National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for branch ing ratio

  1. Cold versus hot fusion deuterium branching ratios

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fox, H.; Bass, R.

    1995-12-31

    A major source of misunderstanding of the nature of cold nuclear fusion has been the expectation that the deuterium branching ratios occurring within a palladium lattice would be consistent with the gas-plasma branching ratios. This misunderstanding has led to the concept of the dead graduate student, the 1989`s feverish but fruitless search for neutron emissions from cold fusion reactors, and the follow-on condemnation of the new science of cold fusion. The experimental facts are that in a properly loaded palladium lattice, the deuterium fusion produces neutrons at little above background, a greatly less-than-expected production of tritium (the tritium desert), and substantially more helium-4 than is observed in hot plasma physics. The experimental evidence is now compelling (800 reports of success from 30 countries) that cold nuclear fusion is a reality, that the branching ratios are unexpected, and that a new science is struggling to be recognized. Commercialization of some types of cold fusion devices has already begun.

  2. Electronic branching ratio of the. tau. lepton

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ammar, R.; Baringer, P.; Coppage, D.; Davis, R.; Kelly, M.; Kwak, N.; Lam, H.; Ro, S.; Kubota, Y.; Lattery, M.; Nelson, J.K.; Perticone, D.; Poling, R.; Schrenk, S.; Wang, R.; Alam, M.S.; Kim, I.J.; Nemati, B.; Romero, V.; Sun, C.R.; Wang, P.; Zoeller, M.M.; Crawford, G.; Fulton, R.; Gan, K.K.; Kagan, H.; Kass, R.; Lee, J.; Malchow, R.; Morrow, F.; Sung, M.K.; Whitmore, J.; Wilson, P.; Butler, F.; Fu, X.; Kalbfleisch, G.; Lambrecht, M.; Skubic, P.; Snow, J.; Wang, P.; Bortoletto, D.; Brown, D.N.; Dominick, J.; McIlwain, R.L.; Miller, D.H.; Modesitt, M.; Shibata, E.I.; Schaffner, S.F.; Shipsey, I.P.J.; Battle, M.; Ernst, J.; Kroha, H.; Roberts, S.; Sparks, K.; Thorndike, E.H.; Wang, C.; Stroynowski, R.; Artuso, M.; Goldberg, M.; Haupt, T.; Horwitz, N.; Kennett, R.; Moneti, G.C.; Playfer, S.; Rozen, Y.; Rubin, P.; Skwarnicki, T.; Stone, S.; Thulasidas, M.; Yao, W.; Zhu, G.; Barnes, A.V.; Bartelt, J.; Csorna, S.E.; Jain, V.; Letson, T.; Mestayer, M.D.; Akerib, D.S.; Barish, B.; Chadha, M.

    1992-06-01

    Using data accumulated by the CLEO I detector operating at the Cornell Electron Storage Ring, we have measured the ratio {ital R}={Gamma}({tau}{r arrow}{ital e}{bar {nu}}{sub {ital e}}{nu}{sub {tau}})/{Gamma}{sub 1}, where {Gamma}{sub 1} is the {tau} decay rate to final states with one charged particle. We find {ital R}=0.2231{plus minus}0.0044{plus minus}0.0073 where the first error is statistical and the second is systematic. Together with the measured topological one-charged-particle branching fraction, this yields the branching fraction of the {tau} lepton to electrons, {ital B}{sub {ital e}}=0.192{plus minus}0.004{plus minus}0.006.

  3. Measurement of the branching ratio ?(?b0??(2S)?0)/?(?b0?J...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Measurement of the branching ratio (b0(2S)0)(b0J0) with the ATLAS detector Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Measurement of the branching ratio...

  4. Improved Measurement of the π→eν Branching Ratio

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aguilar-Arevalo, A.; Aoki, M.; Blecher, M.; Britton, D. I.; Bryman, D. A.; vom Bruch, D.; Chen, S.; Comfort, J.; Ding, M.; Doria, L.; et al

    2015-08-01

    A new measurement of the branching ratio Re/μ=Γ(π+ → e+ν + π+ → e+νγ)/Γ(π+ → μ+ν + π+→μ+νγ) resulted in Rexpe/μ=[1.2344±0.0023(stat)±0.0019(syst)] x 10-4. This is in agreement with the standard model prediction and improves the test of electron-muon universality to the level of 0.1%.

  5. D-T gamma-to-neutron branching ratio determined from inertial confinement fusion plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Y.; Mack, J. M.; Herrmann, H. W.; Young, C. S.; Hale, G. M.; Caldwell, S.; Hoffman, N. M.; Evans, S. C.; Sedillo, T. J.; McEvoy, A.; Langenbrunner, J.; Hsu, H. H.; Huff, M. A.; Batha, S.; Horsfield, C. J.; Rubery, M. S.; Garbett, W. J.; Stoeffl, W.; Grafil, E.; Bernstein, L.; and others

    2012-05-15

    A new deuterium-tritium (D-T) fusion gamma-to-neutron branching ratio [{sup 3}H(d,{gamma}){sup 5}He/{sup 3}H(d,n){sup 4}He] value of (4.2 {+-} 2.0) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -5} was recently reported by this group [Y. Kim et al. Phys. Rev. C (submitted)]. This measurement, conducted at the OMEGA laser facility located at the University of Rochester, was made for the first time using inertial confinement fusion (ICF) plasmas. Neutron-induced backgrounds are significantly reduced in these experiments as compared to traditional beam-target accelerator-based experiments due to the short pulse nature of ICF implosions and the use of gas Cherenkov {gamma}-ray detectors with fast temporal responses and inherent energy thresholds. It is expected that this ICF-based measurement will help resolve the large and long-standing inconsistencies in previously reported accelerator-based values, which vary by a factor of approximately 30. The reported value at ICF conditions was determined by averaging the results of two methods: (1) a direct measurement of ICF D-T {gamma}-ray and neutron emissions using absolutely calibrated detectors and (2) a separate cross-calibration against the better known D-{sup 3}He gamma-to-proton branching ratio [{sup 3}He(d, {gamma}){sup 5}Li/{sup 3}He(d,p){sup 4}He]. Here we include a detailed explanation of these results, and introduce as a corroborative method an in-situ{gamma}-ray detector calibration using neutron-induced {gamma}-rays. Also, by extending the established techniques to two additional series of implosions with significantly different ion temperatures, we test the branching ratio dependence on ion temperature. The data show a D-T branching ratio is nearly constant over the temperature range 2-9 keV. These studies motivate further investigation into the {sup 5}He and {sup 5}Li systems resulting from D-T and D-{sup 3}He fusion, respectively, and result in improved ICF {gamma}-ray reaction history diagnosis at the National Ignition

  6. Evaluation of partial widths and branching ratios from resonance wave functions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldzak, Tamar; Gilary, Ido; Moiseyev, Nimrod

    2010-11-15

    A quantum system in a given resonance state has different open channels for decay. Partial widths are the decay rates of the resonance (metastable) state into the different open channels. Here we present a rigorous derivation of the partial widths from the solution of a time-dependent Schroedinger equation with outgoing boundary conditions. We show that the sum of the partial widths obtained from the resonance wave function is equal to the total width. The difference with respect to previous studies on partial widths and branching ratios is discussed.

  7. Measurement of the Branching Ratio Lambda_c+ -> p pi+ pi-

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lopez-Hinojosa, Guillermo; /San Luis Potosi U.

    2008-03-01

    The confirmation of the Cabibbo-suppressed charm baryon decay mode {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} p{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} is reported. All data analyzed are from SELEX, a fixed target experiment at Fermilab that took data during 1996 and 1997, mainly with a 600 GeV/c {Sigma}{sup -} beam. The branching ratio of the Cabibbo-suppressed decay mode {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} p{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} relative to the Cabibbo-favored mode {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} pK{sup -}{pi}{sup +} is measured to be: {Gamma}({Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} p{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -})/{Gamma}({Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} pK{sup -}{pi}{sup +}) = 0.103 {+-} 0.022.

  8. Direct CP Violation, Branching Ratios and Form Factors B --> pi, B --> K in B decays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O. Leitner; X.-H. Guo; A.W. Thomas

    2004-11-01

    The B {yields} {pi} and B {yields} K transitions involved in hadronic B decays are investigated in a phenomenological way through the framework of QCD factorization. By comparing our results with experimental branching ratios from the BELLE, BABAR and CLEO collaborations for all the B decays including either a pion or a kaon, we propose boundaries for the transition form factors B {yields} {pi} and B {yields} K depending on the CKM matrix element parameters {rho} and {eta}. From this analysis, the form factors required to reproduce the experimental data for branching ratios are F{sup B {yields} {pi}} = 0.31 {+-} 0.12 and F{sup B {yields} K} = 0.37 {+-} 0.13. We calculate the direct CP violating asymmetry parameter, a{sub CP}, for B {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi} and B {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} K decays, in the case where {rho} - {omega} mixing effects are taken into account. Based on these results, we find that the direct CP asymmetry for B{sup -} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup -}, {bar B}{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}, B{sup -} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}K{sup -}, and {bar B}{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} {bar K}{sup 0}, reaches its maximum when the invariant mass {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} is in the vicinity of the {omega} meson mass. The inclusion of {rho} - {omega} mixing provides an opportunity to erase, without ambiguity, the phase uncertainty mod{pi} in the determination of th CKM angles {alpha} in case of b {yields} u and {gamma} in case of b {yields} s.

  9. Measurement of $B_s^0 \\to D_s^{(*)+} D_s^{(*)-}$ Branching Ratios

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J.A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; /Dubna, JINR /Texas A-M

    2012-04-01

    The decays B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} D{sub s}{sup (*)+}D{sub s}{sup (*)-}s are reconstructed in a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 6.8 fb{sup -1} collected by the CDF II detector at the Tevatron p{bar p} collider. All decay modes are observed with a significance of more than 10 {sigma}, and we measure the B{sub s}{sup 0} production rate times B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} D{sub s}{sup (*)+} D{sub s}{sup (*)-} branching ratios relative to the normalization mode B{sup 0} {yields} D{sub s}{sup +}d{sup -} to be 0.183 {+-} 0.021 {+-} 0.017 for B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} D{sub s}{sup +}D{sub s}{sup -}, 0.424 {+-} 0.046 {+-} 0.035 for B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} D{sub s}{sup {+-}} D{sub s}{sup {-+}}, 0.654 {+-} 0.072 {+-} 0.065 for B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} D{sub s}{sup *+} D{sub s}{sup *-}, and 1.261 {+-} 0.095 {+-} 0.112 for the inclusive decay B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} D{sub s}{sup (*)+}D{sub s}{sup (*)-}, where the uncertainties are statistical and systematic. These results are the most precise single measurements to date and provide important constraints for indirect searches for non-standard model physics in B{sub s}{sup 0} mixing.

  10. Measurement of Branching Ratios for Non-leptonic Cabibbo-suppressed Decays of the Charmed-Strange Baryon Xic+

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vazquez Jauregui, Eric; /San Luis Potosi U.

    2008-08-01

    We studied several {Xi}{sub c}{sup +} decay modes, most of them with a hyperon in the final state, and determined their branching ratios. The data used in this analysis come from the fixed target experiment SELEX, a multi-stage spectrometer with high acceptance for forward interactions, that took data during 1996 and 1997 at Fermilab with 600 GeV=c (mainly {Sigma}{sup -}, {pi}{sup -}) and 540 GeV/c (mainly p) beams incident on copper and carbon targets. The thesis mainly details the first observation of two Cabibbo-suppressed decay modes, {Xi}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} {Sigma}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +} and {Xi}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} {Sigma}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +}. The branching ratios of the decays relative to the Cabibbo-favored {Xi}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} {Xi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +} are measured to be: {Lambda}({Xi}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} {Sigma}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +})/{Lambda}({Xi}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} {Xi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +}) = 0.184 {+-} 0.086. Systematic studies have been performed in order to check the stability of the measurements varying all cuts used in the selection of events over a wide interval and we do not observe evidence of any trend, so the systematic error is negligible in the final results because the quadrature sum of the total error is not affected. The branching ratios for the same decay modes of the {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} are measured to check the methodology of the analysis. The branching ratio of the decay mode {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} {Sigma}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +} is measured relative to {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} pK{sup -} {pi}{sup +}, while the one of the decay mode {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} {Sigma}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +} is relative to {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} {Sigma}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}, as they have been reported earlier. The results for the control modes are: {Gamma}({Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} {Sigma}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +})/{Gamma

  11. Measurement of the branching ratio of B¯→D(*)τ−ν¯τ relative to (B)over bar to B¯→D(*)ℓ−ν¯ℓ decays with hadronic tagging at Belle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huschle, Matthias J.; Kuhr, Thomas; Heck, M.; Goldenzweig, P.; Abdesselam, A.; Adachi, I.; Adamczyk, K.; Aihara, H.; Al Said, S.; Arinstein, K.; Asner, David M.; Aushev, T.; Ayad, R.; Aziz, T.; Badhrees, I.; Bakich, A. M.; Bansal, Vikas; Barberio, E.; Bhardwaj, V.; Bhuyan, Bipul; Biswal, J.; Bobrov, A.; Bozek, A.; Bracko, Marko; Browder, Thomas E.; Cervenkov, D.; Chang, P.; Chekelian, V.; Chen, A.; Cheon, B. G.; Chilikin, Kirill; Chistov, R.; Cho, K.; Chobanova, V.; Choi, Y.; Cinabro, David A.; Dalseno, J.; Danilov, M.; Dolezal, Z.; Drasal, Z.; Dutta, D.; Eidelman, S.; Epifanov, D.; Farhat, H.; Fast, James E.; Ferber, T.; Frey, A.; Fulsom, Bryan G.; Gaur, Vipin; Gabyshev, N.; Garmash, Alexey; Gillard, R.; Glattaur, R.; Goh, Y. M.; Golob, B.; Grygier, J.; Hamer, P.; Hara, K.; Hara, Takanori; Hasenbusch, J.; Hayasaka, K.; Hayashii, H.; He, X. H.; Heider, M.; Heller, A.; Horiguchi, T.; Hou, W. S.; Hsu, C. L.; Iijima, T.; Inami, K.; Inguglia, G.; Ishikawa, A.; Itoh, R.; Iwasaki, Y.; Jaegle, Igal; Joffe, D.; Joo, K. K.; Julius, T.; Kang, K. H.; Kato, E.; Katrenko, P.; Kawasaki, T.; Keck, T.; Kiesling, C.; Kim, D. Y.; Kim, H. J.; Kim, J. B.; Kim, J. H.; Kim, K. T.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. J.; Kinoshita, Kay; Ko, Byeong Rok; Kobayashi, Nakako; Kodys, P.; Korpar, S.; Krizan, P.; Krokovny, Pavel; Kumita, T.; Kuzmin, A.; Kwon, Y. J.; Lee, I. S.; Li, C.; Li, Y.; Li Gioi, L.; Libby, J.; Liventsev, Dmitri; Lukin, P.; Masuda, M.; Matvienko, D.; Miyabayashi, K.; Miyake, Hideki; Miyata, H.; Mizuk, R.; Mohanty, G. B.; Mohanty, Subhashree; Moll, A.; Moon, H K.; Mussa, R.; Nakamura, KR; Nakano, E.; Nakao, Mikihiko; Nanut, T.; Nayak, Minakshi; Nisar, N. K.; Nishida, Shohei; Ogawa, S.; Okuno, S.; Oswald, Christian; Pakhlova, Galina; Pal, Bilas K.; Park, C. W.; Park, H.; Pedlar, Todd K.; Pesantez, L.; Pestotnik, Rok; Petric, Marko; Piilonen, Leo E.; Pulvermacher, C.; Ribezl, Eva; Ritter, M.; Rostomyan, A.; Sakai, Y.; Sandilya, Saurabh; Santelj, Luka; Sanuki, T.; Sato, Y.; Savinov, Vladimir; Schneider, O.; Schnell, G.; Schwanda, C.; Schwartz, Alan J.; Semmler, D.; Senyo, K.; Seon, O.; Sevior, Martin E.; Shebalin, V.; Shen, C. P.; Shibata, TA; Shiu, Jing-Ge; Simon, F.; Sohn, Young-Soo; Sokolov, A.; Solovyeva, Elena; Stanic, S.; Staric, M.; Steder, M.; Stypula, J.; Sumihama, M.; Sumiyoshi, T.; Tamponi, Umberto; Teramoto, Y.; Trabelsi, K.; Trusov, V.; Uchida, M.; Uglov, T.; Uno, S.; Usov, Y.; Van Hulse, C.; Vanhoefer, P.; Varner, Gary; Vinokurova, A.; Vorobyev, V.; Wagner, M. N.; Wang, C. H.; Wang, M. Z.; Wang, P.; Wang, X. L.; Watanabe, M.; Watanabe, Y.; Won, Eun Il; Yamamoto, H.; Yamaoka, Jared AK; Yashchenko, S.; Ye, H.; Yook, Youngmin; Yuan, C. Z.; Yusa, Y.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhilich, V.; Zhulanov, V.; Zupanc, A.

    2015-10-26

    Belle II paper 450 We report a measurement of the branching fraction ratios R(D)(()*)) of (B) over bar

  12. Measurement of the Branching fraction ratio B ---> D K / B ---> D pi with the CDF II detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Squillacioti, Paola; /INFN, Pisa /Siena U.

    2006-11-01

    In this thesis the author has described the first measurement performed at a hadron collider of the branching fraction of the Cabibbo-suppressed mode B{sup +} {yields} {bar D}{sup 0} K{sup +}. The analysis has been performed with 360 pb{sup -1} of data collected by the CDF II detector.

  13. Improved Measurement of the ??e? Branching Ratio

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aguilar-Arevalo, A.; Aoki, M.; Blecher, M.; Britton, D. I.; Bryman, D. A.; vom Bruch, D.; Chen, S.; Comfort, J.; Ding, M.; Doria, L.; Cuen-Rochin, S.; Gumplinger, P.; Hussein, A.; Igarashi, Y.; Ito, S.; Kettell, S. H.; Kurchaninov, L.; Littenberg, L. S.; Malbrunot, C.; Mischke, R. E.; Numao, T.; Protopopescu, D.; Sher, A.; Sullivan, T.; Vavilov, D.; Yamada, K.

    2015-08-01

    A new measurement of the branching ratio Re/?=?(?+ ? e+? + ?+ ? e+??)/?(?+ ? ?+? + ?+??+??) resulted in Rexpe/?=[1.23440.0023(stat)0.0019(syst)] x 10-4. This is in agreement with the standard model prediction and improves the test of electron-muon universality to the level of 0.1%.

  14. A Combination of CDF and D0 limits on the branching ratio of B0(s)(d) ---> mu+ mu- decays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bernhard, R.; Glenzinski, D.; Herndon, M.; Kamon, T.; Krutelyov, V.; Landsberg, G.; Lehner, F.; Lin, C.J.; Mrenna, S.; /Zurich U. /Fermilab /Wisconsin U., Madison /Texas A-M /Brown U.

    2005-08-01

    The authors combine the results of CDF and D0 searches for the rare decays B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} and B{sub d}{sup 0} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}. The experiments use 364 pb{sup -1} and 300 pb{sup -1} of data respectively. The limits on the branching ratios are obtained by normalizing the estimated sensitivity to the decay B{sup +} {yields} J/{psi}K{sup +} taking into account the fragmentation ratios f{sub u}/f{sub s(d)}. The combined results exclude branching ratios of BR(B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}) > 1.5 x 10{sup -7} and BR(B{sub d}{sup 0} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}) > 4.0 x 10{sup -8} at 95% confidence level. These are the most stringent limits on these decays at the present time.

  15. B physics: first evidence for b_s0 --> phi phi decay and measurements of branching ratio and a_cp for b+ --> phi k+

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Acosta, D.; The CDF Collaboration

    2005-05-31

    We present the first evidence of charmless decays of the B{sub s}{sup 0} meson, the decay B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} {phi}{phi}, and a measurement of the Branching Ratio BR(B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} {phi}{phi}) using 180 pb{sup -1} of data collected by the CDF II experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. In addition, the BR and direct CP asymmetry for the B{sup +} {yields} {phi}K{sup +} decay are measured.

  16. Determination of the branching ratio for the {sup 209}Bi (n, {gamma}) {sup 210}Bi reaction from 500 eV to 20 keV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borella, A.; Berthomieux, E.; Domingo-Pardo, C.; Gunsing, F.; Marrone, S.; Martinez, T.; Massimi, C.; Mastinu, P. M.; Milazzo, P. M.; Schillebeeckx, P.; Tagliente, G.; Tain, J.; Terlizzi, R.; Wynants, R.

    2006-07-01

    Energy differential neutron capture cross section measurements have been performed to determine the branching ratio for the {sup 209}Bi(n, {gamma}) reaction. The measurements were carried out at the time-of-flight facility GELINA of the IRMM in Geel (Belgium). The capture measurements were performed at a 12 m flight path using three High-Purity Germanium detectors. The experimental set-up was optimized to reduce the prompt background due to scattered neutrons. Several {gamma}-ray spectra corresponding to the {sup 209}Bi + n resonances up to 20 keV were deduced. The results of a preliminary data analysis are given in this paper. (authors)

  17. Measurement of the Ratio of Branching Fractions Br(Bs -> Ds- pi+)/Br(B -> D- pi+) at CDF-II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Furic, Ivan Kresimir; /MIT

    2004-03-01

    The measurement of B{sub s}{sup 0} mixing is one of the flagship analyses for the Run II B physics program. The sensitivity of the measurement to the frequency of B{sub s}{sup 0} oscillations strongly depends on the number of reconstructed B{sub s}{sup 0} mesons. They present the measurement of the ratio of branching fractions Br(B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} D{sub s}{sup -}{pi}{sup +})/Br(B{sup 0} {yields} D{sup -}{pi}{sup +}), which directly influences the number of B{sub s}{sup 0} events available for the measurement of B{sub s}{sup 0} mixing at CDF-II. They analyze 115 pb{sup -1} of data collected with the CDF-II detector in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV using a novel displaced track trigger. They reconstruct 78 {+-} 11 B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} D{sub s}{sup -}{pi}{sup +} decays at 1153 {+-} 45 B{sup 0} {yields} D{sup -}{pi}{sup +} decays with good signal to background ratio. This is the world's largest sample of fully reconstructed B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} D{sub s}{sup -}{pi}{sup +} decays. They find the ratio of production fractions multiplied by the ratio of branching fractions to be: f{sub s}/f{sub d} {center_dot} Br(B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} D{sub s}{sup -}{pi}{sup +})/Br(B{sup 0} {yields} D{sup -}{pi}{sup +}) = 0.325 {+-} 0.046(stat) {+-} 0.034(syst) {+-} 0.084 (BR). Using the world average value of f{sub s}/f{sub d} = 0.26 {+-} 0.03, we infer that the ratio of branching fractions is: Br(B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} D{sub s}{sup -}{pi}{sup +})/Br(B{sup 0} {yields} D{sup -}{pi}{sup +}) = 1.25 {+-} 0.18(stat) {+-} 0.13(syst) {+-} 0.32(BR) {+-} 0.14(PR) where the last uncertainty is due to the uncertainty on the world average measurement of the ratio of B{sub s}{sup 0} to B{sup 0} production rates, f{sub s}/f{sub d}.

  18. First Observation of the Cabibbo-suppressed Decays Xi+(c) ---> Sigma+ pi- pi+ and Xi+(c) ---> Sigma- pi+ pi+ and Measurement of their Branching Ratios

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vazquez-Jauregui, E.; Engelfried, J.; Akgun, U.; Alkhazov, Georgiy; Amaro-Reyes, J.; Atamantchouk, A.G.; Ayan, Ahmet Sedat; Balatz, M.Y.; Blanco-Covarrubias, A.; Bondar, N.F.; Cooper, Peter S.; /Fermilab /Michigan U., Flint

    2008-04-01

    The authors report the first observation of two Cabibbo-suppressed decay modes, {Xi}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} {Sigma}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +} and {Xi}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} {Sigma}{sup -} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +}. They observe 56 {+-} 13 over a background of 21, and 23 {+-} 7 over a background of 12 events, respectively, for the signals. The data were accumulated using the SELEX spectrometer during the 1996-1997 fixed target run at Fermilab, chiefly from a 600 GeV/c {Sigma}{sup -} beam. The branching ratios of the decays relative to the Cabibbo-favored {Xi}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} {Xi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +} are measured to be B({Xi}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} {Sigma}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +})/B({xi}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} {Xi}{sup -} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +}) = 0.50 {+-} 0.20, and B({Xi}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} {Sigma}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +})/B({Xi}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} {Xi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +}) = 0.23 {+-} 0.11, respectively. They also report branching ratios for the same decay modes of the {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} relative to {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} pK{sup -}{pi}{sup +}.

  19. Ing Arvid Nesheim | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Name: Ing Arvid Nesheim Address: Hoymyrmarka 123A Place: Vollen Zip: 1391 Region: Norway Sector: Marine and Hydrokinetic Phone Number: 47 951 08 439 Website: www.anwsite.com...

  20. Measurement of the ratio of branching fractions b(bs --> ds- ds+) /b (b0 --> d- ds+) with the CDF detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Iyutin, Boris; /MIT

    2007-03-01

    In this thesis they report the measurement of ratios of branching fractions: {Beta}(B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} D{sub s}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -})/{Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} D{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}), and {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} D{sup -}D{sub s}{sup +})/{Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} D{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}), using 355 pb{sup -1} of data collected by CDF detector at the Tevatron p{bar p} collider at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV.

  1. Measurement of the branching ratio and asymmetry parameter for the {Sigma}{sup +}{r_arrow}{ital p}{gamma} radiative decay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Timm, S.; Albuquerque, I.F.; Bondar, N.F.; Carrigan, R. Jr.; Chen, D.; Cooper, P.S.; Lisheng, D.; Denisov, A.S.; Dobrovolsky, A.V.; Dubbs, T.; Endler, A.M.F.; Escobar, C.O.; Foucher, M.; Golovtsov, V.L.; Gottschalk, H.; Gouffon, P.; Grachev, V.T.; Khanzadeev, A.V.; Kubantsev, M.A.; Kuropatkin, N.P.; Lach, J.; Lang Pengfei; Langland, J.; Li Chengze; Li Yunshan; Luksys, M.; Mahon, J.R.P.; McCliment, E.; Morelos, A.; Newsom, C.; Pommot Maia, M.C.; Samsonov, V.M.; Schegelsky, V.A.; Shi Huanzhang; Smith, V.J.; Tang Fukun; Terentyev, N.K.; Tkatch, I.I.; Uvarov, L.N.; Vorobyov, A.A.; Yan Jie; Wenheng, Z.; Zheng Shuchen; Zhong Yuanyuan

    1995-05-01

    We have measured the branching ratio for the hyperon radiative decay {Sigma}{sup +}{r_arrow}{ital p}{gamma} using the Fermilab polarized charged hyperon beam. This measurement and our previously published result on the asymmetry parameter in the same decay are part of Fermilab experiment E761. We find {ital B}({Sigma}{sup +}{r_arrow}{ital p}{gamma})/{ital B}({Sigma}{sup +}{r_arrow}{ital p}{pi}{sup 0}) to be [2.32{plus_minus}0.11(stat){plus_minus}0.10(syst)]{times}10{sup {minus}3} with a sample of 31 901 events. The higher statistics and careful attention to systematic uncertainties make these significant improvements over previous measurements. We describe how our measurements were performed and briefly review the theoretical implications of these results.

  2. Measurement of the ratio of branching fractions B(D0 ---> K+ pi-) / B(D0 ---> K- pi+) using the CDF II Detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abulencia, A.; Acosta, D.; Adelman, Jahred A.; Affolder, T.; Akimoto, T.; Albrow, M.G.; Ambrose, D.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Anikeev, K.; /Taiwan, Inst. Phys. /Argonne /Barcelona, Autonoma U. /Baylor U. /INFN, Bologna /Brandeis U. /UC, Davis /UCLA /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /Cantabria Inst. of Phys.

    2006-05-01

    The authors present a measurement of R{sub B}, the ratio of the branching fraction for the rare decay D{sup 0} {yields} K{sup +}{pi}{sup -} to that for the Cabibbo-favored decay D{sup 0} {yields} K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}. Charge conjugate decays are implicitly included. A signal of 2005 {+-} 104 events for the decay D{sup 0} {yields} K{sup +}{pi}{sup -} is obtained using the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. The data set corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 0.35 fb{sup -1} produced in {bar p}p collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. Assuming no mixing, they find R{sub B} = [4.05 {+-} 0.21(stat) {+-} 0.11(syst)] x 10{sup -3}. This measurement is consistent with the world average, and comparable in accuracy with the best measurements from other experiments.

  3. Biography U. Dsterloh Degree: PD Dr.- Ing. habil. Institution...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    U. Dsterloh Degree: PD Dr.- Ing. habil. Institution: Clausthal University of Technology. Chair: chair for waste disposal technologies and geomechanics. 1982- 1988 field of study:...

  4. Measurement of branching ratio and B0s lifetime in the decay B0s → J/ψ f0(980) at CDF

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aaltonen, T.

    2011-09-30

    We present a study of Bs0 decays to the CP-odd final state J/ψ f0(980) with J/ψ → µ+µ- and f0(980) → π+π-. Using pp̄ collision data with an integrated luminosity of 3.8 fb-1 collected by the CDF II detector at the Tevatron we measure a Bs0 lifetime of τ(B0s → J/ψ f0(980)) = 1.70-0.11+0.12(stat) ± 0.03(syst) ps. This is the first measurement of the Bs0} lifetime in a decay to a CP eigenstate and corresponds in the standard model to the lifetime of the heavy Bs0 eigenstate. We also measure the product of branching fractions of B0s → J/ψ f0(980)more » and f0(980) → π+π- relative to the product of branching fractions of B0s → J/ψφ and φ→K+K- to be Rf0/ψ = 0.257 ± 0.020(stat) ± 0.014(syst), which is the most precise determination of this quantity to date.« less

  5. Measurement of the ratio of the production cross sections times branching fractions of Bc ? J/??and B ? J/? K and B(Bc? J/? ???-/+)/B(Bc ? J/? ?) in pp collisions at ?s = 7 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Khachatryan, V.

    2015-01-13

    The ratio of the production cross sections times branching fractions (?(Bc) B(Bc ? J/??))/(?(B) B(B ? J/?K) is studied in proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 7 TeV with the CMS detector at the LHC. The kinematic region investigated requires Ba,sub>c and Bmesons with transverse momentum p? > 15 GeV and rapidity |y| -1. The ratio is determined to be [0.48 0.05 (stat) 0.03(syst) 0.05 (?Bc)]% The J/????-/+ decay mode is also observed in the same data sample. Using a model-independent method developed tomoremeasure the efficiency given the presence of resonant behaviour in the three-pion system, the ratio of the branching fractions J/? ???-/+)/B(Bc is measured to be 2.55 0.80(stat) 0.33(syst) +0.04-0.01 (?Bc), consistent with the previous LHCb result.less

  6. Measurement of the relative branching ratio of B-s(0) -> J/psi f(0)(980) to B-s(0) -> J/psi phi

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov, V.M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Alves, G. A.; Aoki, M.; Askew, A.; Asman, B.; Atkins, S.; Atramentov, O.; Augsten, K.; Avila, C.; BackusMayes, J.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Barreto, J.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besancon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bezzubov, V. A.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Bose, T.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brock, R.; Brooijmans, G.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Brown, J.; Bu, X. B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Burnett, T. H.; Buszello, C. P.; Calpas, B.; Camacho-Perez, E.; Carrasco-Lizarraga, M. A.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chapon, E.; Chen, G.; Chevalier-Thery, S.; Cho, D. K.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M. -C.; Croc, A.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; De, K.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Deliot, F.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P. F.; Dominguez, A.; Dorland, T.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duggan, D.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Dyshkant, A.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, A.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Facini, G.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Fuess, S.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Garcia-Guerra, G. A.; Gavrilov, V.; Gay, P.; Geng, W.; Gerbaudo, D.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Golovanov, G.; Goussiou, A.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Greenwood, Z. D.; Gregores, E. M.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J. -F.; Grohsjean, A.; Gruenendahl, S.; Gruenewald, M. W.; Guillemin, T.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haas, A.; Hagopian, S.; Haley, J.; Han, L.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hohlfeld, M.; Hubacek, Z.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffre, M.; Jamin, D.; Jayasinghe, A.; Jesik, R.; Johns, K.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Jung, A. W.; Juste, A.; Kaadze, K.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Kasper, P. A.; Katsanos, I.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Kohli, J. M.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kulikov, S.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kurca, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Kvita, J.; Lammers, S.; Landsberg, G.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lellouch, J.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lietti, S. M.; Lim, J. K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, Y.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; de Sa, R. Lopes; Lubatti, H. J.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Mackin, D.; Madar, R.; Magana-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Maravin, Y.; Martinez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. L.; Meijer, M. M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P. G.; Merkin, M.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; et al.

    2012-01-20

    We present a measurement of the relative branching fraction, R{sub f{sub 0}/{phi}}, of B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} J/{psi}f{sub 0}(980), with f{sub 0}(980) {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}, to the process B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} J/{psi}{phi}, with {phi} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup -}. The J/{psi}f{sub 0}(980) final state corresponds to a CP-odd eigenstate of B{sub s}{sup 0} that could be of interest in future studies of CP violation. Using 8 fb{sup -1} of data recorded with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider, we find R{sub f{sub 0}/{phi}} = 0.275 {+-} 0.041(stat) {+-} 0.061(syst).

  7. Improved Measurement of the πeν Branching Ratio

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aguilar-Arevalo, A.; Aoki, M.; Blecher, M.; Britton, D. I.; Bryman, D. A.; vom Bruch, D.; Chen, S.; Comfort, J.; Ding, M.; Doria, L.; Cuen-Rochin, S.; Gumplinger, P.; Hussein, A.; Igarashi, Y.; Ito, S.; Kettell, S. H.; Kurchaninov, L.; Littenberg, L. S.; Malbrunot, C.; Mischke, R. E.; Numao, T.; Protopopescu, D.; Sher, A.; Sullivan, T.; Vavilov, D.; Yamada, K.

    2015-08-01

    A new measurement of the branching ratio Re/μ=Γ(π+ → e+ν + π+ → e+νγ)/Γ(π+ → μ+ν + π+→μ+νγ) resulted in Rexpe/μ=[1.2344±0.0023(stat)±0.0019(syst)] x 10-4. This is in agreement with the standard model prediction and improves the test of electron-muon universality to the level of 0.1%.

  8. Measurement of the B0(s) semileptonic branching ratio to an orbitally excited D**(s) state, Br(B0(s) ---> D-(s1)(2536) mu+ nu X)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov, V.M.; Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Acharya, B.S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Aguilo, E.; Ahn, S.H.; Ahsan, M.; Alexeev, G.D.; Alkhazov, G.; /Buenos Aires U. /Rio de Janeiro, CBPF /Rio de Janeiro State U. /ABC Federal U. /Sao Paulo, IFT /Alberta U. /Simon Fraser U. /York U., Canada /McGill U. /Hefei, CUST /Andes U., Bogota

    2007-12-01

    In a data sample of approximately 1.3 fb{sup -1} collected with the D0 detector between 2002 and 2006, the orbitally excited charm state D{sub s1}{sup {+-}}(2536) has been observed with a measured mass of 2535.7 {+-} 0.6(stat) {+-} 0.5(syst) MeV/c{sup 2} via the decay mode B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} D{sub s1}{sup -}(2536){mu}{sup +} {nu}X. A first measurement is made of the branching ratio product Br({bar B} {yields} D{sub s1}{sup -}(2536){mu}{sup +}{nu}X) {center_dot} Br(D{sub s1}{sup -} {yields} D*{sup -} K{sub S}{sup 0}). Assuming that D{sub s1}{sup -}(2536) production in semileptonic decay is entirely from B{sub s}{sup 0}, an extraction of the semileptonic branching ratio Br(B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} D{sub s1}{sup -}(2536){mu}{sup +}{nu}X) is made.

  9. Branching ratio measurements of the predissociation of {sup 12}C{sup 16}O by time-slice velocity-map ion imaging in the energy region from 108 000 to 110 500 cm{sup -1}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gao Hong; Song Yu; Yang Lei; Shi Xiaoyu; Ng, C. Y.; Jackson, William M.; Yin Qingzhu

    2012-07-21

    Direct branching ratio measurements of the three lowest dissociation channels of {sup 12}C{sup 16}O that produce C({sup 3}P) + O({sup 3}P), C({sup 1}D) + O({sup 3}P), and C({sup 3}P) + O({sup 1}D) are reported in the vacuum ultraviolet region from 108 000 cm{sup -1} (92.59 nm) to 110 500 cm{sup -1} (90.50 nm) using the time-slice velocity-map ion imaging and nonlinear resonant four-wave mixing techniques. Rotationally, resolved carbon ion yield spectra for both {sup 1}{Sigma}{sup +} and {sup 1}{Pi} bands of CO in this region have been obtained. Our measurements using this technique show that the branching ratio in this energy region, especially the relative percentages of the two spin-forbidden channels, is strongly dependent on the particular electronic and vibrational energy levels of CO that are excited.

  10. Measurements of branching fraction ratios and CP-asymmetries in suppressed B-→ D(→ K+π-)K- and B-→ D(→ K+π-)π- decays

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aaltonen, T.

    2011-08-01

    We report the first reconstruction in hadron collisions of the suppressed decays B-→ D(→ K+π-)K- and B-→ D(→ K+π-)π- decays, sensitive to the CKM phase {gamma}, using data from 7 fb-1 of integrated luminosity collected by the CDF II detector at the Tevatron collider. We reconstruct a signal for the B-→ D(→ K+π-)K- suppressed mode with a significance of 3.2 standard deviations, and measure the ratios of the suppressed to favored branching fractions R(K) = [22.0 ± 8.6(stat) ± 2.6(syst)] x 10-3, R+(K) = [42.6 ± 13.7(stat) ± 2.8(syst)] x 10-3, R-(K) = [3.8 ± 10.3(stat) ± 2.7(syst)] x 10-3more » as well as the direct CP-violating asymmetry A(K) = -0.82±0.44(stat)±0.09(syst) of this mode. Corresponding quantities for B- → D(→ K+π-)π- decay are also reported.« less

  11. Photoionization dynamics of excited molecular states. Photoelectron angular distributions and rotational and vibrational branching ratios for H2 C ¹Πu, v=0–4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pratt, Stephen T.; Dehmer, Patricia M.; Dehmer, Joseph L.

    1986-01-01

    Photoelectron angular distributions following three photonresonant, four photon (3+1) ionization of H2 via the C ¹Πu, v'=0-4←X ¹Σg⁺, v''= 0 Q(1) transitions are reported. The observed angular distributions are generally more isotropic for v⁺≠v' than for v⁺=v'. Photoelectron spectra obtained along the polarization axis of the laser following (3+1)= ionization via the C ¹Πu, v'= 4←X ¹Σg⁺, v"= 0 R(0) and R(1) transitions are also reported. These spectra are rotationally resolved and exhibit strongly v⁺-dependent rotational branching ratios. The comparison of the angular distribution data with available theoretical calculations indicates good agreement for some transitions and poor agreement for others, suggesting the need for substantial progress in understanding the photoionizationdynamics of even the simplest excited molecular states.

  12. Measurements of branching fraction ratios and CP-asymmetries in suppressed B-→ D(→ K+π-)K- and B-→ D(→ K+π-)π- decays

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aaltonen, T.

    2011-08-01

    We report the first reconstruction in hadron collisions of the suppressed decays B-→ D(→ K+π-)K- and B-→ D(→ K+π-)π- decays, sensitive to the CKM phase {gamma}, using data from 7 fb-1 of integrated luminosity collected by the CDF II detector at the Tevatron collider. We reconstruct a signal for the B-→ D(→ K+π-)K- suppressed mode with a significance of 3.2 standard deviations, and measure the ratios of the suppressed to favored branching fractions R(K) = [22.0 ± 8.6(stat) ± 2.6(syst)] x 10-3, R+(K) = [42.6 ± 13.7(stat) ± 2.8(syst)] x 10-3, R-(K) = [3.8 ± 10.3(stat) ± 2.7(syst)] x 10-3more »as well as the direct CP-violating asymmetry A(K) = -0.82±0.44(stat)±0.09(syst) of this mode. Corresponding quantities for B- → D(→ K+π-)π- decay are also reported.« less

  13. Measurement of the Ratios of Branching Fractions B(Bs -> Ds pi pi pi) / B(Bd -> Dd pi pi pi) and B(Bs -> Ds pi) / B(Bd -> Dd pi)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abulencia, A.; Adelman, J.; Affolder, T.; Akimoto, T.; Albrow, M.G.; Ambrose, D.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Anikeev, K.; Annovi, A.; /Frascati /Taiwan, Inst. Phys.

    2006-10-01

    Using 355 pb{sup -1} of data collected by the CDF II detector in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron, they study the fully reconstructed hadronic decays B{sub (s)}{sup 0} {yields} D{sub (s)}{sup -}{pi}{sup +} and B{sub (s)}{sup 0} {yields} D{sub (s)}{sup -} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}. They present the first measurement of the ratio of branching fractions {Beta}(B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} D{sub s}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -})/{Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} D{sup -} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}) = 1.05 {+-} 0.10(stat.) {+-} 0.22(syst.). They also update their measurement of {Beta}(B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} D{sub s}{sup -} {pi}{sup +})/{Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} D{sup -} {pi}{sup +}) to 1.13 {+-} 0.08(stat.) {+-} 0.23(syst.) improving the statistical uncertainty by more than a factor of two. They find {Beta}(B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} D{sub s}{sup -} {pi}{sup +}) = [3.8 {+-} 0.3(stat.) {+-} 1.3(syst.)] x 10{sup -3} and {Beta}(B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} D{sub s}{sup -} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}) = [8.4 {+-} 0.8(stat.) {+-} 3.2(syst.)] x 10{sup -3}.

  14. Unimolecular photodissociation dynamics of ketene (CH{sub 2}CO): The singlet/triplet branching ratio and experimental observation of the vibrational level thresholds of the transition-state

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, S.K.

    1993-05-01

    The rotational distributions of CO products from the dissociation of ketene at photolysis energies 10 cm{sup {minus}1} below, 56, 110, 200, 325, 425, 1,107, 1,435, 1,720, and 2,500 cm{sup {minus}1} above the singlet threshold, are measured in a supersonic free jet of ketene. The CO(v{double_prime} = 0) rotational distributions at 56, 110, 200, 325, and 425 cm{sup {minus}1} are bimodal. The peaks at low J`s, which are due to CO from the singlet channel, show that the product rotational distribution of CO product from ketene dissociation on the singlet surface is well described by phase space theory (PST). For CO(v{double_prime} = 0) rotational distributions at higher excess energies, the singlet and triplet contributions are not clearly resolved, and the singlet/triplet branching ratios are estimated by assuming that PST accurately predicts the CO rotational distribution from the singlet channel and that the distribution from the triplet channel changes little from that at 10 cm{sup {minus}1} below the singlet threshold. At 2,500 cm{sup {minus}1} excess energy, the CO(v{double_prime} = 1) rotational distribution is obtained, and the ratio of CO(v{double_prime} = 1) to CO(v{double_prime} = 0) products for the singlet channel is close to the variational RRKM calculation, 0.038, and the separate statistical ensembles (SSE) prediction, 0.041, but much greater than the PST prediction, 0.016. Rate constants for the dissociation of ketene (CH{sub 2}CO) and deuterated ketene (CD{sub 2}CO) have been measured at the threshold for the production of the CH(D){sub 2} and CO. Sharp peaks observed in photofragment excitation (PHOFEX) spectra probing CO (v = 0, J = 2) product are identified with the C-C-O bending mode of the transition state. RRKM calculations are carried out for two limiting cases for the dynamics of K-mixing in highly vibrationally excited reactant states.

  15. Executive Branch Management Scorecard | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Branch Management Scorecard Executive Branch Management Scorecard PDF icon Executive Branch Management Scorecard More Documents & Publications Executive Branch Management Scorecard ...

  16. Q&A: FORGE-ing Ahead to Clean, Low-Cost Geothermal Energy | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy FORGE-ing Ahead to Clean, Low-Cost Geothermal Energy Q&A: FORGE-ing Ahead to Clean, Low-Cost Geothermal Energy July 17, 2014 - 2:48pm Addthis Q&A: FORGE-ing Ahead to Clean, Low-Cost Geothermal Energy Q&A: FORGE-ing Ahead to Clean, Low-Cost Geothermal Energy Q&A: FORGE-ing Ahead to Clean, Low-Cost Geothermal Energy Q&A: FORGE-ing Ahead to Clean, Low-Cost Geothermal Energy Lauren Boyd Lauren Boyd Program Manager, Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) Benjamin Phillips

  17. ENERGISE-ing Solutions to Scale Up Distributed Solar | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ENERGISE-ing Solutions to Scale Up Distributed Solar ENERGISE-ing Solutions to Scale Up Distributed Solar May 31, 2016 - 4:10pm Addthis ENERGISE-ing Solutions to Scale Up Distributed Solar Guohui Yuan Systems Integration Program Manager, SunShot Initiative Learn more about ENERGISE If a utility pole falls in a forest and no energy company employee is around to hear it, does it make a sound? Currently, the answer is no. For the most part, utility companies rely on customer calls to react to

  18. Measurement of the {ital D}{sup +}{sub {ital s}}{r_arrow}{eta}l{sup +}{nu} and {ital D}{sup +}{sub {ital s}}{r_arrow}{eta}{prime}l{sup +}{nu} branching ratios

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brandenburg, G.; Cinabro, D.; Liu, T.; Saulnier, M.; Wilson, R.; Yamamoto, H.; Bergfeld, T.; Eisenstein, B.I.; Ernst, J.; Gladding, G.E.; Gollin, G.D.; Palmer, M.; Selen, M.; Thaler, J.J.; Edwards, K.W.; McLean, K.W.; Ogg, M.; Bellerive, A.; Britton, D.I.; Hyatt, E.R.F.; Janicek, R.; MacFarlane, D.B.; Patel, P.M.; Spaan, B.; Sadoff, A.J.; Ammar, R.; Baringer, P.; Bean, A.; Besson, D.; Coppage, D.; Copty, N.; Davis, R.; Hancock, N.; Kotov, S.; Kravchenko, I.; Kwak, N.; Kubota, Y.; Lattery, M.; Momayezi, M.; Nelson, J.K.; Patton, S.; Poling, R.; Savinov, V.; Schrenk, S.; Wang, R.; Alam, M.S.; Kim, I.J.; Ling, Z.; Mahmood, A.H.; O`Neill, J.J.; Severini, H.; Sun, C.R.; Wappler, F.; Crawford, G.; Duboscq, J.E.; Fulton, R.; Fujino, D.; Gan, K.K.; Honscheid, K.; Kagan, H.; Kass, R.; Lee, J.; Sung, M.; White, C.; Wolf, A.; Zoeller, M.M.; Fu, X.; Nemati, B.; Ross, W.R.; Skubic, P.; Wood, M.; Bishai, M.; Fast, J.; Gerndt, E.; Hinson, J.W.; Miao, T.; Miller, D.H.; Modesitt, M.; Shibata, E.I.; Shipsey, I.P.J.; Wang, P.N.; Gibbons, L.; Johnson, S.D.; Kwon, Y.; Roberts, S.; Thorndike, E.H.; Coan, T.E.; Dominick, J.; Fadeyev, V.; Korolkov, I.; Lambrecht, M.; Sanghera, S.; Shelkov, V.; Skwarnicki, T.; Stroynowski, R.; Volobouev, I.; Wei, G.; Artuso, M.; Gao, M.; Goldberg, M.; He, D.; Horwitz, N.; Kopp, S.; Moneti, G.C.; Mountain, R.; Muheim, F.; Mukhin, Y.; Playfer, S.; Stone, S.; Xing, X.; Bartelt, J.; Csorna, S.E.; Jain, V.; Marka, S.; Gibaut, D.; Kinoshita, K.; Pomianowski, P.; Barish, B.; Chadha, M.; Chan, S.; Cowen, D.F.; Eigen, G.; Miller, J.S.; O`Grady, C.; Urheim, J.; Weinstein, A.J.; Wuerthwein, F.; Asner, D.M.; Athanas, M.; Bliss, D.W.; Brower, W.S.; Masek, G.; Paar, H.P.; Gronberg, J.; Korte, C.M.; Kutschke, R.; Menary, S.; Morrison, R.J.; Nakanishi, S.; Nelson, H.N.; Nelson, T.K.; Qiao, C.; Richman, J.D.; Roberts, D.; Ryd, A.; Tajima, H.; Witherell, M.S.; Balest, R.; Cho, K.; Ford, W.T.; Lohner, M.; Park, H.; Rankin, P.; Smith, J.G.; Alexander, J.P.; (CLEO Collaborat..

    1995-11-20

    Using the CLEO II detector we measure {ital B}({ital D}{sup +}{sub {ital s}}{r_arrow}{eta}{ital e}{sup +}{nu})/{ital B}({ital D}{sup +}{sub {ital s}}{r_arrow}{phi}{ital e}{sup +}{nu}) =1.24{plus_minus}0.12{plus_minus}0.15, {ital B}({ital D}{sup +}{sub {ital s}}{r_arrow}{eta}{prime}{ital e}{sup +}{nu})/{ital B} ({ital D}{sup +}{sub {ital s}}{r_arrow}{phi}{ital e}{sup +}{nu})=0.43{plus_minus}0.11{plus_minus}0.07, and {ital B}({ital D}{sup +}{sub {ital s}}{r_arrow}{eta}{prime}{ital e}{sup +}{nu})/{ital B} ({ital D}{sup +}{sub {ital s}}{r_arrow}{eta}{ital e}{sup +}{nu})=0.35{plus_minus}0.09{plus_minus}0.07. We find the ratio of vector to pseudoscalar final states, {ital B}{bold (}{ital D}{sup +}{sub {ital s}}{r_arrow}{phi}{ital e}{sup +}{nu})/{ital B} ({ital D}{sup +}{sub {ital s}}{r_arrow}({eta}+{eta}{prime}){ital e}{sup +}{nu}{bold )}=0.60{plus_minus}0.06{plus_minus}0.06, which is similar to the ratio found in nonstrange {ital D} decays. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital The} {ital American} {ital Physical} {ital Society}.

  19. Enhancing the branching ratios in the dissociation channels for O{sup 16}O{sup 16}O{sup 18} molecule by designing optimum laser pulses: A study using stochastic optimization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Talukder, Srijeeta; Chaudhury, Pinaki; Sen, Shrabani; Sharma, Rahul; Adhikari, Satrajit

    2015-10-14

    We propose a strategy of using a stochastic optimization technique, namely, simulated annealing to design optimum laser pulses (both IR and UV) to achieve greater fluxes along the two dissociating channels (O{sup 18} + O{sup 16}O{sup 16} and O{sup 16} + O{sup 16}O{sup 18}) in O{sup 16}O{sup 16}O{sup 18} molecule. We show that the integrated fluxes obtained along the targeted dissociating channel is larger with the optimized pulse than with the unoptimized one. The flux ratios are also more impressive with the optimized pulse than with the unoptimized one. We also look at the evolution contours of the wavefunctions along the two channels with time after the actions of both the IR and UV pulses and compare the profiles for unoptimized (initial) and optimized fields for better understanding the results that we achieve. We also report the pulse parameters obtained as well as the final shapes they take.

  20. Radioiodinated branched carbohydrates

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Goodman, Mark M.; Knapp, Jr., Furn F.

    1989-01-01

    A radioiodinated branched carbohydrate for tissue imaging. Iodine-123 is stabilized in the compound by attaching it to a vinyl functional group that is on the carbohydrate. The compound exhibits good uptake and retention and is promising in the development of radiopharmaceuticals for brain, heart and tumor imaging.

  1. Higgs boson hadronic branching ratios at the ILC (Journal Article...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Higgs boson of 120 GeV mass, produced in the Higgs-strahlung process at radical(s)250 GeV, was investigated using the full detector simulation and reconstruction procedures. ...

  2. Branching Ratio of the Electromagnetic Decay of the Σ+(1385)

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Keller, D.; Hicks, K.; Adhikari, K. P.; Adikaram, D.; Amaryan, M. J.; Anghinolfi, M.; Baghdasaryan, H.; Ball, J.; Battaglieri, M.; Bedlinskiy, I.; et al

    2012-03-01

    The CLAS detector was used to obtain the first ever measurement of the electromagnetic decay of the Σ*+(1385) from the reaction γp → K0 Σ*+(1385). A real photon beam with a maximum energy of 3.8 GeV was incident on a liquid-hydrogen target, resulting in the photoproduction of the kaon and Σ* hyperon. Kinematic fitting was used to separate the reaction channel from the background processes. The fitting algorithm exploited a new method to kinematically fit neutrons in the CLAS detector, leading to the partial width measurement of 250.0 ± 56.9(stat)-41.2+34.3(sys) keV. A U-spin symmetry test using the SU(3) flavor-multiplet representationmore » yields predictions for the Σ*+(1385) → Σ+γ and Σ*0(1385) → Λγ partial widths that agree with the experimental measurements.« less

  3. Ionization Branching Ratio Control with a Resonance Attosecond Clock

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Argenti, Luca; Lindroth, Eva

    2010-07-30

    We investigate the possibility to monitor the dynamics of autoionizing states in real-time and control the yields of different ionization channels in helium by simulating extreme ultraviolet (XUV) pump IR-probe experiments focused on the N=2 threshold. The XUV pulse creates a coherent superposition of doubly excited states which is found to decay by ejecting electrons in bursts. Prominent interference fringes in the photoelectron angular distribution of the 2s and 2p ionization channels are observed, along with significant out-of-phase quantum beats in the yields of the corresponding parent ions.

  4. Long Branch Capital | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Branch Capital Jump to: navigation, search Name: Long Branch Capital Place: Austin, Texas Zip: 78744 Sector: Efficiency, Renewable Energy Product: Long Branch Capital makes...

  5. Measurement of the ratio of the production cross sections times branching fractions of Bc ? J/??and B ? J/? K and B(Bc? J/? ???-/+)/B(Bc ? J/? ?) in pp collisions at ?s = 7 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khachatryan, V.

    2015-01-13

    The ratio of the production cross sections times branching fractions (?(Bc) B(Bc ? J/??))/(?(B) B(B ? J/?K) is studied in proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 7 TeV with the CMS detector at the LHC. The kinematic region investigated requires Ba,sub>c and Bmesons with transverse momentum p? > 15 GeV and rapidity |y| < 1.6. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 5.1 fb-1. The ratio is determined to be [0.48 0.05 (stat) 0.03(syst) 0.05 (?Bc)]% The J/????-/+ decay mode is also observed in the same data sample. Using a model-independent method developed to measure the efficiency given the presence of resonant behaviour in the three-pion system, the ratio of the branching fractions J/? ???-/+)/B(Bc is measured to be 2.55 0.80(stat) 0.33(syst) +0.04-0.01 (?Bc), consistent with the previous LHCb result.

  6. Measurement of the ratio of the production cross sections times branching fractions of $$B_{c}^{\\pm} \\to J/\\psi \\pi^{\\pm}$$ and $$B^{\\pm} \\to J/\\psi K^{\\pm}$$ and $$\\mathcal{B}(B_{c}^{\\pm} \\to J/\\psi \\pi^{\\pm}\\pi^{\\pm}\\pi^{\\mp})/\\mathcal{B}(B_{c}^{\\pm} \\to J/\\psi \\pi^{\\pm})$$ in pp collisions at $$\\sqrt{s} =$$ 7 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-01-13

    The ratio of the production cross sections times branching fractions (σ(B±c)B(B±c→J/ψπ±))/(σ(B±)B(B±→J/ψK±)) is studied in proton-proton collisions at a center of-mass energy of 7 TeV with the CMS detector at the LHC. The kinematic region investigated requires B c ± and B± mesons with transverse momentum p T > 15 GeV and rapidity |y|< 1.6. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 5.1 fb-1. The ratio is determined to be [0.48±0.05(stat)± 0.03(syst)±0.05 (τBc)]%. The B c ± → J/ψπ ± π ± π ∓ decay is also observed in the same data sample. Using a model-independent method developed tomore » measure the efficiency given the presence of resonant behaviour in the three-pion system, the ratio of the branching fractions B(B±c→J/ψπ±π±π∓)/B(B±c→J/ψπ±) is measured to be 2.55±0.80(stat)±0.33(syst)+0.04-0.01(τBc), consistent with the previous LHCb result.« less

  7. Biography U. Düsterloh Degree: PD Dr.- Ing. habil. Institution: Clausthal University of Technology.

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    U. Düsterloh Degree: PD Dr.- Ing. habil. Institution: Clausthal University of Technology. Chair: chair for waste disposal technologies and geomechanics. 1982- 1988 field of study: mining engineer 1989- 1993 PhD work - geomechanical investigations on the stability of salt caverns for waste disposal. 2009 Habilitation - proof of stability and integrity of underground excavations in saliniferous formations with special regard to lab tests. 1989 - 2012 chief engineer at Clausthal University of

  8. Measurement of the ratio of the production cross sections times branching fractions of $B_{c}^{\\pm} \\to J/\\psi \\pi^{\\pm}$ and $B^{\\pm} \\to J/\\psi K^{\\pm}$ and $\\mathcal{B}(B_{c}^{\\pm} \\to J/\\psi \\pi^{\\pm}\\pi^{\\pm}\\pi^{\\mp})/\\mathcal{B}(B_{c}^{\\pm} \\to J/\\psi \\pi^{\\pm})$ in pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s} =$ 7 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-01-13

    The ratio of the production cross sections times branching fractions (σ(B±c)B(B±c→J/ψπ±))/(σ(B±)B(B±→J/ψK±)) is studied in proton-proton collisions at a center of-mass energy of 7 TeV with the CMS detector at the LHC. The kinematic region investigated requires B c ± and B± mesons with transverse momentum p T > 15 GeV and rapidity |y|< 1.6. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 5.1 fb-1. The ratio is determined to be [0.48±0.05(stat)± 0.03(syst)±0.05 (τBc)]%. The B c ± → J/ψπ ± π ± π decay is also observed in the same data sample. Using a model-independent method developed to measure the efficiency given the presence of resonant behaviour in the three-pion system, the ratio of the branching fractions B(B±c→J/ψπ±π±π)/B(B±c→J/ψπ±) is measured to be 2.55±0.80(stat)±0.33(syst)+0.04-0.01Bc), consistent with the previous LHCb result.

  9. Solid State Photovoltaic Research Branch

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-09-01

    This report summarizes the progress of the Solid State Photovoltaic Research Branch of the Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI) from October 1, 1988, through September 30,l 1989. Six technical sections of the report cover these main areas of SERIs in-house research: Semiconductor Crystal Growth, Amorphous Silicon Research, Polycrystalline Thin Films, III-V High-Efficiency Photovoltaic Cells, Solid-State Theory, and Laser Raman and Luminescence Spectroscopy. Sections have been indexed separately for inclusion on the data base.

  10. Walker Branch Watershed Ecosystems Data

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Walker Branch Watershed is located on the U. S. Department of Energy's Oak Ridge Reservation near Oak Ridge, in Anderson County, Tennessee. The Walker Branch Watershed Project began in 1967 under sponsorship of the U. S. Atomic Energy Commission (now the U. S. Department of Energy). Initially, the project centered primarily on the geologic and hydrologic processes that control the amounts and chemistry of water moving through the watershed. Past projects have included: • U. S. Department of Energy funded studies of watershed hydrology and forest nutrient dynamics • National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration funded studies of forest micrometeorology • Studies of atmospheric deposition under the National Atmospheric Deposition Program • The International Biological Program Eastern Deciduous Forest Biome Project • National Science Foundation sponsored studies of trace element cycling and stream nutrient spiraling • Electric Power Research Institute funded studies of the effects of acidic deposition on canopy processes and soil chemistry. These projects have all contributed to a more complete understanding of how forest watersheds function and have provided insights into the solution of energy-related problems associated with air pollution, contaminant transport, and forest nutrient dynamics. This is one of a few sites in the world characterized by long-term, intensive environmental studies. The Walker Branch Watershed website at http://walkerbranch.ornl.gov/ provides maps, photographs, and data on climate, precipitation, atmospheric deposition, stream discharge and runoff, stream chemistry, and vegetation. [Taken from http://walkerbranch.ornl.gov/ABOUTAAA.HTM

  11. Hawaii Wastewater Branch Webpage | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Webpage Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Hawaii Wastewater Branch Webpage Abstract This is the webpage of the Wastewater Branch of the...

  12. Walker Branch Watershed Ecosystems Data

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    These projects have all contributed to a more complete understanding of how forest watersheds function and have provided insights into the solution of energy-related problems associated with air pollution, contaminant transport, and forest nutrient dynamics. This is one of a few sites in the world characterized by long-term, intensive environmental studies. The Walker Branch Watershed website at http://walkerbranch.ornl.gov/ provides maps, photographs, and data on climate, precipitation, atmospheric deposition, stream discharge and runoff, stream chemistry, and vegetation. [Taken from http://walkerbranch.ornl.gov/ABOUTAAA.HTM

  13. OGLE-ing the Magellanic system: stellar populations in the Magellanic Bridge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Skowron, D. M.; Jacyszyn, A. M.; Udalski, A.; Szymański, M. K.; Skowron, J.; Poleski, R.; Kozłowski, S.; Kubiak, M.; Pietrzyński, G.; Soszyński, I.; Mróz, P.; Pietrukowicz, P.; Ulaczyk, K.; Wyrzykowski, Ł.

    2014-11-10

    We report the discovery of a young stellar bridge that forms a continuous connection between the Magellanic Clouds. This finding is based on number density maps for stellar populations found in data gathered by OGLE-IV that fully cover over 270 deg{sup 2} of the sky in the Magellanic Bridge area. This is the most extensive optical survey of this region to date. We find that the young population is present mainly in the western half of the MBR, which, together with the newly discovered young population in the eastern Bridge, form a continuous stream of stars connecting both galaxies along δ ∼ –73.5 deg. The young population distribution is clumped, with one of the major densities close to the SMC and the other fairly isolated and located approximately mid-way between the Clouds, which we call the OGLE island. These overdensities are well matched by H I surface density contours, although the newly found young population in the eastern Bridge is offset by ∼2 deg north from the highest H I density contour. We observe a continuity of red clump stars between the Magellanic Clouds which represent an intermediate-age population. Red clump stars are present mainly in the southern and central parts of the Magellanic Bridge, below its gaseous part, and their presence is reflected by a strong deviation from the radial density profiles of the two galaxies. This may indicate either a tidal stream of stars, or that the stellar halos of the two galaxies overlap. On the other hand, we do not observe such an overlap within an intermediate-age population represented by the top of the red giant branch and the asymptotic giant branch stars. We also see only minor mixing of the old populations of the Clouds in the southern part of the Bridge, represented by the lowest part of the red giant branch.

  14. QER- Comment of Rachel Branch

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    April 20, 2014 I hereby respectfully request that the Department of Energy Quadrennial Energy Review Task Force on the Infrastructure Constraints in New England oppose any new development or building of any more fossil fuel infrastructure and only allow the repair of existing infrastructure that is absolutely necessary as we transition to sustainable, renewable sources. Further, I respectfully request that any and all subsidies, tax incentives and/or tax exemptions hereinafter be appropriated and/or directed only to sustainable, renewable sources, i. e., solar, wind, and hydro energy, and development of electrical storage capacities for those sustainable and renewable sources. I further request that any funds spent to push for fossil fuel infrastructure be transparent to the general public. As you are holding meetings in Providence and Hartford, when will your meeting in Massachusetts be scheduled so that Commonwealth of Massachusetts residents can participate? Respectfully submitted, Rachel I. Branch

  15. Vegetation survey of PEN Branch wetlands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    A survey was conducted of vegetation along Pen Branch Creek at Savannah River Site (SRS) in support of K-Reactor restart. Plants were identified to species by overstory, understory, shrub, and groundcover strata. Abundance was also characterized and richness and diversity calculated. Based on woody species basal area, the Pen Branch delta was the most impacted, followed by the sections between the reactor and the delta. Species richness for shrub and groundcover strata were also lowest in the delta. No endangered plant species were found. Three upland pine areas were also sampled. In support of K Reactor restart, this report summarizes a study of the wetland vegetation along Pen Branch. Reactor effluent enters Indian Grove Branch and then flows into Pen Branch and the Pen Branch Delta.

  16. Construction Branch Electrician & Lead Electrician | Princeton...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Construction Branch Electrician & Lead Electrician Department: Engineering Supervisor(s): ... devices, and assist with the construction and repair of facilities on the PPPL campus. ...

  17. Asymmetric branching of dissociated photofragments of HD{sup +} in an intense femtosecond laser field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chatterjee, Souvik; Bhattacharyya, S. S.; Dutta, Bibhas

    2011-06-15

    We have numerically explored the asymmetry in the branching ratio of the photofragments in the photodissociation of HD{sup +} (neutral D and neutral H), leading to the possibility of localization of the electron on a chosen nucleus by careful tuning of the laser parameters. For two different frequencies we show that, starting from an initial stationary wave function, proper tuning of the pulse duration (2{sigma}) and peak intensities (I{sup 0}) of the laser pulses can lead to very different branching ratios of the two reaction channels. The results are interpreted in terms of the propagation of the nonstationary wave packet through regions having dominant radiative or nonradiative interactions at different times. We also investigate what effect the choice of initial vibrational state has on the overall asymmetry in the branching ratio of the dissociation products.

  18. FY 1990 Applied Sciences Branch annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keyes, B.M.; Dippo, P.C.

    1991-11-01

    The Applied Sciences Branch actively supports the advancement of DOE/SERI goals for the development and implementation of the solar photovoltaic technology. The primary focus of the laboratories is to provide state-of-the-art analytical capabilities for materials and device characterization and fabrication. The branch houses a comprehensive facility which is capable of providing information on the full range of photovoltaic components. A major objective of the branch is to aggressively pursue collaborative research with other government laboratories, universities, and industrial firms for the advancement of photovoltaic technologies. Members of the branch disseminate research findings to the technical community in publications and presentations. This report contains information on surface and interface analysis, materials characterization, development, electro-optical characterization module testing and performance, surface interactions and FTIR spectroscopy.

  19. ..&rrbt, Chief, Industrial Hy&na Branch, HerlthbrSas8byLaboratoly

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    tf..@ ..&rrbt, Chief, Industrial Hy&na Branch, HerlthbrSas8byLaboratoly ;,.; , ' 1 ' @@w-w 3, 1954 P. B. Klevin, Indurtrial Hygiexn J5rantah, Barrlei &'afelky Lab0raM~ : . .A , 3 t :;p,: . NATIONAL LEiD OF OHIO ROLLINO OFERATIONS AT SIHONr>s SAW 6 STEEL- Amm', +I& y9, <: '.. SmBoLt HSHtPBK ' -: - St. Louis Area Office at the Simnds Saw and Steel Co., k&port, NJ., on tha &boVe clrtm, I oblruloed tb Mat;Lonal Uad umu&m and thorium roll- ing operations which were

  20. EA-263 UBS AG, London Branch | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    EA-263 UBS AG, London Branch Order authorizing UBS AG, London Branch to export electric energy to Mexico. PDF icon EA-263 UBS AG, London Branch More Documents & Publications EA-232 ...

  1. Cow Branch Wind Energy Center Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Cow Branch Wind Energy Center Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Cow Branch Wind Energy Center Wind Farm Facility Cow Branch Wind Energy Center Sector Wind energy Facility...

  2. Microbial production of wax esters from highly branched alkanes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bogan, William W.; Sullivan, Wendy R.; Paterek, James R.

    2005-02-01

    A microbial culture and method for producing wax esters using highly branched alkanes. In accordance with one embodiment, the highly branched alkane is squalane.

  3. Hawaii Department of Health Solid and Hazardous Waste Branch...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and Hazardous Waste Branch Jump to: navigation, search Name: Hawaii Department of Health Solid and Hazardous Waste Branch Address: 919 Ala Moana Boulevard 212 Place: Honolulu,...

  4. Utah DEQ Air Permitting Branch Webpage | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    link for Utah DEQ Air Permitting Branch Webpage Citation Utah Department of Environmental Quality. Utah DEQ Air Permitting Branch Webpage Internet. State of Utah. cited 201411...

  5. Hawaii Department of Health Indoor and Radiological Health Branch...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Indoor and Radiological Health Branch Jump to: navigation, search Name: Hawaii Department of Health Indoor and Radiological Health Branch From Open Energy Information Address: 591...

  6. ARM - Measurement - Isotope ratio

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    govMeasurementsIsotope ratio ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Isotope ratio Ratio of stable isotope concentrations. Categories Atmospheric State, Atmospheric Carbon Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those

  7. Jr., Process Development Branch Construction Division SUBJECT:

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    FR?M : Jr., Process Development Branch Construction Division SUBJECT: INING TESTS AT BOWEN ENGINEERING, INC. - M A Y 16 AND 16,!1961 SYMBOL! EPD:ABBrbt I REY~AKC~: &DiVE;G?i&)il [q a 1 $ a, " I On day 16 and 16,,1951 Bowen Engineering, Inc. made test rune on ypray calcining of boiled-down Mallinokrodt pitohblende raffinate. Theqe rune were made in Bowen'e laboratory unit et North Branch, NT Jel;sey. The initial results indicate that raffidate &$be euocessfully epray oalcined to

  8. Material development in the SI sub 3 N sub 4 system using glass encapsulated Hip'ing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Corbin, N.D.; Sundberg, G.J.; Siebein, K.N.; Willkens, C.A.; Pujari, V.K.; Rossi, G.A.; Hansen, J.S.; Chang, C.L.; Hammarstrom, J.L.

    1992-04-01

    This report covers a two-year program to develop fully dense Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} matrix SiC whisker composites with enhanced properties over monolithic Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} materials. The primary goal was to develop a composite with a fracture toughness > 10 MPa{radical}m, capable of using high pressure glass encapsulated HIP'ing. Coating methods were developed to apply thin (<150nm) stoichiometric BN layers to SiC whiskers and also to apply a dual coating of SiC over carbon to the whiskers. Fracture toughness of the composites was determined to increase as the quantity of whiskers (or elongated grains) with their axis perpendicular to the crack plane increased. Of the interface compositions evaluated in this effort, carbon was determined to be the most effective for increasing toughness. The highest toughnesses (6.8--7.0 MPa{radical}m) were obtained with uniaxially aligned carbon coated whiskers. There was no evidence of the carbon coating compromising the oxidation resistance of the composites at 1370{degree}C.

  9. Photovoltaic Program Branch annual report, FY 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Summers, K A

    1990-03-01

    This report summarizes the progress of the Photovoltaic (PV) Program Branch of the Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI) from October 1, 1988, through September 30, 1989. The branch is responsible for managing the subcontracted portion of SERI's PV Advanced Research and Development Project. In fiscal year (FY) 1989, this included nearly 50 subcontracts, with a total annualized funding of approximately $13.1 million. Approximately two-thirds of the subcontracts were with universities, at a total funding of nearly $4 million. The six technical sections of the report cover the main areas of the subcontracted program: Amorphous Silicon Research, Polycrystalline Thin Films, Crystalline Silicon Materials Research, High-Efficiency Concepts, New Ideas, and University Participation. Technical summaries of each of the subcontracted programs provide a discussion of approaches, major accomplishments in FY 1989, and future research directions. Each report will be cataloged individually.

  10. Hawaii Department of Health Clean Water Branch | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Clean Water Branch Jump to: navigation, search Name: Hawaii Department of Health Clean Water Branch Address: P.O. Box 3378 Place: Honolulu, Hawaii Zip: 96801 Website: hawaii.gov...

  11. North Branch Water & Light Comm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    North Branch Water & Light Comm Jump to: navigation, search Name: North Branch Water & Light Comm Place: Minnesota Phone Number: 651-674-7100 or 651-674-8113 Website:...

  12. EA-261 UBS AG, London Branch | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    1 UBS AG, London Branch EA-261 UBS AG, London Branch Order authorizing UBS AG, London Branch to export electric energy to Mexico. EA-261 UBS AG, London Branch (24.57 KB) More Documents & Publications EA-184 Morgan Stanley Capital Group Inc. EA-166 Duke Energy Trading and Marketing, L.L.C EA-167 PG&E Energy Trading-Power, L.P

  13. Dendrimers and methods of preparing same through proportionate branching

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yu, Yihua; Yue, Xuyi

    2015-09-15

    The present invention provides for monodispersed dendrimers having a core, branches and periphery ends, wherein the number of branches increases exponentially from the core to the periphery end and the length of the branches increases exponentially from the periphery end to the core, thereby providing for attachment of chemical species at the periphery ends without exhibiting steric hindrance.

  14. Detector for measuring the π+ → e+v branching fraction

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aguilar-Arevalo, A. A.; Aoki, M.; Blecher, M.; Bruch, D. vom; Bryman, D.; Comfort, J.; Cuen-Rochin, S.; Doria, L.; Gumplinger, P.; Hussein, A.; et al

    2015-04-13

    The PIENU experiment at TRIUMF is aimed at a measurement of the branching ratio Re/u = Γ((π+ → e+ve) + (π+ → e+veγ))/Γ((π+ → μ+vμ) + (π+ → μ+vμγ)) with precision more »This paper provides a description of the PIENU experimental apparatus and its performance in pursuit of Re/u« less

  15. Peak power ratio generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moyer, Robert D.

    1985-01-01

    A peak power ratio generator is described for measuring, in combination with a conventional power meter, the peak power level of extremely narrow pulses in the gigahertz radio frequency bands. The present invention in a preferred embodiment utilizes a tunnel diode and a back diode combination in a detector circuit as the only high speed elements. The high speed tunnel diode provides a bistable signal and serves as a memory device of the input pulses for the remaining, slower components. A hybrid digital and analog loop maintains the peak power level of a reference channel at a known amount. Thus, by measuring the average power levels of the reference signal and the source signal, the peak power level of the source signal can be determined.

  16. Peak power ratio generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moyer, R.D.

    A peak power ratio generator is described for measuring, in combination with a conventional power meter, the peak power level of extremely narrow pulses in the gigahertz radio frequency bands. The present invention in a preferred embodiment utilizes a tunnel diode and a back diode combination in a detector circuit as the only high speed elements. The high speed tunnel diode provides a bistable signal and serves as a memory device of the input pulses for the remaining, slower components. A hybrid digital and analog loop maintains the peak power level of a reference channel at a known amount. Thus, by measuring the average power levels of the reference signal and the source signal, the peak power level of the source signal can be determined.

  17. Additional chain-branching pathways in the low-temperature oxidation of branched alkanes

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wang, Zhandong; Zhang, Lidong; Moshammer, Kai; Popolan-Vaida, Denisia M.; Shankar, Vijai Shankar Bhavani; Lucassen, Arnas; Hemken, Christian; Taatjes, Craig A.; Leone, Stephen R.; Kohse-Hoinghaus, Katharina; et al

    2015-12-31

    Chain-branching reactions represent a general motif in chemistry, encountered in atmospheric chemistry, combustion, polymerization, and photochemistry; the nature and amount of radicals generated by chain-branching are decisive for the reaction progress, its energy signature, and the time towards its completion. In this study, experimental evidence for two new types of chain-branching reactions is presented, based upon detection of highly oxidized multifunctional molecules (HOM) formed during the gas-phase low-temperature oxidation of a branched alkane under conditions relevant to combustion. The oxidation of 2,5-dimethylhexane (DMH) in a jet-stirred reactor (JSR) was studied using synchrotron vacuum ultra-violet photoionization molecular beam mass spectrometry (SVUV-PI-MBMS).more » Specifically, species with four and five oxygen atoms were probed, having molecular formulas of C8H14O4 (e.g., diketo-hydroperoxide/keto-hydroperoxy cyclic ether) and C8H16O5 (e.g., keto-dihydroperoxide/dihydroperoxy cyclic ether), respectively. The formation of C8H16O5 species involves alternative isomerization of OOQOOH radicals via intramolecular H-atom migration, followed by third O2 addition, intramolecular isomerization, and OH release; C8H14O4 species are proposed to result from subsequent reactions of C8H16O5 species. The mechanistic pathways involving these species are related to those proposed as a source of low-volatility highly oxygenated species in Earth's troposphere. At the higher temperatures relevant to auto-ignition, they can result in a net increase of hydroxyl radical production, so these are additional radical chain-branching pathways for ignition. Furthermore, the results presented herein extend the conceptual basis of reaction mechanisms used to predict the reaction behavior of ignition, and have implications on atmospheric gas-phase chemistry and the oxidative stability of organic substances.« less

  18. Hawaii Department of Health Safe Drinking Water Branch | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hawaii Department of Health Safe Drinking Water Branch Address: 919 Ala Moana Blvd Room 308 Place: Honolulu, Hawaii Zip: 96814 References: Hawaii Department of Health Safe...

  19. Production of anteiso-branched fatty acids in Escherichia coli...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Production of anteiso-branched fatty acids in Escherichia coli; next generation biofuels with improved cold-flow properties Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Production of ...

  20. Wells Branch, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Wells Branch, Texas: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 30.4460353, -97.6794507 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingse...

  1. Branching Mechanisms in Surfactant Micellar Growth (Journal Article...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Branching Mechanisms in Surfactant Micellar Growth Authors: Tang, M ; Carter, W C Publication Date: 2012-08-20 OSTI Identifier: 1169255 ...

  2. Hawaii Department of Health Clean Air Branch | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    to: navigation, search Name: Hawaii Department of Health Clean Air Branch Address: P.O. Box 3378 Place: Honolulu, Hawaii Zip: 96801 Website: hawaii.govhealthenvironmenta...

  3. Hawaii Wastewater Branch Online Application Webpage | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Application Webpage Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Hawaii Wastewater Branch Online Application Webpage Author State of Hawaii...

  4. Hawaii Clean Water Branch Forms Webpage | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Not Provided DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http:crossref.org Online Internet link for Hawaii Clean Water Branch Forms Webpage Citation State of Hawaii Department...

  5. Hawaii Department of Health Clean Air Branch Webpage | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Branch Webpage Internet. cited 20141013. Available from: http:health.hawaii.govcab Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleHawaiiDepartmentofHealthCle...

  6. Mr. John Kinneman, Chief Nuclear Materfals Branch Nuclear Regulatory...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    111989 Mr. John Kinneman, Chief Nuclear Materfals Branch Nuclear Regulatory Commission Region I 475 Allendale Road King of Prussia. Pennsylvania 19406 Dear Mr. Kinneman: -;' .-. 'W ...

  7. CYANOGEN IN NGC 1851 RED GIANT BRANCH AND ASYMPTOTIC GIANT BRANCH STARS: QUADRIMODAL DISTRIBUTIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Campbell, S. W.; Stancliffe, R. J.; Lattanzio, J. C.; Angelou, G. C.; D'Orazi, V.; Yong, D.; Wylie-de Boer, E. C.; Martell, S. L.; Grundahl, F.; Sneden, C. E-mail: david.yong@anu.edu.au

    2012-12-10

    The Galactic globular cluster NGC 1851 has raised much interest since Hubble Space Telescope photometry revealed that it hosts a double subgiant branch. Here we report on our homogeneous study into the cyanogen (CN) band strengths in the red giant branch (RGB) population (17 stars) and asymptotic giant branch (AGB) population (21 stars) using AAOmega/2dF spectra with R {approx} 3000. We discover that NGC 1851 hosts a quadrimodal distribution of CN band strengths in its RGB and AGB populations. This result supports the merger formation scenario proposed for this cluster, such that the CN quadrimodality could be explained by the superposition of two 'normal' bimodal populations. A small sample overlap with an abundance catalog allowed us to tentatively explore the relationship between our CN populations and a range of elemental abundances. We found a striking correlation between CN and [O/Na]. We also found that the four CN peaks may be paired-the two CN-weaker populations being associated with low Ba and the two CN-stronger populations with high Ba. If true, then s-process abundances would be a good diagnostic for disentangling the two original clusters in the merger scenario. More observations are needed to confirm the quadrimodality and also the relationship between the subpopulations. We also report CN results for NGC 288 as a comparison. Our relatively large samples of AGB stars show that both clusters have a bias toward CN-weak AGB populations.

  8. Radiolabeled dimethyl branched long chain fatty acid for heart imaging

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Knapp, Jr., Furn F.; Goodman, Mark M.; Kirsch, Gilbert

    1988-08-16

    A radiolabeled long chain fatty acid for heart imaging that has dimethyl branching at one of the carbons of the chain which inhibits the extent to which oxidation can occur. The closer to the carboxyl the branching is positioned, the more limited the oxidation, thereby resulting in prolonged retention of the radiolabeled compound in the heart.

  9. FY 1992 Measurements and Characterization Branch annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dippo, P.C

    1993-03-01

    The Measurements and Characterization Branch actively supports the advancement of DOE/NREL goals for the development and implementation of the solar photovoltaic (PV) technology. The primary focus of the laboratories is to provide state-of-the-art analytical capabilities for materials and device characterization and fabrication. The branch houses a comprehensive facility that Is capable of providing information on the full range of PV components. A major objective of the branch is to aggressively pursue collaborative research with other government laboratories, universities, and industrial firms for the advancement of Pv technologies. Members of the branch disseminate research findings to the technical community in publications and presentations. The Measurements and Characterization Branch encompasses seven coordinated research groups, providing integrated research and development that covers all aspects of photovoltaic materials/devices characterization.

  10. Branching Mechanisms in Surfactant Micellar Growth (Journal Article...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Branching Mechanisms in Surfactant Micellar Growth Citation ... 1169255 Report Number(s): LLNL-JRNL-575474 DOE Contract Number: DE-AC52-07NA27344 Resource Type: Journal Article ...

  11. Memorandum A. J. Rizzo, Chief TO : Operational Safety Branch

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    j Memorandum A. J. Rizzo, Chief TO / : Operational Safety Branch Harold Glauberman, ?a FROM : Operational Safety Branch ' I DATE: September 30, 1966 REMOVAL OF CONTAMINATED EQUlPMEHT AT THE CANEL FACILITY SUBJECT: MI DDLETOWN, CONNECT I CUT' INTRODUCTION The decision to terminate AEC contract activities at the CANEL facility introduced the need to dispose of radioactively contaminated equipment and materials so as to permit release of the facilities. As a result, -' . the Operational Safety

  12. High ratio recirculating gas compressor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weinbrecht, John F.

    1989-01-01

    A high ratio positive displacement recirculating rotary compressor is disclosed. The compressor includes an integral heat exchanger and recirculation conduits for returning cooled, high pressure discharge gas to the compressor housing to reducing heating of the compressor and enable higher pressure ratios to be sustained. The compressor features a recirculation system which results in continuous and uninterrupted flow of recirculation gas to the compressor with no direct leakage to either the discharge port or the intake port of the compressor, resulting in a capability of higher sustained pressure ratios without overheating of the compressor.

  13. High ratio recirculating gas compressor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weinbrecht, J.F.

    1989-08-22

    A high ratio positive displacement recirculating rotary compressor is disclosed. The compressor includes an integral heat exchanger and recirculation conduits for returning cooled, high pressure discharge gas to the compressor housing to reducing heating of the compressor and enable higher pressure ratios to be sustained. The compressor features a recirculation system which results in continuous and uninterrupted flow of recirculation gas to the compressor with no direct leakage to either the discharge port or the intake port of the compressor, resulting in a capability of higher sustained pressure ratios without overheating of the compressor. 10 figs.

  14. Measurements of Branching Ratios And Search for CP Violation in the Modes B0 to Rho Pi, Rho K

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laplace, Sandrine; /Paris U., VI-VII

    2006-09-18

    The BABAR experiment, at the PEP-II collider at SLAC, has been studying since 1999 CP violation in the B meson system. After the precise measurement of sin2{beta}, one is now concentrating on measuring the angles {alpha} and {gamma} of the unitarity triangle. The work presented in this thesis concerns the measurement of the angle {alpha} in the B{sup 0} {yields} {rho}{pi} mode.

  15. Measurement of the p to s Wave Branching Ratio of {sup 187}Re {beta} Decay from Beta Environmental Fine Structure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arnaboldi, C.; Brofferio, C.; Capelli, S.; Capozzi, F.; Cremonesi, O.; Fiorini, E.; Nucciotti, A.; Pavan, M.; Pessina, G.; Pirro, S.; Previtali, E.; Sisti, M.; Benedek, G.; Filipponi, A.; Giuliani, A.; Pedretti, M.; Monfardini, A.

    2006-02-03

    The mixed occurrence of s-wave and p-wave contributions in a first forbidden unique Gamow-Teller {beta} decay has been investigated for the first time by measuring the beta environmental fine structure (BEFS) in a {sup 187}Re crystalline compound. The experiment has been carried out with an array of eight AgReO{sub 4} thermal detectors operating at a temperature of {approx}100 mK. A fit of the observed BEFS spectrum indicates the p-wave electron emission as the dominant channel. The complete understanding of the BEFS distortion of the {sup 187}Re {beta} decay spectrum is crucial for future experiments aiming at the precise calorimetric measurement of the antineutrino mass.

  16. Measurement of branching fraction ratios and CP asymmetries in B →D0 CPK decays with the BABAR detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marchiori, Giovanni; /Pisa U.

    2010-05-05

    The primary goals of the BABAR experiment are the detection of CP violation (CPV) in the B meson system, the precise measurement of some of the elements of the CKM matrix and the measurement of the rates of rare B meson decays. At present, BABAR has achieved major successes: (1) the discovery, in neutral B decays, of direct and mixing-induced CP violation; (2) accurate measurements of the magnitudes of the CKM matrix elements |V{sub cb}| and |V{sub ub}|; (3) a precise measurement of the CKM parameter {beta} {triple_bond} arg[- V{sub cd}V*{sub cb}/V{sub td}V*{sub tb}]; (4) a first measurement of the CKM parameters {alpha} {triple_bond} arg[- V{sub td}V*{sub tb}/V{sub ud}V*{sub ub}], {gamma} {triple_bond} arg[- V{sub ud}V*{sub ub}/V{sub cd}V*{sub cb}]; and (5) the observation of several rare B decays and the discovery of new particles (in the charmed and charmonium mesons spectroscopy). However, the physics program of BABAR is not yet complete. Two of the key elements of this program that still need to be achieved are: (1) the observation of direct CP violation in charged B decays, which would constitute the first evidence of direct CPV in a charged meson decay; and (2) the precise measurement of {alpha} and {gamma}, which are necessary ingredients for a stringent test of the Standard Model predictions in the quark electroweak sector. A possibility for the discovery of direct CP violation in charged B decays would be the observation of a non-vanishing rate asymmetry in the Cabibbo-suppressed decay B{sup -} {yields} D{sup 0} K{sup -}, with the D{sup 0} decaying to either a CP-even or a CP-odd eigenstate. This class of decays can also provide theoretically-clean information on {gamma}.

  17. Structure of FabH and factors affecting the distribution of branched fatty acids in Micrococcus luteus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pereira, Jose H.; Goh, Ee-Been; Keasling, Jay D.; Beller, Harry R.; Adams, Paul D.

    2012-10-01

    In an effort to better understand the control of the formation of branched fatty acids in Micrococcus luteus, the structure of ?-ketoacyl-ACP synthase III, which catalyzes the initial step of fatty-acid biosynthesis, has been determined. Micrococcus luteus is a Gram-positive bacterium that produces iso- and anteiso-branched alkenes by the head-to-head condensation of fatty-acid thioesters [coenzyme A (CoA) or acyl carrier protein (ACP)]; this activity is of interest for the production of advanced biofuels. In an effort to better understand the control of the formation of branched fatty acids in M. luteus, the structure of FabH (MlFabH) was determined. FabH, or ?-ketoacyl-ACP synthase III, catalyzes the initial step of fatty-acid biosynthesis: the condensation of malonyl-ACP with an acyl-CoA. Analysis of the MlFabH structure provides insights into its substrate selectivity with regard to length and branching of the acyl-CoA. The most structurally divergent region of FabH is the L9 loop region located at the dimer interface, which is involved in the formation of the acyl-binding channel and thus limits the substrate-channel size. The residue Phe336, which is positioned near the catalytic triad, appears to play a major role in branched-substrate selectivity. In addition to structural studies of MlFabH, transcriptional studies of M. luteus were also performed, focusing on the increase in the ratio of anteiso:iso-branched alkenes that was observed during the transition from early to late stationary phase. Gene-expression microarray analysis identified two genes involved in leucine and isoleucine metabolism that may explain this transition.

  18. BRANCH-BASED MODEL FOR THE DIAMETERS OF THE PULMONARY AIRWAYS...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    BRANCH-BASED MODEL FOR THE DIAMETERS OF THE PULMONARY AIRWAYS: ACCOUNTING FOR DEPARTURES ... Title: BRANCH-BASED MODEL FOR THE DIAMETERS OF THE PULMONARY AIRWAYS: ACCOUNTING FOR ...

  19. Energy Balance Bowen Ratio System

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    0 Energy Balance Bowen Ratio System Estimates of surface energy fluxes are a primary product of the data collection systems at the ARM SGP CART site. Surface fluxes tell ...

  20. Subsea pipeline gets welded branch without halting flow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    West, A.; Hutt, G.; Starsmore, R.

    1995-12-11

    In October 1994, a 16 in. welded branch was installed without interruption to production onto Wintershall Noordzee BV`s 36-in. gas pipeline from the K13-A platform in the Dutch sector of the North Sea to Den helder, The Netherlands. The procedure is the first successfully to combine hyperbaric welding and subsea hot tapping without interruption to production. Developers of new fields can now consider exporting product without interrupting existing production and through existing infrastructure even if no convenient tie-in locations exist. Unocal evaluated export options and established that the most attractive alternative was to export gas into the Wintershall 36-in. K13-A to Den Helder pipeline. Various options for installing a branch included the following: flooding the pipeline and installing a conventional tee; stopping production and installing a welded branch followed by hot tapping; and continuing production and installing a welded branch followed by hot tapping. The chosen scheme was to retrofit a subsea side-tap assembly. This was achieved by installation of a welded branch followed by hot tapping into the 36-in. pipeline. The paper describes location determination, schedules, onshore preparation, and offshore work.

  1. Measurement of the inclusive semileptonic branching fraction B(B⁰s→X-l+νl) at Belle

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Oswald, C.; Urquijo, P.; Dingfelder, J.; Adachi, I.; Aihara, H.; Arinstein, K.; Asner, D. M.; Aushev, T.; Bakich, A. M.; Belous, K.; et al

    2013-04-30

    We report a measurement of the inclusive semileptonic B0s branching fraction in a 121 fb⁻¹ data sample collected near the Υ(5S) resonance with the Belle detector at the KEKB asymmetric energy e⁺e⁻ collider. Events containing B⁰(*)sB¯¯¯⁰(*)s pairs are selected by reconstructing a tag side D⁺s and identifying a signal side lepton l⁺ (l=e, μ) that is required to have the same-sign charge to ensure that both originate from different B⁰s mesons. The B⁰s→X⁻l⁺νl branching fraction is extracted from the ratio of the measured yields of D⁺s mesons and D⁺sl⁺ pairs and the known production and branching fractions. The inclusive semileptonicmore » branching fraction is measured to be [10.6±0.5(stat)±0.7(syst)]%.« less

  2. Measurement of the inclusive semileptonic branching fraction B(B⁰s→X-l+νl) at Belle

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Oswald, C.; Urquijo, P.; Dingfelder, J.; Adachi, I.; Aihara, H.; Arinstein, K.; Asner, D. M.; Aushev, T.; Bakich, A. M.; Belous, K.; et al

    2013-04-30

    We report a measurement of the inclusive semileptonic B0s branching fraction in a 121 fb⁻¹ data sample collected near the Υ(5S) resonance with the Belle detector at the KEKB asymmetric energy e⁺e⁻ collider. Events containing B⁰(*)sB¯¯¯⁰(*)s pairs are selected by reconstructing a tag side D⁺s and identifying a signal side lepton l⁺ (l=e, μ) that is required to have the same-sign charge to ensure that both originate from different B⁰s mesons. The B⁰s→X⁻l⁺νl branching fraction is extracted from the ratio of the measured yields of D⁺s mesons and D⁺sl⁺ pairs and the known production and branching fractions. The inclusive semileptonicmore »branching fraction is measured to be [10.6±0.5(stat)±0.7(syst)]%.« less

  3. RADIONUCLIDE INVENTORY AND DISTRIBUTION: FOURMILE BRANCH, PEN BRANCH, AND STEEL CREEK IOUS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hiergesell, R.; Phifer, M.

    2014-04-29

    As a condition to the Department of Energy (DOE) Low Level Waste Disposal Federal Facility Review Group (LFRG) review team approving the Savannah River Site (SRS) Composite Analysis (CA), SRS agreed to follow up on a secondary issue, which consisted of the consolidation of several observations that the team concluded, when evaluated collectively, could potentially impact the integration of the CA results. This report addresses secondary issue observations 4 and 21, which identify the need to improve the CA sensitivity and uncertainty analysis specifically by improving the CA inventory and the estimate of its uncertainty. The purpose of the work described herein was to be responsive to these secondary issue observations by re-examining the radionuclide inventories of the Integrator Operable Units (IOUs), as documented in ERD 2001 and Hiergesell, et. al. 2008. The LFRG concern has been partially addressed already for the Lower Three Runs (LTR) IOU (Hiergesell and Phifer, 2012). The work described in this investigation is a continuation of the effort to address the LFRG concerns by re-examining the radionuclide inventories associated with Fourmile Branch (FMB) IOU, Pen Branch (PB) IOU and Steel Creek (SC) IOU. The overall approach to computing radionuclide inventories for each of the IOUs involved the following components: Defining contaminated reaches of sediments along the IOU waterways Identifying separate segments within each IOU waterway to evaluate individually Computing the volume and mass of contaminated soil associated with each segment, or compartment Obtaining the available and appropriate Sediment and Sediment/Soil analytical results associated with each IOU Standardizing all radionuclide activity by decay-correcting all sample analytical results from sample date to the current point in time, Computing representative concentrations for all radionuclides associated with each compartment in each of the IOUs Computing the radionuclide

  4. Branching Fraction and CP Asymmetry Measurements in Inclusive B ? Xs ???? and B ? Xs? Decays from BABAR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eigen, G.

    2015-04-29

    We present an update on total and partial branching fractions and on CP asymmetries in the semi-inclusive decay B ? Xs???-. Further, we summarize our results on branching fractions and CP asymmetries for semi-inclusive and fully-inclusive B ? Xs? decays. We present the first result on the CP asymmetry diff erence of charged and neutral B ? Xs? decays yielding the first constraint on the ratio of Wilson coeffi cients Im(C8eff/C7eff).

  5. PICO: An Object-Oriented Framework for Branch and Bound

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ECKSTEIN,JONATHAN; HART,WILLIAM E.; PHILLIPS,CYNTHIA A.

    2000-12-01

    This report describes the design of PICO, a C++ framework for implementing general parallel branch-and-bound algorithms. The PICO framework provides a mechanism for the efficient implementation of a wide range of branch-and-bound methods on an equally wide range of parallel computing platforms. We first discuss the basic architecture of PICO, including the application class hierarchy and the package's serial and parallel layers. We next describe the design of the serial layer, and its central notion of manipulating subproblem states. Then, we discuss the design of the parallel layer, which includes flexible processor clustering and communication rates, various load balancing mechanisms, and a non-preemptive task scheduler running on each processor. We describe the application of the package to a branch-and-bound method for mixed integer programming, along with computational results on the ASCI Red massively parallel computer. Finally we describe the application of the branch-and-bound mixed-integer programming code to a resource constrained project scheduling problem for Pantex.

  6. Gas compressor with side branch absorber for pulsation control

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Harris, Ralph E.; Scrivner, Christine M.; Broerman, III, Eugene L.

    2011-05-24

    A method and system for reducing pulsation in lateral piping associated with a gas compressor system. A tunable side branch absorber (TSBA) is installed on the lateral piping. A pulsation sensor is placed in the lateral piping, to measure pulsation within the piping. The sensor output signals are delivered to a controller, which controls actuators that change the acoustic dimensions of the SBA.

  7. Detector for measuring the ?+ ? e+v branching fraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aguilar-Arevalo, A. A.; Aoki, M.; Blecher, M.; Bruch, D. vom; Bryman, D.; Comfort, J.; Cuen-Rochin, S.; Doria, L.; Gumplinger, P.; Hussein, A.; Igarashi, Y.; Ito, N.; Ito, S.; Kettell, S. H.; Kurchaninov, L.; Littenberg, L.; Malbrunot, C.; Mischke, R. E.; Muroi, A.; Numao, T.; Sheffer, G.; Sher, A.; Sullivan, T.; Tauchi, K.; Vavilov, D.; Yamada, K.; Yoshida, M.

    2015-04-13

    The PIENU experiment at TRIUMF is aimed at a measurement of the branching ratio Re/u = ?((?+ ? e+ve) + (?+ ? e+ve?))/?((?+ ? ?+v?) + (?+ ? ?+v??)) with precision < 0.1%. Incident pions, delivered at the rate of 60 kHz with momentum 75 MeV/c, were degraded and stopped in a plastic scintillator target. Pions and their decay product positrons were detected with plastic scintillators and tracked with multiwire proportional chambers and silicon strip detectors. The energies of the positrons were measured in a spectrometer consisting of a large NaI(T?) crystal surrounded by an array of pure CsI crystals. This paper provides a description of the PIENU experimental apparatus and its performance in pursuit of Re/u

  8. Detector for measuring the π+ → e+v branching fraction

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aguilar-Arevalo, A. A.; Aoki, M.; Blecher, M.; Bruch, D. vom; Bryman, D.; Comfort, J.; Cuen-Rochin, S.; Doria, L.; Gumplinger, P.; Hussein, A.; et al

    2015-04-13

    The PIENU experiment at TRIUMF is aimed at a measurement of the branching ratio Re/u = Γ((π+ → e+ve) + (π+ → e+veγ))/Γ((π+ → μ+vμ) + (π+ → μ+vμγ)) with precision < 0.1%. Incident pions, delivered at the rate of 60 kHz with momentum 75 MeV/c, were degraded and stopped in a plastic scintillator target. Pions and their decay product positrons were detected with plastic scintillators and tracked with multiwire proportional chambers and silicon strip detectors. The energies of the positrons were measured in a spectrometer consisting of a large NaI(Tℓ) crystal surrounded by an array of pure CsI crystals.more » This paper provides a description of the PIENU experimental apparatus and its performance in pursuit of Re/u« less

  9. STEM-ing the Tide

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The MacArthur Foundation rolled out its latest class of “geniuses” – 23 Americans who stand out because of their creativity and enterprise.

  10. Relevance of complex branch points for partial wave analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ceci, S.; Svarc, A.; Doering, M.; Hanhart, C.; Krewald, S.; Meissner, U.-G.

    2011-07-15

    A central issue in hadron spectroscopy is to deduce--and interpret--resonance parameters, namely, pole positions and residues, from experimental data, for those are the quantities to be compared to lattice QCD or model calculations. However, not every structure in the observables derives from a resonance pole: the origin might as well be branch points, either located on the real axis (when a new channel composed of stable particles opens) or in the complex plane (when at least one of the intermediate particles is unstable). In this paper we demonstrate first the existence of such branch points in the complex plane and then show on the example of the {pi}N P{sub 11} partial wave that it is not possible to distinguish the structures induced by the latter from a true pole signal based on elastic data alone.

  11. Agriculture and Food Processes Branch program summary document

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1980-06-01

    The work of the Agriculture and Food Processes Branch within the US DOE's Office of Industrial Programs is discussed and reviewed. The Branch is responsible for assisting the food and agricultural sectors of the economy in increasing their energy efficiency by cost sharing with industry the development and demonstration of technologies industry by itself would not develop because of a greater than normal risk factor, but have significant energy conservation benefits. This task is made more difficult by the diversity of agriculture and the food industry. The focus of the program is now on the development and demonstration of energy conservation technology in high energy use industry sectors and agricultural functions (e.g., sugar processing, meat processing, irrigation, and crop drying, high energy use functions common to many sectors of the food industry (e.g., refrigeration, drying, and evaporation), and innovative concepts (e.g., energy integrated farm systems. Specific projects within the program are summarized. (LCL)

  12. Mr. John Kinneman, Chief Nuclear Materfals Branch Nuclear Regulatory Commission

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    111989 Mr. John Kinneman, Chief Nuclear Materfals Branch Nuclear Regulatory Commission Region I 475 Allendale Road King of Prussia. Pennsylvania 19406 Dear Mr. Kinneman: -;' .-. 'W Enclosed are the copfes of the final ORNL survey reports on the radiologlcal Surveys conducted on three Teterboro, New Jersey properties; Metpath Incorporated, Allied Aerospace Corporatio; and Sumftomo Machinery Corporation. Copies of these reports have &en sent directly to the owners by our survey contractor Oak

  13. Variable ratio regenerative braking device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hoppie, Lyle O.

    1981-12-15

    Disclosed is a regenerative braking device (10) for an automotive vehicle. The device includes an energy storage assembly (12) having a plurality of rubber rollers (26, 28) mounted for rotation between an input shaft (36) and an output shaft (42), clutches (38, 46) and brakes (40, 48) associated with each shaft, and a continuously variable transmission (22) connectable to a vehicle drivetrain and to the input and output shafts by the respective clutches. The rubber rollers are torsionally stressed to accumulate energy from the vehicle when the input shaft is clutched to the transmission while the brake on the output shaft is applied, and are torsionally relaxed to deliver energy to the vehicle when the output shaft is clutched to the transmission while the brake on the input shaft is applied. The transmission ratio is varied to control the rate of energy accumulation and delivery for a given rotational speed of the vehicle drivetrain.

  14. Weather-Corrected Performance Ratio

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dierauf, T.; Growitz, A.; Kurtz, S.; Cruz, J. L. B.; Riley, E.; Hansen, C.

    2013-04-01

    Photovoltaic (PV) system performance depends on both the quality of the system and the weather. One simple way to communicate the system performance is to use the performance ratio (PR): the ratio of the electricity generated to the electricity that would have been generated if the plant consistently converted sunlight to electricity at the level expected from the DC nameplate rating. The annual system yield for flat-plate PV systems is estimated by the product of the annual insolation in the plane of the array, the nameplate rating of the system, and the PR, which provides an attractive way to estimate expected annual system yield. Unfortunately, the PR is, again, a function of both the PV system efficiency and the weather. If the PR is measured during the winter or during the summer, substantially different values may be obtained, making this metric insufficient to use as the basis for a performance guarantee when precise confidence intervals are required. This technical report defines a way to modify the PR calculation to neutralize biases that may be introduced by variations in the weather, while still reporting a PR that reflects the annual PR at that site given the project design and the project weather file. This resulting weather-corrected PR gives more consistent results throughout the year, enabling its use as a metric for performance guarantees while still retaining the familiarity this metric brings to the industry and the value of its use in predicting actual annual system yield. A testing protocol is also presented to illustrate the use of this new metric with the intent of providing a reference starting point for contractual content.

  15. FCC LPG olefinicity and branching enhanced by octane catalysts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keyworth, D.A.; Reid, T.A.; Kreider, K.R.; Yatsu, C.A.

    1989-05-29

    Refiners are increasingly recognizing the downstream opportunities for fluid catalytic cracking LPG olefins for the production of methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE), ethyl tertiary butyl ether (ETBE, if the ethanol subsidy is extended to the production of ETBE), and as petrochemical feedstocks. Some of new gasoline FCC octane-enhancing catalysts can support those opportunities because their low non-framework alumina (low NFA) preserve both LPG olefinicity and promote branching of the LPG streams from the FCCU. The combined effect results in more isobutane for alkylate feed, more propylene in the propane/propylene stream, and more isobutene - which makes the addition of an MTBE unit very enticing.

  16. UBS AG, LONDON BRANCH Order No. EA-261 I. BACKGROUND

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    1 I. BACKGROUND Exports of electricity from the United States to a foreign country are regulated and require authorization under section 202(e) of the Federal Power Act (FPA) (16 U.S.C. §824a(e)). On April 11, 2002, the Office of Fossil Energy (FE) of the Department of Energy (DOE) received an application from UBS AG, London Branch (UBS) for authorization to transmit electric energy from the United States to Mexico. UBS, a Swiss corporation formed in 1998 by the merger of Union Bank of

  17. UBS AG, LONDON BRANCH Order No. EA-263 I. BACKGROUND

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    3 I. BACKGROUND Exports of electricity from the United States to a foreign country are regulated and require authorization under section 202(e) of the Federal Power Act (FPA) (16 U.S.C. §824a(e)). On April 11, 2002, the Office of Fossil Energy (FE) of the Department of Energy (DOE) received an application from UBS, AG London Branch (UBS) for authorization to transmit electric energy from the Untied States to Mexico and to Canada. UBS, a Swiss corporation formed in 1998 by the merger of Union

  18. : Hanson Blata, Chief, Radiation Branch Health & Safety Division

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Hanson Blata, Chief, Radiation Branch Health & Safety Division ,DATTE: July 25, 1952 FROM : Eugene Barry, Radiation Brsnchctr@ Health & Safety Division SL-JEm: VISIT TO CANADIAN RADIUM AND UFLANIUM CO, MT. K&O, N. Y. - MAY 28, 1952 SrnOL: HSR:.WB:md On May 28, a visit was made to the Canadian Radium and Uranium Co. of Mt. Kisco, New York, a manufacturer and distributor of radium and polonium products, for the purpose of assisting the New York State Department of Labor in making a

  19. Theory of generalized branch and combine clock networks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    El-Amawy, A.; Kulasinghe, P.

    1994-12-31

    In a recent development a new clock distribution scheme, called Branch-and-Combine or BaC, has been introduced. The scheme is the first to guarantee constant skew bound regardless of network size. In this paper we generalize and extend the work on BaC networks. We established some interesting results on clocking paths, node input sequences, node inputs` relative timing, network stability, and skew bound. Furthermore, this study establishes an upper bound on maximum clocking rates for BaC networks which is about double that predicted by earlier studies.

  20. Vegetation survey of Pen Branch and Four Mile Creek wetlands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    One hundred-fifty plots were recently sampled (vegetational sampling study) at the Savannah River Site (SRS). An extensive characterization of the vascular flora, in four predetermined strata (overstory, Understory, shrub layer, and ground cover), was undertaken to determine dominance, co-dominance, and the importance value (I.V.) of each species. These results will be used by the Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) to evaluate the environmental status of Four Mile Creek, Pen Branch, and two upland pine stands. Objectives of this study were to: Describe in detail the plant communities previously mapped with reference to the topography and drainage, including species of plants present: Examine the successional trends within each sampling area and describe the extent to which current vegetation communities have resulted from specific earlier vegetation disturbances (e.g., logging and grazing); describe in detail the botanical field techniques used to sample the flora; describe the habitat and location of protected and/or rare species of plants; and collect and prepare plant species as herbarium quality specimens. Sampling was conducted at Four Mile Creek and Pen Branch, and in two upland pine plantations of different age growth.

  1. Vegetation survey of Pen Branch and Four Mile Creek wetlands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-10-01

    One hundred-fifty plots were recently sampled (vegetational sampling study) at the Savannah River Site (SRS). An extensive characterization of the vascular flora, in four predetermined strata (overstory, Understory, shrub layer, and ground cover), was undertaken to determine dominance, co-dominance, and the importance value (I.V.) of each species. These results will be used by the Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) to evaluate the environmental status of Four Mile Creek, Pen Branch, and two upland pine stands. Objectives of this study were to: Describe in detail the plant communities previously mapped with reference to the topography and drainage, including species of plants present: Examine the successional trends within each sampling area and describe the extent to which current vegetation communities have resulted from specific earlier vegetation disturbances (e.g., logging and grazing); describe in detail the botanical field techniques used to sample the flora; describe the habitat and location of protected and/or rare species of plants; and collect and prepare plant species as herbarium quality specimens. Sampling was conducted at Four Mile Creek and Pen Branch, and in two upland pine plantations of different age growth.

  2. Advanced Branching Control and Characterization of Inorganic Semiconducting Nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hughes, Steven Michael

    2007-12-31

    The ability to finely tune the size and shape of inorganic semiconducting nanocrystals is an area of great interest, as the more control one has, the more applications will be possible for their use. The first two basic shapes develped in nanocrystals were the sphere and the anistropic nanorod. the II_VI materials being used such as Cadmium Selenide (CdSe) and Cadmium Telluride (CdTe), exhibit polytypism, which allows them to form in either the hexagonally packed wurtzite or cubically packed zinc blende crystalline phase. The nanorods are wurtzite with the length of the rod growing along the c-axis. As this grows, stacking faults may form, which are layers of zinc blende in the otherwise wurtzite crystal. Using this polytypism, though, the first generation of branched crystals were developed in the form of the CdTe tetrapod. This is a nanocrystal that nucleates in the zincblend form, creating a tetrahedral core, on which four wurtzite arms are grown. This structure opened up the possibility of even more complex shapes and applications. This disseration investigates the advancement of branching control and further understanding the materials polytypism in the form of the stacking faults in nanorods.

  3. Branch Flow Model: Relaxations and Convexification-Part II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farivar, M; Low, SH

    2013-08-01

    We propose a branch flow model for the analysis and optimization of mesh as well as radial networks. The model leads to a new approach to solving optimal power flow (OPF) that consists of two relaxation steps. The first step eliminates the voltage and current angles and the second step approximates the resulting problem by a conic program that can be solved efficiently. For radial networks, we prove that both relaxation steps are always exact, provided there are no upper bounds on loads. For mesh networks, the conic relaxation is always exact but the angle relaxation may not be exact, and we provide a simple way to determine if a relaxed solution is globally optimal. We propose convexification of mesh networks using phase shifters so that OPF for the convexified network can always be solved efficiently for an optimal solution. We prove that convexification requires phase shifters only outside a spanning tree of the network and their placement depends only on network topology, not on power flows, generation, loads, or operating constraints. Part I introduces our branch flow model, explains the two relaxation steps, and proves the conditions for exact relaxation. Part II describes convexification of mesh networks, and presents simulation results.

  4. Branch Flow Model: Relaxations and Convexification-Part I

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farivar, M; Low, SH

    2013-08-01

    We propose a branch flow model for the analysis and optimization of mesh as well as radial networks. The model leads to a new approach to solving optimal power flow (OPF) that consists of two relaxation steps. The first step eliminates the voltage and current angles and the second step approximates the resulting problem by a conic program that can be solved efficiently. For radial networks, we prove that both relaxation steps are always exact, provided there are no upper bounds on loads. For mesh networks, the conic relaxation is always exact but the angle relaxation may not be exact, and we provide a simple way to determine if a relaxed solution is globally optimal. We propose convexification of mesh networks using phase shifters so that OPF for the convexified network can always be solved efficiently for an optimal solution. We prove that convexification requires phase shifters only outside a spanning tree of the network and their placement depends only on network topology, not on power flows, generation, loads, or operating constraints. Part I introduces our branch flow model, explains the two relaxation steps, and proves the conditions for exact relaxation. Part II describes convexification of mesh networks, and presents simulation results.

  5. Oscillating side-branch enhancements of thermoacoustic heat exchangers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Swift, Gregory W.

    2003-05-13

    A regenerator-based engine or refrigerator has a regenerator with two ends at two different temperatures, through which a gas oscillates at a first oscillating volumetric flow rate in the direction between the two ends and in which the pressure of the gas oscillates, and first and second heat exchangers, each of which is at one of the two different temperatures. A dead-end side branch into which the gas oscillates has compliance and is connected adjacent to one of the ends of the regenerator to form a second oscillating gas flow rate additive with the first oscillating volumetric flow rate, the compliance having a volume effective to provide a selected total oscillating gas volumetric flow rate through the first heat exchanger. This configuration enables the first heat exchanger to be configured and located to better enhance the performance of the heat exchanger rather than being confined to the location and configuration of the regenerator.

  6. Q-branch Raman scattering and modern kinetic thoery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Monchick, L.

    1993-12-01

    The program is an extension of previous APL work whose general aim was to calculate line shapes of nearly resonant isolated line transitions with solutions of a popular quantum kinetic equation-the Waldmann-Snider equation-using well known advanced solution techniques developed for the classical Boltzmann equation. The advanced techniques explored have been a BGK type approximation, which is termed the Generalized Hess Method (GHM), and conversion of the collision operator to a block diagonal matrix of symmetric collision kernels which then can be approximated by discrete ordinate methods. The latter method, which is termed the Collision Kernel method (CC), is capable of the highest accuracy and has been used quite successfully for Q-branch Raman scattering. The GHM method, not quite as accurate, is applicable over a wider range of pressures and has proven quite useful.

  7. Electrostatically Tuned Self-Assembly of Branched Amphiphilic Peptides

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ting, Christina L.; Frischknecht, Amalie L.; Stevens, Mark J.; Spoerke, Erik D.

    2014-06-19

    Electrostatics plays an important role in the self-assembly of amphiphilic peptides. To develop a molecular understanding of the role of the electrostatic interactions, we develop a coarse-grained model peptide and apply self-consistent field theory to investigate the peptide assembly into a variety of aggregate nanostructures. We find that the presence and distribution of charged groups on the hydrophilic branches of the peptide can modify the molecular configuration from extended to collapsed. This change in molecular configuration influences the packing into spherical micelles, cylindrical micelles (nanofibers), or planar bilayers. The effects of charge distribution therefore has important implications for the designmore » and utility of functional materials based on peptides.« less

  8. IDENTIFYING BLUE HORIZONTAL BRANCH STARS USING THE z FILTER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vickers, John J.; Grebel, Eva K.; Huxor, Avon P.

    2012-04-15

    In this paper we present a new method for selecting blue horizontal branch (BHB) candidates based on color-color photometry. We make use of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey z band as a surface gravity indicator and show its value for selecting BHB stars from quasars, white dwarfs, and main-sequence A-type stars. Using the g, r, i, and z bands, we demonstrate that extraction accuracies on a par with more traditional u, g, and r photometric selection methods may be achieved. We also show that the completeness necessary to probe major Galactic structure may be maintained. Our new method allows us to efficiently select BHB stars from photometric sky surveys that do not include a u-band filter such as the Panoramic Survey Telescope and Rapid Response System.

  9. Measurements of the Branching Fractions and CP Asymmetries of B -> D0_CP K Decays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aubert, B.; Barate, R.; Boutigny, D.; Couderc, F.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; Grauges, E.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Chen, J.C.; Qi, N.D.; Rong, G.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y.S.; Eigen, G.; Ofte, I.; Stugu, B.; Abrams, G.S.; /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /Bristol U. /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa U. /Iowa State U. /Karlsruhe U., EKP /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT, LNS /McGill U. /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /Perugia U. /INFN, Perugia /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Prairie View A-M /Princeton U. /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /South Carolina U. /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Stony Brook /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /Turin U. /INFN, Turin /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Valencia U., IFIC /Vanderbilt U. /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison /Yale U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Clermont-Ferrand U. /Basilicata U., Potenza

    2006-01-05

    We present a study of the decay B{sup -} {yields} D{sub (CP)}{sup 0} K{sup -} and its charge conjugate, where D{sub (CP)}{sup 0} is reconstructed in CP-even, CP-odd, and non-CP flavor eigenstates, based on a sample of 232 million {Upsilon}(4S) {yields} B{bar B} decays collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II e{sup +}e{sup -} storage ring. We measure the partial-rate charge asymmetries AC{sub CP{+-}} and the ratios R{sub CP{+-}} of the B {yields} D{sup 0} K decay branching fractions as measured in CP{+-} and non-CP D{sup 0} decays: A{sub CP+} = 0.35 {+-} 0.13(stat) {+-} 0.04(syst), A{sub CP-} = -0.06 {+-} 0.13(stat) {+-} 0.04(syst), R{sub CP+} = 0.90 {+-} 0.12(stat) {+-} 0.04(syst), R{sub CP-} = 0.86 {+-} 0.10(stat) {+-} 0.05(syst).

  10. North Branch Municipal Water & Light- Commercial & Industrial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    North Branch Municipal Water & Light provides incentives for its commercial and industrial customers to improve the energy efficiency of facilities. Rebates are available for a variety of...

  11. Electrodeposition of InSb branched nanowires: Controlled growth with structurally tailored properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Das, Suprem R.; Mohammad, Asaduzzaman; Janes, David B.; Akatay, Cem; Khan, Mohammad Ryyan; Alam, Muhammad A.; Maeda, Kosuke; Deacon, Russell S.; Ishibashi, Koji; Chen, Yong P.; Sands, Timothy D.

    2014-08-28

    In this article, electrodeposition method is used to demonstrate growth of InSb nanowire (NW) arrays with hierarchical branched structures and complex morphology at room temperature using an all-solution, catalyst-free technique. A gold coated, porous anodic alumina membrane provided the template for the branched NWs. The NWs have a hierarchical branched structure, with three nominal regions: a “trunk” (average diameter of 150 nm), large branches (average diameter of 100 nm), and small branches (average diameter of sub-10 nm to sub-20 nm). The structural properties of the branched NWs were studied using scanning transmission electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, and Raman spectroscopy. In the as-grown state, the small branches of InSb NWs were crystalline, but the trunk regions were mostly nanocrystalline with an amorphous boundary. Post-annealing of NWs at 420 °C in argon produced single crystalline structures along 〈311〉 directions for the branches and along 〈111〉 for the trunks. Based on the high crystallinity and tailored structure in this branched NW array, the effective refractive index allows us to achieve excellent antireflection properties signifying its technological usefulness for photon management and energy harvesting.

  12. Eccentric crank variable compression ratio mechanism

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lawrence, Keith Edward; Moser, William Elliott; Roozenboom, Stephan Donald; Knox, Kevin Jay

    2008-05-13

    A variable compression ratio mechanism for an internal combustion engine that has an engine block and a crankshaft is disclosed. The variable compression ratio mechanism has a plurality of eccentric disks configured to support the crankshaft. Each of the plurality of eccentric disks has at least one cylindrical portion annularly surrounded by the engine block. The variable compression ratio mechanism also has at least one actuator configured to rotate the plurality of eccentric disks.

  13. Nuclear Target Ratios data release page

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nuclear Target Ratios data release page "Measurement of ratios of muon neutrino charged-current cross sections on C, Fe, and Pb to CH at neutrino energies 2-20 GeV" Phys. Rev. Lett. 112 (2014) 231801, hep-ex/1403.2103. Data Anciliary files for this result can be found at http://arxiv.org/src/1403.2103v4/anc Anciliary Files include: Cross section ratios as a function of Bjorken x Cross Section ratio as a function of neutrino energy Target Masses used in the experiment Neutrino Flux used

  14. Measurement of Branching Fractions of B0 Decays to K1(1270)+ pi- and K1(1400)+ pi-

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aubert, Bernard; Bona, M.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Lopez, L.; Palano, Antimo; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, Bjarne; Sun, L.; Abrams, G.S.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D.N.; Cahn, Robert N.; Jacobsen, R.G.; /LBL, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /Bristol U. /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /Consorzio Milano Ricerche /INFN, Milan /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /Napoli Seconda U. /INFN, Naples /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /Perugia U. /INFN, Perugia /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /Banca di Roma /Frascati /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /South Carolina U. /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /Turin U. /INFN, Turin /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Valencia U., IFIC /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2008-08-04

    We present a measurement of the branching fraction of neutral B meson decaying to final states containing a K1 meson, i.e. K{sub 1}(1270) and K{sub 1}(1400), and a charged pion. The data, collected with the BABAR detector at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, represent 454 million B{bar B} pairs produced in e{sup +}e{sup -} annihilation. We measure the branching fraction {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} K{sub 1}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}) = (31.0 {+-} 2.7 {+-} 6.9) x 10{sup -6}, where the first error quoted is statistical and the second is systematic. In the framework of the K-matrix formalism used to describe these decays, we also set limits on the ratio of the production constants for the K{sub 1}(1270){sup +} and K{sub 1}(1400){sup +} mesons in B{sup 0} decays.

  15. Tower Water-Vapor Mixing Ratio

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guastad, Krista; Riihimaki, Laura; none,

    2013-04-01

    The purpose of the Tower Water-Vapor Mixing Ratio (TWRMR) value-added product (VAP) is to calculate water-vapor mixing ratio at the 25-meter and 60-meter levels of the meteorological tower at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) Central Facility.

  16. Dimensions and aspect ratios of natural ice crystals

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Um, J.; McFarquhar, G. M.; Hong, Y. P.; Lee, S. -S.; Jung, C. H.; Lawson, R. P.; Mo, Q.

    2014-12-10

    During the 2006 Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE) in the Tropics, the 2008 Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC) in the Arctic, and the 2010 Small PARTicles In CirrUS (SPARTICUS) campaign in mid-latitudes, high-resolution images of ice crystals were recorded by a Cloud Particle Imager at temperatures (T) between -87 and 0 °C. The projected maximum dimension (D'), length (L'), and width (W') of pristine columns, plates, and component bullets of bullet rosettes were measured using newly developed software, the Ice Crystal Ruler. The number of bullets in each bullet rosette was also measured. Column crystals were furthermore » distinguished as either horizontally oriented columns or columns with other orientations to eliminate any orientation effect on the measured dimensions. Dimensions and aspect ratios (AR, dimension of major axis divided by dimension of minor axis) of crystals were determined as functions of temperature, geophysical location, and type of cirrus. Dimensions of crystals generally increased as temperature increased. Columns and bullets had larger dimensions (i.e., W') of the minor axis (i.e., a axis) for a given dimension (i.e., D' or L') of the major axis (i.e., c axis), and thus smaller AR, as T increased, whereas this trend did not occur for plate crystals. The average number of branches in bullet rosettes was 5.50±1.35 during three campaigns and 6.32±1.34 (5.46±1.34; 4.95±1.01) during TWP-ICE (SPARTICUS; ISDAC). The AR of bullets increased with the number of branches in bullet rosettes. Most dimensions of crystals and ARs of columnar crystals measured during SPARTICUS were larger than those measured during TWP-ICE and ISDAC at −67 < T < −35 °C and at −40 < T < −15 °C, respectively. The relative occurrence of varying pristine habits depended strongly on cirrus type (i.e., anvil or non-anvil clouds), with plates especially occurring more frequently in anvils. The L–W relationships of columns

  17. Dimensions and aspect ratios of natural ice crystals

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Um, J.; McFarquhar, G. M.; Hong, Y. P.; Lee, S. -S.; Jung, C. H.; Lawson, R. P.; Mo, Q.

    2015-04-15

    During the 2006 Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE) in the tropics, the 2008 Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC) in the Arctic, and the 2010 Small PARTicles In CirrUS (SPARTICUS) campaign at mid-latitudes, high-resolution images of ice crystals were recorded by a Cloud Particle Imager at temperatures (T) between -87 and 0 °C. The projected maximum dimension (D'), length (L'), and width (W') of pristine columns, plates, and component bullets of bullet rosettes were measured using newly developed software, the Ice Crystal Ruler. The number of bullets in each bullet rosette was also measured. Column crystals were furthermore » distinguished as either horizontally oriented columns or columns with other orientations to eliminate any orientation effect on the measured dimensions. The dimensions and aspect ratios (AR, the dimension of the major axis divided by the dimension of the minor axis) of crystals were determined as functions of temperature, geophysical location, and type of cirrus. Dimensions of crystals generally increased with temperature. Columns and bullets had larger dimensions (i.e., W') of the minor axis (i.e., a axis) for a given dimension (i.e., D' orL') of the major axis (i.e., c axis), and thus smaller AR, as T increased, whereas this trend did not occur for plate crystals. The average number of branches in bullet rosettes was 5.50 ± 1.35 during three campaigns and 6.32 ± 1.34 (5.46 ± 1.34; 4.95 ± 1.01) during TWP-ICE (SPARTICUS; ISDAC). The AR of bullets increased with the number of branches in bullet rosettes. Most dimensions of crystals and ARs of columnar crystals measured during SPARTICUS were larger than those measured during TWP-ICE and ISDAC at −67 < T < -35 °C and at −40 < T < −15 °C, respectively. The relative occurrence of varying pristine habits depended strongly on cirrus type (i.e., anvil or non-anvil clouds), with plates especially occurring more frequently in anvils. The L

  18. Structure and Hydration of Highly-Branched, Monodisperse Phytoglycogen Nanoparticles

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Nickels, Jonathan D.; Atkinson, John; Papp-Szabo, Erzsebet; Stanley, Christopher; Diallo, Souleymane O.; Perticaroli, Stefania; Baylis, Benjamin; Mahon, Perry; Ehlers, Georg; Katsaras, John; et al

    2016-01-30

    Phytoglycogen is a naturally occurring polysaccharide nanoparticle made up of extensively branched glucose monomers. It has a number of unusual and advantageous properties, such as high water retention, low viscosity, and high stability in water, which make this biomaterial a promising candidate for a wide variety of applications. For this paper, we have characterized the structure and hydration of aqueous dispersions of phytoglycogen nanoparticles using neutron scattering. Small angle neutron scattering results suggest that the phytoglycogen nanoparticles behave similar to hard sphere colloids and are hydrated by a large number of water molecules (each nanoparticle contains between 250% and 285%more » of its mass in water). This suggests that phytoglycogen is an ideal sample in which to study the dynamics of hydration water. To this end, we used quasielastic neutron scattering (QENS) to provide an independent and consistent measure of the hydration number, and to estimate the retardation factor (or degree of water slow-down) for hydration water translational motions. These data demonstrate a length-scale dependence in the measured retardation factors that clarifies the origin of discrepancies between retardation factor values reported for hydration water using different experimental techniques. Finally, the present approach can be generalized to other systems containing nanoconfined water.« less

  19. ABUNDANCES OF C, N, Sr, AND Ba ON THE RED GIANT BRANCH OF {omega} CENTAURI

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stanford, Laura M.; Da Costa, G. S.; Norris, John E. E-mail: gdc@mso.anu.edu.a

    2010-05-10

    Abundances relative to iron for carbon, nitrogen, strontium, and barium are presented for 33 stars on the red giant branch (RGB) of the globular cluster {omega} Centauri. They are based on intermediate-resolution spectroscopic data covering the blue spectral region analyzed using spectrum synthesis techniques. The data reveal the existence of a broad range in the abundances of these elements, and a comparison with similar data for main-sequence stars enables insight into the evolutionary history of the cluster. The majority of the RGB stars were found to be depleted in carbon, i.e., [C/Fe] < 0, while [N/Fe] for the same stars shows a range of {approx}1 dex, from [N/Fe] {approx} 0.7 to 1.7 dex. The strontium-to-iron abundance ratios varied from solar to mildly enhanced (0.0 {<=} [Sr/Fe] {<=} 0.8), with [Ba/Fe] generally equal to or greater than [Sr/Fe]. The carbon and nitrogen abundance ratios for the one known CH star in the sample, ROA 279, are [C/Fe] = 0.6 and [N/Fe] = 0.5 dex. Evidence for evolutionary mixing on the RGB is found from the fact that the relative carbon abundances on the main sequence are generally higher than those on the RGB. However, comparison of the RGB and main-sequence samples shows that the upper level of nitrogen enhancement is similar in both sets at [N/Fe] {approx} 2.0 dex. This is most likely the result of primordial rather than evolutionary mixing processes. One RGB star, ROA 276, was found to have Sr and Ba abundance ratios similar to the anomalous Sr-rich main-sequence star S2015448. High-resolution spectra of ROA 276 were obtained with the Magellan Telescope/MIKE spectrograph combination to confirm this result, revealing that ROA 276 is indeed an unusual star. For this star, calculations of the depletion effect, the potential change in surface abundance that results from the increased depth of the convective envelope as a star moves from the main sequence to the RGB, strongly suggest that the observed Sr enhancement in ROA 276 is of

  20. Molecular Design of Branched and Binary Molecules at Ordered Interfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirsten Larson Genson

    2005-12-27

    This study examined five different branched molecular architectures to discern the effect of design on the ability of molecules to form ordered structures at interfaces. Photochromic monodendrons formed kinked packing structures at the air-water interface due to the cross-sectional area mismatch created by varying number of alkyl tails and the hydrophilic polar head group. The lower generations formed orthorhombic unit cell with long range ordering despite the alkyl tails tilted to a large degree. Favorable interactions between liquid crystalline terminal groups and the underlying substrate were observed to compel a flexible carbosilane dendrimer core to form a compressed elliptical conformation which packed stagger within lamellae domains with limited short range ordering. A twelve arm binary star polymer was observed to form two dimensional micelles at the air-water interface attributed to the higher polystyrene block composition. Linear rod-coil molecules formed a multitude of packing structures at the air-water interface due to the varying composition. Tree-like rod-coil molecules demonstrated the ability to form one-dimensional structures at the air-water interface and at the air-solvent interface caused by the preferential ordering of the rigid rod cores. The role of molecular architecture and composition was examined and the influence chemically competing fragments was shown to exert on the packing structure. The amphiphilic balance of the different molecular series exhibited control on the ordering behavior at the air-water interface and within bulk structures. The shell nature and tail type was determined to dictate the preferential ordering structure and molecular reorganization at interfaces with the core nature effect secondary.

  1. Ecological effects of contaminants in McCoy Branch, 1991--1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ryon, M.G.

    1996-09-01

    The 1984 Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) required assessment of all current and former solid waste management units. Following guidelines under RCRA and the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), a remedial investigation (RI) was required of the Y-12 Plant for their filled coal ash pond (FCAP) and associated areas on McCoy Branch. The RI process was initiated and assessments were presented. Because the disposal of coal ash in the ash pond, McCoy Branch, and Rogers Quarry was not consistent with the Tennessee Water Quality Act, several remediation steps were implemented between 1986 and 1994 for McCoy Branch to address disposal problems. The required ecological risk assessments of McCoy Branch watershed included provisions for biological monitoring of the watershed. The objectives of the biological monitoring were to (1) document changes in biological quality of McCoy Branch after completion of a pipeline bypassing upper McCoy Branch and further, after termination of all discharges to Rogers Quarry, (2) provide guidance on the need for additional remediation, and (3) evaluate the effectiveness of implemented remedial actions. The data from the biological monitoring program may also determine whether the goals of protection of human health and the environment of McCoy Branch are being accomplished.

  2. Production of branched-chain alcohols by recombinant Ralstonia eutropha in fed-batch cultivation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fei, Q; Brigham, CJ; Lu, JN; Fu, RZ; Sinskey, AJ

    2013-09-01

    Branched-chain alcohols are considered promising green energy sources due to their compatibility with existing infrastructure and their high energy density. We utilized a strain of Ralstonia eutropha capable of producing branched-chain alcohols and examined its production in flask cultures. In order to increase isobutanol and 3-methyl-1-butanol (isoamyl alcohol) productivity in the engineered strain, batch, fed-batch, and two-stage fed-batch cultures were carried out in this work. The effects of nitrogen source concentration on branched-chain alcohol production were investigated under four different initial concentrations in fermenters. A maximum 380 g m(-3) of branched-chain alcohol production was observed with 2 kg m(-3) initial NH4Cl concentration in batch cultures. A pH-stat control strategy was utilized to investigate the optimum carbon source amount fed during fed-batch cultures for higher cell density. In cultures of R. eutropha strains that did not produce polyhydroxyalkanoate or branched-chain alcohols, a maximum cell dry weight of 36 kg m(-3) was observed using a fed-batch strategy, when 10 kg m(-3) carbon source was fed into culture medium. Finally, a total branched-chain alcohol titer of 790 g m(-3), the highest branched-chain alcohol yield of 0.03 g g(-1), and the maximum branched-chain alcohol productivity of 8.23 g m(-3) h(-1) were obtained from the engineered strain Re2410/pJL26 in a two-stage fed-batch culture system with pH-stat control. Isobutanol made up over 95% (mass fraction) of the total branched-chain alcohols titer produced in this study. (C) 2013 Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. Effect of Compression Ratio and Piston Geometry on RCCI load...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Compression Ratio and Piston Geometry on RCCI load limit Effect of Compression Ratio and Piston Geometry on RCCI load limit Explores the effect of compression ratio and piston ...

  4. Radioactive anomaly discrimination from spectral ratios

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Maniscalco, James; Sjoden, Glenn; Chapman, Mac Clements

    2013-08-20

    A method for discriminating a radioactive anomaly from naturally occurring radioactive materials includes detecting a first number of gamma photons having energies in a first range of energy values within a predetermined period of time and detecting a second number of gamma photons having energies in a second range of energy values within the predetermined period of time. The method further includes determining, in a controller, a ratio of the first number of gamma photons having energies in the first range and the second number of gamma photons having energies in the second range, and determining that a radioactive anomaly is present when the ratio exceeds a threshold value.

  5. Branched peptide amphiphiles, related epitope compounds and self assembled structures thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stupp, Samuel I.; Guler, Mustafa O.

    2008-11-18

    Branched peptide amphiphilic compounds incorporating one or residues providing a pendant amino group for coupling one or more epitope sequences thereto, such compounds and related compositions for enhanced epitope presentation.

  6. Measurement of the [ital D][r arrow][pi][pi] branching fractions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Selen, M.; Sadoff, A.J.; Ammar, R.; Ball, S.; Baringer, P.; Coppage, D.; Copty, N.; Davis, R.; Hancock, N.; Kelly, M.; Kwak, N.; Lam, H.; Kubota, Y.; Lattery, M.; Nelson, J.K.; Patton, S.; Perticone, D.; Poling, R.; Savinov, V.; Schrenk, S.; Wang, R.; Alam, M.S.; Kim, I.J.; Nemati, B.; O'Neill, J.J.; Severini, H.; Sun, C.R.; Zoeller, M.M.; Crawford, G.; Daubenmeir, C.M.; Fulton, R.; Fujino, D.; Gan, K.K.; Honscheid, K.; Kagan, H.; Kass, R.; Lee, J.; Malchow, R.; Morrow, F.; Skovpen, Y.; Sung, M.; White, C.; Whitmore, J.; Wilson, P.; Butler, F.; Fu, X.; Kalbfleisch, G.; Lambrecht, M.; Ross, W.R.; Skubic, P.; Snow, J.; Wang, P.L.; Wood, M.; Bortoletto, D.; Brown, D.N.; Fast, J.; McIlwain, R.L.; Miao, T.; Miller, D.H.; Modesitt, M.; Schaffner, S.F.; Shibata, E.I.; Shipsey, I.P.J.; Wang, P.N.; Battle, M.; Ernst, J.; Kroha, H.; Roberts, S.; Sparks, K.; Thorndike, E.H.; Wang, C.H.; Dominick, J.; Sanghera, S.; Skwarnicki, T.; Stroynowski, R.; Artuso, M.; He, D.; Goldberg, M.; Horwitz, N.; Ken

    1993-09-27

    Using data from CLEO II at the Cornell Electron Storage Ring we provide a new measurement of the branching fraction for [ital D][sup 0][r arrow][pi][sup +][pi][sup [minus

  7. Measurement of the B?Xs? branching fraction with a sum of exclusive decays

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Saito, T.; Ishikawa, A.; Yamamoto, H.; Abdesselam, A.; Adachi, I.; Aihara, H.; Al Said, S.; Arinstein, K.; Asner, D.?M.; Aushev, T.; et al

    2015-03-04

    We use 772 106 BB meson pairs collected at the ?(4S) resonance with the Belle detector to measure the branching fraction for B ? Xs?. Our measurement uses a sum-of-exclusives approach in which 38 of the hadronic final states with strangeness equal to +1, denoted by Xs, are reconstructed. The inclusive branching fraction for MXs s?)=(3.510.170.33) 104, where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second is systematic.

  8. On virial analysis at low aspect ratio

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bongard, Michael W.; Barr, Jayson L.; Fonck, Raymond J.; Reusch, Joshua A.; Thome, Kathreen E.

    2016-07-28

    The validity of virial analysis to infer global MHD equilibrium poloidal beta βp and internal inductance ℓi from external magnetics measurements is examined for low aspect ratio configurations with A < 2. Numerical equilibrium studies at varied aspect ratio are utilized to validate the technique at finite aspect ratio. The effect of applying high-A approximations to low-A experimental data is quantified and demonstrates significant over-estimation of stored energy (factors of 2–10) in spherical tokamak geometry. Experimental approximations to equilibrium-dependent volume integral terms in the analysis are evaluated at low-A. Highly paramagnetic configurations are found to be inadequately represented through themore » virial mean radius parameter RT. Alternate formulations for inferring βp and ℓi that are independent of RT to avoid this difficulty are presented for the static isotropic limit. Lastly, these formulations are suitable for fast estimation of tokamak stored energy components at low aspect ratio using virial analysis.« less

  9. Controlled synthesis of hyper-branched inorganic nanocrystals withrich three-dimensional structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kanaras, Antonios G.; Sonnichsen, Carsten; Liu, Haitao; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2005-07-27

    Studies of crystal growth kinetics are tightly integrated with advances in the creation of new nanoscale inorganic building blocks and their functional assemblies 1-11. Recent examples include the development of semiconductor nanorods which have potential uses in solar cells 12-17, and the discovery of a light driven process to create noble metal particles with sharp corners that can be used in plasmonics 18,19. In the course of studying basic crystal growth kinetics we developed a process for preparing branched semiconductor nanocrystals such as tetrapods and inorganic dendrimers of precisely controlled generation 20,21. Here we report the discovery of a crystal growth kinetics regime in which a new class of hyper-branched nanocrystals are formed. The shapes range from 'thorny balls', to tree-like ramified structures, to delicate 'spider net'-like particles. These intricate shapes depend crucially on a delicate balance of branching and extension. The multitudes of resulting shapes recall the diverse shapes of snowflakes 22.The three dimensional nature of the branch points here, however, lead to even more complex arrangements than the two dimensionally branched structures observed in ice. These hyper-branched particles not only extend the available three-dimensional shapes in nanoparticle synthesis ,but also provide a tool to study growth kinetics by carefully observing and modeling particle morphology.

  10. Material development in the SI{sub 3}N{sub 4} system using glass encapsulated Hip`ing. Final report, Phase 2: DOE/ORNL Ceramic Technology Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Corbin, N.D.; Sundberg, G.J.; Siebein, K.N.; Willkens, C.A.; Pujari, V.K.; Rossi, G.A.; Hansen, J.S.; Chang, C.L.; Hammarstrom, J.L.

    1992-04-01

    This report covers a two-year program to develop fully dense Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} matrix SiC whisker composites with enhanced properties over monolithic Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} materials. The primary goal was to develop a composite with a fracture toughness > 10 MPa{radical}m, capable of using high pressure glass encapsulated HIP`ing. Coating methods were developed to apply thin (<150nm) stoichiometric BN layers to SiC whiskers and also to apply a dual coating of SiC over carbon to the whiskers. Fracture toughness of the composites was determined to increase as the quantity of whiskers (or elongated grains) with their axis perpendicular to the crack plane increased. Of the interface compositions evaluated in this effort, carbon was determined to be the most effective for increasing toughness. The highest toughnesses (6.8--7.0 MPa{radical}m) were obtained with uniaxially aligned carbon coated whiskers. There was no evidence of the carbon coating compromising the oxidation resistance of the composites at 1370{degree}C.

  11. The core mass growth and stellar lifetime of thermally pulsing asymptotic giant branch stars

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kalirai, Jason S.; Tremblay, Pier-Emmanuel; Marigo, Paola E-mail: paola.marigo@unipd.it

    2014-02-10

    We establish new constraints on the intermediate-mass range of the initial-final mass relation, and apply the results to study the evolution of stars on the thermally pulsing asymptotic giant branch (TP-AGB). These constraints derive from newly discovered (bright) white dwarfs in the nearby Hyades and Praesepe star clusters, including a total of 18 high signal-to-noise ratio measurements with progenitor masses of M {sub initial} = 2.8-3.8 M {sub ?}. We also include a new analysis of existing white dwarfs in the older NGC 6819 and NGC 7789 star clusters, M {sub initial} = 1.6 and 2.0 M {sub ?}. Over this range of initial masses, stellar evolutionary models for metallicity Z {sub initial} = 0.02 predict the maximum growth of the core of TP-AGB stars. By comparing the newly measured remnant masses to the robust prediction of the core mass at the first thermal pulse on the AGB (i.e., from stellar interior models), we establish several findings. First, we show that the stellar core mass on the AGB grows rapidly from 10% to 30% for stars with M {sub initial} = 1.6 to 2.0 M {sub ?}. At larger masses, the core-mass growth decreases steadily to ?10% at M {sub initial} = 3.4 M {sub ?}, after which there is a small hint of a upturn out to M {sub initial} = 3.8 M {sub ?}. These observations are in excellent agreement with predictions from the latest TP-AGB evolutionary models in Marigo et al. We also compare to models with varying efficiencies of the third dredge-up and mass loss, and demonstrate that the process governing the growth of the core is largely the stellar wind, while the third dredge-up plays a secondary, but non-negligible role. Based on the new white dwarf measurements, we perform an exploratory calibration of the most popular mass-loss prescriptions in the literature, as well as of the third dredge-up efficiency as a function of the stellar mass. Finally, we estimate the lifetime and the integrated luminosity of stars on the TP-AGB to peak at t ? 3 Myr and E

  12. Method for nanomachining high aspect ratio structures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yun, Wenbing; Spence, John; Padmore, Howard A.; MacDowell, Alastair A.; Howells, Malcolm R.

    2004-11-09

    A nanomachining method for producing high-aspect ratio precise nanostructures. The method begins by irradiating a wafer with an energetic charged-particle beam. Next, a layer of patterning material is deposited on one side of the wafer and a layer of etch stop or metal plating base is coated on the other side of the wafer. A desired pattern is generated in the patterning material on the top surface of the irradiated wafer using conventional electron-beam lithography techniques. Lastly, the wafer is placed in an appropriate chemical solution that produces a directional etch of the wafer only in the area from which the resist has been removed by the patterning process. The high mechanical strength of the wafer materials compared to the organic resists used in conventional lithography techniques with allows the transfer of the precise patterns into structures with aspect ratios much larger than those previously achievable.

  13. Isolation and characterization of portal branch ligation-stimulated Hmga2-positive bipotent hepatic progenitor cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sakai, Hiroshi; Graduate School of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259 B51, Nagatsuta-cho, Midori-ku, Yokohama, Kanagawa 226-8503 ; Tagawa, Yoh-ichi; Graduate School of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259 B51, Nagatsuta-cho, Midori-ku, Yokohama, Kanagawa 226-8503; PRESTO, Japan Science and Technology Agency, 4-1-8 Honcho, Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012 ; Tamai, Miho; Motoyama, Hiroaki; Ogawa, Shinichiro; McEwen Center for Regenerative Medicine, University Health Network, 190 Elizabeth Street, Toronto, Ont., Canada M5G 2C4 ; Soeda, Junpei; Nakata, Takenari; Miyagawa, Shinichi

    2010-12-17

    Research highlights: {yields} Hepatic progenitor cells were isolated from the portal branch-ligated liver of mice. {yields} Portal branch ligation-stimulated hepatic progenitor cells (PBLHCs) express Hmga2. {yields} PBLHCs have bidirectional differentiation capability in vitro. -- Abstract: Hepatic stem/progenitor cells are one of several cell sources that show promise for restoration of liver mass and function. Although hepatic progenitor cells (HPCs), including oval cells, are induced by administration of certain hepatotoxins in experimental animals, such a strategy would be inappropriate in a clinical setting. Here, we investigated the possibility of isolating HPCs in a portal branch-ligated liver model without administration of any chemical agents. A non-parenchymal cell fraction was prepared from the portal branch-ligated or non-ligated lobe, and seeded onto plates coated with laminin. Most of the cells died, but a small number were able to proliferate. These proliferating cells were cloned as portal branch ligation-stimulated hepatic cells (PBLHCs) by the limiting dilution method. The PBLHCs expressed cytokeratin19, albumin, and Hmga2. The PBLHCs exhibited metabolic functions such as detoxification of ammonium ions and synthesis of urea on Matrigel-coated plates in the presence of oncostatin M. In Matrigel mixed with type I collagen, the PBLHCs became rearranged into cystic and tubular structures. Immunohistochemical staining demonstrated the presence of Hmga2-positive cells around the interlobular bile ducts in the portal branch-ligated liver lobes. In conclusion, successful isolation of bipotent hepatic progenitor cell clones, PBLHCs, from the portal branch-ligated liver lobes of mice provides the possibility of future clinical application of portal vein ligation to induce hepatic progenitor cells.

  14. Measurement of ratio R = (BR(D{sup 0}{yields}K{pi}{pi}{pi})/BR(D{sup 0}{yields}K{pi})) in {pi}{sup -}-Nucleus interactions at 500 GeV/c

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Solano Salinas, C. J.; Paucarchuco, C.; Fernandez, A.; Sheaff, M.

    2007-10-26

    We report a very preliminary result on the measurement of the ratio of branching ratios, for two decays D{sup 0} meson, R = (BR(D{sup 0}{yields}K{pi}{pi}{pi})/BR(D{sup 0}{yields}K{pi})), using data from the E791 experiment. We find R = 1.96{+-}0.0286 (stat){+-}0.06 (sys). This is in agreement with and of similar precision to the current PDG average value 1.97{+-}0.09.

  15. Energy Balance Bowen Ratio Station (EBBR) Handbook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cook, DR

    2011-02-23

    The energy balance Bowen ratio (EBBR) system produces 30-minute estimates of the vertical fluxes of sensible and latent heat at the local surface. Flux estimates are calculated from observations of net radiation, soil surface heat flux, and the vertical gradients of temperature and relative humidity (RH). Meteorological data collected by the EBBR are used to calculate bulk aerodynamic fluxes, which are used in the Bulk Aerodynamic Technique (BA) EBBR value-added product (VAP) to replace sunrise and sunset spikes in the flux data. A unique aspect of the system is the automatic exchange mechanism (AEM), which helps to reduce errors from instrument offset drift.

  16. Energy Balance Bowen Ratio (EBBR) Handbook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cook, D. R.

    2016-01-01

    The Energy Balance Bowen Ratio (EBBR) system produces 30-minute estimates of the vertical fluxes of sensible and latent heat at the local surface. Flux estimates are calculated from observations of net radiation, soil surface heat flux, and the vertical gradients of temperature and relative humidity (RH). Meteorological data collected by the EBBR are used to calculate bulk aerodynamic fluxes, which are used in the Bulk Aerodynamic Technique (BA) EBBR value-added product (VAP) to replace sunrise and sunset spikes in the flux data. A unique aspect of the system is the automatic exchange mechanism (AEM), which helps to reduce errors from instrument offset drift.

  17. High aspect ratio, remote controlled pumping assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brown, S.B.; Milanovich, F.P.

    1995-11-14

    A miniature dual syringe-type pump assembly is described which has a high aspect ratio and which is remotely controlled, for use such as in a small diameter penetrometer cone or well packer used in water contamination applications. The pump assembly may be used to supply and remove a reagent to a water contamination sensor, for example, and includes a motor, gearhead and motor encoder assembly for turning a drive screw for an actuator which provides pushing on one syringe and pulling on the other syringe for injecting new reagent and withdrawing used reagent from an associated sensor. 4 figs.

  18. High aspect ratio, remote controlled pumping assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brown, Steve B.; Milanovich, Fred P.

    1995-01-01

    A miniature dual syringe-type pump assembly which has a high aspect ratio and which is remotely controlled, for use such as in a small diameter penetrometer cone or well packer used in water contamination applications. The pump assembly may be used to supply and remove a reagent to a water contamination sensor, for example, and includes a motor, gearhead and motor encoder assembly for turning a drive screw for an actuator which provides pushing on one syringe and pulling on the other syringe for injecting new reagent and withdrawing used reagent from an associated sensor.

  19. CO (Carbon Monoxide Mixing Ratio System) Handbook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biraud, S

    2011-02-23

    The main function of the CO instrument is to provide continuous accurate measurements of carbon monoxide mixing ratio at the ARM SGP Central Facility (CF) 60-meter tower (36.607 °N, 97.489 °W, 314 meters above sea level). The essential feature of the control and data acquisition system is to record signals from a Thermo Electron 48C and periodically calibrate out zero and span drifts in the instrument using the combination of a CO scrubber and two concentrations of span gas (100 and 300 ppb CO in air). The system was deployed on May 25, 2005.

  20. Conceptual Assessment Framework for Forested Wetland Restoration: The Pen Branch Experience. Restoration of a Severely Impacted Riparian Wetland System - The Pen Branch Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kolka, R.; Nelson, E.A.; Trettin, C.C.

    2000-10-01

    Development of an assessment framework and indicators can be used to evaluate effectiveness of wetland restoration. Example of these include index of biotic integrity and the hydrogeomorphic method. Both approaches provide qualitative ranks. We propose a new method based on the EPA wetland research program. Similar to other methods, indexes are compared to reference communities; however, the comparisons are quantitative. In this paper we discuss the results of our framework using the Pen Branch riparian wetland system as an example.

  1. Flexible Conversion Ratio Fast Reactor Systems Evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neil Todreas; Pavel Hejzlar

    2008-06-30

    Conceptual designs of lead-cooled and liquid salt-cooled fast flexible conversion ratio reactors were developed. Both concepts have cores reated at 2400 MWt placed in a large-pool-type vessel with dual-free level, which also contains four intermediate heat exchanges coupling a primary coolant to a compact and efficient supercritical CO2 Brayton cycle power conversion system. Decay heat is removed passively using an enhanced Reactor Vessel Auxiliary Cooling System and a Passive Secondary Auxiliary Cooling System. The most important findings were that (1) it is feasible to design the lead-cooled and salt-cooled reactor with the flexible conversion ratio (CR) in the range of CR=0 and CR=1 n a manner that achieves inherent reactor shutdown in unprotected accidents, (2) the salt-cooled reactor requires Lithium thermal Expansion Modules to overcme the inherent salt coolant's large positive coolant temperature reactivity coefficient, (3) the preferable salt for fast spectrum high power density cores is NaCl-Kcl-MgCl2 as opposed to fluoride salts due to its better themal-hydraulic and neutronic characteristics, and (4) both reactor, but attain power density 3 times smaller than that of the sodium-cooled reactor.

  2. Hydraulic system for a ratio change transmission

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kalns, Ilmars

    1981-01-01

    Disclosed is a drive assembly (10) for an electrically powered vehicle (12). The assembly includes a transaxle (16) having a two-speed transmission (40) and a drive axle differential (46) disposed in a unitary housing assembly (38), an oil-cooled prime mover or electric motor (14) for driving the transmission input shaft (42), an adapter assembly (24) for supporting the prime mover on the transaxle housing assembly, and a hydraulic system (172) providing pressurized oil flow for cooling and lubricating the electric motor and transaxle and for operating a clutch (84) and a brake (86) in the transmission to shift between the two-speed ratios of the transmission. The adapter assembly allows the prime mover to be supported in several positions on the transaxle housing. The brake is spring-applied and locks the transmission in its low-speed ratio should the hydraulic system fail. The hydraulic system pump is driven by an electric motor (212) independent of the prime mover and transaxle.

  3. Search for the decay Bs0 ? ?? and a measurement of the branching fraction for Bs0 ? ??

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dutta, Deepanwita; Bhuyan, Bipul; Abdesselam, A.; Adachi, I.; Aihara, H.; Al Said, S.; Arinstein, K.; Asner, David M.; Aulchenko, V.; Aushev, T.; Ayad, R.; Aziz, T.; Bahinipati, S.; Bakich, A. M.; Bansal, Vikas; Bhardwaj, V.; Bobrov, A.; Bonvicini, Giovanni; Bracko, Marko; Browder, Thomas E.; Cervenkov, D.; Chen, A.; Cheon, B. G.; Chilikin, K.; Chistov, R.; Cho, K.; Chobanova, V.; Choi, Y.; Cinabro, David A.; Dalseno, J.; Dolezal, Z.; Drasal, Z.; Drutskoy, A.; Dutta, K.; Eidelman, S.; Farhat, H.; Fast, James E.; Frost, O.; Gaur, Vipin; Ganguly, Sudeshna; Garmash, Alexey; Getzkow, D.; Goh, Y. M.; Golob, B.; Hayashii, H.; He, X. H.; Hou, W. S.; Iijima, T.; Ishikawa, A.; Iwasaki, Y.; Jaegle, Igal; Joffe, D.; Kang, K. H.; Kato, E.; Kiesling, C.; Kim, D. Y.; Kim, J. B.; Kim, J. H.; Kim, K. T.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. J.; Kinoshita, Kay; Ko, Byeong Rok; Kodys, P.; Korpar, S.; Krizan, P.; Krokovny, Pavel; Kuhr, Thomas; Kuzmin, A.; Kwon, Y. J.; Lange, J. S.; Lee, I. S.; Lewis, P.; Li, Y.; Li Gioi, L.; Libby, J.; Liventsev, Dmitri; Matvienko, D.; Miyata, H.; Mizuk, R.; Mohanty, G. B.; Moll, A.; Mori, T.; Mussa, R.; Nakano, E.; Nakao, M.; Nanut, T.; Nayak, Minakshi; Nisar, N. K.; Nishida, S.; Ogawa, S.; Okuno, S.; Pakhlov, P.; Pakhlova, Galina; Pedlar, Todd K.; Pestotnik, Rok; Petric, Marko; Piilonen, Leo E.; Ribezl, Eva; Ritter, M.; Rostomyan, A.; Sakai, Y.; Sandilya, Saurabh; Santelj, Luka; Sanuki, T.; Sato, Y.; Savinov, Vladimir; Schneider, O.; Schnell, G.; Schwanda, C.; Schwartz, A. J.; Semmler, D.; Shebalin, V.; Shibata, T. A.; Shiu, Jing-Ge; Shwartz, B.; Sibidanov, A.; Simon, F.; Sohn, Y. S.; Sokolov, A.; Solovieva, E.; Staric, M.; Sumihama, M.; Sumiyoshi, T.; Teramoto, Y.; Trabelsi, K.; Uchida, M.; Unno, Yuji; Uno, S.; Usov, Y.; Van Hulse, C.; Vanhoefer, P.; Varner, G.; Vinokurova, A.; Vossen, Anslem G.; Wagner, M. N.; Wang, C. H.; Wang, P.; Watanabe, Y.; Wehle, S.; Williams, K. M.; Won, E.; Yamamoto, H.; Yamaoka, J.; Yashchenko, S.; Yusa, Y.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhilich, V.; Zupanc, A.

    2015-01-01

    We search for the decay B0s??? and measure the branching fraction for B0s??? using 121.4~fb-1 of data collected at the ?(5S) resonance with the Belle detector at the KEKB asymmetric-energy e+e- collider. The B0s??? branching fraction is measured to be (3.60.5(stat.)0.3(syst.)0.6(fs))10-5, where fs is the fraction of Bs(*)Bs(*) in bb events. Our result is in good agreement with the theoretical predictions as well as with a recent measurement from LHCb. We observe no statistically significant signal for the decay B0s??? and set a 90% confidence-level upper limit on its branching fraction at 3.110-6. This constitutes a significant improvement over the previous result.

  4. High resolution, shallow seismic reflection survey of the Pen Branch fault

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stieve, A.

    1991-05-15

    The purpose of this project, at the Savannah River River Site (SRS) was to acquire, process, and interpret 28 km (17.4 miles) of high resolution seismic reflection data taken across the trace of the Pen Branch fault and other suspected, intersecting north-south trending faults. The survey was optimized for the upper 300 ft of geologic strata in order to demonstrate the existence of very shallow, flat lying horizons, and to determine the depth of the fault or to sediments deformed by the fault. Field acquisition and processing parameters were selected to define small scale spatial variability and structural features in the vicinity of the Pen Branch fault leading to the definition and the location of the Pen Branch fault, the shallowest extent of the fault, and the quantification of the sense and magnitude of motion. Associated geophysical, borehole, and geologic data were incorporated into the investigation to assist in the determination of optimal parameters and aid in the interpretation.

  5. Table E7.1. Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 1998

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 1998;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: Values of Shipments and Employment Sizes;" " Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios;" " Unit: Varies." ...

  6. Table 6.2 Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 2002

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: Values of Shipments and Employment Sizes;" " Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios;" " Unit: Varies." ...

  7. HCCI in a Variable Compression Ratio Engine: Effects of Engine...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    in a Variable Compression Ratio Engine: Effects of Engine Variables HCCI in a Variable Compression Ratio Engine: Effects of Engine Variables 2004 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction ...

  8. CO (Carbon Monoxide Mixing Ratio System) Handbook (Technical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Technical Report: CO (Carbon Monoxide Mixing Ratio System) Handbook Citation Details In-Document Search Title: CO (Carbon Monoxide Mixing Ratio System) Handbook The main function of ...

  9. Revision of the Branch Technical Position on Concentration Averaging and Encapsulation - 12510

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heath, Maurice; Kennedy, James E.; Ridge, Christianne; Lowman, Donald [U.S. NRC, Washington, DC, 20555-0001 (United States); Cochran, John [Sandia National Laboratory (United States)

    2012-07-01

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) regulation governing low-level waste (LLW) disposal, 'Licensing Requirements for Land Disposal of Radioactive Waste', 10 CFR Part 61, establishes a waste classification system based on the concentration of specific radionuclides contained in the waste. The regulation also states, at 10 CFR 61.55(a)(8), that, 'the concentration of a radionuclide (in waste) may be averaged over the volume of the waste, or weight of the waste if the units are expressed as nanocuries per gram'. The NRC's Branch Technical Position on Concentration Averaging and Encapsulation provides guidance on averaging radionuclide concentrations in waste under 10 CFR 61.55(a)(8) when classifying waste for disposal. In 2007, the NRC staff proposed to revise the Branch Technical Position on Concentration Averaging and Encapsulation. The Branch Technical Position on Concentration Averaging and Encapsulation is an NRC guidance document for averaging and classifying wastes under 10 CFR 61. The Branch Technical Position on Concentration Averaging and Encapsulation is used by nuclear power plants (NPPs) licensees and sealed source users, among others. In addition, three of the four U.S. LLW disposal facility operators are required to honor the Branch Technical Position on Concentration Averaging and Encapsulation as a licensing condition. In 2010, the Commission directed the staff to develop guidance regarding large scale blending of similar homogenous waste types, as described in SECY-10-0043 as part of its Branch Technical Position on Concentration Averaging and Encapsulation revision. The Commission is improving the regulatory approach used in the Branch Technical Position on Concentration Averaging and Encapsulation by moving towards a making it more risk-informed and performance-based approach, which is more consistent with the agency's regulatory policies. Among the improvements to the Branch Technical Position on Concentration Averaging and Encapsulation

  10. A Case Study: Using Integrated Approach to Design a Net-Zero Bank Branch

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Athalye, Rahul A.; Xie, YuLong; Liu, Bing; Baechler, Michael C.

    2012-10-26

    This paper describes a real life project conducted by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and PNC Financial Services Group's design team. This is a demonstration project supported by the U.S. Department of Energy's Commercial Partnerships Program, the goal of which is to design and construct a new-zero energy bank branch in Fort Lauderdale, Florida.

  11. Side branch absorber for exhaust manifold of two-stroke internal combustion engine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Harris, Ralph E.; Broerman, III, Eugene L.; Bourn, Gary D.

    2011-01-11

    A method of improving scavenging operation of a two-stroke internal combustion engine. The exhaust pressure of the engine is analyzed to determine if there is a pulsation frequency. Acoustic modeling is used to design an absorber. An appropriately designed side branch absorber may be attached to the exhaust manifold.

  12. A two transition state model for radical-molecule reactions : applications to isomeric branching in the OH-isoprene reaction.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greenwald, E. E.; North, S. W.; Georgievskii, Y.; Klippenstein, S. J.; Chemistry; Texas A&M Univ.; SNL

    2007-06-28

    A two transition state model is applied to the prediction of the isomeric branching in the addition of hydroxyl radical to isoprene. The outer transition state is treated with phase space theory fitted to long-range transition state theory calculations on an electrostatic potential energy surface. High-level quantum chemical estimates are applied to the treatment of the inner transition state. A one-dimensional master equation based on an analytic reduction from two-dimensions for a particular statistical assumption about the rotational part of the energy transfer kernel is employed in the calculation of the pressure dependence of the addition process. We find that an accurate treatment of the two separate transition state regions, at the energy and angular momentum resolved level, is essential to the prediction of the temperature dependence of the addition rate. The transition from a dominant outer transition state to a dominant inner transition state is shown to occur at about 275 K, with significant effects from both transition states over the 30-500 K temperature range. Modest adjustments in the ab initio predicted inner saddle point energies yield predictions that are in quantitative agreement with the available high-pressure limit experimental observations and qualitative agreement with those in the falloff regime. The theoretically predicted capture rate is reproduced to within 10% by the expression [1.71 x 10-10(T/298)-2.58 exp(-608.6/RT) + 5.47 x 10-11(T/298)-1.78 exp(-97.3/RT); with R = 1.987 and T in K] cm3 molecule-1 s-1 over the 30-500 K range. A 300 K branching ratio of 0.67:0.02:0.02:0.29 was determined for formation of the four possible OH-isoprene adduct isomers 1, 2, 3, and 4, respectively, and was found to be relatively insensitive to temperature. An Arrhenius activation energy of -0.77 kcal/mol was determined for the high-pressure addition rate constants around 300 K.

  13. Numerical Estimation of the Spent Fuel Ratio

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lindgren, Eric R.; Durbin, Samuel; Wilke, Jason; Margraf, J.; Dunn, T. A.

    2016-01-01

    Sabotage of spent nuclear fuel casks remains a concern nearly forty years after attacks against shipment casks were first analyzed and has a renewed relevance in the post-9/11 environment. A limited number of full-scale tests and supporting efforts using surrogate materials, typically depleted uranium dioxide (DUO 2 ), have been conducted in the interim to more definitively determine the source term from these postulated events. However, the validity of these large- scale results remain in question due to the lack of a defensible spent fuel ratio (SFR), defined as the amount of respirable aerosol generated by an attack on a mass of spent fuel compared to that of an otherwise identical surrogate. Previous attempts to define the SFR in the 1980's have resulted in estimates ranging from 0.42 to 12 and include suboptimal experimental techniques and data comparisons. Because of the large uncertainty surrounding the SFR, estimates of releases from security-related events may be unnecessarily conservative. Credible arguments exist that the SFR does not exceed a value of unity. A defensible determination of the SFR in this lower range would greatly reduce the calculated risk associated with the transport and storage of spent nuclear fuel in dry cask systems. In the present work, the shock physics codes CTH and ALE3D were used to simulate spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and DUO 2 targets impacted by a high-velocity jet at an ambient temperature condition. These preliminary results are used to illustrate an approach to estimate the respirable release fraction for each type of material and ultimately, an estimate of the SFR. This page intentionally blank

  14. Poisson's ratio and porosity at Coso geothermal area, California...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of the model, are estimated by a jackknife method. We use perturbations of r V p V s ratio and Psi V p .V s product to derive distributions of Poisson's ratio, sigma , and...

  15. Measurement of branching fractions and rate asymmetries in the rare decays B→K(*)l⁺l⁻

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Palano, A.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Brown, D. N.; Kerth, L. T.; et al

    2012-08-24

    In a sample of 471×10⁶ BB¯¯¯ events collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II e⁺e⁻ collider we study the rare decays B→K(*)l⁺l⁻, where l⁺l⁻ is either e⁺e⁻ or μ⁺μ⁻. We report results on partial branching fractions and isospin asymmetries in seven bins of dilepton mass-squared. We further present CP and lepton-flavor asymmetries for dilepton masses below and above the J/ψ resonance. We find no evidence for CP or lepton-flavor violation. The partial branching fractions and isospin asymmetries are consistent with the Standard Model predictions and with results from other experiments.

  16. Measurement of the Branching Fraction of B0 Meson Decay to a_1^+(1260) pi-

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aubert, B.; Barate, R.; Boutigny, D.; Couderc, F.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; Grauges, E.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pompili, A.; Chen, J.C.; Qi, N.D.; Rong, G.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y.S.; Eigen, G.; Ofte, I.; Stugu, B. /Bergen U. /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /Bristol U. /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa U. /Iowa State U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT, LNS /McGill U. /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /Perugia U. /INFN, Perugia /Pisa U. /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa /Prairie View A-M /Princeton U. /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /South Carolina U. /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /Turin U. /INFN, Turin /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Valencia U., IFIC /Vanderbilt U. /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison /Yale U.

    2005-07-12

    We present a preliminary measurement of the branching fraction of the B meson decay B{sup 0} {yields} a{sub 1}{sup +}(1260){pi}{sup -}with a{sub 1}{sup +}(1260) {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}. The data sample corresponds to 218 x 10{sup 6} B{bar B} pairs produced in e{sup +}e{sup -} annihilation through the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance. We find the branching fraction (40.2 {+-} 3.9 {+-} 3.9) x 10{sup -6}, where the first error quoted is statistical and the second is systematic. The fitted values of the a{sub 1}(1260) parameters are m{sub a{sub 1}} = 1.22 {+-} 0.02 GeV/c{sup 2} and {Lambda}{sub a{sub 1}} = 0.423 {+-} 0.050 GeV/c{sup 2}.

  17. Check Burner Air to Fuel Ratios | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Burner Air to Fuel Ratios Check Burner Air to Fuel Ratios This tip sheet discusses when to check and reset burner air to fuel ratios as well as why it's a simply way to maximize the efficiency of process heating equipment. PROCESS HEATING TIP SHEET #2 Check Burner Air to Fuel Ratios (November 2007) (260.29 KB) More Documents & Publications Waste Heat Reduction and Recovery for Improving Furnace Efficiency, Productivity and Emissions Performance: A BestPractices Process Heating Technical

  18. A Measurement of the Exclusive Branching Fraction for B → π K at BaBar

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aspinwall, Marie Louise

    2002-02-01

    This thesis presents an exclusive measurement of the branching fraction B for the rare charmless hadronic B decays to πK final states. A sample of 22.57±0.36 million BB pairs was collected with the BaBar detector at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center's PEP-II B Factory, during the Run 1 data taking period (1999-2000).

  19. Some problems in sequencing and scheduling utilizing branch and bound algorithms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gim, B.

    1988-01-01

    This dissertation deals with branch and bound algorithms which are applied to the two-machine flow-shop problem with sparse precedence constraints and the optimal sequencing and scheduling of multiple feedstocks in a batch-type digester problem. The problem studied here is to find a schedule which minimizes the maximum flow time with the requirement that the schedule does not violate a set of sparse precedence constraints. This research provides a branch and bound algorithm which employs a lower bounding rule and is based on an adjustment of the sequence obtained by applying Johnson's algorithm. It is demonstrated that this lower bounding procedure in conjunction with Kurisu's branching rule is effective for the sparse precedence constraints problem case. Biomass to methane production systems have the potential of supplying 25% of the national gas demand. The optimal operation of a batch digester system requires the sequencing and scheduling of all batches from multiple feedstocks during a fixed time horizon. A significant characteristic of these systems is that the feedstock decays in storage before use in the digester system. The operational problem is to determine the time to allocate to each batch of several feedstocks and then sequence the individual batches so as to maximize biogas production for a single batch type digester over a fixed planning horizon. This research provides a branch and bound algorithm for sequencing and a two-step hierarchical dynamic programming procedure for time allocation scheduling. An efficient heuristic algorithm is developed for large problems and demonstrated to yield excellent results.

  20. Pen Branch fault program: Consolidated report on the seismic reflection surveys and the shallow drilling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stieve, A.L.; Stephenson, D.E.; Aadland, R.K.

    1991-03-23

    The Pen Branch fault was identified in the subsurface at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in 1989 based upon interpretation of earlier seismic reflection surveys and other geologic investigations (Seismorgraph Services Incorp., 1973; Chapman and DiStefano, 1989; Snipes, Fallaw and Price, 1989). A program was initiated at that time to determine the capability of the fault to release seismic energy (Price and others, 1989) as defined in the Nuclear Regulatory Commission regulatory guidelines, 10 CFR 100 Appendix A. This report presents the results of the Pen Branch fault investigation based on data acquired from seismic reflection surveys and shallow drilling across the fault completed at this time. The Earth Science Advisory Committee (ESAC) has reviewed the results of these investigations and unanimously agrees with the conclusion of Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) that the Pen Branch fault is a non-capable fault. ESAC is a committee of 12 earth science professionals from academia and industry with the charter of providing outside peer review of SRS geotechnical, seismic, and ground water modeling programs.

  1. Probing the molecular design of hyper-branched aryl polyesters towards lubricant applications

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Robinson, Joshua W.; Zhou, Yan; Bhattacharya, Priyanka; Erck, Robert; Qu, Jun; Bays, J. Timothy; Cosimbescu, Lelia

    2016-01-05

    We report novel polymeric materials that may be used as viscosity index improvers (VII) for lubricant applications. Our efforts included probing the comb-burst hyper-branched aryl polyester architecture for beneficial viscosity and friction behavior when utilized as an additive in a group I oil. The monomer was designed as to undergo polymerization via polycondensation within the architectural construct (AB2), typical of hyperbranched polymers. The monomer design was comprised of aliphatic arms (12 or 16 methylenes) to provide the necessary lipophilicity to achieve solubility in a non-polar medium. Once polymerized, via catalyst and heat, the surface alcohols were functionalized with fatty acidsmore » (lauric and palmitic). Controlling the aliphatic nature of the internal arms and peripheral end-groups provided four unique flexible polymer designs. Changing the reaction time and concentration provided opportunities to investigate the influence of molecular weight and branching density on oil-solubility, viscosity, and friction. Oil-solubility was found to decrease with fewer internal carbons, but the number of internal carbons appears to have little influence on the bulk solution viscosity. Increased branching and degree of polymerization, and thus molecular weight, were found to reduce the solubility of these systems in the base oil. At concentrations of 2 wt % in a group I base oil, these polymer additives demonstrated improved viscosity index and reduced friction coefficient, validating the basic approach.« less

  2. GUM Analysis for TIMS and SIMS Isotopic Ratios in Graphite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heasler, Patrick G.; Gerlach, David C.; Cliff, John B.; Petersen, Steven L.

    2007-04-01

    This report describes GUM calculations for TIMS and SIMS isotopic ratio measurements of reactor graphite samples. These isotopic ratios are used to estimate reactor burn-up, and currently consist of various ratios of U, Pu, and Boron impurities in the graphite samples. The GUM calculation is a propagation of error methodology that assigns uncertainties (in the form of standard error and confidence bound) to the final estimates.

  3. 13-Energy Efficiency Ratio Window Air Conditioner | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    -Energy Efficiency Ratio Window Air Conditioner 13-Energy Efficiency Ratio Window Air Conditioner Credit: Oak Ridge National Lab Credit: Oak Ridge National Lab Lead Performer: Oak Ridge National Laboratory - Oak Ridge, TN Partners: General Electric - Fairfield, CT DOE Funding: $1,540,000 Cost Share: Provided by CRADA partners Project Term: October 1, 2011 - September 30, 2015 Project Objective This project is designing and developing a high-efficiency 13 energy-efficiecy-ratio (EER) window air

  4. Measurement of the Branching Fraction for D8+ rarr tau+nu_tau and Extraction of the Decay Constant f_D_s

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Martinelli, M.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D.N.; Hooberman, B.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; Osipenkov, I.L.; Tanabe, T.; Hawkes, C.M.

    2010-06-04

    The branching fraction for the decay D{sub s}{sup +} {yields} {tau}{sup +}{nu}{sub {tau}} with {tau}{sup +} {yields} e{sup +}{bar {nu}}{sub {tau}}, is measured using a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 427 fb{sup -1} collected at center of mass energies near 10.58 GeV with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy e{sup +}e{sup -} collider at SLAC. In the process e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} c{bar c} {yields} D*{sub s}{sup +} {bar D}{sub TAG}{bar K}X, the D*{sub s}{sup +} meson is reconstructed as a missing particle, and the subsequent decay D*{sub s}{sup +} {yields} D{sub s}{sup +}{gamma} yields an inclusive D{sub s}{sup +} data sample. Here {bar D}{sub TAG} refers to a fully reconstructed hadronic {bar D} decay, {bar K} is a K{sup -} or {bar K}{sup 0}, and X stands for any number of charged or neutral pions. The decay D{sub s}{sup +} {yields} K{sub S}{sup 0}K{sup +} is isolated also, and from ratio of event yields and known branching fractions, {Beta}(D{sub s}{sup +} {yields} {tau}{sup +}{nu}{sub {tau}}) = (4.5 {+-} 0.5 {+-} 0.4 {+-} 0.3)% is determined. The pseudoscalar decay constant is extracted to be f{sub D{sub s}} = (233 {+-} 13 {+-} 10 {+-} 7) MeV, where the first uncertainty is statistical, the second is systematic, and the third results from the uncertainties on the external measurements used as input to the calculation.

  5. The Effects of Fuel Composition and Compression Ratio on Thermal...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The Effects of Fuel Composition and Compression Ratio on Thermal Efficiency in an HCCI Engine Poster presentation at the 2007 Diesel Engine-Efficiency & Emissions Research ...

  6. Oxygen And Carbon Isotope Ratios Of Hydrothermal Minerals From...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Oxygen And Carbon Isotope Ratios Of Hydrothermal Minerals From Yellowstone Drill Cores Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Oxygen...

  7. Characterization of Tritium Breeding Ratio and Energy Multiplication...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Factor of Lithium-based Ternary Alloys in IFE Blankets Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Characterization of Tritium Breeding Ratio and Energy Multiplication Factor of ...

  8. Autocorrelation Function Statistics and Implication to Decay Ratio Estimation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    March-Leuba, Jose A.

    2016-01-01

    This document summarizes the results of a series of computer simulations to attempt to identify the statistics of the autocorrelation function, and implications for decay ratio estimation.

  9. Process for the conversion of lower alcohols to higher branched oxygenates

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Barger, P.T.

    1996-09-24

    A process is provided for the production of branched C{sub x} oxygenates from lower alcohols such as methanol, ethanol, propanol and mixtures thereof. The process comprises contacting the lower alcohols with a solid catalyst comprising a mixed metal oxide support having components selected from the group consisting of oxides of zinc, magnesium, zirconia, titanium, manganese, chromium, and lanthanides, and an activation metal selected from the group consisting of Group VIII metal, Group IB metals, and mixtures thereof. The advantage of the process is improved yields and selectivity to isobutanol which can subsequently be employed in the production of high octane motor gasoline.

  10. The transport of contaminants during storms in the White Oak Creek and Melton Branch Watersheds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Solomon, D.K.; Marsh, J.D.; Wickliff, D.S.; Larsen, I.L.; Clapp, R.B.

    1989-03-01

    This report documents are transport of contaminants from SWSA 5 along two principle pathways: the saturated groundwater system and the intermittently saturated stormflow system. The results of a baseflow sampling effort and a dye tracer study, indicated that much of the transport through the saturated groundwater system occurs along discrete geologic features. These features appear to be related to the contact between the Maryville and Nolichucky members of the Conasauga shale. Three discrete sources of tritium to Melton Branch Stream (MBS) were identified and traced to SWSA 5 by measuring soil moisture and evapotranspiration along transects between MBS and SWSA 5.

  11. Effects of inelastic electron-electron scattering on branch imbalance relaxation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Entin-Wohlman, O.; Orbach, R.

    1981-08-01

    The rate for branch-imbalance relaxation in a superconductor associated with inelastic electron-electron (Coulomb) scattering is derived, valid at arbitrary temperatures. The calculation is performed for clean superconductors, and shown to extend to cases where impurity scattering is important, using a technique of Schmid. As expected, for temperatures in the vicinity of T/sub c/ the form for the relaxation rate is identical with that arising from inelastic electron-phonon processes, if one replaces the inelastic electron-phonon scattering time with the inelastic electron-electron scattering time.

  12. Process for the conversion of lower alcohols to higher branched oxygenates

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Barger, Paul T. (Arlington Heights, IL)

    1996-01-01

    A process is provided for the production of branched C.sub.4+ oxygenates from lower alcohols such as methanol, ethanol, propanol and mixtures thereof. The process comprises contacting the lower alcohols with a solid catalyst comprising a mixed metal oxide support having components selected from the group consisting of oxides of zinc, magnesium, zirconia, titanium, manganese, chromium, and lanthanides, and an activation metal selected from the group consisting of Group VIII metal, Group IB metals, and mixtures thereof. The advantage of the process is improved yields and selectivity to isobutanol which can subsequently be employed in the production of high octane motor gasoline.

  13. Sex ratios in fetuses and liveborn infants with autosomal aneuploidy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heuther, C.A.; Martin, R.L.M.; Stoppelman, S.M. [Univ. of Cincinnati, OH (United States)] [and others

    1996-06-14

    Ten data sources were used substantially to increase the available data for estimating fetal and livebirth sex ratios for Patau (trisomy 13), Edwards (trisomy 18), and Down (trisomy 21) syndromes and controls. The fetal sex ratio estimate was 0.88 (N = 584) for trisomy 13, 0.90 (N = 1702) for trisomy 18, and 1.16 (N = 3154) for trisomy 21. All were significantly different from prenatal controls (1.07). The estimated ratios in prenatal controls were 1.28 (N = 1409) for CVSs and 1.06 (N = 49427) for amniocenteses, indicating a clear differential selection against males, mostly during the first half of fetal development. By contrast, there were no sex ratio differences for any of the trisomies when comparing gestational ages <16 and >16 weeks. The livebirth sex ratio estimate was 0.90 (N = 293) for trisomy 13, 0.63 (N = 497) for trisomy 18, and 1.15 (N = 6424) for trisomy 21, the latter two being statistically different than controls (1.05) (N = 3660707). These ratios for trisomies 13 and 18 were also statistically different than the ratio for trisomy 21. Only in trisomy 18 did the sex ratios in fetuses and livebirths differ, indicating a prenatal selection against males >16 weeks. No effects of maternal age or race were found on these estimates for any of the fetal or livebirth trisomies. Sex ratios for translocations and mosaics were also estimated for these aneuploids. Compared to previous estimates, these results are less extreme, most likely because of larger sample sizes and less sample bias. They support the hypothesis that these trisomy sex ratios are skewed at conception, or become so during embryonic development through differential intrauterine selection. The estimate for Down syndrome livebirths is also consistent with the hypothesis that its higher sex ratio is associated with paternal nondisjunction. 36 refs., 5 tabs.

  14. A Branch and Bound Approach for Truss Topology Design Problems with Valid Inequalities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cerveira, Adelaide; Agra, Agostinho; Bastos, Fernando; Varum, Humberto

    2010-09-30

    One of the classical problems in the structural optimization field is the Truss Topology Design Problem (TTDP) which deals with the selection of optimal configuration for structural systems for applications in mechanical, civil, aerospace engineering, among others. In this paper we consider a TTDP where the goal is to find the stiffest truss, under a given load and with a bound on the total volume. The design variables are the cross-section areas of the truss bars that must be chosen from a given finite set. This results in a large-scale non-convex problem with discrete variables. This problem can be formulated as a Semidefinite Programming Problem (SDP problem) with binary variables. We propose a branch and bound algorithm to solve this problem. In this paper it is considered a binary formulation of the problem, to take advantage of its structure, which admits a Knapsack problem as subproblem. Thus, trying to improve the performance of the Branch and Bound, at each step, some valid inequalities for the Knapsack problem are included.

  15. DUST IS FORMING ALONG THE RED GIANT BRANCH OF 47 Tuc

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Origlia, Livia; Fusi Pecci, Flavio; Rood, Robert T.; Fabbri, Sara; Ferraro, Francesco R.; Dalessandro, Emanuele; Rich, R. Michael E-mail: flavio.fusipecci@oabo.inaf.i E-mail: sara.fabbri@studio.unibo.i E-mail: emanuele.dalessandr2@unibo.i

    2010-07-20

    We present additional evidence that dust is really forming along the red giant branch (RGB) of 47 Tuc at luminosities ranging from above the horizontal branch to the RGB tip. The presence of dust had been inferred from an infrared excess in the (K - 8) color, with K measured from high spatial resolution ground-based near-IR photometry and '8' referring to Spitzer-Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) 8 {mu}m photometry. We show how (K - 8) is a far more sensitive diagnostic for detecting tiny circumstellar envelopes around warm giants than colors using only the Spitzer-IRAC bands, for example, the (3.6 - 8) color used by Boyer et al. In addition, we also show high-resolution Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys I-band images of the giant stars that have (K - 8) color excess. These images clearly demonstrate that the Boyer et al. statement that our detections of color excess associated with stars below the RGB tip arise from blends and artifacts is simply not valid.

  16. Assessment of approximate computational methods for conical intersections and branching plane vectors in organic molecules

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nikiforov, Alexander; Gamez, Jose A.; Thiel, Walter; Huix-Rotllant, Miquel; Filatov, Michael

    2014-09-28

    Quantum-chemical computational methods are benchmarked for their ability to describe conical intersections in a series of organic molecules and models of biological chromophores. Reference results for the geometries, relative energies, and branching planes of conical intersections are obtained using ab initio multireference configuration interaction with single and double excitations (MRCISD). They are compared with the results from more approximate methods, namely, the state-interaction state-averaged restricted ensemble-referenced Kohn-Sham method, spin-flip time-dependent density functional theory, and a semiempirical MRCISD approach using an orthogonalization-corrected model. It is demonstrated that these approximate methods reproduce the ab initio reference data very well, with root-mean-square deviations in the optimized geometries of the order of 0.1 or less and with reasonable agreement in the computed relative energies. A detailed analysis of the branching plane vectors shows that all currently applied methods yield similar nuclear displacements for escaping the strong non-adiabatic coupling region near the conical intersections. Our comparisons support the use of the tested quantum-chemical methods for modeling the photochemistry of large organic and biological systems.

  17. IS DUST FORMING ON THE RED GIANT BRANCH IN 47 Tuc?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyer, Martha L.; Gordon, Karl D.; Meixner, Margaret; Sewilo, Marta; Shiao, Bernie; Van Loon, Jacco Th.; McDonald, Iain; Babler, Brian; Bracker, Steve; Meade, Marilyn; Block, Miwa; Engelbracht, Charles; Misselt, Karl; Hora, Joe; Indebetouw, Remy; Whitney, Barbara

    2010-03-10

    Using Spitzer Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) observations from the SAGE-SMC Legacy program and archived Spitzer IRAC data, we investigate dust production in 47 Tuc, a nearby massive Galactic globular cluster. A previous study detected infrared excess, indicative of circumstellar dust, in a large population of stars in 47 Tuc, spanning the entire red giant branch (RGB). We show that those results suffered from effects caused by stellar blending and imaging artifacts and that it is likely that no stars below {approx}1 mag from the tip of the RGB are producing dust. The only stars that appear to harbor dust are variable stars, which are also the coolest and most luminous stars in the cluster.

  18. Enhancements of branch and bound methods for the maximal constraint satisfaction problem

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wallace, R.J.

    1996-12-31

    Two methods are described for enhancing performance of branch and bound methods for overconstrained CSPs. These methods improve either the upper or lower bound, respectively, during search, so the two can be combined. Upper bounds are improved by using heuristic repair methods before search to find a good solution quickly, whose cost is used as the initial upper bound. The method for improving lower bounds is an extension of directed arc consistency preprocessing, used in conjunction with forward checking. After computing directed arc consistency counts, inferred counts are computed for all values based on minimum counts for values of adjacent variables that are later in the search order. This inference process can be iterated, so that counts are cascaded from the end to the beginning of the search order, to augment the initial counts. Improvements in time and effort are demonstrated for both techniques using random problems.

  19. Measurement of the B+- --> rho+- pi0 Branching Fraction and Direct CP Asymmetry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aubert, B.; Barate, R.; Boutigny, D.; Couderc, F.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; Grauges, E.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pompili, A.; Chen, J.C.; Qi, N.D.; Rong, G.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y.S.; Eigen, G.; Ofte, I.; Stugu, B. /Bergen U. /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /Bristol U. /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa U. /Iowa State U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT, LNS /McGill U. /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /Perugia U. /INFN, Perugia /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Prairie View A-M /Princeton U. /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /South Carolina U. /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Stony Brook /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /Turin U. /INFN, Turin /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Valencia U., IFIC /Vanderbilt U. /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison /Yale U.

    2005-06-29

    An improved measurement of the process B{sup {+-}} {yields} {rho}{sup {+-}}{pi}{sup 0} is presented. The data sample of 211 fb{sup -1} comprises 232 million {Upsilon}(4S) {yields} B{bar B} decays collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric B Factory at SLAC. The yield and CP asymmetry are calculated using an extended maximum likelihood fitting method. The branching fraction and asymmetry are found to be {Beta}(B{sup {+-}} {yields} {rho}{sup {+-}}{pi}{sup 0}) = [10.0 {+-} 1.4 (Stat.) {+-} 0.9 (Syst.)] x 10{sup -6} and {Alpha}{sub CP}(B{sup {+-}} {yields} {rho}{sup {+-}}{pi}{sup 0}) = -0.01 {+-} 0.13 (Stat.) {+-} 0.02 (Syst.), superseding previous measurements. The statistical significance of the signal is calculated to be 8.7{sigma}.

  20. Measurement of the Absolute Branching Fraction of D0 to K- pi+

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aubert, B.; Bona, M.; Boutigny, D.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Lopez, L.; Palano, A.; Eigen, G.; Ofte, I.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Abrams, G.S.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D.N.; Button-Shafer, J.; /LBL, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /Bristol U. /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Munich, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /Ferrara U. /Frascati /Genoa U. /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Karlsruhe U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT, LNS /McGill U. /Maryland U. /INFN, Milan /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /Perugia U. /Pisa U. /Prairie View A-M /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DSM, DAPNIA, Saclay /South Carolina U. /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /Turin U. /Trieste U. /Valencia U., IFIC /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison /Yale U.

    2007-04-25

    The authors measure the absolute branching fraction for D{sup 0} {yields} K{sup -} {pi}{sup +} using partial reconstruction of {bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D*{sup +}X{ell}{sup -}{bar {nu}}{sub {ell}} decays, in which only the charged lepton and the pion from the decay D*{sup +} {yields} D{sup 0}{pi}{sup +} are used. Based on a data sample of 230 million B{bar B} pairs collected at the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy B Factory at SLAC, they obtain {Beta}(D{sup 0} {yields} K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}) = (4.007 {+-} 0.037 {+-} 0.070)%, where the first error is statistical and the second error is systematic.

  1. Public Data Set: On Virial Analysis at Low Aspect Ratio

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Bongard, Michael W [University of Wisconsin-Madison] (ORCID:0000000231609746); Barr, Jayson L [University of Wisconsin-Madison] (ORCID:0000000177685931); Fonck, Raymond J [University of Wisconsin-Madison] (ORCID:0000000294386762); Reusch, Joshua A [University of Wisconsin-Madison] (ORCID:0000000284249422); Thome, Kathreen E [Oak Ridge Associated Universities] (ORCID:0000000248013922)

    2016-07-28

    This public data set contains openly-documented, machine readable digital research data published in M.W. Bongard, et al., 'On Virial Analysis at Low Aspect Ratio,' Phys. Plasmas 23, 072508 (2016).

  2. Global and nonglobal parameters of horizontal-branch morphology of globular clusters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Milone, A. P.; Marino, A. F.; Dotter, A.; Norris, J. E.; Jerjen, H.; Asplund, M. E-mail: amarino@mso.anu.edu.au E-mail: jerjen@mso.anu.edu.au; and others

    2014-04-10

    The horizontal-branch (HB) morphology of globular clusters (GCs) is mainly determined by metallicity. However, the fact that GCs with almost the same metallicity exhibit different HB morphologies demonstrates that at least one more parameter is needed to explain the HB morphology. It has been suggested that one of these should be a global parameter that varies from GC to GC and the other a nonglobal parameter that varies within the GC. In this study we provide empirical evidence corroborating this idea. We used the photometric catalogs obtained with the Advanced Camera for Surveys of the Hubble Space Telescope and analyze the color-magnitude diagrams of 74 GCs. The HB morphology of our sample of GCs has been investigated on the basis of the two new parameters L1 and L2 that measure the distance between the red giant branch and the coolest part of the HB and the color extension of the HB, respectively. We find that L1 correlates with both metallicity and age, whereas L2 most strongly correlates with the mass of the hosting GC. The range of helium abundance among the stars in a GC, characterized by ΔY and associated with the presence of multiple stellar populations, has been estimated in a few GCs to date. In these GCs we find a close relationship among ΔY, GC mass, and L2. We conclude that age and metallicity are the main global parameters, while the range of helium abundance within a GC is the main nonglobal parameter defining the HB morphology of Galactic GCs.

  3. System and method for high precision isotope ratio destructive analysis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bushaw, Bruce A; Anheier, Norman C; Phillips, Jon R

    2013-07-02

    A system and process are disclosed that provide high accuracy and high precision destructive analysis measurements for isotope ratio determination of relative isotope abundance distributions in liquids, solids, and particulate samples. The invention utilizes a collinear probe beam to interrogate a laser ablated plume. This invention provides enhanced single-shot detection sensitivity approaching the femtogram range, and isotope ratios that can be determined at approximately 1% or better precision and accuracy (relative standard deviation).

  4. High density, high-aspect-ratio precision polyimide nanofilters | Argonne

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    National Laboratory High density, high-aspect-ratio precision polyimide nanofilters December 1, 2009 Tweet EmailPrint Collaborative users from Creatv MicroTech, Inc. and Los Alamos National Laboratory, working with CNM's Nanofabrication & Devices Group, have demonstrated a novel fabrication process that produces high-porosity polymer nanofilters with smooth, uniform. and straight pores and high aspect ratios. Nanofilters have a wide range of applications for various size-exclusion-based

  5. Office of Legal Counsel U.S. Department of Justice *1 EFFECT OF APPROPRIATIONS FOR OTHER AGENCIES AND BRANCHES ON THE AUTHORITY TO

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    337, 1995 WL 917146 (O.L.C.) Office of Legal Counsel U.S. Department of Justice *1 EFFECT OF APPROPRIATIONS FOR OTHER AGENCIES AND BRANCHES ON THE AUTHORITY TO CONTINUE DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE FUNCTIONS DURING THE LAPSE IN THE DEPARTMENT'S APPROPRIATIONS December 13, 1995 Where Congress has provided appropriations for the legislative branch, the Department of Justice may continue to provide testimony at hearings and perform other services related to funded functions of the legislative branch

  6. Utilizing Isotopic Uranium Ratios in Groundwater Evaluations at FUSRAP Sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frederick, W.T.; Keil, K.G.; Rhodes, M.C.; Peterson, J.M.; MacDonell, M.M.

    2007-07-01

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Buffalo District is evaluating environmental radioactive contamination at several Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) sites throughout New York, Pennsylvania, Ohio, and Indiana. The investigations follow the process defined in the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA). Groundwater data from the Niagara Falls Storage Site (NFSS) in Lewiston, New York were evaluated for isotopic uranium ratios, specifically uranium-234 versus uranium-238 (U- 234 and U-238, respectively), and the results were presented at Waste Management 2006. Since uranium naturally occurs in all groundwater, it can be difficult to distinguish where low-concentration impacts from past releases differ from the high end of a site-specific natural background range. In natural groundwater, the ratio of U-234 to U-238 exceeds 1 (unity) due to the alpha particle recoil effect, in which U-234 is preferentially mobilized to groundwater from adjacent rock or soil. This process is very slow and may take hundreds to thousands of years before a measurable increase is seen in the natural isotopic ratio. If site releases are the source of uranium being measured in groundwater, the U-234 to U-238 ratio is commonly closer to 1, which normally reflects FUSRAP-related, uranium-contaminated wastes and soils. This lower ratio occurs because not enough residence time has elapsed since the 1940's and 1950's for the alpha particle recoil effect to have significantly altered the contamination-derived ratio. An evaluation of NFSS-specific and regional groundwater data indicate that an isotopic ratio of 1.2 has been identified as a signature value to help distinguish natural groundwater, which may have a broad background range, from zones impacted by past releases. (authors)

  7. Measurement of Branching Fractions and CP-ViolatingCharge Asymmetries for B Meson Decays to D(*)D(*), and Implications for the CKMAngle gamma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aubert, B.; Barate, R.; Bona, M.; Boutigny, D.; Couderc, F.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; Grauges, E.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Chen, J.C.; Qi, N.D.; Rong, G.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y.S.; Eigen, G.; Ofte, I.; Stugu, B.; /Bergen U. /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /Bristol U. /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Karlsruhe U., EKP /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT, LNS /McGill U. /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /Perugia U. /INFN, Perugia /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Prairie View A-M /Princeton U. /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /South Carolina U. /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Stony Brook /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /Turin U. /INFN, Turin /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Valencia U., IFIC /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison /Yale U.

    2006-07-06

    In summary, the authors have measured branching fractions, upper limits, and charge asymmetries for all B meson decays to D{sup (*)} {bar D}{sup (*)}.

  8. Preconception maternal polychlorinated biphenyl concentrations and the secondary sex ratio

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taylor, Kira C. [Division of Epidemiology, Statistics and Prevention Research, National Institutes of Child Health and Development (NICHD), NIH, DHHS, 6100 Executive Blvd, Room 7B03, Rockville, MD 20852 (United States); Department of Epidemiology, 1518 Clifton Road, NE Atlanta, GA 30322 (United States); Jackson, Leila W. [Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, WG37, Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, 10900 Euclid Avenue Cleveland, OH 44106-4945 (United States); Lynch, Courtney D. [Division of Epidemiology, Statistics and Prevention Research, National Institutes of Child Health and Development (NICHD), NIH, DHHS, 6100 Executive Blvd, Room 7B03, Rockville, MD 20852 (United States); Kostyniak, Paul J. [Toxicology Research Center, 134 Cary Hall, University at Buffalo, State of New York, 3434 Main St., Buffalo, NY 14214-3000 (United States); Buck Louis, Germaine M. [Division of Epidemiology, Statistics and Prevention Research, National Institutes of Child Health and Development (NICHD), NIH, DHHS, 6100 Executive Blvd, Room 7B03, Rockville, MD 20852 (United States)]. E-mail: louisg@mail.nih.gov

    2007-01-15

    The secondary sex ratio is the ratio of male to female live births and historically has ranged from 102 to 106 males to 100 females. Temporal declines have been reported in many countries prompting authors to hypothesize an environmental etiology. Blood specimens were obtained from 99 women aged 24-34 prior to attempting pregnancy and quantified for 76 polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners using dual column gas chromatography with electron capture detection. Women were prospectively followed until pregnancy or 12 cycles of trying. The odds of a male birth for three PCB groupings (total, estrogenic, anti-estrogenic) controlling for maternal characteristics were estimated using logistic regression. Among the 50 women with live births and PCB data, 26 female and 24 male infants were born (ratio 0.92). After adjusting for age and body mass index, odds of a male birth were elevated among women in the second (OR=1.29) and third (OR=1.48) tertiles of estrogenic PCBs; odds (OR=0.70) were reduced among women in the highest tertile of anti-estrogenic PCBs. All confidence intervals included one. The direction of the odds ratios in this preliminary study varied by PCB groupings, supporting the need to study specific PCB patterns when assessing environmental influences on the secondary sex ratio.

  9. Utilizing Isotopic Uranium Ratios in Groundwater Evaluations at NFSS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rhodes, M.C.; Keil, K.G.; Frederick, W.T.; Papura, T.R.; Leithner, J.S.; Peterson, J.M.; MacDonell, M.M.

    2006-07-01

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) Buffalo District is currently evaluating environmental contamination at the Niagara Falls Storage Site (NFSS) under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) as part of its Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). The NFSS is located in the Town of Lewiston in western New York and has been used to store uranium-contaminated materials since 1944. Most of the radioactive materials are currently contained in an on-site structure, but past contamination remains in soil and groundwater. As a naturally occurring radionuclide, uranium is present in all groundwater. Because contamination levels at the site are quite low, it can be difficult to distinguish zones that have been impacted by the past releases from those at the high end of the natural background range. The differences in the isotopic ratio of uranium-234 (U-234) to uranium-238 (U-238) between natural groundwater systems and affected areas are being used in an innovative way to better define the nature and extent of groundwater contamination at NFSS. In natural groundwater, the ratio of U-234 to U-238 exceeds 1 due to the alpha particle recoil effect, in which U-234 is preferentially mobilized to groundwater from adjacent rock or soil. This process is very slow, and it can be hundreds to thousands of years before a measurable impact is seen in the isotopic ratio. Thus, as a result of the recoil effect, the ratio of U-234 to U-238 will be higher in natural groundwater than in contaminated groundwater. This means that if site releases were the source of the uranium being measured in groundwater at NFSS, the ratio of U-234 to U-238 would be expected to be very close to 1 (the same ratio that exists in wastes and soil at the site), because not enough time has elapsed for the alpha particle recoil effect to have significantly altered that ratio. From an evaluation of site and regional groundwater data, an isotopic ratio

  10. Starting low compression ratio rotary Wankel diesel engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kamo, R.; Yamada, T.Y.; Hamada, Y.

    1987-01-01

    The single stage rotary Wankel engine is difficult to convert into a diesel version having an adequate compression ratio and a compatible combustion chamber configuration. Past efforts in designing a rotary-type Wankel diesel engine resorted to a two-stage design. Complexity, size, weight, cost and performance penalties were some of the drawbacks of the two-stage Wankel-type diesel designs. This paper presents an approach to a single stage low compression ratio Wankel-type rotary engine. Cold starting of a low compression ratio single stage diesel Wankel becomes the key problem. It was demonstrated that the low compression single stage diesel Wankel type rotary engine can satisfactorily be cold started with a properly designed combustion chamber in the rotor and a variable heat input combustion aid.

  11. " Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3 Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 2002;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: Values of Shipments within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios;" " Unit: Varies." " "," ",,,"Consumption"," " " "," ",,"Consumption","per Dollar" " "," ","Consumption","per Dollar","of Value","RSE" "NAICS",,"per

  12. " Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3 Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 2006;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: Values of Shipments within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios;" " Unit: Varies." ,,,,"Consumption" ,,,"Consumption","per Dollar" ,,"Consumption","per Dollar","of Value" "NAICS",,"per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments" "Code(a)","Economic

  13. " Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3 Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 2010;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: Values of Shipments within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios;" " Unit: Varies." ,,,,"Consumption" ,,,"Consumption","per Dollar" ,,"Consumption","per Dollar","of Value" "NAICS",,"per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments" "Code(a)","Economic

  14. Method of fabricating a high aspect ratio microstructure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Warren, John B.

    2003-05-06

    The present invention is for a method of fabricating a high aspect ratio, freestanding microstructure. The fabrication method modifies the exposure process for SU-8, an negative-acting, ultraviolet-sensitive photoresist used for microfabrication whereby a UV-absorbent glass substrate, chosen for complete absorption of UV radiation at 380 nanometers or less, is coated with a negative photoresist, exposed and developed according to standard practice. This UV absorbent glass enables the fabrication of cylindrical cavities in a negative photoresist microstructures that have aspect ratios of 8:1.

  15. Constraints on helium enhancement in the globular cluster M4 (NGC 6121): The horizontal branch test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Valcarce, A. A. R.; De Medeiros, J. R.; Catelan, M.; Alonso-Garca, J.; Corts, C.

    2014-02-20

    Recent pieces of evidence have revealed that most, and possibly all, globular star clusters are composed of groups of stars that formed in multiple episodes with different chemical compositions. In this sense, it has also been argued that variations in the initial helium abundance (Y) from one population to the next are also the rule, rather than the exception. In the case of the metal-intermediate globular cluster M4 (NGC 6121), recent high-resolution spectroscopic observations of blue horizontal branch (HB) stars (i.e., HB stars hotter than the RR Lyrae instability strip) suggest that a large fraction of blue HB stars are second-generation stars formed with high helium abundances. In this paper, we test this scenario by using recent photometric and spectroscopic data together with theoretical evolutionary computations for different Y values. Comparing the photometric data with the theoretically derived color-magnitude diagrams, we find that the bulk of the blue HB stars in M4 have ?Y ? 0.01 with respect to the cluster's red HB stars (i.e., HB stars cooler than the RR Lyrae strip)a result which is corroborated by comparison with spectroscopically derived gravities and temperatures, which also favor little He enhancement. However, the possible existence of a minority population on the blue HB of the cluster with a significant He enhancement level is also discussed.

  16. HORIZONTAL BRANCH MORPHOLOGY AND MULTIPLE STELLAR POPULATIONS IN THE ANOMALOUS GLOBULAR CLUSTER M 22

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marino, A. F.; Milone, A. P.; Lind, K. E-mail: milone@iac.es

    2013-05-01

    M 22 is an anomalous globular cluster that hosts two groups of stars with different metallicity and s-element abundance. The star-to-star light-element variations in both groups, with the presence of individual Na-O and C-N anticorrelations, demonstrates that this Milky Way satellite has experienced a complex star formation history. We have analyzed FLAMES/UVES spectra for seven stars covering a small color interval on the reddest horizontal branch (HB) portion of this cluster and investigated possible relations between the chemical composition of a star and its location along the HB. Our chemical abundance analysis takes into account effects introduced by deviations from the local thermodynamic equilibrium (NLTE effects), which are significant for the measured spectral lines in the atmospheric parameters range spanned by our stars. We find that all the analyzed stars are barium-poor and sodium-poor, thus supporting the idea that the position of a star along the HB is strictly related to the chemical composition, and that the HB morphology is influenced by the presence of different stellar populations.

  17. METALLICITY AND KINEMATIC DISTRIBUTIONS OF RED HORIZONTAL-BRANCH STARS FROM THE SDSS SURVEY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Y. Q.; Zhao, G.; Zhao, J. K.; Xue, X. X.; Schuster, W. J. E-mail: schuster@astrosen.unam.m

    2010-08-15

    On the basis of a recently derived color-metallicity relation and stellar parameters from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7 spectroscopic survey, a large sample of red horizontal-branch (RHB) candidates have been selected to serve as standard candles. The metallicity and kinematic distributions of these stars indicate that they mainly originate from the thick-disk and the halo populations. The typical thick disk is characterized by the first group peaking at [Fe/H] {approx} -0.6, V{sub rot} {approx} 170 km s{sup -1} with a vertical scale height around |Z| {approx} 1.2 kpc, while stars with [Fe/H] < -0.9 are dominated by the halo population. Two sub-populations of the halo are suggested by the RHB stars peaking at [Fe/H] {approx} -1.3: one component with V{sub rot} > 0 km s{sup -1} (Halo I) shows a sign of metallicity gradient in the [Fe/H] versus |Z| diagram, while the other with V{sub rot} < 0 km s{sup -1} (Halo II) does not. The Halo I mainly clumps at the inner halo with R < 10 kpc and the Halo II comes both from the inner halo with R < 10 kpc and the outer halo with R > 10 kpc based on the star distribution in the R versus |Z| diagram.

  18. FLUORINE IN THE SOLAR NEIGHBORHOOD: IS IT ALL PRODUCED IN ASYMPTOTIC GIANT BRANCH STARS?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jnsson, H.; Ryde, N. [Lund Observatory, Department of Astronomy and Theoretical Physics, Lund University, Box 43, SE-221 00 Lund (Sweden); Harper, G. M. [School of Physics, Trinity College, Dublin 2 (Ireland); Richter, M. J. [Physics Department, University of California, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Hinkle, K. H., E-mail: henrikj@astro.lu.se [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, P.O. Box 26732, Tucson, AZ 85726 (United States)

    2014-07-10

    The origin of ''cosmic'' fluorine is uncertain, but there are three proposed production sites/mechanisms for the origin: asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars, ? nucleosynthesis in Type II supernovae, and/or the winds of Wolf-Rayet stars. The relative importance of these production sites has not been established even for the solar neighborhood, leading to uncertainties in stellar evolution models of these stars as well as uncertainties in the chemical evolution models of stellar populations. We determine the fluorine and oxygen abundances in seven bright, nearby giants with well determined stellar parameters. We use the 2.3 ?m vibrational-rotational HF line and explore a pure rotational HF line at 12.2 ?m. The latter has never been used before for an abundance analysis. To be able to do this, we have calculated a line list for pure rotational HF lines. We find that the abundances derived from the two diagnostics agree. Our derived abundances are well reproduced by chemical evolution models including only fluorine production in AGB stars and, therefore, we draw the conclusion that this might be the main production site of fluorine in the solar neighborhood. Furthermore, we highlight the advantages of using the 12 ?m HF lines to determine the possible contribution of the ? process to the fluorine budget at low metallicities where the difference between models including and excluding this process is dramatic.

  19. Field studies of streamflow generation using natural and injected tracers on Bickford and Walker Branch Watersheds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Genereux, D.; Hemond, H. . Dept. of Civil Engineering); Mulholland, P. )

    1992-05-01

    Field studies of streamflow generation were undertaken on two forested watersheds, the West Road subcatchment of Bickford Watershed in central Massachusetts and the West Fork of Walker Branch Watershed in eastern Tennessee. A major component of the research was development of a two-stage methodology for the use of naturally-occurring {sup 222}Rn as a tracer. The first of the two stages was solving a mass-balance equation for {sup 222}Rn around a stream reach of interest in order to calculate Rn{sub q}, the {sup 222}Rn content of the lateral inflow to the reach; a conservative tracer (chloride) and a volatile tracer (propane) were injected into the study stream to account for lateral inflow to, and volatilization from, the study reach. The second stage involved quantitative comparison of Rn{sub q} to the measured {sup 222}Rn concentrations of different subsurface waters in order to assess how important these waters were in contributing lateral inflow to the stream reach.

  20. Infrared tip of the red giant branch and distances to the MAFFEI/IC 342 group

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Po-Feng; Tully, R. Brent; Jacobs, Bradley A.; Rizzi, Luca; Dolphin, Andrew E.; Karachentsev, Igor D.

    2014-07-01

    In this paper, we extend the use of the tip of the red giant branch (TRGB) method to near-infrared wavelengths from the previously used I-band, using the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3). Upon calibration of a color dependency of the TRGB magnitude, the IR TRGB yields a random uncertainty of ∼5% in relative distance. The IR TRGB methodology has an advantage over the previously used Advance Camera for Surveys F606W and F814W filter set for galaxies that suffer from severe extinction. Using the IR TRGB methodology, we obtain distances toward three principal galaxies in the Maffei/IC 342 complex, which are located at low Galactic latitudes. New distance estimates using the TRGB method are 3.45{sub −0.13}{sup +0.13} Mpc for IC 342, 3.37{sub −0.23}{sup +0.32} Mpc for Maffei 1, and 3.52{sub −0.30}{sup +0.32} Mpc for Maffei 2. The uncertainties are dominated by uncertain extinction, especially for Maffei 1 and Maffei 2. Our IR calibration demonstrates the viability of the TRGB methodology for observations with the James Webb Space Telescope.

  1. DOUBLE HORIZONTAL BRANCHES IN NGC 6440 AND NGC 6569 UNVEILED BY THE VVV SURVEY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mauro, Francesco; Bidin, Christian Moni; Cohen, Roger; Geisler, Doug; Chene, Andre-Nicolas; Villanova, Sandro; Minniti, Dante; Catelan, Marcio

    2012-12-20

    We report the discovery of a peculiar horizontal branch (HB) in NGC 6440 and NGC 6569, two massive and metal-rich Galactic globular clusters (GGCs) located in the Galactic bulge, within 4 kpc from the Galactic center. In both clusters, two distinct clumps are detected at the level of the cluster HB, separated by only {approx}0.1 mag in the K{sub s} band. They were detected with IR photometric data collected with the 'VISTA Variables in the Via Lactea' Survey, and confirmed in independent IR catalogs available in the literature and Hubble Space Telescope optical photometry. Our analysis demonstrates that these clumps are real cluster features, not a product of field contamination or interstellar reddening. The observed split HBs could be a signature of two stellar sub-populations with different chemical composition and/or age, as recently found in Terzan 5, but it cannot be excluded that they are caused by evolutionary effects, in particular for NGC 6440. This interpretation, however, requires an anomalously high helium content (Y > 0.30). Our discovery suggests that such a peculiar HB morphology could be a common feature of massive, metal-rich bulge GGCs.

  2. The Four-loop Six-gluon NMHV Ratio Function

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dixon, Lance J.; von Hippel, Matt; McLeod, Andrew J.

    2015-09-29

    We use the hexagon function bootstrap to compute the ratio function which characterizes the next-to-maximally-helicity-violating (NMHV) six-point amplitude in planar N = 4 super-Yang-Mills theory at four loops. A powerful constraint comes from dual superconformal invariance, in the form of a Q- differential equation, which heavily constrains the first derivatives of the transcendental functions entering the ratio function. At four loops, it leaves only a 34-parameter space of functions. Constraints from the collinear limits, and from the multi-Regge limit at the leading-logarithmic (LL) and next-to-leading-logarithmic (NLL) order, suffice to fix these parameters and obtain a unique result. We test the result against multi- Regge predictions at NNLL and N3LL, and against predictions from the operator product expansion involving one and two flux-tube excitations; all cross-checks are satisfied. We also study the analytical and numerical behavior of the parity-even and parity-odd parts on various lines and surfaces traversing the three-dimensional space of cross ratios. As part of this program, we characterize all irreducible hexagon functions through weight eight in terms of their coproduct. Furthermore, we provide representations of the ratio function in particular kinematic regions in terms of multiple polylogarithms.

  3. The four-loop six-gluon NMHV ratio function

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Dixon, Lance J.; von Hippel, Matt; McLeod, Andrew J.

    2016-01-11

    We use the hexagon function bootstrap to compute the ratio function which characterizes the next-to-maximally-helicity-violating (NMHV) six-point amplitude in planar N=4 super-Yang-Mills theory at four loops. A powerful constraint comes from dual superconformal invariance, in the form of a Q¯ differential equation, which heavily constrains the first derivatives of the transcendental functions entering the ratio function. At four loops, it leaves only a 34-parameter space of functions. Constraints from the collinear limits, and from the multi-Regge limit at the leading-logarithmic (LL) and next-to-leading-logarithmic (NLL) order, suffice to fix these parameters and obtain a unique result. We test the result againstmore » multi-Regge predictions at NNLL and N3LL, and against predictions from the operator product expansion involving one and two flux-tube excitations; all cross-checks are satisfied. We study the analytical and numerical behavior of the parity-even and parity-odd parts on various lines and surfaces traversing the three-dimensional space of cross ratios. As part of this program, we characterize all irreducible hexagon functions through weight eight in terms of their coproduct. As a result, we also provide representations of the ratio function in particular kinematic regions in terms of multiple polylogarithms.« less

  4. Color-mass-to-light-ratio relations for disk galaxies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McGaugh, Stacy S.; Schombert, James M. E-mail: jschombe@uoregon.edu

    2014-11-01

    We combine Spitzer 3.6 μm observations of a sample of disk galaxies spanning over 10 mag in luminosity with optical luminosities and colors to test population synthesis prescriptions for computing stellar mass. Many commonly employed models fail to provide self-consistent results: the stellar mass estimated from the luminosity in one band can differ grossly from that of another band for the same galaxy. Independent models agree closely in the optical (V band), but diverge at longer wavelengths. This effect is particularly pronounced in recent models with substantial contributions from TP-AGB stars. We provide revised color-mass-to-light ratio relations that yield self-consistent stellar masses when applied to real galaxies. The B – V color is a good indicator of the mass-to-light ratio. Some additional information is provided by V – I, but neither it nor J – K{sub s} are particularly useful for constraining the mass-to-light ratio on their own. In the near-infrared, the mass-to-light ratio depends weakly on color, with typical values of 0.6 M {sub ☉}/L {sub ☉} in the K{sub s} band and 0.47 M {sub ☉}/L {sub ☉} at 3.6 μm.

  5. Non-tracking solar concentrator with a high concentration ratio

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hinterberger, Henry

    1977-01-01

    A nontracking solar concentrator with a high concentration ratio is provided. The concentrator includes a plurality of energy absorbers which communicate with a main header by which absorbed heat is removed. Undesired heat flow of those absorbers not being heated by radiant energy at a particular instant is impeded, improving the efficiency of the concentrator.

  6. MAGNESIUM ISOTOPE RATIOS IN {omega} CENTAURI RED GIANTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Da Costa, G. S.; Norris, John E.; Yong, David

    2013-05-20

    We have used the high-resolution observations obtained at the Anglo-Australian Telescope with Ultra-High Resolution Facility (R {approx} 100,000) and at Gemini-S with b-HROS (R {approx} 150,000) to determine magnesium isotope ratios for seven {omega} Cen red giants that cover a range in iron abundance from [Fe/H] = -1.78 to -0.78 dex, and for two red giants in M4 (NGC 6121). The {omega} Cen stars sample both the ''primordial'' (i.e., O-rich, Na- and Al-poor) and the ''extreme'' (O-depleted, Na- and Al-rich) populations in the cluster. The primordial population stars in both {omega} Cen and M4 show ({sup 25}Mg, {sup 26}Mg)/{sup 24}Mg isotopic ratios that are consistent with those found for the primordial population in other globular clusters with similar [Fe/H] values. The isotopic ratios for the {omega} Cen extreme stars are also consistent with those for extreme population stars in other clusters. The results for the extreme population stars studied indicate that the {sup 26}Mg/{sup 24}Mg ratio is highest at intermediate metallicities ([Fe/H] < -1.4 dex), and for the highest [Al/Fe] values. Further, the relative abundance of {sup 26}Mg in the extreme population stars is notably higher than that of {sup 25}Mg, in contrast to model predictions. The {sup 25}Mg/{sup 24}Mg isotopic ratio in fact does not show any obvious dependence on either [Fe/H] or [Al/Fe] nor, intriguingly, any obvious difference between the primordial and extreme population stars.

  7. FORMATION OF SiC GRAINS IN PULSATION-ENHANCED DUST-DRIVEN WIND AROUND CARBON-RICH ASYMPTOTIC GIANT BRANCH STARS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yasuda, Yuki; Kozasa, Takashi, E-mail: yuki@antares-a.sci.hokudai.ac.jp [Department of Natural History Sciences, Faculty of Science, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0810 (Japan)

    2012-02-01

    We investigate the formation of silicon carbide (SiC) grains in the framework of dust-driven wind around pulsating carbon-rich asymptotic giant branch (C-rich AGB) stars to reveal not only the amount but also the size distribution. Two cases are considered for the nucleation process: one is the local thermal equilibrium (LTE) case where the vibration temperature of SiC clusters T{sub v} is equal to the gas temperature as usual, and another is the non-LTE case in which T{sub v} is assumed to be the same as the temperature of small SiC grains. The results of the hydrodynamical calculations for a model with stellar parameters of mass M{sub *} = 1.0 M{sub Sun }, luminosity L{sub *} = 10{sup 4} L{sub Sun }, effective temperature T{sub eff} = 2600 K, C/O ratio = 1.4, and pulsation period P = 650 days show the following: in the LTE case, SiC grains condense in accelerated outflowing gas after the formation of carbon grains, and the resulting averaged mass ratio of SiC to carbon grains of {approx}10{sup -8} is too small to reproduce the value of 0.01-0.3, which is inferred from the radiative transfer models. On the other hand, in the non-LTE case, the formation region of the SiC grains is more internal and/or almost identical to that of the carbon grains due to the so-called inverse greenhouse effect. The mass ratio of SiC to carbon grains averaged at the outer boundary ranges from 0.098 to 0.23 for the sticking probability {alpha}{sub s} = 0.1-1.0. The size distributions with the peak at {approx}0.2-0.3 {mu}m in radius cover the range of size derived from the analysis of the presolar SiC grains. Thus, the difference between the temperatures of the small cluster and gas plays a crucial role in the formation process of SiC grains around C-rich AGB stars, and this aspect should be explored for the formation process of dust grains in astrophysical environments.

  8. Precision Measurements of the Proton Elastic Form Factor Ratio

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Douglas Higinbotham

    2010-08-01

    New high precision polarization measurements of the proton elastic form factor ratio in the Q^2 from 0.3 to 0.7 [GeV/c]^2 have been made. These elastic H(e,e'p) measurementswere done in Jefferson Lab's Hall A using 80% longitudinally polarized electrons and recoil polarimetry. For Q^2 greater than 1 [GeV/c]^2, previous polarization data indicated a strong deviation of the form factor ratio from unity which sparked renewed theoretical and experimental interest in how two-photon diagrams have been taken into account. The new high precision data indicate that the deviation from unity, while small, persists even at Q^2 less than 1 [GeV/c]^2.

  9. The Atmospheric Muon Charge Ratio at the MINOS Near Detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    de Jong, J.K.; /IIT, Chicago /Oxford U.

    2011-11-01

    The magnetized MINOS near detector can accurately determine the charge sign of atmospheric muons, this facilitates a measurement of the atmospheric muon charge ratio. To reduce the systematic error associated with geometric bias and acceptance we have combined equal periods of data obtained with opposite magnetic field polarities. We report a charge ratio of 1.2666 {+-} 0.0015(stat.){sub -0.0088}{sup +0.0096}(syst.) at a mean E{sub {mu},0{sup cos}}({theta}) = 63 GeV. This measurement is consistent with the world average but significantly lower than the earlier observation at the MINOS far detector. This increase is shown to be consistent with the hypothesis that a greater fraction of the observed muons arise from kaon decay within the cosmic ray shower.

  10. Method for fabricating high aspect ratio structures in perovskite material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Karapetrov, Goran T.; Kwok, Wai-Kwong; Crabtree, George W.; Iavarone, Maria

    2003-10-28

    A method of fabricating high aspect ratio ceramic structures in which a selected portion of perovskite or perovskite-like crystalline material is exposed to a high energy ion beam for a time sufficient to cause the crystalline material contacted by the ion beam to have substantially parallel columnar defects. Then selected portions of the material having substantially parallel columnar defects are etched leaving material with and without substantially parallel columnar defects in a predetermined shape having high aspect ratios of not less than 2 to 1. Etching is accomplished by optical or PMMA lithography. There is also disclosed a structure of a ceramic which is superconducting at a temperature in the range of from about 10.degree. K. to about 90.degree. K. with substantially parallel columnar defects in which the smallest lateral dimension of the structure is less than about 5 microns, and the thickness of the structure is greater than 2 times the smallest lateral dimension of the structure.

  11. Do Coupled Climate Models Correctly SImulate the Upward Branch of the Deept Ocean Global Conveyor?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sarmiento, Jorge L; Downes, Stephanie; Bianchi, Daniele

    2013-01-17

    The large-scale meridional overturning circulation (MOC) connects the deep ocean, a major reservoir of carbon, to the other components of the climate system and must therefore be accurately represented in Earth System Models. Our project aims to address the specific question of the pathways and mechanisms controlling the upwelling branch of the MOC, a subject of significant disagreement between models and observational syntheses, and among general circulation models. Observations of these pathways are limited, particularly in regions of complex hydrography such as the Southern Ocean. As such, we rely on models to examine theories of the overturning circulation, both physically and biogeochemically. This grant focused on a particular aspect of the meridional overturning circulation (MOC) where there is currently significant disagreement between models and observationally based analyses of the MOC, and amongst general circulation models. In particular, the research focused on addressing the following questions: 1. Where does the deep water that sinks in the polar regions rise to the surface? 2. What processes are responsible for this rise? 3. Do state-of-the-art coupled GCMs capture these processes? Our research had three key components: observational synthesis, model development and model analysis. In this final report we outline the key results from these areas of research for the 2007 to 2012 grant period. The research described here was carried out primarily by graduate student, Daniele Bianchi (now a Postdoc at McGill University, Canada), and Postdoc Stephanie Downes (now a Research Fellow at The Australian national University, Australia). Additional support was provided for programmers Jennifer Simeon as well as Rick Slater.

  12. Structural- and optical-property characterization of three-dimensional branched ZnO nanospikes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chia, M.Y.; Chiu, W.S.; Daud, S.N.H.; Khiew, P.S.; Radiman, S.; Abd-Shukor, R.; Hamid, M.A.A.

    2015-08-15

    Current study reports the synthesis of three-dimensional (3-D) ZnO nanospikes with anomalous optical property, where zinc stearate is adopted as a safe, common and low-cost precursor that undergoes thermal pyrolysis under non-hydrolytic approach. High resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) result show that the as-synthesized 3-D ZnO nanospikes are constructed by bundle of nanorods that sprout radially outwards in random orientation. The possible growth mechanism is discussed by referring to the microscopy results. X-ray diffraction (XRD) pattern confirms that the nanospikes are highly crystalline, which existed in hexagonal wurtzite crystal structure. Optical absorption characterization shows that the onset absorption for the nanospikes is slightly red-shifted if compared to commercial ZnO and the corresponding bandgap energy is estimated to be 3.1 eV. The photoluminescene (PL) result of ZnO nanospikes indicate that its optical emission exhibits weak UV emission but very intense visible-light emission that ranged from green- up to red-region. The factors that contributed to the intriguing PL characteristic are discussed. Current finding would offer a versatile synthesis scheme in engineering advanced nanostructures with new design that exhibit congruent optical property. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: • Pyrolysis of zinc stearate in synthesizing 3-D ZnO nanospikes • ZnO nanospikes possess bundle of nanorods that sprout out from the hexagonal stump • Growth mechanism is deduced to elucidate the morphological evolution from nanobullet to nanospike with branching topology • PL spectrum indicate that the nanospike exhibit prominent visible-light emission that ranged from green- to red-region.

  13. Electron-capture supernovae of super-asymptotic giant branch stars and the Crab supernova 1054

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nomoto, Ken'ichi [Kavli Institute for Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (WPI), The University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8583 (Japan); Tominaga, Nozomu [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science and Engineering, Konan University, 8-9-1 Okamoto, Kobe, Hyogo 658-8501, Japan and Kavli Institute for Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (WPI), The University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8583 (Japan); Blinnikov, Sergei I. [Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics (ITEP), Moscow 117218, Russia and Kavli Institute for Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (WPI), The University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8583 (Japan)

    2014-05-02

    An electron-capture supernova (ECSN) is a core-collapse supernova explosion of a super-asymptotic giant branch (SAGB) star with a main-sequence mass M{sub Ms} ? 7 - 9.5M{sub ?}. The explosion takes place in accordance with core bounce and subsequent neutrino heating and is a unique example successfully produced by first-principle simulations. This allows us to derive a first self-consistent multicolor light curves of a core-collapse supernova. Adopting the explosion properties derived by the first-principle simulation, i.e., the low explosion energy of 1.5 10{sup 50} erg and the small {sup 56}Ni mass of 2.5 10{sup ?3} M{sub ?}, we perform a multigroup radiation hydrodynamics calculation of ECSNe and present multicolor light curves of ECSNe of SAGB stars with various envelope mass and hydrogen abundance. We demonstrate that a shock breakout has peak luminosity of L ? 2 10{sup 44} erg s{sup ?1} and can evaporate circumstellar dust up to R ? 10{sup 17} cm for a case of carbon dust, that plateau luminosity and plateau duration of ECSNe are L ? 10{sup 42} erg s{sup ?1} and {sup t} ? 60 - 100 days, respectively, and that a plateau is followed by a tail with a luminosity drop by ? 4 mag. The ECSN shows a bright and short plateau that is as bright as typical Type II plateau supernovae, and a faint tail that might be influenced by spin-down luminosity of a newborn pulsar. Furthermore, the theoretical models are compared with ECSN candidates: SN 1054 and SN 2008S. We find that SN 1054 shares the characteristics of the ECSNe. For SN 2008S, we find that its faint plateau requires a ECSN model with a significantly low explosion energy of E ? 10{sup 48} erg.

  14. Combustion engine variable compression ratio apparatus and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lawrence; Keith E.; Strawbridge, Bryan E.; Dutart, Charles H.

    2006-06-06

    An apparatus and method for varying a compression ratio of an engine having a block and a head mounted thereto. The apparatus and method includes a cylinder having a block portion and a head portion, a piston linearly movable in the block portion of the cylinder, a cylinder plug linearly movable in the head portion of the cylinder, and a valve located in the cylinder plug and operable to provide controlled fluid communication with the block portion of the cylinder.

  15. Radar antenna pointing for optimized signal to noise ratio.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doerry, Armin Walter; Marquette, Brandeis

    2013-01-01

    The Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR) of a radar echo signal will vary across a range swath, due to spherical wavefront spreading, atmospheric attenuation, and antenna beam illumination. The antenna beam illumination will depend on antenna pointing. Calculations of geometry are complicated by the curved earth, and atmospheric refraction. This report investigates optimizing antenna pointing to maximize the minimum SNR across the range swath.

  16. Adjustable ratio roller rocker for internal combustion engines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sheehan, K.A.

    1987-04-07

    This patent describes an adjustable ratio roller rocker for internal combustion engines, comprising: a body; a sliding pushrod seat received in the body; a bolt received in the sliding pushrod seat; a pushrod received in the sliding pushrod seat and the sliding pushrod seat includes a threaded opening that receives the bolt; and the rotation of the bolt causes the sliding pushrod seat to traverse a recessed opening in the body.

  17. Selected financial and operating ratios of public power systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choate, S.

    1996-01-01

    This article is a review of the title publication, which is produced by the American Public Power Association. The report is considered to be a valuable management tool to public power systems in evaluating their competitive positions in the dynamic electric utility industry. It examines 22 categories of ratio indicators that can be used by public power systems to assess their performance relative to other utilities of comparable size in the same geographic region. More than 400 utilities are summarized in the report.

  18. High Aspect Ratio Metallic Structures for Use as Transparent Electrodes -

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Innovation Portal Photovoltaic Solar Photovoltaic Advanced Materials Advanced Materials Find More Like This Return to Search High Aspect Ratio Metallic Structures for Use as Transparent Electrodes Ames Laboratory Contact AMES About This Technology Technology Marketing SummaryMetallic structures that can be used as transparent electrodes or to enhance the performance of solar cells or LEDs.DescriptionEfforts to develop new energy sources and more energy efficient devices has lead to

  19. High Aspect Ratio Metallic Structures for Use as Transparent Electrodes -

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Innovation Portal Solar Photovoltaic Solar Photovoltaic Find More Like This Return to Search High Aspect Ratio Metallic Structures for Use as Transparent Electrodes Ames Laboratory Contact AMES About This Technology Technology Marketing Summary Polymer-based photovoltaic devices have received intense interest in recent years because of their potential to provide low-cost solar energy conversion, flexibility, manufacturability, and light weight. However, the efficiency of organic solar

  20. The charge ratio of the atmospheric muons at low energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bahmanabadi, M.; Samimi, J.; Sheidaei, F.; Ghomi, M. Khakian

    2006-10-15

    From the nature of the muon production processes, it can be seen that the ratio of positive to negative cosmic muons has important information in both 'the atmospheric neutrino problem', and 'the hadronic interactions'. We have carried out an experiment for the measurement of the muon charge ratio in the cosmic ray flux in momentum range 0.112-0.178 GeV/c. The muon charge ratio is found to be 1.21{+-}0.01 with a mean zenith angle of 32 deg. {+-}5 deg. . From the measurements it has been obtained a zenithal angle distribution of muons as I({theta})=I(0)cos{sup n}{theta} with n=1.95{+-}0.13. An asymmetry has been observed in East-West directions because of the geomagnetic field. Meanwhile, in about the same momentum range, positive and negative muons have been studied on the basis of Monte Carlo simulations of the extensive air shower developement (Cosmic Ray Simulations for Kascade), using the Quark Gluon String model with JETs model as generator.

  1. The use of carbon stable isotope ratios in drugs characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Magdas, D. A. Cristea, G. Bot, A. Mirel, V.

    2013-11-13

    Isotopic Ratio Mass Spectrometry (IRMS) is an effective toll to be used for drug product authentication. The isotopic composition could be used to assist in the differentiation between batches of drugs and assist in the identification of counterfeit materials on the market. Only two factors affect the isotopic ratios in pharmaceutical components: the isotopic composition of the raw materials and the synthetic processes performed upon them. Counterfeiting of pharmaceutical drugs threatens consumer confidence in drug products companies' economical well-being. In this preliminary study, the analyzed samples consist in two types of commercially available analgesics, which were purchases from Romanian pharmacies. Differences in δ{sup 13}C between batches from −29.7 to −31.6% were observed, demonstrating that this method can be used to differentiate among individual drug batches and subsequently identify counterfeits on the market. On the other hand, carbon isotopic ratios differences among producers were recorded, the variations being between −31.3 to −34.9% for the same type of analgesic, but from different manufactures.

  2. Aspect Ratio Effects in the Driven, Flux-Core Spheromak

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hooper, E B; Romero-Talam?s, C A; LoDestro, L L; Wood, R D; McLean, H S

    2009-03-02

    Resistive magneto-hydrodynamic simulations are used to evaluate the effects of the aspect ratio, A (length to radius ratio) in a spheromak driven by coaxial helicity injection. The simulations are benchmarked against the Sustained Spheromak Physics Experiment (SSPX) [R. D. Wood, et al., Nucl. Nucl. Fusion 45, 1582 (2005)]. Amplification of the bias ('gun') poloidal flux is fit well by a linear dependence (insensitive to A) on the ratio of gun current and bias flux above a threshold dependent on A. For low flux amplifications in the simulations the n = 1 mode is coherent and the mean-field geometry looks like a tilted spheromak. Because the mode has relatively large amplitude the field lines are open everywhere, allowing helicity penetration. Strongly-driven helicity injection at A {le} 1.4 in simulations generates reconnection events which open the magnetic field lines; this state is characteristic of SSPX. Near the spheromak tilt-mode limit, A {approx} 1.67 for a cylindrical flux conserver, the tilt approaches 90{sup o}; reconnection events are not generated up to the strongest drives simulated. The time-sequence of these events suggests that they are representative of a chaotic process. Implications for spheromak experiments are discussed.

  3. Hige Compression Ratio Turbo Gasoline Engine Operation Using Alcohol Enhancement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heywood, John; Jo, Young Suk; Lewis, Raymond; Bromberg, Leslie; Heywood, John

    2015-10-31

    The overall objective of this project was to quantify the potential for improving the performance and efficiency of gasoline engine technology by use of alcohols to suppress knock. Knock-free operation is obtained by direct injection of a second “anti-knock” fuel such as ethanol, which suppresses knock when, with gasoline fuel, knock would occur. Suppressing knock enables increased turbocharging, engine downsizing, and use of higher compression ratios throughout the engine’s operating map. This project combined engine testing and simulation to define knock onset conditions, with different mixtures of gasoline and alcohol, and with this information quantify the potential for improving the efficiency of turbocharged gasoline spark-ignition engines, and the on-vehicle fuel consumption reductions that could then be realized. The more focused objectives of this project were therefore to: Determine engine efficiency with aggressive turbocharging and downsizing and high compression ratio (up to a compression ratio of 13.5:1) over the engine’s operating range; Determine the knock limits of a turbocharged and downsized engine as a function of engine speed and load; Determine the amount of the knock-suppressing alcohol fuel consumed, through the use of various alcohol-gasoline and alcohol-water gasoline blends, for different driving cycles, relative to the gasoline consumed; Determine implications of using alcohol-boosted engines, with their higher efficiency operation, in both light-duty and medium-duty vehicle sectors.

  4. Measurement of branching fractions and rate asymmetries in the rare decays B→K(*)l⁺l⁻

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Palano, A.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Brown, D. N.; Kerth, L. T.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Lynch, G.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; Asgeirsson, D. J.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T. S.; McKenna, J. A.; Khan, A.; Blinov, V. E.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Druzhinin, V. P.; Golubev, V. B.; Kravchenko, E. A.; Onuchin, A. P.; Serednyakov, S. I.; Skovpen, Yu. I.; Solodov, E. P.; Todyshev, K. Yu.; Yushkov, A. N.; Bondioli, M.; Kirkby, D.; Lankford, A. J.; Mandelkern, M.; Atmacan, H.; Gary, J. W.; Liu, F.; Long, O.; Vitug, G. M.; Campagnari, C.; Hong, T. M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Richman, J. D.; West, C. A.; Eisner, A. M.; Kroseberg, J.; Lockman, W. S.; Martinez, A. J.; Schumm, B. A.; Seiden, A.; Chao, D. S.; Cheng, C. H.; Echenard, B.; Flood, K. T.; Hitlin, D. G.; Ongmongkolkul, P.; Porter, F. C.; Rakitin, A. Y.; Andreassen, R.; Huard, Z.; Meadows, B. T.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Sun, L.; Bloom, P. C.; Ford, W. T.; Gaz, A.; Nauenberg, U.; Smith, J. G.; Wagner, S. R.; Ayad, R.; Toki, W. H.; Spaan, B.; Schubert, K. R.; Schwierz, R.; Bernard, D.; Verderi, M.; Clark, P. J.; Playfer, S.; Bettoni, D.; Bozzi, C.; Calabrese, R.; Cibinetto, G.; Fioravanti, E.; Garzia, I.; Luppi, E.; Munerato, M.; Negrini, M.; Piemontese, L.; Santoro, V.; Baldini-Ferroli, R.; Calcaterra, A.; de Sangro, R.; Finocchiaro, G.; Patteri, P.; Peruzzi, I. M.; Piccolo, M.; Rama, M.; Zallo, A.; Contri, R.; Guido, E.; Lo Vetere, M.; Monge, M. R.; Passaggio, S.; Patrignani, C.; Robutti, E.; Bhuyan, B.; Prasad, V.; Lee, C. L.; Morii, M.; Edwards, A. J.; Adametz, A.; Uwer, U.; Lacker, H. M.; Lueck, T.; Dauncey, P. D.; Behera, P. K.; Mallik, U.; Chen, C.; Cochran, J.; Meyer, W. T.; Prell, S.; Rubin, A. E.; Gritsan, A. V.; Guo, Z. J.; Arnaud, N.; Davier, M.; Derkach, D.; Grosdidier, G.; Le Diberder, F.; Lutz, A. M.; Malaescu, B.; Roudeau, P.; Schune, M. H.; Stocchi, A.; Wormser, G.; Lange, D. J.; Wright, D. M.; Chavez, C. A.; Coleman, J. P.; Fry, J. R.; Gabathuler, E.; Hutchcroft, D. E.; Payne, D. J.; Touramanis, C.; Bevan, A. J.; Di Lodovico, F.; Sacco, R.; Sigamani, M.; Cowan, G.; Brown, D. N.; Davis, C. L.; Denig, A. G.; Fritsch, M.; Gradl, W.; Griessinger, K.; Hafner, A.; Prencipe, E.; Barlow, R. J.; Jackson, G.; Lafferty, G. D.; Behn, E.; Cenci, R.; Hamilton, B.; Jawahery, A.; Roberts, D. A.; Dallapiccola, C.; Cowan, R.; Dujmic, D.; Sciolla, G.; Cheaib, R.; Lindemann, D.; Patel, P. M.; Robertson, S. H.; Biassoni, P.; Neri, N.; Palombo, F.; Stracka, S.; Cremaldi, L.; Godang, R.; Kroeger, R.; Sonnek, P.; Summers, D. J.; Nguyen, X.; Simard, M.; Taras, P.; De Nardo, G.; Monorchio, D.; Onorato, G.; Sciacca, C.; Martinelli, M.; Raven, G.; Jessop, C. P.; LoSecco, J. M.; Wang, W. F.; Honscheid, K.; Kass, R.; Brau, J.; Frey, R.; Sinev, N. B.; Strom, D.; Torrence, E.; Feltresi, E.; Gagliardi, N.; Margoni, M.; Morandin, M.; Posocco, M.; Rotondo, M.; Simi, G.; Simonetto, F.; Stroili, R.; Akar, S.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bomben, M.; Bonneaud, G. R.; Briand, H.; Calderini, G.; Chauveau, J.; Hamon, O.; Leruste, Ph.; Marchiori, G.; Ocariz, J.; Sitt, S.; Biasini, M.; Manoni, E.; Pacetti, S.; Rossi, A.; Angelini, C.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Carpinelli, M.; Casarosa, G.; Cervelli, A.; Forti, F.; Giorgi, M. A.; Lusiani, A.; Oberhof, B.; Paoloni, E.; Perez, A.; Rizzo, G.; Walsh, J. J.; Lopes Pegna, D.; Olsen, J.; Smith, A. J. S.; Telnov, A. V.; Anulli, F.; Faccini, R.; Ferrarotto, F.; Ferroni, F.; Gaspero, M.; Li Gioi, L.; Mazzoni, M. A.; Piredda, G.; Bünger, C.; Grünberg, O.; Hartmann, T.; Leddig, T.; Schröder, H.; Voss, C.; Waldi, R.; Adye, T.; Olaiya, E. O.; Wilson, F. F.; Emery, S.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Vasseur, G.; Yèche, Ch.; Aston, D.; Bard, D. J.; Bartoldus, R.; Benitez, J. F.; Cartaro, C.; Convery, M. R.; Dorfan, J.; Dubois-Felsmann, G. P.; Dunwoodie, W.; Ebert, M.; Field, R. C.; Franco Sevilla, M.; Fulsom, B. G.; Gabareen, A. M.; Graham, M. T.; Grenier, P.; Hast, C.; Innes, W. R.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kim, P.; Kocian, M. L.; Leith, D. W. G. S.; Lewis, P.; Lindquist, B.; Luitz, S.; Luth, V.; Lynch, H. L.; MacFarlane, D. B.; Muller, D. R.; Neal, H.; Nelson, S.; Perl, M.; Pulliam, T.; Ratcliff, B. N.; Roodman, A.; Salnikov, A. A.; Schindler, R. H.; Snyder, A.; Su, D.; Sullivan, M. K.; Va’vra, J.; Wagner, A. P.; Wisniewski, W. J.; Wittgen, M.; Wright, D. H.; Wulsin, H. W.; Young, C. C.; Ziegler, V.; Park, W.; Purohit, M. V.; White, R. M.; Wilson, J. R.; Randle-Conde, A.; Sekula, S. J.; Bellis, M.; Burchat, P. R.; Miyashita, T. S.; Alam, M. S.; Ernst, J. A.; Gorodeisky, R.; Guttman, N.; Peimer, D. R.; Soffer, A.; Lund, P.; Spanier, S. M.; Ritchie, J. L.; Ruland, A. M.; Schwitters, R. F.; Wray, B. C.; Izen, J. M.; Lou, X. C.; Bianchi, F.; Gamba, D.; Lanceri, L.; Vitale, L.; Martinez-Vidal, F.; Oyanguren, A.; Ahmed, H.; Albert, J.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Choi, H. H. F.; King, G. J.; Kowalewski, R.; Lewczuk, M. J.; Nugent, I. M.; Roney, J. M.; Sobie, R. J.; Tasneem, N.; Gershon, T. J.; Harrison, P. F.; Latham, T. E.; Puccio, E. M. T.; Band, H. R.; Dasu, S.; Pan, Y.; Prepost, R.; Wu, S. L.

    2012-08-24

    In a sample of 471×10⁶ BB¯¯¯ events collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II e⁺e⁻ collider we study the rare decays B→K(*)l⁺l⁻, where l⁺l⁻ is either e⁺e⁻ or μ⁺μ⁻. We report results on partial branching fractions and isospin asymmetries in seven bins of dilepton mass-squared. We further present CP and lepton-flavor asymmetries for dilepton masses below and above the J/ψ resonance. We find no evidence for CP or lepton-flavor violation. The partial branching fractions and isospin asymmetries are consistent with the Standard Model predictions and with results from other experiments.

  5. Investigation of Knock limited Compression Ratio of Ethanol Gasoline Blends

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Szybist, James P; Youngquist, Adam D; Wagner, Robert M; Moore, Wayne; Foster, Matthew; Confer, Keith

    2010-01-01

    Ethanol offers significant potential for increasing the compression ratio of SI engines resulting from its high octane number and high latent heat of vaporization. A study was conducted to determine the knock limited compression ratio of ethanol gasoline blends to identify the potential for improved operating efficiency. To operate an SI engine in a flex fuel vehicle requires operating strategies that allow operation on a broad range of fuels from gasoline to E85. Since gasoline or low ethanol blend operation is inherently limited by knock at high loads, strategies must be identified which allow operation on these fuels with minimal fuel economy or power density tradeoffs. A single cylinder direct injection spark ignited engine with fully variable hydraulic valve actuation (HVA) is operated at WOT conditions to determine the knock limited compression ratio (CR) of ethanol fuel blends. The geometric compression ratio is varied by changing pistons, producing CR from 9.2 to 13.66. The effective CR is varied using an electro-hydraulic valvetrain that changed the effective trapped displacement using both Early Intake Valve Closing (EIVC) and Late Intake Valve Closing (LIVC). The EIVC and LIVC strategies result in effective CR being reduced while maintaining the geometric expansion ratio. It was found that at substantially similar engine conditions, increasing the ethanol content of the fuel results in higher engine efficiency and higher engine power. These can be partially attributed to a charge cooling effect and a higher heating valve of a stoichiometric mixture for ethanol blends (per unit mass of air). Additional thermodynamic effects on and a mole multiplier are also explored. It was also found that high CR can increase the efficiency of ethanol fuel blends, and as a result, the fuel economy penalty associated with the lower energy content of E85 can be reduced by about a third. Such operation necessitates that the engine be operated in a de-rated manner for

  6. Finite range and upper branch effects on itinerant ferromagnetism in repulsive Fermi gases: Bethe–Goldstone ladder resummation approach

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    He, Lianyi

    2014-09-19

    In this study, we investigate the ferromagnetic transition in repulsive Fermi gases at zero temperature with upper branch and effective range effects. Based on a general effective Lagrangian that reproduces precisely the two-body ss-wave scattering phase shift, we obtain a nonperturbative expression of the energy density as a function of the polarization by using the Bethe–Goldstone ladder resummation. For hard sphere potential, the predicted critical gas parameter kFa = 0.816 and the spin susceptibility agree well with the results from fixed-node diffusion Monte Carlo calculations. In general, positive and negative effective ranges have opposite effects on the critical gas parametermore » kFa: While a positive effective range reduces the critical gas parameter, a negative effective range increases it. For attractive potential or Feshbach resonance model, the many-body upper branch exhibits an energy maximum at kFa = α with α = 1.34 from the Bethe–Goldstone ladder resummation, which is qualitatively consistent with experimental results. The many-body T-matrix has a positive-energy pole for kFa > α and it becomes impossible to distinguish the bound state and the scattering state. These positive-energy bound states become occupied and therefore the upper branch reaches an energy maximum at kFa = α. In the zero range limit, there exists a narrow window (0.86< kFa < 1.56) for the ferromagnetic phase. At sufficiently large negative effective range, the ferromagnetic phase disappears. On the other hand, the appearance of positive-energy bound state resonantly enhances the two-body decay rate around kFa = α and may prevent the study of equilibrium phases and ferromagnetism of the upper branch Fermi gas.« less

  7. Third report on the Oak Ridge K-25 Site Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program for Mitchell Branch

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hinzman, R.L.; Adams, S.M.; Ashwood, T.L.

    1995-08-01

    As a condition of the modified National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit issued to the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant (ORGDP; now referred to as the Oak Ridge K-25 Site) on September 11, 1986, a Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP) was developed for the receiving stream (Mitchell Branch or K-1700 stream). On October 1, 1992, a renewed NPDES permit was issued for the K-25 Site. A biological monitoring plan was submitted for Mitchell Branch, Poplar Creek, Poplar Creek Embayment of the Clinch River and any unnamed tributaries of these streams. The objectives of BMAP are to (1) demonstrate that the effluent limitations established for the Oak Ridge K-25 Site protect and maintain the use of Mitchell Branch for growth and propagation of fish and other aquatic life and (2) document the effects on stream biota resulting from operation of major new pollution abatement facilities, including the Central Neutralization Facility (CNF) and the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) incinerator. The BMAP consists of four tasks: (1) toxicity monitoring; (2) bioaccumulation monitoring; (3) assessment of fish health; and (4) instream monitoring of biological communities, including benthic macroinvertebrates and fish. This document, the third in a series, reports on the results of the Oak Ridge K-25 Site BMAP; it describes studies that were conducted over various periods of time between June 1990 and December 1993, although monitoring conducted outside this time period is included, as appropriate.

  8. Finite range and upper branch effects on itinerant ferromagnetism in repulsive Fermi gases: BetheGoldstone ladder resummation approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    He, Lianyi

    2014-12-15

    We investigate the ferromagnetic transition in repulsive Fermi gases at zero temperature with upper branch and effective range effects. Based on a general effective Lagrangian that reproduces precisely the two-body s-wave scattering phase shift, we obtain a nonperturbative expression of the energy density as a function of the polarization by using the BetheGoldstone ladder resummation. For hard sphere potential, the predicted critical gas parameter k{sub F}a=0.816 and the spin susceptibility agree well with the results from fixed-node diffusion Monte Carlo calculations. In general, positive and negative effective ranges have opposite effects on the critical gas parameter k{sub F}a: While a positive effective range reduces the critical gas parameter, a negative effective range increases it. For attractive potential or Feshbach resonance model, the many-body upper branch exhibits an energy maximum at k{sub F}a=? with ?=1.34 from the BetheGoldstone ladder resummation, which is qualitatively consistent with experimental results. The many-body T-matrix has a positive-energy pole for k{sub F}a>? and it becomes impossible to distinguish the bound state and the scattering state. These positive-energy bound states become occupied and therefore the upper branch reaches an energy maximum at k{sub F}a=?. In the zero range limit, there exists a narrow window (0.86branch Fermi gas. - Highlights: Nonperturbative interaction energy is obtained within the BetheGoldstone ladder resummation approach. Positive and negative effective ranges have opposite effects on the critical gas parameter. The upper branch Fermi gas exhibits an energy maximum

  9. Negative Resists for Ultra-Tall, High Aspect Ratio Microstructures

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Resists for Ultra-Tall, High Aspect Ratio Microstructures S. Lemke a , P. Goettert a , I. Rudolph a , J. Goettert b,* , B. Löchel a a Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin (HZB) für Materialien und Energie GmbH, Institute for Nanometre Optics and Technology, Albert-Einstein-Str. 15, 12489 Berlin, Germany b Center for Advanced Microstructures & Devices, Louisiana State University, 6980 Jefferson Highway, Baton Rouge, LA 70806, USA *E-Mail: jost@lsu.edu Abstract In this joint research project,

  10. Method for producing thin graphite flakes with large aspect ratios

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bunnell, L. Roy (Kennewick, WA)

    1993-01-01

    A method for making graphite flakes of high aspect ratio by the steps of providing a strong concentrated acid and heating the graphite in the presence of the acid for a time and at a temperature effective to intercalate the acid in the graphite; heating the intercalated graphite at a rate and to a temperature effective to exfoliate the graphite in discrete layers; subjecting the graphite layers to ultrasonic energy, mechanical shear forces, or freezing in an amount effective to separate the layes into discrete flakes.

  11. Fact #780: May 20, 2013 Crude Oil Reserve to Production Ratio...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    0: May 20, 2013 Crude Oil Reserve to Production Ratio Fact 780: May 20, 2013 Crude Oil Reserve to Production Ratio The ratio of reserves to production gives a relative measure of ...

  12. Tower Water-Vapor Mixing Ratio (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Tower Water-Vapor Mixing Ratio Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Tower Water-Vapor Mixing Ratio The purpose of the Tower Water-Vapor Mixing Ratio (TWRMR) value-added ...

  13. Thermodynamic analysis of cascade microcryocoolers with low pressure ratios

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Radebaugh, Ray

    2014-01-29

    The vapor-compression cycle for refrigeration near ambient temperature achieves high efficiency because the isenthalpic expansion of the condensed liquid is a rather efficient process. However, temperatures are limited to about 200 K with a single-stage system. Temperatures down to 77 K are possible with many stages. In the case of microcryocoolers using microcompressors, pressure ratios are usually limited to about 6 or less. As a result, even more stages are required to reach 77 K. If the microcompressors can be fabricated with low-cost wafer-level techniques, then the use of many stages with separate compressors may become a viable option for achieving temperatures of 77 K with high efficiency. We analyze the ideal thermodynamic efficiency of a cascade Joule-Thomson system for various temperatures down to 77 K and with low pressure ratios. About nine stages are required for 77 K, but fewer stages are also analyzed for operation at higher temperatures. For 77 K, an ideal second-law efficiency of 83 % of Carnot is possible with perfect recuperative heat exchangers and 65 % of Carnot is possible with no recuperative heat exchangers. The results are compared with calculated efficiencies in mixed-refrigerant cryocoolers over the range of 77 K to 200 K. Refrigeration at intermediate temperatures is also available. The use of single-component fluids in each of the stages is expected to eliminate the problem of pulsating flow and temperature oscillations experienced in microcryocoolers using mixed refrigerants.

  14. Dartmouth Stellar Evolution Database and the ACS Survey of Galactic Globular Clusters II. Stellar Evolution Tracks, Isochrones, Luminosity Functions, and Synthetic Horizontal-Branch Models

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Dotter, A; Chaboyer, B; Jevremovic, D; Kostov, V; Baron, E; Ferguson, J; Sarajedini, A; Anderson, J

    Web tools are also available at the home page (http://stellar.dartmouth.edu/~models/index.html). These tools allow users to create isochrones and convert them to luminosity functions or create synthetic horizontal branch models.

  15. THE ATOMIC WEIGHTS COMMISSION AND ISOTOPIC ABUNDANCE RATIO DETERMINATIONS.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HOLDEN, N.E.

    2005-08-07

    Following Thomson's discovery of stable isotopes in non-radioactive chemical elements, the derivation of atomic weight values from mass spectrometric measurements of isotopic abundance ratios moved very slowly. Forty years later, only 3 1/2 % of the recommended values were based on mass spectrometric measurements and only 38% in the first half century. It might be noted that two chemical elements (tellurium and mercury) are still based on chemical measurements, where the atomic weight value calculated from the relative isotopic abundance measurement either agrees with the value from the chemical measurement or the atomic weight value calculated from the relative isotopic abundance measurement falls within the uncertainty of the chemical measurement of the atomic weight. Of the 19 chemical elements, whose atomic weight is based on non-corrected relative isotopic abundance measurements, five of these are two isotope systems (indium, iridium, lanthanum, lutetium and tantalum) and one is a three-isotope system (oxygen).

  16. Modular low-aspect-ratio high-beta torsatron

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sheffield, G.V.

    1982-04-01

    A fusion-reactor device is described which the toroidal magnetic field and at least a portion of the poloidal magnetic field are provided by a single set of modular coils. The coils are arranged on the surface of a low-aspect-ratio toroid in planed having the cylindrical coordinate relationship phi = phi/sub i/ + kz, where k is a constant equal to each coil's pitch and phi/sub i/ is the toroidal angle at which the i'th coil intersects the z = o plane. The toroid defined by the modular coils preferably has a race track minor cross section. When vertical field coils and, preferably, a toroidal plasma current are provided for magnetic-field-surface closure within the toroid, a vacuum magnetic field of racetrack-shaped minor cross section with improved stability and beta valves is obtained.

  17. Modular low aspect ratio-high beta torsatron

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sheffield, George V.; Furth, Harold P.

    1984-02-07

    A fusion reactor device in which the toroidal magnetic field and at least a portion of the poloidal magnetic field are provided by a single set of modular coils. The coils are arranged on the surface of a low aspect ratio toroid in planes having the cylindrical coordinate relationship .phi.=.phi..sub.i +kz where k is a constant equal to each coil's pitch and .phi..sub.i is the toroidal angle at which the i'th coil intersects the z=o plane. The device may be described as a modular, high beta torsation whose screw symmetry is pointed along the systems major (z) axis. The toroid defined by the modular coils preferably has a racetrack minor cross section. When vertical field coils and preferably a toroidal plasma current are provided for magnetic field surface closure within the toroid, a vacuum magnetic field of racetrack shaped minor cross section with improved stability and beta valves is obtained.

  18. Tuning giant anomalous Hall resistance ratio in perpendicular Hall balance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, J. Y.; Yang, G.; Wang, S. G. E-mail: ghyu@mater.ustb.edu.cn; Liu, J. L.; Wang, R. M.; Amsellem, E.; Kohn, A.; Yu, G. H. E-mail: ghyu@mater.ustb.edu.cn

    2015-04-13

    Anomalous Hall effect at room temperature in perpendicular Hall balance with a core structure of [Pt/Co]{sub 4}/NiO/[Co/Pt]{sub 4} has been tuned by functional CoO layers, where [Pt/Co]{sub 4} multilayers exhibit perpendicular magnetic anisotropy. A giant Hall resistance ratio up to 69 900% and saturation Hall resistance (R{sub S}{sup P}) up to 2590 mΩ were obtained in CoO/[Pt/Co]{sub 4}/NiO/[Co/Pt]{sub 4}/CoO system, which is 302% and 146% larger than that in the structure without CoO layers, respectively. Transmission electron microscopy shows highly textured [Co/Pt]{sub 4} multilayers and oxide layers with local epitaxial relations, indicating that the crystallographic structure has significant influence on spin dependent transport properties.

  19. The role of cellular structure on increasing the detonability limits of three-step chain-branching detonations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Short, Mark; Kiyanda, Charles B; Quirk, James J; Sharpe, Gary J

    2011-01-27

    In [1], the dynamics of a pulsating three-step chain-branching detonation were studied. The reaction model consists of, sequentially, chain-initiation, chain-branching and chain-termination steps. The chain-initiation and chain-branching steps are taken to be thermally neutral, with chemical energy release occuring in the chain-termination stage. The purpose of the present study is to examine whether cellular detonation structure can increase the value of the chain-branching cross-over temperature T{sub b} at which fully coupled detonation solutions are observed over those in 1 D. The basic concept is straightforward and has been discussed in [1] and [3]; if T{sub s} drops below T{sub b} at the lead shock, the passage of a transverse shock can increase both the lead shock temperature and the temperature behind the transverse wave back above T{sub b}, thus sustaining an unstable cellular detonation for values of T{sub b} for which a one-dimensional pulsating detonation will fail. Experiments potentially supporting this hypothesis with irregular detonations have been shown in [3] in a shock tube with acoustically absorbing walls. Removal of the transverse waves results in detonation failure, giving way to a decoupled shock-flame complex. A number of questions remain to be addressed regarding the possibility of such a mechanism, and, if so, about the precise mechanisms driving the cellular structure for large T{sub b}. For instance, one might ask what sets the cell size in a chain-branching detonation, particularly could the characteristic cell size be set by the chain-branching cross-over temperature T{sub b}: after a transverse wave shock collision, the strength of the transverse wave weakens as it propagates along the front. If the spacing between shock collisions is too large (cell size), then the transverse shocks may weaken to the extent that the lead shock temperature or that behind the transverse waves is not raised above T{sub b}, losing chemical energy to

  20. The ACP (Advanced Computer Program) Branch bus and real-time applications of the ACP multiprocessor system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hance, R.; Areti, H.; Atac, R.; Biel, J.; Cook, A.; Fischler, M.; Gaines, I.; Husby, D.; Nash, T.; Zmuda, T.

    1987-05-08

    The ACP Branchbus, a high speed differential bus for data movement in multiprocessing and data acquisition environments, is described. This bus was designed as the central bus in the ACP multiprocessing system. In its full implementation with 16 branches and a bus switch, it will handle data rates of 160 MByte/sec and allow reliable data transmission over inter rack distances. We also summarize applications of the ACP system in experimental data acquisition, triggering and monitoring, with special attention paid to FASTBUS environments.

  1. A Measurement of the B ---> Eta/C K Branching Fraction Using the BaBar Detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jackson, Frank; /Manchester U.

    2006-04-26

    The branching fraction is measured for the decay channels B{sup 0} {yields} {eta}{sub c}K{sub S}{sup 0} and B{sup +} {yields} {eta}{sub c}K{sup +} where {eta}{sub c} {yields} K{bar K}{pi}, using the BABAR detector. The {eta}{sub c} {yields} K{sub S}{sup 0}K{sup +}{pi}{sup -} and {eta}{sub c} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup -}{pi}{sup 0} decay channels are used, including non-resonant decays and possibly those through intermediate resonances.

  2. Search for the Neutral Current Top Quark Decay t-->Zc Using Ratio of Z-Boson + 4 Jets to W-Boson + 4 Jets Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.; Adelman, Jahred A.; Akimoto, T.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, Dante E.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, Alberto; Antos, Jaroslav; Apollinari, G.; Apresyan, A.; /Purdue U. /Waseda U.

    2009-05-01

    We have used the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF II) to search for the flavor-changing neutral-current (FCNC) top quark decay t {yields} Zc using a technique employing ratios of W and Z production, measured in p{bar p} data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 1.52 fb{sup -1}. The analysis uses a comparison of two decay chains, p{bar p} {yields} t{bar t} {yields} WbWb {yields} {ell}{nu}bjjb and p{bar p} {yields} t{bar t} {yields} ZcWb {yields} {ell}{ell}cjjb, to cancel systematic uncertainties in acceptance, efficiency, and luminosity. We validate the modeling of acceptance and efficiency for lepton identification over the multi-year dataset using another ratio of W and Z production, in this case the observed ratio of inclusive production of W to Z bosons. To improve the discrimination against standard model backgrounds to top quark decays, we calculate the top quark mass for each event with two leptons and four jets assuming it is a t{bar t} event with one of the top quarks decaying to Zc. For additional background discrimination we require at least one jet to be identified as originating from a b-quark. No significant signal is found and we set an upper limit on the FCNC branching ratio Br(t {yields} Zc) using a likelihood constructed from the {ell}{ell}cjjb top quark mass distribution and the number of {ell}{nu}bjjb events. Limits are set as a function of the helicity of the Z boson produced in the FCNC decay. For 100% longitudinally polarized Z bosons we find limits of 8.3% and 9.3% (95% C.L.) depending on the assumptions regarding the theoretical top quark pair production cross-section.

  3. ARM: 10-second Raman Lidar: aerosol scattering ratio and backscattering coefficient profiles, from first Ferrare algorithm

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Chitra Sivaraman; Connor Flynn

    2004-10-01

    10-second Raman Lidar: aerosol scattering ratio and backscattering coefficient profiles, from first Ferrare algorithm

  4. ARM: 1-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol scattering ratio and backscattering coefficient profiles, from first Ferrare algorithm

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Chitra Sivaraman; Connor Flynn

    2004-10-01

    1-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol scattering ratio and backscattering coefficient profiles, from first Ferrare algorithm

  5. ARM: 10-second Raman Lidar: aerosol scattering ratio and backscattering coefficient profiles, from first Ferrare algorithm

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Chitra Sivaraman; Connor Flynn

    10-second Raman Lidar: aerosol scattering ratio and backscattering coefficient profiles, from first Ferrare algorithm

  6. ARM: 10-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol scattering ratio and backscattering coefficient profiles, from first Ferrare algorithm

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Chitra Sivaraman; Connor Flynn

    10-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol scattering ratio and backscattering coefficient profiles, from first Ferrare algorithm

  7. ARM: 2-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol scattering ratio and backscattering coefficient profiles, from first Ferrare algorithm

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Sivaraman, Chitra; Flynn, Connor

    2-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol scattering ratio and backscattering coefficient profiles, from first Ferrare algorithm

  8. ARM: 1-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol scattering ratio and backscattering coefficient profiles, from first Ferrare algorithm

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Chitra Sivaraman; Connor Flynn

    1-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol scattering ratio and backscattering coefficient profiles, from first Ferrare algorithm

  9. ARM: 10-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol scattering ratio and backscattering coefficient profiles, from first Ferrare algorithm

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Newsom, Rob; Goldsmith, John

    1998-03-01

    10-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol scattering ratio and backscattering coefficient profiles, from first Ferrare algorithm

  10. ARM: 2-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol scattering ratio and backscattering coefficient profiles, from first Ferrare algorithm

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Sivaraman, Chitra; Flynn, Connor

    2004-10-01

    2-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol scattering ratio and backscattering coefficient profiles, from first Ferrare algorithm

  11. ISOTOPIC RATIOS IN TITAN's METHANE: MEASUREMENTS AND MODELING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nixon, C. A.; Achterberg, R. K.; Temelso, B.; Vinatier, S.; Bezard, B.; Coustenis, A.; Teanby, N. A.; Mandt, K. E.; Sherrill, C. D.; Irwin, P. G. J.; Jennings, D. E.; Romani, P. N.; Flasar, F. M.

    2012-04-20

    The existence of methane in Titan's atmosphere ({approx}6% level at the surface) presents a unique enigma, as photochemical models predict that the current inventory will be entirely depleted by photochemistry in a timescale of {approx}20 Myr. In this paper, we examine the clues available from isotopic ratios ({sup 12}C/{sup 13}C and D/H) in Titan's methane as to the past atmosphere history of this species. We first analyze recent infrared spectra of CH{sub 4} collected by the Cassini Composite Infrared Spectrometer, measuring simultaneously for the first time the abundances of all three detected minor isotopologues: {sup 13}CH{sub 4}, {sup 12}CH{sub 3}D, and {sup 13}CH{sub 3}D. From these we compute estimates of {sup 12}C/{sup 13}C = 86.5 {+-} 8.2 and D/H = (1.59 {+-} 0.33) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -4}, in agreement with recent results from the Huygens GCMS and Cassini INMS instruments. We also use the transition state theory to estimate the fractionation that occurs in carbon and hydrogen during a critical reaction that plays a key role in the chemical depletion of Titan's methane: CH{sub 4} + C{sub 2}H {yields} CH{sub 3} + C{sub 2}H{sub 2}. Using these new measurements and predictions we proceed to model the time evolution of {sup 12}C/{sup 13}C and D/H in Titan's methane under several prototypical replenishment scenarios. In our Model 1 (no resupply of CH{sub 4}), we find that the present-day {sup 12}C/{sup 13}C implies that the CH{sub 4} entered the atmosphere 60-1600 Myr ago if methane is depleted by chemistry and photolysis alone, but much more recently-most likely less than 10 Myr ago-if hydrodynamic escape is also occurring. On the other hand, if methane has been continuously supplied at the replenishment rate then the isotopic ratios provide no constraints, and likewise for the case where atmospheric methane is increasing. We conclude by discussing how these findings may be combined with other evidence to constrain the overall history of the atmospheric

  12. Condensation of refractory metals in asymptotic giant branch and other stellar environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schwander, D.; Berg, T.; Schönhense, G.; Ott, U.

    2014-09-20

    The condensation of material from a gas of solar composition has been extensively studied, but less so condensation in the environment of evolved stars, which has been mainly restricted to major compounds and some specific element groups such as the Rare Earth elements. Also of interest, however, are refractory metals like Mo, Ru, Os, W, Ir, and Pt, which may condense to form refractory metal nuggets (RMNs) like the ones that have been found in association with presolar graphite. We have performed calculations describing the condensation of these elements in the outflows of s-process enriched AGB stars as well as from gas enriched in r-process products. While in carbon-rich environments (C > O), the formation of carbides is expected to consume W, Mo, and V (Lodders and Fegley), the condensation sequence for the other refractory metals under these conditions does not significantly differ from the case of a cooling gas of solar composition. The composition in detail, however, is significantly different due to the completely different source composition. Condensation from an r-process enriched source differs less from the solar case. Elemental abundance ratios of the refractory metals can serve as a guide for finding candidate presolar grains among the RMNs in primitive meteorites—most of which have a solar system origin—for confirmation by isotopic analysis. We apply our calculations to the case of the four RMNs found by Croat et al., which may very well be presolar.

  13. Measurements of Branching Fractions and CP Asymmetries and Studies of Angular Distributions for B to phi phi K Decays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Martinelli, M.; Milanes, D.A.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Brown, D.N.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; Asgeirsson, D.J.; Hearty, C.; /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Indian Inst. Tech., Guwahati /Harvard U. /Harvey Mudd Coll. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa State U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Paris U., VI-VII /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /SLAC /South Carolina U. /Southern Methodist U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tel Aviv U. /Tennessee U. /Texas Nuclear Corp., Austin /Texas U., Dallas /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /Valencia U. /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2011-08-15

    We present branching fraction and CP asymmetry measurements as well as angular studies of B {yields} {phi}{phi}K decays using 464 x 10{sup 6} B{bar B} events collected by the BABAR experiment. The branching fractions are measured in the {phi}{phi} invariant mass range below the {eta}{sub c} resonance (m{sub {phi}{phi}} < 2.85 GeV). We find {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} {phi}{phi}K{sup +}) = (5.6 {+-} 0.5 {+-} 0.3) x 10{sup -6} and {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {phi}{phi}K{sup 0}) = (4.5 {+-} 0.8 {+-} 0.3) x 10{sup -6}, where the first uncertaintiy is statistical and the second systematic. The measured direct CP asymmetries for the B{sup {+-}} decays are A{sub CP} = -0.10 {+-} 0.08 {+-} 0.02 below the {eta}{sub c} threshold (m{sub {phi}{phi}} < 2.85 GeV) and A{sub CP} = 0.09 {+-} 0.10 {+-} 0.02 in the {eta}{sub c} resonance region (m{sub {phi}{phi}} in [2.94,3.02] GeV). Angular distributions are consistent with J{sub P} = 0{sup -} in the {eta}{sub c} resonance region and favor J{sup P} = 0{sup +} below the {eta}{sub c} resonance.

  14. First report on the Oak Ridge K-25 Site Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program for Mitchell Branch

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, J.G.; Adams, S.M.; Kszos, L.A.; Ryon, M.G.; Southworth, G.R.; Loar, J.M.

    1993-08-01

    A modified National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System permit was issued to the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant (now referred to as the Oak Ridge K-25 Site) on September 11, 1986. The Oak Ridge K-25 Site is a former uranium-enrichment production facility, which is currently managed by Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. for the US Department of Energy. As required in Part III (L) of that permit, a plan for the biological monitoring of Mitchell Branch (K-1700 stream) was prepared and submitted for approval to the US Environmental Protection Agency and the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation [formerly the Tennessee Department of Health and Environment (Loar et al. 1992b)]. The K-25 Site Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP) described biomonitoring activities that would be conducted over the duration of the permit. Because it was anticipated that the composition of existing effluent streams entering Mitchell Branch would be altered shortly after the modified permit was issued, sampling of the benthic invertebrate and fish communities (Task 4 of BMAP) was initiated in August and September 1986 respectively.

  15. Second report on the Oak Ridge K-25 Site Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program for Mitchell Branch

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, J.G.; Adams, S.M.; Hinzman, R.L.; Kszos, L.A.; Loar, J.M.; Peterson, M.J.; Ryon, M.G.; Southworth, G.R.; Crumby, W.D.

    1994-03-01

    On September 11, 1986, a modified National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System permit was issued for the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant (ORGDP; now referred to as the Oak Ridge K-25 Site), a former uranium-enrichment production facility. As required in Part III of the permit, a Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP) was developed for the biological monitoring of Mitchell Branch (K-1700 stream) and submitted for approval to the US EPA and the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation. The plan described biomonitoring activities that would be conducted over the duration of the permit. The objectives of the BMAP are to demonstrate that the effluent limitations established for the Oak Ridge K-25 Site protect and maintain the use of Mitchell Branch for growth and propagation of fish and other aquatic life, and to document the effects on stream biota resulting from operation of major new pollution abatement facilities. The BMAP consists of four tasks: ambient toxicity testing; bioaccumulation studies; biological indicator studies; and ecological surveys of stream communities, including benthic macroinvertebrates and fish. This document is the second in a series of reports presenting the results of the studies that were conducted over various periods of time between August 1987 and June 1990.

  16. NON-LOCAL THERMODYNAMICAL EQUILIBRIUM EFFECTS ON THE IRON ABUNDANCE OF ASYMPTOTIC GIANT BRANCH STARS IN 47 TUCANAE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lapenna, E.; Mucciarelli, A.; Lanzoni, B.; Ferraro, F. R.; Dalessandro, E.; Massari, D.

    2014-12-20

    We present the iron abundance of 24 asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars, members of the globular cluster 47 Tucanae, obtained with high-resolution spectra collected with the FEROS spectrograph at the MPG/ESO 2.2 m Telescope. We find that the iron abundances derived from neutral lines (with a mean value [Fe I/H]=0.94 0.01, ? = 0.08 dex) are systematically lower than those derived from single ionized lines ([Fe II/H] =0.83 0.01, ? = 0.05 dex). Only the latter are in agreement with those obtained for a sample of red giant branch (RGB) cluster stars, for which the Fe I and Fe II lines provide the same iron abundance. This finding suggests that non-local thermodynamical equilibrium (NLTE) effects driven by overionization mechanisms are present in the atmosphere of AGB stars and significantly affect the Fe I lines while leaving Fe II features unaltered. On the other hand, the very good ionization equilibrium found for RGB stars indicates that these NLTE effects may depend on the evolutionary stage. We discuss the impact of this finding on both the chemical analysis of AGB stars and on the search for evolved blue stragglers.

  17. Utilizing the sequential probability ratio test for building joint monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allen, D. W.; Sohn, H.; Worden, K.; Farrar, C. R.

    2002-01-01

    In this application of the statistical pattern recognition paradigm, a prediction model of a chosen feature is developed from the time domain response of a baseline structure. After the model is developed, subsequent feature sets are tested against the model to determine if a change in the feature has occurred. In the proposed statistical inference for damage identification there are two basic hypotheses; (1) the model can predict the feature, in which case the structure is undamaged or (2) the model can not accurately predict the feature, suggesting that the structure is damaged. The Sequential Probability Ratio Test (SPRT) develops a statistical method that quickly arrives at a decision between these two hypotheses and is applicable to continuous monitoring. In the original formulation of the SPRT algorithm, the feature is assumed to be Gaussian and thresholds are set accordingly. It is likely, however, that the feature used for damage identification is sensitive to the tails of the distribution and that the tails may not necessarily be governed by Gaussian characteristics. By modeling the tails using the technique of Extreme Value Statistics, the hypothesis decision thresholds for the SPRT algorithm may be set avoiding the normality assumption. The SPRT algorithm is utilized to decide if the test structure is undamaged or damaged and which joint is exhibiting the change.

  18. In-patient to isocenter KERMA ratios in CT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huda, Walter; Ogden, Kent M.; Lavallee, Robert L.; Roskopf, Marsha L.; Scalzetti, Ernest M.

    2011-10-15

    Purpose: To estimate in-patient KERMA for specific organs in computed tomography (CT) scanning using ratios to isocenter free-in-air KERMA obtained using a Rando phantom.Method: A CT scan of an anthropomorphic phantom results in an air KERMA K at a selected phantom location and air kerma K{sub CT} at the CT scanner isocenter when the scan is repeated in the absence of the phantom. The authors define the KERMA ratio (R{sub K}) as K/ K{sub CT}, which were experimentally determined in a Male Rando Phantom using lithium fluoride chips (TLD-100). R{sub K} values were obtained for a total of 400 individual point locations, as well as for 25 individual organs of interest in CT dosimetry. CT examinations of Rando were performed on a GE LightSpeed Ultra scanner operated at 80 kV, 120 kV, and 140 kV, as well as a Siemens Sensation 16 operated at 120 kV. Results: At 120 kV, median R{sub K} values for the GE and Siemens scanners were 0.60 and 0.64, respectively. The 10th percentile R{sub K} values ranged from 0.34 at 80 kV to 0.54 at 140 kV, and the 90th percentile R{sub K} values ranged from 0.64 at 80 kV to 0.78 at 140 kV. The average R{sub K} for the 25 Rando organs at 120 kV was 0.61 {+-} 0.08. Average R{sub K} values in the head, chest, and abdomen showed little variation. Relative to R{sub K} values in the head, chest, and abdomen obtained at 120 kV, R{sub K} values were about 12% lower in the pelvis and about 58% higher in the cervical spine region. Average R{sub K} values were about 6% higher on the Siemens Sensation 16 scanner than the GE LightSpeed Ultra. Reducing the x-ray tube voltage from 120 kV to 80 kV resulted in an average reduction in R{sub K} value of 34%, whereas increasing the x-ray tube voltage to 140 kV increased the average R{sub K} value by 9%. Conclusions: In-patient to isocenter relative KERMA values in Rando phantom can be used to estimate organ doses in similar sized adults undergoing CT examinations from easily measured air KERMA values at the

  19. An approach to determine a defensible spent fuel ratio.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Durbin, Samuel G.; Lindgren, Eric Richard

    2014-03-01

    Sabotage of spent nuclear fuel casks remains a concern nearly forty years after attacks against shipment casks were first analyzed and has a renewed relevance in the post-9/11 environment. A limited number of full-scale tests and supporting efforts using surrogate materials, typically depleted uranium dioxide (DUO2), have been conducted in the interim to more definitively determine the source term from these postulated events. In all the previous studies, the postulated attack of greatest interest was by a conical shape charge (CSC) that focuses the explosive energy much more efficiently than bulk explosives. However, the validity of these large-scale results remain in question due to the lack of a defensible Spent Fuel Ratio (SFR), defined as the amount of respirable aerosol generated by an attack on a mass of spent fuel compared to that of an otherwise identical DUO2 surrogate. Previous attempts to define the SFR have resulted in estimates ranging from 0.42 to 12 and include suboptimal experimental techniques and data comparisons. Different researchers have suggested using SFR values of 3 to 5.6. Sound technical arguments exist that the SFR does not exceed a value of unity. A defensible determination of the SFR in this lower range would greatly reduce the calculated risk associated with the transport and dry storage of spent nuclear fuel. Currently, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is in possession of several samples of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) that were used in the original SFR studies in the 1980's and were intended for use in a modern effort at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) in the 2000's. A portion of these samples are being used for a variety of research efforts. However, the entirety of SNF samples at ORNL is scheduled for disposition at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) by approximately the end of 2015. If a defensible SFR is to be determined for use in storage and transportation security analyses, the need to begin this effort is urgent in

  20. Measurement of the B -> Omega l Nu and B -> Eta l Nu Branching Fractions Using Neutrino Reconstruction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aubert, Bernard; Bona, M.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, Vincent; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Lopez, L.; Palano, Antimo; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, Bjarne; Sun, L.; Abrams, G.S.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D.N.; Cahn, Robert N.; Jacobsen, R.G.; /LBL, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /Bristol U. /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U., Comp. Sci. Dept. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /Consorzio Milano Ricerche /INFN, Milan /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /Napoli Seconda U. /INFN, Naples /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /Perugia U. /INFN, Perugia /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /Banca di Roma /Frascati /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /South Carolina U. /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /Turin U. /INFN, Turin /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Valencia U., IFIC /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2008-09-09

    The authors present a study of the charmless semileptonic B-meson decays B{sup +} {yields} {omega}{ell}{sup +}{nu} and B{sup +} {yields} {eta}{ell}{sup +}{nu}. The analysis is based on 383 million B{bar B} pairs recorded at the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance with the BABAR detector. The {omega} mesons are reconstructed in the channel {omega} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0} and the {eta} mesons in the channels {eta} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0} and {eta} {yields} {gamma}{gamma}. They measure the branching fractions {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} {omega}{ell}{sup +}{nu}) = (1.14 {+-} 0.16{sub stat} {+-} 0.08{sub syst}) x 10{sup -4} and {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} {eta}{ell}{sup +}{nu}) = (0.31 {+-} 0.06{sub stat} {+-} 0.08{sub syst}) x 10{sup -4}.

  1. High Poisson;s ratio of Earth;s inner core explained by carbon...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    High Poisson;s ratio of Earth;s inner core explained by carbon alloying Citation Details In-Document Search Title: High Poisson;s ratio of Earth;s inner core explained by carbon ...

  2. Remedial investigation report on Chestnut Ridge Operable Unit 2 (filled coal ash pond/Upper McCoy Branch) at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 2: Appendixes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-08-01

    This report comprises appendices A--J which support the Y-12 Plant`s remedial action report involving Chestnut Ridge Operable Unit 2 (filled coal ash pond/Upper McCoy Branch). The appendices cover the following: Sampling fish from McCoy Branch; well and piezometer logs; ecological effects of contaminants in McCoy Branch 1989-1990; heavy metal bioaccumulation data; microbes in polluted sediments; and baseline human health risk assessment data.

  3. The impact of equivalence ratio oscillations on combustion dynamics in a backward-facing step combustor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murat Altay, H.; Speth, Raymond L.; Hudgins, Duane E.; Ghoniem, Ahmed F.

    2009-11-15

    The combustion dynamics of propane-air flames are investigated in an atmospheric pressure, atmospheric inlet temperature, lean, premixed backward-facing step combustor. We modify the location of the fuel injector to examine the impact of equivalence ratio oscillations arriving at the flame on the combustion dynamics. Simultaneous pressure, velocity, heat-release rate and equivalence ratio measurements and high-speed video from the experiments are used to identify and characterize several distinct operating modes. When the fuel is injected far upstream from the step, the equivalence ratio arriving at the flame is steady and the combustion dynamics are controlled only by flame-vortex interactions. In this case, different dynamic regimes are observed depending on the operating parameters. When the fuel is injected close to the step, the equivalence ratio arriving at the flame exhibits oscillations. In the presence of equivalence ratio oscillations, the measured sound pressure level is significant across the entire range of lean mean equivalence ratios even if the equivalence ratio oscillations arriving at the flame are out-of-phase with the pressure oscillations. The combustion dynamics are governed primarily by the flame-vortex interactions, while the equivalence ratio oscillations have secondary effects. The equivalence ratio oscillations could generate variations in the combustion dynamics in each cycle under some operating conditions, destabilize the flame at the entire range of the lean equivalence ratios, and increase the value of the mean equivalence ratio at the lean blowout limit. (author)

  4. A BAYESIAN APPROACH TO LOCATING THE RED GIANT BRANCH TIP MAGNITUDE. II. DISTANCES TO THE SATELLITES OF M31

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Conn, A. R.; Parker, Q. A.; Zucker, D. B.; Ibata, R. A.; Martin, N. F.; Lewis, G. F.; McConnachie, A. W.; Irwin, M. J.; Chapman, S. C.; Tanvir, N.; Fardal, M. A.; Ferguson, A. M. N.; Valls-Gabaud, D.

    2012-10-10

    In 'A Bayesian Approach to Locating the Red Giant Branch Tip Magnitude (Part I)', a new technique was introduced for obtaining distances using the tip of the red giant branch (TRGB) standard candle. Here we describe a useful complement to the technique with the potential to further reduce the uncertainty in our distance measurements by incorporating a matched-filter weighting scheme into the model likelihood calculations. In this scheme, stars are weighted according to their probability of being true object members. We then re-test our modified algorithm using random-realization artificial data to verify the validity of the generated posterior probability distributions (PPDs) and proceed to apply the algorithm to the satellite system of M31, culminating in a three-dimensional view of the system. Further to the distributions thus obtained, we apply a satellite-specific prior on the satellite distances to weight the resulting distance posterior distributions, based on the halo density profile. Thus in a single publication, using a single method, a comprehensive coverage of the distances to the companion galaxies of M31 is presented, encompassing the dwarf spheroidals Andromedas I-III, V, IX-XXVII, and XXX along with NGC 147, NGC 185, M33, and M31 itself. Of these, the distances to Andromedas XXIV-XXVII and Andromeda XXX have never before been derived using the TRGB. Object distances are determined from high-resolution tip magnitude posterior distributions generated using the Markov Chain Monte Carlo technique and associated sampling of these distributions to take into account uncertainties in foreground extinction and the absolute magnitude of the TRGB as well as photometric errors. The distance PPDs obtained for each object both with and without the aforementioned prior are made available to the reader in tabular form. The large object coverage takes advantage of the unprecedented size and photometric depth of the Pan-Andromeda Archaeological Survey. Finally, a

  5. STRONG VARIABLE ULTRAVIOLET EMISSION FROM Y GEM: ACCRETION ACTIVITY IN AN ASYMPTOTIC GIANT BRANCH STAR WITH A BINARY COMPANION?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sahai, Raghvendra; Neill, James D.; Gil de Paz, Armando; Sanchez Contreras, Carmen

    2011-10-20

    Binarity is believed to dramatically affect the history and geometry of mass loss in asymptotic giant branch (AGB) and post-AGB stars, but observational evidence of binarity is sorely lacking. As part of a project to look for hot binary companions to cool AGB stars using the Galaxy Evolution Explorer archive, we have discovered a late-M star, Y Gem, to be a source of strong and variable UV emission. Y Gem is a prime example of the success of our technique of UV imaging of AGB stars in order to search for binary companions. Y Gem's large and variable UV flux makes it one of the most prominent examples of a late-AGB star with a mass accreting binary companion. The UV emission is most likely due to emission associated with accretion activity and a disk around a main-sequence companion star. The physical mechanism generating the UV emission is extremely energetic, with an integrated luminosity of a few x L{sub sun} at its peak. We also find weak CO J = 2-1 emission from Y Gem with a very narrow line profile (FWHM of 3.4 km s{sup -1}). Such a narrow line is unlikely to arise in an outflow and is consistent with emission from an orbiting, molecular reservoir of radius 300 AU. Y Gem may be the progenitor of the class of post-AGB stars which are binaries and possess disks but no outflows.

  6. Environmental geophysics of the Pilot Plant on the west branch of Canal Creek, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McGinnis, L.D.; Miller, S.F.; Daudt, C.R.; Thompson, M.D.; Borden, H.; Benson, M.; Wrobel, J.

    1994-05-01

    Plans to demolish and remediate the Pilot Plant complex in the Edgewood Area of Aberdeen Proving Ground have served to initiate a series of nonintrusive, environmental-geophysical studies. The studies are assisting in the location and identification of pipes, tanks, trenches, and liquid waste in the subsurface. Multiple databases have been integrated to provide support for detection of underground utilities and to determine the stratigraphy and lithology of the subsurface. The studies were conducted within the double security fence and exterior to the double fence, down gradient toward the west branch of Canal Creek. To determine if contaminants found in the creek were associated with the Pilot Plant, both the east and west banks were included in the study area. Magnetic, conductivity, inductive emf, and ground-penetrating-radar anomalies outline buried pipes, trenches, and various pieces of hardware associated with building activities. Ground-penetrating-radar imagery also defines a paleovalley cut 30 ft into Potomac Group sediments of Cretaceous age. The paleovalley crosses the site between Building E5654 and the Pilot Plant fence. The valley is environmentally significant because it may control the pathways of contaminants. The Pilot Plant complex was used to manufacture CC2 Impregnite and incapacitating agents; it also served as a production facility for nerve agents.

  7. Magnetohydrodynamics and deep mixing in evolved stars. I. Two- and three-dimensional analytical models for the asymptotic giant branch

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nucci, M. C.; Busso, M. E-mail: busso@fisica.unipg.it

    2014-06-01

    The advection of thermonuclear ashes by magnetized domains emerging near the H shell was suggested to explain asymptotic giant branch (AGB) star abundances. Here we verify this idea quantitatively through exact MHD models. Starting with a simple two-dimensional (2D) geometry and in an inertia frame, we study plasma equilibria avoiding the complications of numerical simulations. We show that below the convective envelope of an AGB star, variable magnetic fields induce a natural expansion, permitted by the almost ideal MHD conditions, in which the radial velocity grows as the second power of the radius. We then study the convective envelope, where the complexity of macroturbulence allows only for a schematic analytical treatment. Here the radial velocity depends on the square root of the radius. We then verify the robustness of our results with 3D calculations for the velocity, showing that for both studied regions the solution previously found can be seen as a planar section of a more complex behavior, in which the average radial velocity retains the same dependency on the radius found in 2D. As a final check, we compare our results to approximate descriptions of buoyant magnetic structures. For realistic boundary conditions, the envelope crossing times are sufficient to disperse in the huge convective zone any material transported, suggesting magnetic advection as a promising mechanism for deep mixing. The mixing velocities are smaller than for convection but larger than for diffusion and adequate for extra mixing in red giants.

  8. GUM Analysis for SIMS Isotopic Ratios in BEP0 Graphite Qualification Samples, Round 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerlach, David C.; Heasler, Patrick G.; Reid, Bruce D.

    2009-01-01

    This report describes GUM calculations for TIMS and SIMS isotopic ratio measurements of reactor graphite samples. These isotopic ratios are used to estimate reactor burn-up, and currently consist of various ratios of U, Pu, and Boron impurities in the graphite samples. The GUM calculation is a propagation of error methodology that assigns uncertainties (in the form of standard error and confidence bound) to the final estimates.

  9. Measurement of the ratio B(t to Wb)/B(t to Wq) in pp collisions at sqrt(s) = 8 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khachatryan, Vardan; et al.,

    2014-09-01

    The ratio of the top-quark branching fractions R=B(t to Wb)/B(t to Wq), where the denominator includes the sum over all down-type quarks (q = b, s, d), is measured in the t t-bar dilepton final state with proton-proton collision data at sqrt(s)=8 TeV from an integrated luminosity of 19.7 inverse femtobarns, collected with the CMS detector. In order to quantify the purity of the signal sample, the cross section is measured by fitting the observed jet multiplicity, thereby constraining the signal and background contributions. By counting the number of b jets per event, an unconstrained value of R=1.014 +/- 0.003 (stat.) +/- 0.032 (syst.) is measured, in good agreement with the standard model prediction. A lower limit R > 0.955 at the 95% confidence level is obtained after requiring R <;=1, and a lower limit on the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix element abs(V[tb]) > 0.975 is set at 95% confidence level. The result is combined with a previous CMS measurement of the t-channel single-top-quark cross section to determine the top-quark total decay width, Gamma[t]=1.36 +/- 0.02 (stat.) +0.14/-0.11 (syst.) GeV.

  10. Experimental and computational results on exciton/free-carrier ratio, hot/thermalized carrier diffusion, and linear/nonlinear rate constants affecting scintillator proportionality

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, Richard; Grim, Joel; Li, Qi; Ucer, K. B.; Bizarri, G. A.; Kerisit, Sebastien N.; Gao, Fei; Bhattacharya, Pijush; Tupitsyn, Eugene; Rowe, Emmanuel; Buliga, Vladimir M.; Burger, Arnold

    2013-10-01

    Models of nonproportional response in scintillators have highlighted the importance of parameters such as branching ratios, carrier thermalization times, diffusion, kinetic order of quenching, associated rate constants, and radius of the electron track. For example, the fraction ηeh of excitations that are free carriers versus excitons was shown by Payne and coworkers to have strong correlation with the shape of electron energy response curves from Compton-coincidence studies. Rate constants for nonlinear quenching are implicit in almost all models of nonproportionality, and some assumption about track radius must invariably be made if one is to relate linear energy deposition dE/dx to volume-based excitation density n (eh/cm3) in terms of which the rates are defined. Diffusion, affecting time-dependent track radius and thus density of excitations, has been implicated as an important factor in nonlinear light yield. Several groups have recently highlighted diffusion of hot electrons in addition to thermalized carriers and excitons in scintillators. However, experimental determination of many of these parameters in the insulating crystals used as scintillators has seemed difficult. Subpicosecond laser techniques including interband z scan light yield, fluence-dependent decay time, and transient optical absorption are now yielding experimental values for some of the missing rates and ratios needed for modeling scintillator response. First principles calculations and Monte Carlo simulations can fill in additional parameters still unavailable from experiment. As a result, quantitative modeling of scintillator electron energy response from independently determined material parameters is becoming possible on an increasingly firmer data base. This paper describes recent laser experiments, calculations, and numerical modeling of scintillator response.

  11. Altering the volumetric expansion ratio of a Lysholm helical screw expander

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dunbar, M.K.

    1984-01-01

    This is an analysis of the effects of the volumetric expansion ratio on the operation of a Lysholm helical screw expander. Extensive testing of the University of California Lysholm engine with a 5.3 volumetric expansion ratio was performed. In this experiment, the expansion ratio has been reduced from 5.3 to 4.0. Tests were performed at a variety of speeds and qualities for a 5.0 pressure ratio and at a variety of speeds and pressure ratios for 99 percent quality. It was predicted that decreasing the volumetric expansion ratio would decrease the leakage fraction and thereby increase efficiency. This occurred as predicted. Isentropic efficiency increased 20 percent for 50 percent quality steam and 16 percent for 33 percent quality steam, all for an inlet pressure of 120 psia and a speed of 9000 rpm. A maximum efficiency of 47.2 percent was reached at 33 percent quality, 9000 rpm and a pressure ratio of 5.0. It was noted that the leakage rate did not appear to be a function of expansion ratio, as had been expected. Using this fact the previous empirical models of the engine were extended to include volumetric expansion ratio as a variable parameter.

  12. Effect of Compression Ratio and Piston Geometry on RCCI load limit

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Explores the effect of compression ratio and piston design on the practical load range of bio-fueled Reactivity Controlled Compression Ignition (RCCI) combustion.

  13. RATIO COMPUTER

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Post, R.F.

    1958-11-11

    An electronic computer circuit is described for producing an output voltage proportional to the product or quotient of tbe voltages of a pair of input signals. ln essence, the disclosed invention provides a computer having two channels adapted to receive separate input signals and each having amplifiers with like fixed amplification factors and like negatlve feedback amplifiers. One of the channels receives a constant signal for comparison purposes, whereby a difference signal is produced to control the amplification factors of the variable feedback amplifiers. The output of the other channel is thereby proportional to the product or quotient of input signals depending upon the relation of input to fixed signals in the first mentioned channel.

  14. Nucleosynthesis in helium-enriched asymptotic giant branch models: Implications for heavy element enrichment in ω Centauri

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karakas, Amanda I.; Marino, Anna F.; Nataf, David M.

    2014-03-20

    We investigate the effect of helium enrichment on the evolution and nucleosynthesis of low-mass asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars of 1.7 M {sub ☉} and 2.36 M {sub ☉} with a metallicity of Z = 0.0006 ([Fe/H] ≈–1.4). We calculate evolutionary sequences with the primordial helium abundance (Y = 0.24) and with helium-enriched compositions (Y = 0.30, 0.35, 0.40). For comparison, we calculate models of the same mass but at a lower metallicity Z = 0.0003 ([Fe/H] ≈–1.8) with Y = 0.24. Post-processing nucleosynthesis calculations are performed on each of the evolutionary sequences to determine the production of elements from hydrogen to bismuth. Elemental surface abundance predictions and stellar yields are presented for each model. The models with enriched helium have shorter main sequence and AGB lifetimes, and they enter the AGB with a more massive hydrogen-exhausted core than the primordial helium model. The main consequences are as follows: (1) low-mass AGB models with enhanced helium will evolve more than twice as fast, giving them the chance to contribute sooner to the chemical evolution of the forming globular clusters, and (2) the stellar yields will be strongly reduced relative to their primordial helium counterparts. An increase of ΔY = 0.10 at a given mass decreases the yields of carbon by up to ≈60% and of fluorine by up to 80%; it also decreases the yields of the s-process elements barium and lanthanum by ≈45%. While the yields of first s-process peak elements strontium, yttrium, and zirconium decrease by up to 50%, the yields of rubidium either do not change or increase.

  15. Raman scattering method and apparatus for measuring isotope ratios and isotopic abundances

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Harney, Robert C.; Bloom, Stewart D.

    1978-01-01

    Raman scattering is used to measure isotope ratios and/or isotopic abundances. A beam of quasi-monochromatic photons is directed onto the sample to be analyzed, and the resulting Raman-scattered photons are detected and counted for each isotopic species of interest. These photon counts are treated mathematically to yield the desired isotope ratios or isotopic abundances.

  16. The effect of catalyst ratio on catalytic performance in liquid phase dimethyl ether process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo Junwang; Niu Yuqin; Zhang Bijiang

    1997-12-31

    In the liquid phase dimethyl ether (LPDME) process, two functionally different catalysts are slurried together in an inert liquid medium. Syngas reacts on the surface of the methanol catalyst and methanol is dehydrated on the surface of the dehydration catalyst dispersed in the liquid. The process is adaptable to carbon monoxide-rich syngas derived from second generation coal gasifiers. The effect of catalyst ratio on catalytic performances of the dual catalyst was studied in liquid phase dimethyl ether synthesis from syngas at 280 C, 4.0 MPa. CO conversion, H{sub 2} conversion and DME productivity increased with an increase of catalyst ratio initially, reached their maximum at a catalyst ratio of 4.0--5.0, and then decreased. Methanol productivity and methanol equivalent productivity had a similar trend to that of DME productivity. DME selectivity and hydrocarbon selectivity increased with an increase in catalyst ratio whereas methanol selectivity decreased with catalyst ratio.

  17. Forensic Applications of Light-Element Stable Isotope Ratios of Ricinus communis Seeds and Ricin Preparations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kreuzer, Helen W.; West, Jason B.; Ehleringer, James

    2013-01-01

    Seeds of the castor plant Ricinus communis, also known as castor beans, are of forensic interest because they are the source of the poison ricin. We have tested whether stable isotope ratios of castor seeds and ricin prepared by various methods can be used as a forensic signature. We collected over 300 castor seed samples from locations around the world and measured the C, N, O, and H stable isotope ratios of the whole seeds, oil, and three types of ricin preparations. Our results demonstrate that N isotope ratios can be used to correlate ricin prepared by any of these methods to source seeds. Further, stable isotope ratios distinguished >99% of crude and purified ricin protein samples in pair-wise comparison tests. Stable isotope ratios therefore constitute a valuable forensic signature for ricin preparations.

  18. Effect of cold drawing ratio on γ′ precipitation in Inconel X-750

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ha, Jeong Won; Seong, Baek Seok; Jeong, Hi Won; Yoo, Young Soo; Choi, Yoon Suk; Kang, Namhyun

    2014-10-15

    Inconel X-750 is a Ni-based precipitation-hardened superalloy having large tensile and fracture strengths. In the study, X-750 wires were cold drawn to different extents. Small angle neutron scattering was employed to quantitatively measure the size and volume fraction of the γ′ phase as a function of the cold drawing ratio (DR) and aging temperature. The presence and size of γ′ precipitates were confirmed by transmission electron microscopy. The drawing ratio had an important effect on the volume fraction of the γ′ precipitates. However, the size of the precipitates was independent on the drawing ratio. The specimen with the minimum drawing ratio (DR0) produced the largest volume fraction of γ′ as compared with large drawing ratio (DR) specimens such as DR17 and DR42. The small volume fraction of the γ′ phase for a sizeable drawing ratio was associated with the large amount of nucleation sites for secondary carbides, M{sub 23}C{sub 6}, and the fast diffusion path, i.e., dislocation, needed to form M{sub 23}C{sub 6}. A Cr depletion zone around the secondary carbides raised the solubility of γ′. Therefore, the significant drawing ratio contributing to the large volume fraction of the secondary carbides decreased the volume fraction of the γ′ precipitates in Inconel X-750. - Highlights: • The volume fraction of secondary carbides increased with the drawing ratio. • The volume fraction of γ′ decreased as the drawing ratio increased. • The drawing ratio affected the γ′ volume fraction with no variation of the γ' size. • The volume fraction of γ′ was affected by the secondary carbide volume fraction.

  19. Periodic equivalence ratio modulation method and apparatus for controlling combustion instability

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Richards, George A.; Janus, Michael C.; Griffith, Richard A.

    2000-01-01

    The periodic equivalence ratio modulation (PERM) method and apparatus significantly reduces and/or eliminates unstable conditions within a combustion chamber. The method involves modulating the equivalence ratio for the combustion device, such that the combustion device periodically operates outside of an identified unstable oscillation region. The equivalence ratio is modulated between preselected reference points, according to the shape of the oscillation region and operating parameters of the system. Preferably, the equivalence ratio is modulated from a first stable condition to a second stable condition, and, alternatively, the equivalence ratio is modulated from a stable condition to an unstable condition. The method is further applicable to multi-nozzle combustor designs, whereby individual nozzles are alternately modulated from stable to unstable conditions. Periodic equivalence ratio modulation (PERM) is accomplished by active control involving periodic, low frequency fuel modulation, whereby low frequency fuel pulses are injected into the main fuel delivery. Importantly, the fuel pulses are injected at a rate so as not to affect the desired time-average equivalence ratio for the combustion device.

  20. The Ne-to-O abundance ratio of the interstellar medium from IBEX-Lo observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, J.; Kucharek, H.; Möbius, E.; Leonard, T.; Bzowski, M.; Sokół, J. M.; Kubiak, M. A.; Fuselier, S. A.; McComas, D. J.

    2014-11-01

    In this paper we report on a two-year study to estimate the Ne/O abundance ratio in the gas phase of the local interstellar cloud (LIC). Based on the first two years of observations with the Interstellar Boundary Explorer, we determined the fluxes of interstellar neutral (ISN) O and Ne atoms at the Earth's orbit in spring 2009 and 2010. A temporal variation of the Ne/O abundance ratio at the Earth's orbit could be expected due to solar cycle-related effects such as changes of ionization. However, this study shows that there is no significant change in the Ne/O ratio at the Earths orbit from 2009 to 2010. We used time-dependent survival probabilities of the ISNs to calculate the Ne/O abundance ratio at the termination shock. Then we estimated the Ne/O abundance ratio in the gas phase of the LIC with the use of filtration factors and the ionization fractions. From our analysis, the Ne/O abundance ratio in the LIC is 0.33 ± 0.07, which is in agreement with the abundance ratio inferred from pickup-ion measurements.

  1. EMPIRICAL DETERMINATION OF EINSTEIN A-COEFFICIENT RATIOS OF BRIGHT [Fe II] LINES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Giannini, T.; Antoniucci, S.; Nisini, B.; Lorenzetti, D.; Alcal, J. M.; Bacciotti, F.; Podio, L.; Bonito, R.; Stelzer, B.

    2015-01-01

    The Einstein spontaneous rates (A-coefficients) of Fe{sup +} lines have been computed by several authors with results that differ from each other by up to 40%. Consequently, models for line emissivities suffer from uncertainties that in turn affect the determination of the physical conditions at the base of line excitation. We provide an empirical determination of the A-coefficient ratios of bright [Fe II] lines that would represent both a valid benchmark for theoretical computations and a reference for the physical interpretation of the observed lines. With the ESO-Very Large Telescope X-shooter instrument between 3000 and 24700 , we obtained a spectrum of the bright Herbig-Haro object HH1. We detect around 100 [Fe II] lines, some of which with a signal-to-noise ratios ?100. Among these latter lines, we selected those emitted by the same level, whose dereddened intensity ratios are direct functions of the Einstein A-coefficient ratios. From the same X-shooter spectrum, we got an accurate estimate of the extinction toward HH1 through intensity ratios of atomic species, H I recombination lines and H{sub 2} ro-vibrational transitions. We provide seven reliable A-coefficient ratios between bright [Fe II] lines, which are compared with the literature determinations. In particular, the A-coefficient ratios involving the brightest near-infrared lines (?12570/?16440 and ?13209/?16440) are in better agreement with the predictions by the Quinet et al. relativistic Hartree-Fock model. However, none of the theoretical models predict A-coefficient ratios in agreement with all of our determinations. We also show that literature data of near-infrared intensity ratios better agree with our determinations than with theoretical expectations.

  2. The viscosity to entropy ratio: From string theory motivated bounds to warm dense matter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Faussurier, G.; Libby, S. B.; Silvestrelli, P. L.

    2014-07-04

    Here, we study the ratio of viscosity to entropy density in Yukawa one-component plasmas as a function of coupling parameter at fixed screening, and in realistic warm dense matter models as a function of temperature at fixed density. In these two situations, the ratio is minimized for values of the coupling parameters that depend on screening, and for temperatures that in turn depend on density and material. In this context, we also examine Rosenfeld arguments relating transport coefficients to excess reduced entropy for Yukawa one-component plasmas. For these cases we show that this ratio is always above the lower-bound conjecture derived from string theory ideas.

  3. THREE DISCRETE GROUPS WITH HOMOGENEOUS CHEMISTRY ALONG THE RED GIANT BRANCH IN THE GLOBULAR CLUSTER NGC2808

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carretta, E.

    2014-11-10

    We present the homogeneous reanalysis of Mg and Al abundances from high resolution UVES/FLAMES spectra for 31 red giants in the globular cluster NGC2808. We found a well defined Mg-Al anticorrelation reaching a regime of subsolar Mg abundance ratios, with a spread of about 1.4dex in [Al/Fe]. The main result from the improved statistics of our sample is that the distribution of stars is not continuous along the anticorrelation because they are neatly clustered into three distinct clumps, each with different chemical compositions. One group (P) shows a primordial composition of field stars of similar metallicity, and the other two (I and E) have increasing abundances of Al and decreasing abundances of Mg. The fraction of stars we found in the three components (P: 68%, I: 19%, E: 13%) is in excellent agreement with the ratios computed for the three distinct main sequences in NGC2808: for the first time there is a clear correspondence between discrete photometric sequences of dwarfs and distinct groups of giants with homogeneous chemistry. The composition of the I group cannot be reproduced by mixing of matter with extreme processing in hot H-burning and gas with pristine, unprocessed composition, as also found in the recent analysis of three discrete groups in NGC6752. This finding suggests that different classes of polluters were probably at work in NGC2808 as well.

  4. ARM: 10-minute TEMPORARY Raman Lidar: aerosol scattering ratio and backscattering coefficient profiles, from first Ferrare algorithm

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Sivaraman, Chitra; Flynn, Connor

    10-minute TEMPORARY Raman Lidar: aerosol scattering ratio and backscattering coefficient profiles, from first Ferrare algorithm

  5. ARM: 10-minute TEMPORARY Raman Lidar: aerosol scattering ratio and backscattering coefficient profiles, from first Ferrare algorithm

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Sivaraman, Chitra; Flynn, Connor

    2010-12-15

    10-minute TEMPORARY Raman Lidar: aerosol scattering ratio and backscattering coefficient profiles, from first Ferrare algorithm

  6. Two-Stage Variable Compression Ratio (VCR) System to Increase Efficiency in Gasoline Powertrains

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presents two-stage variable compression ratio mechanism realized by varying the connecting rod length, description of the system layout, working principle and expected fuel savings benefits when used in current and future gasoline engine concepts

  7. Heterogeneity of functional groups in a metal-organic framework displays magic number ratios

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sue, Andrew C.-H.; Mannige, Ranjan V.; Deng, Hexiang; Cao, Dennis; Wang, Cheng; Gándara, Felipe; Stoddart, J. Fraser; Whitelam, Stephen; Yaghi, Omar M.

    2015-05-20

    Multiple organic functionalities can now be apportioned into nanoscale domains within a metal-coordinated framework, posing the following question: how do we control the resulting combination of “heterogeneity and order”? Here, we report the creation of a metal–organic framework, MOF-2000, whose two component types are incorporated in a 2:1 ratio, even when the ratio of component types in the starting solution is varied by an order of magnitude. Statistical mechanical modeling suggests that this robust 2:1 ratio has a nonequilibrium origin, resulting from kinetic trapping of component types during framework growth. Our simulations show how other “magic number” ratios of components can be obtained by modulating the topology of a framework and the noncovalent interactions between component types, a finding that may aid the rational design of functional multicomponent materials.

  8. Anomalous pressure dependence of thermal conductivities of large mass ratio compounds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lindsay, Lucas R; Broido, David; Carrete, Jesus; Mingo, Natalio; Reinecke, Tom

    2015-01-01

    The lattice thermal conductivities ( ) of binary compound materials are examined as a function of hydrostatic pressure, P, using a first-principles approach. Compound materials with relatively small mass ratios, such as MgO, show an increase in with P, consistent with measurements. Conversely, compounds with large mass ratios (e.g., BSb, BAs, BeTe, BeSe) exhibit decreasing with increasing P, a behavior that cannot be understood using simple theories of . This anomalous P dependence of arises from the fundamentally different nature of the intrinsic scattering processes for heat-carrying acoustic phonons in large mass ratio compounds compared to those with small mass ratios. This work demonstrates the power of first principles methods for thermal properties and advances the understanding of thermal transport in non-metals.

  9. Fat to muscle ratio measurements with dual energy x-ray absorbtiometry

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chen, A.; Luo, J.; Wang, A.; Broadbent, C.; Zhong, J.; Dilmanian, F. A.; Zafonte, F.; Zhong, Z.

    2015-03-14

    Accurate measurement of the fat-to-muscle ratio in animal model is important for obesity research. In addition, an efficient way to measure the fat to muscle ratio in animal model using dual-energy absorptiometry is presented in this paper. A radioactive source exciting x-ray fluorescence from a target material is used to provide the two x-ray energies needed. The x-rays, after transmitting through the sample, are measured with an energy-sensitive Ge detector. Phantoms and specimens were measured. The results showed that the method was sensitive to the fat to muscle ratios with good linearity. A standard deviation of a few percent inmore » the fat to muscle ratio could be observed with the x-ray dose of 0.001 mGy.« less

  10. Anomalous pressure dependence of thermal conductivities of large mass ratio compounds

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lindsay, Lucas R; Broido, David; Carrete, Jesus; Mingo, Natalio; Reinecke, Tom

    2015-01-01

    The lattice thermal conductivities ( ) of binary compound materials are examined as a function of hydrostatic pressure, P, using a first-principles approach. Compound materials with relatively small mass ratios, such as MgO, show an increase in with P, consistent with measurements. Conversely, compounds with large mass ratios (e.g., BSb, BAs, BeTe, BeSe) exhibit decreasing with increasing P, a behavior that cannot be understood using simple theories of . This anomalous P dependence of arises from the fundamentally different nature of the intrinsic scattering processes for heat-carrying acoustic phonons in large mass ratio compounds compared to those with small massmore » ratios. This work demonstrates the power of first principles methods for thermal properties and advances the understanding of thermal transport in non-metals.« less

  11. Explaining the Cosmic-Ray E+/(E- + E+) and Anti-P/P Ratios Using...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Explaining the Cosmic-Ray E+(E- + E+) and Anti-PP Ratios Using a Steady-State Injection Model Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Explaining the Cosmic-Ray E+(E- + E+) ...

  12. HCCI in a Variable Compression Ratio Engine: Effects of Engine Variables |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy in a Variable Compression Ratio Engine: Effects of Engine Variables HCCI in a Variable Compression Ratio Engine: Effects of Engine Variables 2004 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentation: Southwest Research Institute 2004_deer_ryan.pdf (410.71 KB) More Documents & Publications HCCI - A Technical Review and Progress Report 2006 HCCI - Update of Progress 2005 Fuel Requirements for HCCI Engine Operation

  13. Enhanced performance of branched TiO{sub 2} nanorod based Mn-doped CdS and Mn-doped CdSe quantum dot-sensitized solar cell

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Soo-Kyoung; Gopi, Chandu V. V. M.; Lee, Jae-Cheol; Kim, Hee-Je

    2015-04-28

    TiO{sub 2} branched nanostructures could be efficient as photoanodes for quantum dot-sensitized solar cells (QDSCs) due to their large surface area for QD deposition. In this study, Mn-doped CdS/Mn-doped CdSe deposited branched TiO{sub 2} nanorods were fabricated to enhance the photovoltaic performance of QDSCs. Mn doping in CdS and CdSe retards the recombination losses of electrons, while branched TiO{sub 2} nanorods facilitate effective electron transport and compensate for the low surface area of the nanorod structure. As a result, the charge-transfer resistance (R{sub CT}), electron lifetime (?{sub e}), and the amount of QD deposition were significantly improved with branched TiO{sub 2} nanorod based Mn-doped CdS/Mn-doped CdSe quantum dot-sensitized solar cell.

  14. Application of the Isotope Ratio Method to a Boiling Water Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frank, Douglas P.; Gerlach, David C.; Gesh, Christopher J.; Hurley, David E.; Meriwether, George H.; Mitchell, Mark R.; Reid, Bruce D.

    2010-08-11

    The isotope ratio method is a technique for estimating the energy or plutonium production in a fission reactor by measuring isotope ratios in non-fuel reactor components. The isotope ratios in these components can then be directly related to the cumulative energy production with standard reactor modeling methods. All reactor materials contain trace elemental impurities at parts per million levels, and the isotopes of these elements are transmuted by neutron irradiation in a predictable manner. While measuring the change in a particular isotopes concentration is possible, it is difficult to correlate to energy production because the initial concentration of that element may not be accurately known. However, if the ratio of two isotopes of the same element can be measured, the energy production can then be determined without knowing the absolute concentration of that impurity since the initial natural ratio is known. This is the fundamental principle underlying the isotope ratio method. Extremely sensitive mass-spectrometric methods are currently available that allow accurate measurements of the impurity isotope ratios in samples. Additionally, indicator elements with stable activation products have been identified so that their post-irradiation isotope ratios remain constant. This method has been successfully demonstrated on graphite-moderated reactors. Graphite reactors are particularly well-suited to such analyses since the graphite moderator is resident in the fueled region of the core for the entire period of operation. Applying this method to other reactor types is more difficult since the resident portions of the reactor available for sampling are either outside the fueled region of the core or structural components of individual fuel assemblies. The goal of this research is to show that the isotope ratio method can produce meaningful results for light water-moderated power reactors. In this work, we use the isotope ratio method to estimate the energy

  15. Measurements of branching fractions, polarizations, and direct CP-violation asymmetries in B -> rho0 K* and B -> f0(980) K* decays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    del Amo Sanchez, P.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Martinelli, M.; Milanes, D.A.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Brown, D.N.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; Osipenkov, I.L.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; /Ruhr U., Bochum /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /Indian Inst. Tech., Guwahati /Harvard U. /Harvey Mudd Coll. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa State U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /SLAC /South Carolina U. /Southern Methodist U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tel Aviv U. /Tennessee U. /Texas Nuclear Corp., Austin /Texas U., Dallas /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /Valencia U. /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2011-08-12

    We present measurements of the branching fractions, longitudinal polarization, and direct CP-violation asymmetries for the decays B{sup +} {yields} {rho}{sup 0}K*{sup +} and B{sup +} f{sub 0}(980)K*{sup +} with a sample of (467 {+-} 5) x 10{sup 6} B{bar B} pairs collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy e{sup +}e{sup -} collider at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. We observe B{sup +} {yields} {rho}{sup 0}K*{sup +} with a significance of 5.3{sigma} and measure the branching fraction {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} {rho}{sup 0}K*{sup +}) = (4.6 {+-} 1.0 {+-} 0.4) x 10{sup -6}, the longitudinal polarization f{sub L} = 0.78 {+-} 0.12 {+-} 0.03, and the CP-violation asymmetry A{sub CP} = 0.31 {+-} 0.13 {+-} 0.03. We observe B{sup +} {yields} f{sub 0}(980)K*{sup +} and measure the branching fraction {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} f{sub 0}(980)K*{sup +}) x {Beta}(f{sub 0}(980) {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}) = (4.2 {+-} 0.6 {+-} 0.3) x 10{sup -6} and the CP-violation asymmetry A{sub CP} = -0.15 {+-} 0.12 {+-} 0.03. The first uncertainty quoted is statistical and the second is systematic.

  16. The Tip of the red giant branch distance to the perfect spiral galaxy M74 hosting three core-collapse supernovae

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sung Jang, In; Gyoon Lee, Myung E-mail: mglee@astro.snu.ac.kr

    2014-09-01

    M74 (NGC 628) is a famous face-on spiral galaxy, hosting three core-collapse supernovae (SNe): SN Ic 2002ap, SN II-P 2003gd, and SN II-P 2013ej. However, its distance is not well known. We present a distance estimation for this galaxy based on the Tip of the Red Giant Branch (TRGB) method. We obtain photometry of the resolved stars in the arm-free region of M74 from F555W and F814W images in the Hubble Space Telescope archive. The color-magnitude diagram of the resolved stars shows a dominant red giant branch (RGB) as well as blue main sequence stars, red helium burning stars, and asymptotic giant branch stars. The I-band luminosity function of the RGB stars shows the TRGB to be at I {sub TRGB} = 26.13 ± 0.03 mag, and T {sub RGB} = 25.97 ± 0.03. From this, we derive the distance modulus to M74 to be 30.04 ± 0.04 (random) ± 0.12 (systematic) (corresponding to a linear distance of 10.19 ± 0.14 ± 0.56 Mpc). With this distance estimate, we calibrate the standardized candle method for SNe II-P. From the absolute magnitudes of SN 2003gd, we derive a value of the Hubble constant, H {sub 0} = 72 ± 6 (random) ± 7 (systematic) km s{sup –1} Mpc{sup –1}. It is similar to recent estimates based on the luminosity calibration of Type Ia supernovae.

  17. New asteroseismic scaling relations based on the Hayashi track relation applied to red giant branch stars in NGC 6791 and NGC 6819

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, T.; Li, Y.; Hekker, S. E-mail: ly@ynao.ac.cn

    2014-01-20

    Stellar mass M, radius R, and gravity g are important basic parameters in stellar physics. Accurate values for these parameters can be obtained from the gravitational interaction between stars in multiple systems or from asteroseismology. Stars in a cluster are thought to be formed coevally from the same interstellar cloud of gas and dust. The cluster members are therefore expected to have some properties in common. These common properties strengthen our ability to constrain stellar models and asteroseismically derived M, R, and g when tested against an ensemble of cluster stars. Here we derive new scaling relations based on a relation for stars on the Hayashi track (√(T{sub eff})∼g{sup p}R{sup q}) to determine the masses and metallicities of red giant branch stars in open clusters NGC 6791 and NGC 6819 from the global oscillation parameters Δν (the large frequency separation) and ν{sub max} (frequency of maximum oscillation power). The Δν and ν{sub max} values are derived from Kepler observations. From the analysis of these new relations we derive: (1) direct observational evidence that the masses of red giant branch stars in a cluster are the same within their uncertainties, (2) new methods to derive M and z of the cluster in a self-consistent way from Δν and ν{sub max}, with lower intrinsic uncertainties, and (3) the mass dependence in the Δν - ν{sub max} relation for red giant branch stars.

  18. TiO{sub 2} nanorods branched on fast-synthesized large clearance TiO{sub 2} nanotube arrays for dye-sensitized solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hu Anzheng; Li Haina; Jia Zhiyong; Xia Zhengcai

    2011-11-15

    A large clearance TiO{sub 2} nanotube arrays (LTAs) has been synthesized by a not more than 12 h anodization duration and based on this a branched TiO{sub 2} nanotube arrays (BLTs) has been achieved through TiO{sub 2} nanorods branch-like grown on the LTAs. Some key factors and probable mechanisms of the fabrication processes on two novel nanoarchitectures are discussed. Exhilaratingly, it is found that the obtained LTAs has demonstrated large pore diameter and void spaces (pore diameter {approx}350 nm; void spaces {approx}160 nm; and tube length {approx}3.5 {mu}m), and the synthesized hierarchical BLTs, compared with conventional TiO{sub 2} nanotube arrays, has shown a much stronger dye absorption performance and an approximately double of the solar cell efficiency (in our case from 1.62% to 3.18% under simulated AM 1.5 conditions). - Graphical Abstract: The schematic diagram of synthesis process for LTAs and BLTs is on the above and the corresponding FESEM images of obtained photoanodes samples are shown below. Highlights: > Large clearance TiO{sub 2} nanotube arrays (LTAs) was synthesized by a fast anodization process of 12 h. > Anodization time of 12 h is just 10% of about 120 h reported in the previous references. > Branch-like TiO{sub 2} nanotube arrays (BLTs) was achieved by growing TiO{sub 2} nanorods on the LTAs. > Obtained BLTs and LTAs show impressive morphology and noticeable improvement of surface area. > BLTs shows about more than 1 times higher solar cell efficiency than that of TiO{sub 2} nanotube arrays.

  19. Measurement of the atmospheric muon charge ratio at TeV energies with MINOS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adamson, P.; Andreopoulos, C.; Arms, K.E.; Armstrong, R.; Auty, D.J.; Avvakumov, S.; Ayres, D.S.; Baller, B.; Barish, B.; Barnes, P.D., Jr.; Barr, G.; /Fermilab /University Coll. London /Rutherford /Minnesota U. /Indiana U. /Sussex U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Argonne /Caltech /LLNL, Livermore /Oxford U.

    2007-05-01

    The 5.4 kton MINOS far detector has been taking charge-separated cosmic ray muon data since the beginning of August, 2003 at a depth of 2070 m.w.e. in the Soudan Underground Laboratory, Minnesota, USA. The data with both forward and reversed magnetic field running configurations were combined to minimize systematic errors in the determination of the underground muon charge ratio. When averaged, two independent analyses find the charge ratio underground to be N{sub {mu}}+/N{sub {mu}}-=1.374{+-}0.004(stat)-0.010{sup +0.012}(sys). Using the map of the Soudan rock overburden, the muon momenta as measured underground were projected to the corresponding values at the surface in the energy range 1-7 TeV. Within this range of energies at the surface, the MINOS data are consistent with the charge ratio being energy independent at the 2 standard deviation level. When the MINOS results are compared with measurements at lower energies, a clear rise in the charge ratio in the energy range 0.3-1.0 TeV is apparent. A qualitative model shows that the rise is consistent with an increasing contribution of kaon decays to the muon charge ratio.

  20. Log-ratio signal-processing technique for beam position monitors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shafer, R.E.

    1993-01-01

    Two basic signal-processing techniques are presently in wide use for the processing of signals from beam position monitors (BPMs); difference-over-sum, and amplitude-modulation-to-phase-modulation (AM-PM) conversion. Difference-over-sum offers simplicity and low cost, but poor real-time normalized response and amplitude dynamic range. AM-PM offers fast real-time response and large dynamic range, but is costly and difficult to implement. Logarithmic-ratio processing, a technique using newly available inexpensive hybrid circuits, appears to offer the advantages of both, and the disadvantages of neither. This paper reviews the features techniques, and highlights the features of the log-ratio technique. Among the advantages of log-ratio is a beam-displacement response linearity that is superior to either difference-over-sum or AM-PM for circular-aperture BPMs.

  1. Log-ratio signal-processing technique for beam position monitors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shafer, R.E.

    1993-02-01

    Two basic signal-processing techniques are presently in wide use for the processing of signals from beam position monitors (BPMs); difference-over-sum, and amplitude-modulation-to-phase-modulation (AM-PM) conversion. Difference-over-sum offers simplicity and low cost, but poor real-time normalized response and amplitude dynamic range. AM-PM offers fast real-time response and large dynamic range, but is costly and difficult to implement. Logarithmic-ratio processing, a technique using newly available inexpensive hybrid circuits, appears to offer the advantages of both, and the disadvantages of neither. This paper reviews the features techniques, and highlights the features of the log-ratio technique. Among the advantages of log-ratio is a beam-displacement response linearity that is superior to either difference-over-sum or AM-PM for circular-aperture BPMs.

  2. Measurement of the charge ratio of atmospheric muons with the CMS detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khachatryan, Vardan; et al.

    2010-08-01

    We present a measurement of the ratio of positive to negative muon fluxes from cosmic ray interactions in the atmosphere, using data collected by the CMS detector both at ground level and in the underground experimental cavern at the CERN LHC. Muons were detected in the momentum range from 5 GeV/c to 1 TeV/c. The surface flux ratio is measured to be 1.2766 \\pm 0.0032(stat.) \\pm 0.0032 (syst.), independent of the muon momentum, below 100 GeV/c. This is the most precise measurement to date. At higher momenta the data are consistent with an increase of the charge ratio, in agreement with cosmic ray shower models and compatible with previous measurements by deep-underground experiments.

  3. Nano-scaled graphene platelets with a high length-to-width aspect ratio

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zhamu, Aruna; Guo, Jiusheng; Jang, Bor Z.

    2010-09-07

    This invention provides a nano-scaled graphene platelet (NGP) having a thickness no greater than 100 nm and a length-to-width ratio no less than 3 (preferably greater than 10). The NGP with a high length-to-width ratio can be prepared by using a method comprising (a) intercalating a carbon fiber or graphite fiber with an intercalate to form an intercalated fiber; (b) exfoliating the intercalated fiber to obtain an exfoliated fiber comprising graphene sheets or flakes; and (c) separating the graphene sheets or flakes to obtain nano-scaled graphene platelets. The invention also provides a nanocomposite material comprising an NGP with a high length-to-width ratio. Such a nanocomposite can become electrically conductive with a small weight fraction of NGPs. Conductive composites are particularly useful for shielding of sensitive electronic equipment against electromagnetic interference (EMI) or radio frequency interference (RFI), and for electrostatic charge dissipation.

  4. The viscosity to entropy ratio: From string theory motivated bounds to warm dense matter

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Faussurier, G.; Libby, S. B.; Silvestrelli, P. L.

    2014-07-04

    Here, we study the ratio of viscosity to entropy density in Yukawa one-component plasmas as a function of coupling parameter at fixed screening, and in realistic warm dense matter models as a function of temperature at fixed density. In these two situations, the ratio is minimized for values of the coupling parameters that depend on screening, and for temperatures that in turn depend on density and material. In this context, we also examine Rosenfeld arguments relating transport coefficients to excess reduced entropy for Yukawa one-component plasmas. For these cases we show that this ratio is always above the lower-bound conjecturemore » derived from string theory ideas.« less

  5. Measurement of the multiple-muon charge ratio in the MINOS Far Detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Adamson, P.

    2016-03-30

    The charge ratio, Rμ = Nμ+/Nμ-, for cosmogenic multiple-muon events observed at an underground depth of 2070 mwe has been measured using the magnetized MINOS Far Detector. The multiple-muon events, recorded nearly continuously from August 2003 until April 2012, comprise two independent data sets imaged with opposite magnetic field polarities, the comparison of which allows the systematic uncertainties of the measurement to be minimized. The multiple-muon charge ratio is determined to be Rμ = 1.104±0.006(stat)-0.010+0.009(syst). As a result, this measurement complements previous determinations of single-muon and multiple-muon charge ratios at underground sites and serves to constrain models of cosmic-ray interactions atmore » TeV energies.« less

  6. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS OF INTERFEROMETRIC MEASUREMENTS OF AXIS RATIOS FOR CLASSICAL Be STARS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cyr, R. P.; Jones, C. E.; Tycner, C.

    2015-01-20

    This work presents a novel method to estimate the effective opening angle of CBe star disks from projected axis ratio measurements, obtained by interferometry using a statistical approach. A Monte Carlo scheme was used to generate a large set of theoretical axis ratios from disk models using different distributions of disk densities and opening angles. These theoretical samples were then compared to observational samples, using a two-sample Kolmogorov-Smirnov test, to determine which theoretical distribution best reproduces the observations. The results suggest that the observed ratio distributions in the K, H, and N band can best be explained by the presence of thin disks, with opening half-angles of the order of 0.°15-4.°0. Results for measurements over the Hα line point toward slightly thicker disks, 3.°7-14°, which is consistent with a flaring disk predicted by the viscous disk model.

  7. Determining the slag fraction, water/binder ratio and degree of hydration in hardened cement pastes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yio, M.H.N. Phelan, J.C.; Wong, H.S.; Buenfeld, N.R.

    2014-02-15

    A method for determining the original mix composition of hardened slag-blended cement-based materials based on analysis of backscattered electron images combined with loss on ignition measurements is presented. The method does not require comparison to reference standards or prior knowledge of the composition of the binders used. Therefore, it is well-suited for application to real structures. The method is also able to calculate the degrees of reaction of slag and cement. Results obtained from an experimental study involving sixty samples with a wide range of water/binder (w/b) ratios (0.30 to 0.50), slag/binder ratios (0 to 0.6) and curing ages (3 days to 1 year) show that the method is very promising. The mean absolute errors for the estimated slag, water and cement contents (kg/m{sup 3}), w/b and s/b ratios were 9.1%, 1.5%, 2.5%, 4.7% and 8.7%, respectively. 91% of the estimated w/b ratios were within 0.036 of the actual values. -- Highlights: •A new method for estimating w/b ratio and slag content in cement pastes is proposed. •The method is also able to calculate the degrees of reaction of slag and cement. •Reference standards or prior knowledge of the binder composition are not required. •The method was tested on samples with varying w/b ratios and slag content.

  8. " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1 Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios;" " Unit: Varies." " "," ",,,"Consumption"," " " "," ",,"Consumption","per Dollar"," " " "," ","Consumption","per Dollar","of Value","RSE" "NAICS"," ","per

  9. " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1 Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 2006;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios;" " Unit: Varies." ,,,,"Consumption" ,,,"Consumption","per Dollar" ,,"Consumption","per Dollar","of Value" "NAICS",,"per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","(million

  10. Practical method and device for enhancing pulse contrast ratio for lasers and electron accelerators

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zhang, Shukui; Wilson, Guy

    2014-09-23

    An apparatus and method for enhancing pulse contrast ratios for drive lasers and electron accelerators. The invention comprises a mechanical dual-shutter system wherein the shutters are placed sequentially in series in a laser beam path. Each shutter of the dual shutter system has an individually operated trigger for opening and closing the shutter. As the triggers are operated individually, the delay between opening and closing first shutter and opening and closing the second shutter is variable providing for variable differential time windows and enhancement of pulse contrast ratio.

  11. Spectroscopic study using line ratios of lithiumlike ions in a laser-produced plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moreno, J.C.; Goldsmith, S.; Griem, H.R.

    1989-02-15

    Spectra of highly ionized titanium and calcium in the extreme ultraviolet region were observed in laser-produced plasmas using the OMEGA 24 beam (351 nm) laser system at the University of Rochester. The plasmas were produced using glass microballoon targets coated with a layer of a medium Z element and a layer of parylene (CH). Time-integrated electron temperatures and densities were obtained by comparing measured line intensity ratios of lithiumlike charge states of Ti and Ca to numerical calculations from a collisional-radiative model. The variation of line intensity ratios with electron density and temperature using the collisional-radiative model is discussed.

  12. Control system and method for a power delivery system having a continuously variable ratio transmission

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Frank, A.A.

    1984-07-10

    A control system and method for a power delivery system, such as in an automotive vehicle, having an engine coupled to a continuously variable ratio transmission (CVT). Totally independent control of engine and transmission enable the engine to precisely follow a desired operating characteristic, such as the ideal operating line for minimum fuel consumption. CVT ratio is controlled as a function of commanded power or torque and measured load, while engine fuel requirements (e.g., throttle position) are strictly a function of measured engine speed. Fuel requirements are therefore precisely adjusted in accordance with the ideal characteristic for any load placed on the engine. 4 figs.

  13. Control system and method for a power delivery system having a continuously variable ratio transmission

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Frank, Andrew A.

    1984-01-01

    A control system and method for a power delivery system, such as in an automotive vehicle, having an engine coupled to a continuously variable ratio transmission (CVT). Totally independent control of engine and transmission enable the engine to precisely follow a desired operating characteristic, such as the ideal operating line for minimum fuel consumption. CVT ratio is controlled as a function of commanded power or torque and measured load, while engine fuel requirements (e.g., throttle position) are strictly a function of measured engine speed. Fuel requirements are therefore precisely adjusted in accordance with the ideal characteristic for any load placed on the engine.

  14. Concentration Ratios for Cesium and Strontium in Produce Near Los Alamos

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. Salazar, M.McNaughton, P.R. Fresquez

    2006-03-01

    The ratios of the concentrations of radionuclides in produce (fruits, vegetables, and grains) to the concentrations in the soil have been measured for cesium and strontium at locations near Los Alamos. The Soil, Foodstuffs, and Biota Team of the Meteorology and Air Quality Group of the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) obtained the data at locations within a radius of 50 miles of LANL. The concentration ratios are in good agreement with previous measurements: 0.01 to 0.06 for cesium-137 and 0.1 to 0.5 for strontium-90 (wet-weight basis).

  15. Spitzer SAGE-Spec: Near infrared spectroscopy, dust shells, and cool envelopes in extreme Large Magellanic Cloud asymptotic giant branch stars

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blum, R. D.; Srinivasan, S.; Kemper, F.; Ling, B.

    2014-11-01

    K-band spectra are presented for a sample of 39 Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) SAGE-Spec sources in the Large Magellanic Cloud. The spectra exhibit characteristics in very good agreement with their positions in the near-infrared—Spitzer color-magnitude diagrams and their properties as deduced from the Spitzer IRS spectra. Specifically, the near-infrared spectra show strong atomic and molecular features representative of oxygen-rich and carbon-rich asymptotic giant branch stars, respectively. A small subset of stars was chosen from the luminous and red extreme ''tip'' of the color-magnitude diagram. These objects have properties consistent with dusty envelopes but also cool, carbon-rich ''stellar'' cores. Modest amounts of dust mass loss combine with the stellar spectral energy distribution to make these objects appear extreme in their near-infrared and mid-infrared colors. One object in our sample, HV 915, a known post-asymptotic giant branch star of the RV Tau type, exhibits CO 2.3 μm band head emission consistent with previous work that demonstrates that the object has a circumstellar disk.

  16. Optimization Method to Branch and Bound Large SBO State Spaces Under Dynamic Probabilistic Risk Assessment via use of LENDIT Scales and S2R2 Sets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joseph W. Nielsen; Akira Tokurio; Robert Hiromoto; Jivan Khatry

    2014-06-01

    Traditional Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) methods have been developed and are quite effective in evaluating risk associated with complex systems, but lack the capability to evaluate complex dynamic systems. These time and energy scales associated with the transient may vary as a function of transition time to a different physical state. Dynamic PRA (DPRA) methods provide a more rigorous analysis of complex dynamic systems, while complete, results in issues associated with combinatorial explosion. In order to address the combinatorial complexity arising from the number of possible state configurations and discretization of transition times, a characteristic scaling metric (LENDIT length, energy, number, distribution, information and time) is proposed as a means to describe systems uniformly and thus provide means to describe relational constraints expected in the dynamics of a complex (coupled) systems. Thus when LENDIT is used to characterize four sets state, system, resource and response (S2R2) describing reactor operations (normal and off-normal), LENDIT and S2R2 in combination have the potential to branch and bound the state space investigated by DPRA. In this paper we introduce the concept of LENDIT scales and S2R2 sets applied to a branch-and-bound algorithm and apply the methods to a station black out transient (SBO).

  17. Preliminary core design studies for the advanced burner reactor over a wide range of conversion ratios.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoffman, E. A.; Yang, W. S.; Hill, R. N.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2008-05-05

    A consistent set of designs for 1000 MWt commercial-scale sodium-cooled Advance Burner Reactors (ABR) have been developed for both metal and oxide-fueled cores with conversion ratios from breakeven (CR=1.0) to fertile-free (CR=0.0). These designs are expected to satisfy thermal and irradiation damage limits based on the currently available data. The very low conversion ratio designs require fuel that is beyond the current fuel database, which is anticipated to be qualified by and for the Advanced Burned Test Reactor. Safety and kinetic parameters were calculated, but a safety analysis was not performed. Development of these designs was required to achieve the primary goal of this study, which was to generate representative fuel cycle mass flows for system studies of ABRs as part of the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP). There are slight variations with conversion ratio but the basic ABR configuration consists of 144 fuel assemblies and between 9 and 22 primary control assemblies for both the metal and oxide-fueled cores. Preliminary design studies indicated that it is feasible to design the ABR to accommodate a wide range of conversion ratio by employing different assembly designs and including sufficient control assemblies to accommodate the large reactivity swing at low conversion ratios. The assemblies are designed to fit within the same geometry, but the size and number of fuel pins within each assembly are significantly different in order to achieve the target conversion ratio while still satisfying thermal limits. Current irradiation experience would allow for a conversion ratio of somewhat below 0.75. The fuel qualification for the first ABR should expand this experience to allow for much lower conversion ratios and higher bunrups. The current designs were based on assumptions about the performance of high and very high enrichment fuel, which results in significant uncertainty about the details of the designs. However, the basic fuel cycle performance

  18. Effect of species and wood to bark ratio on pelleting of southern woods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bradfield, J.; Levi, M.P.

    1984-01-01

    Six common southern hardwoods and loblolly pine were pelleted in a laboratory pellet mill. The pellet furnishes were blended to test the effect of different wood to bark ratios on pellet durability and production rate. Included was a ratio chosen to simulate the wood to bark ratio found in whole-tree chips. This furnish produced good quality pellets for all species tested. Pelleting of the pure wood of hardwoods was not successful; furnish routinely blocked the pellet mill dies. Pure pine wood, however, did produce acceptable pellets. It was noted that, as lignin and extractive content increased above a threshold level, the precentage of fines produced in a pellet durability test increased. Thus, all pine and tupelo wood/bark mixes produces high fines. This reduces the desirability of the pellets in the marketplace. Further research is necessary to confirm this relationship. This study suggests that both tree species and wood/bark ratio affect the durability of pellets and the rate with which they can be produced in a laboratory pellet mill. 9 references.

  19. Alkaline solution/binder ratio as a determining factor in the alkaline activation of aluminosilicates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ruiz-Santaquiteria, C.; Fernandez-Jimenez, A.; Palomo, A.

    2012-09-15

    This study investigates the effect of the alkaline solution/binder (S/B) ratio on the composition and nanostructure of the reaction products generated in the alkaline activation of aluminosilicates. The experiments used two mixtures of fly ash and dehydroxylated white clay and for each of these, varying proportions of the solution components. The alkali activator was an 8 M NaOH solution (with and without sodium silicate) used at three S/B ratios: 0.50, 0.75 and 1.25. The {sup 29}Si, {sup 27}Al MAS NMR and XRD characterisation of the reaction products reveal that for ratios nearest the value delivering suitable paste workability, the reaction-product composition and structure depend primarily on the nature and composition of the starting materials and the alkaline activator used. However, when an excess alkaline activator is present in the system, the reaction products tend to exhibit SiO{sub 2}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} ratios of approximately 1, irrespective of the composition of the starting binder or the alkaline activator.

  20. Global gyrokinetic stability of collisionless microtearing modes in large aspect ratio tokamaks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swamy, Aditya K.; Ganesh, R., E-mail: ganesh@ipr.res.in [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar (India); Chowdhury, J. [Department of Physics, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309 (United States); Brunner, S.; Vaclavik, J.; Villard, L. [CRPP, EPFL, 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2014-08-15

    Linear full radius gyrokinetic calculations show the existence of unstable microtearing modes (MTMs) in purely collisionless, high temperature, large aspect ratio tokamak plasmas. The present study takes into account fully gyrokinetic highly passing ions and electrons. The global 2-D structures of the collisionless mode with full radius coupling of the poloidal modes is obtained and compared with another electromagnetic mode, namely, the Alfvn Ion Temperature Gradient (AITG) mode (or Kinetic Ballooning Mode, KBM) for the same equilibrium profile. Several important characteristics of the modes are brought out and compared, such as a clear signature in the symmetry properties of the two modes, the plasma? dependence, and radial and poloidal length scales of the electrostatic and magnetic vector potential fluctuations. Extensive parameter scans for this collisionless microtearing mode reveal the scaling of the growth rate with ? and the electron temperature gradient ?{sub e}. Scans at different ? values show an inverse relationship between the ?{sub e} threshold and ?, leading to a stability diagram, and implying that the mode might exist at moderate to strong temperature gradients for finite ? plasmas in large aspect ratio tokamaks. In contrast to small aspect ratio tokamaks where the trapped electron magnetic drift resonance is found to be important, in large aspect ratio tokamaks, a strong destabilization due to the magnetic drift resonance of passing electrons is observed and is identified as a possible collisionless drive mechanism for the collisionless MTM.

  1. Characterization of Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGS) films with varying gallium ratios

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Claypoole, Jesse; Peace, Bernadette; Sun, Neville; Dwyer, Dan; Eisaman, Matthew D.; Haldar, Pradeep; Efstathiadis, Harry

    2015-09-05

    Cu(In1-x,Gax)Se2 (CIGS) absorber layers were deposited on molybdenum (Mo) coated soda-lime glass substrates with varying Ga content (described as Ga/(In+Ga) ratios) with respect to depth. As the responsible mechanisms for the limitation of the performance of the CIGS solar cells with high Ga contents are not well understood, the goal of this work was to investigate different properties of CIGS absorber films with Ga/(In+Ga) ratios varied between 0.29 and 0.41 (as determined by X-ray florescence spectroscopy (XRF)) in order to better understand the role that the Ga content has on film quality. The Ga grading in the CIGS layer hasmore » the effect causing a higher bandgap toward the surface and Mo contact while the band gap in the middle of the CIGS layer is lower. Also, a wider and larger Ga/(In+Ga) grading dip located deeper in the CIGS absorber layers tend to produce larger grains in the regions of the films that have lower Ga/(In+Ga) ratios. It was found that surface roughness decreases from 51.2 nm to 41.0 nm with increasing Ga/(In+Ga) ratios. However, the surface roughness generally decreases if the Ga grading occurs deeper in the absorber layer.« less

  2. Characterization of Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGS) films with varying gallium ratios

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Claypoole, Jesse; Peace, Bernadette; Sun, Neville; Dwyer, Dan; Eisaman, Matthew D.; Haldar, Pradeep; Efstathiadis, Harry

    2015-09-05

    Cu(In1-x,Gax)Se2 (CIGS) absorber layers were deposited on molybdenum (Mo) coated soda-lime glass substrates with varying Ga content (described as Ga/(In+Ga) ratios) with respect to depth. As the responsible mechanisms for the limitation of the performance of the CIGS solar cells with high Ga contents are not well understood, the goal of this work was to investigate different properties of CIGS absorber films with Ga/(In+Ga) ratios varied between 0.29 and 0.41 (as determined by X-ray florescence spectroscopy (XRF)) in order to better understand the role that the Ga content has on film quality. The Ga grading in the CIGS layer has the effect causing a higher bandgap toward the surface and Mo contact while the band gap in the middle of the CIGS layer is lower. Also, a wider and larger Ga/(In+Ga) grading dip located deeper in the CIGS absorber layers tend to produce larger grains in the regions of the films that have lower Ga/(In+Ga) ratios. It was found that surface roughness decreases from 51.2 nm to 41.0 nm with increasing Ga/(In+Ga) ratios. However, the surface roughness generally decreases if the Ga grading occurs deeper in the absorber layer.

  3. Significant enhancement of the strength-to-resistivity ratio by using nanotwins in epitaxial Cu films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Misra, Amit; Ronningh, Filip; Anderoglu, Osman; Zhang, X

    2008-01-01

    Epitaxial nanotwinned Cu films, with an average twin spacing ranging from 7 to 16 nm, exhibit a high ratio of strength-to-electrical resisitivity, -400 MPa({mu}{Omega}cm){sup -1}. The hardness of these Cu films approaches 2.8 GPa, and their electrical resistivities are comparable to that of oxygen-free high-conductivity Cu. Compared to high-angle grain boundaries, coherent twin interfaces possess inherently high resistance to the transmission of single dislocations, and yet an order of magnitude lower electron scattering coefficient, determined to be 1.5-5 x 10{sup -7} {mu}{Omega}cm{sup 2} at room temperature. Analytical studies as well as experimental results show that, in polycrystalline Cu, grain refinement leads to a maximum of the strength-to-resistivity ratio, -250 MPa({mu}{Omega}cm){sup -1}, when grain size is comparable to the mean-free path of electrons. However, in twinned Cu, such a ratio increases continuously with decreasing twin spacing down to a few nanometers. Hence nanoscale growth twins are more effective to achieve a higher strength-to-resistivity ratio than high-angle grain boundaries.

  4. Magnesite Step Growth Rates as a Function of the Aqueous Magnesium:Carbonate Ratio

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bracco, Jacquelyn N.; Stack, Andrew G.; Higgins, Steven R.

    2014-10-01

    Step velocities of monolayer-height steps on the (101⁻4) magnesite surface have been measured as functions of the aqueous magnesium-to-carbonate ratio and saturation index (SI) using a hydrothermal atomic force microscope (HAFM). At SI ≤ 1.9 and 80-90 °C, step velocities were found to be invariant with changes in the magnesium-to-carbonate ratio, an observation in contrast with standard models for growth and dissolution of ionically-bonded, multi-component crystals. However, at high saturation indices (SI = 2.15), step velocities displayed a ratio dependence, maximized at magnesium-to-carbonate ratios slightly greater than 1:1. Traditional affinity-based models were unable to describe growth rates at the highermore » saturation index. Step velocities also could not be modeled solely through nucleation of kink sites, in contrast to other minerals whose bonding between constituent ions is also dominantly ionic in nature, such as calcite and barite. Instead, they could be described only by a model that incorporates both kink nucleation and propagation. Based on observed step morphological changes at these higher saturation indices, the step velocity maximum at SI = 2.15 is likely due to the rate of attachment to propagating kink sites overcoming the rate of detachment from kink sites as the latter becomes less significant under far from equilibrium conditions.« less

  5. Using Tensor Momentum Dependent Deuteron Potential to Extract the Asymptotic D/S Ratio

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Emad El-Deen, A. Sultan; Mustafa, Mustafa M.; Zahran, Elbadry S.

    2010-09-30

    A new value for the deuteron asymptotic D/S ratio {eta} = 0.02640{+-}0.00024 is extracted from an empirical linear {eta}-Q relation found for a class of deuteron momentum dependent potentials with tensor momentum dependent part. These potentials fit a recently published phase shift analysis and the binding energy of the deuteron.

  6. Effects of fuel type and equivalence ratios on the flickering of triple flames

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sahu, K.B.; Kundu, A.; Ganguly, R.; Datta, A.

    2009-02-15

    An experimental study has been conducted in axisymmetric, co-flowing triple flames with different equivalence ratios of the inner and outer reactant streams (2<{phi}{sub in}<3 and 0{<=}{phi}{sub out}<0.7). Different fuel combinations, like propane/propane, propane/methane or methane/methane in the inner and outer streams respectively, have been used in the experiments. The structures of the triple flames have been compared for the different fuel combinations and equivalence ratios. The conditions under which triple flames exhibit oscillation have been identified. During the oscillation, the non-premixed flame and the outer lean premixed flame flicker strongly, while the inner rich premixed flame remains more or less stable. The flickering frequency has been evaluated through image processing and fast Fourier transform (FFT) of the average pixel intensity of the image frames. It is observed that, for all the fuel combinations, the frequency decreases with the increase in the outer equivalence ratio, while it is relatively invariant with the change in the inner equivalence ratio. However, an increase in the inner equivalence ratio affects the structure of the flame by increasing the heights of the inner premixed flame and non-premixed flame and also enlarges the yellow soot-laden zone at the tip of the inner flame. A scaling analysis of the oscillating flames has been performed based on the measured parameters, which show a variation of Strouhal number (St) with Richardson number (Ri) as St {proportional_to} Ri{sup 0.5}. The fuel type is found to have no influence on this correlation. (author)

  7. Sex ratios, bill deformities, and PCBs in nestling double-crested cormorants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stromborg, K.L. [Fish and Wildlife Service, Green Bay, WI (United States); Sileo, L. [National Biological Service, Madison, WI (United States); Tuinen, P. van [Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Deformed double-crested cormorant (Phalacrocorax auritus) nestlings examined from 1988--1992 had a sex ratio highly skewed toward females (66 of 81) compared to normal nestlings (43 of 80) (P < 0.005). The collection site, Green Bay, WI, is heavily contaminated with PCBs and the possibility of gender alteration was investigated in a designed study by comparing the sex of nestling birds determined using three techniques. These nestlings were collected at five sites, both contaminated and uncontaminated. Genetic sex was determined by cytogenetic techniques and phenotypic sex was determined by macroscopic and histologic examination of gonads. Differences between techniques resulted in a few instances of classifying genetic males as females by one or the other gonadal examinations. Sex ratios of the nestlings from the five sites were compared to binomial distributions assuming equal probabilities of males and females. Sex ratios of normal nestlings were not different from expected regardless of sex determination technique (P > 0.10). Deformed nestlings sexed cytogenetically or histologically did not differ from expected (P > 0.40), but deformed nestlings tended to be classified , macroscopically as females at a higher rate than expected (P = 0.092). The observed sex ratios obtained by macroscopic techniques did not differ between the 1968--1992 observational study and the designed study (P > 0.50). Histologic examination suggested two explanations for the skewed sex ratio: nestlings with undeterminable macroscopic sex usually had testes and, some gonads which grossly resembled ovaries were, in fact, testes. If phenotypic gender alteration is present in these birds, it is more evident at the gross structural level than at the histologic level.

  8. SU-E-I-18: CT Scanner QA Using Normalized CTDI Ratio

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Randazzo, M; Tambasco, M; Russell, B

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To create a ratio of weighted computed tomography dose index (CTDIw) data normalized to in-air measurements (CTDIair) as a function of beam quality to create a look-up table for frequent, rapid quality assurance (QA) checks of CTDI. Methods: The CTDIw values were measured according to TG-63 protocol using a pencil ionization chamber (Unfors Xi CT detector) and head and body Polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) phantoms (16 and 32 cm diameter, respectively). Single scan dose profiles were measured at each clinically available energy (80,100,120,140 kVp) on three different CT scanners (two Siemens SOMATOM Definition Flash and one GE Optima), using a tube current of 400 mA, a one second rotation time, and the widest available beam width (32 × 0.6 mm and 16 × 1.25 mm, respectively). These values were normalized to CTDIair measurements using the same conditions as CTDIw. The ratios (expressed in cGy/R) were assessed for each scanner as a function of each energy's half value layer (HVL) paired with the phantom's appropriate bow tie filter measured in mmAl. Results: Normalized CTDI values vary linearly with HVL for both the head and body phantoms. The ratios for the two Siemens machines are very similar at each energy. Compared to the GE scanner, these values vary between 10–20% for each kVp setting. Differences in CTDIair contribute most to the deviation of the ratios across machines. Ratios are independent of both mAs and collimation. Conclusion: Look-up tables constructed of normalized CTDI values as a function of HVL can be used to derive CTDIw data from only three in-air measurements (one for CTDIair and two with added filtration for HVL) to allow for simple, frequent QA checks without CT phantom setup. Future investigations will involve comparing results with Monte Carlo simulations for validation.

  9. Measurement of branching fraction and first evidence of CP violation in B⁰→a₁±(1260)π∓ decays

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Dalseno, J.; Adachi, I.; Aihara, H.; Asner, D. M.; Aulchenko, V.; Aushev, T.; Bakich, A. M.; Bay, A.; Belous, K.; Bhuyan, B.; et al

    2012-11-26

    We present a measurement of the branching fraction and time-dependent CP violation parameters in B⁰→a±₁(1260)π∓ decays. The results are obtained from the final data sample containing 772×10⁶ BB¯¯¯ pairs collected at the Υ(4S) resonance with the Belle detector at the KEKB asymmetric-energy e⁺e⁻ collider. We obtain the product branching fraction B(B⁰→a±₁(1260)π∓)×B(a±₁(1260)→π±π∓π±)=(11.1±1.0(stat)±1.4(syst))×10⁻⁶ and an upper limit on the product branching fraction for a possible decay with the same final state B(B⁰→a±₂(1320)π∓)×B(a±₂(1320)→π±π∓π±)<2.2×10⁻⁶at 90% CL. In a time-dependent measurement to extract CP asymmetries, we obtain the CP violation parameters ACP=–0.06±0.05(stat)±0.07(syst), CCP=–0.01±0.11(stat)±0.09(syst), SCP=–0.51±0.14(stat)±0.08(syst), representing time- and flavor-integrated direct, flavor-dependent direct and mixing-induced CP violation,more » respectively. Simultaneously, we also extract the CP-conserving parameters ΔC=+0.54±0.11(stat)±0.07(syst), ΔS=–0.09±0.14(stat)±0.06(syst), which, respectively, describe a rate difference and strong phase difference between the decay channels where the a±₁ does not contain the spectator quark and those where it does. We find first evidence of mixing-induced CP violation in B⁰→a±₁(1260)π∓ decays with 3.1σ significance. The rate where the a±₁ does not contain the spectator quark from the B meson is found to dominate the rate where it does at the 4.1σ level. However, there is no evidence for either time- and flavor-integrated direct CP violation or flavor-dependent direct CP violation.« less

  10. Dose ratio proton radiography using the proximal side of the Bragg peak

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doolan, P. J. Royle, G.; Gibson, A.; Lu, H.-M.; Prieels, D.; Bentefour, E. H.

    2015-04-15

    Purpose: In recent years, there has been a movement toward single-detector proton radiography, due to its potential ease of implementation within the clinical environment. One such single-detector technique is the dose ratio method in which the dose maps from two pristine Bragg peaks are recorded beyond the patient. To date, this has only been investigated on the distal side of the lower energy Bragg peak, due to the sharp falloff. The authors investigate the limits and applicability of the dose ratio method on the proximal side of the lower energy Bragg peak, which has the potential to allow a much wider range of water-equivalent thicknesses (WET) to be imaged. Comparisons are made with the use of the distal side of the Bragg peak. Methods: Using the analytical approximation for the Bragg peak, the authors generated theoretical dose ratio curves for a range of energy pairs, and then determined how an uncertainty in the dose ratio would translate to a spread in the WET estimate. By defining this spread as the accuracy one could achieve in the WET estimate, the authors were able to generate lookup graphs of the range on the proximal side of the Bragg peak that one could reliably use. These were dependent on the energy pair, noise level in the dose ratio image and the required accuracy in the WET. Using these lookup graphs, the authors investigated the applicability of the technique for a range of patient treatment sites. The authors validated the theoretical approach with experimental measurements using a complementary metal oxide semiconductor active pixel sensor (CMOS APS), by imaging a small sapphire sphere in a high energy proton beam. Results: Provided the noise level in the dose ratio image was 1% or less, a larger spread of WETs could be imaged using the proximal side of the Bragg peak (max 5.31 cm) compared to the distal side (max 2.42 cm). In simulation, it was found that, for a pediatric brain, it is possible to use the technique to image a region with a

  11. Improved precision and accuracy in quantifying plutonium isotope ratios by RIMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Isselhardt, B. H.; Savina, M. R.; Kucher, A.; Gates, S. D.; Knight, K. B.; Hutcheon, I. D.

    2015-09-01

    Resonance ionization mass spectrometry (RIMS) holds the promise of rapid, isobar-free quantification of actinide isotope ratios in as-received materials (i.e. not chemically purified). Recent progress in achieving this potential using two Pu test materials is presented. RIMS measurements were conducted multiple times over a period of two months on two different Pu solutions deposited on metal surfaces. Measurements were bracketed with a Pu isotopic standard, and yielded absolute accuracies of the measured 240Pu/239Pu ratios of 0.7% and 0.58%, with precisions (95% confidence intervals) of 1.49% and 0.91%. In conclusion, the minor isotope 238Pu was also quantified despite the presence of a significant quantity of 238U in the samples.

  12. Improved precision and accuracy in quantifying plutonium isotope ratios by RIMS

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Isselhardt, B. H.; Savina, M. R.; Kucher, A.; Gates, S. D.; Knight, K. B.; Hutcheon, I. D.

    2015-09-01

    Resonance ionization mass spectrometry (RIMS) holds the promise of rapid, isobar-free quantification of actinide isotope ratios in as-received materials (i.e. not chemically purified). Recent progress in achieving this potential using two Pu test materials is presented. RIMS measurements were conducted multiple times over a period of two months on two different Pu solutions deposited on metal surfaces. Measurements were bracketed with a Pu isotopic standard, and yielded absolute accuracies of the measured 240Pu/239Pu ratios of 0.7% and 0.58%, with precisions (95% confidence intervals) of 1.49% and 0.91%. In conclusion, the minor isotope 238Pu was also quantified despite the presence ofmore » a significant quantity of 238U in the samples.« less

  13. Shear-viscosity to entropy-density ratio from giant dipole resonances in hot nuclei

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nguyen Dinh Dang

    2011-09-15

    The Green-Kubo relation and fluctuation-dissipation theorem are employed to calculate the shear viscosity {eta} of a finite hot nucleus directly from the width and energy of the giant dipole resonance (GDR) of this nucleus. The ratio {eta}/s of shear viscosity {eta} to entropy density s is extracted from the experimental systematics of the GDR in copper, tin, and lead isotopes at finite temperature T. These empirical results are then compared with the predictions by several independent models as well as with almost model-independent estimations. Based on these results, it is concluded that the ratio {eta}/s in medium and heavy nuclei decreases with increasing temperature T to reach (1.3--4)x({h_bar}/2{pi})/(4{pi}k{sub B}) at T=5 MeV.

  14. Structure and electrical characterization of gallium arsenide nanowires with different V/III ratio growth parameters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muhammad, R.; Ahamad, R.; Ibrahim, Z.; Othaman, Z.

    2014-03-05

    Gallium arsenide (GaAs) nanowires were grown vertically on GaAs(111)B substrate by gold-assisted using metal-organic chemical vapour deposition. Field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and conductivity atomic force microscopy (CAFM) analysis were carried out to investigate the effects of V/III ratio on structural properties and current-voltage changes in the wires. Results show that GaAs NWs grow preferably in the wurtzite crystal structure than zinc blende crystal structure with increasing V/III ratio. Additionally, CAFM studies have revealed that zincblende nanowires indicate ohmic characteristic compared to oscillation current occurred for wurtzite structures. The GaAs NWs with high quality structures are needed in solar cells technology for trapping energy that directly converts of sunlight into electricity with maximum capacity.

  15. Simultaneous π/2 rotation of two spin species of different gyromagnetic ratios

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chu, Ping -Han; Peng, Jen -Chieh

    2015-06-05

    Here, we examine the characteristics of the π/2 pulse for simultaneously rotating two spin species of different gyromagnetic ratios with the same sign. For a π/2 pulse using a rotating magnetic field, we derive an equation relating the frequency and strength of the pulse to the gyromagnetic ratios of the two particles and the strength of the constant holding field. For a π/2 pulse using a linear oscillatory magnetic field, we obtain the solutions numerically, and compare them with the solutions for the rotating π/2 pulse. Application of this analysis to the specific case of rotating neutrons and 3He atomsmore » simultaneously with a π/2 pulse, proposed for a neutron electric dipole moment experiment, is also presented.« less

  16. Light emitting diode with high aspect ratio submicron roughness for light extraction and methods of forming

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Li, Ting

    2013-08-13

    The surface morphology of an LED light emitting surface is changed by applying a reactive ion etch (RIE) process to the light emitting surface. High aspect ratio, submicron roughness is formed on the light emitting surface by transferring a thin film metal hard-mask having submicron patterns to the surface prior to applying a reactive ion etch process. The submicron patterns in the metal hard-mask can be formed using a low cost, commercially available nano-patterned template which is transferred to the surface with the mask. After subsequently binding the mask to the surface, the template is removed and the RIE process is applied for time duration sufficient to change the morphology of the surface. The modified surface contains non-symmetric, submicron structures having high aspect ratio which increase the efficiency of the device.

  17. Light emitting diode with high aspect ratio submicron roughness for light extraction and methods of forming

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Li, Ting

    2011-04-26

    The surface morphology of an LED light emitting surface is changed by applying a reactive ion etch (RIE) process to the light emitting surface. High aspect ratio, submicron roughness is formed on the light emitting surface by transferring a thin film metal hard-mask having submicron patterns to the surface prior to applying a reactive ion etch process. The submicron patterns in the metal hard-mask can be formed using a low cost, commercially available nano-patterned template which is transferred to the surface with the mask. After subsequently binding the mask to the surface, the template is removed and the RIE process is applied for time duration sufficient to change the morphology of the surface. The modified surface contains non-symmetric, submicron structures having high aspect ratio which increase the efficiency of the device.

  18. Effect on the tritium breeding ratio for a distributed ICRF antenna in a DEMO reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garcia, A.; Noterdaeme, J.-M.; Fischer, U.; Dies, J.

    2015-12-10

    The paper reports results of MCNP-5 calculations to assess the effect on the Tritium Breeding Ratio (TBR) when integrating a distributed Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequencies (ICRF) antenna in the blanket of DEMO fusion power reactor. The calculations consider different parameters such as the ICRF covering ratio and the type of breeding blanket including the Helium Cooled Pebble Bed (HCPB) and the Helium Cooled Lithium Lead (HCLL) concepts. For an antenna with a full toroidal circumference of 360°, located poloidally at 40° with a poloidal extension of 1 m, the reduction of the TBR is −0.349% for the HCPB blanket and −0.532% for the HCLL blanket. The distributed ICRF antenna is thus shown to have only a marginal effect on the TBR of the DEMO reactor.

  19. Measurement of the nuclear multiplicity ratio or image hadronization K0s at CLAS

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Daniel, A.; Hicks, K.; Brooks, W. K.; Hakobyan, H.; Adhikari, K. P.; Adikaram, D.; Aghasyan, M.; Amarian, M.; Anghinolfi, M.; Avakian, H.; et al

    2011-11-01

    The influence of cold nuclear matter on lepto-production of hadrons in semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering is measured using the CLAS detector in Hall B at Jefferson Lab and a 5.014 GeV electron beam. We report the K0s multiplicity ratios for targets of C, Fe, and Pb relative to deuterium as a function of the fractional virtual photon energy z transferred to the K0sand the transverse momentum squared p2T of the K0s. We find that the multiplicity ratios for K0s are reduced in the nuclear medium at high z and low p2T, with a trend for the K0s transverse momentum tomore » be broadened in the nucleus for large p2T.« less

  20. Numerical studies of the flux-to-current ratio method in the KIPT neutron source facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cao, Y.; Gohar, Y.; Zhong, Z.

    2013-07-01

    The reactivity of a subcritical assembly has to be monitored continuously in order to assure its safe operation. In this paper, the flux-to-current ratio method has been studied as an approach to provide the on-line reactivity measurement of the subcritical system. Monte Carlo numerical simulations have been performed using the KIPT neutron source facility model. It is found that the reactivity obtained from the flux-to-current ratio method is sensitive to the detector position in the subcritical assembly. However, if multiple detectors are located about 12 cm above the graphite reflector and 54 cm radially, the technique is shown to be very accurate in determining the k{sub eff} this facility in the range of 0.75 to 0.975. (authors)

  1. Measurement of the nuclear multiplicity ratio or image hadronization at CLAS

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Daniel, A; Brooks, W K; Hakobyan, H; Adhikari, K P; Adikaram, D; Aghasyan, M; Amarian, M; Anghinolfi, M; Avakian, H; Baghdasryan, H; et al

    2011-11-30

    The influence of cold nuclear matter on lepto-production of hadrons in semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering is measured using the CLAS detector in Hall B at Jefferson Lab and a 5.014 GeV electron beam. We report the View the MathML source multiplicity ratios for targets of C, Fe, and Pb relative to deuterium as a function of the fractional virtual photon energy z transferred to the View the MathML source and the transverse momentum squared View the MathML source of the View the MathML source. We find that the multiplicity ratios for View the MathML source are reduced in the nuclearmoremedium at high z and low View the MathML source, with a trend for the View the MathML source transverse momentum to be broadened in the nucleus for large View the MathML source.less

  2. Heat pump employing optimal refrigerant compressor for low pressure ratio applications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ecker, Amir L.

    1982-01-01

    What is disclosed is a heat pump apparatus for conditioning a fluid characterized by a fluid handler for circulating the fluid in heat exchange relationship with a refrigerant fluid; two refrigerant heat exchangers; one for effecting the heat exchange with the fluid and a second refrigerant-heat exchange fluid heat exchanger for effecting a low pressure ratio of compression of the refrigerant; a rotary compressor for compressing the refrigerant with low power consumption at the low pressure ratio; at least one throttling valve connecting at the inlet side of heat exchanger in which liquid refrigerant is vaporized; a refrigerant circuit serially connecting the above elements; refrigerant in the circuit; a source of heat exchange fluid; heat exchange fluid circulating device and heat exchange fluid circuit for circulating the heat exchange fluid in heat exchange relationship with the refrigerant.

  3. High Precision Measurement of the Proton Elastic Form Factor Ratio at Low Q2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xiaohui Zhan

    2009-12-01

    A high precision measurement of the proton elastic form factor ratio µpGEp/GMp in the range Q2 = 0.3–0.7 GeV2/c2 was performed using recoil polarimetry in Jefferson Lab Hall A. In this low Q2 range, previous data from LEDEX [5] along with many fits and calculations [2, 3, 4] indicate substantial deviations of the ratio from unity. In this new measurement, with 80% polarized electron beam for 24 days, we are able to achieve <1% statistical uncertainty. Preliminary results are a few percent lower than expected from previous world data and fits, indicating a smaller GEp at this region. Beyond the intrinsic interest in nucleon structure, the improved form factor measurements also have implications for DVCS, determinations of the proton Zemach radius and strangeness form factors through parity violation experiments.

  4. Effect of carbonate and phosphate ratios on the transformation of calcium orthophosphates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eliassi, Mohammad Daoud; Zhao, Wei; Tan, Wen Feng

    2014-07-01

    Graphical abstract: Complexes among phosphate, carbonate and calcium have been prepared via a facile hydrothermal route. The synthesized product at the low (0.15) and the high (1.8) molar ratio of PO{sub 4}{sup 3−}/CO{sub 3}{sup 2−} is calcium phosphate hydrate and hydroxylapatite (HAp), respectively. Molar ratios of PO{sub 4}{sup 3−}/CO{sub 3}{sup 2−} are effective on the reduction of carbonate activity during the crystallization of HAp. - Highlights: • Formation of different complexes from CO{sub 3}{sup 2−}, PO{sub 4}{sup 3−} and Ca{sup 2+} solutions at 60 °C. • Molar ratios of PO{sub 4}{sup 3−}/CO{sub 3}{sup 2} cause changes in phase and size of synthesized products. • Addition of PO{sub 4}{sup 3} inhibited the activity of CO{sub 3}{sup 2−} during bound with Ca{sup 2+}. • The phase transformation was completed, when CO{sub 3}{sup 2−} peaks disappeared in FTIR. • PO{sub 4}{sup 3−}, CO{sub 3}{sup 2−} and Ca{sup 2+} distributed heterogeneously on the surface of precipitation. - Abstract: Complexes among phosphate, carbonate and calcium have been synthesized by a designed hydrothermal method. Effects of carbonate and phosphate ratios on the transformation of calcium-orthophosphates were investigated. With X-ray diffraction measurement the synthesized product at the low (0.15) and the high (1.8) molar ratio of PO{sub 4}{sup 3−}/CO{sub 3}{sup 2−} is calcium phosphate hydrate at pH 9.0, and hydroxylapatite (HAp) at pH 8.0, respectively. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy of product at the high ratio (1.8) of PO{sub 4}{sup 3−}/CO{sub 3}{sup 2−} shows that the CO{sub 3}{sup 2−} peaks disappear, and the strong peaks at 1412 and 1460 cm{sup −1} are assigned to the vibrations of PO{sub 4}{sup 3−} in HAp. {sup 31}P nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of products at the low (0.15–0.6) to the high (1.2–1.8) ratios of PO{sub 4}{sup 3−}/CO{sub 3}{sup 2−} are obtained at 2.9 and 2.7 ppm, respectively. Molar ratios of PO

  5. Measurement of the Absolute Branching FractionsB to D\\pi, D^*\\pi, D^{**}\\pi with aMissing Mass Method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aubert, B.; Bona, M.; Boutigny, D.; Couderc, F.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; Grauges, E.; Palano, A.; Chen, J.C.; Qi, N.D.; Rong, G.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y.S.; Eigen, G.; Ofte, I.; Stugu, B.; Abrams, G.S.; Battaglia, M.; /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /Bristol U. /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Karlsruhe U., EKP /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT, LNS /McGill U. /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Pennsylvania U. /Perugia U. /INFN, Perugia /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Prairie View A-M /Princeton U. /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /South Carolina U. /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Stony Brook /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /Turin U. /INFN, Turin /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Valencia U., IFIC /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison /Yale U.

    2006-11-30

    We present branching fraction measurements of charged and neutral B decays to D{pi}{sup -}, D*{pi}{sup -} and D**{pi}{sup -} with a missing mass method, based on a sample of 231 million {Upsilon}(4S) {yields} B{bar B} pairs collected by the BABAR detector at the PEP-II e{sup +}e{sup -} collider. One of the B mesons is fully reconstructed and the other one decays to a reconstructed charged {pi} and a companion charmed meson identified by its recoil mass, inferred by kinematics. Here D** refers to the sum of all the non-strange charm meson states with masses in the range 2.2-2.8 GeV/c{sup 2}.

  6. Baseline Mapping Study of the Steed Pond Aquifer and Crouch Branch Confining Unit Beneath A/M Area, Savannah River Site, Aiken, South Carolina

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JACKSON, DENNISG.

    1998-09-01

    This report presents the results of a baseline mapping project conducted for the Environmental Restoration Department at Savannah River Site. The purpose of this report is to map the distribution of mud (clay and silt-sized material) within each hydrogeologic unit from the surface down to the top of the Crouch Branch aquifer beneath the A/M Area. The distribution of mud layers and variations in the percentage of clay and silt within the strata is extremely important in order to fully characterize the extent of DNAPL beneath the A/M Area and determine the geometry of the contaminant plumes emanating from them. Precision mapping of these layers can aid in locating areas where contamination is most likely to have migrated into the saturated zone. In addition, this information can be used to refine the current remediation systems or assist in designing new remedial systems.

  7. "Table A15. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for" " Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation by Census Region and Economic" " Characteristics of the Establishment, 1991" ,,,"Consumption","Major" " "," ","Consumption","per Dollar","Byproducts(b)","Fuel Oil(c)"," " " ","Consumption","per Dollar","of Value","as a

  8. "Table A48. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    8. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for" " Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation by Census Region, Census Division, and Economic" " Characteristics of the Establishment, 1994" ,,,"Consumption","Major" " "," ","Consumption","per Dollar","Byproducts(b)","Fuel Oil(c)"," " " ","Consumption","per Dollar","of

  9. "Table A50. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    0. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for" " Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation by Industry Group," " Selected Industries, and Economic Characteristics of the" " Establishment, 1991 (Continued)" ,,,,,"Major" ,,,"Consumption","Consumption per","Byproducts(c)","Fuel Oil(d)" ,,"Consumption","per Dollar","Dollar of Value","as a Percent

  10. Internal combustion engine cylinder-to-cylinder balancing with balanced air-fuel ratios

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Harris, Ralph E.; Bourn, Gary D.; Smalley, Anthony J.

    2006-01-03

    A method of balancing combustion among cylinders of an internal combustion engine. For each cylinder, a normalized peak firing pressure is calculated as the ratio of its peak firing pressure to its combustion pressure. Each cylinder's normalized peak firing pressure is compared to a target value for normalized peak firing pressure. The fuel flow is adjusted to any cylinder whose normalized peak firing pressure is not substantially equal to the target value.

  11. Fact #940: August 29, 2016 Diverging Trends of Engine Compression Ratio and

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Gasoline Octane Rating | Department of Energy From the 1920s to the 1970s, the evolution of engines (measured by compression ratio) and the evolution of fuels (measured by octane rating) occurred in tandem. Gasoline octane improvement during that period (red markers in the graph below) was likely due to refinery technology improvement and the addition of lead, which guards against engine knocking. In 1973, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) mandated a reduction in the lead content of

  12. Improving the efficiency of configurational-bias Monte Carlo: A density-guided method for generating bending angle trials for linear and branched molecules

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sepehri, Aliasghar; Loeffler, Troy D.; Chen, Bin

    2014-08-21

    A new method has been developed to generate bending angle trials to improve the acceptance rate and the speed of configurational-bias Monte Carlo. Whereas traditionally the trial geometries are generated from a uniform distribution, in this method we attempt to use the exact probability density function so that each geometry generated is likely to be accepted. In actual practice, due to the complexity of this probability density function, a numerical representation of this distribution function would be required. This numerical table can be generated a priori from the distribution function. This method has been tested on a united-atom model of alkanes including propane, 2-methylpropane, and 2,2-dimethylpropane, that are good representatives of both linear and branched molecules. It has been shown from these test cases that reasonable approximations can be made especially for the highly branched molecules to reduce drastically the dimensionality and correspondingly the amount of the tabulated data that is needed to be stored. Despite these approximations, the dependencies between the various geometrical variables can be still well considered, as evident from a nearly perfect acceptance rate achieved. For all cases, the bending angles were shown to be sampled correctly by this method with an acceptance rate of at least 96% for 2,2-dimethylpropane to more than 99% for propane. Since only one trial is required to be generated for each bending angle (instead of thousands of trials required by the conventional algorithm), this method can dramatically reduce the simulation time. The profiling results of our Monte Carlo simulation code show that trial generation, which used to be the most time consuming process, is no longer the time dominating component of the simulation.

  13. Dartmouth Stellar Evolution Database and the ACS Survey of Galactic Globular Clusters II. Stellar Evolution Tracks, Isochrones, Luminosity Functions, and Synthetic Horizontal-Branch Models

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Dotter, A; Chaboyer, B; Jevremovic, D; Kostov, V; Baron, E; Ferguson, J; Sarajedini, A; Anderson, J

    The Dartmouth Stellar Evolution Database is a collection of stellar evolution tracks and isochrones that spans a range of [Fe/H] from -2.5 to +0.5, [a/Fe] from -0.2 to +0.8 (for [Fe/H]<=0) or +0.2 (for [Fe/H]>0), and initial He mass fractions from Y=0.245 to 0.40. Stellar evolution tracks were computed for masses between 0.1 and 4 Msolar, allowing isochrones to be generated for ages as young as 250 Myr. For the range in masses where the core He flash occurs, separate He-burning tracks were computed starting from the zero age horizontal branch. The tracks and isochrones have been transformed to the observational plane in a variety of photometric systems including standard UBV(RI)C, Stromgren uvby, SDSS ugriz, 2MASS JHKs, and HST ACS/WFC and WFPC2. The Dartmouth Stellar Evolution Database is accessible through a Web site at http://stellar.dartmouth.edu/~models/ where all tracks, isochrones, and additional files can be downloaded. [Copied from online abstract of paper titled "Darmouth Stellar Evolution Database" authored by Dotter, Chaboyer, Jevremovic, Kostov, Baron, Ferguson, and Jason. Abstract is located at http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008ApJS..178...89D] Web tools are also available at the home page (http://stellar.dartmouth.edu/~models/index.html). These tools allow users to create isochrones and convert them to luminosity functions or create synthetic horizontal branch models.

  14. Survey of plutonium and uranium atom ratios and activity levels in Mortandad Canyon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gallaher, B.M.; Efurd, D.W.; Rokop, D.J.; Benjamin, T.M.; Stoker, A.K.

    1997-10-01

    For more than three decades, Mortandad Canyon has been the primary release area of treated liquid radioactive waste from the Los Alamos National Laboratory (Laboratory). In this survey, six water samples and seven stream sediment samples collected in Mortandad Canyon were analyzed by thermal ionization mass spectrometry to determine the plutonium and uranium activity levels and atom ratios. By measuring the {sup 240}Pu/{sup 239}Pu atom ratios, the Laboratory plutonium component was evaluated relative to that from global fallout. Measurements of the relative abundance of {sup 235}U and {sup 236}U were also used to identify non-natural components. The survey results indicate that the Laboratory plutonium and uranium concentrations in waters and sediments decrease relatively rapidly with distance downstream from the major industrial sources. Plutonium concentrations in shallow alluvial groundwater decrease by approximately 1,000-fold along a 3,000-ft distance. At the Laboratory downstream boundary, total plutonium and uranium concentrations were generally within regional background ranges previously reported. Laboratory-derived plutonium is readily distinguished from global fallout in on-site waters and sediments. The isotopic ratio data indicate off-site migration of trace levels of Laboratory plutonium in stream sediments to distances approximately two miles downstream of the Laboratory boundary.

  15. Gas breakdown mechanism in pulse-modulated asymmetric ratio frequency dielectric barrier discharges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Qi; Sun, Jizhong, E-mail: jsun@dlut.edu.cn; Ding, Zhenfeng; Ding, Hongbin; Wang, Dezhen [School of Physics and Optoelectronic Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116023 (China); Nozaki, Tomohiro [Department of Mechanical Sciences and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan); Wang, Zhanhui [Southwestern Institute of Physics, Chengdu 610041 (China)

    2014-08-15

    The gas breakdown mechanisms, especially the roles of metastable species in atmospheric pressure pulse-modulated ratio frequency barrier discharges with co-axial cylindrical electrodes, were studied numerically using a one dimensional self-consistent fluid model. Simulation results showed that in low duty cycle cases, the electrons generated from the channels associated with metastable species played a more important role in initializing next breakdown than the direct ionization of helium atoms of electronic grounded states by electron-impact. In order to quantitatively evaluate the contribution to the discharge by the metastables, we defined a characteristic time and examined how the value varied with the gap distance and the electrode asymmetry. The results indicated that the lifetime of the metastable species (including He*and He{sub 2}{sup *}) was much longer than that of the pulse-on period and as effective sources of producing electrons they lasted over a period up to millisecond. When the ratio of the outer radius to the inner radius of the cylindrical electrodes was far bigger than one, it was found that the metastables distributed mainly in a cylindrical region around the inner electrode. When the ratio decreased as the inner electrode moved outward, the density of metastables in the discharge region near the outer electrode became gradually noticeable. As the discharging gap continued to decrease, the two hill-shaped distributions gradually merged to one big hill. When the discharge spacing was fixed, asymmetric electrodes facilitated the discharge.

  16. Flame Inhibition by Phosphorus-Containing Compounds over a Range of Equivalence Ratios

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jayaweera, T M; Melius, C F; Pitz, W J; Westbrook, C K; Korobeinichev, O P; Shvartsberg, V M; Shmakov, A G; Rybitskaya, I V; Curran, H

    2004-03-17

    There is much interest in the combustion mechanism of organophosphorus compounds (OPCs) due to their role as potential halon replacements in fire suppression. A continuing investigation of the inhibition activity of organophosphorus compounds under a range of equivalence ratios was performed experimentally and computationally, as measured by the burning velocity. Updates to a previous mechanism were made by the addition and modification of reactions in the mechanism for a more complete description of the recombination reactions. In this work, the laminar flame speed is measured experimentally and calculated numerically for a premixed propane/air flame, under a range of equivalence ratios, undoped and doped with dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP). A detailed investigation of the catalytic cycles involved in the recombination of key flame radicals is made for two equivalence ratios, lean and rich. From this, the importance of different catalytic cycles involved in the lean versus rich case is discussed. Although the importance of certain cycles is different under different stoichiometries, the OPCs are similarly effective across the range, demonstrating the robustness of OPCs as flame suppressants. In addition, it is shown that the phosphorus compounds are most active in the high temperature region of the flame. This may, in part, explain their high level of inhibition effectiveness.

  17. Bayesian Integration of Isotope Ratio for Geographic Sourcing of Castor Beans

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo; Kreuzer, Helen; Hart, Garret; Ehleringer, James; West, Jason; Gill, Gary; Duckworth, Douglas

    2012-01-01

    Recenmore » t years have seen an increase in the forensic interest associated with the poison ricin, which is extracted from the seeds of the Ricinus communis plant. Both light element (C, N, O, and H) and strontium (Sr) isotope ratios have previously been used to associate organic material with geographic regions of origin. We present a Bayesian integration methodology that can more accurately predict the region of origin for a castor bean than individual models developed independently for light element stable isotopes or Sr isotope ratios. Our results demonstrate a clear improvement in the ability to correctly classify regions based on the integrated model with a class accuracy of 60.9 ± 2.1 % versus 55.9 ± 2.1 % and 40.2 ± 1.8 % for the light element and strontium (Sr) isotope ratios, respectively. In addition, we show graphically the strengths and weaknesses of each dataset in respect to class prediction and how the integration of these datasets strengthens the overall model.« less

  18. STOCHASTIC HEATING, DIFFERENTIAL FLOW, AND THE ALPHA-TO-PROTON TEMPERATURE RATIO IN THE SOLAR WIND

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chandran, B. D. G.; Verscharen, D.; Isenberg, P. A.; Bourouaine, S.; Quataert, E.; Kasper, J. C. E-mail: s.bourouaine@unh.edu E-mail: daniel.verscharen@unh.edu E-mail: jkasper@cfa.harvard.edu

    2013-10-10

    We extend previous theories of stochastic ion heating to account for the motion of ions along the magnetic field B . We derive an analytic expression for the temperature ratio T{sub i}/T{sub p} in the solar wind assuming that stochastic heating is the dominant ion heating mechanism, where T{sub i} is the perpendicular temperature of species i and T{sub p} is the perpendicular proton temperature. This expression describes how T{sub i}/T{sub p} depends upon U{sub i} and ?{sub ?p}, where U{sub i} is the average velocity along B of species i in the proton frame and ?{sub ?p} is the ratio of the parallel proton pressure to the magnetic pressure, which we take to be ?< 1. We compare our model with previously published measurements of alpha particles and protons from the Wind spacecraft. We find that stochastic heating offers a promising explanation for the dependence of T{sub ?}/T{sub p} on U{sub ?} and ?{sub ?p} when the fractional cross helicity and Alfvn ratio at the proton-gyroradius scale have values that are broadly consistent with solar-wind measurements. We also predict how the temperatures of other ion species depend on their drift speeds.

  19. Effect of Co/Ni ratios in cobalt nickel mixed oxide catalysts on methane combustion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lim, Tae Hwan; Cho, Sung June; Yang, Hee Sung; Engelhard, Mark H.; Kim, Do Heui

    2015-07-31

    A series of cobalt nickel mixed oxide catalysts with the varying ratios of Co to Ni, prepared by co-precipitation method, were applied to methane combustion. Among the various ratios, cobalt nickel mixed oxides having the ratios of Co to Ni of (50:50) and (67:33) demonstrate the highest activity for methane combustion. Structural analysis obtained from X-ray diffraction (XRD) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) evidently demonstrates that CoNi (50:50) and (67:33) samples consist of NiCo2O4and NiO phase and, more importantly, NiCo2O4spinel structure is largely distorted, which is attributed to the insertion of Ni2+ions into octahedral sites in Co3O4spinel structure. Such structural dis-order results in the enhanced portion of surface oxygen species, thus leading to the improved reducibility of the catalysts in the low temperature region as evidenced by temperature programmed reduction by hydrogen (H2TPR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) O 1s results. They prove that structural disorder in cobalt nickel mixed oxides enhances the catalytic performance for methane combustion. Thus, it is concluded that a strong relationship between structural property and activity in cobalt nickel mixed oxide for methane combustion exists and, more importantly, distorted NiCo2O4spinel structure is found to be an active site for methane combustion.

  20. Survey of plutonium and uranium atom ratios and activity levels in Mortandad Canyon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gallaher, B.M.; Benjamin, T.M.; Rokop, D.J.; Stoker, A.K.

    1997-09-22

    For more than three decades Mortandad Canyon has been the primary release area of treated liquid radioactive waste from the Los Alamos National Laboratory (Laboratory). In this survey, six water samples and seven stream sediment samples collected in Mortandad Canyon were analyzed by thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS) to determine the plutonium and uranium activity levels and atom ratios. Be measuring the {sup 240}Pu/{sup 239}Pu atom ratios, the Laboratory plutonium component was evaluated relative to that from global fallout. Measurements of the relative abundance of {sup 235}U and {sup 236}U were also used to identify non-natural components. The survey results indicate the Laboratory plutonium and uranium concentrations in waters and sediments decrease relatively rapidly with distance downstream from the major industrial sources. Plutonium concentrations in shallow alluvial groundwater decrease by approximately 1000 fold along a 3000 ft distance. At the Laboratory downstream boundary, total plutonium and uranium concentrations were generally within regional background ranges previously reported. Laboratory derived plutonium is readily distinguished from global fallout in on-site waters and sediments. The isotopic ratio data indicates off-site migration of trace levels of Laboratory plutonium in stream sediments to distances approximately two miles downstream of the Laboratory boundary.

  1. THE HCN-WATER RATIO IN THE PLANET FORMATION REGION OF DISKS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Najita, Joan R.; Salyk, Colette [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, 950 N. Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States)] [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, 950 N. Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Carr, John S. [Naval Research Laboratory, Code 7211, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)] [Naval Research Laboratory, Code 7211, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Pontoppidan, Klaus M. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States)] [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Van Dishoeck, Ewine F. [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9513, 2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands)] [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9513, 2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Blake, Geoffrey A. [Division of Geological and Planetary Sciences, Mail Stop 150-21, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)] [Division of Geological and Planetary Sciences, Mail Stop 150-21, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2013-04-01

    We find a trend between the mid-infrared HCN/H{sub 2}O flux ratio and submillimeter disk mass among T Tauri stars in Taurus. While it may seem puzzling that the molecular emission properties of the inner disk (ratio in the inner disk and altering the molecular abundances there. We discuss the assumptions that underlie this interpretation, a possible alternative explanation, and related open questions that motivate future work. Whatever its origin, understanding the meaning of the relation between the HCN/H{sub 2}O ratio and disk mass is of interest as trends like this among T Tauri disk properties are relatively rare.

  2. Analysis on burnup step effect for evaluating reactor criticality and fuel breeding ratio

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saputra, Geby; Purnama, Aditya Rizki; Permana, Sidik; Suzuki, Mitsutoshi

    2014-09-30

    Criticality condition of the reactors is one of the important factors for evaluating reactor operation and nuclear fuel breeding ratio is another factor to show nuclear fuel sustainability. This study analyzes the effect of burnup steps and cycle operation step for evaluating the criticality condition of the reactor as well as the performance of nuclear fuel breeding or breeding ratio (BR). Burnup step is performed based on a day step analysis which is varied from 10 days up to 800 days and for cycle operation from 1 cycle up to 8 cycles reactor operations. In addition, calculation efficiency based on the variation of computer processors to run the analysis in term of time (time efficiency in the calculation) have been also investigated. Optimization method for reactor design analysis which is used a large fast breeder reactor type as a reference case was performed by adopting an established reactor design code of JOINT-FR. The results show a criticality condition becomes higher for smaller burnup step (day) and for breeding ratio becomes less for smaller burnup step (day). Some nuclides contribute to make better criticality when smaller burnup step due to individul nuclide half-live. Calculation time for different burnup step shows a correlation with the time consuming requirement for more details step calculation, although the consuming time is not directly equivalent with the how many time the burnup time step is divided.

  3. Study for radionuclide transfer ratio of aerosols generated during heat cutting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Iguchi, Yukihiro; Baba, Tsutomu; Kawakami, Hiroto; Kitahara, Takashi; Watanabe, Atsushi; Kodama, Mitsuhiro

    2007-07-01

    The metallic elements with a low melting point and high vapor pressure seemed to transfer in aerosols selectively at dismantling reactor internals using heat cutting. Therefore, the arc melting tests of neutron irradiated zirconium alloy were conducted to investigate the radionuclide transfer behavior of aerosols generated during the heat cutting of activated metals. The arc melting test was conducted using a tungsten inert gas welding machine in an inert gas or air atmosphere. The radioactive aerosols were collected by filter and charcoal filter. The test sample was obtained from Zry-2 fuel cladding irradiated in a Japanese boiling water reactor for five fuel cycles. The activity analysis, chemical composition measurement and scanning electron microscope observation of aerosols were carried out. Some radionuclides were enriched in the aerosols generated in an inert gas atmosphere and the radionuclide transfer ratio did not change remarkably by the presence of air. The transfer ratio of Sb-125 was almost the same as that of Co-60. It was expected that Sb-125 was enriched from other elements since Sb is an element with a low melting point and high vapor pressure compared with the base metal (Zr). In the viewpoint of the environmental impact assessment, it became clear that the influence if Sb-125 is comparable to Co-60. The transfer ratio of Mn-54 was one order higher compared with other radionuclides. The results were discussed on the basis of thermal properties and oxide formation energy of the metallic elements. (authors)

  4. Uranium Isotopic Ratio Measurements of U3O8 Reference Materials by Atom Probe Tomography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fahey, Albert J.; Perea, Daniel E.; Bartrand, Jonah AG; Arey, Bruce W.; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai

    2016-01-01

    We report results of measurements of isotopic ratios obtained with atom probe tomography on U3O8 reference materials certified for their isotopic abundances of uranium. The results show good agreement with the certified values. High backgrounds due to tails from adjacent peaks complicate the measurement of the integrated peak areas as well as the fact that only oxides of uranium appear in the spectrum, the most intense of which is doubly charged. In addition, lack of knowledge of other instrumental parameters, such as the dead time, may bias the results. Isotopic ratio measurements can be performed at the nanometer-scale with the expectation of sensible results. The abundance sensitivity and mass resolving power of the mass spectrometer are not sufficient to compete with magnetic-sector instruments but are not far from measurements made by ToF-SIMS of other isotopic systems. The agreement of the major isotope ratios is more than sufficient to distinguish most anthropogenic compositions from natural.

  5. ORTHO-TO-PARA ABUNDANCE RATIO OF WATER ION IN COMET C/2001 Q4 (NEAT): IMPLICATION FOR ORTHO-TO-PARA ABUNDANCE RATIO OF WATER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shinnaka, Yoshiharu; Kawakita, Hideyo; Kobayashi, Hitomi; Boice, Daniel C.; Martinez, Susan E.

    2012-04-20

    The ortho-to-para abundance ratio (OPR) of cometary molecules is considered to be one of the primordial characteristics of cometary ices, and contains information concerning their formation. Water is the most abundant species in cometary ices, and OPRs of water in comets have been determined from infrared spectroscopic observations of H{sub 2}O rovibrational transitions so far. In this paper, we present a new method to derive OPR of water in comets from the high-dispersion spectrum of the rovibronic emission of H{sub 2}O{sup +} in the optical wavelength region. The rovibronic emission lines of H{sub 2}O{sup +} are sometimes contaminated by other molecular emission lines but they are not affected seriously by telluric absorption compared with near-infrared observations. Since H{sub 2}O{sup +} ions are mainly produced from H{sub 2}O by photoionization in the coma, the OPR of H{sub 2}O{sup +} is considered to be equal to that of water based on the nuclear spin conservation through the reaction. We have developed a fluorescence excitation model of H{sub 2}O{sup +} and applied it to the spectrum of comet C/2001 Q4 (NEAT). The derived OPR of water is 2.54{sup +0.32}{sub -0.25}, which corresponds to a nuclear spin temperature (T{sub spin}) of 30{sup +10}{sub -4} K. This is consistent with the previous value determined in the near-infrared for the same comet (OPR = 2.6 {+-} 0.3, T{sub spin} = 31{sup +11}{sub -5} K).

  6. Benefits and Drawbacks of Compression Ratio Reduction in PCCI Combustion Application in an Advanced LD Diesel Engine

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Study of the effect of compression ratio on performance of light duty diesel operating with PCCI calibration, near EURO6/Tier 2 Bin 5 NOx limits.

  7. ORBITAL AND MASS RATIO EVOLUTION OF PROTOBINARIES DRIVEN BY MAGNETIC BRAKING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao, Bo; Li, Zhi-Yun

    2013-01-20

    The majority of stars reside in multiple systems, especially binaries. The formation and early evolution of binaries is a longstanding problem in star formation that is not yet fully understood. In particular, how the magnetic field observed in star-forming cores shapes the binary characteristics remains relatively unexplored. We demonstrate numerically, using an MHD version of the ENZO AMR hydro code, that a magnetic field of the observed strength can drastically change two of the basic quantities that characterize a binary system: the orbital separation and mass ratio of the two components. Our calculations focus on the protostellar mass accretion phase, after a pair of stellar 'seeds' have already formed. We find that in dense cores magnetized to a realistic level, the angular momentum of the material accreted by the protobinary is greatly reduced by magnetic braking. Accretion of strongly braked material shrinks the protobinary separation by a large factor compared to the non-magnetic case. The magnetic braking also changes the evolution of the mass ratio of unequal-mass protobinaries by producing material of low specific angular momentum that accretes preferentially onto the more massive primary star rather than the secondary. This is in contrast with the preferential mass accretion onto the secondary previously found numerically for protobinaries accreting from an unmagnetized envelope, which tends to drive the mass ratio toward unity. In addition, the magnetic field greatly modifies the morphology and dynamics of the protobinary accretion flow. It suppresses the traditional circumstellar and circumbinary disks that feed the protobinary in the non-magnetic case; the binary is fed instead by a fast collapsing pseudodisk whose rotation is strongly braked. The magnetic braking-driven inward migration of binaries from their birth locations may be constrained by high-resolution observations of the orbital distribution of deeply embedded protobinaries, especially

  8. Characteristics of Cu stabilized Nb3Al strands with low Cu ratio

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kikuchi, A.; Yamada, R.; Barzi, E.; Kobayashi, M.; Lamm, M.; Nakagawa, K.; Sasaki, K.; Takeuchi, T.; Turrioni, D.; Zlobin, A.V.; /NIMC, Tsukuba /Fermilab /Hitachi, Tsuchiura Works /KEK, Tsukuba

    2008-12-01

    Characteristics of recently developed F4-Nb{sub 3}Al strand with low Cu ratio are described. The overall J{sub c} of the Nb{sub 3}Al strand could be easily increased by decreasing of the Cu ratio. Although the quench of a pulse-like voltage generation is usually observed in superconducting unstable conductor, the F4 strand with a low Cu ratio of 0.61 exhibited an ordinary critical transition of gradual voltage generation. The F4 strand does not have magnetic instabilities at 4.2 K because of the tantalum interfilament matrix. The overall J{sub c} of the F4 strand achieved was 80-85% of the RRP strand. In the large mechanical stress above 100 MPa, the overall J{sub c} of the F4 strand might be comparable to that of high J{sub c} RRP-Nb{sub 3}Sn strands. The Rutherford cable with a high packing factor of 86.5% has been fabricated using F4 strands. The small racetrack magnet, SR07, was also fabricated by a 14 m F4 cable. The quench current, I{sub q}, of SR07 were obtained 22.4 kA at 4.5 K and 25.2 kA at 2.2 K. The tantalum matrix Nb{sub 3}Al strands are promising for the application of super-cooled high-field magnets as well as 4.2 K operation magnets.

  9. Analytical Validation of Accelerator Mass Spectrometry for Pharmaceutical Development: the Measurement of Carbon-14 Isotope Ratio.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keck, B D; Ognibene, T; Vogel, J S

    2010-02-05

    Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is an isotope based measurement technology that utilizes carbon-14 labeled compounds in the pharmaceutical development process to measure compounds at very low concentrations, empowers microdosing as an investigational tool, and extends the utility of {sup 14}C labeled compounds to dramatically lower levels. It is a form of isotope ratio mass spectrometry that can provide either measurements of total compound equivalents or, when coupled to separation technology such as chromatography, quantitation of specific compounds. The properties of AMS as a measurement technique are investigated here, and the parameters of method validation are shown. AMS, independent of any separation technique to which it may be coupled, is shown to be accurate, linear, precise, and robust. As the sensitivity and universality of AMS is constantly being explored and expanded, this work underpins many areas of pharmaceutical development including drug metabolism as well as absorption, distribution and excretion of pharmaceutical compounds as a fundamental step in drug development. The validation parameters for pharmaceutical analyses were examined for the accelerator mass spectrometry measurement of {sup 14}C/C ratio, independent of chemical separation procedures. The isotope ratio measurement was specific (owing to the {sup 14}C label), stable across samples storage conditions for at least one year, linear over 4 orders of magnitude with an analytical range from one tenth Modern to at least 2000 Modern (instrument specific). Further, accuracy was excellent between 1 and 3 percent while precision expressed as coefficient of variation is between 1 and 6% determined primarily by radiocarbon content and the time spent analyzing a sample. Sensitivity, expressed as LOD and LLOQ was 1 and 10 attomoles of carbon-14 (which can be expressed as compound equivalents) and for a typical small molecule labeled at 10% incorporated with {sup 14}C corresponds to 30 fg

  10. Separated Response Function Ratios in Exclusive, Forward {pi}{sup {+/-}} Electroproduction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huber, Garth; Blok, Hendrik; Butuceanu, Cornel; Gaskell, David; Horn, Tanja; Mack, David; Abbott, David; Aniol, Konrad; Anklin, Heinz; Armstrong, Christopher; Arrington, John; Assamagan, Ketevi; Avery, Steven; Baker, Oliver; Barrett, Brynle; Beise, Elizabeth; Bochna, C.; Boeglin, Werner; Brash, Edward; Breuer, Herbert; Chang, C. C.; Chant, Nicholas; Christy, Michael; Dunne, James; Eden, T.; Ent, Rolf; Fenker, Howard; Gibson, Edward; Gilman, Ronald; Gustafsson, Kenneth; Hinton, Wendy; Holt, Roy; Jackson, Harold; Jin, Seong uk; Jones, Mark; Keppel, Cynthia; Kim, pyunghun; Kim, Wooyoung; King, Paul; Klein, Andreas; Koltenuk, Douglas; Kovaltchouk, Vitali; Liang, M.; Liu, J.; Lolos, George; Lung, Allison; Margaziotis, Demetrius; Markowitz, Pete; Matsumura, Akihiko; McKee, David; Meekins, David; Mitchell, Joseph; Miyoshi, Toshinobu; Mkrtchyan, Hamlet; Mueller, Berndt; Niculescu, Gabriel; Niculescu, Maria; Okayasu, Yuichi; Pentchev, Lubomir; Perdrisat, Charles; Pitz, David; Potterveld, David; Punjabi, Vina; Qin, Liming; Reimer, Paul; Reinhold, Joerg; Roche, Julie; Roos, Philip; Sarty, Adam; Shin, Ilkyoung; Smith, Gregory; Stepanyan, Stepan; Tang, Liguang; Tadevosyan, Vardan; Tvaskis, Vladas; van der Meer, Rob; Vansyoc, Kelley; Van Westrum, Derek; Vidakovic, Sandra; Volmer, Jochen; Vulcan, William; Warren, Glen; Wood, Stephen; Xu, C.; Yan, C.; Zhao, Wenxia; Zheng, Xiaochao; Zihlmann, Benedikt

    2014-05-01

    The study of exclusive ?{sup } electroproduction on the nucleon, including separation of the various structure functions, is of interest for a number of reasons. The ratio R{sub L}=?{sup ?{sup ?}}{sub L}/?{sup ?{sup +}}{sub L} is sensitive to isoscalar contamination to the dominant isovector pion exchange amplitude, which is the basis for the determination of the charged pion form factor from electroproduction data. A change in the value of R{sub T}=?{sup ?{sup ?}}{sub T}/?{sup ?{sup +}}{sub T} from unity at small ?t, to 1/4 at large ?t, would suggest a transition from coupling to a (virtual) pion to coupling to individual quarks. Furthermore, the mentioned ratios may show an earlier approach to pQCD than the individual cross sections. We have performed the first complete separation of the four unpolarized electromagnetic structure functions above the dominant resonances in forward, exclusive ? electroproduction on the deuteron at central Q{sup 2} values of 0.6, 1.0, 1.6 GeV{sup 2} at W=1.95 GeV, and Q{sup 2}=2.45 GeV{sup 2} at W=2.22 GeV. Here, we present the L and T cross sections, with emphasis on R{sub L} and R{sub T}, and compare them with theoretical calculations. Results for the separated ratio RL indicate dominance of the pion-pole diagram at low ?t, while results for R{sub T} are consistent with a transition between pion knockout and quark knockout mechanisms.

  11. BINARY CEPHEIDS: SEPARATIONS AND MASS RATIOS IN 5 M {sub ?} BINARIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evans, Nancy Remage; Karovska, Margarita; Tingle, Evan; Bond, Howard E.; Schaefer, Gail H.; Mason, Brian D. E-mail: heb11@psu.edu

    2013-10-01

    Deriving the distribution of binary parameters for a particular class of stars over the full range of orbital separations usually requires the combination of results from many different observing techniques (radial velocities, interferometry, astrometry, photometry, direct imaging), each with selection biases. However, Cepheidscool, evolved stars of ?5 M {sub ?}are a special case because ultraviolet (UV) spectra will immediately reveal any companion star hotter than early type A, regardless of the orbital separation. We have used International Ultraviolet Explorer UV spectra of a complete sample of all 76 Cepheids brighter than V = 8 to create a list of all 18 Cepheids with companions more massive than 2.0 M {sub ?}. Orbital periods of many of these binaries are available from radial-velocity studies, or can be estimated for longer-period systems from detected velocity variability. In an imaging survey with the Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera 3, we resolved three of the companions (those of ? Aql, S Nor, and V659 Cen), allowing us to make estimates of the periods out to the long-period end of the distribution. Combining these separations with orbital data in the literature, we derive an unbiased distribution of binary separations, orbital periods, and mass ratios. The distribution of orbital periods shows that the 5 M {sub ?} binaries have systematically shorter periods than do 1 M {sub ?} stars. Our data also suggest that the distribution of mass ratios depends on both binary separation and system multiplicity. The distribution of mass ratios as a function of orbital separation, however, does not depend on whether a system is a binary or a triple.

  12. Update of distillers grains displacement ratios for corn ethanol life-cycle analysis.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arora, S.; Wu, M.; Wang, M.; Energy Systems

    2011-02-01

    Production of corn-based ethanol (either by wet milling or by dry milling) yields the following coproducts: distillers grains with solubles (DGS), corn gluten meal (CGM), corn gluten feed (CGF), and corn oil. Of these coproducts, all except corn oil can replace conventional animal feeds, such as corn, soybean meal, and urea. Displacement ratios of corn-ethanol coproducts including DGS, CGM, and CGF were last updated in 1998 at a workshop at Argonne National Laboratory on the basis of input from a group of experts on animal feeds, including Prof. Klopfenstein (University of Nebraska, Lincoln), Prof. Berger (University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign), Mr. Madson (Rapheal Katzen International Associates, Inc.), and Prof. Trenkle (Iowa State University) (Wang 1999). Table 1 presents current dry milling coproduct displacement ratios being used in the GREET model. The current effort focuses on updating displacement ratios of dry milling corn-ethanol coproducts used in the animal feed industry. Because of the increased availability and use of these coproducts as animal feeds, more information is available on how these coproducts replace conventional animal feeds. To glean this information, it is also important to understand how industry selects feed. Because of the wide variety of available feeds, animal nutritionists use commercial software (such as Brill Formulation{trademark}) for feed formulation. The software recommends feed for the animal on the basis of the nutritional characteristics, availability, and price of various animal feeds, as well as on the nutritional requirements of the animal (Corn Refiners Association 2006). Therefore, feed formulation considers both the economic and the nutritional characteristics of feed products.

  13. Contrast-to-noise ratio optimization for a prototype phase-contrast computed tomography scanner

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Müller, Mark Yaroshenko, Andre; Velroyen, Astrid; Tapfer, Arne; Bech, Martin; Pauwels, Bart; Bruyndonckx, Peter; Sasov, Alexander; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2015-12-15

    In the field of biomedical X-ray imaging, novel techniques, such as phase-contrast and dark-field imaging, have the potential to enhance the contrast and provide complementary structural information about a specimen. In this paper, a first prototype of a preclinical X-ray phase-contrast CT scanner based on a Talbot-Lau interferometer is characterized. We present a study of the contrast-to-noise ratios for attenuation and phase-contrast images acquired with the prototype scanner. The shown results are based on a series of projection images and tomographic data sets of a plastic phantom in phase and attenuation-contrast recorded with varying acquisition settings. Subsequently, the signal and noise distribution of different regions in the phantom were determined. We present a novel method for estimation of contrast-to-noise ratios for projection images based on the cylindrical geometry of the phantom. Analytical functions, representing the expected signal in phase and attenuation-contrast for a circular object, are fitted to individual line profiles of the projection data. The free parameter of the fit function is used to estimate the contrast and the goodness of the fit is determined to assess the noise in the respective signal. The results depict the dependence of the contrast-to-noise ratios on the applied source voltages, the number of steps of the phase stepping routine, and the exposure times for an individual step. Moreover, the influence of the number of projection angles on the image quality of CT slices is investigated. Finally, the implications for future imaging purposes with the scanner are discussed.

  14. "Table A45. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    5. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption" " for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation by Industry Group," " Selected Industries, and Value of Shipment Categories, 1994" ,,,,,"Major" ,,,"Consumption","Consumption per","Byproducts(c)","Fuel Oil(d)" ,,"Consumption","per Dollar","Dollar of Value","as a Percent","as a Percent","RSE"

  15. "Table A46. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption" " for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation by Industry Group," " Selected Industries, and Employment Size Categories, 1994" ,,,,,"Major" ,,,"Consumption","Consumption per","Byproducts(c)","Fuel Oil(d)" ,,"Consumption","per Dollar","Dollar of Value","as a Percent","as a Percent","RSE"

  16. "Table A47. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    7. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for" " Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation by Census Region, Census Division, Industry Group, and" " Selected Industries, 1994" ,,,,,"Major" ,,,,"Consumption","Byproducts(b)" ,,,"Consumption","per Dollar","as a","Fuel Oil(c) as" ,,"Consumption","per Dollar","of Value","Percent of","a

  17. "Table A51. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for" " Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation by Census Region and Economic" " Characteristics of the Establishment, 1991 " ,,,,,"Major" ,,,"Consumption","Consumption per","Byproducts(c)","Fuel Oil(d)" ,,"Consumption","per Dollar","Dollar of Value","as a Percent","as a Percent","RSE"

  18. "Table A8. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    A8. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for" " Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation by Census Region, Industry Group, and" " Selected Industries, 1991" ,,,,,"Major" ,,,,"Consumption","Byproducts(b)" ,,,"Consumption","per Dollar","as a","Fuel Oil(c) as" ,,"Consumption","per Dollar","of Value","Percent of","a Percent

  19. High confinement mode and edge localized mode characteristics in a near-unity aspect ratio tokamak

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Thome, Kathreen E.; Bongard, Michael W.; Barr, Jayson L.; Bodner, Grant M.; Burke, Marcus G.; Fonck, Raymond J.; Kriete, David M.; Perry, Justin M.; Schlossberg, David J.

    2016-04-27

    Tokamak experiments at near-unity aspect ratio A ≲ 1.2 offer new insights into the self-organized H-mode plasma confinement regime. In contrast to conventional A ~ 3 plasmas, the L–H power threshold PLH is ~15× higher than scaling predictions, and it is insensitive to magnetic topology, consistent with modeling. Edge localized mode (ELM) instabilities shift to lower toroidal mode numbers as A decreases. Furthermore, these ultralow-A operations enable heretofore inaccessible Jedge(R,t) measurements through an ELM that show a complex multimodal collapse and the ejection of a current-carrying filament.

  20. Radiation detection method and system using the sequential probability ratio test

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nelson, Karl E.; Valentine, John D.; Beauchamp, Brock R.

    2007-07-17

    A method and system using the Sequential Probability Ratio Test to enhance the detection of an elevated level of radiation, by determining whether a set of observations are consistent with a specified model within a given bounds of statistical significance. In particular, the SPRT is used in the present invention to maximize the range of detection, by providing processing mechanisms for estimating the dynamic background radiation, adjusting the models to reflect the amount of background knowledge at the current point in time, analyzing the current sample using the models to determine statistical significance, and determining when the sample has returned to the expected background conditions.

  1. Air-fuel ratio controller for a turbocharged internal combustion engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Serve, J.V.; Eckard, D.W.

    1988-09-13

    This patent describes an air-fuel ratio controller for a gaseous-fueled, turbo-charged engine having an air manifold, a gas manifold, and a turbine inlet. The controller consists of: means for controlling air manifold pressure, comprising means for providing an air manifold pressure set point signal based on gas manifold pressure and engine RPM's and at least one constant input; and means for controlling turbine inlet temperature, the means comprising means for modulating the slope of the set point signal for the air manifold pressure controller.

  2. Galaxy Mergers and Dark Matter Halo Mergers in LCDM: Mass, Redshift, and Mass-Ratio Dependence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stewart, Kyle R.; Bullock, James S.; Barton, Elizabeth J.; Wechsler, Risa H.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC

    2009-08-03

    We employ a high-resolution LCDM N-body simulation to present merger rate predictions for dark matter halos and investigate how common merger-related observables for galaxies - such as close pair counts, starburst counts, and the morphologically disturbed fraction - likely scale with luminosity, stellar mass, merger mass ratio, and redshift from z = 0 to z = 4. We provide a simple 'universal' fitting formula that describes our derived merger rates for dark matter halos a function of dark halo mass, merger mass ratio, and redshift, and go on to predict galaxy merger rates using number density-matching to associate halos with galaxies. For example, we find that the instantaneous merger rate of m/M > 0.3 mass ratio events into typical L {approx}> fL{sub *} galaxies follows the simple relation dN/dt {approx_equal} 0.03(1+f)Gyr{sup -1} (1+z){sup 2.1}. Despite the rapid increase in merger rate with redshift, only a small fraction of > 0.4L{sub *} high-redshift galaxies ({approx} 3% at z = 2) should have experienced a major merger (m/M > 0.3) in the very recent past (t < 100 Myr). This suggests that short-lived, merger-induced bursts of star formation should not contribute significantly to the global star formation rate at early times, in agreement with observational indications. In contrast, a fairly high fraction ({approx} 20%) of those z = 2 galaxies should have experienced a morphologically transformative merger within a virial dynamical time. We compare our results to observational merger rate estimates from both morphological indicators and pair-fraction based determinations between z = 0-2 and show that they are consistent with our predictions. However, we emphasize that great care must be made in these comparisons because the predicted observables depend very sensitively on galaxy luminosity, redshift, overall mass ratio, and uncertain relaxation timescales for merger remnants. We show that the majority of bright galaxies at z = 3 should have undergone a major

  3. SUEX Dry Film Resist - A new Material for High Aspect Ratio

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SUEX Dry Film Resist - A new Material for High Aspect Ratio Lithography Donald W Johnson a , Jost Goettert b , Varshni Singh b and Dawit Yemane b a DJ DevCorp, 490 Boston Post Rd, Sudbury, MA 01776 b Louisiana State University, Center for Advanced Microstructures & Devices (CAMD), 6980 Jefferson Hwy, Baton Rouge, LA 70806 don@djdevcorp.com Abstract SUEX epoxy Thick Dry Film Sheets (TDFS) are a promising material for a wide range of MEMS applications. They contain a cationically cured

  4. THE FUELING DIAGRAM: LINKING GALAXY MOLECULAR-TO-ATOMIC GAS RATIOS TO INTERACTIONS AND ACCRETION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stark, David V.; Kannappan, Sheila J.; Eckert, Kathleen D.; Wei, Lisa H.; Baker, Andrew J.; Leroy, Adam K.; Vogel, Stuart N.

    2013-05-20

    To assess how external factors such as local interactions and fresh gas accretion influence the global interstellar medium of galaxies, we analyze the relationship between recent enhancements of central star formation and total molecular-to-atomic (H{sub 2}/H I) gas ratios, using a broad sample of field galaxies spanning early-to-late type morphologies, stellar masses of 10{sup 7.2}-10{sup 11.2} M{sub Sun }, and diverse stages of evolution. We find that galaxies occupy several loci in a ''fueling diagram'' that plots H{sub 2}/H I ratio versus mass-corrected blue-centeredness, a metric tracing the degree to which galaxies have bluer centers than the average galaxy at their stellar mass. Spiral galaxies of all stellar masses show a positive correlation between H{sub 2}/H I ratio and mass-corrected blue-centeredness. When combined with previous results linking mass-corrected blue-centeredness to external perturbations, this correlation suggests a systematic link between local galaxy interactions and molecular gas inflow/replenishment. Intriguingly, E/S0 galaxies show a more complex picture: some follow the same correlation, some are quenched, and a distinct population of blue-sequence E/S0 galaxies (with masses below key scales associated with transitions in gas richness) defines a separate loop in the fueling diagram. This population appears to be composed of low-mass merger remnants currently in late- or post-starburst states, in which the burst first consumes the H{sub 2} while the galaxy center keeps getting bluer, then exhausts the H{sub 2}, at which point the burst population reddens as it ages. Multiple lines of evidence suggest connected evolutionary sequences in the fueling diagram. In particular, tracking total gas-to-stellar mass ratios within the fueling diagram provides evidence of fresh gas accretion onto low-mass E/S0s emerging from their central starburst episodes. Drawing on a comprehensive literature search, we suggest that virtually all galaxies

  5. Morphology and aspect ratio of bismuth nanoparticles embedded in a zinc matrix

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Song, Tae Eun; Wilde, Gerhard; Peterlechner, Martin

    2014-12-15

    Nanoscale Bi particles embedded in a Zn matrix were obtained by casting and melt-spinning, resulting in quenching rate-dependent sizes and shapes. With decreasing Bi particle size, an increasing aspect ratio was observed. Due to high resolution transmission electron microscopy performed for different orientations of the nanoparticles and the matrix, the three-dimensional shape and the respective crystallographic orientations of the Bi nanoparticles as well as the orientation relationship with the matrix have been evaluated. It is suggested that the size-dependence of the nanoparticle morphologies has a strong impact on their thermal stabilities thus affecting the size dependence of the melting temperature.

  6. A minimal sub-Planckian axion inflation model with large tensor-to-scalar ratio

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McDonald, John

    2015-01-01

    We present a minimal axion inflation model which can generate a large tensor-to-scalar ratio while remaining sub-Planckian. The modulus of a complex scalar field ? with a ?|?|{sup 4} potential couples directly to the gauge field of a strongly-coupled sector via a term of the form (|?|/M{sub Pl}){sup m}F F-tilde . This generates a minimum of the potential which is aperiodic in the phase. The resulting inflation model is equivalent to a ?{sup 4/(m+1)} chaotic inflation model. For the natural case of a leading-order portal-like interaction of the form ?{sup }?F F-tilde , the model is equivalent to a ?{sup 4/3} chaotic inflation model and predicts a tensor-to-scalar ratio r = 16/3N = 0.097 and a scalar spectral index n{sub s} = 1 - 5/3N = 0.970. The value of |?| remains sub-Planckian throughout the observable era of inflation, with |?| ?< 0.01M{sub Pl} for N ?< 60 when ? ? 1.

  7. Microscopic silicon-based lateral high-aspect-ratio structures for thin film conformality analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gao, Feng; Arpiainen, Sanna; Puurunen, Riikka L.

    2015-01-15

    Film conformality is one of the major drivers for the interest in atomic layer deposition (ALD) processes. This work presents new silicon-based microscopic lateral high-aspect-ratio (LHAR) test structures for the analysis of the conformality of thin films deposited by ALD and by other chemical vapor deposition means. The microscopic LHAR structures consist of a lateral cavity inside silicon with a roof supported by pillars. The cavity length (e.g., 20–5000 μm) and cavity height (e.g., 200–1000 nm) can be varied, giving aspect ratios of, e.g., 20:1 to 25 000:1. Film conformality can be analyzed with the microscopic LHAR by several means, as demonstrated for the ALD Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and TiO{sub 2} processes from Me{sub 3}Al/H{sub 2}O and TiCl{sub 4}/H{sub 2}O. The microscopic LHAR test structures introduced in this work expose a new parameter space for thin film conformality investigations expected to prove useful in the development, tuning and modeling of ALD and other chemical vapor deposition processes.

  8. The ortho:para ratio of H{sub 3}{sup +} in laboratory and astrophysical plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crabtree, Kyle N.; Indriolo, Nick; Kreckel, Holger; McCall, Benjamin J.

    2015-01-22

    The discovery of H{sub 3}{sup +} in the diffuse interstellar medium has dramatically changed our view of the cosmic-ray ionization rate in diffuse molecular clouds. However, another surprise has been that the ortho:para ratio of H{sub 3}{sup +} in these clouds is inconsistent with the temperature derived from the excitation of H{sub 2}, the dominant species in these clouds. In an effort to understand this discrepancy, we have embarked on an experimental program to measure the nuclear spin dependence of the dissociative electron recombination rate of H{sub 3}{sup +} using the CRYRING and TSR ion storage rings. We have also performed the first measurements of the reaction H{sub 3}{sup +}+H{sub 2}→H{sub 2}+H{sub 3}{sup +} below room temperature. This reaction is likely the most common bimolecular reaction in the universe, and plays an important role in interconverting ortho- and para-H{sub 3}{sup +}. Finally, we have constructed a steady-state chemical model for diffuse clouds, which takes into account the spin-dependence of the formation of H{sub 3}{sup +}, its electron recombination, and its reaction with H{sub 2}. We find that the ortho:para ratio of H{sub 3}{sup +} in diffuse clouds is likely governed by a competition between dissociative recombination and thermalization by reactive collisions.

  9. Mechanically stable, high aspect ratio, multifilar, wound, ribbon-type conductor and method for manufacturing same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cottingham, James G.

    1987-01-01

    A mechanically stable, wound, multifilar, ribbon-type conductor having a cross-sectional aspect ratio which may be greater than 12:1, comprising a plurality of conductive strands wound to form a flattened helix containing a plastic strip into which the strands have been pressed so as to form a bond between the strip and the strands. The bond mechanically stabilizes the conductor under tension, preventing it from collapsing into a tubular configuration. In preferred embodiments the plastic strip may be polytetrafluoroethylene, and the conductive strands may be formed from a superconductive material. Conductors in accordance with the present invention may be manufactured by winding a plurality of conductive strands around a hollow mandrel; the cross-section of a hollow mandrel; the cross-section of the mandrel continuously varying from substantially circular to a high aspect ratio elipse while maintaining a constant circumference. The wound conductive strands are drawn from the mandrel as a multifilar helix while simultaneously a plastic strip is fed through the hollow mandrel so that it is contained within the helix as it is withdrawn from the mandrel. The helical conductor is then compressed into a ribbon-like form and the strands are bonded to the plastic strip by a combination of heat and pressure.

  10. U-234/U-238 ratio: Qualitative estimate of groundwater flow in Rocky Flats monitoring wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laul, J.C.

    1994-02-01

    Groundwater movement through various pathways is the primary mechanism for the transport of radionuclides and trace elements in a water/rock interaction. About three dozen wells, installed in the Rocky Flats Plant (RFP) Solar Evaporation Ponds (SEP) area, are monitored quarterly to evaluate the extent of any lateral and downgradient migration of contaminants from the Solar Evaporation Ponds: 207-A; 207-B North, 207-B Center, and 207-B South; and 207-C. The Solar Ponds are the main source for the various contaminants: radionuclides (U-238, U-234, Pu-239, 240 and Am-241); anions; and trace metals to groundwaters. The U-238 concentrations in Rocky Flats groundwaters vary from <0.2 to 69 pCi/I (IpCi = 3 ug). However, the activity U-234/U-238 ratios are low and range mostly 1.2 to 2.7. The low activity ratios can be interpreted to suggest that the groundwaters are moving slow (

  11. THE STELLAR HALOS OF MASSIVE ELLIPTICAL GALAXIES. II. DETAILED ABUNDANCE RATIOS AT LARGE RADIUS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greene, Jenny E.; Murphy, Jeremy D.; Graves, Genevieve J.; Gunn, James E.; Raskutti, Sudhir; Comerford, Julia M.; Gebhardt, Karl

    2013-10-20

    We study the radial dependence in stellar populations of 33 nearby early-type galaxies with central stellar velocity dispersions ?{sub *} ?> 150 km s{sup 1}. We measure stellar population properties in composite spectra, and use ratios of these composites to highlight the largest spectral changes as a function of radius. Based on stellar population modeling, the typical star at 2R{sub e} is old (?10 Gyr), relatively metal-poor ([Fe/H] ? 0.5), and ?-enhanced ([Mg/Fe] ? 0.3). The stars were made rapidly at z ? 1.5-2 in shallow potential wells. Declining radial gradients in [C/Fe], which follow [Fe/H], also arise from rapid star formation timescales due to declining carbon yields from low-metallicity massive stars. In contrast, [N/Fe] remains high at large radius. Stars at large radius have different abundance ratio patterns from stars in the center of any present-day galaxy, but are similar to average Milky Way thick disk stars. Our observations are thus consistent with a picture in which the stellar outskirts are built up through minor mergers with disky galaxies whose star formation is truncated early (z ? 1.5-2)

  12. FULLY CONVECTIVE MAGNETO-ROTATIONAL TURBULENCE IN LARGE ASPECT-RATIO SHEARING BOXES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bodo, G.; Rossi, P.; Cattaneo, F.; Mignone, A.

    2015-01-20

    We present a numerical study of turbulence and dynamo action in stratified shearing boxes with both finite and zero net magnetic flux. We assume that the fluid obeys the perfect gas law and has finite thermal diffusivity. The latter is chosen to be small enough so that vigorous convective states develop. The properties of these convective solutions are analyzed as the aspect ratio of the computational domain is varied and as the value of the mean field is increased. For the cases with zero net flux, we find that a well-defined converged state is obtained for large enough aspect ratios. In the converged state, the dynamo can be extremely efficient and can generate substantial toroidal flux. We identify solutions in which the toroidal field is mostly symmetric about the mid-plane and solutions in which it is mostly anti-symmetric. The symmetric solutions are found to be more efficient at transporting angular momentum and can give rise to a luminosity that is up to an order of magnitude larger than the corresponding value for the anti-symmetric states. In the cases with a finite net flux, the system appears to spend most of the time in the symmetric states.

  13. High Precision Measurement of the Proton Elastic Form Factor Ratio at Low Q2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xiaohui Zhan

    2010-01-31

    Experiment E08-007 measured the proton elastic form factor ratio ?pGE/GM in the range of Q2 = 0.3?0.7(GeV/c)2 by recoil polarimetry. Data were taken in 2008 at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility in Virginia, USA. A 1.2 GeV polarized electron beam was scattered off a cryogenic hydrogen target. The recoil proton was detected in the left HRS in coincidence with the elasticly scattered electrons tagged by the BigBite spectrometer. The proton polarization was measured by the focal plane polarimeter (FPP). In this low Q2 region, previous measurement from Jefferson Lab Hall A (LEDEX) along with various fits and calculations indicate substantial deviations of the ratio from unity. For this new measurement, the proposed statistical uncertainty (< 1%) was achieved. These new results are a few percent lower than expected from previous world data and fits, which indicate a smaller GEp at this region. Beyond the intrinsic interest in nucleon structure, the new results also have implications in determining the proton Zemach radius and the strangeness form factors from parity violation experiments.

  14. Analysis of depolarization ratios of ClNO{sub 2} dissolved in methanol

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trimithioti, Marilena; Hayes, Sophia C.; Akimov, Alexey V.; Department of Chemistry, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 ; Prezhdo, Oleg V.

    2014-01-07

    A detailed analysis of the resonance Raman depolarization ratio dispersion curve for the NO symmetric stretch of nitryl chloride in methanol at excitation wavelengths spanning the D absorption band is presented. The depolarization ratios are modeled using the time-dependent formalism for Raman scattering with contributions from two excited states (2{sup 1}A{sub 1} and 3{sup 1}B{sub 1}), which are taken as linearly dissociative along the ClN coordinate. The analysis focuses on the interplay between different types of broadening revealing the importance of inhomogenous broadening in determining the relative contributions of the two electronic transitions. We find that the transition dipole moment (M) for 2{sup 1}A{sub 1} is greater than for 3{sup 1}B{sub 1}, in agreement with gas phase calculations in the literature [A. Lesar, M. Hdoscek, M. Muhlhauser, and S. D. Peyerimhoff, Chem. Phys. Lett. 383, 84 (2004)]. However, we find that the polarity of the solvent influences the excited state energetics, leading to a reversal in the ordering of these two states with 3{sup 1}B{sub 1} shifting to lower energies. Molecular dynamics simulations along with linear response and ab initio calculations support the evidence extracted from resonance Raman intensity analysis, providing insights on ClNO{sub 2} electronic structure, solvation effects in methanol, and the source of broadening, emphasizing the importance of a contribution from inhomogeneous linewidth.

  15. Experimental research on heat transfer of natural convection in vertical rectangular channels with large aspect ratio

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, Qing; Qiu, Suizheng; Su, Guanghui; Tian, Wenxi; Ye, Zhonghao

    2010-01-15

    This work presents the experimental research on the steady laminar natural convection heat transfer of air in three vertical thin rectangular channels with different gap clearance. The much higher ratio of width to gap clearance (60-24) and the ratio of length to gap clearance (800-320) make the rectangular channels similar with the coolant flow passage in plate type fuel reactors. The vertical rectangular channels were composed of two stainless steal plates and were heated by electrical heating rods. The wall temperatures were detected with the K-type thermocouples which were inserted into the blind holes drilled in the steal plates. Also the air temperatures at the inlet and outlet of the channel were detected. The wall heat fluxes added to the air flow were calculated by the Fourier heat conduction law. The heat transfer characteristics were analyzed, and the average Nusselt numbers in all the three channels could be well correlated with the Rayleigh number or the modified Rayleigh number in a uniform correlation. Furthermore, the maximum wall temperatures were investigated, which is a key parameter for the fuel's integrity during some accidents. It was found that even the wall heat flux was up to 1500 W/m{sup 2}, the maximum wall temperature was lower than 350 C. All this work is valuable for the plate type reactor's design and safety analysis. (author)

  16. Constraints on the tensor-to-scalar ratio for non-power-law models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vázquez, J. Alberto; Bridges, M.; Ma, Yin-Zhe; Hobson, M.P. E-mail: mb435@mrao.cam.ac.uk E-mail: mph@mrao.cam.ac.uk

    2013-08-01

    Recent cosmological observations hint at a deviation from the simple power-law form of the primordial spectrum of curvature perturbations. In this paper we show that in the presence of a tensor component, a turn-over in the initial spectrum is preferred by current observations, and hence non-power-law models ought to be considered. For instance, for a power-law parameterisation with both a tensor component and running parameter, current data show a preference for a negative running at more than 2.5σ C.L. As a consequence of this deviation from a power-law, constraints on the tensor-to-scalar ratio r are slightly broader. We also present constraints on the inflationary parameters for a model-independent reconstruction and the Lasenby and Doran (LD) model. In particular, the constraints on the tensor-to-scalar ratio from the LD model are: r{sub LD} = 0.11±0.024. In addition to current data, we show expected constraints from Planck-like and CMB-Pol sensitivity experiments by using Markov-Chain-Monte-Carlo sampling chains. For all the models, we have included the Bayesian Evidence to perform a model selection analysis. The Bayes factor, using current observations, shows a strong preference for the LD model over the standard power-law parameterisation, and provides an insight into the accuracy of differentiating models through future surveys.

  17. Auger electron spectroscopy for the determination of sex and age related Ca/P ratio at different bone sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balatsoukas, Ioannis; Kourkoumelis, Nikolaos; Tzaphlidou, Margaret

    2010-10-15

    The Ca/P ratio of normal cortical and trabecular rat bone was measured by Auger electron spectroscopy (AES). Semiquantitative analysis was carried out using ratio techniques to draw conclusions on how age, sex and bone site affect the relative composition of calcium and phosphorus. Results show that Ca/P ratio is not sex dependent; quite the opposite, bone sites exhibit variations in elemental stoichiometry where femoral sections demonstrate higher Ca/P ratio than rear and front tibias. Age-related changes are more distinct for cortical bone in comparison with the trabecular bone. The latter's Ca/P ratio remains unaffected from all the parameters under study. This study confirms that AES is able to successfully quantify bone mineral main elements when certain critical points, related to the experimental conditions, are addressed effectively.

  18. Biogenic opal germanium/silicon ratios used to monitor upwelling intensity in Newport Lagoon section, Monterey Formation, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murnane, R.J.

    1986-04-01

    Empirical evidence and modeling of geochemical cycles of silicon (Si) and germanium (Ge) suggest that opal Ge/Si ratios record water Ge/Si ratios although some fractionation of germanium from silicon occurs during biogenic opal formation. Modeling results also suggest that opal Ge/Si ratios could record changes in upwelling intensity. In today's oceans, areas of high productivity associated with upwelling show relatively elevated surface-water nutrient concentrations, whereas areas of low productivity with restricted upwelling exhibit low surface-water nutrient concentrations. Fractionation of germanium from silicon during biogenic opal formation would cause the surface ocean's Ge/Si ratio to increase as surface-water nutrient concentrations are lowered. Diatomites from the Newport Lagoon section of the Monterey Formation were analyzed to test the hypothesis that biogenic opal Ge/Si ratios could be used to trace upwelling intensity. Diatom assemblages of the Monterey Formation vary with upwelling intensity over a time scale of millions of years. Samples collected from the middle and late Miocene have high ratios (up to 8 x 10/sup -7/) when diatom assemblages indicate relatively weak upwelling, and low ratios (less than 6 x 10/sup -7/) when diatom assemblages indicate relatively strong upwelling. These ratios agree with modeling predictions. Opal Ge/Si ratios may also record upwelling fluctuations on much shorter times scales. Adjacent, centimeter-scale, lighter and darker layers record past variations in biogenic and terrigenous inputs to ocean-bottom sediments. Opal Ge/Si ratios may indicate whether the darker layers result from a relative decrease in surface-water productivity in response to a reduction in upwelling intensity, or only from a relative increase in terrigenous detrital inputs.

  19. Investigation of critical equivalence ratio and chemical speciation in flames of ethylbenzene-ethanol blends

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Therrien, Richard J.; Ergut, Ali; Levendis, Yiannis A.; Richter, Henning; Howard, Jack B.; Carlson, Joel B.

    2010-02-15

    This work investigates five different one-dimensional, laminar, atmospheric pressure, premixed ethanol/ethylbenzene flames (0%, 25%, 50%, 75% and 90% ethanol by weight) at their soot onset threshold ({phi}{sub critical}). Liquid ethanol/ethylbenzene mixtures were pre-vaporized in nitrogen, blended with an oxygen-nitrogen mixture and, upon ignition, burned in premixed one-dimensional flames at atmospheric pressure. The flames were controlled so that each was at its visual soot onset threshold, and all had similar temperature profiles (determined by thermocouples). Fixed gases, light volatile hydrocarbons, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), and oxygenated aromatic hydrocarbons were directly sampled at three locations in each flame. The experimental results were compared with a detailed kinetic model, and the modeling results were used to perform a reaction flux analysis of key species. The critical equivalence ratio was observed to increase in a parabolic fashion as ethanol concentration increased in the fuel mixture. The experimental results showed increasing trends of methane, ethane, and ethylene with increasing concentrations of ethanol in the flames. Carbon monoxide was also seen to increase significantly with the increase of ethanol in the flame, which removes carbon from the PAH and soot formation pathways. The PAH and oxygenated aromatic hydrocarbon values were very similar in the 0%, 25% and 50% ethanol flames, but significantly lower in the 75% and 90% ethanol flames. These results were in general agreement with the model and were reflected by the model soot predictions. The model predicted similar soot profiles for the 0%, 25% and 50% ethanol flames, however it predicted significantly lower values in the 75% and 90% ethanol flames. The reaction flux analysis revealed benzyl to be a major contributor to single and double ring aromatics (i.e., benzene and naphthalene), which was identified in a similar role in nearly sooting or highly sooting

  20. ANALYSIS OF RICIN TOXIN PREPARATIONS FOR CARBOHYDRATE AND FATTY ACID ABUNDANCE AND ISOTOPE RATIO INFORMATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wunschel, David S.; Kreuzer-Martin, Helen W.; Antolick, Kathryn C.; Colburn, Heather A.; Moran, James J.; Melville, Angela M.

    2009-12-01

    employing a quadrupole MS system for compound identification and an isotope ratio MS for measuring the stable isotope ratios of deuterium and hydrogen (D/H) in fatty acids. Finally, the method for analyzing the compound abundance data is included. This study indicates that removal of ricinoleic acid is a conserved consequence of each processing step we tested. Furthermore, the stable isotope D/H ratio of ricinoleic acid distinguished between two of the three castor seed sources. Concentrations of arabinose, xylose, mannose, glucosamine and myo-inositol differentiated between crude or acetone extracted samples and samples produced by protein precipitation. Taken together these data illustrate the ability to distinguish between processes used to purify a ricin sample as well as potentially the source seeds.

  1. Measurement of the production fraction times branching fraction $\\boldsymbol{ f(b\\to\\Lambda_{b})\\cdot \\mathcal{B}(\\Lambda_{b}\\to J/\\psi \\Lambda)}$

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich; Abbott, Braden Keim; Acharya, Bannanje Sripath; Adams, Mark Raymond; Adams, Todd; Alexeev, Guennadi D.; Alkhazov, Georgiy D.; Alton, Andrew K.; Alverson, George O.; Alves, Gilvan Augusto; Ancu, Lucian Stefan; /Nijmegen U. /Fermilab

    2011-05-01

    The {Lambda}{sub b}(udb) baryon is observed in the decay {Lambda}{sub b} {yields} J/{psi}{Lambda} using 6.1 fb{sup -1} of p{bar p} collisions collected with the D0 detector at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. The production fraction multiplied by the branching fraction for this decay relative to that for the decay B{sup 0} {yields} J/{psi}K{sub s}{sup 0} is measured to be 0.345 {+-} 0.034 (stat.) {+-} 0.033 (syst.) {+-} 0.003 (PDG). Using the world average value of f(b {yields} B{sup 0}) {center_dot} {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} J/{psi}K{sub s}{sup 0}) = (1.74 {+-} 0.08) x 10{sup -5}, they obtain f(b {yields} {Lambda}{sub b}) {center_dot} {Beta}({Lambda}{sub b} {yields} J/{psi}{Lambda}) = (6.01 {+-} 0.60 (stat.) {+-} 0.58 (syst.) {+-} 0.28 (PDG)) x 10{sup -5}. This measurement represents an improvement in precision by about a factor of three with respect to the current world average.

  2. FIRST DETECTION OF ULTRAVIOLET EMISSION FROM A DETACHED DUST SHELL: GALAXY EVOLUTION EXPLORER OBSERVATIONS OF THE CARBON ASYMPTOTIC GIANT BRANCH STAR U Hya

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanchez, Enmanuel; Montez, Rodolfo Jr.; Stassun, Keivan G.; Ramstedt, Sofia

    2015-01-10

    We present the discovery of an extended ring of ultraviolet (UV) emission surrounding the asymptotic giant branch (AGB) star U Hya in archival observations performed by the Galaxy Evolution Explorer. This is the third discovery of extended UV emission from a carbon AGB star and the first from an AGB star with a detached shell. From imaging and photometric analysis of the FUV and NUV images, we determined that the UV ring has a radius of ∼110'', thus indicating that the emitting material is likely associated with the detached shell seen in the infrared. We find that scattering of the central point source of NUV and FUV emission by the dust shell is negligible. Moreover, we find that scattering of the interstellar radiation field by the dust shell can contribute at most ∼10% of the FUV flux. Morphological and photometric evidence suggests that shocks caused by the star's motion through space and, possibly, shock-excited H{sub 2} molecules are the most likely origins of the UV flux. In contrast to previous examples of extended UV emission from AGB stars, the extended UV emission from U Hya does not show a bow-shock-like structure, which is consistent with a lower space velocity and lower interstellar medium density. This suggests the detached dust shell is the source of the UV-emitting material and can be used to better understand the formation of detached shells.

  3. TWO DISTINCT RED GIANT BRANCH POPULATIONS IN THE GLOBULAR CLUSTER NGC 2419 AS TRACERS OF A MERGER EVENT IN THE MILKY WAY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Young-Wook; Han, Sang-Il; Joo, Seok-Joo; Jang, Sohee; Na, Chongsam; Lim, Dongwook; Kim, Hak-Sub; Yoon, Suk-Jin; Okamoto, Sakurako; Arimoto, Nobuo

    2013-11-20

    Recent spectroscopic observations of the outer halo globular cluster (GC) NGC 2419 show that it is unique among GCs, in terms of chemical abundance patterns, and some suggest that it was originated in the nucleus of a dwarf galaxy. Here we show, from the Subaru narrowband photometry employing a calcium filter, that the red giant branch (RGB) of this GC is split into two distinct subpopulations. Comparison with spectroscopy has confirmed that the redder RGB stars in the hk[=(Ca–b) – (b – y)] index are enhanced in [Ca/H] by ∼0.2 dex compared to the bluer RGB stars. Our population model further indicates that the calcium-rich second generation stars are also enhanced in helium abundance by a large amount (ΔY = 0.19). Our photometry, together with the results for other massive GCs (e.g., ω Cen, M22, and NGC 1851), suggests that the discrete distribution of RGB stars in the hk index might be a universal characteristic of this growing group of peculiar GCs. The planned narrowband calcium photometry for the Local Group dwarf galaxies would help to establish an empirical connection between these GCs and the primordial building blocks in the hierarchical merging paradigm of galaxy formation.

  4. BRANCH?BASED MODEL FOR THE DIAMETERS OF THE PULMONARY AIRWAYS: ACCOUNTING FOR DEPARTURES FROM SELF?CONSISTENCY AND REGISTRATION ERRORS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neradilek, Moni Blazej; Polissar, Nayak; Einstein, Daniel R.; Glenny, Robb W.; Minard, Kevin R.; Carson, James P.; Jiao, Xiangmin; Jacob, Rick E.; Cox, Timothy C.; Postlewait, Ed; Corley, Richard A.

    2012-06-01

    We examine a previously published branch-based approach to modeling airway diameters that is predicated on the assumption of self-consistency across all levels of the tree. We mathematically formulate this assumption, propose a method to test it and develop a more general model to be used when the assumption is violated. We discuss the effect of measurement error on the estimated models and propose methods that account for it. The methods are illustrated on data from MRI and CT images of silicone casts of two rats, two normal monkeys and one ozone-exposed monkey. Our results showed substantial departures from self-consistency in all five subjects. When departures from selfconsistency exist we do not recommend using the self-consistency model, even as an approximation, as we have shown that it may likely lead to an incorrect representation of the diameter geometry. Measurement error has an important impact on the estimated morphometry models and needs to be accounted for in the analysis.

  5. Measurement of the Inclusive Branching FractionsB(B^- to D^+ Pi^- Pi^-) and B(B^- to D*^+ Pi^- Pi^-)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eschenburg, Vance Onno

    2007-07-17

    The D{sub J}{sup 0} is a family of four orbitally excited mesons: D*{sub 2}(2460){sup 0}, D{sub 1}(2420){sup 0}, D{sub 1}(j = 1/2){sup -}, and D*{sub 0}(j = 1/2){sup 0}. This dissertation presents the measurements of the inclusive branching fractions, {Beta}(B{sup -} {yields} D*{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup -}) and {Beta}(B{sup -} {yields} D{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup -}). The D{sub J}{sup 0} provides an intermediate resonance for those two modes. The data used for this analysis consists of Runs 1-5 with total integrated luminosity of 343.38 fb{sup -1}, which is corresponding to 383.92 million B{bar B} pairs, provided by the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric B Factory. The values presented are: {Beta}(B{sup -} {yields} D{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup -}) = (1.12 {+-} 0.02 {+-} 0.08) x 10{sup -3}; {Beta}(B{sup -} {yields} D*{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup -}) = (1.67 {+-} 0.03 {+-} 0.13) x 10{sup -3}.

  6. K{sub s} -BAND LUMINOSITY EVOLUTION OF THE ASYMPTOTIC GIANT BRANCH POPULATION BASED ON STAR CLUSTERS IN THE LARGE MAGELLANIC CLOUD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ko, Youkyung; Lee, Myung Gyoon; Lim, Sungsoon E-mail: mglee@astro.snu.ac.kr

    2013-11-10

    We present a study of K{sub s} -band luminosity evolution of the asymptotic giant branch (AGB) population in simple stellar systems using star clusters in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). We determine physical parameters of LMC star clusters including center coordinates, radii, and foreground reddenings. Ages of 83 star clusters are derived from isochrone fitting with the Padova models, and those of 19 star clusters are taken from the literature. The AGB stars in 102 star clusters with log(age) = 7.3-9.5 are selected using near-infrared color-magnitude diagrams based on Two Micron All Sky Survey photometry. Then we obtain the K{sub s} -band luminosity fraction of AGB stars in these star clusters as a function of ages. The K{sub s} -band luminosity fraction of AGB stars increases, on average, as age increases from log(age) ? 8.0, reaching a maximum at log(age) ? 8.5, and it decreases thereafter. There is a large scatter in the AGB luminosity fraction for given ages, which is mainly due to stochastic effects. We discuss this result in comparison with five simple stellar population models. The maximum K{sub s} -band AGB luminosity fraction for bright clusters is reproduced by the models that expect the value of 0.7-0.8 at log(age) = 8.5-8.7. We discuss the implication of our results with regard to the study of size and mass evolution of galaxies.

  7. Mineralization and optical characterization of copper oxide nanoparticles using a high aspect ratio bio-template

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zaman, Mohammed Shahriar [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California, Riverside, California 92521 (United States); Haberer, Elaine D., E-mail: haberer@ucr.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California, Riverside, California 92521 (United States); Materials Science and Engineering Program, University of California, Riverside, California 92521 (United States)

    2014-10-21

    Organized chains of copper oxide nanoparticles were synthesized, without palladium (Pd) activation, using the M13 filamentous virus as a biological template. The interaction of Cu precursor ions with the negatively charged viral coat proteins were studied with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy. Discrete nanoparticles with an average diameter of 4.5 nm and narrow size distribution were closely spaced along the length of the high aspect ratio templates. The synthesized material was identified as a mixture of cubic Cu?O and monoclinic CuO. UV/Vis absorption measurements were completed and a direct optical band gap of 2.87 eV was determined using Tauc's method. This value was slightly larger than bulk, signaling quantum confinement effects within the templated materials.

  8. Portable computer to reduce gamma-ray spectra for plutonium isotopic ratios

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ruhter, W.D.; Camp, D.C.

    1981-05-15

    In response to Task A.63 of the International Safeguards Project Office (ISPO), to upgrade measurement technology used by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), a portable data-reduction microprocessor was designed and programmed which allows in-field reduction of gamma-ray spectra and interfaces with the IAEA's multichannel analyzers - the 1000 or 2000-channel memory Silena BS27/N. This report describes the components used in assembling the microprocessor unit: hardware, software used to control the unit, and the mathematical formulation used to obtain isotopic ratios from the gamma-ray data. A simple overview is presented of the unit's operation and the results of tests on gamma-ray spectra that sought to verify the unit's operating characteristics and to determine the precision and effectiveness of the software developed for data reduction.

  9. Elemental ratio measurements of organic compounds using aerosol mass spectrometry: characterization, improved calibration, and implications

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Canagaratna, M. R.; Jimenez, J. L.; Kroll, J. H.; Chen, Q.; Kessler, S. H.; Massoli, P.; Hildebrandt Ruiz, L.; Fortner, E.; Williams, L. R.; Wilson, K. R.; et al

    2015-01-12

    Elemental compositions of organic aerosol (OA) particles provide useful constraints on OA sources, chemical evolution, and effects. The Aerodyne high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) is widely used to measure OA elemental composition. This study evaluates AMS measurements of atomic oxygen-to-carbon (O : C), hydrogen-to-carbon (H : C), and organic mass-to-organic carbon (OM : OC) ratios, and of carbon oxidation state (OS C) for a vastly expanded laboratory data set of multifunctional oxidized OA standards. For the expanded standard data set, the method introduced by Aiken et al. (2008), which uses experimentally measured ion intensities at all ions to determinemore » elemental ratios (referred to here as "Aiken-Explicit"), reproduces known O : C and H : C ratio values within 20% (average absolute value of relative errors) and 12%, respectively. The more commonly used method, which uses empirically estimated H2O+ and CO+ ion intensities to avoid gas phase air interferences at these ions (referred to here as "Aiken-Ambient"), reproduces O : C and H : C of multifunctional oxidized species within 28 and 14% of known values. The values from the latter method are systematically biased low, however, with larger biases observed for alcohols and simple diacids. A detailed examination of the H2O+, CO+, and CO2+ fragments in the high-resolution mass spectra of the standard compounds indicates that the Aiken-Ambient method underestimates the CO+ and especially H2O+ produced from many oxidized species. Combined AMS–vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) ionization measurements indicate that these ions are produced by dehydration and decarboxylation on the AMS vaporizer (usually operated at 600 °C). Thermal decomposition is observed to be efficient at vaporizer temperatures down to 200 °C. These results are used together to develop an "Improved-Ambient" elemental analysis method for AMS spectra measured in air. The Improved-Ambient method uses specific ion

  10. Contact resistance improvement by the modulation of peripheral length to area ratio of graphene contact pattern

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cho, Chunhum; Lee, Sangchul; Lee, Sang Kyung; Noh, Jin Woo; Park, Woojin; Lee, Young Gon; Hwang, Hyeon Jun; Ham, Moon-Ho; Kang, Chang Goo; Lee, Byoung Hun

    2015-05-25

    High contact resistance between graphene and metal is a major huddle for high performance electronic device applications of graphene. In this work, a method to improve the contact resistance of graphene is investigated by varying the ratio of peripheral length and area of graphene pattern under a metal contact. The contact resistance decreased to 0.8 kΩ·μm from 2.1 kΩ·μm as the peripheral length increased from 312 to 792 μm. This improvement is attributed to the low resistivity of edge-contacted graphene, which is 8.1 × 10{sup 5} times lower than that of top-contacted graphene.

  11. Intrinsic low pass filtering improves signal-to-noise ratio in critical-point flexure biosensors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jain, Ankit; Alam, Muhammad Ashraful

    2014-08-25

    A flexure biosensor consists of a suspended beam and a fixed bottom electrode. The adsorption of the target biomolecules on the beam changes its stiffness and results in change of beam's deflection. It is now well established that the sensitivity of sensor is maximized close to the pull-in instability point, where effective stiffness of the beam vanishes. The question: Do the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and the limit-of-detection (LOD) also improve close to the instability point?, however remains unanswered. In this article, we systematically analyze the noise response to evaluate SNR and establish LOD of critical-point flexure sensors. We find that a flexure sensor acts like an effective low pass filter close to the instability point due to its relatively small resonance frequency, and rejects high frequency noise, leading to improved SNR and LOD. We believe that our conclusions should establish the uniqueness and the technological relevance of critical-point biosensors.

  12. Highly aligned arrays of high aspect ratio barium titanate nanowires via hydrothermal synthesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bowland, Christopher C.; Zhou, Zhi; Malakooti, Mohammad H.; Sodano, Henry A.

    2015-06-01

    We report on the development of a hydrothermal synthesis procedure that results in the growth of highly aligned arrays of high aspect ratio barium titanate nanowires. Using a multiple step, scalable hydrothermal reaction, a textured titanium dioxide film is deposited on titanium foil upon which highly aligned nanowires are grown via homoepitaxy and converted to barium titanate. Scanning electron microscope images clearly illustrate the effect the textured film has on the degree of orientation of the nanowires. The alignment of nanowires is quantified by calculating the Herman's Orientation Factor, which reveals a 58% improvement in orientation as compared to growth in the absence of the textured film. The ferroelectric properties of barium titanate combined with the development of this scalable growth procedure provide a powerful route towards increasing the efficiency and performance of nanowire-based devices in future real-world applications such as sensing and power harvesting.

  13. Elemental ratio measurements of organic compounds using aerosol mass spectrometry: Characterization, improved calibration, and implications

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Canagaratna, M. R.; Jimenez, J. L.; Kroll, J. H.; Chen, Q.; Kessler, S. H.; Massoli, P.; Ruiz, L. Hildebrandt; Fortner, E.; Williams, L. R.; Wilson, K. R.; et al

    2015-01-12

    Elemental compositions of organic aerosol (OA) particles provide useful constraints on OA sources, chemical evolution, and effects. The Aerodyne high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) is widely used to measure OA elemental composition. This study evaluates AMS measurements of atomic oxygen-to-carbon (O : C), hydrogen-to-carbon (H : C), and organic mass-to-organic carbon (OM : OC) ratios, and of carbon oxidation state (OS C) for a vastly expanded laboratory data set of multifunctional oxidized OA standards. For the expanded standard data set, the method introduced by Aiken et al. (2008), which uses experimentally measured ionmoreintensities at all ions to determine elemental ratios (referred to here as "Aiken-Explicit"), reproduces known O : C and H : C ratio values within 20% (average absolute value of relative errors) and 12%, respectively. The more commonly used method, which uses empirically estimated H2O+ and CO+ ion intensities to avoid gas phase air interferences at these ions (referred to here as "Aiken-Ambient"), reproduces O : C and H : C of multifunctional oxidized species within 28 and 14% of known values. The values from the latter method are systematically biased low, however, with larger biases observed for alcohols and simple diacids. A detailed examination of the H2O+, CO+, and CO2+ fragments in the high-resolution mass spectra of the standard compounds indicates that the Aiken-Ambient method underestimates the CO+ and especially H2O+ produced from many oxidized species. Combined AMSvacuum ultraviolet (VUV) ionization measurements indicate that these ions are produced by dehydration and decarboxylation on the AMS vaporizer (usually operated at 600 C). Thermal decomposition is observed to be efficient at vaporizer temperatures down to 200 C. These results are used together to develop an "Improved-Ambient" elemental analysis method for AMS spectra measured in air. The Improved-Ambient method uses specific ion

  14. Performance of Cladding on MOX Fuel with Low 240Pu/239Pu Ratio

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCoy, Kevin; Blanpain, Patrick; Morris, Robert Noel

    2014-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy has decided to dispose of a portion of its surplus plutonium by reconstituting it into mixed oxide (MOX) fuel and irradiating it in commercial power reactors. As part of fuel qualification, four lead assemblies were manufactured and irradiated to a maximum fuel rod average burnup of 47.3 MWd/kg heavy metal. This was the world s first commercial irradiation of MOX fuel with a 240Pu/239Pu ratio less than 0.10. Five fuel rods with varying burnups and plutonium contents were selected from one of the assemblies and shipped to Oak Ridge National Laboratory for hot cell examination. This paper discusses the results of those examinations with emphasis on cladding performance. Exams relevant to the cladding included visual and eddy current exams, profilometry, microscopy, hydrogen analysis, gallium analysis, and mechanical testing. There was no discernible effect of the type of MOX fuel on the performance of the cladding.

  15. Nonlinear oscillations and waves in an arbitrary mass ratio cold plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Verma, Prabal Singh

    2011-12-15

    It is well known that nonlinear standing oscillations in an arbitrary mass ratio cold plasma always phase mix away. However, there exist nonlinear electron-ion traveling wave solutions, which do not exhibit phase mixing because they have zero ponderomotive force. The existence of these waves has been demonstrated using a perturbation method. Moreover, it is shown that cold plasma BGK waves [Albritton et al., Nucl. Fusion 15, 1199 (1975)] phase mix away if ions are allowed to move and the scaling of phase mixing is found to be different from earlier work [Sengupta et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 82, 1867 (1999)]. Phase mixing of these waves has been further verified in 1-D particle in cell simulation.

  16. Flavor ratios of extragalactic neutrinos and neutrino shortcuts in extra dimensions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aeikens, Elke; Päs, Heinrich; Pakvasa, Sandip; Sicking, Philipp

    2015-10-02

    The recent measurement of high energy extragalactic neutrinos by the IceCube Collaboration has opened a new window to probe non-standard neutrino properties. Among other effects, sterile neutrino altered dispersion relations (ADRs) due to shortcuts in an extra dimension can significantly affect astrophysical flavor ratios. We discuss two limiting cases of this effect, first active-sterile neutrino oscillations with a constant ADR potential and second an MSW-like resonant conversion arising from geodesics oscillating around the brane in an asymmetrically warped extra dimension. We demonstrate that the second case has the potential to suppress significantly the flux of specific flavors such as ν{sub μ} or ν{sub τ} at high energies.

  17. Nanopowder molding method for creating implantable high-aspect-ratio electrodes on thin flexible substrates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hu, Zhiyu; Thundat, Thomas George

    2006-03-01

    Metal nanoparticles and a nanopowder molding process were used to fabricate 2D and 3D patternable structures having a height-to-width ratio of up to 10:1. By means of this process, an entire neural stimulation circuit, including stimulating electrode, connection trace, and contact pad, can be fused into one continuous, integrated structure where different sections can have different heights, widths, and shapes. The technique is suitable for mass production, and the fabricated electrode is robust and very flexible. More importantly for biomedical applications, the entire fabricated structure can be packed at room temperature onto a biocompatible flexible substrate, such as polydimethylsiloxane, parylene, and polyimide as well as other temperature-sensitive or vacuum-sensitive materials. The electrodes and wires have about the same electrical resistivities as bulk materials and desirable electrochemical properties, including low impedance.

  18. Investigation of L X-ray intensity ratios in Pt induced by proton collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaur, Manpuneet; Kaur, Mandeep; Mohan, Harsh Jain, Arvind Kumar; Singh, Parjit S.; Vohra, Neelam; Sharma, Sunita

    2015-08-28

    A survey of literature on L X-ray parameters inspires us for taking up the present investigation. These parameters are useful to study atomic properties. In view of this, we report L X-ray intensity ratios for Pt, namely, L{sub ℓ} / L{sub α}, L{sub β} / L{sub α} and L{sub γ} / L{sub α} with proton collisions over the energy range 260 - 400 keV with an interval of 20 keV. The intention of research presented in this paper is to explore their energy dependence and comparison with theoretical calculations. These analyses will yield a data in the low energy region which assist in better clarity of proton induced X-ray emission phenomenon.

  19. Measurement and simulation of jet mass caused by a high-aspect ratio pertubation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keiter, Paul A; Cooley, James; Kyrala, George; Wilson, Doug; Blue, Brent; Edwards, John; Robey, Harry; Spears, Brian

    2009-01-01

    Inertial confinement fusion (ICF) capsule performance can be negatively impacted by the presence of hydrodynamic instabilities. To perform a gas fill on an ICF capsule current plans involve drilling a small hole and inserting a fill tube to inject the gas mixture into the capsule. This introduces a perturbation on the capsule, which can seed hydrodynamic instabilities. The small hole can cause jetting of the shell material into the gas, which might adversely affect the capsule performance. We have performed simulations and experiments to study the hydrodynamic evolution of jets from high-aspect ratio holes, such as the fill tube hole. Although simulations using cold materials over predict the amount of mass in the jet, when a reasonable amount of preheat (< 1 eV) is introduced, the simulations are in better agreement with the experiment.

  20. Multi-images deconvolution improves signal-to-noise ratio on gated stimulated emission depletion microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Castello, Marco; Diaspro, Alberto; Vicidomini, Giuseppe

    2014-12-08

    Time-gated detection, namely, only collecting the fluorescence photons after a time-delay from the excitation events, reduces complexity, cost, and illumination intensity of a stimulated emission depletion (STED) microscope. In the gated continuous-wave- (CW-) STED implementation, the spatial resolution improves with increased time-delay, but the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) reduces. Thus, in sub-optimal conditions, such as a low photon-budget regime, the SNR reduction can cancel-out the expected gain in resolution. Here, we propose a method which does not discard photons, but instead collects all the photons in different time-gates and recombines them through a multi-image deconvolution. Our results, obtained on simulated and experimental data, show that the SNR of the restored image improves relative to the gated image, thereby improving the effective resolution.

  1. CHRONIC ZINC SCREENING WATER EFFECT RATIO FOR THE H-12 OUTFALL, SAVANNAH RIVER SITE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coughlin, D.; Looney, B.; Millings, M.

    2009-01-13

    In response to proposed Zn limits for the NPDES outfall H-12, a Zn screening Water Effects Ratio (WER) study was conducted to determine if a full site-specific WER is warranted. Using standard assumptions for relating the lab results to the stream, the screening WER data were consistent with the proposed Zn limit and suggest that a full WER would result in a similar limit. Addition of a humate amendment to the outfall water reduced Zn toxicity, but the toxicity reduction was relatively small and unlikely to impact proposed Zn limits. The screening WER data indicated that the time and expense required to perform a full WER for Zn is not warranted.

  2. Fukushima Daiichi reactor source term attribution using cesium isotope ratios from contaminated environmental samples

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Snow, Mathew S.; Snyder, Darin C.; Delmore, James E.

    2016-01-18

    Source term attribution of environmental contamination following the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP) disaster is complicated by a large number of possible similar emission source terms (e.g. FDNPP reactor cores 1–3 and spent fuel ponds 1–4). Cesium isotopic analyses can be utilized to discriminate between environmental contamination from different FDNPP source terms and, if samples are sufficiently temporally resolved, potentially provide insights into the extent of reactor core damage at a given time. Rice, soil, mushroom, and soybean samples taken 100–250 km from the FDNPP site were dissolved using microwave digestion. Radiocesium was extracted and purified using two sequentialmore » ammonium molybdophosphate-polyacrylonitrile columns, following which 135Cs/137Cs isotope ratios were measured using thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS). Results were compared with data reported previously from locations to the northwest of FDNPP and 30 km to the south of FDNPP. 135Cs/137Cs isotope ratios from samples 100–250 km to the southwest of the FDNPP site show a consistent value of 0.376 ± 0.008. 135Cs/137Cs versus 134Cs/137Cs correlation plots suggest that radiocesium to the southwest is derived from a mixture of FDNPP reactor cores 1, 2, and 3. Conclusions from the cesium isotopic data are in agreement with those derived independently based upon the event chronology combined with meteorological conditions at the time of the disaster. In conclusion, cesium isotopic analyses provide a powerful tool for source term discrimination of environmental radiocesium contamination at the FDNPP site. For higher precision source term attribution and forensic determination of the FDNPP core conditions based upon cesium, analyses of a larger number of samples from locations to the north and south of the FDNPP site (particularly time-resolved air filter samples) are needed. Published in 2016. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain

  3. Maintaining low exhaust emissions with turbocharged gas engines using a feedback air-fuel ratio control system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eckard, D.W.; Serve, J.V.

    1987-10-01

    Maintaining low exhaust emissions on a turbocharged, natural gas engine through the speed and load range requires precise control of the air-fuel ratio. Changes in ambient conditions or fuel heating value will cause the air-fuel ratio to change substantially. By combining air-gas pressure with preturbine temperature control, the air-fuel ratio can be maintained regardless of changes in the ambient conditions or the fuel's heating value. Design conditions and operating results are presented for an air-fuel controller for a turbocharged engine.

  4. Practical in-situ determination of ortho-para hydrogen ratios via fiber-optic based Raman spectroscopy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Sutherland, Liese -Marie; Knudson, James N.; Mocko, Michal; Renneke, Richard M.

    2015-12-17

    An experiment was designed and developed to prototype a fiber-optic-based laser system, which measures the ratio of ortho-hydrogen to para-hydrogen in an operating neutron moderator system at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) spallation neutron source. Preliminary measurements resulted in an ortho to para ratio of 3.06:1, which is within acceptable agreement with the previously published ratio. As a result, the successful demonstration of Raman Spectroscopy for this measurement is expected to lead to a practical method that can be applied for similar in-situ measurements at operating neutron spallation sources.

  5. Elemental ratio measurements of organic compounds using aerosol mass spectrometry: characterization, improved calibration, and implications

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Canagaratna, M. R.; Jimenez, J. L.; Kroll, J. H.; Chen, Q.; Kessler, S. H.; Massoli, P.; Hildebrandt Ruiz, L.; Fortner, E.; Williams, L. R.; Wilson, K. R.; et al

    2014-07-31

    Elemental compositions of organic aerosol (OA) particles provide useful constraints on OA sources, chemical evolution, and effects. The Aerodyne high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) is widely used to measure OA elemental composition. This study evaluates AMS measurements of atomic oxygen-to-carbon (O : C), hydrogen-to-carbon (H : C), organic mass-to-organic carbon (OM : OC), and carbon oxidation state (OSC) for a vastly expanded laboratory dataset of multifunctional oxidized OA standards. For the expanded standard dataset, the "Aiken-Explicit" method (Aiken et al., 2008), which uses experimentally measured ion intensities at all ions to determine elemental ratios, reproduces known molecular O :more » C and H : C ratio values within 20% (average absolute value of relative errors) and 12% respectively. The more commonly used "Aiken-Ambient" method, which uses empirically estimated H2O+ and CO+ ion intensities to avoid gas phase air interferences at these ions, reproduces O : C and H : C of multifunctional oxidized species within 28% and 14% of known values. These values are systematically biased low, however, with larger biases observed for alcohols and simple diacids. A detailed examination of the H2O+, CO+, and CO2+ fragments in the high-resolution mass spectra of the standard compounds indicates that the Aiken-Ambient method underestimates the CO+ and H2O+ produced from many oxidized species. Combined AMS-vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) ionization measurements indicate that these ions are produced by dehydration and decarboxylation on the AMS vaporizer (usually operated at 600 °C). Thermal decomposition is observed to be efficient at vaporizer temperatures down to 200 °C. These results are used together to develop an "Improved-Ambient" elemental analysis method for AMS spectra measured in air. The Improved-Ambient method reduces the systematic biases and reproduces O : C (H : C) ratios of individual oxidized standards within 28% (13

  6. Tensor to scalar ratio and large scale power suppression from pre-slow roll initial conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lello, Louis; Boyanovsky, Daniel, E-mail: lal81@pitt.edu, E-mail: boyan@pitt.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pittsburgh, 3941 O'Hara St, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 (United States)

    2014-05-01

    We study the corrections to the power spectra of curvature and tensor perturbations and the tensor-to-scalar ratio r in single field slow roll inflation with standard kinetic term due to initial conditions imprinted by a ''fast-roll'' stage prior to slow roll. For a wide range of initial inflaton kinetic energy, this stage lasts only a few e-folds and merges smoothly with slow-roll thereby leading to non-Bunch-Davies initial conditions for modes that exit the Hubble radius during slow roll. We describe a program that yields the dynamics in the fast-roll stage while matching to the slow roll stage in a manner that is independent of the inflationary potentials. Corrections to the power spectra are encoded in a ''transfer function'' for initial conditions T{sub ?}(k), P{sub ?}(k) = P{sup BD}{sub ?}(k)T{sub ?}(k), implying a modification of the ''consistency condition'' for the tensor to scalar ratio at a pivot scale k{sub 0}: r(k{sub 0}) = ?8n{sub T}(k{sub 0})[T{sub T}(k{sub 0})/T{sub R}(k{sub 0})]. We obtain T{sub ?}(k) to leading order in a Born approximation valid for modes of observational relevance today. A fit yields T{sub ?}(k) = 1+A{sub ?}k{sup ?p}cos [2??k/H{sub sr}+?{sub ?}], with 1.5?ratio of kinetic to potential energy ? and the slow roll parameters ?{sub V}, ?{sub V} to leading order in slow roll. For a wide range of ? and the values of ?{sub V};?{sub V} corresponding to the upper bounds from Planck, we find that the low quadrupole is consistent with the results from Planck, and

  7. Remedial investigation work plan for Chestnut Ridge Operable Unit 4 (Rogers Quarry/Lower McCoy Branch) at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-09-01

    The Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant includes - 800 acres near the northeast comer of the reservation and adjacent to the city of Oak Ridge (Fig. 1-1). The plant is a manufacturing and developmental engineering facility that produced components for various nuclear weapons systems and provides engineering support to other Energy Systems facilities. More than 200 contaminated sites have been identified at the Y-12 Plant that resulted from past waste management practices. Many of the sites have operable units (OUs) based on priority and on investigative and remediation requirements. This Remedial Investigation RI work plan specifically addresses Chestnut Ridge OU 4. Chestnut Ridge OU 4 consists of Rogers Quarry and Lower McCoy Branch (MCB). Rogers Quarry, which is also known as Old Rogers Quarry or Bethel Valley Quarry was used for quarrying from the late 1940s or early 1950s until about 1960. Since that time, the quarry has been used for disposal of coal ash and materials from Y-12 production operations, including classified materials. Disposal of coal ash ended in July 1993. An RI is being conducted at this site in response to CERCLA regulations. The overall objectives of the RI are to collect data necessary to evaluate the nature and extent of contaminants of concern, support an Ecological Risk Assessment and a Human Health Risk Assessment, support the evaluation of remedial alternatives, and ultimately develop a Record of Decision for the site. The purpose of this work plan is to outline RI activities necessary to define the nature and extent of suspected contaminants at Chestnut Ridge OU 4. Potential migration pathways also will be investigated. Data collected during the RI will be used to evaluate the risk posed to human health and the environment by OU 4.

  8. The Carina project. VII. Toward the breaking of the age-metallicity degeneracy of red giant branch stars using the C {sub U,} {sub B,} {sub I} index

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Monelli, M.; Milone, A. P.; Gallart, C.; Aparicio, A. [Instituto de Astrofsica de Canarias, Calle Via Lactea s/n, E-38205 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Fabrizio, M.; Cassisi, S.; Buonanno, R. [Istituto Nazionale di Astrofisica-Osservatorio Astronomico Collurania, Via M. Maggini, I-64100 Teramo (Italy); Bono, G. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universit di Roma Tor Vergata, Via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, I-00133 Rome (Italy); Stetson, P. B. [Dominion Astrophysical Observatory, NRC-Herzberg, 5071 West Saanich Road, Victoria, BC, V9E 2E7 (Canada); Walker, A. R. [Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory, National Optical Astronomy Observatory, Casilla 603, La Serena (Chile); Nonino, M. [Istituto Nazionale di Astrofisica-Osservatorio Astronomico di Trieste, Via G. B. Tiepolo 11, I-40131 Trieste (Italy); Dall'Ora, M. [INAFOsservatorio Astronomico di Capodimonte, Salita Moiariello 16, I-80131 Napoli (Italy); Ferraro, I.; Iannicola, G.; Pulone, L. [Istituto Nazionale di Astrofisica-Osservatorio Astronomico di Roma, Via Frascati 33, Monte Porzio Catone, I-00044 Rome (Italy); Thvenin, F., E-mail: monelli@iac.es [Universit de Nice Sophia-antipolis, CNRS, Observatoire de la Cte d'Azur, Laboratoire Lagrange, BP 4229, F-06304 Nice (France)

    2014-12-01

    We present an analysis of photometric and spectroscopic data of the Carina dSph galaxy, testing a new approach similar to that used to disentangle multiple populations in Galactic globular clusters (GCs). We show that a proper color combination is able to separate a significant fraction of the red giant branch (RGB) of the two main Carina populations (the old one, ?12 Gyr, and the intermediate-age one, 4-8 Gyr). In particular, the c {sub U,} {sub B,} {sub I} = (U B) (B I) pseudo-color allows us to follow the RGB of both populations along a relevant portion of the RGB. We find that the oldest stars have a more negative c {sub U,} {sub B,} {sub I} pseudo-color than intermediate-age ones. We correlate the pseudo-color of RGB stars with their chemical properties, finding a significant trend between the iron content and the c {sub U,} {sub B,} {sub I}. Stars belonging to the old population are systematically more metal-poor ([Fe/H] =2.32 0.08 dex) than the intermediate-age ones ([Fe/H] =1.82 0.03 dex). This gives solid evidence of the chemical evolution history of this galaxy, and we have a new diagnostic that can allow us to break the age-metallicity degeneracy of H-burning advanced evolutionary phases. We compared the distribution of stars in the c {sub U,} {sub B,} {sub I} plane with theoretical isochrones, finding that no satisfactory agreement can be reached with models developed in a theoretical framework based on standard heavy element distributions. Finally, we discuss possible systematic differences when compared with multiple populations in GCs.

  9. Comprehensive Sampling of Fourmile Branch and Its Seeplines in the F and H Area of SRS: June 1996 and March 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koch, J.

    1998-10-30

    In June 1996, and March 1997 water samples were collected from Fourmile Branch (FMB) and its seeplines in the vicinity of the F- and H-Area Seepage basins. These sampling events represent a continuation of a series of semi-annual sampling events, which are now conducted annually and are aimed at characterizing the shallow groundwater outcropping into FMB and its wetlands. In the past, this groundwater has been shown to contain contaminants migrating from the F- and H-Area Seepage basins. The samples were analyzed for metals listed in Title 40, Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 264, Appendix IX, various radionuclides, and selected inorganic constituents and parameters. Volatile organic compounds were not analyzed for in this sampling event since in previous events they were below detection limits, (ref. Dixon 1993, Dixon and Koch 1995).Results from both sampling events indicate that the seeplines of F and H Areas and FMB continue to be influenced by contaminants in groundwater originating from the capped seepage basins, but to a lesser degree than in the past. This suggests that the most concentrated portion of the contaminant plume may have flushed from the system.Contaminant concentrations measured during these two sampling events were compared to background samples collected during these two events and compared to primary drinking water standard (PDWS), secondary drinking water standards (SDWS), and maximum contaminant levels (MCL) enforceable in 1997. Results were also compared to the 1989 baseline measurements at corresponding locations.Using two separate statistical tests, the concentrations of analytes were compared to background samples. The purpose of the tests was to determine if concentrations of contaminants along the F- and H-Area seeplines were greater than background concentrations.

  10. The identification of extreme asymptotic giant branch stars and red supergiants in M33 with 24 μm variability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Montiel, Edward J.; Clayton, Geoffrey C.; Johnson, Christopher B.; Srinivasan, Sundar; Engelbracht, Charles W.

    2015-02-01

    We present the first detection of 24 μm variability in 24 sources in the Local Group galaxy M33. These results are based on 4 epochs of Multiband Imaging Photometer for Spitzer observations, which are irregularly spaced over ∼750 days. We find that these sources are constrained exclusively to the Holmberg radius of the galaxy, which increases their chances of being members of M33. We have constructed spectral energy distributions (SEDs) ranging from the optical to the submillimeter to investigate the nature of these objects. We find that 23 of our objects are most likely heavily self-obscured, evolved stars, while the remaining source is the Giant H ii region, NGC 604. We believe that the observed variability is the intrinsic variability of the central star reprocessed through their circumstellar dust shells. Radiative transfer modeling was carried out to determine their likely chemical composition, luminosity, and dust production rate (DPR). As a sample, our modeling has determined an average luminosity of (3.8±0.9)×10{sup 4} L{sub ⊙} and a total DPR of (2.3±0.1)×10{sup −5} M{sub ⊙} yr{sup −1}. Most of the sources, given the high DPRs and short wavelength obscuration, are likely extreme asymptotic giant branch (XAGB) stars. Five of the sources are found to have luminosities above the classical AGB limit (M{sub bol} <−7.1 mag, L > 54,000 L{sub ⊙}), which classifies them as probable red supergiants (RSGs). Almost all of the sources are classified as oxygen-rich. As also seen in the LMC, a significant fraction of the dust in M33 is produced by a handful of XAGB and RSG stars.

  11. Optimization of Drive-Bunch Current Profile for Enhanced Transformer Ratio in Beam-Driven Acceleration Techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lemery, F.; Mihalcea, D.; Prokop, C.R.; Piot, P.; /Northern Illinois U. /Fermilab

    2012-07-08

    In recent years, wakefield acceleration has gained attention due to its high acceleration gradients and cost effectiveness. In beam-driven wakefield acceleration, a critical parameter to optimize is the transformer ratio. It has been shown that current shaping of electron beams allows for enhanced (> 2) transformer ratios. In this paper we present the optimization of the pulse shape of the drive bunch for dielectric-wakefield acceleration.

  12. Parallel Operation of Multiple Closely Spaced Small Aspect Ratio Rod Pinches

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Harper-Slaboszewicz, Victor J.; Leckbee, Joshua; Bennett, Nichelle; Madrid, Elizabeth A.; Rose, David V.; Thoma, Carsten; Welch, Dale R.; Lake, Patrick W.; McCourt, Andrew L.

    2014-12-10

    A series of simulations and experiments to resolve questions about the operation of arrays of closely spaced small aspect ratio rod pinches has been performed. Design and post-shot analysis of the experimental results are supported by 3D particle-in-cell simulations. Both simulations and experiments support these conclusions. Penetration of current to the interior of the array appears to be efficient, as the current on the center rods is essentially equal to the current on the outer rods. Current loss in the feed due to the formation of magnetic nulls was avoided in these experiments by design of the feed surface ofmore » the cathode and control of the gap to keep the electric fields on the cathode below the emission threshold. Some asymmetry in the electron flow to the rod was observed, but the flow appeared to symmetrize as it reached the end of the rod. Interaction between the rod pinches can be controlled to allow the stable and consistent operation of arrays of rod pinches.« less

  13. Etching high aspect ratio (110) silicon grooves in CsOH

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yao, S.; Hesketh, P.J.; Macrander, A.T.

    1995-02-01

    In a previous study the authors developed a fabrication process for a single-crystal silicon X-ray analyzer for use at the Advanced Photon Source, a 6 GeV synchrotron accelerator ring under construction at Argonne National Laboratories. The bent silicon crystal will be used as an analyzer to collect and focus a monochromatic beam of X-rays by Bragg reflection with an energy resolution better than 10 meV for the (hhh) planes (H>6) for diffraction near backscattering. The cross-sectional geometry produced by anisotropic etching high aspect ratio (height/width = 115) silicon grooves with CSOH was studied as a function of the solution concentration. At 50 weight percent (w/o) CSOH straight sidewalls are produced, but at 15 and 25 w/o re-entrant tapered profiles are produced. The etch rates are increased in the groove by 25--100% indicating diffusion effects. The etch rate of the surface was in agreement with previous studies of CSOH etching, but unable to predict the dimensional changes in the grooves.

  14. High aspect ratio iridescent three-dimensional metal–insulator–metal capacitors using atomic layer deposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burke, Micheal Blake, Alan; Djara, Vladimir; O'Connell, Dan; Povey, Ian M.; Cherkaoui, Karim; Monaghan, Scott; Scully, Jim; Murphy, Richard; Hurley, Paul K.; Pemble, Martyn E.; Quinn, Aidan J.

    2015-01-01

    The authors report on the structural and electrical properties of TiN/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/TiN metal–insulator–metal (MIM) capacitor structures in submicron three-dimensional (3D) trench geometries with an aspect ratio of ∼30. A simplified process route was employed where the three layers for the MIM stack were deposited using atomic layer deposition (ALD) in a single run at a process temperature of 250 °C. The TiN top and bottom electrodes were deposited via plasma-enhanced ALD using a tetrakis(dimethylamino)titanium precursor. 3D trench devices yielded capacitance densities of 36 fF/μm{sup 2} and quality factors >65 at low frequency (200 Hz), with low leakage current densities (<3 nA/cm{sup 2} at 1 V). These devices also show strong optical iridescence which, when combined with the covert embedded capacitance, show potential for system in package (SiP) anticounterfeiting applications.

  15. Kinetic electron and ion instability of the lunar wake simulated at physical mass ratio

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haakonsen, Christian Bernt Hutchinson, Ian H. Zhou, Chuteng

    2015-03-15

    The solar wind wake behind the moon is studied with 1D electrostatic particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations using a physical ion to electron mass ratio (unlike prior investigations); the simulations also apply more generally to supersonic flow of dense magnetized plasma past non-magnetic objects. A hybrid electrostatic Boltzmann electron treatment is first used to investigate the ion stability in the absence of kinetic electron effects, showing that the ions are two-stream unstable for downstream wake distances (in lunar radii) greater than about three times the solar wind Mach number. Simulations with PIC electrons are then used to show that kinetic electron effects can lead to disruption of the ion beams at least three times closer to the moon than in the hybrid simulations. This disruption occurs as the result of a novel wake phenomenon: the non-linear growth of electron holes spawned from a narrow dimple in the electron velocity distribution. Most of the holes arising from the dimple are small and quickly leave the wake, approximately following the unperturbed electron phase-space trajectories, but some holes originating near the center of the wake remain and grow large enough to trigger disruption of the ion beams. Non-linear kinetic-electron effects are therefore essential to a comprehensive understanding of the 1D electrostatic stability of such wakes, and possible observational signatures in ARTEMIS data from the lunar wake are discussed.

  16. California bearing ratio behavior of soil-stabilized class F fly ash systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leelavathamma, B.; Mini, K.M.; Pandian, N.S.

    2005-11-01

    Fly ash is a finely divided mineral residue resulting from the combustion of coal in power plants that occupies large extents of land and also causes environmental problems. Hence, concerted attempts are being made to effectively use fly ash in an environmentally friendly way instead of dumping. Several studies have been carried out for its bulk utilization, such as its addition to improve the California bearing ratio (CBR) of soil in roads and embankments. But a thorough mixing of fly ash with soil may not be possible in the field. Hence a study has been carried out on the CBR behavior of black cotton soil and Raichur fly ash (which is class F) in layers and compared with the same in mixes. The results show that the CBR values of soil-fly ash mixes are better than layers, as expected. To improve the strength of layers, cement is used as an additive to fly ash. The results show that black cotton soil can be improved with stabilized fly ash, solving its strength problem as well as the disposal problem of fly ash.

  17. Safeguards Verification Measurements using Laser Ablation, Absorbance Ratio Spectrometry in Gaseous Centrifuge Enrichment Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anheier, Norman C.; Cannon, Bret D.; Kulkarni, Gourihar R.; Munley, John T.; Nelson, Danny A.; Qiao, Hong; Phillips, Jon R.

    2012-07-17

    Laser Ablation Absorbance Ratio Spectrometry (LAARS) is a new verification measurement technology under development at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). LAARS uses three lasers to ablate and then measure the relative isotopic abundance of uranium compounds. An ablation laser is tightly focused on uranium-bearing solids, producing a small atomic uranium vapor plume. Two collinear wavelength-tuned spectrometry lasers transit through the plume and the absorbance of U-235 and U-238 isotopes are measured to determine U-235 enrichment. The measurement is independent of chemical form and degree of dilution with nuisance dust and other materials. LAARS has high relative precision and detection limits approaching the femtogram range for U-235. The sample is scanned and assayed point-by-point at rates reaching 1 million measurements/hour, enabling LAARS to detect and analyze uranium in trace samples. The spectrometer is assembled using primarily commercially available components and features a compact design and automated analysis.Two specific gaseous centrifuge enrichment plant (GCEP) applications of the spectrometer are currently under development: 1) LAARS-Environmental Sampling (ES), which collects and analyzes aerosol particles for GCEP misuse detection and 2) LAARS-Destructive Assay (DA), which enables onsite enrichment DA sample collection and analysis for protracted diversion detection. The two applications propose game-changing technological advances in GCEP safeguards verification.

  18. Measurement of Pi-K Ratios from the NuMI Target

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seun, Sin Man; /Harvard U.

    2007-07-01

    Interactions of protons (p) with the NuMI (Neutrinos at the Main Injector) target are used to create the neutrino beam for the MINOS (Main Injector Neutrino Oscillation Search) Experiment. Using the MIPP (Main Injector Particle Production) experimental apparatus, the production of charged pions and kaons in p+NuMI interactions is studied. The data come from a sample of 2 x 10{sup 6} events obtained by MIPP using the 120 GeV/c proton beam from the Main Injector at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory in Illinois, USA. Pions and kaons are identified by measurement in a Ring Imaging Cherenkov detector. Presented are measurements of {pi}{sup -}/{pi}{sup +}, K{sup -}/K{sup +}, {pi}{sup +}/K{sup +} and {pi}{sup -}/K{sup -} production ratios in the momentum range p{sub T} < 2 GeV/c transversely and 20 GeV/c < p{sub z} < 90 GeV/c longitudinally. Also provided are detailed comparisons of the MIPP NuMI data with the MIPP Thin Carbon data, the MIPP Monte Carlo simulation and the current MINOS models in the relevant momentum ranges.

  19. Formation of compressed flat electron beams with high transverse-emittance ratios

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhu, J.; Piot, P.; Mihalcea, D.; Prokop, C. R.

    2014-08-01

    Flat beamsbeams with asymmetric transverse emittanceshave important applications in novel light-source concepts and advanced-acceleration schemes and could possibly alleviate the need for damping rings in lepton colliders. Over the last decade, a flat beam generation technique based on the conversion of an angular-momentum-dominated beam was proposed and experimentally tested. In this paper we explore the production of compressed flat beams. We especially investigate and optimize the flat beam transformation for beams with substantial fractional energy spread. We use as a simulation example the photoinjector of Fermilabs Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator. The optimizations of the flat beam generation and compression at Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator were done via start-to-end numerical simulations for bunch charges of 3.2 nC, 1.0 nC, and 20 pC at ?37??MeV. The optimized emittances of flat beams with different bunch charges were found to be 0.25???m (emittance ratio is ?400), 0.13????m, 15 nm before compression, and 0.41???m, 0.20???m, 16 nm after full compression, respectively, with peak currents as high as 5.5 kA for a 3.2?nC flat beam. These parameters are consistent with requirements needed to excite wakefields in asymmetric dielectric-lined waveguides or produce significant photon flux using small-gap micro-undulators.

  20. O/M RATIO MEASUREMENT IN PURE AND MIXED OXIDE FULES - WHERE ARE WE NOW?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. RUBIN; ET AL

    2000-12-01

    The oxygen-to-metal (O/M) ratio is one of the most critical parameters of nuclear fuel fabrication, and its measurement is closely monitored for manufacturing process control and to ensure the service behavior of the final product. Thermogravimetry is the most widely used method, the procedure for which has remained largely unchanged since its development some thirty years ago. It was not clear to us, however, that this method is still the optimum one in light of advances in instrumentation, and in the current regulatory environment, particularly with regard to waste management and disposal. As part of the MOX fuel fabrication program at Los Alamos, we conducted a comprehensive review of methods for O/M measurements in UO{sub 2}, PuO{sub 2} and mixed oxide fuels for thermal reactors. A concerted effort was made to access information not available in the open literature. We identified approximately thirty five experimental methods that (a) have been developed with the intent of measuring O/M, (b) provided O/M indirectly by suitable reduction of the measured data, or (c) could provide O/M data with suitable data reduction or when combined with other methods. We will discuss the relative strengths and weaknesses of these methods in their application to current routine and small-lot production environment.

  1. Fabrication and characterization of large arrays of mesoscopic gold rings on large-aspect-ratio cantilevers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ngo, D. Q.; Petkovi?, I. Lollo, A.; Castellanos-Beltran, M. A.; Harris, J. G. E.

    2014-10-15

    We have fabricated large arrays of mesoscopic metal rings on ultrasensitive cantilevers. The arrays are defined by electron beam lithography and contain up to 10{sup 5} rings. The rings have a circumference of 1 ?m, and are made of ultrapure (6N) Au that is deposited onto a silicon-on-insulator wafer without an adhesion layer. Subsequent processing of the SOI wafer results in each array being supported at the end of a free-standing cantilever. To accommodate the large arrays while maintaining a low spring constant, the cantilevers are nearly 1 mm in both lateral dimensions and 100 nm thick. The extreme aspect ratio of the cantilevers, the large array size, and the absence of a sticking layer are intended to enable measurements of the rings' average persistent current in the presence of relatively small magnetic fields. We describe the motivation for these measurements, the fabrication of the devices, and the characterization of the cantilevers' mechanical properties. We also discuss the devices' expected performance in measurements of .

  2. Literature review of the concentration ratios of selected radionuclides in freshwater and marine fish

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poston, T.M.; Klopfer, D.C.

    1986-09-01

    Concentration ratios (CR's) used for modeling the uptake and food chain transport of radionuclides in fish have usually been conservative; that is, at the high end of reported values. This practice ensures that the dose to the consumer of contaminated fish will not be underestimated. In many models, however, conservative values have been used for all variables that have any uncertainty associated with them. As a result the dose to the consumer is overestimated. Realistic CR values need to be developed to establish model parameters that will accurately reflect tissue burdens in fish and resulting dose rates to consumers. This report reviews and summarizes published literature on the uptake and distribution of stable and radioactive isotopes of 26 elements. Based on this review, we have made recommendations on CR values to be used for modeling the accumulation of radionuclides in fish. Our recommendations are compared with CR values reported in other publications. A generic discussion of abiotic and biotic factors that influence CR values is provided so that CR values may be adjusted based on site-specific characteristics of the fishes habitat. Recommended CR values for freshwater fish and for marine fish are listed. Although this report emphasizes radionuclides, it is applicable to stable elements as well.

  3. DEEP, LOW MASS RATIO OVERCONTACT BINARY SYSTEMS. XIII. DZ PISCIUM WITH INTRINSIC LIGHT VARIABILITY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Y.-G.; Dai, H.-F.; Qian, S.-B.; Soonthornthum, B. E-mail: qsb@ynao.ac.cn

    2013-08-01

    New multi-color photometry for the eclipsing binary DZ Psc was performed in 2011 and 2012 using the 85 cm telescope at the Xinglong Station of the National Astronomical Observatories of China. Using the updated Wilson-Devinney (W-D) code, we deduced two sets of photometric solutions. The overcontact degree is f = 89.7({+-} 1.0)%, identifying DZ Psc as a deep, low mass ratio overcontact binary. The asymmetric light curves (i.e., LC{sub 2} in 2012) were modeled by a hot spot on the primary star. Based on all of the available light minimum times, we discovered that the orbital period of DZ Psc may be undergoing a secular period increase with a cyclic variation. The modulated period and semi-amplitude of this oscillation are P{sub mod} = 11.89({+-} 0.19) yr and A = 0.0064({+-} 0.0006) days, which may be possibly attributed to either cyclic magnetic activity or light-time effect due to the third body. The long-term period increases at a rate of dP/dt=+7.43({+-}0.17) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -7} days yr{sup -1}, which may be interpreted as conserved mass transfer from the less massive component to the more massive one. With mass transferring, DZ Psc will finally merge into a rapid-rotation single star when J{sub spin}/J{sub orb} > 1/3.

  4. Deducing the 237U(n,f) cross-section using the Surrogate Ratio Method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burke, J T; Bernstein, L A; Escher, J; Ahle, L; Church, J A; Dietrich, F; Moody, K J; Norman, E B; Phair, L W; Fallon, P; Clark, R; Delaplanque, M; Descovich, M; Cromaz, M; Lee, I Y; Macchiavelli, A O; McMahan, M A; Moretto, L G; Rodriguez-Vieitez, E; Stephens, F S

    2005-08-16

    The authors have deduced the {sup 237}U(n,f) cross-section over an equivalent neutron energy range of 0 to 20 MeV using the Surrogate Ratio method. A 55 MeV {sup 4}He{sup 2+} beam from the 88 Inch Cyclotron at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory was used to induce fission in the following reactions {sup 238}U({alpha},{alpha}'f) and {sup 236}U({alpha},{alpha}'f). The {sup 238}U reaction was a surrogate for {sup 237}U(n,f) and the {sup 236}U reaction was used as a surrogate for {sup 235}U(n,f). The energies of the scattered alpha particles were detected in a fully depleted segmented silicon telescope array (STARS) over an angle range of 35{sup o} to 60{sup o} with respect to the beam axis. The fission fragments were detected in a third independent silicon detector located at backward angles between 106{sup o} to 131{sup o}.

  5. CARS study of linewidths of the Q-branch of hydrogen molecules at high temperatures in a pulsed high-pressure H{sub 2}-O{sub 2} combustion chamber

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vereschagin, Konstantin A; Vereschagin, Alexey K; Smirnov, Valery V; Stelmakh, O M; Fabelinskii, V I; Clauss, W; Klimenko, D N; Oschwald, M

    2005-03-31

    The results of measurements of individual line widths of the Q-branch of a hydrogen molecule and the corresponding coefficients of broadening caused by collisions with water molecules at T = 2700 K in a repetitively pulsed high-pressure (50-200 atm) hydrogen-oxygen combustion chamber are presented. CARS spectra of individual Q{sub 1}-Q{sub 7} hydrogen lines, pressure pulses, and the broadband CARS spectra of the entire Q-branch of hydrogen are recorded simultaneously during a single laser pulse. The shape of line profiles was analysed using a Fabry-Perot interferometer. The temperature in the volume being probed was determined from the 'broadband' CARS spectra. The entire body of the experimental results gives information on the spectral linewidths, temperature and pressure in the combustion chamber during CARS probing. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  6. Measurement of the ratio $\\mathcal{B}( \\mathrm{B}^0_{s} \\to \\mathrm{J}/\\psi\\, \\mathrm{f}_0(980))/\\mathcal{B}(\\mathrm{B}^0_{s} \\to \\mathrm{J}/\\psi\\, \\phi(1020))$ in pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 7 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khachatryan, Vardan; et al.,

    2015-01-24

    The ratio $R_{\\, \\mathrm{f}_0 / \\phi}$ of the branching fractions of the $\\mathrm{B}^0_{s}$ meson to the CP-odd eigenstate $\\mathrm{J}/\\psi\\, \\mathrm{f}_0(980)$ and to $\\mathrm{J}/\\psi\\, \\phi(1020)$ is measured, where $\\mathrm{J}/\\psi \\to \\mu^+\\mu^-$, $\\mathrm{f}_0 \\to \\pi^+\\pi^-$, and $\\phi \\to \\mathrm{K}^+\\mathrm{K}^-$. The analysis is based on a data sample of pp collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 7 TeV, collected by the CMS experiment, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5.3 fb$^{-1}$. The result is $R_{\\, \\mathrm{f}_0 / \\phi} = 0.140 \\pm 0.013 \\pm 0.018$, where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second is systematic. This result is consistent with theoretical predictions and previous measurements of $R_{\\, \\mathrm{f}_0 / \\phi}$. It is the most precise measurement of the ratio to date.

  7. Measurement of the ratio $\\mathcal{B}( \\mathrm{B}^0_{s} \\to \\mathrm{J}/\\psi\\, \\mathrm{f}_0(980))/\\mathcal{B}(\\mathrm{B}^0_{s} \\to \\mathrm{J}/\\psi\\, \\phi(1020))$ in pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 7 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-01-27

    The ratio Rf0/? of the branching fractions of the B0 s meson to the CP-odd eigenstate J/? f0(980) and to J/? ?(1020) is measured, where J/? ? + -, f0 ? ? +? -, and ? ? K+K-. The analysis is based on a data sample of pp collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 7 TeV, collected by the CMS experiment, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5.3 fb-1 . The result is Rf0/? = 0.140 0.013 0.018, where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second is systematic. This result is consistent with theoretical predictions and previous measurements of Rf0/?. It is the most precise measurement of the ratio to date.

  8. CANTON LAKESHORE CANTON E BEST CON NEAUT GIDD INGS EAST N ELLSWORT

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... WAT SON -DU HRIN G EVERGREEN KELLY HILL RED BRUSH WEILER SVILLE MEAD VI LLE LAM AR TINE ROSS LEET SDALE RPD-R ICHLAND -4 CROWS RUN WAT TSVILLE S GLADE R UN WIN ESBU RG HAT CH CORN ...

  9. CANTON LAKESHORE CANTON E BEST CON NEAUT GIDD INGS EAST N ELLSWORT

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    MCKEESPORT COR AOPOLIS-MOON REDHAW ST. CLAIR SC ROGGSFIELD FRANKLIN -OAK FOREST RIMERSBURG RENNERD AL E GREENVILL E PAT MOS CRABTR EE BLAC K ASH ROYALT ON N BAKERSTOWN QUEEN ROU GH RUN LUCAS BLAC K H ILL CRESTON WAT TSVILLE WADSWORTH -NORT H OAKLAN D HOM EWORT H UNIT Y ESSELBRUN ALAMED A PAR K-CROOKED RU CHERRY GROVE FRENC HTOWN ST EWART RUN MILL C REEK GLENF IELD-MOU NT NEBO HICKORY E HARRISVILLE E LEST ER GRIGGS CORNERS EN GLAN D WEST VIL LE LAKE BAILEY LAKE OAKFORD BR UNSWICK N HOR ACE

  10. CANTON LAKESHORE CANTON E BEST CON NEAUT GIDD INGS EAST N ELLSWORT

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gas Reserve Class No 2001 gas reserves 0.1 - 10 MMCF 10.1 - 100 MMCF 100.1 - 1,000 MMCF 1,000.1 - 10,000 MMCF 10,000.1 - 100,000 MMCF > 100,000 MMCF Appalachian Basin Boundary C a n a d a U S A OH PA MI NY Lake Erie Lake St. Claire Total Total Total Number Liquid Gas BOE of Reserves Reserves Reserves Basin Fields (Mbbl) (MMcf) (Mbbl) Appalachian 3354 79,141 9,550,156 1,670,834 2001 Proved Reserves for Entire Applachian Basin WV Appalachian Basin, OH-PA (Panel 2 of 7) Oil and Gas Fields By

  11. CANTON LAKESHORE CANTON E BEST CON NEAUT GIDD INGS EAST N ELLSWORT

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Liquids Reserve Class No 2001 liquids reserves 0.1 - 10 Mbbl 10.1 - 100 Mbbl 100.1 - 1,000 Mbbl 1,000.1 - 10,000 Mbbl Appalachian Basin Boundary C a n a d a U S A OH PA MI NY Lake Erie Lake St. Claire Total Total Total Number Liquid Gas BOE of Reserves Reserves Reserves Basin Fields (Mbbl) (MMcf) (Mbbl) Appalachian 3354 79,141 9,550,156 1,670,834 2001 Proved Reserves for Entire Applachian Basin WV Appalachian Basin, OH-PA (Panel 2 of 7) Oil and Gas Fields By 2001 Liquids

  12. Computer systems and methods for visualizStolte; Chris ing data

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stolte, Chris; Hanrahan, Patrick

    2013-01-29

    A method for forming a visual plot using a hierarchical structure of a dataset. The dataset comprises a measure and a dimension. The dimension consists of a plurality of levels. The plurality of levels form a dimension hierarchy. The visual plot is constructed based on a specification. A first level from the plurality of levels is represented by a first component of the visual plot. A second level from the plurality of levels is represented by a second component of the visual plot. The dataset is queried to retrieve data in accordance with the specification. The data includes all or a portion of the dimension and all or a portion of the measure. The visual plot is populated with the retrieved data in accordance with the specification.

  13. Protective interior wall and attach8ing means for a fusion reactor vacuum vessel

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Phelps, Richard D.; Upham, Gerald A.; Anderson, Paul M.

    1988-01-01

    An array of connected plates mounted on the inside wall of the vacuum vessel of a magnetic confinement reactor in order to provide a protective surface for energy deposition inside the vessel. All fasteners are concealed and protected beneath the plates, while the plates themselves share common mounting points. The entire array is installed with torqued nuts on threaded studs; provision also exists for thermal expansion by mounting each plate with two of its four mounts captured in an oversize grooved spool. A spool-washer mounting hardware allows one edge of a protective plate to be torqued while the other side remains loose, by simply inverting the spool-washer hardware.

  14. CANTON LAKESHORE CANTON E BEST CON NEAUT GIDD INGS EAST N ELLSWORT

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Mbbl) Appalachian 3354 79,141 9,550,156 1,670,834 2001 Proved Reserves for Entire Applachian Basin WV Appalachian Basin, OH-PA (Panel 2 of 7) Oil and Gas Fields By 2001 Liquids

  15. CANTON LAKESHORE CANTON E BEST CON NEAUT GIDD INGS EAST N ELLSWORT

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (MMcf) (Mbbl) Appalachian 3354 79,141 9,550,156 1,670,834 2001 Proved Reserves for Entire Applachian Basin WV Appalachian Basin, OH-PA (Panel 2 of 7) Oil and Gas Fields By 2001 Gas

  16. Relationship between substrate concentration and fermentation product ratios in Clostridium thermocellum cultures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brener, D.; Johnson, B.F.

    1984-05-01

    Growth of Clostridium thermocellum in batch cultures was studied over a broad range of cellobiose concentrations. Cultures displayed important differences in their substrate metabolism as determined by the end product yields. Bacterial growth was severly limited when the initial cellobiose concentration was 0.2 (wt/vol), was maximal at substrate concentrations between 0.5 and 2.0%, and did not occur at 5.0% cellobiose. Ethanol accumulated maximally (38.3% ..mu..mol/10/sup 9/ cells) in cultures with an initial cellobiose concentration of 0.8%, whereas cultures in 2.0% cellobiose accumulated on 17.3 ..mu..mol, and substrate-limited cultures (0.2% cellobiose) accumulated little, if any, ethanol beyond that initially detected (8.3 ..mu..mol/10/sup 9/ cells). In a medium with 0.8% cellobiose, ethanol was produced at a constant rate of approximately 1.1 ..mu..mol/10/sup 9/ cells per h from late-logarithmic phase (16 h) of growth well into stationary phase (44 h). When ethanol was added exogenously at levels more than twice the maximum produced by the cultures themselves (0.5% vol/vol), neither the extent of growth (maximum Klett units, 150) nor the amounts of ethanol produced (approximately 0.17%) by the culture was affected. The ratio of ethanol to acetate was highest (2.8) when cells were grown in 0.8% cellobiose and lowest (1.2) when cells were grown in 0.2% cellobiose. 18 references.

  17. Soil-to-Plant Concentration Ratios for Assessing Food Chain Pathways in Biosphere Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Napier, Bruce A.; Fellows, Robert J.; Krupka, Kenneth M.

    2007-10-01

    This report describes work performed for the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commissions project Assessment of Food Chain Pathway Parameters in Biosphere Models, which was established to assess and evaluate a number of key parameters used in the food-chain models used in performance assessments of radioactive waste disposal facilities. Section 2 of this report summarizes characteristics of samples of soils and groundwater from three geographical regions of the United States, the Southeast, Northwest, and Southwest, and analyses performed to characterize their physical and chemical properties. Because the uptake and behavior of radionuclides in plant roots, plant leaves, and animal products depends on the chemistry of the water and soil coming in contact with plants and animals, water and soil samples collected from these regions of the United States were used in experiments at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to determine radionuclide soil-to-plant concentration ratios. Crops and forage used in the experiments were grown in the soils, and long-lived radionuclides introduced into the groundwater provide the contaminated water used to water the grown plants. The radionuclides evaluated include 99Tc, 238Pu, and 241Am. Plant varieties include alfalfa, corn, onion, and potato. The radionuclide uptake results from this research study show how regional variations in water quality and soil chemistry affect radionuclide uptake. Section 3 summarizes the procedures and results of the uptake experiments, and relates the soil-to-plant uptake factors derived. In Section 4, the results found in this study are compared with similar values found in the biosphere modeling literature; the studys results are generally in line with current literature, but soil- and plant-specific differences are noticeable. This food-chain pathway data may be used by the NRC staff to assess dose to persons in the reference biosphere (e.g., persons who live and work in an area potentially affected by

  18. Interim Results from a Study of the Impacts of Tin (II) Based Mercury Treatment in a Small Stream Ecosystem: Tims Branch, Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Looney, Brian; BryanJr., Larry; Mathews, Teresa J; Peterson, Mark J; Roy, W Kelly; Jett, Robert T; Smith, John G

    2012-03-01

    A research team is assessing the impacts of an innovative mercury treatment system in Tims Branch, a small southeastern stream. The treatment system, installed in 2007, reduces and removes inorganic mercury from water using tin(II) (stannous) chloride addition followed by air stripping. The system results in discharge of inorganic tin to the ecosystem. This screening study is based on historical information combined with measurements of contaminant concentrations in water, fish, sediment, biofilms and invertebrates. Initial mercury data indicate that first few years of mercury treatment resulted in a significant decrease in mercury concentration in an upper trophic level fish, redfin pickerel, at all sampling locations in the impacted reach. For example, the whole body mercury concentration in redfin pickerel collected from the most impacted pond decreased approximately 72% between 2006 (pre-treatment) and 2010 (post-treatment). Over this same period, mercury concentrations in the fillet of redfin pickerel in this pond were estimated to have decreased from approximately 1.45 {micro}g/g (wet weight basis) to 0.45 {micro}g/g - a decrease from 4.8x to 1.5x the current EPA guideline concentration for mercury in fillet (0.3 {micro}g/g). Thermodynamic modeling, scanning electron microscopy, and other sampling data for tin suggest that particulate tin (IV) oxides are a significant geochemical species entering the ecosystem with elevated levels of tin measured in surficial sediments and biofilms. Detectable increases in tin in sediments and biofilms extended approximately 3km from the discharge location. Tin oxides are recalcitrant solids that are relatively non-toxic and resistant to dissolution. Work continues to develop and validate methods to analyze total tin in the collected biota samples. In general, the interim results of this screening study suggest that the treatment process has performed as predicted and that the concentration of mercury in upper trophic level

  19. Poisson's ratio of collagen fibrils measured by small angle X-ray scattering of strained bovine pericardium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wells, Hannah C.; Sizeland, Katie H.; Kayed, Hanan R.; Haverkamp, Richard G.; Kirby, Nigel; Hawley, Adrian; Mudie, Stephen T.

    2015-01-28

    Type I collagen is the main structural component of skin, tendons, and skin products, such as leather. Understanding the mechanical performance of collagen fibrils is important for understanding the mechanical performance of the tissues that they make up, while the mechanical properties of bulk tissue are well characterized, less is known about the mechanical behavior of individual collagen fibrils. In this study, bovine pericardium is subjected to strain while small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) patterns are recorded using synchrotron radiation. The change in d-spacing, which is a measure of fibril extension, and the change in fibril diameter are determined from SAXS. The tissue is strained 0.25 (25%) with a corresponding strain in the collagen fibrils of 0.045 observed. The ratio of collagen fibril width contraction to length extension, or the Poisson's ratio, is 2.1 ± 0.7 for a tissue strain from 0 to 0.25. This Poisson's ratio indicates that the volume of individual collagen fibrils decreases with increasing strain, which is quite unlike most engineering materials. This high Poisson's ratio of individual fibrils may contribute to high Poisson's ratio observed for tissues, contributing to some of the remarkable properties of collagen-based materials.

  20. DNC/HNC RATIO OF MASSIVE CLUMPS IN EARLY EVOLUTIONARY STAGES OF HIGH-MASS STAR FORMATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sakai, Takeshi; Sakai, Nami; Yamamoto, Satoshi; Furuya, Kenji; Aikawa, Yuri; Hirota, Tomoya

    2012-03-10

    We have observed the HN{sup 13}C J = 1-0 and DNC J = 1-0 lines toward 18 massive clumps, including infrared dark clouds (IRDCs) and high-mass protostellar objects (HMPOs), by using the Nobeyama Radio Observatory 45 m telescope. We have found that the HN{sup 13}C emission is stronger than the DNC emission toward all of the observed sources. The averaged DNC/HNC ratio is indeed lower toward the observed high-mass sources (0.009 {+-} 0.005) than toward the low-mass starless and star-forming cores (0.06). The kinetic temperature derived from the NH{sub 3} (J, K) = (1, 1) and (2, 2) line intensities is higher toward the observed high-mass sources than toward the low-mass cores. However, the DNC/HNC ratio of some IRDCs involving the Spitzer 24 {mu}m sources is found to be lower than that of HMPOs, although the kinetic temperature of the IRDCs is lower than that of the HMPOs. This implies that the DNC/HNC ratio does not depend only on the current kinetic temperature. With the aid of chemical model simulations, we discuss how the DNC/HNC ratio decreases after the birth of protostars. We suggest that the DNC/HNC ratio in star-forming cores depends on the physical conditions and history in their starless-core phase, such as its duration time and the gas kinetic temperature.

  1. Distribution of local void ratio in porous media systems from 3D X-ray microtomography images

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Al-Raoush, R.; Alshibli, K.A.

    2008-09-04

    We present in this paper a methodology to calculate the distribution of local void ratio in porous media systems from high-resolution three-dimensional images. We introduce an algorithm to calculate the distribution of local void ratio from 3D images based on distance and watershed transforms. The watershed transform is used to segment touched or overlapped particles in an efficient way and the distance transform is used to calculate the boundaries of local void regions. The algorithm is validated using computer simulated 3D images of regular packing, irregular (non-spherical particles) packing, and random uniform spherical packing. Results show that the algorithm is robust, accurate and can be used to calculate local void ratio distribution of 3D systems regardless of irregularity in shapes, sizes, or arrangement of particles. X-ray microtomography images of different glass bead systems are used to calculate distributions of local void ratio. Parameters of distributions are function of porosity and particle-size distribution. The maximum local void ratio in each system is less than 3.0 and the minimum is greater than 0.2.

  2. AGR-2 AND AGR-3/4 RELEASE-TO-BIRTH RATIO DATA ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pham, Binh T; Einerson, Jeffrey J; Scates, Dawn M; Maki, John T; Petti, David A

    2014-09-01

    A series of Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) irradiation tests is being conducted in the Advanced Test Reactor at Idaho National Laboratory in support of development and qualification of tristructural isotropic (TRISO) low enriched fuel used in the High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR). Each AGR test consists of multiple independently controlled and monitored capsules containing fuel compacts placed in a graphite cylinder shrouded by a steel shell. These capsules are instrumented with thermocouples embedded in the graphite enabling temperature control. AGR configuration and irradiation conditions are based on prismatic HTGR technology distinguished primarily by the use of helium coolant, a low-power-density ceramic core capable of withstanding very high temperatures, and TRISO coated particle fuel. Thus, these tests provide valuable irradiation performance data to support fuel process development, qualify fuel for normal operating conditions, and support development and validation of fuel performance and fission product transport models and codes. The release-rate-to-birth-rate ratio (R/B) for each of fission product isotopes (i.e., krypton and xenon) is calculated from release rates in the sweep gas flow measured by the germanium detectors used in the AGR Fission Product Monitoring (FPM) System installed downstream from each irradiated capsule. Birth rates are calculated based on the fission power in the experiment and fission product generation models. Thus, this R/B is a measure of the ability of fuel kernel, particle coating layers, and compact matrix to retain fission gas atoms preventing their release into the sweep gas flow, especially in the event of particle coating failures that occurred during AGR-2 and AGR-3/4 irradiations. The major factors that govern gaseous radioactive decay, diffusion, and release processes are found to be material diffusion coefficient, temperature, and isotopic decay constant. For each of all AGR capsules, ABAQUS-based three

  3. CO/H{sub 2} abundance ratio ? 10{sup 4} in a protoplanetary disk

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    France, Kevin; McJunkin, Matthew; Herczeg, Gregory J.; Penton, Steven V.

    2014-10-20

    The relative abundances of atomic and molecular species in planet-forming disks around young stars provide important constraints on photochemical disk models and provide a baseline for calculating disk masses from measurements of trace species. A knowledge of absolute abundances, those relative to molecular hydrogen (H{sub 2}), are challenging because of the weak rovibrational transition ladder of H{sub 2} and the inability to spatially resolve different emission components within the circumstellar environment. To address both of these issues, we present new contemporaneous measurements of CO and H{sub 2} absorption through the 'warm molecular layer' of the protoplanetary disk around the Classical T Tauri Star RW Aurigae A. We use a newly commissioned observing mode of the Hubble Space Telescope Cosmic Origins Spectrograph to detect warm H{sub 2} absorption in this region for the first time. An analysis of the emission and absorption spectrum of RW Aur shows components from the accretion region near the stellar photosphere, the molecular disk, and several outflow components. The warm H{sub 2} and CO absorption lines are consistent with a disk origin. We model the 1092-1117 spectrum of RW Aur to derive log{sub 10} N(H{sub 2}) = 19.90{sub ?0.22}{sup +0.33} cm{sup 2} at T {sub rot}(H{sub 2}) = 440 39 K. The CO A - X bands observed from 1410 to 1520 are best fit by log{sub 10} N(CO) = 16.1 {sub ?0.5}{sup +0.3} cm{sup 2} at T {sub rot}(CO) = 200{sub ?125}{sup +650} K. Combining direct measurements of the H I, H{sub 2}, and CO column densities, we find a molecular fraction in the warm disk surface of f {sub H2} ? 0.47 and derive a molecular abundance ratio of CO/H{sub 2} = 1.6{sub ?1.3}{sup +4.7} 10{sup 4}, both consistent with canonical interstellar dense cloud values.

  4. Safeguards Verification Measurements using Laser Ablation, Absorbance Ratio Spectrometry in Gaseous Centrifuge Enrichment Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anheier, Norman C.; Cannon, Bret D.; Qiao, Hong; Phillips, Jon R.

    2012-07-01

    Laser Ablation Absorbance Ratio Spectrometry (LAARS) is a new verification measurement technology under development at the US Department of Energy’s (DOE) Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). LAARS uses three lasers to ablate and then measure the relative isotopic abundance of uranium compounds. An ablation laser is tightly focused on uranium-bearing solids producing a small plume containing uranium atoms. Two collinear wavelength-tuned spectrometry lasers transit through the plume and the absorbance of U-235 and U-238 isotopes are measured to determine U-235 enrichment. The measurement has high relative precision and detection limits approaching the femtogram range for uranium. It is independent of chemical form and degree of dilution with nuisance dust and other materials. High speed sample scanning and pinpoint characterization allow measurements on millions of particles/hour to detect and analyze the enrichment of trace uranium in samples. The spectrometer is assembled using commercially available components at comparatively low cost, and features a compact and low power design. Future designs can be engineered for reliable, autonomous deployment within an industrial plant environment. Two specific applications of the spectrometer are under development: 1) automated unattended aerosol sampling and analysis and 2) on-site small sample destructive assay measurement. The two applications propose game-changing technological advances in gaseous centrifuge enrichment plant (GCEP) safeguards verification. The aerosol measurement instrument, LAARS-environmental sampling (ES), collects aerosol particles from the plant environment in a purpose-built rotating drum impactor and then uses LAARS-ES to quickly scan the surface of the impactor to measure the enrichments of the captured particles. The current approach to plant misuse detection involves swipe sampling and offsite analysis. Though this approach is very robust it generally requires several months to

  5. INTERIM RESULTS FROM A STUDY OF THE IMPACTS OF TIN(II) BASED MERCURY TREATMENT IN A SMALL STREAM ECOSYSTEM: TIMS BRANCH, SAVANNAH RIVER SITE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Looney, B.; Bryan, L.; Mathews, T.

    2012-03-30

    control measures have resulted in rapid responses in lake or reservoir fisheries (Joslin 1994, Turner and Southworth 1999; Orihel et al., 2007), but examples of similar responses in Hg-contaminated stream ecosystems are less common. Recent work suggests that stream systems may actually be more susceptible to mercury bioaccumulation than lakes, highlighting the need to better understand the ecological drivers of mercury bioaccumulation in stream-dwelling fish (Chasar et al. 2009, Ward et al. 2010). In the present study we examine the response of fish to remedial actions in Tims Branch, a point-source contaminated stream on the Department of Energy's (DOE) Savannah River Site in Aiken, South Carolina. This second order stream received inorganic mercury inputs at its headwaters from the 1950s-2000s which contaminated the water, sediments, and biota downstream. In 2007, an innovative mercury removal system using tin (II) chloride (stannous chloride, SnCl{sub 2}) was implemented at a pre-existing air stripper. Tin(II) reduces dissolved Hg (II) to Hg (0), which is removed by the air stripper. During this process, tin(II) is oxidized to tin (IV) which is expected to precipitate as colloidal tin(IV) oxides and hydroxides, particulate materials with relatively low toxicity (Hallas and Cooney, 1981, EPA 2002, ATSDR, 2005). The objectives of the present research are to provide an initial assessment of the net impacts of the tin(II) based mercury treatment on key biota and to document the distribution and fate of inorganic tin in this small stream ecosystem after the first several years of operating a full scale system. To support these objectives, we collected fish, sediment, water, invertebrates, and biofilm samples from Tims Branch to quantify the general behavior and accumulation patterns for mercury and tin in the ecosystem and to determine if the treatment process has resulted in: (1) a measurable beneficial impact on (i.e., decrease of) mercury concentration in upper trophic

  6. Spectrum and Charge Ratio of Vertical Cosmic Ray Muons up to Momenta of 2.5 TeV/c

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmelling, M.; Hashim, N.O.; Grupen, C.; Luitz, S.; Maciuc, F.; Mailov, A.; Muller, A.-S.; Sander, H.-G.; Schmeling, S.; Tcaciuc, R.; Wachsmuth, H.; Zuber, K.; /Dresden, Tech. U.

    2012-09-14

    The ALEPH detector at LEP has been used to measure the momentum spectrum and charge ratio of vertical cosmic ray muons underground. The sea-level cosmic ray muon spectrum for momenta up to 2.5 TeV/c has been obtained by correcting for the overburden of 320 meter water equivalent (mwe). The results are compared with Monte Carlo models for air shower development in the atmosphere. From the analysis of the spectrum the total flux and the spectral index of the cosmic ray primaries is inferred. The charge ratio suggests a dominantly light composition of cosmic ray primaries with energies up to 10{sup 15} eV.

  7. Total Space Heat-

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey: Energy End-Use Consumption Tables Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration...

  8. Total Space Heat-

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Revised: December, 2008 Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other All Buildings...

  9. --No Title--

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Intensity (thousand Btusquare foot) Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other...

  10. Total Space Heat-

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other All Buildings*...

  11. --No Title--

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Major Fuel Consumption (trillion Btu) Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other...

  12. --No Title--

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Electricity Consumption (trillion Btu) Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other...

  13. Spatially tracking 13C labeled substrate (bicarbonate) accumulation in microbial communities using laser ablation isotope ratio mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moran, James J.; Doll, Charles G.; Bernstein, Hans C.; Renslow, Ryan S.; Cory, Alexandra B.; Hutchison, Janine R.; Lindemann, Stephen R.; Fredrickson, Jim K.

    2014-08-25

    This is a manuscript we would like to submit for publication in Environmental Microbiology Reports. This manuscript contains a description of a laser ablation isotope ratio mass spectrometry methodology developed at PNNL and applied to a microbial system at a PNNL project location – Hot Lake, Washington. I will submit a word document containing the entire manuscript with this Erica input request form.

  14. Public Data Set: H-mode Plasmas at Very Low Aspect Ratio on the Pegasus Toroidal Experiment

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Thome, Kathreen E. [University of Wisconsin-Madison; Oak Ridge Associated Universities] (ORCID:0000000248013922); Bongard, Michael W. [University of Wisconsin-Madison] (ORCID:0000000231609746); Barr, Jayson L. [University of Wisconsin-Madison] (ORCID:0000000177685931); Burke, Marcus G. [University of Wisconsin-Madison] (ORCID:0000000176193724); Fonck, Raymond J. [University of Wisconsin-Madison] (ORCID:0000000294386762); Kriete, David M. [University of Wisconsin-Madison] (ORCID:0000000236572911); Perry, Justin M. [University of Wisconsin-Madison] (ORCID:0000000171228609); Reusch, Joshua A. [University of Wisconsin-Madison] (ORCID:0000000284249422); Schlossberg, David J. [University of Wisconsin-Madison] (ORCID:0000000287139448)

    2016-08-05

    This public data set contains openly-documented, machine readable digital research data accompanying 'H-mode Plasmas at Very Low Aspect Ratio on the Pegasus Toroidal Experiment' by K.E. Thome et al., accepted for publication in Nuclear Fusion.

  15. Public Data Set: High Confinement Mode and Edge Localized Mode Characteristics in a Near-Unity Aspect Ratio Tokamak

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Thome, Kathreen E. [University of Wisconsin-Madison] (ORCID:0000000248013922); Bongard, Michael W. [University of Wisconsin-Madison] (ORCID:0000000231609746); Barr, Jayson L. [University of Wisconsin-Madison] (ORCID:0000000177685931); Bodner, Grant M. [University of Wisconsin-Madison] (ORCID:0000000324979172); Burke, Marcus G. [University of Wisconsin-Madison] (ORCID:0000000176193724); Fonck, Raymond J. [University of Wisconsin-Madison] (ORCID:0000000294386762); Kriete, David M. [University of Wisconsin-Madison] (ORCID:0000000236572911); Perry, Justin M. [University of Wisconsin-Madison] (ORCID:0000000171228609); Schlossberg, David J. [University of Wisconsin-Madison] (ORCID:0000000287139448)

    2016-04-27

    This data set contains openly-documented, machine readable digital research data corresponding to figures published in K.E. Thome et al., 'High Confinement Mode and Edge Localized Mode Characteristics in a Near-Unity Aspect Ratio Tokamak,' Phys. Rev. Lett. 116, 175001 (2016).

  16. Preparation of ortho-para ratio controlled D{sub 2} gas for muon-catalyzed fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Imao, H.; Ishida, K.; Matsuzaki, T.; Matsuda, Y.; Iwasaki, M.; Kawamura, N.; Strasser, P.; Toyoda, A.; Nagamine, K.

    2008-05-15

    A negative muon in hydrogen targets, e.g., D{sub 2} or D-T mixture, can catalyze nuclear fusions following a series of atomic processes involving muonic hydrogen molecular formation (muon-catalyzed fusion, {mu}CF). The ortho-para state of D{sub 2} is a crucial parameter not only for enhancing the fusion rate but also to precisely investigate various muonic atom processes. We have developed a system for controlling and measuring the ortho-para ratio of D{sub 2} gas for {mu}CF experiments. We successfully collected para-enriched D{sub 2} without using liquid-hydrogen coolant. Ortho-enriched D{sub 2} was also obtained by using a catalytic conversion method with a mixture of chromium oxide and alumina. The ortho-para ratio of D{sub 2} gas was measured with a compact Raman spectroscopy system. We produced large volume (5-30 l at STP), high-purity (less than ppm high-Z contaminant) D{sub 2} targets with a wide range of ortho-para ratios (ortho 20%-99%). By using the ortho-para controlled D{sub 2} in {mu}CF experiments, we observed the dependence of {mu}CF phenomena on the ortho-para ratio.

  17. Quantifying Uranium Isotope Ratios Using Resonance Ionization Mass Spectrometry: The Influence of Laser Parameters on Relative Ionization Probability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Isselhardt, B H

    2011-09-06

    Resonance Ionization Mass Spectrometry (RIMS) has been developed as a method to measure relative uranium isotope abundances. In this approach, RIMS is used as an element-selective ionization process to provide a distinction between uranium atoms and potential isobars without the aid of chemical purification and separation. We explore the laser parameters critical to the ionization process and their effects on the measured isotope ratio. Specifically, the use of broad bandwidth lasers with automated feedback control of wavelength was applied to the measurement of {sup 235}U/{sup 238}U ratios to decrease laser-induced isotopic fractionation. By broadening the bandwidth of the first laser in a 3-color, 3-photon ionization process from a bandwidth of 1.8 GHz to about 10 GHz, the variation in sequential relative isotope abundance measurements decreased from >10% to less than 0.5%. This procedure was demonstrated for the direct interrogation of uranium oxide targets with essentially no sample preparation. A rate equation model for predicting the relative ionization probability has been developed to study the effect of variation in laser parameters on the measured isotope ratio. This work demonstrates that RIMS can be used for the robust measurement of uranium isotope ratios.

  18. Remedial Investigation Report on Chestnut Ridge Operable Unit 2 (Filled Coal Ash Pond/Upper McCoy Branch) at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 1. Main Text

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-08-01

    This document is a report on the remedial investigation (RI) of Chestnut Ridge Operable Unit (OU) 2 at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. Chestnut Ridge OU 2 consists of Upper McCoy Branch (UMB), the Filled Coal Ash Pond (FCAP), and the area surrounding the Sluice Channel formerly associated with coal ash disposal in the FCAP. Chestnut Ridge OU 2 is located within the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Oak Ridge Reservation in Anderson County, Tennessee, approximately 24 miles west of Knoxville. The pond is an 8.5-acre area on the southern slope of Chestnut Ridge, 0.5 mile south of the main Y-12 Plant and geographically separated from the Y-12 Plant by Chestnut Ridge. The elevation of the FCAP is {approximately} 950 ft above mean sea level (msl), and it is relatively flat and largely vegetated. Two small ponds are usually present at the northeast and northwest comers of the FCAP. The Sluice Channel Area extends {approximately}1000 ft from the northern margin of the FCAP to the crest of Chestnut Ridge, which has an elevation of {approximately}1100 ft above msl. The Sluice Channel Area is largely vegetated also. McCoy Branch runs from the top of Chestnut Ridge across the FCAP into Rogers Quarry and out of the quarry where it runs a short distance into Milton Hill Lake at McCoy Embayment, termed UMB. The portion south of Rogers Quarry, within Chestnut Ridge OU 4, is termed Lower McCoy Branch. The DOE Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant disposed of coal ash from its steam plant operations as a slurry that was discharged into an ash retention impoundment; this impoundment is the FCAP. The FCAP was built in 1955 to serve as a settling basin after coal ash slurried over Chestnut Ridge from the Y-12 Plant. The FCAP was constructed by building an earthen dam across the northern tributary of McCoy Branch. The dam was designed to hold 20 years of Y-12 steam plant ash. By July 1967, ash had filled up the impoundment storage behind the dam to within 4 ft of the top.

  19. Beam position monitoring in the 100-MHz to 500-MHz frequency range using the log-ratio technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wells, F.D.; Shafer, R.E.; Gilpatrick, J.D.

    1993-05-01

    A logarithmic-ratio beam position monitor (BPM) circuit has been designed that operates directly from radio frequency- signals in the 100-MHz to 500-MHz frequency range. The circuit uses four logarithmic amplifiers, a pair for each channel. One amplifier per channel receives its signal input directly from a BPM electrode while the second amplifier receives the same signal attenuated by 7-dB. The two outputs of each channel are summed together and the composite video outputs are applied to a differencing amplifier. The net result is the logarithmic-ratio position measurement derived from the two input rf signals. Paralleling the pairs of outputs from the amplifiers provides measurement accuracy that is comparable to other circuit techniques used for position measurement.

  20. Beam position monitoring in the 100-MHz to 500-MHz frequency range using the log-ratio technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wells, F.D.; Shafer, R.E.; Gilpatrick, J.D.

    1993-01-01

    A logarithmic-ratio beam position monitor (BPM) circuit has been designed that operates directly from radio frequency- signals in the 100-MHz to 500-MHz frequency range. The circuit uses four logarithmic amplifiers, a pair for each channel. One amplifier per channel receives its signal input directly from a BPM electrode while the second amplifier receives the same signal attenuated by 7-dB. The two outputs of each channel are summed together and the composite video outputs are applied to a differencing amplifier. The net result is the logarithmic-ratio position measurement derived from the two input rf signals. Paralleling the pairs of outputs from the amplifiers provides measurement accuracy that is comparable to other circuit techniques used for position measurement.