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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "branch 202-586-1114 specific" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Interdiction Branching  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sep 29, 2011 ... of partitioning the search space, referred to as the branching scheme. .... standard branch-and-bound both in terms of size of the enumeration tree and ...... of the fractional variable to be selected to enter at each iteration of the.

2011-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

2

Effect of resolved branches on the performance of delayed branching  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-oi'-order Completion 3. Out-of-order Issue with Out-of-order Completion E. Performance III BRANCH INSTRUCTIONS A. Procedural Dependencies B. Eifect of Branching C. Types of Branches D. Resolution of Branches E. Penalty in Performance . F. Branch Strategies... . 1. Branch Prediction 2, Branch Folding 3. Delayed Branching . 4. COBRA (Cost Optimization of BRAnches) 5. Rearrangement of Instructions IV RESEARCH MODELS A. Objectives of the Research B. Simulation Methodology 6 6 7 9 10 11 12 13 15...

Ramabhadran, Anurekha

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Radioiodinated branched carbohydrates  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A radioiodinated branched carbohydrate for tissue imaging. Iodine-123 is stabilized in the compound by attaching it to a vinyl functional group that is on the carbohydrate. The compound exhibits good uptake and retention and is promising in the development of radiopharmaceuticals for brain, heart and tumor imaging.

Goodman, Mark M. (Knoxville, TN); Knapp, Jr., Furn F. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Technology and Consumer Products Branch: program plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary objective of the Technology and Consumer Products Branch (TCP) is to encourage the development and commercialization of energy-efficient technologies and equipment used in buildings and purchased by consumers. The TCP program conducts technical research, development, and demonstration efforts jointly funded with private industry, educational institutions, utilities, and other Federal and state agencies as appropriate. All contracts, grants, or interagency agreements have the major thrust of developing products and disseminating information that will accelerate commercial availability of energy-efficient, low-cost, reliable technologies, techniques, and products suitable for use by consumers and design professionals in the residential and commercial building sectors. Specifically, the technologies pursued by the branch include heating and cooling systems, consumer appliances, lighting design, and systems. Projects for each of these areas are summarized briefly, and publications resulting from the activities are listed.

None

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Issues in Parallel Branch and Price  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Branch and price is the technique of combining column generation methods with branch ... price has been shown to be very e ective at solving large, specially...

6

energy company opens American branch  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and environmental science and policy departments at UC Davis, said she thinks it is wonderful that Ecostream is coming to the Sacramento area and that UC Davis is a prime location for research on sustainability. "Inenergy company opens American branch in West Sacramento Substainible energy

Lin, C.-Y. Cynthia

7

Optimization Online - Branch-and-cut and Branch-and-cut-and-price ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Jan 27, 2014 ... Branch-and-cut and Branch-and-cut-and-price Algorithms for the Adjacent Only Quadratic Minimum Spanning Tree Problem. Dilson Lucas...

Dilson Lucas Pereira

2014-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

8

Walker Branch Watershed Ecosystems Data  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

These projects have all contributed to a more complete understanding of how forest watersheds function and have provided insights into the solution of energy-related problems associated with air pollution, contaminant transport, and forest nutrient dynamics. This is one of a few sites in the world characterized by long-term, intensive environmental studies. The Walker Branch Watershed website at http://walkerbranch.ornl.gov/ provides maps, photographs, and data on climate, precipitation, atmospheric deposition, stream discharge and runoff, stream chemistry, and vegetation. [Taken from http://walkerbranch.ornl.gov/ABOUTAAA.HTM

9

MD Simulation Study of the Influence of Branch Content on Relaxation and Crystallization of Branched Polyethylene Chains with Uniform Branch Distribution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Branched Polyethylene Chains with Uniform Branch Distribution I. A. HUSSEIN, B. F. ABU-SHARKH* Department-density polyethylene (LLDPE) chains with different levels of branch content (BC), ranging from 10 to 80 branches/1000 C words: MD simulation, Polyethylene, branch content, chain conformation, radius of gyration

Hussein, Ibnelwaleed A.

10

Vegetation survey of PEN Branch wetlands  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A survey was conducted of vegetation along Pen Branch Creek at Savannah River Site (SRS) in support of K-Reactor restart. Plants were identified to species by overstory, understory, shrub, and groundcover strata. Abundance was also characterized and richness and diversity calculated. Based on woody species basal area, the Pen Branch delta was the most impacted, followed by the sections between the reactor and the delta. Species richness for shrub and groundcover strata were also lowest in the delta. No endangered plant species were found. Three upland pine areas were also sampled. In support of K Reactor restart, this report summarizes a study of the wetland vegetation along Pen Branch. Reactor effluent enters Indian Grove Branch and then flows into Pen Branch and the Pen Branch Delta.

Not Available

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Branching Brownian Motion with branching at the origin Sergey Bocharov, Simon C. Harris  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Branching Brownian Motion with branching at the origin Sergey Bocharov, Simon C. Harris University. Dawson and K. Fleischmann [4], K. Fleischmann and J.F. Le Gall [9] or J. Engl¨ander and D. Turaev [7 result is the Strong Law of Large Numbers for the branching system. Theorem 1.7 (SLLN). Let f : R R

Harris, Simon Colin

12

The Intermediate Scale Branch of the Landscape  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Three branches of the string theory landscape have plausibly been identified. One of these branches is expected to exhibit a roughly logarithmic distribution of supersymmetry breaking scales. The original KKLT models are in this class. We argue that certain features of the KKLT model are generic to this branch, and that the resulting phenomenology depends on a small set of discrete choices. As in the MSSM, the weak scale in these theories is tuned; a possible explanation is selection for the dark matter density.

Michael Dine

2005-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

13

MOMENT ASYMPTOTICS FOR MULTITYPE BRANCHING RANDOM WALKS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Montenegro 29 October, 2013 Abstract. We study a discrete time multitype branching random walk on a finite of Montenegro, Cetinjska 2, 81 000 Podgorica, Montenegro, ozrens@t-com.me AMS 2010 Subject Classification: 60J80

König, Wolfgang

14

MOMENT ASYMPTOTICS FOR MULTITYPE BRANCHING RANDOM WALKS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Montenegro 29 October, 2013 Abstract. We study a discrete time multitype branching random walk on a #28;nite of Montenegro, Cetinjska 2, 81 000 Podgorica, Montenegro, ozrens@t-com.me AMS 2010 Subject Classi#28;cation: 60J

König, Wolfgang

15

Regulation of Branching by Phytochrome and Phytohormones  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Light is the fundamental source of energy and information throughout the plant life cycle. Light signals regulate plant architecture and branching, key processes that determine biomass production and grain yield. Low red (R) to far-red (FR) light...

Krishnareddy, Srirama R.

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

16

FY 1990 Applied Sciences Branch annual report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Applied Sciences Branch actively supports the advancement of DOE/SERI goals for the development and implementation of the solar photovoltaic technology. The primary focus of the laboratories is to provide state-of-the-art analytical capabilities for materials and device characterization and fabrication. The branch houses a comprehensive facility which is capable of providing information on the full range of photovoltaic components. A major objective of the branch is to aggressively pursue collaborative research with other government laboratories, universities, and industrial firms for the advancement of photovoltaic technologies. Members of the branch disseminate research findings to the technical community in publications and presentations. This report contains information on surface and interface analysis, materials characterization, development, electro-optical characterization module testing and performance, surface interactions and FTIR spectroscopy.

Keyes, B.M.; Dippo, P.C. [eds.

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Electrochemical Branched-DNA Assay for Polymerase Chain Reaction...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Branched-DNA Assay for Polymerase Chain Reaction-Free Detection and Quantification of Oncogenes in Messenger RNA Electrochemical Branched-DNA Assay for Polymerase Chain...

18

Temperature and Tidal Dynamics in a Branching Estuarine System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Importance of the Interconnectivity of Branching ChannelsImportance of the Interconnectivity of Branching Channels Inquestions about tidal interconnectivity in the Sacramento-

Wagner, Richard Wayne

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Journal of Engineering Mathematics Optimal discharging in a branched estuary Optimal discharging in a branched estuary  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that returns to the discharge site is less polluted than would 1 #12;Journal of Engineering Mathematics OptimalJournal of Engineering Mathematics Optimal discharging in a branched estuary Optimal discharging the proximity of the discharge site to the branching and upon how the rate of discharge is adjusted. Explicit

20

-delayed proton emission branches in 43Cr  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The + decay of very neutron-deficient 43Cr was studied by means of an imaging time projection chamber that allowed recording tracks of charged particles. Events of -delayed emission of one, two, and three protons were clearly identified. The absolute branching ratios for these channels were determined to be (81 4)%, (7.1 0.4)%, and (0.08 0.03)%, respectively. 43Cr is thus established as the second case in which the -3p decay occurs. Although the feeding to the proton-bound states in 43V is expected to be negligible, the large branching ratio of (12 4)% for decays without proton emission is found.

Pomorski, M. [University of Warsaw; Miernik, K. [University of Warsaw; Dominik, W. [University of Warsaw; Janas, Z. [University of Warsaw; Pfutzner, M. [University of Warsaw; Bingham, C. R. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Czyrkowski, H. [University of Warsaw; Cwiok, Mikolaj [Warsaw University; Darby, Iain [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Dabrowski, Ryszard [Warsaw University; Ginter, T. N. [Michigan State University, East Lansing; Grzywacz, Robert Kazimierz [ORNL; Karny, M. [University of Warsaw; Korgul, A. [University of Warsaw; Kusmierz, W. [University of Warsaw; Liddick, Sean [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Rajabali, M. M. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Rykaczewski, Krzysztof Piotr [ORNL; Stolz, A. [Michigan State University, East Lansing

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "branch 202-586-1114 specific" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Improved strategies for branching on general disjunctions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Jul 21, 2008 ... [1] used basis reduction to find good branching directions for certain classes of difficult integer ..... first, the size of the linear systems may become unmanageable in practice, and second, if we add up too many ...... Management Science 51(11), 17201732 (2005) ... ILOG: ILOG CPLEX 11.0 User's Manual.

2009-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

22

Measurement of the D -> pipi branching fractions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Using data from CLEO II at the Cornell Electron Storage Ring we provide a new measurement of the branching fraction for D0 --> pi+pi-, and we present the first measurements of D0 --> pi0pi0 and of D+ --> pi+pi0, which is ...

Ammar, Raymond G.; Ball, S.; Baringer, Philip S.; Coppage, Don; Copty, N.; Davis, Robin E. P.; Hancock, N.; Kelly, M.; Kwak, Nowhan; Lam, H.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Measurement of the D*(2010) branching fractions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report a measurement of the D*+ and D*0 decay branching fractions based on 780 pb-1 of data collected with the CLEO II detector. For radiative D*+ decay, we obtain an upper limit, B(D*+ --> D+ gamma) < 4.2% (90% confidence ...

Ammar, Raymond G.; Ball, S.; Baringer, Philip S.; Coppage, Don; Copty, N.; Davis, Robin E. P.; Hancock, N.; Kelly, M.; Kwak, Nowhan; Lam, H.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Influence of branch content on the microstructure of blends of linear and octene-branched polyethylene  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

experimental densities of the two polymer melts. Initially, chains of LLDPE and HDPE were completely mixed POLYMER JOURNAL #12;short chain branching (SCB) [26]. Few studies have made use of m-LLDPE in blend

Hussein, Ibnelwaleed A.

25

Vegetation survey of Pen Branch and Four Mile Creek wetlands  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One hundred-fifty plots were recently sampled (vegetational sampling study) at the Savannah River Site (SRS). An extensive characterization of the vascular flora, in four predetermined strata (overstory, Understory, shrub layer, and ground cover), was undertaken to determine dominance, co-dominance, and the importance value (I.V.) of each species. These results will be used by the Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) to evaluate the environmental status of Four Mile Creek, Pen Branch, and two upland pine stands. Objectives of this study were to: Describe in detail the plant communities previously mapped with reference to the topography and drainage, including species of plants present: Examine the successional trends within each sampling area and describe the extent to which current vegetation communities have resulted from specific earlier vegetation disturbances (e.g., logging and grazing); describe in detail the botanical field techniques used to sample the flora; describe the habitat and location of protected and/or rare species of plants; and collect and prepare plant species as herbarium quality specimens. Sampling was conducted at Four Mile Creek and Pen Branch, and in two upland pine plantations of different age growth.

Not Available

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Vegetation survey of Pen Branch and Four Mile Creek wetlands  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One hundred-fifty plots were recently sampled (vegetational sampling study) at the Savannah River Site (SRS). An extensive characterization of the vascular flora, in four predetermined strata (overstory, Understory, shrub layer, and ground cover), was undertaken to determine dominance, co-dominance, and the importance value (I.V.) of each species. These results will be used by the Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) to evaluate the environmental status of Four Mile Creek, Pen Branch, and two upland pine stands. Objectives of this study were to: Describe in detail the plant communities previously mapped with reference to the topography and drainage, including species of plants present: Examine the successional trends within each sampling area and describe the extent to which current vegetation communities have resulted from specific earlier vegetation disturbances (e.g., logging and grazing); describe in detail the botanical field techniques used to sample the flora; describe the habitat and location of protected and/or rare species of plants; and collect and prepare plant species as herbarium quality specimens. Sampling was conducted at Four Mile Creek and Pen Branch, and in two upland pine plantations of different age growth.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Branch content of metallocene polyethylene Ramnath Ramachandran, Gregory Beaucage*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Branch content of metallocene polyethylene Ramnath Ramachandran, Gregory Beaucage* and Amit catalyzed polyethylene (PE). A novel scaling approach is applied to determine the mole fraction branch solutions of metallocene polyethylene samples, to quantify the LCB content in polymers previously studied

Beaucage, Gregory

28

annual fourmile branch: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

space, referred to as the branching scheme. .... standard branch-and-bound both in terms of size of the enumeration tree and ...... of the fractional variable to be selected...

29

abnormal branching pattern: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

space, referred to as the branching scheme. .... standard branch-and-bound both in terms of size of the enumeration tree and ...... of the fractional variable to be selected...

30

Photovoltaic Program Branch annual report, FY 1989  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the progress of the Photovoltaic (PV) Program Branch of the Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI) from October 1, 1988, through September 30, 1989. The branch is responsible for managing the subcontracted portion of SERI's PV Advanced Research and Development Project. In fiscal year (FY) 1989, this included nearly 50 subcontracts, with a total annualized funding of approximately $13.1 million. Approximately two-thirds of the subcontracts were with universities, at a total funding of nearly $4 million. The six technical sections of the report cover the main areas of the subcontracted program: Amorphous Silicon Research, Polycrystalline Thin Films, Crystalline Silicon Materials Research, High-Efficiency Concepts, New Ideas, and University Participation. Technical summaries of each of the subcontracted programs provide a discussion of approaches, major accomplishments in FY 1989, and future research directions. Each report will be cataloged individually.

Summers, K A [ed.

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Nano-pore based characterization of branched polymers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We propose a novel characterization method of randomly branched polymers based on the geometrical property of such objects in confined spaces. The central idea is that randomly branched polymers exhibit passing/clogging transition across the nano-channel as a function of the channel size. This critical channel size depends on the degree of the branching, whereby allowing the extraction of the branching information of the molecule.

Takahiro Sakaue; Franoise Brochard-Wyart

2014-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

32

E-Print Network 3.0 - alternative energy branch Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

branch Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: alternative energy branch Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Thesis Overview: Reducing Branch...

33

RADIONUCLIDE INVENTORY AND DISTRIBUTION: FOURMILE BRANCH, PEN BRANCH, AND STEEL CREEK IOUS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As a condition to the Department of Energy (DOE) Low Level Waste Disposal Federal Facility Review Group (LFRG) review team approving the Savannah River Site (SRS) Composite Analysis (CA), SRS agreed to follow up on a secondary issue, which consisted of the consolidation of several observations that the team concluded, when evaluated collectively, could potentially impact the integration of the CA results. This report addresses secondary issue observations 4 and 21, which identify the need to improve the CA sensitivity and uncertainty analysis specifically by improving the CA inventory and the estimate of its uncertainty. The purpose of the work described herein was to be responsive to these secondary issue observations by re-examining the radionuclide inventories of the Integrator Operable Units (IOUs), as documented in ERD 2001 and Hiergesell, et. al. 2008. The LFRG concern has been partially addressed already for the Lower Three Runs (LTR) IOU (Hiergesell and Phifer, 2012). The work described in this investigation is a continuation of the effort to address the LFRG concerns by re-examining the radionuclide inventories associated with Fourmile Branch (FMB) IOU, Pen Branch (PB) IOU and Steel Creek (SC) IOU. The overall approach to computing radionuclide inventories for each of the IOUs involved the following components: Defining contaminated reaches of sediments along the IOU waterways Identifying separate segments within each IOU waterway to evaluate individually Computing the volume and mass of contaminated soil associated with each segment, or compartment Obtaining the available and appropriate Sediment and Sediment/Soil analytical results associated with each IOU Standardizing all radionuclide activity by decay-correcting all sample analytical results from sample date to the current point in time, Computing representative concentrations for all radionuclides associated with each compartment in each of the IOUs Computing the radionuclide inventory of each DOE-added radionuclide for the compartments of each IOU by applying the representative, central value concentration to the mass of contaminated soil Totaling the inventory for all compartments associated with each of the IOUs Using this approach the 2013 radionuclide inventories for each sub-compartment associated with each of the three IOUs were computed, by radionuclide. The inventories from all IOU compartments were then rolled-up into a total inventory for each IOU. To put the computed estimate of radionuclide activities within FMB, PB, and SC IOUs into context, attention was drawn to Cs-137, which was the radionuclide with the largest contributor to the calculated dose to a member of the public at the perimeter of SRS within the 2010 SRS CA (SRNL 2010). The total Cs-137 activity in each of the IOUs was calculated to be 9.13, 1.5, and 17.4 Ci for FMB, PB, and SC IOUs, respectively. Another objective of this investigation was to address the degree of uncertainty associated with the estimated residual radionuclide activity that is calculated for the FMB, PB, and SC IOUs. Two primary contributing factors to overall uncertainty of inventory estimates were identified and evaluated. The first related to the computation of the mass of contaminated material in a particular IOU compartment and the second to the uncertainty associated with analytical counting errors. The error ranges for the mass of contaminated material in each IOU compartment were all calculated to be approximately +/- 9.6%, or a nominal +/-10%. This nominal value was added to the uncertainty associated with the analytical counting errors that were associated with each radionuclide, individually. This total uncertainty was then used to calculate a maximum and minimum estimated radionuclide inventories for each IOU.

Hiergesell, R.; Phifer, M.

2014-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

34

Commissioning Specifications  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Commissioning specifications outline basic requirements of the commissioning process and detail the roles and responsibilities of each party involved. System checklists, startup requirements, and...

35

Annual report, Materials Science Branch, FY 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the progress of the Materials Science Branch of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) from October 1, 1991, through September 30, 1992. Six technical sections of the report cover these main areas of NREL`s in-house research: Crystal Growth, Amorphous Silicon, III-V High-Efficiency Photovoltaic Cells, Solid State Theory, Solid State Spectroscopy, and Program Management. Each section explains the purpose and major accomplishments of the work in the context of the US Department of Energy`s National Photovoltaic Research Program plans.

Padilla, S. [ed.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Branching and Momentum Effects in Photochemistry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The decision on the fate of the reaction (branching of the path) is sometimes not only taken at the last conical intersection, but the Franck-Condon region can also contribute. Consideration of simple properties such as the slopes of the potential surfaces can explain effects such as the principle of least motion or the torquoselectivity without invoking ad-hoc electronic effects. The lack of stereospecificity of cyclobutene ring opening and the wavelength dependence of photochemical reactions of alkylated olefins and cyclobutenes can similarly be explained, if one assumes in addition that the momentum is conserved over a certain time.

Fuss, Werner [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Quantenoptik, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

2007-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

37

Third annual Walker Branch Watershed research symposium. Program and abstracts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The methods and concepts of watershed research, originally applied in an experimental or monitoring mode to relatively small catchments, are increasingly being used at larger scales and for specific applied problems. Research at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, the Tennessee Valley Authority, the US Forest Service, and other agencies and institutions participating in this symposium reflects research over a broad range of spatial scales that is being integrated through large-scale experiments along with computer modeling and graphical interfaces. These research projects address the basic atmospheric, geophysical, biogeochemical, and biological processes that regulate the responses of forested ecosystems to natural environmental variation and anthropogenic stresses. Regional and global issues addressed by presentations include emissions of carbon dioxide, methane, and other hydrocarbons; deposition of sulfate, nitrate, and mercury; land-use changes; biological diversity; droughts; and water quality. The reports presented in this symposium illustrate a wide range of methods and approaches and focus more on concepts and techniques than on a specific physical site. Sites and projects that have contributed research results to this symposium include Walker Branch Watershed (DOE), the Coweeta Hydrologic Laboratory and LTER site (USFS and NSF), Great Smoky Mountains National Park (research funded by NPS, TVA, and EPRI), Imnavait Creek, Alaska (DOE), the TVA-Norris Whole-tree Facility (TVA and EPRI), and DOE`s Biomass Program.

Not Available

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

The Branching of Graphs in 2-d Quantum Gravity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The branching ratio is calculated for three different models of 2d gravity, using dynamical planar phi-cubed graphs. These models are pure gravity, the D=-2 Gaussian model coupled to gravity and the single spin Ising model coupled to gravity. The ratio gives a measure of how branched the graphs dominating the partition function are. Hence it can be used to estimate the location of the branched polymer phase for the multiple Ising model coupled to 2d gravity.

M. G. Harris

1996-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

39

Basic Sciences Branch annual report, FY 1990  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the progress of the Basic Sciences Branch of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) from October 1, 1989, through September 30, 1990. Six technical sections of the report cover these main areas of NREL's in-house research: Semiconductor Crystal Growth, Amorphous Silicon Research, Polycrystalline Thin Films, III-V High-Efficiency Photovoltaic Cells, Solid-State Theory, and Solid-State Spectroscopy. Each section of the report was written by the group leader principally in charge of the work. The task in each case was to explain the purpose and major accomplishments of the work in the context of the US Department of Energy's National Photovoltaic Research Program plans.

Not Available

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Basic Sciences Branch annual report, FY 1990  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the progress of the Basic Sciences Branch of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) from October 1, 1989, through September 30, 1990. Six technical sections of the report cover these main areas of NREL`s in-house research: Semiconductor Crystal Growth, Amorphous Silicon Research, Polycrystalline Thin Films, III-V High-Efficiency Photovoltaic Cells, Solid-State Theory, and Solid-State Spectroscopy. Each section of the report was written by the group leader principally in charge of the work. The task in each case was to explain the purpose and major accomplishments of the work in the context of the US Department of Energy`s National Photovoltaic Research Program plans.

Not Available

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "branch 202-586-1114 specific" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Determination of Charm Hadronic Branching Fractions at CLEO-c  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recent results from CLEO-c on measurements of absolute hadronic branching fractions of D0, D+, and Ds+ mesons are presented.

A. Ryd

2007-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

42

Information-Based Branching Schemes for Binary Linear Mixed ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

For example, the first branching policy 0-0-0 performs ... We expected poor performance of this policy as it weights each active clause .... Hyderabad, India.

2009-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

43

BBuulllleettiinnFEBRUARY 2009 HARBOR BRANCH FORMS OCEAN EXPLORATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is interested in mapping large swaths of sea floor in deep water. Harbor Branch will support this mission for the following reasons: · to provide detailed data on the distribu- tion of deep water reefs in order to protect with project management services, and our ship the RV Seward Johnson. At the same time Harbor Branch's Center

Fernandez, Eduardo

44

Branch length distribution in TREF fractionated polyethylene Ramnath Ramachandran a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Branch length distribution in TREF fractionated polyethylene Ramnath Ramachandran a , Gregory Keywords: Polyethylene Branching Neutron scattering a b s t r a c t Commercial polyethylene is typically and catalyst activity. Further, processing of polyethylene after polymerization may also result in changes

Beaucage, Gregory

45

Radiolabeled dimethyl branched long chain fatty acid for heart imaging  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A radiolabeled long chain fatty acid for heart imaging that has dimethyl branching at one of the carbons of the chain which inhibits the extent to which oxidation can occur. The closer to the carboxyl the branching is positioned, the more limited the oxidation, thereby resulting in prolonged retention of the radiolabeled compound in the heart.

Knapp, Jr., Furn F. (Oak Ridge, TN); Goodman, Mark M. (Knoxville, TN); Kirsch, Gilbert (Woippy, FR)

1988-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

46

INTRODUCTION Branched tubular epithelial structures are found in most  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(respiratory) system, a branched tubular epithelium, is similarly amenable to cellular and genetic analysis to define the mechanisms of branching morphogenesis in vivo. The tracheal system delivers oxygen directly The Company of Biologists Limited 1996 DEV7471 The tracheal (respiratory) system of Drosophila melanogaster

Krasnow, Mark A.

47

APPLYING CACHING TO TWO-LEVEL ADAPTIVE BRANCH PREDICTION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

" of Sibiu Hatfield, Hertfordshire, U.K. Seoul, Korea Sibiu-2400, Romania AL10 9AB 139-743 email: C% [1]. More recently, the advent of superscalar processors has given renewed impetus to branch on a superscalar processor. This renewed interest in branch prediction led to a dramatic breakthrough in the 1990s

Vintan, Lucian N.

48

Surviving particles for subcritical branching processes in random environment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Surviving particles for subcritical branching processes in random environment Vincent Bansaye December 9, 2008 Abstract The asymptotic behavior of a subcritical Branching Process in Random Envi- ronment (BPRE) starting with several particles depends on whether the BPRE is strongly subcritical (SS

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

49

Coupling a branching process to an infinite dimensional epidemic process  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Coupling a branching process to an infinite dimensional epidemic process A. D. Barbour Universit¨at Z¨urich To Cindy Greenwood, for her 70th. Abstract Branching process approximation to the initial stages of an epi- demic process has been used since the 1950's as a technique for pro- viding stochastic

Barbour, Andrew

50

Quantum Darwinism: Entanglement, branches, and the emergent classicality of redundantly stored quantum information  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We lay a comprehensive foundation for the study of redundant information storage in decoherence processes. Redundancy has been proposed as a prerequisite for objectivity, the defining property of classical objects. We consider two ensembles of states for a model universe consisting of one system and many environments: the first consisting of arbitrary states, and the second consisting of 'singly branching' states consistent with a simple decoherence model. Typical states from the random ensemble do not store information about the system redundantly, but information stored in branching states has a redundancy proportional to the environment's size. We compute the specific redundancy for a wide range of model universes, and fit the results to a simple first-principles theory. Our results show that the presence of redundancy divides information about the system into three parts: classical (redundant); purely quantum; and the borderline, undifferentiated or 'nonredundant', information.

Blume-Kohout, Robin; Zurek, Wojciech H. [Theoretical Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545, USA and Institute for Quantum Information, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States); Theoretical Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

2006-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

51

Quantification of branching in model 3-arm star polyethylene Ramnath Ramachandran, Gregory Beaucage*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Quantification of branching in model 3-arm star polyethylene Ramnath Ramachandran, Gregory-arm star polyethylene molecules is presented. Many commercial polyethylenes have long side branches-density polyethylene (LDPE) is typically a highly branched structure with broad distributions in branch content, branch

Beaucage, Gregory

52

Problem definition Branch-and-Price approach Pricing: knapsack problem with conflicts Results A Branch-and-Price Algorithm for the Bin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Problem definition Branch-and-Price approach Pricing: knapsack problem with conflicts Results A Branch-and-Price Algorithm for the Bin Packing Problem with Conflicts Ruslan Sadykov1 François Vanderbeck Sadykov, François Vanderbeck Branch-and-price for bin packing with conflicts #12;Problem definition Branch-and-Price

Vanderbeck, François

53

Role of Specific Cations and Water Entropy on the Stability of Branched DNA Motif Structures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

energy barrier is dominated by entropic effects that result from the decreased surface area, Bangalore, India 560012 Division of Immunology, Beckman Research Institute of the City of Hope, Duarte computer simulations in explicit water and salt on a model TWJ and use free energy calculations to quantify

Goddard III, William A.

54

Measurement of the Topological Branching Fractions of the ? Lepton  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report new and precise measurements of the decay branching fractions of the ? lepton to one and three charged particles. The data, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 176 pb(?1), were collected by the high ...

Baringer, Philip S.

1985-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

55

Establishment report: Reforestation of the Pen Branch corridor and delta  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the role of the USDA Forest Service in the reforestation of the Pen Branch floodplain and delta. The report focuses upon the reforestation activities and monitoring to characterize the sites.

Nelson, E.A.; Dulohery, N.J.; Bunton, C.S.; Trettin, C.C.; McKee, W.H. Jr.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Strong Branching Inequalities for Convex Mixed Integer Nonlinear ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sep 3, 2011 ... the branch-and-bound tree for solving Mixed Integer Nonlinear ..... A complete proof of Lemma 1 can be found in the Ph.D. thesis of K?l?n [24].

2011-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

57

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced branching control Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

control... caused by hard-to-predict branch mispredictions, by collapsing multiple control flow paths and scheduling... - tion of the branch guarding predicate. Depending on...

58

Reproductive success and mortality rates of Ceriodaphnia dubia maintained in water from Upper Three Runs, Pen Branch, and Fourmile Branch  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It is anticipated that the new SRS NPDES permit will require toxicity testing of at numerous outfalls and receiving streams, using the standard test species, Ceriodaphnia dubia. Because SRS surface waters differ markedly from the standard culture water that is used for Ceriodaphnia, studies were undertaken to determine if unimpacted SRS surface waters will support this species. Three SRS surface waters were evaluated; Upper Three Runs at Road 8-1, Pen Branch at Road B, and Fourmile Branch at Road F. Toxicity tests were performed monthly on each water source for eleven months. All three water sources exhibited varying degrees of toxicity to Ceriodaphnia, with Pen Branch being the least toxic and Fourmile Branch being the most toxic. These results indicate that if in-stream toxicity testing is required, it may not be possible to separate the naturally occurring toxic effects of the receiving water from possible toxic effects of SRS effluents.

Specht, W.L.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Using EPR To Compare PEG-branch-nitroxide "Bivalent-Brush Polymers" and Traditional PEG Bottle-Brush Polymers: Branching  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Using EPR To Compare PEG-branch-nitroxide "Bivalent-Brush Polymers" and Traditional PEG Bottle and a hydrophobic nitroxide domain. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy was used to characterize

Turro, Nicholas J.

60

FY 1991 Measurements and Characterization Branch annual report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Measurements and Characterization Branch of the National Renewable Laboratory (NREL) provides comprehensive photovoltaic (PV) materials, devices, characterization, measurement, fabrication, modeling research, and support for the international PV research community, in the context of the US Department of Energy's Photovoltaic Research Program goals. This report summarizes the progress of the Branch from 31 January 1991 through 31 January 1992. The eight technical sections present a succinct overview of the capabilities and accomplishments of each group in the Branch. The Branch is comprised of the following groups: Surface and interface Analysis; Materials Characterization; Device Development; Electro-optical Characterization; Advanced PV module Performance and Reliability Research; Cell Performance Characterization; Surface Interactions, Modification, and Stability; and FTIR Spectroscopic Research. The including measurements and tests of PV materials, cells, submodules, and modules. The report contains a comprehensive bibliography of 77 branch originated journal and conference publications, which were authored in collaboration with, or in support of, approximately 135 university, industrial, government, and in-house research groups.

Osterwald, C.R.; Dippo, P.C. (eds.)

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "branch 202-586-1114 specific" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

FY 1991 Measurements and Characterization Branch annual report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Measurements and Characterization Branch of the National Renewable Laboratory (NREL) provides comprehensive photovoltaic (PV) materials, devices, characterization, measurement, fabrication, modeling research, and support for the international PV research community, in the context of the US Department of Energy`s Photovoltaic Research Program goals. This report summarizes the progress of the Branch from 31 January 1991 through 31 January 1992. The eight technical sections present a succinct overview of the capabilities and accomplishments of each group in the Branch. The Branch is comprised of the following groups: Surface and interface Analysis; Materials Characterization; Device Development; Electro-optical Characterization; Advanced PV module Performance and Reliability Research; Cell Performance Characterization; Surface Interactions, Modification, and Stability; and FTIR Spectroscopic Research. The including measurements and tests of PV materials, cells, submodules, and modules. The report contains a comprehensive bibliography of 77 branch originated journal and conference publications, which were authored in collaboration with, or in support of, approximately 135 university, industrial, government, and in-house research groups.

Osterwald, C.R.; Dippo, P.C. [eds.

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Quantum vs. Classical Read-once Branching Programs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The paper presents the first nontrivial upper and lower bounds for (non-oblivious) quantum read-once branching programs. It is shown that the computational power of quantum and classical read-once branching programs is incomparable in the following sense: (i) A simple, explicit boolean function on 2n input bits is presented that is computable by error-free quantum read-once branching programs of size O(n^3), while each classical randomized read-once branching program and each quantum OBDD for this function with bounded two-sided error requires size 2^{\\Omega(n)}. (ii) Quantum branching programs reading each input variable exactly once are shown to require size 2^{\\Omega(n)} for computing the set-disjointness function DISJ_n from communication complexity theory with two-sided error bounded by a constant smaller than 1/2-2\\sqrt{3}/7. This function is trivially computable even by deterministic OBDDs of linear size. The technically most involved part is the proof of the lower bound in (ii). For this, a new model of quantum multi-partition communication protocols is introduced and a suitable extension of the information cost technique of Jain, Radhakrishnan, and Sen (2003) to this model is presented.

Martin Sauerhoff

2005-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

63

Beta-decay branching ratios of 62Ga  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Beta-decay branching ratios of 62Ga have been measured at the IGISOL facility of the Accelerator Laboratory of the University of Jyvaskyla. 62Ga is one of the heavier Tz = 0, 0+ -> 0+ beta-emitting nuclides used to determine the vector coupling constant of the weak interaction and the Vud quark-mixing matrix element. For part of the experimental studies presented here, the JYFLTRAP facility has been employed to prepare isotopically pure beams of 62Ga. The branching ratio obtained, BR= 99.893(24)%, for the super-allowed branch is in agreement with previous measurements and allows to determine the ft value and the universal Ft value for the super-allowed beta decay of 62Ga.

A. Bey; B. Blank; G. Canchel; C. Dossat; J. Giovinazzo; I. Matea; V. Elomaa; T. Eronen; U. Hager; M. Hakala; A. Jokinen; A. Kankainen; I. Moore; H. Penttila; S. Rinta-Antila; A. Saastamoinen; T. Sonoda; J. Aysto; N. Adimi; G. De France; J. C. Thomas; G. Voltolini; T. Chaventr

2008-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

64

,rsity or Calirorn:taBuue: SOUTHERN -BRANCH  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Astronomy, 117. Biology, 102. Board,96. Books, 97. Boeaiyl, 102. Calendar, 5. Chemistry, 108. Chemistry BRANCH LOS ANGELES , CALIFORNIA ForSaleattheStudents'BookStores. Berkeley and Los Angeles PRICE , 10 information about the University, its organization , government , requirements for admission to undergraduate

Grether, Gregory

65

Extending the Cell SPE with Energy Efficient Branch Prediction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Extending the Cell SPE with Energy Efficient Branch Prediction Martijn Briejer1 , Cor Meenderinck1 , and Ben Juurlink2 1 Delft University of Technology, Delft, the Netherlands cor@ce.et.tudelft.nl 2 Technische Universit¨at Berlin, Berlin, Germany juurlink@cs.tu-berlin.de Abstract. Energy-efficient dynamic

Kuzmanov, Georgi

66

More Branch-and-Bound Experiments in Convex Nonlinear Integer ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sep 29, 2011 ... Department of Industrial Engineering and Management Sciences, Northwestern University,. Evanston, IL 60208 ... chooses the best one as the actual branching variable. Reliability .... mean that all selection strategies perform similarly in practice. Indeed ...... User manual for filterSQP, 1998. University of...

pierre

67

Branching Brownian motion with an inhomogeneous breeding potential  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Branching Brownian motion with an inhomogeneous breeding potential J. W. Harris and S. C. Harris 1TW, U.K. email: john.harris@bristol.ac.uk. Supported by the Heilbronn Institute for Mathe- matical.K. email: s.c.harris@bath.ac.uk 1 #12;|y|p for p > 2, the population would almost surely explode

Harris, Simon Colin

68

Gas compressor with side branch absorber for pulsation control  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and system for reducing pulsation in lateral piping associated with a gas compressor system. A tunable side branch absorber (TSBA) is installed on the lateral piping. A pulsation sensor is placed in the lateral piping, to measure pulsation within the piping. The sensor output signals are delivered to a controller, which controls actuators that change the acoustic dimensions of the SBA.

Harris, Ralph E. (San Antonio, TX); Scrivner, Christine M. (San Antonio, TX); Broerman, III, Eugene L. (San Antonio, TX)

2011-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

69

TRIBAND BRANCH LINE COUPLER USING DOUBLE-LORENTZ  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TRIBAND BRANCH LINE COUPLER USING DOUBLE-LORENTZ TRANSMISSION LINES Hanseung Lee and Sangwook Nam) transmission lines (TL) provides two additional degrees of freedom in realizing triband microwave devices-Lorentz; transmission lines; triband; directional couplers 1. INTRODUCTION The concept of artificial TLs having

Nam, Sangwook

70

A BRANCH-AND-PRICE ALGORITHM AND NEW TEST PROBLEMS ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Next, we describe several branching strategies, their effect on the pricing problem, and then ..... Sun Blade 2000 with 8.0 GB of memory and 2 Sun UltraSPARC-III+ CPUs running at 900 MHz ..... In Proceedings of IJCAI-99, Stockholm, Sweden,.

71

The Polymerase Chain Reaction and Branching Processes Fengzhu Sun  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Polymerase Chain Reaction and Branching Processes Fengzhu Sun Department of Mathematics, DRB is studied. We also study the distribution of the Hamming distance between two randomly chosen sequences long. The double-stranded DNA molecules are heated to near boiling temperature so that the double

Sun, Fengzhu - Sun, Fengzhu

72

Heating System Specification Specification of Heating System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Appendix A Heating System Specification /* Specification of Heating System (loosely based */ requestHeat : Room ­? bool; 306 #12; APPENDIX A. HEATING SYSTEM SPECIFICATION 307 /* user inputs */ livingPattern : Room ­? behaviour; setTemp : Room ­? num; heatSwitchOn, heatSwitchOff, userReset : simple

Day, Nancy

73

E-Print Network 3.0 - asymptotic giant branch Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

search results for: asymptotic giant branch Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Division of Astronomy and Space Physics Convection and Dynamics in Cool Giants Summary: giant branch star:...

74

Branching Fraction Measurement of B to omega l nu decays  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present a measurement of the B{sup +} {yields} {omega}{ell}{sup +}{nu} branching fraction based on a sample of 467 million B{bar B} pairs recorded by the BABAR detector at the SLAC PEP-II e{sup +}e{sup -} collider. We observe 1041 {+-} 133 signal decays, corresponding to a branching fraction of {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} {omega}{ell}{sup +}{nu}) = (1.15 {+-} 0.15 {+-} 0.12) x 10{sup -4}, where the first error is statistical and the second is systematic. The dependence of the decay rate on q{sup 2}, the momentum transfer squared to the lepton system, is compared to QCD predictions of the form factors based on a quark model and light-cone sum rules.

Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; /Annecy, LAPP; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; /Barcelona U., ECM; Palano, A.; /Bari U. /INFN, Bari; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; /Bergen U.; Brown, D.N.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; /Ruhr U., Bochum; Asgeirsson, D.J.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T.S.; McKenna, J.A.; So, R.Y.; /British Columbia U.; Khan, A.; /Brunel U.; Blinov, V.E.; /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Indian Inst. Tech., Guwahati /Harvard U. /Harvey Mudd Coll. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa State U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U., Comp. Sci. Dept. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U.; /more authors..

2012-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

75

The genealogy of branching Brownian motion with absorption  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider a system of particles which perform branching Brownian motion with negative drift and are killed upon reaching zero, in the near-critical regime where the total population stays roughly constant with approximately N particles. We show that the characteristic time scale for the evolution of this population is of order $(\\log N)^3$, in the sense that when time is measured in these units, the scaled number of particles converges to a variant of Neveu's continuous-state branching process. Furthermore, the genealogy of the particles is then governed by a coalescent process known as the Bolthausen-Sznitman coalescent. This validates the nonrigorous predictions by Brunet, Derrida, Muller and Munier for a closely related model.

Julien Berestycki; Nathanal Berestycki; Jason Schweinsberg

2010-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

76

Relevance of complex branch points for partial wave analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A central issue in hadron spectroscopy is to deduce--and interpret--resonance parameters, namely, pole positions and residues, from experimental data, for those are the quantities to be compared to lattice QCD or model calculations. However, not every structure in the observables derives from a resonance pole: the origin might as well be branch points, either located on the real axis (when a new channel composed of stable particles opens) or in the complex plane (when at least one of the intermediate particles is unstable). In this paper we demonstrate first the existence of such branch points in the complex plane and then show on the example of the {pi}N P{sub 11} partial wave that it is not possible to distinguish the structures induced by the latter from a true pole signal based on elastic data alone.

Ceci, S.; Svarc, A. [Rudjer Boskovic Institute, Bijenicka 54, HR-10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Doering, M. [HISKP (Theorie), Universitaet Bonn, Nussallee 14-16, D-53115 Bonn (Germany); Hanhart, C.; Krewald, S. [Institut fuer Kernphysik and Juelich Center for Hadron Physics, Forschungszentrum Juelich, D-52425 Juelich (Germany); Institute for Advanced Simulation, Forschungszentrum Juelich, D-52425 Juelich (Germany); Meissner, U.-G. [HISKP (Theorie), Universitaet Bonn, Nussallee 14-16, D-53115 Bonn (Germany); Institut fuer Kernphysik and Juelich Center for Hadron Physics, Forschungszentrum Juelich, D-52425 Juelich (Germany); Institute for Advanced Simulation, Forschungszentrum Juelich, D-52425 Juelich (Germany)

2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

77

Central Limit Theorem for Branching Random Walks in Random Environment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider branching random walks in $d$-dimensional integer lattice with time-space i.i.d. offspring distributions. When $d \\ge 3$ and the fluctuation of the environment is well moderated by the random walk, we prove a central limit theorem for the density of the population, together with upper bounds for the density of the most populated site and the replica overlap. We also discuss the phase transition of this model in connection with directed polymers in random environment.

Nobuo Yoshida

2007-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

78

Hawaii Wastewater Branch Online Application Webpage | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation,Ohio:Greer CountyCorridor | OpenOpenInformationInformation Branch

79

A method to measure the absolute branching fractions of $?_c$ decays  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

It is proposed to exploit the decay of the meson ${B}^+ \\rightarrow p \\pi^+ \\pi^+ \\bar{\\Sigma}_c^{--}$ and of its charge conjugate $B^-$ copiously produced at LHC to obtain a sample of $\\Lambda_c$ baryons through the strong decay $\\Sigma_c \\rightarrow \\Lambda_c \\pi$. The sample thus obtained is not affected by biases typically introduced by selections that depend on specific decay modes. Therefore it allows a measurement of the absolute branching fraction for the decay of the $\\Lambda_c$ baryon into $ p K \\pi$ or into other observable final states to be performed in a model independent manner. The accuracy that can be achieved with this method is discussed and it is shown that it would be either competitive with or an improvement over current measurements.

Andrea Contu; Dorothea Fonnesu; Rudolf Gerhard Christiaan Oldeman; Biagio Saitta; Claudia Vacca

2014-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

80

A new formulation of the spine approach to branching Robert Hardy and Simon C. Harris  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

deviations for a continuous­typed branching di#usion in Git, J.W.Harris and S.C.Harris [8] and HardyA new formulation of the spine approach to branching di#usions Robert Hardy and Simon C. Harris in branching di#usions: see, for example, the L p convergence of additive martingales in Hardy and Harris [12

Harris, Simon Colin

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "branch 202-586-1114 specific" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

A new formulation of the spine approach to branching Robert Hardy and Simon C. Harris  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

deviations for a continuous-typed branching diffusion in Git, J.W.Harris and S.C.Harris [8] and HardyA new formulation of the spine approach to branching diffusions Robert Hardy and Simon C. Harris in branching diffusions: see, for example, the Lp convergence of additive martingales in Hardy and Harris [12

Harris, Simon Colin

82

A BreakEven Formulation for Evaluating Branch Predictor Energy Efficiency #  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Break­Even Formulation for Evaluating Branch Predictor Energy Efficiency # Michele Co, Dee A demonstrated that a better branch pre­ dictor can increase the energy­efficiency of the system, even if the new a simple, effective metric for eval­ uating the tradeoff between processor energy­efficiency and branch

Co, Michele

83

Low-mass evolution from HE ignition to beyond the horizontal branch  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The evolution of an 0.6 M/sub solar mass/ stellar model during core helium burning is presented. Following the off-center ignition of helium in the core flash, the star remains on the red giant branch for > 10/sup 6/ years, undergoing twelve additional flashes. After leaving the giant branch, the star evolves on the horizontal branch for 8.15 x 10/sup 7/ years before returning to the giant branch and undergoing strong helium-shell flashes. The implications for horizontal branch and RR Lyrae stars are discussed.

Despain, K.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Specific Gravity Urobilinogen  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Date Lot # Specific Gravity pH Leukocytes Nitrite Protein Glucose Ketone Urobilinogen Bilirubin®(Bilirubin): Lot # Protein (Sulfosalicylic Acid): Lot # Specific Gravity - Saline 0.85 Specific Gravity - H20 RBC AND DATA ENTRY FORMS #12;Date Lot # Specific Gravity pH Leukocytes Nitrite Protein Glucose Ketone

Rodriguez, Carlos

85

Specific Gravity Urobilinogen  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Date Lot # Specific Gravity pH Leukocytes Nitrite Protein Glucose Ketone Urobilinogen Bilirubin®(Bilirubin): Lot # Protein (Sulfosalicylic Acid): Lot # Specific Gravity - Saline 0.85 Specific Gravity - H20 # Specific Gravity pH Leukocytes Nitrite Protein Glucose Ketone Urobilinogen Bilirubin Blood / Hemoglobin HCG

Rodriguez, Carlos

86

Measurement of the inclusive semielectronic D(0) branching fraction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Farlane, P. M. Patel, and B. Spaan McGill University and the Institute of Particle Physics, Montreal, Quebec H3A 2T8, Canada A. J. Sadoff Ithaca College, Ithaca, New York 14850 R. Ammar, P. Baringer, A. Bean, D. Besson, D. Coppage, N. Copty, R. Davis, N...PHYSICAL REVIEW D 1 SEPTEMBER 1996VOLUME 54, NUMBER 5ARTICLES Measurement of the inclusive semielectronic D0 branching fraction Y. Kubota, M. Lattery, J. K. Nelson, S. Patton, R. Poling, T. Riehle, V. Savinov, and R. Wang University of Minnesota...

Baringer, Philip S.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

North Branch Water & Light Comm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy ResourcesLoading map...(Utility Company) Jump to:City)Norristown,Braddock is a borough in AlleghenyBranch

88

Wells Branch, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to:Seadov PtyInformationSEDSWawarsing,Webb County,EnergyWellington,Branch, Texas: Energy

89

Farmers Branch, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address:011-DNA Jump37.California: Energy Resources Jump4748456°,FallonBranch, Texas: Energy

90

Hawaii Department of Health Clean Air Branch | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's Heat Jump to:Photon Place:Net JumpStrategyHarvestKwitherbee's pictureBranch

91

Arcing fault in sub-distribution branch circuits  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It's well known the importance of short-circuit current evaluation for the design of any power system. Every system is subject to faults, moreover short-circuits and ground faults can be expected in any point. Even if the maximum and minimum values are generally defined with reference at a bolted-fault, bolted short-circuits are rare and the fault usually involves arcing and burning; particularly the limit value of minimum short-circuit depends really on arcing-fault. In earlier experimental investigations into the functional simulation of insulation loss, in branch circuit conductors, the authors chose to normalize the arcing-fault simulation to be used in laboratory tests. This conventional simulation allows characterization of this intrinsically random phenomenon by means of a probabilistic approach, in order to define in statistical terms the expected short circuit value. The authors examine more closely the arcing-fault in the design of sub distribution branch-circuits as weak points of the installation. In fact, what they propose are straightforward criteria, whether in the structure of the system or in the coordination of protection, which afford a more rational control on arcing-fault.

Parise, G.; Grasseli, U.; Luozzo, V. Di (Univ. di Roma, Rome (Italy). Dept. di Ingegneria Elettrica)

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Specific Learning Difficulties  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dyslexia and other Specific Learning Difficulties (SpLDs) A guide for tutors Enabling Services Supporting you to succeed #12;2 Contents Dyslexia Support ............................................................................................................ 3 Recognising students with dyslexia or other specific learning difficulties................. 4

Anderson, Jim

93

Q-branch Raman scattering and modern kinetic thoery  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The program is an extension of previous APL work whose general aim was to calculate line shapes of nearly resonant isolated line transitions with solutions of a popular quantum kinetic equation-the Waldmann-Snider equation-using well known advanced solution techniques developed for the classical Boltzmann equation. The advanced techniques explored have been a BGK type approximation, which is termed the Generalized Hess Method (GHM), and conversion of the collision operator to a block diagonal matrix of symmetric collision kernels which then can be approximated by discrete ordinate methods. The latter method, which is termed the Collision Kernel method (CC), is capable of the highest accuracy and has been used quite successfully for Q-branch Raman scattering. The GHM method, not quite as accurate, is applicable over a wider range of pressures and has proven quite useful.

Monchick, L. [The Johns Hopkins Univ., Laurel, MD (United States)

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Localization for Branching Random Walks in Random Environment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider branching random walks in $d$-dimensional integer lattice with time-space i.i.d. offspring distributions. This model is known to exhibit a phase transition: If $d \\ge 3$ and the environment is "not too random", then, the total population grows as fast as its expectation with strictly positive probability. If,on the other hand, $d \\le 2$, or the environment is ``random enough", then the total population grows strictly slower than its expectation almost surely. We show the equivalence between the slow population growth and a natural localization property in terms of "replica overlap". We also prove a certain stronger localization property, whenever the total population grows strictly slower than its expectation almost surely.

Yueyun Hu; Nobuo Yoshida

2007-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

95

Measurement of the K+ --> pi+ nu nu branching ratio  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Experiment E949 at Brookhaven National Laboratory studied the rare decay K{sup +}-->pi{sup +} nu{ovr {nu}} and other processes with an exposure of 1.77 x 10{sup 12} k{sup +}'s. The data were analyzed using a blind analysis technique yielding one candidate event with an estimated background of 0.30 {+-} 0.03 events. Combining this result with the observation of two candidate events by the predecessor experiment E787 gave the branching ratio B(K{sup +}-->pi{sup +} nu{ovr {nu}}) = (1.47{sub -0.89}{sup +1.30}) x 10{sup -10}, consistent with the standard model prediction of (0.74 {+-} 0.20) x 10{sup -10}. This is a more detailed report of results previously published [V.V. Anisimovsky et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 93, 031801 (2004)].

Adler, S.; /Brookhaven; Anisimovsky, V.V.; /Moscow, INR; Aoki, M.; /TRIUMF; Ardebili, M.; /Princeton U.; Artamonov, A.V.; /Serpukhov, IHEP; Atiya, M.; /Brookhaven; Bassalleck, B.; /New Mexico U.; Bazarko, A.O.; /Princeton U.; Bhuyan, B.; /Brookhaven; Blackmore, E.W.; /TRIUMF; Bryman, D.A.; /British Columbia U. /Tsinghua U., Beijing /TRIUMF

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

A Branch and Price Approach to the k-Clustering Minimum Biclique ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

work by developing a Branch and Price algorithm that embeds a new metaheuristic based on ... The metaheuristic is also adapted to solve efficiently the pricing.

2011-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

97

Using the primal-dual interior point algorithm within the branch-price ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nov 5, 2012 ... Abstract: Branch-price-and-cut has proven to be a powerful method for solving integer programming problems. It combines decomposition...

Pedro Munari

2012-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

98

Optimization Online - A branch-cut-and-price algorithm for the ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Aug 11, 2014 ... A branch-cut-and-price algorithm for the energy minimization vehicle routing problem. Ricardo Fukasawa (rfukasaw ***at*** math.uwaterloo.ca)

Ricardo Fukasawa

2014-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

99

Branch-and-Price Guided Search for Integer Programs with an ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

yields a small restricted integer program to be solved next. The extended formulation is solved with a branch-and-price algorithm, which, when run to completion,...

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

100

A branch-and-price algorithm for multi-mode resource leveling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mar 1, 2010 ... We present a branch-and-price approach together with a new heuristic to solve the more general turnaround scheduling problem. Besides...

Eamonn T. Coughlan

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "branch 202-586-1114 specific" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

E-Print Network 3.0 - aureobasidium-derived soluble branched...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

5 Simulation of the effects of chain architecture on the sorption of ethylene in polyethylene Summary: investigated the effect of polyethylene chain length and branching on...

102

Electrodeposition of InSb branched nanowires: Controlled growth with structurally tailored properties  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this article, electrodeposition method is used to demonstrate growth of InSb nanowire (NW) arrays with hierarchical branched structures and complex morphology at room temperature using an all-solution, catalyst-free technique. A gold coated, porous anodic alumina membrane provided the template for the branched NWs. The NWs have a hierarchical branched structure, with three nominal regions: a trunk (average diameter of 150?nm), large branches (average diameter of 100?nm), and small branches (average diameter of sub-10?nm to sub-20?nm). The structural properties of the branched NWs were studied using scanning transmission electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, and Raman spectroscopy. In the as-grown state, the small branches of InSb NWs were crystalline, but the trunk regions were mostly nanocrystalline with an amorphous boundary. Post-annealing of NWs at 420?C in argon produced single crystalline structures along ?311? directions for the branches and along ?111? for the trunks. Based on the high crystallinity and tailored structure in this branched NW array, the effective refractive index allows us to achieve excellent antireflection properties signifying its technological usefulness for photon management and energy harvesting.

Das, Suprem R.; Mohammad, Asaduzzaman; Janes, David B., E-mail: janes@ecn.purdue.edu [School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); Birck Nanotechnology Center, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); Akatay, Cem [School of Materials Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); Birck Nanotechnology Center, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); Khan, Mohammad Ryyan; Alam, Muhammad A. [School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); Maeda, Kosuke [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259 Nagatsutacho, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-8502 (Japan); Advanced Device Laboratory, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Deacon, Russell S.; Ishibashi, Koji [Advanced Device Laboratory, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); RIKEN Center for Emergent Matter Science (CEMS), 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Chen, Yong P. [School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); Birck Nanotechnology Center, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); Sands, Timothy D. [School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); School of Materials Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); Birck Nanotechnology Center, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States)

2014-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

103

E-Print Network 3.0 - avalanches branching ratios Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

20 J.Stat.Mech.(2010)P02015 ournal of Statistical Mechanics Summary: ) and subcritical dynamics: individual avalanches are either subcritical (average branching ratio...

104

Div ision of T echnology, Industry & Economics Energy Branch Deploying renewable energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Div ision of T echnology, Industry & Economics Energy Branch Deploying renewable energy, Industry & Economics Energy Branch 1. Policy landscape 2. Helping transition to Renewable Energy 3 governments are promoting renewable energy. Renewable energy ­ Policy Landscape #12;Div ision of T echnology

Canet, Léonie

105

Recovery of Free Energy Branches in Single Molecule Experiments Ivan Junier,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recovery of Free Energy Branches in Single Molecule Experiments Ivan Junier,1 Alessandro Mossa,2 19 February 2009) We present a method for determining the free energy of coexisting states from use optical tweezers to determine the free energy branches of the native and unfolded states of a two

Ritort, Felix

106

Predicting Extinction or Explosion in a Galton-Watson Branching Process  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

sizes of an endangered species whose survival is deemed essential. Case 2. Extinction is undesirablePredicting Extinction or Explosion in a Galton-Watson Branching Process Peter Guttorp and Michael D generations of a discrete- parameter Galton-Watson branching process, one wishes to predict whether extinction

Washington at Seattle, University of

107

Applying Decay Strategies to Branch Predictors for Leakage Energy Savings Zhigang Hu  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Applying Decay Strategies to Branch Predictors for Leakage Energy Savings Zhigang HuÝ Philo Juang@cs.virginia.edu doug@cs.princeton.edu Abstract With technology advancing toward deep submicron, leak- age energy--already shown to reduce leakage energy for caches--to branch-prediction structures. Due to the structural

Martonosi, Margaret

108

M. Shepherd et al.Branch architecture QTL for pine hybrids Original article  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

M. Shepherd et al.Branch architecture QTL for pine hybrids Original article Branch architecture QTL Crossa , Mark J. Dietersb and Robert Henrya a Cooperative Research Centre for Sustainable Production, Australia b Cooperative Research Centre for Sustainable Production Forestry, Queensland Forestry Research

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

109

Process Switches and Branch Prediction Accuracy David Chen, Bennett Lau, Jeffrey Shafer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering Rice University Abstract There were several hypotheses to "repair" the destructive aliasing in the branch history table after a process switch, both combine by [9], is central to this research project. Analogous to memory caches, aliasing in branch prediction

Rixner, Scott

110

A Logistic Branching Process Alternative to the Wright-Fisher Model R. B. Campbell  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Logistic Branching Process Alternative to the Wright-Fisher Model R. B. Campbell Department, Population Regulation Introduction Most of the theoretical work in population genetics is based on the Wright approximation to the Wright-Fisher model. A logistic branching process is introduced in order to limit

Campbell, Russell Bruce

111

Branch structures at the steps of the devil's staircase of the sine circle map  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have discovered substructures consisting of branches at each step of the devil's staircase of the sine circle map. These substructures are found to follow the hierarchy of the Farey tree. We develop a formalism to relate the rational winding number {ital W}={ital p}/{ital q} to the number of branches in these substructures.

Wen, H.C. (Department of Physics, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)); Duong-van, M. (Physics Department, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, University of California, Livermore, California 94550 (United States))

1992-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

112

A Branch and Bound Algorithm for the Protein Folding Problem in the HP Lattice Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Article A Branch and Bound Algorithm for the Protein Folding Problem in the HP Lattice Model Mao tool for the protein folding problem. Key words: protein folding, HP model, branch and bound, lattice Introduction The protein folding problem, or the protein struc- ture prediction problem, is one of the most

Istrail, Sorin

113

Defining the Termination of the Asymptotic Giant Branch  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

I suggest a theoretical quantitative definition for the termination of the asymptotic giant branch (AGB) phase and the beginning of the post-AGB phase. I suggest that the transition will be taken to occur when the ratio of the dynamical time scale to the the envelope thermal time scale, Q, reaches its maximum value. Time average values are used for the different quantities, as the criterion does not refer to the short time-scale variations occurring on the AGB and post-AGB, e.g., thermal pulses (helium shell flashes) and magnetic activity. Along the entire AGB the value of Q increases, even when the star starts to contract. Only when a rapid contraction starts does the value of Q start to decrease. This criterion captures the essence of the transition from the AGB to the post AGB phase, because Q is connected to the stellar effective temperature, reaching its maximum value at T~4000-6000 K, it is related to the mass loss properties, and it reaches its maximum value when rapid contraction starts and envelope mass is very low.

Noam Soker

2007-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

114

Extraction Utility Design Specification  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Extraction Utility Design Specification January 11, 2011 Document Version 1.9 1 Revision History Date Version Section and Titles Author Summary of Change January 15, 2010 1.0 All...

115

Specific light in sculpture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Specific light is defined as light from artificial or altered natural sources. The use and manipulation of light in three dimensional sculptural work is discussed in an historic and contemporary context. The author's work ...

Powell, John William

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Redesigning specificity in miniproteins  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This work focuses on designing specific miniprotein interactions using computational models and then testing these designs with experiments. Miniproteins are small, autonomously-folding proteins that are excellent for ...

Taylor, Christina Marie

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Harmonization of Biodiesel Specifications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Worldwide biodiesel production has grown dramatically over the last several years. Biodiesel standards vary across countries and regions, and there is a call for harmonization. For harmonization to become a reality, standards have to be adapted to cover all feedstocks. Additionally, all feedstocks cannot meet all specifications, so harmonization will require standards to either tighten or relax. For harmonization to succeed, the biodiesel market must be expanded with the alignment of test methods and specification limits, not contracted.

Alleman, T. L.

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Design Specification | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Design Specification Design Specification PARS II Extraction Utility Design Spec v8020130510.pdf More Documents & Publications Design Specifications for the PARS II Extraction...

119

Distribution and origin of ethyl-branched alkanes in a Cenomanian transgressive shale of the Western Interior  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Note Distribution and origin of ethyl-branched alkanes in a Cenomanian transgressive shale hydrocarbon fraction of the basal Graneros Shale (Cenomanian, Western Interior Seaway, USA). On the basis rights reserved. Keywords: Monoethylalkanes; Branched alkanes; Black shales; Cenomanian; Graneros Shale

Kenig, Fabien

120

Ecological effects of contaminants in McCoy Branch, 1991--1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 1984 Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) required assessment of all current and former solid waste management units. Following guidelines under RCRA and the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), a remedial investigation (RI) was required of the Y-12 Plant for their filled coal ash pond (FCAP) and associated areas on McCoy Branch. The RI process was initiated and assessments were presented. Because the disposal of coal ash in the ash pond, McCoy Branch, and Rogers Quarry was not consistent with the Tennessee Water Quality Act, several remediation steps were implemented between 1986 and 1994 for McCoy Branch to address disposal problems. The required ecological risk assessments of McCoy Branch watershed included provisions for biological monitoring of the watershed. The objectives of the biological monitoring were to (1) document changes in biological quality of McCoy Branch after completion of a pipeline bypassing upper McCoy Branch and further, after termination of all discharges to Rogers Quarry, (2) provide guidance on the need for additional remediation, and (3) evaluate the effectiveness of implemented remedial actions. The data from the biological monitoring program may also determine whether the goals of protection of human health and the environment of McCoy Branch are being accomplished.

Ryon, M.G. [ed.] [ed.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "branch 202-586-1114 specific" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Ecological effects of contaminants in McCoy Branch, 1989-1990  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 1984 Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) required assessment of all current and former solid waste management units. Such a RCRA Facility Investigation (RFI) was required of the Y-12 Plant for their Filled Coal Ash Pond on McCoy Branch. Because the disposal of coal ash in the ash pond, McCoy Branch, and Rogers Quarry was not consistent with the Tennessee Water Quality Act, several remediation steps were implemented or planned for McCoy Branch to address disposal problems. The McCoy Branch RFI plan included provisions for biological monitoring of the McCoy Branch watershed. The objectives of the biological monitoring were to: (1) document changes in biological quality of McCoy Branch after completion of a pipeline and after termination of all discharges to Rogers Quarry, (2) provide guidance on the need for additional remediation, and (3) evaluate the effectiveness of implemented remedial actions. The data from the biological monitoring program will also determine if the classified uses, as identified by the State of Tennessee, of McCoy Branch are being protected and maintained. This report discusses results from toxicity monitoring of snails fish community assessment, and a Benthic macroinvertebrate community assessment.

Ryon, M.G. [ed.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Molecular Design of Branched and Binary Molecules at Ordered Interfaces  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study examined five different branched molecular architectures to discern the effect of design on the ability of molecules to form ordered structures at interfaces. Photochromic monodendrons formed kinked packing structures at the air-water interface due to the cross-sectional area mismatch created by varying number of alkyl tails and the hydrophilic polar head group. The lower generations formed orthorhombic unit cell with long range ordering despite the alkyl tails tilted to a large degree. Favorable interactions between liquid crystalline terminal groups and the underlying substrate were observed to compel a flexible carbosilane dendrimer core to form a compressed elliptical conformation which packed stagger within lamellae domains with limited short range ordering. A twelve arm binary star polymer was observed to form two dimensional micelles at the air-water interface attributed to the higher polystyrene block composition. Linear rod-coil molecules formed a multitude of packing structures at the air-water interface due to the varying composition. Tree-like rod-coil molecules demonstrated the ability to form one-dimensional structures at the air-water interface and at the air-solvent interface caused by the preferential ordering of the rigid rod cores. The role of molecular architecture and composition was examined and the influence chemically competing fragments was shown to exert on the packing structure. The amphiphilic balance of the different molecular series exhibited control on the ordering behavior at the air-water interface and within bulk structures. The shell nature and tail type was determined to dictate the preferential ordering structure and molecular reorganization at interfaces with the core nature effect secondary.

Kirsten Larson Genson

2005-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

123

Chemoembolization Via Branches from the Splenic Artery in Patients with Hepatocellular Carcinoma  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: This study was designed to evaluate the radiologic findings and imaging response of chemoembolization via branches of the splenic artery in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Methods: From January 2001 to July 2010, we observed tumor staining supplied by branches of the splenic artery in 34 (0.6%) of 5,413 patients with HCC. Computed tomography (CT) scans and digital subtraction angiograms of these patients were retrospectively reviewed in consensus by two investigators. Results: A total of 39 tumor feeding-vessels in 34 patients were identified: omental branches from the left gastroepiploic artery (n = 5), branches from the short gastric artery (n = 9), and omental branches directly from the splenic artery (n = 25). Branches of the splenic artery that supplied tumors were revealed on the celiac angiogram in 29 (85%) of 34 patients and were detected on pre-procedure CT images in 27 (79%) of 34 patients. Selective chemoembolization was achieved in 38 of 39 tumor-feeding vessels. Complete or partial response of the tumor fed by branches of the splenic artery, as depicted on follow-up CT scans, was achieved in 21 (62%) patients. No patient developed severe complications directly related to chemoembolization via branches of the splenic artery. Conclusions: Omental branches directly from the splenic artery are common tumor-feeding vessels of the splenic artery in cases of advanced HCC with multiple previous chemoembolizations. Tumor-feeding vessels of the splenic artery are usually visualized on the celiac angiogram or CT scan, and chemoembolization through them can be safely performed in most patients.

Choi, Jin Woo; Kim, Hyo-Cheol, E-mail: angiointervention@gmail.com; Chung, Jin Wook; Kim, Ji Dae; Kim, Gyoung Min; Lee, In Joon; Jae, Hwan Jun; Park, Jae Hyung [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology (Korea, Republic of)

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

124

Regulation of branching by phytochrome B and PPFD in Arabidopsis thaliana  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

................................................. 10 Interval between anthesis and the onset of elongation of the topmost three rosette buds of WT, phyA, phyB, and phyAphyB under low light........ 11 The lengths of the main inflorescence (M), the topmost rosette branch R(n), the next topmost... rosette branch R(n-1), and the third topmost rosette branch R(n-2) of WT, phyA, phyB, and phyAphyB from the day of the onset of elongation of bud R(n) to the 10 th day after anthesis under low light............ 33 35 36 36 38 39 40 41 44 45 46...

Chou, Nan-yen

2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

125

A Break-Even Formulation for Evaluating Branch Predictor Energy Michele Co, Dee A.B. Weikle, and Kevin Skadron  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

demonstrated that a better branch pre- dictor can increase the energy-efficiency of the system, even if the new a simple, effective metric for eval- uating the tradeoff between processor energy-efficiency and branch and an energy-efficiency target, we are able to evaluate the energy-efficiency of several existing branch

Co, Michele

126

IDC System Specification Document.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document contains the system specifications derived to satisfy the system requirements found in the IDC System Requirements Document for the IDC Reengineering Phase 2 project. Revisions Version Date Author/Team Revision Description Authorized by V1.0 12/2014 IDC Reengineering Project Team Initial delivery M. Harris

Clifford, David J.

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Understanding Operational Amplifier Specifications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are utilized to the extent TI deems necessary to support this warranty. Specific testing of all parameters are the property of their respective owners. #12;CONTACT INFORMATION INTERNET www.ti.com Register with TI INFORMATION CENTERS US TMS320 Hotline (281) 274-2320 Fax (281) 274-2324 BBS (281) 274-2323 email dsph

Jones, R. Victor

128

Production cross section and topological decay branching fractions of the ? lepton  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report new measurements of the production cross section for the reaction e(+)e(?)??(+)?(?) at s?=29 GeV, as well as the topological decay branching fractions of the ? lepton. The data were taken with the High Resolution ...

Baringer, Philip S.

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Branching fractions and charge asymmetries in charmless hadronic decays at BABAR  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present measurements of branching fraction, polarization and charge asymmetry in charmless hadronic B decays with {eta}, {eta}{prime}, {omega}, and b{sub 1} in the final state. All the results use the final BABAR dataset.

Biassoni, Pietro; /Milan U. /INFN, Milan

2009-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

130

Branched peptide amphiphiles, related epitope compounds and self assembled structures thereof  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Branched peptide amphiphilic compounds incorporating one or residues providing a pendant amino group for coupling one or more epitope sequences thereto, such compounds and related compositions for enhanced epitope presentation.

Stupp, Samuel I. (Chicago, IL); Guler, Mustafa O. (Evanston, IL)

2008-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

131

Analysis of the HVAC System at the Willow Branch Intermediate School  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This report presents an analysis of the HVAC system at the Willow Branch Intermediate School for the MEEN 685 class project. The school is located at College Station, Texas. A portion of the school belonged to Oakwood Intermediate School which...

Wei, G.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Determination of the deuterium-tritium branching ratio based on inertial confinement fusion implosions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The deuterium-tritium (D-T) ?-to-neutron branching ratio [[superscript 3]H(d,?)[superscript 5]He/[superscript 3]H(d,n)[superscript 4]He] was determined under inertial confinement fusion (ICF) conditions, where the ...

Rosenberg, Michael Jonathan

133

Blood Flow At Arterial Branches: Complexities To Resolve For The Angioplasty Suite  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the 1970s [1, 2] led to a large increase of interest in the possible role of fluid dynamics Tubes Branched tubes were fabricated by machining - drilling, reaming, and chloroform- polishing - of 3

Laidlaw, David

134

Glucagon-Induced Vasospasm of Hepatic Artery Branches During Visceral Angiography  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Glucagon is often used in radiology to decrease bowel motility for enhanced imaging, including visceral digital subtraction angiography. We present a case in which branch hepatic artery vasospasm followed the intravenous administration of glucagon during visceral angiography.

Dziedzic, T. Scott; Smith, Tony P., E-mail: smith146@mc.duke.ed [Duke University Medical Center, Department of Radiology (United States)

2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

135

Spring Break Course in Florida! Forensic entomology is a branch of forensic sci-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Spring Break Course in Florida! Forensic entomology is a branch of forensic sci- ence utilizing the science of forensic en- tomology through daily laboratory and field ac- tivities. We also interact

136

A branch-and-bound project assignment methodology with generalized network strategies for updating bounds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-Diaz, Sastri, and Paz 1995). Additionally, an efficient branch-and- bound procedure is highly desirable to solve integer programming models, such as the one being considered in this thesis. In summary the following are the significant contributions... heuristically to obtain near-optimal solutions. Gavish and Pirkul (1991) employed heuristic procedures and a branch-and-bound procedure to develop algorithms for solving the multi-resource generalized assignment problem. Garcia- Diaz, Sastri and Paz (1995...

Jittamai, Phongchai

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

137

J. Am. Chem. Soc. Supporting Information page S1 Deoxyribozymes that Synthesize Branched and Lariat RNA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a branch at the boldface A, while 9F13 and 9F18 create a branch at the boldface U. This L substrate has a 5 nucleotides, which are found in 9F7, 9F13, and 9F18 but not 9F21. Note that the 9F13 enzyme region is only 38'-CCGTCGCCATCTCAGGATGTGGGGTTTTGCCCGAGGGTATGGCAGT--GGGGAGaGAGTCGTATTATCC-3' 9F18: 5'-CCGTCGCCATCTCGGGATGTGGGGCGCCACCAAGTTAATGTTTGGTTTGGGGAGa

Silverman, Scott K.

138

Do Coupled Climate Models Correctly SImulate the Upward Branch of the Deept Ocean Global Conveyor?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The large-scale meridional overturning circulation (MOC) connects the deep ocean, a major reservoir of carbon, to the other components of the climate system and must therefore be accurately represented in Earth System Models. Our project aims to address the specific question of the pathways and mechanisms controlling the upwelling branch of the MOC, a subject of significant disagreement between models and observational syntheses, and among general circulation models. Observations of these pathways are limited, particularly in regions of complex hydrography such as the Southern Ocean. As such, we rely on models to examine theories of the overturning circulation, both physically and biogeochemically. This grant focused on a particular aspect of the meridional overturning circulation (MOC) where there is currently significant disagreement between models and observationally based analyses of the MOC, and amongst general circulation models. In particular, the research focused on addressing the following questions: 1. Where does the deep water that sinks in the polar regions rise to the surface? 2. What processes are responsible for this rise? 3. Do state-of-the-art coupled GCMs capture these processes? Our research had three key components: observational synthesis, model development and model analysis. In this final report we outline the key results from these areas of research for the 2007 to 2012 grant period. The research described here was carried out primarily by graduate student, Daniele Bianchi (now a Postdoc at McGill University, Canada), and Postdoc Stephanie Downes (now a Research Fellow at The Australian national University, Australia). Additional support was provided for programmers Jennifer Simeon as well as Rick Slater.

Sarmiento, Jorge L; Downes, Stephanie; Bianchi, Daniele

2013-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

139

Changing fuel specifications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper will describe the goals, methods, and results of a program designed to expand fuel specifications. The ability to expand fuel specs can provide many advantages to a power company. These would include increased fuel flexibility, better performance and lower fuel cost. The expansion of transportation modes also may enhance the scenario. Although brief, this paper should provide a good understanding of the types of problems that can be encountered, and the cooperative effort necessary to resolve them.

Hatt, R.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Oak Ridge Site Specific  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

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141

Modeling branching effects on source-sink relationships of the cotton plant  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Compared with classical process-based models, the functional-structural plant models provide more efficient tools to explore the impact of changes in plant structures on plant functioning. In this paper we investigated the effects of branches on the sourcesink interaction for the cotton plant (Gossypium hirsutum L.) based on a two-treatment experiment conducted on cotton grown in the field: the singlestem plants and the plants with only two vegetative branches. It was observed that the branched cotton had more organs for the whole plant but the organs on the trunk were smaller than those on the single-stem cotton. The phytomer production of the branches was four or five growth cycles delayed compared with the main stem. The organs on the trunk had similar dynamics of expansion for both treatments. Effects of branches were evaluated by using the functionalstructural model GREENLAB. It allowed estimating the coefficients of sink strength to differentiate the biomass acquisition abilities of organs between diffe...

Li, Dong; Guo, Yan; De Reffye, P; Zhan, Zhigang

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Cylinder Test Specification  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of the cylinder testis two-fold: (1) to characterize the metal-pushing ability of an explosive relative to that of other explosives as evaluated by the E{sub 19} cylinder energy and the G{sub 19} Gurney energy and (2) to help establish the explosive product equation-of-state (historically, the Jones-Wilkins-Lee (JWL) equation). This specification details the material requirements and procedures necessary to assemble and fire a typical Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) cylinder test. Strict adherence to the cylinder. material properties, machining tolerances, material heat-treatment and etching processes, and high explosive machining tolerances is essential for test-to-test consistency and to maximize radial wall expansions. Assembly and setup of the cylinder test require precise attention to detail, especially when placing intricate pin wires on the cylinder wall. The cylinder test is typically fired outdoors and at ambient temperature.

Richard Catanach; Larry Hill; Herbert Harry; Ernest Aragon; Don Murk

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Search for the decay Bs0 ? ?? and a measurement of the branching fraction for Bs0 ? ??  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We search for the decay B0s??? and measure the branching fraction for B0s??? using 121.4~fb-1 of data collected at the ?(5S) resonance with the Belle detector at the KEKB asymmetric-energy e+e- collider. The B0s??? branching fraction is measured to be (3.60.5(stat.)0.3(syst.)0.6(fs))10-5, where fs is the fraction of Bs(*)Bs(*) in bb events. Our result is in good agreement with the theoretical predictions as well as with a recent measurement from LHCb. We observe no statistically significant signal for the decay B0s??? and set a 90% confidence-level upper limit on its branching fraction at 3.110-6. This constitutes a significant improvement over the previous result.

Dutta, Deepanwita; Bhuyan, Bipul; Abdesselam, A.; Adachi, I.; Aihara, H.; Al Said, S.; Arinstein, K.; Asner, David M.; Aulchenko, V.; Aushev, T.; Ayad, R.; Aziz, T.; Bahinipati, S.; Bakich, A. M.; Bansal, Vikas; Bhardwaj, V.; Bobrov, A.; Bonvicini, Giovanni; Bracko, Marko; Browder, Thomas E.; Cervenkov, D.; Chen, A.; Cheon, B. G.; Chilikin, K.; Chistov, R.; Cho, K.; Chobanova, V.; Choi, Y.; Cinabro, David A.; Dalseno, J.; Dolezal, Z.; Drasal, Z.; Drutskoy, A.; Dutta, K.; Eidelman, S.; Farhat, H.; Fast, James E.; Frost, O.; Gaur, Vipin; Ganguly, Sudeshna; Garmash, Alexey; Getzkow, D.; Goh, Y. M.; Golob, B.; Hayashii, H.; He, X. H.; Hou, W. S.; Iijima, T.; Ishikawa, A.; Iwasaki, Y.; Jaegle, Igal; Joffe, D.; Kang, K. H.; Kato, E.; Kiesling, C.; Kim, D. Y.; Kim, J. B.; Kim, J. H.; Kim, K. T.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. J.; Kinoshita, Kay; Ko, Byeong Rok; Kodys, P.; Korpar, S.; Krizan, P.; Krokovny, Pavel; Kuhr, Thomas; Kuzmin, A.; Kwon, Y. J.; Lange, J. S.; Lee, I. S.; Lewis, P.; Li, Y.; Li Gioi, L.; Libby, J.; Liventsev, Dmitri; Matvienko, D.; Miyata, H.; Mizuk, R.; Mohanty, G. B.; Moll, A.; Mori, T.; Mussa, R.; Nakano, E.; Nakao, M.; Nanut, T.; Nayak, Minakshi; Nisar, N. K.; Nishida, S.; Ogawa, S.; Okuno, S.; Pakhlov, P.; Pakhlova, Galina; Pedlar, Todd K.; Pestotnik, Rok; Petric, Marko; Piilonen, Leo E.; Ribezl, Eva; Ritter, M.; Rostomyan, A.; Sakai, Y.; Sandilya, Saurabh; Santelj, Luka; Sanuki, T.; Sato, Y.; Savinov, Vladimir; Schneider, O.; Schnell, G.; Schwanda, C.; Schwartz, A. J.; Semmler, D.; Shebalin, V.; Shibata, T. A.; Shiu, Jing-Ge; Shwartz, B.; Sibidanov, A.; Simon, F.; Sohn, Y. S.; Sokolov, A.; Solovieva, E.; Staric, M.; Sumihama, M.; Sumiyoshi, T.; Teramoto, Y.; Trabelsi, K.; Uchida, M.; Unno, Yuji; Uno, S.; Usov, Y.; Van Hulse, C.; Vanhoefer, P.; Varner, G.; Vinokurova, A.; Vossen, Anslem G.; Wagner, M. N.; Wang, C. H.; Wang, P.; Watanabe, Y.; Wehle, S.; Williams, K. M.; Won, E.; Yamamoto, H.; Yamaoka, J.; Yashchenko, S.; Yusa, Y.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhilich, V.; Zupanc, A.

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Effect of magnetic field on quasiparticle branches of intrinsic Josephson junctions with ferromagnetic layer.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The interlayer tunneling spectroscopy has been performed on micron-sized mesa arrays of HgBr{sub 2} intercalated superconducting Bi2212 single crystals. A ferromagnetic multilayer (Au/Co/Au) is deposited on top of the mesas. The spin-polarized current is driven along the c-axis of the mesas through a ferromagnetic Co layer and the hysteretic quasiparticle branches are observed at 4.2 K. Magnetic field evolution of hysteretic quasiparticle branches is obtained to examine the effect of injected spin-polarized current on intrinsic Josephson junction characteristics. It is observed that there is a gradual distribution in quasiparticle branches with the application of magnetic field and increasing field reduces the switching current progressively.

Ozyuzer, L.; Ozdemir, M.; Kurter, C.; Hinks, D. G.; Gray, K. E. (Materials Science Division); (Izmir Inst. of Tech.)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

A Measurement of the Semileptonic Branching Fraction of the B_s Meson  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report a measurement of the inclusive semileptonic branching fraction of the B{sub s} meson using data collected with the BABAR detector in the center-of-mass energy region above the {gamma}(4S) resonance. We use the inclusive yield of {phi} mesons and the {phi} yield in association with a high-momentum lepton to perform a simultaneous measurement of the semileptonic branching fraction and the production rate of B{sub s} mesons relative to all B mesons as a function of center-of-mass energy. The inclusive semileptonic branching fraction of the B{sub s} meson is determined to be {Beta}(B{sub s} {yields} {ell}{nu}X) = 9.5{sub -2.0}{sup +2.5}(stat){sub -1.9}{sup +1.1}(syst)%, where {ell} indicates the average of e and {mu}.

Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Martinelli, M.; Milanes, D.A.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Brown, D.N.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; Asgeirsson, D.J.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T.S.; McKenna, J.A.; /Imperial Coll., London /Annecy, LAPP /Barcelona U., ECM /INFN, Bari /Bari U. /INFN, Bari /INFN, Bari /Bari U. /Bergen U. /UC, Berkeley /Ruhr U., Bochum /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Indian Inst. Tech., Guwahati /Harvard U. /Harvey Mudd Coll. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa State U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Paris U., VI-VII /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U. /Maryland U.; /more authors..

2012-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

146

Data acquisition with a VAX 11/780 and MBD branch driver  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have designed and implemented a general purpose data acquisition system, XSYS, for the Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory VAX-11/780. The interface is a CAMAC Branch Highway connected to a Microprogrammed Branch Driver (MBD-11). A single general reentrant MBD program handles CAMAC operations and data transfers to and from the VAX using a DMA transfer. Each of the eight MBD channels is controlled by an independent subprocess in the VAX which communicates with the MBD via the UNIBUS. Data are double buffered and are sorted by VAX user written EVAL codes after the MBD wakes a hibernating subprocess image. Scalar operations and control of external devices are also supported.

King, S.E. (Duke Univ., Durham, NC); Lau, Y.C.; Gould, C.R.

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Delayed-neutron branching ratios of precursors in the fission product region  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Delayed-neutron branching ratios in the fission product region have been tabulated, and average values have been determined. In order to provide data complementary to published values an experiment covering the mass range 79-150 has been carried out at the OSIRIS isotope-separator on-line facility at Studsvik. This experiment has resulted in branching ratios for some precursors ([sup 84]Ge, [sup 133]Sn, and [sup 150]La) for which such data have not been reported before. In several other cases the new results are accurate than older determinations. 19 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

Rudstam, G.; Aleklett, K.; Sihver, L. (Studsvik Neutron Research Lab., Nykoeping (Sweden))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

General Vehicle Performance Specifications for the UPRM AUV Vehicle Specifications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

General Vehicle Performance Specifications for the UPRM AUV Vehicle Specifications Vehicle Characteristics Specification Maximum Depth 700m with 1.5 safety factor Vehicle power 2kWHr Li Ion Rechargeable Transducer 700m rated Paroscientific Depth Sensor will be integrated into the vehicle navigation stream

Gilbes, Fernando

149

Generic refinements for behavioral specifications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis investigates the properties of generic refinements of behavioral specifications. At the base of this investigation stands the view from algebraic specification that abstract data types can be modeled as ...

Petria, Marius

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Dynamic rupture through a branched fault2 configuration at Yucca Mountain and resulting3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dynamic rupture through a branched fault2 configuration at Yucca Mountain and resulting3 ground analyses. This is motivated by the normal faults in the vicinity10 of Yucca Mountain, NV, a potential site fault12 located approximately 1 km west of the crest of Yucca Mountain, is the13 most active

Dmowska, Renata

151

Dynamic Rupture through a Branched Fault Configuration at Yucca Mountain, and Resulting Ground Motions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dynamic Rupture through a Branched Fault Configuration at Yucca Mountain, and Resulting Ground of Yucca Mountain, Nevada, a potential site for a high-level radioactive waste repository. The Solitario km away from the SCF beneath the crest of Yucca Mountain, causing the repository site to experience

152

Branching Random Walk in inhomogeneous breeding Sergey Bocharov, Simon C. Harris  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Branching Random Walk in inhomogeneous breeding potential Sergey Bocharov, Simon C. Harris) If p > 2 then Texplo Harris and S. Harris [7]. Theorem 1.4 (J. Harris and S. Harris). Consider a BBM model. a) If p [0, 2) then lim t Rt t

Harris, Simon Colin

153

Side branch absorber for exhaust manifold of two-stroke internal combustion engine  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of improving scavenging operation of a two-stroke internal combustion engine. The exhaust pressure of the engine is analyzed to determine if there is a pulsation frequency. Acoustic modeling is used to design an absorber. An appropriately designed side branch absorber may be attached to the exhaust manifold.

Harris, Ralph E. (San Antonio, TX); Broerman, III, Eugene L. (San Antonio, TX); Bourn, Gary D. (Laramie, WY)

2011-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

154

Some path large deviation results for a branching diffusion Robert Hardy and Simon C. Harris  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in Git, J.Harris and S.C.Harris [4]. Our approach involves an application of a change of measureSome path large deviation results for a branching diffusion Robert Hardy and Simon C. Harris of Hardy and Harris [5, 7, 6]. Our proof combines simple martingale ideas with applications of Varadhan

Harris, Simon Colin

155

Large deviations and martingales for a typed branching diffusion, 1 Simon C Harris and David Williams  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Large deviations and martingales for a typed branching diffusion, 1 by Simon C Harris and David are rather complicated; and these are only sketched here ­ see Harris (1995) and Harris and Williams (1995 for a simpler problem in Champneys, Harris, Toland, Warren and Williams (1995); in the present context

Harris, Simon Colin

156

New analysis of O-14 beta decay: Branching ratios and conserved vector current consistency  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The ground-state Gamow-Teller transition in the decay of O-14 is strongly hindered and the electron spectrum shape deviates markedly from the allowed shape. A reanalysis of the only available data on this spectrum changes the branching ratio...

Towner, IS; Hardy, John C.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

High-Energy Phonon Branches of an Individual Metallic Carbon Nanotube J. Maultzsch,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

High-Energy Phonon Branches of an Individual Metallic Carbon Nanotube J. Maultzsch,1 S. Reich,1 U, 70569 Stuttgart, Germany (Received 13 December 2002; published 19 August 2003) We present excitation-energy dependent Raman measurements between 2.05 and 2.41 eVon the same individual carbon nanotube. We find

Nabben, Reinhard

158

Harbor Branch researcher on top of bottom life ahead of oil spill  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Harbor Branch researcher on top of bottom life ahead of oil spill By Ed Killer Saturday, June 12 like if touched by an underwater plume of oil. No doubt, much of it would be gone forever. Reed inhabiting the reefs, Reed hoped the oil would not be swept around the tip of Florida and onto the fragile

Belogay, Eugene A.

159

Impact of Branching on the UV Degradation of metallocene LLDPE Ibnelwaleed A. Hussein1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Impact of Branching on the UV Degradation of metallocene LLDPE Ibnelwaleed A. Hussein1 *, Ayuba A & Petrochemicals, KFUPM, Dhahran, Saudi Arabia Abstract The effect of UV degradation on metallocene linear low by Mechanical, FTIR and GPC testings. This paper addresses the structural modifications due to UV degradation

Hussein, Ibnelwaleed A.

160

COUNTEREXAMPLES TO THE UNIQUE AND COFINAL BRANCHES ITAY NEEMAN AND JOHN STEEL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

COUNTEREXAMPLES TO THE UNIQUE AND COFINAL BRANCHES HYPOTHESES ITAY NEEMAN AND JOHN STEEL Abstract than) the existence of a cardinal which is strong past a Woodin cardinal. Martin­Steel [3] introduced examples see Neeman [4] and Neeman [5].) Martin­Steel [3] suggested a natural hypothesis, which if true

Steel, John R.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "branch 202-586-1114 specific" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Modeling branching effects on source-sink relationships of the cotton plant , Vronique Letort2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-structural models simulate the architectural development and physiological functioning of plants. Most of them to trace back the dynamics of the source-sink relationship within the plant [12]. A few studies have beenModeling branching effects on source-sink relationships of the cotton plant Dong Li1 , Véronique

Boyer, Edmond

162

Self-Assembly in Chains, Rings, and Branches: A Single Component System with Two Critical Points  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Self-Assembly in Chains, Rings, and Branches: A Single Component System with Two Critical Points October 2013) We study the interplay between phase separation and self-assembly in chains, rings. The emergence of the lower critical point is caused by the self-assembly of rings taking place in the vapor

Sciortino, Francesco

163

High Speed Max-Log-MAP Turbo SISO Decoder Implementation Using Branch Metric Normalization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

High Speed Max-Log-MAP Turbo SISO Decoder Implementation Using Branch Metric Normalization J. H.Erdogan@ee.ed.ac.uk, Tughrul.Arslan@ee.ed.ac.uk Abstract The authors present a turbo soft-in soft-out (SISO) decoder based. The turbo decoder with the proposed technique has been synthesized to evaluate its power consumption

Arslan, Tughrul

164

BOCA RATON DANIA BEACH DAVIE FORT LAUDERDALE HARBOR BRANCH JUPITER PORT ST. LUCIE Educational Plant Survey  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BOCA RATON DANIA BEACH DAVIE FORT LAUDERDALE HARBOR BRANCH JUPITER PORT ST. LUCIE Educational Plant Survey 2011/2012 ­ 2016/2017 Approved by FAU BOT on June 15, 2011 #12;EDUCATIONAL PLANT SURVEY Florida ...................................................................................................................... ii Educational Plant Survey Team

Fernandez, Eduardo

165

CLNS 05/1914 Measurement of Absolute Hadronic Branching Fractions of D  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a double tag technique. Among measurements for three D 0 and six D + modes, we obtain reference branching fractions B(D 0 ! K \\Gamma ? + ) = (3:91 \\Sigma 0:08 \\Sigma 0:09)% and B(D + ! K \\Gamma ? + ? + ) = (9:5 \\Sigma 0:2 \\Sigma 0:3)%, where the uncertainties are stati

166

Supporting Streams of Changes during Branch Integration Vernica Uquillas Gmez, Stphane Ducasse, and Andy Kellens  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Supporting Streams of Changes during Branch Integration Verónica Uquillas Gómez, Stéphane Ducasse, and Andy Kellens Software Languages Lab, Vrije Universiteit Brussel and RMoD, Inria Lille ­ Nord Europe that analyzes changes within a sequence of changes (stream of changes): such analysis identifies

Boyer, Edmond

167

Fractal branching organizations of Ediacaran rangeomorph fronds reveal a lost Proterozoic body plan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fractal branching organizations of Ediacaran rangeomorph fronds reveal a lost Proterozoic body plan, using parametric Lindenmayer systems, a first formal model of rangeomorph morphologies reveals a fractal-filling strategies. The fractal body plan of rangeomorphs is shown to maximize surface area, consistent

Cambridge, University of

168

THESIS FOR THE DEGREE OF LICENTIATE OF PHILOSOPHY Branching of some  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THESIS FOR THE DEGREE OF LICENTIATE OF PHILOSOPHY Branching of some holomorphic representations Göteborg, Sweden 2002 #12; Abstract In this licentiate thesis we consider a family of Hilbert spaces with his time. He suggested the topic of this licentiate thesis and I have since then bene#28;ted from his

Patriksson, Michael

169

A stepped leader model for lightning including charge distribution in branched channels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The stepped leader process in negative cloud-to-ground lightning plays a vital role in lightning protection analysis. As lightning discharge usually presents significant branched or tortuous channels, the charge distribution along the branched channels and the stochastic feature of stepped leader propagation were investigated in this paper. The charge density along the leader channel and the charge in the leader tip for each lightning branch were approximated by introducing branch correlation coefficients. In combination with geometric characteristics of natural lightning discharge, a stochastic stepped leader propagation model was presented based on the fractal theory. By comparing simulation results with the statistics of natural lightning discharges, it was found that the fractal dimension of lightning trajectory in simulation was in the range of that observed in nature and the calculation results of electric field at ground level were in good agreement with the measurements of a negative flash, which shows the validity of this proposed model. Furthermore, a new equation to estimate the lightning striking distance to flat ground was suggested based on the present model. The striking distance obtained by this new equation is smaller than the value estimated by previous equations, which indicates that the traditional equations may somewhat overestimate the attractive effect of the ground.

Shi, Wei; Zhang, Li [School of Electrical Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan 250061 (China); Li, Qingmin, E-mail: lqmeee@ncepu.edu.cn [Beijing Key Lab of HV and EMC, North China Electric Power University, Beijing 102206 (China); State Key Lab of Alternate Electrical Power System with Renewable Energy Sources, Beijing 102206 (China)

2014-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

170

Distinguishing between linear and branched wormlike micelle solutions using extensional rheology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

available to branched micelles which appear to be extremely efficient in extensional flows. These stress of tails, the charge on the surfactant, the salinity of the solution, and the flow conditions Israelachvili, lubricants and emulsifiers. Further, these micelle solutions are extensively used in agrochemical spraying

Rothstein, Jonathan

171

DOI: 10.1002/cphc.200900615 From Branched Networks of Actin Filaments to Bundles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DOI: 10.1002/cphc.200900615 From Branched Networks of Actin Filaments to Bundles Yifat Brill- ses. Cell movement is driven by the dynamic growth of polar actin networks of various structures,[1 containing the lamellipodium, but lacking the nucleus, micro- tubules and other organels can perform movement

Ben-Shaul, Avinoam

172

Predation on infected host promotes evolutionary branching of virulence and pathogens' biodiversity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Predation on infected host promotes evolutionary branching of virulence and pathogens' biodiversity G H L I G H T S c We investigate the role of predators in biodiversity of the pathogens of prey. c investigate the possible role of predators in promoting biodiversity and disruptive evolution (evolutionary

173

Branching processes in random environment a view on critical and subcritical cases  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Branching processes in random environment ­ a view on critical and subcritical cases M. Birkner1 environment. Then the transition from subcriticality to supercriticality proceeds in several steps, and there occurs a second `transition' in the subcritical phase (besides the phase-transition from (sub)criticality

Birkner, Matthias

174

A branch-and-bound algorithm for convex multi-objective Mixed ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ular, branch-and-bound methods have been developed for mixed integer linear. The authors ... In this paper, we focus on convex multi-objective mixed integer non-linear ..... processing of the final Pareto set (1RF), or not executing RF (noRF

2013-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

175

Branch-cut singularities in the thermodynamics of Fermi liquid systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;Search for non analyticity: If f is smooth and regular in the vicinity of f=0, the standard-analyticities associated with branch-cuts enter via ring diagrams, i.e., ladders which are closed onto themselves p+q p -p, the dominant terms are generated in the thermodynamic potential. In ladders the non- analyticities associated

Fominov, Yakov

176

A spine proof of a lower bound for a typed branching Robert Hardy and Simon C. Harris  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of an important and difficult path large-deviations lower bound for a typed branching diffusion as found in Git, J.HarrisA spine proof of a lower bound for a typed branching diffusion Robert Hardy and Simon C. Harris March 8, 2004 Abstract We follow the spine approach as found in Hardy and Harris [6, 8, 7] to define new

Harris, Simon Colin

177

Potential for Branch Predictor Adaptation at the Program and Phase Level for Performance and Energy-Efficiency  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Potential for Branch Predictor Adaptation at the Program and Phase Level for Performance and Energy-Efficiency savings were performed. The performance and energy- efficiency of an 8-wide issue, out-of-order processor of the branch predictor configuration to improve overall processor energy- efficiency. The results

Co, Michele

178

Renewable Energy Ready Home Solar Photovoltaic Specifications...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Renewable Energy Ready Home Solar Photovoltaic Specifications Renewable Energy Ready Home Solar Photovoltaic Specifications Solar Photovoltaic Specification, Checklist and Guide,...

179

Compilation of reports from research supported by the Materials Engineering Branch, Division of Engineering: 1991--1993. Volume 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since 1965, the Materials Engineering Branch, Division of Engineering, of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research, and its predecessors dating back to the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC), has sponsored research programs concerning the integrity of the primary system pressure boundary of light water reactors. The components of concern in these research programs have included the reactor pressure vessel (RPV), steam generators, and the piping. These research programs have covered a broad range of topics, including fracture mechanics analysis and experimental work for RPV and piping applications, inspection method development and qualification, and evaluation of irradiation effects to RPV steels. This report provides as complete a listing as practical of formal technical reports submitted to the NRC by the investigators working on these research programs. This listing includes topical, final and progress reports, and is segmented by topic area. In many cases a report will cover several topics (such as in the case of progress reports of multi-faceted programs), but is listed under only one topic. Therefore, in searching for reports on a specific topic, other related topic areas should be checked also. The separate volumes of this report cover the following periods: Volume 1: 1965--1990 and Volume 2: 1991--1993.

Hiser, A.L. [comp.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

DOCUMENTATION SPECIFIC TASK TRAINING PROGRAM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DOCUMENTATION APPENDIX SPECIFIC TASK TRAINING PROGRAM Conducted by the ILLINOIS CENTER ............................................................. Coordination of Contract Documents Art.105.05 Appendix Page 14

Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "branch 202-586-1114 specific" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

A universal high energy anomaly in angle resolved photoemission spectra of high temperature superconductors -- possible evidence of spinon and holon branches  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

possible evidence of spinon and holon branches J. Graf, 1, 2the pro- posed spinon and holon dispersions, respectively.quasiparticles into a spinon and holon branch in the high T

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Precise measurement of branching ratios in the beta decay of 38Ca  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present the full description of a measurement of the branching ratios for the beta-decay of 38Ca. This decay includes five allowed 0+ --> 1+ branches and a superallowed 0+ --> 0+ one. With our new result for the latter, we determine its ft value to be 3062.3(68) s, a result whose precision (0.2%) is comparable to the precision of the thirteen well known 0+ --> 0+ transitions used up till now for the determination of Vud, the up-down quark-mixing element of the CKM matrix. The 38Ca superallowed transition thus becomes the first addition to this set of transitions in nearly a decade and the first for which a precise mirror comparison is possible, thus enabling an improved test of the isospin-symmetry-breaking corrections required for the extraction of Vud.

Park, H I; Iacob, V E; Bencomo, M; Chen, L; Horvat, V; Nica, N; Roeder, B T; McCleskey, E; Tribble, R E; Towner, I S

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Detection of a branched alkyl molecule in the interstellar medium: iso-propyl cyanide  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The largest non-cyclic molecules detected in the interstellar medium (ISM) are organic with a straight-chain carbon backbone. We report an interstellar detection of a branched alkyl molecule, iso-propyl cyanide (i-C3H7CN), with an abundance 0.4 times that of its straight-chain structural isomer. This detection suggests that branched carbon-chain molecules may be generally abundant in the ISM. Our astrochemical model indicates that both isomers are produced within or upon dust grain ice mantles through the addition of molecular radicals, albeit via differing reaction pathways. The production of iso-propyl cyanide appears to require the addition of a functional group to a non-terminal carbon in the chain. Its detection therefore bodes well for the presence in the ISM of amino acids, for which such side-chain structure is a key characteristic.

Belloche, Arnaud; Mller, Holger S P; Menten, Karl M

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Single-enzyme kinetics with branched pathways: exact theory and series expansion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The progress of the successive rounds of catalytic conversion of substrates into product(s) by a single enzyme is characterized by the distribution of turnover times. Establishing the most general form of dependence of this distribution on the substrate concentration [S] is one of the fundamental challenges in single molecule enzymology. The distribution of the times of dwell of a molecular motor at the successive positions on its track is an analogous quantity. We derive approximate series expansions for the [ATP]-dependence of the first two moments of the dwell time distributions of motors that catalyze hydrolysis of ATP to draw input energy. Comparison between our results for motors with branched pathways and the corresponding expressions reported earlier for linear enzymatic pathways provides deep insight into the effects of the branches. Such insight is likely to help in discovering the most general form of [S]-dependence of these fundamental distributions.

Ashok Garai; Debashish Chowdhury

2014-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

185

Hanford Site environmental management specification  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (RL) uses this Hanford Site Environmental Management Specification (Specification) to document top-level mission requirements and planning assumptions for the prime contractors involved in Hanford Site cleanup and infrastructure activities under the responsibility of the US Department of Energy, Office of Environmental Management. This Specification describes at a top level the activities, facilities, and infrastructure necessary to accomplish the cleanup of the Hanford Site and assigns this scope to Site contractors and their respective projects. This Specification also references the key National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA), Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA), and safety documentation necessary to accurately describe the cleanup at a summary level. The information contained in this document reflects RL`s application of values, priorities, and critical success factors expressed by those involved with and affected by the Hanford Site project. The prime contractors and their projects develop complete baselines and work plans to implement this Specification. These lower-level documents and the data that support them, together with this Specification, represent the full set of requirements applicable to the contractors and their projects. Figure 1-1 shows the relationship of this Specification to the other basic Site documents. Similarly, the documents, orders, and laws referenced in this specification represent only the most salient sources of requirements. Current and contractual reference data contain a complete set of source documents.

Grygiel, M.L.

1998-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

186

Orbital Branching  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nov 15, 2006 ... (CIP) or (PIP) is highly-symmetric, a concept we formalize as follows. ... suppose x is a (non-integral) solution to an LP relaxation of PIP or CIP,.

2006-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

187

"Branches of a Tree" 31 October 2009 Edwards (Ted) Atwood, Ph.D., 1976  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

"Branches of a Tree" ­ 31 October 2009 #12;#12; Edwards (Ted) Atwood, Ph.D., 1976 Kumar Bhushan, PD, 2003-2005 Alex Bonner, Ph.D., 1975 Ting Chen, PD, 2001-2003 Kyung-Hee (Kay) Choi, Ph.D., 1998 Hann--Bin Chuang, Ph.D., 1986 Gejing Deng, Ph.D., 1997 Daniel DeOliveira, Ph.D., 1998 J.D. Dixon, Ph

Spence, Harlan Ernest

188

CLNS 07/2005 Measurement of Absolute Hadronic Branching Fractions of D  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Among measurements for three D 0 and six D + modes, we obtain reference branching fractions B(D 0 ! K \\Gamma ? + ) = (3:891 \\Sigma 0:035 \\Sigma 0:059 \\Sigma 0:035)% and B(D + ! K \\Gamma ? + ? + ) = (9:14 \\Sigma 0:10 \\Sigma 0:16 \\Sigma 0:07)%, where the first uncertainty is statistical, the second is all

189

Circadian oscillation of starch branching enzyme gene expression in the sorghum endosperm  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Expression of the three SBE genes, encoding starch branching enzymes, in the sorghum endosperm exhibited a diurnal rhythm during a 24-h cycle. Remarkably, the oscillation in SBE expression was maintained in cultured spikes after a 48-h dark treatment, also when fed a continuous solution of sucrose or abscisic acid. Our findings suggest that the rhythmicity in SBE expression in the endosperm is independent of cues from the photosynthetic source and that the oscillator resides within the endosperm itself.

Mutisya, J.; Sun, C.; Jansson, C.

2009-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

190

Branching fractions and CP asymmetries in two-body nonleptonic charmless b-hadron decays  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Relative branching fractions of B{sub d,s}{sup 0} {yields} h{sup +}h'{sup -} decays (where h,h' = K or {pi}) and the direct Cp asymmetry A{sub CP} in the B{sub d}{sup 0} {yields} K{sup +}{pi}{sup -} mode are measured with 179 {+-} 11 pb {sup -1} of data collected using the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron p{bar p} collider. The first branching-fraction measurement of a B{sub s}{sup 0} meson to two pseudoscalars, {Beta}(B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} K{sup +} K{sup -}), and a search for the baryon mode {Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} {yields} p{sup +} h{sup -} are also presented, in addition to branching-fraction limits on the rare channels B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} K{sup +} {pi}{sup -}, B{sub d}{sup 0} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup -}, and B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}.

Warburton, Andreas; /McGill U.

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Results of the quarterly tritium survey of Fourmile Branch and its seeplines in the F- and H-Areas of SRS: September 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Environmental Sciences Section (ESS) established a quarterly monitoring program of the Fourmile Branch (FMB) seepline down gradient from the F- and H-Area seepage basins. The program surveys and tracks changes in tritium, specific conductivity, and pH for the seepline water. Measurements from the sixth quarterly survey (September 1993) showed higher tritium and conductivity measurements and higher pH values (pH 5 - 6) than measurements from previous studies. Increased tritium concentrations and conductivity values, as compared to previous surveys, were attributed to decreased rainfall prior to the sampling event However, overall results of the tritium survey and stream monitoring data (Looney et al., 1993) suggest that the tritium plume is flushing from the FMB system.

Dixon, K.L.; Rogers, V.A.; Looney, B.B.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

BBSGI.MAN -BRANCH-BUS/SILICON GRAPHICS DATA ACQUISITION SYSTEM (BBSGI) For IRIX 5.x systems -AT&T UNIX System V Release 4  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BBSGI.MAN - BRANCH-BUS/SILICON GRAPHICS DATA ACQUISITION SYSTEM (BBSGI) For IRIX 5.x systems - AT&T UNIX System V Release 4 r.imossi/oldf/bnl 25-Oct-1993 BRANCH-BUS/SILICON GRAPHICS DATA ACQUISITION The BRANCH-BUS/SILICON GRAPHICS DATA ACQUISITION SYSTEM (BBSGI) is a product of the Online Data Facility

193

THE ASYMPTOTIC GIANT BRANCH AND THE TIP OF THE RED GIANT BRANCH AS PROBES OF STAR FORMATION HISTORY: THE NEARBY DWARF IRREGULAR GALAXY KKH 98  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We investigate the utility of the asymptotic giant branch (AGB) and the red giant branch (RGB) as probes of the star formation history (SFH) of the nearby (D = 2.5 Mpc) dwarf irregular galaxy, KKH 98. Near-infrared (near-IR) Keck Laser Guide Star Adaptive Optics (AO) images resolve 592 IR-bright stars reaching over 1 mag below the tip of the RGB. Significantly deeper optical (F475W and F814W) Hubble Space Telescope images of the same field contain over 2500 stars, reaching to the red clump and the main-sequence turnoff for 0.5 Gyr old populations. Compared to the optical color-magnitude diagram (CMD), the near-IR CMD shows significantly tighter AGB sequences, providing a good probe of the intermediate-age (0.5-5 Gyr) populations. We match observed CMDs with stellar evolution models to recover the SFH of KKH 98. On average, the galaxy has experienced relatively constant low-level star formation (5 x 10{sup -4} M{sub sun} yr{sup -1}) for much of cosmic time. Except for the youngest main-sequence populations (age <0.1 Gyr), which are typically fainter than the AO data flux limit, the SFH estimated from the 592 IR-bright stars is a reasonable match to that derived from the much larger optical data set. Differences between the optical- and IR-derived SFHs for 0.1-1 Gyr populations suggest that current stellar evolution models may be overproducing the AGB by as much as a factor of 3 in this galaxy. At the depth of the AO data, the IR-luminous stars are not crowded. Therefore, these techniques can potentially be used to determine the stellar populations of galaxies at significantly further distances.

Melbourne, J. [Caltech Optical Observatories, Division of Physics, Mathematics and Astronomy, Mail Stop 301-17, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Williams, B.; Dalcanton, J. [Department of Astronomy, Box 351580, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Ammons, S. M.; Max, C.; Koo, D. C. [University of California Observatories/Lick Observatory, Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California at Santa Cruz, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Girardi, Leo [Osservatorio Astronomico di Padova-INAF, Padova (Italy); Dolphin, A., E-mail: jmel@caltech.ed, E-mail: ben@astro.washington.ed, E-mail: jd@astro.washington.ed, E-mail: ammons@ucolick.or, E-mail: max@ucolick.or, E-mail: koo@ucolick.or, E-mail: leo.girardi@oapd.inaf.i, E-mail: adolphin@raytheon.co [Raytheon, 1151 E. Hermans Road, Tucson, AZ 85706 (United States)

2010-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

194

Electric motor model repair specifications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

These model repair specifications list the minimum requirements for repair and overhaul of polyphase AC squireel cage induction motors. All power ranges, voltages, and speeds of squirrel cage motors are covered.

NONE

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Measurement of the ratio of branching fractions B(B-->J/ psi pi )/B(B-->J/ psi K)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report a measurement of the ratio of branching fractions of the decays B[superscript ]?J/??[superscript ] and B[superscript ]?J/?K[superscript ] using the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. The signal ...

Paus, Christoph M. E.

196

Greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste characterization. Appendix E-5: Impact of the 1993 NRC draft Branch Technical Position on concentration averaging of greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report evaluates the effects of concentration averaging practices on the disposal of greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste (GTCC LLW) generated by the nuclear utility industry and sealed sources. Using estimates of the number of waste components that individually exceed Class C limits, this report calculates the proportion that would be classified as GTCC LLW after applying concentration averaging; this proportion is called the concentration averaging factor. The report uses the guidance outlined in the 1993 Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) draft Branch Technical Position on concentration averaging, as well as waste disposal experience at nuclear utilities, to calculate the concentration averaging factors for nuclear utility wastes. The report uses the 1993 NRC draft Branch Technical Position and the criteria from the Barnwell, South Carolina, LLW disposal site to calculate concentration averaging factors for sealed sources. The report addresses three waste groups: activated metals from light water reactors, process wastes from light-water reactors, and sealed sources. For each waste group, three concentration averaging cases are considered: high, base, and low. The base case, which is the most likely case to occur, assumes using the specific guidance given in the 1993 NRC draft Branch Technical Position on concentration averaging. To project future GTCC LLW generation, each waste category is assigned a concentration averaging factor for the high, base, and low cases.

Tuite, P.; Tuite, K.; Harris, G. [Waste Management Group, Inc., Peekskill, NY (United States)

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Building Energy Data Exchange Specification Scoping Report |...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Building Energy Data Exchange Specification Scoping Report Building Energy Data Exchange Specification Scoping Report The Building Energy Data Exchange Specification (BEDES),...

198

RESIDENTIAL WEATHERIZATION SPECIFICATIONS August 30, 2011  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RESIDENTIAL WEATHERIZATION SPECIFICATIONS August 30, 2011 Index to Sections Section Page I. GENERAL............................................................................................35 #12;1 I. GENERAL SPECIFICATIONS 1. These specifications apply to existing residential (retro

199

Branching ratios from B{sub s} and {Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0}  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

CDF Run II relative branching ratio measurements for 65 pb{sup -1} of data in the channels B{sub s} {yields} D{sub s}{sup {-+}}{pi}{sup {-+}}, {Lambda} {sub b}{sup 0} {yields} {Lambda}{sub c}{sup {+-}}{pi}{sup {-+}} and B {yields} h{sup +}h{sup -} are presented. Further, an observation of B{sub s} {yields} K{sup {+-}} K{sup {-+}} and a measurement of A{sub CP} are presented.

Matthew S. Martin

2004-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

200

Publisher's note: Branching ratios for the beta decay of Na-21 (vol 74, pg 015501, 2006)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PHYSICAL REVIEW C 74, 029901(E) (2006) Publisher?s Note: Branching ratios for the ? decay of 21Na [Phys. Rev. C 74, 015501 (2006)] V. E. Iacob, J. C. Hardy, C. A. Gagliardi, J. Goodwin, N. Nica, H. I. Park, G. Tabacaru, L. Trache, R. E. Tribble..., Y. Zhai, and I. S. Towner (Received 31 July 2006; published 11 August 2006) DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevC.74.029901 PACS number(s): 27.30.+t, 23.40.?s, 99.10.Fg This paper was published online on 14 July 2006 with formatting errors in Eqs. (7) and (9...

Iacob, V. E.; Hardy, John C.; Gagliardi, Carl A.; Goodwin, J.; Nica, N.; Park, H. I.; Tabacaru, G.; Trache, L.; Tribble, Robert E.; Zhai, Y.; Towner, I. S.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "branch 202-586-1114 specific" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Globular clusters with the extended horizontal-branch as remaining cores of galaxy building blocks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The relics of building blocks that made stellar halo and bulge are yet to be discovered unless they were completely disrupted throughout the history of the Galaxy. Here we suggest that about 25% of the Milky Way globular clusters have characteristics of the remaining cores of these early building blocks rather than genuine star clusters. They are clearly distinct from other normal globular clusters in the presence of extended horizontal-branch and multiple stellar populations, in mass (brightness), and most importantly in orbital kinematics. Based on this result, a three-stage formation picture of the Milky Way is suggested, which includes early mergers, collapse, and later accretion.

Young-Wook Lee; Hansung B. Gim; Chul Chung

2007-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

202

Process for the conversion of lower alcohols to higher branched oxygenates  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process is provided for the production of branched C.sub.4+ oxygenates from lower alcohols such as methanol, ethanol, propanol and mixtures thereof. The process comprises contacting the lower alcohols with a solid catalyst comprising a mixed metal oxide support having components selected from the group consisting of oxides of zinc, magnesium, zirconia, titanium, manganese, chromium, and lanthanides, and an activation metal selected from the group consisting of Group VIII metal, Group IB metals, and mixtures thereof. The advantage of the process is improved yields and selectivity to isobutanol which can subsequently be employed in the production of high octane motor gasoline.

Barger, Paul T. (Arlington Heights, IL)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Process for the conversion of lower alcohols to higher branched oxygenates  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process is provided for the production of branched C{sub x} oxygenates from lower alcohols such as methanol, ethanol, propanol and mixtures thereof. The process comprises contacting the lower alcohols with a solid catalyst comprising a mixed metal oxide support having components selected from the group consisting of oxides of zinc, magnesium, zirconia, titanium, manganese, chromium, and lanthanides, and an activation metal selected from the group consisting of Group VIII metal, Group IB metals, and mixtures thereof. The advantage of the process is improved yields and selectivity to isobutanol which can subsequently be employed in the production of high octane motor gasoline.

Barger, P.T.

1996-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

204

Simulation of the ultrasonic array response from real branched cracks using an efficient finite element method  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A hybrid model to simulate the ultrasonic array response from stress corrosion cracks is presented. These cracks are branched and difficult to detect so the model is required to enable optimization of an array design. An efficient frequency-domain finite element method is described and selected to simulate the ultrasonic scattering. Experimental validation results are presented, followed by an example of the simulated ultrasonic array response from a real stress corrosion crack whose geometry is obtained from an X-ray Computed Tomography image. A simulation-assisted array design methodology, which includes the model and use of real crack geometries, is proposed.

Felice, Maria V. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Bristol, Bristol BS8 1TR, United Kingdom and Rolls-Royce plc., Bristol BS34 7QE (United Kingdom); Velichko, Alexander; Wilcox, Paul D. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Bristol, Bristol BS8 1TR (United Kingdom); Barden, Tim J.; Dunhill, Tony K. [Rolls-Royce plc., Bristol BS34 7QE (United Kingdom)

2014-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

205

Investigating Commercial Cellulase Performances Toward Specific...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Commercial Cellulase Performances Toward Specific Biomass Recalcitrance Factors Using Reference Substrates. Investigating Commercial Cellulase Performances Toward Specific Biomass...

206

ProductSpecifications Thermo Scientific  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ProductSpecifications Thermo Scientific Niton XL3t GOLDD+ XRF Analyzer The Thermo Scientific Niton XL3t x-ray tube-based x-ray fluorescence (XRF) analyzer with GOLDD+ technology is purpose versatile x-ray tubes ever used in a handheld XRF instrument. When this power is harnessed to our

Short, Daniel

207

Gas Slow Control System Specifications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AMS-02 TRD Gas Slow Control System Specifications v 4.2 26-06-2006 A. Bartoloni, B. Borgia, F. Bucci, F. R. Spada INFN Sezione di Roma 1- Roma, Italy #12;2/45 #12;3/45 1. ABSTRACT 5 2. GAS SYSTEM FUNCTIONAL DESCRIPTION 5 3. GAS CONTROL SYSTEM 8 4. CONTROL SYSTEM COMPONENTS 12 a. Universal Control System

Roma "La Sapienza", Università di

208

Habitability of Super-Earth Planets around Other Suns: Models including Red Giant Branch Evolution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The unexpected diversity of exoplanets includes a growing number of super- Earth planets, i.e., exoplanets with masses of up to several Earth masses and a similar chemical and mineralogical composition as Earth. We present a thermal evolution model for a 10 Earth mass planet orbiting a star like the Sun. Our model is based on the integrated system approach, which describes the photosynthetic biomass production taking into account a variety of climatological, biogeochemical, and geodynamical processes. This allows us to identify a so-called photosynthesis-sustaining habitable zone (pHZ) determined by the limits of biological productivity on the planetary surface. Our model considers the solar evolution during the main-sequence stage and along the Red Giant Branch as described by the most recent solar model. We obtain a large set of solutions consistent with the principal possibility of life. The highest likelihood of habitability is found for "water worlds". Only mass-rich water worlds are able to realize pHZ-type habitability beyond the stellar main-sequence on the Red Giant Branch.

W. von Bloh; M. Cuntz; K. -P. Schroeder; C. Bounama; S. Franck

2008-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

209

Branches of electrostatic turbulence inside solitary plasma structures in the auroral ionosphere  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The excitation of electrostatic turbulence inside space-observed solitary structures is a central topic of this exposition. Three representative solitary structures observed in the topside auroral ionosphere as large-amplitude nonlinear signatures in the electric field and magnetic-field-aligned current on the transverse scales of ?10{sup 2}10{sup 3}?m are evaluated by the theories of electrostatic wave generation in inhomogeneous background configurations. A quantitative analysis shows that the structures are, in general, effective in destabilizing the inhomogeneous energy-density-driven (IEDD) waves, as well as of the ion acoustic waves modified by a shear in the parallel drift of ions. It is demonstrated that the dominating branch of the electrostatic turbulence is determined by the interplay of various driving sources inside a particular solitary structure. The sources do not generally act in unison, so that their common effect may be inhibiting for excitation of electrostatic waves of a certain type. In the presence of large magnetic-field-aligned current, which is not correlated to the inhomogeneous electric field inside the structure, the ion-acoustic branch becomes dominating. In other cases, the IEDD instability is more central.

Golovchanskaya, Irina V.; Kozelov, Boris V. [Polar Geophysical Institute, Apatity 184209 (Russian Federation); Chernyshov, Alexander A.; Mogilevsky, Mikhail M. [Space research Institute, Moscow 117997 (Russian Federation); Ilyasov, Askar A. [Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, Moscow 141700 (Russian Federation); Space research Institute, Moscow 117997 (Russian Federation)

2014-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

210

Branching laws for polynomial endomorphisms in CAR algebra for fermions, uniformly hyperfinite algebras and Cuntz algebras  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Previously, we have shown that the CAR algebra for fermions is embedded in the Cuntz algebra ${\\cal O}_{2}$ in such a way that the generators are expressed in terms of polynomials in the canonical generators of the latter, and it coincides with the U(1)-fixed point subalgebra ${\\cal A}\\equiv {\\cal O}_{2}^{U(1)}$ of ${\\cal O}_{2}$ for the canonical gauge action. Based on this embedding formula, some properties of ${\\cal A}$ are studied in detail by restricting those of ${\\cal O}_{2}$. Various endomorphisms of ${\\cal O}_{2}$, which are defined by polynomials in the canonical generators, are explicitly constructed, and transcribed into those of ${\\cal A}$. Especially, we investigate branching laws for a certain family of such endomorphisms with respect to four important representations, i.e., the Fock representation, the infinite wedge representation and their duals. These endomorphisms are completely classified by their branching laws. As an application, we show that the reinterpretation of the Fock vacuum as the Dirac vacuum is described in representation theory through a mixture of fermions.

Mitsuo Abe; Katsunori Kawamura

2006-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

211

Assessment of approximate computational methods for conical intersections and branching plane vectors in organic molecules  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Quantum-chemical computational methods are benchmarked for their ability to describe conical intersections in a series of organic molecules and models of biological chromophores. Reference results for the geometries, relative energies, and branching planes of conical intersections are obtained using ab initio multireference configuration interaction with single and double excitations (MRCISD). They are compared with the results from more approximate methods, namely, the state-interaction state-averaged restricted ensemble-referenced Kohn-Sham method, spin-flip time-dependent density functional theory, and a semiempirical MRCISD approach using an orthogonalization-corrected model. It is demonstrated that these approximate methods reproduce the ab initio reference data very well, with root-mean-square deviations in the optimized geometries of the order of 0.1 or less and with reasonable agreement in the computed relative energies. A detailed analysis of the branching plane vectors shows that all currently applied methods yield similar nuclear displacements for escaping the strong non-adiabatic coupling region near the conical intersections. Our comparisons support the use of the tested quantum-chemical methods for modeling the photochemistry of large organic and biological systems.

Nikiforov, Alexander; Gamez, Jose A.; Thiel, Walter [Max-Planck-Institut fr Kohlenforschung, Kaiser-Wilhelm-Platz 1, D-45470 Mlheim an der Ruhr (Germany); Huix-Rotllant, Miquel [Institute of Physical and Theoretical Chemistry, Goethe University Frankfurt, Max-von-Laue-Str. 7, D-60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Filatov, Michael, E-mail: mike.filatov@gmail.com [Mulliken Center for Theoretical Chemistry, Institut fr Physikalische und Theoretische Chemie, Universitt Bonn, Beringstr. 4, D-53115 Bonn (Germany)

2014-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

212

Tracing the Metal-Poor M31 Stellar Halo with Blue Horizontal Branch Stars  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have analyzed new HST/ACS and HST/WFC3 imaging in F475W and F814W of two previously-unobserved fields along the M31 minor axis to confirm our previous constraints on the shape of M31's inner stellar halo. Both of these new datasets reach a depth of at least F814W$blue horizontal branch (BHB) of the field as a distinct feature of the color-magnitude diagram. We measure the density of BHB stars and the ratio of BHB to red giant branch stars in each field using identical techniques to our previous work. We find excellent agreement with our previous measurement of a power-law for the 2-D projected surface density with an index of 2.6$^{+0.3}_{-0.2}$ outside of 3 kpc, which flattens to $\\alpha <$1.2 inside of 3 kpc. Our findings confirm our previous suggestion that the field BHB stars in M31 are part of the halo population. However, the total halo profile is now known to differ from this BHB profile, which suggests that we have isolated the metal-poor component. This component ...

Williams, Benjamin F; Gilbert, Eric F BellKaroline M; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Dorman, Claire; Lauer, Tod R; Seth, Anil C; Kalirai, Jason S; Rosenfield, Philip; Girardi, Leo

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Measurements of the Branching fractions for $B_(s) -> D_(s)???$ and $?_b^0 -> ?_c^+???$  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Branching fractions of the decays $H_b\\to H_c\\pi^-\\pi^+\\pi^-$ relative to $H_b\\to H_c\\pi^-$ are presented, where $H_b$ ($H_c$) represents B^0-bar($D^+$), $B^-$ ($D^0$), B_s^0-bar ($D_s^+$) and $\\Lambda_b^0$ ($\\Lambda_c^+$). The measurements are performed with the LHCb detector using 35${\\rm pb^{-1}}$ of data collected at $\\sqrt{s}=7$ TeV. The ratios of branching fractions are measured to be B(B^0-bar -> D^+\\pi^-\\pi^+\\pi^-)/ B(B^0-bar -> D^+\\pi^-) = 2.38\\pm0.11\\pm0.21 B(B^- -> D^0\\pi^-\\pi^+\\pi^-) / B(B^- -> D^0\\pi^-) = 1.27\\pm0.06\\pm0.11 B(B_s^0-bar -> D_s^+\\pi^-\\pi^+\\pi^-) / B(B_s^0-bar -> D_s^+\\pi^-) = 2.01\\pm0.37\\pm0.20 B(\\Lambda_b^0->\\Lambda_c^+\\pi^-\\pi^+\\pi^-) / B(\\Lambda_b^0 -> \\Lambda_c^+\\pi^-) = 1.43\\pm0.16\\pm0.13. We also report measurements of partial decay rates of these decays to excited charm hadrons. These results are of comparable or higher precision than existing measurements.

LHCb Collaboration; R. Aaij; B. Adeva; M. Adinolfi; C. Adrover; A. Affolder; Z. Ajaltouni; J. Albrecht; F. Alessio; M. Alexander; G. Alkhazov; P. Alvarez Cartelle; A. A. Alves Jr; S. Amato; Y. Amhis; J. Anderson; R. B. Appleby; O. Aquines Gutierrez; F. Archilli; L. Arrabito; A. Artamonov; M. Artuso; E. Aslanides; G. Auriemma; S. Bachmann; J. J. Back; D. S. Bailey; V. Balagura; W. Baldini; R. J. Barlow; C. Barschel; S. Barsuk; W. Barter; A. Bates; C. Bauer; Th. Bauer; A. Bay; I. Bediaga; K. Belous; I. Belyaev; E. Ben-Haim; M. Benayoun; G. Bencivenni; S. Benson; J. Benton; R. Bernet; M. -O. Bettler; M. van Beuzekom; A. Bien; S. Bifani; A. Bizzeti; P. M. Bjrnstad; T. Blake; F. Blanc; C. Blanks; J. Blouw; S. Blusk; A. Bobrov; V. Bocci; A. Bondar; N. Bondar; W. Bonivento; S. Borghi; A. Borgia; T. J. V. Bowcock; C. Bozzi; T. Brambach; J. van den Brand; J. Bressieux; D. Brett; S. Brisbane; M. Britsch; T. Britton; N. H. Brook; H. Brown; A. Bchler-Germann; I. Burducea; A. Bursche; J. Buytaert; S. Cadeddu; J. M. Caicedo Carvajal; O. Callot; M. Calvi; M. Calvo Gomez; A. Camboni; P. Campana; A. Carbone; G. Carboni; R. Cardinale; A. Cardini; L. Carson; K. Carvalho Akiba; G. Casse; M. Cattaneo; M. Charles; Ph. Charpentier; N. Chiapolini; K. Ciba; X. Cid Vidal; G. Ciezarek; P. E. L. Clarke; M. Clemencic; H. V. Cliff; J. Closier; C. Coca; V. Coco; J. Cogan; P. Collins; F. Constantin; G. Conti; A. Contu; A. Cook; M. Coombes; G. Corti; G. A. Cowan; R. Currie; B. D'Almagne; C. D'Ambrosio; P. David; I. De Bonis; S. De Capua; M. De Cian; F. De Lorenzi; J. M. De Miranda; L. De Paula; P. De Simone; D. Decamp; M. Deckenhoff; H. Degaudenzi; M. Deissenroth; L. Del Buono; C. Deplano; O. Deschamps; F. Dettori; J. Dickens; H. Dijkstra; P. Diniz Batista; S. Donleavy; A. Dosil Surez; D. Dossett; A. Dovbnya; F. Dupertuis; R. Dzhelyadin; C. Eames; S. Easo; U. Egede; V. Egorychev; S. Eidelman; D. van Eijk; F. Eisele; S. Eisenhardt; R. Ekelhof; L. Eklund; Ch. Elsasser; D. G. d'Enterria; D. Esperante Pereira; L. Estve; A. Falabella; E. Fanchini; C. Frber; G. Fardell; C. Farinelli; S. Farry; V. Fave; V. Fernandez Albor; M. Ferro-Luzzi; S. Filippov; C. Fitzpatrick; M. Fontana; F. Fontanelli; R. Forty; M. Frank; C. Frei; M. Frosini; S. Furcas; A. Gallas Torreira; D. Galli; M. Gandelman; P. Gandini; Y. Gao; J-C. Garnier; J. Garofoli; J. Garra Tico; L. Garrido; C. Gaspar; N. Gauvin; M. Gersabeck; T. Gershon; Ph. Ghez; V. Gibson; V. V. Gligorov; C. Gbel; D. Golubkov; A. Golutvin; A. Gomes; H. Gordon; M. Grabalosa Gndara; R. Graciani Diaz; L. A. Granado Cardoso; E. Graugs; G. Graziani; A. Grecu; S. Gregson; B. Gui; E. Gushchin; Yu. Guz; T. Gys; G. Haefeli; C. Haen; S. C. Haines; T. Hampson; S. Hansmann-Menzemer; R. Harji; N. Harnew; J. Harrison; P. F. Harrison; J. He; V. Heijne; K. Hennessy; P. Henrard; J. A. Hernando Morata; E. van Herwijnen; E. Hicks; W. Hofmann; K. Holubyev; P. Hopchev; W. Hulsbergen; P. Hunt; T. Huse; R. S. Huston; D. Hutchcroft; D. Hynds; V. Iakovenko; P. Ilten; J. Imong; R. Jacobsson; A. Jaeger; M. Jahjah Hussein; E. Jans; F. Jansen; P. Jaton; B. Jean-Marie; F. Jing; M. John; D. Johnson; C. R. Jones; B. Jost; S. Kandybei; M. Karacson; T. M. Karbach; J. Keaveney; U. Kerzel; T. Ketel; A. Keune; B. Khanji; Y. M. Kim; M. Knecht; S. Koblitz; P. Koppenburg; A. Kozlinskiy; L. Kravchuk; K. Kreplin; M. Kreps; G. Krocker; P. Krokovny; F. Kruse; K. Kruzelecki; M. Kucharczyk; S. Kukulak; R. Kumar; T. Kvaratskheliya; V. N. La Thi; D. Lacarrere; G. Lafferty; A. Lai; D. Lambert; R. W. Lambert; E. Lanciotti; G. Lanfranchi; C. Langenbruch; T. Latham; R. Le Gac; J. van Leerdam; J. -P. Lees; R. Lefvre; A. Leflat; J. Lefranois; O. Leroy; T. Lesiak; L. Li; L. Li Gioi; M. Lieng; M. Liles; R. Lindner; C. Linn; B. Liu; G. Liu; J. H. Lopes; E. Lopez Asamar; N. Lopez-March; J. Luisier; F. Machefert; I. V. Machikhiliyan; F. Maciuc; O. Maev; J. Magnin; S. Malde; R. M. D. Mamunur; G. Manca; G. Mancinelli; N. Mangiafave; U. Marconi; R. Mrki; J. Marks; G. Martellotti; A. Martens; L. Martin; A. Martn Snchez; D. Martinez Santos; A. Massafferri; Z. Mathe; C. Matteuzzi; M. Matveev; E. Maurice; B. Maynard; A. Mazurov; G. McGregor; R. McNulty; C. Mclean; M. Meissner; M. Merk; J. Merkel; R. Messi; S. Miglioranzi; D. A. Milanes; M. -N. Minard; S. Monteil; D. Moran; P. Morawski; R. Mountain; I. Mous; F. Muheim; K. Mller; R. Muresan; B. Muryn; M. Musy; J. Mylroie-Smith; P. Naik; T. Nakada; R. Nandakumar; J. Nardulli; I. Nasteva; M. Nedos; M. Needham; N. Neufeld; C. Nguyen-Mau; M. Nicol; S. Nies; V. Niess; N. Nikitin; A. Oblakowska-Mucha; V. Obraztsov; S. Oggero; S. Ogilvy; O. Okhrimenko; R. Oldeman; M. Orlandea; J. M. Otalora Goicochea; P. Owen; B. Pal; J. Palacios; M. Palutan; J. Panman; A. Papanestis; M. Pappagallo; C. Parkes; C. J. Parkinson; G. Passaleva; G. D. Patel; M. Patel; S. K. Paterson

2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

214

Demand forecasting for companies with many branches, low sales numbers per product, and non-recurring orderings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We propose the new Top-Dog-Index to quantify the historic deviation of the supply data of many small branches for a commodity group from sales data. On the one hand, the common parametric assumptions on the customer demand distribution in the literature could not at all be supported in our real-world data set. On the other hand, a reasonably-looking non-parametric approach to estimate the demand distribution for the different branches directly from the sales distribution could only provide us with statistically weak and unreliable estimates for the future demand. Based on real-world sales data from our industry partner we provide evidence that our Top-Dog-Index is statistically robust. Using the Top-Dog-Index, we propose a heuristics to improve the branch-dependent proportion between supply and demand. Our approach cannot estimate the branch-dependent demand directly. It can, however, classify the branches into a given number of clusters according to an historic oversupply or undersupply. This classification ...

Kurz, Sascha

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Chromosome specific repetitive DNA sequences  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method is provided for determining specific nucleotide sequences useful in forming a probe which can identify specific chromosomes, preferably through in situ hybridization within the cell itself. In one embodiment, chromosome preferential nucleotide sequences are first determined from a library of recombinant DNA clones having families of repetitive sequences. Library clones are identified with a low homology with a sequence of repetitive DNA families to which the first clones respectively belong and variant sequences are then identified by selecting clones having a pattern of hybridization with genomic DNA dissimilar to the hybridization pattern shown by the respective families. In another embodiment, variant sequences are selected from a sequence of a known repetitive DNA family. The selected variant sequence is classified as chromosome specific, chromosome preferential, or chromosome nonspecific. Sequences which are classified as chromosome preferential are further sequenced and regions are identified having a low homology with other regions of the chromosome preferential sequence or with known sequences of other family me This invention is the result of a contract with the Department of Energy (Contract No. W-7405-ENG-36).

Moyzis, Robert K. (Los Alamos, NM); Meyne, Julianne (Los Alamos, NM)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

IS DUST FORMING ON THE RED GIANT BRANCH IN 47 Tuc?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Using Spitzer Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) observations from the SAGE-SMC Legacy program and archived Spitzer IRAC data, we investigate dust production in 47 Tuc, a nearby massive Galactic globular cluster. A previous study detected infrared excess, indicative of circumstellar dust, in a large population of stars in 47 Tuc, spanning the entire red giant branch (RGB). We show that those results suffered from effects caused by stellar blending and imaging artifacts and that it is likely that no stars below {approx}1 mag from the tip of the RGB are producing dust. The only stars that appear to harbor dust are variable stars, which are also the coolest and most luminous stars in the cluster.

Boyer, Martha L.; Gordon, Karl D.; Meixner, Margaret; Sewilo, Marta; Shiao, Bernie [STScI, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Van Loon, Jacco Th. [Astrophysics Group, Lennard-Jones Laboratories, Keele University, Staffordshire ST5 5BG (United Kingdom); McDonald, Iain [Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, Alan Turing Building, University of Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Babler, Brian; Bracker, Steve; Meade, Marilyn [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin, Madison, 475 North Charter Street, Madison, WI 53706-1582 (United States); Block, Miwa; Engelbracht, Charles; Misselt, Karl [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Hora, Joe [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, MS 65, Cambridge, MA 02138-1516 (United States); Indebetouw, Remy [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, P.O. Box 3818, Charlottesville, VA 22903-0818 (United States); Whitney, Barbara [Space Science Institute, 4750 Walnut Street, Suite 205, Boulder, CO 80301 (United States)], E-mail: mboyer@stsci.edu

2010-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

217

Measurement of the branching ratios for the decays of D(+)(s) to ??(+), ???(+), ??(+), and ???(+)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to the form factor for D0!K2e1ne , for which *Permanent address: University of Texas, Austin, TX 78712. Permanent address: BINP, RU-630090 Novosibirsk, Russia. Permanent address: Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94551.A. Bellerive, R....5260.0360.04 h3pp 154622 4.560.1 1.1 0.3560.0560.06 h 8 (h gg )p 479626 6.760.1 1.1 1.0960.0660.07 h 8 (h3p)p 5869 1.960.1 0.2 0.7360.1160.122-4 MEASUREMENT OF THE BRANCHING RATIOS FOR THE . . . PHYSICAL REVIEW D 58 052002yields for different channels...

Baringer, Philip S.

1998-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

218

Wide Binary Effects on Asymmetries in Asymptotic Giant Branch Circumstellar Envelopes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Observations of increasingly higher spatial resolution reveal the existence of asymmetries in the circumstellar envelopes of a small fraction of asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars. Although there is no general consensus for their origin, a binary companion star may be responsible. Within this framework, we investigate the gravitational effects associated with a sufficiently wide binary system, where Roche lobe overflow is unimportant, on the outflowing envelopes of AGB stars using three dimensional hydrodynamic simulations. The effects due to individual binary components are separately studied, enabling investigation of the stellar and circumstellar characteristics in detail. The reflex motion of the AGB star alters the wind velocity distribution, thereby, determining the overall shape of the outflowing envelope. On the other hand, the interaction of the companion with the envelope produces a gravitational wake, which exhibits a vertically thinner shape. The two patterns overlap and form clumpy structures. T...

Kim, Hyosun

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Measurement of the Absolute Branching Fraction of D0 to K- pi+  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors measure the absolute branching fraction for D{sup 0} {yields} K{sup -} {pi}{sup +} using partial reconstruction of {bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D*{sup +}X{ell}{sup -}{bar {nu}}{sub {ell}} decays, in which only the charged lepton and the pion from the decay D*{sup +} {yields} D{sup 0}{pi}{sup +} are used. Based on a data sample of 230 million B{bar B} pairs collected at the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy B Factory at SLAC, they obtain {Beta}(D{sup 0} {yields} K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}) = (4.007 {+-} 0.037 {+-} 0.070)%, where the first error is statistical and the second error is systematic.

Aubert, B.; Bona, M.; Boutigny, D.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; /Annecy, LAPP; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; /Barcelona U., ECM; Lopez, L.; Palano, A.; /Bari U.; Eigen, G.; Ofte, I.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; /Bergen U.; Abrams, G.S.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D.N.; Button-Shafer, J.; /LBL, Berkeley

2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

220

Ultrafast energy transfer from rigid, branched side-chains into a conjugated, alternating copolymer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present the synthesis and characterization of a benzodithiophene/thiophene alternating copolymer decorated with rigid, singly branched pendant side chains. We characterize exciton migration and recombination dynamics in these molecules in tetrahydrofuran solution, using a combination of static and time-resolved spectroscopies. As control experiments, we also measure electronic relaxation dynamics in isolated molecular analogues of both the side chain and polymer moieties. We employ semi-empirical and time-dependent density functional theory calculations to show that photoexcitation of the decorated copolymer using 395 nm laser pulses results in excited states primarily localized on the pendant side chains. We use ultrafast transient absorption spectroscopy to show that excitations are transferred to the polymer backbone faster than the instrumental response function, ?250 fs.

Griffin, Graham B.; Rolczynski, Brian S.; Linkin, Alexander; McGillicuddy, Ryan D.; Engel, Gregory S., E-mail: gsengel@uchicago.edu [Department of Chemistry, The James Franck Institute, Institute for Biophysical Dynamics, The University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States); Lundin, Pamela M. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Stanford University, Stauffer III, 381 North-South Mall, Stanford, California 94305 (United States) [Department of Chemical Engineering, Stanford University, Stauffer III, 381 North-South Mall, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); A. R. Smith Department of Chemistry, Appalachian State University, 417 CAP Building, 525 Rivers Street, Boone, North Carolina 28608 (United States); Bao, Zhenan [Department of Chemical Engineering, Stanford University, Stauffer III, 381 North-South Mall, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)] [Department of Chemical Engineering, Stanford University, Stauffer III, 381 North-South Mall, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)

2014-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

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221

Measurement of the $\\Xi^0 \\rightarrow \\Lambda\\gamma$ Decay Asymmetry and Branching Fraction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In data taken with the NA48 experiment at the CERN SPS in 1999, 730 candidates of the weak radiative hyperon decay Xi0 -> Lambda gamma have been found with an estimated background of 58 +- 8 events. From these events the Xi0 -> Lambda gamma decay asymmetry has been determined to alpha(Xi0 -> Lambda gamma) = -0.78 +- 0.18_stat +- 0.06_syst, which is the first evidence of a decay asymmetry in Xi0 -> Lambda gamma. The branching fraction of the decay has been measured to be Br(Xi0 -> Lambda gamma) = (1.16 +- 0.05_stat +- 0.06_syst) x 10^-3.

Lai, A; Bevan, A; Dosanjh, R S; Gershon, T J; Hay, B; Kalmus, George Ernest; Lazzeroni, C; Munday, D J; Olaiya, E; Parker, M A; White, T O; Wotton, S A; Barr, G; Bocquet, G; Ceccucci, Augusto; uhadar-Dnszelmann, T; Cundy, Donald C; D'Agostini, Giulio; Doble, Niels T; Falaleev, V P; Gatignon, L; Gonidec, A; Gorini, B; Govi, G; Grafstrm, P; Kubischta, Werner; Lacourt, A; Norton, A; Palestini, S; Panzer-Steindel, B; Taureg, Hans; Velasco, M; Wahl, H; Cheshkov, C; Gaponenko, A N; Khristov, P Z; Kekelidze, V D; Madigozhin, D T; Molokanova, N A; Potrebenikov, Yu K; Tatishvili, G T; Tkachev, A L; Zinchenko, A I; Knowles, I; Martin, V; Sacco, R; Walker, A; Contalbrigo, M; Dalpiaz, Pietro; Duclos, J; Frabetti, P L; Gianoli, A; Martini, M; Petrucci, F; Savri, M; Bizzeti, A; Calvetti, M; Collazuol, G; Graziani, G; Iacopini, E; Lenti, M; Martelli, F; Veltri, M; Becker, H G; Eppard, K; Eppard, M; Fox, H; Kalter, A; Kleinknecht, K; Koch, U; Kpke, L; Lopes da Silva, P; Marouelli, P; Pellmann, I A; Peters, A; Renk, B; Schmidt, S A; Schnharting, V; Schu, Yu; Wanke, R; Winhart, A; Wittgen, M; Chollet, J C; Fayard, L; Iconomidou-Fayard, L; Ocariz, J; Unal, G; Wingerter-Seez, I; Anzivino, Giuseppina; Cenci, P; Imbergamo, E; Lubrano, P; Mestvirishvili, A; Nappi, A; Pep, M; Piccini, M; Bertanza, L; Carosi, R; Casali, R; Cerri, C; Cirilli, M; Costantini, F; Fantechi, R; Giudici, Sergio; Mannelli, I; Pierazzini, G M; Sozzi, M; Chze, J B; Cogan, J; De Beer, M; Debu, P; Formica, A; Granier de Cassagnac, R; Mazzucato, E; Peyaud, B; Turlay, Ren; Vallage, B; Holder, M; Maier, A; Ziolkowski, M; Arcidiacono, R; Biino, C; Cartiglia, N; Guida, R; Marchetto, F; Menichetti, E; Pastrone, N; Nassalski, J P; Rondio, Ewa; Szleper, M; Wislicki, W; Wronka, S; Dibon, Heinz; Fischer, G; Jeitler, Manfred; Markytan, Manfred; Mikulec, I; Neuhofer, Gnther; Pernicka, Manfred; Taurok, Anton; Widhalm, L

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

First Observation of B+ to rho+ K0 and Measurement of its Branching Fraction and Charge Asymmetry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present the first observation of the decay B{sup +} {yields} {rho}{sup +}K{sup 0}, using a data sample of 348 fb{sup -1} collected at the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance with the BABAR detector. The branching fraction and charge asymmetry are measured to be (8.0{sub -1.3}{sup +1.4} {+-} 0.5) x 10{sup -6} and (-12.2 {+-} 16.6 {+-} 2.0)%, respectively, where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second is systematic. The significance of the observed branching fraction, including systematic uncertainties, is 7.9 standard deviations.

Aubert, B.

2007-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

223

Central Solenoid Insert Technical Specification  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US ITER Project Office (USIPO) is responsible for the ITER central solenoid (CS) contribution to the ITER project. The Central Solenoid Insert (CSI) project will allow ITER validation the appropriate lengths of the conductors to be used in the full-scale CS coils under relevant conditions. The ITER Program plans to build and test a CSI to verify the performance of the CS conductor. The CSI is a one-layer solenoid with an inner diameter of 1.48 m and a height of 4.45 m between electric terminal ends. The coil weight with the terminals is approximately 820 kg without insulation. The major goal of the CSI is to measure the temperature margin of the CS under the ITER direct current (DC) operating conditions, including determining sensitivity to load cycles. Performance of the joints, ramp rate sensitivity, and stability against thermal or electromagnetic disturbances, electrical insulation, losses, and instrumentation are addressed separately and therefore are not major goals in this project. However, losses and joint performance will be tested during the CSI testing campaign. The USIPO will build the CSI that will be tested at the Central Solenoid Model Coil (CSMC) Test Facility at the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Naka, Japan. The industrial vendors (the Suppliers) will report to the USIPO (the Company). All approvals to proceed will be issued by the Company, which in some cases, as specified in this document, will also require the approval of the ITER Organization. Responsibilities and obligations will be covered by respective contracts between the USIPO, called Company interchangeably, and the industrial Prime Contractors, called Suppliers. Different stages of work may be performed by more than one Prime Contractor, as described in this specification. Technical requirements of the contract between the Company and the Prime Contractor will be covered by the Fabrication Specifications developed by the Prime Contractor based on this document and approved by the Company and ITER. The Fabrication Specifications may reflect some national requirements and regulations that are not fully provided here. This document presents the ITER CSI specifications.

Martovetsky, Nicolai N [ORNL; Smirnov, Alexandre [ORNL

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Bonneville Power Administration Program Specific Recovery Plan...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Bonneville Power Administration Program Specific Recovery Plan Bonneville Power Administration Program Specific Recovery Plan Microsoft Word - PSRP May 15 2009 BPA Final.docx...

225

Specific test and evaluation plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this Specific Test and Evaluation Plan (STEP) is to provide a detailed written plan for the systematic testing of modifications made to the 241-AX-B Valve Pit by the W-314 Project. The STEP develops the outline for test procedures that verify the system`s performance to the established Project design criteria. The STEP is a lower tier document based on the W-314 Test and Evaluation Plan (TEP). Testing includes Validations and Verifications (e.g., Commercial Grade Item Dedication activities), Factory Acceptance Tests (FATs), installation tests and inspections, Construction Acceptance Tests (CATs), Acceptance Test Procedures (ATPs), Pre-Operational Test Procedures (POTPs), and Operational Test Procedures (OTPs). It should be noted that POTPs are not required for testing of the transfer line addition. The STEP will be utilized in conjunction with the TEP for verification and validation.

Hays, W.H.

1998-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

226

Growth mechanisms of carbon nanotrees with branched carbon nanofibers synthesized by plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

be interesting for future applications in nanoelectronic devices and also composite materials. hal-008807221 Growth mechanisms of carbon nanotrees with branched carbon nanofibers synthesized by plasma , Didier Pribat*, 3 1 State Key Laboratory for Advanced Metals and Materials, University of Science

Boyer, Edmond

227

Interspecific Variability of Biomass Production of Young Coffea: No Influence of Branch Pruning. Experimental Evidence and Theoretical Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Interspecific Variability of Biomass Production of Young Coffea: No Influence of Branch Pruning diversity and architectural plasticity. In this study, we investigated the biomass production and allocation treatment had no influence on biomass production and allocation for these young trees. We propose

Boyer, Edmond

228

Large deviations and martingales for a typed branching di usion, 1 Simon C Harris and David Williams  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Large deviations and martingales for a typed branching di#11;usion, 1 by Simon C Harris and David are rather complicated; and these are only sketched here { see Harris (1995) and Harris and Williams (1995 for a simpler problem in Champneys, Harris, Toland, Warren and Williams (1995); in the present context

Harris, Simon Colin

229

Internal Energy Dependence of the H + Allene/H + Propyne Product Branching from the Unimolecular Dissociation of 2-Propenyl Radicals  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Internal Energy Dependence of the H + Allene/H + Propyne Product Branching from the Unimolecular product channels as a function of internal energy in the dissociating radical isomer. The data resolve with internal energy to the two isomeric product channels: Based on energetic considerations alone, one expects

Butler, Laurie J.

230

3D branched nanowire heterojunction photoelectrodes for high-efficiency solar water splitting and H2 generation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, it is essential to find a cost-effective and clean method for mass production of hydrogen.6 Techniques for directly con- verting water to hydrogen using solar energy, known as photo- electrolysis, are receiving dimensional branched ZnO/Si heterojunction nanowire array by a two-step, wafer-scale, low-cost, solution

Wang, Deli

231

Data Summary Report for the 1997 Semiannual Tritium Survey for Fourmile Branch and the F- and H-Area Seeplines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents a summary of the definitive data validation and verification for the 1997 RFI/RI semiannual tritium survey for Fourmile Branch and the F- and H-Area Seeplines. The RFI/RI was performed under the direction of WSRC ESS/Ecology. This report was prepared under the direction EPD/EMS.

Koch, J.W. II

1998-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

232

Data Summary Report for the Semiannual Tritium Survey for Fourmile Branch and the F- and H-Area Seeplines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents a summary of the definitive data validation and verification for the Semiannual Tritium Survey for Fourmile Branch and the F- and H-Area Seeplines. The survey was performed at the request of the WSRC ERD and conducted by WSRC/ESS. This report was prepared under the direction of EPD/EMS.

Koch, J. II [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States) Exploration Resources

1996-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

233

Evolution of the dust mass loss with luminosity along the giant branch of the globular cluster 47 Tuc  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The paper investigates the properties of the dust mass loss in stars populating the giant branch of the globular cluster 47 Tuc, by combining ISOCAM and DENIS data. Raster maps of 5 fields covering areas ranging from 4 x 4 to 15 x 15 arcmin2 at different distances from the center of the cluster have been obtained with ISOCAM at 11.5 mum (LW10 filter). The covered fields include most of the red variables known in this cluster. A detection threshold of about 0.2 mJy is achieved, allowing to detect giant stars at 11.5 mum all the way down to the horizontal branch. No dust-enshrouded asymptotic giant branch stars have been found in the observed fields, contrary to the situation encountered in LMC/SMC globular clusters with larger turnoff masses. The color index [12]-[2] (based on the ISO 11.5 mum flux and on the DENIS Ks magnitude) is used as a diagnostic of dust emission (and hence dust mass loss). Its evolution with luminosity along the giant branch reveals that dust mass loss is only present in V3 (the only cluster Mira variable observed in the present study) and in V18, a star presenting intermittent variability. This conclusion confirms the importance of stellar pulsations in the dust formation and ensuing mass loss.

A. Ramdani; A. Jorissen

2001-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

234

8.4 White Dwarfs As an asymptotic giant branch star becomes larger and more luminous, the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

8.4 White Dwarfs As an asymptotic giant branch star becomes larger and more luminous, the rate is the reminant core, the white dwarf. Our knowledge of white dwarfs began in 1850 with the discovery be both hot and faint was for Sirius B to be very, very small, and so they were called white dwarf stars

Peletier, Reynier

235

Economic and Conservation Evaluation of Capital Renovation Projects: Hidalgo County Irrigation District No. 1 (Edinburg) - North Branch / East Main - Final  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

American Development Bank. The proposed project involves installing 4.83 miles of multi-size pipeline to replace a segment of the North Branch / East Main canal. Both nominal and real estimates of water and energy savings and expected economic and financial...

Rister, M. Edward; Lacewell, Ronald D.; Sturdivant, Allen W.; Robinson, John R.C.; Popp, Michael C.

236

A COST-EFFECTIVE TWO-LEVEL ADAPTIVE BRANCH PREDICTOR STEVEN, G. B., EGAN, C., SHIM, W. VINTAN, L.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

" of Sibiu Hatfield, Hertfordshire, U.K. Seoul, Korea Sibiu-2400, Romania AL10 9AB 139-743 email: G accuracy of between 80 to 95% [1]. More recently, the advent of superscalar processors has given renewed are far more costly on a superscalar processor. This renewed interest in branch prediction led

Vintan, Lucian N.

237

Development of a branch and price approach involving vertex cloning to solve the maximum weighted independent set problem  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We propose a novel branch-and-price (B&P) approach to solve the maximum weighted independent set problem (MWISP). Our approach uses clones of vertices to create edge-disjoint partitions from vertex-disjoint partitions. We solve the MWISP on sub...

Sachdeva, Sandeep

2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

238

Measurement of the Branching fraction ratio B ---> D K / B ---> D pi with the CDF II detector  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this thesis the author has described the first measurement performed at a hadron collider of the branching fraction of the Cabibbo-suppressed mode B{sup +} {yields} {bar D}{sup 0} K{sup +}. The analysis has been performed with 360 pb{sup -1} of data collected by the CDF II detector.

Squillacioti, Paola; /INFN, Pisa /Siena U.

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

A Single Transition State Serves Two Mechanisms. The Branching Ratio for CH2O-+ CH3Cl on Improved Potential Energy Surfaces  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for this reaction has been studied by ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD). The energies of transition states change of the potential energy surface around the transition state may vary the branching ratioA Single Transition State Serves Two Mechanisms. The Branching Ratio for CH2O- + CH3Cl on Improved

Schlegel, H. Bernhard

240

Applying Decay Strategies to Branch Predictors for Leakage Energy Savings Zhigang Hu y Philo Juang y Kevin Skadron z Doug Clark Margaret Martonosi y  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Applying Decay Strategies to Branch Predictors for Leakage Energy Savings Zhigang Hu y Philo Juang process, leakage energy starts to become a major concern, especially for large on­chip array structures to consider applying decay techniques, which can reduce leak­ age energy for caches, to the branch

Martonosi, Margaret

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241

Measuring the branching ratio of the rare decay pi0 --> e+ e-  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A precise branching ratio measurement of the rare decay {pi}{sup 0} {yields} e{sup +}e{sup -} has been made. The measurement was made with the rare kaon decay experiment KTeV at Fermilab where the source of {pi}{sup 0}s was K{sub L} {yields} {pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0} decaying in flight. A total of 794 fully reconstructed K{sub L} {yields} 3{pi}{sup 0} events consistent with two of the intermediate {pi}{sup 0}s decaying into {gamma}{gamma} and one into e{sup +}e{sup -} were collected. An estimated 53.2 {+-} 11.0 of these events were expected to be background. Normalizing to the {pi}{sup 0} Dalitz decay they found Br({pi}{sup 0} {yields} e{sup +}e{sup -}, (m{sub e{sup +}e{sup -}}/m{sub {pi}{sup 0}}){sup 2} > 0.95) = (6.44 {+-} 0.25(stat) {+-} 0.22(syst)) x 10{sup -8} where internal radiation, {pi}{sup 0} {yields} e{sup +}e{sup -}({gamma}), was limited by the requirement (m{sub e{sup +}e{sup -}}/m{sub {pi}{sup 0}}){sup 2} > 0.95 which separated it from the tree level Dalitz decay, {pi}{sup 0} {yields} e{sup +}e{sup -}P{gamma}.

Niclasen, Rune; /Colorado U.

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Helium enhancements in globular cluster stars from Asymptotic Giant Branch star pollution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Using a chemical evolution model we investigate the intriguing suggestion that there are populations of stars in some globular clusters (e.g. NGC 2808, omega Centauri) with enhanced levels of helium (Y from about 0.28 to 0.40) compared to the majority of the population that presumably have a primordial helium abundance. We assume that a previous generation of massive low-metallicity Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB) stars has polluted the cluster gas via a slow stellar wind. We use two independent sets of AGB yields computed from detailed models to follow the evolution of helium, carbon, nitrogen and oxygen in the cluster gas using a Salpeter initial mass function (IMF) and a number of top-heavy IMFs. In no case were we able to fit the observational constraints, Y > 0.30 and C+N+O approximately constant. Depending on the shape of the IMF and the yields, we either obtained Y approximately greater than 0.30 and large increases in C+N+O or Y < 0.30 and C+N+O approximately constant. These results suggest that either AGB stars alone are not responsible for the large helium enrichment or that any dredge-up from this generation of stars was less than predicted by standard models.

Amanda Karakas; Yeshe Fenner; Alison Sills; Simon Campbell; John Lattanzio

2006-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

243

Measurement of the branching fraction for $\\tau\\to\\eta K\  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors report on analyses of tau lepton decays {tau}{sup -} {yields} {eta}K{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}} and {tau}{sup -} {yields} {eta}{pi}{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}}, with {eta} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}, using 470 fb{sup -1} of data from the BABAR experiment at PEP-II, collected at center-of-mass energies at and near the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance. They measure the branching fraction for the {tau}{sup -} {yields} {eta}K{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}} decay mode, {Beta}({tau}{sup -} {yields} {eta}K{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}}) = (1.42 {+-} 0.11(stat) {+-} 0.07(syst)) x 10{sup -4}, and report a 95% confidence level upper limit for the second-class current process {tau}{sup -} {yields} {eta}{pi}{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}}, {Beta}({tau}{sup -} {yields} {eta}{pi}{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}}) < 9.9 x 10{sup -5}.

del Amo Sanchez, P.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Tisserand, V.; /Annecy, LAPP; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; /Barcelona U., ECM; Martinelli, M.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; /INFN, Bari /Bari U.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; /Bergen U.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D.N.; Hooberman, B.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; Osipenkov, I.L.; Tanabe, T.; /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /Indian Inst. Tech., Guwahati /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa State U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Paris U., VI-VII /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /SLAC /South Carolina U. /Southern Methodist U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tel Aviv U. /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /Valencia U. /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

2011-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

244

THE FIRST FLUORINE ABUNDANCE DETERMINATIONS IN EXTRAGALACTIC ASYMPTOTIC GIANT BRANCH CARBON STARS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fluorine ({sup 19}F) abundances (or upper limits) are derived in six extragalactic asymptotic giant branch (AGB) carbon stars from the HF(1-0) R9 line at 2.3358 {mu}m in high-resolution spectra. The stars belong to the Local Group galaxies, Large Magellanic Cloud, Small Magellanic Cloud, and Carina dwarf spheroidal, spanning more than a factor of 50 in metallicity. This is the first study to probe the behavior of F with metallicity in intrinsic extragalactic C-rich AGB stars. Fluorine could be measured only in four of the target stars, showing a wide range in F enhancements. Our F abundance measurements together with those recently derived in Galactic AGB carbon stars show a correlation with the observed carbon and s-element enhancements. The observed correlations, however, display a different dependence on the stellar metallicity with respect to theoretical predictions in low-mass, low-metallicity AGB models. We briefly discuss the possible reasons for this discrepancy. If our findings are confirmed in a larger number of metal-poor AGBs, the issue of F production in AGB stars will need to be revisited.

Abia, C.; Cristallo, S.; Dominguez, I. [Dpto. Fisica Teorica y del Cosmos, Universidad de Granada, 18071 Granada (Spain); Cunha, K.; Smith, V. V. [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, P.O. Box 26732, Tucson, AZ 85726 (United States); De Laverny, P.; Recio-Blanco, A. [University of Nice-Sophia Antipolis, CNRS (UMR 6202), Cassiopee, Observatoire de la Cote d'Azur, B.P. 4229, 06304 Nice Cedex 4 (France); Straniero, O., E-mail: cabia@ugr.es [INAF-Osservatorio di Collurania, 64100 Teramo (Italy)

2011-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

245

Field studies of streamflow generation using natural and injected tracers on Bickford and Walker Branch Watersheds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Field studies of streamflow generation were undertaken on two forested watersheds, the West Road subcatchment of Bickford Watershed in central Massachusetts and the West Fork of Walker Branch Watershed in eastern Tennessee. A major component of the research was development of a two-stage methodology for the use of naturally-occurring {sup 222}Rn as a tracer. The first of the two stages was solving a mass-balance equation for {sup 222}Rn around a stream reach of interest in order to calculate Rn{sub q}, the {sup 222}Rn content of the lateral inflow to the reach; a conservative tracer (chloride) and a volatile tracer (propane) were injected into the study stream to account for lateral inflow to, and volatilization from, the study reach. The second stage involved quantitative comparison of Rn{sub q} to the measured {sup 222}Rn concentrations of different subsurface waters in order to assess how important these waters were in contributing lateral inflow to the stream reach.

Genereux, D.; Hemond, H. (Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering); Mulholland, P. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States))

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Dynamos in Asymptotic-Giant-Branch Stars As the Origin of Magnetic Fields Shaping Planetary Nebulale  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Planetary nebulae are thought to be formed when a slow wind from the progenitor giant star is overtaken by a subsequent fast wind generated as the star enters its white dwarf stage$^{1}$. A shock forms near the boundary between the winds, which creates a relatively dense shell that provides the characteristic appearance of a planetary nebula. A spherically symmetric wind will produce a spherically symmetric shell, yet over half of known planetary nebulae are not spherical; rather, they are elliptical or bipolar in shape$^{2}$. While a magnetic field could launch and collimate a bipolar outflow, the origin of such a field has hitherto been unclear, as previous work suggested that a field could not be generated${^3}$. Here we show that an asymptotic-giant-branch (AGB) star can indeed generate a strong magnetic field, in a dynamo at the interface between a rapidly rotating core and the more slowly rotating envelope of the star. The field is strong enough to shape the bipolar outflows that produce the observed bipolar planetary nebulae. Magnetic braking of the stellar core during this process may also explain the puzzlingly$^{4}$ slow rotation of most white dwarf stars.

Eric G. Blackman; Adam Frank; J. Andrew Markiel; John H. Thomas; Hugh M. Van Horn

2001-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

247

Determination of the 242Pu Branching Ratio via Alpha-Gamma Coincidence  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

When the burn-up is high, the {sup 242}Pu isotopic content becomes more important. The traditional correlation method will fail. The {sup 242}Pu isotopic content in the sample plays an essential role if the neutron coincidence method is used to quantify the total amount of plutonium. In one of the earlier measurements we had a chance to measure an isotopic pure (> 99.95 %) {sup 242}Pu thick sample and realized that the difference in the branching ratio (BR) value among current nuclear data3) for the two important gamma-rays at 103.5-keV and 158.8-keV. In this study, the thick sample was counted on a 15% ORTEC safeguards type HPGe to further improve BR determination of the 159-keV gamma-ray. Furthermore, we have made a thin {sup 242}Pu sample from the thick sample and performed alpha-gamma coincidence measurements. Our preliminary gamma-ray BR results are 4.37(6) E-4, 2.79(8) E-5, and 2.25(8) E-6 for 44.9-keV, 103.5-keV, and 158.9-keV, respectively.

Wang, T F

2012-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

248

Population Effects on the Metallicity Distribution Function Derived From the Red Giant Branch  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have tested the reliability of the red giant branch (RGB) as a metallicity indicator accounting for observational errors as well as the complexity of star formation histories (SFHs) and chemical evolution histories observed in various stellar systems. We generate model color-magnitude diagrams (CMDs) produced with a variety of evolutionary histories and compare the resultant metallicity estimates from the colors and magnitudes of RGB stars to the true input metallicities. We include realistic models for photometric errors and completeness in our synthetic CMDs. As expected, for simple simple stellar populations dominated by old stars, the RGB provides a very accurate estimate of the modular metallicity value for a population. An error in the age of a system targeted for this type of study may produce metallicity errors of a few tenths of a dex. The size of this metallicity error depends linearly on the age error, and we find this dependence to be stronger with more precise photometry. If the population has...

Ordoez, Antonio J

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Branching fraction and charge asymmetry measurements in B{yields}J/{psi}{pi}{pi} decays  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We study the decays B{sup 0}{yields}J/{psi}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} and B{sup +}{yields}J/{psi}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup 0}, including intermediate resonances, using a sample of 382x10{sup 6} BB pairs recorded by the BABAR detector at the PEP-II e{sup +}e{sup -} B factory. We measure the branching fractions B(B{sup 0}{yields}J/{psi}{rho}{sup 0})=(2.7{+-}0.3{+-}0.2)x10{sup -5} and B(B{sup +}{yields}J/{psi}{rho}{sup +})=(5.0{+-}0.7{+-}0.3)x10{sup -5}. We also set the following upper limits at the 90% confidence level: B(B{sup 0}{yields}J/{psi}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} nonresonant)<1.2x10{sup -5}, B(B{sup 0}{yields}J/{psi}f{sub 2})<4.6x10{sup -6}, and B(B{sup +}{yields}J/{psi}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup 0} nonresonant)<7.3x10{sup -6}. We measure the charge asymmetry in charged B decays to J/{psi}{rho} to be -0.11{+-}0.12{+-}0.08.

Aubert, B.; Bona, M.; Boutigny, D.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A. [Laboratoire de Physique des Particules, IN2P3/CNRS et Universite de Savoie, F-74941 Annecy-Le-Vieux (France); Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E. [Universitat de Barcelona, Facultat de Fisica, Departament ECM, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain); Lopez, L.; Palano, A. [Universita di Bari, Dipartimento di Fisica and INFN, I-70126 Bari (Italy); Eigen, G.; Ofte, I.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L. [University of Bergen, Institute of Physics, N-5007 Bergen (Norway); Abrams, G. S.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D. N. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)] (and others)

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

New antineutrino energy spectra predictions from the summation of beta decay branches of the fission products  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper, we study the impact of the inclusion of the recently measured beta decay properties of the $^{102;104;105;106;107}$Tc, $^{105}$Mo, and $^{101}$Nb nuclei in an updated calculation of the antineutrino energy spectra of the four fissible isotopes $^{235, 238}$U, and $^{239,241}$Pu. These actinides are the main contributors to the fission processes in Pressurized Water Reactors. The beta feeding probabilities of the above-mentioned Tc, Mo and Nb isotopes have been found to play a major role in the $\\gamma$ component of the decay heat of $^{239}$Pu, solving a large part of the $\\gamma$ discrepancy in the 4 to 3000\\,s range. They have been measured using the Total Absorption Technique (TAS), avoiding the Pandemonium effect. The calculations are performed using the information available nowadays in the nuclear databases, summing all the contributions of the beta decay branches of the fission products. Our results provide a new prediction of the antineutrino energy spectra of $^{235}$U, $^{239,241}$Pu and in particular of $^{238}$U for which no measurement has been published yet. We conclude that new TAS measurements are mandatory to improve the reliability of the predicted spectra.

M. Fallot; S. Cormon; M. Estienne; A. Algora; V. M. Bui; A. Cucoanes; M. Elnimr; L. Giot; D. Jordan; J. Martino; A. Onillon; A. Porta; G. Pronost; A. Remoto; J. L. Tan; F. Yermia; A. -A. Zakari-Issoufou

2012-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

251

Overexpression of Robo2 causes defects in the recruitment of metanephric mesenchymal cells and ureteric bud branching morphogenesis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Overexpression of Robo2 caused reduced UB branching and glomerular number. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Fewer MM cells surrounding the UB after overexpression of Robo2 in vitro. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer No abnormal Epithelial Morphology of UB or apoptosis of mm cells in the kidney. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Overexpression of Robo2 affected MM cells migration and caused UB deficit. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The reduced glomerular number can also be caused by fewer MM cells. -- Abstract: Roundabout 2 (Robo2) is a member of the membrane protein receptor family. The chemorepulsive effect of Slit2-Robo2 signaling plays vital roles in nervous system development and neuron migration. Slit2-Robo2 signaling is also important for maintaining the normal morphogenesis of the kidney and urinary collecting system, especially for the branching of the ureteric bud (UB) at the proper site. Slit2 or Robo2 mouse mutants exhibit multilobular kidneys, multiple ureters, and dilatation of the ureter, renal pelvis, and collecting duct system, which lead to vesicoureteral reflux. To understand the effect of Robo2 on kidney development, we used microinjection and electroporation to overexpress GFP-Robo2 in an in vitro embryonic kidney model. Our results show reduced UB branching and decreased glomerular number after in vitro Robo2 overexpression in the embryonic kidneys. We found fewer metanephric mesenchymal (MM) cells surrounding the UB but no abnormal morphology in the branching epithelial UB. Meanwhile, no significant change in MM proliferation or apoptosis was observed. These findings indicate that Robo2 is involved in the development of embryonic kidneys and that the normal expression of Robo2 can help maintain proper UB branching and glomerular morphogenesis. Overexpression of Robo2 leads to reduced UB branching caused by fewer surrounding MM cells, but MM cell apoptosis is not involved in this effect. Our study demonstrates that overexpression of Robo2 by microinjection in embryonic kidneys is an effective approach to study the function of Robo2.

Ji, Jiayao [Institute of Nephrology, State Key Laboratory of Kidney Disease (2011DAV00088), The Chinese PLA General Hospital, Beijing 100853 (China) [Institute of Nephrology, State Key Laboratory of Kidney Disease (2011DAV00088), The Chinese PLA General Hospital, Beijing 100853 (China); Medical College of NanKai University, Tianjin (China); Li, Qinggang; Xie, Yuansheng; Zhang, Xueguang; Cui, Shaoyuan; Shi, Suozhu [Institute of Nephrology, State Key Laboratory of Kidney Disease (2011DAV00088), The Chinese PLA General Hospital, Beijing 100853 (China)] [Institute of Nephrology, State Key Laboratory of Kidney Disease (2011DAV00088), The Chinese PLA General Hospital, Beijing 100853 (China); Chen, Xiangmei, E-mail: xmchen301@126.com [Institute of Nephrology, State Key Laboratory of Kidney Disease (2011DAV00088), The Chinese PLA General Hospital, Beijing 100853 (China) [Institute of Nephrology, State Key Laboratory of Kidney Disease (2011DAV00088), The Chinese PLA General Hospital, Beijing 100853 (China); Medical College of NanKai University, Tianjin (China)

2012-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

252

Odessa fabricator builds rig specifically for geothermal drilling...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

in the nation's oil and gas fields. Now the Odessa-based company is branching out into alternative energy. The company recently delivered its first Thermal Single rig, a...

253

Model Commissioning Plan and Guide Specifications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objectives of Model Commissioning Plan and Guide Specifications are to ensure that the design team applies commissioning concepts to the design and prepares commissioning specifications and a commission plan for inclusion in the bid construction documents.

NONE

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Runtime verification of object lifetime specifications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis reports on the implementation of a runtime verification system for object lifetime specifications. This system is used to explore and evaluate the expressiveness object lifetime specifications. Object lifetime ...

Benjamin, Zev (Zev A.)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Better Buildings Alliance Equipment Performance Specifications...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Better Buildings Alliance Equipment Performance Specifications - 2013 BTO Peer Review Commercial Buildings Integration Project for the 2013 Building Technologies Office's...

256

Operational restoration of the Pen Branch bottomland hardwood and swamp wetlands - the research setting  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Savannah River Swamp is a 3020 Ha forested wetland on the floodplain of the Savannah River and is located on the Department of Energy's Savannah River Site (SRS) near Aiken, SC. Historically the swamp consisted of approximately 50 percent bald cypress-water tupelo stands, 40 percent mixed bottomland hardwood stands, and 10 percent shrub, marsh, and open water. Creek corridors were typical of Southeastern bottomland hardwood forests. The hydrology was controlled by flooding of the Savannah River and by flow from four creeks that drain into the swamp prior to flow into the Savannah River. Upstream dams have caused some alteration of the water levels and timing of flooding within the floodplain. Major impacts to the swamp hydrology occurred with the completion of the production reactors and one coal-fired powerhouse at the SRS in the early 1950's. Water was pumped from the Savannah River, through secondary heat exchangers of the reactors, and discharged into three of the tributary streams that flow into the swamp. Flow in one of the tributaries, Pen Branch, was typically 0.3 m3 s-1 (10-20) cfs prior to reactor pumping and 11.0 m3 s-1 (400 cfs) during pumping. This continued from 1954 to 1988 at various levels. The sustained increases in water volume resulted in overflow of the original stream banks and the creation of additional floodplains. Accompanying this was considerable erosion of the original stream corridor and deposition of a deep silt layer on the newly formed delta. Heated water was discharged directly into Pen Branch and water temperature in the stream often exceeded 65 degrees C. The nearly continuous flooding of the swamp, the thermal load of the water, and the heavy silting resulted in complete mortality of the original vegetation in large areas of the floodplain. In the years since pumping was reduced, early succession has begun in some affected areas. Most of this has been herbs, grasses, and shrubs. Areas that have seedlings are generally willow thickets that support a lower diversity of wildlife. No volunteer seedlings of heavy-seeded hardwoods or cypress have been found in the corridor areas. Research was conducted to determine methods to reintroduce tree species characteristic of more mature forested wetlands. Three restoration strategies were formulated to deal with the differing conditions of the Upper Corridor, the Lower Corridor, and the Delta regions of the impacted area. Site preparation and planting of each area with mixtures of tree species were carried out to speed the restoration of the ecosystem. Species composition and selection were altered based on the current and expected hydrological regimes that the reforestation areas will be experiencing. Because of the operational design of the restoration project, a research program naturally followed to document the success. Many of those efforts are detailed here.

Nelson, E.A.

2000-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

257

Electron-capture supernovae of super-asymptotic giant branch stars and the Crab supernova 1054  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An electron-capture supernova (ECSN) is a core-collapse supernova explosion of a super-asymptotic giant branch (SAGB) star with a main-sequence mass M{sub Ms} ? 7 - 9.5M{sub ?}. The explosion takes place in accordance with core bounce and subsequent neutrino heating and is a unique example successfully produced by first-principle simulations. This allows us to derive a first self-consistent multicolor light curves of a core-collapse supernova. Adopting the explosion properties derived by the first-principle simulation, i.e., the low explosion energy of 1.5 10{sup 50} erg and the small {sup 56}Ni mass of 2.5 10{sup ?3} M{sub ?}, we perform a multigroup radiation hydrodynamics calculation of ECSNe and present multicolor light curves of ECSNe of SAGB stars with various envelope mass and hydrogen abundance. We demonstrate that a shock breakout has peak luminosity of L ? 2 10{sup 44} erg s{sup ?1} and can evaporate circumstellar dust up to R ? 10{sup 17} cm for a case of carbon dust, that plateau luminosity and plateau duration of ECSNe are L ? 10{sup 42} erg s{sup ?1} and {sup t} ? 60 - 100 days, respectively, and that a plateau is followed by a tail with a luminosity drop by ? 4 mag. The ECSN shows a bright and short plateau that is as bright as typical Type II plateau supernovae, and a faint tail that might be influenced by spin-down luminosity of a newborn pulsar. Furthermore, the theoretical models are compared with ECSN candidates: SN 1054 and SN 2008S. We find that SN 1054 shares the characteristics of the ECSNe. For SN 2008S, we find that its faint plateau requires a ECSN model with a significantly low explosion energy of E ? 10{sup 48} erg.

Nomoto, Ken'ichi [Kavli Institute for Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (WPI), The University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8583 (Japan); Tominaga, Nozomu [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science and Engineering, Konan University, 8-9-1 Okamoto, Kobe, Hyogo 658-8501, Japan and Kavli Institute for Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (WPI), The University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8583 (Japan); Blinnikov, Sergei I. [Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics (ITEP), Moscow 117218, Russia and Kavli Institute for Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (WPI), The University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8583 (Japan)

2014-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

258

Analysis of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in A/M Area Crouch Branch (Cretaceous) Aquifer characterization samples: 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Samples were collected during the A/M Area Crouch Branch (Cretaceous) Aquifer Characterization (Phase I) Program. The samples were analyzed for chlorinated VOCs by the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) and MicroSeeps Ltd. All samples were sealed in the field immediately upon retrieval of the core and subsampling. A total of 113 samples locations were selected for analysis. The Environmental Sciences Section (ESS) of SRTC analyzed all locations in duplicate (226 samples). MicroSeeps Ltd was selected as the quality assurance (QA) check laboratory. MicroSeeps Ltd analyzed 40 locations with 4 duplicates (44 samples). The samples were collected from seven boreholes in A/M Area in the interval from 200 feet deep to the total depth of the boring (360 feet deep nominal); samples were collected every 10 feet within this interval. The sampling zone corresponds approximately to the Crouch Branch Aquifer in A/M Area. The overall A/M Area Crouch Branch Aquifer characterization objectives, a brief description of A/M Area geology and hydrology, and the sample locations, field notes, driller lithologic logs, and required procedural documentation are presented in WSRC (1993).

Looney, B.B.; Haselow, J.S.; Keenan, M.A.; Van Pelt, R.; Eddy-Dilek, C.A.; Rossabi, J.; Simmons, J.L.

1993-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

259

Measurements of $\\Lambda^+_c$ Branching Fractions of Cabibbo-Suppressed Decay Modes involving $\\Lambda$ and $\\Sigma^{0}$  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We measure the branching ratios of the Cabibbo-suppressed decays $\\Lambda^+_c$ $\\to$ $\\Lambda$ $K^+$ and $\\Lambda^+_c$ $\\to$ $\\Sigma^{0}$ $K^+$ %(measured with improved accuracy). relative to the Cabibbo-favored decay modes $\\Lambda^+_c$ $\\to$ $\\Lambda$ $\\pi^+$ and $\\Lambda^+_c$ $\\to$ $\\Sigma^{0}$ $\\pi^+$ to be $ 0.044 \\pm 0.004 ~(\\textnormal{stat.})~ \\pm ~0.003 \\~(\\textnormal{syst.})$ and $ 0.039~ \\pm ~0.005 ~(\\textnormal{stat.})~ \\pm \\~0.003 ~(\\textnormal{syst.})$, respectively. We set an upper limit on the branching ratio at 90 % confidence level for $\\Lambda^+_c$ $\\to$ $\\Lambda$ $K^+ \\pi^+ \\pi^-$ to be $ 4.1 \\times ~10^{-2}$ relative to $\\Lambda^+_c$ $\\to$ $\\Lambda$ $\\pi^+$ and for $\\Lambda^+_c$ $\\to$ $\\Sigma^{0}$ $K^+ \\pi^+ \\pi^-$ to be $ 2.0 \\times ~10^{-2}$ relative to $\\Lambda^+_c$ $\\to$ $\\Sigma^{0}$ $\\pi^+$. We also measure the branching fraction for the Cabibbo-favored mode $\\Lambda^+_c$ $\\to$ $\\Sigma^{0}$ $\\pi^+$ relative to $\\Lambda^+_c$ $\\to$ $\\Lambda$ $\\pi^+$ to be $0.977~ \\pm ~0.015 ~(\\textnorm...

Aubert, B; Abrams, G S; Adye, T; Ahmed, M; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Albert, J; Aleksan, Roy; Allen, M T; Allison, J; Allmendinger, T; Altenburg, D; Andreassen, R; Andreotti, M; Angelini, C; Anulli, F; Arnaud, N; Aston, D; Azzolini, V; Baak, M; Back, J J; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Band, H R; Banerjee, S; Barate, R; Bard, D J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Barrett, M; Bartoldus, R; Batignani, G; Battaglia, M; Bauer, J M; Beck, T W; Behera, P K; Bellini, F; Benayoun, M; Benelli, G; Berger, N; Bernard, D; Berryhill, J W; Best, D; Bettarini, S; Bettoni, D; Bevan, A J; Bhimji, W; Bhuyan, B; Bianchi, F; Biasini, M; Biesiada, J; Blanc, F; Blaylock, G; Blinov, A E; Blinov, V E; Bloom, P C; Blount, N L; Bomben, M; Bondioli, M; Bonneaud, G R; Bosisio, L; Boutigny, D; Bowerman, D A; Boyarski, A M; Boyd, J T; Bozzi, C; Brandenburg, G; Brandt, T; Brau, J E; Breon, A B; Brose, J; Brown, C L; Brown, C M; Brown, D N; Bruinsma, M; Brunet, S; Bucci, F; Buchanan, C; Buchmller, O L; Bugg, W; Bukin, A D; Bula, R; Bulten, H; Burchat, P R; Burke, J P; Button-Shafer, J; Buzzo, A; Bna, M; Cahn, R N; Calabrese, R; Calcaterra, A; Calderini, G; Campagnari, C; Capra, R; Carpinelli, M; Cartaro, C; Cavallo, N; Cavoto, G; Cenci, R; Chai, X; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Chao, M; Charles, E; Charles, M J; Chauveau, J; Chavez, C A; Chen, A; Chen, C; Chen, E; Chen, J C; Chen, S; Chen, X; Cheng, B; Cheng, C H; Chia, Y M; Cibinetto, G; Clark, P J; Claus, R; Cochran, J; Coleman, J P; Contri, R; Convery, M R; Cossutti, F; Cottingham, W N; Couderc, F; Covarelli, R; Cowan, G; Cowan, R; Crawley, H B; Cremaldi, L; Cristinziani, M; Cunha, A; Curry, S; Ct, D; D'Orazio, A; Dahmes, B; Dallapiccola, C; Danielson, N; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Dauncey, P D; David, P; Davier, M; Davis, C L; Day, C T; De Groot, N; De Nardo, Gallieno; De Sangro, R; Del Buono, L; Del Re, D; Della Ricca, G; Di Lodovico, F; Di Marco, E; Dickopp, M; Dingfelder, J C; Dittongo, S; Dong, D; Dong, L; Dorfan, J; Druzhinin, V P; Dubitzky, R S; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W M; Dvoretskii, A; Eckhart, E A; Eckmann, R; Edgar, C L; Edwards, A J; Egede, U; Eichenbaum, A M; Eigen, G; Eisner, A M; Elmer, P; Emery, S; Ernst, J A; Eschenburg, V; Eschrich, I; Eyges, V; Fabozzi, F; Faccini, R; Fan, S; Feltresi, E; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Field, R C; Finocchiaro, G; Flacco, C J; Flack, R L; Flcher, H U; Flood, K T; Ford, K E; Ford, W T; Forster, I J; Forti, F; Fortin, D; Foulkes, S D; Franek, B; Frey, R; Fritsch, M; Fry, J R; Fulsom, B G; Gabathuler, E; Gaidot, A; Gaillard, J R; Galeazzi, F; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Gamet, R; Gan, K K; Ganzhur, S F; Gary, J W; Gaspero, M; Gatto, C; George, K A; Gill, M S; Giorgi, M A; Giroux, X; Gladney, L; Glanzman, T; Godang, R; Goetzen, K; Golubev, V B; Gopal, G P; Gowdy, S J; Gradl, W; Graham, M T; Grancagnolo, S; Graugs-Pous, E; Graziani, G; Green, M G; Grenier, P; Gritsan, A V; Grosdidier, G; Groysman, Y; Guo, Q H; Hadavand, H K; Hadig, T; Haire, M; Halyo, V; Hamano, K; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Hamon, O; Harrison, P F; Harrison, T J; Hart, A J; Hartfiel, B L; Hast, C; Hauke, A; Hawkes, C M; Hearty, C; Held, T; Hertzbach, S S; Heusch, C A; Hill, E J; Hirschauer, J F; Hitlin, D G; Hodgkinson, M C; Hollar, J J; Hong, T M; Honscheid, K; Hopkins, D A; Hrynva, T; Hufnagel, D; Hulsbergen, W D; Hutchcroft, D E; Hcker, A; Igonkina, O; Innes, W R; Izen, J M; Jackson, P D; Jackson, P S; Jacobsen, R G; Jawahery, A; Jessop, C P; John, M J J; Johnson, J R; Judd, D; Kadel, R W; Kadyk, J; Kagan, H; Karyotakis, Yu; Kass, R; Kelly, M P; Kelsey, M H; Kerth, L T; Khan, A; Kim, H; Kim, P; Kirkby, D; Kitayama, I; Klose, V; Knecht, N S; Koch, H; Kocian, M L; Koeneke, K; Kofler, R; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kovalskyi, D; Kowalewski, R V; Kozanecki, Witold; Kravchenko, E A; Kreisel, A; Krishnamurthy, M; Kroeger, R; Kroseberg, J; Kukartsev, G; Kutter, P E; Kyberd, P; La Vaissire, C de; Lacker, H M; Lae, C K; Lafferty, G D; Lanceri, L; Lange, D J; Langenegger, U; Lankford, A J; Latham, T E; Latour, E; Lau, Y P; Lazzaro, A; Le Diberder, F R; Lees, J P; Legendre, M; Leith, D W G S; Lepeltier, V; Leruste, P; Lewandowski, B; Li Gioi, L; Li, H; Li, X; Libby, J; Lista, L; Liu, R; Lo Vetere, M; LoSecco, J M; Lockman, W S; Lombardo, V; London, G W; Long, O; Lou, X C; Lu, M; Luitz, S; Lund, P; Luppi, E; Lusiani, A; Lutz, A M; Lynch, G; Lynch, H L; L, C; Lth, V; MacFarlane, D B; Macri, M M; Mader, W F; Majewski, S A; Malcles, J; Mallik, U; Mancinelli, G; Mandelkern, M A; Marchiori, G; Margoni, M; Marks, J; Marsiske, H; Martnez-Vidal, F; Mattison, T S; Mayer, B; Mazur, M A; Mazzoni, M A; McKenna, J A; McMahon, T R; Meadows, B T; Mellado, B; Menges, W; Messner, R; Meyer, W T; Mihlyi, A; Minamora, J S; Mir, L M; Mohanty, G B; Mohapatra, A K; Mommsen, R K; Monge, M R; Monorchio, D; Moore, T B; Morandin, M; Morgan, S E; Morganti, M; Morganti, S; Morii, M; Muheim, F

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Ergonomic Chair Specifications These specifications are intended to address most employees. Employees that have  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ergonomic Chair Specifications These specifications are intended to address most employees should consult Environmental Health & Safety if they require a special ergonomic chair. a. Any chair must

de Lijser, Peter

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "branch 202-586-1114 specific" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

A branch, price, and cut approach to solving the maximum weighted independent set problem  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

&P) approaches to solve MWISP exactly. B&P is a useful integer-programming tool for solving NP-hard optimization problems. Specifically, I look at vertex- and edge-disjoint decompositions of the underlying graph. MWISPâ??s on the resulting subgraphs are less...

Warrier, Deepak

2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

262

Dartmouth Stellar Evolution Database and the ACS Survey of Galactic Globular Clusters II. Stellar Evolution Tracks, Isochrones, Luminosity Functions, and Synthetic Horizontal-Branch Models  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

Web tools are also available at the home page (http://stellar.dartmouth.edu/~models/index.html). These tools allow users to create isochrones and convert them to luminosity functions or create synthetic horizontal branch models.

Dotter, A; Chaboyer, B; Jevremovic, D; Kostov, V; Baron, E; Ferguson, J; Sarajedini, A; Anderson, J

263

Specification No. 203-HJT-9000R0 Procurement Specification for a Pump  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Specification No. 203-HJT-9000R0 Procurement Specification for a Pump System for the High Power Mercury- Jet Target Experiment August 2005 #12;Draft Specification for Syringe Pump System High Power Mercury Target Experiment 203-HJT-9000R0 8/10/05 Draft Draftii SPECIFICATION FOR A PUMP SYSTEM

McDonald, Kirk

264

Specification No. 203-HJT-9000R09000R1a Specification for a Pump System for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Specification No. 203-HJT-9000R09000R1a Specification for a Pump System for the High Power Mercury-Jet Target Experiment August 24Nov 1, 2005 #12;Specification for Syringe Pump System High Power Mercury Target Experiment 203-HJT-9000R09000R1a ii SPECIFICATION FOR A PUMP SYSTEM FOR THE HIGH POWER MERCURY

McDonald, Kirk

265

Methods for chromosome-specific staining  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Methods and compositions for chromosome-specific staining are provided. Compositions comprise heterogeneous mixtures of labeled nucleic acid fragments having substantially complementary base sequences to unique sequence regions of the chromosomal DNA for which their associated staining reagent is specific. Methods include ways for making the chromosome-specific staining compositions of the invention, and methods for applying the staining compositions to chromosomes. 3 figs.

Gray, J.W.; Pinkel, D.

1995-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

266

Renewable Energy Specifications, Testing and Certification Terms...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Terms of Reference Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Renewable Energy Specifications, Testing and Certification Terms of Reference Agency...

267

Static Consistency Checking for Distributed Specifications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Static Consistency Checking for Distributed Specifications Christian Nentwich, Wolfgang Emmerich, UK {c.nentwich,w.emmerich,a.finkelstein}@cs.ucl.ac.uk Abstract Software engineers building a complex

Finkelstein, Anthony

268

Model Specification for LED Roadway Luminaires Webcast  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This November 15, 2011 webcast presented information about the Model Specification for LED Roadway Luminaires developed by DOE's Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium. During the webcast...

269

Municipal Consortium Releases Updated Model Specification for...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

to reflect changes in technologies and associated standards, and to incorporate feedback from users, the model specification enables cities, utilities, and other local...

270

Electronic quantum effects mapped onto non-Born-Oppenheimer nuclear paths: Nonclassical surmounting over potential barriers and trapping above the transition states due to nonadiabatic path-branching  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We develop the path-branching representation for nonadiabatic electron wavepacket dynamics [T. Yonehara and K. Takatsuka, J. Chem. Phys. 132, 244102 (2010)] so as to treat dynamics in an energy range comparable to the barrier height of adiabatic potential energy curves. With this representation two characteristic chemical reaction dynamics are studied, in which an incident nuclear wavepacket encounters a potential barrier, on top of which lies another nonadiabatically coupled adiabatic potential curve: (1) Dynamics of initial paths coming into the nonadiabatic interaction region with energy lower than the barrier height. They branch into two pieces (and repeat branching subsequently), the upper counterparts of which can penetrate into a classically inaccessible high energy region and eventually branch back to the product region on the ground state curve. This is so to say surmounting the potential barrier via nonadiabatically coupled excited state, and phenomenologically looks like the so-called deep tunneling. (2) Dynamics of classical paths whose initial energies are a little higher than the barrier but may be lower than the bottom of the excited state. They can undergo branching and some of those components are trapped on top of the potential barrier, being followed by the population decay down to the lower state flowing both to product and reactant sites. Such expectations arising from the path-branching representation are numerically confirmed with full quantum mechanical wavepacket dynamics. This phenomenon may be experimentally observed as time-delayed pulses of wavepacket trains.

Yamamoto, Kentaro, E-mail: kyamamoto@mns2.c.u-tokyo.ac.jp; Takatsuka, Kazuo, E-mail: kaztak@mns2.c.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Department of Basic Science, The University of Tokyo, Komaba, 153-8902 Tokyo (Japan)] [Department of Basic Science, The University of Tokyo, Komaba, 153-8902 Tokyo (Japan)

2014-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

271

Summary of beryllium specifications, current and historical  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes beryllium properties included in producer, Department of Energy, and government specifications. The specifications are divided into two major categories: current and historical. Within each category the data are arranged primarily according to increasing purity and secondarily by increasing tensile properties. Qualitative comments on formability and weldability are included. Also, short summaries of powder production and consolidation techniques are provided.

Abeln, S.P.; Kyed, P.

1990-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

272

Working Copy Specification E-I-474  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Working Copy Specification E-I-474 Revision Number 0 Revision Date 07/30/07 ECO Number 11818.7 Packaging and Shipping . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 3.8 Final #12;Working Copy E-I-474, Rev. 0 SPECIFICATION E-X-XXX RECORD OF REVISION ECO/REV NUMBER DATE PAGES

273

Improvements to Technical Specifications surveillance requirements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In August 1983 an NRC task group was formed to investigate problems with surveillance testing required by Technical Specifications, and to recommend approaches to effect improvements. NUREG-1024 ( Technical Specifications-Enhancing Safety Impact'') resulted, and it contained recommendations to review the basis for test frequencies; to ensure that the tests promote safety and do not degrade equipment; and to review surveillance tests so that they do not unnecessarily burden personnel. The Technical Specifications Improvement Program (TSIP) was established in December 1984 to provide the framework for rewriting and improving the Technical Specifications. As an element of the TSIP, all Technical Specifications surveillance requirements were comprehensively examined as recommended in NUREG-1024. The results of that effort are presented in this report. The study found that while some testing at power is essential to verify equipment and system operability, safety can be improved, equipment degradation decreased, and unnecessary personnel burden relaxed by reducing the amount of testing at power.

Lobel, R.; Tjader, T.R.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

A Measurement of the B ---> Eta/C K Branching Fraction Using the BaBar Detector  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The branching fraction is measured for the decay channels B{sup 0} {yields} {eta}{sub c}K{sub S}{sup 0} and B{sup +} {yields} {eta}{sub c}K{sup +} where {eta}{sub c} {yields} K{bar K}{pi}, using the BABAR detector. The {eta}{sub c} {yields} K{sub S}{sup 0}K{sup +}{pi}{sup -} and {eta}{sub c} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup -}{pi}{sup 0} decay channels are used, including non-resonant decays and possibly those through intermediate resonances.

Jackson, Frank; /Manchester U.

2006-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

275

FUNDAMENTAL PARAMETERS, INTEGRATED RED GIANT BRANCH MASS LOSS, AND DUST PRODUCTION IN THE GALACTIC GLOBULAR CLUSTER 47 TUCANAE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fundamental parameters and time evolution of mass loss are investigated for post-main-sequence stars in the Galactic globular cluster 47 Tucanae (NGC 104). This is accomplished by fitting spectral energy distributions (SEDs) to existing optical and infrared photometry and spectroscopy, to produce a true Hertzsprung-Russell diagram. We confirm the cluster's distance as d = 4611{sup +213}{sub -200} pc and age as 12 {+-} 1 Gyr. Horizontal branch models appear to confirm that no more red giant branch mass loss occurs in 47 Tuc than in the more metal-poor {omega} Centauri, though difficulties arise due to inconsistencies between the models. Using our SEDs, we identify those stars that exhibit infrared excess, finding excess only among the brightest giants: dusty mass loss begins at a luminosity of {approx}1000 L{sub sun}, becoming ubiquitous above L = 2000 L{sub sun}. Recent claims of dust production around lower-luminosity giants cannot be reproduced, despite using the same archival Spitzer imagery.

McDonald, I.; Zijlstra, A. A. [Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, Alan Turing Building, Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Boyer, M. L.; Gordon, K.; Meixner, M.; Sewilo, M.; Shiao, B.; Whitney, B. [STScI, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Van Loon, J. Th. [Lennard-Jones Laboratories, Keele University, ST5 5BG (United Kingdom); Hora, J. L.; Robitaille, T. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, MS 65, Cambridge, MA 02138-1516 (United States); Babler, B.; Meade, M. [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin, Madison, 475 North Charter Street, Madison, WI 53706-1582 (United States); Block, M.; Misselt, K., E-mail: iain.mcdonald-2@manchester.ac.uk [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tuscon, AZ 85721 (United States)

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Hausdorff and packing spectra, large deviations, and free energy for branching random walks in $\\R^d$  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Consider an $\\R^d$-valued branching random walk (BRW) on a supercritical Galton Watson tree. Without any assumption on the distribution of this BRW we compute, almost surely and simultaneously, the Hausdorff and packing dimensions of the level sets $E(K)$ of infinite branches in the boundary of the tree (endowed with its standard metric) along which the averages of the BRW have a given closed connected set of limit points $K$. This goes beyond multifractal analysis, which only considers those level sets when $K$ ranges in the set of singletons $\\{\\alpha\\}$, $\\alpha\\in\\R^d$. We also give a $0$-$\\infty$ law for the Hausdorff and packing measures of the level sets $E(\\{\\alpha\\})$, and compute the free energy of the associated logarithmically correlated random energy model in full generality. Moreover, our results complete the previous works on multifractal analysis by including the levels $\\alpha$ which do not belong to the range of the gradient of the free energy. This covers in particular a situation until now badly understood, namely the case where a first order phase transition occurs. As a consequence of our study, we can also describe the whole singularity spectrum of Mandelbrot measures, as well as the associated free energy function (or $L^q$-spectrum), when a first order phase transition occurs.

Najmeddine Attia; Julien Barral

2014-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

277

Measurements of Branching Fractions and CP Asymmetries and Studies of Angular Distributions for B to phi phi K Decays  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present branching fraction and CP asymmetry measurements as well as angular studies of B {yields} {phi}{phi}K decays using 464 x 10{sup 6} B{bar B} events collected by the BABAR experiment. The branching fractions are measured in the {phi}{phi} invariant mass range below the {eta}{sub c} resonance (m{sub {phi}{phi}} < 2.85 GeV). We find {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} {phi}{phi}K{sup +}) = (5.6 {+-} 0.5 {+-} 0.3) x 10{sup -6} and {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {phi}{phi}K{sup 0}) = (4.5 {+-} 0.8 {+-} 0.3) x 10{sup -6}, where the first uncertaintiy is statistical and the second systematic. The measured direct CP asymmetries for the B{sup {+-}} decays are A{sub CP} = -0.10 {+-} 0.08 {+-} 0.02 below the {eta}{sub c} threshold (m{sub {phi}{phi}} < 2.85 GeV) and A{sub CP} = 0.09 {+-} 0.10 {+-} 0.02 in the {eta}{sub c} resonance region (m{sub {phi}{phi}} in [2.94,3.02] GeV). Angular distributions are consistent with J{sub P} = 0{sup -} in the {eta}{sub c} resonance region and favor J{sup P} = 0{sup +} below the {eta}{sub c} resonance.

Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Tisserand, V.; /Annecy, LAPP; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; /Barcelona U., ECM; Martinelli, M.; /INFN, Bari /Bari U.; Milanes, D.A.; /INFN, Bari; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; /INFN, Bari /Bari U.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; /Bergen U.; Brown, D.N.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; /UC, Berkeley; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; /Ruhr U., Bochum; Asgeirsson, D.J.; Hearty, C.; /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Indian Inst. Tech., Guwahati /Harvard U. /Harvey Mudd Coll. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa State U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Paris U., VI-VII /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /SLAC /South Carolina U. /Southern Methodist U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tel Aviv U. /Tennessee U. /Texas Nuclear Corp., Austin /Texas U., Dallas /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /Valencia U. /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

278

Measurements of branching fractions for inclusive K0~/K0 and K*(892)+- decays of neutral and charged D mesons  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Using the data sample of about 33 pb-1 collected at and around 3.773 GeV with the BES-II detector at the BEPC collider, we have studied inclusive K0~/K0 and K*(892)+- decays of D0 and D+ mesons. The branching fractions for the inclusive K0~/K0 and K*(892)- decays are measured to be BF(D0 to K0~/K0 X)=(47.6+-4.8+-3.0)%, BF(D+ to K0~/K0 X)=(60.5+-5.5+-3.3)%, BF(D0 to K*- X)=(15.3+- 8.3+- 1.9)% and BF(D+ to K*- X)=(5.7+- 5.2+- 0.7)%. The upper limits of the branching fractions for the inclusive K*(892)+ decays are set to be BF(D0 to K*+ X)<3.6% and BF(D+ to K*+ X) <20.3% at 90% confidence level.

M. Ablikim

2006-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

279

Branching ratios for the decays of {psi}(3770) and Y(10580) mesons to a pair of light hadrons  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The branching ratios for the exclusive decays of the heavy quarkonia {psi}(3770) and Y(10580) to a pair of light mesons [{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}, KK-bar, {rho}({omega}){pi}, {rho}({omega}){eta}, {rho}({omega}){eta}', K{sup *}K-bar+c.c, {rho}{sup +}{rho}{sup -}, and K{sup *}K-bar{sup *}] and the branching ratios for the decays {psi}(3770) {sup {yields}} J/{psi} + P(P = {pi}{sup 0}, {eta}) and Y(10580) {sup {yields}} Y(1S) + P(P = {pi}{sup 0},{eta},{eta}'), which involve a heavy quarkonium in the final state, are calculated with allowance for new data on the width of the D*{sup {+-}}(2010) meson and the mass differences between the charged and neutral beauty mesons (B{sup {+-}}, on one hand, and B{sup 0} and B-bar{sup 0}, on the other hand). The calculations are based on the model where the Okubo-Zweig-Iizuka rule is dynamically violated owing to the intermediate state DD-bar(BB-bar) in the case of the {psi}(3770) [Y(10580)] meson. The inclusive annihilation of {psi}(3770) and Y(10580) mesons to light hadrons is discussed.

Achasov, N. N., E-mail: achasov@math.nsc.ru; Kozhevnikov, A. A. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Sobolev Institute of Mathematics, Siberian Division (Russian Federation)], E-mail: kozhev@math.nsc.ru

2006-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

280

Measurement of Branching Fractions of B0 Decays to K1(1270)+ pi- and K1(1400)+ pi-  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present a measurement of the branching fraction of neutral B meson decaying to final states containing a K1 meson, i.e. K{sub 1}(1270) and K{sub 1}(1400), and a charged pion. The data, collected with the BABAR detector at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, represent 454 million B{bar B} pairs produced in e{sup +}e{sup -} annihilation. We measure the branching fraction {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} K{sub 1}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}) = (31.0 {+-} 2.7 {+-} 6.9) x 10{sup -6}, where the first error quoted is statistical and the second is systematic. In the framework of the K-matrix formalism used to describe these decays, we also set limits on the ratio of the production constants for the K{sub 1}(1270){sup +} and K{sub 1}(1400){sup +} mesons in B{sup 0} decays.

Aubert, Bernard; Bona, M.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; /Annecy, LAPP; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; /Barcelona U., ECM; Lopez, L.; Palano, Antimo; Pappagallo, M.; /Bari U. /INFN, Bari; Eigen, G.; Stugu, Bjarne; Sun, L.; /Bergen U.; Abrams, G.S.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D.N.; Cahn, Robert N.; Jacobsen, R.G.; /LBL, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /Bristol U. /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /Consorzio Milano Ricerche /INFN, Milan /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /Napoli Seconda U. /INFN, Naples /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /Perugia U. /INFN, Perugia /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /Banca di Roma /Frascati /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /South Carolina U. /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /Turin U. /INFN, Turin /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Valencia U., IFIC /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

2008-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "branch 202-586-1114 specific" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

ATLAS Binary Readout IC (ABC) Specification V5.01 21Jul1999 Project Specification  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ATLAS Binary Readout IC (ABC) Specification V5.01 21­Jul­1999 Project Specification Project Name: ATLAS ATLAS Binary Readout IC (ABC) Specification V5.01 21­Jul­1999 Table of Contents 1. SCOPE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 1.1. ATLAS BINARY FRONT END READOUT ARCHITECTURE

California at Santa Cruz, University of

282

ATLAS Binary Readout IC (ABC) Specification V5.01 21-Jul-1999 Project Specification  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Page 1 ATLAS Binary Readout IC (ABC) Specification V5.01 21-Jul-1999 Project Specification Project Name: ATLAS Binary Chip (ABC) Version: 5.01 Revision History Revision Change Description, Pages Revised and formatting. M. French 21-Jul-99 #12;Page 2 ATLAS Binary Readout IC (ABC) Specification V5.01 21-Jul-1999

California at Santa Cruz, University of

283

Technical requirements specification for tank waste retrieval  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document provides the technical requirements specification for the retrieval of waste from the underground storage tanks at the Hanford Site. All activities covered by this scope are conducted in support of the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) mission.

Lamberd, D.L.

1996-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

284

UPC Language Specifications V1.2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

UPC is an explicitly parallel extension to the ISO C 99Standard. UPC follows the partitioned global address space programming model. This document is the formal specification for the UPC language syntax and semantics.

UPC Consortium

2005-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

285

Double Shell Tank (DST) Utilities Specification  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This specification establishes the performance requirements and provides the references to the requisite codes and standards to he applied during the design of the Double-Shell Tank (DST) Utilities Subsystems that support the first phase of waste feed delivery (WFD). The DST Utilities Subsystems provide electrical power, raw/potable water, and service/instrument air to the equipment and structures used to transfer low-activity waste (LAW) and high-level waste (HLW) to designated DST staging tanks. The DST Utilities Subsystems also support the equipment and structures used to deliver blended LAW and HLW feed from these staging tanks to the River Protection Project (RPP) Privatization Contractor facility where the waste will be immobilized. This specification is intended to be the basis for new projects/installations. This specification is not intended to retroactively affect previously established project design criteria without specific direction by the program.

SUSIENE, W.T.

2000-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

286

Stepwise Development from Ideal Specifications Graeme Smith  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Stepwise Development from Ideal Specifications Graeme Smith Software Verification Research Centre University of Queensland, Australia smith@svrc.uq.edu.au Abstract The stepwise development of a program using

Smith, Graeme

287

BRASIL Language Specification March 9, 2010  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BRASIL Language Specification March 9, 2010 #12;Contents 1 Introduction 3 2 Getting Started: Simulations in BRASIL 4 2.1 The State-Effect Design Pattern . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 2.2 Supporting the State-Effect Pattern in BRASIL

288

Site-specific strategies for cotton management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SITE-SPECIFIC STRATEGIES FOR COTTON MANAGEMENT A Thesis by MARCELO DE CASTRO CHAVES STABILE Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE May 2005 Major Subject: Agronomy SITE-SPECIFIC STRATEGIES FOR COTTON MANAGEMENT A Thesis by MARCELO DE CASTRO CHAVES STABILE Submitted to Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree...

Stabile, Marcelo de Castro Chaves

2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

289

Specific Heat of Disordered 3He  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Porous aerogel is a source of elastic scattering in superfluid 3He and modifies the properties of the superfluid, suppressing the transition temperature and order parameter. The specific heat jumps for the B-phase of superfluid 3He in aerogel have been measured as a function of pressure and interpreted using the homogeneous and inhomogeneous isotropic scattering models. The specific heat jumps for others p-wave states are estimated for comparison.

Choi, H.; Davis, J. P.; Pollanen, J.; Halperin, W. P. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States); Mulders, N. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716 (United States)

2006-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

290

Building America Climate-Specific Guidance | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Building America Building America Climate-Specific Guidance Building America Climate-Specific Guidance Building America Climate-Specific Guidance 2014 Housing Innovation...

291

Indoor airPLUS Construction Specifications Version 1 (Rev. 02...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Specifications Version 1 (Rev. 02) Indoor airPLUS Construction Specifications Version 1 (Rev. 02) Indoor airPLUS Construction Specifications Version 1 (Rev. 02), November 2013,...

292

THE INSIDIOUS BOOSTING OF THERMALLY PULSING ASYMPTOTIC GIANT BRANCH STARS IN INTERMEDIATE-AGE MAGELLANIC CLOUD CLUSTERS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the recent controversy about the role of thermally pulsing asymptotic giant branch (TP-AGB) stars in evolutionary population synthesis (EPS) models of galaxies, one particular aspect is puzzling: TP-AGB models aimed at reproducing the lifetimes and integrated fluxes of the TP-AGB phase in Magellanic Cloud (MC) clusters, when incorporated into EPS models, are found to overestimate, to various extents, the TP-AGB contribution in resolved star counts and integrated spectra of galaxies. In this paper, we call attention to a particular evolutionary aspect, linked to the physics of stellar interiors, that in all probability is the main cause of this conundrum. As soon as stellar populations intercept the ages at which red giant branch stars first appear, a sudden and abrupt change in the lifetime of the core He-burning phase causes a temporary 'boost' in the production rate of subsequent evolutionary phases, including the TP-AGB. For a timespan of about 0.1 Gyr, triple TP-AGB branches develop at slightly different initial masses, causing their frequency and contribution to the integrated luminosity of the stellar population to increase by a factor of ?2. The boost occurs for turn-off masses of ?1.75 M{sub ?}, just in the proximity of the expected peak in the TP-AGB lifetimes (for MC metallicities), and for ages of ?1.6 Gyr. Coincidently, this relatively narrow age interval happens to contain the few very massive MC clusters that host most of the TP-AGB stars used to constrain stellar evolution and EPS models. This concomitance makes the AGB-boosting particularly insidious in the context of present EPS models. As we discuss in this paper, the identification of this evolutionary effect brings about three main consequences. First, we claim that present estimates of the TP-AGB contribution to the integrated light of galaxies derived from MC clusters are biased toward too large values. Second, the relative TP-AGB contribution of single-burst populations falling in this critical age range cannot be accurately derived by approximations such as the fuel consumption theorem, which ignore, by construction, the above evolutionary effect. Third, a careful revision of AGB star populations in intermediate-age MC clusters is urgently demanded, promisingly with the aid of detailed sets of stellar isochrones.

Girardi, Lo [Osservatorio Astronomico di Padova-INAF, Vicolo dell'Osservatorio 5, I-35122 Padova (Italy); Marigo, Paola [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia Galileo Galilei, Universit di Padova, Vicolo dell'Osservatorio 3, I-35122 Padova (Italy); Bressan, Alessandro [SISSA, via Bonomea 365, I-34136 Trieste (Italy); Rosenfield, Philip [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Box 351580, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States)

2013-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

293

Remedial investigation report on Chestnut Ridge Operable Unit 2 (filled coal ash pond/Upper McCoy Branch) at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 2: Appendixes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report comprises appendices A--J which support the Y-12 Plant`s remedial action report involving Chestnut Ridge Operable Unit 2 (filled coal ash pond/Upper McCoy Branch). The appendices cover the following: Sampling fish from McCoy Branch; well and piezometer logs; ecological effects of contaminants in McCoy Branch 1989-1990; heavy metal bioaccumulation data; microbes in polluted sediments; and baseline human health risk assessment data.

Not Available

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

AWS breaks new ground with soldering specification.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Joining technologies continue to advance with new materials, process innovations, and inspection techniques. An increasing number of high-valued, high-reliability applications -- from boilers and ship hulls to rocket motors and medical devices -- have required the development of industry standards and specifications in order to ensure that the best design and manufacturing practices are being used to produce safe, durable products and assemblies. Standards writing has always had an important role at the American Welding Society (AWS). The AWS standards and specifications cover such topics as filler materials, joining processes, inspection techniques, and qualification methods that are used in welding and brazing technologies. These AWS standards and specifications, all of which are approved by the American National Standards Institute (ANSI), have also provided the basis for many similar documents used in Europe and in Pacific Rim countries.

Vianco, Paul Thomas

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project Product Specification  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The process for removal of Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) from the K Basins has been divided into major sub-systems. The Fuel Retrieval System (FRS) removes fuel from the existing storage canisters, cleans it, and places it into baskets. The multi-canister overpack (MCO) loading system places the baskets into an MCO that has been pre-loaded in a cask. The cask, containing a loaded MCO, is then transferred to the Cold Vacuum Drying (CVD) Facility. After drying at the CVD Facility, the cask, and MCO, are transferred to the Canister Storage Building (CSB), where the MCO is removed from the cask, staged, inspected, sealed (by welding), and stored until a suitable permanent disposal option is implemented. The purpose of this document is to specify the process related characteristics of an MCO at the interface between major process systems. The characteristics are derived from the primary technical documents that form the basis for safety analysis and design calculations. This document translates the calculation assumptions into implementation requirements and describes the method of verifying that the requirement is achieved. These requirements are used to define validation test requirements and describe requirements that influence multiple sub-project safety analysis reports. This product specification establishes limits and controls for each significant process parameter at interfaces between major sub-systems that potentially affect the overall safety and/or quality of the SNF packaged for processing, transport, and interim dry storage. The product specifications in this document cover the SNF packaged in MCOs to be transported throughout the SNF Project. The description of the product specifications are organized in the document as follows: Section 2.0--Summary listing of product specifications at each major sub-system interface. Section 3.0--Summary description providing guidance as to how specifications are complied with by equipment design or processing within a major sub-system. Section 4.0--Specific technical basis description for each product specification. The scope of this product specification does not include data collection requirements to support accountability or environmental compliance activities.

PAJUNEN, A.L.

2000-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

296

Engineered waste-package-system design specification  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the waste package performance requirements and geologic and waste form data bases used in developing the conceptual designs for waste packages for salt, tuff, and basalt geologies. The data base reflects the latest geotechnical information on the geologic media of interest. The parameters or characteristics specified primarily cover spent fuel, defense high-level waste, and commercial high-level waste forms. The specification documents the direction taken during the conceptual design activity. A separate design specification will be developed prior to the start of the preliminary design activity.

Not Available

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Laser-induced multiphoton dissociation branching ratios for H{sub 2}{sup +} and D{sub 2}{sup +}  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The multiphoton dissociation branching ratios for H{sub 2}{sup +} and D{sub 2}{sup +} as a function of laser peak intensity and pulse length are investigated by solving the time-dependent Schroedinger equation in the Born-Oppenheimer approximation, neglecting nuclear rotation. An 800 nm laser pulse with peak intensities from 8x10{sup 9} W/cm{sup 2} to 10{sup 14} W/cm{sup 2} and pulse lengths from 5 to 7.5 fs is used. We also investigate the viability of identifying zero-, one-, two-, and three-photon processes based only on the nuclear kinetic energy release spectrum, and check these identifications with a rigorous Floquet-like method.

Hua, J. J.; Esry, B. D. [J. R. Macdonald Laboratory, Department of Physics, Kansas State University, Manhattan, Kansas 66506 (United States)

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

298

Measurement of the B -> Omega l Nu and B -> Eta l Nu Branching Fractions Using Neutrino Reconstruction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors present a study of the charmless semileptonic B-meson decays B{sup +} {yields} {omega}{ell}{sup +}{nu} and B{sup +} {yields} {eta}{ell}{sup +}{nu}. The analysis is based on 383 million B{bar B} pairs recorded at the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance with the BABAR detector. The {omega} mesons are reconstructed in the channel {omega} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0} and the {eta} mesons in the channels {eta} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0} and {eta} {yields} {gamma}{gamma}. They measure the branching fractions {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} {omega}{ell}{sup +}{nu}) = (1.14 {+-} 0.16{sub stat} {+-} 0.08{sub syst}) x 10{sup -4} and {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} {eta}{ell}{sup +}{nu}) = (0.31 {+-} 0.06{sub stat} {+-} 0.08{sub syst}) x 10{sup -4}.

Aubert, Bernard; Bona, M.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, Vincent; /Annecy, LAPP; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; /Barcelona U., ECM; Lopez, L.; Palano, Antimo; Pappagallo, M.; /Bari U. /INFN, Bari; Eigen, G.; Stugu, Bjarne; Sun, L.; /Bergen U.; Abrams, G.S.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D.N.; Cahn, Robert N.; Jacobsen, R.G.; /LBL, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /Bristol U. /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U., Comp. Sci. Dept. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /Consorzio Milano Ricerche /INFN, Milan /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /Napoli Seconda U. /INFN, Naples /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /Perugia U. /INFN, Perugia /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /Banca di Roma /Frascati /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /South Carolina U. /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /Turin U. /INFN, Turin /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Valencia U., IFIC /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

2008-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

299

The Araucaria Project: The Distance to NGC 300 from the Red Giant Branch Tip using HST/ACS imaging  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have used the Advanced Camera for Surveys on board the Hubble Space Telescope to obtain deep photometry of the NGC 300 spiral galaxy in the Sculptor group. The results have been used to derive an accurate distance determination based on the Tip of the Red Giant Branch distance estimator. Both edge-detection and maximum likelihood methods have been applied, to derive a distance modulus (m-M)_0=26.30 +/- 0.03 +/- 0.12 for edge-detection, and (m-M)_0=26.36 +/- 0.02 +/- 0.12 for maximum likelihood. These results are fully consistent with the recent distance estimate derived from near-IR photometry of Cepheids variable stars in the context of the Araucaria project, (m-M)_0= 26.37 +/- 0.05 +/- 0.03.

Luca Rizzi; Fabio Bresolin; Rolf-Peter Kudritzki; Wolfgang Gieren; Grzegorz Pietrzynski

2005-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

300

STAR-TO-STAR IRON ABUNDANCE VARIATIONS IN RED GIANT BRANCH STARS IN THE GALACTIC GLOBULAR CLUSTER NGC 3201  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present the metallicity as traced by the abundance of iron in the retrograde globular cluster NGC 3201, measured from high-resolution, high signal-to-noise spectra of 24 red giant branch stars. A spectroscopic analysis reveals a spread in [Fe/H] in the cluster stars at least as large as 0.4 dex. Star-to-star metallicity variations are supported both through photometry and through a detailed examination of spectra. We find no correlation between iron abundance and distance from the cluster core, as might be inferred from recent photometric studies. NGC 3201 is the lowest mass halo cluster to date to contain stars with significantly different [Fe/H] values.

Simmerer, Jennifer; Ivans, Inese I.; Filler, Dan [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States); Francois, Patrick [Paris-Meudon Observatory, France and Universite de Picardie Jules Verne, F-80080 Amiens (France); Charbonnel, Corinne [Geneva Observatory, University of Geneva, Chemin des Maillettes 51, CH-1290 Versoix (Switzerland); Monier, Richard [Laboratoire Hippolyte Fizeau, Universite Nice Sophia Antipolis, Parc Valrose, F-06000 Nice (France); James, Gaeel, E-mail: jennifer@physics.utah.edu, E-mail: iii@physics.utah.edu, E-mail: dan.filler@utah.edu, E-mail: patrick.francois@obspm.fr, E-mail: corinne.charbonnel@unige.ch, E-mail: richard.monier@unice.fr, E-mail: gjames@eso.org [European Southern Observatory, Karl-Schwarzschild-Strasse 2, D-85748 Garching bei Munchen (Germany)

2013-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "branch 202-586-1114 specific" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

On Titanium Carbide Nanoparticles as the Origin of the 21 Micron Emission Feature in Post-Asymptotic Giant Branch Stars  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Titanium carbide (TiC) nanocrystals were recently proposed as the carrier of the mysterious 21$\\mum$ emission feature observed in post-asymptotic giant branch stars, based on their close spectral match and the presolar nature of meteoritic TiC nanograins (which reveals their stellar ejecta origin). But we show in this {\\it Letter} that the Kramers-Kronig dispersion relations, which relate the wavelength-integrated extinction cross section to the total dust mass, would impose a lower bound on the TiC mass. This Kramers-Kronig lower limit exceeds the maximum available TiC mass by a factor of at least $\\simali$50, independent of the absolute value of the ultraviolet/visible absorptivity of nano TiC. The TiC model is therefore readily ruled out by the Kramers-Kronig physical principle.

Aigen Li

2003-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

302

A ladder of polariton branches formed by coupling an organic semiconductor exciton to a series of closely spaced cavity-photon modes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We construct a microcavity in which the extended optical path length of the cavity (5.9??m) permits a series of closely spaced optical modes to be supported. By placing a J-aggregated cyanine dye into the cavity, we reach the strong-coupling regime and evidence a simultaneous optical hybridization between the organic-exciton and a number of the confined cavity modes, forming an effective ladder of polariton branches. We explore the emission from such cavities and evidence a polariton-population on adjacent polariton branches around k{sub ?}?=?0.

Coles, David M.; Lidzey, David G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Sheffield, Hicks Building, Hounsfield Road, Sheffield S3 7RH (United Kingdom)

2014-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

303

THE ACS NEARBY GALAXY SURVEY TREASURY. IX. CONSTRAINING ASYMPTOTIC GIANT BRANCH EVOLUTION WITH OLD METAL-POOR GALAXIES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In an attempt to constrain evolutionary models of the asymptotic giant branch (AGB) phase at the limit of low masses and low metallicities, we have examined the luminosity functions and number ratios between AGB and red giant branch (RGB) stars from a sample of resolved galaxies from the ACS Nearby Galaxy Survey Treasury. This database provides Hubble Space Telescope optical photometry together with maps of completeness, photometric errors, and star formation histories for dozens of galaxies within 4 Mpc. We select 12 galaxies characterized by predominantly metal-poor populations as indicated by a very steep and blue RGB, and which do not present any indication of recent star formation in their color-magnitude diagrams. Thousands of AGB stars brighter than the tip of the RGB (TRGB) are present in the sample (between 60 and 400 per galaxy), hence, the Poisson noise has little impact in our measurements of the AGB/RGB ratio. We model the photometric data with a few sets of thermally pulsing AGB (TP-AGB) evolutionary models with different prescriptions for the mass loss. This technique allows us to set stringent constraints on the TP-AGB models of low-mass, metal-poor stars (with M < 1.5 M{sub sun}, [Fe/H]{approx}< -1.0). Indeed, those which satisfactorily reproduce the observed AGB/RGB ratios have TP-AGB lifetimes between 1.2 and 1.8 Myr, and finish their nuclear burning lives with masses between 0.51 and 0.55 M{sub sun}. This is also in good agreement with recent observations of white dwarf masses in the M4 old globular cluster. These constraints can be added to those already derived from Magellanic Cloud star clusters as important mileposts in the arduous process of calibrating AGB evolutionary models.

Girardi, Leo [Osservatorio Astronomico di Padova-INAF, Vicolo dell'Osservatorio 5, I-35122 Padova (Italy); Williams, Benjamin F.; Gilbert, Karoline M.; Rosenfield, Philip; Dalcanton, Julianne J. [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Box 351580, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Marigo, Paola [Dipartimento di Astronomia, Universita di Padova, Vicolo dell'Osservatorio 2, I-35122 Padova (Italy); Boyer, Martha L. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Dolphin, Andrew [Raytheon Company, 1151 East Hermans Road, Tucson, AZ 85756 (United States); Weisz, Daniel R.; Skillman, Evan [Department of Astronomy, University of Minnesota, 116 Church Street SE, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Melbourne, Jason [Caltech Optical Observatories, Division of Physics, Mathematics and Astronomy, Mail Stop 301-17, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Olsen, Knut A. G. [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, 950 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Seth, Anil C. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Solvent dependent branching between C-I and C-Br bond cleavage following 266 nm excitation of CH{sub 2}BrI  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It is well known that ultraviolet photoexcitation of halomethanes results in halogen-carbon bond cleavage. Each halogen-carbon bond has a dominant ultraviolet (UV) absorption that promotes an electron from a nonbonding halogen orbital (n{sub X}) to a carbon-halogen antibonding orbital (?*{sub C-X}). UV absorption into specific transitions in the gas phase results primarily in selective cleavage of the corresponding carbon-halogen bond. In the present work, broadband ultrafast UV-visible transient absorption studies of CH{sub 2}BrI reveal a more complex photochemistry in solution. Transient absorption spectra are reported spanning the range from 275 nm to 750 nm and 300 fs to 3 ns following excitation of CH{sub 2}BrI at 266 nm in acetonitrile, 2-butanol, and cyclohexane. Channels involving formation of CH{sub 2}Br + I radical pairs, iso-CH{sub 2}Br-I, and iso-CH{sub 2}I-Br are identified. The solvent environment has a significant influence on the branching ratios, and on the formation and stability of iso-CH{sub 2}Br-I. Both iso-CH{sub 2}Br-I and iso-CH{sub 2}I-Br are observed in cyclohexane with a ratio of ?2.8:1. In acetonitrile this ratio is 7:1 or larger. The observation of formation of iso-CH{sub 2}I-Br photoproduct as well as iso-CH{sub 2}Br-I following 266 nm excitation is a novel result that suggests complexity in the dissociation mechanism. We also report a solvent and concentration dependent lifetime of iso-CH{sub 2}Br-I. At low concentrations the lifetime is >4 ns in acetonitrile, 1.9 ns in 2-butanol and ?1.4 ns in cyclohexane. These lifetimes decrease with higher initial concentrations of CH{sub 2}BrI. The concentration dependence highlights the role that intermolecular interactions can play in the quenching of unstable isomers of dihalomethanes.

Anderson, Christopher P.; Spears, Kenneth G.; Wilson, Kaitlynn R.; Sension, Roseanne J. [Department of Chemistry and Department of Physics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States)] [Department of Chemistry and Department of Physics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States)

2013-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

305

Ultrahigh Specific Impulse Nuclear Thermal Propulsion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Research on nuclear thermal propulsion systems (NTP) have been in forefront of the space nuclear power and propulsion due to their design simplicity and their promise for providing very high thrust at reasonably high specific impulse. During NERVA-ROVER program in late 1950's till early 1970's, the United States developed and ground tested about 18 NTP systems without ever deploying them into space. The NERVA-ROVER program included development and testing of NTP systems with very high thrust (~250,000 lbf) and relatively high specific impulse (~850 s). High thrust to weight ratio in NTP systems is an indicator of high acceleration that could be achieved with these systems. The specific impulse in the lowest mass propellant, hydrogen, is a function of square root of absolute temperature in the NTP thrust chamber. Therefor optimizing design performance of NTP systems would require achieving the highest possible hydrogen temperature at reasonably high thrust to weight ratio. High hydrogen exit temperature produces high specific impulse that is a diret measure of propellant usage efficiency.

Anne Charmeau; Brandon Cunningham; Samim Anghaie

2009-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

306

Modeling and Validation of Pipeline Specifications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-on-Chip design process. Many existing approaches employ a bottom-up approach to pipeline validation, where description language (ADL) constructs, and thus allows a powerful top-down approach to pipeline validationModeling and Validation of Pipeline Specifications PRABHAT MISHRA and NIKIL DUTT University

Mishra, Prabhat

307

Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project Product Specification  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document establishes the limits and controls for the significant parameters that could potentially affect the safety and/or quality of the Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) packaged for processing, transport, and storage. The product specifications in this document cover the SNF packaged in Multi-Canister Overpacks to be transported throughout the SNF Project.

PAJUNEN, A.L.

2000-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

308

Ultrasonic hydrometer. [Specific gravity of electrolyte  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The disclosed ultrasonic hydrometer determines the specific gravity (density) of the electrolyte of a wet battery, such as a lead-acid battery. The hydrometer utilizes a transducer that when excited emits an ultrasonic impulse that traverses through the electrolyte back and forth between spaced sonic surfaces. The transducer detects the returning impulse, and means measures the time t between the initial and returning impulses. Considering the distance d between the spaced sonic surfaces and the measured time t, the sonic velocity V is calculated with the equation V = 2d/t. The hydrometer also utilizes a thermocouple to measure the electrolyte temperature. A hydrometer database correlates three variable parameters including sonic velocity in and temperature and specific gravity of the electrolyte, for temperature values between 0 and 40/sup 0/C and for specific gravity values between 1.05 and 1.30. Upon knowing two parameters (the calculated sonic velocity and the measured temperature), the third parameter (specific gravity) can be uniquely found in the database. The hydrometer utilizes a microprocessor for data storage and manipulation.

Swoboda, C.A.

1982-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

309

SAVCBS 2003 Specification and Verification of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

://www.cs.iastate.edu/SAVCBS/ September 1-2, 2003 Helsinki, Finland Workshop at ESEC/FSE 2003 9th European Software Engineering ConferenceSAVCBS 2003 Specification and Verification of Component-Based Systems ESEC/FSE 2003 9th European Software Engineering Conference and 11th ACM SIGSOFT Symposium on the Foundations of Software Engineering

Leavens, Gary T.

310

Transforming and Refining Abstract Constraint Specifications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Transforming and Refining Abstract Constraint Specifications Alan M. Frisch1 , Brahim Hnich2 , Ian choose model transformations to reduce greatly the amount of effort that is required to solve a problem by systematic search. It is a consid- erable challenge to automate such transformations. A problem may be viewed

Walsh, Toby

311

Mining malware specifications through static reachability analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mining malware specifications through static reachability analysis Hugo Daniel Macedo1 and Tayssir be used to model the stack operations occurring during the binary code execution), use reachability the file under analysis is malicious. Experimental data shows that our approach can be used to learn

Boyer, Edmond

312

Security Policy Specification Using a Graphical Approach Page 1 Security Policy Specification Using a Graphical  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Security Policy Specification Using a Graphical Approach Page 1 Security Policy Specification Using of California, Davis {hoagland,pandey,levitt}@cs.ucdavis.edu Technical Report CSE-98-3 A security policy states for organizations to declare their security policies, even informal state- ments would be better than the current

California at Davis, University of

313

Single Transition State Serves Two Mechanisms. Ab Initio Classical Trajectory Calculations of the Substitution-Electron Transfer Branching Ratio in CH2O-+ CH3Cl  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to the Sub(C) valley. Analysis of the initial conditions did not reveal any definitive factors, the temperature dependence of the branching ratio is a reflection of the shape of the potential energy surface of numerous theoretical studies.25-33 The ET products can be formed either by an outersphere electron transfer

Schlegel, H. Bernhard

314

NIH Extramural Data Book last update May 2008 Data provided by the Division of Information Services, Reporting Branch NEDB 1 NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH (NIH)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NIH Extramural Data Book ­ last update May 2008 Data provided by the Division of Information Services, Reporting Branch NEDB 1 NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH (NIH) EXTRAMURAL DATA BOOK May 2008 #12;NIH Extramural Data Book ­ last update May 2008 Data provided by the Division of Information Services

Baker, Chris I.

315

A measurement of the branching fractions of the f1(1285) and f1(1420) produced in central pp interactions at 450 GeV/c  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A study of the f1(1285) and f1(1420) produced in central pp interactions has been performed. For the first time in a single experiment the branching fractions of both mesons in all major decay modes have been determined. Both the f1(1285) and f1(1420) are consistent with being produced by double Pomeron exchange.

The WA102 Collaboration; D. Barberis et al

1998-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

316

Drug delivery by organ-specific immunoliposomes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Monoclonal antibodies highly specific to the mouse pulmonary endothelial cells were conjugated to liposomes. The resulting immunoliposomes showed high levels of lung accumulation when injected intravenously into mice. Optimal target binding and retention were achieved if the lipid composition included ganglioside GM{sub 1} to reduce the uptake of immunoliposomes by the reticuloendothelial system. Details of the construction and optimization of these organ-specific immunoliposomes are reviewed. The drug delivery potential of this novel liposome system was demonstrated in an experimental pulmonary metastasis model. Immunoliposomes containing a lipophilic prodrug of deoxyfluorouridine effectively prolonged the survival time of the tumor-bearing mice. This and other therapeutic applications of the immunoliposomes are discussed. 25 refs., 5 figs.

Maruyama, Kazuo; Mori, Atsuhide; Hunag, Leaf (Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (USA). Dept. of Biochemistry); Kennel, S.J. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Specific heat in two-dimensional melting  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report the specific heat $c_N$ around the melting transition(s) of micrometer-sized superparamagnetic particles confined in two dimensions, calculated from fluctuations of positions and internal energy, and corresponding Monte Carlo simulations. Since colloidal systems provide single particle resolution, they offer the unique possibility to compare the experimental temperatures of peak position of $c_N(T)$ and symmetry breaking, respectively. While order parameter correlation functions confirm the Kosterlitz-Thouless-Halperin-Nelson-Young melting scenario where translational and orientational order symmetries are broken at different temperatures with an intermediate so called hexatic phase, we observe a single peak of the specific heat within the hexatic phase, with excellent agreement between experiment and simulation. Thus, the peak is not associated with broken symmetries but can be explained with the total defect density, which correlates with the maximum increase of isolated dislocations. The absence of a latent heat strongly supports the continuous character of both transitions.

Sven Deutschlnder; Antonio M. Puertas; Georg Maret; Peter Keim

2014-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

318

Product specification Supersedes data of September 1994  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

specification NPN switching transistors 2N2222; 2N2222A FEATURES · High current (max. 800 mA) · Low voltage (max collector current (DC) - 800 mA Ptot total power dissipation Tamb 25 °C - 500 mW hFE DC current gain IC = 10 mA; VCE = 10 V 75 - fT transition frequency IC = 20 mA; VCE = 20 V; f = 100 MHz 2N2222 250 - MHz 2

Ravikumar, B.

319

The Reaction Specificity of Nanoparticles in Solution  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Iron-based metallic and oxide nanoparticles have been shown to have enhanced reactivity towards a variety of chemical species, including chlorinated hydrocarbons and reducible oxyanions, which frequently contaminate ground water at DOE and other government and industrial sites. Possibly of greater importance is the ability of these nanoparticles to select specific reaction pathways, potentially facilitating the formation of the most environmentally acceptable reaction products.

Baer, Donald R.

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Composition Semantics of the Rosetta Specification Language  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

using Coalgebras . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82 6.2.1 Process Calculi . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83 6.2.2 Coalgebras in Java Semantics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83 6.2.3 Previous Work on Rosetta.... Components may have inputs and outputs that allow them to be parameterized and to communicate with other specification constructs. The terms within a component may either be Boolean expressions written in Rosettas expression language or may instantiate other...

Peck, Megan Elizabeth

2012-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "branch 202-586-1114 specific" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Measurement of CP Asymmetries and Branching Fractions in Charmless Two-Body B-Meson Decays to Pions and Kaons  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present improved measurements of CP-violation parameters in the decays B{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}, B{sup 0} {yields} K{sup +}{pi}{sup -}, and B{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}, and of the branching fractions for B{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0} and B{sup 0} {yields} K{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}. The results are obtained with the full data set collected at the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance by the BABAR experiment at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy B factory at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, corresponding to 467 {+-} 5 million B{bar B} pairs. We find the CP-violation parameter values and branching fractions S{sub {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}} = -0.68 {+-} 0.10 {+-} 0.03, C{sub {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}} = -0.25 {+-} 0.08 {+-} 0.02, {Alpha}{sub K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}} = -0.107 {+-} 0.016{sub -0.004}{sup +0.006}, C{sub {pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}} = -0.43 {+-} 0.26 {+-} 0.05, {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}) = (1.83 {+-} 0.21 {+-} 0.13) x 10{sup -6}, {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} K0{pi}{sup 0}) = (10.1 {+-} 0.6 {+-} 0.4) x 10{sup -6}, where in each case, the first uncertainties are statistical and the second are systematic. We observe CP violation with a significance of 6.7 standard deviations for B{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} and 6.1 standard deviations for B{sup 0} {yields} K{sup +}{pi}{sup -}, including systematic uncertainties. Constraints on the Unitarity Triangle angle {alpha} are determined from the isospin relations among the B {yields} {pi}{pi} rates and asymmetries. Considering only the solution preferred by the Standard Model, we find {alpha} to be in the range [71{sup o}, 109{sup o}] at the 68% confidence level.

Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; /Annecy, LAPP; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; /Barcelona U., ECM; Palano, A.; /Bari U. /INFN, Bari; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; /Bergen U.; Brown, D.N.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; /Ruhr U., Bochum; Asgeirsson, D.J.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T.S.; McKenna, J.A.; So, R.Y.; /British Columbia U.; Khan, A.; /Brunel U.; Blinov, V.E.; /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Indian Inst. Tech., Guwahati /Harvard U. /Harvey Mudd Coll. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa State U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U., Comp. Sci. Dept. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Paris U., VI-VII /Perugia U. /INFN, Perugia /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /SLAC /South Carolina U. /Southern Methodist U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tel Aviv U. /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /Turin U. /INFN, Turin /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Valencia U., IFIC /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

2012-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

322

Face Recognition Deficits in Autism Spectrum Disorders Are Both Domain Specific and Process Specific  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Although many studies have reported face identity recognition deficits in autism spectrum disorders (ASD), two fundamental question remains: 1) Is this deficit process specific for face memory in particular, or does it ...

Weigelt, Sarah

323

Production Of High Specific Activity Copper-67  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for the selective production and isolation of high specific activity Cu.sup.67 from proton-irradiated enriched Zn.sup.70 target comprises target fabrication, target irradiation with low energy (<25 MeV) protons, chemical separation of the Cu.sup.67 product from the target material and radioactive impurities of gallium, cobalt, iron, and stable aluminum via electrochemical methods or ion exchange using both anion and cation organic ion exchangers, chemical recovery of the enriched Zn.sup.70 target material, and fabrication of new targets for re-irradiation is disclosed.

Jamriska, Sr., David J. (Los Alamos, NM); Taylor, Wayne A. (Los Alamos, NM); Ott, Martin A. (Los Alamos, NM); Fowler, Malcolm (Los Alamos, NM); Heaton, Richard C. (Los Alamos, NM)

2003-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

324

Project specific selection of decommissioning techniques  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Three decommissioning projects with quite different contamination characteristics were terminated with the requested result of freely released rooms for dismantled buildings under supervision of the responsible authorities. The examples show that control areas with different kinds of contamination and different equipment can be decommissioned with reasonable effort. The specific selection of decontamination methods and measurement techniques optimizes the performance of the project and lowers the amount of primary and secondary active waste. The careful planning of radiation protection measures ensures the safe work within the foreseen time schedule.

Christ, B.G.; Wehner, E.L. [NUKEM GmbH, Alzenau (Germany). Nuclear Technology Div.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

325

End Points Specification Methods | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergy CooperationRequirementsDraftEmerson: ENERGY STAR Referral (CR289E)Shared PathSpecification

326

Standard technical specifications: Combustion engineering plants. Volume 1, Revision 1: Specifications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the results of the combined effort of the NRC and the industry to produce improved Standard Technical Specifications (STS), Revision 1 for Combustion Engineering Plants. The changes reflected in Revision 1 resulted from the experience gained from license amendment applications to convert to these improved STS or to adopt partial improvements to existing technical specifications. This NUREG is the result of extensive public technical meetings and discussions between the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff and various nuclear power plant licensees, Nuclear Steam Supply System (NSSS) Owners Groups, NSSS vendors, and the Nuclear Energy Institute (NEI). The improved STS were developed based on the criteria in the Final Commission Policy Statement on Technical Specifications Improvements for Nuclear Power Reactors, dated July 22, 1993. The improved STS will be used as the basis for individual nuclear power plant licensees to develop improved plant-specific technical specifications. This report contains three volumes. Volume 1 contains the Specifications for all chapters and sections of the improved STS. Volume 2 contains the Bases for Chapters 2.0 and 3.0, and Sections 3.1--3.3 of the improved STS. Volume 3 contains the Bases for Sections 3.4--3.9 of the improved STS.

NONE

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

How to Design and Market Energy Efficiency Programs to Specific...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

How to Design and Market Energy Efficiency Programs to Specific Neighborhoods How to Design and Market Energy Efficiency Programs to Specific Neighborhoods This presentation, given...

328

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Program Specific...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Program Specific Recovery Plan Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Program Specific Recovery Plan Microsoft Word - PSRP June 5...

329

Draft Specifications for Application of UNFC-2009 to Renewable...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Draft Specifications for Application of UNFC-2009 to Renewable Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Draft Specifications for...

330

Oak Ridge Site Specific Advisory Board Committees | Department...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Committees Oak Ridge Site Specific Advisory Board Committees Oak Ridge's Site Specific Advisory Board uses its committee structure to achieve its mission and conduct many of its...

331

anatomically specific patterns: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

conversion of specifications between formalisms. Indeed 26 Patterns for Representing FMEA in Formal Specification of Control Systems Ilya Lopatkin, Alexei Iliasov, Engineering...

332

Biodiesel Progress: ASTM Specifications and 2nd Generation Biodiesel...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Progress: ASTM Specifications and 2nd Generation Biodiesel Biodiesel Progress: ASTM Specifications and 2nd Generation Biodiesel Presentation given at the 2007 Diesel...

333

Size dependent specific surface area of nanoporous film assembled...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Size dependent specific surface area of nanoporous film assembled by core-shell iron nanoclusters. Size dependent specific surface area of nanoporous film assembled by core-shell...

334

An advanced understanding of the specific effects of xylan and...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

An advanced understanding of the specific effects of xylan and surface lignin contents on enzymatic hydrolysis of An advanced understanding of the specific effects of xylan and...

335

Enforcement Guidance Supplement 00-03, Specific Issues on Applicabilit...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

and Technical Specifications. Specifically, this guidance reaffirms that quality assurance (QA) controls required by 10 CFR 830 are not in any way limited by language...

336

Dust production from sub-solar to super-solar metallicity in Thermally Pulsing Asymptotic Giant Branch Stars  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We discuss the dust chemistry and growth in the circumstellar envelopes (CSEs) of Thermally Pulsing Asymptotic Giant Branch (TP-AGB) star models computed with the COLIBRI code, at varying initial mass and metallicity (Z=0.001, 0.008, 0.02, 0.04, 0.06). A relevant result of our analysis deals with the silicate production in M-stars. We show that, in order to reproduce the observed trend between terminal velocities and mass-loss rates in Galactic M-giants, one has to significantly reduce the efficiency of chemisputtering by H2 molecules, usually considered as the most effective dust destruction mechanism. This indication is also in agreement with the most recent laboratory results, which show that silicates may condense already at T=1400 K, instead than at Tcond=1000 K, as obtained by models that include chemisputtering. From the analysis of the total dust ejecta, we find that the total dust-to-gas ejecta of intermediate-mass stars are much less dependent on metallicity than usually assumed. In a broader contex...

Ambra, Nanni; Paola, Marigo; Lo, Girardi; Atefeh, Javadi; Jacco, van Loon

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Effects of constraints in general branched molecules: A quantitative ab initio study in HCO-L-Ala-NH2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A general approach to the design of accurate classical potentials for protein folding is described. It includes the introduction of a meaningful statistical measure of the differences between approximations of the same potential energy, the definition of a set of Systematic and Approximately Separable and Modular Internal Coordinates (SASMIC), much convenient for the simulation of general branched molecules, and the imposition of constraints on the most rapidly oscillating degrees of freedom. All these tools are used to study the effects of constraints in the Conformational Equilibrium Distribution (CED) of the model dipeptide HCO-L-Ala-NH2. We use ab initio Quantum Mechanics calculations including electron correlation at the MP2 level to describe the system, and we measure the conformational dependence of the correcting terms to the naive CED based in the Potential Energy Surface (PES) without any simplifying assumption. These terms are related to mass-metric tensors determinants and also occur in the Fixman's compensating potential. We show that some of the corrections are non-negligible if one is interested in the whole Ramachandran space. On the other hand, if only the energetically lower region, containing the principal secondary structure elements, is assumed to be relevant, then, all correcting terms may be neglected up to peptides of considerable length. This is the first time, as far as we know, that the analysis of the conformational dependence of these correcting terms is performed in a relevant biomolecule with a realistic potential energy function.

Pablo Echenique; J. L. Alonso; Ivan Calvo

2006-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

338

Measurement of the $B^+\\rightarrow p \\bar{p} K^{+}$ Branching Fraction and Study of the Decay Dynamics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With a sample of 232 x 10{sup 6} {Upsilon}(4S) {yields} B{bar B} events collected with the BABAR detector, we study the decay B{sup +} {yields} p{bar p}K{sup +} excluding charmonium decays to p{bar p}. We measure a branching fraction {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} p{bar p}K{sup +}) = (6.7 {+-} 0.5 {+-} 0.4) x 10{sup -6}. An enhancement at low p{bar p} mass is observed and the Dalitz plot asymmetry suggests dominance of the penguin amplitude in this B decay. We search for a pentaquark candidate {Theta}*{sup ++} decaying into pK{sup +} in the mass range 1.43 to 2.00 GeV/c{sup 2} and set limits on {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} {Theta}*{sup ++} {bar p}) x {Beta}({Theta}*{sup ++} {yields} pK{sup +}) at the 10{sup -7} level.

Aubert, B.; Barate, R.; Boutigny, D.; Couderc, F.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; /Annecy, LAPP; Grauges, E.; /Barcelona, IFAE; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pompili, A.; /Bari U. /INFN, Bari; Chen, J.C.; Qi, N.D.; Rong, G.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y.S.; /Beijing, Inst. High Energy Phys.; Eigen, G.; Ofte, I.; Stugu, B. /Bergen U. /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /Bristol U. /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San

2005-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

339

Evolution and Development of Effective Feedstock Specifications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy promotes the production of a range of liquid fuels and fuel blend stocks from lignocellulosic biomass feedstocks by funding fundamental and applied research that advances the state of technology in biomass collection, conversion, and sustainability. As part of its involvement in this program, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) investigates the feedstock logistics economics and sustainability of these fuels. The 2012 feedstock logistics milestone demonstrated that for high-yield areas that minimize the transportation distances of a low-density, unstable biomass, we could achieve a delivered cost of $35/ton. Based on current conventional equipment and processes, the 2012 logistics design is able to deliver the volume of biomass needed to fulfill the 2012 Renewable Fuel Standards targets for ethanol. However, the Renewable Fuel Standards volume targets are continuing to increase and are expected to peak in 2022 at 36 billion gallons. Meeting these volume targets and achieving a national-scale biofuels industry will require expansion of production capacity beyond the 2012 Conventional Feedstock Supply Design Case to access diverse available feedstocks, regardless of their inherent ability to meet preliminary biorefinery quality feedstock specifications. Implementation of quality specifications (specs), as outlined in the 2017 Design Case Feedstock Supply System Design and Economics for Conversion of Lignocellulosic Biomass to Hydrocarbon Fuels (in progress), requires insertion of deliberate, active quality controls into the feedstock supply chain, whereas the 2012 Conventional Design only utilizes passive quality controls.

Garold Gresham; Rachel Emerson; Amber Hoover; Amber Miller; William Bauer; Kevin Kenney

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Isotope Specific Remediation Media and Systems - 13614  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On March 11, 2011, now two years ago, the magnitude 9.0 Great East Japan earthquake, Tohoku, hit off the Fukushima coast of Japan. While, of course, most of the outcome of this unprecedented natural and manmade disaster was a negative, both in Japan and worldwide, there have been some extremely invaluable lessons learned and new emergency recovery technologies and systems developed. As always, the mother of invention is necessity. Among these developments has been the development and full-scale implementation of proven isotope specific media (ISMs) with the intent of surgically removing specific hazardous isotopes for the purpose of minimizing dose to workers and the environment. The first such ISMs to be deployed at the Fukushima site were those removing cesium (Cs-137) and iodine (I-129). Since deployment on June 17, 2011, along with treated cooling water recycle, some 70% of the curies in the building liquid wastes have been removed by the Kurion system alone. The current levels of cesium are now only 2% of the original levels. Such an unprecedented, 'external cooling system' not only allowed the eventual cold shut down of the reactors in mid-December, 2011, but has allowed workers to concentrate on the cleanup of other areas of the site. Water treatment will continue for quite some time due to continued leakage into the buildings and the eventual goal of cleaning up the reactors and fuel pools themselves. With the cesium removal now in routine operation, other isotopes of concern are likely to become priorities. One such isotope is that of strontium, and yttrium (Sr-90 and Y-90), which is still at original levels causing further dose issues as well as impediments to discharge of the treated waste waters. For over a year now, a new synthetic strontium specific media has been under development and testing both in our licensed facility in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, but also in confirmatory tests by the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) in Japan for Tokyo Electric Power Company (TEPCO). The tests have proven quite successful, even in high salt conditions, and, with loading and dose calculations being completed, will be proposed to add to the existing cesium system. There is no doubt, as high gamma isotopes are removed, other recalcitrant isotopes such as this will require innovative removal media, systems and techniques. Also coming out of this international effort are other ISM media and systems that can be applied more broadly to both Commercial Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs) as well as in Department of Energy (DOE) applications. This cesium and strontium specific media has further been successfully tested in 2012 at a Magnox station in the UK. The resulting proposed mitigation systems for pond and vault cleanup look quite promising. An extremely unusual ISM for carbon 14 (C-14), nickel (Ni-63) and cesium (Cs-137) has been developed for Diablo Canyon NPP for dose reduction testing in their fuel pool. These media will be deployed in Submersible Media Filter (SMF) and Submersible Columns (SC) systems adapted to standard Tri-Nuclear{sup R} housings common in the U.S. and UK. External Vessel Systems (mini-Fukushima) have also been developed as a second mitigation system for D and D and outages. Finally, technetium (Tc- 99) specific media developed for the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) recycle or condensate (secondary) waste streams (WM 2011) are being further perfected and tested for At-Tank Tc-99 removal, as well as At Tank Cs media. In addition to the on-going media development, systems for deploying such media have developed over the last year and are in laboratory- and full-scale testing. These systems include the fore mentioned Submersible Media Filters (SMF), Submersible Columns (SC) and external pilot- and full-scale, lead-lag, canister systems. This paper will include the media development and testing, as well as that of the deployment systems themselves. (authors)

Denton, Mark S.; Mertz, Joshua L. [Kurion, Inc. Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States)] [Kurion, Inc. Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Morita, Keisuke [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai Research and Development Center, Fukushima Project Team, Tokai-mura, Ibaraki-ken, 319-1195 (Japan)] [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai Research and Development Center, Fukushima Project Team, Tokai-mura, Ibaraki-ken, 319-1195 (Japan)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "branch 202-586-1114 specific" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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341

Savannah River Site's Site Specific Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Site Specific Plan (SSP) has been prepared by the Savannah River Site (SRS) in order to show the Environmental Restoration and Waste Management activities that were identified during the preparation of the Department of Energy-Headquarters (DOE-HQ) Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Five-Year Plan (FYP) for FY 1992--1996. The SSP has been prepared in accordance with guidance received from DOE-HQ. DOE-SR is accountable to DOE-HQ for the implementation of this plan. The purpose of the SSP is to develop a baseline for policy, budget, and schedules for the DOE Environmental Restoration and Waste Management activities. The plan explains accomplishments since the Fiscal Year (FY) 1990 plan, demonstrates how present and future activities are prioritized, identifies currently funded activities and activities that are planned to be funded in the upcoming fiscal year, and describes future activities that SRS is considering.

Not Available

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

A summary of North American HVDC converter station reliability specifications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper summarizes Reliability, Availability, and Maintainability (RAM) specifications that were issued for thyristor based HVDC converter stations in service in North America. A total of twenty project specifications are summarized. A detailed summary by project is shown with specific quantitative requirements categorized. Definitions of terms, representative design principles, and formulas used in calculating RAM parameters contained in existing reliability specifications are presented.

Vancers, I. (ABB Power Systems Inc., Los Angeles, CA (United States)); Hormozi, F.J. (Los Angeles Dept. of Water and Power, CA (United States))

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

The Use of Subsurface Barriers to Support Treatment of Metals and Reduce the Flux of Tritium to Fourmile Branch at the Savannah River Site in South Carolina - 13358  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Savannah River Site (SRS) produced tritium, plutonium, and special nuclear materials for national defense, medicine, and the space programs. Acidic groundwater plumes containing metals, metallic radionuclides, non-metallic radionuclides and tritium sourced from the F and H Area Seepage Basins have impacted the surface water of Fourmile Branch on SRS. Tritium releases from Fourmile Branch have impacted the water quality within areas of the Savannah River adjacent to the SRS, and this circumstance has been an ongoing regulatory concern. The F and H Area Seepage Basins operated until 1988 for the disposition of deionized acidic waste water from the F and H Separations Facilities. The waste water contained dilute nitric acid and low concentrations of non-radioactive metals, and radionuclides, with the major isotopes being Cs-137, Sr-90, U-235, U-238, Pu-239, Tc-99, I-129, and tritium. The tritium concentration in the waste water was relatively elevated because there is not a practicable removal method in water. The acid content of the waste water during the operational period of the basins was equal to 12 billion liters of nitric acid. The seepage basins were closed in 1988 and backfilled and capped by 1991. The plumes associated with the F and H basins cover an area of nearly 2.4 square kilometers (600 acres) and discharge along ?2,600 meters of Fourmile Branch. The acidic nature of the plumes and their overall discharge extent along the branch represent a large challenge with respect to reducing contaminant flux to Fourmile Branch. The introduction of nitric acid into the groundwater over a long time effectively reduced the retardation of metal migration from the basins to the groundwater and in the groundwater to Fourmile Branch, because most negatively charged surfaces on the aquifer materials were filled with hydrogen ion. Two large pump and treat systems were constructed in 1997 and operated until 2003 in an attempt to capture and control the releases to Fourmile Branch. The operating cost, including waste disposal, for the two systems was ?$1.3 M/month. Both systems employed reinjection of tritiated water up gradient of the extraction, and produced large quantities of waste from non-tritium isotopes and metals removal prior to reinjection. Both systems were determined to be ineffective and potentially detrimental with respect to limiting the flux of contaminants to Fourmile Branch. After it became apparent that there was very little benefit to continued operation of the systems, and the staggering cost of operations was recognized by the SRS and regulators, a new remedy was developed. The new system uses vertical subsurface barriers to redirect groundwater flow to limit the transport of contaminants to the stream. The barriers were constructed of acid resistant grout using deep soil mixing techniques. The grout mixture used low swelling clay, fly ash, and sodium hydroxide to form a pozzolana material with low permeability and low strength. The SRS and regulators agreed to a series of remedial goals, with the first goal to reduce tritium flux to the stream by 70% and bring constituents other than tritium to groundwater protection standards. (authors)

Blount, Gerald; Thibault, Jeffrey; Wells, Leslie [Savannah River Nuclear Solutions LLC, 730-4B, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)] [Savannah River Nuclear Solutions LLC, 730-4B, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States); Prater, Phillip [Department of Energy, Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)] [Department of Energy, Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Measurement of the B????l?? and B???(')l?? branching fractions, the B????l?? and B???l?? form-factor shapes, and determination of |Vub|  

DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

We report the results of a study of the exclusive charmless semileptonic decays, B???(')l?? and B????l??, undertaken with approximately 46410? BB pairs collected at the ?(4S) resonance with the BABAR detector. The analysis uses events in which the signal B decays are reconstructed with a loose neutrino reconstruction technique. We obtain partial branching fractions for B???l?? and B????l?? decays in three and 12 bins of q, respectively, from which we extract the f+(q) form-factor shapes and the total branching fractions B(B???l??)=(0.360.05stat0.04syst)10?? and B(B????l??)=(1.420.05stat0.07syst)10??. We also measure B(B+??'l??)=(0.240.08stat0.03syst)10??. We obtain values for the magnitude of the CKM matrix element |Vub| using three different QCD calculations.

del Amo Sanchez, P.; Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Martinelli, M.; Milanes, D. A.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Brown, D. N.; Kerth, L. T.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Lynch, G.; Osipenkov, I. L.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; Asgeirsson, D. J.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T. S.; McKenna, J. A.; Khan, A.; Randle-Conde, A.; Blinov, V. E.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Druzhinin, V. P.; Golubev, V. B.; Kravchenko, E. A.; Onuchin, A. P.; Serednyakov, S. I.; Skovpen, Yu. I.; Solodov, E. P.; Todyshev, K. Yu.; Yushkov, A. N.; Bondioli, M.; Curry, S.; Kirkby, D.; Lankford, A. J.; Mandelkern, M.; Martin, E. C.; Stoker, D. P.; Atmacan, H.; Gary, J. W.; Liu, F.; Long, O.; Vitug, G. M.; Campagnari, C.; Hong, T. M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Richman, J. D.; West, C.; Eisner, A. M.; Heusch, C. A.; Kroseberg, J.; Lockman, W. S.; Martinez, A. J.; Schalk, T.; Schumm, B. A.; Seiden, A.; Winstrom, L. O.; Cheng, C. H.; Doll, D. A.; Echenard, B.; Hitlin, D. G.; Ongmongkolkul, P.; Porter, F. C.; Rakitin, A. Y.; Andreassen, R.; Dubrovin, M. S.; Mancinelli, G.; Meadows, B. T.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Bloom, P. C.; Ford, W. T.; Gaz, A.; Nagel, M.; Nauenberg, U.; Smith, J. G.; Wagner, S. R.; Ayad, R.; Toki, W. H.; Jasper, H.; Karbach, T. M.; Petzold, A.; Spaan, B.; Kobel, M. J.; Schubert, K. R.; Schwierz, R.; Bernard, D.; Verderi, M.; Clark, P. J.; Playfer, S.; Watson, J. E.; Andreotti, M.; Bettoni, D.; Bozzi, C.; Calabrese, R.; Cecchi, A.; Cibinetto, G.; Fioravanti, E.; Franchini, P.; Luppi, E.; Munerato, M.; Negrini, M.; Petrella, A.; Piemontese, L.; Baldini-Ferroli, R.; Calcaterra, A.; de Sangro, R.; Finocchiaro, G.; Nicolaci, M.; Pacetti, S.; Patteri, P.; Peruzzi, I. M.; Piccolo, M.; Rama, M.; Zallo, A.; Contri, R.; Guido, E.; Lo Vetere, M.; Monge, M. R.; Passaggio, S.; Patrignani, C.; Robutti, E.; Tosi, S.; Bhuyan, B.; Prasad, V.; Lee, C. L.; Morii, M.; Adametz, A.; Marks, J.; Uwer, U.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Ebert, M.; Lacker, H. M.; Lueck, T.; Volk, A.; Dauncey, P. D.; Tibbetts, M.; Behera, P. K.; Mallik, U.; Chen, C.; Cochran, J.; Crawley, H. B.; Dong, L.; Meyer, W. T.; Prell, S.; Rosenberg, E. I.; Rubin, A. E.; Gritsan, A. V.; Guo, Z. J.; Arnaud, N.; Davier, M.; Derkach, D.; Firmino da Costa, J.; Grosdidier, G.; Le Diberder, F.; Lutz, A. M.; Malaescu, B.; Perez, A.; Roudeau, P.; Schune, M. H.; Serrano, J.; Sordini, V.; Stocchi, A.; Wang, L.; Wormser, G.; Lange, D. J.; Wright, D. M.; Bingham, I.; Chavez, C. A.; Coleman, J. P.; Fry, J. R.; Gabathuler, E.; Gamet, R.; Hutchcroft, D. E.; Payne, D. J.; Touramanis, C.; Bevan, A. J.; Di Lodovico, F.; Sacco, R.; Sigamani, M.; Cowan, G.; Paramesvaran, S.; Wren, A. C.; Brown, D. N.; Davis, C. L.; Denig, A. G.; Fritsch, M.; Gradl, W.; Hafner, A.; Alwyn, K. E.; Bailey, D.; Barlow, R. J.; Jackson, G.; Lafferty, G. D.; Anderson, J.; Cenci, R.; Jawahery, A.; Roberts, D. A.; Simi, G.; Tuggle, J. M.; Dallapiccola, C.; Salvati, E.; Cowan, R.; Dujmic, D.; Sciolla, G.; Zhao, M.; Lindemann, D.; Patel, P. M.; Robertson, S. H.; Schram, M.; Biassoni, P.; Lazzaro, A.; Lombardo, V.; Palombo, F.; Stracka, S.; Cremaldi, L.; Godang, R.; Kroeger, R.; Sonnek, P.; Summers, D. J.; Nguyen, X.; Simard, M.; Taras, P.; De Nardo, G.; Monorchio, D.; Onorato, G.; Sciacca, C.; Raven, G.; Snoek, H. L.; Jessop, C. P.; Knoepfel, K. J.; LoSecco, J. M.; Wang, W. F.; Corwin, L. A.; Honscheid, K.; Kass, R.; Morris, J. P.; Blount, N. L.; Brau, J.; Frey, R.; Igonkina, O.; Kolb, J. A.; Rahmat, R.; Sinev, N. B.; Strom, D.; Strube, J.; Torrence, E.; Castelli, G.; Feltresi, E.; Gagliardi, N.; Margoni, M.; Morandin, M.; Posocco, M.; Rotondo, M.; Simonetto, F.; Stroili, R.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bonneaud, G. R.; Briand, H.; Calderini, G.; Chauveau, J.; Hamon, O.; Leruste, Ph.; Marchiori, G.; Ocariz, J.; Prendki, J.; Sitt, S.; Biasini, M.; Manoni, E.; Rossi, A.; Angelini, C.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Carpinelli, M.; Casarosa, G.; Cervelli, A.; Forti, F.; Giorgi, M. A.; Lusiani, A.; Neri, N.; Paoloni, E.; Rizzo, G.; Walsh, J. J.; Lopes Pegna, D.; Lu, C.; Olsen, J.; Smith, A. J. S.; Telnov, A. V.; Anulli, F.; Baracchini, E.; Cavoto, G.; Faccini, R.; Ferrarotto, F.; Ferroni, F.; Gaspero, M.; Li Gioi, L.; Mazzoni, M. A.; Piredda, G.; Renga, F.; Hartmann, T.; Leddig, T.; Schrder, H.; Waldi, R.; Adye, T.; Franek, B.; Olaiya, E. O.; Wilson, F. F.; Emery, S.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Vasseur, G.; Yche, Ch.; Zito, M.; Allen, M. T.; Aston, D.; Bard, D. J.; Bartoldus, R.; Benitez, J. F.; Cartaro, C.; Convery, M. R.; Dorfan, J.; Dubois-Felsmann, G. P.; Dunwoodie, W.; Field, R. C.; Franco Sevilla, M.; Fulsom, B. G.; Gabareen, A. M.; Graham, M. T.; Grenier, P.; Hast, C.; Innes, W. R.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kim, H.; Kim, P.; Kocian, M. L.; Leith, D. W. G. S.; Li, S.; Lindquist, B.; Luitz, S.; Lynch, H. L.

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Special Projects Branch  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

On June 6, 2005, you submitted a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) report providing the basis for DOEs cost estimate for dispositioning depleted uranium generated at your proposed uranium enrichment facility in

Dear Mr. Krich; Joseph G. Giitter; S Troy Harris/lovington; James Ferl; Cty John Parker/nmed

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

THE DUST BUDGET OF THE SMALL MAGELLANIC CLOUD: ARE ASYMPTOTIC GIANT BRANCH STARS THE PRIMARY DUST SOURCE AT LOW METALLICITY?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We estimate the total dust input from the cool evolved stars in the Small Magellanic Cloud, using the 8 {mu}m excess emission as a proxy for the dust-production rate (DPR). We find that asymptotic giant branch (AGB) and red supergiant (RSG) stars produce (8.6-9.5) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -7} M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1} of dust, depending on the fraction of far-infrared sources that belong to the evolved star population (with 10%-50% uncertainty in individual DPRs). RSGs contribute the least (<4%), while carbon-rich AGB stars (especially the so-called extreme AGB stars) account for 87%-89% of the total dust input from cool evolved stars. We also estimate the dust input from hot stars and supernovae (SNe), and find that if SNe produce 10{sup -3} M{sub Sun} of dust each, then the total SN dust input and AGB input are roughly equivalent. We consider several scenarios of SN dust production and destruction and find that the interstellar medium (ISM) dust can be accounted for solely by stellar sources if all SNe produce dust in the quantities seen around the dustiest examples and if most SNe explode in dense regions where much of the ISM dust is shielded from the shocks. We find that AGB stars contribute only 2.1% of the ISM dust. Without a net positive contribution from SNe to the dust budget, this suggests that dust must grow in the ISM or be formed by another unknown mechanism.

Boyer, M. L.; Gordon, K. D.; Meixner, M.; Sargent, B. A. [STScI, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Srinivasan, S. [UPMC-CNRS UMR7095, Institut d'Astrophysique de Paris, F-75014 Paris (France); Riebel, D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, The Johns Hopkins University, Homewood Campus, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); McDonald, I. [Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, Alan Turing Building, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Van Loon, J. Th. [Astrophysics Group, Lennard-Jones Laboratories, Keele University, Staffordshire ST5 5BG (United Kingdom); Clayton, G. C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University, 233-A Nicholson Hall, Tower Dr., Baton Rouge, LA 70803-4001 (United States); Sloan, G. C., E-mail: mboyer@stsci.edu [Astronomy Department, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853-6801 (United States)

2012-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

347

Evolution of asymptotic giant branch stars II. Optical to far-infrared isochrones with improved TP-AGB models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a large set of theoretical isochrones, whose distinctive features mostly reside on the greatly improved treatment of the thermally pulsing asymptotic giant branch (TP-AGB) phase. Essentially, we have coupled the TP-AGB tracks described in Paper I, at their stages of pre-flash quiescent H-shell burning, with the evolutionary tracks for the previous evolutionary phases from Girardi et al. (2000). Theoretical isochrones for any intermediate value of age and metallicity are then derived by interpolation in the grids. We take care that the isochrones keep, to a good level of detail, the several peculiarities present in these TP-AGB tracks. Theoretical isochrones are then converted to about 20 different photometric systems -- including traditional ground-based systems, and those of recent major wide-field surveys such as SDSS, OGLE, DENIS, 2MASS, UKIDSS, etc., -- by means of synthetic photometry applied to an updated library of stellar spectra, suitably extended to include C-type stars. Finally, we correct the predicted photometry by the effect of circumstellar dust during the mass-losing stages of the AGB evolution, which allows us to improve the results for the optical-to-infrared systems, and to simulate mid- and far-IR systems such as those of Spitzer and AKARI. Access to the data is provided both via a web repository of static tables (http://stev.oapd.inaf.it/dustyAGB07 and CDS), and via an interactive web interface (http://stev.oapd.inaf.it/cmd) that provides tables for any intermediate value of age and metallicity, for several photometric systems, and for different choices of dust properties.

Paola Marigo; Leo Girardi; Alessandro Bressan; Martin A. T. Groenewegen; Laura Silva; Gian Luigi Granato

2008-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

348

Precise Branching Ratio Measurements of the Decays D0-->pi- pi+ pi0 and D0-->K- K+ pi0  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Using 232 fb-1 of e+e- collision data recorded by the BaBar experiment, we measure the ratios of three-body Cabibbo-suppressed decay rates of the D^0 meson relative to that of the Cabibbo-favored decay: B(D0 --> pi- pi+ pi0)/ B(D0 --> K- pi+ pi0) = (10.59 +/- 0.06 +/- 0.13).10^{-2} and B(D0 --> K- K+ pi0)/ B(D0 --> K- pi+ pi0) = (2.37 +/- 0.03 +/- 0.04). 10^{-2}, where the errors are statistical and systematic respectively. The precisions of these measurements are significantly better than those of the current world average values.We note that the second result differs significantly from the current world average value. Using the PDG-2006 value for D0 --> K- pi+ pi0 branching fraction, we obtain, B(D0 --> pi- pi+ pi0) = (1.493 +/- 0.008 +/- 0.018 +/- 0.053). 10^{-2}, B(D0 --> K- K+ pi0) = (0.334 +/- 0.004 +/- 0.006 +/- 0.012). 10^{-2}, where the errors are statistical, systematic, and due to the uncertainty of B(D0 --> K- pi+ pi0). The average squared matrix elements for both of the singly Cabibbo-suppressed decays are roughly a factor of sin^2 \\theta_C smaller than that for the Cabibbo-favored decay and are therefore, in contrast to the corresponding two-body modes, consistent with the naive expectations.

The BABAR Collaboration; B. Aubert

2006-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

349

The Upper Asymptotic Giant Branch of the Elliptical Galaxy Maffei 1, and Comparisons with M32 and NGC 5128  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Deep near-infrared images obtained with adaptive optics systems on the Gemini North and Canada-France-Hawaii telescopes are used to investigate the bright stellar content and central regions of the nearby elliptical galaxy Maffei 1. Stars evolving on the upper asymptotic giant branch (AGB) are resolved in a field 3 arcmin from the center of the galaxy. The locus of bright giants on the (K, H-K) color-magnitude diagram is consistent with a population of stars like those in Baade's Window reddened by E(H-K) = 0.28 +/- 0.05 mag. This corresponds to A_V = 4.5 +/- 0.8 mag, and is consistent with previous estimates of the line of sight extinction computed from the integrated properties of Maffei 1. The AGB-tip occurs at K = 20.0, which correponds to M_K = -8.7; hence, the AGB-tip brightness in Maffei 1 is comparable to that in M32, NGC 5128, and the bulges of M31 and the Milky-Way. The near-infrared luminosity functions (LFs) of bright AGB stars in Maffei 1, M32, and NGC 5128 are also in excellent agreement, both in terms of overall shape and the relative density of infrared-bright stars with respect to the fainter stars that dominate the light at visible and red wavelengths. It is concluded that the brightest AGB stars in Maffei 1, NGC 5128, M32, and the bulge of M31 trace an old, metal-rich population, rather than an intermediate age population. It is also demonstrated that Maffei 1 contains a distinct red nucleus, and this is likely the optical signature of low-level nuclear activity and/or a distinct central stellar population. Finally, there is an absence of globular clusters brighter than the peak of the globular cluster LF in the central 700 x 700 parsecs of Maffei 1.

T. J. Davidge

2002-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

350

THE S{sup 4}G PERSPECTIVE ON CIRCUMSTELLAR DUST EXTINCTION OF ASYMPTOTIC GIANT BRANCH STARS IN M100  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We examine the effect of circumstellar dust extinction on the near-IR (NIR) contribution of asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars in intermediate-age clusters throughout the disk of M100. For our sample of 17 AGB-dominated clusters we extract optical-to-mid-IR spectral energy distributions (SEDs) and find that NIR brightness is coupled to the mid-IR dust emission in such a way that a significant reduction of AGB light, of up to 1 mag in the K band, follows from extinction by the dust shell formed during this stage. Since the dust optical depth varies with AGB chemistry (C-rich or O-rich), our results suggest that the contribution of AGB stars to the flux from their host clusters will be closely linked to the metallicity and the progenitor mass of the AGB star, to which dust chemistry and mass-loss rate are sensitive. Our sample of clusters-each the analogue of a {approx}1 Gyr old post-starburst galaxy-has implications within the context of mass and age estimation via SED modeling at high-z: we find that the average {approx}0.5 mag extinction estimated here may be sufficient to reduce the AGB contribution in the (rest-frame) K band from {approx}70%, as predicted in the latest generation of synthesis models, to {approx}35%. Our technique for selecting AGB-dominated clusters in nearby galaxies promises to be effective for discriminating the uncertainties associated with AGB stars in intermediate-age populations that plague age and mass estimation in high-z galaxies.

Meidt, Sharon E.; Schinnerer, Eva [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Astronomie/Koenigstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Munoz-Mateos, Juan-Carlos; Kim, Taehyun [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Holwerda, Benne [European Space Agency, ESTEC, Keplerlaan 1, 2200 AG, Noordwijk (Netherlands); Ho, Luis C.; Madore, Barry F.; Sheth, Kartik; Menendez-Delmestre, Karin; Seibert, Mark [The Observatories of the Carnegie Institution for Science, Pasadena, CA (United States); Knapen, Johan H. [Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias, Tenerife (Spain); Bosma, Albert; Athanassoula, E. [Laboratoire d'Astrophysique de Marseille (LAM), Marseille (France); Hinz, Joannah L. [Department of Astronomy, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States); Regan, Michael [Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD (United States); De Paz, Armando Gil [Departamento de Astrofisica, Universidad Complutense Madrid, Madrid (Spain); Mizusawa, Trisha [Spitzer Science Center, Pasadena, CA (United States); Gadotti, Dimitri A. [European Southern Observatory, Santiago (Chile); Laurikainen, Eija; Salo, Heikki [Astronomy Division, Department of Physical Sciences, University of Oulu, Oulu (Finland); and others

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Ab Initio/RRKM Study of the Potential Energy Surface of Triplet Ethylene and Product Branching Ratios of the C(3P) + CH4 Reaction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ab Initio/RRKM Study of the Potential Energy Surface of Triplet Ethylene and Product Branching originating from the collision energy (12.2 kcal/mol), the sole reaction products are C2H3 + H, where 90 potential energy surface for the C(3P) + CH4 reaction have been performed using the CCSD(T)/6-311+G(3df,2p

Nguyen, Minh Tho

352

Measurement of the B0 ---> Psi (2S) Lambda0 Branching Fraction on BaBar at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (Abstract Only)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The decays of B{sup 0} mesons to hadronic final states remains a rich area of physics on BaBar. Not only do the c{bar c}-K final states (e.g. B{sup 0} {yields} {psi}(2S)K{sup 0}) allow for the measurement of CP Violation, but the branching fractions provide a sensitive test of the theoretical methods used to account for low energy non-perturbative QCD effects. They present the measurement of the branching fraction for the decay B{sup 0} {yields} {psi}(2S)K{sub s}. The data set consists of 88.8 {+-} 1.0 x 10{sup 6} B{bar b} pairs collected on the e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} {Upsilon}(4S) resonance on BaBar/PEP-II at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). This analysis features a modification of present cuts, with respect to those published so far on BaBar, on the K{sub S} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} and {psi}(2S) {yields} J/{psi}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} which aim at reducing the background while keeping the signal intact. Various data selection criteria are studied for the lepton modes (e{sup +}e{sup -} and {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}) of the J/{psi} and {psi}(2S) to improve signal purity as well as study the stability of the resultant branching fractions.

Olivas, Alexander Raymond, Jr.; /Colorado U.

2005-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

353

Production of high specific activity silicon-32  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for preparation of silicon-32 is provide and includes contacting an irradiated potassium chloride target, including spallation products from a prior irradiation, with sufficient water, hydrochloric acid or potassium hydroxide to form a solution, filtering the solution, adjusting pH of the solution to from about 5.5 to about 7.5, admixing sufficient molybdate-reagent to the solution to adjust the pH of the solution to about 1.5 and to form a silicon-molybdate complex, contacting the solution including the silicon-molybdate complex with a dextran-based material, washing the dextran-based material to remove residual contaminants such as sodium-22, separating the silicon-molybdate complex from the dextran-based material as another solution, adding sufficient hydrochloric acid and hydrogen peroxide to the solution to prevent reformation of the silicon-molybdate complex and to yield an oxidization state of the molybdate adapted for subsequent separation by an anion exchange material, contacting the solution with an anion exchange material whereby the molybdate is retained by the anion exchange material and the silicon remains in solution, and optionally adding sufficient alkali metal hydroxide to adjust the pH of the solution to about 12 to 13. Additionally, a high specific activity silicon-32 product having a high purity is provided.

Phillips, Dennis R. (Los Alamos, NM); Brzezinski, Mark A. (Santa Barbara, CA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Specifications of Futures and Options Contracts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

mechanisms and changes in futures contract specifications. Mark Welch, John Robinson and David P. Anderson* 2 ( c o n t i n u e d o n n e x t p a ge ) T a bl e 1 . C o n t r a c t s p e c i fi c a t i o n s f or a g r i c u l t u r a l c ro p a n d l iv e... s t o ck f u t u r e s . C om m o di t y & s i z e o f c o n t r a c t T i c k e r s y m b o l T r a d i n g h o u r s ( c e n t r a l t i m e ) M o nt h s t ra d e d P r i c e quo t e s M i n i m u m p r i c e fluc t u a t i on D a i l y l i m i...

Welch, Mark; Robinson, John; Anderson, David P.

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

MEASUREMENT OF SPECIFIC HEAT CAPACITY OF SALTSTONE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the goals of the Saltstone variability study is to identify (and quantify the impact of) the operational and compositional variables that control or influence the important processing and performance properties of Saltstone grout mixtures. The heat capacity of the Saltstone waste form is one of the important properties of Saltstone mixes that was last measured at SRNL in 1997. It is therefore important to develop a core competency for rapid and accurate analysis of the specific heat capacity of the Saltstone mixes in order to quantify the impact of compositional and operational variations on this property as part of the variability study. The heat capacity, coupled with the heat of hydration data obtained from isothermal calorimetry for a given Saltstone mix, can be used to predict the maximum temperature increase in the cells within the vaults of the Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF). The temperature increase controls the processing rate and the pour schedule. The maximum temperature is also important to the performance properties of the Saltstone. For example, in mass pours of concrete or grout of which Saltstone is an example, the maximum temperature increase and the maximum temperature difference (between the surface and the hottest location) are controlled to ensure durability of the product and prevent or limit the cracking caused by the thermal gradients produced during curing. This report details the development and implementation of a method for the measurement of the heat capacities of Saltstone mixes as well as the heat capacities of the cementitious materials of the premix and the simulated salt solutions used to batch the mixes. The developed method utilizes the TAM Air isothermal calorimeter and takes advantage of the sophisticated heat flow measurement capabilities of the instrument. Standards and reference materials were identified and used to validate the procedure and ensure accuracy of testing. Heat capacities of Saltstone mixes were {approx} 55% higher than the previous measurement of specific heat capacity on a reference Saltstone mix in 1997. Values of mixes prepared using Deliquification, Dissolution and Adjustment (DDA), Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) and Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) simulants and premix at 0.60 w/cm ratio were {approx} 1.95 J/g/{sup o}C and were equivalent within experimental error. The simple law of mixtures was used to predict the heat capacities of the Saltstone and the results were in excellent agreement with experimental data. This simple law of mixtures can therefore be used to predict the heat capacities of Saltstone mixes in those cases where measurements have not been made. The time dependence of the heat capacity is important as an input to the modeling of temperature increase in Saltstone vaults. The heat capacity of a mix of MCU and premix at 0.60 w/cm ratio was measured immediately after initial mixing and then periodically up to times greater than 100 days. Within experimental error, the heat capacity did not change with time. Therefore, the modeling is not complicated by requiring a time dependent function for specific heat capacity. The water to cementitious material (w/cm) ratio plays a key role in determining the value of the heat capacity. Both experimental and predictive values for SWPF mixes as function of the w/cm ratio were obtained and presented in this report. Predictions of the maximum temperatures of the Saltstone mixes were made using the heat of hydration data from previous isothermal measurements and the newly measured heat capacities for DDA, MCU and SWPF mixes. The maximum temperature increase ranged from 37 to 48 C for these mixes. The presence of aluminate at 0.33 M produced a temperature increase of 68 C which is close to the adiabatic temperature rise of 74 C observed by Steimke and Fowler in 1997 for a mix containing 0.35 M aluminate. Aluminum dissolution of the sludge will increase the aluminate in the DSS which in turn will result in a larger temperature increase in the Saltstone vaults during the curing p

Harbour, J; Vickie Williams, V

2008-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

356

SUPERNOVA EXPLOSIONS OF SUPER-ASYMPTOTIC GIANT BRANCH STARS: MULTICOLOR LIGHT CURVES OF ELECTRON-CAPTURE SUPERNOVAE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An electron-capture supernova (ECSN) is a core-collapse supernova (CCSN) explosion of a super-asymptotic giant branch (SAGB) star with a main-sequence mass M{sub MS} {approx} 7-9.5 M{sub Sun }. The explosion takes place in accordance with core bounce and subsequent neutrino heating and is a unique example successfully produced by first-principle simulations. This allows us to derive a first self-consistent multicolor light curve of a CCSN. Adopting the explosion properties derived by the first-principle simulation, i.e., the low explosion energy of 1.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 50} erg and the small {sup 56}Ni mass of 2.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3} M{sub Sun }, we perform a multi-group radiation hydrodynamics calculation of ECSNe and present multicolor light curves of ECSNe of SAGB stars with various envelope masses and hydrogen abundances. We demonstrate that a shock breakout has a peak luminosity of L {approx} 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 44} erg s{sup -1} and can evaporate circumstellar dust up to R {approx} 10{sup 17} cm for the case of carbon dust, that the plateau luminosity and plateau duration of ECSNe are L {approx} 10{sup 42} erg s{sup -1} and t {approx} 60-100 days, respectively, and that a plateau is followed by a tail with a luminosity drop by {approx}4 mag. The ECSN shows a bright and short plateau that is as bright as typical Type II plateau supernovae, and a faint tail that might be influenced by the spin-down luminosity of a newborn pulsar. Furthermore, the theoretical models are compared with ECSN candidates: SN 1054 and SN 2008S. We find that SN 1054 shares the characteristics of the ECSNe. For SN 2008S, we find that its faint plateau requires an ECSN model with a significantly low explosion energy of E {approx} 10{sup 48} erg.

Tominaga, Nozomu [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science and Engineering, Konan University, 8-9-1 Okamoto, Kobe, Hyogo 658-8501 (Japan); Blinnikov, Sergei I. [Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics (ITEP), Moscow 117218 (Russian Federation); Nomoto, Ken'ichi, E-mail: tominaga@konan-u.ac.jp, E-mail: Sergei.Blinnikov@itep.ru, E-mail: nomoto@astron.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (WPI), University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8583 (Japan)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Long-Term Data Reveal Patterns and Controls on Stream Water Chemistry in a Forested Stream: Walker Branch, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present 20 years of weekly stream water chemistry, hydrology, and climate data for the Walker Branch watershed in eastern Tennessee, USA. Since 1989, the watershed has experienced a similar to 1.08 degrees C increase in mean annual temperature, a similar to 20% decline in precipitation, and a similar to 30% increase in forest evapotranspiration rates. As a result, stream runoff has declined by similar to 34%. We evaluate long-term trends in stream water concentrations and fluxes for nine solutes and use wet deposition data to calculate approximate watershed input-output budgets. Dissolved constituents were classified as geochemical solutes (Ca2+, Mg2+, and SO42-) or nutrients (NH4+, NO3-, soluble reactive phosphorus [SRP], total soluble nitrogen [TSN], total soluble phosphorus [TSP], and dissolved organic carbon [DOC]). Geochemical solutes are predominantly controlled by discharge, and the long-term changes in catchment hydrology have led to significant trends in the concentrations and fluxes of these solutes. Further, the trends in geochemical solute concentrations indicate shifting soil flowpath contributions to streamflow generation through time, with deep groundwater having a greater proportional contribution in recent years. Despite dramatic changes in watershed runoff, there were no trends in inorganic nutrient concentrations (NH4+, NO3-, and SRP). While most nutrients entering the watershed are retained, stream fluxes of nutrient solutes have declined significantly as a result of decreasing runoff. Nutrient concentrations in the stream exhibit large seasonality controlled by in-stream biological uptake. Stream benthic communities are sensitive to hydrologic disturbance, and changes in the frequency or intensity of storm events through time can affect nutrient fluxes. Stream NO3- concentrations are also sensitive to drought, with concentrations decreasing (increasing) if conditions during the three years prior to the time of sampling were drier (wetter) than the long-term mean. Future changes in the incidence of storm events, as well as the number and duration of droughts, have the potential to significantly alter watershed nutrient losses. Our analysis indicates that changing climates can differentially affect watershed element cycles either through changes in biogeochemical process rates or through changes in catchment hydrology. Furthermore, climate change can include both long-term trending in mean climate variables, as well as changes in the frequency and intensity of storms and droughts, with each of these types of change having distinct effects on the biological and geochemical processes governing different solutes.

Lutz, Brian D [Duke University; Mulholland, Patrick J [ORNL; Bernhardt, Emily [Duke University

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Specific-heat discontinuity in impure two-band superconductors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Ginzburg-Landau coefficients and the jump of the specific heat are calculated for a disordered two-band superconductor. We start with the analysis of a more general case with arbitrary anisotropy. While the specific-heat discontinuity...

Mishonov, TM; Penev, ES; Indekeu, JO; Pokrovsky, Valery L.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

altered recombination specificity: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

plasmas. The specific context for this study is astrophysical plasmas, (more) Bennet, Euan David 2012-01-01 32 Altered Expression ofAn Ll-Specific, O-Linked Cuticle...

360

Oak Ridge Site Specific Advisory Board Contacts | Department...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Contacts Oak Ridge Site Specific Advisory Board Contacts Mailing Address Oak Ridge Site Specific Advisory Board P.O. Box 2001, EM-91 Oak Ridge, TN 37831 Phone Numbers (865)...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "branch 202-586-1114 specific" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Semantics of first order parametric specifications Dusko Pavlovi'c  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the algebraic setting and are by now a standard part of most software development toolkits. However, an effort specifications was proposed early on and became a standard part of specification theory (cf. e.g. [8, 12, 13

Pavlovic, Dusko

362

Contrasting Adult Literacy Learners With and Without Specific Learning Disabilities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Contrasting adult literacy learners with and without specific learning disabilities This study of 311 adult education (AE) learners found 29% self-reported having a specific learning disability (SLD). Significant differences ...

Patterson, Margaret; Mellard, Daryl

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Occupational health and safety specification for construction works contracts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Occupational health and safety specification for construction works contracts March 2014 Issued by;#12;Occupational health and safety specification for construction works contracts Contents 1 Scope 1 2 Definitions Health and Safety 1 Specification for Construction Works Contracts Occupational health and safety

Wagner, Stephan

364

Important Cognitive Components of Domain-Specific Search Knowledge  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the subject-specific terms to enter in a query. For example, many university students often buy electronicImportant Cognitive Components of Domain-Specific Search Knowledge Suresh K. Bhavnani School Many users have acquired a sophisticated understanding of searching the Web in specific domains

Bhavnani, Suresh K.

365

Nutrition, digestive system and digestion specificity in phytophagous bats  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nutrition, digestive system and digestion specificity in phytophagous bats NF Zhukova Schmalhausen arisen as to how the feeding and digestion specificity is revealed in phytophagous bats, and how the entire order specificity affects these processes. To tackle these issues, the digestive system

Boyer, Edmond

366

An Object-Oriented Algebraic Steam-Boiler Control Specification  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An Object-Oriented Algebraic Steam-Boiler Control Specification.In this paper an object-oriented algebraic solution of the steam-boiler specification problem is presented computations cannot happen. 1 Introduction The steam-boiler control specification problem has been

?lveczky, Peter Csaba

367

An Object-Oriented Algebraic Steam-Boiler Control Specification  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An Object-Oriented Algebraic Steam-Boiler Control Specification Peter Csaba ()lveczky, Poland Abstract. In this paper an object-oriented algebraic solution of the steam-boiler specification Introduction The steam-boiler control specification problem has been proposed as a challenge for different

?lveczky, Peter Csaba

368

ATLAS SCT L1 Trigger Latency Budget Specification V1.00 15-Oct-1999 ATLAS Specification  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Page 1 ATLAS SCT L1 Trigger Latency Budget Specification V1.00 15-Oct-1999 ATLAS Specification Name: ATLAS SCT L1 Trigger Latency Budget Version: 1.00 Revision History Revision Change Description, Pages-Oct-1999 #12;Page 2 ATLAS SCT L1 Trigger Latency Budget Specification V1.00 15-Oct-1999 Table

California at Santa Cruz, University of

369

Characterization Activities to Evaluate Chlorinated Solvent Discharges to Tims Branch from the A/M Area of the Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this investigation was to identify those regions of plume outcrop along Tims Branch southeast of A/M Area and to establish fixed monitoring points along the seepline to evaluate proposed remediation needs and to support long-term monitoring activities in the vicinity of the seepline. The characterization approach employed in completing these tasks was dynamic and graded. Three stages of characterization were used to evaluate the outcrop region, with the results from each of the previous activities used to direct subsequent characterization.

Jackson, D.G.

2001-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

370

Measurement of branching ratio and B0s lifetime in the decay B0s ? J/? f0(980) at CDF  

DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

We present a study of Bs0 decays to the CP-odd final state J/? f0(980) with J/? ? +- and f0(980) ? ?+?-. Using pp? collision data with an integrated luminosity of 3.8 fb-1 collected by the CDF II detector at the Tevatron we measure a Bs0 lifetime of ?(B0s ? J/? f0(980)) = 1.70-0.11+0.12(stat) 0.03(syst) ps. This is the first measurement of the Bs0} lifetime in a decay to a CP eigenstate and corresponds in the standard model to the lifetime of the heavy Bs0 eigenstate. We also measure the product of branching fractions of B0s ? J/? f0(980) and f0(980) ? ?+?- relative to the product of branching fractions of B0s ? J/?? and ??K+K- to be Rf0/? = 0.257 0.020(stat) 0.014(syst), which is the most precise determination of this quantity to date.

Aaltonen, T [Helsinki Inst. of Phys.; Gonzalez, B Alvarez [Oviedo U.; Cantabria Inst. of Phys.; Amerio, S [INFN, Padua; Amidei, D [Michigan U.; Anastassov, A [Northwestern U.; Annovi, A [Frascati; Antos, J [Comenius U.; Apollinari, G [Fermilab; Appel, J A [Fermilab; Apresyan, A [Purdue U.; Arisawa, T [Waseda U.; Dubna, JINR

2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

371

Improved Measurements of Branching Fractions for B0 -> pi+pi-, K+pi-, and Search for B0 -> K+K-  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present preliminary measurements of branching fractions for the charmless two-body decays B{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} and K{sup +}{pi}{sup -}, and a search for B{sup 0} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup -} using a data sample of approximately 227 million B{bar B} decays. Signal yields are extracted with a multi-dimensional maximum likelihood fit, and the efficiency is corrected for the effects of final-state radiation. We find the charge-averaged branching fractions (in units of 10{sup -6}): {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}) = 5.5 {+-} 0.4 {+-} 0.3; {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} K{sup +}{pi}{sup -}) = 19.2 {+-} 0.6 {+-} 0.6; and {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup -}) = < 0.40. The errors are statistical followed by systematic, and the upper limit on K{sup +}K{sup -} represents a confidence level of 90%.

Aubert, B.; Barate, R.; Boutigny, D.; Couderc, F.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; /Annecy, LAPP; Grauges, E.; /Barcelona, IFAE; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pompili, A.; /Bari U. /INFN, Bari; Chen, J.C.; Qi, N.D.; Rong, G.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y.S.; /Beijing, Inst. High Energy Phys.; Eigen, G.; Ofte, I.; Stugu, B. /Bergen U. /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /Bristol U. /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San

2005-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

372

A Large Stellar Evolution Database for Population Synthesis Studies. III. Inclusion of the full Asymptotic Giant Branch phase and Web tools for stellar population analyses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Stellar evolution tracks and isochrones are key inputs for a wide range of astrophysical studies; in particular, they are essential to the interpretation of photometric and spectroscopic observations of resolved and unresolved stellar populations. We have made available to the astrophysical community a large, homogenous database of up-to-date stellar tracks and isochrones, and a set of programs useful in population synthesis studies. In this paper we first summarize the main properties of our stellar model database (BaSTI) already introduced in Pietrinferni et al. (2004) and Pietrinferni et al. (2006). We then discuss an important update of the database, i.e., the extension of all stellar models and isochrones until the end of the thermal pulses along the Asymptotic Giant Branch. This extension of the library is particularly relevant for stellar population analyses in the near-infrared, or longer wavelengths, where the contribution to the integrated photometric properties by cool and bright Asymptotic Giant Branch stars is significant. A few comparisons with empirical data are also presentend and briefly discussed. We then present three web-tools that allow an interactive access to the database, and make possible to compute user-specified evolutionary tracks, isochrones, stellar luminosity functions, plus synthetic Color-Magnitude-Diagrams and integrated magnitudes for arbitrary Star Formation Histories. All these web tools are available at the BaSTI database official site: http://www.oa-teramo.inaf.it/BASTI.

Daniel Cordier; Adriano Pietrinferni; Santi Cassisi; Maurizio Salaris

2006-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

373

Specific Administrative Controls Review at the Hanford Site with...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

the Office of Health, Safety and Security, participated in the Office of Environmental Management Office of Standards and Quality Assurance, EM-23, review of Specific...

374

Introduction Compound-specific identification, or biomarker analysis,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

269 Introduction Compound-specific identification, or biomarker analysis, in organic geochemistry cases highlighting subtle yet important details not revealed by bulk analyses alone. For example

Long, Bernard

375

PROJECT SPECIFIC CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION FOR A WAVE GLIDER-BASED...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

PROJECT SPECIFIC CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION FOR A WAVE GLIDER-BASED PASSIVE ACOUSTIC DETECTION SYSTEM, Attachment PACIFIC NORTHWEST NATIONAL LABORATORY, RICHLAND, WASHINGTON Proposed...

376

E-Print Network 3.0 - application specific scintimammography...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

is the most widespread technique... in clinical practice, its limitations in terms of specificity and sensitivity are well known 1,2. To ... Source: Lanconelli, Nico -...

377

Specific Effects of Fiber Size and Fiber Swelling on Biomass...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Effects of Fiber Size and Fiber Swelling on Biomass Substrate Surface Area and Enzymatic Digestibility. Specific Effects of Fiber Size and Fiber Swelling on Biomass Substrate...

378

Transuranic Waste Processing Center Oak Ridge Site Specific...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Transuranic Waste Processing Update Oak Ridge Site Specific Advisory Board May 14, 2014 Laura Wilkerson, Portfolio Federal Project Director Karen Deacon, Deputy Federal Project...

379

Oak Ridge Site Specific Advisory Board Meetings | Department...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Meetings Oak Ridge Site Specific Advisory Board Meetings Board Meeting Documents Available for Download January 15, 2015 ORSSAB Meeting - November 2014 Discussion of board...

380

Standard Work Specifications for Single-Family Home Energy Upgrades...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Energy Upgrades Summary (Fact Sheet), Guidelines For Home Energy Professionals, Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE) Standard Work Specifications for Single-Family Home...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "branch 202-586-1114 specific" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

New IEC Specifications Help Define Wind Plant Performance Reporting...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

working with the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) Committee on wind turbine availability to develop three specifications for IEC-61400-26-the standard that...

382

Lineage specific genomics features and insights into evolutionary pathways.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The growing number of complete genome sequences provides an unprecedented way to study many biological questions. In my study, I aim to study lineage specific (more)

Ng, Siu-Kin

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

DOE has published the revised 2010 Energy Sector Specific Plan  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Department of Energy announces the publication of the Energy Sector-Specific Plan: An Annex to the National Infrastructure Protection Plan 2010.

384

Biodiesel Progress: ASTM Specifications and 2nd Generation Biodiesel  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Progress: ASTM Specifications and 2 nd Generation Biodiesel Steve Howell Technical Director National Biodiesel Board Detroit, Michigan August 15, 2007 Today's Topics Biodiesel...

385

abstracting code specific: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Poster: 4195B656 Abstract Title: Specification of Multiple Ganglion Cell Stimulation Codes for Engineering Websites Summary: ProgramPoster: 4195B656 Abstract Title:...

386

Crown Ethers Flatten in Graphene for Strong, Specific Binding...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

SHARE Crown Ethers Flatten in Graphene for Strong, Specific Binding ORNL discovery holds potential for separations, sensors, batteries, biotech and more This sheet of graphene...

387

Microsoft Word - Paducah and Portsmouth Off-Specification UF6...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

UF6 Sample Results PORTS Off-Specification Enriched and Normal Sample Results Sample Transfer Number is the reference to the Production Automated Scheduling System (PASS) number....

388

Technical specifications for mechanical recycling of agricultural plastic waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: Technical specifications for agricultural plastic wastes (APWs) recycling proposed. Specifications are the base for best economical and environmental APW valorisation. Analysis of APW reveals inherent characteristics and constraints of APW streams. Thorough survey on mechanical recycling processes and industry as it applies to APW. Specifications for APW recycling tested, adjusted and verified through pilot trials. - Abstract: Technical specifications appropriate for the recycling of agricultural plastic wastes (APWs), widely accepted by the recycling industry were developed. The specifications establish quality standards to be met by the agricultural plastics producers, users and the agricultural plastic waste management chain. They constitute the base for the best economical and environmental valorisation of the APW. The analysis of the APW streams conducted across Europe in the framework of the European project LabelAgriWaste revealed the inherent characteristics of the APW streams and the inherent constraints (technical or economical) of the APW. The APW stream properties related to its recycling potential and measured during pilot trials are presented and a subsequent universally accepted simplified and expanded list of APW recycling technical specifications is proposed and justified. The list includes two sets of specifications, applied to two different quality categories of recyclable APW: one for pellet production process (Quality I) and another one for plastic profile production process (Quality II). Parameters that are taken into consideration in the specifications include the APW physical characteristics, contamination, composition and degradation. The proposed specifications are focused on polyethylene based APW that represents the vast majority of the APW stream. However, the specifications can be adjusted to cover also APW of different materials (e.g. PP or PVC) that are found in very small quantities in protected cultivations in Europe. The adoption of the proposed specifications could transform this waste stream into a labelled commodity traded freely in the market and will constitute the base for the best economical and environmental valorisation of the APW.

Briassoulis, D., E-mail: briassou@aua.gr; Hiskakis, M.; Babou, E.

2013-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

389

RAPID COMMUNICATION Aquaporin 4-Specific T Cells in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RAPID COMMUNICATION Aquaporin 4-Specific T Cells in Neuromyelitis Optica Exhibit a Th17 Bias. Zamvil, MD, PhD1 Objective: Aquaporin 4 (AQP4)-specific autoantibodies in neuromyelitis optica (NMO pathogenesis. ANN NEUROL 2012;72:53­64 Neuromyelitis optica (NMO) is a rare, disabling, sometimes fatal

Stroud, Robert

390

Requirements on Quality Specification Posed by Service Orientation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

their contribution to service oriented QoS specification is still missing. In this paper we present a strictly. Furthermore we derive requirements for future specification concepts applicable in service oriented en to the composition of products by outsourcing, which results in creat- ing business critical value chains. This trend

391

UPC Language and Library Specifications, Version 1.3  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

UPC is an explicitly parallel extension to the ISO C 99 Standard. UPC follows the partitioned global address space programming model. This document is the formal specification for the UPC language and library syntax and semantics, and supersedes prior specification version 1.2 (LBNL-59208).

UPC Consortium; Bonachea, Dan; Funck, Gary

2013-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

392

Building DomainSpecific Search Engines with Machine Learning Techniques  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.netpart.com lets the user search over company pages by hostname, company name, and location. ffl wwwBuilding Domain­Specific Search Engines with Machine Learning Techniques Andrew McCallum zy Science Carnegie Mellon University Pittsburgh, PA 15213 Abstract Domain­specific search engines

McCallum, Andrew

393

ACE Service Directory Interface Specification Version 1.0  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ACE Service Directory Interface Specification Version 1.0 Renzo Hayashi, Leon Searl, and Gary Specification ______________________________________________ 6 2.4.1 Service Daemon to ACE Service Directory Client to ACE Service Directory Daemon_________________________________________12 S-2.4.2.1 get

Kansas, University of

394

Nucleotide Specificity versus Complex Heterogeneity in Exonuclease Activity Measurements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nucleotide Specificity versus Complex Heterogeneity in Exonuclease Activity Measurements Jo activity is nucleotide-dependent, and that a fluorescent label bound to a nucleotide significantly slows are fluorescently labeled at two specific sites in the nucleotide sequence (positions 5 and 38 from the free end

Enderlein, Jörg

395

2IW05 Software Specification Statecharts -Part I: Syntax  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Timer(t) #12;Reactive Systems Specification: A Chemical Plant Section 2.7.6: Security If the system sends: A Chemical Plant Section 2.7.6: Security If the system sends a signal hot then send a message to the operator SIGPLAN HOPL-III, 2007. #12;Reactive Systems Specification: A Chemical Plant Section 2.7.6: Security

Mousavi, Mohammad

396

Formal Specification and Testing of a Management Architecture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. The aim of our work is to test the applicability of FDTs to managed object specification by formallyFormal Specification and Testing of a Management Architecture G. P. A. Fernandes \\Lambda and J systems management to supply and maintain services required by users has led to a demand for management

Derrick, John

397

Revising Specifications with CTL Properties using Bounded Model Checking  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Revising Specifications with CTL Properties using Bounded Model Checking No Author Given that inconsistencies arise between the formal specification and some desired property. Belief Revision deals. In this paper, we propose the use of belief revision techniques in order to deal with inconsistencies in formal

Finger, Marcelo

398

TESLA: A Formally Defined Event Specification Language Gianpaolo Cugola  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TESLA: A Formally Defined Event Specification Language Gianpaolo Cugola Dip. di Elettronica e to clearly state how the system should behave. Moving from these premises, we present TESLA, a complex event specification language. Each TESLA rule considers incoming data items as notifi- cations of events and defines

Cugola, Gianpaolo

399

Landscape Specification Resizing Leandro Cruz, Luiz Velho and Djalma Lucio  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Landscape Specification Resizing Leandro Cruz, Luiz Velho and Djalma Lucio VISGRAF Lab - IMPA Rio://liris.cnrs.fr/{egalin, apeytavi, eguerin} Abstract--In this work, we introduce a method for resizing a landscape specification, i the landscape dimensions while keeping its overall appearance. Our method is based on the insertion and removal

400

NDetermin: Inferring Nondeterministic Sequential Specifications for Parallelism Correctness  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NDetermin: Inferring Nondeterministic Sequential Specifications for Parallelism Correctness Jacob and that copies bear this notice and the full citation on the first page. To copy otherwise, to republish, to post;NDetermin: Inferring Nondeterministic Sequential Specifications for Parallelism Correctness Jacob Burnim

Necula, George

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "branch 202-586-1114 specific" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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401

Streams of Steam The Steam Boiler Specification Case Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Streams of Steam ­ The Steam Boiler Specification Case Study Manfred Broy, Franz Regensburger-tuned con- cepts of FOCUS by its application of the requirements specification of a steam boiler, see [Abr96-studies. In this context, applying FOCUS to the steam boiler case study ([Abr96]) led us to a couple of questions re- #12

402

average specific absorption: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

average specific absorption First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Original Research Specific...

403

Double Shell Tank (DST) Transfer Piping Subsystem Specification  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This specification establishes the performance requirements and provides references to the requisite codes and standards to be applied during design of the Double-Shell Tank (DST) Transfer Piping Subsystem that supports the first phase of Waste Feed Delivery. This specification establishes the performance requirements and provides references to the requisite codes and standards to be applied during design of the Double-Shell Tank (DST) Transfer Piping Subsystem that supports the first phase of waste feed delivery. This subsystem transfers waste between transfer-associated structures (pits) and to the River Protection Project (RPP) Privatization Contractor Facility where it will be processed into an immobilized waste form. This specification is intended to be the basis for new projects/installations (W-521, etc.). This specification is not intended to retroactively affect previously established project design criteria without specific direction by the program.

GRAVES, C.E.

2000-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

404

Experiment-specific analyses in support of code development  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Experiment-specific models have been developed since 1986 by Oak Ridge National Laboratory Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) severe accident analysis programs for the purpose of BWR experimental planning and optimum interpretation of experimental results. These experiment-specific models have been applied to large integral tests (ergo, experiments) which start from an initial undamaged core state. The tests performed to date in BWR geometry have had significantly different-from-prototypic boundary and experimental conditions because of either normal facility limitations or specific experimental constraints. These experiments (ACRR: DF-4, NRU: FLHT-6, and CORA) were designed to obtain specific phenomenological information such as the degradation and interaction of prototypic components and the effects on melt progression of control-blade materials and channel boxes. Applications of ORNL models specific to the ACRR DF-4 and KfK CORA-16 experiments are discussed and significant findings from the experimental analyses are presented. 32 refs., 16 figs.

Ott, L.J.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Measurement of the Ratio of Branching Fractions Br(Bs -> Ds- pi+)/Br(B -> D- pi+) at CDF-II  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The measurement of B{sub s}{sup 0} mixing is one of the flagship analyses for the Run II B physics program. The sensitivity of the measurement to the frequency of B{sub s}{sup 0} oscillations strongly depends on the number of reconstructed B{sub s}{sup 0} mesons. They present the measurement of the ratio of branching fractions Br(B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} D{sub s}{sup -}{pi}{sup +})/Br(B{sup 0} {yields} D{sup -}{pi}{sup +}), which directly influences the number of B{sub s}{sup 0} events available for the measurement of B{sub s}{sup 0} mixing at CDF-II. They analyze 115 pb{sup -1} of data collected with the CDF-II detector in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV using a novel displaced track trigger. They reconstruct 78 {+-} 11 B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} D{sub s}{sup -}{pi}{sup +} decays at 1153 {+-} 45 B{sup 0} {yields} D{sup -}{pi}{sup +} decays with good signal to background ratio. This is the world's largest sample of fully reconstructed B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} D{sub s}{sup -}{pi}{sup +} decays. They find the ratio of production fractions multiplied by the ratio of branching fractions to be: f{sub s}/f{sub d} {center_dot} Br(B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} D{sub s}{sup -}{pi}{sup +})/Br(B{sup 0} {yields} D{sup -}{pi}{sup +}) = 0.325 {+-} 0.046(stat) {+-} 0.034(syst) {+-} 0.084 (BR). Using the world average value of f{sub s}/f{sub d} = 0.26 {+-} 0.03, we infer that the ratio of branching fractions is: Br(B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} D{sub s}{sup -}{pi}{sup +})/Br(B{sup 0} {yields} D{sup -}{pi}{sup +}) = 1.25 {+-} 0.18(stat) {+-} 0.13(syst) {+-} 0.32(BR) {+-} 0.14(PR) where the last uncertainty is due to the uncertainty on the world average measurement of the ratio of B{sub s}{sup 0} to B{sup 0} production rates, f{sub s}/f{sub d}.

Furic, Ivan Kresimir; /MIT

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

ATLAS-SCT Bipolar Amplifier-Discriminator IC Specification Version 4.01 13-Jan-1999 Project Specification  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

______________________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________________ ATLAS-SCT Bipolar Amplifier-Discriminator IC Specification Version 4.01 13-Jan-1999 Project ______________________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________________ ATLAS-SCT Bipolar Amplifier-Discriminator IC Specification Version 4.01 13-Jan-1999 1. Scope: Establish Circuit to be used as part of the Binary Readout of the ATLAS Semi-Conductor Tracker (SCT). This design

California at Santa Cruz, University of

407

Measurement of the Branching Fraction for D8+ rarr tau+nu_tau and Extraction of the Decay Constant f_D_s  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The branching fraction for the decay D{sub s}{sup +} {yields} {tau}{sup +}{nu}{sub {tau}} with {tau}{sup +} {yields} e{sup +}{bar {nu}}{sub {tau}}, is measured using a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 427 fb{sup -1} collected at center of mass energies near 10.58 GeV with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy e{sup +}e{sup -} collider at SLAC. In the process e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} c{bar c} {yields} D*{sub s}{sup +} {bar D}{sub TAG}{bar K}X, the D*{sub s}{sup +} meson is reconstructed as a missing particle, and the subsequent decay D*{sub s}{sup +} {yields} D{sub s}{sup +}{gamma} yields an inclusive D{sub s}{sup +} data sample. Here {bar D}{sub TAG} refers to a fully reconstructed hadronic {bar D} decay, {bar K} is a K{sup -} or {bar K}{sup 0}, and X stands for any number of charged or neutral pions. The decay D{sub s}{sup +} {yields} K{sub S}{sup 0}K{sup +} is isolated also, and from ratio of event yields and known branching fractions, {Beta}(D{sub s}{sup +} {yields} {tau}{sup +}{nu}{sub {tau}}) = (4.5 {+-} 0.5 {+-} 0.4 {+-} 0.3)% is determined. The pseudoscalar decay constant is extracted to be f{sub D{sub s}} = (233 {+-} 13 {+-} 10 {+-} 7) MeV, where the first uncertainty is statistical, the second is systematic, and the third results from the uncertainties on the external measurements used as input to the calculation.

Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Tisserand, V.; /Annecy, LAPP; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; /Barcelona U., ECM; Martinelli, M.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; /INFN, Bari /Bari U.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; /Bergen U.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D.N.; Hooberman, B.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; Osipenkov, I.L.; Tanabe, T.; /UC, Berkeley; Hawkes, C.M.; /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /Indian Inst. Tech., Guwahati /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa State U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /SLAC /South Carolina U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tel Aviv U. /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /Valencia U. /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

2010-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

408

Results from Development of Model Specifications for Multifamily Energy Retrofits  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Specifications, modeled after CSI MasterFormat, provide the trade contractors and builders with requirements and recommendations on specific building materials, components and industry practices that comply with the expectations and intent of the requirements within the various funding programs associated with a project. The goal is to create a greater level of consistency in execution of energy efficiency retrofits measures across the multiple regions a developer may work. IBACOS and Mercy Housing developed sample model specifications based on a common building construction type that Mercy Housing encounters.

Brozyna, K.

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Substrate specificity of the sialic acid biosynthetic pathway  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Unnatural analogs of sialic acid can be delivered to mammalian cell surfaces through the metabolic transformation of unnatural N-acetylmannosamine (ManNAc) derivatives. In previous studies, mannosamine analogs bearing simple N-acyl groups up to five carbon atoms in length were recognized as substrates by the biosynthetic machinery and transformed into cell-surface sialoglycoconjugates [Keppler, O. T., et al. (2001) Glycobiology 11, 11R-18R]. Such structural alterations to cell surface glycans can be used to probe carbohydrate-dependent phenomena. This report describes our investigation into the extent of tolerance of the pathway toward additional structural alterations of the N-acyl substituent of ManNAc. A panel of analogs with ketone-containing N-acyl groups that varied in the lengthor steric bulk was chemically synthesized and tested for metabolic conversion to cell-surface glycans. We found that extension of the N-acyl chain to six, seven, or eight carbon atoms dramatically reduced utilization by the biosynthetic machinery. Likewise, branching from the linear chain reduced metabolic conversion. Quantitation of metabolic intermediates suggested that cellular metabolism is limited by the phosphorylation of the N-acylmannosamines by ManNAc 6-kinase in the first step of the pathway. This was confirmed by enzymatic assay of the partially purified enzyme with unnatural substrates. Identification of ManNAc 6-kinase as a bottleneck for unnatural sialic acid biosynthesis provides a target for expanding the metabolic promiscuity of mammalian cells.

Jacobs, Christina L.; Goon, Scarlett; Yarema, Kevin J.; Hinderlich, Stephan; Hang, Howard C.; Chai, Diana H.; Bertozzi, Carolyn R.

2001-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

410

Specification and Planning of UAV Missions: A Process Algebra Approach  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Formal languages have recently come under attention as a powerful tool to describe in a precise and rigorous way mission specifications (i.e., mission objectives and constraints) for robotic systems, and to design planning ...

Rasmussen, Steven

411

Double Shell Tank (DST) Monitor and Control Subsystem Specification  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This specification revises the performance requirements and provides references to the requisite codes and standards to be applied during design of the Double-Shell Tank (DST) Monitor and Control Subsystem that supports the first phase of Waste Feed Delivery.

BAFUS, R.R.

2000-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

412

Double Shell Tank (DST) Process Waste Sampling Subsystem Specification  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This specification establishes the performance requirements and provides references to the requisite codes and standards to be applied to the Double-Shell Tank (DST) Process Waste Sampling Subsystem which supports the first phase of Waste Feed Delivery.

RASMUSSEN, J.H.

2000-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

413

Concise specifications of locally optimal code generators Andrew W. Appel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, so it can be much more concise. Twig specifications for the VAX and MC68020 are described. The instruction sets of the DEC VAX and Motorola 68020 are used as a illustrative examples. The VAX architecture

Appel, Andrew W.

414

Technical Evaluation Report "DCE BOOT/OPERATE Interface Specification"  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Technical Evaluation Report "DCE BOOT/OPERATE Interface Specification" Date: November 6, 2000 for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy Reviewed: Technical Evaluation Report Approved: "DCE BOOT/OPERATE Interface Center for Astrophysics & Space Astronomy Revision A Technical Evaluation Report "DCE BOOT

Colorado at Boulder, University of

415

Using XML to Build Consistency Rules for Distributed Specifications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Using XML to Build Consistency Rules for Distributed Specifications Andrea Zisman Wolfgang Emmerich)20 76794413 a.zisman@soi.city.ac.uk {w.emmerich | a.finkelstein}@cs.ucl.ac.uk ABSTRACT The work presented

Finkelstein, Anthony

416

Tissue-specific gene silencing monitored in circulating RNA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Pharmacologic target gene modulation is the primary objective for RNA antagonist strategies and gene therapy. Here we show that mRNAs encoding tissue-specific gene transcripts can be detected in biological fluids and that ...

Sehgal, Alfica

417

Standard specification for sintered (Uranium-Plutonium) dioxide pellets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1.1 This specification covers finished sintered and ground (uranium-plutonium) dioxide pellets for use in thermal reactors. It applies to uranium-plutonium dioxide pellets containing plutonium additions up to 15 % weight. This specification may not completely cover the requirements for pellets fabricated from weapons-derived plutonium. 1.2 This specification does not include (1) provisions for preventing criticality accidents or (2) requirements for health and safety. Observance of this specification does not relieve the user of the obligation to be aware of and conform to all applicable international, federal, state, and local regulations pertaining to possessing, processing, shipping, or using source or special nuclear material. Examples of U.S. government documents are Code of Federal Regulations Title 10, Part 50Domestic Licensing of Production and Utilization Facilities; Code of Federal Regulations Title 10, Part 71Packaging and Transportation of Radioactive Material; and Code of Federal Regulations Tit...

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Spatially localized generation of nucleotide sequence-specific DNA damage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Spatially localized generation of nucleotide sequence-specific DNA damage Dennis H. Oh* , Brett A- neously manipulated at the nucleotide level and in three dimen- sions. This approach for targeting

Boxer, Steven G.

419

PROGRAMME SPECIFICATION POSTGRADUATE PROGRAMMES Programme name Economic Evaluation in Healthcare  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 PROGRAMME SPECIFICATION POSTGRADUATE PROGRAMMES KEY FACTS Programme name Economic Evaluation PROGRAMME SUMMARY This programme is designed to produce professionals who can undertake economic evaluation bases for economic evaluation and in advanced quantitative methods relevant to healthcare decision

Weyde, Tillman

420

Test specification for decant pump and winch assembly  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This specification provides the requirements for testing of the vertical turbine decant pump including the floating suction arm with load sensing winch control, instrumentation and the associated PLC/PC control system.

Staehr, T.W.

1994-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "branch 202-586-1114 specific" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

AFRICA HEALTH PLACEMENTS Job Specification Research Officer (intern)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

culture strategy consulting, health workforce planning, recruitment, workforce retention infrastructure. Innovative Planning: The purpose of this function is to take stakeholder requirements in alignment to planned solutions. #12;AFRICA HEALTH PLACEMENTS Job Specification ­ Research Officer

422

Appendix B: LABORATORY-SPECIFIC CHEMICAL HYGIENE PLAN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

operations, if any, will require prior approval. I. STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES Some laboratory procedures involving hazardous chemicals should have specific Standard Operating Procedures that address health, special precautions or procedures, preventative maintenance schedules (fume hoods are evaluated annually

Ferrara, Katherine W.

423

Specific Examples of Global Activities Environmental assessment in Azerbaijan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, global warming, and global entrepreneurship. Discovery Park works syner- gistically with the Office competitiveness, global energy security, global warming, and global entrepreneurship. Discovery Park worksSpecific Examples of Global Activities · Environmental assessment in Azerbaijan · Study abroad

424

Contractor-specific Documentation & Information in PARS II  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE Office of Acquisition and Project Management established guidelines for documentation that should be available within PARS II through contractor-specific records that are not linked to any...

425

The specification and patterning of the Drosophila egg chamber  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The generation of cell polarity through the localization of specific mRNAs and proteins to discrete subcellular sites is fundamental to asymmetric cell division, tissue morphogenesis, cell migration, and most other ...

Lan, Lan

2010-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

426

Inferring Gene Family Histories in Yeast Identifies Lineage Specific Expansions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The complement of genes found in the genome is a balance between gene gain and gene loss. Knowledge of the specific genes that are gained and lost over evolutionary time allows an understanding of the evolution of biological ...

Ames, Ryan M.; Money, Daniel; Lovell, Simon C.

2014-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

427

The Case for ApplicationSpecific Operating Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Case for Application­Specific Operating Systems Thomas E. Anderson Division of Computer Science processors, higher bandwidth networks, and larger amounts of pri­ mary, secondary, and tertiary storage

Anderson, Tom

428

A Methodology for Automated Verification of Rosetta Specification Transformations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

particular semantic vocabulary and modeling style. The following dissertation proposes a framework, semantics and methodology for automated verification of safety preservation over specification transformations between domains. Utilizing the ideas of lattice...

Lohoefener, Jennifer Lee

2011-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

429

Unique ER Cistromes Control Cell Type-Specific Gene Regulation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-specific E2 regulation of gene expression in MCF7 and U2OS- ER cells, we compared the ER binding sites on DNA a critical role in defining the ER cistrome in MCF7 cells, it is not expressed in U2OS-ER cells, and forkhead-specific effects, however, remains to be explained. We have compared the gene expres- sion profile of the MCF7

Brown, Myles

430

General and specific combining ability in a beef cattle herd  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GENERAL AND SPECIFIC COMBINING ABILITV IN A BEEF CATTLE HERD A Thesis By JAMES EDMOND BROWN Submitted to the Graduate College of the Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE January... 1967 Major Sub)ect: Animal Breeding GENERAL AND SPECIFIC COMBINING ABILITY IN A BEEF CATTLE HERD A Thesis By JAMES EDMOND BROWN Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of Committee) (Head of Department) (M ' ber) I /~ (Member) (Member...

Brown, James Edmond

1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Bernhard Riegll.3.*, Carlton Heine2.3, George M. Branch3 lJnstitut fur Palaontologie der Universitat Wien, Geozentrum Althanstrasse 17, A-I090 Wien, Austria  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Africa .,. ABSTRACT: Advantages and disadvantages of a funnel-shaped growth in 2 coral species (Acropora with particular en- vironments: for example, thinly branching species generally occur in areas of low wave energy to an environment with high sedimentation. Although a funnel exposes a high surface area to solar radiation

432

This directory lists main and branch libraries providing direct library service. Use the Public Library Headquarters file (http://www.library.ca.gov/lds/docs/CaliforniaPublicLibraryHeadquartersDirectory.pdf) for more extensive  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This directory lists main and branch libraries providing direct library service. Use the Public Library Headquarters file (http://www.library.ca.gov/lds/docs/CaliforniaPublicLibraryHeadquartersDirectory, CA 94536-3493 Page 1 of 143Published by the Califorinia State Library. 6/6/2014 rptDirectory

433

Double Shell Tank (DST) Transfer Pump Subsystem Specification  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This specification establishes the performance requirements and provides references to the requisite codes and standards to be applied to the Double-Shell Tank (DST) Transfer Pump Subsystem which supports the first phase of Waste Feed Delivery (WFD). This specification establishes the performance requirements and provides the references to the requisite codes and standards to be applied during the design of the DST Transfer Pump Subsystem that supports the first phase of (WFD). The DST Transfer Pump Subsystem consists of a pump for supernatant and or slurry transfer for the DSTs that will be retrieved during the Phase 1 WFD operations. This system is used to transfer low-activity waste (LAW) and high-level waste (HLW) to designated DST staging tanks. It also will deliver blended LAW and HLW feed from these staging tanks to the River Protection Project (RPP) Privatization Contractor facility where it will be processed into an immobilized waste form. This specification is intended to be the basis for new projects/installations (W-521, etc.). This specification is not intended to retroactively affect previously established project design criteria without specific direction by the program.

LESHIKAR, G.A.

2000-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

434

System specification for the integrated monitoring and surveillance system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This System Specification establishes the requirements for the Plutonium Focus Area (PFA) Integrated Monitoring and Surveillance System (IMSS). In this document, ``Integrated Monitoring and Surveillance System`` is used to describe the concept of integrated sensors, computers, personnel, and systems that perform the functions of sensing conditions, acquiring data, monitoring environmental safety and health, controlling and accounting for materials, monitoring material stability, monitoring container integrity, transferring data, and analyzing, reporting, and storing data. This concept encompasses systems (e.g. sensors, personnel, databases, etc.) that are already in place at the sites but may require modifications or additions to meet all identified surveillance requirements. The purpose of this System Specification is to provide Department of Energy (DOE) sites that store plutonium materials with a consolidation of all known requirements for the storage and surveillance of 3013 packages of stabilized plutonium metals and oxides. This compilation may be used (1) as a baseline for surveillance system design specifications where 3013 packages of stabilized plutonium metals and oxides will be stored and monitored; (2) as a checklist for evaluating existing surveillance systems to ensure that all requirements are met for the storage and surveillance of 3013 packages of stabilized plutonium metals and oxides; and (3) as a baseline for preparing procurement specifications tailored for site specific storage and surveillance of 3013 packages of stabilized plutonium metals and oxides.

NONE

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Measurement of the branching fraction ${\\mathcal{B}}(\\Lambda^0_b\\rightarrow \\Lambda^+_c\\pi^-\\pi^+\\pi^-)$ at CDF  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report an analysis of the {Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} {yields} {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} decay in a data sample collected by the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron corresponding to 2.4 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity. We reconstruct the currently largest samples of the decay modes {Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} {yields} {Lambda}{sub c}(2595){sup +}{pi}{sup -} (with {Lambda}{sub c}(2595){sup +} {yields} {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}), {Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} {yields} {Lambda}{sub c}(2625){sup +}{pi}{sup -} (with {Lambda}{sub c}(2625){sup +} {yields} {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}), {Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} {yields} {Sigma}{sub c}(2455){sup ++}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup -} (with {Sigma}{sub c}(2455){sup ++} {yields} {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}{pi}{sup +}), and {Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} {yields} {Sigma}{sub c}(2455)0{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} (with {Sigma}{sub c}(2455)0 {yields} {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}) and measure the branching fractions relative to the {Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} {yields} {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} branching fraction. We measure the ratio {Beta}({Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} {yields} {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -})/ {Beta}({Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} {yields} {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}{pi}{sup -})=3.04 {+-} 0.33(stat){sub -0.55}{sup +0.70}(syst) which is used to derive {Beta}({Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} {yields} {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -})=(26.8{sub -11.2}{sup +11.9}) x 10{sup -3}.

Aaltonen, T.; /Helsinki Inst. of Phys.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; /Oviedo U. /Cantabria Inst. of Phys.; Amerio, S.; /INFN, Padua; Amidei, D.; /Michigan U.; Anastassov, A.; /Northwestern U. /Fermilab; Annovi, A.; /Frascati; Antos, J.; /Comenius U.; Apollinari, G.; /Fermilab; Appel, J.A.; /Fermilab; Arisawa, T.; /Waseda U.; Artikov, A.; /Dubna, JINR /Texas A-M

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Dye laser amplifier including a specifically designed diffuser assembly  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A large (high flow rate) dye laser amplifier in which a continuous replened supply of dye is excited by a first light beam, specifically a copper vapor laser beam, in order to amplify the intensity of a second different light beam, specifically a dye beam, passing through the dye is disclosed herein. This amplifier includes a dye cell defining a dye chamber through which a continuous stream of dye is caused to pass at a relatively high flow rate and a specifically designed diffuser assembly for slowing down the flow of dye while, at the same time, assuring that as the dye stream flows through the diffuser assembly it does so in a stable manner.

Davin, James (Gilroy, CA); Johnston, James P. (Stanford, CA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Method To Identify Specific Inhibiutors Of Imp Dehydrogenase  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention relates to methods to identify specific inhibitors of the purine nucleotide synthesis enzyme, IMP dehydrogenase (IMPDH). IMPDH is an essential enzyme found in all free-living organisms from humans to bacteria and is an important therapeutic target. The invention allows the identification of specific inhibitors of any IMPDH enzyme which can be expressed in a functional form in a recombinant host cell. A variety of eukaryotic or prokaryotic host systems commonly used for the expression of recombinant proteins are suitable for the practice of the invention. The methods are amenable to high throughput systems for the screening of inhibitors generated by combinatorial chemistry or other methods such as antisense molecule production. Utilization of exogenous guanosine as a control component of the methods allows for the identification of inhibitors specific for IMPDH rather than other causes of decreased cell proliferation.

Collart, Frank R. (Bolingbrook, IL); Huberman, Eliezer (LaGrange, IL)

2000-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

438

Domain-specific Web Service Discovery with Service Class Descriptions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents DynaBot, a domain-specific web service discovery system. The core idea of the DynaBot service discovery system is to use domain-specific service class descriptions powered by an intelligent Deep Web crawler. In contrast to current registry-based service discovery systems--like the several available UDDI registries--DynaBot promotes focused crawling of the Deep Web of services and discovers candidate services that are relevant to the domain of interest. It uses intelligent filtering algorithms to match services found by focused crawling with the domain-specific service class descriptions. We demonstrate the capability of DynaBot through the BLAST service discovery scenario and describe our initial experience with DynaBot.

Rocco, D; Caverlee, J; Liu, L; Critchlow, T J

2005-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

439

Measurements of branching fraction ratios and CP-asymmetries in suppressed B-? D(? K+?-)K- and B-? D(? K+?-)?- decays  

DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

We report the first reconstruction in hadron collisions of the suppressed decays B-? D(? K+?-)K- and B-? D(? K+?-)?- decays, sensitive to the CKM phase {gamma}, using data from 7 fb-1 of integrated luminosity collected by the CDF II detector at the Tevatron collider. We reconstruct a signal for the B-? D(? K+?-)K- suppressed mode with a significance of 3.2 standard deviations, and measure the ratios of the suppressed to favored branching fractions R(K) = [22.0 8.6(stat) 2.6(syst)] x 10-3, R+(K) = [42.6 13.7(stat) 2.8(syst)] x 10-3, R-(K) = [3.8 10.3(stat) 2.7(syst)] x 10-3 as well as the direct CP-violating asymmetry A(K) = -0.820.44(stat)0.09(syst) of this mode. Corresponding quantities for B- ? D(? K+?-)?- decay are also reported.

Aaltonen, T. [Helsinki Inst. of Physics; Gonzalez, Alvarez B. [Oviedo U., Cantabria Inst. of Phys.; Amerio, S. [INFN, Padua; Amidei, D. [Michigan U.; Anastassov, A. [Northwestern U.; Annovi, A. [Frascati; Antos, J [Comenius U.; Apollinari, G. [Fermilab; Appel, J. A [Fermilab; Apresyan, A. [Purdue; Arisawa, T. [Waseda U., Dubna, JINR

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Half-lives and branchings for {\\beta}-delayed neutron emission for neutron-rich Co-Cu isotopes in the r-process  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The {\\beta} decays of very neutron-rich nuclides in the Co-Zn region were studied experimentally at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory using the NSCL {\\beta}-counting station in conjunction with the neutron detector NERO. We measured the branchings for {\\beta}-delayed neutron emission (Pn values) for 74Co (18 +/- 15%) and 75-77Ni (10 +/- 2.8%, 14 +/- 3.6%, and 30 +/- 24%, respectively) for the first time, and remeasured the Pn values of 77-79Cu, 79,81Zn, and 82Ga. For 77-79Cu and for 81Zn we obtain significantly larger Pn values compared to previous work. While the new half-lives for the Ni isotopes from this experiment had been reported before, we present here in addition the first half-life measurements of 75Co (30 +/- 11 ms) and 80Cu (170+110 -50 ms). Our results are compared with theoretical predictions, and their impact on various types of models for the astrophysical rapid neutron-capture process (r-process) is explored. We find that with our new data, the classical r-process model is bet...

Hosmer, P; Aprahamian, A; Arndt, O; Clement, R R C; Estrade, A; Farouqi, K; Kratz, K -L; Liddick, S N; Lisetskiy, A F; Mantica, P F; Mller, P; Mueller, W F; Montes, F; Morton, A C; Ouellette, M; Pellegrini, E; Pereira, J; Pfeiffer, B; Reeder, P; Santi, P; Steiner, M; Stolz, A; Tomlin, B E; Walters, W B; Whr, A; 10.1103/PhysRevC.82.025806

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "branch 202-586-1114 specific" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

The Morphology of the Sub-Giant Branch and Red Clump Reveal No Sign of Age Spreads in Intermediate Age Clusters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A recent surprise in stellar cluster research, made possible through the precision of Hubble Space Telescope photometry, was that some intermediate age (1-2 Gyr) clusters in the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds have main sequence turn-off (MSTO) widths that are significantly broader than would be expected for a simple stellar population (SSP). One interpretation of these extended MSTOs (eMSTOs) is that age spreads of the order of ~500 Myr exist within the clusters, radically redefining our view of stellar clusters, which are traditionally thought of as single age, single metallicity stellar populations. Here we test this interpretation by studying other regions of the CMD that should also be affected by such large age spreads, namely the width of the sub-giant branch (SGB) and the red clump (RC). We study two massive clusters in the LMC that display the eMSTO phenomenon (NGC 1806 & NGC 1846) and show that both have SGB and RC morphologies that are in conflict with expectations if large age spreads exist ...

Bastian, Nate

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Measurement of the Inclusive Branching FractionsB(B^- to D^+ Pi^- Pi^-) and B(B^- to D*^+ Pi^- Pi^-)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The D{sub J}{sup 0} is a family of four orbitally excited mesons: D*{sub 2}(2460){sup 0}, D{sub 1}(2420){sup 0}, D{sub 1}(j = 1/2){sup -}, and D*{sub 0}(j = 1/2){sup 0}. This dissertation presents the measurements of the inclusive branching fractions, {Beta}(B{sup -} {yields} D*{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup -}) and {Beta}(B{sup -} {yields} D{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup -}). The D{sub J}{sup 0} provides an intermediate resonance for those two modes. The data used for this analysis consists of Runs 1-5 with total integrated luminosity of 343.38 fb{sup -1}, which is corresponding to 383.92 million B{bar B} pairs, provided by the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric B Factory. The values presented are: {Beta}(B{sup -} {yields} D{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup -}) = (1.12 {+-} 0.02 {+-} 0.08) x 10{sup -3}; {Beta}(B{sup -} {yields} D*{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup -}) = (1.67 {+-} 0.03 {+-} 0.13) x 10{sup -3}.

Eschenburg, Vance Onno; /Mississippi U.; ,

2007-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

443

Measurement of the production fraction times branching fraction $\\boldsymbol{ f(b\\to\\Lambda_{b})\\cdot \\mathcal{B}(\\Lambda_{b}\\to J/\\psi \\Lambda)}$  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The {Lambda}{sub b}(udb) baryon is observed in the decay {Lambda}{sub b} {yields} J/{psi}{Lambda} using 6.1 fb{sup -1} of p{bar p} collisions collected with the D0 detector at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. The production fraction multiplied by the branching fraction for this decay relative to that for the decay B{sup 0} {yields} J/{psi}K{sub s}{sup 0} is measured to be 0.345 {+-} 0.034 (stat.) {+-} 0.033 (syst.) {+-} 0.003 (PDG). Using the world average value of f(b {yields} B{sup 0}) {center_dot} {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} J/{psi}K{sub s}{sup 0}) = (1.74 {+-} 0.08) x 10{sup -5}, they obtain f(b {yields} {Lambda}{sub b}) {center_dot} {Beta}({Lambda}{sub b} {yields} J/{psi}{Lambda}) = (6.01 {+-} 0.60 (stat.) {+-} 0.58 (syst.) {+-} 0.28 (PDG)) x 10{sup -5}. This measurement represents an improvement in precision by about a factor of three with respect to the current world average.

Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich; /Dubna, JINR; Abbott, Braden Keim; /Oklahoma U.; Acharya, Bannanje Sripath; /Tata Inst.; Adams, Mark Raymond; /Illinois U., Chicago; Adams, Todd; /Florida State U.; Alexeev, Guennadi D.; /Dubna, JINR; Alkhazov, Georgiy D.; /St. Petersburg, INP; Alton, Andrew K.; /Michigan U. /Augustana Coll., Sioux Falls; Alverson, George O.; /Northeastern U.; Alves, Gilvan Augusto; /Rio de Janeiro, CBPF; Ancu, Lucian Stefan; /Nijmegen U. /Fermilab

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

The Uncertainties in the 22Ne + alpha-capture Reaction Rates and the Production of the Heavy Magnesium Isotopes in Asymptotic Giant Branch Stars of Intermediate Mass  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present new rates for the 22Ne(alpha, n)25Mg and 22Ne(alpha,gamma)26Mg reactions, with uncertainties that have been considerably reduced compared to previous estimates, and we study how these new rates affect the production of the heavy magnesium isotopes in models of intermediate mass Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB) stars of different initial compositions. All the models have deep third dredge-up, hot bottom burning and mass loss. Calculations have been performed using the two most commonly used estimates of the 22Ne + alpha rates as well as the new recommended rates, and with combinations of their upper and lower limits. The main result of the present study is that with the new rates, uncertainties on the production of isotopes from Mg to P coming from the 22Ne + alpha-capture rates have been considerably reduced. We have therefore removed one of the important sources of uncertainty to effect models of AGB stars. We have studied the effects of varying the mass-loss rate on nucleosynthesis and discuss other uncertainties related to the physics employed in the computation of stellar structure, such as the modeling of convection, the inclusion of a partial mixing zone and the definition of convective borders. These uncertainties are found to be much larger than those coming from 22Ne + alpha-capture rates, when using our new estimates. Much effort is needed to improve the situation for AGB models.

A. Karakas; M. Lugaro; M. Wiescher; J. Goerres; C. Ugalde

2006-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

445

Measurement of the Branching Fractions of the Rare Decays B0 to Ds(*)+pi-,B0 to Ds(*)+rho-, and B0 to Ds(*)-K(*)+  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors report the measurement of the branching fractions of the rare decays B{sup 0} {yields} D{sub s}{sup (*)+} {pi}{sup -}, B{sup 0} {yields} D{sub s}{sup (*)+} {rho}{sup -}, and B{sup 0} {yields} D{sub s}{sup (*)-} K{sup (*)+} in a sample of 381 x 10{sup 6} {Upsilon}(4S) decays into B{bar B} pairs collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy e{sup +}e{sup -} storage ring. They present evidence for the decay B{sup 0} {yields} D{sub s}{sup -} K*{sup +} and the vector-vector decays B{sup 0} {yields} D{sub s}{sup *+} {rho}{sup -} and B{sup 0} {yields} D{sub s}{sup *-} K{sup *+}, as well as the first measurement of the vector meson polarization in these decays. They also determine the ratios of the CM-suppressed to CKM-favored amplitudes r(D{sup (*)}{pi}) and r(D{sup (*)}{rho}) in decays B{sup 0} {yields} D{sup (*)}{sup {+-}}{pi}{sup {-+}} and B{sup 0} {yields} D{sup (*)}{sup {+-}}{rho}{sup {-+}}, and comment on the prospects for measuring the Cp observable sin(2{beta} + {gamma}).

Aubert, B.; Bona, M.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; /Annecy, LAPP; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; /Barcelona U., ECM; Lopez, L.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; /Bari U.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; /Bergen U.; Abrams, G.S.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D.N.; Button-Shafer, J.; Cahn, R.N.; /Energy Sci. Network /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /Bristol U. /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /Ferrara U. /Frascati /Genoa U. /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Karlsruhe U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT, LNS /McGill U. /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /Perugia U. /Pisa U. /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DSM, DAPNIA, Saclay /South Carolina U. /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /Turin U. /INFN, Turin /Trieste U. /Valencia U., IFIC /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

2008-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

446

Improved Measurements of Neutral B Decay Branching Fractions to K0s pi+ pi- and the Charge Asymmetry of B0 -> K*+ pi-  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors analyze the decay B{sup 0} {yields} K{sub S}{sup 0}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} using a sample of 232 million {Upsilon}(4S) {yields} B{bar B} decays collected with the BABAR detector at the SLAC PEP-II asymmetric-energy B factory. A maximum likelihood fit finds the following branching fractions: {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} K{sup 0}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}) = (43.0 {+-} 2.3 {+-} 2.3) x 10{sup -6}, {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} f{sub 0}({yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -})K{sup 0}) = (5.5 {+-} 0.7 {+-} 0.5 {+-} 0.3) x 10{sup -6} and {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} K*{sup +}{pi}{sup -}) = (11.0 {+-} 1.5 {+-} 0.5 {+-} 0.5) x 10{sup -6}. For these results, the first uncertainty is statistical, the second is systematic, and the third (if present) is due to the effect of interference from other resonances. They also measure the CP-violating charge asymmetry in the decay B{sup 0} {yields} K*{sup +}{pi}{sup -}, {Alpha}{sub K*{pi}} = -0.11 {+-} 0.14 {+-} 0.05.

Aubert, B.; Barate, R.; Boutigny, D.; Couderc, F.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; /Annecy, LAPP; Grauges, E.; /Barcelona, IFAE; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pompili, A.; /Bari U. /INFN, Bari; Chen, J.C.; Qi, N.D.; Rong, G.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y.S.; /Beijing, Inst. High Energy Phys.; Eigen, G.; Ofte, I.; Stugu, B. /Bergen U. /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /Bristol U. /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San

2005-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

447

The Specification and Execution of Heterogeneous Synchronous Reactive Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Specification and Execution of Heterogeneous Synchronous Reactive Systems by Stephen Anthony in Engineering---Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences in the GRADUATE DIVISION of the UNIVERSITY of Heterogeneous Synchronous Reactive Systems Copyright ã 1997 by Stephen Anthony Edwards #12; Abstract

448

Towards an Algebraic Specification of the Java Virtual Machine  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Towards an Algebraic Specification of the Java Virtual Machine K Stephenson Department of Computer of the architecture of an abstract and simplified version of the Java Virtual Machine (JVM). This concentration on the implementation­independent features of the machine allows us to build a clean and easily comprehensible model

Grant, P. W.

449

HSL HSL MI20 PACKAGE SPECIFICATION HSL 2007  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HSL HSL MI20 PACKAGE SPECIFICATION HSL 2007 1 SUMMARY Given an n?n sparse matrix A and an n-vector z, HSL MI20 computes the vector x = Mz, where M is an algebraic multigrid (AMG) v allocatable dummy arguments and allocatable components of derived types. Remark: The development of HSL MI20

Silvester, David J.

450

GDCT Initialization File [gdct.ini] Format Specification Guide  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GDCT Initialization File [gdct.ini] Format Specification Guide Written By: Jeremy Bradbury June 22, 2000 Below is the layout of the gdct.ini file. It is important to note the following: · If the gdct.ini to represent that a file does not exist under the "Recent Files" section of the gdct.ini file. [Internal

Rosebrugh, Robert

451

Software Requirements Specification Verifiable Fuel Cycle Simulation (VISION) Model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this Software Requirements Specification (SRS) is to define the top-level requirements for a Verifiable Fuel Cycle Simulation Model (VISION) of the Advanced Fuel Cycle (AFC). This simulation model is intended to serve a broad systems analysis and study tool applicable to work conducted as part of the AFCI (including costs estimates) and Generation IV reactor development studies.

D. E. Shropshire; W. H. West

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

PROGRAMME SPECIFICATION Programme name Banking and International Finance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 PROGRAMME SPECIFICATION KEY FACTS Programme name Banking and International Finance Award BSc The BSc (Hons) Banking and International Finance degree provides you with the academic knowledge skills and knowledge in the key areas of banking and international finance, including Financial

Weyde, Tillman

453

Open Automated Demand Response Communications Specification (Version 1.0)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The development of the Open Automated Demand Response Communications Specification, also known as OpenADR or Open Auto-DR, began in 2002 following the California electricity crisis. The work has been carried out by the Demand Response Research Center (DRRC), which is managed by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. This specification describes an open standards-based communications data model designed to facilitate sending and receiving demand response price and reliability signals from a utility or Independent System Operator to electric customers. OpenADR is one element of the Smart Grid information and communications technologies that are being developed to improve optimization between electric supply and demand. The intention of the open automated demand response communications data model is to provide interoperable signals to building and industrial control systems that are preprogrammed to take action based on a demand response signal, enabling a demand response event to be fully automated, with no manual intervention. The OpenADR specification is a flexible infrastructure to facilitate common information exchange between the utility or Independent System Operator and end-use participants. The concept of an open specification is intended to allow anyone to implement the signaling systems, the automation server or the automation clients.

Piette, Mary Ann; Ghatikar, Girish; Kiliccote, Sila; Koch, Ed; Hennage, Dan; Palensky, Peter; McParland, Charles

2009-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

454

A Logic Specification for Usage Control Xinwen Zhang, Jaehong Park  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

technologies, Trusted computing, etc. OM-AM Framework Usage Control System · Model examples: Access Matrix1 A Logic Specification for Usage Control Xinwen Zhang, Jaehong Park Francesco Parisi/object attributes, right} to {true, false} · Usage control decisions are based on authorization, obligations

Sandhu, Ravi

455

A Logic Specification for Usage Control Xinwen Zhang, Jaehong Park  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DRM technologies, Trusted computing, etc. OM-AM Framework Usage Control System · Model examples1 A Logic Specification for Usage Control Xinwen Zhang, Jaehong Park Francesco Parisi of {subject/object attributes, right} to {true, false} · Usage control decisions are based on authorization

Sandhu, Ravi

456

Logical Model and Specification of Usage Control XINWEN ZHANG  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Logical Model and Specification of Usage Control XINWEN ZHANG FRANCESCO PARISI-PRESICCE JAEHONG PARK RAVI SANDHU George Mason University The recent usage control model (UCON) is a foundation for next mutability. A usage control decision is determined by combining authorizations, obligations, and conditions

Sandhu, Ravi

457

Optimal Control with Weighted Average Costs and Temporal Logic Specifications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

time than constructing a feasible trajectory. We demonstrate our methods on simulations of autonomous, vehicles, and other cyberphysical systems increases, there is a need for expressive task with respect to some cost function, e.g., time or fuel consumption. Since temporal logic specifications include

Murray, Richard M.

458

Developing a Computer Science-specific Learning Taxonomy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in application-oriented courses such as programming. Keywords Computer science education, taxonomies of learning of a computer science-specific taxonomy. 1.2 What is an educational taxonomy? A taxonomy is a classification. This paper reviews the literature on educational taxonomies and their use in computer science education

Kent, University of

459

Architectural Considerations for Application-Specific Counterflow Pipelines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a new pipeline organization called the Counterflow Pipeline (CFP). This paper evaluates CFP design to an application can be constructed automatically. Third, we present measurements that evaluate CFP design tradeArchitectural Considerations for Application-Specific Counterflow Pipelines Bruce R. Childers, Jack

Childers, Bruce

460

First Class Futures: Specification and implementation of Update Strategies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

useful in some design patterns for concurrency, such as master-worker and pipeline. inria-00544594 languages, futures, update strategies 1 Introduction Futures are language constructs that improve, specific language constructs are necessary to create the futures and to fetch the result. Transparent

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "branch 202-586-1114 specific" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Experimental Support for Reconfigurable Application-Specific Accelerators  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Experimental Support for Reconfigurable Application-Specific Accelerators Isaac Gelado, Enric on hardware accelerators. There have been several efforts in the last few years to extend the thread abstraction was conceived to abstract the CPU, the inherent model is different from what hardware accelerators

Morancho, Enric

462

Microchip method for the enrichment of specific DNA sequences  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for enriching specific genetic material sequences is provided, whereby oligonucleotide molecules complementary to the desired genetic material is first used to isolate the genetic material from a first source of genomic material. Then the genetic material is used as a label to isolate similar genetic sequences from other sources. 4 figs.

Mirzabekov, A.D.; Lysov, Y.P.; Shick, V.V.; Dubiley, S.A.

1998-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

463

Situvis: visualising multivariate context information to evaluate situation specifications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Situvis: visualising multivariate context information to evaluate situation specifications Adrian K, highly multivariate, and constantly being updated as new readings are recorded. Situations have been. The visualisation of large and complex multivariate data sets, such as those that context-aware system developers

Dobson, Simon

464

Experimental criticality specifications, update through 1979. Informal report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A table of contents for LA-7170-MS is provided, and publications of criticality specifications that appeared in 1978 and 1979 are listed. The table was omitted from the original document. An abstract of the original report appeared in Energy Research Abstracts, Volume 3: 43410.

Paxton, H.C. (comp.)

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

TEST RESULT ANALYSIS WITH RESPECT TO FORMAL SPECIFICATIONS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TEST RESULT ANALYSIS WITH RESPECT TO FORMAL SPECIFICATIONS Gregor v. BOCHMANN and Omar B. BELLAL Université de Montréal Montréal, Canada Abstract: There are two aspects to testing: (1) the selection of appropriate test inputs and (2) the analysis of the observed interactions of the implementation under test

von Bochmann, Gregor

466

On Fault Coverage of Tests for Finite State Specifications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

On Fault Coverage of Tests for Finite State Specifications A. Petrenko and G. v. Bochmann-Ville, Montréal (Québec), H3C 3J7, Canada Abstract Testing is a trade-off between increased confidence in the correctness of the implementation under test and constraints on the amount of time and effort that can

von Bochmann, Gregor

467

Generating Test Data from SOFL Specifications \\Lambda A. Jefferson Offutt  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Generating Test Data from SOFL Specifications \\Lambda A. Jefferson Offutt ISSE Department, 4A4@cs.hiroshima­cu.ac.jp Abstract Software testing can only be formalized and quantified when a solid basis for test generation can be defined. Tests are commonly generated from the source code, control flow graphs, design representations

Offutt, Jeff

468

Generating Tests from UML Specifications Jeff Offutt and Aynur Abdurazik ?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Generating Tests from UML Specifications Jeff Offutt and Aynur Abdurazik ? George Mason University, Fairfax VA 22030, USA Abstract. Although most industry testing of complex software is con­ ducted at the system level, most formal research has focused on the unit level. As a result, most system level testing

Offutt, Jeff

469

Specification of composite objects based on the ODP Reference Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Specification of composite objects based on the ODP Reference Model D. Ramazani and G. v. Bochmann}@iro.umontreal.ca Abstract In this paper, we describe our experience in using the RM-ODP to specify composite objects. The concept of a composite object as defined in RM-ODP does not take into account its dynamic structure

von Bochmann, Gregor

470

Standard specification for nuclear-Grade boron carbide pellets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1.1 This specification applies to boron carbide pellets for use as a control material in nuclear reactors. 1.2 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as the standard. The values given in parentheses are for information only.

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Standard specification for sintered gadolinium oxide-uranium dioxide pellets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1.1 This specification is for finished sintered gadolinium oxide-uranium dioxide pellets for use in light-water reactors. It applies to gadolinium oxide-uranium dioxide pellets containing uranium of any 235U concentration and any concentration of gadolinium oxide. 1.2 This specification recognizes the presence of reprocessed uranium in the fuel cycle and consequently defines isotopic limits for gadolinium oxide-uranium dioxide pellets made from commercial grade UO2. Such commercial grade UO2 is defined so that, regarding fuel design and manufacture, the product is essentially equivalent to that made from unirradiated uranium. UO2 falling outside these limits cannot necessarily be regarded as equivalent and may thus need special provisions at the fuel fabrication plant or in the fuel design. 1.3 This specification does not include (1) provisions for preventing criticality accidents or (2) requirements for health and safety. Observance of this specification does not relieve the user of the obligation to be aw...

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Standard Specification for Nuclear Grade Zirconium Oxide Pellets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1.1 This specification applies to pellets of stabilized zirconium oxide used in nuclear reactors. 1.2 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as the standard. The values given in parentheses are for information only.

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Student Health Insurance Designed Specifically for the Students of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, may not meet the minimum standards required by the health care reform law for the restrictions on anStudent Health Insurance Designed Specifically for the Students of The University of Rhode Island to August 31, 2014 ``Your student health insurance coverage, offered by Monumental Life Insurance Company

Rhode Island, University of

474

Conceptual modelling for domain specific document description and retrieval  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and are applied in the tasks of describing and retrieving documents, within cooperative document management settings, where the users themselves have to perform the document management tasks they need in orderConceptual modelling for domain specific document description and retrieval - An approach

475

Balancing Generality and Specificity in Document Management Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Balancing Generality and Specificity in Document Management Systems W. Keith Edwards and Anthony La-purpose applications that operate on that document. KEYWORDS: document management, user interfaces, extensible. Our desktop tools are specialized to match our document management tasks and have increased

Edwards, Keith

476

Rapid communication Identification of a Crohn's disease specific  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to be due to a combination of factors involving diet, genetic background, immunological responses presented antigen, in individuals with a particular genetic back- ground may be involved in the lack that of their respective proteins appear to be useful as specific markers for unequivocally distinguishing Crohn's disease

Perreault, Jean-Pierre

477

Semantics of Architectural Specifications in CASL Lutz Schroder1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the semantic rules in static terms. Using these concepts, we develop the semantics at various levels languages (see e.g. [Wir86,EM85,GHG+ 93,CoFI96,SW99]) is the provision of operations for build- ing large is to outline the semantics of architectural specifications at various levels. We use a simple subset of Casl

Schröder, Lutz

478

COMMERCIAL FUEL CARDS RULES & RESPONSIBILITIES: Vehicle Specific Cards  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

COMMERCIAL FUEL CARDS RULES & RESPONSIBILITIES: Vehicle Specific Cards A card issued rented by that department. Restrictions Commercial fuel cards can only be used for fuel and vehicle Services (number of transactions/day, dollars/month, fuel only, etc.) Departmental Responsibilities

Yang, Zong-Liang

479

OpenADR Specification to Ease Saving Power in Buildings  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

A new data model developed by researchers at the Department of Energys Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and their colleagues at other universities and in the private sector will help facilities and buildings save power through automated demand response technology, and advance the development of the Smart Grid. http://newscenter.lbl.gov/press-releases/2009/04/27/openadr-specification/

Piette, Mary Ann

2013-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

480

PROGRAMME SPECIFICATION UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMMES Programme name Energy Engineering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the fundamentals of mechanical design and energy transfer, is shared with the Mechanical Engineering and Automotive1 PROGRAMME SPECIFICATION UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMMES KEY FACTS Programme name Energy Engineering for a career in #12;2 engineering. The BEng Energy Engineering Route shares Part 1 with all other BEng and MEng

Weyde, Tillman

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "branch 202-586-1114 specific" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Specific heat of apple at different moisture contents and temperatures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This work discusses results of experimental investigations of the specific heat, $C$, of apple in a wide interval of moisture contents ($W=0-0.9$) and temperatures ($T = 283-363$ K). The obtained data reveal the important role of the bound water in determination of $C(W,T)$ behaviour. The additive model for description of $C(W)$ dependence in the moisture range of $0.1apple was considered as a mixture of water and hydrated apple material (water plasticised apple) with specific heat $C_h$. The difference between $C_h$ and specific heat of dry apple, $\\Delta Cb=C_h-C_d$, was proposed as a measure of the excess contribution of bound water to the specific heat. The estimated amounts of bound water $W_b$ were comparable with the monolayer moisture content in apple. The analytical equation was proposed for approximation of $C(W,T)$ dependencies in the studied intervals of moisture content and temperature.

Viacheslav Mykhailyk; Nikolai Lebovka

2013-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

482

Page 1 of 4 University of Cambridge: Programme Specifications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, update or amend this programme specification at any time. MPHIL in ENVIRONMENTAL DESIGN IN ARCHITECTURE 1 of environmental design in architecture and urban planning; 2. the history of environmental design and technology Details n/a 4. Name of Final Award Master of Philosophy 5. Programme Title Environmental Design

de Gispert, Adrià

483

Temporal-Harmonic Specific POD Mode Extraction Gilead Tadmor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Temporal-Harmonic Specific POD Mode Extraction Gilead Tadmor and Daniel Bissex Electrical changes the systems mean field changes significantly, as does the leading shedding harmonic4 , once mode pair will capture harmonically rich time dynamics, reflecting a spatial mix of multiple vortical

Dabiri, John O.

484

Open Automated Demand Response Communications Specification (Version 1.0)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Models DRAS Client API Simple REST Services Simple SOAPAPISPECIFICATIONS 103 UtilityProgramOperatorAPIs .. 103 ParticipantOperatorAPIs.. 103 DRASClientAPIs 103 UseofSimpleRESTAPIandtheminimummethodsthatmustbesupportedare asdescribedinSection9.3.1thataresimilarforsimpleREST

Piette, Mary Ann

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

485

Grid Database Service Specification Document Identifier: GDSS-0.2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Grid Database Service Specification Document Identifier: GDSS-0.2 Date: 4th October 2002 Authors of networked resources. The Open Grid Services Architecture (OGSA) extends Web Services with consistent interfaces for creating, managing and exchanging information among Grid Services, which are dynamic

Glasgow, University of

486

Constraint Orientated Specification with CSP and Real Time Temporal Logic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Constraint Orientated Specification with CSP and Real Time Temporal Logic Justin Pearson Department Processes (CSP) [Hoa85] and a version of Propositional Temporal Logic (PTL), derived from [Eme90]. CSP. The behaviour of a CSP process is dependent on its environment; it is therefore difficult to assert global

Kent, University of

487

A Compositional Testing Framework Driven by Partial Specifications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, sustained by a strong industrial demand. From a practical point of view, a test campaign consists on the availability of a system specification, which is not always the case in practice. Moreover, when it exists to be refined into more concrete interaction sequences. Automating this process in the general case is still

Boyer, Edmond

488

Glucose conjugation for the specific targeting and treatment of cancer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Glucose conjugation for the specific targeting and treatment of cancer Emilia C. Calvaresia and Paul J. Hergenrother*ab Cancers of diverse origins exhibit marked glucose avidity and high rates has led to an interest in targeting it for cancer therapy. One promising strategy for such targeting

Hergenrother, Paul J.

489

PROGRAMME SPECIFICATION POSTGRADUATE PROGRAMMES Programme name Global Political Economy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PROGRAMME SPECIFICATION ­ POSTGRADUATE PROGRAMMES KEY FACTS Programme name Global Political Economy programme in Global Political Economy at City University, you will engage in advanced study of various MA degree in global political economy with a mixture of core courses covering general concepts

Weyde, Tillman

490

Catalytic Domain of Phosphoinositide-specific Phospholipase C (PLC)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Catalytic Domain of Phosphoinositide-specific Phospholipase C (PLC) MUTATIONAL ANALYSIS OF RESIDUES WITHIN THE ACTIVE SITE AND HYDROPHOBIC RIDGE OF PLC 1* (Received for publication, November 20, 1997 Institute, University of Dundee, Dundee DD1 4HN, United Kingdom Structural studies of phospholipase C 1 (PLC

Williams, Roger L.

491

Parameterized Specification and Verification of PLC Systems in Coq  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Parameterized Specification and Verification of PLC Systems in Coq Hai Wan D.CST, Tsinghua and verify PLC software systems with the theorem proving system Coq. Dependent inductive data types are har to cope with this situation, modular development of PLC software is adopted. During the modular

Boyer, Edmond

492

Formal Domain Modeling: From Specification to Atif Mashkoor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Formal Domain Modeling: From Specification to Validation Atif Mashkoor LORIA ­ DEDALE Team ­ Nancy with re- finement based approach at domain level. We also introduce a stepwise validation process and their inter-relationships, along with their important static and dynamic properties of the domain. The domain

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

493

Hybrid Powertrain Design Using a Domain-Specific Modeling Environment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hybrid Powertrain Design Using a Domain- Specific Modeling Environment Wenzhong Gao1 , Sandeep environment is capable of rapidly assimilating new knowledge from experts and design database. Further, it can. As an example, the well-known worldwide recall in Spring 2002 of the BMW 745i was a direct result

Gray, Jeffrey G.

494

Steam boiler control specification problem: A TLA solution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Steam boiler control specification problem: A TLA solution Frank Le?ke and Stephan Merz Institut f of the state of the steam boiler, detect failures, and model message transmission. We give a more detailed between the physi­ cal state of the steam boiler and the model maintained by the controller and discuss

Merz, Stephan

495

Evolving treatment plan quality criteria from institution-specific experience  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: The dosimetric aspects of radiation therapy treatment plan quality are usually evaluated and reported with dose volume histogram (DVH) endpoints. For clinical practicality, a small number of representative quantities derived from the DVH are often used as dose endpoints to summarize the plan quality. National guidelines on reference values for such quantities for some standard treatment approaches are often used as acceptance criteria to trigger treatment plan review. On the other hand, treatment prescription and planning approaches specific to each institution warrants the need to report plan quality in terms of practice consistency and with respect to institution-specific experience. The purpose of this study is to investigate and develop a systematic approach to record and characterize the institution-specific plan experience and use such information to guide the design of plan quality criteria. In the clinical setting, this approach will assist in (1) improving overall plan quality and consistency and (2) detecting abnormal plan behavior for retrospective analysis. Methods: The authors propose a self-evolving methodology and have developed an in-house prototype software suite that (1) extracts the dose endpoints from a treatment plan and evaluates them against both national standard and institution-specific criteria and (2) evolves the statistics for the dose endpoints and updates institution-specific criteria. Results: The validity of the proposed methodology was demonstrated with a database of prostate stereotactic body radiotherapy cases. As more data sets are accumulated, the evolving institution-specific criteria can serve as a reliable and stable consistency measure for plan quality and reveals the potential use of the ''tighter'' criteria than national standards or projected criteria, leading to practice that may push to shrink the gap between plans deemed acceptable and the underlying unknown optimality. Conclusions: The authors have developed a rationale to improve plan quality and consistency, by evolving the plan quality criteria from institution-specific experience, complementary to national standards. The validity of the proposed method was demonstrated with a prototype system on prostate stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) cases. The current study uses direct and indirect DVH endpoints for plan quality evaluation, but the infrastructure proposed here applies to general outcome data as well. The authors expect forward evaluation together with intelligent update based on evidence-based learning, which will evolve the clinical practice for improved efficiency, consistency, and ultimately better treatment outcome.

Ruan, D.; Shao, W.; DeMarco, J.; Tenn, S.; King, C.; Low, D.; Kupelian, P.; Steinberg, M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States)

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

496

SLALOM: a Language for SLA specification and monitoring  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IT services provisioning is usually underpinned by service level agreements (SLAs), aimed at guaranteeing services quality. However, there is a gap between the customer perspective (business oriented) and that of the service provider (implementation oriented) that becomes more evident while defining and monitoring SLAs. This paper proposes a domain specific language (SLA Language for specificatiOn and Monitoring - SLALOM) to bridge the previous gap. The first step in SLALOM creation was factoring out common concepts, by composing the BPMN metamodel with that of the SLA life cycle, as described in ITIL. The derived metamodel expresses the SLALOM abstract syntax model. The second step was to write concrete syntaxes targeting different aims, such as SLA representation in process models. An example of SLALOM's concrete syntax model instantiation for an IT service sup-ported by self-service financial terminals is presented.

Correia, Anacleto; Amaral, Vasco

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

497

Generic solar photovoltaic system dynamic simulation model specification.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is intended to serve as a specification for generic solar photovoltaic (PV) system positive-sequence dynamic models to be implemented by software developers and approved by the WECC MVWG for use in bulk system dynamic simulations in accordance with NERC MOD standards. Two specific dynamic models are included in the scope of this document. The first, a Central Station PV System model, is intended to capture the most important dynamic characteristics of large scale (> 10 MW) PV systems with a central Point of Interconnection (POI) at the transmission level. The second, a Distributed PV System model, is intended to represent an aggregation of smaller, distribution-connected systems that comprise a portion of a composite load that might be modeled at a transmission load bus.

Ellis, Abraham; Behnke, Michael Robert; Elliott, Ryan Thomas

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

498

Novel strategies for ultrahigh specific activity targeted nanoparticles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have developed novel strategies optimized for preparing high specific activity radiolabeled nanoparticles, targeting nuclear imaging of low abundance biomarkers. Several compounds have been labeled with F-18 and Cu-64 for radiolabeling of SCK-nanoparticles via Copper(I) catalyzed or copper-free alkyne-azide cyclolization. Novel strategies have been developed to achieve ultrahigh specific activity with administrable amount of dose for human study using copper-free chemistry. Ligands for carbonic anhydrase 12 (CA12), a low abundance extracellular biomarker for the responsiveness of breast cancer to endocrine therapie, have been labeled with F-18 and Cu-64, and one of them has been evaluated in animal models. The results of this project will lead to major improvements in the use of nanoparticles in nuclear imaging and will significantly advance their potential for detecting low abundance biomarkers of medical importance.

Zhou, Dong

2012-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

499

Specification and Verification of Context-dependent Services  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Current approaches for the discovery, specification, and provision of services ignore the relationship between the service contract and the conditions in which the service can guarantee its contract. Moreover, they do not use formal methods for specifying services, contracts, and compositions. Without a formal basis it is not possible to justify through formal verification the correctness conditions for service compositions and the satisfaction of contractual obligations in service provisions. We remedy this situation in this paper. We present a formal definition of services with context-dependent contracts. We define a composition theory of services with context-dependent contracts taking into consideration functional, nonfunctional, legal and contextual information. Finally, we present a formal verification approach that transforms the formal specification of service composition into extended timed automata that can be verified using the model checking tool UPPAAL.

Ibrahim, Naseem; Mohammad, Mubarak; 10.4204/EPTCS.61.2

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

500

Finite quantum dissipation: the challenge of obtaining specific heat  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider a free particle coupled with finite strength to a bath and investigate the evaluation of its specific heat. A harmonic oscillator bath of Drude type with cutoff frequency omega_D is employed to model an ohmic friction force with dissipation strength gamma. Two scenarios for obtaining specific heat are presented. The first one uses the measurement of the kinetic energy of the free particle while the second one is based on the reduced partition function. Both descriptions yield results which are consistent with the Third Law of thermodynamics. Nevertheless, the two methods produce different results that disagree even in their leading quantum corrections at high temperatures. We also consider the regime where the cutoff frequency is smaller than the friction strength, i.e. omega_D1.

Hnggi, Peter; Talkner, Peter

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z