shale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guzek, James J

    2014-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

    , and rock geomechanical properties. Therefore, optimizing conductivity by tailoring a well’s fracturing treatment to local reservoir characteristics is important to the oil and gas industry for economic reasons. The roots of hydraulic fracturing can... of the formation. Sahoo et al. (2013) identified that mineralogy, hydrocarbon filled porosity, and total organic content are most prominent parameters that control Eagle Ford well productivity. Mineral composition determines several geomechanical properties...

  20. Status of surface conduction in topological insulators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barua, Sourabh, E-mail: sbarua@iitk.ac.in; Rajeev, K. P. [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur, Kanpur 208016 (India)] [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur, Kanpur 208016 (India)

    2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this report, we scrutinize the thickness dependent resistivity data from the recent literature on electrical transport measurements in topological insulators. A linear increase in resistivity with increase in thickness is expected in the case of these materials since they have an insulating bulk and a conducting surface. However, such a trend is not seen in the resistivity versus thickness data for all the cases examined, except for some samples, where it holds for a range of thickness.

  1. Conductive Thermal Interaction in Evaporative Cooling Process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, B. S.; Degelman, L. O.

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    from the evaporative cooler would often be more than 6.5'F lower than that of a conventional evaporative cooling system due to thermal conduction between water and entering air. - Figure 1 Pad type evaporative cooler. DIRECT EVAPORATIVE COOLER... There are several types of direct evaporative cooler configurations available. Two popular system types are pad type unit and rotary type unit. A number of window mounted units are pad type evaporative coolers (Figure 1). In a pad type cooler, water...

  2. Nonlinear optical and conductive polymeric material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Barton, T.J.; Ijadi-Maghsooodi, S; Yi Pang.

    1993-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A polymeric material is described which exhibits nonlinear optical properties if undoped and conductive properties if doped. The polymer is prepared by polymerizing diethynylsilane compositions, the resulting polymeric material having a weight average molecular weight between about 20,000 and about 200,000 grams per mole. The polymer is prepared and catalytically polymerized by exposure to a catalyst, such as MoCl[sub 5] or W(CO)[sub 6].

  3. Method of synthesis of proton conducting materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Garzon, Fernando Henry; Einsla, Melinda Lou; Mukundan, Rangachary

    2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of producing a proton conducting material, comprising adding a pyrophosphate salt to a solvent to produce a dissolved pyrophosphate salt; adding an inorganic acid salt to a solvent to produce a dissolved inorganic acid salt; adding the dissolved inorganic acid salt to the dissolved pyrophosphate salt to produce a mixture; substantially evaporating the solvent from the mixture to produce a precipitate; and calcining the precipitate at a temperature of from about 400.degree. C. to about 1200.degree. C.

  4. Transparent conducting oxides: A -doped superlattice approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cooper, Valentino R [ORNL; Seo, Sung Seok A. [University of Kentucky, Lexington; Lee, Suyoun [ORNL; Kim, Jun Sung [Pohang University of Science and Technology (POSTECH), Pohang, Republic of Korea; Choi, Woo Seok [ORNL; Okamoto, Satoshi [ORNL; Lee, Ho Nyung [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two-dimensional electron gases (2DEGs) at the interface of oxide heterostructures have been the subject of recent experiment and theory, due to the intriguing phenomena that occur in confined electronic states. However, while much has been done to understand the origin of 2DEGs and related phenomena, very little has been explored with regards to the control of conduction pathways and the distribution of charge carriers. Using first principles simulations and experimental thin film synthesis methods, we examine the effect of dimensionality on carrier transport in La delta-doped SrTiO3 (STO) superlattices, as a function of the thickness of the insulating STO spacer. Our computed Fermi surfaces and layer-resolved carrier density proles demonstrate that there is a critical thickness of the STO spacer, below which carrier transport is dominated by three-dimensional conduction of interface charges arising from appreciable overlap of the quantum mechanical wavefunctions between neighboring delta-doped layers. We observe that, experimentally, these superlattices remain highly transparent to visible light. Band structure calculations indicate that this is a result of the appropriately large gap between the O 2p and Ti d states. The tunability of the quantum mechanical wavefunctions and the optical transparency highlight the potential for using oxide heterostructures in novel opto-electronic devices; thus providing a route to the creation of novel transparent conducting oxides.

  5. Conductance valve and pressure-to-conductance transducer method and apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schoeniger, Joseph S.; Cummings, Eric B.; Brennan, James S.

    2005-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A device for interrupting or throttling undesired ionic transport through a fluid network is disclosed. The device acts as a fluid valve by reversibly generating a fixed "bubble" in the conducting solvent solution carried by the network. The device comprises a porous hydrophobic structure filling a portion of a connecting channel within the network and optionally incorporates flow restrictor elements at either end of the porous structure that function as pressure isolation barriers, and a fluid reservoir connected to the region of the channel containing the porous structure. Also included is a pressure pump connected to the fluid reservoir. The device operates by causing the pump to vary the hydraulic pressure to a quantity of solvent solution held within the reservoir and porous structure. At high pressures, most or all of the pores of the structure are filled with conducting liquid so the ionic conductance is high. At lower pressures, only a fraction of the pores are filled with liquid, so ionic conductivity is lower. Below a threshold pressure, the porous structure contains only vapor, so there is no liquid conduction path. The device therefore effectively throttles ionic transport through the porous structure and acts as a "conductance valve" or "pressure-to-conductance" transducer within the network.

  6. A universal high energy anomaly in angle resolved photoemission spectra of high temperature superconductors -- possible evidence of spinon and holon branches

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    possible evidence of spinon and holon branches J. Graf, 1, 2the pro- posed spinon and holon dispersions, respectively.quasiparticles into a spinon and holon branch in the high T

  7. Precise measurement of branching ratios in the beta decay of 38Ca

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, H I; Iacob, V E; Bencomo, M; Chen, L; Horvat, V; Nica, N; Roeder, B T; McCleskey, E; Tribble, R E; Towner, I S

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the full description of a measurement of the branching ratios for the beta-decay of 38Ca. This decay includes five allowed 0+ --> 1+ branches and a superallowed 0+ --> 0+ one. With our new result for the latter, we determine its ft value to be 3062.3(68) s, a result whose precision (0.2%) is comparable to the precision of the thirteen well known 0+ --> 0+ transitions used up till now for the determination of Vud, the up-down quark-mixing element of the CKM matrix. The 38Ca superallowed transition thus becomes the first addition to this set of transitions in nearly a decade and the first for which a precise mirror comparison is possible, thus enabling an improved test of the isospin-symmetry-breaking corrections required for the extraction of Vud.

  8. Branched Microstructures in the Ginzburg-Landau Model of Type-I Superconductors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sergio Conti; Felix Otto; Sylvia Serfaty

    2015-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the Ginzburg-Landau energy for a type-I superconductor in the shape of an infinite three-dimensional slab, with two-dimensional periodicity, with an applied magnetic field which is uniform and perpendicular to the slab. We determine the optimal scaling law of the minimal energy in terms of the parameters of the problem, when the applied magnetic field is sufficiently small and the sample sufficiently thick. This optimal scaling law is proven via ansatz-free lower bounds and an explicit branching construction which refines further and further as one approaches the surface of the sample. Two different regimes appear, with different scaling exponents. In the first regime, the branching leads to an almost uniform magnetic field pattern on the boundary; in the second one the inhomogeneity survives up to the boundary.

  9. Measurement of the Branching Fraction of B0 Meson Decay to a_1^+(1260) pi-

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aubert, B.; Barate, R.; Boutigny, D.; Couderc, F.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; /Annecy, LAPP; Grauges, E.; /Barcelona, IFAE; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pompili, A.; /Bari U. /INFN, Bari; Chen, J.C.; Qi, N.D.; Rong, G.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y.S.; /Beijing, Inst. High Energy Phys.; Eigen, G.; Ofte, I.; Stugu, B. /Bergen U. /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /Bristol U. /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San

    2005-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a preliminary measurement of the branching fraction of the B meson decay B{sup 0} {yields} a{sub 1}{sup +}(1260){pi}{sup -}with a{sub 1}{sup +}(1260) {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}. The data sample corresponds to 218 x 10{sup 6} B{bar B} pairs produced in e{sup +}e{sup -} annihilation through the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance. We find the branching fraction (40.2 {+-} 3.9 {+-} 3.9) x 10{sup -6}, where the first error quoted is statistical and the second is systematic. The fitted values of the a{sub 1}(1260) parameters are m{sub a{sub 1}} = 1.22 {+-} 0.02 GeV/c{sup 2} and {Lambda}{sub a{sub 1}} = 0.423 {+-} 0.050 GeV/c{sup 2}.

  10. Branching fractions and direct CP asymmetries of charmless decay modes at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morello, Michael; /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa

    2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors present new CDF results on the branching fractions and time-integrated direct CP asymmetries for B{sup 0} and B{sub s}{sup 0} decay modes into pairs of charmless charged hadrons (pion or kaon). The data set for this update amounts to 1 fb{sup -1} of {bar p}p collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. They report the first observation of the B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} K{sup -}{pi}{sup +} mode and a measurement of its branching fraction and direct CP asymmetry. They also observe for the first time two charmless decays of b-baryon: {Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} {yields} p{pi}{sup -} and {Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} {yields} pK{sup -}.

  11. Branching fractions for transitions of {psi}(2S) to J/{psi}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mendez, H. [University of Puerto Rico, Mayaguez, 00681 (Puerto Rico); Ge, J. Y.; Miller, D. H.; Shipsey, I. P. J.; Xin, B. [Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); Adams, G. S.; Anderson, M.; Cummings, J. P.; Danko, I.; Hu, D.; Moziak, B.; Napolitano, J. [Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York 12180 (United States); He, Q.; Insler, J.; Muramatsu, H.; Park, C. S.; Thorndike, E. H.; Yang, F. [University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14627 (United States); Artuso, M.; Blusk, S. [Syracuse University, Syracuse, New York 13244 (United States)] (and others)

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report determination of branching fractions for the decays {psi}(2S){yields}h+J/{psi}, where h=any, {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}, {pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}, {eta}, {pi}{sup 0}, and {gamma}{gamma} through {chi}{sub c0,1,2}. These measurements use 27M {psi}(2S) decays produced in e{sup +}e{sup -} collision data collected with the CLEO detector. The resulting branching fractions and ratios thereof improve upon previously achieved precision in all cases, and in combination with other measurements permit determination of B({chi}{sub cJ}{yields}{gamma}J/{psi}) and B({psi}(2S){yields}light hadrons)

  12. Perspectives on the viscoelasticity and flow behavior of entangled linear and branched polymers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Snijkers, F; Olmsted, P D; Vlassopoulos, D

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We briefly review the recent advances in the rheology of entangled polymers and identify emerging research trends and outstanding challenges, especially with respect to branched polymers. Emphasis is placed on the role of well-characterized model systems, as well as the synergy of synthesis-characterization, rheometry and modeling/simulations. The theoretical framework for understanding the observed linear and nonlinear rheological phenomena is the tube model which is critically assessed in view of its successes and shortcomings, whereas alternative approaches are briefly discussed. Finally, intriguing experimental findings and controversial issues that merit consistent explanation, such as shear banding instabilities, multiple stress overshoots in transient simple shear and enhanced steady-state elongational viscosity in polymer solutions, are discussed, whereas future directions such as branch point dynamics and anisotropic monomeric friction are outlined.

  13. Quantum Darwinism: Entanglement, branches, and the emergent classicality of redundantly stored quantum information

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blume-Kohout, Robin; Zurek, Wojciech H. [Theoretical Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545, USA and Institute for Quantum Information, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States); Theoretical Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

    2006-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We lay a comprehensive foundation for the study of redundant information storage in decoherence processes. Redundancy has been proposed as a prerequisite for objectivity, the defining property of classical objects. We consider two ensembles of states for a model universe consisting of one system and many environments: the first consisting of arbitrary states, and the second consisting of 'singly branching' states consistent with a simple decoherence model. Typical states from the random ensemble do not store information about the system redundantly, but information stored in branching states has a redundancy proportional to the environment's size. We compute the specific redundancy for a wide range of model universes, and fit the results to a simple first-principles theory. Our results show that the presence of redundancy divides information about the system into three parts: classical (redundant); purely quantum; and the borderline, undifferentiated or 'nonredundant', information.

  14. Single-enzyme kinetics with branched pathways: exact theory and series expansion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ashok Garai; Debashish Chowdhury

    2014-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The progress of the successive rounds of catalytic conversion of substrates into product(s) by a single enzyme is characterized by the distribution of turnover times. Establishing the most general form of dependence of this distribution on the substrate concentration [S] is one of the fundamental challenges in single molecule enzymology. The distribution of the times of dwell of a molecular motor at the successive positions on its track is an analogous quantity. We derive approximate series expansions for the [ATP]-dependence of the first two moments of the dwell time distributions of motors that catalyze hydrolysis of ATP to draw input energy. Comparison between our results for motors with branched pathways and the corresponding expressions reported earlier for linear enzymatic pathways provides deep insight into the effects of the branches. Such insight is likely to help in discovering the most general form of [S]-dependence of these fundamental distributions.

  15. Detection of a branched alkyl molecule in the interstellar medium: iso-propyl cyanide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Belloche, Arnaud; Müller, Holger S P; Menten, Karl M

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The largest non-cyclic molecules detected in the interstellar medium (ISM) are organic with a straight-chain carbon backbone. We report an interstellar detection of a branched alkyl molecule, iso-propyl cyanide (i-C3H7CN), with an abundance 0.4 times that of its straight-chain structural isomer. This detection suggests that branched carbon-chain molecules may be generally abundant in the ISM. Our astrochemical model indicates that both isomers are produced within or upon dust grain ice mantles through the addition of molecular radicals, albeit via differing reaction pathways. The production of iso-propyl cyanide appears to require the addition of a functional group to a non-terminal carbon in the chain. Its detection therefore bodes well for the presence in the ISM of amino acids, for which such side-chain structure is a key characteristic.

  16. Effective hydraulic conductivity of bounded, strongly heterogeneous porous media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tartakovsky, Daniel M.

    Effective hydraulic conductivity of bounded, strongly heterogeneous porous media Evangelos K of Arizona, Tucson Abstract. We develop analytical expressions for the effective hydraulic conductivity Ke boundaries. The log hydraulic conductivity Y forms a Gaussian, statistically homogeneous and anisotropic

  17. CLNS 07/2005 Measurement of Absolute Hadronic Branching Fractions of D

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Among measurements for three D 0 and six D + modes, we obtain reference branching fractions B(D 0 ! K \\Gamma Ã? + ) = (3:891 \\Sigma 0:035 \\Sigma 0:059 \\Sigma 0:035)% and B(D + ! K \\Gamma Ã? + Ã? + ) = (9:14 \\Sigma 0:10 \\Sigma 0:16 \\Sigma 0:07)%, where the first uncertainty is statistical, the second is all

  18. Circadian oscillation of starch branching enzyme gene expression in the sorghum endosperm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mutisya, J.; Sun, C.; Jansson, C.

    2009-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Expression of the three SBE genes, encoding starch branching enzymes, in the sorghum endosperm exhibited a diurnal rhythm during a 24-h cycle. Remarkably, the oscillation in SBE expression was maintained in cultured spikes after a 48-h dark treatment, also when fed a continuous solution of sucrose or abscisic acid. Our findings suggest that the rhythmicity in SBE expression in the endosperm is independent of cues from the photosynthetic source and that the oscillator resides within the endosperm itself.

  19. Improving the LP bound of a MILP by dual concurrent branching and ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Page 1 ... Furthermore the restrictions of the dual values can be used for studying the addition of arbitrary .... Now let the branch Bi,j be the set {bi,j| y0 ? bi,j ? V i,j}. So Bi,j is a linear ...... Only for the ease of the notations we don't consider cases of case distinction like x1 = 0 ? x2 = 0. .... So what's wrong with our technique?

  20. Regulation of branching by phytochrome B and PPFD in Arabidopsis thaliana

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chou, Nan-yen

    2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE Approved by: Chair of Committee Scott Finlayson Committee Members Dirk Hays Hisashi Koiwa Head of Department David Baltensperger August 2008 Major Subject... formation and the further outgrowth of the axillary buds. Once formed, an axillary bud can either grow out to give rise to an individual branch or remain dormant. Both axillary meristem initiation and bud outgrowth can potentially determine the final...

  1. Measurement of the Branching Fraction for J/?-> p \\bar{p}?and p \\bar{p} ?^{'}

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    BES collaboration

    2009-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Using 58$\\times 10^{6}$ $\\jpsi$ events collected with the Beijing Spectrometer (BESII) at the Beijing Electron Positron Collider (BEPC), the branching fractions of $\\jpsi$ to $p\\bar{p}\\eta$ and $p\\bar{p}\\etap$ are determined. The ratio $\\frac{\\Gamma(\\jpsi\\rar\\ppb\\eta)}{\\Gamma(\\jpsi\\rar\\ppb)}$ obtained by this analysis agrees with expectations based on soft-pion theorem calculations.

  2. Implications of a large B s ? ? + ? ? branching fraction for the minimal supersymmetric standard model

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hooper, Dan; Kelso, Chris

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently, the CDF Collaboration reported the first nonzero measurement of the Bs????? branching fraction. The LHCb, CMS and ATLAS, collaborations have reported upper limits that are in tension with the CDF result. We consider the implications of these measurements for the specific case of the minimal supersymmetric standard model. We also discuss the implications of these measurements for neutralino dark matter and the supersymmetric contribution to the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon.

  3. Experimental Investigation of Propped Fracture Conductivity in Tight Gas Reservoirs Using The Dynamic Conductivity Test

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Romero Lugo, Jose 1985-

    2012-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

    deep into the formation, changing the flow pattern from radial to linear flow. The dynamic conductivity test was used for this research to evaluate the effect of closure stress, temperature, proppant concentration, and flow back rates on fracture...

  4. Measurement of branching fraction and first evidence of CP violation in B??a?±(1260)?? decays

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Dalseno, J.; Adachi, I.; Aihara, H.; Asner, D. M.; Aulchenko, V.; Aushev, T.; Bakich, A. M.; Bay, A.; Belous, K.; Bhuyan, B.; et al

    2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a measurement of the branching fraction and time-dependent CP violation parameters in B??a±?(1260)?? decays. The results are obtained from the final data sample containing 772×10? BB¯¯¯ pairs collected at the ?(4S) resonance with the Belle detector at the KEKB asymmetric-energy e?e? collider. We obtain the product branching fraction B(B??a±?(1260)??)×B(a±?(1260)??±???±)=(11.1±1.0(stat)±1.4(syst))×10?? and an upper limit on the product branching fraction for a possible decay with the same final state B(B??a±?(1320)??)×B(a±?(1320)??±???±)more »respectively. Simultaneously, we also extract the CP-conserving parameters ?C=+0.54±0.11(stat)±0.07(syst), ?S=–0.09±0.14(stat)±0.06(syst), which, respectively, describe a rate difference and strong phase difference between the decay channels where the a±? does not contain the spectator quark and those where it does. We find first evidence of mixing-induced CP violation in B??a±?(1260)?? decays with 3.1? significance. The rate where the a±? does not contain the spectator quark from the B meson is found to dominate the rate where it does at the 4.1? level. However, there is no evidence for either time- and flavor-integrated direct CP violation or flavor-dependent direct CP violation.« less

  5. Measurement of branching fraction and first evidence of CP violation in B??a?±(1260)?? decays

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Dalseno, J.; Adachi, I.; Aihara, H.; Asner, D. M.; Aulchenko, V.; Aushev, T.; Bakich, A. M.; Bay, A.; Belous, K.; Bhuyan, B.; Bozek, A.; Bra?ko, M.; Brovchenko, O.; Browder, T. E.; Chekelian, V.; Chen, A.; Chen, P.; Cheon, B. G.; Chilikin, K.; Chistov, R.; Cho, I.-S.; Cho, K.; Choi, Y.; Doležal, Z.; Drásal, Z.; Eidelman, S.; Fast, J. E.; Gaur, V.; Gabyshev, N.; Garmash, A.; Goh, Y. M.; Hayashii, H.; Horii, Y.; Hoshi, Y.; Hou, W.-S.; Hsiung, Y. B.; Hyun, H. J.; Iijima, T.; Inami, K.; Ishikawa, A.; Itoh, R.; Iwabuchi, M.; Iwasaki, Y.; Iwashita, T.; Julius, T.; Kang, J. H.; Kiesling, C.; Kim, H. O.; Kim, J. B.; Kim, Y. J.; Kinoshita, K.; Ko, B. R.; Koblitz, S.; Kodyš, P.; Korpar, S.; Križan, P.; Krokovny, P.; Kronenbitter, B.; Kuhr, T.; Kumita, T.; Kwon, Y.-J.; Lee, S.-H.; Li, J.; Libby, J.; Liu, C.; Liu, Z. Q.; Louvot, R.; MacNaughton, J.; Matvienko, D.; McOnie, S.; Miyabayashi, K.; Miyata, H.; Miyazaki, Y.; Mohanty, G. B.; Mohapatra, D.; Moll, A.; Muramatsu, N.; Nakao, M.; Natkaniec, Z.; Nedelkovska, E.; Ng, C.; Nishida, S.; Nishimura, K.; Nitoh, O.; Ogawa, S.; Ohshima, T.; Okuno, S.; Pakhlov, P.; Pakhlova, G.; Park, C. W.; Park, H. K.; Pedlar, T. K.; Pestotnik, R.; Petri?, M.; Piilonen, L. E.; Prim, M.; Prothmann, K.; Ritter, M.; Röhrken, M.; Sahoo, H.; Sakai, Y.; Sanuki, T.; Schneider, O.; Schwanda, C.; Schwartz, A. J.; Senyo, K.; Seon, O.; Sevior, M. E.; Shapkin, M.; Shebalin, V.; Shen, C. P.; Shibata, T.-A.; Shiu, J.-G.; Sibidanov, A.; Simon, F.; Smerkol, P.; Sohn, Y.-S.; Solovieva, E.; Stari?, M.; Sumihama, M.; Sumiyoshi, T.; Tatishvili, G.; Teramoto, Y.; Trabelsi, K.; Uchida, M.; Uehara, S.; Unno, Y.; Uno, S.; Urquijo, P.; Usov, Y.; Vanhoefer, P.; Varner, G.; Wang, C. H.; Wang, P.; Watanabe, M.; Watanabe, Y.; Williams, K. M.; Won, E.; Yabsley, B. D.; Yamashita, Y.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhilich, V.; Zhulanov, V.; Zupanc, A.

    2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a measurement of the branching fraction and time-dependent CP violation parameters in B??a±?(1260)?? decays. The results are obtained from the final data sample containing 772×10? BB¯¯¯ pairs collected at the ?(4S) resonance with the Belle detector at the KEKB asymmetric-energy e?e? collider. We obtain the product branching fraction B(B??a±?(1260)??)×B(a±?(1260)??±???±)=(11.1±1.0(stat)±1.4(syst))×10?? and an upper limit on the product branching fraction for a possible decay with the same final state B(B??a±?(1320)??)×B(a±?(1320)??±???±)±? does not contain the spectator quark and those where it does. We find first evidence of mixing-induced CP violation in B??a±?(1260)?? decays with 3.1? significance. The rate where the a±? does not contain the spectator quark from the B meson is found to dominate the rate where it does at the 4.1? level. However, there is no evidence for either time- and flavor-integrated direct CP violation or flavor-dependent direct CP violation.

  6. Branching fractions and CP asymmetries in two-body nonleptonic charmless b-hadron decays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warburton, Andreas; /McGill U.

    2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Relative branching fractions of B{sub d,s}{sup 0} {yields} h{sup +}h'{sup -} decays (where h,h' = K or {pi}) and the direct Cp asymmetry A{sub CP} in the B{sub d}{sup 0} {yields} K{sup +}{pi}{sup -} mode are measured with 179 {+-} 11 pb {sup -1} of data collected using the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron p{bar p} collider. The first branching-fraction measurement of a B{sub s}{sup 0} meson to two pseudoscalars, {Beta}(B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} K{sup +} K{sup -}), and a search for the baryon mode {Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} {yields} p{sup +} h{sup -} are also presented, in addition to branching-fraction limits on the rare channels B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} K{sup +} {pi}{sup -}, B{sub d}{sup 0} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup -}, and B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}.

  7. Functional significance of octameric RuvA for a branch migration complex from Thermus thermophilus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fujiwara, Yoshie [Graduate School of Engineering Science, Osaka University, 1-3, Machikaneyama, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-8531 (Japan); Mayanagi, Kouta [Nagahama Institute of Bio-Science and Technology, 1266 Tamura-cho, Nagahama, Shiga 526-0829 (Japan); The Takara-Bio Endowed Division, Institute for Protein Research, Osaka University, 6-2-3, Furuedai, Suita, Osaka 565-0874 (Japan); JST-BIRD, Nagahama 526-0829 (Japan); Morikawa, Kosuke [The Takara-Bio Endowed Division, Institute for Protein Research, Osaka University, 6-2-3, Furuedai, Suita, Osaka 565-0874 (Japan); CREST, JST, Sanban-cho, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 102-0075 (Japan)], E-mail: morikako@protein.osaka-u.ac.jp

    2008-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The RuvAB complex promotes migration of Holliday junction at the late stage of homologous recombination. The RuvA tetramer specifically recognizes Holliday junction to form two types of complexes. A single tetramer is bound to the open configuration of the junction DNA in complex I, while the octameric RuvA core structure sandwiches the same junction in complex II. The hexameric RuvB rings, symmetrically bound to both sides of RuvA on Holliday junction, pump out DNA duplexes, depending upon ATP hydrolysis. We investigated functional differences between the wild-type RuvA from Thermus thermophilus and mutants impaired the ability of complex II formation. These mutant RuvA, exclusively forming complex I, reduced activities of branch migration and ATP hydrolysis, suggesting that the octameric RuvA is essential for efficient branch migration. Together with our recent electron microscopic analysis, this finding provides important insights into functional roles of complex II in the coordinated branch migration mechanism.

  8. Investigation of the effect of gel residue on hydraulic fracture conductivity using dynamic fracture conductivity test

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marpaung, Fivman

    2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    conductivity is created when proppant slurry is pumped into a hydraulic fracture in low permeability rock. Unlike conventional fracture conductivity tests in which proppant is loaded into the fracture artificially, we pump proppant/ fracturing fluid slurries... different or special methods for completion, stimulation, and/or production techniques to retrieve the resource. Natural gas from coal or coal bed methane, tight gas sands, shale gas, and gas hydrates are all examples of unconventional gas reservoirs...

  9. Investigation of the effect of gel residue on hydraulic fracture conductivity using dynamic fracture conductivity test

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marpaung, Fivman

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    ) ............................................................................ 51 Figure B.9: Fracture Conductivity Behavior (Polymer Concentration = 50 lb/Mgal and Gas Rate = 0.5 slm) ............................................................................ 52 Figure B.10: Fracture Conductivity Behavior (Polymer... documented in API RP-61 (1989). The recommended conditions and procedure for the test includes loading a known proppant concentration (generally 2 lb/ft2) uniformly between two steel pistons at ambient temperature, maintaining closure stress for 15 minutes...

  10. Genealogy of flows of continuous-state branching processes via flows of partitions and the Eve property

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Labbé, Cyril

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We encode the genealogy of a continuous-state branching process associated with a branching mechanism $\\Psi$ - or $\\Psi$-CSBP in short - using a stochastic flow of partitions. This encoding holds for all branching mechanisms and appears as a very tractable object to deal with asymptotic behaviours and convergences. In particular we study the so-called Eve property - the existence of an ancestor from which the entire population descends asymptotically - and give a necessary and sufficient condition on the $\\Psi$-CSBP for this property to hold. Finally, we show that the flow of partitions unifies the lookdown representation and the flow of subordinators when the Eve property holds.

  11. From statistics of regular tree-like graphs to distribution function and gyration radius of branched polymers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grosberg, Alexander Y

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider flexible branched polymer, with quenched branch structure, and show that its conformational entropy as a function of its gyration radius $R$, at large $R$, obeys, in the scaling sense, $\\Delta S \\sim R^2/(a^2L)$, with $a$ bond length (or Kuhn segment) and $L$ defined as an average spanning distance. We show that this estimate is valid up to at most the logarithmic correction for any tree. We do so by explicitly computing the largest eigenvalues of Kramers matrices for both regular and "sparse" 3-branched trees, uncovering on the way their peculiar mathematical properties.

  12. BBSGI.MAN -BRANCH-BUS/SILICON GRAPHICS DATA ACQUISITION SYSTEM (BBSGI) For IRIX 5.x systems -AT&T UNIX System V Release 4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    BBSGI.MAN - BRANCH-BUS/SILICON GRAPHICS DATA ACQUISITION SYSTEM (BBSGI) For IRIX 5.x systems - AT&T UNIX System V Release 4 r.imossi/oldf/bnl 25-Oct-1993 BRANCH-BUS/SILICON GRAPHICS DATA ACQUISITION The BRANCH-BUS/SILICON GRAPHICS DATA ACQUISITION SYSTEM (BBSGI) is a product of the Online Data Facility

  13. Joining Mixed Conducting Oxides Using an Air-Fired Electrically Conductive Braze

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hardy, John S.; Kim, Jin Yong Y.; Weil, K. Scott

    2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Due to their mixed oxygen ion and electron conducting properties, ceramics such as lanthanum strontium cobalt ferrites (LSCF) are attractive materials for use in active electrochemical devices such as solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) and oxygen separation membranes. However, to take full advantage of the unique properties of these materials, reliable joining techniques need to be developed. If such a joining technique yields a ceramic-to-metal junction that is also electrically conductive, the hermetic seals in the device could provide the added function of either drawing current from the mixed conducting oxide, in the case of SOFC applications, or carrying it to the oxide to initate ionic conduction, in the case of oxygen separation and electrocatalysis applications. This would greatly reduce the need for complex interconnect design, thereby simplifying one of the major challenges faced in SOFC development. A process referred to as reactive air brazing (RAB) has been developed in which firing a Ag-CuO filler material in air creates a functional ceramic-to-metal junction, in which the silver-based matrix of the braze affords both metallic ductility and conductivity in the joint. Investigating a range of Ag-CuO alloy combinations determined that compositions containing between 1.4 and 16 mol% CuO appear to offer the best combination of wettability, joint strength, and electrical conductivity.

  14. Conductive ceramic composition and method of preparation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, James L. (Lemont, IL); Kucera, Eugenia H. (Downers Grove, IL)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A ceramic anode composition is formed of a multivalent metal oxide or oxygenate such as an alkali metal, transition metal oxygenate. The anode is prepared as a non-stoichiometric crystalline structure by reaction and conditioning in a hydrogen gas cover containing minor proportions of carbon dioxide and water vapor. The structure exhibits a single phase and substantially enhanced electrical conductivity over that of the corresponding stoichiometric structure. Unexpectedly, such oxides and oxygenates are found to be stable in the reducing anode fuel gas of a molten carbonate fuel cell.

  15. Conductivity maximum in a charged colloidal suspension

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bastea, S

    2009-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Molecular dynamics simulations of a charged colloidal suspension in the salt-free regime show that the system exhibits an electrical conductivity maximum as a function of colloid charge. We attribute this behavior to two main competing effects: colloid effective charge saturation due to counterion 'condensation' and diffusion slowdown due to the relaxation effect. In agreement with previous observations, we also find that the effective transported charge is larger than the one determined by the Stern layer and suggest that it corresponds to the boundary fluid layer at the surface of the colloidal particles.

  16. Lead Sulphide Nanocrystal: Conducting Polymer Solar Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrew A. R. Watt; David Blake; Jamie H. Warner; Elizabeth A. Thomsen; Eric L. Tavenner; Halina Rubinsztein-Dunlop; Paul Meredith

    2004-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we report photovoltaic devices fabricated from PbS nanocrystals and the conducting polymer poly MEH-PPV. This composite material was produced via a new single-pot synthesis which solves many of the issues associated with existing methods. Our devices have white light power conversion efficiencies under AM1.5 illumination of 0.7% and single wavelength conversion efficiencies of 1.1%. Additionally, they exhibit remarkably good ideality factors (n=1.15). Our measurements show that these composites have significant potential as soft optoelectronic materials.

  17. Nanostructured Transparent Conducting Oxides via Blockcopolymer Patterning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Joung Youn Ellie

    2014-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    . This can lead to new device designs of organic light emitting diodes (OLEDS), fuel cells, displays and solar cells. Moreover, the ability to incorporate other various functional materials to form a hybrid with the nanostructured TCO allows possibilities... cell work and the XPS measurements as well as other scientific insights. I am grateful to Dr. K.K. Banger for the help with conductivity measurements as well as the collaborative work on the amorphous TCO. His insights on sol-gel chemistry as well...

  18. Synthesis of transparent conducting oxide coatings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Elam, Jeffrey W.; Martinson, Alex B. F.; Pellin, Michael J.; Hupp, Joseph T.

    2010-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and system for preparing a light transmitting and electrically conductive oxide film. The method and system includes providing an atomic layer deposition system, providing a first precursor selected from the group of cyclopentadienyl indium, tetrakis (dimethylamino) tin and mixtures thereof, inputting to the deposition system the first precursor for reaction for a first selected time, providing a purge gas for a selected time, providing a second precursor comprised of an oxidizer, and optionally inputting a second precursor into the deposition system for reaction and alternating for a predetermined number of cycles each of the first precursor, the purge gas and the second precursor to produce the oxide film.

  19. Exploding conducting film laser pumping apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ware, Kenneth D. (San Diego, CA); Jones, Claude R. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Exploding conducting film laser optical pumping apparatus. The 342-nm molecular iodine and the 1.315-.mu.m atomic iodine lasers have been optically pumped by intense light from exploding-metal-film discharges. Brightness temperatures for the exploding-film discharges were approximately 25,000 K. Although lower output energies were achieved for such discharges when compared to exploding-wire techniques, the larger surface area and smaller inductance inherent in the exploding-film should lead to improved efficiency for optically-pumped gas lasers.

  20. Conductive ceramic composition and method of preparation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, J.L.; Kucera, E.H.

    1991-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A ceramic anode composition is formed of a multivalent metal oxide or oxygenate such as an alkali metal, transition metal oxygenate. The anode is prepared as a non-stoichiometric crystalline structure by reaction and conditioning in a hydrogen gas cover containing minor proportions of carbon dioxide and water vapor. The structure exhibits a single phase and substantially enhanced electrical conductivity over that of the corresponding stoichiometric structure. Unexpectedly, such oxides and oxygenates are found to be stable in the reducing anode fuel gas of a molten carbonate fuel cell. 4 figures.

  1. Code of Conduct Regarding Holiday Gifts

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    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWPSuccessAlamosCharacterization2Climate,Cobalt discoveryCode of Conduct

  2. Conductive Plays - Basement | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, clickInformationNew| Open EnergyInformationConductive Plays - Basement

  3. Glass-like thermal conductivity in high efficiency thermoelectric...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Glass-like thermal conductivity in high efficiency thermoelectric materials Glass-like thermal conductivity in high efficiency thermoelectric materials Discusses strategies to...

  4. Study hints at conduction secrets in bacteria nanowires | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the team used a non-conducting fiber from Gonorrhea to model how electrically conducting proteins might work. They overlaid multiple Geobacter pilin proteins on Gonorrhea's fiber...

  5. EM Conducts Third Annual Spanish Language Training with Record...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    EM Conducts Third Annual Spanish Language Training with Record Participation EM Conducts Third Annual Spanish Language Training with Record Participation March 30, 2015 - 12:00pm...

  6. Possible Dynamically Gated Conductance along Heme Wires in Bacterial...

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    Possible Dynamically Gated Conductance along Heme Wires in Bacterial Multiheme Cytochromes. Possible Dynamically Gated Conductance along Heme Wires in Bacterial Multiheme...

  7. Multilayered YSZ/GZO films with greatly enhanced ionic conduction...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    YSZGZO films with greatly enhanced ionic conduction for low temperature solid oxide fuel cells. Multilayered YSZGZO films with greatly enhanced ionic conduction for low...

  8. An automated tool for three types of saturated hydraulic conductivity...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    automated tool for three types of saturated hydraulic conductivity laboratory measurements. An automated tool for three types of saturated hydraulic conductivity laboratory...

  9. anesthesia conduction: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Technologies and Information Sciences Websites Summary: CodeofConduct British Computer Society Code of Conduct 5 SEPTEMBER 2001 VERSION 2.0 12;INTRODUCTION This Code sets out...

  10. aquifer tests conducted: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Technologies and Information Sciences Websites Summary: CodeofConduct British Computer Society Code of Conduct 5 SEPTEMBER 2001 VERSION 2.0 12;INTRODUCTION This Code sets out...

  11. Non carbon mixed conducting materials for PEFC electrocatalysts...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Non carbon mixed conducting materials for PEFC electrocatalysts and electrodes Non carbon mixed conducting materials for PEFC electrocatalysts and electrodes These slides were...

  12. UMBC Code of Conduct for Logo Merchandise Licensees I. Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adali, Tulay

    UMBC Code of Conduct for Logo Merchandise Licensees I. Introduction A. UMBC is committed licensed University logo merchandise are required to follow when they conduct business. D. Throughout

  13. Formed Core Sampler Hydraulic Conductivity Testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, D. H.; Reigel, M. M.

    2012-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A full-scale formed core sampler was designed and functionally tested for use in the Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF). Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was requested to compare properties of the formed core samples and core drilled samples taken from adjacent areas in the full-scale sampler. While several physical properties were evaluated, the primary property of interest was hydraulic conductivity. Differences in hydraulic conductivity between the samples from the formed core sampler and those representing the bulk material were noted with respect to the initial handling and storage of the samples. Due to testing conditions, the site port samples were exposed to uncontrolled temperature and humidity conditions prior to testing whereas the formed core samples were kept in sealed containers with minimal exposure to an uncontrolled environment prior to testing. Based on the results of the testing, no significant differences in porosity or density were found between the formed core samples and those representing the bulk material in the test stand.

  14. Transparent conducting thin films for spacecraft applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perez-Davis, M.E.; Malave-Sanabria, T.; Hambourger, P.; Rutledge, S.K.; Roig, D.; Degroh, K.K.; Hung, C.

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Transparent conductive thin films are required for a variety of optoelectronic applications: automotive and aircraft windows, and solar cells for space applications. Transparent conductive coatings of indium-tin-oxide (ITO)-magnesium fluoride (MgF2) and aluminum doped zinc oxide (AZO) at several dopant levels are investigated for electrical resistivity (sheet resistance), carrier concentration, optical properties, and atomic oxygen durability. The sheet resistance values of ITO-MgF2 range from 10[sup 2] to 10[sup 11] ohms/square, with transmittance of 75 to 86 percent. The AZO films sheet resistances range from 10[sup 7] to 10[sup 11] ohms/square with transmittances from 84 to 91 percent. It was found that in general, with respect to the optical properties, the zinc oxide (ZnO), AZO, and the high MgF2 content ITO-MgF2 samples, were all durable to atomic oxygen plasma, while the low MgF2 content of ITO-MgF2 samples were not durable to atomic oxygen plasma exposure.

  15. Sampling Artifacts from Conductive Silicone Tubing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Timko, Michael T.; Yu, Zhenhong; Kroll, Jesse; Jayne, John T.; Worsnop, Douglas R.; Miake-Lye, Richard C.; Onasch, Timothy B.; Liscinsky, David; Kirchstetter, Thomas W.; Destaillats, Hugo; Holder, Amara L.; Smith, Jared D.; Wilson, Kevin R.

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We report evidence that carbon impregnated conductive silicone tubing used in aerosol sampling systems can introduce two types of experimental artifacts: 1) silicon tubing dynamically absorbs carbon dioxide gas, requiring greater than 5 minutes to reach equilibrium and 2) silicone tubing emits organic contaminants containing siloxane that adsorb onto particles traveling through it and onto downstream quartz fiber filters. The consequence can be substantial for engine exhaust measurements as both artifacts directly impact calculations of particulate mass-based emission indices. The emission of contaminants from the silicone tubing can result in overestimation of organic particle mass concentrations based on real-time aerosol mass spectrometry and the off-line thermal analysis of quartz filters. The adsorption of siloxane contaminants can affect the surface properties of aerosol particles; we observed a marked reduction in the water-affinity of soot particles passed through conductive silicone tubing. These combined observations suggest that the silicone tubing artifacts may have wide consequence for the aerosol community and should, therefore, be used with caution. Gentle heating, physical and chemical properties of the particle carriers, exposure to solvents, and tubing age may influence siloxane uptake. The amount of contamination is expected to increase as the tubing surface area increases and as the particle surface area increases. The effect is observed at ambient temperature and enhanced by mild heating (<100 oC). Further evaluation is warranted.

  16. Guidance manual for conducting technology demonstration activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jolley, R.L.; Morris, M.I.; Singh, S.P.N.

    1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This demonstration guidance manual has been prepared to assist Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. (Energy Systems), staff in conducting demonstrations. It is prepared in checklist style to facilitate its use and assumes that Energy Systems personnel have project management responsibility. In addition to a detailed step-by-step listing of procedural considerations, a general checklist, logic flow diagram, and several examples of necessary plans are included to assist the user in developing an understanding of the many complex activities required to manage technology demonstrations. Demonstrations are pilot-scale applications of often innovative technologies to determine the commercial viability of the technologies to perform their designed function. Demonstrations are generally conducted on well-defined problems for which existing technologies or processes are less than satisfactory in terms of effectiveness, cost, and/or regulatory compliance. Critically important issues in demonstration management include, but are not limited to, such factors as communications with line and matrix management and with the US Department of Energy (DOE) and Energy Systems staff responsible for management oversight, budgetary and schedule requirements, regulatory compliance, and safety.

  17. THE ASYMPTOTIC GIANT BRANCH AND THE TIP OF THE RED GIANT BRANCH AS PROBES OF STAR FORMATION HISTORY: THE NEARBY DWARF IRREGULAR GALAXY KKH 98

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Melbourne, J. [Caltech Optical Observatories, Division of Physics, Mathematics and Astronomy, Mail Stop 301-17, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Williams, B.; Dalcanton, J. [Department of Astronomy, Box 351580, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Ammons, S. M.; Max, C.; Koo, D. C. [University of California Observatories/Lick Observatory, Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California at Santa Cruz, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Girardi, Leo [Osservatorio Astronomico di Padova-INAF, Padova (Italy); Dolphin, A., E-mail: jmel@caltech.ed, E-mail: ben@astro.washington.ed, E-mail: jd@astro.washington.ed, E-mail: ammons@ucolick.or, E-mail: max@ucolick.or, E-mail: koo@ucolick.or, E-mail: leo.girardi@oapd.inaf.i, E-mail: adolphin@raytheon.co [Raytheon, 1151 E. Hermans Road, Tucson, AZ 85706 (United States)

    2010-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the utility of the asymptotic giant branch (AGB) and the red giant branch (RGB) as probes of the star formation history (SFH) of the nearby (D = 2.5 Mpc) dwarf irregular galaxy, KKH 98. Near-infrared (near-IR) Keck Laser Guide Star Adaptive Optics (AO) images resolve 592 IR-bright stars reaching over 1 mag below the tip of the RGB. Significantly deeper optical (F475W and F814W) Hubble Space Telescope images of the same field contain over 2500 stars, reaching to the red clump and the main-sequence turnoff for 0.5 Gyr old populations. Compared to the optical color-magnitude diagram (CMD), the near-IR CMD shows significantly tighter AGB sequences, providing a good probe of the intermediate-age (0.5-5 Gyr) populations. We match observed CMDs with stellar evolution models to recover the SFH of KKH 98. On average, the galaxy has experienced relatively constant low-level star formation (5 x 10{sup -4} M{sub sun} yr{sup -1}) for much of cosmic time. Except for the youngest main-sequence populations (age <0.1 Gyr), which are typically fainter than the AO data flux limit, the SFH estimated from the 592 IR-bright stars is a reasonable match to that derived from the much larger optical data set. Differences between the optical- and IR-derived SFHs for 0.1-1 Gyr populations suggest that current stellar evolution models may be overproducing the AGB by as much as a factor of 3 in this galaxy. At the depth of the AO data, the IR-luminous stars are not crowded. Therefore, these techniques can potentially be used to determine the stellar populations of galaxies at significantly further distances.

  18. Measurement of the ratio of branching fractions B(B±-->J/ psi pi ±)/B(B±-->J/ psi K±)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paus, Christoph M. E.

    We report a measurement of the ratio of branching fractions of the decays B[superscript ±]?J/??[superscript ±] and B[superscript ±]?J/?K[superscript ±] using the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. The signal ...

  19. Off-fault Damage Associated with a Localized Bend in the North Branch San Gabriel Fault, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Becker, Andrew 1987-

    2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Structures within very large displacement, mature fault zones, such as the North Branch San Gabriel Fault (NBSGF), are the product of a complex combination of processes. Off-fault damage within a damage zone and first-order geometric asperities...

  20. Ion-/proton-conducting apparatus and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yates, Matthew (Penfield, NY); Liu, Dongxia (Rochester, NY)

    2011-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A c-axis-oriented HAP thin film synthesized by seeded growth on a palladium hydrogen membrane substrate. An exemplary synthetic process includes electrochemical seeding on the substrate, and secondary and tertiary hydrothermal treatments under conditions that favor growth along c-axes and a-axes in sequence. By adjusting corresponding synthetic conditions, an HAP this film can be grown to a controllable thickness with a dense coverage on the underlying substrate. The thin films have relatively high proton conductivity under hydrogen atmosphere and high temperature conditions. The c-axis oriented films may be integrated into fuel cells for application in the intermediate temperature range of 200-600.degree. C. The electrochemical-hydrothermal deposition technique may be applied to create other oriented crystal materials having optimized properties, useful for separations and catalysis as well as electronic and electrochemical applications, electrochemical membrane reactors, and in chemical sensors.

  1. High thermal conductivity aluminum nitride ceramic body

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huseby, I. C.; Bobik, C. F.

    1985-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for producing a polycrystalline aluminum nitride ceramic body having a porosity of less than about 10% by volume of said body and a thermal conductivity greater than 1.0 W/cm-K at 22/sup 0/ C., which comprises forming a mixture comprised of aluminum nitride powder and an yttrium additive selected from the group consisting of yttrium, yttrium hydride, yttrium nitride and mixtures thereof, said aluminum nitride and yttrium additive having a predetermined oxygen content, said mixture having a composition wherein the equivalent % of yttrium, aluminum, nitrogen and oxygen shapping said mixture into a compact and sintering said compact at a temperature ranging from about 1850/sup 0/ C. to about 2170/sup 0/ C. in an atmosphere selected from the group consisting of nitrogen, argon, hydrogen and mixtures thereof to produce said polycrystalline body.

  2. Westinghouse GOCO conduct of casualty drills

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ames, C.P.

    1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose of this document is to provide Westinghouse Government Owned Contractor Operated (GOCO) Facilities with information that can be used to implement or improve drill programs. Elements of this guide are highly recommended for use when implementing a new drill program or when assessing an existing program. Casualty drills focus on response to abnormal conditions presenting a hazard to personnel, environment, or equipment; they are distinct from Emergency Response Exercises in which the training emphasis is on site, field office, and emergency management team interaction. The DOE documents which require team training and conducting drills in nuclear facilities and should be used as guidance in non-nuclear facilities are: DOE 5480.19 (Chapter 1 of Attachment I) and DOE 5480.20 (Chapter 1, paragraphs 7 a. and d. of continuing training). Casualty drills should be an integral part of the qualification and training program at every DOE facility.

  3. Nanostructured polymer membranes for proton conduction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Balsara, Nitash Pervez; Park, Moon Jeong

    2013-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Polymers having an improved ability to entrain water are characterized, in some embodiments, by unusual humidity-induced phase transitions. The described polymers (e.g., hydrophilically functionalized block copolymers) have a disordered state and one or more ordered states (e.g., a lamellar state, a gyroid state, etc.). In one aspect, the polymers are capable of undergoing a disorder-to-order transition while the polymer is exposed to an increasing temperature at a constant relative humidity. In some aspects the polymer includes a plurality of portions, wherein a first portion forms proton-conductive channels within the membrane and wherein the channels have a width of less than about 6 nm. The described polymers are capable of entraining and preserving water at high temperature and low humidity. Surprisingly, in some embodiments, the polymers are capable of entraining greater amounts of water with the increase of temperature. The polymers can be used in Polymer Electrolyte Membranes in fuel cells.

  4. Theory of Electrical Conductivities of Ferrogels J. P. Huang

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Ji-Ping

    conductivity of a metal-polymer composite should depend on the conductivity of particles, the particle shapeTheory of Electrical Conductivities of Ferrogels J. P. Huang Max Planck Institute for Polymer, while magnetic fields can offer a correction. I. Introduction Conductive polymers1 have received much

  5. Thermal Conductivity of Composites Under Di erent Heating Scenarios

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : Two dimensional heat transfer model #26;(z), and c p (z) represent the thermal conductivity, density

  6. Washington State University STANDARDS OF CONDUCT FOR STUDENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, Gary S.

    .................................................................................. 5 WAC 50426207 Failure to comply with university officials. ....................................................... 11 STUDENT CONDUCT CODE PROCEDURES

  7. NIRSA National Campus Championship Series Code of Conduct

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NIRSA National Campus Championship Series Code of Conduct The Code of Conduct shall serve's conduct while participating in, and attending, a NCCS event. · Notification to University Officials officials; payment of fines, penalties and monetary damages arising from, or caused by, my conduct while

  8. 2012 NIRSA NCCS Regional Flag Football Code of Conduct

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , a NCCS event. · Notification to University officials for any violation of the Code of Conduct2012 NIRSA NCCS Regional Flag Football Code of Conduct The Code of Conduct shall serve. Violation of the Code of Conduct may result in: · Suspension from the game/match; · Suspension from

  9. History Club of the Newark Campus Code of Conduct

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Michelle

    History Club of the Newark Campus Code of Conduct As members of an official organization Code of Conduct." As stated in the "Introduction" of the "Student Code of Conduct:" The code of student note that you are required to abide by the "Student Code of Conduct" at all History Club events

  10. Materials and methods for autonomous restoration of electrical conductivity

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Blaiszik, Benjamin J; Odom, Susan A; Caruso, Mary M; Jackson, Aaron C; Baginska, Marta B; Ritchey, Joshua A; Finke, Aaron D; White, Scott R; Moore, Jeffrey S; Sottos, Nancy R; Braun, Paul V; Amine, Khalil

    2014-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

    An autonomic conductivity restoration system includes a solid conductor and a plurality of particles. The particles include a conductive fluid, a plurality of conductive microparticles, and/or a conductive material forming agent. The solid conductor has a first end, a second end, and a first conductivity between the first and second ends. When a crack forms between the first and second ends of the conductor, the contents of at least a portion of the particles are released into the crack. The cracked conductor and the released contents of the particles form a restored conductor having a second conductivity, which may be at least 90% of the first conductivity.

  11. Simulation of the ultrasonic array response from real branched cracks using an efficient finite element method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Felice, Maria V. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Bristol, Bristol BS8 1TR, United Kingdom and Rolls-Royce plc., Bristol BS34 7QE (United Kingdom); Velichko, Alexander; Wilcox, Paul D. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Bristol, Bristol BS8 1TR (United Kingdom); Barden, Tim J.; Dunhill, Tony K. [Rolls-Royce plc., Bristol BS34 7QE (United Kingdom)

    2014-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A hybrid model to simulate the ultrasonic array response from stress corrosion cracks is presented. These cracks are branched and difficult to detect so the model is required to enable optimization of an array design. An efficient frequency-domain finite element method is described and selected to simulate the ultrasonic scattering. Experimental validation results are presented, followed by an example of the simulated ultrasonic array response from a real stress corrosion crack whose geometry is obtained from an X-ray Computed Tomography image. A simulation-assisted array design methodology, which includes the model and use of real crack geometries, is proposed.

  12. Process for the conversion of lower alcohols to higher branched oxygenates

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Barger, Paul T. (Arlington Heights, IL)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process is provided for the production of branched C.sub.4+ oxygenates from lower alcohols such as methanol, ethanol, propanol and mixtures thereof. The process comprises contacting the lower alcohols with a solid catalyst comprising a mixed metal oxide support having components selected from the group consisting of oxides of zinc, magnesium, zirconia, titanium, manganese, chromium, and lanthanides, and an activation metal selected from the group consisting of Group VIII metal, Group IB metals, and mixtures thereof. The advantage of the process is improved yields and selectivity to isobutanol which can subsequently be employed in the production of high octane motor gasoline.

  13. Process for the conversion of lower alcohols to higher branched oxygenates

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Barger, P.T.

    1996-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A process is provided for the production of branched C{sub x} oxygenates from lower alcohols such as methanol, ethanol, propanol and mixtures thereof. The process comprises contacting the lower alcohols with a solid catalyst comprising a mixed metal oxide support having components selected from the group consisting of oxides of zinc, magnesium, zirconia, titanium, manganese, chromium, and lanthanides, and an activation metal selected from the group consisting of Group VIII metal, Group IB metals, and mixtures thereof. The advantage of the process is improved yields and selectivity to isobutanol which can subsequently be employed in the production of high octane motor gasoline.

  14. Branching ratios from B{sub s} and {Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matthew S. Martin

    2004-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    CDF Run II relative branching ratio measurements for 65 pb{sup -1} of data in the channels B{sub s} {yields} D{sub s}{sup {-+}}{pi}{sup {-+}}, {Lambda} {sub b}{sup 0} {yields} {Lambda}{sub c}{sup {+-}}{pi}{sup {-+}} and B {yields} h{sup +}h{sup -} are presented. Further, an observation of B{sub s} {yields} K{sup {+-}} K{sup {-+}} and a measurement of A{sub CP} are presented.

  15. Publisher's note: Branching ratios for the beta decay of Na-21 (vol 74, pg 015501, 2006)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iacob, V. E.; Hardy, John C.; Gagliardi, Carl A.; Goodwin, J.; Nica, N.; Park, H. I.; Tabacaru, G.; Trache, L.; Tribble, Robert E.; Zhai, Y.; Towner, I. S.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    PHYSICAL REVIEW C 74, 029901(E) (2006) Publisher?s Note: Branching ratios for the ? decay of 21Na [Phys. Rev. C 74, 015501 (2006)] V. E. Iacob, J. C. Hardy, C. A. Gagliardi, J. Goodwin, N. Nica, H. I. Park, G. Tabacaru, L. Trache, R. E. Tribble..., Y. Zhai, and I. S. Towner (Received 31 July 2006; published 11 August 2006) DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevC.74.029901 PACS number(s): 27.30.+t, 23.40.?s, 99.10.Fg This paper was published online on 14 July 2006 with formatting errors in Eqs. (7) and (9...

  16. Globular clusters with the extended horizontal-branch as remaining cores of galaxy building blocks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Young-Wook Lee; Hansung B. Gim; Chul Chung

    2007-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The relics of building blocks that made stellar halo and bulge are yet to be discovered unless they were completely disrupted throughout the history of the Galaxy. Here we suggest that about 25% of the Milky Way globular clusters have characteristics of the remaining cores of these early building blocks rather than genuine star clusters. They are clearly distinct from other normal globular clusters in the presence of extended horizontal-branch and multiple stellar populations, in mass (brightness), and most importantly in orbital kinematics. Based on this result, a three-stage formation picture of the Milky Way is suggested, which includes early mergers, collapse, and later accretion.

  17. The Discovery of Archaea, the 'Third Branch of Life', and Its Impacts

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem Not Found Item Not Found The item youThe Discovery of Archaea, the 'Third Branch of

  18. Evaluation and Effect of Fracturing Fluids on Fracture Conductivity in Tight Gas Reservoirs Using Dynamic Fracture Conductivity Test 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Correa Castro, Juan

    2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    EVALUATION AND EFFECT OF FRACTURING FLUIDS ON FRACTURE CONDUCTIVITY IN TIGHT GAS RESERVOIRS USING DYNAMIC FRACTURE CONDUCTIVITY TEST A Thesis by JUAN CARLOS CORREA CASTRO Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A... in Tight Gas Reservoirs Using Dynamic Fracture Conductivity Test Copyright 2011 Juan Carlos Correa Castro EVALUATION AND EFFECT OF FRACTURING FLUIDS ON FRACTURE CONDUCTIVITY IN TIGHT GAS RESERVOIRS USING DYNAMIC FRACTURE CONDUCTIVITY TEST A...

  19. Quantized conductance of a suspended graphene nanoconstriction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nikolaos Tombros; Alina Veligura; Juliane Junesch; Marcos H. D. Guimarães; Ivan J. Vera Marun; Harry T. Jonkman; Bart J. van Wees

    2011-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A yet unexplored area in graphene electronics is the field of quantum ballistic transport through graphene nanostructures. Recent developments in the preparation of high mobility graphene are expected to lead to the experimental verification and/or discovery of many new quantum mechanical effects in this field. Examples are effects due to specific graphene edges, such as spin polarization at zigzag edges of a graphene nanoribbon and the use of the valley degree of freedom in the field of graphene valleytronics8. As a first step in this direction we present the observation of quantized conductance at integer multiples of 2e^2/h at zero magnetic field and 4.2 K temperature in a high mobility suspended graphene ballistic nanoconstriction. This quantization evolves into the typical quantum Hall effect for graphene at magnetic fields above 60mT. Voltage bias spectroscopy reveals an energy spacing of 8 meV between the first two subbands. A pronounced feature at 0.6 2e^2/h present at a magnetic field as low as ~0.2T resembles the "0.7 anomaly" observed in quantum point contacts in a GaAs-AlGaAs two dimensional electron gas, having a possible origin in electron-electron interactions.

  20. Quantized conductance of a suspended graphene nanoconstriction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tombros, Nikolaos; Junesch, Juliane; Guimarães, Marcos H D; Marun, Ivan J Vera; Jonkman, Harry T; van Wees, Bart J

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A yet unexplored area in graphene electronics is the field of quantum ballistic transport through graphene nanostructures. Recent developments in the preparation of high mobility graphene are expected to lead to the experimental verification and/or discovery of many new quantum mechanical effects in this field. Examples are effects due to specific graphene edges, such as spin polarization at zigzag edges of a graphene nanoribbon and the use of the valley degree of freedom in the field of graphene valleytronics8. As a first step in this direction we present the observation of quantized conductance at integer multiples of 2e^2/h at zero magnetic field and 4.2 K temperature in a high mobility suspended graphene ballistic nanoconstriction. This quantization evolves into the typical quantum Hall effect for graphene at magnetic fields above 60mT. Voltage bias spectroscopy reveals an energy spacing of 8 meV between the first two subbands. A pronounced feature at 0.6 2e^2/h present at a magnetic field as low as ~0.2T...

  1. Thin transparent conducting films of cadmium stannate

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wu, Xuanzhi (Golden, CO); Coutts, Timothy J. (Lakewood, CO)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for preparing thin Cd.sub.2 SnO.sub.4 films. The process comprises the steps of RF sputter coating a Cd.sub.2 SnO.sub.4 layer onto a first substrate; coating a second substrate with a CdS layer; contacting the Cd.sub.2 SnO.sub.4 layer with the CdS layer in a water- and oxygen-free environment and heating the first and second substrates and the Cd.sub.2 SnO.sub.4 and CdS layers to a temperature sufficient to induce crystallization of the Cd.sub.2 SnO.sub.4 layer into a uniform single-phase spinel-type structure, for a time sufficient to allow full crystallization of the Cd.sub.2 SnO.sub.4 layer at that temperature; cooling the first and second substrates to room temperature; and separating the first and second substrates and layers from each other. The process can be conducted at temperatures less than 600.degree. C., allowing the use of inexpensive soda lime glass substrates.

  2. Ion/proton-conducting apparatus and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yates, Matthew; Xue, Wei

    2014-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A c-axis-oriented HAP thin film synthesized by seeded growth on a palladium hydrogen membrane substrate. An exemplary synthetic process includes electrochemical seeding on the substrate, and secondary and tertiary hydrothermal treatments under conditions that favor growth along c-axes and a-axes in sequence. By adjusting corresponding synthetic conditions, an HAP this film can be grown to a controllable thickness with a dense coverage on the underlying substrate. The thin films have relatively high proton conductivity under hydrogen atmosphere and high temperature conditions. The c-axis oriented films may be integrated into fuel cells for application in the intermediate temperature range of 200-600.degree. C. The electrochemical-hydrothermal deposition technique may be applied to create other oriented crystal materials having optimized properties, useful for separations and catalysis as well as electronic and electrochemical applications, electrochemical membrane reactors, and in chemical sensors. Additional high-density and gas-tight HAP film compositions may be deposited using a two-step deposition method that includes an electrochemical deposition method followed by a hydrothermal deposition method. The two-step method uses a single hydrothermal deposition solution composition. The method may be used to deposit HAP films including but not limited to at least doped HAP films, and more particularly including carbonated HAP films. In addition, the high-density and gas-tight HAP films may be used in proton exchange membrane fuel cells.

  3. Branching laws for polynomial endomorphisms in CAR algebra for fermions, uniformly hyperfinite algebras and Cuntz algebras

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mitsuo Abe; Katsunori Kawamura

    2006-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Previously, we have shown that the CAR algebra for fermions is embedded in the Cuntz algebra ${\\cal O}_{2}$ in such a way that the generators are expressed in terms of polynomials in the canonical generators of the latter, and it coincides with the U(1)-fixed point subalgebra ${\\cal A}\\equiv {\\cal O}_{2}^{U(1)}$ of ${\\cal O}_{2}$ for the canonical gauge action. Based on this embedding formula, some properties of ${\\cal A}$ are studied in detail by restricting those of ${\\cal O}_{2}$. Various endomorphisms of ${\\cal O}_{2}$, which are defined by polynomials in the canonical generators, are explicitly constructed, and transcribed into those of ${\\cal A}$. Especially, we investigate branching laws for a certain family of such endomorphisms with respect to four important representations, i.e., the Fock representation, the infinite wedge representation and their duals. These endomorphisms are completely classified by their branching laws. As an application, we show that the reinterpretation of the Fock vacuum as the Dirac vacuum is described in representation theory through a mixture of fermions.

  4. Branches of electrostatic turbulence inside solitary plasma structures in the auroral ionosphere

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Golovchanskaya, Irina V.; Kozelov, Boris V. [Polar Geophysical Institute, Apatity 184209 (Russian Federation); Chernyshov, Alexander A.; Mogilevsky, Mikhail M. [Space research Institute, Moscow 117997 (Russian Federation); Ilyasov, Askar A. [Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, Moscow 141700 (Russian Federation); Space research Institute, Moscow 117997 (Russian Federation)

    2014-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The excitation of electrostatic turbulence inside space-observed solitary structures is a central topic of this exposition. Three representative solitary structures observed in the topside auroral ionosphere as large-amplitude nonlinear signatures in the electric field and magnetic-field-aligned current on the transverse scales of ?10{sup 2}–10{sup 3}?m are evaluated by the theories of electrostatic wave generation in inhomogeneous background configurations. A quantitative analysis shows that the structures are, in general, effective in destabilizing the inhomogeneous energy-density-driven (IEDD) waves, as well as of the ion acoustic waves modified by a shear in the parallel drift of ions. It is demonstrated that the dominating branch of the electrostatic turbulence is determined by the interplay of various driving sources inside a particular solitary structure. The sources do not generally act in unison, so that their common effect may be inhibiting for excitation of electrostatic waves of a certain type. In the presence of large magnetic-field-aligned current, which is not correlated to the inhomogeneous electric field inside the structure, the ion-acoustic branch becomes dominating. In other cases, the IEDD instability is more central.

  5. Tracing the Metal-Poor M31 Stellar Halo with Blue Horizontal Branch Stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Benjamin F; Gilbert, Eric F BellKaroline M; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Dorman, Claire; Lauer, Tod R; Seth, Anil C; Kalirai, Jason S; Rosenfield, Philip; Girardi, Leo

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have analyzed new HST/ACS and HST/WFC3 imaging in F475W and F814W of two previously-unobserved fields along the M31 minor axis to confirm our previous constraints on the shape of M31's inner stellar halo. Both of these new datasets reach a depth of at least F814W$blue horizontal branch (BHB) of the field as a distinct feature of the color-magnitude diagram. We measure the density of BHB stars and the ratio of BHB to red giant branch stars in each field using identical techniques to our previous work. We find excellent agreement with our previous measurement of a power-law for the 2-D projected surface density with an index of 2.6$^{+0.3}_{-0.2}$ outside of 3 kpc, which flattens to $\\alpha <$1.2 inside of 3 kpc. Our findings confirm our previous suggestion that the field BHB stars in M31 are part of the halo population. However, the total halo profile is now known to differ from this BHB profile, which suggests that we have isolated the metal-poor component. This component ...

  6. Particle decay branching ratios for states of astrophysical importance in 19Ne

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. W. Visser; J. A. Caggiano; R. Lewis; W. B. Handler; A. Parikh; P. D. Parker

    2004-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    We have measured proton and alpha-particle branching ratios of excited states in 19Ne formed using the 19F(3He,t) reaction at a beam energy of 25 MeV. These ratios have a large impact on the astrophysical reaction rates of 15O(alpha,gamma), 18F(p,gamma) and 18F(p,alpha), which are of interest in understanding energy generation in x-ray bursts and in interpreting anticipated gamma-ray observations of novae. We detect decay protons and alpha-particles using a silicon detector array in coincidence with tritons measured in the focal plane detector of our Enge split-pole spectrograph. The silicon array consists of five strip detectors of the type used in the Louvain-Edinburgh Detector Array, subtending angles from 130 degrees to 165 degrees with approximately 14% lab efficiency. The correlation angular distributions give additional confidence in some prior spin-parity assignments that were based on gamma branchings. We measure Gamma_p/Gamma=0.387+-0.016 for the 665 keV proton resonance, which agrees well with the direct measurement of Bardayan et al.

  7. Habitability of Super-Earth Planets around Other Suns: Models including Red Giant Branch Evolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. von Bloh; M. Cuntz; K. -P. Schroeder; C. Bounama; S. Franck

    2008-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The unexpected diversity of exoplanets includes a growing number of super- Earth planets, i.e., exoplanets with masses of up to several Earth masses and a similar chemical and mineralogical composition as Earth. We present a thermal evolution model for a 10 Earth mass planet orbiting a star like the Sun. Our model is based on the integrated system approach, which describes the photosynthetic biomass production taking into account a variety of climatological, biogeochemical, and geodynamical processes. This allows us to identify a so-called photosynthesis-sustaining habitable zone (pHZ) determined by the limits of biological productivity on the planetary surface. Our model considers the solar evolution during the main-sequence stage and along the Red Giant Branch as described by the most recent solar model. We obtain a large set of solutions consistent with the principal possibility of life. The highest likelihood of habitability is found for "water worlds". Only mass-rich water worlds are able to realize pHZ-type habitability beyond the stellar main-sequence on the Red Giant Branch.

  8. Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program for Mitchell Branch

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loar, J.M.; Adams, S.M.; Kszos, L.A.; Ryon, M.G.; Smith, J.G.; Southworth, G.R.; Stewart, A.J.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A proposed Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP) for the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant (ORGDP; currently the Oak Ridge K-25 Site) was prepared in December 1986, as required by the modified National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit that was issued on September 11, 1986. The effluent discharges to Mitchell Branch are complex, consisting of trace elements, organic chemicals, and radionuclides in addition to various conventional pollutants. Moreover, the composition of these effluent streams will be changing over time as various pollution abatement measures are implemented over the next several years. Although contaminant inputs to the stream originate primarily as point sources from existing plant operations, area sources, such as the classified burial grounds and the K-1407-C holding pond, can not be eliminated as potential sources of contaminants. The proposed BMAP consists of four tasks. These tasks include (1) ambient toxicity testing, (2) bioaccumulation studies, (3) biological indicator studies, and (4) ecological surveys of the benthic invertebrate and fish communities. BMAP will determine whether the effluent limits established for ORGDP protect the designated use of the receiving stream (Mitchell Branch) for growth and propagation of fish and aquatic life. Another objective of the program is to document the ecological effects resulting from various pollution abatement projects, such as the Central Neutralization Facility.

  9. Assessment of approximate computational methods for conical intersections and branching plane vectors in organic molecules

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nikiforov, Alexander; Gamez, Jose A.; Thiel, Walter [Max-Planck-Institut für Kohlenforschung, Kaiser-Wilhelm-Platz 1, D-45470 Mülheim an der Ruhr (Germany); Huix-Rotllant, Miquel [Institute of Physical and Theoretical Chemistry, Goethe University Frankfurt, Max-von-Laue-Str. 7, D-60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Filatov, Michael, E-mail: mike.filatov@gmail.com [Mulliken Center for Theoretical Chemistry, Institut für Physikalische und Theoretische Chemie, Universität Bonn, Beringstr. 4, D-53115 Bonn (Germany)

    2014-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantum-chemical computational methods are benchmarked for their ability to describe conical intersections in a series of organic molecules and models of biological chromophores. Reference results for the geometries, relative energies, and branching planes of conical intersections are obtained using ab initio multireference configuration interaction with single and double excitations (MRCISD). They are compared with the results from more approximate methods, namely, the state-interaction state-averaged restricted ensemble-referenced Kohn-Sham method, spin-flip time-dependent density functional theory, and a semiempirical MRCISD approach using an orthogonalization-corrected model. It is demonstrated that these approximate methods reproduce the ab initio reference data very well, with root-mean-square deviations in the optimized geometries of the order of 0.1 Å or less and with reasonable agreement in the computed relative energies. A detailed analysis of the branching plane vectors shows that all currently applied methods yield similar nuclear displacements for escaping the strong non-adiabatic coupling region near the conical intersections. Our comparisons support the use of the tested quantum-chemical methods for modeling the photochemistry of large organic and biological systems.

  10. MATHEMATICAL ANALYSIS OF CONDUCTING AND SUPERCONDUCTING TRANSMISSION LINES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramdani, Karim - Institut de Mathématiques �lie Cartan, Université Henri Poincaré

    MATHEMATICAL ANALYSIS OF CONDUCTING AND SUPERCONDUCTING TRANSMISSION LINES ANNE-SOPHIE BONNET propagation in the microstrip transmission lines used in microelectronics. In the first part, the case of the perfectly conducting strip. Key words. superconducting transmission lines, waveguides, spectral analysis

  11. LECTRISATION ET CONDUCTION LECTRIQUE DES HYDROCARBURES LIQUIDES par L. BRUNINGHAUS.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    ÉLECTRISATION ET CONDUCTION ÉLECTRIQUE DES HYDROCARBURES LIQUIDES par L. BRUNINGHAUS. Sommaire. - I. Electrisation des hydrocarbures. - Les hydrocarbures liquides s'électrisent (négativement) lorsqu'ils s hydrocarbures. - Les hydrocarbures liquides mani- festent trois régimes de conduction : 1° En couches épaisses

  12. Master Thesis Proposal Eddy Current Imaging of Electrically Conducting Media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vuik, Kees

    Master Thesis Proposal Eddy Current Imaging of Electrically Conducting Media Domenico Lahaye and optimization techniques en- abling the eddy current imaging of electrically conducting media. Examples: · perform a literature study into topics such as eddy current imaging, inverse problems including

  13. Tailoring the Thermoelectric Behavior of Electrically Conductive Polymer Composites 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moriarty, Gregory P.

    2013-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

    fabrication temperatures. These concerns have led research efforts into electrically conductive polymer composites prepared in ambient conditions from aqueous solutions. By combining polymer latex with carbon nanotubes (CNT), electrical conductivity can...

  14. Strain-controlled thermal conductivity in ferroic twinned films

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Suzhi

    Large reversible changes of thermal conductivity are induced by mechanical stress, and the corresponding device is a key element for phononics applications. We show that the thermal conductivity ? of ferroic twinned thin ...

  15. Conductivity of Oriented Samaria-Doped Ceria Thin Films Grown...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Conductivity of Oriented Samaria-Doped Ceria Thin Films Grown by Oxygen-plasma-assisted Molecular Beam Epitaxy. Conductivity of Oriented Samaria-Doped Ceria Thin Films Grown by...

  16. Integrated experimental and modeling study of the ionic conductivity...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    modeling study of the ionic conductivity of samaria-doped ceria thin films. Abstract: Oxygen diffusion and ionic conductivity of samaria-doped ceria (SDC) thin films have been...

  17. Laboratory-scale fracture conductivity created by acid etching 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pournik, Maysam

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Success of acid fracturing treatment depends greatly on the created conductivity under closure stress. In order to have sufficient conductivity, the fracture face must be non-uniformly etched while the fracture strength maintained to withstand...

  18. anisotropic conductive film: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and CdIn2O4. Thin films of amorphous Cd2SnO4 were prepared by Nozik with conductivities thin films of polycrystalline spinel Cd2SnO4 with conductivities exceeding 6700 Scm.7...

  19. anomalous thermal conductivity: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    conductivity in the range (4.84 ( 0.44) ? 103 to (5.30 ( 0 84 THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY OF HEMP CONCRETES: VARIATION WITH FORMULATION, DENSITY AND Mathematics Websites Summary:...

  20. apparent thermal conductivity: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    conductivity in the range (4.84 ( 0.44) ? 103 to (5.30 ( 0 66 THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY OF HEMP CONCRETES: VARIATION WITH FORMULATION, DENSITY AND Mathematics Websites Summary:...

  1. Structure, Magnetism and Conductivity in Epitaxial Ti-doped ...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Conductivity in Epitaxial Ti-doped -Fe2O3 Hematite: Experiment and density functional theory Structure, Magnetism and Conductivity in Epitaxial Ti-doped -Fe2O3 Hematite:...

  2. Department of Residential Life Revised Conduct and Contractual Process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harms, Kyle E.

    Department of Residential Life Revised Conduct and Contractual Process Appeal Does Not Meet Criteria Process Complete: Sanctions administered by appropriate staff. Student complies and vacates. Case Declines Administrative Decision Appeals Conduct Board Decision Decision Final; Process Complete Process

  3. In-Plane Conductivity Testing Procedures and Results

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This presentation on conductivity testing was given at the High Temperature Membrane Working Group Meeting in May 2007.

  4. Photovoltaic device having light transmitting electrically conductive stacked films

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weber, Michael F. (St. Paul, MN); Tran, Nang T. (St. Paul, MN); Jeffrey, Frank R. (St. Paul, MN); Gilbert, James R. (St. Paul, MN); Aspen, Frank E. (St. Paul, MN)

    1990-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A light transmitting electrically conductive stacked film, useful as a light transmitting electrode, including a first light transmitting electrically conductive layer, having a first optical thickness, a second light transmitting layer, having a second optical thickness different from the optical thickness of the first layer, and an electrically conductive metallic layer interposed between and in initimate contact with the first and second layers.

  5. CONDUCTION HEAT TRANSFER Dr. Ruhul Amin Fall 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dyer, Bill

    ME 525 CONDUCTION HEAT TRANSFER Dr. Ruhul Amin Fall 2011 Office: 201C Roberts Hall Lecture Room of conduction heat transfer. Important results which are useful for engineering application will also: 121 Roberts Hall Phone: 994-6295 Lecture Periods: 12:45- 2:00, TR TEXT: Heat Conduction, M. N. Ozisik

  6. PREPARING FOR YOUR CONDUCT APPEAL PURPOSE OF THE APPEAL PROCESS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hayden, Nancy J.

    PREPARING FOR YOUR CONDUCT APPEAL 9/15/11 PURPOSE OF THE APPEAL PROCESS The purpose of the appeal process is to ensure that students who engage in the University of Vermont's conduct process, through in and are treated fairly in this process. The appeal process is not a rehearing of the original conduct case

  7. Development and modeling of conducting polymer actuators and the fabrication of a conducting polymer based feedback loop

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Madden, Peter Geoffrey Alexander, 1971-

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Conducting polymers as a class of materials can be used to build a diverse range of devices. Conducting polymer based actuators (muscles), transistors (neurons), strain gages (muscle spindles), force sensors (Golgi tendon ...

  8. UCF-5.012 Organizational Rules of Conduct Student organizations are expected to abide by these Organizational Rules of Conduct,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Stryland, Eric

    UCF-5.012 Organizational Rules of Conduct Student organizations are expected to abide by these Organizational Rules of Conduct, and administrators and faculty are expected to enforce them. These rules should these offenses, constitute violations of the Organizational Rules of Conduct. (1) Theft, Disregard for Property

  9. Heat conduction through a trapped solid: effect of structural changes on thermal conductance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Debasish Chaudhuri; Abhishek Chaudhuri; Surajit Sengupta

    2007-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the conduction of heat across a narrow solid strip trapped by an external potential and in contact with its own liquid. Structural changes, consisting of addition and deletion of crystal layers in the trapped solid, are produced by altering the depth of the confining potential. Nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations and, wherever possible, simple analytical calculations are used to obtain the thermal resistance in the liquid, solid and interfacial regions (Kapitza or contact resistance). We show that these layering transitions are accompanied by sharp jumps in the contact thermal resistance. Dislocations, if present, are shown to increase the thermal resistance of the strip drastically.

  10. IS DUST FORMING ON THE RED GIANT BRANCH IN 47 Tuc?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyer, Martha L.; Gordon, Karl D.; Meixner, Margaret; Sewilo, Marta; Shiao, Bernie [STScI, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Van Loon, Jacco Th. [Astrophysics Group, Lennard-Jones Laboratories, Keele University, Staffordshire ST5 5BG (United Kingdom); McDonald, Iain [Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, Alan Turing Building, University of Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Babler, Brian; Bracker, Steve; Meade, Marilyn [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin, Madison, 475 North Charter Street, Madison, WI 53706-1582 (United States); Block, Miwa; Engelbracht, Charles; Misselt, Karl [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Hora, Joe [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, MS 65, Cambridge, MA 02138-1516 (United States); Indebetouw, Remy [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, P.O. Box 3818, Charlottesville, VA 22903-0818 (United States); Whitney, Barbara [Space Science Institute, 4750 Walnut Street, Suite 205, Boulder, CO 80301 (United States)], E-mail: mboyer@stsci.edu

    2010-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Using Spitzer Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) observations from the SAGE-SMC Legacy program and archived Spitzer IRAC data, we investigate dust production in 47 Tuc, a nearby massive Galactic globular cluster. A previous study detected infrared excess, indicative of circumstellar dust, in a large population of stars in 47 Tuc, spanning the entire red giant branch (RGB). We show that those results suffered from effects caused by stellar blending and imaging artifacts and that it is likely that no stars below {approx}1 mag from the tip of the RGB are producing dust. The only stars that appear to harbor dust are variable stars, which are also the coolest and most luminous stars in the cluster.

  11. Ultrafast energy transfer from rigid, branched side-chains into a conjugated, alternating copolymer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Griffin, Graham B.; Rolczynski, Brian S.; Linkin, Alexander; McGillicuddy, Ryan D.; Engel, Gregory S., E-mail: gsengel@uchicago.edu [Department of Chemistry, The James Franck Institute, Institute for Biophysical Dynamics, The University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States); Lundin, Pamela M. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Stanford University, Stauffer III, 381 North-South Mall, Stanford, California 94305 (United States) [Department of Chemical Engineering, Stanford University, Stauffer III, 381 North-South Mall, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); A. R. Smith Department of Chemistry, Appalachian State University, 417 CAP Building, 525 Rivers Street, Boone, North Carolina 28608 (United States); Bao, Zhenan [Department of Chemical Engineering, Stanford University, Stauffer III, 381 North-South Mall, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)] [Department of Chemical Engineering, Stanford University, Stauffer III, 381 North-South Mall, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)

    2014-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the synthesis and characterization of a benzodithiophene/thiophene alternating copolymer decorated with rigid, singly branched pendant side chains. We characterize exciton migration and recombination dynamics in these molecules in tetrahydrofuran solution, using a combination of static and time-resolved spectroscopies. As control experiments, we also measure electronic relaxation dynamics in isolated molecular analogues of both the side chain and polymer moieties. We employ semi-empirical and time-dependent density functional theory calculations to show that photoexcitation of the decorated copolymer using 395 nm laser pulses results in excited states primarily localized on the pendant side chains. We use ultrafast transient absorption spectroscopy to show that excitations are transferred to the polymer backbone faster than the instrumental response function, ?250 fs.

  12. Wide Binary Effects on Asymmetries in Asymptotic Giant Branch Circumstellar Envelopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Hyosun

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Observations of increasingly higher spatial resolution reveal the existence of asymmetries in the circumstellar envelopes of a small fraction of asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars. Although there is no general consensus for their origin, a binary companion star may be responsible. Within this framework, we investigate the gravitational effects associated with a sufficiently wide binary system, where Roche lobe overflow is unimportant, on the outflowing envelopes of AGB stars using three dimensional hydrodynamic simulations. The effects due to individual binary components are separately studied, enabling investigation of the stellar and circumstellar characteristics in detail. The reflex motion of the AGB star alters the wind velocity distribution, thereby, determining the overall shape of the outflowing envelope. On the other hand, the interaction of the companion with the envelope produces a gravitational wake, which exhibits a vertically thinner shape. The two patterns overlap and form clumpy structures. T...

  13. Measurement of Branching Fraction and CP-Violating Asymmetry for B-> omega K0s

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aubert, B.; Barate, R.; Boutigny, D.; Couderc, F.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; /Annecy, LAPP; Grauges, E.; /Barcelona, IFAE; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pompili, A.; /Bari U. /INFN, Bari; Chen, J.C.; Qi, N.D.; Rong, G.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y.S.; /Beijing, Inst. High Energy Phys.; Eigen, G.; Ofte, I.; Stugu, B. /Bergen U. /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /Bristol U. /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San

    2005-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors present a preliminary measurement of the branching fraction and CP-violating parameters S and C for the decay B{sup 0} {yields} {omega}K{sub S}{sup 0}. The data sample corresponds to 232 x 10{sup 6} B{bar B} pairs produced from e{sup +}e{sup -} annihilation at the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance. They measure {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {omega}K{sup 0}) = (5.9 {+-} 1.0 {+-} 0.4) x 10{sup -6}, S = 0.50{sub -0.38}{sup +0.34} {+-} 0.02 and C = -0.56{sub -0.27}{sup +0.29} {+-} 0.03.

  14. Measurement of the B+- --> rho+- pi0 Branching Fraction and Direct CP Asymmetry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aubert, B.; Barate, R.; Boutigny, D.; Couderc, F.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; /Annecy, LAPP; Grauges, E.; /Barcelona, IFAE; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pompili, A.; /Bari U. /INFN, Bari; Chen, J.C.; Qi, N.D.; Rong, G.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y.S.; /Beijing, Inst. High Energy Phys.; Eigen, G.; Ofte, I.; Stugu, B. /Bergen U. /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /Bristol U. /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San

    2005-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved measurement of the process B{sup {+-}} {yields} {rho}{sup {+-}}{pi}{sup 0} is presented. The data sample of 211 fb{sup -1} comprises 232 million {Upsilon}(4S) {yields} B{bar B} decays collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric B Factory at SLAC. The yield and CP asymmetry are calculated using an extended maximum likelihood fitting method. The branching fraction and asymmetry are found to be {Beta}(B{sup {+-}} {yields} {rho}{sup {+-}}{pi}{sup 0}) = [10.0 {+-} 1.4 (Stat.) {+-} 0.9 (Syst.)] x 10{sup -6} and {Alpha}{sub CP}(B{sup {+-}} {yields} {rho}{sup {+-}}{pi}{sup 0}) = -0.01 {+-} 0.13 (Stat.) {+-} 0.02 (Syst.), superseding previous measurements. The statistical significance of the signal is calculated to be 8.7{sigma}.

  15. Measurement of the Absolute Branching Fraction of D0 to K- pi+

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aubert, B.; Bona, M.; Boutigny, D.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; /Annecy, LAPP; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; /Barcelona U., ECM; Lopez, L.; Palano, A.; /Bari U.; Eigen, G.; Ofte, I.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; /Bergen U.; Abrams, G.S.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D.N.; Button-Shafer, J.; /LBL, Berkeley

    2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors measure the absolute branching fraction for D{sup 0} {yields} K{sup -} {pi}{sup +} using partial reconstruction of {bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D*{sup +}X{ell}{sup -}{bar {nu}}{sub {ell}} decays, in which only the charged lepton and the pion from the decay D*{sup +} {yields} D{sup 0}{pi}{sup +} are used. Based on a data sample of 230 million B{bar B} pairs collected at the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy B Factory at SLAC, they obtain {Beta}(D{sup 0} {yields} K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}) = (4.007 {+-} 0.037 {+-} 0.070)%, where the first error is statistical and the second error is systematic.

  16. Grain ultraviolet extinction properties of recently discovered post asymptotic giant branch stars

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buss, R.H. Jr.; Snow, T.P. Jr.; Lamers, H.J.G.L.M. (Colorado Univ., Boulder (USA) Utrecht, Rijksuniversiteit (Netherlands))

    1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The circumstellar grains of two hot evolved postasymptotic giant branch stars, HD 89353 and HD 213985, are examined, deriving the extinction around 2175 A. An unsuccessful attempt to detect 6614 A diffuse band absorption arising from the grains implies that the carrier of this diffuse band is not the carrier of the unidentified IR features reported by other investigators nor of the 2175 A bump. It is found that the linear UV extinction of the carbon-rich star HD 89353 continues across the 2175 A region with no sign of the bump; for HD 213985 the reverse is found: a strong, wide bump in the mid-UV. A wavelength of 2300 A is derived for the HD 213985 bump, which lies longward of its unusual position in the interstellar medium. Since HD 89353 is metal-poor yet rich in hydrogen and carbon, the linear extinction arises from hydrocarbon grains of radius less than 300 A. 68 refs.

  17. Branched aliphatic alkanes with quaternary substituted carbon atoms in modern and ancient geologic samples.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kenig, F.; Simons, D.-J. H.; Crich, D.; Cowen, J. P.; Ventura, G. T.; Rehbein-Khalily, T.; Brown, T. C.; Anderson, K. B.; Chemistry; Univ. of Illinois at Chicago; Univ. of Hawaii

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A pseudohomologous series of branched aliphatic alkanes with a quaternary substituted carbon atom (BAQCs, specifically 2,2-di-methylalkanes and 3,3- and 5,5-diethylalkanes) were identified in warm (65{sup o}C) deep-sea hydrothermal waters and Late Cretaceous black shales. 5,5-Diethylalkanes were also observed in modern and Holocene marine shelf sediments and in shales spanning the last 800 million years of the geological record. The carbon number distribution of BAQCs indicates a biological origin. These compounds were observed but not identified in previous studies of 2.0 billion- to 2.2 billion-year-old metasediments and were commonly misidentified in other sediment samples, indicating that BAQCs are widespread in the geological record. The source organisms of BAQCs are unknown, but their paleobiogeographic distribution suggests that they have an affinity for sulfides and might be nonphotosynthetic sulfide oxidizers.

  18. Branching fraction for the doubly-Cabibbo-suppressed decay D{sup +}{yields}K{sup +}{pi}{sup 0}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dytman, S. A.; Love, W.; Savinov, V. [University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15260 (United States); Aquines, O.; Li, Z.; Lopez, A.; Mehrabyan, S.; Mendez, H.; Ramirez, J. [University of Puerto Rico, Mayaguez, Puerto Rico 00681 (Puerto Rico); Huang, G. S.; Miller, D. H.; Pavlunin, V.; Sanghi, B.; Shipsey, I. P. J.; Xin, B. [Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); Adams, G. S.; Anderson, M.; Cummings, J. P.; Danko, I.; Napolitano, J. [Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York 12180 (United States)] (and others)

    2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a measurement of the branching fraction for the doubly-Cabibbo-suppressed decay D{sup +}{yields}K{sup +}{pi}{sup 0}, using 281 pb{sup -1} of data accumulated with the CLEO-c detector on the {psi}(3770) resonance. We find B(D{sup +}{yields}K{sup +}{pi}{sup 0})=(2.28{+-}0.36{+-}0.15{+-}0.08)x10{sup -4}, where the first uncertainty is statistical, the second is systematic, and the last error is due to the uncertainty in the reference mode branching fraction.

  19. Measurement of Branching Fractions and Mass Spectra of B to K pi pi gamma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aubert, B.; Barate, R.; Boutigny, D.; Couderc, F.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; /Annecy, LAPP; Grauges, E.; /Barcelona, IFAE; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pompili, A.; /Bari U. /INFN, Bari; Chen, J.C.; Qi, N.D.; Rong, G.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y.S.; /Beijing, Inst. High Energy Phys.; Eigen, G.; Ofte, I.; Stugu, B. /Bergen U. /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /Bristol U. /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San

    2005-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors present a measurement of the partial branching fractions and mass spectra of the exclusive radiative penguin processes B {yields} K{pi}{pi}{gamma} in the range m{sub K{pi}{pi}} < 1.8 GeV/c{sup 2}. They reconstruct four final states: K{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{gamma}, K{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}{gamma}, K{sub S}{sup 0}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{gamma}, and K{sub S}{sup 0}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup 0}{gamma}, where K{sub S}{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}. Using 232 million e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} B{bar B} events recorded by the BABAR experiment at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy storage ring, they measure the branching fractions {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} K{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{gamma}) = (2.95 {+-} 0.13(stat.) {+-} 0.20(syst)) x 10{sup -5}, {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} K{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}{gamma}) = (4.07 {+-} 0.22(stat.) {+-} 0.31(syst.)) x 10{sup -5}, {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} K{sup 0}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{gamma}) = (1.85 {+-} 0.21(stat.) {+-} 0.12(syst.)) x 10{sup -5}, and {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} K{sup 0}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup 0}{gamma}) = (4.56 {+-} 0.42(stat.) {+-} 0.31(syst.)) x 10{sup -5}.

  20. Feasibility of cooling positrons via conduction in conductive micro-tubes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khamehchi, M. A., E-mail: mak@cmr.wsu.edu; Baker, C. J.; Weber, M. H.; Lynn, K. G., E-mail: kgl@wsu.edu [Center for Materials Research, Washington State University, Pullman, Washington 99164-2814 (United States)

    2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A first order perturbation with respect to velocity has been employed to find the frictional damping force imposed on a single moving charge inside a conductive cylindrical micro-tube. The tensorial relationship between the force and velocity is derived and numerically estimated. Our results asymptotically match that of a flat geometry presented in the literature. Using the single particle analysis the cooling is formulated for an arbitrary density ensemble. It is shown that no further cooling via conduction occurs in the well-established non-neutral plasma equilibrium state. Also, the cooling rate for a weakly interacting ensemble is estimated. It is shown micro-tubes can be employed to cool down low density positron ensembles and/or to improve the beam emittance. A pack of tens of thousands of individual micro-tubes, each cooling only tens of positrons, is capable of cooling hundreds of thousands of particles in each cooling cycle. For example, with tens of particles per micro-tube in a 5?cm long micro-tube stack with the resistivity of 0.46??m and the tubes of radius 50??m, hundreds of thousands of positrons can be cooled down with a time constant of 103??s in longitudinal and 7??s in perpendicular direction. However, it must be noted that the cooling does not guarantee long term storage of particles in micro-tubes.

  1. Using electrical impedance tomography to map subsurface hydraulic conductivity

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Berryman, James G. (Danville, CA); Daily, William D. (Livermore, CA); Ramirez, Abelardo L. (Pleasanton, CA); Roberts, Jeffery J. (Livermore, CA)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of Electrical Impedance Tomography (EIT) to map subsurface hydraulic conductivity. EIT can be used to map hydraulic conductivity in the subsurface where measurements of both amplitude and phase are made. Hydraulic conductivity depends on at least two parameters: porosity and a length scale parameter. Electrical Resistance Tomography (ERT) measures and maps electrical conductivity (which can be related to porosity) in three dimensions. By introducing phase measurements along with amplitude, the desired additional measurement of a pertinent length scale can be achieved. Hydraulic conductivity controls the ability to flush unwanted fluid contaminants from the surface. Thus inexpensive maps of hydraulic conductivity would improve planning strategies for subsequent remediation efforts. Fluid permeability is also of importance for oil field exploitation and thus detailed knowledge of fluid permeability distribution in three-dimension (3-D) would be a great boon to petroleum reservoir analysts.

  2. Status of the measurement of K S -> ?e? branching ratio and lepton charge asymmetry with the KLOE detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Kami?ska on behalf of the KLOE-2 collaboration

    2015-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the current status of the analysis of about 1.7 billion K_S K_L pair events collected at DA{\\Phi}NE with the KLOE detector to determine the branching ratio of K_S -> {\\pi}e{\

  3. Interspecific Variability of Biomass Production of Young Coffea: No Influence of Branch Pruning. Experimental Evidence and Theoretical Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Interspecific Variability of Biomass Production of Young Coffea: No Influence of Branch Pruning diversity and architectural plasticity. In this study, we investigated the biomass production and allocation treatment had no influence on biomass production and allocation for these young trees. We propose

  4. Development of a branch and price approach involving vertex cloning to solve the maximum weighted independent set problem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sachdeva, Sandeep

    2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a novel branch-and-price (B&P) approach to solve the maximum weighted independent set problem (MWISP). Our approach uses clones of vertices to create edge-disjoint partitions from vertex-disjoint partitions. We solve the MWISP on sub...

  5. Molecular Theory of Bending Elasticity and Branching of Cylindrical Micelles Sylvio May, Yardena Bohbot, and Avinoam Ben-Shaul*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ben-Shaul, Avinoam

    to form intermicellar junctions (branches). The internal (free) energy of the micelles, before and after a bending deformation and junction formation, are calculated using mean field theories for the free energies of the molecules constituting these structures. The molecular free energies, which depend on the local packing

  6. Measurement of the Branching fraction ratio B ---> D K / B ---> D pi with the CDF II detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Squillacioti, Paola; /INFN, Pisa /Siena U.

    2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis the author has described the first measurement performed at a hadron collider of the branching fraction of the Cabibbo-suppressed mode B{sup +} {yields} {bar D}{sup 0} K{sup +}. The analysis has been performed with 360 pb{sup -1} of data collected by the CDF II detector.

  7. Growth mechanisms of carbon nanotrees with branched carbon nanofibers synthesized by plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    be interesting for future applications in nanoelectronic devices and also composite materials. hal-008807221 Growth mechanisms of carbon nanotrees with branched carbon nanofibers synthesized by plasma , Didier Pribat*, 3 1 State Key Laboratory for Advanced Metals and Materials, University of Science

  8. Measurements of branching fractions for electromagnetic transitions involving the {chi}{sub bJ}(1P) states

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kornicer, M.; Mitchell, R. E.; Tarbert, C. M. [Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana 47405 (United States); Besson, D. [University of Kansas, Lawrence, Kansas 66045 (United States); Pedlar, T. K. [Luther College, Decorah, Iowa 52101 (United States); Cronin-Hennessy, D.; Hietala, J.; Zweber, P. [University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455 (United States); Dobbs, S.; Metreveli, Z.; Seth, K. K.; Tomaradze, A.; Xiao, T. [Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208 (United States); Brisbane, S.; Martin, L.; Powell, A.; Spradlin, P.; Wilkinson, G. [University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3RH (United Kingdom); Mendez, H. [University of Puerto Rico, Mayaguez, Puerto Rico 00681 (Puerto Rico); Ge, J. Y. [Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States)

    2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using (9.32, 5.88) million {Upsilon}(2S,3S) decays taken with the CLEO III detector, we obtain five product branching fractions for the exclusive processes {Upsilon}(2S){yields}{gamma}{chi}{sub b0,1,2}(1P){yields}{gamma}{gamma}{Upsilon}(1S) and {Upsilon}(3S){yields}{gamma}{chi}{sub b1,2}(1P){yields}{gamma}{gamma}{Upsilon}(1S). We observe the transition {chi}{sub b0}(1P){yields}{gamma}{Upsilon}(1S) for the first time. Using the known branching fractions for B[{Upsilon}(2S){yields}{gamma}{chi}{sub bJ}(1P)], we extract values for B[{chi}{sub bJ}(1P){yields}{gamma}{Upsilon}(1S)] for J=0, 1, 2. In turn, these values can be used to unfold the {Upsilon}(3S) product branching fractions to obtain values for B[{Upsilon}(3S){yields}{gamma}{chi}{sub b1,2}(1P)] for the first time individually. Comparison of these with each other and with the branching fraction B[{Upsilon}(3S){yields}{gamma}{chi}{sub b0}] previously measured by CLEO provides tests of relativistic corrections to electric dipole matrix elements.

  9. Data Summary Report for the 1997 Semiannual Tritium Survey for Fourmile Branch and the F- and H-Area Seeplines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koch, J.W. II

    1998-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents a summary of the definitive data validation and verification for the 1997 RFI/RI semiannual tritium survey for Fourmile Branch and the F- and H-Area Seeplines. The RFI/RI was performed under the direction of WSRC ESS/Ecology. This report was prepared under the direction EPD/EMS.

  10. Data Summary Report for the 1998 Semiannual Tritium Surveys for Fourmile Branch and the F- and H-Area Seeplines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koch, J.

    1999-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents a summary of the definitive data validation and verification for the 1998 semiannual tritium surveys for Fourmile Branch and the F- and H-Area Seeplines. The project was performed under the direction of WSRC EAS/Ecology. This report was prepared under the direction of EPD/EMS.

  11. Electron thermal conductivity owing to collisions between degenerate electrons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. S. Shternin; D. G. Yakovlev

    2006-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We calculate the thermal conductivity of electrons produced by electron-electron Coulomb scattering in a strongly degenerate electron gas taking into account the Landau damping of transverse plasmons. The Landau damping strongly reduces this conductivity in the domain of ultrarelativistic electrons at temperatures below the electron plasma temperature. In the inner crust of a neutron star at temperatures T scattering and becomes competitive with the the electron conductivity due to scattering of electrons by impurity ions.

  12. Thermal conductivity of graphene nanoribbons in noble gaseous environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhong, Wei-Rong, E-mail: wrzhong@hotmail.com; Xu, Zhi-Cheng; Zheng, Dong-Qin [Department of Physics and Siyuan Laboratory, College of Science and Engineering, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632 (China); Ai, Bao-Quan, E-mail: aibq@scnu.edu.cn [Laboratory of Quantum Information Technology, ICMP and SPTE, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510006 (China)

    2014-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the thermal conductivity of suspended graphene nanoribbons in noble gaseous environments using molecular dynamics simulations. It is reported that the thermal conductivity of perfect graphene nanoribbons decreases with the gaseous pressure. The decreasing is more obvious for the noble gas with large atomic number. However, the gaseous pressure cannot change the thermal conductivity of defective graphene nanoribbons apparently. The phonon spectra of graphene nanoribbons are also provided to give corresponding supports.

  13. Conducting polymers as potential active materials in electrochemical supercapacitors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rudge, A.; Davey, J.; Raistrick, I.; Gottesfeld, S. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Ferraris, J.P. [Texas Univ., Richardson, TX (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electronically,conducting polymers represent an interesting class of materials for use in electrochemical capacitors because of the combination of high capacitive energy density and low materials cost. Three generalized types of electrochemical capacitors can be constructed using conducting polymers as active material, and in the third of these, which utilizes conducting polymers that can be both n- and p-doped, energy densities of up to 40 watt-hours per kilogram of active material on both electrodes have been demonstrated.

  14. Conducting polymers as potential active materials in electrochemical supercapacitors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rudge, A.; Davey, J.; Raistrick, I.; Gottesfeld, S. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)); Ferraris, J.P. (Texas Univ., Richardson, TX (United States). Dept. of Chemistry)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electronically,conducting polymers represent an interesting class of materials for use in electrochemical capacitors because of the combination of high capacitive energy density and low materials cost. Three generalized types of electrochemical capacitors can be constructed using conducting polymers as active material, and in the third of these, which utilizes conducting polymers that can be both n- and p-doped, energy densities of up to 40 watt-hours per kilogram of active material on both electrodes have been demonstrated.

  15. Effect of Aggregation on Thermal Conduction in Colloidal Nanofluids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R Prasher; W Evans; J Fish; P Meakin; P Phelan; Pawel Keblinski

    2006-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Using effective medium theory we demonstrate that the thermal conductivity of nanofluids can be significantly enhanced by the aggregation of nanoparticles into clusters. The enhancement is based purely on conduction and does not require a novel mechanism. Predictions of the effective medium theory are in excellent agreement with detailed numerical calculations on model nanofluids involving fractal clusters and show the importance of cluster morphology on thermal conductivity enhancements.

  16. NMSLO Application for Permit to Conduct Geophysical Exploration...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- OtherOther: NMSLO Application for Permit to Conduct Geophysical Exploration on Unleased State LandsLegal Published NA Year...

  17. Raman Scattering at Plasmonic Junctions Shorted by Conductive...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    between line spectra and band spectra, can be assigned to shorting the junction plasmon through molecular conductive bridges. This is demonstrated through Raman trajectories...

  18. Conducting and Using Energy Efficiency Studies for States Presentation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This presentation, given through the DOE's Technical Assitance Program (TAP), provides information on how to effectively conduct and use Energy Efficiency Studies for States.

  19. Community Wind Handbook/Understand Your Wind Resource and Conduct...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Conduct a Preliminary Estimate < Community Wind Handbook Jump to: navigation, search WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHCommunity Wind Handbook WindTurbine-icon.png...

  20. Electron Exchange and Conduction in Nontronite from First-Principles...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Conduction in Nontronite from First-Principles. Abstract: Fe-bearing clay minerals serve as an important source and sink for electrons in redox reactions in various...

  1. Electrical and thermal conductivity of low temperature CVD graphene...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and thermal conductivity of low temperature CVD graphene: the effect of disorder This article has been downloaded from IOPscience. Please scroll down to see the full text article....

  2. anisotropic conductive adhesive: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    volumetric flux P (x) w (also called the Darcy flow) is everywhere parallel to the pressure Knowles, Ian W. 24 THE RECOVERY OF AN ANISOTROPIC CONDUCTIVITY IN GROUNDWATER...

  3. Step 3: Conduct Audience Research | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    the methods, at the times, and in the places that will inspire action and changes in behavior. Understand Different Types of Research Develop a Research Plan Conduct Research...

  4. Chemical anchoring of organic conducting polymers to semiconducting surfaces

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Frank, A.J.; Honda, K.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    According to the present invention, an improved method of coating electrodes with conductive polymer films and/or preselected catalysts is provided. The charge conductive polymer is covalently or coordinatively attached to the electrode surface to strengthen the adhesion characteristics of the polymer to the electrode surface or to improve charge conductive properties between the conductive polymer and the electrode surface. Covalent or coordinative attachment is achieved by a number of alternative methods including covalently or coordinatively attaching the desired monomer to the electrode by means of a suitable coupling reagent and, thereafter, electrochemically polymerizing the monomer in situ.

  5. Chemical anchoring of organic conducting polymers to semiconducting surfaces

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Frank, Arthur J. (Lakewood, CO); Honda, Kenji (Wheatridge, CO)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    According to the present invention, an improved method of coating electrodes with conductive polymer films and/or preselected catalysts is provided. The charge-conductive polymer is covalently or coordinatively attached to the electrode surface to strengthen the adhesion characteristics of the polymer to the electrode surface or to improve charge-conductive properties between the conductive polymer and the electrode surface. Covalent or coordinative attachment is achieved by a number of alternative methods including covalently or coordinatively attaching the desired monomer to the electrode by means of a suitable coupling reagent and, thereafter, electrochemically polymerizing the monomer in situ.

  6. affects stomatal conductance: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of interest. Conduction provides extra heating and yet it reduces the free-free radiative efficiency of the accretion flow (by potentially large factors). These idealized solutions...

  7. Assessment of the Portsmouth/Paducah Project Office Conduct of...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Quality CR Condition Report CONOPS Conduct of Operations DOE U.S. Department of Energy DUF6 Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride FIR Field Inspection Report FPD Federal Project Director...

  8. Teachers Conduct Research at Prestigious Department of Energy...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    teachers to conduct practical and essential group research on a variety of projects at CEBAF including: Data analysis, construction and operation of safety systems, and control...

  9. The synthesis and characterization of porous, conductive, and ordered materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Narayan, Tarun Chandru

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two different classes of polymers were pursued as candidates for materials possessing porosity, conductivity, and crystalline order. Attempts were made with hexaazatrinaphthylene- and dibenzotetrathiafulvalene-based ...

  10. Conduct Operations Assessment Plan - Developed By NNSA/Nevada...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AMTS Performance Assurance Division AMNS Programs CONDUCT OF OPERATIONS Assessment Plan NNSANevada Site Office Independent Oversight Division Performance Objective: The purpose of...

  11. NNSA's Summary of Experiments Conducted in Support of Stockpile...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Press Releases Video Gallery Photo Gallery Jobs Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home NNSA Blog NNSA's Summary of Experiments Conducted in Support ... NNSA's...

  12. Improved Electrical Conductivity of Graphene Films Integrated with Metal Nanowires

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    tin oxide films in electrochromic (EC) devices. The successful integration of such graphene/NW films. KEYWORDS: Graphene, nanowires, transparent conductive films, electrochromic devices Due to low electron

  13. First Subcritical Experiment Conducted at Nevada Test Site |...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Subcritical Experiment Conducted at Nevada Test Site | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing...

  14. Method of forming an electrically conductive cellulose composite

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Evans, Barbara R. (Oak Ridge, TN); O'Neill, Hugh M. (Knoxville, TN); Woodward, Jonathan (Ashtead, GB)

    2011-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

    An electrically conductive cellulose composite includes a cellulose matrix and an electrically conductive carbonaceous material incorporated into the cellulose matrix. The electrical conductivity of the cellulose composite is at least 10 .mu.S/cm at 25.degree. C. The composite can be made by incorporating the electrically conductive carbonaceous material into a culture medium with a cellulose-producing organism, such as Gluconoacetobacter hansenii. The composites can be used to form electrodes, such as for use in membrane electrode assemblies for fuel cells.

  15. Software optimization for electrical conductivity imaging in polycrystalline diamond cutters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bogdanov, G.; Ludwig, R. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Worcester Polytechnic Institute, 100 Institute Rd, Worcester, MA 01609 (United States); Wiggins, J.; Bertagnolli, K. [US Synthetic, 1260 South 1600 West, Orem, UT 84058 (United States)

    2014-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We previously reported on an electrical conductivity imaging instrument developed for measurements on polycrystalline diamond cutters. These cylindrical cutters for oil and gas drilling feature a thick polycrystalline diamond layer on a tungsten carbide substrate. The instrument uses electrical impedance tomography to profile the conductivity in the diamond table. Conductivity images must be acquired quickly, on the order of 5 sec per cutter, to be useful in the manufacturing process. This paper reports on successful efforts to optimize the conductivity reconstruction routine, porting major portions of it to NVIDIA GPUs, including a custom CUDA kernel for Jacobian computation.

  16. Conduction Models Of The Temperature Distribution In The East...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Geothermal Project well HGP-A are simulated by model studies using a finite element code for conductive heat flow. Three models were generated: a constant temperature source...

  17. An Analytical Study Of A 2-Layer Transient Thermal Conduction...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Typical interpretation schemes are based on simple, one-layer solutions to the Fourier conduction equation using the annual solar cycle as a surface heat source. We present...

  18. Microscopic mechanism of low thermal conductivity in lead telluride

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Delaire, Olivier A [ORNL; Ma, Jie [ORNL

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Themicroscopic physics behind low-lattice thermal conductivity of single-crystal rock salt lead telluride (PbTe) is investigated. Mode-dependent phonon (normal and umklapp) scattering rates and their impact on thermal conductivity were quantified by first-principles-based anharmonic lattice dynamics calculations that accurately reproduce thermal conductivity in a wide temperature range. The low thermal conductivity of PbTe is attributed to the scattering of longitudinal acoustic phonons by transverse optical phonons with large anharmonicity and small group velocity of the soft transverse acoustic phonons. This results in enhancing the relative contribution of optical phonons, which are usually minor heat carriers in bulk materials.

  19. analyzing skin conductance: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    coupling between each tactile sensing chip and a ground Shinoda, Hiroyuki 8 HandWave: Design and Manufacture of a Wearable Wireless Skin Conductance Computer Technologies and...

  20. Identifying semiconductors by d.c. ionization conductivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    expected from high-Z semiconductor detectors? ,” IEEE Transand binary compound semiconductors and insulators,” J PhysIdentifying Semiconductors by D.C. Ionization Conductivity

  1. The Classical Nature of Thermal Conduction in Nanofluids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacob Eapen; Roberto Rusconi; Roberto Piazza; Sidney Yip

    2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Several new mechanisms have been hypothesized in the recent years to characterize the thermal conduction behavior in nanofluids. In this paper, we show that a large set of nanofluid thermal conductivity data is enveloped by the well-known Hashin and Shtrikman (HS) mean-field bounds for inhomogeneous systems. The thermal conductivity in nanofluids, therefore, is largely dependent on whether the nanoparticles stays dispersed in the base fluid, form linear chain-like configurations, or assume an intermediate configuration. The experimental data, which is strikingly analogous to those in most solid composites and liquid mixtures, provides a strong evidence for the classical nature of thermal conduction in nanofluids.

  2. A Single Transition State Serves Two Mechanisms. The Branching Ratio for CH2O-+ CH3Cl on Improved Potential Energy Surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schlegel, H. Bernhard

    for this reaction has been studied by ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD). The energies of transition states change of the potential energy surface around the transition state may vary the branching ratioA Single Transition State Serves Two Mechanisms. The Branching Ratio for CH2O·- + CH3Cl on Improved

  3. Viscosity calculation of polydisperse branching polymers near gel point Institut fr Theoretische Physik, Cologne University, D-5000 Kln 41, West Germany

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    L-535 Viscosity calculation of polydisperse branching polymers near gel point D. Sievers Institut Whitney. Abstract. 2014 The viscosity of randomly branched polymers has been calculated based that the first choice is better direct near the gel point and yields a logarithmic divergence of the viscosity

  4. Simulation of Branching Blood Flows on Parallel Computers1 Xue Yue, Feng-Nan Hwang, Robin Shandas, Xiao-Chuan Cai

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cai, Xiao-Chuan

    Simulation of Branching Blood Flows on Parallel Computers1 Xue Yue, Feng-Nan Hwang, Robin Shandas nonlinearly implicit algorithm for the numerical simulation of some branching blood flow problems, which-Stokes equations that we use to model the blood flow in the left anterior descending coronary artery. Key words

  5. Applying Decay Strategies to Branch Predictors for Leakage Energy Savings Zhigang Hu y Philo Juang y Kevin Skadron z Doug Clark Margaret Martonosi y

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martonosi, Margaret

    Applying Decay Strategies to Branch Predictors for Leakage Energy Savings Zhigang Hu y Philo Juang process, leakage energy starts to become a major concern, especially for large on­chip array structures to consider applying decay techniques, which can reduce leak­ age energy for caches, to the branch

  6. A Simultaneous Measurement of the Branching Fractions of Ten B to Double Charm Decays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lae, Chung Khim

    2008-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation presents a simultaneous measurement of the branching fractions of ten B {yields} D{sup (*)}{bar D}{sup (*)} decays. The measurements are derived from a sample of 2.32 x 10{sup 8} B{bar B} pairs collected by the BABAR detector at the PEP-II B Factory located at Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. The branching fractions (x 10{sup -4}) are: -0.10 {+-} 0.44 {+-} 0.15 (<0.59) for B{sup 0} {yields} D{sup 0}{bar D}{sup 0}; 1.01 {+-} 1.07 {+-} 0.35 (<2.92) for B{sup 0} {yields} D*{sup 0}{bar D}{sup 0}; -1.31 {+-} 1.05 {+-} 0.41 (<0.92) for B{sup 0} {yields} D*{sup 0}{bar D}*{sup 0}; 2.81 {+-} 0.43 {+-} 0.45 for B{sup 0} {yields} D{sup +}D{sup -}; 5.72 {+-} 0.64 {+-} 0.71 for B{sup 0} {yields} D*{sup +}D{sup -}; 8.11 {+-} 0.57 {+-} 0.97 for B{sup 0} {yields} D*{sup +}D*{sup -}; 3.76 {+-} 0.57 {+-} 0.45 for B{sup -} {yields} D{sup -}D{sup 0}; 3.56 {+-} 0.52 {+-} 0.39 for B{sup -} {yields} D*{sup -}D{sup 0}; 6.30 {+-} 1.32 {+-} 0.93 for B{sup -} {yields} D{sup -}D*{sup 0}; and 8.14 {+-} 1.17 {+-} 1.11 for B{sup -} {yields} D*{sup -}D*{sup 0}. The first uncertainty is statistical while the second is systematic. The number in parentheses is the 90% upper limit using the Feldman-Cousins method with systematic uncertainties taken into account. These measurements are consistent with the Standard Model predictions using the factorization assumption.

  7. REVEALING PROBABLE UNIVERSAL FEATURES IN THE LOWER RED GIANT BRANCH LUMINOSITY FUNCTIONS OF GALACTIC GLOBULAR CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kravtsov, V. V. [Instituto de AstronomIa, Universidad Catolica del Norte, Avenida Angamos 0610, Casilla 1280, Antofagasta (Chile)], E-mail: vkravtsov@ucn.cl

    2009-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper aims at demonstrating, for the first time, very probable universal peculiarities of the evolution of stars in the lower red giant branch (RGB) of Galactic globular clusters (GCs), reflected in two corresponding dips in the luminosity functions (LFs). By relying on the database of Hubble Space Telescope photometry of GCs, we analyze the lower RGB LFs of a sample of 18 GCs in a wide metallicity range, {delta}[Fe/H] {approx} 1.9 dex. We first show that in the F555W-(F439W-F555W) color-magnitude diagrams (CMDs), the lower RGB of GCs, except for the most metal-poor of them, frequently shows an apparent 'knee'. It reveals itself as a fairly abrupt change of the RGB slope. At the same luminosity level, the RGB LFs show a feature in the form of a more or less pronounced dip. We find that the magnitude difference between the RGB base and the given feature is, on average, around {delta} F555W{sup dip} {sub base}{approx} 1.4 mag. It shows a marginal variation with metallicity, if any, comparable to the error. At the same time, the magnitude difference between the dip and the RGB bump, {delta} F555W{sup bump} {sub dip}, decreases with increasing metallicity and falls within the range 0.8 {approx}< {delta} F555W{sup bump} {sub dip} {approx}< 1.7 mag. Generalized LFs (GLFs) have been obtained for three subsamples of GCs within limited metallicity ranges and with different horizontal branch (HB) morphology. They reproduce the 'knee-related' dip that is statistically significant in two of the GLFs. This feature turns out to be more pronounced in the GLFs of GCs with either the blue or red HB morphology than with the intermediate one. The same GLFs also reveal an additional probable universal dip. It shows up below the RGB bump at {delta} F555W slightly increasing from {approx}0.3 to {approx}0.5 mag with increasing metallicity. Also, the statistical significance of this 'prebump' dip increases, on average, toward higher metallicity. Except for the well known RGB bump, no other universal features corresponding to those found here were so far empirically revealed or theoretically predicted in the lower RGB of GCs.

  8. POLYMERIC MICROCOMBUSTORS FOR SOLID-PHASE CONDUCTIVE FUELS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    combustor for the ignition and reaction of solid conductive fuels. Solid fuels can he made conductive, the hum rate of fuel in the overall combustor can he decoupled from the chemical reaction rate by changing igniter volume density; the combustor housing can be made of a low-temperature, low-cost mate

  9. Percolation in Transparent and Conducting Carbon Nanotube Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gruner, George

    and chemical sensors9 , field emission devices10,11 , and transparent conductive coatings7 . We12 , and another. Transmission measurements also indicate the usefulness of nanotube network films as a transparent, conductive coating. Avenues for improvement of the network transparency are discussed. KEYWORDS Nanotubes, Networks

  10. Interactions Between Membrane Conductances Underlying Thalamocortical Slow-Wave Oscillations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Destexhe, Alain

    or oscillations can be explained by interactions between calcium- and voltage-dependent channels. At the networkInteractions Between Membrane Conductances Underlying Thalamocortical Slow-Wave Oscillations A: Oscillations and Bursts Emerging From the Interplay of Intrinsic Conductances in Single Neurons 1404 A

  11. HEALTH CARE COLLEGES CODE OF STUDENT PROFESSIONAL CONDUCT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hayes, Jane E.

    10/14/08 Page 1 HEALTH CARE COLLEGES CODE OF STUDENT PROFESSIONAL CONDUCT (APPROVED BY THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES) ARTICLE 1: INTRODUCTION A. Rationale The credibility of a health care professional is based. Consequently, students in the health care colleges have a particular obligation to conduct themselves at all

  12. DEGRADATION OF TRANSPARENT CONDUCTIVE OXIDES: MECHANISTIC INSIGHTS AND INTERFACIAL ENGINEERING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rollins, Andrew M.

    DEGRADATION OF TRANSPARENT CONDUCTIVE OXIDES: MECHANISTIC INSIGHTS AND INTERFACIAL ENGINEERING;Degradation of Transparent Conductive Oxides: Mechanistic insights and Interfacial engineering Case Western;Dedicated to the science and engineering of photovoltaics, in an effort to make a better world. #12;Table

  13. High carrier concentration p-type transparent conducting oxide films

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yan, Yanfa; Zhang, Shengbai

    2005-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A p-type transparent conducting oxide film is provided which is consisting essentially of, the transparent conducting oxide and a molecular doping source, the oxide and doping source grown under conditions sufficient to deliver the doping source intact onto the oxide.

  14. The Electrical Conductivity Of Partly Ionized Helium Plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sreckovic, Vladimir A.; Ignjatovic, Ljubinko; Mihajlov, A. A. [Institute of Physics, PO Box 57, 11001 Belgrade (Serbia and Montenegro)

    2007-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we analyzed atoms influence on electro conductivity, partially ionized helium plasma, in temperature region 5 000 K - 40 000 K and pressure 0.1 - 10 atm. Electro conductivity was calculated using 'Frost like' formula and Random Phase Approximation method and Semi-Classical (SC) approximation.

  15. Nanoscale Current Imaging of the Conducting Channels in Proton

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buratto, Steve

    Nanoscale Current Imaging of the Conducting Channels in Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells David A area of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) is investigated using conductive probe atomic particle at its end. This is due to the formation of protons, at the carbon cloth side of the cell

  16. THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY OF HEMP CONCRETES: VARIATION WITH FORMULATION, DENSITY AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    envelope and on the performance of systems. This behaviour is related to hygric and thermal propertiesTHERMAL CONDUCTIVITY OF HEMP CONCRETES: VARIATION WITH FORMULATION, DENSITY AND WATER CONTENT of formulation, density and water content on the thermal conductivity of hemp concretes. The investigations

  17. Polymer geometry and Li+ conduction in poly(ethylene oxide)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Averbuch, Amir

    Polymer geometry and Li+ conduction in poly(ethylene oxide) L. Gitelman a , M. Israeli b, , A: Lithium battery Polymer molecule Brownian motion Simulation Conductivity PEO a b s t r a c t We study of the amorphous PE structure is increased by mechanical stretching due to the unraveling of loops in the polymer

  18. Unsaturated hydraulic conductivity function based on a soil fragmentation process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tartakovsky, Daniel M.

    Unsaturated hydraulic conductivity function based on a soil fragmentation process Shmuel Assouline-parameter expression for relative hydraulic conductivity (RHC) of partially saturated soils. It is based on the premise. This assumption allows us to derive hydraulic properties of soils (water retention curves and unsaturated

  19. Original article Hydraulic conductance of two co-occuring neotropical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Original article Hydraulic conductance of two co-occuring neotropical understory shrubs December 1999) Abstract ­ Whole plant hydraulic conductance was measured for two co-occuring neotropical hydraulic con- ductance and leaf specific conducance in the drought-avoiding species, P. trigonum, than

  20. BOWLING GREEN STATE UNIVERSITY CODE OF ETHICS AND CONDUCT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, Paul A.

    BOWLING GREEN STATE UNIVERSITY CODE OF ETHICS AND CONDUCT June 24, 2005 I. PREAMBLE: It is the policy of Bowling Green State University ("University") to pursue its mission and conduct its academic University, Policy on Misconduct in Research · Bowling Green State University, Conflict of Interest