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Sample records for branch 202-252-1114 wendel

  1. Wendell, North Carolina: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Wendell, North Carolina: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 35.780987, -78.3697213 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappin...

  2. Executive Branch Management Scorecard | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Branch Management Scorecard Executive Branch Management Scorecard PDF icon Executive Branch Management Scorecard More Documents & Publications Executive Branch Management Scorecard Slide 1 Three Year Rolling Timeline

  3. Radioiodinated branched carbohydrates

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Goodman, Mark M.; Knapp, Jr., Furn F.

    1989-01-01

    A radioiodinated branched carbohydrate for tissue imaging. Iodine-123 is stabilized in the compound by attaching it to a vinyl functional group that is on the carbohydrate. The compound exhibits good uptake and retention and is promising in the development of radiopharmaceuticals for brain, heart and tumor imaging.

  4. Long Branch Capital | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Branch Capital Jump to: navigation, search Name: Long Branch Capital Place: Austin, Texas Zip: 78744 Sector: Efficiency, Renewable Energy Product: Long Branch Capital makes...

  5. Wendel Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Geothermal Area Profile Location: California Exploration Region: Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: Operational"Operational" is not in the...

  6. Solid State Photovoltaic Research Branch

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-09-01

    This report summarizes the progress of the Solid State Photovoltaic Research Branch of the Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI) from October 1, 1988, through September 30,l 1989. Six technical sections of the report cover these main areas of SERIs in-house research: Semiconductor Crystal Growth, Amorphous Silicon Research, Polycrystalline Thin Films, III-V High-Efficiency Photovoltaic Cells, Solid-State Theory, and Laser Raman and Luminescence Spectroscopy. Sections have been indexed separately for inclusion on the data base.

  7. Hawaii Wastewater Branch Webpage | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Webpage Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Hawaii Wastewater Branch Webpage Abstract This is the webpage of the Wastewater Branch of the...

  8. Walker Branch Watershed Ecosystems Data

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    These projects have all contributed to a more complete understanding of how forest watersheds function and have provided insights into the solution of energy-related problems associated with air pollution, contaminant transport, and forest nutrient dynamics. This is one of a few sites in the world characterized by long-term, intensive environmental studies. The Walker Branch Watershed website at http://walkerbranch.ornl.gov/ provides maps, photographs, and data on climate, precipitation, atmospheric deposition, stream discharge and runoff, stream chemistry, and vegetation. [Taken from http://walkerbranch.ornl.gov/ABOUTAAA.HTM

  9. QER- Comment of Rachel Branch

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    April 20, 2014 I hereby respectfully request that the Department of Energy Quadrennial Energy Review Task Force on the Infrastructure Constraints in New England oppose any new development or building of any more fossil fuel infrastructure and only allow the repair of existing infrastructure that is absolutely necessary as we transition to sustainable, renewable sources. Further, I respectfully request that any and all subsidies, tax incentives and/or tax exemptions hereinafter be appropriated and/or directed only to sustainable, renewable sources, i. e., solar, wind, and hydro energy, and development of electrical storage capacities for those sustainable and renewable sources. I further request that any funds spent to push for fossil fuel infrastructure be transparent to the general public. As you are holding meetings in Providence and Hartford, when will your meeting in Massachusetts be scheduled so that Commonwealth of Massachusetts residents can participate? Respectfully submitted, Rachel I. Branch

  10. Vegetation survey of PEN Branch wetlands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    A survey was conducted of vegetation along Pen Branch Creek at Savannah River Site (SRS) in support of K-Reactor restart. Plants were identified to species by overstory, understory, shrub, and groundcover strata. Abundance was also characterized and richness and diversity calculated. Based on woody species basal area, the Pen Branch delta was the most impacted, followed by the sections between the reactor and the delta. Species richness for shrub and groundcover strata were also lowest in the delta. No endangered plant species were found. Three upland pine areas were also sampled. In support of K Reactor restart, this report summarizes a study of the wetland vegetation along Pen Branch. Reactor effluent enters Indian Grove Branch and then flows into Pen Branch and the Pen Branch Delta.

  11. FY 1990 Applied Sciences Branch annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keyes, B.M.; Dippo, P.C.

    1991-11-01

    The Applied Sciences Branch actively supports the advancement of DOE/SERI goals for the development and implementation of the solar photovoltaic technology. The primary focus of the laboratories is to provide state-of-the-art analytical capabilities for materials and device characterization and fabrication. The branch houses a comprehensive facility which is capable of providing information on the full range of photovoltaic components. A major objective of the branch is to aggressively pursue collaborative research with other government laboratories, universities, and industrial firms for the advancement of photovoltaic technologies. Members of the branch disseminate research findings to the technical community in publications and presentations. This report contains information on surface and interface analysis, materials characterization, development, electro-optical characterization module testing and performance, surface interactions and FTIR spectroscopy.

  12. Cow Branch Wind Energy Center Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Cow Branch Wind Energy Center Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Cow Branch Wind Energy Center Wind Farm Facility Cow Branch Wind Energy Center Sector Wind energy Facility...

  13. Hawaii Department of Health Indoor and Radiological Health Branch...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Indoor and Radiological Health Branch Jump to: navigation, search Name: Hawaii Department of Health Indoor and Radiological Health Branch From Open Energy Information Address: 591...

  14. Utah DEQ Air Permitting Branch Webpage | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    link for Utah DEQ Air Permitting Branch Webpage Citation Utah Department of Environmental Quality. Utah DEQ Air Permitting Branch Webpage Internet. State of Utah. cited 201411...

  15. Hawaii Department of Health Solid and Hazardous Waste Branch...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and Hazardous Waste Branch Jump to: navigation, search Name: Hawaii Department of Health Solid and Hazardous Waste Branch Address: 919 Ala Moana Boulevard 212 Place: Honolulu,...

  16. Microbial production of wax esters from highly branched alkanes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bogan, William W.; Sullivan, Wendy R.; Paterek, James R.

    2005-02-01

    A microbial culture and method for producing wax esters using highly branched alkanes. In accordance with one embodiment, the highly branched alkane is squalane.

  17. EA-263 UBS AG, London Branch | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    3 UBS AG, London Branch EA-263 UBS AG, London Branch Order authorizing UBS AG, London Branch to export electric energy to Mexico. PDF icon EA-263 UBS AG, London Branch More Documents & Publications EA-232 OGE Energy Resources Inc EA-249 Exelon Generation Company LLC EA-122-A Dynegy Power Marketing,

  18. Jr., Process Development Branch Construction Division SUBJECT:

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    FR?M : Jr., Process Development Branch Construction Division SUBJECT: INING TESTS AT BOWEN ENGINEERING, INC. - M A Y 16 AND 16,!1961 SYMBOL! EPD:ABBrbt I REY~AKC~: &DiVE;G?i&)il [q a 1 $ a, " I On day 16 and 16,,1951 Bowen Engineering, Inc. made test rune on ypray calcining of boiled-down Mallinokrodt pitohblende raffinate. Theqe rune were made in Bowen'e laboratory unit et North Branch, NT Jel;sey. The initial results indicate that raffidate &$be euocessfully epray oalcined to

  19. TO :Lyall E. Johnson, Chief Licensing Branch

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Lyall E. Johnson, Chief Licensing Branch ,,,_ i-.. FROM :Clifford K. Beck, Chief q q+. ., ,,/,j !i-/ I, v' Hazards Evaluation Branch ,: s~~p:~LLItma0~7c ~HEI-IICAL wows We have reviewed the letter of December 10, 1958, from Mallinckrodt Chemical Works, requesting amendment of License No. SNM-33 to permit pelleting operations on uranium enriched to 5% U-235 in a new facility at Hematite, Missouri. Batch sizes throughout the operations will not exceed limited safe masses as specified in Report

  20. Photovoltaic Program Branch annual report, FY 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Summers, K A

    1990-03-01

    This report summarizes the progress of the Photovoltaic (PV) Program Branch of the Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI) from October 1, 1988, through September 30, 1989. The branch is responsible for managing the subcontracted portion of SERI's PV Advanced Research and Development Project. In fiscal year (FY) 1989, this included nearly 50 subcontracts, with a total annualized funding of approximately $13.1 million. Approximately two-thirds of the subcontracts were with universities, at a total funding of nearly $4 million. The six technical sections of the report cover the main areas of the subcontracted program: Amorphous Silicon Research, Polycrystalline Thin Films, Crystalline Silicon Materials Research, High-Efficiency Concepts, New Ideas, and University Participation. Technical summaries of each of the subcontracted programs provide a discussion of approaches, major accomplishments in FY 1989, and future research directions. Each report will be cataloged individually.

  1. Cold versus hot fusion deuterium branching ratios

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fox, H.; Bass, R.

    1995-12-31

    A major source of misunderstanding of the nature of cold nuclear fusion has been the expectation that the deuterium branching ratios occurring within a palladium lattice would be consistent with the gas-plasma branching ratios. This misunderstanding has led to the concept of the dead graduate student, the 1989`s feverish but fruitless search for neutron emissions from cold fusion reactors, and the follow-on condemnation of the new science of cold fusion. The experimental facts are that in a properly loaded palladium lattice, the deuterium fusion produces neutrons at little above background, a greatly less-than-expected production of tritium (the tritium desert), and substantially more helium-4 than is observed in hot plasma physics. The experimental evidence is now compelling (800 reports of success from 30 countries) that cold nuclear fusion is a reality, that the branching ratios are unexpected, and that a new science is struggling to be recognized. Commercialization of some types of cold fusion devices has already begun.

  2. Geochemistry of the Wendel-Amedee Geothermal System-California...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    have been identified based on the concentrations of the conservative elements C1 and B, fluid enthalpies, and the application of chemical geothermometers. One is characterized by...

  3. North Branch Water & Light Comm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    North Branch Water & Light Comm Jump to: navigation, search Name: North Branch Water & Light Comm Place: Minnesota Phone Number: 651-674-7100 or 651-674-8113 Website:...

  4. Hawaii Department of Health Clean Water Branch | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Clean Water Branch Jump to: navigation, search Name: Hawaii Department of Health Clean Water Branch Address: P.O. Box 3378 Place: Honolulu, Hawaii Zip: 96801 Website: hawaii.gov...

  5. EA-261 UBS AG, London Branch | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    1 UBS AG, London Branch EA-261 UBS AG, London Branch Order authorizing UBS AG, London Branch to export electric energy to Mexico. PDF icon EA-261 UBS AG, London Branch More Documents & Publications EA-184 Morgan Stanley Capital Group Inc. EA-167 PG&E Energy Trading-Power, L.P EA-181 H.Q Energy Services (U.S

  6. Dendrimers and methods of preparing same through proportionate branching

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yu, Yihua (Bruce); Yue, Xuyi

    2015-09-15

    The present invention provides for monodispersed dendrimers having a core, branches and periphery ends, wherein the number of branches increases exponentially from the core to the periphery end and the length of the branches increases exponentially from the periphery end to the core, thereby providing for attachment of chemical species at the periphery ends without exhibiting steric hindrance.

  7. Hawaii Clean Water Branch Forms Webpage | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Not Provided DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http:crossref.org Online Internet link for Hawaii Clean Water Branch Forms Webpage Citation State of Hawaii Department...

  8. Hawaii Wastewater Branch Online Application Webpage | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Application Webpage Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Hawaii Wastewater Branch Online Application Webpage Author State of Hawaii...

  9. Mr. John Kinneman, Chief Nuclear Materfals Branch Nuclear Regulatory...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    111989 Mr. John Kinneman, Chief Nuclear Materfals Branch Nuclear Regulatory Commission Region I 475 Allendale Road King of Prussia. Pennsylvania 19406 Dear Mr. Kinneman: -;' .-. 'W ...

  10. Hawaii Department of Health Clean Air Branch Webpage | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Branch Webpage Internet. cited 20141013. Available from: http:health.hawaii.govcab Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleHawaiiDepartmentofHealthCle...

  11. Hawaii Department of Health Safe Drinking Water Branch | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hawaii Department of Health Safe Drinking Water Branch Address: 919 Ala Moana Blvd Room 308 Place: Honolulu, Hawaii Zip: 96814 References: Hawaii Department of Health Safe...

  12. Wells Branch, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Wells Branch, Texas: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 30.4460353, -97.6794507 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingse...

  13. Hawaii Department of Health Clean Air Branch | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    to: navigation, search Name: Hawaii Department of Health Clean Air Branch Address: P.O. Box 3378 Place: Honolulu, Hawaii Zip: 96801 Website: hawaii.govhealthenvironmenta...

  14. Radiolabeled dimethyl branched long chain fatty acid for heart imaging

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Knapp, Jr., Furn F. (Oak Ridge, TN); Goodman, Mark M. (Knoxville, TN); Kirsch, Gilbert (Woippy, FR)

    1988-08-16

    A radiolabeled long chain fatty acid for heart imaging that has dimethyl branching at one of the carbons of the chain which inhibits the extent to which oxidation can occur. The closer to the carboxyl the branching is positioned, the more limited the oxidation, thereby resulting in prolonged retention of the radiolabeled compound in the heart.

  15. FY 1992 Measurements and Characterization Branch annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dippo, P.C

    1993-03-01

    The Measurements and Characterization Branch actively supports the advancement of DOE/NREL goals for the development and implementation of the solar photovoltaic (PV) technology. The primary focus of the laboratories is to provide state-of-the-art analytical capabilities for materials and device characterization and fabrication. The branch houses a comprehensive facility that Is capable of providing information on the full range of PV components. A major objective of the branch is to aggressively pursue collaborative research with other government laboratories, universities, and industrial firms for the advancement of Pv technologies. Members of the branch disseminate research findings to the technical community in publications and presentations. The Measurements and Characterization Branch encompasses seven coordinated research groups, providing integrated research and development that covers all aspects of photovoltaic materials/devices characterization.

  16. Higgs boson hadronic branching ratios at the ILC (Journal Article) |

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    SciTech Connect Higgs boson hadronic branching ratios at the ILC Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Higgs boson hadronic branching ratios at the ILC We present a study of the Higgs boson decay branching ratios to bb, cc, and gluons, one of the cornerstones of the physics program at the International Linear Collider. A standard model Higgs boson of 120 GeV mass, produced in the Higgs-strahlung process at {radical}(s)=250 GeV, was investigated using the full detector simulation and

  17. Memorandum A. J. Rizzo, Chief TO : Operational Safety Branch

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    j Memorandum A. J. Rizzo, Chief TO / : Operational Safety Branch Harold Glauberman, ?a FROM : Operational Safety Branch ' I DATE: September 30, 1966 REMOVAL OF CONTAMINATED EQUlPMEHT AT THE CANEL FACILITY SUBJECT: MI DDLETOWN, CONNECT I CUT' INTRODUCTION The decision to terminate AEC contract activities at the CANEL facility introduced the need to dispose of radioactively contaminated equipment and materials so as to permit release of the facilities. As a result, -' . the Operational Safety

  18. Subsea pipeline gets welded branch without halting flow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    West, A.; Hutt, G.; Starsmore, R.

    1995-12-11

    In October 1994, a 16 in. welded branch was installed without interruption to production onto Wintershall Noordzee BV`s 36-in. gas pipeline from the K13-A platform in the Dutch sector of the North Sea to Den helder, The Netherlands. The procedure is the first successfully to combine hyperbaric welding and subsea hot tapping without interruption to production. Developers of new fields can now consider exporting product without interrupting existing production and through existing infrastructure even if no convenient tie-in locations exist. Unocal evaluated export options and established that the most attractive alternative was to export gas into the Wintershall 36-in. K13-A to Den Helder pipeline. Various options for installing a branch included the following: flooding the pipeline and installing a conventional tee; stopping production and installing a welded branch followed by hot tapping; and continuing production and installing a welded branch followed by hot tapping. The chosen scheme was to retrofit a subsea side-tap assembly. This was achieved by installation of a welded branch followed by hot tapping into the 36-in. pipeline. The paper describes location determination, schedules, onshore preparation, and offshore work.

  19. Branching Mechanisms in Surfactant Micellar Growth (Journal Article) |

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    SciTech Connect Journal Article: Branching Mechanisms in Surfactant Micellar Growth Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Branching Mechanisms in Surfactant Micellar Growth Authors: Tang, M ; Carter, W C Publication Date: 2012-08-20 OSTI Identifier: 1169255 Report Number(s): LLNL-JRNL-575474 DOE Contract Number: DE-AC52-07NA27344 Resource Type: Journal Article Resource Relation: Journal Name: Journal of Physical Chemistry B, na, na, March 14, 2013, pp. 2898 Research Org: Lawrence

  20. RADIONUCLIDE INVENTORY AND DISTRIBUTION: FOURMILE BRANCH, PEN BRANCH, AND STEEL CREEK IOUS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hiergesell, R.; Phifer, M.

    2014-04-29

    As a condition to the Department of Energy (DOE) Low Level Waste Disposal Federal Facility Review Group (LFRG) review team approving the Savannah River Site (SRS) Composite Analysis (CA), SRS agreed to follow up on a secondary issue, which consisted of the consolidation of several observations that the team concluded, when evaluated collectively, could potentially impact the integration of the CA results. This report addresses secondary issue observations 4 and 21, which identify the need to improve the CA sensitivity and uncertainty analysis specifically by improving the CA inventory and the estimate of its uncertainty. The purpose of the work described herein was to be responsive to these secondary issue observations by re-examining the radionuclide inventories of the Integrator Operable Units (IOUs), as documented in ERD 2001 and Hiergesell, et. al. 2008. The LFRG concern has been partially addressed already for the Lower Three Runs (LTR) IOU (Hiergesell and Phifer, 2012). The work described in this investigation is a continuation of the effort to address the LFRG concerns by re-examining the radionuclide inventories associated with Fourmile Branch (FMB) IOU, Pen Branch (PB) IOU and Steel Creek (SC) IOU. The overall approach to computing radionuclide inventories for each of the IOUs involved the following components: Defining contaminated reaches of sediments along the IOU waterways Identifying separate segments within each IOU waterway to evaluate individually Computing the volume and mass of contaminated soil associated with each segment, or compartment Obtaining the available and appropriate Sediment and Sediment/Soil analytical results associated with each IOU Standardizing all radionuclide activity by decay-correcting all sample analytical results from sample date to the current point in time, Computing representative concentrations for all radionuclides associated with each compartment in each of the IOUs Computing the radionuclide inventory of each DOE-added radionuclide for the compartments of each IOU by applying the representative, central value concentration to the mass of contaminated soil Totaling the inventory for all compartments associated with each of the IOUs Using this approach the 2013 radionuclide inventories for each sub-compartment associated with each of the three IOUs were computed, by radionuclide. The inventories from all IOU compartments were then rolled-up into a total inventory for each IOU. To put the computed estimate of radionuclide activities within FMB, PB, and SC IOUs into context, attention was drawn to Cs-137, which was the radionuclide with the largest contributor to the calculated dose to a member of the public at the perimeter of SRS within the 2010 SRS CA (SRNL 2010). The total Cs-137 activity in each of the IOUs was calculated to be 9.13, 1.5, and 17.4 Ci for FMB, PB, and SC IOUs, respectively. Another objective of this investigation was to address the degree of uncertainty associated with the estimated residual radionuclide activity that is calculated for the FMB, PB, and SC IOUs. Two primary contributing factors to overall uncertainty of inventory estimates were identified and evaluated. The first related to the computation of the mass of contaminated material in a particular IOU compartment and the second to the uncertainty associated with analytical counting errors. The error ranges for the mass of contaminated material in each IOU compartment were all calculated to be approximately +/- 9.6%, or a nominal +/-10%. This nominal value was added to the uncertainty associated with the analytical counting errors that were associated with each radionuclide, individually. This total uncertainty was then used to calculate a maximum and minimum estimated radionuclide inventories for each IOU.

  1. TO. TO. , W. B; Harris, Chief, Industrial Hygiene'Branch DA , W. B; Harris, Chief, Industrial Hygiene'Branch DA

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ~~~~;.Offi~~~~~~~~~~~ ,/-; l UNITED STh , :__ .~. :__ .~. , , TO. TO. , W. B; Harris, Chief, Industrial Hygiene'Branch DA , W. B; Harris, Chief, Industrial Hygiene'Branch DA Health and Safet Division pa& 1 Ps B.- Klevin :mL -y!yG hMBOL: HSH:PBK hMBOL: HSH:PBK : 1. Purpose of Visit >.. a. To study operations planned by~Bu.reau of Ea: factors for Be, II, thorium, zirconium, etc, i b. ,'To explain to Bureauof Mines' personnel tl in handling any of the aforementioned mate] 2. Scope of Work

  2. PICO: An Object-Oriented Framework for Branch and Bound

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ECKSTEIN,JONATHAN; HART,WILLIAM E.; PHILLIPS,CYNTHIA A.

    2000-12-01

    This report describes the design of PICO, a C++ framework for implementing general parallel branch-and-bound algorithms. The PICO framework provides a mechanism for the efficient implementation of a wide range of branch-and-bound methods on an equally wide range of parallel computing platforms. We first discuss the basic architecture of PICO, including the application class hierarchy and the package's serial and parallel layers. We next describe the design of the serial layer, and its central notion of manipulating subproblem states. Then, we discuss the design of the parallel layer, which includes flexible processor clustering and communication rates, various load balancing mechanisms, and a non-preemptive task scheduler running on each processor. We describe the application of the package to a branch-and-bound method for mixed integer programming, along with computational results on the ASCI Red massively parallel computer. Finally we describe the application of the branch-and-bound mixed-integer programming code to a resource constrained project scheduling problem for Pantex.

  3. Gas compressor with side branch absorber for pulsation control

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Harris, Ralph E. (San Antonio, TX); Scrivner, Christine M. (San Antonio, TX); Broerman, III, Eugene L. (San Antonio, TX)

    2011-05-24

    A method and system for reducing pulsation in lateral piping associated with a gas compressor system. A tunable side branch absorber (TSBA) is installed on the lateral piping. A pulsation sensor is placed in the lateral piping, to measure pulsation within the piping. The sensor output signals are delivered to a controller, which controls actuators that change the acoustic dimensions of the SBA.

  4. Relevance of complex branch points for partial wave analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ceci, S.; Svarc, A.; Doering, M.; Hanhart, C.; Krewald, S.; Meissner, U.-G.

    2011-07-15

    A central issue in hadron spectroscopy is to deduce--and interpret--resonance parameters, namely, pole positions and residues, from experimental data, for those are the quantities to be compared to lattice QCD or model calculations. However, not every structure in the observables derives from a resonance pole: the origin might as well be branch points, either located on the real axis (when a new channel composed of stable particles opens) or in the complex plane (when at least one of the intermediate particles is unstable). In this paper we demonstrate first the existence of such branch points in the complex plane and then show on the example of the {pi}N P{sub 11} partial wave that it is not possible to distinguish the structures induced by the latter from a true pole signal based on elastic data alone.

  5. Construction Branch Electrician & Lead Electrician | Princeton Plasma

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Physics Lab Construction Branch Electrician & Lead Electrician Department: Engineering Supervisor(s): Frank Jones Staff: TSS 04 & 05 Requisition Number: 1600208 (POOL JOB, SOURCE REQUISITION) Position Summary: The Princeton University Plasma Physics Laboratory, a world-renowned fusion energy research center under contract with the U. S. Department of Energy is seeking to hire a: *Facilities Electrician (Grade, TSS 04, one-year term position) and a *Facilities LEAD Electrician (Grade,

  6. Mr. Harold Snyder Chief, Discovery and Investigations Branch

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    . 20545 FEB 2 7 1985 Mr. Harold Snyder Chief, Discovery and Investigations Branch Hazardous Site Control Division Administration for Solid Waste and Emergency Response U. S. Environmental Protection Agency 401 M Street, S. W. Washington, D. C. 20460 Dear Mr. Snyder: The Department of Olin Corporation, Joliet, Illinois. Energy (DOE) has conducted a radiological survey at the Chemicals Group (The former Blockson Chemical Company), This survey indicated that levels of residual radioactive material

  7. Mr. Harold Snyder Chief, Discovery and Investigations Branch

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    FEB 2 I 1985 Mr. Harold Snyder Chief, Discovery and Investigations Branch Hazardous Site Control Division Administration for Solid Waste and Emergency Response U. S. Environmental Protection Agency 401 M Street, S. W. Washington, D. C. 20460 Dear Mr. Snyder: The Department of Energy (DOE) has conducted a radiological survey at the Conserv Corporation (The former Virginia-Carolina Chemical Corporation), Nichols, Florida. This survey indicated that levels of residual radioactive material and

  8. Mr. Harold Snyder Chief, Discovery and Investigations Branch

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Harold Snyder Chief, Discovery and Investigations Branch Hazardous Site Control Division Administration for Solid Waste and Emergency Response U. S. Environmental Protection Agency 401 M Street, S. W. Washington, D. C. 70460 Dear Mr. Snyder: The Department of Energy (DDE) has conducted a radiological survey at the Conserv Corporation (The former Virginia-Carolina Chemical Corporation), Nichols, Florida. This survey indicated that levels of residual radioactive material and associated radiation

  9. Mr. Harold Snyder, Chief Discovery and Investigation Branch

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Ofll s' :y 1: ,' :*,; / c- tii; 1 ;q' (/. 4 L Department of Energy Washington, D .C. 20545 Mr. Harold Snyder, Chief Discovery and Investigation Branch Hazardous Site Control Division Administration for Solid Waste and Emergency Response U.S. Environmental Protection Agency 401 M Street Washington, D.C. 20460 Dear Mr. Snyder: The Department of Energy (DOE) radiological survey at the former Horizons, Inc. facility at 2909 East 79th Street in Cleveland, Ohio, performed in 1977, indicated that

  10. Mr. John Kinneman, Chief Nuclear Materfals Branch Nuclear Regulatory Commission

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    111989 Mr. John Kinneman, Chief Nuclear Materfals Branch Nuclear Regulatory Commission Region I 475 Allendale Road King of Prussia. Pennsylvania 19406 Dear Mr. Kinneman: -;' .-. 'W Enclosed are the copfes of the final ORNL survey reports on the radiologlcal Surveys conducted on three Teterboro, New Jersey properties; Metpath Incorporated, Allied Aerospace Corporatio; and Sumftomo Machinery Corporation. Copies of these reports have &en sent directly to the owners by our survey contractor Oak

  11. Mr. William f. Crow, Acting Director . Uranium Fuel Licensing Branch

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Mr. William f. Crow, Acting Director . Uranium Fuel Licensing Branch U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission 7915 Eastern Avenue Silver Spring, Maryland 20555 Dear Mr. Crow: The Department of Energy (DOE), as a part of its Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP), is conducting efforts to identify all sites and facilities, primarily in the private sector, where radioactive materials were handled, processed or used in District (MED) and Atomic Energy Commission sup (AEC f ort of

  12. Measurement of the branching ratio ?(?b0??(2S)?0)/?(?b0?J...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Measurement of the branching ratio (b0(2S)0)(b0J0) with the ATLAS detector Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Measurement of the branching ratio...

  13. FCC LPG olefinicity and branching enhanced by octane catalysts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keyworth, D.A.; Reid, T.A.; Kreider, K.R.; Yatsu, C.A.

    1989-05-29

    Refiners are increasingly recognizing the downstream opportunities for fluid catalytic cracking LPG olefins for the production of methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE), ethyl tertiary butyl ether (ETBE, if the ethanol subsidy is extended to the production of ETBE), and as petrochemical feedstocks. Some of new gasoline FCC octane-enhancing catalysts can support those opportunities because their low non-framework alumina (low NFA) preserve both LPG olefinicity and promote branching of the LPG streams from the FCCU. The combined effect results in more isobutane for alkylate feed, more propylene in the propane/propylene stream, and more isobutene - which makes the addition of an MTBE unit very enticing.

  14. UBS AG, LONDON BRANCH Order No. EA-261 I. BACKGROUND

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    1 I. BACKGROUND Exports of electricity from the United States to a foreign country are regulated and require authorization under section 202(e) of the Federal Power Act (FPA) (16 U.S.C. §824a(e)). On April 11, 2002, the Office of Fossil Energy (FE) of the Department of Energy (DOE) received an application from UBS AG, London Branch (UBS) for authorization to transmit electric energy from the United States to Mexico. UBS, a Swiss corporation formed in 1998 by the merger of Union Bank of

  15. UBS AG, LONDON BRANCH Order No. EA-263 I. BACKGROUND

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    3 I. BACKGROUND Exports of electricity from the United States to a foreign country are regulated and require authorization under section 202(e) of the Federal Power Act (FPA) (16 U.S.C. §824a(e)). On April 11, 2002, the Office of Fossil Energy (FE) of the Department of Energy (DOE) received an application from UBS, AG London Branch (UBS) for authorization to transmit electric energy from the Untied States to Mexico and to Canada. UBS, a Swiss corporation formed in 1998 by the merger of Union

  16. : Hanson Blata, Chief, Radiation Branch Health & Safety Division

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Hanson Blata, Chief, Radiation Branch Health & Safety Division ,DATTE: July 25, 1952 FROM : Eugene Barry, Radiation Brsnchctr@ Health & Safety Division SL-JEm: VISIT TO CANADIAN RADIUM AND UFLANIUM CO, MT. K&O, N. Y. - MAY 28, 1952 SrnOL: HSR:.WB:md On May 28, a visit was made to the Canadian Radium and Uranium Co. of Mt. Kisco, New York, a manufacturer and distributor of radium and polonium products, for the purpose of assisting the New York State Department of Labor in making a

  17. I-17 Mr. Barold Snyder, Chief Discovery and Investigations Branch

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    &!L,? ,p-- 6 I-1 !j I-17 Mr. Barold Snyder, Chief Discovery and Investigations Branch U. S. Wire-tal Protection Agency 40iM street, s. w. Washington, D. C. 20460 Dear Mr. Snyder: The Dqxtmantof RIergy (DOE) has conducted a radiological survey at the Harshaw Chemical Carpany Facility, Cleveland, Ohio. This survey iudicated levels of residual radioactive material and associated radiation levels at the site are in excess of those used by DOE to determine if a site requires renedial action. The

  18. Advanced Branching Control and Characterization of Inorganic Semiconducting Nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hughes, Steven Michael

    2007-12-31

    The ability to finely tune the size and shape of inorganic semiconducting nanocrystals is an area of great interest, as the more control one has, the more applications will be possible for their use. The first two basic shapes develped in nanocrystals were the sphere and the anistropic nanorod. the II_VI materials being used such as Cadmium Selenide (CdSe) and Cadmium Telluride (CdTe), exhibit polytypism, which allows them to form in either the hexagonally packed wurtzite or cubically packed zinc blende crystalline phase. The nanorods are wurtzite with the length of the rod growing along the c-axis. As this grows, stacking faults may form, which are layers of zinc blende in the otherwise wurtzite crystal. Using this polytypism, though, the first generation of branched crystals were developed in the form of the CdTe tetrapod. This is a nanocrystal that nucleates in the zincblend form, creating a tetrahedral core, on which four wurtzite arms are grown. This structure opened up the possibility of even more complex shapes and applications. This disseration investigates the advancement of branching control and further understanding the materials polytypism in the form of the stacking faults in nanorods.

  19. Vegetation survey of Pen Branch and Four Mile Creek wetlands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    One hundred-fifty plots were recently sampled (vegetational sampling study) at the Savannah River Site (SRS). An extensive characterization of the vascular flora, in four predetermined strata (overstory, Understory, shrub layer, and ground cover), was undertaken to determine dominance, co-dominance, and the importance value (I.V.) of each species. These results will be used by the Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) to evaluate the environmental status of Four Mile Creek, Pen Branch, and two upland pine stands. Objectives of this study were to: Describe in detail the plant communities previously mapped with reference to the topography and drainage, including species of plants present: Examine the successional trends within each sampling area and describe the extent to which current vegetation communities have resulted from specific earlier vegetation disturbances (e.g., logging and grazing); describe in detail the botanical field techniques used to sample the flora; describe the habitat and location of protected and/or rare species of plants; and collect and prepare plant species as herbarium quality specimens. Sampling was conducted at Four Mile Creek and Pen Branch, and in two upland pine plantations of different age growth.

  20. Vegetation survey of Pen Branch and Four Mile Creek wetlands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-10-01

    One hundred-fifty plots were recently sampled (vegetational sampling study) at the Savannah River Site (SRS). An extensive characterization of the vascular flora, in four predetermined strata (overstory, Understory, shrub layer, and ground cover), was undertaken to determine dominance, co-dominance, and the importance value (I.V.) of each species. These results will be used by the Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) to evaluate the environmental status of Four Mile Creek, Pen Branch, and two upland pine stands. Objectives of this study were to: Describe in detail the plant communities previously mapped with reference to the topography and drainage, including species of plants present: Examine the successional trends within each sampling area and describe the extent to which current vegetation communities have resulted from specific earlier vegetation disturbances (e.g., logging and grazing); describe in detail the botanical field techniques used to sample the flora; describe the habitat and location of protected and/or rare species of plants; and collect and prepare plant species as herbarium quality specimens. Sampling was conducted at Four Mile Creek and Pen Branch, and in two upland pine plantations of different age growth.

  1. Oscillating side-branch enhancements of thermoacoustic heat exchangers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Swift, Gregory W.

    2003-05-13

    A regenerator-based engine or refrigerator has a regenerator with two ends at two different temperatures, through which a gas oscillates at a first oscillating volumetric flow rate in the direction between the two ends and in which the pressure of the gas oscillates, and first and second heat exchangers, each of which is at one of the two different temperatures. A dead-end side branch into which the gas oscillates has compliance and is connected adjacent to one of the ends of the regenerator to form a second oscillating gas flow rate additive with the first oscillating volumetric flow rate, the compliance having a volume effective to provide a selected total oscillating gas volumetric flow rate through the first heat exchanger. This configuration enables the first heat exchanger to be configured and located to better enhance the performance of the heat exchanger rather than being confined to the location and configuration of the regenerator.

  2. Q-branch Raman scattering and modern kinetic thoery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Monchick, L.

    1993-12-01

    The program is an extension of previous APL work whose general aim was to calculate line shapes of nearly resonant isolated line transitions with solutions of a popular quantum kinetic equation-the Waldmann-Snider equation-using well known advanced solution techniques developed for the classical Boltzmann equation. The advanced techniques explored have been a BGK type approximation, which is termed the Generalized Hess Method (GHM), and conversion of the collision operator to a block diagonal matrix of symmetric collision kernels which then can be approximated by discrete ordinate methods. The latter method, which is termed the Collision Kernel method (CC), is capable of the highest accuracy and has been used quite successfully for Q-branch Raman scattering. The GHM method, not quite as accurate, is applicable over a wider range of pressures and has proven quite useful.

  3. IDENTIFYING BLUE HORIZONTAL BRANCH STARS USING THE z FILTER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vickers, John J.; Grebel, Eva K.; Huxor, Avon P.

    2012-04-15

    In this paper we present a new method for selecting blue horizontal branch (BHB) candidates based on color-color photometry. We make use of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey z band as a surface gravity indicator and show its value for selecting BHB stars from quasars, white dwarfs, and main-sequence A-type stars. Using the g, r, i, and z bands, we demonstrate that extraction accuracies on a par with more traditional u, g, and r photometric selection methods may be achieved. We also show that the completeness necessary to probe major Galactic structure may be maintained. Our new method allows us to efficiently select BHB stars from photometric sky surveys that do not include a u-band filter such as the Panoramic Survey Telescope and Rapid Response System.

  4. BRANCH-BASED MODEL FOR THE DIAMETERS OF THE PULMONARY AIRWAYS: ACCOUNTING

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    FOR DEPARTURES FROM SELF-CONSISTENCY AND REGISTRATION ERRORS (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect BRANCH-BASED MODEL FOR THE DIAMETERS OF THE PULMONARY AIRWAYS: ACCOUNTING FOR DEPARTURES FROM SELF-CONSISTENCY AND REGISTRATION ERRORS Citation Details In-Document Search Title: BRANCH-BASED MODEL FOR THE DIAMETERS OF THE PULMONARY AIRWAYS: ACCOUNTING FOR DEPARTURES FROM SELF-CONSISTENCY AND REGISTRATION ERRORS We examine a previously published branch-based approach to modeling airway diameters

  5. BRANCH-BASED MODEL FOR THE DIAMETERS OF THE PULMONARY AIRWAYS...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    BRANCH-BASED MODEL FOR THE DIAMETERS OF THE PULMONARY AIRWAYS: ACCOUNTING FOR DEPARTURES FROM SELF-CONSISTENCY AND REGISTRATION ERRORS Citation Details In-Document Search Title: ...

  6. Molecular Design of Branched and Binary Molecules at Ordered Interfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirsten Larson Genson

    2005-12-27

    This study examined five different branched molecular architectures to discern the effect of design on the ability of molecules to form ordered structures at interfaces. Photochromic monodendrons formed kinked packing structures at the air-water interface due to the cross-sectional area mismatch created by varying number of alkyl tails and the hydrophilic polar head group. The lower generations formed orthorhombic unit cell with long range ordering despite the alkyl tails tilted to a large degree. Favorable interactions between liquid crystalline terminal groups and the underlying substrate were observed to compel a flexible carbosilane dendrimer core to form a compressed elliptical conformation which packed stagger within lamellae domains with limited short range ordering. A twelve arm binary star polymer was observed to form two dimensional micelles at the air-water interface attributed to the higher polystyrene block composition. Linear rod-coil molecules formed a multitude of packing structures at the air-water interface due to the varying composition. Tree-like rod-coil molecules demonstrated the ability to form one-dimensional structures at the air-water interface and at the air-solvent interface caused by the preferential ordering of the rigid rod cores. The role of molecular architecture and composition was examined and the influence chemically competing fragments was shown to exert on the packing structure. The amphiphilic balance of the different molecular series exhibited control on the ordering behavior at the air-water interface and within bulk structures. The shell nature and tail type was determined to dictate the preferential ordering structure and molecular reorganization at interfaces with the core nature effect secondary.

  7. Production of branched-chain alcohols by recombinant Ralstonia eutropha in fed-batch cultivation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fei, Q; Brigham, CJ; Lu, JN; Fu, RZ; Sinskey, AJ

    2013-09-01

    Branched-chain alcohols are considered promising green energy sources due to their compatibility with existing infrastructure and their high energy density. We utilized a strain of Ralstonia eutropha capable of producing branched-chain alcohols and examined its production in flask cultures. In order to increase isobutanol and 3-methyl-1-butanol (isoamyl alcohol) productivity in the engineered strain, batch, fed-batch, and two-stage fed-batch cultures were carried out in this work. The effects of nitrogen source concentration on branched-chain alcohol production were investigated under four different initial concentrations in fermenters. A maximum 380 g m(-3) of branched-chain alcohol production was observed with 2 kg m(-3) initial NH4Cl concentration in batch cultures. A pH-stat control strategy was utilized to investigate the optimum carbon source amount fed during fed-batch cultures for higher cell density. In cultures of R. eutropha strains that did not produce polyhydroxyalkanoate or branched-chain alcohols, a maximum cell dry weight of 36 kg m(-3) was observed using a fed-batch strategy, when 10 kg m(-3) carbon source was fed into culture medium. Finally, a total branched-chain alcohol titer of 790 g m(-3), the highest branched-chain alcohol yield of 0.03 g g(-1), and the maximum branched-chain alcohol productivity of 8.23 g m(-3) h(-1) were obtained from the engineered strain Re2410/pJL26 in a two-stage fed-batch culture system with pH-stat control. Isobutanol made up over 95% (mass fraction) of the total branched-chain alcohols titer produced in this study. (C) 2013 Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Branched peptide amphiphiles, related epitope compounds and self assembled structures thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stupp, Samuel I. (Chicago, IL); Guler, Mustafa O. (Evanston, IL)

    2008-11-18

    Branched peptide amphiphilic compounds incorporating one or residues providing a pendant amino group for coupling one or more epitope sequences thereto, such compounds and related compositions for enhanced epitope presentation.

  9. Measurement of the B?Xs? branching fraction with a sum of exclusive decays

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Saito, T.; Ishikawa, A.; Yamamoto, H.; Abdesselam, A.; Adachi, I.; Aihara, H.; Al Said, S.; Arinstein, K.; Asner, D.?M.; Aushev, T.; et al

    2015-03-04

    We use 772 106 BB meson pairs collected at the ?(4S) resonance with the Belle detector to measure the branching fraction for B ? Xs?. Our measurement uses a sum-of-exclusives approach in which 38 of the hadronic final states with strangeness equal to +1, denoted by Xs, are reconstructed. The inclusive branching fraction for MXs s?)=(3.510.170.33) 104, where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second is systematic.

  10. Controlled synthesis of hyper-branched inorganic nanocrystals withrich three-dimensional structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kanaras, Antonios G.; Sonnichsen, Carsten; Liu, Haitao; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2005-07-27

    Studies of crystal growth kinetics are tightly integrated with advances in the creation of new nanoscale inorganic building blocks and their functional assemblies 1-11. Recent examples include the development of semiconductor nanorods which have potential uses in solar cells 12-17, and the discovery of a light driven process to create noble metal particles with sharp corners that can be used in plasmonics 18,19. In the course of studying basic crystal growth kinetics we developed a process for preparing branched semiconductor nanocrystals such as tetrapods and inorganic dendrimers of precisely controlled generation 20,21. Here we report the discovery of a crystal growth kinetics regime in which a new class of hyper-branched nanocrystals are formed. The shapes range from 'thorny balls', to tree-like ramified structures, to delicate 'spider net'-like particles. These intricate shapes depend crucially on a delicate balance of branching and extension. The multitudes of resulting shapes recall the diverse shapes of snowflakes 22.The three dimensional nature of the branch points here, however, lead to even more complex arrangements than the two dimensionally branched structures observed in ice. These hyper-branched particles not only extend the available three-dimensional shapes in nanoparticle synthesis ,but also provide a tool to study growth kinetics by carefully observing and modeling particle morphology.

  11. Isolation and characterization of portal branch ligation-stimulated Hmga2-positive bipotent hepatic progenitor cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sakai, Hiroshi; Graduate School of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259 B51, Nagatsuta-cho, Midori-ku, Yokohama, Kanagawa 226-8503 ; Tagawa, Yoh-ichi; Graduate School of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259 B51, Nagatsuta-cho, Midori-ku, Yokohama, Kanagawa 226-8503; PRESTO, Japan Science and Technology Agency, 4-1-8 Honcho, Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012 ; Tamai, Miho; Motoyama, Hiroaki; Ogawa, Shinichiro; McEwen Center for Regenerative Medicine, University Health Network, 190 Elizabeth Street, Toronto, Ont., Canada M5G 2C4 ; Soeda, Junpei; Nakata, Takenari; Miyagawa, Shinichi

    2010-12-17

    Research highlights: {yields} Hepatic progenitor cells were isolated from the portal branch-ligated liver of mice. {yields} Portal branch ligation-stimulated hepatic progenitor cells (PBLHCs) express Hmga2. {yields} PBLHCs have bidirectional differentiation capability in vitro. -- Abstract: Hepatic stem/progenitor cells are one of several cell sources that show promise for restoration of liver mass and function. Although hepatic progenitor cells (HPCs), including oval cells, are induced by administration of certain hepatotoxins in experimental animals, such a strategy would be inappropriate in a clinical setting. Here, we investigated the possibility of isolating HPCs in a portal branch-ligated liver model without administration of any chemical agents. A non-parenchymal cell fraction was prepared from the portal branch-ligated or non-ligated lobe, and seeded onto plates coated with laminin. Most of the cells died, but a small number were able to proliferate. These proliferating cells were cloned as portal branch ligation-stimulated hepatic cells (PBLHCs) by the limiting dilution method. The PBLHCs expressed cytokeratin19, albumin, and Hmga2. The PBLHCs exhibited metabolic functions such as detoxification of ammonium ions and synthesis of urea on Matrigel-coated plates in the presence of oncostatin M. In Matrigel mixed with type I collagen, the PBLHCs became rearranged into cystic and tubular structures. Immunohistochemical staining demonstrated the presence of Hmga2-positive cells around the interlobular bile ducts in the portal branch-ligated liver lobes. In conclusion, successful isolation of bipotent hepatic progenitor cell clones, PBLHCs, from the portal branch-ligated liver lobes of mice provides the possibility of future clinical application of portal vein ligation to induce hepatic progenitor cells.

  12. Conceptual Assessment Framework for Forested Wetland Restoration: The Pen Branch Experience. Restoration of a Severely Impacted Riparian Wetland System - The Pen Branch Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kolka, R.; Nelson, E.A.; Trettin, C.C.

    2000-10-01

    Development of an assessment framework and indicators can be used to evaluate effectiveness of wetland restoration. Example of these include index of biotic integrity and the hydrogeomorphic method. Both approaches provide qualitative ranks. We propose a new method based on the EPA wetland research program. Similar to other methods, indexes are compared to reference communities; however, the comparisons are quantitative. In this paper we discuss the results of our framework using the Pen Branch riparian wetland system as an example.

  13. Asymmetric branching of dissociated photofragments of HD{sup +} in an intense femtosecond laser field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chatterjee, Souvik; Bhattacharyya, S. S.; Dutta, Bibhas

    2011-06-15

    We have numerically explored the asymmetry in the branching ratio of the photofragments in the photodissociation of HD{sup +} (neutral D and neutral H), leading to the possibility of localization of the electron on a chosen nucleus by careful tuning of the laser parameters. For two different frequencies we show that, starting from an initial stationary wave function, proper tuning of the pulse duration (2{sigma}) and peak intensities (I{sup 0}) of the laser pulses can lead to very different branching ratios of the two reaction channels. The results are interpreted in terms of the propagation of the nonstationary wave packet through regions having dominant radiative or nonradiative interactions at different times. We also investigate what effect the choice of initial vibrational state has on the overall asymmetry in the branching ratio of the dissociation products.

  14. Search for the decay Bs0 ? ?? and a measurement of the branching fraction for Bs0 ? ??

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dutta, Deepanwita; Bhuyan, Bipul; Abdesselam, A.; Adachi, I.; Aihara, H.; Al Said, S.; Arinstein, K.; Asner, David M.; Aulchenko, V.; Aushev, T.; Ayad, R.; Aziz, T.; Bahinipati, S.; Bakich, A. M.; Bansal, Vikas; Bhardwaj, V.; Bobrov, A.; Bonvicini, Giovanni; Bracko, Marko; Browder, Thomas E.; Cervenkov, D.; Chen, A.; Cheon, B. G.; Chilikin, K.; Chistov, R.; Cho, K.; Chobanova, V.; Choi, Y.; Cinabro, David A.; Dalseno, J.; Dolezal, Z.; Drasal, Z.; Drutskoy, A.; Dutta, K.; Eidelman, S.; Farhat, H.; Fast, James E.; Frost, O.; Gaur, Vipin; Ganguly, Sudeshna; Garmash, Alexey; Getzkow, D.; Goh, Y. M.; Golob, B.; Hayashii, H.; He, X. H.; Hou, W. S.; Iijima, T.; Ishikawa, A.; Iwasaki, Y.; Jaegle, Igal; Joffe, D.; Kang, K. H.; Kato, E.; Kiesling, C.; Kim, D. Y.; Kim, J. B.; Kim, J. H.; Kim, K. T.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. J.; Kinoshita, Kay; Ko, Byeong Rok; Kodys, P.; Korpar, S.; Krizan, P.; Krokovny, Pavel; Kuhr, Thomas; Kuzmin, A.; Kwon, Y. J.; Lange, J. S.; Lee, I. S.; Lewis, P.; Li, Y.; Li Gioi, L.; Libby, J.; Liventsev, Dmitri; Matvienko, D.; Miyata, H.; Mizuk, R.; Mohanty, G. B.; Moll, A.; Mori, T.; Mussa, R.; Nakano, E.; Nakao, M.; Nanut, T.; Nayak, Minakshi; Nisar, N. K.; Nishida, S.; Ogawa, S.; Okuno, S.; Pakhlov, P.; Pakhlova, Galina; Pedlar, Todd K.; Pestotnik, Rok; Petric, Marko; Piilonen, Leo E.; Ribezl, Eva; Ritter, M.; Rostomyan, A.; Sakai, Y.; Sandilya, Saurabh; Santelj, Luka; Sanuki, T.; Sato, Y.; Savinov, Vladimir; Schneider, O.; Schnell, G.; Schwanda, C.; Schwartz, A. J.; Semmler, D.; Shebalin, V.; Shibata, T. A.; Shiu, Jing-Ge; Shwartz, B.; Sibidanov, A.; Simon, F.; Sohn, Y. S.; Sokolov, A.; Solovieva, E.; Staric, M.; Sumihama, M.; Sumiyoshi, T.; Teramoto, Y.; Trabelsi, K.; Uchida, M.; Unno, Yuji; Uno, S.; Usov, Y.; Van Hulse, C.; Vanhoefer, P.; Varner, G.; Vinokurova, A.; Vossen, Anslem G.; Wagner, M. N.; Wang, C. H.; Wang, P.; Watanabe, Y.; Wehle, S.; Williams, K. M.; Won, E.; Yamamoto, H.; Yamaoka, J.; Yashchenko, S.; Yusa, Y.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhilich, V.; Zupanc, A.

    2015-01-01

    We search for the decay B0s??? and measure the branching fraction for B0s??? using 121.4~fb-1 of data collected at the ?(5S) resonance with the Belle detector at the KEKB asymmetric-energy e+e- collider. The B0s??? branching fraction is measured to be (3.60.5(stat.)0.3(syst.)0.6(fs))10-5, where fs is the fraction of Bs(*)Bs(*) in bb events. Our result is in good agreement with the theoretical predictions as well as with a recent measurement from LHCb. We observe no statistically significant signal for the decay B0s??? and set a 90% confidence-level upper limit on its branching fraction at 3.110-6. This constitutes a significant improvement over the previous result.

  15. High resolution, shallow seismic reflection survey of the Pen Branch fault

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stieve, A.

    1991-05-15

    The purpose of this project, at the Savannah River River Site (SRS) was to acquire, process, and interpret 28 km (17.4 miles) of high resolution seismic reflection data taken across the trace of the Pen Branch fault and other suspected, intersecting north-south trending faults. The survey was optimized for the upper 300 ft of geologic strata in order to demonstrate the existence of very shallow, flat lying horizons, and to determine the depth of the fault or to sediments deformed by the fault. Field acquisition and processing parameters were selected to define small scale spatial variability and structural features in the vicinity of the Pen Branch fault leading to the definition and the location of the Pen Branch fault, the shallowest extent of the fault, and the quantification of the sense and magnitude of motion. Associated geophysical, borehole, and geologic data were incorporated into the investigation to assist in the determination of optimal parameters and aid in the interpretation.

  16. Revision of the Branch Technical Position on Concentration Averaging and Encapsulation - 12510

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heath, Maurice; Kennedy, James E.; Ridge, Christianne; Lowman, Donald [U.S. NRC, Washington, DC, 20555-0001 (United States); Cochran, John [Sandia National Laboratory (United States)

    2012-07-01

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) regulation governing low-level waste (LLW) disposal, 'Licensing Requirements for Land Disposal of Radioactive Waste', 10 CFR Part 61, establishes a waste classification system based on the concentration of specific radionuclides contained in the waste. The regulation also states, at 10 CFR 61.55(a)(8), that, 'the concentration of a radionuclide (in waste) may be averaged over the volume of the waste, or weight of the waste if the units are expressed as nanocuries per gram'. The NRC's Branch Technical Position on Concentration Averaging and Encapsulation provides guidance on averaging radionuclide concentrations in waste under 10 CFR 61.55(a)(8) when classifying waste for disposal. In 2007, the NRC staff proposed to revise the Branch Technical Position on Concentration Averaging and Encapsulation. The Branch Technical Position on Concentration Averaging and Encapsulation is an NRC guidance document for averaging and classifying wastes under 10 CFR 61. The Branch Technical Position on Concentration Averaging and Encapsulation is used by nuclear power plants (NPPs) licensees and sealed source users, among others. In addition, three of the four U.S. LLW disposal facility operators are required to honor the Branch Technical Position on Concentration Averaging and Encapsulation as a licensing condition. In 2010, the Commission directed the staff to develop guidance regarding large scale blending of similar homogenous waste types, as described in SECY-10-0043 as part of its Branch Technical Position on Concentration Averaging and Encapsulation revision. The Commission is improving the regulatory approach used in the Branch Technical Position on Concentration Averaging and Encapsulation by moving towards a making it more risk-informed and performance-based approach, which is more consistent with the agency's regulatory policies. Among the improvements to the Branch Technical Position on Concentration Averaging and Encapsulation are more risk-informed limits for the sizes of sealed sources for safe disposal. Using more realistic intruder exposure scenarios, the suggested limits for Class B and C waste disposal of sealed sources, particularly Cs-137 and Co-60, have been increased. These suggested changes, and others in the Branch Technical Position on Concentration Averaging and Encapsulation, if adopted by Agreement States, have the potential to eliminate numerous orphan sources (i.e., sources that currently have no disposal pathway) that are now being stored. Permanent disposal of these sources, rather than temporary storage, will help reduce safety and security risks. The revised Branch Technical Position on Concentration Averaging and Encapsulation has an alternative approach section which provides flexibility to generators and processors, while also ensuring that intruder protection will be maintained. Alternative approaches provide flexibility by allowing for consideration of likelihood of intrusion, the possibility of averaging over larger volumes and allowing for disposal of large activity sources. The revision has improved the organization of the Branch Technical Position on Concentration Averaging and Encapsulation, improved its clarity, better documented the bases for positions, and made the positions more risk informed while also maintaining protection for intruder as required by 10 CFR Part 61. (authors)

  17. Side branch absorber for exhaust manifold of two-stroke internal combustion engine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Harris, Ralph E. (San Antonio, TX); Broerman, III, Eugene L. (San Antonio, TX); Bourn, Gary D. (Laramie, WY)

    2011-01-11

    A method of improving scavenging operation of a two-stroke internal combustion engine. The exhaust pressure of the engine is analyzed to determine if there is a pulsation frequency. Acoustic modeling is used to design an absorber. An appropriately designed side branch absorber may be attached to the exhaust manifold.

  18. Measurement of branching fractions and rate asymmetries in the rare decays B→K(*)l⁺l⁻

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Palano, A.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Brown, D. N.; Kerth, L. T.; et al

    2012-08-24

    In a sample of 471×10⁶ BB¯¯¯ events collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II e⁺e⁻ collider we study the rare decays B→K(*)l⁺l⁻, where l⁺l⁻ is either e⁺e⁻ or μ⁺μ⁻. We report results on partial branching fractions and isospin asymmetries in seven bins of dilepton mass-squared. We further present CP and lepton-flavor asymmetries for dilepton masses below and above the J/ψ resonance. We find no evidence for CP or lepton-flavor violation. The partial branching fractions and isospin asymmetries are consistent with the Standard Model predictions and with results from other experiments.

  19. Measurement of the Branching Fraction of B0 Meson Decay to a_1^+(1260) pi-

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aubert, B.; Barate, R.; Boutigny, D.; Couderc, F.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; Grauges, E.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pompili, A.; Chen, J.C.; Qi, N.D.; Rong, G.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y.S.; Eigen, G.; Ofte, I.; Stugu, B. /Bergen U. /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /Bristol U. /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa U. /Iowa State U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT, LNS /McGill U. /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /Perugia U. /INFN, Perugia /Pisa U. /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa /Prairie View A-M /Princeton U. /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /South Carolina U. /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /Turin U. /INFN, Turin /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Valencia U., IFIC /Vanderbilt U. /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison /Yale U.

    2005-07-12

    We present a preliminary measurement of the branching fraction of the B meson decay B{sup 0} {yields} a{sub 1}{sup +}(1260){pi}{sup -}with a{sub 1}{sup +}(1260) {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}. The data sample corresponds to 218 x 10{sup 6} B{bar B} pairs produced in e{sup +}e{sup -} annihilation through the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance. We find the branching fraction (40.2 {+-} 3.9 {+-} 3.9) x 10{sup -6}, where the first error quoted is statistical and the second is systematic. The fitted values of the a{sub 1}(1260) parameters are m{sub a{sub 1}} = 1.22 {+-} 0.02 GeV/c{sup 2} and {Lambda}{sub a{sub 1}} = 0.423 {+-} 0.050 GeV/c{sup 2}.

  20. Improved Measurement of the π→eν Branching Ratio

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aguilar-Arevalo, A.; Aoki, M.; Blecher, M.; Britton, D. I.; Bryman, D. A.; vom Bruch, D.; Chen, S.; Comfort, J.; Ding, M.; Doria, L.; et al

    2015-08-01

    A new measurement of the branching ratio Re/μ=Γ(π+ → e+ν + π+ → e+νγ)/Γ(π+ → μ+ν + π+→μ+νγ) resulted in Rexpe/μ=[1.2344±0.0023(stat)±0.0019(syst)] x 10-4. This is in agreement with the standard model prediction and improves the test of electron-muon universality to the level of 0.1%.

  1. The Discovery of Archaea, the 'Third Branch of Life', and Its Impacts

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The Discovery of Archaea, the 'Third Branch of Life', and Its Impacts Resources with Additional Information Electron micrograph and genetic map of Methanococcus jannaschii 'In 1996 scientists supported by the DOE's Microbial Genome Program reported the complete genome sequence of Methanococcus jannaschii, a methane-producing microorganism that dwells around "white smokers" on the seafloor. The details of the genome confirm the existence of a third kingdom of living organisms, the

  2. Some problems in sequencing and scheduling utilizing branch and bound algorithms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gim, B.

    1988-01-01

    This dissertation deals with branch and bound algorithms which are applied to the two-machine flow-shop problem with sparse precedence constraints and the optimal sequencing and scheduling of multiple feedstocks in a batch-type digester problem. The problem studied here is to find a schedule which minimizes the maximum flow time with the requirement that the schedule does not violate a set of sparse precedence constraints. This research provides a branch and bound algorithm which employs a lower bounding rule and is based on an adjustment of the sequence obtained by applying Johnson's algorithm. It is demonstrated that this lower bounding procedure in conjunction with Kurisu's branching rule is effective for the sparse precedence constraints problem case. Biomass to methane production systems have the potential of supplying 25% of the national gas demand. The optimal operation of a batch digester system requires the sequencing and scheduling of all batches from multiple feedstocks during a fixed time horizon. A significant characteristic of these systems is that the feedstock decays in storage before use in the digester system. The operational problem is to determine the time to allocate to each batch of several feedstocks and then sequence the individual batches so as to maximize biogas production for a single batch type digester over a fixed planning horizon. This research provides a branch and bound algorithm for sequencing and a two-step hierarchical dynamic programming procedure for time allocation scheduling. An efficient heuristic algorithm is developed for large problems and demonstrated to yield excellent results.

  3. Detector for measuring the π+ → e+v branching fraction

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aguilar-Arevalo, A. A.; Aoki, M.; Blecher, M.; Bruch, D. vom; Bryman, D.; Comfort, J.; Cuen-Rochin, S.; Doria, L.; Gumplinger, P.; Hussein, A.; et al

    2015-04-13

    The PIENU experiment at TRIUMF is aimed at a measurement of the branching ratio Re/u = Γ((π+ → e+ve) + (π+ → e+veγ))/Γ((π+ → μ+vμ) + (π+ → μ+vμγ)) with precision more »This paper provides a description of the PIENU experimental apparatus and its performance in pursuit of Re/u« less

  4. Probing the molecular design of hyper-branched aryl polyesters towards lubricant applications

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Robinson, Joshua W.; Zhou, Yan; Bhattacharya, Priyanka; Erck, Robert; Qu, Jun; Bays, J. Timothy; Cosimbescu, Lelia

    2016-01-05

    We report novel polymeric materials that may be used as viscosity index improvers (VII) for lubricant applications. Our efforts included probing the comb-burst hyper-branched aryl polyester architecture for beneficial viscosity and friction behavior when utilized as an additive in a group I oil. The monomer was designed as to undergo polymerization via polycondensation within the architectural construct (AB2), typical of hyperbranched polymers. The monomer design was comprised of aliphatic arms (12 or 16 methylenes) to provide the necessary lipophilicity to achieve solubility in a non-polar medium. Once polymerized, via catalyst and heat, the surface alcohols were functionalized with fatty acidsmore » (lauric and palmitic). Controlling the aliphatic nature of the internal arms and peripheral end-groups provided four unique flexible polymer designs. Changing the reaction time and concentration provided opportunities to investigate the influence of molecular weight and branching density on oil-solubility, viscosity, and friction. Oil-solubility was found to decrease with fewer internal carbons, but the number of internal carbons appears to have little influence on the bulk solution viscosity. Increased branching and degree of polymerization, and thus molecular weight, were found to reduce the solubility of these systems in the base oil. At concentrations of 2 wt % in a group I base oil, these polymer additives demonstrated improved viscosity index and reduced friction coefficient, validating the basic approach.« less

  5. Pen Branch fault program: Consolidated report on the seismic reflection surveys and the shallow drilling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stieve, A.L.; Stephenson, D.E.; Aadland, R.K.

    1991-03-23

    The Pen Branch fault was identified in the subsurface at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in 1989 based upon interpretation of earlier seismic reflection surveys and other geologic investigations (Seismorgraph Services Incorp., 1973; Chapman and DiStefano, 1989; Snipes, Fallaw and Price, 1989). A program was initiated at that time to determine the capability of the fault to release seismic energy (Price and others, 1989) as defined in the Nuclear Regulatory Commission regulatory guidelines, 10 CFR 100 Appendix A. This report presents the results of the Pen Branch fault investigation based on data acquired from seismic reflection surveys and shallow drilling across the fault completed at this time. The Earth Science Advisory Committee (ESAC) has reviewed the results of these investigations and unanimously agrees with the conclusion of Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) that the Pen Branch fault is a non-capable fault. ESAC is a committee of 12 earth science professionals from academia and industry with the charter of providing outside peer review of SRS geotechnical, seismic, and ground water modeling programs.

  6. Process for the conversion of lower alcohols to higher branched oxygenates

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Barger, P.T.

    1996-09-24

    A process is provided for the production of branched C{sub x} oxygenates from lower alcohols such as methanol, ethanol, propanol and mixtures thereof. The process comprises contacting the lower alcohols with a solid catalyst comprising a mixed metal oxide support having components selected from the group consisting of oxides of zinc, magnesium, zirconia, titanium, manganese, chromium, and lanthanides, and an activation metal selected from the group consisting of Group VIII metal, Group IB metals, and mixtures thereof. The advantage of the process is improved yields and selectivity to isobutanol which can subsequently be employed in the production of high octane motor gasoline.

  7. Process for the conversion of lower alcohols to higher branched oxygenates

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Barger, Paul T. (Arlington Heights, IL)

    1996-01-01

    A process is provided for the production of branched C.sub.4+ oxygenates from lower alcohols such as methanol, ethanol, propanol and mixtures thereof. The process comprises contacting the lower alcohols with a solid catalyst comprising a mixed metal oxide support having components selected from the group consisting of oxides of zinc, magnesium, zirconia, titanium, manganese, chromium, and lanthanides, and an activation metal selected from the group consisting of Group VIII metal, Group IB metals, and mixtures thereof. The advantage of the process is improved yields and selectivity to isobutanol which can subsequently be employed in the production of high octane motor gasoline.

  8. The transport of contaminants during storms in the White Oak Creek and Melton Branch Watersheds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Solomon, D.K.; Marsh, J.D.; Wickliff, D.S.; Larsen, I.L.; Clapp, R.B.

    1989-03-01

    This report documents are transport of contaminants from SWSA 5 along two principle pathways: the saturated groundwater system and the intermittently saturated stormflow system. The results of a baseflow sampling effort and a dye tracer study, indicated that much of the transport through the saturated groundwater system occurs along discrete geologic features. These features appear to be related to the contact between the Maryville and Nolichucky members of the Conasauga shale. Three discrete sources of tritium to Melton Branch Stream (MBS) were identified and traced to SWSA 5 by measuring soil moisture and evapotranspiration along transects between MBS and SWSA 5.

  9. Mr. Milton Sfegal, Chief Applied Research Branch Division of Che;Rical Development

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Milton Sfegal, Chief Applied Research Branch Division of Che;Rical Development Tennessee Valley Authority NuPcla Shoals, Al&am 35660 . chitlcaea: subject: FiADIOLOGXCAL STATUS OP FORXER ATUHIC lINEG'' COXHXSS132J CO- PACILITXZS ThFs vill confirm discussions arraqfng for Department of Energy representatives to visit those WA facilities at Kusc3.e Shoals vhich vere utilize;! during the 1951-1955 period for vork andar AX contract. A6 a part of a aatiorrA& DO, p site re38sessment program,

  10. A Branch and Bound Approach for Truss Topology Design Problems with Valid Inequalities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cerveira, Adelaide; Agra, Agostinho; Bastos, Fernando; Varum, Humberto

    2010-09-30

    One of the classical problems in the structural optimization field is the Truss Topology Design Problem (TTDP) which deals with the selection of optimal configuration for structural systems for applications in mechanical, civil, aerospace engineering, among others. In this paper we consider a TTDP where the goal is to find the stiffest truss, under a given load and with a bound on the total volume. The design variables are the cross-section areas of the truss bars that must be chosen from a given finite set. This results in a large-scale non-convex problem with discrete variables. This problem can be formulated as a Semidefinite Programming Problem (SDP problem) with binary variables. We propose a branch and bound algorithm to solve this problem. In this paper it is considered a binary formulation of the problem, to take advantage of its structure, which admits a Knapsack problem as subproblem. Thus, trying to improve the performance of the Branch and Bound, at each step, some valid inequalities for the Knapsack problem are included.

  11. Assessment of approximate computational methods for conical intersections and branching plane vectors in organic molecules

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nikiforov, Alexander; Gamez, Jose A.; Thiel, Walter; Huix-Rotllant, Miquel; Filatov, Michael

    2014-09-28

    Quantum-chemical computational methods are benchmarked for their ability to describe conical intersections in a series of organic molecules and models of biological chromophores. Reference results for the geometries, relative energies, and branching planes of conical intersections are obtained using ab initio multireference configuration interaction with single and double excitations (MRCISD). They are compared with the results from more approximate methods, namely, the state-interaction state-averaged restricted ensemble-referenced Kohn-Sham method, spin-flip time-dependent density functional theory, and a semiempirical MRCISD approach using an orthogonalization-corrected model. It is demonstrated that these approximate methods reproduce the ab initio reference data very well, with root-mean-square deviations in the optimized geometries of the order of 0.1 or less and with reasonable agreement in the computed relative energies. A detailed analysis of the branching plane vectors shows that all currently applied methods yield similar nuclear displacements for escaping the strong non-adiabatic coupling region near the conical intersections. Our comparisons support the use of the tested quantum-chemical methods for modeling the photochemistry of large organic and biological systems.

  12. Detector for measuring the π+ → e+v branching fraction

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aguilar-Arevalo, A. A.; Aoki, M.; Blecher, M.; Bruch, D. vom; Bryman, D.; Comfort, J.; Cuen-Rochin, S.; Doria, L.; Gumplinger, P.; Hussein, A.; et al

    2015-04-13

    The PIENU experiment at TRIUMF is aimed at a measurement of the branching ratio Re/u = Γ((π+ → e+ve) + (π+ → e+veγ))/Γ((π+ → μ+vμ) + (π+ → μ+vμγ)) with precision < 0.1%. Incident pions, delivered at the rate of 60 kHz with momentum 75 MeV/c, were degraded and stopped in a plastic scintillator target. Pions and their decay product positrons were detected with plastic scintillators and tracked with multiwire proportional chambers and silicon strip detectors. The energies of the positrons were measured in a spectrometer consisting of a large NaI(Tℓ) crystal surrounded by an array of pure CsI crystals.more » This paper provides a description of the PIENU experimental apparatus and its performance in pursuit of Re/u« less

  13. Measurement of the Branching Ratio Lambda_c+ -> p pi+ pi-

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lopez-Hinojosa, Guillermo; /San Luis Potosi U.

    2008-03-01

    The confirmation of the Cabibbo-suppressed charm baryon decay mode {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} p{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} is reported. All data analyzed are from SELEX, a fixed target experiment at Fermilab that took data during 1996 and 1997, mainly with a 600 GeV/c {Sigma}{sup -} beam. The branching ratio of the Cabibbo-suppressed decay mode {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} p{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} relative to the Cabibbo-favored mode {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} pK{sup -}{pi}{sup +} is measured to be: {Gamma}({Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} p{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -})/{Gamma}({Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} pK{sup -}{pi}{sup +}) = 0.103 {+-} 0.022.

  14. Detector for measuring the ?+ ? e+v branching fraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aguilar-Arevalo, A. A.; Aoki, M.; Blecher, M.; Bruch, D. vom; Bryman, D.; Comfort, J.; Cuen-Rochin, S.; Doria, L.; Gumplinger, P.; Hussein, A.; Igarashi, Y.; Ito, N.; Ito, S.; Kettell, S. H.; Kurchaninov, L.; Littenberg, L.; Malbrunot, C.; Mischke, R. E.; Muroi, A.; Numao, T.; Sheffer, G.; Sher, A.; Sullivan, T.; Tauchi, K.; Vavilov, D.; Yamada, K.; Yoshida, M.

    2015-04-13

    The PIENU experiment at TRIUMF is aimed at a measurement of the branching ratio Re/u = ?((?+ ? e+ve) + (?+ ? e+ve?))/?((?+ ? ?+v?) + (?+ ? ?+v??)) with precision < 0.1%. Incident pions, delivered at the rate of 60 kHz with momentum 75 MeV/c, were degraded and stopped in a plastic scintillator target. Pions and their decay product positrons were detected with plastic scintillators and tracked with multiwire proportional chambers and silicon strip detectors. The energies of the positrons were measured in a spectrometer consisting of a large NaI(T?) crystal surrounded by an array of pure CsI crystals. This paper provides a description of the PIENU experimental apparatus and its performance in pursuit of Re/u

  15. Measurement of the B+- --> rho+- pi0 Branching Fraction and Direct CP Asymmetry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aubert, B.; Barate, R.; Boutigny, D.; Couderc, F.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; Grauges, E.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pompili, A.; Chen, J.C.; Qi, N.D.; Rong, G.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y.S.; Eigen, G.; Ofte, I.; Stugu, B. /Bergen U. /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /Bristol U. /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa U. /Iowa State U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT, LNS /McGill U. /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /Perugia U. /INFN, Perugia /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Prairie View A-M /Princeton U. /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /South Carolina U. /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Stony Brook /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /Turin U. /INFN, Turin /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Valencia U., IFIC /Vanderbilt U. /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison /Yale U.

    2005-06-29

    An improved measurement of the process B{sup {+-}} {yields} {rho}{sup {+-}}{pi}{sup 0} is presented. The data sample of 211 fb{sup -1} comprises 232 million {Upsilon}(4S) {yields} B{bar B} decays collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric B Factory at SLAC. The yield and CP asymmetry are calculated using an extended maximum likelihood fitting method. The branching fraction and asymmetry are found to be {Beta}(B{sup {+-}} {yields} {rho}{sup {+-}}{pi}{sup 0}) = [10.0 {+-} 1.4 (Stat.) {+-} 0.9 (Syst.)] x 10{sup -6} and {Alpha}{sub CP}(B{sup {+-}} {yields} {rho}{sup {+-}}{pi}{sup 0}) = -0.01 {+-} 0.13 (Stat.) {+-} 0.02 (Syst.), superseding previous measurements. The statistical significance of the signal is calculated to be 8.7{sigma}.

  16. Structure of FabH and factors affecting the distribution of branched fatty acids in Micrococcus luteus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pereira, Jose H.; Goh, Ee-Been; Keasling, Jay D.; Beller, Harry R.; Adams, Paul D.

    2012-10-01

    In an effort to better understand the control of the formation of branched fatty acids in Micrococcus luteus, the structure of ?-ketoacyl-ACP synthase III, which catalyzes the initial step of fatty-acid biosynthesis, has been determined. Micrococcus luteus is a Gram-positive bacterium that produces iso- and anteiso-branched alkenes by the head-to-head condensation of fatty-acid thioesters [coenzyme A (CoA) or acyl carrier protein (ACP)]; this activity is of interest for the production of advanced biofuels. In an effort to better understand the control of the formation of branched fatty acids in M. luteus, the structure of FabH (MlFabH) was determined. FabH, or ?-ketoacyl-ACP synthase III, catalyzes the initial step of fatty-acid biosynthesis: the condensation of malonyl-ACP with an acyl-CoA. Analysis of the MlFabH structure provides insights into its substrate selectivity with regard to length and branching of the acyl-CoA. The most structurally divergent region of FabH is the L9 loop region located at the dimer interface, which is involved in the formation of the acyl-binding channel and thus limits the substrate-channel size. The residue Phe336, which is positioned near the catalytic triad, appears to play a major role in branched-substrate selectivity. In addition to structural studies of MlFabH, transcriptional studies of M. luteus were also performed, focusing on the increase in the ratio of anteiso:iso-branched alkenes that was observed during the transition from early to late stationary phase. Gene-expression microarray analysis identified two genes involved in leucine and isoleucine metabolism that may explain this transition.

  17. Measurement of branching fractions and rate asymmetries in the rare decays B?K(*)l?l?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Palano, A.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Brown, D. N.; Kerth, L. T.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Lynch, G.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; Asgeirsson, D. J.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T. S.; McKenna, J. A.; Khan, A.; Blinov, V. E.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Druzhinin, V. P.; Golubev, V. B.; Kravchenko, E. A.; Onuchin, A. P.; Serednyakov, S. I.; Skovpen, Yu. I.; Solodov, E. P.; Todyshev, K. Yu.; Yushkov, A. N.; Bondioli, M.; Kirkby, D.; Lankford, A. J.; Mandelkern, M.; Atmacan, H.; Gary, J. W.; Liu, F.; Long, O.; Vitug, G. M.; Campagnari, C.; Hong, T. M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Richman, J. D.; West, C. A.; Eisner, A. M.; Kroseberg, J.; Lockman, W. S.; Martinez, A. J.; Schumm, B. A.; Seiden, A.; Chao, D. S.; Cheng, C. H.; Echenard, B.; Flood, K. T.; Hitlin, D. G.; Ongmongkolkul, P.; Porter, F. C.; Rakitin, A. Y.; Andreassen, R.; Huard, Z.; Meadows, B. T.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Sun, L.; Bloom, P. C.; Ford, W. T.; Gaz, A.; Nauenberg, U.; Smith, J. G.; Wagner, S. R.; Ayad, R.; Toki, W. H.; Spaan, B.; Schubert, K. R.; Schwierz, R.; Bernard, D.; Verderi, M.; Clark, P. J.; Playfer, S.; Bettoni, D.; Bozzi, C.; Calabrese, R.; Cibinetto, G.; Fioravanti, E.; Garzia, I.; Luppi, E.; Munerato, M.; Negrini, M.; Piemontese, L.; Santoro, V.; Baldini-Ferroli, R.; Calcaterra, A.; de Sangro, R.; Finocchiaro, G.; Patteri, P.; Peruzzi, I. M.; Piccolo, M.; Rama, M.; Zallo, A.; Contri, R.; Guido, E.; Lo Vetere, M.; Monge, M. R.; Passaggio, S.; Patrignani, C.; Robutti, E.; Bhuyan, B.; Prasad, V.; Lee, C. L.; Morii, M.; Edwards, A. J.; Adametz, A.; Uwer, U.; Lacker, H. M.; Lueck, T.; Dauncey, P. D.; Behera, P. K.; Mallik, U.; Chen, C.; Cochran, J.; Meyer, W. T.; Prell, S.; Rubin, A. E.; Gritsan, A. V.; Guo, Z. J.; Arnaud, N.; Davier, M.; Derkach, D.; Grosdidier, G.; Le Diberder, F.; Lutz, A. M.; Malaescu, B.; Roudeau, P.; Schune, M. H.; Stocchi, A.; Wormser, G.; Lange, D. J.; Wright, D. M.; Chavez, C. A.; Coleman, J. P.; Fry, J. R.; Gabathuler, E.; Hutchcroft, D. E.; Payne, D. J.; Touramanis, C.; Bevan, A. J.; Di Lodovico, F.; Sacco, R.; Sigamani, M.; Cowan, G.; Brown, D. N.; Davis, C. L.; Denig, A. G.; Fritsch, M.; Gradl, W.; Griessinger, K.; Hafner, A.; Prencipe, E.; Barlow, R. J.; Jackson, G.; Lafferty, G. D.; Behn, E.; Cenci, R.; Hamilton, B.; Jawahery, A.; Roberts, D. A.; Dallapiccola, C.; Cowan, R.; Dujmic, D.; Sciolla, G.; Cheaib, R.; Lindemann, D.; Patel, P. M.; Robertson, S. H.; Biassoni, P.; Neri, N.; Palombo, F.; Stracka, S.; Cremaldi, L.; Godang, R.; Kroeger, R.; Sonnek, P.; Summers, D. J.; Nguyen, X.; Simard, M.; Taras, P.; De Nardo, G.; Monorchio, D.; Onorato, G.; Sciacca, C.; Martinelli, M.; Raven, G.; Jessop, C. P.; LoSecco, J. M.; Wang, W. F.; Honscheid, K.; Kass, R.; Brau, J.; Frey, R.; Sinev, N. B.; Strom, D.; Torrence, E.; Feltresi, E.; Gagliardi, N.; Margoni, M.; Morandin, M.; Posocco, M.; Rotondo, M.; Simi, G.; Simonetto, F.; Stroili, R.; Akar, S.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bomben, M.; Bonneaud, G. R.; Briand, H.; Calderini, G.; Chauveau, J.; Hamon, O.; Leruste, Ph.; Marchiori, G.; Ocariz, J.; Sitt, S.; Biasini, M.; Manoni, E.; Pacetti, S.; Rossi, A.; Angelini, C.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Carpinelli, M.; Casarosa, G.; Cervelli, A.; Forti, F.; Giorgi, M. A.; Lusiani, A.; Oberhof, B.; Paoloni, E.; Perez, A.; Rizzo, G.; Walsh, J. J.; Lopes Pegna, D.; Olsen, J.; Smith, A. J. S.; Telnov, A. V.; Anulli, F.; Faccini, R.; Ferrarotto, F.; Ferroni, F.; Gaspero, M.; Li Gioi, L.; Mazzoni, M. A.; Piredda, G.; Bnger, C.; Grnberg, O.; Hartmann, T.; Leddig, T.; Schrder, H.; Voss, C.; Waldi, R.; Adye, T.; Olaiya, E. O.; Wilson, F. F.; Emery, S.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Vasseur, G.; Yche, Ch.; Aston, D.; Bard, D. J.; Bartoldus, R.; Benitez, J. F.; Cartaro, C.; Convery, M. R.; Dorfan, J.; Dubois-Felsmann, G. P.; Dunwoodie, W.; Ebert, M.; Field, R. C.; Franco Sevilla, M.; Fulsom, B. G.; Gabareen, A. M.; Graham, M. T.; Grenier, P.; Hast, C.; Innes, W. R.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kim, P.; Kocian, M. L.; Leith, D. W. G. S.; Lewis, P.; Lindquist, B.; Luitz, S.; Luth, V.; Lynch, H. L.; MacFarlane, D. B.; Muller, D. R.; Neal, H.; Nelson, S.; Perl, M.; Pulliam, T.; Ratcliff, B. N.; Roodman, A.; Salnikov, A. A.; Schindler, R. H.; Snyder, A.; Su, D.; Sullivan, M. K.; Vavra, J.; Wagner, A. P.; Wisniewski, W. J.; Wittgen, M.; Wright, D. H.; Wulsin, H. W.; Young, C. C.; Ziegler, V.; Park, W.; Purohit, M. V.; White, R. M.; Wilson, J. R.; Randle-Conde, A.; Sekula, S. J.; Bellis, M.; Burchat, P. R.; Miyashita, T. S.; Alam, M. S.; Ernst, J. A.; Gorodeisky, R.; Guttman, N.; Peimer, D. R.; Soffer, A.; Lund, P.; Spanier, S. M.; Ritchie, J. L.; Ruland, A. M.; Schwitters, R. F.; Wray, B. C.; Izen, J. M.; Lou, X. C.; Bianchi, F.; Gamba, D.; Lanceri, L.; Vitale, L.; Martinez-Vidal, F.; Oyanguren, A.; Ahmed, H.; Albert, J.

    2012-08-24

    In a sample of 47110? BB events collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II e?e? collider we study the rare decays B?K(*)l?l?, where l?l? is either e?e? or ????. We report results on partial branching fractions and isospin asymmetries in seven bins of dilepton mass-squared. We further present CP and lepton-flavor asymmetries for dilepton masses below and above the J/? resonance. We find no evidence for CP or lepton-flavor violation. The partial branching fractions and isospin asymmetries are consistent with the Standard Model predictions and with results from other experiments.

  18. Measurement of Branching Fractions and CP-ViolatingCharge Asymmetries for B Meson Decays to D(*)D(*), and Implications for the CKMAngle gamma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aubert, B.; Barate, R.; Bona, M.; Boutigny, D.; Couderc, F.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; Grauges, E.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Chen, J.C.; Qi, N.D.; Rong, G.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y.S.; Eigen, G.; Ofte, I.; Stugu, B.; /Bergen U. /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /Bristol U. /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Karlsruhe U., EKP /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT, LNS /McGill U. /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /Perugia U. /INFN, Perugia /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Prairie View A-M /Princeton U. /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /South Carolina U. /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Stony Brook /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /Turin U. /INFN, Turin /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Valencia U., IFIC /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison /Yale U.

    2006-07-06

    In summary, the authors have measured branching fractions, upper limits, and charge asymmetries for all B meson decays to D{sup (*)} {bar D}{sup (*)}.

  19. Measurement of the inclusive semileptonic branching fraction B(B⁰s→X-l+νl) at Belle

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Oswald, C.; Urquijo, P.; Dingfelder, J.; Adachi, I.; Aihara, H.; Arinstein, K.; Asner, D. M.; Aushev, T.; Bakich, A. M.; Belous, K.; et al

    2013-04-30

    We report a measurement of the inclusive semileptonic B0s branching fraction in a 121 fb⁻¹ data sample collected near the Υ(5S) resonance with the Belle detector at the KEKB asymmetric energy e⁺e⁻ collider. Events containing B⁰(*)sB¯¯¯⁰(*)s pairs are selected by reconstructing a tag side D⁺s and identifying a signal side lepton l⁺ (l=e, μ) that is required to have the same-sign charge to ensure that both originate from different B⁰s mesons. The B⁰s→X⁻l⁺νl branching fraction is extracted from the ratio of the measured yields of D⁺s mesons and D⁺sl⁺ pairs and the known production and branching fractions. The inclusive semileptonicmore »branching fraction is measured to be [10.6±0.5(stat)±0.7(syst)]%.« less

  20. Measurement of the inclusive semileptonic branching fraction B(B⁰s→X-l+νl) at Belle

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Oswald, C.; Urquijo, P.; Dingfelder, J.; Adachi, I.; Aihara, H.; Arinstein, K.; Asner, D. M.; Aushev, T.; Bakich, A. M.; Belous, K.; et al

    2013-04-30

    We report a measurement of the inclusive semileptonic B0s branching fraction in a 121 fb⁻¹ data sample collected near the Υ(5S) resonance with the Belle detector at the KEKB asymmetric energy e⁺e⁻ collider. Events containing B⁰(*)sB¯¯¯⁰(*)s pairs are selected by reconstructing a tag side D⁺s and identifying a signal side lepton l⁺ (l=e, μ) that is required to have the same-sign charge to ensure that both originate from different B⁰s mesons. The B⁰s→X⁻l⁺νl branching fraction is extracted from the ratio of the measured yields of D⁺s mesons and D⁺sl⁺ pairs and the known production and branching fractions. The inclusive semileptonicmore » branching fraction is measured to be [10.6±0.5(stat)±0.7(syst)]%.« less

  1. Measurement of the Branching fraction ratio B ---> D K / B ---> D pi with the CDF II detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Squillacioti, Paola; /INFN, Pisa /Siena U.

    2006-11-01

    In this thesis the author has described the first measurement performed at a hadron collider of the branching fraction of the Cabibbo-suppressed mode B{sup +} {yields} {bar D}{sup 0} K{sup +}. The analysis has been performed with 360 pb{sup -1} of data collected by the CDF II detector.

  2. DOUBLE HORIZONTAL BRANCHES IN NGC 6440 AND NGC 6569 UNVEILED BY THE VVV SURVEY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mauro, Francesco; Bidin, Christian Moni; Cohen, Roger; Geisler, Doug; Chene, Andre-Nicolas; Villanova, Sandro; Minniti, Dante; Catelan, Marcio

    2012-12-20

    We report the discovery of a peculiar horizontal branch (HB) in NGC 6440 and NGC 6569, two massive and metal-rich Galactic globular clusters (GGCs) located in the Galactic bulge, within 4 kpc from the Galactic center. In both clusters, two distinct clumps are detected at the level of the cluster HB, separated by only {approx}0.1 mag in the K{sub s} band. They were detected with IR photometric data collected with the 'VISTA Variables in the Via Lactea' Survey, and confirmed in independent IR catalogs available in the literature and Hubble Space Telescope optical photometry. Our analysis demonstrates that these clumps are real cluster features, not a product of field contamination or interstellar reddening. The observed split HBs could be a signature of two stellar sub-populations with different chemical composition and/or age, as recently found in Terzan 5, but it cannot be excluded that they are caused by evolutionary effects, in particular for NGC 6440. This interpretation, however, requires an anomalously high helium content (Y > 0.30). Our discovery suggests that such a peculiar HB morphology could be a common feature of massive, metal-rich bulge GGCs.

  3. FLUORINE IN THE SOLAR NEIGHBORHOOD: IS IT ALL PRODUCED IN ASYMPTOTIC GIANT BRANCH STARS?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jnsson, H.; Ryde, N. [Lund Observatory, Department of Astronomy and Theoretical Physics, Lund University, Box 43, SE-221 00 Lund (Sweden); Harper, G. M. [School of Physics, Trinity College, Dublin 2 (Ireland); Richter, M. J. [Physics Department, University of California, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Hinkle, K. H., E-mail: henrikj@astro.lu.se [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, P.O. Box 26732, Tucson, AZ 85726 (United States)

    2014-07-10

    The origin of ''cosmic'' fluorine is uncertain, but there are three proposed production sites/mechanisms for the origin: asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars, ? nucleosynthesis in Type II supernovae, and/or the winds of Wolf-Rayet stars. The relative importance of these production sites has not been established even for the solar neighborhood, leading to uncertainties in stellar evolution models of these stars as well as uncertainties in the chemical evolution models of stellar populations. We determine the fluorine and oxygen abundances in seven bright, nearby giants with well determined stellar parameters. We use the 2.3 ?m vibrational-rotational HF line and explore a pure rotational HF line at 12.2 ?m. The latter has never been used before for an abundance analysis. To be able to do this, we have calculated a line list for pure rotational HF lines. We find that the abundances derived from the two diagnostics agree. Our derived abundances are well reproduced by chemical evolution models including only fluorine production in AGB stars and, therefore, we draw the conclusion that this might be the main production site of fluorine in the solar neighborhood. Furthermore, we highlight the advantages of using the 12 ?m HF lines to determine the possible contribution of the ? process to the fluorine budget at low metallicities where the difference between models including and excluding this process is dramatic.

  4. Constraints on helium enhancement in the globular cluster M4 (NGC 6121): The horizontal branch test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Valcarce, A. A. R.; De Medeiros, J. R.; Catelan, M.; Alonso-Garca, J.; Corts, C.

    2014-02-20

    Recent pieces of evidence have revealed that most, and possibly all, globular star clusters are composed of groups of stars that formed in multiple episodes with different chemical compositions. In this sense, it has also been argued that variations in the initial helium abundance (Y) from one population to the next are also the rule, rather than the exception. In the case of the metal-intermediate globular cluster M4 (NGC 6121), recent high-resolution spectroscopic observations of blue horizontal branch (HB) stars (i.e., HB stars hotter than the RR Lyrae instability strip) suggest that a large fraction of blue HB stars are second-generation stars formed with high helium abundances. In this paper, we test this scenario by using recent photometric and spectroscopic data together with theoretical evolutionary computations for different Y values. Comparing the photometric data with the theoretically derived color-magnitude diagrams, we find that the bulk of the blue HB stars in M4 have ?Y ? 0.01 with respect to the cluster's red HB stars (i.e., HB stars cooler than the RR Lyrae strip)a result which is corroborated by comparison with spectroscopically derived gravities and temperatures, which also favor little He enhancement. However, the possible existence of a minority population on the blue HB of the cluster with a significant He enhancement level is also discussed.

  5. Infrared tip of the red giant branch and distances to the MAFFEI/IC 342 group

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Po-Feng; Tully, R. Brent; Jacobs, Bradley A.; Rizzi, Luca; Dolphin, Andrew E.; Karachentsev, Igor D.

    2014-07-01

    In this paper, we extend the use of the tip of the red giant branch (TRGB) method to near-infrared wavelengths from the previously used I-band, using the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3). Upon calibration of a color dependency of the TRGB magnitude, the IR TRGB yields a random uncertainty of ?5% in relative distance. The IR TRGB methodology has an advantage over the previously used Advance Camera for Surveys F606W and F814W filter set for galaxies that suffer from severe extinction. Using the IR TRGB methodology, we obtain distances toward three principal galaxies in the Maffei/IC 342 complex, which are located at low Galactic latitudes. New distance estimates using the TRGB method are 3.45{sub ?0.13}{sup +0.13} Mpc for IC 342, 3.37{sub ?0.23}{sup +0.32} Mpc for Maffei 1, and 3.52{sub ?0.30}{sup +0.32} Mpc for Maffei 2. The uncertainties are dominated by uncertain extinction, especially for Maffei 1 and Maffei 2. Our IR calibration demonstrates the viability of the TRGB methodology for observations with the James Webb Space Telescope.

  6. Field studies of streamflow generation using natural and injected tracers on Bickford and Walker Branch Watersheds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Genereux, D.; Hemond, H. . Dept. of Civil Engineering); Mulholland, P. )

    1992-05-01

    Field studies of streamflow generation were undertaken on two forested watersheds, the West Road subcatchment of Bickford Watershed in central Massachusetts and the West Fork of Walker Branch Watershed in eastern Tennessee. A major component of the research was development of a two-stage methodology for the use of naturally-occurring {sup 222}Rn as a tracer. The first of the two stages was solving a mass-balance equation for {sup 222}Rn around a stream reach of interest in order to calculate Rn{sub q}, the {sup 222}Rn content of the lateral inflow to the reach; a conservative tracer (chloride) and a volatile tracer (propane) were injected into the study stream to account for lateral inflow to, and volatilization from, the study reach. The second stage involved quantitative comparison of Rn{sub q} to the measured {sup 222}Rn concentrations of different subsurface waters in order to assess how important these waters were in contributing lateral inflow to the stream reach.

  7. Measurements of the Branching Fractions and CP Asymmetries of B -> D0_CP K Decays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aubert, B.; Barate, R.; Boutigny, D.; Couderc, F.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; Grauges, E.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Chen, J.C.; Qi, N.D.; Rong, G.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y.S.; Eigen, G.; Ofte, I.; Stugu, B.; Abrams, G.S.; /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /Bristol U. /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa U. /Iowa State U. /Karlsruhe U., EKP /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT, LNS /McGill U. /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /Perugia U. /INFN, Perugia /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Prairie View A-M /Princeton U. /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /South Carolina U. /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Stony Brook /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /Turin U. /INFN, Turin /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Valencia U., IFIC /Vanderbilt U. /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison /Yale U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Clermont-Ferrand U. /Basilicata U., Potenza

    2006-01-05

    We present a study of the decay B{sup -} {yields} D{sub (CP)}{sup 0} K{sup -} and its charge conjugate, where D{sub (CP)}{sup 0} is reconstructed in CP-even, CP-odd, and non-CP flavor eigenstates, based on a sample of 232 million {Upsilon}(4S) {yields} B{bar B} decays collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II e{sup +}e{sup -} storage ring. We measure the partial-rate charge asymmetries AC{sub CP{+-}} and the ratios R{sub CP{+-}} of the B {yields} D{sup 0} K decay branching fractions as measured in CP{+-} and non-CP D{sup 0} decays: A{sub CP+} = 0.35 {+-} 0.13(stat) {+-} 0.04(syst), A{sub CP-} = -0.06 {+-} 0.13(stat) {+-} 0.04(syst), R{sub CP+} = 0.90 {+-} 0.12(stat) {+-} 0.04(syst), R{sub CP-} = 0.86 {+-} 0.10(stat) {+-} 0.05(syst).

  8. METALLICITY AND KINEMATIC DISTRIBUTIONS OF RED HORIZONTAL-BRANCH STARS FROM THE SDSS SURVEY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Y. Q.; Zhao, G.; Zhao, J. K.; Xue, X. X.; Schuster, W. J. E-mail: schuster@astrosen.unam.m

    2010-08-15

    On the basis of a recently derived color-metallicity relation and stellar parameters from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7 spectroscopic survey, a large sample of red horizontal-branch (RHB) candidates have been selected to serve as standard candles. The metallicity and kinematic distributions of these stars indicate that they mainly originate from the thick-disk and the halo populations. The typical thick disk is characterized by the first group peaking at [Fe/H] {approx} -0.6, V{sub rot} {approx} 170 km s{sup -1} with a vertical scale height around |Z| {approx} 1.2 kpc, while stars with [Fe/H] < -0.9 are dominated by the halo population. Two sub-populations of the halo are suggested by the RHB stars peaking at [Fe/H] {approx} -1.3: one component with V{sub rot} > 0 km s{sup -1} (Halo I) shows a sign of metallicity gradient in the [Fe/H] versus |Z| diagram, while the other with V{sub rot} < 0 km s{sup -1} (Halo II) does not. The Halo I mainly clumps at the inner halo with R < 10 kpc and the Halo II comes both from the inner halo with R < 10 kpc and the outer halo with R > 10 kpc based on the star distribution in the R versus |Z| diagram.

  9. The core mass growth and stellar lifetime of thermally pulsing asymptotic giant branch stars

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kalirai, Jason S.; Tremblay, Pier-Emmanuel; Marigo, Paola E-mail: paola.marigo@unipd.it

    2014-02-10

    We establish new constraints on the intermediate-mass range of the initial-final mass relation, and apply the results to study the evolution of stars on the thermally pulsing asymptotic giant branch (TP-AGB). These constraints derive from newly discovered (bright) white dwarfs in the nearby Hyades and Praesepe star clusters, including a total of 18 high signal-to-noise ratio measurements with progenitor masses of M {sub initial} = 2.8-3.8 M {sub ?}. We also include a new analysis of existing white dwarfs in the older NGC 6819 and NGC 7789 star clusters, M {sub initial} = 1.6 and 2.0 M {sub ?}. Over this range of initial masses, stellar evolutionary models for metallicity Z {sub initial} = 0.02 predict the maximum growth of the core of TP-AGB stars. By comparing the newly measured remnant masses to the robust prediction of the core mass at the first thermal pulse on the AGB (i.e., from stellar interior models), we establish several findings. First, we show that the stellar core mass on the AGB grows rapidly from 10% to 30% for stars with M {sub initial} = 1.6 to 2.0 M {sub ?}. At larger masses, the core-mass growth decreases steadily to ?10% at M {sub initial} = 3.4 M {sub ?}, after which there is a small hint of a upturn out to M {sub initial} = 3.8 M {sub ?}. These observations are in excellent agreement with predictions from the latest TP-AGB evolutionary models in Marigo et al. We also compare to models with varying efficiencies of the third dredge-up and mass loss, and demonstrate that the process governing the growth of the core is largely the stellar wind, while the third dredge-up plays a secondary, but non-negligible role. Based on the new white dwarf measurements, we perform an exploratory calibration of the most popular mass-loss prescriptions in the literature, as well as of the third dredge-up efficiency as a function of the stellar mass. Finally, we estimate the lifetime and the integrated luminosity of stars on the TP-AGB to peak at t ? 3 Myr and E = 1.2 10{sup 10} L {sub ?} yr for M {sub initial} ? 2 M {sub ?} (t ? 2 Myr for luminosities brighter than the red giant branch tip at log (L/L {sub ?}) > 3.4), decreasing to t = 0.4 Myr and E = 6.1 10{sup 9} L {sub ?} yr for stars with M {sub initial} ? 3.5 M {sub ?}. The implications of these results are discussed, especially with respect to general studies aimed at characterizing the integrated light output of TP-AGB stars in population synthesis models.

  10. Measurement of $B_s^0 \\to D_s^{(*)+} D_s^{(*)-}$ Branching Ratios

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J.A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; /Dubna, JINR /Texas A-M

    2012-04-01

    The decays B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} D{sub s}{sup (*)+}D{sub s}{sup (*)-}s are reconstructed in a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 6.8 fb{sup -1} collected by the CDF II detector at the Tevatron p{bar p} collider. All decay modes are observed with a significance of more than 10 {sigma}, and we measure the B{sub s}{sup 0} production rate times B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} D{sub s}{sup (*)+} D{sub s}{sup (*)-} branching ratios relative to the normalization mode B{sup 0} {yields} D{sub s}{sup +}d{sup -} to be 0.183 {+-} 0.021 {+-} 0.017 for B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} D{sub s}{sup +}D{sub s}{sup -}, 0.424 {+-} 0.046 {+-} 0.035 for B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} D{sub s}{sup {+-}} D{sub s}{sup {-+}}, 0.654 {+-} 0.072 {+-} 0.065 for B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} D{sub s}{sup *+} D{sub s}{sup *-}, and 1.261 {+-} 0.095 {+-} 0.112 for the inclusive decay B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} D{sub s}{sup (*)+}D{sub s}{sup (*)-}, where the uncertainties are statistical and systematic. These results are the most precise single measurements to date and provide important constraints for indirect searches for non-standard model physics in B{sub s}{sup 0} mixing.

  11. Electron-capture supernovae of super-asymptotic giant branch stars and the Crab supernova 1054

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nomoto, Ken'ichi [Kavli Institute for Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (WPI), The University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8583 (Japan); Tominaga, Nozomu [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science and Engineering, Konan University, 8-9-1 Okamoto, Kobe, Hyogo 658-8501, Japan and Kavli Institute for Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (WPI), The University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8583 (Japan); Blinnikov, Sergei I. [Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics (ITEP), Moscow 117218, Russia and Kavli Institute for Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (WPI), The University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8583 (Japan)

    2014-05-02

    An electron-capture supernova (ECSN) is a core-collapse supernova explosion of a super-asymptotic giant branch (SAGB) star with a main-sequence mass M{sub Ms} ? 7 - 9.5M{sub ?}. The explosion takes place in accordance with core bounce and subsequent neutrino heating and is a unique example successfully produced by first-principle simulations. This allows us to derive a first self-consistent multicolor light curves of a core-collapse supernova. Adopting the explosion properties derived by the first-principle simulation, i.e., the low explosion energy of 1.5 10{sup 50} erg and the small {sup 56}Ni mass of 2.5 10{sup ?3} M{sub ?}, we perform a multigroup radiation hydrodynamics calculation of ECSNe and present multicolor light curves of ECSNe of SAGB stars with various envelope mass and hydrogen abundance. We demonstrate that a shock breakout has peak luminosity of L ? 2 10{sup 44} erg s{sup ?1} and can evaporate circumstellar dust up to R ? 10{sup 17} cm for a case of carbon dust, that plateau luminosity and plateau duration of ECSNe are L ? 10{sup 42} erg s{sup ?1} and {sup t} ? 60 - 100 days, respectively, and that a plateau is followed by a tail with a luminosity drop by ? 4 mag. The ECSN shows a bright and short plateau that is as bright as typical Type II plateau supernovae, and a faint tail that might be influenced by spin-down luminosity of a newborn pulsar. Furthermore, the theoretical models are compared with ECSN candidates: SN 1054 and SN 2008S. We find that SN 1054 shares the characteristics of the ECSNe. For SN 2008S, we find that its faint plateau requires a ECSN model with a significantly low explosion energy of E ? 10{sup 48} erg.

  12. Do Coupled Climate Models Correctly SImulate the Upward Branch of the Deept Ocean Global Conveyor?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sarmiento, Jorge L; Downes, Stephanie; Bianchi, Daniele

    2013-01-17

    The large-scale meridional overturning circulation (MOC) connects the deep ocean, a major reservoir of carbon, to the other components of the climate system and must therefore be accurately represented in Earth System Models. Our project aims to address the specific question of the pathways and mechanisms controlling the upwelling branch of the MOC, a subject of significant disagreement between models and observational syntheses, and among general circulation models. Observations of these pathways are limited, particularly in regions of complex hydrography such as the Southern Ocean. As such, we rely on models to examine theories of the overturning circulation, both physically and biogeochemically. This grant focused on a particular aspect of the meridional overturning circulation (MOC) where there is currently significant disagreement between models and observationally based analyses of the MOC, and amongst general circulation models. In particular, the research focused on addressing the following questions: 1. Where does the deep water that sinks in the polar regions rise to the surface? 2. What processes are responsible for this rise? 3. Do state-of-the-art coupled GCMs capture these processes? Our research had three key components: observational synthesis, model development and model analysis. In this final report we outline the key results from these areas of research for the 2007 to 2012 grant period. The research described here was carried out primarily by graduate student, Daniele Bianchi (now a Postdoc at McGill University, Canada), and Postdoc Stephanie Downes (now a Research Fellow at The Australian national University, Australia). Additional support was provided for programmers Jennifer Simeon as well as Rick Slater.

  13. Finite range and upper branch effects on itinerant ferromagnetism in repulsive Fermi gases: BetheGoldstone ladder resummation approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    He, Lianyi

    2014-12-15

    We investigate the ferromagnetic transition in repulsive Fermi gases at zero temperature with upper branch and effective range effects. Based on a general effective Lagrangian that reproduces precisely the two-body s-wave scattering phase shift, we obtain a nonperturbative expression of the energy density as a function of the polarization by using the BetheGoldstone ladder resummation. For hard sphere potential, the predicted critical gas parameter k{sub F}a=0.816 and the spin susceptibility agree well with the results from fixed-node diffusion Monte Carlo calculations. In general, positive and negative effective ranges have opposite effects on the critical gas parameter k{sub F}a: While a positive effective range reduces the critical gas parameter, a negative effective range increases it. For attractive potential or Feshbach resonance model, the many-body upper branch exhibits an energy maximum at k{sub F}a=? with ?=1.34 from the BetheGoldstone ladder resummation, which is qualitatively consistent with experimental results. The many-body T-matrix has a positive-energy pole for k{sub F}a>? and it becomes impossible to distinguish the bound state and the scattering state. These positive-energy bound states become occupied and therefore the upper branch reaches an energy maximum at k{sub F}a=?. In the zero range limit, there exists a narrow window (0.86branch Fermi gas. - Highlights: Nonperturbative interaction energy is obtained within the BetheGoldstone ladder resummation approach. Positive and negative effective ranges have opposite effects on the critical gas parameter. The upper branch Fermi gas exhibits an energy maximum and reentrant ferromagnetic transition. The ferromagnetic phase disappears for large and negative effective ranges.

  14. Measurement of the branching ratio of B¯→D(*)τ−ν¯τ relative to (B)over bar to B¯→D(*)ℓ−ν¯ℓ decays with hadronic tagging at Belle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huschle, Matthias J.; Kuhr, Thomas; Heck, M.; Goldenzweig, P.; Abdesselam, A.; Adachi, I.; Adamczyk, K.; Aihara, H.; Al Said, S.; Arinstein, K.; Asner, David M.; Aushev, T.; Ayad, R.; Aziz, T.; Badhrees, I.; Bakich, A. M.; Bansal, Vikas; Barberio, E.; Bhardwaj, V.; Bhuyan, Bipul; Biswal, J.; Bobrov, A.; Bozek, A.; Bracko, Marko; Browder, Thomas E.; Cervenkov, D.; Chang, P.; Chekelian, V.; Chen, A.; Cheon, B. G.; Chilikin, Kirill; Chistov, R.; Cho, K.; Chobanova, V.; Choi, Y.; Cinabro, David A.; Dalseno, J.; Danilov, M.; Dolezal, Z.; Drasal, Z.; Dutta, D.; Eidelman, S.; Epifanov, D.; Farhat, H.; Fast, James E.; Ferber, T.; Frey, A.; Fulsom, Bryan G.; Gaur, Vipin; Gabyshev, N.; Garmash, Alexey; Gillard, R.; Glattaur, R.; Goh, Y. M.; Golob, B.; Grygier, J.; Hamer, P.; Hara, K.; Hara, Takanori; Hasenbusch, J.; Hayasaka, K.; Hayashii, H.; He, X. H.; Heider, M.; Heller, A.; Horiguchi, T.; Hou, W. S.; Hsu, C. L.; Iijima, T.; Inami, K.; Inguglia, G.; Ishikawa, A.; Itoh, R.; Iwasaki, Y.; Jaegle, Igal; Joffe, D.; Joo, K. K.; Julius, T.; Kang, K. H.; Kato, E.; Katrenko, P.; Kawasaki, T.; Keck, T.; Kiesling, C.; Kim, D. Y.; Kim, H. J.; Kim, J. B.; Kim, J. H.; Kim, K. T.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. J.; Kinoshita, Kay; Ko, Byeong Rok; Kobayashi, Nakako; Kodys, P.; Korpar, S.; Krizan, P.; Krokovny, Pavel; Kumita, T.; Kuzmin, A.; Kwon, Y. J.; Lee, I. S.; Li, C.; Li, Y.; Li Gioi, L.; Libby, J.; Liventsev, Dmitri; Lukin, P.; Masuda, M.; Matvienko, D.; Miyabayashi, K.; Miyake, Hideki; Miyata, H.; Mizuk, R.; Mohanty, G. B.; Mohanty, Subhashree; Moll, A.; Moon, H K.; Mussa, R.; Nakamura, KR; Nakano, E.; Nakao, Mikihiko; Nanut, T.; Nayak, Minakshi; Nisar, N. K.; Nishida, Shohei; Ogawa, S.; Okuno, S.; Oswald, Christian; Pakhlova, Galina; Pal, Bilas K.; Park, C. W.; Park, H.; Pedlar, Todd K.; Pesantez, L.; Pestotnik, Rok; Petric, Marko; Piilonen, Leo E.; Pulvermacher, C.; Ribezl, Eva; Ritter, M.; Rostomyan, A.; Sakai, Y.; Sandilya, Saurabh; Santelj, Luka; Sanuki, T.; Sato, Y.; Savinov, Vladimir; Schneider, O.; Schnell, G.; Schwanda, C.; Schwartz, Alan J.; Semmler, D.; Senyo, K.; Seon, O.; Sevior, Martin E.; Shebalin, V.; Shen, C. P.; Shibata, TA; Shiu, Jing-Ge; Simon, F.; Sohn, Young-Soo; Sokolov, A.; Solovyeva, Elena; Stanic, S.; Staric, M.; Steder, M.; Stypula, J.; Sumihama, M.; Sumiyoshi, T.; Tamponi, Umberto; Teramoto, Y.; Trabelsi, K.; Trusov, V.; Uchida, M.; Uglov, T.; Uno, S.; Usov, Y.; Van Hulse, C.; Vanhoefer, P.; Varner, Gary; Vinokurova, A.; Vorobyev, V.; Wagner, M. N.; Wang, C. H.; Wang, M. Z.; Wang, P.; Wang, X. L.; Watanabe, M.; Watanabe, Y.; Won, Eun Il; Yamamoto, H.; Yamaoka, Jared AK; Yashchenko, S.; Ye, H.; Yook, Youngmin; Yuan, C. Z.; Yusa, Y.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhilich, V.; Zhulanov, V.; Zupanc, A.

    2015-10-26

    Belle II paper 450 We report a measurement of the branching fraction ratios R(D)(()*)) of (B) over bar

  15. Dartmouth Stellar Evolution Database and the ACS Survey of Galactic Globular Clusters II. Stellar Evolution Tracks, Isochrones, Luminosity Functions, and Synthetic Horizontal-Branch Models

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Dotter, A; Chaboyer, B; Jevremovic, D; Kostov, V; Baron, E; Ferguson, J; Sarajedini, A; Anderson, J

    Web tools are also available at the home page (http://stellar.dartmouth.edu/~models/index.html). These tools allow users to create isochrones and convert them to luminosity functions or create synthetic horizontal branch models.

  16. Measurement of Branching Ratios for Non-leptonic Cabibbo-suppressed Decays of the Charmed-Strange Baryon Xic+

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vazquez Jauregui, Eric; /San Luis Potosi U.

    2008-08-01

    We studied several {Xi}{sub c}{sup +} decay modes, most of them with a hyperon in the final state, and determined their branching ratios. The data used in this analysis come from the fixed target experiment SELEX, a multi-stage spectrometer with high acceptance for forward interactions, that took data during 1996 and 1997 at Fermilab with 600 GeV=c (mainly {Sigma}{sup -}, {pi}{sup -}) and 540 GeV/c (mainly p) beams incident on copper and carbon targets. The thesis mainly details the first observation of two Cabibbo-suppressed decay modes, {Xi}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} {Sigma}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +} and {Xi}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} {Sigma}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +}. The branching ratios of the decays relative to the Cabibbo-favored {Xi}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} {Xi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +} are measured to be: {Lambda}({Xi}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} {Sigma}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +})/{Lambda}({Xi}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} {Xi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +}) = 0.184 {+-} 0.086. Systematic studies have been performed in order to check the stability of the measurements varying all cuts used in the selection of events over a wide interval and we do not observe evidence of any trend, so the systematic error is negligible in the final results because the quadrature sum of the total error is not affected. The branching ratios for the same decay modes of the {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} are measured to check the methodology of the analysis. The branching ratio of the decay mode {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} {Sigma}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +} is measured relative to {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} pK{sup -} {pi}{sup +}, while the one of the decay mode {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} {Sigma}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +} is relative to {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} {Sigma}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}, as they have been reported earlier. The results for the control modes are: {Gamma}({Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} {Sigma}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +})/{Gamma}({Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} pK{sup -} {pi}{sup +}) = 0.716 {+-} 0.144 and {Gamma}({Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} {Sigma}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +})/{Gamma}({Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} {Sigma}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}) = 0.382 {+-} 0.104. The branching ratio of the decay mode {Xi}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} pK{sup -} {pi}{sup +} relative to {Xi}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} {Xi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +} is considered as another control mode, the measured value is {Gamma}({Xi}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} pK{sup -}{pi}{sup +})/{Gamma}({Xi}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} {Xi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +}) = 0.194 {+-} 0.054. Systematic studies have been also performed for the control modes and all systematic variations are also small compared to the statistical error. We also report the first observation of two more decay modes, the Cabibbo-suppressed decay {Xi}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} {Xi}{sup -} K{sup +}{pi}{sup +} and the doubly Cabibbo-suppressed decay {Xi}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} {Sigma}{sup +}K{sup +}{pi}{sup -}, but their branching ratios have not been measured up to now.

  17. The role of cellular structure on increasing the detonability limits of three-step chain-branching detonations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Short, Mark; Kiyanda, Charles B; Quirk, James J; Sharpe, Gary J

    2011-01-27

    In [1], the dynamics of a pulsating three-step chain-branching detonation were studied. The reaction model consists of, sequentially, chain-initiation, chain-branching and chain-termination steps. The chain-initiation and chain-branching steps are taken to be thermally neutral, with chemical energy release occuring in the chain-termination stage. The purpose of the present study is to examine whether cellular detonation structure can increase the value of the chain-branching cross-over temperature T{sub b} at which fully coupled detonation solutions are observed over those in 1 D. The basic concept is straightforward and has been discussed in [1] and [3]; if T{sub s} drops below T{sub b} at the lead shock, the passage of a transverse shock can increase both the lead shock temperature and the temperature behind the transverse wave back above T{sub b}, thus sustaining an unstable cellular detonation for values of T{sub b} for which a one-dimensional pulsating detonation will fail. Experiments potentially supporting this hypothesis with irregular detonations have been shown in [3] in a shock tube with acoustically absorbing walls. Removal of the transverse waves results in detonation failure, giving way to a decoupled shock-flame complex. A number of questions remain to be addressed regarding the possibility of such a mechanism, and, if so, about the precise mechanisms driving the cellular structure for large T{sub b}. For instance, one might ask what sets the cell size in a chain-branching detonation, particularly could the characteristic cell size be set by the chain-branching cross-over temperature T{sub b}: after a transverse wave shock collision, the strength of the transverse wave weakens as it propagates along the front. If the spacing between shock collisions is too large (cell size), then the transverse shocks may weaken to the extent that the lead shock temperature or that behind the transverse waves is not raised above T{sub b}, losing chemical energy to drive the front in those regions. Failure may result if less than sufficient of the lead shock be driven above n to sustain reaction. Our starting point for generating cellular solutions is as in [I], consisting of an initial ZND wave in the channel, but perturbed here by a density non-uniformity to generate a cellular structure. Exactly how far the detonability limits (value of T{sub b}) can be extended is not addressed here, as such issues relate in part to the way the cellular structure is generated [6]. Our concern here is to investigate the mechanisms of self-sustained cellular detonation for values of T{sub b} above those that lead to 1D pulsating wave failure that can be generated from the initial ZND wave. Finally, we do not consider cellular propagation driven by a process of apparent thermal ignition of hot-spots downstream that tends to appear close to the 20 detonability limit. Such events are subject to the lack of correct thermal diffusive physics in the model and thus to the form of numerical dissipation in the underlying flow algorithm.

  18. The ACP (Advanced Computer Program) Branch bus and real-time applications of the ACP multiprocessor system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hance, R.; Areti, H.; Atac, R.; Biel, J.; Cook, A.; Fischler, M.; Gaines, I.; Husby, D.; Nash, T.; Zmuda, T.

    1987-05-08

    The ACP Branchbus, a high speed differential bus for data movement in multiprocessing and data acquisition environments, is described. This bus was designed as the central bus in the ACP multiprocessing system. In its full implementation with 16 branches and a bus switch, it will handle data rates of 160 MByte/sec and allow reliable data transmission over inter rack distances. We also summarize applications of the ACP system in experimental data acquisition, triggering and monitoring, with special attention paid to FASTBUS environments.

  19. NON-LOCAL THERMODYNAMICAL EQUILIBRIUM EFFECTS ON THE IRON ABUNDANCE OF ASYMPTOTIC GIANT BRANCH STARS IN 47 TUCANAE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lapenna, E.; Mucciarelli, A.; Lanzoni, B.; Ferraro, F. R.; Dalessandro, E.; Massari, D.

    2014-12-20

    We present the iron abundance of 24 asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars, members of the globular cluster 47 Tucanae, obtained with high-resolution spectra collected with the FEROS spectrograph at the MPG/ESO 2.2 m Telescope. We find that the iron abundances derived from neutral lines (with a mean value [Fe I/H]=0.94 0.01, ? = 0.08 dex) are systematically lower than those derived from single ionized lines ([Fe II/H] =0.83 0.01, ? = 0.05 dex). Only the latter are in agreement with those obtained for a sample of red giant branch (RGB) cluster stars, for which the Fe I and Fe II lines provide the same iron abundance. This finding suggests that non-local thermodynamical equilibrium (NLTE) effects driven by overionization mechanisms are present in the atmosphere of AGB stars and significantly affect the Fe I lines while leaving Fe II features unaltered. On the other hand, the very good ionization equilibrium found for RGB stars indicates that these NLTE effects may depend on the evolutionary stage. We discuss the impact of this finding on both the chemical analysis of AGB stars and on the search for evolved blue stragglers.

  20. Measurement of Branching Fractions of B0 Decays to K1(1270)+ pi- and K1(1400)+ pi-

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aubert, Bernard; Bona, M.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Lopez, L.; Palano, Antimo; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, Bjarne; Sun, L.; Abrams, G.S.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D.N.; Cahn, Robert N.; Jacobsen, R.G.; /LBL, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /Bristol U. /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /Consorzio Milano Ricerche /INFN, Milan /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /Napoli Seconda U. /INFN, Naples /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /Perugia U. /INFN, Perugia /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /Banca di Roma /Frascati /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /South Carolina U. /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /Turin U. /INFN, Turin /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Valencia U., IFIC /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2008-08-04

    We present a measurement of the branching fraction of neutral B meson decaying to final states containing a K1 meson, i.e. K{sub 1}(1270) and K{sub 1}(1400), and a charged pion. The data, collected with the BABAR detector at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, represent 454 million B{bar B} pairs produced in e{sup +}e{sup -} annihilation. We measure the branching fraction {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} K{sub 1}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}) = (31.0 {+-} 2.7 {+-} 6.9) x 10{sup -6}, where the first error quoted is statistical and the second is systematic. In the framework of the K-matrix formalism used to describe these decays, we also set limits on the ratio of the production constants for the K{sub 1}(1270){sup +} and K{sub 1}(1400){sup +} mesons in B{sup 0} decays.

  1. Measurements of Branching Fractions and CP Asymmetries and Studies of Angular Distributions for B to phi phi K Decays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Martinelli, M.; Milanes, D.A.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Brown, D.N.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; Asgeirsson, D.J.; Hearty, C.; /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Indian Inst. Tech., Guwahati /Harvard U. /Harvey Mudd Coll. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa State U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Paris U., VI-VII /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /SLAC /South Carolina U. /Southern Methodist U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tel Aviv U. /Tennessee U. /Texas Nuclear Corp., Austin /Texas U., Dallas /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /Valencia U. /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2011-08-15

    We present branching fraction and CP asymmetry measurements as well as angular studies of B {yields} {phi}{phi}K decays using 464 x 10{sup 6} B{bar B} events collected by the BABAR experiment. The branching fractions are measured in the {phi}{phi} invariant mass range below the {eta}{sub c} resonance (m{sub {phi}{phi}} < 2.85 GeV). We find {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} {phi}{phi}K{sup +}) = (5.6 {+-} 0.5 {+-} 0.3) x 10{sup -6} and {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {phi}{phi}K{sup 0}) = (4.5 {+-} 0.8 {+-} 0.3) x 10{sup -6}, where the first uncertaintiy is statistical and the second systematic. The measured direct CP asymmetries for the B{sup {+-}} decays are A{sub CP} = -0.10 {+-} 0.08 {+-} 0.02 below the {eta}{sub c} threshold (m{sub {phi}{phi}} < 2.85 GeV) and A{sub CP} = 0.09 {+-} 0.10 {+-} 0.02 in the {eta}{sub c} resonance region (m{sub {phi}{phi}} in [2.94,3.02] GeV). Angular distributions are consistent with J{sub P} = 0{sup -} in the {eta}{sub c} resonance region and favor J{sup P} = 0{sup +} below the {eta}{sub c} resonance.

  2. ..&rrbt, Chief, Industrial Hy&na Branch, HerlthbrSas8byLaboratoly

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    tf..@ ..&rrbt, Chief, Industrial Hy&na Branch, HerlthbrSas8byLaboratoly ;,.; , ' 1 ' @@w-w 3, 1954 P. B. Klevin, Indurtrial Hygiexn J5rantah, Barrlei &'afelky Lab0raM~ : . .A , 3 t :;p,: . NATIONAL LEiD OF OHIO ROLLINO OFERATIONS AT SIHONr>s SAW 6 STEEL- Amm', +I& y9, <: '.. SmBoLt HSHtPBK ' -: - St. Louis Area Office at the Simnds Saw and Steel Co., k&port, NJ., on tha &boVe clrtm, I oblruloed tb Mat;Lonal Uad umu&m and thorium roll- ing operations which were

  3. Branching Fraction and CP Asymmetry Measurements in Inclusive B ? Xs ???? and B ? Xs? Decays from BABAR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eigen, G.

    2015-04-29

    We present an update on total and partial branching fractions and on CP asymmetries in the semi-inclusive decay B ? Xs???-. Further, we summarize our results on branching fractions and CP asymmetries for semi-inclusive and fully-inclusive B ? Xs? decays. We present the first result on the CP asymmetry diff erence of charged and neutral B ? Xs? decays yielding the first constraint on the ratio of Wilson coeffi cients Im(C8eff/C7eff).

  4. A two transition state model for radical-molecule reactions : applications to isomeric branching in the OH-isoprene reaction.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greenwald, E. E.; North, S. W.; Georgievskii, Y.; Klippenstein, S. J.; Chemistry; Texas A&M Univ.; SNL

    2007-06-28

    A two transition state model is applied to the prediction of the isomeric branching in the addition of hydroxyl radical to isoprene. The outer transition state is treated with phase space theory fitted to long-range transition state theory calculations on an electrostatic potential energy surface. High-level quantum chemical estimates are applied to the treatment of the inner transition state. A one-dimensional master equation based on an analytic reduction from two-dimensions for a particular statistical assumption about the rotational part of the energy transfer kernel is employed in the calculation of the pressure dependence of the addition process. We find that an accurate treatment of the two separate transition state regions, at the energy and angular momentum resolved level, is essential to the prediction of the temperature dependence of the addition rate. The transition from a dominant outer transition state to a dominant inner transition state is shown to occur at about 275 K, with significant effects from both transition states over the 30-500 K temperature range. Modest adjustments in the ab initio predicted inner saddle point energies yield predictions that are in quantitative agreement with the available high-pressure limit experimental observations and qualitative agreement with those in the falloff regime. The theoretically predicted capture rate is reproduced to within 10% by the expression [1.71 x 10-10(T/298)-2.58 exp(-608.6/RT) + 5.47 x 10-11(T/298)-1.78 exp(-97.3/RT); with R = 1.987 and T in K] cm3 molecule-1 s-1 over the 30-500 K range. A 300 K branching ratio of 0.67:0.02:0.02:0.29 was determined for formation of the four possible OH-isoprene adduct isomers 1, 2, 3, and 4, respectively, and was found to be relatively insensitive to temperature. An Arrhenius activation energy of -0.77 kcal/mol was determined for the high-pressure addition rate constants around 300 K.

  5. Environmental geophysics of the Pilot Plant on the west branch of Canal Creek, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McGinnis, L.D.; Miller, S.F.; Daudt, C.R.; Thompson, M.D.; Borden, H.; Benson, M.; Wrobel, J.

    1994-05-01

    Plans to demolish and remediate the Pilot Plant complex in the Edgewood Area of Aberdeen Proving Ground have served to initiate a series of nonintrusive, environmental-geophysical studies. The studies are assisting in the location and identification of pipes, tanks, trenches, and liquid waste in the subsurface. Multiple databases have been integrated to provide support for detection of underground utilities and to determine the stratigraphy and lithology of the subsurface. The studies were conducted within the double security fence and exterior to the double fence, down gradient toward the west branch of Canal Creek. To determine if contaminants found in the creek were associated with the Pilot Plant, both the east and west banks were included in the study area. Magnetic, conductivity, inductive emf, and ground-penetrating-radar anomalies outline buried pipes, trenches, and various pieces of hardware associated with building activities. Ground-penetrating-radar imagery also defines a paleovalley cut 30 ft into Potomac Group sediments of Cretaceous age. The paleovalley crosses the site between Building E5654 and the Pilot Plant fence. The valley is environmentally significant because it may control the pathways of contaminants. The Pilot Plant complex was used to manufacture CC2 Impregnite and incapacitating agents; it also served as a production facility for nerve agents.

  6. The identification of extreme asymptotic giant branch stars and red supergiants in M33 with 24??m variability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Montiel, Edward J.; Clayton, Geoffrey C.; Johnson, Christopher B.; Srinivasan, Sundar; Engelbracht, Charles W.

    2015-02-01

    We present the first detection of 24 ?m variability in 24 sources in the Local Group galaxy M33. These results are based on 4 epochs of Multiband Imaging Photometer for Spitzer observations, which are irregularly spaced over ?750 days. We find that these sources are constrained exclusively to the Holmberg radius of the galaxy, which increases their chances of being members of M33. We have constructed spectral energy distributions (SEDs) ranging from the optical to the submillimeter to investigate the nature of these objects. We find that 23 of our objects are most likely heavily self-obscured, evolved stars, while the remaining source is the Giant H ii region, NGC 604. We believe that the observed variability is the intrinsic variability of the central star reprocessed through their circumstellar dust shells. Radiative transfer modeling was carried out to determine their likely chemical composition, luminosity, and dust production rate (DPR). As a sample, our modeling has determined an average luminosity of (3.80.9)10{sup 4} L{sub ?} and a total DPR of (2.30.1)10{sup ?5} M{sub ?} yr{sup ?1}. Most of the sources, given the high DPRs and short wavelength obscuration, are likely extreme asymptotic giant branch (XAGB) stars. Five of the sources are found to have luminosities above the classical AGB limit (M{sub bol} 54,000 L{sub ?}), which classifies them as probable red supergiants (RSGs). Almost all of the sources are classified as oxygen-rich. As also seen in the LMC, a significant fraction of the dust in M33 is produced by a handful of XAGB and RSG stars.

  7. Grant County, Minnesota: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Minnesota Ashby, Minnesota Barrett, Minnesota Elbow Lake, Minnesota Herman, Minnesota Hoffman, Minnesota Norcross, Minnesota Wendell, Minnesota Retrieved from "http:...

  8. Improved Measurement of the ??e? Branching Ratio

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aguilar-Arevalo, A.; Aoki, M.; Blecher, M.; Britton, D. I.; Bryman, D. A.; vom Bruch, D.; Chen, S.; Comfort, J.; Ding, M.; Doria, L.; Cuen-Rochin, S.; Gumplinger, P.; Hussein, A.; Igarashi, Y.; Ito, S.; Kettell, S. H.; Kurchaninov, L.; Littenberg, L. S.; Malbrunot, C.; Mischke, R. E.; Numao, T.; Protopopescu, D.; Sher, A.; Sullivan, T.; Vavilov, D.; Yamada, K.

    2015-08-01

    A new measurement of the branching ratio Re/?=?(?+ ? e+? + ?+ ? e+??)/?(?+ ? ?+? + ?+??+??) resulted in Rexpe/?=[1.23440.0023(stat)0.0019(syst)] x 10-4. This is in agreement with the standard model prediction and improves the test of electron-muon universality to the level of 0.1%.

  9. New asteroseismic scaling relations based on the Hayashi track relation applied to red giant branch stars in NGC 6791 and NGC 6819

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, T.; Li, Y.; Hekker, S. E-mail: ly@ynao.ac.cn

    2014-01-20

    Stellar mass M, radius R, and gravity g are important basic parameters in stellar physics. Accurate values for these parameters can be obtained from the gravitational interaction between stars in multiple systems or from asteroseismology. Stars in a cluster are thought to be formed coevally from the same interstellar cloud of gas and dust. The cluster members are therefore expected to have some properties in common. These common properties strengthen our ability to constrain stellar models and asteroseismically derived M, R, and g when tested against an ensemble of cluster stars. Here we derive new scaling relations based on a relation for stars on the Hayashi track (?(T{sub eff})?g{sup p}R{sup q}) to determine the masses and metallicities of red giant branch stars in open clusters NGC 6791 and NGC 6819 from the global oscillation parameters ?? (the large frequency separation) and ?{sub max} (frequency of maximum oscillation power). The ?? and ?{sub max} values are derived from Kepler observations. From the analysis of these new relations we derive: (1) direct observational evidence that the masses of red giant branch stars in a cluster are the same within their uncertainties, (2) new methods to derive M and z of the cluster in a self-consistent way from ?? and ?{sub max}, with lower intrinsic uncertainties, and (3) the mass dependence in the ?? - ?{sub max} relation for red giant branch stars.

  10. Enhanced performance of branched TiO{sub 2} nanorod based Mn-doped CdS and Mn-doped CdSe quantum dot-sensitized solar cell

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Soo-Kyoung; Gopi, Chandu V. V. M.; Lee, Jae-Cheol; Kim, Hee-Je

    2015-04-28

    TiO{sub 2} branched nanostructures could be efficient as photoanodes for quantum dot-sensitized solar cells (QDSCs) due to their large surface area for QD deposition. In this study, Mn-doped CdS/Mn-doped CdSe deposited branched TiO{sub 2} nanorods were fabricated to enhance the photovoltaic performance of QDSCs. Mn doping in CdS and CdSe retards the recombination losses of electrons, while branched TiO{sub 2} nanorods facilitate effective electron transport and compensate for the low surface area of the nanorod structure. As a result, the charge-transfer resistance (R{sub CT}), electron lifetime (?{sub e}), and the amount of QD deposition were significantly improved with branched TiO{sub 2} nanorod based Mn-doped CdS/Mn-doped CdSe quantum dot-sensitized solar cell.

  11. Measurement of branching fraction and first evidence of CP violation in B⁰→a₁±(1260)π∓ decays

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Dalseno, J.; Adachi, I.; Aihara, H.; Asner, D. M.; Aulchenko, V.; Aushev, T.; Bakich, A. M.; Bay, A.; Belous, K.; Bhuyan, B.; et al

    2012-11-26

    We present a measurement of the branching fraction and time-dependent CP violation parameters in B⁰→a±₁(1260)π∓ decays. The results are obtained from the final data sample containing 772×10⁶ BB¯¯¯ pairs collected at the Υ(4S) resonance with the Belle detector at the KEKB asymmetric-energy e⁺e⁻ collider. We obtain the product branching fraction B(B⁰→a±₁(1260)π∓)×B(a±₁(1260)→π±π∓π±)=(11.1±1.0(stat)±1.4(syst))×10⁻⁶ and an upper limit on the product branching fraction for a possible decay with the same final state B(B⁰→a±₂(1320)π∓)×B(a±₂(1320)→π±π∓π±)more »respectively. Simultaneously, we also extract the CP-conserving parameters ΔC=+0.54±0.11(stat)±0.07(syst), ΔS=–0.09±0.14(stat)±0.06(syst), which, respectively, describe a rate difference and strong phase difference between the decay channels where the a±₁ does not contain the spectator quark and those where it does. We find first evidence of mixing-induced CP violation in B⁰→a±₁(1260)π∓ decays with 3.1σ significance. The rate where the a±₁ does not contain the spectator quark from the B meson is found to dominate the rate where it does at the 4.1σ level. However, there is no evidence for either time- and flavor-integrated direct CP violation or flavor-dependent direct CP violation.« less

  12. The Tip of the red giant branch distance to the perfect spiral galaxy M74 hosting three core-collapse supernovae

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sung Jang, In; Gyoon Lee, Myung E-mail: mglee@astro.snu.ac.kr

    2014-09-01

    M74 (NGC 628) is a famous face-on spiral galaxy, hosting three core-collapse supernovae (SNe): SN Ic 2002ap, SN II-P 2003gd, and SN II-P 2013ej. However, its distance is not well known. We present a distance estimation for this galaxy based on the Tip of the Red Giant Branch (TRGB) method. We obtain photometry of the resolved stars in the arm-free region of M74 from F555W and F814W images in the Hubble Space Telescope archive. The color-magnitude diagram of the resolved stars shows a dominant red giant branch (RGB) as well as blue main sequence stars, red helium burning stars, and asymptotic giant branch stars. The I-band luminosity function of the RGB stars shows the TRGB to be at I {sub TRGB} = 26.13 0.03 mag, and T {sub RGB} = 25.97 0.03. From this, we derive the distance modulus to M74 to be 30.04 0.04 (random) 0.12 (systematic) (corresponding to a linear distance of 10.19 0.14 0.56 Mpc). With this distance estimate, we calibrate the standardized candle method for SNe II-P. From the absolute magnitudes of SN 2003gd, we derive a value of the Hubble constant, H {sub 0} = 72 6 (random) 7 (systematic) km s{sup 1} Mpc{sup 1}. It is similar to recent estimates based on the luminosity calibration of Type Ia supernovae.

  13. Measurements of branching fractions, polarizations, and direct CP-violation asymmetries in B -> rho0 K* and B -> f0(980) K* decays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    del Amo Sanchez, P.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Martinelli, M.; Milanes, D.A.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Brown, D.N.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; Osipenkov, I.L.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; /Ruhr U., Bochum /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /Indian Inst. Tech., Guwahati /Harvard U. /Harvey Mudd Coll. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa State U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /SLAC /South Carolina U. /Southern Methodist U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tel Aviv U. /Tennessee U. /Texas Nuclear Corp., Austin /Texas U., Dallas /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /Valencia U. /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2011-08-12

    We present measurements of the branching fractions, longitudinal polarization, and direct CP-violation asymmetries for the decays B{sup +} {yields} {rho}{sup 0}K*{sup +} and B{sup +} f{sub 0}(980)K*{sup +} with a sample of (467 {+-} 5) x 10{sup 6} B{bar B} pairs collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy e{sup +}e{sup -} collider at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. We observe B{sup +} {yields} {rho}{sup 0}K*{sup +} with a significance of 5.3{sigma} and measure the branching fraction {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} {rho}{sup 0}K*{sup +}) = (4.6 {+-} 1.0 {+-} 0.4) x 10{sup -6}, the longitudinal polarization f{sub L} = 0.78 {+-} 0.12 {+-} 0.03, and the CP-violation asymmetry A{sub CP} = 0.31 {+-} 0.13 {+-} 0.03. We observe B{sup +} {yields} f{sub 0}(980)K*{sup +} and measure the branching fraction {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} f{sub 0}(980)K*{sup +}) x {Beta}(f{sub 0}(980) {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}) = (4.2 {+-} 0.6 {+-} 0.3) x 10{sup -6} and the CP-violation asymmetry A{sub CP} = -0.15 {+-} 0.12 {+-} 0.03. The first uncertainty quoted is statistical and the second is systematic.

  14. B physics: first evidence for b_s0 --> phi phi decay and measurements of branching ratio and a_cp for b+ --> phi k+

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Acosta, D.; The CDF Collaboration

    2005-05-31

    We present the first evidence of charmless decays of the B{sub s}{sup 0} meson, the decay B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} {phi}{phi}, and a measurement of the Branching Ratio BR(B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} {phi}{phi}) using 180 pb{sup -1} of data collected by the CDF II experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. In addition, the BR and direct CP asymmetry for the B{sup +} {yields} {phi}K{sup +} decay are measured.

  15. Spitzer SAGE-Spec: Near infrared spectroscopy, dust shells, and cool envelopes in extreme Large Magellanic Cloud asymptotic giant branch stars

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blum, R. D. [NOAO, 950 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Srinivasan, S.; Kemper, F.; Ling, B. [Academia Sinica, Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, 11F of Astronomy-Mathematics Building, NTU/AS, No. 1, Sec. 4, Roosevelt Road, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Volk, K. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States)

    2014-11-01

    K-band spectra are presented for a sample of 39 Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) SAGE-Spec sources in the Large Magellanic Cloud. The spectra exhibit characteristics in very good agreement with their positions in the near-infraredSpitzer color-magnitude diagrams and their properties as deduced from the Spitzer IRS spectra. Specifically, the near-infrared spectra show strong atomic and molecular features representative of oxygen-rich and carbon-rich asymptotic giant branch stars, respectively. A small subset of stars was chosen from the luminous and red extreme ''tip'' of the color-magnitude diagram. These objects have properties consistent with dusty envelopes but also cool, carbon-rich ''stellar'' cores. Modest amounts of dust mass loss combine with the stellar spectral energy distribution to make these objects appear extreme in their near-infrared and mid-infrared colors. One object in our sample, HV 915, a known post-asymptotic giant branch star of the RV Tau type, exhibits CO 2.3 ?m band head emission consistent with previous work that demonstrates that the object has a circumstellar disk.

  16. Optimization Method to Branch and Bound Large SBO State Spaces Under Dynamic Probabilistic Risk Assessment via use of LENDIT Scales and S2R2 Sets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joseph W. Nielsen; Akira Tokurio; Robert Hiromoto; Jivan Khatry

    2014-06-01

    Traditional Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) methods have been developed and are quite effective in evaluating risk associated with complex systems, but lack the capability to evaluate complex dynamic systems. These time and energy scales associated with the transient may vary as a function of transition time to a different physical state. Dynamic PRA (DPRA) methods provide a more rigorous analysis of complex dynamic systems, while complete, results in issues associated with combinatorial explosion. In order to address the combinatorial complexity arising from the number of possible state configurations and discretization of transition times, a characteristic scaling metric (LENDIT length, energy, number, distribution, information and time) is proposed as a means to describe systems uniformly and thus provide means to describe relational constraints expected in the dynamics of a complex (coupled) systems. Thus when LENDIT is used to characterize four sets state, system, resource and response (S2R2) describing reactor operations (normal and off-normal), LENDIT and S2R2 in combination have the potential to branch and bound the state space investigated by DPRA. In this paper we introduce the concept of LENDIT scales and S2R2 sets applied to a branch-and-bound algorithm and apply the methods to a station black out transient (SBO).

  17. Measurement of branching ratio and B0s lifetime in the decay B0s → J/ψ f0(980) at CDF

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aaltonen, T.

    2011-09-30

    We present a study of Bs0 decays to the CP-odd final state J/ψ f0(980) with J/ψ → µ+µ- and f0(980) → π+π-. Using pp̄ collision data with an integrated luminosity of 3.8 fb-1 collected by the CDF II detector at the Tevatron we measure a Bs0 lifetime of τ(B0s → J/ψ f0(980)) = 1.70-0.11+0.12(stat) ± 0.03(syst) ps. This is the first measurement of the Bs0} lifetime in a decay to a CP eigenstate and corresponds in the standard model to the lifetime of the heavy Bs0 eigenstate. We also measure the product of branching fractions of B0s → J/ψ f0(980)more » and f0(980) → π+π- relative to the product of branching fractions of B0s → J/ψφ and φ→K+K- to be Rf0/ψ = 0.257 ± 0.020(stat) ± 0.014(syst), which is the most precise determination of this quantity to date.« less

  18. First Observation of the Cabibbo-suppressed Decays Xi+(c) ---> Sigma+ pi- pi+ and Xi+(c) ---> Sigma- pi+ pi+ and Measurement of their Branching Ratios

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vazquez-Jauregui, E.; Engelfried, J.; Akgun, U.; Alkhazov, Georgiy; Amaro-Reyes, J.; Atamantchouk, A.G.; Ayan, Ahmet Sedat; Balatz, M.Y.; Blanco-Covarrubias, A.; Bondar, N.F.; Cooper, Peter S.; /Fermilab /Michigan U., Flint

    2008-04-01

    The authors report the first observation of two Cabibbo-suppressed decay modes, {Xi}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} {Sigma}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +} and {Xi}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} {Sigma}{sup -} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +}. They observe 56 {+-} 13 over a background of 21, and 23 {+-} 7 over a background of 12 events, respectively, for the signals. The data were accumulated using the SELEX spectrometer during the 1996-1997 fixed target run at Fermilab, chiefly from a 600 GeV/c {Sigma}{sup -} beam. The branching ratios of the decays relative to the Cabibbo-favored {Xi}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} {Xi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +} are measured to be B({Xi}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} {Sigma}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +})/B({xi}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} {Xi}{sup -} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +}) = 0.50 {+-} 0.20, and B({Xi}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} {Sigma}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +})/B({Xi}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} {Xi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +}) = 0.23 {+-} 0.11, respectively. They also report branching ratios for the same decay modes of the {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} relative to {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} pK{sup -}{pi}{sup +}.

  19. Measurement of the Absolute Branching FractionsB to D\\pi, D^*\\pi, D^{**}\\pi with aMissing Mass Method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aubert, B.; Bona, M.; Boutigny, D.; Couderc, F.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; Grauges, E.; Palano, A.; Chen, J.C.; Qi, N.D.; Rong, G.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y.S.; Eigen, G.; Ofte, I.; Stugu, B.; Abrams, G.S.; Battaglia, M.; /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /Bristol U. /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Karlsruhe U., EKP /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT, LNS /McGill U. /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Pennsylvania U. /Perugia U. /INFN, Perugia /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Prairie View A-M /Princeton U. /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /South Carolina U. /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Stony Brook /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /Turin U. /INFN, Turin /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Valencia U., IFIC /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison /Yale U.

    2006-11-30

    We present branching fraction measurements of charged and neutral B decays to D{pi}{sup -}, D*{pi}{sup -} and D**{pi}{sup -} with a missing mass method, based on a sample of 231 million {Upsilon}(4S) {yields} B{bar B} pairs collected by the BABAR detector at the PEP-II e{sup +}e{sup -} collider. One of the B mesons is fully reconstructed and the other one decays to a reconstructed charged {pi} and a companion charmed meson identified by its recoil mass, inferred by kinematics. Here D** refers to the sum of all the non-strange charm meson states with masses in the range 2.2-2.8 GeV/c{sup 2}.

  20. Measurement of the relative branching ratio of B-s(0) -> J/psi f(0)(980) to B-s(0) -> J/psi phi

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov, V.M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Alves, G. A.; Aoki, M.; Askew, A.; Asman, B.; Atkins, S.; Atramentov, O.; Augsten, K.; Avila, C.; BackusMayes, J.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Barreto, J.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besancon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bezzubov, V. A.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Bose, T.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brock, R.; Brooijmans, G.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Brown, J.; Bu, X. B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Burnett, T. H.; Buszello, C. P.; Calpas, B.; Camacho-Perez, E.; Carrasco-Lizarraga, M. A.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chapon, E.; Chen, G.; Chevalier-Thery, S.; Cho, D. K.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M. -C.; Croc, A.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; De, K.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Deliot, F.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P. F.; Dominguez, A.; Dorland, T.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duggan, D.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Dyshkant, A.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, A.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Facini, G.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Fuess, S.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Garcia-Guerra, G. A.; Gavrilov, V.; Gay, P.; Geng, W.; Gerbaudo, D.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Golovanov, G.; Goussiou, A.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Greenwood, Z. D.; Gregores, E. M.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J. -F.; Grohsjean, A.; Gruenendahl, S.; Gruenewald, M. W.; Guillemin, T.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haas, A.; Hagopian, S.; Haley, J.; Han, L.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hohlfeld, M.; Hubacek, Z.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffre, M.; Jamin, D.; Jayasinghe, A.; Jesik, R.; Johns, K.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Jung, A. W.; Juste, A.; Kaadze, K.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Kasper, P. A.; Katsanos, I.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Kohli, J. M.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kulikov, S.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kurca, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Kvita, J.; Lammers, S.; Landsberg, G.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lellouch, J.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lietti, S. M.; Lim, J. K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, Y.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; de Sa, R. Lopes; Lubatti, H. J.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Mackin, D.; Madar, R.; Magana-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Maravin, Y.; Martinez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. L.; Meijer, M. M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P. G.; Merkin, M.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; et al.

    2012-01-20

    We present a measurement of the relative branching fraction, R{sub f{sub 0}/{phi}}, of B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} J/{psi}f{sub 0}(980), with f{sub 0}(980) {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}, to the process B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} J/{psi}{phi}, with {phi} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup -}. The J/{psi}f{sub 0}(980) final state corresponds to a CP-odd eigenstate of B{sub s}{sup 0} that could be of interest in future studies of CP violation. Using 8 fb{sup -1} of data recorded with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider, we find R{sub f{sub 0}/{phi}} = 0.275 {+-} 0.041(stat) {+-} 0.061(syst).

  1. Improving the efficiency of configurational-bias Monte Carlo: A density-guided method for generating bending angle trials for linear and branched molecules

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sepehri, Aliasghar; Loeffler, Troy D.; Chen, Bin

    2014-08-21

    A new method has been developed to generate bending angle trials to improve the acceptance rate and the speed of configurational-bias Monte Carlo. Whereas traditionally the trial geometries are generated from a uniform distribution, in this method we attempt to use the exact probability density function so that each geometry generated is likely to be accepted. In actual practice, due to the complexity of this probability density function, a numerical representation of this distribution function would be required. This numerical table can be generated a priori from the distribution function. This method has been tested on a united-atom model of alkanes including propane, 2-methylpropane, and 2,2-dimethylpropane, that are good representatives of both linear and branched molecules. It has been shown from these test cases that reasonable approximations can be made especially for the highly branched molecules to reduce drastically the dimensionality and correspondingly the amount of the tabulated data that is needed to be stored. Despite these approximations, the dependencies between the various geometrical variables can be still well considered, as evident from a nearly perfect acceptance rate achieved. For all cases, the bending angles were shown to be sampled correctly by this method with an acceptance rate of at least 96% for 2,2-dimethylpropane to more than 99% for propane. Since only one trial is required to be generated for each bending angle (instead of thousands of trials required by the conventional algorithm), this method can dramatically reduce the simulation time. The profiling results of our Monte Carlo simulation code show that trial generation, which used to be the most time consuming process, is no longer the time dominating component of the simulation.

  2. Measurement of the Branching Fraction for D8+ rarr tau+nu_tau and Extraction of the Decay Constant f_D_s

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Martinelli, M.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D.N.; Hooberman, B.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; Osipenkov, I.L.; Tanabe, T.; Hawkes, C.M.

    2010-06-04

    The branching fraction for the decay D{sub s}{sup +} {yields} {tau}{sup +}{nu}{sub {tau}} with {tau}{sup +} {yields} e{sup +}{bar {nu}}{sub {tau}}, is measured using a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 427 fb{sup -1} collected at center of mass energies near 10.58 GeV with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy e{sup +}e{sup -} collider at SLAC. In the process e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} c{bar c} {yields} D*{sub s}{sup +} {bar D}{sub TAG}{bar K}X, the D*{sub s}{sup +} meson is reconstructed as a missing particle, and the subsequent decay D*{sub s}{sup +} {yields} D{sub s}{sup +}{gamma} yields an inclusive D{sub s}{sup +} data sample. Here {bar D}{sub TAG} refers to a fully reconstructed hadronic {bar D} decay, {bar K} is a K{sup -} or {bar K}{sup 0}, and X stands for any number of charged or neutral pions. The decay D{sub s}{sup +} {yields} K{sub S}{sup 0}K{sup +} is isolated also, and from ratio of event yields and known branching fractions, {Beta}(D{sub s}{sup +} {yields} {tau}{sup +}{nu}{sub {tau}}) = (4.5 {+-} 0.5 {+-} 0.4 {+-} 0.3)% is determined. The pseudoscalar decay constant is extracted to be f{sub D{sub s}} = (233 {+-} 13 {+-} 10 {+-} 7) MeV, where the first uncertainty is statistical, the second is systematic, and the third results from the uncertainties on the external measurements used as input to the calculation.

  3. Measurement of the production fraction times branching fraction $\\boldsymbol{ f(b\\to\\Lambda_{b})\\cdot \\mathcal{B}(\\Lambda_{b}\\to J/\\psi \\Lambda)}$

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich; /Dubna, JINR; Abbott, Braden Keim; /Oklahoma U.; Acharya, Bannanje Sripath; /Tata Inst.; Adams, Mark Raymond; /Illinois U., Chicago; Adams, Todd; /Florida State U.; Alexeev, Guennadi D.; /Dubna, JINR; Alkhazov, Georgiy D.; /St. Petersburg, INP; Alton, Andrew K.; /Michigan U. /Augustana Coll., Sioux Falls; Alverson, George O.; /Northeastern U.; Alves, Gilvan Augusto; /Rio de Janeiro, CBPF; Ancu, Lucian Stefan; /Nijmegen U. /Fermilab

    2011-05-01

    The {Lambda}{sub b}(udb) baryon is observed in the decay {Lambda}{sub b} {yields} J/{psi}{Lambda} using 6.1 fb{sup -1} of p{bar p} collisions collected with the D0 detector at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. The production fraction multiplied by the branching fraction for this decay relative to that for the decay B{sup 0} {yields} J/{psi}K{sub s}{sup 0} is measured to be 0.345 {+-} 0.034 (stat.) {+-} 0.033 (syst.) {+-} 0.003 (PDG). Using the world average value of f(b {yields} B{sup 0}) {center_dot} {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} J/{psi}K{sub s}{sup 0}) = (1.74 {+-} 0.08) x 10{sup -5}, they obtain f(b {yields} {Lambda}{sub b}) {center_dot} {Beta}({Lambda}{sub b} {yields} J/{psi}{Lambda}) = (6.01 {+-} 0.60 (stat.) {+-} 0.58 (syst.) {+-} 0.28 (PDG)) x 10{sup -5}. This measurement represents an improvement in precision by about a factor of three with respect to the current world average.

  4. BRANCH?BASED MODEL FOR THE DIAMETERS OF THE PULMONARY AIRWAYS: ACCOUNTING FOR DEPARTURES FROM SELF?CONSISTENCY AND REGISTRATION ERRORS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neradilek, Moni Blazej; Polissar, Nayak; Einstein, Daniel R.; Glenny, Robb W.; Minard, Kevin R.; Carson, James P.; Jiao, Xiangmin; Jacob, Rick E.; Cox, Timothy C.; Postlewait, Ed; Corley, Richard A.

    2012-06-01

    We examine a previously published branch-based approach to modeling airway diameters that is predicated on the assumption of self-consistency across all levels of the tree. We mathematically formulate this assumption, propose a method to test it and develop a more general model to be used when the assumption is violated. We discuss the effect of measurement error on the estimated models and propose methods that account for it. The methods are illustrated on data from MRI and CT images of silicone casts of two rats, two normal monkeys and one ozone-exposed monkey. Our results showed substantial departures from self-consistency in all five subjects. When departures from selfconsistency exist we do not recommend using the self-consistency model, even as an approximation, as we have shown that it may likely lead to an incorrect representation of the diameter geometry. Measurement error has an important impact on the estimated morphometry models and needs to be accounted for in the analysis.

  5. K{sub s} -BAND LUMINOSITY EVOLUTION OF THE ASYMPTOTIC GIANT BRANCH POPULATION BASED ON STAR CLUSTERS IN THE LARGE MAGELLANIC CLOUD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ko, Youkyung; Lee, Myung Gyoon; Lim, Sungsoon E-mail: mglee@astro.snu.ac.kr

    2013-11-10

    We present a study of K{sub s} -band luminosity evolution of the asymptotic giant branch (AGB) population in simple stellar systems using star clusters in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). We determine physical parameters of LMC star clusters including center coordinates, radii, and foreground reddenings. Ages of 83 star clusters are derived from isochrone fitting with the Padova models, and those of 19 star clusters are taken from the literature. The AGB stars in 102 star clusters with log(age) = 7.3-9.5 are selected using near-infrared color-magnitude diagrams based on Two Micron All Sky Survey photometry. Then we obtain the K{sub s} -band luminosity fraction of AGB stars in these star clusters as a function of ages. The K{sub s} -band luminosity fraction of AGB stars increases, on average, as age increases from log(age) ? 8.0, reaching a maximum at log(age) ? 8.5, and it decreases thereafter. There is a large scatter in the AGB luminosity fraction for given ages, which is mainly due to stochastic effects. We discuss this result in comparison with five simple stellar population models. The maximum K{sub s} -band AGB luminosity fraction for bright clusters is reproduced by the models that expect the value of 0.7-0.8 at log(age) = 8.5-8.7. We discuss the implication of our results with regard to the study of size and mass evolution of galaxies.

  6. The Carina project. VII. Toward the breaking of the age-metallicity degeneracy of red giant branch stars using the C {sub U,} {sub B,} {sub I} index

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Monelli, M.; Milone, A. P.; Gallart, C.; Aparicio, A. [Instituto de Astrofsica de Canarias, Calle Via Lactea s/n, E-38205 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Fabrizio, M.; Cassisi, S.; Buonanno, R. [Istituto Nazionale di Astrofisica-Osservatorio Astronomico Collurania, Via M. Maggini, I-64100 Teramo (Italy); Bono, G. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universit di Roma Tor Vergata, Via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, I-00133 Rome (Italy); Stetson, P. B. [Dominion Astrophysical Observatory, NRC-Herzberg, 5071 West Saanich Road, Victoria, BC, V9E 2E7 (Canada); Walker, A. R. [Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory, National Optical Astronomy Observatory, Casilla 603, La Serena (Chile); Nonino, M. [Istituto Nazionale di Astrofisica-Osservatorio Astronomico di Trieste, Via G. B. Tiepolo 11, I-40131 Trieste (Italy); Dall'Ora, M. [INAFOsservatorio Astronomico di Capodimonte, Salita Moiariello 16, I-80131 Napoli (Italy); Ferraro, I.; Iannicola, G.; Pulone, L. [Istituto Nazionale di Astrofisica-Osservatorio Astronomico di Roma, Via Frascati 33, Monte Porzio Catone, I-00044 Rome (Italy); Thvenin, F., E-mail: monelli@iac.es [Universit de Nice Sophia-antipolis, CNRS, Observatoire de la Cte d'Azur, Laboratoire Lagrange, BP 4229, F-06304 Nice (France)

    2014-12-01

    We present an analysis of photometric and spectroscopic data of the Carina dSph galaxy, testing a new approach similar to that used to disentangle multiple populations in Galactic globular clusters (GCs). We show that a proper color combination is able to separate a significant fraction of the red giant branch (RGB) of the two main Carina populations (the old one, ?12 Gyr, and the intermediate-age one, 4-8 Gyr). In particular, the c {sub U,} {sub B,} {sub I} = (U B) (B I) pseudo-color allows us to follow the RGB of both populations along a relevant portion of the RGB. We find that the oldest stars have a more negative c {sub U,} {sub B,} {sub I} pseudo-color than intermediate-age ones. We correlate the pseudo-color of RGB stars with their chemical properties, finding a significant trend between the iron content and the c {sub U,} {sub B,} {sub I}. Stars belonging to the old population are systematically more metal-poor ([Fe/H] =2.32 0.08 dex) than the intermediate-age ones ([Fe/H] =1.82 0.03 dex). This gives solid evidence of the chemical evolution history of this galaxy, and we have a new diagnostic that can allow us to break the age-metallicity degeneracy of H-burning advanced evolutionary phases. We compared the distribution of stars in the c {sub U,} {sub B,} {sub I} plane with theoretical isochrones, finding that no satisfactory agreement can be reached with models developed in a theoretical framework based on standard heavy element distributions. Finally, we discuss possible systematic differences when compared with multiple populations in GCs.

  7. Remedial investigation work plan for Chestnut Ridge Operable Unit 4 (Rogers Quarry/Lower McCoy Branch) at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-09-01

    The Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant includes - 800 acres near the northeast comer of the reservation and adjacent to the city of Oak Ridge (Fig. 1-1). The plant is a manufacturing and developmental engineering facility that produced components for various nuclear weapons systems and provides engineering support to other Energy Systems facilities. More than 200 contaminated sites have been identified at the Y-12 Plant that resulted from past waste management practices. Many of the sites have operable units (OUs) based on priority and on investigative and remediation requirements. This Remedial Investigation RI work plan specifically addresses Chestnut Ridge OU 4. Chestnut Ridge OU 4 consists of Rogers Quarry and Lower McCoy Branch (MCB). Rogers Quarry, which is also known as Old Rogers Quarry or Bethel Valley Quarry was used for quarrying from the late 1940s or early 1950s until about 1960. Since that time, the quarry has been used for disposal of coal ash and materials from Y-12 production operations, including classified materials. Disposal of coal ash ended in July 1993. An RI is being conducted at this site in response to CERCLA regulations. The overall objectives of the RI are to collect data necessary to evaluate the nature and extent of contaminants of concern, support an Ecological Risk Assessment and a Human Health Risk Assessment, support the evaluation of remedial alternatives, and ultimately develop a Record of Decision for the site. The purpose of this work plan is to outline RI activities necessary to define the nature and extent of suspected contaminants at Chestnut Ridge OU 4. Potential migration pathways also will be investigated. Data collected during the RI will be used to evaluate the risk posed to human health and the environment by OU 4.

  8. Comprehensive Sampling of Fourmile Branch and Its Seeplines in the F and H Area of SRS: June 1996 and March 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koch, J.

    1998-10-30

    In June 1996, and March 1997 water samples were collected from Fourmile Branch (FMB) and its seeplines in the vicinity of the F- and H-Area Seepage basins. These sampling events represent a continuation of a series of semi-annual sampling events, which are now conducted annually and are aimed at characterizing the shallow groundwater outcropping into FMB and its wetlands. In the past, this groundwater has been shown to contain contaminants migrating from the F- and H-Area Seepage basins. The samples were analyzed for metals listed in Title 40, Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 264, Appendix IX, various radionuclides, and selected inorganic constituents and parameters. Volatile organic compounds were not analyzed for in this sampling event since in previous events they were below detection limits, (ref. Dixon 1993, Dixon and Koch 1995).Results from both sampling events indicate that the seeplines of F and H Areas and FMB continue to be influenced by contaminants in groundwater originating from the capped seepage basins, but to a lesser degree than in the past. This suggests that the most concentrated portion of the contaminant plume may have flushed from the system.Contaminant concentrations measured during these two sampling events were compared to background samples collected during these two events and compared to primary drinking water standard (PDWS), secondary drinking water standards (SDWS), and maximum contaminant levels (MCL) enforceable in 1997. Results were also compared to the 1989 baseline measurements at corresponding locations.Using two separate statistical tests, the concentrations of analytes were compared to background samples. The purpose of the tests was to determine if concentrations of contaminants along the F- and H-Area seeplines were greater than background concentrations.

  9. CARS study of linewidths of the Q-branch of hydrogen molecules at high temperatures in a pulsed high-pressure H{sub 2}-O{sub 2} combustion chamber

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vereschagin, Konstantin A; Vereschagin, Alexey K; Smirnov, Valery V; Stelmakh, O M; Fabelinskii, V I; Clauss, W; Klimenko, D N; Oschwald, M

    2005-03-31

    The results of measurements of individual line widths of the Q-branch of a hydrogen molecule and the corresponding coefficients of broadening caused by collisions with water molecules at T = 2700 K in a repetitively pulsed high-pressure (50-200 atm) hydrogen-oxygen combustion chamber are presented. CARS spectra of individual Q{sub 1}-Q{sub 7} hydrogen lines, pressure pulses, and the broadband CARS spectra of the entire Q-branch of hydrogen are recorded simultaneously during a single laser pulse. The shape of line profiles was analysed using a Fabry-Perot interferometer. The temperature in the volume being probed was determined from the 'broadband' CARS spectra. The entire body of the experimental results gives information on the spectral linewidths, temperature and pressure in the combustion chamber during CARS probing. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  10. FORMATION OF SiC GRAINS IN PULSATION-ENHANCED DUST-DRIVEN WIND AROUND CARBON-RICH ASYMPTOTIC GIANT BRANCH STARS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yasuda, Yuki; Kozasa, Takashi, E-mail: yuki@antares-a.sci.hokudai.ac.jp [Department of Natural History Sciences, Faculty of Science, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0810 (Japan)

    2012-02-01

    We investigate the formation of silicon carbide (SiC) grains in the framework of dust-driven wind around pulsating carbon-rich asymptotic giant branch (C-rich AGB) stars to reveal not only the amount but also the size distribution. Two cases are considered for the nucleation process: one is the local thermal equilibrium (LTE) case where the vibration temperature of SiC clusters T{sub v} is equal to the gas temperature as usual, and another is the non-LTE case in which T{sub v} is assumed to be the same as the temperature of small SiC grains. The results of the hydrodynamical calculations for a model with stellar parameters of mass M{sub *} = 1.0 M{sub Sun }, luminosity L{sub *} = 10{sup 4} L{sub Sun }, effective temperature T{sub eff} = 2600 K, C/O ratio = 1.4, and pulsation period P = 650 days show the following: in the LTE case, SiC grains condense in accelerated outflowing gas after the formation of carbon grains, and the resulting averaged mass ratio of SiC to carbon grains of {approx}10{sup -8} is too small to reproduce the value of 0.01-0.3, which is inferred from the radiative transfer models. On the other hand, in the non-LTE case, the formation region of the SiC grains is more internal and/or almost identical to that of the carbon grains due to the so-called inverse greenhouse effect. The mass ratio of SiC to carbon grains averaged at the outer boundary ranges from 0.098 to 0.23 for the sticking probability {alpha}{sub s} = 0.1-1.0. The size distributions with the peak at {approx}0.2-0.3 {mu}m in radius cover the range of size derived from the analysis of the presolar SiC grains. Thus, the difference between the temperatures of the small cluster and gas plays a crucial role in the formation process of SiC grains around C-rich AGB stars, and this aspect should be explored for the formation process of dust grains in astrophysical environments.

  11. A Geochemical Reconnaissance Of The Alid Volcaniccenter And Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Robert O. Fournier, Theoderos Tesfai, Wendell A. Duffield, Michael A. Clynne, James G. Smith, Leake Woldegiorgis, Kidane Weldemariam and Gabreab Kahsai Published Journal...

  12. Late Cenozoic Ring Faulting and Volcanism in the Coso Range Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    to the surface during the past few million years. Author Wendell A. Duffield Published Journal Geology, 1975 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http:crossref.org...

  13. No Slide Title

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ogren 10242008 Miniature Multi-filter Continuous Light Absorption Photometer John A. Ogren and Jim Wendell Earth System Research Laboratory National Oceanic and Atmospheric...

  14. Remedial Investigation Report on Chestnut Ridge Operable Unit 2 (Filled Coal Ash Pond/Upper McCoy Branch) at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 1. Main Text

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-08-01

    This document is a report on the remedial investigation (RI) of Chestnut Ridge Operable Unit (OU) 2 at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. Chestnut Ridge OU 2 consists of Upper McCoy Branch (UMB), the Filled Coal Ash Pond (FCAP), and the area surrounding the Sluice Channel formerly associated with coal ash disposal in the FCAP. Chestnut Ridge OU 2 is located within the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Oak Ridge Reservation in Anderson County, Tennessee, approximately 24 miles west of Knoxville. The pond is an 8.5-acre area on the southern slope of Chestnut Ridge, 0.5 mile south of the main Y-12 Plant and geographically separated from the Y-12 Plant by Chestnut Ridge. The elevation of the FCAP is {approximately} 950 ft above mean sea level (msl), and it is relatively flat and largely vegetated. Two small ponds are usually present at the northeast and northwest comers of the FCAP. The Sluice Channel Area extends {approximately}1000 ft from the northern margin of the FCAP to the crest of Chestnut Ridge, which has an elevation of {approximately}1100 ft above msl. The Sluice Channel Area is largely vegetated also. McCoy Branch runs from the top of Chestnut Ridge across the FCAP into Rogers Quarry and out of the quarry where it runs a short distance into Milton Hill Lake at McCoy Embayment, termed UMB. The portion south of Rogers Quarry, within Chestnut Ridge OU 4, is termed Lower McCoy Branch. The DOE Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant disposed of coal ash from its steam plant operations as a slurry that was discharged into an ash retention impoundment; this impoundment is the FCAP. The FCAP was built in 1955 to serve as a settling basin after coal ash slurried over Chestnut Ridge from the Y-12 Plant. The FCAP was constructed by building an earthen dam across the northern tributary of McCoy Branch. The dam was designed to hold 20 years of Y-12 steam plant ash. By July 1967, ash had filled up the impoundment storage behind the dam to within 4 ft of the top.

  15. Measurement of the ratio of the production cross sections times branching fractions of Bc ? J/??and B ? J/? K and B(Bc? J/? ???-/+)/B(Bc ? J/? ?) in pp collisions at ?s = 7 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Khachatryan, V.

    2015-01-13

    The ratio of the production cross sections times branching fractions (?(Bc) B(Bc ? J/??))/(?(B) B(B ? J/?K) is studied in proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 7 TeV with the CMS detector at the LHC. The kinematic region investigated requires Ba,sub>c and Bmesons with transverse momentum p? > 15 GeV and rapidity |y| -1. The ratio is determined to be [0.48 0.05 (stat) 0.03(syst) 0.05 (?Bc)]% The J/????-/+ decay mode is also observed in the same data sample. Using a model-independent method developed tomoremeasure the efficiency given the presence of resonant behaviour in the three-pion system, the ratio of the branching fractions J/? ???-/+)/B(Bc is measured to be 2.55 0.80(stat) 0.33(syst) +0.04-0.01 (?Bc), consistent with the previous LHCb result.less

  16. Measurement of Branching Fractions of B decays to K1(1270)pi and K1(1400)pi and Determination of the CKM angle alpha from B0 --> a1(1260) /- pi-/

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aubert, B.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Martinelli, M.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D.N.; Hooberman, B.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G. /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa State U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /SLAC /South Carolina U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tel Aviv U. /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /Valencia U. /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2009-10-30

    We report measurements of the branching fractions of neutral and charged B meson decays to final states containing a K{sub 1}(1270) or K{sub 1}(1400) meson and a charged pion. The data, collected with the BABAR detector at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, correspond to 454 million B{bar B} pairs produced in e{sup +}e{sup -} annihilation. We measure the branching fractions {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} K{sub 1}(1270){sup +}{pi}{sup -} + K{sub 1}(1400){sup +}{pi}{sup -}) = 3.1{sub 0.7}{sup +0.8} x 10{sup -5} and {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} K{sub 1}(1270){sup 0}{pi}{sup +} + K{sub 1}(1400){sup 0}{pi}{sup +}) = 2.9{sub -1.7}{sup +2.9} x 10{sup -5} (< 8.2 x 10{sup -5} at 90% confidence level), where the errors are statistical and systematic combined. The B{sup 0} decay mode is observed with a significance of 7.5{sigma}, while a significance of 3.2{sigma} is obtained for the B{sup +} decay mode. Based on these results, we estimate the weak phase {alpha} = (79 {+-} 7 {+-} 11){sup o} from the time dependent CP asymmetries in B{sup 0} {yields} a{sub 1}(1260){sup {+-}}{pi}{sup {-+}} decays.

  17. Measurement of the B????l?? and B???(')l?? branching fractions, the B????l?? and B???l?? form-factor shapes, and determination of |Vub|

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    del Amo Sanchez, P.; Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Martinelli, M.; Milanes, D. A.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Brown, D. N.; Kerth, L. T.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Lynch, G.; Osipenkov, I. L.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; Asgeirsson, D. J.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T. S.; McKenna, J. A.; Khan, A.; Randle-Conde, A.; Blinov, V. E.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Druzhinin, V. P.; Golubev, V. B.; Kravchenko, E. A.; Onuchin, A. P.; Serednyakov, S. I.; Skovpen, Yu. I.; Solodov, E. P.; Todyshev, K. Yu.; Yushkov, A. N.; Bondioli, M.; Curry, S.; Kirkby, D.; Lankford, A. J.; Mandelkern, M.; Martin, E. C.; Stoker, D. P.; Atmacan, H.; Gary, J. W.; Liu, F.; Long, O.; Vitug, G. M.; Campagnari, C.; Hong, T. M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Richman, J. D.; West, C.; Eisner, A. M.; Heusch, C. A.; Kroseberg, J.; Lockman, W. S.; Martinez, A. J.; Schalk, T.; Schumm, B. A.; Seiden, A.; Winstrom, L. O.; Cheng, C. H.; Doll, D. A.; Echenard, B.; Hitlin, D. G.; Ongmongkolkul, P.; Porter, F. C.; Rakitin, A. Y.; Andreassen, R.; Dubrovin, M. S.; Mancinelli, G.; Meadows, B. T.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Bloom, P. C.; Ford, W. T.; Gaz, A.; Nagel, M.; Nauenberg, U.; Smith, J. G.; Wagner, S. R.; Ayad, R.; Toki, W. H.; Jasper, H.; Karbach, T. M.; Petzold, A.; Spaan, B.; Kobel, M. J.; Schubert, K. R.; Schwierz, R.; Bernard, D.; Verderi, M.; Clark, P. J.; Playfer, S.; Watson, J. E.; Andreotti, M.; Bettoni, D.; Bozzi, C.; Calabrese, R.; Cecchi, A.; Cibinetto, G.; Fioravanti, E.; Franchini, P.; Luppi, E.; Munerato, M.; Negrini, M.; Petrella, A.; Piemontese, L.; Baldini-Ferroli, R.; Calcaterra, A.; de Sangro, R.; Finocchiaro, G.; Nicolaci, M.; Pacetti, S.; Patteri, P.; Peruzzi, I. M.; Piccolo, M.; Rama, M.; Zallo, A.; Contri, R.; Guido, E.; Lo Vetere, M.; Monge, M. R.; Passaggio, S.; Patrignani, C.; Robutti, E.; Tosi, S.; Bhuyan, B.; Prasad, V.; Lee, C. L.; Morii, M.; Adametz, A.; Marks, J.; Uwer, U.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Ebert, M.; Lacker, H. M.; Lueck, T.; Volk, A.; Dauncey, P. D.; Tibbetts, M.; Behera, P. K.; Mallik, U.; Chen, C.; Cochran, J.; Crawley, H. B.; Dong, L.; Meyer, W. T.; Prell, S.; Rosenberg, E. I.; Rubin, A. E.; Gritsan, A. V.; Guo, Z. J.; Arnaud, N.; Davier, M.; Derkach, D.; Firmino da Costa, J.; Grosdidier, G.; Le Diberder, F.; Lutz, A. M.; Malaescu, B.; Perez, A.; Roudeau, P.; Schune, M. H.; Serrano, J.; Sordini, V.; Stocchi, A.; Wang, L.; Wormser, G.; Lange, D. J.; Wright, D. M.; Bingham, I.; Chavez, C. A.; Coleman, J. P.; Fry, J. R.; Gabathuler, E.; Gamet, R.; Hutchcroft, D. E.; Payne, D. J.; Touramanis, C.; Bevan, A. J.; Di Lodovico, F.; Sacco, R.; Sigamani, M.; Cowan, G.; Paramesvaran, S.; Wren, A. C.; Brown, D. N.; Davis, C. L.; Denig, A. G.; Fritsch, M.; Gradl, W.; Hafner, A.; Alwyn, K. E.; Bailey, D.; Barlow, R. J.; Jackson, G.; Lafferty, G. D.; Anderson, J.; Cenci, R.; Jawahery, A.; Roberts, D. A.; Simi, G.; Tuggle, J. M.; Dallapiccola, C.; Salvati, E.; Cowan, R.; Dujmic, D.; Sciolla, G.; Zhao, M.; Lindemann, D.; Patel, P. M.; Robertson, S. H.; Schram, M.; Biassoni, P.; Lazzaro, A.; Lombardo, V.; Palombo, F.; Stracka, S.; Cremaldi, L.; Godang, R.; Kroeger, R.; Sonnek, P.; Summers, D. J.; Nguyen, X.; Simard, M.; Taras, P.; De Nardo, G.; Monorchio, D.; Onorato, G.; Sciacca, C.; Raven, G.; Snoek, H. L.; Jessop, C. P.; Knoepfel, K. J.; LoSecco, J. M.; Wang, W. F.; Corwin, L. A.; Honscheid, K.; Kass, R.; Morris, J. P.; Blount, N. L.; Brau, J.; Frey, R.; Igonkina, O.; Kolb, J. A.; Rahmat, R.; Sinev, N. B.; Strom, D.; Strube, J.; Torrence, E.; Castelli, G.; Feltresi, E.; Gagliardi, N.; Margoni, M.; Morandin, M.; Posocco, M.; Rotondo, M.; Simonetto, F.; Stroili, R.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bonneaud, G. R.; Briand, H.; Calderini, G.; Chauveau, J.; Hamon, O.; Leruste, Ph.; Marchiori, G.; Ocariz, J.; Prendki, J.; Sitt, S.; Biasini, M.; Manoni, E.; Rossi, A.; Angelini, C.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Carpinelli, M.; Casarosa, G.; Cervelli, A.; Forti, F.; Giorgi, M. A.; Lusiani, A.; Neri, N.; Paoloni, E.; Rizzo, G.; Walsh, J. J.; Lopes Pegna, D.; Lu, C.; Olsen, J.; Smith, A. J. S.; Telnov, A. V.; Anulli, F.; Baracchini, E.; Cavoto, G.; Faccini, R.; Ferrarotto, F.; Ferroni, F.; Gaspero, M.; Li Gioi, L.; Mazzoni, M. A.; Piredda, G.; Renga, F.; Hartmann, T.; Leddig, T.; Schrder, H.; Waldi, R.; Adye, T.; Franek, B.; Olaiya, E. O.; Wilson, F. F.; Emery, S.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Vasseur, G.; Yche, Ch.; Zito, M.; Allen, M. T.; Aston, D.; Bard, D. J.; Bartoldus, R.; Benitez, J. F.; Cartaro, C.; Convery, M. R.; Dorfan, J.; Dubois-Felsmann, G. P.; Dunwoodie, W.; Field, R. C.; Franco Sevilla, M.; Fulsom, B. G.; Gabareen, A. M.; Graham, M. T.; Grenier, P.; Hast, C.; Innes, W. R.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kim, H.; Kim, P.; Kocian, M. L.; Leith, D. W. G. S.; Li, S.; Lindquist, B.; Luitz, S.; Lynch, H. L.

    2011-03-24

    We report the results of a study of the exclusive charmless semileptonic decays, B???(')l?? and B????l??, undertaken with approximately 46410? BB pairs collected at the ?(4S) resonance with the BABAR detector. The analysis uses events in which the signal B decays are reconstructed with a loose neutrino reconstruction technique. We obtain partial branching fractions for B???l?? and B????l?? decays in three and 12 bins of q, respectively, from which we extract the f+(q) form-factor shapes and the total branching fractions B(B???l??)=(0.360.05stat0.04syst)10?? and B(B????l??)=(1.420.05stat0.07syst)10??. We also measure B(B+??'l??)=(0.240.08stat0.03syst)10??. We obtain values for the magnitude of the CKM matrix element |Vub| using three different QCD calculations.

  18. Variation of the Side Chain Branch Position Leads to Vastly Improved Molecular Weight and OPV Performance in 4,8-dialkoxybenzo[1,2-b:4,5-b′]dithiophene/2,1,3-benzothiadiazole Copolymers

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Coffin, Robert C.; MacNeill, Christopher M.; Peterson, Eric D.; Ward, Jeremy W.; Owen, Jack W.; McLellan, Claire A.; Smith, Gregory M.; Noftle, Ronald E.; Jurchescu, Oana D.; Carroll, David L.

    2011-01-01

    Tmore » hrough manipulation of the solubilizing side chains, we were able to dramatically improve the molecular weight ( M w ) of 4,8-dialkoxybenzo[1,2- b :4,5- b ′ ]dithiophene (BDT)/2,1,3-benzothiadiazole (BT) copolymers. When dodecyl side chains ( P1 ) are employed at the 4- and 8-positions of the BDT unit, we obtain a chloroform-soluble copolymer fraction with M w of 6.3 kg/mol. Surprisingly, by moving to the commonly employed 2-ethylhexyl branch ( P2 ), M w decreases to 3.4 kg/mol. This is despite numerous reports that this side chain increases solubility and M w . By moving the ethyl branch in one position relative to the polymer backbone (1-ethylhexyl, P3 ), M w is dramatically increased to 68.8 kg/mol. As a result of this M w increase, the shape of the absorption profile is dramatically altered, with λ max = 637 nm compared with 598 nm for P1 and 579 nm for P2 . The hole mobility as determined by thin film transistor (TFT) measurements is improved from ~ 1 × 10 − 6  cm 2 /Vs for P1 and P2 to 7 × 10 − 4  cm 2 /Vs for P3 , while solar cell power conversion efficiency in increased to 2.91 % for P3 relative to 0.31 % and 0.19 % for P1 and P2 , respectively.« less

  19. Measurements of branching fraction ratios and CP-asymmetries in suppressed B-→ D(→ K+π-)K- and B-→ D(→ K+π-)π- decays

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aaltonen, T.

    2011-08-01

    We report the first reconstruction in hadron collisions of the suppressed decays B-→ D(→ K+π-)K- and B-→ D(→ K+π-)π- decays, sensitive to the CKM phase {gamma}, using data from 7 fb-1 of integrated luminosity collected by the CDF II detector at the Tevatron collider. We reconstruct a signal for the B-→ D(→ K+π-)K- suppressed mode with a significance of 3.2 standard deviations, and measure the ratios of the suppressed to favored branching fractions R(K) = [22.0 ± 8.6(stat) ± 2.6(syst)] x 10-3, R+(K) = [42.6 ± 13.7(stat) ± 2.8(syst)] x 10-3, R-(K) = [3.8 ± 10.3(stat) ± 2.7(syst)] x 10-3more » as well as the direct CP-violating asymmetry A(K) = -0.82±0.44(stat)±0.09(syst) of this mode. Corresponding quantities for B- → D(→ K+π-)π- decay are also reported.« less

  20. Measurements of branching fraction ratios and CP-asymmetries in suppressed B-→ D(→ K+π-)K- and B-→ D(→ K+π-)π- decays

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aaltonen, T.

    2011-08-01

    We report the first reconstruction in hadron collisions of the suppressed decays B-→ D(→ K+π-)K- and B-→ D(→ K+π-)π- decays, sensitive to the CKM phase {gamma}, using data from 7 fb-1 of integrated luminosity collected by the CDF II detector at the Tevatron collider. We reconstruct a signal for the B-→ D(→ K+π-)K- suppressed mode with a significance of 3.2 standard deviations, and measure the ratios of the suppressed to favored branching fractions R(K) = [22.0 ± 8.6(stat) ± 2.6(syst)] x 10-3, R+(K) = [42.6 ± 13.7(stat) ± 2.8(syst)] x 10-3, R-(K) = [3.8 ± 10.3(stat) ± 2.7(syst)] x 10-3more »as well as the direct CP-violating asymmetry A(K) = -0.82±0.44(stat)±0.09(syst) of this mode. Corresponding quantities for B- → D(→ K+π-)π- decay are also reported.« less

  1. Nucleic acid amplification using modular branched primers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ulanovsky, Levy; Raja, Mugasimangalam C.

    2001-01-01

    Methods and compositions expand the options for making primers for use in amplifying nucleic acid segments. The invention eliminates the step of custom synthesis of primers for Polymerase Chain Reactions (PCR). Instead of being custom-synthesized, a primer is replaced by a combination of several oligonucleotide modules selected from a pre-synthesized library. A modular combination of just a few oligonucleotides essentially mimics the performance of a conventional, custom-made primer by matching the sequence of the priming site in the template. Each oligonucleotide module has a segment that matches one of the stretches within the priming site.

  2. North Branch Municipal Water & Light - Commercial & Industrial...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    with recycling of working unit Dishwasher: 25 - 40 Clothes Washer: 50 - 100 Clothes Dryer: 25 - 50 Replacement Motors: 15 - 2,700, varies by HP and efficiency Variable...

  3. Nanocrystals with linear and branched topology

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Alivisatos, A. Paul (Oakland, CA); Milliron, Delia (Berkeley, CA); Manna, Liberato (Lecce, IT); Hughes, Steven M. (Berkeley, CA)

    2007-12-04

    Disclosed herein are nanostructures comprising distinct dots and rods coupled through potential barriers of tuneable height and width, and arranged in three dimensional space at well defined angles and distances. Such control allows investigation of potential applications ranging from quantum information processing to artificial photosynthesis.

  4. Measurements of Time-Dependent CP-Asymmetry Parameters in B Meson Decays to \\eta^{\\prime} K^0 and of Branching Fractions of SU(3) Related Modes with BaBar Experiment at SLAC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biassoni, Pietro; /Milan U.

    2009-01-22

    In this thesis work we have measured the following upper limits at 90% of confidence level, for B meson decays (in units of 10{sup -6}), using a statistics of 465.0 x 10{sup 6} B{bar B} pairs: {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {eta}K{sup 0}) < 1.6 {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {eta}{eta}) < 1.4 {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {eta}{prime}{eta}{prime}) < 2.1 {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {eta}{phi}) < 0.52 {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {eta}{omega}) < 1.6 {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {eta}{prime}{phi}) < 1.2 {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {eta}{prime}{omega}) < 1.7 We have no observation of any decay mode, statistical significance for our measurements is in the range 1.3-3.5 standard deviation. We have a 3.5{sigma} evidence for B {yields} {eta}{omega} and a 3.1 {sigma} evidence for B {yields} {eta}{prime}{omega}. The absence of observation of the B{sup 0} {yields} {eta}K{sup 0} open an issue related to the large difference compared to the charged mode B{sup +} {yields} {eta}K{sup +} branching fraction, which is measured to be 3.7 {+-} 0.4 {+-} 0.1 [118]. Our results represent substantial improvements of the previous ones [109, 110, 111] and are consistent with theoretical predictions. All these results were presented at Flavor Physics and CP Violation (FPCP) 2008 Conference, that took place in Taipei, Taiwan. They will be soon included into a paper to be submitted to Physical Review D. For time-dependent analysis, we have reconstructed 1820 {+-} 48 flavor-tagged B{sup 0} {yields} {eta}{prime}K{sup 0} events, using the final BABAR statistic of 467.4 x 10{sup 6} B{bar B} pairs. We use these events to measure the time-dependent asymmetry parameters S and C. We find S = 0.59 {+-} 0.08 {+-} 0.02, and C = -0.06 {+-} 0.06 {+-} 0.02. A non-zero value of C would represent a directly CP non-conserving component in B{sup 0} {yields} {eta}{prime}K{sup 0}, while S would be equal to sin2{beta} measured in B{sup 0} {yields} J/{psi}K{sub s}{sup 0} [108], a mixing-decay interference effect, provided the decay is dominated by amplitudes of a single weak phase. The new measured value of S can be considered in agreement with the expectations of the 'Standard Model', inside the experimental and theoretical uncertainties. Inconsistency of our result for S with CP conservation (S = 0) has a significance of 7.1 standard deviations (statistical and systematics included). Our result for the direct-CP violation parameter C is 0.9 standard deviations from zero (statistical and systematics included). Our results are in agreement with the previous ones [18]. Despite the statistics is only 20% larger than the one used in previous measurement, we improved of 20% the error on S and of 14% the error on C. This error is the smaller ever achieved, by both BABAR and Belle, in Time-Dependent CP Violation Parameters measurement is a b {yields} s transition.

  5. Honey Lake Geothermal Area

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Honey Lake geothermal area is located in Lassen County, California and Washoe County, Nevada. There are three geothermal projects actively producing electrical power. They are located at Wendel...

  6. Measurement of the B⁰→π⁻l⁺ν and B⁺→η(')l⁺ν branching fractions, the B⁰→π⁻l⁺ν and B⁺→ηl⁺ν form-factor shapes, and determination of |Vub|

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    del Amo Sanchez, P.; Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Martinelli, M.; Milanes, D. A.; Palano, A.; et al

    2011-03-24

    We report the results of a study of the exclusive charmless semileptonic decays, B⁺→η(')l⁺ν and B⁰→π⁻l⁺ν, undertaken with approximately 464×10⁶ BB¯¯ pairs collected at the Υ(4S) resonance with the BABAR detector. The analysis uses events in which the signal B decays are reconstructed with a loose neutrino reconstruction technique. We obtain partial branching fractions for B⁺→ηl⁺ν and B⁰→π⁻l⁺ν decays in three and 12 bins of q², respectively, from which we extract the f+(q²) form-factor shapes and the total branching fractions B(B⁺→ηl⁺ν)=(0.36±0.05stat±0.04syst)×10⁻⁴ and B(B⁰→π⁻l⁺ν)=(1.42±0.05stat±0.07syst)×10⁻⁴. We also measure B(B+→η'l⁺ν)=(0.24±0.08stat±0.03syst)×10⁻⁴. We obtain values for the magnitude of the CKM matrix element |Vub| usingmore » three different QCD calculations.« less

  7. Branching Fraction Measurements of the Color-Suppressed Decays B0bar to D(*)0 pi0, D(*)0 eta, D(*)0 omega, and D(*)0 eta_prime and Measurement of the Polarization in the Decay B0bar to D*0 omega

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Martinelli, M.; Milanes, D.A.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Brown, D.N.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; Asgeirsson, D.J.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T.S.; McKenna, J.A.; ,

    2012-02-14

    We report updated branching fraction measurements of the color-suppressed decays {bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}, D*{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}, D{sup 0}{eta}, D*{sup 0}{eta}, D{sup 0}{omega}, D*{sup 0}{omega}, D{sup 0}{eta}', and D*{sup 0}{eta}'. We measure the branching fractions (x10{sup -4}): {Beta}({bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}) = 2.69 {+-} 0.09 {+-} 0.13, {Beta}({bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D*{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}) = 3.05 {+-} 0.14 {+-} 0.28, {Beta}({bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D{sup 0}{eta}) = 2.53 {+-} 0.09 {+-} 0.11, {Beta}({bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D*{sup 0}{eta}) = 2.69 {+-} 0.14 {+-} 0.23, {Beta}({bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D{sup 0}{omega}) = 2.57 {+-} 0.11 {+-} 0.14, {Beta}({bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D*{sup 0}{omega}) = 4.55 {+-} 0.24 {+-} 0.39, {Beta}({bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D{sup 0}{eta}') = 1.48 {+-} 0.13 {+-} 0.07, and {Beta}({bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D*{sup 0}{eta}') = 1.49 {+-} 0.22 {+-} 0.15. We also present the first measurement of the longitudinal polarization fraction of the decay channel D*{sup 0}{omega}, f{sub L} = (66.5 {+-} 4.7 {+-} 1.5)%. In the above, the first uncertainty is statistical and the second is systematic. The results are based on a sample of (454 {+-} 5) x 10{sup 6} B{bar B} pairs collected at the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance, with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II storage rings at SLAC. The measurements are the most precise determinations of these quantities from a single experiment. They are compared to theoretical predictions obtained by factorization, Soft Collinear Effective Theory (SCET) and perturbative QCD (pQCD). We find that the presence of final state interactions is favored and the measurements are in better agreement with SCET than with pQCD.

  8. Measurement of the ratio of the production cross sections times branching fractions of Bc ? J/??and B ? J/? K and B(Bc? J/? ???-/+)/B(Bc ? J/? ?) in pp collisions at ?s = 7 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khachatryan, V.

    2015-01-13

    The ratio of the production cross sections times branching fractions (?(Bc) B(Bc ? J/??))/(?(B) B(B ? J/?K) is studied in proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 7 TeV with the CMS detector at the LHC. The kinematic region investigated requires Ba,sub>c and Bmesons with transverse momentum p? > 15 GeV and rapidity |y| < 1.6. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 5.1 fb-1. The ratio is determined to be [0.48 0.05 (stat) 0.03(syst) 0.05 (?Bc)]% The J/????-/+ decay mode is also observed in the same data sample. Using a model-independent method developed to measure the efficiency given the presence of resonant behaviour in the three-pion system, the ratio of the branching fractions J/? ???-/+)/B(Bc is measured to be 2.55 0.80(stat) 0.33(syst) +0.04-0.01 (?Bc), consistent with the previous LHCb result.

  9. Measurement of the ratio of the production cross sections times branching fractions of $$B_{c}^{\\pm} \\to J/\\psi \\pi^{\\pm}$$ and $$B^{\\pm} \\to J/\\psi K^{\\pm}$$ and $$\\mathcal{B}(B_{c}^{\\pm} \\to J/\\psi \\pi^{\\pm}\\pi^{\\pm}\\pi^{\\mp})/\\mathcal{B}(B_{c}^{\\pm} \\to J/\\psi \\pi^{\\pm})$$ in pp collisions at $$\\sqrt{s} =$$ 7 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-01-13

    The ratio of the production cross sections times branching fractions (σ(B±c)B(B±c→J/ψπ±))/(σ(B±)B(B±→J/ψK±)) is studied in proton-proton collisions at a center of-mass energy of 7 TeV with the CMS detector at the LHC. The kinematic region investigated requires B c ± and B± mesons with transverse momentum p T > 15 GeV and rapidity |y|< 1.6. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 5.1 fb-1. The ratio is determined to be [0.48±0.05(stat)± 0.03(syst)±0.05 (τBc)]%. The B c ± → J/ψπ ± π ± π ∓ decay is also observed in the same data sample. Using a model-independent method developed tomore » measure the efficiency given the presence of resonant behaviour in the three-pion system, the ratio of the branching fractions B(B±c→J/ψπ±π±π∓)/B(B±c→J/ψπ±) is measured to be 2.55±0.80(stat)±0.33(syst)+0.04-0.01(τBc), consistent with the previous LHCb result.« less

  10. Branching Mechanisms in Surfactant Micellar Growth (Journal Article...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Resource Type: Journal Article Resource Relation: Journal Name: Journal of Physical Chemistry B, na, na, March 14, 2013, pp. 2898 Research Org: Lawrence Livermore National...

  11. Branching Ratio of the Electromagnetic Decay of the Σ+(1385)

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Keller, D.; Hicks, K.; Adhikari, K. P.; Adikaram, D.; Amaryan, M. J.; Anghinolfi, M.; Baghdasaryan, H.; Ball, J.; Battaglieri, M.; Bedlinskiy, I.; et al

    2012-03-01

    The CLAS detector was used to obtain the first ever measurement of the electromagnetic decay of the Σ*+(1385) from the reaction γp → K0 Σ*+(1385). A real photon beam with a maximum energy of 3.8 GeV was incident on a liquid-hydrogen target, resulting in the photoproduction of the kaon and Σ* hyperon. Kinematic fitting was used to separate the reaction channel from the background processes. The fitting algorithm exploited a new method to kinematically fit neutrons in the CLAS detector, leading to the partial width measurement of 250.0 ± 56.9(stat)-41.2+34.3(sys) keV. A U-spin symmetry test using the SU(3) flavor-multiplet representationmore » yields predictions for the Σ*+(1385) → Σ+γ and Σ*0(1385) → Λγ partial widths that agree with the experimental measurements.« less

  12. Supervisory Civil Engineer or Supervisory Geologist (Branch Chief)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    If you are ready to begin your new career or are looking for a place to make an impact, what better place than a top 5 agency? We are looking for the best and brightest to join our team of...

  13. Measurement of the branching fraction for ?(3770)???c0 ...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    FG02-04ER41291; DESC0010118 Type: Published Article Journal Name: Physics Letters. Section B Additional Journal Information: Journal Volume: 753; Journal Issue: C;...

  14. Measurement of the branching fraction for ?(3770)???c0 ...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    0370-2693 Publisher: Elsevier Sponsoring Org: USDOE Country of Publication: Netherlands Language: English Word Cloud More Like This Free Publicly Accessible Full Text Publisher's...

  15. PNC Financial Services - Net-Zero Energy Bank Branch

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2013-03-01

    PNC has opened a zero-energy building that is 57% more efficient than ASHRAE 90.1-2004. Exterior features include shading to control glare from sunlight and photovoltaic solar panels to produce as much electricity as the building consumes annually.

  16. When regulations go too far the taking of private property by environmental regulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Plott, D.M.

    1995-12-01

    Seventy years ago Justice Oliver Wendell Homes wrote in an Opinion of the United States Supreme Court that{open_quotes}...while property may be regulated to a certain extent, if regulation goes too far it will be recognized as a taking.{close_quotes} Pennsylvania Coal Co. v. Mahon, 260 U.S. 393 (1992) The Fifth Amendment of the United States Constitution provides that private property shall not be {open_quotes}taken for public use, without just compensation{close_quotes}. After lying dormant for half a century, the {open_quotes}takings{close_quotes} clause of the United States constitution is being invoked to challenge environmental regulations throughout the country. In essence, property owners are saying that if the government wants to regulate to protect wetlands, wildlife habitat and other natural resources it must pay just compensation to the property owners for the restrictions imposed upon the use of their land. During the past ten years, the U.S. Supreme Court has decided several takings cases. While the judicial branch of government has become increasingly active in takings cases, the U.S. Congress and State legislatures have also been extremely active in efforts to protect private property rights. Typically, these legislative requires a takings impact analysis by the government to determine if its actions are likely to result in the compensable taking of private property or require compensation if property values are reduced by a certain percentage. This paper reviews the judicial standards that have been established for reviewing taking claims and sets forth a framework for analyzing when a regulation goes {open_quotes}too far{close_quotes} so as to require payment of compensation.

  17. Condensation of refractory metals in asymptotic giant branch and other stellar environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schwander, D.; Berg, T.; Schnhense, G.; Ott, U.

    2014-09-20

    The condensation of material from a gas of solar composition has been extensively studied, but less so condensation in the environment of evolved stars, which has been mainly restricted to major compounds and some specific element groups such as the Rare Earth elements. Also of interest, however, are refractory metals like Mo, Ru, Os, W, Ir, and Pt, which may condense to form refractory metal nuggets (RMNs) like the ones that have been found in association with presolar graphite. We have performed calculations describing the condensation of these elements in the outflows of s-process enriched AGB stars as well as from gas enriched in r-process products. While in carbon-rich environments (C > O), the formation of carbides is expected to consume W, Mo, and V (Lodders and Fegley), the condensation sequence for the other refractory metals under these conditions does not significantly differ from the case of a cooling gas of solar composition. The composition in detail, however, is significantly different due to the completely different source composition. Condensation from an r-process enriched source differs less from the solar case. Elemental abundance ratios of the refractory metals can serve as a guide for finding candidate presolar grains among the RMNs in primitive meteoritesmost of which have a solar system originfor confirmation by isotopic analysis. We apply our calculations to the case of the four RMNs found by Croat et al., which may very well be presolar.

  18. Qbox First-principles Molecular Dynamics (Qball branch, svn release 081

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2013-03-05

    Qball is a modified version of the open source Qbox first-principles molecular dynamics code which was originally developed at LLNL by Francois Gygi.

  19. All executive branch employees are subject to statutory and regulatory conflict of interest restrictions

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    GC GUIDANCE ON ACCESSING SUBCONTRACTOR EMPLOYMENT RECORDS Federal officials, on occasion, may seek access to contractor or subcontractor employment and personnel records. There are circumstances in which such access is appropriate and permissible. But access should only be granted in circumstances that demonstrate such access is authorized and that creates a record of such access that can be reviewed. In some situations, such as an investigation by the Inspector General, specific officials are

  20. The Discovery of Archaea, the 'Third Branch of Life', and Its...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    available in documents and on the Web. Documents: A Review of Acquired Thermotolerance, Heat Shock Proteins, and Molecular Chaperones in Archaea: Heat Shock in Archaea, DOE...

  1. Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: Siemens | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Siemens Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: Siemens Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: Siemens Currently, Siemens has installed charging stations at four of its largest U.S. sites: Orlando, FL; Iselin, NJ; Alpharetta, GA; and Wendell, NC. In 2011, Siemens surveyed a portion of its U.S. employees to gauge their interest in purchasing plug-in electric vehicles. Siemens will periodically update the survey to re-evaluate their employees' demand for stations. Fast Facts Joined the Workplace

  2. Multiply Methyl-Branched Fatty Acids and Diacids in the Polar Lipids of a Microaerophilic Subsurface Microbial Community

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hedrick, David B.; Peacock, Aaron D.; Long, Philip E.; White, David C.

    2008-09-01

    A previously unreported series of di- and trimethylated fatty acids, as well as saturated and monounsaturated diacids were identified in polar lipids isolated from environmental subsurface sediment samples. Mechanisms are proposed for their formation, but their origin and role in cell membranes remains unknown.

  3. Strain-Dependent Photoluminescence Behavior of CdSe/CdS Nanocrystals with Spherical, Linear, and Branched Topologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choi, Charina L.; Koski, Kristie J.; Sivasankar, Sanjeevi; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2009-08-13

    The photoluminescence of CdSe/CdS core/shell quantum dots, nanorods, and tetrapods is investigated as a function of applied hydrostatic and non-hydrostatic pressure. The optoelectronic properties of all three nanocrystal morphologies are affected by strain. Furthermore, it is demonstrated that the unique morphology of a tetrapod is highly sensitive to non-isotropic stress environments. Seeded tetrapods can thereby serve as an optical strain gauge, capable of measuring forces on the order of nanonewtons. We anticipate that a nanocrystal strain gauge with optical readout will be useful for applications ranging from sensitive optomechanical devices to investigations of biomechanical processes.

  4. Method for generating a mesh representation of a region characterized by a trunk and a branch thereon

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shepherd, Jason; Mitchell, Scott A.; Jankovich, Steven R.; Benzley, Steven E.

    2007-05-15

    The present invention provides a meshing method, called grafting, that lifts the prior art constraint on abutting surfaces, including surfaces that are linking, source/target, or other types of surfaces of the trunk volume. The grafting method locally modifies the structured mesh of the linking surfaces allowing the mesh to conform to additional surface features. Thus, the grafting method can provide a transition between multiple sweep directions extending sweeping algorithms to 23/4-D solids. The method is also suitable for use with non-sweepable volumes; the method provides a transition between meshes generated by methods other than sweeping as well.

  5. THREE DISCRETE GROUPS WITH HOMOGENEOUS CHEMISTRY ALONG THE RED GIANT BRANCH IN THE GLOBULAR CLUSTER NGC2808

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carretta, E.

    2014-11-10

    We present the homogeneous reanalysis of Mg and Al abundances from high resolution UVES/FLAMES spectra for 31 red giants in the globular cluster NGC2808. We found a well defined Mg-Al anticorrelation reaching a regime of subsolar Mg abundance ratios, with a spread of about 1.4dex in [Al/Fe]. The main result from the improved statistics of our sample is that the distribution of stars is not continuous along the anticorrelation because they are neatly clustered into three distinct clumps, each with different chemical compositions. One group (P) shows a primordial composition of field stars of similar metallicity, and the other two (I and E) have increasing abundances of Al and decreasing abundances of Mg. The fraction of stars we found in the three components (P: 68%, I: 19%, E: 13%) is in excellent agreement with the ratios computed for the three distinct main sequences in NGC2808: for the first time there is a clear correspondence between discrete photometric sequences of dwarfs and distinct groups of giants with homogeneous chemistry. The composition of the I group cannot be reproduced by mixing of matter with extreme processing in hot H-burning and gas with pristine, unprocessed composition, as also found in the recent analysis of three discrete groups in NGC6752. This finding suggests that different classes of polluters were probably at work in NGC2808 as well.

  6. Measurement of branching fraction ratios and CP asymmetries in B →D0 CPK decays with the BABAR detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marchiori, Giovanni; /Pisa U.

    2010-05-05

    The primary goals of the BABAR experiment are the detection of CP violation (CPV) in the B meson system, the precise measurement of some of the elements of the CKM matrix and the measurement of the rates of rare B meson decays. At present, BABAR has achieved major successes: (1) the discovery, in neutral B decays, of direct and mixing-induced CP violation; (2) accurate measurements of the magnitudes of the CKM matrix elements |V{sub cb}| and |V{sub ub}|; (3) a precise measurement of the CKM parameter {beta} {triple_bond} arg[- V{sub cd}V*{sub cb}/V{sub td}V*{sub tb}]; (4) a first measurement of the CKM parameters {alpha} {triple_bond} arg[- V{sub td}V*{sub tb}/V{sub ud}V*{sub ub}], {gamma} {triple_bond} arg[- V{sub ud}V*{sub ub}/V{sub cd}V*{sub cb}]; and (5) the observation of several rare B decays and the discovery of new particles (in the charmed and charmonium mesons spectroscopy). However, the physics program of BABAR is not yet complete. Two of the key elements of this program that still need to be achieved are: (1) the observation of direct CP violation in charged B decays, which would constitute the first evidence of direct CPV in a charged meson decay; and (2) the precise measurement of {alpha} and {gamma}, which are necessary ingredients for a stringent test of the Standard Model predictions in the quark electroweak sector. A possibility for the discovery of direct CP violation in charged B decays would be the observation of a non-vanishing rate asymmetry in the Cabibbo-suppressed decay B{sup -} {yields} D{sup 0} K{sup -}, with the D{sup 0} decaying to either a CP-even or a CP-odd eigenstate. This class of decays can also provide theoretically-clean information on {gamma}.

  7. Measurements of Branching Ratios And Search for CP Violation in the Modes B0 to Rho Pi, Rho K

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laplace, Sandrine; /Paris U., VI-VII

    2006-09-18

    The BABAR experiment, at the PEP-II collider at SLAC, has been studying since 1999 CP violation in the B meson system. After the precise measurement of sin2{beta}, one is now concentrating on measuring the angles {alpha} and {gamma} of the unitarity triangle. The work presented in this thesis concerns the measurement of the angle {alpha} in the B{sup 0} {yields} {rho}{pi} mode.

  8. Administrative Records Central Compendium of Guidance Documents, United States Environmental Protection Agency, Hazardous Waste Division, Superfund Branch. I-1700-1701-1.02

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

  9. Winter Weather Outlook

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The operations branch of the CPC prepares long-range forecasts by applying dynamical, empirical, and statistical techniques. The analysis branch performs applied research to...

  10. Geothermal energy: opportunities for California commerce. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-08-01

    This report provides a preliminary engineering and economic assessment of five direct use projects using low and moderate temperature geothermal resources. Each project site and end-use application was selected because each has a high potential for successful, near-term (2 to 5 years) commercial development. The report also includes an extensive bibliography, and reference and contact lists. The five projects are: Wendel Agricultural Complex, East Mesa Livestock Complex, East Mesa Vegetable Dehydration Facility, Calapatria Heating District and Bridgeport Heating District. The projects involve actual investors, resource owners, and operators with varying financial commitments for project development. For each project, an implementation plan is defined which identifies major barriers to development and methods to overcome them. All projects were determined to be potentially feasible. Three of the projects cascade heat from a small-scale electric generator to direct use applications. Small-scale electric generation technology (especially in the 0.5 to 3 MW range) has recently evolved to such a degree as to warrant serious consideration. These systems provide a year-round heating load and substantially improve the economic feasibility of most direct use energy projects using geothermal resources above 200/sup 0/F.

  11. GYROKINETIC PARTICLE SIMULATION OF TURBULENT TRANSPORT IN BURNING PLASMAS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Horton, Claude Wendell

    2014-06-10

    The SciDAC project at the IFS advanced the state of high performance computing for turbulent structures and turbulent transport. The team project with Prof Zhihong Lin [PI] at Univ California Irvine produced new understanding of the turbulent electron transport. The simulations were performed at the Texas Advanced Computer Center TACC and the NERSC facility by Wendell Horton, Lee Leonard and the IFS Graduate Students working in that group. The research included a Validation of the electron turbulent transport code using the data from a steady state university experiment at the University of Columbia in which detailed probe measurements of the turbulence in steady state were used for wide range of temperature gradients to compare with the simulation data. These results were published in a joint paper with Texas graduate student Dr. Xiangrong Fu using the work in his PhD dissertation. X.R. Fu, W. Horton, Y. Xiao, Z. Lin, A.K. Sen and V. Sokolov, Validation of electron Temperature gradient turbulence in the Columbia Linear Machine, Phys. Plasmas 19, 032303 (2012).

  12. US Nuclear Regulatory Commission functional organization charts, March 15, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-03-01

    Functional organization charts for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission offices, divisions, and branches are presented.

  13. U. S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission functional organization charts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-07-01

    Functional organization charts for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission offices, divisions and branches are presented.

  14. US Nuclear Regulatory Commission functional organization charts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-11-30

    Functional organization charts for the NRC Commission Offices, Divisions, and Branches are presented.

  15. US Nuclear Regulatory Commission functional organization charts, March 15, 1993. Revision 16

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-03-01

    Functional organization charts for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission offices, divisions, and branches are presented.

  16. U. S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission functional organization charts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-02-01

    Functional organization charts for the NRC Commission Offices, Divisions, Staffs and Branches are presented.

  17. Synthesis of new high performance lubricants and solid lubricants. Progress report, April 1992--March 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lagow, R.J.

    1993-04-01

    Synthesis and testing was begun on a number of new classes of lubricants: perfluoropolyethers (branching effects), perfluoromethylene oxide ethers, chlorine-substituted fluorocarbon polyethers, fluorine-containing branched ether lubricants, glycerine- based perfluoropolyesters, perfluoro epoxy ether chains, etc.

  18. Synthesis of new high performance lubricants and solid lubricants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lagow, R.J.

    1993-04-01

    Synthesis and testing was begun on a number of new classes of lubricants: perfluoropolyethers (branching effects), perfluoromethylene oxide ethers, chlorine-substituted fluorocarbon polyethers, fluorine-containing branched ether lubricants, glycerine- based perfluoropolyesters, perfluoro epoxy ether chains, etc.

  19. --No Title--

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... Also Stacy Cole is the branch 19 chief from the Research and Methodology 20 Branch within the Manufacturing and 21 Construction Division. 22 Also sitting in the back there is BETA ...

  20. Savannah River Ecology Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ruth Patrick - Myers Branch Set-Aside Meyers Branch is a second order stream whose watershed encompasses 12,565 acres (5,085 ha), approximately one half of the Steel Creek...

  1. Annual Confidential Financial Disclosure Report (OGE 450)

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2002-10-01

    This Notice addresses the Executive Branch confidential disclosure requirements. These requirements apply to career GS (GM) employees.

  2. One of EM's Last Recovery Act Projects at Oak Ridge Improves Safety at

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Laboratory | Department of Energy EM's Last Recovery Act Projects at Oak Ridge Improves Safety at Laboratory One of EM's Last Recovery Act Projects at Oak Ridge Improves Safety at Laboratory November 26, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis EM deactivated one of five ventilation branches that led to stack 3039. The ventilation branches are connected to numerous facilities throughout ORNL’s central campus. EM deactivated one of five ventilation branches that led to stack 3039. The ventilation branches

  3. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Motor VFDs, Agricultural Equipment, CustomOthers pending approval, Commercial Cooking Equipment, LED Lighting, Commercial Refrigeration Equipment North Branch Municipal...

  4. antagonist Haga, Kazuko; Kruse, Andrew C.; Asada, Hidetsugu;

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    BIOLOGY; CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM; DISEASES; DISSOCIATION; NERVES; ORGANS; POTASSIUM; PROTEINS; REGULATIONS; RESIDUES; TARGETS; TYROSINE The parasympathetic branch of the autonomic...

  5. TITLE AUTHORS SUBJECT SUBJECT RELATED DESCRIPTION PUBLISHER AVAILABILI...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    BIOLOGY CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM DISEASES DISSOCIATION NERVES ORGANS POTASSIUM PROTEINS REGULATIONS RESIDUES TARGETS TYROSINE The parasympathetic branch of the autonomic...

  6. "Title","Creator/Author","Publication Date","OSTI Identifier...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    BIOLOGY; CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM; DISEASES; DISSOCIATION; NERVES; ORGANS; POTASSIUM; PROTEINS; REGULATIONS; RESIDUES; TARGETS; TYROSINE",,"The parasympathetic branch of the...

  7. Annual Confidential Financial Disclosure Report (OGE 450)

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1999-10-01

    This Notice addresses Executive Branch confidential financial disclosure requirements. These requirements apply to career GS (GM) employees.

  8. Annual Confidential Financial Disclosure Report (OGE 450)

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2000-10-01

    This Notice addresses Executive Branch confidential financial disclosure requirements. These requirements apply to career GS (GM) employees.

  9. John C Lacenere | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    John C Lacenere Head, Electrical Engineering Power Branch Contact Information Phone: 609-243-3308 Email: lacenere

  10. US Nuclear Regulatory Commission functional organization charts, January 31, 1992. Revision 15

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-02-01

    Functional organization charts for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission offices, divisions, and branches are presented in this document.

  11. US Nuclear Regulatory Commission functional organization charts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-08-15

    Functional organization charts for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission offices, divisions, and branches are presented in this document.

  12. US Nuclear Regulatory Commission functional organization charts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-04-01

    Functional organization charts for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission offices, divisions, and branches are presented in this document.

  13. U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission organization charts and functional statements. Revision 19

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-01-31

    Functional statements and organization charts for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission offices, divisions, and branches are presented.

  14. US Nuclear Regulatory Commission functional organization charts, January 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-02-01

    Functional organization charts for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission offices, divisions, and branches are presented in this document.

  15. Effects of ion abundances on electromagnetic ion cyclotron wave growth rate in the vicinity of the plasmapause

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henning, F. D. Mace, R. L.

    2014-04-15

    Electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves in multi-ion species plasmas propagate in branches. Except for the branch corresponding to the heaviest ion species, which has only a resonance at its gyrofrequency, these branches are bounded below by a cutoff frequency and above by a resonant gyrofrequency. The condition for wave growth is determined by the thermal anisotropies of each ion species, j, which sets an upper bound, ?{sub j}{sup ?}, on the wave frequency below which that ion species contributes positively to the growth rate. It follows that the relative positions of the cutoffs and the critical frequencies ?{sub j}{sup ?} play a crucial role in determining whether a particular wave branch will be unstable. The effect of the magnetospheric ion abundances on the growth rate of each branch of the EMIC instability in a model where all the ion species have kappa velocity distributions is investigated by appealing to the above ideas. Using the variation of the cutoff frequencies predicted by cold plasma theory as a guide, optimal ion abundances that maximise the EMIC instability growth rate are sought. When the ring current is comprised predominantly of H{sup +} ions, all branches of the EMIC wave are destabilised, with the proton branch having the maximum growth rate. When the O{sup +} ion abundance in the ring current is increased, a decrease in the growth rate of the proton branch and cyclotron damping of the helium branch are observed. The oxygen branch, on the other hand, experiences an increase in the maximum growth rate with an increase in the O{sup +} ion abundance. When the ring current is comprised predominantly of He{sup +} ions, only the helium and oxygen branches of the EMIC wave are destabilised, with the helium branch having the maximum growth rate.

  16. Magnetohydrodynamics and deep mixing in evolved stars. I. Two- and

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    three-dimensional analytical models for the asymptotic giant branch (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Magnetohydrodynamics and deep mixing in evolved stars. I. Two- and three-dimensional analytical models for the asymptotic giant branch Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Magnetohydrodynamics and deep mixing in evolved stars. I. Two- and three-dimensional analytical models for the asymptotic giant branch The advection of thermonuclear ashes by magnetized domains emerging near the H

  17. Annual Confidential Financial Disclosure Report (OGE 450)

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2001-10-01

    This Notice addresses the Executive Branch confidential financial disclosure requirements. These requirements apply to career GS (GM) employees. (Replaces DOE N 326.7).

  18. Annual Confidential Financial Disclosure Report (SF 450)

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1995-10-13

    This Notice addresses the Executive Branch confidential financial disclosure requirements. These requirements apply to persons employed at the GS-15 level and below, except for Schedule C appointees.

  19. Transitioning Los Alamos technology into the marketplace

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    All Issues submit Transitioning Los Alamos technology into the marketplace A personal message from Duncan McBranch, Chief Technology Officer, Los Alamos National...

  20. Slide 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Repetitive branching, a novel and simple synthesis method, produces zeolite crystals with large-pore "highways" that improve transport and utilization of chemicals within the...

  1. Microsoft PowerPoint - 6_Andy IMboden_Presentation to 2013 NMMSS...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Waste Confidence Activities Andy Imboden, Branch Chief Waste Confidence Directorate, U.S. NRC Agenda What is Waste Confidence? Brief History 2012 Court of Appeals...

  2. Microsoft PowerPoint - 9_SUZANNE_ANI_NMMSS_2014 MCA-SAni.pptx

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Responsibilities at the NRC Suzanne M. Ani Office of Nuclear Material Safety & Safeguards Division of Fuel Cycle Safety & Safeguards Material Control & Accounting Branch At the...

  3. Washington County, Tennessee: Energy Resources | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    4 Climate Zone Subtype A. Places in Washington County, Tennessee Fall Branch, Tennessee Gray, Tennessee Johnson City, Tennessee Jonesborough, Tennessee Midway, Tennessee Oak Grove,...

  4. Safety Culture in the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Reactor Oversight Process

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presenter: Undine Shoop, Chief, Health Physics and Human Performance Branch, Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission

  5. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Handling of Beyond Design Basis Events for Nuclear Power Reactors

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presenter: Bill Reckley, Chief, Policy and Support Branch, Japan Lessons-Learned Project Directorate, Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation, US Nuclear Regulatory Commission US Nuclear Regulatory Commission

  6. Ogemaw County, Michigan: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Number 6 Climate Zone Subtype A. Places in Ogemaw County, Michigan Prescott, Michigan Rose City, Michigan Skidway Lake, Michigan West Branch, Michigan Retrieved from "http:...

  7. Chisago County, Minnesota: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    A. Places in Chisago County, Minnesota Center City, Minnesota Chisago City, Minnesota Harris, Minnesota Lindstrom, Minnesota North Branch, Minnesota Rush City, Minnesota Shafer,...

  8. The ABCs of Hanford Cleanup

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ABC's of Hanford Cleanup A B C ARRA Budget Community Relations Plan Asbestos Branching Out Columbia River Workshops Baton Chromium Badgers

  9. QBOX/QBALL V. 82

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    002856WKSTN00 Qbox First-principles Molecular Dynamics (Qball branch, svn release 081 https://lc.llnl.gov/stash/projects/Qball

  10. Comparison between MSW ash and RDF ash from incineration process...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Solid Waste Processing Div.; Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States). Air Pollution Technology Branch Country of Publication: United States ...

  11. Parallel integrated thermal management

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bennion, Kevin; Thornton, Matthew

    2014-08-19

    Embodiments discussed herein are directed to managing the heat content of two vehicle subsystems through a single coolant loop having parallel branches for each subsystem.

  12. This research was supported as part of the Catalysis Center for...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Fuel, Chemical and Pharmaceutical Industries Repetitive branching, a novel and simple synthesis method, produces zeolite crystals with large-pore "highways" that improve transport...

  13. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    North Branch Municipal Water & Light- Commercial & Industrial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Southern Minnesota Municipal Power Agency (SMMPA) is a joint-action agency which...

  14. P.L. 95-91, "Department of Energy Organization Act" (1977)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2011-12-13

    The purpose of this Act to establish a permanent Department of Energy in the executive branch to assist in the development of a coordinated national energy policy.

  15. Single ion conductor cross-linked polymeric networks

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kerr, John Borland (Oakland, CA); Wang, Shanger (Fairfield, CA); Han, Yong Bong (Berkeley, CA); Liu, Gao (Oakland, CA); Hou, Jun (Painted Post, NY); Sloop, Steven Edward (Berkeley, CA)

    2005-10-18

    Single ion conductors comprising polymer electrolytes prepared by grafting a salt compound onto a comb-branch polymer or dendrimer are disclosed having superior properties.

  16. DISTRICT COMMAND BRIEF

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Major Maintenance at Philpott Lake Daniel Brown Chief, Lakes Branch, Operations Division April 2, 2015 BUILDING STRONG GovernorExciter Replacement BUILDING STRONG Switchgear ...

  17. Robert Hofstadter, Electron Scattering, the Structure of the...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ever since that initial discovery, and has been an important factor in all branches of nuclear and high energy physics, in astrophysics, as well as in medicine, biology,...

  18. Aerogel-Based Insulation for High-Temperature Industrial Processes...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    be expected to scale similarly. Over the same period, these sales would reduce domestic energy consumption by more than 65 TBtu. Upon branching out into all industrial processes...

  19. Unique Auxin Regulation Mechanism Discovered

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Unique Auxin Regulation Mechanism Discovered Print The plant hormone auxin regulates many plant growth and development processes, including shoot growth, root branching, fruit...

  20. Utah Division of Environmental Response and Remediation Underground...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Environmental Response and Remediation Underground Storage Tank Branch Webpage Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Utah Division of...

  1. Update on the Hanford Site Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program (CBDPP) Stan Branch Richland Operations Office Hanford Advisory Board Health, Safety and Environmental Protection Committee January 7,...

  2. Improvement of Design Codes to Account for Accident Thermal Effects...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... The pre-cracking branch was almost identical for all reinforcement levels. The analysis results of this study show that the reinforcement ratio and temperature amplitude have ...

  3. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (28) branching ratio (27) luminosity (27) high energy physics (25) leptons ... which determines their annihilation luminosity, are very sensitive to numerical ...

  4. Radiative and Leptonic B-meson Decays from the B-factories (Conference...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    bosons in Type II two-Higgs double models. The B yields Xsub sgamma branching fraction measurements also constrain models with universal extra dimensions. Authors: Walsh,...

  5. Hydrogen transport diagnostics by atomic and molecular emission...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    and Q branches of the Fulcher-alpha band of hydrogen molecules simultaneously with ... dependences by the Zeeman effect, the emission locations, intensities, and the ...

  6. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... and Q branches of the Fulcher-alpha band of hydrogen molecules simultaneously with ... dependences by the Zeeman effect, the emission locations, intensities, and the ...

  7. Oregon Department of Transportation - Maintenance and Operations...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Maintenance and Operations Branch Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Oregon Department of Transportation - Maintenance and Operations...

  8. 18C

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    18N deduced levels, -branching. 1991RE02: 18C; measured T12, neutron emission probability, upper limits. Tof isochronous spectrometer, ion-neutron delayed coincidence....

  9. Gibson County, Indiana: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Indiana Fort Branch, Indiana Francisco, Indiana Haubstadt, Indiana Hazleton, Indiana Mackey, Indiana Oakland City, Indiana Owensville, Indiana Patoka, Indiana Princeton, Indiana...

  10. Polymer Engineering Center

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Center 1513 University Ave 1035 Mechanical Engineering building natalie.rudolph@wisc.edu Dielectric Analysis Dipl.-Phys. Alexander Chaloupka Fraunhofer ICT Branch...

  11. Induction voidmeter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, Thomas T. (Downers Grove, IL); Roop, Conard J. (Lockport, IL); Schmidt, Kenneth J. (Midlothian, IL); Brewer, John (Oak Lawn, IL)

    1986-01-01

    An induction voidmeter for detecting voids in a conductive fluid may comprise: a four arm bridge circuit having two adjustable circuit elements connected as opposite arms of said bridge circuit, an input branch, and an output branch; two induction coils, bifilarly wound together, connected as the remaining two opposing arms of said bridge circuit and positioned such that the conductive fluid passes through said coils; applying an AC excitation signal to said input branch; and detecting the output signal generated in response to said excitation signal across said output branch. The induction coils may be located outside or inside a non-magnetic pipe containing the conductive fluid.

  12. Induction voidmeter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, T.T.; Roop, C.J.; Schmidt, K.J.; Brewer, J.

    1983-12-21

    An induction voidmeter for detecting voids in a conductive fluid may comprise: a four arm bridge circuit having two adjustable circuit elements connected as opposite arms of said bridge, an input branch, and an output branch; two induction coils, bifilarly wound together, connected as the remaining two opposing arms of said bridge circuit and positioned such that the conductive fluid passes through said coils; means for applying an AC excitation signal to said input branch; and means for detecting the output signal generated in response to said excitation signal across said output branch. The induction coils may be located outside or inside a non-magnetic pipe containing the conductive fluid.

  13. ORISE Resources: Population Monitoring in Radiation Emergencies

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Population Monitoring in Radiation Emergencies: A Guide for State and Local Health Planners A newly released guide from the Radiation Studies Branch (RSB) of the Centers for...

  14. TITLE AUTHORS SUBJECT SUBJECT RELATED DESCRIPTION PUBLISHER AVAILABILI...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    sup Alburger D E Warburton E K PHYSICS BRANCHING RATIO CARBON CARBON DECAY DEUTERON BEAMS ELECTRIC CHARGES ENERGY ENERGY LEVELS ERRORS LIFETIME MAGNETIC FIELDS MAGNETIC MOMENTS...

  15. Magnetic Pair Spectrometer Studies of Electromagnetic Transitions...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Warburton, E. K. PHYSICS; BRANCHING RATIO; CARBON 13; CARBON 14; DECAY; DEUTERON BEAMS; ELECTRIC CHARGES; ENERGY; ENERGY LEVELS; ERRORS; LIFETIME; MAGNETIC FIELDS; MAGNETIC...

  16. "Title","Creator/Author","Publication Date","OSTI Identifier...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Commission (AEC)","PHYSICS; BRANCHING RATIO; CARBON 13; CARBON 14; DECAY; DEUTERON BEAMS; ELECTRIC CHARGES; ENERGY; ENERGY LEVELS; ERRORS; LIFETIME; MAGNETIC FIELDS; MAGNETIC...

  17. Magnetic Pair Spectrometer Studies of Electromagnetic Transitions...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    English Subject: PHYSICS; BRANCHING RATIO; CARBON 13; CARBON 14; DECAY; DEUTERON BEAMS; ELECTRIC CHARGES; ENERGY; ENERGY LEVELS; ERRORS; LIFETIME; MAGNETIC FIELDS; MAGNETIC...

  18. Cori Phase II

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    architecture enhanced for high performance computing; will feature 2X the out-of-order buffer depth of current Silvermont, Gatherscatter in hardware, Advanced Branch...

  19. Single ion conductor cross-linked polymeric networks

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kerr, John Borland (Oakland, CA); Wang, Shanger (Fairfield, CA); Hou, Jun (Painted Post, NY); Sloop, Steven Edward (Berkeley, CA); Han, Yong Bong (Berkeley, CA); Liu, Gao (Oakland, CA)

    2011-03-08

    Single ion conductors comprising polymer electrolytes prepared by grafting a salt compound onto a comb-branch polymer or dendrimer are disclosed having superior properties.

  20. System and method for modeling and analyzing complex scenarios

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shevitz, Daniel Wolf

    2013-04-09

    An embodiment of the present invention includes a method for analyzing and solving possibility tree. A possibility tree having a plurality of programmable nodes is constructed and solved with a solver module executed by a processor element. The solver module executes the programming of said nodes, and tracks the state of at least a variable through a branch. When a variable of said branch is out of tolerance with a parameter, the solver disables remaining nodes of the branch and marks the branch as an invalid solution. The valid solutions are then aggregated and displayed as valid tree solutions.

  1. One of EM's Last Recovery Act Projects at Oak Ridge Improves...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    arriving at a safer, cleaner campus to conduct their advanced research." The project's main objective was to deactivate a ventilation branch connected to ORNL's central gaseous...

  2. SREL Reprint #3289

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    water system. This study investigates whether metal concentrations in Tims Branchs sediment, biofilm, and other biota exceed screening level risk calculations to determine if...

  3. La Sabina SA | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Name: La Sabina SA Place: Estoril, Portugal Zip: 2765-495 Sector: Solar Product: Mining company branching out into solar development. Redeveloping the Mina Sao Domingos area....

  4. NEPA History | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of President Obama to "call upon all executive branch agencies to promote public involvement and transparency in their implementation of the National Environmental Policy Act." ...

  5. Presidential Proclamation on the 40th Anniversary of the National...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of President Obama to "call upon all executive branch agencies to promote public involvement and transparency in their implementation of the National Environmental Policy Act." ...

  6. PowerPoint Presentation

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    and Leases Reindustrialization Program in Oak Ridge, Tennessee March 13, 2013 Brian Henry Chief, Reservation Management Branch US DOE- Oak Ridge 2 By 2017, the Oak Ridge...

  7. Townsend Ventures LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name: Townsend Ventures LLC Product: A Maryland, USA based branch of Townsend Capital LLC formed as a vehicle for that company's...

  8. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    and quantum mechanics, general physics (24) stanford linear accelerator center (23) high energy physics (22) luminosity (21) branching ratio (20) storage rings...

  9. Fuji Sun Energy Co Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Energy Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Fuji Sun Energy Co Ltd Place: Kyoto, Japan Sector: Wind energy Product: The PV system installation branch of Fujipream; also...

  10. Property:RAPID/Contact/ID5/Position | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    (State Lands Contact) + N Nevada Division of Environmental Protection + Bureau of Waste Management SW Branch Supervisor + R Railroad Commission of Texas + Discharge Permitting...

  11. Microsoft PowerPoint - Org Chart Color Coded 10_02_2015.pptx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (Internal Review) McCollum, D. Detail Finance Division 726J020000 (820) Dir: Boilanger, F. Dep: Tiberio, M. Budget, Development, Analysis & Forecasting Branch 726J021000 ...

  12. 6He

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    deduced log ft, Gamow-Teller transition strength, level width, di-neutron, neutron halo roles. 1993BO24: 6He(-); measured -delayed deuteron spectrum; deduced branching...

  13. DeSoto County, Mississippi: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Climate Zone Number 3 Climate Zone Subtype A. Places in DeSoto County, Mississippi Hernando, Mississippi Horn Lake, Mississippi Lynchburg, Mississippi Olive Branch, Mississippi...

  14. US Nuclear Regulatory Commission organization charts and functional statements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-11-01

    This document contains organization charts for the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and for the five offices of the NRC. Function statements are provided delineating the major responsibilities and operations of each office. Organization and function are provided to the branch level. The head of each office, division, and branch is also listed.

  15. Structures with three dimensional nanofences comprising single crystal segments

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Goyal, Amit; Wee, Sung-Hun

    2013-08-27

    An article includes a substrate having a surface and a nanofence supported by the surface. The nanofence includes a multiplicity of primary nanorods and branch nanorods, each of the primary nanorods being attached to said substrate, and each of the branch nanorods being attached to a primary nanorods and/or another branch nanorod. The primary and branch nanorods are arranged in a three-dimensional, interconnected, interpenetrating, grid-like network defining interstices within the nanofence. The article further includes an enveloping layer supported by the nanofence, disposed in the interstices, and forming a coating on the primary and branch nanorods. The enveloping layer has a different composition from that of the nanofence and includes a radial p-n single junction solar cell photovoltaic material and/or a radial p-n multiple junction solar cell photovoltaic material.

  16. A methodology for generating dynamic accident progression event trees for level-2 PRA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hakobyan, A.; Denning, R.; Aldemir, T. [Ohio State Univ., Nuclear Engineering Program, 650 Ackerman Road, Columbus, OH 43202 (United States); Dunagan, S.; Kunsman, D. [Sandia National Laboratory, Albuquerque, NM 87185 (United States)

    2006-07-01

    Currently, the development and analysis of Accident Progression Event Trees (APETs) are performed in a manner that is computationally time consuming, difficult to reproduce and also can be phenomenologically inconsistent. A software tool (ADAPT) is described for automated APET generation using the concept of dynamic event trees. The tool determines the branching times from a severe accident analysis code based on user specified criteria for branching. It assigns user specified probabilities to every branch, tracks the total branch probability, and truncates branches based on the given pruning/truncation rules to avoid an unmanageable number of scenarios. While the software tool could be applied to any systems analysis code, the MELCOR code is used for this illustration. A case study is presented involving station blackout with the loss of auxiliary feedwater system for a pressurized water reactor. (authors)

  17. Dual chain synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zamora, Paul O.; Pena, Louis A.; Lin, Xinhua

    2009-10-06

    The invention provides synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs having two peptide chains each branched from a branch moiety, such as trifunctional amino acid residues, the branch moieties separated by a first linker of from 3 to about 20 backbone atoms, which peptide chains bind a heparin-binding growth factor receptor and are covalently bound to a non-signaling peptide that includes a heparin-binding domain, preferably by a second linker, which may be a hydrophobic second linker. The synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs are useful as pharmaceutical agents, soluble biologics or as surface coatings for medical devices.

  18. Dual chain synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zamora, Paul O.; Pena, Louis A.; Lin, Xinhua

    2012-04-24

    The invention provides synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs having two peptide chains each branched from a branch moiety, such as trifunctional amino acid residues, the branch moieties separated by a first linker of from 3 to about 20 backbone atoms, which peptide chains bind a heparin-binding growth factor receptor and are covalently bound to a non-signaling peptide that includes a heparin-binding domain, preferably by a second linker, which may be a hydrophobic second linker. The synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs are useful as pharmaceutical agents, soluble biologics or as surface coatings for medical devices.

  19. Searches for Leptonic B Decays at BaBar

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, Silke; /SLAC

    2012-04-25

    Measurements of the branching fractions of purely leptonic decays of B-mesons translate into constraints in the plane of the charged Higgs mass versus tan {beta} which are relatively insensitive to the particular theoretical model. Using the full BABAR dataset of 450 million B-decays we search for these decays. No significant signal is found in the decays into electrons or muons and we set upper limits on the branching fractions of the order of a 10{sup -6} at 90% confidence level. We measure the branching fraction of B {yields} {tau}{mu} to be (1.7 {+-} 0.6) x 10{sup -4}.

  20. 20O

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    O β--Decay Evaluated Data Measurements 1960SC01: 20O; measured not abstracted; deduced nuclear properties. 1970MA42: 20O; measured T1/2, Eγ, Iγ; deduced log ft. 1974AL09: 20O; measured Eγ, Iγ, T1/2, deduced log ft. 20F levels deduced γ-branching. 1985AN17: 20O(β-); deduced Q. Mass excess data input. 1987AL06: 20O(β-); measured Eγ, Iγ; deduced β- branching, log ft. 20F levels deduced γ-branching, allowed, first-forbidden unique, nonunique transition strength. 2009LI51: 20O(β-);

  1. OneTouch 4.0 Scanned Documents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Pond B 15 Lower Three Runs Creek 15 Beaver Dam Creek 15 Steel Creek 15 Pen Branch and Four ... (I 4 km), Four Mile Creek (l3 krn), Beaver Dam Creek (6 km), and a section of the Savannah ...

  2. Agenda/Presentations | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    ... Adelaide Giantelli, Chief, Source Management and Protection Branch, NRC 4:00-4:30 Isotope Utilization and Demands in the Physical Sciences .pdf file (2.8MB) Timothy Hallman, ...

  3. Licensee contractor and vendor inspection status report. Volume 19, No. 2: Quarterly report, April--June 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-08-01

    This periodical covers the results of inspections performed by the NRC`s Special Inspection Branch, Vendor Inspection Section, that have been distributed to the inspected organizations during the period from April 1995 through June 1995.

  4. Microsoft PowerPoint - Implementation of IAEA safeguards_Peter...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Implementation of IAEA Safeguards in the U.S. Peter Habighorst, MC&A Branch Chief U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Background 2 1957 Nonproliferation Treaty (NPT) 1970 INFCIRC66...

  5. Microsoft PowerPoint - IAEA Safeguards Reporting Requirements...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    IAEA Safeguards Reporting Requirements for U.S. Facilities Peter Habighorst, MC&A Branch Chief U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission IAEA Nuclear Material Reporting to the IAEA...

  6. EEI of Shenzhen | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    up in China by 'BioYankuang Hong Kong Listed' and 'Shenzhen branch of Yankuang' to invest in and control 51% of shares in a number of local operating companies set up to...

  7. Odessa fabricator builds rig specifically for geothermal drilling

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    For 35 years, MD Cowan has built drilling rigs, developing a market for its Super Single® rig for use in the nation's oil and gas fields. Now the Odessa-based company is branching out into alternative energy.

  8. Landscaping for Shade | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    roots and stronger branches, they are less prone to breakage by windstorms or heavy snow loads. Slow-growing trees can also be more drought resistant than fast-growing trees....

  9. ABO Wind Espana SA | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    ABO Wind Espana SA Place: Valencia, Spain Zip: 46002 Sector: Wind energy Product: Spanish branch of project developer ABO Wind AG. Coordinates: 39.468791, -0.376913 Show...

  10. New EM Facility Treats Groundwater at Oak Ridge

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    OAK RIDGE, Tenn. – Oak Ridge’s EM program is operating a new facility that reduces the amount of contaminants entering Mitchell Branch, a stream at DOE’s East Tennessee Technology Park.

  11. CX-006954: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Joint Sandia - University of Texas Medical Branch MicrofluidicsCX(s) Applied: B3.12Date: 08/03/2011Location(s): Albuquerque, New MexicoOffice(s): NNSA-Headquarters, Savannah River Operations Office

  12. Fermilab Cultural Events in Chicago's Far West Side

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    few years I have begun to branch out to other "bridge cities" including Boston, New York City and Pittsburgh. In 2011 I explored the bridges in Berlin, Germany. I select...

  13. CX-008630: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Surface Water and Groundwater Sampling Pen Branch Floodplain near Chemicals Metals and Pesticides Pits CX(s) Applied: B3.1 Date: 06/07/2012 Location(s): South Carolina Offices(s): Savannah River Operations Office

  14. Study of the Rare Decay B Mesons Decaying to X Mesons Positive...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    +- or Ksub s and up to two pions, with at most one pisup 0. They observe a signal of 40 +- 10(stat) +- 2(syst) events and extract a branching fraction Beta(B...

  15. Annual Confidential Financial Disclosure Report (OGE Form 450 or 450-A)

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2003-09-29

    This Notice address the Executive Branch confidential financial disclosure reporting requirements. These requirements apply to career GS/GM employees as well as employees serving in excepted service positions designate EJ, EK, and EN.

  16. DOE Publishes Final Rule Regarding Post-Employment Restrictions

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Department of Energy published a final rule establishing procedures under which a former employee of the executive branch may obtain approval to make communications to DOE solely for the...

  17. Argonne Physics Division - ATLAS - PAC December 14-15, 2012

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Gamma-Ray Branching Ratio Measurements for Long-Lived Fission Products 5 1529x P.Friedman In-beam Evaluation of Plasma Panel Sensor Prototypes 2 1530 C.M.Deibel Direct study...

  18. Goma 6.0

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Schunk, Randy; Rao, Rekha; Johannes, Justine

    2014-06-23

    Goma 6.0, open-sourced in 2013, is finite element software that excels in the analyses of multiphysics processes, particularly those involving the major branches of mechanics.

  19. Hubble space telescope and ground-based observations of the type...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Authors: McCully, Curtis ; Jha, Saurabh W. 1 ; Foley, Ryan J. 2 ; Chornock, Ryan 3 ; Holtzman, Jon A. 4 ; Balam, David D. 5 ; Branch, David 6 ; Filippenko, Alexei V. ; ...

  20. Confidential Financial Disclosure Report (OGE Form 450)

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2004-09-20

    This Notice addresses the Executive Branch confidential financial disclosure reporting requirements. These requirements apply to career GS/GM employees as well as employees serving in excepted service positions designated EJ, EK, and EN.

  1. Policy Flash 2012-2 | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    2 Policy Flash 2012-2 OMB Memorandum M-11-32, "Accelerating Payment to Small Businesses for Goods and Services," established an Executive Branch policy to pay small business...

  2. Science in St. Louis | Dr. Himadri Pakrasi | Photosynthetic Antenna...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Himadri Pakrasi Engineering Biology and Energy from the Sun: the future is bright for food, feed, and fuels October 13, 2015 - 7:00pm Florissant Valley Branch, St. Louis County...

  3. Title Goes Here

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    beam size with a two-slit interferometer. An additional branch line contains a power meter andor photo-diode for beam intensity measurements. Due to the need to provide...

  4. Solaria | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Solaria Jump to: navigation, search Name: Solaria Place: Israel Sector: Solar Product: Israel-based solar branch of Shikun v'Binui. References: Solaria1 This article is a stub....

  5. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Ending Wednesday, October 5, 2011) Like autumn leaves floating down to earth, natural gas prices dropped decidedly from their 4 support branch this past week. In a whirlwind of...

  6. Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Ending Wednesday, October 5, 2011) Like autumn leaves floating down to earth, natural gas prices dropped decidedly from their 4 support branch this past week. In a whirlwind of...

  7. OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific and Technical Informatio...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    To my way of thinking, this is tantamount to OSTI lighting 84 million candles that shine ... It's funny to think of any branch of the DOE lighting candles I'm thinking something more ...

  8. Contractor Past Performance Information

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    7.2 (May 2014) 2 2014 Critical Few Performance Measures * Policy Flash 2013-73 dated ... Strategic sourcing is a branch and tenet of Supply Chain Management; strategic sourcing ...

  9. ATLAS Approved Experiments - PAC June 4-5, 2004

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Trap and precision measurement of the Q-value of the superallowed branch 6 1080 A. Hecht A Search for "Superallowed" Alpha Decays in 113,114Ba 6 1083 M. Carpenter Study of...

  10. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Order No. 18, executive branch state agencies and departments are required to reduce energy consumption by 30% by the end of Fiscal Year (FY) 2015 when compared to FY 2008,...

  11. Implementing Distribution Control with a Concentration of Wind...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Jieyang Branch Brute Force 195.93.180.125 External 105 0 105 Russia Brute Force 112.216.82.130 External 99 0 99 Korea Brute Force 222.88.154.79 External 87 0 87 Russia Brute Force ...

  12. ORISE: Training Tools for Healthy Schools | How ORISE is Making...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The conversion of existing instructor-led training into an e-learning series will help the School Health Branch widen its reach and increase exposure to CDC-developed tools ...

  13. Search for the Standard Model Higgs Boson in Missing Transverse...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    backgrounds, and a limit is set at 95% C.L. on the section multiplied by branching fraction of (pbar p yields (ZW)H) x (H yields bbar b). For a Higgs boson mass of 115...

  14. Bassett Mechanical Explores Mid-size Wind Market

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    About five years ago, Wisconsin’s Bassett Mechanical began branching into renewable energy. The nearly 75-year-old company started producing components used to anchor the towers of wind turbines to their foundations.

  15. Berkeley Lab's New Computing Sciences Facility Features First...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Branch circuits run from 408 to 208V PDUs (power distribution units) to racks just below floor tile. Red is UPS (uninterruptible power supply), blue is normal power. "With the ...

  16. Version Control

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Control at NERSC Jack Deslippe Options at NERSC SVN Great for small projects with few developers working on a single branch. GIT Great for big projects with many developers...

  17. Hierarchy of scales in B{yields}PS decays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Delepine, D.; Lucio M, J. L.; Mendoza S, J. A.; Ramirez, Carlos A.

    2008-08-31

    We show that the naive factorization approach can accommodate the existence of the observed hierarchy of branching ratios for the B{yields}PS decays (P stands for pseudoscalar and S for scalar mesons respectively.

  18. Loan Specialist (Risk Management)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This position is located in the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Loan Programs Office (LPO), Risk Management Division (RMD), and Enterprise Risk Management & Compliance Branch. The LPO mission...

  19. ASCEM Project Achieves Major Milestone with Initial User Release

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    WASHINGTON, D.C. The Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM) Project has reached a major milestone at record pace with the release of the research and development branch of the ASCEM toolset.

  20. Nonlinear

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    It drives modes of a purely damped branch of the dispersion relation to finite amplitude and changes the rate at which free energy is released into the turbulence by shifting the ...

  1. Los Alamos, New Mexico, September 8, 2009- Los Alamos National...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Deputy Principal Associate Director Duncan McBranch will discuss LDRD impacts on border security and the nation's energy grid at 1 p.m. The event is an ideal opportunity...

  2. "Artificial" brains, electrical grids, and disease modeling:...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Deputy Principal Associate Director Duncan McBranch will discuss LDRD impacts on border security and the nation's energy grid at 1 p.m. The event is an ideal opportunity...

  3. Actuation fluid adapter for hydraulically-actuated electronically-controlled fuel injector and engine using same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Keyster, Eric S. (Peoria, IL); Merchant, Jack A. (Peoria, IL)

    2002-01-01

    A fuel injector adapter consists of a block defining a pressure communication passage therethrough and an actuation fluid passage. The actuation fluid passage includes three separate branches that open through an outer surface of the block at three separate locations.

  4. C:\\Forms\\DOE F 2100.1.cdr

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    1 (3-86) ALLOTMENT TO BE ISSUED TO: EXPLANATION OF PURPOSE FOR WHICH FUNDS WILL BE USED: RECOMMENDED BY: (Signature and Title) CHIEF, ACCOUNTING OPERATIONS BRANCH OR DESIGNEE:...

  5. EIS-0395: Record of Decision and Floodplain Statement of Findings...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    (DOE) received applications from North Branch Resources, LLC (NBR) and Generadora del Desierto, S.A. de C.V. (GDD) to construct the proposed San Luis Rio Colorado Project in Yuma...

  6. Room Air Conditioners | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    can meet the unit's power requirements. Room units operate on 115-volt or 230-volt circuits. The standard household receptacle is a connection for a 115-volt branch circuit....

  7. Hanford Site Celebrates National Native American Heritage Month...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    At Hanford this month, Pat Courtney Gold, a Wasco native from the Upriver Branch of the ... Gold, who was raised on the Warm Springs Indian Reservation in Oregon, summarized the ...

  8. 7Be

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7Be(EC); measured decay products, E, I; deduced precise T12 values for different materials. Measurements for Branching Ratios 1938RU01: 7Be. 1948KU10: 7Be; measured E....

  9. TO

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    D*TE: July 10, 1951 I FROM : 'Russell H. BdcL, Chief, Research Service Branch, Berkeley &'?A - wp+q - 'I s , This Br'ea desires 500 pounds of U03 for research work on the...

  10. Energy Conservation Standards for State Facilities

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Under Executive Order No. 18, executive branch state agencies and departments are required to reduce energy consumption by 30% by the end of Fiscal Year (FY) 2015 when compared to FY 2008, with...

  11. 17O

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    O Thermal Neutron Capture Evaluated Data Measurements 1976LOZX: 16O(n, ), E thermal; measured , -coin. 17O levels deduced -branching. 1977MC05: 16O(n, ), E thermal;...

  12. Python on Genepool

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Python on Genepool Python on Genepool Using Python on Genepool There are two major branches of Python supported on genepool: python 2.7.3 and python 3.2.3. These packages are...

  13. Transfers

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Transfer means a change of an employee, from one Federal government branch (executive, legislative, judicial) to another or from one agency to another without a break in service of 1 full work day. 

  14. High Electric Demand Days: Clean Energy Strategies for Improving Air Quality

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This presentation, presented in July 2008, addressed greenhouse gas reduction goals on high electric demand days. Presenter was Art Diem of the State and Local Capacity Building Branch at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.

  15. DISTRICT COMMAND BRIEF

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Major Maintenance at Philpott Lake Daniel Brown Chief, Lakes Branch, Operations Division April 2, 2015 BUILDING STRONG ® Governor/Exciter Replacement BUILDING STRONG ® Switchgear Relocation BUILDING STRONG ® New Switchgear Building Location * Contract Award - May 1, 2015

  16. TO

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    t Reactor Materialo Bran&, ieu York DATE: Auguet 28, 1950 PROM 1 Ft. S. Pearson, L&f, Admlnlot.rativi Semioar. Branch, Pittsburgh gy .< SUBJEn: HAlERIAL YlMSFEll CRRYDICAT' B...

  17. 13B

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    B --Decay Evaluated Data Measurements 1962MA19: 13B; deduced nuclear properties. 1968CH28: 13B; measured T12, delayed n(t); deduced log ft, delayed n-branching ratio....

  18. Method and apparatus for rapid stopping and starting of a thermoacoustic engine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Swift, Gregory W.; Backhaus, Scott N.; Gardner, David L.

    2003-11-11

    A thermoacoustic engine-driven system with a hot heat exchanger, a regenerator or stack, and an ambient heat exchanger includes a side branch load for rapid stopping and starting, the side branch load being attached to a location in the thermoacoustic system having a nonzero oscillating pressure and comprising a valve, a flow resistor, and a tank connected in series. The system is rapidly stopped simply by opening the valve and rapidly started by closing the valve.

  19. 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Optical Depth Retrievals from Solar Background "Signal" of Micropulse Lidars W.J. Wiscombe and A. Marshak Climate and Radiation Branch National Aeronautics and Space Agency/Goddard Space Flight Center Greenbelt, Maryland J.C. Chiu Joint Center for Earth Systems Technology University of Maryland Baltimore County Baltimore, Maryland E.J. Welton Mesoscale Atmospheric Processes Branch National Aeronautics and Space Agency/Goddard Space Flight Center Greenbelt, Maryland S.C. Valencia

  20. C:\LRC\WORK\^PDFMAKE\USC05.03

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    24 TITLE 5-GOVERNMENT ORGANIZATION AND EMPLOYEES § 552 in consultation with the Secretary of the Treasury, shall complete a study on the use of administrative subpoena power by executive branch agencies or enti- ties and shall report the findings to the Committees on the Judiciary of the Senate and the House of Rep- resentatives. Such report shall include- ''(1) a description of the sources of administrative subpoena power and the scope of such subpoena power within executive branch agencies;

  1. Collaborative Research. Damage and Burst Dynamics in Failure of Complex Geomaterials. A Statistical Physics Approach to Understanding the Complex Emergent Dynamics in Near Mean-Field Geological Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rundle, John B.; Klein, William

    2015-09-29

    We have carried out research to determine the dynamics of failure in complex geomaterials, specifically focusing on the role of defects, damage and asperities in the catastrophic failure processes (now popularly termed Black Swan events). We have examined fracture branching and flow processes using models for invasion percolation, focusing particularly on the dynamics of bursts in the branching process. We have achieved a fundamental understanding of the dynamics of nucleation in complex geomaterials, specifically in the presence of inhomogeneous structures.

  2. Hierarchical Diagnosis V. E. Zuev, V. V. Zuev, and G. A. Titov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    V. E. Zuev, V. V. Zuev, and G. A. Titov Institute of Atmospheric Optics Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences T omsk, Russia developed at the Institute of Atmospheric Optics of the Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences. A number of the atmospheric parameters are measured by several methods by means of devices. This approach is important for intercalibration and increasing the reliability and the accuracy of the data obtained. Figure 1 illustrates the principal

  3. Highly Active and Selective Metal-modified Zeolite Catalysts for Low

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Temperature Conversion of Methanol and Dimethyl Ether to Gasoline-range Branched Hydrocarbons - Energy Innovation Portal Biomass and Biofuels Biomass and Biofuels Find More Like This Return to Search Highly Active and Selective Metal-modified Zeolite Catalysts for Low Temperature Conversion of Methanol and Dimethyl Ether to Gasoline-range Branched Hydrocarbons National Renewable Energy Laboratory Contact NREL About This Technology Technology Marketing Summary Recent investigations by a

  4. Cloud Retrievals from Landsat-7 During ARESE II

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cloud Retrievals from Landsat-7 During ARESE II L. Oreopoulos, G. Wen, and A. Marshak Joint Center for Earth Systems Technology University of Maryland Baltimore County Baltimore, Maryland R. F. Cahalan National Aeronautics and Space Administration Goddard Space Flight Center Climate and Radiation Branch Greenbelt, Maryland D. Kratz National Aeronautics and Space Administration Langley Research Center Radiation and Aerosols Branch Hampton, Virginia Background on Landsat-7 While for most Landsat

  5. Load Modeling and State Estimation Methods for Power Distribution Systems: Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tom McDermott

    2010-05-07

    The project objective was to provide robust state estimation for distribution systems, comparable to what has been available on transmission systems for decades. This project used an algorithm called Branch Current State Estimation (BCSE), which is more effective than classical methods because it decouples the three phases of a distribution system, and uses branch current instead of node voltage as a state variable, which is a better match to current measurement.

  6. ARM - Feature Stories and Releases Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    9, 2015 [Facility News, Feature Stories and Releases] Seeing the Forest Through the Trees-And to the Aerosols Bookmark and Share End of the Biogenic Aerosols - Effects on Clouds and Climate Campaign in Finland Finnish scientists are measuring aerosols on branches as they grow in the boreal forests. Image courtesy of Juho Aalto. Finnish scientists are measuring aerosols on branches as they grow in the boreal forests. Image courtesy of Juho Aalto. Nine months in the icy, cold forests of Finland

  7. ARM - Feature Stories and Releases Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    January 23, 2015 [Feature Stories and Releases] Chasing Aerosols and Atmospheric Rivers Bookmark and Share ARM Cloud Aerosol Precipitation Experiment (ACAPEX) sets sail and takes flight An atmospheric river branches off an equatorial storm, stretching from Hawaii to the U.S. West Coast, transporting as much moisture as 10-20 times the flow in the Mississippi River. An atmospheric river branches off an equatorial storm, stretching from Hawaii to the U.S. West Coast, transporting as much moisture

  8. 22nd International Conference on Numerical Simulation of Plasmas (ICNSP) |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Princeton Plasma Physics Lab 9, 2011, 5:00pm Conference Long Branch, New Jersey 22nd International Conference on Numerical Simulation of Plasmas (ICNSP) Long Branch, NJ Host: W. Lee Coordinator: Jennifer Jones Contact Information Website: Website PPPL Entrance Procedures Visitor Information, Directions, Security at PPPL As a federal facility, the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory is operating under heightened security measures because of the events of September 11, 2001. Upon arrival at

  9. Deep drilling phase of the Pen Brand Fault Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stieve, A.

    1991-05-15

    This deep drilling activity is one element of the Pen Branch Fault Program at Savannah River Site (SRS). The effort will consist of three tasks: the extension of wells PBF-7 and PBF-8 into crystalline basement, geologic and drilling oversight during drilling operations, and the lithologic description and analysis of the recovered core. The drilling program addresses the association of the Pen Branch fault with order fault systems such as the fault that formed the Bunbarton basin in the Triassic.

  10. UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    '.... '|le , * f C. Office Memorandum * UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT .-- J TO ' Leo Graup, Chief, DATE: September 29, 1958 Property Management Branch rFi0 : M. S. Weinstein Industrial Hygiene Branch, HASL SUBJBT: SURVEY AT HAIST PROPETIY SYMBOL: HSH:MSW. Thisl property was purchased during MED operation and used as a dumping ground for refinery residues generated by Linde Air Products during their period of participation in the refinery operations program. \It 2 consists of 10 acres in addition to a

  11. -.. IJNDSAY CHFXtCAL COMFAKY IND'J?ZRIAL HYGIEFE SJRVEY PART1

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    IJNDSAY CHFXtCAL COMFAKY IND'J?ZRIAL HYGIEFE SJRVEY PART1 OCCUPATIONAL EXPOS'~ TO THORIUI'! DUST AND THORCN Paul B. Klevin Industrial Hygiene Branch and James Fresco Analytical Branch Health and Safety Division Issued: January 21, 1953 Distribution: Health and Safety, NYOO) y Chemical Company Chemical Company hi.- %glneering and Construction (Catalytic) 5 - Biology and Medicine, Washington 6 - Mle (w. B. Harris, Health and Safety) New York Operations Office Health and Safety Division

  12. Microsoft PowerPoint - 9_SUZANNE_ANI_NMMSS_2014 MCA-SAni.pptx

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    MC&A Responsibilities at the NRC Suzanne M. Ani Office of Nuclear Material Safety & Safeguards Division of Fuel Cycle Safety & Safeguards Material Control & Accounting Branch At the NRC...  Office of Nuclear Material Safety & Safeguards (NMSS) - Division of Fuel Cycle Safety & Safeguards (FCSS) * Material Control & Accounting Branch (MCAB)  Lead responsibility of domestic and international safeguards policy and regulation for fuel cycle facilities 2 Recent

  13. Inflow/outflow boundary conditions for particle-based blood flow simulations: Application to arterial bifurcations and trees

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lykov, Kirill; Li, Xuejin; Lei, Huan; Pivkin, Igor V.; Karniadakis, George Em; Feng, James

    2015-08-28

    When blood flows through a bifurcation, red blood cells (RBCs) travel into side branches at different hematocrit levels, and it is even possible that all RBCs enter into one branch only, leading to a complete separation of plasma and R- BCs. To quantify this phenomenon via particle-based mesoscopic simulations, we developed a general framework for open boundary conditions in multiphase flows that is effective even for high hematocrit levels. The inflow at the inlet is duplicated from a fully developed flow generated in a pilot simulation with periodic boundary conditions. The outflow is controlled by adaptive forces to maintain themore » flow rate and velocity gradient at fixed values, while the particles leaving the arteriole at the outlet are removed from the system. Upon valida- tion of this approach, we performed systematic 3D simulations to study plasma skimming in arterioles of diameters 20 to 32 microns. For a flow rate ratio 6:1 at the branches, we observed the \\all-or-nothing" phenomenon with plasma only entering the low flow rate branch. We then simulated blood-plasma separation in arteriolar bifurcations with different bifurcation angles and same diameter of the daughter branches. Our simulations predict a significant increase in RBC flux through the main daughter branch as the bifurcation angle is increased. Lastly, we demonstrated the new methodology for simulating blood flow in ves- sels with multiple inlets and outlets, constructed using an angiogenesis model.« less

  14. Inflow/outflow boundary conditions for particle-based blood flow simulations: Application to arterial bifurcations and trees

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lykov, Kirill; Li, Xuejin; Lei, Huan; Pivkin, Igor V.; Karniadakis, George Em; Feng, James

    2015-08-28

    When blood flows through a bifurcation, red blood cells (RBCs) travel into side branches at different hematocrit levels, and it is even possible that all RBCs enter into one branch only, leading to a complete separation of plasma and RBCs. To quantify this phenomenon via particle-based mesoscopic simulations, we developed a general framework for open boundary conditions in multiphase flows that is effective even for high hematocrit levels. The inflow at the inlet is duplicated from a fully developed flow generated in a pilot simulation with periodic boundary conditions. The outflow is controlled by adaptive forces to maintain the flowmorerate and velocity gradient at fixed values, while the particles leaving the arteriole at the outlet are removed from the system. Upon validation of this approach, we performed systematic 3D simulations to study plasma skimming in arterioles of diameters 20 to 32 microns. For a flow rate ratio 6:1 at the branches, we observed the all-or-nothing phenomenon with plasma only entering the low flow rate branch. We then simulated blood-plasma separation in arteriolar bifurcations with different bifurcation angles and same diameter of the daughter branches. Our simulations predict a significant increase in RBC flux through the main daughter branch as the bifurcation angle is increased. Finally, we demonstrated the effectiveness of the new methodology in simulations of blood flow in vessels with multiple inlets and outlets, constructed using an angiogenesis modeless

  15. A measurement of rare all-charged decays of the D[sup 0] meson

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kennedy, C.J.

    1993-01-01

    A measurement of five rare decay of the D[sup 0] meson have been made and are presented here. The data for these measurements was obtained in Fermilab experiment E687, a photoproduction experiment with mean photon energy of 220 GeV. For the two body states the author measured the Branching Ratio ([pi][pi])/(K[pi]) of 0.045 [+-] 0.007 [+-] 0.008 (The first error is statistical the second systematic), and a Branching Ratio (KK)/(K[pi]) of 0.104 [+-] 0.007 [+-] 0.0045. A derivative of this gives the Branching Ratio (KK)/([pi][pi]) of 2.28 [+-] 0.38. The fourbody state give the following results: Branching Ratio ([pi][pi][pi][pi])/(K[pi][pi][pi]) of 0.103 [+-] 0.011 [+-] 0.016; Branching Ratio (KK[pi][pi])/(K[pi][pi][pi]) of 0.034 [+-] 0.004 [+-] 0.004; and Branching Ratio (KKK[pi])/([pi][pi][pi]) of 0.0047 [+-] 0.0017 [+-] 0.0017. Comparisons to previous experiments and the world average are also given.

  16. ADAPT (Analysis of Dynamic Accident Progression Trees) Beta Version 0.9

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2010-01-07

    The purpose of the ADAPT code is to generate Dynamic Event Trees (DET) using a user specified simulator. ADAPT can utilize any simulation tool which meets a minimal set of requirements. ADAPT is based on the concept of DET which use explicit modeling of the deterministic dynamic processes that take place during a nuclear reactor plant system evolution along with stochastic modeling. When DET are used to model different aspects of Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA),more » all accident progression scenarios starting from an initiating event are considered simultaneously. The DET branching occurs at user specified times and/or when an action is required by the system and/or the operator. These outcomes then decide how the dynamic system variables will evolve in time for each DET branch. Since two different outcomes at a DET branching may lead to completely different paths for system evolution, the next branching for these paths may occur not only at different times, but can be based on different branching criteria. The computational infrastructure allows for flexibility in ADAPT to link with different system simulation codes, parallel processing of the scenarios under consideration, on-line scenario management (initiation as well as termination) and user friendly graphical capabilities. The ADAPT system is designed for a distributed computing environment; the scheduler can track multiple concurrent branches simultaneously. The scheduler is modularized so that the DET branching strategy can be modified (e.g. biasing towards the worse case scenario/event). Independent database systems store data from the simulation tasks and the DET structure so that the event tree can be constructed and analyzed later. ADAPT is provided with a user-friendly client which can easily sort through and display the results of an experiment, precluding the need for the user to manually inspect individual simulator runs.« less

  17. SLOW RISE AND PARTIAL ERUPTION OF A DOUBLE-DECKER FILAMENT. I. OBSERVATIONS AND INTERPRETATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu Rui; Kliem, Bernhard; Toeroek, Tibor; Titov, Viacheslav S.; Lionello, Roberto; Linker, Jon A.; Liu Chang; Wang Haimin

    2012-09-01

    We study an active-region dextral filament that was composed of two branches separated in height by about 13 Mm, as inferred from three-dimensional reconstruction by combining SDO and STEREO-B observations. This 'double-decker' configuration sustained for days before the upper branch erupted with a GOES-class M1.0 flare on 2010 August 7. Analyzing this evolution, we obtain the following main results. (1) During the hours before the eruption, filament threads within the lower branch were observed to intermittently brighten up, lift upward, and then merge with the upper branch. The merging process contributed magnetic flux and current to the upper branch, resulting in its quasi-static ascent. (2) This transfer might serve as the key mechanism for the upper branch to lose equilibrium by reaching the limiting flux that can be stably held down by the overlying field or by reaching the threshold of the torus instability. (3) The erupting branch first straightened from a reverse S shape that followed the polarity inversion line and then writhed into a forward S shape. This shows a transfer of left-handed helicity in a sequence of writhe-twist-writhe. The fact that the initial writhe is converted into the twist of the flux rope excludes the helical kink instability as the trigger process of the eruption, but supports the occurrence of the instability in the main phase, which is indeed indicated by the very strong writhing motion. (4) A hard X-ray sigmoid, likely of coronal origin, formed in the gap between the two original filament branches in the impulsive phase of the associated flare. This supports a model of transient sigmoids forming in the vertical flare current sheet. (5) Left-handed magnetic helicity is inferred for both branches of the dextral filament. (6) Two types of force-free magnetic configurations are compatible with the data, a double flux rope equilibrium and a single flux rope situated above a loop arcade.

  18. Communication with U.S. federal decision makers : a primer with notes on the use of computer models as a means of communication.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Webb, Erik Karl; Tidwell, Vincent Carroll

    2009-10-01

    This document outlines ways to more effectively communicate with U.S. Federal decision makers by outlining the structure, authority, and motivations of various Federal groups, how to find the trusted advisors, and how to structure communication. All three branches of Federal governments have decision makers engaged in resolving major policy issues. The Legislative Branch (Congress) negotiates the authority and the resources that can be used by the Executive Branch. The Executive Branch has some latitude in implementation and prioritizing resources. The Judicial Branch resolves disputes. The goal of all decision makers is to choose and implement the option that best fits the needs and wants of the community. However, understanding the risk of technical, political and/or financial infeasibility and possible unintended consequences is extremely difficult. Primarily, decision makers are supported in their deliberations by trusted advisors who engage in the analysis of options as well as the day-to-day tasks associated with multi-party negotiations. In the best case, the trusted advisors use many sources of information to inform the process including the opinion of experts and if possible predictive analysis from which they can evaluate the projected consequences of their decisions. The paper covers the following: (1) Understanding Executive and Legislative decision makers - What can these decision makers do? (2) Finding the target audience - Who are the internal and external trusted advisors? (3) Packaging the message - How do we parse and integrate information, and how do we use computer simulation or models in policy communication?

  19. Effective field theory of non-attractor inflation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akhshik, Mohammad; Firouzjahi, Hassan; Jazayeri, Sadra

    2015-07-29

    We present the model-independent studies of non attractor inflation in the context of effective field theory (EFT) of inflation. Within the EFT approach two independent branches of non-attractor inflation solutions are discovered in which a near scale-invariant curvature perturbation power spectrum is generated from the interplay between the variation of sound speed and the second slow roll parameter η. The first branch captures and extends the previously studied models of non-attractor inflation in which the curvature perturbation is not frozen on super-horizon scales and the single field non-Gaussianity consistency condition is violated. We present the general expression for the amplitude of local-type non-Gaussianity in this branch. The second branch is new in which the curvature perturbation is frozen on super-horizon scales and the single field non-Gaussianity consistency condition does hold in the squeezed limit. Depending on the model parameters, the shape of bispectrum in this branch changes from an equilateral configuration to a folded configuration while the amplitude of non-Gaussianity is less than unity.

  20. Transition between vortex rings and MAP solutions for electrically charged magnetic solutions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wong, Khai-Ming; Soltanian, Amin; Teh, Rosy

    2014-03-05

    We consider the bifurcation and transition of axially symmetric monopole-antimonopole pair (MAP) and vortex ring solutions in the presence of electric charge for the SU(2) Yang-Mills-Higgs field theory. Here we investigate the properties of MAP/vortex ring solutions with n = 3,? = 0.65, for different Higgs field strength ?. For ? < 4.93, there is only one fundamental branch of vortex ring solution, but at the critical value of ?{sub b} = 4.93, branching happens and 2 sets of new solutions appeared. The new branch with less energy is a full MAP solution while the branch with higher energy contains MAP at the beginning and separation between poles of MAP on the z-axis reduces gradually and at another critical value of ?{sub t} = 14.852, they merge together at z = 0. Beyond this point the solutions change to the vortex ring solutions and a transitions between MAP and vortex ring solutions happens at this branch.

  1. Roaming radical kinetics in the decomposition of acetaldehyde.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harding, L. B.; Georgievskii, Y.; Klippenstein, S. J.; Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division

    2010-01-01

    A novel theoretical framework for predicting the branching between roaming and bond fission channels in molecular dissociations is described and applied to the decomposition of acetaldehyde. This reduced dimensional trajectory (RDT) approach, which is motivated by the long-range nature of the roaming, bond fission, and abstraction dynamical bottlenecks, involves the propagation of rigid-body trajectories on an analytic potential energy surface. The analytic potential is obtained from fits to large-scale multireference ab initio electronic structure calculations. The final potential includes one-dimensional corrections from higher-level electronic structure calculations and for the effect of conserved mode variations along both the addition and abstraction paths. The corrections along the abstraction path play a significant role in the predicted branching. Master equation simulations are used to transform the microcanonical branching ratios obtained from the RDT simulations to the temperature- and pressure-dependent branching ratios observed in thermal decomposition experiments. For completeness, a transition-state theory treatment of the contributions of the tight transition states for the molecular channels is included in the theoretical analyses. The theoretically predicted branching between molecules and radicals in the thermal decomposition of acetaldehyde is in reasonable agreement with the corresponding shock tube measurement described in the companion paper. The prediction for the ratio of the tight to roaming contributions to the molecular channel also agrees well with results extracted from recent experimental and experimental/theoretical photodissociation studies.

  2. High Temperature Chemical Kinetic Combustion Modeling of Lightly Methylated Alkanes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sarathy, S M; Westbrook, C K; Pitz, W J; Mehl, M

    2011-03-01

    Conventional petroleum jet and diesel fuels, as well as alternative Fischer-Tropsch (FT) fuels and hydrotreated renewable jet (HRJ) fuels, contain high molecular weight lightly branched alkanes (i.e., methylalkanes) and straight chain alkanes (n-alkanes). Improving the combustion of these fuels in practical applications requires a fundamental understanding of large hydrocarbon combustion chemistry. This research project presents a detailed high temperature chemical kinetic mechanism for n-octane and three lightly branched isomers octane (i.e., 2-methylheptane, 3-methylheptane, and 2,5-dimethylhexane). The model is validated against experimental data from a variety of fundamental combustion devices. This new model is used to show how the location and number of methyl branches affects fuel reactivity including laminar flame speed and species formation.

  3. System for training and evaluation of security personnel in use of firearms

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hall, Howard F. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1990-01-01

    An interactive video display system comprising a laser disc player with a remote large-screen projector to view life-size video scenarios and a control computer. A video disc has at least one basic scenario and one or more branches of the basic scenario with one or more subbranches from any one or more of the branches and further subbranches, if desired, to any level of programming desired. The control computer is programmed for interactive control of the branching, and control of other effects that enhance the scenario, in response to detection of when the trainee has (1) drawn an infrared laser handgun from his holster, (2) fired his laser handgun, (3) taken cover, (4) advanced or retreated from the adversary on the screen, and (5) when the adversary has fired his gun at the trainee.

  4. Study of 14O as a test of the unitarity of the CKM matrix and the CVC hypothesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burke, Jason Timothy

    2004-06-01

    The study of superallowed beta decay in nuclei, in conjunction with other experiments, provide a test of the unitarity of the quark mixing matrix or CKM matrix. Nonunitarity of the CKM matrix could imply the existence of a fourth generation of quarks, right handed currents in the weak interaction, and/or new exotic fermions. Advances in radioactive beam techniques allow the creation of nearly pure samples of nuclei for beta decay studies. The subject of this thesis is the development of a radioactive beam of 14O and the study of the 14O halflife and branching ratio. The radioactive beam is produced by ionizing 12C14O radioactive gas and then accelerating with an ECR ion source. The 14O nucleus decays via superallowed beta decay with a branching ratio > 99 percent. The low Z of 14O is important for calculating reliable corrections to the beta decay that generally increase in with Z. The > 99 percent branching ratio can be established with modest precision on the complementary branching ratio.When this work began the experimentally determined CKM matrix was nonunitary by 2.5 standard deviations. Recent studies of Kaon, Hyperon, and B meson decays have been used to determine Vus and Vub matrix elements. In this work the halflife and branching ratio of 14O are measured and used to establish Vud. The unitarity of the CKM matrix is then assessed. The halflife of 14O was determined to be 70.683 +- 0.015 s and the GamowTeller branching ratio was found to be 0.643 +- 0.020 percent. Using these results the value of Vud is 0.9738 +- 0.0005. Incorporating the new values for Vus of 0.2272 +- 0.0030 and Vub of 0.0035 +- 0.0015 the squared sum of the first row of the CKM matrix is 0.9999 +- 0.0017 which is consistent with unitarity.

  5. Synthetic heparin-binding factor analogs

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pena, Louis A.; Zamora, Paul O.; Lin, Xinhua; Glass, John D.

    2010-04-20

    The invention provides synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs having at least one peptide chain, and preferably two peptide chains branched from a dipeptide branch moiety composed of two trifunctional amino acid residues, which peptide chain or chains bind a heparin-binding growth factor receptor and are covalently bound to a non-signaling peptide that includes a heparin-binding domain, preferably by a linker, which may be a hydrophobic linker. The synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs are useful as pharmaceutical agents, soluble biologics or as surface coatings for medical devices.

  6. Structured copolymers and their use as absorbents, gels and carriers of metal ions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hedstrand, David M. (Midland, MI); Helmer, Bradley J. (Midland, MI); Tomalia, Donald A. (Midland, MI)

    1996-01-01

    Dense star polymers or dendrimers having a highly branched interior structure capable of associating or chelating with metal ions are modified by capping with a hydrophobic group capable of providing a hydrophobic outer shell. The modified dendrimers are useful for dispersing metal ions in a non-aqueous polymer matrix. Also dense star polymers or dendrimers having a highly branched hydrophilic interior structure are modified by capping with a hydrophobic group capable of providing a hydrophobic outer shell, which modified polymers are useful as gels and surfactants.

  7. 18Ne

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ne β+-Decay Evaluated Data Measurements 1954GO17: 18Ne. 1961BU05: 18Ne; measured not abstracted; deduced nuclear properties. 1961EC02: 18Ne; measured not abstracted; deduced nuclear properties. 1963FR10: 18Ne; measured not abstracted; deduced nuclear properties. 1965FR09: 18Ne; measured not abstracted; deduced nuclear properties. 1968GO05: 18Ne; measured Eγ, Iγ; deduced Iβ, log ft. 18F deduced levels, branching ratios. 1970AL11: 18Ne; measured T1/2; deduced log ft, β-branching. 1970AS06,

  8. 19C

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    C β--Decay Evaluated Data Measurements 1987DUZU, 1988DU09, 1988DUZT: 19C(β-n); measured β-delayed neutron spectra; deduced T1/2, multi-neutron branching ratios. 1994OZZY, 1995KIZZ, 1995OZ02, 1995OZZY: 19C(β-n); measured β-delayed neutron spectra, γn-coin, T1/2; deduced log ft, B(GT). 19N deduced levels, β-decay branching ratios. 2002KAZU, 2003KAZX: 19C(β-); measured Iβ(t) from oriented nuclei implanted in various materials; deduced spin polarization, g-factor. Measured half-life for

  9. Scattering from Star Polymers including Excluded Volume Effects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Xin [ORNL; Do, Changwoo [ORNL; Liu, Yun [National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST); Sanchez-Diaz, Luis E [ORNL; Hong, Kunlun [ORNL; Smith, Greg [ORNL; Chen, Wei-Ren [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    In this work we present a new model for the form factor of a star polymer consisting of self-avoiding branches. This new model incorporates excluded volume effects and is derived from the two point correlation function for a star polymer.. We compare this model to small angle neutron scattering (SANS) measurements from polystyrene (PS) stars immersed in a good solvent, tetrahydrofuran (THF). It is shown that this model provides a good description of the scattering signature originating from the excluded volume effect and it explicitly elucidates the connection between the global conformation of a star polymer and the local stiffness of its constituent branch.

  10. Structured copolymers and their use as absorbents, gels and carriers of metal ions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hedstrand, D.M.; Helmer, B.J.; Tomalia, D.A.

    1996-10-01

    Dense star polymers or dendrimers having a highly branched interior structure capable of associating or chelating with metal ions are modified by capping with a hydrophobic group capable of providing a hydrophobic outer shell. The modified dendrimers are useful for dispersing metal ions in a non-aqueous polymer matrix. Also dense star polymers or dendrimers having a highly branched hydrophilic interior structure are modified by capping with a hydrophobic group capable of providing a hydrophobic outer shell, which modified polymers are useful as gels and surfactants.

  11. Chemical Kinetics of Combustion Processes

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Combustion Processes Hai Wang B. Yang, J. Camacho, S. Lieb, S. Memarzadeh, S.-K. Gao and S. Koumlis University of Southern California 2010 CEFRC Conference Benzene + O( 3 P) → Products * Overall rate coefficient extensively studied, but the products and branching ratios not well known. * Theoretical challenges in dealing with spin-state crossing. Figure 1. Branching ratios observed as a function of temperature at 4 Torr for (a) m/z=94/93 and m/z=66/65 by magnetic sector mass spectrometer

  12. Tensor mesons produced in tau lepton decays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lopez Castro, G.; Munoz, J. H.

    2011-05-01

    Light tensor mesons (T=a{sub 2}, f{sub 2} and K{sub 2}*) can be produced in decays of {tau} leptons. In this paper we compute the branching ratios of {tau}{yields}T{pi}{nu} decays by assuming the dominance of intermediate virtual states to model the form factors involved in the relevant hadronic matrix elements. The exclusive f{sub 2}(1270){pi}{sup -} decay mode turns out to have the largest branching ratio, of O(10{sup -4}). Our results indicate that the contribution of tensor meson intermediate states to the three-pseudoscalar channels of {tau} decays are rather small.

  13. Study of the K0L ???????decay

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ogata, R.; Suzuki, S.; Ahn, J. K.; Akune, Y.; Baranov, V.; Chen, K. F.; Comfort, J.; Doroshenko, M.; Fujioka, Y.; Hsiung, Y. B.; et al

    2011-09-21

    The rare decay K0L???????? was studied with the E391a detector at the KEK 12-GeV proton synchrotron. Based on 9.410? K0L decays, an upper limit of 8.110?? was obtained for the branching fraction at 90% confidence level. We also set a limit on the K0L?????X (X?invisible particles) process; the limit on the branching fraction varied from 7.010?? to 4.010?? for the mass of X ranging from 50 MeV/c to 200 MeV/c.

  14. 35 COFibE, Series A. U. S. ATOXIC ENERGY CCMMISSION r'C Cj NE# YORK OPERATIONS OFFICE

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    COFibE, Series A. - U. S. ATOXIC ENERGY CCMMISSION r'C Cj NE# YORK OPERATIONS OFFICE HEkLTH AND SAFETY DIVISION (Merril Eicsnbud, Dirsator) MONTHLY REPORT OF FIELD ACTIVITIES (This report%v,rs%~~~nth period) Indusorial Ii~iene Branoh m a . . 0 . . c . . . o W. B. Harris, Chief Radiation Branch . y y e 0e . e . e . . . . e . . . Hanson Blatz, Chief Fi:e and Accident Branch D e a o o . . . ..s . . B. J. Kehoe, Chief Medical Advioer, Dr. J. A. Quiglsy Siometrician, Dr. A. E. Brandt TABLF OF

  15. DOE-MIRMISBWG

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    FEE-13-1998 14:45 . . - . DOE-MIRMISBWG 7 2 . r i-.1 I-' ? * \,, ? / :' , 2' .' 513 I365 4489 P. 02/11 .1??y 7 -- RADIOLOGICAL SCOPING SURVEY OF FO,RMER MONSANTO FACILITIES (Unit III and Warehouse) DAYTON, OHIO Report Date: 4 September 1997 Survey Date: 27 Ahgust 1997 Prepared by: Mark L, Mays, Chief Radiation Safety Branch Sponsored by: Miamisburg Environmental Management Project Office Ohio Field Office U.S. Department of Energy Conducted by: Radiation Safety Branch Offke of Environmental

  16. I RADIOLOGICAL SCOPING SURVEY OF FO,RMER MONSANTO' FACILITIES

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    -I a.d *4dk *-f--l- --- I. ,e-- - .- --_ -- -. ;,. -* " . I . RADIOLOGICAL SCOPING SURVEY OF FO,RMER MONSANTO' FACILITIES (Unit XII and W a rehouse) DAYTON, OHIO Report Date: 4 September 1997 Survey Dak 27 Aitgust 1991 Prepared by: Mark L. Mays, Chief Radiation Safety Branch Sponsored by: M iamisburg Environmental Matigement Reject Office Ohio FTekl Ofice U.S.. Department of Energy Conducted by: %diation Safety Branch Of&e of Environmental Management ggtb Air Base W ing U.S. Departmtnt

  17. S-J=--.- Al' AMERICAN B&E CCMP~,

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ,f,. . : '+=z& /. : : ..A. J. Br+in, Chief :%eld.~ervices Branch DATE:IkCember 2, l'jjy S-J=--.- Al' AMERICAN B&E CCMP~, ltlAm m m , coNNEcmcLl!r SYMBOL: .HSF:HG At'the Fwest of the SHoO~the Field Services Branch -eyed &e &+ ~ .*siOn Of ,coPper Clad natural urenium billets at the American Brass ., 1 :c""p"y, .Waterbury,~&maeCticut, on October 20; 1959. . . ,,;. . ,', ,., ," . . <; : ,.. ,. ;. -~:,Process Description' : ' ,' ,:. ..;, . . . . .: ._ _. :

  18. TO

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    S. R. Gustaxson,, Chief, SF Materials Accounta- DATE: w 20: 195% bility Branch, Prcduction Division, Nem York Operations Office FROM : Y AL-a&-- V went Vespe, Chief, SF Idaterials Accountability Branch Technical Services Division, Chicago Operations Office =JsJ-: REQUEST FCR UfMNItiL4 COZPWNDS FOR PRATT &?7HIn,EY AIRCPSL"T Itwfilbe ippreciateci if arrangements are maiie to supply Pratt & V&itney with the followi?g material: Uranium hydride 500 gr~am3 Uranium dioxide <

  19. QER- Comment of Janice Kurkoski

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Proposal for Conservation Reward Rate for Electricity First of all, thank you for the time you are taking to hear from the public along with the industry and government officials in this critical matter. I attended the public hearing in Hartford CT two days ago and was able to comment on parts of what we are proposing here. We are writing to open a conversation with you about a proposal that we have been discussing in our past meetings. We would like to see you initiate legislation that would mandate a "stepped rate" for electricity, under which consumers who used less would pay a lower rate per kilowatt hour than those who used more. Background North Quabbin Energy is a community group from the nine North Quabbin towns in north central Massachusetts that focuses on education and local action relating to ways to conserve energy and support local and regional enterprises that reduce our dependence on imported resources. The towns are Athol, Orange, Petersham, Royalston, Warwick, Wendell, New Salem, Erving and Phillipston. Our members include representatives from the appointed Energy Committees of these towns. For the past six years, we have participated in many different types of events and activities, always with an emphasis on the idea that the single best way to address the high financial, social, and environmental costs of our current energy use patterns is to consume less energy in the first place. What we have discovered in our community work is that most people seem aware of the reasons for conserving energy (lowering greenhouse gas emissions, saving money, reducing dependence on oil and other imported resources, etc.). Many are also knowledgeable about the basic weatherization and conservation strategies that utilities, municipalities, and community groups like ours try to promote (for example, adding insulation to homes, turning thermostats down, or using fluorescent or LED lighting rather than incandescent bulbs). Yet except when energy prices are extraordinarily high, it appears that there is a great deal of inertia among the general public about actually making changes in their energy consumption patterns. This proposal would address that issue of inertia by creating a direct incentive program for using less electricity. People could very quickly and easily make changes that would lower their electric use, and would see immediate results on their electric bills. Comparable programs Many utilities are beginning to offer peak and off-peak metering as a way to equalize demand on the electric grid, but although this is useful in making people more aware of their energy use patterns, it does nothing to reduce overall demand and may actually encourage more wasteful consumption at off-peak times. A few utilities are starting to offer the kind of stepped rate or rewards program that we are proposing. For example, Western Massachusetts Electric Company recently inaugurated a program that awards "points" (redeemable for consumer items) for the numbers of kilowatt hours saved. In our opinion, this kind of program sends the wrong message because it encourages people to save in one area (electricity use) in order to consume in another. Examples of programs more in line with what we are proposing already exist. One is British Columbia Hydro's "Conservation Rate," started in April 2010. Under their Residential Conservation Rate, customers pay 7.52 cents per kWh for the first 1,350 kWh they use over an average two-month billing period. Above that amount, customers pay 11.27 cents per kWh for the balance of the electricity used during the billing period. In nearby Vermont, the Washington Electric Cooperative has had stepped or tiered rates for years. They reward residential users with a relatively very low rate of 9.43 cents per kWhr for the first 200 kWhrs, and then charge a significantly higher rate of 21.06 cents thereafter. As a result, their customers use on average about 11% less than the households in our area. Points for discussion What might be a reasonable target figure for the stepped rate? The current Massachusetts average is about 610 kWh/month. Members of North Quabbin Energy have demonstrated that it is quite possible to use a half or even a third of that amount without any decline in standard or quality of living1. In fact, this level of reduction is imperative given the seriousness of climate change and resource depletion. How could this change best be promoted to the public? We would argue that this is not a rate increase, but rather a rate redistribution that rewards lower energy consumption. It seems important to emphasize the positive rewards of this kind of change, rather than framing it as a penalty for higher use2. It also seems crucial to demonstrate from the outset that reducing a household's electric use can be done with surprising ease, given a greater awareness of how much energy waste can be avoided with a change in behavior. How could the concerns of low-income customers, those with large families, or those who heat exclusively with electricity be addressed? The BCHydro and Washington Electric Cooperative programs provide useful models for addressing these questions, and there is a great deal of regional data that shows how these consumers would by no means be penalized in the kind of pricing structure we are proposing. What programs could be funded with the increased revenues? Public outrage would be justified if the money went into the general coffers of the utility companies and fossil fuel energy supply and distribution companies. Enhanced conservation programs should be the target of these revenues. Attachments: 1 NQE individual.pdf, 2 NQE proposed incentive rate Note - if attachments do not go through, see this web page for these documents: http://northquabbinenergy.org/wordpress/?page_id=205

  20. Leveraging Lighting for Energy Savings: GSA Northwest/Artic Region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2016-01-01

    Case study describes how the Northwest/Arctic Region branch of the General Services Administration (GSA) improved safety and energy efficiency in its Fairbanks Federal Building parking garage used by federal employees, U.S. Marshals, and the District Court. A 74% savings was realized by replacing 220 high-pressure sodium fixtures with 220 light-emitting diode fixtures.

  1. Search for a strongly decaying neutral charmed pentaquark

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Link, J.M.; Yager, P.M.; Anjos, J.C.; Bediaga, I.; Castromonte, C.; Machado, A.A.; Magnin, J.; Massafferri, A.; de Miranda, J.M.; Pepe, I.M.; Polycarpo, E.; dos Reis, A.C.; Carrillo, S.; Casimiro, E.; Cuautle, E.; Sanchez-Hernandez, A.; Uribe, C.; Vazquez, F.; Agostino, L.; Cinquini, L.; Cumalat,J.P.; ,

    2005-06-01

    We present a search for a charmed pentaquark decaying strongly to D{sup (*)}-p. Finding no evidence for such a state, we set limits on the cross section times branching ratio relative to D*{sup -} and D{sup -} under particular assumptions about the production mechanism.

  2. POLICY GUIDANCE MEMORANDUM #06 Reducing Text Messaging While Driving

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Order directed all agencies of the executive branch to take appropriate action within the scope of their existing programs to further the policies of this order and to implement rules for text messaging while operating Government-owned vehicles, or using electronic equipment supplied by the Government while driving.

  3. Behavior of Spent Nuclear Fuel in Water Pool Storage

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Chief, Waste Management Branch NRC D i v i s i o n o f M a t e r i a l s and Fuel Cycle F a c i l i t y L i c e n s i n g Washington, DC 20555 W. G. Be1 t e r ERDA D i v i s...

  4. Science in St. Louis | Dr. Benjamin Kumfer | Photosynthetic Antenna

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Research Center Benjamin Kumfer Science in St. Louis | Dr. Benjamin Kumfer An Introduction to Carbon Capture, Utilization, and Storage December 8, 2015 - 7:00pm Jamestown Bluffs Branch, St. Louis County Library, 4153 N. Highway 67 Florissant, MO

  5. Science in St. Louis | Dr. Tristram R. Kidder | Photosynthetic Antenna

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Research Center Tristram R. Kidder Science in St. Louis | Dr. Tristram R. Kidder Ancient Lessons for Modern Times: An Environmental History of the Yellow River, China, 5000-2000 BC November 10, 2015 - 7:00pm Mid-County Branch, St. Louis County Library, 7821 Maryland Ave. St. Louis, MO 63105-3875

  6. Biomass thermal conversion research at SERI

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Milne, T. A.; Desrosiers, R. E.; Reed, T. B.

    1980-09-01

    SERI's involvement in the thermochemical conversion of biomass to fuels and chemicals is reviewed. The scope and activities of the Biomass Thermal Conversion and Exploratory Branch are reviewed. The current status and future plans for three tasks are presented: (1) Pyrolysis Mechanisms; (2) High Pressure O/sub 2/ Gasifier; and (3) Gasification Test Facility.

  7. Kinetic transverse dispersion relation for relativistic magnetized electron-positron plasmas with Maxwell-Jttner velocity distribution functions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lpez, Rodrigo A.; Moya, Pablo S.; Muoz, Vctor; Vias, Adolfo F.; Valdivia, J. Alejandro

    2014-09-15

    We use a kinetic treatment to study the linear transverse dispersion relation for a magnetized isotropic relativistic electron-positron plasma with finite relativistic temperature. The explicit linear dispersion relation for electromagnetic waves propagating along a constant background magnetic field is presented, including an analytical continuation to the whole complex frequency plane for the case of Maxwell-Jttner velocity distribution functions. This dispersion relation is studied numerically for various temperatures. For left-handed solutions, the system presents two branches, the electromagnetic ordinary mode and the Alfvn mode. In the low frequency regime, the Alfvn branch has two dispersive zones, the normal zone (where ??/?k?>?0) and an anomalous zone (where ??/?k?branch, the electromagnetic waves are damped, and there is a maximum wave number for which the Alfvn branch is suppressed. We also study the dependence of the Alfvn velocity and effective plasma frequency with the temperature. We complemented the analytical and numerical approaches with relativistic full particle simulations, which consistently agree with the analytical results.

  8. Sterically shielded diboron-containing metallocene olefin polymerization catalysts

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Marks, Tobin J. (Evanston, IL); Ja, Li (Chicago, IL); Yang, Xinmin (Evanston, IL)

    1995-09-05

    A non-coordinating anion, preferably containing a sterically shielded diboron hydride, if combined with a cyclopenta-dienyl-substituted metallocene cation component, such as a zirconocene metallocene, is a useful olefin polymerization catalyst component. The anion preferably has the formula ##STR1## where R is branched lower alkyl, such as t-butyl.

  9. CX-004311: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Commercial Renewable Energy Systems - Young Men's Christian Association of Western North Carolina, Rueter Family Branch Solar ThermalCX(s) Applied: A9, B1.5, B1.7, B1.31, B5.1Date: 11/01/2010Location(s): Asheville, North CarolinaOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  10. Integrable modification of the critical Chalker-Coddington network model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ikhlef, Yacine; Fendley, Paul; Cardy, John

    2011-10-01

    We consider the Chalker-Coddington network model for the integer quantum Hall effect, and examine the possibility of solving it exactly. In the supersymmetric path integral framework, we introduce a truncation procedure, leading to a series of well-defined two-dimensional loop models with two loop flavors. In the phase diagram of the first-order truncated model, we identify four integrable branches related to the dilute Birman-Wenzl-Murakami braid-monoid algebra and parameterized by the loop fugacity n. In the continuum limit, two of these branches (1,2) are described by a pair of decoupled copies of a Coulomb-gas theory, whereas the other two branches (3,4) couple the two loop flavors, and relate to an SU(2){sub r}xSU(2){sub r}/SU(2){sub 2r} Wess-Zumino-Witten (WZW) coset model for the particular values n=-2cos[{pi}/(r+2)], where r is a positive integer. The truncated Chalker-Coddington model is the n=0 point of branch 4. By numerical diagonalization, we find that its universality class is neither an analytic continuation of the WZW coset nor the universality class of the original Chalker-Coddington model. It constitutes rather an integrable, critical approximation to the latter.

  11. l UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Serviwr w ' Branch, Pittsburgh W fJ3lUALFBRlFICATES MATDlALS,-3 @ * l . - -- E&red ia Copy lo. laf &8tewial Tramfor Cerfiiioatu Nor, 303-Z 353-2, 71bds 958-2 and %pZ eoverhg...

  12. Annual Confidential Financial Disclosure Report (OGE Form 450 or 450A)

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2007-01-03

    This Notice addresses the Executive Branch confidential financial disclosure reporting requirements. These requirements apply to career GS/GM and prevailing rate system and administratively determined employees as well as employees serving in excepted service positions designated EJ, EK, and EN.

  13. FIA-12-0036- In the Matter of Judicial Watch

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Appellant requested “[a]ll communications with Nancy-Ann DeParle, any other member of the Obama administration, or any third party regarding the development and implementation of ‘alternative administrative measures’ to advance the president’s policy goals in circumvention of the legislative branch of the federal government.”

  14. Annual Confidential Financial Disclosure Report (OGE Form 450)

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2007-12-20

    The Notice addresses the Executive Branch confidential financial disclosure reporting requirements. These requirements apply to career GS/GM and prevailing rate system and administratively determined employees as well as employees serving in excepted service positions designated EJ, EK, and EN. Cancels DOE N 326.13.

  15. Annual Confidential Financial Disclosure Report (OGE Form 450 or 450A)

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2005-09-30

    This Notice addresses the Executive Branch confidential financial disclosure reporting requirements. These requirements apply to career GS/GM and prevailing rate system and administratively determined employees as well as employees serving in excepted service positions designated EJ, EK, and EN. (Note: It replaces DOE N 326.11, which expired 9-29-05.)

  16. Pruning apparatus and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dellinger, Roger D. (Prosser, WA)

    1997-01-01

    The present invention is an automated pruning apparatus that requires little or no follow-up hand pruning and requires no sensors to avoid supportive trunks or posts. The present invention uses at least one pair of flat, close angled toothed, counter rotating blades. Woody branches are directed to the counter rotating blades first with a lifting arm and secondly by a quilled drum.

  17. Small cell foams containing a modified dense star polymer or dendrimer as a nucleating agent

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hedstrand, D.M.; Tomalia, D.A.

    1995-02-28

    A small cell foam having a modified dense star polymer or dendrimer is described. This modified dense star polymer or dendrimer has a highly branched interior of one monomeric composition and an exterior structure of a different monomeric composition capable of providing a hydrophobic outer shell and a particle diameter of from about 5 to about 1,000 nm with a matrix polymer.

  18. Women @ Energy: Brenda Teaster

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    "You will learn so many things about how the world works and meet many interesting, intelligent, and talented people. Engineers can be some of the most ethical, witty, and fun people you could ever want to meet. Engineering also provides a great background for almost any other career choice if you decide to branch out."

  19. GSA Northwest/Arctic Region Achieves 74% Savings in Parking Lighting

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Case study describes how the Northwest/Arctic Region branch of the General Services Administration (GSA) improved safety and energy efficiency in its Fairbanks Federal Building parking garage used by federal employees, U.S. Marshals, and the District Court. A 74% savings was realized by replacing 220 high-pressure sodium fixtures with 220 light-emitting diode fixtures.

  20. DZero (D0) Experiment Results for B Physics from the Fermilab Tevatron

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    ,

    Topics we are working on include CP violation, measurements of B hadron properties (masses, lifetimes, decay branching ratios, production mechanisms), and searches for rare decays. The D0 (DZero) Experiment consists of a worldwide collaboration of scientists conducting research on the fundamental nature of matter.

  1. Table

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    - 17 a Nucleus E xi E xf J i (T i ) J f (T f ) (eV) Branching ratio Mult. S (W.u.) (MeV) (%) 16 N b 0.12 0 0 - (1) 2 - (1) (8.7 0.1) 10 -11 100 E2...

  2. In the forefront of the fight for our environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    This booklet publicizes the work of the Quebec Regional Office of Environment Canada's Environmental Protection Branch. It answers the most frequently asked questions on enforcing the law; controlling toxic substances, water and air pollution; Environment Canada's responsibilities in waste management and contaminated sites; and supporting the St. Lawrence action plan.

  3. Time-integrated measurements of $\\gamma$ at the Tevatron and prospects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Squillacioti, Paola

    2010-12-01

    The measurement of CP-violating asymmetries and branching ratios of B {yields} DK modes allows a theoretically-clean extraction of the CKM angle {gamma}. We report recent CDF measurements with Cabibbo suppressed ({pi}{pi}, KK) or doubly Cabibbo suppressed (K{sup +}{pi}{sup -}) D decays. These measurements are performed for the first time in hadron collisions.

  4. Furth Plasma Physics Library | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Research Education Organization Business Operations Careers/ Human Resources Directory Environment, Safety & Health Furth Plasma Physics Library Lab Leadership Organization Chart Technology Transfer Contact Us Business Operations Careers/ Human Resources Directory Environment, Safety & Health Furth Plasma Physics Library Lab Leadership Organization Chart Technology Transfer Furth Plasma Physics Library The Harold P. Furth Plasma Physics Library is a branch of the Princeton University

  5. Investigation of lasing characteristics of 1% Nd : YAG laser ceramics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vatnik, S M; Osipov, V V; Vedin, I A; Kurbatov, P F

    2013-03-31

    The lasing characteristics of 1 % Nd : YAG laser ceramics synthesised at the Institute of Electrophysics, Ural Branch, Russian Academy of Sciences are studied. CW lasing is obtained in all the samples with the slope and total optical efficiencies of 25 % and 18 %, respectively. Intrinsic absorption and scattering losses in the ceramics are estimated. (extreme light fields and their applications)

  6. Plasmonic waves of a semi-infinite random nanocomposite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moradi, Afshin

    2013-10-15

    The dispersion curves of the plasmonic waves of a semi-infinite random metal-dielectric nanocomposite, consisting of bulk metal embedded with dielectric inclusions, are presented. Two branches of p-polarized surface plasmon-polariton modes are found to exist. The possibility of experimentally observing the surface waves by attenuated total reflection is demonstrated.

  7. Isotope Cancer Treatment Research at LANL

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Weidner, John; Nortier, Meiring

    2014-06-02

    Los Alamos National Laboratory has produced medical isotopes for diagnostic and imaging purposes for more than 30 years. Now LANL researchers have branched out into isotope cancer treatment studies. New results show that an accelerator-based approach can produce clinical trial quantities of actinium-225, an isotope that has promise as a way to kill tumors without damaging surrounding healthy cells.

  8. Electric current-producing device having sulfone-based electrolyte

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Angell, Charles Austen (Mesa, AZ); Sun, Xiao-Guang (Tempe, AZ)

    2010-11-16

    Electrolytic solvents and applications of such solvents including electric current-producing devices. For example, a solvent can include a sulfone compound of R1--SO2--R2, with R1 being an alkyl group and R2 a partially oxygenated alkyl group, to exhibit high chemical and thermal stability and high oxidation resistance. For another example, a battery can include, between an anode and a cathode, an electrolyte which includes ionic electrolyte salts and a non-aqueous electrolyte solvent which includes a non-symmetrical, non-cyclic sulfone. The sulfone has a formula of R1--SO2--R2, wherein R1 is a linear or branched alkyl or partially or fully fluorinated linear or branched alkyl group having 1 to 7 carbon atoms, and R2 is a linear or branched or partially or fully fluorinated linear or branched oxygen containing alkyl group having 1 to 7 carbon atoms. The electrolyte can include an electrolyte co-solvent and an electrolyte additive for protective layer formation.

  9. Higgs Coupling Measurements at a 1 TeV Linear Collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barklow, T

    2003-12-18

    Methods for extracting Higgs boson signals at a 1 TeV center-of-mass energy e{sup +}e{sup -} linear collider are described. In addition, estimates are given for the accuracy with which branching fractions can be measured for Higgs boson decays to b{bar b} WW, gg, and {gamma}{gamma}.

  10. Git Replacement for the

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2014-09-23

    GRAPE is a tool for managing software project workflows for the Git version control system. It provides a suite of tools to simplify and configure branch based development, integration with a project's testing suite, and integration with the Atlassian Stash repository hosting tool.

  11. U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission organization charts and functional statements. Revision 18

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-07-23

    This document (NUREG-0325) is the current US NRC organization chart, listing all NRC offices and regions and their components down through the branch level as of July 23, 1995. Functional statements of each position are given, as is the name of the individual holding the position.

  12. Radioiodinated glucose analogues for use as imaging agents

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Goodman, Mark M.; Knapp, Jr., Furn F.

    1988-01-01

    A radioiodinated branched carbohydrate for tissue imaging. Iodine-123 is stabilized in the compound by attaching it to a vinyl functional group that is on the carbohydrate. The compound exhibits good uptake and retention and is promising in the development of radiopharmaceuticals for brain, heart and tumor imaging.

  13. Microsoft PowerPoint - Enhancements_Easson [Compatibility Mode]

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Tribal Activities - Advance Notification, Policy Statement, and Outreach Stuart Easson, Intergovernmental Liaison Branch * Advance Notification Update - Map overview * Update on Tribal Policy Statement * Tribal Outreach - Consultations - Education - Federal Partnerships * Questions 2 Overview 2 Advance Notification Rule - The NRC now requires the licensee to provide advanced notification to participating Federally-recognized Tribal governments of shipment of: * Irradiated reactor fuel * Certain

  14. Final fate of spherically symmetric gravitational collapse of a dust cloud in Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet gravity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maeda, Hideki

    2006-05-15

    We give a model of the higher-dimensional spherically symmetric gravitational collapse of a dust cloud including the perturbative effects of quantum gravity. The n({>=}5)-dimensional action with the Gauss-Bonnet term for gravity is considered and a simple formulation of the basic equations is given for the spacetime M{approx_equal}M{sup 2}xK{sup n-2} with a perfect fluid and a cosmological constant. This is a generalization of the Misner-Sharp formalism of the four-dimensional spherically symmetric spacetime with a perfect fluid in general relativity. The whole picture and the final fate of the gravitational collapse of a dust cloud differ greatly between the cases with n=5 and n{>=}6. There are two families of solutions, which we call plus-branch and the minus-branch solutions. A plus-branch solution can be attached to the outside vacuum region which is asymptotically anti-de Sitter in spite of the absence of a cosmological constant. Bounce inevitably occurs in the plus-branch solution for n{>=}6, and consequently singularities cannot be formed. Since there is no trapped surface in the plus-branch solution, the singularity formed in the case of n=5 must be naked. On the other hand, a minus-branch solution can be attached to the outside asymptotically flat vacuum region. We show that naked singularities are massless for n{>=}6, while massive naked singularities are possible for n=5. In the homogeneous collapse represented by the flat Friedmann-Robertson-Walker solution, the singularity formed is spacelike for n{>=}6, while it is ingoing-null for n=5. In the inhomogeneous collapse with smooth initial data, the strong cosmic censorship hypothesis holds for n{>=}10 and for n=9 depending on the parameters in the initial data, while a naked singularity is always formed for 5{<=}n{<=}8. These naked singularities can be globally naked when the initial surface radius of the dust cloud is fine-tuned, and then the weak cosmic censorship hypothesis is violated.

  15. Observation of χcJ decaying into the pp̄K⁺K⁻ final state

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ablikim, M.; Achasov, M. N.; Alberto, D.; An, L.; An, Q.; An, Z. H.; Bai, J. Z.; Baldini, R.; Ban, Y.; Becker, J.; et al

    2011-06-27

    First measurements of the decays of the three χcJ states to pp̄K⁺K⁻ final states are presented. Intermediate Φ→K⁺K⁻ and Λ(1520)→pK⁻ resonance states are observed, and branching fractions for χcJ→p̄K⁺Λ(1520), Λ(1520)Λ¯¯¯(1520), and Φpp̄ are reported. We also measure branching fractions for direct χcJ→pp̄K⁺K⁻ decays. These are first observations of χcJ decays to unstable baryon resonances and provide useful information about the χcJ states. The experiment uses samples of χcJ mesons produced via radiative transitions from 106×10⁶ ψ' mesons collected in the BESIII detector at the BEPCII e⁺e⁻ collider.

  16. First measurement of ADS parameters using $B^- \\to D^0K^-$ decays in hadron collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garosi, Paola; /Siena U. /INFN, Pisa

    2011-06-01

    Measurements of branching fractions and CP-asymmetries of B{sup -} {yields} D{sup 0}K{sup -} modes allow a theoretically-clean extraction of the CKM angle {gamma}. The method proposed by Atwood, Dunietz and Soni (ADS) makes use of a decay chain where color and Cabibbo suppression interfere, which produces large CP-violating asymmetries. The CDF experiment reports the first measurement at a hadron collider of branching fractions and CP-asymmetries of suppressed B{sup -} {yields} D{sup 0}h{sup -} signals, where h is {pi} or K. Using 5.0 fb{sup -1} of data we found a combined significance exceeding 5{sigma} and we determined the ADS parameters with accuracy comparable with B-factories.

  17. Multiple production of supersymmetric Higgs bosons in Z sup 0 decays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Giudice, G.F. )

    1990-04-01

    Multi-Higgs-boson production in {ital Z}{sup 0} decays is discussed in the context of low-energy supergravity models. For Higgs-boson masses lighter than about 20 GeV, {ital Z}{sup 0}{r arrow}{ital H}{sub 2}{sup 0}{ital H}{sub 2}{sup 0}{ital H}{sub 3}{sup 0} naturally has a branching ratio in the range 10{sup {minus}4}--10{sup {minus}6}. {ital Z}{sup 0}{r arrow}{ital H}{sub 2}{sup 0}{ital H}{sub 2}{sup 0}{ital l{bar l}}, where {ital l} is a neutral or charged lepton, has a branching ratio in the same range if {ital m}{sub {ital H}2}{lt}10 GeV. Detection of these processes will give information about the structure of the Higgs sector and about the {ital HHZZ} and {ital HHH} couplings.

  18. Mineral Resource Information System for Field Lab in the Osage Mineral Reservation Estate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carroll, H.B.; Johnson, William I.

    1999-04-27

    The Osage Mineral Reservation Estate is located in Osage County, Oklahoma. Minerals on the Estate are owned by members of the Osage Tribe who are shareholders in the Estate. The Estate is administered by the Osage Agency, Branch of Minerals, operated by the U.S. Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA). Oil, natural gas, casinghead gas, and other minerals (sand, gravel, limestone, and dolomite) are exploited by lessors. Operators may obtain from the Branch of Minerals and the Osage Mineral Estate Tribal Council leases to explore and exploit oil, gas, oil and gas, and other minerals on the Estate. Operators pay a royalty on all minerals exploited and sold from the Estate. A mineral Resource Information system was developed for this project to evaluate the remaining hydrocarbon resources located on the Estate. Databases on Microsoft Excel spreadsheets of operators, leases, and production were designed for use in conjunction with an evaluation spreadsheet for estimating the remaining hydrocarbons on the Estate.

  19. Engineering Ralstonia eutropha for Production of Isobutanol (IBT) Motor Fuel from Carbon Dioxide, Hydrogen, and Oxygen Project Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sinskey, Anthony J.; Worden, Robert Mark; Brigham, Christopher; Lu, Jingnan; Quimby, John Westlake; Gai, Claudia; Speth, Daan; Elliott, Sean; Fei, John Qiang; Bernardi, Amanda; Li, Sophia; Grunwald, Stephan; Grousseau, Estelle; Maiti, Soumen; Liu, Chole

    2013-12-16

    This research project is a collaboration between the Sinskey laboratory at MIT and the Worden laboratory at Michigan State University. The goal of the project is to produce Isobutanol (IBT), a branched-chain alcohol that can serve as a drop-in transportation fuel, through the engineered microbial biosynthesis of Carbon Dioxide, Hydrogen, and Oxygen using a novel bioreactor. This final technical report presents the findings of both the biological engineering work at MIT that extended the native branched-chain amino acid pathway of the wild type Ralstonia eutropha H16 to perform this biosynthesis, as well as the unique design, modeling, and construction of a bioreactor for incompatible gasses at Michigan State that enabled the operational testing of the complete system. This 105 page technical report summarizing the three years of research includes 72 figures and 11 tables of findings. Ralstonia eutropha (also known as Cupriavidus necator) is a Gram-negative, facultatively chemolithoautotrophic bacteria. It has been the principle organism used for the study of polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) polymer biosynthesis. The wild-type Ralstonia eutropha H16 produces PHB as an intracellular carbon storage material while under nutrient stress in the presence of excess carbon. Under this stress, it can accumulate approximately 80 % of its cell dry weight (CDW) as this intracellular polymer. With the restoration of the required nutrients, the cells are then able to catabolize this polymer. If extracted from the cell, this PHB polymer can be processed into biodegradable and biocompatible plastics, however for this research, it is the efficient metabolic pathway channeling the captured carbon that is of interest. R. eutropha is further unique in that it contains two carbon-fixation CalvinBensonBassham cycle operons, two oxygen-tolerant hydrogenases, and several formate dehydrogenases. It has also been much studied for its ability in the presence of oxygen, to fix carbon dioxide into complex cellular molecules using the energy from hydrogen. In this research project, engineered strains of R. eutropha redirected the excess carbon from PHB storage into the production of isobutanol and 3-methyl-1-butanol (branched-chain higher alcohols). These branched-chain higher alcohols can be used directly as substitutes for fossil-based fuels and are seen as alternative biofuels to ethanol and biodiesel. Importantly, these alcohols have approximately 98 % of the energy content of gasoline, 17 % higher than the current gasoline additive ethanol, without impacting corn market production for feed or food. Unlike ethanol, these branched-chain alcohols have low vapor pressure, hygroscopicity, and water solubility, which make them readily compatible with the existing pipelines, gasoline pumps, and engines in our transportation infrastructure. While the use of alternative energies from solar, wind, geothermal, and hydroelectric has spread for stationary power applications, these energy sources cannot be effectively or efficiently employed in current or future transportation systems. With the ongoing concerns of fossil fuel availability and price stability over the long term, alternative biofuels like branched-chain higher alcohols hold promise as a suitable transportation fuel in the future. We showed in our research that various mutant strains of R. eutropha with isobutyraldehyde dehydrogenase activity, in combination with the overexpression of plasmid-borne, native branched-chain amino acid biosynthesis pathway genes and the overexpression of heterologous ketoisovalerate decarboxylase gene, would produce isobutanol and 3-methyl-1-butanol when initiated during nitrogen or phosphorus limitation. Early on, we isolated one mutant R. eutropha strain which produced over 180 mg/L branched-chain alcohols in flask culture while being more tolerant of isobutanol toxicity. After the targeted elimination of genes encoding several potential carbon sinks (ilvE, bkdAB, and aceE), the production titer of the improved to 270 mg/L isobutanol and 40 mg/L 3-methyl-1-butanol.

  20. Single-shot hyperspectral coherent Raman planar imaging in the range 0–4200 cm⁻¹

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bohlin, Alexis; Kliewer, Christopher J.

    2014-10-20

    We propose a technique for ultrabroadband planar coherent Raman spectroscopy that enables wideband chemically selective mapping of molecular partition functions in the gas-phase within a single-laser-shot. A spectral region spanning 0–4200 cm⁻¹ is excited simultaneously, in principle allowing for coherent planar imaging of most all fundamental Raman-active modes. This unique instantaneous and spatially correlated assessment enables multiplexed studies of transient dynamical systems in a two-dimensional (2D) field. Here, we demonstrate single-laser-shot high temperature diagnostics of H₂, with spatially resolved 2D measurement of transitions of both the pure-rotational H₂ S-branch and the vibrational H₂ Q-branch, analyzing the temperature contour of amore » reacting fuel-species as it evolves at a flame-front.« less

  1. Three-body scattering theory without knowledge of exact asymptotic boundary conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shakeshaft, Robin

    2009-07-15

    We formulate the theory of three-body scattering without explicit reference to exact asymptotic boundary conditions on the wave function. The transition rate and amplitude are expressed as volume integrals of the resolvent, which are insensitive to the region of asymptotically large distances. The physical branch of the resolvent is selected through the arrow of time, which is required to point forward in each subchannel. This is accomplished by first expressing the resolvent as an integral over time and then making a conformal transformation of each half of the time plane onto a unit disk. The physical branch corresponds to a path of integration in the upper half of the disk. We have tested the method, using a real discrete basis, by calculating the total cross section for singlet S-wave electron impact ionization of atomic hydrogen; our results are in reasonable agreement overall with the landmark results of Bartlet and Stelbovics [Phys. Rev. Lett. 93, 233201 (2004)].

  2. Alfven waves in dusty plasmas with plasma particles described by anisotropic kappa distributions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Galvao, R. A.; Ziebell, L. F.; Gaelzer, R.; Juli, M. C. de

    2012-12-15

    We utilize a kinetic description to study the dispersion relation of Alfven waves propagating parallelly to the ambient magnetic field in a dusty plasma, taking into account the fluctuation of the charge of the dust particles, which is due to inelastic collisions with electrons and ions. We consider a plasma in which the velocity distribution functions of the plasma particles are modelled as anisotropic kappa distributions, study the dispersion relation for several combinations of the parameters {kappa}{sub Parallel-To} and {kappa}{sub Up-Tack }, and emphasize the effect of the anisotropy of the distributions on the mode coupling which occurs in a dusty plasma, between waves in the branch of circularly polarized waves and waves in the whistler branch.

  3. Shocks and finite-time singularities in Hele-Shaw flow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Teodorescu, Razvan; Wiegmann, P; Lee, S-y

    2008-01-01

    Hele-Shaw flow at vanishing surface tension is ill-defined. In finite time, the flow develops cusplike singularities. We show that the ill-defined problem admits a weak dispersive solution when singularities give rise to a graph of shock waves propagating in the viscous fluid. The graph of shocks grows and branches. Velocity and pressure jump across the shock. We formulate a few simple physical principles which single out the dispersive solution and interpret shocks as lines of decompressed fluid. We also formulate the dispersive solution in algebro-geometrical terms as an evolution of Krichever-Boutroux complex curve. We study in details the most generic (2,3) cusp singularity which gives rise to an elementary branching event. This solution is self-similar and expressed in terms of elliptic functions.

  4. Dual power, constant speed electric motor system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kirschbaum, Herbert S. (Asheville, NC)

    1984-01-01

    A dual capacity permanent split capacitor electric motor system is provided with a stator having main and auxiliary windings. The main stator winding includes two winding sections which are connected in parallel with each other and across a pair of line terminals while the auxiliary winding is connected in series with a capacitor to form a circuit branch which is connected between the line terminals for operation at a first output power level. Switching means are provided to reconnect the main stator winding sections in series with each other and in series with a second capacitor to form a circuit branch which is connected between the line terminals while the stator auxiliary winding is connected directly between the line terminals for operation at a second output power level. Automatic rotation reversal occurs when the motor switches from the first to the second output power level.

  5. West Maui Groundwater Flow Model

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Nicole Lautze

    2015-01-01

    Groundwater flow model for West Maui. Data is from the following sources: Whittier, R. and A.I. El-Kadi. 2014. Human and Environmental Risk Ranking of Onsite Sewage Disposal Systems For the Hawaiian Islands of Kauai, Molokai, Maui, and Hawaii – Final. Prepared by the University of Hawaii, Dept. of Geology and Geophysics for the State of Hawaii Dept. of Health, Safe Drinking Water Branch. September 2014; and Whittier, R.B., K. Rotzoll, S. Dhal, A.I. El-Kadi, C. Ray, G. Chen, and D. Chang. 2004. Hawaii Source Water Assessment Program Report – Volume V – Island of Maui Source Water Assessment Program Report. Prepared for the Hawaii Department of Health, Safe Drinking Water Branch. University of Hawaii, Water Resources Research Center. Updated 2008.

  6. Kauai Groundwater Flow Model

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Nicole Lautze

    2015-01-01

    Groundwater flow model for Kauai. Data is from the following sources: Whittier, R. and A.I. El-Kadi. 2014. Human and Environmental Risk Ranking of Onsite Sewage Disposal Systems For the Hawaiian Islands of Kauai, Molokai, Maui, and Hawaii – Final. Prepared by the University of Hawaii, Dept. of Geology and Geophysics for the State of Hawaii Dept. of Health, Safe Drinking Water Branch. September 2014.; and Whittier, R.B., K. Rotzoll, S. Dhal, A.I. El-Kadi, C. Ray, G. Chen, and D. Chang. 2004. Hawaii Source Water Assessment Program Report – Volume IV – Island of Kauai Source Water Assessment Program Report. Prepared for the Hawaii Department of Health, Safe Drinking Water Branch. University of Hawaii, Water Resources Research Center. Updated 2015.

  7. 12Be

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Be β--Decay Evaluated Data Measurements 1965PO03: 12Be; measured not abstracted; deduced nuclear properties. 1978AL10: 12Be; measured T1/2, delayed neutrons; deduced upper limit delayed neutron branch. 1984DU15: 12Be(β-); measured T1/2. 1986CU01: 12Be(β-); measured β-decay T1/2. 1986HAYX: 12Be; measured β-decay T1/2. 1994KE06: 12Be(β-); measured βγ-coin, T1/2; deduced ft. 12B levels deduced β-branching ratio. 1994RE1R, 1991RE02: 12Be(β-n); measured T1/2, neutron emission probabilities.

  8. A stochastic model for the measurement of electricity outage costs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grosfeld-Nir, A.; Tishler, A. (Tel Aviv Univ. (Israel))

    1993-01-01

    The measurement of customer outage costs has recently become an important subject of research for electric utilities. This paper uses a stochastic dynamic model as the starting point in developing a market-based method for the evaluation of outage costs. Specifically, the model postulates that once an electricity outage occurs, all production activity stops. Full production is resumed once the electricity outage is over. This process repeats itself indefinitely. The business customer maximizes his expected discounted profits (the expected value of the firm), taking into account his limited ability to respond to repeated random electricity outages. The model is applied to 11 industrial branches in Israel. The estimates exhibit a large variation across branches. 34 refs., 3 tabs.

  9. Real-time observation of morphological transformations in II-VI semiconducting nanobelts via environmental transmission electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Agarwal, Rahul; Zakharov, Dmitri N.; Krook, Nadia M.; Liu, Wenjing; Berger, Jacob; Stach, Eric A.; Agarwal, Ritesh

    2015-05-01

    It has been observed that wurtzite II–VI semiconducting nanobelts transform into single-crystal, periodically branched nanostructures upon heating. The mechanism of this novel transformation has been elucidated by heating II–VI nanobelts in an environmental transmission electron microscope (ETEM) in oxidizing, reducing and inert atmospheres while observing their structural changes with high spatial resolution. The interplay of surface reconstruction of high-energy surfaces of the wurtzite phase and environment-dependent anisotropic chemical etching of certain crystal surfaces in the branching mechanism of nanobelts has been observed. Understanding of structural and chemical transformations of materials via in situ microscopy techniques and their role in designing new nanostructured materials is discussed.

  10. Measurement of Polarization and Search for CP Violation in Bs0??? Decays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.; lvarez Gonzlez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J. A.; Apresyan, A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Asaadi, J.; Ashmanskas, W.; Auerbach, B.; Aurisano, A.; Azfar, F.; Badgett, W.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Barnett, B. A.; Barria, P.; Bartos, P.; Bauce, M.; Bauer, G.; Bedeschi, F.; Beecher, D.; Behari, S.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Bhatti, A.; Binkley, M.; Bisello, D.; Bizjak, I.; Bland, K. R.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brigliadori, L.; Brisuda, A.; Bromberg, C.; Brucken, E.; Bucciantonio, M.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H. S.; Budd, S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Buzatu, A.; Calancha, C.; Camarda, S.; Campanelli, M.; Campbell, M.; Canelli, F.; Carls, B.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Carron, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Cauz, D.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chen, Y. C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Chlebana, F.; Cho, K.; Chokheli, D.; Chou, J. P.; Chung, W. H.; Chung, Y. S.; Ciobanu, C. I.; Ciocci, M. A.; Clark, A.; Clarke, C.; Compostella, G.; Convery, M. E.; Conway, J.; Corbo, M.; Cordelli, M.; Cox, C. A.; Cox, D. J.; Crescioli, F.; Cuenca Almenar, C.; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; Dagenhart, D.; dAscenzo, N.; Datta, M.; de Barbaro, P.; De Cecco, S.; De Lorenzo, G.; DellOrso, M.; Deluca, C.; Demortier, L.; Deng, J.; Deninno, M.; Devoto, F.; dErrico, M.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruzza, B.; Dittmann, J. R.; DOnofrio, M.; Donati, S.; Dong, P.; Dorigo, M.; Dorigo, T.; Ebina, K.; Elagin, A.; Eppig, A.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, D.; Errede, S.; Ershaidat, N.; Eusebi, R.; Fang, H. C.; Farrington, S.; Feindt, M.; Fernandez, J. P.; Ferrazza, C.; Field, R.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Frank, M. J.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J. C.; Funakoshi, Y.; Furic, I.; Gallinaro, M.; Galyardt, J.; Garcia, J. E.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Garosi, P.; Gerberich, H.; Gerchtein, E.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Giannetti, P.; Gibson, K.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giromini, P.; Giunta, M.; Giurgiu, G.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldin, D.; Goldschmidt, N.; Golossanov, A.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; Gonzlez, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A. T.; Goulianos, K.; Grinstein, S.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Group, R. C.; Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Gunay-Unalan, Z.; Haber, C.; Hahn, S. R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Hamaguchi, A.; Han, J. Y.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Hare, D.; Hare, M.; Harr, R. F.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hays, C.; Heck, M.; Heinrich, J.; Herndon, M.; Hewamanage, S.; Hidas, D.; Hocker, A.; Hopkins, W.; Horn, D.; Hou, S.; Hughes, R. E.; Hurwitz, M.; Husemann, U.; Hussain, N.; Hussein, M.; Huston, J.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ivanov, A.; James, E.; Jang, D.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeon, E. J.; Jha, M. K.; Jindariani, S.; Johnson, W.; Jones, M.; Joo, K. K.; Jun, S. Y.; Junk, T. R.; Kamon, T.; Karchin, P. E.; Kasmi, A.; Kato, Y.; Ketchum, W.; Keung, J.; Khotilovich, V.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, H. W.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. K.; Kimura, N.; Kirby, M.; Klimenko, S.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D. J.; Konigsberg, J.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Krop, D.; Krumnack, N.; Kruse, M.; Krutelyov, V.; Kuhr, T.; Kurata, M.; Kwang, S.; Laasanen, A. T.; Lami, S.; Lammel, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lander, R. L.; Lannon, K.; Lath, A.; Latino, G.; LeCompte, T.; Lee, E.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, J. S.; Lee, S. W.; Leo, S.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J. D.; Limosani, A.; Lin, C.-J.; Linacre, J.; Lindgren, M.; Lipeles, E.; Lister, A.; Litvintsev, D. O.; Liu, C.; Liu, Q.; Liu, T.; Lockwitz, S.; Loginov, A.; Lucchesi, D.; Lueck, J.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Lungu, G.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; Madrak, R.; Maeshima, K.; Makhoul, K.; Malik, S.; Manca, G.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, C.; Martnez, M.; Martnez-Ballarn, R.; Mastrandrea, P.; Mattson, M. E.; Mazzanti, P.; McFarland, K. S.; McIntyre, P.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Menzione, A.; Mesropian, C.; Miao, T.; Mietlicki, D.; Mitra, A.; Miyake, H.; Moed, S.; Moggi, N.; Mondragon, M. N.; Moon, C. S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M. J.; Morlock, J.; Movilla Fernandez, P.; Mukherjee, A.; Muller, Th.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Naganoma, J.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Nett, J.; Neu, C.; Neubauer, M. S.; Nielsen, J.; Nodulman, L.; Norniella, O.; Nurse, E.; Oakes, L.; Oh, S. H.; Oh, Y. D.; Oksuzian, I.; Okusawa, T.; Orava, R.; Ortolan, L.; Pagan Griso, S.; Pagliarone, C.; Palencia, E.; Papadimitriou, V.; Paramonov, A. A.; Patrick, J.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Pellett, D. E.; Penzo, A.; Phillips, T. J.; Piacentino, G.; Pianori, E.; Pilot, J.; Pitts, K.; Plager, C.; Pondrom, L.; Potamianos, K.; Poukhov, O.

    2011-12-01

    We present the first measurement of polarization and CP-violating asymmetries in a Bs0 decay into two light vector mesons, Bs0???, and an improved determination of its branching ratio using 295 decays reconstructed in a data sample corresponding to 2.9 fb? of integrated luminosity collected by the CDF experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. The fraction of longitudinal polarization is determined to be fL=0.3480.041(stat)0.021(syst), and the branching ratio B(Bs0???)=[2.320.18(stat)0.82(syst)]10??. Asymmetries of decay angle distributions sensitive to CP violation are measured to be Au=-0.0070.064(stat)0.018(syst) and Av=-0.1200.064(stat)0.016(syst).

  11. Measurement of B⁰→J/ψη(') and constraint on the η-η' mixing angle

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chang, M.-C.; Duh, Y.-C.; Lin, J.-Y.; Adachi, I.; Adamczyk, K.; Aihara, H.; Asner, D. M.; Aushev, T.; Bakich, A. M.; Bhardwaj, V.; et al

    2012-05-04

    We measure the branching fractions of B⁰→J/ψη(') decays with the complete Belle data sample of 772×10⁶ BB¯¯¯ events collected at the Υ(4S) resonance with the Belle detector at the KEKB asymmetric-energy e⁺e⁻ collider. The results for the branching fractions are: B(B⁰→J/ψη)=(12.3±1.811.7±0.7)×10⁻⁶ and B(B⁰→J/ψη')<7.4×10⁻⁶ at 90% confidence level. The η-η' mixing angle is constrained to be less than 42.2° at 90% confidence level.

  12. Kauai Groundwater Flow Model

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Nicole Lautze

    2015-01-01

    Groundwater flow model for Kauai. Data is from the following sources: Whittier, R. and A.I. El-Kadi. 2014. Human and Environmental Risk Ranking of Onsite Sewage Disposal Systems For the Hawaiian Islands of Kauai, Molokai, Maui, and Hawaii Final. Prepared by the University of Hawaii, Dept. of Geology and Geophysics for the State of Hawaii Dept. of Health, Safe Drinking Water Branch. September 2014.; and Whittier, R.B., K. Rotzoll, S. Dhal, A.I. El-Kadi, C. Ray, G. Chen, and D. Chang. 2004. Hawaii Source Water Assessment Program Report Volume IV Island of Kauai Source Water Assessment Program Report. Prepared for the Hawaii Department of Health, Safe Drinking Water Branch. University of Hawaii, Water Resources Research Center. Updated 2015.

  13. West Maui Groundwater Flow Model

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Nicole Lautze

    2015-01-01

    Groundwater flow model for West Maui. Data is from the following sources: Whittier, R. and A.I. El-Kadi. 2014. Human and Environmental Risk Ranking of Onsite Sewage Disposal Systems For the Hawaiian Islands of Kauai, Molokai, Maui, and Hawaii Final. Prepared by the University of Hawaii, Dept. of Geology and Geophysics for the State of Hawaii Dept. of Health, Safe Drinking Water Branch. September 2014; and Whittier, R.B., K. Rotzoll, S. Dhal, A.I. El-Kadi, C. Ray, G. Chen, and D. Chang. 2004. Hawaii Source Water Assessment Program Report Volume V Island of Maui Source Water Assessment Program Report. Prepared for the Hawaii Department of Health, Safe Drinking Water Branch. University of Hawaii, Water Resources Research Center. Updated 2008.

  14. Delta connected resonant snubber circuit

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lai, Jih-Sheng (Knoxville, TN); Peng, Fang Zheng (Oak Ridge, TN); Young, Sr., Robert W. (Oak Ridge, TN); Ott, Jr., George W. (Knoxville, TN)

    1998-01-01

    A delta connected, resonant snubber-based, soft switching, inverter circuit achieves lossless switching during dc-to-ac power conversion and power conditioning with minimum component count and size. Current is supplied to the resonant snubber branches solely by the dc supply voltage through the main inverter switches and the auxiliary switches. Component count and size are reduced by use of a single semiconductor switch in the resonant snubber branches. Component count is also reduced by maximizing the use of stray capacitances of the main switches as parallel resonant capacitors. Resonance charging and discharging of the parallel capacitances allows lossless, zero voltage switching. In one embodiment, circuit component size and count are minimized while achieving lossless, zero voltage switching within a three-phase inverter.

  15. Resonant snubber inverter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lai, Jih-Sheng (Knoxville, TN); Young, Sr., Robert W. (Oak Ridge, TN); Chen, Daoshen (Knoxville, TN); Scudiere, Matthew B. (Oak Ridge, TN); Ott, Jr., George W. (Knoxville, TN); White, Clifford P. (Knoxville, TN); McKeever, John W. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1997-01-01

    A resonant, snubber-based, soft switching, inverter circuit achieves lossless switching during dc-to-ac power conversion and power conditioning with minimum component count and size. Current is supplied to the resonant snubber branches solely by the main inverter switches. Component count and size are reduced by use of a single semiconductor switch in the resonant snubber branches. Component count is also reduced by maximizing the use of stray capacitances of the main switches as parallel resonant capacitors. Resonance charging and discharging of the parallel capacitances allows lossless, zero voltage switching. In one embodiment, circuit component size and count are minimized while achieving lossless, zero voltage switching within a three-phase inverter.

  16. Radio-nuclide mixture identification using medium energy resolution detectors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nelson, Karl Einar

    2013-09-17

    According to one embodiment, a method for identifying radio-nuclides includes receiving spectral data, extracting a feature set from the spectral data comparable to a plurality of templates in a template library, and using a branch and bound method to determine a probable template match based on the feature set and templates in the template library. In another embodiment, a device for identifying unknown radio-nuclides includes a processor, a multi-channel analyzer, and a memory operatively coupled to the processor, the memory having computer readable code stored thereon. The computer readable code is configured, when executed by the processor, to receive spectral data, to extract a feature set from the spectral data comparable to a plurality of templates in a template library, and to use a branch and bound method to determine a probable template match based on the feature set and templates in the template library.

  17. Finite ballooning angle effects on ion temperature gradient driven mode in gyrokinetic flux tube simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singh, Rameswar, E-mail: rameswar.singh@lpp.polytechnique.fr [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat Gandhinagar, Gujarat 2382 428 (India) [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat Gandhinagar, Gujarat 2382 428 (India); Laboratoire de Physique des Plasmas, Ecole Polytechnique, Route de Saclay, 91128 Palaiseau Cedex (France); Brunner, S. [CRPP, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)] [CRPP, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Ganesh, R. [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat Gandhinagar, Gujarat 2382 428 (India)] [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat Gandhinagar, Gujarat 2382 428 (India); Jenko, F. [Max-Planck-Institut fur Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, D-85748 Garching (Germany)] [Max-Planck-Institut fur Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2014-03-15

    This paper presents effects of finite ballooning angles on linear ion temperature gradient (ITG) driven mode and associated heat and momentum flux in Gyrokinetic flux tube simulation GENE. It is found that zero ballooning angle is not always the one at which the linear growth rate is maximum. The ITG mode acquires a short wavelength (SW) branch (k{sub ?}?{sub i}?>?1) when growth rates maximized over all ballooning angles are considered. However, the SW branch disappears on reducing temperature gradient showing characteristics of zero ballooning angle SWITG in case of extremely high temperature gradient. Associated heat flux is even with respect to ballooning angle and maximizes at nonzero ballooning angle while the parallel momentum flux is odd with respect to the ballooning angle.

  18. Search for invisible decays of a Higgs boson using vector-boson fusion in pp collisions at √s = 8 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; et al

    2016-01-28

    A search for a Higgs boson produced via vector-boson fusion and decaying into invisible particles is presented, using 20.3 fb-1 of proton-proton collision data at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 TeV recorded by the ATLAS detector at the LHC. For a Higgs boson with a mass of 125 GeV, assuming the Standard Model production cross section, an upper bound of 0.28 is set on the branching fraction of H → invisible at 95% confidence level, where the expected upper limit is 0.31. Furthermore, the results are interpreted in models of Higgs-portal dark matter where the branching fraction limit is convertedmore » into upper bounds on the dark-matter-nucleon scattering cross section as a function of the dark-matter particle mass, and compared to results from the direct dark-matter detection experiments.« less

  19. Detailed Kinetic Modeling of Gasoline Surrogate Mixtures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mehl, M; Curran, H J; Pitz, W J; Westbrook, C K

    2009-03-09

    Real fuels are complex mixtures of thousands of hydrocarbon compounds including linear and branched paraffins, naphthenes, olefins and aromatics. It is generally agreed that their behavior can be effectively reproduced by simpler fuel surrogates containing a limited number of components. In this work, a recently revised version of the kinetic model by the authors is used to analyze the combustion behavior of several components relevant to gasoline surrogate formulation. Particular attention is devoted to linear and branched saturated hydrocarbons (PRF mixtures), olefins (1-hexene) and aromatics (toluene). Model predictions for pure components, binary mixtures and multi-component gasoline surrogates are compared with recent experimental information collected in rapid compression machine, shock tube and jet stirred reactors covering a wide range of conditions pertinent to internal combustion engines. Simulation results are discussed focusing attention on the mixing effects of the fuel components.

  20. Kinetic Modeling of Gasoline Surrogate Components and Mixtures under Engine Conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mehl, M; Pitz, W J; Westbrook, C K; Curran, H J

    2010-01-11

    Real fuels are complex mixtures of thousands of hydrocarbon compounds including linear and branched paraffins, naphthenes, olefins and aromatics. It is generally agreed that their behavior can be effectively reproduced by simpler fuel surrogates containing a limited number of components. In this work, an improved version of the kinetic model by the authors is used to analyze the combustion behavior of several components relevant to gasoline surrogate formulation. Particular attention is devoted to linear and branched saturated hydrocarbons (PRF mixtures), olefins (1-hexene) and aromatics (toluene). Model predictions for pure components, binary mixtures and multicomponent gasoline surrogates are compared with recent experimental information collected in rapid compression machine, shock tube and jet stirred reactors covering a wide range of conditions pertinent to internal combustion engines (3-50 atm, 650-1200K, stoichiometric fuel/air mixtures). Simulation results are discussed focusing attention on the mixing effects of the fuel components.

  1. Chemical kinetic modeling of component mixtures relevant to gasoline

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mehl, M; Curran, H J; Pitz, W J; Westbrook, C K

    2009-02-13

    Real fuels are complex mixtures of thousands of hydrocarbon compounds including linear and branched paraffins, naphthenes, olefins and aromatics. It is generally agreed that their behavior can be effectively reproduced by simpler fuel surrogates containing a limited number of components. In this work, a recently revised version of the kinetic model by the authors is used to analyze the combustion behavior of several components relevant to gasoline surrogate formulation. Particular attention is devoted to linear and branched saturated hydrocarbons (PRF mixtures), olefins (1-hexene) and aromatics (toluene). Model predictions for pure components, binary mixtures and multi-component gasoline surrogates are compared with recent experimental information collected in rapid compression machine, shock tube and jet stirred reactors covering a wide range of conditions pertinent to internal combustion engines. Simulation results are discussed focusing attention on the mixing effects of the fuel components.

  2. Observation of the rare $B^0_s\\to\\mu^+\\mu^-$ decay from the combined analysis of CMS and LHCb data

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-05-13

    A joint measurement is presented of the branching fractions $B^0_s\\to\\mu^+\\mu^-$ and $B^0\\to\\mu^+\\mu^-$ in proton-proton collisions at the LHC by the CMS and LHCb experiments. The data samples were collected in 2011 at a centre-of-mass energy of 7 TeV, and in 2012 at 8 TeV. The combined analysis produces the first observation of the $B^0_s\\to\\mu^+\\mu^-$ decay, with a statistical significance exceeding six standard deviations, and the best measurement of its branching fraction so far, and three standard deviation evidence for the $B^0\\to\\mu^+\\mu^-$ decay. The measurements are statistically compatible with SM predictions and impose stringent constraints on several theories beyond the SM.

  3. The light curve shapes as a key to resolving the origin of long secondary periods in red giant stars

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Soszy?ski, I.; Udalski, A. E-mail: udalski@astrouw.edu.pl

    2014-06-10

    We present a study of Optical Gravitational Lensing Experiment light curves of red giant stars exhibiting long secondary periods (LSPs)an enigmatic phenomenon commonly observed in stars on the upper red giant branch and asymptotic giant branch. We show that the light curves of LSP stars are essentially identical to those of the spotted variables with one dark spot on their photospheres. Such behavior can be explained by the presence of a dusty cloud orbiting the red giant together with a low-mass companion in a close, circular orbit. We argue that the binary scenario is in agreement with most of the observational properties of LSP variables, including non-sinusoidal shapes of their radial velocity curves.

  4. In Situ Casting and Imaging of the Rat Airway Tree for Accurate 3D Reconstruction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacob, Rick E.; Colby, Sean M.; Kabilan, Senthil; Einstein, Daniel R.; Carson, James P.

    2013-08-01

    The use of anatomically accurate, animal-specific airway geometries is important for understanding and modeling the physiology of the respiratory system. One approach for acquiring detailed airway architecture is to create a bronchial cast of the conducting airways. However, typical casting procedures either do not faithfully preserve the in vivo branching angles, or produce rigid casts that when removed for imaging are fragile and thus easily damaged. We address these problems by creating an in situ bronchial cast of the conducting airways in rats that can be subsequently imaged in situ using 3D micro-CT imaging. We also demonstrate that deformations in airway branch angles resulting from the casting procedure are small, and that these angle deformations can be reversed through an interactive adjustment of the segmented cast geometry. Animal work was approved by the Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory.

  5. Real-time observation of morphological transformations in II-VI semiconducting nanobelts via environmental transmission electron microscopy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Agarwal, Rahul; Zakharov, Dmitri N.; Krook, Nadia M.; Liu, Wenjing; Berger, Jacob; Stach, Eric A.; Agarwal, Ritesh

    2015-05-01

    It has been observed that wurtzite II–VI semiconducting nanobelts transform into single-crystal, periodically branched nanostructures upon heating. The mechanism of this novel transformation has been elucidated by heating II–VI nanobelts in an environmental transmission electron microscope (ETEM) in oxidizing, reducing and inert atmospheres while observing their structural changes with high spatial resolution. The interplay of surface reconstruction of high-energy surfaces of the wurtzite phase and environment-dependent anisotropic chemical etching of certain crystal surfaces in the branching mechanism of nanobelts has been observed. Understanding of structural and chemical transformations of materials via in situ microscopy techniques and their role in designingmore » new nanostructured materials is discussed.« less

  6. Resonant snubber inverter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lai, J.S.; Young, R.W. Sr.; Chen, D.; Scudiere, M.B.; Ott, G.W. Jr.; White, C.P.; McKeever, J.W.

    1997-06-24

    A resonant, snubber-based, soft switching, inverter circuit achieves lossless switching during dc-to-ac power conversion and power conditioning with minimum component count and size. Current is supplied to the resonant snubber branches solely by the main inverter switches. Component count and size are reduced by use of a single semiconductor switch in the resonant snubber branches. Component count is also reduced by maximizing the use of stray capacitances of the main switches as parallel resonant capacitors. Resonance charging and discharging of the parallel capacitances allows lossless, zero voltage switching. In one embodiment, circuit component size and count are minimized while achieving lossless, zero voltage switching within a three-phase inverter. 14 figs.

  7. Delta connected resonant snubber circuit

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lai, J.S.; Peng, F.Z.; Young, R.W. Sr.; Ott, G.W. Jr.

    1998-01-20

    A delta connected, resonant snubber-based, soft switching, inverter circuit achieves lossless switching during dc-to-ac power conversion and power conditioning with minimum component count and size. Current is supplied to the resonant snubber branches solely by the dc supply voltage through the main inverter switches and the auxiliary switches. Component count and size are reduced by use of a single semiconductor switch in the resonant snubber branches. Component count is also reduced by maximizing the use of stray capacitances of the main switches as parallel resonant capacitors. Resonance charging and discharging of the parallel capacitances allows lossless, zero voltage switching. In one embodiment, circuit component size and count are minimized while achieving lossless, zero voltage switching within a three-phase inverter. 36 figs.

  8. Observation of the Decay B⁻→Ds(*)+K⁻l⁻ν⁻⁻l

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    del Amo Sanchez, P.; Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Martinelli, M.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; et al

    2011-07-22

    We report the observation of the decay B⁻→Ds(*)+K⁻l⁻ν¯l based on 342fb⁻¹ of data collected at the Υ(4S) resonance with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II e⁺e⁻ storage rings at SLAC. A simultaneous fit to three D+s decay chains is performed to extract the signal yield from measurements of the squared missing mass in the B meson decay. We observe the decay B⁻→Ds(*)+K⁻l⁻ν¯l with a significance greater than 5 standard deviations (including systematic uncertainties) and measure its branching fraction to be B(B⁻→Ds(*)+K⁻l⁻ν¯l)=[6.13+1.04-1.03(stat)±0.43(syst)±0.51(B(Ds))]×10⁻⁴, where the last error reflects the limited knowledge of the Ds branching fractions.

  9. Damage analysis and fundamental studies. Quarterly progress report, January-March 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-05-01

    The DAFS program element is a national effort composed of contributions from a number of National Laboratories and other government laboratories, universities, and industrial laboratories. It was organized by the Materials and Radiation Effects Branch, Office of Fusion Energy, DOE, and a Task Group on Damage Analysis and Fundamental Studies which operates under the auspices of that Branch. The purpose of this series of reports is to provide a working technical record of that effort for the use of the program participants, for the fusion energy program in general, and for the Department of Energy. This report is organized along topical lines in parallel to a Program Plan of the same title so that activities and accomplishments may be followed readily, relative to that Program Plan. Thus, the work of a given laboratory may appear throughout the report. The Table of Contents is annotated for the convenience of the reader.

  10. Search for the decay K+ to pi+ gamma gamma in the pi+ momentum region P > 213 MeV/c

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Artamonov, A.V.; Bassalleck, B.; Bhuyan, B.; Blackmore, E.W.; Bryman, D.A.; Chen, S.; Chiang, I.-H.; Christidi, I.-A.; Cooper, P.S.; Diwan, M.V.; Frank, J.S.; Fujiwara,T.; Hu, J.; Jaffe, D.E.; Kabe, S.; Kettell, S.H.; Khabibullin, M.M.; Khotjantsev, A.N.; Kitching, P.; Kobayashi, M.; Komatsubara, T.K.; ,

    2005-05-01

    We have searched for the K{sup +} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{gamma}{gamma} decay in the kinematic region with {pi}{sup +} momentum close to the end point. No events were observed, and the 90% confidence-level upper limit on the partial branching ratio was obtained, B(K{sup +} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{gamma}{gamma}, P > 213 MeV/c) < 8.3 x 10{sup -9} under the assumption of chiral perturbation theory including next-to-leading order ''unitarity'' corrections. The same data were used to determine an upper limit on the K{sup +} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{gamma} branching ratio of 2.3 x 10{sup -9} at the 90% confidence level.

  11. Evidence for B+ -> K*0bar K*+

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aubert, B.; Bona, M.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Lopez, L.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D.N.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Karlsruhe U., EKP /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT, LNS /McGill U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DSM, DAPNIA, Saclay /South Carolina U. /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /Valencia U., IFIC /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2009-06-19

    We present measurements of the branching fraction and fraction of longitudinal polarization for the decay B{sup +} {yields} {bar K}*{sup 0} K*{sup +} with a sample of 467 {+-} 5 million B{bar B} pairs collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy e{sup +}e{sup -} collider at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. We obtain the branching fraction {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} {bar K}*{sup 0} K*{sup +}) = (1.2 {+-} 0.5 {+-} 0.1) x 10{sup ?6} with a significance of 3.7 standard deviations including systematic uncertainties. We measure the fraction of longitudinal polarization f{sub L} = 0.75{sub -0.26}{sup +0.16} {+-} 0.03. The first error quoted is statistical and the second is systematic.

  12. Observation of the Decay B??Ds(*)+K?l????l

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    del Amo Sanchez, P.; Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Martinelli, M.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; et al

    2011-07-22

    We report the observation of the decay B??Ds(*)+K?l??l based on 342fb? of data collected at the ?(4S) resonance with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II e?e? storage rings at SLAC. A simultaneous fit to three D+s decay chains is performed to extract the signal yield from measurements of the squared missing mass in the B meson decay. We observe the decay B??Ds(*)+K?l??l with a significance greater than 5 standard deviations (including systematic uncertainties) and measure its branching fraction to be B(B??Ds(*)+K?l??l)=[6.13+1.04-1.03(stat)0.43(syst)0.51(B(Ds))]10??, where the last error reflects the limited knowledge of the Ds branching fractions.

  13. Pulling the Meridional Overturning Circulation From the South DESC0005100

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cessi, Paola; Wolfe, Christopher L.

    2015-11-25

    This project concerned the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC), its stability, variability and sensitivity to atmospheric forcing, both mechanical (wind-stress) and thermodynamical (heat and freshwater surface fluxes). The focus of the study is the interhemispheric cell in the largely adiabatic regime, where the flow is characterized by a descending branch in the high latitudes of the North Atlantic and the upwelling branch in the Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC) region of the Southern Ocean. These two end points are connected by shared isopycnals along which the flow takes place. The approach is to systematically study the amplitude and frequency of the AMOC’s response to localized buoyancy with an ocean-only model in both coarse and high-resolution configurations, analyzed with innovative diagnostics, focused on the “residual overturning circulation” (ROC), which is the proper measure of the transport of heat and other tracers.

  14. Dual power, constant speed electric motor system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kirschbaum, H.S.

    1984-07-31

    A dual capacity permanent split capacitor electric motor system is provided with a stator having main and auxiliary windings. The main stator winding includes two winding sections which are connected in parallel with each other and across a pair of line terminals while the auxiliary winding is connected in series with a capacitor to form a circuit branch which is connected between the line terminals for operation at a first output power level. Switching means are provided to reconnect the main stator winding sections in series with each other and in series with a second capacitor to form a circuit branch which is connected between the line terminals while the stator auxiliary winding is connected directly between the line terminals for operation at a second output power level. Automatic rotation reversal occurs when the motor switches from the first to the second output power level. 6 figs.

  15. Infrared Absorption Spectroscopy and Chemical Kinetics of Free Radicals, Final Technical Report

    DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

    Curl, Robert F.; Glass, Graham P.

    2004-11-01

    This research was directed at the detection, monitoring, and study of the chemical kinetic behavior by infrared absorption spectroscopy of small free radical species thought to be important intermediates in combustion. Work on the reaction of OH with acetaldehyde has been completed and published and work on the reaction of O({sup 1}D) with CH{sub 4} has been completed and submitted for publication. In the course of our investigation of branching ratios of the reactions of O({sup 1}D) with acetaldehyde and methane, we discovered that hot atom chemistry effects are not negligible at the gas pressures (13 Torr) initially used. Branching ratios of the reaction of O({sup 1}D) with CH{sub 4} have been measured at a tenfold higher He flow and fivefold higher pressure.

  16. Study of J/??pp? and J/??nn?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ablikim, M.; Achasov, M. N.; Ambrose, D. J.; An, F. F.; An, Q.; An, Z. H.; Bai, J. Z.; Ban, Y.; Becker, J.; Berger, N.; Bertani, M.; Bian, J. M.; Boger, E.; Bondarenko, O.; Boyko, I.; Briere, R. A.; Bytev, V.; Cai, X.; Calcaterra, A.; Cao, G. F.; Chang, J. F.; Chelkov, G.; Chen, G.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, J. C.; Chen, M. L.; Chen, S. J.; Chen, Y.; Chen, Y. B.; Cheng, H. P.; Chu, Y. P.; Cronin-Hennessy, D.; Dai, H. L.; Dai, J. P.; Dedovich, D.; Deng, Z. Y.; Denig, A.; Denysenko, I.; Destefanis, M.; Ding, W. M.; Ding, Y.; Dong, L. Y.; Dong, M. Y.; Du, S. X.; Fang, J.; Fang, S. S.; Fava, L.; Feldbauer, F.; Feng, C. Q.; Ferroli, R. B.; Fu, C. D.; Fu, J. L.; Gao, Y.; Geng, C.; Goetzen, K.; Gong, W. X.; Gradl, W.; Greco, M.; Gu, M. H.; Gu, Y. T.; Guan, Y. H.; Guo, A. Q.; Guo, L. B.; Guo, Y. P.; Han, Y. L.; Hao, X. Q.; Harris, F. A.; He, K. L.; He, M.; He, Z. Y.; Held, T.; Heng, Y. K.; Hou, Z. L.; Hu, H. M.; Hu, J. F.; Hu, T.; Huang, B.; Huang, G. M.; Huang, J. S.; Huang, X. T.; Huang, Y. P.; Hussain, T.; Ji, C. S.; Ji, Q.; Ji, X. B.; Ji, X. L.; Jia, L. K.; Jiang, L. L.; Jiang, X. S.; Jiao, J. B.; Jiao, Z.; Jin, D. P.; Jin, S.; Jing, F. F.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Kavatsyuk, M.; Kuehn, W.; Lai, W.; Lange, J. S.; Leung, J. K. C.; Li, C. H.; Li, Cheng; Li, Cui; Li, D. M.; Li, F.; Li, G.; Li, H. B.; Li, J. C.; Li, K.; Li, Lei; Li, N. B.; Li, Q. J.; Li, S. L.; Li, W. D.; Li, W. G.; Li, X. L.; Li, X. N.; Li, X. Q.; Li, X. R.; Li, Z. B.; Liang, H.; Liang, Y. F.; Liang, Y. T.; Liao, G. R.; Liao, X. T.; Liu, B. J.; Liu, B. J.; Liu, C. L.; Liu, C. X.; Liu, C. Y.; Liu, F. H.; Liu, Fang; Liu, Feng; Liu, H.; Liu, H. B.; Liu, H. H.; Liu, H. M.; Liu, H. W.; Liu, J. P.; Liu, K. Y.; Liu, Kai; Liu, Kun; Liu, P. L.; Liu, S. B.; Liu, X.; Liu, X. H.; Liu, Y.; Liu, Y. B.; Liu, Z. A.; Liu, Zhiqiang; Liu, Zhiqing; Loehner, H.; Lu, G. R.; Lu, H. J.; Lu, J. G.; Lu, Q. W.; Lu, X. R.; Lu, Y. P.; Luo, C. L.; Luo, M. X.; Luo, T.; Luo, X. L.; Lv, M.; Ma, C. L.; Ma, F. C.; Ma, H. L.; Ma, Q. M.; Ma, S.; Ma, T.; Ma, X. Y.; Ma, Y.; Maas, F. E.; Maggiora, M.; Malik, Q. A.; Mao, H.; Mao, Y. J.; Mao, Z. P.; Messchendorp, J. G.; Min, J.; Min, T. J.; Mitchell, R. E.; Mo, X. H.; Morales Morales, C.; Motzko, C.; Muchnoi, N. Yu.; Nefedov, Y.; Nicholson, C.; Nikolaev, I. B.; Ning, Z.; Olsen, S. L.; Ouyang, Q.; Pacetti, S.; Park, J. W.; Pelizaeus, M.; Peters, K.; Ping, J. L.; Ping, R. G.; Poling, R.; Prencipe, E.; Pun, C. S. J.; Qi, M.; Qian, S.; Qiao, C. F.; Qin, X. S.; Qin, Y.; Qin, Z. H.; Qiu, J. F.; Rashid, K. H.; Rong, G.; Ruan, X. D.; Sarantsev, A.; Schulze, J.; Shao, M.; Shen, C. P.; Shen, X. Y.; Sheng, H. Y.; Shepherd, M. R.; Song, X. Y.; Spataro, S.; Spruck, B.; Sun, D. H.; Sun, G. X.; Sun, J. F.; Sun, S. S.; Sun, X. D.; Sun, Y. J.; Sun, Y. Z.; Sun, Z. J.; Sun, Z. T.; Tang, C. J.; Tang, X.; Thorndike, E. H.; Tian, H. L.; Toth, D.; Ullrich, M.; Varner, G. S.; Wang, B.; Wang, B. Q.; Wang, K.; Wang, L. L.; Wang, L. S.; Wang, M.; Wang, P.; Wang, P. L.; Wang, Q.; Wang, Q. J.; Wang, S. G.; Wang, X. F.; Wang, X. L.; Wang, Y. D.; Wang, Y. F.; Wang, Y. Q.; Wang, Z.; Wang, Z. G.; Wang, Z. Y.; Wei, D. H.; Weidenkaff, P.; Wen, Q. G.; Wen, S. P.; Werner, M.; Wiedner, U.; Wu, L. H.; Wu, N.; Wu, S. X.; Wu, W.; Wu, Z.; Xia, L. G.; Xiao, Z. J.; Xie, Y. G.; Xiu, Q. L.; Xu, G. F.; Xu, G. M.; Xu, H.; Xu, Q. J.; Xu, X. P.; Xu, Y.; Xu, Z. R.; Xue, F.; Xue, Z.; Yan, L.; Yan, W. B.; Yan, Y. H.; Yang, H. X.; Yang, T.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Y. X.; Ye, H.; Ye, M.; Ye, M. H.; Yu, B. X.; Yu, C. X.; Yu, J. S.; Yu, S. P.; Yuan, C. Z.; Yuan, W. L.; Yuan, Y.; Zafar, A. A.; Zallo, A.; Zeng, Y.; Zhang, B. X.; Zhang, B. Y.; Zhang, C. C.; Zhang, D. H.; Zhang, H. H.; Zhang, H. Y.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, J. G.; Zhang, J. Q.; Zhang, J. W.; Zhang, J. Y.; Zhang, J. Z.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, S. H.; Zhang, T. R.; Zhang, X. J.; Zhang, X. Y.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Y. H.; Zhang, Y. S.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhang, Z. Y.; Zhao, G.; Zhao, H. S.; Zhao, J. W.; Zhao, K. X.; Zhao, Lei; Zhao, Ling; Zhao, M. G.; Zhao, Q.; Zhao, S. J.; Zhao, T. C.; Zhao, X. H.; Zhao, Y. B.; Zhao, Z. G.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zheng, B.; Zheng, J. P.; Zheng, Y. H.; Zheng, Z. P.; Zhong, B.; Zhong, J.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, X. K.; Zhou, X. R.; Zhu, C.; Zhu, K.; Zhu, K. J.; Zhu, S. H.; Zhu, X. L.; Zhu, X. W.; Zhu, Y. M.; Zhu, Y. S.; Zhu, Z. A.; Zhuang, J.; Zou, B. S.; Zou, J. H.; Zuo, J. X.

    2012-08-31

    The decays J/??pp? and J/??nn? have been investigated with a sample of 225.210? J/? events collected with the BESIII detector at the BEPCII e?e? collider. The branching fractions are determined to be B(J/??pp?)=(2.1120.0040.031)10? and B(J/??nn?)=(2.070.010.17)10?. Distributions of the angle ? between the proton or antineutron and the beam direction are well described by the form 1+?cos??, and we find ?=0.5950.0120.015 for J/??pp? and ?=0.500.040.21 for J/??nn?. Our branching-fraction results suggest a large phase angle between the strong and electromagnetic amplitudes describing the J/??NN decay.

  17. Complete (O{sub 7},O{sub 8}) contribution to B{yields}X{sub s{gamma}} at O({alpha}{sub s}{sup 2})

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Asatrian, H. M.; Ewerth, T.; Ferroglia, A.; Greub, C.; Ossola, G.

    2010-10-01

    We calculate the set of O({alpha}{sub s}{sup 2}) corrections to the branching ratio and to the photon energy spectrum of the decay process B{yields}X{sub s{gamma}} originating from the interference of diagrams involving the electromagnetic dipole operator O{sub 7} with diagrams involving the chromomagnetic dipole operator O{sub 8}. The corrections evaluated here are one of the elements needed to complete the calculations of the B{yields}X{sub s{gamma}} branching ratio at next-to-next-to-leading order in QCD. We conclude that this set of corrections does not change the central value of the standard model prediction for Br(B{yields}X{sub s{gamma}}) by more than 1%.

  18. On the possibility of deuteron disintegration in electrochemically compressed D/sup +/ in a palladium cathode

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ragheb, M.; Miley, G.H. . Dept. of Nuclear Engineering )

    1989-09-01

    The possibility of deuteron disintegration due to polarization in the coulomb field of a target nucleus according to an Oppenheimer-Phillips process is discussed within the context of electrochemically compressed D/sup +/ in a palladium cathode. This reaction is possible between deuterons and palladium isotopes, as well as between the deuterons themselves. In the last case, the equivalent of the proton branch of the deuterium-deuterium fusion reaction occurs in preference to the neutron branch. The process provides a possible explanation for the observed energy release, tritium production, and neutron suppression in the Fleischmann and Pons experiment. If such a process can be experimentally verified, analogous processes leading to the disintegration of the /sup 9/Be nucleus may be achievable.

  19. Exhaust gas recirculation system for an internal combustion engine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wu, Ko-Jen

    2013-05-21

    An exhaust gas recirculation system for an internal combustion engine comprises an exhaust driven turbocharger having a low pressure turbine outlet in fluid communication with an exhaust gas conduit. The turbocharger also includes a low pressure compressor intake and a high pressure compressor outlet in communication with an intake air conduit. An exhaust gas recirculation conduit fluidly communicates with the exhaust gas conduit to divert a portion of exhaust gas to a low pressure exhaust gas recirculation branch extending between the exhaust gas recirculation conduit and an engine intake system for delivery of exhaust gas thereto. A high pressure exhaust gas recirculation branch extends between the exhaust gas recirculation conduit and the compressor intake and delivers exhaust gas to the compressor for mixing with a compressed intake charge for delivery to the intake system.

  20. Nonuniform black strings in various dimensions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sorkin, Evgeny

    2006-11-15

    The nonuniform black-strings branch, which emerges from the critical Gregory-Laflamme string, is numerically constructed in dimensions 6{<=}D{<=}11 and extended into the strongly nonlinear regime. All the solutions are more massive and less entropic than the marginal string. We find the asymptotic values of the mass, the entropy and other physical variables in the limit of large horizon deformations. By explicit metric comparison we verify that the local geometry around the waist of our most nonuniform solutions is conelike with less than 10% deviation. We find evidence that in this regime the characteristic length scale has a power-law dependence on a parameter along the branch of the solutions, and estimate the critical exponent.

  1. High cation transport polymer electrolyte

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gerald, II, Rex E. (Brookfield, IL); Rathke, Jerome W. (Homer Glen, IL); Klingler, Robert J. (Westmont, IL)

    2007-06-05

    A solid state ion conducting electrolyte and a battery incorporating same. The electrolyte includes a polymer matrix with an alkali metal salt dissolved therein, the salt having an anion with a long or branched chain having not less than 5 carbon or silicon atoms therein. The polymer is preferably a polyether and the salt anion is preferably an alkyl or silyl moiety of from 5 to about 150 carbon/silicon atoms.

  2. X:\ARM_19~1\P355-365.WPD

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    h (1 g) ( , ; ) 1 ( ) 1 e / with 2 2 1 1 R NIP ( ) 1 2 R IP ( ') ( , ;| - '|) d ' -5/3 rs rs , rs , rs . Session Papers 363 (1) (2) (3) A Characteristic Scale in Radiation Fields of Fractal Clouds W. Wiscombe, R. Cahalan, A. Davis, and A. Marshak National Aeronautics and Space Administration/Goddard Space Flight Center Climate & Radiation Branch Greenbelt, Maryland The wavenumber spectrum of Landsat imagery for marine The location of the scale break is determined entirely stratocumulus

  3. A regular version of Smilansky model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barseghyan, Diana; Exner, Pavel; Nuclear Physics Institute ASCR, 25068 ?e near Prague

    2014-04-15

    We discuss a modification of Smilansky model in which a singular potential channel is replaced by a regular, below unbounded potential which shrinks as it becomes deeper. We demonstrate that, similarly to the original model, such a system exhibits a spectral transition with respect to the coupling constant, and determine the critical value above which a new spectral branch opens. The result is generalized to situations with multiple potential channels..

  4. Search for production of vector-like quark pairs and of four top quarks in the lepton-plus-jets final state in pp collisions at √s = 8 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.

    2015-08-20

    A search for pair production of vector-like quarks, both up-type (T) and down-type (B), as well as for four-top-quark production, is presented. The search is based on pp collisions at \\( \\sqrt{s}=8 \\) TeV recorded in 2012 with the ATLAS detector at the CERN Large Hadron Collider and corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 20.3 fb–1. Data are analysed in the lepton-plus-jets final state, characterised by an isolated electron or muon with high transverse momentum, large missing transverse momentum and multiple jets. Dedicated analyses are performed targeting three cases: a T quark with significant branching ratio to a W bosonmore » and a b-quark \\( \\left(T\\overline{T}\\to Wb+\\mathrm{X}\\right) \\), and both a T quark and a B quark with significant branching ratio to a Higgs boson and a third-generation quark (\\( T\\overline{T}\\to Ht+X\\;\\mathrm{and}\\;B\\overline{B}\\to Hb+\\mathrm{X} \\) respectively). No significant excess of events above the Standard Model expectation is observed, and 95% CL lower limits are derived on the masses of the vector-like T and B quarks under several branching ratio hypotheses assuming contributions from T → Wb, Zt, Ht and B → Wt, Zb, Hb decays. The 95% CL observed lower limits on the T quark mass range between 715 GeV and 950 GeV for all possible values of the branching ratios into the three decay modes, and are the most stringent constraints to date. In addition, the most restrictive upper bounds on four-top-quark production are set in a number of new physics scenarios.« less

  5. OTEC support services. Quarterly technical progress report No. 8, February 15-May 14, 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lipari, M. V.

    1980-05-01

    Technical engineering and management support services provided by the VSE Corporation for the Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Program of the Ocean Systems Branch, Division of Central Solar Technology are reported. Tasks include: (1) survey, analysis, evaluation, and recommendation concerning program performance; (2) program technical monitoring; (3) development and implementation of methodology to identify and evaluate program alternatives; (4) technical assessments; (5) OTEC system integration; (6) environment and siting considerations; and (7) transmission subsystem considerations. (WHK)

  6. Microsoft PowerPoint - P&RA CoP EPA optimization Biggs final 111215

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Implementing Optimization in the Superfund Program __________________________________________________ For the Interagency Performance and Risk Assessment Community of Practice (P&RA CoP) November 12, 2015 Kirby Biggs National Optimization Program Coordinator Technology Integration and Information Branch Office of Superfund Remediation and Technology Integration Washington DC 20460 biggs.kirby@epa.gov . 703-823-3081 . www.cluin.org/optimization (Cleanup Horizon: 2004 - 2033) Source:

  7. Sandia National Laboratories: No More Green Waste in the Landfill

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    No More Green Waste in the Landfill June 09, 2011 Dump Truck Image On the heels of Sandia National Laboratories' successful food waste composting program, Pollution Prevention (P2) has teamed with the Facilities' Grounds and Roads team and the Solid Waste Transfer Facility to implement green waste composting. Previously, branches and logs were being diverted and mulched by Kirtland Air Force Base at their Construction & Demolition Landfill that is on base and utilized under contract by

  8. Solid state pulsed power generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tao, Fengfeng; Saddoughi, Seyed Gholamali; Herbon, John Thomas

    2014-02-11

    A power generator includes one or more full bridge inverter modules coupled to a semiconductor opening switch (SOS) through an inductive resonant branch. Each module includes a plurality of switches that are switched in a fashion causing the one or more full bridge inverter modules to drive the semiconductor opening switch SOS through the resonant circuit to generate pulses to a load connected in parallel with the SOS.

  9. Section 12

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A Mesoscale Convective System Parameterization Scheme for Use in General Circulation Models W. R. Cotton, G. D. Alexander, H. Jiang Colorado State University Fort Collins, Colorado Cloud-resolving simulations of mesoscale convective systems these simulations focuses on conditional sampling of the (MCS) have been used to build a parameterization scheme of stratiform region of each system. The conditional sampling of the thermodynamic forcing by the mesoscale flow branches of the fine grid data

  10. Aza crown ether compounds as anion receptors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lee, Hung Sui (East Setauket, NY); Yang, Xiao-Oing (Port Jefferson Station, NY); McBreen, James (Bellport, NY)

    1998-08-04

    A family of aza-ether based compounds including linear, multi-branched and aza-crown ethers is provided. When added to non-aqueous battery electrolytes, the new family of aza-ether based compounds acts as neutral receptors to complex the anion moiety of the electrolyte salt thereby increasing the conductivity and the transference number of LI.sup.+ ion in alkali metal batteries.

  11. Aza compounds as anion receptors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lee, Hung Sui (East Setauket, NY); Yang, Xiao-Qing (Port Jefferson Station, NY); McBreen, James (Bellport, NY)

    1998-01-06

    A family of aza-ether based compounds including linear, multi-branched and aza-crown ethers is provided. When added to non-aqueous battery electrolytes, the family of aza-ether based compounds acts as neutral receptors to complex the anion moiety of the electrolyte salt thereby increasing the conductivity and the transference number of Li.sup.+ ion in alkali metal batteries.

  12. Anion receptor compounds for non-aqueous electrolytes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lee, Hung Sui (East Setauket, NY); Yang, Xiao-Oing (Port Jefferson Station, NY); McBreen, James (Bellport, NY)

    2000-09-19

    A new family of aza-ether based compounds including linear, multi-branched and aza-crown ethers is provided. When added to non-aqueous battery electrolytes, the new family of aza-ether based compounds acts as neutral receptors to complex the anion moiety of the electrolyte salt thereby increasing the conductivity and the transference number of LI.sup.+ ion in alkali metal batteries.

  13. Preface to special topic: Selected articles from phononics 2013: The second international conference on phononic crystals/metamaterials, phonon transport and optomechanics, 2-7 June 2013, Sharm El-Sheikh, Egypt

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hussein, Mahmoud I.; El-Kady, Ihab; Li, Baowen; Snchez-Dehesa, Jos

    2014-12-31

    Phononics is an interdisciplinary branch of physics and engineering that deals with the behavior of phonons, and more broadly elastic and acoustic waves in similar context, and their manipulation in solids and/or fluids to benefit technological applications. Compared to resembling disciplines, such as electronics and photonics, phononics is a youthful field. It is growing at a remarkable rate, especially when viewed liberally with no limiting constraints on any particular length scale, discipline or application.

  14. An Enquiry Concerning Charmless Semileptonic Decays of Bottom Mesons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chaisanguanthum, Kris Somboon; /Harvard U. /SLAC

    2008-09-19

    The branching fractions for the decays B {yields} P{ell}{nu}{sub {ell}}, where P are the pseudoscalar charmless mesons {pi}{sup {+-}}, {pi}{sup 0}, {eta} and {eta}{prime} and {ell} is an electron or muon, are measured with B{sup 0} and B{sup {+-}} mesons found in the recoil of a second B meson decaying as B {yields} D{ell}{nu}{sub {ell}} or B {yields} D*{ell}{nu}{sub {ell}}. The measurements are based on a data set of 348 fb{sup -1} of e{sup +}e{sup -} collisions at {radical}s = 10.58 GeV recorded with the BABAR detector. Assuming isospin symmetry, measured pionic branching fractions are combined into {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup -}{ell}{sup +}{nu}{sub {ell}}) = (1.54 {+-} 0.17{sub (stat)} {+-} 0.09{sub (syst)}) x 10{sup -4}. First evidence of the B{sup +} {yields} {eta}{ell}{sup +}{nu}{sub {ell}} decay is seen; its branching fraction is measured to be {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} {eta}{ell}{sup +}{nu}{sub {ell}}) = (0.64 {+-} 0.20{sub (stat)} {+-} 0.03{sub (syst)}) x 10{sup -4}. It is determined that {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} {eta}{prime}{ell}{sup +}{nu}{sub {ell}}) < 0.47 x 10{sup -4} to 90% confidence. Partial branching fractions for the pionic decays in ranges of the momentum transfer and various published calculations of the B {yields} {pi} hadronic form factor are used to obtain values of the magnitude of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix element V{sub ub} between 3.61 and 4.07 x 10{sup -3}.

  15. DOE pollution prevention in the 21st century

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-10-01

    This document presents abstracts of the topics covered in the DOE Pollution Prevention in the 21st Century conference held July 9-11, 1996. These topics include: model facilities; Federal/NEPA/stake- holders; microchemistry; solvents and reduction; education and outreach; return on investments; energy management; decontamination and decommissioning; planning and regulations; environmental restoration; recycling; affirmative procurement in the executive branch; construction and demolition; materials exchange; and ISO 2000.

  16. Aza crown ether compounds as anion receptors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lee, H.S.; Yang, X.O.; McBreen, J.

    1998-08-04

    A family of aza-ether based compounds including linear, multi-branched and aza-crown ethers is provided. When added to non-aqueous battery electrolytes, the new family of aza-ether based compounds acts as neutral receptors to complex the anion moiety of the electrolyte salt thereby increasing the conductivity and the transference number of LI{sup +} ion in alkali metal batteries. 3 figs.

  17. Aza compounds as anion receptors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lee, H.S.; Yang, X.Q.; McBreen, J.

    1998-01-06

    A family of aza-ether based compounds including linear, multi-branched and aza-crown ethers is provided. When added to non-aqueous battery electrolytes, the family of aza-ether based compounds acts as neutral receptors to complex the anion moiety of the electrolyte salt thereby increasing the conductivity and the transference number of Li{sup +} ion in alkali metal batteries. 3 figs.

  18. Sol-gel kinetics for the preparation of inorganic/organic siloxane copolymers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rankin, S.E.; Macosko, C.W.; McCormick, A.V.

    1996-12-31

    A model is described which incorporates hydrolysis pseudo-equilibrium to quantify the evolution of silicon site distributions in sol-gel polymerization up to higher conversions than previously possible. {sup 29}Si nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy data are used (1) to provide a means of recognizing hydrolysis pseudo-equilibrium and (2) to provide examples where different substitution effects on condensation rate coefficients caused by branching are observed. Extension of the model to copolymerization is discussed.

  19. Unique Auxin Regulation Mechanism Discovered

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Unique Auxin Regulation Mechanism Discovered Print The plant hormone auxin regulates many plant growth and development processes, including shoot growth, root branching, fruit ripening, tropisms, and flowering. But how such a simple molecule elicits such a variety of cellular responses has been a mystery. An important breakthrough came in 2005, wh en a conserved plant protein known as TIR1 (part of a protein destruction machinery system) was identified as a receptor for auxin. Now, an

  20. CIMEL Measurements of Zenith Radiances at the ARM SGP Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CIMEL Measurements of Zenith Radiances at the ARM SGP Site W. J. Wiscombe National Aeronautics and Space Administration Goddard Space Flight Center Climate and Radiation Branch Greenbelt, Maryland A. Marshak and K. Evans Joint Center for Earth Systems Technology University of Maryland Baltimore, Maryland Y. Knyazikhin Department of Geography Boston University Boston, Massachusetts H. W. Barker Environment Canada Downsview, Ontario, Canada C. F. Pavloski Department of Meteorology Pennsylvania

  1. 6th US-Russian Pu Science Workshop Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    US-Russian Pu Science Workshop Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory University of California, Livermore, California July 14 and 15, 2006 Local Chairs: Michael Fluss, James Tobin, Adam Schwartz LLNL, Livermore, USA Alexander V. Petrovtsev, RFNC * VNIITF, Snezhinsk, Russia Boris A. Nadykto, RFNC * VNIIEF, Sarov, Russia Lidia F. Timofeeva, VNIINM, Moscow, Russia Siegfried S. Hecker, (Luis Morales POC) LANL, Los Alamos, USA Valentin E. Arkhipov, IMP, Ural Branch of RAS, Yekaterinburg, Russia This

  2. A New Look into the Treatment of Small-Scale Drop Variability in Radiative Transfer

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Look into the Treatment of Small-Scale Drop Variability in Radiative Transfer W. J. Wiscombe and A. Marshak National Aeronautics and Space Administration Goddard Space Flight Center Climate and Radiation Branch Greenbelt, Maryland Y. Knyazikhin Department of Geography Boston University Boston, Massachusetts Introduction Drop size and drop spatial distribution determine photon-cloud interaction. The classical approach assumes that the number of drops of a given radius is proportional to volume

  3. An Improved Daylight Correction for IR Loss in ARM Diffuse SW Measurements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    An Improved Daylight Correction for IR Loss in ARM Diffuse SW Measurements C. N. Long, K. Younkin, and K. L. Gaustad Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington J. A. Augustine National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Air Resources Laboratory Surface Radiation Research Branch Boulder, Colorado Introduction A paper by Cess et al. (2000) notes that some clear-sky diffuse shortwave (SW) measurements they were using from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern

  4. Posters

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3 Posters Mean Fluxes of the Near-Infrared Radiation in Broken Clouds V. E. Zuev, G. A. Titov, T. B. Zhuravleva, and S. Y. Popov Institute of Atmospheric Optics, Siberian Branch Russian Academy of Sciences Tomsk, Russia Radiation codes of current general circulation models (GCMs) involve calculations of the spectrally integrated upward and downward fluxes of solar and thermal radiation at different atmospheric levels. For the visible, vertical profiles of the mean fluxes of upward and downward

  5. Posters Brightness Fields of Broken Clouds V. E. Zuev, G. A. Titov, E. I. Kasyanov, and D. A. Zimin

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 Posters Brightness Fields of Broken Clouds V. E. Zuev, G. A. Titov, E. I. Kasyanov, and D. A. Zimin Institute of Atmospheric Optics, Siberian Branch Russian Academy of Sciences Tomsk, Russia Introduction The radiation budget and brightness field of the system "atmosphere-underlying surface" are controlled, to a considerable degree, by the variety of forms and the strong space-time variability of cloud cover. The space and angle structure of the radiation fields of cloudy atmosphere

  6. Posters Mean Fluxes of Visible Solar Radiation in Broken Clouds

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7 Posters Mean Fluxes of Visible Solar Radiation in Broken Clouds V. E. Zuev, G. A. Titov, T. B. Zhuravleva, and S. Y. Popov Institute of Atmospheric Optics, Siberian Branch Russian Academy of Sciences Tomsk, Russia Introduction Generally, radiation codes for general circulation models (GCMs) include, together with other procedures, calculations of vertical profiles of upward and downward radiation fluxes which are needed to calculate radiant heat influxes. These last radiative characteristics

  7. PowerPoint Presentation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    STM BBHRP NASA Langley Research Center / Atmospheric Sciences ARM March 10-14, 2008 Improvements in Broadband Shortwave and Longwave Fluxes over ARM Domains M.M. Khaiyer, D.R.Doelling, M.L. Nordeen, R. Palikonda, Y. Yi Science Systems and Applications, Inc. P. Minnis National Aeronautics and Space Administration Langley Research Center Climate Science Branch ARM STM BBHRP NASA Langley Research Center / Atmospheric Sciences ARM March 10-14, 2008 Introduction * NASA Langley Cloud Group provides

  8. ARQ.2_09.cover.indd

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    HISTORY OF THE SEABORG INSTITUTE Contents The Seaborg Institute for Transactinium Science Established to educate the next generation of nuclear scientists 1 ITS Advisory Council 5 Seaborg the scientist 7 Naming seaborgium 11 Branching out 13 IGCAR honors Seaborg's contributions to actinide science 16 Seaborg Institute for Transactinium Science/Los Alamos National Laboratory Contents History of the Seaborg Institute 1 2nd Quarter 2009 Actinide Research Quarterly In the late 1970s and early 1980s,

  9. Microsoft Word - DOE-ID-13-065 UC Berkeley EC B3-6.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5 SECTION A. Project Title: Structural Health Monitoring of Nuclear Spent Fuel Storage Facilities - University of California, Berkeley SECTION B. Project Description The University of California-Berkeley, in collaboration with Argonne National Laboratory, proposes to demonstrate that the recoil-ion approach to -delayed neutron spectroscopy can be an innovative method to collect high-quality measurements of neutron emission branching ratio and energy spectrum that are needed for nuclear-energy

  10. Microsoft Word - ESH-004_R4_final form.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    PPPL PRINCETON PLASMA PHYSICS LABORATORY PROCEDURE No. ESH-004 Rev 4 Attachment 1, Page 1 of 2 JOB HAZARD ANALYSIS Reference: Work Order # Work Permit # Work Planning # Procedure # Other Written by (Print): Date: Division/Branch/Org: Description of job/work to be performed: Location of job/work to be performed: Hazard (Check-off and Describe the source of the hazard) Control Measures (Write # of Control(s) in Box) See Back Chemicals MSDS's Available Training Provided Ergonomic Issues (Repetitive

  11. Recent Higgs results from the ATLAS experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brendlinger, Kurt; Collaboration: ATLAS Collaboration

    2014-06-24

    This paper presents recent results on the Higgs boson from the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider. The Collaboration reports on measurements of the signal strength, couplings, and spin of the Higgs in several decay channels. We find all measurements to be consistent with Standard Model predictions. The Higgs branching fraction to invisible particles is constrained and no evidence of physics beyond the Standard Model is found.

  12. Infrared lessons for ultraviolet gravity: the case of massive gravity and Born-Infeld

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jimnez, Jose Beltrn; Heisenberg, Lavinia; Olmo, Gonzalo J. E-mail: Lavinia.Heisenberg@unige.ch

    2014-11-01

    We generalize the ultraviolet sector of gravitation via a Born-Infeld action using lessons from massive gravity. The theory contains all of the elementary symmetric polynomials and is treated in the Palatini formalism. We show how the connection can be solved algebraically to be the Levi-Civita connection of an effective metric. The non-linearity of the algebraic equations yields several branches, one of which always reduces to General Relativity at low curvatures. We explore in detail a minimal version of the theory, for which we study solutions in the presence of a perfect fluid with special attention to the cosmological evolution. In vacuum we recover Ricci-flat solutions, but also an additional physical solution corresponding to an Einstein space. The existence of two physical branches remains for non-vacuum solutions and, in addition, the branch that connects to the Einstein space in vacuum is not very sensitive to the specific value of the energy density. For the branch that connects to the General Relativity limit we generically find three behaviours for the Hubble function depending on the equation of state of the fluid, namely: either there is a maximum value for the energy density that connects continuously with vacuum, or the energy density can be arbitrarily large but the Hubble function saturates and remains constant at high energy densities, or the energy density is unbounded and the Hubble function grows faster than in General Relativity. The second case is particularly interesting because it could offer an interesting inflationary epoch even in the presence of a dust component. Finally, we discuss the possibility of avoiding certain types of singularities within the minimal model.

  13. Diagnostic and therapeutic applications of diode lasers and solid state lasers in medicine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacques, S.L. . Cancer Center); Welch, A.J. ); Motamedi, M. . Medical Branch); Rastegar, S. ); Tittel, F. ); Esterowitz, L. )

    1992-05-01

    The Texas Medical Center in Houston and the nearby UT Medical Branch at Galveston together constitute a major center of medical research activities. Laser applications in medicine are under development with the engineering assistance of the colloborating engineering centers at Rice University, UT-Austin, and Texas A M Univ. In addition, this collective is collaborating with the Naval Research Laboratory, where new developments in laser design are underway, in order to transfer promising new laser technology rapidly into the medical environment.

  14. Hierardlicsl Diagnosis V. V. Zuev Institute of Atmospheric Optics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hierardlicsl Diagnosis V. V. Zuev Institute of Atmospheric Optics Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences Tomsk, Russia Systematic observations of the earth's ozone layer over the last ten years indicate a steady decrease of ozone content in the stratospheric maximum and, on the contrary, a increase of ozone concentrations in the troposphere. This trend is illustrated clearly by the results of 20 years' observations of high-altitude ozone concentration distribution in the troposphere

  15. High Conductivity Single-ion Cross-linked Polymers for Lithium Batteries

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Fuel Cells - Energy Innovation Portal Vehicles and Fuels Vehicles and Fuels Energy Storage Energy Storage Advanced Materials Advanced Materials Find More Like This Return to Search High Conductivity Single-ion Cross-linked Polymers for Lithium Batteries and Fuel Cells Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Contact LBL About This Technology Cross-linked comb-branch structure.The molecular structures are infinitely variable in order to provide optimum properties for both bulk membranes and

  16. Hydrogen transport diagnostics by atomic and molecular emission line

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    profiles simultaneously measured for large helical device (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Hydrogen transport diagnostics by atomic and molecular emission line profiles simultaneously measured for large helical device Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Hydrogen transport diagnostics by atomic and molecular emission line profiles simultaneously measured for large helical device We observe the Balmer-{alpha}, -{beta}, and -{gamma} lines of hydrogen atoms and Q branches of the

  17. Structure of the human M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor bound to an

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    antagonist (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Journal Article: Structure of the human M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor bound to an antagonist Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Structure of the human M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor bound to an antagonist The parasympathetic branch of the autonomic nervous system regulates the activity of multiple organ systems. Muscarinic receptors are G-protein-coupled receptors that mediate the response to acetylcholine released from

  18. Pruning apparatus and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dellinger, R.D.

    1997-12-09

    The present invention is an automated pruning apparatus that requires little or no follow-up hand pruning and requires no sensors to avoid supportive trunks or posts. The present invention uses at least one pair of flat, close angled toothed, counter rotating blades. Woody branches are directed to the counter rotating blades first with a lifting arm and secondly by a quilled drum. 16 figs.

  19. Excited D{sub s} (and Pentaquarks) in Chiral Perturbation Theory

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Conference) | SciTech Connect Conference: Excited D{sub s} (and Pentaquarks) in Chiral Perturbation Theory Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Excited D{sub s} (and Pentaquarks) in Chiral Perturbation Theory I present results of a heavy hadron chiral perturbation theory analysis of the decays and masses of the recently discovered excited charm mesons. The present data on the electromagnetic branching ratios are consistent with heavy quark symmetry predictions and disfavor a molecular

  20. Slide21 | OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific and Technical

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Information 1 Potential Next Steps The OSTI-Publisher agreements demonstrate the workability of a hybrid/distributed approach to public access - if decisions are made to pursue public access. Centralized metadata Decentralized full text Article (Version of Record) at publisher website Accepted manuscript at author's institution or other host site U.S. Executive and Legislative branches of government are considering broader implementation of "public access" beyond the National