National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for brakes front disk

  1. DOES MAGNETIC-FIELD-ROTATION MISALIGNMENT SOLVE THE MAGNETIC BRAKING CATASTROPHE IN PROTOSTELLAR DISK FORMATION?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li Zhiyun [Astronomy Department, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Krasnopolsky, Ruben; Shang, Hsien [Academia Sinica, Theoretical Institute for Advanced Research in Astrophysics, Taipei, Taiwan (China)

    2013-09-01

    Stars form in dense cores of molecular clouds that are observed to be significantly magnetized. In the simplest case of a laminar (non-turbulent) core with the magnetic field aligned with the rotation axis, both analytic considerations and numerical simulations have shown that the formation of a large, 10{sup 2} AU scale, rotationally supported protostellar disk is suppressed by magnetic braking in the ideal MHD limit for a realistic level of core magnetization. This theoretical difficulty in forming protostellar disks is termed the ''magnetic braking catastrophe''. A possible resolution to this problem, proposed by Hennebelle and Ciardi and Joos et al., is that misalignment between the magnetic field and rotation axis may weaken the magnetic braking enough to enable disk formation. We evaluate this possibility quantitatively through numerical simulations. We confirm the basic result of Joos et al. that the misalignment is indeed conducive to disk formation. In relatively weakly magnetized cores with dimensionless mass-to-flux ratio {approx}> 4, it enabled the formation of rotationally supported disks that would otherwise be suppressed if the magnetic field and rotation axis are aligned. For more strongly magnetized cores, disk formation remains suppressed, however, even for the maximum tilt angle of 90 Degree-Sign . If dense cores are as strongly magnetized as indicated by OH Zeeman observations (with a mean dimensionless mass-to-flux ratio {approx}2), it would be difficult for the misalignment alone to enable disk formation in the majority of them. We conclude that, while beneficial to disk formation, especially for the relatively weak field case, misalignment does not completely solve the problem of catastrophic magnetic braking in general.

  2. Hybrid: Braking

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    button highlighted Stopped Button subbanner graphic: gray bar BRAKING: PART 1 Regenerative braking converts otherwise wasted energy from braking into electricity and stores it in the battery. In regenerative braking, the electric motor is reversed so that, instead of using electricity to turn the wheels, the rotating wheels turn the motor and create electricity. Using energy from the wheels to turn the motor slows the vehicle down. Go to next… stage graphic: vertical blue rule Main stage: See

  3. Gravity brake

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lujan, Richard E.

    2001-01-01

    A mechanical gravity brake that prevents hoisted loads within a shaft from free-falling when a loss of hoisting force occurs. A loss of hoist lifting force may occur in a number of situations, for example if a hoist cable were to break, the brakes were to fail on a winch, or the hoist mechanism itself were to fail. Under normal hoisting conditions, the gravity brake of the invention is subject to an upward lifting force from the hoist and a downward pulling force from a suspended load. If the lifting force should suddenly cease, the loss of differential forces on the gravity brake in free-fall is translated to extend a set of brakes against the walls of the shaft to stop the free fall descent of the gravity brake and attached load.

  4. Braking system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Norgren, D.U.

    1982-09-23

    A balanced braking system comprising a plurality of braking assemblies located about a member to be braked. Each of the braking assemblies consists of a spring biased piston of a first material fitted into a body of a different material which has a greater contraction upon cooling than the piston material. The piston is provided with a recessed head portion over which is positioned a diaphragm and forming a space therebetween to which is connected a pressurized fluid supply. The diaphragm is controlled by the fluid in the space to contact or withdraw from the member to be braked. A cooling means causes the body within which the piston is fitted to contract more than the piston, producing a tight shrink fit therebetween. The braking system is particularly applicable for selectively braking an arbor of an electron microscope which immobilizes, for example, a vertically adjustable low temperature specimen holder during observation. The system provides balanced braking forces which can be easily removed and re-established with minimal disturbance to arbor location.

  5. BRAKE DEVICE

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    O'Donnell, T.J.

    1959-03-10

    A brake device is described for utilization in connection with a control rod. The device comprises a pair of parallelogram link mechanisms, a control rod moveable rectilinearly therebetween in opposite directions, and shoes resiliently supported by the mechanism for frictional engagement with the control rod.

  6. Full Hybrid: Braking

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Braking button highlighted Stopped button BRAKING PART 1 Regenerative braking converts otherwise wasted energy from braking into electricity and stores it in the battery. In regenerative braking, the electric motor is reversed so that, instead of using electricity to turn the wheels, the rotating wheels turn the motor and create electricity. Using energy from the wheels to turn the motor slows the vehicle down. Go to next… stage graphic: vertical blue rule Main stage: See through car with

  7. WIND BRAKING OF MAGNETARS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tong, H.; Xu, R. X.; Qiao, G. J.; Song, L. M.

    2013-05-10

    We explore the wind braking of magnetars considering recent observations challenging the traditional magnetar model. There is evidence for strong multipole magnetic fields in active magnetars, but the dipole field inferred from spin-down measurements may be strongly biased by particle wind. Recent observations challenging the traditional model of magnetars may be explained naturally by the wind braking scenario: (1) the supernova energies of magnetars are of normal value; (2) the non-detection in Fermi observations of magnetars; (3) the problem posed by low magnetic field soft gamma-ray repeaters; (4) the relation between magnetars and high magnetic field pulsars; and (5) a decreasing period derivative during magnetar outbursts. Transient magnetars with L{sub x}<- E-dot{sub rot} may still be magnetic dipole braking. This may explain why low luminosity magnetars are more likely to have radio emissions. A strong reduction of the dipole magnetic field is possible only when the particle wind is very collimated at the star surface. A small reduction of the dipole magnetic field may result from detailed considerations of magnetar wind luminosity. In the wind braking scenario, magnetars are neutron stars with a strong multipole field. For some sources, a strong dipole field may no longer be needed. A magnetism-powered pulsar wind nebula will be one of the consequences of wind braking. For a magnetism-powered pulsar wind nebula, we should see a correlation between the nebula luminosity and the magnetar luminosity. Under the wind braking scenario, a braking index smaller than three is expected. Future braking index measurement of a magnetar may tell us whether magnetars are wind braking or magnetic dipole braking.

  8. Vehicle brake testing system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stevens, Samuel S.; Hodgson, Jeffrey W.

    2002-11-19

    This invention relates to a force measuring system capable of measuring forces associated with vehicle braking and of evaluating braking performance. The disclosure concerns an invention which comprises a first row of linearly aligned plates, a force bearing surface extending beneath and beside the plates, vertically oriented links and horizontally oriented links connecting each plate to a force bearing surface, a force measuring device in each link, a transducer coupled to each force measuring device, and a computing device coupled to receive an output signal from the transducer indicative of measured force in each force measuring device. The present invention may be used for testing vehicle brake systems.

  9. Putting On the Brakes to Protect America's Natural Treasures - Continuum

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Magazine | NREL Putting On the Brakes to Protect America's Natural Treasures Putting On the Brakes to Protect America's Natural Treasures National Parks Initiative greens roads and preserves once-in-a-lifetime experiences. A white, four-door car parked on asphalt in front of a marble, multi-columned, dome-roofed building, which is surrounded by evergreen trees and under a slightly cloudy sky. A plug-in electric vehicle charges near the Thomas Jefferson Memorial in Washington, D.C. Photo from

  10. Combined hydraulic and regenerative braking system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Venkataperumal, Rama R.; Mericle, Gerald E.

    1981-06-02

    A combined hydraulic and regenerative braking system and method for an electric vehicle, with the braking system being responsive to the applied hydraulic pressure in a brake line to control the braking of the vehicle to be completely hydraulic up to a first level of brake line pressure, to be partially hydraulic at a constant braking force and partially regenerative at a linearly increasing braking force from the first level of applied brake line pressure to a higher second level of brake line pressure, to be partially hydraulic at a linearly increasing braking force and partially regenerative at a linearly decreasing braking force from the second level of applied line pressure to a third and higher level of applied line pressure, and to be completely hydraulic at a linearly increasing braking force from the third level to all higher applied levels of line pressure.

  11. Combined hydraulic and regenerative braking system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Venkataperumal, R.R.; Mericle, G.E.

    1979-08-09

    A combined hydraulic and regenerative braking system and method for an electric vehicle is disclosed. The braking system is responsive to the applied hydraulic pressure in a brake line to control the braking of the vehicle to be completely hydraulic up to a first level of brake line pressure, to be partially hydraulic at a constant braking force and partially regenerative at a linearly increasing braking force from the first level of applied brake line pressure to a higher second level of brake line pressure, to be partially hydraulic at a linearly increasing braking force and partially regenerative at a linearly decreasing braking force from the second level of applied line pressure to a third and higher level of applied line pressure, and to be completely hydraulic at a linearly increasing braking force from the third level to all higher applied levels of line pressure.

  12. Solar tracker motor having a fixed caliper and a translating caliper each with an electromagnetic brake system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rau, Scott James

    2013-01-29

    Concepts and technologies described herein provide for an accurate and cost-effective method for rotating a solar array disk for tracking the movement of the sun. According to various aspects, a motor includes a fixed caliper and a translating caliper positioned adjacent to one another. Electromagnetically controlled brakes on the translating caliper grip the solar array disk while adjacent, but spaced apart, electromagnets on the fixed caliper and the translating caliper are energized to create an attractive force that pulls the translating caliper with the solar array disk toward the fixed caliper. After reaching the fixed caliper, brakes on the fixed caliper are engaged with the disk, brakes on the translating caliper are released from the disk, and the translating caliper is pushed back to the starting location where the process repeats until the desired rotation is completed.

  13. Regenerative braking device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hoppie, Lyle O.

    1982-01-12

    Disclosed are several embodiments of a regenerative braking device for an automotive vehicle. The device includes a plurality of rubber rollers (24, 26) mounted for rotation between an input shaft (14) connectable to the vehicle drivetrain and an output shaft (16) which is drivingly connected to the input shaft by a variable ratio transmission (20). When the transmission ratio is such that the input shaft rotates faster than the output shaft, the rubber rollers are torsionally stressed to accumulate energy, thereby slowing the vehicle. When the transmission ratio is such that the output shaft rotates faster than the input shaft, the rubber rollers are torsionally relaxed to deliver accumulated energy, thereby accelerating or driving the vehicle.

  14. Variable ratio regenerative braking device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hoppie, Lyle O.

    1981-12-15

    Disclosed is a regenerative braking device (10) for an automotive vehicle. The device includes an energy storage assembly (12) having a plurality of rubber rollers (26, 28) mounted for rotation between an input shaft (36) and an output shaft (42), clutches (38, 46) and brakes (40, 48) associated with each shaft, and a continuously variable transmission (22) connectable to a vehicle drivetrain and to the input and output shafts by the respective clutches. The rubber rollers are torsionally stressed to accumulate energy from the vehicle when the input shaft is clutched to the transmission while the brake on the output shaft is applied, and are torsionally relaxed to deliver energy to the vehicle when the output shaft is clutched to the transmission while the brake on the input shaft is applied. The transmission ratio is varied to control the rate of energy accumulation and delivery for a given rotational speed of the vehicle drivetrain.

  15. Brake blending strategy for a hybrid vehicle

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Boberg, Evan S.

    2000-12-05

    A hybrid electric powertrain system is provided including a transmission for driving a pair of wheels of a vehicle and a heat engine and an electric motor/generator coupled to the transmission. A friction brake system is provided for applying a braking torque to said vehicle. A controller unit generates control signals to the electric motor/generator and the friction brake system for controllably braking the vehicle in response to a drivers brake command. The controller unit determines and amount of regenerative torque available and compares this value to a determined amount of brake torque requested for determining the control signals to the electric motor/generator and the friction brake system.

  16. ETA-HTP06 - Braking Test

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    HTP06 Revision 2 Effective October 1, 2007 Braking Test Prepared by Electric ... Activity Requirements 3 5.3 Dry Controlled Test 4 6. Glossary 5 7. References 7 Appendices ...

  17. Hybrid Braking System for Non-Drive Axles | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Hybrid Braking System for Non-Drive Axles A hybrid braking system is designed to conserve diesel fuel (or alternative fuels) by using regenerative braking, which extends hybrid ...

  18. Method and apparatus for wind turbine braking

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Barbu, Corneliu; Teichmann, Ralph; Avagliano, Aaron; Kammer, Leonardo Cesar; Pierce, Kirk Gee; Pesetsky, David Samuel; Gauchel, Peter

    2009-02-10

    A method for braking a wind turbine including at least one rotor blade coupled to a rotor. The method includes selectively controlling an angle of pitch of the at least one rotor blade with respect to a wind direction based on a design parameter of a component of the wind turbine to facilitate reducing a force induced into the wind turbine component as a result of braking.

  19. Adaptive controller for regenerative and friction braking system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Davis, Roy I.

    1990-01-01

    A regenerative and friction braking system for a vehicle having one or more roadwheels driven by an electric traction motor includes a driver responsive device for producing a brake demand signal having a magnitude corresponding to the level of braking force selected by the driver and friction and regenerative brakes operatively connected with the roadwheels of the vehicle. A system according to this invention further includes control means for operating the friction and regenerative braking subsystems so that maximum brake torques sustainable by the roadwheels of the vehicle without skidding or slipping will not be exceeded.

  20. Adaptive controller for regenerative and friction braking system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Davis, R.I.

    1990-10-16

    A regenerative and friction braking system for a vehicle having one or more road wheels driven by an electric traction motor includes a driver responsive device for producing a brake demand signal having a magnitude corresponding to the level of braking force selected by the driver and friction and regenerative brakes operatively connected with the road wheels of the vehicle. A system according to this invention further includes control means for operating the friction and regenerative braking subsystems so that maximum brake torques sustainable by the road wheels of the vehicle without skidding or slipping will not be exceeded. 8 figs.

  1. ORBITAL AND MASS RATIO EVOLUTION OF PROTOBINARIES DRIVEN BY MAGNETIC BRAKING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao, Bo; Li, Zhi-Yun

    2013-01-20

    The majority of stars reside in multiple systems, especially binaries. The formation and early evolution of binaries is a longstanding problem in star formation that is not yet fully understood. In particular, how the magnetic field observed in star-forming cores shapes the binary characteristics remains relatively unexplored. We demonstrate numerically, using an MHD version of the ENZO AMR hydro code, that a magnetic field of the observed strength can drastically change two of the basic quantities that characterize a binary system: the orbital separation and mass ratio of the two components. Our calculations focus on the protostellar mass accretion phase, after a pair of stellar 'seeds' have already formed. We find that in dense cores magnetized to a realistic level, the angular momentum of the material accreted by the protobinary is greatly reduced by magnetic braking. Accretion of strongly braked material shrinks the protobinary separation by a large factor compared to the non-magnetic case. The magnetic braking also changes the evolution of the mass ratio of unequal-mass protobinaries by producing material of low specific angular momentum that accretes preferentially onto the more massive primary star rather than the secondary. This is in contrast with the preferential mass accretion onto the secondary previously found numerically for protobinaries accreting from an unmagnetized envelope, which tends to drive the mass ratio toward unity. In addition, the magnetic field greatly modifies the morphology and dynamics of the protobinary accretion flow. It suppresses the traditional circumstellar and circumbinary disks that feed the protobinary in the non-magnetic case; the binary is fed instead by a fast collapsing pseudodisk whose rotation is strongly braked. The magnetic braking-driven inward migration of binaries from their birth locations may be constrained by high-resolution observations of the orbital distribution of deeply embedded protobinaries, especially with ALMA and JVLA.

  2. Electric vehicle regenerative antiskid braking and traction control system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cikanek, S.R.

    1995-09-12

    An antiskid braking and traction control system for an electric or hybrid vehicle having a regenerative braking system operatively connected to an electric traction motor, and a separate hydraulic braking system includes one or more sensors for monitoring present vehicle parameters and a processor, responsive to the sensors, for calculating vehicle parameters defining the vehicle behavior not directly measurable by the sensors and determining if regenerative antiskid braking control, requiring hydraulic braking control, or requiring traction control are required. The processor then employs a control strategy based on the determined vehicle state and provides command signals to a motor controller to control the operation of the electric traction motor and to a brake controller to control fluid pressure applied at each vehicle wheel to provide the appropriate regenerative antiskid braking control, hydraulic braking control, and traction control. 10 figs.

  3. Electric vehicle regenerative antiskid braking and traction control system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cikanek, Susan R.

    1995-01-01

    An antiskid braking and traction control system for an electric or hybrid vehicle having a regenerative braking system operatively connected to an electric traction motor, and a separate hydraulic braking system includes one or more sensors for monitoring present vehicle parameters and a processor, responsive to the sensors, for calculating vehicle parameters defining the vehicle behavior not directly measurable by the sensors and determining if regenerative antiskid braking control, requiring hydrualic braking control, or requiring traction control are required. The processor then employs a control strategy based on the determined vehicle state and provides command signals to a motor controller to control the operation of the electric traction motor and to a brake controller to control fluid pressure applied at each vehicle wheel to provide the appropriate regenerative antiskid braking control, hydraulic braking control, and traction control.

  4. Disk filter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bergman, Werner

    1986-01-01

    An electric disk filter provides a high efficiency at high temperature. A hollow outer filter of fibrous stainless steel forms the ground electrode. A refractory filter material is placed between the outer electrode and the inner electrically isolated high voltage electrode. Air flows through the outer filter surfaces through the electrified refractory filter media and between the high voltage electrodes and is removed from a space in the high voltage electrode.

  5. Disk filter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bergman, W.

    1985-01-09

    An electric disk filter provides a high efficiency at high temperature. A hollow outer filter of fibrous stainless steel forms the ground electrode. A refractory filter material is placed between the outer electrode and the inner electrically isolated high voltage electrode. Air flows through the outer filter surfaces through the electrified refractory filter media and between the high voltage electrodes and is removed from a space in the high voltage electrode.

  6. Front Burner- Issue 14

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Cybersecurity Front Burner Issue No. 14 highlights the 2013 National Cybersecurity Awareness Month (NCSAM) Campaign and Phishing Scams.

  7. Front Burner- Issue 15

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Cybersecurity Front Burner Issue No. 15 addresses the DOE eSCRM Program and Secure Online Shopping.

  8. Engine brake control in automatic transmission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hayasaki, K.; Sugano, K.

    1988-09-13

    This patent describes an engine braking control for a transmission for an automotive vehicle having an engine, the transmission including an input member drivingly coupled to the engine and an output member subject to load from driving wheels of the automotive vehicle, the transmission also including a first rotary member, a second rotary member, a hydraulically operated clutch selectively establishing a drive connection between the first rotary member and the second rotary member, and a one-way clutch arranged in parallel to the hydraulically operated clutch such that when the hydraulically operated clutch is released, the one-way clutch transmits forward torque from the first rotary member to the second rotary member, but interrupts transmission of revers torque to the first rotary member from the second rotary member, the engine braking control comprising: means for providing an engine braking command fluid pressure signal when demanded by a vehicle operator; a valve means for normally discharging hydraulic fluid from the hydraulically operated clutch to deactivate the hydraulically operated clutch, the valve means being fluidly connected to the hydraulically operated clutch, the engine braking command fluid pressure signal providing means and a drain port. The valve means including a valve spool having a first position where the hydraulically operated clutch is allowed to communicate with the drain port to permit discharge of hydraulic fluid therefrom and thus the hydraulically operated clutch is caused to be deactivated and a second position where the hydraulically operated clutch is disconnected from the drain port and allowed to communicate with the engine braking command fluid pressure signal.

  9. Front Burner- Issue 13

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Cybersecurity Front Burner Issue No. 13 contained a message from the Associate Chief Information Officer (ACIO) for Cybersecurity as well as a listing of recommended cybersecurity practices.

  10. ARM - Front Page

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Page Front Page World's premier ground-based observations facility advancing climate change research A U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science user facility, providing data...

  11. Front Burner- Issue 18

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Cybersecurity Front Burner Issue No. 18 addresses keeping kids safe on the Internet, cyber crime, and DOE Cyber awareness and training initiatives.

  12. Braking system for use with an arbor of a microscope

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Norgren, Duane U. (Orinda, CA)

    1984-01-01

    A balanced braking system comprising a plurality of braking assemblies located about a member to be braked. Each of the braking assemblies consists of a spring biased piston of a first material fitted into a body of a different material which has a greater contraction upon cooling than the piston material. The piston is provided with a recessed head portion over which is positioned a diaphragm and forming a space therebetween to which is connected a pressurized fluid supply. The diaphragm is controlled by the fluid in the space to contact or withdraw from the member to be braked. A cooling device causes the body within which the piston is fitted to contract more than the piston, producing a tight shrink fit therebetween. The braking system is particularly applicable for selectively braking an arbor of an electron microscope which immobilizes, for example, a vertically adjustable low temperature specimen holder during observation. The system provides balanced braking forces which can be easily removed and re-established with minimal disturbance to arbor location.

  13. The Vela pulsar with an active fallback disk

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    zskan, Gke; Ek?i, K. Yavuz [Faculty of Science and Letters, Department of Physics, ?stanbul Technical University, Maslak 34469, ?stanbul (Turkey); Hambaryan, Valeri; Neuhuser, Ralph; Hohle, Markus M.; Ginski, Christian [Astrophysikalisches Institut und Universitts-Sternwarte, Universitt Jena, Schillergchen 2-3, 07745 Jena (Germany); Werner, Klaus, E-mail: eksi@itu.edu.tr [Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Kepler Center for Astro and Particle Physics, Eberhard Karls University, Sand 1, D-72076 Tbingen (Germany)

    2014-11-20

    Fallback disks are expected to form around young neutron stars. The presence of these disks can be revealed by their blackbody spectrum in the infrared, optical, and UV bands. We present a re-reduction of the archival optical and infrared data of the Vela pulsar, together with the existing infrared and UV spectrum of Vela, and model their unpulsed components with the blackbody spectrum of a supernova debris disk. We invoke the quiescent disk solution of Sunyaev and Shakura for the description of the disk in the propeller stage and find the inner radius of the disk to be inside the light cylinder radius. We perform a high-resolution X-ray analysis with XMM-Newton and find a narrow absorption feature at 0.57 keV that can be interpreted as the K {sub ?} line of He-like oxygen (O VII). The strength of the line indicates an element over-abundance in our line of sight exceeding the amounts that would be expected from interstellar medium. The spectral feature may originate from the pulsar wind nebula and may be partly caused by the reprocessed X-ray radiation by the fallback disk. We discuss the lower-than-three braking index of Vela as partially due to the contribution of the propeller torques. Our results suggest that the pulsar mechanism can work simultaneously with the propeller processes and that the debris disks can survive the radiation pressure for at least ?10{sup 4} yr. As Vela is a relatively close object, and a prototypical pulsar, the presence of a disk, if confirmed, may indicate the ubiquity of debris disks around young neutron stars.

  14. Hall-effect-controlled gas dynamics in protoplanetary disks. I. Wind solutions at the inner disk

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bai, Xue-Ning

    2014-08-20

    The gas dynamics of protoplanetary disks (PPDs) is largely controlled by non-ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) effects including Ohmic resistivity, the Hall effect, and ambipolar diffusion. Among these the role of the Hall effect is the least explored and most poorly understood. In this series, we have included, for the first time, all three non-ideal MHD effects in a self-consistent manner to investigate the role of the Hall effect on PPD gas dynamics using local shearing-box simulations. In this first paper, we focus on the inner region of PPDs, where previous studies (Bai and Stone 2013; Bai 2013) excluding the Hall effect have revealed that the inner disk up to ?10 AU is largely laminar, with accretion driven by a magnetocentrifugal wind. We confirm this basic picture and show that the Hall effect modifies the wind solutions depending on the polarity of the large-scale poloidal magnetic field B{sub 0} threading the disk. When B{sub 0}??>0, the horizontal magnetic field is strongly amplified toward the disk interior, leading to a stronger disk wind (by ?50% or less in terms of the wind-driven accretion rate). The enhanced horizontal field also leads to much stronger large-scale Maxwell stress (magnetic braking) that contributes to a considerable fraction of the wind-driven accretion rate. When B{sub 0}??<0, the horizontal magnetic field is reduced, leading to a weaker disk wind (by ? 20%) and negligible magnetic braking. Under fiducial parameters, we find that when B{sub 0}??>0, the laminar region extends farther to ?10-15 AU before the magnetorotational instability sets in, while for B{sub 0}??<0, the laminar region extends only to ?3-5 AU for a typical accretion rate of ?10{sup 8} to10{sup 7} M {sub ?} yr{sup 1}. Scaling relations for the wind properties, especially the wind-driven accretion rate, are provided for aligned and anti-aligned field geometries.

  15. Glass rupture disk

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Glass, S. Jill; Nicolaysen, Scott D.; Beauchamp, Edwin K.

    2002-01-01

    A frangible rupture disk and mounting apparatus for use in blocking fluid flow, generally in a fluid conducting conduit such as a well casing, a well tubing string or other conduits within subterranean boreholes. The disk can also be utilized in above-surface pipes or tanks where temporary and controllable fluid blockage is required. The frangible rupture disk is made from a pre-stressed glass with controllable rupture properties wherein the strength distribution has a standard deviation less than approximately 5% from the mean strength. The frangible rupture disk has controllable operating pressures and rupture pressures.

  16. Disk Quota Increase Request

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Disk Quota Increase Disk Quota Increase Request NERSC will consider reasonable requests for changes in disk space and inode limits. Please submit a request through the "Request Forms" section at the NERSC help portal. If you select "Hopper scratch directory" from the "File System" menu below, the quota value requested applies to the combined contents of $SCRATCH and $SCRATCH2. Please ask for the least amount of resources you need, since the sum of disk space and

  17. Fuzzy logic electric vehicle regenerative antiskid braking and traction control system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cikanek, S.R.

    1994-10-25

    An regenerative antiskid braking and traction control system using fuzzy logic for an electric or hybrid vehicle having a regenerative braking system operatively connected to an electric traction motor, and a separate hydraulic braking system includes sensors for monitoring present vehicle parameters and a processor, responsive to the sensors, for calculating vehicle parameters defining the vehicle behavior not directly measurable by the sensor and determining if regenerative antiskid braking control, requiring hydraulic braking control, and requiring traction control are required. The processor then employs fuzzy logic based on the determined vehicle state and provides command signals to a motor controller to control operation of the electric traction motor and to the brake controller to control fluid pressure applied at each vehicle wheel to provide the appropriate regenerative braking control, hydraulic braking control, and traction control. 123 figs.

  18. Fuzzy logic electric vehicle regenerative antiskid braking and traction control system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cikanek, Susan R.

    1994-01-01

    An regenerative antiskid braking and traction control system using fuzzy logic for an electric or hybrid vehicle having a regenerative braking system operatively connected to an electric traction motor, and a separate hydraulic braking system includes sensors for monitoring present vehicle parameters and a processor, responsive to the sensors, for calculating vehicle parameters defining the vehicle behavior not directly measurable by the sensor and determining if regenerative antiskid braking control, requiring hydraulic braking control, and requiring traction control are required. The processor then employs fuzzy logic based on the determined vehicle state and provides command signals to a motor controller to control operation of the electric traction motor and to the brake controller to control fluid pressure applied at each vehicle wheel to provide the appropriate regenerative braking control, hydraulic braking control, and traction control.

  19. Regenerative braking device with rotationally mounted energy storage means

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hoppie, Lyle O.

    1982-03-16

    A regenerative braking device for an automotive vehicle includes an energy storage assembly (12) having a plurality of rubber rollers (26, 28) mounted for rotation between an input shaft (30) and an output shaft (32), clutches (50, 56) and brakes (52, 58) associated with each shaft, and a continuously variable transmission (22) connectable to a vehicle drivetrain and to the input and output shafts by the respective clutches. In a second embodiment the clutches and brakes are dispensed with and the variable ratio transmission is connected directly across the input and output shafts. In both embodiments the rubber rollers are torsionally stressed to accumulate energy from the vehicle when the input shaft rotates faster or relative to the output shaft and are torsionally relaxed to deliver energy to the vehicle when the output shaft rotates faster or relative to the input shaft.

  20. CIRCUMPLANETARY DISK FORMATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ward, William R.; Canup, Robin M.

    2010-11-15

    The development and evolution of a circumplanetary disk during the accretion of a giant planet is examined. The planet gains mass and angular momentum from infalling solar nebula material while simultaneously contracting due to luminosity losses. When the planet becomes rotationally unstable it begins to shed material into a circumplanetary disk. Viscosity causes the disk to spread to a moderate fraction of the Hill radius where it is assumed that a small fraction of the material escapes back into heliocentric orbit, carrying away most of the excess angular momentum. As the planet's contraction continues, its radius can become smaller than the spatial range of the inflow and material begins to fall directly onto the disk, which switches from a spin-out disk to an accretion disk as the planet completes its growth. We here develop a description of the circumplanetary disk, which is combined with models of the planet's contraction and the inflow rate including its angular momentum content to yield a solution for the time evolution of a planet-disk system.

  1. THE MAGNETIC FIELD IN THE CLASS 0 PROTOSTELLAR DISK OF L1527

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Segura-Cox, Dominique M.; Looney, Leslie W.; Stephens, Ian W.; Fernndez-Lpez, Manuel; Crutcher, Richard; Kwon, Woojin; Tobin, John J.; Li, Zhi-Yun

    2015-01-01

    We present subarcsecond (?0.''35) resolved observations of the 1.3 mm dust polarization from the edge-on circumstellar disk around the Class0 protostar L1527. The inferred magnetic field is consistent with a dominantly toroidal morphology; there is no significantly detected vertical poloidal component to which observations of an edge-on disk are most sensitive. This suggests that angular momentum transport in Class0 protostars (when large amounts of material are fed down to the disk from the envelope and accreted onto the protostar) is driven mainly by magnetorotational instability rather than magnetocentrifugal winds at 50 AU scales. In addition, with the data to date there is an early, tentative trend that R >30 AU disks have so far been found in Class0 systems with average magnetic fields on the 1000 AU scale strongly misaligned with the rotation axis. The absence of such a disk in the aligned case could be due to efficient magnetic braking that disrupts disk formation. If this is the case, this implies that candidate Class0 disk systems could be identified by the average magnetic field direction at ?1000 AU spatial scales.

  2. FRONT BURNER - ISSUE 19 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    FRONT BURNER - ISSUE 19 FRONT BURNER - ISSUE 19 The Cybersecurity Front Burner Issue No. 19 is the 2014 DOE NCSAM event newsletter, which examines Securing the Internet of Things, Facebook Messenger Application, and implementation of the Contractor Training Site. PDF icon Cybersecurity Front Burner Issue No. 19 More Documents & Publications FRONT BURNER - Issue 20 2012 NCSAM Campaign

  3. Front Burner - Issue 16 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Front Burner - Issue 16 Front Burner - Issue 16 The Cybersecurity Front Burner Issue No. 16 addresses Malware, the Worst Passwords of 2013, and the Flat Stanley and Stop.Think.Connect. Campaign. PDF icon Cybersecurity Front Burner Newsletter Issue 16 More Documents & Publications April 2014 Cybersecurity Awareness Campaign - Malware FRONT BURNER - Issue 20

  4. Heavy and Overweight Vehicle Brake Testing: Five-Axle Combination Tractor-Flatbed Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lascurain, Mary Beth; Capps, Gary J; Franzese, Oscar

    2013-10-01

    The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration, in coordination with the Federal Highway Administration, sponsored the Heavy and Overweight Vehicle Brake Testing (HOVBT) program in order to provide information about the effect of gross vehicle weight (GVW) on braking performance. Because the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Regulations limit the number of braking system defects that may exist for a vehicle to be allowed to operate on the roadways, the examination of the effect of brake defects on brake performance for increased loads is also relevant. The HOVBT program seeks to provide relevant information to policy makers responsible for establishing load limits, beginning with providing test data for a combination tractor/trailer. This testing was conducted on a five-axle combination vehicle with tractor brakes meeting the Reduced Stopping Distance requirement rulemaking. This report provides a summary of the testing activities, the results of various analyses of the data, and recommendations for future research. Following a complete brake rebuild, instrumentation, and brake burnish, stopping tests were performed from 20 and 40 mph with various brake application pressures (15 psi, 25 psi, 35 psi, 45 psi, 55 psi, and full system pressure). These tests were conducted for various brake conditions at the following GVWs: 60,000, 80,000, 91,000, 97,000, 106,000, and 116,000 lb. The 80,000-lb GVWs included both balanced and unbalanced loads. The condition of the braking system was also varied. To introduce these defects, brakes (none, forward drive axle, or rear trailer axle) were made inoperative. In addition to the stopping tests, performance-based brake tests were conducted for the various loading and brake conditions. Analysis of the stopping test data showed the stopping distance to increase with load (as expected) and also showed that more braking force was generated by the drive axle brakes than the trailer axle brakes. The constant-pressure stopping test data revealed a linear relationship between brake application pressure and was used to develop an algorithm to normalize stopping data for weight and initial speed.

  5. Premixed direct injection disk

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    York, William David; Ziminsky, Willy Steve; Johnson, Thomas Edward; Lacy, Benjamin; Zuo, Baifang; Uhm, Jong Ho

    2013-04-23

    A fuel/air mixing disk for use in a fuel/air mixing combustor assembly is provided. The disk includes a first face, a second face, and at least one fuel plenum disposed therebetween. A plurality of fuel/air mixing tubes extend through the pre-mixing disk, each mixing tube including an outer tube wall extending axially along a tube axis and in fluid communication with the at least one fuel plenum. At least a portion of the plurality of fuel/air mixing tubes further includes at least one fuel injection hole have a fuel injection hole diameter extending through said outer tube wall, the fuel injection hole having an injection angle relative to the tube axis. The invention provides good fuel air mixing with low combustion generated NOx and low flow pressure loss translating to a high gas turbine efficiency, that is durable, and resistant to flame holding and flash back.

  6. SPINDOWN OF ISOLATED NEUTRON STARS: GRAVITATIONAL WAVES OR MAGNETIC BRAKING?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Staff, Jan E.; Jaikumar, Prashanth; Chan, Vincent; Ouyed, Rachid

    2012-05-20

    We study the spindown of isolated neutron stars from initially rapid rotation rates, driven by two factors: (1) gravitational wave emission due to r-modes and (2) magnetic braking. In the context of isolated neutron stars, we present the first study including self-consistently the magnetic damping of r-modes in the spin evolution. We track the spin evolution employing the RNS code, which accounts for the rotating structure of neutron stars for various equations of state. We find that, despite the strong damping due to the magnetic field, r-modes alter the braking rate from pure magnetic braking for B {<=} 10{sup 13} G. For realistic values of the saturation amplitude {alpha}{sub sat}, the r-mode can also decrease the time to reach the threshold central density for quark deconfinement. Within a phenomenological model, we assess the gravitational waveform that would result from r-mode-driven spindown of a magnetized neutron star. To contrast with the persistent signal during the spindown phase, we also present a preliminary estimate of the transient gravitational wave signal from an explosive quark-hadron phase transition, which can be a signal for the deconfinement of quarks inside neutron stars.

  7. Front Range Energy LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search Logo: Front Range Energy LLC Name: Front Range Energy LLC Address: 31375 Great Western Dr Place: Windsor, Colorado Zip: 80550 Region: Rockies Area Sector: Biofuels...

  8. GIANT PLANET FORMATION BY DISK INSTABILITY IN LOW MASS DISKS?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boss, Alan P.

    2010-12-20

    Forming giant planets by disk instability requires a gaseous disk that is massive enough to become gravitationally unstable and able to cool fast enough for self-gravitating clumps to form and survive. Models with simplified disk cooling have shown the critical importance of the ratio of the cooling to the orbital timescales. Uncertainties about the proper value of this ratio can be sidestepped by including radiative transfer. Three-dimensional radiative hydrodynamics models of a disk with a mass of 0.043 M{sub sun} from 4 to 20 AU in orbit around a 1 M{sub sun} protostar show that disk instabilities are considerably less successful in producing self-gravitating clumps than in a disk with twice this mass. The results are sensitive to the assumed initial outer disk (T{sub o}) temperatures. Models with T{sub o} = 20 K are able to form a single self-gravitating clump, whereas models with T{sub o} = 25 K form clumps that are not quite self-gravitating. These models imply that disk instability requires a disk with a mass of at least {approx}0.043 M{sub sun} inside 20 AU in order to form giant planets around solar-mass protostars with realistic disk cooling rates and outer-disk temperatures. Lower mass disks around solar-mass protostars must rely upon core accretion to form inner giant planets.

  9. Real-Time Dynamic Brake Assessment Proof of Concept Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lascurain, Mary Beth; Franzese, Oscar; Capps, Gary J

    2011-11-01

    This proof-of-concept research was performed to explore the feasibility of using real-world braking data from commercial motor vehicles to make a diagnosis of brake condition similar to that of the performance-based brake tester (PBBT). This was done by determining the relationship between pressure and brake force (P-BF), compensating for the gross vehicle weight (GVW). The nature of this P-BF relationship (e.g., low braking force for a given brake application pressure) may indicate brake system problems. In order to determine the relationship between brake force and brake application pressure, a few key parameters of duty cycle information were collected. Because braking events are often brief, spanning only a few seconds, a sample rate of 10 Hz was needed. The algorithm under development required brake application pressure and speed (from which deceleration was calculated). Accurate weight estimation was also needed to properly derive the braking force from the deceleration. In order to ensure that braking force was the predominant factor in deceleration for the segments of data used in analysis, the data was screened for grade as well. Also, the analysis needed to be based on pressures above the crack pressure. The crack pressure is the pressure below which the individual brakes are not applied due the nature of the mechanical system. This value, which may vary somewhat from one wheel end to another, is approximately 10 psi. Therefore, only pressures 15 psi and above were used in the analysis. The Department of Energy s Medium Truck Duty Cycle research has indicated that under the real-world circumstances of the test vehicle brake pressures of up to approximately 30 psi can be expected. Several different types of data were collected during the testing task of this project. Constant-pressure stopping tests were conducted at several combinations of brake application pressure (15, 20, 25, and 30 psi), load conditions (moderately and fully laden), and speeds (20 and 30 mph). Data was collected at 10 Hz. Standard and stepped-pressure performance-based brake tests with brake pressure transducers were performed for each loading condition. The stepped-pressure test included the constant-pressure intervals of brake application at 15, 20, 25, and 30 psi. The PBBT data files included 10 Hz streaming data collected during the testing of each axle. Two weeks of real-world duty cycle (driving and braking) data was also collected at 10 Hz. Initial analysis of the data revealed that the data collected in the field (i.e., day-to-day operations) provided the same information as that obtained from the controlled tests. Analysis of the data collected revealed a strong linear relationship between brake application pressure and deceleration for given GVWs. As anticipated, initial speed was not found to be a significant factor in the deceleration-pressure relationship, unlike GVW. The positive results obtained from this proof of concept test point to the need for further research to expand this concept. A second phase should include testing over a wider range of speeds and include medium brake application pressures in addition to the low pressures tested in this research. Testing on multiple vehicles would also be of value. This future phase should involve testing to determine how degradation of braking performance affects the pressure-deceleration relationship.

  10. Compositions, Functions, and Testing of Friction Brake Materials and Their Additives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blau, PJ

    2001-10-22

    The purpose of this report is to present a survey of commercial brake materials and additives, and to indicate their typical properties and functions, especially as regards their use in heavy trucks. Most truck pad and shoe materials described here were designed to wear against cast iron. Brake material test methods are also briefly described. This report does not address issues associated with the fabrication and manufacturing of brake materials. Since there are literally thousands of brake material additives, and their combinations are nearly limitless, it is impractical to list them all here. Rather, an attempt has been made to capture the primary constituents and their functions. An Appendix contains thermo-physical properties of some current and potential brake materials.

  11. Wind turbine trailing-edge aerodynamic brake design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quandt, G.

    1996-01-01

    This report describes the design of a centrifugally actuated aerodynamic-overspeed device for a horizontal-axis wind turbine. The device will meet the following criteria; (1) It will be effective for airfoil angles of attack 0{degrees} to 45{degrees}. (2) It will be stowed inside the blade profile prior to deployment. (3) It will be capable of offsetting the positive torque produced by the overall blade. (4) Hinge moments will be minimized to lower actuator loads and cost. (5) It will be evaluated as a potential power modulating active rotor-control system. A literature review of aerodynamic braking devices was conducted. Information from the literature review was used to conceptualize the most effective devices for subsequent testing and design. Wind-tunnel test data for several braking devices are presented in this report. Using the data for the most promising configuration, a preliminary design was developed for a MICON 65/13 wind turbine with Phoenix 7.9-m rotor blades.

  12. FRONT BURNER - Issue 20 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Issue 20 FRONT BURNER - Issue 20 Cybersecurity Front Burner Issue No. 20 examines Phishing and provides tips for protecting yourself from this common and clever security threat. You'll also see information on wireless networks, supply chains, training events, and cybersecurity resources. PDF icon Cybersecurity Front Burner Issue No. 20 More Documents & Publications 2013 NCSAM Campaign Cybersecurity Flyers/Pamphlets Front Burner - Issue 16

  13. Operations & Maintenance Best Practices Guide: Front Matter

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Guide describes the front matter of the Operations and Maintenance Best Practices: a Guide to Achieving Operational Efficiency.

  14. BLM Sierra Front Field Office | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Front Field Office Jump to: navigation, search Name: BLM Sierra Front Field Office Abbreviation: Sierra Front Address: 5665 Morgan Mill Road Place: Carson City, NV Zip: 89701 Phone...

  15. Berkeley Disk Resource Manager

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2004-02-27

    The Berkeley Disk Resource Manager (B-DRM) is a middleware component whose function is to provide dynamic space allocation and file management of a shared disk system on the Grid. It provides space allocation and dynamic information on storage availability for the planning and execution of Grid jobs. The B-DRM manages two types of resources: space and files. Vi1en managing space, the B-DRM allocates space to the requesting client based on a default space quota, Then managing files, the B-DRM allocates space for files, invokes file transfer services to move files into the space, pins files for a certain lifetime, releases files upon the client?s request, and uses file replacement policies to optimize the use of the shared space. The B-DRM is designed to provide effective sharing of files, by monitoring the activity of shared files, and making dynamic decisions on which files to replace when space is needed. In addition, the B-DRM performs automatic garbage collection of unused files when space is needed by removing selected files that were released by the client or whose lifetime has expired. The BDRM supports requests to get multiple files in a single call, manages a queue of the requested files, brings in as many files as the space quota permits, and continues to reuse the space when files are released to stream files to the client until the entire request is satisfied. Similarly, the B-DRM supports requests to put multiple files into its space, streaming files into the allocated space and reusing the space if necessary.

  16. Berkeley Disk Resource Manager

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2004-02-27

    The Berkeley Disk Resource Manager (B-DRM) is a middleware component whose function is to provide dynamic space allocation and file management of a shared disk system on the Grid. It provides space allocation and dynamic information on storage availability for the planning and execution of Grid jobs. The B-DRM manages two types of resources: space and files. Vi1en managing space, the B-DRM allocates space to the requesting client based on a default space quota, Thenmore » managing files, the B-DRM allocates space for files, invokes file transfer services to move files into the space, pins files for a certain lifetime, releases files upon the client’s request, and uses file replacement policies to optimize the use of the shared space. The B-DRM is designed to provide effective sharing of files, by monitoring the activity of shared files, and making dynamic decisions on which files to replace when space is needed. In addition, the B-DRM performs automatic garbage collection of unused files when space is needed by removing selected files that were released by the client or whose lifetime has expired. The BDRM supports requests to get multiple files in a single call, manages a queue of the requested files, brings in as many files as the space quota permits, and continues to reuse the space when files are released to stream files to the client until the entire request is satisfied. Similarly, the B-DRM supports requests to put multiple files into its space, streaming files into the allocated space and reusing the space if necessary.« less

  17. Bay Front Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    NEEDS 2006 Database Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleBayFrontBiomassFacility&oldid397174" Feedback Contact needs updating Image needs updating...

  18. Cybersecurity Front Burner | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The Cybersecurity Front Burner Issue No. 19 examines Securing the Internet of Things, Facebook Messenger Application, and implementation of the Contractor Training Site. July 17, ...

  19. ACCRETING CIRCUMPLANETARY DISKS: OBSERVATIONAL SIGNATURES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhu, Zhaohuan

    2015-01-20

    I calculate the spectral energy distributions of accreting circumplanetary disks using atmospheric radiative transfer models. Circumplanetary disks only accreting at 10{sup –10} M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1} around a 1 M{sub J} planet can be brighter than the planet itself. A moderately accreting circumplanetary disk ( M-dot ∼10{sup −8} M{sub ⊙} yr{sup −1}; enough to form a 10 M{sub J} planet within 1 Myr) around a 1 M{sub J} planet has a maximum temperature of ∼2000 K, and at near-infrared wavelengths (J, H, K bands), this disk is as bright as a late-M-type brown dwarf or a 10 M{sub J} planet with a ''hot start''. To use direct imaging to find the accretion disks around low-mass planets (e.g., 1 M{sub J} ) and distinguish them from brown dwarfs or hot high-mass planets, it is crucial to obtain photometry at mid-infrared bands (L', M, N bands) because the emission from circumplanetary disks falls off more slowly toward longer wavelengths than those of brown dwarfs or planets. If young planets have strong magnetic fields (≳100 G), fields may truncate slowly accreting circumplanetary disks ( M-dot ≲10{sup −9} M{sub ⊙} yr{sup −1}) and lead to magnetospheric accretion, which can provide additional accretion signatures, such as UV/optical excess from the accretion shock and line emission.

  20. Effects of turbulence on cosmic ray propagation in protostars and young star/disk systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fatuzzo, Marco; Adams, Fred C. E-mail: fca@umich.edu

    2014-05-20

    The magnetic fields associated with young stellar objects are expected to have an hour-glass geometry, i.e., the magnetic field lines are pinched as they thread the equatorial plane surrounding the forming star but merge smoothly onto a background field at large distances. With this field configuration, incoming cosmic rays experience both a funneling effect that acts to enhance the flux impinging on the circumstellar disk and a magnetic mirroring effect that acts to reduce that flux. To leading order, these effects nearly cancel out for simple underlying magnetic field structures. However, the environments surrounding young stellar objects are expected to be highly turbulent. This paper shows how the presence of magnetic field fluctuations affects the process of magnetic mirroring, and thereby changes the flux of cosmic rays striking circumstellar disks. Turbulence has two principle effects: (1) the (single) location of the magnetic mirror point found in the absence of turbulence is replaced with a wide distribution of values. (2) The median of the mirror point distribution moves outward for sufficiently large fluctuation amplitudes (roughly when ?B/B {sub 0} > 0.2 at the location of the turbulence-free mirror point); the distribution becomes significantly non-Gaussian in this regime as well. These results may have significant consequences for the ionization fraction of the disk, which in turn dictates the efficiency with which disk material can accrete onto the central object. A similar reduction in cosmic ray flux can occur during the earlier protostellar stages; the decrease in ionization can help alleviate the magnetic braking problem that inhibits disk formation.

  1. Compliant mechanism road bicycle brake: a rigid-body replacement case study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olsen, Brian M; Howell, Larry L; Magleby, Spencer P

    2011-01-19

    The design of high-performance bicycle brakes is complicated by the competing design objectives of increased performance and low weight. But this challenge also provides a good case study to demonstrate the design of compliant mechanisms to replace current rigid-link mechanisms. This paper briefly reviews current road brake designs, demonstrates the use of rigid-body replacement synthesis to design a compliant mechanism, and illustrates the combination of compliant mechanism design tools. The resulting concept was generated from the modified dual-pivot brake design and is a partially compliant mechanism where one pin has the dual role of a joint and a mounting pin. The pseudo-rigid-body model, finite element analysis, and optimization algorithms are used to generate design dimensions, and designs are considered for both titanium and E-glass flexures. The resulting design has the potential of reducing the part count and overall weight while maintaining a performance similar to the benchmark.

  2. REPORT on the TRUCK BRAKE LINING WORKSHOP and FLEET OPERATORS' SURVEY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blau, P.J.

    2003-02-03

    The report summarizes what transpired during brake linings-related workshop held at the Fall 2003 meeting of the Technology and Maintenance Council (TMC) in Charlotte, NC. The title of the workshop was ''Developing a Useful Friction Material Rating System''. It was organized by a team consisting of Peter Blau (Oak Ridge National Laboratory), Jim Britell (National Highway Traffic Safety Administration), and Jim Lawrence (Motor and Equipment Manufacturers Association). The workshop was held under the auspices of TMC Task Force S6 (Chassis), chaired by Joseph Stianche (Sanderson Farms, Inc.). Six invited speakers during the morning session provided varied perspectives on testing and rating aftermarket automotive and truck brake linings. They were: James R. Clark, Chief Engineer, Foundation Brakes and Wheel Equipment, Dana Corporation, Spicer Heavy Axle and Brake Division; Charles W. Greening, Jr, President, Greening Test Labs; Tim Duncan, General Manager, Link Testing Services;Dennis J. McNichol, President, Dennis NationaLease; Jim Fajerski, Business Manager, OE Sales and Applications Engineering, Federal Mogul Corporation; and Peter J. Blau, Senior Materials Development Engineer, Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The afternoon break-out sessions addressed nine questions concerning such issues as: ''Should the federal government regulate aftermarket lining quality?''; ''How many operators use RP 628, and if so, what's good or bad about it?''; and ''Would there be any value to you of a vocation-specific rating system?'' The opinions of each discussion group, consisting of 7-9 participants, were reported and consolidated in summary findings on each question. Some questions produced a greater degree of agreement than others. In general, the industry seems eager for more information that would allow those who are responsible for maintaining truck brakes to make better, more informed choices on aftermarket linings. A written fleet operator survey was also conducted during the TMC meeting. Twenty-one responses were received, spanning fleet sizes between 12 and 170,000 vehicles. Responses are summarized in a series of tables separated into responses from small (100 or fewer powered vehicles), medium (101-1000 vehicles), and large fleets (>1000 vehicles). The vast majority of fleets do their own brake maintenance, relying primarily on experience and lining manufactures to select aftermarket linings. At least half of the responders are familiar to some extent with TMC Recommended Practice 628 on brake linings, but most do not use this source of test data as the sole criterion to select linings. Significant shortfalls in the applicability of TMC RP 628 to certain types of brake systems were noted.

  3. System for lubrication of a brake air compressor associated with a turbocharged internal combustion engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spencer, J.C.

    1992-10-13

    This patent describes a system for use with a vehicle which includes a turbocharged internal combustion engine having a lubricating system wherein lubricating oil from an engine oil reservoir is circulated within the engine and also to and from an associated brake system air compressor which supplies compressed air for operation of the vehicle air braking system. This patent describes improvement in passing supercharged air to an oil crankcase of the air compressor to cause lubricating oil to drain therefrom and return to the engine oil reservoir.

  4. Optimization of the Processing of Mo Disks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tkac, Peter; Rotsch, David A.; Stepinski, Dominique; Makarashvili, Vakhtang; Harvey, James; Vandegrift, George F.

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this work is to decrease the processing time for irradiated disks of enriched Mo for the production of 99Mo. Results are given for the dissolution of nonirradiated Mo disks, optimization of the process for large-scale dissolution of sintered disks, optimization of the removal of the main side products (Zr and Nb) from dissolved targets, and dissolution of irradiated Mo disks.

  5. Strengthening the Front Lines: Sales Training and Continuing...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    the Front Lines: Sales Training and Continuing Education for Contractors Strengthening the Front Lines: Sales Training and Continuing Education for Contractors Better Buildings ...

  6. Light-Front Holography, Color Confinement, and Supersymmetric...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Conference: Light-Front Holography, Color Confinement, and Supersymmetric Features of QCD Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Light-Front Holography, Color Confinement, and ...

  7. The anti-glitch of magnetar 1E 2259+586 in the wind braking scenario

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tong, H.

    2014-04-01

    The anti-glitch of magnetar 1E 2259+586 is analyzed theoretically. An enhanced particle wind during the observational interval takes away additional rotational energy of the neutron star, which will result in a net spin-down of the magnetar, i.e., an anti-glitch. In the wind braking scenario of the anti-glitch, there are several predictions: (1) a radiative event will always accompany the anti-glitch, (2) there will be a decrease/variation of the braking index after the anti-glitch, and (3) the anti-glitch is just a period of enhanced spin-down. If there are enough timing observations, a period of enhanced spin-down is expected instead of an anti-glitch. Applications to previous timing events of SGR 1900+14 and PSR J1846–0258 are also included. It is shown that current timing events of 1E 2259+586, SGR 1900+14, and PSR J1846–0258 can be understood safely in the wind braking model. The enhanced spin-down and absence of an anti-glitch before the giant flare of SGR 1806–20 is consistent with the wind braking scenario.

  8. Comparison between a propane-air combustion front and a helium-air simulated combustion front

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barraclough, S.

    1983-12-01

    Turbulent combustion experiments were performed in a right cylindrical combustion bomb using a premixed propane-air gaseous fuel. The initial conditions inside the combustion chamber were three psig and room temperature. Prior to spark firing, the turbulence intensity inside the combustion chamber was measured and could be varied over a ten fold range. The effect of initial turbulence intensity on turbulent flame propagation was investigated. Two regimes of turbulent combustion were identified, which is in agreement with a previous investigator's results. One of them, a ''transition regime'' occurs when the turbulence intensity is approximately twice the laminar flame speed. Within the transition regime, the turbulent burning speed is linearly proportional to initial turbulence intensity and independent of laminar flame speed and turbulence length scale. A high pressure helium front was injected into the combustion chamber to simulate the combustion front. Since the helium front is isothermal, hot-wire anemometry can be used to quantify the change in turbulence intensity ahead of the propagating front. The helium front was found to have different characteristics than the combustion front.

  9. SLIM DISKS AROUND KERR BLACK HOLES REVISITED

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sadowski, Aleksander

    2009-08-01

    We investigate stationary slim accretion disks around Kerr black holes. We construct a new numerical method based on the relaxation technique. We systematically cover the whole parameter space relevant to stellar mass X-ray binaries. We also notice some non-monotonic features in the disk structure, overlooked in previous studies.

  10. BACKPRESSURE TESTING OF ROTARY MICROFILTER DISKS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fowley, M.; Herman, D.

    2011-04-14

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), under the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM), is modifying and testing the SpinTek{trademark} rotary microfilter (RMF) for radioactive filtration service in the Department of Energy (DOE) complex. The RMF has been shown to improve filtration throughput when compared to other conventional methods such as cross-flow filtration. A concern with the RMF was that backpressure, or reverse flow through the disk, would damage the filter membranes. Reverse flow might happen as a result of an inadvertent valve alignment during flushing. Testing was completed in the Engineering Development Laboratory (EDL) located in SRNL to study the physical effects of backpressure as well as to determine the maximum allowable back-pressure for RMF disks. The RMF disks tested at the EDL were manufactured by SpinTek{trademark} Filtration and used a Pall Corporation PMM050 filter membrane (0.5 micron nominal pore size) made from 316L stainless steel. Early versions of the RMF disks were made from synthetic materials that were incompatible with caustic solutions and radioactive service as well as being susceptible to delaminating when subjected to backpressure. Figure 1-1 shows the essential components of the RMF; 3 rotating disks and 3 stationary turbulence promoters (or shear elements) are shown. Figure 1-2 show the assembly view of a 25 disk RMF proposed for use at the Savannah River Site (SRS) and at the Hanford Facility. The purpose of the testing discussed in this report was to determine the allowable backpressure for RMF disks as well as study the physical effects of backpressure on RMF disks made with the Pall PMM050 membrane. This was accomplished by pressurizing the disks in the reverse flow direction (backpressure) until the test limit was reached or until membrane failure occurred. Backpressure was applied to the disks with air while submerged in deionized (DI) water. This method provided a visual representation of membrane integrity via bubble flow patterns. Membrane failure was defined as the inability to filter effectively at the nominal filter pore size. Effective filtration was determined by turbidity measurements of filtrate that was produced by applying forward-pressure to the disks while submerged in a representative simulant. The representative simulant was Tank 8F simulated sludge produced for SRNL by Optima Chemical. Two disks were tested. Disk 1 was tested primarily to determine approximate levels of backpressure where membrane failure occurred. These levels were then used to define the strategy for testing the Disk 2; a strategy that would better define and quantify the mode of failure.

  11. Front contact solar cell with formed emitter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cousins, Peter John

    2014-11-04

    A bipolar solar cell includes a backside junction formed by an N-type silicon substrate and a P-type polysilicon emitter formed on the backside of the solar cell. An antireflection layer may be formed on a textured front surface of the silicon substrate. A negative polarity metal contact on the front side of the solar cell makes an electrical connection to the substrate, while a positive polarity metal contact on the backside of the solar cell makes an electrical connection to the polysilicon emitter. An external electrical circuit may be connected to the negative and positive metal contacts to be powered by the solar cell. The positive polarity metal contact may form an infrared reflecting layer with an underlying dielectric layer for increased solar radiation collection.

  12. Front contact solar cell with formed emitter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cousins, Peter John

    2012-07-17

    A bipolar solar cell includes a backside junction formed by an N-type silicon substrate and a P-type polysilicon emitter formed on the backside of the solar cell. An antireflection layer may be formed on a textured front surface of the silicon substrate. A negative polarity metal contact on the front side of the solar cell makes an electrical connection to the substrate, while a positive polarity metal contact on the backside of the solar cell makes an electrical connection to the polysilicon emitter. An external electrical circuit may be connected to the negative and positive metal contacts to be powered by the solar cell. The positive polarity metal contact may form an infrared reflecting layer with an underlying dielectric layer for increased solar radiation collection.

  13. Pentan isomers compound flame front structure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mansurov, Z.A.; Mironenko, A.W.; Bodikov, D.U.; Rachmetkaliev, K.N.

    1995-08-13

    The fuels (hexane, pentane, diethyl ether) and conditions investigated in this study are relevant to engine knock in spark- ignition engines. A review is provided of the field of low temperature hydrocarbon oxidation. Studies were made of radical and stable intermediate distribution in the front of cool flames: Maximum concentrations of H atoms and peroxy radicals were observed in the luminous zone of the cool flame front. Peroxy radicals appear before the luminous zone at 430 K due to diffusion. H atoms were found in cool flames of butane and hexane. H atoms diffuses from the luminous zone to the side of the fresh mixture, and they penetrate into the fresh mixture to a small depth. Extension of action sphear of peroxy radicals in the fresh mixture is much greater than that of H atoms due to their small activity and high concentrations.

  14. The Kozai-Lidov mechanism in hydrodynamical disks. II. Effects of binary and disk parameters

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Fu, Wen; Lubow, Stephen H.; Martin, Rebecca G.

    2015-07-01

    Martin et al. (2014b) showed that a substantially misaligned accretion disk around one component of a binary system can undergo global damped Kozai–Lidov (KL) oscillations. During these oscillations, the inclination and eccentricity of the disk are periodically exchanged. However, the robustness of this mechanism and its dependence on the system parameters were unexplored. In this paper, we use three-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations to analyze how various binary and disk parameters affect the KL mechanism in hydrodynamical disks. The simulations include the effect of gas pressure and viscosity, but ignore the effects of disk self-gravity. We describe results for different numerical resolutions,more » binary mass ratios and orbital eccentricities, initial disk sizes, initial disk surface density profiles, disk sound speeds, and disk viscosities. We show that the KL mechanism can operate for a wide range of binary-disk parameters. We discuss the applications of our results to astrophysical disks in various accreting systems.« less

  15. Kinetic information from detonation front curvature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Souers, P. C., LLNL

    1998-06-15

    The time constants for time-dependent modeling may be estimated from reaction zone lengths, which are obtained from two sources One is detonation front curvature, where the edge lag is close to being a direct measure The other is the Size Effect, where the detonation velocity decreases with decreasing radius as energy is lost to the cylinder edge A simple theory that interlocks the two effects is given A differential equation for energy flow in the front is used, the front is described by quadratic and sixth-power radius terms The quadratic curvature comes from a constant power source of energy moving sideways to the walls Near the walls, the this energy rises to the total energy of detonation and produces the sixth-power term The presence of defects acting on a short reaction zone can eliminate the quadratic part while leaving the wall portion of the cuvature A collection of TNT data shows that the reaction zone increases with both the radius and the void fraction

  16. Front lighted shadowgraphic method and apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stone, William J.

    1985-02-26

    High contrast silhouette images of a substantially opaque object are obtained using front illumination techniques. The object is frontally illuminated by light of a first polarization. A frontal surface of the object reflects the incident light to an observation station. The polarization of incident light bypassing the object and incident on a background is changed. The background light is reflected to the observation station, and the intensity of one of the two, differently polarized, reflected images is substantially reduced with respect to the other. Apparatus for carrying out the method includes a first polarizer for polarizing frontally incident illuminating light, a second polarizer behind the object and a reflective surface behind the second polarizer. A polarization analyzer, located in front of the object, is used to extinguish one of the two reflected images. Apparatus for carrying out the invention in instruments having a polarized light source and a polarization analyzer includes a combination of a polarizing material, for contacting a rear surface of the object, and a reflective surface provided adjacent the rear surface of the polarizing material. The combination is applied to the rear surface of the object. Back-surface mirrors of pleochroic substrates applied to thin film physical vapor deposited electronic circuit elements enable front lighted shadowgraphic imaging of the elements.

  17. Turbine inter-disk cavity cooling air compressor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chupp, Raymond E. (Oviedo, FL); Little, David A. (Oviedo, FL)

    1998-01-01

    The inter-disk cavity between turbine rotor disks is used to pressurize cooling air. A plurality of ridges extend radially outwardly over the face of the rotor disks. When the rotor disks are rotated, the ridges cause the inter-disk cavity to compress air coolant flowing through the inter-disk cavity en route to the rotor blades. The ridges eliminate the need for an external compressor to pressurize the air coolant.

  18. Turbine inter-disk cavity cooling air compressor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chupp, R.E.; Little, D.A.

    1998-01-06

    The inter-disk cavity between turbine rotor disks is used to pressurize cooling air. A plurality of ridges extend radially outwardly over the face of the rotor disks. When the rotor disks are rotated, the ridges cause the inter-disk cavity to compress air coolant flowing through the inter-disk cavity en route to the rotor blades. The ridges eliminate the need for an external compressor to pressurize the air coolant. 5 figs.

  19. Magnesium Front End Design and Development | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    9 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, May 18-22, 2009 -- Washington D.C. PDF icon lm_21_quinn.pdf More Documents & Publications Magnesium Front End Research and Development AMD 604 Magnesium Front End Development (AMD 603/604/904) Magnesium Front End Research and Development AMD 604

  20. Fast radial flows in transition disk holes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosenfeld, Katherine A.; Andrews, Sean M.; Chiang, Eugene

    2014-02-20

    Protoplanetary 'transition' disks have large, mass-depleted central cavities, yet also deliver gas onto their host stars at rates comparable to disks without holes. The paradox of simultaneous transparency and accretion can be explained if gas flows inward at much higher radial speeds inside the cavity than outside the cavity, since surface density (and by extension optical depth) varies inversely with inflow velocity at fixed accretion rate. Radial speeds within the cavity might even have to approach free-fall values to explain the huge surface density contrasts inferred for transition disks. We identify observational diagnostics of fast radial inflow in channel maps made in optically thick spectral lines. Signatures include (1) twisted isophotes in maps made at low systemic velocities and (2) rotation of structures observed between maps made in high-velocity line wings. As a test case, we apply our new diagnostic tools to archival Atacama Large Millimeter Array data on the transition disk HD 142527 and uncover evidence for free-fall radial velocities inside its cavity. Although the observed kinematics are also consistent with a disk warp, the radial inflow scenario is preferred because it predicts low surface densities that appear consistent with recent observations of optically thin CO isotopologues in this disk. How material in the disk cavity sheds its angular momentum wholesale to fall freely onto the star is an unsolved problem; gravitational torques exerted by giant planets or brown dwarfs are briefly discussed as a candidate mechanism.

  1. HPSS Disk Cache Upgrade Caters to Capacity

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    HPSS Disk Cache Upgrade Caters to Capacity HPSS Disk Cache Upgrade Caters to Capacity Analysis of NERSC Users' Data-Access Habits Reveals Sweet Spot for Short-term Storage October 16, 2015 Contact: Kathy Kincade, +1 510 495 2124, kkincade@lbl.gov HPSS 09 vert NERSC users today are benefiting from a business decision made three years ago by the center's Storage Systems Group (SSG) as they were looking to upgrade the High-Performance Storage System (HPSS) disk cache: rather than focus primarily on

  2. Novel Perspectives from Light-Front QCD, Super-Conformal Algebra, and Light-Front Holography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brodsky, Stanley J.

    2015-12-01

    Light-Front Quantization – Dirac’s “Front Form” – provides a physical, frame-independent formalism for hadron dynamics and structure. Observables such as structure functions, transverse momentum distributions, and distribution amplitudes are defined from the hadronic LFWFs. One obtains new insights into the hadronic mass scale, the hadronic spectrum, and the functional form of the QCD running coupling in the nonperturbative domain using light-front holography. In addition, superconformal algebra leads to remarkable supersymmetric relations between mesons and baryons. I also discuss evidence that the antishadowing of nuclear structure functions is nonuniversal; i.e., flavor dependent, and why shadowing and antishadowing phenomena may be incompatible with the momentum and other sum rules for the nuclear parton distribution functions.

  3. TILT, WARP, AND SIMULTANEOUS PRECESSIONS IN DISKS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Montgomery, M. M.

    2012-07-10

    Warps are suspected in disks around massive compact objects. However, the proposed warping source-non-axisymmetric radiation pressure-does not apply to white dwarfs. In this Letter, we report the first smoothed particle hydrodynamic simulations of accretion disks in SU UMa-type systems that naturally tilt, warp, and simultaneously precess in the prograde and retrograde directions using white dwarf V344 Lyrae in the Kepler field as our model. After {approx}79 days in V344 Lyrae, the disk angular momentum L{sub d} becomes misaligned to the orbital angular momentum L{sub o} . As the gas stream remains normal to L{sub o} , hydrodynamics (e.g., the lift force) is a likely source to disk tilt. In addition to tilt, the outer disk annuli cyclically change shape from circular to highly eccentric due to tidal torques by the secondary star. The effect of simultaneous prograde and retrograde precession is a warp of the colder, denser midplane as seen along the disk rim. The simulated rate of apsidal advance to nodal regression per orbit nearly matches the observed ratio in V344 Lyrae.

  4. Water vapor distribution in protoplanetary disks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Du, Fujun; Bergin, Edwin A.

    2014-09-01

    Water vapor has been detected in protoplanetary disks. In this work, we model the distribution of water vapor in protoplanetary disks with a thermo-chemical code. For a set of parameterized disk models, we calculate the distribution of dust temperature and radiation field of the disk with a Monte Carlo method, and then solve the gas temperature distribution and chemical composition. The radiative transfer includes detailed treatment of scattering by atomic hydrogen and absorption by water of Lyα photons, since the Lyα line dominates the UV spectrum of accreting young stars. In a fiducial model, we find that warm water vapor with temperature around 300 K is mainly distributed in a small and well-confined region in the inner disk. The inner boundary of the warm water region is where the shielding of UV field due to dust and water itself become significant. The outer boundary is where the dust temperature drops below the water condensation temperature. A more luminous central star leads to a more extended distribution of warm water vapor, while dust growth and settling tends to reduce the amount of warm water vapor. Based on typical assumptions regarding the elemental oxygen abundance and the water chemistry, the column density of warm water vapor can be as high as 10{sup 22} cm{sup –2}. A small amount of hot water vapor with temperature higher than ∼300 K exists in a more extended region in the upper atmosphere of the disk. Cold water vapor with temperature lower than 100 K is distributed over the entire disk, produced by photodesorption of the water ice.

  5. Front lighted optical tooling method and apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stone, W.J.

    1983-06-30

    An optical tooling method and apparatus uses a front lighted shadowgraphic technique to enhance visual contrast of reflected light. The apparatus includes an optical assembly including a fiducial mark, such as cross hairs, reflecting polarized light with a first polarization, a polarizing element backing the fiducial mark and a reflective surface backing the polarizing element for reflecting polarized light bypassing the fiducial mark and traveling through the polarizing element. The light reflected by the reflecting surface is directed through a second pass of the polarizing element toward the frontal direction with a polarization differing from the polarization of the light reflected by the fiducial mark. When used as a tooling target, the optical assembly may be mounted directly to a reference surface or may be secured in a mounting, such as a magnetic mounting. The optical assembly may also be mounted in a plane defining structure and used as a spherometer in conjunction with an optical depth measuring instrument.

  6. Light-Front Holography, Light-Front Wavefunctions, and Novel QCD Phenomena

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; de Teramond, Guy F.; /Costa Rica U.

    2012-02-16

    Light-Front Holography is one of the most remarkable features of the AdS/CFT correspondence. In spite of its present limitations it provides important physical insights into the nonperturbative regime of QCD and its transition to the perturbative domain. This novel framework allows hadronic amplitudes in a higher dimensional anti-de Sitter (AdS) space to be mapped to frame-independent light-front wavefunctions of hadrons in physical space-time. The model leads to an effective confining light-front QCD Hamiltonian and a single-variable light-front Schroedinger equation which determines the eigenspectrum and the light-front wavefunctions of hadrons for general spin and orbital angular momentum. The coordinate z in AdS space is uniquely identified with a Lorentz-invariant coordinate {zeta} which measures the separation of the constituents within a hadron at equal light-front time and determines the off-shell dynamics of the bound-state wavefunctions, and thus the fall-off as a function of the invariant mass of the constituents. The soft-wall holographic model modified by a positive-sign dilaton metric, leads to a remarkable one-parameter description of nonperturbative hadron dynamics - a semi-classical frame-independent first approximation to the spectra and light-front wavefunctions of meson and baryons. The model predicts a Regge spectrum of linear trajectories with the same slope in the leading orbital angular momentum L of hadrons and the radial quantum number n. The hadron eigensolutions projected on the free Fock basis provides the complete set of valence and non-valence light-front Fock state wavefunctions {Psi}{sub n/H} (x{sub i}, k{sub {perpendicular}i}, {lambda}{sub i}) which describe the hadron's momentum and spin distributions needed to compute the direct measures of hadron structure at the quark and gluon level, such as elastic and transition form factors, distribution amplitudes, structure functions, generalized parton distributions and transverse momentum distributions. The effective confining potential also creates quark-antiquark pairs from the amplitude q {yields} q{bar q}q. Thus in holographic QCD higher Fock states can have any number of extra q{bar q} pairs. We discuss the relevance of higher Fock-states for describing the detailed structure of space and time-like form factors. The AdS/QCD model can be systematically improved by using its complete orthonormal solutions to diagonalize the full QCD light-front Hamiltonian or by applying the Lippmann-Schwinger method in order to systematically include the QCD interaction terms. A new perspective on quark and gluon condensates is also obtained.

  7. EFFECT OF PHOTODESORPTION ON THE SNOW LINES AT THE SURFACE OF OPTICALLY THICK CIRCUMSTELLAR DISKS AROUND HERBIG Ae/Be STARS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oka, Akinori; Nakamoto, Taishi [Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Ookayama, Meguro, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan); Inoue, Akio K. [College of General Education, Osaka Sangyo University, 3-1-1, Nakagaito, Daito, Osaka 574-8530 (Japan); Honda, Mitsuhiko, E-mail: akinoue@las.osaka-sandai.ac.jp [Department of Information Science, Kanagawa University, 2946, Tsuchiya, Hiratsuka, Kanagawa 259-1293 (Japan)

    2012-03-10

    We investigate the effect of photodesorption on the snow line position at the surface of a protoplanetary disk around a Herbig Ae/Be star, motivated by the detection of water ice particles at the surface of the disk around HD142527 by Honda et al. For this aim, we obtain the density and temperature structure in the disk with a 1+1D radiative transfer and determine the distribution of water ice particles in the disk by the balance between condensation, sublimation, and photodesorption. We find that photodesorption induced by far-ultraviolet radiation from the central star depresses the ice-condensation front toward the mid-plane and pushes the surface snow line significantly outward when the stellar effective temperature exceeds a certain critical value. This critical effective temperature depends on the stellar luminosity and mass, the water abundance in the disk, and the yield of photodesorption. We present an approximate analytic formula for the critical temperature. We separate Herbig Ae/Be stars into two groups on the HR diagram according to the critical temperature: one is the disks where photodesorption is effective and from which we may not find ice particles at the surface, and the other is the disks where photodesorption is not effective. We estimate the snow line position at the surface of the disk around HD142527 to be 100-300 AU, which is consistent with the water ice detection at >140 AU in the disk. All the results depend on the dust grain size in a complex way, and this point requires more work in the future.

  8. Hybrid: Braking

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Button Stopped button highlighted subbanner graphic: gray bar STOPPED When the vehicle is stopped, such as at a red light, the gasoline engine and electric motor shut off automatically so that energy is not wasted in idling. The battery continues to power auxillary systems, such as the air conditioning and dashboard displays. stage graphic: vertical blue rule Main stage: See through car with battery, engine, and electric motor visible. The car is stopped at an intersection. Main stage: See

  9. Hybrid: Braking

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Since the battery helps power the vehicle, it is larger and holds much more energy than batteries used to start conventional vehicles. Main stage: See through car with battery, ...

  10. Light-front representation of chiral dynamics in peripheral transverse

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    densities (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Light-front representation of chiral dynamics in peripheral transverse densities Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Light-front representation of chiral dynamics in peripheral transverse densities The nucleon's electromagnetic form factors are expressed in terms of the transverse densities of charge and magnetization at fixed light-front time. At peripheral transverse distances b = O(M_pi^{-1}) the densities are governed by chiral

  11. Strengthening the Front Lines: Sales Training and Continuing Education for

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Contractors | Department of Energy the Front Lines: Sales Training and Continuing Education for Contractors Strengthening the Front Lines: Sales Training and Continuing Education for Contractors Better Buildings Residential Network Peer Exchange Call Series: Strengthening the Front Lines: Sales Training and Continuing Education for Contractors, call slides and discussion summary. PDF icon Call Slides and Discussion Summary More Documents & Publications Staged Upgrades - Homeowner-focused

  12. Front contact solar cell with formed electrically conducting layers on the front side and backside

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cousins, Peter John

    2012-06-26

    A bipolar solar cell includes a backside junction formed by a silicon substrate and a first doped layer of a first dopant type on the backside of the solar cell. A second doped layer of a second dopant type makes an electrical connection to the substrate from the front side of the solar cell. A first metal contact of a first electrical polarity electrically connects to the first doped layer on the backside of the solar cell, and a second metal contact of a second electrical polarity electrically connects to the second doped layer on the front side of the solar cell. An external electrical circuit may be electrically connected to the first and second metal contacts to be powered by the solar cell.

  13. MAGNETIC BRAKING FORMULATION FOR SUN-LIKE STARS: DEPENDENCE ON DIPOLE FIELD STRENGTH AND ROTATION RATE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matt, Sean P.; Pinsonneault, Marc H.; Greene, Thomas P. E-mail: kmac@ucar.edu E-mail: thomas.p.greene@nasa.gov

    2012-08-01

    We use two-dimensional axisymmetric magnetohydrodynamic simulations to compute steady-state solutions for solar-like stellar winds from rotating stars with dipolar magnetic fields. Our parameter study includes 50 simulations covering a wide range of relative magnetic field strengths and rotation rates, extending from the slow- and approaching the fast-magnetic-rotator regimes. Using the simulations to compute the angular momentum loss, we derive a semi-analytic formulation for the external torque on the star that fits all of the simulations to a precision of a few percent. This formula provides a simple method for computing the magnetic braking of Sun-like stars due to magnetized stellar winds, which properly includes the dependence on the strength of the magnetic field, mass loss rate, stellar radius, surface gravity, and spin rate, and which is valid for both slow and fast rotators.

  14. Front lighted optical tooling method and apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stone, William J.

    1985-06-18

    An optical tooling method and apparatus uses a front lighted shadowgraphic technique to enhance visual contrast of reflected light. The apparatus includes an optical assembly including a fiducial mark, such as cross hairs, reflecting polarized light with a first polarization, a polarizing element backing the fiducial mark and a reflective surface backing the polarizing element for reflecting polarized light bypassing the fiducial mark and traveling through the polarizing element. The light reflected by the reflecting surface is directed through a second pass of the polarizing element toward the frontal direction with a polarization differing from the polarization of the light reflected by the fiducial mark. When used as a tooling target, the optical assembly may be mounted directly to a reference surface or may be secured in a mounting, such as a magnetic mounting. The optical assembly may also be mounted in a plane defining structure and used as a spherometer in conjunction with an optical depth measuring instrument. A method of measuring a radius of curvature of an unknown surface includes positioning the spherometer on a surface between the surface and a depth measuring optical instrument. As the spherometer is frontally illuminated, the distance from the depth measuring instrument to the fiducial mark and the underlying surface are alternately measured and the difference in these measurements is used as the sagittal height to calculate a radius of curvature.

  15. ACCRETION DISK WARPING BY RESONANT RELAXATION: THE CASE OF MASER DISK NGC 4258

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bregman, Michal; Alexander, Tal

    2009-08-01

    The maser disk around the massive black hole (MBH) in active galaxy NGC 4258 exhibits an O(10 deg.) warp on the O(0.1 pc) scale. The physics driving the warp is still debated. Suggested mechanisms include torquing by relativistic frame dragging or by radiation pressure. We propose here a new warping mechanism: resonant torquing of the disk by stars in the dense cusp around the MBH. We show that resonant torquing can induce such a warp over a wide range of observed and deduced physical parameters of the maser disk.

  16. THE COLLISIONAL EVOLUTION OF DEBRIS DISKS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gaspar, Andras; Rieke, George H.; Balog, Zoltan E-mail: grieke@as.arizona.edu

    2013-05-01

    We explore the collisional decay of disk mass and infrared emission in debris disks. With models, we show that the rate of the decay varies throughout the evolution of the disks, increasing its rate up to a certain point, which is followed by a leveling off to a slower value. The total disk mass falls off {proportional_to}t {sup -0.35} at its fastest point (where t is time) for our reference model, while the dust mass and its proxy-the infrared excess emission-fades significantly faster ({proportional_to}t {sup -0.8}). These later level off to a decay rate of M{sub tot}(t){proportional_to}t {sup -0.08} and M{sub dust}(t) or L{sub ir}(t){proportional_to}t {sup -0.6}. This is slower than the {proportional_to}t {sup -1} decay given for all three system parameters by traditional analytic models. We also compile an extensive catalog of Spitzer and Herschel 24, 70, and 100 {mu}m observations. Assuming a log-normal distribution of initial disk masses, we generate model population decay curves for the fraction of stars harboring debris disks detected at 24 {mu}m. We also model the distribution of measured excesses at the far-IR wavelengths (70-100 {mu}m) at certain age regimes. We show general agreement at 24 {mu}m between the decay of our numerical collisional population synthesis model and observations up to a Gyr. We associate offsets above a Gyr to stochastic events in a few select systems. We cannot fit the decay in the far-infrared convincingly with grain strength properties appropriate for silicates, but those of water ice give fits more consistent with the observations (other relatively weak grain materials would presumably also be successful). The oldest disks have a higher incidence of large excesses than predicted by the model; again, a plausible explanation is very late phases of high dynamical activity around a small number of stars. Finally, we constrain the variables of our numerical model by comparing the evolutionary trends generated from the exploration of the full parameter space to observations. Amongst other results, we show that erosive collisions are dominant in setting the timescale of the evolution and that planetesimals on the order of 100 km in diameter are necessary in the cascades for our population synthesis models to reproduce the observations.

  17. Electron g-2 in Light-front Quantization

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhao, Xingbo; Honkanen, Heli; Maris, Pieter; Vary, James P.; Brodsky, Stanley J.

    2014-10-01

    Basis Light-front Quantization has been proposed as a nonperturbative framework for solving quantum field theory. We apply this approach to Quantum Electrodynamics and explicitly solve for the light-front wave function of a physical electron. Based on the resulting light-front wave function, we evaluate the electron anomalous magnetic moment. Nonperturbative mass renormalization is performed. Upon extrapolation to the infinite basis limit our numerical results agree with the Schwinger result obtained in perturbation theory to an accuracy of 0.06%.

  18. Light-Front Holography, Color Confinement, and Supersymmetric...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Resource Relation: Journal Name: arXiv:1601.06328; Conference: Invited paper Theory and Experiment for Hadrons on the Light-Front (Light Cone 2015), 21-25 Sep 2015. Frascati, Italy ...

  19. Advanced integrated safeguards using front-end-triggering devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howell, J.A.; Whitty, W.J.

    1995-12-01

    This report addresses potential uses of front-end-triggering devices for enhanced safeguards. Such systems incorporate video surveillance as well as radiation and other sensors. Also covered in the report are integration issues and analysis techniques.

  20. Front-end utility rate updates | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Front-end utility rate updates Home > Groups > Utility Rate Rmckeel's picture Submitted by Rmckeel(297) Contributor 13 February, 2013 - 14:28 Utility Rates A few utility rate...

  1. Modeling transiting circumstellar disks: characterizing the newly discovered eclipsing disk system OGLE LMC-ECL-11893

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott, Erin L.; Mamajek, Eric E.; Pecaut, Mark J.; Quillen, Alice C.; Moolekamp, Fred; Bell, Cameron P. M.

    2014-12-10

    We investigate the nature of the unusual eclipsing star OGLE LMC-ECL-11893 (OGLE J05172127-6900558) in the Large Magellanic Cloud recently reported by Dong et al. The eclipse period for this star is 468 days, and the eclipses exhibit a minimum of ?1.4 mag, preceded by a plateau of ?0.8 mag. Spectra and optical/IR photometry are consistent with the eclipsed star being a lightly reddened B9III star of inferred age ?150 Myr and mass ?4 M {sub ?}. The disk appears to have an outer radius of ?0.2 AU with predicted temperatures of ?1100-1400 K. We model the eclipses as being due to either a transiting geometrically thin dust disk or gaseous accretion disk around a secondary object; the debris disk produces a better fit. We speculate on the origin of such a dense circumstellar dust disk structure orbiting a relatively old low-mass companion, and on the similarities of this system to the previously discovered EE Cep.

  2. ASSEMBLY OF PROTOPLANETARY DISKS AND INCLINATIONS OF CIRCUMBINARY PLANETS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Foucart, Francois; Lai, Dong

    2013-02-10

    The Kepler satellite has discovered a number of transiting planets around close binary stars. These circumbinary systems have highly aligned planetary and binary orbits. In this paper, we explore how the mutual inclination between the planetary and binary orbits may reflect the physical conditions of the assembly of protoplanetary disks and the interaction between protostellar binaries and circumbinary disks. Given the turbulent nature of star-forming molecular clouds, it is possible that the gas falling onto the outer region of a circumbinary disk and the central protostellar binary have different axes of rotation. Thus, the newly assembled circumbinary disk can be misaligned with respect to the binary. However, the gravitational torque from the binary produces a warp and twist in the disk, and the back-reaction torque tends to align the disk and the binary orbital plane. We present a new, analytic calculation of this alignment torque and show that the binary-disk inclination angle can be reduced appreciably after the binary accretes a few percent of its mass from the disk. Our calculation suggests that in the absence of other disturbances, circumbinary disks and planets around close (sub-AU) stellar binaries, for which mass accretion onto the proto-binary is very likely to have occurred, are expected to be highly aligned with the binary orbits, while disks and planets around wide binaries can be misaligned. Measurements of the mutual inclinations of circumbinary planetary systems can provide a clue to the birth environments of such systems.

  3. ORBITAL MIGRATION OF PROTOPLANETS IN A MARGINALLY GRAVITATIONALLY UNSTABLE DISK

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boss, Alan P.

    2013-02-20

    Core accretion and disk instability require giant protoplanets to form in the presence of disk gas. Protoplanet migration models generally assume disk masses low enough that the disk's self-gravity can be neglected. However, disk instability requires a disk massive enough to be marginally gravitationally unstable (MGU). Even for core accretion, an FU Orionis outburst may require a brief MGU disk phase. We present a new set of three-dimensional, gravitational radiation hydrodynamics models of MGU disks with multiple protoplanets, which interact gravitationally with the disk and with each other, including disk gas mass accretion. Initial protoplanet masses are 0.01 to 10 M {sub Circled-Plus} for core accretion models, and 0.1 to 3 M {sub Jup} for Nice scenario models, starting on circular orbits with radii of 6, 8, 10, or 12 AU, inside a 0.091 M {sub Sun} disk extending from 4 to 20 AU around a 1 M {sub Sun} protostar. Evolutions are followed for up to {approx}4000 yr and involve phases of relative stability (e {approx} 0.1) interspersed with chaotic phases (e {approx} 0.4) of orbital interchanges. The 0.01 to 10 M {sub Circled-Plus} cores can orbit stably for {approx}1000 yr: monotonic inward or outward orbital migration of the type seen in low mass disks does not occur. A system with giant planet masses similar to our solar system (1.0, 0.33, 0.1, 0.1 M {sub Jup}) was stable for over 1000 yr, and a Jupiter-Saturn-like system was stable for over 3800 yr, implying that our giant planets might well survive an MGU disk phase.

  4. Accretion disk radiation dynamics and the cosmic battery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koutsantoniou, Leela E.; Contopoulos, Ioannis E-mail: icontop@academyofathens.gr

    2014-10-10

    We investigate the dynamics of radiation in the surface layers of an optically thick astrophysical accretion disk around a Kerr black hole. The source of the radiation is the surface of the accretion disk itself, and not a central object as in previous studies of the Poynting-Robertson effect. We generate numerical sky maps from photon trajectories that originate on the surface of the disk as seen from the inner edge of the disk at the position of the innermost stable circular orbit. We investigate several accretion disk morphologies with a Shakura-Sunyaev surface temperature distribution. Finally, we calculate the electromotive source of the Cosmic Battery mechanism around the inner edge of the accretion disk and obtain characteristic timescales for the generation of astrophysical magnetic fields.

  5. Composite polymer: Glass edge cladding for laser disks

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Powell, H.T.; Wolfe, C.A.; Campbell, J.H.; Murray, J.E.; Riley, M.O.; Lyon, R.E.; Jessop, E.S.

    1987-11-02

    Large neodymium glass laser disks for disk amplifiers such as those used in the Nova laser require an edge cladding which absorbs at 1 micrometer. This cladding prevents edge reflections from causing parasitic oscillations which would otherwise deplete the gain. Nova now utilizes volume-absorbing monolithic-glass claddings which are fused at high temperature to the disks. These perform quite well but are expensive to produce. Absorbing glass strips are adhesively bonded to the edges of polygonal disks using a bonding agent whose index of refraction matches that of both the laser and absorbing glass. Optical finishing occurs after the strips are attached. Laser disks constructed with such claddings have shown identical gain performance to the previous Nova disks and have been tested for hundreds of shots without significant degradation. 18 figs.

  6. Composite polymer-glass edge cladding for laser disks

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Powell, Howard T.; Riley, Michael O.; Wolfe, Charles R.; Lyon, Richard E.; Campbell, John H.; Jessop, Edward S.; Murray, James E.

    1989-01-01

    Large neodymium glass laser disks for disk amplifiers such as those used in the Nova laser require an edge cladding which absorbs at 1 micrometer. This cladding prevents edge reflections from causing parasitic oscillations which would otherwise deplete the gain. Nova now utilizes volume-absorbing monolithic-glass claddings which are fused at high temperature to the disks. These perform quite well but are expensive to produce. Absorbing glass strips are adhesively bonded to the edges of polygonal disks using a bonding agent whose index of refraction matches that of both the laser and absorbing glass. Optical finishing occurs after the strips are attached. Laser disks constructed with such claddings have shown identical gain performance to the previous Nova disks and have been tested for hundreds of shots without significant degradation.

  7. TIDAL DISRUPTION FLARES: THE ACCRETION DISK PHASE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Montesinos Armijo, Matias; De Freitas Pacheco, Jose A. [Observatoire de la Cote d'Azur, Laboratoire Cassiopee, Universite de Nice Sophia-Antipolis Bd de l'Observatoire, BP 4229, 06304 Nice Cedex 4 (France)

    2011-08-01

    The evolution of an accretion disk, formed as a consequence of the disruption of a star by a black hole, is followed by solving numerically hydrodynamic equations. The present investigation aims to study the dependence of resulting light curves on dynamical and physical properties of such a transient disk during its existence. One of the main results derived from our simulations is that blackbody fits of X-ray data tend to overestimate the true mean disk temperature. In fact, the temperature derived from blackbody fits should be identified with the color X-ray temperature rather than the average value derived from the true temperature distribution along the disk. The time interval between the beginning of the circularization of the bound debris and the beginning of the accretion process by the black hole is determined by the viscous (or accretion) timescale, which also fixes the rising part of the resulting light curve. The luminosity peak coincides with the beginning of matter accretion by the black hole and the late evolution of the light curve depends on the evolution of the debris fallback rate. Peak bolometric luminosities are in the range 10{sup 45}-10{sup 46} erg s{sup -1}, whereas peak luminosities in soft X-rays (0.2-2.0 keV) are typically one order of magnitude lower. The typical timescale derived from our preferred models for the flare luminosity to decay by two orders of magnitude is about 3-4 yr. Predicted soft X-ray light curves reproduce quite well data on galaxies in which a variable X-ray emission possibly related to a tidal event was detected. In the cases of NGC 3599 and IC 3599, data are reproduced well by models defined by a black hole with mass {approx}10{sup 7} M{sub sun} and a disrupted star of about 1 solar mass. The X-ray variation observed in XMMSL1 is consistent with a model defined by a black hole with mass {approx}3 x 10{sup 6} M{sub sun} and a disrupted star of 1 solar mass, while that observed in the galaxy situated in the cluster A1689 is consistent with a model including a black hole of {approx}10{sup 7} M{sub sun} and a disrupted star of {approx}0.5 M{sub sun}.

  8. Disk Space Quota Management | Argonne Leadership Computing Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Account Information Accounts and Access FAQ Connect & Log In Using CRYPTOCards Disk Space Quota Management Allocations Mira/Cetus/Vesta Cooley Policies Documentation Feedback Please provide feedback to help guide us as we continue to build documentation for our new computing resource. [Feedback Form] Disk Space Quota Management As you manage your project's disk space quota, it's important to remember that users you approve as to be added as project members are also added to the project's

  9. THE KOZAI-LIDOV MECHANISM IN HYDRODYNAMICAL DISKS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin, Rebecca G.; Nixon, Chris; Armitage, Philip J. [JILA, University of Colorado and NIST, UCB 440, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Lubow, Stephen H. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Price, Daniel J. [Monash Centre for Astrophysics (MoCA), School of Mathematical Sciences, Monash University, Clayton, Vic. 3800 (Australia); Do?an, Suzan [Department of Astronomy and Space Sciences, University of Ege, Bornova, 35100 ?zmir (Turkey); King, Andrew [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leicester, University Road, Leicester LE1 7RH (United Kingdom)

    2014-09-10

    We use three-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations to show that a highly misaligned accretion disk around one component of a binary system can exhibit global Kozai-Lidov cycles, where the inclination and eccentricity of the disk are interchanged periodically. This has important implications for accreting systems on all scales, for example, the formation of planets and satellites in circumstellar and circumplanetary disks, outbursts in X-ray binary systems, and accretion onto supermassive black holes.

  10. Formation of warped disks by galactic flyby encounters. I. Stellar disks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Jeonghwan H.; An, Sung-Ho; Yoon, Suk-Jin; Peirani, Sebastien; Kim, Sungsoo; Ann, Hong Bae

    2014-07-01

    Warped disks are almost ubiquitous among spiral galaxies. Here we revisit and test the 'flyby scenario' of warp formation, in which impulsive encounters between galaxies are responsible for warped disks. Based on N-body simulations, we investigate the morphological and kinematical evolution of the stellar component of disks when galaxies undergo flyby interactions with adjacent dark matter halos. We find that the so-called 'S'-shaped warps can be excited by flybys and sustained for even up to a few billion years, and that this scenario provides a cohesive explanation for several key observations. We show that disk warp properties are governed primarily by the following three parameters: (1) the impact parameter, i.e., the minimum distance between two halos; (2) the mass ratio between two halos; and (3) the incident angle of the flyby perturber. The warp angle is tied up with all three parameters, yet the warp lifetime is particularly sensitive to the incident angle of the perturber. Interestingly, the modeled S-shaped warps are often non-symmetric depending on the incident angle. We speculate that the puzzling U- and L-shaped warps are geometrically superimposed S-types produced by successive flybys with different incident angles, including multiple interactions with a satellite on a highly elongated orbit.

  11. High average power scaleable thin-disk laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Beach, Raymond J.; Honea, Eric C.; Bibeau, Camille; Payne, Stephen A.; Powell, Howard; Krupke, William F.; Sutton, Steven B.

    2002-01-01

    Using a thin disk laser gain element with an undoped cap layer enables the scaling of lasers to extremely high average output power values. Ordinarily, the power scaling of such thin disk lasers is limited by the deleterious effects of amplified spontaneous emission. By using an undoped cap layer diffusion bonded to the thin disk, the onset of amplified spontaneous emission does not occur as readily as if no cap layer is used, and much larger transverse thin disks can be effectively used as laser gain elements. This invention can be used as a high average power laser for material processing applications as well as for weapon and air defense applications.

  12. Methods for enhancing mapping of thermal fronts in oil recovery

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lee, D.O.; Montoya, P.C.; Wayland, J.R. Jr.

    1984-03-30

    A method for enhancing the resistivity contrasts of a thermal front in an oil recovery production field as measured by the controlled source audio frequency magnetotelluric (CSAMT) technique is disclosed. This method includes the steps of: (1) preparing a CSAMT-determined topological resistivity map of the production field; (2) introducing a solution of a dopant material into the production field at a concentration effective to alter the resistivity associated with the thermal front; said dopant material having a high cation exchange capacity which might be selected from the group consisting of montmorillonite, illite, and chlorite clays; said material being soluble in the conate water of the production field; (3) preparing a CSAMT-determined topological resistivity map of the production field while said dopant material is moving therethrough; and (4) mathematically comparing the maps from step (1) and step (3) to determine the location of the thermal front. This method is effective with the steam flood, fire flood and water flood techniques.

  13. Methods for enhancing mapping of thermal fronts in oil recovery

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lee, David O.; Montoya, Paul C.; Wayland, Jr., James R.

    1987-01-01

    A method for enhancing the resistivity contrasts of a thermal front in an oil recovery production field as measured by the CSAMT technique is disclosed. This method includes the steps of: (a) preparing a CSAMT-determined topological resistivity map of the production field; (b) introducing a solution of a dopant material into the production field at a concentration effective to alter the resistivity associated with the thermal front; said dopant material having a high cation exchange capacity which might be selected from the group consisting of montmorillonite, illite, and chlorite clays; said material being soluble in the connate water of the production field; (c) preparing a CSAMT-determined topological resistivity map of the production field while said dopant material is moving therethrough; and (d) mathematically comparing the maps from step (a) and step (c) to determine the location of the thermal front. This method is effective with the steam flood, fire flood and water flood techniques.

  14. Light-front holographic QCD and emerging confinement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; de Téramond, Guy F.; Dosch, Hans Günter; Erlich, Joshua

    2015-05-21

    In this study we explore the remarkable connections between light-front dynamics, its holographic mapping to gravity in a higher-dimensional anti-de Sitter (AdS) space, and conformal quantum mechanics. This approach provides new insights into the origin of a fundamental mass scale and the physics underlying confinement dynamics in QCD in the limit of massless quarks. The result is a relativistic light-front wave equation for arbitrary spin with an effective confinement potential derived from a conformal action and its embedding in AdS space. This equation allows for the computation of essential features of hadron spectra in terms of a single scale. The light-front holographic methods described here give a precise interpretation of holographic variables and quantities in AdS space in terms of light-front variables and quantum numbers. This leads to a relation between the AdS wave functions and the boost-invariant light-front wave functions describing the internal structure of hadronic bound-states in physical spacetime. The pion is massless in the chiral limit and the excitation spectra of relativistic light-quark meson and baryon bound states lie on linear Regge trajectories with identical slopes in the radial and orbital quantum numbers. In the light-front holographic approach described here currents are expressed as an infinite sum of poles, and form factors as a product of poles. At large q2 the form factor incorporates the correct power-law fall-off for hard scattering independent of the specific dynamics and is dictated by the twist. At low q2 the form factor leads to vector dominance. The approach is also extended to include small quark masses. We briefly review in this report other holographic approaches to QCD, in particular top-down and bottom-up models based on chiral symmetry breaking. We also include a discussion of open problems and future applications.

  15. Does the debris disk around HD 32297 contain cometary grains?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rodigas, Timothy J.; Hinz, Philip M.; Bailey, Vanessa; Defrere, Denis; Leisenring, Jarron; Schneider, Glenn; Skemer, Andrew J.; Vaitheeswaran, Vidhya; Debes, John H.; Mamajek, Eric E.; Pecaut, Mark J.; Currie, Thayne; De Rosa, Robert J.; Ward-Duong, Kimberly; Hill, John M.; Skrutskie, Michael

    2014-03-01

    We present an adaptive optics imaging detection of the HD 32297 debris disk at L' (3.8 ?m) obtained with the LBTI/LMIRcam infrared instrument at the Large Binocular Telescope. The disk is detected at signal-to-noise ratio per resolution element ?3-7.5 from ?0.''3 to 1.''1 (30-120 AU). The disk at L' is bowed, as was seen at shorter wavelengths. This likely indicates that the disk is not perfectly edge-on and contains highly forward-scattering grains. Interior to ?50 AU, the surface brightness at L' rises sharply on both sides of the disk, which was also previously seen at Ks band. This evidence together points to the disk containing a second inner component located at ?50 AU. Comparing the color of the outer (50 disk at L' with archival Hubble Space Telescope/NICMOS images of the disk at 1-2 ?m allows us to test the recently proposed cometary grains model of Donaldson et al. We find that the model fails to match this disk's surface brightness and spectrum simultaneously (reduced chi-square = 17.9). When we modify the density distribution of the model disk, we obtain a better overall fit (reduced chi-square = 2.87). The best fit to all of the data is a pure water ice model (reduced chi-square = 1.06), but additional resolved imaging at 3.1 ?m is necessary to constrain how much (if any) water ice exists in the disk, which can then help refine the originally proposed cometary grains model.

  16. DISTRIBUTION OF ACCRETING GAS AND ANGULAR MOMENTUM ONTO CIRCUMPLANETARY DISKS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tanigawa, Takayuki; Ohtsuki, Keiji; Machida, Masahiro N.

    2012-03-01

    We investigate gas accretion flow onto a circumplanetary disk from a protoplanetary disk in detail by using high-resolution three-dimensional nested-grid hydrodynamic simulations, in order to provide a basis of formation processes of satellites around giant planets. Based on detailed analyses of gas accretion flow, we find that most of gas accretion onto circumplanetary disks occurs nearly vertically toward the disk surface from high altitude, which generates a shock surface at several scale heights of the circumplanetary disk. The gas that has passed through the shock surface moves inward because its specific angular momentum is smaller than that of the local Keplerian rotation, while gas near the midplane in the protoplanetary disk cannot accrete to the circumplanetary disk. Gas near the midplane within the planet's Hill sphere spirals outward and escapes from the Hill sphere through the two Lagrangian points L{sub 1} and L{sub 2}. We also analyze fluxes of accreting mass and angular momentum in detail and find that the distributions of the fluxes onto the disk surface are well described by power-law functions and that a large fraction of gas accretion occurs at the outer region of the disk, i.e., at about 0.1 times the Hill radius. The nature of power-law functions indicates that, other than the outer edge, there is no specific radius where gas accretion is concentrated. These source functions of mass and angular momentum in the circumplanetary disk would provide us with useful constraints on the structure and evolution of the circumplanetary disk, which is important for satellite formation.

  17. On the propagation of a coupled saturation and pressure front

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vasco, D. W.

    2010-12-01

    Using an asymptotic technique, valid for a medium with smoothly varying heterogeneity, I derive an expression for the velocity of a propagating, coupled saturation and pressure front. Due to the nonlinearity of the governing equations, the velocity of the propagating front depends upon the magnitude of the saturation and pressure changes across the front in addition to the properties of the medium. Thus, the expression must be evaluated in conjunction with numerical reservoir simulation. The propagation of the two-phase front is governed by the background saturation distribution, the saturation-dependent component of the fluid mobility, the porosity, the permeability, the capillary pressure function, the medium compressibility, and the ratio of the slopes of the relative permeability curves. Numerical simulation of water injection into a porous layer saturated with a nonaqueous phase liquid indicates that two modes of propagation are important. The fastest mode of propagation is a pressure-dominated disturbance that travels through the saturated layer. This is followed, much later, by a coupled mode with a large saturation change. These two modes are also observed in a simulation using a heterogeneous porous layer. A comparison between the propagation times estimated from the results of the numerical simulation and predictions from the asymptotic expression indicates overall agreement.

  18. Front and backside processed thin film electronic devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yuan, Hao-Chih; Wang, Guogong; Eriksson, Mark A.; Evans, Paul G.; Lagally, Max G.; Ma, Zhenqiang

    2010-10-12

    This invention provides methods for fabricating thin film electronic devices with both front- and backside processing capabilities. Using these methods, high temperature processing steps may be carried out during both frontside and backside processing. The methods are well-suited for fabricating back-gate and double-gate field effect transistors, double-sided bipolar transistors and 3D integrated circuits.

  19. Front and backside processed thin film electronic devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Evans, Paul G.; Lagally, Max G.; Ma, Zhenqiang; Yuan, Hao-Chih; Wang, Guogong; Eriksson, Mark A.

    2012-01-03

    This invention provides thin film devices that have been processed on their front- and backside. The devices include an active layer that is sufficiently thin to be mechanically flexible. Examples of the devices include back-gate and double-gate field effect transistors, double-sided bipolar transistors and 3D integrated circuits.

  20. Critical Configurations of Hard Disks on the Torus

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2013-04-16

    CCHDT constructs and classifies various arrangements of hard disks of a single radius places on the unit square with periodic boundary conditions. Specifially, a given configuration is evolved to the nearest critical point on a smoothed hard disk energy fuction, and is classified by the adjacency matrix of the canonically labelled contact graph.

  1. POLAR DISK GALAXY FOUND IN WALL BETWEEN VOIDS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stanonik, K.; Van Gorkom, J. H.; Platen, E.; Van de Weygaert, R.; Van der Hulst, J. M.; Aragon-Calvo, M. A.; Peebles, P. J. E.

    2009-05-01

    We have found an isolated polar disk galaxy in what appears to be a cosmological wall situated between two voids. This void galaxy is unique as its polar disk was discovered serendipitously in an H I survey of SDSS void galaxies, with no optical counterpart to the H I polar disk. Yet the H I mass in the disk is comparable to the stellar mass in the galaxy. This suggests slow accretion of the H I material at a relatively recent time. There is also a hint of a warp in the outer parts of the H I disk. The central, stellar disk appears relatively blue, with faint near-UV emission, and is oriented (roughly) parallel to the surrounding wall, implying gas accretion from the voids. The considerable gas mass and apparent lack of stars in the polar disk, coupled with the general underdensity of the environment, supports recent theories of cold flow accretion as an alternate formation mechanism for polar disk galaxies.

  2. Linear corotation torques in non-barotropic disks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsang, David

    2014-02-20

    A fully analytic expression for the linear corotation torque to first order in eccentricity for planets in non-barotropic protoplanetary disks is derived, taking into account the effect of disk entropy gradients. This torque formula is applicable to both the co-orbital, corotation torques and the non-co-orbital, corotation torques—for planets in orbits with non-zero eccentricity—in disks where the thermal diffusivity and viscosity are sufficient to maintain the linearity of these interactions. While the co-orbital, corotation torque is important for migration of planets in Type I migration, the non-co-orbital, corotation torque plays an important role in the eccentricity evolution of giant planets that have opened gaps in the disk. The presence of an entropy gradient in the disk can significantly modify the corotation torque in both these cases.

  3. GRAVITATIONAL WAVE SIGNATURES OF HYPERACCRETING COLLAPSAR DISKS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kotake, Kei; Takiwaki, Tomoya; Harikae, Seiji

    2012-08-20

    By performing two-dimensional special relativistic (SR) magnetohydrodynamic simulations, we study possible signatures of gravitational waves (GWs) in the context of the collapsar model for long-duration gamma-ray bursts. In our SR simulations, the central black hole is treated as an absorbing boundary. By doing so, we focus on the GWs generated by asphericities in neutrino emission and matter motions in the vicinity of the hyperaccreting disks. We compute nine models by adding initial angular momenta and magnetic fields parametrically to a precollapse core of a 35 M{sub Sun} progenitor star. As for the microphysics, a realistic equation of state is employed and the neutrino cooling is taken into account via a multi-flavor neutrino leakage scheme. To accurately estimate GWs produced by anisotropic neutrino emission, we perform a ray-tracing analysis in general relativity by a post-processing procedure. By employing a stress formula that includes contributions from both magnetic fields and SR corrections, we also study the effects of magnetic fields on the gravitational waveforms. We find that the GW amplitudes from anisotropic neutrino emission show a monotonic increase with time, whose amplitudes are much larger than those from matter motions of the accreting material. We show that the increasing trend of the neutrino GWs stems from the excess of neutrino emission in the direction near parallel to the spin axis illuminated from the hyperaccreting disks. We point out that a recently proposed future space-based interferometer like Fabry-Perot-type DECIGO would permit the detection of these GW signals within Almost-Equal-To 100 Mpc.

  4. Light-front holographic QCD and emerging confinement

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; de Téramond, Guy F.; Dosch, Hans Günter; Erlich, Joshua

    2015-05-21

    In this study we explore the remarkable connections between light-front dynamics, its holographic mapping to gravity in a higher-dimensional anti-de Sitter (AdS) space, and conformal quantum mechanics. This approach provides new insights into the origin of a fundamental mass scale and the physics underlying confinement dynamics in QCD in the limit of massless quarks. The result is a relativistic light-front wave equation for arbitrary spin with an effective confinement potential derived from a conformal action and its embedding in AdS space. This equation allows for the computation of essential features of hadron spectra in terms of a single scale. Themore » light-front holographic methods described here give a precise interpretation of holographic variables and quantities in AdS space in terms of light-front variables and quantum numbers. This leads to a relation between the AdS wave functions and the boost-invariant light-front wave functions describing the internal structure of hadronic bound-states in physical spacetime. The pion is massless in the chiral limit and the excitation spectra of relativistic light-quark meson and baryon bound states lie on linear Regge trajectories with identical slopes in the radial and orbital quantum numbers. In the light-front holographic approach described here currents are expressed as an infinite sum of poles, and form factors as a product of poles. At large q2 the form factor incorporates the correct power-law fall-off for hard scattering independent of the specific dynamics and is dictated by the twist. At low q2 the form factor leads to vector dominance. The approach is also extended to include small quark masses. We briefly review in this report other holographic approaches to QCD, in particular top-down and bottom-up models based on chiral symmetry breaking. We also include a discussion of open problems and future applications.« less

  5. Type I planet migration in nearly laminar disks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Hui; Li, Shengtai; Lubow, S H; Lin, D

    2008-01-01

    We describe two-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations of the migration of low-mass planets ({<=}30 M{sub {circle_plus}}) in nearly laminar disks (viscosity parameter {alpha} < 10{sup -3}) over timescales of several thousand orbit periods. We consider disk masses of 1, 2, and 5 times the minimum mass solar nebula, disk thickness parameters of H/r = 0.035 and 0.05, and a variety of {alpha} values and planet masses. Disk self-gravity is fully included. Previous analytic work has suggested that Type I planet migration can be halted in disks of sufficiently low turbulent viscosity, for {alpha} {approx} 10{sup -4}. The halting is due to a feedback effect of breaking density waves that results in a slight mass redistribution and consequently an increased outward torque contribution. The simulations confirm the existence of a critical mass (M{sub {alpha}} {approx} 10M{sub {circle_plus}}) beyond which migration halts in nearly laminar disks. For {alpha} {approx}> 10{sup -3}, density feedback effects are washed out and Type I migration persists. The critical masses are in good agreement with the analytic model of Rafikov. In addition, for {alpha} {approx}> 10{sup -4} steep density gradients produce a vortex instability, resulting in a small time-varying eccentricity in the planet's orbit and a slight outward migration. Migration in nearly laminar disks may be sufficiently slow to reconcile the timescales of migration theory with those of giant planet formation in the core accretion model.

  6. Finite axisymmetric charged dust disks in conformastatic spacetimes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gonzalez, Guillermo A.; Gutierrez-Pineres, Antonio C.; Ospina, Paolo A.

    2008-09-15

    An infinite family of axisymmetric charged dust disks of finite extension is presented. The disks are obtained by solving the vacuum Einstein-Maxwell equations for conformastatic spacetimes, which are characterized by only one metric function. In order to obtain the solutions, a functional relationship between the metric function and the electric potential is assumed. It is also assumed that the metric function is functionally dependent on another auxiliary function, which is taken as a solution of the Laplace equation. The solutions for the auxiliary function are then taken as given by the infinite family of generalized Kalnajs disks recently obtained by Gonzalez and Reina [G. A. Gonzalez and J. I. Reina, Mon. Not. R. Astron. Soc. 371, 1873 (2006).], expressed in terms of the oblate spheroidal coordinates and corresponding to a family of well-behaved Newtonian axisymmetric thin disks of finite radius. The obtained relativistic thin disks have a charge density that is equal, except maybe by a sign, to their mass density, in such a way that the electric and gravitational forces are in exact balance. The energy density of the disks is everywhere positive and well behaved, vanishing at the edge. Accordingly, as the disks are made of dust, their energy-momentum tensor agrees with all the energy conditions.

  7. PLANETESIMALS IN DEBRIS DISKS OF SUN-LIKE STARS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shannon, Andrew; Wu Yanqin

    2011-09-20

    Observations of dusty debris disks can be used to test theories of planetesimal coagulation. Planetesimals of sizes up to a couple of thousand kilometers are embedded in these disks and their mutual collisions generate the small dust grains that are observed. The dust luminosities, when combined with information on the dust spatial extent and the system age, can be used to infer initial masses in the planetesimal belts. Carrying out such a procedure for a sample of debris disks around Sun-like stars, we reach the following two conclusions. First, if we assume that colliding planetesimals satisfy a primordial size spectrum of the form dn/ds{proportional_to}s{sup -q}, observed disks strongly favor a value of q between 3.5 and 4, while both current theoretical expectations and statistics of Kuiper belt objects favor a somewhat larger value. Second, number densities of planetesimals are two to three orders of magnitude higher in detected disks than in the Kuiper belt, for comparably sized objects. This is a surprise for the coagulation models. It would require a similar increase in the disk surface density over that of the Minimum Mass Solar Nebula, which is unreasonable. Both of our conclusions are driven by the need to explain the presence of bright debris disks at a few gigayears of age.

  8. ALIGNMENT OF PROTOSTARS AND CIRCUMSTELLAR DISKS DURING THE EMBEDDED PHASE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spalding, Christopher; Batygin, Konstantin; Adams, Fred C. E-mail: kbatygin@gps.caltech.edu

    2014-12-20

    Star formation proceeds via the collapse of a molecular cloud core over multiple dynamical timescales. Turbulence within cores results in a spatially non-uniform angular momentum of the cloud, causing a stochastic variation in the orientation of the disk forming from the collapsing material. In the absence of star-disk angular momentum coupling, such disk-tilting would provide a natural mechanism for the production of primordial spin-orbit misalignments in the resulting planetary systems. However, owing to high accretion rates in the embedded phase of star formation, the inner edge of the circumstellar disk extends down to the stellar surface, resulting in efficient gravitational and accretional angular momentum transfer between the star and the disk. Here, we demonstrate that the resulting gravitational coupling is sufficient to suppress any significant star-disk misalignment, with accretion playing a secondary role. The joint tilting of the star-disk system leads to a stochastic wandering of star-aligned bipolar outflows. Such wandering widens the effective opening angle of stellar outflows, allowing for more efficient clearing of the remainder of the protostar's gaseous envelope. Accordingly, the processes described in this work provide an additional mechanism responsible for sculpting the stellar initial mass function.

  9. The effect of radial migration on galactic disks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vera-Ciro, Carlos; D'Onghia, Elena; Navarro, Julio; Abadi, Mario

    2014-10-20

    We study the radial migration of stars driven by recurring multi-arm spiral features in an exponential disk embedded in a dark matter halo. The spiral perturbations redistribute angular momentum within the disk and lead to substantial radial displacements of individual stars, in a manner that largely preserves the circularity of their orbits and that results, after 5 Gyr (?40 full rotations at the disk scale length), in little radial heating and no appreciable changes to the vertical or radial structure of the disk. Our results clarify a number of issues related to the spatial distribution and kinematics of migrators. In particular, we find that migrators are a heavily biased subset of stars with preferentially low vertical velocity dispersions. This 'provenance bias' for migrators is not surprising in hindsight, for stars with small vertical excursions spend more time near the disk plane, and thus respond more readily to non-axisymmetric perturbations. We also find that the vertical velocity dispersion of outward migrators always decreases, whereas the opposite holds for inward migrators. To first order, newly arrived migrators simply replace stars that have migrated off to other radii, thus inheriting the vertical bias of the latter. Extreme migrators might therefore be recognized, if present, by the unexpectedly small amplitude of their vertical excursions. Our results show that migration, understood as changes in angular momentum that preserve circularity, can strongly affect the thin disk, but cast doubts on models that envision the Galactic thick disk as a relic of radial migration.

  10. Self-gravity in neutrino-dominated accretion disks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Tong; Yu, Xiao-Fei; Gu, Wei-Min; Lu, Ju-Fu

    2014-08-10

    We present the effects of self-gravity on the vertical structure and neutrino luminosity of the neutrino-dominated accretion disks in cylindrical coordinates. It is found that significant changes of the structure appear in the outer region of the disk, especially for high accretion rates (e.g., ? 1 M{sub ?} s{sup 1}), and thus cause the slight increase in the neutrino luminosity. Furthermore, the gravitational instability of the disk is reviewed by the vertical distribution of the Toomre parameter, which may account for the late-time flares in gamma-ray bursts and the extended emission in short-duration gamma-ray bursts.

  11. At Plasma Camp, teachers experience research front and center | Princeton

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Plasma Physics Lab At Plasma Camp, teachers experience research front and center By Constance Kaita August 12, 2013 Tweet Widget Google Plus One Share on Facebook Wendy Dlakic, a physics and earth science teacher from Livingston, Mont., examines a plasma with Nick Guilbert, a master teacher and collaborator from The Peddie School, at this year's Plasma Camp for physics teachers at PPPL from July 15 to 19. (Photo by Photo by Elle Starkman/ PPPL Office of Communications) Wendy Dlakic, a

  12. Formation mechanism of steep wave front in magnetized plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sasaki, M. Kasuya, N.; Itoh, S.-I.; Kobayashi, T.; Arakawa, H.; Itoh, K.; Fukunaga, K.; Yamada, T.; Yagi, M.

    2015-03-15

    Bifurcation from a streamer to a solitary drift wave is obtained in three dimensional simulation of resistive drift waves in cylindrical plasmas. The solitary drift wave is observed in the regime where the collisional transport is important as well as fluctuation induced transport. The solitary drift wave forms a steep wave front in the azimuthal direction. The phase of higher harmonic modes are locked to that of the fundamental mode, so that the steep wave front is sustained for a long time compared to the typical time scale of the drift wave oscillation. The phase entrainment between the fundamental and second harmonic modes is studied, and the azimuthal structure of the stationary solution is found to be characterized by a parameter which is determined by the deviation of the fluctuations from the Boltzmann relation. There are two solutions of the azimuthal structures, which have steep wave front facing forward and backward in the wave propagation direction, respectively. The selection criterion of these solutions is derived theoretically from the stability of the phase entrainment. The simulation result and experimental observations are found to be consistent with the theoretical prediction.

  13. Time series analysis of Adaptive Optics wave-front sensor telemetry...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Time series analysis of Adaptive Optics wave-front sensor telemetry data Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Time series analysis of Adaptive Optics wave-front sensor ...

  14. Modified Anti-de-Sitter Metric, Light-Front Quantized QCD, and...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Modified Anti-de-Sitter Metric, Light-Front Quantized QCD, and Conformal Quantum Mechanics Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Modified Anti-de-Sitter Metric, Light-Front...

  15. Energy Proportionality for Disk Storage Using Replication

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Jinoh; Rotem, Doron

    2010-09-09

    Energy saving has become a crucial concern in datacenters as several reports predict that the anticipated energy costs over a three year period will exceed hardware acquisition. In particular, saving energy for storage is of major importance as storage devices (and cooling them off) may contribute over 25 percent of the total energy consumed in a datacenter. Recent work introduced the concept of energy proportionality and argued that it is a more relevant metric than just energy saving as it takes into account the tradeoff between energy consumption and performance. In this paper, we present a novel approach, called FREP (Fractional Replication for Energy Proportionality), for energy management in large datacenters. FREP includes areplication strategy and basic functions to enable flexible energy management. Specifically, our method provides performance guarantees by adaptively controlling the power states of a group of disks based on observed and predicted workloads. Our experiments, using a set of real and synthetic traces, show that FREP dramatically reduces energy requirements with a minimal response time penalty.

  16. Misaligned Disks as Obscurers in Active Galaxies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lawrence, A.; Elvis, M.

    2010-06-02

    We review critically the evidence concerning the fraction of Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) which appear as Type 2 AGN, carefully distinguishing strict Type 2 AGN from both more lightly reddened Type 1 AGN, and from low excitation narrow line AGN, which may represent a different mode of activity. Low excitation AGN occur predominantly at low luminosities; after removing these, true Type 2 AGN represent 58{-+}5% of all AGN, and lightly reddened Type 1 AGN a further {approx}15%. Radio, IR, and volume-limited samples all agree in showing no change of Type 2 fraction with luminosity. X-ray samples do show a change with luminosity; we discuss possible reasons for this discrepancy. We test a very simple picture which produces this Type 2 fraction with minimal assumptions. In this picture, infall from large scales occurs in random directions, but must eventually align with the inner accretion flow, producing a severely warped disk on parsec scales. If the re-alignment is dominated by tilt, with minimal twist, a wide range of covering factors is predicted in individual objects, but with an expected mean fraction of Type 2 AGN of exactly 50%. This 'tilted disc' picture predicts reasonable alignment of observed nuclear structures on average, but with distinct misalignments in individual cases. Initial case studies of the few well resolved objects show that such misalignments are indeed present.

  17. EFFECTS OF DUST FEEDBACK ON VORTICES IN PROTOPLANETARY DISKS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fu, Wen; Liang, Edison; Li, Hui; Li, Shengtai; Lubow, Stephen

    2014-11-10

    We carried out two-dimensional, high-resolution simulations to study the effect of dust feedback on the evolution of vortices induced by massive planets in protoplanetary disks. Various initial dust to gas disk surface density ratios (0.001-0.01) and dust particle sizes (Stokes number 4 10{sup 4}-0.16) are considered. We found that while dust particles migrate inward, vortices are very effective at collecting them. When dust density becomes comparable to gas density within the vortex, a dynamical instability is excited and it alters the coherent vorticity pattern and destroys the vortex. This dust feedback effect is stronger with a higher initial dust/gas density ratio and larger dust grain. Consequently, we found that the disk vortex lifetime can be reduced up to a factor of 10. We discuss the implications of our findings on the survivability of vortices in protoplanetary disks and planet formation.

  18. Stochastic formation of magnetic vortex structures in asymmetric disks

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    triggered by chaotic dynamics (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Stochastic formation of magnetic vortex structures in asymmetric disks triggered by chaotic dynamics Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Stochastic formation of magnetic vortex structures in asymmetric disks triggered by chaotic dynamics Authors: Im, Mi-Young ; Lee, Ki-Suk ; Vogel, Andreas ; Hong, Jung-Il ; Meier, Guido ; Fischer, Peter Publication Date: 2014-12-17 OSTI Identifier: 1167390 Report Number(s): LBNL-6890E

  19. Evolution of accretion disks in tidal disruption events

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shen, Rong-Feng; Matzner, Christopher D. E-mail: matzner@astro.utoronto.ca

    2014-04-01

    During a stellar tidal disruption event (TDE), an accretion disk forms as stellar debris returns to the disruption site and circularizes. Rather than being confined within the circularizing radius, the disk can spread to larger radii to conserve angular momentum. A spreading disk is a source of matter for re-accretion at rates that may exceed the later stellar fallback rate, although a disk wind can suppress its contribution to the central black hole accretion rate. A spreading disk is detectible through a break in the central accretion rate history or, at longer wavelengths, by its own emission. We model the evolution of TDE disk size and accretion rate by accounting for the time-dependent fallback rate, for the influence of wind losses in the early advective stage, and for the possibility of thermal instability for accretion rates intermediate between the advection-dominated and gas-pressure-dominated states. The model provides a dynamic basis for modeling TDE light curves. All or part of a young TDE disk will precess as a solid body because of the Lense-Thirring effect, and precession may manifest itself as a quasi-periodic modulation of the light curve. The precession period increases with time. Applying our results to the jetted TDE candidate Swift J1644+57, whose X-ray light curve shows numerous quasi-periodic dips, we argue that the data best fit a scenario in which a main-sequence star was fully disrupted by an intermediate mass black hole on an orbit significantly inclined from the black hole equator, with the apparent jet shutoff at t = 500 days corresponding to a disk transition from the advective state to the gas-pressure-dominated state.

  20. Apparatus and method for pressure testing closure disks

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Merten, C.W. Jr.

    1992-01-21

    A method and device are described for testing the burst pressure of closure disks which provides high pressure to both sides of a disk and rapidly releases pressure from one side thereof causing a high rate of change of pressure. A hollow notched plug allows the rapid release of pressure upon rupturing. A tensile load is transmitted by a piston in combination with fluid pressure to the hollow notched plug. 5 figs.

  1. Apparatus and method for pressure testing closure disks

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Merten, Jr., Charles W.

    1992-01-21

    A method and device for testing the burst pressure of closure disks which provides high pressure to both sides of a disk and rapidly releases pressure from one side thereof causing a high rate of change of pressure. A hollow notched plug allows the rapid release of pressure upon rupturing. A tensile load is transmitted by a piston in combination with fluid pressure to the hollow notched plug.

  2. EQUILIBRIUM DISKS, MAGNETOROTATIONAL INSTABILITY MODE EXCITATION, AND STEADY-STATE TURBULENCE IN GLOBAL ACCRETION DISK SIMULATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parkin, E. R.; Bicknell, G. V.

    2013-02-15

    Global three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations of turbulent accretion disks are presented which start from fully equilibrium initial conditions in which the magnetic forces are accounted for and the induction equation is satisfied. The local linear theory of the magnetorotational instability (MRI) is used as a predictor of the growth of magnetic field perturbations in the global simulations. The linear growth estimates and global simulations diverge when nonlinear motions-perhaps triggered by the onset of turbulence-upset the velocity perturbations used to excite the MRI. The saturated state is found to be independent of the initially excited MRI mode, showing that once the disk has expelled the initially net flux field and settled into quasi-periodic oscillations in the toroidal magnetic flux, the dynamo cycle regulates the global saturation stress level. Furthermore, time-averaged measures of converged turbulence, such as the ratio of magnetic energies, are found to be in agreement with previous works. In particular, the globally averaged stress normalized to the gas pressure <{alpha}{sub P}>bar = 0.034, with notably higher values achieved for simulations with higher azimuthal resolution. Supplementary tests are performed using different numerical algorithms and resolutions. Convergence with resolution during the initial linear MRI growth phase is found for 23-35 cells per scale height (in the vertical direction).

  3. CONSTRAINTS ON COMPTON-THICK WINDS FROM BLACK HOLE ACCRETION DISKS: CAN WE SEE THE INNER DISK?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reynolds, Christopher S.

    2012-11-01

    Strong evidence is emerging that winds can be driven from the central regions of accretion disks in both active galactic nuclei and Galactic black hole binaries. Direct evidence for highly ionized, Compton-thin inner-disk winds comes from observations of blueshifted (v {approx} 0.05-0.1c) iron-K X-ray absorption lines. However, it has been suggested that the inner regions of black hole accretion disks can also drive Compton-thick winds-such winds would enshroud the inner disk, preventing us from seeing direct signatures of the accretion disk (i.e., the photospheric thermal emission, or the Doppler/gravitationally broadened iron K{alpha} line). Here, we show that, provided the source is sub-Eddington, the well-established wind-driving mechanisms fail to launch a Compton-thick wind from the inner disk. For the accelerated region of the wind to be Compton-thick, the momentum carried in the wind must exceed the available photon momentum by a factor of at least 2/{lambda}, where {lambda} is the Eddington ratio of the source, ruling out radiative acceleration unless the source is very close to the Eddington limit. Compton-thick winds also carry large mass fluxes, and a consideration of the connections between the wind and the disk shows this to be incompatible with magneto-centrifugal driving. Finally, thermal driving of the wind is ruled out on the basis of the large Compton radii that typify black hole systems. In the absence of some new acceleration mechanisms, we conclude that the inner regions of sub-Eddington accretion disks around black holes are indeed naked.

  4. Instrument Front-Ends at Fermilab During Run II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meyer, Thomas; Slimmer, David; Voy, Duane; /Fermilab

    2011-07-13

    The optimization of an accelerator relies on the ability to monitor the behavior of the beam in an intelligent and timely fashion. The use of processor-driven front-ends allowed for the deployment of smart systems in the field for improved data collection and analysis during Run II. This paper describes the implementation of the two main systems used: National Instruments LabVIEW running on PCs, and WindRiver's VxWorks real-time operating system running in a VME crate processor.

  5. GAS EMISSION FROM DEBRIS DISKS AROUND A AND F STARS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zagorovsky, Kyryl; Brandeker, Alexis; Wu Yanqin E-mail: alexis@astro.su.s

    2010-09-01

    Gas has been detected in a number of debris disk systems. This gas may have arisen from grain sublimation or grain photodesorption. It interacts with the surrounding dust grains through a number of charge and heat exchanges. Studying the chemical composition and physical state of this gas can therefore reveal much about the dust component in these debris disks. We have produced a new code, ONTARIO, to address gas emission from dusty gas-poor disks around A-F stars. This code computes the gas ionization and thermal balance self-consistently, with particular care taken of heating/cooling mechanisms. Line emission spectra are then produced for each species (up to zinc) by statistical equilibrium calculations of the atomic/ionic energy levels. For parameters that resemble the observed {beta} Pictoris gas disk, we find that the gas is primarily heated by photoelectric emission from dust grains, and primarily cooled through the C II 157.7 {mu}m line emission. The gas can be heated to a temperature that is warmer than that of the dust and may in some cases reach temperature for thermal escape. The dominant cooling line, C II 157.7 {mu}m, should be detectable by Herschel in these disks, while the O I 63.2 {mu}m line will be too faint. We also study the dependence of the cooling line fluxes on a variety of disk parameters, in light of the much improved sensitivity to thermal line emission in the mid/far-infrared and at submillimeter wavelengths provided by, in particular, Herschel, SOFIA, and ALMA. These new instruments will yield much new information about dusty debris disks.

  6. THE EFFECTS OF INITIAL ABUNDANCES ON NITROGEN IN PROTOPLANETARY DISKS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schwarz, Kamber R.; Bergin, Edwin A.

    2014-12-20

    The dominant form of nitrogen provided to most solar system bodies is currently unknown, though available measurements show that the detected nitrogen in solar system rocks and ices is depleted with respect to solar abundances and the interstellar medium. We use a detailed chemical/physical model of the chemical evolution of a protoplanetary disk to explore the evolution and abundance of nitrogen-bearing molecules. Based on this model, we analyze how initial chemical abundances provided as either gas or ice during the early stages of disk formation influence which species become the dominant nitrogen bearers at later stages. We find that a disk with the majority of its initial nitrogen in either atomic or molecular nitrogen is later dominated by atomic and molecular nitrogen as well as NH{sub 3} and HCN ices, where the dominant species varies with disk radius. When nitrogen is initially in gaseous ammonia, it later becomes trapped in ammonia ice except in the outer disk where atomic nitrogen dominates. For a disk with the initial nitrogen in the form of ammonia ice, the nitrogen remains trapped in the ice as NH{sub 3} at later stages. The model in which most of the initial nitrogen is placed in atomic N best matches the ammonia abundances observed in comets. Furthermore, the initial state of nitrogen influences the abundance of N{sub 2}H{sup +}, which has been detected in protoplanetary disks. Strong N{sub 2}H{sup +} emission is found to be indicative of an N{sub 2} abundance greater than n{sub N{sub 2}}/n{sub H{sub 2}}>10{sup ?6} in addition to tracing the CO snow line. Our models also indicate that NO is potentially detectable, with lower N gas abundances leading to higher NO abundances.

  7. RELAXATION OF WARPED DISKS: THE CASE OF PURE HYDRODYNAMICS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sorathia, Kareem A.; Krolik, Julian H.; Hawley, John F.

    2013-05-10

    Orbiting disks may exhibit bends due to a misalignment between the angular momentum of the inner and outer regions of the disk. We begin a systematic simulational inquiry into the physics of warped disks with the simplest case: the relaxation of an unforced warp under pure fluid dynamics, i.e., with no internal stresses other than Reynolds stress. We focus on the nonlinear regime in which the bend rate is large compared to the disk aspect ratio. When warps are nonlinear, strong radial pressure gradients drive transonic radial motions along the disk's top and bottom surfaces that efficiently mix angular momentum. The resulting nonlinear decay rate of the warp increases with the warp rate and the warp width, but, at least in the parameter regime studied here, is independent of the sound speed. The characteristic magnitude of the associated angular momentum fluxes likewise increases with both the local warp rate and the radial range over which the warp extends; it also increases with increasing sound speed, but more slowly than linearly. The angular momentum fluxes respond to the warp rate after a delay that scales with the square root of the time for sound waves to cross the radial extent of the warp. These behaviors are at variance with a number of the assumptions commonly used in analytic models to describe linear warp dynamics.

  8. SHADOWS CAST BY A WARP IN THE HD 142527 PROTOPLANETARY DISK

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marino, S.; Perez, S.; Casassus, S.

    2015-01-10

    Detailed observations of gaps in protoplanetary disks have revealed structures that drive current research on circumstellar disks. One such feature is the two intensity nulls seen along the outer disk of the HD 142527 system, which are particularly well traced in polarized differential imaging. Here we propose that these are shadows cast by the inner disk. The inner and outer disk are thick, in terms of the unit-opacity surface in the H band, so that the shape and orientation of the shadows inform on the three-dimensional structure of the system. Radiative transfer predictions on a parametric disk model allow us to conclude that the relative inclination between the inner and outer disks is 70° ± 5°. This finding taps the potential of high-contrast imaging of circumstellar disks, and bears consequences on the gas dynamics of gapped disks, as well as on the physical conditions in the shadowed regions.

  9. Meson transition form factors in light-front holographic QCD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; Cao Fuguang; de Teramond, Guy F.

    2011-10-01

    We study the photon-to-meson transition form factors (TFFs) F{sub M}{gamma}(Q{sup 2}) for {gamma}{gamma}{sup *}{yields}M using light-front holographic methods. The Chern-Simons action, which is a natural form in five-dimensional anti-de Sitter (AdS) space, is required to describe the anomalous coupling of mesons to photons using holographic methods and leads directly to an expression for the photon-to-pion TFF for a class of confining models. Remarkably, the predicted pion TFF is identical to the leading order QCD result where the distribution amplitude has asymptotic form. The Chern-Simons form is local in AdS space and is thus somewhat limited in its predictability. It only retains the qq component of the pion wave function, and further, it projects out only the asymptotic form of the meson distribution amplitude. It is found that in order to describe simultaneously the decay process {pi}{sup 0}{yields}{gamma}{gamma} and the pion TFF at the asymptotic limit, a probability for the qq component of the pion wave function P{sub qq}=0.5 is required, thus giving indication that the contributions from higher Fock states in the pion light-front wave function need to be included in the analysis. The probability for the Fock state containing four quarks P{sub qqqq}{approx}10%, which follows from analyzing the hadron matrix elements for a dressed current model, agrees with the analysis of the pion elastic form factor using light-front holography including higher Fock components in the pion wave function. The results for the TFFs for the {eta} and {eta}{sup '} mesons are also presented. The rapid growth of the pion TFF exhibited by the BABAR data at high Q{sup 2} is not compatible with the models discussed in this article, whereas the theoretical calculations are in agreement with the experimental data for the {eta} and {eta}{sup '} TFFs.

  10. LARGE-SCALE CORONAL PROPAGATING FRONTS IN SOLAR ERUPTIONS AS OBSERVED BY THE ATMOSPHERIC IMAGING ASSEMBLY ON BOARD THE SOLAR DYNAMICS OBSERVATORY—AN ENSEMBLE STUDY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nitta, Nariaki V.; Schrijver, Carolus J.; Title, Alan M.; Liu, Wei

    2013-10-10

    This paper presents a study of a large sample of global disturbances in the solar corona with characteristic propagating fronts as intensity enhancement, similar to the phenomena that have often been referred to as Extreme Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (EIT) waves or extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) waves. Now EUV images obtained by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory provide a significantly improved view of these large-scale coronal propagating fronts (LCPFs). Between 2010 April and 2013 January, a total of 171 LCPFs have been identified through visual inspection of AIA images in the 193 Å channel. Here we focus on the 138 LCPFs that are seen to propagate across the solar disk, first studying how they are associated with flares, coronal mass ejections (CMEs), and type II radio bursts. We measure the speed of the LCPF in various directions until it is clearly altered by active regions or coronal holes. The highest speed is extracted for each LCPF. It is often considerably higher than EIT waves. We do not find a pattern where faster LCPFs decelerate and slow LCPFs accelerate. Furthermore, the speeds are not strongly correlated with the flare intensity or CME magnitude, nor do they show an association with type II bursts. We do not find a good correlation either between the speeds of LCPFs and CMEs in a subset of 86 LCPFs observed by one or both of the Solar and Terrestrial Relations Observatory spacecraft as limb events.

  11. PROTOSTELLAR DISK FORMATION ENABLED BY WEAK, MISALIGNED MAGNETIC FIELDS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krumholz, Mark R.; Crutcher, Richard M.; Hull, Charles L. H.

    2013-04-10

    The gas from which stars form is magnetized, and strong magnetic fields can efficiently transport angular momentum. Most theoretical models of this phenomenon find that it should prevent formation of large (>100 AU), rotationally supported disks around most protostars, even when non-ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) effects that allow the field and gas to decouple are taken into account. Using recent observations of magnetic field strengths and orientations in protostellar cores, we show that this conclusion is incorrect. The distribution of magnetic field strengths is very broad, and alignments between fields and angular momentum vectors within protostellar cores are essentially random. By combining the field strength and misalignment data with MHD simulations showing that disk formation is expected for both weak and misaligned fields, we show that these observations imply that we should expect disk fractions of {approx}10%-50% even when protostars are still deeply embedded in their parent cores, and even if the gas is governed by ideal MHD.

  12. CONSTRAINTS FROM ASYMMETRIC HEATING: INVESTIGATING THE EPSILON AURIGAE DISK

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pearson, Richard L. III; Stencel, Robert E. E-mail: robert.stencel@du.edu

    2015-01-01

    Epsilon Aurigae is a long-period eclipsing binary that likely contains an F0Ia star and a circumstellar disk enshrouding a hidden companion, assumed to be a main-sequence B star. High uncertainty in its parallax has kept the evolutionary status of the system in question and, hence, the true nature of each component. This unknown, as well as the absence of solid state spectral features in the infrared, requires an investigation of a wide parameter space by means of both analytic and Monte Carlo radiative transfer (MCRT) methods. The first MCRT models of epsilon Aurigae that include all three system components are presented here. We seek additional system parameter constraints by melding analytic approximations with MCRT outputs (e.g., dust temperatures) on a first-order level. The MCRT models investigate the effects of various parameters on the disk-edge temperatures; these include two distances, three particle size distributions, three compositions, and two disk masses, resulting in 36 independent models. Specifically, the MCRT temperatures permit analytic calculations of effective heating and cooling curves along the disk edge. These are used to calculate representative observed fluxes and corresponding temperatures. This novel application of thermal properties provides the basis for utilization of other binary systems containing disks. We find degeneracies in the model fits for the various parameter sets. However, the results show a preference for a carbon disk with particle size distributions ≥10 μm. Additionally, a linear correlation between the MCRT noon and basal temperatures serves as a tool for effectively eliminating portions of the parameter space.

  13. Asymmetric evolution of magnetic reconnection in collisionless accretion disk

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shirakawa, Keisuke Hoshino, Masahiro

    2014-05-15

    An evolution of a magnetic reconnection in a collisionless accretion disk is investigated using a 2.5 dimensional hybrid code simulation. In astrophysical disks, magnetorotational instability (MRI) is considered to play an important role by generating turbulence in the disk and contributes to an effective angular momentum transport through a turbulent viscosity. Magnetic reconnection, on the other hand, also plays an important role on the evolution of the disk through a dissipation of a magnetic field enhanced by a dynamo effect of MRI. In this study, we developed a hybrid code to calculate an evolution of a differentially rotating system. With this code, we first confirmed a linear growth of MRI. We also investigated a behavior of a particular structure of a current sheet, which would exist in the turbulence in the disk. From the calculation of the magnetic reconnection, we found an asymmetric structure in the out-of-plane magnetic field during the evolution of reconnection, which can be understood by a coupling of the Hall effect and the differential rotation. We also found a migration of X-point whose direction is determined only by an initial sign of J{sub 0}×Ω{sub 0}, where J{sub 0} is the initial current density in the neutral sheet and Ω{sub 0} is the rotational vector of the background Keplerian rotation. Associated with the migration of X-point, we also found a significant enhancement of the perpendicular magnetic field compared to an ordinary MRI. MRI-Magnetic reconnection coupling and the resulting magnetic field enhancement can be an effective process to sustain a strong turbulence in the accretion disk and to a transport of angular momentum.

  14. Time series analysis of Adaptive Optics wave-front sensor telemetry data

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Time series analysis of Adaptive Optics wave-front sensor telemetry data Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Time series analysis of Adaptive Optics wave-front sensor telemetry data Time series analysis techniques are applied to wave-front sensor telemetry data from the Lick Adaptive Optics System. For 28 fully-illuminated subapertures, telemetry data of 4096 consecutive slope estimates for each subaperture are available. The primary problem is

  15. Near-infrared structure of fast and slow-rotating disk galaxies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schechtman-Rook, Andrew; Bershady, Matthew A.

    2014-11-10

    We investigate the stellar disk structure of six nearby edge-on spiral galaxies using high-resolution JHK {sub s}-band images and three-dimensional radiative transfer models. To explore how mass and environment shape spiral disks, we selected galaxies with rotational velocities between 69 km s{sup 1} disk structure. Of the fast-rotating (V {sub rot} > 150 km s{sup 1}) galaxies, only NGC 4013 has the super-thin+thin+thick nested disk structure seen in NGC 891 and the Milky Way, albeit with decreased oblateness, while NGC 1055, a disturbed massive spiral galaxy, contains disks with h{sub z} ? 200 pc. NGC 4565, another fast-rotator, contains a prominent ring at a radius ?5 kpc but no super-thin disk. Despite these differences, all fast-rotating galaxies in our sample have inner truncations in at least one of their disks. These truncations lead to Freeman Type II profiles when projected face-on. Slow-rotating galaxies are less complex, lacking inner disk truncations and requiring fewer disk components to reproduce their light distributions. Super-thin disk components in undisturbed disks contribute ?25% of the total K {sub s}-band light, up to that of the thin-disk contribution. The presence of super-thin disks correlates with infrared flux ratios; galaxies with super-thin disks have f{sub K{sub s}}/f{sub 60} {sub ?m}?0.12 for integrated light, consistent with super-thin disks being regions of ongoing star-formation. Attenuation-corrected vertical color gradients in (J K {sub s}) correlate with the observed disk structure and are consistent with population gradients with young-to-intermediate ages closer to the mid-plane, indicating that disk heatingor coolingis a ubiquitous phenomenon.

  16. Development of a Front Tracking Method for Two-Phase Micromixing...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Development of a Front Tracking Method for Two-Phase Micromixing of Incompressible Viscous Fluids with Interfacial Tension in Solvent Extraction Citation Details In-Document Search...

  17. BIPOLAR JETS LAUNCHED FROM ACCRETION DISKS. II. THE FORMATION OF ASYMMETRIC JETS AND COUNTER JETS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fendt, Christian; Sheikhnezami, Somayeh E-mail: nezami@mpia.de

    2013-09-01

    We investigate the jet launching from accretion disks, in particular the formation of intrinsically asymmetric jet/counter jet systems. We perform axisymmetric MHD simulations of the disk-jet structure on a bipolar computational domain covering both hemispheres. We apply various models such as asymmetric disks with (initially) different scale heights in each hemisphere, symmetric disks into which a local disturbance is injected, and jets launched into an asymmetric disk corona. We consider both a standard global magnetic diffusivity distribution and a novel local diffusivity model. Typical disk evolution first shows substantial disk warping and then results in asymmetric outflows with a 10%-30% mass flux difference. We find that the magnetic diffusivity profile is essential for establishing a long-term outflow asymmetry. We conclude that bipolar asymmetry in protostellar and extragalactic jets can indeed be generated intrinsically and maintained over a long time by disk asymmetries and the standard jet launching mechanism.

  18. MAGNETIZED ACCRETION AND DEAD ZONES IN PROTOSTELLAR DISKS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dzyurkevich, Natalia; Henning, Thomas; Turner, Neal J.; Kley, Wilhelm

    2013-03-10

    The edges of magnetically dead zones in protostellar disks have been proposed as locations where density bumps may arise, trapping planetesimals and helping form planets. Magneto-rotational turbulence in magnetically active zones provides both accretion of gas on the star and transport of mass to the dead zone. We investigate the location of the magnetically active regions in a protostellar disk around a solar-type star, varying the disk temperature, surface density profile, and dust-to-gas ratio. We also consider stellar masses between 0.4 and 2 M{sub Sun }, with corresponding adjustments in the disk mass and temperature. The dead zone's size and shape are found using the Elsasser number criterion with conductivities including the contributions from ions, electrons, and charged fractal dust aggregates. The charged species' abundances are found using the approach proposed by Okuzumi. The dead zone is in most cases defined by the ambipolar diffusion. In our maps, the dead zone takes a variety of shapes, including a fish tail pointing away from the star and islands located on and off the midplane. The corresponding accretion rates vary with radius, indicating locations where the surface density will increase over time, and others where it will decrease. We show that density bumps do not readily grow near the dead zone's outer edge, independently of the disk parameters and the dust properties. Instead, the accretion rate peaks at the radius where the gas-phase metals freeze out. This could lead to clearing a valley in the surface density, and to a trap for pebbles located just outside the metal freezeout line.

  19. FAST MODES AND DUSTY HORSESHOES IN TRANSITIONAL DISKS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mittal, Tushar; Chiang, Eugene

    2015-01-01

    The brightest transitional protoplanetary disks are often azimuthally asymmetric: their millimeter-wave thermal emission peaks strongly on one side. Dust overdensities can exceed ?100:1, while gas densities vary by factors less than a few. We propose that these remarkable ALMA observationswhich may bear on how planetesimals formreflect a gravitational global mode in the gas disk. The mode is (1) fastits pattern speed equals the disk's mean Keplerian frequency; (2) of azimuthal wavenumber m = 1, displacing the host star from the barycenter; and (3) Toomre-stable. We solve for gas streamlines including the indirect stellar potential in the frame rotating with the pattern speed, under the drastic simplification that gas does not feel its own gravity. Near corotation, the gas disk takes the form of a horseshoe-shaped annulus. Dust particles with aerodynamic stopping times much shorter or much longer than the orbital period are dragged by gas toward the horseshoe center. For intermediate stopping times, dust converges toward a ?45 wide arc on the corotation circle. Particles that do not reach their final accumulation points within disk lifetimes, either because of gas turbulence or long particle drift times, conform to horseshoe-shaped gas streamlines. Our mode is not self-consistent because we neglect gas self-gravity; still, we expect that trends between accumulation location and particle size, similar to those we have found, are generically predicted by fast modes and are potentially observable. Unlike vortices, global modes are not restricted in radial width to the pressure scale height; their large radial and azimuthal extents may better match observations.

  20. Silicon Solar Cells with Front Hetero-contact and Aluminum Alloy Back Junction (Poster)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yuan, H.-C.; Page, M. R.; Iwaniczko, E.; Xu, Y.; Roybal, L.; Wang, Q.; Branz, H. M.; Meier, D. L.

    2008-05-01

    The objectives of this report are: (1) to apply industrial back Al process in efficient n-wafer cells with a-Si:H front surface passivation; and (2) to evaluate the surface recombination velocity (SRV) of the a-Si:H passivated front surface with different surface preparation procedures.

  1. Front-end electronics and trigger systems - status and challenges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spieler, Helmuth G; Spieler, Helmuth G

    2007-08-21

    The past quarter century has brought about a revolution in front-end electronics for large-scale detector systems. Custom integrated circuits specifically tailored to the requirements of large detector systems have provided unprecedented performance and enabled systems that once were deemed impossible. The evolution of integrated circuit readouts in strip detectors is summarized, the present status described, and challenges posed by the sLHC and ILC are discussed. Performance requirements increase, but key considerations remain as in the past: power dissipation, material, and services. Smaller CMOS feature sizes will not provide the required electronic noise at lower power, but will improve digital power efficiency. Significant improvements appear to be practical in more efficient power distribution. Enhanced digital electronics have provided powerful trigger processors that greatly improve the trigger efficiency. In data readout systems they also improve data throughput, while reducing power requirements. Concurrently with new developments in high energy physics, detector systems for cosmology and astrophysics have made great strides. As an example, a large-scale readout for superconducting bolometer arrays is described.

  2. Inhibition of slug front corrosion in multiphase flow conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, H.J.; Jepson, W.P.

    1998-12-31

    Corrosion at the slug front at the bottom of a pipeline is identified as one of the worst cases of corrosion occurring in the pipeline which carries unprocessed multiphase production with a high level of CO{sub 2} gas. One objective of the study in recommending a subsea completion to shore was to determine if commercial corrosion inhibitors can control this type of corrosion using carbon steel pipeline. Thus, inhibitors which showed excellent performance in the lab using the Rotating Cylinder Electrode system (RCE) were further evaluated to confirm their performance in a flow loop simulating the test conditions predicted from the flow modeling for the proposed pipeline. The performance profile of two commercial inhibitors were determined in a 4 in. flow loop at 7O C, 100 psig CO{sub 2} partial pressure in corrosive brines with or without ethylene glycol and/or light hydrocarbon. Results showed that the carbon steel pipeline could be adequately protected at low temperature using a commercial corrosion inhibitor to meet the designed life of the pipeline. Ethylene glycol, which is used in the pipeline to prevent hydrate formation, reduces the corrosivity of the brine and gives no effect on inhibitor performance under the slug flow conditions. A good agreement in inhibitor performance was observed between the flow loop and the RCE testing. The uninhibited corrosion rate of the test brine in this study is in good agreement with the predicted value using deWaard and Williams correlation for CO{sub 2} corrosion.

  3. IMAGING THE DISK AND JET OF THE CLASSICAL T TAURI STAR AA TAU

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cox, Andrew W.; Grady, Carol A.; Hammel, Heidi B.; Hornbeck, Jeremy; Russell, Ray W.; Sitko, Michael L.; Woodgate, Bruce E.

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies of the classical T Tauri star AA Tau have interpreted the UX-Orionis-like photo-polarimetric variability as being due to a warp in the inner disk caused by an inclined stellar magnetic dipole field. We test that these effects are macroscopically observable in the inclination and alignment of the disk. We use Hubble Space Telescope (HST)/STIS coronagraphic imagery to measure the V magnitude of the star for both STIS coronagraphic observations, compare these data with optical photometry in the literature, and find that, unlike other classical T Tauri stars observed in the same HST program, the disk is most robustly detected in scattered light at stellar optical minimum light. We measure the outer disk radius, 1.''15 {+-} 0.''10, major-axis position angle, and disk inclination and find that the inner disk, as reported in the literature, is both misinclined and misaligned with respect to the outer disk. AA Tau drives a faint jet, detected in both STIS observations and in follow-on Goddard Fabry-Perot imagery, which is also misaligned with respect to the projection of the outer disk minor axis and is poorly collimated near the star, but which can be traced 21'' from the star in data from 2005. The measured outer disk inclination, 71 Degree-Sign {+-} 1 Degree-Sign , is out of the range of inclinations suggested for stars with UX-Orionis-like variability when no grain growth has occurred in the disk. The faintness of the disk, small disk size, and detection of the star despite the high inclination all indicate that the dust disk must have experienced grain growth and settling toward the disk midplane, which we verify by comparing the observed disk with model imagery from the literature.

  4. TRANSITIONAL DISKS AND THEIR ORIGINS: AN INFRARED SPECTROSCOPIC SURVEY OF ORION A

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, K. H.; Watson, Dan M.; Manoj, P.; Forrest, W. J.; Arnold, Laura; Najita, Joan; Furlan, Elise; Sargent, Benjamin; Espaillat, Catherine; Muzerolle, James; Megeath, S. T.; Calvet, Nuria; Green, Joel D.

    2013-06-01

    Transitional disks are protoplanetary disks around young stars, with inner holes or gaps which are surrounded by optically thick outer, and often inner, disks. Here we present observations of 62 new transitional disks in the Orion A star-forming region. These were identified using the Spitzer Space Telescope's Infrared Spectrograph and followed up with determinations of stellar and accretion parameters using the Infrared Telescope Facility's SpeX. We combine these new observations with our previous results on transitional disks in Taurus, Chamaeleon I, Ophiuchus, and Perseus, and with archival X-ray observations. This produces a sample of 105 transitional disks of ''cluster'' age 3 Myr or less, by far the largest hitherto assembled. We use this sample to search for trends between the radial structure in the disks and many other system properties, in order to place constraints on the possible origins of transitional disks. We see a clear progression of host-star accretion rate and the different disk morphologies. We confirm that transitional disks with complete central clearings have median accretion rates an order of magnitude smaller than radially continuous disks of the same population. Pre-transitional disks-those objects with gaps that separate inner and outer disks-have median accretion rates intermediate between the two. Our results from the search for statistically significant trends, especially related to M-dot , strongly support that in both cases the gaps are far more likely to be due to the gravitational influence of Jovian planets or brown dwarfs orbiting within the gaps, than to any of the photoevaporative, turbulent, or grain-growth processes that can lead to disk dissipation. We also find that the fraction of Class II YSOs which are transitional disks is large, 0.1-0.2, especially in the youngest associations.

  5. DUST TRANSPORT IN PROTOSTELLAR DISKS THROUGH TURBULENCE AND SETTLING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turner, N. J.; Carballido, A. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Sano, T., E-mail: neal.turner@jpl.nasa.go [Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

    2010-01-01

    We apply ionization balance and magnetohydrodynamical (MHD) calculations to investigate whether magnetic activity moderated by recombination on dust grains can account for the mass accretion rates and the mid-infrared spectra and variability of protostellar disks. The MHD calculations use the stratified shearing-box approach and include grain settling and the feedback from the changing dust abundance on the resistivity of the gas. The two-decade spread in accretion rates among solar-mass T Tauri stars is too large to result solely from variations in the grain size and stellar X-ray luminosity, but can plausibly be produced by varying these parameters together with the disk magnetic flux. The diverse shapes and strengths of the mid-infrared silicate bands can come from the coupling of grain settling to the distribution of the magnetorotational turbulence, through the following three effects. First, recombination on grains 1 mum or smaller yields a magnetically inactive dead zone extending more than two scale heights from the midplane, while turbulent motions in the magnetically active disk atmosphere overshoot the dead zone boundary by only about one scale height. Second, grains deep in the dead zone oscillate vertically in wave motions driven by the turbulent layer above, but on average settle at the rates found in laminar flow, so that the interior of the dead zone is a particle sink and the disk atmosphere will become dust-depleted unless resupplied from elsewhere. Third, with sufficient depletion, the dead zone is thinner and mixing dredges grains off the midplane. The last of these processes enables evolutionary signatures such as the degree of settling to sometimes decrease with age. The MHD results also show that the magnetic activity intermittently lifts clouds of small grains into the atmosphere. Consequently the photosphere height changes by up to one-third over timescales of a few orbits, while the extinction along lines of sight grazing the disk surface varies by factors of 2 over times down to a tenth of an orbit. We suggest that the changing shadows cast by the dust clouds on the outer disk are a cause of the daily to monthly mid-infrared variability found in many young stars.

  6. Adaptor assembly for coupling turbine blades to rotor disks

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Garcia-Crespo, Andres Jose; Delvaux, John McConnell

    2014-09-23

    An adaptor assembly for coupling a blade root of a turbine blade to a root slot of a rotor disk is described. The adaptor assembly includes a turbine blade having a blade root and an adaptor body having an adaptor root. The adaptor body defines a slot having an open end configured to receive the blade root of the turbine blade such that the adaptor root of the adaptor body and the blade root of the turbine blade are adjacent to one another when the blade root of the turbine blade is positioned within the slot. Both the adaptor root of the adaptor body and the blade root of the turbine blade are configured to be received within the root slot of the rotor disk.

  7. KINEMATICS OF CLASSICAL CEPHEIDS IN THE NUCLEAR STELLAR DISK

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matsunaga, Noriyuki; Fukue, Kei; Yamamoto, Ryo; Kobayashi, Naoto; Hamano, Satoshi; Inno, Laura; Genovali, Katia; Bono, Giuseppe; Baba, Junichi; Fujii, Michiko S.; Aoki, Wako; Tsujimoto, Takuji; Kondo, Sohei; Ikeda, Yuji; Nishiyama, Shogo; Nagata, Tetsuya

    2015-01-20

    Classical Cepheids are useful tracers of the Galactic young stellar population because their distances and ages can be determined from their period-luminosity and period-age relations. In addition, the radial velocities and chemical abundance of the Cepheids can be derived from spectroscopic observations, providing further insights into the structure and evolution of the Galaxy. Here, we report the radial velocities of classical Cepheids near the Galactic center, three of which were reported in 2011 and a fourth being reported for the first time. The velocities of these Cepheids suggest that the stars orbit within the nuclear stellar disk, a group of stars and interstellar matter occupying a region of ?200pc around the center, although the three-dimensional velocities cannot be determined until the proper motions are known. According to our simulation, these four Cepheids formed within the nuclear stellar disk like younger stars and stellar clusters therein.

  8. Verification of runaway migration in a massive disk

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Shengtai

    2009-01-01

    Runaway migration of a proto-planet was first proposed and observed by Masset and Papaloizou (2003). The semi-major axis of the proto-planet varies by 50% over just a few tens of orbits when runaway migration happens. More recent work by D'Angelo et al. (2005) solved the same problem with locally refined grid and found that the migration rate is sharply reduced and no runaway occurs when the grid cells surrounding the planet are refined enough. To verify these two seemly contradictory results, we independently perform high-resolution simulations, solving the same problem as Masset and Papaloizou (2003), with and without self-gravity. We find that the migration rate is highly dependent on the softening used in the gravitational force between thd disk and planet. When a small softening is used in a 2D massive disk, the mass of the circumplanetary disk (CPD) increases with time with enough resolution in the CPD region. It acts as the mass is continually accreted to the CPD, which cannot be settled down until after thousands of orbits. If the planet is held on a fixed orbit long enough, the mass of CPD will become so large that the condition for the runaway migration derived in Masset (2008) will not be satisfied, and hence the runaway migration will not be triggered. However, when a large softening is used, the mass of the CPD will begin to decrease after the initial increase stage. Our numerical results with and without disk-gravity confirm that the runaway migration indeed exists when the mass deficit is larger than the total mass of the planet and CPD. Our simulations results also show that the torque from the co-orbital region, in particular the planet's Hill sphere, is the main contributor to the runaway migration, and the CPD which is lagged behind by the planet becomes so asymmetric that it accelerates the migration.

  9. Wet-steam erosion of steam turbine disks and shafts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Averkina, N. V.; Zheleznyak, I. V.; Kachuriner, Yu. Ya.; Nosovitskii, I. A.; Orlik, V. G.; Shishkin, V. I.

    2011-01-15

    A study of wet-steam erosion of the disks and the rotor bosses or housings of turbines in thermal and nuclear power plants shows that the rate of wear does not depend on the diagrammed degree of moisture, but is determined by moisture condensing on the surfaces of the diaphragms and steam inlet components. Renovating the diaphragm seals as an assembly with condensate removal provides a manifold reduction in the erosion.

  10. ORIGIN OF CHEMICAL AND DYNAMICAL PROPERTIES OF THE GALACTIC THICK DISK

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bekki, Kenji [ICRAR, M468, University of Western Australia, Crawley, Western Australia, 6009 (Australia); Tsujimoto, Takuji [National Astronomical Observatory, Mitaka-shi, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan)

    2011-09-01

    We adopt a scenario in which the Galactic thick disk was formed by minor merging between the first generation of the Galactic thin disk (FGTD) and a dwarf galaxy about {approx}9 Gyr ago and thereby investigate chemical and dynamical properties of the Galactic thick disk. In this scenario, the dynamical properties of the thick disk have long been influenced both by the mass growth of the second generation of the Galactic thin disk (i.e., the present thin disk) and by its non-axisymmetric structures. On the other hand, the early star formation history and chemical evolution of the thin disk was influenced by the remaining gas of the thick disk. Based on N-body simulations and chemical evolution models, we investigate the radial metallicity gradient, structural and kinematical properties, and detailed chemical abundance patterns of the thick disk. Our numerical simulations show that the ancient minor merger event can significantly flatten the original radial metallicity gradient of the FGTD, in particular, in the outer part, and also can be responsible for migration of inner metal-rich stars into the outer part (R > 10 kpc). The simulations show that the central region of the thick disk can develop a bar due to dynamical effects of a separate bar in the thin disk. Whether or not rotational velocities (V{sub {phi}}) can correlate with metallicities ([Fe/H]) for the simulated thick disks depends on the initial metallicity gradients of the FGTDs. The simulated orbital eccentricity distributions in the thick disk for models with higher mass ratios ({approx}0.2) and lower orbital eccentricities ({approx}0.5) of minor mergers are in good agreement with the corresponding observations. The simulated V{sub {phi}}-|z| relation of the thick disk in models with low orbital inclination angles of mergers are also in good agreement with the latest observational results. The vertical metallicity gradient of the simulated thick disk is rather flat or very weakly negative in the solar neighborhood. Our Galactic chemical evolution models show that if we choose two distinctive timescales for star formation in the thin and thick disks, then the models can explain both the observed metallicity distribution functions and correlations between [Mg/Fe] and [Fe/H] for the two disks in a self-consistent manner. We discuss how the early star formation history and chemical evolution of the Galactic thin disk can be influenced by the pre-existing thick disk.

  11. Laser illuminator and optical system for disk patterning

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hackel, Lloyd A. (Livermore, CA); Dane, C. Brent (Livermore, CA); Dixit, Shamasundar N. (Livermore, CA); Everett, Mathew (Pleasanton, CA); Honig, John (Livermore, CA)

    2000-01-01

    Magnetic recording media are textured over areas designated for contact in order to minimize friction with data transducing heads. In fabricating a hard disk, an aluminum nickel-phosphorous substrate is polished to a specular finish. A mechanical means is then used to roughen an annular area intended to be the head contact band. An optical and mechanical system allows thousands of spots to be generated with each laser pulse, allowing the textured pattern to be rapidly generated with a low repetition rate laser and an uncomplicated mechanical system. The system uses a low power laser, a beam expander, a specially designed phase plate, a prism to deflect the beam, a lens to transmit the diffraction pattern to the far field, a mechanical means to rotate the pattern and a trigger system to fire the laser when sections of the pattern are precisely aligned. The system generates an annular segment of the desired pattern with which the total pattern is generated by rotating the optical system about its optic axis, sensing the rotational position and firing the laser as the annular segment rotates into the next appropriate position. This marking system can be integrated into a disk sputtering system for manufacturing magnetic disks, allowing for a very streamlined manufacturing process.

  12. SNOW LINES AS PROBES OF TURBULENT DIFFUSION IN PROTOPLANETARY DISKS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Owen, James E. [Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics, 60 St George Street, Toronto, M5S 3H8, ON (Canada)

    2014-07-20

    Sharp chemical discontinuities can occur in protoplanetary disks, particularly at ''snow lines'' where a gas-phase species freezes out to form ice grains. Such sharp discontinuities will diffuse out due to the turbulence suspected to drive angular momentum transport in accretion disks. We demonstrate that the concentration gradientin the vicinity of the snow lineof a species present outside a snow line but destroyed inside is strongly sensitive to the level of turbulent diffusion (provided the chemical and transport timescales are decoupled) and provides a direct measurement of the radial ''Schmidt number'' (the ratio of the angular momentum transport to radial turbulent diffusion). Taking as an example the tracer species N{sub 2}H{sup +}, which is expected to be destroyed inside the CO snow line (as recently observed in TW Hya) we show that ALMA observations possess significant angular resolution to constrain the Schmidt number. Since different turbulent driving mechanisms predict different Schmidt numbers, a direct measurement of the Schmidt number in accretion disks would allow inferences to be made about the nature of the turbulence.

  13. Water in protoplanetary disks: Deuteration and turbulent mixing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Furuya, Kenji; Aikawa, Yuri; Nomura, Hideko; Hersant, Franck; Wakelam, Valentine

    2013-12-10

    We investigate water and deuterated water chemistry in turbulent protoplanetary disks. Chemical rate equations are solved with the diffusion term, mimicking turbulent mixing in a vertical direction. Water near the midplane is transported to the disk atmosphere by turbulence and is destroyed by photoreactions to produce atomic oxygen, while the atomic oxygen is transported to the midplane and reforms water and/or other molecules. We find that this cycle significantly decreases column densities of water ice at r ? 30 AU, where dust temperatures are too high to reform water ice effectively. The radial extent of such region depends on the desorption energy of atomic hydrogen. Our model indicates that water ice could be deficient even outside the sublimation radius. Outside this radius, the cycle decreases the deuterium-to-hydrogen (D/H) ratio of water ice from ?2 10{sup 2}, which is set by the collapsing core model, to 10{sup 4}-10{sup 2} in 10{sup 6} yr, without significantly decreasing the water ice column density. The resultant D/H ratios depend on the strength of mixing and the radial distance from the central star. Our finding suggests that the D/H ratio of cometary water (?10{sup 4}) could be established (i.e., cometary water could be formed) in the solar nebula, even if the D/H ratio of water ice delivered to the disk was very high (?10{sup 2}).

  14. DOE Offers Conditional Loan Guarantee for Front End Nuclear Facility in

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Idaho | Department of Energy Loan Guarantee for Front End Nuclear Facility in Idaho DOE Offers Conditional Loan Guarantee for Front End Nuclear Facility in Idaho May 20, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis Washington, DC - As part of a broad effort to expand the use of nuclear power in the United States and reduce carbon pollution, U.S. Secretary of Energy Steven Chu announced today the Department's first conditional commitment for a front-end nuclear facility. The $2 billion loan guarantee will support

  15. Travelling fronts of the CO oxidation on Pd(111) with coverage-dependent diffusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cisternas, Jaime, E-mail: jecisternas@miuandes.cl [Facultad de Ingeniera y Ciencias Aplicadas, Universidad de los Andes, Monseor Alvaro del Portillo 12455, Las Condes, Santiago (Chile); Karpitschka, Stefan [Physics of Fluids, University of Twente, Drienerlolaan 5, 7522 NB Enschede (Netherlands); Wehner, Stefan [Institut fr Integrierte Naturwissenschaften - Physik, Universitt Koblenz-Landau, 56070 Koblenz (Germany)

    2014-10-28

    In this work, we study a surface reaction on Pd(111) crystals under ultra-high-vacuum conditions that can be modeled by two coupled reaction-diffusion equations. In the bistable regime, the reaction exhibits travelling fronts that can be observed experimentally using photo electron emission microscopy. The spatial profile of the fronts reveals a coverage-dependent diffusivity for one of the species. We propose a method to solve the nonlinear eigenvalue problem and compute the direction and the speed of the fronts based on a geometrical construction in phase-space. This method successfully captures the dependence of the speed on control parameters and diffusivities.

  16. Electron Anomalous Magnetic Moment in Basis Light-Front Quantization Approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao, Xingbo; Honkanen, Heli; Maris, Pieter; Vary, James P.; Brodsky, Stanley J.; /SLAC

    2012-02-17

    We apply the Basis Light-Front Quantization (BLFQ) approach to the Hamiltonian field theory of Quantum Electrodynamics (QED) in free space. We solve for the mass eigenstates corresponding to an electron interacting with a single photon in light-front gauge. Based on the resulting non-perturbative ground state light-front amplitude we evaluate the electron anomalous magnetic moment. The numerical results from extrapolating to the infinite basis limit reproduce the perturbative Schwinger result with relative deviation less than 1.2%. We report significant improvements over previous works including the development of analytic methods for evaluating the vertex matrix elements of QED.

  17. Modified Anti-de-Sitter Metric, Light-Front Quantized QCD, and...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Modified Anti-de-Sitter Metric, Light-Front Quantized QCD, and Conformal Quantum Mechanics Dosch, Hans Gunter; U. Heidelberg, ITP; Brodsky, Stanley J.; SLAC; de Teramond, Guy F.;...

  18. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Magnesium-Intensive Front End Sub-Structure Development

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by USAMP at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about magnesium-intensive front end sub...

  19. NEAR-INFRARED DETECTION OF A SUPER-THIN DISK IN NGC 891

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schechtman-Rook, Andrew; Bershady, Matthew A.

    2013-08-10

    We probe the disk structure of the nearby, massive, edge-on spiral galaxy NGC 891 with subarcsecond resolution JHK{sub s}-band images covering {approx} {+-}10 kpc in radius and {+-}5 kpc in height. We measure intrinsic surface brightness (SB) profiles using realistic attenuation corrections constrained from near- and mid-infrared (Spitzer) color maps and three-dimensional Monte Carlo radiative-transfer models. In addition to the well-known thin and thick disks, a super-thin disk with 60-80 pc scale-height-comparable to the star-forming disk of the Milky Way-is visibly evident and required to fit the attenuation-corrected light distribution. Asymmetries in the super-thin disk light profile are indicative of young, hot stars producing regions of excess luminosity and bluer (attenuation-corrected) near-infrared color. To fit the inner regions of NGC 891, these disks must be truncated within {approx}3 kpc, with almost all their luminosity redistributed in a bar-like structure 50% thicker than the thin disk. There appears to be no classical bulge but rather a nuclear continuation of the super-thin disk. The super-thin, thin, thick, and bar components contribute roughly 30%, 42%, 13%, and 15% (respectively) to the total K{sub s}-band luminosity. Disk axial ratios (length/height) decrease from 30 to 3 from super-thin to thick components. Both exponential and sech{sup 2} vertical SB profiles fit the data equally well. We find that the super-thin disk is significantly brighter in the K{sub s}-band than typically assumed in integrated spectral energy distribution models of NGC 891: it appears that in these models the excess flux, likely produced by young stars in the super-thin disk, has been mistakenly attributed to the thin disk.

  20. Millimeter image of the HL Tau Disk: gaps opened by planets?...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Millimeter image of the HL Tau Disk: gaps opened by planets? Authors: Li, Hui 1 + Show Author Affiliations Los Alamos National ...

  1. AdS/QCD and Applications of Light-Front Holography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; Cao, Fu-Guang; de Teramond, Guy F.; /Costa Rica U.

    2012-02-16

    Light-Front Holography leads to a rigorous connection between hadronic amplitudes in a higher dimensional anti-de Sitter (AdS) space and frame-independent light-front wavefunctions of hadrons in 3 + 1 physical space-time, thus providing a compelling physical interpretation of the AdS/CFT correspondence principle and AdS/QCD, a useful framework which describes the correspondence between theories in a modified AdS5 background and confining field theories in physical space-time. To a first semiclassical approximation, where quantum loops and quark masses are not included, this approach leads to a single-variable light-front Schroedinger equation which determines the eigenspectrum and the light-front wavefunctions of hadrons for general spin and orbital angular momentum. The coordinate z in AdS space is uniquely identified with a Lorentz-invariant coordinate {zeta} which measures the separation of the constituents within a hadron at equal light-front time. The internal structure of hadrons is explicitly introduced and the angular momentum of the constituents plays a key role. We give an overview of the light-front holographic approach to strongly coupled QCD. In particular, we study the photon-to-meson transition form factors (TFFs) F{sub M{gamma}}(Q{sup 2}) for {gamma}{gamma}* {yields} M using light-front holographic methods. The results for the TFFs for the {eta} and {eta}' mesons are also presented. Some novel features of QCD are discussed, including the consequences of confinement for quark and gluon condensates. A method for computing the hadronization of quark and gluon jets at the amplitude level is outlined.

  2. Radiation-driven warping of circumbinary disks around eccentric young star binaries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hayasaki, Kimitake; Sohn, Bong Won; Jung, Taehyun; Zhao, Guangyao; Okazaki, Atsuo T.; Naito, Tsuguya

    2014-12-10

    We study a warping instability of a geometrically thin, non-self-gravitating, circumbinary disk around young binary stars on an eccentric orbit. Such a disk is subject to both the tidal torques due to a time-dependent binary potential and the radiative torques due to radiation emitted from each star. The tilt angle between the circumbinary disk plane and the binary orbital plane is assumed to be very small. We find that there is a radius within/beyond which the circumbinary disk is unstable to radiation-driven warping, depending on the disk density and temperature gradient indices. This marginally stable warping radius is very sensitive to viscosity parameters, a fiducial disk radius and the temperature measured there, the stellar luminosity, and the disk surface density at a radius where the disk changes from optically thick to thin for the irradiation from the central stars. On the other hand, it is insensitive to the orbital eccentricity and binary irradiation parameter, which is a function of the binary mass ratio and luminosity of each star. Since the tidal torques can suppress the warping in the inner part of the circumbinary disk, the disk starts to be warped in the outer part. While the circumbinary disks are most likely to be subject to the radiation-driven warping on an AU to kilo-AU scale for binaries with young massive stars more luminous than 10{sup 4} L {sub ?}, the radiation-driven warping does not work for those around young binaries with the luminosity comparable to the solar luminosity.

  3. EVIDENCE FOR A SNOW LINE BEYOND THE TRANSITIONAL RADIUS IN THE TW Hya PROTOPLANETARY DISK

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, K. [Division of Physics, Mathematics and Astronomy, MC 150-21, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)] [Division of Physics, Mathematics and Astronomy, MC 150-21, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Pontoppidan, K. M. [Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States)] [Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Salyk, C. [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, 950 N. Cherry Ave., Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States)] [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, 950 N. Cherry Ave., Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Blake, G. A., E-mail: kzhang@caltech.edu [Division of Geological and Planetary Sciences, MC 150-21, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2013-04-01

    We present an observational reconstruction of the radial water vapor content near the surface of the TW Hya transitional protoplanetary disk, and report the first localization of the snow line during this phase of disk evolution. The observations are comprised of Spitzer-IRS, Herschel-PACS, and Herschel-HIFI archival spectra. The abundance structure is retrieved by fitting a two-dimensional disk model to the available star+disk photometry and all observed H{sub 2}O lines, using a simple step-function parameterization of the water vapor content near the disk surface. We find that water vapor is abundant ({approx}10{sup -4} per H{sub 2}) in a narrow ring, located at the disk transition radius some 4 AU from the central star, but drops rapidly by several orders of magnitude beyond 4.2 AU over a scale length of no more than 0.5 AU. The inner disk (0.5-4 AU) is also dry, with an upper limit on the vertically averaged water abundance of 10{sup -6} per H{sub 2}. The water vapor peak occurs at a radius significantly more distant than that expected for a passive continuous disk around a 0.6 M{sub Sun} star, representing a volatile distribution in the TW Hya disk that bears strong similarities to that of the solar system. This is observational evidence for a snow line that moves outward with time in passive disks, with a dry inner disk that results either from gas giant formation or gas dissipation and a significant ice reservoir at large radii. The amount of water present near the snow line is sufficient to potentially catalyze the (further) formation of planetesimals and planets at distances beyond a few AU.

  4. FORMATION OF MULTIPLE-SATELLITE SYSTEMS FROM LOW-MASS CIRCUMPLANETARY PARTICLE DISKS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hyodo, Ryuki; Ohtsuki, Keiji; Takeda, Takaaki E-mail: ohtsuki@tiger.kobe-u.ac.jp

    2015-01-20

    Circumplanetary particle disks would be created in the late stage of planetary formation either by impacts of planetary bodies or disruption of satellites or passing bodies, and satellites can be formed by accretion of disk particles spreading across the Roche limit. Previous N-body simulation of lunar accretion focused on the formation of single-satellite systems from disks with large disk-to-planet mass ratios, while recent models of the formation of multiple-satellite systems from disks with smaller mass ratios do not take account of gravitational interaction between formed satellites. In the present work, we investigate satellite accretion from particle disks with various masses, using N-body simulation. In the case of accretion from somewhat less massive disks than the case of lunar accretion, formed satellites are not massive enough to clear out the disk, but can become massive enough to gravitationally shepherd the disk outer edge and start outward migration due to gravitational interaction with the disk. When the radial location of the 2:1 mean motion resonance of the satellite reaches outside the Roche limit, the second satellite can be formed near the disk outer edge, and then the two satellites continue outward migration while being locked in the resonance. Co-orbital satellites are found to be occasionally formed on the orbit of the first satellite. Our simulations also show that stochastic nature involved in gravitational interaction and collision between aggregates in the tidal environment can lead to diversity in the final mass and orbital architecture, which would be expected in satellite systems of exoplanets.

  5. Design of the NSLS-II Linac Front End Test Stand

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fliller III, R.; Johanson, M.; Lucas, M.; Rose, J.; Shaftan, T.

    2011-03-28

    The NSLS-II operational parameters place very stringent requirements on the injection system. Among these are the charge per bunch train at low emittance that is required from the linac along with the uniformity of the charge per bunch along the train. The NSLS-II linac is a 200 MeV linac produced by Research Instruments Gmbh. Part of the strategy for understanding to operation of the injectors is to test the front end of the linac prior to its installation in the facility. The linac front end consists of a 100 kV electron gun, 500 MHz subharmonic prebuncher, focusing solenoids and a suite of diagnostics. The diagnostics in the front end need to be supplemented with an additional suite of diagnostics to fully characterize the beam. In this paper we discuss the design of a test stand to measure the various properties of the beam generated from this section. In particular, the test stand will measure the charge, transverse emittance, energy, energy spread, and bunching performance of the linac front end under all operating conditions of the front end.

  6. Apparatus for characterizing the temporo-spatial properties of a dynamic fluid front and method thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Battiste, Richard L

    2013-12-31

    Methods and apparatus are described for characterizing the temporal-spatial properties of a dynamic fluid front within a mold space while the mold space is being filled with fluid. A method includes providing a mold defining a mold space and having one or more openings into the mold space; heating a plurality of temperature sensors that extend into the mold space; injecting a fluid into th emold space through the openings, the fluid experiencing a dynamic fluid front while filling the mold space with a fluid; and characterizing temporal-spatial properties of the dynamic fluid front by monitoring a termperature of each of the plurality of heated temperature sensors while the mold space is being filled with the fluid. An apparatus includes a mold defining a mold space; one or more openings for introducing a fluid into th emold space and filling the mold space with the fluid, the fluid experiencing a dynamic fluid front while filling the mold space; a plurality of heated temperature sensors extending into the mold space; and a computer coupled to the plurality of heated temperature sensors for characterizing the temporal-spatial properties of the dynamic fluid front.

  7. Apparatus for characterizing the temporo-spatial properties of a dynamic fluid front and method thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Battiste, Richard L.

    2007-12-25

    Methods and apparatus are described for characterizing the temporal-spatial properties of a dynamic fluid front within a mold space while the mold space is being filled with fluid. A method includes providing a mold defining a mold space and having one or more openings into the mold space; heating a plurality of temperature sensors that extend into the mold space; injecting a fluid into the mold space through the openings, the fluid experiencing a dynamic fluid front while filling the mold space with the fluid; and characterizing temporal-spatial properties of the dynamic fluid front by monitoring a temperature of each of the plurality of heated temperature sensors while the mold space is being filled with the fluid. An apparatus includes a mold defining a mold space; one or more openings for introducing a fluid into the mold space and filling the mold space with the fluid, the fluid experiencing a dynamic fluid front while filling the mold space; a plurality of heated temperature sensors extending into the mold space; and a computer coupled to the plurality of heated temperature sensors for characterizing the temporal-spatial properties of the dynamic fluid front.

  8. THE MIGRATION OF GAP-OPENING PLANETS IS NOT LOCKED TO VISCOUS DISK EVOLUTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duffell, Paul C.; MacFadyen, Andrew I.; Farris, Brian D.; Haiman, Zoltan; D'Orazio, Daniel J.

    2014-09-01

    Most standard descriptions of TypeII migration state that massive, gap-opening planets must migrate at the viscous drift rate. This is based on the idea that the disk is separated into an inner and outer region and gas is considered unable to cross the gap. In fact, gas easily crosses the gap on horseshoe orbits, nullifying this necessary premise which would set the migration rate. In this work, it is demonstrated using highly accurate numerical calculations that the actual migration rate is dependent on disk and planet parameters, and can be significantly larger or smaller than the viscous drift rate. In the limiting case of a disk much more massive than the secondary, the migration rate saturates to a constant that is sensitive to disk parameters and is not necessarily of the order of the viscous rate. In the opposite limit of a low-mass disk, the migration rate decreases linearly with disk mass. Steady-state solutions in the low disk mass limit show no pile-up outside the secondary's orbit, and no corresponding drainage of the inner disk.

  9. VERTICAL STRUCTURE AND CORONAL POWER OF ACCRETION DISKS POWERED BY MAGNETOROTATIONAL-INSTABILITY TURBULENCE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Uzdensky, Dmitri A.

    2013-10-01

    In this paper, we consider two outstanding intertwined problems in modern high-energy astrophysics: (1) the vertical-thermal structure of an optically thick accretion disk heated by the dissipation of magnetohydrodynamic turbulence driven by the magnetorotational instability (MRI), and (2) determining the fraction of the accretion power released in the corona above the disk. For simplicity, we consider a gas-pressure-dominated disk and assume a constant opacity. We argue that the local turbulent dissipation rate due to the disruption of the MRI channel flows by secondary parasitic instabilities should be uniform across most of the disk, almost up to the disk photosphere. We then obtain a self-consistent analytical solution for the vertical thermal structure of the disk, governed by the balance between the heating by MRI turbulence and the cooling by radiative diffusion. Next, we argue that the coronal power fraction is determined by the competition between the Parker instability, viewed as a parasitic instability feeding off of MRI channel flows, and other parasitic instabilities. We show that the Parker instability inevitably becomes important near the disk surface, leading to a certain lower limit on the coronal power. While most of the analysis in this paper focuses on the case of a disk threaded by an externally imposed vertical magnetic field, we also discuss the zero net flux case, in which the magnetic field is produced by the MRI dynamo itself, and show that most of our arguments and conclusions should be valid in this case as well.

  10. ALMA observations of a misaligned binary protoplanetary disk system in Orion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, Jonathan P.; Mann, Rita K.; Francesco, James Di; Johnstone, Doug; Matthews, Brenda; Andrews, Sean M.; Ricci, Luca; Hughes, A. Meredith; Bally, John

    2014-12-01

    We present Atacama Large Millimeter/Submillimeter Array (ALMA) observations of a wide binary system in Orion, with projected separation 440 AU, in which we detect submillimeter emission from the protoplanetary disks around each star. Both disks appear moderately massive and have strong line emission in CO 3-2, HCO{sup +} 4-3, and HCN 3-2. In addition, CS 7-6 is detected in one disk. The line-to-continuum ratios are similar for the two disks in each of the lines. From the resolved velocity gradients across each disk, we constrain the masses of the central stars, and show consistency with optical-infrared spectroscopy, both indicative of a high mass ratio ?9. The small difference between the systemic velocities indicates that the binary orbital plane is close to face-on. The angle between the projected disk rotation axes is very high, ?72, showing that the system did not form from a single massive disk or a rigidly rotating cloud core. This finding, which adds to related evidence from disk geometries in other systems, protostellar outflows, stellar rotation, and similar recent ALMA results, demonstrates that turbulence or dynamical interactions act on small scales well below that of molecular cores during the early stages of star formation.

  11. Stellar and gaseous nuclear disks observed in nearby (U)LIRGs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Medling, Anne M.; U, Vivian; Guedes, Javiera; Max, Claire E.; Holden, Bradford; Mayer, Lucio; Roškar, Rok; Armus, Lee; Sanders, David E-mail: max@ucolick.org

    2014-03-20

    We present near-infrared integral field spectroscopy of the central kiloparsec of 17 nearby luminous and ultra-luminous infrared galaxies undergoing major mergers. These observations were taken with OSIRIS assisted by the Keck I and II Adaptive Optics systems, providing spatial resolutions of a few tens of parsecs. The resulting kinematic maps reveal gas disks in at least 16 out of 19 nuclei and stellar disks in 11 out of 11 nuclei observed in these galaxy merger systems. In our late-stages mergers, these disks are young (stellar ages <30 Myr) and likely formed as gas disks that became unstable to star formation during the merger. On average, these disks have effective radii of a few hundred parsecs, masses between 10{sup 8} and 10{sup 10} M {sub ☉}, and v/σ between 1 and 5. These disks are similar to those created in high-resolution hydrodynamical simulations of gas-rich galaxy mergers, and favor short coalescence times for binary black holes. The few galaxies in our sample in earlier stages of mergers have disks that are larger (r {sub eff} ∼ 200-1800 pc) and are likely remnants of the galactic disks that have not yet been completely disrupted by the merger.

  12. LLNL Data Disk Evaluation Report and Information Gathering Document #449.R1.3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BeLue, A.

    2015-09-29

    This is a report on Data Storage Disk Evaluation and characterization. The purpose of this memo is to capture new recipients due to some recent characterization issues with the Hammer Mill process. The Data Storage Disk Evaluation report was generated utilizing data acquired during 2009 and 2010 from submitted storage media.

  13. Apparatus and method for phase fronts based on superluminal polarization current

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Singleton, John; Ardavan, Houshang; Ardavan, Arzhang

    2012-02-28

    An apparatus and method for a radiation source involving phase fronts emanating from an accelerated, oscillating polarization current whose distribution pattern moves superluminally (that is, faster than light in vacuo). Theoretical predictions and experimental measurements using an existing prototype superluminal source show that the phase fronts from such a source can be made to be very complex. Consequently, it will be very difficult for an aircraft imaged by such a radiation to detect where this radiation has come from. Moreover, the complexity of the phase fronts makes it almost impossible for electronics on an aircraft to synthesize a rogue reflection. A simple directional antenna and timing system should, on the other hand, be sufficient for the radar operators to locate the aircraft, given knowledge of their own source's speed and modulation pattern.

  14. Hamiltonian Light-front Field Theory Within an AdS/QCD Basis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vary, J.P.; Honkanen, H.; Li, Jun; Maris, P.; Brodsky, S.J.; Harindranath, A.; de Teramond, G.F.; Sternberg, P.; Ng, E.G.; Yang, C.; /LBL, Berkeley

    2009-12-16

    Non-perturbative Hamiltonian light-front quantum field theory presents opportunities and challenges that bridge particle physics and nuclear physics. Fundamental theories, such as Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) and Quantum Electrodynamics (QED) offer the promise of great predictive power spanning phenomena on all scales from the microscopic to cosmic scales, but new tools that do not rely exclusively on perturbation theory are required to make connection from one scale to the next. We outline recent theoretical and computational progress to build these bridges and provide illustrative results for nuclear structure and quantum field theory. As our framework we choose light-front gauge and a basis function representation with two-dimensional harmonic oscillator basis for transverse modes that corresponds with eigensolutions of the soft-wall AdS/QCD model obtained from light-front holography.

  15. Hamiltonian Light-Front Ffield Theory in a Basis Function Approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vary, J.P.; Honkanen, H.; Li, Jun; Maris, P.; Brodsky, S.J.; Harindranath, A.; de Teramond, G.F.; Sternberg, P.; Ng, E.G.; Yang, C.

    2009-05-15

    Hamiltonian light-front quantum field theory constitutes a framework for the non-perturbative solution of invariant masses and correlated parton amplitudes of self-bound systems. By choosing the light-front gauge and adopting a basis function representation, we obtain a large, sparse, Hamiltonian matrix for mass eigenstates of gauge theories that is solvable by adapting the ab initio no-core methods of nuclear many-body theory. Full covariance is recovered in the continuum limit, the infinite matrix limit. There is considerable freedom in the choice of the orthonormal and complete set of basis functions with convenience and convergence rates providing key considerations. Here, we use a two-dimensional harmonic oscillator basis for transverse modes that corresponds with eigensolutions of the soft-wall AdS/QCD model obtained from light-front holography. We outline our approach, present illustrative features of some non-interacting systems in a cavity and discuss the computational challenges.

  16. Measures of the Environmental Footprint of the Front End of the Nuclear Fuel Cycle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brett Carlsen; Emily Tavrides; Erich Schneider

    2010-08-01

    Previous estimates of environmental impacts associated with the front end of the nuclear fuel cycle have focused primarily on energy consumption and CO2 emissions. Results have varied widely. Section 2 of this report provides a summary of historical estimates. This study revises existing empirical correlations and their underlying assumptions to fit to a more complete set of existing data. This study also addresses land transformation, water withdrawals, and occupational and public health impacts associated with the processes of the front end of the once-through nuclear fuel cycle. These processes include uranium mining, milling, refining, conversion, enrichment, and fuel fabrication. Metrics are developed to allow environmental impacts to be summed across the full set of front end processes, including transportation and disposition of the resulting depleted uranium.

  17. Parameters of a supersonic combustion chamber with organization of combustion at the flame front

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Solokhin, E.L.; Mironenko, V.A.; Ivanov, V.I.

    1985-10-25

    In some engineering problems, it is necessary to burn fuel in the combustion chamber with supersonic flow. As a rule, the scheme of organization of the process in such a chamber presupposes a separate accompanying feed of fuel and oxidant in which combustion of fuel takes place in a diffusion flame front. In this article we give theoretical results of investigation of a supersonic combustion chamber in which combustion of the fuel mixture takes place in a oblique flame front stabilized by an external source (analogous to the subsonic combustion chambers of ramjets). The possibility of the existence of such an oblique flame front in a supersonic flow of fuel mixture was previously proved experimentally.

  18. Tidal disruptions in circumbinary disks. II. Observational signatures in the reverberation spectra

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brem, P.; Amaro-Seoane, P.; Cuadra, J.; Komossa, S.

    2014-09-10

    Supermassive binary black holes (SMBBHs) with sub-pc separations form in the course of galaxy mergers, if both galaxies harbor massive black holes. Clear observational evidence for them however still eludes us. We propose a novel method of identifying these systems by means of reverberation mapping their circumbinary disk after a tidal disruption event has ionized it. The tidal disruption of a star at the secondary leads to strong asymmetries in the disk response. We model the shape of the velocity-delay maps for various toy disk models and more realistic gas distributions obtained by smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations. The emissivity of the ionized disk is calculated with Cloudy. We find peculiar asymmetries in the maps for off center ionizing sources that may help us constrain geometrical parameters of a circumbinary disk such as semimajor axis and orbital phase of the secondary, as well as help strengthen the observational evidence for sub-parsec SMBBHs as such.

  19. Herschel photometry of disks around low-mass stars in the R CrA cloud

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harvey, Paul M.; Henning, Thomas; Liu, Yao; Wolf, Sebastian E-mail: nje@astro.as.utexas.edu E-mail: yliu@pmo.ac.cn E-mail: yliu@pmo.ac.cn

    2014-11-01

    We report photometric results from a subset of a Herschel-PACS program to observe cool dust in disks around low-mass stars as a complement to our earlier program to measure far-infrared emission from brown dwarfs. In this latest study we observed five low-mass objects in the nearby R Corona Australis region and detected at least three at 70 μm. Using a Monte Carlo radiative transfer code we have investigated the disk masses and geometry based on detailed spectral energy distribution (SED) modeling, and we compare these new results to those from our earlier larger sample of brown dwarfs. In particular, our SED analysis for these five objects shows again that disk geometries of brown dwarfs or low-mass stars are generally similar to their higher mass counterparts like T Tauri disks, but the range of disk mass extends to well below the value found in T Tauri stars.

  20. Xenon in the protoplanetary disk (PPD-XE)

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Marti, K.; Mathew, K. J.

    2015-06-18

    Relationships among solar system Xe components as observed in the solar wind (SW), in planetary atmospheres and in meteorites are investigated using isotopic correlations. The term PPD-Xe is used for components inferred to have been present in the molecular cloud material that formed the protoplanetary disk (PPD). The evidence of the lack of simple relationships between terrestrial atmospheric Xe and solar or meteoritic components is confirmed. Xe isotopic correlations indicate a heterogeneous PPD composition with variable mixing ratios of the nucleosynthetic component Xe-HL. Solar Xe represents a bulk PPD component, and the isotopic abundances did not change from the timemore » of incorporation into the interior of Mars, through times of regolith implantations to the present.« less

  1. Adaptor assembly for coupling turbine blades to rotor disks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Delvaux, John McConnel; Garcia-Crespo, Andres Jose; Joyce, Kilmer Joseph; Tindell, Allan Randall

    2014-06-03

    An adaptor assembly for coupling a blade root of a turbine blade to a root slot of a rotor disk is disclosed. The adaptor assembly may generally include an adaptor body having a root configured to be received within the root slot. The adaptor body may also define a slot having an open end configured to receive the blade root. The adaptor body may further define a channel. The adaptor assembly may also include a plate having an outwardly extending foot. The foot may be configured to be received within the channel. Additionally, the plate may be configured to cover at least a portion of the open end of the slot when the foot is received within the channel.

  2. Accretion disks in the IRAS 23151+5912 region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rodrguez-Esnard, T.; Trinidad, M. A.; Migenes, V. E-mail: trinidad@astro.ugto.mx

    2014-06-20

    We present observations of radio continuum emission at 1.3 and 3.6 cm and H{sub 2}O masers toward the high-mass star-forming region IRAS 23151+5912 carried out with the Very Large Array-Expanded Very Large Array (in transition phase) in configuration A. We detected one continuum source at 1.3 cm in the region, but the counterpart of this radio continuum source at 3.6 cm was not detected at a level of 3?. We also detected 13 water maser spots toward IRAS 23151+5912, which are distributed in three groups aligned along the northeast-southwest direction. Our results suggest that the 1.3 cm emission is consistent with a hypercompact H II region, probably with an embedded zero-age main-sequence star of type B2. In particular, we find that this young star is spatially associated with a maser group, which is tracing a disk-like structure of about 460 AU. We also find that the masers of the second group are probably describing a circumstellar disk of about 86 AU, whose central protostar, still undetected, should have a mass of ?11 M {sub ?}. We also suggest that the third water maser group is possibly associated with the SiO outflow and the undetected driving source of the system. Finally, we noted that the 1.3 cm continuum source and the three maser groups are aligned in the northeast-southwest direction, similar to the elongation of the large ionized region, which probably is the result of shock-wave induced star formation on the densest region of the medium.

  3. The decay of debris disks around solar-type stars

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sierchio, J. M.; Rieke, G. H.; Su, K. Y. L.; Gspr, Andras, E-mail: sierchio@mit.edu [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States)

    2014-04-10

    We present a Spitzer MIPS study of the decay of debris disk excesses at 24 and 70 ?m for 255 stars of types F4-K2. We have used multiple tests, including consistency between chromospheric and X-ray activity and placement on the H-R diagram, to assign accurate stellar ages. Within this spectral type range, at 24 ?m, 13.6% 2.8% of the stars younger than 1 Gyr have excesses at the 3? level or more, whereas none of the older stars do, confirming previous work. At 70 ?m, 22.5% 3.6% of the younger stars have excesses at ?3? significance, whereas only 4.7{sub ?2.2}{sup +3.7}% of the older stars do. To characterize the far-infrared behavior of debris disks more robustly, we doubled the sample by including stars from the DEBRIS and DUNES surveys. For the F4-K4 stars in this combined sample, there is only a weak (statistically not significant) trend in the incidence of far-infrared excess with spectral type (detected fractions of 21.9{sub ?4.3}{sup +4.8}%, late F; 16.5{sub ?3.3}{sup +3.9}%, G; and 16.9{sub ?5.0}{sup +6.3}%, early K). Taking this spectral type range together, there is a significant decline between 3 and 4.5 Gyr in the incidence of excesses, with fractional luminosities just under 10{sup 5}. There is an indication that the timescale for decay of infrared excesses varies roughly inversely with the fractional luminosity. This behavior is consistent with theoretical expectations for passive evolution. However, more excesses are detected around the oldest stars than are expected from passive evolution, suggesting that there is late-phase dynamical activity around these stars.

  4. Modeling self-subtraction in angular differential imaging: Application to the HD 32297 debris disk

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Esposito, Thomas M.; Fitzgerald, Michael P.; Graham, James R.; Kalas, Paul

    2014-01-01

    We present a new technique for forward-modeling self-subtraction of spatially extended emission in observations processed with angular differential imaging (ADI) algorithms. High-contrast direct imaging of circumstellar disks is limited by quasi-static speckle noise, and ADI is commonly used to suppress those speckles. However, the application of ADI can result in self-subtraction of the disk signal due to the disk's finite spatial extent. This signal attenuation varies with radial separation and biases measurements of the disk's surface brightness, thereby compromising inferences regarding the physical processes responsible for the dust distribution. To compensate for this attenuation, we forward model the disk structure and compute the form of the self-subtraction function at each separation. As a proof of concept, we apply our method to 1.6 and 2.2 ?m Keck adaptive optics NIRC2 scattered-light observations of the HD 32297 debris disk reduced using a variant of the 'locally optimized combination of images' algorithm. We are able to recover disk surface brightness that was otherwise lost to self-subtraction and produce simplified models of the brightness distribution as it appears with and without self-subtraction. From the latter models, we extract radial profiles for the disk's brightness, width, midplane position, and color that are unbiased by self-subtraction. Our analysis of these measurements indicates a break in the brightness profile power law at r ? 110 AU and a disk width that increases with separation from the star. We also verify disk curvature that displaces the midplane by up to 30 AU toward the northwest relative to a straight fiducial midplane.

  5. On the movement of a liquid front in an unsaturated, fractured porous medium, Part 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nitao, J.J.; Buscheck, T.A.

    1989-06-01

    The primary aim of this paper is to present approximate analytical solutions of the fracture flow which gives the position of the liquid fracture front as a function of time. These solutions demonstrate that the liquid movement in the fracture can be classified into distinctive time periods, or flow regimes. It is also shown that when plotted versus time using a log-log scale, the liquid fracture front position asymptotically approaches a series of line segments. Two-dimensional numerical simulations were run utilizing input data applicable to the densely welded, fractured tuff found at Yucca Mountain in order to confirm these observations. 19 refs., 15 figs., 8 tabs.

  6. Probing for exoplanets hiding in dusty debris disks: Disk imaging, characterization, and exploration with HST/STIS multi-roll coronagraphy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schneider, Glenn; Hinz, Phillip M.; Grady, Carol A.; Hines, Dean C.; Debes, John H.; Perrin, Marshall D.; Moro-Martin, Amaya; Stark, Christopher C.; Kuchner, Marc J.; Woodgate, Bruce E.; Weinberger, Alycia J.; Rodigas, Timothy J.; Wisniewski, John P.; Silverstone, Murray D.; Jang-Condell, Hannah; Henning, Thomas; Serabyn, Eugene; Tamura, Motohide

    2014-10-01

    Spatially resolved scattered-light images of circumstellar debris in exoplanetary systems constrain the physical properties and orbits of the dust particles in these systems. They also inform on co-orbiting (but unseen) planets, the systemic architectures, and forces perturbing the starlight-scattering circumstellar material. Using Hubble Space Telescope (HST)/Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) broadband optical coronagraphy, we have completed the observational phase of a program to study the spatial distribution of dust in a sample of 10 circumstellar debris systems and 1 'mature' protoplanetrary disk, all with HST pedigree, using point-spread-function-subtracted multi-roll coronagraphy. These observations probe stellocentric distances ?5 AU for the nearest systems, and simultaneously resolve disk substructures well beyond corresponding to the giant planet and Kuiper Belt regions within our own solar system. They also disclose diffuse very low-surface-brightness dust at larger stellocentric distances. Herein we present new results inclusive of fainter disks such as HD 92945 (F {sub disk}/F {sub star} = 5 10{sup 5}), confirming, and better revealing, the existence of a narrow inner debris ring within a larger diffuse dust disk. Other disks with ring-like substructures and significant asymmetries and complex morphologies include HD 181327, for which we posit a spray of ejecta from a recent massive collision in an exo-Kuiper Belt; HD 61005, suggested to be interacting with the local interstellar medium; and HD 15115 and HD 32297, also discussed in the context of putative environmental interactions. These disks and HD 15745 suggest that debris system evolution cannot be treated in isolation. For AU Mic's edge-on disk, we find out-of-plane surface brightness asymmetries at ?5 AU that may implicate the existence of one or more planetary perturbers. Time-resolved images of the MP Mus protoplanetary disk provide spatially resolved temporal variability in the disk illumination. These and other new images from our HST/STIS GO/12228 program enable direct inter-comparison of the architectures of these exoplanetary debris systems in the context of our own solar system.

  7. ACCRETION OF GAS ONTO GAP-OPENING PLANETS AND CIRCUMPLANETARY FLOW STRUCTURE IN MAGNETIZED TURBULENT DISKS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Uribe, A. L. [University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Klahr, H.; Henning, Th., E-mail: uribe@oddjob.uchicago.edu [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Astronomie, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2013-06-01

    We have performed three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamical simulations of stellar accretion disks, using the PLUTO code, and studied the accretion of gas onto a Jupiter-mass planet and the structure of the circumplanetary gas flow after opening a gap in the disk. We compare our results with simulations of laminar, yet viscous disks with different levels of an {alpha}-type viscosity. In all cases, we find that the accretion flow across the surface of the Hill sphere of the planet is not spherically or azimuthally symmetric, and is predominantly restricted to the mid-plane region of the disk. Even in the turbulent case, we find no significant vertical flow of mass into the Hill sphere. The outer parts of the circumplanetary disk are shown to rotate significantly below Keplerian speed, independent of viscosity, while the circumplanetary disk density (therefore the angular momentum) increases with viscosity. For a simulation of a magnetized turbulent disk, where the global averaged alpha stress is {alpha}{sub MHD} = 10{sup -3}, we find the accretion rate onto the planet to be M-dot {approx}2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -6}M{sub J} yr{sup -1} for a gap surface density of 12 g cm{sup -2}. This is about a third of the accretion rate obtained in a laminar viscous simulation with equivalent {alpha} parameter.

  8. NON-BAROTROPIC LINEAR ROSSBY WAVE INSTABILITY IN THREE-DIMENSIONAL DISKS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, Min-Kai

    2013-03-10

    Astrophysical disks with localized radial structure, such as protoplanetary disks containing dead zones or gaps due to disk-planet interaction, may be subject to the non-axisymmetric Rossby wave instability (RWI) that leads to vortex formation. The linear instability has recently been demonstrated in three-dimensional (3D) barotropic disks. It is the purpose of this study to generalize the 3D linear problem to include an energy equation, thereby accounting for baroclinity in three dimensions. Linear stability calculations are presented for radially structured, vertically stratified, geometrically thin disks with non-uniform entropy distribution in both directions. Polytropic equilibria are considered but adiabatic perturbations assumed. The unperturbed disk has a localized radial density bump, making it susceptible to the RWI. The linearized fluid equations are solved numerically as a partial differential equation eigenvalue problem. Emphasis on the ease of method implementation is given. It is found that when the polytropic index is fixed and adiabatic index increased, non-uniform entropy has negligible effect on the RWI growth rate, but pressure and density perturbation magnitudes near a pressure enhancement increase away from the midplane. The associated meridional flow is also qualitatively changed from homentropic calculations. Meridional vortical motion is identified in the nonhomentropic linear solution, as well as in a nonlinear global hydrodynamic simulation of the RWI in an initially isothermal disk evolved adiabatically. Numerical results suggest that buoyancy forces play an important role in the internal flow of Rossby vortices.

  9. Development of Novel Front Contract Pastes for Crystalline Silicon Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duty, C.; Jellison, D. G.E. P.; Joshi, P.

    2012-04-05

    In order to improve the efficiencies of silicon solar cells, paste to silicon contact formation mechanisms must be more thoroughly understood as a function of paste chemistry, wafer properties and firing conditions. Ferro Corporation has been involved in paste development for over 30 years and has extensive expertise in glass and paste formulations. This project has focused on the characterization of the interface between the top contact material (silver paste) and the underlying silicon wafer. It is believed that the interface between the front contact silver and the silicon wafer plays a dominant role in the electrical performance of the solar cell. Development of an improved front contact microstructure depends on the paste chemistry, paste interaction with the SiNx, and silicon (Si) substrate, silicon sheet resistivity, and the firing profile. Typical front contact ink contains silver metal powders and flakes, glass powder and other inorganic additives suspended in an organic medium of resin and solvent. During fast firing cycles glass melts, wets, corrodes the SiNx layer, and then interacts with underlying Si. Glass chemistry is also a critical factor in the development of an optimum front contact microstructure. Over the course of this project, several fundamental characteristics of the Ag/Si interface were documented, including a higher-than-expected distribution of voids along the interface, which could significantly impact electrical conductivity. Several techniques were also investigated for the interfacial analysis, including STEM, EDS, FIB, EBSD, and ellipsometry.

  10. Coherent States and Spontaneous Symmetry Breaking in Light Front Scalar Field Theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vary, J.P.; Chakrabarti, D.; Harindranath, A.; Lloyd, R.; Martinovic, L.; Spence, J.R.; /Iowa State U.

    2005-12-14

    Recently developed nuclear many-body techniques provide novel results when applied to constituent quark models and to light-front scalar field theory. We show how spontaneous symmetry breaking arises and is consistent with a coherent state ansatz in a variational treatment. The kink and the kink-antikink topological features are identified and the onset of symmetry restoration is demonstrated.

  11. Silicon Solar Cells with Front Hetero-Contact and Aluminum Alloy Back Junction: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yuan, H.-C.; Page, M. R.; Iwaniczko, E.; Xu, Y.; Roybal, L.; Wang, Q.; Branz, H. M.; Meier, D. L.

    2008-05-01

    We prototype an alternative n-type monocrystalline silicon (c-Si) solar cell structure that utilizes an n/i-type hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) front hetero-contact and a back p-n junction formed by alloying aluminum (Al) with the n-type Si wafer.

  12. Front-end Electronics for Unattended Measurement (FEUM). Prototype Test Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Conrad, Ryan C.; Morris, Scott J.; Smith, Leon E.; Keller, Daniel T.

    2015-09-16

    The IAEA has requested that PNNL perform an initial set of tests on front-end electronics for unattended measurement (FEUM) prototypes. The FEUM prototype test plan details the tests to be performed, the criteria for evaluation, and the procedures used to execute the tests.

  13. KINEMATICS OF THE CO GAS IN THE INNER REGIONS OF THE TW Hya DISK

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosenfeld, Katherine A.; Qi Chunhua; Andrews, Sean M.; Wilner, David J.; Corder, Stuartt A.; Dullemond, C. P.; Lin Shinyi; Hughes, A. M.; D'Alessio, Paola; Ho, P. T. P.

    2012-10-01

    We present a detailed analysis of the spatially and spectrally resolved {sup 12}CO J = 2-1 and J = 3-2 emission lines from the TW Hya circumstellar disk, based on science verification data from the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA). These lines exhibit substantial emission in their high-velocity wings (with projected velocities out to 2.1 km s{sup -1}, corresponding to intrinsic orbital velocities >20 km s{sup -1}) that trace molecular gas as close as 2 AU from the central star. However, we are not able to reproduce the intensity of these wings and the general spatio-kinematic pattern of the lines with simple models for the disk structure and kinematics. Using three-dimensional non-local thermodynamic equilibrium molecular excitation and radiative transfer calculations, we construct some alternative models that successfully account for these features by modifying either (1) the temperature structure of the inner disk (inside the dust-depleted disk cavity; r < 4 AU), (2) the intrinsic (Keplerian) disk velocity field, or (3) the distribution of disk inclination angles (a warp). The latter approach is particularly compelling because a representative warped disk model qualitatively reproduces the observed azimuthal modulation of optical light scattered off the disk surface. In any model scenario, the ALMA data clearly require a substantial molecular gas reservoir located inside the region where dust optical depths are known to be substantially diminished in the TW Hya disk, in agreement with previous studies based on infrared spectroscopy. The results from these updated model prescriptions are discussed in terms of their potential physical origins, which might include dynamical perturbations from a low-mass companion with an orbital separation of a few AU.

  14. Method and apparatus for bistable optical information storage for erasable optical disks

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Land, C.E.; McKinney, I.D.

    1988-05-31

    A method and an optical device for bistable storage of optical information, together with reading and erasure of the optical information, using a photoactivated shift in a field dependent phase transition between a metastable or a bias-stabilized ferroelectric (FE) phase and a stable antiferroelectric (AFE) phase in a lead lanthanum zirconate titanate (PLZT). An optical disk contains the PLZT. Writing and erasing of optical information can be accomplished by a light beam normal to the disk. Reading of optical information can be accomplished by a light beam at an incidence angle of 15 to 60 degrees to the normal of the disk. 10 figs.

  15. Method and apparatus for bistable optical information storage for erasable optical disks

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Land, Cecil E.; McKinney, Ira D.

    1990-01-01

    A method and an optical device for bistable storage of optical information, together with reading and erasure of the optical information, using a photoactivated shift in a field dependent phase transition between a metastable or a bias-stabilized ferroelectric (FE) phase and a stable antiferroelectric (AFE) phase in an lead lanthanum zirconate titanate (PLZT). An optical disk contains the PLZT. Writing and erasing of optical information can be accomplished by a light beam normal to the disk. Reading of optical information can be accomplished by a light beam at an incidence angle of 15 to 60 degrees to the normal of the disk.

  16. HERSCHEL's ''COLD DEBRIS DISKS'': BACKGROUND GALAXIES OR QUIESCENT RIMS OF PLANETARY SYSTEMS?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krivov, A. V.; Loehne, T.; Mutschke, H.; Neuhaeuser, R. [Astrophysikalisches Institut und Universitaetssternwarte, Friedrich-Schiller-Universitaet Jena, Schillergaesschen 2-3, D-07745 Jena (Germany); Eiroa, C.; Marshall, J. P.; Mustill, A. J. [Departamento de Fisica Teorica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco, E-28049 Madrid (Spain); Montesinos, B. [Departamento de Astrofisica, Centro de Astrobiologia (CAB, CSIC-INTA), ESAC Campus, P.O. Box 78, E-28691 Villanueva de la Canada, Madrid (Spain); Del Burgo, C. [Instituto Nacional de Astrofisica, Optica y Electronica (INAOE), Apartado Postal 51 y 216, 72000 Puebla, Pue. (Mexico); Absil, O. [Institut d'Astrophysique et de Geophysique, Universite de Liege, Allee du 6 Aout 17, B-4000 Liege (Belgium); Ardila, D. [NASA Herschel Science Center, California Institute of Technology, 1200 East California Boulevard, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Augereau, J.-C.; Ertel, S.; Lebreton, J. [UJF-Grenoble 1/CNRS-INSU, Institut de Planetologie et d'Astrophysique de Grenoble (IPAG), UMR 5274, F-38041 Grenoble (France); Bayo, A. [European Southern Observatory, Alonso de Cordova 3107, Vitacura, Santiago (Chile); Bryden, G. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Danchi, W. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Exoplanets and Stellar Astrophysics, Code 667, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Liseau, R. [Department of Earth and Space Sciences, Chalmers University of Technology, Onsala Space Observatory, SE-43992, Onsala (Sweden); Mora, A. [ESA-ESAC Gaia SOC, P.O. Box 78, E-28691 Villanueva de la Canada, Madrid (Spain); Pilbratt, G. L., E-mail: krivov@astro.uni-jena.de [ESA Astrophysics and Fundamental Physics Missions Division, ESTEC/SRE-SA, Keplerlaan 1, 2201 AZ Noordwijk (Netherlands); and others

    2013-07-20

    Infrared excesses associated with debris disk host stars detected so far peak at wavelengths around {approx}100 {mu}m or shorter. However, 6 out of 31 excess sources studied in the Herschel Open Time Key Programme, DUNES, have been seen to show significant-and in some cases extended-excess emission at 160 {mu}m, which is larger than the 100 {mu}m excess. This excess emission has been attributed to circumstellar dust and has been suggested to stem from debris disks colder than those known previously. Since the excess emission of the cold disk candidates is extremely weak, challenging even the unrivaled sensitivity of Herschel, it is prudent to carefully consider whether some or even all of them may represent unrelated galactic or extragalactic emission, or even instrumental noise. We re-address these issues using several distinct methods and conclude that it is highly unlikely that none of the candidates represents a true circumstellar disk. For true disks, both the dust temperatures inferred from the spectral energy distributions and the disk radii estimated from the images suggest that the dust is nearly as cold as a blackbody. This requires the grains to be larger than {approx}100 {mu}m, even if they are rich in ices or are composed of any other material with a low absorption in the visible. The dearth of small grains is puzzling, since collisional models of debris disks predict that grains of all sizes down to several times the radiation pressure blowout limit should be present. We explore several conceivable scenarios: transport-dominated disks, disks of low dynamical excitation, and disks of unstirred primordial macroscopic grains. Our qualitative analysis and collisional simulations rule out the first two of these scenarios, but show the feasibility of the third one. We show that such disks can indeed survive for gigayears, largely preserving the primordial size distribution. They should be composed of macroscopic solids larger than millimeters, but smaller than a few kilometers in size. If larger planetesimals were present, then they would stir the disk, triggering a collisional cascade and thus causing production of small debris, which is not seen. Thus, planetesimal formation, at least in the outer regions of the systems, has stopped before 'cometary' or 'asteroidal' sizes were reached.

  17. Measurement of wave-front aberration in a small telescope remote imaging system using scene-based wave-front sensing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Poyneer, Lisa A; Bauman, Brian J

    2015-03-31

    Reference-free compensated imaging makes an estimation of the Fourier phase of a series of images of a target. The Fourier magnitude of the series of images is obtained by dividing the power spectral density of the series of images by an estimate of the power spectral density of atmospheric turbulence from a series of scene based wave front sensor (SBWFS) measurements of the target. A high-resolution image of the target is recovered from the Fourier phase and the Fourier magnitude.

  18. ON THE MISALIGNMENT OF THE DIRECTLY IMAGED PLANET {beta} PICTORIS b WITH THE SYSTEM'S WARPED INNER DISK

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dawson, Rebekah I.; Murray-Clay, Ruth A.; Fabrycky, Daniel C.

    2011-12-10

    The vertical warp in the debris disk {beta} Pictoris-an inclined inner disk extending into a flat outer disk-has long been interpreted as the signpost of a planet on an inclined orbit. Direct images spanning 2004-2010 have revealed {beta} Pictoris b, a planet with a mass and orbital distance consistent with this picture. However, it was recently reported that the orbit of planet b is aligned with the flat outer disk, not the inclined inner disk, and thus lacks the inclination to warp the disk. We explore three scenarios for reconciling the apparent misalignment of the directly imaged planet {beta} Pictoris b with the warped inner disk of {beta} Pictoris: observational uncertainty, an additional planet, and damping of planet b's inclination. We find that, at the extremes of the uncertainties, the orbit of {beta} Pictoris b has the inclination necessary to produce the observed warp. We also find that if planet b were aligned with the flat outer disk, it would prevent another planet from creating a warp with the observed properties; therefore planet b itself must be responsible for the warp. Finally, planet b's inclination could have been damped by dynamical friction and still produce the observed disk morphology, but the feasibility of damping depends on disk properties and the presence of other planets. More precise observations of the orbit of planet b and the position angle of the outer disk will allow us to distinguish between the first and third scenarios.

  19. Convection causes enhanced magnetic turbulence in accretion disks in outburst

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hirose, Shigenobu; Blaes, Omer; Coleman, Matthew S. B.; Krolik, Julian H.; Sano, Takayoshi

    2014-05-20

    We present the results of local, vertically stratified, radiation magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) shearing box simulations of magneto-rotational instability (MRI) turbulence appropriate for the hydrogen ionizing regime of dwarf nova and soft X-ray transient outbursts. We incorporate the frequency-integrated opacities and equation of state for this regime, but neglect non-ideal MHD effects and surface irradiation, and do not impose net vertical magnetic flux. We find two stable thermal equilibrium tracks in the effective temperature versus surface mass density plane, in qualitative agreement with the S-curve picture of the standard disk instability model. We find that the large opacity at temperatures near 10{sup 4} K, a corollary of the hydrogen ionization transition, triggers strong, intermittent thermal convection on the upper stable branch. This convection strengthens the magnetic turbulent dynamo and greatly enhances the time-averaged value of the stress to thermal pressure ratio ?, possibly by generating vertical magnetic field that may seed the axisymmetric MRI, and by increasing cooling so that the pressure does not rise in proportion to the turbulent dissipation. These enhanced stress to pressure ratios may alleviate the order of magnitude discrepancy between the ?-values observationally inferred in the outburst state and those that have been measured from previous local numerical simulations of magnetorotational turbulence that lack net vertical magnetic flux.

  20. Spectral Energy Distributions for Disk and Halo M Dwarfs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leggett, S. K.; Allard, F.; Dahn, Conard; Hauschildt, P. H.; Kerr, T. H.; Rayner, J.

    2000-06-01

    We have obtained infrared (1-2.5 {mu}m) spectroscopy for 42 halo and disk dwarfs with spectral types M1-M6.5. These data are compared to synthetic spectra generated by the latest model atmospheres of Allard and Hauschildt. Photospheric parameters metallicity, effective temperature, and radius are determined for the sample.We find good agreement between observation and theory except for known problems due to incomplete molecular data for metal hydrides and H2O. The metal-poor M subdwarfs are well matched by the models, as oxide opacity sources are less important in this case. The derived effective temperatures for the sample range from 3600 to 2600 K; at these temperatures grain formation and extinction are not significant in the photosphere. The derived metallicities range from solar to 1/10 solar. The radii and effective temperatures derived agree well with recent models of low-mass stars. The spectra are available in electronic form upon request. (c) 2000 The American Astronomical Society.

  1. ON THE EVOLUTION OF THE CO SNOW LINE IN PROTOPLANETARY DISKS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin, Rebecca G. [JILA, University of Colorado and NIST, UCB 440, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Livio, Mario [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States)

    2014-03-10

    CO is thought to be a vital building block for prebiotic molecules that are necessary for life. Thus, understanding where CO existed in a solid phase within the solar nebula is important for understanding the origin of life. We model the evolution of the CO snow line in a protoplanetary disk. We find that the current observed location of the CO snow line in our solar system, and in the solar system analog TW Hydra, cannot be explained by a fully turbulent disk model. With time-dependent disk models we find that the inclusion of a dead zone (a region of low turbulence) can resolve this problem. Furthermore, we obtain a fully analytic solution for the CO snow line radius for late disk evolutionary times. This will be useful for future observational attempts to characterize the demographics and predict the composition and habitability of exoplanets.

  2. Slit disk for modified faraday cup diagnostic for determining power density of electron and ion beams

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Teruya, Alan T.; Elmer; John W.; Palmer, Todd A.

    2011-03-08

    A diagnostic system for characterization of an electron beam or an ion beam includes an electrical conducting disk of refractory material having a circumference, a center, and a Faraday cup assembly positioned to receive the electron beam or ion beam. At least one slit in the disk provides diagnostic characterization of the electron beam or ion beam. The at least one slit is located between the circumference and the center of the disk and includes a radial portion that is in radial alignment with the center and a portion that deviates from radial alignment with the center. The electron beam or ion beam is directed onto the disk and translated to the at least one slit wherein the electron beam or ion beam enters the at least one slit for providing diagnostic characterization of the electron beam or ion beam.

  3. Rotating Disk-Electrode Aqueous Electrolyte Accelerated Stress Tests for PGM Electrocatalyst/Support Durability Evaluation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Rotating disk-electrode aqueous electrolyte accelerated stress test protocols developed by the DOE Durability Working Group for platinum group metal (PGM) electrocatalyst/support durability evaluation, October 4, 2011.

  4. AN EXAMINATION OF COLLISIONAL GROWTH OF SILICATE DUST IN PROTOPLANETARY DISKS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yamamoto, Tetsuo; Kadono, Toshihiko; Wada, Koji

    2014-03-10

    N-body simulations of collisions of dust aggregates in protoplanetary disks performed so far have revealed that silicate aggregates suffer from catastrophic disruption if the collision velocities are higher than about 10 m s{sup 1}, which is much lower than those expected in the disks. This is mainly due to the low surface energy of the quartz used in the simulations. We find a simple relation between the surface energy and melting temperature for various materials including those of astrophysical interest, and show that the surface energy of the quartz used in the previous simulations is much lower than the present estimate. This result may provide a way out of the difficulty of growing silicate dust inside the snowline in disks. We show that silicate dust can evade catastrophic disruption and grow even at high-velocity collisions expected in the disks if one takes the present estimate of the surface energy into account.

  5. Section: Front

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Federal Aviation Administration's Winter Icing and Storms Program (WISP) and First ISCCP ... WISP Winter Icing and Storms Program WPDA Wind Profiler Demonstration Array WSI Whole Sky ...

  6. front cover

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Exclusive Provider Option (EPO) Medical Program For Medicare Retirees and Their Covered Family Members Administered by: N113794 01/15 CUSTOMER ASSISTANCE Customer Service: Medical/Surgical Claims and Prescription Drugs-The 24/7 Nurseline can help when you have a health problem or concern. The 24/7 Nurseline is staffed by registered nurses who are available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. 24/7 Nurseline toll-free telephone number: 1-800-973-6329 When you have a non- medical benefit question or

  7. front cover

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Preferred Provider Option (PPO) Medical Program For Medicare Retirees and Their Covered Family Members Administered by: N113794 01/15 CUSTOMER ASSISTANCE Customer Service: Medical/Surgical Claims and Prescription Drugs-The 24/7 Nurseline can help when you have a health problem or concern. The 24/7 Nurseline is staffed by registered nurses who are available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. 24/7 Nurseline toll-free telephone number: 1-800-973-6329 When you have a non- medical benefit question or

  8. front cover

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Preferred Provider Option (PPO) Medical Program For Active Employees and Their Covered Family Members and Non- Medicare Eligible Retirees and Their Covered Family Members Administered by: N113794 01/15 CUSTOMER ASSISTANCE Customer Service: Medical/Surgical Claims and Prescription Drugs-The 24/7 Nurseline can help when you have a health problem or concern. The 24/7 Nurseline is staffed by registered nurses who are available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. 24/7 Nurseline toll-free telephone number:

  9. Front cover

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    ... and the use of margin requirements (cash deposits), in ... cattle, lean hogs) and the NY- MEX (crude oil and natural gas). ... Testimony before the Committee on Home- land Security and ...

  10. front cover

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    care. Also, this Medical Program does not cover services received outside the United States, unless there is an emergency. Most preauthorizations may be requested over...

  11. Stellar and gaseous nuclear disks observed in nearby (U)LIRGs (Journal

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Article) | SciTech Connect Stellar and gaseous nuclear disks observed in nearby (U)LIRGs Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Stellar and gaseous nuclear disks observed in nearby (U)LIRGs We present near-infrared integral field spectroscopy of the central kiloparsec of 17 nearby luminous and ultra-luminous infrared galaxies undergoing major mergers. These observations were taken with OSIRIS assisted by the Keck I and II Adaptive Optics systems, providing spatial resolutions of a few

  12. WIND-DRIVEN ACCRETION IN PROTOPLANETARY DISKS. II. RADIAL DEPENDENCE AND GLOBAL PICTURE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bai Xuening, E-mail: xbai@cfa.harvard.edu [Institute for Theory and Computation, Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, MS-51, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2013-08-01

    Non-ideal magnetohydrodynamical effects play a crucial role in determining the mechanism and efficiency of angular momentum transport as well as the level of turbulence in protoplanetary disks (PPDs), which are the key to understanding PPD evolution and planet formation. It was shown in our previous work that at 1 AU, the magnetorotational instability (MRI) is completely suppressed when both ohmic resistivity and ambipolar diffusion (AD) are taken into account, resulting in a laminar flow with accretion driven by magnetocentrifugal wind. In this work, we study the radial dependence of the laminar wind solution using local shearing-box simulations. The scaling relation on the angular momentum transport for the laminar wind is obtained, and we find that the wind-driven accretion rate can be approximated as M-dot approx. 0.91 x 10{sup -8}R{sub AU}{sup 1.21}(B{sub p}/10 mG){sup 0.93} M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}, where B{sub p} is the strength of the large-scale poloidal magnetic field threading the disk. The result is independent of disk surface density. Four criteria are outlined for the existence of the laminar wind solution: (1) ohmic resistivity dominated the midplane region, (2) the AD-dominated disk upper layer, (3) the presence of a (not too weak) net vertical magnetic flux, and (4) sufficiently well-ionized gas beyond the disk surface. All these criteria are likely to be met in the inner region of the disk from {approx}0.3 AU to about 5-10 AU for typical PPD accretion rates. Beyond this radius, the angular momentum transport is likely to proceed due to a combination of the MRI and disk wind, and eventually completely dominated by the MRI (in the presence of strong AD) in the outer disk. Our simulation results provide key ingredients for a new paradigm on the accretion processes in PPDs.

  13. Normal Modes of Black Hole Accretion Disks (Technical Report) | SciTech

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Connect Technical Report: Normal Modes of Black Hole Accretion Disks Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Normal Modes of Black Hole Accretion Disks × You are accessing a document from the Department of Energy's (DOE) SciTech Connect. This site is a product of DOE's Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) and is provided as a public service. Visit OSTI to utilize additional information resources in energy science and technology. A paper copy of this document is also

  14. REVERSE RADIATIVE SHOCK LASER EXPERIMENTS RELEVANT TO ACCRETING STREAM-DISK

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    IMPACT IN INTERACTING BINARIES (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect REVERSE RADIATIVE SHOCK LASER EXPERIMENTS RELEVANT TO ACCRETING STREAM-DISK IMPACT IN INTERACTING BINARIES Citation Details In-Document Search Title: REVERSE RADIATIVE SHOCK LASER EXPERIMENTS RELEVANT TO ACCRETING STREAM-DISK IMPACT IN INTERACTING BINARIES We present the first results from high-energy-density laboratory astrophysics experiments that explore the hydrodynamic and radiative properties of a reverse shock relevant

  15. Device for testing closure disks at high rates of change of pressure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Merten, Jr., Charles W.

    1993-11-09

    A device for testing the burst pressure of closure disks which provides high pressure to both sides of a disk and rapidly releases pressure from one side thereof causing a high rate of change of pressure. A hollow notched plug allows the rapid release of pressure upon rupturing. A means is also disclosed for transmitting a tensile load from a piston to a hollow notched plug and for sealing the means for transmitting load within a hole in a piston.

  16. FORMATION OF GIANT PLANETS BY DISK INSTABILITY ON WIDE ORBITS AROUND PROTOSTARS WITH VARIED MASSES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boss, Alan P.

    2011-04-10

    Doppler surveys have shown that more massive stars have significantly higher frequencies of giant planets inside {approx}3 AU than lower mass stars, consistent with giant planet formation by core accretion. Direct imaging searches have begun to discover significant numbers of giant planet candidates around stars with masses of {approx}1 M{sub sun} to {approx}2 M{sub sun} at orbital distances of {approx}20 AU to {approx}120 AU. Given the inability of core accretion to form giant planets at such large distances, gravitational instabilities of the gas disk leading to clump formation have been suggested as the more likely formation mechanism. Here, we present five new models of the evolution of disks with inner radii of 20 AU and outer radii of 60 AU, for central protostars with masses of 0.1, 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, and 2.0 M{sub sun}, in order to assess the likelihood of planet formation on wide orbits around stars with varied masses. The disk masses range from 0.028 M{sub sun} to 0.21 M{sub sun}, with initial Toomre Q stability values ranging from 1.1 in the inner disks to {approx}1.6 in the outer disks. These five models show that disk instability is capable of forming clumps on timescales of {approx}10{sup 3} yr that, if they survive for longer times, could form giant planets initially on orbits with semimajor axes of {approx}30 AU to {approx}70 AU and eccentricities of {approx}0 to {approx}0.35, with initial masses of {approx}1 M{sub Jup} to {approx}5 M{sub Jup}, around solar-type stars, with more protoplanets forming as the mass of the protostar (and protoplanetary disk) is increased. In particular, disk instability appears to be a likely formation mechanism for the HR 8799 gas giant planetary system.

  17. IMAGING DISK DISTORTION OF BE BINARY SYSTEM {delta} SCORPII NEAR PERIASTRON

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Che, X.; Monnier, J. D.; Kraus, S.; Baron, F.; Tycner, C.; Zavala, R. T.; Pedretti, E.; Ten Brummelaar, T.; McAlister, H.; Sturmann, J.; Sturmann, L.; Turner, N.; Ridgway, S. T.

    2012-09-20

    The highly eccentric Be binary system {delta} Sco reached periastron during early 2011 July, when the distance between the primary and secondary was a few times the size of the primary disk in the H band. This opened a window of opportunity to study how the gaseous disks around Be stars respond to gravitational disturbance. We first refine the binary parameters with the best orbital phase coverage data from the Navy Precision Optical Interferometer. Then we present the first imaging results of the disk after the periastron, based on seven nights of five telescope observations with the MIRC combiner at the CHARA array. We found that the disk was inclined 27.{sup 0}6 {+-} 6.{sup 0}0 from the plane of the sky, had a half-light radius of 0.49 mas (2.2 stellar radii), and consistently contributed 71.4% {+-} 2.7% of the total flux in the H band from night to night, suggesting no ongoing transfer of material into the disk during the periastron. The new estimation of the periastron passage is UT 2011 July 3 07:00 {+-} 4:30. Re-analysis of archival VLTI-AMBER interferometry data allowed us to determine the rotation direction of the primary disk, constraining it to be inclined either {approx}119 Degree-Sign or {approx}171 Degree-Sign relative to the orbital plane of the binary system. We also detect inner disk asymmetries that could be explained by spot-like emission with a few percent of the disk total flux moving in Keplerian orbits, although we lack sufficient angular resolution to be sure of this interpretation and cannot yet rule out spiral density waves or other more complicated geometries.

  18. THE HCN-WATER RATIO IN THE PLANET FORMATION REGION OF DISKS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Najita, Joan R.; Salyk, Colette [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, 950 N. Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States)] [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, 950 N. Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Carr, John S. [Naval Research Laboratory, Code 7211, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)] [Naval Research Laboratory, Code 7211, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Pontoppidan, Klaus M. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States)] [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Van Dishoeck, Ewine F. [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9513, 2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands)] [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9513, 2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Blake, Geoffrey A. [Division of Geological and Planetary Sciences, Mail Stop 150-21, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)] [Division of Geological and Planetary Sciences, Mail Stop 150-21, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2013-04-01

    We find a trend between the mid-infrared HCN/H{sub 2}O flux ratio and submillimeter disk mass among T Tauri stars in Taurus. While it may seem puzzling that the molecular emission properties of the inner disk (disk (beyond {approx}20 AU) probed by the submillimeter continuum, an interesting possible interpretation is that the trend is a result of planetesimal and protoplanet formation. Because objects this large are decoupled from the accretion flow, when they form, they can lock up water (and oxygen) beyond the snow line, thereby enhancing the C/O ratio in the inner disk and altering the molecular abundances there. We discuss the assumptions that underlie this interpretation, a possible alternative explanation, and related open questions that motivate future work. Whatever its origin, understanding the meaning of the relation between the HCN/H{sub 2}O ratio and disk mass is of interest as trends like this among T Tauri disk properties are relatively rare.

  19. A parametric modeling approach to measuring the gas masses of circumstellar disks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, Jonathan P.; Best, William M. J. E-mail: wbest@ifa.hawaii.edu

    2014-06-10

    The disks that surround young stars are mostly composed of molecular gas, which is harder to detect and interpret than the accompanying dust. Disk mass measurements have therefore relied on large and uncertain extrapolations from the dust to the gas. We have developed a grid of models to study the dependencies of isotopologue CO line strengths on disk structure and temperature parameters and find that a combination of {sup 13}CO and C{sup 18}O observations provides a robust measure of the gas mass. We apply this technique to Submillimeter Array observations of nine circumstellar disks and published measurements of six well studied disks. We find evidence for selective photodissociation of C{sup 18}O and determine masses to within a factor of about three. The inferred masses for the nine disks in our survey range from 0.7 to 6 M {sub Jup}, and all are well below the extrapolation from the interstellar medium gas-to-dust ratio of 100. This is consistent with the low masses of planets found around such stars, and may be due to accretion or photoevaporation of a dust-poor upper atmosphere. However, the masses may be underestimated if there are more efficient CO depletion pathways than those known in molecular clouds and cold cores.

  20. Design, testing and two-dimensional flow modeling of a multiple-disk fan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Engin, Tahsin; Oezdemir, Mustafa; Cesmeci, Sevki [Department of Mechanical Engineering, The University of Sakarya, Esentepe Campus, 54187 Sakarya (Turkey)

    2009-11-15

    A multiple-disk Tesla type fan has been designed, tested and analyzed two-dimensionally using the conservation of angular momentum principle. Experimental results showed that such multiple-disk fans exhibited exceptionally low performance characteristics, which could be attributed to the low viscosity, tangential nature of the flow, and large mechanical energy losses at both suction and discharge sections that are comparable to the total input power. By means of theoretical analysis, local and overall shearing stresses on the disk surfaces have been determined based on tangential and radial velocity distributions of the air flow of different volume flow rates at prescribed disk spaces and rotational speeds. Then the total power transmitted by rotating disks to air flow, and the power acquired by the air flow in the gap due to transfer of angular momentum have been obtained by numerically integrating shearing stresses over the disk surfaces. Using the measured shaft and hydraulic powers, these quantities were utilized to evaluate mechanical energy losses associated with the suction and discharge sections of the fan. (author)

  1. Quasi-static model of collimated jets and radio lobes. I. Accretion disk and jets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Colgate, Stirling A.; Li, Hui; Fowler, T. Kenneth; Pino, Jesse

    2014-07-10

    This is the first of a series of papers showing that when an efficient dynamo can be maintained by accretion disks around supermassive black holes in active galactic nuclei, it can lead to the formation of a powerful, magnetic helix that could explain both the observed radio jet/lobe structures on very large scales and ultimately the enormous power inferred from the observed ultra-high-energy cosmic rays. In this work, we solve a set of one-dimensional equations similar to the steady-state standard accretion disk model, but now including the large-scale magnetic fields giving rises to jets. We find that the frequently made assumption that large-scale fields are frozen into the disk is fundamentally incorrect, due to the necessity for current and the accreting mass to flow perpendicular to magnetic flux surfaces. A correct treatment greatly simplifies the calculations, yielding fields that leave the disk nearly vertically with magnetic profiles uniquely determined by disk angular momentum conservation. Representative solutions of the magnetic fields in different radial regions of the disk surface are given, and they determine the overall key features in the jet structure and its dissipation, which will be the subjects of later papers.

  2. Surface geometry of protoplanetary disks inferred from near-infrared imaging polarimetry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Takami, Michihiro; Hasegawa, Yasuhiro; Gu, Pin-Gao; Karr, Jennifer L.; Chapillon, Edwige; Tang, Ya-Wen [Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Academia Sinica, PO Box 23-141, Taipei 10617, Taiwan, ROC (China); Muto, Takayuki [Division of Liberal Arts, Kogakuin University, 1-24-2, Nishi-Shinjuku, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 163-8677 (Japan); Dong, Ruobing [Nuclear Science Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Hashimoto, Jun [H. L. Dodge Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Oklahoma, 440 W. Brooks St. Norman, OK 73019 (United States); Kusakabe, Nobuyuki; Akiyama, Eiji; Kwon, Jungmi [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Itoh, Youchi [Nishi-Harima Astronomical Observatory, Center for Astronomy, University of Hyogo, 407-2 Nishigaichi, Sayo, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5313 (Japan); Carson, Joseph [Department of Physics and Astronomy, College of Charleston, 58 Coming Street, Charleston, SC 29424 (United States); Follette, Katherine B. [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Mayama, Satoshi [The Center for the Promotion of Integrated Sciences, The Graduate University for Advanced Studies (SOKENDAI), Shonan International Village, Hayama-cho, Miura-gun, Kanagawa 240-0193 (Japan); Sitko, Michael [Department of Physics, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH 45221 (United States); Janson, Markus [Astrophysics Research Center, Queen's University Belfast, BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); Grady, Carol A. [Eureka Scientific, 2452 Delmer Suite 100, Oakland, CA 96402 (United States); Kudo, Tomoyuki, E-mail: hiro@asiaa.sinica.edu.tw [Subaru Telescope, 650 North Aohoku Place, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States); and others

    2014-11-01

    We present a new method of analysis for determining the surface geometry of five protoplanetary disks observed with near-infrared imaging polarimetry using Subaru-HiCIAO. Using as inputs the observed distribution of polarized intensity (PI), disk inclination, assumed properties for dust scattering, and other reasonable approximations, we calculate a differential equation to derive the surface geometry. This equation is numerically integrated along the distance from the star at a given position angle. We show that, using these approximations, the local maxima in the PI distribution of spiral arms (SAO 206462, MWC 758) and rings (2MASS J16042165-2130284, PDS 70) are associated with local concave-up structures on the disk surface. We also show that the observed presence of an inner gap in scattered light still allows the possibility of a disk surface that is parallel to the light path from the star, or a disk that is shadowed by structures in the inner radii. Our analysis for rings does not show the presence of a vertical inner wall as often assumed in studies of disks with an inner gap. Finally, we summarize the implications of spiral and ring structures as potential signatures of ongoing planet formation.

  3. X-ray driven reaction front dynamics at calcite-water interfaces

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Laanait, Nouamane; Callagon, Erika Blanca R.; Zhang, Zhan; Sturchio, Neil C.; Lee, Sang Soo; Fenter, Paul

    2015-09-18

    The interface of minerals with aqueous solutions is central to geochemical reactivity, hosting processes that span multiple spatiotemporal scales. Understanding such processes requires spatially and temporally resolved observations, and experimental controls that precisely manipulate the interfacial thermodynamic state. Using the intense radiation fields of a focused synchrotron X-ray beam, we drove dissolution at the calcite-aqueous interface and simultaneously probed the dynamics of the propagating reaction fronts using surface X-ray microscopy. Evolving surface structures are controlled by the time-dependent solution composition as characterized by a kinetic reaction model. At extreme disequilibria, the onset of reaction front instabilities was observed with velocitiesmore » of >30 nanometers per second. As a result, these instabilities are identified as a signature of transport-limited dissolution of calcite under extreme disequilibrium.« less

  4. Laws of convective vortex formation behind a flame front during its propagation in a tube

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abrukov, S.A.; Samsonov, V.P.

    1986-05-01

    This paper examines laws and conditions of convective vortex formation in combustion products during the propagation of a slow, stable flame in a vertical, half-open tube. The main element of the experimental unit was the reaction tube and weightless conditions were created in a freely falling container holding the reaction tube. Propane-air and CO-air mixtures were used. The structure of the flow behind the flame front was studied by the interferometric method. Frames are show from an interference film illustrating the typical pattern of vortex formation behind the flame front when the flame propagates upward at a velocity of 7 cm/sec. Analyses of the interferograms shows that the flame is stable before the vortices appear and that the flow of combustion products is laminar.

  5. X-ray Driven Reaction Front Dynamics at Mineral-Aqueous Interfaces

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Laanait, Nouamane; Callagon, Erika Blanca R; Zhang, Zhan; Sturchio, N. C.; Lee, Sang Soo; Fenter, Paul

    2015-01-01

    The interface of minerals with aqueous solutions is central to geochemical reactivity, hosting processes that span multiple spatiotemporal scales. Understanding such processes requires spatially and temporally resolved observations, and experimental controls that precisely manipulate the interfacial thermodynamic state. Using the intense radiation fields of a focused synchrotron X-ray beam, we drove dissolution at the calcite-aqueous interface and simultaneously probed the dynamics of the propagating reaction fronts using surface X-ray microscopy. Evolving surface structures are controlled by the time-dependent solution composition as characterized by a kinetic reaction model. At extreme disequilibria, the onset of reaction front instabilities was observed with velocitiesmore » of >30 nanometers per second. These instabilities are identified as a signature of transport-limited dissolution of calcite under extreme disequilibrium.« less

  6. Superconformal Baryon-Meson Symmetry and Light-Front Holographic QCD

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Dosch, Hans Guenter; de Teramond, Guy F.; Brodsky, Stanley J.

    2015-04-10

    We construct an effective QCD light-front Hamiltonian for both mesons and baryons in the chiral limit based on the generalized supercharges of a superconformal graded algebra. The superconformal construction is shown to be equivalent to a semi-classical approximation to light-front QCD and its embedding in AdS space. The specific breaking of conformal invariance inside the graded algebra uniquely determines the effective confinement potential. The generalized supercharges connect the baryon and meson spectra to each other in a remarkable manner. In particular, the π/b1 Regge trajectory is identified as the superpartner of the nucleon trajectory. However, the lowest-lying state on thismore » trajectory, the π-meson is massless in the chiral limit and has no supersymmetric partner.« less

  7. Unconstrained plastering : all-hexahedral mesh generation via advancing front geometry decomposition (2004-2008).

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blacker, Teddy Dean; Staten, Matthew L.; Kerr, Robert A.; Owen, Steven James

    2010-03-01

    The generation of all-hexahedral finite element meshes has been an area of ongoing research for the past two decades and remains an open problem. Unconstrained plastering is a new method for generating all-hexahedral finite element meshes on arbitrary volumetric geometries. Starting from an unmeshed volume boundary, unconstrained plastering generates the interior mesh topology without the constraints of a pre-defined boundary mesh. Using advancing fronts, unconstrained plastering forms partially defined hexahedral dual sheets by decomposing the geometry into simple shapes, each of which can be meshed with simple meshing primitives. By breaking from the tradition of previous advancing-front algorithms, which start from pre-meshed boundary surfaces, unconstrained plastering demonstrates that for the tested geometries, high quality, boundary aligned, orientation insensitive, all-hexahedral meshes can be generated automatically without pre-meshing the boundary. Examples are given for meshes from both solid mechanics and geotechnical applications.

  8. Method of fabricating conductive electrodes on the front and backside of a thin film structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tabada, Phillipe J. (Roseville, CA); Tabada, legal representative, Melody (Roseville, CA); Pannu, Satinderpall S. (Pleasanton, CA)

    2011-05-22

    A method of fabricating a thin film device having conductive front and backside electrodes or contacts. Top-side cavities are first formed on a first dielectric layer, followed by the deposition of a metal layer on the first dielectric layer to fill the cavities. Defined metal structures are etched from the metal layer to include the cavity-filled metal, followed by depositing a second dielectric layer over the metal structures. Additional levels of defined metal structures may be formed in a similar manner with vias connecting metal structures between levels. After a final dielectric layer is deposited, a top surface of a metal structure of an uppermost metal layer is exposed through the final dielectric layer to form a front-side electrode, and a bottom surface of a cavity-filled portion of a metal structure of a lowermost metal layer is also exposed through the first dielectric layer to form a back-side electrode.

  9. Macroscopic dust in protoplanetary disksfrom growth to destruction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deckers, J.; Teiser, J.

    2014-12-01

    The collision dynamics of dusty bodies are crucial for planetesimal formation. Decimeter agglomerates are especially important in the different formation models. Therefore, in continuation of our experiments on mutual decimeter collisions, we investigate collisions of centimeter onto decimeter dust agglomerates in a small drop tower under vacuum conditions (p ? 5 10{sup 1} mbar) at a mean collision velocity of 6.68 0.67 m s{sup 1}. We use quartz dust with irregularly shaped micrometer grains. Centimeter projectiles with different diameters, masses, and heights are used, their typical volume filling factor is ? {sub p,} {sub m} = 0.466 0.02. The decimeter agglomerates have a mass of about 1.5 kg, a diameter and height of 12 cm, and a mean filling factor of ? {sub t,} {sub m} = 0.44 0.004. At lower collision energies, only the projectile gets destroyed and mass is transferred to the target. The accretion efficiency decreases with increasing obliquity and increasing difference in filling factor, if the projectile is more compact than the target. The accretion efficiency increases with increasing collision energy for collision energies under a certain threshold. Beyond this threshold at 298 25 mJ, catastrophic disruption of the target can be observed. This corresponds to a critical fragmentation strength Q* = 190 16 mJ kg{sup 1}, which is a factor of four larger than expected. Analyses of the projectile fragments show a power-law size distribution with an average exponent of 3.8 0.3. The mass distributions suggest that the fraction of smallest fragments increases for higher collision energies. This is interesting for impacts of small particles on large target bodies within protoplanetary disks, as smaller fragments couple better to the surrounding gas and re-accretion by gas drag is more likely.

  10. Multiple reaction fronts in the oxidation-reduction of iron-rich uranium ores

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dewynne, J.N. . Faculty of Mathematical Studies); Fowler, A.C. . Mathematical Inst.); Hagan, P.S. )

    1993-08-01

    When a container of radioactive waste is buried underground, it eventually corrodes, and leakage of radioactive material to the surrounding rock occurs. Depending on the chemistry of the rock, many different reactions may occur. A particular case concerns the oxidation and reduction of uranium ores by infiltrating groundwater, since UO[sub 3] is relatively soluble (and hence potentially transportable to the water supply), whereas UO[sub 2] is essentially insoluble. It is therefore of concern to those involved with radioactive waste disposal to understand the mechanics of uranium transport through reduction and oxidation reactions. This paper describes the oxidation of iron-rich uranium-bearing rocks by infiltration of groundwater. A reaction-diffusion model is set up to describe the sequence of reactions involving iron oxidation, uranium oxidation and reduction, sulfuric acid production, and dissolution of the host rock that occur. On a geological timescale of millions of years, the reactions occur very fast in very thin reaction fronts. It is shown that the redox front that separates oxidized (orange) rock from reduced (black) rock must actually consist of two separate fronts that move together, at which the two separate processes of uranium oxidation and iron reduction occur, respectively. Between these fronts, a high concentration of uranium is predicted. The mechanics of this process are not specific to uranium-mediated redox reactions, but apply generally and may be used to explain the formation of concentrated ore deposits in extended veins. On the long timescales of relevance, a quasi-static response results, and the problem can be solved explicitly in one dimension. This provides a framework for studying more realistic two-dimensional problems in fissured rocks and also for the future study of uraninite nodule formation.

  11. Method and apparatus for generating radiation utilizing DC to AC conversion with a conductive front

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dawson, John M.; Mori, Warren B.; Lai, Chih-Hsiang; Katsouleas, Thomas C.

    1998-01-01

    Method and apparatus for generating radiation of high power, variable duration and broad tunability over several orders of magnitude from a laser-ionized gas-filled capacitor array. The method and apparatus convert a DC electric field pattern into a coherent electromagnetic wave train when a relativistic ionization front passes between the capacitor plates. The frequency and duration of the radiation is controlled by the gas pressure and capacitor spacing.

  12. Method and apparatus for generating radiation utilizing DC to AC conversion with a conductive front

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dawson, J.M.; Mori, W.B.; Lai, C.H.; Katsouleas, T.C.

    1998-07-14

    Method and apparatus ar disclosed for generating radiation of high power, variable duration and broad tunability over several orders of magnitude from a laser-ionized gas-filled capacitor array. The method and apparatus convert a DC electric field pattern into a coherent electromagnetic wave train when a relativistic ionization front passes between the capacitor plates. The frequency and duration of the radiation is controlled by the gas pressure and capacitor spacing. 4 figs.

  13. Modeling MHD accretion-ejection: episodic ejections of jets triggered by a mean-field disk dynamo

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stepanovs, Deniss; Fendt, Christian; Sheikhnezami, Somayeh E-mail: fendt@mpia.de

    2014-11-20

    We present MHD simulations exploring the launching, acceleration, and collimation of jets and disk winds. The evolution of the disk structure is consistently taken into account. Extending our earlier studies, we now consider the self-generation of the magnetic field by an ?{sup 2}? mean-field dynamo. The disk magnetization remains on a rather low level, which helps to evolve the simulations for T > 10, 000 dynamical time steps on a domain extending 1500 inner disk radii. We find the magnetic field of the inner disk to be similar to the commonly found open field structure, favoring magneto-centrifugal launching. The outer disk field is highly inclined and predominantly radial. Here, differential rotation induces a strong toroidal component, which plays a key role in outflow launching. These outflows from the outer disk are slower, denser, and less collimated. If the dynamo action is not quenched, magnetic flux is continuously generated, diffuses outward through the disk, and fills the entire disk. We have invented a toy model triggering a time-dependent mean-field dynamo. The duty cycles of this dynamo lead to episodic ejections on similar timescales. When the dynamo is suppressed as the magnetization falls below a critical value, the generation of the outflows and also accretion is inhibited. The general result is that we can steer episodic ejection and large-scale jet knots by a disk-intrinsic dynamo that is time-dependent and regenerates the jet-launching magnetic field.

  14. Light-front representation of chiral dynamics in peripheral transverse densities

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Granados, Carlos G.; Weiss, Christian

    2015-07-31

    The nucleon's electromagnetic form factors are expressed in terms of the transverse densities of charge and magnetization at fixed light-front time. At peripheral transverse distances b = O(M_pi^{-1}) the densities are governed by chiral dynamics and can be calculated model-independently using chiral effective field theory (EFT). We represent the leading-order chiral EFT results for the peripheral transverse densities as overlap integrals of chiral light-front wave functions, describing the transition of the initial nucleon to soft pion-nucleon intermediate states and back. The new representation (a) explains the parametric order of the peripheral transverse densities; (b) establishes an inequality between the spin-independentmore » and -dependent densities; (c) exposes the role of pion orbital angular momentum in chiral dynamics; (d) reveals a large left-right asymmetry of the current in a transversely polarized nucleon and suggests a simple interpretation. The light-front representation enables a first-quantized, quantum-mechanical view of chiral dynamics that is fully relativistic and exactly equivalent to the second-quantized, field-theoretical formulation. It relates the charge and magnetization densities measured in low-energy elastic scattering to the generalized parton distributions probed in peripheral high-energy scattering processes. The method can be applied to nucleon form factors of other operators, e.g. the energy-momentum tensor.« less

  15. FBI Fingerprint Image Capture System High-Speed-Front-End throughput modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rathke, P.M.

    1993-09-01

    The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) has undertaken a major modernization effort called the Integrated Automated Fingerprint Identification System (IAFISS). This system will provide centralized identification services using automated fingerprint, subject descriptor, mugshot, and document processing. A high-speed Fingerprint Image Capture System (FICS) is under development as part of the IAFIS program. The FICS will capture digital and microfilm images of FBI fingerprint cards for input into a central database. One FICS design supports two front-end scanning subsystems, known as the High-Speed-Front-End (HSFE) and Low-Speed-Front-End, to supply image data to a common data processing subsystem. The production rate of the HSFE is critical to meeting the FBI`s fingerprint card processing schedule. A model of the HSFE has been developed to help identify the issues driving the production rate, assist in the development of component specifications, and guide the evolution of an operations plan. A description of the model development is given, the assumptions are presented, and some HSFE throughput analysis is performed.

  16. Resource intensities of the front end of the nuclear fuel cycle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schneider, E.; Phathanapirom, U.; Eggert, R.; Collins, J.

    2013-07-01

    This paper presents resource intensities, including direct and embodied energy consumption, land and water use, associated with the processes comprising the front end of the nuclear fuel cycle. These processes include uranium extraction, conversion, enrichment, fuel fabrication and depleted uranium de-conversion. To the extent feasible, these impacts are calculated based on data reported by operating facilities, with preference given to more recent data based on current technologies and regulations. All impacts are normalized per GWh of electricity produced. Uranium extraction is seen to be the most resource intensive front end process. Combined, the energy consumed by all front end processes is equal to less than 1% of the electricity produced by the uranium in a nuclear reactor. Land transformation and water withdrawals are calculated at 8.07 m{sup 2} /GWh(e) and 1.37x10{sup 5} l/GWh(e), respectively. Both are dominated by the requirements of uranium extraction, which accounts for over 70% of land use and nearly 90% of water use.

  17. Delayed muons in extensive air showers and double-front showers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beisembaev, R. U.; Vavilov, Yu. N. Vildanov, N. G.; Kruglov, A. V.; Stepanov, A. V.; Takibaev, J. S.

    2009-11-15

    The results of a long-term experiment performed in the period between 1995 and 2006 with the aid of the MUON-T underground (20 mwe) scintillation facility arranged at the Tien Shan mountain research station at an altitude of 3340 m above sea level are presented. The time distribution of delayed muons with an energy in excess of 5 GeV in extensive air showers of energy not lower than 106 GeV with respect to the shower front was obtained with a high statistical significance in the delay interval between 30 and 150 ns. An effect of the geomagnetic field in detecting delayed muons in extensive air showers was discovered. This effect leads to the asymmetry of their appearance with respect to the north-south direction. The connection between delayed muons and extensive air showers featuring two fronts separated by a time interval of several tens of to two hundred nanoseconds is discussed. This connection gives sufficient grounds to assume that delayed muons originate from the decays of pions and kaons produced in the second, delayed, front of extensive air showers.

  18. CHEMISTRY OF IMPACT-GENERATED SILICATE MELT-VAPOR DEBRIS DISKS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Visscher, Channon; Fegley, Bruce Jr.

    2013-04-10

    In the giant impact theory for lunar origin, the Moon forms from material ejected by the impact into an Earth-orbiting disk. Here we report the initial results from a silicate melt-vapor equilibrium chemistry model for such impact-generated planetary debris disks. In order to simulate the chemical behavior of a two-phase (melt+vapor) disk, we calculate the temperature-dependent pressure and chemical composition of vapor in equilibrium with molten silicate from 2000 to 4000 K. We consider the elements O, Na, K, Fe, Si, Mg, Ca, Al, Ti, and Zn for a range of bulk silicate compositions (Earth, Moon, Mars, eucrite parent body, angrites, and ureilites). In general, the disk atmosphere is dominated by Na, Zn, and O{sub 2} at lower temperatures (<3000 K) and SiO, O{sub 2}, and O at higher temperatures. The high-temperature chemistry is consistent for any silicate melt composition, and we thus expect abundant SiO, O{sub 2}, and O to be a common feature of hot, impact-generated debris disks. In addition, the saturated silicate vapor is highly oxidizing, with oxygen fugacity (f{sub O{sub 2}}) values (and hence H{sub 2}O/H{sub 2} and CO{sub 2}/CO ratios) several orders of magnitude higher than those in a solar-composition gas. High f{sub O{sub 2}} values in the disk atmosphere are found for any silicate composition because oxygen is the most abundant element in rock. We thus expect high oxygen fugacity to be a ubiquitous feature of any silicate melt-vapor disk produced via collisions between rocky planets.

  19. GRAVITATIONAL INSTABILITY OF ROTATING, PRESSURE-CONFINED, POLYTROPIC GAS DISKS WITH VERTICAL STRATIFICATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Jeong-Gyu; Kim, Woong-Tae; Seo, Young Min; Hong, Seung Soo E-mail: wkim@astro.snu.ac.kr E-mail: sshong@astro.snu.ac.kr

    2012-12-20

    We investigate the gravitational instability (GI) of rotating, vertically stratified, pressure-confined, polytropic gas disks using a linear stability analysis as well as analytic approximations. The disks are initially in vertical hydrostatic equilibrium and bounded by a constant external pressure. We find that the GI of a pressure-confined disk is in general a mixed mode of the conventional Jeans and distortional instabilities, and is thus an unstable version of acoustic-surface-gravity waves. The Jeans mode dominates in weakly confined disks or disks with rigid boundaries. On the other hand, when the disk has free boundaries and is strongly pressure confined, the mixed GI is dominated by the distortional mode that is surface-gravity waves driven unstable under their own gravity and thus incompressible. We demonstrate that the Jeans mode is gravity-modified acoustic waves rather than inertial waves and that inertial waves are almost unaffected by self-gravity. We derive an analytic expression for the effective sound speed c{sub eff} of acoustic-surface-gravity waves. We also find expressions for the gravity reduction factors relative to a razor-thin counterpart that are appropriate for the Jeans and distortional modes. The usual razor-thin dispersion relation, after correcting for c{sub eff} and the reduction factors, closely matches the numerical results obtained by solving a full set of linearized equations. The effective sound speed generalizes the Toomre stability parameter of the Jeans mode to allow for the mixed GI of vertically stratified, pressure-confined disks.

  20. PROBING THE INNER REGIONS OF PROTOPLANETARY DISKS WITH CO ABSORPTION LINE SPECTROSCOPY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McJunkin, Matthew; France, Kevin; Burgh, Eric B.; Brown, Alexander; Herczeg, Gregory J.; Schindhelm, Eric; Brown, Joanna M.

    2013-03-20

    Carbon monoxide (CO) is the most commonly used tracer of molecular gas in the inner regions of protoplanetary disks. CO can be used to constrain the excitation and structure of the circumstellar environment. Absorption line spectroscopy provides an accurate assessment of a single line of sight through the protoplanetary disk system, giving more straightforward estimates of column densities and temperatures than CO and molecular hydrogen (H{sub 2}) emission line studies. We analyze new observations of ultraviolet CO absorption from the Hubble Space Telescope along the sightlines to six classical T Tauri stars. Gas velocities consistent with the stellar velocities, combined with the moderate-to-high disk inclinations, argue against the absorbing CO gas originating in a fast-moving disk wind. We conclude that the far-ultraviolet observations provide a direct measure of the disk atmosphere or possibly a slow disk wind. The CO absorption lines are reproduced by model spectra with column densities in the range N({sup 12}CO) {approx} 10{sup 16}-10{sup 18} cm{sup -2} and N({sup 13}CO) {approx} 10{sup 15}-10{sup 17} cm{sup -2}, rotational temperatures T{sub rot}(CO) {approx} 300-700 K, and Doppler b-values, b {approx} 0.5-1.5 km s{sup -1}. We use these results to constrain the line-of-sight density of the warm molecular gas (n{sub CO} {approx} 70-4000 cm{sup -3}) and put these observations in context with protoplanetary disk models.

  1. DEAD, UNDEAD, AND ZOMBIE ZONES IN PROTOSTELLAR DISKS AS A FUNCTION OF STELLAR MASS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mohanty, Subhanjoy; Ercolano, Barbara; Turner, Neal J. E-mail: ercolano@usm.lmu.de

    2013-02-10

    We investigate the viability of the magnetorotational instability (MRI) in X-ray ionized viscous accretion disks around both solar-type stars and very low mass stars. In particular, we determine the disk regions where the MRI can be shut off either by Ohmic resistivity (the so-called dead and undead zones) or by ambipolar diffusion (a region we term the zombie zone). We consider two stellar masses: M {sub *} = 0.7 M {sub Sun} and 0.1 M {sub Sun }. In each case, we assume that: the disk surface density profile is that of a scaled Minimum Mass Solar Nebula, with M {sub disk}/M {sub *} = 0.01 as suggested by current data; disk ionization is driven primarily by stellar X-rays, complemented by cosmic rays and radionuclides; and the stellar X-ray luminosity scales with bolometric luminosity as L{sub X} /L {sub *} Almost-Equal-To 10{sup -3.5}, as observed. Ionization rates are calculated with the MOCCASIN Monte Carlo X-ray transport code, and ionization balance determined using a simplified chemical network, including well-mixed 0.1 {mu}m grains at various levels of depletion. We find that (1) ambipolar diffusion is the primary factor controlling MRI activity in disks around both solar-type and very low mass classical T Tauri stars. Assuming that the MRI yields the maximum possible field strength at each radius, we further find that: (2) the MRI-active layer constitutes only {approx}5%-10% of the total disk mass; (3) the accretion rate ( M-dot ) varies radially in both magnitude and sign (inward or outward), implying time-variable accretion as well as the creation of disk gaps and overdensities, with consequences for planet formation and migration; (4) achieving the empirical accretion rates in solar-type and very low mass stars requires a depletion of well-mixed small grains (via grain growth and/or settling) by a factor of 10-1000 relative to the standard dust-to-gas mass ratio of 10{sup -2}; and (5) the current non-detection of polarized emission from field-aligned grains in the outer disk regions is consistent with active MRI at those radii.

  2. Shrinking galaxy disks with fountain-driven accretion from the halo

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elmegreen, Bruce G.; Struck, Curtis; Hunter, Deidre A. E-mail: curt@iastate.edu

    2014-12-01

    Star formation in most galaxies requires cosmic gas accretion because the gas consumption time is short compared to the Hubble time. This accretion presumably comes from a combination of infalling satellite debris, cold flows, and condensation of hot halo gas at the cool disk interface, perhaps aided by a galactic fountain. In general, the accretion will have a different specific angular momentum than the part of the disk that receives it, even if the gas comes from the nearby halo. The gas disk then expands or shrinks over time. Here we show that condensation of halo gas at a rate proportional to the star formation rate in the fountain model will preserve an initial shape, such as an exponential, with a shrinking scale length, leaving behind a stellar disk with a slightly steeper profile of younger stars near the center. This process is slow for most galaxies, producing imperceptible radial speeds, and it may be dominated by other torques, but it could be important for blue compact dwarfs, which tend to have large, irregular gas reservoirs and steep blue profiles in their inner stellar disks.

  3. Constraining the disk masses of the class I binary protostar GV Tau

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sheehan, Patrick D.; Eisner, Josh A.

    2014-08-10

    We present new spatially resolved 1.3 mm imaging with CARMA of the GV Tau system. GV Tau is a Class I binary protostar system in the Taurus Molecular Cloud, the components of which are separated by 1.''2. Each protostar is surrounded by a protoplanetary disk, and the pair may be surrounded by a circumbinary envelope. We analyze the data using detailed radiative transfer modeling of the system. We create synthetic protostar model spectra, images, and visibilities and compare them with CARMA 1.3 mm visibilities, a Hubble Space Telescope near-infrared scattered light image, and broadband spectral energy distributions from the literature to study the disk masses and geometries of the GV Tau disks. We show that the protoplanetary disks around GV Tau fall near the lower end of estimates of the Minimum Mass Solar Nebula, and may have just enough mass to form giant planets. When added to the sample of Class I protostars from Eisner, we confirm that Class I protostars are on average more massive than their Class II counterparts. This suggests that substantial dust grain processing occurs between the Class I and Class II stages, and may help to explain why the Class II protostars do not appear to have, on average, enough mass in their disks to form giant planets.

  4. Revealing asymmetries in the HD 181327 debris disk: A recent massive collision or interstellar medium warping

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stark, Christopher C.; Kuchner, Marc J.; Schneider, Glenn; Weinberger, Alycia J.; Debes, John H.; Grady, Carol A.; Jang-Condell, Hannah

    2014-07-01

    New multi-roll coronagraphic images of the HD 181327 debris disk obtained using the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph on board the Hubble Space Telescope reveal the debris ring in its entirety at high signal-to-noise ratio and unprecedented spatial resolution. We present and apply a new multi-roll image processing routine to identify and further remove quasi-static point-spread function-subtraction residuals and quantify systematic uncertainties. We also use a new iterative image deprojection technique to constrain the true disk geometry and aggressively remove any surface brightness asymmetries that can be explained without invoking dust density enhancements/deficits. The measured empirical scattering phase function for the disk is more forward scattering than previously thought and is not well-fit by a Henyey-Greenstein function. The empirical scattering phase function varies with stellocentric distance, consistent with the expected radiation pressured-induced size segregation exterior to the belt. Within the belt, the empirical scattering phase function contradicts unperturbed debris ring models, suggesting the presence of an unseen planet. The radial profile of the flux density is degenerate with a radially varying scattering phase function; therefore estimates of the ring's true width and edge slope may be highly uncertain. We detect large scale asymmetries in the disk, consistent with either the recent catastrophic disruption of a body with mass >1% the mass of Pluto, or disk warping due to strong interactions with the interstellar medium.

  5. THE REINCARNATION OF INTERSTELLAR DUST: THE IMPORTANCE OF ORGANIC REFRACTORY MATERIAL IN INFRARED SPECTRA OF COMETARY COMAE AND CIRCUMSTELLAR DISKS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kimura, Hiroshi

    2013-09-20

    We consider the reincarnation of interstellar dust to be reborn in protoplanetary disks as aggregates consisting of submicron-sized grains with a crystalline or amorphous silicate core and an organic-rich carbonaceous mantle. We find that infrared spectra of reincarnated interstellar dust reproduce emission peaks at correct wavelengths where the peaks were observed in cometary comae, debris disks, and protoplanetary disks if the volume fraction of organic refractory meets the constraints on elemental abundances. We discuss what we can learn from the infrared spectra of reincarnated interstellar dust in cometary comae and circumstellar disks.

  6. On the ion front of a plasma expanding into a vacuum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allen, J. E.; University College, Oxford, Oxford OX1 4BH ; Perego, M.

    2014-03-15

    Calculations are reported on the expansion of a plasma into a vacuum, using a model of cold ions and Boltzmann electrons. The initial distribution of the ions at the edge of the plasma greatly affects the subsequent expansion. An initial abrupt drop of ion density leads to an expansion in which the abrupt drop is maintained. A finite slope, however, leads to the formation of a peak of ion density at the ion front. The subsequent behaviour may lead to wave breaking and the formation of multi-valued ion velocity distributions.

  7. Method for characterization of the rate of movement of an oxidation front in cementitious materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Almond, Philip M.; Langton, Christine A.; Stefanko, David B.

    2016-03-01

    Disclosed are methods for determining the redox condition of cementitious materials. The methods are leaching methods that utilize a redox active transition metal indicator that is present in the cementitious material and exhibits variable solubility depending upon the oxidation state of the indicator. When the leaching process is carried out under anaerobic conditions, the presence or absence of the indicator in the leachate can be utilized to determine the redox condition of and location of the oxidation front in the material that has been subjected to the leaching process.

  8. Resonant Coherent Excitation of Fast Hydrogen Atoms in Front of a LiF(001) Surface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Auth, C.; Mertens, A.; Winter, H.; Borisov, A.G.; Garcia de Abajo, F.J.

    1997-12-01

    We have scattered protons and hydrogen atoms with energies of some keV from a LiF(001) surface under a grazing angle of incidence. From the intensity of Lyman-{alpha} radiation (transition from n=2 to n=1, {lambda}=121.6 nm ) as a function of projectile energy for different azimuthal orientations of the crystal surface, we find clear evidence for a resonant coherent excitation of n=2 states of hydrogen atoms in the oscillating electric field in front of the insulator surface. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  9. OPCPA front end and contrast optimization for the OMEGA EP kilojoule, picosecond laser

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Dorrer, C.; Consentino, A.; Irwin, D.; Qiao, J.; Zuegel, J. D.

    2015-09-01

    OMEGA EP is a large-scale laser system that combines optical parametric amplification and solid-state laser amplification on two beamlines to deliver high-intensity, high-energy optical pulses. The temporal contrast of the output pulse is limited by the front-end parametric fluorescence and other features that are specific to parametric amplification. The impact of the two-crystal parametric preamplifier, pump-intensity noise, and pump-signal timing is experimentally studied. The implementation of a parametric amplifier pumped by a short pump pulse before stretching, further amplification, and recompression to enhance the temporal contrast of the high-energy short pulse is described.

  10. MERGING COLD FRONTS IN THE GALAXY PAIR NGC 7619 AND NGC 7626

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Randall, S. W.; Jones, C.; Kraft, R.; Forman, W. R.; O'Sullivan, E.

    2009-05-10

    We present results from Chandra observations of the galaxy pair NGC 7619 and NGC 7626, the two dominant members of the Pegasus group. The X-ray images show a brightness edge associated with each galaxy, which we identify as merger cold fronts. The edges are sharp, and the axes of symmetry of the edges are roughly antiparallel, suggesting that these galaxies are falling toward one another in the plane of the sky. The detection of merger cold fronts in each of the two dominant member galaxies implies a merging subgroup scenario, since the alternative is that the galaxies are falling into a preexisting {approx}1 keV halo without a dominant galaxy of its own, and such objects are not observed. We estimate the three-dimensional velocities from the cold fronts and, using the observed radial velocities of the galaxies, show that the velocity vectors are indeed most likely close to the plane of the sky, with a relative velocity of {approx}1190 km s{sup -1}. The relative velocity is consistent with what is expected from the infall of two roughly equal mass subgroups whose total viral mass equals that of the Pegasus group. We conclude that the Pegasus cluster is most likely currently forming from a major merger of two subgroups, dominated by NGC 7619 and NGC 7626. NGC 7626 contains a strong radio source, consisting of a core with two symmetric jets, and radio lobes. Although we find no associated structure in the X-ray surface brightness map, the temperature map reveals a clump of cool gas just outside the southern lobe, presumably entrained by the lobe, and possibly an extension of cooler gas into the lobe itself. The jet axis is parallel with the projected direction of motion of NGC 7626 (inferred from the symmetry axis of the merger cold front), and the southern leading jet is foreshortened as compared to the northern trailing one, possibly due to the additional ram pressure encountered by the forward jet.

  11. Charged annular disks and Reissner-Nordstroem type black holes from extremal dust

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lora-Clavijo, F. D.; Ospina-Henao, P. A.; Pedraza, J. F.

    2010-10-15

    We present the first analytical superposition of a charged black hole with an annular disk of extremal dust. In order to obtain the solutions, we first solve the Einstein-Maxwell field equations for sources that represent disklike configurations of matter in confomastatic spacetimes by assuming a functional dependence among the metric function, the electric potential, and an auxiliary function, which is taken as a solution of the Laplace equation. We then employ the Lord Kelvin inversion method applied to models of finite extension in order to obtain annular disks. The structures obtained extend to infinity, but their total masses are finite and all the energy conditions are satisfied. Finally, we observe that the extremal Reissner-Nordstroem black hole can be embedded into the center of the disks by adding a boundary term in the inversion.

  12. Magnetization reversal assisted by half antivortex states in nanostructured circular cobalt disks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lara, A.; Aliev, F. G.; Dobrovolskiy, O. V.; Prieto, J. L.; Huth, M.

    2014-11-03

    The half antivortex, a fundamental topological structure which determines magnetization reversal of submicron magnetic devices with domain walls, has been suggested also to play a crucial role in spin torque induced vortex core reversal in circular disks. Here, we report on magnetization reversal in circular disks with nanoholes through consecutive metastable states with half antivortices. In-plane anisotropic magnetoresistance and broadband susceptibility measurements accompanied by micromagnetic simulations reveal that cobalt (Co) disks with two and three linearly arranged nanoholes directed at 45° and 135° with respect to the external magnetic field show reproducible step-like changes in the anisotropic magnetoresistance and magnetic permeability due to transitions between different intermediate states mediated by vortices and half antivortices confined to the dot nanoholes and edges, respectively. Our findings are relevant for the development of multi-hole based spintronic and magnetic memory devices.

  13. VOLATILE-RICH CIRCUMSTELLAR GAS IN THE UNUSUAL 49 CETI DEBRIS DISK

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roberge, Aki; Grady, Carol A.; Welsh, Barry Y.; Kamp, Inga; Weinberger, Alycia J.

    2014-11-20

    We present Hubble Space Telescope Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph far-UV spectra of the edge-on disk around 49 Ceti, one of the very few debris disks showing submillimeter CO emission. Many atomic absorption lines are present in the spectra, most of which arise from circumstellar gas lying along the line-of-sight to the central star. We determined the line-of-sight C I column density, estimated the total carbon column density, and set limits on the O I column density. Surprisingly, no line-of-sight CO absorption was seen. We discuss possible explanations for this non-detection, and present preliminary estimates of the carbon abundances in the line-of-sight gas. The C/Fe ratio is much greater than the solar value, suggesting that 49 Cet harbors a volatile-rich gas disk similar to that of ? Pictoris.

  14. AN ENIGMATIC POINT-LIKE FEATURE WITHIN THE HD169142 TRANSITIONAL DISK ,

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biller, Beth A.; Males, Jared; Morzinski, Katie; Close, Laird M.; Follette, Katherine B.; Hinz, Philip M.; Rodigas, Timothy; Weinberger, Alycia; Juhsz, Attila; Lacour, Sylvestre; Henning, Thomas; Pott, Jrg-Uwe; Khler, Rainer; Bonnefoy, Mickal

    2014-09-01

    We report the detection of a faint point-like feature possibly related to ongoing planet-formation in the disk of the transition disk star HD169142. The point-like feature has a ?mag(L)? 6.4, at a separation of ?0.''11 and position angle ?0. Given its lack of an H or K{sub S} counterpart despite its relative brightness, this candidate cannot be explained by purely photospheric emission and must be a disk feature heated by an as yet unknown source. Its extremely red colors make it highly unlikely to be a background object, but future multi-wavelength follow up is necessary for confirmation and characterization of this feature.

  15. SPIN EVOLUTION OF ACCRETING YOUNG STARS. I. EFFECT OF MAGNETIC STAR-DISK COUPLING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matt, Sean P.; Greene, Thomas P.; Pinzon, Giovanni; De la Reza, Ramiro E-mail: thomas.p.greene@nasa.go E-mail: delareza@on.b

    2010-05-10

    We present a model for the rotational evolution of a young, solar mass star interacting with an accretion disk. The model incorporates a description of the angular momentum transfer between the star and the disk due to a magnetic connection, and includes changes in the star's mass and radius and a decreasing accretion rate. The model also includes, for the first time in a spin evolution model, the opening of the stellar magnetic field lines, as expected to arise from twisting via star-disk differential rotation. In order to isolate the effect that this has on the star-disk interaction torques, we neglect the influence of torques that may arise from open field regions connected to the star or disk. For a range of magnetic field strengths, accretion rates, and initial spin rates, we compute the stellar spin rates of pre-main-sequence stars as they evolve on the Hayashi track to an age of 3 Myr. How much the field opening affects the spin depends on the strength of the coupling of the magnetic field to the disk. For the relatively strong coupling (i.e., high magnetic Reynolds number) expected in real systems, all models predict spin periods of less than {approx}3 days, in the age range of 1-3 Myr. Furthermore, these systems typically do not reach an equilibrium spin rate within 3 Myr, so that the spin at any given time depends upon the choice of initial spin rate. This corroborates earlier suggestions that, in order to explain the full range of observed rotation periods of approximately 1-10 days, additional processes, such as the angular momentum loss from powerful stellar winds, are necessary.

  16. THE MINERALOGY AND STRUCTURE OF THE INNER DEBRIS DISK OF {beta} PICTORIS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li Dan; Telesco, Charles M.; Wright, Christopher M.

    2012-11-10

    We observed the edge-on, planet-bearing disk of {beta} Pictoris using T-ReCS at Gemini to clarify and extend previous observations and conclusions about this unique system. Our spectroscopy and spectral modeling of the 10 {mu}m silicate feature constrain the spatial distributions of three representative dust components (0.1 {mu}m/2.0 {mu}m glassy olivine and crystalline forsterite) across the inner 20 AU of the disk. We confirm that the 2.0 {mu}m glassy olivine is strongly peaked in the disk center and that the 0.1 {mu}m glassy olivine does not show this concentration, but rather is double peaked, with the peaks on either side of the star. However, we do not see the strong difference in brightness between those two peaks reported in a previous study. Although the spatial distribution of the 0.1 {mu}m dust is consistent with the scenario of a dust-replenishing planetesimal belt embedded in the disk, we note an alternative interpretation that can explain the spatial distributions of the 0.1 {mu}m and 2.0 {mu}m grains simultaneously and does not require the planetesimal belt. In addition to the spectroscopy, we also obtained a new 11.7 {mu}m image of the {beta} Pic disk. By comparing this image with that acquired in 2003, we confirm the existence and overall shape of the dusty clump at 52 AU in the SW disk. We speculate that the clump's projected spatial displacement of {approx}2.0 AU, a 3.6{sigma} result, between two epochs separated by seven years is due to the Keplerian motion of the clump at an orbital radius of 54.3{sup +2.0} {sub -1.2} AU.

  17. EXTREME GAS FRACTIONS IN CLUMPY, TURBULENT DISK GALAXIES AT z ∼ 0.1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fisher, David B.; Glazebrook, Karl; Bassett, Robert; Bolatto, Alberto; Obreschkow, Danail; Cooper, Erin Mentuch; Wisnioski, Emily; Abraham, Roberto G.; Damjanov, Ivana; Green, Andy; McGregor, Peter

    2014-08-01

    In this Letter, we report the discovery of CO fluxes, suggesting very high gas fractions in three disk galaxies seen in the nearby universe (z ∼ 0.1). These galaxies were investigated as part of the DYnamics of Newly Assembled Massive Objects (DYNAMO) survey. High-resolution Hubble Space Telescope imaging of these objects reveals the presence of large star forming clumps in the bodies of the galaxies, while spatially resolved spectroscopy of redshifted Hα reveals the presence of high dispersion rotating disks. The internal dynamical state of these galaxies resembles that of disk systems seen at much higher redshifts (1 < z < 3). Using CO(1-0) observations made with the Plateau de Bure Interferometer, we find gas fractions of 20%-30% and depletion times of t {sub dep} ∼ 0.5 Gyr (assuming a Milky-Way-like α{sub CO}). These properties are unlike those expected for low-redshift galaxies of comparable specific star formation rate, but they are normal for their high-z counterparts. DYNAMO galaxies break the degeneracy between gas fraction and redshift, and we show that the depletion time per specific star formation rate for galaxies is closely tied to gas fraction, independent of redshift. We also show that the gas dynamics of two of our local targets corresponds to those expected from unstable disks, again resembling the dynamics of high-z disks. These results provide evidence that DYNAMO galaxies are local analogs to the clumpy, turbulent disks, which are often found at high redshift.

  18. The thickening of the thin disk in the third galactic quadrant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carraro, Giovanni; Vzquez, Rubn A.; Ahumada, Javier A.; Giorgi, Edgar E. E-mail: rvazquez@fcaglp.unlp.edu.ar E-mail: javier@oac.uncor.edu

    2015-01-01

    In the third Galactic quadrant (180{sup ?}?l?270{sup ?}) of the Milky Way, the Galactic thin disk exhibits a significant warpshown both by gas and young starsbending down a few kiloparsecs below the formal Galactic plane (b=0{sup ?}). This warp shows its maximum at l?240{sup ?}, in the direction of the Canis Major constellation. In a series of papers, we have traced the detailed structure of this region using open star clusters, putting particular emphasis on the spiral structure of the outer disk. We noted a conspicuous accumulation of young star clusters within 23 kpc from the Sun and close to b = 0, which we interpreted as the continuation of the Local (Orion) arm toward the outer disk. While most clusters (and young stars in their background) closely follow the warp of the disk, our decade-old survey of the spiral structure of this region led us to identify three clusters, Haffner 18 (1 and 2) and Haffner 19, which remain very close to b = 0 and lie at distances (4.5, ?8.0, and 6.4 kpc) where most of the material is already significantly warped. Here, we report on a search for clusters that share the same properties as Haffner 18 and 19, and investigate the possible reasons for such an unexpected occurrence. We present UBVRI photometry of five young clusters, namely NGC 2345, NGC 2374, Trumpler 9, Haffner 20, and Haffner 21, which also lie close to the formal Galactic plane. With the exception of Haffner 20, in the background of these clusters we detected young stars that appear close to b=0{sup ?} and are located at distances up to ?8 kpc from the Sun, thus deviating significantly from the warp. These populations define a structure that distributes over almost the entire third Galactic quadrant. We discuss this structure in the context of a possible thin disk flaring, similar to the Galactic thick disk.

  19. Reprocessing of ices in turbulent protoplanetary disks: Carbon and nitrogen chemistry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Furuya, Kenji; Aikawa, Yuri

    2014-08-01

    We study the influence of the turbulent transport on ice chemistry in protoplanetary disks, focusing on carbon- and nitrogen-bearing molecules. Chemical rate equations are solved with the diffusion term, mimicking the turbulent mixing in the vertical direction. Turbulence can bring ice-coated dust grains from the midplane to the warm irradiated disk surface, and the ice mantles are reprocessed by photoreactions, thermal desorption, and surface reactions. The upward transport decreases the abundance of methanol and ammonia ices at r ? 30 AU because warm dust temperature prohibits their reformation on grain surfaces. This reprocessing could explain the smaller abundances of carbon and nitrogen bearing molecules in cometary coma than those in low-mass protostellar envelopes. We also show the effect of mixing on the synthesis of complex organic molecules (COMs) in two ways: (1) transport of ices from the midplane to the disk surface and (2) transport of atomic hydrogen from the surface to the midplane. The former enhances the COMs formation in the disk surface, while the latter suppresses it in the midplane. Then, when mixing is strong, COMs are predominantly formed in the disk surface, while their parent molecules are (re)formed in the midplane. This cycle expands the COMs distribution both vertically and radially outward compared with that in the non-turbulent model. We derive the timescale of the sink mechanism by which CO and N{sub 2} are converted to less volatile molecules to be depleted from the gas phase and find that the vertical mixing suppresses this mechanism in the inner disks.

  20. VARIABILITY OF DISK EMISSION IN PRE-MAIN SEQUENCE AND RELATED STARS. III. EXPLORING STRUCTURAL CHANGES IN THE PRE-TRANSITIONAL DISK IN HD169142

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wagner, Kevin R.; Sitko, Michael L.; Swearingen, Jeremy R.; Champney, Elizabeth H.; Johnson, Alexa N.; Werren, Chelsea; Grady, Carol A.; Whitney, Barbara A.; Russell, Ray W.; Schneider, Glenn H.; Momose, Munetake; Muto, Takayuki; Inoue, Akio K.; Lauroesch, James T.; Hornbeck, Jeremy; Brown, Alexander; Fukagawa, Misato; Currie, Thayne M.; Wisniewski, John P.; Woodgate, Bruce E. E-mail: sitkoml@ucmail.uc.edu E-mail: ehchampney@gmail.com E-mail: ccwerren@yahoo.com E-mail: bwhitney@astro.wisc.edu

    2015-01-10

    We present near-IR (NIR) and far-UV observations of the pre-transitional (gapped) disk in HD169142 using NASA's Infrared Telescope Facility and Hubble Space Telescope. The combination of our data along with existing data sets into the broadband spectral energy distribution reveals variability of up to 45% between ?1.5-10 ?m over a maximum timescale of 10yr. All observations known to us separate into two distinct states corresponding to a high near-IR state in the pre-2000 epoch and a low state in the post-2000 epoch, indicating activity within the ?1 AU region of the disk. Through analysis of the Pa ? and Br ? lines in our data we derive a mass accretion rate in 2013 May of M-dot ? (1.5-2.7) 10{sup 9} M {sub ?} yr{sup 1}. We present a theoretical modeling analysis of the disk in HD169142 using Monte-Carlo radiative transfer simulation software to explore the conditions and perhaps signs of planetary formation in our collection of 24yr of observations. We find that shifting the outer edge (r ? 0.3 AU) of the inner disk by 0.05 AU toward the star (in simulation of accretion and/or sculpting by forming planets) successfully reproduces the shift in NIR flux. We establish that the ?40-70 AU dark ring imaged in the NIR by Quanz et al. and Momose et al. and at 7mm by Osorio et al. may be reproduced with a 30% scaled density profile throughout the region, strengthening the link to this structure being dynamically cleared by one or more planetary mass bodies.

  1. Device for testing closure disks at high rates of change of pressure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Merten, C.W. Jr.

    1993-11-09

    A device is described for testing the burst pressure of closure disks which provides high pressure to both sides of a disk and rapidly releases pressure from one side thereof causing a high rate of change of pressure. A hollow notched plug allows the rapid release of pressure upon rupturing. A means is also disclosed for transmitting a tensile load from a piston to a hollow notched plug and for sealing the means for transmitting load within a hole in a piston. 5 figures.

  2. THE MERGER RATE OF BINARY WHITE DWARFS IN THE GALACTIC DISK (Journal

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Article) | SciTech Connect THE MERGER RATE OF BINARY WHITE DWARFS IN THE GALACTIC DISK Citation Details In-Document Search Title: THE MERGER RATE OF BINARY WHITE DWARFS IN THE GALACTIC DISK We use multi-epoch spectroscopy of {approx}4000 white dwarfs in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey to constrain the properties of the Galactic population of binary white dwarf systems and calculate their merger rate. With a Monte Carlo code, we model the distribution of {Delta}RV{sub max}, the maximum radial

  3. The Herschel cold debris disks: Confusion with the extragalactic background at 160 ?m

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gspr, Andrs; Rieke, George H. [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States)

    2014-03-20

    The Herschel 'DUst around NEarby Stars' (DUNES) survey has found a number of debris disk candidates that are apparently very cold, with temperatures near 22 K. It has proven difficult to fit their spectral energy distributions with conventional models for debris disks. Given this issue, we carefully examine the alternative explanation that the detections arise from confusion with infrared cirrus and/or background galaxies that are not physically associated with the foreground stars. We find that such an explanation is consistent with all of these detections.

  4. The Majorana low-noise low-background front-end electronics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abgrall, N.; Aguayo, E.; Avignone, III, F. T.; Barabash, A. S.; Bertrand, F. E.; Boswell, M.; Brudanin, V.; Busch, M.; Byram, D.; Caldwell, A. S.; Chan, Y. -D.; Christofferson, C. D.; Combs, D. C.; Cuesta, C.; Detwiler, J. A.; Doe, P. J.; Efremenko, Yu.; Egorov, V.; Ejiri, H.; Elliott, S. R.; Fast, J. E.; Finnerty, P.; Fraenkle, F. M.; Galindo-Uribarri, A.; Giovanetti, G. K.; Goett, J.; Green, M. P.; Gruszko, J.; Guiseppe, V. E.; Gusev, K.; Hallin, A. L.; Hazama, R.; Hegai, A.; Henning, R.; Hoppe, E. W.; Howard, S.; Howe, M. A.; Keeter, K. J.; Kidd, M. F.; Kochetov, O.; Konovalov, S. I.; Kouzes, R. T.; LaFerriere, B. D.; Leon, J.; Leviner, L. E.; Loach, J. C.; MacMullin, J.; MacMullin, S.; Martin, R. D.; Meijer, S.; Mertens, S.; Nomachi, M.; Orrell, J. L.; O'Shaughnessy, C.; Overman, N. R.; Phillips, II, D. G.; Poon, A. W.P.; Pushkin, K.; Radford, D. C.; Rager, J.; Rielage, K.; Robertson, R. G.H.; Romero-Romero, E.; Ronquest, M. C.; Schubert, A. G.; Shanks, B.; Shima, T.; Shirchenko, M.; Snavely, K. J.; Snyder, N.; Suriano, A. M.; Thompson, J.; Timkin, V.; Tornow, W.; Trimble, J. E.; Varner, R. L.; Vasilyev, S.; Vetter, K.; Vorren, K.; White, B. R.; Wilkerson, J. F.; Wiseman, C.; Xu, W.; Yakushev, E.; Young, A. R.; Yu, C. -H.; Yumatov, V.

    2015-03-24

    The Majorana Demonstrator will search for the neutrinoless double beta decay (??(0?)) of the isotope ??Ge with a mixed array of enriched and natural germanium detectors. In view of the next generation of tonne-scale germanium-based ??(0?)-decay searches, a major goal of the Majorana Demonstrator is to demonstrate a path forward to achieving a background rate at or below 1 cnt/(ROI-t-y) in the 4 keV region of interest (ROI) around the 2039-keV Q-value of the ??Ge ??(0?)-decay. Such a requirement on the background level significantly constrains the design of the readout electronics, which is further driven by noise and energy resolution performances. We present here the low-noise low-background front-end electronics developed for the low-capacitance p-type point contact (P-PC) germanium detectors of the Majorana Demonstrator. This resistive-feedback front-end, specifically designed to have low mass, is fabricated on a radioassayed fused-silica substrate where the feedback resistor consists of a sputtered thin film of high purity amorphous germanium and the feedback capacitor is based on the capacitance between gold conductive traces.

  5. Front-end Electronics for Unattended Measurement (FEUM). Results of Prototype Evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Conrad, Ryan C.; Keller, Daniel T.; Morris, Scott J.; Smith, Leon E.

    2015-07-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) deploys unattended monitoring systems to provide continuous monitoring of nuclear material within safeguarded facilities around the world. As the number of unattended monitoring instruments increases, the IAEA is challenged to become more efficient in the implementation of those systems. In 2010, the IAEA initiated the Front-End Electronics for Unattended Measurement (FEUM) project with the goals of greater flexibility in the interfaces to various sensors and data acquisition systems, and improved capabilities for remotely located sensors (e.g., where sensor and front-end electronics might be separated by tens of meters). In consultation with the IAEA, a technical evaluation of a candidate FEUM device produced by a commercial vendor has been performed. This evaluation assessed the device against the IAEAs original technical specifications and a broad range of important parameters that include sensor types, cable lengths and types, industrial electromagnetic noise that can degrade signals from remotely located detectors, and high radiation fields. Testing data, interpretation, findings and recommendations are provided.

  6. Adapting wave-front algorithms to efficiently utilize systems with deep communication hierarchies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kerbyson, Darren J; Lang, Michael; Pakin, Scott

    2009-01-01

    Large-scale systems increasingly exhibit a differential between intra-chip and inter-chip communication performance. Processor-cores on the same socket are able to communicate at lower latencies, and with higher bandwidths, than cores on different sockets either within the same node or between nodes. A key challenge is to efficiently use this communication hierarchy and hence optimize performance. We consider here the class of applications that contain wave-front processing. In these applications data can only be processed after their upstream neighbors have been processed. Similar dependencies result between processors in which communication is required to pass boundary data downstream and whose cost is typically impacted by the slowest communication channel in use. In this work we develop a novel hierarchical wave-front approach that reduces the use of slower communications in the hierarchy but at the cost of additional computation and higher use of on-chip communications. This tradeoff is explored using a performance model and an implementation on the Petascale Roadrunner system demonstrates a 27% performance improvement at full system-scale on a kernel application. The approach is generally applicable to large-scale multi-core and accelerated systems where a differential in system communication performance exists.

  7. On the structure of quasi-stationary laser ablation fronts in strongly radiating plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Basko, M. M. Novikov, V. G.; Grushin, A. S.

    2015-05-15

    The effect of strong thermal radiation on the structure of quasi-stationary laser ablation fronts is investigated under the assumption that all the laser flux is absorbed at the critical surface. Special attention is paid to adequate formulation of the boundary-value problem for a steady-state planar ablation flow. The dependence of the laser-to-x-ray conversion efficiency ϕ{sub r} on the laser intensity I{sub L} and wavelength λ{sub L} is analyzed within the non-equilibrium diffusion approximation for radiation transfer. The scaling of the main ablation parameters with I{sub L} and λ{sub L} in the strongly radiative regime 1−ϕ{sub r}≪1 is derived. It is demonstrated that strongly radiating ablation fronts develop a characteristic extended cushion of “radiation-soaked” plasma between the condensed ablated material and the critical surface, which can efficiently suppress perturbations from the instabilities at the critical surface.

  8. The Majorana low-noise low-background front-end electronics

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abgrall, N.; Aguayo, E.; Avignone, III, F. T.; Barabash, A. S.; Bertrand, F. E.; Boswell, M.; Brudanin, V.; Busch, M.; Byram, D.; Caldwell, A. S.; et al

    2015-03-24

    The Majorana Demonstrator will search for the neutrinoless double beta decay (ββ(0ν)) of the isotope ⁷⁶Ge with a mixed array of enriched and natural germanium detectors. In view of the next generation of tonne-scale germanium-based ββ(0ν)-decay searches, a major goal of the Majorana Demonstrator is to demonstrate a path forward to achieving a background rate at or below 1 cnt/(ROI-t-y) in the 4 keV region of interest (ROI) around the 2039-keV Q-value of the ⁷⁶Ge ββ(0ν)-decay. Such a requirement on the background level significantly constrains the design of the readout electronics, which is further driven by noise and energy resolutionmore » performances. We present here the low-noise low-background front-end electronics developed for the low-capacitance p-type point contact (P-PC) germanium detectors of the Majorana Demonstrator. This resistive-feedback front-end, specifically designed to have low mass, is fabricated on a radioassayed fused-silica substrate where the feedback resistor consists of a sputtered thin film of high purity amorphous germanium and the feedback capacitor is based on the capacitance between gold conductive traces.« less

  9. Low temperature front surface passivation of interdigitated back contact silicon heterojunction solar cell

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shu, Brent; Das, Ujjwal; Jani, Omkar; Hegedus, Steve; Birkmire, Robert

    2009-06-08

    The interdigitated back contact silicon heterojunction (IBC-SHJ) solar cell requires a low temperature front surface passivation/anti-reflection structure. Conventional silicon surface passivation using SiO2 or a-SiNx is performed at temperature higher than 400C, which is not suitable for the IBC-SHJ cell. In this paper, we propose a PECVD a-Si:H/a-SiNx:H/a-SiC:H stack structure to passivate the front surface of crystalline silicon at low temperature. The optical properties and passivation quality of this structure are characterized and solar cells using this structure are fabricated. With 2 nm a-Si:H layer, the stack structure exhibits stable passivation with effective minority carrier lifetime higher than 2 ms, and compatible with IBC-SHJ solar cell processing. A critical advantage of this structure is that the SiC allows it to be HF resistant, thus it can be deposited as the first step in the process. This protects the a-Si/c-Si interface and maintains a low surface recombination velocity.

  10. Top Ten Reasons for DEOX as a Front End to Pyroprocessing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    B.R. Westphal; K.J. Bateman; S.D. Herrmann

    2007-11-01

    A front end step is being considered to augment chopping during the treatment of spent oxide fuel by pyroprocessing. The front end step, termed DEOX for its emphasis on decladding via oxidation, employs high temperatures to promote the oxidation of UO2 to U3O8 via an oxygen carrier gas. During oxidation, the spent fuel experiences a 30% increase in lattice structure volume resulting in the separation of fuel from cladding with a reduced particle size. A potential added benefit of DEOX is the removal of fission products, either via direct release from the broken fuel structure or via oxidation and volatilization by the high temperature process. Fuel element chopping is the baseline operation to prepare spent oxide fuel for an electrolytic reduction step. Typical chopping lengths range from 1 to 5 mm for both individual elements and entire assemblies. During electrolytic reduction, uranium oxide is reduced to metallic uranium via a lithium molten salt. An electrorefining step is then performed to separate a majority of the fission products from the recoverable uranium. Although DEOX is based on a low temperature oxidation cycle near 500oC, additional conditions have been tested to distinguish their effects on the process.[1] Both oxygen and air have been utilized during the oxidation portion followed by vacuum conditions to temperatures as high as 1200oC. In addition, the effects of cladding on fission product removal have also been investigated with released fuel to temperatures greater than 500oC.

  11. OGLE-LMC-ECL-11893: The discovery of a long-period eclipsing binary with a circumstellar disk

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dong, Subo; Katz, Boaz; Prieto, Jose L.; Udalski, Andrzej; Kozlowski, Szymon; Street, R. A.; Tsapras, Y.; Bramich, D. M.; Hundertmark, M.; Horne, K.; Dominik, M.; Jaimes, R. Figuera; Snodgrass, C.

    2014-06-10

    We report the serendipitous discovery of a disk-eclipse system OGLE-LMC-ECL-11893. The eclipse occurs with a period of 468 days, a duration of about 15 days, and a deep (up to ?m{sub I} ? 1.5), peculiar, and asymmetric profile. A possible origin of such an eclipse profile involves a circumstellar disk. The presence of the disk is confirmed by the H-? line profile from the follow-up spectroscopic observations, and the star is identified as Be/Ae type. Unlike the previously known disk-eclipse candidates, the eclipses of OGLE-LMC-ECL-11893 retain the same shape throughout the span of ?17 yr (13 orbital periods), indicating no measurable orbital precession of the disk.

  12. Cast Stone Oxidation Front Evaluation: Preliminary Results For Samples Exposed To Moist Air

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Langton, C. A.; Almond, P. M.

    2013-11-26

    The rate of oxidation is important to the long-term performance of reducing salt waste forms because the solubility of some contaminants, e.g., technetium, is a function of oxidation state. TcO{sub 4}{sup −} in the salt solution is reduced to Tc(IV) and has been shown to react with ingredients in the waste form to precipitate low solubility sulfide and/or oxide phases. Upon exposure to oxygen, the compounds containing Tc(IV) oxidize to the pertechnetate ion, Tc(VII)O{sub 4}{sup −}, which is very soluble. Consequently the rate of technetium oxidation front advancement into a monolith and the technetium leaching profile as a function of depth from an exposed surface are important to waste form performance and ground water concentration predictions. An approach for measuring contaminant oxidation rate (effective contaminant specific oxidation rate) based on leaching of select contaminants of concern is described in this report. In addition, the relationship between reduction capacity and contaminant oxidation is addressed. Chromate (Cr(VI) was used as a non-radioactive surrogate for pertechnetate, Tc(VII), in Cast Stone samples prepared with 5 M Simulant. Cast Stone spiked with pertechnetate was also prepared and tested. Depth discrete subsamples spiked with Cr were cut from Cast Stone exposed to Savannah River Site (SRS) outdoor ambient temperature fluctuations and moist air. Depth discrete subsamples spiked with Tc-99 were cut from Cast Stone exposed to laboratory ambient temperature fluctuations and moist air. Similar conditions are expected to be encountered in the Cast Stone curing container. The leachability of Cr and Tc-99 and the reduction capacities, measured by the Angus-Glasser method, were determined for each subsample as a function of depth from the exposed surface. The results obtained to date were focused on continued method development and are preliminary and apply to the sample composition and curing / exposure conditions described in this report. The Cr oxidation front (depth to which soluble Cr was detected) for the Cast Stone sample exposed for 68 days to ambient outdoor temperatures and humid air (total age of sample was 131 days) was determined to be about 35 mm below the top sample surface exposed. The Tc oxidation front, depth at which Tc was insoluble, was not determined. Interpretation of the results indicates that the oxidation front is at least 38 mm below the exposed surface. The sample used for this measurement was exposed to ambient laboratory conditions and humid air for 50 days. The total age of the sample was 98 days. Technetium appears to be more easily oxidized than Cr in the Cast Stone matrix. The oxidized forms of Tc and Cr are soluble and therefore leachable. Longer exposure times are required for both the Cr and Tc spiked samples to better interpret the rate of oxidation. Tc spiked subsamples need to be taken further from the exposed surface to better define and interpret the leachable Tc profile. Finally Tc(VII) reduction to Tc(IV) appears to occur relatively fast. Results demonstrated that about 95 percent of the Tc(VII) was reduced to Tc(IV) during the setting and very early stage setting for a Cast Stone sample cured 10 days. Additional testing at longer curing times is required to determine whether additional time is required to reduce 100 % of the Tc(VII) in Cast Stone or whether the Tc loading exceeded the ability of the waste form to reduce 100 % of the Tc(VII). Additional testing is required for samples cured for longer times. Depth discrete subsampling in a nitrogen glove box is also required to determine whether the 5 percent Tc extracted from the subsamples was the result of the sampling process which took place in air. Reduction capacity measurements (per the Angus-Glasser method) performed on depth discrete samples could not be correlated with the amount of chromium or technetium leached from the depth discrete subsamples or with the oxidation front inferred from soluble chromium and technetium (i.e., effective Cr and Tc oxidation fronts). Residual reduction capacity in the oxidized region of the test samples indicates that the remaining reduction capacity is not effective in re-reducing Cr(VI) or Tc(VII) in the presence of oxygen. Depth discrete sampling and leaching is a useful for evaluating Cast Stone and other chemically reducing waste forms containing ground granulated blast furnace slag (GGBFS) or other reduction / sequestration reagents to control redox sensitive contaminant chemistry and leachability in the near surface disposal environment. Based on results presented in this report, reduction capacity measured by the Angus-Glasser Ce(IV) method is not an appropriate or meaningful parameter for determining or predicting Tc and Cr oxidation / retentions, speciation, or solubilities in cementitious materials such as Cast Stone. A model for predicting Tc(IV) oxidation to soluble Tc(VII) should consider the waste form porosity (pathway for oxygen ingress), oxygen source, and the contaminant specific oxidation rates and oxidation fronts. Depth discrete sampling of materials exposed to realistic conditions in combination with short term leaching of crushed samples has potential for advancing the understanding of factors influencing performance. This information can be used to support conceptual model development.

  13. Relativistic static thin dust disks with an inner edge: An infinite family of new exact solutions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gonzalez, Guillermo A.; Gutierrez-Pineres, Antonio C.; Vina-Cervantes, Viviana M.

    2009-06-15

    An infinite family of new exact solutions of the vacuum Einstein equations is presented. The solutions are static and axially symmetric and correspond to an infinite family of thin dust disks with a central inner edge. The metric functions of all the solutions can be explicitly computed, and can be expressed in a simple manner in terms of oblate spheroidal coordinates. The energy density of all the disks of the family is positive everywhere and well behaved, so that the corresponding energy-momentum tensor is in full agreement with all the energy conditions. Moreover, although the total mass of the disks is infinite, the solutions are asymptotically flat and the Riemann tensor is regular everywhere, as it is shown by computing the curvature scalars. Now, besides its importance as a new family of exact solutions of the vacuum Einstein equations, the main importance of this family of solutions is that it can be easily superposed with the Schwarzschild solution in order to describe thin disks surrounding a central black hole. Accordingly, a detailed analysis of this superposition will be presented in a subsequent paper.

  14. OCCULTATION OF THE T TAURI STAR RW AURIGAE A BY ITS TIDALLY DISRUPTED DISK

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rodriguez, Joseph E.; Stassun, Keivan G.; Pepper, Joshua; Siverd, Robert J.; Cargile, Phillip; Beatty, Thomas G.; Gaudi, B. Scott

    2013-11-01

    RW Aur A is a classical T Tauri star, believed to have undergone a reconfiguration of its circumstellar environment as a consequence of a recent flyby of its stellar companion, RW Aur B. This interaction stripped away part of the circumstellar disk of RW Aur A, leaving a tidally disrupted ''arm'' and a short truncated circumstellar disk. We present photometric observations of the RW Aur system from the Kilodegree Extremely Little Telescope survey showing a long and deep dimming that occurred from 2010 September until 2011 March. The dimming has a depth of ?2 mag, a duration of ?180 days, and was confirmed by archival observations from American Association of Variable Star Observers. We suggest that this event is the result of a portion of the tidally disrupted disk occulting RW Aur A, specifically a fragment of the tidally disrupted arm. The calculated transverse linear velocity of the occulter is in excellent agreement with the measured relative radial velocity of the tidally disrupted arm. Using simple kinematic and geometric arguments, we show that the occulter cannot be a feature of the RW Aur A circumstellar disk, and we consider and discount other hypotheses. We also place constraints on the thickness and semimajor axis of the portion of the arm that occulted the star.

  15. THE LINK BETWEEN LIGHT AND MASS IN LATE-TYPE SPIRAL GALAXY DISKS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swaters, Robert A.; Bershady, Matthew A.; Martinsson, Thomas P. K.; Westfall, Kyle B.; Andersen, David R.; Verheijen, Marc A. W.

    2014-12-20

    We present the correlation between the extrapolated central disk surface brightness (?) and extrapolated central surface mass density (?) for galaxies in the DiskMass sample. This ?-? relation has a small scatter of 30% at the high surface brightness (HSB) end. At the low surface brightness (LSB) end, galaxies fall above the ?-? relation, which we attribute to their higher dark matter content. After correcting for the dark matter as well as for the contribution of gas and the effects of radial gradients in the disk, the LSB end falls back on the linear ?-? relation. The resulting scatter around the corrected ?-? relation is 25% at the HSB end and about 50% at the LSB end. The intrinsic scatter in the ?-? relation is estimated to be 10%-20%. Thus, if ? {sub K,} {sub 0} is known, the stellar surface mass density is known to within 10%-20% (random error). Assuming disks have an exponential vertical distribution of mass, the average ?{sub ?}{sup K} is 0.24 M {sub ?}/L {sub ?}, with an intrinsic scatter around the mean of at most 0.05 M {sub ?}/L {sub ?}. This value for ?{sub ?}{sup K} is 20% smaller than we found in Martinsson et al., mainly due to the correction for dark matter applied here. This small scatter means that among the galaxies in our sample, variations in scale height, vertical density profile shape, and/or the ratio of vertical over radial velocity dispersion must be small.

  16. SURVIVAL OF INTERSTELLAR MOLECULES TO PRESTELLAR DENSE CORE COLLAPSE AND EARLY PHASES OF DISK FORMATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hincelin, U.; Wakelam, V.; Hersant, F.; Guilloteau, S.; Commerçon, B.

    2013-09-20

    An outstanding question of astrobiology is the link between the chemical composition of planets, comets, and other solar system bodies and the molecules formed in the interstellar medium. Understanding the chemical and physical evolution of the matter leading to the formation of protoplanetary disks is an important step for this. We provide some new clues to this long-standing problem using three-dimensional chemical simulations of the early phases of disk formation: we interfaced the full gas-grain chemical model Nautilus with the radiation-magnetohydrodynamic model RAMSES, for different configurations and intensities of the magnetic field. Our results show that the chemical content (gas and ices) is globally conserved during the collapsing process, from the parent molecular cloud to the young disk surrounding the first Larson core. A qualitative comparison with cometary composition suggests that comets are constituted of different phases, some molecules being direct tracers of interstellar chemistry, while others, including complex molecules, seem to have been formed in disks, where higher densities and temperatures allow for an active grain surface chemistry. The latter phase, and its connection with the formation of the first Larson core, remains to be modeled.

  17. Generation of magnetic field on the accretion disk around a proto-first-star

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shiromoto, Yuki; Susa, Hajime; Hosokawa, Takashi

    2014-02-20

    The generation process of a magnetic field around a proto-first-star is studied. Utilizing the recent numerical results of proto-first-star formation based on radiation hydrodynamics simulations, we assess the magnetic field strength generated by the radiative force and the Biermann battery effect. We find that a magnetic field of ∼10{sup –9} G is generated on the surface of the accretion disk around the proto-first-star. The field strength on the accretion disk is smaller by two orders of magnitude than the critical value, above which the gravitational fragmentation of the disk is suppressed. Thus, the generated seed magnetic field hardly affect the dynamics of on-site first star formation directly, unless an efficient amplification process is taken into consideration. We also find that the generated magnetic field is continuously blown out from the disk on the outflows to the poles, that are driven by the thermal pressure of photoheated gas. The strength of the diffused magnetic field in low-density regions is ∼10{sup –14}-10{sup –13} G at n {sub H} = 10{sup 3} cm{sup –3}, which could play an important role in the next generation star formation, as well as the seeds of the magnetic field in the present-day universe.

  18. THE STABILITY OF LOW SURFACE BRIGHTNESS DISKS BASED ON MULTI-WAVELENGTH MODELING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MacLachlan, J. M.; Wood, K.; Matthews, L. D.; Gallagher, J. S.

    2011-11-01

    To investigate the structure and composition of the dusty interstellar medium (ISM) of low surface brightness (LSB) disk galaxies, we have used multi-wavelength photometry to construct spectral energy distributions for three low-mass, edge-on LSB galaxies (V{sub rot} = 88-105 km s{sup -1}). We use Monte Carlo radiation transfer codes that include the effects of transiently heated small grains and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon molecules to model and interpret the data. We find that, unlike the high surface brightness galaxies previously modeled, the dust disks appear to have scale heights equal to or exceeding their stellar scale heights. This result supports the findings of previous studies that low-mass disk galaxies have dust scale heights comparable to their stellar scale heights and suggests that the cold ISM of low-mass, LSB disk galaxies may be stable against fragmentation and gravitational collapse. This may help to explain the lack of observed dust lanes in edge-on LSB galaxies and their low current star formation rates. Dust masses are found in the range (1.16-2.38) x 10{sup 6} M{sub sun}, corresponding to face-on (edge-on), V-band, optical depths 0.034 {approx}< {tau}{sub face} {approx}< 0.106 (0.69 {approx}< {tau}{sub eq} {approx}< 1.99).

  19. Residual stress and plastic anisotropy in indented 2024-T351 aluminum disks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clausen, Bjorn; Prime, Michael B; Saurabh, Kabra; Brown, Donald W; Pagliaro, Pierluigi; Backlund, Peter; Shaw, Sanjiv; Criss, Everett

    2009-01-01

    Recent studies have proven that generating a well defined residual stress state using the indented disk approach is an excellent way to validate experimental and modeling techniques for measuring and predicting residual stresses. The previous studies dealt with indented stainless steel disks, and included experimental determination of residual stresses using the Contour Method and neutron diffraction measurements. The measured residual stress states showed good agreement between the techniques, and a Finite Element Model predicted residual stress state based upon material properties determined form standard tension and compression/tension tests was also in good agreement with the measurements. In the present work, disks of 2024-T351 Aluminum were investigated. As before, the residual stress profile was measured using neutron diffraction and the Contour Method and Finite Element Modeling was employed to predict the residual stress profile. Analysis and comparison of the three techniques were complicated by the fact that the experimental data shows evidence of plastic anisotropy and strong Bauschinger effect within the indented disks.

  20. Thermal modeling of head disk interface system in heat assisted magnetic recording

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vemuri, Sesha Hari; Seung Chung, Pil; Jhon, Myung S., E-mail: mj3a@andrew.cmu.edu [Department of Chemical Engineering and Data Storage Systems Center, Carnegie Mellon University, 5000 Forbes Ave., Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213 (United States); Min Kim, Hyung [Department of Mechanical System Engineering, Kyonggi University, Suwon, Gyeonggi-do 440-746 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-07

    A thorough understanding of the temperature profiles introduced by the heat assisted magnetic recording is required to maintain the hotspot at the desired location on the disk with minimal heat damage to other components. Here, we implement a transient mesoscale modeling methodology termed lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) for phonons (which are primary carriers of energy) in the thermal modeling of the head disk interface (HDI) components, namely, carbon overcoat (COC). The LBM can provide more accurate results compared to conventional Fourier methodology by capturing the nanoscale phenomena due to ballistic heat transfer. We examine the in-plane and out-of-plane heat transfer in the COC via analyzing the temperature profiles with a continuously focused and pulsed laser beam on a moving disk. Larger in-plane hotspot widening is observed in continuously focused laser beam compared to a pulsed laser. A pulsed laser surface develops steeper temperature gradients compared to continuous hotspot. Furthermore, out-of-plane heat transfer from the COC to the media is enhanced with a continuous laser beam then a pulsed laser, while the temperature takes around 140 fs to reach the bottom surface of the COC. Our study can lead to a realistic thermal model describing novel HDI material design criteria for the next generation of hard disk drives with ultra high recording densities.

  1. Solid state laser disk amplifer architecture: the normal-incidence stack

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dane, C. Brent; Albrecht, Georg F.; Rotter, Mark D.

    2005-01-25

    Normal incidence stack architecture coupled with the development of diode array pumping enables the power/energy per disk to be increased, a reduction in beam distortions by orders of magnitude, a beam propagation no longer restricted to only one direction of polarization, and the laser becomes so much more amendable to robust packaging.

  2. CO/H{sub 2} abundance ratio ? 10{sup 4} in a protoplanetary disk

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    France, Kevin; McJunkin, Matthew; Herczeg, Gregory J.; Penton, Steven V.

    2014-10-20

    The relative abundances of atomic and molecular species in planet-forming disks around young stars provide important constraints on photochemical disk models and provide a baseline for calculating disk masses from measurements of trace species. A knowledge of absolute abundances, those relative to molecular hydrogen (H{sub 2}), are challenging because of the weak rovibrational transition ladder of H{sub 2} and the inability to spatially resolve different emission components within the circumstellar environment. To address both of these issues, we present new contemporaneous measurements of CO and H{sub 2} absorption through the 'warm molecular layer' of the protoplanetary disk around the Classical T Tauri Star RW Aurigae A. We use a newly commissioned observing mode of the Hubble Space Telescope Cosmic Origins Spectrograph to detect warm H{sub 2} absorption in this region for the first time. An analysis of the emission and absorption spectrum of RW Aur shows components from the accretion region near the stellar photosphere, the molecular disk, and several outflow components. The warm H{sub 2} and CO absorption lines are consistent with a disk origin. We model the 1092-1117 spectrum of RW Aur to derive log{sub 10} N(H{sub 2}) = 19.90{sub ?0.22}{sup +0.33} cm{sup 2} at T {sub rot}(H{sub 2}) = 440 39 K. The CO A - X bands observed from 1410 to 1520 are best fit by log{sub 10} N(CO) = 16.1 {sub ?0.5}{sup +0.3} cm{sup 2} at T {sub rot}(CO) = 200{sub ?125}{sup +650} K. Combining direct measurements of the H I, H{sub 2}, and CO column densities, we find a molecular fraction in the warm disk surface of f {sub H2} ? 0.47 and derive a molecular abundance ratio of CO/H{sub 2} = 1.6{sub ?1.3}{sup +4.7} 10{sup 4}, both consistent with canonical interstellar dense cloud values.

  3. STAR FORMATION IN THE EXTENDED GASEOUS DISK OF THE ISOLATED GALAXY CIG 96

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Espada, D.; Sabater, J.; Verdes-Montenegro, L.; Sulentic, J.; Munoz-Mateos, J. C.; Gil de Paz, A.; Verley, S.; Leon, S.

    2011-07-20

    We study the Kennicutt-Schmidt star formation law and efficiency in the gaseous disk of the isolated galaxy CIG 96 (NGC 864), with special emphasis on its unusually large atomic gas (H I) disk (r{sub Hmathsci}/r{sub 25} = 3.5, r{sub 25} = 1.'85). We present deep Galaxy Evolution Explorer near- and far-UV observations, used as a recent star formation tracer, and we compare them with new, high-resolution (16''or 1.6 kpc) Very Large Array H I observations. The UV and H I maps show good spatial correlation outside the inner 1', where the H I phase dominates over H{sub 2}. Star-forming regions in the extended gaseous disk are mainly located along the enhanced H I emission within two (relatively) symmetric, giant gaseous spiral arm-like features, which emulate an H I pseudo-ring at r {approx_equal} 3'. Inside this structure, two smaller gaseous spiral arms extend from the northeast and southwest of the optical disk and connect to the previously mentioned H I pseudo-ring. Interestingly, we find that the (atomic) Kennicutt-Schmidt power-law index systematically decreases with radius, from N {approx_equal} 3.0 {+-} 0.3 in the inner disk (0.'8-1.'7) to N = 1.6 {+-} 0.5 in the outskirts of the gaseous disk (3.'3-4.'2). Although the star formation efficiency (SFE), the star formation rate per unit of gas, decreases with radius where the H I component dominates as is common in galaxies, we find that there is a break of the correlation at r = 1.5r{sub 25}. At radii 1.5r{sub 25} < r < 3.5r{sub 25}, mostly within the H I pseudo-ring structure, regions exist whose SFE remains nearly constant, SFE {approx_equal} 10{sup -11} yr{sup -1}. We discuss possible mechanisms that might be triggering the star formation in the outskirts of this galaxy, and we suggest that the constant SFE for such large radii (r > 2r{sub 25}) and at such low surface densities might be a common characteristic in extended UV disk galaxies.

  4. ON RELATIVISTIC DISK SPECTROSCOPY IN COMPACT OBJECTS WITH X-RAY CCD CAMERAS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, J. M.; Cackett, E. M. [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, 500 Church Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); D'Ai, A. [Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche ed Astronomiche, Universita di Palermo, Palermo (Italy); Bautz, M. W.; Nowak, M. A. [Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, MIT, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Bhattacharyya, S. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Mumbai 400005 (India); Burrows, D. N.; Kennea, J. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Pennsylvania State University, 525 Davey Lab, College Park, PA 16802 (United States); Fabian, A. C.; Reis, R. C. [Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge, CB3 OHA (United Kingdom); Freyberg, M. J.; Haberl, F. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbachstrasse, 85748 Garching (Germany); Strohmayer, T. E. [Astrophysics Science Division, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Tsujimoto, M., E-mail: jonmm@umich.ed [Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, Institute of Space and Astronomical Sciences, 3-1-1 Yoshino-dai, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 229-8510 (Japan)

    2010-12-01

    X-ray charge-coupled devices (CCDs) are the workhorse detectors of modern X-ray astronomy. Typically covering the 0.3-10.0 keV energy range, CCDs are able to detect photoelectric absorption edges and K shell lines from most abundant metals. New CCDs also offer resolutions of 30-50 (E/{Delta}E), which is sufficient to detect lines in hot plasmas and to resolve many lines shaped by dynamical processes in accretion flows. The spectral capabilities of X-ray CCDs have been particularly important in detecting relativistic emission lines from the inner disks around accreting neutron stars and black holes. One drawback of X-ray CCDs is that spectra can be distorted by photon 'pile-up', wherein two or more photons may be registered as a single event during one frame time. We have conducted a large number of simulations using a statistical model of photon pile-up to assess its impacts on relativistic disk line and continuum spectra from stellar-mass black holes and neutron stars. The simulations cover the range of current X-ray CCD spectrometers and operational modes typically used to observe neutron stars and black holes in X-ray binaries. Our results suggest that severe photon pile-up acts to falsely narrow emission lines, leading to falsely large disk radii and falsely low spin values. In contrast, our simulations suggest that disk continua affected by severe pile-up are measured to have falsely low flux values, leading to falsely small radii and falsely high spin values. The results of these simulations and existing data appear to suggest that relativistic disk spectroscopy is generally robust against pile-up when this effect is modest.

  5. ON THE UNUSUAL GAS COMPOSITION IN THE {beta} PICTORIS DEBRIS DISK

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xie, Ji-Wei; Wu, Yanqin; Brandeker, Alexis E-mail: wu@astro.utoronto.ca

    2013-01-10

    The metallic gas associated with the {beta} Pic debris disk is not believed to be primordial, but arises from the destruction of dust grains. Recent observations have shown that carbon and oxygen in this gas are exceptionally overabundant compared to other elements, by some 400 times. We study the origin of this enrichment under two opposing hypotheses: preferential production, where the gas is produced with the observed unusual abundance (as may happen if gas is produced by photodesorption from C/O-rich icy grains), and preferential depletion, where the gas evolves to the observed state from an original solar abundance (if outgassing occurs under high-speed collisions) under a number of dynamical processes. We include in our study the following processes: radiative blowout of metallic elements, dynamical coupling between different species, and viscous accretion onto the star. We find that, if gas viscosity is sufficiently low (the conventional {alpha} parameter {approx}< 10{sup -3}), differential blowout dominates. While gas accumulates gradually in the disks, metallic elements subject to strong radiation forces, such as Na and Fe, deplete more quickly than C and O, naturally leading to the observed overabundance of C and O. On the other hand, if gas viscosity is high ({alpha} {approx}> 10{sup -1}, as expected for this largely ionized disk), gas is continuously produced and viscously accreted toward the star. This removal process does not discriminate between elements so the observed overabundance of C and O has to be explained by a preferential production that strongly favors C and O to other metallic elements. One such candidate is photodesorption off the grains. We compare our calculation against all observed elements ({approx}10) in the gas disk and find a mild preference for the second scenario, based on the abundance of Si alone. If true, {beta} Pic should still be accreting at an observable rate, well after its primordial disk has disappeared.

  6. Development of a transonic front stage of an axial flow compressor for industrial gas turbines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Katoh, Y.; Ishii, H.; Tsuda, Y.; Yanagida, M. . Mechanical Engineering Research Lab.); Kashiwabara, Y. . Dept. of Mechanical Systems Engineering)

    1994-10-01

    This paper describes the aerodynamic blade design of a highly loaded three-stage compressor, which is a model compressor for the front stage of an industrial gas turbine. Test results are presented that confirm design performance. Some surge and rotating stall measurement results are also discussed. The first stator blade in this test compressor operates in the high subsonic range at the inlet. To reduce the pressure loss due to blade surface shock waves, a shock-free airfoil is designed to replace the first stator blade in an NACA-65 airfoil in a three-stage compressor. Comparison of the performance of both blades shows that the shock-free airfoil blade reduces pressure loss. This paper also presents some experimental results for MCA (multicircular arc) airfoils, which are used for first rotor blades.

  7. Noise behavior of a 180-nm CMOS SOI technology for detector front-end electronics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Re, Valerio; Gaioni, Luigi; Manghisoni, Massimo; Ratti, Lodovico; Speziali, Valeria; Traversi, Gianluca; Yarema, Ray; /Fermilab

    2008-01-01

    This paper is motivated by the growing interest of the detector and readout electronics community towards silicon-on-insulator CMOS processes. Advanced SOI MOSFETs feature peculiar electrical characteristics impacting their performance with respect to bulk CMOS devices. Here we mainly focus on the study of these effects on the noise parameters of the transistors, using experimental data relevant to 180 nm fully depleted SOI devices as a reference. The comparison in terms of white and 1/f noise components with bulk MOSFETs with the same minimum feature size gives a basis of estimate for the signal-to-noise ratio achievable in detector front-end integrated circuits designed in an SOI technology.

  8. Development/Demonstration of an Advanced Oxy-Fuel Front-End System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mighton, Steven, J.

    2007-08-06

    Owens Corning and other glass manufacturers have used oxy-fuel combustion technology successfully in furnaces to reduce emissions, increase throughput, reduce fuel consumption and, depending on the costs of oxygen and fuel, reduce energy costs. The front end of a fiberglass furnace is the refractory channel system that delivers glass from the melter to the forming process. After the melter, it is the second largest user of energy in a fiberglass plant. A consortium of glass companies and suppliers, led by Owens Corning, was formed to develop and demonstrate oxy/fuel combustion technology for the front end of a fiberglass melter, to demonstrate the viability of this energy saving technology to the U.S. glass industry, as a D.O.E. sponsored project. The project goals were to reduce natural gas consumption and CO2 green house gas emissions by 65 to 70% and create net cost savings after the purchase of oxygen to achieve a project payback of less than 2 years. Project results in Jackson, TN included achieving a 56% reduction in gas consumption and CO2 emissions. A subsequent installation in Guelph ON, not impacted by unrelated operational changes in Jackson, achieved a 64% reduction. Using the more accurate 64% reduction in the payback calculation yielded a 2.2 year payback in Jackson. The installation of the demonstration combustion system saves 77,000 DT/yr of natural gas or 77 trillion Btu/yr and eliminates 4500 tons/yr of CO2 emissions. This combustion system is one of several energy and green house gas reduction technologies being adopted by Owens Corning to achieve aggressive goals relating to the companys global facility environmental footprint.

  9. Measures of the environmental footprint of the front end of the nuclear fuel cycle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    E. Schneider; B. Carlsen; E. Tavrides; C. van der Hoeven; U. Phathanapirom

    2013-11-01

    Previous estimates of environmental impacts associated with the front end of the nuclear fuel cycle (FEFC) have focused primarily on energy consumption and CO2 emissions. Results have varied widely. This work builds upon reports from operating facilities and other primary data sources to build a database of front end environmental impacts. This work also addresses land transformation and water withdrawals associated with the processes of the FEFC. These processes include uranium extraction, conversion, enrichment, fuel fabrication, depleted uranium disposition, and transportation. To allow summing the impacts across processes, all impacts were normalized per tonne of natural uranium mined as well as per MWh(e) of electricity produced, a more conventional unit for measuring environmental impacts that facilitates comparison with other studies. This conversion was based on mass balances and process efficiencies associated with the current once-through LWR fuel cycle. Total energy input is calculated at 8.7 x 10- 3 GJ(e)/MWh(e) of electricity and 5.9 x 10- 3 GJ(t)/MWh(e) of thermal energy. It is dominated by the energy required for uranium extraction, conversion to fluoride compound for subsequent enrichment, and enrichment. An estimate of the carbon footprint is made from the direct energy consumption at 1.7 kg CO2/MWh(e). Water use is likewise dominated by requirements of uranium extraction, totaling 154 L/MWh(e). Land use is calculated at 8 x 10- 3 m2/MWh(e), over 90% of which is due to uranium extraction. Quantified impacts are limited to those resulting from activities performed within the FEFC process facilities (i.e. within the plant gates). Energy embodied in material inputs such as process chemicals and fuel cladding is identified but not explicitly quantified in this study. Inclusion of indirect energy associated with embodied energy as well as construction and decommissioning of facilities could increase the FEFC energy intensity estimate by a factor of up to 2.

  10. The Light-Front Schrödinger Equation and Determination of the Perturbative QCD Scale from Color Confinement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; de Teramond, Guy F.; Deur, Alexandre P.; Dosch, Hans G.

    2015-09-01

    The valence Fock-state wavefunctions of the light-front QCD Hamiltonian satisfy a relativistic equation of motion with an effective confining potential U which systematically incorporates the effects of higher quark and gluon Fock states. If one requires that the effective action which underlies the QCD Lagrangian remains conformally invariant and extends the formalism of de Alfaro, Fubini and Furlan to light front Hamiltonian theory, the potential U has a unique form of a harmonic oscillator potential, and a mass gap arises. The result is a nonperturbative relativistic light-front quantum mechanical wave equation which incorporates color confinement and other essential spectroscopic and dynamical features of hadron physics, including a massless pion for zero quark mass and linear Regge trajectories with the same slope in the radial quantum number n and orbital angular momentum L. Only one mass parameter κ appears. Light-front holography thus provides a precise relation between the bound-state amplitudes in the fifth dimension of AdS space and the boost-invariant light-front wavefunctions describing the internal structure of hadrons in physical space-time. We also show how the mass scale κ underlying confinement and hadron masses determines the scale ΛMS¯¯¯¯ controlling the evolution of the perturbative QCD coupling. The relation between scales is obtained by matching the nonperturbative dynamics, as described by an effective conformal theory mapped to the light-front and its embedding in AdS space, to the perturbative QCD regime computed to four-loop order. The result is an effective coupling defined at all momenta. The predicted value ΛMS¯¯¯¯=0.328±0.034 GeV is in agreement with the world average 0.339±0.010 GeV. The analysis applies to any renormalization scheme.

  11. THE WIRED SURVEY. IV. NEW DUST DISKS FROM THE McCOOK and SION WHITE DWARF CATALOG

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoard, D. W.; Wachter, Stefanie; Debes, John H.; Leisawitz, David T.; Cohen, Martin

    2013-06-10

    We have compiled photometric data from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer All Sky Survey and other archival sources for the more than 2200 objects in the original McCook and Sion Catalog of Spectroscopically Identified White Dwarfs. We applied color-selection criteria to identify 28 targets whose infrared spectral energy distributions depart from the expectation for the white dwarf (WD) photosphere alone. Seven of these are previously known WDs with circumstellar dust disks, five are known central stars of planetary nebulae, and six were excluded for being known binaries or having possible contamination of their infrared photometry. We fit WD models to the spectral energy distributions of the remaining ten targets, and find seven new candidates with infrared excess suggesting the presence of a circumstellar dust disk. We compare the model dust disk properties for these new candidates with a comprehensive compilation of previously published parameters for known WDs with dust disks. It is possible that the current census of WDs with dust disks that produce an excess detectable at K-band and shorter wavelengths is close to complete for the entire sample of known WDs to the detection limits of existing near-IR all-sky surveys. The WD dust disk candidates now being found using longer wavelength infrared data are drawn from a previously underrepresented region of parameter space, in which the dust disks are overall cooler, narrower in radial extent, and/or contain fewer emitting grains.

  12. THE GEMINI PLANET-FINDING CAMPAIGN: THE FREQUENCY OF GIANT PLANETS AROUND DEBRIS DISK STARS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wahhaj, Zahed; Liu, Michael C.; Nielsen, Eric L.; Ftaclas, Christ; Chun, Mark; Biller, Beth A.; Hayward, Thomas L.; Thatte, Niranjan; Tecza, Matthias; Shkolnik, Evgenya L.; Kuchner, Marc; Reid, I. Neill; De Gouveia Dal Pino, Elisabete M.; Gregorio-Hetem, Jane; Boss, Alan; Lin, Douglas N. C.; and others

    2013-08-20

    We have completed a high-contrast direct imaging survey for giant planets around 57 debris disk stars as part of the Gemini NICI Planet-Finding Campaign. We achieved median H-band contrasts of 12.4 mag at 0.''5 and 14.1 mag at 1'' separation. Follow-up observations of the 66 candidates with projected separation <500 AU show that all of them are background objects. To establish statistical constraints on the underlying giant planet population based on our imaging data, we have developed a new Bayesian formalism that incorporates (1) non-detections, (2) single-epoch candidates, (3) astrometric and (4) photometric information, and (5) the possibility of multiple planets per star to constrain the planet population. Our formalism allows us to include in our analysis the previously known {beta} Pictoris and the HR 8799 planets. Our results show at 95% confidence that <13% of debris disk stars have a {>=}5 M{sub Jup} planet beyond 80 AU, and <21% of debris disk stars have a {>=}3 M{sub Jup} planet outside of 40 AU, based on hot-start evolutionary models. We model the population of directly imaged planets as d {sup 2} N/dMda{proportional_to}m {sup {alpha}} a {sup {beta}}, where m is planet mass and a is orbital semi-major axis (with a maximum value of a{sub max}). We find that {beta} < -0.8 and/or {alpha} > 1.7. Likewise, we find that {beta} < -0.8 and/or a{sub max} < 200 AU. For the case where the planet frequency rises sharply with mass ({alpha} > 1.7), this occurs because all the planets detected to date have masses above 5 M{sub Jup}, but planets of lower mass could easily have been detected by our search. If we ignore the {beta} Pic and HR 8799 planets (should they belong to a rare and distinct group), we find that <20% of debris disk stars have a {>=}3 M{sub Jup} planet beyond 10 AU, and {beta} < -0.8 and/or {alpha} < -1.5. Likewise, {beta} < -0.8 and/or a{sub max} < 125 AU. Our Bayesian constraints are not strong enough to reveal any dependence of the planet frequency on stellar host mass. Studies of transition disks have suggested that about 20% of stars are undergoing planet formation; our non-detections at large separations show that planets with orbital separation >40 AU and planet masses >3 M{sub Jup} do not carve the central holes in these disks.

  13. The diskmass survey. VIII. On the relationship between disk stability and star formation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Westfall, Kyle B.; Verheijen, Marc A. W.; Andersen, David R.; Bershady, Matthew A.; Martinsson, Thomas P. K.; Swaters, Robert A.

    2014-04-10

    We study the relationship between the stability level of late-type galaxy disks and their star-formation activity using integral-field gaseous and stellar kinematic data. Specifically, we compare the two-component (gas+stars) stability parameter from Romeo and Wiegert (Q {sub RW}), incorporating stellar kinematic data for the first time, and the star-formation rate estimated from 21 cm continuum emission. We determine the stability level of each disk probabilistically using a Bayesian analysis of our data and a simple dynamical model. Our method incorporates the shape of the stellar velocity ellipsoid (SVE) and yields robust SVE measurements for over 90% of our sample. Averaging over this subsample, we find a meridional shape of ?{sub z}/?{sub R}=0.51{sub ?0.25}{sup +0.36} for the SVE and, at 1.5 disk scale lengths, a stability parameter of Q {sub RW} = 2.0 0.9. We also find that the disk-averaged star-formation-rate surface density ( ?-dot {sub e,?}) is correlated with the disk-averaged gas and stellar mass surface densities (? {sub e,} {sub g} and ? {sub e,} {sub *}) and anti-correlated with Q {sub RW}. We show that an anti-correlation between ?-dot {sub e,?} and Q {sub RW} can be predicted using empirical scaling relations, such that this outcome is consistent with well-established statistical properties of star-forming galaxies. Interestingly, ?-dot {sub e,?} is not correlated with the gas-only or star-only Toomre parameters, demonstrating the merit of calculating a multi-component stability parameter when comparing to star-formation activity. Finally, our results are consistent with the Ostriker et al. model of self-regulated star-formation, which predicts ?-dot {sub e,?}/?{sub e,g}??{sub e,?}{sup 1/2}. Based on this and other theoretical expectations, we discuss the possibility of a physical link between disk stability level and star-formation rate in light of our empirical results.

  14. Temperature activated absorption during laser-induced damage: The evolution of laser-supported solid-state absorption fronts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carr, C W; Bude, J D; Shen, N; Demange, P

    2010-10-26

    Previously we have shown that the size of laser induced damage sites in both KDP and SiO{sub 2} is largely governed by the duration of the laser pulse which creates them. Here we present a model based on experiment and simulation that accounts for this behavior. Specifically, we show that solid-state laser-supported absorption fronts are generated during a damage event and that these fronts propagate at constant velocities for laser intensities up to 4 GW/cm{sup 2}. It is the constant absorption front velocity that leads to the dependence of laser damage site size on pulse duration. We show that these absorption fronts are driven principally by the temperature-activated deep sub band-gap optical absorptivity, free electron transport, and thermal diffusion in defect-free silica for temperatures up to 15,000K and pressures < 15GPa. In addition to the practical application of selecting an optimal laser for pre-initiation of large aperture optics, this work serves as a platform for understanding general laser-matter interactions in dielectrics under a variety of conditions.

  15. AdS Black Disk Model for Small-x Deep Inelastic Scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cornalba, Lorenzo; Costa, Miguel S.; Penedones, Joao

    2010-08-13

    Using the approximate conformal invariance of QCD at high energies we consider a simple anti-de Sitter black disk model to describe saturation in deep inelastic scattering. Deep inside saturation the structure functions have the same power law scaling, F{sub T}{approx}F{sub L}{approx}x{sup -{omega}}, where {omega} is related to the expansion rate of the black disk with energy. Furthermore, the ratio F{sub L}/F{sub T} is given by the universal value (1+{omega}/3+{omega}), independently of the target. For {gamma}*-{gamma}* scattering at high energies we obtain explicit expressions and ratios for the total cross sections of transverse and longitudinal photons in terms of the single parameter {omega}.

  16. PRECISE BLACK HOLE MASSES FROM MEGAMASER DISKS: BLACK HOLE-BULGE RELATIONS AT LOW MASS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greene, Jenny E.; Peng, Chien Y.; Kim, Minjin; Kuo, Cheng-Yu; Braatz, James A.; Impellizzeri, C. M. Violette; Condon, James J.; Lo, K. Y.; Henkel, Christian; Reid, Mark J.

    2010-09-20

    The black hole (BH)-bulge correlations have greatly influenced the last decade of efforts to understand galaxy evolution. Current knowledge of these correlations is limited predominantly to high BH masses (M{sub BH{approx}}>10{sup 8} M{sub sun}) that can be measured using direct stellar, gas, and maser kinematics. These objects, however, do not represent the demographics of more typical L < L* galaxies. This study transcends prior limitations to probe BHs that are an order of magnitude lower in mass, using BH mass measurements derived from the dynamics of H{sub 2}O megamasers in circumnuclear disks. The masers trace the Keplerian rotation of circumnuclear molecular disks starting at radii of a few tenths of a pc from the central BH. Modeling of the rotation curves, presented by Kuo et al., yields BH masses with exquisite precision. We present stellar velocity dispersion measurements for a sample of nine megamaser disk galaxies based on long-slit observations using the B and C spectrograph on the Dupont telescope and the Dual Imaging Spectrograph on the 3.5 m telescope at Apache Point. We also perform bulge-to-disk decomposition of a subset of five of these galaxies with Sloan Digital Sky Survey imaging. The maser galaxies as a group fall below the M{sub BH}-{sigma}{sub *} relation defined by elliptical galaxies. We show, now with very precise BH mass measurements, that the low-scatter power-law relation between M{sub BH} and {sigma}{sub *} seen in elliptical galaxies is not universal. The elliptical galaxy M{sub BH}-{sigma}{sub *} relation cannot be used to derive the BH mass function at low mass or the zero point for active BH masses. The processes (perhaps BH self-regulation or minor merging) that operate at higher mass have not effectively established an M{sub BH}-{sigma}{sub *} relation in this low-mass regime.

  17. CONVERGENCE STUDIES OF MASS TRANSPORT IN DISKS WITH GRAVITATIONAL INSTABILITIES. I. THE CONSTANT COOLING TIME CASE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael, Scott; Steiman-Cameron, Thomas Y.; Durisen, Richard H. [Astronomy Department, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47405 (United States); Boley, Aaron C., E-mail: scamicha@astro.indiana.edu, E-mail: tomsc@astro.indiana.edu, E-mail: durisen@astro.indiana.edu, E-mail: aaron.boley@gmail.com [Department of Astronomy, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States)

    2012-02-10

    We conduct a convergence study of a protostellar disk, subject to a constant global cooling time and susceptible to gravitational instabilities (GIs), at a time when heating and cooling are roughly balanced. Our goal is to determine the gravitational torques produced by GIs, the level to which transport can be represented by a simple {alpha}-disk formulation, and to examine fragmentation criteria. Four simulations are conducted, identical except for the number of azimuthal computational grid points used. A Fourier decomposition of non-axisymmetric density structures in cos (m{phi}), sin (m{phi}) is performed to evaluate the amplitudes A{sub m} of these structures. The A{sub m} , gravitational torques, and the effective Shakura and Sunyaev {alpha} arising from gravitational stresses are determined for each resolution. We find nonzero A{sub m} for all m-values and that A{sub m} summed over all m is essentially independent of resolution. Because the number of measurable m-values is limited to half the number of azimuthal grid points, higher-resolution simulations have a larger fraction of their total amplitude in higher-order structures. These structures act more locally than lower-order structures. Therefore, as the resolution increases the total gravitational stress decreases as well, leading higher-resolution simulations to experience weaker average gravitational torques than lower-resolution simulations. The effective {alpha} also depends upon the magnitude of the stresses, thus {alpha}{sub eff} also decreases with increasing resolution. Our converged {alpha}{sub eff} is consistent with predictions from an analytic local theory for thin disks by Gammie, but only over many dynamic times when averaged over a substantial volume of the disk.

  18. Exclusion of cosmic rays in protoplanetary disks. II. Chemical gradients and observational signatures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cleeves, L. Ilsedore; Bergin, Edwin A.; Adams, Fred C.

    2014-10-20

    The chemical properties of protoplanetary disks are especially sensitive to their ionization environment. Sources of molecular gas ionization include cosmic rays (CRs), stellar X-rays, and short-lived radionuclides, each of which varies with location in the disk. This behavior leads to a significant amount of chemical structure, especially in molecular ion abundances, which is imprinted in their submillimeter rotational line emission. Using an observationally motivated disk model, we make predictions for the dependence of chemical abundances on the assumed properties of the ionizing field. We calculate the emergent line intensity for abundant molecular ions and simulate sensitive observations with the Atacama Large Millimeter/Sub-millimeter Array (ALMA) for a disk at D = 100 pc. The models readily distinguish between high ionization rates (ζ ≳ 10{sup –17} s{sup –1} per H{sub 2}) and below, but it becomes difficult to distinguish between low ionization models when ζ ≲ 10{sup –19} s{sup –1}. We find that H{sub 2}D{sup +} emission is not detectable for sub-interstellar CR rates with ALMA (6h integration), and that N{sub 2}D{sup +} emission may be a more sensitive tracer of midplane ionization. HCO{sup +} traces X-rays and high CR rates (ζ{sub CR} ≳ 10{sup –17} s{sup –1}), and provides a handle on the warm molecular ionization properties where CO is present in the gas. Furthermore, species like HCO{sup +}, which emits from a wide radial region and samples a large gradient in temperature, can exhibit ring-like emission as a consequence of low-lying rotational level de-excitation near the star. This finding highlights a scenario where rings are not necessarily structural or chemical in nature, but simply a result of the underlying line excitation properties.

  19. MIXING AND TRANSPORT OF SHORT-LIVED AND STABLE ISOTOPES AND REFRACTORY GRAINS IN PROTOPLANETARY DISKS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boss, Alan P.

    2013-08-10

    Analyses of primitive meteorites and cometary samples have shown that the solar nebula must have experienced a phase of large-scale outward transport of small refractory grains as well as homogenization of initially spatially heterogeneous short-lived isotopes. The stable oxygen isotopes, however, were able to remain spatially heterogeneous at the {approx}6% level. One promising mechanism for achieving these disparate goals is the mixing and transport associated with a marginally gravitationally unstable (MGU) disk, a likely cause of FU Orionis events in young low-mass stars. Several new sets of MGU models are presented that explore mixing and transport in disks with varied masses (0.016 to 0.13 M{sub Sun }) around stars with varied masses (0.1 to 1 M{sub Sun }) and varied initial Q stability minima (1.8 to 3.1). The results show that MGU disks are able to rapidly (within {approx}10{sup 4} yr) achieve large-scale transport and homogenization of initially spatially heterogeneous distributions of disk grains or gas. In addition, the models show that while single-shot injection heterogeneity is reduced to a relatively low level ({approx}1%), as required for early solar system chronometry, continuous injection of the sort associated with the generation of stable oxygen isotope fractionations by UV photolysis leads to a sustained, relatively high level ({approx}10%) of heterogeneity, in agreement with the oxygen isotope data. These models support the suggestion that the protosun may have experienced at least one FU Orionis-like outburst, which produced several of the signatures left behind in primitive chondrites and comets.

  20. HD106906b: A PLANETARY-MASS COMPANION OUTSIDE A MASSIVE DEBRIS DISK

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bailey, Vanessa; Reiter, Megan; Morzinski, Katie; Males, Jared; Su, Kate Y. L.; Hinz, Philip M.; Stark, Daniel; Close, Laird M.; Follette, Katherine B.; Rodigas, Timothy; Meshkat, Tiffany; Kenworthy, Matthew; Mamajek, Eric; Briguglio, Runa; Puglisi, Alfio; Xompero, Marco; Weinberger, Alycia J.

    2014-01-01

    We report the discovery of a planetary-mass companion, HD106906 b, with the new Magellan Adaptive Optics (MagAO) + Clio2 system. The companion is detected with Clio2 in three bands: J, K{sub S} , and L', and lies at a projected separation of 7.''1 (650 AU). It is confirmed to be comoving with its 13 2 Myr F5 host using Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys astrometry over a time baseline of 8.3 yr. DUSTY and COND evolutionary models predict that the companion's luminosity corresponds to a mass of 11 2 M {sub Jup}, making it one of the most widely separated planetary-mass companions known. We classify its Magellan/Folded-Port InfraRed Echellette J/H/K spectrum as L2.5 1; the triangular H-band morphology suggests an intermediate surface gravity. HD106906 A, a pre-main-sequence Lower Centaurus Crux member, was initially targeted because it hosts a massive debris disk detected via infrared excess emission in unresolved Spitzer imaging and spectroscopy. The disk emission is best fit by a single component at 95 K, corresponding to an inner edge of 15-20 AU and an outer edge of up to 120 AU. If the companion is on an eccentric (e > 0.65) orbit, it could be interacting with the outer edge of the disk. Close-in, planet-like formation followed by scattering to the current location would likely disrupt the disk and is disfavored. Furthermore, we find no additional companions, though we could detect similar-mass objects at projected separations >35 AU. In situ formation in a binary-star-like process is more probable, although the companion-to-primary mass ratio, at <1%, is unusually small.

  1. Transition from the infalling envelope to the Keplerian disk around L1551 IRS 5

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chou, Ti-Lin [Department of Physics, National Taiwan University, No. 1, Sec. 4, Roosevelt Road, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Takakuwa, Shigehisa; Yen, Hsi-Wei; Ohashi, Nagayoshi; Ho, Paul T. P., E-mail: tlchou@asiaa.sinica.edu.tw [Academia Sinica Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, P. O. Box 23-141, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China)

    2014-11-20

    We present combined Submillimeter Array (SMA) +Atacama Submillimeter Telescope Experiment (ASTE) images of the Class I protobinary L1551 IRS 5 in the CS (J = 7-6) line, the submillimeter images of L1551 IRS 5 with the most complete spatial sampling ever achieved (0.''9-36''). The SMA image of L1551 IRS 5 in the 343 GHz dust-continuum emission is also presented, which shows an elongated feature along the northwest to southeast direction (?160 AU 80 AU), perpendicular to the associated radio jets. The combined SMA+ASTE images show that the high-velocity (?1.5 km s{sup 1}) CS emission traces the structure of the dust component and shows a velocity gradient along the major axis, which is reproduced by a geometrically thin Keplerian-disk model with a central stellar mass of ?0.5 M {sub ?}. The low-velocity (?1.3 km s{sup 1}) CS emission shows an extended (?1000 AU) feature that exhibits slight south (blueshifted) to north (redshifted) emission offsets, which is modeled with a rotating and infalling envelope with a conserved angular momentum. The rotational motion of the envelope connects smoothly to the inner Keplerian rotation at a radius of ?64 AU. The infalling velocity of the envelope is ?three times lower than the free-fall velocity toward the central stellar mass of 0.5 M {sub ?}. These results demonstrate transition from the infalling envelope to the Keplerian disk, consistent with the latest theoretical studies of disk formation. We suggest that sizable (r ? 50-200 AU) Keplerian disks are already formed when the protostars are still deeply embedded in the envelopes.

  2. A NEW ACCRETION DISK AROUND THE MISSING LINK BINARY SYSTEM PSR J1023+0038

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patruno, A.; Archibald, A. M.; Hessels, J. W. T.; Bassa, C. G.; Janssen, G. H.; Bogdanov, S.; Stappers, B. W.; Lyne, A. G.; Kaspi, V. M.; Tendulkar, S.

    2014-01-20

    PSR J1023+0038 is an exceptional system for understanding how slowly rotating neutron stars are spun up to millisecond rotational periods through accretion from a companion star. Observed as a radio pulsar from 2007-2013, optical data showed that the system had an accretion disk in 2000/2001. Starting at the end of 2013 June, the radio pulsar has become undetectable, suggesting a return to the previous accretion-disk state, where the system more closely resembles an X-ray binary. In this Letter we report the first targeted X-ray observations ever performed of the active phase and complement them with UV/optical and radio observations collected in 2013 October. We find strong evidence that indeed an accretion disk has recently formed in the system and we report the detection of fast X-ray changes spanning about two orders of magnitude in luminosity. No radio pulsations are seen during low flux states in the X-ray light curve or at any other times.

  3. Stellar metallicity of the extended disk and distance of the spiral galaxy NGC 3621

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kudritzki, Rolf-Peter; Bresolin, Fabio; Hosek, Matthew W. Jr.; Urbaneja, Miguel A.; Przybilla, Norbert E-mail: bresolin@ifa.hawaii.edu E-mail: Miguel.Urbaneja-Perez@uibk.ac.at

    2014-06-10

    Low resolution (?4.5 ) ESO VLT/FORS spectra of blue supergiant stars are analyzed to determine stellar metallicities (based on elements such as iron, titanium, and magnesium) in the extended disk of the spiral galaxy, NGC 3621. Mildly subsolar metallicity (0.30 dex) is found for the outer objects beyond 7 kpc, independent of galactocentric radius and compatible with the absence of a metallicity gradient, confirming the results of a recent investigation of interstellar medium H II region gas oxygen abundances. The stellar metallicities are slightly higher than those from the H II regions when based on measurements of the weak forbidden auroral oxygen line at 4363 but lower than the ones obtained with the R {sub 23} strong line method. It is shown that the present level of metallicity in the extended disk cannot be the result of chemical evolution over the age of the disk with the present rate of in situ star formation. Additional mechanisms must be involved. In addition to metallicity, stellar effective temperatures, gravities, interstellar reddening, and bolometric magnitudes are determined. After the application of individual reddening corrections for each target, the flux-weighted gravity-luminosity relationship of blue supergiant stars is used to obtain a distance modulus of 29.07 0.09 mag (distance D = 6.52 0.28 Mpc). This new distance is discussed in relation to Cepheid and the tip of the red giant branch distances.

  4. Global Simulations of Dynamo and Magnetorotational Instability in Madison Plasma Experiments and Astrophysical Disks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ebrahimi, Fatima

    2014-07-31

    Large-scale magnetic fields have been observed in widely different types of astrophysical objects. These magnetic fields are believed to be caused by the so-called dynamo effect. Could a large-scale magnetic field grow out of turbulence (i.e. the alpha dynamo effect)? How could the topological properties and the complexity of magnetic field as a global quantity, the so called magnetic helicity, be important in the dynamo effect? In addition to understanding the dynamo mechanism in astrophysical accretion disks, anomalous angular momentum transport has also been a longstanding problem in accretion disks and laboratory plasmas. To investigate both dynamo and momentum transport, we have performed both numerical modeling of laboratory experiments that are intended to simulate nature and modeling of configurations with direct relevance to astrophysical disks. Our simulations use fluid approximations (Magnetohydrodynamics - MHD model), where plasma is treated as a single fluid, or two fluids, in the presence of electromagnetic forces. Our major physics objective is to study the possibility of magnetic field generation (so called MRI small-scale and large-scale dynamos) and its role in Magneto-rotational Instability (MRI) saturation through nonlinear simulations in both MHD and Hall regimes.

  5. THE FATE OF PLANETESIMALS IN TURBULENT DISKS WITH DEAD ZONES. I. THE TURBULENT STIRRING RECIPE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Okuzumi, Satoshi [Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan); Ormel, Chris W., E-mail: okuzumi@geo.titech.ac.jp [Astronomy Department, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    Turbulence in protoplanetary disks affects planet formation in many ways. While small dust particles are mainly affected by the aerodynamical coupling with turbulent gas velocity fields, planetesimals and larger bodies are more affected by gravitational interaction with gas density fluctuations. For the latter process, a number of numerical simulations have been performed in recent years, but a fully parameter-independent understanding has not been yet established. In this study, we present simple scaling relations for the planetesimal stirring rate in turbulence driven by magnetorotational instability (MRI), taking into account the stabilization of MRI due to ohmic resistivity. We begin with order-of-magnitude estimates of the turbulence-induced gravitational force acting on solid bodies and associated diffusion coefficients for their orbital elements. We then test the predicted scaling relations using the results of recent ohmic-resistive MHD simulations by Gressel et al. We find that these relations successfully explain the simulation results if we properly fix order-of-unity uncertainties within the estimates. We also update the saturation predictor for the density fluctuation amplitude in MRI-driven turbulence originally proposed by Okuzumi and Hirose. Combination of the scaling relations and saturation predictor allows us to know how the turbulent stirring rate of planetesimals depends on disk parameters such as the gas column density, distance from the central star, vertical resistivity distribution, and net vertical magnetic flux. In Paper II, we apply our recipe to planetesimal accretion to discuss its viability in turbulent disks.

  6. DEPLETION OF MOLECULAR GAS BY AN ACCRETION OUTBURST IN A PROTOPLANETARY DISK

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Banzatti, A.; Pontoppidan, K. M.; Muzerolle, J. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Bruderer, S. [Max-Planck-Institut fr Extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbachstr. 1, D-85748 Garching bei Mnchen (Germany); Meyer, M. R., E-mail: banzatti@stsci.edu [ETH Zrich, Institut fr Astronomie, Wolfgang-Pauli-Strasse 27, CH-8093 Zrich (Switzerland)

    2015-01-01

    We investigate new and archival 3-5 ?m high-resolution (?3 km s{sup 1}) spectroscopy of molecular gas in the inner disk of the young solar-mass star EX Lupi, taken during and after the strong accretion outburst of 2008. The data were obtained using the CRIRES spectrometer at the European Southern Observatory Very Large Telescope in 2008 and 2014. In 2008, emission lines from CO, H{sub 2}O, and OH were detected with broad profiles tracing gas near and within the corotation radius (0.02-0.3 AU). In 2014, the spectra display marked differences. The CO lines, while still detected, are much weaker, and the H{sub 2}O and OH lines have disappeared altogether. At 3 ?m a veiled stellar photospheric spectrum is observed. Our analysis finds that the molecular gas mass in the inner disk has decreased by an order of magnitude since the outburst, matching a similar decrease in the accretion rate onto the star. We discuss these findings in the context of a rapid depletion of material accumulated beyond the disk corotation radius during quiescent periods, as proposed by models of episodic accretion in EXor-type young stars.

  7. Angular momentum exchange by gravitational torques and infall in the circumbinary disk of the protostellar system L1551 NE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Takakuwa, Shigehisa; Ho, Paul T. P. [Academia Sinica Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, P.O. Box 23-141, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Saito, Masao [Joint ALMA Observatory, Ave. Alonso de Cordova 3107, Vitacura, Santiago (Chile); Saigo, Kazuya [ALMA Project Office, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Osawa 2-21-1, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Matsumoto, Tomoaki [Faculty of Humanity and Environment, Hosei University, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 102-8160 (Japan); Lim, Jeremy [Department of Physics, University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam Road (Hong Kong); Hanawa, Tomoyuki, E-mail: takakuwa@asiaa.sinica.edu.tw [Center for Frontier Science, Chiba University, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8522 (Japan)

    2014-11-20

    We report an ALMA observation of the Class I binary protostellar system L1551 NE in the 0.9 mm continuum, C{sup 18}O (3-2), and {sup 13}CO (3-2) lines at a ?1.6 times higher resolution and a ?6 times higher sensitivity than those of our previous SubMillimeter Array (SMA) observations, which revealed a r ? 300 AU scale circumbinary disk in Keplerian rotation. The 0.9 mm continuum shows two opposing U-shaped brightenings in the circumbinary disk and exhibits a depression between the circumbinary disk and the circumstellar disk of the primary protostar. The molecular lines trace non-axisymmetric deviations from Keplerian rotation in the circumbinary disk at higher velocities relative to the systemic velocity, where our previous SMA observations could not detect the lines. In addition, we detect inward motion along the minor axis of the circumbinary disk. To explain the newly observed features, we performed a numerical simulation of gas orbits in a Roche potential tailored to the inferred properties of L1551 NE. The observed U-shaped dust features coincide with locations where gravitational torques from the central binary system are predicted to impart angular momentum to the circumbinary disk, producing shocks and hence density enhancements seen as a pair of spiral arms. The observed inward gas motion coincides with locations where angular momentum is predicted to be lowered by the gravitational torques. The good agreement between our observation and model indicates that gravitational torques from the binary stars constitute the primary driver for exchanging angular momentum so as to permit infall through the circumbinary disk of L1551 NE.

  8. Electromagnetic energy conversion in downstream fronts from three dimensional kinetic reconnection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lapenta, Giovanni [Departement Wiskunde, KU Leuven, Universiteit Leuven (Belgium)] [Departement Wiskunde, KU Leuven, Universiteit Leuven (Belgium); Goldman, Martin; Newman, David [University of Colorado, Colorado 80309 (United States)] [University of Colorado, Colorado 80309 (United States); Markidis, Stefano [High Performance Computing and Visualization (HPCViz) Department, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden)] [High Performance Computing and Visualization (HPCViz) Department, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden); Divin, Andrey [Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala (Sweden)] [Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala (Sweden)

    2014-05-15

    The electromagnetic energy equation is analyzed term by term in a 3D simulation of kinetic reconnection previously reported by Vapirev et al. [J. Geophys. Res.: Space Phys. 118, 1435 (2013)]. The evolution presents the usual 2D-like topological structures caused by an initial perturbation independent of the third dimension. However, downstream of the reconnection site, where the jetting plasma encounters the yet unperturbed pre-existing plasma, a downstream front is formed and made unstable by the strong density gradient and the unfavorable local acceleration field. The energy exchange between plasma and fields is most intense at the instability, reaching several pW/m{sup 3}, alternating between load (energy going from fields to particles) and generator (energy going from particles to fields) regions. Energy exchange is instead purely that of a load at the reconnection site itself in a region focused around the x-line and elongated along the separatrix surfaces. Poynting fluxes are generated at all energy exchange regions and travel away from the reconnection site transporting an energy signal of the order of about S?10{sup ?3}W/m{sup 2}.

  9. Progress in indirect and direct-drive planar experiments on hydrodynamic instabilities at the ablation front

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Casner, A. Masse, L.; Huser, G.; Galmiche, D.; Liberatore, S.; Riazuelo, G.; Delorme, B.; Martinez, D.; Remington, B.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Igumenshchev, I.; Michel, D. T.; Froula, D.; Seka, W.; Goncharov, V. N.; Olazabal-Loumé, M.; Nicolaï, Ph.; Breil, J.; Tikhonchuk, V. T.; Fujioka, S.; and others

    2014-12-15

    Understanding and mitigating hydrodynamic instabilities and the fuel mix are the key elements for achieving ignition in Inertial Confinement Fusion. Cryogenic indirect-drive implosions on the National Ignition Facility have evidenced that the ablative Rayleigh-Taylor Instability (RTI) is a driver of the hot spot mix. This motivates the switch to a more flexible higher adiabat implosion design [O. A. Hurricane et al., Phys. Plasmas 21, 056313 (2014)]. The shell instability is also the main candidate for performance degradation in low-adiabat direct drive cryogenic implosions [Goncharov et al., Phys. Plasmas 21, 056315 (2014)]. This paper reviews recent results acquired in planar experiments performed on the OMEGA laser facility and devoted to the modeling and mitigation of hydrodynamic instabilities at the ablation front. In application to the indirect-drive scheme, we describe results obtained with a specific ablator composition such as the laminated ablator or a graded-dopant emulator. In application to the direct drive scheme, we discuss experiments devoted to the study of laser imprinted perturbations with special phase plates. The simulations of the Richtmyer-Meshkov phase reversal during the shock transit phase are challenging, and of crucial interest because this phase sets the seed of the RTI growth. Recent works were dedicated to increasing the accuracy of measurements of the phase inversion. We conclude by presenting a novel imprint mitigation mechanism based on the use of underdense foams. The foams induce laser smoothing by parametric instabilities thus reducing the laser imprint on the CH foil.

  10. Progress on the upgrade of the CMS Hadron Calorimeter Front-End electronics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, Jake; Whitmore, Juliana; /Fermilab

    2011-11-01

    We present a scheme to upgrade the CMS HCAL front-end electronics in the second long shutdown to upgrade the LHC (LS2), which is expected to occur around 2018. The HCAL electronics upgrade is required to handle the major instantaneous luminosity increase (up to 5 * 10{sup 34} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}) and an expected integrated luminosity of {approx}3000 fb{sup -1}. A key aspect of the HCAL upgrade is to read out longitudinal segmentation information to improve background rejection, energy resolution, and electron isolation at the L1 trigger. This paper focuses on the requirements for the new electronics and on the proposed solutions. The requirements include increased channel count, additional timing capabilities, and additional redundancy. The electronics are required to operate in a harsh environment and are constrained by the existing infrastructure. The proposed solutions span from chip level to system level. They include the development of a new ASIC ADC, the design and testing of higher speed transmitters to handle the increased data volume, the evaluation and use of circuits from other developments, evaluation of commercial FPGAs, better thermal design, and improvements in the overall readout architecture. We will report on the progress of the designs for these upgraded systems, along with performance requirements and initial design studies.

  11. Springback Reduction in Stamping of Front Side Member with a Response Surface Method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Song, Jung-Han; Huh, Hoon; Kim, Se-Ho; Park, Sung-Ho

    2005-08-05

    Springback is a common phenomenon in sheet metal forming since the elastic recovery of the internal stresses is induced after removal of the tooling. The numerical analysis of springback is a complicated time-consuming job and its result is greatly effected by a type of the yield function, finite elements used and the constraint condition for eliminating a rigid body motion. In this paper, optimization of the draw-bead force is carried out utilizing the response surface method in order to reduce springback and improve shape accuracy of a deep drawn product. In the optimization process, the tendency of springback is evaluated qualitatively without springback simulation usually done with the implicit solving scheme. Instead of springback simulation, the amount of stress deviation along the thickness direction in the deep drawn product is used as an indicator of springback. The stamping process is analyzed for a front side member formed with advanced high strength steel (AHSS) sheets such as DP60. The analysis procedure fully covers the binder-wrap, stamping, trimming and springback processes with the commercial elasto-plastic finite element code LS-DYNA 3D. The effect of the restraining force of draw-beads is confirmed with the decreased stress deviation. The analysis result shown in the final springback simulation demonstrates that the present analysis provides a guideline for controlling the evolution of springback based on the finite element simulation of complicated auto-body members.

  12. The complex structure of stars in the outer galactic disk as revealed by Pan-STARRS1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Slater, Colin T.; Bell, Eric F.; Schlafly, Edward F.; Martin, Nicolas F.; Rix, Hans-Walter; Morganson, Eric; Pearrubia, Jorge; Bernard, Edouard J.; Ferguson, Annette M. N.; Martinez-Delgado, David; Wyse, Rosemary F. G.; Burgett, William S.; Chambers, Kenneth C.; Hodapp, Klaus W.; Kaiser, Nicholas; Magnier, Eugene A.; Tonry, John L.; Draper, Peter W.; Metcalfe, Nigel; Price, Paul A.; and others

    2014-08-10

    We present a panoptic view of the stellar structure in the Galactic disk's outer reaches commonly known as the Monoceros Ring, based on data from Pan-STARRS1. These observations clearly show the large extent of the stellar overdensities on both sides of the Galactic disk, extending between b = 25 and b = +35 and covering over 130 in Galactic longitude. The structure exhibits a complex morphology with both stream-like features and a sharp edge to the structure in both the north and the south. We compare this map to mock observations of two published simulations aimed at explaining such structures in the outer stellar disk, one postulating an origin as a tidal stream and the other demonstrating a scenario where the disk is strongly distorted by the accretion of a satellite. These morphological comparisons of simulations can link formation scenarios to observed structures, such as demonstrating that the distorted-disk model can produce thin density features resembling tidal streams. Although neither model produces perfect agreement with the observationsthe tidal stream predicts material at larger distances that is not detected while in the distorted disk model, the midplane is warped to an excessive degreefuture tuning of the models to accommodate these latest data may yield better agreement.

  13. THE RADIAL METALLICITY GRADIENTS IN THE MILKY WAY THICK DISK AS FOSSIL SIGNATURES OF A PRIMORDIAL CHEMICAL DISTRIBUTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Curir, A.; Serra, A. L.; Spagna, A.; Lattanzi, M. G.; Re Fiorentin, P.; Diaferio, A.

    2014-04-01

    In this Letter we examine the evolution of the radial metallicity gradient induced by secular processes, in the disk of an N-body Milky Way-like galaxy. We assign a [Fe/H] value to each particle of the simulation according to an initial, cosmologically motivated, radial chemical distribution and let the disk dynamically evolve for ∼6 Gyr. This direct approach allows us to take into account only the effects of dynamical evolution and to gauge how and to what extent they affect the initial chemical conditions. The initial [Fe/H] distribution increases with R in the inner disk up to R ≈ 10 kpc and decreases for larger R. We find that the initial chemical profile does not undergo major transformations after ∼6 Gyr of dynamical evolution. The final radial chemical gradients predicted by the model in the solar neighborhood are positive and of the same order as those recently observed in the Milky Way thick disk. We conclude that (1) the spatial chemical imprint at the time of disk formation is not washed out by secular dynamical processes and (2) the observed radial gradient may be the dynamical relic of a thick disk originated from a stellar population showing a positive chemical radial gradient in the inner regions.

  14. The high-efficiency jets magnetically accelerated from a thin disk in powerful lobe-dominated FRII radio galaxies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Shuang-Liang

    2014-06-10

    A maximum jet efficiency line R ? 25 (R = L {sub jet}/L {sub bol}), found in FRII radio galaxies by Fernandes et al., was extended to cover the full range of jet power by Punsly. Recent general relativistic magnetohydrodynamic simulations of jet formation have mainly focused on the enhancement of jet power. In this work, we suggest that the jet efficiency could be very high even for conventional jet power if the radiative efficiency of disks was much smaller. We adopt the model of a thin disk with magnetically driven winds to investigate the observational high-efficiency jets in FRII radio galaxies. It is found that the structure of a thin disk can be significantly altered by the feedback of winds. The temperature of a disk gradually decreases with increasing magnetic field; the disk density, surface density, and pressure also change enormously. The lower temperature and higher surface density in the inner disk result in the rapid decrease of radiative efficiency. Thus, the jet efficiency is greatly improved even if the jet power is conventional. Our results can explain the observations quite well. The theoretical maximum jet efficiency of R ? 1000 suggested by our calculations is large enough to explain all of the high jet efficiency in observations, even considering the episodic activity of jets.

  15. CONSTRAINTS ON THE SPACETIME GEOMETRY AROUND 10 STELLAR-MASS BLACK HOLE CANDIDATES FROM THE DISK'S THERMAL SPECTRUM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kong, Lingyao; Li, Zilong; Bambi, Cosimo

    2014-12-20

    In a previous paper, one of us (C. Bambi) described a code to compute the thermal spectrum of geometrically thin and optically thick accretion disks around generic stationary and axisymmetric black holes, which are not necessarily of the Kerr type. As the structure of the accretion disk and the propagation of electromagnetic radiation from the disk to the distant observer depend on the background metric, the analysis of the thermal spectrum of thin disks can be used to test the actual nature of black hole candidates. In this paper, we consider the 10 stellar-mass black hole candidates for which the spin parameter has already been estimated from the analysis of the disk's thermal spectrum under the assumption of the Kerr background, and we translate the measurements reported in the literature into constraints on the spin parameter-deformation parameter plane. The analysis of the disk's thermal spectrum can be used to estimate only one parameter of the geometry close to the compact object; therefore, it is not possible to get independent measurements of both the spin and the deformation parameters. The constraints obtained here will be used in combination with other measurements in future work with the final goal of breaking the degeneracy between the spin and possible deviations from the Kerr solution and thus test the Kerr black hole hypothesis.

  16. An Integrated Front-End Readout And Feature Extraction System for the BaBar Drift Chamber

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Jinlong; /Colorado U.

    2006-08-10

    The BABAR experiment has been operating at SLAC's PEP-II asymmetric B-Factory since 1999. The accelerator has achieved more than three times its original design luminosity of 3 x 10{sup 33} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}, with plans for an additional factor of three in the next two years. To meet the experiment's performance requirements in the face of significantly higher trigger and background rates, the drift chamber's front-end readout system has been redesigned around the Xilinx Spartan 3 FPGA. The new system implements analysis and feature-extraction of digitized waveforms in the front-end, reducing the data bandwidth required by a factor of four.

  17. EVOLUTION OF SNOW LINE IN OPTICALLY THICK PROTOPLANETARY DISKS: EFFECTS OF WATER ICE OPACITY AND DUST GRAIN SIZE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oka, Akinori; Nakamoto, Taishi; Ida, Shigeru, E-mail: akinorioka1@gmail.com, E-mail: nakamoto@geo.titech.ac.jp [Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo (Japan)

    2011-09-10

    Evolution of a snow line in an optically thick protoplanetary disk is investigated with numerical simulations. The ice-condensing region in the disk is obtained by calculating the temperature and the density with the 1+1D approach. The snow line migrates as the mass accretion rate ( M-dot ) in the disk decreases with time. Calculations are carried out from an early phase with high disk accretion rates ( M-dot {approx}10{sup -7} M{sub sun} yr{sup -1}) to a later phase with low disk accretion rates ( M-dot {approx}10{sup -12} M{sub sun} yr{sup -1}) using the same numerical method. It is found that the snow line moves inward for M-dot {approx}>10{sup -10} M{sub sun} yr{sup -1}, while it gradually moves outward in the later evolution phase with M-dot {approx}<10{sup -10} M{sub sun} yr{sup -1}. In addition to the silicate opacity, the ice opacity is taken into consideration. In the inward migration phase, the additional ice opacity increases the distance of the snow line from the central star by a factor of 1.3 for dust grains {approx}< 10 {mu}m in size and of 1.6 for {approx}> 100 {mu}m. It is inevitable that the snow line comes inside Earth's orbit in the course of the disk evolution if the viscosity parameter {alpha} is in the range 0.001-0.1, the dust-to-gas mass ratio is higher than a tenth of the solar abundance value, and the dust grains are smaller than 1 mm. The formation of water-devoid planetesimals in the terrestrial planet region seems to be difficult throughout the disk evolution, which imposes a new challenge to planet formation theory.

  18. A global three-dimensional radiation magneto-hydrodynamic simulation of super-eddington accretion disks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jiang, Yan-Fei; Stone, James M.; Davis, Shane W.

    2014-12-01

    We study super-Eddington accretion flows onto black holes using a global three-dimensional radiation magneto-hydrodynamical simulation. We solve the time-dependent radiative transfer equation for the specific intensities to accurately calculate the angular distribution of the emitted radiation. Turbulence generated by the magneto-rotational instability provides self-consistent angular momentum transfer. The simulation reaches inflow equilibrium with an accretion rate ∼220 L {sub Edd}/c {sup 2} and forms a radiation-driven outflow along the rotation axis. The mechanical energy flux carried by the outflow is ∼20% of the radiative energy flux. The total mass flux lost in the outflow is about 29% of the net accretion rate. The radiative luminosity of this flow is ∼10 L {sub Edd}. This yields a radiative efficiency ∼4.5%, which is comparable to the value in a standard thin disk model. In our simulation, vertical advection of radiation caused by magnetic buoyancy transports energy faster than photon diffusion, allowing a significant fraction of the photons to escape from the surface of the disk before being advected into the black hole. We contrast our results with the lower radiative efficiencies inferred in most models, such as the slim disk model, which neglect vertical advection. Our inferred radiative efficiencies also exceed published results from previous global numerical simulations, which did not attribute a significant role to vertical advection. We briefly discuss the implications for the growth of supermassive black holes in the early universe and describe how these results provided a basis for explaining the spectrum and population statistics of ultraluminous X-ray sources.

  19. A DOUBLE OUTBURST FROM IGR J00291+5934: IMPLICATIONS FOR ACCRETION DISK INSTABILITY THEORY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartman, Jacob M.; Galloway, Duncan K.; Chakrabarty, Deepto

    2011-01-01

    The accretion-powered millisecond pulsar IGR J00291+5934 underwent two {approx}10 day long outbursts during 2008, separated by 30 days in quiescence. Such a short quiescent period between outbursts has never been seen before from a neutron star X-ray transient. X-ray pulsations at the 599 Hz spin frequency are detected throughout both outbursts. For the first time, we derive a pulse phase model that connects two outbursts, providing a long baseline for spin frequency measurement. Comparison with the frequency measured during the 2004 outburst of this source gives a spin-down during quiescence of -(4 {+-} 1) x 10{sup -15} Hz s{sup -1}, approximately an order of magnitude larger than the long-term spin-down observed in the 401 Hz accretion-powered pulsar SAX J1808.4-3658. If this spin-down is due to magnetic dipole radiation, it requires a 2 x 10{sup 8} G field strength, and its high spin-down luminosity may be detectable with the Fermi Large Area Telescope. Alternatively, this large spin-down could be produced by gravitational wave emission from a fractional mass quadrupole moment of Q/I = 1 x 10{sup -9}. The rapid succession of the outbursts also provides a unique test of models for accretion in low-mass X-ray binaries. Disk instability models generally predict that an outburst will leave the accretion disk too depleted to fuel a second outburst after such a brief quiescence. We suggest a modification in which the outburst is shut off by the onset of a propeller effect before the disk is depleted. This model can explain the short quiescence and the unusually slow rise of the light curve of the second 2008 outburst.

  20. SPIRAL ARMS IN THE DISK OF HD 142527 FROM CO EMISSION LINES WITH ALMA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christiaens, V.; Casassus, S.; Perez, S.; Van der Plas, G.; Mnard, F.

    2014-04-10

    In view of both the size of its gap and the previously reported asymmetries and near-infrared spiral arms, the transition disk of the Herbig Fe star HD 142527 constitutes a remarkable case study. This paper focuses on the morphology of the outer disk through ALMA observations of {sup 12}CO J = 2-1, {sup 12}CO J = 3-2, and {sup 13}CO J = 2-1. Both {sup 12}CO J = 2-1 and {sup 12}CO J = 3-2 show spiral features of different sizes. The innermost spiral arm (S1) is a radio counterpart of the first near-infrared spiral observed by Fukagawa, but it is shifted radially outward. However, the most conspicuous CO spiral arm (S2) lies at the outskirts of the disk and has not been detected before. It corresponds to a cold density structure, with both brightness and excitation temperatures of order 132 K and conspicuous in the {sup 12}CO J = 2-1 peak-intensity map, but faint in {sup 12}CO J = 3-2. There is also a faint counterarm (S3), at a point-symmetric location of S2 with respect to the star. These three spirals are modeled separately with two different formulae that approximate the loci of density maxima in acoustic waves due to embedded planets. S1 could be fit relatively well with these formulae, compared to S2 and S3. Alternative scenarios such as gravitational instability or external tidal interaction are discussed. The impact of channelization on spectrally and spatially resolved peak intensity maps is also briefly addressed.

  1. Characterizing Inflow Conditions Across the Rotor Disk of a Utility-Scale Wind Turbine (Poster)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clifton, A.; Lundquist, J. K.; Kelley, N.; Scott, G.; Jager, D.; Schreck, S.

    2012-01-01

    Multi-megawatt utility-scale wind turbines operate in a turbulent, thermally-driven atmosphere where wind speed and air temperature vary with height. Turbines convert the wind's momentum into electrical power, and so changes in the atmosphere across the rotor disk influence the power produced by the turbine. To characterize the inflow into utility scale turbines at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) near Boulder, Colorado, NREL recently built two 135-meter inflow monitoring towers. This poster introduces the towers and the measurements that are made, showing some of the data obtained in the first few months of operation in 2011.

  2. CO AND H{sub 2} ABSORPTION IN THE AA TAURI CIRCUMSTELLAR DISK

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    France, Kevin; Burgh, Eric B.; Schindhelm, Eric; Brown, Alexander; Herczeg, Gregory J.; Yang, Hao; Linsky, Jeffrey L.; Abgrall, Herve; Roueff, Evelyne; Brown, Joanna M.

    2012-01-01

    The direct study of molecular gas in inner protoplanetary disks is complicated by uncertainties in the spatial distribution of the gas, the time variability of the source, and the comparison of observations across a wide range of wavelengths. Some of these challenges can be mitigated with far-ultraviolet spectroscopy. Using new observations obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope Cosmic Origins Spectrograph, we measure column densities and rovibrational temperatures for CO and H{sub 2} observed on the line of sight through the AA Tauri circumstellar disk. CO A - X absorption bands are observed against the far-UV continuum. The CO absorption is characterized by log{sub 10}(N({sup 12}CO)) = 17.5 {+-} 0.5 cm{sup -2} and T{sub rot}(CO) = 500{sup +500}{sub -200} K, although this rotational temperature may underestimate the local kinetic temperature of the CO-bearing gas. We also detect {sup 13}CO in absorption with an isotopic ratio of {approx}20. We do not observe H{sub 2} absorption against the continuum; however, hot H{sub 2} (v > 0) is detected in absorption against the Ly{alpha} emission line. We measure the column densities in eight individual rovibrational states, determining a total log{sub 10}(N(H{sub 2})) = 17.9{sup +0.6}{sub -0.3} cm{sup -2} with a thermal temperature of T(H{sub 2}) = 2500{sup +800}{sub -700} K. The high temperature of the molecules, the relatively small H{sub 2} column density, and the high inclination of the AA Tauri disk suggest that the absorbing gas resides in an inner disk atmosphere. If the H{sub 2} and CO are cospatial within a molecular layer {approx}0.6 AU thick, this region is characterized by {approx} 10{sup 5} cm{sup -3} with an observed (CO/H{sub 2}) ratio of {approx}0.4. We also find evidence for a departure from a purely thermal H{sub 2} distribution, suggesting that excitation by continuum photons and H{sub 2} formation may be altering the level populations in the molecular gas.

  3. EVAPORATION OF GRAIN-SURFACE SPECIES BY SHOCK WAVES IN A PROTOPLANETARY DISK

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aota, Takuhiro; Aikawa, Yuri; Inoue, Tsuyoshi

    2015-02-01

    Recent Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array observations of young protostellar objects detected warm SO emission, which could be associated with a forming protostellar disk. In order to investigate if such warm gas can be produced by accretion shock onto the forming disk, we calculate the sputtering and thermal desorption of various grain-surface species in one-dimensional shock waves. We find that thermal desorption is much more efficient than the sputtering in the post-shock region. While H{sub 2}O can be thermally desorbed, if the accretion velocity is larger than 8 km s{sup 1} with the pre-shock gas number density of 10{sup 9} cm{sup 3}, SO is desorbed if the accretion velocity ?2 km s{sup 1} and ?4 km s{sup 1}, with the pre-shock density of 10{sup 9} cm{sup 3} and 10{sup 8} cm{sup 3}, respectively. We also find that the column density of hydrogen nuclei in warm post-shock gas is N {sub warm} ? 10{sup 21} cm{sup 2}.

  4. More pieces of the puzzle: chemistry and substructures in the galactic thick disk

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Helmi, Amina; Williams, Mary; Freeman, K. C.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; De Silva, G. E-mail: mary@aip.de

    2014-08-20

    We present a study of the chemical abundances of solar neighborhood stars associated with dynamical structures in the Milky Way's (thick) disk. These stars were identified as an overdensity in the eccentricity range 0.3 < ε < 0.5 in the Copenhagen-Geneva Survey by Helmi et al. We find that stars with these dynamical characteristics do not constitute a homogeneous population. A relatively sharp transition in dynamical and chemical properties appears to occur at a metallicity of [Fe/H] ∼ –0.4. Stars with [Fe/H] > –0.4 have mostly lower eccentricities, smaller vertical velocity dispersions, are α-enhanced, and define a rather narrow sequence in [α/Fe] versus [Fe/H], clearly distinct from that of the thin disk. Stars with [Fe/H] < –0.4 have a range of eccentricities, are hotter vertically, and depict a larger spread in [α/Fe]. We also found tentative evidence of a substructure possibly associated with the disruption of a metal-rich star cluster. The differences between these populations of stars is also present in, e.g., [Zn/Fe], [Ni/Fe], and [SmII/Fe], suggesting a real physical distinction.

  5. IDENTIFYING NEARBY, YOUNG, LATE-TYPE STARS BY MEANS OF THEIR CIRCUMSTELLAR DISKS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schneider, Adam; Song, Inseok; Melis, Carl; Zuckerman, B.; Bessell, Mike E-mail: song@physast.uga.edu E-mail: ben@astro.ucla.edu

    2012-10-01

    It has recently been shown that a significant fraction of late-type members of nearby, very young associations (age {approx}<10 Myr) display excess emission at mid-IR wavelengths indicative of dusty circumstellar disks. We demonstrate that the detection of mid-IR excess emission can be utilized to identify new nearby, young, late-type stars including two definite new members ('TWA 33' and 'TWA 34') of the TW Hydrae Association (TWA). Both new TWA members display mid-IR excess emission in the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer catalog and they show proper motion and youthful spectroscopic characteristics-namely, H{alpha} emission, strong lithium absorption, and low surface gravity features consistent with known TWA members. We also detect mid-IR excess-the first unambiguous evidence of a dusty circumstellar disk-around a previously identified UV-bright, young, accreting star (2M1337) that is a likely member of the Lower-Centaurus Crux region of the Scorpius-Centaurus Complex.

  6. FORMATION OF CLOSE IN SUPER-EARTHS AND MINI-NEPTUNES: REQUIRED DISK MASSES AND THEIR IMPLICATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schlichting, Hilke E.

    2014-11-01

    Recent observations by the Kepler space telescope have led to the discovery of more than 4000 exoplanet candidates consisting of many systems with Earth- to Neptune-sized objects that reside well inside the orbit of Mercury around their respective host stars. How and where these close-in planets formed is one of the major unanswered questions in planet formation. Here, we calculate the required disk masses for in situ formation of the Kepler planets. We find that if close-in planets formed as isolation masses, then standard gas-to-dust ratios yield corresponding gas disks that are gravitationally unstable for a significant fraction of systems, ruling out such a scenario. We show that the maximum width of a planet's accretion region in the absence of any migration is 2v {sub esc}/?, where v {sub esc} is the escape velocity of the planet and ? is the Keplerian frequency, and we use it to calculate the required disk masses for in situ formation with giant impacts. Even with giant impacts, formation without migration requires disk surface densities in solids at semi-major axes of less than 0.1AU of 10{sup 3}-10{sup 5} g cm{sup 2}, implying typical enhancements above the minimum-mass solar nebular (MMSN) by at least a factor of 20. Corresponding gas disks are below but not far from the gravitational stability limit. In contrast, formation beyond a fewAU is consistent with MMSN disk masses. This suggests that the migration of either solids or fully assembled planets is likely to have played a major role in the formation of close-in super-Earths and mini-Neptunes.

  7. SPIN (Version 3. 83): A Fortran program for modeling one-dimensional rotating-disk/stagnation-flow chemical vapor deposition reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coltrin, M.E. ); Kee, R.J.; Evans, G.H.; Meeks, E.; Rupley, F.M.; Grcar, J.F. )

    1991-08-01

    In rotating-disk reactor a heated substrate spins (at typical speeds of 1000 rpm or more) in an enclosure through which the reactants flow. The rotating disk geometry has the important property that in certain operating regimes{sup 1} the species and temperature gradients normal to the disk are equal everywhere on the disk. Thus, such a configuration has great potential for highly uniform chemical vapor deposition (CVD),{sup 2--5} and indeed commercial rotating-disk CVD reactors are now available. In certain operating regimes, the equations describing the complex three-dimensional spiral fluid motion can be solved by a separation-of-variables transformation{sup 5,6} that reduces the equations to a system of ordinary differential equations. Strictly speaking, the transformation is only valid for an unconfined infinite-radius disk and buoyancy-free flow. Furthermore, only some boundary conditions are consistent with the transformation (e.g., temperature, gas-phase composition, and approach velocity all specified to be independent of radius at some distances above the disk). Fortunately, however, the transformed equations will provide a very good practical approximation to the flow in a finite-radius reactor over a large fraction of the disk (up to {approximately}90% of the disk radius) when the reactor operating parameters are properly chosen, i.e, high rotation rates. In the limit of zero rotation rate, the rotating disk flow reduces to a stagnation-point flow, for which a similar separation-of-variables transformation is also available. Such flow configurations ( pedestal reactors'') also find use in CVD reactors. In this report we describe a model formulation and mathematical analysis of rotating-disk and stagnation-point CVD reactors. Then we apply the analysis to a compute code called SPIN and describe its implementation and use. 31 refs., 4 figs.

  8. A test of star formation laws in disk galaxies. II. Dependence on dynamical properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Suwannajak, Chutipong; Tan, Jonathan C.; Leroy, Adam K.

    2014-05-20

    We use the observed radial profiles of the mass surface densities of total, ? {sub g}, and molecular, ?{sub H2}, gas, rotation velocity, and star formation rate (SFR) surface density, ?{sub sfr}, of the molecular-rich (?{sub H2} ? ?{sub HI}/2) regions of 16 nearby disk galaxies to test several star formation (SF) laws: a 'Kennicutt-Schmidt (K-S)' law, ?{sub sfr}=A{sub g}?{sub g,2}{sup 1.5}; a 'Constant Molecular' law, ?{sub sfr} = A {sub H2}?{sub H2,2}; the turbulence-regulated laws of Krumholz and McKee (KM05) and Krumholz, McKee, and Tumlinson (KMT09); a 'Gas-?' law, ?{sub sfr}=B{sub ?}?{sub g}?; and a shear-driven 'giant molecular cloud (GMC) Collision' law, ?{sub sfr} = B {sub CC}? {sub g}?(1-0.7?), where ? ? d ln v {sub circ}/d ln r. If allowed one free normalization parameter for each galaxy, these laws predict the SFR with rms errors of factors of 1.4-1.8. If a single normalization parameter is used by each law for the entire galaxy sample, then rms errors range from factors of 1.5-2.1. Although the Constant Molecular law gives the smallest rms errors, the improvement over the KMT, K-S, and GMC Collision laws is not especially significant, particularly given the different observational inputs that the laws utilize and the scope of included physics, which ranges from empirical relations to detailed treatment of interstellar medium processes. We next search for systematic variation of SF law parameters with local and global galactic dynamical properties of disk shear rate (related to ?), rotation speed, and presence of a bar. We demonstrate with high significance that higher shear rates enhance SF efficiency per local orbital time. Such a trend is expected if GMC collisions play an important role in SF, while an opposite trend would be expected if the development of disk gravitational instabilities is the controlling physics.

  9. ON THE TEMPORAL EVOLUTION OF THE DISK COUNTERPART OF TYPE II SPICULES IN THE QUIET SUN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sekse, D. H.; Rouppe van der Voort, L.; De Pontieu, B.

    2013-02-20

    The newly established type II spicule has been speculated to provide enough hot plasma to play an important role in the mass loading and heating of the solar corona. With the identification of rapid blueshifted excursions (RBEs) as the on-disk counterpart of type II spicules we have analyzed three different high-quality timeseries with the CRisp Imaging SpectroPolarimeter (CRISP) at the Swedish Solar Telescope on La Palma and subjected to an automated detection routine to detect a large number of RBEs for statistical purposes. Our observations are of a quiet-Sun region at disk center and we find lower Doppler velocities, 15-40 km s{sup -1}, and Doppler widths, 2-15 km s{sup -1}, of RBEs than in earlier coronal hole studies, 30-50 km s{sup -1} and 7-23 km s{sup -1}, respectively. In addition, we examine the spatial dependence of Doppler velocities and widths along the RBE axis and conclude that there is no clear trend to this over the field of view or in individual RBEs in the quiet Sun at disk center. These differences with previous coronal hole studies are attributed to the more varying magnetic field configuration in quiet-Sun conditions. Using an extremely high-cadence data set has allowed us to improve greatly on the determination of lifetimes of RBEs, which we find to range from 5 to 60 s with an average lifetime of 30 s, as well as the transverse motions in RBEs, with transverse velocities up to 55 km s{sup -1} and averaging 12 km s{sup -1}. Furthermore, our measurements of the recurrence rates of RBEs provide important new constraints on coronal heating by spicules. We also see many examples of a sinusoidal wave pattern in the transverse motion of RBEs with periods averaging 54 s and amplitudes from 21.5 to 129 km which agrees well with previous studies of wave motion in spicules at the limb. We interpret the appearance of RBEs over their full length within a few seconds as the result of a combination of three kinds of motions as is earlier reported for spicules. Finally, we look at the temporal connection between H{alpha} and Ca II 8542 RBEs and find that Ca II 8542 RBEs in addition to being located closer to the footpoint also appear before the H{alpha} RBEs. This connection between Ca II 8542 and H{alpha} supports the idea that heating is occurring in spicules and contributes more weight to the prominence of spicules as a source for heating and mass loading of the corona.

  10. THE INCIDENCE OF ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI IN PURE DISK GALAXIES: THE SPITZER VIEW

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Satyapal, S.; Mcalpine, W.; Gliozzi, M. [George Mason University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, MS 3F3, 4400 University Drive, Fairfax, VA 22030 (United States); Boeker, T. [ESA/ESTEC, Keplerlaan 1, 2200 AG Noordwijk (Netherlands); Abel, N. P. [Department of Physics, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH 45221 (United States); Heckman, T., E-mail: satyapal@physics.gmu.ed [Center for Astrophysical Sciences, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States)

    2009-10-10

    Using the Spitzer telescope, we have conducted a high-resolution spectroscopic study of 18 bulgeless (Hubble type of Sd or Sdm) galaxies that show no definitive signatures of nuclear activity in their optical spectra. This is the first systematic mid-infrared (MIR) search for weak or hidden active galactic nuclei (AGNs) in a statistically significant sample of bulgeless (Sd/Sdm) disk galaxies. Based on the detection of the high-ionization [Ne V] 14.3 mum line, we report the discovery of an AGN in 1 out of the 18 galaxies in the sample. This galaxy, NGC 4178, is a nearby edge-on Sd galaxy, which likely hosts a prominent nuclear star cluster (NSC). The bolometric luminosity of the AGN inferred from the [Ne V] line luminosity is approx8 x 10{sup 41} ergs s{sup -1}. This is almost 2 orders of magnitude greater than the luminosity of the AGN in NGC 4395, the best studied AGN in a bulgeless disk galaxy. Assuming that the AGN in NGC 4178 is radiating below the Eddington limit, the lower mass limit for the black hole is approx6 x 10{sup 3} M {sub sun}. The fact that none of the other galaxies in the sample shows any evidence for an AGN demonstrates that while the AGN detection rate based on MIR diagnostics is high (30%-40%) in optically quiescent galaxies with pseudobulges or weak classical bulges (Hubble type Sbc and Sc), it drops drastically in Sd/Sdm galaxies. Our observations, therefore, confirm that AGNs in completely bulgeless disk galaxies are not hidden in the optical but truly are rare. Of the three Sd galaxies with AGNs known so far, all have prominent NSCs, suggesting that in the absence of a well-defined bulge, the galaxy must possess an NSC in order to host an AGN. On the other hand, while the presence of an NSC appears to be a requirement for hosting an AGN in bulgeless galaxies, neither the properties of the NSC nor those of the host galaxy appear exceptional in late-type AGN host galaxies. The recipe for forming and growing a central black hole in a bulgeless galaxy therefore remains unknown.

  11. Stochastic formation of magnetic vortex structures in asymmetric disks triggered by chaotic dynamics

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Im, Mi-Young; Lee, Ki-Suk; Vogel, Andreas; Hong, Jung-Il; Meier, Guido; Fischer, Peter

    2014-12-17

    The non-trivial spin configuration in a magnetic vortex is a prototype for fundamental studies of nanoscale spin behaviour with potential applications in magnetic information technologies. Arrays of magnetic vortices interfacing with perpendicular thin films have recently been proposed as enabler for skyrmionic structures at room temperature, which has opened exciting perspectives on practical applications of skyrmions. An important milestone for achieving not only such skyrmion materials but also general applications of magnetic vortices is a reliable control of vortex structures. However, controlling magnetic processes is hampered by stochastic behaviour, which is associated with thermal fluctuations in general. Here we showmore » that the dynamics in the initial stages of vortex formation on an ultrafast timescale plays a dominating role for the stochastic behaviour observed at steady state. Our results show that the intrinsic stochastic nature of vortex creation can be controlled by adjusting the interdisk distance in asymmetric disk arrays.« less

  12. MOA-2013-BLG-220Lb: Massive planetary companion to galactic-disk host

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yee, J. C.; Gould, A.; Gaudi, B. S.; Han, C.; Choi, J.-Y.; Hwang, K.-H.; Jung, Y. K.; Skowron, J.; Udalski, A.; Bond, I. A.; Hundertmark, M.; Monard, L. A. G.; Porritt, I.; Nelson, P.; Bozza, V.; Albrow, M. D.; Christie, G. W.; DePoy, D. L.; Lee, C.-U.; McCormick, J.; Collaboration: μFUN Collaboration),; MOA Collaboration),; OGLE Collaboration),; RoboNet Collaboration),; and others

    2014-07-20

    We report the discovery of MOA-2013-BLG-220Lb, which has a super-Jupiter mass ratio q = 3.01 ± 0.02 × 10{sup –3} relative to its host. The proper motion, μ = 12.5 ± 1 mas yr{sup –1}, is one of the highest for microlensing planets yet discovered, implying that it will be possible to separately resolve the host within ∼7 yr. Two separate lines of evidence imply that the planet and host are in the Galactic disk. The planet could have been detected and characterized purely with follow-up data, which has important implications for microlensing surveys, both current and into the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) era.

  13. Tribocharging phenomena in hard disk amorphous carbon coatings with and without perfluoropolyether lubricants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    van den Oetelaar, Ronald J.A.; Xu, Lei; Ogletree, D. Frank; Salmeron, Miquel; Tang, Hung; Gui, Jing

    2000-08-01

    Scanning polarization force microscopy was used to study changes in surface potential (tribocharging) caused by the contact between a tungsten carbide tip and the amorphous carbon coating of a hard disk,both when bare and when covered with Zdol-TX lubricant. The surface potential change produced by tip contact decays with time at a rate that is strongly dependent on lubricant coverage, and on the presence of oxygen and water vapor in the environment. Two different charging mechanisms are proposed. One involves chemical modification of the surface by removal of oxygen bound to the surface. This gives rise to a potential change that decays with time. Another mechanism involves trapping of charge in states within the energy gap of the insulating carbon film. The potential change due to this trapped charge does not decay over periods much greater than 1 hour.

  14. Hard disk drive based microsecond x-ray chopper for characterization of ionization chambers and photodiodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mller, O. Ltzenkirchen-Hecht, D.; Frahm, R.

    2015-03-15

    A fast X-ray chopper capable of producing ms long X-ray pulses with a typical rise time of few ?s was realized. It is ideally suited to investigate the temporal response of X-ray detectors with response times of the order of ?s to ms, in particular, any kind of ionization chambers and large area photo diodes. The drive mechanism consists of a brushless DC motor and driver electronics from a common hard disk drive, keeping the cost at an absolute minimum. Due to its simple construction and small dimensions, this chopper operates at home lab based X-ray tubes and synchrotron radiation sources as well. The dynamics of the most important detectors used in time resolved X-ray absorption spectroscopy, namely, ionization chambers and Passivated Implanted Planar Silicon photodiodes, were investigated in detail. The results emphasize the applicability of this X-ray chopper.

  15. THE VERTICAL COMPOSITION OF NEUTRINO-DOMINATED ACCRETION DISKS IN GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Tong; Xue, Li; Gu, Wei-Min; Lu, Ju-Fu, E-mail: tongliu@xmu.edu.cn [Department of Physics and Institute of Theoretical Physics and Astrophysics, Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian 361005 (China)] [Department of Physics and Institute of Theoretical Physics and Astrophysics, Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian 361005 (China)

    2013-01-10

    We investigate the vertical structure and element distribution of neutrino-dominated accretion flows around black holes in spherical coordinates using the reasonable nuclear statistical equilibrium. According to our calculations, heavy nuclei tend to be produced in a thin region near the disk surface, whose mass fractions are primarily determined by the accretion rate and vertical distribution of temperature and density. In this thin region, we find that {sup 56}Ni is dominant for the flow with a low accretion rate (e.g., 0.05 M {sub Sun} s{sup -1}), but {sup 56}Fe is dominant for the flow with a high accretion rate (e.g., 1 M {sub Sun} s{sup -1}). The dominant {sup 56}Ni in the aforementioned region may provide a clue to understanding the bumps in the optical light curve of core-collapse supernovae.

  16. BINARIES MIGRATING IN A GASEOUS DISK: WHERE ARE THE GALACTIC CENTER BINARIES?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baruteau, C.; Lin, D. N. C.; Cuadra, J. E-mail: lin@ucolick.org

    2011-01-01

    The massive stars in the Galactic center inner arcsecond share analogous properties with the so-called Hot Jupiters. Most of these young stars have highly eccentric orbits and were probably not formed in situ. It has been proposed that these stars acquired their current orbits from the tidal disruption of compact massive binaries scattered toward the proximity of the central supermassive black hole. Assuming a binary star formed in a thin gaseous disk beyond 0.1 pc from the central object, we investigate the relevance of disk-satellite interactions to harden the binding energy of the binary, and to drive its inward migration. A massive, equal-mass binary star is found to become more tightly wound as it migrates inward toward the central black hole. The migration timescale is very similar to that of a single-star satellite of the same mass. The binary's hardening is caused by the formation of spiral tails lagging the stars inside the binary's Hill radius. We show that the hardening timescale is mostly determined by the mass of gas inside the binary's Hill radius and that it is much shorter than the migration timescale. We discuss some implications of the binary's hardening process. When the more massive (primary) components of close binaries eject most their mass through supernova explosion, their secondary stars may attain a range of eccentricities and inclinations. Such processes may provide an alternative unified scenario for the origin of the kinematic properties of the central cluster and S-stars in the Galactic center as well as the high-velocity stars in the Galactic halo.

  17. INTERMEDIATE-MASS HOT CORES AT {approx}500 AU: DISKS OR OUTFLOWS?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palau, Aina; Girart, Josep M.; Fuente, Asuncion; Alonso-Albi, Tomas; Fontani, Francesco; Sanchez-Monge, Alvaro; Boissier, Jeremie; Pietu, Vincent; Neri, Roberto; Busquet, Gemma; Estalella, Robert; Zapata, Luis A.; Zhang, Qizhou; Ho, Paul T. P.; Audard, Marc

    2011-12-20

    Observations with the Plateau de Bure Interferometer in the most extended configuration toward two intermediate-mass star-forming regions, IRAS 22198+6336 and AFGL 5142, reveal the presence of several complex organic molecules at {approx}500 AU scales, confirming the presence of hot cores in both regions. The hot cores are not rich in CN-bearing molecules, as often seen in massive hot cores, and are mainly traced by CH{sub 3}CH{sub 2}OH, (CH{sub 2}OH){sub 2}, CH{sub 3}COCH{sub 3}, and CH{sub 3}OH, with, additionally, CH{sub 3}CHO, CH{sub 3}OD, and HCOOD for IRAS 22198+6336, and C{sub 6}H and O{sup 13}CS for AFGL 5142. The emission of complex molecules is resolved down to sizes of {approx}300 and {approx}600 AU, for IRAS 22198+6336 and AFGL 5142, respectively, and most likely is tracing protostellar disks rather than flattened envelopes or toroids as is usually found. This is especially clear for the case of IRAS 22198+6336, where we detect a velocity gradient for all the mapped molecules perpendicular to the most chemically rich outflow of the region, yielding a dynamic mass {approx}> 4 M{sub Sun }. As for AFGL 5142, the hot core emission is resolved into two elongated cores separated {approx}1800 AU. A detailed comparison of the complex molecule peaks to the new CO (2-1) data and H{sub 2}O maser data from the literature suggests also that for AFGL 5142 the complex molecules are mainly associated with disks, except for a faint and extended molecular emission found to the west, which is possibly produced in the interface between one of the outflows and the dense surrounding gas.

  18. Stratified magnetically driven accretion-disk winds and their relations to jets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fukumura, Keigo; Tombesi, Francesco; Kazanas, Demosthenes; Shrader, Chris; Contopoulos, Ioannis

    2014-01-10

    We explore the poloidal structure of two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) winds in relation to their potential association with the X-ray warm absorbers (WAs) and the highly ionized ultra-fast outflows (UFOs) in active galactic nuclei (AGNs), in a single unifying approach. We present the density n(r, ?), ionization parameter ?(r, ?), and velocity structure v(r, ?) of such ionized winds for typical values of their fluid-to-magnetic flux ratio, F, and specific angular momentum, H, for which wind solutions become super-Alfvnic. We explore the geometrical shape of winds for different values of these parameters and delineate the values that produce the widest and narrowest opening angles of these winds, quantities necessary in the determination of the statistics of AGN obscuration. We find that winds with smaller H show a poloidal geometry of narrower opening angles with their Alfvn surface at lower inclination angles and therefore they produce the highest line of sight (LoS) velocities for observers at higher latitudes with the respect to the disk plane. We further note a physical and spatial correlation between the X-ray WAs and UFOs that form along the same LoS to the observer but at different radii, r, and distinct values of n, ?, and v consistent with the latest spectroscopic data of radio-quiet Seyfert galaxies. We also show that, at least in the case of 3C 111, the winds' pressure is sufficient to contain the relativistic plasma responsible for its radio emission. Stratified MHD disk winds could therefore serve as a unique means to understand and unify the diverse AGN outflows.

  19. THREE-DIMENSIONAL LAGRANGIAN TURBULENT DIFFUSION OF DUST GRAINS IN A PROTOPLANETARY DISK: METHOD AND FIRST APPLICATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Charnoz, Sebastien; Aleon, Jerome

    2011-08-10

    In order to understand how the chemical and isotopic compositions of dust grains in a gaseous turbulent protoplanetary disk are altered during their journey in the disk, it is important to determine their individual trajectories. We study here the dust-diffusive transport using Lagrangian numerical simulations using the popular 'turbulent diffusion' formalism. However, it is naturally expressed in an Eulerian form, which does not allow the trajectories of individual particles to be studied. We present a simple stochastic and physically justified procedure for modeling turbulent diffusion in a Lagrangian form that overcomes these difficulties. We show that a net diffusive flux F of the dust appears and that it is proportional to the gas density ({rho}) gradient and the dust diffusion coefficient D{sub d}: (F = D{sub d} /{rho} x grad({rho})). It induces an inward transport of dust in the disk's midplane, while favoring outward transport in the disk's upper layers. We present tests and applications comparing dust diffusion in the midplane and upper layers as well as sample trajectories of particles with different sizes. We also discuss potential applications for cosmochemistry and smoothed particle hydrodynamic codes.

  20. Cryogenic disk Yb : YAG laser with 120-mJ energy at 500-Hz pulse repetition rate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perevezentsev, E A; Mukhin, I B; Kuznetsov, I I; Palashov, O V; Khazanov, Efim A

    2013-03-31

    A repetitively pulsed laser system based on cryogenically cooled Yb : YAG disks is developed. The creation of Yb : YAG/YAG composites and the use of an active liquid nitrogen cooling system made it possible to significantly decrease the effect of amplified spontaneous emission. The average output power of the system is 60 W. (extreme light fields and their applications)

  1. Effect of Front-Side Silver Metallization on Underlying n+-p Junction in Multicrystalline Silicon Solar Cells: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jiang, C. S.; Li, Z. G.; Moutinho, H. R.; Liang, L.; Ionkin, A.; Al-Jassim, M. M.

    2012-06-01

    We report on the effect of front-side Ag metallization on the underlying n+-p junction of multicrystalline Si solar cells. The junction quality beneath the contacts was investigated by characterizing the uniformities of the electrostatic potential and doping concentration across the junction, using scanning Kelvin probe force microscopy and scanning capacitance microscopy. We investigated cells with a commercial Ag paste (DuPont PV159) and fired at furnace setting temperatures of 800 degrees, 840 degrees, and 930 degrees C, which results in actual cell temperatures ~100 degrees C lower than the setting temperature and the three cells being under-, optimal-, and over-fired. We found that the uniformity of the junction beneath the Ag contact was significantly degraded by the over-firing, whereas the junction retained good uniformity with the optimal- and under-fire temperatures. Further, Ag crystallites with widely distributed sizes from <100 nm to several μm were found at the Ag/Si interface of the over-fired cell. Large crystallites were imaged as protrusions into Si deeper than the junction depth. However, the junction was not broken down; instead, it was reformed on the entire front of the crystallite/Si interface. We propose a mechanism of the junction-quality degradation, based on emitter Si melting at the temperature around the Ag-Si eutectic point during firing, and subsequent recrystallization with incorporation of impurities in the Ag paste and with formation of crystallographic defects during quenching.

  2. WIND-DRIVEN ACCRETION IN PROTOPLANETARY DISKS. I. SUPPRESSION OF THE MAGNETOROTATIONAL INSTABILITY AND LAUNCHING OF THE MAGNETOCENTRIFUGAL WIND

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bai Xuening; Stone, James M., E-mail: xbai@cfa.harvard.edu [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Peyton Hall, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States)

    2013-05-20

    We perform local, vertically stratified shearing-box MHD simulations of protoplanetary disks (PPDs) at a fiducial radius of 1 AU that take into account the effects of both Ohmic resistivity and ambipolar diffusion (AD). The magnetic diffusion coefficients are evaluated self-consistently from a look-up table based on equilibrium chemistry. We first show that the inclusion of AD dramatically changes the conventional picture of layered accretion. Without net vertical magnetic field, the system evolves into a toroidal field dominated configuration with extremely weak turbulence in the far-UV ionization layer that is far too inefficient to drive rapid accretion. In the presence of a weak net vertical field (plasma {beta} {approx} 10{sup 5} at midplane), we find that the magnetorotational instability (MRI) is completely suppressed, resulting in a fully laminar flow throughout the vertical extent of the disk. A strong magnetocentrifugal wind is launched that efficiently carries away disk angular momentum and easily accounts for the observed accretion rate in PPDs. Moreover, under a physical disk wind geometry, all the accretion flow proceeds through a strong current layer with a thickness of {approx}0.3H that is offset from disk midplane with radial velocity of up to 0.4 times the sound speed. Both Ohmic resistivity and AD are essential for the suppression of the MRI and wind launching. The efficiency of wind transport increases with increasing net vertical magnetic flux and the penetration depth of the FUV ionization. Our laminar wind solution has important implications on planet formation and global evolution of PPDs.

  3. REVERSE RADIATIVE SHOCK LASER EXPERIMENTS RELEVANT TO ACCRETING STREAM-DISK IMPACT IN INTERACTING BINARIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krauland, C. M.; Drake, R. P.; Kuranz, C. C.; Huntington, C. M.; Kaczala, D. N.; Klein, S.; Sweeney, R.; Young, R. P.; Keiter, P. A.; Loupias, B.; Falize, E.; Villette, B.; Plewa, T. E-mail: rpdrake@umich.edu

    2013-01-01

    We present the first results from high-energy-density laboratory astrophysics experiments that explore the hydrodynamic and radiative properties of a reverse shock relevant to a cataclysmic variable system. A reverse shock is a shock wave that develops when a freely flowing, supersonic plasma is impeded. In our experiments, performed on the Omega Laser Facility, a laser pulse is used to accelerate plasma ejecta into a vacuum. This flow is directed into an Al plate in front of which a shock forms in the rebounding plasma. The plasma flow is moving fast enough that it is shocked to high enough temperatures that radiative cooling affects the shock structure. These are the first experiments to produce a radiative reverse shock wave.

  4. Considerations on the design of front-end electronics for silicon calorimetry for the SSC (Superconducting Super Collider)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wintenberg, A.L.; Bauer, M.L.; Britton, C.L. Jr.; Kennedy, E.J.; Todd, R.A. ); Berridge, S.C.; Bugg, W.M. )

    1990-01-01

    Some considerations are described for the design of a silicon-based sampling calorimetry detector for the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC). The use of silicon as the detection medium allows fast, accurate, and fine-grained energy measurements -- but for optimal performance, the front-end electronics must be matched to the detector characteristics and have the speed required by the high SSC interaction rates. The relation between the signal-to-noise ratio of the calorimeter electronics and the charge collection time, the preamplifier power dissipation, detector capacitance and leakage, charge gain, and signal shaping and sampling was studied. The electrostatic transformer connection was analyzed and found to be unusable for a tightly arranged calorimeter because of stray capacitance effects. The method of deconvolutional sampling was developed as a means for pileup correction following synchronous sampling and analog storage. 3 refs., 6 figs.

  5. THE POWER SPECTRUM OF THE MILKY WAY: VELOCITY FLUCTUATIONS IN THE GALACTIC DISK

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bovy, Jo; Bird, Jonathan C.; Prez, Ana E. Garca; Majewski, Steven R.; Nidever, David L.; Zasowski, Gail

    2015-02-20

    We investigate the kinematics of stars in the mid-plane of the Milky Way (MW) on scales between 25 pc and 10 kpc with data from the Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE), the Radial Velocity Experiment (RAVE), and the Geneva-Copenhagen survey (GCS). Using red-clump (RC) stars in APOGEE, we determine the large-scale line-of-sight velocity field out to 5 kpc from the Sun in (0.75 kpc){sup 2} bins. The solar motion V{sub ?} {sub } {sub c} with respect to the circular velocity V{sub c} is the largest contribution to the power on large scales after subtracting an axisymmetric rotation field; we determine the solar motion by minimizing the large-scale power to be V{sub ?} {sub } {sub c} = 24 1 (ran.) 2 (syst. [V{sub c} ]) 5 (syst.[large-scale]) km s{sup 1}, where the systematic uncertainty is due to (1) a conservative 20 km s{sup 1} uncertainty in V{sub c} and (2) the estimated power on unobserved larger scales. Combining the APOGEE peculiar-velocity field with RC stars in RAVE out to 2 kpc from the Sun and with local GCS stars, we determine the power spectrum of residual velocity fluctuations in the MW's disk on scales between 0.2 kpc{sup 1} ? k ? 40 kpc{sup 1}. Most of the power is contained in a broad peak between 0.2 kpc{sup 1} < k < 0.9 kpc{sup 1}. We investigate the expected power spectrum for various non-axisymmetric perturbations and demonstrate that the central bar with commonly used parameters but of relatively high mass can explain the bulk of velocity fluctuations in the plane of the Galactic disk near the Sun. Streaming motions ?10 km s{sup 1} on ? 3 kpc scales in the MW are in good agreement with observations of external galaxies and directly explain why local determinations of the solar motion are inconsistent with global measurements.

  6. Edge-facet pumped, multi-aperture, thin-disk laser geometry for very high average power output scaling

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zapata, Luis E.

    2004-12-21

    The average power output of a laser is scaled, to first order, by increasing the transverse dimension of the gain medium while increasing the thickness of an index matched light guide proportionately. Strategic facets cut at the edges of the laminated gain medium provide a method by which the pump light introduced through edges of the composite structure is trapped and passes through the gain medium repeatedly. Spontaneous emission escapes the laser volume via these facets. A multi-faceted disk geometry with grooves cut into the thickness of the gain medium is optimized to passively reject spontaneous emission generated within the laser material, which would otherwise be trapped and amplified within the high index composite disk. Such geometry allows the useful size of the laser aperture to be increased, enabling the average laser output power to be scaled.

  7. FIONDA (Filtering Images of Niobium Disks Application): Filter application for Eddy Current Scanner data analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boffo, C.; Bauer, P.; /Fermilab

    2005-05-01

    As part of the material QC process, each Niobium disk from which a superconducting RF cavity is built must undergo an eddy current scan [1]. This process allows to discover embedded defects in the material that are not visible to the naked eye because too small or under the surface. Moreover, during the production process of SC cavities the outer layer of Nb is removed via chemical or electro-chemical etching, thus it is important to evaluate the quality of the subsurface layer (in the order of 100nm) where superconductivity will happen. The reference eddy current scanning machine is operated at DESY; at Fermilab we are using the SNS eddy current scanner on loan, courtesy of SNS. In the past year, several upgrades were implemented aiming at raising the SNS machine performance to that of the DESY reference machine [2]. As part of this effort an algorithm that enables the filtering of the results of the scans and thus improves the resolution of the process was developed. The description of the algorithm and of the software used to filter the scan results is presented in this note.

  8. ELEMENTAL ABUNDANCE RATIOS IN STARS OF THE OUTER GALACTIC DISK. IV. A NEW SAMPLE OF OPEN CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yong, David; Carney, Bruce W.; Friel, Eileen D. E-mail: bruce@physics.unc.edu

    2012-10-01

    We present radial velocities and chemical abundances for nine stars in the old, distant open clusters Be18, Be21, Be22, Be32, and PWM4. For Be18 and PWM4, these are the first chemical abundance measurements. Combining our data with literature results produces a compilation of some 68 chemical abundance measurements in 49 unique clusters. For this combined sample, we study the chemical abundances of open clusters as a function of distance, age, and metallicity. We confirm that the metallicity gradient in the outer disk is flatter than the gradient in the vicinity of the solar neighborhood. We also confirm that the open clusters in the outer disk are metal-poor with enhancements in the ratios [{alpha}/Fe] and perhaps [Eu/Fe]. All elements show negligible or small trends between [X/Fe] and distance (<0.02 dex kpc{sup -1}), but for some elements, there is a hint that the local (R{sub GC} < 13 kpc) and distant (R{sub GC} > 13 kpc) samples may have different trends with distance. There is no evidence for significant abundance trends versus age (<0.04 dex Gyr{sup -1}). We measure the linear relation between [X/Fe] and metallicity, [Fe/H], and find that the scatter about the mean trend is comparable to the measurement uncertainties. Comparison with solar neighborhood field giants shows that the open clusters share similar abundance ratios [X/Fe] at a given metallicity. While the flattening of the metallicity gradient and enhanced [{alpha}/Fe] ratios in the outer disk suggest a chemical enrichment history different from that of the solar neighborhood, we echo the sentiments expressed by Friel et al. that definitive conclusions await homogeneous analyses of larger samples of stars in larger numbers of clusters. Arguably, our understanding of the evolution of the outer disk from open clusters is currently limited by systematic abundance differences between various studies.

  9. Andromeda (M31) optical and infrared disk survey. I. Insights in wide-field near-IR surface photometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sick, Jonathan; Courteau, Stphane; Cuillandre, Jean-Charles; McDonald, Michael; De Jong, Roelof; Tully, R. Brent

    2014-05-01

    We present wide-field near-infrared J and K{sub s} images of the Andromeda Galaxy (M31) taken with WIRCam at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope as part of the Andromeda Optical and Infrared Disk Survey. This data set allows simultaneous observations of resolved stars and near-infrared (NIR) surface brightness across M31's entire bulge and disk (within R = 22 kpc), permitting a direct test of the stellar composition of near-infrared light in a nearby galaxy. Here we develop NIR observation and reduction methods to recover a uniform surface brightness map across the 3 1 disk of M31 with 27 WIRCam fields. Two sky-target nodding strategies are tested, and we find that strictly minimizing sky sampling latency cannot improve background subtraction accuracy to better than 2% of the background level due to spatio-temporal variations in the NIR skyglow. We fully describe our WIRCam reduction pipeline and advocate using flats built from night-sky images over a single night, rather than dome flats that do not capture the WIRCam illumination field. Contamination from scattered light and thermal background in sky flats has a negligible effect on the surface brightness shape compared to the stochastic differences in background shape between sky and galaxy disk fields, which are ?0.3% of the background level. The most dramatic calibration step is the introduction of scalar sky offsets to each image that optimizes surface brightness continuity. Sky offsets reduce the mean surface brightness difference between observation blocks from 1% to <0.1% of the background level, though the absolute background level remains statistically uncertain to 0.15% of the background level. We present our WIRCam reduction pipeline and performance analysis to give specific recommendations for the improvement of NIR wide-field imaging methods.

  10. HIGH-RESOLUTION MID-INFRARED IMAGING OF THE CIRCUMSTELLAR DISKS OF HERBIG Ae/Be STARS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marinas, N.; Telesco, C. M.; Packham, C.; Fisher, R. S.

    2011-08-20

    We have imaged the circumstellar environments of 17 Herbig Ae/Be stars at 12 and 18 {mu}m using MICHELLE on Gemini North and T-ReCS on Gemini South. Our sample contained eight Group I sources, those having large rising near- to far-infrared (IR) fluxes, and nine Group II sources, those having more modest mid-IR fluxes relative to their near-IR flux (in the classification of Meeus et al.). We have resolved extended emission from all Group I sources in our target list. The majority of these sources have radially symmetric mid-IR emission extending from a radius of 10 AU to hundreds of AU. Only one of the nine Group II sources is resolved at the FWHM level, with another two Group II sources resolved at fainter levels. Models by Dullemond et al. explain the observed spectral energy distribution of Group II sources using self-shadowed cold disks. If this is the case for all the Group II sources, we do not expect to detect extended emission with this study, since the IR emission measured should arise from a region only a few AU in size, which is smaller than our resolution. The fact that we do resolve some of the Group II sources implies that their disks are not completely flat, and might represent an intermediate stage. We also find that none of the more massive (>3 M{sub sun}) Herbig Ae/Be stars in our sample belongs to Group I, which may point to a relationship between stellar mass and circumstellar dust evolution. Disks around more massive stars might evolve faster so that stars are surrounded by a more evolved flat disk by the time they become optically visible, or they might follow a different evolutionary path altogether.

  11. SEARCH FOR CIRCUMSTELLAR DISKS AND RADIO JETS IN THE MASSIVE STAR-FORMATION REGION IRAS 23033+5951

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rodriguez, T.; Trinidad, M. A.; Migenes, V. E-mail: trinidad@astro.ugto.mx

    2012-08-20

    We present radio continuum (1.3 and 3.6 cm) and H{sub 2}O maser observations toward the high-mass star-forming region IRAS 23033+5951 carried out with the VLA-EVLA (in transition phase) in the A configuration. Three radio continuum sources are detected at 3.6 cm, which are aligned in the east-west direction. However, no continuum emission is detected in the region at 1.3 cm. Based on the continuum information, we find that the two continuum sources detected in the region could be consistent with ultracompact H II regions harboring ZAMS B2 and B2.5 stars; however, we do not rule out that they could be associated with a radio jet. In addition, nine water maser spots are detected toward IRAS 23033+5951, which are clustered in two groups and located about 2'' to the south of the continuum sources. The spatio-kinematical distribution of the water masers suggests that they are tracing a circumstellar disk associated with a central star ZAMS B0, which could be the least evolved source in the region and has not developed an H II region yet. Moreover, as the circumstellar disk seems to be associated with the CO molecular outflow observed in the region, this conforms to a disk-YSO-outflow system, similar to that found in low-mass stars.

  12. A NEW SUB-PERIOD-MINIMUM CATACLYSMIC VARIABLE WITH PARTIAL HYDROGEN DEPLETION AND EVIDENCE OF SPIRAL DISK STRUCTURE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Littlefield, C.; Garnavich, P.; Magno, K.; Applegate, A.; Pogge, R.; Irwin, J.; Marion, G. H.; Kirshner, R.; Vinko, J.

    2013-06-15

    We present time-resolved spectroscopy and photometry of CSS 120422:111127+571239 (=SBS 1108+574), a recently discovered SU UMa-type dwarf nova whose 55 minute orbital period is well below the cataclysmic variable (CV) period minimum of {approx}78 minutes. In contrast with most other known CVs, its spectrum features He I emission of comparable strength to the Balmer lines, implying a hydrogen abundance less than 0.1 of long-period CVs-but still at least 10 times higher than that in AM CVn stars. Together, the short orbital period and remarkable helium-to-hydrogen ratio suggest that mass transfer in CSS 120422 began near the end of the donor star's main-sequence lifetime, meaning that this CV is a strong candidate progenitor of an AM CVn system as described by Podsiadlowski et al. Moreover, a Doppler tomogram of the H{alpha} line reveals two distinct regions of enhanced emission. While one is the result of the stream-disk impact, the other is probably attributable to spiral disk structure generated when material in the outer disk achieves a 2:1 orbital resonance with respect to the donor.

  13. SATURATED TORQUE FORMULA FOR PLANETARY MIGRATION IN VISCOUS DISKS WITH THERMAL DIFFUSION: RECIPE FOR PROTOPLANET POPULATION SYNTHESIS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Masset, F. S. [Instituto de Ciencias Fisicas, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico (UNAM), Apdo. Postal 48-3, 62251-Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico); Casoli, J., E-mail: masset@fis.unam.m, E-mail: jules.casoli@cea.f, E-mail: masset@fis.unam.m [Laboratoire AIM, CEA/DSM, CNRS, Universite Paris Diderot, Irfu/Service d'Astrophysique, Bat. 709, CEA/Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2010-11-10

    We provide torque formulae for low-mass planets undergoing type I migration in gaseous disks. These torque formulae put special emphasis on the horseshoe drag, which is prone to saturation: the asymptotic value reached by the horseshoe drag depends on a balance between coorbital dynamics (which tends to cancel out or saturate the torque) and diffusive processes (which tend to restore the unperturbed disk profiles, thereby desaturating the torque). We entertain the question of this asymptotic value and derive torque formulae that give the total torque as a function of the disk's viscosity and thermal diffusivity. The horseshoe drag features two components: one that scales with the vortensity gradient and another that scales with the entropy gradient and constitutes the most promising candidate for halting inward type I migration. Our analysis, which is complemented by numerical simulations, recovers characteristics already noted by numericists, namely, that the viscous timescale across the horseshoe region must be shorter than the libration time in order to avoid saturation and that, provided this condition is satisfied, the entropy-related part of the horseshoe drag remains large if the thermal timescale is shorter than the libration time. Side results include a study of the Lindblad torque as a function of thermal diffusivity and a contribution to the corotation torque arising from vortensity viscously created at the contact discontinuities that appear at the horseshoe separatrices. For the convenience of the reader mostly interested in the torque formulae, Section 8 is self-contained.

  14. No more active galactic nuclei in clumpy disks than in smooth galaxies at z ∼ 2 in CANDELS/3D-HST

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trump, Jonathan R.; Luo, Bin; Brandt, W. N.; Barro, Guillermo; Guo, Yicheng; Koo, David C.; Faber, S. M.; Brammer, Gabriel B.; Ferguson, Henry C.; Grogin, Norman A.; Kartaltepe, Jeyhan; Koekemoer, Anton M.; Bell, Eric F.; Dekel, Avishai; Hopkins, Philip F.; Kocevski, Dale D.; McIntosh, Daniel H.; Momcheva, Ivelina; and others

    2014-10-01

    We use CANDELS imaging, 3D-HST spectroscopy, and Chandra X-ray data to investigate if active galactic nuclei (AGNs) are preferentially fueled by violent disk instabilities funneling gas into galaxy centers at 1.3 < z < 2.4. We select galaxies undergoing gravitational instabilities using the number of clumps and degree of patchiness as proxies. The CANDELS visual classification system is used to identify 44 clumpy disk galaxies, along with mass-matched comparison samples of smooth and intermediate morphology galaxies. We note that despite being mass-matched and having similar star formation rates, the smoother galaxies tend to be smaller disks with more prominent bulges compared to the clumpy galaxies. The lack of smooth extended disks is probably a general feature of the z ∼ 2 galaxy population, and means we cannot directly compare with the clumpy and smooth extended disks observed at lower redshift. We find that z ∼ 2 clumpy galaxies have slightly enhanced AGN fractions selected by integrated line ratios (in the mass-excitation method), but the spatially resolved line ratios indicate this is likely due to extended phenomena rather than nuclear AGNs. Meanwhile, the X-ray data show that clumpy, smooth, and intermediate galaxies have nearly indistinguishable AGN fractions derived from both individual detections and stacked non-detections. The data demonstrate that AGN fueling modes at z ∼ 1.85—whether violent disk instabilities or secular processes—are as efficient in smooth galaxies as they are in clumpy galaxies.

  15. BLACK HOLE-NEUTRON STAR MERGERS WITH A HOT NUCLEAR EQUATION OF STATE: OUTFLOW AND NEUTRINO-COOLED DISK FOR A LOW-MASS, HIGH-SPIN CASE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deaton, M. Brett; Duez, Matthew D.; Foucart, Francois; O'Connor, Evan; Ott, Christian D.; Scheel, Mark A.; Szilagyi, Bela; Kidder, Lawrence E.; Muhlberger, Curran D. E-mail: m.duez@wsu.edu

    2013-10-10

    Neutrino emission significantly affects the evolution of the accretion tori formed in black hole-neutron star mergers. It removes energy from the disk, alters its composition, and provides a potential power source for a gamma-ray burst. To study these effects, simulations in general relativity with a hot microphysical equation of state (EOS) and neutrino feedback are needed. We present the first such simulation, using a neutrino leakage scheme for cooling to capture the most essential effects and considering a moderate mass (1.4 M{sub ?} neutron star, 5.6 M{sub ?} black hole), high-spin (black hole J/M {sup 2} = 0.9) system with the K{sub 0} = 220 MeV Lattimer-Swesty EOS. We find that about 0.08 M{sub ?} of nuclear matter is ejected from the system, while another 0.3 M{sub ?} forms a hot, compact accretion disk. The primary effects of the escaping neutrinos are (1) to make the disk much denser and more compact, (2) to cause the average electron fraction Y{sub e} of the disk to rise to about 0.2 and then gradually decrease again, and (3) to gradually cool the disk. The disk is initially hot (T ? 6 MeV) and luminous in neutrinos (L{sub ?} ? 10{sup 54} erg s{sup 1}), but the neutrino luminosity decreases by an order of magnitude over 50 ms of post-merger evolution.

  16. NEW SPATIALLY RESOLVED MID-INFRARED OBSERVATIONS OF THE TRANSITIONAL DISK TW Hya AND TENTATIVE EVIDENCE FOR A SELF-LUMINOUS COMPANION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arnold, Timothy J.; Eisner, J. A.; Monnier, J. D.; Tuthill, Peter E-mail: jeisner@email.arizona.edu E-mail: p.tuthill@physics.usyd.edu.au

    2012-05-10

    We present spatially resolved observations of the canonical transition disk object TW Hya at 8.74 {mu}m, 11.66 {mu}m, and 18.30 {mu}m, obtained with the T-ReCS instrument on the Gemini telescope. These observations are a result of a novel observing mode at Gemini that enables speckle imaging. Using this technique, we image our target with short enough exposure times to achieve diffraction limited images. We use Fourier techniques to reduce our data, which allows high-precision calibration of the instrumental point-spread function. Our observations span two epochs and we present evidence for temporal variability at 11.66 {mu}m in the disk of TW Hya. We show that previous models of TW Hya's disk from the literature are incompatible with our observations and construct a model to explain the discrepancies. We detect marginal asymmetry in our data, most significantly at the shortest wavelengths. To explain our data, we require a model that includes an optically thin inner disk extending from 0.02 to 3.9 AU, an optically thick ring representing the outer disk wall at 3.9 AU and extending to 4.6 AU, and a hotter-than-disk-equilibrium source of emission located at {approx}3.5 AU.

  17. ENHANCED ACCRETION RATES OF STARS ON SUPERMASSIVE BLACK HOLES BY STAR-DISK INTERACTIONS IN GALACTIC NUCLEI

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Just, Andreas; Yurin, Denis; Makukov, Maxim; Berczik, Peter; Omarov, Chingis; Spurzem, Rainer; Vilkoviskij, Emmanuil Y.

    2012-10-10

    We investigate the dynamical interaction of a central star cluster surrounding a supermassive black hole (SMBH) and a central accretion disk (AD). The dissipative force acting on stars in the disk leads to an enhanced mass flow toward the SMBH and to an asymmetry in the phase space distribution due to the rotating AD. The AD is considered as a stationary Keplerian rotating disk, which is vertically extended in order to employ a fully self-consistent treatment of stellar dynamics including the dissipative force originating from star-gas ram pressure effects. The stellar system is treated with a direct high-accuracy N-body integration code. A star-by-star representation, desirable in N-body simulations, cannot be extended to real particle numbers yet. Hence, we carefully discuss the scaling behavior of our model with regard to particle number and tidal accretion radius. The main idea is to find a family of models for which the ratio of two-body relaxation time and dissipation time (for kinetic energy of stellar orbits) is constant, which then allows us to extrapolate our results to real parameters of galactic nuclei. Our model is derived from basic physical principles and as such it provides insight into the role of physical processes in galactic nuclei, but it should be regarded as a first step toward more realistic and more comprehensive simulations. Nevertheless, the following conclusions appear to be robust: the star accretion rate onto the AD and subsequently onto the SMBH is enhanced by a significant factor compared to purely stellar dynamical systems neglecting the disk. This process leads to enhanced fueling of central disks in active galactic nuclei (AGNs) and to an enhanced rate of tidal stellar disruptions. Such disruptions may produce electromagnetic counterparts in the form of observable X-ray flares. Our models improve predictions for their rates in quiescent galactic nuclei. We do not yet model direct stellar collisions in the gravitational potential well of the black hole, which could further enhance the growth rate of the black hole. Our models are relevant for quiescent galactic nuclei, because all our mass accretion rates would give rise to luminosities much smaller than the Eddington luminosity. To reach Eddington luminosities, outflows, and feedback as in the most active QSOs, other scenarios are needed, such as gas accretion after galaxy mergers. However, for AGNs close to the Eddington limit, this process may not serve as the dominant accretion process due to the long timescale.

  18. THE HST/ACS COMA CLUSTER SURVEY. VIII. BARRED DISK GALAXIES IN THE CORE OF THE COMA CLUSTER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marinova, Irina; Jogee, Shardha; Weinzirl, Tim; Erwin, Peter; Trentham, Neil; Ferguson, Henry C.; Goudfrooij, Paul; Hammer, Derek; Den Brok, Mark; Peletier, Reynier F.; Kleijn, Gijs V.; Graham, Alister W.; Carter, David; Mouhcine, Mustapha; Balcells, Marc; Guzman, Rafael; Hoyos, Carlos; Mobasher, Bahram; Peng, Eric W. E-mail: sj@astro.as.utexas.edu

    2012-02-20

    We use high-resolution ({approx}0.''1) F814W Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) images from the Hubble Space Telescope ACS Treasury survey of the Coma cluster at z {approx} 0.02 to study bars in massive disk galaxies (S0s), as well as low-mass dwarf galaxies in the core of the Coma cluster, the densest environment in the nearby universe. Our study helps to constrain the evolution of bars and disks in dense environments and provides a comparison point for studies in lower density environments and at higher redshifts. Our results are: (1) we characterize the fraction and properties of bars in a sample of 32 bright (M{sub V} {approx}< -18, M{sub *} > 10{sup 9.5} M{sub Sun }) S0 galaxies, which dominate the population of massive disk galaxies in the Coma core. We find that the measurement of a bar fraction among S0 galaxies must be handled with special care due to the difficulty in separating unbarred S0s from ellipticals, and the potential dilution of the bar signature by light from a relatively large, bright bulge. The results depend sensitively on the method used: the bar fraction for bright S0s in the Coma core is 50% {+-} 11%, 65% {+-} 11%, and 60% {+-} 11% based on three methods of bar detection, namely, strict ellipse fit criteria, relaxed ellipse fit criteria, and visual classification. (2) We compare the S0 bar fraction across different environments (the Coma core, A901/902, and Virgo) adopting the critical step of using matched samples and matched methods in order to ensure robust comparisons. We find that the bar fraction among bright S0 galaxies does not show a statistically significant variation (within the error bars of {+-}11%) across environments which span two orders of magnitude in galaxy number density (n {approx} 300-10,000 galaxies Mpc{sup -3}) and include rich and poor clusters, such as the core of Coma, the A901/902 cluster, and Virgo. We speculate that the bar fraction among S0s is not significantly enhanced in rich clusters compared to low-density environments for two reasons. First, S0s in rich clusters are less prone to bar instabilities as they are dynamically heated by harassment and are gas poor as a result of ram pressure stripping and accelerated star formation. Second, high-speed encounters in rich clusters may be less effective than slow, strong encounters in inducing bars. (3) We also take advantage of the high resolution of the ACS ({approx}50 pc) to analyze a sample of 333 faint (M{sub V} > -18) dwarf galaxies in the Coma core. Using visual inspection of unsharp-masked images, we find only 13 galaxies with bar and/or spiral structure. An additional eight galaxies show evidence for an inclined disk. The paucity of disk structures in Coma dwarfs suggests that either disks are not common in these galaxies or that any disks present are too hot to develop instabilities.

  19. DENSITY WAVES EXCITED BY LOW-MASS PLANETS IN PROTOPLANETARY DISKS. I. LINEAR REGIME

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dong, Ruobing; Stone, James M.; Petrovich, Cristobal; Rafikov, Roman R. E-mail: rrr@astro.princeton.edu E-mail: cpetrovi@astro.princeton.edu

    2011-11-01

    Density waves excited by planets embedded in protoplanetary disks play a central role in planetary migration and gap opening processes. We carry out two-dimensional shearing sheet simulations to study the linear regime of wave evolution with the grid-based code Athena and provide detailed comparisons with theoretical predictions. Low-mass planets (down to {approx}0.03 M{sub Circled-Plus} at 1 AU) and high spatial resolution (256 grid points per scale height) are chosen to mitigate the effects of wave nonlinearity. To complement the existing numerical studies, we focus on the primary physical variables such as the spatial profile of the wave, torque density, and the angular momentum flux carried by the wave, instead of secondary quantities such as the planetary migration rate. Our results show percent level agreement with theory in both physical and Fourier spaces. New phenomena such as the change of the toque density sign far from the planet are discovered and discussed. Also, we explore the effect of the numerical algorithms and find that a high order of accuracy, high resolution, and an accurate planetary potential are crucial to achieve good agreement with the theory. We find that the use of a too large time step without properly resolving the dynamical timescale around the planet produces incorrect results and may lead to spurious gap opening. Global simulations of planet migration and gap opening violating this requirement may be affected by spurious effects resulting in, e.g., the incorrect planetary migration rate and gap opening mass.

  20. NGC 1365: A low column density state unveiling a low ionization disk wind

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Braito, V.; Reeves, J. N.; Gofford, J.; Nardini, E.; Porquet, D.; Risaliti, G.

    2014-11-01

    We present the time-resolved spectral analysis of the XMM-Newton data of NGC 1365 collected during one XMM-Newton observation, which caught this 'changing-look' active galactic nucleus in a high flux state characterized also by a low column density (N {sub H} ? 10{sup 22} cm{sup 2}) of the X-ray absorber. During this observation, the low-energy photoelectric cut-off is at about ?1 keV and the primary continuum can be investigated with the XMM-Newton-RGS data, which show strong spectral variability that can be explained as a variable low N {sub H} that decreased from N {sub H} ? 10{sup 23} cm{sup 2} to 10{sup 22} cm{sup 2} in a 100 ks timescale. The spectral analysis of the last segment of the observation revealed the presence of several absorption features that can be associated with an ionized (log ? ? 2 erg cm s{sup 1}) outflowing wind (v {sub out} ? 2000 km s{sup 1}). We detected for the first time a possible P-Cygni profile of the Mg XII Ly? line associated with this mildly ionized absorber indicative of a wide angle outflowing wind. We suggest that this wind is a low ionization zone of the highly ionized wind present in NGC 1365, which is responsible for the iron K absorption lines and is located within the variable X-ray absorber. At the end of the observation, we detected a strong absorption line at E ? 0.76 keV most likely associated with a lower ionization zone of the absorber (log ? ? 0.2 erg cm s{sup 1}, N {sub H} ? 10{sup 22} cm{sup 2}), which suggests that the variable absorber in NGC 1365 could be a low ionization zone of the disk wind.

  1. DISCOVERY OF H? EMISSION FROM THE CLOSE COMPANION INSIDE THE GAP OF TRANSITIONAL DISK HD142527

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Close, L. M.; Follette, K. B.; Males, J. R.; Apai, D.; Morzinski, K.; Rodigas, T. J.; Hinz, P.; Bailey, V.; Puglisi, A.; Xompero, M.; Briguglio, R.; Najita, J.; Weinberger, A. J.

    2014-02-01

    We utilized the new high-order 585 actuator Magellan Adaptive Optics system (MagAO) to obtain very high-resolution visible light images of HD142527 with MagAO's VisAO science camera. In the median seeing conditions of the 6.5m Magellan telescope (0.''50.''7), we find MagAO delivers 24%-19% Strehl at H? (0.656 ?m). We detect a faint companion (HD142527B) embedded in this young transitional disk system at just 86.3 1.9 mas (?12 AU) from the star. The companion is detected in both H? and a continuum filter (?mag = 6.33 0.20 mag at H? and 7.50 0.25 mag in the continuum filter). This provides confirmation of the tentative companion discovered by Biller and co-workers with sparse aperture masking at the 8m Very Large Telescope. The H? emission from the ?0.25 solar mass companion (EW = 180 ) implies a mass accretion rate of ?5.9 10{sup 10} M {sub sun} yr{sup 1} and a total accretion luminosity of 1.2% L {sub sun}. Assuming a similar accretion rate, we estimate that a 1 Jupiter mass gas giant could have considerably better (50-1000) planet/star contrasts at H? than at the H band (COND models) for a range of optical extinctions (3.4-0 mag). We suggest that ?0.5-5 M {sub jup} extrasolar planets in their gas accretion phase could be much more luminous at H? than in the NIR. This is the motivation for our new MagAO GAPplanetS survey for extrasolar planets.

  2. UNVEILING THE EVOLUTIONARY SEQUENCE FROM INFALLING ENVELOPES TO KEPLERIAN DISKS AROUND LOW-MASS PROTOSTARS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yen, Hsi-Wei; Takakuwa, Shigehisa; Ohashi, Nagayoshi; Ho, Paul T. P.

    2013-07-20

    We performed Submillimeter Array observations in the C{sup 18}O (2-1) emission line toward six Class 0 and I protostars to study rotational motions of their surrounding envelopes and circumstellar material on 100-1000 AU scales. C{sup 18}O (2-1) emission with intensity peaks located at the protostellar positions is detected toward all six sources. The rotational velocities of the protostellar envelopes as a function of radius were measured from the position-velocity diagrams perpendicular to the outflow directions passing through the protostellar positions. Two Class 0 sources, B335 and NGC 1333 IRAS 4B, show no detectable rotational motion, while L1527 IRS (Class 0/I) and L1448-mm (Class 0) exhibit rotational motions with radial profiles of V{sub rot}{proportional_to}r {sup -1.0{+-}0.2} and {proportional_to}r {sup -1.0{+-}0.1}, respectively. The other Class I sources, TMC-1A and L1489 IRS, exhibit the fastest rotational motions among the sample, and their rotational motions have flatter radial profiles of V{sub rot}{proportional_to}r {sup -0.6{+-}0.1} and {proportional_to}r {sup -0.5{+-}0.1}, respectively. The rotational motions with the radial dependence of {approx}r {sup -1} can be interpreted as rotation with a conserved angular momentum in a dynamically infalling envelope, while those with the radial dependence of {approx}r {sup -0.5} can be interpreted as Keplerian rotation. These observational results demonstrate categorization of rotational motions from infalling envelopes to Keplerian-disk formation. Models of the inside-out collapse where the angular momentum is conserved are discussed and compared with our observational results.

  3. Review and comparison of web- and disk-based tools for residentialenergy analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mills, Evan

    2002-08-25

    There exist hundreds of building energy software tools, both web- and disk-based. These tools exhibit considerable range in approach and creativity, with some being highly specialized and others able to consider the building as a whole. However, users are faced with a dizzying array of choices and, often, conflicting results. The fragmentation of development and deployment efforts has hampered tool quality and market penetration. The purpose of this review is to provide information for defining the desired characteristics of residential energy tools, and to encourage future tool development that improves on current practice. This project entails (1) creating a framework for describing possible technical and functional characteristics of such tools, (2) mapping existing tools onto this framework, (3) exploring issues of tool accuracy, and (4) identifying ''best practice'' and strategic opportunities for tool design. evaluated 50 web-based residential calculators, 21 of which we regard as ''whole-house'' tools(i.e., covering a range of end uses). Of the whole-house tools, 13 provide open-ended energy calculations, 5 normalize the results to actual costs (a.k.a ''bill-disaggregation tools''), and 3 provide both options. Across the whole-house tools, we found a range of 5 to 58 house-descriptive features (out of 68 identified in our framework) and 2 to 41 analytical and decision-support features (55 possible). We also evaluated 15 disk-based residential calculators, six of which are whole-house tools. Of these tools, 11 provide open-ended calculations, 1 normalizes the results to actual costs, and 3 provide both options. These tools offered ranges of 18 to 58 technical features (70 possible) and 10 to 40 user- and decision-support features (56 possible). The comparison shows that such tools can employ many approaches and levels of detail. Some tools require a relatively small number of well-considered inputs while others ask a myriad of questions and still miss key issues. The value of detail has a lot to do with the type of question(s) being asked by the user (e.g., the availability of dozens of miscellaneous appliances is immaterial for a user attempting to evaluate the potential for space-heating savings by installing a new furnace). More detail does not, according to our evaluation, automatically translate into a ''better'' or ''more accurate'' tool. Efforts to quantify and compare the ''accuracy'' of these tools are difficult at best, and prior tool-comparison studies have not undertaken this in a meaningful way. The ability to evaluate accuracy is inherently limited by the availability of measured data. Furthermore, certain tool outputs can only be measured against ''actual'' values that are themselves calculated (e.g., HVAC sizing), while others are rarely if ever available (e.g., measured energy use or savings for specific measures). Similarly challenging is to understand the sources of inaccuracies. There are many ways in which quantitative errors can occur in tools, ranging from programming errors to problems inherent in a tool's design. Due to hidden assumptions and non-variable ''defaults'', most tools cannot be fully tested across the desirable range of building configurations, operating conditions, weather locations, etc. Many factors conspire to confound performance comparisons among tools. Differences in inputs can range from weather city, to types of HVAC systems, to appliance characteristics, to occupant-driven effects such as thermostat management. Differences in results would thus no doubt emerge from an extensive comparative exercise, but the sources or implications of these differences for the purposes of accuracy evaluation or tool development would remain largely unidentifiable (especially given the paucity of technical documentation available for most tools). For the tools that we tested, the predicted energy bills for a single test building ranged widely (by nearly a factor of three), and far more so at the end-use level. Most tools over-predicted energy bills and all over-predicted consumption. Variability was lower among disk-based tools,but they more significantly over-predicted actual use. The deviations (over-predictions) we observed from actual bills corresponded to up to $1400 per year (approx. 250 percent of the actual bills). For bill-disaggregation tools, wherein the results are forced to equal actual bills, the accuracy issue shifts to whether or not the total is properly attributed to the various end uses and to whether savings calculations are done accurately (a challenge that demands relatively rare end-use data). Here, too, we observed a number of dubious results. Energy savings estimates automatically generated by the web-based tools varied from $46/year (5 percent of predicted use) to $625/year (52 percent of predicted use).

  4. Non-filamentated ultra-intense and ultra-short pulse fronts in three-dimensional Raman seed amplification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lehmann, G.; Spatschek, K. H.

    2014-05-15

    Ultra-intense and ultra-short laser pulses may be generated up to the exawatt-zetawatt regime due to parametric processes in plasmas. The minimization of unwanted plasma processes leads to operational limits which are discussed here with respect to filamentation. Transverse filamentation, which originally was derived for plane waves, is being investigated for seed pulse propagation in the so called ?-pulse limit. A three-dimensional (3D) three-wave-interaction model is the basis of the present investigation. To demonstrate the applicability of the three-wave-interaction model, the 1D pulse forms are compared with those obtained from 1D particle in cell and Vlasov simulations. Although wave-breaking may occur, the kinetic simulations show that the leading pumped pulse develops a form similar to that obtained from the three-wave-interaction model. In the main part, 2D and 3D filamentation processes of (localized) pulses are investigated with the three-wave-interaction model. It is shown that the leading pulse front can stay filamentation-free, whereas the rear parts show transverse modulations.

  5. Generation of short gamma-ray pulses on electron bunches formed in intense interfering laser beams with tilted fronts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Korobkin, V V; Romanovskiy, M Yu; Trofimov, V A; Shiryaev, O B

    2014-05-30

    It is shown that in the interference of multiple laser pulses with a relativistic intensity, phase and amplitude fronts of which are tilted at an angle with respect to their wave vector, effective traps of charged particles, which are moving at the velocity of light, are formed. Such traps are capable of capturing and accelerating the electrons produced in the ionisation of low-density gas by means of laser radiation. The accelerated electrons in the traps form a bunch, whose dimensions in all directions are much smaller than the laser radiation wavelength. Calculations show that the energy of accelerated electrons may amount to several hundred GeV at experimentally accessible relativistic laser intensities. As a result of the inverse Compton scattering, gamma-quanta with a high energy and narrow radiation pattern are emitted when these electrons interact with a laser pulse propagating from the opposite direction. The duration of emitted gamma-ray pulses constitutes a few attoseconds. The simulation is performed by solving the relativistic equation of motion for an electron with a relevant Lorentz force. (interaction of radiation with matter)

  6. parking permit application - front

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    SIGNATURE ST CAR NO 1, MAKE TAG NUMBER ST TAG NUMBER CAR NO 2, MAKE YEARS FEDERAL SERVICE ... SIGNATURE ST CAR NO 1, MAKE TAG NUMBER ST TAG NUMBER CAR NO 2, MAKE YEARS FEDERAL SERVICE ...

  7. cover front.qxd

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Area 10, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, October 1984. vii Preface Beginning with the Manhattan Project during World War II, the Federal Government has carried out extensive nuclear ...

  8. FactsheetFront2016

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

  9. parking permit application - front

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    HOME ADDRESS (Street, City, State) EMPLOYER DOE ROUTE SYMBOL WORK PHONE EXT SIGNATURE ST CAR NO 1, MAKE TAG NUMBER ST TAG NUMBER CAR NO 2, MAKE YEARS FEDERAL SERVICE POSITION TITLE ...

  10. New Vision front

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy Videos to Help Improve Energy Literacy Throughout the Nation New Videos to Help Improve Energy Literacy Throughout the Nation December 3, 2014 - 5:47pm Addthis MORE ON THIS STORY Download or order free copies of the Energy Literacy Framework by emailing energyliteracy@ee.doe.gov Search the Education Toolbox for more lessons and videos on Energy Read the fact sheet on the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy's new climate education, literacy, and training

  11. parking permit application - front

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    POSITION TITLE MI FIRST NAME LAST NAME HOME ADDRESS (Street, City, State) EMPLOYER DOE ROUTE SYMBOL WORK PHONE EXT SIGNATURE ST CAR NO 1, MAKE TAG NUMBER ST TAG NUMBER CAR NO 2, MAKE YEARS FEDERAL SERVICE POSITION TITLE MI FIRST NAME LAST NAME HOME ADDRESS (Street, City, State) EMPLOYER DOE ROUTE SYMBOL WORK PHONE EXT INSTRUCTIONS: Complete requested information in each applicable blank. For make of car: Use Ford, Chevrolet, Plymouth, Toyota, Volkswagen, etc., Not model name. Return original

  12. ETA-NTP006 Braking Test

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Electric Transportation Applications All Rights Reserved Procedure ETA-NTP006 Revision 3 ... Electric Transportation Applications All Rights Reserved Procedure ETA-NTP006 Revision 3 ...

  13. ETA-HITP06 - Braking Test

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Electric Transportation Applications All Rights Reserved TABLE OF CONTENTS 1. Objectives ... Electric Transportation Applications All Rights Reserved 1. Objective This procedure ...

  14. ETA-UTP006 - Braking Test

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Electric Transportation Applications All Rights Reserved TABLE OF CONTENTS 1.0 Objectives ... Electric Transportation Applications All Rights Reserved 1.0 Objective This procedure ...

  15. Chandra spectroscopy of MAXI J1305704: Detection of an infalling black hole disk wind?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, J. M.; Maitra, D.; Reynolds, M. T.; Degenaar, N.; King, A. L.; Raymond, J.; Kallman, T. R.; Fabian, A. C.; Proga, D.; Reynolds, C. S.; Cackett, E. M.; Kennea, J. A.; Beardmore, A.

    2014-06-10

    We report on a high-resolution Chandra/HETG X-ray spectrum of the transient X-ray binary MAXI J1305704. A rich absorption complex is detected in the Fe L band, including density-sensitive lines from Fe XX, Fe XXI, and Fe XXII. Spectral analysis over three wavelength bands with a large grid of XSTAR photoionization models generally requires a gas density of n ? 10{sup 17} cm{sup 3}. Assuming a luminosity of L = 10{sup 37} erg s{sup 1}, fits to the 10-14 band constrain the absorbing gas to lie within r = (3.9 0.7) 10{sup 3} km from the central engine, or about r = 520 90 (M/5 M {sub ?}) r{sub g} , where r{sub g} = GM/c {sup 2}. At this small distance from the compact object, gas in stable orbits should have a gravitational redshift of z = v/c ? (3 1) 10{sup 3} (M/5 M {sub ?}), and any tenuous inflowing gas should have a free-fall velocity of v/c ? (6 1) 10{sup 2} (M/5 M {sub ?}){sup 1/2}. The best-fit single-zone photoionization models measure a redshift of v/c = (2.6-3.2) 10{sup 3}. Models with two absorbing zones provide significantly improved fits, and the additional zone is measured to have a redshift of v/c = (4.6-4.9) 10{sup 2} (models including two zones suggest slightly different radii and may point to lower densities). Thus, the observed shifts are broadly consistent with those expected at the photoionization radius. The absorption spectrum revealed in MAXI J1305704 may be best explained in terms of a 'failed wind' like those predicted in some recent numerical simulations of black hole accretion flows. The robustness of the velocity shifts was explored through detailed simulations with the Chandra/MARX ray-tracing package and analysis of the zeroth-order ACIS-S3 spectrum. These tests are particularly important given the anomalously large angle between the source and the optical axis in this observation. The simulations and ACIS spectrum suggest that the shifts are not instrumental; however, strong caution is warranted. We discuss our results in the context of accretion flows in stellar-mass black holes and active galactic nuclei, as well as the potential role of failed winds in emerging connections between disk outflows and black hole state transitions.

  16. DENSITY WAVES EXCITED BY LOW-MASS PLANETS IN PROTOPLANETARY DISKS. II. HIGH-RESOLUTION SIMULATIONS OF THE NONLINEAR REGIME

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dong Ruobing; Stone, James M.; Rafikov, Roman R. E-mail: rrr@astro.princeton.edu

    2011-11-01

    We investigate numerically the propagation of density waves excited by a low-mass planet in a protoplanetary disk in the nonlinear regime, using two-dimensional local shearing box simulations with the grid-based code Athena at high spatial resolution (256 grid points per scale height h). The nonlinear evolution results in the wave steepening into a shock, causing damping and angular momentum transfer to the disk. On long timescales this leads to spatial redistribution of the disk density, causing migration feedback and potentially resulting in gap opening. Previous numerical studies concentrated on exploring these secondary phenomena as probes of the nonlinear wave evolution. Here we focus on exploring the evolution of the basic wave properties, such as its density profile evolution, shock formation, and post-shock wave behavior, and provide comparison with analytical theory. The generation of potential vorticity at the shock is computed analytically and is subsequently verified by simulations and used to pinpoint the shock location. We confirm the theoretical relation between the shocking length and the planet mass (including the effect of the equation of state), and the post-shock decay of the angular momentum flux carried by the wave. The post-shock evolution of the wave profile is explored, and we quantitatively confirm its convergence to the theoretically expected N-wave shape. The accuracy of various numerical algorithms used to compute the nonlinear wave evolution is also investigated: we find that higher order spatial reconstruction and high resolution are crucial for capturing the shock formation correctly.

  17. H{sub 2}CO AND N{sub 2}H{sup +} IN PROTOPLANETARY DISKS: EVIDENCE FOR A CO-ICE REGULATED CHEMISTRY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qi, Chunhua; Wilner, David J. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)] [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Oeberg, Karin I. [Departments of Chemistry and Astronomy, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22904 (United States)] [Departments of Chemistry and Astronomy, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22904 (United States)

    2013-03-01

    We present Submillimeter Array (SMA) observations of H{sub 2}CO and N{sub 2}H{sup +} emission in the disks around the T Tauri star TW Hya and the Herbig Ae star HD 163296 at 2''-6'' resolution and discuss the distribution of these species with respect to CO freezeout. The H{sub 2}CO and N{sub 2}H{sup +} emission toward HD 163296 does not peak at the continuum emission center that marks the stellar position but is instead significantly offset. Using a previously developed model for the physical structure of this disk, we show that the H{sub 2}CO observations are reproduced if H{sub 2}CO is present predominantly in the cold outer disk regions. A model where H{sub 2}CO is present only beyond the CO snow line (estimated at a radius of 160 AU) matches the observations well. We also show that the average H{sub 2}CO excitation temperature, calculated from two transitions of H{sub 2}CO observed in these two disks and a larger sample of disks around T Tauri stars in the DISCS (the Disk Imaging Survey of Chemistry with SMA) program, is consistent with the CO freezeout temperature of {approx}20 K. In addition, we show that N{sub 2}H{sup +} and H{sub 2}CO line fluxes in disks are strongly correlated, indicative of co-formation of these species across the sample. Taken together, these results imply that H{sub 2}CO and N{sub 2}H{sup +} are generally present in disks only at low temperatures where CO depletes onto grains, consistent with fast destruction of N{sub 2}H{sup +} by gas-phase CO, and in situ formation of H{sub 2}CO through hydrogenation of CO ice. In this scenario H{sub 2}CO, CH{sub 3}OH, and N{sub 2}H{sup +} emission in disks should appear as rings with the inner edge at the CO midplane snow line. This prediction can be tested directly using observations from ALMA with higher resolution and better sensitivity.

  18. Electroexcitation of the Δ(1232)3/2+ and Δ(1600)3/2+ in a light-front relativistic quark model

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aznauryan, Inna G.; Burkert, Volker D.

    2015-09-30

    The magnetic-dipole form factor and the ratios REM and RSM for the γ* N → Δ(1232)3/2+ transition are predicted within light-front relativistic quark model up to photon virtuality Q2=12 GeV2. Furthermore, we predict the helicity amplitudes of the γ* N → Δ(1600)3/2+ transition assuming the Δ(1600)3/2+ is the first radial excitation of the ground state Delta(1232)3/2+.

  19. THE PROJECT-X INJECTOR EXPERIMENT: A NOVEL HIGH PERFORMANCE FRONT-END FOR A FUTURE HIGH POWER PROTON FACILITY AT FERMILAB

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nagaitsev, S.; et al,

    2013-09-25

    A multi-MW proton facility, Project X, has been proposed and is currently under development at Fermilab. We are carrying out a program of research and development aimed at integrated systems testing of critical components comprising the front end of Project X. This program, known as the Project X Injector Experiment (PXIE), is being undertaken as a key component of the larger Project X R&D program. The successful completion of this program will validate the concept for the Project X front end, thereby minimizing a primary technical risk element within Project X. PXIE is currently under construction at Fermilab and will be completed over the period FY12-17. PXIE will include an H* ion source, a CW 2.1-MeV RFQ and two superconductive RF (SRF) cryomodules providing up to 25 MeV energy gain at an average beam current of 1 mA (upgradable to 2 mA). Successful systems testing will also demonstrate the viability of novel front end technologies that are expected find applications beyond Project X.

  20. Measurements of the ablation-front trajectory and low-mode nonuniformity in direct-drive implosions using x-ray self-emission shadowgraphy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Michel, D. T.; Davis, A. K.; Armstrong, W.; Bahr, R.; Epstein, R.; Goncharov, V. N.; Hohenberger, M.; Igumenshchev, I. V.; Jungquist, R.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; et al

    2015-07-08

    Self-emission x-ray shadowgraphy provides a method to measure the ablation-front trajectory and low-mode nonuniformity of a target imploded by directly illuminating a fusion capsule with laser beams. The technique uses time-resolved images of soft x-rays (> 1 keV) emitted from the coronal plasma of the target imaged onto an x-ray framing camera to determine the position of the ablation front. Methods used to accurately measure the ablation-front radius (more » $${\\it\\delta}R=\\pm 1.15~{\\rm\\mu}\\text{m}$$), image-to-image timing ($${\\it\\delta}({\\rm\\Delta}t)=\\pm 2.5$$ ps) and absolute timing ($${\\it\\delta}t=\\pm 10$$ ps) are presented. Angular averaging of the images provides an average radius measurement of$${\\it\\delta}(R_{\\text{av}})=\\pm 0.15~{\\rm\\mu}\\text{m}$$and an error in velocity of$${\\it\\delta}V/V=\\pm 3\\%$$. This technique was applied on the Omega Laser Facility and the National Ignition Facility.« less

  1. N-BODY SIMULATION OF PLANETESIMAL FORMATION THROUGH GRAVITATIONAL INSTABILITY OF A DUST LAYER IN LAMINAR GAS DISK

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michikoshi, Shugo; Kokubo, Eiichiro [Center for Computational Astrophysics, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Inutsuka, Shu-ichiro, E-mail: michikoshi@cfca.j, E-mail: kokubo@th.nao.ac.j, E-mail: inutsuka@nagoya-u.j [Department of Physics, Graduate School of Science, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya, Aichi 464-8602 (Japan)

    2010-08-20

    We investigate the formation process of planetesimals from the dust layer by the gravitational instability in the gas disk using local N-body simulations. The gas is modeled as a background laminar flow. We study the formation process of planetesimals and its dependence on the strength of the gas drag. Our simulation results show that the formation process is divided into three stages qualitatively: the formation of wake-like density structures, the creation of planetesimal seeds, and their collisional growth. The linear analysis of the dissipative gravitational instability shows that the dust layer is secularly unstable although Toomre's Q value is larger than unity. However, in the initial stage, the growth time of the gravitational instability is longer than that of the dust sedimentation and the decrease in the velocity dispersion. Thus, the velocity dispersion decreases and the disk shrinks vertically. As the velocity dispersion becomes sufficiently small, the gravitational instability finally becomes dominant. Then wake-like density structures are formed by the gravitational instability. These structures fragment into planetesimal seeds. The seeds grow rapidly owing to mutual collisions.

  2. MODELING THE Fe K LINE PROFILES IN TYPE I ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI WITH A COMPTON-THICK DISK WIND

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tatum, M. M.; Turner, T. J.; Sim, S. A.; Miller, L.; Reeves, J. N.; Patrick, A. R.; Long, K. S.

    2012-06-20

    We have modeled a small sample of Seyfert galaxies that were previously identified as having simple X-ray spectra with little intrinsic absorption. The sources in this sample all contain moderately broad components of Fe K-shell emission and are ideal candidates for testing the applicability of a Compton-thick accretion disk wind model to active galactic nucleus (AGN) emission components. Viewing angles through the wind allow the observer to see the absorption signature of the gas, whereas face-on viewing angles allow the observer to see the scattered light from the wind. We find that the Fe K emission line profiles are well described with a model of a Compton-thick accretion disk wind of solar abundances, arising tens to hundreds of gravitational radii from the central black hole. Further, the fits require a neutral component of Fe K{alpha} emission that is too narrow to arise from the inner part of the wind, and likely comes from a more distant reprocessing region. Our study demonstrates that a Compton-thick wind can have a profound effect on the observed X-ray spectrum of an AGN, even when the system is not viewed through the flow.

  3. Constraining the age of the NGC 4565 H I disk WARP: Determining the origin of gas WARPS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Radburn-Smith, David J.; Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Stilp, Adrienne M.; De Jong, Roelof S.; Streich, David; Bell, Eric F.; Monachesi, Antonela; Dolphin, Andrew E.; Holwerda, Benne W.; Bailin, Jeremy

    2014-01-01

    We have mapped the distribution of young and old stars in the gaseous H I warp of NGC 4565. We find a clear correlation of young stars (<600 Myr) with the warp but no coincident old stars (>1 Gyr), which places an upper limit on the age of the structure. The formation rate of the young stars, which increased ?300 Myr ago relative to the surrounding regions, is (6.3{sub ?1.5}{sup +2.5})10{sup ?5} M {sub ?} yr{sup 1} kpc{sup 2}. This implies a ?60 20 Gyr depletion time of the H I warp, similar to the timescales calculated for the outer H I disks of nearby spiral galaxies. While some stars associated with the warp fall into the asymptotic giant branch (AGB) region of the color-magnitude diagram, where stars could be as old as 1 Gyr, further investigation suggests that they may be interlopers rather than real AGB stars. We discuss the implications of these age constraints for the formation of H I warps and the gas fueling of disk galaxies.

  4. THE STAR-FORMING HISTORIES OF THE NUCLEUS, BULGE, AND INNER DISK OF NGC5102: CLUES TO THE EVOLUTION OF A NEARBY LENTICULAR GALAXY {sup ,} {sup ,}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davidge, T. J.

    2015-01-20

    Long slit spectra recorded with the Gemini Multi-Object Spectrograph on Gemini South are used to examine the star-forming history (SFH) of the lenticular galaxy NGC5102. Structural and supplemental photometric information are obtained from archival Spitzer [3.6] images. Absorption features at blue and visible wavelengths are traced out along the minor axis to galactocentric radii ?60 arcsec (?0.9 kpc), sampling the nucleus, bulge, and disk components. Comparisons with model spectra point to luminosity-weighted metallicities that are consistent with the colors of resolved red giant branch stars in the disk. The nucleus has a luminosity-weighted age at visible wavelengths of ?1{sub ?0.1}{sup +0.2}Gyr, and the integrated light is dominated by stars that formed over a time period of only a few hundred Myr. For comparison, the luminosity-weighted ages of the bulge and disk are ?2{sub ?0.2}{sup +0.5}Gyr and 10{sub ?2}{sup +2}Gyr, respectively. The g' [3.6] colors of the nucleus and bulge are consistent with the spectroscopically based ages. In contrast to the nucleus, models that assume star-forming activity spanning many Gyr provide a better match to the spectra of the bulge and disk than simple stellar population models. Isophotes in the bulge have a disky shape, hinting that the bulge was assembled from material with significant rotational support. The SFHs of the bulge and disk are consistent with the bulge forming from the collapse of a long-lived bar, rather than from the collapse of a transient structure that formed as the result of a tidal interaction. It is thus suggested that the progenitor of NGC5102 was a barred disk galaxy that morphed into a lenticular galaxy through the buckling of its bar.

  5. Powerloads on the front end components and the duct of the heating and diagnostic neutral beam lines at ITER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singh, M. J.; Boilson, D.; Hemsworth, R. S.; Geli, F.; Graceffa, J.; Urbani, M.; Schunke, B.; Chareyre, J.; Dlougach, E.; Krylov, A.

    2015-04-08

    The heating and current drive beam lines (HNB) at ITER are expected to deliver ∼16.7 MW power per beam line for H beams at 870 keV and D beams at 1 MeV during the H-He and the DD/DT phases of ITER operation respectively. On the other hand the diagnostic neutral beam (DNB) line shall deliver ∼2 MW power for H beams at 100 keV during both the phases. The path lengths over which the beams from the HNB and DNB beam lines need to be transported are 25.6 m and 20.7 m respectively. The transport of the beams over these path lengths results in beam losses, mainly by the direct interception of the beam with the beam line components and reionisation. The lost power is deposited on the surfaces of the various components of the beam line. In order to ensure the survival of these components over the operational life time of ITER, it is important to determine to the best possible extent the operational power loads and power densities on the various surfaces which are impacted by the beam in one way or the other during its transport. The main factors contributing to these are the divergence of the beamlets and the halo fraction in the beam, the beam aiming, the horizontal and vertical misalignment of the beam, and the gas profile along the beam path, which determines the re-ionisation loss, and the re-ionisation cross sections. The estimations have been made using a combination of the modified version of the Monte Carlo Gas Flow code (MCGF) and the BTR code. The MCGF is used to determine the gas profile in the beam line and takes into account the active gas feed into the ion source and neutraliser, the HNB-DNB cross over, the gas entering the beamline from the ITER machine, the additional gas atoms generated in the beam line due to impacting ions and the pumping speed of the cryopumps. The BTR code has been used to obtain the power loads and the power densities on the various surfaces of the front end components and the duct modules for different scenarios of ITER operation. The gas profile and the magnetic field distribution for each scenario has been considered in these evaluations. The worst case power loads and power densities for each surface have been used to study their thermo-mechanical behaviour and manufacturing feasibility. The details of these calculations and results obtained are presented and discussed.

  6. Fabrication of Natural Uranium UO2 Disks (Phase II): Texas A&M Work for Others Summary Document

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerczak, Tyler J.; Baldwin, Charles A.; Schmidlin, Joshua E.; Henry, Jr, John James

    2015-08-28

    The steps to fabricate natural UO2 disks for an irradiation campaign led by Texas A&M University are outlined. The process was initiated with stoichiometry adjustment of parent, U3O8 powder. The next stage of sample preparation involved exploratory pellet pressing and sintering to achieve the desired natural UO2 pellet densities. Ideal densities were achieved through the use of a bimodal powder size blend. The steps involved with disk fabrication are also presented, describing the coring and thinning process executed to achieve final dimensionality.

  7. THE FAR-ULTRAVIOLET 'CONTINUUM' IN PROTOPLANETARY DISK SYSTEMS. II. CARBON MONOXIDE FOURTH POSITIVE EMISSION AND ABSORPTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    France, Kevin; Schindhelm, Eric; Burgh, Eric B.; Brown, Alexander; Green, James C.; Herczeg, Gregory J.; Brown, Joanna M.; Harper, Graham M.; Linsky, Jeffrey L.; Yang Hao; Abgrall, Herve; Ardila, David R.; Bergin, Edwin; Bethell, Thomas; Calvet, Nuria; Ingleby, Laura; Espaillat, Catherine; Gregory, Scott G.; Hillenbrand, Lynne A.; Hussain, Gaitee

    2011-06-10

    We exploit the high sensitivity and moderate spectral resolution of the Hubble Space Telescope Cosmic Origins Spectrograph to detect far-ultraviolet (UV) spectral features of carbon monoxide (CO) present in the inner regions of protoplanetary disks for the first time. We present spectra of the classical T Tauri stars HN Tau, RECX-11, and V4046 Sgr, representative of a range of CO radiative processes. HN Tau shows CO bands in absorption against the accretion continuum. The CO absorption most likely arises in warm inner disk gas. We measure a CO column density and rotational excitation temperature of N(CO) = (2 {+-} 1) x 10{sup 17} cm{sup -2} and T{sub rot}(CO) 500 {+-} 200 K for the absorbing gas. We also detect CO A-X band emission in RECX-11 and V4046 Sgr, excited by UV line photons, predominantly H I Ly{alpha}. All three objects show emission from CO bands at {lambda} > 1560 A, which may be excited by a combination of UV photons and collisions with non-thermal electrons. In previous observations these emission processes were not accounted for due to blending with emission from the accretion shock, collisionally excited H{sub 2}, and photo-excited H{sub 2}, all of which appeared as a 'continuum' whose components could not be separated. The CO emission spectrum is strongly dependent upon the shape of the incident stellar Ly{alpha} emission profile. We find CO parameters in the range: N(CO) {approx} 10{sup 18}-10{sup 19} cm{sup -2}, T{sub rot}(CO) {approx}> 300 K for the Ly{alpha}-pumped emission. We combine these results with recent work on photo-excited and collisionally excited H{sub 2} emission, concluding that the observations of UV-emitting CO and H{sub 2} are consistent with a common spatial origin. We suggest that the CO/H{sub 2} ratio ({identical_to} N(CO)/N(H{sub 2})) in the inner disk is {approx}1, a transition between the much lower interstellar value and the higher value observed in solar system comets today, a result that will require future observational and theoretical study to confirm.

  8. Helium bombardment leak testing of the closure disk weld for MC2949, MC3004, and MC3095 pyrotechnic devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dudley, W.A.

    1980-03-31

    A helium bombardment leak test procedure was developed to determine the leak level of the closure disk weld performed on three nearly identical pyrotechnic actuators. The inspection procedure is capable of leak testing any of the three product types at a rate better than 120 units per 8-hr work shift. Testing is performed on a 100% sample plan and employs a go/no-go bombardment leak rate acceptance specification of 3 x 10/sup -9/ atm-cm/sup 3/-sec/sup -1/. In addition to the current test procedure and results, this report includes a description of procedure and results associated with the test as initially performed. Other applications of the current technique are also listed.

  9. CLUES ON THE REJUVENATION OF THE S0 GALAXY NGC 404 FROM THE CHEMICAL ABUNDANCE OF ITS OUTER DISK

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bresolin, Fabio

    2013-08-01

    The oxygen abundance of the outer disk of the nearby S0 galaxy NGC 404, a prototypical early-type galaxy with extended star formation, has been derived from the analysis of H II region spectra. The high mean value found, 12 + log(O/H) = 8.6 {+-} 0.1, equivalent to approximately 80% of the solar value, argues against both the previously proposed cold accretion and recent merger scenarios as viable mechanisms for the assembly of the star-forming gas. The combination of the present-day gas metallicity with the published star formation history of this galaxy favors a model in which the recent star forming activity represents the declining tail of the original one.

  10. TIME DELAY AND ACCRETION DISK SIZE MEASUREMENTS IN THE LENSED QUASAR SBS 0909+532 FROM MULTIWAVELENGTH MICROLENSING ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hainline, Laura J.; Morgan, Christopher W.; MacLeod, Chelsea L.; Landaal, Zachary D. [Department of Physics, United States Naval Academy, 572C Holloway Rd, Annapolis, MD 21402 (United States); Kochanek, C. S. [Department of Astronomy, The Ohio State University, 140 West 18th Ave, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Harris, Hugh C.; Tilleman, Trudy [United States Naval Observatory, Flagstaff Station, 10391 West Naval Observatory Road, Flagstaff, AZ 86001-8521 (United States); Goicoechea, L. J.; Shalyapin, V. N. [Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Cantabria, Avda. de Los Castros s/n, E-39005 Santander (Spain); Falco, Emilio E., E-mail: hainline@usna.edu, E-mail: cmorgan@usna.edu, E-mail: macleod@usna.edu, E-mail: m123894@usna.edu, E-mail: ckochanek@astronomy.ohio-state.edu, E-mail: hch@nofs.navy.mil, E-mail: trudy@nofs.navy.mil, E-mail: goicol@unican.es, E-mail: vshal@ukr.net, E-mail: falco@cfa.harvard.edu [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden St, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2013-09-01

    We present three complete seasons and two half-seasons of Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) r-band photometry of the gravitationally lensed quasar SBS 0909+532 from the U.S. Naval Observatory, as well as two seasons each of SDSS g-band and r-band monitoring from the Liverpool Robotic Telescope. Using Monte Carlo simulations to simultaneously measure the system's time delay and model the r-band microlensing variability, we confirm and significantly refine the precision of the system's time delay to {Delta}t{sub AB} = 50{sub -4}{sup +2} days, where the stated uncertainties represent the bounds of the formal 1{sigma} confidence interval. There may be a conflict between the time delay measurement and a lens consisting of a single galaxy. While models based on the Hubble Space Telescope astrometry and a relatively compact stellar distribution can reproduce the observed delay, the models have somewhat less dark matter than we would typically expect. We also carry out a joint analysis of the microlensing variability in the r and g bands to constrain the size of the quasar's continuum source at these wavelengths, obtaining log {l_brace}(r{sub s,r}/cm)[cos i/0.5]{sup 1/2}{r_brace} = 15.3 {+-} 0.3 and log {l_brace}(r{sub s,g}/cm)[cos i/0.5]{sup 1/2}{r_brace} = 14.8 {+-} 0.9, respectively. Our current results do not formally constrain the temperature profile of the accretion disk but are consistent with the expectations of standard thin disk theory.

  11. Formation of a Keplerian disk in the infalling envelope around L1527 IRS: transformation from infalling motions to Kepler motions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ohashi, Nagayoshi [Subaru Telescope, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 650 North A'ohoku Place, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States); Saigo, Kazuya [Chile Observatory, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Osawa 2-21-1, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Aso, Yusuke; Koyamatsu, Shin [Department of Astronomy, Graduate School of Science, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Aikawa, Yuri [Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Kobe University, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan); Machida, Masahiro N. [Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Faculty of Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka 812-8581 (Japan); Saito, Masao [Joint ALMA Observatory, Ave. Alonso de Cordova 3107, Vitacura, Santiago (Chile); Takahashi, Sanemichi Z. [Department of Physics, Kyoto University, Oiwake-cho, Kitashirakawa, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Takakuwa, Shigehisa; Yen, Hsi-Wei [Academia Sinica Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, PO Box 23-141, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Tomida, Kengo [Department of Astronomical Science, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Tomisaka, Kohji, E-mail: nohashi@naoj.org [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Osawa 2-21-1, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan)

    2014-12-01

    We report Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) cycle 0 observations of the C{sup 18}O (J = 2-1), SO (J{sub N} = 6{sub 5}-5{sub 4}), and the 1.3 mm dust continuum toward L1527 IRS, a class 0 solar-type protostar surrounded by an infalling and rotating envelope. C{sup 18}O emission shows strong redshifted absorption against the bright continuum emission associated with L1527 IRS, strongly suggesting infall motions in the C{sup 18}O envelope. The C{sup 18}O envelope also rotates with a velocity mostly proportional to r {sup 1}, where r is the radius, whereas the rotation profile at the innermost radius (?54 AU) may be shallower than r {sup 1}, suggestive of formation of a Keplerian disk around the central protostar of ?0.3 M {sub ?} in dynamical mass. SO emission arising from the inner part of the C{sup 18}O envelope also shows rotation in the same direction as the C{sup 18}O envelope. The rotation is, however, rigid-body-like, which is very different from the differential rotation shown by C{sup 18}O. In order to explain the line profiles and the position-velocity (PV) diagrams of C{sup 18}O and SO observed, simple models composed of an infalling envelope surrounding a Keplerian disk of 54 AU in radius orbiting a star of 0.3 M {sub ?} are examined. It is found that in order to reproduce characteristic features of the observed line profiles and PV diagrams, the infall velocity in the model has to be smaller than the free-fall velocity yielded by a star of 0.3 M {sub ?}. Possible reasons for the reduced infall velocities are discussed.

  12. JET PROPERTIES OF GeV-SELECTED RADIO-LOUD NARROW-LINE SEYFERT 1 GALAXIES AND POSSIBLE CONNECTION TO THEIR DISK AND CORONA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, Xiao-Na; Lin, Da-Bin; Liang, En-Wei; Zhang, Jin; Xue, Zi-Wei; Zhang, Shuang-Nan

    2015-01-01

    The observed spectral energy distributions of five GeV-selected narrow-line Seyfert 1 (NLS1) galaxies are fitted with a model including the radiation ingredients from the relativistic jet, the accretion disk, and the corona. We compare the properties of these GeV NLS1 galaxies with flat spectrum radio quasars (FSRQs), BL Lacertae objects (BL Lacs), and radio-quiet (RQ) Seyfert galaxies, and explore possible hints for jet-disk/corona connection. Our results show that the radiation physics and the jet properties of the GeV NLS1 galaxies resemble that of FSRQs. The luminosity variations of PMN J0948+0022 and 1H 0323+342 at the GeV band is tightly correlated with the beaming factor (?), similar to that observed in FSRQ 3C 279. The accretion disk luminosities and the jet powers of the GeV NLS1 galaxies cover both the ranges of FSRQs and BL Lacs. With the detection of bright corona emission in 1H 0323+342, we show that the ratio of the corona luminosity (L {sub corona}) to the accretion disk luminosity (L {sub d}) is marginally within the high end of this ratio distribution for an RQ Seyfert galaxy sample, and the variation of jet luminosity may connect with L {sub corona}. However, it is still unclear whether a system with a high L {sub corona}/L {sub d} ratio prefers to power a jet.

  13. Measurements of the ablation-front trajectory and low-mode nonuniformity in direct-drive implosions using x-ray self-emission shadowgraphy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michel, D. T.; Davis, A. K.; Armstrong, W.; Bahr, R.; Epstein, R.; Goncharov, V. N.; Hohenberger, M.; Igumenshchev, I. V.; Jungquist, R.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Radha, P. B.; Sangster, T. C.; Sorce, C.; Froula, D. H.

    2015-07-08

    Self-emission x-ray shadowgraphy provides a method to measure the ablation-front trajectory and low-mode nonuniformity of a target imploded by directly illuminating a fusion capsule with laser beams. The technique uses time-resolved images of soft x-rays (> 1 keV) emitted from the coronal plasma of the target imaged onto an x-ray framing camera to determine the position of the ablation front. Methods used to accurately measure the ablation-front radius (${\\it\\delta}R=\\pm 1.15~{\\rm\\mu}\\text{m}$), image-to-image timing (${\\it\\delta}({\\rm\\Delta}t)=\\pm 2.5$ ps) and absolute timing (${\\it\\delta}t=\\pm 10$ ps) are presented. Angular averaging of the images provides an average radius measurement of${\\it\\delta}(R_{\\text{av}})=\\pm 0.15~{\\rm\\mu}\\text{m}$and an error in velocity of${\\it\\delta}V/V=\\pm 3\\%$. This technique was applied on the Omega Laser Facility and the National Ignition Facility.

  14. Real-Space Microscopic Electrical Imaging of n+-p Junction Beneath Front-Side Ag Contact of Multicrystalline Si Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jiang, C. S.; Li, Z. G.; Moutinho, H. R.; Liang, L.; Ionkin, A.; Al-Jassim, M. M.

    2012-04-15

    We investigated the quality of the n+-p diffused junction beneath the front-side Ag contact of multicrystalline Si solar cells by characterizing the uniformities of electrostatic potential and doping concentration across the junction using the atomic force microscopy-based electrical imaging techniques of scanning Kelvin probe force microscopy and scanning capacitance microscopy. We found that Ag screen-printing metallization fired at the over-fire temperature significantly degrades the junction uniformity beneath the Ag contact grid, whereas metallization at the optimal- and under-fire temperatures does not cause degradation. Ag crystallites with widely distributed sizes were found at the Ag-grid/emitter-Si interface of the over-fired cell, which is associated with the junction damage beneath the Ag grid. Large crystallites protrude into Si deeper than the junction depth. However, the junction was not broken down; instead, it was reformed on the entire front of the crystallite/Si interface. We propose a mechanism of junction-quality degradation, based on emitter Si melting at the temperature around the Ag-Si eutectic point during firing, and subsequent re-crystallization with incorporation of Ag and other impurities and with formation of crystallographic defects during quenching. The effect of this junction damage on solar cell performance is discussed.

  15. Suppressing Thermal Energy Drift In The LLNL Flash X-Ray Accelerator Using Linear Disk Resistor Stacks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kreitzer, B R; Houck, T L; Luchterhand, O C

    2011-07-19

    This paper addresses thermal drift in sodium thiosulfate liquid resistors and their replacement with linear disk resistors from HVR Advanced Power Components. Sodium thiosulfate resistors in the FXR induction linear accelerator application have a temperature coefficient of {approx}1.8%/C. The FXR Marx banks send an 8kJ pulse through eight 524 cm{sup 3} liquid resistors at a repetition rate of up to 1 every 45 seconds. Every pulse increases the temperature of the solution by {approx}0.4 C which produces a 0.7% change in resistance. The typical cooling rate is {approx}0.4 C per minute which results in {approx}0.1% energy drop per pulse during continuous pulsed operations. A radiographic accelerator is extraordinarily sensitive to energy variations. Changes in beam energy produce movement in beam transport, changes in spot size, and large dose variations. If self-heating were the only problem, we could predict the increase in input voltage required to compensate for the energy loss. However, there are other variables that influence the temperature of the resistors such as focus magnet heating, changes in room temperature, changes in cooling water, where the cell is located, etc. Additionally not all of the resistors have equivalent cooling rates and as many as 32 resistors are driven from a single power source. The FXR accelerator group elected to replace the sodium thiosulfate resistors with HVR Linear Disk Resistors in a stack type configuration. With data limited for these resistors when used in oil and at low resistance values, a full characterization needed to be performed. High currents (up to 15kA), high voltages (up to 400kV), and Fast Rise times (<10ns) made a resistor choice difficult. Other solid resistors have been tried and had problems at the connection points and with the fact that the resistivity changed as they absorbed oil. The selected HVR resistors have the advantage of being manufactured with the oil impregnated in to them so this characteristic is minimized while still offering the desired low temperature coefficient of resistance compared to sodium thiosulfate. The characterization experiments and comparison with the sodium thiosulfate liquid resistors will be fully discussed and the final design described.

  16. A CODE TO COMPUTE THE EMISSION OF THIN ACCRETION DISKS IN NON-KERR SPACETIMES AND TEST THE NATURE OF BLACK HOLE CANDIDATES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bambi, Cosimo

    2012-12-20

    Astrophysical black hole (BH) candidates are thought to be the Kerr BHs predicted by general relativity, but the actual nature of these objects has still to be proven. The analysis of the electromagnetic radiation emitted by a geometrically thin and optically thick accretion disk around a BH candidate can provide information about the geometry of the spacetime around the compact object and it can thus test the Kerr BH hypothesis. In this paper, I present a code based on a ray-tracing approach and capable of computing some basic properties of thin accretion disks in spacetimes with deviations from the Kerr background. The code can be used to fit current and future X-ray data of stellar-mass BH candidates and constrain possible deviations from the Kerr geometry in the spin parameter-deformation parameter plane.

  17. THE WELL-ALIGNED ORBIT OF WASP-84b: EVIDENCE FOR DISK MIGRATION OF A HOT JUPITER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, D. R.; Triaud, A. H. M. J.; Turner, O. D.; Brown, D. J. A.; Clark, B. J. M.; Smalley, B.; Cameron, A. Collier; Doyle, A. P.; Gillon, M.; Hellier, C.; Lovis, C.; Maxted, P. F. L.; Pollacco, D.; Queloz, D.; Smith, A. M. S.

    2015-02-10

    We report the sky-projected orbital obliquity (spin–orbit angle) of WASP-84 b, a 0.69M{sub Jup} planet in an 8.52 day orbit around a G9V/K0V star, to be λ = −0.3 ± 1.7°. We obtain a true obliquity of ψ = 17.3 ± 7.7° from a measurement of the inclination of the stellar spin axis with respect to the sky plane. Due to the young age and the weak tidal forcing of the system, we suggest that the orbit of WASP-84b is unlikely to have both realigned and circularized from the misaligned and/or eccentric orbit likely to have arisen from high-eccentricity migration. Therefore we conclude that the planet probably migrated via interaction with the protoplanetary disk. This would make it the first “hot Jupiter” (P<10 d) to have been shown to have migrated via this pathway. Further, we argue that the distribution of obliquities for planets orbiting cool stars (T{sub eff} < 6250 K) suggests that high-eccentricity migration is an important pathway for the formation of short-orbit, giant planets.

  18. PROPERTIES OF M31. II. A CEPHEID DISK SAMPLE DERIVED FROM THE FIRST YEAR OF PS1 PANDROMEDA DATA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kodric, Mihael; Riffeser, Arno; Hopp, Ulrich; Seitz, Stella; Koppenhoefer, Johannes; Bender, Ralf; Goessl, Claus; Snigula, Jan; Lee, Chien-Hsiu; Ngeow, Chow-Choong; Chambers, K. C.; Magnier, E. A.; Price, P. A.; Burgett, W. S.; Hodapp, K. W.; Kaiser, N.; Kudritzki, R.-P.

    2013-04-15

    We present a sample of Cepheid variable stars toward M31 based on the first year of regular M31 observations of the PS1 survey in the r{sub P1} and i{sub P1} filters. We describe the selection procedure for Cepheid variable stars from the overall variable source sample and develop an automatic classification scheme using Fourier decomposition and the location of the instability strip. We find 1440 fundamental mode (classical {delta}) Cep stars, 126 Cepheids in the first overtone mode, and 147 belonging to the Population II types. Two hundred ninety-six Cepheids could not be assigned to one of these classes and three hundred fifty-four Cepheids were found in other surveys. These 2009 Cepheids constitute the largest Cepheid sample in M31 known so far and the full catalog is presented in this paper. We briefly describe the properties of our sample in its spatial distribution throughout the M31 galaxy, in its age properties, and we derive an apparent period-luminosity relation (PLR) in our two bands. The Population I Cepheids nicely follow the dust pattern of the M31 disk, whereas the 147 Type II Cepheids are distributed throughout the halo of M31. We outline the time evolution of the star formation in the major ring found previously and find an age gradient. A comparison of our PLR to previous results indicates a curvature term in the PLR.

  19. A small-scale eruption leading to a blowout macrospicule jet in an on-disk coronal hole

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adams, Mitzi; Sterling, Alphonse C.; Moore, Ronald L.; Gary, G. Allen E-mail: alphonse.sterling@nasa.gov E-mail: gag0002@uah.edu

    2014-03-01

    We examine the three-dimensional magnetic structure and dynamics of a solar EUV-macrospicule jet that occurred on 2011 February 27 in an on-disk coronal hole. The observations are from the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) and the SDO Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI). The observations reveal that in this event, closed-field-carrying cool absorbing plasma, as in an erupting mini-filament, erupted and opened, forming a blowout jet. Contrary to some jet models, there was no substantial recently emerged, closed, bipolar-magnetic field in the base of the jet. Instead, over several hours, flux convergence and cancellation at the polarity inversion line inside an evolved arcade in the base apparently destabilized the entire arcade, including its cool-plasma-carrying core field, to undergo a blowout eruption in the manner of many standard-sized, arcade-blowout eruptions that produce a flare and coronal mass ejection. Internal reconnection made bright 'flare' loops over the polarity inversion line inside the blowing-out arcade field, and external reconnection of the blowing-out arcade field with an ambient open field made longer and dimmer EUV loops on the outside of the blowing-out arcade. That the loops made by the external reconnection were much larger than the loops made by the internal reconnection makes this event a new variety of blowout jet, a variety not recognized in previous observations and models of blowout jets.

  20. OPTICAL EMISSION OF THE ULTRALUMINOUS X-RAY SOURCE NGC 5408 X-1: DONOR STAR OR IRRADIATED ACCRETION DISK?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grise, F.; Kaaret, P.; Corbel, S.; Cseh, D.

    2012-02-01

    We obtained three epochs of simultaneous Hubble Space Telescope (HST)/Wide Field Camera 3 and Chandra observations of the ultraluminous X-ray source (ULX) NGC 5408 X-1. The counterpart of the X-ray source is seen in all HST filters, from the UV through the near-IR (NIR), and for the first time, we resolve the optical nebula around the ULX. We identified a small OB association near the ULX that may be the birthplace of the system. The stellar association is young, {approx}5 Myr, contains massive stars up to 40 M{sub Sun }, and is thus similar to associations seen near other ULXs, albeit younger. The UV/optical/NIR spectral energy distribution (SED) of the ULX counterpart is consistent with that of a B0I supergiant star. We are also able to fit the whole SED from the X-rays to the NIR with an irradiated disk model. The three epochs of data show only marginal variability and thus, we cannot firmly conclude on the nature of the optical emission.

  1. RF window assembly comprising a ceramic disk disposed within a cylindrical waveguide which is connected to rectangular waveguides through elliptical joints

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tantawi, Sami G.; Dolgashev, Valery A.; Yeremian, Anahid D.

    2016-03-15

    A high-power microwave RF window is provided that includes a cylindrical waveguide, where the cylindrical waveguide includes a ceramic disk concentrically housed in a central region of the cylindrical waveguide, a first rectangular waveguide, where the first rectangular waveguide is connected by a first elliptical joint to a proximal end of the cylindrical waveguide, and a second rectangular waveguide, where the second rectangular waveguide is connected by a second elliptical joint to a distal end of the cylindrical waveguide.

  2. ALMA results of the pseudodisk, rotating disk, and jet in the continuum and HCO{sup +} in the protostellar system HH 212

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Chin-Fei; Hirano, Naomi; Shang, Hsien; Ho, Paul T. P.; Krasnopolsky, Ruben; Zhang, Qizhou

    2014-05-10

    HH 212 is a nearby (400 pc) Class 0 protostellar system showing several components that can be compared with theoretical models of core collapse. We have mapped it in the 350 GHz continuum and HCO{sup +} J = 4-3 emission with ALMA at up to ?0.''4 resolution. A flattened envelope and a compact disk are seen in the continuum around the central source, as seen before. The HCO{sup +} kinematics shows that the flattened envelope is infalling with small rotation (i.e., spiraling) into the central source, and thus can be identified as a pseudodisk in the models of magnetized core collapse. Also, the HCO{sup +} kinematics shows that the disk is rotating and can be rotationally supported. In addition, to account for the missing HCO{sup +} emission at low-redshifted velocity, an extended infalling envelope is required, with its material flowing roughly parallel to the jet axis toward the pseudodisk. This is expected if it is magnetized with an hourglass B-field morphology. We have modeled the continuum and HCO{sup +} emission of the flattened envelope and disk simultaneously. We find that a jump in density is required across the interface between the pseudodisk and the disk. A jet is seen in HCO{sup +} extending out to ?500 AU away from the central source, with the peaks upstream of those seen before in SiO. The broad velocity range and high HCO{sup +} abundance indicate that the HCO{sup +} emission traces internal shocks in the jet.

  3. Development of the front end test stand and vessel for extraction and source plasma analyses negative hydrogen ion sources at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lawrie, S. R.; Faircloth, D. C.; Letchford, A. P.; Perkins, M.; Whitehead, M. O.; Wood, T.; Gabor, C.; Back, J.

    2014-02-15

    The ISIS pulsed spallation neutron and muon facility at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL) in the UK uses a Penning surface plasma negative hydrogen ion source. Upgrade options for the ISIS accelerator system demand a higher current, lower emittance beam with longer pulse lengths from the injector. The Front End Test Stand is being constructed at RAL to meet the upgrade requirements using a modified ISIS ion source. A new 10% duty cycle 25 kV pulsed extraction power supply has been commissioned and the first meter of 3 MeV radio frequency quadrupole has been delivered. Simultaneously, a Vessel for Extraction and Source Plasma Analyses is under construction in a new laboratory at RAL. The detailed measurements of the plasma and extracted beam characteristics will allow a radical overhaul of the transport optics, potentially yielding a simpler source configuration with greater output and lifetime.

  4. A 5 {mu}m IMAGE OF {beta} PICTORIS b AT A SUB-JUPITER PROJECTED SEPARATION: EVIDENCE FOR A MISALIGNMENT BETWEEN THE PLANET AND THE INNER, WARPED DISK

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Currie, Thayne; Kuchner, Marc; Thalmann, Christian; Matsumura, Soko; Madhusudhan, Nikku; Burrows, Adam

    2011-08-01

    We present and analyze a new M' detection of the young exoplanet {beta} Pictoris b from 2008 VLT/NaCo data at a separation of {approx}4 AU and a high signal-to-noise rereduction of L' data taken in 2009 December. Based on our orbital analysis, the planet's orbit is viewed almost perfectly edge-on (i {approx} 89 deg) and has a Saturn-like semimajor axis of 9.50 AU{sup +3.93} {sup AU}{sub -1.7AU}. Intriguingly, the planet's orbit is aligned with the major axis of the outer disk ({Omega} {approx} 31 deg.) but is probably misaligned with the warp/inclined disk at 80 AU, often cited as a signpost for the planet's existence. Our results motivate new studies to clarify how {beta} Pic b sculpts debris disk structures and whether a second planet is required to explain the warp/inclined disk.

  5. X-ray observations of XSS J12270-4859 in a new low state: A transformation to a disk-free rotation-powered pulsar binary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bogdanov, Slavko; Patruno, Alessandro; Archibald, Anne M.; Bassa, Cees; Hessels, Jason W. T.; Janssen, Gemma H.; Stappers, Ben W.

    2014-07-01

    We present XMM-Newton and Chandra observations of the low-mass X-ray binary XSS J12270-4859, which experienced a dramatic decline in optical/X-ray brightness at the end of 2012, indicative of the disappearance of its accretion disk. In this new state, the system exhibits previously absent orbital-phase-dependent, large-amplitude X-ray modulations with a decline in flux at superior conjunction. The X-ray emission remains predominantly non-thermal but with an order of magnitude lower mean luminosity and significantly harder spectrum relative to the previous high flux state. This phenomenology is identical to the behavior of the radio millisecond pulsar (MSP) binary PSR J1023+0038 in the absence of an accretion disk, where the X-ray emission is produced in an intra-binary shock driven by the pulsar wind. This further demonstrates that XSS J12270-4859 no longer has an accretion disk and has transformed to a full-fledged eclipsing 'redback' system that hosts an active rotation-powered MSP. There is no evidence for diffuse X-ray emission associated with the binary that may arise due to outflows or a wind nebula. An extended source situated 1.'5 from XSS J12270-4859 is unlikely to be associated, and is probably a previously uncataloged galaxy cluster.

  6. TESTING THE HYPOTHESIS THAT METHANOL MASER RINGS TRACE CIRCUMSTELLAR DISKS: HIGH-RESOLUTION NEAR-INFRARED AND MID-INFRARED IMAGING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    De Buizer, James M.; Bartkiewicz, Anna; Szymczak, Marian

    2012-08-01

    Milliarcsecond very long baseline interferometry maps of regions containing 6.7 GHz methanol maser emission have lead to the recent discovery of ring-like distributions of maser spots and the plausible hypothesis that they may be tracing circumstellar disks around forming high-mass stars. We aimed to test this hypothesis by imaging these regions in the near- and mid-infrared at high spatial resolution and compare the observed emission to the expected infrared morphologies as inferred from the geometries of the maser rings. In the near-infrared we used the Gemini North adaptive optics system of ALTAIR/NIRI, while in the mid-infrared we used the combination of the Gemini South instrument T-ReCS and super-resolution techniques. Resultant images had a resolution of {approx}150 mas in both the near-infrared and mid-infrared. We discuss the expected distribution of circumstellar material around young and massive accreting (proto)stars and what infrared emission geometries would be expected for the different maser ring orientations under the assumption that the masers are coming from within circumstellar disks. Based upon the observed infrared emission geometries for the four targets in our sample and the results of spectral energy distribution modeling of the massive young stellar objects associated with the maser rings, we do not find compelling evidence in support of the hypothesis that methanol masers rings reside in circumstellar disks.

  7. EFFECTS OF DUST GROWTH AND SETTLING ON THE IONIZATION BY RADIONUCLIDES. I. FORMULATION AND RESULTS IN A QUIESCENT STATE OF PROTOPLANETARY DISKS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Umebayashi, Toyoharu; Katsuma, Norihito; Nomura, Hideko

    2013-02-10

    We investigate the evolution of the ionization rates by the decay of radionuclides in protoplanetary disks at the early stage of planet formation where size growth and settling of dust particles proceed extensively. Because most of the nuclides to ionize gas, such as short-lived nuclide {sup 26}Al and long-lived one {sup 40}K, are refractory elements, they are contained in the solid material of dust particles. Thus, the ionization by these nuclides is affected by the following three processes: (1) the change of the relative abundance of dust particles due to the settling toward the midplane of the disk, (2) the energy loss of emitted energetic particles inside the solid material of dust particles, and (3) the absorption of energetic particles by the other dust particles located nearby. In this series of papers we comprehensively investigate the basic physical processes, calculate the settling and size growth of dust particles numerically, and clarify the evolution of the ionization rates relative to their initial values in various disk models at this stage. In this paper we investigate the energy-loss processes concerning dust particles, formulate the coalescence equation for settling particles, and apply them to quiescent disk models that are similar to the solar nebula. For simplicity, dust particles are assumed to be compact spheres that remain perfect sticking for mutual collisions. Because the settling of dust particles is not appreciable in the first 10{sup 3} yr, the ionization rate varies little except in the outermost part near the disk surface. As the settling proceeds, the rate around the midplane increases considerably. The maximum ionization rates by {sup 26}Al in the minimum mass solar nebula are about 100, 51, and 14 times larger than their initial values for the orbits R = 0.5, 1, and 5 AU, respectively, which are close to or exceed the ionization rate by cosmic ray in the interstellar medium. The rates by {sup 40}K also increase by factors of about 36, 19, and 5 at the same orbits. In the inner orbital regions, these rates exceed the rates by the attenuated cosmic rays by an order of magnitude. The rates in the residual parts decrease extensively as time goes by, because amounts of the floating dust particles decrease continuously.

  8. ACCRETION-INHIBITED STAR FORMATION IN THE WARM MOLECULAR DISK OF THE GREEN-VALLEY ELLIPTICAL GALAXY NGC3226?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Appleton, P. N.; Bitsakis, T.; Alatalo, K.; Mundell, C.; Lacy, M.; Armus, L.; Charmandaris, V.; Duc, P.-A.; Lisenfeld, U.; Ogle, P.

    2014-12-20

    We present archival Spitzer photometry and spectroscopy and Herschel photometry of the peculiar ''Green Valley'' elliptical galaxy NGC3226. The galaxy, which contains a low-luminosity active galactic nucleus (AGN), forms a pair with NGC3227 and is shown to lie in a complex web of stellar and H I filaments. Imaging at 8 and 16?m reveals a curved plume structure 3kpc in extent, embedded within the core of the galaxy and coincident with the termination of a 30kpc long H I tail. In situ star formation associated with the infrared (IR) plume is identified from narrowband Hubble Space Telescope (HST) imaging. The end of the IR plume coincides with a warm molecular hydrogen disk and dusty ring containing 0.7-1.1 10{sup 7} M {sub ?} detected within the central kiloparsec. Sensitive upper limits to the detection of cold molecular gas may indicate that a large fraction of the H{sub 2} is in a warm state. Photometry derived from the ultraviolet (UV) to the far-IR shows evidence for a low star-formation rate of ?0.04 M {sub ?} yr{sup 1} averaged over the last 100Myr. A mid-IR component to the spectral energy distribution (SED) contributes ?20% of the IR luminosity of the galaxy, and is consistent with emission associated with the AGN. The current measured star formation rate is insufficient to explain NGC3226's global UV-optical ''green'' colors via the resurgence of star formation in a ''red and dead'' galaxy. This form of ''cold accretion'' from a tidal stream would appear to be an inefficient way to rejuvenate early-type galaxies and may actually inhibit star formation.

  9. MODERATE-LUMINOSITY GROWING BLACK HOLES FROM 1.25 < z < 2.7: VARIED ACCRETION IN DISK-DOMINATED HOSTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simmons, B. D.; Glikman, E.; Urry, C. M.; Schawinski, K.; Cardamone, C.

    2012-12-10

    We compute black hole masses and bolometric luminosities for 57 active galactic nuclei (AGNs) in the redshift range 1.25 {<=} z {<=} 2.67, selected from the GOODS-South deep multi-wavelength survey field via their X-ray emission. We determine host galaxy morphological parameters by separating the galaxies from their central point sources in deep Hubble Space Telescope images, and host stellar masses and colors by multi-wavelength spectral energy distribution fitting. Of GOODS AGNs at these redshifts, 90% have detected rest-frame optical nuclear point sources; bolometric luminosities range from 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 43} to 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 46} erg s{sup -1}. The black holes are growing at a range of accretion rates, with {approx}> 50% of the sample having L/L{sub Edd} < 0.1. Of the host galaxies, 70% have stellar masses M{sub *} > 10{sup 10} M{sub Sun }, with a range of colors suggesting a complex star formation history. We find no evolution of AGN bolometric luminosity within the sample, and no correlation between AGN bolometric luminosity and host stellar mass, color, or morphology. Fully half the sample of host galaxies are disk-dominated, with another 25% having strong disk components. Fewer than 15% of the systems appear to be at some stage of a major merger. These moderate-luminosity AGN hosts are therefore inconsistent with a dynamical history dominated by mergers strong enough to destroy disks, indicating that minor mergers or secular processes dominate the coevolution of galaxies and their central black holes at z {approx} 2.

  10. RECOVERY OF THE CANDIDATE PROTOPLANET HD 100546 b WITH GEMINI/NICI AND DETECTION OF ADDITIONAL (PLANET-INDUCED?) DISK STRUCTURE AT SMALL SEPARATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Currie, Thayne; Kudo, Tomoyuki [NAOJ, Subaru Telescope, 650N' Aohoku Pl., Hilo, HI 96720 (United States); Muto, Takayuki [Division of Liberal Arts, Kogashin University, 1-24-2, Nishi-Shinjuku, Shinijuku-ku, Tokyo 163-8677 (Japan); Honda, Mitsuhiko [Department of Mathematics and Physics, Kanagawa University, 2946 Tsuchiya, Hiratsuka 259-1293 (Japan); Brandt, Timothy D. [Astrophysics Department, Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, NJ 08540 (United States); Grady, Carol [Eureka Scientific, 2452 Delmer, Suite 100, Oakland, CA96002 (United States); Fukagawa, Misato [Graduate School of Science, Osaka University, 1-1 Machikaneyama, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-0043 (Japan); Burrows, Adam [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, 7 Ivy Lane, Princeton, NJ 08544-1001 (United States); Janson, Markus [Stockholm University, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Kuzuhara, Masayuki [Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1 Ookayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan); McElwain, Michael W. [Exoplanets and Stellar Astrophysics Laboratory, Code 667, Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Follette, Katherine [Department of Astronomy, Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721-0065 (United States); Hashimoto, Jun [H. L. Dodge Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Oklahoma, 440W. Brooks St Norman, OK 73019 (United States); Henning, Thomas [Max Planck Institute for Astronomy, Knigstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Kandori, Ryo; Kusakabe, Nobuhiko; Morino, Jun-ichi; Nishikawa, Jun [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1, Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Kwon, Jungmi; Mede, Kyle, E-mail: currie@naoj.org [Department of Astronomy, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1, Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); and others

    2014-12-01

    We report the first independent, second epoch (re-)detection of a directly imaged protoplanet candidate. Using L' high-contrast imaging of HD 100546 taken with the Near-Infrared Coronagraph and Imager on Gemini South, we recover ''HD 100546 b'' with a position and brightness consistent with the original Very Large Telescope/NAos-COnica detection from Quanz etal., although data obtained after 2013 will be required to decisively demonstrate common proper motion. HD 100546 b may be spatially resolved, up to ?12-13 AU in diameter, and is embedded in a finger of thermal IR-bright, polarized emission extending inward to at least 0.''3. Standard hot-start models imply a mass of ?15 M{sub J} . However, if HD 100546 b is newly formed or made visible by a circumplanetary disk, both of which are plausible, its mass is significantly lower (e.g., 1-7 M{sub J} ). Additionally, we discover a thermal IR-bright disk feature, possibly a spiral density wave, at roughly the same angular separation as HD 100546 b but 90 away. Our interpretation of this feature as a spiral arm is not decisive, but modeling analyses using spiral density wave theory implies a wave launching point exterior to ?0.''45 embedded within the visible disk structure: plausibly evidence for a second, hitherto unseen, wide-separation planet. With one confirmed protoplanet candidate and evidence for one to two others, HD 100546 is an important evolutionary precursor to intermediate-mass stars with multiple super-Jovian planets at moderate/wide separations like HR 8799.

  11. Fast-wave Power Flow Along SOL Field Lines In NSTX nd The Associated Power Deposition Profile Across The SOL In Front Of The Antenna

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perkins, Roy

    2013-06-21

    Fast-wave heating and current drive efficiencies can be reduced by a number of processes in the vicinity of the antenna and in the scrape off layer (SOL). On NSTX from around 25% to more than 60% of the high-harmonic fast-wave power can be lost to the SOL regions, and a large part of this lost power flows along SOL magnetic field lines and is deposited in bright spirals on the divertor floor and ceiling. We show that field-line mapping matches the location of heat deposition on the lower divertor, albeit with a portion of the heat outside of the predictions. The field-line mapping can then be used to partially reconstruct the profile of lost fast-wave power at the midplane in front of the antenna, and the losses peak close to the last closed flux surface (LCFS) as well as the antenna. This profile suggests a radial standing-wave pattern formed by fast-wave propagation in the SOL, and this hypothesis will be tested on NSTX-U. Advanced RF codes must reproduce these results so that such codes can be used to understand this edge loss and to minimize RF heat deposition and erosion in the divertor region on ITER.

  12. Experimental investigation into the effect of reformer gas addition on flame speed and flame front propagation in premixed, homogeneous charge gasoline engines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Conte, Enrico; Boulouchos, Konstantinos

    2006-07-15

    The effect of reformer gas addition to gasoline in internal combustion engines is assessed based on in-cylinder measurement techniques. These include ion sensors, an optical spark plug and heat release analysis from the cylinder pressure. A detailed analysis of these measurements is presented, giving insight into the combustion process and into the energy release. The flame front shape and propagation in the combustion chamber are reconstructed and the flame speed is estimated. The laminar flame speed has been observed to increase linearly with the energy fraction of reformer gas in the fuel blend. From pure gasoline to pure reformer gas the laminar flame speed increases by a factor of 4.4. The relative increase in the turbulent flame speed is lower. These results confirm what can be observed from the heat release analysis, that reformer gas addition mainly shortens the first phase of the combustion process. Different reformer gas compositions were tested, varying the ratio of hydrogen to inert species. Finally, flame propagation and flame speed at EGR-burn limit and at lean-burn limit are investigated. (author)

  13. STRUCTURE AND KINEMATICS OF THE STELLAR HALOS AND THICK DISKS OF THE MILKY WAY BASED ON CALIBRATION STARS FROM SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY DR7

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carollo, Daniela; Norris, John E.; Freeman, Ken C.; Beers, Timothy C.; Lee, Young Sun; Chiba, Masashi; Ivezic, Zeljko; Rockosi, Constance M.; Yanny, Brian E-mail: jen@mso.anu.edu.a E-mail: beers@pa.msu.ed E-mail: chiba@astr.tohoku.ac.j E-mail: crockosi@ucolick.or

    2010-03-20

    The structure and kinematics of the recognized stellar components of the Milky Way are explored, based on well-determined atmospheric parameters and kinematic quantities for 32360 'calibration stars' from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and its first extension, SDSS-II, which included the sub-survey Sloan Extension for Galactic Understanding and Exploration (SEGUE). Full space motions for a sub-sample of 16,920 stars, exploring a local volume within 4 kpc of the Sun, are used to derive velocity ellipsoids for the inner- and outer-halo components of the Galaxy, as well as for the canonical thick-disk and proposed metal-weak thick-disk (MWTD) populations. This new sample of calibration stars represents an increase of 60% relative to the numbers used in a previous analysis. We first examine the question of whether the data require the presence of at least a two-component halo in order to account for the rotational behavior of likely halo stars in the local volume, and whether more than two components are needed. We also address the question of whether the proposed MWTD is kinematically and chemically distinct from the canonical thick disk, and point out that the Galactocentric rotational velocity inferred for the MWTD, as well as its mean metallicity, appear quite similar to the values derived previously for the Monoceros stream, suggesting a possible association between these structures. In addition, we consider the fractions of each component required to understand the nature of the observed kinematic behavior of the stellar populations of the Galaxy as a function of distance from the plane. Scale lengths and scale heights for the thick-disk and MWTD components are determined. Spatial density profiles for the inner- and outer-halo populations are inferred from a Jeans theorem analysis. The full set of calibration stars (including those outside the local volume) is used to test for the expected changes in the observed stellar metallicity distribution function with distance above the Galactic plane in situ, due to the changing contributions from the underlying stellar populations. The above issues are considered, in concert with theoretical and observational constraints from other Milky-Way-like galaxies, in light of modern cold dark matter galaxy formation models.

  14. The moving group targets of the seeds high-contrast imaging survey of exoplanets and disks: Results and observations from the first three years

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brandt, Timothy D.; Turner, Edwin L.; Janson, M.; Knapp, G. R.; Kuzuhara, Masayuki; McElwain, Michael W.; Schlieder, Joshua E.; Carson, J.; Biller, B.; Bonnefoy, M.; Brandner, W.; Wisniewski, John P.; Hashimoto, J.; Matsuo, T.; Dressing, C.; Moro-Martn, A.; Kudo, T.; Kusakabe, N.; Abe, L.; and others

    2014-05-01

    We present results from the first three years of observations of moving group (MG) targets in the Strategic Exploration of Exoplanets and Disks with Subaru (SEEDS) high-contrast imaging survey of exoplanets and disks using the Subaru telescope. We achieve typical contrasts of ?10{sup 5} at 1'' and ?10{sup 6} beyond 2'' around 63 proposed members of nearby kinematic MGs. We review each of the kinematic associations to which our targets belong, concluding that five, ? Pictoris (?20 Myr), AB Doradus (?100 Myr), Columba (?30 Myr), Tucana-Horogium (?30 Myr), and TW Hydrae (?10 Myr), are sufficiently well-defined to constrain the ages of individual targets. Somewhat less than half of our targets are high-probability members of one of these MGs. For all of our targets, we combine proposed MG membership with other age indicators where available, including Ca II HK emission, X-ray activity, and rotation period, to produce a posterior probability distribution of age. SEEDS observations discovered a substellar companion to one of our targets, ? And, a late B star. We do not detect any other substellar companions, but do find seven new close binary systems, of which one still needs to be confirmed. A detailed analysis of the statistics of this sample, and of the companion mass constraints given our age probability distributions and exoplanet cooling models, will be presented in a forthcoming paper.

  15. Spatially resolved chemistry in nearby galaxies. III. Dense molecular gas in the inner disk of the LIRG IRAS 04296+2923

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meier, David S.; Turner, Jean L.; Beck, Sara C. E-mail: turner@astro.ucla.edu

    2014-11-10

    We present a survey of 3 mm molecular lines in IRAS 04296+2923, one of the brightest known molecular-line emitting galaxies, and one of the closest luminous infrared galaxies (LIRGs). Data are from the Owens Valley and CARMA millimeter interferometers. Species detected at ≲ 4'' resolution include C{sup 18}O, HCN, HCO{sup +}, HNC, CN, CH{sub 3}OH, and, tentatively, HNCO. Along with existing CO, {sup 13}CO, and radio continuum data, these lines constrain the chemical properties of the inner disk. Dense molecular gas in the nucleus fuels a star formation rate ≳10 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1} and is traced by lines of HCN, HCO{sup +}, HNC, and CN. A correlation between HCN and star formation rate is observed on sub-kiloparsec scales, consistent with global relations. Toward the nucleus, CN abundances are similar to those of HCN, indicating emission comes from a collection (∼40-50) of moderate visual extinction, photon-dominated-region clouds. The CO isotopic line ratios are unusual: CO(1-0)/{sup 13}CO(1-0) and CO(1-0)/C{sup 18}O(1-0) line ratios are large toward the starburst, as is commonly observed in LIRGs, but farther out in the disk these ratios are remarkably low (≲ 3). {sup 13}CO/C{sup 18}O abundance ratios are lower than in Galactic clouds, possibly because the C{sup 18}O is enriched by massive star ejecta from the starburst. {sup 13}CO is underabundant relative to CO. Extended emission from CH{sub 3}OH indicates that dynamical shocks pervade both the nucleus and the inner disk. The unusual CO isotopologue ratios, the CO/HCN intensity ratio versus L {sub IR}, the HCN/CN abundance ratio, and the gas consumption time versus inflow rate all indicate that the starburst in IRAS 04296+2923 is in an early stage of development.

  16. THE 2011 FEBRUARY 15 X2 FLARE, RIBBONS, CORONAL FRONT, AND MASS EJECTION: INTERPRETING THE THREE-DIMENSIONAL VIEWS FROM THE SOLAR DYNAMICS OBSERVATORY AND STEREO GUIDED BY MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC FLUX-ROPE MODELING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schrijver, Carolus J.; Title, Alan M.; Aulanier, Guillaume; Pariat, Etienne; Delannee, Cecile E-mail: title@lmsal.com E-mail: etienne.pariat@obspm.fr

    2011-09-10

    The 2011 February 15 X2.2 flare and associated Earth-directed halo coronal mass ejection were observed in unprecedented detail with high resolution in spatial, temporal, and thermal dimensions by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on the Solar Dynamics Observatory, as well as by instruments on the two STEREO spacecraft, then at near-quadrature relative to the Sun-Earth line. These observations enable us to see expanding loops from a flux-rope-like structure over the shearing polarity-inversion line between the central {delta}-spot groups of AR 11158, developing a propagating coronal front ('EIT wave'), and eventually forming the coronal mass ejection moving into the inner heliosphere. The observations support the interpretation that all of these features, including the 'EIT wave', are signatures of an expanding volume traced by loops (much larger than the flux rope only), surrounded by a moving front rather than predominantly wave-like perturbations; this interpretation is supported by previously published MHD models for active-region and global scales. The lateral expansion of the eruption is limited to the local helmet-streamer structure and halts at the edges of a large-scale domain of connectivity (in the process exciting loop oscillations at the edge of the southern polar coronal hole). The AIA observations reveal that plasma warming occurs within the expansion front as it propagates over quiet Sun areas. This warming causes dimming in the 171 A (Fe IX and Fe X) channel and brightening in the 193 and 211 A (Fe XII-XIV) channels along the entire front, while there is weak 131 A (Fe VIII and Fe XXI) emission in some directions. An analysis of the AIA response functions shows that sections of the front running over the quiet Sun are consistent with adiabatic warming; other sections may require additional heating which MHD modeling suggests could be caused by Joule dissipation. Although for the events studied here the effects of volumetric expansion are much more obvious than true wave phenomena, we discuss how different magnetic environments within and around the erupting region can lead to the signatures of either or both of these aspects.

  17. Advanced process control and novel test methods for PVD silicon and elastomeric silicone coatings utilized on ion implant disks, heatsinks and selected platens

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Springer, J.; Allen, B.; Wriggins, W.; Kuzbyt, R.; Sinclair, R.

    2012-11-06

    Coatings play multiple key roles in the proper functioning of mature and current ion implanters. Batch and serial implanters require strategic control of elemental and particulate contamination which often includes scrutiny of the silicon surface coatings encountering direct beam contact. Elastomeric Silicone Coatings must accommodate wafer loading and unloading as well as direct backside contact during implant plus must maintain rigid elemental and particulate specifications. The semiconductor industry has had a significant and continuous effort to obtain ultra-pure silicon coatings with sustained process performance and long life. Low particles and reduced elemental levels for silicon coatings are a major requirement for process engineers, OEM manufacturers, and second source suppliers. Relevant data will be presented. Some emphasis and detail will be placed on the structure and characteristics of a relatively new PVD Silicon Coating process that is very dense and homogeneous. Wear rate under typical ion beam test conditions will be discussed. The PVD Silicon Coating that will be presented here is used on disk shields, wafer handling fingers/fences, exclusion zones of heat sinks, beam dumps and other beamline components. Older, legacy implanters can now provide extended process capability using this new generation PVD silicon - even on implanter systems that were shipped long before the advent of silicon coating for contamination control. Low particles and reduced elemental levels are critical performance criteria for the silicone elastomers used on disk heatsinks and serial implanter platens. Novel evaluation techniques and custom engineered tools are used to investigate the surface interaction characteristics of multiple Elastomeric Silicone Coatings currently in use by the industry - specifically, friction and perpendicular stiction. These parameters are presented as methods to investigate the critical wafer load and unload function. Unique tools and test methods have been developed that deliver accurate and repeatable data, which will be described.

  18. Population studies. XIII. A new analysis of the Bidelman-Macconnell 'weak-metal' stars - confirmation of metal-poor stars in the thick disk of the galaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beers, Timothy C.; Norris, John E.; Placco, Vinicius M.; Lee, Young Sun; Rossi, Silvia; Carollo, Daniela; Masseron, Thomas E-mail: jen@mso.anu.edu.au E-mail: youngsun@cnu.ac.kr E-mail: daniela.carollo@mq.edu.au

    2014-10-10

    A new set of very high signal-to-noise (S/N > 100/1), medium-resolution (R ∼ 3000) optical spectra have been obtained for 302 of the candidate 'weak-metal' stars selected by Bidelman and MacConnell. We use these data to calibrate the recently developed generalization of the Sloan Extension for Galactic Exploration and Understanding and Exploration (SEGUE) Stellar Parameter Pipeline, and obtain estimates of the atmospheric parameters (T {sub eff}, log g, and [Fe/H]) for these non-Sloan Digital Sky Survey/SEGUE data; we also obtain estimates of [C/Fe]. The new abundance measurements are shown to be consistent with available high-resolution spectroscopic determinations, and represent a substantial improvement over the accuracies obtained from the previous photometric estimates reported in Paper I of this series. The apparent offset in the photometric abundances of the giants in this sample noted by several authors is confirmed by our new spectroscopy; no such effect is found for the dwarfs. The presence of a metal-weak thick-disk (MWTD) population is clearly supported by these new abundance data. Some 25% of the stars with metallicities –1.8 < [Fe/H] ≤–0.8 exhibit orbital eccentricities e < 0.4, yet are clearly separated from members of the inner-halo population with similar metallicities by their location in a Lindblad energy versus angular momentum diagram. A comparison is made with recent results for a similar-size sample of Radial Velocity Experiment stars from Ruchti et al. We conclude, based on both of these samples, that the MWTD is real, and must be accounted for in discussions of the formation and evolution of the disk system of the Milky Way.

  19. Magnetic braking of stellar cores in red giants and supergiants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maeder, André; Meynet, Georges E-mail: georges.meynet@unige.ch

    2014-10-01

    Magnetic configurations, stable on the long term, appear to exist in various evolutionary phases, from main-sequence stars to white dwarfs and neutron stars. The large-scale ordered nature of these fields, often approximately dipolar, and their scaling according to the flux conservation scenario favor a fossil field model. We make some first estimates of the magnetic coupling between the stellar cores and the outer layers in red giants and supergiants. Analytical expressions of the truncation radius of the field coupling are established for a convective envelope and for a rotating radiative zone with horizontal turbulence. The timescales of the internal exchanges of angular momentum are considered. Numerical estimates are made on the basis of recent model grids. The direct magnetic coupling of the core to the extended convective envelope of red giants and supergiants appears unlikely. However, we find that the intermediate radiative zone is fully coupled to the core during the He-burning and later phases. This coupling is able to produce a strong spin down of the core of red giants and supergiants, also leading to relatively slowly rotating stellar remnants such as white dwarfs and pulsars. Some angular momentum is also transferred to the outer convective envelope of red giants and supergiants during the He-burning phase and later.

  20. XMM-NEWTON MONITORING OF THE CLOSE PRE-MAIN-SEQUENCE BINARY AK SCO. EVIDENCE OF TIDE-DRIVEN FILLING OF THE INNER GAP IN THE CIRCUMBINARY DISK

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gomez de Castro, Ana Ines; Lopez-Santiago, Javier; Talavera, Antonio; Sytov, A. Yu.; Bisikalo, D.

    2013-03-20

    AK Sco stands out among pre-main-sequence binaries because of its prominent ultraviolet excess, the high eccentricity of its orbit, and the strong tides driven by it. AK Sco consists of two F5-type stars that get as close as 11 R{sub *} at periastron passage. The presence of a dense (n{sub e} {approx} 10{sup 11} cm{sup -3}) extended envelope has been unveiled recently. In this article, we report the results from an XMM-Newton-based monitoring of the system. We show that at periastron, X-ray and UV fluxes are enhanced by a factor of {approx}3 with respect to the apastron values. The X-ray radiation is produced in an optically thin plasma with T {approx} 6.4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 6} K and it is found that the N{sub H} column density rises from 0.35 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 21} cm{sup -2} at periastron to 1.11 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 21} cm{sup -2} at apastron, in good agreement with previous polarimetric observations. The UV emission detected in the Optical Monitor band seems to be caused by the reprocessing of the high-energy magnetospheric radiation on the circumstellar material. Further evidence of the strong magnetospheric disturbances is provided by the detection of line broadening of 278.7 km s{sup -1} in the N V line with Hubble Space Telescope/Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph. Numerical simulations of the mass flow from the circumbinary disk to the components have been carried out. They provide a consistent scenario with which to interpret AK Sco observations. We show that the eccentric orbit acts like a gravitational piston. At apastron, matter is dragged efficiently from the inner disk border, filling the inner gap and producing accretion streams that end as ring-like structures around each component of the system. At periastron, the ring-like structures come into contact, leading to angular momentum loss, and thus producing an accretion outburst.

  1. THE INTERSTELLAR MEDIUM IN DISTANT STAR-FORMING GALAXIES: TURBULENT PRESSURE, FRAGMENTATION, AND CLOUD SCALING RELATIONS IN A DENSE GAS DISK AT z = 2.3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swinbank, A. M.; Smail, Ian; Papadopoulos, P. P.; Cox, P.; Krips, M.; Neri, R.; Ivison, R. J.; Thomson, A. P.; Richard, J.; Ebeling, H.

    2011-11-20

    We have used the Institut de Radioastronomie Millimetrique (IRAM) Plateau de Bure Interferometer and the Expanded Very Large Array to obtain a high-resolution map of the CO(6-5) and CO(1-0) emission in the lensed, star-forming galaxy SMM J2135-0102 at z = 2.32. The kinematics of the gas are well described by a model of a rotationally supported disk with an inclination-corrected rotation speed, v{sub rot} = 320 {+-} 25 km s{sup -1}, a ratio of rotational-to-dispersion support of v/{sigma} = 3.5 {+-} 0.2, and a dynamical mass of (6.0 {+-} 0.5) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 10} M{sub Sun} within a radius of 2.5 kpc. The disk has a Toomre parameter, Q = 0.50 {+-} 0.15, suggesting that the gas will rapidly fragment into massive clumps on scales of L{sub J} {approx} 400 pc. We identify star-forming regions on these scales and show that they are {approx}10 Multiplication-Sign denser than those in quiescent environments in local galaxies, and significantly offset from the local molecular cloud scaling relations (Larson's relations). The large offset compared to local molecular cloud line-width-size scaling relations implies that supersonic turbulence should remain dominant on scales {approx}100 Multiplication-Sign smaller than in the kinematically quiescent interstellar medium (ISM) of the Milky Way, while the molecular gas in SMM J2135 is expected to be {approx}50 Multiplication-Sign denser than that in the Milky Way on all scales. This is most likely due to the high external hydrostatic pressure we measure for the ISM, P{sub tot}/k{sub B} {approx} (2 {+-} 1) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 7} K cm{sup -3}. In such highly turbulent ISM, the subsonic regions of gravitational collapse (and star formation) will be characterized by much higher critical densities, n{sub crit} > = 10{sup 8} cm{sup -3}, a factor {approx}>1000 Multiplication-Sign more than the quiescent ISM of the Milky Way.

  2. EVIDENCE AGAINST AN EDGE-ON DISK AROUND THE EXTRASOLAR PLANET, 2MASS 1207 b AND A NEW THICK-CLOUD EXPLANATION FOR ITS UNDERLUMINOSITY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Skemer, Andrew J.; Close, Laird M.; Szucs, Laszlo; Apai, Daniel; Pascucci, Ilaria; Biller, Beth A.

    2011-05-10

    Since the discovery of the first directly imaged, planetary-mass object, 2MASS 1207 b, several works have sought to explain a disparity between its observed temperature and luminosity. Given its known age, distance, and spectral type, 2MASS 1207 b is underluminous by a factor of {approx}10 ({approx}2.5 mag) when compared to standard models of brown-dwarf/giant-planet evolution. In this paper, we study three possible sources of 2MASS 1207 b's underluminosity. First, we investigate Mohanty et al.'s hypothesis that a near edge-on disk, comprising large, gray-extincting grains, might be responsible for 2MASS 1207 b's underluminosity. After radiative transfer modeling, we conclude that the hypothesis is unlikely due to the lack of variability seen in multi-epoch photometry and unnecessary due to the increasing sample of underluminous brown dwarfs/giant exoplanets that cannot be explained by an edge-on disk. Next, we test the analogous possibility that a spherical shell of dust could explain 2MASS 1207 b's underluminosity. Models containing enough dust to create {approx}2.5 mag of extinction, placed at reasonable radii, are ruled out by our new Gemini/T-ReCS 8.7 {mu}m photometric upper limit for 2MASS 1207 b. Finally, we investigate the possibility that 2MASS 1207 b is intrinsically cooler than the commonly used AMES-DUSTY fits to its spectrum, and thus it is not, in fact, underluminous. New, thick-cloud model grids by Madhusudhan et al. fit 2MASS 1207 b's 1-10 {mu}m spectral energy distribution well, but they do not quite fit its near-infrared spectrum. However, we suggest that with some 'tuning', they might be capable of simultaneously reproducing 2MASS 1207 b's spectral shape and luminosity. In this case, the whole class of young, underluminous brown dwarfs/giant exoplanets might be explained by atmospheres that are able to suspend thick, dusty clouds in their photospheres at temperatures lower than field brown dwarfs.

  3. An array of virtual Frisch-grid CdZnTe detectors and a front-end application-specific integrated circuit for large-area position-sensitive gamma-ray cameras

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bolotnikov, A. E.; Ackley, K.; Camarda, G. S.; Cherches, C.; Cui, Y.; De Geronimo, G.; Fried, J.; Hodges, D.; Hossain, A.; Lee, W.; et al

    2015-07-28

    We developed a robust and low-cost array of virtual Frisch-grid CdZnTe (CZT) detectors coupled to a front-end readout ASIC for spectroscopy and imaging of gamma rays. The array operates as a self-reliant detector module. It is comprised of 36 close-packed 6x6x15 mm3 detectors grouped into 3x3 sub-arrays of 2x2 detectors with the common cathodes. The front-end analog ASIC accommodates up to 36 anode and 9 cathode inputs. Several detector modules can be integrated into a single- or multi-layer unit operating as a Compton or a coded-aperture camera. We present the results from testing two fully assembled modules and readout electronics.more » The further enhancement of the arrays’ performance and reduction of their cost are made possible by using position-sensitive virtual Frisch-grid detectors, which allow for accurate corrections of the response of material non-uniformities caused by crystal defects.« less

  4. An array of virtual Frisch-grid CdZnTe detectors and a front-end application-specific integrated circuit for large-area position-sensitive gamma-ray cameras

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bolotnikov, A. E.; Ackley, K.; Camarda, G. S.; Cherches, C.; Cui, Y.; De Geronimo, G.; Fried, J.; Hodges, D.; Hossain, A.; Lee, W.; Mahler, G.; Maritato, M.; Petryk, M.; Roy, U.; Salwen, C.; Vernon, E.; Yang, G.; James, R. B.

    2015-07-28

    We developed a robust and low-cost array of virtual Frisch-grid CdZnTe (CZT) detectors coupled to a front-end readout ASIC for spectroscopy and imaging of gamma rays. The array operates as a self-reliant detector module. It is comprised of 36 close-packed 6x6x15 mm3 detectors grouped into 3x3 sub-arrays of 2x2 detectors with the common cathodes. The front-end analog ASIC accommodates up to 36 anode and 9 cathode inputs. Several detector modules can be integrated into a single- or multi-layer unit operating as a Compton or a coded-aperture camera. We present the results from testing two fully assembled modules and readout electronics. The further enhancement of the arrays’ performance and reduction of their cost are made possible by using position-sensitive virtual Frisch-grid detectors, which allow for accurate corrections of the response of material non-uniformities caused by crystal defects.

  5. Generation of runaway electrons and X-ray emission during breakdown of atmospheric-pressure air by voltage pulses with an ∼0.5-μs front duration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kostyrya, I. D.; Tarasenko, V. F.

    2015-03-15

    Results are presented from experiments on the generation of runaway electron beams and X-ray emission in atmospheric-pressure air by using voltage pulses with an ∼0.5-μs front duration. It is shown that the use of small-curvature-radius spherical cathodes (or other cathodes with small curvature radii) decreases the intensity of the runaway electron beam and X-ray emission. It is found that, at sufficiently high voltages at the electrode gap (U{sub m} ∼ 100 kV), the gap breakdown, the formation of a spark channel, and the generation of a runaway electron beam occur over less than 10 ns. At high values of U{sub m} behind the anode that were reached by increasing the cathode size and the electrode gap length, a supershort avalanche electron beam with a full width at half-maximum (FWHM) of up to ∼100 ps was detected. At voltages of ∼50 kV, the second breakdown regime was revealed in which a runaway electron beam with an FWHM of ∼2 ns was generated, whereas the FWHM of the X-ray pulse increased to ∼100 ns. It is established that the energy of the bulk of runaway electrons decreases with increasing voltage front duration and is ⩽30 keV in the first regime and ⩽10 keV in the second regime.

  6. Oxygen Reduction Reaction Measurements on Platinum Electrocatalysts Utilizing Rotating Disk Electrode Technique: I. Impact of Impurities, Measurement Protocols and Applied Corrections

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Shinozaki, Kazuma; Zack, Jason W.; Richards, Ryan M.; Pivovar, Bryan S.; Kocha, Shyam S.

    2015-07-22

    The rotating disk electrode (RDE) technique is being extensively used as a screening tool to estimate the activity of novel PEMFC electrocatalysts synthesized in lab-scale (mg) quantities. Discrepancies in measured activity attributable to glassware and electrolyte impurity levels, as well as conditioning, protocols and corrections are prevalent in the literature. Moreover, the electrochemical response to a broad spectrum of commercially sourced perchloric acid and the effect of acid molarity on impurity levels and solution resistance were also assessed. Our findings reveal that an area specific activity (SA) exceeding 2.0 mA/cm2 (20 mV/s, 25°C, 100 kPa, 0.1 M HClO4) for polishedmore » poly-Pt is an indicator of impurity levels that do not impede the accurate measurement of the ORR activity of Pt based catalysts. After exploring various conditioning protocols to approach maximum utilization of the electrochemical area (ECA) and peak ORR activity without introducing catalyst degradation, an investigation of measurement protocols for ECA and ORR activity was conducted. Down-selected protocols were based on the criteria of reproducibility, duration of experiments, impurity effects and magnitude of pseudo-capacitive background correction. In sum, statistical reproducibility of ORR activity for poly-Pt and Pt supported on high surface area carbon was demonstrated.« less

  7. POLARIZED LIGHT IMAGING OF THE HD142527 TRANSITION DISK WITH THE GEMINI PLANET IMAGER: DUST AROUND THE CLOSE-IN COMPANION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rodigas, Timothy J.; Weinberger, Alycia; Follette, Katherine B.; Close, Laird; Hines, Dean C.

    2014-08-20

    When giant planets form, they grow by accreting gas and dust. HD142527 is a young star that offers a scaled-up view of this process. It has a broad, asymmetric ring of gas and dust beyond ?100AU and a wide inner gap. Within the gap, a low-mass stellar companion orbits the primary star at just ?12AU, and both the primary and secondary are accreting gas. In an attempt to directly detect the dusty counterpart to this accreted gas, we have observed HD142527 with the Gemini Planet Imager in polarized light at Y band (0.95-1.14 ?m). We clearly detect the companion in total intensity and show that its position and photometry are generally consistent with the expected values. We also detect a point source in polarized light that may be spatially separated by ? a fewAU from the location of the companion in total intensity. This suggests that dust is likely falling onto or orbiting the companion. Given the possible contribution of scattered light from this dust to previously reported photometry of the companion, the current mass limits should be viewed as upper limits only. If the dust near the companion is eventually confirmed to be spatially separated, this system would resemble a scaled-up version of the young planetary system inside the gap of the transition disk around LkCa 15.

  8. Investigating wind turbine impacts on near-wake flow using profiling Lidar data and large-eddy simulations with an actuator disk model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mirocha, Jeffrey D.; Rajewski, Daniel A.; Marjanovic, Nikola; Lundquist, Julie K.; Kosovic, Branko; Draxl, Caroline; Churchfield, Matthew J.

    2015-08-27

    In this study, wind turbine impacts on the atmospheric flow are investigated using data from the Crop Wind Energy Experiment (CWEX-11) and large-eddy simulations (LESs) utilizing a generalized actuator disk (GAD) wind turbine model. CWEX-11 employed velocity-azimuth display (VAD) data from two Doppler lidar systems to sample vertical profiles of flow parameters across the rotor depth both upstream and in the wake of an operating 1.5 MW wind turbine. Lidar and surface observations obtained during four days of July 2011 are analyzed to characterize the turbine impacts on wind speed and flow variability, and to examine the sensitivity of these changes to atmospheric stability. Significant velocity deficits (VD) are observed at the downstream location during both convective and stable portions of four diurnal cycles, with large, sustained deficits occurring during stable conditions. Variances of the streamwise velocity component, σu, likewise show large increases downstream during both stable and unstable conditions, with stable conditions supporting sustained small increases of σu , while convective conditions featured both larger magnitudes and increased variability, due to the large coherent structures in the background flow. Two representative case studies, one stable and one convective, are simulated using LES with a GAD model at 6 m resolution to evaluate the compatibility of the simulation framework with validation using vertically profiling lidar data in the near wake region. Virtual lidars were employed to sample the simulated flow field in a manner consistent with the VAD technique. Simulations reasonably reproduced aggregated wake VD characteristics, albeit with smaller magnitudes than observed, while σu values in the wake are more significantly underestimated. The results illuminate the limitations of using a GAD in combination with coarse model resolution in the simulation of near wake physics, and validation thereof using VAD data.

  9. Investigating wind turbine impacts on near-wake flow using profiling Lidar data and large-eddy simulations with an actuator disk model

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Mirocha, Jeffrey D.; Rajewski, Daniel A.; Marjanovic, Nikola; Lundquist, Julie K.; Kosovic, Branko; Draxl, Caroline; Churchfield, Matthew J.

    2015-08-27

    In this study, wind turbine impacts on the atmospheric flow are investigated using data from the Crop Wind Energy Experiment (CWEX-11) and large-eddy simulations (LESs) utilizing a generalized actuator disk (GAD) wind turbine model. CWEX-11 employed velocity-azimuth display (VAD) data from two Doppler lidar systems to sample vertical profiles of flow parameters across the rotor depth both upstream and in the wake of an operating 1.5 MW wind turbine. Lidar and surface observations obtained during four days of July 2011 are analyzed to characterize the turbine impacts on wind speed and flow variability, and to examine the sensitivity of thesemore » changes to atmospheric stability. Significant velocity deficits (VD) are observed at the downstream location during both convective and stable portions of four diurnal cycles, with large, sustained deficits occurring during stable conditions. Variances of the streamwise velocity component, σu, likewise show large increases downstream during both stable and unstable conditions, with stable conditions supporting sustained small increases of σu , while convective conditions featured both larger magnitudes and increased variability, due to the large coherent structures in the background flow. Two representative case studies, one stable and one convective, are simulated using LES with a GAD model at 6 m resolution to evaluate the compatibility of the simulation framework with validation using vertically profiling lidar data in the near wake region. Virtual lidars were employed to sample the simulated flow field in a manner consistent with the VAD technique. Simulations reasonably reproduced aggregated wake VD characteristics, albeit with smaller magnitudes than observed, while σu values in the wake are more significantly underestimated. The results illuminate the limitations of using a GAD in combination with coarse model resolution in the simulation of near wake physics, and validation thereof using VAD data.« less

  10. IDENTIFICATION OF AN {sup 84}Sr-DEPLETED CARRIER IN PRIMITIVE METEORITES AND IMPLICATIONS FOR THERMAL PROCESSING IN THE SOLAR PROTOPLANETARY DISK

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paton, Chad; Schiller, Martin; Bizzarro, Martin E-mail: schiller@snm.ku.dk

    2013-02-01

    The existence of correlated nucleosynthetic heterogeneities in solar system reservoirs is now well demonstrated for numerous nuclides. However, it has proven difficult to discriminate between the two disparate processes that can explain such correlated variability: incomplete mixing of presolar material or secondary processing of a well-mixed disk. Using stepwise acid-leaching of the Ivuna CI-chondrite, we show that unlike other nuclides such as {sup 54}Cr and {sup 50}Ti, Sr-isotope variability is the result of a carrier depleted in {sup 84}Sr. The carrier is most likely presolar SiC, which is known to have both high Sr-concentrations relative to solar abundances and extremely depleted {sup 84}Sr compositions. Thus, variability in {sup 84}Sr in meteorites and their components can be attributed to varying contributions from presolar SiC. The observed {sup 84}Sr excesses in calcium-aluminum refractory inclusions (CAIs) suggest their formation from an SiC-free gaseous reservoir, whereas the {sup 84}Sr depletions present in differentiated meteorites require their formation from material with an increased concentration of SiC relative to CI chondrites. The presence of a positive correlation between {sup 84}Sr and {sup 54}Cr, despite being hosted in carriers of negative and positive anomalies, respectively, is not compatible with incomplete mixing of presolar material but instead suggests that the solar system's nucleosynthetic heterogeneity reflects selective thermal processing of dust. Based on vaporization experiments of SiC under nebular conditions, the lack of SiC material in the CAI-forming gas inferred from our data requires that the duration of thermal processing of dust resulting in the vaporization of CAI precursors was extremely short-lived, possibly lasting only hours to days.

  11. Oxygen Reduction Reaction Measurements on Platinum Electrocatalysts Utilizing Rotating Disk Electrode Technique: II. Influence of Ink Formulation, Catalyst Layer Uniformity and Thickness

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shinozaki, Kazuma; Zack, Jason W.; Pylypenko, Svitlana; Pivovar, Bryan S.; Kocha, Shyam S.

    2015-09-17

    Platinum electrocatalysts supported on high surface area and Vulcan carbon blacks (Pt/HSC, Pt/V) were characterized in rotating disk electrode (RDE) setups for electrochemical area (ECA) and oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) area specific activity (SA) and mass specific activity (MA) at 0.9 V. Films fabricated using several ink formulations and film-drying techniques were characterized for a statistically significant number of independent samples. The highest quality Pt/HSC films exhibited MA 870 ± 91 mA/mgPt and SA 864 ± 56 μA/cm2 Pt while Pt/V had MA 706 ± 42 mA/mgPt and SA 1120 ± 70 μA/cm2 Pt when measured in 0.1 M HClO4, 20 mV/s, 100 kPa O2 and 23±2°C. An enhancement factor of 2.8 in themeasured SA was observable on eliminating Nafion ionomer and employing extremely thin, uniform films (~4.5 μg/cm2 Pt) of Pt/HSC. The ECA for Pt/HSC (99 ± 7 m2/gPt) and Pt/V (65 ± 5 m2/gPt) were statistically invariant and insensitive to film uniformity/thickness/fabrication technique; accordingly, enhancements in MA are wholly attributable to increases in SA. Impedance measurements coupled with scanning electron microscopy were used to de-convolute the losses within the catalyst layer and ascribed to the catalyst layer resistance, oxygen diffusion, and sulfonate anion adsorption/blocking. The ramifications of these results for proton exchange membrane fuel cells have also been examined.

  12. Oxygen Reduction Reaction Measurements on Platinum Electrocatalysts Utilizing Rotating Disk Electrode Technique: II. Influence of Ink Formulation, Catalyst Layer Uniformity and Thickness

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Shinozaki, Kazuma; Zack, Jason W.; Pylypenko, Svitlana; Pivovar, Bryan S.; Kocha, Shyam S.

    2015-09-17

    Platinum electrocatalysts supported on high surface area and Vulcan carbon blacks (Pt/HSC, Pt/V) were characterized in rotating disk electrode (RDE) setups for electrochemical area (ECA) and oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) area specific activity (SA) and mass specific activity (MA) at 0.9 V. Films fabricated using several ink formulations and film-drying techniques were characterized for a statistically significant number of independent samples. The highest quality Pt/HSC films exhibited MA 870 ± 91 mA/mgPt and SA 864 ± 56 μA/cm2 Pt while Pt/V had MA 706 ± 42 mA/mgPt and SA 1120 ± 70 μA/cm2 Pt when measured in 0.1 M HClO4,more » 20 mV/s, 100 kPa O2 and 23±2°C. An enhancement factor of 2.8 in themeasured SA was observable on eliminating Nafion ionomer and employing extremely thin, uniform films (~4.5 μg/cm2 Pt) of Pt/HSC. The ECA for Pt/HSC (99 ± 7 m2/gPt) and Pt/V (65 ± 5 m2/gPt) were statistically invariant and insensitive to film uniformity/thickness/fabrication technique; accordingly, enhancements in MA are wholly attributable to increases in SA. Impedance measurements coupled with scanning electron microscopy were used to de-convolute the losses within the catalyst layer and ascribed to the catalyst layer resistance, oxygen diffusion, and sulfonate anion adsorption/blocking. The ramifications of these results for proton exchange membrane fuel cells have also been examined.« less

  13. Zinc enhanced hard disk media

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zou, Jie; Lambeth, David N.; Laughlin, David E.

    2002-01-01

    The present invention provides a magnetic recording media incorporating Zn containing layers in close proximity to a magnetic layer to provide media having increased coercivity and lower noise. The Zn containing layer can be incorporated in a rotating, translating or stationary recording media to operate in conjunction with magnetic transducing heads for recording and reading of magnetic data, as well as other applications. The magnetic recording medium of the invention preferably includes a Co or Co alloy film magnetic layer, underlayer structures to promote epitaxial crystalline structure in the magnetic layer, and a Zn containing layer to promote isolation between the magnetic grains. The medium can further include seed layers, underlayers, intermediate layers, and overlayers. The process of manufacture includes promoting diffusion of Zn to the magnetic layer grain boundaries.

  14. Shockwave Engine: Wave Disk Engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-01-14

    Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: MSU is developing a new engine for use in hybrid automobiles that could significantly reduce fuel waste and improve engine efficiency. In a traditional internal combustion engine, air and fuel are ignited, creating high-temperature and high-pressure gases which expand rapidly. This expansion of gases forces the engine’s pistons to pump and powers the car. MSU’s engine has no pistons. It uses the combustion of air and fuel to build up pressure within the engine, generating a shockwave that blasts hot gas exhaust into the blades of the engine’s rotors causing them to turn, which generates electricity. MSU’s redesigned engine would be the size of a cooking pot and contain fewer moving parts—reducing the weight of the engine by 30%. It would also enable a vehicle that could use 60% of its fuel for propulsion.

  15. THE VLA NASCENT DISK AND MULTIPLICITY (VANDAM) SURVEY OF PERSEUS PROTOSTARS. RESOLVING THE SUB-ARCSECOND BINARY SYSTEM IN NGC1333 IRAS2A

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tobin, John J.; Looney, Leslie W.; Dunham, Michael M.; Li, Zhi-Yun; Chandler, Claire J.; Perez, Laura M.; Segura-Cox, Dominique; Harris, Robert J.; Hull, Charles L. H.; Sadavoy, Sarah I.; Melis, Carl; Kratter, Kaitlin; Jrgensen, Jes K.; Plunkett, Adele L. E-mail: jeskj@nbi.dk

    2015-01-01

    We are conducting a Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) Ka-band (8mm and 1 cm) and C-band (4cm and 6.4cm) survey of all known protostars in the Perseus Molecular Cloud, providing resolution down to ?0.''06 and ?0.''35 in the Ka band and C band, respectively. Here we present first results from this survey that enable us to examine the source NGC1333 IRAS2A in unprecedented detail and resolve it into a protobinary system separated by 0.''621 0.''006 (?143 AU) at 8mm, 1cm, and 4cm. These two sources (IRAS2A VLA1 and VLA2) are likely driving the two orthogonal outflows known to originate from IRAS2A. The brighter source IRAS2A VLA1 is extended perpendicular to its outflow in the VLA data, with a deconvolved size of 0.''055 (?13 AU), possibly tracing a protostellar disk. The recently reported candidate companions (IRAS2A MM2 and MM3) are not detected in either our VLA data, Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy (CARMA) 1.3mm data, or Submillimeter Array (SMA) 850 ?m data. SMA CO (J = 3 ? 2), CARMA CO (J = 2 ? 1), and lower-resolution CARMA CO (J = 1 ? 0) observations are used to examine the outflow origins and the nature of the candidate companions to IRAS2A VLA1. The CO (J = 3 ? 2) and (J = 2 ? 1) data show that IRAS2A MM2 is coincident with a bright CO emission spot in the east-west outflow, and IRAS2A MM3 is within the north-south outflow. In contrast, IRAS2A VLA2 lies at the east-west outflow symmetry point. We propose that IRAS2A VLA2 is the driving source of the east-west outflow and a true companion to IRAS2A VLA1, whereas IRAS2A MM2 and MM3 may not be protostellar.

  16. Formation of short-lived radionuclides in the protoplanetary disk during late-stage irradiation of a volatile-rich reservoir

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacobsen, B; Matzel, J; Hutcheon, I D; Krot, A N; Yin, Q -; Nagashima, K; Ramon, E; Weber, P; Ishii, H; Ciesla, F

    2010-11-30

    The origin of short-lived (t{sub 1/2} < 5 Myr) and now extinct radionuclides ({sup 10}Be, {sup 26}Al, {sup 36}Cl, {sup 41}Ca, {sup 53}Mn, {sup 60}Fe; hereafter SLRs) is fundamental to understanding the formation of the early solar system. Two distinct classes of models have been proposed to explain the origin of SLRs: (1) injection from a nearby stellar source (e.g., supernova, asymptotic giant branch star or Wolf-Rayet star) and (2) solar energetic particle irradiation of dust and gas near the proto-Sun. Recent studies have demonstrated that {sup 36}Cl was extant in the early solar system. However, its presence, initial abundance and the noticeable decoupling from {sup 26}Al raise serious questions about the origin of SLRs. Here we report {sup 36}Cl-{sup 36}S and {sup 26}Al-{sup 26}Mg systematics for wadalite and grossular, secondary minerals in a calcium-aluminum-rich inclusion (CAI) from the CV chondrite Allende that allow us to reassess the origin of SLRs. The inferred abundance of {sup 36}Cl in wadalite, corresponding to a {sup 36}Cl/{sup 35}Cl ratio of (1.81 {+-} 0.13) x 10{sup -5}, is the highest {sup 36}Cl abundance reported in any early solar system material. The high level of {sup 36}Cl in wadalite and the absence of {sup 26}Al ({sup 26}Al/{sup 27}Al {le} 3.9 x 10{sup -6}) in co-existing grossular indicates that (1) {sup 36}Cl formed by late-stage solar energetic particle irradiation and (2) the production of {sup 36}Cl, recorded by secondary minerals, is unrelated to the origin of {sup 26}Al and other SLRs ({sup 10}Be, {sup 53}Mn) recorded by primary minerals of CAIs and chondrules. We conclude that 36Cl was produced by solar energetic particle irradiation of a volatile-rich reservoir in an optically thin protoplanetary disk adjacent to the accretion region of the CV chondrite parent asteroid.

  17. PLANETARY CONSTRUCTION ZONES IN OCCULTATION: DISCOVERY OF AN EXTRASOLAR RING SYSTEM TRANSITING A YOUNG SUN-LIKE STAR AND FUTURE PROSPECTS FOR DETECTING ECLIPSES BY CIRCUMSECONDARY AND CIRCUMPLANETARY DISKS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mamajek, Eric E.; Quillen, Alice C.; Pecaut, Mark J.; Moolekamp, Fred; Scott, Erin L.; Kenworthy, Matthew A.; Cameron, Andrew Collier; Parley, Neil R.

    2012-03-15

    The large relative sizes of circumstellar and circumplanetary disks imply that they might be seen in eclipse in stellar light curves. We estimate that a survey of {approx}10{sup 4} young ({approx}10 million year old) post-accretion pre-main-sequence stars monitored for {approx}10 years should yield at least a few deep eclipses from circumplanetary disks and disks surrounding low-mass companion stars. We present photometric and spectroscopic data for a pre-main-sequence K5 star (1SWASP J140747.93-394542.6 = ASAS J140748-3945.7), a newly discovered {approx}0.9 M{sub Sun} member of the {approx}16 Myr old Upper Centaurus-Lupus subgroup of Sco-Cen at a kinematic distance of 128 {+-} 13 pc. This star exhibited a remarkably long, deep, and complex eclipse event centered on 2007 April 29 (as discovered in Super Wide Angle Search for Planets (SuperWASP) photometry, and with portions of the dimming confirmed by All Sky Automated Survey (ASAS) data). At least five multi-day dimming events of >0.5 mag are identified, with a >3.3 mag deep eclipse bracketed by two pairs of {approx}1 mag eclipses symmetrically occurring {+-}12 days and {+-}26 days before and after. Hence, significant dimming of the star was taking place on and off over at least a {approx}54 day period in 2007, and a strong >1 mag dimming event occurring over a {approx}12 day span. We place a firm lower limit on the period of 850 days (i.e., the orbital radius of the eclipser must be >1.7 AU and orbital velocity must be <22 km s{sup -1}). The shape of the light curve is similar to the lopsided eclipses of the Be star EE Cep. We suspect that this new star is being eclipsed by a low-mass object orbited by a dense inner disk, further girded by at least three dusty rings of optical depths near unity. Between these rings are at least two annuli of near-zero optical depth (i.e., gaps), possibly cleared out by planets or moons, depending on the nature of the secondary. For possible periods in the range 2.33-200 yr, the estimated total ring mass is {approx}8-0.4 M{sub Moon} (if the rings have optical opacity similar to Saturn's rings), and the edge of the outermost detected ring has orbital radius {approx}0.4-0.09 AU. In the new era of time-domain astronomy opened by surveys like SuperWASP, ASAS, etc., and soon to be revolutionized by Large Synoptic Survey Telescope, discovering and characterizing eclipses by circumplanetary and circumsecondary disks will provide us with observational constraints on the conditions that spawn satellite systems around gas giant planets and planetary systems around stars.

  18. A:\1FRONT(REVISED).PDF

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ACKNOWLEDGMENTS Special "Thanks" are given to the many individuals who participated in the multi-disciplinary team from DOE Headquarters and Field Elements. They wrote the chapters or provided insight, input and information arising from their own experiences. It was their valuable expertise which formed the basis for this Reference Book. Sponsor: Richard H. Hopf, Director, Office of Procurement & Assistance Management Lead Office Director: Stephen J. Michelsen, Director, Office of

  19. Volume 3 - Front Matter and TOC

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ... fatality LEU low-enriched uranium ... Long-Term Management of Used Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste 2.1 National ... waste would meet the acceptance criteria. ...

  20. Front, Preface, Exec summary, Contents.PDF

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Professor Barry Smith from the British Geological Survey, UK, was contracted to prepare ... Muirhead, Alan Phipps, Ed Rance, Jennifer Smith, Neil Stradling * SCK*CEN Studiecentrum ...

  1. Dissolving the mineral calcite: Reaction front instability |...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ---Metagenomics ---Terrestrial ecology --Molecular biology ---Clinical proteomics and biomarker discovery ---Interventional biology ---Proteomics --Structural biology...

  2. Volume 1 Front Matter and TOC

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Virgin Islands Recovery Act State Memo Virgin Islands Recovery Act State Memo The American Recovery & Reinvestment Act( ARRA) is making a meaningful down payment on the nation's energy and environmental future. The Recovery Act investments in the U.S. Virgin Islands are supporting a broad range of clean energy projects from energy efficiency and the smart grid to solar power and biofuels. Through these investments, the U.S. Virgin Islands' businesses, universities, non-profits, and local

  3. TT_Awards_cover_front_FINAL.indd

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Near Single-Crystalline, High-Carrier-Mobility Silicon ... Electrical injection is by indirect exciton injection into ... a new model of HCV viral load increase in the setting of ...

  4. CSI 2264: simultaneous optical and infrared light curves of young disk-bearing stars in NGC 2264 with CoRoT and Spitzerevidence for multiple origins of variability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cody, Ann Marie; Stauffer, John; Rebull, Luisa M.; Carey, Sean; Baglin, Annie; Micela, Giuseppina; Flaccomio, Ettore; Morales-Caldern, Mara; Aigrain, Suzanne; Bouvier, Jrme; Gutermuth, Robert; Song, Inseok; Turner, Neal; Alencar, Silvia H. P.; Zwintz, Konstanze; Plavchan, Peter; Terebey, Susan; and others

    2014-04-01

    We present the Coordinated Synoptic Investigation of NGC 2264, a continuous 30 day multi-wavelength photometric monitoring campaign on more than 1000 young cluster members using 16 telescopes. The unprecedented combination of multi-wavelength, high-precision, high-cadence, and long-duration data opens a new window into the time domain behavior of young stellar objects. Here we provide an overview of the observations, focusing on results from Spitzer and CoRoT. The highlight of this work is detailed analysis of 162 classical T Tauri stars for which we can probe optical and mid-infrared flux variations to 1% amplitudes and sub-hour timescales. We present a morphological variability census and then use metrics of periodicity, stochasticity, and symmetry to statistically separate the light curves into seven distinct classes, which we suggest represent different physical processes and geometric effects. We provide distributions of the characteristic timescales and amplitudes and assess the fractional representation within each class. The largest category (>20%) are optical 'dippers' with discrete fading events lasting ?1-5 days. The degree of correlation between the optical and infrared light curves is positive but weak; notably, the independently assigned optical and infrared morphology classes tend to be different for the same object. Assessment of flux variation behavior with respect to (circum)stellar properties reveals correlations of variability parameters with H? emission and with effective temperature. Overall, our results point to multiple origins of young star variability, including circumstellar obscuration events, hot spots on the star and/or disk, accretion bursts, and rapid structural changes in the inner disk.

  5. Turbulence and combustion interaction: High resolution local flame front structure visualization using simultaneous single-shot PLIF imaging of CH, OH, and CH{sub 2}O in a piloted premixed jet flame

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Z.S.; Li, B.; Sun, Z.W.; Alden, M. [Division of Combustion Physics, Lund University, P.O. Box 118, S-221 00 Lund (Sweden); Bai, X.S. [Division of Fluid Mechanics, Lund University, P.O. Box 118, S-221 00 Lund (Sweden)

    2010-06-15

    High resolution planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) was applied to investigate the local flame front structures of turbulent premixed methane/air jet flames in order to reveal details about turbulence and flame interaction. The targeted turbulent flames were generated on a specially designed coaxial jet burner, in which low speed stoichiometric gas mixture was fed through the outer large tube to provide a laminar pilot flame for stabilization of the high speed jet flame issued through the small inner tube. By varying the inner tube flow speed and keeping the mixture composition as that of the outer tube, different flames were obtained covering both the laminar and turbulent flame regimes with different turbulent intensities. Simultaneous CH/CH{sub 2}O, and also OH PLIF images were recorded to characterize the influence of turbulence eddies on the reaction zone structure, with a spatial resolution of about 40 {mu}m and temporal resolution of around 10 ns. Under all experimental conditions, the CH radicals were found to exist only in a thin layer; the CH{sub 2}O were found in the inner flame whereas the OH radicals were seen in the outer flame with the thin CH layer separating the OH and CH{sub 2}O layers. The outer OH layer is thick and it corresponds to the oxidation zone and post-flame zone; the CH{sub 2}O layer is thin in laminar flows; it becomes broad at high speed turbulent flow conditions. This phenomenon was analyzed using chemical kinetic calculations and eddy/flame interaction theory. It appears that under high turbulence intensity conditions, the small eddies in the preheat zone can transport species such as CH{sub 2}O from the reaction zones to the preheat zone. The CH{sub 2}O species are not consumed in the preheat zone due to the absence of H, O, and OH radicals by which CH{sub 2}O is to be oxidized. The CH radicals cannot exist in the preheat zone due to the rapid reactions of this species with O{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} in the inner-layer of the reaction zones. The local PLIF intensities were evaluated using an area integrated PLIF signal. Substantial increase of the CH{sub 2}O signal and decrease of CH signal was observed as the jet velocity increases. These observations raise new challenges to the current flamelet type models. (author)

  6. Techno-Economic Analysis of the Deacetylation and Disk Refining Process. Characterizing the Effect of Refining Energy and Enzyme Usage on Minimum Sugar Selling Price and Minimum Ethanol Selling Price

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Xiaowen; Shekiro, Joseph; Pschorn, Thomas; Sabourin, Marc; Tucker, Melvin P.; Tao, Ling

    2015-10-29

    A novel, highly efficient deacetylation and disk refining (DDR) process to liberate fermentable sugars from biomass was recently developed at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). The DDR process consists of a mild, dilute alkaline deacetylation step followed by low-energy-consumption disk refining. The DDR corn stover substrates achieved high process sugar conversion yields, at low to modest enzyme loadings, and also produced high sugar concentration syrups at high initial insoluble solid loadings. The sugar syrups derived from corn stover are highly fermentable due to low concentrations of fermentation inhibitors. The objective of this work is to evaluate the economic feasibility of the DDR process through a techno-economic analysis (TEA). A large array of experiments designed using a response surface methodology was carried out to investigate the two major cost-driven operational parameters of the novel DDR process: refining energy and enzyme loadings. The boundary conditions for refining energy (128–468 kWh/ODMT), cellulase (Novozyme’s CTec3) loading (11.6–28.4 mg total protein/g of cellulose), and hemicellulase (Novozyme’s HTec3) loading (0–5 mg total protein/g of cellulose) were chosen to cover the most commercially practical operating conditions. The sugar and ethanol yields were modeled with good adequacy, showing a positive linear correlation between those yields and refining energy and enzyme loadings. The ethanol yields ranged from 77 to 89 gallons/ODMT of corn stover. The minimum sugar selling price (MSSP) ranged from $0.191 to $0.212 per lb of 50 % concentrated monomeric sugars, while the minimum ethanol selling price (MESP) ranged from $2.24 to $2.54 per gallon of ethanol. The DDR process concept is evaluated for economic feasibility through TEA. The MSSP and MESP of the DDR process falls within a range similar to that found with the deacetylation/dilute acid pretreatment process modeled in NREL’s 2011 design report. The DDR process is a much simpler process that requires less capital and maintenance costs when compared to conventional chemical pretreatments with pressure vessels. As a result, we feel the DDR process should be considered as an option for future biorefineries with great potential to be more cost-effective.

  7. Techno-Economic Analysis of the Deacetylation and Disk Refining Process. Characterizing the Effect of Refining Energy and Enzyme Usage on Minimum Sugar Selling Price and Minimum Ethanol Selling Price

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chen, Xiaowen; Shekiro, Joseph; Pschorn, Thomas; Sabourin, Marc; Tucker, Melvin P.; Tao, Ling

    2015-10-29

    A novel, highly efficient deacetylation and disk refining (DDR) process to liberate fermentable sugars from biomass was recently developed at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). The DDR process consists of a mild, dilute alkaline deacetylation step followed by low-energy-consumption disk refining. The DDR corn stover substrates achieved high process sugar conversion yields, at low to modest enzyme loadings, and also produced high sugar concentration syrups at high initial insoluble solid loadings. The sugar syrups derived from corn stover are highly fermentable due to low concentrations of fermentation inhibitors. The objective of this work is to evaluate the economic feasibilitymore » of the DDR process through a techno-economic analysis (TEA). A large array of experiments designed using a response surface methodology was carried out to investigate the two major cost-driven operational parameters of the novel DDR process: refining energy and enzyme loadings. The boundary conditions for refining energy (128–468 kWh/ODMT), cellulase (Novozyme’s CTec3) loading (11.6–28.4 mg total protein/g of cellulose), and hemicellulase (Novozyme’s HTec3) loading (0–5 mg total protein/g of cellulose) were chosen to cover the most commercially practical operating conditions. The sugar and ethanol yields were modeled with good adequacy, showing a positive linear correlation between those yields and refining energy and enzyme loadings. The ethanol yields ranged from 77 to 89 gallons/ODMT of corn stover. The minimum sugar selling price (MSSP) ranged from $0.191 to $0.212 per lb of 50 % concentrated monomeric sugars, while the minimum ethanol selling price (MESP) ranged from $2.24 to $2.54 per gallon of ethanol. The DDR process concept is evaluated for economic feasibility through TEA. The MSSP and MESP of the DDR process falls within a range similar to that found with the deacetylation/dilute acid pretreatment process modeled in NREL’s 2011 design report. The DDR process is a much simpler process that requires less capital and maintenance costs when compared to conventional chemical pretreatments with pressure vessels. As a result, we feel the DDR process should be considered as an option for future biorefineries with great potential to be more cost-effective.« less

  8. Documentation - Laboratory for Laser Energetics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 - Laser Amplifiers Front Matter - Maintenance Index & Schedules (S-OM-P-027) Rod ... SSA Pump Module Windows (S-SM-P-180) SSA Laser Disk Inspection (S-SM-P-181) Inspect ...

  9. Direct drive wind turbine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bywaters, Garrett Lee; Danforth, William; Bevington, Christopher; Stowell, Jesse; Costin, Daniel

    2006-09-19

    A wind turbine is provided that minimizes the size of the drive train and nacelle while maintaining the power electronics and transformer at the top of the tower. The turbine includes a direct drive generator having an integrated disk brake positioned radially inside the stator while minimizing the potential for contamination. The turbine further includes a means for mounting a transformer below the nacelle within the tower.

  10. Direct drive wind turbine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bywaters, Garrett; Danforth, William; Bevington, Christopher; Jesse, Stowell; Costin, Daniel

    2007-02-27

    A wind turbine is provided that minimizes the size of the drive train and nacelle while maintaining the power electronics and transformer at the top of the tower. The turbine includes a direct drive generator having an integrated disk brake positioned radially inside the stator while minimizing the potential for contamination. The turbine further includes a means for mounting a transformer below the nacelle within the tower.

  11. Direct drive wind turbine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bywaters, Garrett; Danforth, William; Bevington, Christopher; Jesse, Stowell; Costin, Daniel

    2006-10-10

    A wind turbine is provided that minimizes the size of the drive train and nacelle while maintaining the power electronics and transformer at the top of the tower. The turbine includes a direct drive generator having an integrated disk brake positioned radially inside the stator while minimizing the potential for contamination. The turbine further includes a means for mounting a transformer below the nacelle within the tower.

  12. Direct drive wind turbine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bywaters, Garrett; Danforth, William; Bevington, Christopher; Stowell, Jesse; Costin, Daniel

    2006-07-11

    A wind turbine is provided that minimizes the size of the drive train and nacelle while maintaining the power electronics and transformer at the top of the tower. The turbine includes a direct drive generator having an integrated disk brake positioned radially inside the stator while minimizing the potential for contamination. The turbine further includes a means for mounting a transformer below the nacelle within the tower.

  13. HPSS Disk Cache Upgrade Caters to Capacity

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2015 Contact: Kathy Kincade, +1 510 495 2124, kkincade@lbl.gov HPSS 09 vert NERSC users today are benefiting from a business decision made three years ago by the center's Storage...

  14. Disk Quota | Argonne Leadership Computing Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Linking Queueing & Running Jobs Data Transfer Debugging & Profiling Performance Tools & APIs Software & Libraries IBM References Cooley Policies Documentation Feedback Please...

  15. Daimler's SuperTruck Program; 50% Brake Thermal Efficiency | Department of

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Energy Presents highlights of engine and vehicle advances made, and progress towards achieving aggressive goals PDF icon deer12_sisken.pdf More Documents & Publications Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: SuperTruck Program: Engine Project Review SuperTruck Program: Engine Project Review Supertruck - Improving Transportation Efficiency through Integrated Vehicle, Engine and Powertrain Research

  16. Operator interface for vehicles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bissontz, Jay E

    2015-03-10

    A control interface for drivetrain braking provided by a regenerative brake and a non-regenerative brake is implemented using a combination of switches and graphic interface elements. The control interface comprises a control system for allocating drivetrain braking effort between the regenerative brake and the non-regenerative brake, a first operator actuated control for enabling operation of the drivetrain braking, and a second operator actuated control for selecting a target braking effort for drivetrain braking. A graphic display displays to an operator the selected target braking effort and can be used to further display actual braking effort achieved by drivetrain braking.

  17. TECH_08DEC-1 BEDB_Front Cover_Spiral

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    9 2009 Buildings Energy Data Book October 2009 Prepared for the Buildings Technologies Program Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy U.S. Department of Energy by D&R International, Ltd. under contract to Research and Development Solutions, LLC and National Energy Technology Laboratory Table of Contents iii Foreword ..........................................................................................................................................v Acknowledgements

  18. Y-12_Front Cover_Summary_Feb2011.ai

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    (NNSA) TITLE: Final Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement for the Y-12 National Security ... In any event, emergency preparedness procedures would be employed to minimize ...

  19. Away from the Range Front: Intra-Basin Geothermal Exploration...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    rock mechanical technologies from mining, geotechnical, and academic practice but novel to geothermal exploration, to locate blind geothermal resource upflow along faults...

  20. Magnesium Front End Development (AMD 603/604/904)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

  1. ASC_brochure_front_2_10-23

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    a nuclear weapon 2003 Delivered a nuclear safety simulation of a complex, abnormal, ... Augmented computing power for science campaigns with the 360-teraFLOPS ASC BlueGeneL ...

  2. CHARACTERIZATION OF THE ADVANCED RADIOGRAPHIC CAPABILITY FRONT END ON NIF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haefner, C; Heebner, J; Dawson, J; Fochs, S; Shverdin, M; Crane, J K; Kanz, V K; Halpin, J; Phan, H; Sigurdsson, R; Brewer, W; Britten, J; Brunton, G; Clark, W; Messerly, M J; Nissen, J D; Nguyen, H; Shaw, B; Hackel, R; Hermann, M; Tietbohl, G; Siders, C W; Barty, C J

    2009-07-15

    We have characterized the Advanced Radiographic Capability injection laser system and demonstrated that it meets performance requirements for upcoming National Ignition Facility fusion experiments. Pulse compression was achieved with a scaled down replica of the meter-scale grating ARC compressor and sub-ps pulse duration was demonstrated at the Joule-level.

  3. Front-end Nuclear Facilities (2008) | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Significant Safety Instrumented Systems Used at DOE Non-Reactor Nuclear Facilities | Department of Energy Frequently Asked Questions Regarding DOE-STD-1195-2011, Design of Safety Significant Safety Instrumented Systems Used at DOE Non-Reactor Nuclear Facilities Frequently Asked Questions Regarding DOE-STD-1195-2011, Design of Safety Significant Safety Instrumented Systems Used at DOE Non-Reactor Nuclear Facilities January 7, 2015 Frequently Asked Questions regarding DOE-STD-1195-2011 which

  4. TipCard_Front_back_final_rev2.indd

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Three Year Rolling Timeline Three Year Rolling Timeline PDF icon The Department&#8217;s real property assets are vital to the accomplishment of its mission More Documents & Publications FY2012 Three Year Rolling Timeline Three-year Rolling Timeline The Department&#8217;s real property assets are vital to the accomplishment of its mission

    Thrift Savings Plan (TSP) Thrift Savings Plan (TSP) The Thrift Savings Plan (TSP) is a voluntary retirement savings and investment plan for

  5. The OPAL silicon-tungsten calorimeter front end electronics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, B.E.; Charalambous, A. . Dept. of Physics and Astronomy); Anderson, K. )

    1994-08-01

    A pair of small angle silicon-tungsten (Si-W) calorimeters has been built to measure the luminosity to a precision better than 0.1% in the OPAL experiment at the Large Electron Positron (LEP) collider at CERN near Geneva. Each calorimeter contains 19 layers of tungsten (W) plates and silicon (Si) detectors, corresponding to a total of 22 radiation lengths, sampled by about 1 m[sup 2] of detectors divided into 304 x64 independently read out channels. A complete electronics system has been developed, from the preamplifier up to the VME read out and control interface. It includes a fast trigger based on analogue sums. This paper describes how a large number of channels have been implemented in a dense environment, thanks to the use of ASIC's directly bonded on the detector.

  6. Light-front representation of chiral dynamics in peripheral transverse...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Additional Journal Information: Journal Name: Journal of High Energy Physics (Online); Journal Volume: 2015; Journal Issue: 7; Journal ID: ISSN 1029-8479 Publisher: Springer Berlin ...

  7. Y-12_Front Cover_Summary_Feb2011.ai

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    ... National Laboratory ORR Oak Ridge Reservation PC Performance Category PCB polychlorinated biphenyls PEIS Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement PIDAS Perimeter Intrusion ...

  8. Nonlinear effects of stretch on the flame front propagation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Halter, F.; Tahtouh, T.; Mounaim-Rousselle, C. [Institut PRISME, Universite d'Orleans, 8 rue Leonard de Vinci, 45072 Orleans Cedex 2 (France)

    2010-10-15

    In all experimental configurations, the flames are affected by stretch (curvature and/or strain rate). To obtain the unstretched flame speed, independent of the experimental configuration, the measured flame speed needs to be corrected. Usually, a linear relationship linking the flame speed to stretch is used. However, this linear relation is the result of several assumptions, which may be incorrected. The present study aims at evaluating the error in the laminar burning speed evaluation induced by using the traditional linear methodology. Experiments were performed in a closed vessel at atmospheric pressure for two different mixtures: methane/air and iso-octane/air. The initial temperatures were respectively 300 K and 400 K for methane and iso-octane. Both methodologies (linear and nonlinear) are applied and results in terms of laminar speed and burned gas Markstein length are compared. Methane and iso-octane were chosen because they present opposite evolutions in their Markstein length when the equivalence ratio is increased. The error induced by the linear methodology is evaluated, taking the nonlinear methodology as the reference. It is observed that the use of the linear methodology starts to induce substantial errors after an equivalence ratio of 1.1 for methane/air mixtures and before an equivalence ratio of 1 for iso-octane/air mixtures. One solution to increase the accuracy of the linear methodology for these critical cases consists in reducing the number of points used in the linear methodology by increasing the initial flame radius used. (author)

  9. Town of Front Royal, Virginia (Utility Company) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Royal Place: Virginia Phone Number: 540-635-3027 Website: www.frontroyalva.comtown-serv Twitter: @townfrontroyal Facebook: https:www.facebook.comfrontroyalva Outage...

  10. Southline Transmission Line Project - Volume 1 Front Matter

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy Southface Energy Institute: Advanced Commercial Buildings Initiative Southface Energy Institute: Advanced Commercial Buildings Initiative Southface Energy Institute: Advanced Commercial Buildings Initiative Lead Performer: Southface Energy Institute - Atlanta, GA Partners: - City of Atlanta - Atlanta, GA - Georgia Institute of Technology - Atlanta, GA - Kendeda Fund - Atlanta, GA - Oak Ridge National Laboratory - Oak Ridge, TN - Acuity Brands Lighting - Atlanta, GA -

  11. Magnesium Front End Research and Development AMD 604

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2009 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, May 18-22, 2009 -- Washington D.C.

  12. U.S. Front Line on Industrial Energy Efficiency

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2009-04-01

    Strategic plan of the Industrial Technologies Program, its mission, vision, goals, objectives, and strategic elements.

  13. Away from the Range Front- Intra-Basin Geothermal Exploration

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE Geothermal Peer Review 2010 - Presentation. Project highlights: Escalate mechanical and structural methods to build on; Push-core may optimize shallow drilling; & Over-coring stress measurement may reveal local stress.

  14. Direct mounted photovoltaic device with improved front clip

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Keenihan, James R; Boven, Michelle; Brown, Jr., Claude; Gaston, Ryan S; Hus, Michael; Langmaid, Joe A; Lesniak, Mike

    2013-11-05

    The present invention is premised upon a photovoltaic assembly system for securing and/or aligning at least a plurality of vertically adjacent (overlapping) photovoltaic device assemblies to one another. The securing function being accomplished by a clip member that may be a separate component or integral to one or more of the photovoltaic device assemblies.

  15. Strengthening the Front Lines: Sales Training and Continuing...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Amy Beley, Senior Program Manager, Build it Green Sam Flanery, Founder, ... Nahman Plumbing and Heating BPI Build It Green Building Science Academy ...

  16. Microsoft Word - Department of Energy Front End Nuclear Solicitation...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    12 VII. Closing ChecklistSatisfaction of ... the rigorous underwriting criteria appropriate for projects ... to provide DOE with a top level description of the project, ...

  17. Formation mechanism of steep wave front in magnetized plasmas...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The selection criterion of these solutions is derived theoretically from the stability of the phase entrainment. The simulation result and experimental observations are found to be ...

  18. Front End and HFOFO Snake for a Muon Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neuffer, D.; Alexahin, Y.

    2015-09-01

    A neutrino factory or muon collider requires the capture and cooling of a large number of muons. Scenarios for capture, bunching, phase-energy rotation and initial cooling of μ’s produced from a proton source target have been developed, for neutrino factory and muon collider scenarios. They require a drift section from the target, a bunching section and a $\\phi-\\delta E$ rotation section leading into the cooling channel. The currently preferred cooling channel design is an “HFOFO Snake” configuration that cools both $\\mu^+$ and $\\mu^-$ transversely and longitudinally. The status of the design is presented and variations are discussed.

  19. Energy Ambassadors to Provide Front Line Support for Alaska Native...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    held at the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service Regional Office in Anchorage in September. ... held at the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service Regional Office in Anchorage in September. ...

  20. EIS-0391-FEIS-Volume1-FrontMatter-2012

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ......... 1-3 1.2.2 Tank Waste Remediation System Environmental Impact ... 1.2.3 Developments Since Issuing the Tank Waste Remediation System Environmental Impact ...