National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for braking anti-lock brakes

  1. Gravity brake

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lujan, Richard E. (Santa Fe, NM)

    2001-01-01

    A mechanical gravity brake that prevents hoisted loads within a shaft from free-falling when a loss of hoisting force occurs. A loss of hoist lifting force may occur in a number of situations, for example if a hoist cable were to break, the brakes were to fail on a winch, or the hoist mechanism itself were to fail. Under normal hoisting conditions, the gravity brake of the invention is subject to an upward lifting force from the hoist and a downward pulling force from a suspended load. If the lifting force should suddenly cease, the loss of differential forces on the gravity brake in free-fall is translated to extend a set of brakes against the walls of the shaft to stop the free fall descent of the gravity brake and attached load.

  2. Braking system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Norgren, D.U.

    1982-09-23

    A balanced braking system comprising a plurality of braking assemblies located about a member to be braked. Each of the braking assemblies consists of a spring biased piston of a first material fitted into a body of a different material which has a greater contraction upon cooling than the piston material. The piston is provided with a recessed head portion over which is positioned a diaphragm and forming a space therebetween to which is connected a pressurized fluid supply. The diaphragm is controlled by the fluid in the space to contact or withdraw from the member to be braked. A cooling means causes the body within which the piston is fitted to contract more than the piston, producing a tight shrink fit therebetween. The braking system is particularly applicable for selectively braking an arbor of an electron microscope which immobilizes, for example, a vertically adjustable low temperature specimen holder during observation. The system provides balanced braking forces which can be easily removed and re-established with minimal disturbance to arbor location.

  3. Hybrid: Braking

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center HomeVehicle Replacement VouchersBraking

  4. Full Hybrid: Braking

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center HomeVehicle Replacement VouchersBraking button highlighted Stopped

  5. Combined hydraulic and regenerative braking system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Venkataperumal, Rama R. (Troy, MI); Mericle, Gerald E. (Mount Clemens, MI)

    1981-06-02

    A combined hydraulic and regenerative braking system and method for an electric vehicle, with the braking system being responsive to the applied hydraulic pressure in a brake line to control the braking of the vehicle to be completely hydraulic up to a first level of brake line pressure, to be partially hydraulic at a constant braking force and partially regenerative at a linearly increasing braking force from the first level of applied brake line pressure to a higher second level of brake line pressure, to be partially hydraulic at a linearly increasing braking force and partially regenerative at a linearly decreasing braking force from the second level of applied line pressure to a third and higher level of applied line pressure, and to be completely hydraulic at a linearly increasing braking force from the third level to all higher applied levels of line pressure.

  6. Regenerative braking device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hoppie, Lyle O. (Birmingham, MI)

    1982-01-12

    Disclosed are several embodiments of a regenerative braking device for an automotive vehicle. The device includes a plurality of rubber rollers (24, 26) mounted for rotation between an input shaft (14) connectable to the vehicle drivetrain and an output shaft (16) which is drivingly connected to the input shaft by a variable ratio transmission (20). When the transmission ratio is such that the input shaft rotates faster than the output shaft, the rubber rollers are torsionally stressed to accumulate energy, thereby slowing the vehicle. When the transmission ratio is such that the output shaft rotates faster than the input shaft, the rubber rollers are torsionally relaxed to deliver accumulated energy, thereby accelerating or driving the vehicle.

  7. Variable ratio regenerative braking device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hoppie, Lyle O. (Birmingham, MI)

    1981-12-15

    Disclosed is a regenerative braking device (10) for an automotive vehicle. The device includes an energy storage assembly (12) having a plurality of rubber rollers (26, 28) mounted for rotation between an input shaft (36) and an output shaft (42), clutches (38, 46) and brakes (40, 48) associated with each shaft, and a continuously variable transmission (22) connectable to a vehicle drivetrain and to the input and output shafts by the respective clutches. The rubber rollers are torsionally stressed to accumulate energy from the vehicle when the input shaft is clutched to the transmission while the brake on the output shaft is applied, and are torsionally relaxed to deliver energy to the vehicle when the output shaft is clutched to the transmission while the brake on the input shaft is applied. The transmission ratio is varied to control the rate of energy accumulation and delivery for a given rotational speed of the vehicle drivetrain.

  8. Brake System Modeling, Control And Integrated Brake/throttle Switching Phase I

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hedrick, Karl; Et. al.,

    1997-01-01

    and vacuum chambers, the intake manifold, the secondary brake line at the master cylinder and the front brake on the same hydraulic

  9. Brake Defect Causation and Abatement Study (BDCAS)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    cost with proper re- pairs being made the first time and reduction in out-of-service vehicles #12; corrective actions and validate true abatement of initial out-of- service causation the FMCSA began the BDCAS brake efficiency data as new brakes are burnished; and where possible, collect brake efficiency data

  10. Commercial Motor Vehicle Brake Assessment Tools

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Commercial Motor Vehicle Brake Assessment Tools Commercial Motor Vehicle Roadside Technology to deceleration in g's ­ Passing score: BE43.5 · Enforcement tool for only 3 years. · Based solely on brake Brake Research · CMVRTC research built on these enforcement tools ­ Correlation Study ­ Level-1 / PBBT

  11. Brake blending strategy for a hybrid vehicle

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Boberg, Evan S. (Hazel Park, MI)

    2000-12-05

    A hybrid electric powertrain system is provided including a transmission for driving a pair of wheels of a vehicle and a heat engine and an electric motor/generator coupled to the transmission. A friction brake system is provided for applying a braking torque to said vehicle. A controller unit generates control signals to the electric motor/generator and the friction brake system for controllably braking the vehicle in response to a drivers brake command. The controller unit determines and amount of regenerative torque available and compares this value to a determined amount of brake torque requested for determining the control signals to the electric motor/generator and the friction brake system.

  12. Commercial Motor Vehicle Brake-Related Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Commercial Motor Vehicle Brake-Related Research Commercial Motor Vehicle Roadside Technology Corridor Safety Technology Showcase October 14, 2010 Commercial Motor Vehicle Roadside Technology Corridor

  13. Multidisciplinary design optimization of an automotive magnetorheological brake design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, Edward

    Multidisciplinary design optimization of an automotive magnetorheological brake design Edward J to the elec- tromagnet. Key issues involved in the initial design of the automotive MR brake are presented: Magnetorheological fluid; Automotive brake; Finite element analysis; Computational fluid dynamics; Multidisciplinary

  14. A diagnostic system for air brakes in commercial vehicles 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coimbatore Subramanian, Shankar Ram

    2007-09-17

    ............. 14 4 The S-cam foundation brake ....................... 15 5 A schematic of the drum brake ..................... 16 6 A schematic of the experimental setup ................. 24 7 A sectional view of the treadle valve .................. 26 8 A layout... the disc brake and the drum brake. In this dissertation, the main focus will be restricted to air brake systems that use S-cam drum foundation brakes. A. Background and motivation The safety of vehicles operating on the road depends amongst other things...

  15. Svendborg Brakes | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LIST OFAMERICA'SHeavyAgencyTendo New Energy EquipmentSvendborg Brakes Jump to:

  16. TMV Technology Capabilities Brake Stroke Monitor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    TMV Technology Capabilities Brake Stroke Monitor Brake monitoring systems are proactive maintenance This technology allows for CMV operators to have knowledge of their steer, drive, and tandem axle group weights setup is required. Current Safety/Enforcement Technologies EOBR (electronic on-board recorder) On

  17. An engine air-brake integration study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mulchandani, Hiten

    2011-01-01

    The feasibility of operating an engine air-brake (EAB) integrated with a pylon duct bifurcation in a realistic aircraft engine environment has been analyzed. The EAB uses variable exit guide vanes downstream of a high ...

  18. Method and apparatus for wind turbine braking

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Barbu, Corneliu (Laguna Hills, CA); Teichmann, Ralph (Nishkayuna, NY); Avagliano, Aaron (Houston, TX); Kammer, Leonardo Cesar (Niskayuna, NY); Pierce, Kirk Gee (Simpsonville, SC); Pesetsky, David Samuel (Greenville, SC); Gauchel, Peter (Muenster, DE)

    2009-02-10

    A method for braking a wind turbine including at least one rotor blade coupled to a rotor. The method includes selectively controlling an angle of pitch of the at least one rotor blade with respect to a wind direction based on a design parameter of a component of the wind turbine to facilitate reducing a force induced into the wind turbine component as a result of braking.

  19. Contactless magnetic brake for automotive applications 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gay, Sebastien Emmanuel

    2009-05-15

    MAGNETIC BRAKE FOR AUTOMOTIVE APPLICATIONS A Dissertation by SEBASTIEN EMMANUEL GAY Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY... May 2005 Major Subject: Electrical Engineering CONTACTLESS MAGNETIC BRAKE FOR AUTOMOTIVE APPLICATIONS A Dissertation by SEBASTIEN EMMANUEL GAY Submitted to Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements...

  20. CMV Brake Wear and Performance Test Little is known about the brake

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    inspections were due to brake defects. Additionally, brake maintenance and repair present a significant cost as part of an 18-month Field Operational Test. Parameters Being Measured The PBBT machine uses in Data, Statistical Analysis Geo-Spatial Information Tools Defense Transportation Energy Policy Analysis

  1. Adaptive controller for regenerative and friction braking system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Davis, Roy I. (Ypsilanti, MI)

    1990-01-01

    A regenerative and friction braking system for a vehicle having one or more roadwheels driven by an electric traction motor includes a driver responsive device for producing a brake demand signal having a magnitude corresponding to the level of braking force selected by the driver and friction and regenerative brakes operatively connected with the roadwheels of the vehicle. A system according to this invention further includes control means for operating the friction and regenerative braking subsystems so that maximum brake torques sustainable by the roadwheels of the vehicle without skidding or slipping will not be exceeded.

  2. Adaptive controller for regenerative and friction braking system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Davis, R.I.

    1990-10-16

    A regenerative and friction braking system for a vehicle having one or more road wheels driven by an electric traction motor includes a driver responsive device for producing a brake demand signal having a magnitude corresponding to the level of braking force selected by the driver and friction and regenerative brakes operatively connected with the road wheels of the vehicle. A system according to this invention further includes control means for operating the friction and regenerative braking subsystems so that maximum brake torques sustainable by the road wheels of the vehicle without skidding or slipping will not be exceeded. 8 figs.

  3. Electric vehicle regenerative antiskid braking and traction control system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cikanek, S.R.

    1995-09-12

    An antiskid braking and traction control system for an electric or hybrid vehicle having a regenerative braking system operatively connected to an electric traction motor, and a separate hydraulic braking system includes one or more sensors for monitoring present vehicle parameters and a processor, responsive to the sensors, for calculating vehicle parameters defining the vehicle behavior not directly measurable by the sensors and determining if regenerative antiskid braking control, requiring hydraulic braking control, or requiring traction control are required. The processor then employs a control strategy based on the determined vehicle state and provides command signals to a motor controller to control the operation of the electric traction motor and to a brake controller to control fluid pressure applied at each vehicle wheel to provide the appropriate regenerative antiskid braking control, hydraulic braking control, and traction control. 10 figs.

  4. Electric vehicle regenerative antiskid braking and traction control system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cikanek, Susan R. (Wixom, MI)

    1995-01-01

    An antiskid braking and traction control system for an electric or hybrid vehicle having a regenerative braking system operatively connected to an electric traction motor, and a separate hydraulic braking system includes one or more sensors for monitoring present vehicle parameters and a processor, responsive to the sensors, for calculating vehicle parameters defining the vehicle behavior not directly measurable by the sensors and determining if regenerative antiskid braking control, requiring hydrualic braking control, or requiring traction control are required. The processor then employs a control strategy based on the determined vehicle state and provides command signals to a motor controller to control the operation of the electric traction motor and to a brake controller to control fluid pressure applied at each vehicle wheel to provide the appropriate regenerative antiskid braking control, hydraulic braking control, and traction control.

  5. Design Restrictions Ground clearance Brake components cannot contact

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Provancher, William

    of Mechanical Engineering, University of Utah Test Results Heat Test ­ apply pressure to the rotating brake. The truck and brake must be strong but not heavy. · Temperature ­ The brake will generate a lot of heat. The epoxy, wheels and bearings must all be able to withstand high heat. · Testing of Realistic Conditions

  6. Engine brake control in automatic transmission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hayasaki, K.; Sugano, K.

    1988-09-13

    This patent describes an engine braking control for a transmission for an automotive vehicle having an engine, the transmission including an input member drivingly coupled to the engine and an output member subject to load from driving wheels of the automotive vehicle, the transmission also including a first rotary member, a second rotary member, a hydraulically operated clutch selectively establishing a drive connection between the first rotary member and the second rotary member, and a one-way clutch arranged in parallel to the hydraulically operated clutch such that when the hydraulically operated clutch is released, the one-way clutch transmits forward torque from the first rotary member to the second rotary member, but interrupts transmission of revers torque to the first rotary member from the second rotary member, the engine braking control comprising: means for providing an engine braking command fluid pressure signal when demanded by a vehicle operator; a valve means for normally discharging hydraulic fluid from the hydraulically operated clutch to deactivate the hydraulically operated clutch, the valve means being fluidly connected to the hydraulically operated clutch, the engine braking command fluid pressure signal providing means and a drain port. The valve means including a valve spool having a first position where the hydraulically operated clutch is allowed to communicate with the drain port to permit discharge of hydraulic fluid therefrom and thus the hydraulically operated clutch is caused to be deactivated and a second position where the hydraulically operated clutch is disconnected from the drain port and allowed to communicate with the engine braking command fluid pressure signal.

  7. Hybrid Braking System for Non-Drive Axles | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Braking System for Non-Drive Axles Hybrid Braking System for Non-Drive Axles A hybrid braking system is designed to conserve diesel fuel (or alternative fuels) by using...

  8. Braking system for use with an arbor of a microscope

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Norgren, Duane U. (Orinda, CA)

    1984-01-01

    A balanced braking system comprising a plurality of braking assemblies located about a member to be braked. Each of the braking assemblies consists of a spring biased piston of a first material fitted into a body of a different material which has a greater contraction upon cooling than the piston material. The piston is provided with a recessed head portion over which is positioned a diaphragm and forming a space therebetween to which is connected a pressurized fluid supply. The diaphragm is controlled by the fluid in the space to contact or withdraw from the member to be braked. A cooling device causes the body within which the piston is fitted to contract more than the piston, producing a tight shrink fit therebetween. The braking system is particularly applicable for selectively braking an arbor of an electron microscope which immobilizes, for example, a vertically adjustable low temperature specimen holder during observation. The system provides balanced braking forces which can be easily removed and re-established with minimal disturbance to arbor location.

  9. Development of Diagnostic Algorithms for Air Brakes in Trucks 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dhar, Sandeep

    2011-10-21

    In this dissertation, we focus on development of algorithms for estimating the severity of air leakage and for predicting the out-of-adjustment of pushrod in an air brake system of heavy commercial vehicles. The leakage of air from the brake system...

  10. A pressure control scheme for air brakes in commercial vehicles 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bowlin, Christopher Leland

    2007-04-25

    This research is focused on developing a control scheme for regulating the pressure in the brake chamber of an air brake system found in most commercial vehicles like trucks, tractor-trailers and buses. Such a control scheme can be used...

  11. Non-invasive Spoofing Attacks For Anti-lock Braking Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR)

    the proposed ABS spoofer module using industrial ABS sensors and wheel speed decoders, concluding by outlining the implementation and lifetime considerations of an ABS spoofer with real hardware. Keywords: Automotive embedded

  12. Airbus A320 Braking as Predicate-Action Peter B. Ladkin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ladkin, Peter B.

    to interest us and others in the design of the A320 braking system [FI.93a, FI.93b, FI.93c]. This paper]. The Braking System Design of the A320. The braking system design of the A320 is described in the A320 Flight). The brakes and anti-skid system are described in [FCOM, 1.32.30: Landing Gear: Brakes and Anti

  13. A mathematical model for air brake systems in the presence of leaks 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramaratham, Srivatsan

    2008-10-10

    of leaks. Brake systems in trucks are crucial for ensuring the safety of vehicles and passengers on the roadways. Most trucks in the US are equipped with S-cam drum brake systems and they are sensitive to maintenance. Brake defects such as leaks are a major... and schematic of operation. . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 3 A typical drum brake assembly. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 4 Front and rear brake chambers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 5 Automatic slack adjuster construction...

  14. Regenerative braking on bicycles to power LED safety flashers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collier, Ian M

    2005-01-01

    This work develops a method for capturing some of the kinetic energy ordinarily lost during braking on bicycles to power LED safety flashers. The system is designed to eliminate: (a) battery changing in popular LED flashers, ...

  15. Design considerations for an automotive magnetorheological brake Kerem Karakoc, Edward J. Park *, Afzal Suleman

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, Edward

    Design considerations for an automotive magnetorheological brake Kerem Karakoc, Edward J. Park *, Afzal Suleman Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Victoria, P.O. Box 3055, STN CSC February 2008 Available online xxxx Keywords: Mechatronic design Magnetorheological fluid Automotive brake

  16. Modeling the pneumatic relay valve of an s-cam air brake 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vilayannur Natarajan, Shankar

    2005-08-29

    Statistics indicate that defects in brake system contribute significantly to fatal crashes involving commercial vehicles. Hence there is a need for developing preventive and active safety measures for assessing the performance of an air brake system...

  17. Fuzzy logic electric vehicle regenerative antiskid braking and traction control system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cikanek, S.R.

    1994-10-25

    An regenerative antiskid braking and traction control system using fuzzy logic for an electric or hybrid vehicle having a regenerative braking system operatively connected to an electric traction motor, and a separate hydraulic braking system includes sensors for monitoring present vehicle parameters and a processor, responsive to the sensors, for calculating vehicle parameters defining the vehicle behavior not directly measurable by the sensor and determining if regenerative antiskid braking control, requiring hydraulic braking control, and requiring traction control are required. The processor then employs fuzzy logic based on the determined vehicle state and provides command signals to a motor controller to control operation of the electric traction motor and to the brake controller to control fluid pressure applied at each vehicle wheel to provide the appropriate regenerative braking control, hydraulic braking control, and traction control. 123 figs.

  18. Fuzzy logic electric vehicle regenerative antiskid braking and traction control system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cikanek, Susan R. (Wixom, MI)

    1994-01-01

    An regenerative antiskid braking and traction control system using fuzzy logic for an electric or hybrid vehicle having a regenerative braking system operatively connected to an electric traction motor, and a separate hydraulic braking system includes sensors for monitoring present vehicle parameters and a processor, responsive to the sensors, for calculating vehicle parameters defining the vehicle behavior not directly measurable by the sensor and determining if regenerative antiskid braking control, requiring hydraulic braking control, and requiring traction control are required. The processor then employs fuzzy logic based on the determined vehicle state and provides command signals to a motor controller to control operation of the electric traction motor and to the brake controller to control fluid pressure applied at each vehicle wheel to provide the appropriate regenerative braking control, hydraulic braking control, and traction control.

  19. Braking the Gas in the beta Pictoris Disk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fern'andez, R; Wu, Y; Brandeker, Alexis; Fern\\'andez, Rodrigo

    2006-01-01

    (Abridged) The main sequence star beta Pictoris hosts the best studied circumstellar disk to date. Nonetheless, a long-standing puzzle has been around since the detection of metallic gas in the disk: radiation pressure from the star should blow the gas away, yet the observed motion is consistent with Keplerian rotation. In this work we search for braking mechanisms that can resolve this discrepancy. We find that all species affected by radiation force are heavily ionized and dynamically coupled into a single fluid by Coulomb collisions, reducing the radiation force on species feeling the strongest acceleration. For a gas of solar composition, the resulting total radiation force still exceeds gravity, while a gas of enhanced carbon abundance could be self-braking. We also explore two other braking agents: collisions with dust grains and neutral gas. Grains surrounding beta Pic are photoelectrically charged to a positive electrostatic potential. If a significant fraction of the grains are carbonaceous (10% in t...

  20. Regenerative braking device with rotationally mounted energy storage means

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hoppie, Lyle O. (Birmingham, MI)

    1982-03-16

    A regenerative braking device for an automotive vehicle includes an energy storage assembly (12) having a plurality of rubber rollers (26, 28) mounted for rotation between an input shaft (30) and an output shaft (32), clutches (50, 56) and brakes (52, 58) associated with each shaft, and a continuously variable transmission (22) connectable to a vehicle drivetrain and to the input and output shafts by the respective clutches. In a second embodiment the clutches and brakes are dispensed with and the variable ratio transmission is connected directly across the input and output shafts. In both embodiments the rubber rollers are torsionally stressed to accumulate energy from the vehicle when the input shaft rotates faster or relative to the output shaft and are torsionally relaxed to deliver energy to the vehicle when the output shaft rotates faster or relative to the input shaft.

  1. Aalborg Universitet Disturbance Control of the Hydraulic Brake in a Wind Turbine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Zhenyu

    Aalborg Universitet Disturbance Control of the Hydraulic Brake in a Wind Turbine Jepsen, Frank Brake in a Wind Turbine. In Energy Conference and Exhibition (EnergyCon), 2010 IEEE International . (pp from vbn.aau.dk on: juli 07, 2015 #12;Disturbance Control of the Hydraulic Brake in a Wind Turbine

  2. The Chinese brake fern (Pteris vittata L.), native to China, is widely naturalized in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Lena

    The Chinese brake fern (Pteris vittata L.), native to China, is widely naturalized in many areas and anatomical aspects of Chinese brake fern (Pteris vittata; Pteridaceae) Bhaskar Bondada1, Cong Tu, and Lena Ma-0290, U.S.A.; e-mail: lqma@ifas.ufl.edu). Sur- face structure and anatomical aspects of Chinese brake fern

  3. Regenerative Braking for an Electric Vehicle Using Ultracapacitors and a Buck-Boost Converter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Catholic University of Chile (Universidad Católica de Chile)

    Regenerative Braking for an Electric Vehicle Using Ultracapacitors and a Buck-Boost Converter Juan situation (regenerative braking), the battery voltage goes up, and then the control needs to activate regenerative braking can be avoided #12;with the help of ultracapacitors. Besides, ultracapacitors allow

  4. Emission Factor for Antimony in Brake Abrasion Dusts as One of the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Short, Daniel

    112-8551, Japan, and Akebono Brake Industry, Co., Ltd., 5-4-71 Higashi, Hanyu, Saitama 348-8509, Japan, and shape distributions, automotive brake abrasion dusts were suspected as one of the important sources factor that originates from automotive braking in order to quantitatively evaluate the contribution

  5. Tyre curve estimation in slip-controlled braking

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, Jonathan I.; Cebon, David

    2015-06-09

    identifying a Kalman filter observer for vehicle handling dynamics. IMECHE Part D – J. of Auto. Eng. 2006; 220: 1063–1072. 27. Yi J et al. Emergency braking control with an observer-based dynamic tire/road friction model and wheel angular velocity... also used by Shim et al.15, and Hong et al.16 Unsal and Kachroo17 compared an EKF with a sliding mode observer to estimate vehicle velocity, using this estimated velocity with a nominal slip-friction curve to determine the braking force. The authors...

  6. Braking index of isolated pulsars: open questions and ways forward

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamil, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    Isolated pulsars are rotating neutron stars with accurately measured angular velocities $\\Omega$, and their time derivatives which show unambiguously that the pulsars are slowing down. Although the exact mechanism of the spin-down is a question of debate, the commonly accepted view is that it arises either through emission of magnetic dipole radiation (MDR) from a rotating magnetized body, through emission of a relativistic particle wind, or via higher order magnetic multipole or gravitational quadrupole radiation. The calculated energy loss by a rotating pulsar is model dependent and leads to the power law $\\dot{\\Omega}$ = -K $\\Omega^{\\rm n}$ where $n$ is called the braking index. The theoretical value for braking index is $n = 1, 3, 5$ for wind, MDR, quadrupole radiation respectively. The accepted view is that pulsar braking is strongly dominated by MDR. Highly precise observations of isolated pulsars yield braking index values in the range $1 < n < 2.8$ which are consistently less than the value pred...

  7. Active Pedestrian Safety by Automatic Braking and Evasive Steering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gavrila, Dariu M.

    1 Active Pedestrian Safety by Automatic Braking and Evasive Steering C. Keller, T. Dang, H. Fritz of crashes. This paper presents a novel active pedestrian safety system, which combines sensing, situation two complementary approaches for added robustness: motion-based object detection and pedestrian

  8. Heavy and Overweight Vehicle Brake Testing: Five-Axle Combination Tractor-Flatbed Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lascurain, Mary Beth; Capps, Gary J; Franzese, Oscar

    2013-10-01

    The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration, in coordination with the Federal Highway Administration, sponsored the Heavy and Overweight Vehicle Brake Testing (HOVBT) program in order to provide information about the effect of gross vehicle weight (GVW) on braking performance. Because the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Regulations limit the number of braking system defects that may exist for a vehicle to be allowed to operate on the roadways, the examination of the effect of brake defects on brake performance for increased loads is also relevant. The HOVBT program seeks to provide relevant information to policy makers responsible for establishing load limits, beginning with providing test data for a combination tractor/trailer. This testing was conducted on a five-axle combination vehicle with tractor brakes meeting the Reduced Stopping Distance requirement rulemaking. This report provides a summary of the testing activities, the results of various analyses of the data, and recommendations for future research. Following a complete brake rebuild, instrumentation, and brake burnish, stopping tests were performed from 20 and 40 mph with various brake application pressures (15 psi, 25 psi, 35 psi, 45 psi, 55 psi, and full system pressure). These tests were conducted for various brake conditions at the following GVWs: 60,000, 80,000, 91,000, 97,000, 106,000, and 116,000 lb. The 80,000-lb GVWs included both balanced and unbalanced loads. The condition of the braking system was also varied. To introduce these defects, brakes (none, forward drive axle, or rear trailer axle) were made inoperative. In addition to the stopping tests, performance-based brake tests were conducted for the various loading and brake conditions. Analysis of the stopping test data showed the stopping distance to increase with load (as expected) and also showed that more braking force was generated by the drive axle brakes than the trailer axle brakes. The constant-pressure stopping test data revealed a linear relationship between brake application pressure and was used to develop an algorithm to normalize stopping data for weight and initial speed.

  9. Energy Efficiency in Heavy Vehicle Tires, Drivetrains, and Braking Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peter J. Blau

    2000-04-26

    This document was prepared to support the primary goals of the Department of Energy, Office of Heavy Vehicle Technologies. These were recently stated as follows: ''Develop by 2004 the enabling technologies for a class 7-8 truck with a fuel efficiency of 10 mpg (at 65 mph) which will meet prevailing emission standards. For Class 3-6 trucks operating on an urban driving cycle, develop by 2004 commercially viable vehicles that achieve at least double the fuel economy of comparable current vehicles (1999), and as a research goal, reduce criteria pollutants to 30% below EPA standards. Develop by 2004 the diesel engine enabling technologies to support large-scale industry dieselization of Class 1 and 2 trucks, achieving a 35 % fuel efficiency improvement over comparable gasoline-fueled trucks, while meeting applicable emissions standards.'' The enabling technologies for improving the fuel efficiency of trucks, include not only engine technologies but also technologies involved with lowering the rolling resistance of tires, reducing vehicle aerodynamic drag, improving thermal management, and reducing parasitic frictional losses in drive train components. Opportunities also exist for making better use of the energy that might ordinarily be dissipated during vehicle braking. Braking systems must be included in this evaluation since safety in truck operations is vital, and braking requirements are greater for vehicles having lowered resistance to rolling. The Office of Heavy Vehicle Technologies has initiated a program to improve the aerodynamics of heavy vehicles through wind tunnel testing, computational modeling, and on-road evaluations. That activity is described in a separate multi-year plan; therefore, emphasis in this document will be on tires, drive trains, and braking systems. Recent, dramatic fluctuations in diesel fuel prices have emphasized the importance of effecting savings in truck fuel economy by implementing new component designs and materials.

  10. Braking the Gas in the beta Pictoris Disk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodrigo Fernández; Alexis Brandeker; Yanqin Wu

    2006-01-11

    (Abridged) The main sequence star beta Pictoris hosts the best studied circumstellar disk to date. Nonetheless, a long-standing puzzle has been around since the detection of metallic gas in the disk: radiation pressure from the star should blow the gas away, yet the observed motion is consistent with Keplerian rotation. In this work we search for braking mechanisms that can resolve this discrepancy. We find that all species affected by radiation force are heavily ionized and dynamically coupled into a single fluid by Coulomb collisions, reducing the radiation force on species feeling the strongest acceleration. For a gas of solar composition, the resulting total radiation force still exceeds gravity, while a gas of enhanced carbon abundance could be self-braking. We also explore two other braking agents: collisions with dust grains and neutral gas. Grains surrounding beta Pic are photoelectrically charged to a positive electrostatic potential. If a significant fraction of the grains are carbonaceous (10% in the midplane and larger at higher altitudes), ions can be slowed down to satisfy the observed velocity constraints. For neutral gas to brake the coupled ion fluid, we find the minimum required mass to be $\\approx$ 0.03 $M_\\earth$, consistent with observed upper limits of the hydrogen column density, and substantially reduced relative to previous estimates. Our results favor a scenario in which metallic gas is generated by grain evaporation in the disk, perhaps during grain-grain collisions. We exclude a primordial origin for the gas, but cannot rule out the possibility of its production by falling evaporating bodies near the star. We discuss the implications of this work for observations of gas in other debris disks.

  11. SPINDOWN OF ISOLATED NEUTRON STARS: GRAVITATIONAL WAVES OR MAGNETIC BRAKING?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Staff, Jan E.; Jaikumar, Prashanth; Chan, Vincent; Ouyed, Rachid

    2012-05-20

    We study the spindown of isolated neutron stars from initially rapid rotation rates, driven by two factors: (1) gravitational wave emission due to r-modes and (2) magnetic braking. In the context of isolated neutron stars, we present the first study including self-consistently the magnetic damping of r-modes in the spin evolution. We track the spin evolution employing the RNS code, which accounts for the rotating structure of neutron stars for various equations of state. We find that, despite the strong damping due to the magnetic field, r-modes alter the braking rate from pure magnetic braking for B {<=} 10{sup 13} G. For realistic values of the saturation amplitude {alpha}{sub sat}, the r-mode can also decrease the time to reach the threshold central density for quark deconfinement. Within a phenomenological model, we assess the gravitational waveform that would result from r-mode-driven spindown of a magnetized neutron star. To contrast with the persistent signal during the spindown phase, we also present a preliminary estimate of the transient gravitational wave signal from an explosive quark-hadron phase transition, which can be a signal for the deconfinement of quarks inside neutron stars.

  12. Real-Time Dynamic Brake Assessment Proof of Concept Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lascurain, Mary Beth [ORNL; Franzese, Oscar [ORNL; Capps, Gary J [ORNL

    2011-11-01

    This proof-of-concept research was performed to explore the feasibility of using real-world braking data from commercial motor vehicles to make a diagnosis of brake condition similar to that of the performance-based brake tester (PBBT). This was done by determining the relationship between pressure and brake force (P-BF), compensating for the gross vehicle weight (GVW). The nature of this P-BF relationship (e.g., low braking force for a given brake application pressure) may indicate brake system problems. In order to determine the relationship between brake force and brake application pressure, a few key parameters of duty cycle information were collected. Because braking events are often brief, spanning only a few seconds, a sample rate of 10 Hz was needed. The algorithm under development required brake application pressure and speed (from which deceleration was calculated). Accurate weight estimation was also needed to properly derive the braking force from the deceleration. In order to ensure that braking force was the predominant factor in deceleration for the segments of data used in analysis, the data was screened for grade as well. Also, the analysis needed to be based on pressures above the crack pressure. The crack pressure is the pressure below which the individual brakes are not applied due the nature of the mechanical system. This value, which may vary somewhat from one wheel end to another, is approximately 10 psi. Therefore, only pressures 15 psi and above were used in the analysis. The Department of Energy s Medium Truck Duty Cycle research has indicated that under the real-world circumstances of the test vehicle brake pressures of up to approximately 30 psi can be expected. Several different types of data were collected during the testing task of this project. Constant-pressure stopping tests were conducted at several combinations of brake application pressure (15, 20, 25, and 30 psi), load conditions (moderately and fully laden), and speeds (20 and 30 mph). Data was collected at 10 Hz. Standard and stepped-pressure performance-based brake tests with brake pressure transducers were performed for each loading condition. The stepped-pressure test included the constant-pressure intervals of brake application at 15, 20, 25, and 30 psi. The PBBT data files included 10 Hz streaming data collected during the testing of each axle. Two weeks of real-world duty cycle (driving and braking) data was also collected at 10 Hz. Initial analysis of the data revealed that the data collected in the field (i.e., day-to-day operations) provided the same information as that obtained from the controlled tests. Analysis of the data collected revealed a strong linear relationship between brake application pressure and deceleration for given GVWs. As anticipated, initial speed was not found to be a significant factor in the deceleration-pressure relationship, unlike GVW. The positive results obtained from this proof of concept test point to the need for further research to expand this concept. A second phase should include testing over a wider range of speeds and include medium brake application pressures in addition to the low pressures tested in this research. Testing on multiple vehicles would also be of value. This future phase should involve testing to determine how degradation of braking performance affects the pressure-deceleration relationship.

  13. Tachyon cosmology, supernovae data and the Big Brake singularity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Z. Keresztes; L. Á. Gergely; V. Gorini; U. Moschella; A. Yu. Kamenshchik

    2009-04-21

    We compare the existing observational data on type Ia Supernovae with the evolutions of the universe predicted by a one-parameter family of tachyon models which we have introduced recently in paper \\cite{we-tach}. Among the set of the trajectories of the model which are compatible with the data there is a consistent subset for which the universe ends up in a new type of soft cosmological singularity dubbed Big Brake. This opens up yet another scenario for the future history of the universe besides the one predicted by the standard $\\Lambda$CDM model.

  14. Adaptive Torque Control of Electro-Rheological Fluid Brakes Used in Active Knee Rehabilitation Devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mavroidis, Constantinos

    1 Adaptive Torque Control of Electro-Rheological Fluid Brakes Used in Active Knee Rehabilitation-rheological fluid (ERF) based variable resistance brakes that are used in compact and portable rehabilitation Control, Actuators for Rehabilitation Robotics I. INTRODUCTION Electro-rheological fluids (ERFs

  15. Modeling the pneumatic subsystem of a S-cam air brake system 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coimbatore Subramanian, Shankar

    2004-09-30

    The air brake system is one of the critical components in ensuring the safe operation of any commercial vehicle. This work is directed towards the development of a fault-free model of the pneumatic subsystem of the air brake system. This model can...

  16. On The Use of Eddy Current Brakes as Tunable, Fast Turn-On Viscous Dampers For Haptic Rendering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hayward, Vincent

    On The Use of Eddy Current Brakes as Tunable, Fast Turn-On Viscous Dampers For Haptic RenderingGill University, Montr´eal, Canada ABSTRACT We describe the use of eddy current brakes as fast turn-on, tunable, linear dampers for haptic rendering using a prototype haptic device outfitted with eddy current brakes

  17. A nonextensive view of the stellar braking indices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Freitas, D B; Soares, B B; Silva, J R P

    2015-01-01

    The present work is based on a description for the angular mometum loss rate due to magnetic braking for main-sequence stars on the relationship between stellar rotation and age. In general, this loss rate denoted by $\\mathrm dJ/\\mathrm dt$ depends on angular velocity $\\Omega$ in the form $\\mathrm dJ/\\mathrm dt\\propto\\Omega^{q}$, where $q$ is a parameter extracted from nonextensive statistical mechanics. Already, in context of stellar rotation, this parameter is greater than unity and it is directly related to the braking index. For $q$ equal to unity, the scenario of saturation of the magnetic field is recovered, otherwise $q$ indicates an unsaturated field. This new approach have been proposed and investigated by de Freitas \\& De Medeiros for unsaturated field stars. In present work, we propose a nonextensive approach for the stellar rotational evolution based on the Reiners \\& Mohanthy model. In this sense, we developed a nonextensive version of Reiners \\& Mohanthy torque and also compare this ...

  18. Evaluation of driver braking performance to an unexpected object in the roadway 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Picha, Dale Louis

    1994-01-01

    ) in 1940, incorporates two components into geometric design, a perception-response time (PRT) component and a braking distance component. Because of the importance of sight distance on highways, previous research has questioned the assumptions of these two...

  19. Injection Timing Effects on Brake Fuel Conversion Efficiency and Engine System's Respones 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McLean, James Elliott

    2011-10-21

    Societal concerns on combustion-based fuel consumption are ever-increasing. With respect to internal combustion engines, this translates to a need to increase brake fuel conversion efficiency (BFCE). Diesel engines are a relatively efficient...

  20. A study of factors affecting foot movement time in a braking maneuver 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berman, Andrea Helene

    1994-01-01

    The nature of foot movement time (MT) in an actual braking maneuver and in a stationary vehicle was investigated regarding the effects of age and gender of the driver and nature of the stimulus to which the driver was ...

  1. Combined fast valving and braking resistor application to improve transient stability 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Jen-Yeu Thomas

    1982-01-01

    COMBINED FAST VALVING AND BRAKING RESISTOR APPLICATION TO IMPROVE TRANSIENT STABILITY A Thesis by Submitted to the Graduate College of' Texas A&M University in Partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May... 1982 Major Subjecta Electrical Engineering COMBINED FAST VALVING AND BRAKING RESISTOR APPLICATION TO IMPROVE TRANSIENT STABILITY A Thesis by Approved as to style and content by& herman oY mm ee ad of' De tment Member May 1982 ABSTRACT...

  2. Braking index of isolated uniformly rotating magnetized pulsars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamil, Oliver; Urbanec, Martin; Urbancova, Gabriela

    2015-01-01

    Isolated pulsars are rotating neutron stars with accurately measured angular velocities $\\Omega$, and their time derivatives which show unambiguously that the pulsars are slowing down. Although the exact mechanism of the spin-down is a question of debate in detail, the commonly accepted view is that it arises through emission of magnetic dipole radiation (MDR) from a rotating magnetized body. Other processes, including the emission of gravitational radiation, and of relativistic particles (pulsar wind), are also being considered. The calculated energy loss by a rotating pulsar with a constant moment of inertia is assumed proportional to a model dependent power of $\\Omega$. This relation leads to the power law $\\dot{\\Omega}$ = -K $\\Omega^{\\rm n}$ where $n$ is called the braking index. The MDR model predicts $n$ exactly equal to 3. Selected observations of isolated pulsars provide rather precise values of $n$, individually accurate to a few percent or better, in the range 1$ <$ n $ < $ 2.8, which is consi...

  3. Initial results using Eddy Current Brakes as Fast Turn-on, Programmable Physical Dampers for Haptic Rendering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hayward, Vincent

    Initial results using Eddy Current Brakes as Fast Turn-on, Programmable Physical Dampers for Haptic Machines McGill University, Montr´eal, Qu´ebec, Canada ABSTRACT We demonstrate the use of eddy current propose an alternate method to create damping in a haptic interface that uses eddy current brakes. 2 EDDY

  4. Energy-Saving Control of an Unstable Valve with a MR Brake QingHui Yuan and Perry Y. Li

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Perry Y.

    as a brake does not imply heat reduction. In this paper, we propose a new type of actuator in which a dual lead to heat reduction. In [6], we use a dual-solenoid actuator and design a controller to minimizeEnergy-Saving Control of an Unstable Valve with a MR Brake QingHui Yuan and Perry Y. Li Abstract

  5. REPORT on the TRUCK BRAKE LINING WORKSHOP and FLEET OPERATORS' SURVEY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blau, P.J.

    2003-02-03

    The report summarizes what transpired during brake linings-related workshop held at the Fall 2003 meeting of the Technology and Maintenance Council (TMC) in Charlotte, NC. The title of the workshop was ''Developing a Useful Friction Material Rating System''. It was organized by a team consisting of Peter Blau (Oak Ridge National Laboratory), Jim Britell (National Highway Traffic Safety Administration), and Jim Lawrence (Motor and Equipment Manufacturers Association). The workshop was held under the auspices of TMC Task Force S6 (Chassis), chaired by Joseph Stianche (Sanderson Farms, Inc.). Six invited speakers during the morning session provided varied perspectives on testing and rating aftermarket automotive and truck brake linings. They were: James R. Clark, Chief Engineer, Foundation Brakes and Wheel Equipment, Dana Corporation, Spicer Heavy Axle and Brake Division; Charles W. Greening, Jr, President, Greening Test Labs; Tim Duncan, General Manager, Link Testing Services;Dennis J. McNichol, President, Dennis NationaLease; Jim Fajerski, Business Manager, OE Sales and Applications Engineering, Federal Mogul Corporation; and Peter J. Blau, Senior Materials Development Engineer, Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The afternoon break-out sessions addressed nine questions concerning such issues as: ''Should the federal government regulate aftermarket lining quality?''; ''How many operators use RP 628, and if so, what's good or bad about it?''; and ''Would there be any value to you of a vocation-specific rating system?'' The opinions of each discussion group, consisting of 7-9 participants, were reported and consolidated in summary findings on each question. Some questions produced a greater degree of agreement than others. In general, the industry seems eager for more information that would allow those who are responsible for maintaining truck brakes to make better, more informed choices on aftermarket linings. A written fleet operator survey was also conducted during the TMC meeting. Twenty-one responses were received, spanning fleet sizes between 12 and 170,000 vehicles. Responses are summarized in a series of tables separated into responses from small (100 or fewer powered vehicles), medium (101-1000 vehicles), and large fleets (>1000 vehicles). The vast majority of fleets do their own brake maintenance, relying primarily on experience and lining manufactures to select aftermarket linings. At least half of the responders are familiar to some extent with TMC Recommended Practice 628 on brake linings, but most do not use this source of test data as the sole criterion to select linings. Significant shortfalls in the applicability of TMC RP 628 to certain types of brake systems were noted.

  6. System for lubrication of a brake air compressor associated with a turbocharged internal combustion engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spencer, J.C.

    1992-10-13

    This patent describes a system for use with a vehicle which includes a turbocharged internal combustion engine having a lubricating system wherein lubricating oil from an engine oil reservoir is circulated within the engine and also to and from an associated brake system air compressor which supplies compressed air for operation of the vehicle air braking system. This patent describes improvement in passing supercharged air to an oil crankcase of the air compressor to cause lubricating oil to drain therefrom and return to the engine oil reservoir.

  7. Achieving Consistent Maximum Brake Torque with Varied Injection Timing in a DI Diesel Engine 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kroeger, Timothy H

    2013-09-19

    The brake torque of a direct-injection diesel engine is known to plateau over a range of injection timings. Injection timing affects the engine’s ignition delay and the fractions of fuel which burn in premixed and diffusion modes. Therefore...

  8. ORBITAL AND MASS RATIO EVOLUTION OF PROTOBINARIES DRIVEN BY MAGNETIC BRAKING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao, Bo; Li, Zhi-Yun

    2013-01-20

    The majority of stars reside in multiple systems, especially binaries. The formation and early evolution of binaries is a longstanding problem in star formation that is not yet fully understood. In particular, how the magnetic field observed in star-forming cores shapes the binary characteristics remains relatively unexplored. We demonstrate numerically, using an MHD version of the ENZO AMR hydro code, that a magnetic field of the observed strength can drastically change two of the basic quantities that characterize a binary system: the orbital separation and mass ratio of the two components. Our calculations focus on the protostellar mass accretion phase, after a pair of stellar 'seeds' have already formed. We find that in dense cores magnetized to a realistic level, the angular momentum of the material accreted by the protobinary is greatly reduced by magnetic braking. Accretion of strongly braked material shrinks the protobinary separation by a large factor compared to the non-magnetic case. The magnetic braking also changes the evolution of the mass ratio of unequal-mass protobinaries by producing material of low specific angular momentum that accretes preferentially onto the more massive primary star rather than the secondary. This is in contrast with the preferential mass accretion onto the secondary previously found numerically for protobinaries accreting from an unmagnetized envelope, which tends to drive the mass ratio toward unity. In addition, the magnetic field greatly modifies the morphology and dynamics of the protobinary accretion flow. It suppresses the traditional circumstellar and circumbinary disks that feed the protobinary in the non-magnetic case; the binary is fed instead by a fast collapsing pseudodisk whose rotation is strongly braked. The magnetic braking-driven inward migration of binaries from their birth locations may be constrained by high-resolution observations of the orbital distribution of deeply embedded protobinaries, especially with ALMA and JVLA.

  9. Use of an auditory signal in a rear-end collision warning system: effects on braking force and reaction time 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hopkins, Jennifer Susan

    1995-01-01

    This simulator experiment is a preliminary study examining the effects of different auditory signals on braking force and reaction time in a rear-end collision warning system. A driving simulator was built in which subjects operated a computer...

  10. Nonlinear analysis of time series of vibration data from a friction brake: SSA, PCA, and MFDFA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nikolay K. Vitanov; Norbert P. Hoffmann; Boris Wernitz

    2014-10-23

    We use the methodology of singular spectrum analysis (SSA), principal component analysis (PCA), and multi-fractal detrended fluctuation analysis (MFDFA), for investigating characteristics of vibration time series data from a friction brake. SSA and PCA are used to study the long time-scale characteristics of the time series. MFDFA is applied for investigating all time scales up to the smallest recorded one. It turns out that the majority of the long time-scale dynamics, that is presumably dominated by the structural dynamics of the brake system, is dominated by very few active dimensions only and can well be understood in terms of low dimensional chaotic attractors. The multi-fractal analysis shows that the fast dynamical processes originating in the friction interface are in turn truly multi-scale in nature.

  11. DOES MAGNETIC-FIELD-ROTATION MISALIGNMENT SOLVE THE MAGNETIC BRAKING CATASTROPHE IN PROTOSTELLAR DISK FORMATION?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li Zhiyun [Astronomy Department, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Krasnopolsky, Ruben; Shang, Hsien [Academia Sinica, Theoretical Institute for Advanced Research in Astrophysics, Taipei, Taiwan (China)

    2013-09-01

    Stars form in dense cores of molecular clouds that are observed to be significantly magnetized. In the simplest case of a laminar (non-turbulent) core with the magnetic field aligned with the rotation axis, both analytic considerations and numerical simulations have shown that the formation of a large, 10{sup 2} AU scale, rotationally supported protostellar disk is suppressed by magnetic braking in the ideal MHD limit for a realistic level of core magnetization. This theoretical difficulty in forming protostellar disks is termed the ''magnetic braking catastrophe''. A possible resolution to this problem, proposed by Hennebelle and Ciardi and Joos et al., is that misalignment between the magnetic field and rotation axis may weaken the magnetic braking enough to enable disk formation. We evaluate this possibility quantitatively through numerical simulations. We confirm the basic result of Joos et al. that the misalignment is indeed conducive to disk formation. In relatively weakly magnetized cores with dimensionless mass-to-flux ratio {approx}> 4, it enabled the formation of rotationally supported disks that would otherwise be suppressed if the magnetic field and rotation axis are aligned. For more strongly magnetized cores, disk formation remains suppressed, however, even for the maximum tilt angle of 90 Degree-Sign . If dense cores are as strongly magnetized as indicated by OH Zeeman observations (with a mean dimensionless mass-to-flux ratio {approx}2), it would be difficult for the misalignment alone to enable disk formation in the majority of them. We conclude that, while beneficial to disk formation, especially for the relatively weak field case, misalignment does not completely solve the problem of catastrophic magnetic braking in general.

  12. Probability of failure of the waste hoist brake system at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greenfield, M.A. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Sargent, T.J. [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States)]|[Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Hoover Institution

    1998-01-01

    In its most recent report on the annual probability of failure of the waste hoist brake system at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), the annual failure rate is calculated to be 1.3E({minus}7)(1/yr), rounded off from 1.32E({minus}7). A calculation by the Environmental Evaluation Group (EEG) produces a result that is about 4% higher, namely 1.37E({minus}7)(1/yr). The difference is due to a minor error in the US Department of Energy (DOE) calculations in the Westinghouse 1996 report. WIPP`s hoist safety relies on a braking system consisting of a number of components including two crucial valves. The failure rate of the system needs to be recalculated periodically to accommodate new information on component failure, changes in maintenance and inspection schedules, occasional incidents such as a hoist traveling out-of-control, either up or down, and changes in the design of the brake system. This report examines DOE`s last two reports on the redesigned waste hoist system. In its calculations, the DOE has accepted one EEG recommendation and is using more current information about the component failures rates, the Nonelectronic Parts Reliability Data (NPRD). However, the DOE calculations fail to include the data uncertainties which are described in detail in the NPRD reports. The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission recommended that a system evaluation include mean estimates of component failure rates and take into account the potential uncertainties that exist so that an estimate can be made on the confidence level to be ascribed to the quantitative results. EEG has made this suggestion previously and the DOE has indicated why it does not accept the NRC recommendation. Hence, this EEG report illustrates the importance of including data uncertainty using a simple statistical example.

  13. Solar tracker motor having a fixed caliper and a translating caliper each with an electromagnetic brake system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rau, Scott James

    2013-01-29

    Concepts and technologies described herein provide for an accurate and cost-effective method for rotating a solar array disk for tracking the movement of the sun. According to various aspects, a motor includes a fixed caliper and a translating caliper positioned adjacent to one another. Electromagnetically controlled brakes on the translating caliper grip the solar array disk while adjacent, but spaced apart, electromagnets on the fixed caliper and the translating caliper are energized to create an attractive force that pulls the translating caliper with the solar array disk toward the fixed caliper. After reaching the fixed caliper, brakes on the fixed caliper are engaged with the disk, brakes on the translating caliper are released from the disk, and the translating caliper is pushed back to the starting location where the process repeats until the desired rotation is completed.

  14. Hybrid: Braking

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageBlenderBusiness Case for E85CaliforniaCleanUNITEDNREL

  15. Hybrid: Braking

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageBlenderBusiness Case for E85CaliforniaCleanUNITEDNRELButton

  16. Uncertainty-Enabled Design of a Rocket Sled Track Switch Drs. Jordan E. Massad and Matthew R. Brake

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Uncertainty-Enabled Design of a Rocket Sled Track Switch Drs. Jordan E. Massad and Matthew R. Brake Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico Rocket sled tracks provide a dynamically rich environment acceleration profile, the switch closes to complete a circuit for instrument activation. Preliminary tests

  17. CityCarControl : an electric vehicle drive-by-wire solution for distributed steering, braking and throttle control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Thomas B., M. Eng. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we propose CityCarControl, a system to manage the steering, braking, and throttle of a new class of intra-city electric vehicles. These vehicles have a focus on extreme light-weight and a small parking ...

  18. Energy-Saving Control of an Unstable Valve with a MR Brake QingHui Yuan and Perry Y. Li

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Perry Y.

    Energy-Saving Control of an Unstable Valve with a MR Brake QingHui Yuan and Perry Y. Li Abstract controller is then developed to achieve position tracking and energy-saving. Simulation verifies that using. INTRODUCTION Energy-saving is an important issue in fluid power indus- try. The research of energy efficiency

  19. MAGNETIC BRAKING FORMULATION FOR SUN-LIKE STARS: DEPENDENCE ON DIPOLE FIELD STRENGTH AND ROTATION RATE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matt, Sean P.; Pinsonneault, Marc H.; Greene, Thomas P. E-mail: kmac@ucar.edu E-mail: thomas.p.greene@nasa.gov

    2012-08-01

    We use two-dimensional axisymmetric magnetohydrodynamic simulations to compute steady-state solutions for solar-like stellar winds from rotating stars with dipolar magnetic fields. Our parameter study includes 50 simulations covering a wide range of relative magnetic field strengths and rotation rates, extending from the slow- and approaching the fast-magnetic-rotator regimes. Using the simulations to compute the angular momentum loss, we derive a semi-analytic formulation for the external torque on the star that fits all of the simulations to a precision of a few percent. This formula provides a simple method for computing the magnetic braking of Sun-like stars due to magnetized stellar winds, which properly includes the dependence on the strength of the magnetic field, mass loss rate, stellar radius, surface gravity, and spin rate, and which is valid for both slow and fast rotators.

  20. ACCEPTED AUTHORS' DRAFT, THE FINAL VERSION TO APPEAR IN THE IEEE/ASME TRANSACTIONS ON MECHATRONICS, VOL. 13, NO. 6, 669677, 2008. 1 Eddy Current Brakes for Haptic Interfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hayward, Vincent

    , VOL. 13, NO. 6, 669­677, 2008. 1 Eddy Current Brakes for Haptic Interfaces: Design, Identification describe the design of an eddy current brake for use as programmable viscous damper for haptic interfaces actuators for haptic interfaces. We overview the governing physical relationships, and describe design

  1. Hydraulic Drivetrain and Regenerative Braking Team 13: Andrew Brown, Karan Desai, Andrew McGrath, Hurst Nuckols, Grant Wilson Adviser: Dr. Andrew Jackson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carpick, Robert W.

    Hydraulic Drivetrain and Regenerative Braking Team 13: Andrew Brown, Karan Desai, Andrew Mc Pressure Reservior Filter Variable Vane Pump Motor/Pump Hydraulic Accumulators Solenoid Valve Relief Valve Suction Line Since their development in 2006, hydraulic drivetrain systems have gained considerable

  2. Finite element analysis of the effect of up-armouring on the off-road braking and sharp-turn performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grujicic, Mica

    Finite element analysis of the effect of up-armouring on the off-road braking and sharp-mobility multi-purpose wheeled vehicle, off-road vehicle performance, finite element modelling and simulations revision for publication on 15 June 2009. DOI: 10.1243/09544070JAUTO1187 Abstract: A comprehensive finite

  3. An analysis of the annual probability of failure of the waste hoist brake system at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greenfield, M.A. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Sargent, T.J.

    1995-11-01

    The Environmental Evaluation Group (EEG) previously analyzed the probability of a catastrophic accident in the waste hoist of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) and published the results in Greenfield (1990; EEG-44) and Greenfield and Sargent (1993; EEG-53). The most significant safety element in the waste hoist is the hydraulic brake system, whose possible failure was identified in these studies as the most important contributor in accident scenarios. Westinghouse Electric Corporation, Waste Isolation Division has calculated the probability of an accident involving the brake system based on studies utilizing extensive fault tree analyses. This analysis conducted for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) used point estimates to describe the probability of failure and includes failure rates for the various components comprising the brake system. An additional controlling factor in the DOE calculations is the mode of operation of the brake system. This factor enters for the following reason. The basic failure rate per annum of any individual element is called the Event Probability (EP), and is expressed as the probability of failure per annum. The EP in turn is the product of two factors. One is the {open_quotes}reported{close_quotes} failure rate, usually expressed as the probability of failure per hour and the other is the expected number of hours that the element is in use, called the {open_quotes}mission time{close_quotes}. In many instances the {open_quotes}mission time{close_quotes} will be the number of operating hours of the brake system per annum. However since the operation of the waste hoist system includes regular {open_quotes}reoperational check{close_quotes} tests, the {open_quotes}mission time{close_quotes} for standby components is reduced in accordance with the specifics of the operational time table.

  4. We Brake for Mars Hi! My name is Mike Meacham. I'm an engineer here at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waliser, Duane E.

    We Brake for Mars Hi! My name is Mike Meacham. I'm an engineer here at the Jet Propulsion a really big parachute. To make these large parachutes you have to test them before you go. You need a way've got to test big here on Earth. You got to be a little crazy sometimes if you want to do crazy things

  5. Upper and lower limits on the Crab pulsar's astrophysical parameters set from gravitational wave observations by LIGO: braking index and energy considerations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giovanni Santostasi

    2008-07-16

    The Laser Interferometer Gravitational Observatory (LIGO) has recently reached the end of its fifth science run (S5), having collected more than a year worth of data. Analysis of the data is still ongoing but a positive detection of gravitational waves, while possible, is not realistically expected for most likely sources. This is particularly true for what concerns gravitational waves from known pulsars. In fact, even under the most optimistic (and not very realistic) assumption that all the pulsar's observed spin-down is due to gravitational waves, the gravitational wave strain at earth from all the known isolated pulsars (with the only notable exception of the Crab pulsar) would not be strong enough to be detectable by existing detectors. By August 2006, LIGO had produced enough data for a coherent integration capable to extract signal from noise that was weaker than the one expected from the Crab pulsar's spin-down limit. No signal was detected, but beating the spin-down limit is a considerable achievement for the LIGO Scientific Collaboration (LSC). It is customary to translate the upper limit on strain from a pulsar into a more astrophysically significant upper limit on ellipticity. Once the spin-down limit has been beaten, it is possible to release the constraint that all the spin-down is due to gravitational wave emission. A more complete model with diverse braking mechanisms can be used to set limits on several astrophysical parameters of the pulsar. This paper shows possible values of such parameters for the Crab pulsar given the current limit on gravitational waves from this neutron star.

  6. Master Thesis High torque, high impact braking

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daraio, Chiara

    to add a break in each actuated joint, so it is not necesary to wasted energy during the stoped time to any sort of actuator, e.g., hidraulic, electric, . . . Even though they have been deeply studied

  7. Adaptation of hybrid five-phase ABS algorithms for experimental validation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    -lock braking, Hybrid control systems, Limit cycle analysis, Experimental validation, Quarter-car. 1Adaptation of hybrid five-phase ABS algorithms for experimental validation Mathieu Gerard WilliamAnti-lock Braking System (ABS) is the most important active safety system for passenger cars, but unfortunately

  8. Fuzzy Throttle And Brake Control For Platoons Of Smart Cars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, H.; Dickerson, J.; Kosko, B.

    1995-01-01

    for Platoons of Smart Cars,” in Fuzzy Sets, Neural Networks,The hardware on the test car had limited memory and usedclosing rate between the cars. The spike at 15 seconds shows

  9. Why Brake-By-Wire (BBW) ? Advantages of BBW

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yao, Bin

    Central Bearing Planetary Gear Bearing Planetary Gear Stator Rotor Bearing Motor Revolver Revolver Bearing Force Sensor Cap Nut (Carrier) Spindle Planetary Rollers Internal Gear Sun Gear Pressure Pin Holder Pads Planetary Gear Objective Development of a Reference Model to Interrogate Dynamic Behaviors

  10. Modeling of air brakes for onboard diagnostics of heavy trucks 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kankanala, Penchala N

    2000-01-01

    Accidents involving commercial vehicles have disastrous consequences; most of the times they result in human fatalities, environmental damage, traffic congestion leading to fuel wastage and associated productivity losses. Moreover, with the rapid...

  11. Brake System Analysis, Reliability Testing And Control Using Bench Experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Z.; Yang, B.

    1997-01-01

    Hydraulic Module The function of AHM is to provide an input force to vacuumVacuum pump failure' a) complete loss of vaczum b) partial loss 2) Auxiliary hydraulichydraulic pump for actuator Software failure due to wrong inputs leading to controller failure Reduction in effective vacuum

  12. ORNL/Pub40701 Heavy and Overweight Vehicle Brake

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Energy (DOE) Information Bridge. Web site http://www.osti.gov/bridge Reports produced before January 1 are available to DOE employees, DOE contractors, Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDE) representatives specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does

  13. Daimler's SuperTruck Program; 50% Brake Thermal Efficiency

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presents highlights of engine and vehicle advances made, and progress towards achieving aggressive goals

  14. Compression Braking for Longitudinal Control of Commercial Heavy Vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moklegaard, Lasse; Druzhinina, Maria; Stefanopoulou, Anna G.

    2001-01-01

    i g i t a l Simulation of Turbocharged Diesel Engines UnderN . 1984. Dynamic Turbocharged Diesel Engine Simulator forMoskwa. J. J. 1995. Turbocharged Diesel Engine Modeling for

  15. Legislation & Embedded Fundamental Ambiguities in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Classify These? Fuel injectors Anti-lock brakes Hot water heater control Refrigerator control Home) of the Uniform Commercial Code (aka Article 2), and the ¡ Uniform Computer Information Transactions Act (aka Article 2 (Sales) (other Articles govern wire transfers, cheque payment systems, secured loans, etc

  16. AVCEM: Advanced Vehicle Cost and Energy Use Model. Overview of AVCEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delucchi, Mark

    2005-01-01

    accounted separately), regenerative braking, battery thermalthere is no regenerative braking, and vehicle efficiency,iterative calculations. Regenerative braking is represented

  17. AVCEM: Advanced-Vehicle Cost and Energy Use Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delucchi, Mark

    2005-01-01

    accounted separately), regenerative braking, battery thermalthere is no regenerative braking, and vehicle efficiency,iterative calculations. Regenerative braking is represented

  18. Simulations of Plug-in Hybrid Vehicles Using Advanced Lithium Batteries and Ultracapacitors on Various Driving Cycles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burke, Andy; Zhao, Hengbing

    2010-01-01

    capability and thus regenerative braking performancecapability and thus regenerative braking performanceaccept all the regenerative braking energy. This paper is

  19. Prioritizing Climate Change Mitigation Alternatives: Comparing Transportation Technologies to Options in Other Sectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutsey, Nicholas P.

    2008-01-01

    crops Full HEV (regenerative braking, battery-electricidle-off and limited regenerative braking Closing/covering

  20. Identifying Options for Deep Reductions in Greenhouse Gas Emissions from California Transportation: Meeting an 80% Reduction Goal in 2050

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Christopher; McCollum, David L; McCarthy, Ryan; Leighty, Wayne

    2008-01-01

    under low loads, and regenerative braking. Application ofthe entire fleet). Regenerative braking can improve energy

  1. Braking of Tearing Mode Rotation by Ferromagnetic Conducting Walls in Tokamaks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fitzpatrick, Richard

    the equilibrium magnetic field. Magnetic islands degrade plasma confinement because they enable heat and particles structures known as magnetic islands. Magnetic islands are radially localized struc- tures centered on so fast rotation, magnetic islands co-rotate with the plasma at their associated rational surfaces.10

  2. Pneumatic brake control for precision stopping of heavy-duty vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bu, Fanping; Tan, Han-Shue

    2007-01-01

    stopping” of a 40 foot CNG bus for the Bus Precision Dockingfor two different 40 foot CNG buses (c1 and c2). Althoughpressure of two different CNG buses (c1 and c2) speeds since

  3. Pneumatic brake control for precision stopping of heavy-duty vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bu, Fanping; Tan, Han-Shue

    2007-01-01

    IEEE/ASME Trans. on Mechatronics, vol. 5, no. 1, pp. 79–91,Advanced Intelligent Mechatronics (AIM), Italy, 2001. [21

  4. ORNL/TTG/BWPT/PVS/Rev5 Performance-Based Brake Tester

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .S. Department of Energy (DOE) Information Bridge. Web site http://www.osti.gov/bridge Reports produced before are available to DOE employees, DOE contractors, Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDE) representatives specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does

  5. ORNL/TM-2011/479 Real-Time Dynamic Brake Assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    produced after January 1, 1996, are generally available free via the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE to DOE employees, DOE contractors, Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDE) representatives specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does

  6. No Keplerian Disk >10 AU around the Protostar B335: Magnetic Braking or Young Age?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yen, Hsi-Wei; Koch, Patrick M; Aso, Yusuke; Koyamatsu, Shin; Krasnopolsky, Ruben; Ohashi, Nagayoshi

    2015-01-01

    We have conducted ALMA cycle 2 observations in the 1.3 mm continuum and in the C18O (2-1) and SO (5_6-4_5) lines at a resolution of ~0.3" toward the Class 0 protostar B335. The 1.3 mm continuum, C18O, and SO emission all show central compact components with sizes of ~40-180 AU within more extended components. The C18O component shows signs of infalling and rotational motion. By fitting simple kinematic models to the C18O data, the protostellar mass is estimated to be 0.05 Msun. The specific angular momentum, on a 100 AU scale, is ~4.3E-5 km/s*pc. A similar specific angular momentum, ~3E-5 to 5E-5 km/s*pc, is measured on a 10 AU scale from the velocity gradient observed in the central SO component, and there is no clear sign of an infalling motion in the SO emission. By comparing the infalling and rotational motion, our ALMA results suggest that the observed rotational motion has not yet reached Keplerian velocity neither on a 100 AU nor even on a 10 AU scale. Consequently, the radius of the Keplerian disk in ...

  7. Longitudinal Control of Commercial Heavy Vehicles Equipped with Variable Compression Brake

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moklegaard, Lasse; Druzhinina, Maria; Stefanopoulou, Anna G.

    2002-01-01

    tively converting the turbocharged diesel engine, t h a tvalve of the vehicle's turbocharged diesel engine using avalve of the vehicle's turbocharged diesel engine using a

  8. Fault tolerant control of automatically controlled vehicles in response to brake system failures 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hsien, Li-Wei

    1998-01-01

    Increasing highway traffic congestion and high cost of ics. building new highways have brought out a renewed design of an Automated Highway System (AHS). Since safety is an important issue in the development of an AHS, ...

  9. Climate and Transportation Solutions: Findings from the 2009 Asilomar Conference on Transportation and Energy Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sperling, Daniel; Cannon, James S.

    2010-01-01

    ef?ciency through regenerative braking. The development of aincluding start/stop with regenerative braking, combustioneffects of regenerative braking. Since the acceleration term

  10. Quantifying the benefits of hybrid vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turrentine, Tom; Delucchi, Mark; Heffner, Reid R.; Kurani, Kenneth S; Sun, Yongling

    2006-01-01

    coasting through regenerative braking. Second, by downsizingrecharge the battery. Regenerative braking and coasting Onehybrid that uses regenerative braking and some electric

  11. The Rise of Electric Two-wheelers in China: Factors for their Success and Implications for the Future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weinert, Jonathan X.

    2007-01-01

    management system. Regenerative braking too many products,60V battery systems and regenerative braking. Two companiessell E2Ws with regenerative braking systems. Innovation in

  12. Fuel Cell Powered Vehicles Using Supercapacitors: Device Characteristics, Control Strategies, and Simulation Results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Hengbing; Burke, Andy

    2010-01-01

    the capture of regenerative braking energy, which willand frequent capture of regenerative braking energy, thethe stack and the regenerative braking energy and provide a

  13. ELECTROCHEMICAL POWER FOR TRANSPORTATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cairns, Elton J.

    2012-01-01

    Improvement from Regenerative Braking on the Copper Electriccomponents. The use of regenerative braking can also have aeasier to add regenerative braking capability, particularly

  14. Transportation and its Infrastructure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01

    electrical energy if regenerative braking is available (seerecharged only by regenerative braking and engine charging,systems, store regenerative braking energy and to operate

  15. Optimum Performance of Direct Hydrogen Hybrid Fuel Cell Vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Hengbing; Burke, Andy

    2009-01-01

    decelerating through regenerative braking. In the hybridvehicle through regenerative braking. The remaining energya narrow range, such that regenerative braking energy can be

  16. Kwangjin Lee J. R. Barber

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barber, James R.

    Kwangjin Lee J. R. Barber Department of Mechanical Engineering and Applied Mechanics, University Instability in Automotive Disk Brakes Under a Drag Brake Application Thermoelastic instability in an automotive disk brake system is investigated exper- imentally underdrag braking conditions. The onset

  17. Ultracapacitor Technologies and Application in Hybrid and Electric Vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burke, Andy

    2009-01-01

    recharged during regenerative braking. With these two modes,energy during regenerative braking. In the Honda system, the

  18. Batteries for Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles (PHEVs): Goals and the State of Technology circa 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Axsen, Jonn; Burke, Andy; Kurani, Kenneth S

    2008-01-01

    generator or from regenerative braking and uses the energya generator and from regenerative braking, and passes energy

  19. Driving Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles: Reports from U.S. Drivers of HEVs converted to PHEVs, circa 2006-07

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurani, Kenneth S; Heffner, Reid R.; Turrentine, Tom

    2008-01-01

    energy through regenerative braking. In contrast, PHEVs canfrom a stop, and regenerative braking—signaled to HEV owners

  20. DESIGNMODELOFAVACUUM-ASSISTED7 HYDRAULICBRAKINGSYSTEM8

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Papalambros, Panos

    ;DESIGN MODEL OF A VACUUM-ASSISTED HYDRAULIC BRAKING SYSTEM Ramprasad S. Krishnamachari Graduate Student hydraulic brake system is one of the common brake systems used in cars. Shown in Fig. 1 is a typical vacuum cylinders To hand brake brake lines Fig. 1 Vacuum assisted hydraulic brake system The difference

  1. This paper presents a new actuation approach which combines the use of brakes, springs and mini motors to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and mini motors to produce a safer and more energy efficient way to drive haptic devices. The applications which can only be powered by limited energy sources such as small batteries. This work also addresses Introduction The continuing emergence of computer haptics for train- ing, industrial and entertainment

  2. Acceleration of Type 2 Spicules in the Solar Chromosphere - 2: Viscous Braking and Upper Bounds on Coronal Energy Input

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goodman, Michael L

    2014-01-01

    A magnetohydrodynamic model is used to determine conditions under which the Lorentz force accelerates plasma to type 2 spicule speeds in the chromosphere. The model generalizes a previous model to include a more realistic pre-spicule state, and the vertical viscous force. Two cases of acceleration under upper chromospheric conditions are considered. The magnetic field strength for these cases is ~ this energy. Compressive heating dominates during the early phase of acceleration. The maximum energy injected into the corona by type 2 spicules, defined as the energy flux in the upper chromosphere, may largely balance total coronal energy losses in quiet regions, possibly also in coronal holes, but not in active regions. It is proposed that magnetic flux emergence in inter-granular regions drives type 2 spicules.

  3. 394 J. GUIDANCE, VOL. 20, NO. 2: ENGINEERING NOTES thrust-induced braking acceleration. Therefore, including air drag,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singh, Tarunraj

    -pathanglemay be used as the independentvariableto obtaina single rst-orderequation,viz., dv d� D f1.�/v C f2.�/v3 (6) where f1.�/ D ® cosec� ¡ cot� (7a) f2.�/ D ¯ cosec� (7b) Equation(6) is a form of Bernoulli by v.�/¡2 D ·exp ¡2 f1 d� ´ ¡ 2exp ¡2 f1d� ´ £ exp 2 f1 d� ´ f2 d� (8) Evaluatingthe integralsand

  4. Sensor-Friendly Freeways: Investigation of Progressive Roadway Changes to Facilitate Deployment of AHS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Misener, James A.; Griffiths, Paul; Johnson, Lee; Segal, Andy

    2001-01-01

    three potential systems: Light Emitting Diode Brake Lightthree potential systems: Light Emitting Diode Brake Lightfrom a vehicle. Light Emitting Diode Brakelight Messaging

  5. Cooperative Adaptive Cruise Control (CACC) for Truck Platooning: Operational Concept Alternatives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nowakowski, Christopher; Shladover, Steven E; Lu, Xiao-Yun; Thompson, Deborah; Kailas, Aravind

    2015-01-01

    truck attributes of engine performance, weight and braking performance, or aerodynamics.trucks within the CACC string to be ordered by weight and braking performance, engine performance, aerodynamics,

  6. Design Principles of a flywheel Regenerative Braking System (f-RBS) for Formula SAE type racecar and system testing on a Virtual Test Rig modeled on MSC ADAMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pochiraju, Anirudh

    2012-08-31

    to these advantages, flywheels are being used for Energy storage in various applications some of which are: 1. Uninterrupted Power Supply (UPS) systems [5, 18]. 2. Grid energy systems like the Beacon Flywheel Power Storage Plant in Stephentown, New York [19]. 3... for Uninterrupted Power Supply (UPS) systems, grid power storage requirements and pulse power requirements. In comparison, the application of FES in the field of transportation has been more of a recent phenomenon. Safety issues with rotating steel flywheels...

  7. Performance of Networked Control Systems under Sporadic Feedback

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lemmon, Michael

    Regenerative Braking power inverter storage Micro-Grid Renewable Generation PHEV Smart Grid - Distributed

  8. University of Toronto Scaffolds Standard

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chan, Hue Sun

    , maintenance and dismantling; Scaffolds equipped with castors or wheels must have a braking device on each

  9. Development of Dual-Fuel Engine for Class 8 Applications

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Highlights roadmap towards 55% brake thermal efficiency and progress to meet engine development goals

  10. Environmental Life-cycle Assessment of Passenger Transportation: A Detailed Methodology for Energy, Greenhouse Gas and Criteria Pollutant Inventories of Automobiles, Buses, Light Rail, Heavy Rail and Air

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chester, Mikhail; Horvath, Arpad

    2007-01-01

    brake cleaners, carburetor and choke cleaners, and enginecleaners, carburetor cleaners, choke cleaners, and engine

  11. Life-cycle Environmental Inventory of Passenger Transportation in the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chester, Mikhail V

    2008-01-01

    brake  cleaners, carburetor and choke cleaners, and engine cleaners, carburetor cleaners, choke cleaners, and engine 

  12. Environmental Life-cycle Assessment of Passenger Transportation: A Detailed Methodology for Energy, Greenhouse Gas and Criteria Pollutant Inventories of Automobiles, Buses, Light Rail, Heavy Rail and Air v.2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chester, Mikhail; Horvath, Arpad

    2008-01-01

    brake cleaners, carburetor and choke cleaners, and enginecleaners, carburetor cleaners, choke cleaners, and engine

  13. Journal of Power Sources 210 (2012) 286291 Contents lists available at SciVerse ScienceDirect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, Craig B.

    2012-01-01

    solar and wind sys- tems and regenerative braking in cars. New battery chemistries and control systems

  14. 194 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON INDUSTRIAL ELECTRONICS, VOL. 56, NO. 1, JANUARY 2009 PWM Method to Eliminate Power Sources in a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Catholic University of Chile (Universidad Católica de Chile)

    unidirectional if the machine is not using regenerative braking. In this paper, these nine power supplies

  15. n CAPABILITY STATEMENT Centre for Sustainable

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liley, David

    , control systems, battery charging, battery capacity indication, regenerative braking. Modelling of wear

  16. Computation of Optimal Current References for Flux-weakening of Multi-Phase Synchronous

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    the start-stop concept, a regenerative braking and torque assistance. The torque boost makes possible

  17. SOC/SIP for energy management Bernard COURTOIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    consumption with stop-start, with the use of electrical power for acceleration, with regenerative braking

  18. Vehicle System Dynamics 0042-3114/01/3602-179$16.00 2001, Vol. 36, No. 23, pp. 179201 # Swets & Zeitlinger

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stefanopoulou, Anna

    engine model of a six cylinder, 350 Hp turbocharged diesel engine, equipped with a compression brake

  19. Atmospheric Environment 41 (2007) 49084919 Particle size and composition distribution analysis of automotive

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Short, Daniel

    2007-01-01

    of automotive brake abrasion dusts for the evaluation of antimony sources of airborne particulate matter Akihiro

  20. Lateral control of articulated vehicles for automated highway systems under uncertainty in vehicle parameters 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daud, Omar

    1998-01-01

    is first developed and then the steering controller is augmented with an independent braking controller which provides differential torque for directly controlling the trailer yaw motion by applying unilateral tire braking on the trailer rear wheels...

  1. Energy Management System for an Hybrid Electric Vehicle, Using Ultracapacitors and Neural Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Catholic University of Chile (Universidad Católica de Chile)

    from regenerative braking, or with scarce power capacity for fast acceleration. The experimental HEV to accept energy from regenerative braking. For this reason, hybrid systems use an auxiliary energy system

  2. 614 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON INDUSTRIAL ELECTRONICS, VOL. 53, NO. 2, APRIL 2006 Energy-Management System for a Hybrid Electric

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Catholic University of Chile (Universidad Católica de Chile)

    with a poor ability to recover energy from a regenerative braking, or with a scarce power capacity for a fast batteries, are unable to accept energy from the regen- erative braking. For this reason, these vehicles may

  3. 1642 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON INTELLIGENT TRANSPORTATION SYSTEMS, VOL. 14, NO. 4, DECEMBER 2013 Minimal-Energy Driving Strategy for High-Speed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tong, Lang

    , including the extended speed range, energy efficiency, and regenerative braking. Based on this model, train the regenerative brake to feed back the kinetic energy, etc. On the other hand, a proper driving strategy can also

  4. 12,000 MILE / ANNUAL VEHICLE SAFETY INSPECTON CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY, LONG BEACH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sorin, Eric J.

    transmission fluid Inspect brake linings for wear and wheel cylinders for signs of leakage Inspect brake lines, including; radiator core, freeze plugs, hoses and water pump Inspect suspension system, tie rod ends

  5. Motion planning for 3D Navier Stokes equations and stability of nonholonomic source seeking algorithms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cochran, Jennie Eleanor

    2008-01-01

    control of a tunable thermoacoustic cooler,” IEEE Trans.braking systems, [48] in thermoacoustic coolers, and [88] in

  6. Heavy-duty H2-Diesel Dual Fuel Engines

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Brake thermal efficiency can be improved with the addition of a large amount of hydrogen at medium to high loads

  7. EDITED BY CAROLINE ASH CREDITS(TOPTOBOTTOM):BURMANNETAL.;MATZELETAL.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leake, Mark C.

    , such as in regenerative braking in hybrid cars. For very small power requirements, capaci- tors have not been competitive

  8. ARES NW Power and Conservation Council Presentation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shortfall of power, due to high demand, energy supplied into the grid by regenerative braking of shuttle

  9. 48669Federal Register / Vol. 65, No. 154 / Wednesday, August 9, 2000 / Proposed Rules Type of motor vehicle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    vehicle Service Brake Systems Emergency brake sys- tems: applica- tion and brak- ing distance in feet from initial speed of 20 mph Braking force as a percent- age of gross vehicle or combination weight mph B. Property-carrying vehicles: (1) Single unit vehicles having a manufacturer's GVWR of 10

  10. ZEBRA plus ultracapacitors: A good match for energy efficient EVs Juan Dixon, Micah Ortzar, Eduardo Arcos and Ian Nakashima.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Catholic University of Chile (Universidad Católica de Chile)

    to be improved for fast acceleration and good regenerative braking. With this purpose in mind, an ultra capacitor of batteries show reduced acceleration and reduced regenerative braking capability. One example of this kind be observed, the ZEBRA does not have a good specific power for braking and acceleration [2]. To improve

  11. Monitoring System for Testing the Performance of an Electric Vehicle Using Ultracapacitors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Catholic University of Chile (Universidad Católica de Chile)

    , efficiency, state of charge, regenerative braking. 1. Introduction Ultracapacitors are a new technology, or fast charge during regenerative braking can be avoided with the help of ultracapacitors. Besides, ultracapacitors allow regenerative braking even when the batteries are fully charged. This paper describes

  12. DSP Based Ultracapacitor System for Hybrid-Electric Vehicles Juan W. Dixon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Catholic University of Chile (Universidad Católica de Chile)

    regenerative braking, or with scarce power capacity for fast acceleration. The ratings of the ultracapacitor, regenerative braking is disconnected from the main computer of the traction drive system, and the battery", "Regenerative Braking". 1. Introduction Throughout the years hybrid vehicles have proofed themselves the shorter

  13. Report on Fire Event Originated by Ultracapacitors in an Experimental Electric Vehicle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Catholic University of Chile (Universidad Católica de Chile)

    and sudden battery discharge during acceleration, or fast charge during regenerative braking can be avoided with the help of ultracapacitors. Besides, ultracapacitors allow regenerative braking even when the batteries (acceleration and regeneration during braking). The Ultracapacitor Bank and Battery Pack were connected using

  14. built by airport authority for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ladkin, Peter B.

    on landing 3.1.1.3.1.1.3 low weight on each main gear wheel 3.1.1.3.1.1.1.3 condition of RWY surface 3 between consequences of design and behaviour expected by pilots 3.1.1.3.2.2 braking systems' logical design 3.1.1.3.2 speed brakes and thrust reverser deployment delayed 3.1.1.3 braking delayed 3

  15. Operating Experience Level 3, Lack of Familiarity with Infrequently...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    in configurations where it was difficult to see and operate safety controls such as parking brake releases. Accordingly, this OE-3 document provides recommended actions for...

  16. Saving Fuel, Reducing Emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.; Arons, Samuel M.; Lemoine, Derek M.; Hummel, Holmes

    2009-01-01

    regenerative braking, as do Saving Fuel, Reducing Emissionsconditions, the expected savings in fuel costs are notis whether the fuel cost savings over the lifetime of the

  17. DEVELOPMENT OF THE HELIUM-JET FED ONLINE MASS SEPARATOR RAMA AND ITS APPLICATION TO STUDIES OF Tz = -2 NUCLEI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moltz, D.M.

    2010-01-01

    CLUTCH/BRAKE ENERGIZED TO CONNECT ROTARY SOLENOID TO SHAFT.ROTARY SOLENOID ACTUATED ROTATING SHAFT 1 8 0 ° , STOPROTATION AND ALLOWING ROTARY SOLENOID TO RELAX, STOP ROD

  18. Exhaust Heat Driven Rankine Cycle for a Heavy Duty Diesel Engine

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presents progress to date and plans to develop a viable Rankine engine to harness useful brake power from wasted heat energy in heavy duty truck engine exhaust

  19. Microsoft PowerPoint - Advances_Fuller [Compatibility Mode

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    to developing rear-end collisions Haptic warning provides short brake pulse which causes drivers to respond faster to imminent rear-end collisions "Always on" at speeds...

  20. The selection of mechanical actuators based on performance indices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fleck, Norman A.

    . Huber, N. A. Fleck and M. F. Ashby Table 1. Typical applications of actuators aerospace automotive industrial equipment flight control surfaces braking automation equipment landing gear movement tappets

  1. Oxygen-Enriched Combustion for Military Diesel Engine Generators...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Oxygen-Enriched Combustion for Military Diesel Engine Generators Oxygen-Enriched Combustion for Military Diesel Engine Generators Substantial increases in brake power and...

  2. Sensorless Control of Doubly-Fed Induction Generator-Based Wind urbines using a High-Order Sliding Mode Observer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brest, Université de

    Circuit Breaker Medium Voltage Switchgear Line Coupling Transformer Gear Pitch Drive Brake DFIGDFIG Frequency Converter Wind Turbine Control Main Circuit Breaker Medium Voltage Switchgear Line Coupling

  3. "Title","Creator/Author","Publication Date","OSTI Identifier...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The Sandia MEMS passive shock sensor : FY08 design summary.","Walraven, Jeremy Allen; Baker, Michael Sean; Clemens, Rebecca C.; Mitchell, John Anthony; Brake, Matthew Robert; Epp,...

  4. Comparing Environmental Impacts of Additive Manufacturing vs. Traditional Machining via Life-Cycle Assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Faludi, Jeremy; Bayley, Cindy; Bhogal, Suraj; Iribarne, Myles

    2014-01-01

    motor! is! similar! to! a! Baldor! 5.6kW! motor! weighing!specification! sheet,! Baldor! BM3710T! brake! motor. !!

  5. Sedimentary records of metal deposition in Japanese alpine lakes for the last 250 years: Recent enrichment of airborne Sb and In in East Asia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Short, Daniel

    . Antimony is used in automobile brake pads, batteries, ceramics, glass, plastics, and flame retardants concentrations (Gebel, 1997), and In compounds are potentially pulmonary toxins, carcinogens, and teratogens

  6. High-reliability computing for the smarter planet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quinn, Heather M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Graham, Paul [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Manuzzato, Andrea [UNIV OF PADOVA; Dehon, Andre [UNIV OF PENN; Carter, Nicholas [INTEL CORPORATION

    2010-01-01

    The geometric rate of improvement of transistor size and integrated circuit performance, known as Moore's Law, has been an engine of growth for our economy, enabling new products and services, creating new value and wealth, increasing safety, and removing menial tasks from our daily lives. Affordable, highly integrated components have enabled both life-saving technologies and rich entertainment applications. Anti-lock brakes, insulin monitors, and GPS-enabled emergency response systems save lives. Cell phones, internet appliances, virtual worlds, realistic video games, and mp3 players enrich our lives and connect us together. Over the past 40 years of silicon scaling, the increasing capabilities of inexpensive computation have transformed our society through automation and ubiquitous communications. In this paper, we will present the concept of the smarter planet, how reliability failures affect current systems, and methods that can be used to increase the reliable adoption of new automation in the future. We will illustrate these issues using a number of different electronic devices in a couple of different scenarios. Recently IBM has been presenting the idea of a 'smarter planet.' In smarter planet documents, IBM discusses increased computer automation of roadways, banking, healthcare, and infrastructure, as automation could create more efficient systems. A necessary component of the smarter planet concept is to ensure that these new systems have very high reliability. Even extremely rare reliability problems can easily escalate to problematic scenarios when implemented at very large scales. For life-critical systems, such as automobiles, infrastructure, medical implantables, and avionic systems, unmitigated failures could be dangerous. As more automation moves into these types of critical systems, reliability failures will need to be managed. As computer automation continues to increase in our society, the need for greater radiation reliability is necessary. Already critical infrastructure is failing too frequently. In this paper, we will introduce the Cross-Layer Reliability concept for designing more reliable computer systems.

  7. Kwangjin Lee J. R. Barber

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barber, James R.

    Kwangjin Lee J. R. Barber Department of Mechanical Engineering and Applied Mechanics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Ml 48109-2125 Frictionally Excited Thermoelastic Instability in Automotive Disk Brakes Thermoelastic instability in automotive disk brake systems is investigated focusing on the effect of a finite

  8. PROOF COPY 018405PHP Observation of tearing mode deceleration and locking due to eddy currents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fitzpatrick, Richard

    to eddy currents induced in a conducting shell B. E. Chapman Department of Physics, University 6, 3878 1999 in which a braking torque originates from eddy currents induced by the rotating mode, eddy currents induced in the conducting shell surrounding the plasma exert a braking torque

  9. IEEE Instrumentation and Measurement Technology Conference

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gillespie, Brent

    , and light emitting diode brake- light messaging. These technologies all focus on improving the signal- ance, sensor, radar, fluorescence, light emitting diode. I. INTRODUCTION As a compromise between · Radar reflection-enhanced license plates · Vehicle-to-vehicle light emitting diode (LED) brake- light

  10. Implementation and Evaluation of an Ultracapacitor-Based Auxiliary Energy System for Electric Vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Catholic University of Chile (Universidad Católica de Chile)

    (W/kg) for acceleration, and power reversal capability for regenerative braking [3, 4]. Most hybrid regenerative braking capability and better efficiency. These two energy storage devices can be connected System" (AES). The MES provides extended driving range and the AES good acceleration and regenerative

  11. Journal of Cleaner Production 13 (2005) 1931 www.elsevier.com/locate/jclepro

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Short, Daniel

    2005-01-01

    as a lubricant in friction material. X-ray diffraction analysis revealed Sb in 3/3 disc brake pads (range 41 and products of service. Brake pads are true products of consumption, because they are released to biological be expec- ted to be increasingly used for cars. However, cars also contain some consumption parts

  12. PBBT Valuation Study Purpose PBBT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tester is a roller dynamometer that measures the efficiency of each brake on a vehicle. Brake efficiency: · Determine time savings afforded by using CMV Inspection Pit to conduct NAS Level- 1 inspections · Determine possible within an 8-hour shift when used in conjunction with a PBBT · Quantify time savings with using

  13. NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH INSTITUTE AARHUS UNIVERSITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the emission sources fuel consumption, engine oil, tyre wear, brake wear and road abrasion. The emission metals, road transport, fuel consumption, engine oil, tyre wear, brake wear, road abra- sion Layout: Ann.1 Metal content in fuels 15 2.2 Heavy metal emissions from fuel consumption 17 2.3 Engine oil and engine

  14. Vibration Isolation of a Locomotive Mounted Energy Storage Flywheel 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Xiaohua

    2011-02-22

    Utilizing flywheels to store and reuse energy from regenerative braking on locomotives is a new technology being developed in the Vibration Control and Electromechanics Lab at Texas A&M. This thesis focuses on the motion analysis of a locomotive...

  15. Robust yaw stability controller design and hardware-in-the-loop testing for a road vehicle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guvenc, Levent

    Unsymmetrical loading on a car like mu-split braking, side wind forces, or unilateral loss of tire pressure results in unexpected yaw disturbances that require yaw stabilization either by the driver or by an automatic ...

  16. Crevice volume effect on spark ignition engine efficiency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Patrick M. (Patrick Michael)

    2013-01-01

    A set of experiments and a simulation study are completed to quantify the effect of the piston crevice on engine efficiency. The simulation study breaks down the loss mechanisms on brake efficiency at different displacement ...

  17. Apparatus for stopping a vehicle

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wattenburg, Willard H. (Walnut Creek, CA); McCallen, David B. (Livermore, CA)

    2007-03-20

    An apparatus for externally controlling one or more brakes on a vehicle having a pressurized fluid braking system. The apparatus can include a pressurizable vessel that is adapted for fluid-tight coupling to the braking system. Impact to the rear of the vehicle by a pursuit vehicle, shooting a target mounted on the vehicle or sending a signal from a remote control can all result in the fluid pressures in the braking system of the vehicle being modified so that the vehicle is stopped and rendered temporarily inoperable. A control device can also be provided in the driver's compartment of the vehicle for similarly rendering the vehicle inoperable. A driver or hijacker of the vehicle preferably cannot overcome the stopping action from the driver's compartment.

  18. Wireless Roadside Inspection (WRI) Every year the number of trucks on the road, and the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    carrier/coach USDOT number Shipping document ID Equipment (e.g., trailer) ID Vehicle Measures Brakes Tire warning Container Coupling Driver performance Emissions Exhaust system Fuel system Steering Suspension

  19. Verification and Validation of Hybrid Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jin, Xiaoqing

    2013-01-01

    brake torque. The outputs are gear position, engine speed inspeed in mph. The discrete gear shift logic is done usingThe simpli?ed gear shift logic of a four-speed

  20. Particulate matter emissions from a DISI engine under cold-fast-idle conditions for ethanol-gasoline blends

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dimou, Iason

    2011-01-01

    In an effort to build internal combustion engines with both reduced brake-specific fuel consumption and better emission control, engineers developed the Direct Injection Spark Ignition (DISI) engine. DISI engines combine ...

  1. VEHICLE ANNUAL COMPREHENSIVE INSPECTION CHECKLIST To be completed for each vehicle annually

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, Paul A.

    emission filter INSPECT BODY AND GLASS ( ) Fuel pump ( ) ( ) Fuel Filter TOP OFF ALL FLUIDS ( ) Battery fluid ( ) ( ) Brake cylinder fluid SPARK PLUGS ( ) Transmission fluid ( ) ( ) Windshield washer fluid ELECTRICAL ( ) Battery fluid ( ) Starter ( ) Radiator pressure cap ( ) Battery cranking voltage ( ) Radiator

  2. Design of a fuzzy controller for energy management of a parallel hybrid electric vehicle 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Estrada Gutierrez, Pedro Cuauhtemoc

    1997-01-01

    devices apply torque directly to the drive shaft for propelling the vehicle. Each component of the hybrid vehicle is modeled, and throttle angle, motor current and brake torque command are chosen as the control inputs. Another input considered...

  3. Assessing benefits of coordination on safety in automated highway systems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Choi, Woosuk

    2000-01-01

    the lead vehicle brakes at its maximum possible deceleration. The quantities that are of interest are severity of impact in terms of relative velocity at impact, probability of a collision, and expected number of collisions. We are interested...

  4. An evaluation of modifications to the advance warning sign at passive highway-railroad grade crossings 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keller, Bridgette DeWees

    1995-01-01

    to an advance warning preceding a passive railroad crossing would result in adverse driver reactions such as slamming on the brakes or erratic steering maneuvers. Approaching motor vehicles detected by a motion sensor activate a strobe light which flashed until...

  5. Stormwater Management for UMore Park Molly McClung

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amin, S. Massoud

    from brake dust, oils on asphalt, and pesticides and fertilizer from landscaping. These compounds ground water sources on site. To support the current goals of creating a sustainable, regenerative

  6. Open Archive TOULOUSE Archive Ouverte (OATAO) OATAO is an open access repository that collects the work of Toulouse researchers and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    (1) are used. One such application is regenerative brak- ing, used to recover power in cars and electric mass transit vehicles that would otherwise lose braking energy as heat. However, super- capacitors

  7. Polar-Molecule-Dominated Electrorheological Fluids Featuring High Yield Stresses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zexian, Cao

    , brakes and shock absorbers, and many novel uses such as in accurate polishing, robotics, haptic Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (P

  8. The economics of evolution: Henry Ford and the Model T Robert A. Laird and Thomas N. Sherratt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laird, Robert

    inspectors came back with reports of almost every kind of failure: axles, brakes, pistons Á all were liable were unnecessarily durable and asked that they be built to a cheaper specification. The general lesson

  9. Just build it! : a fully functional concept vehicle using robotic wheels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmitt, Peter, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2007-01-01

    Interest in electric vehicle drive units is resurging with the proliferation of hybrid and electric vehicles. Currently emerging key-technologies are: in-wheel motors, electric braking, integrated steering activators and ...

  10. Notes 12. (a) Annular pressure (damper) seals, and (b) Hydrostatic journal bearings 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    San Andres, Luis

    2009-01-01

    The mechanism of centering stiffness in seals. Force coefficients for short-length pressure seals. Design of annular seals: swirl brakes, impact on rotordynamics. Hydrostatic bearings in modern applications. The principle of hydrostatic lubrication...

  11. TITLE AUTHORS SUBJECT SUBJECT RELATED DESCRIPTION PUBLISHER AVAILABILI...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The Sandia MEMS passive shock sensor FY08 design summary Walraven Jeremy Allen Baker Michael Sean Clemens Rebecca C Mitchell John Anthony Brake Matthew Robert Epp David S Wittwer...

  12. Smart Cruise Control: An ITS Applica on for Improved Fuel Economy, Safety, and Traffic Conges on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and traffic throughput efficiency of the road system. cta.ornl.gov Contact Tim LaClair Research R&D Center that calculates a planned speed profile that minimizes braking · Vehicle-to-vehicle (V2V) communications

  13. EVALUATION OF UPFLOW FILTERS FOREVALUATION OF UPFLOW FILTERS FOR STORMWATER TREATMENT AT CRITICALSTORMWATER TREATMENT AT CRITICAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, Shirley E.

    .brakes, etc. Infiltration Devices: Subsurface Infiltration Trenches,Infiltration Devices: Subsurface Infiltration Trenches, Surface Percolation Areas, Porous Pavement, Grass Filters,Surface Percolation Areas filters.downflow filters. OBJECTIVES OF THE STUDYOBJECTIVES OF THE STUDY Primary:Primary: Optimize

  14. Smart Parking Pilot on the Coaster Commuter Rail Line in San Diego, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blake, Tagan; Rodier, Caroline J.; Shaheen, Susan

    2008-01-01

    brake command an vehicle drive Cycle 1 Ac ce p us cr Page 23of three main blocks: drive cycle, driver, and vehicle. The21,22]. The block of drive cycle defines the driving profile

  15. Optimization of Fuel Cell System Operating Conditions for Fuel Cell Vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Hengbing; Burke, Andy

    2008-01-01

    brake command an vehicle drive Cycle 1 Ac ce p us cr Page 23of three main blocks: drive cycle, driver, and vehicle. The21,22]. The block of drive cycle defines the driving profile

  16. Experimental investigation of frictional melting of argillite at high slip rates: Implications for seismic slip in subduction-accretion complexes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fialko, Yuri

    of the melt layer. Our experimental results suggest that viscous braking can be efficient at shallow depths recently found in exhumed subduction thrusts, roof thrusts of duplex struc- tures [Ikesawa et al., 2003

  17. 1061-933X/05/6701- 2005 Pleiades Publishing, Inc.0001 Colloid Journal, Vol. 67, No. 1, 2005, pp. 120. Translated from Kolloidnyi Zhurnal, Vol. 67, No. 1, 2005, pp. 525.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , cutting tools, and braking systems. Such growing technologies as the production of modern elec- tronics, metal injection molding, production of ceram- ics, and the formation of thick- and thin-film coatings

  18. Household Hazardous Waste Collection Centers are not permitted to accept waste from businesses, churches, schools, nonprofit organizations or government agencies.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mease, Kenneth D.

    insecticides Moth repellents Mouse and rat poisons and baits Other Flammable Products CO2 cartridges (lecture injection cleaners Fuel additives Motor oil Starter fluids Transmission and brake fluid Indoor Pesticides

  19. Charged Particle Energization and Transport in the Magnetotail during Substorms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pan, Qingjiang

    2015-01-01

    Owen (2011), Plasma jet braking: energy dissipation and non-Hones Jr. (1979), High-energy magnetospheric protons andof energetic electrons energy ( E ? 200 keV ) in the earth’s

  20. CALL FOR PAPERS & PRESENTATIONS Abstracts due by September 15, 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Su, Xiao

    Energy conservation and efficiency, energy storage modeling, hybrid vehicles, emissions reduction savings, energy storage devices, regenerative braking, smart electrical supply Abstract can be submitted System safety approaches, safety data management, risk analysis approaches, accident avoidance, accident

  1. Motorized control for mirror mount apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cutburth, Ronald W. (Tracy, CA)

    1989-01-01

    A motorized control and automatic braking system for adjusting mirror mount apparatus is disclosed. The motor control includes a planetary gear arrangement to provide improved pitch adjustment capability while permitting a small packaged design. The motor control for mirror mount adjustment is suitable for laser beam propagation applications. The brake is a system of constant contact, floating detents which engage the planetary gear at selected between-teeth increments to stop rotation instantaneously when the drive motor stops.

  2. 1.2.3. internal event and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ladkin, Peter B.

    3.1.1.3.1.1.3 low weight on each main gear wheel 3.1.1.3.2.2 braking system's logical design 3 3.1.1.3.1.1.3 low weight on each main gear wheel 3.1.1.3.2.2 braking system's logical design 3.1.1.3.2.3 divergence between consequences of design and behaviour expected by CRW 3.1.1.3.2.3.1 behavior expected

  3. Microcomputer Analysis of Pumping System Performance 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bierschenk, J. L.; Schmidt, P. S.

    1986-01-01

    produced by the pump for a given series computers, has been developed to permit the capacity, as well as the brake horsepower, analysis of pump operation based on descriptions efficiency, and net positive suction head. Pump of the piping system... to impeller peripheral velocity and head is proportional to the square of the peripheral velocity. Therefore. flow (Q) will vary directly with the change in speed (n). head (H) will vary as the square of the speed, and brake horsepower (BHP) will vary...

  4. Full Hybrid: Passing

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center HomeVehicle Replacement VouchersBraking buttonhighlighted Braking

  5. Full Hybrid: Stopped

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center HomeVehicle Replacement VouchersBraking buttonhighlightedBraking

  6. Utilizing fly ash particles to produce low-cost metal matrix composites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Withers, G.

    2008-07-01

    Metal matrix composites (MMCs) are a blend of fine ceramic particles mixed with metals such as aluminium or magnesium. Fly ash is considerably cheaper than ceramics; aluminium-fly ash composites cost less than 60% of conventional aluminium-SiC composites making them attractive to automakers striving for lower weight and cheaper materials for brake rotors or brake drums. Ultalite.com has consulted with US researchers to to find the optimum requirements of the fly ash needed to make MMCs. Particle size 20-40 microns, low calcium oxide content and spherical particles were identified. The desired particles once extracted are stirred into molten aluminum and the resulting composite is into ingots for shipment to a casting facility. Dynamometer testing has shown that aluminium-fly ash composite brake drums have better performance and wear than cast iron drums. 6 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Heel and toe driving on fuel cell vehicle

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Choi, Tayoung; Chen, Dongmei

    2012-12-11

    A system and method for providing nearly instantaneous power in a fuel cell vehicle. The method includes monitoring the brake pedal angle and the accelerator pedal angle of the vehicle, and if the vehicle driver is pressing both the brake pedal and the accelerator pedal at the same time and the vehicle is in a drive gear, activating a heel and toe mode. When the heel and toe mode is activated, the speed of a cathode compressor is increased to a predetermined speed set-point, which is higher than the normal compressor speed for the pedal position. Thus, when the vehicle brake is removed, the compressor speed is high enough to provide enough air to the cathode, so that the stack can generate nearly immediate power.

  8. Control system for supercharged internal combustion engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kawamura, H.

    1988-05-24

    A control system for controlling an internal combustion engine is described having a supercharge including a rotatable shaft and an exhaust turbine driven by exhaust gas. The control system comprising: a rotary electric machine mounted on the rotatable shaft of the supercharger for imposing a load on the exhaust turbine of the supercharger; setting means for setting an engine brake mode of the internal combustion engine; and operating means for operating the rotary electric machine when the engine brake mode is set by the setting means.

  9. Final report for CCS cross-layer reliability visioning study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quinn, Heather M; Dehon, Andre; Carter, Nicj

    2010-12-20

    The geometric rate of improvement of transistor size and integrated circuit performance known as Moore's Law has been an engine of growth for our economy, enabling new products and services, creating new value and wealth, increasing safety, and removing menial tasks from our daily lives. Affordable, highly integrated components have enabled both life-saving technologies and rich entertainment applications. Anti-lock brakes, insulin monitors, and GPS-enabled emergency response systems save lives. Cell phones, internet appliances, virtual worlds, realistic video games, and mp3 players enrich our lives and connect us together. Over the past 40 years of silicon scaling, the increasing capabilities of inexpensive computation have transformed our society through automation and ubiquitous communications. Looking forward, increasing unpredictability threatens our ability to continue scaling integrated circuits at Moore's Law rates. As the transistors and wires that make up integrated circuits become smaller, they display both greater differences in behavior among devices designed to be identical and greater vulnerability to transient and permanent faults. Conventional design techniques expend energy to tolerate this unpredictability by adding safety margins to a circuit's operating voltage, clock frequency or charge stored per bit. However, the rising energy costs needed to compensate for increasing unpredictability are rapidly becoming unacceptable in today's environment where power consumption is often the limiting factor on integrated circuit performance and energy efficiency is a national concern. Reliability and energy consumption are both reaching key inflection points that, together, threaten to reduce or end the benefits of feature size reduction. To continue beneficial scaling, we must use a cross-layer, Jull-system-design approach to reliability. Unlike current systems, which charge every device a substantial energy tax in order to guarantee correct operation in spite of rare events, such as one high-threshold transistor in a billion or one erroneous gate evaluation in an hour of computation, cross-layer reliability schemes make reliability management a cooperative effort across the system stack, sharing information across layers so that they only expend energy on reliability when an error actually occurs. Figure 1 illustrates an example of such a system that uses a combination of information from the application and cheap architecture-level techniques to detect errors. When an error occurs, mechanisms at higher levels in the stack correct the error, efficiently delivering correct operation to the user in spite of errors at the device or circuit levels. In the realms of memory and communication, engineers have a long history of success in tolerating unpredictable effects such as fabrication variability, transient upsets, and lifetime wear using information sharing, limited redundancy, and cross-layer approaches that anticipate, accommodate, and suppress errors. Networks use a combination of hardware and software to guarantee end-toend correctness. Error-detection and correction codes use additional information to correct the most common errors, single-bit transmission errors. When errors occur that cannot be corrected by these codes, the network protocol requests re-transmission of one or more packets until the correct data is received. Similarly, computer memory systems exploit a cross-layer division of labor to achieve high performance with modest hardware. Rather than demanding that hardware alone provide the virtual memory abstraction, software page-fault and TLB-miss handlers allow a modest piece of hardware, the TLB, to handle the common-case operations on a cyc1e-by-cycle basis while infrequent misses are handled in system software. Unfortunately, mitigating logic errors is not as simple or as well researched as memory or communication systems. This lack of understanding has led to very expensive solutions. For example, triple-modular redundancy masks errors by triplicating computations in either time or area. T

  10. Paper Number Sizing and Optimal Operation of a Power Split Hydraulic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Perry Y.

    sector. In hybrid vehicles energy is saved by regenerating kinetic energy while braking, by operating power sources that can directly or indirectly propel the vehicle. A hybrid vehicle saves energy in three as alternative energy storage and electric motors and generators are used to assist the engine in power, is often

  11. A Coordinated Train Control Algorithm to Improve Regenerative Energy Receptivity in Metro Transit Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barkan, Christopher P.L.

    regenerative energy receptivity and energy savings in a bi-directional metro transit network, this paper formulates a coordinated train control algorithm based on genetic algorithm techniques. The energy saving is a braking mechanism that decelerates the vehicle by converting its kinetic energy into electric energy

  12. 1 Copyright 2014 by ASME Proceedings of the 2014 Joint Rail Conference

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barkan, Christopher P.L.

    operations, regenerative braking is one practical way for saving energy because it enables the kinetic energy-unit railcars are converted into generators, and electricity generated from kinetic energy of the train trains, the excess energy must be dissipated by the resistors on-board the train where electrical power

  13. This article was downloaded by:[Lee, John D.] [Lee, John D.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, John D.

    Ergonomics Publication details, including instructions for authors and subscription information: http sensitivity to brake pulse duration and magnitude', Ergonomics, 50:6, 828 - 836 To link to this article: DOI of the vehicle and, in *Corresponding author. Email: jdlee@engineering.uiowa.edu Ergonomics Vol. 50, No. 6

  14. AAIB Bulletin No: 2/2005 Ref: EW/C2003/08/11 Category: 1.1 Aircraft Type and Registration: Airbus A320-200, C-FTDF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ladkin, Peter B.

    's Runway 30. On finals, the Electronic Centralized Aircraft Monitoring (ECAM) display showed a STEERING to recognise the lack of pedal braking and there was no overt warning from the ECAM of the malfunction) and the crew noted that the WHEEL page on the ECAM (Electronic Centralized Aircraft Monitoring) display showed

  15. 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 Time, (sec)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mektronika Systems MIRA QinetiQ Shell UK Tinsley Bridge Volvo Trucks Effects of Tyre Dynamics on Slip Control by tyre vibration? · What benefits can be achieved by using a Smart Tyre signal? vx ba Effects of Tyre Smart Tyre Straight-Line Braking Performance on Smooth, Wet Road Slip Controller Performance

  16. D2Cyber: A Design Automation Tool for Dependable Cybercars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -by-wire (e.g., steer-by-wire (SBW), brake-by-wire). ISO 26262 specifies automotive safety integrity levels cybercar applications where electronic controllers substitute for the traditional mechanical and/or hydraulic systems. The use of electronic controllers in automotive systems has not only improved performance

  17. Breakthrough Makes LED Lights More Versatile Author: Andrea Thompson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rogers, John A.

    Breakthrough Makes LED Lights More Versatile Author: Andrea Thompson Source: http these limitations by combining the best of two worlds of LEDs to make ultrathin, ultrasmall and flexible light-sized inorganic LEDs after a request from Ford Motor Co. to create a third brake light for cars that would

  18. SwRI Patents Southwest Research Institute -Page 1 of 85

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapman, Clark R.

    ,720,184 5/13/2014 Use of Braking Energy to Augment Exhaust Heat for Improved Operation of Exhaust Aftertreatment Devices Cynthia C. Webb, Karl J Kreder III SwRI 8,714,121 5/6/2014 Split-Cycle Air Hybrid V

  19. Cost Analysis of Fuel Cell Systems for Transportation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    /FreedomCar guidelines. Packaging (Piping, Electrical, .....) Start-up Power (battery); Anode Tailgas Burner Included in DOE PEMFC System Analyzed Fuel Tank · Power Conditioning · Electric Motor · Electric Drive Train · Regenerative Braking System (Battery) Managers (Controllers and Sensors) Air Thermal Water Safety Other: · AC

  20. CATEGORY/BUYER LISTING BUYERS: Darlene Smith, Richard Wagner Page 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Michelle

    CONDITIONING EQUIP AND ACCESSORIES ROBERT LOZIER (614) 292-9959 AIRCP AIRCRAFT PARTS & SUPP: AIRCRAFT EQUIP PLUGS, BATTERIES, BRAKES, HOSES, FLUID, WHEELS, RIMS, FILTERS, ETC SERVICE AND REPAIR RICHARD WAGNER (614) 688-3678 AUTSP AUTOMOTIVE SHOP EQUIP: BATTERY CHARGERS, TIRE CHANGING EQUIP. ETC JOHN MALONEY

  1. CATEGORY/BUYER LISTING BUYERS: Darlene Smith, Richard Wagner Page 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Michelle

    -8729 *AIRCN AIR CONDITIONERS-SEE ALSO HVAC: AIR CONDITIONING EQUIP AND ACCESSORIES ROBERT LOZIER (614) 292 & SUPP: ANTIFREEZE, OIL, TIRES, SPARK PLUGS, BATTERIES, BRAKES, HOSES, FLUID, WHEELS, RIMS, FILTERS, ETC SERVICE AND REPAIR RICHARD WAGNER (614) 688-3678 AUTSP AUTOMOTIVE SHOP EQUIP: BATTERY CHARGERS, TIRE

  2. Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and testing of the Westport High Pressure Direct Injection liquefied natural gas heavy duty engine and 0.01 grams per brake horsepower-hour particulate matter. The engine test results were successful Commission at 916-327-1551. i #12;ABSTRACT Westport Innovations is a leader in gaseous fuel engine technology

  3. INTRODUCTION Muscle fibers can be modified to produce a broad continuum of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hynes, Wayne L.

    as powerful motors (Lutz and Rome, 1994; Marsh and Olson, 1994), as brakes or shock absorbers (Full et al heavy chain (MHC) and the function of the The Journal of Experimental Biology 213, 1079-1091 © 2010 23529, USA and 3 Department of Mechanical Engineering, Southern Methodist University, Dallas, TX 75275

  4. Series 8000 Available in 3 lengths

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Landers, Robert G.

    is subjected to automated performance testing prior to shipment. LCM-1 LO-COG ® DC Servo MotorsSeries 8000 magnets enclosed in heavy-gauge steel return rings · Diamond turned commutators ensure maximum brush life · Shaft-mounted pulleys and gears · Ball bearings · Multiple windings · Electromechanical brakes

  5. nature photonics | VOL 1 | APRIL 2007 | www.nature.com/naturephotonics 189 he semiconductor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheludev, Nikolay

    . Increasingly, cars are equipped with LED indicator and brake lights. Most crucially, however, the LED Electric Company laboratories, Marshall Nathan of IBM and Robert Rediker of MIT, and their co (Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers) senior member at the US Embassy in Moscow5

  6. A Probabilistic Particle Control Approximation of Chance Constrained Stochastic Predictive Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Brian C.

    and can control a ground vehicle while being robust to brake failures. I. INTRODUCTION Robust control such as failures. We demonstrate in simulation that the new method is able to control an aircraft in turbulence control ensures that failure is prevented under all possible uncertainties. In many cases, for example

  7. RESEARCH FRONT CSIRO PUBLISHING Foreword

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Short, Daniel

    it is now being used extensively in industry[3] and for items such as car brake linings[4] and in fire to organisms is not well understood. Antimony is a global contaminant and there is an urgent need to improve of analytical procedures for measuring trace contaminants in water, sediment and biota. He is also director

  8. Computer controllable synchronous shifting of an automatic transmission

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Davis, R.I.; Patil, P.B.

    1989-08-08

    A multiple forward speed automatic transmission produces its lowest forward speed ratio when a hydraulic clutch and hydraulic brake are disengaged and a one-way clutch connects a ring gear to the transmission casing. Second forward speed ratio results when the hydraulic clutch is engaged to connect the ring gear to the planetary carrier of a second gear set. Reverse drive and regenerative operation result when an hydraulic brake fixes the planetary and the direction of power flow is reversed. Various sensors produce signals representing the torque at the output of the transmission or drive wheels, the speed of the power source, and the hydraulic pressure applied to a clutch and brake. A control algorithm produces input data representing a commanded upshift, a commanded downshift, a commanded transmission output torque, and commanded power source speed. A microprocessor processes the inputs and produces a response to them in accordance with the execution of a control algorithm. Output or response signals cause selective engagement and disengagement of the clutch and brake at a rate that satisfies the requirements for a short gear ratio change and smooth torque transfer between the friction elements. 6 figs.

  9. Computer controlled synchronous shifting of an automatic transmission

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Davis, Roy I. (9214 Abbey La., Ypsilanti, MI 48198); Patil, Prabhakar B. (10294 W. Outer Dr., Detroit, MI 48223)

    1989-01-01

    A multiple forward speed automatic transmission produces its lowest forward speed ratio when a hydraulic clutch and hydraulic brake are disengaged and a one-way clutch connects a ring gear to the transmission casing. Second forward speed ratio results when the hydraulic clutch is engaged to connect the ring gear to the planetary carrier of a second gear set. Reverse drive and regenerative operation result when an hydraulic brake fixes the planetary and the direction of power flow is reversed. Various sensors produce signals representing the torque at the output of the transmission or drive wheels, the speed of the power source, and the hydraulic pressure applied to a clutch and brake. A control algorithm produces input data representing a commanded upshift, a commanded downshift, a commanded transmission output torque, and commanded power source speed. A microprocessor processes the inputs and produces a response to them in accordance with the execution of a control algorithm. Output or response signals cause selective engagement and disengagement of the clutch and brake at a rate that satisfies the requirements for a short gear ratio change and smooth torque transfer between the friction elements.

  10. 1.2.3. internal event and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ladkin, Peter B.

    main gear wheel 3.1.1.3.2.2 braking system's logical design 3.1.1.3.2.3 divergence between consequences of design and behaviour expected by CRW 3.1.1.3.2.3.1 behavior expected by CRW 3.1.1.3.2.3.1.1 `normal

  11. internal event and its description

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ladkin, Peter B.

    main gear wheel 3.1.1.3.2.2 braking system's logical design 3.1.1.3.2.3 divergence between consequences of design and behaviour expected by CRW 3.1.1.3.2.3.1 behavior expected by CRW 3.1.1.3.2.3.1.1 `normal

  12. The 1993 Warsaw Accident (with Michael Hohl)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ladkin, Peter B.

    with the landing gear very lightly and did not compress the left landing gear leg suÆciently (p9) (DESIGN). #15; q speed of 72 kts (p9) (DESIGN) and because the crew used full aps which disabled the braking system until the recorded touchdown (p32) (DESIGN). #15; r) The deceleration decreased because a layer of water

  13. Lecture notes Introductory fluid mechanics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Malham, Simon J.A.

    Lecture notes Introductory fluid mechanics Simon J.A. Malham Simon J.A. Malham (15th September 2014 of fluid mechanics and along the way see lots of interesting applications. 2 Fluid flow, the Continuum are generally incompressible--a feature essential to all modern car braking mechanisms. Fluids can be further

  14. Lecture notes Introductory incompressible fluid mechanics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Malham, Simon J.A.

    Lecture notes Introductory incompressible fluid mechanics Simon J.A. Malham Simon J.A. Malham (23rd of fluid mechanics and along the way see lots of interesting applications. 2 Fluid flow, the Continuum. Liquids are generally incompressible--a feature essential to all modern car braking mechanisms. Fluids can

  15. AME 436, 2nd Midterm Exam Study Guide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Brake torque, power, MEP · Efficiency - thermal, mechanical, volumetric · Emissions · Ideal-gas cycle Indicated Mean Effective Pressure (IMEPg)? b) What is the Pumping Mean Effective Pressure (PMEP)? c) If the volumetric efficiency is 100%, what is the air mass flow rate ( mair )? d) What is the net indicated thermal

  16. Author's personal copy Journal of Hazardous Materials 185 (2011) 983989

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Lena

    2011-01-01

    of frond harvesting regimes and arsenic levels in refill water Seenivasan Natarajana,1 , Robert H. Stampsa online 8 October 2010 Keywords: Chinese brake fern Hydroponic tanks Phytoremediation Frond harvest Water, three frond-harvesting regimes (all, mature, and senescing fronds) and two water-refilling schemes

  17. Thermal Evolution of Strange Stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou Xia; Wang Lingzhi; Zhou Aizhi

    2007-09-03

    We investigated the thermal evolution of rotating strange stars with the deconfinement heating due to magnetic braking. We consider the stars consisting of either normal quark matter or color-flavor-locked phase. Combining deconfinement heating with magnetic field decay, we find that the thermal evolution curves are identical to pulsar data.

  18. Multispectral Machine Vision for Improved Undercarriage Inspection of Railroad Rolling Stock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Todorovic, Sinisa

    mechanical or electrical systems, for example, brakes and traction motors, respectively. Thermal energy are developing a machine vision system to improve both the efficiency and effectiveness of this inspection. Camera location was the first to be considered because it affects various other design elements

  19. ATriP to Halifax By SaulWilson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilson, W. Stephen

    taking some pictures from the far end of the platform, we boarded the last car, a Quiet Car, so I could consist of a mere six Amfleet cars led by a single AEM- 7. (Evidently the temporary elimination of Acela service due to cracks on their brakes had created a serious lack of Amfleet cars; normal trains would have

  20. Operating Systems Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bogliolo, Alessandro

    by the environment" 4 Introduction (2) ¿ Examples of real-time systems: ¿ plant control ¿ control of production systems ¿ space missions ¿ household appliances ¿ virtual / augmented reality #12;3 5 Introduction (3 of application: ¿ Automotive: · power-train control, air-bag control, steer by wire, brake by wire ¿ Aircraft

  1. An architect wants to design a 5 m high circular pillar with a radius of 0.5 m that holds a bronze statue that weighs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertulani, Carlos A. - Department of Physics and Astronomy, Texas A&M University

    -03= 7E+05 Pa (about 7 times the atmospheric pressure). #12;6 Force and pressure A P=0 Vacuum Air (P=1. #12;8 Does the shape of the container matter? NO!! #12;9 Hydraulic brake 6.4 cm2 1.8 cm2 F=44 N R=0

  2. The Plasma Magnet for Deep Space Exploration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shepherd, Simon

    . Expansion is halted by solar wind pressure is in balance with the magnetic pressure from the driven currentsW RF power ·Magnetic shielding of spacecraft from high energy solar particles ·Magneto-braking in magnetosphere of outer planets ·Electrical power generation from back emf on RF field coils from solar plasma

  3. Fuel Quality & Metering Current Status and Future Needs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fuel Quality & Metering Current Status and Future Needs DOE Tank Safety Workshop Sandia National with enforcing the quality standards for Gasoline, Diesel, Motor Oil, Coolants, Brake Fluid, ATF, and Hydrogen commercial weighing, measuring, or counting device. This includes all Retail Motor Fuel devices (California

  4. "Are You Getting Your Money's Worth?" CC ONSUMERONSUMER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    pumps. We also test the quality of; gasoline, diesel fuel, motor oil, and brake fluid you didn't get. · When buying gasoline, look at the pump reading before the start of fuel delivery. The reading should be cleared and the pump set at zero be- fore you dispense fuel. · Check your receipts

  5. The Plasma Magnet John Slough

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shepherd, Simon

    power from the solar wind. ·The ultimate spacecraft speed powered by the plasma magnet the Solar Wind plications: ulti-MW thruster leveraged from multi-KW RF power agneto-braking in magnetosphere (rotor) creating an expanding magnetized bubble. Expansion is halted by solar wind pressure is in balance

  6. The New PulsarSupernova Remnant System PSR J1119\\Gamma6127 and SNR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ). The mean MJD of this observation (51404.4) is just six days after a glitch reported by Camilo et al. (2000:31 \\Theta 10 \\Gamma23 Epoch of period (MJD) 51398 48355.00 Braking index, n 2:91 \\Sigma 0:01 2:837 \\Sigma 0

  7. A Smart Walker to Understand Walking Abilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poupart, Pascal

    for Aging, Village of Winston Park, Toronto Rehabilitation Institute, CIHR, NSERC #12;3 Outline · Motivation? Pascal Poupart, 11/21/2008 #12;7 Smart Walker walker devices + caregivers users Force sensors Load, brakes, load) ­ environment (obstacles) · Why? ­ Detect falls ­ Monitor users ­ Ensure safety #12;9 i

  8. Provided to Michigan State University as an example system description for educational purposes only. All questions should be directed to the instructor, Dr. Betty H.C. Cheng at Michigan State University.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    idle when the vehicle is stopped, the average car's fuel economy will improve by about 3.5 %. While emissions are reduced by approximately 4%, making this a truly green technology. Assisted Direct Start emissions. The engine is automatically restarted when the driver releases the brake and engages the gas

  9. Model Based Safety Assessment Dynamic System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grigoras, .Romulus

    Assessment Techniques ·Failure mode and effect analysis (FMEA) ­ Model: from a local failure to its system chain .... 2 Functional FMEA template FT unannunciated loss of wheel braking #12;Drawbacks of the Classical Safety Assessment Techniques · Fault Tree, FMEA ­ Give failure propagation paths without referring

  10. 3736 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON VEHICULAR TECHNOLOGY, VOL. 59, NO. 8, OCTOBER 2010 Asymmetrical Multilevel Inverter for Traction Drives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Catholic University of Chile (Universidad Católica de Chile)

    reduces these nine sources to only one: the battery car. The topology also permits full regenerative braking working as a three-level converter. The proposed system is intended for ap- plication in EVs from levels of voltage, bidirectional power supplies are required, and the same happens when regenerative

  11. Efficient high density train operations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gordon, Susanna P. (Oakland, CA); Evans, John A. (Hayward, CA)

    2001-01-01

    The present invention provides methods for preventing low train voltages and managing interference, thereby improving the efficiency, reliability, and passenger comfort associated with commuter trains. An algorithm implementing neural network technology is used to predict low voltages before they occur. Once voltages are predicted, then multiple trains can be controlled to prevent low voltage events. Further, algorithms for managing inference are presented in the present invention. Different types of interference problems are addressed in the present invention such as "Interference. During Acceleration", "Interference Near Station Stops", and "Interference During Delay Recovery." Managing such interference avoids unnecessary brake/acceleration cycles during acceleration, immediately before station stops, and after substantial delays. Algorithms are demonstrated to avoid oscillatory brake/acceleration cycles due to interference and to smooth the trajectories of closely following trains. This is achieved by maintaining sufficient following distances to avoid unnecessary braking/accelerating. These methods generate smooth train trajectories, making for a more comfortable ride, and improve train motor reliability by avoiding unnecessary mode-changes between propulsion and braking. These algorithms can also have a favorable impact on traction power system requirements and energy consumption.

  12. Method of managing interference during delay recovery on a train system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gordon, Susanna P.; Evans, John A.

    2005-12-27

    The present invention provides methods for preventing low train voltages and managing interference, thereby improving the efficiency, reliability, and passenger comfort associated with commuter trains. An algorithm implementing neural network technology is used to predict low voltages before they occur. Once voltages are predicted, then multiple trains can be controlled to prevent low voltage events. Further, algorithms for managing inference are presented in the present invention. Different types of interference problems are addressed in the present invention such as "Interference During Acceleration", "Interference Near Station Stops", and "Interference During Delay Recovery." Managing such interference avoids unnecessary brake/acceleration cycles during acceleration, immediately before station stops, and after substantial delays. Algorithms are demonstrated to avoid oscillatory brake/acceleration cycles due to interference and to smooth the trajectories of closely following trains. This is achieved by maintaining sufficient following distances to avoid unnecessary braking/accelerating. These methods generate smooth train trajectories, making for a more comfortable ride, and improve train motor reliability by avoiding unnecessary mode-changes between propulsion and braking. These algorithms can also have a favorable impact on traction power system requirements and energy consumption.

  13. Voltage control on a train system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gordon, Susanna P.; Evans, John A.

    2004-01-20

    The present invention provides methods for preventing low train voltages and managing interference, thereby improving the efficiency, reliability, and passenger comfort associated with commuter trains. An algorithm implementing neural network technology is used to predict low voltages before they occur. Once voltages are predicted, then multiple trains can be controlled to prevent low voltage events. Further, algorithms for managing inference are presented in the present invention. Different types of interference problems are addressed in the present invention such as "Interference During Acceleration", "Interference Near Station Stops", and "Interference During Delay Recovery." Managing such interference avoids unnecessary brake/acceleration cycles during acceleration, immediately before station stops, and after substantial delays. Algorithms are demonstrated to avoid oscillatory brake/acceleration cycles due to interference and to smooth the trajectories of closely following trains. This is achieved by maintaining sufficient following distances to avoid unnecessary braking/accelerating. These methods generate smooth train trajectories, making for a more comfortable ride, and improve train motor reliability by avoiding unnecessary mode-changes between propulsion and braking. These algorithms can also have a favorable impact on traction power system requirements and energy consumption.

  14. Design and Architecture of the Unified Modular Snake Robot Cornell Wright, Austin Buchan, Ben Brown, Jason Geist, Michael Schwerin,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Choset, Howie

    Motor Current Joint Angle Actuators 36 V Brushed DC Motor SMA Wire Parking Brake Torque 1.3 Nm (0.95 ft its locomotion. Inside each 2-DOF module are two hobby servos, magnetic encoders, and a Lithium Ion, power, and speed tradeoffs. Each module includes a motor and gear train, an SMA wire actuated bistable

  15. Effects of Plant Age on Arsenic Hyperaccumulation by Pteris vittata L.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Lena

    of biomass production lead to higher As accumulation and removal by young plants. This re- search Introduction Arsenic (As) is a ubiquitous trace element present in soils and plants. Natural and anthropogenic of hyperaccumulator plants such as Pteris vittata L (Chinese brake fern) for phyto- extraction of arsenic

  16. [Minor revision posted 11/2/12 (replaces 11/29/07 edition)] Operating Policy and Procedure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rock, Chris

    are dependent upon the nature and degree of exposure to wear, deterioration, or malfunction. e. Frequent in lines, tanks, valves, drain pumps, and other parts of air or hydraulic systems- checked daily; (3) Hooks) Excessive brake wear; (6) Excessive wear of chain drive sprockets and excessive chain stretch; and (7

  17. Combustion joining of refractory materials: Carboncarbon composites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mukasyan, Alexander

    Combustion joining of refractory materials: Carbon­carbon composites Jeremiah D.E. White Department­carbon composite is achieved by employing self-sustained, oxygen-free, high-temperature combustion reactions to a used "core" to produce a brake that meets the performance specifications. The combustion-joining (CJ

  18. A New Microstructural Parameter for the Characterization of Porous Ceramics Derived from a Combination of Stochastic and Mechanical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmidt, Volker

    materials are of interest for different technical applications e.g. vehicle disc brakes, coatings of turbine in burners of stationary gas turbines or in other high temperature applications. To correlate the properties Materials Simulation (ICAMS), Ruhr-Universit¨at Bochum, Universit¨atsstr. 150, 44801, Bochum, Germany b

  19. Volume 2, Issue 2 GT-CERT NEWSLETTERGeorgia T ech Office of E merg ency Pre pared ne ss

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Mo

    positions. There are opportunities to be involved with drills and training in the areas of Damage Assessment or other severe weather. Encourage the idea of drilling for a sever weather event, as well as the posting. Vehicle Emergency Kit: Extra fluids (brake fluid, oil, etc.) Jumper cables Tools (pliers, adjustable

  20. miR-153 and miR-335, Ethanol Sensitive MicroRNAs, Control NSC/NPC Maturation during Fetal Brain Development 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsai, Pai Chi

    2014-05-05

    conclude that miR-335 and miR-153 act as molecular brakes to prevent NSCs/NPCs early maturation by regulating cell differentiation genes during the second trimester, and ethanol leads to organizational defects in the developing cerebral cortex through...

  1. A Modular High Temperature Measurement Set-Up for Semiconductor Device Characterization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    such as combustion engines, car brake systems, turbines or well drilling. Therefore, the high temperature to the exposure to the oxygen in the surrounding air. Apart from measuring device terminal characteristics chambers has several ports for electrical feedthroughs as well as a feedthrough for the cooling liquid

  2. Energy Management for an Onboard Storage System Based on Multi-Objective Optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Noé, Reinhold

    Energy Management for an Onboard Storage System Based on Multi-Objective Optimization Tobias Knoke an onboard energy storage, the overhead line peak power and energy consumption can be reduced. The storage. This can be achieved by using an onboard energy storage, which recuperates the power during the braking

  3. TRANSPORTATION SERVICES VEHICLE RENTAL FEES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) $120.00 PARTS + 10% BRAKE SHOE REPLACEMENT (REAR) $180.00 PARTS + 10% ENGINE FLUSH $60.00 OIL CHANGE $60.00 QM HEAVY EQUIPMENT & OTHERS QM VEHICLES $250.00 SAFETY CHECK $20.00 TIRE SERVICE HEAVY EQUIPMENT TIRE SERVICE FLAT REPAIR $30.00 TIRE SERVICE REPLACEMENT

  4. School of Computing, Informatics and Decision System Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fainekos, Georgios E.

    driving - which would mean a loss of some control and in many cars also disables power steering. Braking is in error. The ECU monitors certain driving conditions, and when the engine is found to be out of tolerance an optimal driving condition outside its prescribed tolerances, a rough idle or stalling situation ensues

  5. AVL-PASSION AND RESULTS AVL is the world's largest privately owned company for development, simulation and testing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Yuxiao

    AVL- PASSION AND RESULTS AVL is the world's largest privately owned company for development and the 2 biggest contributors to losses are oil pump and open clutches. This means that the layout number of open clutches/brakes with following constrains: 1. Number of gears 2. Gear range (top gear

  6. High voltage bus and auxiliary heater control system for an electric or hybrid vehicle

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Murty, Balarama Vempaty (West Bloomfield, MI)

    2000-01-01

    A control system for an electric or hybrid electric vehicle includes a vehicle system controller and a control circuit having an electric immersion heater. The heater is electrically connected to the vehicle's high voltage bus and is thermally coupled to a coolant loop containing a heater core for the vehicle's climate control system. The system controller responds to cabin heat requests from the climate control system by generating a pulse width modulated signal that is used by the control circuit to operate the heater at a duty cycle appropriate for the amount of cabin heating requested. The control system also uses the heater to dissipate excess energy produced by an auxiliary power unit and to provide electric braking when regenerative braking is not desirable and manual braking is not necessary. The control system further utilizes the heater to provide a safe discharge of a bank of energy storage capacitors following disconnection of the battery or one of the high voltage connectors used to transmit high voltage operating power to the various vehicle systems. The control circuit includes a high voltage clamping circuit that monitors the voltage on the bus and operates the heater to clamp down the bus voltage when it exceeds a pre-selected maximum voltage. The control system can also be used to phase in operation of the heater when the bus voltage exceeds a lower threshold voltage and can be used to phase out the auxiliary power unit charging and regenerative braking when the battery becomes fully charged.

  7. The picture represents how motions of distal enzyme loops (shown as thick colored tubes) in the enzyme cyclophilin A can impact the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    discovery casts enzymes in new light Similarly, scientists have known for decades that certain structural energy applications, specifically in the area of cellulosic ethanol. Highly efficient enzymes could bring," Agarwal said. "For example, regardless of which company makes a car, they all have wheels and brakes

  8. JOURNAL OF NATURAL RESOURCES & LIFE SCIENCES EDUCATION VOLUME 38 2009 87 exceeds the harvesting rate, forest carbon uptake during

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grogan, Paul

    , and lifestyle/ social dimensions. For example, is an energy-efficient hybrid car (with regenerative braking the harvesting rate, forest carbon uptake during growth of new trees in the harvested forest or woodlot offsets, Increasing energy costs as well as concerns about climate change associated with fossil fuel use have

  9. Fachgebiet Konstruktion von Maschinensystemen Prof. Dr.Ing. Henning J. Meyer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Machinery System Design Design of suspension and braking systems for mobile working machines and off road.km.tuberlin.de June 2426, 2008 ETH Zurich Contents · requirements · system design · network topology and configuration A company designing software for leasing of construction machines · GeoSat A company specialized

  10. Rachel Andrews Georgia Institute of Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rachel Andrews Georgia Institute of Technology Oscar Franzese Energy & Transportation Science) are roller dynamometers currently used to measure CMV brake efficiency. During a PBBT test, the CMV driver. Acknowledgements: Gary Capps, Mary Beth Lascurain Energy & Transportation Science Division Zane Pannell Pellissippi

  11. U31: Vehicle Stability and Dynamics: Electronic Stability Control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petrolino, Joseph; Spezia, Tony; Arant, Michael; Delorenzis, Damon; LaClair, Tim J; Lim, Alvin; Pape, Doug

    2011-01-01

    A team led by NTRCI is working to improve the roll and yaw stability of heavy duty combination trucks through developing stability algorithms, assembling demonstration hardware, and investigating robust wireless communication. Modern electronic stability control (ESC) products automatically slow a vehicle rounding a corner too quickly or apply individual brakes when necessary to improve the steering characteristics of a vehicle. Air brake systems in North America provide no electronic communication between a tractor and semitrailer, limiting the degree to which control systems can be optimized. Prior research has demonstrated stability improvements where dynamic measurements and control commands are communicated between units of a vehicle. Three related activities were undertaken: (1) Develop an algorithm for the optimum yaw and roll control of a combination vehicle. Vehicle state parameters needed to control the vehicle and the proper brake response were determined. An integrated stability control for the tractor and semitrailer requires communication between the two units. Dynamic models were used to assess the algorithm. (2) Implement the ESC algorithm in the laboratory. Hardware components suitable for the harsh environment for measurement, sensor-to-controller communication, and semitrailer-to-tractor communication and brake actuation were specified and assembled as a working system. The goal was to collect the needed vehicle state information, transmit the information to the ESC system, and then actuate the brakes in response to controller commands. (3) Develop a wireless network with the data rate and reliability necessary to communicate dynamic signals for a vehicle stability control system. Adaptive connectivity-aware, multi-hop routing was selected because it can perform in the harsh environment where packet collisions and fading often will exist. The protocol is to give high priority to urgent messages.

  12. High reduction transaxle for electric vehicle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kalns, Ilmars

    1987-01-01

    A drivetrain (12) includes a transaxle assembly (16) for driving ground engaging wheels of a land vehicle powered by an AC motor. The transaxle includes a ratio change section having planetary gear sets (24, 26) and brake assemblies (28, 30). Sun gears (60, 62) of the gear sets are directly and continuously connected to an input drive shaft (38) driven by the motor. A first drive (78a) directly and continuously connects a planetary gear carrier (78) of gear sets (24) with a ring gear (68) of gear set (26). A second drive (80a) directly and continuously connects a planetary gear carrier (80) of gear set (26) with a sun gear (64) of a final speed reduction gear set (34) having a planetary gear carrier directly and continuously connected to a differential (22). Brakes (28, 30) are selectively engageable to respectively ground a ring gear 66 of gear set 24 and ring gear 68 of gear set 26.

  13. Mechanisms of Organic-inorganic Interactions in Soils and Aqueous Environments Elucidated using Calorimetric Techniques 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harvey, Omar R.

    2011-08-08

    : bacteria, viruses and spores; roads, tire and brake abrasions; and fine soil particles [20]. Secondary organic aerosols (SOAs) are formed through condensation of VOCs in the atmosphere [20]. Estimates of atmospheric organic matter production are very... of the biochar formed during pyrolysis is dependent on combustion conditions (eg. temperature, combustion duration and oxygen supply) and the chemistry of the original plant tissues. As combustion temperature increases transformation of plant tissues occur via...

  14. Load Stability Alarm Paul Moldovan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levi, Anthony F. J.

    Wheel Hitches · Special connecter in bed of pick-up truck · Completely different than the previous://images.hayneedle.com/mgen/master:C TM933.jpg 6 #12;Towing Technology cont'd · Most trailers have own light and brake system · Connects.thefuntimesguide.com/images/blogs/fifth -wheel-trailer-and-pickup-truck-public-domain.gif 7 #12;Consumer · Ideal consumer is every person who

  15. Heavy Truck Engine Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, Christopher

    2009-01-08

    The Heavy Duty Truck Engine Program at Cummins embodied three significant development phases. All phases of work strove to demonstrate a high level of diesel engine efficiency in the face of increasingly stringent emission requirements. Concurrently, aftertreatment system development and refinement was pursued in support of these efficiency demonstrations. The program's first phase focused on the demonstration in-vehicle of a high level of heavy duty diesel engine efficiency (45% Brake Thermal Efficiency) at a typical cruise condition while achieving composite emissions results which met the 2004 U.S. EPA legislated standards. With a combination of engine combustion calibration tuning and the development and application of Urea-based SCR and particulate aftertreatment, these demonstrations were successfully performed by Q4 of 2002. The second phase of the program directed efforts towards an in-vehicle demonstration of an engine system capable of meeting 2007 U.S. EPA legislated emissions requirements while achieving 45% Brake Thermal Efficiency at cruise conditions. Through further combustion optimization, the refinement of Cummins Cooled EGR architecture, the application of a high pressure common rail fuel system and the incorporation of optimized engine parasitics, Cummins Inc. successfully demonstrated these deliverables in Q2 of 2004. The program's final phase set a stretch goal of demonstrating 50% Brake Thermal Efficiency from a heavy duty diesel engine system capable of meeting 2010 U.S. EPA legislated emissions requirements. Cummins chose to pursue this goal through further combustion development and refinement of the Cooled EGR system architecture and also applied a Rankine cycle Waste Heat Recovery technique to convert otherwise wasted thermal energy to useful power. The engine and heat recovery system was demonstrated to achieve 50% Brake Thermal Efficiency while operating at a torque peak condition in second quarter, 2006. The 50% efficient engine system was capable of meeting 2010 emissions requirements through the application of NOx and particulate matter reduction techniques proven earlier in the program.

  16. Direct drive wind turbine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bywaters, Garrett Lee; Danforth, William; Bevington, Christopher; Stowell, Jesse; Costin, Daniel

    2006-09-19

    A wind turbine is provided that minimizes the size of the drive train and nacelle while maintaining the power electronics and transformer at the top of the tower. The turbine includes a direct drive generator having an integrated disk brake positioned radially inside the stator while minimizing the potential for contamination. The turbine further includes a means for mounting a transformer below the nacelle within the tower.

  17. Direct drive wind turbine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bywaters, Garrett; Danforth, William; Bevington, Christopher; Jesse, Stowell; Costin, Daniel

    2007-02-27

    A wind turbine is provided that minimizes the size of the drive train and nacelle while maintaining the power electronics and transformer at the top of the tower. The turbine includes a direct drive generator having an integrated disk brake positioned radially inside the stator while minimizing the potential for contamination. The turbine further includes a means for mounting a transformer below the nacelle within the tower.

  18. Direct drive wind turbine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bywaters, Garrett; Danforth, William; Bevington, Christopher; Stowell, Jesse; Costin, Daniel

    2006-07-11

    A wind turbine is provided that minimizes the size of the drive train and nacelle while maintaining the power electronics and transformer at the top of the tower. The turbine includes a direct drive generator having an integrated disk brake positioned radially inside the stator while minimizing the potential for contamination. The turbine further includes a means for mounting a transformer below the nacelle within the tower.

  19. Direct drive wind turbine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bywaters, Garrett; Danforth, William; Bevington, Christopher; Jesse, Stowell; Costin, Daniel

    2006-10-10

    A wind turbine is provided that minimizes the size of the drive train and nacelle while maintaining the power electronics and transformer at the top of the tower. The turbine includes a direct drive generator having an integrated disk brake positioned radially inside the stator while minimizing the potential for contamination. The turbine further includes a means for mounting a transformer below the nacelle within the tower.

  20. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory NSTX Experimental Proposal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

    /min Li evaporation. · No HeGDC between shots. · Shorten shot to 500-600 ms to reduce shot cycle to 10 is to study the effect of rotation on the L-H threshold power. n=3 braking will be used to vary the rotation) and at higher rotation (NHTX, ST-CTF). 3. Experimental run plan · Establish L-H threshold power in low

  1. Reducing Fuel Consumption through Semi-Automated Platooning with Class 8 Tractor Trailer Combinations (Poster)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lammert, M.; Gonder, J.

    2014-07-01

    This poster describes the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's evaluation of the fuel savings potential of semi-automated truck platooning. Platooning involves reducing aerodynamic drag by grouping vehicles together and decreasing the distance between them through the use of electronic coupling, which allows multiple vehicles to accelerate or brake simultaneously. The NREL study addressed the need for data on American style line-haul sleeper cabs with modern aerodynamics and over a range of trucking speeds common in the United States.

  2. Mobility 2035 Metropolitan Transportation Plan 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Killeen-Temple Urban Transportation Study

    2009-05-20

    braking while decelerating or traveling downhill will be captured with some conversion losses. 9 CHAPTER IV DATA GATHERING To investigate the effect of electrifying existing interstate/freeway transportation, as a start, the existing traffic... on the grid by conveying on the new guideway freight and passenger vehicles currently driven on the freeways and interstate highways. The calculation required total vehicle miles traveled (VMT) and the hourly volume pattern by each vehicle class and road...

  3. Speed Control in Industrial Refrigeration: Theory, Application & Case Studies 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilcox, M. H.

    1995-01-01

    -pressure regulators (BPRs) or liquid solenoids, and condensers cycle fans. Unfortunately, these control methods do not provide the maximum attainable reduction in brake horsepower (BHP) as refrigeration capacity is reduced. This paper will discuss... theory and case study, speed control of these components provides maximum flexibility, control and energy efficiency. SPEED CONTROL BACKGROUND In standard system design, electric motors are intended to operate at a fixed speed. This speed...

  4. Identifying Savings Opportunities 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chari, S.

    1993-01-01

    -COOLING) IFAN DRIVE IMp?] IpUMP DRIVE IMH81 ROLL HEATING (HEAT TRANSFER-HEATING) :.::;.. ::. ;::'" motors) HT - Heat Transfer - Heating 99... ESL-IE-93-03-16 Proceedings from the Fifteenth National Industrial Energy Technology Conference, Houston, Tx, March 24-25, 1993 -- F.,... 3 ac....rna.c Flow Of-oram for Auto putts ..anuf.c.... BRAKE AND CLUTCH MANUFACTURE PIE CASTING OPERATION IR...

  5. Atmos. Chem. Phys., 12, 93659379, 2012 www.atmos-chem-phys.net/12/9365/2012/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meskhidze, Nicholas

    considered a major contributor to NOx emissions in China. Beijing initiated a comprehensive vehicle test-road distance-specific (g km-1) nor brake-specific (g kWh-1) NOx emission factors for diesel buses and heavy, the average NOx emission factors for Euro II, Euro III and Euro IV buses are 11.3 ± 3.3 g km-1, 12.5 ± 1.3 g

  6. Effects of a platinum-based fuel additive on the performance of a single cylinder research diesel engine 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ruemmele, Warren Pietro

    1990-01-01

    lift sensor in the fuel injector body. In this way, the start and duration of fuel injection were better identified. The brake torque of the engine was measured using a calibrated strain gauge load cell. Engine RPN was measured using a digital... Description AVL BQP 500C Piezoelectric cell Fuel injector needle lift PCB 462A Wolf f Charge amplifier Hall effect needle lift sensor Crank angle position AVL 360-C-72 Optical crank angle marker Cylinder TDC Bruel & Kjaer MM-0002 Magnetic...

  7. COMPETENT CELLS (based on Hanahan 1983 J Mol Biol 166, 557580) STREAK a fresh plate the day before inoculation from parent stock (NOT previous

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cross, George

    sample to measure OD but keep the culture shaking and at 37°C. · COOL culture rapidly in ice water, 2 min.5 ml. · ALIQUOT 200 µl to pre-labeled and pre-chilled Eppendorf tubes. · FREEZE ON DRY ICE and STORE with swirling. · TRANSFER culture to pre-chilled 50 ml conical tubes. · SPIN 3,000 rpm, 10 min, 4°C: NO BRAKE

  8. Hybrid: Passing

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageBlenderBusiness Case forbutton highlighted Braking Button

  9. Hybrid: Starting

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageBlenderBusiness Case forbutton highlighted Braking

  10. Idling Pushes Profits out the Tailpipe

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageBlenderBusiness Case forbutton highlighted BrakingIdling

  11. Illinois Waiver letter on variances from UL ruling on E85 dispensers

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageBlenderBusiness Case forbutton highlighted BrakingIdling

  12. Indianapolis Public Transportation Corporation. Advanced Technology Vehicles in Service: Diesel Hybrid Electric Buses (Fact Sheet).

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageBlenderBusiness Case forbutton highlighted BrakingIdlingWeb

  13. Iowa State Fire Marshall Amendment

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageBlenderBusiness Case forbutton highlighted BrakingIdlingWeb

  14. Kinder Morgan Central Florida Pipeline Ethanol Project

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageBlenderBusiness Case forbutton highlighted BrakingIdlingWeb

  15. Full Hybrid: Cruising

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center HomeVehicle Replacement VouchersBraking button highlighted

  16. Full Hybrid: Low Speed

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center HomeVehicle Replacement VouchersBraking button

  17. Full Hybrid: Starting

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center HomeVehicle Replacement VouchersBraking buttonhighlighted

  18. Hydrogen Vehicle and Infrastructure Codes and Standards Citations (Brochure), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center HomeVehicle Replacement VouchersBrakingHydrogen Vehicle and

  19. National Template: Hydrogen Vehicle and Infrastructure Codes and Standards (Fact Sheet), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center HomeVehicle Replacement VouchersBrakingHydrogen Vehicle and pipeline

  20. Natural Gas Vehicle and Infrastructure Codes and Standards Chart (Revised) (Fact Sheet), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center HomeVehicle Replacement VouchersBrakingHydrogen Vehicle and

  1. Natural Gas Vehicle and Infrastructure Codes and Standards Citations (Brochure), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center HomeVehicle Replacement VouchersBrakingHydrogen Vehicle andNatural

  2. Propane Vehicle and Infrastructure Codes and Standards Chart (Revised) (Fact Sheet), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center HomeVehicle Replacement VouchersBrakingHydrogen Vehicle

  3. Propane Vehicle and Infrastructure Codes and Standards Citations (Brochure), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center HomeVehicle Replacement VouchersBrakingHydrogen Vehicle NREL is a

  4. Stop/Start: Driving

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center HomeVehicle Replacement VouchersBrakingHydrogen Vehicle NREL is

  5. Stop/Start: Overview

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center HomeVehicle Replacement VouchersBrakingHydrogen Vehicle NREL

  6. Buildings Energy Data Book

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center HomeVehicle Replacement VouchersBrakingHydrogen Vehicle NRELCurrent

  7. Buildings Energy Data Book

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center HomeVehicle Replacement VouchersBrakingHydrogen Vehicle

  8. Buildings Energy Data Book

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center HomeVehicle Replacement VouchersBrakingHydrogen Vehicle2.1

  9. Buildings Energy Data Book

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center HomeVehicle Replacement VouchersBrakingHydrogen Vehicle2.13.1

  10. Buildings Energy Data Book

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center HomeVehicle Replacement VouchersBrakingHydrogen

  11. Buildings Energy Data Book

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center HomeVehicle Replacement VouchersBrakingHydrogen7.1 National

  12. Buildings Energy Data Book

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center HomeVehicle Replacement VouchersBrakingHydrogen7.1

  13. Buildings Energy Data Book

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center HomeVehicle Replacement VouchersBrakingHydrogen7.1Contact Us

  14. Buildings Energy Data Book

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center HomeVehicle Replacement VouchersBrakingHydrogen7.1Contact

  15. Method for controlling a motor vehicle powertrain

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Burba, J.C.; Landman, R.G.; Patil, P.B.; Reitz, G.A.

    1990-05-22

    A multiple forward speed automatic transmission produces its lowest forward speed ratio when a hydraulic clutch and hydraulic brake are disengaged and a one-way clutch connects a ring gear to the transmission casing. Second forward speed ratio results when the hydraulic clutch is engaged to connect the ring gear to the planetary carrier of a second gear set. Reverse drive and regenerative operation result when an hydraulic brake fixes the planetary and the direction of power flow is reversed. Various sensors produce signals representing the position of the gear selector lever operated manually by the vehicle operator, the speed of the power source, the state of the ignition key, and the rate of release of an accelerator pedal. A control algorithm produces input data representing a commanded upshift, a commanded downshift and a torque command and various constant torque signals. A microprocessor processes the input and produces a response to them in accordance with the execution of a control algorithm. Output or response signals cause selective engagement and disengagement of the clutch and brake to produce the forward drive, reverse and regenerative operation of the transmission. 7 figs.

  16. Method for controlling a motor vehicle powertrain

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Burba, Joseph C. (Ypsilanti, MI); Landman, Ronald G. (Ypsilanti, MI); Patil, Prabhakar B. (Detroit, MI); Reitz, Graydon A. (Farmington Hills, MI)

    1990-01-01

    A multiple forward speed automatic transmission produces its lowest forward speed ratio when a hydraulic clutch and hydraulic brake are disengaged and a one-way clutch connects a ring gear to the transmission casing. Second forward speed ratio results when the hydraulic clutch is engaged to connect the ring gear to the planetary carrier of a second gear set. Reverse drive and regenerative operation result when an hydraulic brake fixes the planetary and the direction of power flow is reversed. Various sensors produce signals representing the position of the gear selector lever operated manually by the vehicle operator, the speed of the power source, the state of the ignition key, and the rate of release of an accelerator pedal. A control algorithm produces input data representing a commanded upshift, a commanded downshift and a torque command and various constant torque signals. A microprocessor processes the input and produces a response to them in accordance with the execution of a control algorithm. Output or response signals cause selective engagement and disengagement of the clutch and brake to produce the forward drive, reverse and regenerative operation of the transmission.

  17. Safe Tractor Operation: Driving on Highways 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, David

    2004-09-16

    of the car first notices the tractor while still 400 feet behind it, the driver has less than 10 seconds to avoid a collision with the tractor. In this time, the driver of the car must recognize the danger, determine the speed the tractor is traveling... the brakes, clutch and steering mechanisms, and often cannot see everything around them while sitting in the tractor seat. Don?t put your child in this dangerous situation. Chil- dren should never drive tractors on public roads. Extra Riders Except...

  18. A recuperative external combustion open cycle gas turbine 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benson, Dan Thomas

    1979-01-01

    Annulus Turbine Exhaust Outer Gas Annulus B. B Shell ~ Heavy Fin Rivet nin Light Fin Outer Air Annulus Inner Air Annulus Outer Liner Divider Combustor Inner Liner Figure 4 RECOC Test Engine 13 Table 1 Solar T-62T-17 Gas Turbine MODEL... test engine, a Go-Power D312 water brake dynamometer was available. The power output was the product of the dynamometer torque reading multiplied by shaft speed. The heat imput rate was calculated by flowing fuel from the 2000 ml test vol'- ume...

  19. Eddy current system for inspection of train hollow axles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chady, Tomasz; Psuj, Grzegorz; Sikora, Ryszard; Kowalczyk, Jacek; Spychalski, Ireneusz [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Faculty of Electrical Engineering, West Pomeranian University of Technology, Szczecin (Poland)

    2014-02-18

    The structural integrity of wheelsets used in rolling stock is of great importance to the safety. In this paper, electromagnetic system with an eddy current transducer suitable for the inspection of hollow axles have been presented. The transducer was developed to detect surface braking defects having depth not smaller than 0.5 mm. Ultrasound technique can be utilized to inspect the whole axle, but it is not sufficiently sensitive to shallow defects located close to the surface. Therefore, the electromagnetic technique is proposed to detect surface breaking cracks that cannot be detected by ultrasonic technique.

  20. Inductrack configuration

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Post, Richard Freeman (Walnut Creek, CA)

    2006-08-29

    A simple permanent-magnet-excited maglev geometry provides levitation forces and is stable against vertical displacements from equilibrium but is unstable against horizontal displacements. An Inductrack system is then used in conjunction with this system to effect stabilization against horizontal displacements and to provide centering forces to overcome centrifugal forces when the vehicle is traversing curved sections of a track or when any other transient horizontal force is present. In some proposed embodiments, the Inductrack track elements are also employed as the stator of a linear induction-motor drive and braking system.

  1. Inductrack configuration

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Post, Richard Freeman

    2003-10-07

    A simple permanent-magnet-excited maglev geometry provides levitation forces and is stable against vertical displacements from equilibrium but is unstable against horizontal displacements. An Inductrack system is then used in conjunction with this system to effect stabilization against horizontal displacements and to provide centering forces to overcome centrifugal forces when the vehicle is traversing curved sections of a track or when any other transient horizontal force is present. In some proposed embodiments, the Inductrack track elements are also employed as the stator of a linear induction-motor drive and braking system.

  2. Dry powder mixes comprising phase change materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Salyer, I.O.

    1995-12-26

    A free flowing, conformable powder-like mix of silica particles and a phase change material (PCM) is provided. The silica particles have a critical size of about 0.005 to about 0.025 microns and the PCM must be added to the silica in an amount of 75% or less PCM per combined weight of silica and PCM. The powder-like mix can be used in tableware items, medical wraps, tree wraps, garments, quilts and blankets, and particularly in applications for heat protection for heat sensitive items, such as aircraft flight recorders, and for preventing brake fade in automobiles, buses, trucks and aircraft. 3 figs.

  3. Electric machine for hybrid motor vehicle

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hsu, John Sheungchun (Oak Ridge, TN)

    2007-09-18

    A power system for a motor vehicle having an internal combustion engine and an electric machine is disclosed. The electric machine has a stator, a permanent magnet rotor, an uncluttered rotor spaced from the permanent magnet rotor, and at least one secondary core assembly. The power system also has a gearing arrangement for coupling the internal combustion engine to wheels on the vehicle thereby providing a means for the electric machine to both power assist and brake in relation to the output of the internal combustion engine.

  4. A Strategically Timed Verbal Task Improves Performance and Neurophysiological Alertness During Fatiguing Drives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atchley, Paul; Chan, Mark; Gregersen, Sabrina

    2013-08-06

    , fatigue inducing, drives which are more typical for motor carrier operators, military operations, or long-distance recreational drives. Second, improved performance was measured primarily by lateral vehicle control. While maintaining a stable lane... sounded if driving speed exceeded 125.53 km/h. Data collection began at the 0.600 km mark and ended at the 177.600 km mark. Data was divided into 9 blocks of 19.733 km. Braking events occurred in the first, fourth, seventh and ninth block of the drive...

  5. Energy and Reliability Considerations For Adjustable Speed Driven Pumps 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Casada, D.

    1999-01-01

    Technology Conference, Houston, TX, May 12-13, 1999 all-static head system (H s = 100) to being greatest in the H s =0 system. o HXX) 2 3 Row rate (gpm) Figure 1. Example system head curves The power required to pump fluid through a system... Technology Conference, Houston, TX, May 12-13, 1999 r--?---??-? o 1000 2brake horsepower) The power...

  6. Capacitive microelectromechanical switches with dynamic soft-landing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jain, Ankit; Alam, Muhammad Ashraful; Nair, Pradeep R.

    2015-10-13

    A microelectromechanical system (MEMS)-based electrical switch. The electrical switch includes a moveable electrode, a dielectric layer positioned adjacent the moveable electrode on a first side of the dielectric layer and spaced apart from the moveable electrode when the moveable electrode is in an inactivated position and in contact with the moveable electrode when the moveable electrode is in an activated position, and a substrate attached to the dielectric layer on a second side opposite to the first side, the moveable electrode is configured to brake prior to coming in contact with the dielectric layer when the moveable electrode is switched between the inactivated state and the activated state.

  7. User Empowerment in the Internet of Things

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Munjin, Dejan

    2011-01-01

    This paper focuses on the characteristics of two big triggers that facilitated wide user adoption of the Internet: Web 2.0 and online social networks. We detect brakes for reproduction of these events in Internet of things. To support our hypothesis we first compare the difference between the ways of use of the Internet with the future scenarios of Internet of things. We detect barriers that could slow down apparition of this kind of social events during user adoption of Internet of Things and we propose a conceptual framework to solve these problems.

  8. The Coughing Pulsar Magnetosphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ioannis Contopoulos

    2005-07-08

    Polar magnetospheric gaps consume a fraction of the electric potential that develops accross open field lines. This effect modifies significantly the structure of the axisymmetric pulsar magnetosphere. We present numerical stead-state solutions for various values of the gap potential. We show that a charge starved magnetosphere contains significantly less electric current than one with freely available electric charges. As a result, electromagnetic neutron star braking becomes inefficient. We argue that the magnetosphere may spontaneously rearrange itself to a lower energy configuration through a dramatic release of electromagnetic field energy and magentic flux. Our results might be relevant in understanding the recent December 27, 2004 burst observed in SGR 1806-20.

  9. The Coughing Pulsar Magnetosphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Contopoulos, I

    2005-01-01

    Polar magnetospheric gaps consume a fraction of the electric potential that develops accross open field lines. This effect modifies significantly the structure of the axisymmetric pulsar magnetosphere. We present numerical stead-state solutions for various values of the gap potential. We show that a charge starved magnetosphere contains significantly less electric current than one with freely available electric charges. As a result, electromagnetic neutron star braking becomes inefficient. We argue that the magnetosphere may spontaneously rearrange itself to a lower energy configuration through a dramatic release of electromagnetic field energy and magentic flux. Our results might be relevant in understanding the recent December 27, 2004 burst observed in SGR 1806-20.

  10. New coke-sorting system at OAO Koks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    B.Kh. Bulaevskii; V.S. Shved; Yu.V. Kalimin; S.D. Filippov [OAO Koks, Kemerovo (Russian Federation)

    2009-05-15

    A new coke-sorting system has been introduced at OAO Koks. It differs from the existing system in that it has no bunkers for all-purpose coke but only bunkers for commercial coke. In using this system with coke from battery 4, the crushing of the coke on conveyer belts, at roller screens, and in the commercial-coke bunkers is studied. After installing braking elements in the coke path, their effectiveness in reducing coke disintegration and improving coke screening is investigated. The granulometric composition and strength of the commercial coke from coke battery 3, with the new coke-sorting system, is evaluated.

  11. Double acting stirling engine phase control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berchowitz, David M.

    1983-01-01

    A mechanical device for effecting a phase change between the expansion and compression volumes of a double-acting Stirling engine uses helical elements which produce opposite rotation of a pair of crankpins when a control rod is moved, so the phase between two pairs of pistons is changed by +.psi. and the phase between the other two pairs of pistons is changed by -.psi.. The phase can change beyond .psi.=90.degree. at which regenerative braking and then reversal of engine rotation occurs.

  12. Multi-Layer Stratified Scavenging (MULS) - a new scavenging method for two-stroke engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Onishi, S.; Jo, S.H.; Jo, P.D.; Kato, S.

    1984-01-01

    A new scavenging method for two-stroke cycle engines - Multi-Layer Stratified Scavenging (MULS) - has been developed. The MULS method is achieved by separating the mixture generated by the carburetor into a rich mixture and a lean mixture between the inlet manifold and the scavenging ports, and by finely controlling the scavenging flows. With the MULS method the thermal efficiency and HC emissions of two-stroke cycle gasoline engines are considerably improved without sacrificing the brake specific power output and mechanical simplicity.

  13. Prestressed elastomer for energy storage

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hoppie, Lyle O. (Birmingham, MI); Speranza, Donald (Canton, MI)

    1982-01-01

    Disclosed is a regenerative braking device for an automotive vehicle. The device includes a power isolating assembly (14), an infinitely variable transmission (20) interconnecting an input shaft (16) with an output shaft (18), and an energy storage assembly (22). The storage assembly includes a plurality of elastomeric rods (44, 46) mounted for rotation and connected in series between the input and output shafts. The elastomeric rods are prestressed along their rotational or longitudinal axes to inhibit buckling of the rods due to torsional stressing of the rods in response to relative rotation of the input and output shafts.

  14. Switchpower | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LIST OFAMERICA'SHeavyAgencyTendo New Energy EquipmentSvendborg Brakes Jump

  15. Synergics | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LIST OFAMERICA'SHeavyAgencyTendo New Energy EquipmentSvendborg Brakes JumpSynergics

  16. System Advisor Model (SAM) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LIST OFAMERICA'SHeavyAgencyTendo New Energy EquipmentSvendborg Brakes

  17. T O Green Europe | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LIST OFAMERICA'SHeavyAgencyTendo New Energy EquipmentSvendborg BrakesO Green Europe

  18. TCI Renewables | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LIST OFAMERICA'SHeavyAgencyTendo New Energy EquipmentSvendborg BrakesO Green EuropeTCI

  19. TECNOSOL | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LIST OFAMERICA'SHeavyAgencyTendo New Energy EquipmentSvendborg BrakesO Green

  20. TME Spain | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LIST OFAMERICA'SHeavyAgencyTendo New Energy EquipmentSvendborg BrakesO GreenTME Spain

  1. TPI Composites | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LIST OFAMERICA'SHeavyAgencyTendo New Energy EquipmentSvendborg BrakesO GreenTME

  2. TS Wind Power Developers | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LIST OFAMERICA'SHeavyAgencyTendo New Energy EquipmentSvendborg BrakesO GreenTMETS Wind

  3. TW Energy International | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LIST OFAMERICA'SHeavyAgencyTendo New Energy EquipmentSvendborg BrakesO GreenTMETS

  4. Taggart China | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LIST OFAMERICA'SHeavyAgencyTendo New Energy EquipmentSvendborg BrakesO

  5. Tags | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LIST OFAMERICA'SHeavyAgencyTendo New Energy EquipmentSvendborg BrakesOTags Home >

  6. Tang Group Energy Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LIST OFAMERICA'SHeavyAgencyTendo New Energy EquipmentSvendborg BrakesOTags Home

  7. Tar Sands | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LIST OFAMERICA'SHeavyAgencyTendo New Energy EquipmentSvendborg BrakesOTags HomeTar

  8. Tebar Eolica | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LIST OFAMERICA'SHeavyAgencyTendo New Energy EquipmentSvendborg BrakesOTags

  9. TechnoSpin Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LIST OFAMERICA'SHeavyAgencyTendo New Energy EquipmentSvendborg BrakesOTagsTechnoSpin

  10. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield MunicipalTechnical Report:SpeedingPennsylvaniaSwitch toSwitchSwitch toSwitch toBrake, Matthew

  11. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield MunicipalTechnical Report:SpeedingPennsylvaniaSwitch toSwitchSwitch toSwitch toBrake, MatthewMitchell,

  12. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield MunicipalTechnical Report:SpeedingPennsylvaniaSwitch toSwitchSwitch toSwitch toBrake,

  13. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield MunicipalTechnical Report:SpeedingPennsylvaniaSwitch toSwitchSwitch toSwitch toBrake,Switch to Detail

  14. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield MunicipalTechnical Report:SpeedingPennsylvaniaSwitch toSwitchSwitch toSwitch toBrake,Switch to

  15. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield MunicipalTechnical Report:SpeedingPennsylvaniaSwitch toSwitchSwitch toSwitch toBrake,Switch toGuiseppe,

  16. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield MunicipalTechnical Report:SpeedingPennsylvaniaSwitch toSwitchSwitch toSwitch toBrake,Switch

  17. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield MunicipalTechnical Report:SpeedingPennsylvaniaSwitch toSwitchSwitch toSwitch toBrake,SwitchSwitch to

  18. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield MunicipalTechnical Report:SpeedingPennsylvaniaSwitch toSwitchSwitch toSwitch toBrake,SwitchSwitch

  19. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield MunicipalTechnical Report:SpeedingPennsylvaniaSwitch toSwitchSwitch toSwitch toBrake,SwitchSwitchSwitch

  20. Buildings Energy Data Book

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center HomeVehicle Replacement VouchersBrakingHydrogen Vehicle2.13.14.1

  1. Buildings Energy Data Book

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center HomeVehicle Replacement VouchersBrakingHydrogen Vehicle2.13.14.15.1

  2. Buildings Energy Data Book

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center HomeVehicle Replacement VouchersBrakingHydrogen7.1 National8.1

  3. Buildings Energy Data Book

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center HomeVehicle Replacement VouchersBrakingHydrogen7.1Contact Us Users

  4. Buildings Energy Data Book

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center HomeVehicle Replacement VouchersBrakingHydrogen7.1Contact UsGlossary

  5. Buildings Energy Data Book

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center HomeVehicle Replacement VouchersBrakingHydrogen7.1ContactExplore

  6. Buildings Energy Data Book

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center HomeVehicle Replacement VouchersBrakingHydrogen7.1ContactExplore 5.5

  7. Buildings Energy Data Book

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center HomeVehicle Replacement VouchersBrakingHydrogen7.1ContactExplore

  8. Air separation membranes : an alternative to EGR in large bore natural gas engines.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biruduganti, M.; Gupta, S.; Bihari, B.; McConnell, S.; Sekar, R.; Energy Systems

    2010-08-01

    Air separation membranes (ASMs) could potentially replace exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) technology in engines due to the proven benefits in NOx reduction but without the drawbacks of EGR. Previous investigations of nitrogen-enriched air (NEA) combustion using nitrogen bottles showed up to 70% NOx reduction with modest 2% nitrogen enrichment. The investigation in this paper was performed with an ASM capable of delivering at least 3.5% NEA to a single-cylinder spark-ignited natural gas engine. Low temperature combustion is one of the pathways to meet the mandatory ultra low NOx emissions levels set by regulatory agencies. In this study, a comparative assessment is made between natural gas combustion in standard air and 2% NEA. Enrichment beyond this level degraded engine performance in terms of power density, brake thermal efficiency (BTE), and unburned hydrocarbon emissions for a given equivalence ratio. The ignition timing was optimized to yield maximum brake torque for standard air and NEA. Subsequently, conventional spark ignition was replaced by laser ignition (LI) to extend lean ignition limit. Both ignition systems were studied under a wide operating range from {Psi} :1.0 to the lean misfire limit. It was observed that with 2% NEA, for a similar fuel quantity, the equivalence ratio {Psi} increases by 0.1 relative to standard air conditions. Analysis showed that lean burn operation along with NEA and alternative ignition source, such as LI, could pave the pathway for realizing lower NO{sub x} emissions with a slight penalty in BTE.

  9. Hydraulic system for a ratio change transmission

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kalns, Ilmars (Northville, MI)

    1981-01-01

    Disclosed is a drive assembly (10) for an electrically powered vehicle (12). The assembly includes a transaxle (16) having a two-speed transmission (40) and a drive axle differential (46) disposed in a unitary housing assembly (38), an oil-cooled prime mover or electric motor (14) for driving the transmission input shaft (42), an adapter assembly (24) for supporting the prime mover on the transaxle housing assembly, and a hydraulic system (172) providing pressurized oil flow for cooling and lubricating the electric motor and transaxle and for operating a clutch (84) and a brake (86) in the transmission to shift between the two-speed ratios of the transmission. The adapter assembly allows the prime mover to be supported in several positions on the transaxle housing. The brake is spring-applied and locks the transmission in its low-speed ratio should the hydraulic system fail. The hydraulic system pump is driven by an electric motor (212) independent of the prime mover and transaxle.

  10. Housing assembly for electric vehicle transaxle

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kalns, Ilmars (Northville, MI)

    1981-01-01

    Disclosed is a drive assembly (10) for an electrically powered vehicle (12). The assembly includes a transaxle (16) having a two-speed transmission (40) and a drive axle differential (46) disposed in a unitary housing assembly (38), an oil-cooled prime mover or electric motor (14) for driving the transmission input shaft (42), an adapter assembly (24) for supporting the prime mover on the transaxle housing assembly, and a hydraulic system (172) providing pressurized oil flow for cooling and lubricating the electric motor and transaxle and for operating a clutch (84) and a brake (86) in the transmission to shift between the two-speed ratios of the transmission. The adapter assembly allows the prime mover to be supported in several positions on the transaxle housing. The brake is spring-applied and locks the transmission in its low-speed ratio should the hydraulic system fail. The hydraulic system pump is driven by an electric motor (212) independent of the prime mover and transaxle.

  11. Two-speed transaxle

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kalns, Ilmars (Northville, MI)

    1981-01-01

    Disclosed is a drive assembly (10) for an electrically powered vehicle (12). The assembly includes a transaxle (16) having a two-speed transmission (40) and a drive axle differential (46) disposed in a unitary housing assembly (38), an oil-cooled prime mover or electric motor (14) for driving the transmission input shaft (42), an adapter assembly (24) for supporting the prime mover on the transaxle housing assembly, and a hydraulic system (172) providing pressurized oil flow for cooling and lubricating the electric motor and transaxle and for operating a clutch (84) and a brake (86) in the transmission to shift between the two-speed ratios of the transmission. The adapter assembly allows the prime mover to be supported in several positions on the transaxle housing. The brake is spring-applied and locks the transmission in its low-speed ratio should the hydraulic system fail. The hydraulic system pump is driven by an electric motor (212) independent of the prime mover and transaxle.

  12. Pulsar wind model for the spin-down behavior of intermittent pulsars

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, L.; Tong, H.; Yan, W. M.; Yuan, J. P.; Wang, N.; Xu, R. X.

    2014-06-10

    Intermittent pulsars are part-time radio pulsars. They have higher slow down rates in the on state (radio-loud) than in the off state (radio-quiet). This gives evidence that particle wind may play an important role in pulsar spindown. The effect of particle acceleration is included in modeling the rotational energy loss rate of the neutron star. Applying the pulsar wind model to the three intermittent pulsars (PSR B1931+24, PSR J1841–0500, and PSR J1832+0029) allows their magnetic fields and inclination angles to be calculated simultaneously. The theoretical braking indices of intermittent pulsars are also given. In the pulsar wind model, the density of the particle wind can always be the Goldreich-Julian density. This may ensure that different on states of intermittent pulsars are stable. The duty cycle of particle wind can be determined from timing observations. It is consistent with the duty cycle of the on state. Inclination angle and braking index observations of intermittent pulsars may help to test different models of particle acceleration. At present, the inverse Compton scattering induced space charge limited flow with field saturation model can be ruled out.

  13. Reactivity Controlled Compression Ignition (RCCI) Combustion on a Multi-Cylinder Light-Duty Diesel Engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Curran, Scott; Hanson, Reed M; Wagner, Robert M

    2012-01-01

    Reactivity controlled compression ignition is a low-temperature combustion technique that has been shown, both in computational fluid dynamics modeling and single-cylinder experiments, to obtain diesel-like efficiency or better with ultra-low nitrogen oxide and soot emissions, while operating primarily on gasoline-like fuels. This paper investigates reactivity controlled compression ignition operation on a four-cylinder light-duty diesel engine with production-viable hardware using conventional gasoline and diesel fuel. Experimental results are presented over a wide speed and load range using a systematic approach for achieving successful steady-state reactivity controlled compression ignition combustion. The results demonstrated diesel-like efficiency or better over the operating range explored with low engine-out nitrogen oxide and soot emissions. A peak brake thermal efficiency of 39.0% was demonstrated for 2600 r/min and 6.9 bar brake mean effective pressure with nitrogen oxide emissions reduced by an order of magnitude compared to conventional diesel combustion operation. Reactivity controlled compression ignition emissions and efficiency results are compared to conventional diesel combustion operation on the same engine.

  14. FVB Energy Inc. Technical Assistance Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeSteese, John G.

    2011-05-17

    The request made by FVB asked for advice and analysis regarding the value of recapturing the braking energy of trains operating on electric light rail transit systems. A specific request was to evaluate the concept of generating hydrogen by electrolysis. The hydrogen would, in turn, power fuel cells that could supply electric energy back into the system for train propulsion or, possibly, also to the grid. To allow quantitative assessment of the potential resource, analysis focused on operations of the SoundTransit light rail system in Seattle, Washington. An initial finding was that the full cycle efficiency of producing hydrogen as the medium for capturing and reusing train braking energy was quite low (< 20%) and, therefore, not likely to be economically attractive. As flywheel energy storage is commercially available, the balance of the analysis focused the feasibility of using this alternative on the SoundTransit system. It was found that an investment in a flywheel with a 25-kWh capacity of the type manufactured by Beacon Power Corporation (BPC) would show a positive 20-year net present value (NPV) based on the current frequency of train service. The economic attractiveness of this option would increase initially if green energy subsidies or rebates were applicable and, in the future, as the planned frequency of train service grows.

  15. Combustion characteristics of indolene-methanol blends in a CFR spark ignition engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patel, K.S.

    1984-01-01

    A study of the combustion characteristics of indolene, methanol and indolene-methanol blends has been completed. The investigation included theoretical and experimental parts. In the theoretical part, turbulent burning velocity, laminar burning velocity, and mass burning velocity are computed. The experimental part was completed on a CFR spark ignition engine using indolene, methanol, and indolene-methanol blends. Methanol concentration was varied from 0 to 100 vol.%. For each blend, compression ratio was varied from 5.0 to KLCR (Knock Limited Compression Ratio). The results of theoretical analysis showed that the laminar burning velocity increased as the vol.% of methanol increased. The experimental results indicated that adding methanol to indolene, MBT (Minimum advanced for Best Torque) spark advance, volumetric efficiency, brake mean effective pressure are decreased while break specific fuel consumption, brake thermal efficiency an KLCR are increased. The theoretical and experimental results showed that adding methanol to indolene, apparent flame speed, turbulent burning velocity and the ratio of turbulent to laminar burning velocity increased. Pure methanol produced the highest turbulent burning velocity. It is concluded that methanol has considerable effect on the combustion characteristics of spark ignition engine.

  16. Effects of the Exposure to Corrosive Salts on the Frictional Behavior of Gray Cast Iron and a Titanium-Based Metal Matrix Composite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blau, Peter Julian; Truhan, Jr., John J; Kenik, Edward A

    2007-01-01

    The introduction of increasingly aggressive road-deicing chemicals has created significant and costly corrosion problems for the trucking industry. From a tribological perspective, corrosion of the sliding surfaces of brakes after exposure to road salts can create oxide scales on the surfaces that affect friction. This paper describes experiments on the effects of exposure to sodium chloride and magnesium chloride sprays on the transient frictional behavior of cast iron and a titanium-based composite sliding against a commercial brake lining material. Corrosion scales on cast iron initially act as abrasive third-bodies, then they become crushed, spread out, and behave as a solid lubricant. The composition and subsurface microstructures of the corrosion products on the cast iron were analyzed. Owing to its greater corrosion resistance, the titanium composite remained scale-free and its frictional response was markedly different. No corrosion scales were formed on the titanium composite after aggressive exposure to salts; however, a reduction in friction was still observed. Unlike the crystalline sodium chloride deposits that tended to remain dry, hygroscopic magnesium chloride deposits absorbed ambient moisture from the air, liquefied, and retained a persistent lubricating effect on the titanium surfaces.

  17. Accretion and activity on the post-common-envelope binary RR~Cae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ribeiro, T; Kafka, S; Dufour, P; Gianninas, A; Fontaine, G

    2013-01-01

    Current scenarios for the evolution of interacting close binaries - such as cataclysmic variables (CVs) - rely mainly on our understanding of low-mass star angular momentum loss (AML) mechanisms. The coupling of stellar wind with its magnetic field, i.e., magnetic braking, is the most promising mechanism to drive AML in these stars. There are basically two properties driving magnetic braking: the stellar magnetic field and the stellar wind. Understanding the mechanisms that drive AML therefore requires a comprehensive understanding of these two properties. RRCae is a well-known nearby (d=20pc) eclipsing DA+M binary with an orbital period of P=7.29h. The system harbors a metal-rich cool white dwarf (WD) and a highly active M-dwarf locked in synchronous rotation. The metallicity of the WD suggests that wind accretion is taking place, which provides a good opportunity to obtain the mass-loss rate of the M-dwarf component. We analyzed multi-epoch time-resolved high-resolution spectra of RRCae in search for traces...

  18. A Bidirectional High-Power-Quality Grid Interface With a Novel Bidirectional Noninverted Buck Boost Converter for PHEVs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Onar, Omer C

    2012-01-01

    Plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) will play a vital role in future sustainable transportation systems due to their potential in terms of energy security, decreased environmental impact, improved fuel economy, and better performance. Moreover, new regulations have been established to improve the collective gas mileage, cut greenhouse gas emissions, and reduce dependence on foreign oil. This paper primarily focuses on two major thrust areas of PHEVs. First, it introduces a grid-friendly bidirectional alternating current/direct current ac/dc dc/ac rectifier/inverter for facilitating vehicle-to-grid (V2G) integration of PHEVs. Second, it presents an integrated bidirectional noninverted buck boost converter that interfaces the energy storage device of the PHEV to the dc link in both grid-connected and driving modes. The proposed bidirectional converter has minimal grid-level disruptions in terms of power factor and total harmonic distortion, with less switching noise. The integrated bidirectional dc/dc converter assists the grid interface converter to track the charge/discharge power of the PHEV battery. In addition, while driving, the dc/dc converter provides a regulated dc link voltage to the motor drive and captures the braking energy during regenerative braking.

  19. Studies on the practical application of producer gas from agricultural residues as supplementary fuel for diesel engines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cruz, I.E.

    1980-01-01

    Gasification of various agricultural residues in down-draft, fixed bed gas producers and the utilization of the gas in small diesel engines converted for dual-fuel operation were studied at the College of Engineering, University of the Philippines. Such agricultural residues as coconut shells, wood waste, rice hulls and corn cobs were readily gasified in gas producers of simple design. Cleaning of the gas before its use in diesel engines presented some problems. Use of charcoal in the gas producers to provide gas to a 5-brake horsepower single cylinder engine and a 65-brake horsepower six cylinder engine proved satisfactory. With charcoal as fuel, the percentage of the total energy from diesel oil replaced by producer gas and utilized in the single cylinder engine was higher (79%) compared to that in the six cylinder engine (73%). The thermal efficiency of the bigger gas producer, however was significantly better (85%) compared to the smaller gas producer (70%). The total gasification rate of the bigger reactor (20 kg/h) was 8 times that (2.5 kg/h) of the smaller reactor.

  20. Comparison of propane and methane performance and emissions in a turbocharged direct injection dual fuel engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gibson, C. M.; Polk, A. C.; Shoemaker, N. T.; Srinivasan, K. K.; Krishnan, S. R.

    2011-04-20

    With increasingly restrictive NO x and particulate matter emissions standards, the recent discovery of new natural gas reserves, and the possibility of producing propane efficiently from biomass sources, dual fueling strategies have become more attractive. This paper presents experimental results from dual fuel operation of a four-cylinder turbocharged direct injection (DI) diesel engine with propane or methane (a natural gas surrogate) as the primary fuel and diesel as the ignition source. Experiments were performed with the stock engine control unit at a constant speed of 1800 rpm, and a wide range of brake mean effective pressures (BMEPs) (2.7-11.6 bars) and percent energy substitutions (PESs) of C 3 H 8 and CH 4. Brake thermal efficiencies (BTEs) and emissions (NO x, smoke, total hydrocarbons (THCs), CO, and CO 2) were measured. Maximum PES levels of about 80-95% with CH 4 and 40-92% with C 3 H 8 were achieved. Maximum PES was limited by poor combustion efficiencies and engine misfire at low loads for both C 3 H 8 and CH 4, and the onset of knock above 9 bar BMEP for C 3 H 8. While dual fuel BTEs were lower than straight diesel BTEs at low loads, they approached diesel BTE values at high loads. For dual fuel operation, NO x and smoke reductions (from diesel values) were as high as 66-68% and 97%, respectively, but CO and THC emissions were significantly higher with increasing PES at all engine loads

  1. Parker Hybrid Hydraulic Drivetrain Demonstration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Collett, Raymond; Howland, James; Venkiteswaran, Prasad

    2014-03-31

    This report examines the benefits of Parker Hannifin hydraulic hybrid brake energy recovery systems used in commercial applications for vocational purposes. A detailed background on the problem statement being addressed as well as the solution set specific for parcel delivery will be provided. Objectives of the demonstration performed in high start & stop applications included opportunities in fuel usage reduction, emissions reduction, vehicle productivity, and vehicle maintenance. Completed findings during the demonstration period and parallel investigations with NREL, CALSTART, along with a literature review will be provided herein on this research area. Lastly, results identified in the study by third parties validated the savings potential in fuel reduction of on average of 19% to 52% over the baseline in terms of mpg (Lammert, 2014, p11), Parker data for parcel delivery vehicles in the field parallels this at a range of 35% - 50%, emissions reduction of 17.4% lower CO2 per mile and 30.4% lower NOx per mile (Gallo, 2014, p15), with maintenance improvement in the areas of brake and starter replacement, while leaving room for further study in the area of productivity in terms of specific metrics that can be applied and studied.

  2. A Novel Integrated Magnetic Structure Based DC/DC Converter for Hybrid Battery/Ultracapacitor Energy Storage Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Onar, Omer C [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    This manuscript focuses on a novel actively controlled hybrid magnetic battery/ultracapacitor based energy storage system (ESS) for vehicular propulsion systems. A stand-alone battery system might not be sufficient to satisfy peak power demand and transient load variations in hybrid and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (HEV, PHEV). Active battery/ultracapacitor hybrid ESS provides a better solution in terms of efficient power management and control flexibility. Moreover, the voltage of the battery pack can be selected to be different than that of the ultracapacitor, which will result in flexibility of design as well as cost and size reduction of the battery pack. In addition, the ultracapacitor bank can supply or recapture a large burst of power and it can be used with high C-rates. Hence, the battery is not subjected to supply peak and sharp power variations, and the stress on the battery will be reduced and the battery lifetime would be increased. Utilizing ultracapacitor results in effective capturing of the braking energy, especially in sudden braking conditions.

  3. Assessment of the advantages and feasibility of a nuclear rocket

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howe, S.D.

    1985-01-01

    The feasibility of rebuilding and testing a nuclear thermal rocket (NTR) for the Mars mission has been investigated. Calculations indicate that an NTR would substantially reduce the earth-orbit assembled mass compared to LOX/LH/sub 2/ systems. The mass savings were 36% and 65% for the cases of total aerobraking and of total propulsive braking respectively. Consequently, the cost savings for a single mission of using an NTR, if aerobraking is feasible, are probably insufficient to warrant the NTR development. If multiple missions are planned or if propulsive braking is desired at Mars and/or at Earth, then the savings of about $7B will easily pay for the NTR development. Estimates of the cost of rebuilding a NTR were based on the previous NERVA program's budget plus additional costs to develop a flight ready engine. The total cost to build the engine would be between $4 to 5B. The concept of developing a full-power test stand at Johnston Atoll in the Pacific appears very feasible. The added expense of building facilities on the island should be less than $1.4B.

  4. Use of a new microporous insulation in a sub car at Acme Steel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harvey, H.; Gamble, F.C.; MacKenzie, I.B.

    1996-12-31

    Acme Steel Co. is a small integrated steel company headquartered in Riverdale IL., with its blast furnace and coke plant operations located in the city of Chicago. Rail transportation between the two plants is by Conrail with two crews assigned exclusively to Acme. The torpedo cars used for this service are specially reinforced, with 36 in. wheels and additional braking capability for safety on public rail tracks. Over a seven month period, microporous insulating panels 0.28 in. thick in No. 49 sub ladle saved an average 24 degrees in the iron on arrival at the BOF compared to the average for the rest of the fleet. The microporous insulation replaced 0.25 in. of compressed fiber panel.

  5. Hydrogen engine performance analysis project. Second annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adt, Jr., R. R.; Swain, M. R.; Pappas, J. M.

    1980-01-01

    Progress in a 3 year research program to evaluate the performance and emission characteristics of hydrogen-fueled internal combustion engines is reported. Fifteen hydrogen engine configurations will be subjected to performance and emissions characterization tests. During the first two years, baseline data for throttled and unthrottled, carburetted and timed hydrogen induction, Pre IVC hydrogen-fueled engine configurations, with and without exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) and water injection, were obtained. These data, along with descriptions of the test engine and its components, the test apparatus, experimental techniques, experiments performed and the results obtained, are given. Analyses of other hydrogen-engine project data are also presented and compared with the results of the present effort. The unthrottled engine vis-a-vis the throttled engine is found, in general, to exhibit higher brake thermal efficiency. The unthrottled engine also yields lower NO/sub x/ emissions, which were found to be a strong function of fuel-air equivalence ratio. (LCL)

  6. Power Modulation Investigation for High Temperature (175-200 degrees Celcius) Automotive Application

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCluskey, F. P.

    2007-04-30

    Hybrid electric vehicles were re-introduced in the late 1990s after a century dominated by purely internal combustion powered engines[1]. Automotive players, such as GM, Ford, DaimlerChrysler, Honda, and Toyota, together with major energy producers, such as BPAmoco, were the major force in the development of hybrid electric vehicles. Most notable was the development by Toyota of its Prius, which was launched in Japan in 1997 and worldwide in 2001. The shift to hybrids was driven by the fact that the sheer volume of vehicles on the road had begun to tax the ability of the environment to withstand the pollution of the internal combustion engine and the ability of the fossil fuel industry to produce a sufficient amount of refined gasoline. In addition, the number of vehicles was anticipated to rise exponentially with the increasing affluence of China and India. Over the last fifteen years, major advances have been made in all the technologies essential to hybrid vehicle success, including batteries, motors, power control and conditioning electronics, regenerative braking, and power sources, including fuel cells. Current hybrid electric vehicles are gasoline internal combustion--electric motor hybrids. These hybrid electric vehicles range from micro-hybrids, where a stop/start system cuts the engine while the vehicle is stopped, and mild hybrids where the stop/start system is supplemented by regenerative braking and power assist, to full hybrids where the combustion motor is optimized for electric power production, and there is full electric drive and full regenerative braking. PSA Peugeot Citroen estimates the increased energy efficiency will range from 3-6% for the micro-hybrids to 15-25% for the full hybrids.[2] Gasoline-electric hybrids are preferred in US because they permit long distance travel with low emissions and high gasoline mileage, while still using the existing refueling infrastructure. One of the most critical areas in which technology has been advancing has been the development of electronics that can operate in the high temperature environments present in hybrid vehicles. The temperatures under the hood for a gasoline-electric hybrid vehicle are comparable to those for traditional internal combustion engines. This is known to be a difficult environment with respect to commercial-grade electronics, as there are surface and ambient temperatures ranging from 125 C to 175 C. In addition, some hybrid drive electronics are placed in even harsher environments, such as on or near the brakes, where temperatures can reach 250 C. Furthermore, number of temperature cycles experienced by electronics in a hybrid vehicle is different from that experienced in a traditional vehicle. A traditional internal combustion vehicle will have the engine running for longer periods, whereas a mild or micro-hybrid engine will experience many more starts and stops.[3] This means that hybrid automotive electronics will undergo more cycles of a potential wider temperature cycle than standard automotive electronics, which in turn see temperature cycles of 2 to 3 times the magnitude of the {Delta}T = 50 C-75 C experienced by commercial-grade electronics. This study will discuss the effects of these harsh environments on the failure mechanisms and ultimate reliability of electronic systems developed for gasoline-electric hybrid vehicles. In addition, it will suggest technologies and components that can reasonably be expected to perform well in these environments. Finally, it will suggest areas where further research is needed or desirable. Areas for further research will be highlighted in bold, italic type. It should be noted that the first area where further research is desirable is in developing a clearer understanding of the actual hybrid automotive electronics environment and how to simulate it through accelerated testing, thus: Developing specific mission profiles and accelerated testing protocols for the underhood environment for hybrid cars, as has previously been done for gasoline-powered vehicles, is an important area for further st

  7. Quantum Vacuum Friction in Highly Magnetized Neutron Stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnaud Dupays; Carlo Rizzo; Dimitar Bakalov; Giovanni F. Bignami

    2008-04-25

    In this letter we calculate the energy loss of highly magnetized neutron star due to friction with quantum vacuum, namely Quantum Vacuum Friction (QVF). Taking into account one-loop corrections in the effective Heisenberg-Euler Lagrangian of the light-light interaction, we derive an analytic expression for QVF allowing us to consider magnetic field at the surface of the star as high as $10^{11} $T. In the case of magnetars with high magnetic field above the QED critical field, we show that the energy loss by QVF dominates the energy loss process. This has important consequences, in particular on the inferred value of the magnetic field. This also indicates the need for independent measurements of magnetic field, energy loss rate, and of the braking index to fully characterize magnetars.

  8. Wind turbine spoiler

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sullivan, William N. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1985-01-01

    An aerodynamic spoiler system for a vertical axis wind turbine includes spoilers on the blades initially stored near the rotor axis to minimize drag. A solenoid latch adjacent the central support tower releases the spoilers and centrifugal force causes the spoilers to move up the turbine blades away from the rotor axis, thereby producing a braking effect and actual slowing of the associated wind turbine, if desired. The spoiler system can also be used as an infinitely variable power control by regulated movement of the spoilers on the blades over the range between the undeployed and fully deployed positions. This is done by the use of a suitable powered reel and cable located at the rotor tower to move the spoilers.

  9. Wind turbine having a direct-drive drivetrain

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bevington, Christopher M.; Bywaters, Garrett L.; Coleman, Clint C.; Costin, Daniel P.; Danforth, William L.; Lynch, Jonathan A.; Rolland, Robert H.

    2011-02-22

    A wind turbine comprising an electrical generator that includes a rotor assembly. A wind rotor that includes a wind rotor hub is directly coupled to the rotor assembly via a simplified connection. The wind rotor and generator rotor assembly are rotatably mounted on a central spindle via a bearing assembly. The wind rotor hub includes an opening having a diameter larger than the outside diameter of the central spindle adjacent the bearing assembly so as to allow access to the bearing assembly from a cavity inside the wind rotor hub. The spindle is attached to a turret supported by a tower. Each of the spindle, turret and tower has an interior cavity that permits personnel to traverse therethrough to the cavity of the wind rotor hub. The wind turbine further includes a frictional braking system for slowing, stopping or keeping stopped the rotation of the wind rotor and rotor assembly.

  10. Wind turbine/generator set and method of making same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bevington, Christopher M.; Bywaters, Garrett L.; Coleman, Clint C.; Costin, Daniel P.; Danforth, William L.; Lynch, Jonathan A.; Rolland, Robert H.

    2013-06-04

    A wind turbine comprising an electrical generator that includes a rotor assembly. A wind rotor that includes a wind rotor hub is directly coupled to the rotor assembly via a simplified connection. The wind rotor and generator rotor assembly are rotatably mounted on a central spindle via a bearing assembly. The wind rotor hub includes an opening having a diameter larger than the outside diameter of the central spindle adjacent the bearing assembly so as to allow access to the bearing assembly from a cavity inside the wind rotor hub. The spindle is attached to a turret supported by a tower. Each of the spindle, turret and tower has an interior cavity that permits personnel to traverse therethrough to the cavity of the wind rotor hub. The wind turbine further includes a frictional braking system for slowing, stopping or keeping stopped the rotation of the wind rotor and rotor assembly.

  11. Wind turbine rotor hub and teeter joint

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Coleman, Clint (Warren, VT); Kurth, William T. (Warren, VT); Jankowski, Joseph (Stowe, VT)

    1994-10-11

    A rotor hub is provided for coupling a wind turbine rotor blade and a shaft. The hub has a yoke with a body which is connected to the shaft, and extension portions which are connected to teeter bearing blocks, each of which has an aperture. The blocks are connected to a saddle which envelops the rotor blade by one or two shafts which pass through the apertures in the bearing blocks. The saddle and blade are separated by a rubber interface which provides for distribution of stress over a larger portion of the blade. Two teeter control mechanisms, which may include hydraulic pistons and springs, are connected to the rotor blade and to the yoke at extension portions. These control mechanisms provide end-of-stroke damping, braking, and stiffness based on the teeter angle and speed of the blade.

  12. Primary Cosmic Ray Proton Flux Measured by AMS-02

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Consolandi, C

    2014-01-01

    The Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS-02) is a high energy particle detector designed to study origin and nature of cosmic rays up to a few TV from space. It was installed on the International Space Station (ISS) on May 19, 2011. During the first two years of operation AMS-02 performed precise measurements of the proton flux. In the low rigidity range, from 1 GV to 20 GV, the proton flux was daily measured with a statistical error less than 1%. In the same rigidity range a gradual decrease due to Solar modulation effect and transit variations due to Solar Flares and Coronal Mass Ejection were also observed. In the rigidity range from 20 GV up to 100 GV instead, AMS-02 data show no drastic variation and the results are consistent with other experiments. Above 100 GV, AMS-02 proton flux exhibits a single power low behavior with no fine structures nor brakes.

  13. Canada: politics converts a boom to potential bust

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maciej, H.

    1981-02-15

    At the start of the decade, the Canadian Petroleum Industry was poised for an expenditure and activity breakout to take Canada off the world oil market and make the country secure and self-sufficient in oil supplies by the time the 1990s roll around. Then, on October 28, 1980, the government of Canada unveiled its National Energy Program (NEP). Instead of clearing the tracks for growth, the NEP put the brakes on industry. Therefore, instead of setting drilling records, getting into high gear on the long-delayed oil sands Mega-Projects, and increasing exploration in the promising offshore areas, budgets are being cut by as much as 50%, major projects are being shelved, and an exodus of drilling rigs to the US is underway. Designed to deliver the election promises of the last federal compaign, the NEP is producing a crisis of confidence and shortages instead of progress toward self-sufficiency.

  14. Submerged electricity generation plane with marine current-driven motors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dehlsen, James G.P.; Dehlsen, James B.; Fleming, Alexander

    2014-07-01

    An underwater apparatus for generating electric power from ocean currents and deep water tides. A submersible platform including two or more power pods, each having a rotor with fixed-pitch blades, with drivetrains housed in pressure vessels that are connected by a transverse structure providing buoyancy, which can be a wing depressor, hydrofoil, truss, or faired tube. The platform is connected to anchors on the seafloor by forward mooring lines and a vertical mooring line that restricts the depth of the device in the water column. The platform operates using passive, rather than active, depth control. The wing depressor, along with rotor drag loads, ensures the platform seeks the desired operational current velocity. The rotors are directly coupled to a hydraulic pump that drives at least one constant-speed hydraulic-motor generator set and enables hydraulic braking. A fluidic bearing decouples non-torque rotor loads to the main shaft driving the hydraulic pumps.

  15. Electric vehicle drive train with direct coupling transmission

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tankersley, Jerome B. (Fredericksburg, VA); Boothe, Richard W. (Roanoke, VA); Konrad, Charles E. (Roanoke, VA)

    1995-01-01

    An electric vehicle drive train includes an electric motor and an associated speed sensor, a transmission operable in a speed reduction mode or a direct coupled mode, and a controller responsive to the speed sensor for operating the transmission in the speed reduction mode when the motor is below a predetermined value, and for operating the motor in the direct coupled mode when the motor speed is above a predetermined value. The controller reduces the speed of the motor, such as by regeneratively braking the motor, when changing from the speed reduction mode to the direct coupled mode. The motor speed may be increased when changing from the direct coupled mode to the speed reduction mode. The transmission is preferably a single stage planetary gearbox.

  16. Simulations of the Fuel Economy and Emissions of Hybrid Transit Buses over Planned Local Routes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gao, Zhiming; LaClair, Tim J; Daw, C Stuart; Smith, David E; Franzese, Oscar

    2014-01-01

    We present simulated fuel economy and emissions city transit buses powered by conventional diesel engines and diesel-hybrid electric powertrains of varying size. Six representative city drive cycles were included in the study. In addition, we included previously published aftertreatment device models for control of CO, HC, NOx, and particulate matter (PM) emissions. Our results reveal that bus hybridization can significantly enhance fuel economy by reducing engine idling time, reducing demands for accessory loads, exploiting regenerative braking, and shifting engine operation to speeds and loads with higher fuel efficiency. Increased hybridization also tends to monotonically reduce engine-out emissions, but trends in the tailpipe (post-aftertreatment) emissions involve more complex interactions that significantly depend on motor size and drive cycle details.

  17. A Waste Heat Recovery System for Light Duty Diesel Engines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Briggs, Thomas E; Wagner, Robert M; Edwards, Kevin Dean; Curran, Scott; Nafziger, Eric J

    2010-01-01

    In order to achieve proposed fuel economy requirements, engines must make better use of the available fuel energy. Regardless of how efficient the engine is, there will still be a significant fraction of the fuel energy that is rejected in the exhaust and coolant streams. One viable technology for recovering this waste heat is an Organic Rankine Cycle. This cycle heats a working fluid using these heat streams and expands the fluid through a turbine to produce shaft power. The present work was the development of such a system applied to a light duty diesel engine. This lab demonstration was designed to maximize the peak brake thermal efficiency of the engine, and the combined system achieved an efficiency of 44.4%. The design of the system is discussed, as are the experimental performance results. The system potential at typical operating conditions was evaluated to determine the practicality of installing such a system in a vehicle.

  18. Radiative Magnetic Reconnection in Astrophysics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Uzdensky, Dmitri A

    2015-01-01

    I review a new rapidly growing area of high-energy plasma astrophysics --- radiative magnetic reconnection, i.e., a reconnection regime where radiation reaction influences reconnection dynamics, energetics, and nonthermal particle acceleration. This influence be may be manifested via a number of astrophysically important radiative effects, such as radiation-reaction limits on particle acceleration, radiative cooling, radiative resistivity, braking of reconnection outflows by radiation drag, radiation pressure, viscosity, and even pair creation at highest energy densities. Self-consistent inclusion of these effects in magnetic reconnection theory and modeling calls for serious modifications to our overall theoretical approach to the problem. In addition, prompt reconnection-powered radiation often represents our only observational diagnostic tool for studying remote astrophysical systems; this underscores the importance of developing predictive modeling capabilities to connect the underlying physical condition...

  19. Wind turbine/generator set having a stator cooling system located between stator frame and active coils

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bevington, Christopher M.; Bywaters, Garrett L.; Coleman, Clint C.; Costin, Daniel P.; Danforth, William L.; Lynch, Jonathan A.; Rolland, Robert H.

    2012-11-13

    A wind turbine comprising an electrical generator that includes a rotor assembly. A wind rotor that includes a wind rotor hub is directly coupled to the rotor assembly via a simplified connection. The wind rotor and generator rotor assembly are rotatably mounted on a central spindle via a bearing assembly. The wind rotor hub includes an opening having a diameter larger than the outside diameter of the central spindle adjacent the bearing assembly so as to allow access to the bearing assembly from a cavity inside the wind rotor hub. The spindle is attached to a turret supported by a tower. Each of the spindle, turret and tower has an interior cavity that permits personnel to traverse therethrough to the cavity of the wind rotor hub. The wind turbine further includes a frictional braking system for slowing, stopping or keeping stopped the rotation of the wind rotor and rotor assembly.

  20. Zinc-bromine battery design for electric vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bellows, R.; Grimes, P.; Einstein, H.; Kantner, E.; Malachesky, P.; Newby, K.

    1982-01-01

    Design projections for zinc-bromine batteries are attractive for electric vehicle applications in terms of low manufacturing costs ($28/kWh) and good performance characteristics. Zinc-bromine batery projections (60 to 80 Wh/kg, 130 to 200 W/kg) compare favorably to both current lead acid batteries and proposed advanced battery candidates. The performance of recently developed battery components with 1200 cm/sup 2/ electrodes in a 120V, 10 kWh module is described. Similarly constructed smaller scale (600 cm/sup 2/) components have shown lifetimes exceeding 400 cycles and the ability to follow both regenerative braking (J227aD) and random cycling regimes. Initial dynamometer evaluations of full scale 20 kWh batteries is expected in early 1984.

  1. Zinc-bromine battery design for electric vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bellows, R.J.; Einstein, H.; Grimes, P.; Kantner, E.; Malachesky, P.; Newby, K.

    1983-02-01

    Design projections for zinc-bromine batteries are attractive for electric vehicle applications in terms of low manufacturing costs ($28/kWh) and good performance characteristics. Zinc-bromine battery projections (60-80 Wh/kg, 130-200 W/kg) compare favorably to both current lead acid batteries and proposed advanced battery candidates. The performance of recently developed battery components with 1200 cm/sup 2/ electrodes in a 120V, 10 kWh module is described. Similarly constructed smaller scale (600 cm/sup 2/) components have shown lifetimes exceeding 400 cycles and the ability to follow both regenerative braking (J227aD) and random cycling regimes. Initial dynamometer evaluations of full scale 20 kWh batteries is expected in early 1984.

  2. Accretion-powered Stellar Winds as a Solution to the Stellar Angular Momentum Problem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sean Matt; Ralph E. Pudritz

    2005-10-03

    We compare the angular momentum extracted by a wind from a pre-main-sequence star to the torques arising from the interaction between the star and its Keplerian accretion disk. We find that the wind alone can counteract the spin-up torque from mass accretion, solving the mystery of why accreting pre-main-sequence stars are observed to spin at less than 10% of break-up speed, provided that the mass outflow rate in the stellar winds is ~10% of the accretion rate. We suggest that such massive winds will be driven by some fraction $\\epsilon$ of the accretion power. For observationally constrained typical parameters of classical T-Tauri stars, $\\epsilon$ needs to be between a few and a few tens of percent. In this scenario, efficient braking of the star will terminate simultaneously with accretion, as is usually assumed to explain the rotation velocities of stars in young clusters.

  3. Control system for a hybrid powertrain system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Naqvi, Ali K.; Demirovic, Besim; Gupta, Pinaki; Kaminsky, Lawrence A.

    2014-09-09

    A vehicle includes a powertrain with an engine, first and second torque machines, and a hybrid transmission. A method for operating the vehicle includes operating the engine in an unfueled state, releasing an off-going clutch which when engaged effects operation of the hybrid transmission in a first continuously variable mode, and applying a friction braking torque to a wheel of the vehicle to compensate for an increase in an output torque of the hybrid transmission resulting from releasing the off-going clutch. Subsequent to releasing the off-going clutch, an oncoming clutch which when engaged effects operation of the hybrid transmission in a second continuously variable mode is synchronized. Subsequent to synchronization of the oncoming clutch, the oncoming clutch is engaged.

  4. Performance and emissions of propane, natural gas, and methanol fuelled bus engines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goetz, W.A.; Petherick, D.; Topaloglu, T.

    1988-01-01

    A comparative evaluation of six transit bus engines (three diesel, one propane (LPG), one natural gas for vehicles (NGV), and one methanol) has been performed. The purpose of the program was to assess the exhaust emissions and fuel consumption of current state-of-the-art large alternative fuel engines. Engine dynamometer test work was performed at the Ontario Research Foundation (ORF) which allowed a detailed comparison of several alternative-fuelled engines versus their diesel counterparts. Test data includes steady-state brake-specific fuel consumption maps, torque and horsepower curves. Transient performance, fuel consumption and emissions information came from computer-controlled engine dynamometer runs of the Advanced Design Bus (ADB) test cycle.

  5. Coiled tubing helps gas production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matheny, S.L. Jr.

    1980-08-11

    To boost production from its gas fields in Lake Erie, Consumers' Gas Co., Toronto, used a giant reel holding a 33,000-ft coil of 1-in. polypropylene-coated steel tubing to lay about 44 miles of control lines that now service 20 wells 17 miles offshore. As the forward motion of the boat unwound the tubing, the reel rig's hydraulic motor served as a brake to maintain the proper tension. This innovative method of laying the lines eliminated more than 80% of the pipe joints, correspondingly reduced the installation labor time, and improved the system's reliability. The two hydraulic-control lines that were laid actuate the gas-gathering line valves, while a hydrate-control line injects each well with methyl alcohol to inhibit hydrate formation.

  6. Magnetized hypermassive neutron star collapse: a central engine for short gamma-ray bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masaru Shibata; Matthew D. Duez; Yuk Tung Liu; Stuart L. Shapiro; Branson C. Stephens

    2005-11-04

    A hypermassive neutron star (HMNS) is a possible transient formed after the merger of a neutron star binary. In the latest magnetohydrodynamic simulations in full general relativity, we find that a magnetized HMNS undergoes `delayed' collapse to a rotating black hole (BH) as a result of angular momentum transport via magnetic braking and the magnetorotational instability. The outcome is a BH surrounded by a massive, hot torus with a collimated magnetic field. The torus accretes onto the BH at a quasi-steady accretion rate ~10 solar mass/s; the lifetime of the torus is ~10 ms. The torus has a temperature \\sim 10^{12} K, leading to copious neutrino-antineutrino thermal radiation. Therefore, the collapse of an HMNS is a promising scenario for generating short-duration gamma-ray bursts and an accompanying burst of gravitational waves and neutrinos.

  7. DOE Hybrid and Electric Vehicle Test Platform

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gao, Yimin [Advanced Vehicle Research Center, Danville, VA (United States)

    2012-03-31

    Based on the contract NT-42790 to the Department of Energy, “Plug-in Hybrid Ethanol Research Platform”, Advanced Vehicle Research Center (AVRC) Virginia has successfully developed the phase I electric drive train research platform which has been named as Laboratory Rapid Application Testbed (LabRAT). In phase II, LabRAT is to be upgraded into plug-in hybrid research platform, which will be capable of testing power systems for electric vehicles, and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles running on conventional as well as alternative fuels. LabRAT is configured as a rolling testbed with plentiful space for installing various component configurations. Component connections are modularized for flexibility and are easily replaced for testing various mechanisms. LabRAT is designed and built as a full functional vehicle chassis with a steering system, brake system and four wheel suspension. The rear drive axle offers maximum flexibility with a quickly changeable gear ratio final drive to accommodate different motor speed requirements. The electric drive system includes an electric motor which is mechanically connected to the rear axle through an integrated speed/torque sensor. Initially, a 100 kW UQM motor and corresponding UQM motor controller is used which can be easily replaced with another motor/controller combination. A lithium iron phosphate (LiFePO4) battery pack is installed, which consists of 108 cells of 100 AH capacity, giving the total energy capacity of 32.5 kWh. Correspondingly, a fully functional battery management system (BMS) is installed to perform battery cell operation monitoring, cell voltage balancing, and reporting battery real time operating parameters to vehicle controller. An advanced vehicle controller ECU is installed for controlling the drive train. The vehicle controller ECU receives traction or braking torque command from driver through accelerator and brake pedal position sensors and battery operating signals from the BMS through CAN BUS, and then generates motor torque command (traction or braking) to the motor controller based on the control algorithm software embedded in the vehicle controller ECU. The vehicle controller ECU is a re-programmable electronic control unit. Any control algorithm software developed can be easily downloaded to vehicle controller ECU to test any newly developed control strategy. The flexibility of the control system significantly enhances the practical applicability of the LabRAT. A new test methodology has been developed for the LabRAT simulating any vehicles running on road with different weights from compact passenger car to light duty truck on an AC or eddy current dynamometers without much effort for modification of the system. LabRAT is equipped with a fully functional data acquisition system supplied by CyberMetrix. The measurement points along the drive train are DC electric power between battery pack and motor controller input, AC electric power between motor controller and electric motor, mechanical power between motor and rear axle. The data acquisition system is designed with more capability than current requirements in order to meet the requirements for phase II.

  8. Advanced Hybrid Propulsion and Energy Management System for High Efficiency, Off Highway, 240 Ton Class, Diesel Electric Haul Trucks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richter, Tim; Slezak, Lee; Johnson, Chris; Young, Henry; Funcannon, Dan

    2008-12-31

    The objective of this project is to reduce the fuel consumption of off-highway vehicles, specifically large tonnage mine haul trucks. A hybrid energy storage and management system will be added to a conventional diesel-electric truck that will allow capture of braking energy normally dissipated in grid resistors as heat. The captured energy will be used during acceleration and motoring, reducing the diesel engine load, thus conserving fuel. The project will work towards a system validation of the hybrid system by first selecting an energy storage subsystem and energy management subsystem. Laboratory testing at a subscale level will evaluate these selections and then a full-scale laboratory test will be performed. After the subsystems have been proven at the full-scale lab, equipment will be mounted on a mine haul truck and integrated with the vehicle systems. The integrated hybrid components will be exercised to show functionality, capability, and fuel economy impacts in a mine setting.

  9. Power conversion apparatus and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Su, Gui-Jia (Knoxville, TN)

    2012-02-07

    A power conversion apparatus includes an interfacing circuit that enables a current source inverter to operate from a voltage energy storage device (voltage source), such as a battery, ultracapacitor or fuel cell. The interfacing circuit, also referred to as a voltage-to-current converter, transforms the voltage source into a current source that feeds a DC current to a current source inverter. The voltage-to-current converter also provides means for controlling and maintaining a constant DC bus current that supplies the current source inverter. The voltage-to-current converter also enables the current source inverter to charge the voltage energy storage device, such as during dynamic braking of a hybrid electric vehicle, without the need of reversing the direction of the DC bus current.

  10. Nano-Scale Interpenetrating Phase Composites (IPC S) for Industrial and Vehicle Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hemrick, James Gordon; Hu, Michael Z.

    2010-06-01

    A one-year project was completed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to explore the technical and economic feasibility of producing nano-scale Interpenetrating Phase Composite (IPC) components of a usable size for actual testing/implementation in a real applications such as high wear/corrosion resistant refractory shapes for industrial applications, lightweight vehicle braking system components, or lower cost/higher performance military body and vehicle armor. Nano-scale IPC s with improved mechanical, electrical, and thermal properties have previously been demonstrated at the lab scale, but have been limited in size. The work performed under this project was focused on investigating the ability to take the current traditional lab scale processes to a manufacturing scale through scaling of these processes or through the utilization of an alternative high-temperature process.

  11. Radio Pulsars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beskin, V S; Gwinn, C R; Tchekhovskoy, A

    2015-01-01

    Almost 50 years after radio pulsars were discovered in 1967, our understanding of these objects remains incomplete. On the one hand, within a few years it became clear that neutron star rotation gives rise to the extremely stable sequence of radio pulses, that the kinetic energy of rotation provides the reservoir of energy, and that electromagnetic fields are the braking mechanism. On the other hand, no consensus regarding the mechanism of coherent radio emission or the conversion of electromagnetic energy to particle energy yet exists. In this review, we report on three aspects of pulsar structure that have seen recent progress: the self-consistent theory of the magnetosphere of an oblique magnetic rotator; the location, geometry, and optics of radio emission; and evolution of the angle between spin and magnetic axes. These allow us to take the next step in understanding the physical nature of the pulsar activity.

  12. Low cost electronic ultracapacitor interface technique to provide load leveling of a battery for pulsed load or motor traction drive applications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    King, Robert Dean (Schenectady, NY); DeDoncker, Rik Wivina Anna Adelson (Malvern, PA)

    1998-01-01

    A battery load leveling arrangement for an electrically powered system in which battery loading is subject to intermittent high current loading utilizes a passive energy storage device and a diode connected in series with the storage device to conduct current from the storage device to the load when current demand forces a drop in battery voltage. A current limiting circuit is connected in parallel with the diode for recharging the passive energy storage device. The current limiting circuit functions to limit the average magnitude of recharge current supplied to the storage device. Various forms of current limiting circuits are disclosed, including a PTC resistor coupled in parallel with a fixed resistor. The current limit circuit may also include an SCR for switching regenerative braking current to the device when the system is connected to power an electric motor.

  13. Phases of holographic d-wave superconductor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krikun, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    We study different phases in the holographic model of d-wave superconductor. These are described by solutions to the classical equations of motion found in different ansatze. Apart from the known homogeneous d-wave superconducting phase we find three new solutions. Two of them represent two distinct families of the spatially modulated solutions, which realize the charge density wave phases in the dual theory. The third one is the new homogeneous phase with nonzero anapole moment. These phases are relevant to the physics of cuprate high-Tc superconductor in pseudogap region. While the d-wave phase preserves translation, parity and time reversal symmetry, the striped phases break translations spontaneously. Parity and time-reversal are preserved when combined with discrete half-periodic shift of the wave. In anapole phase translation symmetry is preserved, but parity and time reversal are spontaneously broken. All of the considered solutions brake the global $U(1)$. Thermodynamical treatment shows that in the s...

  14. Test results of a Stirling engine utilizing heat exchanger modules with an integral heat pipe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Skupinski, R.C.; Tower, L.K.; Madi, F.J.; Brusk, K.D.

    1993-04-01

    The Heat Pipe Stirling Engine (HP-1000), a free-piston Stirling engine incorporating three heat exchanger modules, each having a sodium filled heat pipe, has been tested at the NASA-Lewis Research Center as part of the Civil Space Technology Initiative (CSTI). The heat exchanger modules were designed to reduce the number of potential flow leak paths in the heat exchanger assembly and incorporate a heat pipe as the link between the heat source and the engine. An existing RE-1000 free-piston Stirling engine was modified to operate using the heat exchanger modules. This paper describes heat exchanger module and engine performance during baseline testing. Condenser temperature profiles, brake power, and efficiency are presented and discussed.

  15. Heavy-Duty Stoichiometric Compression Ignition Engine with Improved Fuel Economy over Alternative Technologies for Meeting 2010 On-Highway Emission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirby J. Baumgard; Richard E. Winsor

    2009-12-31

    The objectives of the reported work were: to apply the stoichiometric compression ignition (SCI) concept to a 9.0 liter diesel engine; to obtain engine-out NO{sub x} and PM exhaust emissions so that the engine can meet 2010 on-highway emission standards by applying a three-way catalyst for NO{sub x} control and a particulate filter for PM control; and to simulate an optimize the engine and air system to approach 50% thermal efficiency using variable valve actuation and electric turbo compounding. The work demonstrated that an advanced diesel engine can be operated at stoichiometric conditions with reasonable particulate and NOx emissions at full power and peak torque conditions; calculated that the SCI engine will operate at 42% brake thermal efficiency without advanced hardware, turbocompounding, or waste heat recovery; and determined that EGR is not necessary for this advanced concept engine, and this greatly simplifies the concept.

  16. 21st Century Locomotive Technology: 2003 Annual Technical Status Report DOE/AL68284-TSR03

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lembit Salasoo

    2004-01-09

    The 21st Century Locomotive program objective is to develop 25% more efficient freight locomotives by 2010. Diesel engine-related research addresses advanced fuel injection, electric turbocharger and abradable seals. Assembly of a common rail fuel injection test system is underway, and a CFD combustion model has been validated. An electrically assisted turbocharger has been constructed and operated, meeting the generator mode design rating. System characterization and optimization is ongoing. Candidate abradable seal materials have been identified and test coupons prepared. Locomotive system-related research addresses capturing, storing and utilizing regenerative braking energy in a hybrid locomotive, and fuel optimization control. Hybrid locomotive energy storage requirements have been identified and studies on specific energy storage solutions are in progress. Energy management controls have been defined and testing initiated. Train and track parameter identification necessary for fuel optimization has been demonstrated.

  17. Method and apparatus for controlling battery charging in a hybrid electric vehicle

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Phillips, Anthony Mark (Northville, MI); Blankenship, John Richard (Dearborn, MI); Bailey, Kathleen Ellen (Dearborn, MI); Jankovic, Miroslava (Birmingham, MI)

    2003-06-24

    A starter/alternator system (24) for hybrid electric vehicle (10) having an internal combustion engine (12) and an energy storage device (34) has a controller (30) coupled to the starter/alternator (26). The controller (30) has a state of charge manager (40) that monitors the state of charge of the energy storage device. The controller has eight battery state-of-charge threshold values that determine the hybrid operating mode of the hybrid electric vehicle. The value of the battery state-of-charge relative to the threshold values is a factor in the determination of the hybrid mode, for example; regenerative braking, charging, battery bleed, boost. The starter/alternator may be operated as a generator or a motor, depending upon the mode.

  18. The Crab glitches: incidence and cumulative effect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Graham Smith; C. Jordan

    2003-01-10

    The fourteen glitches observed during 33 years do not show the simple pattern expected from a relaxation oscillator. They may however be regarded as three major events separated by about 12 years, the third being a group of smaller glitches. There is a step increase in slowdown rate at each glitch, whose cumulative effect makes a significant contribution to the second differential nu-ddot. The braking index "n" has previously been evaluated only between glitches: the effect of the glitches is to reduce "n" from 2.51 to 2.45. This extra effect due to the glitches would be explained by an increase in dipole field at the fractional rate of 1.5x10^-5 per annum.

  19. A miniature powerplant for very small, very long range autonomous aircraft. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tad McGeer

    1999-09-29

    The authors have developed a new piston engine offering unprecedented efficiency for a new generation of miniature robotic aircraft. Following Phase 1 preliminary design in 1996--97, they have gone forward in Phase 2 to complete detail design, and are nearing completion of a first batch of ten engines. A small-engine dynamometer facility has been built in preparation for the test program. Provisions have been included for supercharging, which will allow operation at ceilings in the 10,000 m range. Component tests and detailed analysis indicate that the engine will achieve brake-specific fuel consumption well below 300 gm/kWh at power levels of several hundred watts. This level of performance opens the door to development of tabletop-sized aircraft having transpacific range and multi-day endurance, which will offer extraordinary new capabilities for meteorology, geomagnetic, and a variety of applications in environmental monitoring and military operations.

  20. Utilization of rotor kinetic energy storage for hybrid vehicles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hsu, John S. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    2011-05-03

    A power system for a motor vehicle having an internal combustion engine, the power system comprises an electric machine (12) further comprising a first excitation source (47), a permanent magnet rotor (28) and a magnetic coupling rotor (26) spaced from the permanent magnet rotor and at least one second excitation source (43), the magnetic coupling rotor (26) also including a flywheel having an inertial mass to store kinetic energy during an initial acceleration to an operating speed; and wherein the first excitation source is electrically connected to the second excitation source for power cycling such that the flywheel rotor (26) exerts torque on the permanent magnet rotor (28) to assist braking and acceleration of the permanent magnet rotor (28) and consequently, the vehicle. An axial gap machine and a radial gap machine are disclosed and methods of the invention are also disclosed.

  1. Electric vehicle drive train with direct coupling transmission

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tankersley, J.B.; Boothe, R.W.; Konrad, C.E.

    1995-04-04

    An electric vehicle drive train includes an electric motor and an associated speed sensor, a transmission operable in a speed reduction mode or a direct coupled mode, and a controller responsive to the speed sensor for operating the transmission in the speed reduction mode when the motor is below a predetermined value, and for operating the motor in the direct coupled mode when the motor speed is above a predetermined value. The controller reduces the speed of the motor, such as by regeneratively braking the motor, when changing from the speed reduction mode to the direct coupled mode. The motor speed may be increased when changing from the direct coupled mode to the speed reduction mode. The transmission is preferably a single stage planetary gearbox. 6 figures.

  2. Smart Infrared Inspection System Field Operational Test Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Siekmann, Adam [ORNL; Capps, Gary J [ORNL; Franzese, Oscar [ORNL; Lascurain, Mary Beth [ORNL

    2011-06-01

    The Smart InfraRed Inspection System (SIRIS) is a tool designed to assist inspectors in determining which vehicles passing through the SIRIS system are in need of further inspection by measuring the thermal data from the wheel components. As a vehicle enters the system, infrared cameras on the road measure temperatures of the brakes, tires, and wheel bearings on both wheel ends of commercial motor vehicles (CMVs) in motion. This thermal data is then presented to enforcement personal inside of the inspection station on a user friendly interface. Vehicles that are suspected to have a violation are automatically alerted to the enforcement staff. The main goal of the SIRIS field operational test (FOT) was to collect data to evaluate the performance of the prototype system and determine the viability of such a system being used for commercial motor vehicle enforcement. From March 2010 to September 2010, ORNL facilitated the SIRIS FOT at the Greene County Inspection Station (IS) in Greeneville, Tennessee. During the course of the FOT, 413 CMVs were given a North American Standard (NAS) Level-1 inspection. Of those 413 CMVs, 384 were subjected to a SIRIS screening. A total of 36 (9.38%) of the vehicles were flagged by SIRIS as having one or more thermal issues; with brakes issues making up 33 (91.67%) of those. Of the 36 vehicles flagged as having thermal issues, 31 (86.11%) were found to have a violation and 30 (83.33%) of those vehicles were placed out-of-service (OOS). Overall the enforcement personnel who have used SIRIS for screening purposes have had positive feedback on the potential of SIRIS. With improvements in detection algorithms and stability, the system will be beneficial to the CMV enforcement community and increase overall trooper productivity by accurately identifying a higher percentage of CMVs to be placed OOS with minimal error. No future evaluation of SIRIS has been deemed necessary and specifications for a production system will soon be drafted.

  3. Heavy and Overweight Vehicle Defects Interim Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Siekmann, Adam [ORNL; Capps, Gary J [ORNL

    2012-12-01

    The Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), along with the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA), has an interest in overweight commercial motor vehicles, how they affect infrastructure, and their impact on safety on the nation s highways. To assist both FHWA and FMCSA in obtaining more information related to this interest, data was collected and analyzed from two separate sources. A large scale nationwide data collection effort was facilitated by the Commercial Vehicle Safety Alliance as part of a special study on overweight vehicles and an additional, smaller set, of data was collected from the state of Tennessee which included a much more detailed set of data. Over a six-month period, 1,873 Level I inspections were performed in 18 different states that volunteered to be a part of this study. Of the 1,873 inspections, a vehicle out-of-service (OOS) violation was found on 44.79% of the vehicles, a rate significantly higher than the national OOS rate of 27.23%. The main cause of a vehicle being placed OOS was brake-related defects, with approximately 30% of all vehicles having an OOS brake violation. Only about 4% of vehicles had an OOS tire violation, and even fewer had suspension and wheel violations. Vehicle weight violations were most common on an axle group as opposed to a gross vehicle weight violation. About two thirds of the vehicles cited with a weight violation were overweight on an axle group with an average amount of weight over the legal limit of about 2,000 lbs. Data collection is scheduled to continue through January 2014, with more potentially more states volunteering to collect data. More detailed data collections similar to the Tennessee data collection will also be performed in multiple states.

  4. Effect of E85 on RCCI Performance and Emissions on a Multi-Cylinder Light-Duty Diesel Engine - SAE World Congress

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Curran, Scott; Hanson, Reed M; Wagner, Robert M

    2012-01-01

    This paper investigates the effect of E85 on load expansion and FTP modal point emissions indices under reactivity controlled compression ignition (RCCI) operation on a light-duty multi-cylinder diesel engine. A General Motors (GM) 1.9L four-cylinder diesel engine with the stock compression ratio of 17.5:1, common rail diesel injection system, high-pressure exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) system and variable geometry turbocharger was modified to allow for port fuel injection with gasoline or E85. Controlling the fuel reactivity in-cylinder by the adjustment of the ratio of premixed low-reactivity fuel (gasoline or E85) to direct injected high reactivity fuel (diesel fuel) has been shown to extend the operating range of high-efficiency clean combustion (HECC) compared to the use of a single fuel alone as in homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) or premixed charge compression ignition (PCCI). The effect of E85 on the Ad-hoc federal test procedure (FTP) modal points is explored along with the effect of load expansion through the light-duty diesel speed operating range. The Ad-hoc FTP modal points of 1500 rpm, 1.0bar brake mean effective pressure (BMEP); 1500rpm, 2.6bar BMEP; 2000rpm, 2.0bar BMEP; 2300rpm, 4.2bar BMEP; and 2600rpm, 8.8bar BMEP were explored. Previous results with 96 RON unleaded test gasoline (UTG-96) and ultra-low sulfur diesel (ULSD) showed that with stock hardware, the 2600rpm, 8.8bar BMEP modal point was not obtainable due to excessive cylinder pressure rise rate and unstable combustion both with and without the use of EGR. Brake thermal efficiency and emissions performance of RCCI operation with E85 and ULSD is explored and compared against conventional diesel combustion (CDC) and RCCI operation with UTG 96 and ULSD.

  5. Experimental Investigation of Fuel-Reactivity Controlled Compression Ignition (RCCI) Combustion Mode in a Multi-Cylinder, Light-Duty Diesel Engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cho, Kukwon; Curran, Scott; Prikhodko, Vitaly Y; Sluder, Scott; Parks, II, James E; Wagner, Robert M

    2011-01-01

    An experimental study was performed to provide the combustion and emission characteristics resulting from fuel-reactivity controlled compression ignition (RCCI) combustion mode utilizing dual-fuel approach in a light-duty, multi-cylinder diesel engine. In-cylinder fuel blending using port fuel injection of gasoline before intake valve opening (IVO) and early-cycle, direct injection of diesel fuel was used as the charge preparation and fuel blending strategy. In order to achieve the desired auto-ignition quality through the stratification of the fuel-air equivalence ratio ( ), blends of commercially available gasoline and diesel fuel were used. Engine experiments were performed at an engine speed of 2300rpm and an engine load of 4.3bar brake mean effective pressure (BMEP). It was found that significant reduction in both nitrogen oxide (NOx) and particulate matter (PM) was realized successfully through the RCCI combustion mode even without applying exhaust gas recirculation (EGR). However, high carbon monoxide (CO) and hydrocarbon (HC) emissions were observed. The low combustion gas temperature during the expansion and exhaust processes seemed to be the dominant source of high CO emissions in the RCCI combustion mode. The high HC emissions during the RCCI combustion mode could be due to the increased combustion quenching layer thickness as well as the -stratification at the periphery of the combustion chamber. The slightly higher brake thermal efficiency (BTE) of the RCCI combustion mode was observed than the other combustion modes, such as the conventional diesel combustion (CDC) mode, and single-fuel, premixed charge compression ignition (PCCI) combustion mode. The parametric study of the RCCI combustion mode revealed that the combustion phasing and/or the peak cylinder pressure rise rate of the RCCI combustion mode could be controlled by several physical parameters premixed ratio (rp), intake swirl intensity, and start of injection (SOI) timing of directly injected fuel unlike other low temperature combustion (LTC) strategies.

  6. DRIVE CYCLE EFFICIENCY AND EMISSIONS ESTIMATES FOR REACTIVITY CONTROLLED COMPRESSION IGNITION IN A MULTI-CYLINDER LIGHT-DUTY DIESEL ENGINE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Curran, Scott; Briggs, Thomas E; Cho, Kukwon; Wagner, Robert M

    2011-01-01

    In-cylinder blending of gasoline and diesel to achieve Reactivity Controlled Compression Ignition (RCCI) has been shown to reduce NOx and PM emissions while maintaining or improving brake thermal efficiency as compared to conventional diesel combustion (CDC). The RCCI concept has an advantage over many advanced combustion strategies in that by varying both the percent of premixed gasoline and EGR rate, stable combustion can be extended over more of the light-duty drive cycle load range. Changing the percent premixed gasoline changes the fuel reactivity stratification in the cylinder providing further control of combustion phasing and pressure rise rate than the use of EGR alone. This paper examines the combustion and emissions performance of light-duty diesel engine using direct injected diesel fuel and port injected gasoline to carry out RCCI for steady-state engine conditions which are consistent with a light-duty drive cycle. A GM 1.9L four-cylinder engine with the stock compression ratio of 17.5:1, common rail diesel injection system, high-pressure EGR system and variable geometry turbocharger was modified to allow for port fuel injection with gasoline. Engine-out emissions, engine performance and combustion behavior for RCCI operation is compared against both CDC and a premixed charge compression ignition (PCCI) strategy which relies on high levels of EGR dilution. The effect of percent of premixed gasoline, EGR rate, boost level, intake mixture temperature, combustion phasing and pressure rise rate is investigated for RCCI combustion for the light-duty modal points. Engine-out emissions of NOx and PM were found to be considerably lower for RCCI operation as compared to CDC and PCCI, while HC and CO emissions were higher. Brake thermal efficiency was similar or higher for many of the modal conditions for RCCI operation. The emissions results are used to estimate hot-start FTP-75 emissions levels with RCCI and are compared against CDC and PCCI modes.

  7. Engineering of a novel Ca{sup 2+}-regulated kinesin molecular motor using a calmodulin dimer linker

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shishido, Hideki; Maruta, Shinsaku

    2012-06-29

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Engineered kinesin-M13 and calmodulin involving single cysteine were prepared. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CaM mutant was cross-linked to dimer by bifunctional thiol reactive reagent. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Kinesin-M13 was dimerized via CaM dimer in the presence of calcium. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Function of the engineered kinesin was regulated by a Ca{sup 2+}-calmodulin dimer linker. -- Abstract: The kinesin-microtubule system holds great promise as a molecular shuttle device within biochips. However, one current barrier is that such shuttles do not have 'on-off' control of their movement. Here we report the development of a novel molecular motor powered by an accelerator and brake system, using a kinesin monomer and a calmodulin (CaM) dimer. The kinesin monomer, K355, was fused with a CaM target peptide (M13 peptide) at the C-terminal part of the neck region (K355-M13). We also prepared CaM dimers using CaM mutants (Q3C), (R86C), or (A147C) and crosslinkers that react with cysteine residues. Following induction of K355-M13 dimerization with CaM dimers, we measured K355-M13 motility and found that it can be reversibly regulated in a Ca{sup 2+}-dependent manner. We also found that velocities of K355-M13 varied depending on the type and crosslink position of the CaM dimer used; crosslink length also had a moderate effect on motility. These results suggest Ca{sup 2+}-dependent dimerization of K355-M13 could be used as a novel molecular shuttle, equipped with an accelerator and brake system, for biochip applications.

  8. MILLISECOND PULSAR AGES: IMPLICATIONS OF BINARY EVOLUTION AND A MAXIMUM SPIN LIMIT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kiziltan, Buelent; Thorsett, Stephen E., E-mail: bulent@astro.ucsc.ed [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California and UCO/Lick Observatory, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States)

    2010-05-20

    In the absence of constraints from the binary companion or supernova remnant, the standard method for estimating pulsar ages is to infer an age from the rate of spin-down. While the generic spin-down age may give realistic estimates for normal pulsars, it can fail for pulsars with very short periods. Details of the spin-up process during the low-mass X-ray binary (LMXB) phase pose additional constraints on the period (P) and spin-down rates ( P-dot ) that may consequently affect the age estimate. Here, we propose a new recipe to estimate millisecond pulsar (MSP) ages that parametrically incorporates constraints arising from binary evolution and limiting physics. We show that the standard method can be improved by this approach to achieve age estimates closer to the true age while the standard spin-down age may overestimate or underestimate the age of the pulsar by more than a factor of {approx}10 in the millisecond regime. We use this approach to analyze the population on a broader scale. For instance, in order to understand the dominant energy loss mechanism after the onset of radio emission, we test for a range of plausible braking indices. We find that a braking index of n = 3 is consistent with the observed MSP population. We demonstrate the existence and quantify the potential contributions of two main sources of age corruption: the previously known 'age bias' due to secular acceleration and 'age contamination' driven by sub-Eddington progenitor accretion rates. We explicitly show that descendants of LMXBs that have accreted at very low rates ( m-dot << M-dot{sub Edd}) will exhibit ages that appear older than the age of the Galaxy. We further elaborate on this technique, the implications and potential solutions it offers regarding MSP evolution, the underlying age distribution, and the post-accretion energy loss mechanism.

  9. Performance and Emissions Characteristics of Bio-Diesel (B100)-Ignited Methane and Propane Combustion in a Four Cylinder Turbocharged Compression Ignition Engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shoemaker, N. T.; Gibson, C. M.; Polk, A. C.; Krishnan, S. R.; Srinivasan, K. K.

    2011-10-05

    Different combustion strategies and fuel sources are needed to deal with increasing fuel efficiency demands and emission restrictions. One possible strategy is dual fueling using readily available resources. Propane and natural gas are readily available with the current infrastructure and biodiesel is growing in popularity as a renewable fuel. This paper presents experimental results from dual fuel combustion of methane (as a surrogate for natural gas) and propane as primary fuels with biodiesel pilots in a 1.9 liter, turbocharged, 4 cylinder diesel engine at 1800 rev/min. Experiments were performed with different percentage energy substitutions (PES) of propane and methane and at different brake mean effective pressures (BMEP/bmep). Brake thermal efficiency (BTE) and emissions (NOx, HC, CO, CO2, O2 and smoke) were also measured. Maximum PES levels for B100-methane dual fuelling were limited to 70% at 2.5 bar bmep and 48% at 10 bar bmep, and corresponding values for B100-propane dual fuelling were 64% and 43%, respectively. Maximum PES was limited by misfire at 2.5 bar bmep and the onset of engine knock at 10 bar bmep. Dual fuel BTEs approached straight B100 values at 10 bar bmep while they were significantly lower than B100 values at 2.5 bar bmep. In general dual fuelling was beneficial in reducing NOx and smoke emissions by 33% and 50%, respectively from baseline B100 levels; however, both CO and THC emissions were significantly higher than baseline B100 levels at all PES and loads.

  10. Hybrid vehicle system studies and optimized hydrogen engine design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, J.R.; Aceves, S.

    1995-04-26

    We have done system studies of series hydrogen hybrid automobiles that approach the PNGV design goal of 34 km/liter (80 mpg), for 384 km (240 mi) and 608 km (380 mi) ranges. Our results indicate that such a vehicle appears feasible using an optimized hydrogen engine. We have evaluated the impact of various on-board storage options on fuel economy. Experiments in an available engine at the Sandia CRF demonstrated NO{sub x} emissions of 10 to 20 ppM at an equivalence ratio of 0.4, rising to about 500 ppm at 0.5 equivalence ratio using neat hydrogen. Hybrid simulation studies indicate that exhaust NO{sub x} concentrations must be less than 180 ppM to meet the 0.2 g/mile ULEV or Federal Tier II emissions regulations. LLNL has designed and fabricated a first generation optimized hydrogen engine head for use on an existing Onan engine. This head features 15:1 compression ratio, dual ignition, water cooling, two valves and open quiescent combustion chamber to minimize heat transfer losses. Initial testing shows promise of achieving an indicated efficiency of nearly 50% and emissions of less than 100 ppM NO{sub x}. Hydrocarbons and CO are to be measured, but are expected to be very low since their only source is engine lubricating oil. A successful friction reduction program on the Onan engine should result in a brake thermal efficiency of about 42% compared to today`s gasoline engines of 32%. Based on system studies requirements, the next generation engine will be about 2 liter displacement and is projected to achieve 46% brake thermal efficiency with outputs of 15 kW for cruise and 40 kW for hill climb.

  11. Advanced Natural Gas Reciprocating Engine(s)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pike, Edward

    2014-03-31

    The objective of the Cummins ARES program, in partnership with the US Department of Energy (DOE), is to develop advanced natural gas engine technologies that increase engine system efficiency at lower emissions levels while attaining lower cost of ownership. The goals of the project are to demonstrate engine system achieving 50% Brake Thermal Efficiency (BTE) in three phases, 44%, 47% and 50% (starting baseline efficiency at 36% BTE) and 0.1 g/bhp-hr NOx system out emissions (starting baseline NOx emissions at 2 – 4 g/bhp-hr NOx). Primary path towards above goals include high Brake Mean Effective Pressure (BMEP), improved closed cycle efficiency, increased air handling efficiency and optimized engine subsystems. Cummins has successfully demonstrated each of the phases of this program. All targets have been achieved through application of a combined set of advanced base engine technologies and Waste Heat Recovery from Charge Air and Exhaust streams, optimized and validated on the demonstration engine and other large engines. The following architectures were selected for each Phase: Phase 1: Lean Burn Spark Ignited (SI) Key Technologies: High Efficiency Turbocharging, Higher Efficiency Combustion System. In production on the 60/91L engines. Over 500MW of ARES Phase 1 technology has been sold. Phase 2: Lean Burn Technology with Exhaust Waste Heat Recovery (WHR) System Key Technologies: Advanced Ignition System, Combustion Improvement, Integrated Waste Heat Recovery System. Base engine technologies intended for production within 2 to 3 years Phase 3: Lean Burn Technology with Exhaust and Charge Air Waste Heat Recovery System Key Technologies: Lower Friction, New Cylinder Head Designs, Improved Integrated Waste Heat Recovery System. Intended for production within 5 to 6 years Cummins is committed to the launch of next generation of large advanced NG engines based on ARES technology to be commercialized worldwide.

  12. AB Levitator and Electricity Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander Bolonkin

    2007-03-01

    The author researched this new idea - support of flight by any aerial vehicles at significant altitude solely by the magnetic field of the planet. It is shown that current technology allows humans to create a light propulsion (AB engine) which does not depend on air, water or ground terrain. Simultaniosly, this revolutionary thruster is a device for the storage of electricity which is extracted and is replenished (during braking) from/into the storage with 100 percent efficiency. The relative weight ratio of this engine is 0.01 - 0.1 (from thrust). For some types of AB engine (toroidal form) the thrust easily may be changed in any direction without turning of engine. The author computed many projects using different versions of offered AB engine: small device for levitation-flight of a human (including flight from Earth to Outer Space), fly VTOL car (track), big VTOL aircrat, suspended low altitude stationary satellite, powerful Space Shuttle-like booster for travel to the Moon and Mars without spending energy (spended energy is replenished in braking when ship returns from other planet to its point of origin), using AB-devices in military, in sea-going ships (submarimes), in energy industry (for example. as small storage of electric energy) and so on. The vehicles equipped with AB propulsion can take flight for days and cover distances of tens thousands of kilometers at hypersonic or extra-atmosphere space speeds. The work contains tens of inventions and innovations which solves problems and breaks limitations which appear in solution of these very complex revolutionary ideas. Key word: AB levitator, levitation, non-rocket outer space flight, electric energy storage, AB propulsion, AB engine, Bolonkin.

  13. An Analysis of Energy Savings Possible Through Advances in Automotive Tooling Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rick Schmoyer, RLS

    2004-12-03

    The use of lightweight and highly formable advanced materials in automobile and truck manufacturing has the potential to save fuel. Advances in tooling technology would promote the use of these materials. This report describes an energy savings analysis performed to approximate the potential fuel savings and consequential carbon-emission reductions that would be possible because of advances in tooling in the manufacturing of, in particular, non-powertrain components of passenger cars and heavy trucks. Separate energy analyses are performed for cars and heavy trucks. Heavy trucks are considered to be Class 7 and 8 trucks (trucks rated over 26,000 lbs gross vehicle weight). A critical input to the analysis is a set of estimates of the percentage reductions in weight and drag that could be achieved by the implementation of advanced materials, as a consequence of improved tooling technology, which were obtained by surveying tooling industry experts who attended a DOE Workshop, Tooling Technology for Low-Volume Vehicle Production, held in Seattle and Detroit in October and November 2003. The analysis is also based on 2001 fuel consumption totals and on energy-audit component proportions of fuel use due to drag, rolling resistance, and braking. The consumption proportions are assumed constant over time, but an allowance is made for fleet growth. The savings for a particular component is then the product of total fuel consumption, the percentage reduction of the component, and the energy audit component proportion. Fuel savings estimates for trucks also account for weight-limited versus volume-limited operations. Energy savings are assumed to be of two types: (1) direct energy savings incurred through reduced forces that must be overcome to move the vehicle or to slow it down in braking. and (2) indirect energy savings through reductions in the required engine power, the production and transmission of which incur thermodynamic losses, internal friction, and other inefficiencies. Total savings for an energy use component are estimated by scaling up the direct savings with an approximate total-to-direct savings ratio. Market penetration for new technology vehicles is estimated from projections about scrappage. Retrofit savings are assumed negligible, but savings are also assumed to accrue with increases in the fleet size, based on economic growth forecasts. It is assumed that as vehicles in the current fleet are scrapped, they are replaced with advanced-technology vehicles. Saving estimates are based on proportions of new vehicles, rather than new-vehicle mileages. In practice, of course, scrapped vehicles are often replaced with used vehicles, and used vehicles are replaced with new vehicles. Because new vehicles are typically driven more than old, savings estimates based on count rather than mileage proportions tend to be biased down (i.e., conservative). Savings are expressed in terms of gallons of fuel saved, metric tons of CO2 emissions reductions, and percentages relative to 2001 levels of fuel and CO2. The sensitivity of the savings projections to inputs such as energy-audit proportions of fuel consumed for rolling resistance, drag, braking, etc. is assessed by considering different scenarios. Though based on many approximations, the estimates approximate the potential energy savings possible because of improvements in tooling. For heavy trucks, annual diesel savings of 2.4-6.8 percent, and cumulative savings on the order of 54-154 percent, of 2001 consumption could accrue by 2050. By 2050, annual gasoline savings of 2.8-12 percent, and cumulative savings on the order of 83-350 percent of 2001 consumption could accrue for cars.

  14. Hall-effect-controlled gas dynamics in protoplanetary disks. I. Wind solutions at the inner disk

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bai, Xue-Ning

    2014-08-20

    The gas dynamics of protoplanetary disks (PPDs) is largely controlled by non-ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) effects including Ohmic resistivity, the Hall effect, and ambipolar diffusion. Among these the role of the Hall effect is the least explored and most poorly understood. In this series, we have included, for the first time, all three non-ideal MHD effects in a self-consistent manner to investigate the role of the Hall effect on PPD gas dynamics using local shearing-box simulations. In this first paper, we focus on the inner region of PPDs, where previous studies (Bai and Stone 2013; Bai 2013) excluding the Hall effect have revealed that the inner disk up to ?10 AU is largely laminar, with accretion driven by a magnetocentrifugal wind. We confirm this basic picture and show that the Hall effect modifies the wind solutions depending on the polarity of the large-scale poloidal magnetic field B{sub 0} threading the disk. When B{sub 0}??>0, the horizontal magnetic field is strongly amplified toward the disk interior, leading to a stronger disk wind (by ?50% or less in terms of the wind-driven accretion rate). The enhanced horizontal field also leads to much stronger large-scale Maxwell stress (magnetic braking) that contributes to a considerable fraction of the wind-driven accretion rate. When B{sub 0}??<0, the horizontal magnetic field is reduced, leading to a weaker disk wind (by ? 20%) and negligible magnetic braking. Under fiducial parameters, we find that when B{sub 0}??>0, the laminar region extends farther to ?10-15 AU before the magnetorotational instability sets in, while for B{sub 0}??<0, the laminar region extends only to ?3-5 AU for a typical accretion rate of ?10{sup –8} to10{sup –7} M {sub ?} yr{sup –1}. Scaling relations for the wind properties, especially the wind-driven accretion rate, are provided for aligned and anti-aligned field geometries.

  15. Development of a new feed channel spacer for reverse osmosis elements. Phase 2 final report, October 1, 1994--December 31, 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Milstead, C.E.; Riley, R.L.

    1998-02-11

    During Phase 1, computer modeling techniques were used as the prime instrument of evaluation of designs for a new feed channel spacer to replace the 30 mil thick standard mesh (Vexar) spacer currently used in ROWPU [Reverse Osmosis Water Processing Unit] spiral-wound elements. A hemispherical peg model, based on a Bed of Nails concept developed in Phase 1, was selected for prototype production of spiral-wound elements for field testing. Evaluation in the See-Thru test cell to observe pressure drops through the spacer, feed mixing patterns and ease of cleaning fouled membrane samples showed considerable benefit over Vexar. This design would be suitable for production by roll embossing (or rotary punching) methods instead of expensive injection molding techniques. A 10{1/2} inch die set was fabricated to prove this concept using a 12 ton press brake. Due to a number of factors, however, the equipment did not work as anticipated and numerous modifications are currently in progress. This work will continue at no cost to the government until completed. A seawater test system has been constructed for field testing of various commercially available feed channel spacers for comparison with the Vexar spacer.

  16. Wind turbine having a direct-drive drivetrain

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bevington, Christopher M.; Bywaters, Garrett L.; Coleman, Clint C.; Costin, Daniel P.; Danforth, William L.; Lynch, Jonathan A.; Rolland, Robert H.

    2008-10-07

    A wind turbine (100) comprising an electrical generator (108) that includes a rotor assembly (112). A wind rotor (104) that includes a wind rotor hub (124) is directly coupled to the rotor assembly via a simplified connection. The wind rotor and generator rotor assembly are rotatably mounted on a central spindle (160) via a bearing assembly (180). The wind rotor hub includes an opening (244) having a diameter larger than the outside diameter of the central spindle adjacent the bearing assembly so as to allow access to the bearing assembly from a cavity (380) inside the wind rotor hub. The spindle is attached to a turret (140) supported by a tower (136). Each of the spindle, turret and tower has an interior cavity (172, 176, 368) that permits personnel to traverse therethrough to the cavity of the wind rotor hub. The wind turbine further includes a frictional braking system (276) for slowing, stopping or keeping stopped the rotation of the wind rotor and rotor assembly.

  17. Durability testing of a diesel fuel, methyl tallowate, and ethanol blend in a Cummins N14-410 diesel engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ali, Y.; Hanna, M.A. [Univ. of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE (United States)

    1996-05-01

    A Cummins N14-410 diesel engine was operated on an 80:13:7% (v/v) blend of diesel fuel: methyl tallowate: ethanol. The standard 200-h Engine Manufacturers Association (EMA) test procedure was followed to test engine durability. Engine performance was evaluated in terms of power produced at rated speed, peak torque produced at a speed of 1200 rpm, and brake specific fuel consumption at both speeds. Engine exhaust emissions analyses were performed, and the engine oil was analyzed for accumulation of heavy metals at 45 h intervals. It was observed that engine performance was satisfactory for 148 h at which time the injector in cylinder 2 failed. The injector was changed, and after an additional 11 h (159 h total) of operation the injector in cylinder 5 failed. That injector was also replaced, and the 200-h procedure was continued. The test was discontinued after 197 h when the supply of the fuel blend was exhausted. The injectors were removed and the injector in cylinder 1 was observed to be coked. This injector was sent to the Cummins Engine Co. for analysis. It was found that failure of this injector was not because of the fuel used, but because of a crack had developed across the tip due to an excessively tight overhead adjustment. Engine oil analyses performed for accumulation of wear metals did not reveal any excessive wear on the engine parts. 12 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  18. A spinning mirror for fast angular scans of EBW emission for magnetic pitch profile measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Volpe, Francesco [Department of Engineering Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States)

    2010-10-15

    A tilted spinning mirror rapidly steers the line of sight of the electron Bernstein wave (EBW) emission radiometer at the Mega-Amp Spherical Tokamak (MAST). In order to resist high mechanical stresses at rotation speeds of up to 12 000 rpm and to avoid eddy current induced magnetic braking, the mirror consists of a glass-reinforced nylon substrate of a special self-balanced design, coated with a reflecting layer. By completing an angular scan every 2.5-10 ms, it allows one to characterize with good time resolution the Bernstein-extraordinary-ordinary mode-conversion efficiency as a function of the view angles. Angular maps of conversion efficiency are directly related to the magnetic pitch angle at the cutoff layer for the ordinary mode. Hence, measurements at various frequencies provide the safety factor profile at the plasma edge. Initial measurements and indications of the feasibility of the diagnostic are presented. Moreover, angular scans indicate the best launch conditions for EBW heating.

  19. Gearbox Reliability Collaborative Phase 3 Gearbox 2 Test Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Link, H.; Keller, J.; Guo, Y.; McNiff, B.

    2013-04-01

    Gearboxes in wind turbines have not been achieving their expected design life even though they commonly meet or exceed the design criteria specified in current design standards. One of the basic premises of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Gearbox Reliability Collaborative (GRC) is that the low gearbox reliability results from the absence of critical elements in the design process or insufficient design tools. Key goals of the GRC are to improve design approaches and analysis tools and to recommend practices and test methods resulting in improved design standards for wind turbine gearboxes that lower the cost of energy (COE) through improved reliability. The GRC uses a combined gearbox testing, modeling and analysis approach, along with a database of information from gearbox failures collected from overhauls and investigation of gearbox condition monitoring techniques to improve wind turbine operations and maintenance practices. Testing of Gearbox 2 (GB2) using the two-speed turbine controller that has been used in prior testing. This test series will investigate non-torque loads, high-speed shaft misalignment, and reproduction of field conditions in the dynamometer. This test series will also include vibration testing using an eddy-current brake on the gearbox's high speed shaft.

  20. Field Operations Program Activities Status Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. E. Francfort; D. V. O'Hara; L. A. Slezak

    1999-05-01

    The Field Operations Program is an electric vehicle testing and evaluation program sponsored by US Department of Energy and managed by the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. The Program's goals are to evaluate electric vehicles in real-world applications and environments, support electric vehicle technology advancement, develop infrastructure elements necessary to support significant electric vehicle use, support increased use of electric vehicles in federal fleets, and increase overall awareness and acceptance of electric vehicles. This report covers Program activities from fiscal year 1997 through mid-fiscal year 1999. The Field Operations Program succeeded the Site Operator Program, which ended in September 1996. Electric vehicle testing conducted by the Program includes baseline performance testing (EV America testing), accelerated reliability (life-cycle) testing, and fleet testing. The baseline performance parameters include accelerations, braking, range, energy efficiency, and charging time. The Program collects accelerated reliability and fleet operations data on electric vehicles operated by the Program's Qualified Vehicle Testing (QVT) partners. The Program's QVT partners have over 3 million miles of electric vehicle operating experience.

  1. Site operator program final report for fiscal years 1992 through 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Francfort, J.E.; Bassett, R.R.; Birasco, S.

    1998-01-01

    The Site Operator Program was an electric vehicle testing and evaluation program sponsored by US Department of Energy and managed at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. The Program`s goals included the field evaluation of electric vehicles in real-world applications and environments; the support of electric vehicle technology advancement; the development of infrastructure elements necessary to support significant electric vehicle use; and increasing the awareness and acceptance of electric vehicles. This report covers Program activities from 1992 to 1996. The Site Operator Program ended in September 1996, when it was superseded by the Field Operations Program. Electric vehicle testing included baseline performance testing, which was performed in conjunction with EV America. The baseline performance parameters included acceleration, braking, range, energy efficiency, and charging time. The Program collected fleet operations data on electric vehicles operated by the Program`s thirteen partners, comprising electric utilities, universities, and federal agencies. The Program`s partners had over 250 electric vehicles, from vehicle converters and original equipment manufacturers, in their operating fleets. Test results are available via the World Wide Web site at http://ev.inel.gov/sop.

  2. THE MAGNETIC FIELD IN THE CLASS 0 PROTOSTELLAR DISK OF L1527

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Segura-Cox, Dominique M.; Looney, Leslie W.; Stephens, Ian W.; Fernández-López, Manuel; Crutcher, Richard; Kwon, Woojin; Tobin, John J.; Li, Zhi-Yun

    2015-01-01

    We present subarcsecond (?0.''35) resolved observations of the 1.3 mm dust polarization from the edge-on circumstellar disk around the Class 0 protostar L1527. The inferred magnetic field is consistent with a dominantly toroidal morphology; there is no significantly detected vertical poloidal component to which observations of an edge-on disk are most sensitive. This suggests that angular momentum transport in Class 0 protostars (when large amounts of material are fed down to the disk from the envelope and accreted onto the protostar) is driven mainly by magnetorotational instability rather than magnetocentrifugal winds at 50 AU scales. In addition, with the data to date there is an early, tentative trend that R > 30 AU disks have so far been found in Class 0 systems with average magnetic fields on the 1000 AU scale strongly misaligned with the rotation axis. The absence of such a disk in the aligned case could be due to efficient magnetic braking that disrupts disk formation. If this is the case, this implies that candidate Class 0 disk systems could be identified by the average magnetic field direction at ?1000 AU spatial scales.

  3. TIME-DEPENDENT NONEXTENSIVITY ARISING FROM THE ROTATIONAL EVOLUTION OF SOLAR-TYPE STARS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Silva, J. R. P.; Nepomuceno, M. M. F.; Soares, B. B.; De Freitas, D. B., E-mail: joseronaldo@uern.br [Departamento de Física, Universidade do Estado do Rio Grande do Norte, Mossoró-RN (Brazil)

    2013-11-01

    Nonextensive formalism is a generalization of the Boltzmann-Gibbs statistics. In this formalism, the entropic index q is a quantity characterizing the degree of nonextensivity and is interpreted as a parameter of long-memory or long-range interactions between the components of the system. Since its proposition in 1988, this formalism has been applied to investigate a wide variety of natural phenomena. In stellar astrophysics, a theoretical distribution function based on nonextensive formalism (q distributions) has been successfully applied to reproduce the distribution of stellar radial and rotational velocity data. In this paper, we investigate the time variation of the entropic index q obtained from the distribution of rotation, Vsin i, for a sample of 254 rotational data for solar-type stars from 11 open clusters aged between 35.5 Myr and 2.6 Gyr. As a result, we have found an anti-correlation between the entropic index q and the age of clusters, and that the distribution of rotation Vsin i for these stars becomes extensive for an age greater than about 170 Myr. Assuming that the parameter q is associated with long-memory effects, we suggest that the memory of the initial angular momentum of solar-type stars can be scaled by the entropic index q. We also propose a physical link between the parameter q and the magnetic braking of stellar rotation.

  4. Effectiveness of Diesel Oxidation Catalyst in Reducing HC and CO Emissions from Reactivity Controlled Compression Ignition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prikhodko, Vitaly Y; Curran, Scott; Parks, II, James E; Wagner, Robert M

    2013-01-01

    Reactivity Controlled Compression Ignition (RCCI) has been shown to allow for diesel-like or better brake thermal efficiency with significant reductions in nitrogen oxide (NOX) particulate matter (PM) emissions. Hydrocarbon (HC) and carbon monoxide (CO) emission levels, on the other hand, are similar to those of port fuel injected gasoline engines. The higher HC and CO emissions combined with the lower exhaust temperatures with RCCI operation present a challenge for current exhaust aftertreatments. The reduction of HC and CO emissions in a lean environment is typically achieved with an oxidation catalyst. In this work, several diesel oxidation catalysts (DOC) with different precious metal loadings were evaluated for effectiveness to control HC and CO emissions from RCCI combustion in a light-duty multi-cylinder engine operating on gasoline and diesel fuels. Each catalyst was evaluated in a steady-state engine operation with temperatures ranging from 160 to 260 C. A shift to a higher light-off temperature was observed during the RCCI operation. In addition to the steady-state experiments, the performances of the DOCs were evaluated during multi-mode engine operation by switching from diesel-like combustion at higher exhaust temperature and low HC/CO emissions to RCCI combustion at lower temperature and higher HC/CO emissions. High CO and HC emissions from RCCI generated an exotherm keeping the catalyst above the light-off temperature.

  5. Light-Duty Drive Cycle Simulations of Diesel Engine-Out Exhaust Properties for an RCCI-Enabled Vehicle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gao, Zhiming; Curran, Scott; Daw, C Stuart; Wagner, Robert M

    2013-01-01

    In-cylinder blending of gasoline and diesel fuels to achieve low-temperature reactivity controlled compression ignition (RCCI) can reduce NOx and PM emissions while maintaining or improving brake thermal efficiency compared to conventional diesel combustion (CDC). Moreover, the dual-fueling RCCI is able to achieve these benefits by tailoring combustion reactivity over a wider range of engine operation than is possible with a single fuel. However, the currently demonstrated range of stable RCCI combustion just covers a portion of the engine speed-load range required in several light-duty drive cycles. This means that engines must switch from RCCI to CDC when speed and load fall outside of the stable RCCI range. In this study we investigated the impact of RCCI as it has recently been demonstrated on practical engine-out exhaust temperature and emissions by simulating a multi-mode RCCI-enabled vehicle operating over two urban and two highway driving cycles. To implement our simulations, we employed experimental engine maps for a multi-mode RCCI/CDC engine combined with a standard mid-size, automatic transmission, passenger vehicle in the Autonomie vehicle simulation platform. Our results include both detailed transient and cycle-averaged engine exhaust temperature and emissions for each case, and we note the potential implications of the modified exhaust properties on catalytic emissions control and utilization of waste heat recovery on future RCCI-enabled vehicles.

  6. Cosmic-ray propagation at small scale: a support for protostellar disc formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Padovani, Marco; Hennebelle, Patrick; Commercon, Benoît; Joos, Marc

    2015-01-01

    As long as magnetic fields remain frozen into the gas, the magnetic braking prevents the formation of protostellar discs. This condition is subordinate to the ionisation fraction characterising the inmost parts of a collapsing cloud. The ionisation level is established by the number and the energy of the cosmic rays able to reach these regions. Adopting the method developed in our previous studies, we computed how cosmic rays are attenuated as a function of column density and magnetic field strength. We applied our formalism to low- and high-mass star formation models obtained by numerical simulations of gravitational collapse that include rotation and turbulence. In general, we found that the decoupling between gas and magnetic fields, condition allowing the collapse to go ahead, occurs only when the cosmic-ray attenuation is taken into account with respect to a calculation in which the cosmic-ray ionisation rate is kept constant. We also found that the extent of the decoupling zone also depends on the dust ...

  7. Northeast Regional Biomass Program first and second quarter reports, October 1, 1994--March 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-07-01

    The Northeast states face several near-term barriers to the expanded use of biomass energy. Informational and technical barriers have impeded industrial conversions, delaying the development of a wood energy supply infrastructure. Concern over the environmental impacts on resources are not well understood. Public awareness and concern about safety issues surrounding wood energy use has also grown to the point of applying a brake to the trend of increases in residential applications of biomass energy. In addition, many residential commercial, industrial, and commercial energy users are discouraged from using biomass energy because of the convenience factor. Regardless of the potential for cost savings, biomass energy sources, aside from being perceived as more esoteric, are also viewed as more work for the user. The Northeast Regional biomass Program (NRBP) is designed to help the eleven Northeastern states overcome these obstacles and achieve their biomass energy potentials. The objective of this program in the current and future years is to increase the role of biomass fuels in the region`s energy mix by providing the impetus for states and the private sector to develop a viable Northeast biomass fuels market. This paper contains a management report, state program summaries, technical project status report, and technology transfer activities.

  8. Northeast regional biomass program. Second & third quarterly reports, October 1, 1995--March 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-07-01

    The Northeast Regional Biomass Program (NRBP) is comprised of the following states: Connecticut. Delaware, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island and Vermont. It is managed for the Department of Energy (DOE) by the CONEG Policy Research Center, Inc. The Northeast states face several near-term barriers to the expanded use of biomass energy. Informational and technical barriers have impeded industrial conversions, delaying the development of a wood energy supply infrastructure. Concern over the environmental impacts on resources are not well understood. Public awareness and concern about safety issues surrounding wood energy use has also grown to the point of applying a brake to the trend of increases in residential applications of biomass energy. In addition, many residential, industrial, and commercial energy users are discouraged from using biomass energy because of the convenience factor. Regardless of the potential for cost savings, biomass energy sources, aside from being perceived as more esoteric, are also viewed as more work for the user. The Northeast Regional Biomass Program (NRBP) is designed to help the eleven Northeastern states overcome these obstacles and achieve their biomass energy potentials. The objective of this program in the current and future years is to increase the role of biomass fuels in the region`s energy mix by providing the impetus for states and the private sector to develop a viable Northeast biomass fuels market.

  9. Northeast regional biomass program: Second and Third quarterlies and final report, January 1994--September 30, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-07-01

    The Northeast Regional Biomass Program (NRBP) is comprised of the following states: Connecticut, Delaware, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania. Rhode Island and Vermont. It is managed for the Department of Energy (DOE) by the CONEG Policy Research Center, Inc. The Northeast states face several near-term barriers to the expanded use of biomass energy. Informational and technical barriers have impeded industrial conversions, delaying the development of a wood energy supply infrastructure. Concern over the environmental impacts on resources are not well understood. Public awareness and concern about safety issues surrounding wood energy use has also grown to the point of applying a brake to the trend of increases in residential applications of biomass energy. In addition, many residential, commercial, industrial, and commercial energy users are discouraged from using biomass energy because of the convenience factor. Regardless of the potential for cost savings, biomass energy sources, aside from being perceived as more esoteric, are also viewed as more work for the user. The Northeast Regional Biomass Program (NRBP) is designed to help the eleven states overcome obstacles and achieve biomass energy potentials.

  10. Electric vehicle climate control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dauvergne, J.

    1994-04-01

    EVs have insufficient energy sources for a climatic comfort system. The heat rejection of the drivetrain is dispersed in the vehicle (electric motor, batteries, electronic unit for power control). Its level is generally low (no more than 2-kW peaks) and variable according to the trip profile, with no heat rejection at rest and a maximum during regenerative braking. Nevertheless, it must be used for heating. It is not realistic to have the A/C compressor driven by the electric traction motor: the motor does not operate when the vehicle is at rest, precisely when maximum cooling power is required. The same is true for hybrid vehicles during electric operation. It is necessary to develop solutions that use stored onboard energy either from the traction batteries or specific storage source. In either case, it is necessary to design the climate control system to use the energy efficiently to maximize range and save weight. Heat loss through passenger compartment seals and the walls of the passenger compartment must be limited. Plastic body panes help to reduce heat transfer, and heat gain is minimized with insulating glazing. This article describes technical solutions to solve the problem of passenger thermal comfort. However, the heating and A/C systems of electrically operated vehicles may have marginal performance at extreme outside temperatures.

  11. From solar to stellar corona: the role of wind, rotation and magnetism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Réville, Victor; Strugarek, Antoine; Matt, Sean P; Bouvier, Jérôme; Folsom, Colin P; Petit, Pascal

    2015-01-01

    Observations of surface magnetic fields are now within reach for many stellar types thanks to the development of Zeeman-Doppler Imaging. These observations are extremely useful for constraining rotational evolution models of stars, as well as for characterizing the generation of magnetic field. We recently demonstrated that the impact of coronal magnetic field topology on the rotational braking of a star can be parametrized with a scalar parameter: the open magnetic flux. However, without running costly numerical simulations of the stellar wind, reconstructing the coronal structure of the large scale magnetic field is not trivial. An alternative -broadly used in solar physics- is to extrapolate the surface magnetic field assuming a potential field in the corona, to describe the opening of the field lines by the magnetized wind. This technique relies on the definition of a so-called source surface radius, which is often fixed to the canonical value of 2.5Rsun. However this value likely varies from star to star...

  12. An Optimization Model for Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malikopoulos, Andreas [ORNL] [ORNL; Smith, David E [ORNL] [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    The necessity for environmentally conscious vehicle designs in conjunction with increasing concerns regarding U.S. dependency on foreign oil and climate change have induced significant investment towards enhancing the propulsion portfolio with new technologies. More recently, plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) have held great intuitive appeal and have attracted considerable attention. PHEVs have the potential to reduce petroleum consumption and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in the commercial transportation sector. They are especially appealing in situations where daily commuting is within a small amount of miles with excessive stop-and-go driving. The research effort outlined in this paper aims to investigate the implications of motor/generator and battery size on fuel economy and GHG emissions in a medium-duty PHEV. An optimization framework is developed and applied to two different parallel powertrain configurations, e.g., pre-transmission and post-transmission, to derive the optimal design with respect to motor/generator and battery size. A comparison between the conventional and PHEV configurations with equivalent size and performance under the same driving conditions is conducted, thus allowing an assessment of the fuel economy and GHG emissions potential improvement. The post-transmission parallel configuration yields higher fuel economy and less GHG emissions compared to pre-transmission configuration partly attributable to the enhanced regenerative braking efficiency.

  13. Investigating the low-temperature impedance increase of lithium-ion cells.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abraham, D. P.; Heaton, J. R.; Kang, S.-H.; Dees, D. W.; Jansen, A. N.; Chemical Engineering

    2008-01-01

    Low-temperature performance loss is a significant barrier to commercialization of lithium-ion cells in hybrid electric vehicles. Increased impedance, especially at temperatures below 0 C, reduces the cell pulse power performance required for cold engine starts, quick acceleration, or regenerative braking. Here we detail electrochemical impedance spectroscopy data on binder- and carbon-free layered-oxide and spinel-oxide electrodes, obtained over the +30 to ?30 C temperature range, in coin cells containing a lithium-preloaded Li{sub 4/3}Ti{sub 5/3}O{sub 4} composite (LTOc) counter electrode and a LiPF{sub 6}-bearing ethylene carbonate/ethyl methyl carbonate electrolyte. For all electrodes studied, the impedance increased with decreasing cell temperature; the increases observed in the midfrequency arc dwarfed the increases in ohmic resistance and diffusional impedance. Our data suggest that the movement of lithium ions across the electrochemical interface on the active material may have been increasingly hindered at lower temperatures, especially below 0 C. Low-temperature performance may be improved by modifying the electrolyte-active material interface (for example, through electrolyte composition changes). Increasing surface area of active particles (for example, through nanoparticle use) can lower the initial electrode impedance and lead to lower cell impedances at -30 C.

  14. Turbulent drag reduction through oscillating discs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wise, Daniel J

    2014-01-01

    The changes of a turbulent channel flow subjected to oscillations of wall flush-mounted rigid discs are studied by means of direct numerical simulations. The Reynolds number is $R_\\tau$=$180$, based on the friction velocity of the stationary-wall case and the half channel height. The primary effect of the wall forcing is the sustained reduction of wall-shear stress, which reaches a maximum of 20%. A parametric study on the disc diameter, maximum tip velocity, and oscillation period is presented, with the aim to identify the optimal parameters which guarantee maximum drag reduction and maximum net energy saving, computed by taking into account the power spent to actuate the discs. This may be positive and reaches 6%. The Rosenblat viscous pump flow is used to predict the power spent for disc motion in the turbulent channel flow and to estimate localized and transient regions over the disc surface subjected to the turbulent regenerative braking effect, for which the wall turbulence exerts work on the discs. The...

  15. Nuclear-Powered Millisecond Pulsars and the Maximum Spin Frequency of Neutron Stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deepto Chakrabarty; Edward H. Morgan; Michael P. Muno; Duncan K. Galloway; Rudy Wijnands; Michiel van der Klis; Craig B. Markwardt

    2003-07-01

    Millisecond pulsars are neutron stars (NSs) that are thought to have been spun-up by mass accretion from a stellar companion. It is unknown whether there is a natural brake for this process, or if it continues until the centrifugal breakup limit is reached at submillisecond periods. Many NSs that are accreting from a companion exhibit thermonuclear X-ray bursts that last tens of seconds, caused by unstable nuclear burning on their surfaces. Millisecond brightness oscillations during bursts from ten NSs (as distinct from other rapid X-ray variability that is also observed) are thought to measure the stellar spin, but direct proof of a rotational origin has been lacking. Here, we report the detection of burst oscillations at the known spin frequency of an accreting millisecond pulsar, and we show that these oscillations always have the same rotational phase. This firmly establishes burst oscillations as nuclear-powered pulsations tracing the spin of accreting NSs, corroborating earlier evidence. The distribution of spin frequencies of the 11 nuclear-powered pulsars cuts off well below the breakup frequency for most NS models, supporting theoretical predictions that gravitational radiation losses can limit accretion torques in spinning up millisecond pulsars.

  16. Nuclear-Powered Millisecond Pulsars and the Maximum Spin Frequency of Neutron Stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chakraborty, D; Muno, M P; Galloway, D K; Wijnands, R; Van der Klis, M; Markwardt, C B; Chakrabarty, Deepto; Morgan, Edward H.; Muno, Michael P.; Galloway, Duncan K.; Wijnands, Rudy; Klis, Michiel van der; Markwardt, Craig B.

    2003-01-01

    Millisecond pulsars are neutron stars (NSs) that are thought to have been spun-up by mass accretion from a stellar companion. It is unknown whether there is a natural brake for this process, or if it continues until the centrifugal breakup limit is reached at submillisecond periods. Many NSs that are accreting from a companion exhibit thermonuclear X-ray bursts that last tens of seconds, caused by unstable nuclear burning on their surfaces. Millisecond brightness oscillations during bursts from ten NSs (as distinct from other rapid X-ray variability that is also observed) are thought to measure the stellar spin, but direct proof of a rotational origin has been lacking. Here, we report the detection of burst oscillations at the known spin frequency of an accreting millisecond pulsar, and we show that these oscillations always have the same rotational phase. This firmly establishes burst oscillations as nuclear-powered pulsations tracing the spin of accreting NSs, corroborating earlier evidence. The distributio...

  17. Accounting for the Variation of Driver Aggression in the Simulation of Conventional and Advanced Vehicles (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neubauer, J.; Wood, E.

    2013-05-01

    This presentation discusses a method of accounting for realistic levels of driver aggression to higher-level vehicle studies, including the impact of variation in real-world driving characteristics (acceleration and speed) on vehicle energy consumption and different powertrains (e.g., conventionally powered vehicles versus electrified drive vehicles [xEVs]). Aggression variation between drivers can increase fuel consumption by more than 50% or decrease it by more than 20% from average. The normalized fuel consumption deviation from average as a function of population percentile was found to be largely insensitive to powertrain. However, the traits of ideal driving behavior are a function of powertrain. In conventional vehicles, kinetic losses dominate rolling resistance and aerodynamic losses. In xEVs with regenerative braking, rolling resistance and aerodynamic losses dominate. The relation of fuel consumption predicted from real-world drive data to that predicted by the industry-standard HWFET, UDDS, LA92, and US06 drive cycles was not consistent across powertrains, and varied broadly from the mean, median, and mode of real-world driving. A drive cycle synthesized by NREL's DRIVE tool accurately and consistently reproduces average real-world for multiple powertrains within 1%, and can be used to calculate the fuel consumption effects of varying levels of driver aggression.

  18. Influence of the chemical surface structure on the nanoscale friction in plasma nitrided and post-oxidized ferrous alloy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freislebem, Márcia; Menezes, Caren M.; Cemin, Felipe; Costi, Fernanda B.; Ferreira, Patrícia A.; Aguzzoli, César; Baumvol, Israel J. R.; Alvarez, Fernando; Figueroa, Carlos A.

    2014-09-15

    Friction is a ubiquitous phenomenon in everyday activities spanning from vehicles where efficient brakes are mandatory up to mechanical devices where its minimum effects are pursued for energy efficiency issues. Recently, theoretical models succeed correlating the friction behavior with energy transference via phonons between sliding surfaces. Therefore, considering that the energy losses by friction are prompted through phonons, the chemical surface structure between sliding surfaces is very important to determine the friction phenomenon. In this work, we address the issue of friction between a conical diamond tip sliding on different functionalized flat steel surfaces by focusing the influence of the chemical bonds in the outermost layers on the sliding resistance. This geometry allows probing the coupling of the sharp tip with terminator species on the top and underneath material surface at in-depth friction measurements from 20 to 200?nm. Experimentally, the friction coefficient decreases when nitrogen atoms are substituted for oxygen in the iron network. This effect is interpreted as due to energy losses through phonons whilst lower vibrational frequency excitation modes imply lower friction coefficients and a more accurate adjustment is obtained when a theoretical model with longitudinal adsorbate vibration is used.

  19. Wireless Transfer of Electricity in Outer Space

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander Bolonkin

    2008-05-07

    Author offers conclusions from his research of a revolutionary new idea - transferring electric energy in the hard vacuum of outer space wirelessly, using a plasma power cord as an electric cable (wire). He shows that a certain minimal electric currency creates a compressed force that supports the plasma cable in the compacted form. A large energy can be transferred hundreds of millions of kilometers by this method. The required mass of the plasma cable is only hundreds of grams. He computed the macroprojects: transference of hundreds kilowatts of energy to Earth Space Station, transferring energy to the Moon or back, transferring energy to a spaceship at distance 100 million of kilometers, the transfer energy to Mars when one is located at opposed side of the distant Sun, transfer colossal energy from one of Earth's continents to another continent (for example, between Europe-USA) wirelessly-using Earth ionosphere as cable, using Earth as gigantic storage of electric energy, using the plasma ring as huge MagSail for moving of spaceships. He also demonstrates that electric currency in a plasma cord can accelerate or brake spacecraft and space apparatus.

  20. A Circumbinary Planet in Orbit Around the Short-Period White-Dwarf Eclipsing Binary RR Cae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qian, S -B; Zhu, L -Y; Dai, Z -B; Lajus, E Fernandez; Baume, G L

    2012-01-01

    By using six new determined mid-eclipse times together with those collected from the literature, we found that the Observed-Calculated (O-C) curve of RR Cae shows a cyclic change with a period of 11.9 years and an amplitude of 14.3s, while it undergoes an upward parabolic variation (revealing a long-term period increase at a rate of dP/dt =+4.18(+-0.20)x10^(-12). The cyclic change was analyzed for the light-travel time effect that arises from the gravitational influence of a third companion. The mass of the third body was determined to be M_3*sin i' = 4.2(+-0.4) M_{Jup} suggesting that it is a circumbinary giant planet when its orbital inclination is larger than 17.6 degree. The orbital separation of the circumbinary planet from the central eclipsing binary is about 5.3(+-0.6)AU. The period increase is opposite to the changes caused by angular momentum loss via magnetic braking or/and gravitational radiation, nor can it be explained by the mass transfer between both components because of its detached configur...

  1. Positioning system for the LCLS undulator.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trakhenberg, E. M.

    2002-09-12

    The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) Project includes the undulator subsystem that has 33 undulator magnetic structures each 3.4 m long. Positioning of the LCLS undulators along the undulator line with an accuracy of 50 {micro}m in the vertical transverse direction is required. A prototype of the LCLS undulator has been built with a positioning system based on three stages with cam shafts. Each cam shaft produces reciprocating motion with a range of {+-}3 mm. A servomotor with integrated brake, incremental rotary encoder, servo amplifier, and controller is used with a 100:1 ratio gear box to drive each cam shaft. Resolution of the motion control is about 0.05 {micro}m. SmartMotors are connected in parallel through an RS-485 interface to the serial port of the computer. With this approach, the control system is easily expandable; up to 120 motors can be controlled with one serial port. Positioning accuracy of about 10 {micro}m for the LCLS undulator prototype is demonstrated.

  2. 3XMM J185246.6+003317: ANOTHER LOW MAGNETIC FIELD MAGNETAR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rea, N.; Viganò, D.; Torres, D. F. [Institute of Space Sciences (CSIC-IEEC), Campus UAB, Torre C5, 2a planta, E-08193 Barcelona (Spain); Israel, G. L. [INAF-Astronomical Observatory of Rome, via Frascati 33, I-00040, Monte Porzio Catone, Roma (Italy); Pons, J. A. [Departament de Fisica Aplicada, Universitat d'Alacant, Ap. Correus 99, E-03080 Alacant (Spain)

    2014-01-20

    We study the outburst of the newly discovered X-ray transient 3XMM J185246.6+003317, re-analyzing all available XMM-Newton observations of the source to perform a phase-coherent timing analysis, and derive updated values of the period and period derivative. We find the source rotating at P = 11.55871346(6) s (90% confidence level; at epoch MJD 54728.7) but no evidence for a period derivative in the seven months of outburst decay spanned by the observations. This translates to a 3? upper limit for the period derivative of P-dot <1.4×10{sup ?13} s s{sup –1}, which, assuming the classical magneto-dipolar braking model, gives a limit on the dipolar magnetic field of B {sub dip} < 4.1 × 10{sup 13} G. The X-ray outburst and spectral characteristics of 3XMM J185246.6+003317 confirm its identification as a magnetar, but the magnetic field upper limit we derive defines it as the third ''low-B'' magnetar discovered in the past 3 yr, after SGR 0418+5729 and Swift J1822.3–1606. We have also obtained an upper limit to the quiescent luminosity (<4 × 10{sup 33} erg s{sup –1}), in line with the expectations for an old magnetar. The discovery of this new low field magnetar reaffirms the prediction of about one outburst per year from the hidden population of aged magnetars.

  3. The dependence of stellar mass and angular momentum losses on latitude and on active region and dipolar magnetic fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garraffo, Cecilia; Cohen, Ofer

    2015-01-01

    Rotation evolution of late-type stars is dominated by magnetic braking and the underlying factors that control this angular momentum loss are important for the study of stellar spin-down. In this work, we study angular momentum loss as a function of two different aspects of magnetic activity using a calibrated Alfv\\'en wave-driven magnetohydrodynamic wind model: the strengths of magnetic spots and their distribution in latitude. By driving the model using solar and modified solar surface magnetograms, we show that the topology of the field arising from the net interaction of both small-scale and large-scale field is important for spin-down rates and that angular momentum loss is not a simple function of large scale magnetic field strength. We find that changing the latitude of magnetic spots can modify mass and angular momentum loss rates by a factor of two. The general effect that causes these differences is the closing down of large-scale open field at mid- and high-latitudes by the addition of the small-sc...

  4. Advanced Aerodynamic Devices to Improve the Performance, Economics, Handling, and Safety of Heavy Vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert J. Englar

    2001-05-14

    Research is being conducted at the Georgia Tech Research Institute (GTRI) to develop advanced aerodynamic devices to improve the performance, economics, stability, handling and safety of operation of Heavy Vehicles by using previously-developed and flight-tested pneumatic (blown) aircraft technology. Recent wind-tunnel investigations of a generic Heavy Vehicle model with blowing slots on both the leading and trailing edges of the trailer have been conducted under contract to the DOE Office of Heavy Vehicle Technologies. These experimental results show overall aerodynamic drag reductions on the Pneumatic Heavy Vehicle of 50% using only 1 psig blowing pressure in the plenums, and over 80% drag reductions if additional blowing air were available. Additionally, an increase in drag force for braking was confirmed by blowing different slots. Lift coefficient was increased for rolling resistance reduction by blowing only the top slot, while downforce was produced for traction increase by blowing only the bottom. Also, side force and yawing moment were generated on either side of the vehicle, and directional stability was restored by blowing the appropriate side slot. These experimental results and the predicted full-scale payoffs are presented in this paper, as is a discussion of additional applications to conventional commercial autos, buses, motor homes, and Sport Utility Vehicles.

  5. Hydromechanical transmission with compound planetary assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Orshansky, Jr., deceased, Elias (late of San Francisco, CA); Weseloh, William E. (San Diego, CA)

    1980-01-01

    A power transmission having three distinct ranges: (1) hydrostatic, (2) simple power-split hydromechanical, and (3) compound power-split hydromechanical. A single compound planetary assembly has two sun gears, two ring gears, and a single carrier with two sets of elongated planet gears. The two sun gears may be identical in size, and the two ring gears may be identical in size. A speed-varying module in driving relationship to the first sun gear is clutchable, in turn, to (1) the input shaft and (2) the second sun gear. The speed-varying means may comprise a pair of hydraulic units hydraulically interconnected so that one serves as a pump while the other serves as a motor and vice versa, one of the units having a variable stroke and being the one clutchable to either the input shaft or to the second sun gear. The other unit, which may have a fixed stroke, is connected in driving relation to the first sun gear. A brake grounds the carrier in the first range and in reverse and causes drive to be delivered to the output shaft through the first ring gear in a hydrostatic mode, the first ring gear being rigidly connected to the output shaft. The input shaft is also clutchable to the second ring gear of the compound planetary assembly.

  6. Transmission with a first-stage hydrostatic mode and two hydromechanical stages

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Orshansky, Jr., deceased, Elias (late of San Fransisco, CA); Weseloh, William E. (San Diego, CA)

    1981-01-01

    A power transmission having two planetary assemblies, each having at least one carrier with planet gears, at least one sun gear, and at least one ring gear. A speed-varying module is connected in driving relation to the input shaft and in driving relationship to the sun gear or gears of the first planetary assembly. The speed-varying means may comprise a pair of hydraulic units hydraulically interconnected so that one serves as a pump while the other serves as a motor and vice versa, one of the units having a variable stroke and being connected in driving relation to the input shaft, the other unit, which may have a fixed stroke, being connected in driving relation to the sun gear. The input shaft is also connected directly to a sun gear of the second planetary assembly and is further connectable by a clutch to a carrier of the first planetary assembly. Another clutch enables connecting the carrier of the first planetary assembly to a ring gear of the second planetary assembly. A brake grounds the first carrier in the first range and in reverse and causes drive to be delivered to the output through a ring gear of the first planetary assembly in a hydrostatic mode. The carrier of the second planetary assembly is connected in rigid driving relationship to that first ring gear, and in all ranges these two elements transmit the drive to the output shaft.

  7. Health-hazard evaluation report HETA 87-392-2099, Loral Systems Group, Akron, Ohio

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-02-01

    In response to a request from the International Union, United Automobile, Aerospace and Agricultural Implement Workers of America (UAW), an evaluation was undertaken of possible health hazards at the Loral Systems Group (SIC-3728) located in Akron, Ohio. Concern was voiced about possible asbestos (1332214) exposure. The company produces wheels and brakes for civilian and military aircraft and currently employs about 1560 persons at the Akron facility. At the time of the study there were about 2300 living retirees. The precise number who had worked in one of the four areas of particular interest was unkown. Of the 166 persons found eligible for inclusion in the health hazard evaluation (15 or more years of potential asbestos exposure in at least one of the four identified programs and still residing in Ohio), 129 participated in a medical evaluation consisting of a chest x-ray, pulmonary function test, and completion of a questionnaire to detail medical and prior work histories. Abnormal pulmonary function results were noted in 39 of these individuals of whom 30 demonstrated an obstructive pattern, three a restrictive pattern, and six both an obstructive and restrictive component. Nonsmoking participants were more likely to report chronic cough, chronic phlegm, and chronic bronchitis than comparisons.

  8. Electric vehicle test report, Cutler-Hammer Corvette

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-01-01

    The work described was part of the effort to characterize vehicles for the state-of-the-art assessment of electric vehicles. The vehicle evaluated was a Chevrolet Corvette converted to electric operation. The vehicle was based on a standard production 1967 chassis and body. The original internal combustion engine was replaced by an electric traction motor. Eighteen batteries supplied the electrical energy. A controller, an onboard battery charger, and several dashboard instruments completed the conversion. The remainder of the vehicle, and in particular the remainder of the drive-train (clutch, driveshaft, and differential), was stock, except for the transmission. The overall objective of the tests was to develop performance data at the system and subsystem level. The emphasis was on the electrical portion of the drive train, although some analysis and discussion of the mechanical elements are included. There was no evaluation of other aspects of the vehicle such as braking, ride, handling, passenger accomodations, etc. Included are a description of the vehicle, the tests performed and a discussion of the results. Tests were conducted both on the road (actually a mile long runway) and in a chassis dynamometer equipped laboratory. The majority of the tests performed were according to SAE Procedure J227a and included maximum effort accelerations, constant-speed range, and cyclic range. Some tests that are not a part of the SAE Procedure J227a are described and the analysis of the data from all tests is discussed. (LCL)

  9. Compton Backscattering Concept for the Production of Molybdenum-99

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L. Merminga, G.A. Krafft

    2009-05-01

    The medical isotope Molybdenum-99 is presently used for 80-85% of all nuclear medicine procedures and is produced by irradiating highly enriched uranium U-235 targets in NRU reactors. It was recently proposed that an electron linac be used for the production of 99Mo via photo-fission of a natural uranium target coming from the excitation of the giant dipole resonance around 15 MeV. The photons can be produced using the braking radiation (“bremsstrahlung”) spectrum of an electron beam impinged on a high Z material. In this paper we present an alternate concept for the production of 99Mo which is also based on photo-fission of U-238, but where the ~15 MeV gamma-rays are produced by Compton backscattering of laser photons from relativistic electrons. We assume a laser wavelength of 330 nm, resulting in 485 MeV electron beam energy, and 10 mA of average current. Because the induced energy spread on the electron beam is a few percent, one may recover most of the electron beam energy, which substantially increases the efficiency of the system. The accelerator concept, based on a three-pass recirculation system with energy recovery, is described and efficiency estimates are presented.

  10. Energy efficiency of electric vehicles at the 1994 American Tour de Sol

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quong, S.; Duoba, M.; Buitrago, C.; LeBlanc, N.; Larsen, R.

    1994-11-01

    In 1994, the US Department of Energy, through Argonne National Laboratory`s Center for Transportation Research, sponsored energy-efficiency data collection from student, private, and professional electric vehicles during the American Tour de Sol (ATdS). The ATDS is a multiple-day road rally event, from New York City to Philadelphia. During each leg of the event, kilowatt-hour meters measured the efficiency of the electric vehicles (EVs), which averaged from 5.68 to 65.74 km/kWh. In addition to daily energy-usage measurements, some vehicles used a data-acquisition unit to collect second-by-second information. This showed, in one case, that 21% of the total energy was captured in regenerative braking. Some of the vehicles were also tested on a dynamometer for energy-efficiency, acceleration, and steady-state power ratings. This paper also compares the energy efficiency of the vehicles during the road rally to the dynamometer results. In almost all vehicles, there was an increase in energy efficiency when the vehicle was traveling over the road, due to the non-transient duty cycle and efficient driving techniques. The dynamometer testing also showed that some EVs are equal to or better than gasoline vehicles in performance and efficiency.

  11. Powertrain Controls Optimization for HD Hybrid Line Haul Trucks - FY2014 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, David E.

    2014-12-01

    This is a vehicle system level project, encompassing analytical modeling and supervisory controls development as well as experimental verification/validation testing at the component, powertrain, and full vehicle system level. This project supports the goal of petroleum consumption reduction for medium and heavy trucks through the development of advanced hybrid technologies and control systems. VSST has invested previously in R&D to support hybrid energy storage systems (Li-ion plus ultra-caps) for light duty, passenger car applications. This research will be extended to the MD and HD sector where current battery technology is not mature enough to handle the substantial regenerative braking power levels these trucks are capable of producing. With this hybrid energy storage system, substantial gains in overall vehicle efficiency are possible. In addition, advanced combustion technologies, such as RCCI, will be implemented into an advanced hybrid powertrain for a Class 8 line haul application. This powertrain, leveraged from other VSST work (Meritor, a current ORNL/VSST partner), is ideal for taking advantage of the benefits of RCCI operation due to its series hybrid mode of operation. Emissions control is also a focus of this project, especially due to the fact that RCCI creates a low temperature exhaust stream that must addressed.

  12. Flavor violating $Z'$ from $SO(10)$ SUSY GUT in High-Scale SUSY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hisano, Junji; Omura, Yuji; Yamanaka, Masato

    2015-01-01

    We propose an $SO(10)$ supersymmetric grand unified theory (SUSY GUT), where the $SO(10)$ gauge symmetry breaks down to $SU(3)_c \\times SU(2)_L \\times U(1)_Y\\times U(1)_{X}$ at the GUT scale and $U(1)_X$ is radiatively broken at the SUSY-braking scale. In order to achieve the observed Higgs mass around $126$ GeV and also to satisfy constraints on flavor- and/or CP-violating processes, we assume that the SUSY-breaking scale is $O(100)$ TeV, so that the $U(1)_X$ breaking scale is also $O(100)$ TeV. One big issue in the SO(10) GUTs is how to realize realistic Yukawa couplings. In our model, not only ${\\bf 16}$-dimensional but also ${\\bf 10}$-dimensional matter fields are introduced to predict the observed fermion masses and mixings. The Standard-Model quarks and leptons are linear combinations of the ${\\bf 16}$- and ${\\bf 10}$-dimensional fields so that the $U(1)_{X}$ gauge interaction may be flavor-violating. We investigate the current constraints on the flavor-violating $Z'$ interaction from the flavor physics...

  13. Spinning like a blue straggler: the population of fast rotating blue straggler stars in ? Centauri

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mucciarelli, A.; Lovisi, L.; Ferraro, F. R.; Dalessandro, E.; Lanzoni, B.

    2014-12-10

    By using high-resolution spectra acquired with FLAMES-GIRAFFE at the ESO/VLT, we measured the radial and rotational velocities for 110 blue straggler stars (BSSs) in ? Centauri, the globular cluster-like stellar system harboring the largest known BSS population. According to their radial velocities, 109 BSSs are members of the system. The rotational velocity distribution is very broad, with the bulk of BSSs spinning at less than ?40 km s{sup –1} (in agreement with the majority of such stars observed in other globular clusters) and a long tail reaching ?200 km s{sup –1}. About 40% of the sample has v{sub e} sin i > 40 km s{sup –1} and about 20% has v{sub e} sin i > 70 km s{sup –1}. Such a large fraction is very similar to the percentage of fast rotating BSSs observed in M4. Thus, ? Centauri is the second stellar cluster, beyond M4, with a surprisingly high population of fast spinning BSSs. We found a hint of radial behavior for a fraction of fast rotating BSSs, with a mild peak within one core radius, and a possible rise in the external regions (beyond four core radii). This may suggest that recent formation episodes of mass transfer BSSs occurred preferentially in the outskirts of ? Centauri, or that braking mechanisms able to slow down these stars are least efficient in the lowest density environments.

  14. NASA Lewis Stirling engine computer code evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sullivan, T.J.

    1989-01-01

    In support of the US Department of Energy's Stirling Engine Highway Vehicle Systems program, the NASA Lewis Stirling engine performance code was evaluated by comparing code predictions without engine-specific calibration factors to GPU-3, P-40, and RE-1000 Stirling engine test data. The error in predicting power output was /minus/11 percent for the P-40 and 12 percent for the RE-1000 at design conditions and 16 percent for the GPU-3 at near-design conditions (2000 rpm engine speed versus 3000 rpm at design). The efficiency and heat input predictions showed better agreement with engine test data than did the power predictions. Concerning all data points, the error in predicting the GPU-3 brake power was significantly larger than for the other engines and was mainly a result of inaccuracy in predicting the pressure phase angle. Analysis into this pressure phase angle prediction error suggested that improvement to the cylinder hysteresis loss model could have a significant effect on overall Stirling engine performance predictions. 13 refs., 26 figs., 3 tabs.

  15. Delayed charging. A means to improve two-stroke engine characteristics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rochelle, P.H.C.

    1994-09-01

    We have developed and patented a new simple device which reduces the amount of short-circuited fresh charge in two-stroke cycle engines and produces stratified charging and combustion. The principle consists in scavenging the burnt gases with fresh air and delaying the introduction of the fresh charge in the cylinder. A numerical simulation showed a good promise of consumption and pollution improvement for this configuration. Then, preliminary bench tests have been carried out with a 50 cc production engine and the same modified engine including a delay-circuit. Due to delayed charging, brake specific fuel consumption shows a mean 20% reduction, down to a maximum of 25% comparing to production engine figures; unburnt hydrocarbons show a mean 35% reduction, down to more than 50%; carbon-monoxide production decreases to a mean 1% concentration; and torque increases at low r.p.m., but lowers at higher speeds of revolution due to the diminished permeability of this first prototype engine. 23 refs., 10 figs.

  16. Recycled waste oil: A fuel for medium speed diesel engines?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheng, A.B.L.; Poynton, W.A.; Howard, J.G.

    1996-12-31

    This paper describes the exploratory engine trials that Mirrlees Blackstone has undertaken to investigate the effect of fueling an engine using waste oil derived from used lubricants. The effect on the engine`s mechanical components, and thermal performance are examined, and the steps taken to overcome problems are discussed. The proposed engine is sited within the Research and Development facilities, housed separately from the manufacturing plant. The unit is already capable of operating on two different types of fuel with single engine set up. It is a 3 cylinder, 4-stroke turbocharged direct injection engine mounted on an underbase and it operates at 600 rpm, 15.0 bar B.M.E.P. (Brake Mean Effective Pressure). It is a mature engine, built {approximately} 20 years previously, and used for emergency stand-by duties in the company`s powerhouse. The test engine is coupled to an alternator and the electricity generated is fed to the national grid. Initial samples of treated fuel oil, analyzed by an independent oil analysis consultant, indicated that the fuel oil does not correspond to a normal fuel oil. They contained high concentrations of trace elements (i.e. calcium, phosphorus, lead, aluminum and silicon) which was consistent with sourcing from waste lubricating oils. The fuel oil was considered to be too severe for use in an engine.

  17. Comparison of emissions and efficiency of a turbocharged lean-burn natural gas and Hythane-fueled engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larsen, J.F.; Wallace, J.S.

    1997-01-01

    An experiment was conducted to evaluate the potential for reduced exhaust emissions and improved efficiency, by way of lean-burn engine fueling with hydrogen supplemented natural gas (Hythane). The emissions and efficiency of the Hythane fuel (15% hydrogen, 85% natural gas by volume), were compared to the emissions and efficiency of pure natural gas using a turbocharged, spark ignition, 3.1 L, V-6 engine. The feasibility of heavy duty engine fueling with Hythane was assessed through testing conducted at engine speed and load combinations typical of heavy-duty engine operation. Comparison of the efficiency and emissions at MBT spark timing revealed that Hythane fueling of the test engine resulted in consistently lower brake specific energy consumption and emissions of total hydrocarbons (THC), carbon monoxide (CO), and carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), at a given equivalence ratio. There was no clear trend with respect to MBT oxides of nitrogen (NO{sub x}) emissions. It was also discovered that an improved NO{sub x}-THC tradeoff resulted when Hythane was used to fuel the test engine. Consequently, Hythane engine operating parameters can be adjusted to achieve a concurrent reduction in NO{sub x} and THC emissions relative to natural gas fueling.

  18. PASSIVE DETECTION OF VEHICLE LOADING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garrett, A.

    2012-01-03

    The Digital Imaging and Remote Sensing Laboratory (DIRS) at the Rochester Institute of Technology, along with the Savannah River National Laboratory is investigating passive methods to quantify vehicle loading. The research described in this paper investigates multiple vehicle indicators including brake temperature, tire temperature, engine temperature, acceleration and deceleration rates, engine acoustics, suspension response, tire deformation and vibrational response. Our investigation into these variables includes building and implementing a sensing system for data collection as well as multiple full-scale vehicle tests. The sensing system includes; infrared video cameras, triaxial accelerometers, microphones, video cameras and thermocouples. The full scale testing includes both a medium size dump truck and a tractor-trailer truck on closed courses with loads spanning the full range of the vehicle's capacity. Statistical analysis of the collected data is used to determine the effectiveness of each of the indicators for characterizing the weight of a vehicle. The final sensing system will monitor multiple load indicators and combine the results to achieve a more accurate measurement than any of the indicators could provide alone.

  19. Tidally-driven Roche-Lobe Overflow of Hot Jupiters with MESA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Valsecchi, Francesca; Rasio, Frederic A; Marchant, Pablo; Rogers, Leslie A

    2015-01-01

    Many exoplanets have now been detected in orbits with ultra-short periods, very close to the Roche limit. Building upon our previous work, we study the possibility that mass loss through Roche lobe overflow (RLO) may affect the evolution of these planets, and could possibly transform a hot Jupiter into a lower-mass planet (hot Neptune or super-Earth). We focus here on systems in which the mass loss occurs slowly ("stable mass transfer" in the language of binary star evolution) and we compute their evolution in detail with the binary evolution code MESA. We include the effects of tides, RLO, irradiation and photo-evaporation of the planet, as well as the stellar wind and magnetic braking. Our calculations all start with a hot Jupiter close to its Roche limit, in orbit around a sun-like star. The initial orbital decay and onset of RLO are driven by tidal dissipation in the star. We confirm that such a system can indeed evolve to produce lower-mass planets in orbits of a few days. The RLO phase eventually ends a...

  20. PROTOSTELLAR JETS ENCLOSED BY LOW-VELOCITY OUTFLOWS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Machida, Masahiro N.

    2014-11-20

    A protostellar jet and outflow are calculated for ?270 yr following the protostar formation using a three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamics simulation, in which both the protostar and its parent cloud are spatially resolved. A high-velocity (?100 km s{sup –1}) jet with good collimation is driven near the disk's inner edge, while a low-velocity (? 10 km s{sup –1}) outflow with a wide opening angle appears in the outer-disk region. The high-velocity jet propagates into the low-velocity outflow, forming a nested velocity structure in which a narrow high-velocity flow is enclosed by a wide low-velocity flow. The low-velocity outflow is in a nearly steady state, while the high-velocity jet appears intermittently. The time-variability of the jet is related to the episodic accretion from the disk onto the protostar, which is caused by gravitational instability and magnetic effects such as magnetic braking and magnetorotational instability. Although the high-velocity jet has a large kinetic energy, the mass and momentum of the jet are much smaller than those of the low-velocity outflow. A large fraction of the infalling gas is ejected by the low-velocity outflow. Thus, the low-velocity outflow actually has a more significant effect than the high-velocity jet in the very early phase of the star formation.

  1. Reconciling a Reactionless Propulsive Drive with the First Law of Thermodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Higgins, Andrew J

    2015-01-01

    A "space drive" is a hypothetical device that generates a propulsive force in free space using an input of power without the need for a reaction mass. Any device that generates photons (e.g., a laser) would qualify as a propellantless "photon rocket," but the force generated by emitting photons per power input (3.33 $\\mu$N/kW) is too small to be a practical propulsion device. The ability to generate greater force per power input would be highly desirable, but, as demonstrated in this paper, such a device would be able to operate as a perpetual motion machine of the first kind. Since applying a constant force results in a constant acceleration, the kinetic energy of a mass driven by such a device increases quadratically with time, while the energy input increases only linearly with time. Thus, at some point, the kinetic energy of the device-driven mass exceeds the energy input, and if this energy is collected via decelerating the mass (via regenerative electromagnetic braking, for example), then there would be...

  2. Electric vehicles move closer to market

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O`Connor, L.

    1995-03-01

    This article reports that though battery technology is currently limiting the growth of EVs, the search for improvements is spurring innovative engineering developments. As battery makers, automakers, national laboratories, and others continue their search for a practical source of electric power that will make electric vehicles (EVs) more viable, engineers worldwide are making progress in other areas of EV development. Vector control, for example, enables better regulation of motor torque and speed; composite and aluminum parts reduce the vehicle`s weight, which in turn reduces the load on the motor and battery; and flywheel energy storage systems, supercapacitors, regenerative brake systems, and hybrid/electric drive trains increase range and acceleration. Despite efforts to develop an electric vehicle from the ground up, most of the early EVs to be sold in the United States will likely be converted from gasoline-powered vehicles. Chrysler Corp., for example, is expected to sell electric versions of its minivans and build them on the same assembly line as its gasoline-powered vehicles to reduce costs. The pace of engineering development in this field is fast and furious. Indeed, it is virtually impossible to monitor all emerging EV technology. To meet their quotas, the major automakers may even consider buying credits from smaller, innovative EV manufacturers. But whatever stopgap measures vehicle makers take, technology development will be the driving force behind long-term EV growth.

  3. Advanced Techniques for Power System Identification from Measured Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pierre, John W.; Wies, Richard; Trudnowski, Daniel

    2008-11-25

    Time-synchronized measurements provide rich information for estimating a power-system's electromechanical modal properties via advanced signal processing. This information is becoming critical for the improved operational reliability of interconnected grids. A given mode's properties are described by its frequency, damping, and shape. Modal frequencies and damping are useful indicators of power-system stress, usually declining with increased load or reduced grid capacity. Mode shape provides critical information for operational control actions. This project investigated many advanced techniques for power system identification from measured data focusing on mode frequency and damping ratio estimation. Investigators from the three universities coordinated their effort with Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). Significant progress was made on developing appropriate techniques for system identification with confidence intervals and testing those techniques on field measured data and through simulation. Experimental data from the western area power system was provided by PNNL and Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for both ambient conditions and for signal injection tests. Three large-scale tests were conducted for the western area in 2005 and 2006. Measured field PMU (Phasor Measurement Unit) data was provided to the three universities. A 19-machine simulation model was enhanced for testing the system identification algorithms. Extensive simulations were run with this model to test the performance of the algorithms. University of Wyoming researchers participated in four primary activities: (1) Block and adaptive processing techniques for mode estimation from ambient signals and probing signals, (2) confidence interval estimation, (3) probing signal design and injection method analysis, and (4) performance assessment and validation from simulated and field measured data. Subspace based methods have been use to improve previous results from block processing techniques. Bootstrap techniques have been developed to estimate confidence intervals for the electromechanical modes from field measured data. Results were obtained using injected signal data provided by BPA. A new probing signal was designed that puts more strength into the signal for a given maximum peak to peak swing. Further simulations were conducted on a model based on measured data and with the modifications of the 19-machine simulation model. Montana Tech researchers participated in two primary activities: (1) continued development of the 19-machine simulation test system to include a DC line; and (2) extensive simulation analysis of the various system identification algorithms and bootstrap techniques using the 19 machine model. Researchers at the University of Alaska-Fairbanks focused on the development and testing of adaptive filter algorithms for mode estimation using data generated from simulation models and on data provided in collaboration with BPA and PNNL. There efforts consist of pre-processing field data, testing and refining adaptive filter techniques (specifically the Least Mean Squares (LMS), the Adaptive Step-size LMS (ASLMS), and Error Tracking (ET) algorithms). They also improved convergence of the adaptive algorithms by using an initial estimate from block processing AR method to initialize the weight vector for LMS. Extensive testing was performed on simulated data from the 19 machine model. This project was also extensively involved in the WECC (Western Electricity Coordinating Council) system wide tests carried out in 2005 and 2006. These tests involved injecting known probing signals into the western power grid. One of the primary goals of these tests was the reliable estimation of electromechanical mode properties from measured PMU data. Applied to the system were three types of probing inputs: (1) activation of the Chief Joseph Dynamic Brake, (2) mid-level probing at the Pacific DC Intertie (PDCI), and (3) low-level probing on the PDCI. The Chief Joseph Dynamic Brake is a 1400 MW disturbance to the system and is injected for a ha

  4. High Efficiency, Clean Combustion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donald Stanton

    2010-03-31

    Energy use in trucks has been increasing at a faster rate than that of automobiles within the U.S. transportation sector. According to the Energy Information Administration (EIA) Annual Energy Outlook (AEO), a 23% increase in fuel consumption for the U.S. heavy duty truck segment is expected between 2009 to 2020. The heavy duty vehicle oil consumption is projected to grow between 2009 and 2050 while light duty vehicle (LDV) fuel consumption will eventually experience a decrease. By 2050, the oil consumption rate by LDVs is anticipated to decrease below 2009 levels due to CAFE standards and biofuel use. In contrast, the heavy duty oil consumption rate is anticipated to double. The increasing trend in oil consumption for heavy trucks is linked to the vitality, security, and growth of the U.S. economy. An essential part of a stable and vibrant U.S. economy is a productive U.S. trucking industry. Studies have shown that the U.S. gross domestic product (GDP) is strongly correlated to freight transport. Over 90% of all U.S. freight tonnage is transported by diesel power and over 75% is transported by trucks. Given the vital role that the trucking industry plays in the economy, improving the efficiency of the transportation of goods was a central focus of the Cummins High Efficient Clean Combustion (HECC) program. In a commercial vehicle, the diesel engine remains the largest source of fuel efficiency loss, but remains the greatest opportunity for fuel efficiency improvements. In addition to reducing oil consumption and the dependency on foreign oil, this project will mitigate the impact on the environment by meeting US EPA 2010 emissions regulations. Innovation is a key element in sustaining a U.S. trucking industry that is competitive in global markets. Unlike passenger vehicles, the trucking industry cannot simply downsize the vehicle and still transport the freight with improved efficiency. The truck manufacturing and supporting industries are faced with numerous challenges to reduce oil consumption and greenhouse gases, meet stringent emissions regulations, provide customer value, and improve safety. The HECC program successfully reduced engine fuel consumption and greenhouse gases while providing greater customer valve. The US EPA 2010 emissions standard poses a significant challenge for developing clean diesel powertrains that meet the DoE Vehicle Technologies Multi-Year Program Plan (MYPP) for fuel efficiency improvement while remaining affordable. Along with exhaust emissions, an emphasis on heavy duty vehicle fuel efficiency is being driven by increased energy costs as well as the potential regulation of greenhouse gases. An important element of the success of meeting emissions while significantly improving efficiency is leveraging Cummins component technologies such as fuel injection equipment, aftertreatment, turbomahcinery, electronic controls, and combustion systems. Innovation in component technology coupled with system integration is enabling Cummins to move forward with the development of high efficiency clean diesel products with a long term goal of reaching a 55% peak brake thermal efficiency for the engine plus aftertreatment system. The first step in developing high efficiency clean products has been supported by the DoE co-sponsored HECC program. The objectives of the HECC program are: (1) To design and develop advanced diesel engine architectures capable of achieving US EPA 2010 emission regulations while improving the brake thermal efficiency by 10% compared to the baseline (a state of the art 2007 production diesel engine). (2) To design and develop components and subsystems (fuel systems, air handling, controls, etc) to enable construction and development of multi-cylinder engines. (3) To perform an assessment of the commercial viability of the newly developed engine technology. (4) To specify fuel properties conducive to improvements in emissions, reliability, and fuel efficiency for engines using high-efficiency clean combustion (HECC) technologies. To demonstrate the technology is compatible with B2

  5. Accumulation of mercury in selected plant species grown in soils contaminated with different mercury compounds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Su, Yi; Han, Fengxiang; Shiyab, Safwan; Chen, Jian; Monts, David L. [Institute for Clean Energy Technology (ICET), Mississippi State University, 205 Research Blvd, Starkville, MS 39759 (United States)

    2007-07-01

    The objective of our research is to screen and search for suitable plant species for phyto-remediation of mercury-contaminated soil. Currently our effort is specifically focused on mercury removal from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites, where mercury contamination is a major concern. In order to cost effectively implement mercury remediation efforts, it is necessary now to obtain an improved understanding of biological means of removing mercury and mercury compounds.. Phyto-remediation is a technology that uses various plants to degrade, extract, contain, or immobilize contaminants from soil and water. In particular, phyto-extraction is the uptake of contaminants by plant roots and translocation within the plants to shoots or leaves. Contaminants are generally removed by harvesting the plants. We have investigated phyto-extraction of mercury from contaminated soil by using some of the known metal-accumulating plants since no natural plant species with mercury hyper-accumulating properties has yet been identified. Different natural plant species have been studied for mercury uptake, accumulation, toxicity and overall mercury removal efficiency. Various mercury compounds, such as HgS, HgCl{sub 2}, and Hg(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}, were used as contaminant sources. Different types of soil were examined and chosen for phyto-remediation experiments. We have applied microscopy and diffuse reflectance spectrometry as well as conventional analytical chemistry to monitor the phyto-remediation processes of mercury uptake, translocation and accumulation, and the physiological impact of mercury contaminants on selected plant species. Our results indicate that certain plant species, such as beard grass (Polypogon monospeliensis), accumulated a very limited amount of mercury in the shoots (<65 mg/kg), even though root mercury accumulation is significant (maximum 2298 mg/kg). Consequently, this plant species may not be suitable for mercury phyto-remediation. Other plant species, such as Indian mustard (Brassica juncea), a well-studied metal accumulator, exhibited severe chlorosis symptoms during some experiments. Among all the plant species studied, Chinese brake fern (Pteris vittata) accumulated significant amount of mercury in both roots and shoots and hence may be considered as a potential candidate for mercury phyto-extraction. During one experiment, Chinese brake ferns accumulated 540 mg/kg and 1469 mg/kg in shoots after 18 days of growing in soils treated with 500 parts-per-million (ppm) and 1000 ppm HgCl{sub 2} powder, respectively; no visual stress symptoms were observed. We also studied mercury phyto-remediation using aged soils that contained HgS, HgCl{sub 2}, or Hg(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}. We have found that up to hundreds of ppm mercury can be accumulated in the roots of Indian mustard plants grown with soil contaminated by mercury sulfide; HgS is assumed to be the most stable and also the predominant mercury form in flood plain soils. We have also started to investigate different mercury uptake mechanisms, such as root uptake of soil contaminant and foliar mercury accumulation from ambient air. We have observed mercury translocation from roots to shoot for Chinese fern and two Indian mustard varieties. (authors)

  6. Near Zero Emissions at 50 Percent Thermal Efficiency

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2012-12-31

    Detroit Diesel Corporation (DDC) has successfully completed a 10 year DOE sponsored heavy-duty truck engine program, hereafter referred to as the NZ-50 program. This program was split into two major phases. The first phase was called â??Near-Zero Emission at 50 Percent Thermal Efficiency,â? and was completed in 2007. The second phase was initiated in 2006, and this phase was named â??Advancements in Engine Combustion Systems to Enable High-Efficiency Clean Combustion for Heavy-Duty Engines.â? This phase was completed in September, 2010. The key objectives of the NZ-50 program for this first phase were to: â?¢ Quantify thermal efficiency degradation associated with reduction of engine-out NOx emissions to the 2007 regulated level of ~1.1 g/hp-hr. â?¢ Implement an integrated analytical/experimental development plan for improving subsystem and component capabilities in support of emerging engine technologies for emissions and thermal efficiency goals of the program. â?¢ Test prototype subsystem hardware featuring technology enhancements and demonstrate effective application on a multi-cylinder, production feasible heavy-duty engine test-bed. â?¢ Optimize subsystem components and engine controls (calibration) to demonstrate thermal efficiency that is in compliance with the DOE 2005 Joule milestone, meaning greater than 45% thermal efficiency at 2007 emission levels. â?¢ Develop technology roadmap for meeting emission regulations of 2010 and beyond while mitigating the associated degradation in engine fuel consumption. Ultimately, develop technical prime-path for meeting the overall goal of the NZ-50 program, i.e., 50% thermal efficiency at 2010 regulated emissions. These objectives were successfully met during the course of the NZ-50 program. The most noteworthy achievements in this program are summarized as follows: â?¢ Demonstrated technologies through advanced integrated experiments and analysis to achieve the technical objectives of the NZ-50 program with 50.2% equivalent thermal efficiency under EPA 2010 emissions regulations. â?¢ Experimentally demonstrate brake efficiency of 48.5% at EPA 2010 emission level at single steady-state point. â?¢ Analytically demonstrated additional brake efficiency benefits using advanced aftertreatment configuration concept and air system enhancement including, but not limited to, turbo-compound, variable valve actuator system, and new cylinder head redesign, thus helping to achieve the final program goals. â?¢ Experimentally demonstrated EPA 2010 emissions over FTP cycles using advanced integrated engine and aftertreatment system. These aggressive thermal efficiency and emissions results were achieved by applying a robust systems technology development methodology. It used integrated analytical and experimental tools for subsystem component optimization encompassing advanced fuel injection system, increased EGR cooling capacity, combustion process optimization, and advanced aftertreatment technologies. Model based controls employing multiple input and output techniques enabled efficient integration of the various subsystems and ensured optimal performance of each system within the total engine package. . The key objective of the NZ-50 program for the second phase was to explore advancements in engine combustion systems using high-efficiency clean combustion (HECC) techniques to minimize cylinder-out emissions, targeting a 10% efficiency improvement. The most noteworthy achievements in this phase of the program are summarized as follows: â?¢ Experimentally and analytically evaluated numerous air system improvements related to the turbocharger and variable valve actuation. Some of the items tested proved to be very successful and modifications to the turbine discovered in this program have since been incorporated into production hardware. â?¢ The combustion system development continued with evaluation of various designs of the 2-step piston bowl. Significant improvemen

  7. Effect Of Platooning on Fuel Consumption of Class 8 Vehicles Over a Range of Speeds, Following Distances, and Mass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lammert, M. P.; Duran, A.; Diez, J.; Burton, K.; Nicholson, A.

    2014-10-01

    This research project evaluates fuel consumption results of two Class 8 tractor-trailer combinations platooned together compared to their standalone fuel consumption. A series of ten modified SAE Type II J1321 fuel consumption track tests were performed to document fuel consumption of two platooned vehicles and a control vehicle at varying steady-state speeds, following distances, and gross vehicle weights (GVWs). The steady-state speeds ranged from 55 mph to 70 mph, the following distances ranged from a 20-ft following distance to a 75-ft following distance, and the GVWs were 65K lbs and 80K lbs. All tractors involved had U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) SmartWay-compliant aerodynamics packages installed, and the trailers were equipped with side skirts. Effects of vehicle speed, following distance, and GVW on fuel consumption were observed and analyzed. The platooning demonstration system used in this study consisted of radar systems, Dedicated Short-Range Communication (DSRC) vehicle-to-vehicle (V2V) communications, vehicle braking and torque control interface, cameras and driver displays. The lead tractor consistently demonstrated an improvement in average fuel consumption reduction as following distance decreased, with results showing 2.7% to 5.3% fuel savings at a GVW of 65k. The trailing vehicle achieved fuel consumption savings ranging from 2.8% to 9.7%; tests during which the engine cooling fan did not operate achieved savings of 8.4% to 9.7%. 'Team' fuel savings, considering the platooned vehicles as one, ranged from 3.7% to 6.4%, with the best combined result being for 55 mph, 30-ft following distance, and 65k GVW.

  8. Gravitational wave emission and spin-down of young pulsars

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alford, Mark G.; Schwenzer, Kai [Department of Physics, Washington University, St. Louis, MO 63130 (United States)

    2014-01-20

    The rotation frequencies of young pulsars are systematically below their theoretical Kepler limit. r-modes have been suggested as a possible explanation for this observation. With the help of semi-analytic expressions that make it possible to assess the uncertainties of the r-mode scenario due to the impact of uncertainties in underlying microphysics, we perform a quantitative analysis of the spin-down and the emitted gravitational waves of young pulsars. We find that the frequency to which r-modes spin-down a young neutron star (NS) is surprisingly insensitive to both the microscopic details and the saturation amplitude. Comparing our result to astrophysical data, we show that for a range of sufficiently large saturation amplitudes r-modes provide a viable spin-down scenario and that all observed young pulsars are very likely already outside the r-mode instability region. Therefore, the most promising sources for gravitational wave detection are unobserved NSs associated with recent supernovae, and we find that advanced LIGO should be able to see several of them. Our analysis shows that despite the coupling of the spin-down and thermal evolution, a power-law spin-down with an effective braking index n {sub rm} ? 7 is realized. Because of this, the gravitational wave strain amplitude is completely independent of both the r-mode saturation amplitude and the microphysics and depends on the saturation mechanism only within some tens of percent. However, the gravitational wave frequency depends on the amplitude, and we provide the required expected timing parameter ranges to look for promising sources in future searches.

  9. Investigating potential light-duty efficiency improvements through simulation of turbo-compounding and waste-heat recovery systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edwards, Kevin Dean; Wagner, Robert M; Briggs, Thomas E

    2010-01-01

    Modern diesel engines used in light-duty transportation applications have peak brake thermal efficiencies in the range of 40-42% for high-load operation with substantially lower efficiencies at realistic road-load conditions. Thermodynamic energy and exergy analysis reveals that the largest losses from these engines are due to combustion irreversibility and heat loss to the coolant, through the exhaust, and by direct convection and radiation to the environment. Substantial improvement in overall engine efficiency requires reducing or recovering these losses. Unfortunately, much of the heat transfer either occurs at relatively low temperatures resulting in large entropy generation (such as in the air-charge cooler), is transferred to low-exergy flow streams (such as the oil and engine coolant), or is radiated or convected directly to the environment. While there are significant opportunities for recovery from the exhaust and EGR cooler for heavy-duty applications, achieving similar benefits for light-duty applications is complicated by transient, low-load operation at typical driving conditions and competition with the turbocharger and aftertreatment system for the limited thermal resources. We have developed an organic Rankine cycle model using GT-Suite to investigate the potential for efficiency improvement through waste-heat recovery from the exhaust and EGR cooler of a light-duty diesel engine. The model is used to examine the effects of efficiency-improvement strategies such as cylinder deactivation, use of advanced materials and improved insulation to limit ambient heat loss, and turbo-compounding on the steady-state performance of the ORC system and the availability of thermal energy for downstream aftertreatment systems. Results from transient drive-cycle simulations are also presented, and we discuss strategies to address operational difficulties associated with transient drive cycles and balancing the thermal requirements of waste-heat recovery, turbocharging or turbo-compounding, and exhaust aftertreatment.

  10. The Vela pulsar with an active fallback disk

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Özsükan, Gökçe; Ek?i, K. Yavuz [Faculty of Science and Letters, Department of Physics, ?stanbul Technical University, Maslak 34469, ?stanbul (Turkey); Hambaryan, Valeri; Neuhäuser, Ralph; Hohle, Markus M.; Ginski, Christian [Astrophysikalisches Institut und Universitäts-Sternwarte, Universität Jena, Schillergäßchen 2-3, 07745 Jena (Germany); Werner, Klaus, E-mail: eksi@itu.edu.tr [Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Kepler Center for Astro and Particle Physics, Eberhard Karls University, Sand 1, D-72076 Tübingen (Germany)

    2014-11-20

    Fallback disks are expected to form around young neutron stars. The presence of these disks can be revealed by their blackbody spectrum in the infrared, optical, and UV bands. We present a re-reduction of the archival optical and infrared data of the Vela pulsar, together with the existing infrared and UV spectrum of Vela, and model their unpulsed components with the blackbody spectrum of a supernova debris disk. We invoke the quiescent disk solution of Sunyaev and Shakura for the description of the disk in the propeller stage and find the inner radius of the disk to be inside the light cylinder radius. We perform a high-resolution X-ray analysis with XMM-Newton and find a narrow absorption feature at 0.57 keV that can be interpreted as the K {sub ?} line of He-like oxygen (O VII). The strength of the line indicates an element over-abundance in our line of sight exceeding the amounts that would be expected from interstellar medium. The spectral feature may originate from the pulsar wind nebula and may be partly caused by the reprocessed X-ray radiation by the fallback disk. We discuss the lower-than-three braking index of Vela as partially due to the contribution of the propeller torques. Our results suggest that the pulsar mechanism can work simultaneously with the propeller processes and that the debris disks can survive the radiation pressure for at least ?10{sup 4} yr. As Vela is a relatively close object, and a prototypical pulsar, the presence of a disk, if confirmed, may indicate the ubiquity of debris disks around young neutron stars.

  11. Emission Characteristics of a Diesel Engine Operating with In-Cylinder Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Blending

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prikhodko, Vitaly Y; Curran, Scott; Barone, Teresa L; Lewis Sr, Samuel Arthur; Storey, John Morse; Cho, Kukwon; Wagner, Robert M; Parks, II, James E

    2010-01-01

    Advanced combustion regimes such as homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) and premixed charge compression ignition (PCCI) offer benefits of reduced nitrogen oxides (NOx) and particulate matter (PM) emissions. However, these combustion strategies often generate higher carbon monoxide (CO) and hydrocarbon (HC) emissions. In addition, aldehydes and ketone emissions can increase in these modes. In this study, the engine-out emissions of a compression-ignition engine operating in a fuel reactivity- controlled PCCI combustion mode using in-cylinder blending of gasoline and diesel fuel have been characterized. The work was performed on a 1.9-liter, 4-cylinder diesel engine outfitted with a port fuel injection system to deliver gasoline to the engine. The engine was operated at 2300 rpm and 4.2 bar brake mean effective pressure (BMEP) with the ratio of gasoline to diesel fuel that gave the highest engine efficiency and lowest emissions. Engine-out emissions for aldehydes, ketones and PM were compared with emissions from conventional diesel combustion. Sampling and analysis was carried out following micro-tunnel dilution of the exhaust. Particle geometric mean diameter, number-size distribution, and total number concentration were measured by a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS). For the particle mass measurements, samples were collected on Teflon-coated quartz-fiber filters and analyzed gravimetrically. Gaseous aldehydes and ketones were sampled using dinitrophenylhydrazine-coated solid phase extraction cartridges and the extracts were analyzed by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS). In addition, emissions after a diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC) were also measured to investigate the destruction of CO, HC and formaldehydes by the catalyst.

  12. In-Cylinder Fuel Blending of Gasoline/Diesel for Improved Efficiency and Lowest Possible Emissions on a Multi-Cylinder Light-Duty Diesel Engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Curran, Scott; Prikhodko, Vitaly Y; Wagner, Robert M; Parks, II, James E; Cho, Kukwon; Sluder, Scott; Kokjohn, Sage; Reitz, Rolf

    2010-01-01

    In-cylinder fuel blending of gasoline/diesel fuel is investigated on a multi-cylinder light-duty diesel engine as a potential strategy to control in-cylinder fuel reactivity for improved efficiency and lowest possible emissions. This approach was developed and demonstrated at the University of Wisconsin through modeling and single-cylinder engine experiments. The objective of this study is to better understand the potential and challenges of this method on a multi-cylinder engine. More specifically, the effect of cylinder-to-cylinder imbalances, heat rejection, and in-cylinder charge motion as well as the potential limitations imposed by real-world turbo-machinery were investigated on a 1.9-liter four-cylinder engine. This investigation focused on one engine condition, 2300 rpm, 4.2 bar brake mean effective pressure (BMEP). Gasoline was introduced with a port-fuel-injection system. Parameter sweeps included gasoline-to-diesel fuel ratio, intake air mixture temperature, in-cylinder swirl number, and diesel start-of-injection phasing. In addition, engine parameters were trimmed for each cylinder to balance the combustion process for maximum efficiency and lowest emissions. An important observation was the strong influence of intake charge temperature on cylinder pressure rise rate. Experiments were able to show increased thermal efficiency along with dramatic decreases in oxides of nitrogen (NOX) and particulate matter (PM). However, indicated thermal efficiency for the multi-cylinder experiments were less than expected based on modeling and single-cylinder results. The lower indicated thermal efficiency is believed to be due increased heat transfer as compared to the model predictions and suggest a need for improved cylinder-to-cylinder control and increased heat transfer control.

  13. Piston Bowl Optimization for RCCI Combustion in a Light-Duty Multi-Cylinder Engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hanson, Reed M; Curran, Scott; Wagner, Robert M; Reitz, Rolf; Kokjohn, Sage

    2012-01-01

    Reactivity Controlled Compression Ignition (RCCI) is an engine combustion strategy that that produces low NO{sub x} and PM emissions with high thermal efficiency. Previous RCCI research has been investigated in single-cylinder heavy-duty engines. The current study investigates RCCI operation in a light-duty multi-cylinder engine at 3 operating points. These operating points were chosen to cover a range of conditions seen in the US EPA light-duty FTP test. The operating points were chosen by the Ad Hoc working group to simulate operation in the FTP test. The fueling strategy for the engine experiments consisted of in-cylinder fuel blending using port fuel-injection (PFI) of gasoline and early-cycle, direct-injection (DI) of diesel fuel. At these 3 points, the stock engine configuration is compared to operation with both the original equipment manufacturer (OEM) and custom machined pistons designed for RCCI operation. The pistons were designed with assistance from the KIVA 3V computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code. By using a genetic algorithm optimization, in conjunction with KIVA, the piston bowl profile was optimized for dedicated RCCI operation to reduce unburned fuel emissions and piston bowl surface area. By reducing these parameters, the thermal efficiency of the engine was improved while maintaining low NOx and PM emissions. Results show that with the new piston bowl profile and an optimized injection schedule, RCCI brake thermal efficiency was increased from 37%, with the stock EURO IV configuration, to 40% at the 2,600 rev/min, 6.9 bar BMEP condition, and NOx and PM emissions targets were met without the need for exhaust after-treatment.

  14. Plasma rotation and NTM onset driven by central EC deposition in TCV tokamak

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nowak, S.; Lazzaro, E. [Istituto di Fisica del Plasma CNR, Euratom Association, 20125 Milano (Italy); Sauter, O.; Canal, G.; Duval, B.; Federspiel, L.; Karpushov, A. N.; Kim, D.; Reimerders, H.; Rossel, J.; Testa, D.; Wagner, D. [Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), Centre de Recherches en Physique des Plasmas (CRPP), Association EURATOM-Confederation Suisse, 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Raju, D. [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar, Gujarat (India); Collaboration: TCV Team

    2014-02-12

    The effects of the central electron cyclotron heating (ECH) and current drive (ECCD) on the spontaneous plasma rotation and on the presence of Tearing Modes (TM), observed in the TCV tokamak[1], were recently investigated as an interplay between the toroidal velocity and NTM onset in absence of sawteeth, ELMs and error fields [2–3]. In a set of reproducible TCV discharges (I{sub p}? ?150 kA, B{sub t}? ?1.4 T, ne,{sub av?} 1.5 10{sup 19} m{sup ?3}, T{sub e}? 3 keV and T{sub i}?0.25 keV, q{sub 95}?5.8) with both pure EC heating and current drive the cnt-Ip toroidal velocity was observed to be reduced with subsequent co-Ip appearance of 3/2 and 2/1 modes during the ramp up EC phases. The understanding of the capability of the on-axis EC power to modify the rotation profiles before and after the TM onset and of the sudden disappearance of 3/2 mode when 2/1 starts is the main purpose of this work. The velocity profile modifications are due to a direct effect of the EC absorbed power and also related to some variation of the perpendicular diffusion of the toroidal momentum and to magnetic braking effects of the kind of neoclassical toroidal viscosity (NTV) due to the NTM resonant field perturbations associated to the presence of TM. Numerical investigations are performed using a 1D toroidal momentum balance equation including contributions by external sources, as EC power, and NTV torques. Furthermore, the combined evolution of the 3/2 and 2/1 modes requires considering also coupling effects included in a generalized Rutherford equation for the modelling of the TM time growth.

  15. Analysis of ignition behavior in a turbocharged direct injection dual fuel engine using propane and methane as primary fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Polk, A. C.; Gibson, C. M.; Shoemaker, N. T.; Srinivasan, K. K.; Krishnan, S. R.

    2011-10-05

    This paper presents experimental analyses of the ignition delay (ID) behavior for diesel-ignited propane and diesel-ignited methane dual fuel combustion. Two sets of experiments were performed at a constant speed (1800 rev/min) using a 4-cylinder direct injection diesel engine with the stock ECU and a wastegated turbocharger. First, the effects of fuel-air equivalence ratios (���© pilot �¢���¼ 0.2-0.6 and ���© overall �¢���¼ 0.2-0.9) on IDs were quantified. Second, the effects of gaseous fuel percent energy substitution (PES) and brake mean effective pressure (BMEP) (from 2.5 to 10 bar) on IDs were investigated. With constant ���© pilot (> 0.5), increasing ���© overall with propane initially decreased ID but eventually led to premature propane autoignition; however, the corresponding effects with methane were relatively minor. Cyclic variations in the start of combustion (SOC) increased with increasing ���© overall (at constant ���© pilot), more significantly for propane than for methane. With increasing PES at constant BMEP, the ID showed a nonlinear (initially increasing and later decreasing) trend at low BMEPs for propane but a linearly decreasing trend at high BMEPs. For methane, increasing PES only increased IDs at all BMEPs. At low BMEPs, increasing PES led to significantly higher cyclic SOC variations and SOC advancement for both propane and methane. Finally, the engine ignition delay (EID) was also shown to be a useful metric to understand the influence of ID on dual fuel combustion.

  16. Multipolar electromagnetic fields around neutron stars: exact vacuum solutions and related properties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jerome Petri

    2015-04-01

    The magnetic field topology in the surrounding of neutron stars is one of the key questions in pulsar magnetospheric physics. A very extensive literature exists about the assumption of a dipolar magnetic field but very little progress has been made in attempts to include multipolar components in a self-consistent way. In this paper, we study the effect of multipolar electromagnetic fields anchored in the star. We give exact analytical solutions in closed form for any order $l$ and apply them to the retarded point quadrupole ($l=2$), hexapole ($l=3$) and octopole ($l=4$), a generalization of the retarded point dipole ($l=1$). We also compare the Poynting flux from each multipole and show that the spin down luminosity depends on the ratio $R/r_{\\rm L}$, $R$ being the neutron star radius and $r_{\\rm L}$ the light-cylinder radius. Therefore the braking index also depends on $R/r_{\\rm L}$. As such multipole fields possess very different topology, most importantly smaller length scales compared to the dipolar field, especially close to the neutron star, we investigate the deformation of the polar caps induced by these multipolar fields. Such fields could have a strong impact on the interpretation of the pulsed radio emission suspected to emanate from these polar caps as well as on the inferred geometry deduced from the high-energy light-curve fitting and on the magnetic field strength. Discrepancies between the two-pole caustic model and our new multipole-caustic model are emphasized with the quadrupole field. To this respect, we demonstrate that working with only a dipole field can be very misleading.

  17. Lean-burn hydrogen spark-ignited engines: the mechanical equivalent to the fuel cell

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aceves, S.M.; Smith, J.R.

    1996-10-01

    Fuel cells are considered as the ideal power source for future vehicles, due to their high efficiency and low emissions. However, extensive use of fuel cells in light-duty vehicles is likely to be years away, due to their high manufacturing cost. Hydrogen-fueled, spark-ignited, homogeneous-charge engines offer a near-term alternative to fuel cells. Hydrogen in a spark-ignited engine can be burned at very low equivalence ratios, so that NO[sub x] emissions can be reduced to less than 10 ppm without catalyst. HC and CO emissions may result from oxidation of engine oil, but by proper design are negligible (a few ppm). Lean operation also results in increased indicated efficiency due to the thermodynamic properties of the gaseous mixture contained in the cylinder. The high effective octane number of hydrogen allows the use of a high compression ratio, further increasing engine efficiency. In this paper, a simplified engine model is used for predicting hydrogen engine efficiency and emissions. The model uses basic thermodynamic equations for the compression and expansion processes, along with an empirical correlation for heat transfer, to predict engine indicated efficiency. A friction correlation and a supercharger/turbocharger model are then used to calculate brake thermal efficiency. The model is validated with many 1345 experimental points obtained in a recent evaluation of a hydrogen research engine. The experimental data are used to adjust the empirical constants in the heat release rate and heat transfer correlation. The adjusted engine model predicts pressure traces, indicated efficiency and NO,, emissions with good accuracy over the range of speed, equivalence ratio and manifold pressure experimentally covered.

  18. Development of Pneumatic Aerodynamic Devices to Improve the Performance, Economics, and Safety of Heavy Vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert J. Englar

    2000-06-19

    Under contract to the DOE Office of Heavy Vehicle Technologies, the Georgia Tech Research Institute (GTRI) is developing and evaluating pneumatic (blown) aerodynamic devices to improve the performance, economics, stability and safety of operation of Heavy Vehicles. The objective of this program is to apply the pneumatic aerodynamic aircraft technology previously developed and flight-tested by GTRI personnel to the design of an efficient blown tractor-trailer configuration. Recent experimental results obtained by GTRI using blowing have shown drag reductions of 35% on a streamlined automobile wind-tunnel model. Also measured were lift or down-load increases of 100-150% and the ability to control aerodynamic moments about all 3 axes without any moving control surfaces. Similar drag reductions yielded by blowing on bluff afterbody trailers in current US trucking fleet operations are anticipated to reduce yearly fuel consumption by more than 1.2 billion gallons, while even further reduction is possible using pneumatic lift to reduce tire rolling resistance. Conversely, increased drag and down force generated instantaneously by blowing can greatly increase braking characteristics and control in wet/icy weather due to effective ''weight'' increases on the tires. Safety is also enhanced by controlling side loads and moments caused on these Heavy Vehicles by winds, gusts and other vehicles passing. This may also help to eliminate the jack-knifing problem if caused by extreme wind side loads on the trailer. Lastly, reduction of the turbulent wake behind the trailer can reduce splash and spray patterns and rough air being experienced by following vehicles. To be presented by GTRI in this paper will be results developed during the early portion of this effort, including a preliminary systems study, CFD prediction of the blown flowfields, and design of the baseline conventional tractor-trailer model and the pneumatic wind-tunnel model.

  19. On use of CO{sub 2} chemiluminescence for combustion metrics in natural gas fired reciprocating engines.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gupta, S. B.; Bihari, B.; Biruduganti, M.; Sekar, R.; Zigan, J.

    2011-01-01

    Flame chemiluminescence is widely acknowledged to be an indicator of heat release rate in premixed turbulent flames that are representative of gas turbine combustion. Though heat release rate is an important metric for evaluating combustion strategies in reciprocating engine systems, its correlation with flame chemiluminescence is not well studied. To address this gap an experimental study was carried out in a single-cylinder natural gas fired reciprocating engine that could simulate turbocharged conditions with exhaust gas recirculation. Crank angle resolved spectra (266-795 nm) of flame luminosity were measured for various operational conditions by varying the ignition timing for MBT conditions and by holding the speed at 1800 rpm and Brake Mean effective Pressure (BMEP) at 12 bar. The effect of dilution on CO*{sub 2}chemiluminescence intensities was studied, by varying the global equivalence ratio (0.6-1.0) and by varying the exhaust gas recirculation rate. It was attempted to relate the measured chemiluminescence intensities to thermodynamic metrics of importance to engine research -- in-cylinder bulk gas temperature and heat release rate (HRR) calculated from measured cylinder pressure signals. The peak of the measured CO*{sub 2} chemiluminescence intensities coincided with peak pressures within {+-}2 CAD for all test conditions. For each combustion cycle, the peaks of heat release rate, spectral intensity and temperature occurred in that sequence, well separated temporally. The peak heat release rates preceded the peak chemiluminescent emissions by 3.8-9.5 CAD, whereas the peak temperatures trailed by 5.8-15.6 CAD. Such a temporal separation precludes correlations on a crank-angle resolved basis. However, the peak cycle heat release rates and to a lesser extent the peak cycle temperatures correlated well with the chemiluminescent emission from CO*{sub 2}. Such observations point towards the potential use of flame chemiluminescence to monitor peak bulk gas temperatures as well as peak heat release rates in natural gas fired reciprocating engines.

  20. Effects of turbulence on cosmic ray propagation in protostars and young star/disk systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fatuzzo, Marco; Adams, Fred C. E-mail: fca@umich.edu

    2014-05-20

    The magnetic fields associated with young stellar objects are expected to have an hour-glass geometry, i.e., the magnetic field lines are pinched as they thread the equatorial plane surrounding the forming star but merge smoothly onto a background field at large distances. With this field configuration, incoming cosmic rays experience both a funneling effect that acts to enhance the flux impinging on the circumstellar disk and a magnetic mirroring effect that acts to reduce that flux. To leading order, these effects nearly cancel out for simple underlying magnetic field structures. However, the environments surrounding young stellar objects are expected to be highly turbulent. This paper shows how the presence of magnetic field fluctuations affects the process of magnetic mirroring, and thereby changes the flux of cosmic rays striking circumstellar disks. Turbulence has two principle effects: (1) the (single) location of the magnetic mirror point found in the absence of turbulence is replaced with a wide distribution of values. (2) The median of the mirror point distribution moves outward for sufficiently large fluctuation amplitudes (roughly when ?B/B {sub 0} > 0.2 at the location of the turbulence-free mirror point); the distribution becomes significantly non-Gaussian in this regime as well. These results may have significant consequences for the ionization fraction of the disk, which in turn dictates the efficiency with which disk material can accrete onto the central object. A similar reduction in cosmic ray flux can occur during the earlier protostellar stages; the decrease in ionization can help alleviate the magnetic braking problem that inhibits disk formation.