National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for branch boxes creek

  1. Geology of the Bee Branch-Mill Creek area, Mason County, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, George Howard

    1957-01-01

    . andstcns member. ?organ Creek lmesrcne res?er . Pomrt Ie rn shale m, . mber . Bio? '", . one ct' th . "oint Peck . hale '&au Saba limestcno member . Ordoeician sy;tem . 12 13 14 15 15 16 16 17 19 Ellen? urger group. Mississippian system..., Chappel '"creation. Barnet t shale. ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 4 ~ ~ 25 26 Pennsylvanian system. ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 28 N*rble Falls group 'I ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ &mithsick 'c rr, . * Lic n. \\ ~ Cretaceous system . Quaternarr sy ten...

  2. Environmental geophysics of the Pilot Plant on the west branch of Canal Creek, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McGinnis, L.D.; Miller, S.F.; Daudt, C.R.; Thompson, M.D.; Borden, H.; Benson, M.; Wrobel, J.

    1994-05-01

    Plans to demolish and remediate the Pilot Plant complex in the Edgewood Area of Aberdeen Proving Ground have served to initiate a series of nonintrusive, environmental-geophysical studies. The studies are assisting in the location and identification of pipes, tanks, trenches, and liquid waste in the subsurface. Multiple databases have been integrated to provide support for detection of underground utilities and to determine the stratigraphy and lithology of the subsurface. The studies were conducted within the double security fence and exterior to the double fence, down gradient toward the west branch of Canal Creek. To determine if contaminants found in the creek were associated with the Pilot Plant, both the east and west banks were included in the study area. Magnetic, conductivity, inductive emf, and ground-penetrating-radar anomalies outline buried pipes, trenches, and various pieces of hardware associated with building activities. Ground-penetrating-radar imagery also defines a paleovalley cut 30 ft into Potomac Group sediments of Cretaceous age. The paleovalley crosses the site between Building E5654 and the Pilot Plant fence. The valley is environmentally significant because it may control the pathways of contaminants. The Pilot Plant complex was used to manufacture CC2 Impregnite and incapacitating agents; it also served as a production facility for nerve agents.

  3. Box Integrals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bailey, David H.; Borwein, Jonathan M.; Crandall, Richard E.

    2006-01-01

    Box integrals D.H. Bailey ? J.M. Borwein † April 3,Abstract. By a “box integral” we mean here an expectation |r· dr n . The study of box integrals leads one naturally into

  4. Prairie Creek Branch Public Library, Dallas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meckfessel, R.

    2011-01-01

    ? 53 well geothermal / heat pump system ? greywater recapture and reuse ? 7.7 kw photovoltaic array key sustainability overview - energy and water ? compliance with City of Dallas iSWM program ? raised floor air distribution ? high...

  5. Steel Creek primary producers: Periphyton and seston, L-Lake/Steel Creek Biological Monitoring Program, January 1986--December 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bowers, J.A. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Toole, M.A.; van Duyn, Y. [Normandeau Associates Inc., New Ellenton, SC (United States)

    1992-02-01

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) encompasses 300 sq mi of the Atlantic Coastal Plain in west-central South Carolina. Five major tributaries of the Savannah River -- Upper Three Runs Creek, Four Mile Creek, Pen Branch, Steel Creek, and Lower Three Runs Creek -- drain the site. In 1985, L Lake, a 400-hectare cooling reservoir, was built on the upper reaches of Steel Creek to receive effluent from the restart of L-Reactor and to protect the lower reaches from thermal impacts. The Steel Creek Biological Monitoring Program was designed to assess various components of the system and identify and changes due to the operation of L-Reactor or discharge from L Lake. An intensive ecological assessment program prior to the construction of the lake provided baseline data with which to compare data accumulated after the lake was filled and began discharging into the creek. The Department of Energy must demonstrate that the operation of L-Reactor will not significantly alter the established aquatic ecosystems. This report summarizes the results of six years` data from Steel Creek under the L-Lake/Steel Creek Monitoring Program. L Lake is discussed separately from Steel Creek in Volumes NAI-SR-138 through NAI-SR-143.

  6. Sampling box

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Phillips, Terrance D. (617 Chestnut Ct., Aiken, SC 29803); Johnson, Craig (100 Midland Rd., Oak Ridge, TN 37831-0895)

    2000-01-01

    An air sampling box that uses a slidable filter tray and a removable filter cartridge to allow for the easy replacement of a filter which catches radioactive particles is disclosed.

  7. Hawaii Department of Health Clean Water Branch | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Clean Water Branch Jump to: navigation, search Name: Hawaii Department of Health Clean Water Branch Address: P.O. Box 3378 Place: Honolulu, Hawaii Zip: 96801 Website: hawaii.gov...

  8. Biodiversity Corridors in Alamo Creek, Vacaville, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Urrechaga, Jose; Wei, Xinghan

    2012-01-01

    Troy Horn, Oct, 2003 4.   Alamo Creek final report, 2005Biodiversity Corridors in Alamo Creek, Vacaville, Californiain the city and uses Alamo Creek, in Vacaville, California,

  9. Interdiction Branching

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-09-29

    Sep 29, 2011 ... of partitioning the search space, referred to as the branching scheme. .... standard branch-and-bound both in terms of size of the enumeration tree and ...... of the fractional variable to be selected to enter at each iteration of the.

  10. Waller Creek Urban Redevelopment 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, S.

    2013-01-01

    Winkler Melba Whatley Waller Creek Conservancy Directors – November 2013 ESL-KT-13-12-51 CATEE 2013: Clean Air Through Energy Efficiency Conference, San Antonio, Texas Dec. 16-18 CITY COUNCIL APPROVES DESIGN PLAN... Antonio, Texas Dec. 16-18 Thomas Phifer ESL-KT-13-12-51 CATEE 2013: Clean Air Through Energy Efficiency Conference, San Antonio, Texas Dec. 16-18 8Waller Creek and a Chain of Parks Palm Park Shaded Respite The Narrows Intensified Urbanity The Refuge...

  11. Branched Polymers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richard Kenyon; Peter Winkler

    2007-09-14

    Building on and from the work of Brydges and Imbrie, we give an elementary calculation of the volume of the space of branched polymers of order $n$ in the plane and in 3-space. Our development reveals some more general identities, and allows exact random sampling. In particular we show that a random 3-dimensional branched polymer of order $n$ has diameter of order $\\sqrt{n}$.

  12. //exeCutivesummary This report synthesizes historical evidence into a picture of how Coyote Creek looked and functioned

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    South Babb Creek Laguna Socayre Norwood Creek Thompson Creek Upper Silver Creek Tulare Hill Laguna Seca

  13. Technology and the Box

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maitland, Padma

    2013-01-01

    its explorations of technology in partnership with radicalPadma Maitland Technology and the Box The room is thedisciplines. The theme of “Technology and the Box” emerged

  14. Declared Wolf Creek

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    15-Nov 22-Nov 29-Nov 6-Dec 13-Dec 20-Dec 27-Dec 115% Nameplate Declared Wolf Creek UNIT 1 (MW) 52 45 52 52 52 52 52 52 52 52 52 52 52 UNIT 2 (MW) 52 45 52 52 52 52 52 52 52 52...

  15. Manufacturing Battle Creek

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Doncker, Elise

    to the manufacturing sector in Western Michigan. In addition to serving as director of the MRC, Dr. Patten is alsoManufacturing Research Center Kalamazoo Battle Creek The College of Engineering and Applied Sciences The Supporting manufacturing industries by providing opportunities for collaboration with faculty

  16. Lower East Fork Poplar Creek

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    is safe for limited water-contact recreational uses, such as wading in footwear. Eating fish from the creek is not recommended based upon the level of mercury in the fish. Are...

  17. Big Bayou Creek and Little Bayou Creek Watershed Monitoring Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kszos, L.A.; Peterson, M.J.; Ryon; Smith, J.G.

    1999-03-01

    Biological monitoring of Little Bayou and Big Bayou creeks, which border the Paducah Site, has been conducted since 1987. Biological monitoring was conducted by University of Kentucky from 1987 to 1991 and by staff of the Environmental Sciences Division (ESD) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) from 1991 through March 1999. In March 1998, renewed Kentucky Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (KPDES) permits were issued to the US Department of Energy (DOE) and US Enrichment Corporation. The renewed DOE permit requires that a watershed monitoring program be developed for the Paducah Site within 90 days of the effective date of the renewed permit. This plan outlines the sampling and analysis that will be conducted for the watershed monitoring program. The objectives of the watershed monitoring are to (1) determine whether discharges from the Paducah Site and the Solid Waste Management Units (SWMUs) associated with the Paducah Site are adversely affecting instream fauna, (2) assess the ecological health of Little Bayou and Big Bayou creeks, (3) assess the degree to which abatement actions ecologically benefit Big Bayou Creek and Little Bayou Creek, (4) provide guidance for remediation, (5) provide an evaluation of changes in potential human health concerns, and (6) provide data which could be used to assess the impact of inadvertent spills or fish kill. According to the cleanup will result in these watersheds [Big Bayou and Little Bayou creeks] achieving compliance with the applicable water quality criteria.

  18. Lost Creek, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas:Montezuma, Arizona:Oregon: EnergyLloyd, NewBranchLongweiLosCerrillos,Creek, Texas:

  19. Biodiversity Corridors in Alamo Creek, Vacaville, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Urrechaga, Jose; Wei, Xinghan

    2012-01-01

    The primary information source is from our field trip oninformation about Alamo Creek comes from three primary sources.

  20. Asotin Creek Model Watershed Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Browne, D.; Holzmiller, J.; Koch, F.; Polumsky, S.; Schlee, D.; Thiessen, G.; Johnson, C.

    1995-04-01

    The Asotin Creek Model Watershed Plan is the first to be developed in Washington State which is specifically concerned with habitat protection and restoration for salmon and trout. The plan is consistent with the habitat element of the ``Strategy for Salmon``. Asotin Creek is similar in many ways to other salmon-bearing streams in the Snake River system. Its watershed has been significantly impacted by human activities and catastrophic natural events, such as floods and droughts. It supports only remnant salmon and trout populations compared to earlier years. It will require protection and restoration of its fish habitat and riparian corridor in order to increase its salmonid productivity. The watershed coordinator for the Asotin County Conservation District led a locally based process that combined local concerns and knowledge with technology from several agencies to produce the Asotin Creek Model Watershed Plan.

  1. TURKEY CREEK BASIN Kansas and Missouri

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    TURKEY CREEK BASIN Kansas and Missouri MODIFICATION REQUEST Modification to the authorized total the Turkey Creek channel and runoff from the adjacent hillsides, and the current depth of flooding along in the past decade. Additionally, the Turkey Creek tunnel constructed in 1919 to divert the channel away from

  2. Historical Ecology of Alameda Creek

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    flowing under bridge Would always have to drive through water running water "excessively deep" hole Always the water comes out again." (Danti 1795) #12;Pools in Alameda Creek ca. 1860-1875 4-6 feet deep Always sure of finding water Swim until July/Aug 6-10 feet deep Standing, not running water "swimming in there at any

  3. PUBLICATIONS BRANCH OF TECHNOLOGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    INDEX of PUBLICATIONS by the BRANCH OF TECHNOLOGY BUREAU OF COMMERCIAL FISHERIES, 1955-59 Inclusive OF PUBLICATIONS BY THE BRANCH OF TECHNOLOGY BUREAU OF COMMERCIAL FISHERIES 1955-59 Inclusive by F. Bruce Sanford continue s, for the year s 1955- 59, the listing of publications by the Branch of Technology given

  4. Case Study: Goose Creek CISD 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    White, D.

    2014-01-01

    GOOSE CREEK CISD FINANCIALS • $4,866,124 project • $600k annual savings • 5,954,383 kWh annual savings IMPROVEMENTS • Lighting and water efficiency, computer power management, HVAC, controls redesign case study McKinstry first worked with Goose... • $693,866 project • $87k annual savings • 682,228 kWh annual savings IMPROVEMENTS • HVAC, lighting and water efficiency, computer power management case study Lake Dallas ISD was interested in improving the energy efficiency and aging infrastructure...

  5. Kansas Nuclear Profile - Wolf Creek Generating Station

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    April 2012" "Next Release Date: February 2013" "Wolf Creek Generating Station" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor...

  6. New Jersey Nuclear Profile - Oyster Creek

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Oyster Creek" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date"...

  7. prisoners and boxes 1 The condemned prisoners and the boxes.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Peter

    prisoners and boxes 1 The condemned prisoners and the boxes. A group of 100 condemned prisoners it there is the name of one of the prisoners, such that each of the 100 names appears exactly once. However, the ordering of the names in the boxes is random. 1 2 3 99 100 Once inside the room, each prisoner is allowed

  8. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Hoe Creek Underground Coal...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Hoe Creek Underground Coal Gasification Site - 045 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Hoe Creek Underground Coal Gasification Site (045) Designated Name: Alternate Name: Location:...

  9. Bennett Creek | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop IncIowaWisconsin: EnergyYorkColoradoBelcher Homes JumpCreek Jump to: navigation,

  10. Panther Creek | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsourceII JumpQuarterly Smart GridNorth Carolina: EnergyIncPan AfricanHomePantexCreek Jump

  11. Melons are branched polymers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Razvan Gurau; James P. Ryan

    2013-02-18

    Melonic graphs constitute the family of graphs arising at leading order in the 1/N expansion of tensor models. They were shown to lead to a continuum phase, reminiscent of branched polymers. We show here that they are in fact precisely branched polymers, that is, they possess Hausdorff dimension 2 and spectral dimension 4/3.

  12. Sediment dynamics of an impounded river: Yegua Creek, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martinez, Adriana Elizabeth

    2009-05-15

    , Yegua Creek drainage basin ................................. 22 6 Annual peak discharge 1925-1991............................................................. 24 7 Flood frequency curve for Yegua Creek before and after stream impoundment... ....... 85 44 Depositional and erosional features upstream of Y50US .......................... 86 45 Yegua Creek depositional feature downstream of Somerville Dam .......... 87 46 Same location on Yegua Creek after major flood event...

  13. Reintroduction of Native FishReintroduction of Native Fish Species to Coal CreekSpecies to Coal Creek

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Matthew

    1 Reintroduction of Native FishReintroduction of Native Fish Species to Coal CreekSpecies to Coal Control and Reclamation ActSurface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977of 1977 Coal Creek Watershed Foundation (2000)Coal Creek Watershed Foundation (2000) BackgroundBackground Fish populations in Coal Creek

  14. Landowners lead successful Buck Creek restoration 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boutwell, Kathryn S.

    2012-01-01

    manager for Buck Creek, said that in ????, landowners took the initiative to secure the scienti?c information needed to be?er evaluate both water quality in the creek as well as potential sources of bacteria across the watershed. Using funding secured... from the Texas State Soil and Water Conservation Board?s Clean Water Act provided by the EPA, the Buck Creek restoration e?ort began. Initially, AgriLife sta? collected water quality data and conducted a source survey of the watershed, according...

  15. Panther Creek, Idaho, Habitat Rehabilitation, Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reiser, Dudley W.

    1986-01-01

    The purpose of the project was to achieve full chinook salmon and steelhead trout production in the Panther Creek, Idaho, basin. Plans were developed to eliminate the sources of toxic effluent entering Panther Creek. Operation of a cobalt-copper mine since the 1930's has resulted in acid, metal-bearing drainage entering the watershed from underground workings and tailings piles. The report discusses plans for eliminating and/or treating the effluent to rehabilitate the water quality of Panther Creek and allow the reestablishment of salmon and trout spawning runs. (ACR)

  16. Projection optics box

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hale, Layton C. (Livermore, CA); Malsbury, Terry (Tracy, CA); Hudyma, Russell M. (San Ramon, CA); Parker, John M. (Tracy, CA)

    2000-01-01

    A projection optics box or assembly for use in an optical assembly, such as in an extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) system using 10-14 nm soft x-ray photons. The projection optics box utilizes a plurality of highly reflective optics or mirrors, each mounted on a precision actuator, and which reflects an optical image, such as from a mask, in the EUVL system onto a point of use, such as a target or silicon wafer, the mask, for example, receiving an optical signal from a source assembly, such as a developed from laser system, via a series of highly reflective mirrors of the EUVL system. The plurality of highly reflective optics or mirrors are mounted in a housing assembly comprised of a series of bulkheads having wall members secured together to form a unit construction of maximum rigidity. Due to the precision actuators, the mirrors must be positioned precisely and remotely in tip, tilt, and piston (three degrees of freedom), while also providing exact constraint.

  17. Cerrito Creek step-pools: An opportunity for restoration and education at Blake Garden

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Behrends, Nathaniel

    2008-01-01

    Post-Project Assessment of the Alamo Creek Restoration (EastBerkeley campus, East Alamo Creek at the Windemereand stepping- stones. East Alamo Creek Case Study: This

  18. A post project appraisal of the restoration/rehabilitation of Alamo Creek

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smolko, Darrell

    2003-01-01

    Associates, Ltd. , Alamo Creek: Conceptual Restoration Plan/Basis of Design Summary Alamo Creek Restoration, Phase 1aRestoration/Rehabilitation of Alamo Creek Darrell Smolko UC

  19. Rainwater in the Urban Landscape: The Garrison Creek Demonstration Project [Infrastructure as Landscape, Landscape as Infrastructure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, James; Storey, Kim

    1996-01-01

    public space. Toronto's Garrison Creek is a typical exampleit V ..-v..-. Urban The Garrison Creek Bemonstration Projectl Co-evolving systems: Toronto's Garrison Creek Ravine, city

  20. San Francisquit LosTrancosCreek

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kay, Mark A.

    San Francisquit o C reek LosTrancosCreek Lake Lagunita Felt Lake Searville Lake Bear Gulch HOOVER PARK PEERS PARK SHORELINE GOLF LINKS SHORELINE AT MOUNTAIN VIEW SEALE PARK KELLOG PARK BOWLING

  1. EIS-0346: Salmon Creek Project, WA

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EIS analyzes BPA's proposal to fund activities that would restore sufficient water flows to Salmon Creek and rehabilitate its streambed as necessary to provide adequate passage for summer steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and possibly spring chinook (O. tshawytscha).

  2. Hills Creek Powerhouse Turbine and Unit Rehabilitation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and oxygen content suitable for fish, require the project to discharge a minimum of 300 cfs throughout its entire operating head range. The Francis runners at Hills Creek have...

  3. Impedance Measurement Box

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Christophersen, Jon

    2013-05-28

    Energy storage devices, primarily batteries, are now more important to consumers, industries and the military. With increasing technical complexity and higher user expectations, there is also a demand for highly accurate state-of-health battery assessment techniques. IMB incorporates patented, proprietary, and tested capabilities using control software and hardware that can be part of an embedded monitoring system. IMB directly measures the wideband impedance spectrum in seconds during battery operation with no significant impact on service life. It also can be applied to batteries prior to installation, confirming health before entering active service, as well as during regular maintenance. For more information about this project, visit http://www.inl.gov/rd100/2011/impedance-measurement-box/

  4. Three fermions in a box

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas Luu

    2008-10-13

    I calculate finite-volume effects for three identical spin-1/2 fermions in a box assuming short-ranged repulsive interactions of `natural size'. This analysis employs standard perturbation theory in powers of 1/L, where L^3 is the volume of the box. I give results for the ground states in the A_1, T_1, and E cubic representations.

  5. Multidimensional Computational Fluid Dynamics Modeling of the Dispersion of White Oak Creek Contaminants in the Clinch River

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Platfoot, J.H.; Wendel, M.W.; Williams, P.T.

    1996-10-01

    This report describes the simulation of the dispersion and dilution of dissolved or finely suspended contaminants entering the Clinch river from White Oak Creek. The work is accomplished through the application of a commercial computational fluid dynamics (CFD) solver. This study assumes that contaminants originating in the White Oak Creed watershed, which drains Oak Ridge National Laboratory, will eventually reach the mouth of White Oak Creek and be discharged into the clinch River. The numerical model was developed to support the analysis of the off-site consequences of releases from the ORNL liquid low-level waste system. The system contains storage tanks and transfer lines in Bethel Valley and Melton Valley. Under certain failure modes, liquid low-level waste could be released to White Oak Creek or Melton Branch to White Oak Creek and eventually be discharged to the Clinch River. Since the Clinch River has unrestricted access by the public and water usage from the Clinch River is not controlled by the Department of Energy, such a liquid low-level waste spill would create the possibility of public exposure to the contaminant. This study is limited to the dispersion of the contaminants downstream of the confluence of White Oak Creek.

  6. University Library Box 19497 817-272-3000 www.uta.edu/library/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Arlington, University of

    University Library Box 19497 · 817-272-3000 · www.uta.edu/library/ The UT Arlington Library includes the Central Library, two branch libraries (Architecture and Fine Arts, Science and Engineering) two electronic libraries (Business and Social Work) and the Library Collection Depository

  7. Ichnotaxonomic assessment of Mazon Creek area trace fossils, Illinois, USA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LoBue, David J.

    2010-08-12

    The Francis Creek Shale Member (FCSM) of the Mid-Pennsylvanian Carbondale Formation along Mazon Creek in northern Illinois is known for soft-bodied organisms preserved within siderite concretions. Trace fossils, though ...

  8. FIDDLER CREEK POLYMER AUGMENTATION PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lyle A. Johnson, Jr.

    2001-10-31

    The Fiddler Creek field is in Weston County, Wyoming, and was discovered in 1948. Secondary waterflooding recovery was started in 1955 and terminated in the mid-1980s with a fieldwide recovery of approximately 40%. The West Fiddler Creek Unit, the focus of this project, had a lower recovery and therefore has the most remaining oil. Before the project this unit was producing approximately 85 bbl of oil per day from 20 pumping wells and 17 swab wells. The recovery process planned for this project involved adapting two independent processes, the injection of polymer as a channel blocker or as a deep-penetrating permeability modifier, and the stabilization of clays and reduction of the residual oil saturation in the near-wellbore area around the injection wells. Clay stabilization was not conducted because long-term fresh water injection had not severely reduced the injectivity. It was determined that future polymer injection would not be affected by the clay. For the project, two adjoining project patterns were selected on the basis of prior reservoir studies and current well availability and production. The primary injection well of Pattern 1 was treated with a small batch of MARCIT gel to create channel blocking. The long-term test was designed for three phases: (1) 77 days of injection of a 300-mg/l cationic polyacrylamide, (2) 15 days of injection of a 300-mg/l anionic polymer to ensure injectivity of the polymer, and (3) 369 days of injection of the 300-mg/l anionic polymer and a 30:1 mix of the crosslinker. Phases 1 and 2 were conducted as planned. Phase 3 was started in late March 1999 and terminated in May 2001. In this phase, a crosslinker was added with the anionic polymer. Total injection for Phase 3 was 709,064 bbl. To maintain the desired injection rate, the injection pressure was slowly increased from 1,400 psig to 2,100 psig. Early in the application of the polymer, it appeared that the sweep improvement program was having a positive effect on Pattern 1 with lesser effects in Pattern 2. These early observations did not continue to develop. The oil production for both patterns remained fairly constant to the rates established by the restart of waterflooding. The water production declined but stabilized in both patterns. The stabilization of the oil at prepolymer rates and water production at the lower rates can be attributed to the polymer injection, but the effect was not as great as originally predicted. The sweep improvement for the patterns appeared to be negatively impacted by extended shutdowns in the injection and production systems. Such problems as those experienced in this project can be expected when long-term polymer injection is started in old waterflood fields. To prevent these problems, new injection and production tubulars and pumps would be required at a cost prohibitive to the present, independent operators. Unless the future results from the continued waterflood show positive effects of the long-term polymer injection, it appears that the batch-type polymer treatment may have more promise than the long-term treatment and should be more cost effective.

  9. Radioiodinated branched carbohydrates

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Goodman, Mark M. (Knoxville, TN); Knapp, Jr., Furn F. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1989-01-01

    A radioiodinated branched carbohydrate for tissue imaging. Iodine-123 is stabilized in the compound by attaching it to a vinyl functional group that is on the carbohydrate. The compound exhibits good uptake and retention and is promising in the development of radiopharmaceuticals for brain, heart and tumor imaging.

  10. 2007 Formula SAE pedal box

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schiller, Brad W

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this thesis is the design and implementation of the pedal box for the 2007 MIT Formula SAE car. Formula SAE is a collegiate competition in which groups of degree seeking students design and manufacture small ...

  11. Recommendation 195: Mitigation of Contamination in Bear Creek Burial Grounds

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The ORSSAB requests DOE provide possible remedial actions to mitigate releases of contamination from Bear Creek Burial Grounds.

  12. DRAFT ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT1 PINE CREEK DAM, OKLAHOMA2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    #12;#12;DRAFT ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT1 PINE CREEK DAM, OKLAHOMA2 DAM SAFETY MODIFICATION3 &4 Environmental Assessment Pine Creek Dam, Oklahoma Dam Safety Modification & Interim Risk Reduction Measure and risk reduction measures necessary to correct structural and maintenance deficiencies of Pine Creek Dam

  13. Effect of resolved branches on the performance of delayed branching 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramabhadran, Anurekha

    1995-01-01

    The impact of resolved branch instructions on the performance of the delayed branching scheme is studied for a two-instruction-issue superscalar pipelined RISC processor. Two processor models are created in Verilog HDL, ...

  14. Physics: the big black box Mirror conjecture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cavalieri, Renzo

    Physics: the big black box Math Mirror conjecture A look into the mirror (I) an overview of Mirror Symmetry #12;Physics: the big black box Math Mirror conjecture Outline 1 Physics: the big black box 2 Math Symmetry #12;Physics: the big black box Math Mirror conjecture A slogan Mirror Symmetry is a correspondence

  15. Fast exact linear algebra, LinBox

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pernet, Clément

    Fast exact linear algebra, LinBox Clément Pernet Introduction LinBox: an overview Principles-place eliminations Fast matrix multiplication Linear algebra over big integers Fast exact linear algebra: LinBox Clément PERNET SAGE Days 6, November 11, 2007 #12;Fast exact linear algebra, LinBox Clément Pernet

  16. Perspectives for the LinBox library

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pernet, Clément

    Parallel Perspectives for the LinBox library Clément PERNET Introduction The LinBox library Principles Organisation of the library Dense computations BlackBox computations Parallelism perspectives Design considerations Algorithmic perspectives Conclusion Parallel Perspectives for the LinBox library

  17. Optimization Control Strategies for HVAC Terminal Boxes 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhu, Y.; Batten, T.; Noboa, H.; Claridge, D. E.; Turner, W. D.; Liu, M.; Zhou, J.; Cameron, C.; Keeble, D.; Hirchak, R.

    2000-01-01

    was limited for some boxes due to the existing box design setting. In some cases, the boxes can only supply a certain amount of hot air even in the full heating mode even though the hot duct of the boxes can allow more air flow through. Instead, the boxes..., > CFMb(due to hot duct inlet size limit) Figure 3- 1. The new VAV box operation control schedule when minimum CFM requirements exceed hot duct capacity -Heating Load Cooling Load - If CFMmi, = CFM h,, Figure 3-2 The new VAV box operation control...

  18. Branched Polymers and Hyperplane Arrangements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Postnikov, Alexander

    We generalize the construction of connected branched polymers and the notion of the volume of the space of connected branched polymers studied by Brydges and Imbrie (Ann Math, 158:1019–1039, 2003), and Kenyon and Winkler ...

  19. Constraint Orbital Branching JAMES OSTROWSKI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Linderoth, Jeffrey T.

    of Ostrowski et al. [2007] to the case of branching on disjunctions formed by inequalities--constraint orbital

  20. BRANCHED POLYMERS AND HYPERPLANE ARRANGEMENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Postnikov, Alexander

    BRANCHED POLYMERS AND HYPERPLANE ARRANGEMENTS KAROLA M´ESZ´AROS ALEXANDER POSTNIKOV Abstract. We of connected branched polymers studied by Brydges and Imbrie [BI], and Kenyon and Winkler [KW] to any hyperplane arrangement A. The volume of the resulting configuration space of connected branched polymers

  1. Clear Creek, Texas Flood Risk Management Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    ) of 1996 requires four distinct steps for an evaluation of economic benefits and costs for projects for an evaluation of economic benefits and costs for projects were conducted and displayed in the Economic Appendix ­ Economic Evaluation. The non-Federal projects (FEMA buyout and detention on Marys Creek) augments

  2. Collaborative Monitoring in Walnut Creek, California1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    that they gained insight into priorities of Preserve users and knowledge of areas that might require new management regeneration and native grass populations in target management areas in the four Open Space Preserves and had to re-examine some of their own assumptions. The City of Walnut Creek managers stated

  3. Second report on the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program for White Oak Creek Watershed and the Clinch River

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loar, J.M.; Adams, S.M.; Bailey, R.D.; Blaylock, B.G.; Boston, H.L.; Cox, D.K.; Huston, M.A.; Kimmel, B.L.; Loar, J.M.; Olsen, C.R.; Ryon, M.G.; Shugart, L.R.; Smith, J.G.; Southworth, G.R.; Stewart, A.J.; Walton, B.T.; Talmage, S.S.; Murphy, J.B.; Valentine, C.K.; Appellanis, S.M.; Jimenez, B.D.; Huq, M.V.; Meyers-Schone, L.J.; Mohrbacher, D.A.; Olsen, C.R.; Stout, J.G.

    1992-12-01

    As a condition of the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit issued to Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) on April 1, 1986, a Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP) was developed for White Oak Creek (WOC); selected tributaries of WOC, including Fifth Creek, First Creek, Melton Branch, and Northwest Tributary; and the Clinch River. BMAP consists of seven major tasks that address both radiological and nonradiological contaminants in the aquatic and terrestrial environs on-site and the aquatic environs off-site. These tasks are (1) toxicity monitoring; (2) bioaccumulation monitoring of nonradiological contaminants in aquatic biota; (3) biological indicator studies; (4) instream ecological monitoring; (5) assessment of contaminants in the terrestrial environment; (6) radioecology of WOC and White Oak Lake (WOL); and (7) contaminant transport, distribution, and fate in the WOC embayment-Clinch River-Watts Bar Reservoir system. This document, the second of a series of annual reports, described the results of BMAP studies conducted in 1987.

  4. Jeff Doerzbacher 1J 505 Oak Branch Drive. Austin. Texas 78737

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jeff Doerzbacher 1J 505 Oak Branch Drive. Austin. Texas 78737 Albert W. Green Environment Assessment. Texas Parks and Wildlife Department 4200 Smith School Road. Austin. Texas 78744 Robert S. Jones Marine Science Institute. University of Texas at Austin P.O. Box 1267. Port Aransas. Texas 78373 Gary C

  5. Types of Student Engagement and Commitment to Stream Stewardship: Strawberry Creek on University of California at Berkeley Campus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Javier, Alexander; Jones, Darryl; Tannenbaum, Sara Rose

    2011-01-01

    Charbonneau, R. B. 1987. Strawberry Creek Management Plan,R. and Resh, V.H. 1992. Strawberry Creek on the Universityto Stream Stewardship: Strawberry Creek on University of

  6. NETL's JIC in a box

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    David Anna

    2010-01-08

    The National Energy Technology Laboratory developed the idea of a portable joint information center AKA JIC in-a-box. This video discribes some of the equipment in the portable JIC as well as some of the methodology that NETL developed as a result of this portable JIC concept.

  7. Foundation Accounting PO Box 3062739

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McQuade, D. Tyler

    Foundation Accounting PO Box 3062739 Tallahassee, FL 32306-2739 PH: (850) 644-6000 Revised 1 required): Date: Foundation Approval(s): Date: FOUNDATION ACCOUNTING USE ONLY Check Invoice Invoice Date Account Code Fund Project Amount Requisition Total Review Disb Supr. Signature Approvals for Payment

  8. Restoration Potential of a Mining-Impacted Urban Stream: Horseshoe Branch of Lion Creek, Oakland, CA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hackenjos, Bethany; Woelfle-Erskine, Cleo; Wood, Jacob

    2010-01-01

    should be removed, or acid mine drainage should be treated.cost of ongoing acid mine drainage, and use those revenueshighly impacted by acid mine drainage and urbanization. Past

  9. Glove box for water pit applications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mills, William C. (Richland, WA); Rabe, Richard A. (North Fork, ID)

    2005-01-18

    A glove box assembly that includes a glove box enclosure attached to a longitudinally extending hollow tube having an entranceway, wherein the portion of the tube is in a liquid environment. An elevator member is provided for raising an object that is introduced into the hollow tube from the liquid environment to a gas environment inside the glove box enclosure while maintaining total containment.

  10. Upper Turkey Creek, Merriam, Kansas Feasibility Report Flood Risk Management Project Report Summary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Upper Turkey Creek, Merriam, Kansas Feasibility Report Flood Risk Management Project Report Summary 1 REPORT SUMMARY UPPER TURKEY CREEK BASIN PROJECT FEASIBILITY REPORT AND INTEGRATED ENVIRONMENTAL Study Authority. The Upper Turkey Creek Basin Project, Flood Risk Management Feasibility Study (the

  11. Development of a Discharge-Stage Rating Curve for Strawberry Creek

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hunt, Lisa

    2011-01-01

    Stage Rating Curve for Strawberry Creek Lisa Hunt ReferencesCharbonneau, R. 1987. Strawberry Creek Management Plan,R. and V.H. Resh. 1992. Strawberry Creek on the University

  12. New Jersey Nuclear Profile - PSEG Hope Creek Generating Station

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    PSEG Hope Creek Generating Station" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License...

  13. Illumination box and camera system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Haas, Jeffrey S. (San Ramon, CA); Kelly, Fredrick R. (Modesto, CA); Bushman, John F. (Oakley, CA); Wiefel, Michael H. (La Honda, CA); Jensen, Wayne A. (Livermore, CA); Klunder, Gregory L. (Oakland, CA)

    2002-01-01

    A hand portable, field-deployable thin-layer chromatography (TLC) unit and a hand portable, battery-operated unit for development, illumination, and data acquisition of the TLC plates contain many miniaturized features that permit a large number of samples to be processed efficiently. The TLC unit includes a solvent tank, a holder for TLC plates, and a variety of tool chambers for storing TLC plates, solvent, and pipettes. After processing in the TLC unit, a TLC plate is positioned in a collapsible illumination box, where the box and a CCD camera are optically aligned for optimal pixel resolution of the CCD images of the TLC plate. The TLC system includes an improved development chamber for chemical development of TLC plates that prevents solvent overflow.

  14. The importance of tidal creek ecosystems Keywords: Estuary; Tidal creek; Pollution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mallin, Michael

    . They are most abundant along the Atlantic Seaboard from New Jersey to Florida, and along the Gulf Coast). Tidal creeks are especially abundant in low-energy systems such as protected areas behind barrier. As an example, the four southernmost coastal counties in North Carolina (Onslow, Pender, New Hanover

  15. Big Canyon Creek Ecological Restoration Strategy.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rasmussen, Lynn; Richardson, Shannon

    2007-10-01

    He-yey, Nez Perce for steelhead or rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), are a culturally and ecologically significant resource within the Big Canyon Creek watershed; they are also part of the federally listed Snake River Basin Steelhead DPS. The majority of the Big Canyon Creek drainage is considered critical habitat for that DPS as well as for the federally listed Snake River fall chinook (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) ESU. The Nez Perce Soil and Water Conservation District (District) and the Nez Perce Tribe Department of Fisheries Resources Management-Watershed (Tribe), in an effort to support the continued existence of these and other aquatic species, have developed this document to direct funding toward priority restoration projects in priority areas for the Big Canyon Creek watershed. In order to achieve this, the District and the Tribe: (1) Developed a working group and technical team composed of managers from a variety of stakeholders within the basin; (2) Established geographically distinct sub-watershed areas called Assessment Units (AUs); (3) Created a prioritization framework for the AUs and prioritized them; and (4) Developed treatment strategies to utilize within the prioritized AUs. Assessment Units were delineated by significant shifts in sampled juvenile O. mykiss (steelhead/rainbow trout) densities, which were found to fall at fish passage barriers. The prioritization framework considered four aspects critical to determining the relative importance of performing restoration in a certain area: density of critical fish species, physical condition of the AU, water quantity, and water quality. It was established, through vigorous data analysis within these four areas, that the geographic priority areas for restoration within the Big Canyon Creek watershed are Big Canyon Creek from stream km 45.5 to the headwaters, Little Canyon from km 15 to 30, the mainstem corridors of Big Canyon (mouth to 7km) and Little Canyon (mouth to 7km). The District and the Tribe then used data collected from the District's stream assessment and inventory, utilizing the Stream Visual Assessment Protocol (SVAP), to determine treatment necessary to bring 90% of reaches ranked Poor or Fair through the SVAP up to good or excellent. In 10 year's time, all reaches that were previously evaluated with SVAP will be reevaluated to determine progress and to adapt methods for continued success. Over 400 miles of stream need treatment in order to meet identified restoration goals. Treatments include practices which result in riparian habitat improvements, nutrient reductions, channel condition improvements, fish habitat improvements, invasive species control, water withdrawal reductions, improved hydrologic alterations, upland sediment reductions, and passage barrier removal. The Nez Perce Soil and Water Conservation District (District) and the Nez Perce Tribe Department of Fisheries Resource Management Watershed Division (Tribe) developed this document to guide restoration activities within the Big Canyon Creek watershed for the period of 2008-2018. This plan was created to demonstrate the ongoing need and potential for anadromous fish habitat restoration within the watershed and to ensure continued implementation of restoration actions and activities. It was developed not only to guide the District and the Tribe, but also to encourage cooperation among all stakeholders, including landowners, government agencies, private organizations, tribal governments, and elected officials. Through sharing information, skills, and resources in an active, cooperative relationships, all concerned parties will have the opportunity to join together to strengthen and maintain a sustainable natural resource base for present and future generations within the watershed. The primary goal of the strategy is to address aquatic habitat restoration needs on a watershed level for resident and anadromous fish species, promoting quality habitat within a self-sustaining watershed. Seven objectives have been developed to support this goal: (1) Identify factors limiting quality

  16. Leon Creek Flood Risk Management Project San Antonio, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Leon Creek Flood Risk Management Project San Antonio, Texas 27 March 2014 ABSTRACT: Leon Creek is an important riverine system located on the western side of San Antonio in Bexar County Texas. The high flood that result in extremely rapid but relatively short-duration flood peaks and high velocity stream flows

  17. Bridge Creek Watershed Volunteer Lake Secchi Disk Monitoring Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;Bridge Creek Watershed Volunteer Lake Secchi Disk Monitoring Program 1996 DOE FRAP 1996-13 Ryan.C. December 1996 #12;ABSTRACT This document summarizes data collected during the first year of the Bridge transparency data from 22 lakes in the Bridge Creek watershed. Secchi depth readings were collected between May

  18. Edwards Creek Geothermal Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, AlabamaETEC GmbH Jump to:Providence,New Mexico: EnergyEnergyCreek Geothermal Project

  19. Fermilab | Tritium at Fermilab | Indian Creek Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation Current HABFES OctoberEvan Racah861MayArtQuestions forFeature photoIndian Creek

  20. Dry Creek Ventures | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar2-0057-EA Jump to:of the National ClimateDongyingOpen Energy3) Jump to:Creek

  1. Separation Creek Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EIS Report UrlNM-bRenewableSMUDSectional ModelofSenerSeparation Creek

  2. Smith Creek Geothermal Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EIS ReportEurope GmbH JumpSlough Heat andCreek Geothermal Project Jump

  3. Stony Creek Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EIS ReportEurope GmbHSoloPageBeforeCreek Wind Farm Jump to: navigation,

  4. Twin Creeks Technologies | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EISTJThin Film SolarTown(LECBP) | OpenTrack WindTuvalu:Creeks

  5. Willow Creek Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EISTJThinWarsaw,WhatUtilityRateNamingHelperVirginia:Willow Creek Wind

  6. Forest Creek Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoopButtePowerEdistoWhiskeyFootprint Ventures Jump to: navigation,PortalCreek Wind Farm

  7. Lava Creek Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource History ViewInformationWinds Jump to:Laredo Ridge WindHill JumpLava Creek

  8. Bear Creek Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop IncIowaWisconsin: EnergyYorkColorado StateWindInc Jump to:Baywood-LosCreek Wind

  9. Cobb Creek Geothermal Facility | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoopButtePower Ventures Jump to: navigation, searchClover HillCobalt Biofuels JumpCreek

  10. Bull Creek Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop IncIowaWisconsin:PontiacInformationAssessment ToolkitBull Creek Wind Farm Jump

  11. Bear Creek Valley Watershed | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n c i p a l De p uBUS SERVICE SUBSIDIESDepartment of585Bear Creek Valley

  12. Papalote Creek II | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsourceII JumpQuarterly Smart GridNorth Carolina: EnergyIncPan AfricanHomePantexCreek

  13. Papalote Creek Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsourceII JumpQuarterly Smart GridNorth Carolina: EnergyIncPan AfricanHomePantexCreekWind

  14. Two-dimensional water quality modeling of Town Creek embayment on Guntersville Reservoir

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bender, M.D.; Shiao, Ming C.; Hauser, G.E. . Engineering Lab.); Butkus, S.R. . Water Quality Dept.)

    1990-09-01

    TVA investigated water quality of Town Creek embayment using a branched two-dimensional model of Guntersville Reservoir. Simulation results were compared in terms of algal biomass, nutrient concentrations, and volume of embayment with depleted dissolved oxygen. Stratification and flushing play a significant role in the embayment water quality. Storms introduce large loadings of organics, nutrients, and suspended solids. Dissolved oxygen depletion is most severe after storms followed by low flow that fails to flush the embayment. Embayment water quality responses to potential animal waste and erosion controls were explored. Modeling indicated animal waste controls were much more cost-effective than erosion controls. Erosion controls will decrease embayment suspended solids and thereby increase algal biomass due to greater light penetration. 29 refs., 16 figs., 4 tabs.

  15. Oak Ridge National Laboratory Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program for White Oak Creek Watershed and the Clinch River

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loar, J.M.; Adams, S.M.; Allison, L.J.; Blaylock, B.G.; Boston, H.L.; Huston, M.A.; Kimmel, B.L.; Smith, J.G.; Southworth, G.R.; Stewart, A.J.; Walton, B.T.; Kitchings, J.T.; Olsen, C.R.

    1991-09-01

    On April 1, 1986, a National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit was issued for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) (EPA 1986). As specified in Part 3: Special Conditions (Item H) of the permit, a plan for biological monitoring of the Clinch River, White Oak Creek (WOC), Northwest Tributary (NWT) of WOC, Melton Branch (MB), Fifth Creek, and First Creek shall be submitted for approval to the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Tennessee Department of Health and Environment (TDHE) within 90 days of the effective date of the permit. The plan, which is referred to in Part 3 (H) of the permit as the Biological Monitoring Plan and Abatement Program (BMPAP), describes characterization monitoring studies to be conducted for the duration of the permit (5 years). In order to be consistent with the terminology used for the Biological Monitoring and Abatement Programs for the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plan and the Oak Ridge K-25 Plant, BMPAP will subsequently be referred to as the Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP). The proposed BMAP outlined in this document is based on preliminary discussions held on December 9, 1985, between staff of Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. (ORNL and Central Management), the US Department of Energy (DOE), EPA, and TDHE. 232 refs., 11 figs., 7 tabs.

  16. Anacostia Tributary Trail System Paint Branch Trail

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernstein, Joseph B.

    Anacostia Tributary Trail System Paint Branch Trail Under Construction Under Construction B oulevard (M D 193) To University Boulevard Paint Branch Parkway Dickinson Avenue Princeton Avenue

  17. Water Quality Monitoring in the Buck Creek Watershed and Facilitation of Buck Creek Watershed Partnership 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gregory, L.; Dyer, P.

    2013-01-01

    & 20376); two are in AU 0207A_02 (stations 20365 & 20368) and one is located on a tributary of the creek (station 20367). Building on this recommendation, two additional sites were included in the Interim Monitoring project. These added stations... the Interim Monitoring project Table 1. Water quality monitoring station descriptions Project? Site?No.?? TCEQ? Monitoring? Station?No.? General?Station?Location?&?Description? County? TCEQ Assessment Unit Station is Located In BC 03 20365 Buck...

  18. Alternative Perspectives on the Battle of Wolf Creek of 1938

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Warde, Mary Jane

    2001-09-01

    The Battle of Wolf Creek in northwestern Oklahoma in 1838 was highly significant to the Cheyenne, Arapaho, Kiowa, Comanche, and Plains Apache tribes, but little known beyond their mutual frontier. Their oral accounts of the battle allow us...

  19. The battle of Sailor's Creek: a study in leadership 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Cloyd Allen, Jr.

    2007-04-25

    The Battle of Sailor's Creek, 6 April 1865, has been overshadowed by Lee's surrender at Appomattox Court House several days later, yet it is an example of the Union military war machine reaching its apex of war making ...

  20. HYDROLOGY OF BISHOP CREEK, CALIFORNIA: AN ISOTOPIC ANALYSIS 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    diverting Bishop creek water for hydroelectric power for many years. Recently there has been concern that must be released from the hydroelectric power plants to the channel, during certain times of the year

  1. Workers Remove Glove Boxes from Ventilation at Hanford's Plutonium...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    boxes inside the facility's former processing area. This work is performed inside plastic enclosures to limit the spread of contamination. Preparing the glove boxes for...

  2. Ministry of Environment Ecosystem Branch

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ministry of Environment Ecosystem Branch 2202 Main Mall University of British Columbia Vancouver aware of and which would definitely provide information applicable throughout the basin, is a study being proposed by Dr. Molly Webb. The last three years of this study will provide information

  3. C(re)ek-storation Community Collaboration Site: North Fork of Strawberry Creek by La Loma and Le Conte Avenues

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tannenbaum, Sara Rose

    2011-01-01

    1987. Excerpts from: The Strawberry Creek Management Plan.and Vince Resh. 1992. Strawberry Creek on the University ofSite: North Fork of Strawberry Creek by La Loma and Le Conte

  4. Solar Pizza Oven Box k - 6

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Ready to Build? BUILD A PIZZA BOX SOLAR OVEN Background The sun is hot enough to bake food. Here's how to make a simple solar oven that gets hot enough to warm up cookies and other...

  5. Glove box on vehicular instrument panel

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Atarashi, Kazuya (Saitama, JP)

    1985-01-01

    A glove box for the upper surface of an automobile dashboard whereby it may be positioned close to the driver. The glove box lid is pivotally supported by arms extending down either side to swing forwardly for opening. A hook is pivotally support adjacent an arm and weighted to swing into engagement with the arm to prevent opening of the lid during abrupt deceleration. A toggle spring assists in maintaining the lid in either the open or closed position.

  6. HYDROGEN AND VOC RETENTION IN WASTE BOXES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    PACE ME; MARUSICH RM

    2008-11-21

    The Hanford Waste Management Project Master Documented Safety Analysis (MDSA) (HNF-14741, 2003) identifies derived safety controls to prevent or mitigate the risks of a single-container deflagration during operations requiring moving, venting or opening transuranic (TRU)-waste containers. The issue is whether these safety controls are necessary for operations involving TRU-waste boxes that are being retrieved from burial at the Hanford Site. This paper investigates the potential for a deflagration hazard within these boxes and whether safety controls identified for drum deflagration hazards should be applied to operations involving these boxes. The study evaluates the accumulation of hydrogen and VOCs within the waste box and the transport of these gases and vapors out of the waste box. To perform the analysis, there were numerous and major assumptions made regarding the generation rate and the transport pathway dimensions and their number. Since there is little actual data with regards to these assumptions, analyses of three potential configurations were performed to obtain some indication of the bounds of the issue (the concentration of hydrogen or flammable VOCs within a waste box). A brief description of each of the three cases along with the results of the analysis is summarized.

  7. New Branches of Massive Gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Comelli, Denis; Koyama, Kazuya; Pilo, Luigi; Tasinato, Gianmassimo

    2015-01-01

    The basic building block for Lorentz invariant and ghost free massive gravity is the square root of the combination $g^{-1}\\eta\\,$, where $g^{-1}$ is the inverse of the physical metric and $\\eta$ is a reference metric. Since the square root of a matrix is not uniquely defined, it is possible to have physically inequivalent potentials corresponding to different branches. We show that around Minkowski background the only perturbatively well defined branch is the potential proposed by de Rham, Gabadadze and Tolley. On the other hand, if Lorentz symmetry is broken spontaneously, other potentials exist with a standard perturbative expansion. We show this explicitly building new Lorentz invariant, ghost-free massive gravity potentials for theories that in the background preserve rotational invariance, but break Lorentz boosts.

  8. Features and Dimensions of the Hayward fault zone in the Strawberry and Blackberry Creek Area Berkeley, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, P.L.

    2011-01-01

    Hayward Fault Zone in the Strawberry and Blackberry Creekward Fault Zone in the Strawberry and Blackberry Creek Area,Hayward fault zone in the Strawberry and Blackberry Creek

  9. Solid State Photovoltaic Research Branch

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-09-01

    This report summarizes the progress of the Solid State Photovoltaic Research Branch of the Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI) from October 1, 1988, through September 30,l 1989. Six technical sections of the report cover these main areas of SERIs in-house research: Semiconductor Crystal Growth, Amorphous Silicon Research, Polycrystalline Thin Films, III-V High-Efficiency Photovoltaic Cells, Solid-State Theory, and Laser Raman and Luminescence Spectroscopy. Sections have been indexed separately for inclusion on the data base.

  10. Recurrent faulting and petroleum accumulation, Cat Creek Anticline, central Montana

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, W.J. (Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign (United States))

    1991-06-01

    The Cat Creek anticline, scene of central Montana's first significant oil discovery, is underlain by a south-dipping high-angle fault (Cat Creek fault) that has undergone several episodes of movement with opposite sense of displacement. Borehole data suggest that the Cat Creek fault originated as a normal fault during Proterozoic rifting concurrent with deposition of the Belt Supergroup. Reverse faulting took place in Late Cambrian time, and again near the end of the Devonian Period. The Devonian episode, coeval with the Antler orogeny, raised the southern block several hundred feet. The southern block remained high through Meramecian time, then began to subside. Post-Atokan, pre-Middle Jurassic normal faulting lowered the southern block as much as 1,500 ft. During the Laramide orogeny (latest Cretaceous-Eocene) the Cat Creek fault underwent as much as 4,000 ft of reverse displacement and a comparable amount of left-lateral displacement. The Cat Creek anticline is a fault-propagation fold; en echelon domes and listric normal faults developed along its crest in response to wrenching. Oil was generated mainly in organic-rich shales of the Heath Formation (upper Chesterian Series) and migrated upward along tectonic fractures into Pennsylvanian, Jurassic, and Cretaceous reservoir rocks in structural traps in en echelon domes. Production has been achieved only from those domes where structural closure was retained from Jurassic through Holocene time.

  11. RUSSIAN ACADEMY OF SCIENCES Ural Branch

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turova, Varvara

    with the homicidal chau#11;eur dynamics: Scienti#12;c reports. IMM Ural Branch of RAS. Ekaterinburg, Russia, 2000RUSSIAN ACADEMY OF SCIENCES Ural Branch Institute of Mathematics and Mechanics Scienti#12;c reports of Mathematics and Mechanics Ural Branch of RAS Patsko V.S., Turova V.L. Numerical study of di#11;erential games

  12. The branching programme of mouse lung development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krasnow, Mark A.

    ARTICLES The branching programme of mouse lung development Ross J. Metzger1 {, Ophir D. Klein2 {, Gail R. Martin2 & Mark A. Krasnow1 Mammalian lungs are branched networks containing thousands by three geometrically simple local modes of branching used in three different orders throughout the lung

  13. EA-1219: Hoe Creek Underground Coal Gasification Test Site Remediation, Campbell County, Wyoming

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts for the proposed Hoe Creek Underground Coal Gasification Test Site Remediation that would be performed at the Hoe Creek site in Campbell County, Wyoming.

  14. The feasibility of residential development in the newly master planned Ship Creek area of Anchorage, Alaska

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Debenham, Shaun T. (Shaun Todd), 1973-

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this thesis is to determine if a 40 unit condominium complex located in the Ship Creek area in Anchorage, Alaska, is financially feasible. Historically, Ship Creek has been an industrial area but recently the ...

  15. Fast-growing willow shrub named `Fish Creek`

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Abrahamson, Lawrence P.; Kopp, Richard F.; Smart, Lawrence B.; Volk, Timothy A.

    2007-05-08

    A distinct male cultivar of Salix purpurea named `Fish Creek`, characterized by rapid stem growth producing greater than 30% more woody biomass than either of its parents (`94001` and `94006`) and 20% more biomass than a current production cultivar (`SV1`). `Fish Creek` can be planted from dormant stem cuttings, produces multiple stems after coppice, and the stem biomass can be harvested when the plant is dormant. In the spring following harvest, the plant will re-sprout very vigorously, producing new stems that can be harvested after two to four years of growth. This harvest cycle can be repeated several times. The stem biomass can be chipped and burned as a source of renewable energy, generating heat and/or electricity. `Fish Creek` displays a low incidence of rust disease or damage by beetles or sawflies.

  16. Roberts Creek Study Forest: the effects of shelterwood harvesting and blowdown

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    is sediment produc- tion in domestic water supply creeks. The effects of timber harvesting on sedimentRoberts Creek Study Forest: the effects of shelterwood harvesting and blowdown on sediment production in a small zero-order creek by Robert O. Hudson and Brian D'Anjou KEYWORDS: Shelterwood harvest

  17. Pike Creek, Delaware: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland:NPIProtectio1975) | Open EnergyPhoenicia,Creek, Ohio:Mississippi:Ohio:Creek,

  18. Coconut Creek, Florida: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, Alabama (Utility Company) JumpIowa: Energy ResourcesCreek,CoastalCochranCoconut Creek,

  19. Walker Branch Watershed Ecosystems Data

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    These projects have all contributed to a more complete understanding of how forest watersheds function and have provided insights into the solution of energy-related problems associated with air pollution, contaminant transport, and forest nutrient dynamics. This is one of a few sites in the world characterized by long-term, intensive environmental studies. The Walker Branch Watershed website at http://walkerbranch.ornl.gov/ provides maps, photographs, and data on climate, precipitation, atmospheric deposition, stream discharge and runoff, stream chemistry, and vegetation. [Taken from http://walkerbranch.ornl.gov/ABOUTAAA.HTM

  20. Promotion of solar box cooker technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stibravy, R.

    1992-09-01

    Over 1.5 billion people are affected by fuel wood shortage, according to the UN Food and Agricultural Organization. Meanwhile solar cookers are under-exploited. The author presents one version of this technology and discusses how it may be promoted world-wide. The increased use of non fossil fuel energy is essential world-wide in combating global warming trends, preserving the environment, conserving resources and achieving sustainable development. The Solar Box Cooker (SBC) - a box within a box - uses an easily available source of such energy that is also renewable (in contrast to energy that, once used, is not, such as oil, coal, gas, wood). It is also readily available for the developing world, and for much of the developed world too.

  1. Third report on the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program for White Oak Creek Watershed and the Clinch River

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loar, J.M. [ed.] [ed.; Adams, S.M.; Bailey, R.D. [and others] [and others

    1994-03-01

    As a condition of the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit issued to Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) on April 1, 1985, a Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP) was developed for White Oak Creek (WOC); selected tributaries of WOC, including Fifth Creek, First Creek, Melton Branch, and Northwest Tributary; and the Clinch River. The BMAP currently consists of six major tasks that address both radiological and nonradiological contaminants in the aquatic and terrestrial environs at ORNL. These are (1) toxicity monitoring, (2) bioaccumulation monitoring of nonradiological contaminants in aquatic biota, (3) biological indicator studies, (4) instream ecological monitoring, (5) assessment of contaminants in the terrestrial environment, and (6) radioecology of WOC and White Oak Lake (WOL). The investigation of contaminant transport, distribution, and fate in the WOC embayment-Clinch River-Watts Bar Reservoir system was originally a task of the BMAP but, in 1988, was incorporated into the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Facility Investigation for the Clinch River, a separate study to assess offsite contamination from all three Department of Energy facilities in Oak Ridge.

  2. Development, Topography, and Identity: The Dougherty Valley and the New Suburban Metropolis [Research and Debate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davids, Rene'

    2008-01-01

    Creek Coyote Creek East Alamo Creek San Cantanio Creek SanCreek Tassajara Creek West Alamo Creek C RO W C AN YO N RDzone between branches of Alamo Creek and the foothills dem-

  3. Mechanical properties of branched actin filaments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohammadhosein Razbin; Martin Falcke; Panayotis Benetatos; Annette Zippelius

    2015-06-26

    Cells moving on a two dimensional substrate generate motion by polymerizing actin filament networks inside a flat membrane protrusion. New filaments are generated by branching off existing ones, giving rise to branched network structures. We investigate the force-extension relation of branched filaments, grafted on an elastic structure at one end and pushing with the free ends against the leading edge cell membrane. Single filaments are modeled as worm-like chains, whose thermal bending fluctuations are restricted by the leading edge cell membrane, resulting in an effective force. Branching can increase the stiffness considerably; however the effect depends on branch point position and filament orientation, being most pronounced for intermediate tilt angles and intermediate branch point positions. We describe filament networks without cross-linkers to focus on the effect of branching. We use randomly positioned branch points, as generated in the process of treadmilling, and orientation distributions as measured in lamellipodia. These networks reproduce both the weak and strong force response of lamellipodia as measured in force-velocity experiments. We compare properties of branched and unbranched networks. The ratio of the network average of the force per branched filament to the average force per unbranched filament depends on the orientation distribution of the filaments. The ratio exhibits compression dependence and may go up to about 4.5 in networks with a narrow orientation distribution. With orientation distributions measured in lamellipodia, it is about two and essentially independent from network compression, graft elasticity and filament persistence length.

  4. Evidence of Streamflow and Sediment Effects on Juvenile Coho and Benthic Macroinvertebrates of Lagunitas Creek and San Geronimo Creek, Marin County, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ball, Joanie; Diver, Sibyl; Hwan, Jason

    2009-01-01

    Resh. 2008. Quantitative linkages among sediment supply,streambed fine sediment, and benthic macroinvertebrates inData: Lagunitas Creek Sediment and Riparian Management Plan,

  5. The geoarchaeology of Buttermilk Creek, Bell County, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gibson, Brandy Deanne

    1997-01-01

    was conducted. Buttermilk Creek is a 13 km stream incised into limestone bedrock with a drainage basin size of 43 kM2 , a stream gradient of 8.5 m/km, and a sinuosity of 1.26. This project was undertaken with two objectives in mind-, to create a...

  6. Tillman Creek Mitigation Site As-Build Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gresham, Doug [Otak, Inc.

    2009-05-29

    This as-built report describes site conditions at the Tillman Creek mitigation site in South Cle Elum, Washington. This mitigation site was constructed in 2006-2007 to compensate for wetland impacts from the Yakama Nation hatchery. This as-built report provides information on the construction sequence, as-built survey, and establishment of baseline monitoring stations.

  7. ORESTIMBA CREEK, WEST STANISLAUS COUNTY, CA FLOOD RISK MANAGEMENT PROJECT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    ORESTIMBA CREEK, WEST STANISLAUS COUNTY, CA FLOOD RISK MANAGEMENT PROJECT 29 May 2013 ABSTRACT flood risk management for the City of Newman, Stanislaus County, California and the surrounding area public health risks caused by area flooding included contamination of domestic water wells and inundation

  8. ASSESSMENT OF LIVESTOCK WINTERING AREAS IN BRIDGE CREEK BASIN, 1996

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Agricultural Practice for Waste Management... 6 3.0 ASSESSMENT RESULTS................................... 7 3 with the environmental guidelines of the Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food (1992) and the Code of Agricultural Practice for Waste Management (Waste Management Act, Health Act, 1992). Bridge Creek drains a 1,550 km area

  9. Can Planets Influence the Horizontal Branch Morphology?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Noam Soker

    1998-03-19

    As stars which have planetary systems evolve along the red giant branch and expand, they interact with the close planets. The planets deposit angular momentum and energy into the red giant stars' envelopes, both of which are likely to enhance mass loss on the red giant branch. The enhanced mass loss causes the star to become bluer as it turns to the horizontal branch. I propose that the presence of planetary systems, through this mechanism, can explain some anomalies in horizontal branch morphologies. In particular, planetary systems may be related to the ``second parameter'', which determines the distribution of horizontal branch stars on the Hertzsprung-Russel diagram. The proposed scenario predicts that surviving massive planets or brown dwarfs orbit many of the extreme blue horizontal branch stars, at orbital periods of tens days.

  10. Nondestructive assay of boxed radioactive waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gilles, W.P.; Roberts, R.J.; Jasen, W.G.

    1992-12-01

    This paper describes the problems related to the nondestructive assay (NDA) of boxed radioactive waste at the Hanford Site and how Westinghouse Hanford company (WHC) is solving the problems. The waste form and radionuclide content are described. The characteristics of the combined neutron and gamma-based measurement system are described.

  11. Safety evaluation for packaging CPC metal boxes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Romano, T.

    1995-05-15

    This Safety Evaluation for Packaging (SEP) provides authorization for the use of Container Products Corporation (CPC) metal boxes, as described in this document, for the interarea shipment of radioactive contaminated equipment and debris for storage in the Central Waste Complex (CWC) or T Plant located in the 200 West Area. Authorization is granted until November 30, 1995. The CPC boxes included in this SEP were originally procured as US Department of Transportation (DOT) Specification 7A Type A boxes. A review of the documentation provided by the manufacturer revealed the documentation did not adequately demonstrate compliance to the 4 ft drop test requirement of 49 CFR 173.465(c). Preparation of a SEP is necessary to document the equivalent safety of the onsite shipment in lieu of meeting DOT packaging requirements until adequate documentation is received. The equivalent safety of the shipment is based on the fact that the radioactive contents consist of contaminated equipment and debris which are not dispersible. Each piece is wrapped in two layers of no less than 4 mil plastic prior to being placed in the box which has an additional 10 mil liner. Pointed objects and sharp edges are padded to prevent puncture of the plastic liner and wrapping.

  12. MD Simulation Study of the Influence of Branch Content on Relaxation and Crystallization of Branched Polyethylene Chains with Uniform Branch Distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hussein, Ibnelwaleed A.

    of Branched Polyethylene Chains with Uniform Branch Distribution I. A. HUSSEIN, B. F. ABU-SHARKH* Department-density polyethylene (LLDPE) chains with different levels of branch content (BC), ranging from 10 to 80 branches/1000 C words: MD simulation, Polyethylene, branch content, chain conformation, radius of gyration

  13. Product realization of the 2.007 control box

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Wey-Jiun

    2006-01-01

    A second generation control box using frequency hopping spread spectrum radio was designed and built for use in the Spring 2006 offering of 2.007 Design and Manufacturing I. A third generation control box that could hold ...

  14. White-Box Security Notions for Symmetric Encryption Schemes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR)

    in the last decade. Several white-box implementations of standard block-ciphers (DES, AES) have been proposed of a cryptosystem, cryptographers consider attack sce- narios where an adversary is only given a black-box access

  15. Updated 7-11 Elliott B. Branch

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Updated 7-11 Elliott B. Branch Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Navy (Acquisition and Procurement) Office of the Assistant Secretary of the Navy Elliott B. Branch is the Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Navy (Acquisition and Procurement) in the Office of the Assistant Secretary of the Navy (Research

  16. Effects of K-Reactor pre-operational cold flow testing on total suspended solids in Pen Branch

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilde, E.W.

    1991-12-01

    Total suspended solids (TSS) levels were monitored by SRL Environmental Sciences personnel at two locations in the Pen Branch Creek system in conjunction with K Reactor cold flow (pump) testing required as part of the reactor restart effort. The TSS data were compared with flow and rainfall data collected simultaneously in an effort to obtain insight on the suspension and movement for particulate material in the Pen Branch system in response to natural and operational causes. Pump testing clearly caused higher TSS levels at the two sampling locations. The artificially elevated TSS levels were more pronounced at a sampling location near the reactor than at a sampling location farther downstream. Although the environmental data provided by this study were obtained and used exclusively for process control and research purposes, rather than for formal regulatory compliance (i.e. NPDES monitoring), the TSS levels determined by the comprehensive testing were compared with NPDES limits required at various SRS outfalls. TSS values in Pen Branch were seldom in excess of these limits. Because of the relatively few times that TSS values at the two sampling locations exceeded typical'' NPDES limits, and the fact that occasional relatively high TSS values could clearly be solely attributed to rainfall, it was concluded that no major adverse environmental impacts were caused to the Pen Branch system as a result of the K-Reactor pre-operational pump testing.

  17. Effects of K-Reactor pre-operational cold flow testing on total suspended solids in Pen Branch

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilde, E.W.

    1991-12-01

    Total suspended solids (TSS) levels were monitored by SRL Environmental Sciences personnel at two locations in the Pen Branch Creek system in conjunction with K Reactor cold flow (pump) testing required as part of the reactor restart effort. The TSS data were compared with flow and rainfall data collected simultaneously in an effort to obtain insight on the suspension and movement for particulate material in the Pen Branch system in response to natural and operational causes. Pump testing clearly caused higher TSS levels at the two sampling locations. The artificially elevated TSS levels were more pronounced at a sampling location near the reactor than at a sampling location farther downstream. Although the environmental data provided by this study were obtained and used exclusively for process control and research purposes, rather than for formal regulatory compliance (i.e. NPDES monitoring), the TSS levels determined by the comprehensive testing were compared with NPDES limits required at various SRS outfalls. TSS values in Pen Branch were seldom in excess of these limits. Because of the relatively few times that TSS values at the two sampling locations exceeded ``typical`` NPDES limits, and the fact that occasional relatively high TSS values could clearly be solely attributed to rainfall, it was concluded that no major adverse environmental impacts were caused to the Pen Branch system as a result of the K-Reactor pre-operational pump testing.

  18. EA-1978: Sand Creek Winds, McCone County, Montana

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Western Area Power Administration (Western) is preparing an EA to analyze the potential environmental impacts of the proposed Sand Creek Winds Project, a 75-MW wind farm between the towns of Circle and Wolf Point in McCone County, Montana. The proposed wind farm would interconnect to Western’s existing Wolf Point to Circle 115-kV transmission line approximately 18 miles north of Wolf Point.

  19. Pebble Creek, Florida: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland:NPIProtectio Program |ViewIllinois: Energy ResourcesPebble Creek, Florida:

  20. Rehabilitate Newsome Creek Watershed, 2007-2008 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bransford, Stephanie [Nez Perce Tribe Fisheries/Watershed Program

    2009-05-01

    The Nez Perce Tribe Department of Fisheries Resource Management, Watershed Division approaches watershed restoration with a ridge-top to ridgetop approach. The Nez Perce Tribe (NPT) and the Nez Perce National Forest (NPNF) have formed a partnership in completing watershed restoration activities, and through this partnership more work is accomplished by sharing funding and resources in our effort. The Nez Perce Tribe began watershed restoration projects within the Newsome Creek watershed of the South Fork Clearwater River in 1997. Progress has been made in restoring the watershed through road decommissioning and culvert replacement. Starting in FY 2001 and continuing into the present, a major stream restoration effort on the mainstem of Newsome Creek has been pursued. From completing a watershed assessment to a feasibility study of 4 miles of mainstem rehabilitation to carrying that forward into NEPA and a final design, we will begin the effort of restoring the mainstem channel of Newsome Creek to provide spawning and rearing habitat for anadromous and resident fish species. Roads have been surveyed and prioritized for removal or improvement as well as culverts being prioritized for replacement to accommodate fish passage throughout the watershed.

  1. Islais Creek reinterpreted: An exploration of restoration designs in the urbanized context of San Francisco

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Griffith, Lucas A

    2006-01-01

    Creek: From Stream to Sewer". 2006. narrative on waterbackbone to a combined sewer system located underground inThis submerged combined sewer system persists today as

  2. Hydrologic diversity in Santa Cruz mountain creeks and implications for steelhead population survival

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peterson, Michael

    2012-01-01

    diversity in Santa Cruz mountain creeks and implications foroccurring in the Santa Cruz mountains and outlets in andto compare Santa Cruz mountain watershed responses to a

  3. ORIGINAL PAPER Functional coordination between branch hydraulic properties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Malhi, Yadvinder

    ORIGINAL PAPER Functional coordination between branch hydraulic properties and leaf functional coordination between branch hydraulic properties and leaf functional traits among nine miombo woodlands canopy the question: are branch hydraulic properties coordinated with leaf functional traits linked to plant drought

  4. Software branch prediction via inter-procedural path profiling 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thoppae, Mothi M

    2002-01-01

    . Several authors have suggested ways of predicting the direction of conditional branches with hardware that uses the history of previous branches. The branches are predicted statically, which occurs during compile time, or dynamically, which occurs during...

  5. FY 1990 Applied Sciences Branch annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keyes, B.M.; Dippo, P.C.

    1991-11-01

    The Applied Sciences Branch actively supports the advancement of DOE/SERI goals for the development and implementation of the solar photovoltaic technology. The primary focus of the laboratories is to provide state-of-the-art analytical capabilities for materials and device characterization and fabrication. The branch houses a comprehensive facility which is capable of providing information on the full range of photovoltaic components. A major objective of the branch is to aggressively pursue collaborative research with other government laboratories, universities, and industrial firms for the advancement of photovoltaic technologies. Members of the branch disseminate research findings to the technical community in publications and presentations. This report contains information on surface and interface analysis, materials characterization, development, electro-optical characterization module testing and performance, surface interactions and FTIR spectroscopy.

  6. Hadronic ?Z box corrections in Møller scattering

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hall, Nathan L.; Blunden, Peter G.; Melnitchouk, Wally; Thomas, Anthony W.; Young, Ross D.

    2014-04-01

    The possibility of measuring the parity-violating asymmetry in Moller scattering with sufficient accuracy to determine sin2?W to 0.1% offers a complementary path to the discovery of new physics to that followed at high energy colliders. We present a new calculation of the ?Z box contribution to parity-violating electron-proton scattering, which constitutes an important uncertainty in computing the background to this process. We show that while the ?Z correction grows rapidly with energy, it can be relatively well constrained by data from parity-violating inelastic scattering and parton distribution functions.

  7. Unlocking the Mysteries of the Bounding Box 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Caldwell, Douglas R.

    2005-08-29

    ,50). This bounding box has a width of 360 degrees, rather than 20 degrees, exaggerating by eighteen times the width of the Boxtopia. The Global Gotchas can be clearly seen in Figure 3, where Russia, the United States, Kiribati, Fiji, New Zealand... Bounding Rectangle," MiMi.hu, http://en.mimi.hu/gis/ Page 18 minimum_bounding_rectangle.html 2. Open GIS Consortium, Inc., OpenGIS? Geography Markup Language (GML) Implementation Specification, OGC 02-023r4, Version 3.0, January 29, 2003. https://portal...

  8. Microbial production of wax esters from highly branched alkanes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bogan, William W.; Sullivan, Wendy R.; Paterek, James R.

    2005-02-01

    A microbial culture and method for producing wax esters using highly branched alkanes. In accordance with one embodiment, the highly branched alkane is squalane.

  9. Remedial investigation/feasibility study for the Clinch River/Poplar Creek operable unit. Volume 1. Main text

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-09-01

    This is the combined Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study Report for the Clinch River/Poplar Crack (CR/PC) Operable Unit (OU). The CR/PC OU is located in Anderson and Roane Counties, Tennessee and consists of the Clinch River and several of its embayments in Melton Hill and Watts Bar Reservoirs. These waters have received hazardous substances released over a period of 50 years from the US Department of Energy`s Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), a National Priority List site established under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act. A remedial investigation has been conducted to determine the current nature and extent of any contamination and to assess the resulting risk to human health and the environment. The feasibility study evaluates remedial action alternatives to identify any that are feasible for implementation and that would effectively reduce risk. Historical studies had indicated that current problems would likely include {sup 137}Cs in sediment of the Clinch River, mercury in sediment and fish of Poplar Creek and PCBs and pesticides in fish from throughout the OU. Peak releases of mercury and {sup 137}Cs occurred over 35 years ago, and current releases are low. Past releases of PCBs from the ORR are poorly quantified, and current releases are difficult to quantify because levels are so low. The site characterization focused on contaminants in surface water, sediment, and biota. Contaminants in surface water were all found to be below Ambient Water Quality Criteria. Other findings included the following: elevated metals including cesium 137 and mercury in McCoy Branch sediments; PCBs and chlordane elevated in several fish species, presenting the only major human health risk, significant ecological risks in Poplar Creek but not in the Clinch River.

  10. Harmonic oscillator in a one-dimensional box

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paolo Amore; Francisco M. Fernandez

    2009-07-31

    We study a harmonic molecule confined to a one--dimensional box with impenetrable walls. We explicitly consider the symmetry of the problem for the cases of different and equal masses. We propose suitable variational functions and compare the approximate energies given by the variation method and perturbation theory with accurate numerical ones for a wide range of values of the box length. We analyze the limits of small and large box size.

  11. Independent External Peer Review for the Clear Creek, Texas Flood Risk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Independent External Peer Review for the Clear Creek, Texas Flood Risk Management General Institute 505 King Avenue Columbus, OH 43201 for U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Flood Risk Management Planning SERVICE (STAS) on Final Independent External Peer Review Report for Clear Creek, Texas Flood Risk

  12. Wolf Creek Nuclear Operating Corporation | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-EnhancingEtGeorgia:Illinois:Wizard Power Pty Ltd Jump to: navigation, searchWolf Creek

  13. Walnut Creek, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-EnhancingEt Al.,Turin,Village ofWaialua,Wallington, New Jersey: EnergyCreek,

  14. Todd Creek, Colorado: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-EnhancingEt Al., 2013)Open EnergyTinoxOpenStatutes Jump to:bSouth Dakota: EnergyCreek,

  15. Turtle Creek, Pennsylvania: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-EnhancingEt Al.,Turin, New York: Energy Resources Jump to:Georgia:Turpin Hills,Creek,

  16. Hunters Creek, Florida: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas: Energy Resources JumpNewTexas: EnergyHunterdon County, New Jersey: EnergyCreek,

  17. Fritz Creek, Alaska: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View New PagesSustainable Urban TransportFortistar LLCNorthIdaho: EnergyTexas:Maine:FrioCreek,

  18. Grape Creek, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View New PagesSustainableGlynn County, Georgia:Oregon: Energy Resources JumpSouth,Grape Creek,

  19. Dow Chemical Company-Oyster Creek VIII | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, Alabama (UtilityInstrumentsArea (DOEDixmont,Missouri:Dow Chemical Company-Oyster Creek

  20. East Basin Creek Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, AlabamaETEC GmbH Jump to: navigation, searchEarthcare Products JumpEast Basin Creek

  1. Pigeon Creek, Ohio: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland:NPIProtectio1975) | Open EnergyPhoenicia,Creek, Ohio: Energy Resources Jump to:

  2. Smith Creek Valley Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EIS ReportEurope GmbH JumpSlough Heat andCreek Geothermal Project

  3. Ballenger Creek, Maryland: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EAandAmminex AAustriaBiofuels BrasilMaine: EnergyBallenger Creek, Maryland:

  4. Barton Creek, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EAandAmminexInformation Bartholomew County,Creek, Texas: Energy

  5. Coal Creek, Colorado: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, Alabama (Utility Company) JumpIowa: Energy ResourcesCreek, Colorado: Energy Resources

  6. Hickory Creek, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource History View NewGuam: Energyarea, CaliforniaHess Retail NaturalAreas | OpenCreek,

  7. LaCreek Electric Assn, Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource History ViewInformation Actions(Redirected fromAvoidtools <Riviera,LaCreek

  8. MHK Projects/Coal Creek Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource HistoryScenarios Towards 2050 Jump to:Projects/AlaskaInformationCreek Project

  9. Birch Creek Village Elec Util | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop IncIowaWisconsin:Pontiac Biomass Facility Jump to:Biola,BiomassBiomassCreek

  10. Deer Creek Hot Spring Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoopButtePower VenturesInformation9) WindGridDeepi has not created anyDeer Creek

  11. Cantua Creek, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoopButte County,Camilla, Georgia: Energy Resources JumpCanbyCantua Creek, California:

  12. Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: ClipperCreek, Inc. | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematics And Statistics » USAJobs SearchAMERICA'SEnergy SafelyEnergy ClipperCreek, Inc. Workplace

  13. Fermilab | Tritium at Fermilab | Kress Creek Aerial View

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverse (Journal Article) | SciTechSubmitted MoreTraffic Safety TrafficKress Creek

  14. THE WILDCAT-SAN PABLO CREEK FLOOD CONTROL PROJECT AND ITS IMPLICATIONS FOR THE DESIGN OF ENVIRONMENTALLY SENSITIVE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    THE WILDCAT-SAN PABLO CREEK FLOOD CONTROL PROJECT AND ITS IMPLICATIONS FOR THE DESIGN type of joint federal and local flood control project on Wildcat and San Pablo Creeks in North Richmond on Wildcat and San Pablo Creeks in North Richmond, California, which was designed for the com- plementary

  15. Boiling Water at Hot Creek--The Dangerous and Dynamic Thermal Springs in California's Long Valley Caldera

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torgersen, Christian

    Boiling Water at Hot Creek--The Dangerous and Dynamic Thermal Springs in California's Long Valley. Because of this danger, the U.S. Forest Service has had to close parts of the Hot Creek Geologic Site the region. The attractions of Hot Creek, however, also harbor danger. The locations, dis- charge rates

  16. APPLYING CACHING TO TWO-LEVEL ADAPTIVE BRANCH PREDICTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vintan, Lucian N.

    - 1 - APPLYING CACHING TO TWO-LEVEL ADAPTIVE BRANCH PREDICTION EGAN, C., STEVEN, G. B., SHIM, W of the Camera-ready paper. #12;- 2 - APPLYING CACHING TO TWO-LEVEL ADAPTIVE BRANCH PREDICTION ABSTRACT During the 1990s Two-level Adaptive Branch Predictors were developed to meet the requirement for accurate branch

  17. Asotin Creek Model Watershed Plan: Asotin County, Washington, 1995.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Browne, Dave

    1995-04-01

    The Northwest Power Planning Council completed its ``Strategy for Salmon'' in 1992. This is a plan, composed of four specific elements,designed to double the present production of 2.5 million salmon in the Columbia River watershed. These elements have been called the ``four H's'': (1) improve harvest management; (2) improve hatcheries and their production practices; (3) improve survival at hydroelectric dams; and (4) improve and protect fish habitat. The Asotin Creek Model Watershed Plan is the first to be developed in Washington State which is specifically concerned with habitat protection and restoration for salmon and trout. The plan is consistent with the habitat element of the ``Strategy for Salmon''. Asotin Creek is similar in many ways to other salmon-bearing streams in the Snake River system. Its watershed has been significantly impacted by human activities and catastrophic natural events, such as floods and droughts. It supports only remnant salmon and trout populations compared to earlier years. It will require protection and restoration of its fish habitat and riparian corridor in order to increase its salmonid productivity.

  18. Stream sediment detailed geochemical survey for Date Creek Basin, Arizona

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Butz, T.R.; Tieman, D.J.; Grimes, J.G.; Bard, C.S.; Helgerson, R.N.; Pritz, P.M.

    1980-06-30

    Results of the Date Creek Basin detailed geochemical survey are reported. Field and laboratory data are reported for 239 stream sediment samples. Statistical and areal distributions of uranium and possible uranium-related variables are displayed. A generalized geologic map of the area is provided, and pertinent geologic factors which may be of significance in evaluating the potential for uranium mineralization are briefly discussed. Based on stream sediment geochemical data, significant concentrations of uranium are restricted to the Anderson Mine area. The 84th percentile concentrations of U-FL, U-NT, and U-FL/U-NT combined with low thorium/U-NT values reflect increased mobility and enrichment of uranium in the carbonate host rocks of that area. Elements characteristically associated with the uranium mineralization include lithium and arsenic. No well defined diffusion halos suggesting outliers of similar uranium mineralization were observed from the stream sediment data in other areas of the Date Creek Basin. Significant concentrations of U-FL or U-NT found outside the mine area are generally coincident with low U-FL/U-NT values and high concentrations of zirconium, titanium, and phosphorus. This suggests that the uranium is related to a resistate mineral assemblage derived from surrounding crystalline igneous and metamorphic rocks.

  19. Optimal orientation in branched cytoskeletal networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. A. Quint; J. M. Schwarz

    2011-02-22

    Actin cytoskeletal protrusions in crawling cells, or lamellipodia, exhibit various morphological properties such as two characteristic peaks in the distribution of filament orientation with respect to the leading edge. To understand these properties, using the dendritic nucleation model as a basis for cytoskeletal restructuring, a kinetic-population model with orientational-dependent branching (birth) and capping (death) is constructed and analyzed. Optimizing for growth yields a relation between the branch angle and filament orientation that explains the two characteristic peaks. The model also exhibits a subdominant population that allows for more accurate modeling of recent measurements of filamentous actin density along the leading edge of lamellipodia in keratocytes. Finally, we explore the relationship between orientational and spatial organization of filamentous actin in lamellipodia and address recent observations of a prevalence of overlapping filaments to branched filaments---a finding that is claimed to be in contradiction with the dendritic nucleation model.

  20. Revisiting the BGE Attack on a White-Box AES Implementation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR)

    . White-box cryptography aims to protect the secret key of a cipher in an environment in which-box implementation of AES [5]. White-box cryptography aims to protect the confidentiality of the secret key device, or a set-top box. #12;In 2004, Billet et al. [3] presented an attack on the white-box AES

  1. BlindBox: Deep Packet Inspection over Encrypted Traffic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR)

    BlindBox: Deep Packet Inspection over Encrypted Traffic Justine Sherry UC Berkeley Chang Lan UC middleboxes perform deep packet inspection (DPI), a set of useful tasks which examine packet payloads that simultaneously provides both of these properties. The approach of Blind- Box is to perform the deep

  2. THE CLE-2000 TOOL-BOX Institut de genie nucleaire

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meunier, Michel

    THE CLE-2000 TOOL-BOX Robert ROY Institut de g´enie nucl´eaire ´Ecole Polytechnique de Montr´eal e all over the world. Assuming a basic definition for the free-format procedure, an efficient CLE- 2000 codes, without recoding or defining new modules. The CLE-2000 tool-box is described in this report

  3. A solar box cooker for mass production in East Africa

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Funk, P.A.; Wilcke, W.F.

    1992-12-31

    A solar box cooker produced in Tanzania, East Africa with indigenous materials is described. When compared to a commercially produced glass and cardboard one, it was found to perform as well. Heat transfer through each major component of the cooker is presented. The smallest losses were through the walls of the box. The greatest losses were observed in the cover system.

  4. LightBox -Exploring Interaction Modalities with Colored Light

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of light to very subtle animations, transitions and dimmed lighting effects. Implementation LightBox is housed in an aluminum suitcase measuring 48x38x25cm. The lid of the suitcase contains a panel of 12x12 Design. Figure 1. An animated lighting sequence visualized on the hi-power LEDs of LightBox #12

  5. Matrix Power S-Box Construction Eligijus Sakalauskasa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR)

    Matrix Power S-Box Construction Eligijus Sakalauskasa and Kestutis Luksysb Department of Applied.Sakalauskas@ktu.lt b Kestutis.Luksys@ktu.lt Abstract The new symmetric cipher S-box construction based on matrix power function is presented. The matrix consisting of plain data bit strings is combined with three round key

  6. On Virtual Grey Box Obfuscation for General Circuits Nir Bitansky

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR)

    § Omer Paneth¶ July 18, 2014 Abstract An obfuscator O is Virtual Grey Box (VGB) for a class C of circuits unbounded computational resources and polynomially many oracle queries to C. VGB obfuscation is often of interest VGB is equivalent to full-fledged Virtual Black Box obfuscation. We investigate the feasibility

  7. Water Conservation Study for Manastash Creek Water Users, Kittias County, Washington, Final Report 2002.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Montgomery Watson Harza (Firm)

    2002-12-31

    Manastash Creek is tributary of the Yakima River and is located southwest and across the Yakima River from the City of Ellensburg. The creek drains mountainous terrain that ranges in elevation from 2,000 feet to over 5,500 feet and is primarily snowmelt fed, with largest flows occurring in spring and early summer. The creek flows through a narrow canyon until reaching a large, open plain that slopes gently toward the Yakima River and enters the main stem of the Yakima River at river mile 154.5. This area, formed by the alluvial fan of the Creek as it leaves the canyon, is the subject of this study. The area is presently dominated by irrigated agriculture, but development pressures are evident as Ellensburg grows and develops as an urban center. Since the mid to late nineteenth century when irrigated agriculture was established in a significant manner in the Yakima River Basin, Manastash Creek has been used to supply irrigation water for farming in the area. Adjudicated water rights dating back to 1871 for 4,465 acres adjacent to Manastash Creek allow appropriation of up to 26,273 acre-feet of creek water for agricultural irrigation and stock water. The diversion of water from Manastash Creek for irrigation has created two main problems for fisheries. They are low flows or dewatered reaches of Manastash Creek and fish passage barriers at the irrigation diversion dams. The primary goal of this study, as expressed by Yakama Nation and BPA, is to reestablish safe access in tributaries of the Yakima River by removing physical barriers and unscreened diversions and by adding instream flow where needed for fisheries. The goal expressed by irrigators who would be affected by these projects is to support sustainable and profitable agricultural use of land that currently uses Manastash Creek water for irrigation. This study provides preliminary costs and recommendations for a range of alternative projects that will partially or fully meet the goal of establishing safe access for fisheries in Manastash Creek by reducing or eliminating diversions and eliminating fish passage barriers. Further study and design will be necessary to more fully develop the alternatives, evaluate their environmental benefits and impacts and determine the effect on Manastash Creek water users. Those studies will be needed to determine which alternative has the best combination of benefits and costs, and meets the goal of the Manastash Creek water users.

  8. Johnson Creek Artificial Propagation and Enhancement Project Operations and Maintenance Program; Brood Year 1998: Johnson Creek Chinook Salmon Supplementation, Biennial Report 1998-2000.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daniel, Mitch; Gebhards, John

    2003-05-01

    The Nez Perce Tribe, through funding provided by the Bonneville Power Administration, has implemented a small scale chinook salmon supplementation program on Johnson Creek, a tributary in the South Fork of the Salmon River, Idaho. The Johnson Creek Artificial Propagation Enhancement project was established to enhance the number of threatened Snake River summer chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) returning to Johnson Creek through artificial propagation. Adult chinook salmon collection and spawning began in 1998. A total of 114 fish were collected from Johnson Creek and 54 fish (20 males and 34 females) were retained for Broodstock. All broodstock were transported to Lower Snake River Compensation Plan's South Fork Salmon River adult holding and spawning facility, operated by the Idaho Department of Fish and Game. The remaining 60 fish were released to spawn naturally. An estimated 155,870 eggs from Johnson Creek chinook spawned at the South Fork Salmon River facility were transported to the McCall Fish Hatchery for rearing. Average fecundity for Johnson Creek females was 4,871. Approximately 20,500 eggs from females with high levels of Bacterial Kidney Disease were culled. This, combined with green-egg to eyed-egg survival of 62%, resulted in about 84,000 eyed eggs produced in 1998. Resulting juveniles were reared indoors at the McCall Fish Hatchery in 1999. All of these fish were marked with Coded Wire Tags and Visual Implant Elastomer tags and 8,043 were also PIT tagged. A total of 78,950 smolts were transported from the McCall Fish Hatchery and released directly into Johnson Creek on March 27, 28, 29, and 30, 2000.

  9. Couse/Tenmile Creeks Watershed Project Implementation : 2007 Conservtion Projects. [2007 Habitat Projects Completed].

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Asotin County Conservation District

    2008-12-10

    The Asotin County Conservation District (ACCD) is the primary entity coordinating habitat projects on private lands within Asotin County watersheds. The Tenmile Creek watershed is a 42 square mile tributary to the Snake River, located between Asotin Creek and the Grande Ronde River. Couse Creek watershed is a 24 square mile tributary to the Snake River, located between Tenmile Creek and the Grande Ronde River. Both watersheds are almost exclusively under private ownership. The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife has documented wild steelhead and rainbow/redband trout spawning and rearing in Tenmile Creek and Couse Creek. The project also provides Best Management Practice (BMP) implementation throughout Asotin County, but the primary focus is for the Couse and Tenmile Creek watersheds. The ACCD has been working with landowners, Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), Washington State Conservation Commission (WCC), Natural Resource Conservation Service (NRCS), Farm Service Agency (FSA), Salmon Recovery Funding Board (SRFB), Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), U.S. Forest Service, Pomeroy Ranger District (USFS), Nez Perce Tribe (NPT), Washington Department of Ecology (DOE), National Marine Fisheries Service (NOAA Fisheries), and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) to address habitat projects in Asotin County. The Asotin Subbasin Plan identified priority areas and actions for ESA listed streams within Asotin County. Couse Creek and Tenmile Creek are identified as protection areas in the plan. The Conservation Reserve Enhancement Program (CREP) has been successful in working with landowners to protect riparian areas throughout Asotin County. Funding from BPA and other agencies has also been instrumental in protecting streams throughout Asotin County by utilizing the ridge top to ridge top approach.

  10. Improved Measurement of the ??e? Branching Ratio

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aguilar-Arevalo, A.; Aoki, M.; Blecher, M.; Britton, D. I.; Bryman, D. A.; vom Bruch, D.; Chen, S.; Comfort, J.; Ding, M.; Doria, L.; et al

    2015-08-01

    A new measurement of the branching ratio Re/?=?(?+ ? e+? + ?+ ? e+??)/?(?+ ? ?+? + ?+??+??) resulted in Rexpe/?=[1.2344±0.0023(stat)±0.0019(syst)] x 10-4. This is in agreement with the standard model prediction and improves the test of electron-muon universality to the level of 0.1%.

  11. BUREAU OF COMMERCIAL BRANCH OF ECONOMICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    REPORT to the BUREAU OF COMMERCIAL FISHERIES on the BRANCH OF ECONOMICS Circular 173 UNITED STATES TO T HE BUREAU O:B-' ~ OM 11~ I ( I \\L FISHERIES ON THE BRr\\. O F ECONOMIC by James Crutchfield (Chai r was formed by the Bureau of Commercial Fisheries to review its economic program. The members of the committee

  12. Measurement of the D -> pipi branching fractions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ammar, Raymond G.; Ball, S.; Baringer, Philip S.; Coppage, Don; Copty, N.; Davis, Robin E. P.; Hancock, N.; Kelly, M.; Kwak, Nowhan; Lam, H.

    1993-09-01

    Using data from CLEO II at the Cornell Electron Storage Ring we provide a new measurement of the branching fraction for D0 --> pi+pi-, and we present the first measurements of D0 --> pi0pi0 and of D+ --> pi+pi0, which is due to an isospin changing...

  13. Campbell Creek Research Homes FY 2012 Annual Performance Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gehl, Anthony C; Munk, Jeffrey D; Jackson, Roderick K; Boudreaux, Philip R; Khowailed, Gannate A

    2013-01-01

    The Campbell Creek project is funded and managed by the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) Technology Innovation, Energy Efficiency, Power Delivery & and Utilization Office. Technical support is provided under contract by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the Electric Power Research Institute.The project was designed to determine the relative energy efficiency of typical new home construction, energy efficiency retrofitting of existing homes, and high -performance new homes built from the ground up for energy efficiency. This project will compare three houses that represented the current construction practice as a base case (Builder House CC1); a modified house that could represent a major energy- efficient retrofit (Retrofit House CC2); and a house constructed from the ground up to be a high- performance home (High Performance House CC3). In order tTo enablehave a valid comparison, it was necessary to simulate occupancy in all three houses and heavily monitor the structural components and the energy usage by component. All three houses are two story, slab on grade, framed construction. CC1 and CC2 are approximately 2,400 square feet2. CC3 has a pantry option, that is primarily used as a mechanical equipment room, that adds approximately 100 square feet2. All three houses are all-electric (with the exception of a gas log fireplace that is not used during the testing), and use air-source heat pumps for heating and cooling. The three homes are located in Knoxville in the Campbell Creek Subdivision. CC1 and CC2 are next door to each other and CC3 is across the street and a couple of houses down. The energy data collected will be used to determine the benefits of retrofit packages and high -performance new home packages. There are over 300 channels of continuous energy performance and thermal comfort data collection in the houses (100 for each house). The data will also be used to evaluate the impact of energy -efficient upgrades ton the envelope, mechanical equipment, or demand -response options. Each retrofit will be evaluated incrementally, by both short -term measurements and computer modeling, using a calibrated model. This report is intended to document the comprehensive testing, data analysis, research, and findings within the January 2011 through October 2012 timeframe at the Campbell Creek research houses. The following sections will provide an in-depth assessment of the technology progression in each of the three research houses. A detailed assessment and evaluation of the energy performance of technologies tested will also be provided. Finally, lessons learned and concluding remarks will be highlighted.

  14. EA-1988: NFSC (Northwest Fisheries Science Center) Earthen Drainage Channel, Burley Creek Hatchery, Port Orchard, Washington

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), with DOE’s Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) as a cooperating agency, prepared an EA that assesses the potential environmental impacts of a NOAA Northwest Fisheries Science Center proposal to construct an earthen drainage channel at its Burley Creek Hatchery in Kitsap County, Washington. The project would facilitate increased discharge of treated effluent from the hatchery facility into the adjacent Burley Creek. BPA’s proposal is to fund the project. The project website is http://efw.bpa.gov/environmental_services/Document_Library/Burley_Creek/.

  15. Measure Guideline: Optimizing the Configuration of Flexible Duct Junction Boxes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beach, R.; Burdick, A.

    2014-03-01

    This measure guideline offers additional recommendations to heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) system designers for optimizing flexible duct, constant-volume HVAC systems using junction boxes within Air Conditioning Contractors of America (ACCA) Manual D guidance (Rutkowski, H. Manual D -- Residential Duct Systems, 3rd edition, Version 1.00. Arlington, VA: Air Conditioning Contractors of America, 2009.). IBACOS used computational fluid dynamics software to explore and develop guidance to better control the airflow effects of factors that may impact pressure losses within junction boxes among various design configurations (Beach, R., Prahl, D., and Lange, R. CFD Analysis of Flexible Duct Junction Box Design. Golden, CO: National Renewable Energy Laboratory, submitted for publication 2013). These recommendations can help to ensure that a system aligns more closely with the design and the occupants' comfort expectations. Specifically, the recommendations described herein show how to configure a rectangular box with four outlets, a triangular box with three outlets, metal wyes with two outlets, and multiple configurations for more than four outlets. Designers of HVAC systems, contractors who are fabricating junction boxes on site, and anyone using the ACCA Manual D process for sizing duct runs will find this measure guideline invaluable for more accurately minimizing pressure losses when using junction boxes with flexible ducts.

  16. White Oak Creek Watershed topographic map and related materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farrow, N.D.

    1981-04-01

    On March 22, 1978 a contract was let to Accu-Air Surveys, Inc., of Seymour, Indiana, to produce a topographic map of the White Oak Creek Watershed. Working from photography and ground control surveys, Accu-Air produced a map to ORNL's specifications. The map is in four sections (N.W., N.E., S.W., S.E.) at a scale of 1:2400. Contour intervals are 5 ft (1.5 m) with accented delineations every 25 ft (7.6 m). The scribe method was used for the finished map. Planimetric features, roads, major fence lines, drainage features, and tree lines are included. The ORNL grid is the primary coordinate system which is superimposed on the state plain coordinates.

  17. Sherman Creek Hatchery; 1995-1996 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Combs, Mitch [Washington Dept. of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA (United States). Hatcheries Program

    1997-01-01

    The Sherman Creek Hatchery (SCH) was designed to rear 1.7 million kokanee fry for acclimation and imprinting during the spring and early summer. Additionally, it was designed to trap all available returning adult kokanee during the fall for broodstock operations and evaluations. Since the start of this program, the operations of the SCH have been modified to better achieve program goals. These strategic changes have been the result of recommendations through the Lake Roosevelt Hatcheries Coordination Team (LRHCT) and were implemented to enhance imprinting, improve survival and operate the two kokanee facilities more effectively. The primary change has been to replace the kokanee fingerling program with a kokanee yearling (post smolt) program. The second significant change has been to rear 120,000 rainbow trout fingerling at SCH from July through October to enable the Spokane Tribal Hatchery (STH) to rear additional kokanee for the yearling program.

  18. Safeguards Approaches for Black Box Processes or Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diaz-Marcano, Helly; Gitau, Ernest TN; Hockert, John; Miller, Erin; Wylie, Joann

    2013-09-25

    The objective of this study is to determine whether a safeguards approach can be developed for “black box” processes or facilities. These are facilities where a State or operator may limit IAEA access to specific processes or portions of a facility; in other cases, the IAEA may be prohibited access to the entire facility. The determination of whether a black box process or facility is safeguardable is dependent upon the details of the process type, design, and layout; the specific limitations on inspector access; and the restrictions placed upon the design information that can be provided to the IAEA. This analysis identified the necessary conditions for safeguardability of black box processes and facilities.

  19. An Archaeological Survey for the Turkey Creek Trail Project in Brazos County, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, William

    2015-07-15

    An archaeological survey of the proposed Turkey Creek Trail project in central Brazos County, Texas was performed by Brazos Valley Research Associates (BVRA) in July of 2004 under Archeology Permit 3474. The state agencies associated...

  20. Tribal Decision-Making and Intercultural Relations: Crow Creek Agency, 1863-1885

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Galler, Robert

    2002-03-01

    Lower Yanktonai residents experienced great change during the first two decades at the Crow Creek agency in Dakota Territory. This essay traces the evolution of relations between tribal members, federal agents, and ...

  1. HYDROGEOLOGIC CONSEQUENCES OF THE MODIFIED IN-SITU RETORTING PROCESS, PICEANCE CREEK BASIN, COLORADO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mehran, M.

    2014-01-01

    Water Management in Oil Shale Mining," Volumes I and II,and Technology of Oil Shale," Ann Arbor Science PublishersRequirements at an Oil Shale Surface Mine, Piceance Creek

  2. ORGANIC MATTER DISTRIBUTION AND TURNOVER ALONG A GRADIENT FROM FOREST TO TIDAL CREEK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lawrence, Deborah

    i ORGANIC MATTER DISTRIBUTION AND TURNOVER ALONG A GRADIENT FROM FOREST TO TIDAL CREEK A Thesis. A nested plot design was used to harvest vegetation, obtain soil cores, and collect quantitative data... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... .18 Qualitative Vegetation Analysis

  3. ORNL/TM-2014/666 Final Review of the Campbell Creek

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Xiaorui "Ray"

    ORNL/TM-2014/666 Final Review of the Campbell Creek Demonstrations Showcased by Tennessee Valley or reflect those of the United States Government or any agency thereof. #12;ORNL/TM-2014/666 Energy

  4. Geoarchaeology of the Burntwood Creek Rockshelter (14RW418), Northwest Kansas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murphy, Laura Renee

    2008-07-31

    The Burntwood Creek rockshelter (14RW418) in northwestern Kansas is a large, amphitheater-shaped alcove formed in the Ogallala Formation, a late Miocene/Pliocene-age lithostratigraphic unit underlying the High Plains ...

  5. Extending Correlation in Branch Prediction Schemes Lucian N. VINTAN*)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vintan, Lucian N.

    . A classic Branch Target Cache (BTC) [Hen96] achieves these objectives by holding the following information to access the BTC in parallel with the normal instruction fetch process. As a result each branch

  6. Branch content of metallocene polyethylene Ramnath Ramachandran, Gregory Beaucage*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beaucage, Gregory

    Branch content of metallocene polyethylene Ramnath Ramachandran, Gregory Beaucage* and Amit catalyzed polyethylene (PE). A novel scaling approach is applied to determine the mole fraction branch solutions of metallocene polyethylene samples, to quantify the LCB content in polymers previously studied

  7. Biomechanical consequences of branching in flexible wave-swept macroalgae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martone, Patrick T.

    Biomechanical consequences of branching in flexible wave-swept macroalgae Samuel Starko1,2 *, Barry Key words: biomechanics, dislodgement, drag, evolution, hydrodynamics, intertidal, macroalgae. Branching has clear biomechanical consequences, increasing drag and the need for increased attachment

  8. Titanha Alloy Wwfacturbi: L'ivinien Hatioml Lead Camparw Box...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Llcm No. c- 3u3 xmAtdr cktebor 24, lp55 Titanha Alloy Wwfacturbi: L'ivinien Hatioml Lead Camparw Box C, Widgr, Station Uagara F&lb, New York Attention; &. steprmn F, Ijrbw...

  9. Little Boxes: High Tech and the Silicon Valley

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crawford, Margaret

    2013-01-01

    Immigrant Workers and the High-Tech Global Economy (Newin a clerical position at high-tech firms like Varian. TheCrawford Little Boxes High-Tech and the Silicon Valley The

  10. Lab Ahead of Schedule Processing Waste in Large Boxes

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    LOS ALAMOS, N.M. – The TRU Waste Program at Los Alamos National Laboratory is currently two months ahead of schedule processing and repackaging waste stored in large fiberglass-reinforced boxes (FRPs).

  11. GREEN SUPERCOMPUTING IN A DESKTOP BOX

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HSU, CHUNG-HSING; FENG, WU-CHUN; CHING, AVERY

    2007-01-17

    The computer workstation, introduced by Sun Microsystems in 1982, was the tool of choice for scientists and engineers as an interactive computing environment for the development of scientific codes. However, by the mid-1990s, the performance of workstations began to lag behind high-end commodity PCs. This, coupled with the disappearance of BSD-based operating systems in workstations and the emergence of Linux as an open-source operating system for PCs, arguably led to the demise of the workstation as we knew it. Around the same time, computational scientists started to leverage PCs running Linux to create a commodity-based (Beowulf) cluster that provided dedicated computer cycles, i.e., supercomputing for the rest of us, as a cost-effective alternative to large supercomputers, i.e., supercomputing for the few. However, as the cluster movement has matured, with respect to cluster hardware and open-source software, these clusters have become much more like their large-scale supercomputing brethren - a shared (and power-hungry) datacenter resource that must reside in a machine-cooled room in order to operate properly. Consequently, the above observations, when coupled with the ever-increasing performance gap between the PC and cluster supercomputer, provide the motivation for a 'green' desktop supercomputer - a turnkey solution that provides an interactive and parallel computing environment with the approximate form factor of a Sun SPARCstation 1 'pizza box' workstation. In this paper, they present the hardware and software architecture of such a solution as well as its prowess as a developmental platform for parallel codes. In short, imagine a 12-node personal desktop supercomputer that achieves 14 Gflops on Linpack but sips only 185 watts of power at load, resulting in a performance-power ratio that is over 300% better than their reference SMP platform.

  12. Executive Branch Management Scorecard | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12, 2015 InfographiclighbulbsDepartmentDeveloping11,Branch Management Scorecard

  13. Measurements of $\\Xi_c^{+}$ Branching Ratios

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Link, J M; Anjos, J C; Bediaga, I; Göbel, C; Magnin, J; Massafferri, A; De Miranda, J M; Pepe, I M; Polycarpo, E; Dos Reis, A C; Carrillo, S; Casimiro, E; Cuautle, E; Sánchez-Hernández, A; Uribe, C; Vázquez, F; Agostino, L; Cinquini, L; Cumalat, J P; O'Reilly, B; Segoni, I; Wahl, M; Butler, J N; Cheung, H W K; Chiodini, G; Gaines, I; Garbincius, P H; Garren, L A; Gottschalk, E E; Kasper, P H; Kreymer, A E; Kutschke, R; Wang, M; Benussi, L; Bertani, M; Bianco, S; Fabbri, Franco Luigi; Zallo, A; Reyes, M; Cawlfield, C; Kim, D Y; Rahimi, A; Wiss, J; Gardner, R; Kryemadhi, A; Chung, Y S; Kang, J S; Ko, B R; Kwak, J W; Lee, K B; Cho, K; Park, H; Alimonti, G; Barberis, S; Boschini, M; Cerutti, A; D'Angelo, P; Di Corato, M; Dini, P; Edera, L; Erba, S; Giammarchi, M; Inzani, P; Leveraro, F; Malvezzi, S; Menasce, D; Mezzadri, M; Moroni, L; Pedrini, D; Pontoglio, C; Prelz, F; Rovere, M; Sala, S; Davenport, T F; Arena, V; Boca, G; Bonomi, G; Gianini, G; Liguori, G; Lopes-Pegna, D; Merlo, M M; Pantea, D; Ratti, S P; Riccardi, C; Vitulo, P; Hernández, H; López, A M; Luiggi, E; Méndez, H; Paris, A; Quinones, J; Ramírez, J E; Zhang, Y; Wilson, J R; Handler, T; Mitchell, R; Engh, D; Hosack, M; Johns, W E; Nehring, M S; Sheldon, P D; Stenson, K; Vaandering, E W; Webster, M; Sheaff, M

    2003-01-01

    Using data collected by the fixed target Fermilab experiment FOCUS, we measure the branching ratios of the Cabibbo favored decays $\\Xi_c^+ \\to \\Sigma^+K^-\\pi^+$, $\\Xi_c^+ \\to \\Sigma^+ \\bar{K}^{*}(892)^0$, and $\\Xi_c^+ \\to \\Lambda^0K^-\\pi^+\\pi^+$ relative to $\\Xi_c^+ \\to \\Xi^-\\pi^+\\pi^+$ to be $0.91\\pm0.11\\pm0.04$, $0.78\\pm0.16\\pm0.06$, and $0.28\\pm0.06\\pm0.06$, respectively. We report the first observation of the Cabibbo suppressed decay $\\Xi_c^+ \\to \\Sigma^+K^+K^-$ and we measure the branching ratio relative to $\\Xi_c^+ \\to \\Sigma^+K^-\\pi^+$ to be $0.16\\pm0.06\\pm0.01$. We also set 90% confidence level upper limits for $\\Xi_c^+ \\to \\Sigma^+ \\phi$ and $\\Xi_c^+ \\to \\Xi^*(1690)^0(\\Sigma^+ K^-) K^+$ relative to $\\Xi_c^+ \\to \\Sigma^+K^-\\pi^+$ to be 0.12 and 0.05, respectively. We find an indication of the decays $\\Xi_c^+ \\to \\Omega^-K^{+}\\pi^+$ and $\\Xi_c^+ \\to \\Sigma^{*}(1385)^+ \\bar{K}^0$ and set 90% confidence level upper limits for the branching ratios with respect to $\\Xi_c^+ \\to \\Xi^-\\pi^+\\pi^+$ to be 0.12 a...

  14. Cold versus hot fusion deuterium branching ratios

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fox, H.; Bass, R.

    1995-12-31

    A major source of misunderstanding of the nature of cold nuclear fusion has been the expectation that the deuterium branching ratios occurring within a palladium lattice would be consistent with the gas-plasma branching ratios. This misunderstanding has led to the concept of the dead graduate student, the 1989`s feverish but fruitless search for neutron emissions from cold fusion reactors, and the follow-on condemnation of the new science of cold fusion. The experimental facts are that in a properly loaded palladium lattice, the deuterium fusion produces neutrons at little above background, a greatly less-than-expected production of tritium (the tritium desert), and substantially more helium-4 than is observed in hot plasma physics. The experimental evidence is now compelling (800 reports of success from 30 countries) that cold nuclear fusion is a reality, that the branching ratios are unexpected, and that a new science is struggling to be recognized. Commercialization of some types of cold fusion devices has already begun.

  15. Persistently laminar branched surfaces Ying-Qing Wu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Ying-Qing

    Persistently laminar branched surfaces Ying-Qing Wu Abstract We define sink marks for branched that a non 2-bridge Mon- tesinos knot K has a persistently laminar branched surface unless it is equivalent that there are many persistently laminar tangles. 1 Introduction Essential lamination plays an important role

  16. Dendrimers and methods of preparing same through proportionate branching

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, Yihua; Yue, Xuyi

    2015-09-15

    The present invention provides for monodispersed dendrimers having a core, branches and periphery ends, wherein the number of branches increases exponentially from the core to the periphery end and the length of the branches increases exponentially from the periphery end to the core, thereby providing for attachment of chemical species at the periphery ends without exhibiting steric hindrance.

  17. Branching patterns emerge in a mathematical model of the dynamics of lung development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014-01-01

    313–324 Branching patterns emerge in a mathematical model ofcascades of branching events emerge naturally; the branchingof the branching plane, all emerge imme- diately from the

  18. Dr. StrangeBox or : how I learned to stop worrying and love urban big box retail

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Press, Jared Harding

    2013-01-01

    Over the past decade, Big Box retailers have been trying to tap into urban markets after years of explicitly avoiding them in favor of suburban environments. In the past few years, retailers have begun experimenting with ...

  19. The Glass Box offers a unique environment to support research, development and evaluation of software

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Glass Box offers a unique environment to support research, development and evaluation of software products used by workers performing real computer- based tasks. The Glass Box instrumentation and to retrieve, store, and share Glass Box data. · Test Bed environment­Glass Box serves as a test bed

  20. Sampling and analysis plan for treatment water and creek water for the Lower East Fork Poplar Creek Operable Unit, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-04-01

    This document provides the Environmental Restoration Program with information about the methodology, organizational structure, quality assurance and health and safety practices to be employed during the water sampling and analysis activities associated with the remediation of the Lower East Fork Poplar Creek Operable Unit during remediation of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and Bruner sites.

  1. Willow Creek Wildlife Mitigation Project. Final Environmental Assessment.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-04-01

    Today`s notice announces BPA`s proposal to fund land acquisition or acquisition of a conservation easement and a wildlife management plan to protect and enhance wildlife habitat at the Willow Creek Natural Area in Eugene, Oregon. This action would provide partial mitigation for wildlife and wildlife habitat lost by the development of Federal hydroelectric projects in the Willamette River Basin. The project is consistent with BPA`s obligations under provisions of the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act of 1980 as outlined by the Northwest Power Planning Council`s 1994 Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. BPA has prepared an environmental assessment (DOE/EA-1023) evaluating the proposed project. Based on the analysis in the EA, BPA has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment, within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, the preparation of an environmental impact statement (EIS) is not required and BPA is issuing this FONSI.

  2. White Oak Creek Embayment site characterization and contaminant screening analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blaylock, B.G.; Ford, C.J.; Frank, M.L.; Hoffman, F.O.; Hook, L.A.

    1993-01-01

    Analyses of sediment samples collected near the mouth of White Oak Creek during the summer of 1990 revealed [sup 137]Cs concentrations [> 10[sup 6] Bq/kg dry wt (> 10[sup 4] pCi/g dry wt)] near the sediment surface. Available evidence indicates that these relatively high concentrations of [sup 137]Cs now at the sediment surface were released from White Oak Dam in the mid-1950s and had accumulated at depositionalsites in the embayment. These accumulated sediments are being eroded and transported downstream primarily during winter low-water levels by flood events and by a combination of normal downstream flow and the water turbulence created by the release of water from Melton Hill Dam during hydropower generation cycles. This report provides a more thorough characterization of the extent of contamination in WOCE than was previously available. Environmental samples collected from WOCE were analyzed for organic, inorganic, and radiological contaminants in fish, water, and sediment. These results were used to conduct a human health effects screening analysis. Walkover radiation surveys conducted inside the fenced area surrounding the WOCE at summer-pool (741 ft MSL) and at winter-pool (733 ft MSL) level, indicated a maximum exposure rate of 3 mR h[sup 1] 1 m above the soil surface.

  3. West Foster Creek Expansion Project 2007 HEP Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ashley, Paul R.

    2008-02-01

    During April and May 2007, the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority's (CBFWA) Regional HEP Team (RHT) conducted baseline Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) (USFWS 1980, 1980a) analyses on five parcels collectively designated the West Foster Creek Expansion Project (3,756.48 acres). The purpose of the HEP analyses was to document extant habitat conditions and to determine how many baseline/protection habitat units (HUs) to credit Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for funding maintenance and enhancement activities on project lands as partial mitigation for habitat losses associated with construction of Grand Coulee and Chief Joseph Dams. HEP evaluation models included mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus), western meadowlark (Sturnella neglecta), sharp-tailed grouse, (Tympanuchus phasianellus), Bobcat (Lynx rufus), mink (Neovison vison), mallard (Anas platyrhynchos), and black-capped chickadee (Parus atricapillus). Combined 2007 baseline HEP results show that 4,946.44 habitat units were generated on 3,756.48 acres (1.32 HUs per acre). HEP results/habitat conditions were generally similar for like cover types at all sites. Unlike crediting of habitat units (HUs) on other WDFW owned lands, Bonneville Power Administration received full credit for HUs generated on these sites.

  4. Annual report, Basic Sciences Branch, FY 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-04-01

    This report summarizes the progress of the Basic Sciences Branch of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) from October 1, 1990, through September 30, 1991. Seven technical sections of the report cover these main areas of NREL's in-house research: Semiconductor Crystal Growth, Amorphous Silicon Research, Polycrystalline Thin Films, III-V High-Efficiency Photovoltaic Cells, Solid-State Theory, Solid-State Spectroscopy, and Superconductivity. Each section explains the purpose and major accomplishments of the work in the context of the US Department of Energy's National Photovoltaic Research Program plans.

  5. Long Branch Capital | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas:Montezuma, Arizona:Oregon: EnergyLloyd, NewBranch Capital Jump to: navigation, search

  6. Integrated Box Interrogation System (IBIS) Preliminary Design Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DR. Stephen Croft; Mr. David Martancik; Dr. Brian Young; Dr. Patrick MJ Chard; Dr. Robert J Estop; Sheila Melton; Gaetano J. Arnone

    2003-01-13

    Canberra Industries has won the tendered solicitation, INEEL/EST-99-00121 for boxed waste Nondestructive Assay Development and Demonstration. Canberra will provide the Integrated Box Interrogation System (IBIS) which is a suite of assay instrumentation and a data reduction system that addresses the measurement needs for Boxed Wastes identified in the solicitation and facilitates the associated experimental program and demonstration of system capability. The IBIS system will consist of the next generation CWAM system, i.e. CWAM II, which is a Scanning Passive/Active Neutron interrogation system which we will call a Box Segmented Neutron Scanner (BSNS), combined with a physically separate Box Segmented Gamma-ray Scanning (BSGS) system. These systems are based on existing hardware designs but will be tailored to the large sample size and enhanced to allow the program to evaluate the following measurement criteria:Characterization and correction for matrix heterogeneity Characterization of non-uniform radio-nuclide and isotopic compositions Assay of high density matrices (both high-Z and high moderator contents)Correction for radioactive material physical form - such as self shielding or multiplication effects due to large accumulations of radioactive materials.Calibration with a minimal set of reference standards and representative matrices.THis document summarizes the conceptual design parameters of the IBIS and indicates areas key to the success of the project where development is to be centered. The work presented here is a collaborative effort between scientific staff within Canberra and within the NIS-6 group at LANL.

  7. Early post-restoration re-vegetation performance and critical social and institutional factors in a landowner-involved restoration project on lower Wooden Valley Creek, Napa County, CA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levy, Morgan; Post, Charles

    2010-01-01

    13. Description of Water Temperature Monitoring Stations inSuisun Creek Water Temperature Monitoring Summary (cont. )Suisun Creek Water Temperature Monitoring Summary (cont. )

  8. Finding Space-Time Transformations for Uniform Recurrences via Branch-ing Parametric Linear Programming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gugat, Martin

    consisting of two linear mappings, an allocation and a timing function. In this paper, we address the problem allocation function, a continuous relaxation of this problem is studied by passing from linear to quasi of the null space of the allocation function. Therefore, a branching approach is proposed for finding quasi

  9. Evaluation of dredged material proposed for ocean disposal from Westchester Creek project area, New York

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pinza, M.R.; Gardiner, W.W.; Barrows, E.S.; Borde, A.B.

    1996-11-01

    The objective of the Westchester Creek project was to evaluate proposed dredged material from this area to determine its suitability for unconfined ocean disposal at the Mud Dump Site. Westchester Creek was one of five waterways that the US Army Corps of Engineers- New York District (USACE-NYD) requested the Battelle/Marine Sciences Laboratory (MSL) to sample and evaluate for dredging and disposal in May 1995. The evaluation of proposed dredged material from the Westchester Creek project area consisted of bulk sediment chemical analyses, chemical analyses of dredging site water and elutriate, benthic acute and water-column toxicity tests, and bioaccumulation studies. Thirteen individual sediment core samples were collected from this area and analyzed for grain size, moisture content, and total organic carbon (TOC). One composite sediment sample representing the Westchester Creek area to be dredged, was analyzed for bulk density, specific gravity, metals, chlorinated pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners, polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and 1,4-dichlorobenzene. Dredging site water and elutriate water, which is prepared from the suspended- particulate phase (SPP) of the Westchester Creek sediment composite, was analyzed for metals, pesticides, and PCBS.

  10. GROUNDWATER-FED IRON-RICH MICROBIAL MATS IN A FRESHWATER CREEK: GROWTH CYCLES AND FOSSILIZATION POTENTIAL OF MICROBIAL FEATURES. J. Schieber, Department of Geological Sciences, Indi-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schieber, Juergen

    GROUNDWATER-FED IRON-RICH MICROBIAL MATS IN A FRESHWATER CREEK: GROWTH CYCLES AND FOSSILIZATION Description: We have investigated a groundwater-fed tributary to Jackson Creek in SE Bloomington/Indiana which

  11. Seismic deformation analysis of Tuttle Creek Dam Timothy D. Stark, Michael H. Beaty, Peter M. Byrne, Gonzalo Castro,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seismic deformation analysis of Tuttle Creek Dam Timothy D. Stark, Michael H. Beaty, Peter M. Byrne, and David L. Mathews Abstract: To facilitate the design of seismic remediation for Tuttle Creek Dam in east central Kansas, a seismic finite differ- ence analysis of the dam was performed using the software FLAC

  12. An Archaeological Survey of the Proposed Hurricane Creek Detention Facility Number 1 in Central Angelina County, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, William

    2015-06-11

    OF THE PROPOSED HURRICANE CREEK DETENTION FACILITY NUMBER 1 IN CENTRAL ANGELINA COUNTY, TEXAS Texas Antiquities Permit Number 2383 by William E. Moore Brazos Valley Research Associates Contract... Report Number 71 2000 AN ARCHAEOLOGICAL SURVEY OF THE PROPOSED HURRICANE CREEK DETENTION FACILITY NUMBER 1 IN CENTRAL ANGELINA COUNTY, TEXAS BVRA Project Number 99-17 Principal Investigator: William E. Moore...

  13. An Archaeological Survey of the Proposed Hurricane Creek Detention Pond Number 4 in Central Angelina County, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, William

    2015-06-12

    HURRICANE CREEK DETENTION POND NUMBER 4 IN CENTRAL ANGELINA COUNTY, TEXAS Texas Antiquities Permit Number 2335 By William E. Moore Brazos Valley Research Associates Contract Report Number 73... 2000 AN ARCHAEOLOGICAL SURVEY OF THE PROPOSED HURRICANE CREEK DETENTION POND NUMBER 4 IN CENTRAL ANGELINA COUNTY, TEXAS BVRA Project Number 99-18 Principal Investigator William E. Moore Prepared...

  14. Biological monitoring of Upper Three Runs Creek, Savannah River Plant, Aiken County, South Carolina

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Specht, W.L.

    1991-10-01

    In anticipation of the fall 1988 start up of effluent discharges into Upper Three Creek by the F/H Area Effluent Treatment Facility of the Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC, a two and one half year biological study was initiated in June 1987. Upper Three Runs Creek is an intensively studied fourth order stream known for its high species richness. Designed to assess the potential impact of F H area effluent on the creek, the study includes qualitative and quantitative macroinvertebrate stream surveys at five sites, chronic toxicity testing of the effluent, water chemistry and bioaccumulation analysis. This final report presents the results of both pre-operational and post-operational qualitative and quantitative (artificial substrate) macroinvertebrate studies. Six quantitative and three qualitative studies were conducted prior to the initial release of the F/H ETF effluent and five quantitative and two qualitative studies were conducted post-operationally.

  15. Biomonitoring of fish communities, using the index of Biotic Integrity, as an indicator of the success of soil conservation measures in the Rabbit Creek and Middle Creek watersheds, Macon County, North Carolina

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-08-01

    Fish communities in two upper Little Tennessee River tributaries, Rabbit Creek and Middle Creek, both located in Macon County, North Carolina, were monitored using IBI methods in 1990 and again in 1992. A single site, each on the lower reaches of its respective creek, was chosen to reflect the influence of conditions throughout the watershed and to provide a measure of water quality exiting the watershed. The Rabbit Creek watershed (Holly Springs community) has a long history of settlement and agricultural use. Dominant land uses today are pasture in the bottom lands and residential development at higher elevations. Much of the upper portion of the Middle Creek watershed on the slopes of Scaly Mountain is devoted to cabbage farming, often on steep slopes and highly erodible soils. From the cabbage growing area, the creek drops 400 feet to the lower valley. Other common land uses include residential, livestock, and forest. Both streams are characterized by heavy sedimentation and frequent high turbidity. Both streams showed marked improvement between 1990 and 1992. In 1990, Rabbit Creek`s IBI score was 31.0, for a bioclass rating of ``poor.`` In 1992, the IBI score was 42.1 for a bioclass rating of ``fair.`` For Middle Creek, the corresponding figures and ratings are 42.1 (fair) and 54.5 (good). Examination of the data for Rabbit Creek shows a reduction in the proportion of pollution-tolerant species, a higher proportion of specialized insectivores, a higher catch rate (reflecting higher total numbers of fish), and an additional intolerant species. In both cases, the data (supported by visual observation) suggests the causative factor is reduced sedimentation.

  16. Fresh look at randomly branched polymers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hans-Karl Janssen; Olaf Stenull

    2009-11-09

    We develop a new, dynamical field theory of isotropic randomly branched polymers, and we use this model in conjunction with the renormalization group (RG) to study several prominent problems in the physics of these polymers. Our model provides an alternative vantage point to understand the swollen phase via dimensional reduction. We reveal a hidden Becchi-Rouet-Stora (BRS) symmetry of the model that describes the collapse ($\\theta$-)transition to compact polymer-conformations, and calculate the critical exponents to 2-loop order. It turns out that the long-standing 1-loop results for these exponents are not entirely correct. A runaway of the RG flow indicates that the so-called $\\theta^\\prime$-transition could be a fluctuation induced first order transition.

  17. Gauge Theories on the Coulomb branch

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John H. Schwarz

    2014-08-05

    We construct the world-volume action of a probe D3-brane in $AdS_5 \\times S^5$ with $N$ units of flux. It has the field content, symmetries, and dualities of the $U(1)$ factor of ${\\cal N} =4$ $U(N+1)$ super Yang--Mills theory, spontaneously broken to $U(N) \\times U(1)$ by being on the Coulomb branch, with the massive fields integrated out. This motivates the conjecture that it is the exact effective action, called a `highly effective action' (HEA). We construct an $SL(2,Z)$ multiplet of BPS soliton solutions of the D3-brane theory (the conjectured HEA) and show that it reproduces the electrically charged massive states that have been integrated out as well as magnetic monopoles and dyons. Their charges are uniformly spread on a spherical surface, called a `soliton bubble', which is interpreted as a phase boundary.

  18. Nucleosynthesis in asymptotic giant branch stars

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    El Eid, Mounib F., E-mail: meid@aub.edu.lb [American University of Beirut, Department of Physics, P.O. Box 11-0236, Riad El-Solh, Beirut (Lebanon)

    2014-05-09

    The nucleosynthesis in asymptotic giant branch stars (briefly: AGB)is a challenging and fascinating subject in the theory of stellar evolution and important for observations as well. This is because about of half the heavy elements beyond iron are synthesized during thermal pulsation phases of these stars. Furthermore, the understanding of the production of the heavy elements and some light elements like carbon and fluorine represent a powerful tool to get more insight into the internal structure of these stars. The diversity of nuclear processing during the AGB phases may also motivate experimental activities in measuring important nuclear reactions. In this contribution, we emphasize several interesting feature of the nucleosynthesis in AGB stars which still needs further elaboration especially from theoretical point of view.

  19. Detector for measuring the $?^+\\to e^+?_e$ branching fraction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. A. Aguilar-Arevalo; M. Aoki; M. Blecher; D. vom Bruch; D. Bryman; J. Comfort; S. Cuen-Rochin; L. Doria; P. Gumplinger; A. Hussein; Y. Igarashi; N. Ito; S. Ito; S. H. Kettell; L. Kurchaninov; L. Littenberg; C. Malbrunot; R. E. Mischke; A. Muroi; T. Numao; G. Sheffer; A. Sher; T. Sullivan; K. Tauchi; D. Vavilov; K. Yamada; M. Yoshida

    2015-05-11

    The PIENU experiment at TRIUMF is aimed at a measurement of the branching ratio $R^{e/\\mu}$ = ${\\Gamma\\big((\\pi^{+} \\rightarrow e^{+} \

  20. Statistical distributions of earthquake numbers: consequence of branching process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kagan, Yan Y

    2010-01-01

    in the study of the seismic process (with Comments by M. S.point branching process along the magnitude (or log seismic

  1. Mr. John Kinneman, Chief Nuclear Materfals Branch Nuclear Regulatory...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    111989 Mr. John Kinneman, Chief Nuclear Materfals Branch Nuclear Regulatory Commission Region I 475 Allendale Road King of Prussia. Pennsylvania 19406 Dear Mr. Kinneman: -;' .-. 'W...

  2. Experimental determination of the elastic cotunneling rate in a hybrid single-electron box

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, Chia-Heng; Tai, Po-Chen; Chen, Yung-Fu, E-mail: yfuchen@ncu.edu.tw [Department of Physics, National Central University, Jhongli 32001, Taiwan (China); Jiang, Jheng-An; Wu, Cen-Shawn [Department of Physics, National Changhua University of Education, Changhua 500, Taiwan (China); Chen, Jeng-Chung [Department of Physics, National Tsing-Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China)

    2014-06-09

    We report measurements of charge configurations and charge transfer dynamics in a hybrid single-electron box composed of aluminum and copper. We used two single-electron transistors (SETs) to simultaneously read out different parts of the box, enabling us to map out stability diagrams of the box and identify various charge transfer processes in the box. We further characterized the elastic cotunneling in the box, which is an important source of error in electron turnstiles consisting of hybrid SETs, and found that the rate was as low as 1?Hz at degeneracy and compatible with theoretical estimates for electron tunneling via virtual states in the central superconducting island of the box.

  3. Computer Science & Engineering Box 352350 Seattle, WA 98195-2350

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borenstein, Elhanan

    Computer Science & Engineering #12;Box 352350 Seattle, WA 98195-2350 Nonprofit Org US Postage PAID in the Computer Science Department. He is a superb researcher in the design of interactive, visual data, Carnegie Mellon University's Finmeccanica Associate Professor in the School of Computer Science, is widely

  4. On Klee's Measure Problem for Grounded Boxes Hakan Yildiz

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suri, Subhash

    is a standard step used in algorithms for the Klee's measure, but instead of solving the cross-section problem for computing Klee's measure for a set of n 2-grounded boxes. This is an improvement of roughly O( n) compared into one of maintaining its (d-1)-dimensional cross-section with a sweeping plane. The sweeping

  5. MATLAB package for solving Box-Constrained Integer Least

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toronto, University of

    BILS: MATLAB package for solving Box-Constrained Integer Least Squares Problems User's Guide Xiao. This MATLAB package provides the solution to the BILS problem. The purpose of this document is to show how to use this package. For the theory and al- gorithms implemented in this package, see the paper "Solving

  6. Modeling of RTF Glove-Box and Stripper System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hsu, R.H.

    2001-03-28

    The glove box-stripper system for the Replacement Tritium Facility (RTF) has been modeled to determine its steady-state performance. To permit comparison, simulations of modified cases were compared with a standard or base case. This paper discusses tests conducted, results obtained and makes recommendations.

  7. Energy Savings Assessment for Digital-to-Analog Converter Boxes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheung, Hoi Ying Iris; Meier, Alan; Brown, Richard

    2011-01-18

    The Digital Television (DTV) Converter Box Coupon Program was administered by the U.S. government to subsidize purchases of digital-to-analog converter boxes, with up to two $40 coupons for each eligible household. In order to qualify as Coupon Eligible Converter Boxes (CECBs), these devices had to meet a number of minimum performance specifications, including energy efficiency standards. The Energy Star Program also established voluntary energy efficiency specifications that are more stringent than the CECB requirements. In this study, we measured the power and energy consumptions for a sample of 12 CECBs (including 6 Energy Star labeled models) in-use in homes and estimated aggregate energy savings produced by the energy efficiency policies. Based on the 35 million coupons redeemed through the end of the program, our analysis indicates that between 2500 and 3700 GWh per year are saved as a result of the energy efficiency policies implemented on digital-to-analog converter boxes. The energy savings generated are equivalent to the annual electricity use of 280,000 average US homes.

  8. Troubleshoot Glove Box Cryo-pump Eric Sundholm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wager, John F.

    Troubleshoot Glove Box Cryo-pump Eric Sundholm 8-4-06 Background Pump and chamber were in good working order for many years. Pumping motion on the cold head suddenly, and without warning, stopped. The predictable pumping was replaced by a shaking and apparent short stroking like ticking. Data

  9. IBM ILOG CPLEX What is inside of the box?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossmann, Ignacio E.

    IBM ILOG CPLEX What is inside of the box? Ricardo Lima rlima@andrew.cmu.edu EWO Seminar CarnegieEWO seminar #12;Introduction CPLEX Optimization software package Commercialized by IBM ILOG Interfaces by IBM Latest stable release: 12.2 CPLEX history and facts 12/07/2010 11EWO seminar 2008 ­ Bixby, Gu

  10. Recovery Act Begins Box Remediation Operations at F Canyon

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    AIKEN, S.C. – The F Canyon box remediation program, an American Recovery and Reinvestment Act project at Savannah River Site (SRS), has come online to process legacy transuranic (TRU) waste for off-site shipment and permanent disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), a geological repository in New Mexico.

  11. Atmospheric Mercury near Salmon Falls Creek Reservoir in Southern Idaho

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael L. Abbott; Jeffrey J. Einerson

    2007-12-01

    Gaseous elemental mercury (GEM) and reactive gaseous mercury (RGM) were measured over two-week seasonal field campaigns near Salmon Falls Creek Reservoir in south-central Idaho from the summer of 2005 through the fall of 2006 and over the entire summer of 2006 using automated Tekran mercury analyzers. GEM, RGM, and particulate mercury (HgP) were also measured at a secondary site 90 km to the west in southwestern Idaho during the summer of 2006. The study was performed to characterize mercury air concentrations in the southern Idaho area for the first time, estimate mercury dry deposition rates, and investigate the source of observed elevated concentrations. High seasonal variability was observed with the highest GEM (1.91 ± 0.9 ng m-3) and RGM (8.1 ± 5.6 pg m-3) concentrations occurring in the summer and lower values in the winter (1.32 ± 0.3 ng m-3, 3.2 ± 2.9 pg m-3 for GEM, RGM respectively). The summer-average HgP concentrations were generally below detection limit (0.6 ± 1 pg m-3). Seasonally-averaged deposition velocities calculated using a resistance model were 0.034 ± 0.032, 0.043 ± 0.040, 0.00084 ± 0.0017 and 0.00036 ± 0.0011 cm s-1 for GEM (spring, summer, fall, and winter, respectively) and 0.50 ± 0.39, 0.40 ± 0.31, 0.51 ± 0.43 and 0.76 ± 0.57 cm s-1 for RGM. The total annual RGM + GEM dry deposition estimate was calculated to be 11.9 ± 3.3 µg m-2, or about 2/3 of the total (wet + dry) deposition estimate for the area. Periodic elevated short-term GEM (2.2 – 12 ng m-3) and RGM (50 - 150 pg m-3) events were observed primarily during the warm seasons. Back-trajectory modeling and PSCF analysis indicated predominant source directions from the southeast (western Utah, northeastern Nevada) through the southwest (north-central Nevada) with fewer inputs from the northwest (southeastern Oregon and southwestern Idaho).

  12. Atmospheric mercury near Salmon Falls Creek Reservoir in southern Idaho

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael L. Abbott; Jeffrey J. Einerson

    2008-03-01

    Gaseous elemental mercury (GEM) and reactive gaseous mercury (RGM) were measured over 2-week seasonal field campaigns near Salmon Falls Creek Reservoir in south-central Idaho from the summer of 2005 through the fall of 2006 and over the entire summer of 2006 using automated Tekran Hg analyzers. GEM, RGM, and particulate Hg (HgP) were also measured at a secondary site 90 km to the west in southwestern Idaho during the summer of 2006. The study was performed to characterize Hg air concentrations in the southern Idaho area for the first time, estimate Hg dry deposition rates, and investigate the source of observed elevated concentrations. High seasonal variability was observed with the highest GEM (1.91 ± 0.9 ng m-3) and RGM (8.1 ± 5.6 pg m-3) concentrations occurring in the summer and lower values in the winter (1.32 ± 0.3 ng m-3, 3.2 ± 2.9 pg m-3 for GEM, RGM, respectively). The summer-average HgP concentrations were generally below detection limit (0.6 ± 1 pg m-3). Seasonally averaged deposition velocities calculated using a resistance model were 0.034 ± 0.032, 0.043 ± 0.040, 0.00084 ± 0.0017 and 0.00036 ± 0.0011 cm s-1 for GEM (spring, summer, fall and winter, respectively) and 0.50 ± 0.39, 0.40 ± 0.31, 0.51 ± 0.43 and 0.76 ± 0.57 cm s-1 for RGM. The total annual RGM + GEM dry deposition estimate was calculated to be 11.9 ± 3.3 µg m-2, or about 2/3 of the total (wet + dry) deposition estimate for the area. Periodic elevated short-term GEM (2.2–12 ng m-3) and RGM (50–150 pg m-3) events were observed primarily during the warm seasons. Back-trajectory modeling and PSCF analysis indicate predominant source directions to the SE (western Utah, northeastern Nevada) and SW (north-central Nevada) with fewer inputs from the NW (southeastern Oregon and southwestern Idaho).

  13. Optimal Terminal Box Control for Single Duct Air-Handling Units 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cho, Y.; Vondal, J.; Wang, G.; Liu, M.

    2006-01-01

    Terminal boxes maintain room temperature by modulating supply air temperature and airflow in building HVAC systems. Terminal boxes with conventional control sequences often supply inadequate airflow to a conditioned space, resulting in occupant...

  14. Manufacturing of the motor mount of the uBox, an intelligent pillbox

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    León, Jessica (Jessica E.)

    2008-01-01

    The uBox has been developed to be a solution to the medication adherence problems for a multitude of applications. The box offers a way to collect and formulate patient and volunteer adherence data for use in the field ...

  15. Power-Aware Branch Prediction: Characterization and Design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Wei

    Power-Aware Branch Prediction: Characterization and Design Dharmesh Parikh, Kevin Skadron, Yan-point benchmarks to explore the role of branch predictor organization in power/energy/performance tradeoffs's total power dissipation, prediction accuracy is nevertheless a powerful lever on processor behavior

  16. A STRATEGIC PLAN FOR HARBOR BRANCH OCEANOGRAPHIC INSTITUTE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marques, Oge

    A STRATEGIC PLAN FOR HARBOR BRANCH OCEANOGRAPHIC INSTITUTE AT FLORIDA ATLANTIC UNIVERSITY 2012­2017 RESEARCH, PARTNERSHIPS & STEWARDSHIP FOR THE FUTURE LIVING OCEANS OUR #12;CONTENTS About the Strategic Plan of Harbor Branch Resources............................................ 22 #12;1 ABOUT THE STRATEGIC PLAN

  17. Branch length distribution in TREF fractionated polyethylene Ramnath Ramachandran a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beaucage, Gregory

    Branch length distribution in TREF fractionated polyethylene Ramnath Ramachandran a , Gregory Keywords: Polyethylene Branching Neutron scattering a b s t r a c t Commercial polyethylene is typically and catalyst activity. Further, processing of polyethylene after polymerization may also result in changes

  18. HIDDEN SYMMETRIES OF CYCLIC BRANCHED COVERINGS OF 2-BRIDGE KNOTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    HIDDEN SYMMETRIES OF CYCLIC BRANCHED COVERINGS OF 2-BRIDGE KNOTS MARCO RENI AND ANDREI VESNIN hyperbolic 3-manifolds Mn(K), which are n- fold cyclic branched coverings of 2-bridge knots K. We show the symmetry groups of knots and links (see [BZ], [Ka]). Particularly, the class of 2-bridge knots

  19. Radiolabeled dimethyl branched long chain fatty acid for heart imaging

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Knapp, Jr., Furn F. (Oak Ridge, TN); Goodman, Mark M. (Knoxville, TN); Kirsch, Gilbert (Woippy, FR)

    1988-08-16

    A radiolabeled long chain fatty acid for heart imaging that has dimethyl branching at one of the carbons of the chain which inhibits the extent to which oxidation can occur. The closer to the carboxyl the branching is positioned, the more limited the oxidation, thereby resulting in prolonged retention of the radiolabeled compound in the heart.

  20. Start Paint Branch Dr End 3501 University Blvd E

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maryland at College Park, University of

    Start Paint Branch Dr End 3501 University Blvd E Hyattsville, MD 20783 Travel 1.3 mi ­ about 5 mins ©2008 Google - Map data ©2008 NAVTEQTM - Terms of Use Page 1 of 2Paint Branch Dr to 3501 University Blvd E, Hyattsville, MD 20783 - Google Maps 6/1/2008http://maps.google.com/maps?f=d&hl=en&geocode=&saddr=Paint

  1. Operational restoration of the Pen Branch bottomland hardwood and swamp wetlands - the research setting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, E.A.

    2000-01-05

    The Savannah River Swamp is a 3020 Ha forested wetland on the floodplain of the Savannah River and is located on the Department of Energy's Savannah River Site (SRS) near Aiken, SC. Historically the swamp consisted of approximately 50 percent bald cypress-water tupelo stands, 40 percent mixed bottomland hardwood stands, and 10 percent shrub, marsh, and open water. Creek corridors were typical of Southeastern bottomland hardwood forests. The hydrology was controlled by flooding of the Savannah River and by flow from four creeks that drain into the swamp prior to flow into the Savannah River. Upstream dams have caused some alteration of the water levels and timing of flooding within the floodplain. Major impacts to the swamp hydrology occurred with the completion of the production reactors and one coal-fired powerhouse at the SRS in the early 1950's. Water was pumped from the Savannah River, through secondary heat exchangers of the reactors, and discharged into three of the tributary streams that flow into the swamp. Flow in one of the tributaries, Pen Branch, was typically 0.3 m3 s-1 (10-20) cfs prior to reactor pumping and 11.0 m3 s-1 (400 cfs) during pumping. This continued from 1954 to 1988 at various levels. The sustained increases in water volume resulted in overflow of the original stream banks and the creation of additional floodplains. Accompanying this was considerable erosion of the original stream corridor and deposition of a deep silt layer on the newly formed delta. Heated water was discharged directly into Pen Branch and water temperature in the stream often exceeded 65 degrees C. The nearly continuous flooding of the swamp, the thermal load of the water, and the heavy silting resulted in complete mortality of the original vegetation in large areas of the floodplain. In the years since pumping was reduced, early succession has begun in some affected areas. Most of this has been herbs, grasses, and shrubs. Areas that have seedlings are generally willow thickets that support a lower diversity of wildlife. No volunteer seedlings of heavy-seeded hardwoods or cypress have been found in the corridor areas. Research was conducted to determine methods to reintroduce tree species characteristic of more mature forested wetlands. Three restoration strategies were formulated to deal with the differing conditions of the Upper Corridor, the Lower Corridor, and the Delta regions of the impacted area. Site preparation and planting of each area with mixtures of tree species were carried out to speed the restoration of the ecosystem. Species composition and selection were altered based on the current and expected hydrological regimes that the reforestation areas will be experiencing. Because of the operational design of the restoration project, a research program naturally followed to document the success. Many of those efforts are detailed here.

  2. FY 1992 Measurements and Characterization Branch annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dippo, P.C

    1993-03-01

    The Measurements and Characterization Branch actively supports the advancement of DOE/NREL goals for the development and implementation of the solar photovoltaic (PV) technology. The primary focus of the laboratories is to provide state-of-the-art analytical capabilities for materials and device characterization and fabrication. The branch houses a comprehensive facility that Is capable of providing information on the full range of PV components. A major objective of the branch is to aggressively pursue collaborative research with other government laboratories, universities, and industrial firms for the advancement of Pv technologies. Members of the branch disseminate research findings to the technical community in publications and presentations. The Measurements and Characterization Branch encompasses seven coordinated research groups, providing integrated research and development that covers all aspects of photovoltaic materials/devices characterization.

  3. Energy use of set-top boxes and telephony products in the U.S.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosen, Karen B.; Meier, Alan K.; Zandelin, Stephan

    2001-01-01

    chargers are typically included as part of wireless phonechargers. LBNL-45305 5 CONCLUSIONS This study found that cable boxes, wireless

  4. Large Woody Debris Budgets in the Caspar Creek Experimental Watersheds1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Monitoring of large woody debris (LWD) in the two mainstem channels of the Caspar Creek Experimental debris (LWD) in stream channels. Because LWD inputs are often episodic and pieces can persist for decades in the channel, an LWD budgeting approach can be a useful tool to estimate long-term effects of management

  5. Testing a blowing snow model against distributed snow measurements at Upper Sheep Creek,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tarboton, David

    Testing a blowing snow model against distributed snow measurements at Upper Sheep Creek, Idaho S. Seyfried5 Abstract. In this paper a physically based snow transport model (SnowTran-3D) was used to simulate snow drifting over a 30 m grid and was compared to detailed snow water equivalence (SWE) surveys

  6. Effects of Timber Harvest on Fog Drip and Streamflow, Caspar Creek Experimental

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    basin was clearcut. Annual water yield and summer flows increased following both timber harvestsEffects of Timber Harvest on Fog Drip and Streamflow, Caspar Creek Experimental Watersheds of fog drip. Key words: fog drip, hydrologic processes, streamflow, timber harvest Introduction

  7. FLORAL AND FAUNAL DIFFERENCES BETWEEN FRAGMENTED AND UNFRAGMENTED BAHAMIAN TIDAL CREEKS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Langerhans, Brian

    Valentine-Rose1,7 , Julia A. Cherry1,2 , J. Jacob Culp1,3 , Kathryn E. Perez1,4 , Jeff B. Pollock1 , D, mangroves, seagrass macroalgal beds, as well as tidal creeks; Dahlgren and Marr 2004), have been identified

  8. FISHTRAP CREEK WORKSHOP Watershed Response to the McLure Forest Fire

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eaton, Brett

    FISHTRAP CREEK WORKSHOP Watershed Response to the McLure Forest Fire Date: March 6th , 2008: 8 disturbance and forest harvesting. Figure 1. Location of the McLure fire. From Phillips (2007). #12;Figure 2 and after the fire (R.D. Moore, UBC) 10:00 ­ 10:30 Refreshment break Session 2: Channel morphology

  9. Storm water control plan for the Lower East Fork Poplar Creek Operable Unit, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-04-01

    This document provides the Environmental Restoration Program with information about the erosion and sediment control, storm water management, maintenance, and reporting and record keeping practices to be employed during Phase II of the remediation project for the Lower East Fork Poplar Creek (LEFPC) Operable Unit.

  10. Contribution of valley-side erosion to sedimentation problems in Wolf Pen Creek, College Station, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilson, Rachel Suzanne

    2000-01-01

    , or urbanized). However, the state of urbanization is not the controlling factor in the case of Wolf Pen Creek and many other similar urban drainage basins. Instead, the level of stability varies with other factors, namely the geology of the basin and climate...

  11. An archaeological survey along a seismic line in Village Creek State Park Hardin County, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, William

    2015-06-03

    An Archaeological Survey was conducted along 6600 feet of seismic line with a right-of-way of ten feet for TGS Onshore Geophysical Company by Brazos Valley Research Associates on November 7, 1991. The area examined is located in Village creek State...

  12. Cyanobacterial macrophytes in an Early Silurian (Llandovery) continental biota: Passage Creek, lower Massanutten Sandstone,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tomescu, Alexandru MF

    , lower Massanutten Sandstone, Virginia, USA ALEXANDRU M. F. TOMESCU, GAR W. ROTHWELL AND ROSMARIE in an Early Silurian (Llandovery) continental biota: Passage Creek, lower Massanutten Sandstone, Virginia, USA, in the lower Massanutten Sandstone (Virginia, USA). Filaments are predominantly multiseriate and consist

  13. EA-1967: Hills Creek-Lookout Point Transmission Line Rebuild, Lane County, Oregon

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Bonneville Power Administration is preparing an EA to assess potential environmental impacts of the proposed rebuild of its 26-mile 115 kilovolt (kV) wood-pole Hills Creek-Lookout Point transmission line, which is generally located between Lowell and Oakridge, in Lane County, Oregon.

  14. On Reverse-Engineering S-Boxes with Hidden Design Criteria or Structure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR)

    On Reverse-Engineering S-Boxes with Hidden Design Criteria or Structure Alex Biryukov and Léo of F are far from random and propose a design criteria, along with an algorithm which generates S into the visual representation of S-box's DDT. Keywords: S-box design criteria, Skipjack, linearity, functional

  15. Black Box Design Ahmad Asi, Benjimin Chang, Mehdi Dadfarnia, Serge Kamta,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Austin, Mark

    , Khan Black Box Design #12;Project Stakeholders ENES489P Black-Box Team and Advisors Military Logistics Use Case 4: Threats to System/Reliability Use Case 5: Maintenance Asi, Chang, Dadfarnia, Kamta, Khan Using the Black Box System Maintenance (has its own used case activity diagram) Data Rotator program

  16. Quick-Start Operating Guide Document No. 1800-13 Stainless Steel Glove Boxes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yoo, S. J. Ben

    Quick-Start Operating Guide Document No. 1800-13 Stainless Steel Glove Boxes (Series 300 ­ 600-Start Operating Guide Stainless Steel Glove Boxes (Series 300 ­ 600) © Copyright 2010 Terra Universal Inc. All.0Introduction This manual provides information on installing and operating your Terra Stainless Steel Glove Box

  17. Using EPR To Compare PEG-branch-nitroxide "Bivalent-Brush Polymers" and Traditional PEG Bottle-Brush Polymers: Branching

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turro, Nicholas J.

    Using EPR To Compare PEG-branch-nitroxide "Bivalent-Brush Polymers" and Traditional PEG Bottle-Brush Polymers: Branching Makes a Difference Alan O. Burts, Yongjun Li, Aleksandr V. Zhukhovitskiy, Paresma R-brush random and block copolymers. Our results demonstrate that bivalent bottle-brush polymers have greater

  18. Quantification of branching in model 3-arm star polyethylene Ramnath Ramachandran, Gregory Beaucage*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beaucage, Gregory

    1 Quantification of branching in model 3-arm star polyethylene Ramnath Ramachandran, Gregory-arm star polyethylene molecules is presented. Many commercial polyethylenes have long side branches-density polyethylene (LDPE) is typically a highly branched structure with broad distributions in branch content, branch

  19. Adsorption of annealed branched polymers on curved surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wagner, Jef; Zandi, Roya

    2015-01-01

    The behavior of annealed branched polymers near adsorbing surfaces plays a fundamental role in many biological and industrial processes. Most importantly single stranded RNA in solution tends to fold up and self-bind to form a highly branched structure. Using a mean field theory, we both perturbatively and numerically examine the adsorption of branched polymers on surfaces of several different geometries in a good solvent. Independent of the geometry of the wall, we observe that as branching density increases, surface tension decreases. However, we find a coupling between the branching density and curvature in that a further lowering of surface tension occurs when the wall curves towards the polymer, but the amount of lowering of surface tension decreases when the wall curves away from the polymer. We find that for branched polymers confined into spherical cavities, most of branch-points are located in the vicinity of the interior wall and the surface tension is minimized for a critical cavity radius. For bra...

  20. Spatial Extent of Branching Brownian Motion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kabir Ramola; Satya N. Majumdar; Gregory Schehr

    2015-03-13

    We study the one dimensional branching Brownian motion starting at the origin and investigate the correlation between the rightmost ($X_{\\max}\\geq 0$) and leftmost ($X_{\\min} \\leq 0$) visited sites up to time $t$. At each time step the existing particles in the system either diffuse (with diffusion constant $D$), die (with rate $a$) or split into two particles (with rate $b$). We focus on the regime $b \\leq a$ where these two extreme values $X_{\\max}$ and $X_{\\min}$ are strongly correlated. We show that at large time $t$, the joint probability distribution function (PDF) of the two extreme points becomes stationary $P(X,Y,t \\to \\infty) \\to p(X,Y)$. Our exact results for $p(X,Y)$ demonstrate that the correlation between $X_{\\max}$ and $X_{\\min}$ is nonzero, even in the stationary state. From this joint PDF, we compute exactly the stationary PDF $p(\\zeta)$ of the (dimensionless) span $\\zeta = {(X_{\\max} - X_{\\min})}/{\\sqrt{D/b}}$, which is the distance between the rightmost and leftmost visited sites. This span distribution is characterized by a linear behavior ${p}(\\zeta) \\sim \\frac{1}{2} \\left(1 + \\Delta \\right) \\zeta$ for small spans, with $\\Delta = \\left(\\frac{a}{b} -1\\right)$. In the critical case ($\\Delta = 0$) this distribution has a non-trivial power law tail ${p}(\\zeta) \\sim 8 \\pi \\sqrt{3} /\\zeta^3$ for large spans. On the other hand, in the subcritical case ($\\Delta > 0$), we show that the span distribution decays exponentially as ${p}(\\zeta) \\sim (A^2/2) \\zeta \\exp \\left(- \\sqrt{\\Delta}~\\zeta\\right)$ for large spans, where $A$ is a non-trivial function of $\\Delta$ which we compute exactly. We show that these asymptotic behaviors carry the signatures of the correlation between $X_{\\max}$ and $X_{\\min}$. Finally we verify our results via direct Monte Carlo simulations.

  1. Box- and peanut-shaped bulges: II. NIR observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Luetticke; R. -J. Dettmar; M. Pohlen

    2000-08-30

    We have observed 60 edge-on galaxies in the NIR in order to study the stellar distribution in galaxies with box/peanut-shaped bulges. The much smaller amount of dust extinction at these wavelengths allows us to identify in almost all target galaxies with box/peanut-shaped bulges an additional thin, central component in cuts parallel to the major axis. This structure can be identified with a bar. The length of this structure scaled by the length of the bulge correlates with the morphologically classified shape of the bulge. This newly established correlation is therefore mainly interpreted as the projection of the bar at different aspect angles. Galaxies with peanut bulges have a bar seen nearly edge-on and the ratio of bar length to thickness, 14 +/- 4, can be directly measured for the first time. In addition, the correlation of the boxiness of bulges with the bar strength indicates that the bar characteristic could partly explain differences in the bulge shape. Furthermore, a new size relation between the box/peanut structure and the central bulge is found. Our observations are discussed in comparison to a N-body simulation for barred galaxies (Pfenniger & Friedli 1991). We conclude that the inner region of barred disk galaxies are build up by three distinct components: the spheroidal bulge, a thin bar, and a b/p structure most likely representing the thick part of the bar.

  2. The temporal mapping of riparian vegetation at Leon Creek in Bexar County, Texas from 1987 to 1999 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cummins, Karen Leigh

    2000-01-01

    Leon Creek's riparian vegetation was evaluated through the use of Landsat TM data, where different methods were compared and integrated. Through the use of an Image Difference Calculation, areas of 20% or more change in pixel value from 1987...

  3. Saeltzer Dam Removal on Clear Creek 11 years later: An assessment of upstream channel changes since the dam's removal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simons, Crystal; Walker, Katelyn; Zimring, Mark

    2011-01-01

    Boulder BLDR Bedrock BDRK Dam Rubble DMRB Table B1. 2011pages. Brown, M. (n.d. ). Clear Creek—McCormick-Saeltzer DamRemoval: Dam removal re-opens spring run salmon habitat. US

  4. Lateral Continuity of the Eagle Ford Group Strata in Lozier Canyon and Antonio Creek, Terrell County, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gardner, Rand D

    2013-09-24

    simplistic assumptions about relevant horizontal reservoir heterogeneities can lead to sub-optimal or uneconomical exploitation. High-resolution correlation of individual beds in the Eagle Ford Group over several miles in Lozier Canyon and Antonio Creek...

  5. Establishment report: Reforestation of the Pen Branch corridor and delta

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, E.A.; Dulohery, N.J.; Bunton, C.S.; Trettin, C.C.; McKee, W.H. Jr.

    1995-12-01

    This report documents the role of the USDA Forest Service in the reforestation of the Pen Branch floodplain and delta. The report focuses upon the reforestation activities and monitoring to characterize the sites.

  6. Dynamic Branch Prediction using Neural Networks Gordon Steven1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vintan, Lucian N.

    instructions to the processor pipeline. A classic Branch Target Cache (BTC) [1] achieves these objectives by using the PC address to access the BTC in parallel with the instruction fetch process. As a result each

  7. Covering Congress: Media Effects on Evaluations of the Legislative Branch 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Tyler

    2010-01-16

    This project takes an in-depth look at the role that media coverage of both individual members of Congress and Congress as a whole plays in shaping approval of legislators and the legislative branch. I argue that by examining ...

  8. Frobenius n-homomorphisms, transfers and branched coverings 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rees E.G.; Buchstaber V.M.

    2008-01-01

    The main purpose is to characterise continuous maps that are n-branched coverings in terms of induced maps on the rings of functions. The special properties of Frobenius nhomomorphisms between two function spaces that ...

  9. Briefing and Ancillary Materials for Rocky Branch Watershed Tour

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    James, L. Allan

    1 Briefing and Ancillary Materials for Rocky Branch Watershed Tour Allan James This briefing available on the Water as a Resource, Geog 347, website: http://people.cas.sc.edu/ajames/347 Go to Ancillary

  10. Hindered amine development and operating experience at Quirk Creek Gas Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smart, P.; Devenny, I. [Imperial Oil Resources Ltd., Calgary, Alberta (Canada); Rendall, A. [Nalco/Exxon Energy Chemicals, Calgary, Alberta (Canada)

    1997-12-31

    The Imperial Oil Resources Limited Quirk Creek gas plant has a significant natural gas treating challenge. The natural gas feed contains H{sub 2}S, CO{sub 2}, carbonyl sulfide, mercaptans and elemental sulfur. The trace sulfur components are difficult to remove with conventional solvents. Over its 26 year history, three different solvents have been used. The latest solvent, a hybrid of a hindered amine and a physical solvent, has been operating for over two years, with better than expected performance. This high capacity solvent has lowered operating costs by over $500,000/yr by reducing solids formation. The development work, including pilot testing at Quirk Creek, and the operating history will be reviewed.

  11. Boundary Creek thermal areas of Yellowstone National Park: II, thermal water analyses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thompson, J.M. (Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA); Hutchinson, R.A.

    1980-09-01

    Water samples from 28 thermal springs, 2 non-thermal springs, and 2 creeks from the Boundary Creek Thermal Areas (BCTA) in the southwestern corner of Yellowstone National Park were analyzed to help establish a chemical water-quality base line prior to possible geothermal exploitation of the Island Park Geothermal Area (IPGA). The springs, situated at the southwestern end of the Madison Plateau, are the Yellowstone Park thermal waters nearest to the IPGA and might respond to geothermal exploitation in the IPGA. Water temperatures ranging from 50/sup 0/ to 90/sup 0/C and low Cl concentrations (< 110 mgL/sup -1/) characterize spring waters in the BCTA. They are chemically distinct from the major geysers and hot springs in Yellowstone Park. The Na-K-Ca and silica geothermometers are in general agreement, usually within 10/sup 0/C, and indicate reservoir temperatures of 150 to 170/sup 0/C.

  12. Boundary Creek Thermal areas of Yellowstone National Park I: thermal activity and geologic setting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hutchinson, R.A.

    1980-09-01

    Proposed geothermal leasing in the Island Park Geothermal Area (IPGA) in national forest and public lands adjacent to Yellowstone National Park has called attention to the moderate to high temperature springs of the Boundary Creek Thermal Areas. Up until late 1977 no description or geochemical inventory studies had been conducted in these areas. The thermal springs are scattered in four major groups along the Boundary Creek drainage with three to six km. of the IPGA - park border. Observations and analyses of physical and chemical indicators suggest that the source is under the Madison Plateau and that the waters are generally similar in the lower three thermal units. These hot springs should be monitored so as to provide early warning of change in the event that geothermal development in the IPGA causes withdrawal of groundwater from Yellow Stone National Park.

  13. Reintroduction of Lower Columbia River Chum Salmon into Duncan Creek, 2007 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hillson, Todd D.

    2009-06-12

    The National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) listed Lower Columbia River (LCR) chum salmon as threatened under the Endangered Species Act (ESA) in March, 1999 (64 FR 14508, March 25, 1999). The listing was in response to the reduction in abundance from historical levels of more than one-half million returning adults to fewer than 10,000 present-day spawners. Harvest, habitat degradation, changes in flow regimes, riverbed movement and heavy siltation have been largely responsible for this decline. The timing of seasonal changes in river flow and water temperatures is perhaps the most critical factor in structuring the freshwater life history of this species. This is especially true of the population located directly below Bonneville Dam, where hydropower operations can block access to spawning sites, dewater redds, strand fry, cause scour or fill of redds and increase sedimentation of spawning gravels. Prior to 1997, only two chum salmon populations were recognized as genetically distinct in the Columbia River, although spawning had been documented in many Lower Columbia River tributaries. The first population was in the Grays River (RKm 34), a tributary of the Columbia River, and the second was a group of spawners utilizing the mainstem Columbia River just below Bonneville Dam (RKm 235) adjacent to Ives Island and in Hardy and Hamilton creeks. Using additional DNA samples, Small et al. (2006) grouped chum salmon spawning in the mainstem Columbia River and the Washington State tributaries into three groups: the Coastal, the Cascade and the Gorge. The Coastal group comprises those spawning in the Grays River, Skamokawa Creek and the broodstock used at the Sea Resources facility on the Chinook River. The Cascade group comprises those spawning in the Cowlitz (both summer and fall stocks), Kalama, Lewis, and East Fork Lewis rivers, with most supporting unique populations. The Gorge group comprises those spawning in the mainstem Columbia River from the I-205 Bridge up to Bonneville Dam and those spawning in Hamilton and Hardy creeks. Response to the federal ESA listing has been primarily through direct-recovery actions: reducing harvest, hatchery supplementation using local broodstock for populations at catastrophic risk, habitat restoration (including construction of spawning channels) and flow agreements to protect spawning and rearing areas. Both state and federal agencies have built controlled spawning areas. In 1998, the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) began a chum salmon supplementation program using native stock on the Grays River. This program was expanded during 1999 - 2001 to include reintroduction into the Chinook River using eggs from the Grays River Supplementation Program. These eggs are incubated at the Grays River Hatchery, reared to release size at the Sea Resources Hatchery on the Chinook River, and the fry are released at the mouth of the Chinook River. Native steelhead, chum, and coho salmon are present in Duncan Creek, and are recognized as subpopulations of the Lower Gorge population, and are focal species in the Lower Columbia Fish Recovery Board (LCFRB) plan. Steelhead, chum and coho salmon that spawn in Duncan Creek are listed as Threatened under the ESA. Duncan Creek is classified by the LCFRB plan as a watershed for intensive monitoring (LCFRB 2004). This project was identified in the 2004 Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) revised Biological Opinion (revised BiOp) to increase survival of chum salmon, 'BPA will continue to fund the program to re-introduce Columbia River chum salmon into Duncan Creek as long as NOAA Fisheries determines it to be an essential and effective contribution to reducing the risk of extinction for this ESU'. (USACE et al. 2004, page 85-86). The Governors Forum on Monitoring and Salmon Recovery and Watershed Health recommends one major population from each ESU have adult and juvenile monitoring. Duncan Creek chum salmon are identified in this plan to be intensively monitored. Planners recommended that a combination of natural and hatchery production

  14. Campbell Creek TVA 2010 First Year Performance Report July 1, 2009 August 31, 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christian, Jeffrey E; Gehl, Anthony C; Boudreaux, Philip R; New, Joshua Ryan

    2010-10-01

    This research project was initiated by TVA in March 2008 and encompasses three houses that are of similar size, design and located within the same community - Campbell Creek, Farragut TN with simulated occupancy. This report covers the performance period from July 1, 2009 to August 31, 2010. It is the intent of TVA that this Valley Data will inform electric utilities future residential retrofit incentive program.

  15. Widget:ExpandableBoxEnd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-EnhancingEtGeorgia: EnergyMaryland:Meadow Lake,Maine: EnergyWickliffe,ExpandableBoxEnd

  16. Box Butte County, Nebraska: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmentalBowerbank, Maine: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search EquivalentOhio:Box

  17. Habitat Projects Completed within the Asotin Creek Watershed, 1999 Completion Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Bradley J.

    2000-01-01

    The Asotin Creek Model Watershed Program (ACMWP) is the primary entity coordinating habitat projects on both private and public lands within the Asotin Creek watershed. The Asotin Creek watershed covers approximately 325 square miles in the Blue Mountains of southeastern Washington in WRIA 35. According to WDFW's Priority WRIA's by At-Risk Stock Significance Map, it is the highest priority in southeastern WA. Snake River spring chinook salmon, summer steelhead and bull trout, which are listed under the Endangered Species Act (ESA), are present in the watershed. The ACMWP began coordinating habitat projects in 1995. Approximately two hundred seventy-six projects have been implemented through the ACMWP as of 1999. Twenty of these projects were funded in part through Bonneville Power Administration's 1999 Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. These projects used a variety of methods to enhance and protect watershed conditions. In-stream work for fish habitat included construction of hard structures (e.g. vortex rock weirs), meander reconstruction, placement of large woody debris (LWD) and whole trees and improvements to off-channel rearing habitat; thirty-eight were created with these structures. Three miles of stream benefited from riparian improvements such as vegetative plantings (17,000 trees and shrubs) and noxious weed control. Two sediment basin constructions, 67 acres of grass seeding, and seven hundred forty-five acres of minimum till were implemented to reduce sediment production and delivery to streams in the watershed.

  18. Habitat Projects Completed within the Asotin Creek Watershed, 1998 Completion Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Bradley J.

    1999-11-01

    The Asotin Creek Model Watershed Program (ACMWP) is the primary entity coordinating habitat projects on both private and public lands within the Asotin Creek watershed. The Asotin Creek watershed covers approximately 325 square miles in the Blue Mountains of southeastern Washington. Snake River spring chinook salmon, summer steelhead and bull trout, which are listed under the Endangered Species Act (ESA), are present in the watershed. The ACMWP began coordinating habitat projects in 1995. Approximately two hundred forty-six projects have been implemented through the ACMWP as of 1998. Fifty-nine of these projects were funded in part through Bonneville Power Administration's 1998 Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. These projects used a variety of methods to enhance and protect watershed conditions. In-stream work for fish habitat included construction of hard structures (e.g. vortex rock weirs), meander reconstruction, placement of large woody debris (LWD) and whole trees and improvements to off-channel rearing habitat; one hundred thirty-nine pools were created with these structures. Three miles of stream benefited from riparian improvements such as fencing, vegetative plantings, and noxious weed control. Two alternative water developments were completed, providing off-stream-watering sources for livestock. 20,500 ft of upland terrace construction, seven sediment basin construction, one hundred eighty-seven acres of grass seeding, eight hundred fifty acres of direct seeding and eighteen sediment basin cleanouts were implemented to reduce sediment production and delivery to streams in the watershed.

  19. Tritium stripping in a nitrogen glove box using palladium/zeolite and SAES St 198{trademark}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klien, J.E.; Wermer, J.R.

    1995-01-01

    Glove box clean-up experiments were conducted in a nitrogen glove box using palladium deposited on zeolite (Pd/z) and a SAES St 198{trademark} getter as tritium stripping materials. Protium/deuterium samples spiked with tritium were released into a 620 liter glove box to simulate tritium releases in a 10,500 liter glove box. The Pd/z and the SAES St 198{trademark} stripper beds produced a reduction in tritium activity of approximately two to three orders of magnitude and glove box clean-up was limited by a persistent background tritium activity level. Attempts to significantly reduce the glove box activity to lower levels without purging were unsuccessful.

  20. Tritium stripping in a nitrogen glove box using palladium/zeolite and SAES St 198

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klein, J.E.; Wermer, J.R.

    1995-10-01

    Glove box clean-up experiments were conducted in a nitrogen glove box using palladium deposited on zeolite (Pd/z) and a SAES St 198 getter as tritium stripping materials. Protium/deuterium samples spiked with tritium were released into a 620 liter glove box to simulate tritium releases in a 10,500 liter glove box. The Pd/z and the SAES St 198 stripper beds produced a reduction in tritium activity of approximately two to three orders of magnitude and glove box clean-up was limited by a persistent background tritium activity level. Attempts to significantly reduce the glove box activity to lower levels without purging were unsuccessful. 3 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  1. FY 1991 Measurements and Characterization Branch annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Osterwald, C.R.; Dippo, P.C. [eds.

    1992-11-01

    The Measurements and Characterization Branch of the National Renewable Laboratory (NREL) provides comprehensive photovoltaic (PV) materials, devices, characterization, measurement, fabrication, modeling research, and support for the international PV research community, in the context of the US Department of Energy`s Photovoltaic Research Program goals. This report summarizes the progress of the Branch from 31 January 1991 through 31 January 1992. The eight technical sections present a succinct overview of the capabilities and accomplishments of each group in the Branch. The Branch is comprised of the following groups: Surface and interface Analysis; Materials Characterization; Device Development; Electro-optical Characterization; Advanced PV module Performance and Reliability Research; Cell Performance Characterization; Surface Interactions, Modification, and Stability; and FTIR Spectroscopic Research. The including measurements and tests of PV materials, cells, submodules, and modules. The report contains a comprehensive bibliography of 77 branch originated journal and conference publications, which were authored in collaboration with, or in support of, approximately 135 university, industrial, government, and in-house research groups.

  2. Subsea pipeline gets welded branch without halting flow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    West, A.; Hutt, G.; Starsmore, R.

    1995-12-11

    In October 1994, a 16 in. welded branch was installed without interruption to production onto Wintershall Noordzee BV`s 36-in. gas pipeline from the K13-A platform in the Dutch sector of the North Sea to Den helder, The Netherlands. The procedure is the first successfully to combine hyperbaric welding and subsea hot tapping without interruption to production. Developers of new fields can now consider exporting product without interrupting existing production and through existing infrastructure even if no convenient tie-in locations exist. Unocal evaluated export options and established that the most attractive alternative was to export gas into the Wintershall 36-in. K13-A to Den Helder pipeline. Various options for installing a branch included the following: flooding the pipeline and installing a conventional tee; stopping production and installing a welded branch followed by hot tapping; and continuing production and installing a welded branch followed by hot tapping. The chosen scheme was to retrofit a subsea side-tap assembly. This was achieved by installation of a welded branch followed by hot tapping into the 36-in. pipeline. The paper describes location determination, schedules, onshore preparation, and offshore work.

  3. A Logistic Branching Process Alternative to the Wright-Fisher Model R. B. Campbell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Campbell, Russell Bruce

    A Logistic Branching Process Alternative to the Wright-Fisher Model R. B. Campbell Department://www.math.uni.edu/campbell (319) 273-2447 Running head: Logistic Branching Process Keywords: Branching Process, Coalescent approximation to the Wright-Fisher model. A logistic branching process is introduced in order to limit

  4. Optimization Online - RBFOpt: an open-source library for black-box ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alberto Costa

    2014-09-12

    Sep 12, 2014 ... RBFOpt: an open-source library for black-box optimization with costly function evaluations. Alberto Costa ... Classification Scheme · Credits

  5. Renormalized field theory of collapsing directed randomly branched polymers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hans-Karl Janssen; Frank Wevelsiep; Olaf Stenull

    2009-10-01

    We present a dynamical field theory for directed randomly branched polymers and in particular their collapse transition. We develop a phenomenological model in the form of a stochastic response functional that allows us to address several interesting problems such as the scaling behavior of the swollen phase and the collapse transition. For the swollen phase, we find that by choosing model parameters appropriately, our stochastic functional reduces to the one describing the relaxation dynamics near the Yang-Lee singularity edge. This corroborates that the scaling behavior of swollen branched polymers is governed by the Yang-Lee universality class as has been known for a long time. The main focus of our paper lies on the collapse transition of directed branched polymers. We show to arbitrary order in renormalized perturbation theory with $\\varepsilon$-expansion that this transition belongs to the same universality class as directed percolation.

  6. Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Evaluation Program; Meadow Creek vs. Lake Whatcom Stock Kokanee Salmon Investigations in Lake Roosevelt, 2001 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McLellan, Holly; Scholz, Allan

    2002-03-01

    Lake Roosevelt has been stocked with Lake Whatcom stock kokanee since 1989 with the primary objective of creating a self-sustaining recreational fishery. Due to low return numbers, it was hypothesized a stock of kokanee, native to the upper Columbia River, might perform better than the coastal Lake Whatcom strain. Kokanee from Meadow Creek, a tributary of Kootenay Lake, British Columbia were selected as an alternative stock. Matched pair releases of Lake Whatcom and Meadow Creek kokanee were made from Sherman Creek Hatchery in late June 2000 and repeated in 2001. Stock performance between Lake Whatcom and Meadow Creek kokanee was evaluated using three performance measures; (1) the number of returns to Sherman Creek, the primary egg collection facility, (2) the number of returns to other tributaries and (3) the number of returns to the creel. Kokanee were collected during five passes through the reservoir via electrofishing, which included 87 tributary mouths during the fall of 2000 and 2001. Chi-square analysis indicated age two Meadow Creek kokanee returned to Sherman Creek in significantly higher numbers when compared to the Whatcom stock in 2000 ({chi}{sup 2} = 736.6; d.f. = 1; P < 0.01) and 2001 ({chi}{sup 2} = 156.2; d.f. = 1; P < 0.01). Reservoir wide recoveries of age two kokanee had similar results in 2000 ({chi}{sup 2} = 735.3; d.f. = 1; P < 0.01) and 2001 ({chi}{sup 2} = 150.1; d.f. = 1; P < 0.01). Six Lake Whatcom and seven Meadow Creek three year olds were collected in 2001. The sample size of three year olds was too small for statistical analysis. No kokanee were collected during creel surveys in 2000, and two (age three kokanee) were collected in 2001. Neither of the hatchery kokanee collected were coded wire tagged, therefore stock could not be distinguished. After two years of monitoring, neither Meadow Creek or Lake Whatcom kokanee appear to be capable of providing a run of three-year-old spawners to sustain stocking efforts. The small number of hatchery three-year-olds collected indicated that the current stocking methods will continue to produce a limited jacking run largely composed of precocious males and a small number of three-year-olds. However, supplemental creel data indicated anglers harvested two-year-old hatchery kokanee 30-45 days after release. Supplemental creel data should continue to be collected to accurately evaluate hatchery contributions to the creel.

  7. Status of the experiments on radiative branch of decay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. U. Khafizov; S. V. Tolokonnikov; V. A. Solovei; M. R. Kolhidashvili

    2009-03-09

    This report is dedicated to the investigation of radiative neutron decay. The theoretical spectrum of radiative gamma quanta, calculated within the framework of the standard electroweak interaction model, is compared with our experimental value of branching ratio (B.R.) for radiative neutron decay. It is noted that the study of radiative branches of elementary particle decay occupies a central place in the fundamental problem of searching for deviations from the standard electroweak model. Particular attention is paid to analyzing the results of the experiment conducted at the FRMII reactor of the Technical University of Munich in 2005.

  8. Vere-Jones' self-similar branching model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saichev, A. [Mathematical Department, Nizhny Novgorod State University, Gagarin prosp. 23, Nizhny Novgorod, 603950 (Russian Federation); Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Sornette, D. [Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics and Department of Earth and Space Sciences, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Laboratoire de Physique de la Matiere Condensee, CNRS UMR 6622 and Universitee de Nice-Sophia Antipolis, 06108 Nice Cedex 2 (France)

    2005-11-01

    Motivated by its potential application to earthquake statistics as well as for its intrinsic interest in the theory of branching processes, we study the exactly self-similar branching process introduced recently by Vere-Jones. This model extends the ETAS class of conditional self-excited branching point-processes of triggered seismicity by removing the problematic need for a minimum (as well as maximum) earthquake size. To make the theory convergent without the need for the usual ultraviolet and infrared cutoffs, the distribution of magnitudes m{sup '} of daughters of first-generation of a mother of magnitude m has two branches m{sup '}m with exponent {beta}+d, where {beta} and d are two positive parameters. We investigate the condition and nature of the subcritical, critical, and supercritical regime in this and in an extended version interpolating smoothly between several models. We predict that the distribution of magnitudes of events triggered by a mother of magnitude m over all generations has also two branches m{sup '}m with exponent {beta}+h, with h=d{radical}(1-s), where s is the fraction of triggered events. This corresponds to a renormalization of the exponent d into h by the hierarchy of successive generations of triggered events. For a significant part of the parameter space, the distribution of magnitudes over a full catalog summed over an average steady flow of spontaneous sources (immigrants) reproduces the distribution of the spontaneous sources with a single branch and is blind to the exponents {beta},d of the distribution of triggered events. Since the distribution of earthquake magnitudes is usually obtained with catalogs including many sequences, we conclude that the two branches of the distribution of aftershocks are not directly observable and the model is compatible with real seismic catalogs. In summary, the exactly self-similar Vere-Jones model provides an attractive new approach to model triggered seismicity, which alleviates delicate questions on the role of magnitude cutoffs in other non-self-similar models. The new prediction concerning two branches in the distribution of magnitudes of aftershocks could be tested with recently introduced stochastic reconstruction methods, tailored to disentangle the different triggered sequences.

  9. CTUIR Grande Ronde River Watershed Restoration Program McCoy Creek/McIntyre Creek Road Crossing, 1995-1999 Progress Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Childs, Allen B.

    2000-08-01

    The Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) and Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) entered into a contract agreement beginning in 1996 to fund watershed restoration and enhancement actions and contribute to recovery of fish and wildlife resources and water quality in the Grande Ronde River Basin. The CTUIR's habitat program is closely coordinated with the Grande Ronde Model Watershed Program and multiple agencies and organizations within the basin. The CTUIR has focused during the past 4 years in the upper portions of the Grande Ronde Subbasin (upstream of LaGrande, Oregon) on several major project areas in the Meadow, McCoy, and McIntyre Creek watersheds and along the mainstem Grande Ronde River. This Annual Report provides an overview of individual projects and accomplishments.

  10. 1Black Box Software Testing Copyright 2003 Cem Kaner The Role of Testers in XP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1Black Box Software Testing Copyright © 2003 Cem Kaner The Role of Testers in XP Cem Kaner August reflect the views of the National Science Foundation (NSF). #12;2Black Box Software Testing Copyright © 2003 Cem Kaner Testing: The Traditional View · Many years ago, the software development community

  11. AN IMPROVEMENT IN HATCHING AND REARING BOXES; WITH NOTES ON THE CONTINUOUS .FEEDING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of which the box is built, its rectangular form, and, last but not least, the position at which the waste. In the course of a few days the inside of the box up to water level- assuming, of course, that it is in use

  12. Probabilistic Analysis of Onion Routing in a Black-box Model JOAN FEIGENBAUM, Yale University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Tor 1. INTRODUCTION Every day, half a million people use the onion-routing network Tor [Dingledine etA Probabilistic Analysis of Onion Routing in a Black-box Model JOAN FEIGENBAUM, Yale University a probabilistic analysis of onion routing. The analysis is presented in a black-box model of anonymous

  13. A New Cauchy-Based Black-Box Technique for Uncertainty in Risk Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kreinovich, Vladik

    A New Cauchy-Based Black-Box Technique for Uncertainty in Risk Analysis V. Kreinovich a,, S information in risk analysis. Several such techniques have been presented, often on a heuristic basis. Key words: Uncertainty, Risk analysis, Monte-Carlo, black-box techniques PACS: 02.70.Tt, 02.70.Uu, 02

  14. A New CauchyBased BlackBox Technique for Uncertainty in Risk Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kreinovich, Vladik

    A New Cauchy­Based Black­Box Technique for Uncertainty in Risk Analysis V. Kreinovich a;\\Lambda , S information in risk analysis. Several such techniques have been presented, often on a heuristic basis. Key words: Uncertainty, Risk analysis, Monte­Carlo, black­box techniques PACS: 02.70.Tt, 02.70.Uu, 02

  15. S-box pipelining using genetic algorithms for high-throughput AES implementations: How

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR)

    S-box pipelining using genetic algorithms for high-throughput AES implementations: How fast can we. In this manuscript, we explore how Genetic Algorithms (GAs) can be used for pipelining the AES substitution box based the implementation area [5,6]. However, when considering fast hardware implementations, pipelining is an obvious

  16. Regulating the ethylene response of a plant by modulation of F-box proteins

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Guo, Hongwei (La Jolla, CA); Ecker, Joseph R. (Carlsbad, CA)

    2010-02-02

    The invention relates to transgenic plants having reduced sensitivity to ethylene as a result of having a recombinant nucleic acid encoding a F-box protein, and a method of producing a transgenic plant with reduced ethylene sensitivity by transforming the plant with a nucleic acid sequence encoding a F-box protein.

  17. On highly nonlinear S-boxes and their inability to thwart DPA attacks (completed version)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR)

    of transparency order of S-boxes. This new characteristic is related to the ability of an S-box, used in a cryptosystem in which the round keys are introduced by addition, to thwart single-bit or multi-bit DPA attacks- tion about twice slower). We prove lower bounds on the transparency order of highly nonlinear S

  18. Sediment and radionuclide transport in rivers: radionuclide transport modeling for Cattaraugus and Buttermilk Creeks, New York

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Onishi, Y.; Yabusaki, S.B.; Kincaid, C.T.; Skaggs, R.L.; Walters, W.H.

    1982-12-01

    SERATRA, a transient, two-dimensional (laterally-averaged) computer model of sediment-contaminant transport in rivers, satisfactorily resolved the distribution of sediment and radionuclide concentrations in the Cattaraugus Creek stream system in New York. By modeling the physical processes of advection, diffusion, erosion, deposition, and bed armoring, SERATRA routed three sediment size fractions, including cohesive soils, to simulate three dynamic flow events. In conjunction with the sediment transport, SERATRA computed radionuclide levels in dissolved, suspended sediment, and bed sediment forms for four radionuclides (/sup 137/Cs, /sup 90/Sr, /sup 239/ /sup 240/Pu, and /sup 3/H). By accounting for time-dependent sediment-radionuclide interaction in the water column and bed, SERATA is a physically explicit model of radionuclide fate and migration. Sediment and radionuclide concentrations calculated by SERATA in the Cattaraugus Creek stream system are in reasonable agreement with measured values. SERATRA is in the field performance phase of an extensive testing program designed to establish the utility of the model as a site assessment tool. The model handles not only radionuclides but other contaminants such as pesticides, heavy metals and other toxic chemicals. Now that the model has been applied to four field sites, including the latest study of the Cattaraugus Creek stream system, it is recommended that a final model be validated through comparison of predicted results with field data from a carefully controlled tracer test at a field site. It is also recommended that a detailed laboratory flume be tested to study cohesive sediment transport, deposition, and erosion characteristics. The lack of current understanding of these characteristics is one of the weakest areas hindering the accurate assessment of the migration of radionuclides sorbed by fine sediments of silt and clay.

  19. Branching fraction and photon energy spectrum for b -> s gamma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ammar, Raymond G.; Bean, Alice; Besson, David Zeke; Zhao, X.

    2001-12-01

    We have measured the branching fraction and photon energy spectrum for the radiative penguin process b --> s gamma. We find B(b --> s gamma) = (3.21 +/- 0.43 +/- 0.27(-0.10)(+0.18)) x 10(-4), where the errors are statistical, ...

  20. Branching of negative streamers in free flight Andrea Rocco,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ebert, Ute

    and rapidly growing channels of high ionization penetrating a region of low or vanishing ionization under over the full streamer head. Branching then would occur due to randomly distributed ionization ava of the streamer is concentrated in a thin layer around the head rather than being smeared out over the full head

  1. Levy processes and continuous-state branching processes: part I

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L´evy processes and continuous-state branching processes: part I Andreas E. Kyprianou, Department motion has continuous paths whereas a Poisson process does not. Secondly, a Poisson process is a non another, we see that they also have a lot in common. Both processes have right continuous paths with left

  2. Branching ratios for the beta decay of Na-21 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iacob, V. E.; Hardy, John C.; Gagliardi, Carl A.; Goodwin, J.; Nica, N.; Park, H. I.; Tabacaru, G.; Trache, L.; Tribble, Robert E.; Zhai, Y.; Towner, I. S.

    2006-01-01

    We have measured the beta-decay branching ratio for the transition from Na-21 to the first excited state of Ne-21. A recently published test of the standard model, which was based on a measurement of the beta-nu correlation ...

  3. The Polymerase Chain Reaction and Branching Processes Fengzhu Sun

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, Fengzhu - Sun, Fengzhu

    The Polymerase Chain Reaction and Branching Processes Fengzhu Sun Department of Mathematics, DRB is studied. We also study the distribution of the Hamming distance between two randomly chosen sequences long. The double-stranded DNA molecules are heated to near boiling temperature so that the double

  4. PICO: An Object-Oriented Framework for Branch and Bound

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ECKSTEIN,JONATHAN; HART,WILLIAM E.; PHILLIPS,CYNTHIA A.

    2000-12-01

    This report describes the design of PICO, a C++ framework for implementing general parallel branch-and-bound algorithms. The PICO framework provides a mechanism for the efficient implementation of a wide range of branch-and-bound methods on an equally wide range of parallel computing platforms. We first discuss the basic architecture of PICO, including the application class hierarchy and the package's serial and parallel layers. We next describe the design of the serial layer, and its central notion of manipulating subproblem states. Then, we discuss the design of the parallel layer, which includes flexible processor clustering and communication rates, various load balancing mechanisms, and a non-preemptive task scheduler running on each processor. We describe the application of the package to a branch-and-bound method for mixed integer programming, along with computational results on the ASCI Red massively parallel computer. Finally we describe the application of the branch-and-bound mixed-integer programming code to a resource constrained project scheduling problem for Pantex.

  5. Detector for measuring the ?+ ? e+v branching fraction

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aguilar-Arevalo, A. A.; Aoki, M.; Blecher, M.; Bruch, D. vom; Bryman, D.; Comfort, J.; Cuen-Rochin, S.; Doria, L.; Gumplinger, P.; Hussein, A.; et al

    2015-04-13

    The PIENU experiment at TRIUMF is aimed at a measurement of the branching ratio Re/u = ?((?+ ? e+ve) + (?+ ? e+ve?))/?((?+ ? ?+v?) + (?+ ? ?+v??)) with precision more »This paper provides a description of the PIENU experimental apparatus and its performance in pursuit of Re/u« less

  6. Measurement of the branching fraction for D+ -> kappa(-) pi(+) pi(+)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ammar, Raymond G.; Ball, S.; Baringer, Philip S.; Bean, Alice; Besson, David Zeke; Coppage, Don; Copty, N.; Davis, Robin E. P.; Hancock, N.; Kelly, M.; Kwak, Nowhan; Lam, H.

    1994-04-01

    Using the CLEO II detector at the Cornell Electron Storage Ring we have measured the ratio of branching fractions, B(D+ --> K-pi+pi+)/B(D0 --> K-pi+ = 2.35 +/- 0.16 +/- 0.16. Our recent measurement of B(D0 --> K-pi+) then gives B(D+ --> K-pi+pi...

  7. RUSSIAN ACADEMY OF SCIENCE Lenin Order of Siberian Branch

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smaluk, Victor

    is important to know the energy spread contribution into the total systematic error. Information aboutRUSSIAN ACADEMY OF SCIENCE Lenin Order of Siberian Branch G.I. Budker INSTITUTE OF NUCLEAR PHYSICS V.A. Kiselev, N.Yu. Muchnoi, O.I. Meshkov, V.V. Smaluk, V.N. Zhilich, A.N. Zhuravlev BEAM ENERGY

  8. The branching process with logistic growth By Amaury Lambert

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lambert, Amaury

    in ecology, and translates mathematically into a quadratic death rate. The logistic branching process, or LB) combined with constant coagulation rate (the death rate is proportional to the number of possible, the first birth will arrive at rate n and the first death at rate dn+cn(n-1). This size-dependence complies

  9. Convergence in gradient systems with branching of equilibria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Galaktionov, V A [University of Bath (United Kingdom); Pohozaev, Stanislav I [Steklov Mathematical Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences (Russian Federation); Shishkov, A E [Institute of Applied Mathematics and Mechanics of the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Donetsk (Ukraine)

    2007-06-30

    The basic model is a semilinear elliptic equation with coercive C{sup 1} non-linearity: {delta}{psi}+f({psi})=0 in {omega}, {psi}=0 on {partial_derivative}{omega}, where {omega} subset of R{sup N} is a bounded smooth domain. The main hypothesis (H{sub R}) about resonance branching is as follows: if a branching of equilibria occurs at a point {psi} with k-dimensional kernel of the linearized operator {delta}+f'({psi})I, then the branching subset S{sub k} at {psi} is a locally smooth k-dimensional manifold. For N=1 the first result on the stabilization to a single equilibrium is due to Zelenyak (1968). It is shown that Zelenyak's approach, which is based on the analysis of Lyapunov functions, can be extended to general gradient systems in Hilbert spaces with smooth resonance branching. The case of asymptotically small non-autonomous perturbations of such systems is also considered. The approach developed here represents an alternative to Hale's stabilization method (1992) and other similar techniques in the theory of gradient systems. Bibliography: 32 titles.

  10. Power Grid Verification Using Node and Branch Nahi Abdul Ghani

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Najm, Farid N.

    conservative and tight LP. Results show a dramatic reduction in the number of LPs thus making vectorless grid-case voltage drops which, in turn, entails the solution of as many linear programs (LPs) as there are nodes among node voltage drops and among branch currents. This allows us to replace a group of LPs by one

  11. Continuum Cascade Model: Branching Random Walk for Traveling Wave

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yoshiaki Itoh

    2015-07-15

    The food web is a directed graph in which nodes label species and directed links represent the predation between species. Cascade models generate random food webs. The recursion to obtain the probability distribution of the longest chain length has the solution with traveling wave. We consider a branching random walk to study the asymptotic probability on the wave front.

  12. Post-Fire Debris-Flow Hazard Assessment of the Area Burned by the 2013 Beaver Creek Fire near Hailey, Central Idaho

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torgersen, Christian

    Post-Fire Debris-Flow Hazard Assessment of the Area Burned by the 2013 Beaver Creek Fire near-flow hazard assessment of the area burned by the 2013 Beaver Creek Fire near Hailey, central Idaho: U­1273 Prepared in cooperation with Blaine County, Idaho #12;#12;Post-Fire Debris-Flow Hazard Assessment

  13. Correlation of stratigraphy with revegetation conditions at the Gibbons Creek Lignite Mine, Grimes County, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parisot, Laurence D.

    1991-01-01

    (after Ott, 1988). . 2 Table for determining the tail area (after Ott, 1988). . . . 59 60 LIST OF FIGURES Figure Page 1 Lignite resources in Texas 2 Use of dragline for surface-mining at the Gibbons Creek Mine, Texas. . 3 3 Method of surface... of the lignite in a trench involves the removal of the overburden with the use of a dragline (Figure 2). When the lignite has been extracted from the cut, the trench is backfilled with the overburden of the adjacent trench. This new overburden forms the spoil...

  14. EA-1895: Lolo Creek Permanent Weir Construction near town of Weippe, Clearwater County, Idaho

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE’s Bonneville Power Administration was preparing this EA to evaluate the potential environmental impacts of replacing an existing seasonal fish weir with a permanent weir, which would have been used to monitor federally-listed Snake River steelhead and collect spring Chinook salmon adults to support ongoing supplementation programs in the watershed. The Bureau of Land Management, a cooperating agency, preliminarily determined Lolo Creek to be suitable for Congressional designation into the Wild and Scenic River System. The EA included a Wild and Scenic River Section 7 analysis. This project was canceled.

  15. Mineral resources of the Home Creek wilderness study area, Harney County, Oregon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vander Meulen, D.B.; Griscom, A.; King, H.D.; Vercoutere, T.L.; Moyle, P.R.

    1988-01-01

    This book discusses the Home Creek Wilderness Study Area, on the western slope of Steens Mountain in the northern Basin and Range physiographic province of southeastern Oregon. The area is underlain by Miocene Steens Basalt. Isolated outcrops of the Devine Canyon ash-flow tuff unconformably overlie the Steens Basalt. Pleistocene shoreline deposits and Holocene dunes are exposed in the western part of the study area, moderate potential for sand and gravel resources in lake shoreline deposits, and low potential for geothermal energy throughout the study area.

  16. EA-1978: Sand Creek Winds, McCone County, Montana | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum Based|Department of Energy 8:Final78: Sand Creek Winds, McCone County,

  17. Bear Creek Valley Floodplain Hot Spot Removal Action Project Plan, Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-01-01

    The Bear Creek Valley Floodplain Hot Spot Removal Action Project Plan, Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (Y/ER-301) was prepared (1) to safely, cost-effectively, and efficiently evaluate the environmental impact of solid material in the two debris areas in the context of industrial land uses (as defined in the Bear Creek Valley Feasibility Study) to support the Engineering Evaluation/Cost Assessment and (2) to evaluate, define, and implement the actions to mitigate these impacts. This work was performed under Work Breakdown Structure 1.x.01.20.01.08.

  18. UW School of Oceanography Box 357940 206-543-5062 UW EH&S Radiation Safety Section Box 354400 201 Hall Health Seattle WA 98195-4400 206-543-0463

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Riser, Stephen C.

    /Position: Address: Period of Use: From To Office Phone Number: Email Address: Cell Phone Number: 2. IndividualUW School of Oceanography Box 357940 206-543-5062 UW EH&S Radiation Safety Section Box 354400 201-543-5062 UW EH&S Radiation Safety Section Box 354400 201 Hall Health Seattle WA 98195-4400 206

  19. VCU International Admissions 408 West Franklin Street, P.O. Box 843043, Richmond, Virginia 23284-3012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gough, Christopher M.

    VCU International Admissions 408 West Franklin Street, P.O. Box 843043, Richmond, Virginia 23284-3012

  20. Final review of the Campbell Creek demonstrations showcased by Tennessee Valley Authority

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gehl, Anthony C.; Munk, Jeffrey D.; Jackson, Roderick K.; Boudreaux, Philip R.; Miller, William A.; New, Joshua Ryan; Khowailed, Giannate

    2015-06-01

    The Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) Technology Innovation, Energy Efficiency, Power Delivery and Utilization Office funded and managed a showcase demonstration located in the suburbs of west Knox county, Tennessee. Work started March 2008 with the goal of documenting best practices for retrofitting existing homes and for building new high-efficiency homes. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) provided technical support. An analytical base was developed for helping homeowners, homebuyers, builders, practitioners and the TVA make informed economic decisions for the materials and incentives necessary to build a new high-efficiency home or retrofit an existing home. New approaches to more efficiently control active energy subsystems and information for selecting or upgrading to Energy Star appliances, changing all lights to 100% CFL s and upgrading windows to low-E gas filled glazing yields a 40% energy savings with neutral cash flow for the homeowner. Passive designs were reviewed and recommendations made for envelope construction that is durable and energy efficient. The Campbell Creek project complements the DOE Building Technologies Program strategic goal. Results of the project created technologies and design approaches that will yield affordable energy efficient homes. The 2010 DOE retrofit goals are to find retrofit packages that attain 30% whole house energy savings as documented by pre and post Home Energy rating scores (HERS). Campbell Creek met these goals.

  1. Restoring Anadromous Fish Habitat in the Lapwai Creek Watershed, Technical Report 2003-2006.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rasmussen, Lynn

    2007-02-01

    The Restoring Anadromous Fish Habitat in the Lapwai Creek Watershed is a multi-phase project to enhance steelhead trout in the Lapwai Creek watershed by improving salmonid spawning and rearing habitat. Habitat is limited by extreme high runoff events, low summer flows, high water temperatures, poor instream cover, spawning gravel siltation, and sediment, nutrient and bacteria loading. Funded by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) as part of the Northwest Power Planning Council's Fish and Wildlife Program, the project assists in mitigating damage to steelhead runs caused by the Columbia River hydroelectric dams. The project is sponsored by the Nez Perce Soil and Water Conservation District (District). Target fish species include steelhead trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). Steelhead trout within the Snake River Basin were listed in 1997 as threatened under the Endangered Species Act. Accomplishments for the contract period December 1, 2003 through February 28, 2004 include; seven grade stabilization structures, 0.67 acres of wetland plantings, ten acres tree planting, 500 linear feet streambank erosion control, two acres grass seeding, and 120 acres weed control.

  2. Restoring Anadromous Fish Habitat in Big Canyon Creek Watershed, 2004-2005 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rasmussen, Lynn

    2006-07-01

    The ''Restoring Anadromous Fish Habitat in the Big Canyon Creek Watershed'' is a multi-phase project to enhance steelhead trout in the Big Canyon Creek watershed by improving salmonid spawning and rearing habitat. Habitat is limited by extreme high runoff events, low summer flows, high water temperatures, poor instream cover, spawning gravel siltation, and sediment, nutrient and bacteria loading. Funded by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) as part of the Northwest Power Planning Council's Fish and Wildlife Program, the project assists in mitigating damage to steelhead runs caused by the Columbia River hydroelectric dams. The project is sponsored by the Nez Perce Soil and Water Conservation District. Target fish species include steelhead trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). Steelhead trout within the Snake River Basin were listed in 1997 as threatened under the Endangered Species Act. Accomplishments for the contract period September 1, 2004 through October 31, 2005 include; 2.7 riparian miles treated, 3.0 wetland acres treated, 5,263.3 upland acres treated, 106.5 riparian acres treated, 76,285 general public reached, 3,000 students reached, 40 teachers reached, 18 maintenance plans completed, temperature data collected at 6 sites, 8 landowner applications received and processed, 14 land inventories completed, 58 habitat improvement project designs completed, 5 newsletters published, 6 habitat plans completed, 34 projects installed, 2 educational workshops, 6 displays, 1 television segment, 2 public service announcements, a noxious weed GIS coverage, and completion of NEPA, ESA, and cultural resources requirements.

  3. Wind-Turbine Gear-Box Roller-Bearing Premature-Failure Caused by Grain-Boundary Hydrogen Embrittlement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grujicic, Mica

    Wind-Turbine Gear-Box Roller-Bearing Premature-Failure Caused by Grain-Boundary Hydrogen, 2014) To help overcome the problem of horizontal-axis wind-turbine (HAWT) gear-box roller of the damage progression in, and the final failure of a prototypical HAWT gear-box roller-bearing inner raceway

  4. Regulating the ethylene response of a plant by modulation of F-box proteins

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Guo, Hongwei [Beijing, CN; Ecker, Joseph R [Carlsbad, CA

    2014-01-07

    The relationship between F-box proteins and proteins invovled in the ethylene response in plants is described. In particular, F-box proteins may bind to proteins involved in the ethylene response and target them for degradation by the ubiquitin/proteasome pathway. The transcription factor EIN3 is a key transcription factor mediating ethylne-regulated gene expression and morphological responses. EIN3 is degraded through a ubiquitin/proteasome pathway mediated by F-box proteins EBF1 and EBF2. The link between F-box proteins and the ethylene response is a key step in modulating or regulating the response of a plant to ethylene. Described herein are transgenic plants having an altered sensitivity to ethylene, and methods for making transgenic plant haing an althered sensitivity to ethylene by modulating the level of activity of F-box proteins. Methods of altering the ethylene response in a plant by modulating the activity or expression of an F-box protein are described. Also described are methods of identifying compounds that modulate the ethylene response in plants by modulating the level of F-box protein expression or activity.

  5. METHODOLOGY FOR THE NUMBER OF FILTERS NEEDED IN A WASTE BOX

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MARUSICH, R.M.

    2007-05-17

    Waste in large waste boxes can generate volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and hydrogen. These waste boxes may or may not have flow paths out of them (although it is believed that most do). These boxes will be retrieved, sampled, and then coated with polyurea. After coating, filters will be installed in the box to keep the concentration of VOCs and hydrogen acceptably low. The MDSA requires that a vent path must be protected during application of the polyurea coating. If the box has been sampled then it is vented and the vent path must be protected. This report provides a model in which the user inputs the free volume of the waste box, sample concentration (ppm of total VOC or volume fraction hydrogen) along with the number of filters to be placed into the waste box lid. Using this information, the model provides an estimate of concentration vs. time or the number of filters needed to reduce the concentration by a specified fraction. If the equations from this report are placed into spreadsheets which are then used to demonstrate TSR compliance, the spreadsheets must come under the Software QA Plan for such documents. Chapters 2 and 3 present the theory. Chapter 4 presents the method with examples of its use found in Chapter 5. Chapter 6 provides the basis far the use of 1,000 ppm as the concentration below which the method is valid under any condition.

  6. Transuranic and Low-Level Boxed Waste Form Nondestructive Assay Technology Overview and Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G. Becker; M. Connolly; M. McIlwain

    1999-02-01

    The Mixed Waste Focus Area (MWFA) identified the need to perform an assessment of the functionality and performance of existing nondestructive assay (NDA) techniques relative to the low-level and transuranic waste inventory packaged in large-volume box-type containers. The primary objectives of this assessment were to: (1) determine the capability of existing boxed waste form NDA technology to comply with applicable waste radiological characterization requirements, (2) determine deficiencies associated with existing boxed waste assay technology implementation strategies, and (3) recommend a path forward for future technology development activities, if required. Based on this assessment, it is recommended that a boxed waste NDA development and demonstration project that expands the existing boxed waste NDA capability to accommodate the indicated deficiency set be implemented. To ensure that technology will be commercially available in a timely fashion, it is recommended this development and demonstration project be directed to the private sector. It is further recommended that the box NDA technology be of an innovative design incorporating sufficient NDA modalities, e.g., passive neutron, gamma, etc., to address the majority of the boxed waste inventory. The overall design should be modular such that subsets of the overall NDA system can be combined in optimal configurations tailored to differing waste types.

  7. Box- and peanut-shaped bulges: I. Statistics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Luetticke; R. -J. Dettmar; M. Pohlen

    2000-06-26

    We present a classification for bulges of a complete sample of ~1350 edge-on disk galaxies derived from the RC3 (Third Reference Catalogue of Bright Galaxies, de Vaucouleurs et al. 1991). A visual classification of the bulges using the Digitized Sky Survey (DSS) in three types of b/p bulges or as an elliptical type is presented and supported by CCD images. NIR observations reveal that dust extinction does almost not influence the shape of bulges. There is no substantial difference between the shape of bulges in the optical and in the NIR. Our analysis reveals that 45% of all bulges are box- and peanut-shaped (b/p). The frequency of b/p bulges for all morphological types from S0 to Sd is > 40%. In particular, this is for the first time that such a large frequency of b/p bulges is reported for galaxies as late as Sd. The fraction of the observed b/p bulges is large enough to explain the b/p bulges by bars.

  8. WHAT'S INSIDE THE BLACK BOX - EXPLAINING PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT TO STAKEHOLDERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seitz, R; Elmer Wilhite, E

    2009-01-06

    The performance assessment (PA) process is being applied to support an increasing variety of waste management decisions that involve the whole spectrum of stakeholders. As with many technical tools, the PA process can be seen as a black box, which can be difficult to understand when implemented. Recognizing the increasing use of PA and the concerns about difficulties with understanding, the Savannah River Site Citizens Advisory Board (CAB) made a recommendation that the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) provide a Public Educational Forum on PAs. The DOE-Headquarters Environmental Management (DOE-EM) Office of Compliance and the DOE-Savannah River (DOE-SR) responded to this recommendation by supporting the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) in developing several presentation modules that can be used to describe different aspects of the PA process. For the Public Educational Forum, the PA modules were combined with presentations on DOE perspectives, historical modeling efforts at the Savannah River Site, and review perspectives from the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The overall goals are to help the public understand how PAs are implemented and the rigor that is applied, and to provide insight into the use of PAs for waste management decision-making.

  9. Controlled synthesis of hyper-branched inorganic nanocrystals with rich three-dimensional structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kanaras, Antonios G.; Sonnichsen, Carsten; Liu, Haitao; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2005-01-01

    Figure 1. Three-dimensional structure of the hyper-branchedhyper-branched inorganic nanocrystals with rich three-dimensionalhyper- branched particles not only extend the available three-dimensional

  10. Revised Final Independent External Peer Review Report for the East Branch Dam, Clarion River,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Revised Final Independent External Peer Review Report for the East Branch Dam, Clarion River, Elk County, Pennsylvania: Dam Safety Modification Report Prepared by Battelle Memorial Institute Prepared Report East Branch Dam, Clarion River, Elk County, Pennsylvania: Dam Safety Modification Report

  11. Towards a consistent description of in-medium parton branching

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Apolinário, Liliana; Milhano, Guilherme; Salgado, Carlos A

    2015-01-01

    Ultra-relativistic heavy-ion collisions are a window of opportunity to study QCD matter under extreme conditions of temperature and density, such as the quark-gluon plasma. Among the several possibilities, the study of jet quenching - generic name given to in-medium energy loss modifications of the parton branching - is a powerful tool to assess the properties of this new state of matter. The description of the parton shower is very well understood in vacuum (controlled reference) and medium-induced modifications of this process can be experimentally accessed through jet measurements. Current experimental data, however, cannot be entirely described only with energy loss phenomena. Transverse momentum broadening and decoherence effects, both theoretically established by now, and their interplay are essential to build a consistent picture of the medium-modifications of the parton branching and to achieve a correct description of the current experimental data. In this write-up, we will present the latest develop...

  12. Branch dependence in the "consistent histories" approach to quantum mechanics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas Müller

    2006-11-12

    In the consistent histories formalism one specifies a family of histories as an exhaustive set of pairwise exclusive descriptions of the dynamics of a quantum system. We define branching families of histories, which strike a middle ground between the two available mathematically precise definitions of families of histories, viz., product families and Isham's history projector operator formalism. The former are too narrow for applications, and the latter's generality comes at a certain cost, barring an intuitive reading of the ``histories''. Branching families retain the intuitiveness of product families, they allow for the interpretation of a history's weight as a probability, and they allow one to distinguish two kinds of coarse-graining, leading to reconsidering the motivation for the consistency condition.

  13. Thermodynamic Branch in the Chemical System Response to External Impact

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zilbergleyt, B

    2012-01-01

    The paper gives an account of a detailed investigation of the thermodynamic branch as a path of the chemical system deviation from its isolated thermodynamic equilibrium under an external impact. For a combination of direct and reverse reactions in the same chemical system, full thermodynamic branch is presented by an S-shaped curve, whose ends asymptotically achieve appropriate initial states, which, in turn, are logistic ends of the opposite reactions. The slope tangents of the steepest parts of the curves, the areas of the maximum rate of the shift growth vs. the external thermodynamic force, occurred to be directly proportional to the force and, simultaneously, linearly proportional to the thermodynamic equivalent of chemical reaction, which is the ratio between the amount in moles of any reaction participant, transformed in an isolated system, along the reaction way from its initial state to thermodynamic equilibrium, to its stoichiometric coefficient. The found linearity is valid for arbitrary combinati...

  14. The genealogy of branching Brownian motion with absorption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berestycki, Julien; Schweinsberg, Jason

    2010-01-01

    We consider a system of particles which perform branching Brownian motion with negative drift and are killed upon reaching zero, in the near-critical regime where the total population stays roughly constant with approximately N particles. We show that the characteristic time scale for the evolution of this population is of order (log N)^3, in the sense that when time is measured in these units, the scaled number of particles converges to a variant of Neveu's continuous-state branching process. Furthermore, the genealogy of the particles is then governed by a coalescent process known as the Bolthausen-Sznitman coalescent. This validates the non-rigorous predictions by Brunet, Derrida, Muller, and Munier for a closely related model.

  15. The genealogy of extremal particles of Branching Brownian Motion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arguin, Louis-Pierre; Kistler, Nicola

    2010-01-01

    Branching Brownian Motion describes a system of particles which diffuse in space and split into offsprings according to a certain random mechanism. In virtue of the groundbreaking work by M. Bramson on the convergence of solutions of the Fisher-KPP equation to traveling waves, the law of the rightmost particle in the limit of large times is rather well understood. In this work, we address the full statistics of the extremal particles (first-, second-, third- etc. largest). In particular, we prove that in the large $t-$limit, such particles descend with overwhelming probability from ancestors having split either within a distance of order one from time $0$, or within a distance of order one from time $t$. The approach relies on characterizing, up to a certain level of precision, the paths of the extremal particles. As a byproduct, a heuristic picture of Branching Brownian Motion ``at the edge'' emerges, which sheds light on the still unknown limiting extremal process.

  16. The genealogy of branching Brownian motion with absorption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Julien Berestycki; Nathanaël Berestycki; Jason Schweinsberg

    2013-03-14

    We consider a system of particles which perform branching Brownian motion with negative drift and are killed upon reaching zero, in the near-critical regime where the total population stays roughly constant with approximately N particles. We show that the characteristic time scale for the evolution of this population is of order $(\\log N)^3$, in the sense that when time is measured in these units, the scaled number of particles converges to a variant of Neveu's continuous-state branching process. Furthermore, the genealogy of the particles is then governed by a coalescent process known as the Bolthausen-Sznitman coalescent. This validates the nonrigorous predictions by Brunet, Derrida, Muller and Munier for a closely related model.

  17. Relevance of complex branch points for partial wave analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ceci, S.; Svarc, A.; Doering, M.; Hanhart, C.; Krewald, S.; Meissner, U.-G.

    2011-07-15

    A central issue in hadron spectroscopy is to deduce--and interpret--resonance parameters, namely, pole positions and residues, from experimental data, for those are the quantities to be compared to lattice QCD or model calculations. However, not every structure in the observables derives from a resonance pole: the origin might as well be branch points, either located on the real axis (when a new channel composed of stable particles opens) or in the complex plane (when at least one of the intermediate particles is unstable). In this paper we demonstrate first the existence of such branch points in the complex plane and then show on the example of the {pi}N P{sub 11} partial wave that it is not possible to distinguish the structures induced by the latter from a true pole signal based on elastic data alone.

  18. Regulating the ethylene response of a plant by modulation of F-box proteins

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Guo, Hongwei (Beijing, CN); Ecker, Joseph R. (Carlsbad, CA)

    2011-03-08

    The invention relates to transgenic plants having reduced sensitivity to ethylene as a result of having a recombinant nucleic acid encoding an F-box protein that interacts with a EIN3 involved in an ethylene response of plants, and a method of producing a transgenic plant with reduced ethylene sensitivity by transforming the plant with a nucleic acid sequence encoding an F-box protein. The inventions also relates to methods of altering the ethylene response in a plant by modulating the activity or expression of an F-box protein.

  19. 12/16/2000 TheEASE BranchPredictor 1 Decem ber16th,2000

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, Brian L.

    12/16/2000 TheEASE BranchPredictor 1 Decem ber16th,2000 TheEASE Branch PredictorTheEASE Branch Predictor SereneBanerjee,Lizy K .John,Brian L.Evans #12;12/16/2000 TheEASE BranchPredictor 2 M otivation ance ­ Predictbranch occurrence ­ Predictbranch address · M issed speculations decreasethroughput #12;12/16/2000

  20. Branching actin network remodeling governs the force-velocity relationship

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel B. Smith; Jian Liu

    2011-11-28

    Actin networks, acting as an engine pushing against an external load, are fundamentally important to cell motility. A measure of the effectiveness of an engine is the velocity the engine is able to produce at a given force, the force-velocity curve. One type of force-velocity curve, consisting of a concave region where velocity is insensitive to increasing force followed by a decrease in velocity, is indicative of an adaptive response. In contrast, an engine whose velocity rapidly decays as a convex curve in response to increasing force would indicate a lack of adaptive response. Even taken outside of a cellular context, branching actin networks have been observed to exhibit both concave and convex force-velocity curves. The exact mechanism that can explain both force-velocity curves is not yet known. We carried out an agent-based stochastic simulation to explore such a mechanism. Our results suggest that upon loading, branching actin networks are capable of remodeling by increasing the number filaments growing against the load. Our model provides a mechanism that can account for both convex and concave force-velocity relationships observed in branching actin networks. Finally, our model gives a potential explanation to the experimentally observed force history dependence for actin network velocity.

  1. Thermodynamic Branch in the Chemical System Response to External Impact

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Zilbergleyt

    2012-03-20

    The paper gives an account of a detailed investigation of the thermodynamic branch as a path of the chemical system deviation from its isolated thermodynamic equilibrium under an external impact. For a combination of direct and reverse reactions in the same chemical system, full thermodynamic branch is presented by an S-shaped curve, whose ends asymptotically achieve appropriate initial states, which, in turn, are logistic ends of the opposite reactions. The slope tangents of the steepest parts of the curves, the areas of the maximum rate of the shift growth vs. the external thermodynamic force, occurred to be directly proportional to the force and, simultaneously, linearly proportional to the thermodynamic equivalent of chemical reaction, which is the ratio between the amount in moles of any reaction participant, transformed in an isolated system, along the reaction way from its initial state to thermodynamic equilibrium, to its stoichiometric coefficient. The found linearity is valid for arbitrary combination of the stoichiometric coefficients in a reaction of compound synthesis from chemical elements like aA+bB=AaBb, and confirms the exclusive role of the thermodynamic equivalent of transformation as the chemical system characteristic of robustness and irreversibility. Results of this work allow for quantitative evaluation of the chemical system shift from thermodynamic equilibrium along thermodynamic branch and its rate vs. the shifting force. Such an investigation became possible due to the development of discrete thermodynamics of chemical equilibria.

  2. DFI JOURNAL Vol. 6 No. 1 July 2012 [3] Jet Grouting and Safety of Tuttle Creek Dam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DFI JOURNAL Vol. 6 No. 1 July 2012 [3] Jet Grouting and Safety of Tuttle Creek Dam Timothy D. Stark to assess, particu- larly when the project involves an operational dam. Usually the reservoir is operating at non- critical conditions (normal pool or non-seismic state) during jet grouting and after construc

  3. An Assessment of the Natural and Anthropogenic Geochemistry of the Red Mountain Creek Watershed: Ironton Mining District, Colorado 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Litt, Joshua

    2014-04-29

    Red Mountain Creek is located in the rich mineralized San Juan Mountains of Southwestern Colorado, where mining from the mid 1800s through the late 1970s occurred. Sampling of the Uncompahgre River in the late 1970s, which is downstream of the five...

  4. The development of an aquatic spill model for the White Oak Creek watershed, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, R.O.

    1996-05-01

    This study develops an aquatic spill model applicable to the White Oak Creek watershed draining the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Hazardous, toxic, and radioactive chemicals are handled and stored on the laboratory reservation. An accidental spill into the White Oak Creek watershed could contaminate downstream water supplies if insufficient dilution did not occur. White Oak Creek empties into the Clinch River, which flows into the Tennessee River. Both rivers serve as municipal water supplies. The aquatic spill model provides estimates of the dilution at sequential downstream locations along White Oak creek and the Clinch River after an accidental spill of a liquid containing a radioactively decaying constituent. The location of the spill on the laboratory is arbitrary, while hydrologic conditions range from drought to extreme flood are simulated. The aquatic spill model provides quantitative estimates with which to assess water quality downstream from the site of the accidental spill, allowing an informed decision to be made whether to perform mitigating measures so that the integrity of affected water supplies is not jeopardized.

  5. An Archaeological Survey for the Offsite Utilities Associated with the Proposed Thompson's Creek Wastewater Treatment Plant in Brazos County Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, William

    2015-07-30

    An archaeological survey for the proposed offsite utilities associated with the Thompson’s Creek Waste Water Treatment Plant project along a 300 meter segment of a 12-inch water line in west-central Brazos County, Texas was conducted by Brazos...

  6. Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Evaluation Program; Meadow Creek vs. Lake Whatcom Stock Kokanee Salmon Investigations in Lake Roosevelt, Annual Report 2002.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McLellan, Holly

    2003-03-01

    Lake Whatcom, Washington kokanee have been stocked in Lake Roosevelt since 1987 with the primary objective of creating a self-sustaining fishery. Success has been limited by low recruitment to the fishery, low adult returns to hatcheries, and a skewed sex ratio. It was hypothesized that a stock native to the upper Columbia River might perform better than the coastal Lake Whatcom stock. Kokanee from Meadow Creek, a tributary of Kootenay Lake, British Columbia were selected as an alternative stock. Post smolts from each stock were released from Sherman Creek Hatchery in late June 2000 and repeated in 2001. Stock performance was evaluated using three measures; (1) number of returns to Sherman Creek, the primary egg collection facility, (2) the number of returns to 86 tributaries sampled and, (3) the number of returns to the creel. In two repeated experiments, neither Meadow Creek or Lake Whatcom kokanee appeared to be capable of providing a run of three-year old spawners to sustain stocking efforts. Less than 10 three-years olds from either stock were collected during the study period. Chi-square analysis indicated age two Meadow Creek kokanee returned to Sherman Creek and to other tributaries in significantly higher numbers when compared to the Lake Whatcom stock in both 2000 and 2001. However, preliminary data from the Spokane Tribe of Indians indicated that a large number of both stocks were precocial before they were stocked. The small number of hatchery three-year olds collected indicated that the current hatchery rearing and stocking methods will continue to produce a limited jacking run largely composed of precocious males and a small number of three-year olds. No kokanee from the study were collected during standard lake wide creel surveys. Supplemental creel data, including fishing derbies, test fisheries, and angler diaries, indicated anglers harvested two-year-old hatchery kokanee a month after release. The majority of the two-year old kokanee harvested were from a direct stock at the Fort Spokane boat launch. Only Lake Whatcom kokanee were stocked from the boat launch, therefore stock performance was not evaluated, however the high success of the stocking location will likely increase harvest of hatchery kokanee in the future. Despite low numbers of the targeted three-year olds, Meadow Creek kokanee should be stocked when possible to promote fish native to the upper Columbia River.

  7. Applied Probability Trust (21 October 2008) CONTINUOUS-STATE BRANCHING PROCESSES AND SELF-SIMILARITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Applied Probability Trust (21 October 2008) CONTINUOUS-STATE BRANCHING PROCESSES AND SELF study the -stable continuous-state branching processes (for (1, 2]) and the latter process conditioned of the Lamperti transformation for continuous state branching processes and the Lamperti transformation

  8. A BreakEven Formulation for Evaluating Branch Predictor Energy Efficiency #

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Wei

    A Break­Even Formulation for Evaluating Branch Predictor Energy Efficiency # Michele Co, Dee A demonstrated that a better branch pre­ dictor can increase the energy­efficiency of the system, even if the new a simple, effective metric for eval­ uating the tradeoff between processor energy­efficiency and branch

  9. Branching morphogenesis of the lung: new molecular insights into an old

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chuang, Pao-Tien

    Branching morphogenesis of the lung: new molecular insights into an old problem Pao-Tien Chuang1 It has been known for decades that branching morpho- genesis of the lung is mediated through reciprocal between major signaling path- ways during branching morphogenesis of the lung in mice. It has been known

  10. The genealogy of branching Brownian motion with absorption by Julien Berestycki

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berestycki, Julien

    The genealogy of branching Brownian motion with absorption by Julien Berestycki , Nathana-state branching process. Furthermore, the genealogy of the particles is then governed by a coalescent process . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64 7.2 Flows describing the genealogy of branching Brownian motion . . . . . . . . . . . . 65 7

  11. REU PROJECT ON BRANCH POLYMERS SARA BILLEY, TOM BOOTHBY, MORGAN EICHWALD, AND CHRIS FOX

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Billey, Sara

    REU PROJECT ON BRANCH POLYMERS SARA BILLEY, TOM BOOTHBY, MORGAN EICHWALD, AND CHRIS FOX 1. A branched polymer of order n in R2 is obtained by plac- ing these disks in the plane in any configuration so at the origin. Branched polymers have been studied in con- nection with molecular chemistry, statistical physics

  12. Dimensional Reduction and Crossover to Mean-Field Behavior for Branched Polymers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dimensional Reduction and Crossover to Mean-Field Behavior for Branched Polymers John Z. Imbrie will review recent results on dimensional reduction for branched polymers, and discuss implications for critical phenomena. Parisi and Sourlas argued in [PS81] that branched polymers fall into the universal- ity

  13. Sherman Creek Hatchery; Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife Fish Program, 2003 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lovrak, Jon (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Fish Management Program, Hatcheries Division, Ford, WA); Combs, Mitch (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Fish Management Program, Hatcheries Division, Kettle Falls, WA)

    2004-01-01

    Sherman Creek Hatchery's primary objective is the restoration and enhancement of the recreational and subsistence fishery in Lake Roosevelt and Banks Lake. The Sherman Creek Hatchery (SCH) was designed to rear 1.7 million kokanee fry for acclimation and imprinting during the spring and early summer. Additionally, it was designed to trap all available returning adult kokanee during the fall for broodstock operation and evaluation. Since the start of this program, the operations on Lake Roosevelt have been modified to better achieve program goals. The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Spokane Tribe of Indians and the Colville Confederated Tribes form the interagency Lake Roosevelt Hatcheries Coordination Team (LRHCT) which sets goals and objectives for both Sherman Creek and the Spokane Tribal Hatchery. The LRHCT also serves to coordinate enhancement efforts on Lake Roosevelt and Banks Lake. Since 1994 the kokanee fingerling program has changed to yearling releases. By utilizing both the hatcheries and additional net pens, up to 1,000,000 kokanee yearlings can be reared and released. The construction and operation of twenty net pens in 2001 enabled the increased production. Another significant change has been to rear up to 300,000 rainbow trout fingerling at SCH from July through October, for stocking into the volunteer net pens. This enables the Spokane Tribal Hatchery (STH) to rear additional kokanee to further the enhancement efforts on Lake Roosevelt. Current objectives include increased use of native tributary stocks where available for propagation into Upper Columbia River Basin waters. The Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Evaluation Program (LRFEP) is responsible for monitoring and evaluation on the Lake Roosevelt Projects. From 1988 to 1998, the principal sport fishery on Lake Roosevelt has shifted from walleye to include rainbow trout and kokanee salmon (Underwood et al. 1997, Tilson and Scholz 1997). The angler use, harvest rates for rainbow and kokanee and the economic value of the fishery has increased substantially during this 10-year period. The investigations on the lake also suggest that the hatchery and net pen programs have enhanced the Lake Roosevelt fishery while not negatively impacting wild and native stocks within the lake. The 2003 Fourth Annual Two Rivers Trout Derby was again a great success. The harvest and data collection were the highest level to date with 1,668 rainbow trout and 416 kokanee salmon caught. The fishermen continue to praise the volunteer net pen program and the hatchery efforts as 90% of the rainbows and 93% of the kokanee caught were of hatchery origin (Lee, 2003).

  14. Sherman Creek Hatchery; Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife Fish Program; 2002 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Combs, Mitch (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Kettle Falls, WA)

    2003-01-01

    Sherman Creek Hatchery's primary objective is the restoration and enhancement of the recreational and subsistence fishery in Lake Roosevelt and Banks Lake. The Sherman Creek Hatchery (SCH) was designed to rear 1.7 million kokanee fry for acclimation and imprinting during the spring and early summer. Additionally, it was designed to trap all available returning adult kokanee during the fall for broodstock operations and evaluations. Since the start of this program, the operations on Lake Roosevelt have been modified to better achieve program goals. The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Spokane Tribe of Indians and the Colville Confederated Tribe form the interagency Lake Roosevelt Hatcheries Coordination Team (LRHCT) which sets goals and objectives for both Sherman Creek and the Spokane Tribal Hatchery and serves to coordinate enhancement efforts on Lake Roosevelt and Banks Lake. The primary changes have been to replace the kokanee fingerling program with a yearling (post smolt) program of up to 1,000,000 fish. To construct and operate twenty net pens to handle the increased production. The second significant change was to rear up to 300,000 rainbow trout fingerling at SCH from July through October, for stocking into the volunteer net pens. This enables the Spokane Tribal Hatchery (STH) to rear additional kokanee to further the enhancement efforts on Lake Roosevelt. Current objectives include increased use of native/indigenous stocks where available for propagation into Upper Columbia River Basin Waters. The Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Evaluation Program (LRFEP) is responsible for monitoring and evaluation on the Lake Roosevelt Projects. From 1988 to 1998, the principal sport fishery on Lake Roosevelt has shifted from walleye to include rainbow trout and kokanee salmon (Underwood et al. 1997, Tilson and Scholz 1997). The angler use, harvest rates for rainbow and kokanee and the economic value of the fishery has increased substantially during this 10-year period. The investigations on the lake also suggest that the hatchery and net pen programs have enhanced the Lake Roosevelt fishery while not negatively impacting wild and native stocks within the lake. The 2002 Third Annual Two Rivers Trout Derby was again a great success with 529 rainbow trout and 80 kokanee salmon caught. The fishermen had a lot of praise for the volunteer net pen program and the hatchery efforts as 84% of the rainbows and 62% of the kokanee caught were of hatchery origin (Lee, 2002).

  15. Sherman Creek Hatchery; Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife Fish Program, 2001 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Combs, Mitch (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Kettle Falls, WA)

    2002-01-01

    Sherman Creek Hatchery's primary objective is the restoration and enhancement of the recreational and subsistence fishery in Lake Roosevelt and Banks Lake. The Sherman Creek Hatchery (SCH) was designed to rear 1.7 million kokanee fry for acclimation and imprinting during the spring and early summer. Additionally, it was designed to trap all available returning adult kokanee during the fall for broodstock operations and evaluations. Since the start of this program, the operations on Lake Roosevelt have been modified to better achieve program goals. The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Spokane Tribe of Indians and the Colville Confederated Tribe form the interagency Lake Roosevelt Hatcheries Coordination Team (LRHCT) which sets goals and objectives for both Sherman Creek and the Spokane Tribal Hatchery and serves to coordinate enhancement efforts on Lake Roosevelt and Banks Lake. The primary changes have been to replace the kokanee fingerling program with a yearling (post smolt) program of up to 1,000,000 fish. To construct and operate twenty net pens to handle the increased production. The second significant change was to rear up to 300,000 rainbow trout fingerling at SCH from July through October, for stocking into the volunteer net pens. This enables the Spokane Tribal Hatchery (STH) to rear additional kokanee to further the enhancement efforts on Lake Roosevelt. Current objectives include increased use of native/indigenous stocks where available for propagation into Upper Columbia River Basin Waters. Monitoring and evaluation is preformed by the Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Monitoring Program. From 1988 to 1998, the principle sport fishery on Lake Roosevelt has shifted from walleye to include rainbow trout and kokanee salmon (Underwood et al. 1997, Tilson and Scholz 1997). The angler use, harvest rates for rainbow and kokanee and the economic value of the fishery has increased substantially during this 10-year period. The most recent information from the monitoring program also suggests that the hatchery and net pen rearing programs have been beneficial to enhancing the Lake Roosevelt fishery while not negatively impacting wild and native stocks within the lake. The 2001 fishing season has been especially successful with great fishing for both rainbow and kokanee throughout Lake Roosevelt. The results of the Two Rivers Fishing Derby identified 100 percent of the rainbow and 47 percent of the kokanee caught were of hatchery origin.

  16. The Energy Box : comparing locally automated control strategies of residential electricity consumption under uncertainty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Livengood, Daniel James

    2011-01-01

    The Energy Box is an always-on background processor automating the temporal management of one's home or small business electrical energy usage. Cost savings are achieved in a variety of environments, ranging from at pricing ...

  17. B and C class MADS-box genes and the developmental genetics of maize flower development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whipple, Clinton J.

    2006-01-01

    diversification of the two C-Class MADS box genes OSMADS32004). Conservation of B-class floral homeotic gene function2004). Conservation of B-class floral homeotic gene function

  18. Air and water flows in a large sand box with a two-layer aquifer system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiao, Jiu Jimmy

    the initial water table, the larger the vacuum, and the longer the time to reach the maximum vacuum table is close to the interface of the two layers. Keywords Sand box . Groundwater hydraulics

  19. Design and manufacture of the 2003 2.007 wireless control boxes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Varady, Eric, 1980-

    2003-01-01

    A new smaller, lighter, and more durable wireless control box was designed and built for use in the 2.007 Design Contest. The new units can also be commanded by an external controller via a standard serial interface.

  20. Design of an instrumented workpart for robotic aircraft wing-box assembly

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaina, Leighton

    2006-01-01

    The idea of an underactuated robotic arm used in aircraft wing assembly and production was created to improve the wing-box assembly process. In order to display the robots capabilities and areas of improvement, a suitable ...

  1. Reliable Recovery of Piled Box-like Objects via Parabolically Deformable Superquadrics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and generic depalletizing systems stems pri- marily from the car and food industries. Such systems and piled box-like objects. A vacuum gripper is used for grasping the objects from their exposed surfaces

  2. Cavity-nesting Bird Use of Nest Boxes in Vineyards of Central-Coast California1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cavity-nesting Bird Use of Nest Boxes in Vineyards of Central-Coast California1 Daniel P. Mummert,2, Robertson and Rendell 1990), lower predation rates (Nilsson 1984, Purcell and others 1997, Robertson

  3. Simple multistage closed-(box+reservoir) models of chemical evolution: an application to the inner Galactic halo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Caimmi, R

    2010-01-01

    Simple closed-box (CB) models of chemical evolution are extended on two respects: (i) simple closed-(box+reservoir) (CBR) models allowing gas outflow from the box into the reservoir or gas inflow into the box from the reservoir with same composition as the preexisting gas and rate proportional to the star formation rate, and (ii) simple multistage closed-(box+reservoir) (MCBR) models allowing different stages of evolution characterized by different inflow or outflow rates. The stellar initial mass function is assumed to be universal, and mass conservation holds for the whole system (box+reservoir) while it is violated for each subsystem (box and reservoir). The theoretical differential oxygen abundance distribution (TDOD) predicted by the model, under the assumption of instantaneous recycling, is a continuous broken line, where different slopes are related to different inflow rates. For an application of the model (a) a fictitious sample is built up from two distinct samples and taken as representative of the...

  4. Letter box line blackener for the HDTV/conventional-analog hybrid system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wysocki, Frederick J.; Nickel, George H.

    2006-07-18

    A blackener for letter box lines associated with a HDTV/conventional-analog hybrid television transmission where the blackener counts horizontal sync pulses contained in the HDTV/conventional-analog hybrid television transmission and determines when the HDTV/conventional-analog hybrid television transmission is in letter-box lines: if it is, then the blackener sends substitute black signal to an output; and if it is not, then the blackener sends the HDTV/conventional-analog hybrid television transmission to the output.

  5. Supplying LNG markets using nitrogen rejection units at Exxon Shute Creek Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hanus, P.M.; Kimble, E.L.

    1995-11-01

    Interest is growing in the United States for using Liquid Natural Gas (LNG) as an alternative transportation fuel for diesel and as a source of heating fuel. For gas producers, LNG offers a premium price opportunity versus conventional natural gas sales. To supply this developing market, two existing Nitrogen Rejection Units (NRU) at the Exxon Shute Creek Facility in Wyoming were modified allowing LNG extraction and truck loading for transport to customers. The modifications involved adding heat exchanger capacity to the NRUs to compensate for the refrigeration loss when LNG is removed. Besides allowing for LNG extraction, the modifications also debottlenecked the NRUs resulting in higher methane recovery and lower compression costs. With the modifications, the NRUs are capable of producing for sale 60,000 gpd (5 MMscfd gas equivalent) of high purity LNG. Total investment has been $5 million with initial sales of LNG occurring in September 1994.

  6. Examination of eastern oil shale disposal problems - the Hope Creek field study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koppenaal, D.W.; Kruspe, R.R.; Robl, T.L.; Cisler, K.; Allen, D.L.

    1985-02-01

    A field-based study of problems associated with the disposal of processed Eastern oil shale was initiated in mid-1983 at a private research site in Montgomery County, Kentucky. The study (known as the Hope Creek Spent Oil Shale Disposal Project) is designed to provide information on the geotechnical, revegetation/reclamation, and leachate generation and composition characteristics of processed Kentucky oil shales. The study utilizes processed oil shale materials (retorted oil shale and reject raw oil shale fines) obtained from a pilot plant run of Kentucky oil shale using the travelling grate retort technology. Approximately 1000 tons of processed oil shale were returned to Kentucky for the purpose of the study. The study, composed of three components, is described. The effort to date has concentrated on site preparation and the construction and implementation of the field study research facilities. These endeavors are described and the project direction in the future years is defined.

  7. Examination of a Junction-Box Adhesion Test for Use in Photovoltaic Module Qualification: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, D. C.; Wohlgemuth, J. H.

    2012-08-01

    Engineering robust adhesion of the junction-box (j-box) is a hurdle typically encountered by photovoltaic (PV) module manufacturers during product development. There are historical incidences of adverse effects (e.g., fires) caused when the j-box/adhesive/module system has failed in the field. The addition of a weight to the j-box during the 'damp heat' IEC qualification test is proposed to verify the basic robustness of its adhesion system. The details of the proposed test will be described, in addition to the preliminary results obtained using representative materials and components. The described discovery experiments examine moisture-cured silicone, foam tape, and hot-melt adhesives used in conjunction with PET or glass module 'substrates.' To be able to interpret the results, a set of material-level characterizations was performed, including thermogravimetric analysis, differential scanning calorimetry, and dynamic mechanical analysis. PV j-boxes were adhered to a substrate, loaded with a prescribed weight, and then placed inside an environmental chamber (at 85C, 85% relative humidity). Some systems did not remain attached through the discovery experiments. Observed failure modes include delamination (at the j-box/adhesive or adhesive/substrate interface) and phase change/creep. The results are discussed in the context of the application requirements, in addition to the plan for the formal experiment supporting the proposed modification to the qualification test.

  8. Hawaii Clean Water Branch Forms Webpage | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View New PagesSustainableGlynnMassachusetts:Ohio: EnergyMinnesota:Havre deBioEnergyWater Branch

  9. EA-263 UBS AG, London Branch | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergy A plug-inPPL EnergyPlus, LLC to export electric energySvcs to3 UBS AG, London Branch

  10. Reservoir Simulation and Evaluation of the Upper Jurassic Smackover Microbial Carbonate and Grainstone-Packstone Reservoirs in Little Cedar Creek Field, Conecuh County, Alabama 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mostafa, Moetaz Y

    2013-04-25

    .......................................................................... 59 x LIST OF TABLES Page TABLE 1—PVT Samples for The Grainstone –Packstone... Reservoir Fluid ................................. 23 TABLE 2 — PVT Samples for The Microbial Boundstone Reservoir Fluid ................................. 25 1 INTRODUCTION The Little Cedar Creek Field...

  11. YOUR LOCAL WEATHER: Scottsdale: 74 | Mesa: 75 | Chandler: 73 | Queen Creek: 75 | Phoenix: 77 | Glendale: 72 | Luke AFB: 70 | More Weather... Friday, October 7, 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGraw, Kevin J.

    YOUR LOCAL WEATHER: Scottsdale: 74º | Mesa: 75º | Chandler: 73º | Queen Creek: 75º | Phoenix: 77º | Glendale: 72º | Luke AFB: 70º | More Weather... Friday, October 7, 2005 » Web Member-Login Quick Search

  12. Mechanical Analysis of the Fuel Assembly Box of a HPLWR Fuel Assembly

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Himmel, Steffen; Starflinger, Joerg; Schulenberg, Thomas; Hofmeister, Jan

    2006-07-01

    The aim of the work presented in this paper is to demonstrate that the assembly box of the fuel assembly for a HPLWR proposed by Hofmeister et al. will remain mechanically within the design limits. The commercial finite element code ANSYS has been used to investigate the deformation behaviour caused by thermal convective and pressure boundary conditions provided by the results from Waata et al. for the fuel assembly. The results of these ANSYS analyses show a bending of the assembly box caused by the applied temperature and pressure distribution which, however, is still within the geometrical allowances. The maximum bending of the 4.35 m long assembly box appears close to the mid section, i.e. at 2.45 m axial height, and amounts to about 2 mm, only. The maximum indentation is mainly caused by the pressure difference across the box wall and occurs near the top of the assembly. The indentation at this point can be evaluated to be around 0.2 mm. Both bending and indentation will influence the coolant mass flux and the moderator distribution, and thus needs to be considered for predictions of the power profile and of the coolant heat-up. They are not considered to be critical as long as these deformations are small compared with the nominal gap width of 1 mm between box wall and claddings and 10 mm between adjacent assembly boxes. A second analysis has been performed to study the effect on non-symmetric coolant temperature profiles. A coolant temperature increase by 30 deg. C on one side of the box increased the thermal bending to 4 mm, indicating the sensitivity of this design with respect to temperature non-uniformities. (authors)

  13. Advanced Branching Control and Characterization of Inorganic Semiconducting Nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hughes, Steven Michael

    2007-12-31

    The ability to finely tune the size and shape of inorganic semiconducting nanocrystals is an area of great interest, as the more control one has, the more applications will be possible for their use. The first two basic shapes develped in nanocrystals were the sphere and the anistropic nanorod. the II_VI materials being used such as Cadmium Selenide (CdSe) and Cadmium Telluride (CdTe), exhibit polytypism, which allows them to form in either the hexagonally packed wurtzite or cubically packed zinc blende crystalline phase. The nanorods are wurtzite with the length of the rod growing along the c-axis. As this grows, stacking faults may form, which are layers of zinc blende in the otherwise wurtzite crystal. Using this polytypism, though, the first generation of branched crystals were developed in the form of the CdTe tetrapod. This is a nanocrystal that nucleates in the zincblend form, creating a tetrahedral core, on which four wurtzite arms are grown. This structure opened up the possibility of even more complex shapes and applications. This disseration investigates the advancement of branching control and further understanding the materials polytypism in the form of the stacking faults in nanorods.

  14. Towards a consistent description of in-medium parton branching

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liliana Apolinário; Néstor Armesto; Guilherme Milhano; Carlos A. Salgado

    2015-05-25

    Ultra-relativistic heavy-ion collisions are a window of opportunity to study QCD matter under extreme conditions of temperature and density, such as the quark-gluon plasma. Among the several possibilities, the study of jet quenching - generic name given to in-medium energy loss modifications of the parton branching - is a powerful tool to assess the properties of this new state of matter. The description of the parton shower is very well understood in vacuum (controlled reference) and medium-induced modifications of this process can be experimentally accessed through jet measurements. Current experimental data, however, cannot be entirely described only with energy loss phenomena. Transverse momentum broadening and decoherence effects, both theoretically established by now, and their interplay are essential to build a consistent picture of the medium-modifications of the parton branching and to achieve a correct description of the current experimental data. In this write-up, we will present the latest developments that address such unified description.

  15. The Effect of Sedimentation on Plutonium Transport in Fourmile Branch

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, K.F.

    2002-02-21

    The major mechanisms of radioactive material transport and fate in surface water are sources, dilution, advection and dispersion of radionuclides by flow and surface waves, radionuclide decay, and interaction between sediment and radionuclides. STREAM II, an aqueous transport module of the Savannah River Site emergency response WIND system, accounts for the source term, and the effects of dilution, advection and dispersion. Although the model has the capability to account for nuclear decay, due to the short time interval of interest for emergency response, the effect of nuclear decay is very small and so it is not employed. The interactions between the sediment and radionuclides are controlled by the flow conditions and physical and chemical characteristics of the radionuclides and the sediment constituents. The STREAM II version used in emergency response must provide results relatively quickly; it therefore does not model the effects of sediment deposition/resuspension. This study estimates the effects of sediment deposition/resuspension on aqueous plutonium transport in Fourmile Branch. There are no measured data on plutonium transport through surface water available for direct model calibration. Therefore, a literature search was conducted to find the range of plutonium partition coefficients based on laboratory experiments and field measurements. A sensitivity study of the calculated plutonium peak concentrations as a function of the input parameter of partition coefficient was then performed. Finally, an estimation of the plutonium partition coefficient was made for the Fourmile Branch.

  16. Status and Monitoring of Natural and Supplemented Chinook Salmon in Johnson Creek, Idaho, 2006-2007 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rabe, Craig D.; Nelson, Douglas D.

    2008-11-17

    The Nez Perce Tribe Johnson Creek Artificial Propagation Enhancement Project (JCAPE) has conducted juvenile and adult monitoring and evaluation studies for its 10th consecutive year. Completion of adult and juvenile Chinook salmon studies were conducted for the purpose of evaluating a small-scale production initiative designed to increase the survival of a weak but recoverable spawning aggregate of summer Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha. The JCAPE program evaluates the life cycle of natural origin (NOR) and hatchery origin (HOR) supplementation fish to quantify the key performance measures: abundance, survival-productivity, distribution, genetics, life history, habitat, and in-hatchery metrics. Operation of a picket style weir and intensive multiple spawning ground surveys were completed to monitor adult Chinook salmon and a rotary screw trap was used to monitor migrating juvenile Chinook salmon in Johnson Creek. In 2007, spawning ground surveys were conducted on all available spawning habitat in Johnson Creek and one of its tributaries. A total of 63 redds were observed in the index reach and 11 redds for all other reaches for a combined count of 74 redds. Utilization of carcass recovery surveys and adult captures at an adult picket weir yielded a total estimated adult escapement to Johnson Creek of 438 Chinook salmon. Upon deducting fish removed for broodstock (n=52), weir mortality/ known strays (n=12), and prespawning mortality (n=15), an estimated 359 summer Chinook salmon were available to spawn. Estimated total migration of brood year 2005 NOR juvenile Chinook salmon at the rotary screw trap was calculated for three seasons (summer, fall, and spring). The total estimated migration was 34,194 fish; 26,671 of the NOR migrants left in the summer (July 1 to August 31, 2005) as fry/parr, 5,852 left in the fall (September 1 to November 21, 2005) as presmolt, and only 1,671 NOR fish left in the spring (March 1 to June 30, 2006) as smolt. In addition, there were 120,415 HOR supplementation smolts released into Johnson Creek during the week of March 12, 2007. Life stage-specific juvenile survival from Johnson Creek to Lower Granite and McNary dams was calculated for brood year 2005 NOR and HOR supplementation juvenile Chinook salmon. Survival of NOR parr Chinook salmon migrating from Johnson Creek to Lower Granite and McNary dams was 28.2% and 16.2%. Survival of NOR presmolt Chinook salmon migrating from Johnson Creek to Lower Granite and McNary dams was 28.2% and 22.3%. Survival of NOR smolt Chinook salmon migrating from Johnson Creek to Lower Granite and McNary dams was 44.7% and 32.9%. Survival of HOR smolt Chinook salmon migrating from Johnson Creek to Lower Granite and McNary dams was 31.9% and 26.2%. Multi-year analysis on smolt to adult return rate's (SAR's) and progeny to parent ratio's (P:P's) were calculated for NOR and HOR supplementation Brood Year 2002 Chinook salmon. SAR's were calculated from Johnson Creek to Johnson Creek (JC to JC), Lower Granite Dam to Lower Granite (LGD to LGD), and Lower Granite Dam to Johnson Creek (LGD to JC); for NOR fish SAR's were 0.16%, 1.16% and 1.12%, while HOR supplementation SAR's from JC to JC, LGD to LGD and LGD to JC were 0.04%, 0.19% and 0.13%. P:P's for all returning NOR and HOR supplemented adults were under replacement levels at 0.13 and 0.65, respectively. Recruit per spawner estimates (R/S) for Brood Year 2005 adult Chinook salmon were also calculated for NOR and HOR supplemented Chinook salmon at JC and LGD. R/S estimates for NOR and HOR supplemented fish at JC were 231 and 1,745, while R/S estimates at LGD were 67 and 557. Management recommendations address (1) effectiveness of data collection methods, (2) sufficiency of data quality (statistical power) to enable management recommendations, (3) removal of uncertainty and subsequent cessation of M&E activities, and (4) sufficiency of findings for program modifications prior to five-year review.

  17. Pubblicato in Polo M. (a cura di), Industria bancaria e concorrenza, Il Mulino, 2000. Branching and competitiveness across regions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cerasi, Vittoria

    entry to a new branch on the ground of discretionary economic reasons. As a result, 8000 new branches behaviour. We find evidence that the cost of opening branches has reduced. Although the implementation in terms of competitiveness, branching opportunity costs and profitability in line with stylised facts

  18. Sediment and radionuclide transport in rivers. Phase 2. Field sampling program for Cattaraugus and Buttermilk Creeks, New York

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walters, W.H.; Ecker, R.M.; Onishi, Y.

    1982-04-01

    As part of a study on sediment and radionuclide transport in rivers, Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is investigating the effect of sediment on the transport of radionuclides in Cattaraugus and Buttermilk Creeks, New York. A source of radioactivity in these creeks is the Western New York Nuclear Service Center which consists of a low-level waste disposal site and a nuclear fuel reprocessing plant. Other sources of radioactivity include fallout from worldwide weapons testing and natural background radioactivity. The major objective of the PNL Field Sampling Program is to provide data on sediment and radionuclide characteristics in Cattaraugus and Buttermilk Creeks to verify the use of the Sediment and Radionuclide Transport model, SERATRA, for nontidal rivers. This report covers the results of field data collection conducted during September 1978. Radiological analysis of sand, silt, and clay size fractions of suspended and bed sediment, and water were performed. Results of these analyses indicate that the principal radionuclides occurring in these two water courses, with levels significantly higher than background levels, during the Phase 2 sampling program were Cesium-137 and Strontium-90. These radionuclides had significantly higher activity levels above background in the bed sediment, suspended sediment, and water samples. Other radionuclides that are possibly being released into the surface water environment by the Nuclear Fuel Services facilities are Plutonium-238, 239, and 240, Americium-241, Curium-244, and Tritium. More radionuclides were consistently found in the bed sediment as compared to suspended sediment. The fewest radionuclides were found in the water of Buttermilk and Cattaraugus Creeks. The higher levels were found in the bed sediments for the gamma-emitters and in the suspended sediment for the alpha and beta-emitters (not including Tritium).

  19. Phase 2 confirmatory sampling data report, Lower East Fork Poplar Creek, Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-01-01

    A Remedial Investigation of East Fork Poplar Creek (EFPC) concluded that mercury is the principal contaminant of concern in the EFPC floodplain. The highest concentrations of mercury were found to be in a visually distinct black layer of soil that typically lies 15 to 30 cm (6 to 12 in.) below the surface. Mercury contamination was found to be situated in distinct areas along the floodplain, and generally at depths > 20 cm (8 in.) below the surface. In accordance with Comprehensive, Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), a feasibility study was prepared to assess alternatives for remediation, and a proposed plan was issued to the public in which a preferred alternative was identified. In response to public input, the plan was modified and US Department of Energy (DOE) issued a Record of Decision in 1995 committing to excavating all soil in the EFPC floodplain exceeding a concentration of 400 parts per million (ppm) of mercury. The Lower East Fork Poplar Creek (LEFPC) remedial action (RA) focuses on the stretch of EFPC flowing from Lake Reality at the Y-12 Plant, through the city of Oak Ridge, to Poplar Creek on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) and its associated floodplain. Specific areas were identified that required remediation at the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Site along Illinois Avenue and at the Bruner Site along the Oak Ridge Turnpike. The RA was conducted in two separate phases. Phase 2, conducted from February to October 1997, completed the remediation efforts at the NOAA facility and fully remediated the Bruner Site. During both phases, data were collected to show that the remedial efforts performed at the NOAA and Bruner sites were successful in implementing the Record of Decision and had no adverse impact on the creek water quality or the city of Oak Ridge publicly owned treatment works.

  20. Confirmatory Sampling and Analysis Plan for the Lower East Fork Poplar Creek Operable Unit, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-12-01

    This document describes the organization, strategy, and procedures to be used to confirm that mercury concentrations in soils in the remediated areas are statistically less than, or equal to, the cleanup standard of 400 ppm. It focuses on confirming the cleanup of the stretch of the Lower East Fork Popular Creed flowing from Lake Reality at the Y-12 Plant, through the City of Oak Ridge, to Poplar Creek on the Oak Ridge Reservation and its associated flood plain.

  1. Gas Storage Potential of Li-decorated ExBox4+

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Das, Ranjita

    2014-01-01

    The newly developed compound ExBox4+ is explored to check whether it is a proficient hydrogen storage material. Both exoherdal and endohedral hydrogen adsorption on ExBox4+ are studied. Endohedral hydrogen molecules interact strongly than exohedral ones. The hydrogen adsorption energy is as good as the recently studied charged fullerenes. The hydrogen storage capacity appears to be ~4.3 wt%. The endohedral CO sorption is also analysed with the help of DFT. The first principle DFT calculation and MD simulation are performed to investigate the effect of lithium doping on the gas adsorbing capacity and adsorption enthalpy as well as adsorption energy of ExBox4+.The metal atom interaction with ExBox4+is found to be pretty strong, and the interaction energy appears to be higher than the metal cohesive energy.The thermodynamic parameters suggest that metal doping method is spontaneous in nature. The analysis of adsorption energy, thermodynamic properties and MD simulation results suggest that Li doped ExBox4+ can b...

  2. Trial Run of a Junction-Box Attachment Test for Use in Photovoltaic Module Qualification (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, D.; Deibert, S.; Wohlgemuth, J.

    2014-06-01

    Engineering robust adhesion of the junction-box (j-box) is a hurdle typically encountered by photovoltaic (PV) module manufacturers during product development and manufacturing process control. There are historical incidences of adverse effects (e.g., fires), caused when the j-box/adhesive/module system has failed in the field. The addition of a weight to the j-box during the 'damp-heat', 'thermal-cycle', or 'creep' tests within the IEC qualification protocol is proposed to verify the basic robustness of the adhesion system. The details of the proposed test are described, in addition to a trial run of the test procedure. The described experiments examine 4 moisture-cured silicones, 4 foam tapes, and a hot-melt adhesive used in conjunction with glass, KPE, THV, and TPE substrates. For the purpose of validating the experiment, j-boxes were adhered to a substrate, loaded with a prescribed weight, and then subjected to aging. The replicate mock-modules were aged in an environmental chamber (at 85 deg C/85% relative humidity for 1000 hours; then 100 degrees C/<10% relative humidity for 200 hours) or fielded in Golden, Miami, and Phoenix for 1 year. Attachment strength tests, including pluck and shear test geometries, were also performed on smaller component specimens.

  3. Interpretation of recent seismic data from a frontier hydrocarbon province: western Rough Creek graben, southern Illinois and western Kentucky

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bertagne, A.J.; Pisasale, E.T.; Leising, T.C.

    1986-05-01

    The northern basement fault of the Rough Creek graben is seismically discernible and has surface expression in the Rough Creek fault zone. The southern basement fault is not clearly defined seismically, but can be inferred from shallow faulting and gravity data. This fault is roughly coincident with the Pennyrile fault zone. Extensional faults that formed the rift boundaries were the sites of late-stage compressional and extensional tectonics. Flower structures observed along the graben boundaries probably indicate post-Pennsylvanian wrench faulting. The basement within the graben plunges north-northwest, with the lowest point occurring south of the Rough Creek fault zone. Pre-Knox sediments thicken to approximately 12,000 in this area. The Knox Megagroup thickens toward the Mississippi Embayment, ranging from 4800 ft (southeastern graben area) to more than 7000 ft (west end of graben). Upper Ordovician to Devonian units also display westward thickening. The top of the Meramecian, New Albany, Maquoketa, and the base of the Knox generate continuous, high-amplitude seismic reflections due to large impedance contrasts between clastic and carbonate units. Shallow oil and gas production (Mississippian and Pennsylvanian) is present in this area. However, deep horizons (Knox, Lower Cambrian) remain relatively untested. Potential hydrocarbon traps in the pre-Knox sequence observed on seismic include fault blocks and updip pinch-outs.

  4. Sediment and radionuclide transport in rivers. Phase 3. Field sampling program for Cattaraugus and Buttermilk Creeks, New York

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ecker, R.M.; Walters, W.H.; Onishi, Y.

    1982-08-01

    A field sampling program was conducted on Cattaraugus and Buttermilk Creeks, New York during April 1979 to investigate the transport of radionuclides in surface waters as part of a continuing program to provide data for application and verification of Pacific Northwest Laboratory's (PNL) sediment and radionuclide transport model, SERATRA. Bed sediment, suspended sediment and water samples were collected during unsteady flow conditions over a 45 mile reach of stream channel. Radiological analysis of these samples included gamma ray spectrometry analysis, and radiochemical separation and analysis of Sr-90, Pu-238, Pu-239, 240, Am-241 and Cm-244. Tritium analysis was also performed on water samples. Based on the evaluation of radionuclide levels in Cattaraugus and Buttermilk Creeks, the Nuclear Fuel Services facility at West Valley, New York, may be the source of Cs-137, Sr-90, Cs-134, Co-60, Pu-238, Pu-239, 240, Am-241, Cm-244 and tritium found in the bed sediment, suspended sediment and water of Buttermilk and Cattaraugus Creeks. This field sampling effort was the last of a three phase program to collect hydrologic and radiologic data at different flow conditions.

  5. Analysis of dust samples collected from spent nuclear fuel interim storage containers at Hope Creek, Delaware, and Diablo Canyon, California.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bryan, Charles R.; Enos, David George

    2014-07-01

    Potentially corrosive environments may form on the surface of spent nuclear fuel dry storage canisters by deliquescence of deposited dusts. To assess this, samples of dust were collected from in-service dry storage canisters at two near-marine sites, the Hope Creek and Diablo Canyon storage installations, and have been characterized with respect to mineralogy, chemistry, and texture. At both sites, terrestrially-derived silicate minerals, including quartz, feldspars, micas, and clays, comprise the largest fraction of the dust. Also significant at both sites were particles of iron and iron-chromium metal and oxides generated by the manufacturing process. Soluble salt phases were minor component of the Hope Creek dusts, and were compositionally similar to inland salt aerosols, rich in calcium, sulfate, and nitrate. At Diablo Canyon, however, sea-salt aerosols, occurring as aggregates of NaCl and Mg-sulfate, were a major component of the dust samples. The seasalt aerosols commonly occurred as hollow spheres, which may have formed by evaporation of suspended aerosol seawater droplets, possibly while rising through the heated annulus between the canister and the overpack. The differences in salt composition and abundance for the two sites are attributed to differences in proximity to the open ocean and wave action. The Diablo Canyon facility is on the shores of the Pacific Ocean, while the Hope Creek facility is on the shores of the Delaware River, several miles from the open ocean.

  6. Guidance Document Glove boxes allow the user to perform operations in an atmosphere different from the ambient. Gloves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in Metallurgy). This second type of glove box is designed to contain a high purity inert atmosphere (e.g. argon

  7. Isotopic dating of Lava Creek B tephra in terrace deposits along the Wind River, Wyoming--Implications for post 0. 6 Ma uplift of the Yellowstone hotspot

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Izett, G.A.; Pierce, K.L.; Naeser, N.D. (U.S.G.S., Denver, CO (United States)); Jaworowski, C. (Univ. of Wyoming, Laramie, WY (United States). Dept. of Geology and Geophysics)

    1992-01-01

    Along the Wind River near Kinnear (Pavillon quadrangle), a meter-thick tephra layer occurs near the middle of a main-stem gravel deposit about 100 m above the river. On Muddy Ridge 25 km east of Kinnear, a Lava Creek B tephra layer occurs at the base of a terrace deposit about 100 m above Muddy Creek. Another Lava Creek B tephra site 67 km northwest and upstream from Kinnear occurs within main-stem gravels of a terrace deposit 145 m above the river. This upstream increase of 45 m of the tephra horizon raises the concern that the two tephra layers might not be of the same age. All three tephras contain the same assemblage of phenocrysts as that in the Lava Creek Tuff, Member B in Yellowstone National Park and the Lava Creek B volcanic ash bed of the Western U.S., and therefore they are arguably correlatives. The authors confirmed this petrographic correlation by isotopic dating of sanidine crystals recovered from cm-size pumice lapilli in the Kinnear tephra and from coarse-grained tephra at the Muddy Creek site. Laser total-fusion Ar-40-Ar-39 ages of sanidine from the two sites are coeval, 0.66[plus minus]0.01 Ma and 0.67[plus minus]0.01 Ma at Muddy Creek. Conventional K-Ar dating of sanidine from the tephra at the Cl453 site resulted in an age of 0.60[plus minus]0.02 Ma. Glass-mantled zircon crystals from the Cl453 site yielded a fission-track age of 0.67[plus minus]0.16 Ma. These isotopic ages are compatible with conventional K-Ar, Ar-40-Ar-39, and fission-track ages of the Lava Creek Tuff, Member B in Yellowstone National Park and other occurrences of Lava Creek B ash beds. The authors suggest that the terrace deposit that contains the Lava Creek B tephra rises from the Kinnear site northwest up the Wind River as a result of Quaternary uplift in the area of the Yellowstone hotspot.

  8. Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Evaluation Program : Meadow Creek vs. Lake Whatcom Stock Kokanee Salmon Investigations in Lake Roosevelt Annual Report 2000-2001.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McLellan, Holly J.; Scholz, Allan T.

    2001-07-01

    Lake Roosevelt has been stocked with Whatcom stock kokanee since 1989 to mitigate for anadromous salmon losses caused by the construction of Grand Coulee Dam. The primary objective of the hatchery plantings was to create a self-sustaining recreational fishery. Due to low return numbers, it was hypothesized a native stock of kokanee might perform better than the coastal Whatcom strain. Therefore, kokanee from Meadow Creek, a tributary of Kootenay Lake, British Columbia were selected as an alternative stock. Matched pair releases of Whatcom stock and Meadow Creek kokanee were made from Sherman Creek in late June 2000. Stock performance between Lake Whatcom and Meadow Creek kokanee was evaluated through three performance measures (1) returns to Sherman Creek, the primary egg collection facility, (2) returns to other tributaries, indicating availability for angler harvest, and (3) returns to the creel. A secondary objective was to evaluate the numbers collected at downstream fish passage facilities. Age 2 kokanee were collected during five passes through the reservoir, which included 89 tributaries between August 17th and November 7th, 2000. Sherman Creek was sampled once a week because it was the primary egg collection location. A total of 2,789 age 2 kokanee were collected, in which 2,658 (95%) were collected at Sherman Creek. Chi-square analysis indicated the Meadow Creek kokanee returned to Sherman Creek in significantly higher numbers compared to the Whatcom stock ({chi}{sup 2} = 734.4; P < 0.01). Reservoir wide recoveries indicated similar results ({chi}{sup 2} = 733.1; P < 0.01). No age 2 kokanee were collected during creel surveys. Age 3 kokanee are expected to recruit to the creel in 2001. No age 2 kokanee were collected at the fish passage facilities due to a 170 mm size restriction at the fish passage centers. Age 3 kokanee are expected to be collected at the fish passage centers during 2001. Stock performance cannot be properly evaluated until 2001, when age 3 kokanee are expected to return to Sherman Creek.

  9. Q-branch Raman scattering and modern kinetic thoery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Monchick, L. [The Johns Hopkins Univ., Laurel, MD (United States)

    1993-12-01

    The program is an extension of previous APL work whose general aim was to calculate line shapes of nearly resonant isolated line transitions with solutions of a popular quantum kinetic equation-the Waldmann-Snider equation-using well known advanced solution techniques developed for the classical Boltzmann equation. The advanced techniques explored have been a BGK type approximation, which is termed the Generalized Hess Method (GHM), and conversion of the collision operator to a block diagonal matrix of symmetric collision kernels which then can be approximated by discrete ordinate methods. The latter method, which is termed the Collision Kernel method (CC), is capable of the highest accuracy and has been used quite successfully for Q-branch Raman scattering. The GHM method, not quite as accurate, is applicable over a wider range of pressures and has proven quite useful.

  10. Oscillating side-branch enhancements of thermoacoustic heat exchangers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swift, Gregory W.

    2003-05-13

    A regenerator-based engine or refrigerator has a regenerator with two ends at two different temperatures, through which a gas oscillates at a first oscillating volumetric flow rate in the direction between the two ends and in which the pressure of the gas oscillates, and first and second heat exchangers, each of which is at one of the two different temperatures. A dead-end side branch into which the gas oscillates has compliance and is connected adjacent to one of the ends of the regenerator to form a second oscillating gas flow rate additive with the first oscillating volumetric flow rate, the compliance having a volume effective to provide a selected total oscillating gas volumetric flow rate through the first heat exchanger. This configuration enables the first heat exchanger to be configured and located to better enhance the performance of the heat exchanger rather than being confined to the location and configuration of the regenerator.

  11. BRIDGE: Branching Ratio Inquiry/Decay Generated Events

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patrick Meade; Matthew Reece

    2007-10-24

    We present the manual for the program BRIDGE: Branching Ratio Inquiry/Decay Generated Events. The program is designed to operate with arbitrary models defined within matrix element generators, so that one can simulate events with small final-state multiplicities, decay them with BRIDGE, and then pass them to showering and hadronization programs. BRI can automatically calculate widths of two and three body decays. DGE can decay unstable particles in any Les Houches formatted event file. DGE is useful for the generation of event files with long decay chains, replacing large matrix elements by small matrix elements followed by sequences of decays. BRIDGE is currently designed to work with the MadGraph/MadEvent programs for implementing and simulating new physics models. In particular, it can operate with the MadGraph implementation of the MSSM. In this manual we describe how to use BRIDGE, and present a number of sample results to demonstrate its accuracy.

  12. MACRO-ENVIRONMENTAL MAPPING OF INTERNATIONAL BRANCH CAMPUS ACTIVITIES OF UNIVERSITIES WORLDWIDE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kosmützky, Ann; Krücken , Georg

    2014-01-01

    issues and trends in offshore higher education. London:Huisman, J. (2012). Managing offshore branch campuses. Ansand? Academic work in an offshore campus of an Australian

  13. White Oak Creek Embayment site characterization and contaminant screening analysis. Environmental Restoration Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blaylock, B.G.; Ford, C.J.; Frank, M.L.; Hoffman, F.O.; Hook, L.A.

    1993-01-01

    Analyses of sediment samples collected near the mouth of White Oak Creek during the summer of 1990 revealed {sup 137}Cs concentrations [> 10{sup 6} Bq/kg dry wt (> 10{sup 4} pCi/g dry wt)] near the sediment surface. Available evidence indicates that these relatively high concentrations of {sup 137}Cs now at the sediment surface were released from White Oak Dam in the mid-1950s and had accumulated at depositionalsites in the embayment. These accumulated sediments are being eroded and transported downstream primarily during winter low-water levels by flood events and by a combination of normal downstream flow and the water turbulence created by the release of water from Melton Hill Dam during hydropower generation cycles. This report provides a more thorough characterization of the extent of contamination in WOCE than was previously available. Environmental samples collected from WOCE were analyzed for organic, inorganic, and radiological contaminants in fish, water, and sediment. These results were used to conduct a human health effects screening analysis. Walkover radiation surveys conducted inside the fenced area surrounding the WOCE at summer-pool (741 ft MSL) and at winter-pool (733 ft MSL) level, indicated a maximum exposure rate of 3 mR h{sup 1} 1 m above the soil surface.

  14. Down-regulation of kelch domain-containing F-box protein in Arabidopsis enhances the production of (poly)phenols and tolerance to ultraviolet radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Xuebin; Liu, Chang -Jun; Gou, Mingyue; Guo, Chunrong; Yang, Huijun

    2014-12-01

    Phenylpropanoid biosynthesis in plants engenders myriad phenolics with diverse biological functions. Phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL) is the first committed enzyme in the pathway, directing primary metabolic flux into a phenylpropanoid branch. Previously, we demonstrated that the Arabidopsis Kelch-domain containing F-box proteins, AtKFB01, -20, and -50, function as the negative regulators controlling phenylpropanoid biosynthesis via mediating PAL’s ubiquitination and subsequent degradation. Here, we reveal that Arabidopsis KFB39, a close homolog of AtKFB50, also interacts physically with PAL isozymes and modulates PALs' stability and activity. Disturbing the expression of KFB39 reciprocally affects the accumulation/deposition of a set of phenylpropanoid end products, suggesting that KFB39 is an additional post-translational regulator responsible for the turnover of PAL and negatively controlling phenylpropanoid biosynthesis. Furthermore, we discover that exposure of Arabidopsis to UV-B radiation suppresses the expression of all four KFB genes while inducing the transcription of PAL isogenes; these data suggest that Arabidopsis consolidates both transcriptional and post-translational regulation mechanisms to maximize its responses to UV stress. Simultaneous down-regulation of all four identified KFBs significantly enhances the production of (poly)phenols and the plant’s tolerance to UV irradiation. This study offers a biotechnological approach for engineering the production of useful phenolic chemicals and for increasing a plant’s resistance to environmental stress.

  15. Down-regulation of kelch domain-containing F-box protein in Arabidopsis enhances the production of (poly)phenols and tolerance to ultraviolet radiation

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhang, Xuebin; Liu, Chang -Jun; Gou, Mingyue; Guo, Chunrong; Yang, Huijun

    2014-12-01

    Phenylpropanoid biosynthesis in plants engenders myriad phenolics with diverse biological functions. Phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL) is the first committed enzyme in the pathway, directing primary metabolic flux into a phenylpropanoid branch. Previously, we demonstrated that the Arabidopsis Kelch-domain containing F-box proteins, AtKFB01, -20, and -50, function as the negative regulators controlling phenylpropanoid biosynthesis via mediating PAL’s ubiquitination and subsequent degradation. Here, we reveal that Arabidopsis KFB39, a close homolog of AtKFB50, also interacts physically with PAL isozymes and modulates PALs' stability and activity. Disturbing the expression of KFB39 reciprocally affects the accumulation/deposition of a set of phenylpropanoid end products, suggesting thatmore »KFB39 is an additional post-translational regulator responsible for the turnover of PAL and negatively controlling phenylpropanoid biosynthesis. Furthermore, we discover that exposure of Arabidopsis to UV-B radiation suppresses the expression of all four KFB genes while inducing the transcription of PAL isogenes; these data suggest that Arabidopsis consolidates both transcriptional and post-translational regulation mechanisms to maximize its responses to UV stress. Simultaneous down-regulation of all four identified KFBs significantly enhances the production of (poly)phenols and the plant’s tolerance to UV irradiation. This study offers a biotechnological approach for engineering the production of useful phenolic chemicals and for increasing a plant’s resistance to environmental stress.« less

  16. SAVANNAH RIVER SITE (SRS) Phase II of the SRS Dose Reconstruction Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    's Branch cadmium 2.2 To Beaver Dam Creek hydrogen sulfide 2000 To Tim's Branch lead 20 Seepage Basins nitrate 0­1383 To Four Mile Creek in groundwater nitrate Up to 3890 To Tim's Branch nitrate

  17. HumanWildlife Interactions 5(1):100105, Spring 2011 A rat-resistant artificial nest box for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to the island of Kauai, Hawaii. The sole population of about 500 birds is currently restricted to remote, higher, Hawaii Field Station, P.O. Box 10880, Hilo, HI 96721, USA will.pitt@aphis.usda.gov LAURA C. DRISCOLL, USDA/APHIS/Wildlife Services' National Wildlife Research Center, Hawaii Field Station, P.O. Box 10880

  18. Petteri Harjulehto, Department of Mathematics and Statistics, P.O. Box 4, FIN-00014 University of Helsinki, Finland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hasto, Peter

    of Helsinki, Finland (petteri.harjulehto@helsinki.fi) Peter H¨ast¨o, Department of Mathematics and Statistics, P.O. Box 4, FIN-00014 University of Helsinki, Finland (peter.hasto@helsinki.fi) Mikko Pere, Department of Mathematics and Statistics, P.O. Box 4, FIN-00014 University of Helsinki, Finland (mikko

  19. *Corresponding author. Department of Biology, University of Crete, P.O. Box 2208, GR-71409 Heraklion, Crete, Greece.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petratos, Kyriacos

    Heraklion, Crete, Greece. Tel.: #30-81-394455; fax: #30-81-394351. E-mail address: kokkinid@imbb.forth.gr (M of Crete, P.O. Box 2208, GR-71110 Heraklion, Crete, Greece Institute of Molecular Biology and Biotechnology (IMBB), P.O. Box 1527, GR-71110 Heraklion, Crete, Greece Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Chiba

  20. VERIFICATION OF A FINITE ELEMENT MODEL OF AN UNMANNED AERIAL VEHICLE WING TORQUE BOX VIA EXPERIMENTAL MODAL TESTING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yaman, Yavuz

    VERIFICATION OF A FINITE ELEMENT MODEL OF AN UNMANNED AERIAL VEHICLE WING TORQUE BOX VIA Aeronautical Association, Faculty of Aeronautics and Astronautics, TURKEY KEYWORDS Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Wing (FEM) of an unmanned aerial vehicle wing torque box was verified by the experimental modal testing

  1. Div ision of T echnology, Industry & Economics Energy Branch Deploying renewable energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Canet, Léonie

    Div ision of T echnology, Industry & Economics Energy Branch Deploying renewable energy, Industry & Economics Energy Branch 1. Policy landscape 2. Helping transition to Renewable Energy 3 governments are promoting renewable energy. Renewable energy ­ Policy Landscape #12;Div ision of T echnology

  2. A new branch of mountain pass solutions for the choreographical 3body problem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A new branch of mountain pass solutions for the choreographical 3­body problem G. Arioli.terracini@unimib.it Abstract. We prove the existence of a new branch of solutions of Mountain Pass type for the periodic 3 on a bisection algorithm, we provide a numerical non­rigorous solution of Mountain Pass type for this problem

  3. Fluid transport in branched structures with temporary closures: A model for quasistatic lung inflation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buldyrev, Sergey

    Fluid transport in branched structures with temporary closures: A model for quasistatic lung a model system relevant to the inflation of a mammalian lung, an asymmetric bifurcating structure description of the underlying branching structure of the lung, by analyzing experimental pressure-volume data

  4. Branched CNT@SnO2 nanorods@carbon hierarchical heterostructures for lithium ion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qi, Limin

    Branched CNT@SnO2 nanorods@carbon hierarchical heterostructures for lithium ion batteries with high used as an anode material in lithium ion batteries, the branched CNT@SnO2@C heterostructures exhibited of the 1D mesocrystalline SnO2 nanorods. Introduction Lithium ion batteries (LIBs) have become

  5. Understanding trait interactions and their impacts on growth in Scots pine branches across Europe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mencuccini, Maurizio

    ­effect relationships between anatomical traits, hydraulic traits and branch growth, we measured for each branch Studies, Wageningen University, PO 47, NL­6700 AA Wageningen, The Netherlands; 2 CREAF / Ecology Unit: the tracheid hydraulic diame- ter, double cell wall thickness, cell lumen span area, wood density, cavitation

  6. Eciency of the Incomplete Enumeration algorithm for Monte-Carlo simulation of linear and branched polymers.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dhar, Deepak

    polymers. Sumedha #3; and Deepak Dhar y Department Of Theoretical Physics Tata Institute Of Fundamental algorithm for linear and branched polymers. There is a qualitative di#11;erence in the eÆciency in these two for linear polymers, but as exp(cn #11; ) for branched (undirected and directed) polymers, where 0

  7. Sox9 plays multiple roles in the lung epithelium during branching morphogenesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sander, Maike

    Sox9 plays multiple roles in the lung epithelium during branching morphogenesis Briana E. Rockicha, Durham, NC, and approved October 2, 2013 (received for review June 21, 2013) Lung branching morphogenesis lung. Intricate regulation of signaling pathways, tran- scription factors, and epithelial

  8. Recovery of Free Energy Branches in Single Molecule Experiments Ivan Junier,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ritort, Felix

    Recovery of Free Energy Branches in Single Molecule Experiments Ivan Junier,1 Alessandro Mossa,2 19 February 2009) We present a method for determining the free energy of coexisting states from use optical tweezers to determine the free energy branches of the native and unfolded states of a two

  9. A Branch and Bound Algorithm for the Protein Folding Problem in the HP Lattice Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Istrail, Sorin

    Article A Branch and Bound Algorithm for the Protein Folding Problem in the HP Lattice Model Mao tool for the protein folding problem. Key words: protein folding, HP model, branch and bound, lattice Introduction The protein folding problem, or the protein struc- ture prediction problem, is one of the most

  10. Parking Citation Appeal UVA Parking and Transportation, P.O. Box 400000, Charlottesville, Va. 229044000

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Acton, Scott

    UNACCEPTABLE GROUNDS FOR APPEAL ARE: Parking for SHORT periods, parking in a nearly empty lot, not knowing Parking Citation Appeal UVA Parking and Transportation, P.O. Box 400000, Charlottesville, Va. 229044000 (434)9247231 Office: 1101 Millmont Street, Charlottesville, Va. 22904 www.virginia.edu/parking

  11. Fast 3D Triangle-Box Overlap Testing Tomas Akenine-Moller

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    acceptance/rejection tests early on, and then testing each triangle edge for intersection with the cube faces. They also use fast acceptance/rejectance tests, but recast the testing of an edge against the cubeFast 3D Triangle-Box Overlap Testing Tomas Akenine-M¨oller Department of Computer Engineering

  12. DEVELOPMENT OF A NEW GLOVE FOR GLOVE BOXES WITH HIGH-LEVEL PERFORMANCES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blancher, J.; Poirier, J.M.

    2003-02-27

    This paper describes the results of a joint technological program of COGEMA and MAPA to develop a new generation of glove for glove boxes. The mechanical strength of this glove is twice as high as the best characteristics of gloves available on the market. This new generation of product has both a higher level of performance and better ergonomics.

  13. On the Occurrence of Thermal Runaway in Diode in the J-Box

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This PowerPoint presentation, focused on the environmental testing of diodes, was originally presented at the International PV Module Quality Assurance Forum on Feb. 26-27, 2013 in Denver, CO. It details the thermal runaway tests of J-boxes and discusses the Tj measurement method for bypass diodes. The presentation wraps up with a discussion of the team's anticipated next steps.

  14. Probabilistic Analysis of Onion Routing in a Black-box [Extended Abstract

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    --Distributed applications General Terms Algorithms, Security, Theory Keywords Anonymity, onion routing, Tor A full version-1-59593-883-1/07/0010 ...$5.00. 1. INTRODUCTION Every day, thousands of people use the onion-routing net- work Tor [6Probabilistic Analysis of Onion Routing in a Black-box Model [Extended Abstract] Joan Feigenbaum

  15. Down the borehole but outside the box: innovative approaches to wireline log data interpretation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bodin, Thomas

    Down the borehole but outside the box: innovative approaches to wireline log data interpretation or more different properties, with depth down a borehole. They are routinely correlated with, and, such as oil and gas, wireline log interpretation is highly developed. In other industries, such as geothermal

  16. The Recursive NanoBox Processor Grid: A Reliable System Architecture for Unreliable Nanotechnology Devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    The Recursive NanoBox Processor Grid: A Reliable System Architecture for Unreliable Nanotechnology, Minneapolis, MN 55455 Telephone: 612-625-5007 Fax: 612-625-4583 Abstract Advanced molecular nanotechnology designed for fabrication with unreliable nanotechnology devices. This architecture is composed of many

  17. A Grey-Box Approach to Automated Mechanism Design (Extended Abstract)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parsons, Simon

    A Grey-Box Approach to Automated Mechanism Design (Extended Abstract) Jinzhong Niu, Kai Cai auction mechanisms using the framework of the TAC Market Design Game and relates the performance that the strongest mechanisms we found using this approach are able to win the Market Design Game against known

  18. Black-Box Identification for PLC based MPC of a Binary Distillation Column

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Black-Box Identification for PLC based MPC of a Binary Distillation Column B. Huyck ,, F. Logist J is to upgrade the control system with a linear MPC running on a PLC. However, before a model based controller can be used on a PLC, an accurate (but simple) process model has to be constructed. Hence, the aim

  19. Philadelphia University P.O. Box (1) Philadelphia University 19392 Jordan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    [1/3] Philadelphia University P.O. Box (1) Philadelphia University 19392 Jordan Fax Number: +962-mail Address : mmahafzah@philadelphia.edu.j Curriculum Vitae Dr. Mohammed Mahafzah Associate Professor Faculty of Information Technology, Philadelphia University, Jordan. Responsibilities include teaching

  20. Hanford Workers Achieve Success in Difficult Glove Box Project at Plutonium Finishing Plant

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    RICHLAND, Wash. – EM’s Richland Operations Office and contractor CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CH2M HILL) recently finished safely separating three glove boxes for removal from Hanford’s Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) after months of planning and preparation.

  1. Comparisons of box model calculations and measurements of formaldehyde from the 1997 North Atlantic Regional Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Comparisons of box model calculations and measurements of formaldehyde from the 1997 North Atlantic October 2001; accepted 16 November 2001; published 18 April 2002. [1] Formaldehyde (CH2O) measurements: formaldehyde, photochemical modeling, aircraft measurements, North Atlantic troposphere 1. Introduction [2

  2. Opening the Black Box: Low-dimensional dynamics in high-dimensional

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    it on three high-dimensional RNN examples: a 3-bit flip-flop device, an input- dependent sine wave generator temporally complex input- output relationships, input-dependent pattern generation, or autonomous patternOpening the Black Box: Low-dimensional dynamics in high-dimensional recurrent neural networks David

  3. AUTOMATIC MAPMAKING Dept of Mathematics, Lund Inst. of Technology, Box 118, S-221 00 Lund, Sweden

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lunds Universitet

    AUTOMATIC MAPMAKING K. STR M Dept of Mathematics, Lund Inst. of Technology, Box 118, S-221 00 Lund, Sweden Abstract. In this paper the problem of automatic mapmaking is treated. The principles- tonomous vehicles; automatic surveying 1. INTRODUCTION Generation of a model of the environment

  4. Uranium Watch 76 South Main Street, # 7 | P.O. Box 344

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Uranium Watch 76 South Main Street, # 7 | P.O. Box 344 Moab, Utah 84532 435-26O-8384, May 2, 2014. Dear Mr. Rosnick: REQUEST FOR EXTENSION OF TIME TO SUBMIT COMMENTS Uranium Watch requests Rosnick/EPA 2 June 10, 2014 1 http://www.radiationcontrol.utah.gov/Uranium_Mills/uraniumone/docs/2012

  5. Smart Home in a Box: A Large Scale Smart Home Deployment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cook, Diane J.

    B) Project. The upcoming SHiB Project targets building 100 smart homes in several kinds of living spacesSmart Home in a Box: A Large Scale Smart Home Deployment Aaron S. CRANDALL a and Diane J. COOK a,1 a School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Washington State University, USA Abstract. Smart

  6. Evaluation of the Effect of Different Modified Atmosphere Packaging Box Liners on the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crisosto, Carlos H.

    that the use of MAP box liners is recommended to improve market life of `Friar' plums up to 45 days cold with different permeabilities to oxygen and carbon dioxide to pro- long the shelf life of fruit and vegeta- bles and Shelf Life of `Friar' Plums Celia M. Canti´n1 , Carlos H. Crisosto2,4 , and Kevin R. Day3 ADDITIONAL

  7. Technical task plan for testing filter box sorbent-paint filter test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kilpatrick, L.L.

    1993-09-01

    At the Savannah River Plant, High Level Waste Engineering (HLWE) asked Interim Waste Technology (IWT) to choose and test a sorbent to add to the ITP filter box that meets the EPA requirement for land disposal of containerized liquid hazardous wastes per Paint Filter Liquids (PFL) test method 9095. This report outlines the process to be used in accomplishing this task.

  8. INTERNATIONAL ATOMIC ENERGY AGENCY Wagramer Strasse 5, P.O. Box 100

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    always driven human development. New technologies in energy production, starting from the use of fireINTERNATIONAL ATOMIC ENERGY AGENCY Wagramer Strasse 5, P.O. Box 100 A-1400 Vienna, Austria www Germany (page 10,11,15), ORNL Oak Ridge National Laboratory USA (page 6), IAEA Archives Vienna (page 8

  9. "BLUE BOX" POWER ELECTRONICS CONTROL MODULES FOR LABORATORY-BASED EDUCATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kimball, Jonathan W.

    for Electric Machinery and Electromechanics Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering University. L. CHAPMAN CEME-TR-2004-02 June 2004 Grainger Center for Electric Machinery and Electromechanics of design documents detailing the design and fabrication of "blue box" power electronics control modules

  10. Defining the Termination of the Asymptotic Giant Branch

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Noam Soker

    2007-12-22

    I suggest a theoretical quantitative definition for the termination of the asymptotic giant branch (AGB) phase and the beginning of the post-AGB phase. I suggest that the transition will be taken to occur when the ratio of the dynamical time scale to the the envelope thermal time scale, Q, reaches its maximum value. Time average values are used for the different quantities, as the criterion does not refer to the short time-scale variations occurring on the AGB and post-AGB, e.g., thermal pulses (helium shell flashes) and magnetic activity. Along the entire AGB the value of Q increases, even when the star starts to contract. Only when a rapid contraction starts does the value of Q start to decrease. This criterion captures the essence of the transition from the AGB to the post AGB phase, because Q is connected to the stellar effective temperature, reaching its maximum value at T~4000-6000 K, it is related to the mass loss properties, and it reaches its maximum value when rapid contraction starts and envelope mass is very low.

  11. Backflow in Post-Asymptotic Giant Branch Stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Noam Soker

    2001-03-07

    We derive the conditions for a backflow toward the central star(s) of circumstellar material to occur during the post-asymptotic giant branch (AGB) phase. The backflowing material may be accreted by the post-AGB star and/or its companion, if such exists. Such a backflow may play a significant role in shaping the descendant planetary nebula, by, among other things, slowing down the post-AGB evolution, and by forming an accretion disk which may blow two jets. We consider three forces acting on a slowly moving mass element: the gravity of the central system, radiation pressure, and fast wind ram pressure. We find that for a significant backflow to occur, a slow dense flow should exsist, such that the relation between the total mass in the slow flow, M, and the solid angle it covers, Omega, is given by (4*pi*M/Omega)>0.1Mo. The requirement for both high mass loss rate per unit solid angle and a very slow wind, such that it can be decelerated and flow back, probably requires close binary interaction.

  12. Flow Characteristics Analysis of Widows' Creek Type Control Valve for Steam Turbine Control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoo, Yong H.; Sohn, Myoung S.; Suh, Kune Y.

    2006-07-01

    The steam turbine converts the kinetic energy of steam to mechanical energy of rotor blades in the power conversion system of fossil and nuclear power plants. The electric output from the generator of which the rotor is coupled with that of the steam turbine depends on the rotation velocity of the steam turbine bucket. The rotation velocity is proportional to the mass flow rate of steam entering the steam turbine through valves and nozzles. Thus, it is very important to control the steam mass flow rate for the load following operation of power plants. Among various valves that control the steam turbine, the control valve is most significant. The steam flow rate is determined by the area formed by the stem disk and the seat of the control valve. While the ideal control valve linearly controls the steam mass flow rate with its stem lift, the real control valve has various flow characteristic curves pursuant to the stem lift type. Thus, flow characteristic curves are needed to precisely design the control valves manufactured for the operating conditions of nuclear power plants. OMEGA (Optimized Multidimensional Experiment Geometric Apparatus) was built to experimentally study the flow characteristics of steam flowing inside the control valve. The Widows' Creek type control valve was selected for reference. Air was selected as the working fluid in the OMEGA loop to exclude the condensation effect in this simplified approach. Flow characteristic curves were plotted by calculating the ratio of the measured mass flow rate versus the theoretical mass flow rate of the air. The flow characteristic curves are expected to be utilized to accurately design and operate the control valve for fossil as well as nuclear plants. (authors)

  13. Sherman Creek Hatchery; Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife Fish Program, 2000 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Combs, Mitch (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Kettle Falls, WA)

    2001-03-01

    The Sherman Creek Hatchery (SCH) was designed to rear 1.7 million kokanee fry for acclimation and imprinting during the spring and early summer. Additionally, it was designed to trap all available returning adult kokanee during the fall for broodstock operations and evaluations. Since the start of this program, the operations on Lake Roosevelt have been modified to better achieve program goals. These strategic changes have been the result of recommendations through the Lake Roosevelt Hatcheries Coordination Team (LRHCT) and were done to enhance imprinting, improve survival and operate the two kokanee facilities more effectively. The primary changes have been to replace the kokanee fingerling program with a yearling (post smolt) program of up to 1,000,000 fish. To construct and operate twenty net pens to handle the increased production. The second significant change was to rear 200,000 rainbow trout fingerling at SCH from July through October, for stocking into the volunteer net pens. This enables the Spokane Tribal Hatchery (STH) to rear additional kokanee to further the enhancement efforts on Lake Roosevelt. Monitoring and evaluation is preformed by the Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Monitoring Program. From 1988 to 1998, the principle sport fishery on Lake Roosevelt has shifted from walleye to include rainbow trout and kokanee salmon (Underwood et al. 1997, Tilson and Scholz 1997). The angler use, harvest rates for rainbow and kokanee and the economic value of the fishery has increased substantially during this 10-year period. The most recent information from the monitoring program also suggests that the hatchery and net pen rearing programs have been beneficial to enhancing the Lake Roosevelt fishery while not negatively impacting wild and native stocks within the lake.

  14. Natural Recharge to the Unconfined Aquifer System on the Hanford Site from the Greater Cold Creek Watershed: Progress Report 2004

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waichler, Scott R.; Wigmosta, Mark S.; Coleman, Andre M.

    2004-09-14

    Movement of contaminants in groundwater at the Hanford Site is heavily dependent on recharge to the unconfined aquifer. As the effects of past artificial discharges dissipate, the water table is expected to return to more natural conditions, and natural recharge will become the driving force when evaluating future groundwater flow conditions and related contaminant transport. Previous work on the relationship of natural recharge to groundwater movement at the Hanford Site has focused on direct recharge from infiltrating rainfall and snowmelt within the area represented by the Sitewide Groundwater Model (SGM) domain. However, part of the groundwater recharge at Hanford is provided by flow from Greater Cold Creek watershed (GCC), a large drainage area on the western boundary of the Hanford Site that includes Cold Creek Valley, Dry Creek Valley, and the Hanford side of Rattlesnake Mountain. This study was undertaken to estimate the recharge from GCC, which is believed to enter the unconfined aquifer as both infiltrating streamflow and shallow subsurface flow. To estimate recharge, the Distributed Hydrology-Soil-Vegetation Model (DHSVM) was used to simulate a detailed water balance of GCC from 1956 to 2001 at a spatial resolution of 200~m and a temporal resolution of one hour. For estimating natural recharge to Hanford from watersheds along its western and southwestern boundaries, the most important aspects that need to be considered are 1)~distribution and relative magnitude of precipitation and evapotranspiration over the watershed, 2)~streamflow generation at upper elevations and infiltration at lower elevations during rare runoff events, and 3)~permeability of the basalt bedrock surface underlying the soil mantle.

  15. Building America Technology Solutions for New and Existing Homes: New Insights for Improving the Designs of Flexible Duct Junction Boxes (Fact Sheet)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    IBACOS explored the relationships between pressure and physical configurations of flexible duct junction boxes by using computational fluid dynamics simulations to predict individual box parameters and total system pressure, thereby ensuring improved HVAC performance.

  16. Transferring Capital Equipment To Surplus First you need to find the asset you wish to surplus. On the Main Menu screen under the Lookup and Maintenance box

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . On the Main Menu screen under the Lookup and Maintenance box in the middle of the screen look under

  17. Ecological effects of contaminants in McCoy Branch, 1989-1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ryon, M.G. [ed.

    1992-01-01

    The 1984 Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) required assessment of all current and former solid waste management units. Such a RCRA Facility Investigation (RFI) was required of the Y-12 Plant for their Filled Coal Ash Pond on McCoy Branch. Because the disposal of coal ash in the ash pond, McCoy Branch, and Rogers Quarry was not consistent with the Tennessee Water Quality Act, several remediation steps were implemented or planned for McCoy Branch to address disposal problems. The McCoy Branch RFI plan included provisions for biological monitoring of the McCoy Branch watershed. The objectives of the biological monitoring were to: (1) document changes in biological quality of McCoy Branch after completion of a pipeline and after termination of all discharges to Rogers Quarry, (2) provide guidance on the need for additional remediation, and (3) evaluate the effectiveness of implemented remedial actions. The data from the biological monitoring program will also determine if the classified uses, as identified by the State of Tennessee, of McCoy Branch are being protected and maintained. This report discusses results from toxicity monitoring of snails fish community assessment, and a Benthic macroinvertebrate community assessment.

  18. Molecular Design of Branched and Binary Molecules at Ordered Interfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirsten Larson Genson

    2005-12-27

    This study examined five different branched molecular architectures to discern the effect of design on the ability of molecules to form ordered structures at interfaces. Photochromic monodendrons formed kinked packing structures at the air-water interface due to the cross-sectional area mismatch created by varying number of alkyl tails and the hydrophilic polar head group. The lower generations formed orthorhombic unit cell with long range ordering despite the alkyl tails tilted to a large degree. Favorable interactions between liquid crystalline terminal groups and the underlying substrate were observed to compel a flexible carbosilane dendrimer core to form a compressed elliptical conformation which packed stagger within lamellae domains with limited short range ordering. A twelve arm binary star polymer was observed to form two dimensional micelles at the air-water interface attributed to the higher polystyrene block composition. Linear rod-coil molecules formed a multitude of packing structures at the air-water interface due to the varying composition. Tree-like rod-coil molecules demonstrated the ability to form one-dimensional structures at the air-water interface and at the air-solvent interface caused by the preferential ordering of the rigid rod cores. The role of molecular architecture and composition was examined and the influence chemically competing fragments was shown to exert on the packing structure. The amphiphilic balance of the different molecular series exhibited control on the ordering behavior at the air-water interface and within bulk structures. The shell nature and tail type was determined to dictate the preferential ordering structure and molecular reorganization at interfaces with the core nature effect secondary.

  19. Production of branched-chain alcohols by recombinant Ralstonia eutropha in fed-batch cultivation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fei, Q; Brigham, CJ; Lu, JN; Fu, RZ; Sinskey, AJ

    2013-09-01

    Branched-chain alcohols are considered promising green energy sources due to their compatibility with existing infrastructure and their high energy density. We utilized a strain of Ralstonia eutropha capable of producing branched-chain alcohols and examined its production in flask cultures. In order to increase isobutanol and 3-methyl-1-butanol (isoamyl alcohol) productivity in the engineered strain, batch, fed-batch, and two-stage fed-batch cultures were carried out in this work. The effects of nitrogen source concentration on branched-chain alcohol production were investigated under four different initial concentrations in fermenters. A maximum 380 g m(-3) of branched-chain alcohol production was observed with 2 kg m(-3) initial NH4Cl concentration in batch cultures. A pH-stat control strategy was utilized to investigate the optimum carbon source amount fed during fed-batch cultures for higher cell density. In cultures of R. eutropha strains that did not produce polyhydroxyalkanoate or branched-chain alcohols, a maximum cell dry weight of 36 kg m(-3) was observed using a fed-batch strategy, when 10 kg m(-3) carbon source was fed into culture medium. Finally, a total branched-chain alcohol titer of 790 g m(-3), the highest branched-chain alcohol yield of 0.03 g g(-1), and the maximum branched-chain alcohol productivity of 8.23 g m(-3) h(-1) were obtained from the engineered strain Re2410/pJL26 in a two-stage fed-batch culture system with pH-stat control. Isobutanol made up over 95% (mass fraction) of the total branched-chain alcohols titer produced in this study. (C) 2013 Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  20. Remedial investigation/feasibility study of the Clinch River/Poplar Creek operable unit. Volume 1: Main text

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-06-01

    This report presents the findings of an investigation into contamination of the Clinch River and Poplar Creek near the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) in eastern Tennessee. For more than 50 years, various hazardous and radioactive substances have been released to the environment as a result of operations and waste management activities at the ORR. In 1989, the ORR was placed on the National Priorities List (NPL), established and maintained under the federal Comprehensive environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA). Under CERCLA, NPL sites must be investigated to determine the nature and extent of contamination at the site, assess the risk to human health and the environment posed by the site, and, if necessary, identify feasible remedial alternatives that could be used to clean the site and reduce risk. To facilitate the overall environmental restoration effort at the ORR, CERCLA activities are being implemented individually as distinct operable units (OUs). This document is the combined Remedial Investigation and Feasibility Study Report for the Clinch River/Poplar Creek OU.

  1. Phase 1 report on the Bear Creek Valley treatability study, Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-04-01

    Bear Creek Valley (BCV) is located within the US Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Reservation and encompasses multiple waste units containing hazardous and radioactive wastes associated with past operations at the adjacent Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. The BCV Remedial Investigation determined that disposal of wastes at the S-3 Site, Boneyard/Burnyard (BYBY), and Bear Creek Burial Grounds (BCBG) has caused contamination of both deep and shallow groundwater. The primary contaminants include uranium, nitrate, and VOCs, although other metals such as aluminum, magnesium, and cadmium persist. The BCV feasibility study will describe several remedial options for this area, including both in situ and ex situ treatment of groundwater. This Treatability Study Phase 1 Report describes the results of preliminary screening of treatment technologies that may be applied within BCV. Four activities were undertaken in Phase 1: field characterization, laboratory screening of potential sorbents, laboratory testing of zero valent iron products, and field screening of three biological treatment systems. Each of these activities is described fully in technical memos attached in Appendices A through G.

  2. Packing of softly repulsive particles in a spherical box - a generalised Thomson problem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Mughal

    2013-06-12

    We study the (near or close to) ground state distribution of N softly repelling particles trapped in the interior of a spherical box. The charges mutually interact via an inverse power law potential of the form $1/r^\\gamma$. We study three regimes in which the charges form an single spherical shell at the edge of the box ($\\gamma=1$), a series of concentric shells of increasing density ($\\gamma=2$) and $\\gamma=12$ for which the charges form shells with a more uniform charge distribution. We conduct numerical simulations for clusters containing up to 5000 charges and compare charge density across the system with continuum limit results. The agreement between numerical (discrete) results and the continuum limit is found to improve with increasing N.

  3. Higher-Derivative $f(R,\\Box R, T)$ Theories of Gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Houndjo, M J S; Mazhari, N S; Momeni, D; Myrzakulov, R

    2016-01-01

    In literature there is a model of modified gravity in which the matter Lagrangian is coupled to the geometry via trace of the stress-energy momentum tensor $T=T_{\\mu}^{\\mu}$. This type of modified gravity is called as $f(R,T)$ in which $R$ is Ricci scalar $R=R_{\\mu}^{\\mu}$. We extend manifestly this model to include the higher derivative term $\\Box R$. We derived equation of motion (EOM) for the model by starting from the basic variational principle. Later we investigate FLRW cosmology for our model. We show that de Sitter solution is unstable for a generic type of $f(R,\\Box R, T)$ model. Furthermore we investigate an inflationary scenario based on this model. A graceful exit from inflation is guaranteed in this type of modified gravity.

  4. Mesoscopic Effects in Bose-Einstein Condensate Fluctuations of an Ideal Gas in a Box 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dorfman, Konstantin Evgenievich

    2009-05-15

    . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93 ix LIST OF FIGURES FIGURE Page 1 Negative binomial distribution of the number of noncondensed atoms for an ideal Bose gas in a box with total number of particles N = 10000. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 2... Temperature scaling of the normalization factor, i.e. ?(N ?n) for an ideal Bose gas (N = 100 - grey line, N = 1000 - black line). Temperature is normalized by the standard thermodynamic limit critical value Tc(N = ?) that differs from the finite-size Tc(N...

  5. 4.5-K Cold Box for SNS - A Successful Cooperation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fleck, U.; Kurtcuoglu, K. [Linde Kryotechnik AG, CH-8422 Pfungen (Switzerland); Urbin, J.; Howe, D. [Linde BOC Process Plants LLC, Tulsa, Oklahoma, 74133-1923 (United States)

    2004-06-23

    The US Department of Energy is constructing the next generation, accelerator-based, neutron source, the Spallation Neutron Source at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The superconducting LINAC requires a large custom cryogenic helium system that was specified and ordered by the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Laboratory. Two groups of Linde AG's engineering division teamed to design, fabricate, and deliver the 4.5-K cold box for the SNS Central He liquefier. Linde Kryotechnik AG (LK), Switzerland provided design, engineering support and the gas bearing turbine systems. Process design for 4.5 K cooling as well as 38-K shield cooling will be explained. Control logic, including turbine related logic, was specified by LK and implemented successfully by ORNL in their control system in cooperation with LK. Linde BOC Process Plants LLC, Tulsa, Oklahoma fabricated, tested and delivered the cold box. Skills and techniques specific to helium cold box fabrication will be discussed. Finally, an overview of the commissioning will be provided according to the project status.

  6. Box- and peanut-shaped bulges. III. A new class of bulges: Thick Boxy Bulges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Luetticke; M. Pohlen; R. -J. Dettmar

    2004-01-06

    Inspecting all 1224 edge-on disk galaxies larger than 2' in the RC3 on DSS images we have found several galaxies with extraordinary bulges meeting two criteria: They are box shaped and large in respect to the diameters of their galaxies. These bulges are often disturbed, show frequently prominent irregularities and asymmetries, and some possess possible merger remnants or merging satellites. For these bulges we have introduced the term "Thick Boxy Bulges" (TBBs). About 2% of all disk galaxies (S0-Sd), respectively 4% of all galaxies with box- and peanut-shaped (b/p) bulges, belong to this class of galaxies. Using multicolour CCD and NIR data we have enlarged and followed up our sample of nearly 20 galaxies with a TBB. The disturbed morphology of a large fraction of these galaxies shows that many of the TBB galaxies are not dynamically settled. For the TBBs the extent of the box shape seems to be too large to result from a normal bar potential. Therefore we conclude that two classes of b/p bulges exist with different origins. While most (~96%) b/p bulges can be explained by bars alone, the extended boxy structures of TBBs result most likely from accreted material by infalling satellite companions (soft merging).

  7. Analysis of the HVAC System at the Willow Branch Intermediate School 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wei, G.

    1997-01-01

    This report presents an analysis of the HVAC system at the Willow Branch Intermediate School for the MEEN 685 class project. The school is located at College Station, Texas. A portion of the school belonged to Oakwood Intermediate School which...

  8. Siberian Branch of Russian Academy of Sciences BUDKER INSTITUTE OF NUCLEAR PHYSICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siberian Branch of Russian Academy of Sciences BUDKER INSTITUTE OF NUCLEAR PHYSICS ANNUAL REPORT 2010 NOVOSIBIRSK 2011 #12;Contents Introduction 7 1. Physics of Elementary Particles...............................................................................32 1.9.2 Physical results

  9. Branched peptide amphiphiles, related epitope compounds and self assembled structures thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stupp, Samuel I. (Chicago, IL); Guler, Mustafa O. (Evanston, IL)

    2008-11-18

    Branched peptide amphiphilic compounds incorporating one or residues providing a pendant amino group for coupling one or more epitope sequences thereto, such compounds and related compositions for enhanced epitope presentation.

  10. Measurement of the inclusive semileptonic branching fraction B(B?s?X-l+?l) at Belle

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Oswald, C.; Urquijo, P.; Dingfelder, J.; Adachi, I.; Aihara, H.; Arinstein, K.; Asner, D. M.; Aushev, T.; Bakich, A. M.; Belous, K.; Bhardwaj, V.; Bhuyan, B.; Bondar, A.; Bonvicini, G.; Bozek, A.; Bra?ko, M.; Browder, T. E.; Chang, P.; Chekelian, V.; Chen, A.; Chen, P.; Cheon, B. G.; Chilikin, K.; Chistov, R.; Cho, K.; Chobanova, V.; Choi, S.-K.; Choi, Y.; Cinabro, D.; Dalseno, J.; Doležal, Z.; Drásal, Z.; Drutskoy, A.; Dutta, D.; Eidelman, S.; Esen, S.; Farhat, H.; Fast, J. E.; Gaur, V.; Gabyshev, N.; Ganguly, S.; Gillard, R.; Goh, Y. M.; Golob, B.; Haba, J.; Hayasaka, K.; Hayashii, H.; Horii, Y.; Hoshi, Y.; Hou, W.-S.; Hyun, H. J.; Iijima, T.; Ishikawa, A.; Itoh, R.; Iwasaki, Y.; Kah, D. H.; Kang, J. H.; Kato, E.; Kawasaki, T.; Kiesling, C.; Kim, H. J.; Kim, H. O.; Kim, J. B.; Kim, K. T.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, Y. J.; Kinoshita, K.; Klucar, J.; Ko, B. R.; Korpar, S.; Kouzes, R. T.; Križan, P.; Krokovny, P.; Kronenbitter, B.; Kuhr, T.; Kumita, T.; Kwon, Y.-J.; Lee, S.-H.; Li, J.; Li, Y.; Libby, J.; Liu, C.; Liu, Y.; Liu, Z. Q.; Liventsev, D.; Louvot, R.; Lutz, O.; Matvienko, D.; Miyabayashi, K.; Miyata, H.; Mizuk, R.; Mohanty, G. B.; Moll, A.; Muramatsu, N.; Nagasaka, Y.; Nakano, E.; Nakao, M.; Nedelkovska, E.; Nisar, N. K.; Nishida, S.; Nitoh, O.; Nozaki, T.; Ogawa, S.; Ohshima, T.; Okuno, S.; Olsen, S. L.; Ostrowicz, W.; Pakhlov, P.; Pakhlova, G.; Park, H.; Park, H. K.; Pedlar, T. K.; Pestotnik, R.; Petri?, M.; Piilonen, L. E.; Prim, M.; Prothmann, K.; Ritter, M.; Röhrken, M.; Rozanska, M.; Ryu, S.; Sahoo, H.; Saito, T.; Sakai, Y.; Sandilya, S.; Santelj, L.; Sanuki, T.; Sato, Y.; Schneider, O.; Schnell, G.; Schwanda, C.; Schwartz, A. J.; Senyo, K.; Seon, O.; Sevior, M. E.; Shapkin, M.; Shen, C. P.; Shibata, T.-A.; Shiu, J.-G.; Shwartz, B.; Sibidanov, A.; Simon, F.; Smerkol, P.; Sohn, Y.-S.; Sokolov, A.; Solovieva, E.; Stari?, M.; Sumiyoshi, T.; Tatishvili, G.; Teramoto, Y.; Trabelsi, K.; Tsuboyama, T.; Uchida, M.; Uehara, S.; Uglov, T.; Unno, Y.; Uno, S.; Van Hulse, C.; Vanhoefer, P.; Varner, G.; Varvell, K. E.; Wang, C. H.; Wang, M.-Z.; Wang, P.; Watanabe, M.; Watanabe, Y.; Williams, K. M.; Won, E.; Yamamoto, H.; Yamashita, Y.; Zhang, C. C.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhilich, V.; Zupanc, A.

    2013-04-01

    We report a measurement of the inclusive semileptonic B0s branching fraction in a 121 fb?¹ data sample collected near the ?(5S) resonance with the Belle detector at the KEKB asymmetric energy e?e? collider. Events containing B?(*)sB¯¯¯?(*)s pairs are selected by reconstructing a tag side D?s and identifying a signal side lepton l? (l=e, ?) that is required to have the same-sign charge to ensure that both originate from different B?s mesons. The B?s?X?l??l branching fraction is extracted from the ratio of the measured yields of D?s mesons and D?sl? pairs and the known production and branching fractions. The inclusive semileptonic branching fraction is measured to be [10.6±0.5(stat)±0.7(syst)]%.

  11. Pervasive Synaptic Branch Removal in the Mammalian Neuromuscular System at Birth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tapia, Juan C.

    Using light and serial electron microscopy, we show profound refinements in motor axonal branching and synaptic connectivity before and after birth. Embryonic axons become maximally connected just before birth when they ...

  12. Determination of the deuterium-tritium branching ratio based on inertial confinement fusion implosions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosenberg, Michael Jonathan

    The deuterium-tritium (D-T) ?-to-neutron branching ratio [[superscript 3]H(d,?)[superscript 5]He/[superscript 3]H(d,n)[superscript 4]He] was determined under inertial confinement fusion (ICF) conditions, where the ...

  13. Measurement of the inclusive semileptonic branching fraction B(B?s?X-l+?l) at Belle

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Oswald, C.; Urquijo, P.; Dingfelder, J.; Adachi, I.; Aihara, H.; Arinstein, K.; Asner, D. M.; Aushev, T.; Bakich, A. M.; Belous, K.; et al

    2013-04-30

    We report a measurement of the inclusive semileptonic B0s branching fraction in a 121 fb?¹ data sample collected near the ?(5S) resonance with the Belle detector at the KEKB asymmetric energy e?e? collider. Events containing B?(*)sB¯¯¯?(*)s pairs are selected by reconstructing a tag side D?s and identifying a signal side lepton l? (l=e, ?) that is required to have the same-sign charge to ensure that both originate from different B?s mesons. The B?s?X?l??l branching fraction is extracted from the ratio of the measured yields of D?s mesons and D?sl? pairs and the known production and branching fractions. The inclusive semileptonicmore »branching fraction is measured to be [10.6±0.5(stat)±0.7(syst)]%.« less

  14. The thermodynamic properties of mixtures of normal octane and branched paraffin hydrocarbons 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Edward Kou-Shan

    1975-01-01

    THE THEi%ODYNANIC PROPERTIES Ol' NIXTURES OF NORMAL OCTANE AND BRANCHED PARAFFIN HYDROCARBONS A Thesis by Edward Kou-Shan Liu Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas AkN University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree... of NASTER OF SCIENCE December 1975 Major Subject: Chemical Engineering THF THERMODYNAMIC PROPERTIES OF MIXTURES OF NORMAL OCTANE AND BRANCHED PARAFFIN HYDROCARBONS A Thesis by EDWARD KOU-SHA N LID Approved as to style and content by: Chairman...

  15. Measurement of the B¯?Xs? branching fraction with a sum of exclusive decays

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Saito, T.; Ishikawa, A.; Yamamoto, H.; Abdesselam, A.; Adachi, I.; Aihara, H.; Al Said, S.; Arinstein, K.; Asner, D.?M.; Aushev, T.; et al

    2015-03-04

    We use 772 × 106 BB meson pairs collected at the ?(4S) resonance with the Belle detector to measure the branching fraction for B¯ ? Xs?. Our measurement uses a sum-of-exclusives approach in which 38 of the hadronic final states with strangeness equal to +1, denoted by Xs, are reconstructed. The inclusive branching fraction for MXs s?)=(3.51±0.17±0.33) × 10–4, where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second is systematic.

  16. Controlled synthesis of hyper-branched inorganic nanocrystals withrich three-dimensional structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kanaras, Antonios G.; Sonnichsen, Carsten; Liu, Haitao; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2005-07-27

    Studies of crystal growth kinetics are tightly integrated with advances in the creation of new nanoscale inorganic building blocks and their functional assemblies 1-11. Recent examples include the development of semiconductor nanorods which have potential uses in solar cells 12-17, and the discovery of a light driven process to create noble metal particles with sharp corners that can be used in plasmonics 18,19. In the course of studying basic crystal growth kinetics we developed a process for preparing branched semiconductor nanocrystals such as tetrapods and inorganic dendrimers of precisely controlled generation 20,21. Here we report the discovery of a crystal growth kinetics regime in which a new class of hyper-branched nanocrystals are formed. The shapes range from 'thorny balls', to tree-like ramified structures, to delicate 'spider net'-like particles. These intricate shapes depend crucially on a delicate balance of branching and extension. The multitudes of resulting shapes recall the diverse shapes of snowflakes 22.The three dimensional nature of the branch points here, however, lead to even more complex arrangements than the two dimensionally branched structures observed in ice. These hyper-branched particles not only extend the available three-dimensional shapes in nanoparticle synthesis ,but also provide a tool to study growth kinetics by carefully observing and modeling particle morphology.

  17. Assess Current and Potential Salmonid Production in Rattlesnake Creek Associated with Restoration Efforts; US Geological Survey Reports, 2002-2003 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Connolly, Patrick J. (US Geological Survey, Columbia River Research Laboratory, Western Fisheries Research Center, Cook, WA)

    2003-12-01

    This project was designed to document existing habitat conditions and fish populations within the Rattlesnake Creek watershed (White Salmon River subbasin, Washington) before major habitat restoration activities are implemented and prior to the reintroduction of salmon and steelhead above Condit Dam. Returning adult salmon Oncorhynchus spp. and steelhead O. mykiss have not had access to Rattlesnake Creek since 1913. An assessment of resident trout populations should serve as a good surrogate for evaluation of factors that would limit salmon and steelhead production in the watershed. Personnel from United States Geological Survey's Columbia River Research Laboratory (USGS-CRRL) attend to three main objectives of the Rattlesnake Creek project. The first is to characterize stream and riparian habitat conditions. This effort includes measures of water quality, water quantity, stream habitat, and riparian conditions. The second objective is to determine the status of fish populations in the Rattlesnake Creek drainage. To accomplish this, we derived estimates of salmonid population abundance, determined fish species composition, assessed distribution and life history attributes, obtained tissue samples for genetic analysis, and assessed fish diseases in the watershed. The third objective is to use the collected habitat and fisheries information to help identify and prioritize areas in need of restoration. As this report covers the second year of at least a three-year study, it is largely restricted to describing our efforts and findings for the first two objectives.

  18. Assess Current and Potential Salmonid Production in Rattlesnake Creek Associated with Restoration Efforts; US Geological Survey Reports, 2001-2002 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Connolly, Patrick J. (US Geological Survey, Western Fisheries Research Center, Columbia River Research Laboratory, Cook, WA)

    2003-01-01

    This project was designed to document existing habitat conditions and fish populations within the Rattlesnake Creek watershed (White Salmon River subbasin, Washington) before major habitat restoration activities are implemented and prior to the reintroduction of salmon and steelhead above Condit Dam. Returning adult salmon Oncorhynchus spp. and steelhead O. mykiss have not had access to Rattlesnake Creek since 1914. An assessment of resident trout populations should serve as a good surrogate for evaluation of factors that would limit salmon and steelhead production in the watershed. Personnel from United States Geological Survey's Columbia River Research Laboratory (USGS-CRRL) attend to three main objectives of the Rattlesnake Creek project. The first is to characterize stream and riparian habitat conditions. This effort includes measures of water quality, water quantity, stream habitat, and riparian conditions. The second objective is to determine the status of fish populations in the Rattlesnake Creek drainage. To accomplish this, we derived estimates of salmonid population abundance, determined fish species composition, assessed distribution and life history attributes, obtained tissue samples for future genetic analysis, and assessed fish diseases in the watershed. The third objective is to use the collected habitat and fisheries information to help identify and prioritize areas in need of restoration. As this report covers the first year of a three-year study, this report is restricted to describing our work on the first two objectives only.

  19. Opal Creek Forest Preserve Act of 1994. Introduced in the House of Representatives, One Hundred Third Congress, Second Session, August 8, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1994-12-31

    The legislative text proposes to provide for the establishment and management of the Opal Creek Forest Reserve in Oregon. The purpose of the Act is to protect and preserve the forests and watersheds in the Reserve. And to promote and conduct research regarding old-growth forests and for educators to provide scientifically credible information to the public.

  20. Box Canyon 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unknown

    2011-09-05

    to understand the significance of periodic orbits on a simple dynamic system. Two hybrid system applications with different levels of complexity will be considered in this thesis – an anthropomorphic Bipedal walking robot and a Double Pendulum with a...

  1. Pandora's Box

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kazzi, A Antoine

    2004-01-01

    AACEM, CORD, EMRA, and the ACEP Councilors and membershipCORD, AACEM, SAEM and the ACEP Council & members did notfrom AAEM, AAEM/RES, ACEP, and CORD. However, these written

  2. Box Canyon 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unknown

    2011-09-05

    , little is known about their mechanisms of formation and the relationship of sub-surface structure to current seep activity. In this study, we examined three seafloor seeps in the Garden Banks and Mississippi Canyon areas using exploration and reprocessed...

  3. Isolation and characterization of portal branch ligation-stimulated Hmga2-positive bipotent hepatic progenitor cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sakai, Hiroshi; Graduate School of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259 B51, Nagatsuta-cho, Midori-ku, Yokohama, Kanagawa 226-8503 ; Tagawa, Yoh-ichi; Graduate School of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259 B51, Nagatsuta-cho, Midori-ku, Yokohama, Kanagawa 226-8503; PRESTO, Japan Science and Technology Agency, 4-1-8 Honcho, Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012 ; Tamai, Miho; Motoyama, Hiroaki; Ogawa, Shinichiro; McEwen Center for Regenerative Medicine, University Health Network, 190 Elizabeth Street, Toronto, Ont., Canada M5G 2C4 ; Soeda, Junpei; Nakata, Takenari; Miyagawa, Shinichi

    2010-12-17

    Research highlights: {yields} Hepatic progenitor cells were isolated from the portal branch-ligated liver of mice. {yields} Portal branch ligation-stimulated hepatic progenitor cells (PBLHCs) express Hmga2. {yields} PBLHCs have bidirectional differentiation capability in vitro. -- Abstract: Hepatic stem/progenitor cells are one of several cell sources that show promise for restoration of liver mass and function. Although hepatic progenitor cells (HPCs), including oval cells, are induced by administration of certain hepatotoxins in experimental animals, such a strategy would be inappropriate in a clinical setting. Here, we investigated the possibility of isolating HPCs in a portal branch-ligated liver model without administration of any chemical agents. A non-parenchymal cell fraction was prepared from the portal branch-ligated or non-ligated lobe, and seeded onto plates coated with laminin. Most of the cells died, but a small number were able to proliferate. These proliferating cells were cloned as portal branch ligation-stimulated hepatic cells (PBLHCs) by the limiting dilution method. The PBLHCs expressed cytokeratin19, albumin, and Hmga2. The PBLHCs exhibited metabolic functions such as detoxification of ammonium ions and synthesis of urea on Matrigel-coated plates in the presence of oncostatin M. In Matrigel mixed with type I collagen, the PBLHCs became rearranged into cystic and tubular structures. Immunohistochemical staining demonstrated the presence of Hmga2-positive cells around the interlobular bile ducts in the portal branch-ligated liver lobes. In conclusion, successful isolation of bipotent hepatic progenitor cell clones, PBLHCs, from the portal branch-ligated liver lobes of mice provides the possibility of future clinical application of portal vein ligation to induce hepatic progenitor cells.

  4. KEITH SCHAEFER brings more than 25 years of leadership experience to his position of Chairman, City Paper Box, an international manufacturer of paper products serving the food service industry. Throughout his career, he has held a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sibille, Etienne

    Paper Box, an international manufacturer of paper products serving the food service industry. Throughout

  5. "Little Box Challenge" Inverters Arrive at NREL - News Releases | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservationBio-Inspired SolarAboutXuRod Hunt (208) 386-52542 120"Geek"Little Box

  6. Search for the decay Bs0 ? ?? and a measurement of the branching fraction for Bs0 ? ??

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dutta, Deepanwita; Bhuyan, Bipul; Abdesselam, A.; Adachi, I.; Aihara, H.; Al Said, S.; Arinstein, K.; Asner, David M.; Aulchenko, V.; Aushev, T.; Ayad, R.; Aziz, T.; Bahinipati, S.; Bakich, A. M.; Bansal, Vikas; Bhardwaj, V.; Bobrov, A.; Bonvicini, Giovanni; Bracko, Marko; Browder, Thomas E.; Cervenkov, D.; Chen, A.; Cheon, B. G.; Chilikin, K.; Chistov, R.; Cho, K.; Chobanova, V.; Choi, Y.; Cinabro, David A.; Dalseno, J.; Dolezal, Z.; Drasal, Z.; Drutskoy, A.; Dutta, K.; Eidelman, S.; Farhat, H.; Fast, James E.; Frost, O.; Gaur, Vipin; Ganguly, Sudeshna; Garmash, Alexey; Getzkow, D.; Goh, Y. M.; Golob, B.; Hayashii, H.; He, X. H.; Hou, W. S.; Iijima, T.; Ishikawa, A.; Iwasaki, Y.; Jaegle, Igal; Joffe, D.; Kang, K. H.; Kato, E.; Kiesling, C.; Kim, D. Y.; Kim, J. B.; Kim, J. H.; Kim, K. T.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. J.; Kinoshita, Kay; Ko, Byeong Rok; Kodys, P.; Korpar, S.; Krizan, P.; Krokovny, Pavel; Kuhr, Thomas; Kuzmin, A.; Kwon, Y. J.; Lange, J. S.; Lee, I. S.; Lewis, P.; Li, Y.; Li Gioi, L.; Libby, J.; Liventsev, Dmitri; Matvienko, D.; Miyata, H.; Mizuk, R.; Mohanty, G. B.; Moll, A.; Mori, T.; Mussa, R.; Nakano, E.; Nakao, M.; Nanut, T.; Nayak, Minakshi; Nisar, N. K.; Nishida, S.; Ogawa, S.; Okuno, S.; Pakhlov, P.; Pakhlova, Galina; Pedlar, Todd K.; Pestotnik, Rok; Petric, Marko; Piilonen, Leo E.; Ribezl, Eva; Ritter, M.; Rostomyan, A.; Sakai, Y.; Sandilya, Saurabh; Santelj, Luka; Sanuki, T.; Sato, Y.; Savinov, Vladimir; Schneider, O.; Schnell, G.; Schwanda, C.; Schwartz, A. J.; Semmler, D.; Shebalin, V.; Shibata, T. A.; Shiu, Jing-Ge; Shwartz, B.; Sibidanov, A.; Simon, F.; Sohn, Y. S.; Sokolov, A.; Solovieva, E.; Staric, M.; Sumihama, M.; Sumiyoshi, T.; Teramoto, Y.; Trabelsi, K.; Uchida, M.; Unno, Yuji; Uno, S.; Usov, Y.; Van Hulse, C.; Vanhoefer, P.; Varner, G.; Vinokurova, A.; Vossen, Anslem G.; Wagner, M. N.; Wang, C. H.; Wang, P.; Watanabe, Y.; Wehle, S.; Williams, K. M.; Won, E.; Yamamoto, H.; Yamaoka, J.; Yashchenko, S.; Yusa, Y.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhilich, V.; Zupanc, A.

    2015-01-01

    We search for the decay B0s??? and measure the branching fraction for B0s??? using 121.4~fb-1 of data collected at the ?(5S) resonance with the Belle detector at the KEKB asymmetric-energy e+e- collider. The B0s??? branching fraction is measured to be (3.6±0.5(stat.)±0.3(syst.)±0.6(fs))×10-5, where fs is the fraction of Bs(*)B¯s(*) in bb¯ events. Our result is in good agreement with the theoretical predictions as well as with a recent measurement from LHCb. We observe no statistically significant signal for the decay B0s??? and set a 90% confidence-level upper limit on its branching fraction at 3.1×10-6. This constitutes a significant improvement over the previous result.

  7. Branching ratio measurements of the 7.12-MeV state in 16O

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Matei; C. R. Brune

    2004-10-25

    Knowledge of the gamma-ray branching ratios of the 7.12-MeV state of 16O is important for the extrapolation of the 12C(a,g)16O cross section to astrophysical energies. Ground state transitions provide most of the 12C(a,g)16O total cross section while cascade transitions have contributions of the order of 10-20%. Determining the 7.12-MeV branching ratio will result in a better extrapolation of the cascade and E2 ground state cross section to low energies. We report here on measurements on the branching ratio of the 7.12-MeV level in 16O.

  8. High resolution, shallow seismic reflection survey of the Pen Branch fault

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stieve, A.

    1991-05-15

    The purpose of this project, at the Savannah River River Site (SRS) was to acquire, process, and interpret 28 km (17.4 miles) of high resolution seismic reflection data taken across the trace of the Pen Branch fault and other suspected, intersecting north-south trending faults. The survey was optimized for the upper 300 ft of geologic strata in order to demonstrate the existence of very shallow, flat lying horizons, and to determine the depth of the fault or to sediments deformed by the fault. Field acquisition and processing parameters were selected to define small scale spatial variability and structural features in the vicinity of the Pen Branch fault leading to the definition and the location of the Pen Branch fault, the shallowest extent of the fault, and the quantification of the sense and magnitude of motion. Associated geophysical, borehole, and geologic data were incorporated into the investigation to assist in the determination of optimal parameters and aid in the interpretation.

  9. Minthorn Springs Creek Summer Juvenile Release and Adult Collection Facility; 1992 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rowan, Gerald D.

    1993-08-01

    The Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CT'UIR) and Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) are cooperating in a joint effort to supplement steelhead and re-establish salmon runs in the Umatilla River Basin. As an integral part of this program, Bonifer and Minthorn Acclimation Facilities are operated for holding and spawning adult steelhead and fall chinook salmon and acclimation and release of juvenile salmon and steelhead. Acclimation of 109,101 spring chinook salmon and 19,977 summer steelhead was completed at Bonifer in the spring of 1992. At Minthorn, 47,458 summer steelhead were acclimated and released. Control groups of spring chinook salmon were released instream concurrent with the acclimated releases to evaluate the effects of acclimation on adult returns to the Umatilla River. Acclimation studies with summer steelhead were not conducted in 1992. A total of 237 unmarked adult steelhead were collected for broodstock at Three Mile Dam from October 18, 1991 through April 24, 1992 and held at Minthorn. Utilizing a 3 x 3 spawning matrix, a total of 476,871 green eggs were taken from 86 females. The eggs were transferred to Umatilla Hatchery for incubation, rearing, and later release into the Umatilla River. A total of 211 fall chinook salmon were also collected for broodstock at Three Mile Dam and held at Minthorn. Using a 1:1 spawning ratio, a total of 195,637 green eggs were taken from 58 females. They were also transferred to Umatilla Hatchery for incubation, rearing, and later release into the Umatilla River. Personnel from the ODFW Eastern Oregon Fish Pathology Laboratory in La Grande took samples of tissues and reproductive fluids from Umatilla River summer steelhead and fall chinook salmon broodstock for monitoring and evaluation purposes. Cell culture assays for replicating agents, including IHNV virus, on all spawned fish were negative. One of 60 summer steelhead tested positive for EIBS virus, while all fall chinook tested we re negative for inclusions. One of 73 summer steelhead sampled for BKD had a high level of antigen, while all others had very low or negative antigen levels. All fall chinook tested had low or negative antigen levels. Regularly-scheduled maintenance of pumps, equipment and facilities was performed in 1992. The progress of outmigration for juvenile releases was monitored at the Westland Canal fish trapping facility by CTUIR and ODFW personnel. Coho and spring chinook yearlings were released in mid-March at Umatilla rivermile (RM) 56 and 60. The peak outmigration period past Westland (RM 27) was mid-April to early May, approximately four to seven weeks after release. Groups of summer steelhead were released from Minthorn (RM 63) and Bonifer (RM 81) in late March and into Meacham Creek near Bonifer in late April. The peak outmigration period past Westland for all groups appeared to be the first two to three weeks in May. Spring chinook yearlings released in mid-April from Bonifer and at Umatilla RM 89, migrated rapidly downriver and the peak outmigration period past Westland appeared to be within a week or two after release. Fall and spring chinook subyearlings released in mid-May at RM 42 and 60, respectively, also migrated rapidly downriver and the peak outmigration period was within days after release. Coded-wire tag recovery information was accessed to determine the contribution of Umatilla River releases to the ocean, Columbia River and Umatilla River fisheries. Total estimated summer steelhead survival have ranged from 0.03 to 0.61% for releases in which recovery information is complete. Coho survival rates have ranged from 0.15 to 4.14%, and spring chinook yearling survival rates from spring releases have ranged from 0.72 to 0.74%. Survival rates of fall chinook yearlings have ranged from 0.08 to 3.01%, while fall chinook subyearling survival rates have ranged from 0.25 to 0.87% for spring released groups.

  10. Trial-Run of a Junction-Box Attachment Test for Use in Photovoltaic Module Qualification: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, D. C.; Deibert, S. L.; Wohlgemuth, J. H.

    2014-06-01

    Engineering robust adhesion of the junction box (j-box) is a hurdle typically encountered by photovoltaic module manufacturers during product development and manufacturing process control. There are historical incidences of adverse effects (e.g., fires) caused when the j-box/adhesive/module system has failed in the field. The addition of a weight to the j-box during the 'damp-heat,' 'thermal-cycle,' or 'creep' tests within the IEC qualification protocol is proposed to verify the basic robustness of the adhesion system. The details of the proposed test are described, in addition to a trial-run of the test procedure. The described experiments examine four moisture-cured silicones, four foam tapes, and a hot-melt adhesive used in conjunction with glass, KPE, THV, and TPE substrates. For the purpose of validating the experiment, j-boxes were adhered to a substrate, loaded with a prescribed weight, and then subjected to aging. The replicate mock-modules were aged in an environmental chamber (at 85 degrees C/85% relative humidity for 1000 hours; then 100 degrees C/<10% relative humidity for 200 hours) or fielded in Golden (CO), Miami (FL), and Phoenix (AZ) for one year. Attachment strength tests, including pluck and shear test geometries, were also performed on smaller component specimens.

  11. Uplifting the baryonic branch: a test for backreacting anti-D3-branes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anatoly Dymarsky; Stefano Massai

    2013-09-30

    Placing D3 or anti-D3-branes at the tip of the Klebanov-Strassler background results in uplifting the baryonic branch of the moduli space of the dual field theory. In this paper we derive a mass formula for the scalar particle associated with the motion along the baryonic branch, from both open and closed string points of view. We show that both methods give the same mass at linear order in number of (anti)D3-branes, thus providing a comprehensive check for the recently found linearized supergravity solution describing backreacting anti-D3-branes at the tip.

  12. Measurement of branching fractions and rate asymmetries in the rare decays B?K(*)l?l?

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Palano, A.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Brown, D. N.; Kerth, L. T.; et al

    2012-08-24

    In a sample of 471×10? BB¯¯¯ events collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II e?e? collider we study the rare decays B?K(*)l?l?, where l?l? is either e?e? or ????. We report results on partial branching fractions and isospin asymmetries in seven bins of dilepton mass-squared. We further present CP and lepton-flavor asymmetries for dilepton masses below and above the J/? resonance. We find no evidence for CP or lepton-flavor violation. The partial branching fractions and isospin asymmetries are consistent with the Standard Model predictions and with results from other experiments.

  13. Measurement of the ratio of the production cross sections times branching fractions of B [superscript ±][subscript c] ? [J over ?? [superscript ±

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Apyan, Aram

    The ratio of the production cross sections times branching fractions (?(B[superscript ± [subscript c])B(B[superscript ±] [subscript c]?J[over ?? [superscript ±

  14. Performance Demonstration Program Plan for Nondestructive Assay of Boxed Wastes for the TRU Waste Characterization Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlsbad Field Office

    2001-01-31

    The Performance Demonstration Program (PDP) for nondestructive assay (NDA) consists of a series of tests to evaluate the capability for NDA of transuranic (TRU) waste throughout the Department of Energy (DOE) complex. Each test is termed a PDP cycle. These evaluation cycles provide an objective measure of the reliability of measurements obtained from NDA systems used to characterize the radiological constituents of TRU waste. The primary documents governing the conduct of the PDP are the Waste Acceptance Criteria for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WAC; DOE 1999a) and the Quality Assurance Program Document (QAPD; DOE 1999b). The WAC requires participation in the PDP; the PDP must comply with the QAPD and the WAC. The WAC contains technical and quality requirements for acceptable NDA. This plan implements the general requirements of the QAPD and applicable requirements of the WAC for the NDA PDP for boxed waste assay systems. Measurement facilities demonstrate acceptable performance by the successful testing of simulated waste containers according to the criteria set by this PDP Plan. Comparison among DOE measurement groups and commercial assay services is achieved by comparing the results of measurements on similar simulated waste containers reported by the different measurement facilities. These tests are used as an independent means to assess the performance of measurement groups regarding compliance with established quality assurance objectives (QAO’s). Measurement facilities must analyze the simulated waste containers using the same procedures used for normal waste characterization activities. For the boxed waste PDP, a simulated waste container consists of a modified standard waste box (SWB) emplaced with radioactive standards and fabricated matrix inserts. An SWB is a waste box with ends designed specifically to fit the TRUPACT-II shipping container. SWB’s will be used to package a substantial volume of the TRU waste for disposal. These PDP sample components are distributed to the participating measurement facilities that have been designated and authorized by the Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO). The NDA Box PDP materials are stored at these sites under secure conditions to protect them from loss, tampering, or accidental damage. Using removable PDP radioactive standards, isotopic activities in the simulated waste containers are varied to the extent possible over the range of concentrations anticipated in actual waste characterization situations. Manufactured matrices simulate expected waste matrix configurations and provide acceptable consistency in the sample preparation process at each measurement facility. Analyses that are required by the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) to demonstrate compliance with various regulatory requirements and that are included in the PDP may only be performed by measurement facilities that demonstrate acceptable performance in the PDP. These analyses are referred to as WIPP analyses, and the wastes on which they are performed are referred to as WIPP wastes in this document.

  15. Characterization of Ion Species Mix of the Textor Diagnostic Hydrogen Beam Injector with an RF and Arc-discharge Plasma Box

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ivanov, A A; Kreter, A; Maximov, V V; Podmonogin, A A; Schweer, B; Shikhoutsev, I V; Stupishin, N V; Uhlemann, R; Usoltsev, D V

    2002-01-01

    Characterization of Ion Species Mix of the Textor Diagnostic Hydrogen Beam Injector with an RF and Arc-discharge Plasma Box

  16. Revision of the Branch Technical Position on Concentration Averaging and Encapsulation - 12510

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heath, Maurice; Kennedy, James E.; Ridge, Christianne; Lowman, Donald [U.S. NRC, Washington, DC, 20555-0001 (United States); Cochran, John [Sandia National Laboratory (United States)

    2012-07-01

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) regulation governing low-level waste (LLW) disposal, 'Licensing Requirements for Land Disposal of Radioactive Waste', 10 CFR Part 61, establishes a waste classification system based on the concentration of specific radionuclides contained in the waste. The regulation also states, at 10 CFR 61.55(a)(8), that, 'the concentration of a radionuclide (in waste) may be averaged over the volume of the waste, or weight of the waste if the units are expressed as nanocuries per gram'. The NRC's Branch Technical Position on Concentration Averaging and Encapsulation provides guidance on averaging radionuclide concentrations in waste under 10 CFR 61.55(a)(8) when classifying waste for disposal. In 2007, the NRC staff proposed to revise the Branch Technical Position on Concentration Averaging and Encapsulation. The Branch Technical Position on Concentration Averaging and Encapsulation is an NRC guidance document for averaging and classifying wastes under 10 CFR 61. The Branch Technical Position on Concentration Averaging and Encapsulation is used by nuclear power plants (NPPs) licensees and sealed source users, among others. In addition, three of the four U.S. LLW disposal facility operators are required to honor the Branch Technical Position on Concentration Averaging and Encapsulation as a licensing condition. In 2010, the Commission directed the staff to develop guidance regarding large scale blending of similar homogenous waste types, as described in SECY-10-0043 as part of its Branch Technical Position on Concentration Averaging and Encapsulation revision. The Commission is improving the regulatory approach used in the Branch Technical Position on Concentration Averaging and Encapsulation by moving towards a making it more risk-informed and performance-based approach, which is more consistent with the agency's regulatory policies. Among the improvements to the Branch Technical Position on Concentration Averaging and Encapsulation are more risk-informed limits for the sizes of sealed sources for safe disposal. Using more realistic intruder exposure scenarios, the suggested limits for Class B and C waste disposal of sealed sources, particularly Cs-137 and Co-60, have been increased. These suggested changes, and others in the Branch Technical Position on Concentration Averaging and Encapsulation, if adopted by Agreement States, have the potential to eliminate numerous orphan sources (i.e., sources that currently have no disposal pathway) that are now being stored. Permanent disposal of these sources, rather than temporary storage, will help reduce safety and security risks. The revised Branch Technical Position on Concentration Averaging and Encapsulation has an alternative approach section which provides flexibility to generators and processors, while also ensuring that intruder protection will be maintained. Alternative approaches provide flexibility by allowing for consideration of likelihood of intrusion, the possibility of averaging over larger volumes and allowing for disposal of large activity sources. The revision has improved the organization of the Branch Technical Position on Concentration Averaging and Encapsulation, improved its clarity, better documented the bases for positions, and made the positions more risk informed while also maintaining protection for intruder as required by 10 CFR Part 61. (authors)

  17. Wildlife and Wildlife Habitat Loss Assessment at Hills Creek Dam and Reservoir Project, Middle Fork Willamette River, Oregon, 1985 Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Noyes, J.H.

    1985-09-01

    A habitat based assessment was conducted of the US Army Corps of Engineers' Hills Creek Dam and Reservoir Project on the Middle Fork Willamette River, Oregon, to determine losses or gains resulting from the development and operation of the hydroelectric related components of the project. Preconstruction, postconstruction, and recent vegetation cover types of the project site were mapped based on aerial photographs from 1944, 1964, and 1979, respectively. Vegetation cover types were identified within the affected area and acreages of each type at each period were determined. Fifteen wildlife target species were selected to represent a cross-section of species groups affected by the project. An interagency team evaluated the suitability of the habitat to support the target species at each time period. An evaluation procedure which accounted for both the quantity and quality of habitat was used to aid in assessing impacts resulting from the project. The Hills Creek Project extensively altered or affected 4662 acres of land and river in the Middle Fork Willamette River drainage. Impacts to wildlife centered around the loss of 2694 acres of old-growth forest and 207 acres of riparian habitat. Impacts resulting from the Hills Creek Project included the loss of winter range for Roosevelt elk, and the loss of year-round habitat for black-tailed deer, black bear, cougar, river otter, beaver, ruffed grouse, spotted owl, and other nongame species. Bald eagle and osprey were benefited by an increase in foraging habitat. The potential of the affected area to support wildlife was greatly altered as a result of the Hills Creek Project, losses or gains in the potential of the habitat to support wildlife will exist over the life of the project.

  18. An Assessment of health risk associated with mercury in soil and sediment from East Fork Poplar Creek, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Revis, N.; Holdsworth, G.; Bingham, G.; King, A.; Elmore, J.

    1989-04-01

    This report presents results from a study conducted to determine the toxicity of Mercury in soils sediments samples. Mice were fed via diet, soils and sediment, from various locations along the East Fork Poplar creek. Tissue distribution of pollutants was determined at various intervals. The tissue level relative to toxicity was used to determine the effect of a complex matrix on the gastrointestinal absorption and tissue distribution of the pollutants (other pollutants included cadmium and selenium).

  19. Self-organized coordination in collective response of non-interacting agents: Emergence of bimodality in box-office success

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chakrabarti, Anindya S

    2013-01-01

    Many socio-economic phenomena are characterized by the appearance of a few "hit" products having a substantially higher popularity compared to their often equivalent competitors, reflected in a bimodal distribution of response (success). Using the example of box-office performance of movies, we show that the empirically observed bimodality can emerge via self-organization in a model where agents (theatres) independently decide whether to adapt a new movie. The response exhibits extreme variability even in the absence of learning or communication between agents and suggests that properly timing the release is a key determinant of box-office success.

  20. Sampling and analysis plan for the Bear Creek Valley Boneyard/Burnyard Accelerated Action Project, Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-03-01

    In the Bear Creek Valley Watershed Remedial Investigation, the Boneyard/Burnyard was identified as the source of the largest releases of uranium into groundwater and surface water in Bear Creek Valley. The proposed action for remediation of this site is selective excavation and removal of source material and capping of the remainder of the site. The schedule for this action has been accelerated so that this is the first remedial action planned to be implemented in the Bear Creek Valley Record of Decision. Additional data needs to support design of the remedial action were identified at a data quality objectives meeting held for this project. Sampling at the Boneyard/Burnyard will be conducted through the use of a phased approach. Initial or primary samples will be used to make in-the-field decisions about where to locate follow-up or secondary samples. On the basis of the results of surface water, soil, and groundwater analysis, up to six test pits will be dug. The test pits will be used to provide detailed descriptions of source materials and bulk samples. This document sets forth the requirements and procedures to protect the personnel involved in this project. This document also contains the health and safety plan, quality assurance project plan, waste management plan, data management plan, implementation plan, and best management practices plan for this project as appendices.