National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for br baghouse reverse

  1. br Owner br Facility br Type br Capacity br MW br Commercial...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Owner br Facility br Type br Capacity br MW br Commercial br Online br Date br Geothermal br Area br Geothermal br Region Coordinates Ahuachapan Geothermal Power Plant LaGeo SA de...

  2. Using high temperature baghouses to enhance desulfurization following economizer sorbent injection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, G.; Keener, T.C.

    1995-12-31

    In order to explore the potential of using high temperature baghouses to enhance SO{sub 2} removal following upstream sorbent injection, an integrated two-stage reactor system has been built. It consists of an injection stage and a filtration stage. Distinct from one-stage fixed-bed reactors, sorbent particles in this system are initially converted under controlled injection conditions before entering the filtration reactor chamber. By the aid of the system, several unique features regarding the gas-solid reactions in the baghouse after economizer zone sorbent injection have been revealed. Results have shown that the appropriate usage of a high temperature baghouse may substantially enhance the performance of the process. The further SO{sub 2} removal in the baghouse is comprehensively affected by both the conditions in the injection zone and those in the baghouse.

  3. Baghouse Slipstream Testing at TXU's Big Brown Station

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John Pavlish; Jason Laumb; Robert Jensen; Jeffery Thompson; Christopher Martin; Mark Musich; Brandon Pavlish; Stanley Miller; Lucinda Hamre

    2007-04-30

    Performing sorbent testing for mercury control at a large scale is a very expensive endeavor and requires months of planning and careful execution. Even with good planning, there are plant limitations on what operating/design parameters can be varied/tested and when. For parameters that cannot be feasibly tested at the full scale (lower/higher gas flow, different bag material, cleaning methods, sorbents, etc.), an alternative approach is used to perform tests on a slipstream unit using flue gas from the plant. The advantage that a slipstream unit provides is the flexibility to test multiple operating and design parameters and other possible technology options without risking major disruption to the operation of the power plant. Additionally, the results generated are expected to simulate full-scale conditions closely, since the flue gas used during the tests comes directly from the plant in question. The Energy & Environmental Research Center developed and constructed a mobile baghouse that allows for cost-effective testing of impacts related to variation in operating and design parameters, as well as other possible mercury control options. Multiple sorbents, air-to-cloth ratios, bag materials, and cleaning frequencies were evaluated while flue gas was extracted from Big Brown when it fired a 70% Texas lignite-30% Powder River Basin (PRB) blend and a 100% PRB coal.

  4. Hydrometallurgical process for recovering iron sulfate and zinc sulfate from baghouse dust

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zaromb, Solomon; Lawson, Daniel B.

    1994-01-01

    A process for recovering zinc/rich and iron-rich fractions from the baghouse dust that is generated in various metallurgical operations, especially in steel-making and other iron-making plants, comprises the steps of leaching the dust by hot concentrated sulfuric acid so as to generate dissolved zinc sulfate and a precipitate of iron sulfate, separating the precipitate from the acid by filtration and washing with a volatile liquid, such as methanol or acetone, and collecting the filtered acid and the washings into a filtrate fraction. The volatile liquid may be recovered distillation, and the zinc may be removed from the filtrate by alternative methods, one of which involves addition of a sufficient amount of water to precipitate hydrated zinc sulfate at 10.degree. C., separation of the precipitate from sulfuric acid by filtration, and evaporation of water to regenerate concentrated sulfuric acid. The recovery of iron may also be effected in alternative ways, one of which involves roasting the ferric sulfate to yield ferric oxide and sulfur trioxide, which can be reconverted to concentrated sulfuric acid by hydration. The overall process should not generate any significant waste stream.

  5. Hydrometallurgical process for recovering iron sulfate and zinc sulfate from baghouse dust

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zaromb, S.; Lawson, D.B.

    1994-02-15

    A process for recovering zinc-rich and iron-rich fractions from the baghouse dust that is generated in various metallurgical operations, especially in steel-making and other iron-making plants, comprises the steps of leaching the dust by hot concentrated sulfuric acid so as to generate dissolved zinc sulfate and a precipitate of iron sulfate, separating the precipitate from the acid by filtration and washing with a volatile liquid, such as methanol or acetone, and collecting the filtered acid and the washings into a filtrate fraction. The volatile liquid may be recovered by distillation, and the zinc may be removed from the filtrate by alternative methods, one of which involves addition of a sufficient amount of water to precipitate hydrated zinc sulfate at 10 C, separation of the precipitate from sulfuric acid by filtration, and evaporation of water to regenerate concentrated sulfuric acid. The recovery of iron may also be effected in alternative ways, one of which involves roasting the ferric sulfate to yield ferric oxide and sulfur trioxide, which can be reconverted to concentrated sulfuric acid by hydration. The overall process should not generate any significant waste stream. 1 figure.

  6. Jatropha BR | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    BR Jump to: navigation, search Name: Jatropha BR Place: Brazil Product: Brazilian-based consortium of five leading Brazilian companies engaged in the integrated jatropha curcas...

  7. Photoinduced Br Desorption from CsBr Thin Films Grown on Cu(100)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Halliday, Matthew T.; Joly, Alan G.; Hess, Wayne P.; Shluger, AL

    2015-10-22

    Thin films of CsBr deposited onto metals such as copper are potential photocathode materials for light sources and other applications. We investigate desorption dynamics of Br atoms from CsBr films grown on insulator (KBr, LiF) and metal (Cu) substrates induced by sub-bandgap 6.4 eV laser pulses. The experimental results demonstrate that the peak kinetic energy of Br atoms desorbed from CsBr/Cu films is much lower than that for the hyperthermal desorption from CsBr/LiF films. Kelvin probe measurements indicate negative charge at the surface following Br desorption from CsBr/Cu films. Our ab initio calculations of excitons at CsBr surfaces demonstrate that this behavior can be explained by an exciton model of desorption including electron trapping at the CsBr surface. Trapped negative charges reduce the energy of surface excitons available for Br desorption. We examine the electron-trapping characteristics of low-coordinated sites at the surface, in particular, divacancies and kink sites. We also provide a model of cation desorption caused by Franck-Hertz excitation of F centers at the surface in the course of irradiation of CsBr/Cu films. These results provide new insights into the mechanisms of photoinduced structural evolution of alkali halide films on metal substrates and activation of metal photocathodes coated with CsBr.

  8. X-ray absorption studies of mixed salt polymer electrolytes: ZnBr{sub 2}/CaBr{sub 2}-PEO, ZnBr{sub 2}/LiBr-PEO, and ZnBr{sub 2}/RbBr-PEO complexes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McBreen, J.; Yang, X.Q.; Lee, H.S.; Okamoto, Y.

    1995-02-01

    Polyethylene oxide (PEO)-salt systems are an important new class of electrolytes that are being considered for many uses. X-ray absorption (XAS) studies of ZnBr{sub 2}-PEO complexes, at the Zn K edge, at temperatures between 25 and 120 C, indicate that additions of bromide salts of Li, Rb, or Ca result in the formation of ZnBr{sub 4}{sup {minus} 2} complexes with a Zn-Br bond length of 2.42 {angstrom}. XAS, at the Rb K edge, in mixed RbBr/ZnBr{sub 2}-PEO complexes with an excess of ZnBr{sub 2}, shows that the ZnBr{sub 2} causes the RbBr to dissolve in the polymer. The Rb{sup +} ions are weakly complexed with the PEO with an Rb-O bond distance of 2.93 {angstrom}.

  9. High energy XeBr electric discharge laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sze, Robert C.; Scott, Peter B.

    1981-01-01

    A high energy XeBr laser for producing coherent radiation at 282 nm. The XeBr laser utilizes an electric discharge as the excitation source to minimize formation of molecular ions thereby minimizing absorption of laser radiation by the active medium. Additionally, HBr is used as the halogen donor which undergoes harpooning reactions with Xe.sub.M * to form XeBr*.

  10. High energy XeBr electric discharge laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sze, R.C.; Scott, P.B.

    A high energy XeBr laser for producing coherent radiation at 282 nm is disclosed. The XeBr laser utilizes an electric discharge as the excitation source to minimize formation of molecular ions thereby minimizing absorption of laser radiation by the active medium. Additionally, HBr, is used as the halogen donor which undergoes harpooning reactions with Xe/sub M/ to form XeBr.

  11. Optimization of electrode characteristics for the Br?/H? redox flow cell

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tucker, Michael C.; Cho, Kyu Taek; Weber, Adam Z.; Lin, Guangyu; Van Nguyen, Trung

    2015-01-01

    The Br?/H? redox flow cell shows promise as a high-power, low-cost energy storage device. The effect of various aspects of material selection, processing, and assembly of electrodes on the operation, performance, and efficiency of the system is determined. In particular, (+) electrode thickness, cell compression, hydrogen pressure, and () electrode architecture are investigated. Increasing hydrogen pressure and depositing the () catalyst layer on the membrane instead of on the carbon-paper backing layers have a large positive impact on performance, enabling a limiting current density above 2 A cm-2 and a peak power density of 1.4 W cm-2. Maximum energy efficiency of 79% is achieved. In addition, the root cause of limiting-current behavior in this system is elucidated, where it is found that Br- reversibly adsorbs at the Pt () electrode for potentials exceeding a critical value, and the extent of Br- coverage is potential-dependent. This phenomenon limits maximum cell current density and must be addressed in system modeling and design. These findings are expected to lower system cost and enable higher efficiency.

  12. Optimization of electrode characteristics for the Br-2/H-2 redox flow cell

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tucker, MC; Cho, KT; Weber, AZ; Lin, GY; Nguyen, TV

    2014-10-17

    The Br-2/H-2 redox flow cell shows promise as a high-power, low-cost energy storage device. The effect of various aspects of material selection, processing, and assembly of electrodes on the operation, performance, and efficiency of the system is determined. In particular, (+) electrode thickness, cell compression, hydrogen pressure, and (-) electrode architecture are investigated. Increasing hydrogen pressure and depositing the (-) catalyst layer on the membrane instead of on the carbon paper backing layers have a large positive impact on performance, enabling a limiting current density above 2 A cm(-2) and a peak power density of 1.4 W cm(-2). Maximum energy efficiency of 79 % is achieved. In addition, the root cause of limiting-current behavior in this system is elucidated, where it is found that Br- reversibly adsorbs at the Pt (-) electrode for potentials exceeding a critical value, and the extent of Br- coverage is potential-dependent. This phenomenon limits maximum cell current density and must be addressed in system modeling and design. These findings are expected to lower system cost and enable higher efficiency.

  13. Reversible Acid Gas Capture

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Dave Heldebrant

    2012-12-31

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory scientist David Heldebrant demonstrates how a new process called reversible acid gas capture works to pull carbon dioxide out of power plant emissions.

  14. Improved production of Br atoms near zero speed by photodissociating laser aligned Br{sub 2} molecules

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deng, L. Z., E-mail: lzdeng@phy.ecnu.edu.cn; Yin, J. P., E-mail: jpyin@phy.ecnu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Precision Spectroscopy, Department of Physics, East China Normal University, Shanghai 200062 (China)

    2014-10-28

    We theoretically investigated the improvement on the production rate of the decelerated bromine (Br) atoms near zero speed by photodissociating laser aligned Br{sub 2} precursors. Adiabatic alignment of Br{sub 2} precursors exposed to long laser pulses with duration on the order of nanoseconds was investigated by solving the time-dependent Schrdinger equation. The dynamical fragmentation of adiabatically aligned Br{sub 2} precursors was simulated and velocity distribution of the Br atoms produced was analyzed. Our study shows that the larger the degree of the precursor alignment, ?cos{sup 2}???, the higher the production rate of the decelerated Br atoms near zero speed. For Br{sub 2} molecules with an initial rotational temperature of ?1 K, a ?cos{sup 2}??? value of ?0.88 can result in an improvement factor of over ?20 on the production rate of the decelerated Br atoms near zero speed, requiring a laser intensity of only ?1 10{sup 12} W/cm{sup 2} for alignment.

  15. Characterization of high-voltage cathodes in CsBr-LiBr-KBr eutectic electrolyte

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    GUIDOTTI,RONALD A.; REINHARDT,FREDERICK W.

    2000-04-20

    The transition-metal oxides LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4}, MnO{sub 2}, CrO{sub 2}, and LiCoO{sub 2} were evaluated for possible use as high-voltage cathodes for potential geothermal power applications. These were coupled with Li(Si) anodes and a low-melting CsBr-LiBr-KBr eutectic electrolyte that melts at 228.5 C. Single-cell tests at 250 C and 300 C at 15.8 and 31.6 mA/cm{sup 2} showed that MnO{sub 2} performed the best overall and had the lowest polarization. A 5-cell battery test using LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4} cathodes was only modestly successful due to possible parasitic chemical reactions between the cathode and electrolyte at the much higher temperature (500 C) during discharge. The overall energy densities for these cathode were still less than for FeS{sub 2}.

  16. Preliminary upper limit on BR(D{sup {+-}}{r_arrow}{pi}{sup {...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Preliminary upper limit on BR(Dsup +-rarrowpisup +-musup +musup -) Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Preliminary upper limit on BR(Dsup ...

  17. Ca2+-Doped CeBr3 Scintillating Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guss, Paul; Foster, Michael E.; Wong, Bryan M.; Doty, F. Patrick; Shah, Kanai; Squillante, Michael R.; Shirwadkar, Urmila; Hawrami, Rastgo; Tower, Josh; Yuan, Ding

    2014-01-21

    Despite the outstanding scintillation performance characteristics of cerium tribromide (CeBr3) and cerium-activated lanthanum tribromide, their commercial availability and application are limited due to the difficulties of growing large, crack-free single crystals from these fragile materials. This investigation employed aliovalent doping to increase crystal strength while maintaining the optical properties of the crystal. One divalent dopant (Ca2+) was used as a dopant to strengthen CeBr3 without negatively impacting scintillation performance. Ingots containing nominal concentrations of 1.9% of the Ca2+ dopant were grown. Preliminary scintillation measurements are presented for this aliovalently doped scintillator. Ca2+-doped CeBr3 exhibited little or no change in the peak fluorescence emission for 371 nm optical excitation for CeBr3. The structural, electronic, and optical properties of CeBr3 crystals were studied using the density functional theory within the generalized gradient approximation. The calculated lattice parameters are in good agreement with the experimental data. The energy band structures and density of states were obtained. The optical properties of CeBr3, including the dielectric function, were calculated.

  18. Time reversal communication system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Candy, James V.; Meyer, Alan W.

    2008-12-02

    A system of transmitting a signal through a channel medium comprises digitizing the signal, time-reversing the digitized signal, and transmitting the signal through the channel medium. The channel medium may be air, earth, water, tissue, metal, and/or non-metal.

  19. Photoelectron Emission Studies in CsBr at 257 nm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maldonado, Juan R.; Liu, Zhi; Sun, Yun; Pianetta, Piero A.; Pease, Fabian W.; /Stanford U., Elect. Eng. Dept. /SLAC, SSRL

    2006-09-28

    CsBr/Cr photocathodes were found [1,2] to meet the requirements of a multi-electron beam lithography system operating with a light energy of 4.8 eV (257nm). The fact that photoemission was observed with a light energy below the reported 7.3 eV band gap for CsBr was not understood. This paper presents experimental results on the presence of intra-band gap absorption sites (IBAS) in CsBr thin film photo electron emitters, and presents a model based on IBAS to explain the observed photoelectron emission behavior at energies below band gap. A fluorescence band centered at 330 nm with a FWHM of about 0.34 eV was observed in CsBr/Cr samples under 257 nm laser illumination which can be attributed to IBAS and agrees well with previously obtained synchrotron photoelectron spectra[1] from the valence band of CsBr films.

  20. Reversal bending fatigue testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Jy-An John; Wang, Hong; Tan, Ting

    2014-10-21

    Embodiments for apparatuses for testing reversal bending fatigue in an elongated beam are disclosed. Embodiments are configured to be coupled to first and second end portions of the beam and to apply a bending moment to the beam and create a pure bending condition in an intermediate portion of the beam. Embodiments are further configured to cyclically alternate the direction of the bending moment applied to the beam such that the intermediate portion of the beam cyclically bends in opposite directions in a pure bending condition.

  1. Reversible brazing process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pierce, Jim D.; Stephens, John J.; Walker, Charles A.

    1999-01-01

    A method of reversibly brazing surfaces together. An interface is affixed to each surface. The interfaces can be affixed by processes such as mechanical joining, welding, or brazing. The two interfaces are then brazed together using a brazing process that does not defeat the surface to interface joint. Interfaces of materials such as Ni-200 can be affixed to metallic surfaces by welding or by brazing with a first braze alloy. The Ni-200 interfaces can then be brazed together using a second braze alloy. The second braze alloy can be chosen so that it minimally alters the properties of the interfaces to allow multiple braze, heat and disassemble, rebraze cycles.

  2. Decommissioning of the BR3 reactor: status and perspectives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Noynaert, L.; Verstraeten, I.

    2007-07-01

    The BR3 plant at Mol in Belgium built at the end of the fifties was the first PWR plant built outside the USA. The reactor had a small net power output (10 MWe) but comprised all the loops and features of a commercial PWR plant. The BR3 plant was operated with the main objective of testing advanced PWR fuels under irradiation conditions similar to those encountered in large commercial PWR plants. The reactor was started in 1962 and shut down in 1987 after 25 years of continuous operation. Since 1989, SCK.CEN is decommissioning the BR3 PWR research reactor. The dismantling of the metallic components including reactor pressure vessel and internals is completed and extensively reported in the literature. The dismantling of auxiliary components and the decontamination of parts of the infrastructure are now going on. The decommissioning progress is continuously monitored and costs and strategy are regularly reassessed. The first part of the paper describes the main results and lessons learned from the reassessment exercises performed in 1994, 1999, 2004 and 2007. Impacts of changes in legal framework on the decommissioning costs will be addressed. These changes concern e.g. licensing aspects, clearance levels, waste management... The middle part of the paper discusses the management of activated and/or contaminated concrete. The costing exercise performed in 1995 highlighted that the management of activated and contaminated concrete is the second main cost item after the dismantling of the reactor pressure vessel and internals. Different possible solutions were studied. These are evacuation as radioactive waste with or without supercompaction, recycling this 'radioactive' grout or concrete for conditioning of radioactive waste e.g. conditioning of metallic waste. The paper will give the results of the cost-benefit analysis made to select the solution retained. The last part of the paper will discuss the end goal of the decommissioning of the BR3. In the final

  3. Reverse Osmosis Optimization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-08-01

    This technology evaluation was prepared by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory on behalf of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP). The technology evaluation assesses techniques for optimizing reverse osmosis (RO) systems to increase RO system performance and water efficiency. This evaluation provides a general description of RO systems, the influence of RO systems on water use, and key areas where RO systems can be optimized to reduce water and energy consumption. The evaluation is intended to help facility managers at Federal sites understand the basic concepts of the RO process and system optimization options, enabling them to make informed decisions during the system design process for either new projects or recommissioning of existing equipment. This evaluation is focused on commercial-sized RO systems generally treating more than 80 gallons per hour.

  4. Reverse Osmosis Optimization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McMordie Stoughton, Kate; Duan, Xiaoli; Wendel, Emily M.

    2013-08-26

    This technology evaluation was prepared by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory on behalf of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP). ¬The technology evaluation assesses techniques for optimizing reverse osmosis (RO) systems to increase RO system performance and water efficiency. This evaluation provides a general description of RO systems, the influence of RO systems on water use, and key areas where RO systems can be optimized to reduce water and energy consumption. The evaluation is intended to help facility managers at Federal sites understand the basic concepts of the RO process and system optimization options, enabling them to make informed decisions during the system design process for either new projects or recommissioning of existing equipment. This evaluation is focused on commercial-sized RO systems generally treating more than 80 gallons per hour.¬

  5. Multiple stimulus reversible hydrogels

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gutowska, Anna; Krzyminski, Karol J.

    2006-04-25

    A polymeric solution capable of gelling upon exposure to a critical minimum value of a plurality of environmental stimuli is disclosed. The polymeric solution may be an aqueous solution utilized in vivo and capable of having the gelation reversed if at least one of the stimuli fall below, or outside the range of, the critical minimum value. The aqueous polymeric solution can be used either in industrial or pharmaceutical environments. In the medical environment, the aqueous polymeric solution is provided with either a chemical or radioisotopic therapeutic agent for delivery to a specific body part. The primary advantage of the process is that exposure to one environmental stimuli alone will not cause gelation, thereby enabling the therapeutic agent to be conducted through the body for relatively long distances without gelation occurring.

  6. Multiple stimulus reversible hydrogels

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gutowska, Anna; Krzyminski, Karol J.

    2003-12-09

    A polymeric solution capable of gelling upon exposure to a critical minimum value of a plurality of environmental stimuli is disclosed. The polymeric solution may be an aqueous solution utilized in vivo and capable of having the gelation reversed if at least one of the stimuli fall below, or outside the range of, the critical minimum value. The aqueous polymeric solution can be used either in industrial or pharmaceutical environments. In the medical environment, the aqueous polymeric solution is provided with either a chemical or radioisotopic therapeutic agent for delivery to a specific body part. The primary advantage of the process is that exposure to one environmental stimuli alone will not cause gelation, thereby enabling the therapeutic agent to be conducted through the body for relatively long distances without gelation occurring.

  7. Reverse photoacoustic standoff spectroscopy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Van Neste, Charles W.; Senesac, Lawrence R.; Thundat, Thomas G.

    2011-04-12

    A system and method are disclosed for generating a reversed photoacoustic spectrum at a greater distance. A source may emit a beam to a target and a detector measures signals generated as a result of the beam being emitted on the target. By emitting a chopped/pulsed light beam to the target, it may be possible to determine the target's optical absorbance by monitoring the intensity of light collected at the detector at different wavelengths. As the wavelength of light is changed, the target may absorb or reject each optical frequency. Rejection may increase the intensity at the sensing element and absorption may decrease the intensity. Accordingly, an identifying spectrum of the target may be made with the intensity variation of the detector as a function of illuminating wavelength.

  8. Reverse slapper detonator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weingart, Richard C.

    1990-01-01

    A reverse slapper detonator (70), and methodology related thereto, are provided. The detonator (70) is adapted to be driven by a pulse of electric power from an external source (80). A conductor (20) is disposed along the top (14), side (18), and bottom (16) surfaces of a sheetlike insulator (12). Part of the conductor (20) comprises a bridge (28), and an aperture (30) is positioned within the conductor (20), with the bridge (28) and the aperture (30) located on opposite sides of the insulator (12). A barrel (40) and related explosive charge (50) are positioned adjacent to and in alignment with the aperture (30), and the bridge (28) is buttressed with a backing layer (60). When the electric power pulse vaporizes the bridge (28), a portion of the insulator (12) is propelled through the aperture (30) and barrel (40), and against the explosive charge (50), thereby detonating it.

  9. A preliminary report on the photoionization efficiency spectrum, ionization energy and heat of formation of Br{sub 2}O; and the appearance energy of BrO{sup +} (Br{sub 2}O)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thorn, R.P. Jr.; Monks, P.S.; Stief, L.J.; Kuo, S.C.; Zhang, Z.; Klemm, R.B.

    1995-08-01

    We report experimental results for the photoionization efficiency (PIE) spectrum of Br{sub 2}O along with the ionization energy (derived form the ionization threshold) and the appearance energy (AE) of BrO{sup +} (Br{sub 2}O). A value for the heat of formation of Br{sub 2}O is derived form the AE result. Experiments were performed by employing a discharge flow-photoionization mass spectrometer (DF-PIMS) apparatus coupled to beamline U-11 at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) at Brookhaven National Laboratory.

  10. Supercritical fluid reverse micelle systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fulton, John L.; Smith, Richard D.

    1992-01-01

    of 1 ) United States Patent 5,158,704 Fulton ,   et al. October 27, 1992 Supercritical fluid reverse micelle systems

  11. AmeriFlux BR-Sa3 Santarem-Km83-Logged Forest

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goulden, Mike

    2016-01-01

    This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site BR-Sa3 Santarem-Km83-Logged Forest. Site Description - Cleared forest. Logged site is near km 83 along BR-183.

  12. Guide to Developing Air-Cooled Lithium Bromide (LiBr) Absorption...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Guide to Developing Air-Cooled Lithium Bromide (LiBr) Absorption for CHP Applications, April 2005 Guide to Developing Air-Cooled Lithium Bromide (LiBr) Absorption for CHP...

  13. High gradient rf gun studies of CsBr photocathodes

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Vecchione, Theodore; Maldonado, Juan R.; Gierman, Stephen; Corbett, Jeff; Hartmann, Nick; Pianetta, Piero A.; Hesselink, Lambertus; Schmerge, John F.

    2015-04-03

    CsBr photocathodes have 10 times higher quantum efficiency with only 3 times larger intrinsic transverse emittance than copper. They are robust and can withstand 80 MV/m fields without breaking down or emitting dark current. They can operate in 2×10⁻⁹ torr vacuum and survive exposure to air. They are well suited for generating high pulse charge in rf guns without a photocathode transfer system.

  14. High gradient rf gun studies of CsBr photocathodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vecchione, Theodore; Maldonado, Juan R.; Gierman, Stephen; Corbett, Jeff; Hartmann, Nick; Pianetta, Piero A.; Hesselink, Lambertus; Schmerge, John F.

    2015-04-03

    CsBr photocathodes have 10 times higher quantum efficiency with only 3 times larger intrinsic transverse emittance than copper. They are robust and can withstand 80 MV/m fields without breaking down or emitting dark current. They can operate in 210?? torr vacuum and survive exposure to air. They are well suited for generating high pulse charge in rf guns without a photocathode transfer system.

  15. Reversible micromachining locator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Salzer, Leander J. (Los Alamos, NM); Foreman, Larry R. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1999-01-01

    This invention provides a device which includes a locator, a kinematic mount positioned on a conventional tooling machine, a part carrier disposed on the locator and a retainer ring. The locator has disposed therein a plurality of steel balls, placed in an equidistant position circumferentially around the locator. The kinematic mount includes a plurality of magnets which are in registry with the steel balls on the locator. In operation, a blank part to be machined is placed between a surface of a locator and the retainer ring (fitting within the part carrier). When the locator (with a blank part to be machined) is coupled to the kinematic mount, the part is thus exposed for the desired machining process. Because the locator is removably attachable to the kinematic mount, it can easily be removed from the mount, reversed, and reinserted onto the mount for additional machining. Further, the locator can likewise be removed from the mount and placed onto another tooling machine having a properly aligned kinematic mount. Because of the unique design and use of magnetic forces of the present invention, positioning errors of less than 0.25 micrometer for each machining process can be achieved.

  16. Reversible micromachining locator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Salzer, L.J.; Foreman, L.R.

    1999-08-31

    This invention provides a device which includes a locator, a kinematic mount positioned on a conventional tooling machine, a part carrier disposed on the locator and a retainer ring. The locator has disposed therein a plurality of steel balls, placed in an equidistant position circumferentially around the locator. The kinematic mount includes a plurality of magnets which are in registry with the steel balls on the locator. In operation, a blank part to be machined is placed between a surface of a locator and the retainer ring (fitting within the part carrier). When the locator (with a blank part to be machined) is coupled to the kinematic mount, the part is thus exposed for the desired machining process. Because the locator is removably attachable to the kinematic mount, it can easily be removed from the mount, reversed, and reinserted onto the mount for additional machining. Further, the locator can likewise be removed from the mount and placed onto another tooling machine having a properly aligned kinematic mount. Because of the unique design and use of magnetic forces of the present invention, positioning errors of less than 0.25 micrometer for each machining process can be achieved. 7 figs.

  17. Improved Growth Methods for LaBr3 Scintillation Radiation Detectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McGregor, Douglas S

    2011-05-01

    The objective is to develop advanced materials for deployment as high-resolution gamma ray detectors. Both LaBr3 and CeBr3 are advanced scintillation materials, and will be studied in this research. Prototype devices, in collaboration Sandia National Laboratories, will be demonstrated along with recommendations for mass production and deployment. It is anticipated that improved methods of crystal growth will yield larger single crystals of LaBr3 for deployable room-temperature operated gamma radiation spectrometers. The growth methods will be characterized. The LaBr3 and CeBr3 scintillation crystals will be characterized for light yield, spectral resolution, and for hardness.

  18. Supercritical fluid reverse micelle separation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fulton, John L.; Smith, Richard D.

    1993-01-01

    A method of separating solute material from a polar fluid in a first polar fluid phase is provided. The method comprises combining a polar fluid, a second fluid that is a gas at standard temperature and pressure and has a critical density, and a surfactant. The solute material is dissolved in the polar fluid to define the first polar fluid phase. The combined polar and second fluids, surfactant, and solute material dissolved in the polar fluid is maintained under near critical or supercritical temperature and pressure conditions such that the density of the second fluid exceeds the critical density thereof. In this way, a reverse micelle system defining a reverse micelle solvent is formed which comprises a continuous phase in the second fluid and a plurality of reverse micelles dispersed in the continuous phase. The solute material is dissolved in the polar fluid and is in chemical equilibrium with the reverse micelles. The first polar fluid phase and the continuous phase are immiscible. The reverse micelles each comprise a dynamic aggregate of surfactant molecules surrounding a core of the polar fluid. The reverse micelle solvent has a polar fluid-to-surfactant molar ratio W, which can vary over a range having a maximum ratio W.sub.o that determines the maximum size of the reverse micelles. The maximum ratio W.sub.o of the reverse micelle solvent is then varied, and the solute material from the first polar fluid phase is transported into the reverse micelles in the continuous phase at an extraction efficiency determined by the critical or supercritical conditions.

  19. Supercritical fluid reverse micelle separation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fulton, J.L.; Smith, R.D.

    1993-11-30

    A method of separating solute material from a polar fluid in a first polar fluid phase is provided. The method comprises combining a polar fluid, a second fluid that is a gas at standard temperature and pressure and has a critical density, and a surfactant. The solute material is dissolved in the polar fluid to define the first polar fluid phase. The combined polar and second fluids, surfactant, and solute material dissolved in the polar fluid is maintained under near critical or supercritical temperature and pressure conditions such that the density of the second fluid exceeds the critical density thereof. In this way, a reverse micelle system defining a reverse micelle solvent is formed which comprises a continuous phase in the second fluid and a plurality of reverse micelles dispersed in the continuous phase. The solute material is dissolved in the polar fluid and is in chemical equilibrium with the reverse micelles. The first polar fluid phase and the continuous phase are immiscible. The reverse micelles each comprise a dynamic aggregate of surfactant molecules surrounding a core of the polar fluid. The reverse micelle solvent has a polar fluid-to-surfactant molar ratio W, which can vary over a range having a maximum ratio W[sub o] that determines the maximum size of the reverse micelles. The maximum ratio W[sub o] of the reverse micelle solvent is then varied, and the solute material from the first polar fluid phase is transported into the reverse micelles in the continuous phase at an extraction efficiency determined by the critical or supercritical conditions. 27 figures.

  20. Natural Organobromine in Marine Sediments: New Evidence of Biogeochemical Br Cycling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A Leri; J Hakala; M Marcus; A Lanzirotti; C Reddy; S Myneni

    2011-12-31

    Organobromine (Br{sub org}) compounds, commonly recognized as persistent, toxic anthropogenic pollutants, are also produced naturally in terrestrial and marine systems. Several enzymatic and abiotic bromination mechanisms have been identified, as well as an array of natural Br{sub org} molecules associated with various marine organisms. The fate of the carbon-bromine functionality in the marine environment, however, remains largely unexplored. Oceanographic studies have noted an association between bromine (Br) and organic carbon (C{sub org}) in marine sediments. Even so, there has been no direct chemical evidence that Br in the sediments exists in a stable form apart from inorganic bromide (Br{sub inorg}), which is widely presumed conservative in marine systems. To investigate the scope of natural Br{sub org} production and its fate in the environment, we probed Br distribution and speciation in estuarine and marine sediments using in situ X-ray spectroscopy and spectromicroscopy. We show that Br{sub org} is ubiquitous throughout diverse sedimentary environments, occurring in correlation with C{sub org} and metals such as Fe, Ca, and Zn. Analysis of sinking particulate carbon from the seawater column links the Br{sub org} observed in sediments to biologically produced Br{sub org} compounds that persist through humification of natural organic matter (NOM). Br speciation varies with sediment depth, revealing biogeochemical cycling of Br between organic and inorganic forms as part of the burial and degradation of NOM. These findings illuminate the chemistry behind the association of Br with Corg in marine sediments and cast doubt on the paradigmatic classification of Br as a conservative element in seawater systems.

  1. Novel visible-light AgBr/Ag?PO? hybrids photocatalysts with surface plasma resonance effects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Yunfang Li, Xiuli; Wang, Yawen; Fan, Caimei

    2013-06-01

    Three kinds of AgBr/Ag?PO? hybrids were synthesised via an anion-exchange precipitation method and characterised by XRD, XPS, SEM, EDS, and UVvis. The results showed that AgBr/Ag?PO? hybrids displayed much higher photocatalytic activities than single Ag?PO? or AgBr under visible light (?>420 nm), and OH and h? were the major active species during the degradation process. Considering interstitial ions Ag?? on lattice gap of AgBr are easy to become sliver particle, we deduced the possible photocatalytic mechanism could be ascribed to the synergistic effects of the appropriate valence band position of Ag?PO? and AgBr, surface plasmon resonance effect of Ag?, reactive radical species Br?, and the Ag vacancy on the surface of catalysts. - Graphical abstract: The optical absorption and structural morphology of the as-prepared AgBr@Ag?PO? photocatalyst using an anion-exchange precipitation method are conductive to the photocatalytic degradation of organics in water. Highlights: Novel AgBr/Ag?PO? hybrids are synthesised by a facile method. AgBr/Ag?PO? hybrids show excellent photocatalytic activities under visible light. Interstitial ions are in favour of the formation of Ag particle. Surface plasmon resonance effect plays a key factor for light absorption. The photocatalytic mechanism for AgBr/Ag?PO? hybrids is studied.

  2. Rotation Reversal Bifurcation and Energy Confinement Saturation...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Rotation Reversal Bifurcation and Energy Confinement Saturation in Tokamak OhmicL-Mode Plasmas Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Rotation Reversal Bifurcation and Energy...

  3. Direct Imaging of Asymmetric Magnetization Reversal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Direct Imaging of Asymmetric Magnetization Reversal Direct Imaging of Asymmetric Magnetization Reversal Print Wednesday, 28 September 2005 00:00 The phenomenon of exchange bias has...

  4. Reversible Fuel Cells Workshop | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The workshop was divided into two sessions-a PEM reversible fuel cell session and a reversible SOFC... critical issues, materials and systems barriers, and manufacturing issues ...

  5. X-ray photoemission analysis of chemically modified TlBr surfaces for improved radiation detectors

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Nelson, A. J.; Voss, L. F.; Beck, P. R.; Graff, R. T.; Conway, A. M.; Nikolic, R. J.; Payne, S. A.; Lee, J. -S.; Kim, H.; Cirignano, L.; et al

    2013-01-12

    We subjected device-grade TlBr to various chemical treatments used in room temperature radiation detector fabrication to determine the resulting surface composition and electronic structure. As-polished TlBr was treated separately with HCl, SOCl2, Br:MeOH and HF solutions. High-resolution photoemission measurements on the valence band electronic structure and Tl 4f, Br 3d, Cl 2p and S 2p core lines were used to evaluate surface chemistry and shallow heterojunction formation. Surface chemistry and valence band electronic structure were correlated with the goal of optimizing the long-term stability and radiation response.

  6. Apparatus for improving the working time of the XeBr laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sander, R.K.; Balog, G.; Seegmiller, E.T.

    1980-03-04

    In XeBr lasers which make use of HBr as the source of bromine, it has been found that the working life of the laser is limited because of dissociation of the HBr in the lasing region to form H/sub 2/ and Br/sub 2/. Accordingly, apparatus is disclosed for substantially improving the working time of the XeBr laser wherein means are provided for recombining H/sub 2/ and Br/sub 2/ into HBr and for continuously circulating the gaseous working medium from the lasing region through the recombination region.

  7. Apparatus for improving the working time of the XeBr laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sander, Robert K.; Balog, George; Seegmiller, Emma T.

    1982-01-01

    In XeBr lasers which make use of HBr as the source of bromine, it has been found that the working life of the laser is limited because of dissociation of the HBr in the lasing region to form H.sub.2 and Br.sub.2. Accordingly, apparatus is disclosed for substantially improving the working time of the XeBr laser wherein means are provided for recombining H.sub.2 and Br.sub.2 into HBr and for continuously circulating the gaseous working medium from the lasing region through the recombination region. BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

  8. Performance of LiAlloy/Ag(2)CrO(4) Couples in Molten CsBr-LiBr-KBr Eutectic

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    GUIDOTTI,RONALD A.; REINHARDT,FREDERICK W.

    1999-10-18

    The performance of Li-alloy/CsBr-LiBr-KBr/Ag{sub 2}CrO{sub 4} systems was studied over a temperature range of 250 C to 300 C, for possible use as a power source for geothermal borehole applications. Single cells were discharged at current densities of 15.8 and 32.6 mA/cm{sup 2} using Li-Si and Li-Al anodes. When tested in 5-cell batteries, the Li-Si/CsBr-LiBr-KBr/Ag{sub 2}CrO{sub 4} system exhibited thermal runaway. Thermal analytical tests showed that the Ag{sub 2}CrO{sub 4} cathode reacted exothermically with the electrolyte on activation. Consequently, this system would not be practical for the envisioned geothermal borehole applications.

  9. Results for aliovalent doping of CeBr{sub 3} with Ca{sup 2+}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guss, Paul; Foster, Michael E.; Wong, Bryan M.; Patrick Doty, F.; Shah, Kanai; Squillante, Michael R.; Shirwadkar, Urmila; Hawrami, Rastgo; Tower, Joshua; Yuan, Ding

    2014-01-21

    Despite the outstanding scintillation performance characteristics of cerium tribromide (CeBr{sub 3}) and cerium-activated lanthanum tribromide, their commercial availability and application are limited due to the difficulties of growing large, crack-free single crystals from these fragile materials. This investigation employed aliovalent doping to increase crystal strength while maintaining the optical properties of the crystal. One divalent dopant (Ca{sup 2+}) was used as a dopant to strengthen CeBr{sub 3} without negatively impacting scintillation performance. Ingots containing nominal concentrations of 1.9% of the Ca{sup 2+} dopant were grown, i.e., 1.9% of the CeBr{sub 3} molecules were replaced by CaBr{sub 2} molecules, to match our target replacement of 1 out of 54 cerium atoms be replaced by a calcium atom. Precisely the mixture was composed of 2.26 g of CaBr{sub 2} added to 222.14 g of CeBr{sub 3}. Preliminary scintillation measurements are presented for this aliovalently doped scintillator. Ca{sup 2+}-doped CeBr{sub 3} exhibited little or no change in the peak fluorescence emission for 371?nm optical excitation for CeBr{sub 3}. The structural, electronic, and optical properties of CeBr{sub 3} crystals were studied using the density functional theory within the generalized gradient approximation. Calculated lattice parameters are in agreement with the experimental data. The energy band structures and density of states were obtained. The optical properties of CeBr{sub 3}, including the dielectric function, were calculated.

  10. Reverse engineering of integrated circuits

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chisholm, Gregory H.; Eckmann, Steven T.; Lain, Christopher M.; Veroff, Robert L.

    2003-01-01

    Software and a method therein to analyze circuits. The software comprises several tools, each of which perform particular functions in the Reverse Engineering process. The analyst, through a standard interface, directs each tool to the portion of the task to which it is most well suited, rendering previously intractable problems solvable. The tools are generally used iteratively to produce a successively more abstract picture of a circuit, about which incomplete a priori knowledge exists.

  11. Characterization of the LiSi/CsBr-LiBr-KBr/FeS(2) System for Potential Use as a Geothermal Borehole Power Source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    GUIDOTTI, RONALD A.; REINHARDT, FREDERICK W.

    1999-10-18

    We are continuing to study the suitability of modified thermal-battery technology as a potential power source for geothermal borehole applications. Previous work focused on the LiSi/FeS{sub 2} couple over a temperature range of 350 C to 400 C with the LiBr-KBr-LiF eutectic, which melts at 324.5 C. In this work, the discharge processes that take place in LiSi/CsBr-LiBr-KBr eutectic/FeS{sub 2} thermal cells were studied at temperatures between 250 C and 400 C using pelletized cells with immobilized electrolyte. The CsBr-LiBr-KBr eutectic was selected because of its lower melting point (228.5 C). Incorporation of a quasi-reference electrode allowed the determination of the relative contribution of each electrode to the overall cell polarization. The results of single-cell tests and limited battery tests are presented, along with preliminary data for battery stacks tested in a simulated geothermal borehole environment.

  12. Studies on Ca2+-Doped CeBr3 Scintillating Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guss, P. [NSTec; Foster, M. E. [SNL; Wong, B. M. [SNL; Doty, F. P. [SNL; Shah, K. [RMD; Squillante, M. [RMD; Glodo, J. [RMD; Yuan, D. [NSTec

    2013-07-03

    Despite the outstanding scintillation performance characteristics of cerium tribromide (CeBr3) and cerium-activated lanthanum tribromide (LaBr3:Ce), their commercial availability and application is limited due to the difficulties of growing large, crack-free single crystals from these fragile materials. The objective of this investigation was to employ aliovalent doping to increase crystal strength while maintaining the optical properties of the crystal. One divalent dopant (Ca2+) was investigated as a dopant to strengthen CeBr3 without negatively impacting scintillation performance. Ingots containing nominal concentrations of 1.9% of the Ca2+ dopant were grown. Preliminary scintillation measurements are presented for this aliovalently doped scintillator. Ca2+-doped CeBr3 exhibited little or no change in the peak fluorescence emission for 371 nm optical excitation for CeBr3. The structural, electronic, and optical properties of CeBr3 crystals were investigated using the density functional theory within generalized gradient approximation. The calculated lattice parameters are in good agreement with the experimental data. The energy band structures and density of states were obtained. The optical properties of CeBr3, including the dielectric function, were calculated.

  13. Structure and properties of electronic and hole centers in CsBr from theoretical calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Halliday, Matthew T.; Hess, Wayne P.; Shluger, Alexander L.

    2015-06-24

    The electronic structure, geometry, diffusion barriers and optical properties of fundamental defects of CsBr are calculated using hybrid functional DFT and TD- DFT methods. The B3LYP functional with a modified exchange contribution has been used in an embedded cluster scheme to model the structure and spectroscopic properties of self-trapped triplet exciton, interstitial Br atoms and ions, self-trapped holes and Br vacancies. The calculated migration barriers and positions of maxima of optical absorption bands are in good agreement with experiment, justifying the obtained defect geometries. The o*-center triplet exciton luminescence energy is also accurately calculated.

  14. Remote Whispering Applying Time Reversal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, Brian Eric

    2015-07-16

    The purpose of this project was to explore the use of time reversal technologies as a means for communication to a targeted individual or location. The idea is to have the privacy of whispering in one’s ear, but to do this remotely from loudspeakers not located near the target. Applications of this work include communicating with hostages and survivors in rescue operations, communicating imaging and operational conditions in deep drilling operations, monitoring storage of spent nuclear fuel in storage casks without wires, or clandestine activities requiring signaling between specific points. This technology provides a solution in any application where wires and radio communications are not possible or not desired. It also may be configured to self calibrate on a regular basis to adjust for changing conditions. These communications allow two people to converse with one another in real time, converse in an inaudible frequency range or medium (i.e. using ultrasonic frequencies and/or sending vibrations through a structure), or send information for a system to interpret (even allowing remote control of a system using sound). The time reversal process allows one to focus energy to a specific location in space and to send a clean transmission of a selected signal only to that location. In order for the time reversal process to work, a calibration signal must be obtained. This signal may be obtained experimentally using an impulsive sound, a known chirp signal, or other known signals. It may also be determined from a numerical model of a known environment in which the focusing is desired or from passive listening over time to ambient noise.

  15. Measurement of the Ratio of Branching Fractions Br(Bs -> Ds- pi+)/Br(B -> D- pi+) at CDF-II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Furic, Ivan Kresimir; /MIT

    2004-03-01

    The measurement of B{sub s}{sup 0} mixing is one of the flagship analyses for the Run II B physics program. The sensitivity of the measurement to the frequency of B{sub s}{sup 0} oscillations strongly depends on the number of reconstructed B{sub s}{sup 0} mesons. They present the measurement of the ratio of branching fractions Br(B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} D{sub s}{sup -}{pi}{sup +})/Br(B{sup 0} {yields} D{sup -}{pi}{sup +}), which directly influences the number of B{sub s}{sup 0} events available for the measurement of B{sub s}{sup 0} mixing at CDF-II. They analyze 115 pb{sup -1} of data collected with the CDF-II detector in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV using a novel displaced track trigger. They reconstruct 78 {+-} 11 B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} D{sub s}{sup -}{pi}{sup +} decays at 1153 {+-} 45 B{sup 0} {yields} D{sup -}{pi}{sup +} decays with good signal to background ratio. This is the world's largest sample of fully reconstructed B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} D{sub s}{sup -}{pi}{sup +} decays. They find the ratio of production fractions multiplied by the ratio of branching fractions to be: f{sub s}/f{sub d} {center_dot} Br(B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} D{sub s}{sup -}{pi}{sup +})/Br(B{sup 0} {yields} D{sup -}{pi}{sup +}) = 0.325 {+-} 0.046(stat) {+-} 0.034(syst) {+-} 0.084 (BR). Using the world average value of f{sub s}/f{sub d} = 0.26 {+-} 0.03, we infer that the ratio of branching fractions is: Br(B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} D{sub s}{sup -}{pi}{sup +})/Br(B{sup 0} {yields} D{sup -}{pi}{sup +}) = 1.25 {+-} 0.18(stat) {+-} 0.13(syst) {+-} 0.32(BR) {+-} 0.14(PR) where the last uncertainty is due to the uncertainty on the world average measurement of the ratio of B{sub s}{sup 0} to B{sup 0} production rates, f{sub s}/f{sub d}.

  16. Reversible Fuel Cells Workshop Summary Report | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Reversible Fuel Cells Workshop Summary Report Reversible Fuel Cells Workshop Summary Report Summary and presentations from the NREL Reversible Fuel Cells Workshop held April 19, ...

  17. Development of Reversible Fuel Cell Systems at Proton Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Reversible Fuel Cell Systems at Proton Energy Everett Anderson NRELDOE Reversible Fuel Cell Workshop 19 April 2011 Development of Reversible Fuel Cell Systems at Proton Energy ...

  18. Oxidation/Reduction Reactions at the Metal Contact-TlBr Interface...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: OxidationReduction Reactions at the Metal Contact-TlBr Interface: An X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy Study Authors: Nelson, A J ; Swanberg, E L ; Voss, L F ; Graff, R T ; ...

  19. Hydrogen for X-group exchange in CH3X, X = Cl, Br, I, OMe and...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Hydrogen for X-group exchange in CH3X, X Cl, Br, I, OMe and NMe2 byMonomeric ... Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Hydrogen for X-group exchange in CH3X, X Cl, ...

  20. LAKESHORE AVON BR ANT-EDEN ALD EN-LANC ASTER AU BURN W SH ELDON

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    81 81 LAKESHORE AVON BR ANT-EDEN ALD EN-LANC ASTER AU BURN W SH ELDON CALEDONIA HURON C REEK LEIC EST ER COL DEN ASH FORD INDIAN FALLS LAWTONS SAR DINIA RPD-037 -2 ...

  1. Measurement of BR(Bu to phi K)/BR(Bu to J/psi K) at the collider detector at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Napora, Robert A

    2004-10-01

    This thesis presents evidence for the decay mode B{sup {+-}} {yields} {phi}K{sup {+-}} in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV using (120 {+-} 7)pb{sup -1} of data collected by the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF). This signal is then used to measure the branching ratio relative to the decay mode B{sup {+-}} {yields} J/{psi}K{sup {+-}}. The measurement starts from reconstructing the two decay modes: B{sup {+-}} {yields} {phi}K{sup {+-}}, where {phi} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup -} and B{sup {+-}} {yields} J/{psi}K{sup {+-}}, where J/{psi} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}. The measurement yielded 23 {+-} 7 B{sup {+-}} {yields} {phi}K{sup {+-}} events, and 406 {+-} 26 B{sup {+-}} {yields} J/{psi}K{sup {+-}} events. The fraction of B{sup {+-}} {yields} J/{psi}K{sup {+-}} events where the J/{psi} subsequently decayed to two muons (as opposed to two electrons) was found to be f{sub {mu}{mu}} = 0.839 {+-} 0.066. The relative branching ratio of the two decays is then calculated based on the equation: BR(B{sup {+-}} {yields} {phi}K{sup {+-}})/BR(B{sup {+-}} {yields} J/{psi}K{sup {+-}}) = N{sub {phi}K}/N{sub {psi}K} {center_dot}f{sub {mu}{mu}} BR(J/{psi} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -})/BR({phi} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup -}) {epsilon}{sub {mu}{mu}}K/{epsilon}KKK R({epsilon}{sub iso}). The measurement finds BR(B{sup {+-}} {yields} {phi}K{sup {+-}})/BR(B{sup {+-}} {yields} J/{psi}K{sup {+-}}) = 0.0068 {+-} 0.0021(stat.) {+-} 0.0007(syst.). The B{sup {+-}} {yields} {phi}K{sup {+-}} branching ratio is then found to be BR(B{sup {+-}} {yields} {phi}K{sup {+-}}) = [6.9 {+-} 2.1(stat.) {+-} 0.8(syst.)] x 10{sup -6}. This value is consistent with similar measurements reported by the e{sup +}e{sup -} collider experiments BaBar[1], Belle[2], and CLEO[3].

  2. Process of forming compounds using reverse micelle or reverse microemulsion systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Linehan, John C.; Fulton, John L.; Bean, Roger M.

    1998-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a process for producing a nanometer-sized metal compound. The process comprises forming a reverse micelle or reverse microemulsion system comprising a polar fluid in a non-polar or low-polarity fluid. A first reactant comprising a multi-component, water-soluble metal compound is introduced into the polar fluid in a non-polar or low-polarity fluid. This first reactant can be introduced into the reverse micelle or reverse microemulsion system during formation thereof or subsequent to the formation of the reverse micelle or microemulsion system. The water-soluble metal compound is then reacted in the reverse micelle or reverse microemulsion system to form the nanometer-sized metal compound. The nanometer-sized metal compound is then precipitated from the reverse micelle or reverse microemulsion system.

  3. Reverse Osmosis Optimization | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Reverse Osmosis Optimization Reverse Osmosis Optimization Report assesses techniques for optimizing reverse osmosis (RO) systems to increase RO system performance and water efficiency. It provides a general description of RO systems, the influence of RO systems on water use, and key areas where RO systems can be optimized to reduce water and energy consumption. This report is intended to help facility managers at Federal sites understand the basic concepts of the RO process and system

  4. Direct Imaging of Asymmetric Magnetization Reversal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Direct Imaging of Asymmetric Magnetization Reversal Direct Imaging of Asymmetric Magnetization Reversal Print Wednesday, 28 September 2005 00:00 The phenomenon of exchange bias has transformed how data is read on magnetic hard disks and created an explosion in their information storage density. However, it remains poorly understood, and even the fundamental mechanism of magnetic reversal for exchange-biased systems in changing magnetic fields is unclear. By using x-ray photoemission electron

  5. Gravity controlled anti-reverse rotation device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dickinson, Robert J.; Wetherill, Todd M.

    1983-01-01

    A gravity assisted anti-reverse rotation device for preventing reverse rotation of pumps and the like. A horizontally mounted pawl is disposed to mesh with a fixed ratchet preventing reverse rotation when the pawl is advanced into intercourse with the ratchet by a vertically mounted lever having a lumped mass. Gravitation action on the lumped mass urges the pawl into mesh with the ratchet, while centrifugal force on the lumped mass during forward, allowed rotation retracts the pawl away from the ratchet.

  6. Time Reversal of Bose-Einstein Condensates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin, J.; Georgeot, B.; Shepelyansky, D. L. [Laboratoire de Physique Theorique, Universite de Toulouse III, CNRS, 31062 Toulouse (France)

    2008-08-15

    Using Gross-Pitaevskii equation, we study the time reversibility of Bose-Einstein condensates (BEC) in kicked optical lattices, showing that in the regime of quantum chaos, the dynamics can be inverted from explosion to collapse. The accuracy of time reversal decreases with the increase of atom interactions in BEC, until it is completely lost. Surprisingly, quantum chaos helps to restore time reversibility. These predictions can be tested with existing experimental setups.

  7. Direct Imaging of Asymmetric Magnetization Reversal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Direct Imaging of Asymmetric Magnetization Reversal Print The phenomenon of exchange bias has transformed how data is read on magnetic hard disks and created an explosion in their...

  8. Rotation Reversal Bifurcation and Energy Confinement Saturation...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Rotation Reversal Bifurcation and Energy Confinement Saturation in Tokamak Ohmic L -Mode Plasmas Authors: Rice, J. E. ; Cziegler, I. ; Diamond, P. H. ; Duval, B. P. ; ...

  9. Fuel cell system with coolant flow reversal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kothmann, Richard E. (Pittsburgh, PA)

    1986-01-01

    Method and apparatus for cooling electrochemical fuel cell system components. Periodic reversal of the direction of flow of cooling fluid through a fuel cell stack provides greater uniformity and cell operational temperatures. Flow direction through a recirculating coolant fluid circuit is reversed through a two position valve, without requiring modulation of the pumping component.

  10. Three component vibrational time reversal communication

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Anderson, Brian E.; Ulrich, Timothy J.; Ten Cate, James A.

    2015-01-01

    Time reversal provides an optimal prefilter matched signal to apply to a communication signal before signal transmission. Time reversal allows compensation for wave speed dispersion and can function well in reverberant environments. Time reversal can be used to focus elastic energy to each of the three components of motion independently. A pipe encased in concrete was used to demonstrate the ability to conduct communications of information using three component time reversal. Furthermore, the ability of time reversal to compensate for multi-path distortion (overcoming reverberation) will be demonstrated and the rate of signal communication will be presented. [The U.S. Department ofmore » Energy, through the LANL/LDRD Program, is gratefully acknowledged for supporting this work.]« less

  11. Guide to Developing Air-Cooled Lithium Bromide (LiBr) Absorption for CHP Applications, April 2005

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Development status of air-cooled lithium bromide (LiBr)-water absorption chillers for cooling, heating, and power (CHP) system applications in light-commercial buildings.

  12. Very fast doped LaBr.sub.3 scintillators and time-of-flight PET

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shah, Kanai S.

    2006-10-31

    The present invention concerns very fast scintillator materials capable of resolving the position of an annihilation event within a portion of a human body cross-section. In one embodiment, the scintillator material comprises LaBr.sub.3 doped with cerium. Particular attention is drawn to LaBr.sub.3 doped with a quantity of Ce that is chosen for improving the timing properties, in particular the rise time and resultant timing resolution of the scintillator, and locational capabilities of the scintillator.

  13. LAKESHORE AVON BR ANT-EDEN ALD EN-LANC ASTER AU BURN W SH ELDON

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    81 § ¨ ¦ 81 LAKESHORE AVON BR ANT-EDEN ALD EN-LANC ASTER AU BURN W SH ELDON CALEDONIA HURON C REEK LEIC EST ER COL DEN ASH FORD INDIAN FALLS LAWTONS SAR DINIA RPD-037 -2 GLENWOOD PU LASKI PAVILION CON CORD COL LINS N ELM A ORC HARD PARK-H AMBU RG DANLEY CORNERS ST ILLWAT ER CHAFF EE-ARCAD E FAYETT E-WATERLOO LAKEVIEW JAVA SEN EC A W ELLER Y AU RORA E ZOAR BU FFALO TIOGA SILVER LAKE AKR ON ROM E RAT HBON E ALM A BET HANY WYOMING ULYSSES BR ANCH W SAN DY CREEK COL LINS BLOOMFIELD E LEBANON

  14. Chemical reactions in reverse micelle systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Matson, Dean W.; Fulton, John L.; Smith, Richard D.; Consani, Keith A.

    1993-08-24

    This invention is directed to conducting chemical reactions in reverse micelle or microemulsion systems comprising a substantially discontinuous phase including a polar fluid, typically an aqueous fluid, and a microemulsion promoter, typically a surfactant, for facilitating the formation of reverse micelles in the system. The system further includes a substantially continuous phase including a non-polar or low-polarity fluid material which is a gas under standard temperature and pressure and has a critical density, and which is generally a water-insoluble fluid in a near critical or supercritical state. Thus, the microemulsion system is maintained at a pressure and temperature such that the density of the non-polar or low-polarity fluid exceeds the critical density thereof. The method of carrying out chemical reactions generally comprises forming a first reverse micelle system including an aqueous fluid including reverse micelles in a water-insoluble fluid in the supercritical state. Then, a first reactant is introduced into the first reverse micelle system, and a chemical reaction is carried out with the first reactant to form a reaction product. In general, the first reactant can be incorporated into, and the product formed in, the reverse micelles. A second reactant can also be incorporated in the first reverse micelle system which is capable of reacting with the first reactant to form a product.

  15. Cheaper Adjoints by Reversing Address Computations

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hascoët, L.; Utke, J.; Naumann, U.

    2008-01-01

    The reverse mode of automatic differentiation is widely used in science and engineering. A severe bottleneck for the performance of the reverse mode, however, is the necessity to recover certain intermediate values of the program in reverse order. Among these values are computed addresses, which traditionally are recovered through forward recomputation and storage in memory. We propose an alternative approach for recovery that uses inverse computation based on dependency information. Address storage constitutes a significant portion of the overall storage requirements. An example illustrates substantial gains that the proposed approach yields, and we show use cases in practical applications.

  16. Reversing the Circulation of Magnetic Vortices

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Reversing the Circulation of Magnetic Vortices Print In magnetic media, information is stored in binary form-one or zero, depending on which way the electronic spins are aligned in...

  17. Remote Whispering Applying Time Reversal (Technical Report) ...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    of spent nuclear fuel in storage casks without wires, or ... remote control of a system using sound). The time reversal process allows one to focus energy to a specific location ...

  18. Direct Imaging of Asymmetric Magnetization Reversal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and H. Ohldag, "Direct imaging of asymmetric magnetization reversal in exchange-biased FeMnPd bilayers by x-ray photoemission electron microscopy," Phys. Rev. Lett. 94, 107203...

  19. Direct Imaging of Asymmetric Magnetization Reversal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    H. Ohldag, "Direct imaging of asymmetric magnetization reversal in exchange-biased FeMnPd bilayers by x-ray photoemission electron microscopy," Phys. Rev. Lett. 94, 107203 (2005...

  20. CALiPER Application Summary Report 16. LED BR30 and R30 Lamps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2012-07-01

    This report analyzes the independently tested performance of 13 LED products labeled as BR30 or R30 lamps. The test results indicate substantial improvement versus earlier CALiPER testing of similar products, and performance comparable to recent data from LED Lighting Facts and ENERGY STAR.

  1. Reversing the Circulation of Magnetic Vortices

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Reversing the Circulation of Magnetic Vortices Reversing the Circulation of Magnetic Vortices Print Wednesday, 31 July 2013 00:00 In magnetic media, information is stored in binary form-one or zero, depending on which way the electronic spins are aligned in a given section of the medium. Recently, however, magnetic vortices have drawn scientists toward a new possibility: multibit storage in which each logic unit has four states instead of two and can store twice the information. Each tiny

  2. Reversible Fuel Cells Workshop Summary Report

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Reversible Fuel Cells Workshop Summary Report Prepared for: U.S. Department of Energy Prepared by: Dr. Robert J. Remick National Renewable Energy Laboratory Mr. Douglas Wheeler DJW Technology YOU'RE INVITED  NREL WORKSHOP Reversible fuel cells operate like batteries and may be one solution to the problem of storing electricity generated by variable resources. This workshop will bring together subject matter experts and fuel cell developers to discuss the state-of- the-art and to draft a road

  3. Direct Imaging of Asymmetric Magnetization Reversal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Direct Imaging of Asymmetric Magnetization Reversal Print The phenomenon of exchange bias has transformed how data is read on magnetic hard disks and created an explosion in their information storage density. However, it remains poorly understood, and even the fundamental mechanism of magnetic reversal for exchange-biased systems in changing magnetic fields is unclear. By using x-ray photoemission electron microscopy at the ALS to directly image the magnetic structure of an exchange-biased film,

  4. Direct Imaging of Asymmetric Magnetization Reversal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Direct Imaging of Asymmetric Magnetization Reversal Print The phenomenon of exchange bias has transformed how data is read on magnetic hard disks and created an explosion in their information storage density. However, it remains poorly understood, and even the fundamental mechanism of magnetic reversal for exchange-biased systems in changing magnetic fields is unclear. By using x-ray photoemission electron microscopy at the ALS to directly image the magnetic structure of an exchange-biased film,

  5. Direct Imaging of Asymmetric Magnetization Reversal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Direct Imaging of Asymmetric Magnetization Reversal Print The phenomenon of exchange bias has transformed how data is read on magnetic hard disks and created an explosion in their information storage density. However, it remains poorly understood, and even the fundamental mechanism of magnetic reversal for exchange-biased systems in changing magnetic fields is unclear. By using x-ray photoemission electron microscopy at the ALS to directly image the magnetic structure of an exchange-biased film,

  6. Direct Imaging of Asymmetric Magnetization Reversal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Direct Imaging of Asymmetric Magnetization Reversal Print The phenomenon of exchange bias has transformed how data is read on magnetic hard disks and created an explosion in their information storage density. However, it remains poorly understood, and even the fundamental mechanism of magnetic reversal for exchange-biased systems in changing magnetic fields is unclear. By using x-ray photoemission electron microscopy at the ALS to directly image the magnetic structure of an exchange-biased film,

  7. Direct Imaging of Asymmetric Magnetization Reversal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Direct Imaging of Asymmetric Magnetization Reversal Print The phenomenon of exchange bias has transformed how data is read on magnetic hard disks and created an explosion in their information storage density. However, it remains poorly understood, and even the fundamental mechanism of magnetic reversal for exchange-biased systems in changing magnetic fields is unclear. By using x-ray photoemission electron microscopy at the ALS to directly image the magnetic structure of an exchange-biased film,

  8. Photochromic Metal-Organic Frameworks: Reversible Control of...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Reversible Control of Singlet Oxygen Generation Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Photochromic Metal-Organic Frameworks: Reversible Control of Singlet Oxygen ...

  9. Reversible ratchet effects for vortices in conformal pinning...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Reversible ratchet effects for vortices in conformal pinning arrays Citation Details In-Document Search This content will become publicly available on May 3, 2016 Title: Reversible...

  10. Fractional Topological Phases and Broken Time-Reversal Symmetry...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Fractional Topological Phases and Broken Time-Reversal Symmetry in Strained Graphene Title: Fractional Topological Phases and Broken Time-Reversal Symmetry in Strained Graphene ...

  11. REVERSE RADIATIVE SHOCK LASER EXPERIMENTS RELEVANT TO ACCRETING...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    REVERSE RADIATIVE SHOCK LASER EXPERIMENTS RELEVANT TO ACCRETING STREAM-DISK IMPACT IN INTERACTING BINARIES Citation Details In-Document Search Title: REVERSE RADIATIVE SHOCK LASER ...

  12. Time-reversal-invariant topological superconductivity in n -doped...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Time-reversal-invariant topological superconductivity in n -doped BiH Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Time-reversal-invariant topological superconductivity in n -doped ...

  13. Time-reversal symmetric hierarchy of fractional incompressible...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Time-reversal symmetric hierarchy of fractional incompressible liquids Title: Time-reversal symmetric hierarchy of fractional incompressible liquids Authors: Santos, Luiz ; ...

  14. Reversible Metal Hydride Thermal Energy Storage for High Temperature...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Reversible Metal Hydride Thermal Energy Storage for High Temperature Power Generation Systems Reversible Metal Hydride Thermal Energy Storage for High Temperature Power Generation ...

  15. Optimal design of reverse osmosis module networks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maskan, F.; Wiley, D.E.; Johnston, L.P.M.; Clements, D.J.

    2000-05-01

    The structure of individual reverse osmosis modules, the configuration of the module network, and the operating conditions were optimized for seawater and brackish water desalination. The system model included simple mathematical equations to predict the performance of the reverse osmosis modules. The optimization problem was formulated as a constrained multivariable nonlinear optimization. The objective function was the annual profit for the system, consisting of the profit obtained from the permeate, capital cost for the process units, and operating costs associated with energy consumption and maintenance. Optimization of several dual-stage reverse osmosis systems were investigated and compared. It was found that optimal network designs are the ones that produce the most permeate. It may be possible to achieve economic improvements by refining current membrane module designs and their operating pressures.

  16. Time reversal signal processing for communication.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Young, Derek P.; Jacklin, Neil; Punnoose, Ratish J.; Counsil, David T.

    2011-09-01

    Time-reversal is a wave focusing technique that makes use of the reciprocity of wireless propagation channels. It works particularly well in a cluttered environment with associated multipath reflection. This technique uses the multipath in the environment to increase focusing ability. Time-reversal can also be used to null signals, either to reduce unintentional interference or to prevent eavesdropping. It does not require controlled geometric placement of the transmit antennas. Unlike existing techniques it can work without line-of-sight. We have explored the performance of time-reversal focusing in a variety of simulated environments. We have also developed new algorithms to simultaneously focus at a location while nulling at an eavesdropper location. We have experimentally verified these techniques in a realistic cluttered environment.

  17. Transport Physics in Reversed Shear Plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Levinton, F.M.; Batha, S.H.; Beer, M.A.; Bell, M.G.; Budny, R.V.; Efthimion, P.C.; Mazzucato, E.; Nazikian, R.; Park, H.K.; Ramsey, A.T.; Schmidt, G.L.; Scott, S.D.; Synakowski, E.J.; Taylor, G.; Von Goeler, S.; Zarnstorff, M.C.; Bush, C.E.

    1997-12-31

    Reversed magnetic shear is considered a good candidate for improving the tokamak concept because it has the potential to stabilize MHD instabilities and reduce particle and energy transport. With reduced transport the high pressure gradient would generate a strong off-axis bootstrap current and could sustain a hollow current density profile. Such a combination of favorable conditions could lead to an attractive steady-state tokamak configuration. Indeed, a new tokamak confinement regime with reversed magnetic shear has been observed on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) where the particle, momentum, and ion thermal diffusivities drop precipitously, by over an order of magnitude. The particle diffusivity drops to the neoclassical level and the ion thermal diffusivity drops to much less than the neoclassical value in the region with reversed shear. This enhanced reversed shear (ERS) confinement mode is characterized by an abrupt transition with a large rate of rise of the density in the reversed shear region during neutral beam injection, resulting in nearly a factor of three increase in the central density to 1.2 X 10(exp 20) cube m. At the same time the density fluctuation level in the reversed shear region dramatically decreases. The ion and electron temperatures, which are about 20 keV and 7 keV respectively, change little during the ERS mode. The transport and transition into and out of the ERS mode have been studied on TFTR with plasma currents in the range 0.9-2.2 MA, with a toroidal magnetic field of 2.7-4.6 T, and the radius of the q(r) minimum, q{sub min}, has been varied from r/a = 0.35 to 0.55. Toroidal field and co/counter neutral beam injection toroidal rotation variations have been used to elucidate the underlying physics of the transition mechanism and power threshold of the ERS mode.

  18. AmeriFlux BR-Sa1 Santarem-Km67-Primary Forest

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saleska, Scott

    2016-01-01

    This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site BR-Sa1 Santarem-Km67-Primary Forest. Site Description - The LBA Tapajos KM67 Mature Forest site is located in the Tapajos National Forest, a 450,000 ha closed-canopy upland forest in Amazonian Brazil. Bounded by the Tapajos River in the west and highway BR-163 to the east, the tower is located on a flat plateau (or planalto) that extends up to 150 km to the north, south, and east. Within the confines of the National Forest, anthropogenic disturbances are limited to a few small hunting trails. The surrounding stand is classified as primary or "old-growth"" predominantly by its uneven age distribution, emergent trees, numerous epiphytes and abundant large logs. In 2007 falling trees hit the tower guy wires rendering all instrumentation in-operational. After a complete restoration tower measurements resumed in August of 2008.

  19. Spectroscopic Evidence for a High-Spin Br-Fe(IV)-Oxo Intermediate in the

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    alpha-Ketoglutarate-Dependent Halogenase CytC3 from Streptomyces Working title - Spectroscopic Evidence for a High-Spin Br-Fe(IV)-Oxo Intermediate in the alpha-Ketoglutarate-Dependent Halogenase CytC3 from Streptomyces There are over 4,500 known halogenated natural products. The presence of a halogen in the molecular framework tunes a compound's chemical reactivity or biological activity in these natural fungicides and antibiotics. Four classes of enzymes are now known to catalyze

  20. Investigation into Nanostructured Lanthanum Halides and CeBr{sub 3} for Nuclear Radiation Detection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guss, P., Guise, R., Mukhopadhyay, S., Yuan, D.

    2011-06-22

    This slide-show presents work on radiation detection with nanostructured lanthanum halides and CeBr{sub 3}. The goal is to extend the gamma energy response on both low and high-energy regimes by demonstrating the ability to detect low-energy x-rays and relatively high-energy activation prompt gamma rays simultaneously using the nano-structured lanthanum bromide, lanthanum fluoride, cerium bromide, or other nanocrystal material. Homogeneous and nano structure cases are compared.

  1. Response of LaBr{sub 3}(Ce) scintillators to 2.5 MeV fusion neutrons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cazzaniga, C.; Nocente, M.; Gorini, G.; Istituto di Fisica del Plasma, Associazione EURATOM-ENEA-CNR, Via Roberto Cozzi 53, Milano 20125 ; Tardocchi, M.; Croci, G.; Giacomelli, L.; Angelone, M.; Pillon, M.; Villari, S.; Weller, A.; Petrizzi, L.; Collaboration: ASDEX Upgrade Team; JET-EFDA Contributors

    2013-12-15

    Measurements of the response of LaBr{sub 3}(Ce) to 2.5 MeV neutrons have been carried out at the Frascati Neutron Generator and at tokamak facilities with deuterium plasmas. The observed spectrum has been interpreted by means of a Monte Carlo model. It is found that the main contributor to the measured response is neutron inelastic scattering on {sup 79}Br, {sup 81}Br, and {sup 139}La. An extrapolation of the count rate response to 14 MeV neutrons from deuterium-tritium plasmas is also presented. The results are of relevance for the design of ?-ray diagnostics of fusion burning plasmas.

  2. Characterization of low-melting electrolytes for potential geothermal borehole power supplies: The LiBr-KBr-LiF eutectic

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guidotti, R.A.; Reinhardt, F.W.

    1998-05-01

    The suitability of modified thermal-battery technology for use as a potential power source for geothermal borehole applications is under investigation. As a first step, the discharge processes that take place in LiSi/LiBr-KBr-LiF/FeS{sub 2} thermal cells were studied at temperatures of 350 C and 400 C using pelletized cells with immobilized electrolyte. Incorporation of a reference electrode allowed the relative contribution of each electrode to the overall cell polarization to be determined. The results of single-cell tests are presented, along with preliminary data for cells based on a lower-melting CsBr-LiBr-KBr eutectic salt.

  3. A modified Stillinger-Weber potential for TlBr and its polymorphic extension

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Xiaowang; Foster, Michael E.; Jones, Reese E.; Doty, F. Patrick; Yang, Pin; Fan, Hongyou

    2015-04-30

    TlBr is promising for g- and x- radiation detection, but suffers from rapid performance degradation under the operating external electric fields. To enable molecular dynamics (MD) studies of this degradation, we have developed a Stillinger-Weber type of TlBr interatomic potential. During this process, we have also addressed two problems of wider interests. First, the conventional Stillinger-Weber potential format is only applicable for tetrahedral structures (e.g., diamond-cubic, zinc-blende, or wurtzite). Here we have modified the analytical functions of the Stillinger-Weber potential so that it can now be used for other crystal structures. Second, past modifications of interatomic potentials cannot always be applied by a broad community because any new analytical functions of the potential would require corresponding changes in the molecular dynamics codes. Here we have developed a polymorphic potential model that simultaneously incorporates Stillinger-Weber, Tersoff, embedded-atom method, and any variations (i.e., modified functions) of these potentials. As a result, we have implemented this polymorphic model in MD code LAMMPS, and demonstrated that our TlBr potential enables stable MD simulations under external electric fields.

  4. Laser cooling of MgCl and MgBr in theoretical approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wan, Mingjie; Shao, Juxiang; Huang, Duohui; Yang, Junsheng; Cao, Qilong; Jin, Chengguo; Wang, Fanhou; Gao, Yufeng

    2015-07-14

    Ab initio calculations for three low-lying electronic states (X{sup 2}Σ{sup +}, A{sup 2}Π, and 2{sup 2}Π) of MgCl and MgBr molecules, including spin-orbit coupling, are performed using multi-reference configuration interaction plus Davidson correction method. The calculations involve all-electronic basis sets and Douglas–Kroll scalar relativistic correction. Spectroscopic parameters well agree with available theoretical and experimental data. Highly diagonally distributed Franck-Condon factors f{sub 00} for A{sup 2}Π{sub 3/2,1/2} (υ′ = 0) → X{sup 2}Σ{sup +}{sub 1/2} (υ″ = 0) are determined for both MgCl and MgBr molecules. Suitable radiative lifetimes τ of A{sup 2}Π{sub 3/2,1/2} (υ′ = 0) states for rapid laser cooling are also obtained. The proposed laser drives A{sup 2}Π{sub 3/2} (υ′ = 0) → X{sup 2}Σ{sup +}{sub 1/2} (υ″ = 0) transition by using three wavelengths (main pump laser λ{sub 00}; two repumping lasers λ{sub 10} and λ{sub 21}). These results indicate the probability of laser cooling MgCl and MgBr molecules.

  5. Closed-cage (fullerene-like) structures of NiBr{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bar-Sadan, M.; Popovitz-Biro, R.; Prior, Yehiam; Tenne, R. . E-mail: reshef.tenne@weizmann.ac.il

    2006-11-09

    It is well accepted by now that nanoparticles of inorganic layered compounds form closed-cage structures (IF). In particular closed-cage nanoparticles of metal dihalides, like NiCl{sub 2}, CdCl{sub 2} and CdI{sub 2} were shown to produce such structures in the past. In the present report IF-NiBr{sub 2} polyhedra and quasi-spherical structures were obtained by the evaporation/recrystallization technique as well as by laser ablation. When the nanoclusters were formed in humid atmosphere, nickel perbromate hydrate [Ni(BrO{sub 4}){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 6}] polyhedra and short tubules were produced, as a result of a reaction with water. Nanooctahedra of NiBr{sub 2} were found occasionally in the irradiated soot. The reoccurrence of this structure in the IF family suggests that it is a generic one. Consistent with previous observations, this study showed that formation of the IF materials stabilized the material under the electron-beam irradiation. The growth mechanism of these nanostructures is briefly discussed.

  6. A modified Stillinger-Weber potential for TlBr and its polymorphic extension

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhou, Xiaowang; Foster, Michael E.; Jones, Reese E.; Doty, F. Patrick; Yang, Pin; Fan, Hongyou

    2015-04-30

    TlBr is promising for g- and x- radiation detection, but suffers from rapid performance degradation under the operating external electric fields. To enable molecular dynamics (MD) studies of this degradation, we have developed a Stillinger-Weber type of TlBr interatomic potential. During this process, we have also addressed two problems of wider interests. First, the conventional Stillinger-Weber potential format is only applicable for tetrahedral structures (e.g., diamond-cubic, zinc-blende, or wurtzite). Here we have modified the analytical functions of the Stillinger-Weber potential so that it can now be used for other crystal structures. Second, past modifications of interatomic potentials cannot always bemore » applied by a broad community because any new analytical functions of the potential would require corresponding changes in the molecular dynamics codes. Here we have developed a polymorphic potential model that simultaneously incorporates Stillinger-Weber, Tersoff, embedded-atom method, and any variations (i.e., modified functions) of these potentials. As a result, we have implemented this polymorphic model in MD code LAMMPS, and demonstrated that our TlBr potential enables stable MD simulations under external electric fields.« less

  7. Re-evaluation of the eutectic region of the LiBr-KBr-LiF system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Redey, L.; Guidotti, R.A.

    1996-05-01

    The separator pellet in a thermal battery consists of electrolyte immobilized by a binder (typically, MgO powder). The melting point of the electrolyte determines the effective operating window for its use in a thermal battery. The development of a two-hour thermal battery required the use of a molten salt that had a lower melting point and larger liquidus range than the LiCl-KCl eutectic which melts at 352 C. Several candidate eutectic electrolyte systems were evaluated for their suitability for this application. One was the LiCl-LiBr-KBr eutectic used at Argonne National Laboratories for high-temperature rechargeable batteries for electric-vehicle applications. Using a custom-designed high-temperature conductivity cell, the authors were able to readily determine the liquidus region for the various compositions studied around the original eutectic for the LiBr-KBr-LiF system. The actual eutectic composition was found to be 60.0 m/o LiBr-37.5 m/o KBr-2.5 m/o LiF with a melting point of 324 {+-} 0.5 C.

  8. Geothermal br Resource br Area Geothermal br Resource br Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Aluto Langano Geothermal Area Aluto Langano Geothermal Area East African Rift System Ethiopian Rift Valley Major Normal Fault Basalt MW K Amatitlan Geothermal Area Amatitlan...

  9. Measurement of ratio R = (BR(D{sup 0}{yields}K{pi}{pi}{pi})/BR(D{sup 0}{yields}K{pi})) in {pi}{sup -}-Nucleus interactions at 500 GeV/c

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Solano Salinas, C. J.; Paucarchuco, C.; Fernandez, A.; Sheaff, M.

    2007-10-26

    We report a very preliminary result on the measurement of the ratio of branching ratios, for two decays D{sup 0} meson, R = (BR(D{sup 0}{yields}K{pi}{pi}{pi})/BR(D{sup 0}{yields}K{pi})), using data from the E791 experiment. We find R = 1.96{+-}0.0286 (stat){+-}0.06 (sys). This is in agreement with and of similar precision to the current PDG average value 1.97{+-}0.09.

  10. Reversing entanglement change by a weak measurement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun Qingqing; Zubairy, M. Suhail; Al-Amri, M.; Davidovich, Luiz

    2010-11-15

    Entanglement of a system changes due to interactions with the environment. A typical type of interaction is amplitude damping. If we add a detector to monitor the environment and only select the no-damping outcome, this amplitude damping is modified into a weak measurement. Here we show that the entanglement change of a two-qubit state due to amplitude damping or weak measurement can be probabilistically reversed. For the amplitude-damping case, the entanglement partially recovers under most conditions. For the weak-measurement case, the recovery of the initial entangled state is exact. The reversal procedure involves another weak measurement, preceded and followed by bit flips applied to both qubits. We propose a linear optics scheme for the experimental demonstration of these procedures.

  11. Forward and reverse characteristics of irradiated MOSFETs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paccagnella, A.; Ceschia, M.; Verzellesi, G.; Dalla Betta, G.F.; Soncini, G.; Bellutti, P.; Fuochi, P.G.

    1996-06-01

    pMOSFETs biased with V{sub gs} < V{sub gd} during Co{sup 60} {gamma} irradiation have shown substantial differences between the forward and reverse subthreshold characteristics, induced by a non-uniform charge distribution in the gate oxide. Correspondingly, modest differences have been observed in the over-threshold I-V characteristics. After irradiation, the forward subthreshold curves can shift at higher or lower gate voltages than the reverse ones. The former behavior has been observed in long-channel devices, in agreement with the classical MOS theory and numerical simulations. The latter result has been obtained in short-channel devices, and it has been correlated to a parasitic punch-through conduction mechanism.

  12. On the design of reversible QDCA systems.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeBenedictis, Erik P.; Frank, Michael P. (Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL); Ottavi, Marco; Frost-Murphy, Sarah E.

    2006-10-01

    This work is the first to describe how to go about designing a reversible QDCA system. The design space is substantial, and there are many questions that a designer needs to answer before beginning to design. This document begins to explicate the tradeoffs and assumptions that need to be made and offers a range of approaches as starting points and examples. This design guide is an effective tool for aiding designers in creating the best quality QDCA implementation for a system.

  13. Membranes for Reverse-Organic Air Separations

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    New Membranes Use Reverse Separation to Reduce Pollutant Emissions: Many industrial applications need a process to separate pollutants known as volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from air in order to protect the environment and save energy. One such application is the venting of vapor from underground storage tanks (UST) used in gasoline storage and dispensing. These vapors, which can build up and create high pressure within the UST, contribute to ground-level ozone and smog upon release.

  14. AmeriFlux US-Br3 Brooks Field Site 11- Ames

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parkin, Tim; Prueger, John

    2016-01-01

    This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site US-Br3 Brooks Field Site 11- Ames. Site Description - The Brooks Field Site 11 - Ames Site is one of three sites (Brooks Field Site 10 and Brooks Field Site 1011) located in a corn/soybean agricultural landscape of central Iowa. The farming systems, associated tillage, and nutrient management practices for soybean/corn production are typical of those throughout Upper Midwest Corn Belt. All three sites are members of the AmeriFlux network. Information for all three can be found in synchronous pages of this website.

  15. AmeriFlux US-Br1 Brooks Field Site 10- Ames

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Parkin, Tim [USDA; Prueger, John [National Laboratory for Agriculture and the Environment

    2016-01-01

    This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site US-Br1 Brooks Field Site 10- Ames. Site Description - The Brooks Field Site 10 - Ames Site is one of three sites (Brooks Field Site 11 and Brooks Field Site 1011) located in a corn/soybean agricultural landscape of central Iowa. The farming systems, associated tillage, and nutrient management practices for soybean/corn production are typical of those throughout Upper Midwest Corn Belt. All three sites are members of the AmeriFlux network. Information for all three can be found in synchronous pages of this website.

  16. Br-rich Tips of Calcified Crab Claws are Less Hard but More Fracture

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Resistant: A Comparison of Mineralized and Heavy-element Biological Materials Br-rich Tips of Calcified Crab Claws are Less Hard but More Fracture Resistant: A Comparison of Mineralized and Heavy-element Biological Materials figure 1 Figure 1. The heavy element biomaterial is the darker material at the tip of the shore crab claws. Figure "b" shows the same claw as "a" but after bead blasting. The claw tips are less eroded by the bead blasting than surrounding calcified

  17. Reversible Sigma C-C Bond Formation Between Phenanthroline Ligands...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Reversible Sigma C-C Bond Formation Between Phenanthroline Ligands Activated by (C5Me5)2Yb Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Reversible Sigma C-C Bond Formation Between ...

  18. Progress on the Development of Reversible SOFC Stack Technology

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation by Casey Brown, Versa Power Systems, at the NREL Reversible Fuel Cells Workshop, April 19, 2011

  19. Development of Reversible Fuel Cell Systems at Proton Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation by Everett Anderson, PROTON ON SITE, at the NREL Reversible Fuel Cells Workshop, April 19, 2011

  20. Fuel loading of PeBR for a long operation life on the lunar surface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schriener, T. M.; El-Genk, M. S.

    2012-07-01

    The Pellet Bed Reactor (PeBR) power system could provide 99.3 kW e to a lunar outpost for 66 full power years and is designed for no single point failures. The core of this fast energy spectrum reactor consists of three sectors that are neutronically and thermally coupled, but hydraulically independent. Each sector has a separate Closed Brayton Cycle (CBC) loop for energy conversion and separate water heat-pipes radiator panels for heat rejection. He-Xe (40 g/mole) binary gas mixture serves as the reactor coolant and CBC working fluid. On the lunar surface, the emplaced PeBR below grade is loaded with spherical fuel pellets (1-cm in dia.). It is launched unfueled and the pellets are launched in separate subcritical canisters, one for each core sector. This paper numerically simulates the transient loading of a core sector with fuel pellets on the Moon. The simulation accounts for the dynamic interaction of the pellets during loading and calculates the axial and radial distributions of the volume porosity in the sector. The pellets pack randomly with a volume porosity of 0.39 - 0.41 throughout most of the sector, except near the walls the local porosity is higher. (authors)

  1. Time Reversal in Solids (Linear and Nonlinear Elasticity): Multimedia Resources in Time Reversal

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Dynamic nonlinear elastic behavior, nonequilibrium dynamics, first observed as a curiosity in earth materials has now been observed in a great variety of solids. The primary manifestations of the behavior are characteristic wave distortion, and slow dynamics, a recovery process to equilibrium that takes place linearly with the logarithm of time, over hours to days after a wave disturbance. The link between the diverse materials that exhibit nonequilibrium dynamics appears to be the presence of soft regions, thought to be 'damage' at many scales, ranging from order 10-9 m to 10-1 m at least. The regions of soft matter may be distributed as in a rock sample, or isolated, as in a sample with a single crack [LANLhttp://www.lanl.gov/orgs/ees/ees11/geophysics/nonlinear/nonlinear.shtml]. The Geophysics Group (EES-11) at Los Alamos National Laboratory has posted two or more multimedia items under each of the titles below to demonstrate aspects of their work: 1) Source Reconstruction Using Time Reversal; 2) Robustness and Efficiency of Time Reversal Acoustics in Solid Media; 3) Audio Example of Time Reversal - Speech Privacy; 4) Crack Imagining with Time Reversal - Experimental Results; 5) Time Reversal of the 2004 (M9.0) Sumatra Earthquake.

  2. Reversing the Circulation of Magnetic Vortices

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Reversing the Circulation of Magnetic Vortices Print In magnetic media, information is stored in binary form-one or zero, depending on which way the electronic spins are aligned in a given section of the medium. Recently, however, magnetic vortices have drawn scientists toward a new possibility: multibit storage in which each logic unit has four states instead of two and can store twice the information. Each tiny magnetic whirl has a polarity that can point up or down and a circulation that can

  3. Reversing the Circulation of Magnetic Vortices

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Reversing the Circulation of Magnetic Vortices Print In magnetic media, information is stored in binary form-one or zero, depending on which way the electronic spins are aligned in a given section of the medium. Recently, however, magnetic vortices have drawn scientists toward a new possibility: multibit storage in which each logic unit has four states instead of two and can store twice the information. Each tiny magnetic whirl has a polarity that can point up or down and a circulation that can

  4. Reversing the Circulation of Magnetic Vortices

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Reversing the Circulation of Magnetic Vortices Print In magnetic media, information is stored in binary form-one or zero, depending on which way the electronic spins are aligned in a given section of the medium. Recently, however, magnetic vortices have drawn scientists toward a new possibility: multibit storage in which each logic unit has four states instead of two and can store twice the information. Each tiny magnetic whirl has a polarity that can point up or down and a circulation that can

  5. Reversing the Circulation of Magnetic Vortices

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Reversing the Circulation of Magnetic Vortices Print In magnetic media, information is stored in binary form-one or zero, depending on which way the electronic spins are aligned in a given section of the medium. Recently, however, magnetic vortices have drawn scientists toward a new possibility: multibit storage in which each logic unit has four states instead of two and can store twice the information. Each tiny magnetic whirl has a polarity that can point up or down and a circulation that can

  6. Reversing the Circulation of Magnetic Vortices

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Reversing the Circulation of Magnetic Vortices Print In magnetic media, information is stored in binary form-one or zero, depending on which way the electronic spins are aligned in a given section of the medium. Recently, however, magnetic vortices have drawn scientists toward a new possibility: multibit storage in which each logic unit has four states instead of two and can store twice the information. Each tiny magnetic whirl has a polarity that can point up or down and a circulation that can

  7. Reversing the Circulation of Magnetic Vortices

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Reversing the Circulation of Magnetic Vortices Print In magnetic media, information is stored in binary form-one or zero, depending on which way the electronic spins are aligned in a given section of the medium. Recently, however, magnetic vortices have drawn scientists toward a new possibility: multibit storage in which each logic unit has four states instead of two and can store twice the information. Each tiny magnetic whirl has a polarity that can point up or down and a circulation that can

  8. Reversing the Circulation of Magnetic Vortices

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Reversing the Circulation of Magnetic Vortices Print In magnetic media, information is stored in binary form-one or zero, depending on which way the electronic spins are aligned in a given section of the medium. Recently, however, magnetic vortices have drawn scientists toward a new possibility: multibit storage in which each logic unit has four states instead of two and can store twice the information. Each tiny magnetic whirl has a polarity that can point up or down and a circulation that can

  9. Kinetic Stability of the Field Reversed Configuration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    E.V. Belova; R.C. Davidson; H. Ji; and M. Yamada

    2002-07-09

    New computational results are presented which advance the understanding of the stability properties of the Field-Reversed Configuration (FRC). The FRC is an innovative confinement approach that offers a unique fusion reactor potential because of its compact and simple geometry, translation properties, and high plasma beta. One of the most important issues is FRC stability with respect to low-n (toroidal mode number) MHD modes. There is a clear discrepancy between the predictions of standard MHD theory that many modes should be unstable on the MHD time scale, and the observed macroscopic resilience of FRCs in experiments.

  10. High temperature crystal structures and superionic properties of SrCl{sub 2}, SrBr{sub 2}, BaCl{sub 2} and BaBr{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hull, Stephen; Norberg, Stefan T.; Ahmed, Istaq; Eriksson, Sten G.; Mohn, Chris E.

    2011-11-15

    The structural properties of the binary alkaline-earth halides SrCl{sub 2}, SrBr{sub 2}, BaCl{sub 2} and BaBr{sub 2} have been investigated from ambient temperature up to close to their melting points, using the neutron powder diffraction technique. Fluorite-structured SrCl{sub 2} undergoes a gradual transition to a superionic phase at 900-1100 K, characterised by an increasing concentration of anion Frenkel defects. At a temperature of 920(3) K, the tetragonal phase of SrBr{sub 2} undergoes a first-order transition to a cubic fluorite phase. This high temperature phase shows the presence of extensive disorder within the anion sublattice, which differs from that found in superionic SrCl{sub 2}. BaCl{sub 2} and BaBr{sub 2} both adopt the cotunnite crystal structure under ambient conditions. BaCl{sub 2} undergoes a first-order structural transition at 917(5) K to a disordered fluorite-structured phase. The relationship between the (disordered) crystal structures and the ionic conductivity behaviour is discussed and the influence of the size of the mobile anion on the superionic behaviour is explored. - Graphical abstract: Anomalous behaviour of the lattice expansion of SrCl{sub 2} at temperatures of {approx}1000 K is associated with the gradual transition to a superionic phase, whilst SrBr{sub 2} undergoes a first-order structural transition ({beta}{yields}{alpha}) to a fluorite-structured superionic phase at 920(3) K. Highlights: > Anomalous behaviour of the lattice expansion of SrCl{sub 2} occurs at temperatures {approx}1000 K. > Crystal structure of {beta}-SrBr{sub 2} is described in detail. > On heating, SrBr{sub 2} and BaCl{sub 2} transform to a fluorite-structured superionic phase. > Temperature dependence of the BaCl{sub 2} and BaBr{sub 2} structures is presented. > Nature of the superionic phases within the alkaline-earth halides is discussed.

  11. Infrared fluorescence studies of electronic-to-vibrational energy transfer in a Br2:NO system. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hawks, M.R.

    1993-12-01

    Steady-state photolysis techniques were used to study electronic-to-vibrational energy transfer mechanisms from atomic bromine to nitric oxide. Molecular bromine was photodissociated by 488nm radiation to produce equal parts Br(2p(sub 1/2)) and Br(2p (sub 3/2)). Side fluorescence intensity from Br(2p (sub 1/2)) at 2.7 microns and from NO (v =1) and 2 around 5.3 microns measured as a function of bromine pressure and nitric oxide pressure. The branching ratio collisional transfer into the first and second states of NO was determined, and previously reported rates for quenching of NO by molecular bromine were verified. Nitric oxide, Bromine, E-V transfer, Infrared fluorescence, Photolysis.

  12. Molecular Characterization of Brown Carbon (BrC) Chromophores in Secondary Organic Aerosol Generated From Photo-Oxidation of Toluene

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, Peng; Liu, Jiumeng; Shilling, John E.; Kathmann, Shawn M.; Laskin, Julia; Laskin, Alexander

    2015-09-28

    Atmospheric Brown carbon (BrC) is a significant contributor to light absorption and climate forcing. However, little is known about a fundamental relationship between the chemical composition of BrC and its optical properties. In this work, light-absorbing secondary organic aerosol (SOA) was generated in the PNNL chamber from toluene photo-oxidation in the presence of NOx (Tol-SOA). Molecular structures of BrC components were examined using nanospray desorption electrospray ionization (nano-DESI) and liquid chromatography (LC) combined with UV/Vis spectroscopy and electrospray ionization (ESI) high-resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS). The chemical composition of BrC chromophores and the light absorption properties of toluene SOA (Tol-SOA) depend strongly on the initial NOx concentration. Specifically, Tol-SOA generated under high-NOx conditions (defined here as initial NOx/toluene of 5/1) appears yellow and mass absorption coefficient of the bulk sample (MACbulk@365nm = 0.78 m2 g-1) is nearly 80 fold higher than that measured for the Tol-SOA sample generated under low-NOx conditions (NOx/toluene < 1/300). Fifteen compounds, most of which are nitrophenols, are identified as major BrC chromophores responsible for the enhanced light absorption of Tol-SOA material produced in the presence of NOx. The integrated absorbance of these fifteen chromophores accounts for 40-60% of the total light absorbance by Tol-SOA at wavelengths between 300 nm and 500 nm. The combination of tandem LC-UV/Vis-ESI/HRMS measurements provides an analytical platform for predictive understanding of light absorption properties by BrC and their relationship to the structure of individual chromophores. General trends in the UV/vis absorption by plausible isomers of the BrC chromophores were evaluated using theoretical chemistry calculations. The molecular-level understanding of BrC chemistry is helpful for better understanding the evolution and behavior of light absorbing aerosols in the atmosphere.

  13. LiCl Dehumidifier LiBr absorption chiller hybrid air conditioning system with energy recovery

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ko, Suk M.

    1980-01-01

    This invention relates to a hybrid air conditioning system that combines a solar powered LiCl dehumidifier with a LiBr absorption chiller. The desiccant dehumidifier removes the latent load by absorbing moisture from the air, and the sensible load is removed by the absorption chiller. The desiccant dehumidifier is coupled to a regenerator and the desiccant in the regenerator is heated by solar heated hot water to drive the moisture therefrom before being fed back to the dehumidifier. The heat of vaporization expended in the desiccant regenerator is recovered and used to partially preheat the driving fluid of the absorption chiller, thus substantially improving the overall COP of the hybrid system.

  14. X-ray-absorption study of CuBr at high pressure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tranquada, J.M.; Ingalls, R.

    1986-09-15

    The x-ray-absorption spectrum of cuprous bromide has been measured as a function of pressure. The x-ray-absorption near-edge structure proved to be an excellent indicator of high-pressure phase transitions in this material. The normalized ''white-line'' peak heights at both the Cu and Br K-italic edges decreased on entering the tetragonal phase and increased in going to the NaCl structure. The zinc-blende to tetragonal phase transition took place over a very narrow pressure range centered at 46 +- 5 kbar. The transformation from the tetragonal to the NaCl structure, on the other hand, showed a broad mixed-phase region, suggesting a nucleation-and-growth mechanism for the transition. The mixed-phase region was centered at 75 +- 6 kbar. No evidence of a phase between the zinc-blende and tetragonal phases was observed, presumably because it does not exist. Analysis of the extended x-ray-absorption fine-structure (EXAFS) clearly showed that there is no change in coordination in going from the zinc-blende to the tetragonal phase although the nearest-neighbor distance increases slightly. A much larger increase in R-italic/sub 1/ occurs at the transition to the NaCl structure, where the coordination increases from 4 to 6. The mean-square deviation in the nearest-neighbor bond length, sigma/sub 1//sup 2/, appears to be a fairly smooth function of nearest-neighbor distance, decreasing (or increasing) as R-italic/sub 1/ decreases (or increases) more or less independent of structure. Evidence from the literature was presented to suggest that the zinc-blende to tetragonal transition in CuBr (and also CuCl) should occur by shear deformation.

  15. Synthesis, crystal structure, spectroscopic and thermal properties of [Et{sub 4}N][Ta{sub 6}Br{sub 12}(H{sub 2}O){sub 6}]Br{sub 4}.4H{sub 2}O (Et=ethyl)-A new compound with the paramagnetic [Ta{sub 6}Br{sub 12}]{sup 3+} cluster core

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peric, Berislav; Jozic, Drazan; Planinic, Pavica; Brnicevic, Nevenka; Giester, Gerald

    2009-09-15

    A new hexanuclear cluster compound, [Et{sub 4}N][Ta{sub 6}Br{sub 12}(H{sub 2}O){sub 6}]Br{sub 4}.4H{sub 2}O (Et=ethyl) (1), with the paramagnetic [Ta{sub 6}Br{sub 12}]{sup 3+} cluster entity, was synthesized and characterized by elemental and TG/DTA analyses, IR and UV/Vis spectroscopy and by a single-crystal X-ray diffraction study. The presence of the paramagnetic [Ta{sub 6}Br{sub 12}]{sup 3+} unit was confirmed also by the room-temperature magnetic and EPR measurements. The compound crystallizes in the tetragonal I4{sub 1}/a space group, with a=14.299(5), c=21.241(5) A, Z=4, R{sub 1}(F)/wR{sub 2}(F{sup 2})=0.0296/0.0811. The structure contains discrete [Ta{sub 6}Br{sub 12}(H{sub 2}O){sub 6}]{sup 3+} cations with an octahedron of metal atoms edge-bridged by bromine atoms and with water molecules occupying all six terminal positions. The cluster units are positioned in the vertices of the three-dimensional (pseudo)diamond lattice. The structure shows similarities with literature reported structures of cluster compounds crystallizing in the diamond (Fd3-barm) space group. - Graphical abstract: Two interpenetrating (pseudo)diamond nets formed by packing of the paramagnetic [Ta{sub 6}Br{sub 12}(H{sub 2}O)]{sup 3+} (octahedral) and diamagnetic [Et{sub 4}N]{sup +} (spheres) cations.

  16. Towards reversible basic linear algebra subprograms: A performance study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perumalla, Kalyan S.; Yoginath, Srikanth B.

    2014-12-06

    Problems such as fault tolerance and scalable synchronization can be efficiently solved using reversibility of applications. Making applications reversible by relying on computation rather than on memory is ideal for large scale parallel computing, especially for the next generation of supercomputers in which memory is expensive in terms of latency, energy, and price. In this direction, a case study is presented here in reversing a computational core, namely, Basic Linear Algebra Subprograms, which is widely used in scientific applications. A new Reversible BLAS (RBLAS) library interface has been designed, and a prototype has been implemented with two modes: (1) a memory-mode in which reversibility is obtained by checkpointing to memory in forward and restoring from memory in reverse, and (2) a computational-mode in which nothing is saved in the forward, but restoration is done entirely via inverse computation in reverse. The article is focused on detailed performance benchmarking to evaluate the runtime dynamics and performance effects, comparing reversible computation with checkpointing on both traditional CPU platforms and recent GPU accelerator platforms. For BLAS Level-1 subprograms, data indicates over an order of magnitude better speed of reversible computation compared to checkpointing. For BLAS Level-2 and Level-3, a more complex tradeoff is observed between reversible computation and checkpointing, depending on computational and memory complexities of the subprograms.

  17. Towards reversible basic linear algebra subprograms: A performance study

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Perumalla, Kalyan S.; Yoginath, Srikanth B.

    2014-12-06

    Problems such as fault tolerance and scalable synchronization can be efficiently solved using reversibility of applications. Making applications reversible by relying on computation rather than on memory is ideal for large scale parallel computing, especially for the next generation of supercomputers in which memory is expensive in terms of latency, energy, and price. In this direction, a case study is presented here in reversing a computational core, namely, Basic Linear Algebra Subprograms, which is widely used in scientific applications. A new Reversible BLAS (RBLAS) library interface has been designed, and a prototype has been implemented with two modes: (1) amore » memory-mode in which reversibility is obtained by checkpointing to memory in forward and restoring from memory in reverse, and (2) a computational-mode in which nothing is saved in the forward, but restoration is done entirely via inverse computation in reverse. The article is focused on detailed performance benchmarking to evaluate the runtime dynamics and performance effects, comparing reversible computation with checkpointing on both traditional CPU platforms and recent GPU accelerator platforms. For BLAS Level-1 subprograms, data indicates over an order of magnitude better speed of reversible computation compared to checkpointing. For BLAS Level-2 and Level-3, a more complex tradeoff is observed between reversible computation and checkpointing, depending on computational and memory complexities of the subprograms.« less

  18. Review of field-reversed configurations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steinhauer, Loren C.

    2011-07-15

    This review addresses field-reversed configurations (FRCs), which are compact-toroidal magnetic systems with little or no toroidal field and very high {beta} (ratio of plasma pressure to magnetic pressure). Although enthusiasm for the FRC has primarily been driven by its potential for an attractive fusion reactor, this review focuses on the physics rather than on technological or engineering aspects. Major advances in both theory and experiment have taken place since the previous comprehensive FRC review in 1988. Even so many questions remain. In particular, even though FRC experiments have exhibited remarkable stability, how well this extrapolates to larger systems remains unresolved. The review considers FRCs under familiar topical categories: equilibrium, global stability, self-organization, transport, formation, and sustainment.

  19. Digital reverse propagation in focusing Kerr media

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goy, Alexandre; Psaltis, Demetri

    2011-03-15

    Lenses allow the formation of clear images in homogeneous linear media. Holography is an alternative imaging method, but its use is limited to cases in which it provides an advantage, such as three-dimensional imaging. In nonlinear media, lenses no longer work. The light produces intensity-dependent aberrations. The reverse propagation method used in digital holography to form images from recorded holograms works even in Kerr media [M. Tsang, D. Psaltis, and F. G. Omenetto, Opt. Lett. 28, 1873 (2003).]. The principle has been experimentally demonstrated recently in defocusing media [C. Barsi, W.Wan, and J.W. Fleischer, Nat. Photonics 3, 211 (2009).]. Here, we report experimental results in focusing media.

  20. Ultrafast dynamics of strong-field dissociative ionization ofCH2Br2 probed by femtosecond soft x-ray transient absorptionspectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loh, Zhi-Heng; Leone, Stephen R.

    2008-01-15

    Femtosecond time-resolved soft x-ray transient absorption spectroscopy based on a high-order harmonic generation source is used to investigate the dissociative ionization of CH{sub 2}Br{sub 2} induced by 800 nm strong-field irradiation. At moderate peak intensities (2.0 x 10{sup 14} W/cm{sup 2}), strong-field ionization is accompanied by ultrafast C-Br bond dissociation, producing both neutral Br ({sup 2}P{sub 3/2}) and Br* ({sup 2}P{sub 1/2}) atoms together with the CH{sub 2}Br{sup +} fragment ion. The measured rise times for Br and Br* are 130 {+-} 22 fs and 74 {+-} 10 fs, respectively. The atomic bromine quantum state distribution shows that the Br/Br* population ratio is 8.1 {+-} 3.8 and that the Br {sup 2}P{sub 3/2} state is not aligned. The observed product distribution and the timescales of the photofragment appearances suggest that multiple field-dressed potential energy surfaces are involved in the dissociative ionization process. In addition, the transient absorption spectrum of CH{sub 2}Br{sub 2}{sup +} suggests that the alignment of the molecule relative to the polarization axis of the strong-field ionizing pulse determines the electronic symmetry of the resulting ion; alignment of the Br-Br, H-H, and C{sub 2} axis of the molecule along the polarization axis results in the production of the ion {tilde X}({sup 2}B{sub 2}), {tilde B}({sup 2}B{sub 1}) and {tilde C}({sup 2}A{sub 1}) states, respectively. At higher peak intensities (6.2 x 10{sup 14} W/cm{sup 2}), CH{sub 2}Br{sub 2}{sup +} undergoes sequential ionization to form the metastable CH{sub 2}Br{sub 2}{sup 2+} dication. These results demonstrate the potential of core-level probing with high-order harmonic transient absorption spectroscopy for studying ultrafast molecular dynamics.

  1. Electrodeposition of zinc on glassy carbon from ZnCl/sub 2/ and ZnBr/sub 2/ electrolytes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McBreen, J.; Gannon, E.

    1983-08-01

    The initial stages of the electrocrystallization of zinc from 3M ZnCl/sub 2/ and 3M ZnBr/sub 2/ on glassy carbon has been investigated using cyclic voltametry, the potential step method, and scanning electron microscopy. Particular care was taken to ensure electrolyte purity and to eliminate resistance effects in the measurements. The nucleation overvoltage in 3M ZnCl/sub 2/ was about 17 and about 12 mV in 3M ZnBr/sub 2/. In 3M ZnCl/sub 2/, the current transients from the potential step measurements could be fitted to a simple model that assumes instantaneous nucleation followed by growth of three dimensional centers under kinetic control. A similar mechanism is operative for 3M ZnBr/sub 2/ at low overvoltages. At higher overvoltages, the current transient is governed by mixed kinetic and diffusion control and cannot be fitted to a simple model. The lower nucleation overvoltage and the faster kinetics in 3M ZnBr/sub 2/ is correlated with the lower stability constants for the zinc bromide complexes. Erroneous results are obtained when resistance effects are not accounted for.

  2. A XANES and EXAFS Study of Hydration and Ion Pairing in Ambient Aqueous MnBr[subscript 2] Solutions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Yongsheng; Fulton, John L.; Partenheimer, Walter

    2008-09-25

    Extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) and X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopies were used to probe the first-shell coordination structure of Mn(II) in aqueous MnBr{sub 2} solutions at ambient conditions from very dilute to the near saturation limit. The Mn K-edge EXAFS spectra for 0.05 and 0.2 m solutions showed that there was no Br(-I) in the first shell, and that the Mn(II) was fully hydrated with six water molecules in an octahedral arrangement. In contrast, for 6 m solution, the coordination number of water was reduced to about 5, and an average of about one bromine atom was present in the first shell as a contact ion pair. The 1s {yields} 4p transition at 6545.5 eV confirmed the observation of Mn-Br contact ion pairs at high concentrations and the 1s {yields} 3d transition at 6539.5 eV showed that the first shell coordination symmetry remained octahedral even in the presence of Mn-Br ion pairs.

  3. Evaluation of production samples of the scintillators LaBr3:Ce andLaCl3:Ce

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choong, Woon-Seng; Derenzo, Stephen E.; Moses, William W.

    2005-09-15

    We report on the evaluation of the performance of two recently developed scintillator materials, LaCl{sub 3}:Ce and LaBr{sub 3}:Ce, at the task of gamma ray spectroscopy. Their performance is compared to a standard scintillator used for gamma ray spectroscopy--a 25 mm diameter 25 mm tall cylinder of NaI:Tl. We measure the pulse height, energy resolution, and full-energy efficiency of production LaBr{sub 3}:Ce and LaCl{sub 3}:Ce scintillation crystals of different sizes and geometries for a variety of gamma-ray energies. Using production rather than specially selected crystals will establish whether immediate large-scale use is feasible. The crystal is excited by gamma rays from one of six isotopic sources ({sup 125}I, {sup 241}Am, {sup 57}Co, {sup 22}Na, {sup 137}Cs, and {sup 60}Co) placed 15 cm away from the scintillator. Our measurements show that both LaCl{sub 3} and LaBr{sub 3} outperform NaI:Tl in almost all cases. They outperform NaI:Tl at all energies for the photopeak fraction and counting rate measurements, and for energy resolution at higher energies (above 200 keV for LaCl{sub 3} and 75 keV for LaBr{sub 3}). The performance of production crystals is excellent and these scintillators should be considered for immediate use in systems where stopping power and energy resolution are crucial.

  4. Photochromic Metal-Organic Frameworks: Reversible Control of...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Photochromic Metal-Organic Frameworks: Reversible Control of Singlet Oxygen Generation Previous Next List Jihye Park, Dawei Feng, Shuai Yuan and Hong-Cai Zhou, Angew. Chem. Int....

  5. A Reversible Crystallinity-Preserving Phase Transition in Metal...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Reversible Crystallinity-Preserving Phase Transition in Metal-Organic Frameworks: Discovery, ... was discovered in a metal-organic framework (MOF) PCN-526. During the phase ...

  6. Reversible Alteration of CO2 Adsorption upon Photochemical or...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Reversible Alteration of CO2 Adsorption upon Photochemical or Thermal Treatment in a Metal-Organic Framework Previous Next List Jinhee Park , Daqiang Yuan , Khanh T. Pham , ...

  7. Reversible Seeding in Storage Rings (Conference) | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    We propose to generate steady-state microbunching in a storage ring with a reversible seeding scheme. High gain harmonic generation (HGHG) and echo-enabled harmonic generation ...

  8. A Reversible Crystallinity-Preserving Phase Transition in Metal...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Reversible Crystallinity-Preserving Phase Transition in Metal-Organic Frameworks: Discovery, Mechanistic Studies, and Potential Applications Previous Next List Liu, Dahuan; Liu,...

  9. Advanced Materials for Reversible Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (RSOFC...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fuel Cell (RSOFC), Dual Mode Operation with Low Degradation Advanced Materials for Reversible Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (RSOFC), Dual Mode Operation with Low Degradation Presented ...

  10. Materials and System Issues with Reversible SOFC | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Cells Workshop Summary Report Advanced Materials for Reversible Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (RSOFC), Dual Mode Operation with Low Degradation Lessons Learned from SOFCSOEC Development...

  11. Dynamics and efficiency of magnetic vortex circulation reversal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Dynamics and efficiency of magnetic vortex circulation reversal Not Available Temp HTML Storage 2: Urbnek, Michal; Uhl, Vojtch; Lambert, Charles-Henri; Kan, Jimmy J.; ...

  12. Reversible Aptamer-Au Plasmon Rulers for Secreted Single Molecules

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lee, Somin Eunice; Chen, Qian; Bhat, Ramray; Petkiewicz, Shayne; Smith, Jessica M.; Ferry, Vivian E.; Correia, Ana Luisa; Alivisatos, A. Paul; Bissell, Mina J.

    2015-06-03

    Plasmon rulers, consisting of pairs of gold nanoparticles, allow single-molecule analysis without photobleaching or blinking; however, current plasmon rulers are irreversible, restricting detection to only single events. Here, we present a reversible plasmon ruler, comprised of coupled gold nanoparticles linked by a single aptamer, capable of binding individual secreted molecules with high specificity. We show that the binding of target secreted molecules to the reversible plasmon ruler is characterized by single-molecule sensitivity, high specificity, and reversibility. Lastly, such reversible plasmon rulers should enable dynamic and adaptive live-cell measurement of secreted single molecules in their local microenvironment.

  13. Ag/AgBr/g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4}: A highly efficient and stable composite photocatalyst for degradation of organic contaminants under visible light

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cao, Jing; Zhao, Yijie; Lin, Haili; Xu, Benyan; Chen, Shifu

    2013-10-15

    Graphical abstract: Ag/AgBr/g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} composite photocatalysts displayed excellent photocatalytic activities on the degradation of methyl orange (MO) under visible light. The improved photocatalytic performance and stability of Ag/AgBr/g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} originated from the synergetic effects of AgBr/g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} interface and metallic Ag nanoparticles. O{sub 2}?, one of the reactive species, was responsible for the photodegradation of MO compared to H+ and OH. - Highlights: Novel Ag/AgBr/g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} composite photocatalyst was reported. Ag/AgBr/g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} had novel energy band combination between AgBr and g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4}. Synergetic effects of AgBr/g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} interface and metallic Ag nanoparticles. Electron trapping role of metallic Ag dominated the stability of Ag/AgBr/g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4}. - Abstract: Novel Ag/AgBr/g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} composite photocatalysts were constructed via depositionprecipitation method and extensively characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and UVvis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS). Under visible light (? > 420 nm), Ag/AgBr/g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} composite photocatalysts displayed much higher photocatalytic activities than those of Ag/AgBr and g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} for degradation of methyl orange (MO). 50% Ag/AgBr/g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} presented the best photocatalytic performance, which was mainly attributed to the synergistic effects of AgBr/g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} interface and the in situ metallic Ag nanoparticles for efficiently separating electronhole pairs. Furthermore, Ag/AgBr/g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} remained good photocatalytic activity through 5 times of cycle experiments. Additionally, the radical scavengers experiment indicated that O{sub 2}{sup ?} was the main reactive species for the MO degradation under visible light.

  14. Synthesis and photocatalytic performance of an efficient Ag@AgBr/K{sub 2}Ti{sub 4}O{sub 9} composite photocatalyst under visible light

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liang, Yinghua; Lin, Shuanglong; Liu, Li; Hu, Jinshan; Cui, Wenquan

    2014-08-15

    Highlights: The plasmatic Ag@AgBr sensitized K{sub 2}Ti{sub 4}O{sub 9} composite photocatalysts. Ag@AgBr greatly increased visible light absorption for K{sub 2}Ti{sub 4}O{sub 9}. The plamonic photocatalysts exhibited enhanced activity for the degradation of RhB. - Abstract: Ag@AgBr nanoparticle-sensitized K{sub 2}Ti{sub 4}O{sub 9} composite photocatalysts (Ag@AgBr/K{sub 2}Ti{sub 4}O{sub 9}) were prepared by a facile precipitationphotoreduction method. The photocatalytic activities of the Ag@AgBr/K{sub 2}Ti{sub 4}O{sub 9} nanocomposites were evaluated for photocatalytic degradation of (RhB) under visible light irradiation. The composites exhibited excellent visible light absorption, which was attributable to the surface plasmon effect of Ag nanoparticles. The Ag@AgBr was uniformly scattered on the surface of K{sub 2}Ti{sub 4}O{sub 9} and possessed sizes in the range of 2050 nm. The loading amount of Ag@AgBr was also studied, and was found to influence the absorption spectra of the resulting composites. Approximately 95.9% of RhB was degraded by Ag@AgBr (20 wt.%)/K{sub 2}Ti{sub 4}O{sub 9} after irradiation for 1 h. The stability of the material was also investigated by performing consecutive runs. Additionally, studies performed using radical scavengers indicated that O{sub 2}{sup ?} and Br{sup 0} acted as the main reactive species. Based on the experimental results, a photocatalytic mechanism for organics degradation over Ag@AgBr/K{sub 2}Ti{sub 4}O{sub 9} photocatalysts was proposed.

  15. A high performance field-reversed configuration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Binderbauer, M. W.; Tajima, T.; Steinhauer, L. C.; Garate, E.; Tuszewski, M.; Smirnov, A.; Gota, H.; Barnes, D.; Deng, B. H.; Thompson, M. C.; Trask, E.; Yang, X.; Putvinski, S.; Rostoker, N.; Andow, R.; Aefsky, S.; Bolte, N.; Bui, D. Q.; Ceccherini, F.; Clary, R.; and others

    2015-05-15

    Conventional field-reversed configurations (FRCs), high-beta, prolate compact toroids embedded in poloidal magnetic fields, face notable stability and confinement concerns. These can be ameliorated by various control techniques, such as introducing a significant fast ion population. Indeed, adding neutral beam injection into the FRC over the past half-decade has contributed to striking improvements in confinement and stability. Further, the addition of electrically biased plasma guns at the ends, magnetic end plugs, and advanced surface conditioning led to dramatic reductions in turbulence-driven losses and greatly improved stability. Together, these enabled the build-up of a well-confined and dominant fast-ion population. Under such conditions, highly reproducible, macroscopically stable hot FRCs (with total plasma temperature of ∼1 keV) with record lifetimes were achieved. These accomplishments point to the prospect of advanced, beam-driven FRCs as an intriguing path toward fusion reactors. This paper reviews key results and presents context for further interpretation.

  16. Rigid-rotor, field-reversed configuration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Conti, F. Giammanco, F.; Plasma Diagnostics and Technologies Ltd., Via Giuntini 63, 56023 Navacchio ; Wessel, F. J.; Binderbauer, M. W.; Bolte, N.; Morehouse, M.; Qerushi, A.; Rahman, H. U.; Roche, T.; Slepchenkov, M.

    2014-02-15

    The radial profiles, n(r), B{sub z}(r), and E{sub r}(r), for a Flux-Coil (“inductively driven”), Field-Reversed Configuration (FC-FRC) are measured and compared to the predictions of the Rigid-Rotor Model (RRM), which is an analytic, one-dimensional, time-independent, equilibrium description for the FRC. Injectors mounted on both ends of the confinement vessel provide a pre-fill plasma. Coaxial coils mounted outside the vacuum boundaries of the annular-confinement vessel accelerate the plasma and produce the FRC. The density profile is measured by laser interferometry, the magnetic-field profile using an in-situ probe array, and the electric-field profile using an in-situ, floating-probe array. Free parameters for each profile are measured, which also allow other intrinsic-plasma parameters to be determined, using computer-fit algorithms: null radius, radial thickness, plasma temperature, rotation frequencies, the latter of which are independently verified by spectroscopy. All radial profiles agree with the RRM predictions, for the experimental configuration, parameter regime, and specified-time interval studied here.

  17. Reversible piezomagnetoelectric switching in bulk polycrystalline ceramics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stevenson, T. Bennett, J.; Brown, A. P.; Wines, T.; Bell, A. J.; Comyn, T. P.; Smith, R. I.

    2014-08-01

    Magnetoelectric (ME) coupling in materials offer tremendous advantages in device functionality enabling technologies including advanced electronic memory, combining electronic speed, and efficiency with magnetic robustness. However, low cost polycrystalline ME materials are excluded from most commercial applications, operating only at cryogenic temperatures, impractically large electric/magnetic fields, or with low ME coefficients (1-100 mV/cm Oe). Despite this, the technological potential of single compound ME coupling has continued to drive research into multiferroics over the last two decades. Here we show that by manipulating the large induced atomic strain within the polycrystalline, room temperature multiferroic compound 0.7BiFeO{sub 3}–0.3PbTiO{sub 3}, we can induce a reversible, piezoelectric strain controlled ME effect. Employing an in situ neutron diffraction experiment, we have demonstrated that this piezomagnetoelectric effect manifests with an applied electric field >8 kV/mm at the onset of piezoelectric strain, engineered in to the compound by crystallographic phase mixing. This produces a remarkable intrinsic ME coefficient of 1276 mV/cm Oe, due to a strain driven modification to the oxygen sub-lattice, inducing an increase in magnetic moment per Fe{sup 3+} ion of +0.142 μ{sub B}. This work provides a framework for investigations into strain engineered nanostructures to realize low-cost ME devices designed from the atoms up, as well as contributing to the deeper understanding of single phase ME coupling mechanisms.

  18. Liquid suspensions of reversible metal hydrides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Reilly, J.J.; Grohse, E.W.; Winsche, W.E.

    1983-12-08

    The reversibility of the process M + x/2 H/sub 2/ ..-->.. MH/sub x/, where M is a metal hydride former that forms a hydride MH/sub x/ in the presence of H/sub 2/, generally used to store and recall H/sub 2/, is found to proceed under a liquid, thereby to reduce contamination, provide better temperature control and provide in situ mobility of the reactants. Thus, a slurry of particles of a metal hydride former with an inert solvent is subjected to temperature and pressure controlled atmosphere containing H/sub 2/, to store hydrogen (at high pressures) and to release (at low pressures) previously stored hydrogen. The direction of the flow of the H/sub 2/ through the liquid is dependent upon the H/sub 2/ pressure in the gas phase at a given temperature. When the former is above the equilibrium absorption pressure of the respective hydride the reaction proceeds to the right, i.e., the metal hydride is formed and hydrogen is stored in the solid particle. When the H/sub 2/ pressure in the gas phase is below the equilibrium dissociation pressure of the respective hydride the reaction proceeds to the left, the metal hydride is decomposed and hydrogen is released into the gas phase.

  19. Direct molecular diffusion and micro-mixing for rapid dewatering of LiBr solution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bigham, S; Isfahani, RN; Moghaddam, S

    2014-03-01

    A slow molecular diffusion rate often limits the desorption process of an absorbate molecule from a liquid absorbent. To enhance the desorption rate, the absorbent is often boiled to increase the liquid vapor interfacial area. However, the growth of bubbles generated during the nucleate boiling process still remains mass-diffusion limited. Here, it is shown that a desorption rate higher than that of boiling can be achieved, if the vapor absorbent interface is continuously replenished with the absorbate-rich solution to limit the concentration boundary layer growth. The study is conducted in a LiBr-water-solution, in which the water molecules' diffusion rate is quite slow. The manipulation of the vapor solution interface concentration distribution is enabled by the mechanical confinement of the solution flow within microchannels, using a hydrophobic vapor-venting membrane and the implementation of microstructures on the flow channel's bottom wall. The microstructures stretch and fold the laminar streamlines within the solution film and produce vortices. The vortices continuously replace the concentrated solution at the vapor solution interface with the water-rich solution brought from the bottom and middle of the flow channel. The physics of the process is described using a combination of experimental and numerical studies. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  20. The corrosion phenomena in the coin cell BR2325 of the ``superstoichiometric fluorocarbon-lithium'' system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mitkin, V.N.; Galkin, P.S.; Denisova, T.N.

    1998-07-01

    It was noted at the earlier study and at the longer observations of the novel various types of superstoichiometric fluorocarbon materials CF{sub 1+x}, where x = 0.1--0.33 (FCM) and their behavior, that despite of their known hygroscopity during a storage of samples in laboratory and technological utensils nevertheless occurs an appreciable sorption of atmospheric moisture. The color of samples does not change but sometimes there appears a smell of hydrogen fluoride and even corrosion of glasswares at a long storage. On the basis of these facts was assumed that at a long storage the slow reactions of HF producing with a sorption moisture can proceed. This phenomena is necessary to take into account for successful manufacturing of long life lithium cells based on superstoichiometric fluorocarbon composite cathodes (FCC). The chemistry of such slow hydrolytic process and especially of processes which can proceed at manufacturing of FCC earlier was not investigated also of any data in the literature in this occasion is not present. Just for this reason the authors undertook a study of the corrosion phenomena which can proceed in industrial sources of a current at a long storage under influence of slow hydrolysis of C-F bonds by moisture. The goal of the study was to search long term damages in the slightly wet FCM and based on these materials cathodic composites for fluorocarbon-lithium cells. As a model for corrosion process investigation they have chosen a standard coin lithium battery of a type BR2325.

  1. Photoluminescence characteristics of polariton condensation in a CuBr microcavity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nakayama, Masaaki Murakami, Katsuya; Furukawa, Yoshiaki; Kim, DaeGwi

    2014-07-14

    We have investigated the photoluminescence (PL) properties of a CuBr microcavity at 10?K, including the temporal profiles, from the viewpoint of cavity-polariton condensation. The excitation energy density dependence of the PL intensity (band width) of the lower polariton branch at an in-plane wave vector of k{sub //}?=?0 exhibits a threshold-like increase (decrease). A large blueshift in the PL energy of ?10?meV caused by the cavity-polariton renormalization is correlated with the excitation energy density dependence of the PL intensity. The estimated density of photogenerated electron-hole pairs at the threshold is two orders lower than the Mott transition density. These results consistently demonstrate the occurrence of cavity-polariton condensation. In addition, we found that the PL rise and decay times are shortened dramatically by the cavity-polariton condensation, which reflects the bosonic final state stimulation in the relaxation process and the intrinsic cavity-polariton lifetime in the decay process.

  2. Reversibly immobilized biological materials in monolayer films on electrodes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weaver, Paul F. (Golden, CO); Frank, Arthur J. (Lakewood, CO)

    1993-01-01

    Methods and techniques are described for reversibly binding charged biological particles in a fluid medium to an electrode surface. The methods are useful in a variety of applications. The biological materials may include microbes, proteins, and viruses. The electrode surface may consist of reversibly electroactive materials such as polyvinylferrocene, silicon-linked ferrocene or quinone.

  3. Reducing current reversal time in electric motor control

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bredemann, Michael V

    2014-11-04

    The time required to reverse current flow in an electric motor is reduced by exploiting inductive current that persists in the motor when power is temporarily removed. Energy associated with this inductive current is used to initiate reverse current flow in the motor.

  4. Reversibly immobilized biological materials in monolayer films on electrodes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weaver, P.F.; Frank, A.J.

    1993-05-04

    Methods and techniques are described for reversibly binding charged biological particles in a fluid medium to an electrode surface. The methods are useful in a variety of applications. The biological materials may include microbes, proteins, and viruses. The electrode surface may consist of reversibly electroactive materials such as polyvinylferrocene, silicon-linked ferrocene or quinone.

  5. Method for distinguishing multiple targets using time-reversal acoustics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Berryman, James G.

    2004-06-29

    A method for distinguishing multiple targets using time-reversal acoustics. Time-reversal acoustics uses an iterative process to determine the optimum signal for locating a strongly reflecting target in a cluttered environment. An acoustic array sends a signal into a medium, and then receives the returned/reflected signal. This returned/reflected signal is then time-reversed and sent back into the medium again, and again, until the signal being sent and received is no longer changing. At that point, the array has isolated the largest eigenvalue/eigenvector combination and has effectively determined the location of a single target in the medium (the one that is most strongly reflecting). After the largest eigenvalue/eigenvector combination has been determined, to determine the location of other targets, instead of sending back the same signals, the method sends back these time reversed signals, but half of them will also be reversed in sign. There are various possibilities for choosing which half to do sign reversal. The most obvious choice is to reverse every other one in a linear array, or as in a checkerboard pattern in 2D. Then, a new send/receive, send-time reversed/receive iteration can proceed. Often, the first iteration in this sequence will be close to the desired signal from a second target. In some cases, orthogonalization procedures must be implemented to assure the returned signals are in fact orthogonal to the first eigenvector found.

  6. Viscosity and density of aqueous solutions of LiBr, LiCl, ZnBr[sub 2], CaCl[sub 2], and LiNO[sub 3]; 1: Single salt solutions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wimby, J.M.; Berntsson, T.S. . Dept. of Heat and Power Technology)

    1994-01-01

    New experimental data for the viscosity and density of the binary systems lithium chloride + water, lithium bromide + water, calcium chloride + water, lithium nitrate + water, and zinc bromide + water are presented. Densities are presented in tabular form and as 10-parameter correlations, while kinematic and dynamic viscosities are presented in tabular form. Data are presented in the concentration range from intermediate dilution to close to room temperature crystallization concentration. The temperature ranges are 20--70 C for density and 25--90 C for viscosity. When available, literature data are compared with the new data, and some disagreement is found. New thermogravimetric curves are presented for the dehydration of CaCl[sub 2], ZnBr[sub 2], and LiBr in order to enable evaluation of drying as a composition determination technique.

  7. A comparison of ROChem reverse osmosis and spiral wound reverse osmosis membrane modules

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Siler, J.L.

    1992-01-31

    Testing of the ROChem Disc Tube[reg sign] reverse osmosis (RO) module's performance on biologically active feed waters has been completed. Both the ROChem module (using Filmtec standard-rejection seawater membranes) and the Filmtec spiral-wound membrane module (using Filmtec high-rejection seawater membranes) were tested with stimulant solutions containing typical bacteria and metal hydroxide levels found in the F/H Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF) influent. Results indicate that the ROChem module gave superior performance over the spiral-wound module. Water flux losses were reduced by over 30% for water recoveries above 40%.

  8. A comparison of ROChem reverse osmosis and spiral wound reverse osmosis membrane modules

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Siler, J.L.

    1992-01-31

    Testing of the ROChem Disc Tube{reg_sign} reverse osmosis (RO) module`s performance on biologically active feed waters has been completed. Both the ROChem module (using Filmtec standard-rejection seawater membranes) and the Filmtec spiral-wound membrane module (using Filmtec high-rejection seawater membranes) were tested with stimulant solutions containing typical bacteria and metal hydroxide levels found in the F/H Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF) influent. Results indicate that the ROChem module gave superior performance over the spiral-wound module. Water flux losses were reduced by over 30% for water recoveries above 40%.

  9. Cs{sub 3}Zr{sub 6}Br{sub 15}Z (Z = C, B): A stuffed rhombohedral perovskite structure of linked clusters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qi, Ru-Yi; Corbett, J.D.

    1995-03-29

    The isostructural title compounds are synthesized in good yields form reactions of Zr, ZrBr{sub 4}, CsBr, and Z in sealed Ta tubing for {approximately}3 weeks at 850 {degrees}C. Their single-crystal data refinements established the products as Cs{sub 3.02(7)-}Zr{sub 6}Br{sub 14}C and Cs{sub 3.39(5)}Zr{sub 6}br{sub 15}B (R3c, Z = 6, a = 13.1031 (6), 13.116(1) {angstrom}, c = 35.800(3), 35.980(6) {angstrom}, R(F)/R{sub w} = 5.4/5.9, 5.4/4.4%, respectively). The structure is derived form a three-dimensional [Zr{sub 6}(Z)Br{sub 12}]Br{sub 6/2} network of four-rings (as in ReO{sub 6/2}) twisted into a rhombohedral perovskite analogous to VF{sub 3}. The three necessary Cs{sup +} cations are fractionally distributed over five sites that are far from optimal or common, with either eight asymmetric or only three close bromide neighbors. Refinement of a third Cs{sub 3.18(5)}Zr{sub 6}Br{sub 15}C structure at {minus}50 {degrees}C gave the same result with somewhat smaller positional distributions of the atoms.

  10. Periodicity, Electronic Structures, and Bonding of Gold Tetrahalides [AuX4](-) (X = F, CI, Br, I, At, Uus)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Wan-Lu; Li, Yong; Xu, Congqiao; Wang, Xue B.; Vorpagel, Erich R.; Li, Jun

    2015-12-07

    Systematic theoretical and experimental investigations have been performed to understand the periodicity and electronic structures of trivalent-gold halides using gold tetrahalides [AuX4]⁻ anions (X = F, Cl, Br, I, At, Uus). The [AuX4]⁻ (X = Cl, Br, I) anions were produced in gas phase and their negative-ion photoelectron spectra were obtained, which exhibited rich and well-resolved spectral peaks. We calculated the adiabatic as well as vertical electron detachment energies using density functional methods with scalar and spin-orbit coupling relativistic effects. The simulated photoelectron spectra based on these calculations are in good agreement with the experimental spectra. Our results show that the trivalent Au(III) oxidation state becomes progressively less stable while Au(I) is preferred when the halides become heavier along the Period Table. This trend reveals that the oxidation state of metals in complexes can be manipulated through ligand design

  11. Steady-State Thermal-Hydraulics Analyses for the Conversion of the BR2 Reactor to LEU

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Licht, J. R.; Bergeron, A.; Dionne, B.; Van den Branden, G.; Kalcheva, S.; Sikik, E.; Koonen, E.

    2015-12-01

    BR2 is a research reactor used for radioisotope production and materials testing. It’s a tank-in-pool type reactor cooled by light water and moderated by beryllium and light water (Figure 1). The reactor core consists of a beryllium moderator forming a matrix of 79 hexagonal prisms in a hyperboloid configuration; each having a central bore that can contain a variety of different components such as a fuel assembly, a control or regulating rod, an experimental device, or a beryllium or aluminum plug. Based on a series of tests, the BR2 operation is currently limited to a maximum allowable heat flux of 470 W/cm2 to ensure fuel plate integrity during steady-state operation and after a loss-of-flow/loss-of-pressure accident.

  12. Comparison of CsBr and KBr coated Cu photocathodes: Effects of laser irradiation and work function changes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    He, Weidong; VilayurGanapathy, Subramanian; Joly, Alan G.; Droubay, Timothy C.; Chambers, Scott A.; Maldonado, Juan R.; Hess, Wayne P.

    2013-02-20

    Thin films (7 nm layers) of CsBr and KBr were deposited on Cu(100) to investigate photoemission properties of these potential photocathode materials. After thin film deposition and prolonged laser ultraviolet (UV) irradiation (266 nm picosecond laser) photoemission quantum efficiency increases by factors of 26 and 77 for KBr/Cu(100) and CsBr/Cu(100) photocathodes, respectively. Immediately following thin film deposition, a decrease in work function is observed, compared to bare Cu, in both cases. Quantum efficiency enhancements are attributed to the decrease in photocathode work function, due to the deposition of alkali halide thin films, and photo-induced processes, that introduce defect states into the alkali halide bandgap, induced by UV laser irradiation. It is possible that alkali metal formation occurs during UV irradiation and that this further contributes to photoemission enhancement. Our results suggest that KBr, a relatively stable alkali-halide, has potential for photocathode applications.

  13. Palladium-catalyzed Br/D exchange of arenes: Selective deuterium incorporation with versatile functional group tolerance and high efficiency

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Honghai -Hai; Bonnesen, Peter V.; Hong, Kunlun

    2015-07-13

    There is a facile method for introducing one or more deuterium atoms onto an aromatic nucleus via Br/D exchange with high functional group tolerance and high incorporation efficiency is disclosed. Deuterium-labeled aryl chlorides and aryl borates which could be used as substrates in cross-coupling reactions to construct more complicated deuterium-labeled compounds can also be synthesized by this method.

  14. Palladium-catalyzed Br/D exchange of arenes: Selective deuterium incorporation with versatile functional group tolerance and high efficiency

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhang, Honghai -Hai; Bonnesen, Peter V.; Hong, Kunlun

    2015-01-01

    There is a facile method for introducing one or more deuterium atoms onto an aromatic nucleus via Br/D exchange with high functional group tolerance and high incorporation efficiency is disclosed. Deuterium-labeled aryl chlorides and aryl borates which could be used as substrates in cross-coupling reactions to construct more complicated deuterium-labeled compounds can also be synthesized by this method.

  15. Magnetization reversal in TmCrO{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoshii, Kenji

    2012-11-15

    Highlights: ► We observed two magnetization reversals in TmCrO{sub 3}. ► The reversal at 28 K is attributed to antiparallel coupling between Cr{sup 3+} and Tm{sup 3+}. ► The other reversal originates from spin reorientation. ► Magnetocaloric effect is observed at the spin reorientation temperature. ► Characteristic magnetization switching is demonstrated. -- Abstract: The perovskite chromite TmCrO{sub 3} shows magnetization reversal at two temperatures. The reversal at ∼28 K is attributed to the antiparallel coupling between Tm{sup 3+} and Cr{sup 3+} moments, while that at the lower temperature (∼6–7 K) is rooted in a rotation of the magnetic moments. Magnetocaloric measurements offer a relatively large entropy change (∼4–5 J kg{sup −1} K{sup −1}) at the lower temperature. The reversal at ∼28 K is accompanied by a sign change of an exchange-bias-like field. The absence of the training effect suggests that this behavior is rooted in unidirectional magnetic anisotropy. The existence of the two magnetization reversals offers the characteristic switching of magnetization. For example, the magnetization is flipped without changing the direction of the applied magnetic field.

  16. Magnetic excitations in the spin-1/2 triangular-lattice antiferromagnet Cs2CuBr4

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zvyagin, S. A.; Ozerov, M.; Kamenskyi, D.; Wosnitza, J.; Krzystek, J.; Yoshizawa, D.; Hagiwara, M.; Hu, Rongwei; Ryu, Hyejin; Petrovic, C.; et al

    2015-11-27

    We present on high- field electron spin resonance (ESR) studies of magnetic excitations in the spin- 1/2 triangular-lattice antiferromagnet Cs2CuBr4. Frequency- field diagrams of ESR excitations are measured for different orientations of magnetic fields up to 25 T. We show that the substantial zero- field energy gap, Δ ≈ 9.5 K, observed in the low-temperature excitation spectrum of Cs2CuBr4 [Zvyagin et al:, Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 077206 (2014)], is present well above TN. Noticeably, the transition into the long-range magnetically ordered phase does not significantly affect the size of the gap, suggesting that even below TN the high-energy spin dynamicsmore » in Cs2CuBr4 is determined by short-range-order spin correlations. The experimental data are compared with results of model spin-wave-theory calculations for spin-1/2 triangle-lattice antiferromagnet.« less

  17. Three-dimensional time reversal communications in elastic media

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Anderson, Brian E.; Ulrich, Timothy J.; Le Bas, Pierre-Yves; Ten Cate, James A.

    2016-02-23

    Our letter presents a series of vibrational communication experiments, using time reversal, conducted on a set of cast iron pipes. Time reversal has been used to provide robust, private, and clean communications in many underwater acoustic applications. Also, the use of time reversal to communicate along sections of pipes and through a wall is demonstrated here in order to overcome the complications of dispersion and multiple scattering. These demonstrations utilize a single source transducer and a single sensor, a triaxial accelerometer, enabling multiple channels of simultaneous communication streams to a single location.

  18. Reversible CO Scavenging via Adsorbate-Dependent Spin State Transition...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Reversible CO Scavenging via Adsorbate-Dependent Spin State Transitions in an Iron(II)-Triazolate Metal-Organic Framework Previous Next List Reed, Douglas A.; Xiao, Dianne J.; ...

  19. The TITAN reversed-field-pinch fusion reactor study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    This paper on titan plasma engineering contains papers on the following topics: reversed-field pinch as a fusion reactor; parametric systems studies; magnetics; burning-plasma simulations; plasma transient operations; current drive; and physics issues for compact RFP reactors.

  20. Magnetic Vortex Core Reversal by Low-Field Excitations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    millitesla (mT) to reverse the direction of a vortex core. ... and their possible application to data storage technologies. ... Is there a physical limit to how far this process can go? At ...

  1. Effects of q -profile structures on intrinsic torque reversals...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Effects of q -profile structures on intrinsic torque reversals Authors: Lu, Z. X. ; Wang, W. X. ; Diamond, P. H. ; Tynan, G. ; Ethier, S. ; Chen, J. ; Gao, C. ; Rice, J. E. ...

  2. Reversible Magnesium Intercalation into a Layered Oxyfluoride Cathode -

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Joint Center for Energy Storage Research December 18, 2015, Research Highlights Reversible Magnesium Intercalation into a Layered Oxyfluoride Cathode Powder diffraction of oxyfluoridecathode with intercalated Mg and capacities of oxyfluorideand oxide cathodes Scientific Achievement Magnesium was reversibly intercalated at room temperature into an oxyfluoride cathode without the co-intercalation of electrolytes or protons and without the formation of unwanted side-products that commonly

  3. Preparation, characterization and photocatalytic activity of visible-light-driven plasmonic Ag/AgBr/ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanocomposites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Xiaojuan Tang, Duanlian; Tang, Fan; Zhu, Yunyan; He, Changfa; Liu, Minghua Lin, Chunxiang; Liu, Yifan

    2014-08-15

    Highlights: A plasmonic Ag/AgBr/ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} photocatalyst has been successfully synthesized. Ag/AgBr/ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanocomposites exhibit high visible light photocatalytic activity. Ag/AgBr/ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} photocatalyst is stable and magnetically separable. - Abstract: A visible-light-driven plasmonic Ag/AgBr/ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanocomposite has been successfully synthesized via a depositionprecipitation and photoreduction through a novel one-pot process. X-ray diffraction spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and UVvis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy were employed to investigate the crystal structure, chemical composition, morphology, and optical properties of the as-prepared nanocomposites. The photocatalytic activities of the nanocomposites were evaluated by photodegradation of Rhodamine B (RhB) and phenol under visible light. The results demonstrated that the obtained Ag/AgBr/ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanocomposites exhibited higher photocatalytic activity as compared to pure ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}. In addition, the sample photoreduced for 20 min and calcined at 500 C achieved the highest photocatalytic activity. Furthermore, the Ag/AgBr/ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanocomposite has high stability under visible light irradiation and could be conveniently separated by using an external magnetic field.

  4. Electronic-to-vibrational energy transfer from Br* to CO2 and electronic-to-vibrational laser feasibility studies. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Katapski, S.M.

    1992-11-01

    The energy transfer mechanism from photo-excited bromine atoms (Br(2P sub 1/2)) to C02 is investigated in a pulsed fluorescence experiment. An excimer-pumped pulsed dye laser operating at 480 nm is used to photolyze molecular bromine, resulting in the creation of one excited state bromine atom, Br(2P sub 1/2), and one ground state atom, Br(2P sub 3/2). The electronically-excited bromine atoms (referred to as Br*) collide with and excite vibrational modes in the ground electronic state of CO2. Measurements are made of the Br* lifetimes and associated quenching processes, and the electronic-to-vibrational (E yields V) energy transfer rate from Br* to CO2. The feasibility of subsequent stimulated emission from the CO2 on the (101)-(100)(4.3 micron) transition is studied, and attempts are made to achieve lasing. Limitations of the experimental apparatus prevented achieving stimulated emission on the 4.3 micron transition. Recommendations are made for improvements in the analysis and apparatus for further research.... Bromine, Spin-orbit relaxation, Quenching, E-V energy transfer.

  5. Real-time sub- Å ngstrom imaging of reversible and irreversible...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Real-time sub- ngstrom imaging of reversible and irreversible conformations in rhodium catalysts and graphene Title: Real-time sub- ngstrom imaging of reversible and ...

  6. Theoretical investigation of structural properties of CuCl, CuBr and CuI compounds under hydrostatic pressure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Louhibi-Fasla, S.; Djabri, H. Rekab; Achour, H.; Kefif, K.

    2013-12-16

    We have applied a recent version of the full potential linear muffin-tin orbitals method (FPLMTO) to study the structural properties of copper halides CuX (X=Cl, Br, I) under high pressure using the generalized gradient approximation (GGA) for the exchange and correlation potential by Perdew et al. Results are given for lattice parameters, bulk modulus and its first derivatives in the wurtzite(B4), zinc-blende (B3), CsCl (B2), rock-salt (B1), and PbO (B10) structures. The results of these calculations are compared with the available theoretical and experimental data.

  7. Nanostructured Lanthanum Halides and CeBr3 for Nuclear Radiation and Detection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul Guss, Sanjoy Mukhopadhyay, Ron Guise, Ding Yuan

    2010-06-09

    Scintillator materials are used to detect, and in some cases identify, gamma rays. Higher performance scintillators are expensive, hard to manufacture, fragile, and sometimes require liquid nitrogen or cooling engines. But whereas lower-quality scintillators are cheap, easy to manufacture, and more rugged, their performance is lower. At issue: can the desirable qualities of high-and low-performance scintillators be combined to achieve better performance at lower cost? Preliminary experiments show that a LaF{sub 3}:Ce oleic acid-based nanocomposite exhibits a photopeak when exposed to {sup 137}Cs source gamma-radiation. The chemical synthesis of the cerium-doped lanthanum halide nanoparticles are scalable and large quantities of material can be produced at a time, unlike typical crystal growth processes such as the Bridgeman process. Using a polymer composite (Figure 1), produced by LANL, initial measurements of the unloaded and 8% LaF{sub 3}:Ce-loaded sample have been made using {sup 137}Cs sources. Figure 2 shows an energy spectrum acquired for CeF{sub 3}. The lighter plot is the measured polymer-only spectrum and the black plot is the spectrum from the nanocomposite scintillator. As the development of this material continues, the energy resolution is expected to improve and the photopeak-to-Compton ratio will become greater at higher loadings. These measurements show the expected Compton edge in the polymer-only sample, and the Compton edge and photo-peak expected in the nanophosphor composites that LANL has produced. Using a porous VYCORR with CdSe/ZnS core shell quantum dots, Letant has demonstrated that he has obtained signatures of the 241Am photopeak with energy resolution as good at NaI (Figure 3). We begin with the fact that CeBr{sub 3} crystals do not have a self-activity component as strong as the lanthanum halides. The radioactive 0.090% {sup 138}La component of lanthanum leads to significant self-activity, which will be a problem for very large

  8. Lower hybrid accessibility in a large, hot reversed field pinch

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dziubek, R.A.; Harvey, R.W.; Hokin, S.A.; Uchimoto, E.

    1995-11-01

    Accessibility and damping of the slow wave in a reversed field pinch (RFP) plasma is investigated theoretically, using projected Reversed Field Experiment (RFX) plasma parameters. By numerically solving the hot plasma dispersion relation, regions of propagation are found and the possibility of mode conversion is analyzed. If the parallel index of refraction of the wave is chosen judiciously at the edge of the plasma, the slow wave is accessible to a target region located just inside the reversal surface without mode conversion. Landau damping is also optimized in this region. A representative fast electron population is then added in order to determine its effect on accessibility and damping. The presence of these electrons, whose parameters were estimated by extrapolation of Madison Symmetric Torus (MST) data, does not affect the accessibility of the wave. However, the initial phase velocity of the wave needs to be increased somewhat in order to maintain optimal damping in the target zone.

  9. Implications of Scheduled ITC Reversion for RPS Compliance: Preliminary Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lowder, Travis; Miller, John; O'Shaughnessy, Eric; Heeter, Jenny

    2015-09-14

    This poster presents DRAFT initial results of a forthcoming NREL analysis. The analysis investigates the impacts of the scheduled investment tax credit (ITC) reversion from 30 percent to 10 percent for certain solar photovoltaic projects. Specifically, it considers whether the reversion will result in increased use of alternative compliance payments (ACPs) in lieu of solar renewable energy credits (SRECs) for renewable portfolio standard (RPS) compliance. The analysis models the effect of a 10 percent ITC on power purchase agreement (PPA) prices for non-residential systems in the eight states with solar carve-outs and solar ACPs. Our preliminary results suggest that states will likely install sufficient capacity to meet long-term targets through SRECs rather than ACPs following the ITC reversion. However, the analysis shows that the ITC reversion could affect project economics such that capacity shortfalls in certain states could temporarily increase the use of ACPs. NREL anticipates publishing a full report of this analysis in fall 2015. credits (SRECs) for renewable portfolio standard (RPS) compliance. The analysis models the effect of a 10 percent ITC on power purchase agreement (PPA) prices for non-residential systems in the eight states with solar carve-outs and solar ACPs. Our preliminary results suggest that states will likely install sufficient capacity to meet long-term targets through SRECs rather than ACPs following the ITC reversion. However, the analysis shows that the ITC reversion could affect project economics such that capacity shortfalls in certain states could temporarily increase the use of ACPs. NREL anticipates publishing a full report of this analysis in fall 2015.

  10. Impact of membrane characteristics on the performance and cycling of the Br-2-H-2 redox flow cell

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tucker, MC; Cho, KT; Spingler, FB; Weber, AZ; Lin, GY

    2015-06-15

    The Br-2/H-2 redox flow cell shows promise as a high-power, low-cost energy storage device. In this paper, the effect of various aspects of material selection and processing of proton exchange membranes on the operation of the Br-2/H-2 redox flow cell is determined. Membrane properties have a significant impact on the performance and efficiency of the system. In particular, there is a tradeoff between conductivity and crossover, where conductivity limits system efficiency at high current density and crossover limits efficiency at low current density. The impact of thickness, pretreatment procedure, swelling state during cell assembly, equivalent weight, membrane reinforcement, and addition of a microporous separator layer on this tradeoff is assessed. NR212 (50 mu m) pretreated by soaking in 70 degrees C water is found to be optimal for the studied operating conditions. For this case, an energy efficiency of greater than 75% is achieved for current density up to 400 mA cm(-2), with a maximum obtainable energy efficiency of 88%. A cell with this membrane was cycled continuously for 3164 h. Membrane transport properties, including conductivity and bromine and water crossover, were found to decrease moderately upon cycling but remained higher than those for the as-received membrane. (C) 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Preliminary design report: Babcock and Wilcox BR-100 100-ton rail/barge spent fuel shipping cask

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1990-02-01

    The purpose of this document is to provide information on burnup credit as applied to the preliminary design of the BR-100 shipping cask. There is a brief description of the preliminary basket design and the features used to maintain a critically safe system. Following the basket description is a discussion of various criticality analyses used to evaluate burnup credit. The results from these analyses are then reviewed in the perspective of fuel burnups expected to be shipped to either the final repository or a Monitored Retrievable Storage (MRS) facility. The hurdles to employing burnup credit in the certification of any cask are then outlines and reviewed. the last section gives conclusions reached as to burnup credit for the BR-100 cask, based on our analyses and experience. All information in this study refers to the cask configured to transport PWR fuel. Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) fuel satisfies the criticality requirements so that burnup credit is not needed. All calculations generated in the preparation of this report were based upon the preliminary design which will be optimized during the final design. 8 refs., 19 figs., 16 tabs.

  12. Magnetic Vortex Core Reversal by Low-Field Excitations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Magnetic Vortex Core Reversal by Low-Field Excitations Magnetic Vortex Core Reversal by Low-Field Excitations Print Wednesday, 28 March 2007 00:00 In micrometer-sized magnetic thin films, the magnetization typically adopts an in-plane, circular configuration known as a magnetic vortex. At the vortex core, the magnetization turns sharply out of the plane, pointing either up or down. Magnetic data storage based on this binary phenomenon is an intriguing concept, but it would require the ability to

  13. Energy current imaging method for time reversal in elastic media

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, Brian E; Ulrich, Timothy J; Le Bas, Pierre - Yves A; Larmat, Carene; Johnson, Paul A; Guyer, Robert A; Griffa, Michele

    2009-01-01

    An energy current imaging method is presented for use in locating sources of wave energy during the back propagation stage of the time reversal process. During the back propagation phase of an ideal time reversal experiment, wave energy coalesces from all angles of incidence to recreate the source event; after the recreation, wave energy diverges in every direction. An energy current imaging method based on this convergence/divergence behavior has been developed. The energy current imaging method yields a smaller spatial distribution for source reconstruction than is possible with traditional energy imaging methods.

  14. In-situ Characterization of Highly Reversible Phase Transformation by

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Synchrotron X-ray Laue Microdiffraction In-situ Characterization of Highly Reversible Phase Transformation by Synchrotron X-ray Laue Microdiffraction In-situ Characterization of Highly Reversible Phase Transformation by Synchrotron X-ray Laue Microdiffraction Print Monday, 23 May 2016 09:50 In situ measurement of the orientation matrices for the austenite and martensite phases of the alloy Cu25Au30Zn45 across the interface was performed by synchrotron x-ray Laue microdiffraction at the ALS.

  15. Modified polynomial function model for reversed field pinches

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shen, W.; Sprott, J.C.

    1990-11-01

    A generalized analytic representation for the magnetic field and current density profiles in a reversed field pinch is proposed. These profiles have zero current density at the wall and finite plasma pressure. The profiles are characterized by two free parameters here taken to be the field reversal parameter (F) and pinch parameter ({Theta}). From the profiles, many useful quantities such as magnetic energy, beta, inductane, resistance and ohmic input power are calculated. These quantities provide a basis for analyzing experimental data and performing electrical circuit modeling of RFP discharges. 19 refs., 9 figs.

  16. E-print Network : Main View : Search Results for Title: "Reversible...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Reversible control of spin-polarized supercurrents in ferromagnetic Josephson junctions" Author: Banerjee AND Robinson...

  17. Dissociative adsorption of CH{sub 3}X (X = Br and Cl) on a silicon(100) surface revisited by density functional theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Chen-Guang; Huang, Kai E-mail: wji@ruc.edu.cn; Ji, Wei E-mail: wji@ruc.edu.cn

    2014-11-07

    During the dissociative adsorption on a solid surface, the substrate usually participates in a passive manner to accommodate fragments produced upon the cleavage of the internal bond(s) of a (transient) molecular adsorbate. This simple picture, however, neglects the flexibility of surface atoms. Here, we report a Density Functional Theory study to revisit our early studies of the dissociative adsorption of CH{sub 3}X (X = Br and Cl) on Si(100). We have identified a new reaction pathway, which involves a flip of a silicon dimer; this new pathway agrees better with experiments. For our main exemplar of CH{sub 3}Br, insights have been gained using a simple model that involves a three-atom reactive center, Br-C-Si. When the silicon dimer flips, the interaction between C and Si in the Br-C-Si center is enhanced, evident in the increased energy-split of the frontier orbitals. We also examine how the dissociation dynamics of CH{sub 3}Br is altered on a heterodimer (Si-Al, Si-P, and Si-Ge) in a Si(100) surface. In each case, we conclude, on the basis of computed reaction pathways, that no heterodimer flipping is involved before the system transverses the transition state to dissociative adsorption.

  18. Reversing-counterpulse repetitive-pulse inductive storage circuit

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Honig, E.M.

    1987-02-10

    A high-power reversing-counterpulse repetitive-pulse inductive storage and transfer circuit includes an opening switch, a main energy storage coil, a counterpulse capacitor and a small inductor. After counterpulsing the opening switch off, the counterpulse capacitor is recharged by the main energy storage coil before the load pulse is initiated. This gives the counterpulse capacitor sufficient energy for the next counterpulse operation, although the polarity of the capacitor's voltage must be reversed before that can occur. By using a current-zero switch as the counterpulse start switch, the capacitor is disconnected from the circuit (with a full charge) when the load pulse is initiated, preventing the capacitor from depleting its energy store by discharging through the load. After the load pulse is terminated by reclosing the main opening switch, the polarity of the counterpulse capacitor voltage is reversed by discharging the capacitor through a small inductor and interrupting the discharge current oscillation at zero current and peak reversed voltage. The circuit enables high-power, high-repetition-rate operation with reusable switches and features total control (pulse-to-pulse) over output pulse initiation, duration, repetition rate, and, to some extent, risetime. 10 figs.

  19. Rotational stability of a long field-reversed configuration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnes, D. C. Steinhauer, L. C.

    2014-02-15

    Rotationally driven modes of long systems with dominantly axial magnetic field are considered. We apply the incompressible model and order axial wavenumber small. A recently developed gyro-viscous model is incorporated. A one-dimensional equilibrium is assumed, but radial profiles are arbitrary. The dominant toroidal (azimuthal) mode numbers ℓ=1 and ℓ=2 modes are examined for a variety of non-reversed (B) and reversed profiles. Previous results for both systems with rigid rotor equilibria are reproduced. New results are obtained by incorporation of finite axial wavenumber and by relaxing the assumption of rigid electron and ion rotation. It is shown that the frequently troublesome ℓ=2 field reversed configuration (FRC) mode is not strongly affected by ion kinetic effects (in contrast to non-reversed cases) and is likely stabilized experimentally only by finite length effects. It is also shown that the ℓ=1 wobble mode has a complicated behavior and is affected by a variety of configuration and profile effects. The rotationally driven ℓ=1 wobble is completely stabilized by strong rotational shear, which is anticipated to be active in high performance FRC experiments. Thus, observed wobble modes in these systems are likely not driven by rotation alone.

  20. Simulation studies of nucleation of ferroelectric polarization reversal.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brennecka, Geoffrey L.; Winchester, Benjamin Michael

    2014-08-01

    Electric field-induced reversal of spontaneous polarization is the defining characteristic of a ferroelectric material, but the process(es) and mechanism(s) associated with the initial nucleation of reverse-polarity domains are poorly understood. This report describes studies carried out using phase field modeling of LiTaO3, a relatively simple prototype ferroelectric material, in order to explore the effects of either mechanical deformation or optically-induced free charges on nucleation and resulting domain configuration during field-induced polarization reversal. Conditions were selected to approximate as closely as feasible those of accompanying experimental work in order to provide not only support for the experimental work but also ensure that additional experimental validation of the simulations could be carried out in the future. Phase field simulations strongly support surface mechanical damage/deformation as effective for dramatically reducing the overall coercive field (Ec) via local field enhancements. Further, optically-nucleated polarization reversal appears to occur via stabilization of latent nuclei via the charge screening effects of free charges.

  1. Reversing-counterpulse repetitive-pulse inductive storage circuit

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Honig, Emanuel M.

    1987-01-01

    A high-power reversing-counterpulse repetitive-pulse inductive storage and transfer circuit includes an opening switch, a main energy storage coil, a counterpulse capacitor and a small inductor. After counterpulsing the opening switch off, the counterpulse capacitor is recharged by the main energy storage coil before the load pulse is initiated. This gives the counterpulse capacitor sufficient energy for the next counterpulse operation, although the polarity of the capacitor's voltage must be reversed before that can occur. By using a current-zero switch as the counterpulse start switch, the capacitor is disconnected from the circuit (with a full charge) when the load pulse is initiated, preventing the capacitor from depleting its energy store by discharging through the load. After the load pulse is terminated by reclosing the main opening switch, the polarity of the counterpulse capacitor voltage is reversed by discharging the capacitor through a small inductor and interrupting the discharge current oscillation at zero current and peak reversed voltage. The circuit enables high-power, high-repetition-rate operation with reusable switches and features total control (pulse-to-pulse) over output pulse initiation, duration, repetition rate, and, to some extent, risetime.

  2. Reversing-counterpulse repetitive-pulse inductive storage circuit

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Honig, E.M.

    1984-06-05

    A high power reversing-counterpulse repetitive-pulse inductive storage and transfer circuit includes an opening switch, a main energy storage coil, a counterpulse capacitor and a small inductor. After counterpulsing the opening switch off, the counterpulse capacitor is recharged by the main energy storage coil before the load pulse is initiated. This gives the counterpulse capacitor sufficient energy for the next counterpulse operation, although the polarity of the capacitor's voltage must be reversed before that can occur. By using a current-zero switch as the counterpulse start switch, the capacitor is disconnected from the circuit (with a full charge) when the load pulse is initiated, preventing the capacitor from depleting its energy store by discharging through the load. After the load pulse is terminated by reclosing the main opening switch, the polarity of the counterpulse capacitor voltage is reversed by discharging the capacitor through a small inductor and interrupting the discharge current oscillation at zero current and peak reversed voltage. The circuit enables high-power, high-repetition-rate operation with reusable switches and features total control (pulse-to-pulse) over output pulse initiation, duration, repetition rate, and, to some extent, risetime.

  3. Single line reversing system capsular pneumatic freight pipelines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weaver, P.B.

    1999-07-01

    In the 1800's the first Pneumatic Tube Systems sent a carrier vertically from one floor to another in a hospital using a foot-powered bellows. The carrier was returned to the starting point down the same tube using gravity. This was the first Single Line Reversing system. As the stations were moved apart horizontally the foot-powered bellows at both ends became ineffective and were replaced with a single blower or exhauster. The blower/exhauster ran continuously therefore a second line for returning carriers to the starting point, had to be installed - hence Twin Line systems. These systems were used for transporting mail, paperwork, medications, steel mill samples, parts, tools, medical lab samples, etc., in hospitals, stores and other businesses. Twin Line systems were very popular until about 1970 at which time installation labor and material costs became expensive and controls were becoming unnecessarily complicated and expensive. These reasons plus new technology forced the return to Single Line Reversing technology. Back in the 1800's three ``people transporting'' subways were built. A fourth system was built under the Pentagon in the 1950's or 1960's. It is difficult to find information on this one. All are Single Line Reversing systems. The difference between a Single Line Reversing and a Twin Line system is exactly as the names imply. The principle of the operation of these systems is covered herein. The physics for these two kinds of systems is the same. The Single Line Reversing system is technically more complex but capital and operating expense is far less costly. These costs are discussed herein.

  4. Environmental effects on noble-gas hydrides: HXeBr, HXeCCH, and HXeH in noble-gas and molecular matrices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsuge, Masashi E-mail: leonid.khriachtchev@helsinki.fi; Lignell, Antti; Rsnen, Markku; Khriachtchev, Leonid E-mail: leonid.khriachtchev@helsinki.fi

    2013-11-28

    Noble-gas hydrides HNgY (Ng is a noble-gas atom and Y is an electronegative group) are sensitive probes of local environment due to their relatively weak bonding and large dipole moments. We experimentally studied HXeBr in Ar, Kr, and N{sub 2} matrices, HXeCCH in Ne and N{sub 2} matrices, and HXeH in an N{sub 2} matrix. These are the first observations of noble-gas hydrides in an N{sub 2} matrix. An N{sub 2} matrix strongly increases the HXe stretching frequency of HXeBr and HXeCCH with respect to a Ne matrix, which is presumably due to a strong interaction between the HNgY dipole moment and quadrupole moments of the surrounding lattice N{sub 2} molecules. The spectral shift of HXeBr in an N{sub 2} matrix is similar to that in a CO{sub 2} matrix, which is a rather unexpected result because the quadrupole moment of CO{sub 2} is about three times as large as that of N{sub 2}. The HXe stretching frequencies of HXeBr and HXeCCH in noble-gas matrices show a trend of ?(Ne) < ?(Xe) < ?(Kr) < ?(Ar), which is a non-monotonous function of the dielectric constants of the noble-gas solids. The MP2(full) calculations of HXeBr and HXeCCH with the polarizable continuum model as well as the CCSD(T) calculations of the HXeBrNg and HXeCCHNg (Ng = Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe) complexes cannot fully explain the experimental observations. It is concluded that more sophisticated computational models should be used to describe these experimental findings.

  5. Stabilized wide bandgap MAPbBrxI3-x perovskite by enhanced grain size and improved crystallinity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hu, Miao; Bi, Cheng; Yuan, Yongbo; Bai, Yang; Huang, Jinsong

    2015-12-07

    In this study, the light instability of CH3NH3PbIxBr3–x has been raised one of the biggest challenges for its application in tandem solar cells. Here we show that an improved crystallinity and grain size of CH3NH3PbIxBr3–x films could stabilize these materials under one sun illumination, improving both the efficiency and stability of the wide-bandgap perovskite solar cells.

  6. Low Surface Recombination Velocity in Solution-Grown CH3NH3PbBr3 Perovskite Single Crystal

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Yang, Ye; Yan, Yong; Yang, Mengjin; Choi, Sukgeun; Zhu, Kai; Luter, Joseph M.; Beard, Matthew C.

    2015-08-06

    Organic-inorganic hybrid perovskites are attracting intense research effort due to their impressive performance in solar cells. While the carrier transport parameters such as mobility and bulk carrier lifetime shows sufficient characteristics, the surface recombination, which can have major impact on the solar cell performance, has not been studied. Here we measure surface recombination dynamics in CH3NH3PbBr3 perovskite single crystals using broadband transient reflectance spectroscopy. The surface recombination velocity is found to be 3.4±0.1 103 cm s-1, B2–3 orders of magnitude lower than that in many important unpassivated semiconductors employed in solar cells. Our result suggests that the planar grain sizemore » for the perovskite thin films should be larger thanB30 mm to avoid the influence of surface recombination on the effective carrier lifetime.« less

  7. Forward and reverse control system for induction motors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wright, J.T.

    1987-09-15

    A control system for controlling the direction of rotation of a rotor of an induction motor includes an array of five triacs with one of the triacs applying a current of fixed phase to the windings of the rotor and four of the triacs being switchable to apply either hot ac current or return ac current to the stator windings so as to reverse the phase of current in the stator relative to that of the rotor and thereby reverse the direction of rotation of the rotor. Switching current phase in the stator is accomplished by operating the gates of pairs of the triacs so as to connect either hot ac current or return ac current to the input winding of the stator. 1 fig.

  8. Two-step polarization reversal in biased ferroelectrics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daniels, John E. Ukritnukun, Supphatuch; Glaum, Julia; Cozzan, Clayton; Tutuncu, Goknur; Dosch, Chris; Andrieux, Jerome; Jo, Wook; Jones, Jacob L.

    2014-06-14

    Polarization reversal in polycrystalline ferroelectrics is shown to occur via two distinct and sequential domain reorientation steps. This reorientation sequence, which cannot be readily discriminated in the overall sample polarization, is made apparent using time-resolved high-energy x-ray diffraction. Upon application of electric fields opposite to the initial poling direction, two unique and significantly different time constants are observed. The first (faster time constant) is shown to be derived by the release of a residual stress due to initial electrical biasing and the second (slower time constant) due to the redevelopment of residual stress during further domain wall motion. A modified domain reorientation model is given that accurately describes the domain volume fraction evolution during the reversal process.

  9. Treatment of produced waters by electrocoagulation and reverse osmosis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tuggle, K.; Humenick, M.; Barker, F.

    1992-08-01

    Two oil field produced waters and one coal bed methane produced water from Wyoming were treated with electrocoagulation and reverse osmosis. All three produced waters would require treatment to meet the new Wyoming Department of Environmental Quality requirements for effluent discharge into a class III or IV stream. The removal of radium 226 and oil and grease was the primary focus of the study. Radium 226 and oil and grease were removed from the produced waters with electrocoagulation. The best removal of radium 226 (>84%) was achieved with use of a non-sacrificial anode (titanium). The best removal of oil and grease (>93%) was achieved using a sacrificial anode (aluminum). By comparison, reverse osmosis removed up to 87% of the total dissolved solids and up to 95% of the radium 226.

  10. Fast chirality reversal of the magnetic vortex by electric current

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lim, W. L. Liu, R. H.; Urazhdin, S.; Tyliszczak, T.; Erokhin, S. G.; Berkov, D.

    2014-12-01

    The possibility of high-density information encoding in magnetic materials by topologically stable inhomogeneous magnetization configurations such as domain walls, skyrmions, and vortices has motivated intense research into mechanisms enabling their control and detection. While the uniform magnetization states can be efficiently controlled by electric current using magnetic multilayer structures, this approach has proven much more difficult to implement for inhomogeneous states. Here, we report direct observation of fast reversal of magnetic vortex by electric current in a simple planar structure based on a bilayer of spin Hall material Pt with a single microscopic ferromagnetic disk contacted by asymmetric electrodes. The reversal is enabled by a combination of the chiral Oersted field and spin current generated by the nonuniform current distribution in Pt. Our results provide a route for the efficient control of inhomogeneous magnetization configurations by electric current.

  11. Advanced Catalysts and MEAs for Reversible Alkaline Membrane Fuel Cells

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Catalysts and MEAs for Reversible Alkaline Membrane Fuel Cells Hui Xu (PI) Giner Inc Newton, MA This presentation does not contain any proprietary, confidential, or otherwise restricted information DOE Catalyst Work Group Meeting June 8, 2015 2 Barriers Addressed * Activity (catalyst; MEA) * Durability (catalyst; MEA) * Cost (catalyst; MEA) Technical Targets * Design and develop ORR/OER bi-functional oxide catalysts * Integrate ORR/OER bifunctional oxide catalysts and alkaline membranes to

  12. Magnetic Vortex Core Reversal by Low-Field Excitations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Magnetic Vortex Core Reversal by Low-Field Excitations Print In micrometer-sized magnetic thin films, the magnetization typically adopts an in-plane, circular configuration known as a magnetic vortex. At the vortex core, the magnetization turns sharply out of the plane, pointing either up or down. Magnetic data storage based on this binary phenomenon is an intriguing concept, but it would require the ability to flip the vortex cores on demand. Because these structures are highly stable, very

  13. Magnetic Vortex Core Reversal by Low-Field Excitations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Magnetic Vortex Core Reversal by Low-Field Excitations Print In micrometer-sized magnetic thin films, the magnetization typically adopts an in-plane, circular configuration known as a magnetic vortex. At the vortex core, the magnetization turns sharply out of the plane, pointing either up or down. Magnetic data storage based on this binary phenomenon is an intriguing concept, but it would require the ability to flip the vortex cores on demand. Because these structures are highly stable, very

  14. Magnetic Vortex Core Reversal by Low-Field Excitations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Magnetic Vortex Core Reversal by Low-Field Excitations Print In micrometer-sized magnetic thin films, the magnetization typically adopts an in-plane, circular configuration known as a magnetic vortex. At the vortex core, the magnetization turns sharply out of the plane, pointing either up or down. Magnetic data storage based on this binary phenomenon is an intriguing concept, but it would require the ability to flip the vortex cores on demand. Because these structures are highly stable, very

  15. Magnetic Vortex Core Reversal by Low-Field Excitations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Magnetic Vortex Core Reversal by Low-Field Excitations Print In micrometer-sized magnetic thin films, the magnetization typically adopts an in-plane, circular configuration known as a magnetic vortex. At the vortex core, the magnetization turns sharply out of the plane, pointing either up or down. Magnetic data storage based on this binary phenomenon is an intriguing concept, but it would require the ability to flip the vortex cores on demand. Because these structures are highly stable, very

  16. Magnetic Vortex Core Reversal by Low-Field Excitations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Magnetic Vortex Core Reversal by Low-Field Excitations Print In micrometer-sized magnetic thin films, the magnetization typically adopts an in-plane, circular configuration known as a magnetic vortex. At the vortex core, the magnetization turns sharply out of the plane, pointing either up or down. Magnetic data storage based on this binary phenomenon is an intriguing concept, but it would require the ability to flip the vortex cores on demand. Because these structures are highly stable, very

  17. Reversible and irreversible ion migration processes in lead halide

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    perovskites for photovoltaics | MIT-Harvard Center for Excitonics Reversible and irreversible ion migration processes in lead halide perovskites for photovoltaics March 9, 2016 at 4:30 PM/36-462 Eric Hoke Stanford University, Draper Laboratory hoke-eric Lead hybrid perovskites are a promising family of photovoltaic absorber materials that have achieved power conversion efficiencies of over 20%. Lead halide perovskites are ionic materials with a low lattice energy which are unusual properties

  18. Understanding the Initial Stages of Reversible Mg Deposition and Stripping

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in Inorganic Nonaqueous Electrolytes - Joint Center for Energy Storage Research April 8, 2015, Research Highlights Understanding the Initial Stages of Reversible Mg Deposition and Stripping in Inorganic Nonaqueous Electrolytes MgCl+ Desolvation Diagram Scientific Achievement The chemical species at the Mg-anode surface in the presence of Magnesium Aluminum-Chloro complex (MACC) electrolyte were identified. While solvent molecules (THF and DME) are loosely bound at the Mg(0001) surface, the

  19. Progress on the Development of Reversible SOFC Stack Technology

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    the Development of Reversible SOFC Stack Technology Presented by: Casey Brown 19 April 2011 Copyright © 2011 Versa Power Systems - All Rights Reserved Versa Power Systems * Versa Power Systems is a developer of planar solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) * Privately held company headquartered in Littleton, Colorado, United States * SOFC development facility in Calgary, Alberta, Canada * Activities in both stationary and mobile SOFC development Copyright © 2011 Versa Power Systems - All Rights

  20. Magnetic Vortex Core Reversal by Low-Field Excitations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Magnetic Vortex Core Reversal by Low-Field Excitations Print In micrometer-sized magnetic thin films, the magnetization typically adopts an in-plane, circular configuration known as a magnetic vortex. At the vortex core, the magnetization turns sharply out of the plane, pointing either up or down. Magnetic data storage based on this binary phenomenon is an intriguing concept, but it would require the ability to flip the vortex cores on demand. Because these structures are highly stable, very

  1. Magnetic Vortex Core Reversal by Low-Field Excitations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Magnetic Vortex Core Reversal by Low-Field Excitations Print In micrometer-sized magnetic thin films, the magnetization typically adopts an in-plane, circular configuration known as a magnetic vortex. At the vortex core, the magnetization turns sharply out of the plane, pointing either up or down. Magnetic data storage based on this binary phenomenon is an intriguing concept, but it would require the ability to flip the vortex cores on demand. Because these structures are highly stable, very

  2. Reversible geling co-polymer and method of making

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gutowska, Anna

    2005-12-27

    The present invention is a thereapeutic agent carrier having a thermally reversible gel or geling copolymer that is a linear random copolymer of an [meth-]acrylamide derivative and a hydrophilic comonomer, wherein the linear random copolymer is in the form of a plurality of linear chains having a plurality of molecular weights greater than or equal to a minimum geling molecular weight cutoff and a therapeutic agent.

  3. Corrosion/erosion pipe inspection using reverse geometry radiography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Albert, R.D.

    1996-07-01

    Measurement of corrosion in piping was studied using the Digiray Reverse Geometry X-ray{reg_sign} (RGX{reg_sign}) imaging system during a series of field tests. Sponsored by Shell, Exxon and Mobil oil companies, these were recently carried out at the Shell Martinez refinery facility. Results of the field tests as well as other RGX radiographs taken in the laboratory by Digiray will be described in this report.

  4. Cooling by Time Reversal of Atomic Matter Waves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin, J.; Georgeot, B.; Shepelyansky, D. L. [Laboratoire de Physique Theorique, Universite de Toulouse III, CNRS, 31062 Toulouse (France)

    2008-02-01

    We propose an experimental scheme which allows us to realized approximate time reversal of matter waves for ultracold atoms in the regime of quantum chaos. We show that a significant fraction of the atoms return back to their original state, being at the same time cooled down by several orders of magnitude. We give a theoretical description of this effect supported by extensive numerical simulations. The proposed scheme can be implemented with existing experimental setups.

  5. Dynamic processes in field-reversed-configuration compact toroids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rej, D.J.

    1987-01-01

    In this lecture, the dynamic processes involved in field-reversed configuration (FRC) formation, translation, and compression will be reviewed. Though the FRC is related to the field-reversed mirror concept, the formation method used in most experiments is a variant of the field-reversed THETA-pinch. Formation of the FRC eqilibrium occurs rapidly, usually in less than 20 ..mu..s. The formation sequence consists of several coupled processes: preionization; radial implosion and compression; magnetic field line closure; axial contraction; equilibrium formation. Recent experiments and theory have led to a significantly improved understanding of these processes; however, the experimental method still relies on a somewhat empirical approach which involves the optimization of initial preionization plasma parameters and symmetry. New improvements in FRC formation methods include the use of lower voltages which extrapolate better to larger devices. The axial translation of compact toroid plasmas offers an attractive engineering convenience in a fusion reactor. FRC translation has been demonstrated in several experiments worldwide, and these plasmas are found to be robust, moving at speeds up to the Alfven velocity over distances of up to 16 m, with no degradation in the confinement. Compact toroids are ideal for magnetic compression. Translated FRCs have been compressed and heated by imploding liners. Upcoming experiments will rely on external flux compression to heat a translater FRC at 1-GW power levels. 39 refs.

  6. CROSSED MOLECULAR BEAM STUDIES OF CHEMILUMINESCENT REACTIONS: F{sub 2} + I{sub 2}, Br{sub 2} and ICl

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kahler, C.C.; Lee, Y.T.

    1980-05-01

    The chemiluminescent bimolecular halogen-halogen reactions, F{sub 2} + I{sub 2}, Br{sub 2} and ICl, have been studied by the crossed molecular beam technique. Undispersed chemiluminescence was measured as a function of collision energy and, for I{sub 2} + F{sub 2}, as a function of the two beam pressures. Although no spectra were obtained to positively identify the emitters as IF*, ClF* and BrF*, arguments are given to support this identification. The observed reaction thresholds of 4.2 and 5.9 kcal/mole for I{sub 2} + F{sub 2} and ICl + F{sub 2} , respectively, are the same as the threshold energies for production of the stable trihalogens I{sub 2}F and ClF. This coincidence of threshold energies, as well as similar high collision energy behavior, implies that the chemiluminescent reaction proceeds via a stable trihalogen intermediate. This mechanism can explain our results and the results of other workers without resorting to a symmetry forbidden four center reaction mechanism. A threshold of 11.3 kcal/mole was found for Br{sub 2} + F{sub 2} , no threshold for Br{sub 2}F has been previously reported. Laser enhancement of the I{sub 2} + F{sub 2} reaction was attempted, but no enhancement was seen.

  7. A Reversible Structural Phase Transition in ZnV2O6 at High Pressures...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    A Reversible Structural Phase Transition in ZnV2O6 at High Pressures Citation Details In-Document Search Title: A Reversible Structural Phase Transition in ZnV2O6 at High Pressures ...

  8. Flow reversal power limit for the HFBR (Technical Report) | SciTech...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Flow reversal power limit for the HFBR Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Flow reversal power limit for the HFBR You are accessing a document from the Department of ...

  9. Reversible Acid Gas Capture Using CO2-Binding Organic Liquids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heldebrant, David J.; Koech, Phillip K.; Yonker, Clement R.; Rainbolt, James E.; Zheng, Feng

    2010-08-31

    Acid gas scrubbing technology is predominantly aqueous alkanolamine based. Of the acid gases, CO2, H2S and SO2 have been shown to be reversible, however there are serious disadvantages with corrosion and high regeneration costs. The primary scrubbing system composed of monoethanolamine is limited to 30% by weight because of the highly corrosive solution. This gravimetric limitation limits the CO2 volumetric (?108 g/L) and gravimetric capacity (?7 wt%) of the system. Furthermore the scrubbing system has a large energy penalty from pumping and heating the excess water required to dissolve the MEA bicarbonate salt. Considering the high specific heat of water (4 j/g-1K-1), low capacities and the high corrosion we set out to design a fully organic solvent that can chemically bind all acid gases i.e. CO2 as reversible alkylcarbonate ionic liquids or analogues thereof. Having a liquid acid gas carrier improves process economics because there is no need for excess solvent to pump and to heat. We have demonstrated illustrated in Figure 1, that CO2-binding organic liquids (CO2BOLs) have a high CO2 solubility paired with a much lower specific heat (<1.5 J/g-1K-1) than aqueous systems. CO2BOLs are a subsection of a larger class of materials known as Binding Organic Liquids (BOLs). Our BOLs have been shown to reversibly bind and release COS, CS2, and SO2, which we denote COSBOLS, CS2BOLs and SO2BOLs. Our BOLs are highly tunable and can be designed for post or pre-combustion gas capture. The design and testing of the next generation zwitterionic CO2BOLs and SO2BOLs are presented.

  10. Reversible Bending Fatigue Testing on Zry-4 Surrogate Rods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Jy-An John; Wang, Hong; Bevard, Bruce Balkcom; Howard, Rob L

    2014-01-01

    Testing high-burnup spent nuclear fuel (SNF) presents many challenges in areas such as specimen preparation, specimen installation, mechanical loading, load control, measurements, data acquisition, and specimen disposal because these tasks are complicated by the radioactivity of the test specimens. Research and comparison studies conducted at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) resulted in a new concept in 2010 for a U-frame testing setup on which to perform hot-cell reversible bending fatigue testing. Subsequently, the three-dimensional finite element analysis and the engineering design of components were completed. In 2013 the ORNL team finalized the upgrade of the U-frame testing setup and the integration of the U-frame setup into a Bose dual linear motor test bench to develop a cyclic integrated reversible-bending fatigue tester (CIRFT). A final check was conducted on the CIRFT test system in August 2013, and the CIRFT was installed in the hot cell in September 2013 to evaluate both the static and dynamic mechanical response of SNF rods under simulated loads. The fatigue responses of Zircaloy-4 (Zry-4) cladding and the role of pellet pellet and pellet clad interactions are critical to SNF vibration integrity, but such data are not available due to the unavailability of an effective testing system. While the deployment of the developed CIRFT test system in a hot cell will provide the opportunity to generate the data, the use of a surrogate rod has proven quite effective in identifying the underlying deformation mechanism of an SNF composite rod under an equivalent loading condition. This paper presents the experimental results of using surrogate rods under CIRFT reversible cyclic loading. Specifically, monotonic and cyclic bending tests were conducted on surrogate rods made of a Zry-4 tube and alumina pellet inserts, both with and without an epoxy bond.

  11. Error-field penetration in reversed magnetic shear configurations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, H. H.; Wang, Z. X.; Wang, X. Q. [MOE Key Laboratory of Materials Modification by Beams of the Ministry of Education, School of Physics and Optoelectronic Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China)] [MOE Key Laboratory of Materials Modification by Beams of the Ministry of Education, School of Physics and Optoelectronic Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Wang, X. G. [School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)] [School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2013-06-15

    Error-field penetration in reversed magnetic shear (RMS) configurations is numerically investigated by using a two-dimensional resistive magnetohydrodynamic model in slab geometry. To explore different dynamic processes in locked modes, three equilibrium states are adopted. Stable, marginal, and unstable current profiles for double tearing modes are designed by varying the current intensity between two resonant surfaces separated by a certain distance. Further, the dynamic characteristics of locked modes in the three RMS states are identified, and the relevant physics mechanisms are elucidated. The scaling behavior of critical perturbation value with initial plasma velocity is numerically obtained, which obeys previously established relevant analytical theory in the viscoresistive regime.

  12. Overview of results from the MST reversed field pinch experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    38 Please note that terms and conditions apply. Overview of results from the MST reversed field pinch experiment View the table of contents for this issue, or go to the journal homepage for more 2015 Nucl. Fusion 55 104006 (http://iopscience.iop.org/0029-5515/55/10/104006) Home Search Collections Journals About Contact us My IOPscience | International Atomic Energy Agency Nuclear Fusion Nucl. Fusion 55 (2015) 104006 (8pp) doi:10.1088/0029-5515/55/10/104006 Overview of results from the MST

  13. New Limit on Time-Reversal Violation in Beta Decay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mumm, H. P.; Chupp, T. E.; Cooper, R. L.; Coulter, K. P.; Freedman, S. J.; Fujikawa, B. K.; Garcia, A.; Jones, G. L.; Nico, J. S.; Thompson, A. K.; Trull, C. A.; Wietfeldt, F. E.; Wilkerson, J. F.

    2011-09-02

    We report the results of an improved determination of the triple correlation DP{center_dot}(p{sub e}xp{sub v}) that can be used to limit possible time-reversal invariance in the beta decay of polarized neutrons and constrain extensions to the standard model. Our result is D=[-0.96{+-}1.89(stat){+-}1.01(sys)]x10{sup -4}. The corresponding phase between g{sub A} and g{sub V} is {phi}{sub AV}=180.013 deg. {+-}0.028 deg. (68% confidence level). This result represents the most sensitive measurement of D in nuclear {beta} decay.

  14. Perturbative transport studies in the reversed-field pinch

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Perturbative transport studies in the reversed-field pinch This article has been downloaded from IOPscience. Please scroll down to see the full text article. 2005 Nucl. Fusion 45 1342 (http://iopscience.iop.org/0029-5515/45/11/015) Download details: IP Address: 128.104.166.233 The article was downloaded on 11/10/2010 at 22:09 Please note that terms and conditions apply. View the table of contents for this issue, or go to the journal homepage for more Home Search Collections Journals About

  15. Synthesis and magnetic reversal of bi-conical Ni nanostructures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biziere, N.; Lassalle Ballier, R.; Viret, M.

    2011-09-15

    Template synthesis in polyethylene terephthalate (PET) membranes has been used to grow hour glass shaped nickel nanowires with a constriction in the range of tens of nanometers at the center. Anisotropic magnetoresistance measurements have been performed on a single nanowire to follow magnetization reversal of the structure. The results are explained via 3D micromagnetic simulations showing the appearance of a complex vortex state close to the constriction whose propagation depends on the angle between the cone axis and the applied field. The interest of this original growth process for spintronics is discussed.

  16. Time reversal invariance - a test in free neutron decay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lising, Laura J.

    1999-05-18

    Time reversal invariance violation plays only a small role in the Standard Model, and the existence of a T-violating effect above the predicted level would be an indication of new physics. A sensitive probe of this symmetry in the weak interaction is the measurement of the T-violating ''D''-correlation in the decay of free neutrons. The triple-correlation D{sigma}{sub n}{center_dot}p{sub e} x p{sub v} involves three kinematic variables, the neutron spin, electron momentu, and neutrino (or proton) momentum, and changes sign under time reversal. This experiment detects the decay products of a polarized cold neutron beam with an octagonal array of scintillation and solid-state detectors. Data from first run at NIST's Cold Neutron Research Facility give a D-coefficient of -0.1 {+-} 1.3(stat.) {+-} 0.7(syst) x 10{sup -3}. This measurement has the greatest bearing on extensions to the Standard model that incorporate leptoquarks, although exotic fermion and lift-right symmetric models also allow a D as large as the present limit.

  17. Reverse licensing: international technology transfer to the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharokhi, M.

    1985-01-01

    This dissertation, theoretically and empirically, focuses on US licensees as the recipient of foreign technology, and investigates characteristics of licensees, licenses, and licensed technology. The viability of reverse licensing, as an international growth strategy, is evaluated from the standpoint of two groups of firms. The first consists of thousands of small and medium sized US manufacturing firms, with few products and virtually no R and D expenditures. Without R and D, new technology and stiff international competition, they are forced into bankruptcies despite their extreme importance in the economy (48% of private workforce, 42% of sales, and 38% of GNP). The second group consists of thousands of small and medium sized firms overseas, with a relatively good supply of technology (i.e., patents) and anxious to exploit the US market but lack required resources for FDI. Technology licensing is, perhaps, the only viable option available to them. Reverse licensing provides both groups with a mechanism for their growth, survival, and prosperity. Many US firms have utilized this strategy for many years (i.e, 118 in Ohio) for tapping foreign sources including Soviet bloc technology.

  18. Semi-Implicit Reversible Algorithms for Rigid Body Rotational Dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nukala, Phani K; Shelton Jr, William Allison

    2006-09-01

    This paper presents two semi-implicit algorithms based on splitting methodology for rigid body rotational dynamics. The first algorithm is a variation of partitioned Runge-Kutta (PRK) methodology that can be formulated as a splitting method. The second algorithm is akin to a multiple time stepping scheme and is based on modified Crouch-Grossman (MCG) methodology, which can also be expressed as a splitting algorithm. These algorithms are second-order accurate and time-reversible; however, they are not Poisson integrators, i.e., non-symplectic. These algorithms conserve some of the first integrals of motion, but some others are not conserved; however, the fluctuations in these invariants are bounded over exponentially long time intervals. These algorithms exhibit excellent long-term behavior because of their reversibility property and their (approximate) Poisson structure preserving property. The numerical results indicate that the proposed algorithms exhibit superior performance compared to some of the currently well known algorithms such as the Simo-Wong algorithm, Newmark algorithm, discrete Moser-Veselov algorithm, Lewis-Simo algorithm, and the LIEMID[EA] algorithm.

  19. Dual capacity compressor with reversible motor and controls arrangement therefor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sisk, Francis J.

    1980-12-02

    A hermetic reciprocating compressor such as may be used in heat pump applications is provided for dual capacity operation by providing the crankpin of the crankshaft with an eccentric ring rotatably mounted thereon, and with the end of the connecting rod opposite the piston encompassing the outer circumference of the eccentric ring, with means limiting the rotation of the eccentric ring upon the crankpin between one end point and an opposite angularly displaced end point to provide different values of eccentricity depending upon which end point the eccentric ring is rotated to upon the crankpin, and a reversible motor in the hermetic shell of the compressor for rotating the crankshaft, the motor operating in one direction effecting the angular displacement of the eccentric ring relative to the crankpin to the one end point, and in the opposite direction effecting the angular displacement of the eccentric ring relative to the crankpin to the opposite end point, this arrangement automatically giving different stroke lengths depending upon the direction of motor rotation. The mechanical structure of the arrangement may take various forms including at least one in which any impact of reversal is reduced by utilizing lubricant passages and chambers at the interface area of the crankpin and eccentric ring to provide a dashpot effect. In the main intended application of the arrangement according to the invention, that is, in a refrigerating or air conditioning system, it is desirable to insure a delay during reversal of the direction of compressor operation. A control arrangement is provided in which the control system controls the direction of motor operation in accordance with temperature conditions, the system including control means for effecting operation in a low capacity direction or alternatively in a high capacity direction in response to one set, and another set, respectively, of temperature conditions and with timer means delaying a restart of the compressor

  20. Magnetic excitations in the spin-1/2 triangular-lattice antiferromagnet Cs2CuBr4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zvyagin, S. A.; Ozerov, M.; Kamenskyi, D.; Wosnitza, J.; Krzystek, J.; Yoshizawa, D.; Hagiwara, M.; Hu, Rongwei; Ryu, Hyejin; Petrovic, C.; Zhitomirsky, M. E.

    2015-11-27

    We present on high- field electron spin resonance (ESR) studies of magnetic excitations in the spin- 1/2 triangular-lattice antiferromagnet Cs2CuBr4. Frequency- field diagrams of ESR excitations are measured for different orientations of magnetic fields up to 25 T. We show that the substantial zero- field energy gap, Δ ≈ 9.5 K, observed in the low-temperature excitation spectrum of Cs2CuBr4 [Zvyagin et al:, Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 077206 (2014)], is present well above TN. Noticeably, the transition into the long-range magnetically ordered phase does not significantly affect the size of the gap, suggesting that even below TN the high-energy spin dynamics in Cs2CuBr4 is determined by short-range-order spin correlations. The experimental data are compared with results of model spin-wave-theory calculations for spin-1/2 triangle-lattice antiferromagnet.

  1. Communication: Transfer ionization in a thermal reaction of a cation and anion: Ar{sup +} with Br{sup −} and I{sup −}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shuman, Nicholas S.; Miller, Thomas M.; Viggiano, Albert A.; Johnsen, Rainer

    2013-11-07

    We present experimental evidence that reactions of argon cations Ar{sup +} with the halogen anions Br{sup −} and I{sup −} do not occur exclusively by mutual neutralization, but also produce the cations Br{sup +} or I{sup +} ions by transfer ionization (TI). The experiments were carried out in flowing-afterglow plasmas at gas temperatures between and 300 and 500 K, and employed a variant of the Variable Electron and Neutral Density Attachment Mass Spectrometry method. The measured TI rate coefficients are 1.9 ± 0.6 × 10{sup −9} cm{sup 3} s{sup −1} and 1.1 ± {sub 0.3}{sup 0.8}× 10{sup −9} cm{sup 3} s{sup −1} for the Br{sup −} and I{sup −} reactions, respectively. We find that the TI rate coefficients decline with temperature as T{sup −0.5} to T{sup −1}. No indication of TI was found in the reaction with Cl{sup −}, where it is endoergic.

  2. Spectroscopic Evidence for a High-Spin Br-Fe(IV)-Oxo Intermediate in the alpha-Ketoglutarate-Dependent Halogenase CytC3 from Streptomyces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Galonic Fujimori,D.; Barr, E.; Matthews, M.; Koch, G.; Yonce, J.; Walsh, C.; Bollinger, J.; Krebs, C.; Riggs-Gelasco, P.

    2007-01-01

    The complex of the mononuclear non-heme halogenase CytC3 from Streptomyces, Fe(II), {alpha}-ketoglutarate, bromide, and the substrate l-2-aminobutyryl-S-CytC2 reacts with O2 to form a reaction intermediate. Variable-field, freeze-quench Mossbauer spectroscopy reveals this intermediate to be a mixture of two high-spin Fe(IV) complexes in an approximate 3.7/1 ratio. Freeze-quench Fe K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy provides further insight into the structure of this intermediate. A short 1.62-Angstroms interaction between the Fe and one of its ligands is attributed to the Fe(IV)-oxo group, and a 2.43-Angstroms interaction is assigned to the Fe-Br interaction. A significantly longer Fe-Br separation (2.53 Angstroms) is observed in the reactant complex, consistent with lower valency of the Fe in the reactant complex. This intermediate is the first example for a Br-Fe(IV)-oxo complex in a protein and provides evidence for a unifying mechanism for Fe(II) and {alpha}-ketoglutarate-dependent dioxygenases and halogenases.

  3. Spectroscopic Evidence for a High-Spin Br-Fe(IV)-Oxo Intermediate in the -Ketoglutarate-Dependent Halogenase CyTc3 From Streptomyces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fujimori, D.Galonic; Barr, E.W.; Matthews, M.L.; Koch, G.M.; Yonce, J.R.; Walsh, C.T.; Bollinger, J.M., Jr.; Krebs, C.; Riggs-Gelasco, P.J.

    2009-06-01

    The complex of the mononuclear non-heme halogenase CytC3 from Streptomyces, Fe(II), {alpha}-ketoglutarate, bromide, and the substrate l-2-aminobutyryl-S-CytC2 reacts with O{sub 2} to form a reaction intermediate. Variable-field, freeze-quench Moessbauer spectroscopy reveals this intermediate to be a mixture of two high-spin Fe(IV) complexes in an approximate 3.7/1 ratio. Freeze-quench Fe K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy provides further insight into the structure of this intermediate. A short 1.62-{angstrom} interaction between the Fe and one of its ligands is attributed to the Fe(IV)-oxo group, and a 2.43-{angstrom} interaction is assigned to the Fe-Br interaction. A significantly longer Fe-Br separation (2.53 {angstrom}) is observed in the reactant complex, consistent with lower valency of the Fe in the reactant complex. This intermediate is the first example for a Br-Fe(IV)-oxo complex in a protein and provides evidence for a unifying mechanism for Fe(II) and {alpha}-ketoglutarate-dependent dioxygenases and halogenases.

  4. Reducing collective quantum state rotation errors with reversible dephasing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cox, Kevin C.; Norcia, Matthew A.; Weiner, Joshua M.; Bohnet, Justin G.; Thompson, James K.

    2014-12-29

    We demonstrate that reversible dephasing via inhomogeneous broadening can greatly reduce collective quantum state rotation errors, and observe the suppression of rotation errors by more than 21?dB in the context of collective population measurements of the spin states of an ensemble of 2.110{sup 5} laser cooled and trapped {sup 87}Rb atoms. The large reduction in rotation noise enables direct resolution of spin state populations 13(1) dB below the fundamental quantum projection noise limit. Further, the spin state measurement projects the system into an entangled state with 9.5(5) dB of directly observed spectroscopic enhancement (squeezing) relative to the standard quantum limit, whereas no enhancement would have been obtained without the suppression of rotation errors.

  5. Statistical Stability and Time-Reversal Imgaing in Random Media

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berryman, J; Borcea, L; Papanicolaou, G; Tsogka, C

    2002-02-05

    Localization of targets imbedded in a heterogeneous background medium is a common problem in seismic, ultrasonic, and electromagnetic imaging problems. The best imaging techniques make direct use of the eigenfunctions and eigenvalues of the array response matrix, as recent work on time-reversal acoustics has shown. Of the various imaging functionals studied, one that is representative of a preferred class is a time-domain generalization of MUSIC (MUltiple Signal Classification), which is a well-known linear subspace method normally applied only in the frequency domain. Since statistical stability is not characteristic of the frequency domain, a transform back to the time domain after first diagonalizing the array data in the frequency domain takes optimum advantage of both the time-domain stability and the frequency-domain orthogonality of the relevant eigenfunctions.

  6. Adiabatic model and design of a translating field reversed configuration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Intrator, T. P.; Siemon, R. E.; Sieck, P. E.

    2008-04-15

    We apply an adiabatic evolution model to predict the behavior of a field reversed configuration (FRC) during decompression and translation, as well as during boundary compression. Semi-empirical scaling laws, which were developed and benchmarked primarily for collisionless FRCs, are expected to remain valid even for the collisional regime of FRX-L experiment. We use this approach to outline the design implications for FRX-L, the high density translated FRC experiment at Los Alamos National Laboratory. A conical theta coil is used to accelerate the FRC to the largest practical velocity so it can enter a mirror bounded compression region, where it must be a suitable target for a magnetized target fusion (MTF) implosion. FRX-L provides the physics basis for the integrated MTF plasma compression experiment at the Shiva-Star pulsed power facility at Kirtland Air Force Research Laboratory, where the FRC will be compressed inside a flux conserving cylindrical shell.

  7. Magnetization reversal driven by a spin torque oscillator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sbiaa, R.

    2014-09-01

    Magnetization reversal of a magnetic free layer under spin transfer torque (STT) effect from a magnetic hard layer with a fixed magnetization direction and an oscillating layer is investigated. By including STT from the oscillating layer with in-plane anisotropy and orthogonal polarizer, magnetization-time dependence of free layer is determined. The results show that the frequency and amplitude of oscillations can be varied by adjusting the current density and magnetic properties. For an optimal oscillation frequency (f{sub opt}), a reduction of the switching time (t{sub 0}) of the free layer is observed. Both f{sub opt} and t{sub 0} increase with the anisotropy field of the free layer.

  8. Nanofiltration/reverse osmosis for treatment of coproduced waters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mondal, S.; Hsiao, C.L.; Wickramasinghe, S.R. [Colorado State University, Ft Collins, CO (United States)

    2008-07-15

    Current high oil and gas prices have lead to renewed interest in exploration of nonconventional energy sources such as coal bed methane, tar sand, and oil shale. However oil and gas production from these nonconventional sources has lead to the coproduction of large quantities of produced water. While produced water is a waste product from oil and gas exploration it is a very valuable natural resource in the arid Western United States. Thus treated produced water could be a valuable new source of water. Commercially available nanofiltration and low pressure reverse osmosis membranes have been used to treat three produced waters. The results obtained here indicate that the permeate could be put to beneficial uses such as crop and livestock watering. However minimizing membrane fouling will be essential for the development of a practical process. Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy imaging may be used to observe membrane fouling.

  9. Anomalous transport theory for the reversed field pinch

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Terry, P.W.; Hegna, C.C; Sovinec, C.R.

    1996-09-01

    Physically motivated transport models with predictive capabilities and significance beyond the reversed field pinch (RFP) are presented. It is shown that the ambipolar constrained electron heat loss observed in MST can be quantitatively modeled by taking account of the clumping in parallel streaming electrons and the resultant self-consistent interaction with collective modes; that the discrete dynamo process is a relaxation oscillation whose dependence on the tearing instability and profile relaxation physics leads to amplitude and period scaling predictions consistent with experiment; that the Lundquist number scaling in relaxed plasmas driven by magnetic turbulence has a weak S{sup {minus}1/4} scaling; and that radial E{times}B shear flow can lead to large reductions in the edge particle flux with little change in the heat flux, as observed in the RFP and tokamak. 24 refs.

  10. Amplification and reversal of Knudsen force by thermoelectric heating

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Neill, William J.; Wada, Mizuki; Strongrich, Andrew D.; Cofer, Anthony; Alexeenko, Alina A.

    2014-12-09

    We show that the Knudsen thermal force generated by a thermally-induced flow over a heated beam near a colder wall could be amplified significantly by thermoelectric heating. Bidirectional actuation is achieved by switching the polarity of the thermoelectric device bias voltage. The measurements of the resulting thermal forces at different rarefaction regimes, realized by changing geometry and gas pressure, are done using torsional microbalance. The repulsive or attractive forces between a thermoelectrically heated or cooled plate and a substrate are shown to be up to an order of magnitude larger than for previously studied configurations and heating methods due to favorable coupling of two thermal gradients. The amplification and reversal of the Knudsen force is confirmed by numerical solution of the Boltzmann-ESBGK kinetic model equation. Because of the favorable scaling with decreasing system size, the Knudsen force with thermoelectric heating offers a novel actuation and sensing mechanism for nano/microsystems.

  11. Advanced Materials for Reversible Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (RSOFC), Dual Mode

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Operation with Low Degradation | Department of Energy for Reversible Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (RSOFC), Dual Mode Operation with Low Degradation Advanced Materials for Reversible Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (RSOFC), Dual Mode Operation with Low Degradation Presented at the Department of Energy Fuel Cell Projects Kickoff Meeting, September 1 - October 1, 2009 petri_versa%20_power_kickoff.pdf (3.53 MB) More Documents & Publications Reversible Fuel Cells Workshop Summary Report Progress on the

  12. Considerations for the use of the modified line reversal technique for gas temperature measurement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Winkleman, B.C.

    1993-06-01

    Several areas related to the successful and accurate application of modified line reversal are discussed. Initially, generalized modified line reversal equations are developed. A review of basic line reversal theory is presented followed by development of correction factors for optical system effects. Image size and their effect on accurate determinations of spectral radiances is discussed. Temperature biases introduced by image vignetting is calculated. Measured image irradiances are given.

  13. Neutron inelastic scattering investigation of the magnetic excitations in Cu{sub 2}Te{sub 2}O{sub 5}X{sub 2} (X=Br,Cl)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crowe, S.J.; Majumdar, S.; Lees, M.R.; Paul, D. McK.; Bewley, R.I.; Levett, S.J.; Ritter, C.

    2005-06-01

    Neutron inelastic scattering investigations have been performed on the spin tetrahedral system Cu{sub 2}Te{sub 2}O{sub 5}X{sub 2} (X=Cl,Br). We report the observation of magnetic excitations with a dispersive component in both compounds, associated with the three-dimensional incommensurate magnetic order that develops below T{sub N}{sup Cl}=18.2 K and T{sub N}{sup Br}=11.4 K. The excitation in Cu{sub 2}Te{sub 2}O{sub 5}Cl{sub 2} softens as the temperature approaches T{sub N}{sup Cl}, leaving diffuse quasi-elastic scattering above the transition temperature. In the bromide, the excitations are present well above T{sub N}{sup Br}, which might be attributed to the presence of a degree of low dimensional correlations above T{sub N}{sup Br} in this compound.

  14. Strong and Reversible Binding of Carbon Dioxide in a Green Metal...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Strong and Reversible Binding of Carbon Dioxide in a Green Metal-Organic Framework Previous Next List Jeremiah J. Gassensmith, Hiroyasu Furukawa, Ronald A. Smaldone, Ross S. ...

  15. Are We Heading Towards a Reversal of the Trend for Ever-Greater...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Mobility? Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Are We Heading Towards a Reversal of the Trend for Ever-Greater Mobility? AgencyCompany Organization:...

  16. Flow reversal power limit for the HFBR (Technical Report) | SciTech...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The experiments were single channel flow reversal tests under a range of conditions. The analytical phase involved simulations of the tests to benchmark the physical models and ...

  17. Magnetization reversal induced by in-plane current in Ta/CoFeB...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    current are accordance with those for magnetization reversal by spin transfer torque originated from the spin Hall effect in the Ta layer. Authors: Zhang, C. 1 ;...

  18. MODIFIED REVERSE OSMOSIS SYSTEM FOR TREATMENT OF PRODUCED WATERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    T.M. Whitworth; Liangxiong Li

    2002-09-15

    This report describes work performed during the second year of the project ''Modified reverse osmosis system for treatment of produced waters.'' We performed two series of reverse osmosis experiments using very thin bentonite clay membranes compacted to differing degrees. The first series of 10 experiments used NaCl solutions with membranes that ranged between 0.041 and 0.064mm in thickness. Our results showed compaction of such ultra-thin clay membranes to be problematic. The thickness of the membranes was exceeded by the dimensional variation in the machined experimental cell and this is believed to have resulted in local bypassing of the membrane with a resultant decrease in solute rejection efficiency. In two of the experiments, permeate flow was varied as a percentage of the total flow to investigate results of changing permeate flow on solute rejection. In one experiment, the permeate flow was varied between 2.4 and 10.3% of the total flow with no change in solute rejection. In another experiment, the permeate flow was varied between 24.6 and 52.5% of the total flow. In this experiment, the solute rejection rate decreased as the permeate occupied greater fractions of the total flow. This suggests a maximum solute rejection efficiency for these clay membranes for a permeate flow of between 10.3 and 24.6% of the total; flow. Solute rejection was found to decrease with increasing salt concentration and ranged between 62.9% and 19.7% for chloride and between 61.5 and 16.8% for sodium. Due to problems with the compaction procedure and potential membrane bypassing, these rejection rates are probably not the upper limit for NaCl rejection by bentonite membranes. The second series of four reverse osmosis experiments was conducted with a 0.057mm-thick bentonite membrane and dilutions of a produced water sample with an original TDS of 196,250 mg/l obtained from a facility near Loco Hill, New Mexico, operated by an independent. These experiments tested the separation

  19. MODIFIED REVERSE OSMOSIS SYSTEM FOR TREATMENT OF PRODUCED WATERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    T.M. Whitworth; Liangxiong Li

    2002-09-15

    This report describes work performed during the first year of the project ''Modified Reverse Osmosis System for Treatment of Produced Waters.'' This research project has two objectives. The first objective is to test the use of clay membranes in the treatment of produced waters by reverse osmosis. The second objective is to test the ability of a system patented by the New Mexico Tech Research Foundation to remove salts from reverse osmosis waste streams as a solid. We performed 12 experiments using clay membranes in cross-flow experimental cells. We found that, due to dispersion in the porous frit used adjacent to the membrane, the concentration polarization layer seems to be completely (or nearly completely) destroyed at low flow rates. This observation suggests that clay membranes used with porous frit material many reach optimum rejection rates at lower pumping rates than required for use with synthetic membranes. The solute rejection efficiency decreases with increasing solution concentration. For the membranes and experiments reported here, the rejection efficiency ranged from 71% with 0.01 M NaCl solution down to 12% with 2.3 M NaCl solution. More compacted clay membranes will have higher rejection capabilities. The clay membranes used in our experiments were relatively thick (approximately 0.5 mm). The active layer of most synthetic membranes is only 0.04 {micro}m (0.00004 mm), approximately 1250 times thinner than the clay membranes used in these experiments. Yet clay membranes as thin as 12 {micro}m have been constructed (Fritz and Eady, 1985). Since Darcy's law states that the flow through a material of constant permeability is inversely proportional to it's the material's thickness, then, based on these experimental observations, a very thin clay membrane would be expected to have much higher flow rates than the ones used in these experiments. Future experiments will focus on testing very thin clay membranes. The membranes generally exhibited reasonable

  20. Reversible rigid coupling apparatus and method for borehole seismic transducers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Owen, Thomas E.; Parra, Jorge O.

    1992-01-01

    An apparatus and method of high resolution reverse vertical seismic profile (VSP) measurements is shown. By encapsulating the seismic detector and heaters in a meltable substance (such as wax), the seismic detector can be removably secured in a borehole in a manner capable of measuring high resolution signals in the 100 to 1000 hertz range and higher. The meltable substance is selected to match the overall density of the detector package with the underground formation, yet still have relatively low melting point and rigid enough to transmit vibrations to accelerometers in the seismic detector. To minimize voids in the meltable substance upon solidification, the meltable substance is selected for minimum shrinkage, yet still having the other desirable characteristics. Heaters are arranged in the meltable substance in such a manner to allow the lowermost portion of the meltable substance to cool and solidify first. Solidification continues upwards from bottom-to-top until the top of the meltable substance is solidified and the seismic detector is ready for use. To remove, the heaters melt the meltable substance and the detector package is pulled from the borehole.

  1. Compact Reversed-Field Pinch Reactors (CRFPR): preliminary engineering considerations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hagenson, R.L.; Krakowski, R.A.; Bathke, C.G.; Miller, R.L.; Embrechts, M.J.; Schnurr, N.M.; Battat, M.E.; LaBauve, R.J.; Davidson, J.W.

    1984-08-01

    The unique confinement physics of the Reversed-Field Pinch (RFP) projects to a compact, high-power-density fusion reactor that promises a significant reduction in the cost of electricity. The compact reactor also promises a factor-of-two reduction in the fraction of total cost devoted to the reactor plant equipment (i.e., fusion power core (FPC) plus support systems). In addition to operational and developmental benefits, these physically smaller systems can operate economically over a range of total power output. After giving an extended background and rationale for the compact fusion approaches, key FPC subsystems for the Compact RFP Reactor (CRFPR) are developed, designed, and integrated for a minimum-cost, 1000-MWe(net) system. Both the problems and promise of the compact, high-power-density fusion reactor are quantitatively evaluated on the basis of this conceptual design. The material presented in this report both forms a framework for a broader, more expanded conceptual design as well as suggests directions and emphases for related research and development.

  2. Turbulent transport in the MST reversed-field pinch

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rempel, T.D.; Almagri, A.F.; Assadi, S.; Den Hartog, D.J.; Hokin, S.A.; Prager, S.C.; Sarff, J.S.; Shen, W.; Sidikman, K.L.; Spragins, C.W.; Sprott, J.C.; Stoneking, M.R.; Zita, E.J.

    1991-11-01

    Measurements of edge turbulence and the associated transport are ongoing in the Madison Symmetric Torus (R = 1.5 m, a = 0.52 m) reversed-field pinch using magnetic and electrostatic probes. Magnetic fluctuations are dominated by m = 1 and n {approximately} 2R/a tearing modes. Particle losses induced by magnetic field fluctuations have been found to be ambipolar (<{tilde J}{sub parallel}{tilde B}{sub r}> = O). Electrostatic fluctuations are broadband and turbulent, with mode widths {delta}m {approximately} 3--7 and {delta}n {approximately}70--150. Particle, parallel current, and energy transport arising from coherent motion with the fluctuating {tilde E}xB drift has been measured. Particle transport via this channel is comparable to the total particle loss from MST. Energy transport (from <{tilde P}{tilde E}{sub phi}>/B{sub o}) due to electrostatic fluctuations is relatively small, and parallel current transport (from <{tilde J}{sub parallel}{tilde E}{sub chi}>/B{sub o}) may be small as well.

  3. Transport and equilibrium in field-reversed mirrors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyd, J.K.

    1982-09-01

    Two plasma models relevant to compact torus research have been developed to study transport and equilibrium in field reversed mirrors. In the first model for small Larmor radius and large collision frequency, the plasma is described as an adiabatic hydromagnetic fluid. In the second model for large Larmor radius and small collision frequency, a kinetic theory description has been developed. Various aspects of the two models have been studied in five computer codes ADB, AV, NEO, OHK, RES. The ADB code computes two dimensional equilibrium and one dimensional transport in a flux coordinate. The AV code calculates orbit average integrals in a harmonic oscillator potential. The NEO code follows particle trajectories in a Hill's vortex magnetic field to study stochasticity, invariants of the motion, and orbit average formulas. The OHK code displays analytic psi(r), B/sub Z/(r), phi(r), E/sub r/(r) formulas developed for the kinetic theory description. The RES code calculates resonance curves to consider overlap regions relevant to stochastic orbit behavior.

  4. Fusion proton diagnostic for the C-2 field reversed configuration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Magee, R. M. Clary, R.; Korepanov, S.; Smirnov, A.; Garate, E.; Knapp, K.; Tkachev, A.

    2014-11-15

    Measurements of the flux of fusion products from high temperature plasmas provide valuable insights into the ion energy distribution, as the fusion reaction rate is a very sensitive function of ion energy. In C-2, where field reversed configuration plasmas are formed by the collision of two compact toroids and partially sustained by high power neutral beam injection [M. Binderbauer et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 105, 045003 (2010); M. Tuszewski et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 255008 (2012)], measurements of DD fusion neutron flux are used to diagnose ion temperature and study fast ion confinement and dynamics. In this paper, we will describe the development of a new 3 MeV proton detector that will complement existing neutron detectors. The detector is a large area (50?cm{sup 2}), partially depleted, ion implanted silicon diode operated in a pulse counting regime. While the scintillator-based neutron detectors allow for high time resolution measurements (?100 kHz), they have no spatial or energy resolution. The proton detector will provide 10 cm spatial resolution, allowing us to determine if the axial distribution of fast ions is consistent with classical fast ion theory or whether anomalous scattering mechanisms are active. We will describe in detail the diagnostic design and present initial data from a neutral beam test chamber.

  5. Treatment of biomass gasification wastewaters using reverse osmosis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petty, S.E.; Eliason, S.D.; Laegreid, M.M.

    1981-09-01

    Reverse osmosis (RO) was evaluated as a treatment technology for the removal of organics from biomass gasification wastewaters (BGW) generated from an experimental biomass gasifier at Texas Tech University. Wastewaters were characteristically high in chemical oxygen demand (COD) with initial values ranging from 32,000 to 68,000 mg/1. Since RO is normally considered a complementary treatment technology, wastewaters were pretreated by biological or wet air oxidation (WAO) processes. One set of experiments were run using untreated wastewaters to compare membrane performance with those experiments using pretreated wastewaters. Experiments were run for 8 to 10 hrs using UOP's TFC-85 membrane operating at 700 psig and 18 to 20/sup 0/C. This membrane is similar to the NS-100, a membrane known for being effective in the separation of organics from solution. Separation of organics from solution was determined by COD removal. Removal percentages for biologically pretreated wastewaters averaged 98% except for one group of runs averaging 69% removal. This exception was probably due to the presence of milk solids in the feed. Use of RO on WAO pretreated wastewaters and unpretreated feeds resulted in 90% COD removal. Membrane degradation was observed when using full-strength and WAO pretreated feeds, but not when using feeds that had undergone biological pretreatment. Color removal was computed for the majority of experiments completed. Overall, 99 to 100% of the total color was removed from BGW feeds, values which coincide with those reported in the literature for other wastewaters.

  6. Two-dimensional interpreter for field-reversed configurations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steinhauer, Loren

    2014-08-15

    An interpretive method is developed for extracting details of the fully two-dimensional (2D) “internal” structure of field-reversed configurations (FRC) from common diagnostics. The challenge is that only external and “gross” diagnostics are routinely available in FRC experiments. Inferring such critical quantities as the poloidal flux and the particle inventory has commonly relied on a theoretical construct based on a quasi-one-dimensional approximation. Such inferences sometimes differ markedly from the more accurate, fully 2D reconstructions of equilibria. An interpreter based on a fully 2D reconstruction is needed to enable realistic within-the-shot tracking of evolving equilibrium properties. Presented here is a flexible equilibrium reconstruction with which an extensive data base of equilibria was constructed. An automated interpreter then uses this data base as a look-up table to extract evolving properties. This tool is applied to data from the FRC facility at Tri Alpha Energy. It yields surprising results at several points, such as the inferences that the local β (plasma pressure/external magnetic pressure) of the plasma climbs well above unity and the poloidal flux loss time is somewhat longer than previously thought, both of which arise from full two-dimensionality of FRCs.

  7. Multichannel optical diagnostic system for field-reversed configuration plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Takahashi, Tsutomu; Gota, Hiroshi; Fujino, Toshiyuki; Okada, Masanori; Asai, Tomohiko; Fujimoto, Kayoko; Ohkuma, Yasunori; Nogi, Yasuyuki

    2004-12-01

    A constructed diagnostic system consisting of a 60-channel set of optical detectors with flexible viewing configurations is realized to investigate three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) motions and the internal structure of a field-reversed configuration (FRC) plasma. The system can detect radiation from the plasma in the wavelength range of 420-820 nm. Optical filters are used to select the wavelength ranges required in the experiment. The sensitivities of all the optical detectors are calibrated using radiation from the FRC plasma at a quiescent phase. Radiation profiles measured by orthogonal viewing configuration of the detectors are shown at three toroidal cross sections. From these profiles, the time evolution of the three-dimensional MHD motion of the plasma is depicted. The radiation profile measured by a one-dimensional viewing configuration yields not only an electron density profile inside the separatrix but also the width of an edge-layer plasma. A bright halo around the edge-layer plasma is observed using a Balmer-{alpha} line filter. The orthogonal viewing configuration can also be used to analyze the internal structure of the FRC. The deviated position of the major axis is estimated from the comparison between the measured radiation profiles and the nonconcentric density profile based on the rigid rotor profile model.

  8. Advances in the numerical modeling of field-reversed configurations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Belova, Elena V.; Davidson, Ronald C.; Ji, Hantao; Yamada, Masaaki

    2006-05-15

    The field-reversed configuration (FRC) is a compact torus with little or no toroidal magnetic field. A theoretical understanding of the observed FRC equilibrium and stability properties presents significant challenges due to the high plasma beta, plasma flows, large ion gyroradius, and the stochasticity of the particle orbits. Advanced numerical simulations are generally required to describe and understand the detailed behavior of FRC plasmas. Results of such simulations are presented in this paper. It is shown that 3D nonlinear hybrid simulations using the HYM code [E. V. Belova et al., Phys. Plasmas 7, 4996 (2000)] reproduce all major experimentally observed stability properties of elongated (theta-pinch-formed) FRCs. Namely, the scaling of the growth rate of the n=1 tilt mode with the S*/E parameter (S* is the FRC kinetic parameter, E is elongation, and n is toroidal mode number), the nonlinear saturation of the tilt mode, ion toroidal spin-up, and the growth of the n=2 rotational mode have been demonstrated and studied in detail. The HYM code has also been used to study stability properties of FRCs formed by the counterhelicity spheromak merging method. A new stability regime has been found for FRCs with elongation E{approx}1, which requires a close-fitting conducting shell and energetic beam ion stabilization.

  9. Two-fluid physics and field-reversed configurations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hakim, A.; Shumlak, U.

    2007-05-15

    In this paper, algorithms for the solution of two-fluid plasma equations are presented and applied to the study of field-reversed configurations (FRCs). The two-fluid model is more general than the often used magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) model. The model takes into account electron inertia, charge separation, and the full electromagnetic field equations, and it allows for separate electron and ion motion. The algorithm presented is the high-resolution wave propagation scheme. The wave propagation method is based on solutions to the Riemann problem at cell interfaces. Operator splitting is used to incorporate the Lorentz and electromagnetic source terms. The algorithms are benchmarked against the Geospace Environmental Modeling Reconnection Challenge problem. Equilibrium of FRC is studied. It is shown that starting from a MHD equilibrium produces a relaxed two-fluid equilibrium with strong flows at the FRC edges due to diamagnetic drift. The azimuthal electron flow causes lower-hybrid drift instabilities (LHDI), which can be captured if the ion gyroradius is well resolved. The LHDI is known to be a possible source of anomalous resistivity in many plasma configurations. LHDI simulations are performed in slab geometries and are compared to recent experimental results.

  10. Homopolar machine for reversible energy storage and transfer systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stillwagon, Roy E.

    1978-01-01

    A homopolar machine designed to operate as a generator and motor in reversibly storing and transferring energy between the machine and a magnetic load coil for a thermo-nuclear reactor. The machine rotor comprises hollow thin-walled cylinders or sleeves which form the basis of the system by utilizing substantially all of the rotor mass as a conductor thus making it possible to transfer substantially all the rotor kinetic energy electrically to the load coil in a highly economical and efficient manner. The rotor is divided into multiple separate cylinders or sleeves of modular design, connected in series and arranged to rotate in opposite directions but maintain the supply of current in a single direction to the machine terminals. A stator concentrically disposed around the sleeves consists of a hollow cylinder having a number of excitation coils each located radially outward from the ends of adjacent sleeves. Current collected at an end of each sleeve by sleeve slip rings and brushes is transferred through terminals to the magnetic load coil. Thereafter, electrical energy returned from the coil then flows through the machine which causes the sleeves to motor up to the desired speed in preparation for repetition of the cycle. To eliminate drag on the rotor between current pulses, the brush rigging is designed to lift brushes from all slip rings in the machine.

  11. Reversed-field pinch studies in the Madison Symmetric Torus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hokin, S.; Almagri, A.; Cekic, M.; Chapman, B.; Crocker, N.; Den Hartog, D.J.; Fiksel, G.; Henry, J.; Ji, H.; Prager, S.; Sarff, J.; Scime, E.; Shen, W.; Stoneking, M.; Watts, C.

    1993-04-03

    Studies of large-size (R = 1.5 m, a = 0.5 m), moderate current (I < 750 kA) reversed-field pinch (RFP) plasmas are carried out in the Madison Symmetric Torus in order to evaluate and improve RFP confinement, study general toroidal plasma MHD issues, determine the mechanism of the RFP dynamo, and measure fluctuation-induced transport and anomalous ion heating. MST confinement has been improved by reduction of magnetic field errors with correction coils in the primary circuit and reduction of impurities using boronization; high densities have been achieved with hydrogen pellet injection. MHD tearing modes with poloidal mode number m = 1 and toroidal mode numbers n = 5--7 are prevalent and nonlinearly couple to produce sudden relaxations akin to tokamak sawteeth. Edge fluctuation-induced transport has been measured with a variety of insertable probes. Ions exhibit anomalous heating, with increases of ion temperature occuring during strong MHD relaxation. The RFP dynamo has been studied with attention to various possible mechanisms, including motion-EMF drive, the Hall effect, and superthermal electrons. Initial profile control experiments have begun using insertable biased probes and plasma guns. The toroidal field capacity of MST will be upgraded during Summer, 1993 to allow low-current tokamak operation as well as improved RFP operation.

  12. Homopolar machine for reversible energy storage and transfer systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stillwagon, Roy E.

    1981-01-01

    A homopolar machine designed to operate as a generator and motor in reversibly storing and transferring energy between the machine and a magnetic load coil for a thermo-nuclear reactor. The machine rotor comprises hollow thin-walled cylinders or sleeves which form the basis of the system by utilizing substantially all of the rotor mass as a conductor thus making it possible to transfer substantially all the rotor kinetic energy electrically to the load coil in a highly economical and efficient manner. The rotor is divided into multiple separate cylinders or sleeves of modular design, connected in series and arranged to rotate in opposite directions but maintain the supply of current in a single direction to the machine terminals. A stator concentrically disposed around the sleeves consists of a hollow cylinder having a number of excitation coils each located radially outward from the ends of adjacent sleeves. Current collected at an end of each sleeve by sleeve slip rings and brushes is transferred through terminals to the magnetic load coil. Thereafter, electrical energy returned from the coil then flows through the machine which causes the sleeves to motor up to the desired speed in preparation for repetition of the cycle. To eliminate drag on the rotor between current pulses, the brush rigging is designed to lift brushes from all slip rings in the machine.

  13. Some Results Bearing on the Value of Improvements of Membranes for Reverse Osmosis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lamont, A

    2006-03-08

    This analysis evaluates the potential economic benefits that could result from the improvements in the permeability of membranes for reverse osmosis. The discussion provides a simple model of the operation of a reverse osmosis plant. It examines the change in the operation that might result from improvements in the membrane and computes the cost of water as a function of the membrane permeability.

  14. Parity violation in nuclear magnetic resonance frequencies of chiral tetrahedral tungsten complexes NWXYZ (X, Y, Z = H, F, Cl, Br or I)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nahrwold, Sophie Berger, Robert; Clemens-Schöpf-Institute, Technical University Darmstadt, Petersenstr. 22, D-64287 Darmstadt ; Schwerdtfeger, Peter; Fachbereich Chemie, Philipps-Universität Marburg, Hans-Meerwein-Str., D-35032 Marburg

    2014-01-14

    Density functional theory within the two-component quasi-relativistic zeroth-order regular approximation (ZORA) is used to predict parity violation shifts in {sup 183}W nuclear magnetic resonance shielding tensors of chiral, tetrahedrally bonded tungsten complexes of the form NWXYZ (X, Y, Z = H, F, Cl, Br or I), as well as for the heavier systems NWHAtF and NWH(117)F for comparison. The calculations reveal that sub-mHz accuracy is required to detect such tiny effects in this class of compounds, and that parity violation effects are very sensitive to the choice of ligands.

  15. NMR shielding and spin–rotation constants of {sup 175}LuX (X = {sup 19}F, {sup 35}Cl, {sup 79}Br, {sup 127}I) molecules

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Demissie, Taye B.

    2015-12-31

    This presentation demonstrates the relativistic effects on the spin-rotation constants, absolute nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) shielding constants and shielding spans of {sup 175}LuX (X = {sup 19}F, {sup 35}Cl, {sup 79}Br, {sup 127}I) molecules. The results are obtained from calculations performed using density functional theory (non-relativistic and four-component relativistic) and coupled-cluster calculations. The spin-rotation constants are compared with available experimental values. In most of the molecules studied, relativistic effects make an order of magnitude difference on the NMR absolute shielding constants.

  16. Electric Dipole Moments in Radioactive Nuclei, Tests of Time Reversal Symmetry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Auerbach, N.

    2010-11-24

    The research of radioactive nuclei opens new possibilities to study fundamental symmetries, such as time reversal and reflection symmetry. Such nuclei often provide conditions to check in an optimal way certain symmetries and the violation of such symmetries. We will discuss the possibility of obtaining improved limits on violation of time reversal symmetry using pear shaped radioactive nuclei. An effective method to test time reversal invariance in the non-strange sector is to measure parity and time reversal violating (T-P-odd) electromagnetic moments, (such as the static electric dipole moment). Parity and time reversal violating components in the nuclear force may produce P-T-odd moments in nuclei which in turn induce such moments in atoms. We will discuss the possibility that in some reflection asymmetric, heavy nuclei (which are radioactive) these moments are enhanced by several orders of magnitude. Present and future experiments, which will test this idea, will be mentioned.

  17. Radiative reverse shock laser experiments relevant to accretion processes in cataclysmic variables

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krauland, C. M.; Drake, R. P.; Kuranz, C. C.; Sweeney, R.; Grosskopf, M.; Klein, S.; Gillespie, R.; Keiter, P. A.; Loupias, B.; Falize, E.

    2013-05-15

    We discuss the production of radiative reverse shocks in experiments at the Omega-60 laser facility. The ability of this high-intensity laser to impart large energy densities on micron-thin foils makes it feasible to create supersonic plasma flows. Obtaining a radiative reverse shock in the laboratory requires a sufficiently fast flow (∼100 km/s) of a material whose opacity is large enough to produce energetically significant emission from experimentally achievable shocked layers. The reverse shock forms in the flow once it is impeded. This paper presents the first radiographic data of normal incidence, reverse shockwaves. These experiments are primarily motivated by the contribution of radiative reverse shock waves to the evolving dynamics of the cataclysmic variable (CV) system in which they reside. We show similarity properties to suggest that the experimental production of radiative reserve shocks in the laboratory may be scalable to such astrophysical systems.

  18. Petrogenesis of the reversely-zoned Turtle pluton, southeastern California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allen, C.M.

    1989-01-01

    Few plutons with a reversed geometry of a felsic rim and mafic core have been described in the geologic literature. The Turtle pluton of S.E. California is an intrusion composed of a granitic rim and granodioritic core and common microgranitoid enclaves. Field observations, mineral textures and chemistries, major and trace element geochemistry, and isotopic variability support a petrogenetic model of in situ, concomitant, magma mixing and fractional crystallization of rhyolitic magma progressively mixed with an increasing volume of andesitic magma, all without chemical contribution from entrained basaltic enclaves. Hornblende geobarometry indicates the Turtle pluton crystallized at about 3.5 kb. A crystallization sequence of biotite before hornblende (and lack of pyroxenes) suggests the initial granitic magma contained less than 4 wt% H{sub 2}O at temperatures less than 780C. U-Pb, Pb-Pb, Rb-Sr and oxygen isotope studies indicate the terrane intruded by the Turtle pluton is 1.8 Ga, that the Turtle pluton crystallized at 130 Ma, that the Target Granite and garnet aplites are about 100 Ma, and that these intrusions were derived from different sources. Models based on isotopic data suggest the rhyolitic end member magma of the Turtle pluton was derived from mafic igneous rocks, and was not derived from sampled Proterozoic country rocks. Similarity of common Sr and Pb isotopic ratios of these rocks to other Mesozoic intrusions in the Colorado River Region suggest the Turtle pluton and Target Granite have affinities like rocks to the east, including the Whipple Mountains and plutons of western Arizona. P-T-t history of the southern Turtle Mountains implies uplift well into the upper crust by Late Cretaceous time so that the heating and deformation events of the Late Cretaceous and Tertiary observed in flanking ranges did not affect the study area.

  19. The TITAN Reversed-Field Pinch fusion reactor study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-03-01

    The TITAN Reversed-Field Pinch (RFP) fusion reactor study is a multi-institutional research effort to determine the technical feasibility and key developmental issues of an RFP fusion reactor, especially at high power density, and to determine the potential economics, operations, safety, and environmental features of high-mass-power-density fusion systems. The TITAN conceptual designs are DT burning, 1000 MWe power reactors based on the RFP confinement concept. The designs are compact, have a high neutron wall loading of 18 MW/m{sup 2} and a mass power density of 700 kWe/tonne. The inherent characteristics of the RFP confinement concept make fusion reactors with such a high mass power density possible. Two different detailed designs have emerged: the TITAN-I lithium-vanadium design, incorporating the integrated-blanket-coil concept; and the TITAN-II aqueous loop-in-pool design with ferritic steel structure. This report contains a collection of 16 papers on the results of the TITAN study which were presented at the International Symposium on Fusion Nuclear Technology. This collection describes the TITAN research effort, and specifically the TITAN-I and TITAN-II designs, summarizing the major results, the key technical issues, and the central conclusions and recommendations. Overall, the basic conclusions are that high-mass power-density fusion reactors appear to be technically feasible even with neutron wall loadings up to 20 MW/m{sup 2}; that single-piece maintenance of the FPC is possible and advantageous; that the economics of the reactor is enhanced by its compactness; and the safety and environmental features need not to be sacrificed in high-power-density designs. The fact that two design approaches have emerged, and others may also be possible, in some sense indicates the robustness of the general findings.

  20. A chopper system for shortening the duration of pulsed supersonic beams seeded with NO or Br{sub 2} down to 13 μs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lam, Jessica; Rennick, Christopher J.; Softley, Timothy P.

    2015-05-15

    A chopper wheel construct is used to shorten the duration of a molecular beam to 13 μs. Molecular beams seeded with NO or with Br{sub 2} and an initial pulse width of ≥200 μs were passed through a spinning chopper wheel, which was driven by a brushless DC in vacuo motor at a range of speeds, from 3000 rpm to 80 000 rpm. The resulting duration of the molecular-beam pulses measured at the laser detection volume ranged from 80 μs to 13 μs and was the same for both NO and Br{sub 2}. The duration is consistent with a simple analytical model, and the minimum pulse width measured is limited by the spreading of the beam between the chopper and the detection point as a consequence of the longitudinal velocity distribution of the beam. The setup adopted here effectively eliminates buildup of background gas without the use of a differential pumping stage, and a clean narrow pulse is obtained with low rotational temperature.

  1. Design and experimental testing of the performance of an outdoor LiBr/H{sub 2}O solar thermal absorption cooling system with a cold store

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Agyenim, Francis; Knight, Ian; Rhodes, Michael

    2010-05-15

    A domestic-scale prototype experimental solar cooling system has been developed based on a LiBr/H{sub 2}O absorption system and tested during the 2007 summer and autumn months in Cardiff University, UK. The system consisted of a 12 m{sup 2} vacuum tube solar collector, a 4.5 kW LiBr/H{sub 2}O absorption chiller, a 1000 l cold storage tank and a 6 kW fan coil. The system performance, as well as the performances of the individual components in the system, were evaluated based on the physical measurements of the daily solar radiation, ambient temperature, inlet and outlet fluid temperatures, mass flow rates and electrical consumption by component. The average coefficient of thermal performance (COP) of the system was 0.58, based on the thermal cooling power output per unit of available thermal solar energy from the 12 m{sup 2} Thermomax DF100 vacuum tube collector on a hot sunny day with average peak insolation of 800 W/m{sup 2} (between 11 and 13.30 h) and ambient temperature of 24 C. The system produced an electrical COP of 3.6. Experimental results prove the feasibility of the new concept of cold store at this scale, with chilled water temperatures as low as 7.4 C, demonstrating its potential use in cooling domestic scale buildings. (author)

  2. Phenomenology of reverse-shock emission in the optical afterglows of gamma-ray bursts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Japelj, J.; Kopa?, D.; Gomboc, A. [Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, University of Ljubljana, Jadranska ulica 19, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Kobayashi, S.; Harrison, R.; Virgili, F. J.; Mundell, C. G. [Astrophysics Research Institute, Liverpool John Moores University, Liverpool, L3 5RF (United Kingdom); Guidorzi, C. [Physics Departments, University of Ferrara, via Saragat 1, I-44122, Ferrara (Italy); Melandri, A., E-mail: jure.japelj@fmf.uni-lj.si, E-mail: andreja.gomboc@fmf.uni-lj.si [INAF Osservatorio Astronomico di Brera, via E. Bianchi 46, I-23807 Merate (Italy)

    2014-04-20

    We use a parent sample of 118 gamma-ray burst (GRB) afterglows, with known redshift and host galaxy extinction, to separate afterglows with and without signatures of dominant reverse-shock (RS) emission and to determine which physical conditions lead to a prominent reverse-shock emission. We identify 10 GRBs with reverse-shock signatures: 990123, 021004, 021211, 060908, 061126, 080319B, 081007, 090102, 090424, and 130427A. By modeling their optical afterglows with reverse- and forward-shock analytic light curves and using Monte Carlo simulations, we estimate the parameter space of the physical quantities describing the ejecta and circumburst medium. We find that physical properties cover a wide parameter space and do not seem to cluster around any preferential values. Comparing the rest-frame optical, X-ray, and high-energy properties of the larger sample of non-RS-dominated GRBs, we show that the early-time (<1 ks) optical spectral luminosity, X-ray afterglow luminosity, and ?-ray energy output of our reverse-shock dominated sample do not differ significantly from the general population at early times. However, the GRBs with dominant reverse-shock emission have fainter than average optical forward-shock emission at late times (>10 ks). We find that GRBs with an identifiable reverse-shock component show a high magnetization parameter R {sub B} = ?{sub B,r}/?{sub B,f} ? 2-10{sup 4}. Our results are in agreement with the mildly magnetized baryonic jet model of GRBs.

  3. Thorough Chemical Decontamination with the MEDOC Process : Batch Treatment of Dismantled Pieces or Loop Treatment of Large Components Such as the BR3 Steam Generator and Pressurizer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ponnet, M.; Klein, M.; Massaut, V.; Davain, H.; Aleton, G.

    2003-02-25

    The dismantling of the BR3-PWR reactor leads to the production of large masses of contaminated metallic pieces, including structural materials, primary pipings, tanks and heat exchangers. One of our main objectives is to demonstrate that we can minimize the volume of radioactive waste in an economical way, by the use of alternative waste routes, such as the clearance of materials after thorough decontamination. The SCKoCEN uses its own developed chemical decontamination process, so-called MEDOC (Metal Decontamination by Oxidation with Cerium), based on the use of cerium IV as strong oxidant in sulphuric acid with continuous regeneration using ozone. An industrial installation has been designed and constructed in close collaboration with Framatome-ANP (France). This installation started operation in September 1999 for the treatment of the metallic pieces arising from the dismantling of the BR3 reactor. Since then, more than 25 tons of contaminated material including primary pipes have been treated batchwise with success. 75 % of material could be directly cleared after treatment (Activity lower than 0.1 Bq/g for 60Co) and the other 25% free released after melting activity. The SCKoCEN performed in April 2002 the closed loop decontamination of the BR3 Steam Generator by connection of the MEDOC plant after few adaptations. The decontamination was done within 30 cycles in 3 weeks with consecutive steps like decontamination steps (injection of the solution into the SG) and regeneration steps with ozone. In total, 60 hours of decontamination at 70 C and 130 hours of regeneration were needed to reach the objectives. The tube bundle (600 m2) was attacked and about 10 {micro}m representing more than 41 kg of stainless steel and 2.06 GBq of 60Co was dissolved into the solution. The residual contamination measurements made directly into the water box are still going on, however it seems that the objective to reach the free release criteria after melting is achieved. The next

  4. Reversal of the Upper Critical Field Anisotropy and Spin-Locked...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Spin-Locked Superconductivity in K2Cr3As3 Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Reversal of the Upper Critical Field Anisotropy and Spin-Locked Superconductivity in K2Cr3As3 ...

  5. Real space mapping of oxygen vacancy diffusion and electrochemical transformations by hysteretic current reversal curve measurements

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kalinin, Sergei V.; Balke, Nina; Borisevich, Albina Y.; Jesse, Stephen; Maksymovych, Petro; Kim, Yunseok; Strelcov, Evgheni

    2014-06-10

    An excitation voltage biases an ionic conducting material sample over a nanoscale grid. The bias sweeps a modulated voltage with increasing maximal amplitudes. A current response is measured at grid locations. Current response reversal curves are mapped over maximal amplitudes of the bias cycles. Reversal curves are averaged over the grid for each bias cycle and mapped over maximal bias amplitudes for each bias cycle. Average reversal curve areas are mapped over maximal amplitudes of the bias cycles. Thresholds are determined for onset and ending of electrochemical activity. A predetermined number of bias sweeps may vary in frequency where each sweep has a constant number of cycles and reversal response curves may indicate ionic diffusion kinetics.

  6. A new reversal mode in exchange coupled antiferromagnetic/ferromagnetic disks: distorted viscous vortex

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gilbert, Dustin A.; Ye, Li; Varea, Aïda; Agramunt-Puig, Sebastià; del Valle, Nuria; Navau, Carles; López-Barbera, José Francisco; Buchanan, Kristen S.; Hoffmann, Axel; Sánchez, Alvar; Sort, Jordi; Liu, Kai; Nogués, Josep

    2015-04-28

    Magnetic vortices have generated intense interest in recent years due to their unique reversal mechanisms, fascinating topological properties, and exciting potential applications. In addition, the exchange coupling of magnetic vortices to antiferromagnets has also been shown to lead to a range of novel phenomena and functionalities. Here we report a new magnetization reversal mode of magnetic vortices in exchange coupled Ir20Mn80/Fe20Ni80 microdots: distorted viscous vortex reversal. In contrast to the previously known or proposed reversal modes, the vortex is distorted close to the interface and viscously dragged due to the uncompensated spins of a thin antiferromagnet, which leads to unexpected asymmetries in the annihilation and nucleation fields. These results provide a deeper understanding of the physics of exchange coupled vortices and may also have important implications for applications involving exchange coupled nanostructures.

  7. Nano-scale Composite Hetero-structures: Novel High Capacity Reversible...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    0kumta.pdf (1.9 MB) More Documents & Publications Nano-scale Composite Hetero-structures: Novel High Capacity Reversible Anodes for Lithium-ion Batteries Nanoscale ...

  8. Magnetization reversal in CoPt(111) hard/soft bilayers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alexandrakis, V.; Niarchos, D.; Wolff, M.

    2009-03-15

    The magnetization reversal in magnetron sputtered CoPt(111) hard/soft bilayers has been studied by polarized neutron reflectometry and magnetization measurements. The stability of the hard layer is tuned by the heat-treatment conditions which are used to crystallize the chemically ordered, high anisotropy, L{sub 1}0 phase. All the samples show the same features in their first order reversal curves but the lateral domain size during the magnetization reversal of the soft layer differs. In samples with strong intergrain coupling it exceeds the coherence length of the neutron beam, resulting in spin-flip scattering. In contrast, the hard layer reversal occurs through the reorientation in small domains.

  9. Colorado - C.R.S. 36-1-136 - Rights of Way Granted - Reversion...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- StatuteStatute: Colorado - C.R.S. 36-1-136 - Rights of Way Granted - ReversionLegal Abstract This section covers the...

  10. A new reversal mode in exchange coupled antiferromagnetic/ferromagnetic disks: distorted viscous vortex

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Gilbert, Dustin A.; Ye, Li; Varea, Aïda; Agramunt-Puig, Sebastià; del Valle, Nuria; Navau, Carles; López-Barbera, José Francisco; Buchanan, Kristen S.; Hoffmann, Axel; Sánchez, Alvar; et al

    2015-04-28

    Magnetic vortices have generated intense interest in recent years due to their unique reversal mechanisms, fascinating topological properties, and exciting potential applications. In addition, the exchange coupling of magnetic vortices to antiferromagnets has also been shown to lead to a range of novel phenomena and functionalities. Here we report a new magnetization reversal mode of magnetic vortices in exchange coupled Ir20Mn80/Fe20Ni80 microdots: distorted viscous vortex reversal. In contrast to the previously known or proposed reversal modes, the vortex is distorted close to the interface and viscously dragged due to the uncompensated spins of a thin antiferromagnet, which leads to unexpectedmore » asymmetries in the annihilation and nucleation fields. These results provide a deeper understanding of the physics of exchange coupled vortices and may also have important implications for applications involving exchange coupled nanostructures.« less

  11. FLUX ENHANCEMENT IN CROSSFLOW MEMBRANE FILTRATION: FOULING AND IT'S MINIMIZATION BY FLOW REVERSAL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shamsuddin Ilias

    2005-01-25

    Fouling problems are perhaps the single most important reason for relatively slow acceptance of ultrafiltration in many areas of chemical and biological processing. To overcome the losses in permeate flux associated with concentration polarization and fouling in cross flow membrane filtration, we investigated the concept of flow reversal as a method to enhance membrane flux in ultrafiltration. Conceptually, flow reversal prevents the formation of stable hydrodynamic and concentration boundary layers at or near the membrane surface. Further more, periodic reversal of the flow direction of the feed stream at the membrane surface results in prevention and mitigation of membrane fouling. Consequently, these advantages are expected to enhance membrane flux significantly. A crossflow membrane filtration unit was designed and built to test the concept of periodic flow reversal for flux enhancement. The essential elements of the system include a crossflow hollow fiber membrane module integrated with a two-way valve to direct the feed flow directions. The two-way valve is controlled by a controller-timer for periodic reversal of flow of feed stream. Another important feature of the system is that with changing feed flow direction, the permeate flow direction is also changed to maintain countercurrent feed and permeate flows for enhanced mass transfer driving force (concentration difference). In this report, we report our application of Flow Reversal technique in clarification of apple juice containing pectin. The presence of pectin in apple juice makes the clarification process difficult and is believed to cause membrane fouling. Of all compounds found in apple juice, pectin is most often identified as the major hindrance to filtration performance. Based on our ultrafiltration experiments with apple juice, we conclude that under flow reversal conditions, the permeate flux is significantly enhanced when compared with the conventional unidirectional flow. Thus, flow reversal

  12. Fullrmc, A Rigid Body Reverse Monte Carlo Modeling Package Enabled With

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Machine Learning And Artificial Intelligence - Joint Center for Energy Storage Research January 22, 2016, Research Highlights Fullrmc, A Rigid Body Reverse Monte Carlo Modeling Package Enabled With Machine Learning And Artificial Intelligence Liquid Sulfur. Sx≤8 molecules recognized and built upon modelling Scientific Achievement Novel approach to reverse modelling atomic and molecular systems from a set of experimental data and constraints. New fitting concepts such as 'Group',

  13. High Temperature Reverse By-Pass Diodes Bias and Failures | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Reverse By-Pass Diodes Bias and Failures High Temperature Reverse By-Pass Diodes Bias and Failures Presented at the PV Module Reliability Workshop, February 26 - 27 2013, Golden, Colorado pvmrw13_ps3_memc_posbic.pdf (498.72 KB) More Documents & Publications US & Japan TG 4 Activities of QA Forum Thermal Reliability Study of Bypass Diodes in Photovoltaic Modules US TG 4 Activities of QA Forum

  14. Estimation of steady-state and transcient power distributions for the RELAP analyses of the 1963 loss-of-flow and loss-of-pressure tests at BR2.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dionne, B.; Tzanos, C. P.

    2011-05-23

    To support the safety analyses required for the conversion of the Belgian Reactor 2 (BR2) from highly-enriched uranium (HEU) to low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel, the simulation of a number of loss-of-flow tests, with or without loss of pressure, has been undertaken. These tests were performed at BR2 in 1963 and used instrumented fuel assemblies (FAs) with thermocouples (TC) imbedded in the cladding as well as probes to measure the FAs power on the basis of their coolant temperature rise. The availability of experimental data for these tests offers an opportunity to better establish the credibility of the RELAP5-3D model and methodology used in the conversion analysis. In order to support the HEU to LEU conversion safety analyses of the BR2 reactor, RELAP simulations of a number of loss-of-flow/loss-of-pressure tests have been undertaken. Preliminary analyses showed that the conservative power distributions used historically in the BR2 RELAP model resulted in a significant overestimation of the peak cladding temperature during the transient. Therefore, it was concluded that better estimates of the steady-state and decay power distributions were needed to accurately predict the cladding temperatures measured during the tests and establish the credibility of the RELAP model and methodology. The new approach ('best estimate' methodology) uses the MCNP5, ORIGEN-2 and BERYL codes to obtain steady-state and decay power distributions for the BR2 core during the tests A/400/1, C/600/3 and F/400/1. This methodology can be easily extended to simulate any BR2 core configuration. Comparisons with measured peak cladding temperatures showed a much better agreement when power distributions obtained with the new methodology are used.

  15. Low Surface Recombination Velocity in Solution-Grown CH3NH3PbBr3 Perovskite Single Crystal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Ye; Yan, Yong; Yang, Mengjin; Choi, Sukgeun; Zhu, Kai; Luter, Joseph M.; Beard, Matthew C.

    2015-08-06

    Organic-inorganic hybrid perovskites are attracting intense research effort due to their impressive performance in solar cells. While the carrier transport parameters such as mobility and bulk carrier lifetime shows sufficient characteristics, the surface recombination, which can have major impact on the solar cell performance, has not been studied. Here we measure surface recombination dynamics in CH3NH3PbBr3 perovskite single crystals using broadband transient reflectance spectroscopy. The surface recombination velocity is found to be 3.4±0.1 103 cm s-1, B2–3 orders of magnitude lower than that in many important unpassivated semiconductors employed in solar cells. Our result suggests that the planar grain size for the perovskite thin films should be larger thanB30 mm to avoid the influence of surface recombination on the effective carrier lifetime.

  16. Feasibility of a super high-energy-density battery of the Li/Br/F sub 3 electrochemical system. Final report, 15 August 1989-14 May 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frysz, C.A.; Pyszczek, M.F.; Ebel, S.J.

    1990-08-16

    Feasibility studies on the practical aspects of developing a lithium/bromine trifluoride battery have been studied. Efforts directed toward identifying materials for porous electrode separators, glasses for insulated electrical feed-throughs, and metals for lid, case and current collector fabrication via electrochemical testing techniques have resulted in a list of materials suitable for these applications. Prototype cells utilizing a spirally wound electrode configuration have been constructed and discharged. The use of lithium salts as an electrolyte additive has been explored, and has shown a positive effect on discharge performance. Through the use of currently available technology, however, the lithium/bromine trifluoride couple has not delivered energy density comparable to other high energy density lithium systems. This investigation has revealed that practical Li/BrF3 cell development will require further extensive fundamental electrochemical research.

  17. Reverse logistics system and recycling potential at a landfill: A case study from Kampala City

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kinobe, J.R.; Gebresenbet, G.; Niwagaba, C.B.; Vinnerås, B.

    2015-08-15

    Highlights: • Quantifies the different waste streams delivered at the landfill. • Evaluates the amount of potential waste products that enters into the reverse cycle. • Drawing out the reverse logistics activities from Kampala City to Kiteezi landfill. • Identify the storage, collection and transportation mechanisms of products to the various destinations; and finally. • The study suggests efficient measures to improve reverse logistics system. - Abstract: The rapid growing population and high urbanisation rates in Sub-Saharan Africa has caused enormous pressure on collection services of the generated waste in the urban areas. This has put a burden on landfilling, which is the major waste disposal method. Waste reduction, re-use and recycling opportunities exist but are not fully utilized. The common items that are re-used and re-cycled are plastics, paper, aluminum, glass, steel, cardboard, and yard waste. This paper develops an overview of reverse logistics at Kiteezi landfill, the only officially recognised waste disposal facility for Kampala City. The paper analyses, in details the collection, re-processing, re-distribution and final markets of these products into a reversed supply chain network. Only 14% of the products at Kiteezi landfill are channeled into the reverse chain while 63% could be included in the distribution chain but are left out and disposed of while the remaining 23% is buried. This is because of the low processing power available, lack of market value, lack of knowledge and limited value addition activities to the products. This paper proposes possible strategies of efficient and effective reverse logistics development, applicable to Kampala City and other similar cities.

  18. Flux Enhancement in Crossflow Membrane Filtration: Fouling and It's Minimization by Flow Reversal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shamsuddin Ilias

    2005-08-04

    Fouling problems are perhaps the single most important reason for relatively slow acceptance of ultrafiltration in many areas of chemical and biological processing. To overcome the losses in permeate flux associated with concentration polarization and fouling in cross flow membrane filtration, we investigated the concept of flow reversal as a method to enhance membrane flux in ultrafiltration. Conceptually, flow reversal prevents the formation of stable hydrodynamic and concentration boundary layers at or near the membrane surface. Further more, periodic reversal of the flow direction of the feed stream at the membrane surface results in prevention and mitigation of membrane fouling. Consequently, these advantages are expected to enhance membrane flux significantly. A crossflow membrane filtration unit was designed and built to test the concept of periodic flow reversal for flux enhancement. The essential elements of the system include a crossflow hollow fiber membrane module integrated with a two-way valve to direct the feed flow directions. The two-way valve is controlled by a controller-timer for periodic reversal of flow of feed stream. Another important feature of the system is that with changing feed flow direction, the permeate flow direction is also changed to maintain countercurrent feed and permeate flows for enhanced mass transfer driving force (concentration difference). Three feed solutions (Bovine serum albumin (BSA), apple juice and citrus fruit pectin) were studied in crossflow membrane filtration. These solutes are well-known in membrane filtration for their fouling and concentration polarization potentials. Laboratory-scale tests on a hollow-fiber ultrafiltration membrane module using each of the feed solutes show that under flow reversal conditions, the permeate flux is significantly enhanced when compared with the conventional unidirectional flow. The flux enhancement is dramatic (by an order of magnitude) with increased feed concentration and

  19. FLUX ENHANCEMENT IN CROSSFLOW MEMBRANE FILTRATION: FOULING AND IT'S MINIMIZATION BY FLOW REVERSAL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shamsuddin Ilias

    2004-06-14

    Fouling problems are perhaps the single most important reason for relatively slow acceptance of ultrafiltration in many areas of chemical and biological processing. To overcome the losses in permeate flux associated with concentration polarization and fouling in cross flow membrane filtration, we investigated the concept of flow reversal as a method to enhance membrane flux in ultrafiltration. Conceptually, flow reversal prevents the formation of stable hydrodynamic and concentration boundary layers at or near the membrane surface. Further more, periodic reversal of the flow direction of the feed stream at the membrane surface results in prevention and mitigation of membrane fouling. Consequently, these advantages are expected to enhance membrane flux significantly. A crossflow membrane filtration unit was designed and built to test the concept of periodic flow reversal for flux enhancement. The essential elements of the system include a crossflow hollow fiber membrane module integrated with a two-way valve to direct the feed flow directions. The two-way valve is controlled by a controller-timer for periodic reversal of flow of feed stream. Another important feature of the system is that with changing feed flow direction, the permeate flow direction is also changed to maintain countercurrent feed and permeate flows for enhanced mass transfer driving force (concentration difference). In our previous report, we reported our work on UF of BSA. In this report, we report our continuing application of Flow Reversal technique in clarification of apple juice containing pectin. The presence of pectin in apple juice makes the clarification process difficult and is believed to cause membrane fouling. Of all compounds found in apple juice, pectin is most often identified as the major hindrance to filtration performance. Laboratory-scale tests on a hollow-fiber ultrafiltration membrane module using pectin in apple juice as feed show that under flow reversal conditions, the

  20. Magnetic property, Raman spectroscopy and crystal field analysis of Sm{sub 3+} in Sm(BrO{sub 3}){sub 3}⋅9H{sub 2}O

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mandal, J.; Chakrabarti, P. K.; Purohit, T.; Chattopadhyay, K. N.; Ghosh, M.

    2014-04-24

    Single crystals of Sm(BrO{sub 3}){sub 3}⋅9H{sub 2}O (SmBR) were grown and the principal molar susceptibility perpendicular to c-axis (χ{sub ⊥}) was measured from 300 K down to 14 K and χ{sub ‖}, the parallel susceptibility, anisotropy was measured in the temperature range of 300-120 K. A cross-over between χ{sub ‖} and χ{sub ⊥} was observed at ∼ 120 K i.e., below this temperature χ{sub |||}<χ{sub ‖}. Raman spectra of SmBR were recorded in the wave number range of 10-4000 cm{sup −1} and crystal field (CF) Stark energies were extracted from the spectra. A good theoretical simulation of the observed magnetic susceptibilities and observed CF Stark energies of Sm{sup 3+} in SmBR was achieved using the one electron crystal field (CF) interaction with D{sup 3h} site symmetry. The electronic specific heat along with the quadruple splitting and hyperfine heat capacity were calculated by using the results of CF analysis.

  1. Incommensurate magnetic ordering in Cu{sub 2}Te{sub 2}O{sub 5}X{sub 2} (X=Cl,Br) studied by single crystal neutron diffraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zaharko, O.; Roennow, H.; Mesot, J.; Crowe, S. J.; Paul, D. McK.; Brown, P. J.; Daoud-Aladine, A.; Meents, A.; Wagner, A.; Prester, M.; Berger, H.

    2006-02-01

    Polarized and unpolarized neutron-diffraction studies have been carried out on single crystals of the coupled spin tetrahedra systems Cu{sub 2}Te{sub 2}O{sub 5}X{sub 2} (X=Cl,Br). A model of the magnetic structure associated with the propagation vectors k{sup '}{sub Cl}{approx_equal}(-0.150,0.422,(1/2)) and k{sup '}{sub Br}{approx_equal}(-0.172,0.356,(1/2)) and stable below T{sub N}=18 K for X=Cl and T{sub N}=11 K for X=Br is proposed. A feature of the model, common to both the bromide and chloride, is a canted coplanar motif for the four Cu{sup 2+} spins on each tetrahedron which rotates on a helix from cell to cell following the propagation vector. The Cu{sup 2+} magnetic moment determined for X=Br,0.395(5){mu}{sub B}, is significantly less than for X=Cl,0.88(1){mu}{sub B} at 2 K. The magnetic structure of the chloride associated with the wave vector k{sup '} differs from that determined previously for the wave vector k{approx_equal}(0.150,0.422,(1/2)) [O. Zaharko et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 93, 217206(E) (2004)].

  2. Laser Raman spectroscopy study of the zinc and bromide ion complex equilibrium in zinc/bromine battery electrolytes. [2M ZnBr/sub 2/ and 1M KBr solution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grimes, P.G.; Larrabee, J.A.

    1985-01-01

    Laser Raman spectroscopy was used to study the zinc and bromide ion complex equilibrium in zinc bromine battery model electrolytes. Solutions of zinc bromide with added KBr, HBr and N-methyl, N-ethyl morpholinium (MEM) bromide were examined and compared. Solutions studied ranged from 1 to 3 molar in zinc and from 2.5 to 8 molar in bromide. A typical Raman spectrum of a zinc bromide solution is shown in Figure 1. Each of the zinc species is identified, Zn/sup + +/ (aq), ZnBr/sup +/, ZnBr/sub 2/ (aq), ZnBr/sub 3//sup -/ and ZnBr/sub 4//sup 2 -/. By the use of peak heights or deconvolution/integration along with published Raman cross sections, the amount of each zinc species could be quantitatively determined. The addition of bromide ions to the zinc bromide solutions will shift the equilibrium toward higher bromide complexes. The added cations will influence the shifts. It has been noted that the conductivity of the electrolyte decreases when the quaternary ammonium ions are present compared to cations such as potassium or hydrogen. Significantly more free zinc is present in zinc bromide solutions with added KBr than with either MEMBr or HBr. Shifts are also noted with the other zinc ion containing species. It appears that the quaternary ammonium ions and possibly the pH could have a stabilizing effect on zinc bromide complex ion formation. 2 figs.

  3. Theoretical, numerical and experimental investigation of centrifugal pumps in reverse operation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Derakhshan, Shahram; Nourbakhsh, Ahmad

    2008-09-15

    When a pump works as a turbine, its hydraulic behavior will be changed. Several methods have been developed to predict the best efficiency of pumps running as turbines but their results are not in good coincidence with experimental data for all pumps. Therefore, study and investigation of hydraulic behavior of pumps in reverse operation can be useful. In this study, the best efficiency point of an industrial centrifugal pump running as turbine was achieved using a theoretical analysis. This method tries to estimate hydraulic components of reverse (turbine) mode using direct (pump) mode. In the next step, the pump was simulated in direct and reverse modes by computational fluid dynamics. 3D full Navier-Stokes equations were solved using FineTurbo V.7 flow solver. Using numerical results, complete characteristic curves of the pump in direct and reverse modes were obtained. For experimental verification of theoretical and numerical results, the pump was tested as a turbine in a test rig. All required parameters were measured to achieve complete characteristic curves of the reverse pump. The theoretical and numerical results were compared with experimental data and some other methods. (author)

  4. Intrinsic torque reversals induced by magnetic shear effects on the turbulence spectrum in tokamak plasmas

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lu, Z. X.; Wang, W. X.; Diamond, P. H.; Tynan, G.; Ethier, S.; Gao, C.; Rice, J.

    2015-05-04

    We report that intrinsic torque, which can be generated by turbulent stresses, can induce toroidal rotation in a tokamak plasma at rest without direct momentum injection. Reversals in intrinsic torque have been inferred from the observation of toroidal velocity changes in recent lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) experiments. Here we focus on understanding the cause of LHCD-induced intrinsic torque reversal using gyrokinetic simulations and theoretical analyses. A new mechanism for the intrinsic torque reversal linked to magnetic shear (sˆ) effects on the turbulence spectrum is identified. This reversal is a consequence of the ballooning structure at weak sˆ . Basedmore » on realistic profiles from the Alcator C-Mod LHCD experiments, simulations demonstrate that the intrinsic torque reverses for weak sˆ discharges and that the value of sˆ crit is consistent with the experimental results sˆ expcrit [Rice et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 125003 (2013)]. In conclusion, the consideration of this intrinsic torque feature in our work is important for the understanding of rotation profile generation at weak and its consequent impact on macro-instability stabilization and micro-turbulence reduction, which is crucial for ITER. It is also relevant to internal transport barrier formation at negative or weakly positive sˆ .« less

  5. Superelasticity by reversible variant reorientation in a Ni-Mn-Ga microwire with bamboo grains

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wang, Z. L.; Zheng, P.; Nie, Z. H.; Ren, Y.; Wang, Y. D.; Mullner, P.; Dunand, D. C.

    2015-08-26

    The link between microstructure and mechanical properties is investigated for a superelastic Ni–Mn–Ga microwire with 226 μm diameter, created by solidification via the Taylor method. The wire, which consists of bamboo grains with tetragonal martensite matrix and coarse γ precipitates, exhibits fully reversible superelastic behavior up to 4% tensile strain. Upon multiple tensile load–unload cycles, reproducible stress fluctuations of ~3 MPa are measured on the loading superelastic stress plateau of ~50 MPa. During cycles at various temperatures spanning -70 to 55 °C, the plateau stress decreases from 58 to 48 MPa near linearly with increasing temperature. Based on in situmore » synchrotron X-ray diffraction measurements, we conclude that this superelastic behavior is due to reversible martensite variants reorientation (i.e., reversible twinning) with lattice rotation of ~13°. The reproducible stress plateau fluctuations are assigned to reversible twinning at well-defined locations along the wire. The strain recovery during unloading is attributed to reverse twinning, driven by the internal stress generated on loading between the elastic γ precipitates and the twinning martensite matrix. Lastly, the temperature dependence of the twining stress on loading is related to the change in tetragonality of the martensite, as measured by X-ray diffraction.« less

  6. Superelasticity by reversible variant reorientation in a Ni-Mn-Ga microwire with bamboo grains

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Z. L.; Zheng, P.; Nie, Z. H.; Ren, Y.; Wang, Y. D.; Mullner, P.; Dunand, D. C.

    2015-08-26

    The link between microstructure and mechanical properties is investigated for a superelastic Ni–Mn–Ga microwire with 226 μm diameter, created by solidification via the Taylor method. The wire, which consists of bamboo grains with tetragonal martensite matrix and coarse γ precipitates, exhibits fully reversible superelastic behavior up to 4% tensile strain. Upon multiple tensile load–unload cycles, reproducible stress fluctuations of ~3 MPa are measured on the loading superelastic stress plateau of ~50 MPa. During cycles at various temperatures spanning -70 to 55 °C, the plateau stress decreases from 58 to 48 MPa near linearly with increasing temperature. Based on in situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction measurements, we conclude that this superelastic behavior is due to reversible martensite variants reorientation (i.e., reversible twinning) with lattice rotation of ~13°. The reproducible stress plateau fluctuations are assigned to reversible twinning at well-defined locations along the wire. The strain recovery during unloading is attributed to reverse twinning, driven by the internal stress generated on loading between the elastic γ precipitates and the twinning martensite matrix. Lastly, the temperature dependence of the twining stress on loading is related to the change in tetragonality of the martensite, as measured by X-ray diffraction.

  7. High field strength following the Kauai R-N geomagnetic reversal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul, H.A. . Dept. of Geology)

    1993-04-01

    The paleomagnetism of superposed lava flows on Kauai, Hawaii shows that the ancient geomagnetic field was unusually strong following a reverse-to-normal polarity transition that occurred about 4 million years ago. Paleointensities were determined by a standard experimental procedure (Thelliers' method) that recreates the process of remanence acquisition in volcanic rocks. This experiment makes it possible to infer the strength of the geomagnetic field present with each lava flow formed, thus producing an accurate picture of the ancient field's behavior after the reversal. Samples from 10 volcanic units yielded virtual dipole moments (VDMs) ranging from 7.4 [times] 10[sup 22] Am[sup 2] to 14.5 [times] 10[sup 22] Am[sup 2] with an average of 11.1[times]10[sup 22] Am[sup 2]. This value is high in comparisons to the average VDM for the past 5 m.y., approximately 8.7[times]10[sup 22] Am[sup 2]. In contrast to the highly variable dipole moment observed following a 15 m.y. old reversal at Steen s Mountain, Oregon, the field following the Kauai transition was relatively steady. Surprisingly, the maximum dipole moments following the two reversals were nearly equal. This similarity hints that high field strength may be a systematic feature of the geodynamo immediately following a polarity reversal.

  8. REVERSE RADIATIVE SHOCK LASER EXPERIMENTS RELEVANT TO ACCRETING STREAM-DISK IMPACT IN INTERACTING BINARIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krauland, C. M.; Drake, R. P.; Kuranz, C. C.; Huntington, C. M.; Kaczala, D. N.; Klein, S.; Sweeney, R.; Young, R. P.; Keiter, P. A.; Loupias, B.; Falize, E.; Villette, B.; Plewa, T. E-mail: rpdrake@umich.edu

    2013-01-01

    We present the first results from high-energy-density laboratory astrophysics experiments that explore the hydrodynamic and radiative properties of a reverse shock relevant to a cataclysmic variable system. A reverse shock is a shock wave that develops when a freely flowing, supersonic plasma is impeded. In our experiments, performed on the Omega Laser Facility, a laser pulse is used to accelerate plasma ejecta into a vacuum. This flow is directed into an Al plate in front of which a shock forms in the rebounding plasma. The plasma flow is moving fast enough that it is shocked to high enough temperatures that radiative cooling affects the shock structure. These are the first experiments to produce a radiative reverse shock wave.

  9. Magnetization reversal assisted by half antivortex states in nanostructured circular cobalt disks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lara, A.; Aliev, F. G.; Dobrovolskiy, O. V.; Prieto, J. L.; Huth, M.

    2014-11-03

    The half antivortex, a fundamental topological structure which determines magnetization reversal of submicron magnetic devices with domain walls, has been suggested also to play a crucial role in spin torque induced vortex core reversal in circular disks. Here, we report on magnetization reversal in circular disks with nanoholes through consecutive metastable states with half antivortices. In-plane anisotropic magnetoresistance and broadband susceptibility measurements accompanied by micromagnetic simulations reveal that cobalt (Co) disks with two and three linearly arranged nanoholes directed at 45° and 135° with respect to the external magnetic field show reproducible step-like changes in the anisotropic magnetoresistance and magnetic permeability due to transitions between different intermediate states mediated by vortices and half antivortices confined to the dot nanoholes and edges, respectively. Our findings are relevant for the development of multi-hole based spintronic and magnetic memory devices.

  10. Multi-channel time-reversal receivers for multi and 1-bit implementations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Candy, James V.; Chambers, David H.; Guidry, Brian L.; Poggio, Andrew J.; Robbins, Christopher L.

    2008-12-09

    A communication system for transmitting a signal through a channel medium comprising digitizing the signal, time-reversing the digitized signal, and transmitting the signal through the channel medium. In one embodiment a transmitter is adapted to transmit the signal, a multiplicity of receivers are adapted to receive the signal, a digitizer digitizes the signal, and a time-reversal signal processor is adapted to time-reverse the digitized signal. An embodiment of the present invention includes multi bit implementations. Another embodiment of the present invention includes 1-bit implementations. Another embodiment of the present invention includes a multiplicity of receivers used in the step of transmitting the signal through the channel medium.

  11. Ultra-fast magnetic vortex core reversal by a local field pulse

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rückriem, R.; Albrecht, M.; Schrefl, T.

    2014-02-03

    Magnetic vortex core reversal of a 20-nm-thick permalloy disk with a diameter of 100 nm was studied by micromagnetic simulations. By applying a global out-of-plane magnetic field pulse, it turned out that the final core polarity is very sensitive to pulse width and amplitude, which makes it hard to control. The reason for this phenomenon is the excitation of radial spin waves, which dominate the reversal process. The excitation of spin waves can be strongly suppressed by applying a local field pulse within a small area at the core center. With this approach, ultra-short reversal times of about 15 ps were achieved, which are ten times faster compared to a global pulse.

  12. The elimination of the reverse circulation in thermosiphon solar water heaters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prapas, D.E.; Sotiropoulos, B.A. )

    1991-01-01

    Thermosiphon solar water heaters (TSWH), employing either closed or open collector loops, are widely used today to cover a substantial part of the hot water needs, mostly in residential small scale applications. Their cost is lower in comparison to pumped systems, because no pumps, controls etc. are required. However, the storage tank has to be mounted above the collector in order to promote the thermosiphon flow; this could be a serious drawback in some applications. An undesirable characteristic of TSWH is the reverse circulation (RC) of the working liquid when the temperature of the collector is lower than that of the storage tank. The causes of reverse circulation in thermosyphon solar water heaters, the geometry of the systems, and the affects of nocturnal radiative cooling of the collector are discussed. A means of interconnecting collector and tank to drastically reduce reverse circulation is presented.

  13. Preliminary observations on Quaternary reverse faulting along the southern front of the Northern Range of Trinidad

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beltran, C. , Caracus )

    1993-02-01

    Several geomorphological evidences of Quaternary reverse faulting are observed along the southern front of the Northern Range in Trinidad between Port-of-Spain and Matura Point. Such a mountain front is associated to a reverse fault system showing an imbricated pattern southward. In the north, the system is limited by a structural feature showing an important vertical component. Southward this system progressively changes to low angle faults. This geometry is corroborated by seismic profiling in the continent shelf. The active faulting evidences consist in lateral drainage offsets, fault trenches, sag-ponds, triangular facets, and saddles. Some quaternary terraces show fault scarps and tilting. We postulate that these reverse fault systems as Arima Fault instead of El Pilar fault as it is not actually connected to the San Sebestian-El Pilar right-lateral slip system, due to the southward prolongation of the southern limit of the Caribbean Plate through the fault system of Los Bajos-El Soldado.

  14. Simulation of oscillating field current drive on the reversed-field pinch

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harned, D.S.; Schnack, D.D.; Strauss, H.R.; Nebel, R.A.

    1988-07-01

    Oscillating field current drive on the reversed-field pinch is simulated by using a three-dimensional nonlinear resistive magnetohydrodynamic model in conjunction with a one-dimensional hyper-resistive model. When input from the three-dimensional model is used for fluctuating fields in the hyper-resistive equations, the two models are found to give similar relaxed profiles. Comparisons are made with experiments on the Los Alamos National Laboratory ZT-40M reversed-field pinch device (Nucl. Fusion 25, 1321 (1985)). Simulation results indicate that the oscillation period must be much less than the resistive decay time, but should not be much less than the hyper-resistive relaxation time, in order to maintain reversal without a steady-state driving field.

  15. Reversible gelling culture media for in-vitro cell culture in three-dimensional matrices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    An, Yuehuei H.; Mironov, Vladimir A.; Gutowska, Anna

    2000-01-01

    A gelling cell culture medium useful for forming a three dimensional matrix for cell culture in vitro is prepared by copolymerizing an acrylamide derivative with a hydrophilic comonomer to form a reversible (preferably thermally reversible) gelling linear random copolymer in the form of a plurality of linear chains having a plurality of molecular weights greater than or equal to a minimum gelling molecular weight cutoff, mixing the copolymer with an aqueous solvent to form a reversible gelling solution and adding a cell culture medium to the gelling solution to form the gelling cell culture medium. Cells such as chondrocytes or hepatocytes are added to the culture medium to form a seeded culture medium, and temperature of the medium is raised to gel the seeded culture medium and form a three dimensional matrix containing the cells. After propagating the cells in the matrix, the cells may be recovered by lowering the temperature to dissolve the matrix and centrifuging.

  16. FLUX ENHANCEMENT IN CROSSFLOW MEMBRANE FILTRATION: FOULING AND IT'S MINIMIZATION BY FLOW REVERSAL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shamsuddin Ilias

    2002-03-14

    Fouling problems are perhaps the single most important reason for relatively slow acceptance of ultrafiltration in many areas of chemical and biological processing. To overcome the losses in permeate flux associated with concentration polarization and fouling in cross flow membrane filtration, we investigated the concept of flow reversal as a method to enhance membrane flux in ultrafiltration. Conceptually, flow reversal prevents the formation of stable hydrodynamic and concentration boundary layers at or near the membrane surface. Further more, periodic reversal of the flow direction of the feed stream at the membrane surface results in prevention and mitigation of membrane fouling. Consequently, these advantages are expected to enhance membrane flux significantly. A crossflow membrane filtration unit was designed and built to test the concept of periodic flow reversal for flux enhancement. The essential elements of the system include a crossflow hollow fiber membrane module integrated with a two-way valve to direct the feed flow directions. The two-way valve is controlled by a controller-timer for periodic reversal of flow of feed stream. Another important feature of the system is that with changing feed flow direction, the permeate flow direction is also changed to maintain countercurrent feed and permeate flows for enhanced mass transfer driving force (concentration difference). Bovine serum albumin (BSA) is a well-studied model solute in membrane filtration known for its fouling and concentration polarization capabilities. Laboratory-scale tests on a hollow-fiber ultrafiltration membrane module using BSA solution as feed show that under flow reversal conditions, the permeate flux is significantly enhanced when compared with the conventional unidirectional flow. The flux enhancement is dramatic (by an order of magnitude) with increased feed concentration and operating transmembrane pressure.

  17. Propagation direction reversal of ionization zones in the transition between high and low current magnetron sputtering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    School of Materials Science and Engineering, State Key Lab for Materials Processing and Die & Mold Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074, China; Department of Physics, University of California Berkeley, Berkeley, California 94720, USA; Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, California 94720, USA; Yang, Yuchen; Liu, Jason; Liu, Lin; Anders, Andr

    2014-12-11

    Past research has revealed the propagation of dense, asymmetric ionization zones in both high and low current magnetron discharges. Here we report about the direction reversal of ionization zone propagation as observed with fast cameras. At high currents, zones move in the E B direction with velocities of 103 to 104 m/s. However at lower currents, ionization zones are observed to move in the opposite, the -E B direction, with velocities ~;; 103 m/s. It is proposed that the direction reversal is associated with the local balance of ionization and supply of neutrals in the ionization zone.

  18. Magnetization Reversal Process of Single Crystal α-Fe Containing a Nonmagnetic Particle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Yi; Xu, Ben; Hu, Shenyang Y.; Li, Yulan; Li, Qiu-Lin; Liu, Wei

    2015-09-25

    The magnetization reversal process and hysteresis loops in a single crystal α-iron with nonmagnetic particles are simulated in this work based on the Landau-Lifshitz–Gilbert equation. The evolutions of the magnetic domain morphology are studied, and our analyses show that the magnetization reversal process is affected by the interaction between the moving domain wall and the existing nonmagnetic particles. This interaction strongly depends on the size of the particles, and it is found that particles with a particular size contribute the most to magnetic hardening.

  19. Lower-hybrid poloidal current drive for fluctuation reduction in a reversed field pinch

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Uchimoto, E.; Cekic, M.; Harvey, R.W.; Litwin, C.; Prager, S.C.; Sarff, J.S.; Sovinec, C.R.

    1994-06-01

    Current drive using the lower-hybrid slow wave is shown to be a promising candidate for improving confinement properties of a reversed field pinch (RFP). Ray-tracing calculations indicate that the wave will make a few poloidal turns while spiraling radially into a target zone inside the reversal layer. The poloidal antenna wavelength of the lower hybrid wave can be chosen so that efficient parallel current drive will occur mostly in the poloidal direction in this outer region. Three-dimensional resistive magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) computation demonstrates that an additive poloidal current in this region will reduce the magnetic fluctuations and magnetic stochasticity.

  20. Turbulent transport in the Madison Symmetric Torus reversed-field pinch

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    transport in the Madison Symmetric Torus reversed-field pinch* T. D. Rempel,+ A. F. Almagri, S. Assadi, D. J. Den Hartog, S. A. Hokin, S. C. Prager, J. S. Sarff, W. Shen, K. L. Sidikman, C. W. Spragins, J. C. Sprott, M. R. Stoneking, and E. J. Zita University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53 706 (Received 22 November 1991; accepted 20 February 1992) Measurements of edge turbulence and the associated transport are ongoing in the Madison Symmetric Torus (MST) reversed-field pinch [Fusion

  1. Time-reversal focusing of an expanding soliton gas in disordered replicas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fratalocchi, A.; Armaroli, A.; Trillo, S.

    2011-05-15

    We investigate the properties of time reversibility of a soliton gas, originating from a dispersive regularization of a shock wave, as it propagates in a strongly disordered environment. An original approach combining information measures and spin glass theory shows that time-reversal focusing occurs for different replicas of the disorder in forward and backward propagation, provided the disorder varies on a length scale much shorter than the width of the soliton constituents. The analysis is performed by starting from a new class of reflectionless potentials, which describe the most general form of an expanding soliton gas of the defocusing nonlinear Schroedinger equation.

  2. Ion heating and magnetohydrodynamic dynamo fluctuations in the reversed-field pinch

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ion heating and magnetohydrodynamic dynamo fluctuations in the reversed-field pinch Earl Scime?) Miodrag Cekic, D. J. Den Hartog, Samuel Hokin, D. J. Holly, and Christopher Watts Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 5.3 706 (Received 8 June 1992; accepted 18 August 1992) Ion temperatures have been measured in the Madison Symmetric Torus (MST) [Dexter et aL, Fusion Technol. 19, 131 ( 199 1 j] reversed-field pinch (RFP) with a five channel charge exchange

  3. MHD computation of feedback of resistive-shell instabilities in the reversed field pinch

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zita, E.J.; Prager, S.C.; Ho, Y.L.; Schnack, D.D

    1992-05-01

    MHD computation demonstrates that feedback can sustain reversal and reduce loop voltage in resistive-shell reversed field pinch (RFP) plasmas. Edge feedback on {approximately}2R/a tearing modes resonant near axis is found to restore plasma parameters to nearly their levels with a close-fitting conducting shell. When original dynamo modes are stabilized, neighboring tearing modes grow to maintain the RFP dynamo more efficiently. This suggests that experimentally observed limits on RFP pulselengths to the order of the shell time can be overcome by applying feedback to a few helical modes.

  4. Absence of correlation between Sry polymorphisms and XY sex reversal caused by the M.m. domesticus Y chromosome

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlisle, C.; Nagamine, C.M. [Vanderbilt Univ., School of Medicine, Nashville, TN (United States)] [Vanderbilt Univ., School of Medicine, Nashville, TN (United States); Winkinig, H.; Weichenhan, D. [Medizinische Universitaet Zu Luebeck (Germany)] [Medizinische Universitaet Zu Luebeck (Germany)

    1996-04-01

    Mus musculus domesticus Y chromosomes (Y{sup DOM} Chrs) vary in their ability to induce testes in the strain C57BL/6J. In severe cases, XY females develop (XY{sup DOM} sex reversal). To identify the molecular basis for the sex reversal, a 2.7-kb region of Sry, the testis-determining gene, was sequenced from Y{sup DOM} Chrs linked to normal testis determination, transient sex reversal, and severe sex reversal. Four mutations were identified. However, no correlation exists between these mutations and severity of XY{sup DOM} sex reversal. RT-PCR identified Sry transcripts in XY{sup DOM} sex-reversed fetal gonads at 11 d.p.c., the age when Sry is hypothesized to function. In addition, no correlation exists between XY{sup DOM} sex reversal and copy numbers of pSx1, a Y-repetitive sequence whose deletion is linked to XY sex reversal. We conclude that SRY protein variants, blockade of Sry transcription, and deletion of pSx1 sequences are not the underlying causes of XY{sup DOM} sex reversal. 63 refs., 6 figs., 6 tabs.

  5. A field-reversed magnetic configuration and applications of high-temperature FRC plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ryzhkov, S. V.

    2011-12-15

    As applied to a tokomak, a magnetic trap for confinement of a plasma with an inverted field or a magnetic field reversed configuration (FRC) is one of the most promising alternatives of the systems with high {beta}. A brief review of the latest data on FRC and potential directions of using such configurations in addition to energy generation in thermonuclear reactors (TNRs) is proposed.

  6. Confinement analyses of the high-density field-reversed configuration plasma in the field-reversed configuration experiment with a liner

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang Shouyin; Intrator, T.P.; Wurden, G.A.; Waganaar, W.J.; Taccetti, J.M.; Renneke, R.; Grabowski, C.; Ruden, E.L.

    2005-05-15

    The focus of the field-reversed configuration (FRC) experiment with a liner (FRX-L) is the formation of a target FRC plasma for magnetized target fusion experiments. An FRC plasma with density of 10{sup 23} m{sup -3}, total temperature in the range of 150-300 eV, and a lifetime of {approx_equal}20 {mu}s is desired. Field-reversed {theta}-pinch technology is used with programed cusp fields at {theta}-coil ends to achieve non-tearing field line reconnections during FRC formation. Well-formed FRCs with density between (2-4)x10{sup 22} m{sup -3}, lifetime in the range of 15-20 {mu}s, and total temperature between 300-500 eV are reproducibly created. Key FRC parameters have standard deviation in the mean of 10% during consecutive shots. The FRCs are formed at 50 mTorr deuterium static fill using 2 kG net reversed bias field inside the {theta}-coil confinement region, with external main field unexpectedly ranging between 15-30 kG. The high-density FRCs confinement properties are approximately in agreement with empirical scaling laws obtained from previous experiments with fill pressure mostly less than 20 mTorr. Analyses in this paper reveal that reducing the external main field modulation and/or extending the {theta}-coil length in the FRX-L device are critical in achieving higher FRC parameters for application in magnetized target fusion.

  7. Hanford Speakers Bureau<br>>Frequently Asked Questions - Hanford...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of the topics covered by the Hanford Speakers Bureau? The presentation covers various strategies for cleaning up the 586 square miles Hanford Site. Speakers can provide an...

  8. Investigation and demonstration of dry carbon-based sorbent injection for mercury control. Quarterly technical report, April 1--June 30, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hunt, T.; Sjostrom, S.; Smith, J.; Chang, R.

    1996-07-27

    The overall objective this two phase program is to investigate the use of dry carbon-based sorbents for mercury control. During Phase 1, a bench-scale field test device that can be configured as an electrostatic precipitator, a pulse-jet baghouse, or a reverse-gas baghouse has been designed and will be integrated with an existing pilot-scale facility at PSCo`s Comanche Station. Up to three candidate sorbents will then be injected into the flue gas stream upstream of the test device to determine the mercury removal efficiency for each sorbent. During the Phase 11 effort, component integration for the most promising dry sorbent technology (technically and economically feasible) shall be tested at the 5000 acfm pilot-scale. An extensive work plan has been developed for the project. Three sorbents will be selected for evaluation at the facility through investigation, presentation, and discussion among team members: PSCO, EPRI, ADA, and DOE. The selected sorbents will be tested in the five primary bench-scale configurations: pulse `et baghouse, TOXECON, reverse-gas baghouse, electrostatic precipitator, and an ESP or fabric filter `with no Comanche ash in the flue gas stream. In the EPRI TOXECON system, mercury sorbents will be injected downstream of a primary particulate control device, and collected in a pulse-jet baghouse operated at air-to-cloth ratios of 12 to 16 ft/min, thus separating the mercury and sorbent from the captured flyash. In the no-ash configuration, an external flyash sample will be injected into a clean gas stream to investigate possible variations in sorbent effectiveness in the presence of different ashes. The use of an existing test facility, a versatile design for the test fixture, and installation of a continuous mercury analyzer will allow for the completion of this ambitious test plan. The primary activity during the quarter was to complete fabrication and installation of the facility.

  9. Improvement of {gamma}-ray energy resolution of LaBr{sub 3}:Ce{sup 3+} scintillation detectors by Sr{sup 2+} and Ca{sup 2+} co-doping

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alekhin, M. S.; Haas, J. T. M. de; Khodyuk, I. V.; Dorenbos, P.; Kraemer, K. W.; Menge, P. R.; Ouspenski, V.

    2013-04-22

    Commercially available LaBr{sub 3}:5% Ce{sup 3+} scintillators show with photomultiplier tube readout about 2.7% energy resolution for the detection of 662 keV {gamma}-rays. Here we will show that by co-doping LaBr{sub 3}:Ce{sup 3+} with Sr{sup 2+} or Ca{sup 2+} the resolution is improved to 2.0%. Such an improvement is attributed to a strong reduction of the scintillation light losses that are due to radiationless recombination of free electrons and holes during the earliest stages (1-10 ps) inside the high free charge carrier density parts of the ionization track.

  10. High field magnetotransport and point contact Andreev reflection measurements on CuCr{sub 2}Se{sub 4} and CuCr{sub 2}Se{sub 3}BrDegenerate magnetic semiconductor single crystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borisov, K. Coey, J. M. D.; Stamenov, P.; Alaria, J.

    2014-05-07

    Single crystals of the metallically degenerate fully magnetic semiconductors CuCr{sub 2}Se{sub 4} and CuCr{sub 2}Se{sub 3}Br have been prepared by the Chemical Vapour Transport method, using either Se or Br as transport agents. The high-quality, millimetre-sized, octahedrally faceted, needle- and platelet-shaped crystals are characterised by means of high field magnetotransport (?{sub 0}H? 14?T) and Point Contact Andreev Reflection. The relatively high spin polarisation observed |P|>0.56, together with the relatively low minority carrier effective mass of 0.25 m{sub e}, and long scattering time 10{sup ?13}?s, could poise these materials for integration in low- and close-to-room temperature minority injection bipolar heterojunction transistor demonstrations.

  11. Measurement of the B0(s) semileptonic branching ratio to an orbitally excited D**(s) state, Br(B0(s) ---> D-(s1)(2536) mu+ nu X)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov, V.M.; Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Acharya, B.S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Aguilo, E.; Ahn, S.H.; Ahsan, M.; Alexeev, G.D.; Alkhazov, G.; /Buenos Aires U. /Rio de Janeiro, CBPF /Rio de Janeiro State U. /ABC Federal U. /Sao Paulo, IFT /Alberta U. /Simon Fraser U. /York U., Canada /McGill U. /Hefei, CUST /Andes U., Bogota

    2007-12-01

    In a data sample of approximately 1.3 fb{sup -1} collected with the D0 detector between 2002 and 2006, the orbitally excited charm state D{sub s1}{sup {+-}}(2536) has been observed with a measured mass of 2535.7 {+-} 0.6(stat) {+-} 0.5(syst) MeV/c{sup 2} via the decay mode B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} D{sub s1}{sup -}(2536){mu}{sup +} {nu}X. A first measurement is made of the branching ratio product Br({bar B} {yields} D{sub s1}{sup -}(2536){mu}{sup +}{nu}X) {center_dot} Br(D{sub s1}{sup -} {yields} D*{sup -} K{sub S}{sup 0}). Assuming that D{sub s1}{sup -}(2536) production in semileptonic decay is entirely from B{sub s}{sup 0}, an extraction of the semileptonic branching ratio Br(B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} D{sub s1}{sup -}(2536){mu}{sup +}{nu}X) is made.

  12. Elasticity-induced force reversal between active spinning particles in dense passive media

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aragones, J. L.; Steimel, J. P.; Alexander-Katz, A.

    2016-04-26

    The self-organization of active particles is governed by their dynamic effective interactions. Such interactions are controlled by the medium in which such active agents reside. Here we study the interactions between active agents in a dense non-active medium. Our system consists of actuated, spinning, active particles embedded in a dense monolayer of passive, or non-active, particles. We demonstrate that the presence of the passive monolayer alters markedly the properties of the system and results in a reversal of the forces between active spinning particles from repulsive to attractive. The origin of such reversal is due to the coupling between themore » active stresses and elasticity of the system. Finally, this discovery provides a mechanism for the interaction between active agents in complex and structured media, opening up opportunities to tune the interaction range and directionality via the mechanical properties of the medium.« less

  13. Evaluate fundamental approaches to longwall dust control: Subprogram F, Reversed drum rotation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ludlow, J.; Kelly, J.; Ruggieri, S.

    1990-05-01

    In longwall mining, a significant portion of the shearer operator's dust exposure is caused by dust generated during loading. With the conventional direction of shearer drum rotation, loading efficiency is usually poor due to obstructions caused by the ranging arms and the cowl support arms. By reversing the normal direction of rotation, however, the arms no longer provide an obstruction. This results in improved loading efficiency and reduced dust generation. This report describes the reversed drum rotation concept and presents the results of a field survey and underground evaluation conducted to prove its feasibility and to measure its dust control benefits. Through this effort, the technique was shown to be feasible from both a mining and mechanical standpoint. During the underground test, it reduced dust levels near the shearer operator's positions by about 85%. 20 figs., 4 tabs.

  14. Advanced dimensional inspection for the reverse engineering of power plant equipment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kotteakos, B.; Ball, K.A.

    1996-12-31

    Forced outages and critical path situations often leave electric utilities with very few options other than the OEM. What does the utility do when faced with the situation of long lead time or obsolete items necessary to bring units back on-line, or off load restrictions. At Southern California Edison Company (SCE), a proactive approach to the reverse engineering and inspection process was undertaken to reduce the effects of similar situations. Advances in dimensional measurement technology have afforded the authors` company a cost effective method for obtaining the necessary inspection data to remanufacture certain items. This paper identifies equipment utilized by SCE for the reverse engineering and inspection of turbine and turbine related components and their typical applications in the power generation industry.

  15. Plasma-gun-assisted field-reversed configuration formation in a conical θ-pinch

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Weber, T. E.; Intrator, T. P.; Smith, R. J.

    2015-04-29

    The injection of plasma via an annular array of coaxial plasma guns during the pre-ionization phase of field-reversed configuration (FRC) formation is shown to catalyze the bulk ionization of a neutral gas prefill in the presence of a strong axial magnetic field and change the character of outward flux flow during field-reversal from a convective process to a much slower resistive diffusion process. Our approach was found to significantly improve FRC formation in a conical θ-pinch, resulting in a ~350% increase in trapped flux at typical operating conditions, an expansion of accessible formation parameter space to lower densities and highermore » temperatures, and a reduction or elimination of several deleterious effects associated with the pre-ionization phase.« less

  16. Plasma-gun-assisted field-reversed configuration formation in a conical θ-pinch

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weber, T. E. Intrator, T. P.; Smith, R. J.

    2015-04-15

    Injection of plasma via an annular array of coaxial plasma guns during the pre-ionization phase of field-reversed configuration (FRC) formation is shown to catalyze the bulk ionization of a neutral gas prefill in the presence of a strong axial magnetic field and change the character of outward flux flow during field-reversal from a convective process to a much slower resistive diffusion process. This approach has been found to significantly improve FRC formation in a conical θ-pinch, resulting in a ∼350% increase in trapped flux at typical operating conditions, an expansion of accessible formation parameter space to lower densities and higher temperatures, and a reduction or elimination of several deleterious effects associated with the pre-ionization phase.

  17. Power balance in a high-density field reversed configuration plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Renneke, R. M.; Intrator, T. P.; Hsu, S. C.; Wurden, G. A.; Waganaar, W. J.; Ruden, E. L.; Grabowski, T. C.

    2008-06-15

    A global power balance analysis has been performed for the Field Reversed Experiment with Liner high density (>5x10{sup 22} m{sup -3}) field reversed configuration (FRC) plasma. The analysis was based on a zero-dimensional power balance model [D. J. Rey and M. Tuszewski, Phys. Fluids 27, 1514 (1984)]. The key findings are as follows. First, the percentage of radiative losses relative to total loss is an order of magnitude lower than previous lower density FRC experiments. Second, Ohmic heating was found to correlate with the poloidal flux trapping at FRC formation, suggesting that poloidal flux dissipation is primarily responsible for plasma heating. Third, high density FRCs analyzed in this work reinforce the low-density adiabatic scaling, which shows that particle confinement time and flux confinement time are approximately equal.

  18. Microturbulence studies of pulsed poloidal current drive discharges in the reversed field pinch

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carmody, D. Pueschel, M. J.; Anderson, J. K.; Terry, P. W.

    2015-01-15

    Experimental discharges with pulsed poloidal current drive (PPCD) in the Madison Symmetric Torus reversed field pinch are investigated using a semi-analytic equilibrium model in the gyrokinetic turbulence code GENE. PPCD cases, with plasma currents of 500 kA and 200 kA, exhibit a density-gradient-driven trapped electron mode (TEM) and an ion temperature gradient mode, respectively. Relative to expectations of tokamak core plasmas, the critical gradients for the onset of these instabilities are found to be greater by roughly a factor of the aspect ratio. A significant upshift in the nonlinear TEM transport threshold, previously found for tokamaks, is confirmed in nonlinear reversed field pinch simulations and is roughly three times the threshold for linear instability. The simulated heat fluxes can be brought in agreement with measured diffusivities by introducing a small, resonant magnetic perturbation, thus modeling the residual fluctuations from tearing modes. These fluctuations significantly enhance transport.

  19. Plasma-gun-assisted field-reversed configuration formation in a conical θ-pinch

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weber, T. E.; Intrator, T. P.; Smith, R. J.

    2015-04-29

    The injection of plasma via an annular array of coaxial plasma guns during the pre-ionization phase of field-reversed configuration (FRC) formation is shown to catalyze the bulk ionization of a neutral gas prefill in the presence of a strong axial magnetic field and change the character of outward flux flow during field-reversal from a convective process to a much slower resistive diffusion process. Our approach was found to significantly improve FRC formation in a conical θ-pinch, resulting in a ~350% increase in trapped flux at typical operating conditions, an expansion of accessible formation parameter space to lower densities and higher temperatures, and a reduction or elimination of several deleterious effects associated with the pre-ionization phase.

  20. ATP-independent reversal of a membrane protein aggregate by a chloroplast SRP subunit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jaru-Ampornpan, Peera; Shen, Kuang; Lam, Vinh Q.; Ali, Mona; Doniach, Sebastian; Jia, Tony Z.; Shan, Shu-ou (CIT); (Stanford)

    2010-07-23

    Membrane proteins impose enormous challenges to cellular protein homeostasis during their post-translational targeting, and they require chaperones to keep them soluble and translocation competent. Here we show that a novel targeting factor in the chloroplast signal recognition particle (cpSRP), cpSRP43, is a highly specific molecular chaperone that efficiently reverses the aggregation of its substrate proteins. In contrast to 'ATPases associated with various cellular activities' (AAA{sup +}) chaperones, cpSRP43 uses specific binding interactions with its substrate to mediate its 'disaggregase' activity. This disaggregase capability can allow targeting machineries to more effectively capture their protein substrates and emphasizes a close connection between protein folding and trafficking processes. Moreover, cpSRP43 provides the first example to our knowledge of an ATP-independent disaggregase and shows that efficient reversal of protein aggregation can be attained by specific binding interactions between a chaperone and its substrate.

  1. Magnetohydrodynamic simulations of noninductive helicity injection in the reversed-field pinch and tokamak

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sovinec, C.R.

    1995-12-31

    Numerical computation is used to investigate resistive magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) fluctuations in the reversed-field pinch (RFP) and in tokamak-like configurations driven solely by direct current (DC) helicity injection. A Lundquist number (S) scan of RFP turbulence without plasma pressure produces the weak scaling of S{sup -0.18} for the root-mean-square magnetic fluctuation level for 2.5x10{sup 3}{le}S{le}4x10{sup 4}. The temporal behavior of fluctuations and the reversal parameter becomes more regular as S is increased, acquiring a {open_quotes}sawtooth{close_quotes} shape at the largest value of S. Simulations with plasma pressure and anisotropic thermal conduction demonstrate energy transport resulting from parallel heat fluctuations. To investigate means of improving RFP energy confinement, three forms of current profile modification are tested. Radio frequency (RF) current drive is modeled with an auxiliary electron force, and linear stability calculations are used.

  2. Effects of Si/Al Ratio on Cu/SSZ-13 NH3-SCR Catalysts: Implications for the active Cu species and the Roles of Brønsted Acidity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gao, Feng; Washton, Nancy M.; Wang, Yilin; Kollar, Marton; Szanyi, Janos; Peden, Charles HF

    2015-09-03

    Cu/SSZ-13 catalysts with three Si/Al ratios of 6, 12 and 35 were synthesized with Cu incorporation via solution ion exchange. The implications of varying Si/Al ratios on the nature of the multiple Cu species that can be present in the SSZ-13 zeolite are a major focus of this work, as highlighted by the results of a variety of catalyst characterization and reaction kinetics measurements. Specifically, catalysts were characterized with surface area/pore volume measurements, temperature programmed reduction by H2 (H2-TPR), NH3 temperature programmed desorption (NH3-TPD), and DRIFTS and solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopies. Catalytic properties were examined using NO oxidation, ammonia oxidation, and standard ammonia selective catalytic reduction (NH3-SCR) reactions on selected catalysts under differential conditions. Besides indicating possible variably active multiple Cu species for these reactions, the measurements are also used to untangle some of the complexities caused by the interplay between redox of Cu ion centers and Brønsted acidity. All three reactions appear to follow a redox reaction mechanism, yet the roles of Brønsted acidity are quite different. For NO oxidation, increasing Si/Al ratio lowers Cu redox barriers, thus enhancing reaction rates. Brønsted acidity appears to play essentially no role for this reaction. For standard NH3-SCR, residual Brønsted acidity plays a significant beneficial role at both low- and high-temperature regimes. For NH3 oxidation, no clear trend is observed suggesting both Cu ion center redox and Brønsted acidity play important and perhaps competing roles. The authors gratefully acknowledge the US Department of Energy (DOE), Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Vehicle Technologies Office for the support of this work. The research described in this paper was performed in the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL), a national scientific user facility sponsored by the DOE’s Office of

  3. Reversible CO-binding to the Active Site of Nitrogenase | Stanford

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource Reversible CO-binding to the Active Site of Nitrogenase Tuesday, March 31, 2015 All living organisms depend on the availability of nitrogen for incorporation into the basic biological building blocks such as amino acids and DNA. Globally the largest reservoir for nitrogen is the atmosphere, with an N2 content of roughly 78%. However, as a highly unreactive gas, most organisms are unable to directly utilize dinitrogen due to the severe energy barrier required

  4. DEFINING THE PLAYERS IN HIGHER-ORDER NETWORKS: PREDICTIVE MODELING FOR REVERSE ENGINEERING FUNCTIONAL INFLUENCE NETWORKS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McDermott, Jason E.; Costa, Michelle N.; Stevens, S.L.; Stenzel-Poore, Mary; Sanfilippo, Antonio P.

    2011-01-20

    A difficult problem that is currently growing rapidly due to the sharp increase in the amount of high-throughput data available for many systems is that of determining useful and informative causative influence networks. These networks can be used to predict behavior given observation of a small number of components, predict behavior at a future time point, or identify components that are critical to the functioning of the system under particular conditions. In these endeavors incorporating observations of systems from a wide variety of viewpoints can be particularly beneficial, but has often been undertaken with the objective of inferring networks that are generally applicable. The focus of the current work is to integrate both general observations and measurements taken for a particular pathology, that of ischemic stroke, to provide improved ability to produce useful predictions of systems behavior. A number of hybrid approaches have recently been proposed for network generation in which the Gene Ontology is used to filter or enrich network links inferred from gene expression data through reverse engineering methods. These approaches have been shown to improve the biological plausibility of the inferred relationships determined, but still treat knowledge-based and machine-learning inferences as incommensurable inputs. In this paper, we explore how further improvements may be achieved through a full integration of network inference insights achieved through application of the Gene Ontology and reverse engineering methods with specific reference to the construction of dynamic models of transcriptional regulatory networks. We show that integrating two approaches to network construction, one based on reverse-engineering from conditional transcriptional data, one based on reverse-engineering from in situ hybridization data, and another based on functional associations derived from Gene Ontology, using probabilities can improve results of clustering as evaluated by a

  5. Fluctuation and transport reduction in a reversed field pinch by inductive poloidal current drive

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sarff, J.S.; Hokin, S.A.; Ji, H.; Prager, S.C.; Sovinec, C.R.

    1993-12-01

    An auxilliay poloidal inductive electric field applied to a reversed field pinch plasma reduces the current density gradient, slows the growth of m=1 tearing fluctations, suppresses their associated sawteeth, and doubles the energy confinement time. Small sawteeth occur in the improved state but with m=0 precursors. By requiring a change of toroidal flux embedding the plasma, inductive poloidal current profile drive is transient, but the improvement encourages the program of RFP transport suppression using current profile control.

  6. Production of field-reversed mirror plasma with a coaxial plasma gun

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hartman, Charles W.; Shearer, James W.

    1982-01-01

    The use of a coaxial plasma gun to produce a plasma ring which is directed into a magnetic field so as to form a field-reversed plasma confined in a magnetic mirror. Plasma thus produced may be used as a target for subsequent neutral beam injection or other similarly produced and projected plasma rings or for direct fusion energy release in a pulsed mode.

  7. Production of field-reversed mirror plasma with a coaxial plasma gun

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hartman, C.W.; Shearer, J.W.

    The use of a coaxial plasma gun to produce a plasma ring which is directed into a magnetic field so as to form a field-reversed plasma confined in a magnetic mirror. Plasma thus produced may be used as a target for subsequent neutral beam injection or other similarly produced and projected plasma rings or for direct fusion energy release in a pulsed mode.

  8. Sidestream treatment of high silica cooling water and reverse osmosis desalination in geothermal power generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mindler, A.B.; Bateman, S.T.

    1981-01-19

    Bench scale and pilot plant test work has been performed on cooling water for silica reduction and water reuse, at DOE's Raft River Geothermal Site, Malta, Idaho in cooperation with EG and G (Idaho), Inc. Technical supervision was by Permutit. A novel process of rusting iron shavings was found effective and economical in reducing silica to less than 20 mg/l. Reverse Osmosis was investigated for water reuse after pretreatment and ion exchange softening.

  9. Final report for the field-reversed configuration power plant critical-issue scoping study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Santarius, John F.; Mogahed, Elsayed A.; Emmert, Gilbert A.; Khater, Hesham Y.; Nguyen, Canh N.; Ryzhkov, Sergei V.; Stubna, Michael D.; Steinhauer, Loren C.; Miley, George H.

    2001-03-01

    This report describes research in which a team from the Universities of Wisconsin, Washington, and Illinois performed a scoping study of critical issues for field-reversed configuration (FRC) power plants. The key tasks for this research were (1) systems analysis of deuterium-tritium (D-T) FRC fusion power plants, and (2) conceptual design of the blanket and shield module for an FRC fusion core.

  10. Reversible Electrocatalytic Production and Oxidation of Hydrogen at Low Overpotentials by a Functional Hydrogenase Mimic

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Stuart E.; Yang, Jenny Y.; DuBois, Daniel L.; Bullock, Morris

    2012-03-26

    A new bis(diphosphine) nickel(II) complex, [Ni(PPh2NR2)2](BF4)2, 1, (R = CH2CH2OCH3) is described. A {Delta}G{sup o} of 0.84 kcal/mol{sup -1} for hydrogen addition for this complex was calculated from the experimentally determined equilibrium constant. This complex displays reversible electrocatalytic activity for hydrogen production and oxidation at low overpotentials, a characteristic most commonly associated with hydrogenase enzymes.

  11. Semiclassical matrix model for quantum chaotic transport with time-reversal symmetry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Novaes, Marcel

    2015-10-15

    We show that the semiclassical approach to chaotic quantum transport in the presence of time-reversal symmetry can be described by a matrix model. In other words, we construct a matrix integral whose perturbative expansion satisfies the semiclassical diagrammatic rules for the calculation of transport statistics. One of the virtues of this approach is that it leads very naturally to the semiclassical derivation of universal predictions from random matrix theory.

  12. Method of electric field flow fractionation wherein the polarity of the electric field is periodically reversed

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stevens, Fred J. (Naperville, IL)

    1992-01-01

    A novel method of electric field flow fractionation for separating solute molecules from a carrier solution is disclosed. The method of the invention utilizes an electric field that is periodically reversed in polarity, in a time-dependent, wave-like manner. The parameters of the waveform, including amplitude, frequency and wave shape may be varied to optimize separation of solute species. The waveform may further include discontinuities to enhance separation.

  13. REVERSIBLE HYDROGEN STORAGE IN A LiBH{sub 4}-C{sub 60} NANOCOMPOSITE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Teprovich, J.; Zidan, R.; Peters, B.; Wheeler, J.

    2013-08-06

    Reversible hydrogen storage in a LiBH{sub 4}:C{sub 60} nanocomposite (70:30 wt. %) synthesized by solvent-assisted mixing has been demonstrated. During the solvent-assisted mixing and nanocomposite formation, a chemical reaction occurs in which the C{sub 60} cages are significantly modified by polymerization as well as by hydrogenation (fullerane formation) in the presence of LiBH{sub 4}. We have determined that two distinct hydrogen desorption events are observed upon rehydrogenation of the material, which are attributed to the reversible formation of a fullerane (C{sub 60}H{sub x}) as well as a LiBH4 species. This system is unique in that the carbon species (C{sub 60}) actively participates in the hydrogen storage process which differs from the common practice of melt infiltration of high surface area carbon materials with LiBH{sub 4} (nanoconfinment effect). This nanocomposite demonstrated good reversible hydrogen storage properties as well as the ability to absorb hydrogen under mild conditions (pressures as low as 10 bar H{sub 2} or temperatures as low as 150?C). The nanocomposite was characterized by TGA-RGA, DSC, XRD, LDI-TOF-MS, FTIR, 1H NMR, and APPI MS.

  14. Kinetic simulations of the formation and stability of the field-reversed configuration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Omelchenko, Yu. A.

    2000-05-01

    The Field-Reversed Configuration (FRC) is a high-beta compact toroidal plasma confined primarily by poloidal fields. In the FRC the external field is reversed on axis by the diamagnetic current carried by thermal plasma particles. A three-dimensional, hybrid, particle-in-cell (zero-inertia fluid electrons, and kinetic ions), code FLAME, previously used to study ion rings [Yu. A. Omelchenko and R. N. Sudan, J. Comp. Phys. 133, 146 (1997)], is applied to investigate FRC formation and tilt instability. Axisymmetric FRC equilibria are obtained by simulating the standard experimental reversed theta-pinch technique. These are used to study the nonlinear tilt mode in the ''kinetic'' and ''fluid-like'' cases characterized by ''small'' ({approx}3) and ''large'' ({approx}12) ratios of the characteristic radial plasma size to the mean ion gyro-radius, respectively. The formation simulations have revealed the presence of a substantial toroidal (azimuthal) magnetic field inside the separatrix, generated due to the stretching of the poloidal field by a sheared toroidal electron flow. This is shown to be an important tilt-stabilizing effect in both cases. On the other hand, the tilt mode stabilization by finite Larmor radius effects has been found relatively insignificant for the chosen equilibria. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics.

  15. Damage imaging in a laminated composite plate using an air-coupled time reversal mirror

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Le Bas, P. -Y.; Remillieux, M. C.; Pieczonka, L.; Ten Cate, J. A.; Anderson, B. E.; Ulrich, T. J.

    2015-11-03

    We demonstrate the possibility of selectively imaging the features of a barely visible impact damage in a laminated composite plate by using an air-coupled time reversal mirror. The mirror consists of a number of piezoelectric transducers affixed to wedges of power law profiles, which act as unconventional matching layers. The transducers are enclosed in a hollow reverberant cavity with an opening to allow progressive emission of the ultrasonic wave field towards the composite plate. The principle of time reversal is used to focus elastic waves at each point of a scanning grid spanning the surface of the plate, thus allowing localized inspection at each of these points. The proposed device and signal processing removes the need to be in direct contact with the plate and reveals the same features as vibrothermography and more features than a C-scan. More importantly, this device can decouple the features of the defect according to their orientation, by selectively focusing vector components of motion into the object, through air. For instance, a delamination can be imaged in one experiment using out-of-plane focusing, whereas a crack can be imaged in a separate experiment using in-plane focusing. As a result, this capability, inherited from the principle of time reversal, cannot be found in conventional air-coupled transducers.

  16. Momentum-independent reflectionless transmission in the non-Hermitian time-reversal symmetric system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, X.Z.; Song, Z.

    2013-12-15

    We theoretically study the non-Hermitian systems, the non-Hermiticity of which arises from the unequal hopping amplitude (UHA) dimers. The distinguishing features of these models are that they have full real spectra if all of the eigenvectors are time-reversal (T) symmetric rather than parity-time-reversal (PT) symmetric, and that their Hermitian counterparts are shown to be an experimentally accessible system, which have the same topological structures as that of the original ones but modulated hopping amplitudes within the unbroken region. Under the reflectionless transmission condition, the scattering behavior of momentum-independent reflectionless transmission (RT) can be achieved in the concerned non-Hermitian system. This peculiar feature indicates that, for a certain class of non-Hermitian systems with a balanced combination of the RT dimers, the defects can appear fully invisible to an outside observer. -- Highlights: We investigate the non-Hermitian system with time reversal symmetry. The Hermitian counterpart is experimentally accessible system. The behavior of momentum-independent reflectionless transmission can be achieved. A balanced combination of reflectionless transmission dimers leads to invisibility. It paves an alternative way for the design of invisible cloaking devices.

  17. Statistics of reversible transitions in two-state trajectories in force-ramp spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diezemann, Gregor

    2014-05-14

    A possible way to extract information about the reversible dissociation of a molecular adhesion bond from force fluctuations observed in force ramp experiments is discussed. For small loading rates the system undergoes a limited number of unbinding and rebinding transitions observable in the so-called force versus extension (FE) curves. The statistics of these transient fluctuations can be utilized to estimate the parameters for the rebinding rate. This is relevant in the experimentally important situation where the direct observation of the reversed FE-curves is hampered, e.g., due to the presence of soft linkers. I generalize the stochastic theory of the kinetics in two-state models to the case of time-dependent kinetic rates and compute the relevant distributions of characteristic forces. While for irreversible systems there is an intrinsic relation between the rupture force distribution and the population of the free-energy well of the bound state, the situation is slightly more complex if reversible systems are considered. For a two-state model, a stationary rupture force distribution that is proportional to the population can be defined and allows to consistently discuss quantities averaged over the transient fluctuations. While irreversible systems are best analyzed in the soft spring limit of small pulling device stiffness and large loading rates, here I argue to use the stiffness of the pulling device as a control parameter in addition to the loading rate.

  18. Damage imaging in a laminated composite plate using an air-coupled time reversal mirror

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Le Bas, P. -Y.; Remillieux, M. C.; Pieczonka, L.; Ten Cate, J. A.; Anderson, B. E.; Ulrich, T. J.

    2015-11-03

    We demonstrate the possibility of selectively imaging the features of a barely visible impact damage in a laminated composite plate by using an air-coupled time reversal mirror. The mirror consists of a number of piezoelectric transducers affixed to wedges of power law profiles, which act as unconventional matching layers. The transducers are enclosed in a hollow reverberant cavity with an opening to allow progressive emission of the ultrasonic wave field towards the composite plate. The principle of time reversal is used to focus elastic waves at each point of a scanning grid spanning the surface of the plate, thus allowingmore » localized inspection at each of these points. The proposed device and signal processing removes the need to be in direct contact with the plate and reveals the same features as vibrothermography and more features than a C-scan. More importantly, this device can decouple the features of the defect according to their orientation, by selectively focusing vector components of motion into the object, through air. For instance, a delamination can be imaged in one experiment using out-of-plane focusing, whereas a crack can be imaged in a separate experiment using in-plane focusing. As a result, this capability, inherited from the principle of time reversal, cannot be found in conventional air-coupled transducers.« less

  19. Optical absorption and luminescence spectroscopy of U{sup 3+} in K{sub 2}La{ital X}{sub 5} ({ital X}=Cl,Br,I)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andres, H.P.; Kraemer, K.; Guedel, H.

    1996-08-01

    The title compounds were synthesized and high-resolution absorption and luminescence spectra measured in the near-infrared, VIS, and near UV regions. The visible absorption spectra are dominated by very intense 5{ital f}{r_arrow}6{ital d} bands overlapping with {ital f}-{ital f} transitions. The onset of the first {ital f}-{ital d} absorption is shifted from 46000 cm{sup {minus}1} in K{sub 2}LaCl{sub 5}:Nd{sup 3+} to 15000 cm{sup {minus}1} in K{sub 2}LaCl{sub 5}:U{sup 3+}. Crystal-field splittings in corresponding {sup 2{ital S}+1}{ital L}{sub {ital J}} multiplets are greater by typically a factor of 2 in the U{sup 3+} doped crystal, thus reflecting the larger extension and stronger interaction of the 5{ital f} electrons with the ligands. {ital f}-{ital f} transitions are typically two orders of magnitude more intense in K{sub 2}LaCl{sub 5}:U{sup 3+} than in K{sub 2}LaCl{sub 5}:Nd{sup 3+}. Along the halide series K{sub 2}La{ital X}{sub 5}:U{sup 3+} ({ital X}=Cl,Br,I) the differences in the position of corresponding {ital f}-{ital d} and {ital f}-{ital f} transitions, crystal-field splittings, vibronic intensities, and excited-state lifetimes can be explained with the increasing covalency, the decreasing phonon energies, the increasing electron-phonon coupling, and the increasing U-{ital X} distances. The {ital f}-{ital d} excited states provide a nonradiative bypass of some {ital f}-{ital f} excited states in the case of all these halide lattices. The excited-state dynamics are determined by a delicate interplay of radiative and nonradiative relaxation processes, they are strongly dependent on the nature of {ital X}. Multiphonon relaxation processes are least competitive in the iodide due to the very low value of 106 cm{sup {minus}1} for the highest-energy phonons. A cross-relaxation mechanism determines the dynamics of the iodide at room temperature. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  20. Atomic-scale observation of parallel development of super elasticity and reversible plasticity in GaAs nanowires

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bao, Peite; Du, Sichao; Zheng, Rongkun; Wang, Yanbo; Liao, Xiaozhou; Cui, Xiangyuan; Yen, Hung-Wei; Kong Yeoh, Wai; Ringer, Simon P.; Gao, Qiang; Hoe Tan, H.; Jagadish, Chennupati; Liu, Hongwei; Zou, Jin

    2014-01-13

    We report the atomic-scale observation of parallel development of super elasticity and reversible dislocation-based plasticity from an early stage of bending deformation until fracture in GaAs nanowires. While this phenomenon is in sharp contrast to the textbook knowledge, it is expected to occur widely in nanostructures. This work indicates that the super recoverable deformation in nanomaterials is not simple elastic or reversible plastic deformation in nature, but the coupling of both.

  1. Off-axis sawteeth and double-tearing reconnection in reversed magnetic shear plasmas in TFTR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang, Z.; Park, W.; Fredrickson, E.D.

    1996-06-01

    Off-axis sawteeth are often observed in reversed magnetic shear plasmas when the minimum safety factor q is near or below 2. Fluctuations with m/n = 2/1 (m and n are the poloidal and toroidal mode numbers) appear before and after the crashes. Detailed comparison has been made between the measured T{sub e} profile evolution during the crash and a nonlinear numerical magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) simulation. The good agreement between the observation and simulation indicates that the off-axis sawteeth are due to a double-tearing magnetic reconnection process.

  2. Formation, spin-up, and stability of field-reversed configurations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Omelchenko, Yuri A.

    2015-08-24

    Formation, spontaneous spin-up and stability of theta-pinch formed field-reversed configurations are studied self-consistently in three dimensions with a multiscale hybrid model that treats all plasma ions as full-orbit collisional macro-particles and the electrons as a massless quasineutral fluid. The end-to-end hybrid simulations for the first time reveal poloidal profiles of implosion-driven fast toroidal plasma rotation and demonstrate three well-known discharge regimes as a function of experimental parameters: the decaying stable configuration, the tilt unstable configuration and the nonlinear evolution of a fast growing tearing mode.

  3. Watts nickel and rinse water recovery via an advanced reverse osmosis system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmidt, C.; White, I.E.; Ludwig, R.

    1993-08-01

    The report summarizes the results of an eight month test program conducted at the Hewlett Packard Printed Circuit Board Production Plant, Sunnyvale, CA (H.P.) to assess the effectiveness of an advanced reverse osmosis system (AROS). The AROS unit, manufactured by Water Technologies, Inc. (WTI) of Minneapolis, MN, incorporates membrane materials and system components designed to treat metal plating rinse water and produce two product streams; (1) a concentrated metal solution suitable for the plating bath, and (2) rinse water suitable for reuse as final rinse. Waste water discharge can be virtually eliminated and significant reductions realized in the need for new plating bath solution and rinse water.

  4. Electromagnetic drift instabilities in high-beta plasma under conditions of a field reversed configuration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chirkov, A. Yu.; Khvesyuk, V. I.

    2010-01-15

    Electromagnetic drift instabilities are studied in the conditions of a field reversed configuration (FRC). Dispersion equation is based on the set of Vlasov-Maxwell equations taking into account nonadiabatic responses both of ions and electrons. Considered drift instabilities are caused by density and temperature gradients. It is assumed that magnetic field of the FRC is purely poloidal. Two kinds of magnetic field nonuniformity are considered: (i) perpendicular gradient due to high beta values (beta is the plasma pressure/magnetic pressure) and (ii) curvature of magnetic lines. There is low frequency drift instability existing for high-beta regimes. Modes of such instability can propagate transversally to the unperturbed magnetic field lines.

  5. Enhanced Confinement and Stability of a Field-Reversed Configuration with Rotating Magnetic Field Current Drive

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Slough, J. T.; Miller, K. E.

    2000-08-14

    A new experiment has been constructed to study the sustainment of a field-reversed configuration (FRC) with a rotating magnetic field (RMF). FRCs were formed with cold, unmagnetized ions and thus without a kinetic ion component that was believed to provide stability to internal tilt modes. No destructive instabilities were observed for the RMF FRC. Only peripheral radial penetration of the RMF was observed. The radially inward flow arising from axial screening currents at the FRC edge reduced convective and conductive losses to the measurement limit of the diagnostics. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  6. Tearing relaxation and the globalization of transport in field-reversed configurations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steinhauer, Loren; Barnes, D. C.

    2009-09-15

    Tearing instability of field-reversed configurations (FRC) is investigated using the method of neighboring equilibria. It is shown that the conducting wall position in experiment lies very close to the location needed for tearing stability. This strongly suggests that vigorous but benign tearing modes, acting globally, are the engine of continual self-organization in FRCs, i.e., tearing relaxation. It also explains the ''profile consistency'' and anomalous loss rate of magnetic flux. In effect, tearing globalizes the effect of edge-driven transport.

  7. Separatrix radius measurement of field-reversed configuration plasma in FRX-L

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, S.Y.; Tejero, E.M.; Taccetti, J.M.; Wurden, G.A.; Intrator, T.P.; Waganaar, W.J.; Perkins, R.

    2004-10-01

    Magnetic pickup coils and single turn flux loops are installed on the FRX-L device. The combination of the two measurements provides the excluded flux radius that approximates the separatrix radius of the field-reversed configuration (FRC) plasma. Arrays of similar probes are used to map out local magnetic field dynamics beyond both ends of the theta-coil confinement region to help understand the effects of cusp locations on flux trapping during the FRC formation process. Details on the probe design and system calibrations are presented. The overall system calibration of excluded flux radius measurement is examined by replacing FRC plasma with a known radius aluminum conductor cylinder.

  8. Depth profile of a time-reversal focus in an elastic solid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Remillieux, Marcel C.; Anderson, Brian E.; Ulrich, T. J.; Le Bas, Pierre -Yves; Payan, Cedric

    2015-04-01

    The out-of-plane velocity component is focused on the flat surface of an isotropic solid sample using the principle of time reversal. This experiment is often reproduced in the context of nondestructive testing for imaging features near the surface of the sample. However, it is not clear how deep the focus extends into the bulk of the sample and what its profile is. In this paper, this question is answered using both numerical simulations and experimental data. The profiles of the foci are expressed in terms of the wavelengths of the dominant waves, based on the interpretation of the Lambs problem and the use of the diffraction limit.

  9. Watermelon-like iron nanoparticles: Cr doping effect on magnetism and magnetization interaction reversal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaur, Maninder; Dai, Qilin; Bowden, Mark E.; Engelhard, Mark H.; Wu, Yaqiao; Tang, Jinke; Qiang, You

    2013-06-26

    Chromium (Cr) forms a solid solution with iron (Fe) lattice when doped in core-shell iron -iron oxide nanocluster (NC) and shows a mixed phase of sigma (?) FeCr and bcc Fe. The Cr dopant affects heavily the magnetization and magnetic reversal process, and causes the hysteresis loop to shrink near the zero field axis. Dramatic transformation happens from dipolar interaction (0 at. % Cr) to strong exchange interaction (8 at. % of Cr) is confirmed from the Henkel plot and delta M plot, and is explained by a water-melon model of core-shell NC system.

  10. Numerical analysis of thermally assisted spin-transfer torque magnetization reversal in synthetic ferrimagnetic free layers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shen, J.; Shi, M.; Tanaka, T. Matsuyama, K.

    2015-05-07

    The spin transfer torque magnetization reversal of synthetic ferrimagnetic free layers under pulsed temperature rise was numerically studied by solving the LandauLifshitzGilbert equation, taking into account the stochastic random fields, the temperature dependence of magnetic parameters, and the spin torque terms. The anti-parallel magnetization configuration was retained at the elevated temperature, due to interlayer dipole coupling. A significant thermal assistance effect, resulting in a 40% reduction in the switching current, was demonstrated during a nanosecond pulsed temperature rise up to 77% of the Curie temperature.

  11. Polarization reversal and domain kinetics in magnesium doped stoichiometric lithium tantalate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shur, V. Ya., E-mail: vladimir.shur@urfu.ru; Akhmatkhanov, A. R.; Baturin, I. S. [Institute of Natural Sciences, Ural Federal University, 620000 Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Labfer Ltd., 620014 Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Chuvakova, M. A. [Institute of Natural Sciences, Ural Federal University, 620000 Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation)

    2014-10-13

    The polarization reversal process has been studied in 1?mol.?% MgO doped stoichiometric lithium tantalate (LT) single crystal. The revealed stages of domain structure evolution represent (1) continuous nucleation and growth of isolated hexagonal domains with walls oriented along Y directions and (2) continuous motion of the plane domain walls stimulated by merging with isolated domains. The activation field dependence of the switching time has been revealed. The coercive field for quasi-static switching is about 150?V/mm. The bulk screening process has been analyzed. The main parameters of the switching process have been compared with other representatives of LT family.

  12. Strong radial electric field shear and reduced fluctuations in a reversed-field pinch

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chapman, B.E.; Chiang, C.S.; Prager, S.C.; Sarff, J.S.

    1997-05-01

    A strongly sheared radial electric field is observed in enhanced confinement discharges in the MST reversed-field pinch. The strong shear develops in a narrow region in the plasma edge. Electrostatic fluctuations are reduced over the entire plasma edge with an extra reduction in the shear region. Magnetic fluctuations, resonant in the plasma core but global in extent, are also reduced. The reduction of fluctuations in the shear region is presumably due to the strong shear, but the causes of the reductions outside this region have not been established.

  13. Transient loss of plasma from a theta pinch having an initially reversed magnetic field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heidrich, J. E.

    1981-01-01

    The results of an experimental study of the transient loss of plasma from a 25-cm-long theta pinch initially containing a reversed trapped magnetic field are presented. The plasma, amenable to MHD analyses, was a doubly ionized helium plasma characterized by an ion density N/sub i/ = 2 x 10/sup 16/ cm/sup -3/ and an ion temperature T/sub i/ = 15 eV at midcoil and by N/sub i/ = 0.5 x 10/sup 16/ cm/sup -3/ and T/sub i/ = 6 eV at a position 2.5 cm beyond the end of the theta coil.

  14. Reversal of the cosmic ray density gradient perpendicular to the ecliptic plane

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swinson, D.B.; Kananen, H.

    1982-03-01

    Annual averages of the diurnal variation in cosmic ray intensity from neutron monitors in Deep River and Oulu and underground muon telescopes in Bolivia and at Embudo and Socorro, New Mexico, have been determined as a function of the sense of the interplantary magnetic field for the years 1965--1975. These data point to a cosmic ray density gradient, perpendicular to the ecliptic plane, pointing southward prior to 1969 and changing to a northward pointing gradient after the reversal of the sun's polar magnetic field in 1969--1971. This result supports numerical calculations for the prereversal and postreversal field configurations at intermediate and high cosmic ray rigidities.

  15. Pressure driven tearing and interchange modes in the reversed field pinch

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paccagnella, R.

    2013-01-15

    In this work, the magneto-hydro-dynamic stability of pressure driven modes in the reversed field pinch has been analyzed. It is shown that at low and intermediate {beta}'s, i.e., typically for values below 20-25%, the tearing parity is dominant, while only at very high {beta}, well above the achieved experimental values, at least part of the modes are converted to ideal interchange instabilities. Before their transition to ideal instabilities, according to their Lundquist number scaling, they can be classified as resistive-g modes.

  16. An Enhanced Nonlinear Critical Gradient for Electron Turbulent Transport due to Reversed Magnetic Shear

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterson, J. L.; Hammet, G. W.; Mikkelsen, D. R.; Yuh, H. Y.; Candy, J.; Guttenfelder, W.; Kaye, S. M.; LeBlanc, B.

    2011-05-11

    The first nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations of electron internal transport barriers (e-ITBs) in the National Spherical Torus Experiment show that reversed magnetic shear can suppress thermal transport by increasing the nonlinear critical gradient for electron-temperature-gradient-driven turbulence to three times its linear critical value. An interesting feature of this turbulence is non- linearly driven off-midplane radial streamers. This work reinforces the experimental observation that magnetic shear is likely an effective way of triggering and sustaining e-ITBs in magnetic fusion devices.

  17. Depth profile of a time-reversal focus in an elastic solid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Remillieux, Marcel C.; Anderson, Brian E.; Ulrich, T. J.; Le Bas, Pierre -Yves; Payan, Cedric

    2015-04-01

    The out-of-plane velocity component is focused on the flat surface of an isotropic solid sample using the principle of time reversal. This experiment is often reproduced in the context of nondestructive testing for imaging features near the surface of the sample. However, it is not clear how deep the focus extends into the bulk of the sample and what its profile is. In this paper, this question is answered using both numerical simulations and experimental data. The profiles of the foci are expressed in terms of the wavelengths of the dominant waves, based on the interpretation of the Lamb’s problem and the use of the diffraction limit.

  18. Location of gap nodes in the organic superconductors {kappa}-(ET){sub 2}Cu(NCS){sub 2} and {kappa}-(ET){sub 2}Cu[N(CN){sub 2}Br determined by magnetocalorimetry.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malone, L.; Taylor, O. J.; Schlueter, J. A.; Carrington, A.; Materials Science Division; Univ. Bristol

    2010-07-16

    We report specific-heat measurements of the organic superconductors {kappa}-(ET){sub 2}Cu(NCS){sub 2} and {kappa}-(ET){sub 2}Cu[N(CN){sub 2}]Br. When the magnetic field is rotated in the highly conducting planes at low temperature (T = 0.4 K), we observe clear oscillations of specific heat which have a strong fourfold component. The observed strong field and temperature dependence of this fourfold component identifies it as originating from nodes in the superconducting energy gap which point along the in-plane crystal axes (d{sub xy} symmetry).

  19. Imaging Faults with Reverse-Time Migration for Geothermal Exploration at Jemez Pueblo in New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Lianjie; Albrecht, Michael; Kaufman, Greg; Kelley, Shari; Rehfeldt, Kenneth; Zhang, Zhifu

    2011-01-01

    The fault zones at Jemez Pueblo may dominate the flow paths of hot water, or confine the boundaries of the geothermal reservoir. Therefore, it is crucial to image the geometry of these fault zones for geothermal exploration in the area. We use reverse-time migration with a separation imaging condition to image the faults at Jemez Pueblo. A finite-difference full-wave equation method with a perfectly-matching-layer absorbing boundary condition is used for backward propagation of seismic reflection data from receivers and forward propagation of wavefields from sources. In the imaging region, the wavefields are separated into the upgoing and downgoing waves, and leftgoing and rightgoing waves. The upgoing and downgoing waves are used to obtain the downward-looking image, and the leftgoing and rightgoing waves are used to form the left-looking image and right-looking image from sources. The left-looking and right-looking images are normally weaker than the downward-looking image because the reflections from the fault zones are much weaker than those from sedimentary layers, but these migration results contain the images of the faults. We apply our reverse-time migration with a wavefield separation imaging condition to seismic data acquired at Jemez Pueblo, and our preliminary results reveal many faults in the area.

  20. Deuterium-Tritium Simulations of the Enhanced Reversed Shear Mode in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mikkelsen, D.R.; Manickam, J.; Scott, S.D.; Zarnstorff

    1997-04-01

    The potential performance, in deuterium-tritium plasmas, of a new enhanced con nement regime with reversed magnetic shear (ERS mode) is assessed. The equilibrium conditions for an ERS mode plasma are estimated by solving the plasma transport equations using the thermal and particle dif- fusivities measured in a short duration ERS mode discharge in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor [F. M. Levinton, et al., Phys. Rev. Letters, 75, 4417, (1995)]. The plasma performance depends strongly on Zeff and neutral beam penetration to the core. The steady state projections typically have a central electron density of {approx}2:5x10 20 m{sup -3} and nearly equal central electron and ion temperatures of {approx}10 keV. In time dependent simulations the peak fusion power, {approx} 25 MW, is twice the steady state level. Peak performance occurs during the density rise when the central ion temperature is close to the optimal value of {approx} 15 keV. The simulated pressure profiles can be stable to ideal MHD instabilities with toroidal mode number n = 1, 2, 3, 4 and {infinity} for {beta}{sub norm} up to 2.5; the simulations have {beta}{sub norm} {le} 2.1. The enhanced reversed shear mode may thus provide an opportunity to conduct alpha physics experiments in conditions imilar to those proposed for advanced tokamak reactors.

  1. Metal Hydride Thermal Storage: Reversible Metal Hydride Thermal Storage for High-Temperature Power Generation Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2011-12-05

    HEATS Project: PNNL is developing a thermal energy storage system based on a Reversible Metal Hydride Thermochemical (RMHT) system, which uses metal hydride as a heat storage material. Heat storage materials are critical to the energy storage process. In solar thermal storage systems, heat can be stored in these materials during the day and released at nightwhen the sun is not outto drive a turbine and produce electricity. In nuclear storage systems, heat can be stored in these materials at night and released to produce electricity during daytime peak-demand hours. PNNLs metal hydride material can reversibly store heat as hydrogen cycles in and out of the material. In a RHMT system, metal hydrides remain stable in high temperatures (600- 800C). A high-temperature tank in PNNLs storage system releases heat as hydrogen is absorbed, and a low-temperature tank stores the heat until it is needed. The low-cost material and simplicity of PNNLs thermal energy storage system is expected to keep costs down. The system has the potential to significantly increase energy density.

  2. Experimental profile evolution of a high-density field-reversed configuration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ruden, E. L.; Zhang, Shouyin; Intrator, T. P.; Wurden, G. A.

    2006-12-15

    A field-reversed configuration (FRC) gains angular momentum over time, eventually resulting in an n=2 rotational instability (invariant under rotation by {pi}) terminating confinement. To study this, a laser interferometer probes the time history of line integrated plasma density along eight chords of the high-density ({approx}10{sup 17} cm{sup -3}) field-reversed configuration experiment with a liner. Abel and tomographic inversions provide density profiles during the FRC's azimuthally symmetric phase, and over a period when the rotational mode has saturated and rotates with a roughly fixed profile, respectively. During the latter part of the symmetric phase, the FRC approximates a magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equilibrium, allowing the axial magnetic-field profile to be calculated from pressure balance. Basic FRC properties such as temperature and poloidal flux are then inferred. The subsequent two-dimensional n=2 density profiles provide angular momentum information needed to set bounds on prior values of the stability relevant parameter {alpha} (rotational to ion diamagnetic drift frequency ratio), in addition to a view of plasma kinematics useful for benchmarking plasma models of higher order than MHD.

  3. Nonlinear stability of field-reversed configurations with self-generated toroidal field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Omelchenko, Y. A.; Schaffer, M. J.; Parks, P. B.

    2001-10-01

    The field-reversed configuration (FRC) is a high-beta compact toroidal plasma confinement scheme in which the external poloidal field is reversed on the geometric axis by azimuthal (toroidal) plasma current. A quasineutral, hybrid, particle-in-cell (PIC) approach [Y. A. Omelchenko and R. N. Sudan, Phys. Plasmas 2, 2773 (1995)] is applied to study long-term nonlinear stability of computational FRC equilibria to a number of toroidal modes, including the most disruptive tilt mode. In particular, a self-generated toroidal magnetic field is found to be an important factor in mitigating the instability and preventing the confinement disruption. This is shown to be a unique FRC property resulting from the Hall effect in the regions of vanishing poloidal magnetic field. The instability-driven toroidal field stabilizes kink formation by increasing the magnetic field energy without destabilizing curvature-driven plasma motion. Finally, the tilt instability saturates due to nonlinear, finite Larmor radius (FLR) effects and plasma relaxation to a quasisteady kinetic state. During this transition the FRC is shown to dissipate a substantial amount of initially trapped flux and plasma energy. These effects are demonstrated for kinetic and fluid-like, spherical and prolate FRCs.

  4. Nonlinear electron magnetohydrodynamics physics. I. Whistler spheromaks, mirrors, and field reversed configurations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stenzel, R. L.; Urrutia, J. M.; Strohmaier, K. D.

    2008-04-15

    The nonlinear interactions of time-varying magnetic fields with plasmas is investigated in the regime of electron magnetohydrodynamics. Simple magnetic field geometries are excited in a large laboratory plasma with a loop antenna driven with large oscillatory currents. When the axial loop field opposes the ambient field, the net field can be reversed to create a field-reversed configuration (FRC). In the opposite polarity, a strong field enhancement is produced. The time-varying antenna field excites whistler modes with wave magnetic fields exceeding the ambient magnetic field. The resulting magnetic field topologies have been measured. As the magnetic topology is changed from FRC to strong enhancement, two propagating field configurations resembling spheromaks are excited, one with positive and the other with negative helicity. Such 'whistler spheromaks' propagate with their null points along the weaker ambient magnetic field, with the current density localized around its O-line. In contrast, 'whistler mirrors' which have topologies similar to linear whistlers, except with B{sub wave}>B{sub 0}, have no null regions and, therefore, broad current layers. This paper describes the basic field topologies of whistler spheromaks and mirrors, while companion papers discuss the associated nonlinear phenomena as well as the interaction between them.

  5. Unexpected edge conduction in mercury telluride quantum wells under broken time-reversal symmetry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ma, Eric Yue; Calvo, M. Reyes; Wang, Jing; Lian, Biao; Muhlbauer, Mathias; Brune, Christoph; Cui, Yong -Tao; Lai, Keji; Kundhikanjana, Worasom; Yang, Yongliang; Baenninger, Matthias; Konig, Markus; Ames, Christopher; Buhmann, Hartmut; Leubner, Philipp; Molenkamp, Laurens W.; Zhang, Shou -Cheng; Goldhaber-Gordon, David; Kelly, Michael A.; Shen, Zhi -Xun

    2015-05-26

    The realization of quantum spin Hall effect in HgTe quantum wells is considered a milestone in the discovery of topological insulators. Quantum spin Hall states are predicted to allow current flow at the edges of an insulating bulk, as demonstrated in various experiments. A key prediction yet to be experimentally verified is the breakdown of the edge conduction under broken time-reversal symmetry. Here we first establish a systematic framework for the magnetic field dependence of electrostatically gated quantum spin Hall devices. We then study edge conduction of an inverted quantum well device under broken time-reversal symmetry using microwave impedance microscopy, and compare our findings to a non-inverted device. At zero magnetic field, only the inverted device shows clear edge conduction in its local conductivity profile, consistent with theory. Surprisingly, the edge conduction persists up to 9 T with little change. Finally, this indicates physics beyond simple quantum spin Hall model, including material-specific properties and possibly many-body effects.

  6. Unexpected edge conduction in mercury telluride quantum wells under broken time-reversal symmetry

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ma, Eric Yue; Calvo, M. Reyes; Wang, Jing; Lian, Biao; Muhlbauer, Mathias; Brune, Christoph; Cui, Yong -Tao; Lai, Keji; Kundhikanjana, Worasom; Yang, Yongliang; et al

    2015-05-26

    The realization of quantum spin Hall effect in HgTe quantum wells is considered a milestone in the discovery of topological insulators. Quantum spin Hall states are predicted to allow current flow at the edges of an insulating bulk, as demonstrated in various experiments. A key prediction yet to be experimentally verified is the breakdown of the edge conduction under broken time-reversal symmetry. Here we first establish a systematic framework for the magnetic field dependence of electrostatically gated quantum spin Hall devices. We then study edge conduction of an inverted quantum well device under broken time-reversal symmetry using microwave impedance microscopy,more » and compare our findings to a non-inverted device. At zero magnetic field, only the inverted device shows clear edge conduction in its local conductivity profile, consistent with theory. Surprisingly, the edge conduction persists up to 9 T with little change. Finally, this indicates physics beyond simple quantum spin Hall model, including material-specific properties and possibly many-body effects.« less

  7. Ultrafast and Highly Reversible Sodium Storage in Zinc-Antimony Intermetallic Nanomaterials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nie, Anmin; Gan, Li-yong; Cheng, Yingchun; Tao, Xinyong; Yuan, Yifei; Sharifi-Asl, Soroosh; He, Kun; Asayesh-Ardakani, Hasti; Vasiraju, Venkata; Lu, Jun; Mashayek, Farzad; Klie, Robert; Vaddiraju, Sreeram; Schwingenschlögl, Udo; Shahbazian-Yassar, Reza

    2015-12-17

    The progress on sodium-ion battery technology faces many grand challenges, one of which is the considerably lower rate of sodium insertion/deinsertion in electrode materials due to the larger size of sodium (Na) ions and complicated redox reactions compared to the lithium-ion systems. Here, it is demonstrated that sodium ions can be reversibly stored in Zn-Sb intermetallic nanowires at speeds that can exceed 295 nm s-1. Remarkably, these values are one to three orders of magnitude higher than the sodiation rate of other nanowires electrochemically tested with in situ transmission electron micro­scopy. It is found that the nanowires display about 161% volume expansion after the first sodiation and then cycle with an 83% reversible volume expansion. Despite their massive expansion, the nanowires can be cycled without any cracking or facture during the ultrafast sodiation/desodiation process. Additionally, most of the phases involved in the sodiation/desodiation process possess high electrical conductivity. More specifically, the NaZnSb exhibits a layered structure, which provides channels for fast Na+ diffusion. This observation indicates that Zn-Sb intermetallic nanomaterials offer great promise as high rate and good cycling stability anodic materials for the next generation of sodium-ion batteries.

  8. Zero-flux planes, flux reversals and diffusion paths in ternary and quaternary diffusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dayananda, M.A.

    1986-05-23

    During isothermal multicomponent diffusion, interdiffusion fluxes of individual components can go to zero at zero-flux planes (ZFP) and exhibit flux reversals from one side to the other of such planes. Interdiffusion fluxes as well as the locations and compositions of ZFPs for components are determined directly from the concentration profiles of diffusion couples without the need for prior knowledge of interdiffusion coefficients. The development and identification of ZFPs is reviewed with the aid of single phase and two-phase diffusion couples investigated in the Cu-Ni-Zn system at 775/sup 0/C. ZFP locations in the diffusion zone nearly correspond to sections where the activity of a component is the same as its activity in either of the terminal alloys of a couple. Path slopes at ZFPs are uniquely dictated by the atomic mobility and thermodynamic data for the components. Discontinuous flux reversals for the components can also occur at interfaces in multiphase couples. Identification of ZFPs is also presented for diffusion in the Cu-Ni-Zn-Mn quaternary system. Analytical representation of diffusion paths for both ternary and quaternary diffusion couples is presented with the aid of characteristic path parameters.

  9. Metalized T graphene: A reversible hydrogen storage material at room temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ye, Xiao-Juan; Zhong, Wei, E-mail: csliu@njupt.edu.cn, E-mail: wzhong@nju.edu.cn; Du, You-Wei [Nanjing National Laboratory of Microstructures, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Liu, Chun-Sheng, E-mail: csliu@njupt.edu.cn, E-mail: wzhong@nju.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Radio Frequency and Micro-Nano Electronics of Jiangsu Province, Nanjing University of Posts and Telecommunications, Nanjing 210023 (China); Zeng, Zhi [Key Laboratory of Materials Physics, Institute of Solid State Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China)

    2014-09-21

    Lithium (Li)-decorated graphene is a promising hydrogen storage medium due to its high capacity. However, homogeneous mono-layer coating graphene with lithium atoms is metastable and the lithium atoms would cluster on the surface, resulting in the poor reversibility. Using van der Waals-corrected density functional theory, we demonstrated that lithium atoms can be homogeneously dispersed on T graphene due to a nonuniform charge distribution in T graphene and strong hybridizations between the C-2p and Li-2p orbitals. Thus, Li atoms are not likely to form clusters, indicating a good reversible hydrogen storage. Both the polarization mechanism and the orbital hybridizations contribute to the adsorption of hydrogen molecules (storage capacity of 7.7 wt. %) with an optimal adsorption energy of 0.19 eV/H?. The adsorption/desorption of H? at ambient temperature and pressure is also discussed. Our results can serve as a guide in the design of new hydrogen storage materials based on non-hexagonal graphenes.

  10. Flow instability and flow reversal in heated annular multichannels with initial downward flow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guerrero, H.N.; Hart, C.M.

    1992-12-31

    Experimental and theoretical results are presented regarding the stability of initial downward flow of single phase water in parallel annular channels of the Savannah River Site (SRS) fuel assembly. The test was performed on an electrically heated prototypic mockup of a Mark-22 fuel assembly. The test conditions consisted of mass fluxes, from 98--294 kg/m{sup 2}-sec, and inlet water temperatures of 25{degrees}C and 40{degrees}C. With increased power to the heaters, flow instability was detected, characterized by flow fluctuations and flow redistribution among subchannels of the outer flow channel. With increased power, a condition was observed indicating local subchannel flow reversals where certain subchannel fluid temperatures were high at the inlet and low at the exit. With additional power increased, a critical heat flux condition was observed indicating local subchannel flow reversals where certain subchannel fluid temperatures were high at the inlet and low at the exit. With additional power increases, a critical heat flux condition was reached in the outer channel.

  11. Flow instability and flow reversal in heated annular multichannels with initial downward flow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guerrero, H.N.; Hart, C.M.

    1992-01-01

    Experimental and theoretical results are presented regarding the stability of initial downward flow of single phase water in parallel annular channels of the Savannah River Site (SRS) fuel assembly. The test was performed on an electrically heated prototypic mockup of a Mark-22 fuel assembly. The test conditions consisted of mass fluxes, from 98--294 kg/m[sup 2]-sec, and inlet water temperatures of 25[degrees]C and 40[degrees]C. With increased power to the heaters, flow instability was detected, characterized by flow fluctuations and flow redistribution among subchannels of the outer flow channel. With increased power, a condition was observed indicating local subchannel flow reversals where certain subchannel fluid temperatures were high at the inlet and low at the exit. With additional power increased, a critical heat flux condition was observed indicating local subchannel flow reversals where certain subchannel fluid temperatures were high at the inlet and low at the exit. With additional power increases, a critical heat flux condition was reached in the outer channel.

  12. Reversible Ionic Liquids as Double-Action Solvents for Efficient CO{sub 2} Capture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Charles Eckert; Charles Liotta

    2011-09-30

    We have developed a novel class of CO{sub 2} capture solvents, Reversible Ionic Liquids (RevILs), that offer high absorption capacity through two modes of capture: chemical reaction (chemisorption) and physical solubility (physisorption). These solvents are silicon containing alkaline compounds such as silylamines that form a liquid salt (ionic liquid) upon reaction with CO{sub 2}. Subsequently, modest elevations in temperature reverse the reaction and yield pure CO{sub 2} for sequestration. By incorporating Si in the molecules we have reduced the viscosity, thereby improving the mass transfer rates of CO{sub 2} absorption/desorption and decreasing the processing costs for pumping the solvent. In this project, we have made systematic changes to the structure of these compounds to improve several physical and thermodynamic properties important for CO{sub 2} capture. Through these structure-property paradigms, we have obtained a RevIL which requires only a third of the energy required by conventional aqueous MEA process for 90% CO{sub 2} capture.

  13. Reversible Ionic Liquids as Double-Action Solvents for Efficient CO2 Capture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eckert, Charles; Liotta, Charles

    2011-09-30

    We have developed a novel class of CO{sub 2} capture solvents, Reversible Ionic Liquids (RevILs), that offer high absorption capacity through two modes of capture: chemical reaction (chemisorption) and physical solubility (physisorption). These solvents are silicon containing alkaline compounds such as silylamines that form a liquid salt (ionic liquid) upon reaction with CO{sub 2}. Subsequently, modest elevations in temperature reverse the reaction and yield pure CO{sub 2} for sequestration. By incorporating Si in the molecules we have reduced the viscosity, thereby improving the mass transfer rates of CO{sub 2} absorption/desorption and decreasing the processing costs for pumping the solvent. In this project, we have made systematic changes to the structure of these compounds to improve several physical and thermodynamic properties important for CO{sub 2} capture. Through these structure-property paradigms, we have obtained a RevIL which requires only a third of the energy required by conventional aqueous MEA process for 90% CO{sub 2} capture.

  14. Fine particle (2.5 microns) emissions: regulations, measurement, and control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John D. McKenna; James H. Turner; James P. McKenna, Jr.

    2008-09-15

    Contents: Introduction; Health effects; Air monitoring; Emission control methods - fabric filter/baghouses, electrostatic precipitators, wet scrubbers; Environmental technology verification and baghouse filtration products; Cost considerations; and Nanoparticulates.

  15. Effect of externally applied pressure on the magnetic behavior of Cu{sub 2}Te{sub 2}O{sub 5}(Br{sub x}Cl{sub 1-x}){sub 2}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crowe, S. J.; Lees, M. R.; Paul, D. M. K.; Bewely, R. I.; Taylor, J.; McIntyre, G.; Zaharko, O.; Berger, H.

    2006-04-01

    The effect of externally applied pressure on the magnetic behavior of Cu{sub 2}Te{sub 2}O{sub 5}(Br{sub x}Cl{sub 1-x}){sub 2} with x=0, 0.73, and 1, is investigated by a combination of magnetic susceptibility, neutron diffraction, and neutron inelastic scattering measurements. The magnetic transition temperatures of the x=0 and 0.73 compositions are observed to increase linearly with increasing pressure at a rate of 0.23(2) and 0.04(1) K/kbar, respectively. However, the bromide shows contrasting behavior with a large suppression of the transition temperature under pressure, at a rate of -0.95(9) K/kbar. In neutron inelastic scattering measurements of Cu{sub 2}Te{sub 2}O{sub 5}Br{sub 2} under pressure only a small change to the ambient pressure magnetic excitations were observed. A peak in the density of states was seen to shift from {approx}5 meV in ambient pressure to {approx}6 meV under an applied pressure of 11.3 kbar, which was associated with an increase in the overall magnetic coupling strength.

  16. Spectral indices measurements using miniature fission chambers at the MINERVE zero-power reactor at CEA using calibration data obtained at the BR1 reactor at SCK.CEN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    De lanaute, N. Blanc; Mellier, F.; Lyoussi, A.; Domergue, C.; Di Salvo, J. [CEA, DEN, DER, SPEX, F-13108 St Paul Les Durance, (France); Borms, L.; Wagemans, J. [CEN SCK, Belgian Nucl Res Ctr, B-2400 Mol, (Belgium)

    2012-08-15

    Spectral indices measurements performed in 2004 at the CEA MINERVE facility loaded with the R-UO{sub 2} lattice, using calibration data acquired at the SCK center dot CEN BR1 facility in 2001, resulted in ambivalent conclusions. On one hand, spectral indices involving only fissile isotopes gave consistent discrepancies between calculation and experiment. On the other hand, spectral indices involving both fissile and fertile isotopes, in particular the {sup 238}U(n, f)/{sup 235}U(n, f) spectral index, showed inconsistent results depending on the type of calibration data used. For different reasons, no definitive explanation was given at that time. In 2009, the preparation of the AMMON program at the EOLE facility motivated the manufacturing of a new set of detectors. At the same time, the re-installation of the R1-UO{sub 2} lattice in MINERVE provided the opportunity to carry out again a spectral indices measurement campaign. Nevertheless, although the isotopic compositions of active deposits were better known than previously, the comparison between experimental results and calculations still lead to inconsistent discrepancies. In April 2010, a new calibration series conducted again at the BR1 facility allowed the CEA to reanalyze the spectral indices measurements performed in 2009. With these very latest calibration data, experimental values of spectral indices finally matched calculations within the uncertainty margins. This paper also sums up the work that has been achieved to explain the incoherencies observed in 2004. (authors)

  17. Resin-assisted enrichment of thiols as a general strategy for proteomic profiling of cysteine-based reversible modifications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo, Jia; Gaffrey, Matthew J.; Su, Dian; Liu, Tao; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Qian, Weijun

    2013-12-12

    Reversible modifications on cysteine thiols play a significant role in redox signaling and regulation. A number of reversible redox modifications, including disulfide formation, S-nitrosylation, and S-glutathionylation, have been recognized for their significance in various physiological and pathological processes. Here we describe in detail a resin-assisted thiol-affinity enrichment protocol for both biochemical and proteomics applications. This protocol serves as a general approach for specific isolation of thiol-containing proteins or peptides derived from reversible redox-modified proteins. This approach utilizes thiol-affinity resins to directly capture thiol-containing proteins or peptides through a disulfide exchange reaction followed by on-resin protein digestion and on-resin multiplexed isobaric labeling to facilitate LC-MS/MS based quantitative site-specific analysis of redox modifications. The overall approach requires a much simpler workflow with increased specificity compared to the commonly used biotin switch technique. By coupling different selective reduction strategies, the resin-assisted approach provides the researcher with a useful tool capable of enriching different types of reversible modifications on protein thiols. Procedures for selective enrichment and analyses of S-nitrosylation and total reversible cysteine oxidation are presented to demonstrate the utility of this general strategy.

  18. Electric field controlled reversible magnetic anisotropy switching studied by spin rectification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Hengan; Fan, Xiaolong Wang, Fenglong; Jiang, Changjun; Rao, Jinwei; Zhao, Xiaobing; Xue, Desheng; Gui, Y. S.; Hu, C.-M.

    2014-03-10

    In this letter, spin rectification was used to study the electric field controlled dynamic magnetic properties of the multiferroic composite which is a Co stripe with induced in-plane anisotropy deposited onto a Pb(Mg{sub 1∕3}Nb{sub 2∕3})O{sub 3}-PbTiO{sub 3} substrate. Due to the coupling between piezoelectric and magnetoelastic effects, a reversible in-plane anisotropy switching has been realized by varying the history of the applied electric field. This merit results from the electric hysteresis of the polarization in the nonlinear piezoelectric regime, which has been proved by a butterfly type electric field dependence of the in-plane anisotropy field. Moreover, the electric field dependent effective demagnetization field and linewidth have been observed at the same time.

  19. Reverse trade mission on the drilling and completion of geothermal wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-09-09

    This draft report was prepared as required by Task No. 2 of the US Department of Energy, Grant No. DE-FG07-89ID12850 Reverse Trade Mission to Acquaint International Representatives with US Power Plant and Drilling Technology'' (mission). As described in the grant proposal, this report covers the reactions of attendees toward US technology, its possible use in their countries, and an evaluation of the mission by the staff leaders. Note this is the draft report of one of two missions carried out under the same contract number. Because of the diversity of the mission subjects and the different attendees at each, a separate report for each mission has been prepared. This draft report has been sent to all mission attendees, specific persons in the US Department of Energy and Los Alamos National Lab., the California Energy Commission (CEC), and various other governmental agencies.

  20. Reversible monolayer-to-crystalline phase transition in amphiphilic silsesquioxane at the air-water interface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Banerjee, R.; Sanyal, M. K.; Bera, M. K.; Gibaud, A.; Lin, B.; Meron, M.

    2015-02-17

    We report on the counter intuitive reversible crystallisation of two-dimensional monolayer of Trisilanolisobutyl Polyhedral Oligomeric SilSesquioxane (TBPOSS) on water surface using synchrotron x-ray scattering measurements. Amphiphilic TBPOSS form rugged monolayers and Grazing Incidence X-ray Scattering (GIXS) measurements reveal that the in-plane inter-particle correlation peaks, characteristic of two-dimensional system, observed before transition is replaced by intense localized spots after transition. The measured x-ray scattering data of the non-equilibrium crystalline phase on the air-water interface could be explained with a model that assumes periodic stacking of the TBPOSS dimers. These crystalline stacking relaxes upon decompression and the TBPOSS layer retains its initial monolayer state. The existence of these crystals in compressed phase is confirmed by atomic force microscopy measurements by lifting the materials on a solid substrate.

  1. First-Order Reversal Curve Probing of Spatially Resolved Polarization Dynamics in Ferroelectric Nanocapacitors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Yunseok; Kumar, Amit; Jesse, Stephen; Kalinin, Sergei V

    2011-01-01

    Spatially resolved polarization switching in ferroelectric nanocapacitors was studied on the sub-25 nm scale using the first-order reversal curve (FORC) method. The chosen capacitor geometry allows both a high-veracity observation of the ferroelastic domain structure and the mapping of polarization switching in a uniform field, synergistically combining microstructural observations and probing of uniform-field polarization responses as relevant to device operation. A classical Kolmogorov-Avrami-Ishibashi model has been adapted to the voltage domain and the individual switching dynamics of the FORC response curves are well approximated by the adapted model. The comparison with microstructures suggests a strong spatial variability of the switching dynamics inside the nanocapacitors.

  2. Device for adapting continuously variable transmissions to infinitely variable transmissions with forward-neutral-reverse capabilities

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wilkes, Donald F.; Purvis, James W.; Miller, A. Keith

    1997-01-01

    An infinitely variable transmission is capable of operating between a maximum speed in one direction and a minimum speed in an opposite direction, including a zero output angular velocity, while being supplied with energy at a constant angular velocity. Input energy is divided between a first power path carrying an orbital set of elements and a second path that includes a variable speed adjustment mechanism. The second power path also connects with the orbital set of elements in such a way as to vary the rate of angular rotation thereof. The combined effects of power from the first and second power paths are combined and delivered to an output element by the orbital element set. The transmission can be designed to operate over a preselected ratio of forward to reverse output speeds.

  3. Transport reduction by current profile control in the reversed field pinch

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sarff, J.S.; Almagri, A.F.; Cekic, M.

    1994-11-01

    An auxiliary poloidal inductive electric field applied to a reversed field pinch (RFP) plasma reduces the current density gradient, slows the growth of m = 1 tearing fluctuations, suppresses their associated sawteeth, and doubles the energy confinement time. This experiment attacks the dominant RFP plasma loss mechanism of parallel streaming in a stochastic magnetic field. The auxiliary electric field flattens the current profile and reduces the magnetic fluctuation level. Since a toroidal flux change linking the plasma is required to generate the inductive poloidal electric field, the current drive is transient to avoid excessive perturbation of the equilibrium. To sustain and enhance the improved state, electrostatic and RF current drivers are being developed. A novel electrostatic current drive scheme uses a plasma source for electron injection, and the lower-hybrid wave is a good candidate for RF current drive.

  4. Water permeability of nanoporous graphene at realistic pressures for reverse osmosis desalination

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cohen-Tanugi, David; Grossman, Jeffrey C.

    2014-08-21

    Nanoporous graphene (NPG) shows tremendous promise as an ultra-permeable membrane for water desalination thanks to its atomic thickness and precise sieving properties. However, a significant gap exists in the literature between the ideal conditions assumed for NPG desalination and the physical environment inherent to reverse osmosis (RO) systems. In particular, the water permeability of NPG has been calculated previously based on very high pressures (1000–2000 bars). Does NPG maintain its ultrahigh water permeability under real-world RO pressures (<100 bars)? Here, we answer this question by drawing results from molecular dynamics simulations. Our results indicate that NPG maintains its ultrahigh permeability even at low pressures, allowing a permeate water flux of 6.0 l/h-bar per pore, or equivalently 1041 ± 20 l/m{sup 2}-h-bar assuming a nanopore density of 1.7 × 10{sup 13} cm{sup −2}.

  5. Low-temperature distillation plants: a comparison with seawater reverse osmosis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoffman, D.

    1981-07-01

    Low-temperature distillation plants using large aluminum-alloy heat-transfer surfaces have reduced energy requirements to levels projected today for second-generation seawater reverse-osmosis (SWRO) plants. Less sensitive to feed contamination, and totally free from maintenance associated with a complex and critical feed-pretreatment system and periodic membrane replacements, the low-temperature distillation plants out-perform SWRO plants also by their higher-quality product, 2-10 ppM TDS versus 300 to 1000 ppM TDS. Energy requirements and operating costs for Low Temperature Vapor Compression (LT-VC) and Multi-Effect-Distillation (LT-MED) plants, in dual-purpose and various waste-heat-utilization schemes, are compared with those of SWRO plants. 10 references, 14 figures, 8 tables.

  6. Effect of Ion Skin Depth on Relaxation of Merging Spheromaks to a Field-Reversed Configuration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kawamori, Eiichirou; Ono, Yasushi

    2005-08-19

    The effect of ion skin depth on the relaxation of merging spheromaks to a field-reversed configuration (FRC) is studied experimentally for a wide range of size parameter S* (ratio of minor radius to ion skin depth) from 1 to 7. The two merging spheromaks are observed to relax to an FRC or a new spheromak depending on whether the initial poloidal eigenvalue is smaller or larger than a threshold value. The bifurcation value is found to increase with decreasing size parameter S{sup *}, indicating that the low-S* condition provides a wide bifurcated range of relaxation to an FRC. The FRC-style relaxation under the low-S* conditions was accompanied by the suppression of the low-n modes (n is the toroidal mode number) activity. The fast rotations of the modes were followed by suppression of the low-n modes.

  7. Field-Reversed Configuration Formation Scheme Utilizing a Spheromak and Solenoid Induction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerhardt, S. P.; Belova, E. V.; Yamada, M.; Ji, H.; Ren, B.; McGeehan, B.; Inomoto, M.

    2008-06-12

    A new field-reversed configuration (FRC) formation technique is described, where a spheromak transitions to a FRC with inductive current drive. The transition is accomplished only in argon and krypton plasmas, where low-n kink modes are suppressed; spheromaks with a lighter majority species, such as neon and helium, either display a terminal tilt-mode, or an n=2 kink instability, both resulting in discharge termination. The stability of argon and krypton plasmas through the transition is attributed to the rapid magnetic diffusion of the currents that drive the kink-instability. The decay of helicity during the transition is consistent with that expected from resistivity. This observation indicates a new scheme to form a FRC plasma, provided stability to low-n modes is maintained, as well as a unique situation where the FRC is a preferred state.

  8. Field-Reversed Configuration Power Plant Critical-Issue Scoping Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Santarius, J. F.; Mogahed, E. A.; Emmert, G. A.; Khater, H. Y.; Nguyen, C. N.; Ryzhkov, S. V.; Stubna, M. D.

    2000-03-31

    A team from the Universities of Wisconsin, Washington, and Illinois performed an engineering scoping study of critical issues for field-reversed configuration (FRC) power plants. The key tasks for this research were (1) systems analysis for deuterium-tritium (D-T) FRC fusion power plants, and (2) conceptual design of the blanket and shield module for an FRC fusion core. For the engineering conceptual design of the fusion core, the project team focused on intermediate-term technology. For example, one decision was to use steele structure. The FRC systems analysis led to a fusion power plant with attractive features including modest size, cylindrical symmetry, good thermal efficiency (52%), relatively easy maintenance, and a high ratio of electric power to fusion core mass, indicating that it would have favorable economics.

  9. Tomographic reconstruction of deformed internal structure of a field-reversed configuration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Asai, T.; Takahashi, T.; Kiguchi, T.; Matsuzawa, Y.; Nogi, Y.

    2006-07-15

    Deformation of the internal structure of a field-reversed configuration (FRC) was studied using a tomographic reconstruction technique. A simple and configurable tomographic system was developed, with which the time evolution of the FRC internal structure was reconstructed. In the latter phase of equilibrium, a FRC has a well-known global rotational instability with toroidal mode number n=2. It has been believed that elliptical deformation of the FRC allows interaction between the wall and the plasma, which terminates this configuration. However, these experiments revealed the FRC to deform into a dumbbell-like structure before the edge hits the chamber wall, leading to the disruption phase. In addition, an internal shift (toroidal mode number n=1) mode was observed in the equilibrium phase, followed by growth of n=2 rotational instability.

  10. Stochastic ion heating in a field-reversed configuration geometry by rotating magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cohen, S. A.; Landsman, A. S.; Glasser, A. H.

    2007-07-15

    Ion heating by application of rotating magnetic fields (RMFs) to a prolate field-reversed configuration (FRC) is explored by analytical and numerical techniques. For odd-parity RMFs (RMF{sub o}), perturbation analysis shows ions in figure-8 orbits gain energy at resonances of the RMF{sub o} frequency {omega}{sub R}, with the figure-8 orbital frequency {omega}. Since figure-8 orbits tend to gain the most energy from the RMF and are unlikely to escape in the cusp region (where most losses occur), they are optimal candidates for rapid stochastic heating, as compared to cyclotron and betatron orbits. Comparisons are made between heating caused by even- and odd-parity RMFs and between heating in currently operating and in reactor-scale FRC devices.

  11. A steady state field-reversed configuration with rotating magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ohnishi, Masami; Yamamoto, Yasushi; Yoshikawa, Kiyoshi; Kitagaki, Jiro; Ishida, Akio

    1995-12-31

    The numerical simulations were made on current sustainment of a field-reversed configuration (FRC) by a rotating magnetic field (RMF). The RMF externally applied just after producing the FRC by a theta pinch discharge is found to penetrate rapidly into the FRC, and to drive a steady current before the FRC collapses due to Joule dissipation. The minimum rotating magnetic field to sustain the equilibrium is also found to be as small as 10% of the axial magnetic field. The RMF`s with the mode number of m = 1 or 2 are found to provide the similar effects. The numerical results show that the method of applying an RMF to an FRC is considerably effective for sustaining the hot and dense FRC in the steady state.

  12. Multi-channel Doppler backscattering measurements in the C-2 field reversed configuration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmitz, L. Peebles, W. A.; Ruskov, E.; Deng, B. H.; Gota, H.; Gupta, D.; Tuszewski, M.; Douglass, J.; Binderbauer, M.; Tajima, T.

    2014-11-15

    A versatile heterodyne Doppler Backscattering (DBS) system is used to measure density fluctuation levels (in the wavenumber range kρ{sub s} ≤ 50), and the toroidal E × B flow velocity in the C-2 Field-Reversed Configuration (FRC). Six tunable frequencies in three waveguide bands (26 GHz ≤ f ≤ 90 GHz) are launched using monostatic beam optics, via a quasi-optical beam combiner/polarizer and an adjustable parabolic focusing mirror (inside the vacuum enclosure) achieving Gaussian beam spot sizes of 3–5.5 cm at the X/O-mode cutoff. The DBS system covers plasma densities of 0.8 × 10{sup 13} ≤ n{sub e} ≤ 1 × 10{sup 14} cm{sup −3}, and provides access to the FRC core (up to the field null) and across the FRC separatrix into the scrape-off layer plasma.

  13. Visible bremsstrahlung tomographic diagnostic for the pulsed high density field-reversed configuration experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gota, H.; Andreason, S. P.; Votroubek, G. R.; Pihl, C. J.; Slough, J. T.

    2006-10-15

    A diagnostic suite for the source section of the pulsed high density field-reversed configuration (FRC) experiment has been constructed to investigate the equilibrium and stability of FRC plasmas. In particular, a visible bremsstrahlung tomographic system has been designed and implemented. Three types of tomographic analyses for FRCs are performed: a Fourier fit method (Cormack-Granetz), a maximum entropy method, and a minimum Fisher method utilizing code developed for the TCV tokamak experiment in Switzerland [Anton et al., Plasma Phys. Controled Fusion 38, 1849 (1996)]. Results from the different methods and end-on imaging from the fast-framing camera are compared showing relative agreement of FRC internal structures between all measurements.

  14. Stochastic Ion Heating in a Field-reversed Configuration Geometry by Rotating Magnetic Fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S.A. Cohen, A.S. Landsman, and A.H. Glasser

    2007-06-25

    Ion heating by application of rotating magnetic fields (RMF) to a prolate field-reversed configuration(FRC) is explored by analytical and numerical techniques. For odd-parity RMF (RMFo), perturbation analysis shows ions in figure-8 orbits gain energy at resonances of the RMFo frequency, ωR, with the figure-8 orbital frequency, ω. Since figure-8 orbits tend to gain the most energy from the RMF and are unlikely to escape in the cusp region (where most losses occur), they are optimal candidates for rapid stochastic heating, as compared to cyclotron and betatron orbits. Comparisons are made between heating caused by even- and odd-parity RMFs and between heating in currently operating and in reactor-scale FRC devices.

  15. Field-reversed configuration formation scheme utilizing a spheromak and solenoid induction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerhardt, S. P.; Belova, E. V.; Yamada, M.; Ji, H.; Ren, Y.; McGeehan, B.; Inomoto, M.

    2008-03-15

    A new field-reversed configuration (FRC) formation technique is described, where a spheromak transitions to a FRC with inductive current drive. The transition is accomplished only in argon and krypton plasmas, where low-n kink modes are suppressed; spheromaks with a lighter majority species, such as neon and helium, either display a terminal tilt-mode, or an n=2 kink instability, both resulting in discharge termination. The stability of argon and krypton plasmas through the transition is attributed to the rapid magnetic diffusion of the currents that drive the kink-instability. The decay of helicity during the transition is consistent with that expected from resistivity. This observation indicates a new scheme to form a FRC plasma, provided stability to low-n modes is maintained, as well as a unique situation where the FRC is a preferred state.

  16. Hall magnetohydrodynamics simulations of end-shorting induced rotation in field-reversed configurations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Macnab, A. I. D.; Milroy, R. D.; Kim, C. C.; Sovinec, C. R.

    2007-09-15

    End-shorting of the open field lines that surround a field-reversed configuration (FRC) is believed to contribute to its observed rotation. In this study, nonlinear extended magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) simulations were performed that detail the end-shorting process and the resulting spin-up of the FRC. The tangential component of the electric field E{sub T} is set to zero at the axial boundaries in an extended MHD model that includes the Hall and {nabla}P{sub e} terms. This shorting of the electric field leads to the generation of toroidal fields on the open field lines, which apply a torque leading to a rotation of the ions on the open field lines. The FRC then gains angular momentum through a viscous transfer from the open field line region. In addition, it is shown that spin-up is still induced when insulating boundaries are assumed.

  17. Acoustic Longitudinal Field NIF Optic Feature Detection Map Using Time-Reversal & MUSIC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lehman, S K

    2006-02-09

    We developed an ultrasonic longitudinal field time-reversal and MUltiple SIgnal Classification (MUSIC) based detection algorithm for identifying and mapping flaws in fused silica NIF optics. The algorithm requires a fully multistatic data set, that is one with multiple, independently operated, spatially diverse transducers, each transmitter of which, in succession, launches a pulse into the optic and the scattered signal measured and recorded at every receiver. We have successfully localized engineered ''defects'' larger than 1 mm in an optic. We confirmed detection and localization of 3 mm and 5 mm features in experimental data, and a 0.5 mm in simulated data with sufficiently high signal-to-noise ratio. We present the theory, experimental results, and simulated results.

  18. Fano q-reversal in topological insulator Bi2Se3

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    S. V. Dordevic; Petrovic, C.; Foster, G. M.; Wolf, M. S.; Stojilovic, N.; Lei, Hechang; Chen, Z.; Li, Z. Q.; Tung, L. C.

    2016-03-22

    Here, we studied the magneto-optical response of a canonical topological insulator Bi2Se3 with the goal of addressing a controversial issue of electron–phonon coupling. Magnetic-field induced modifications of reflectance are very pronounced in the infrared part of the spectrum, indicating strong electron–phonon coupling. This coupling causes an asymmetric line-shape of the 60 cm–1 phonon mode, and is analyzed within the Fano formalism. The analysis reveals that the Fano asymmetry parameter (q) changes sign when the cyclotron resonance is degenerate with the phonon mode. To the best of our knowledge this is the first example of magnetic field driven q-reversal.

  19. A new high performance field reversed configuration operating regime in the C-2 device

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tuszewski, M.; Smirnov, A.; Thompson, M. C.; Barnes, D.; Binderbauer, M. W.; Brown, R.; Bui, D. Q.; Clary, R.; Conroy, K. D.; Deng, B. H.; Dettrick, S. A.; Douglass, J. D.; Garate, E.; Glass, F. J.; Gota, H.; Guo, H.Y.; Gupta, D.; Gupta, S.; Kinley, J. S.; Knapp, K.; and others

    2012-05-15

    Large field reversed configurations (FRCs) are produced in the C-2 device by combining dynamic formation and merging processes. The good confinement of these FRCs must be further improved to achieve sustainment with neutral beam (NB) injection and pellet fuelling. A plasma gun is installed at one end of the C-2 device to attempt electric field control of the FRC edge layer. The gun inward radial electric field counters the usual FRC spin-up and mitigates the n = 2 rotational instability without applying quadrupole magnetic fields. Better plasma centering is also obtained, presumably from line-tying to the gun electrodes. The combined effects of the plasma gun and of neutral beam injection lead to the high performance FRC operating regime, with FRC lifetimes up to 3 ms and with FRC confinement times improved by factors 2 to 4.

  20. Formation of a field reversed configuration for magnetic and electrostatic confinement of plasma

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rostoker, Norman; Binderbauer, Michl

    2003-12-16

    A system and method for containing plasma and forming a Field Reversed Configuration (FRC) magnetic topology are described in which plasma ions are contained magnetically in stable, non-adiabatic orbits in the FRC. Further, the electrons are contained electrostatically in a deep energy well, created by tuning an externally applied magnetic field. The simultaneous electrostatic confinement of electrons and magnetic confinement of ions avoids anomalous transport and facilitates classical containment of both electrons and ions. In this configuration, ions and electrons may have adequate density and temperature so that upon collisions they are fused together by nuclear force, thus releasing fusion energy. Moreover, the fusion fuel plasmas that can be used with the present confinement system and method are not limited to neutronic fuels only, but also advantageously include advanced fuels.

  1. Formation of a field reversed configuration for magnetic and electrostatic confinement of plasma

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rostoker, Norman; Binderbauer, Michl; Qerushi, Artan; Tahsiri, Hooshang

    2007-02-20

    A system and method for containing plasma and forming a Field Reversed Configuration (FRC) magnetic topology are described in which plasma ions are contained magnetically in stable, non-adiabatic orbits in the FRC. Further, the electrons are contained electrostatically in a deep energy well, created by tuning an externally applied magnetic field. The simultaneous electrostatic confinement of electrons and magnetic confinement of ions avoids anomalous transport and facilitates classical containment of both electrons and ions. In this configuration, ions and electrons may have adequate density and temperature so that upon collisions they are fused together by nuclear force, thus releasing fusion energy. Moreover, the fusion fuel plasmas that can be used with the present confinement system and method are not limited to neutronic fuels only, but also advantageously include advanced fuels.

  2. Formation of a field reversed configuration for magnetic and electrostatic confinement of plasma

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rostoker, Norman; Binderbauer, Michl; Qerushi, Artan; Tahsiri, Hooshang

    2006-02-07

    A system and method for containing plasma and forming a Field Reversed Configuration (FRC) magnetic topology are described in which plasma ions are contained magnetically in stable, non-adiabatic orbits in the FRC. Further, the electrons are contained electrostatically in a deep energy well, created by tuning an externally applied magnetic field. The simultaneous electrostatic confinement of electrons and magnetic confinement of ions avoids anomalous transport and facilitates classical containment of both electrons and ions. In this configuration, ions and electrons may have adequate density and temperature so that upon collisions they are fused together by nuclear force, thus releasing fusion energy. Moreover, the fusion fuel plasmas that can be used with the present confinement system and method are not limited to neutronic fuels only, but also advantageously include advanced fuels.

  3. Reversible conversion of dominant polarity in ambipolar polymer/graphene oxide hybrids

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhou, Ye; Han, Su -Ting; Sonar, Prashant; Ma, Xinlei; Chen, Jihua; Zheng, Zijian; Roy, V. A. L.

    2015-03-24

    The possibility to selectively modulate the charge carrier transport in semiconducting materials is extremely challenging for the development of high performance and low-power consuming logic circuits. Systematical control over the polarity (electrons and holes) in transistor based on solution processed layer by layer polymer/graphene oxide hybrid system has been demonstrated. The conversion degree of the polarity is well controlled and reversible by trapping the opposite carriers. Basically, an electron device is switched to be a hole only device or vice versa. Finally, a hybrid layer ambipolar inverter is demonstrated in which almost no leakage of opposite carrier is found. Wemore » conclude that this hybrid material has wide range of applications in planar p-n junctions and logic circuits for high-throughput manufacturing of printed electronic circuits.« less

  4. Confinement improvement with rf poloidal current drive in the reversed-field pinch

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hokin, S.; Sarff, J.; Sovinec, C.; Uchimoto, E.

    1994-03-08

    External control of the current profile in a reversed-field pinch (RFP), by means such as rf poloidal current drive, may have beneficial effects well beyond the direct reduction of Ohmic input power due to auxiliary heating. Reduction of magnetic turbulence associated with the dynamo, which drives poloidal current in a conventional RFP, may allow operation at lower density and higher electron temperature, for which rf current drive becomes efficient and the RFP operates in a more favorable regime on the n{tau} vs T diagram. Projected parameters for RFX at 2 MA axe studied as a concrete example. If rf current drive allows RFX to operate with {beta} = 10% (plasma energy/magnetic energy) at low density (3 {times} 10{sup 19} m{sup {minus}3}) with classical resistivity (i.e. without dynamo-enhanced power input), 40 ms energy confinement times and 3 keV temperatures will result, matching the performance of tokamaks of similar size.

  5. Soft x-ray measurement of internal tearing mode structure in a reversed-field pinch

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chartas, G.; Hokin, S.

    1991-09-16

    The structure of internally resonant tearing modes has been studied in the Madison Symmetric Torus reversed-field pinch with a soft x-ray detector system consisting of an imaging array at one toroidal location and several detectors at different toroidal locations. The toroidal mode numbers of m = 1 structures are in the range n = {minus}5, {minus}6, {minus}7. The modes propagate with phase velocity v = 1--6 {times} 10{sup 6} cm/s, larger than the diamagnetic drift velocity v{sub d} {approximately} 5 {times} 10{sup 5} cm/s. Phase locking between modes with different n in manifested as a beating of soft x-ray signals which is found to be strongest near the resonant surfaces of the modes (r/a = 0.1 -- 0.5). 15 refs., 5 figs.

  6. Reversible electro-optic device employing aprotic molten salts and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Warner, Benjamin P.; McCleskey, T. Mark; Burrell, Anthony K.; Hall, Simon B.

    2008-01-08

    A single-compartment reversible mirror device having a solution of aprotic molten salt, at least one soluble metal-containing species comprising metal capable of being electrodeposited, and at least one anodic compound capable of being oxidized was prepared. The aprotic molten salt is liquid at room temperature and includes lithium and/or quaternary ammonium cations, and anions selected from trifluoromethylsulfonate (CF.sub.3SO.sub.3.sup.-), bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide ((CF.sub.3SO.sub.2).sub.2N.sup.-), bis(perfluoroethylsulfonyl)imide ((CF.sub.3CF.sub.2SO.sub.2).sub.2N.sup.-) and tris(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)methide ((CF.sub.3SO.sub.2).sub.3C.sup.-). A method for preparing substantially pure molten salts is also described.

  7. Reversible Electro-Optic Device Employing Aprotic Molten Salts And Method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Warner, Benjamin P.; McCleskey, T. Mark; Burrell, Anthony K.; Hall, Simon B.

    2005-03-01

    A single-compartment reversible mirror device having a solution of aprotic molten salt, at least one soluble metal-containing species comprising metal capable of being electrodeposited, and at least one anodic compound capable of being oxidized was prepared. The aprotic molten salt is liquid at room temperature and includes lithium and/or quaternary ammonium cations, and anions selected from trifluoromethylsulfonate (CF.sub.3 SO.sub.3.sup.-), bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide ((CF.sub.3 SO.sub.2).sub.2 N.sup.-), bis(perfluoroethylsulfonyl)imide ((CF.sub.3 CF.sub.2 SO.sub.2).sub.2 N.sup.-) and tris(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)methide ((CF.sub.3 SO.sub.2).sub.3 C.sup.-). A method for preparing substantially pure molten salts is also described.

  8. System and method for manipulating domain pinning and reversal in ferromagnetic materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Silevitch, Daniel M.; Rosenbaum, Thomas F.; Aeppli, Gabriel

    2013-10-15

    A method for manipulating domain pinning and reversal in a ferromagnetic material comprises applying an external magnetic field to a uniaxial ferromagnetic material comprising a plurality of magnetic domains, where each domain has an easy axis oriented along a predetermined direction. The external magnetic field is applied transverse to the predetermined direction and at a predetermined temperature. The strength of the magnetic field is varied at the predetermined temperature, thereby isothermally regulating pinning of the domains. A magnetic storage device for controlling domain dynamics includes a magnetic hard disk comprising a uniaxial ferromagnetic material, a magnetic recording head including a first magnet, and a second magnet. The ferromagnetic material includes a plurality of magnetic domains each having an easy axis oriented along a predetermined direction. The second magnet is positioned adjacent to the magnetic hard disk and is configured to apply a magnetic field transverse to the predetermined direction.

  9. Reversible monolayer-to-crystalline phase transition in amphiphilic silsesquioxane at the air-water interface

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Banerjee, R.; Sanyal, M. K.; Bera, M. K.; Gibaud, A.; Lin, B.; Meron, M.

    2015-02-17

    We report on the counter intuitive reversible crystallisation of two-dimensional monolayer of Trisilanolisobutyl Polyhedral Oligomeric SilSesquioxane (TBPOSS) on water surface using synchrotron x-ray scattering measurements. Amphiphilic TBPOSS form rugged monolayers and Grazing Incidence X-ray Scattering (GIXS) measurements reveal that the in-plane inter-particle correlation peaks, characteristic of two-dimensional system, observed before transition is replaced by intense localized spots after transition. The measured x-ray scattering data of the non-equilibrium crystalline phase on the air-water interface could be explained with a model that assumes periodic stacking of the TBPOSS dimers. These crystalline stacking relaxes upon decompression and the TBPOSS layer retains its initialmore » monolayer state. The existence of these crystals in compressed phase is confirmed by atomic force microscopy measurements by lifting the materials on a solid substrate.« less

  10. Time-reversal symmetry breaking and the field theory of quantum chaos

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simons, B.D. [Cavendish Laboratory, Madingley Road, Cambridge, CB3 0HE (United Kingdom)] [Cavendish Laboratory, Madingley Road, Cambridge, CB3 0HE (United Kingdom); Agam, O. [NEC Research Institute, 4 Independence Way, Princeton, New Jersey 08540 (United States)] [NEC Research Institute, 4 Independence Way, Princeton, New Jersey 08540 (United States); Andreev, A.V. [Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States)] [Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States)

    1997-04-01

    Recent studies have shown that the quantum statistical properties of systems which are chaotic in their classical limit can be expressed in terms of an effective field theory. Within this description, spectral properties are determined by low energy relaxation modes of the classical evolution operator. It is in the interaction of these modes that quantum interference effects are encoded. In this paper we review this general approach and discuss how the theory is modified to account for time-reversal symmetry breaking. To keep our discussion general, we will also briefly describe how the theory is modified by the presence of an additional discrete symmetry such as inversion. Throughout, parallels are drawn between quantum chaotic systems and the properties of weakly disordered conductors. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  11. Symmetries and quantum chaos: Time-reversal invariance in the nucleon-nucleon interaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    French, J.B.; Kota, V.K.B.; Pandey, A.; Tomsovic, S.

    1987-06-08

    Let ..cap alpha.. be the relative norm of a symmetry-breaking term in the Hamiltonian of a many-particle system, and ..lambda.. the energy-dependent transition parameter which charcterizes the quantum chaos via spectral and strength fluctuations. Combining a compact theory for ..lambda../..cap alpha../sup 2/ with fluctuation theories by which ..lambda.. can be deduced from (neutron-resonance) data gives, for the time-reversal-noninvariant nucleon-nucleon interaction, ..cap alpha..less than or equal to(1--2) x 10/sup -3/, which would improve with better small-strength data in nuclei with dense spectra. Diffusion equations involving ..lambda.. as the ''time'' variable are also discussed.

  12. REVERSIBLE AND IRREVERSIBLE PASSIVATION OF A LA-NI-AL ALLOY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shanahan, K.; Klein, J.

    2009-06-25

    This paper seeks to explore some of the effects of passivating a LaNi{sub 4.25}Al{sub 0.75} sample by air oxidation under controlled conditions. Passivation of this metal hydride alloy seems to have two distinct regimes. The first occurs with air oxidation at 80 C and 20 C. It is characterized by complete reversibility upon hydrogen readsorption, although said readsorption is hindered substantially at room temperature, requiring the material to be heated to produce the reactivation. The second regime is illustrated by 130 C air oxidation and is characterized by irreversible loss of hydrogen absorption capacity. This passivation does not hinder hydrogen readsorption into the remaining hydride material.

  13. Overview of C-2 field-reversed configuration experiment plasma diagnostics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gota, H. Thompson, M. C.; Tuszewski, M.; Binderbauer, M. W.

    2014-11-15

    A comprehensive diagnostic suite for field-reversed configuration (FRC) plasmas has been developed and installed on the C-2 device at Tri Alpha Energy to investigate the dynamics of FRC formation as well as to understand key FRC physics properties, e.g., confinement and stability, throughout a discharge. C-2 is a unique, large compact-toroid merging device that produces FRC plasmas partially sustained for up to ∼5 ms by neutral-beam (NB) injection and end-on plasma-guns for stability control. Fundamental C-2 FRC properties are diagnosed by magnetics, interferometry, Thomson scattering, spectroscopy, bolometry, reflectometry, and NB-related fast-ion/neutral diagnostics. These diagnostics (totaling >50 systems) are essential to support the primary goal of developing a deep understanding of NB-driven FRCs.

  14. Depth profile of a time-reversal focus in an elastic solid

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Remillieux, Marcel C.; Anderson, Brian E.; Ulrich, T. J.; Le Bas, Pierre -Yves; Payan, Cedric

    2015-04-01

    The out-of-plane velocity component is focused on the flat surface of an isotropic solid sample using the principle of time reversal. This experiment is often reproduced in the context of nondestructive testing for imaging features near the surface of the sample. However, it is not clear how deep the focus extends into the bulk of the sample and what its profile is. In this paper, this question is answered using both numerical simulations and experimental data. The profiles of the foci are expressed in terms of the wavelengths of the dominant waves, based on the interpretation of the Lamb’s problemmore » and the use of the diffraction limit.« less

  15. Curvature and ionization-induced reversible hydrogen storage in metalized hexagonal B{sub 36}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Chun-Sheng Wang, Xiangfu; Yan, Xiaohong; Ye, Xiao-Juan; Zeng, Zhi

    2014-11-21

    The synthesis of quasiplanar boron clusters (B{sub 36}) with a central hexagonal hole provides the first experimental evidence that a single-atomic-layer borophene with hexagonal vacancies is potentially viable [Z. Piazza, H. Hu, W. Li, Y. Zhao, J. Li, and L. S. Wang, Nat. Commun. 5, 3113 (2014)]. However, owing to the hexagonal holes, tunning the electronic and physical properties of B{sub 36} through chemical modifications is not fully understood. Based on (van der Waals corrected-) density functional theory, we show that Li adsorbed on B{sub 36} and B{sub 36}{sup ?} clusters can serve as reversible hydrogen storage media. The present results indicate that the curvature and ionization of substrates can enhance the bond strength of Li due to the energetically favorable B 2p-Li 2p orbitals hybridization. Both the polarization mechanism and the orbital hybridization between H-s orbitals and Li-2s2p orbitals contribute to the adsorption of H{sub 2} molecules and the resulting adsorption energy lies between the physisorbed and chemisorbed states. Interestingly, the number of H{sub 2} in the hydrogen storage medium can be measured by the appearance of the negative differential resistance behavior at different bias voltage regions. Furthermore, the cluster-assembled hydrogen storage materials constructed by metalized B{sub 36} clusters do not cause a decrease in the number of adsorbed hydrogen molecules per Li. The system reported here is favorable for the reversible hydrogen adsorption/desorption at ambient conditions.

  16. Precise discussion of time-reversal asymmetries in B-meson decays

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Morozumi, Takuya; Okane, Hideaki; Umeeda, Hiroyuki

    2015-02-26

    BaBar collaboration announced that they observed time reversal (T) asymmetry through B meson system. In the experiment, time dependencies of two distinctive processes, B_ →B¯0 and B¯0 → B_ (– expresses CP value) are compared with each other. In our study, we examine event number difference of these two processes. In contrast to the BaBar asymmetry, the asymmetry of events number includes the overall normalization difference for rates. Time dependence of the asymmetry is more general and it includes terms absent in one used by BaBar collaboration. Both of the BaBar asymmetry and ours are naively thought to be T-oddmore » since two processes compared are related with flipping time direction. We investigate the time reversal transformation property of our asymmetry. Using our notation, one can see that the asymmetry is not precisely a T-odd quantity, taking into account indirect CP and CPT violation of K meson systems. The effect of ϵK is extracted and gives rise to O(10–3) contribution. The introduced parameters are invariant under rephasing of quarks so that the coefficients of our asymmetry are expressed as phase convention independent quantities. Some combinations of the asymmetry enable us to extract parameters for wrong sign decays of Bd meson, CPT violation, etc. As a result, we also study the reason why the T-even terms are allowed to contribute to the asymmetry, and find that several conditions are needed for the asymmetry to be a T-odd quantity.« less

  17. Understanding the initial stages of reversible Mg deposition and stripping in inorganic nonaqueous electrolytes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Canepa, Pieremanuele; Gautam, Gopalakrishnan Sai; Malik, Rahul; Jayaraman, Saivenkataraman; Rong, Ziqin; Zavadil, Kevin R.; Persson, Kristin; Ceder, Gerbrand

    2015-04-08

    Multivalent (MV) battery architectures based on pairing a Mg metal anode with a high-voltage (~3 V) intercalation cathode offer a realistic design pathway toward significantly surpassing the energy storage performance of traditional Li-ion-based batteries, but there are currently only few electrolyte systems that support reversible Mg deposition. Using both static first-principles calculations and ab initio molecular dynamics, we perform a comprehensive adsorption study of several salt and solvent species at the interface of Mg metal with an electrolyte of Mg2+ and Cl–dissolved in liquid tetrahydrofuran (THF). Our findings not only provide a picture of the stable species at the interface but also explain how this system can support reversible Mg deposition, and as such, we provide insights in how to design other electrolytes for Mg plating and stripping. Furthermore, the active depositing species are identified to be (MgCl)+ monomers coordinated by THF, which exhibit preferential adsorption on Mg compared to possible passivating species (such as THF solvent or neutral MgCl2 complexes). We found that upon deposition, the energy to desolvate these adsorbed complexes and facilitate charge transfer is shown to be small (~61–46.2 kJ mol–1 to remove three THF from the strongest adsorbing complex), and the stable orientations of the adsorbed but desolvated (MgCl)+ complexes appear to be favorable for charge transfer. Lastly, observations of Mg–Cl dissociation at the Mg surface at very low THF coordinations (0 and 1) suggest that deleterious Cl incorporation in the anode may occur upon plating. In the stripping process, this is beneficial by further facilitating the Mg removal reaction.

  18. Understanding the Initial Stages of Reversible Mg Deposition and Stripping in Inorganic Non-Aqueous Electrolytes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Canepa, Pieremanuele; Gautam, Gopalakrishnan Sai; Malik, Rahul; Jayaraman, Saivenkataraman; Rong, Ziqin; Zavadil, Kevin R.; Persson, Kristin; Ceder, Gerbrand

    2015-04-08

    Multivalent (MV) battery architectures based on pairing a Mg metal anode with a high-voltage (~3 V) intercalation cathode offer a realistic design pathway toward significantly surpassing the energy storage performance of traditional Li-ion-based batteries, but there are currently only few electrolyte systems that support reversible Mg deposition. Using both static first-principles calculations and ab initio molecular dynamics, we perform a comprehensive adsorption study of several salt and solvent species at the interface of Mg metal with an electrolyte of Mg2+ and Cldissolved in liquid tetrahydrofuran (THF). Our findings not only provide a picture of the stable species at the interface but also explain how this system can support reversible Mg deposition, and as such, we provide insights in how to design other electrolytes for Mg plating and stripping. Furthermore, the active depositing species are identified to be (MgCl)+ monomers coordinated by THF, which exhibit preferential adsorption on Mg compared to possible passivating species (such as THF solvent or neutral MgCl2 complexes). We found that upon deposition, the energy to desolvate these adsorbed complexes and facilitate charge transfer is shown to be small (~6146.2 kJ mol1 to remove three THF from the strongest adsorbing complex), and the stable orientations of the adsorbed but desolvated (MgCl)+ complexes appear to be favorable for charge transfer. Finally, observations of MgCl dissociation at the Mg surface at very low THF coordinations (0 and 1) suggest that deleterious Cl incorporation in the anode may occur upon plating. In the stripping process, this is beneficial by further facilitating the Mg removal reaction.

  19. Understanding the Initial Stages of Reversible Mg Deposition and Stripping in Inorganic Non-Aqueous Electrolytes

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Canepa, Pieremanuele; Gautam, Gopalakrishnan Sai; Malik, Rahul; Jayaraman, Saivenkataraman; Rong, Ziqin; Zavadil, Kevin R.; Persson, Kristin; Ceder, Gerbrand

    2015-04-08

    Multivalent (MV) battery architectures based on pairing a Mg metal anode with a high-voltage (~3 V) intercalation cathode offer a realistic design pathway toward significantly surpassing the energy storage performance of traditional Li-ion-based batteries, but there are currently only few electrolyte systems that support reversible Mg deposition. Using both static first-principles calculations and ab initio molecular dynamics, we perform a comprehensive adsorption study of several salt and solvent species at the interface of Mg metal with an electrolyte of Mg2+ and Cl–dissolved in liquid tetrahydrofuran (THF). Our findings not only provide a picture of the stable species at the interfacemore » but also explain how this system can support reversible Mg deposition, and as such, we provide insights in how to design other electrolytes for Mg plating and stripping. Furthermore, the active depositing species are identified to be (MgCl)+ monomers coordinated by THF, which exhibit preferential adsorption on Mg compared to possible passivating species (such as THF solvent or neutral MgCl2 complexes). We found that upon deposition, the energy to desolvate these adsorbed complexes and facilitate charge transfer is shown to be small (~61–46.2 kJ mol–1 to remove three THF from the strongest adsorbing complex), and the stable orientations of the adsorbed but desolvated (MgCl)+ complexes appear to be favorable for charge transfer. Finally, observations of Mg–Cl dissociation at the Mg surface at very low THF coordinations (0 and 1) suggest that deleterious Cl incorporation in the anode may occur upon plating. In the stripping process, this is beneficial by further facilitating the Mg removal reaction.« less

  20. Particle count monitoring of reverse osmosis water treatment for removal of low-level radionuclides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moritz, E.J.; Hoffman, C.R.; Hergert, T.R.

    1995-03-01

    Laser diode particle counting technology and analytical measurements were used to evaluate a pilot-scale reverse osmosis (RO) water treatment system for removal of particulate matter and sub-picocurie low-level radionuclides. Stormwater mixed with Waste Water Treatment Plant (WWTP) effluent from the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS), formerly a Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear weapons production facility, were treated. No chemical pretreatment of the water was utilized during this study. The treatment system was staged as follows: multimedia filtration, granular activated carbon adsorption, hollow tube ultrafiltration, and reverse osmosis membrane filtration. Various recovery rates and two RO membrane models were tested. Analytical measurements included total suspended solids (TSS), total dissolved solids (TDS), gross alpha ({alpha}) and gross beta ({beta}) activity, uranium isotopes {sup 233/234}U and {sup 238}U, plutonium {sup 239/240}Pu, and americium {sup 241}Am. Particle measurement between 1--150 microns ({mu}) included differential particle counts (DPC), and total particle counts (TPC) before and after treatment at various sampling points throughout the test. Performance testing showed this treatment system produced a high quality effluent in clarity and purity. Compared to raw water levels, TSS was reduced to below detection of 5 milligrams per liter (mg/L) and TDS reduced by 98%. Gross {alpha} was essentially removed 100%, and gross {beta} was reduced an average of 94%. Uranium activity was reduced by 99%. TPC between 1-150{mu} were reduced by an average 99.8% to less than 1,000 counts per milliliter (mL), similar in purity to a good drinking water treatment plant. Raw water levels of {sup 239/240}Pu and {sup 241}Am were below reliable quantitation limits and thus no removal efficiencies could be determined for these species.

  1. Understanding the initial stages of reversible Mg deposition and stripping in inorganic nonaqueous electrolytes

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Canepa, Pieremanuele; Gautam, Gopalakrishnan Sai; Malik, Rahul; Jayaraman, Saivenkataraman; Rong, Ziqin; Zavadil, Kevin R.; Persson, Kristin; Ceder, Gerbrand

    2015-04-08

    Multivalent (MV) battery architectures based on pairing a Mg metal anode with a high-voltage (~3 V) intercalation cathode offer a realistic design pathway toward significantly surpassing the energy storage performance of traditional Li-ion-based batteries, but there are currently only few electrolyte systems that support reversible Mg deposition. Using both static first-principles calculations and ab initio molecular dynamics, we perform a comprehensive adsorption study of several salt and solvent species at the interface of Mg metal with an electrolyte of Mg2+ and Cl–dissolved in liquid tetrahydrofuran (THF). Our findings not only provide a picture of the stable species at the interfacemore » but also explain how this system can support reversible Mg deposition, and as such, we provide insights in how to design other electrolytes for Mg plating and stripping. Furthermore, the active depositing species are identified to be (MgCl)+ monomers coordinated by THF, which exhibit preferential adsorption on Mg compared to possible passivating species (such as THF solvent or neutral MgCl2 complexes). We found that upon deposition, the energy to desolvate these adsorbed complexes and facilitate charge transfer is shown to be small (~61–46.2 kJ mol–1 to remove three THF from the strongest adsorbing complex), and the stable orientations of the adsorbed but desolvated (MgCl)+ complexes appear to be favorable for charge transfer. Lastly, observations of Mg–Cl dissociation at the Mg surface at very low THF coordinations (0 and 1) suggest that deleterious Cl incorporation in the anode may occur upon plating. In the stripping process, this is beneficial by further facilitating the Mg removal reaction.« less

  2. On-chip single-copy real-time reverse-transcription PCR in isolated picoliter droplets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beer, N R; Wheeler, E; Lee-Houghton, L; Watkins, N; Nasarabadi, S; Hebert, N; Leung, P; Arnold, D; Bailey, C; Colston, B

    2007-12-19

    The first lab-on-chip system for picoliter droplet generation and RNA isolation, followed by reverse transcription, and PCR amplification with real-time fluorescence detection in the trapped droplets has been developed. The system utilized a shearing T-junction in a fused silica device to generate a stream of monodisperse picoliter-scale droplets that were isolated from the microfluidic channel walls and each other by the oil phase carrier. An off-chip valving system stopped the droplets on-chip, allowing thermal cycling for reverse transcription and subsequent PCR amplification without droplet motion. This combination of the established real-time reverse transcription-PCR assay with digital microfluidics is ideal for isolating single-copy RNA and virions from a complex environment, and will be useful in viral discovery and gene-profiling applications.

  3. Reversible elastic deformation of functionalized sp{sup 2} carbon at pressures of up to 33?GPa

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Soignard, Emmanuel; Hochheimer, Hans D.; Yarger, Jeff; Raj, Rishi

    2014-10-06

    We show that sp{sup 2} carbon bonded to silicon and oxygen can withstand reversible elastic deformation at pressures of up to 33?GPa. These experiments were carried out in a diamond anvil cell. In-situ Raman spectroscopy was employed to record the reversibility of elastic deformation by measuring the movement in the D and G peaks of carbon. Above 33?GPa the material, a silicon oxycarbide, transforms into an unidentified state which is retained upon unloading down to ambient pressure. Thermodynamical analysis suggests that the material could have transformed into a crystalline state at these ultrahigh pressures, driven by mechanical work.

  4. Solid-state synthesis, structure and properties of a novel open-framework cadmium selenite bromide: [Cd{sub 10}(SeO{sub 3}){sub 8}Br{sub 4}]·HBr·H{sub 2}O

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Wen-Tong; Wang, Ming-Sheng; Wang, Guan-E; Chen, Hui-Fen; Guo, Guo-Cong

    2013-08-15

    A novel open-framework cadmium selenite bromide, [Cd{sub 10}(SeO{sub 3}){sub 8}Br{sub 4}]·HBr·H{sub 2}O (1), has been obtained by a solid-state reaction at 450 °C, and the structure has been determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. Compound 1 crystallizes in Pbcm of the orthorhombic system: a=10.882(3), b=16.275(5), c=18.728(6) Å, V=3317(2) Å{sup 3}, R1/wR2=0.0411/0.0659. Compound 1 is characteristic of a novel 3-D open-framework structure, composing {sub ∞}{sup 2}[CdSeO{sub 3}] layers and the pillars of edge-shared CdO{sub 3}Br{sub 2} square pyramids. The lattice water molecules and the HBr molecules locate in the voids of the framework. Optical absorption spectrum of 1 reveals the presence of an optical gap of 1.65 eV. Solid-state photoluminescent study indicates that compound 1 exhibits strong violet emission. TG–DSC measurement shows that compound 1 is thermally stable up to 200 °C. - Graphical abstract: A metal selenite halide has been synthesized and features a 3-D open-framework structure, composing edge-shared CdO{sub 8} decahedra and pillars of edge-sharing pentahedra. UV–vis, TG–DSC and luminescent measurements are also reported. Highlights: • This paper reports a novel cadmium selenite bromide obtained by an intermediate-temperature solid-state reaction. • The title compound is characteristic of a novel 3-D open-framework structure, composing {sub ∞}{sup 2}[CdSeO{sub 3}] layers and the pillars of edge-shared CdO{sub 3}Br{sub 2} square pyramids. • The title compound is thermally stable up to 200 °C. • The title compound has an optical gap of 1.65 eV and exhibits strong violet emission.

  5. Apparatus and method for controlling the rotary airlocks in a coal processing system by reversing the motor current rotating the air lock

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Groombridge, Clifton E.

    1996-01-01

    An improvement to a coal processing system where hard materials found in the coal may cause jamming of either inflow or outflow rotary airlocks, each driven by a reversible motor. The instantaneous current used by the motor is continually monitored and compared to a predetermined value. If an overcurrent condition occurs, indicating a jamming of the airlock, a controller means starts a "soft" reverse rotation of the motor thereby clearing the jamming. Three patterns of the motor reversal are provided.

  6. Investigation and demonstration of dry carbon-based sorbent injection for mercury control. Quarterly technical report, July 1, 1996--September 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hunt, T.; Sjostrom, S.; Smith, J.

    1996-11-06

    The overall objective of this two phase program is to investigate the use of dry carbon-based sorbents for mercury control. This information is important to the utility industry in anticipation of pending regulations. During Phase I, a bench-scale field test device that can be configured as an electrostatic precipitator, a pulse-jet baghouse, or a reverse-gas baghouse has been designed, built and integrated with an existing pilot-scale facility at PSCo`s Comanche Station. Up to three candidate sorbents will be injected into the flue gas stream upstream of the test device to and mercury concentration measurements will be made to determine the mercury removal efficiency for each sorbent. During the Phase II effort, component integration for the most promising dry sorbent technology shall be tested at the 5000 acfm pilot-scale.

  7. Mutual neutralization of atomic rare-gas cations (Ne{sup +}, Ar{sup +}, Kr{sup +}, Xe{sup +}) with atomic halide anions (Cl{sup −}, Br{sup −}, I{sup −})

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shuman, Nicholas S.; Miller, Thomas M.; Viggiano, Albert A.; Johnsen, Rainer

    2014-01-28

    We report thermal rate coefficients for 12 reactions of rare gas cations (Ne{sup +}, Ar{sup +}, Kr{sup +}, Xe{sup +}) with halide anions (Cl{sup −}, Br{sup −}, I{sup −}), comprising both mutual neutralization (MN) and transfer ionization. No rate coefficients have been previously reported for these reactions; however, the development of the Variable Electron and Neutral Density Attachment Mass Spectrometry technique makes it possible to measure the difference of the rate coefficients for pairs of parallel reactions in a Flowing Afterglow-Langmuir Probe apparatus. Measurements of 18 such combinations of competing reaction pairs yield an over-determined data set from which a consistent set of rate coefficients of the 12 MN reactions can be deduced. Unlike rate coefficients of MN reactions involving at least one polyatomic ion, which vary by at most a factor of ∼3, those of the atom-atom reactions vary by at least a factor 60 depending on the species. It is found that the rate coefficients involving light rare-gas ions are larger than those for the heavier rare-gas ions, but the opposite trend is observed in the progression from Cl{sup −} to I{sup −}. The largest rate coefficient is 6.5 × 10{sup −8} cm{sup 3} s{sup −1} for Ne{sup +} with I{sup −}. Rate coefficients for Ar{sup +}, Kr{sup +}, and Xe{sup +} reacting with Br{sub 2}{sup −} are also reported.

  8. Experimental and ab initio studies of the reactive processes in gas phase i-C{sub 3}H{sub 7}Br and i-C{sub 3}H{sub 7}OH collisions with potassium ions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lpez, E.; Lucas, J. M.; Andrs, J. de; Albert, M.; Aguilar, A., E-mail: a.aguilar@ub.edu [Departament de Qumica Fsica, Institut de Qumica Terica i Computacional (IQTCUB), Universitat de Barcelona, Mart i Franqus, 1, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Bofill, J. M. [Departament de Qumica Orgnica, Institut de Qumica Terica i Computacional (IQTCUB), Universitat de Barcelona, Mart i Franqus, 1, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Bassi, D. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universit degli Studi di Trento, 38123 Povo-Trento (Italy)

    2014-10-28

    Collisions between potassium ions and neutral i-C{sub 3}H{sub 7}Br and i-C{sub 3}H{sub 7}OH, all in their electronic ground state, have been studied in the 0.1010.00 eV center of mass (CM) collision energy range, using the radiofrequency-guided ion beam technique. In K{sup +} + i-C{sub 3}H{sub 7}Br collisions KHBr{sup +} formation was observed and quantified, while the analogous KH{sub 2}O{sup +} formation in K{sup +} + i-C{sub 3}H{sub 7}OH was hardly detected. Moreover, formation of the ion-molecule adducts and their decomposition leading to C{sub 3}H{sub 7}{sup +} and either KBr or KOH, respectively, have been observed. For all these processes, absolute cross-sections were measured as a function of the CM collision energy. Ab initio structure calculations at the MP2 level have given information about the potential energy surfaces (PESs) involved. In these, different stationary points have been characterized using the reaction coordinate method, their connectivity being ensured by using the intrinsic-reaction-coordinate method. From the measured excitation function for KHBr{sup +} formation the corresponding thermal rate constant at 303 K has been calculated. The topology of the calculated PESs allows an interpretation of the main features of the reaction dynamics of both systems, and in particular evidence the important role played by the potential energy wells in controlling the reactivity for the different reaction channels.

  9. Design and testing of a unique active Compton-suppressed LaBr3(Ce) detector system for improved sensitivity assays of TRU in remote-handled TRU wastes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. K. Hartwell; M. E. McIlwain; J. A. Kulisek

    2007-10-01

    The US Department of Energy’s transuranic (TRU) waste inventory includes about 4,500 m3 of remote-handled TRU (RH-TRU) wastes composed of a variety of containerized waste forms having a contact surface dose rate that exceeds 2 mSv/hr (200 mrem/hr) containing waste materials with a total TRU concentration greater than 3700 Bq/g (100 nCi/g). As part of a research project to investigate the use of active Compton-suppressed room-temperature gamma-ray detectors for direct non-destructive quantification of the TRU content of these RH-TRU wastes, we have designed and purchased a unique detector system using a LaBr3(Ce) primary detector and a NaI(Tl) suppression mantle. The LaBr3(Ce) primary detector is a cylindrical unit ~25 mm in diameter by 76 mm long viewed by a 38 mm diameter photomultiplier. The NaI(Tl) suppression mantle (secondary detector) is 175 mm by 175 mm with a center well that accommodates the primary detector. An important feature of this arrangement is the lack of any “can” between the primary and secondary detectors. These primary and secondary detectors are optically isolated by a thin layer (.003") of aluminized kapton, but the hermetic seal and thus the aluminum can surrounds the outer boundary of the detector system envelope. The hermetic seal at the primary detector PMT is at the PMT wall. This arrangement virtually eliminates the “dead” material between the primary and secondary detectors, a feature that preliminary modeling indicated would substantially improve the Compton suppression capability of this device. This paper presents both the expected performance of this unit determined from modeling with MCNPX, and the performance measured in our laboratory with radioactive sources.

  10. Catalyzed Nano-Framework Stablized High Density Reversible Hydrogen Storage Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tang, Xia; Opalka, Susanne M.; Mosher, Daniel A; Laube, Bruce L; Brown, Ronald J; Vanderspurt, Thomas H; Arsenault, Sarah; Wu, Robert; Strickler, Jamie; Ronnebro, Ewa; Boyle, Tim; Cordaro, Joseph

    2010-06-30

    A wide range of high capacity on-board rechargeable material candidates have exhibited non-ideal behavior related to irreversible hydrogen discharge / recharge behavior, and kinetic instability or retardation. This project addresses these issues by incorporating solvated and other forms of complex metal hydrides, with an emphasis on borohydrides, into nano-scale frameworks of low density, high surface area skeleton materials to stabilize, catalyze, and control desorption product formation associated with such complex metal hydrides. A variety of framework chemistries and hydride / framework combinations were investigated to make a relatively broad assessment of the method's potential. In this project, the hydride / framework interactions were tuned to decrease desorption temperatures for highly stable compounds or increase desorption temperatures for unstable high capacity compounds, and to influence desorption product formation for improved reversibility. First principle modeling was used to explore heterogeneous catalysis of hydride reversibility by modeling H2 dissociation, hydrogen migration, and rehydrogenation. Atomic modeling also demonstrated enhanced NaTi(BH4)4 stabilization at nano-framework surfaces modified with multi-functional agents. Amine multi-functional agents were found to have more balanced interactions with nano-framework and hydride clusters than other functional groups investigated. Experimentation demonstrated that incorporation of Ca(BH4)2 and Mg(BH4)2 in aerogels enhanced hydride desorption kinetics. Carbon aerogels were identified as the most suitable nano-frameworks for hydride kinetic enhancement and high hydride loading. High loading of NaTi(BH4)4 ligand complex in SiO2 aerogel was achieved and hydride stability was improved with the aerogel. Although improvements of desorption kinetics was observed, the incorporation of Ca

  11. Principal physics of rotating magnetic-field current drive of field reversed configurations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoffman, A.L.; Guo, H.Y.; Miller, K.E.; Milroy, R.D.

    2006-01-15

    After extensive experimentation on the Translation, Confinement, and Sustainment rotating magnetic-field (RMF)-driven field reversed configuration (FRC) device [A. L. Hoffman et al., Fusion Sci. Technol. 41, 92 (2002)], the principal physics of RMF formation and sustainment of standard prolate FRCs inside a flux conserver is reasonably well understood. If the RMF magnitude B{sub {omega}} at a given frequency {omega} is high enough compared to other experimental parameters, it will drive the outer electrons of a plasma column into near synchronous rotation, allowing the RMF to penetrate into the plasma. If the resultant azimuthal current is strong enough to reverse an initial axial bias field B{sub o} a FRC will be formed. A balance between the RMF applied torque and electron-ion friction will determine the peak plasma density n{sub m}{proportional_to}B{sub {omega}}/{eta}{sup 1/2}{omega}{sup 1/2}r{sub s}, where r{sub s} is the FRC separatrix radius and {eta} is an effective weighted plasma resistivity. The plasma total temperature T{sub t} is free to be any value allowed by power balance as long as the ratio of FRC diamagnetic current, I{sup '}{sub dia}{approx_equal}2B{sub e}/{mu}{sub o}, is less than the maximum possible synchronous current, I{sup '}{sub sync}=e{omega}r{sub s}{sup 2}/2. The RMF will self-consistently penetrate a distance {delta}{sup *} governed by the ratio {zeta}=I{sup '}{sub dia}/I{sup '}{sub sync}. Since the FRC is a diamagnetic entity, its peak pressure p{sub m}=n{sub m}kT{sub t} determines its external magnetic field B{sub e}{approx_equal}(2{mu}{sub o}p{sub m}){sup 1/2}. Higher FRC currents, magnetic fields, and poloidal fluxes can thus be obtained, with the same RMF parameters, simply by raising the plasma temperature. Higher temperatures have also been noted to reduce the effective plasma resistivity, so that these higher currents can be supported with surprisingly little increase in absorbed RMF power.

  12. THE MAGNETIZATION DEGREE OF THE OUTFLOW POWERING THE HIGHLY POLARIZED REVERSE-SHOCK EMISSION OF GRB 120308A

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Shuai; Jin, Zhi-Ping; Wei, Da-Ming, E-mail: jin@pmo.ac.cn, E-mail: dmwei@pmo.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Dark Matter and Space Astronomy, Purple Mountain Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing, 210008 (China)

    2015-01-01

    GRB 120308A, a long duration ?-ray burst (GRB) detected by Swift, was distinguished by a highly polarized early optical afterglow emission that strongly suggests an ordered magnetic field component in the emitting region. In this work, we model the optical and X-ray emission in the reverse and forward shock scenario and show that the strength of the magnetic field in the reverse-shock region is ?10 times stronger than that in the forward shock region. Consequently, the outflow powering the highly polarized reverse-shock optical emission was mildly magnetized at a degree of ? ? a few percent. Considering the plausible magnetic energy dissipation in both the acceleration and prompt emission phases of the GRB outflow, the afterglow data of GRB 120308A provides us with compelling evidence that, at least for some GRBs, a nonignorable fraction of the energy was released in the form of Poynting flux, confirming the finding first made in the reverse-forward shock emission modeling of the optical afterglow of GRB 990123 by Fan etal. in 2002 and Zhang etal. in 2003.

  13. Strong and Reversible Binding of Carbon Dioxide in a Green Metal–Organic Framework

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gassensmith, Jeremiah J.; Furukawa, Hiroyasu; Smaldone, Ronald A.; Forgan, Ross S.; Botros, Youssry Y.; Yaghi, Omar M.; Stoddart, J. Fraser

    2011-08-30

    The efficient capture and storage of gaseous CO₂ is a pressing environmental problem. Although porous metal–organic frameworks (MOFs) have been shown to be very effective at adsorbing CO₂ selectively by dint of dipole–quadruple interactions and/or ligation to open metal sites, the gas is not usually trapped covalently. Furthermore, the vast majority of these MOFs are fabricated from nonrenewable materials, often in the presence of harmful solvents, most of which are derived from petrochemical sources. Herein we report the highly selective adsorption of CO₂ by CD-MOF-2, a recently described green MOF consisting of the renewable cyclic oligosaccharide γ-cyclodextrin and RbOH, by what is believed to be reversible carbon fixation involving carbonate formation and decomposition at room temperature. The process was monitored by solid-state ¹³C NMR spectroscopy as well as colorimetrically after a pH indicator was incorporated into CD-MOF-2 to signal the formation of carbonic acid functions within the nanoporous extended framework.

  14. Conventional empirical law reverses in the phase transitions of 122-type iron-based superconductors

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Yu, Zhenhai; Wang, Lin; Wang, Luhong; Liu, Haozhe; Zhao, Jinggeng; Li, Chunyu; Sinogeikin, Stanislav; Wu, Wei; Luo, Jianlin; Wang, Nanlin; et al

    2014-11-24

    Phase transition of solid-state materials is a fundamental research topic in condensed matter physics, materials science and geophysics. It has been well accepted and widely proven that isostructural compounds containing different cations undergo same pressure-induced phase transitions but at progressively lower pressures as the cation radii increases. However, we discovered that this conventional law reverses in the structural transitions in 122-type iron-based superconductors. In this report, a combined low temperature and high pressure X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurement has identified the phase transition curves among the tetragonal (T), orthorhombic (O) and the collapsed-tetragonal (cT) phases in the structural phase diagram ofmore » the iron-based superconductor AFe2As2 (A = Ca, Sr, Eu, and Ba). As a result, the cation radii dependence of the phase transition pressure (T → cT) shows an opposite trend in which the compounds with larger ambient radii cations have a higher transition pressure.« less

  15. The time evolution of turbulent parameters in reversed-field pinch plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Titus, J. B.; Alexander, Brandon; Johnson, J. A. III

    2013-04-28

    Turbulence is abundant in fully ionized fusion plasmas, with unique turbulent characteristics in different phases of the discharge. Using Fourier and chaos-based techniques, a set of parameters have been developed to profile the time evolution of turbulence in high temperature, fusion plasmas, specifically in self-organized, reversed-field pinch plasma in the Madison Symmetric Torus. With constant density and plasma current, the turbulence profile is measured during ramp-up, magnetic reconnection, and increased confinement phases. During magnetic reconnection, a scan of plasma current is performed with a constant density. Analysis revealed that the energy associated with turbulence (turbulent energy) is found to increase when changes in magnetic energy occur and is correlated to edge ion temperatures. As the turbulent energy increases with increasing current, the rate at which this energy flow between scales (spectral index) and anti-persistence of the fluctuations increases (Hurst exponent). These turbulent parameters are then compared to the ramp-up phase and increased confinement regime.

  16. Conventional empirical law reverses in the phase transitions of 122-type iron-based superconductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, Zhenhai; Wang, Lin; Wang, Luhong; Liu, Haozhe; Zhao, Jinggeng; Li, Chunyu; Sinogeikin, Stanislav; Wu, Wei; Luo, Jianlin; Wang, Nanlin; Yang, Ke; Zhao, Yusheng; Mao, Ho -kwang

    2014-11-24

    Phase transition of solid-state materials is a fundamental research topic in condensed matter physics, materials science and geophysics. It has been well accepted and widely proven that isostructural compounds containing different cations undergo same pressure-induced phase transitions but at progressively lower pressures as the cation radii increases. However, we discovered that this conventional law reverses in the structural transitions in 122-type iron-based superconductors. In this report, a combined low temperature and high pressure X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurement has identified the phase transition curves among the tetragonal (T), orthorhombic (O) and the collapsed-tetragonal (cT) phases in the structural phase diagram of the iron-based superconductor AFe2As2 (A = Ca, Sr, Eu, and Ba). As a result, the cation radii dependence of the phase transition pressure (T → cT) shows an opposite trend in which the compounds with larger ambient radii cations have a higher transition pressure.

  17. Electrolytic conditioning of a magnesium aluminum chloride complex for reversible magnesium deposition

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Barile, Christopher J.; Barile, Elizabeth C.; Zavadil, Kevin R.; Nuzzo, Ralph G.; Gewirth, Andrew A.

    2014-12-04

    We describe in this report the electrochemistry of Mg deposition and dissolution from the magnesium aluminum chloride complex (MACC). The results define the requirements for reversible Mg deposition and definitively establish that voltammetric cycling of the electrolyte significantly alters its composition and performance. Elemental analysis, scanning electron microscopy, and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM-EDS) results demonstrate that irreversible Mg and Al deposits form during early cycles. Electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) data show that inhibitory oligomers develop in THF-based solutions. These oligomers form via the well-established mechanism of a cationic ring-opening polymerization of THF during the initial synthesis of the MACC andmore » under resting conditions. In contrast, MACC solutions in 1,2-dimethoxyethane (DME), an acyclic solvent, do not evolve as dramatically at open circuit potential. Furthermore, we propose a mechanism describing how the conditioning process of the MACC in THF improves its performance by both tuning the Mg:Al stoichiometry and eliminating oligomers.« less

  18. Plasmon-enhanced reverse water gas shift reaction over oxide supported Au catalysts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Upadhye, AA; Ro, I; Zeng, X; Kim, HJ; Tejedor, I; Anderson, MA; Dumesic, JA; Huber, GW

    2015-01-01

    We show that localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) can enhance the catalytic activities of different oxide-supported Au catalysts for the reverse water gas shift (RWGS) reaction. Oxide-supported Au catalysts showed 30 to 1300% higher activity for RWGS under visible light compared to dark conditions. Au/TiO2 catalyst prepared by the deposition-precipitation (DP) method with 3.5 nm average Au particle size showed the highest activity for the RWGS reaction. Visible light is converted into chemical energy for this reaction with up to a 5% overall efficiency. A shift in the apparent activation energy (from 47 kJ mol(-1) in dark to 35 kJ mol(-1) in light) and apparent reaction order with respect to CO2 (from 0.5 in dark to 1.0 in light) occurs due to the LSPR. Our kinetic results indicate that the LSPR increases the rate of either the hydroxyl hydrogenation or carboxyl decomposition more than any other steps in the reaction network.

  19. Reactivity enhancement of oxide skins in reversible Ti-doped NaAlH{sub 4}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Delmelle, Renaud; Borgschulte, Andreas; Gehrig, Jeffrey C.; Züttel, Andreas

    2014-12-15

    The reversibility of hydrogen sorption in complex hydrides has only been shown unambiguously for NaAlH{sub 4} doped with transition metal compounds. Despite a multitude of investigations of the effect of the added catalyst on the hydrogen sorption kinetics of NaAlH{sub 4}, the mechanism of catalysis remains elusive so far. Following the decomposition of TiCl{sub 3}-doped NaAlH{sub 4} by in-situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), we link the chemical state of the dopant with those of the hydride and decomposition products. Titanium and aluminium change their oxidation states during cycling. The change of the formal oxidation state of Al from III to zero is partly due to the chemical reaction from NaAlH{sub 4} to Al. Furthermore, aluminium oxide is formed (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}), which coexists with titanium oxide (Ti{sub 2}O{sub 3}). The interplay of metallic and oxidized Ti with the oxide skin might explain the effectiveness of Ti and similar dopants (Ce, Zr…)

  20. Formation, dynamics, and implication of solid electrolyte interphase in high voltage reversible conversion fluoride nanocomposites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gmitter, Andrew J.; Badway, Fadwa; Rangan, Sylvie; Bartynski, Robert A.; Halajko, Anna; Pereira, Nathalie; Amatucci, Glenn G.

    2010-01-01

    Metal fluoride nanocomposites are uniquely suited as an alternative pathway to provide very high energy density cathodes for lithium batteries. Contrasted with modern intercalation compounds, they undergo conversion upon discharge into nanodomains of lithium fluoride and highly active metal. The nanosized metal formed during the discharge process along with the dynamic nature of the crystal structure may have considerable impact on the stability of any solid state interphase formed through reaction with the electrolyte. This is in contrast to the more macrocrystalline and stable crystal structure of traditional intercalation compounds. It has been found that the cyclic carbonates are susceptible to decomposition on the nanometal surfaces at potentials as high as 2.00 V vs. Li, and the products have been identified with Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM), Attenuated Total Reflectance-Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR), and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) as lithium carbonate species. Of greater importance is the impact of these decomposition products on the reversible cycling of the metal fluoride. Through a series of potentiodynamic and galvanostatic cycling trials, a clear relationship has been developed for the bismuth fluoride nanocomposites, the decomposition of the electrolyte solvent, and the cycle life. Acyclic organic carbonate solvents have been found to have minimal interaction and exhibited better long-term cycling performance than cyclic solvents.

  1. Liver fibrosis in mice induced by carbon tetrachloride and its reversion by luteolin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Domitrovic, Robert; Jakovac, Hrvoje; Tomac, Jelena; Sain, Ivana

    2009-12-15

    Hepatic fibrosis is effusive wound healing process in which excessive connective tissue builds up in the liver. Because specific treatments to stop progressive fibrosis of the liver are not available, we have investigated the effects of luteolin on carbon tetrachloride (CCl{sub 4})-induced hepatic fibrosis. Male Balb/C mice were treated with CCl{sub 4} (0.4 ml/kg) intraperitoneally (i.p.), twice a week for 6 weeks. Luteolin was administered i.p. once daily for next 2 weeks, in doses of 10, 25, and 50 mg/kg of body weight. The CCl{sub 4} control group has been observed for spontaneous reversion of fibrosis. CCl{sub 4}-intoxication increased serum aminotransferase and alkaline phosphatase levels and disturbed hepatic antioxidative status. Most of these parameters were spontaneously normalized in the CCl{sub 4} control group, although the progression of liver fibrosis was observed histologically. Luteolin treatment has increased hepatic matrix metalloproteinase-9 levels and metallothionein (MT) I/II expression, eliminated fibrinous deposits and restored architecture of the liver in a dose-dependent manner. Concomitantly, the expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein and alpha-smooth muscle actin indicated deactivation of hepatic stellate cells. Our results suggest the therapeutic effects of luteolin on CCl{sub 4}-induced liver fibrosis by promoting extracellular matrix degradation in the fibrotic liver tissue and the strong enhancement of hepatic regenerative capability, with MTs as a critical mediator of liver regeneration.

  2. Local transport barrier formation and relaxation in reverse-shear plasmas on the TFTR tokamak

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Synakowski, E.J.; Beer, M.A.; Batha, S.H.

    1997-02-01

    The roles of turbulence stabilization by sheared E x B flow and Shafranov-shift gradients are examined for TFTR. Enhanced Reverse-Shear plasmas. Both effects in combination provide the basis of a positive-feedback model that predicts reinforced turbulence suppression with increasing pressure gradient. Local fluctuation behavior at the onset of ERS confinement is consistent with this framework. The power required for transitions into the ERS regime are lower when high power neutral beams are applied earlier in the current profile evolution, consistent with the suggestion that both effects play a role. Separation of the roles of E x B and Shafranov shift effects was performed by varying the E x B shear through changes in the toroidal velocity with nearly-steady-state pressure profiles. Transport and fluctuation levels increase only when E x B shearing rates are driven below a critical value that is comparable to the fastest linear growth rates of the dominant instabilities. While a turbulence suppression criterion that involves the ratio of shearing to linear growth rates is in accord with many of these results, the existence of hidden dependencies of the criterion is suggested in experiments where the toroidal field was varied. The forward transition into the ERS regime has also been examined in strongly rotating plasmas. The power threshold is higher with unidirectional injection than with balanced injection.

  3. Formation and sustainment of field reversed configuration (FRC) plasmas by spheromak merging and neutral beam injection

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Yamada, Masaaki

    2016-01-01

    This study briefly reviews a compact toroid reactor concept that addresses critical issues for forming, stabilizing and sustaining a field reversed configuration (FRC) with the use of plasma merging, plasma shaping, conducting shells, neutral beam injection (NBI). In this concept, an FRC plasma is generated by the merging of counter-helicity spheromaks produced by inductive discharges and sustained by the use of neutral beam injection (NBI). Plasma shaping, conducting shells, and the NBI would provide stabilization to global MHD modes. Although a specific FRC reactor design is outside the scope of the present paper, an example of a promising FRC reactormore » program is summarized based on the previously developed SPIRIT (Self-organized Plasmas by Induction, Reconnection and Injection Techniques) concept in order to connect this concept to the recently achieved the High Performance FRC plasmas obtained by Tri Alpha Energy [Binderbauer et al, Phys. Plasmas 22,056110, (2015)]. This paper includes a brief summary of the previous concept paper by M. Yamada et al, Plasma Fusion Res. 2, 004 (2007) and the recent experimental results from MRX.« less

  4. Formation and sustainment of field reversed configuration (FRC) plasmas by spheromak merging and neutral beam injection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yamada, Masaaki

    2016-01-01

    This study briefly reviews a compact toroid reactor concept that addresses critical issues for forming, stabilizing and sustaining a field reversed configuration (FRC) with the use of plasma merging, plasma shaping, conducting shells, neutral beam injection (NBI). In this concept, an FRC plasma is generated by the merging of counter-helicity spheromaks produced by inductive discharges and sustained by the use of neutral beam injection (NBI). Plasma shaping, conducting shells, and the NBI would provide stabilization to global MHD modes. Although a specific FRC reactor design is outside the scope of the present paper, an example of a promising FRC reactor program is summarized based on the previously developed SPIRIT (Self-organized Plasmas by Induction, Reconnection and Injection Techniques) concept in order to connect this concept to the recently achieved the High Performance FRC plasmas obtained by Tri Alpha Energy [Binderbauer et al, Phys. Plasmas 22,056110, (2015)]. This paper includes a brief summary of the previous concept paper by M. Yamada et al, Plasma Fusion Res. 2, 004 (2007) and the recent experimental results from MRX.

  5. Reversal of the asymmetry in a cylindrical coaxial capacitively coupled Ar/Cl2 plasma

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Upadhyay, Janardan; Im, Do; Popović, Svetozar; Vušković, Leposava; Valente-Feliciano, Anne -Marie; Phillips, Larry

    2015-10-08

    The reduction of the asymmetry in the plasma sheath voltages of a cylindrical coaxial capacitively coupled plasma is crucial for efficient surface modification of the inner surfaces of concave three-dimensional structures, including superconducting radio frequency cavities. One critical asymmetry effect is the negative dc self-bias, formed across the inner electrode plasma sheath due to its lower surface area compared to the outer electrode. The effect on the self-bias potential with the surface enhancement by geometric modification on the inner electrode structure is studied. The shapes of the inner electrodes are chosen as cylindrical tube, large and small pitch bellows, andmore » disc-loaded corrugated structure (DLCS). The dc self-bias measurements for all these shapes were taken at different process parameters in Ar/Cl2 discharge. Lastly, the reversal of the negative dc self-bias potential to become positive for a DLCS inner electrode was observed and the best etch rate is achieved due to the reduction in plasma asymmetry.« less

  6. Novel Fouling-Reducing Coatings for Ultrafiltration, Nanofiltration, and Reverse Osmosis Membranes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benny Freeman

    2008-08-31

    Polymeric membranes could potentially be the most flexible and viable long-term strategy for treatment of produced water from oil and gas production. However, widespread use of membranes, including reverse osmosis (RO) membranes, for produced water purification is hindered due to fouling caused by the impurities present in the water. Fouling of RO membranes is likely caused by surface properties including roughness, hydrophilicity, and charge, so surface modification is the most widely considered approach to improve the fouling properties of current RO membranes. This project focuses on two main approaches to surface modification: coating and grafting. Hydrophilic coating and grafting materials based on poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) are applied to commercial RO membranes manufactured by Dow FilmTec and GE. Crossflow filtration experiments are used to determine the fouling resistance of modified membranes, and compare their performance to that of unmodified commercial RO membranes. Grafting and coating are shown to be two alternative methods of producing modified membranes with improved fouling resistance.

  7. Reversible Electrochemical Insertion of Lithium into Type I Ba8AlySi46-y Clathrate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Ying; Raghavan, Rahul; Wagner, Nicholas; Davidowski, Stephen; Baggetto, Loic; Zhao, Ran; Cheng, Qian; Holland, Gregory p; Yarger, Jeffery L; Veith, Gabriel M; Ellis-Terrell, Carol; Miller, Michael A; Chan, Kwai; Chan, Candace

    2015-01-01

    Silicon clathrates contain cage-like structures that can encapsulate various guest atoms or molecules. Here we present an electrochemical evaluation of type I silicon clathrates based on Ba8AlySi46-y for the anode material in lithium-ion batteries. Post-cycling characterization with NMR and XRD show no discernible structural or volume changes even after electrochemical insertion of 44 Li into the clathrate structure. The observed properties are in stark contrast with lithiation of other silicon anodes, which become amorphous and suffer from larger volume changes. The lithiation/delithiation processes are proposed to occur in single phase reactions at approximately 0.2 and 0.4 V vs. Li/Li+, respectively, distinct from other diamond cubic or amorphous silicon anodes. Reversible capacities as high as 499 mAh g-1 at a 5 mA g-1 rate were observed for silicon clathrate with composition Ba8Al8.54Si37.46, corresponding to Li:Si of 1.18:1. The results show that silicon clathrates could be promising durable anodes for lithium-ion batteries.

  8. Langmuir probe diagnostic suite in the C-2 field-reversed configuration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roche, T. Armstrong, S.; Knapp, K.; Slepchenkov, M.; Sun, X.

    2014-11-15

    Several in situ probes have been designed and implemented into the diagnostic array of the C-2 field-reversed configuration (FRC) at Tri Alpha Energy [M. Tuszewski et al. (the TAE Team), Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 255008 (2012)]. The probes are all variations on the traditional Langmuir probe. They include linear arrays of triple probes, linear arrays of single-tipped swept probes, a multi-faced Gundestrup probe, and an ion-sensitive probe. The probes vary from 5 to 7 mm diameter in size to minimize plasma perturbations. They also have boron nitride outer casings that prevent unwanted electrical breakdown and reduce the introduction of impurities. The probes are mounted on motorized linear-actuators allowing for programmatic scans of the various plasma parameters over the course of several shots. Each probe has a custom set of electronics that allows for measurement of the desired signals. High frequency ( > 5MHz) analog optical-isolators ensure that plasma parameters can be measured at sub-microsecond time scales while providing electrical isolation between machine and data acquisition systems. With these probes time-resolved plasma parameters (temperature, density, spatial potential, flow, and electric field) can be directly/locally measured in the FRC jet and edge/scrape-off layer.

  9. Tomographic imaging system for measuring impurity line emission in a field-reversed configuration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roche, T.; Heidbrink, W. W.; McWilliams, R.; Bolte, N.; Garate, E.; Wessel, F.

    2012-10-15

    A 16 chord optical tomography system has been developed and implemented in the flux coil generated-field reversed configuration (FRC). The chords are arranged in two fans of eight, which cover {approx}35% of the vessel area at the midplane. Each illuminate separate photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) which are fitted with narrow band-pass filters. In this case, filters are centered at 434.8 nm to measure emission from singly ionized argon. PMT crosstalk is negligible. Background noise due to electron radiation and H{sub {gamma}} line radiation is <10% of argon emission. The spatial resolution of the reconstruction is 1.5 cm. Argon is introduced using a puff valve and tube designed to impart the gas into the system as the FRC is forming. Reconstruction of experimental data results in time-dependent, 2D emissivity profiles of the impurity ions. Analysis of these data show radial, cross-field diffusion to be in the range of 10-10{sup 3} m{sup 2}/s during FRC equilibrium.

  10. Equilibrium paradigm for field-reversed configurations and application to experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steinhauer, Loren C.; Intrator, T. P.

    2009-07-15

    Fresh insights on field-reversed configurations (FRCs) are incorporated in a new paradigm for equilibria. In particular four new or unappreciated properties are accounted for: an empirically based scrape-off layer thickness; a new, more accurate axial force balance relation; viscous force regularity at the O-point; and the broken-surface effect. The new paradigm corrects glaring defects of previous models (rigid rotor, Hill's vortex). Further, the new paradigm is simple enough to be easily used as an interpretive tool despite the limited data suite in most experiments. It is applied to the newly enhanced FRC data compendium, a database of 69 records from 15 facilities. Several important observations and corrections on the previous understanding of FRCs follow, three of which stand out. (1) The traditional axial force balance ('average-{beta}' relation) gives an inaccurate scaling with the separatrix-to-wall radius ratio. (2) The improved equilibrium paradigm yields separatrix particle transport rates of 3-5 m{sup 2}/s for 'best confinement' examples; this is a factor of three lower than crude 'bulk' estimates commonly used. (3) The transport compared to the Bohm rate shows a great deal of scatter (40% scatter/mean ratio), i.e., 'Bohm' is not a useful representation for transport scaling.

  11. Extended magnetohydrodynamic simulations of field reversed configuration formation and sustainment with rotating magnetic field current drive

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Milroy, R. D.; Kim, C. C.; Sovinec, C. R.

    2010-06-15

    Three-dimensional simulations of field reversed configuration (FRC) formation and sustainment with rotating magnetic field (RMF) current drive have been performed with the NIMROD code [C. R. Sovinec et al., J. Comput. Phys. 195, 355 (2004)]. The Hall term is a zeroth order effect with strong coupling between Fourier components, and recent enhancements to the NIMROD preconditioner allow much larger time steps than was previously possible. Boundary conditions to capture the effects of a finite length RMF antenna have been added, and simulations of FRC formation from a uniform background plasma have been performed with parameters relevant to the translation, confinement, and sustainment-upgrade experiment at the University of Washington [H. Y. Guo, A. L. Hoffman, and R. D. Milroy, Phys. Plasmas 14, 112502 (2007)]. The effects of both even-parity and odd-parity antennas have been investigated, and there is no evidence of a disruptive instability for either antenna type. It has been found that RMF effects extend considerably beyond the ends of the antenna, and that a large n=0 B{sub t}heta can develop in the open-field line region, producing a back torque opposing the RMF.

  12. Rotating magnetic field current drive of high-temperature field reversed configurations with high {zeta} scaling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo, H. Y.; Hoffman, A. L.; Milroy, R. D.

    2007-11-15

    Greatly reduced recycling and impurity ingestion in the Translation, Confinement, and Sustainment--Upgrade (TCSU) device has allowed much higher plasma temperatures to be achieved in the field reversed configurations (FRC) under rotating magnetic field (RMF) formation and sustainment. The hotter plasmas have higher magnetic fields and much higher diamagnetic electron rotation rates so that the important ratio of average electron rotation frequency to RMF frequency, called {zeta}, approaches unity, for the first time, in TCSU. A large fraction of the RMF power is absorbed by an as yet unexplained (anomalous) mechanism directly proportional to the square of the RMF magnitude. It becomes of relatively lesser significance as the FRC current increases, and simple resistive heating begins to dominate, but the anomalous absorption is useful for initial plasma heating. Measurements of total absorbed power, and comparisons of applied RMF torque to torque on the electrons due to electron-ion friction under high-{zeta} operation, over a range of temperatures and fields, have allowed the separation of the classical Ohmic and anomalous heating to be inferred, and cross-field plasma resistivities to be calculated.

  13. Effects of background neutral particles on a field-reversed configuration plasma in the translation process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matsuzawa, Yoshiki; Asai, Tomohiko; Takahashi, Tsutomu; Takahashi, Toshiki

    2008-08-15

    A field-reversed configuration (FRC) plasma was translated into a weakly ionized plasma and the effects of heating and particle buildup of the FRC plasma due to the background neutral particles and plasma injection in the translation process were investigated. Improvement of the particle and poloidal flux confinements and delay of onset of n=2 rotational instability were observed in the translation process. It was found that the internal structure of the plasma pressure (plasma temperature and density) at the separatrix and field null was deformed by the particle injection. FRC plasma translation through the background particles was equivalent to an end-on particle beam injection to the FRC plasma. Particles and energy were supplied during the translation. The results obtained for the phenomena of particle supply and plasma heating were also supported by the results of two-dimensional particle simulation. The effects of background particle injection appear to be a promising process for the regeneration of translation kinetic energy to plasma internal energy.

  14. Numerical Study of Field-reversed Configurations: The Formation and Ion Spin-up

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    E.V. Belova; R.C. Davidson; H. Ji; M. Yamada; C.D. Cothran; M.R. Brown; M.J. Schaffer

    2005-06-06

    Results of three-dimensional numerical simulations of field-reversed configurations (FRCs) are presented. Emphasis of this work is on the nonlinear evolution of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) instabilities in kinetic FRCs, and the new FRC formation method by counter-helicity spheromak merging. Kinetic simulations show nonlinear saturation of the n = 1 tilt mode, where n is the toroidal mode number. The n = 2 and n = 3 rotational modes are observed to grow during the nonlinear phase of the tilt instability due to the ion spin-up in the toroidal direction. The ion toroidal spin-up is shown to be related to the resistive decay of the internal flux, and the resulting loss of particle confinement. Three-dimensional MHD simulations of counter-helicity spheromak merging and FRC formation show good qualitative agreement with results from the SSX-FRC experiment. The simulations show formation of an FRC in about 20-30 Alfven times for typical experimental parameters. The growth rate of the n = 1 tilt mode is shown to be significantly reduced compared to the MHD growth rate due to the large plasma viscosity and field-line-tying effects.

  15. Penetration and radial force balance in field-reversed configuration with large rotating magnetic field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ohnishi, M.; Fukuhara, M.; Masaki, T.; Osawa, H.; Chikano, T.; Hugrass, W.

    2008-10-15

    A field-reversed configuration (FRC) is formed by applying a rotating magnetic field (RMF) much larger than the axial magnetic field to a cylindrical glass vacuum chamber filled with 10 Pa argon gas without a preionization. The FRC with the plasma density 2.2x10{sup 19} m{sup -3}, the temperature 8.0 eV, the separatrix length 0.45 m, and the separatrix radius 0.035 m is sustained for the notably long period of 40 ms. It is observed that the antenna current which produces the RMF is reduced by about half after the FRC is formed. The interaction between the plasma and the antenna circuit increases the antenna resistance and changes the inductance of the antenna so that the circuit becomes nonresonant. The RMF is sufficiently large to fully penetrate to the center during the period and drive the current with a rigid rotor profile. The RMF is shown to play a major role in sustaining the plasma pressure.

  16. Flux generation and sustainment of a field reversed configuration with rotating magnetic field current drive

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Slough, J. T.; Miller, K. E.

    2000-05-01

    A new experimental device has been constructed to study the flux build-up and sustainment of a field reversed configuration (FRC) with a rotating magnetic field (RMF). Even though complete penetration was expected from RMF theory, the RMF field was observed to penetrate only a few centimeters inside the FRC separatrix. Despite the limited penetration, significantly larger toroidal currents (40 kA) were driven than in previous experiments ({approx}2 kA) with the same RMF field. The high currents and lack of deep penetration allowed the axial field to be the dominant field throughout the FRC. The radially inward pondermotive force arising from axial screening currents at the FRC edge had a significant influence on energy and particle confinement, reducing convective losses to the limit of observability. With only ohmic heating, the measured low ion temperatures (2 eV) left the ions unmagnetized while the electrons ({approx}40 eV) were well magnetized. No destructive instability was observed for the RMF driven FRC despite the lack of a strong kinetic ion component. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics.

  17. Magnetic design calculation and FRC formation modeling for the field reversed experiment liner

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dorf, L. A.; Intrator, T. P.; Renneke, R.; Hsu, S. C.; Wurden, G. A.; Awe, T.; Siemon, R.; Semenov, V. E.

    2008-10-01

    Integrated magnetic modeling and design are important to meet the requirements for (1) formation, (2) translation, and (3) compression of a field reversed configuration (FRC) for magnetized target fusion. Off-the-shelf solutions do not exist for many generic design issues. A predictive capability for time-dependent magnetic diffusion in realistically complicated geometry is essential in designing the experiment. An eddy-current code was developed and used to compute the mutual inductances between driven magnetic coils and passive magnetic shields (flux excluder plates) to calculate the self-consistent axisymmetric magnetic fields during the first two stages. The plasma in the formation stage was modeled as an immobile solid cylinder with selectable constant resistivity and magnetic flux that was free to readjust itself. It was concluded that (1) use of experimentally obtained anomalously large plasma resistivity in magnetic diffusion simulations is sufficient to predict magnetic reconnection and FRC formation, (2) comparison of predicted and experimentally observed timescales for FRC Ohmic decay shows good agreement, and (3) for the typical range of resistivities, the magnetic null radius decay rate scales linearly with resistivity. The last result can be used to predict the rate of change in magnetic flux outside of the separatrix (equal to the back-emf loop voltage), and thus estimate a minimum {theta}-coil loop voltage required to form an FRC.

  18. Kinetic Effects on the Stability Properties of Field-reversed Configurations: II. Nonlinear Evolution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elena V. Belova; Ronald C. Davidson; Hantao Ji; Masaaki Yamada

    2003-11-25

    Results of three-dimensional hybrid simulations of the field-reversed configuration (FRC) are presented. Emphasis of this work is on the nonlinear evolution of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) instabilities in kinetic FRCs. A wide range of ''bar s'' values is considered, where the ''bar s'' is the FRC kinetic parameter, which measures the number of ion gyroradii in the configuration. The linear and nonlinear stability of MHD modes with toroidal mode numbers n greater than or equal to 1 is investigated, including the effects of ion rotation, finite electron pressure, and weak toroidal field. Low-''bar s'' simulations show nonlinear saturation of the n = 1 tilt mode. The n greater than or equal to 2 rotational modes are observed to grow during the nonlinear phase of the tilt instability due to ion spin-up in the toroidal direction. Large-''bar s'' simulations show no saturation of the tilt mode, and there is a slow nonlinear evolution of the instability after the initial fast linear growth. Overall, the hybrid simulations demonstrate the importance of nonlinear effects, which are responsible for the saturation of instabilities in low-''bar s'' configurations, and also for the increase in FRC life-time compared to MHD models in high-''bar s'' configurations.

  19. Designing a biocidal reverse osmosis membrane coating: Synthesis and biofouling properties

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hibbs, Michael R.; McGrath, Lucas K.; Kang, Seoktae; Adout, Atar; Altman, Susan J.; Elimelech, Menachem; Cornelius, Chris J.

    2015-12-04

    In this study, a biocidal coating was developed in order to reduce biofouling on a reverse osmosis (RO) membrane using a quaternary ammonium (QA) functionalized polymer. The synthesis of a series of polysulfone (PS) ionomers with QA groups is described, and a method for spraying these QA ionomers as an alcoholic solution, which dried into water insoluble coatings. Contact angle and streaming potential were used to analyze the coating's hydrophilicity and surface charge. Both PS-QA1 and the commercial RO membrane had an apparent contact angle of 68° that increased to 126° for PS-QA12 corresponding to alkyl chain length. A negativelymore » charged particle-probe was used to measure coated and uncoated RO membrane interaction forces. Measured interaction forces correlated strongly with the length of alkyl chains or hydrophobicity of the coated surfaces. Uncoated RO membranes and ones coated with PS-QA were exposed to suspensions of Escherichia coli cells. All four PS-QA coatings showed significant biotoxicity and killed 100% of the E. coli cells, but uncoated RO membranes had metabolically active biofilms. However, coatings tested in a RO crossflow system showed a flux reduction that is attributed to mass transfer resistance due to excessively thick films.« less

  20. Designing a biocidal reverse osmosis membrane coating: Synthesis and biofouling properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hibbs, Michael R.; McGrath, Lucas K.; Kang, Seoktae; Adout, Atar; Altman, Susan J.; Elimelech, Menachem; Cornelius, Chris J.

    2015-12-04

    In this study, a biocidal coating was developed in order to reduce biofouling on a reverse osmosis (RO) membrane using a quaternary ammonium (QA) functionalized polymer. The synthesis of a series of polysulfone (PS) ionomers with QA groups is described, and a method for spraying these QA ionomers as an alcoholic solution, which dried into water insoluble coatings. Contact angle and streaming potential were used to analyze the coating's hydrophilicity and surface charge. Both PS-QA1 and the commercial RO membrane had an apparent contact angle of 68° that increased to 126° for PS-QA12 corresponding to alkyl chain length. A negatively charged particle-probe was used to measure coated and uncoated RO membrane interaction forces. Measured interaction forces correlated strongly with the length of alkyl chains or hydrophobicity of the coated surfaces. Uncoated RO membranes and ones coated with PS-QA were exposed to suspensions of Escherichia coli cells. All four PS-QA coatings showed significant biotoxicity and killed 100% of the E. coli cells, but uncoated RO membranes had metabolically active biofilms. However, coatings tested in a RO crossflow system showed a flux reduction that is attributed to mass transfer resistance due to excessively thick films.

  1. Passive Superconducting Flux Conservers for Rotating-Magnetic-Field-Driven Field-Reversed Configurations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oz, E.; Myers, C. E.; Edwards, M. R.; Berlinger, B.; Brooks, A.; Cohen, S. A.

    2011-01-05

    The Princeton Field-Reversed Configuration (PFRC) experiment employs an odd-parity rotating magnetic field (RMFo) current drive and plasma heating system to form and sustain high-? plasmas. For radial confinement, an array of coaxial, internal, passive, flux-conserving (FC) rings applies magnetic pressure to the plasma while still allowing radio-frequency RMFo from external coils to reach the plasma. The 3 ms pulse duration of the present experiment is limited by the skin time (?fc) of its room-temperature copper FC rings. To explore plasma phenomena with longer characteristic times, the pulse duration of the next-generation PFRC-2 device will exceed 100 ms, necessitating FC rings with (?fc > 300 ms. In this paper we review the physics of internal, discrete, passive FCs and describe the evolution of the PFRC's FC array. We then detail new experiments that have produced higher performance FC rings that contain embedded high-temperature superconducting (HTS) tapes. Several HTS tape winding configurations have been studied and a wide range of extended skin times, from 0.4 s to over 103 s, has been achieved. The new FC rings must carry up to 3 kA of current to balance the expected PFRC-2 plasma pressure, so the dependence of the HTS-FC critical current on the winding configuration and temperature was also studied. From these experiments, the key HTS-FC design considerations have been identified and HTS-FC rings with the desired performance characteristics have been produced.

  2. Reversible Dehydration Behavior Reveals Coordinatively Unsaturated Metal Sites in Microporous Aluminum Phosphonates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kinnibrugh, Tiffany L.; Bakhmutov, Vladimir I.; Clearfield, Abraham

    2014-10-01

    Incorporation of the same ligand into three different aluminum phenylenediphosphonates (Al(H2O)(O3PC6H4PO3H) (1), Al-4(H2O)(2)(O3PC6H4PO3)(3) (2), and Al-4(H2O)(4)(O3PC6H4PO3)(2.84)(OH)(0.64) (3)) was accomplished by varying the synthetic conditions. The compounds have different sorption properties; however, all exhibit reversible dehydration behavior. The structures of the hydrated and dehydrated phases were determined from powder X-ray diffraction data. Compounds 2 and 3 were found to be microporous, while compound 1 was found to be nonporous. The stability of the dehydrated phase and the resulting porosity was found to be influenced by the change in the structure upon loss of water.

  3. Target characterization using decomposition of the time-reversal operator: electromagnetic scattering from small ellipsoids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chambers, D H; Berryman, J G

    2006-05-18

    Decomposition of the time-reversal operator for an array, or equivalently the singular value decomposition of the multistatic response matrix, has been used to improve imaging and localization of targets in complicated media. Typically, each singular value is associated with one scatterer even though it has been shown in several cases that a single scatterer can generate several singular values. In earlier papers Chambers and Berryman [1, 2] showed that a small spherical scatterer can generate up to six singular values depending on the array geometry and sphere composition. It was shown that the existence and characteristics of multiple singular values for each scatterer can, in principle, be used to determine certain properties of the scatterers, e.g. conducting or non-conducting material. In this paper, we extend this analysis to non-spherical targets and show how orientation information about the target may be obtained from the spectrum of singular values. The general properties of the decomposition for small non-spherical dielectric (and possibly conductive) targets in an electromagnetic field are derived and detailed results are obtained for the specific cases of non-magnetic and perfectly conducting needles and disks. It is shown that scatterer orientation can be estimated by tracking the singular values of a linear array as it is rotated around its midpoint.

  4. Electrolytic conditioning of a magnesium aluminum chloride complex for reversible magnesium deposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barile, Christopher J.; Barile, Elizabeth C.; Zavadil, Kevin R.; Nuzzo, Ralph G.; Gewirth, Andrew A.

    2014-12-04

    We describe in this report the electrochemistry of Mg deposition and dissolution from the magnesium aluminum chloride complex (MACC). The results define the requirements for reversible Mg deposition and definitively establish that voltammetric cycling of the electrolyte significantly alters its composition and performance. Elemental analysis, scanning electron microscopy, and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM-EDS) results demonstrate that irreversible Mg and Al deposits form during early cycles. Electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) data show that inhibitory oligomers develop in THF-based solutions. These oligomers form via the well-established mechanism of a cationic ring-opening polymerization of THF during the initial synthesis of the MACC and under resting conditions. In contrast, MACC solutions in 1,2-dimethoxyethane (DME), an acyclic solvent, do not evolve as dramatically at open circuit potential. Furthermore, we propose a mechanism describing how the conditioning process of the MACC in THF improves its performance by both tuning the Mg:Al stoichiometry and eliminating oligomers.

  5. Highly Reversible Mg Insertion in Nanostructured Bi for Mg Ion Batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shao, Yuyan; Gu, Meng; Li, Xiaolin; Nie, Zimin; Zuo, Pengjian; Li, Guosheng; Liu, Tianbiao L.; Xiao, Jie; Cheng, Yingwen; Wang, Chong M.; Zhang, Jiguang; Liu, Jun

    2014-01-08

    Rechargeable magnesium batteries have attracted wide attention for energy storage. Currently, most studies focus on Mg metal as the anode, but this approach is still limited by the properties of the electrolyte and poor control of the Mg plating/stripping processes.1,2 Here we report the synthesis and application of Bi nanotubes as a high performance anode material for rechargeable Mg ion batteries. The nanostructured Bi anode delivers a high reversible specific capacity (350 mAh/gBi, or 3430 mAh/cm3 Bi), excellent stability, and high columbic efficiency (95 % initial and very close to 100% afterwards). The good performance is attributed to the unique properties of in-situ formed, interconnected nanoporous bismuth. Such nanostructures can effectively accommodate the large volume change without losing electric contact and significantly reduce diffusion length for Mg2+. Significantly, the nanostructured Bi anode can be used with conventional electrolytes which will open new opportunities to study Mg ion battery chemistry and further improve the properties. The performance and the stability of a full cell Mg ion battery have been demonstrated with conventional electrolytes. This work suggests that other high energy density alloy compounds may also be considered for Mg-ion chemistry for high capacity electrode materials.

  6. The Role of Axisymmetric Reconnection Events in JET Discharges with Extreme Shear Reversal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    B.C. Stratton; J.A. Breslau; R.V. Budny; S.C. Jardin; W. Park; H.R. Strauss; L.E. Zakharov; B. Alper; V. Drozdov; N.C. Hawkes; S. Reyes-Cortes; and Contributors to the EFDA-JET Work Programme

    2001-12-03

    Injection of Lower Hybrid Heating and Current Drive into the current ramp-up phase of Joint European Torus (JET) discharges can produce extremely reversed q-profiles characterized by a core region of very small or zero current density (within Motional Stark Effect diagnostic measurement errors) and q(subscript min) > 1. T(subscript e)-profiles show sawtooth-like collapses and the presence of an internal transport barrier. Accurate equilibrium reconstructions of these discharges are obtained using the ESC code, which was recently extended to allow equilibrium reconstructions in which a free boundary solver determines the plasma boundary and a fixed boundary solver provides the magnetic geometry and current density profile. The core current density does not appear to go negative, although current diffusion calculations indicate that sufficient non-inductive current drive to cause this is present. This is explained by nonlinear resistive MHD simulations in toroidal geometry which predict that these discharges undergo n=0 reconnection events (axisymmetric sawteeth) that redistribute the current to hold the core current density near zero.

  7. Reversing the brain drain from Eastern European countries: the push' and pull' factors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vizi, E.S. Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Budapest Yeshiva Univ., New York, NY )

    1993-01-01

    A mass departure of intellectuals is going on in countries such as Poland, Russia, the Ukraine, Czechoslovakia, Hungary, Bulgaria, and Romania. There is growing concern about the increasing number of intellectuals who have left, or are going to leave, these countries. The main problem is not that scientists and intellectuals are leaving to go abroad to work under better conditions - that is certainly beneficial for science as a whole. Rather, the problem occurs when they do not return. The migration of professionals, even if it is only temporary, only reflects the operation of an international market for specialized human capital. However, a minimum level of human capital is indispensable to a country's economic development. A loss of skilled human resources will ultimately have a grave impact on the economy and jeopardize development programs. There are several reasons for this migration. Top-level scientists have always been drawn to countries that offer greater attractions - facilities, salaries, career prospects, satisfaction, prestige. Drastic changes are needed in the official policy toward R D in Eastern European Countries. The atmosphere must be changed to make it more favorable for intellectual work. In addition, international agencies and governments of developed countries should help these poorer countries to reverse the brain drain. A program of Science and Technology for stability should be created in order to provide direct assistance to basic and applied scientific and technical research in these countries. 16 refs., 3 tabs.

  8. REVERSAL OF FORTUNE: INCREASED STAR FORMATION EFFICIENCIES IN THE EARLY HISTORIES OF DWARF GALAXIES?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Madau, Piero; Weisz, Daniel R.; Conroy, Charlie

    2014-08-01

    On dwarf galaxy scales, the different shapes of the galaxy stellar mass function and the dark halo mass function require a star-formation efficiency (SFE) in these systems that is currently more than 1 dex lower than that of Milky Way-size halos. Here, we argue that this trend may actually be reversed at high redshift. Specifically, by combining the resolved star-formation histories of nearby isolated dwarfs with the simulated mass-growth rates of dark matter halos, we show that the assembly of these systems occurs in two phases: (1) an early, fast halo accretion phase with a rapidly deepening potential well, characterized by a high SFE; and (2) a late, slow halo accretion phase where, perhaps as a consequence of reionization, the SFE is low. Nearby dwarfs have more old stars than predicted by assuming a constant or decreasing SFE with redshift, a behavior that appears to deviate qualitatively from the trends seen among more massive systems. Taken at face value, the data suggest that at sufficiently early epochs, dwarf galaxy halos above the atomic cooling mass limit can be among the most efficient sites of star formation in the universe.

  9. Reverse logistics network for municipal solid waste management: The inclusion of waste pickers as a Brazilian legal requirement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferri, Giovane Lopes; Diniz Chaves, Gisele de Lorena; Ribeiro, Glaydston Mattos

    2015-06-15

    Highlights: • We propose a reverse logistics network for MSW involving waste pickers. • A generic facility location mathematical model was validated in a Brazilian city. • The results enable to predict the capacity for screening and storage centres (SSC). • We minimise the costs for transporting MSW with screening and storage centres. • The use of SSC can be a potential source of revenue and a better use of MSW. - Abstract: This study proposes a reverse logistics network involved in the management of municipal solid waste (MSW) to solve the challenge of economically managing these wastes considering the recent legal requirements of the Brazilian Waste Management Policy. The feasibility of the allocation of MSW material recovery facilities (MRF) as intermediate points between the generators of these wastes and the options for reuse and disposal was evaluated, as well as the participation of associations and cooperatives of waste pickers. This network was mathematically modelled and validated through a scenario analysis of the municipality of São Mateus, which makes the location model more complete and applicable in practice. The mathematical model allows the determination of the number of facilities required for the reverse logistics network, their location, capacities, and product flows between these facilities. The fixed costs of installation and operation of the proposed MRF were balanced with the reduction of transport costs, allowing the inclusion of waste pickers to the reverse logistics network. The main contribution of this study lies in the proposition of a reverse logistics network for MSW simultaneously involving legal, environmental, economic and social criteria, which is a very complex goal. This study can guide practices in other countries that have realities similar to those in Brazil of accelerated urbanisation without adequate planning for solid waste management, added to the strong presence of waste pickers that, through the

  10. New Pathways and Metrics for Enhanced, Reversible Hydrogen Storage in Boron-Doped Carbon Nanospaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pfeifer, Peter; Wexler, Carlos; Hawthorne, M. Frederick; Lee, Mark W.; Jalistegi, Satish S.

    2014-08-14

    This project, since its start in 2007—entitled “Networks of boron-doped carbon nanopores for low-pressure reversible hydrogen storage” (2007-10) and “New pathways and metrics for enhanced, reversible hydrogen storage in boron-doped carbon nanospaces” (2010-13)—is in support of the DOE's National Hydrogen Storage Project, as part of the DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program’s comprehensive efforts to enable the widespread commercialization of hydrogen and fuel cell technologies in diverse sectors of the economy. Hydrogen storage is widely recognized as a critical enabling technology for the successful commercialization and market acceptance of hydrogen powered vehicles. Storing sufficient hydrogen on board a wide range of vehicle platforms, at energy densities comparable to gasoline, without compromising passenger or cargo space, remains an outstanding technical challenge. Of the main three thrust areas in 2007—metal hydrides, chemical hydrogen storage, and sorption-based hydrogen storage—sorption-based storage, i.e., storage of molecular hydrogen by adsorption on high-surface-area materials (carbons, metal-organic frameworks, and other porous organic networks), has emerged as the most promising path toward achieving the 2017 DOE storage targets of 0.055 kg H2/kg system (“5.5 wt%”) and 0.040 kg H2/liter system. The objective of the project is to develop high-surface-area carbon materials that are boron-doped by incorporation of boron into the carbon lattice at the outset, i.e., during the synthesis of the material. The rationale for boron-doping is the prediction that boron atoms in carbon will raise the binding energy of hydro- gen from 4-5 kJ/mol on the undoped surface to 10-14 kJ/mol on a doped surface, and accordingly the hydro- gen storage capacity of the material. The mechanism for the increase in binding energy is electron donation from H2 to electron-deficient B atoms, in the form of sp2 boron-carbon bonds. Our team is proud to have

  11. Closeout Report - Search for Time Reversal Symmetry Violation with TREK at J-PARC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kohl, Michael

    2015-04-15

    positions. Two former graduate students of the group have graduated and received their PhD degrees in nuclear physics (Dr. Anusha Liyanage and Dr. Ozgur Ates). In particular, this award has enabled Dr. Kohl to pursue the TREK project (Time Reversal Experiment with Kaons) at J-PARC, which he has been leading and advancing as International Spokesperson. Originally proposed as a search for time reversal symmetry violation [6], the project has evolved into a precision test of lepton flavor universality in the Standard Model along with sensitive searches for physics beyond the Standard Model through a possible discovery of new particles such as a sterile neutrino or a neutral gauge boson from the hidden sector in the mass region up to 300 MeV/c2 [7]. Experiment TREK/E36, first proposed in 2010, has been mounted between November 2014 and April 2015, and commissioning with beam has been started in April 2015, with production running anticipated in early summer and late fall 2015. It uses the apparatus from the previous KEK/E-246 experiment with partial upgrades to measure the ratio of decay widths of leptonic two-body decays of the charged kaon to µν and eν, respectively, which is highly sensitive to the ratio of electromagnetic charged lepton couplings and possible new physics processes that could differentiate between μ and e, hence breaking lepton flavor universality of the Standard Model. Through the searches for neutral massive particles, TREK/E36 can severely constrain any new physics scenarios designed to explain the proton radius puzzle [12, 13].

  12. SHORT GAMMA-RAY BURSTS IN THE ''TIME-REVERSAL'' SCENARIO

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ciolfi, Riccardo; Siegel, Daniel M. E-mail: daniel.siegel@aei.mpg.de

    2015-01-10

    Short gamma-ray bursts (SGRBs) are among the most luminous explosions in the universe and their origin still remains uncertain. Observational evidence favors the association with binary neutron star or neutron star-black hole (NS-BH) binary mergers. Leading models relate SGRBs to a relativistic jet launched by the BH-torus system resulting from the merger. However, recent observations have revealed a large fraction of SGRB events accompanied by X-ray afterglows with durations ∼10{sup 2}-10{sup 5} s, suggesting continuous energy injection from a long-lived central engine, which is incompatible with the short (≲ 1 s) accretion timescale of a BH-torus system. The formation of a supramassive NS, resisting the collapse on much longer spin-down timescales, can explain these afterglow durations, but leaves serious doubts on whether a relativistic jet can be launched at the merger. Here we present a novel scenario accommodating both aspects, where the SGRB is produced after the collapse of a supramassive NS. Early differential rotation and subsequent spin-down emission generate an optically thick environment around the NS consisting of a photon-pair nebula and an outer shell of baryon-loaded ejecta. While the jet easily drills through this environment, spin-down radiation diffuses outward on much longer timescales and accumulates a delay that allows the SGRB to be observed before (part of) the long-lasting X-ray signal. By analyzing diffusion timescales for a wide range of physical parameters, we find delays that can generally reach ∼10{sup 5} s, compatible with observations. The success of this fundamental test makes this ''time-reversal'' scenario an attractive alternative to current SGRB models.

  13. On the reversal of star formation rate-density relation at z = 1: Insights from simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tonnesen, Stephanie; Cen, Renyue E-mail: cen@astro.princeton.edu

    2014-06-20

    Recent surveys have found a reversal of the star formation rate (SFR)-density relation at z = 1 from that at z = 0, while the sign of the slope of the color-density relation remains unchanged. We use adaptive mesh refinement cosmological hydrodynamic simulations of a 21 × 24 × 20 h {sup –3} Mpc{sup 3} region to examine the SFR-density and color-density relations of galaxies at z = 0 and z = 1. The local environmental density is defined by the dark matter mass in spheres of radius 1 h {sup –1} Mpc, and we probe two decades of environmental densities. Our simulations produce a large increase of SFR with density at z = 1, as in the Elbaz et al. observations. We also find a significant evolution to z = 0, where the SFR-density relation is much flatter. The simulated color-density relation is consistent from z = 1 to z = 0, in agreement with observations. We find that the increase in SFR with local density at z = 1 is due to a growing population of star-forming galaxies in higher-density environments. At z = 0 and z = 1 both the SFR and cold gas mass are correlated with the galaxy halo mass, and therefore the correlation between median halo mass and local density is an important cause of the SFR-density relation at both redshifts. However, at z = 0 the local density on 1 h {sup –1} Mpc scales affects galaxy SFRs as much as halo mass. Finally, we find indications that while at z = 0 high-density environments depress galaxy SFRs, at z = 1 high-density environments tend to increase SFRs.

  14. Energetic-particle-driven instabilities and induced fast-ion transport in a reversed field pinch

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, L.; Brower, D. L.; Ding, W. X.; Anderson, J. K.; Capecchi, W.; Eilerman, S.; Forest, C. B.; Koliner, J. J.; Nornberg, M. D.; Reusch, J.; Sarff, J. S.; Liu, D.

    2014-05-15

    Multiple bursty energetic-particle (EP) driven modes with fishbone-like structure are observed during 1?MW tangential neutral-beam injection in a reversed field pinch (RFP) device. The distinguishing features of the RFP, including large magnetic shear (tending to add stability) and weak toroidal magnetic field (leading to stronger drive), provide a complementary environment to tokamak and stellarator configurations for exploring basic understanding of EP instabilities. Detailed measurements of the EP mode characteristics and temporal-spatial dynamics reveal their influence on fast ion transport. Density fluctuations exhibit a dynamically evolving, inboard-outboard asymmetric spatial structure that peaks in the core where fast ions reside. The measured mode frequencies are close to the computed shear Alfvn frequency, a feature consistent with continuum modes destabilized by strong drive. The frequency pattern of the dominant mode depends on the fast-ion species. Multiple frequencies occur with deuterium fast ions compared to single frequency for hydrogen fast ions. Furthermore, as the safety factor (q) decreases, the toroidal mode number of the dominant EP mode transits from n=5 to n=6 while retaining the same poloidal mode number m=1. The transition occurs when the m=1, n=5 wave-particle resonance condition cannot be satisfied as the fast-ion safety factor (q{sub fi}) decreases. The fast-ion temporal dynamics, measured by a neutral particle analyzer, resemble a classical predator-prey relaxation oscillation. It contains a slow-growth phase arising from the beam fueling followed by a rapid drop when the EP modes peak, indicating that the fluctuation-induced transport maintains a stiff fast-ion density profile. The inferred transport rate is strongly enhanced with the onset of multiple EP modes.

  15. Anomalous ion heating and superthermal electrons in the MST reversed-field pinch

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hokin, S.; Almagri, A.; Assadi, S.; Cekic, M.; Chapman, B.; Chartas, G.; Crocker, N.; Cudzinovic, M.; Den Hartog, D.J.; Dexter, R.; Fiksel, G.; Fonck, R.; Henry, J.; Holly, D.; Prager, S.; Rempel, T.; Sarff, J.; Scime, E.; Shen, W.; Sprott, C.; Stoneking, M.; Watts, C.

    1992-09-01

    Anomalous ion heating and superthermal electron populations have been studied in the MST reversed-field pinch. The ion heating is much stronger than that given by classical electron-ion friction, and is particularly strong during dynamo bursts. The heating displays a marked density dependence: in a 350-kA discharge with a maximum {bar n} = 0.9 {times} 10{sup 13} cm{sup {minus} 3}, T{sub i} rises sharply as {bar n} drops below 0.4 {times} 10{sub 13} cm{sup {minus}3} late in the discharge. Superthermal electrons are produced in the core, with temperatures of T{sub eh}, = 350--700 eV while the bulk core temperature is T{sub e}o = 130--230 eV. The fraction of superthermal electrons decreases with increasing density, from 40% at {bar n} = 0.5 {times} 10{sup 13} cm{sup {minus}3} to 8% at {bar n} = 1.9 {times} 10{sup 13} cm{sup {minus}3} at I = 350 kA. However, data with similar plasma parameters but higher oxygen impurity content had a lower T{sub eh} and higher hot fraction. The edge superthermal electron distribution is well fit by a drifted bi-Maxwellian distribution with T{sub {parallel}} {approximately} T{sub e0} and relative drift speed v{sub d}/v{sub th} = 0.4. With the assumption that the parallel heat flux measured with a pyroelectric probe is carried by superthermal electrons, the measured electron current is consistent with T{sub {perpendicular}} {approximately} T{sub ea} {approximately} T{sub e0}/3 and accounts for over half of the total edge parallel current measured with magnetic probes.

  16. The TITAN Reversed-Field Pinch fusion reactor study: Scoping phase report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-01-01

    The TITAN research program is a multi-institutional effort to determine the potential of the Reversed-Field Pinch (RFP) magnetic fusion concept as a compact, high-power-density, and ''attractive'' fusion energy system from economic (cost of electricity, COE), environmental, and operational viewpoints. In particular, a high neutron wall loading design (18 MW/m/sup 2/) has been chosen as the reference case in order to quantify the issue of engineering practicality, to determine the physics requirements and plasma operating mode, to assess significant benefits of compact systems, and to illuminate the main drawbacks. The program has been divided into two phases, each roughly one year in length: the Scoping Phase and the Design Phase. During the scoping phase, the TITAN design team has defined the parameter space for a high mass power density (MPD) RFP reactor, and explored a variety of approaches to the design of major subsystems. Two major design approaches consistent with high MPD and low COE, the lithium-vanadium blanket design and aqueous loop-in-pool design, have been selected for more detailed engineering evaluation in the design phase. The program has retained a balance in its approach to investigating high MPD systems. On the one hand, parametric investigations of both subsystems and overall system performance are carried out. On the other hand, more detailed analysis and engineering design and integration are performed, appropriate to determining the technical feasibility of the high MPD approach to RFP fusion reactors. This report describes the work of the scoping phase activities of the TITAN program. A synopsis of the principal technical findings and a brief description of the TITAN multiple-design approach is given. The individual chapters on Plasma Physics and Engineering, Parameter Systems Studies, Divertor, Reactor Engineering, and Fusion Power Core Engineering have been cataloged separately.

  17. Multiple Redox Modes in the Reversible Lithiation of High-Capacity, Peierls-Distorted Vanadium Sulfide

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Britto, Sylvia; Leskes, Michal; Hua, Xiao; Hébert, Claire-Alice; Shin, Hyeon Suk; Clarke, Simon; Borkiewicz, Olaf; Chapman, Karena W.; Seshadri, Ram; Cho, Jaephil; et al

    2015-06-08

    Vanadium sulfide VS4 in the patronite mineral structure, is a linear chain compound comprising vanadium atoms coordinated by disulfide anions [S2]2–. 51V NMR shows that the material, despite having V formally in the d1 configuration, is diamagnetic, suggesting potential dimerization through metal-metal bonding associated with a Peierls distortion of the linear chains. This is supported by density functional calculations, and is also consistent with the observed alternation in V-V distances of 2.8 Å and 3.2 Å along the chains. Partial lithiation results in reduction of the disulfide ions to sulfide S2–, including via an internal redox process whereby an electronmore » from V4+ is transferred to [S2]2– resulting in oxidation of V4+ to V5+ and reduction of the [S2]2– to S2- to form Li3VS4 containing tetrahedral [VS4]3– anions. On further lithiation this is followed by reduction of the V5+ in Li3VS4 to form Li3+xVS4 (x=0.5-1), a mixed valent V4+/V5+ compound. Eventually reduction to Li2S plus elemental V occurs. Despite the complex redox processes involving both the cation and the anion occurring in this material, the system is found to be partially reversible between 0 and 3 V. In conclusion, the unusual redox processes in this system are elucidated using a suite of short range characterization tools including 51V Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy (NMR), S Kedge X-ray Absorption Near Edge Spectroscopy (XANES) and Pair Distribution Function (PDF) Analysis of X-ray data.« less

  18. Reverse weathering, the carbonate-feldspar system, and porosity evolution during burial of sandstones

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Milliken, K.L.; Land, L.S. )

    1991-03-01

    Acid generated by reverse weathering in mudrocks drives linked reactions involving carbonates and feldspars that in turn have a profound impact on the evolution of porosity during burial diagenesis of sandstones. In the Oligocene Frio Formation along the Texas Gulf Coast, petrographic evidence at various scales in both sandstones and shales, and modern pore fluid compositions are all consistent with this idea. Acid released during illitization of smectite dissolves marine skeletal and detrital carbonate in shales. Shales export excess H+, dissolved CA++, and CO{sub 2} to the sandstones. Resultant interaction of sandstones with these shale-derived fluids is primarily controlled by the feldspar content of the sandstones. If the sandstones contain reactive feldspar content of the sandstones. If the sandstones contain reactive feldspar, acid from the shales is effectively buffered, thus allowing precipitation of calcite as cements and grain replacements in the sandstones and maintenance of fluids with low pCO{sub 2}. Once the supply of reactive detrital feldspar is exhausted through dissolution and albitization, shale-derived H+ remobilizes carbonate in sandstones, generating secondary porosity and fluids with high pCO{sub 2}. Acid generated through thermal maturation of organic matter plays only a trivial role in this system of reactions because the quantity of acid required for dissolution of carbonate and feldspar far exceeds the amount of kerogen in the system. The balance between the local acid generation capacity of shales, the local buffering capacity of feldspars in sandstones, and the availability of externally derived acids and ions is the primary control on the sequence of reactions occurring during burial metamorphism of sandstones.

  19. Observations of improved confinement in field reversed configurations sustained by antisymmetric rotating magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo, H.Y.; Hoffman, A.L.; Steinhauer, L.C.

    2005-06-15

    Rotating magnetic fields (RMF) have been employed to both form and sustain currents in field reversed configurations (FRC). A major concern about this method has been the fear of opening up magnetic field lines with even small ratios of vacuum RMF B{sub {omega}} to external confinement field B{sub e}. A recently proposed innovation was to use an antisymmetric arrangement of RMF, but vacuum calculations with full RMF penetration showed that very low values of B{sub {omega}}/B{sub e} would still be required to provide field-line closure. Recent comparisons of symmetric and antisymmetric RMF drive on the translation, confinement, and sustainment (TCS) facility [A. L. Hoffman, H. Y. Guo, J. T. Slough et al., Fusion Sci. Technol. 41, 92 (2002)] have shown strong improvements in the basic confinement properties of the FRCs when using antisymmetric drive, even with ratios of B{sub {omega}}/B{sub e} as high as 0.3. This is due to normal standard operation with only partial penetration of the RMF beyond the FRC separatrix. The uniform transverse RMF in vacuum is shielded by the conducting plasma, resulting in a mostly azimuthal field near the FRC separatrix with a very small radial component. Simple numerical calculations using analytical solutions for the partially penetrated antisymmetric RMF, superimposed on Grad-Shafranov solutions for the poloidal FRC fields, show good field-line closure for the TCS experimental conditions. The antisymmetric arrangement also leads to more efficient current drive and improved stabilization of rotational modes.

  20. Field reversing magnetotail current sheets: earth, Venus, and Comet Giacobini-Zinner

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McComas, D.J.

    1986-09-01

    This dissertation examines the field reversing magnetotail current sheets at the earth, Venus, and Comet Giacobini-Zinner. In the near earth study a new analysis technique is developed to calculate the detailed current density distributions within the cross tail current sheet for the first time. This technique removes the effects of a variable sheet velocity by inverting intersatellite timings between the co-orbiting satellites ISEE-1 and -2. Case studies of three relatively geomagnetically quiet crossings are made; sheet thicknesses and peak current densities are approx.1-5 x 10/sup 4/ km and approx.5-50 nA/m/sup 2/. Current density distributions reveal a high density central region, lower density shoulders, and considerable fine structure throughout. In the Venus study another new analysis technique is developed to reconstruct the average tail configuration from a correlation between field magnitude and draping angle in a large statistical data set. In the comet study, high resolution magnetic field and plasma electron data from the ICE traversal of Giacobini-Zinner are combined for the first time to determine the tail/current sheet geometry and calculate certain important but unmeasured local ion and upstream properties. Pressure balance across the tail gives ion temperatures and betas of approx.1.2 x 10/sup 5/ K and approx.40 in the center of the current sheet to approx.1 x 10/sup 6/ K and approx.3 in the outer lobes. Axial stress balance shows that the velocity shear upstream near the nucleus is >6 (approx.1 at ICE), and that a region of strongly enhanced mass loading (ion source rate approx.24 times that upstream from lobes) exists upstream from the current sheet. The integrated downtail mass flux is approx.2.6 x 10/sup 26/ H/sub 2/O+/sec, which is only approx.1% of the independently determined total cometary efflux. 79 refs., 37 figs.