Sample records for br anch pet

  1. br Owner br Facility br Type br Capacity br MW br Commercial...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Facility br Type br Capacity br MW br Commercial br Online br Date br Geothermal br Area br Geothermal br Region Coordinates Ahuachapan Geothermal Power Plant LaGeo SA de CV Single...

  2. Pet Insurance Veterinary Pet Insurance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pilyugin, Sergei S.

    29 Pet Insurance Veterinary Pet Insurance® Veterinary Pet Insurance® is the nation's oldest, largest and number one veterinarian-recommended pet health insurance provider. With comprehensive plans designed to protect you financially when the unexpected occurs, affordable coverage from VPI® Pet Insurance

  3. Positron Emission Tomography (PET)

    DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

    Welch, M. J.

    1990-01-00T23:59:59.000Z

    Positron emission tomography (PET) assesses biochemical processes in the living subject, producing images of function rather than form. Using PET, physicians are able to obtain not the anatomical information provided by other medical imaging techniques, but pictures of physiological activity. In metaphoric terms, traditional imaging methods supply a map of the body's roadways, its, anatomy; PET shows the traffic along those paths, its biochemistry. This document discusses the principles of PET, the radiopharmaceuticals in PET, PET research, clinical applications of PET, the cost of PET, training of individuals for PET, the role of the United States Department of Energy in PET, and the futures of PET.

  4. PET Analysis Challenging Problems in PET Imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Renaut, Rosemary

    PET Analysis Challenging Problems in PET Imaging Estimating the Input Function for a Human Brain FDG-PET Study A Feasibility Study Dr. Hongbin Guo, Prof. Rosemary A. Renaut Department of Mathematics and Statistics,Arizona State Univerisity Dr. Kewei Chen Banner Good Samaritan PET center, Phoenix Supported by

  5. Policy on Pets on Campus Policy on Pets on Campus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sridhar, Srinivas

    Policy on Pets on Campus 10/30/2014 Policy on Pets on Campus I. Purpose and Scope The presence. This policy addresses pets on all property owned and controlled by the university and applies to all students. Policy The University prohibits pets in university-owned or leased buildings, except as provided below

  6. PET-Recycling Schweiz Naglerwiesenstrasse 4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krause, Rolf

    PET-Recycling Schweiz Naglerwiesenstrasse 4 8049 Zurigo Telefono: 044 344 10 80 Fax: 044 344 10 99 E-mail: info@prs.ch www.petrecycling.ch #12;Il PET è un materiale riciclabile. Riciclare PET utilizzato il PET. Riconsegna le bottiglie PET, se no mancano altrove! #12;PET ­ più di un semplice materiale

  7. ModPET: A Novel Small-Animal PET System Positron Emission Tomography (PET) and PET/CT systems have become the gold standard for imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arizona, University of

    ModPET: A Novel Small-Animal PET System Positron Emission Tomography (PET) and PET/CT systems have these results to their human counterparts. Current small-animal PET scanners are very costly and complicated for Gamma-Ray Imaging, we are developing a novel small-animal PET scanner that utilizes common modular

  8. Pet Groomer? Check this out....

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    Want to be a Pet Groomer? Check this out.... Costs for Students Registering through UNH Continuing. For more information and an application, contact: Thompson School of Applied Science Pet Grooming Diploma Program in Pet Grooming University of New Hampshire Thompson School of Applied Science Applied Animal

  9. Jatropha BR | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup | OpenHunanInformationJames Watkins Jump to:JapanJatropha BR Jump

  10. Lanthanum halide scintillators for time-of-flight 3-D pet

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Karp, Joel S. (Glenside, PA); Surti, Suleman (Philadelphia, PA)

    2008-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A Lanthanum Halide scintillator (for example LaCl.sub.3 and LaBr.sub.3) with fast decay time and good timing resolution, as well as high light output and good energy resolution, is used in the design of a PET scanner. The PET scanner includes a cavity for accepting a patient and a plurality of PET detector modules arranged in an approximately cylindrical configuration about the cavity. Each PET detector includes a Lanthanum Halide scintillator having a plurality of Lanthanum Halide crystals, a light guide, and a plurality of photomultiplier tubes arranged respectively peripherally around the cavity. The good timing resolution enables a time-of-flight (TOF) PET scanner to be developed that exhibits a reduction in noise propagation during image reconstruction and a gain in the signal-to-noise ratio. Such a PET scanner includes a time stamp circuit that records the time of receipt of gamma rays by respective PET detectors and provides timing data outputs that are provided to a processor that, in turn, calculates time-of-flight (TOF) of gamma rays through a patient in the cavity and uses the TOF of gamma rays in the reconstruction of images of the patient.

  11. PET-Related Bibliography. Organized by topic. Biased toward PET. Slightly annotated. Hardly complete.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oakes, Terry

    PET-Related Bibliography. Organized by topic. Biased toward PET. Slightly annotated. Hardly complete. Outline I. PET Scanner Quantitation, Physics. A. Normalization B. Scatter correction, scatter C standards, acceptance test, QA/QC, NEMA H. 3D PET J. Resolution K. Specific PET Scanners 1. GE Advance 2

  12. JOB DESCRIPTION Requisition ID 4206BR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    general office and administrative policies. May supervise lower level staff members. Schedules in accordance with established procedures. Performs research and/or statistical analyses and assistsJOB DESCRIPTION Requisition ID 4206BR ASU Job Title Administrative Secretary Job Title

  13. A Pet's Place University of Illinois

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jain, Kanti

    A Pet's Place University of Illinois College of Veterinary Medicine vetmed Clinic *A Pet's Place Course Records Men: Eric Ollila, 15:54 (1995) Women: Jenny Marine, 19:04 (1994) See like to participate in the: _____5K run _____5K pet run _____5K walk _____5K pet walk Please check one

  14. Reconstruction and Restoration of PET Images.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mosegaard, Klaus

    Reconstruction and Restoration of PET Images. Ph.D. Thesis Peter Alshede Philipsen LYNGBY 1998 IMM with reconstruction and restoration of Positron Emission Tomography (PET) images carried out at the Section of Digital contains a short introduction to PET imaging. The second part, chapters 2 to 4, describe the PET scanner

  15. PET COMPUTER PROGRAMS FOR USE WITH THE 88-INCH CYCLOTRON

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gough, R.A.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in PRE . . .. Q ii PET COMPUTER PROGRAMSprograms written for the PET computer which provide anFusion Research Division PET COMPUTER PROGRAMS FOR USE WITH

  16. Comparison of CT, PET, and PET/CT for Staging of Patients with Indolent Non-Hodgkins Lymphoma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fueger, Barbara J.; Yeom, Kristen; Czernin, Johannes; Sayre, James W.; Phelps, Michael E.; Allen-Auerbach, Martin S.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Differences between PET and CT were not significant forperformed significantly better than PET and CT in correctlyadditional information over PET and CT for the staging and

  17. Molecular imaging in oncology: the acceptance of PET/CT and the emergence of MR/PET imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schiepers, Christiaan; Dahlbom, Magnus

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    only [2] to combining PET and CT [3] and PET and MRI [4].varies widely between PET and CT, e.g. arms up or down,body imaging with MRI or PET/CT: the future for single-

  18. Introduction of the Development ofIntroduction of the Development of New PET TracersNew PET Tracers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Introduction of the Development ofIntroduction of the Development of New PET TracersNew PET Tracers The Center for Translational Neuroimaging KunKun--EekEek KilKil #12;Principles of PET-1 PET: Positron Emission Tomography #12;Principles of PET-2 Cyclotron Scanner #12;Principles of PET-3 0 0.01 0.02 0.03 0

  19. Development of PhytoPET: A plant imaging PET system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dong, H; Lee, S J; McKisson, J; Xi, W; Zorn, C; Howell, C R; Crowell, A S; Cumberbatch, L; Reid, C D; Smith, M F

    2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The development and initial evaluation of a high-resolution positron emission tomography (PET) system to image the biodistribution of positron emitting tracers in live plants is underway. The positron emitting {sup 11}CO{sub 2} tracer is used in plant biology research investigating carbon sequestration in biomass, optimization of plant productivity and biofuel development. This PhytoPET design allows flexible arrangements of PET detectors based on individual standalone detector modules built from single 5 cm x 5 cm Hamamatsu H8500 position sensitive photomultiplier tubes. Each H8500 is coupled to a LYSO:Ce scintillator array composed of 48 x 48 elements that are 10 mm thick arranged with a 1.0 mm pitch. An Ethernet based 12-bit flash analog to digital data acquisition system with onboard coincident matrix definition is under development to digitize the signals. The detector modules of the PhytoPET system can be arranged and stacked to accommodate various sized plants and plant structures.

  20. Pets on Campus November 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    on campus property or dogs and other pet animals brought into campus facilities without proper authorization and in campus facilities and does not replace other applicable federal, provincial, and local laws unattended on campus for any period of time. 3. Dogs or other animals may not be intentionally abandoned

  1. Volume 7, Issue 3 pet center of excellence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jadvar, Hossein

    Volume 7, Issue 3 2010.3 newsletter pet center of excellence ImagingEvaluationofProstateCancer withFDG-PET/CT, was PET/CT. I say sur- prisingly because FDG PET/CT is excellent for overall cancer staging, but Tc-99m cancer is biologically and clini- cally a heterogeneous disease. The utility of FDG-PET in prostate

  2. Subunit IV-PetL chimeras in cytochrome b6f complex Chimeric fusions of subunit IV and PetL in the b6 f complex of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Subunit IV-PetL chimeras in cytochrome b6f complex - 1 - Chimeric fusions of subunit IV and Pet IV-PetL chimeras in cytochrome b6 f complex Additional keywords : PetG, PetM, PetN, transmembrane topology, mass spectrometry, State Transitions, protein phosphorylation. #12;Subunit IV-PetL chimeras

  3. J-PET analysis framework for the prototype TOF-PET detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krzemie?, W; Stola, K; Trybek, D; Bednarski, T; Bia?as, P; Czerwi?ski, E; Kap?on, ?; Kochanowski, A; Korcyl, G; Kowal, J; Kowalski, P; Kozik, T; Molenda, M; Moskal, P; Nied?wiecki, Sz; Pa?ka, M; Pawlik, M; Raczy?ski, L; Rudy, Z; Salabura, P; Sharma, N G; S?omski, A; Smyrski, J; Strzelecki, A; Wi?licki, W; Zieli?ski, M; Zo?, N

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Novel TOF-PET scanner solutions demand, apart from the state of the art detectors, software for fast processing of the gathered data, monitoring of the whole scanner and reconstruction of the PET image. In this article we present an analysis framework for the novel STRIP-PET scanner developed by the J-PET collaboration in the Institute of Physics of the Jagiellonian University. This software is based on the ROOT package used in many particle physics experiments.

  4. Statistical Image Reconstruction Algorithms Using Paraboloidal Surrogates for PET Transmission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fessler, Jeffrey A.

    Statistical Image Reconstruction Algorithms Using Paraboloidal Surrogates for PET Transmission Reconstruction Algorithms Using Paraboloidal Surrogates for PET Transmission Scans by Hakan Erdogan Chair: Jeffrey A. Fessler Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is a diagnostic imaging tool that provides images

  5. PET Imaging of Nucleoside Metabolism for Individualized Therapy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Jason Thanh

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    min prior to FLT injection). PET was performed 180 min afterleukemia in C57/BL6 mice. PET was performed 180 min afterHow can we tell if PET imaging for cancer is

  6. Molecular imaging in oncology: the acceptance of PET/CT and the emergence of MR/PET imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schiepers, Christiaan; Dahlbom, Magnus

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CTComputed tomography . PETPositron Emission Tomography .body imaging with MRI or PET/CT: the future for single-Sollitto RA et al (2009) 18F-FDG PET/CT of transitional cell

  7. assaying pet targets: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Physics Websites Summary: 2549 Abstract-- In this paper a modular power electronic transformer (PET) for feeding sensitive of the H-bridge cells. The proposed PET can...

  8. High energy XeBr electric discharge laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sze, Robert C. (Santa Fe, NM); Scott, Peter B. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A high energy XeBr laser for producing coherent radiation at 282 nm. The XeBr laser utilizes an electric discharge as the excitation source to minimize formation of molecular ions thereby minimizing absorption of laser radiation by the active medium. Additionally, HBr is used as the halogen donor which undergoes harpooning reactions with Xe.sub.M * to form XeBr*.

  9. Does Pet Arrival Trigger Prosocial Behaviors in Individuals with Autism?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Does Pet Arrival Trigger Prosocial Behaviors in Individuals with Autism? Marine Grandgeorge1 between the presence or the arrival of pets in families with an individual with autism and the changes of pets - two groups of 12 individuals and two groups of 8 individuals were assigned to: study 1 (pet

  10. PET functional volume delineation: a robustness and repeatability study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    1 PET functional volume delineation: a robustness and repeatability study Mathieu Hatt1 , Ph: Robustness of functional volume determination in PET Keywords: PET uptake volume determination, robustness;2 Abstract Purpose: Current state of the art algorithms for functional uptake volume segmentation in PET

  11. Pet Video Chat: Monitoring and Interacting with Dogs over Distance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Golbeck, Jennifer

    Pet Video Chat: Monitoring and Interacting with Dogs over Distance Abstract Companies are now making video-communication systems that allow pet owners to see, and, in some cases, even interact with their pets when they are separated by distance. Such `doggie cams' show promise, yet it is not clear how pet

  12. Volume 10, Issue 4 pet center of excellence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jadvar, Hossein

    cancer. The most common PET tracer in use today is 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18 F-FDG), a radiolabeled glucose analog for which many tumors exhibit avid uptake. With this trac- er, FDG-PET/CT provides a meta information in an FDG-PET/CT scan is routinely used for diagnosis and staging of cancer. How- ever, PET

  13. Analysing PET scans data for predicting response to chemotherapy in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sleeman, Derek

    (CT1, CT2,. . .) and PET scans (PT1 to PT4). cancer cells tend to grow more rapidly than other tissueAnalysing PET scans data for predicting response to chemotherapy in breast cancer patients Elias the use of Positron Emission Tomography (PET) [11, 13]. PET scans can be used to visualise

  14. Prison Pet Partnership Program The Prison Pet Partnership Program rescues and trains homeless animals to provide service dogs for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borenstein, Elhanan

    Prison Pet Partnership Program (Ongoing) The Prison Pet Partnership Program rescues and trains skills to women inmates so they can find gainful employment in the pet industry upon release. The Program to service. We value education and growth. We value building partnerships in a community. The Prison Pet

  15. Comparison of CT, PET, and PET/CT for Staging of Patients with Indolent Non-Hodgkins Lymphoma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fueger, Barbara J.; Yeom, Kristen; Czernin, Johannes; Sayre, James W.; Phelps, Michael E.; Allen-Auerbach, Martin S.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    B. J. Fueger et al. : PET/CT for indolent lymphoma Table 2.Performance for detection of nodal disease Sensitivity PETCT PET/CT pG0.001 vs PET, CT Specificity pG0.001 vs PET

  16. Bottled drinking water: Water contamination from bottle materials (glass, hard PET, soft PET), the influence of colour and acidification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Short, Daniel

    Bottled drinking water: Water contamination from bottle materials (glass, hard PET, soft PET in glass and PET bottles demonstrates significant (Wilcoxon rank sum test, a = 0.05) differences in median. 0.016 lg/L). Glass contaminates the water with Ce (19 higher than in PET bottles), Pb (14), Al (7

  17. Bottled drinking water: water contamination from bottle materials (glass, hard PET, soft PET), the influence of colour and acidification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Filzmoser, Peter

    Bottled drinking water: water contamination from bottle materials (glass, hard PET, soft PET in glass and PET bottles demonstrates significant (Wilcoxon rank sum test, =0.05) differences in median. 0.016 g/L). Glass contaminates the water with Ce (19x higher than in PET bottles), Pb (14 x), Al (7

  18. PET

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    le DG fait l'introduction et laisse la parole plusieurs intervenants au sujet de la physique des particules

  19. Combined PET/MRI scanner

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schlyer, David (Bellport, NY); Woody, Craig L. (Setauket, NY); Rooney, William (Miller Place, NY); Vaska, Paul (Sound Beach, NY); Stoll, Sean (Wading River, NY); Pratte, Jean-Francois (Stony Brook, NY); O'Connor, Paul (Bellport, NY)

    2007-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A combined PET/MRI scanner generally includes a magnet for producing a magnetic field suitable for magnetic resonance imaging, a radiofrequency (RF) coil disposed within the magnetic field produced by the magnet and a ring tomograph disposed within the magnetic field produced by the magnet. The ring tomograph includes a scintillator layer for outputting at least one photon in response to an annihilation event, a detection array coupled to the scintillator layer for detecting the at least one photon outputted by the scintillator layer and for outputting a detection signal in response to the detected photon and a front-end electronic array coupled to the detection array for receiving the detection signal, wherein the front-end array has a preamplifier and a shaper network for conditioning the detection signal.

  20. Automated movement correction for dynamic PET/CT images: Evaluation with phantom and patient data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    co- registration between PET and CT and for between frameco-registration between PET and CT, the PET images with ACregistration between PET and CT. Figure 3 shows that small

  1. CURRICULUM VITAE Julie Br ig ham -Gr ette

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schweik, Charles M.

    CURRICULUM VITAE Julie Br ig ham -Gr ette Address: Department of Geosciences, University of Massachusetts, Box 35820, Amherst, MA 01003-5820, USA Born: Albion, Michigan, 11 Jan 1955 Office phone: (413

  2. Ca2+-Doped CeBr3 Scintillating Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guss, Paul [NSTec; Foster, Michael E. [SNL; Wong, Bryan M. [SNL; Doty, F. Patrick [SNL; Shah, Kanai [RMD; Squillante, Michael R. [RMD; Shirwadkar, Urmila [RMD; Hawrami, Rastgo [RMD; Tower, Josh [RMD; Yuan, Ding [NSTec

    2014-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Despite the outstanding scintillation performance characteristics of cerium tribromide (CeBr3) and cerium-activated lanthanum tribromide, their commercial availability and application are limited due to the difficulties of growing large, crack-free single crystals from these fragile materials. This investigation employed aliovalent doping to increase crystal strength while maintaining the optical properties of the crystal. One divalent dopant (Ca2+) was used as a dopant to strengthen CeBr3 without negatively impacting scintillation performance. Ingots containing nominal concentrations of 1.9% of the Ca2+ dopant were grown. Preliminary scintillation measurements are presented for this aliovalently doped scintillator. Ca2+-doped CeBr3 exhibited little or no change in the peak fluorescence emission for 371 nm optical excitation for CeBr3. The structural, electronic, and optical properties of CeBr3 crystals were studied using the density functional theory within the generalized gradient approximation. The calculated lattice parameters are in good agreement with the experimental data. The energy band structures and density of states were obtained. The optical properties of CeBr3, including the dielectric function, were calculated.

  3. Imaging corn plants with PhytoPET, a modular PET system for plant biology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, S.; Kross, B.; McKisson, J.; McKisson, J. E.; Weisenberger, A. G.; Xi, W.; Zorn, C.; Bonito, G.; Howell, C. R.; Reid, C. D.; Crowell, A.; Cumberbatch, L. C.; Topp, C.; Smith, M. F.

    2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    PhytoPET is a modular positron emission tomography (PET) system designed specifically for plant imaging. The PhytoPET design allows flexible arrangements of PET detectors based on individual standalone detector modules built from single Hamamatsu H8500 position sensitive photomultiplier tubes and pixelated LYSO arrays. We have used the PhytoPET system to perform preliminary corn plant imaging studies at the Duke University Biology Department Phytotron. Initial evaluation of the PhytoPET system to image the biodistribution of the positron emitting tracer {sup 11}C in corn plants is presented. {sup 11}CO{sub 2} is loaded into corn seedlings by a leaf-labeling cuvette and translocation of {sup 11}C-sugars is imaged by a flexible arrangement of PhytoPET modules on each side. The PhytoPET system successfully images {sup 11}C within corn plants and allows for the dynamic measurement of {sup 11}C-sugar translocation from the leaf to the roots.

  4. PET Plants: Imaging Natural Processes for Renewable Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Homes, Christopher C.

    PET Plants: Imaging Natural Processes for Renewable Energy from Plants Benjamin A. Babst Goldhaber Postdoctoral Fellow Medical Department Plant Imaging #12;PET imaging for medicine Tumor Diagnosis Biomedical research and plants #12;Brookhaven's Unique Capabilities Movement, distribution, and metabolism

  5. All ESHP students are required to take PET 4947 (Practicum) and PET 4946 (Internship), which is a progression from a supervised field classroom experience and then a total

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    All ESHP students are required to take PET 4947 (Practicum) and PET 4946 (Internship), which of this content knowledge through practical exams in PET 4550 (Exercise Testing) and in PET 4947 (Practicum are assessed for the communication abilities in the following two ways: 1. A requirement of PET 4947

  6. Matrix isolation and computational study of isodifluorodibromomethane (F{sub 2}CBr-Br): A route to Br{sub 2} formation in CF{sub 2}Br{sub 2} photolysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    George, Lisa; Kalume, Aimable; Reid, Scott A. [Department of Chemistry, Marquette University, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53201-1881 (United States); El-Khoury, Patrick Z.; Tarnovsky, Alexander [Department of Chemistry and Center for Photochemical Sciences, Bowling Green State University, Bowling Green, Ohio 43403 (United States)

    2010-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The photolysis products of dibromodifluoromethane (CF{sub 2}Br{sub 2}) were characterized by matrix isolation infrared and UV/Visible spectroscopy, supported by ab initio calculations. Photolysis at wavelengths of 240 and 266 nm of CF{sub 2}Br{sub 2}:Ar samples ({approx}1:5000) held at {approx}5 K yielded iso-CF{sub 2}Br{sub 2} (F{sub 2}CBrBr), a weakly bound isomer of CF{sub 2}Br{sub 2}, which is characterized here for the first time. The observed infrared and UV/Visible absorptions of iso-CF{sub 2}Br{sub 2} are in excellent agreement with computational predictions at the B3LYP/aug-cc-pVTZ level. Single point energy calculations at the CCSD(T)/aug-cc-pVDZ level on the B3LYP optimized geometries suggest that the isoform is a minimum on the CF{sub 2}Br{sub 2} potential energy surface, lying some 55 kcal/mol above the CF{sub 2}Br{sub 2} ground state. The energies of various stationary points on the CF{sub 2}Br{sub 2} potential energy surface were characterized computationally; taken with our experimental results, these show that iso-CF{sub 2}Br{sub 2} is an intermediate in the Br+CF{sub 2}Br{yields}CF{sub 2}+Br{sub 2} reaction. The photochemistry of the isoform was also investigated; excitation into the intense 359 nm absorption band resulted in isomerization to CF{sub 2}Br{sub 2}. Our results are discussed in view of the rich literature on the gas-phase photochemistry of CF{sub 2}Br{sub 2}, particularly with respect to the existence of a roaming atom pathway leading to molecular products.

  7. PET radiotracers: crossing the bloodbrain barrier and surviving

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shen, Jun

    PET radiotracers: crossing the blood­brain barrier and surviving metabolism Victor W. Pike in the living human brain with positron emission tomography (PET) are increasingly useful in clinical research or undesirable metabolism. These issues are reviewed. Emerging PET radiotracers for measuring efflux transporter

  8. Hierarchical regularization for edge-preserving reconstruction of PET images

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bardsley, John

    Hierarchical regularization for edge-preserving reconstruction of PET images Johnathan M. Bardsley.somersalo@case.edu Abstract. The data in PET emission and transmission tomography and in low dose X-ray tomography, consists that the algorithm gives good quality reconstructions for both emission and transmission PET problems in an efficient

  9. Parallel algorithm and hybrid regularization for dynamic PET reconstruction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Parallel algorithm and hybrid regularization for dynamic PET reconstruction N. Pustelnik, Student Abstract--To improve the estimation at the voxel level in dynamic Positron Emission Tomography (PET in the presence of Poisson noise and it is extended here to (dynamic) space + time PET image reconstruction

  10. www.pet.hw.ac.uk 1 Private and Confidential

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Painter, Kevin

    www.pet.hw.ac.uk 1 Private and Confidential Application for MSc Courses - Supplementary Information of Exam Grade Attained Subjects taken at `O' level or equivalent with grades #12;www.pet.hw.ac.uk 2 of principal & subsidiary subjects Please leave blank for Institute Use #12;www.pet.hw.ac.uk 3 Employment Dates

  11. Restoring functional PET Images using Anatomical MR Images

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mosegaard, Klaus

    Restoring functional PET Images using Anatomical MR Images Peter Philipsen, Ulrik Kjems, Peter Toft signal to noise ratio and the low spa­ tial resolution in Positron Emission Tomography (PET) images ? And Positron Emission Tomography (PET) Images? ffl Segmentation of MR Images ­ Extraction of important edges

  12. PET/NIR Imaging DOI: 10.1002/ange.201205271

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cheng, Jianjun

    PET/NIR Imaging DOI: 10.1002/ange.201205271 Aptamer-Functionalized, Ultra-Small, Monodisperse (PET), and ultrasound and photoacoustic imag- ing.[4b,5b,6] However, each technique has its drawbacks, and none is sufficient to provide all the necessary information for LN assessment.[4b] PET is the most

  13. Hierarchical regularization for edge-preserving reconstruction of PET images

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bardsley, John

    1 Hierarchical regularization for edge-preserving reconstruction of PET images Johnathan M. Bardsley , Daniela Calvetti, and Erkki Somersalo Abstract--The data in PET emission and transmission tomog for both emission and transmission PET problems at very low computational cost. Index Terms

  14. Joint estimation of attenuation and emission images from PET scans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fessler, Jeffrey A.

    Joint estimation of attenuation and emission images from PET scans Hakan Erdogan and Jeffrey A Motivation · Attenuation correction needed for quantitatively accurate PET · Post-injection transmission scans necessitated by whole-body PET Inject (in waiting room) Radioisotope Uptake 40-60 minutes 10

  15. Using Functional Languages in Formal Methods: The Pet System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peled, Doron A.

    Using Functional Languages in Formal Methods: The Pet System Elsa L. Gunter and Doron A. Peled Bell language for the back­end of our new Path Exploration Tool (Pet) [2]. This tool is intended for interactive testing of sequential and concur­ rent software. The main calculation performed by Pet is the symbolic

  16. PET Evaluation of Novel Radiofluorinated Reboxetine Analogs as Norepinephrine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shen, Jun

    PET Evaluation of Novel Radiofluorinated Reboxetine Analogs as Norepinephrine Transporter Probes transporter; PET; monkey; reboxetine; FMeNER; FMeNER-D2 ABSTRACT (S,S)-2-( -(2-Fluoromethoxyphenoxy]FMeNER into cynomolgus monkey, PET examination with the head in the field of view revealed skull- bound radioactivity

  17. Some proximal methods for CBCT and PET S. Anthoine 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Some proximal methods for CBCT and PET tomography S. Anthoine 1 , J.-F. Aujol 2 , Y. Boursier 3 , C) and Positron Emission To- mography (PET) are two complementary medical imaging modalities providing-rays for CBCT and radiotracer for PET. Two demonstrators based on a technological breakthrough (acquisition

  18. Recovery of Dynamic PET Regions via Simultaneous Segmentation and Deconvolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Möller, Torsten

    Recovery of Dynamic PET Regions via Simultaneous Segmentation and Deconvolution Benjamin Smith1 and deconvolution of dynamic PET images. By incorporating the PSF of the imaging system into our segmentation model effect. We show improved segmentation results, and outperform two state-of-the-art dynamic PET

  19. Registration of PET and MR hand volumes using Bayesian Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Magee, Derek

    Registration of PET and MR hand volumes using Bayesian Networks Derek Magee1 , Steven Tanner1 is presented. PET and MR scans are aligned by optimising the configuration of a tube based model using a set to study the use of high-resolution HIDAC PET imagery in investigating bone growth and erosion in arthritis

  20. Diploma Program in Pet Grooming University of New Hampshire

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    Diploma Program in Pet Grooming University of New Hampshire Thompson School of Applied Science Applied Animal Science Curriculum The Thompson School has developed a program leading to a Diploma in Pet-oriented programs which provide a combination of academic and practical hands-on education. This Pet Grooming

  1. PET Imaging of Nucleoside Metabolism for Individualized Therapy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Jason Thanh

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    18 F-CA) small-animal PET/CT scans of C57BL/6J mice (imagesin mice. (A) Small-animal PET/CT images of C57BL/6J mice. (L- 18 F-FAC small-animal PET/CT scan of dCK knockout mouse.

  2. Volume 9, Issue 2 pet center of excellence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jadvar, Hossein

    study that compared Ga-68-DOTA-NOC PET/computed tomogra- phy (CT) with CT alone, the sensitivity for PET/CT, respectively, and 80 percent and 98 percent for CT alone, respec- tively9 . In another single center study involving 109 patients with GEP NETs, PET/CT was more accurate than conventional imaging

  3. From single-molecule magnetism to long-range ferromagnetism in Hpyr[Fe17O16(OH)12(py)12Br4]Br4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ryan, Dominic

    and intermolecular engineering of mo- lecular magnets can lead to the observation of long-range magnetic orderingFrom single-molecule magnetism to long-range ferromagnetism in Hpyr[Fe17O16(OH)12(py)12Br4]Br4 C magnet Hpyr Fe17O16 OH 12 py 12Br4 Br4 "Fe17" has a well-defined cluster spin ground state of S=35

  4. CsBr/GaN Heterojunction Photoelectron Source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maldonado, J.R.; /Stanford U., Elect. Eng. Dept.; Liu, Z.; Sun, Y.; /SLAC, SSRL; Schuetter, S.; /Wisconsin U., Madison; Pianetta, P.; /SLAC, SSRL; Pease, R.F.W.; /Stanford U., Elect. Eng. Dept.

    2009-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Experimental results on a new CsBr/GaN heterojunction photocathode structure are presented. The results indicate a fourfold improvement in photoyield relative to CsBr/Cr photocathodes. A model is presented based on intraband states in CsBr and electron injection from the GaN (with 1% addition of indium) substrate to explain the observed photoyield enhancement. The photocathode lifetime at high current density (>40 A/cm{sup 2}) is limited by laser heating of the small illuminated area. Calculations are presented for sapphire and diamond substrates, indicating a factor of 20 reduction in temperature for the latter. The results are encouraging for the realization of a high photoyield photocathode operating at high current density with long lifetime.

  5. Attenuation map reconstruction from TOF PET data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Qingsong; Wang, Ge

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To reconstruct a radioactive tracer distribution with positron emission tomography (PET), the background attenuation correction is needed to eliminate image artifacts. Recent research shows that time-of-flight (TOF) PET data determine the attenuation sinogram up to a constant, and its gradient can be computed using an analytic algorithm. In this paper, we study a direct estimation of the sinogram only from TOF PET data. First, the gradient of the attenuation sinogram is estimated using the aforementioned algorithm. Then, a relationship is established to link the differential attenuation sinogram and the underlying attenuation background. Finally, an iterative algorithm is designed to determine the attenuation sinogram accurately and stably. A 2D numerical simulation study is conducted to verify the correctness of our proposed approach.

  6. PRODUCTION CONSIDERATIONS FOR THE CLASSICAL PET NUCLIDES.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    FINN,R.; SCHLYER,D.

    2001-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear Medicine is the specialty of medical imaging, which utilizes a variety of radionuclides incorporated into specific compounds for diagnostic imaging and therapeutic applications. During recent years, research efforts associated with this discipline have concentrated on the decay characteristics of particular radionuclides and the design of unique radiolabeled tracers necessary to achieve time-dependent molecular images. The specialty is expanding with specific Positron emission tomography (PET) and SPECT radiopharmaceuticals allowing for an extension from functional process imaging in tissue to pathologic processes and nuclide directed treatments. PET is an example of a technique that has been shown to yield the physiologic information necessary for clinical oncology diagnoses based upon altered tissue metabolism. Most PET drugs are currently produced using a cyclotron at locations that are in close proximity to the hospital or academic center at which the radiopharmaceutical will be administered. In November 1997, a law was enacted called the Food and Drug Administration Modernization Act of 1997 which directed the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to establish appropriate procedures for the approval of PET drugs in accordance with section 505 of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act and to establish current good manufacturing practice requirements for such drugs. At this time the FDA is considering adopting special approval procedures and cGMP requirements for PET drugs. The evolution of PET radiopharmaceuticals has introduced a new class of ''drugs'' requiring production facilities and product formulations that must be closely aligned with the scheduled clinical utilization. The production of the radionuclide in the appropriate synthetic form is but one critical component in the manufacture of the finished radiopharmaceutical.

  7. Vanderbilt University Pet Policy for Live-in Employees Vanderbilt University permits live-in employees, be they faculty or staff, to own and keep pets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bordenstein, Seth

    1 Vanderbilt University Pet Policy for Live-in Employees Vanderbilt pets in their University assigned housing. The requirements of the policy are as follows: 1. Pets are limited to domesticated dogs, domesticated cats and fish

  8. Analysis framework for the J-PET scanner

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krzemie?, W; Gruntowski, A; Stola, K; Trybek, D; Bednarski, T; Bia?as, P; Czerwi?ski, E; Kami?ska, D; Kap?on, L; Kochanowski, A; Korcyl, G; Kowal, J; Kowalski, P; Kozik, T; Kubicz, E; Moskal, P; Nied?wiecki, Sz; Pa?ka, M; Raczy?ski, L; Rudy, Z; Salabura, P; Sharma, N G; Silarski, M; S?omski, A; Smyrski, J; Strzelecki, A; Wieczorek, A; Wi?licki, W; Zieli?ski, M; Zo?, N

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    J-PET analysis framework is a flexible, lightweight, ROOT-based software package which provides the tools to develop reconstruction and calibration procedures for PET tomography. In this article we present the implementation of the full data-processing chain in the J-PET framework which is used for the data analysis of the J-PET tomography scanner. The Framework incorporates automated handling of PET setup parameters' database as well as high level tools for building data reconstruction procedures. Each of these components is briefly discussed.

  9. Refractive indexes of aqueous LiBr solutions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zaltash, A.; Ally, M.R. (Energy Div., Oak Ridge National Lab., Oak Ridge, TN (US))

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reports that the refractive indexes of water-lithium bromide solutions were measured in the temperature range from 5.0 to 80.0 {degrees}C and in the range of salt concentrations from 0.00 (deionized water) to 58.90 mass %. An electrolyte solution of LlBr in water was chosen for study because of its wide use as an absorption chiller fluid. The concentration of LlBr aqueous solution was determined by argentimetric titration using tetrabromofluoresceln (Eosin) as an adsorption indicator and was checked at a few discrete concentrations (10.06, 20.30, and 58.90 mass % LlBr) against the values obtained by gravimetric analysis. The deviation between values obtained using these two techniques was found to be less than 0.27 mass %. The refractive indexes are shown to represent a reliable and convenient way of measuring the concentration of salt (or water) in LlBr solutions with accuracies of {plus minus}0.3 mass % salt.

  10. Delayed neutron energy spectra of {sup 87}Br, {sup 88}Br, {sup 89}Br, {sup 90}Br, {sup 137}I, {sup 138}I, {sup 139}I, and {sup 186}Te

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greenwood, R.C.; Watts, K.D. [Lockheed Idaho Technologies Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States). Idaho National Engineering Lab.

    1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In prior publications, the authors reported measurements of the energy spectra of delayed neutrons for the isotope-separated fission product precursors {sup 93}Rb, {sup 94}Rb, {sup 95}Rb, {sup 96}Rb, {sup 97}Rb, {sup 143}Cs, {sup 144}Cs, and {sup 145}Cs. Such studies of delayed neutron energy spectra have important applications in reactor physics, primarily relating to the fundamental role played by delayed neutrons in the kinetic behavior of nuclear reactors. Measurement of the energy spectra of delayed neutrons for the isotope-separated, fission product precursors {sup 87}Br, {sup 88}Br, {sup 89}Br, {sup 90}Br, {sup 137}I, {sup 138}I, {sup 139}I, and {sup 136}Te are reported for an energy range up to 1,213 keV and with lower cutoff energies of 11.1, 11.1, 29.9, 48.9, 14.2, 23.3, 29.9, and 48.9 keV, respectively. These data were obtained at the TRISTAN Isotope Separation On-Line facility using H{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} gas-filled proportional counters. The data for each of the bromine, iodine, and tellurium isotopes show good qualitative agreement with the published {sup 3}He ionization chamber data at energies above {approximately}200 keV. In addition, they provide definitive spectral information down to their respective cut-off energies.

  11. Miniature 'Wearable' PET Scanner Ready for Use

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Paul Vaska

    2013-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Scientists from BNL, Stony Brook University, and collaborators have demonstrated the efficacy of a "wearable," portable PET scanner they've developed for rats. The device will give neuroscientists a new tool for simultaneously studying brain function and behavior in fully awake, moving animals.

  12. The New Oncology: Cost-effectiveness and Matchless Impactof PET-CT in Cancer Management CME

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jadvar, Hossein

    The New Oncology: Cost-effectiveness and Matchless Impactof PET-CT in Cancer Management CME Author in integrating cost-effective FDG-PET and PET-CT fusion techniques into their clinical armamentarium to refine the clinical impact and cost-effectiveness of advanced imaging studies such as FDG-PET scanning and PET-CT

  13. Longpath DOAS observations of surface BrO at Summit, Greenland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    surface BrO at Summit, Greenland J. Stutz 1 , J. L. Thomasimpact of BrO at Summit, Greenland in 2007 and 2008, Atmos.of peroxy radicals at Summit, Greenland during summer 2003,

  14. MOLECULAR BEAM STUDIES OF UNIMOLECULAR REACTIONS: Cl, F + C2H3Br

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buss, Richard J.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    C1, F + C H Br Richard J. Buss, Michael J. Coggio1a, andF + C H3Br Z Richard J. Buss, Michael J. Coggiola and Yuan

  15. Guide to Developing Air-Cooled Lithium Bromide (LiBr) Absorption...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Guide to Developing Air-Cooled Lithium Bromide (LiBr) Absorption for CHP Applications, April 2005 Guide to Developing Air-Cooled Lithium Bromide (LiBr) Absorption for CHP...

  16. The decay of a new nuclide /sup 71/Br

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hagberg, E; Evans, H C; Hardy, J C; Koslowsky, V T; Schmeing, H; Schrewe, U J; Sharma, K S

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The decay of mass-separated samples of the previously unknown nuclide /sup 71/Br have been investigated by means of the Chalk River on-line isotope separator. Eleven gamma -transitions were assigned to the decay of this nuclide and its half-life was measured to be 21.4+or-0.6 s. A simple decay scheme for /sup 71/Br has been constructed incorporating six levels in its daughter, /sup 71/Se. The half-life of the first excited state in /sup 71/Se was measured to be 5.5+or-1.0 mu s and the transition from this state to the ground state was found to be highly converted. Systematic trends in the level schemes of /sup 67 /Zn, /sup 69/Ge and /sup 71/Se are investigated. (16 refs).

  17. PET IMAGE RECONSTRUCTION USING ANATOMICAL INFORMATION THROUGH MUTUAL INFORMATION BASED PRIORS: A SCALE SPACE APPROACH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rangarajan, Anand

    PET IMAGE RECONSTRUCTION USING ANATOMICAL INFORMATION THROUGH MUTUAL INFORMATION BASED PRIORS prior for incorpo- rating information from co-registered anatomical images into PET image reconstruction using mutual information based rigid registration. PET data are then simulated from the au

  18. Statistical Tomographic Image Reconstruction Methods for Randoms-Precorrected PET Measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fessler, Jeffrey A.

    Statistical Tomographic Image Reconstruction Methods for Randoms-Precorrected PET Measurements-Precorrected PET Measurements by Mehmet Yavuz Chair: Jeffrey A. Fessler Medical imaging systems such as positron emission tomography (PET) and electron- ically collimated single positron emission tomography (SPECT

  19. Roberto de Beauclair Seixas tron@lncc.br

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DICOM 3 Roberto de Beauclair Seixas tron@lncc.br #12;Imagens Médicas - Raios X #12;Imagens Médicas - CT Tomoscan AV da Philips #12;Imagens Médicas - CT Banco de detetores Tubo de raios-X Tubo de Raio X 120 a 150 K Volts 50 a 100 detetores #12;Imagens Médicas - CT Hounsfield Units (HU) ar -1000 gordura

  20. Equipe 2004/2005 Antonio Roberto Formaggio (formag@ltid.inpe.br) Coord.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ://www.dpi.inpe.br/spring/) Referncia - Imagens GeoCover (https://zulu.ssc.nasa.gov/mrsid/mrsid.pl) Limites municipais Atlas (IBGE/INPE) (http://www.dpi.inpe.br/spring/portugues/banco.html) #12;Imagens de Satlite Seleo Catlogo de Imagens CBERS/Landsat (http://www.dgi.inpe.br) #12;Imagens de Satlite Pedido e aquisio Registro

  1. PET/CT shielding design comparisons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coker, Audra Lee

    2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    moving through the gantry (with permission from Bushong 2001). 7 Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is a noninvasive diagnostic imaging tool that takes advantage of certain radiopharmaceuticals and allows abnormal metabolic... activity in and around organs to be examined by injection of a radionuclide into a patient (Radiology 2006). These radiopharmaceuticals, biological compounds linked to radiation-emitting radionuclides, can in some cases be tailored for concentration...

  2. Improved Growth Methods for LaBr3 Scintillation Radiation Detectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McGregor, Douglas S

    2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective is to develop advanced materials for deployment as high-resolution gamma ray detectors. Both LaBr3 and CeBr3 are advanced scintillation materials, and will be studied in this research. Prototype devices, in collaboration Sandia National Laboratories, will be demonstrated along with recommendations for mass production and deployment. It is anticipated that improved methods of crystal growth will yield larger single crystals of LaBr3 for deployable room-temperature operated gamma radiation spectrometers. The growth methods will be characterized. The LaBr3 and CeBr3 scintillation crystals will be characterized for light yield, spectral resolution, and for hardness.

  3. Lifetimes of N = Z Nuclei As-66 and Br-70

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burch, R. H.; Gagliardi, Carl A.; Tribble, Robert E.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    PHYSICAL REVIEW C VOLUME 38, NUMBER 3 Lifetimes of N =Z nuclei As and Br SEPTEMBER 1988 R. H. Burch Jr., C. A. Gagliardi, and R. E. Tribble Cyclotron Institute, Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (Received 5 May 1988) We have... of the target wheel, the detector telescope, and the detector shielding. 1988 The American Physical Society 1366 R. H. BURCH, JR., C. A. GAGLIARDI, AND R. E. TRIBBLE 38 indexer with an antibacklash circuit drove the stepping motor. After each irradiation...

  4. animal pet imaging: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    animal pet imaging First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Wesleyan University Policy on Pets,...

  5. animal pet imager: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    animal pet imager First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Wesleyan University Policy on Pets,...

  6. Restoring functional PET Images using Anatomical MR Images

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mosegaard, Klaus

    Restoring functional PET Images using Anatomical MR Images Peter Alshede Philipsen, Ulrik Kjems,uk,pto,lkh@imm.dtu.dk Abstract In this paper we present a Bayesian method to enhance functional 3D PET images using apriori as a true PET­MR result, and further more show how to obtain the desired information from the MR images. 1

  7. animal pet cameras: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    animal pet cameras First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Wesleyan University Policy on Pets,...

  8. animal dedicated pet: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    animal dedicated pet First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 A dedicated high resolution PET...

  9. animal pet clear: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    animal pet clear First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Wesleyan University Policy on Pets,...

  10. animal 18ffdg pet: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    animal 18ffdg pet First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Wesleyan University Policy on Pets,...

  11. DEPARTMENT On the Web Exotic Pets: Health and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Kate

    DEPARTMENT On the Web Exotic Pets: Health and Safety Issues for Children and Parents Kristine M pets, children, health, education, Web In the United States, persons in nearly 28 million households, or preparation of this manuscript. Conflicts of interest: None to report. Disclaimer: Reference to a Web site

  12. ML Reconstruction of Dynamic PET Images from Projections and Clist

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zibulevsky, Michael

    ML Reconstruction of Dynamic PET Images from Projections and Clist Michael Zibulevsky Computer Science Department FEC 313 University of New Mexico Albuquerque, NM 87131 USA email: michael and w vc are non-negative dynamic parameters. Corresponding PET data y bt represents number of counts

  13. Radioimmuntherapie3 Radioimmundiagnostik (Immuno-PET/CT)3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gollisch, Tim

    Radioimmuntherapie3 Radioimmundiagnostik (Immuno-PET/CT)3 Entzndungsdiagnostik mit [18F]FDG3 of Inflammatory Diseases with [18F]FDG3 Characterisation of Multinodular Toxic Goiter3 Radioactive tracers onkologischer Therapiekonzepte Radioimmunotherapy3 Radioimmunodiagnostics (Immuno-PET/CT)3 Diagnosis

  14. Photoluminescence and photostimulated luminescence of oxygen impurities in CsBr

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Appleby, G. A.; Zimmermann, J.; Hesse, S.; Seggern, H. von [Electronic Materials Division, Institute of Materials Science, Darmstadt University of Technology, 64287 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Oxygen impurities have been detected in undoped CsBr by photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy and their contribution to photostimulated luminescence (PSL) properties of powdered CsBr is discussed. When excited at 200 nm, PL is observed from CsBr which consists of three separate emission peaks. The intrinsic luminescence of CsBr at 379 nm is accompanied by two emission peaks at 395 and 460 nm which arise from oxygen impurities, the latter of which is also PSL active following x-irradiation. Sintering of CsBr with the reducing agent NH{sub 4}Br removes the oxygen impurities so that the 395 and 460 nm emissions are no longer detectable, and subsequently the PSL emission is significantly reduced. PSL storage time measurements of these materials show that oxygen impurities favorably increase both the PSL sensitivity and radiation induced charge-center stability in CsBr:Eu{sup 2+}. The oxygen impurities and their associated luminescence properties can be reintroduced to the CsBr matrix with a controlled concentration by doping with CsOH and then subsequently sintering the resultant CsBr:OH{sup -} with NH{sub 4}Br, which in this system reduces the OH{sup -} centers to O{sup 2-}.

  15. AUTOMATIC HOT SPOT DETECTION AND SEGMENTATION IN WHOLE BODY FDG-PET IMAGES Haiying Guan1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Barbara, University of

    AUTOMATIC HOT SPOT DETECTION AND SEGMENTATION IN WHOLE BODY FDG-PET IMAGES Haiying Guan1 , Toshiro a system for automatic hot spots detection and segmentation in whole body FDG-PET images. The main in clinical PET images. 1.INTRODUCTION Positron emission tomography (PET) using fluorine-18 de- oxyglucose

  16. The Octagonal PET II: The Topology of the Richard Evan Schwartz

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schwartz, Richard Evan

    The Octagonal PET II: The Topology of the Limit Sets Richard Evan Schwartz September 29, 2012 arise in these PETs. 1 Introduction 1.1 Background A polytope exchange transformation (or PET simplest examples of PETs are 1-dimensional systems, known as in- terval exchange transformations (or IETs

  17. Denoising of PET images by combining wavelets and curvelets for improved preservation of resolution and quantitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Denoising of PET images by combining wavelets and curvelets for improved preservation of Positron Emission Tomography (PET) images is a challenging task due to the inherent low signal evaluation of Positron Emission Tomography (PET) images often involve pre- processing steps. As PET images

  18. Improved Imaged-derived Input Function for Study of Human Brain FDG-PET

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Renaut, Rosemary

    Improved Imaged-derived Input Function for Study of Human Brain FDG-PET Hongbin Guo, Rosemary tomography (PET) studies. Two time windows can be recognized in the time activity curve measured from the compartmental model for FDG PET [5]. Index Terms Quantification of FDG PET, Automated Image-derived input

  19. Listmode-Driven Optimal Gating (OG) Respiratory Motion Management: Potential Impact On Quantitative PET Imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kay, Mark A.

    PET Imaging K Lee*, D Hristov , Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Palo Alto PET imaging. Methods: During the PET acquisitions, an optical camera tracked and recorded the motion of a tool placed on top of patients' torso. PET event data were utilized to detect and derive a motion

  20. Automated Tumour Delineation Using Joint PET/CT Information Vaclav Potesil 1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Xiaolei

    Automated Tumour Delineation Using Joint PET/CT Information Vaclav Potesil 1,2 , Xiaolei Huang 1 for automated delineation of tumor boundaries in whole-body PET/CT by jointly using information from both PET. Keywords: Tumor delineation, PET-CT, segmentation, radiation therapy planning 1. INTRODUCTION

  1. High-Resolution PET Detector. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karp, Joel

    2014-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project was to develop an understanding of the limits of performance for a high resolution PET detector using an approach based on continuous scintillation crystals rather than pixelated crystals. The overall goal was to design a high-resolution detector, which requires both high spatial resolution and high sensitivity for 511 keV gammas. Continuous scintillation detectors (Anger cameras) have been used extensively for both single-photon and PET scanners, however, these instruments were based on NaI(Tl) scintillators using relatively large, individual photo-multipliers. In this project we investigated the potential of this type of detector technology to achieve higher spatial resolution through the use of improved scintillator materials and photo-sensors, and modification of the detector surface to optimize the light response function.We achieved an average spatial resolution of 3-mm for a 25-mm thick, LYSO continuous detector using a maximum likelihood position algorithm and shallow slots cut into the entrance surface.

  2. Babcock and Wilcox BR-100 100-ton rail/barge spent fuel shipping cask

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Preliminary Design Report (PDR) provides a detailed description of the design, analyses, and testing programs for the BR-100 cask. The BR-100 is a Type B(U) cask designed for transport by rail or barge. This report presents the preliminary analyses and tests which have been performed for the BR-100 and outlines the confirmatory analyses and tests which will be performed.

  3. Solvent dependent branching between C-I and C-Br bond cleavage following 266 nm excitation of CH{sub 2}BrI

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, Christopher P.; Spears, Kenneth G.; Wilson, Kaitlynn R.; Sension, Roseanne J. [Department of Chemistry and Department of Physics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States)] [Department of Chemistry and Department of Physics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States)

    2013-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

    It is well known that ultraviolet photoexcitation of halomethanes results in halogen-carbon bond cleavage. Each halogen-carbon bond has a dominant ultraviolet (UV) absorption that promotes an electron from a nonbonding halogen orbital (n{sub X}) to a carbon-halogen antibonding orbital (?*{sub C-X}). UV absorption into specific transitions in the gas phase results primarily in selective cleavage of the corresponding carbon-halogen bond. In the present work, broadband ultrafast UV-visible transient absorption studies of CH{sub 2}BrI reveal a more complex photochemistry in solution. Transient absorption spectra are reported spanning the range from 275 nm to 750 nm and 300 fs to 3 ns following excitation of CH{sub 2}BrI at 266 nm in acetonitrile, 2-butanol, and cyclohexane. Channels involving formation of CH{sub 2}Br + I radical pairs, iso-CH{sub 2}Br-I, and iso-CH{sub 2}I-Br are identified. The solvent environment has a significant influence on the branching ratios, and on the formation and stability of iso-CH{sub 2}Br-I. Both iso-CH{sub 2}Br-I and iso-CH{sub 2}I-Br are observed in cyclohexane with a ratio of ?2.8:1. In acetonitrile this ratio is 7:1 or larger. The observation of formation of iso-CH{sub 2}I-Br photoproduct as well as iso-CH{sub 2}Br-I following 266 nm excitation is a novel result that suggests complexity in the dissociation mechanism. We also report a solvent and concentration dependent lifetime of iso-CH{sub 2}Br-I. At low concentrations the lifetime is >4 ns in acetonitrile, 1.9 ns in 2-butanol and ?1.4 ns in cyclohexane. These lifetimes decrease with higher initial concentrations of CH{sub 2}BrI. The concentration dependence highlights the role that intermolecular interactions can play in the quenching of unstable isomers of dihalomethanes.

  4. Optical characteristics of a HgBr excilamp

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malinina, A A; Malinin, A N; Shuaibov, A K [Uzhgorod National University, Uzhgorod (Ukraine)

    2013-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Optical characteristics of a coaxial HgBr excilamp on multicomponent mercury dibromide vapour mixtures with helium, nitrogen and sulfur hexafluoride are investigated under pumping by a pulse-periodic barrier discharge. Stable excilamp operation was demonstrated at a pump pulse repetition rate of 3 9 kHz. The component composition of the working system was determined, which provides a maximal average and pulsed specific radiation power of 48.8 mW cm{sup -3} and 40.6 W cm{sup -3}, respectively, at the efficiency of 7.3 % in the blue-green spectral range with the maximal radiation intensity at the wavelength of 502 nm. The reduction in the radiation power after 2.5 10{sup 6} shots is 5 %. Interpretation is given for the results of optimisation of excilamp characteristics. (optical radiation sources)

  5. Apparatus for improving the working time of the XeBr laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sander, Robert K. (Los Alamos, MN); Balog, George (Los Alamos, MN); Seegmiller, Emma T. (Los Alamos, MN)

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In XeBr lasers which make use of HBr as the source of bromine, it has been found that the working life of the laser is limited because of dissociation of the HBr in the lasing region to form H.sub.2 and Br.sub.2. Accordingly, apparatus is disclosed for substantially improving the working time of the XeBr laser wherein means are provided for recombining H.sub.2 and Br.sub.2 into HBr and for continuously circulating the gaseous working medium from the lasing region through the recombination region. BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

  6. STRIP-PET: a novel detector concept for the TOF-PET scanner

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moskal, P; Bia?as, P; Ciszewska, M; Czerwi?ski, E; Heczko, A; Kajetanowicz, M; Kap?on, ?; Kochanowski, A; Konopka-Cupia?, G; Korcyl, G; Krzemie?, W; ?ojek, K; Majewski, J; Migda?, W; Molenda, M; Nied?wiecki, Sz; Pa?ka, M; Rudy, Z; Salabura, P; Silarski, M; S?omski, A; Smyrski, J; Zdebik, J; Zieli?ski, M

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We briefly present a design of a new PET scanner based on strips of polymer scintillators arranged in a barrel constituting a large acceptance detector. The solution proposed is based on the superior timing properties of the polymer scintillators. The position and time of the reaction of the gamma quanta in the detector material will be determined based on the time of arrival of light signals to the edges of the scintillator strips.

  7. Modeling of material response during fiber drawing of semicrystalline pet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yadav, Seemant

    2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    has been made for more general conditions. This is due in part to the complexity of polymeric behavior. In this work, experimental results of uniaxial extension tests on Polyethylene terephthalate (PET) were obtained from Dr. S.Bechtel, were analyzed...

  8. Intrinsic Radiation in Lutetium Based PET Detector: Advantages and Disadvantages

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wei, Qingyang

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Lutetium (Lu) based scintillators such as LSO and LYSO, are widely used in modern PET detectors due to their high stopping power for 511 keV gamma rays, high light yield and short decay time. However, 2.6% of naturally occurring Lu is 176Lu, a long-lived radioactive element including a beta decay and three major simultaneous gamma decays. This phenomenon introduces random events to PET systems that affects the system performance. On the other hand, the advantages of intrinsic radiation of 176Lu (IRL) continues to be exploited. In this paper, research literatures about IRL in PET detectors are reviewed. Details about the adverse effects of IRL to PET and their solutions, as well as the useful applications are presented and discussed.

  9. autoactivation pet imaging: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    radiologists. Currently, to our knowledge, The first author performed the work while at SIEMENS California at Santa Barbara, University of 50 Comparison between 18F-FDG PET image...

  10. Simultaneous PET/fMRI for imaging neuroreceptor dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sander, Christin Y. (Christin Yen-Ming)

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Whole-brain neuroimaging is a key technique for studying brain function and connectivity. Recent advances in combining two imaging modalities - magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and positron emission tomography (PET) - into ...

  11. Model Error Correction for Linear Methods in PET Neuroreceptor Measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Renaut, Rosemary

    Model Error Correction for Linear Methods in PET Neuroreceptor Measurements Hongbin Guo address: hguo1@asu.edu (Hongbin Guo) Preprint submitted to NeuroImage December 11, 2008 #12;reached. A new

  12. ELIXYS - a fully automated, three-reactor high-pressure radiosynthesizer for development and routine production of diverse PET tracers.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    cancer treatment with PET/CT: does it make a difference? Jfor decentralized production of PET tracers. In Positronprobes FMAU, FHBG, and FHPG as PET imaging agents for HSV1-

  13. High-resolution 18F-FDG PET with MRI for monitoring response to treatment in rheumatoid arthritis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of a dedicated breast PET/CT scanner during human imaging. Jhigh-resolution 18 F-FDG PET images (pseudocolor) overlaidMONTH High-resolution 18 F-FDG PET with MRI for monitoring

  14. Fabrication and characterization of a 0.5-mm lutetium oxyorthosilicate detector array for high-resolution PET applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stickel, Jennifer R; Qi, Jinyi; Cherry, Simon R

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for a high resolution PET detector using position sensitive51:21312142. 0.5- MM LSO A RRAY FOR PET Stickel et al.Instrumentation aspects of animal PET. Annu Rev Biomed Eng.

  15. Unusual association of alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma with pancreatic metastasis: emerging role of PET-CT in tumor staging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Christie R, Daw NC et al ( 2005) PET/CT in the evaluation ofComparative study of FDG PET/CT and conventional imaging inet al (2009) Diagnostic value of PET/CT for the staging and

  16. Estimated cumulative radiation dose from PET/CT in children with malignancies: reply to Gelfand et al

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chawla, Soni C.; Boechat, M. Ines; McNitt-Gray, Michael

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    radiation dose from PET/CT in children with malignancies.radiation dose from PET/CT in children with malig- nancies:radiation dose from PET/CT in children with malignancies:

  17. High-resolution 18F-FDG PET with MRI for monitoring response to treatment in rheumatoid arthritis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of a dedicated breast PET/CT scanner during human imaging. J2]. A high-resolution PET/CT scanner for imaging extremitiesOA). An extremity 18 F-FDG PET/CT scan immediately following

  18. Estimated cumulative radiation dose from PET/CT in children with malignancies: a 5-year retrospective review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    N, Feig SA (2007) PET/CT in the evaluating pediatriccan be used for both PET and CT studies. The ALARA principleMB, Christie R, Daw NC (2005) PET/CT in the evaluation of

  19. ELIXYS - a fully automated, three-reactor high-pressure radiosynthesizer for development and routine production of diverse PET tracers.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for use with both the PET and CT systems. Ten-minute whole-cancer treatment with PET/CT: does it make a difference? Jalgorithm was applied. PET/CT images were fused and an-

  20. Unusual association of alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma with pancreatic metastasis: emerging role of PET-CT in tumor staging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The combination of PET and CT provided a mean effective doseChristie R, Daw NC et al ( 2005) PET/CT in the evaluation ofComparative study of FDG PET/CT and conventional imaging in

  1. MR-based motion correction for PET imaging using wired active MR microcoils in simultaneous PET-MR: Phantom study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Chuan; Brady, Thomas J.; El Fakhri, Georges; Ouyang, Jinsong, E-mail: ouyang.jinsong@mgh.harvard.edu [Center for Advanced Medical Imaging Sciences, Division of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Department of Imaging, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02114 and Department of Radiology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 (United States)] [Center for Advanced Medical Imaging Sciences, Division of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Department of Imaging, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02114 and Department of Radiology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 (United States); Ackerman, Jerome L. [Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, Massachusetts General Hospital, Charlestown, Massachusetts 02129 and Department of Radiology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 (United States)] [Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, Massachusetts General Hospital, Charlestown, Massachusetts 02129 and Department of Radiology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 (United States); Petibon, Yoann [Center for Advanced Medical Imaging Sciences, Division of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Department of Imaging, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02114 (United States)] [Center for Advanced Medical Imaging Sciences, Division of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Department of Imaging, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02114 (United States)

    2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Artifacts caused by head motion present a major challenge in brain positron emission tomography (PET) imaging. The authors investigated the feasibility of using wired active MR microcoils to track head motion and incorporate the measured rigid motion fields into iterative PET reconstruction. Methods: Several wired active MR microcoils and a dedicated MR coil-tracking sequence were developed. The microcoils were attached to the outer surface of an anthropomorphic{sup 18}F-filled Hoffman phantom to mimic a brain PET scan. Complex rotation/translation motion of the phantom was induced by a balloon, which was connected to a ventilator. PET list-mode and MR tracking data were acquired simultaneously on a PET-MR scanner. The acquired dynamic PET data were reconstructed iteratively with and without motion correction. Additionally, static phantom data were acquired and used as the gold standard. Results: Motion artifacts in PET images were effectively removed by wired active MR microcoil based motion correction. Motion correction yielded an activity concentration bias ranging from ?0.6% to 3.4% as compared to a bias ranging from ?25.0% to 16.6% if no motion correction was applied. The contrast recovery values were improved by 37%156% with motion correction as compared to no motion correction. The image correlation (mean standard deviation) between the motion corrected (uncorrected) images of 20 independent noise realizations and static reference was R{sup 2} = 0.978 0.007 (0.588 0.010, respectively). Conclusions: Wired active MR microcoil based motion correction significantly improves brain PET quantitative accuracy and image contrast.

  2. CPD plasmid code: White label pET22b-50CPD(SalI)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, Chris

    CPD plasmid code: White label pET22b-50CPD(SalI) Green label pET22b-52CPD(SacI) Blue label pET22b also be flexible otherwise autocleavage will be inefficient Yellow label pET22b-HA-50CPD(SalI) Purple label pET28a-50CPD(SalI) Red label pET28a-HA-50CPD(SalI) Shen comment: I would recommend trying out

  3. Results for aliovalent doping of CeBr{sub 3} with Ca{sup 2+}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guss, Paul, E-mail: gusspp@nv.doe.gov [Remote Sensing Laboratory Nellis, P. O. Box 98521, Las Vegas, Nevada 89193-8521 (United States); Foster, Michael E.; Wong, Bryan M.; Patrick Doty, F. [Materials Chemistry Department, Sandia National Laboratories, California, P. O. Box 969, Livermore, California 94551-0969 (United States); Shah, Kanai; Squillante, Michael R.; Shirwadkar, Urmila; Hawrami, Rastgo; Tower, Joshua [Radiation Monitoring Devices, Inc., 44 Hunt Street, Watertown, Massachusetts 02472 (United States); Yuan, Ding [National Security Technologies, LLC, Los Alamos Operations, P. O. Box 809, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87544-0809 (United States)

    2014-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Despite the outstanding scintillation performance characteristics of cerium tribromide (CeBr{sub 3}) and cerium-activated lanthanum tribromide, their commercial availability and application are limited due to the difficulties of growing large, crack-free single crystals from these fragile materials. This investigation employed aliovalent doping to increase crystal strength while maintaining the optical properties of the crystal. One divalent dopant (Ca{sup 2+}) was used as a dopant to strengthen CeBr{sub 3} without negatively impacting scintillation performance. Ingots containing nominal concentrations of 1.9% of the Ca{sup 2+} dopant were grown, i.e., 1.9% of the CeBr{sub 3} molecules were replaced by CaBr{sub 2} molecules, to match our target replacement of 1 out of 54 cerium atoms be replaced by a calcium atom. Precisely the mixture was composed of 2.26 g of CaBr{sub 2} added to 222.14 g of CeBr{sub 3}. Preliminary scintillation measurements are presented for this aliovalently doped scintillator. Ca{sup 2+}-doped CeBr{sub 3} exhibited little or no change in the peak fluorescence emission for 371?nm optical excitation for CeBr{sub 3}. The structural, electronic, and optical properties of CeBr{sub 3} crystals were studied using the density functional theory within the generalized gradient approximation. Calculated lattice parameters are in agreement with the experimental data. The energy band structures and density of states were obtained. The optical properties of CeBr{sub 3}, including the dielectric function, were calculated.

  4. Positron Emission Tomography (PET) Evaluation After Initial Chemotherapy and Radiation Therapy Predicts Local Control in Rhabdomyosarcoma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dharmarajan, Kavita V., E-mail: dharmark@mskcc.org [Departments of Radiation Oncology, Pediatric Oncology, and Nuclear Medicine, Memorial Sloan-Kettering, New York, New York (United States); Wexler, Leonard H.; Gavane, Somali; Fox, Josef J.; Schoder, Heiko; Tom, Ashlyn K.; Price, Alison N.; Meyers, Paul A.; Wolden, Suzanne L. [Departments of Radiation Oncology, Pediatric Oncology, and Nuclear Medicine, Memorial Sloan-Kettering, New York, New York (United States)] [Departments of Radiation Oncology, Pediatric Oncology, and Nuclear Medicine, Memorial Sloan-Kettering, New York, New York (United States)

    2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: 18-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (PET) is already an integral part of staging in rhabdomyosarcoma. We investigated whether primary-site treatment response characterized by serial PET imaging at specific time points can be correlated with local control. Patients and Methods: We retrospectively examined 94 patients with rhabdomyosarcoma who received initial chemotherapy 15 weeks (median) before radiotherapy and underwent baseline, preradiation, and postradiation PET. Baseline PET standardized uptake values (SUVmax) and the presence or absence of abnormal uptake (termed PET-positive or PET-negative) both before and after radiation were examined for the primary site. Local relapse-free survival (LRFS) was calculated according to baseline SUVmax, PET-positive status, and PET-negative status by the Kaplan-Meier method, and comparisons were tested with the log-rank test. Results: The median patient age was 11 years. With 3-year median follow-up, LRFS was improved among postradiation PET-negative vs PET-positive patients: 94% vs 75%, P=.02. By contrast, on baseline PET, LRFS was not significantly different for primary-site SUVmax {<=}7 vs >7 (median), although the findings suggested a trend toward improved LRFS: 96% for SUVmax {<=}7 vs 79% for SUVmax >7, P=.08. Preradiation PET also suggested a statistically insignificant trend toward improved LRFS for PET-negative (97%) vs PET-positive (81%) patients (P=.06). Conclusion: Negative postradiation PET predicted improved LRFS. Notably, 77% of patients with persistent postradiation uptake did not experience local failure, suggesting that these patients could be closely followed up rather than immediately referred for intervention. Negative baseline and preradiation PET findings suggested statistically insignificant trends toward improved LRFS. Additional study may further understanding of relationships between PET findings at these time points and outcome in rhabdomyosarcoma.

  5. Singlet-Triplet Splittings in CX2 (X ) F, Cl, Br, I) Dihalocarbenes via Negative Ion Photoelectron Spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lineberger, W. Carl

    Singlet-Triplet Splittings in CX2 (X ) F, Cl, Br, I) Dihalocarbenes via Negative Ion Photoelectron2, and CI2. In addition to the long list of theoretical studies on CX2 (X ) F, Cl, Br, I

  6. Studies on Ca2+-Doped CeBr3 Scintillating Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guss, P. [NSTec; Foster, M. E. [SNL; Wong, B. M. [SNL; Doty, F. P. [SNL; Shah, K. [RMD; Squillante, M. R. [RMD; Shirwadkar, U. [RMD; Hawrami, R. [RMD; Tower, J. [RMD; Yuan, D. [NSTec

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Despite the outstanding scintillation performance characteristics of cerium tribromide (CeBr3) and cerium-activated lanthanum tribromide (LaBr3:Ce), their commercial availability and application is limited due to the difficulties of growing large, crack-free single crystals from these fragile materials. The objective of this investigation was to employ aliovalent doping to increase crystal strength while maintaining the optical properties of the crystal. One divalent dopant (Ca2+) was investigated as a dopant to strengthen CeBr3 without negatively impacting scintillation performance. Ingots containing nominal concentrations of 1.9% of the Ca2+ dopant were grown. Preliminary scintillation measurements are presented for this aliovalently doped scintillator. Ca2+-doped CeBr3 exhibited little or no change in the peak fluorescence emission for 371 nm optical excitation for CeBr3. The structural, electronic, and optical properties of CeBr3 crystals were investigated using the density functional theory within generalized gradient approximation. The calculated lattice parameters are in good agreement with the experimental data. The energy band structures and density of states were obtained. The optical properties of CeBr3, including the dielectric function, were calculated.

  7. Electron Transfer to SF6 and Oriented CH3Br Sean A. Harris, Susan D. Wiediger, and Philip R. Brooks*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brooks, Philip R.

    ARTICLES Electron Transfer to SF6 and Oriented CH3Br Sean A. Harris, Susan D. Wiediger, and Philip in collisions of unoriented SF6 and oriented CH3Br. For lab energies 5-30 eV, Br- is the only ion observed from the same energetic threshold for forming Br- . SF5 - , SF6 - , and F- ions are observed from SF6 and O2

  8. Neurovascular coupling to D2/D3 dopamine receptor occupancy using simultaneous PET/functional MRI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sander, Christin Yen-Ming

    This study employed simultaneous neuroimaging with positron emission tomography (PET) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to demonstrate the relationship between changes in receptor occupancy measured by PET ...

  9. PET: an Interactive Software Testing Tool Elsa Gunter, Robert Kurshan, Doron Peled

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peled, Doron A.

    PET: an Interactive Software Testing Tool Elsa Gunter, Robert Kurshan, Doron Peled Bell Laboratories 600 Mountain Ave. Murray Hill, NJ 07974 April 16, 2000 Abstract We describe here the PET (standing programs, interleaved sequences of code. The PET system calculates the exact condition to execute path

  10. Prognostic value of 18 F-FDG PET image-based

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    1 Prognostic value of 18 F-FDG PET image-based parameters in esophageal cancer and impact of tumor Medicine 3 Department of Radiotherapy CHU Morvan, Brest, France Running title: FDG PET indices for survival Phone:+33298018111 Word count: 5976 Keywords: PET, tumor volume, tumor segmentation, esophageal cancer

  11. Noninvasive high-resolution detection of the arterial and venous input function through a PET Wrist

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Noninvasive high-resolution detection of the arterial and venous input function through a PET Wrist using planar coincidence images. I. INTRODUCTION Quantitative Positron Emission Tomography (PET) often determine the input function. These techniques include external monitors and PET scanners that measure

  12. Thoracic CT-PET Registration Using a 3D Breathing Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Thoracic CT-PET Registration Using a 3D Breathing Model Antonio Moreno1 , Sylvie Chambon1 , Anand P Orlando, USA Abstract. In the context of thoracic CT-PET volume registration, we present a novel method applications. We consider Computed Tomography (CT) and Positron Emission Tomography (PET) in thoracic regions

  13. Retinotopic Organization of Early Visual Spatial Attention Effects as Revealed by PET and ERPs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Retinotopic Organization of Early Visual Spatial Attention Effects as Revealed by PET and ERPs M: Cerebral blood flow PET scans and high-density event-related potentials (ERPs) were recorded (separate of attention. In PET scans, active attention vs. passive showed strong activation in the contralateral dorsal

  14. Statistical Image Reconstruction Methods for Simultaneous Emission/Transmission PET Scans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Erdogan, Hakan

    Statistical Image Reconstruction Methods for Simultaneous Emission/Transmission PET Scans Hakan are necessary for estimating the attenuation correction factors (ACFs) to yield quantitatively accu- rate PET to recon- struct lower noise PET emission images from simultaneous trans- mission/emission scans

  15. Compensation du mouvement respiratoire dans les images TEP Respiratory motion correction in PET images

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Compensation du mouvement respiratoire dans les images TEP Respiratory motion correction in PET itérative. Abstract The quality of the Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is currently limited an integrated system to compensate respiratory motion in PET images. It is based on synchronous acquisition

  16. Avian Mite Bites Acquired From a New Source--Pet Gerbils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lucky, Andrea

    Avian Mite Bites Acquired From a New Source--Pet Gerbils Report of 2 Cases and Review infested pet gerbils and reviews the der- matologic literature about avian mites. Observations: An 11-year their pet gerbils were found to be infested with Ornithonyssus sylviarum (the northern fowl mite

  17. FUZZY VERSUS HARD HIDDEN MARKOV CHAINS SEGMENTATION FOR VOLUME DETERMINATION AND QUANTITATION IN NOISY PET IMAGES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    IN NOISY PET IMAGES M. Hatt1 , N. Boussion1 , Member IEEE, F. Lamare1 , Student Member IEEE, C. Collet2 , F-conducteurs (PHASE), ULP, Strasbourg, France. ABSTRACT Accurate volume contouring in PET is crucial for quantitation for automatic lesion volume delineation that permit noise modelling and have not previously been applied to PET

  18. Helpful Resources Online Rescue Network provides a list of pet rescue groups by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jawitz, James W.

    Helpful Resources Online Rescue Network provides a list of pet rescue groups by state--select your mammals, but they may be able to connect you with local rescue groups who will help place exotic pets of qualified exotic pet veterinarians, searchable by zip code. Contact them for advice or euthanasia services

  19. Solid State Blending of Poly(ethylene terephthalate) with Polystyrene: Extent of PET Amorphization and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mitchell, Brian S.

    Solid State Blending of Poly(ethylene terephthalate) with Polystyrene: Extent of PET Amorphization.interscience.wiley.com). ABSTRACT: Polystyrene (PS) and poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) were blended to- gether in the solid. CMA PS/PET blend morphologies were characterized both qualitatively and quantitatively through

  20. Announcing... Agency Services is excited to announce that we have partnered with Pet's Best

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gleeson, Joseph G.

    Announcing... Agency Services is excited to announce that we have partnered with Pet's Best Insurance Company to offer pet health insurance for your dog or cat. This coverage will be offered at a discounted rate to all California Casualty employees and customers. The Pets Best policy covers illnesses

  1. Low-Dose Dual-Energy CT for PET Attenuation Correction with Statistical Sinogram Restoration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fessler, Jeffrey A.

    1 Low-Dose Dual-Energy CT for PET Attenuation Correction with Statistical Sinogram Restoration. of Michigan & Univ. of Washington Outline Introduction - PET/CT background - CT-based attenuation correction for PET Conventional sinogram decomposition in DE-CT Statistically motivated sinogram restoration in DE

  2. Adapted Convex Optimization Algorithm for Wavelet-Based Dynamic PET Reconstruction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Adapted Convex Optimization Algorithm for Wavelet-Based Dynamic PET Reconstruction Nelly Abstract--This work deals with Dynamic Positron Emission Tomography (PET) data reconstruction, considering. The effectiveness of this approach is shown with simulated dynamic PET data. Comparative results are also provided

  3. Exploring Pet Video Chat: The Remote Awareness and Interaction Needs of Families with Dogs and Cats

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Golbeck, Jennifer

    1 Exploring Pet Video Chat: The Remote Awareness and Interaction Needs of Families with Dogs College Park, MD, USA golbeck@cs.umd.edu ABSTRACT Many people have pets such as dogs and cats that they would consider to be family. Along with this comes a need to stay aware of one's pet and, possibly

  4. Fuzzy hidden Markov chains segmentation for volume determination and quantitation in PET

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Fuzzy hidden Markov chains segmentation for volume determination and quantitation in PET M. Hatt1;52(12):3467-91" DOI : 10.1088/0031-9155/52/12/010 #12;2 ABSTRACT Accurate volume of interest (VOI) estimation in PET is concerned. inserm-00150348,version1-6Apr2009 #12;3 1. Introduction Positron Emission Tomography (PET) has

  5. Compact, High-Resolution, Multi-Layer Semiconductor PET Detector Module

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohta, Shigemi

    Compact, High-Resolution, Multi-Layer Semiconductor PET Detector Module Summary Multi tomography (PET) systems, but the conventional electrodes used require a prohibitive number of readout channels. Now, a breakthrough compact PET detector offers a specialized configuration of cross strip

  6. Intra-tumor heterogeneity on baseline 18 F-FDG PET images

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Intra-tumor heterogeneity on baseline 18 F-FDG PET images characterized by textural features 4. INSERM, U613, Faculty of Medicine, Brest F-29200, France Keywords: 18 F-FDG PET, esophageal(0)298018124 Email: florent.tixier@etudiant.univ-brest.fr Short running title: PET texture analysis predicts response

  7. Multi observation PET image analysis for patient follow-up quantitation and therapy assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brest, Université de

    1 Multi observation PET image analysis for patient follow-up quantitation and therapy assessment S Institut Telecom - Telecom Bretagne, Brest, F-29200 France. Abstract. In Positron Emission Tomography (PET-quantitative parameters restricted to maximum SUV measured in PET scans during the treatment. Such measurements do

  8. Comparison between 18F-FDG PET image derived indices for early prediction of response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Comparison between 18F-FDG PET image derived indices for early prediction of response foot line: sequential 18 F-FDG PET for breast cancer hal-00748923,version1-6Nov2012 #12;2 ABSTRACT from sequential 18 F-FDG Positron Emission Tomography (PET) scans for early tumor response prediction

  9. Evaluating an Alternative Model for the Input Function in FDG-PET Studies 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Renaut, Rosemary

    Evaluating an Alternative Model for the Input Function in FDG-PET Studies 1 Hongbin Guo 2 Rosemary-D-glucose flu- oro (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) brain studies with bolus injection is presented-derived expressions. The new model provides an effective means to recover the input function in FDG-PET studies

  10. Chemical compounds and toxicological assessments of drinking water stored in polyethylene terephthalate (PET)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Short, Daniel

    terephthalate (PET) bottles: A source of controversy reviewed Cristina Bach a,b, *, Xavier Dauchy a , Marie to restrictions and/or specifications according to their toxicological data. Despite this, the analysis of PET and additives. Genotoxic and estrogenic activities in PET-bottled water have been reported. Chemical mixtures

  11. A Generalized Diffusion Based Inter-Iteration Nonlinear Bilateral Filtering Scheme for PET

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    A Generalized Diffusion Based Inter-Iteration Nonlinear Bilateral Filtering Scheme for PET Image inter-iteration filtering scheme based diffusion MAP estimate for PET image reconstruction is proposed,version1 #12;1. Introduction Positron emission tomography (PET) is one of the most important imaging tools

  12. The age of reason for FDG PET image derived indices Dimitris Visvikis1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    The age of reason for FDG PET image derived indices Dimitris Visvikis1 , Mathieu Hatt1 , Florent, CHU Milétrie, Poitiers, France Keywords: image derived parameters, 18F-FDG-PET, prediction, prognosis : 10.1007/s00259-012-2239-0 #12;The clinical use of Positron Emission Tomography (PET) imaging using

  13. On the Internet, Everybody Knows Youre a Dog: The Human-Pet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Golbeck, Jennifer

    On the Internet, Everybody Knows Youre a Dog: The Human-Pet Relationship in Online Social Networks Abstract The benefits of pet ownership to physical and mental health are extensive and well documented. Online social networks have the potential to strengthen these relationships and build community among pet

  14. CORTICAL BRAIN SURFACE MAPPING FOR STUDYING PARTIAL VOLUME EFFECTS IN BRAIN FDG PET IMAGES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, Paul

    CORTICAL BRAIN SURFACE MAPPING FOR STUDYING PARTIAL VOLUME EFFECTS IN BRAIN FDG PET IMAGES Hillary PET images is confounded by tissue atrophy and partial volume effects, especially in patients-based cortical brain surface mapping technique to account for partial volume effects on brain FDG PET images

  15. IMPROVED QUANTITATIVE METHODS FOR MULTIPLE NEUROPHARMACOLOGICAL NON-INVASIVE BRAIN PET STUDIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fessler, Jeffrey A.

    i IMPROVED QUANTITATIVE METHODS FOR MULTIPLE NEUROPHARMACOLOGICAL NON-INVASIVE BRAIN PET STUDIES.2.2 Multiple Neuropharmacological Measures from a single PET scan ................. 4 1.2.2.1 Dual ...................................................................................... 5 1.2.3 Reduction of inter-scanner PET image variability

  16. A method for OSEM PET Reconstruction on parallel architectures using STIR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hellebrand, Sybille

    A method for OSEM PET Reconstruction on parallel architectures using STIR Tobias Beisel, Stefan (PET) data, we introduced an approach for parallel architectures by applying the message passing for two- or three-dimensional (2D/3D) PET. To reduce the amount of time needed to complete

  17. CT-PET Landmark-based Lung Registration Using a Dynamic Breathing Model S. Chambon1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    CT-PET Landmark-based Lung Registration Using a Dynamic Breathing Model S. Chambon1 , A. Moreno1-based registration of CT (at two different instants of the breathing cycle, intermediate expirations) and PET images in order to simulate the instant in the breathing cycle most similar to the PET image and guarantee

  18. democrite-00024907,version2-23Nov2005 Experimental study of a liquid Xenon PET

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    democrite-00024907,version2-23Nov2005 Experimental study of a liquid Xenon PET prototype module M (PET). The specific design aims at taking full advantage of the liquid Xenon properties. It does-Multiplier Tube (PSPMT) operating in the VUV range (178 nm). Key words: Positron emission tomography (PET

  19. PET: a Tool for Post-editing and Assessing Machine Translation Wilker Aziz* and Lucia Specia**

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mitkov, Ruslan

    PET: a Tool for Post-editing and Assessing Machine Translation Wilker Aziz* and Lucia Specia.Specia@sheffield.ac.uk Download: http://pers-www.wlv.ac.uk/~in1676/pet/ Given the significant recent improvements in Machine required to correct them. PET, a stand-alone Post-Editing Tool has two main purposes: facilitate the post

  20. BioSystems 71 (2003) 8192 Clustering huge data sets for parametric PET imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Renaut, Rosemary

    BioSystems 71 (2003) 81­92 Clustering huge data sets for parametric PET imaging Hongbin Guoa University, Tempe, AZ 85287-1804, USA b Good Samaritan PET Center, Good Samaritan Regional Medical Center preprocessing clustering technique for quantification of kinetic PET data is presented. A two-stage clustering

  1. LOCALLY WEIGHTED TOTAL VARIATION DENOISING FOR RINGING ARTIFACT SUPPRESSION IN PET RECONSTRUCTION USING PSF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    with PSF modeling is now implemented and widely used in clinical PET/CT systems. Some work has been doneLOCALLY WEIGHTED TOTAL VARIATION DENOISING FOR RINGING ARTIFACT SUPPRESSION IN PET RECONSTRUCTION tomography (PET) images, but also introduces ringing artifacts and over enhancement that is contrast

  2. Investigation of PET/MRI Image Fusion Schemes for Enhanced Breast Cancer Diagnosis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    with anatomical images is well appreciated in the advent of PET/CT. There is an increasing interest in expanding. Initial experience with combined PET (functional imaging) and x-ray computed tomography (CT, anatomicalInvestigation of PET/MRI Image Fusion Schemes for Enhanced Breast Cancer Diagnosis Karl G. Baum

  3. The need for clinical quantification of combined PET/MRI data in pediatric epilepsy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hua, Jing

    decade PET/CT showed the added value of multi- modality integration for both research and clinical oncology. In fact, since 2000, the world market share of PET/CT scanners increased from less than 5 by combined PET and CT imaging has improved both the localization and staging of tumors in addition

  4. OFFICIAL POLICY 6.1.3 Policy on Pets on Campus 4/22/2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kasman, Alex

    OFFICIAL POLICY 6.1.3 Policy on Pets on Campus 4/22/2014 Policy Statement 1.0 BUILDINGS AND OFFICES, "College"), unless allowed under the terms of Section 4.0 of this Policy. 2.0 COLLEGE GROUNDS Pets are permitted on campus grounds, subject to the terms of this Policy. Pets brought on campus grounds

  5. Specific recommendations for accurate and direct use of PET-CT in PET guided radiotherapy for head and neck sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas, C. M., E-mail: christopher.thomas@gstt.nhs.uk; Convery, D. J.; Greener, A. G. [Guy's and St. Thomas NHS Foundation Trust, Medical Physics Department, St. Thomas Hospital, London SE1 7EH (United Kingdom)] [Guy's and St. Thomas NHS Foundation Trust, Medical Physics Department, St. Thomas Hospital, London SE1 7EH (United Kingdom); Pike, L. C.; Baker, S.; Woods, E. [Division of Imaging Sciences and Biomedical Engineering, King's College London, King's Health Partners, St. Thomas Hospital, London SE1 7EH (United Kingdom)] [Division of Imaging Sciences and Biomedical Engineering, King's College London, King's Health Partners, St. Thomas Hospital, London SE1 7EH (United Kingdom); Hartill, C. E. [Guy's and St. Thomas NHS Foundation Trust, Radiotherapy, Clinical Outpatients Clinic, St. Thomas Hospital, London SE1 7EH (United Kingdom)] [Guy's and St. Thomas NHS Foundation Trust, Radiotherapy, Clinical Outpatients Clinic, St. Thomas Hospital, London SE1 7EH (United Kingdom)

    2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To provide specific experience-based guidance and recommendations for centers wishing to develop, validate, and implement an accurate and efficient process for directly using positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) for the radiotherapy planning of head and neck cancer patients. Methods: A PET-CT system was modified with hard-top couch, external lasers and radiotherapy immobilization and indexing devices and was subject to a commissioning and quality assurance program. PET-CT imaging protocols were developed specifically for radiotherapy planning and the image quality and pathway tested using phantoms and five patients recruited into an in-house study. Security and accuracy of data transfer was tested throughout the whole data pathway. The patient pathway was fully established and tested ready for implementation in a PET-guided dose-escalation trial for head and neck cancer patients. Results: Couch deflection was greater than for departmental CT simulator machines. An area of high attenuation in the couch generated image artifacts and adjustments were made accordingly. Using newly developed protocols CT image quality was suitable to maintain delineation and treatment accuracy. Upon transfer of data to the treatment planning system a half pixel offset between PET and CT was observed and corrected. By taking this into account, PET to CT alignment accuracy was maintained below 1 mm in all systems in the data pathway. Transfer of structures delineated in the PET fusion software to the radiotherapy treatment planning system was validated. Conclusions: A method to perform direct PET-guided radiotherapy planning was successfully validated and specific recommendations were developed to assist other centers. Of major concern is ensuring that the quality of PET and CT data is appropriate for radiotherapy treatment planning and on-treatment verification. Couch movements can be compromised, bore-size can be a limitation for certain immobilization techniques, laser positioning may affect setup accuracy and couch deflection may be greater than scanners dedicated to radiotherapy. The full set of departmental commissioning and routine quality assurance tests applied to radiotherapy CT simulators must be carried out on the PET-CT scanner. CT image quality must be optimized for radiotherapy planning whilst understanding that the appearance will differ between scanners and may affect delineation. PET-CT quality assurance schedules will need to be added to and modified to incorporate radiotherapy quality assurance. Methods of working for radiotherapy and PET staff will change to take into account considerations of both parties. PET to CT alignment must be subject to quality control on a loaded and unloaded couch preferably using a suitable emission phantom, and tested throughout the whole data pathway. Data integrity must be tested throughout the whole pathway and a system included to verify that delineated structures are transferred correctly. Excellent multidisciplinary team communication and working is vital, and key staff members on both sides should be specifically dedicated to the project. Patient pathway should be clearly devised to optimize patient care and the resources of all departments. Recruitment of a cohort of patients into a methodology study is valuable to test the quality assurance methods and pathway.

  6. Delayed neutron studies of separated isotopes of Br, Rb, I, and Cs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reeder, R L; Wright, J F

    1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Discusses delayed neutron studies of separated isotopes of Br, Rb, I, and Cs are currently in progress at the Spectrometer for On-Line Analysis of Radionuclides (SOLAR) facility operated by Battelle, Pacific Northwest Laboratories. (2 refs).

  7. pET System Manual TB055 10th Edition 0702 1United States & Canada 800-207-0144

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lebendiker, Mario

    pET System Manual TB055 10th Edition 0702 1United States & Canada 800-207-0144 Germany 0800 6931 of the pET Manual was published July, 2002. Novagen is continually expanding and upgrading the pET System. Please check the Novagen website, www.novagen.com, for updated pET System Manual information. Table

  8. A liquid xenon PET camera -Simulation and position sensitive PMT tests S.Jan, J.Collot, E Tournefier

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    A liquid xenon PET camera - Simulation and position sensitive PMT tests S.Jan, J.Collot, E a Positron Emission Tomograph (PET) based on the use of liquid xenon (LXe) as an active medium. This PET (½½ ) PET camera dedicated to hadrontherapy is also considered. This development is proposed by three

  9. Combining a Breathing Model and Tumor-Specific Rigidity Constraints for Registration of CT-PET Thoracic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chambon, Sylvie

    Combining a Breathing Model and Tumor-Specific Rigidity Constraints for Registration of CT-PET modalities, namely Computerized Tomography (CT) and Positron Emission Tomography (PET). While recent technical advancements in combined CT/PET scanners provide 3D CT and PET data of the thoracic region

  10. Incorporation of motion information for tumour volume definition in PET Comparison of different methods of incorporating respiratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    , respiratory motion, super-resolution, 4D PET imaging 1. Introduction Computed tomography (CT) is routinely Tomography (PET) for diagnosis and staging, as well as the widespread availability of combined PET/CT scanners, led to numerous studies investigating the potential of PET/CT for target volume delineation. Use

  11. Measurement of BR(Bu to phi K)/BR(Bu to J/psi K) at the collider detector at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Napora, Robert A

    2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis presents evidence for the decay mode B{sup {+-}} {yields} {phi}K{sup {+-}} in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV using (120 {+-} 7)pb{sup -1} of data collected by the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF). This signal is then used to measure the branching ratio relative to the decay mode B{sup {+-}} {yields} J/{psi}K{sup {+-}}. The measurement starts from reconstructing the two decay modes: B{sup {+-}} {yields} {phi}K{sup {+-}}, where {phi} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup -} and B{sup {+-}} {yields} J/{psi}K{sup {+-}}, where J/{psi} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}. The measurement yielded 23 {+-} 7 B{sup {+-}} {yields} {phi}K{sup {+-}} events, and 406 {+-} 26 B{sup {+-}} {yields} J/{psi}K{sup {+-}} events. The fraction of B{sup {+-}} {yields} J/{psi}K{sup {+-}} events where the J/{psi} subsequently decayed to two muons (as opposed to two electrons) was found to be f{sub {mu}{mu}} = 0.839 {+-} 0.066. The relative branching ratio of the two decays is then calculated based on the equation: BR(B{sup {+-}} {yields} {phi}K{sup {+-}})/BR(B{sup {+-}} {yields} J/{psi}K{sup {+-}}) = N{sub {phi}K}/N{sub {psi}K} {center_dot}f{sub {mu}{mu}} BR(J/{psi} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -})/BR({phi} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup -}) {epsilon}{sub {mu}{mu}}K/{epsilon}KKK R({epsilon}{sub iso}). The measurement finds BR(B{sup {+-}} {yields} {phi}K{sup {+-}})/BR(B{sup {+-}} {yields} J/{psi}K{sup {+-}}) = 0.0068 {+-} 0.0021(stat.) {+-} 0.0007(syst.). The B{sup {+-}} {yields} {phi}K{sup {+-}} branching ratio is then found to be BR(B{sup {+-}} {yields} {phi}K{sup {+-}}) = [6.9 {+-} 2.1(stat.) {+-} 0.8(syst.)] x 10{sup -6}. This value is consistent with similar measurements reported by the e{sup +}e{sup -} collider experiments BaBar[1], Belle[2], and CLEO[3].

  12. austin pet centre: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    austin pet centre First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Are Cells Robots? Robert Austin...

  13. animal pet scanner: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    animal pet scanner First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Atlas-based attenuation correction...

  14. animal pet scanners: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    animal pet scanners First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Atlas-based attenuation correction...

  15. animal pet bioluminescence: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    animal pet bioluminescence First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 INTENSITY REGULATION OF...

  16. PET: Reducing Database Energy Cost via Query Optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tu, Yicheng

    PET: Reducing Database Energy Cost via Query Optimization Zichen Xu The Ohio State University xuz@ece.osu.edu Yi-Cheng Tu The University of South Florida ytu@cse.usf.edu Xiaorui Wang The Ohio State University xwang@ece.osu.edu ABSTRACT Energy conservation is a growing important issue in designing mod- ern

  17. TOF-PET Imaging within the Framework of Sparse Reconstruction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lao, Dapeng

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Page 1-1 Diagram describing of the Radon transformation where the red line denotes the LOR (line of response) and the ROI (region of interest) is discretized into n?n pixels...-1. The relationship between the object of interest ),( yxf and PET observed data ),( sp ? can be formally represented via the well-known Radon transformation [28], namely, ?? ??= dxdyxysyxfsp ))sincos...

  18. imported for the exotic pet trade. In their native range,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jawitz, James W.

    , the ultimate source of the African Rock Pythons is escapes or releases of animals that were T h e I n v a d e rimported for the exotic pet trade. In their native range, African Rock Pythons in- habit somewhat survey suggests that another species of large constrictor snake, the Northern African Rock Python, may

  19. br Owner br Facility br Type br Capacity br MW br Commercial br Online

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells, Wisconsin: EnergyWyandanch,Eaga SolarZolo Technologies IncusgbcblackOwner

  20. 7/29/13 About the PET Center of Excellence interactive.snm.org/index.cfm?PageID=9257 1/3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jadvar, Hossein

    7/29/13 About the PET Center of Excellence interactive.snm.org/index.cfm?PageID=9257 1/3 Home Join Today! How to Join Member Benefits About the PET Center Presidents Message Board of Directors News/Pubs PET COE Newsletters PET References Archive Views You Can Use PET News Today MI: Making a Difference

  1. 48 51(2) avril/April 2005 Canadian Medical Physics Newsletter / Le bulletin canadien physique mdical 30 Years Ago: First PET Scanner in Canada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, Chris

    . To many or you reading this today, PET, and better still PET/CT, is something that your department "has mdical 30 Years Ago: First PET Scanner in Canada Submitted by Chris Thompson Montreal Neurological (PET) in Canada. Thirty years ago, "PET" was a domestic animal, not a medical imaging technique

  2. IH Report#: 01-066pets TITLE: Restriction of Pets and other Animals in Stanford University Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    with recirculating ventilation systems can permit the transmission of allergens, dander, and odors, etc., from one facilities. EXCEPTIONS: Pets or animals are permitted into Stanford University facilities if the animals-by-case exceptions may be made by the senior manager in the school or vice presidential area or his or her designee

  3. Measurement of \\Gamma_{ee}(J/\\psi)*Br(J/\\psi->e^+e^-) and \\Gamma_{ee}(J/\\psi)*Br(J/\\psi->\\mu^+\\mu^-)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anashin, V V; Baldin, E M; Barladyan, A K; Barnyakov, A Yu; Barnyakov, M Yu; Baru, S E; Bedny, I V; Beloborodova, O L; Blinov, A E; Blinov, V E; Bobrov, A V; Bobrovnikov, V S; Bogomyagkov, A V; Bondar, A E; Bondarev, D V; Buzykaev, A R; Eidelman, S I; Glukhovchenko, Yu M; Gulevich, V V; Gusev, D V; Karnaev, S E; Karpov, G V; Karpov, S V; Kharlamova, T A; Kiselev, V A; Kononov, S A; Kotov, K Yu; Kravchenko, E A; Kulikov, V F; Kurkin, G Ya; Kuper, E A; Levichev, E B; Maksimov, D A; Malyshev, V M; Maslennikov, A L; Medvedko, A S; Meshkov, O I; Mishnev, S I; Morozov, I I; Muchnoi, N Yu; Neufeld, V V; Nikitin, S A; Nikolaev, I B; Okunev, I N; Onuchin, A P; Oreshkin, S B; Orlov, I O; Osipov, A A; Peleganchuk, S V; Pivovarov, S G; Piminov, P A; Petrov, V V; Poluektov, A O; Popkov, I N; Prisekin, V G; Ruban, A A; Sandyrev, V K; Savinov, G A; Shamov, A G; Shatilov, D N; Shwartz, B A; Simonov, E A; Sinyatkin, S V; Skovpen, Yu I; Skrinsky, A N; Smaluk, V V; Sokolov, A V; Sukharev, A M; Starostina, E V; Talyshev, A A; Tayursky, V A; Telnov, V I; Tikhonov, Yu A; Todyshev, K Yu; Tumaikin, G M; Usov, Yu V; Vorobiov, A I; Yushkov, A N; Zhilich, V N; Zhulanov, V V; Zhuravlev, A N

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The products of the electron width of the J/\\psi meson and the branching fraction of its decays to the lepton pairs were measured using data from the KEDR experiment at the VEPP-4M electron-positron collider. The results are \\Gamma_{ee}(J/\\psi)*Br(J/\\psi->e^+e^-)=0.3323\\pm0.0064\\pm0.0048 keV, \\Gamma_{ee}(J/\\psi)*Br(J/\\psi->\\mu^+\\mu^-)=0.3318\\pm0.0052\\pm0.0063 keV. Assuming e\\mu universality and using the world average value of the lepton branching fraction, we also determine the leptonic \\Gamma_{ll}=5.59\\pm0.12 keV and total \\Gamma=94.1\\pm2.7 keV widths of the J/\\psi meson.

  4. Measuring BR($h \\to \\tau ^+ \\tau ^-$) at the ILC: a full simulation study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kawada, Shin-ichi; Suehara, Taikan; Takahashi, Tohru; Tanabe, Tomohiko; Yokoyama, Harumichi

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We evaluate the expected measurement accuracy of the branching ratio of the Standard Model Higgs boson decaying into tau pairs at the ILC with a full simulation of the ILD detector concept. We assume a Higgs mass of 125 GeV, a branching ratio of BR($h \\to \\tau ^+ \\tau ^-$) = 6.32%, a beam polarization of electron (positron) of -0.8(+0.3), and an integrated luminosity of 250 fb$^{-1}$. The Higgs-strahlung process $e^+ e^- \\to Zh$ with $Z \\to q\\overline{q}$ is analyzed. We estimate the measurement accuracy of the branching ratio $\\Delta (\\sigma \\times \\mathrm{BR}) / (\\sigma \\times \\mathrm{BR})$ to be 3.4% with using a multivariate analysis technique.

  5. PET imaging to non-invasively study immune activation leading to antitumor responses with a 4-1BB agonistic antibody

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    AS, Radu CG, Ribas A: PET imaging of the immune system:as: Escuin-Ordinas et al. : PET imaging to non-invasivelyRESEARCH ARTICLE Open Access PET imaging to non-invasively

  6. Impact of carbohydrate restriction with and without fatty acid loading on myocardial 18F-FDG uptake during PET: A randomized controlled trial

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cheng, Victor Y.; Slomka, Piotr J.; Ahlen, Marie; Thomson, Louise E.; Waxman, Alan D.; Berman, Daniel S.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    18 F-FDG uptake during PET: A randomized controlled trialmay enhance 18 F-FDG-PET-based imaging of small, in?amedpreparations prior to 18 F-FDG-PET. Methods and Results. We

  7. Impact of carbohydrate restriction with and without fatty acid loading on myocardial 18F-FDG uptake during PET: A randomized controlled trial

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cheng, Victor Y.; Slomka, Piotr J.; Ahlen, Marie; Thomson, Louise E.; Waxman, Alan D.; Berman, Daniel S.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    coronary arteries with 18F-FDG PET/CT in patients with sup-acquired in a Gemini PET/CT scanner (Philips Healthcare,in a quiet room for 60 minutes. CT and PET images were then

  8. Recycling of PET bottles as fine aggregate in concrete

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frigione, Mariaenrica, E-mail: mariaenrica.frigione@unisalento.i [Department of Engineering for Innovation, University of Salento, Via per Monteroni, 73100 Lecce (Italy)

    2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An attempt to substitute in concrete the 5% by weight of fine aggregate (natural sand) with an equal weight of PET aggregates manufactured from the waste un-washed PET bottles (WPET), is presented. The WPET particles possessed a granulometry similar to that of the substituted sand. Specimens with different cement content and water/cement ratio were manufactured. Rheological characterization on fresh concrete and mechanical tests at the ages of 28 and 365 days were performed on the WPET/concretes as well as on reference concretes containing only natural fine aggregate in order to investigate the influence of the substitution of WPET to the fine aggregate in concrete. It was found that the WPET concretes display similar workability characteristics, compressive strength and splitting tensile strength slightly lower that the reference concrete and a moderately higher ductility.

  9. Compact and mobile high resolution PET brain imager

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Majewski, Stanislaw (Yorktown, VA); Proffitt, James (Newport News, VA)

    2011-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A brain imager includes a compact ring-like static PET imager mounted in a helmet-like structure. When attached to a patient's head, the helmet-like brain imager maintains the relative head-to-imager geometry fixed through the whole imaging procedure. The brain imaging helmet contains radiation sensors and minimal front-end electronics. A flexible mechanical suspension/harness system supports the weight of the helmet thereby allowing for patient to have limited movements of the head during imaging scans. The compact ring-like PET imager enables very high resolution imaging of neurological brain functions, cancer, and effects of trauma using a rather simple mobile scanner with limited space needs for use and storage.

  10. Gamma-ray tracking method for pet systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mihailescu, Lucian; Vetter, Kai M.

    2010-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Gamma-ray tracking methods for use with granular, position sensitive detectors identify the sequence of the interactions taking place in the detector and, hence, the position of the first interaction. The improved position resolution in finding the first interaction in the detection system determines a better definition of the direction of the gamma-ray photon, and hence, a superior source image resolution. A PET system using such a method will have increased efficiency and position resolution.

  11. GPU accelerated image reconstruction in a two-strip J-PET tomograph

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bia?as, P; Strzelecki, A; Bednarski, T; Czerwi?ski, E; Gajos, A; Kami?ska, D; Kap?on, ?; Kochanowski, A; Korcyl, G; Kowalski, P; Kozik, T; Krzemie?, W; Kubicz, E; Moskal, P; Nied?wiecki, Sz; Pa?ka, M; Raczy?ski, L; Rudy, Z; Rundel, O; Salabura, P; Sharma, N G; Silarski, M; S?omski, A; Smyrski, J; Wieczorek, A; Wi?licki, W; Zieli?ski, M; Zo?, N

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a fast GPU implementation of the image reconstruction routine, for a novel two strip PET detector that relies solely on the time of flight measurements.

  12. GPU accelerated image reconstruction in a two-strip J-PET tomograph

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Bia?as; J. Kowal; A. Strzelecki; T. Bednarski; E. Czerwi?ski; A. Gajos; D. Kami?ska; ?. Kap?on; A. Kochanowski; G. Korcyl; P. Kowalski; T. Kozik; W. Krzemie?; E. Kubicz; P. Moskal; Sz. Nied?wiecki; M. Pa?ka; L. Raczy?ski; Z. Rudy; O. Rundel; P. Salabura; N. G. Sharma; M. Silarski; A. S?omski; J. Smyrski; A. Wieczorek; W. Wi?licki; M. Zieli?ski; N. Zo?

    2015-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a fast GPU implementation of the image reconstruction routine, for a novel two strip PET detector that relies solely on the time of flight measurements.

  13. Department of Mechanical Engineering Spring 2012 Assistive Pet Loading Device for Automobiles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demirel, Melik C.

    for Automobiles Overview The main purpose of this project is to design and build a prototype of a new pet ramp

  14. PSD Methods Comparison and Discrimination Efficiency Study for LaBr3:Ce Detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cang, Jirong; Zeng, Zhi; Cheng, Jianping; Liu, Yinong; Li, Junli

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    LaBr3:Ce scintillator has been widely studied for nuclear spectroscopy because of its optimal energy resolution (CCM, the correlation between the CCM feature value distribution and the total charge (energy) was quantitatively analyzed, and a fitting equation of the correlation is inferred and verified with experiment. With the equation, an energy-dependent threshold was chosen to optimize the discrim...

  15. Br J Nutr . Author manuscript Calcium carbonate suppresses haem toxicity markers without calcium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    Br J Nutr . Author manuscript Page /1 9 Calcium carbonate suppresses haem toxicity markers without-term studies in rats identified calcium carbonate as the most effective calcium salt to bind haem in vitro demonstrated that a diet containing 100 mol/g calcium carbonate did not promote aberrant crypt foci

  16. The solvation of Cl , Br , and I in acetonitrile clusters: Photoelectron spectroscopy and molecular dynamics simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perera, Lalith

    The solvation of Cl , Br , and I in acetonitrile clusters: Photoelectron spectroscopy and molecular in acetonitrile clusters CH3CN n with n 1­33, 1­40, and 1­55, respectively, taken with 7.9 eV photon energy. Anion simulations of halide­acetonitrile clusters reproduce the measured stabilization energies and generate full

  17. Measuring Regional Changes in the Diastolic Deformation of the Left Ventricle of SHR Rats Using microPET Technology and Hyperelastic Warping

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    VERESS, ALEXANDER I.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    modality images (e.g. PET-CT, SPECT-CT etc. ). The presentTatini VR, Bis K. Combined CT-PET criteria for myocardial

  18. The effects of demographics and pet ownership on attachment towards and opinion about owned and unowned free-roaming cats

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramon, Melanie Elaine

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A telephone questionnaire was developed to collect information on pet owners, cat ownership patterns, and people's opinions about homeless pets. A 7-day observation log was also developed to gather information about free-roaming cats in Caldwell, TX...

  19. \\Questo un elenco che potrebbe subire variazioni anche giornaliere 2 aprile 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Segatti, Antonio

    .30 s aula Weber Lingua spagnola I h. 9.30 aula E Lingua spagnola II h. 9.30 aula E Politica e societ 2012 Analisi dell'opinione pubblica h. 9.30 aula C Cittadini, politica e media h. 9.30 aula C Correnti'istruzione h. 11s aula weber Sociologia delle migrazioni e politica dell'immigrazione h. 11 s aula weber

  20. Validation of a 4D-PET Maximum Intensity Projection for Delineation of an Internal Target Volume

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Callahan, Jason, E-mail: jason.callahan@petermac.org [Centre for Molecular Imaging, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, Victoria (Australia)] [Centre for Molecular Imaging, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Kron, Tomas [Department of Physical Sciences, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, Victoria (Australia) [Department of Physical Sciences, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Peter MacCallum Department of Oncology, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne (Australia); Schneider-Kolsky, Michal [Department of Medical Imaging and Radiation Science, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria (Australia)] [Department of Medical Imaging and Radiation Science, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria (Australia); Dunn, Leon [Department of Applied Physics, RMIT University, Melbourne (Australia)] [Department of Applied Physics, RMIT University, Melbourne (Australia); Thompson, Mick [Centre for Molecular Imaging, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, Victoria (Australia)] [Centre for Molecular Imaging, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Siva, Shankar [Department of Radiation Oncology, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, Victoria (Australia)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Aarons, Yolanda [Department of Radiation Oncology, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, Victoria (Australia) [Department of Radiation Oncology, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Peter MacCallum Department of Oncology, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne (Australia); Binns, David [Centre for Molecular Imaging, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, Victoria (Australia)] [Centre for Molecular Imaging, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Hicks, Rodney J. [Centre for Molecular Imaging, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, Victoria (Australia) [Centre for Molecular Imaging, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Peter MacCallum Department of Oncology, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne (Australia)

    2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: The delineation of internal target volumes (ITVs) in radiation therapy of lung tumors is currently performed by use of either free-breathing (FB) {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography-computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) or 4-dimensional (4D)-CT maximum intensity projection (MIP). In this report we validate the use of 4D-PET-MIP for the delineation of target volumes in both a phantom and in patients. Methods and Materials: A phantom with 3 hollow spheres was prepared surrounded by air then water. The spheres and water background were filled with a mixture of {sup 18}F and radiographic contrast medium. A 4D-PET/CT scan was performed of the phantom while moving in 4 different breathing patterns using a programmable motion device. Nine patients with an FDG-avid lung tumor who underwent FB and 4D-PET/CT and >5 mm of tumor motion were included for analysis. The 3 spheres and patient lesions were contoured by 2 contouring methods (40% of maximum and PET edge) on the FB-PET, FB-CT, 4D-PET, 4D-PET-MIP, and 4D-CT-MIP. The concordance between the different contoured volumes was calculated using a Dice coefficient (DC). The difference in lung tumor volumes between FB-PET and 4D-PET volumes was also measured. Results: The average DC in the phantom using 40% and PET edge, respectively, was lowest for FB-PET/CT (DCAir = 0.72/0.67, DCBackground 0.63/0.62) and highest for 4D-PET/CT-MIP (DCAir = 0.84/0.83, DCBackground = 0.78/0.73). The average DC in the 9 patients using 40% and PET edge, respectively, was also lowest for FB-PET/CT (DC = 0.45/0.44) and highest for 4D-PET/CT-MIP (DC = 0.72/0.73). In the 9 lesions, the target volumes of the FB-PET using 40% and PET edge, respectively, were on average 40% and 45% smaller than the 4D-PET-MIP. Conclusion: A 4D-PET-MIP produces volumes with the highest concordance with 4D-CT-MIP across multiple breathing patterns and lesion sizes in both a phantom and among patients. Freebreathing PET/CT consistently underestimates ITV when compared with 4D PET/CT for a lesion affected by respiration.

  1. Arbib, Fagg and Grafton: Synthetic PET Imaging for Grasping May 20, 2001 1 Arbib, M.A., Fagg, A.H., and Grafton, S.T., to appear, Synthetic PET Imaging for Grasping: From

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Arbib, Fagg and Grafton: Synthetic PET Imaging for Grasping May 20, 2001 1 Arbib, M.A., Fagg, A.H., and Grafton, S.T., to appear, Synthetic PET Imaging for Grasping: From Primate Neurophysiology to Human, Eds.), Cambridge MA: The MIT Press. Synthetic PET Imaging for Grasping: From Primate Neurophysiology

  2. Feasibility and electromagnetic compatibility study of the ClearPEM front-end electronics for simultaneous PET-MR imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dalang, Robert C.

    for simultaneous PET-MR imaging J.A. Neves a,b,c,n , R. Bugalho a,b , R. Gruetter c,d,e , A.W. Magill c,d , C Keywords: PET ClearPEM 7 Tesla MR Simultaneous PET-MRI EMI and EMC a b s t r a c t In this work we present a first feasibility study of the ClearPEM technology for simultaneous PET-MR imaging. The mutual

  3. J Nucl Med . Author manuscript Impact of tumor size and tracer uptake heterogeneity in (18)F-FDG PET and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    in (18)F-FDG PET and CT non-small cell lung cancer tumor delineation Mathieu Hatt 1 * , Catherine Cheze@univ-brest.fr > Abstract The objectives of this study were to investigate the relationship between CT and 18F-FDG PET based tumor volumes in NSCLC and the impact of tumor size and uptake heterogeneity on various PET uptake

  4. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON MEDICAL IMAGING, VOL. 16, NO. 2, APRIL 1997 137 Motion Correction of PET Images

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, Chris

    IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON MEDICAL IMAGING, VOL. 16, NO. 2, APRIL 1997 137 Motion Correction of PET--Positron emission tomography (PET) is a relatively lengthy brain imaging method. Because it is difficult. The technique associates the incoming data with the real-space position of the head. During the PET scan

  5. VISUALIZING ALL THE FITS: EVALUATING THE QUALITY AND PRECISION OF PARAMETRIC IMAGES CREATED FROM DIRECT RECONSTRUCTION OF PET

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DIRECT RECONSTRUCTION OF PET SINOGRAM DATA Evan D. Morris1 , Mustafa E Kamasak2 , Bradley T. Christian3-fitted curves. The size of the data set involved (4D PET data) presents unique problems in the visualization to the PET sinograms in orders to evaluate the precision of the parametric images and the validity kinetic

  6. Robustness of intratumour 18F-FDG PET uptake heterogeneity quantification for therapy response prediction in ooesophageal carcinoma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brest, Université de

    1 Robustness of intratumour 18F-FDG PET uptake heterogeneity quantification for therapy response title: Robustness of FDG PET tumour heterogeneity quantification Corresponding author: M. Hatt, INSERM;2 ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: Intra-tumour uptake heterogeneity in PET quantified through textural features

  7. Abstract--GATE, the Geant4 Application for Tomographic Emission, is a simulation platform developed for PET and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    for PET and SPECT. It combines a powerful simulation core (the Geant4 toolkit) and a large range-animal PET scanner configuration. Simulated resolution curves and reconstructed images are shown for rotating PET scanners. Lastly, we present comparisons of simulated point-spread functions and spectra

  8. A New Non-Monotonic Algorithm for PET Image Reconstruction Suvrit Sra, Dongmin Kim, Inderjit Dhillon, and Bernhard Scholkopf

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sra, Suvrit

    A New Non-Monotonic Algorithm for PET Image Reconstruction Suvrit Sra, Dongmin Kim, Inderjit we introduce NMML, a non-monotonic algorithm for maximum likelihood PET image reconstruction. NMML for PET, and new ones continue to be designed. Among these, methods based on the expectation maximization

  9. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON NUCLEAR SCIENCE, VOL. 51, NO. 1, FEBRUARY 2004 85 Optimal Calibration of PET Crystal Position Maps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Michael T.

    IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON NUCLEAR SCIENCE, VOL. 51, NO. 1, FEBRUARY 2004 85 Optimal Calibration of PET, IEEE Abstract--A method is developed for estimating optimal PET gamma-ray detector crystal position liklihood estimation, positron emission tomography (PET). I. INTRODUCTION Acommon detector configuration

  10. 3D Local Binary Pattern for PET image classification by SVM Application to early Alzheimer disease diagnosis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    3D Local Binary Pattern for PET image classification by SVM Application to early Alzheimer disease of Fluorodeoxyglucose PET scans might become a possibility to make early diagnosis more efficient. Temporal and parietal lobes are the main location of medical findings. We have clues that in PET images these lobes contain

  11. Pet owners have the responsibility to care for the well being of their animals. Your ability to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pet owners have the responsibility to care for the well being of their animals. Your ability to care for an animal can help determine what kind of animal you select as a pet. Out-of-Town Emergency Pamphlet, "Emergency Preparedness for Your Pets," 2003. Veterinarians in Your County or City Name

  12. Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research A 545 (2005) 427435 CYBPET: a cylindrical PET system for breast imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, Chris

    Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research A 545 (2005) 427­435 CYBPET: a cylindrical PET January 2005 Available online 28 March 2005 Abstract We propose a Cylindrical Breast PET (CYBPET) system of scattered photons from the other breast and the rest of the body. To compare the CYBPET with whole-body PET

  13. AUTOMATIC CLASSIFICATION OF ALZHEIMER'S DISEASE VS. FRONTOTEMPORAL DEMENTIA: A SPATIAL DECISION TREE APPROACH WITH FDG-PET

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utah, University of

    TREE APPROACH WITH FDG-PET N. Sadeghi1 , N. L. Foster2 , A. Y. Wang2 , S. Minoshima3 , A. P. Lieberman4 48109 ABSTRACT We introduce a novel approach for the automatic classifica- tion of FDG-PET scans-- Brain imaging, decision tree, FDG-PET, Alzheimer's Disease, Frontotemporal dementia. 1. INTRODUCTION

  14. Eur J Nucl Med Mol Imaging . Author manuscript The age of reason for FDG PET image-derived indices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Eur J Nucl Med Mol Imaging . Author manuscript Page /1 3 The age of reason for FDG PET image Author Keywords image derived parameters ; 18F-FDG-PET ; prediction ; prognosis ; therapy response The clinical use of Positron Emission Tomography (PET) imaging using the 2-deoxy-2-(18F

  15. Measuring the whole bone marrow asset in humans by a computational approach to integrated PET/CT imaging.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piana, Michele

    ; 7 CNR-SPIN. Genova. Italy Running Head: PET/CT measurement of bone marrow volume AddressMeasuring the whole bone marrow asset in humans by a computational approach to integrated PET/CT to chemotherapy. Keywords: PET/CT; bone marrow imaging; image processing. #12;2 Introduction Bone marrow (BM

  16. Atlas-based attenuation correction for small animal PET/MRI scanners Abhijit J. Chaudhari, ajchaudhari@ucdavis.edu,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leahy, Richard M.

    of MRI values to absolute CT intensities [3]. Rotating a PET transmission source around the animalAtlas-based attenuation correction for small animal PET/MRI scanners 1 Abhijit J. Chaudhari PET/MRI scanners producing anatomically co-registered simultaneously-acquired images of morphology

  17. Tumor delineation using PET in head and neck cancers: Threshold contouring and lesion volumes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yetisgen-Yildiz, Meliha

    PET/CT patient images. The intensity value of the threshold contour level that returns 100Tumor delineation using PET in head and neck cancers: Threshold contouring and lesion volumes Eric as a function of the reconstruction method, smoothing, and lesion size in head and neck cancer patients using

  18. Development of breast anthropomorphic phantoms for combined PET-Ultrasound elastography imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    be labeled with 18 F FDG. The phantom was imaged with whole body PET/CT and also with Shear Wave of PET for detecting breast cancer are reported to be 92%~97% and 78%~90% [6], which is ideal of this technology to breast imaging has been reported to with promising results [8]. This motivates us to Manuscript

  19. Memory Consumption Analysis for the GOE and PET Unequal Erasure Protection Schemes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Memory Consumption Analysis for the GOE and PET Unequal Erasure Protection Schemes Aline Roumy Encoding Transmission (PET) [2], while the other family uses a dedicated signaling scheme, as is the case such a practical metric as the peak memory consumption. Thanks to a modeling of the packet storage behavior

  20. Study of the Crystalline Morphology Evolution of PET and PET/PC Blends by Time-resolved Synchrotron Small Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS) and DSC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barbosa, Irineu; Larocca, Nelson M.; Hage, Elias [Dep. de Engenharia de Materiais, Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos, Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil); Plivelic, Tomas S.; Torriani, Iris L. [Laboratorio Nacional de Luz Sincrotron, Campinas, SP (Brazil); Mantovani, Gerson L. [Centro de Engenharia, Modelagem e Ciencias Sociais Aplicadas, Universidade Federal do ABC, 09090-400 Santo Andre, SP (Brazil)

    2009-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Isothermal melt crystallization of poly(ethylene terephthalate)(PET) and PET/PC (polycarbonate) blend, with and without a transesterification catalyst, was studied by time-resolved small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) in order to achieve the variation of the morphological parameters throughout the whole crystallization time. For neat PET, the catalyst promotes a decrease of the crystal lamellar thickness but for the blend no variations were observed. The effect of incorporation of catalyst in crystallization kinetics was very distinct in PET pure and the blend: in the former the catalyst leads to an increase of this kinetics while for the latter it was observed a decreasing.

  1. Geothermal br Resource br Area Geothermal br Resource br Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Zone Mesozoic granite granodiorite Aurora Geothermal Area Aurora Geothermal Area Walker Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region MW Beowawe Hot Springs Geothermal Area Beowawe Hot...

  2. Abundances of s-process elements in planetary nebulae: Br, Kr & Xe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Y. Zhang; R. Williams; E. Pellegrini; K. Cavagnolo; J. A. Baldwin; B. Sharpee; M. Phillips; X. -W. Liu

    2006-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We identify emission lines of post-iron peak elements in very high signal-to-noise spectra of a sample of planetary nebulae. Analysis of lines from ions of Kr and Xe reveals enhancements in most of the PNe, in agreement with the theories of s-process in AGB star. Surprisingly, we did not detect lines from Br even though s-process calculations indicate that it should be produced with Kr at detectable levels.

  3. cnEiFrnr,:-BR,1;q*tsE ns John Franks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Short, Daniel

    cnEiFrnr,:- BR,1;q*tsE ns Acid rain John Franks The liDk betwccn sulphur at|d dtrogen odde5 sofe.i,rc fro; th..f..ts torhesethe6xh6ustsofmiilionsol porlol of acid rain, little has been don. Acid rain was mntioned by Bdish chemistRobenAngus Smirhas a factor in lhe air a.ound Manchesterand 'cor

  4. MS 211 -CALCULO NUMERICO -1o http://www.ime.unicamp.br/ ms211/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sussner, Peter

    MS 211 - C´ALCULO NUM´ERICO - 1o SEM/2010 http://www.ime.unicamp.br/ ms211/ Turma Per Ruggiero e V´era Lucia da Rocha Lopes, C´alculo Num´erico - Aspectos Te´oricos e Computacionais, Pearson´etodos Num´ericos para as Engenharias e Ci^encias Aplicadas, Edi- tora da Unicamp, Campinas, segunda edi

  5. Optimization of electrode characteristics for the Br?/H? redox flow cell

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Tucker, Michael C.; Cho, Kyu Taek; Weber, Adam Z.; Lin, Guangyu; Van Nguyen, Trung

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Br?/H? redox flow cell shows promise as a high-power, low-cost energy storage device. The effect of various aspects of material selection, processing, and assembly of electrodes on the operation, performance, and efficiency of the system is determined. In particular, (+) electrode thickness, cell compression, hydrogen pressure, and () electrode architecture are investigated. Increasing hydrogen pressure and depositing the () catalyst layer on the membrane instead of on the carbon-paper backing layers have a large positive impact on performance, enabling a limiting current density above 2 A cm-2 and a peak power density of 1.4 W cm-2. Maximum energy efficiencymoreof 79% is achieved. In addition, the root cause of limiting-current behavior in this system is elucidated, where it is found that Br? reversibly adsorbs at the Pt () electrode for potentials exceeding a critical value, and the extent of Br? coverage is potential-dependent. This phenomenon limits maximum cell current density and must be addressed in system modeling and design. These findings are expected to lower system cost and enable higher efficiency.less

  6. Optimization of electrode characteristics for the Br2/H2 redox flow cell

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Tucker, Michael C.; Cho, Kyu Taek; Weber, Adam Z.; Lin, Guangyu; Nguyen, Trung V.

    2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Br2/H2 redox flow cell shows promise as a high-power, low-cost energy storage device. The effect of various aspects of material selection, processing, and assembly of electrodes on the operation, performance, and efficiency of the system is determined. In particular, (+) electrode thickness, cell compression, hydrogen pressure, and (?) electrode architecture are investigated. Increasing hydrogen pressure and depositing the (?) catalyst layer on the membrane instead of on the carbon paper backing layers have a large positive impact on performance, enabling a limiting current density above 2 A cm?2 and a peak power density of 1.4 W cm?2. Maximum energymoreefficiency of 79 % is achieved. In addition, the root cause of limiting-current behavior in this system is elucidated, where it is found that Br? reversibly adsorbs at the Pt (?) electrode for potentials exceeding a critical value, and the extent of Br? coverage is potential-dependent. This phenomenon limits maximum cell current density and must be addressed in system modeling and design. These findings are expected to lower system cost and enable higher efficiency.less

  7. Optimization of electrode characteristics for the Br2/H2 redox flow cell

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Tucker, Michael C.; Cho, Kyu Taek; Weber, Adam Z.; Lin, Guangyu; Nguyen, Trung V.

    2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Br2/H2 redox flow cell shows promise as a high-power, low-cost energy storage device. The effect of various aspects of material selection, processing, and assembly of electrodes on the operation, performance, and efficiency of the system is determined. In particular, (+) electrode thickness, cell compression, hydrogen pressure, and (?) electrode architecture are investigated. Increasing hydrogen pressure and depositing the (?) catalyst layer on the membrane instead of on the carbon paper backing layers have a large positive impact on performance, enabling a limiting current density above 2 A cm?2 and a peak power density of 1.4 W cm?2. Maximum energy efficiency of 79 % is achieved. In addition, the root cause of limiting-current behavior in this system is elucidated, where it is found that Br? reversibly adsorbs at the Pt (?) electrode for potentials exceeding a critical value, and the extent of Br? coverage is potential-dependent. This phenomenon limits maximum cell current density and must be addressed in system modeling and design. These findings are expected to lower system cost and enable higher efficiency.

  8. Benefits Office: Phone: (352) 392-2HRS Fax: (352) 392-5166 E-mail: benefits@ufl.edu Pet Insurance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mair, Bernard A.

    Benefits Office: Phone: (352) 392-2HRS Fax: (352) 392-5166 E-mail: benefits@ufl.edu Pet Insurance* Injury Plan $5/paycheck* $5/paycheck* Veterinary Pet Insurance ® Veterinary Pet Insurance® is the nation's oldest, largest and number one veterinarian-recommended pet health insurance provider. With comprehensive

  9. Migration of antimony from PET trays into food simulant and food: determination of Arrhenius parameters and comparison of predicted and measured migration data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Short, Daniel

    Migration of antimony from PET trays into food simulant and food: determination of Arrhenius) Migration experiments with small sheets cut out from ovenable PET trays were performed in two-sided contact) was estimated to be 62% in the PET sample under study. Apparent diffusion coefficients of Sb in PET trays were

  10. | 128 | haematologica/the hematology journal | 2008; 93(1) 18-F FDG-PET in the staging of lymphocyte-predominant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    in the staging of LPHD. Key words: 18F FDG-PET, FDG-PET/CT, lymphocyte-predominant Hodgkin's disease, staging| 128 | haematologica/the hematology journal | 2008; 93(1) 18-F FDG-PET in the staging retrospectively the usefulness of 18 F-FDG-PET in the staging of 31 patients with lymphocyte-predomi- nant Hodgkin

  11. Impact of tumor size and tracer uptake heterogeneity in F-FDG PET and CT NonSmall Cell Lung Cancer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    heterogeneity on various PET uptake delineation approaches. Methods: 25 NSCLC cancer patients with 18F-FDG PET/CT increasingly used for staging Non-small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC) (1). In addition, the use of 18 F-FDG PET/CT F-FDG), associated with Computed Tomography (CT) since the development of PET/CT devices, has been

  12. PET imaging predicts future body weight and cocaine preference

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michaelides M.; Wang G.; Michaelides M.; Thanos P.K. Kim R.; Cho J.; Ananth M.; Wang G.-J.; Volkow N.D.

    2011-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Deficits in dopamine D2/D3 receptor (D2R/D3R) binding availability using PET imaging have been reported in obese humans and rodents. Similar deficits have been reported in cocaine-addicts and cocaine-exposed primates. We found that D2R/D3R binding availability negatively correlated with measures of body weight at the time of scan (ventral striatum), at 1 (ventral striatum) and 2 months (dorsal and ventral striatum) post scan in rats. Cocaine preference was negatively correlated with D2R/D3R binding availability 2 months (ventral striatum) post scan. Our findings suggest that inherent deficits in striatal D2R/D3R signaling are related to obesity and drug addiction susceptibility and that ventral and dorsal striatum serve dissociable roles in maintaining weight gain and cocaine preference. Measuring D2R/D3R binding availability provides a way for assessing susceptibility to weight gain and cocaine abuse in rodents and given the translational nature of PET imaging, potentially primates and humans.

  13. Evaluation of the spline reconstruction technique for PET

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kastis, George A., E-mail: gkastis@academyofathens.gr; Kyriakopoulou, Dimitra [Research Center of Mathematics, Academy of Athens, Athens 11527 (Greece)] [Research Center of Mathematics, Academy of Athens, Athens 11527 (Greece); Gaitanis, Anastasios [Biomedical Research Foundation of the Academy of Athens (BRFAA), Athens 11527 (Greece)] [Biomedical Research Foundation of the Academy of Athens (BRFAA), Athens 11527 (Greece); Fernndez, Yolanda [Centre dImatge Molecular Experimental (CIME), CETIR-ERESA, Barcelona 08950 (Spain)] [Centre dImatge Molecular Experimental (CIME), CETIR-ERESA, Barcelona 08950 (Spain); Hutton, Brian F. [Institute of Nuclear Medicine, University College London, London NW1 2BU (United Kingdom)] [Institute of Nuclear Medicine, University College London, London NW1 2BU (United Kingdom); Fokas, Athanasios S. [Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB30WA (United Kingdom)] [Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB30WA (United Kingdom)

    2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: The spline reconstruction technique (SRT), based on the analytic formula for the inverse Radon transform, has been presented earlier in the literature. In this study, the authors present an improved formulation and numerical implementation of this algorithm and evaluate it in comparison to filtered backprojection (FBP). Methods: The SRT is based on the numerical evaluation of the Hilbert transform of the sinogram via an approximation in terms of custom made cubic splines. By restricting reconstruction only within object pixels and by utilizing certain mathematical symmetries, the authors achieve a reconstruction time comparable to that of FBP. The authors have implemented SRT in STIR and have evaluated this technique using simulated data from a clinical positron emission tomography (PET) system, as well as real data obtained from clinical and preclinical PET scanners. For the simulation studies, the authors have simulated sinograms of a point-source and three digital phantoms. Using these sinograms, the authors have created realizations of Poisson noise at five noise levels. In addition to visual comparisons of the reconstructed images, the authors have determined contrast and bias for different regions of the phantoms as a function of noise level. For the real-data studies, sinograms of an{sup 18}F-FDG injected mouse, a NEMA NU 4-2008 image quality phantom, and a Derenzo phantom have been acquired from a commercial PET system. The authors have determined: (a) coefficient of variations (COV) and contrast from the NEMA phantom, (b) contrast for the various sections of the Derenzo phantom, and (c) line profiles for the Derenzo phantom. Furthermore, the authors have acquired sinograms from a whole-body PET scan of an {sup 18}F-FDG injected cancer patient, using the GE Discovery ST PET/CT system. SRT and FBP reconstructions of the thorax have been visually evaluated. Results: The results indicate an improvement in FWHM and FWTM in both simulated and real point-source studies. In all simulated phantoms, the SRT exhibits higher contrast and lower bias than FBP at all noise levels, by increasing the COV in the reconstructed images. Finally, in real studies, whereas the contrast of the cold chambers are similar for both algorithms, the SRT reconstructed images of the NEMA phantom exhibit slightly higher COV values than those of FBP. In the Derenzo phantom, SRT resolves the 2-mm separated holes slightly better than FBP. The small-animal and human reconstructions via SRT exhibit slightly higher resolution and contrast than the FBP reconstructions. Conclusions: The SRT provides images of higher resolution, higher contrast, and lower bias than FBP, by increasing slightly the noise in the reconstructed images. Furthermore, it eliminates streak artifacts outside the object boundary. Unlike other analytic algorithms, the reconstruction time of SRT is comparable with that of FBP. The source code for SRT will become available in a future release of STIR.

  14. Near UV atmospheric absorption measurements of column abundances during Airborne Arctic Stratospheric Expedition, January-February 1989: 3. BrO observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wahner, A.; Callies, J.; Dorn, H.P.; Platt, U.; Schiller, C. (Kernforschungsanlage Juelich (West Germany))

    1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Column abundances of BrO were measured during the Airborne Arctic Stratospheric Expedition from January 6 to February 9, 1989 by near UV absorption spectroscopy. BrO was detected during early flights by scattered sunlight observations during twilight and direct moon light observations during the night. The daytime vertical column abundances of BrO varied between 2 {times} 10{sup 13} cm{sup {minus}2} and 13 {times} 10{sup 13} cm{sup {minus}2} and are consistent with observed OClO column abundances and chemical model calculations. The nighttime presence of BrO suggests different vertical profiles of BrO and ClO.

  15. Calibration of photomultipliers gain used in the J-PET detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bednarski, T; Moskal, P; Bia?as, P; Giergiel, K; Kap?on, ?; Kochanowski, A; Korcyl, G; Kowal, J; Kowalski, P; Kozik, T; Krzemie?, W; Molenda, M; Moskal, I; Nied?wiecki, Sz; Pa?ka, M; Pawlik, M; Raczy?ski, L; Rudy, Z; Salabura, P; Sharma, N G; Silarski, M; S?omski, A; Smyrski, J; Strzelecki, A; Szyma?ski, K; Wi?licki, W; Witkowski, P; Zieli?ski, M; Zo?, N

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Photomultipliers are commonly used in commercial PET scanner as devices which convert light produced in scintillator by gamma quanta from positron-electron annihilation into electrical signal. For proper analysis of obtained electrical signal, a photomultiplier gain curve must be known, since gain can be significantly different even between photomultipliers of the same model. In this article we describe single photoelectron method used for photomultipliers calibration applied for J-PET scanner, a novel PET detector being developed at the Jagiellonian University. Description of calibration method, an example of calibration curve and gain of few R4998 Hamamatsu photomultipliers are presented.

  16. The Pet-Fish problem on the World-Wide Web

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aerts, Diederik; D'Hooghe, Bart; Sozzo, Sandro

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We identify the presence of Pet-Fish problem situations and the corresponding Guppy effect of concept theory on the World-Wide Web. For this purpose, we introduce absolute weights for words expressing concepts and relative weights between words expressing concepts, and the notion of 'meaning bound' between two words expressing concepts, making explicit use of the conceptual structure of the World-Wide Web. The Pet-Fish problem occurs whenever there are exemplars - in the case of Pet and Fish these can be Guppy or Goldfish - for which the meaning bound with respect to the conjunction is stronger than the meaning bounds with respect to the individual concepts.

  17. PSD Methods Comparison and Discrimination Efficiency Study for LaBr3:Ce Detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jirong Cang; Ming Zeng; Zhi Zeng; Jianping Cheng; Yinong Liu; Junli Li

    2015-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

    LaBr3:Ce scintillator has been widely studied for nuclear spectroscopy because of its optimal energy resolution (CCM, the correlation between the CCM feature value distribution and the total charge (energy) was quantitatively analyzed, and a fitting equation of the correlation is inferred and verified with experiment. With the equation, an energy-dependent threshold was chosen to optimize the discrimination efficiency. Therefore, it can be expected that a correction of the alpha and gamma PSD spectrum would also be done with the equation, to achieve more accurate result.

  18. Performance simulation of a MRPC-based PET Imaging System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Banerjee; S. Chattopadhyay

    2011-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The low cost and high resolution gas-based Multi-gap Resistive Plate Chamber (MRPC) opens a new possibility to find an efficient alternative detector for Time of Flight (TOF) based Positron Emission Tomography, where the sensitivity of the system depends largely on the time resolution of the detector. Suitable converters can be used to increase the efficiency of detection of photons from annihilation. In this work, we perform a detailed GEANT4 simulation to optimize the converter thickness thereby improving the efficiency of photon conversion. Also we have developed a Monte Carlo based simulation of MRPC response thereby obtaining the intrinsic time resolution of the detector, making it possible to simulate the final response of MRPC-based systems for PET imaging. The result of the cosmic ray test of a four-gap Bakelite-based MRPC operating in streamer mode is discussed.

  19. High resolution PET breast imager with improved detection efficiency

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Majewski, Stanislaw

    2010-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A highly efficient PET breast imager for detecting lesions in the entire breast including those located close to the patient's chest wall. The breast imager includes a ring of imaging modules surrounding the imaged breast. Each imaging module includes a slant imaging light guide inserted between a gamma radiation sensor and a photodetector. The slant light guide permits the gamma radiation sensors to be placed in close proximity to the skin of the chest wall thereby extending the sensitive region of the imager to the base of the breast. Several types of photodetectors are proposed for use in the detector modules, with compact silicon photomultipliers as the preferred choice, due to its high compactness. The geometry of the detector heads and the arrangement of the detector ring significantly reduce dead regions thereby improving detection efficiency for lesions located close to the chest wall.

  20. Resources for Pet, Poultry and Livestock Owners Affected by Natural Disasters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Faries Jr., Floron C.

    2008-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

    This publication lists agencies and other organizations that can help locate missing pets and livestock, assist with carcass disposal, provide animal feed, and help in other ways after a disaster. There are phone numbers and Web addresses for each...

  1. The effect of pet ownership/attachment on the stress level of multiple sclerosis patients

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loven, Ashley Marie

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    whether or not pet ownership and/or attachment influenced the perceived stress level and number of negative life events experienced by MS patients in the relapsing remitting stage. Participants were given a questionnaire that consisted of 7 surveys...

  2. Dosimetry of Y-90 Liquid Brachytherapy in a Dog with Osteosarcoma Using PET/CT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Jingjie

    2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    receive a total dose of over 1000 Gy. Y-90 liquid brachytherapy has the potential to be used as an adjuvant therapy or for palliation purposes. Future work includes evaluation of pharmacokinetics of the Y-90 radiopharmaceutical, calibration of PET...

  3. Imaging the Brain in Real-Time with PET-Enabled "Helmet Cam"

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Imaging the Brain in Real-Time with a PET-Enabled "Helmet-Cam" Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window) Share on Facebook (Opens in new window) Click to share (Opens...

  4. An Input Function Estimation Method for FDG-PET Human Brain Studies 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Renaut, Rosemary

    An Input Function Estimation Method for FDG-PET Human Brain Studies 1 Hongbin Guo ,2 Rosemary 85287-1804, Tel: 480-965-8002, Fax: 480-965-4160 Email addresses: hb guo@asu.edu (Hongbin Guo), renaut

  5. System Response Kernel Calculation for List-mode Reconstruction in Strip PET Detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bia?as, P; Strzelecki, A; Bednarski, T; Czerwi?ski, E; Kap?on, ?; Kochanowski, A; Korcyl, G; Kowalski, P; Kozik, T; Krzemie?, W; Molenda, M; Moskal, P; Nied?wiecki, Sz; Pa?ka, M; Pawlik, M; Raczy?ski, L; Rudy, Z; Salabura, P; Sharma, N G; Silarski, M; S?omski, A; Smyrski, J; Wi?licki, W; Zieli?ski, M

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Reconstruction of the image in Positron Emission Tomographs (PET) requires the knowledge of the system response kernel which describes the contribution of each pixel (voxel) to each tube of response (TOR). This is especially important in list-mode reconstruction systems, where an efficient analytical approximation of such function is required. In this contribution, we present a derivation of the system response kernel for a novel 2D strip PET.

  6. Breath gating of cardiac PET using 13N-NH3: An optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    was carried out using 13 N-NH3 on two dierent PET/CT scanners: a Siemens Biograph 64 and a Siemens mCT PET. In this project the breath-motion was estimated using an ane transformation on the obtained images, from which- jekt er udført ved brug af 13 N-NH3 på to skannere, henholdsvis en Siemens Biograph 64 og en Siemens m

  7. F-18 Labeled Diabody-Luciferase Fusion Proteins for Optical-ImmunoPET

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Anna M

    2013-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of the proposed work is to develop novel dual-labeled molecular imaging probes for multimodality imaging. Based on small, engineered antibodies called â??diabodiesâ?, these probes will be radioactively tagged with Fluorine-18 for PET imaging, and fused to luciferases for optical (bioluminescence) detection. Performance will be evaluated and validated using a prototype integrated optical-PET imaging system, OPET. Multimodality probes for optical-PET imaging will be based on diabodies that are dually labeled with 18F for PET detection and fused to luciferases for optical imaging. 1) Two sets of fusion proteins will be built, targeting the cell surface markers CEA or HER2. Coelenterazine-based luciferases and variant forms will be evaluated in combination with native substrate and analogs, in order to obtain two distinct probes recognizing different targets with different spectral signatures. 2) Diabody-luciferase fusion proteins will be labeled with 18F using amine reactive [18F]-SFB produced using a novel microwave-assisted, one-pot method. 3) Sitespecific, chemoselective radiolabeling methods will be devised, to reduce the chance that radiolabeling will inactivate either the target-binding properties or the bioluminescence properties of the diabody-luciferase fusion proteins. 4) Combined optical and PET imaging of these dual modality probes will be evaluated and validated in vitro and in vivo using a prototype integrated optical-PET imaging system, OPET. Each imaging modality has its strengths and weaknesses. Development and use of dual modality probes allows optical imaging to benefit from the localization and quantitation offered by the PET mode, and enhances the PET imaging by enabling simultaneous detection of more than one probe.

  8. Infrared spectra of ClCN{sup +}, ClNC{sup +}, and BrCN{sup +} trapped in solid neon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacox, Marilyn E.; Thompson, Warren E. [Optical Technology Division, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899-8441 (United States)

    2007-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    When a mixture of ClCN or BrCN with a large excess of neon is codeposited at 4.3 K with a beam of neon atoms that have been excited in a microwave discharge, the infrared spectrum of the resulting solid includes prominent absorptions of the uncharged isocyanide, ClNC or BrNC, and of the corresponding cation, ClCN{sup +} or BrCN{sup +}. The NC-stretching fundamentals of the isocyanides trapped in solid neon lie close to the positions for their previously reported argon-matrix counterparts. The CN-stretching absorptions of ClCN{sup +} and BrCN{sup +} and the CCl-stretching absorption of ClCN{sup +} appear very close to the gas-phase band centers. Absorptions of two overtones and one combination band of ClCN{sup +} are identified. Reversible photoisomerization of ClCN{sup +} to ClNC{sup +} occurs. The two stretching vibrational fundamentals and several infrared and near infrared absorptions associated with electronic transitions of ClNC{sup +} are observed. Minor infrared peaks are attributed to the vibrational fundamental absorptions of the CX and CX{sup +} species (X=Cl,Br)

  9. Polyethelene terephthalate (PET) scrap recycling. (Latest citations from the Rubber and Plastics Research Association database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the recycling of polyethelene terephthalate (PET) products. Discarded bottles and household PET scrap are primary sources of this material. Recycling machinery, processes, and programs are discussed. Cable insulation, sheet films, foam products, and other products made from recycled PET are described. The impact of recycling on resource conservation and waste disposal problems is evaluated. (Contains a minimum of 73 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  10. SU-D-9A-03: STAMP: Simulator for Texture Analysis in MRI/PET

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laberge, S; Vallieres, M; Levesque, I R.; El Naqa, I [McGill University, Montreal, QC (Canada)

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To develop a convenient simulation platform to facilitate PET/MR image analysis with the prospect of gaining a better understanding of the influence of acquisition parameters on PET/MRI textural features. The simulation platform is demonstrated by showing textural variations of a representative case study using different image acquisition parameters. Methods: The simulation platform is composed of MRI simulators JEMRIS and SIMRI to achieve simulations of customized MRI sequences on sample tumor models. The PET simulator GATE is used to get 2D and 3D Monte Carlo acquisitions of voxelized PET sources using a phantom geometry and a customized scanner architecture. The platform incorporates a series of graphical user interfaces written in Matlab. Two GUIs are used to facilitate communication with the simulation executables installed on a computer cluster. A third GUI is used to collect and display the clinical and simulated images, as well as fused PET/MRI images, and perform computation of textural features.To illustrate the capabilities of this platform, one FDG-PET and T1-weighted (T1w) digitized tumor models were generated from clinical images of a soft-tissue sarcoma patient. Numerically simulated MR images were produced using 3 different echo times (TE) and 5 different repetition times (TR). PET 2D images were simulated using an OSEM algorithm with 1 to 32 iterations and a post-reconstruction Gaussian filter of 0, 2, 4 or 6 mm width. Results: STAMP was successfully used to produce numerically simulated FDG-PET and MRI images, and to calculate their corresponding textures. Three typical textures (GLCM-Contrast, GLSZM-ZSV and NGTDM-Coarseness) were found to vary by a range of 45% on average compared to reference scanning conditions in the case of FDG-PET, and by a range of 40% in the case of T1w MRI. Conclusion: We have successfully developed a Matlab-based simulation platform to facilitate PET/MRI texture image analysis for outcome prediction.

  11. High temperature crystal structures and superionic properties of SrCl{sub 2}, SrBr{sub 2}, BaCl{sub 2} and BaBr{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hull, Stephen, E-mail: stephen.hull@stfc.ac.uk [The ISIS Facility, STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Norberg, Stefan T. [The ISIS Facility, STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Chalmers University of Technology, SE-412 96 Gothenburg (Sweden); Ahmed, Istaq; Eriksson, Sten G. [Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Chalmers University of Technology, SE-412 96 Gothenburg (Sweden); Mohn, Chris E. [Department of Chemistry and Centre for Materials Science and Nanotechnology, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1033 Blindern, N-0315 Oslo (Norway)

    2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The structural properties of the binary alkaline-earth halides SrCl{sub 2}, SrBr{sub 2}, BaCl{sub 2} and BaBr{sub 2} have been investigated from ambient temperature up to close to their melting points, using the neutron powder diffraction technique. Fluorite-structured SrCl{sub 2} undergoes a gradual transition to a superionic phase at 900-1100 K, characterised by an increasing concentration of anion Frenkel defects. At a temperature of 920(3) K, the tetragonal phase of SrBr{sub 2} undergoes a first-order transition to a cubic fluorite phase. This high temperature phase shows the presence of extensive disorder within the anion sublattice, which differs from that found in superionic SrCl{sub 2}. BaCl{sub 2} and BaBr{sub 2} both adopt the cotunnite crystal structure under ambient conditions. BaCl{sub 2} undergoes a first-order structural transition at 917(5) K to a disordered fluorite-structured phase. The relationship between the (disordered) crystal structures and the ionic conductivity behaviour is discussed and the influence of the size of the mobile anion on the superionic behaviour is explored. - Graphical abstract: Anomalous behaviour of the lattice expansion of SrCl{sub 2} at temperatures of {approx}1000 K is associated with the gradual transition to a superionic phase, whilst SrBr{sub 2} undergoes a first-order structural transition ({beta}{yields}{alpha}) to a fluorite-structured superionic phase at 920(3) K. Highlights: > Anomalous behaviour of the lattice expansion of SrCl{sub 2} occurs at temperatures {approx}1000 K. > Crystal structure of {beta}-SrBr{sub 2} is described in detail. > On heating, SrBr{sub 2} and BaCl{sub 2} transform to a fluorite-structured superionic phase. > Temperature dependence of the BaCl{sub 2} and BaBr{sub 2} structures is presented. > Nature of the superionic phases within the alkaline-earth halides is discussed.

  12. The impact of water flow configuration on crystallisation in LiBr/H2O absorption water heater

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Kai [ORNL; Abdelaziz, Omar [ORNL; Vineyard, Edward Allan [ORNL

    2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Lithium Bromide (LiBr) strong solution entering the absorber tends to crystallise when the absorber temperature is increased for a fixed evaporating pressure. This is considered the key technical barrier for the development of a LiBr absorption heat pump water heater. There are several approaches to avoid the crystallisation problem, such as chemical crystallisation inhibitors, heat and mass transfer enhancement and thermodynamic cycle modification. This paper investigates and compares two flow configurations of LiBr absorption heat pump water heater to evaluate the allowable operating conditions for each. The simulation results indicated that introducing the process water through the absorber first results in lower absorber temperature and hence less tendency for crystallisation.

  13. Microwave-assisted solvothermal synthesis of flower-like Ag/AgBr/BiOBr microspheres and their high efficient photocatalytic degradation for p-nitrophenol

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Tingting, E-mail: tingtingli1983@hotmail.com [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Key Laboratory of Environmental Biology and Pollution Control, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); State Key Laboratory of Chemo/Biosensing and Chemometrics, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Department of Environment and Chemical Engineering, Key Laboratory of Jiangxi Province for Ecological Diagnosis, Remediation and Pollution Control, Nanchang Hangkong University, Nanchang 330063 (China); Luo, Shenglian, E-mail: sllou@hnu.edu.cn [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Key Laboratory of Environmental Biology and Pollution Control, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); State Key Laboratory of Chemo/Biosensing and Chemometrics, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Department of Environment and Chemical Engineering, Key Laboratory of Jiangxi Province for Ecological Diagnosis, Remediation and Pollution Control, Nanchang Hangkong University, Nanchang 330063 (China); Yang, Lixia [Department of Environment and Chemical Engineering, Key Laboratory of Jiangxi Province for Ecological Diagnosis, Remediation and Pollution Control, Nanchang Hangkong University, Nanchang 330063 (China)

    2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Flower-like Ag/AgBr/BiOBr microspheres were successfully fabricated by the approach of microwave-assisted solvothermal and in situ photo-assisted reduction. A reactive ionic liquid 1-hexadecyl-3-methylimidazolium bromide ([C{sub 16}mim]Br) was employed as Br source in the presence of surfactant polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP). The photocatalytic activity of Ag/AgBr/BiOBr towards the decomposition of p-nitrophenol under visible light irradiation was evaluated. The results indicated that Ag/AgBr/BiOBr showed enhanced photocatalytic activity towards p-nitrophenol, comparing with P25, BiOBr and Ag/AgBr. More than 96% of p-nitrophenol was decomposed in 3.5 h under visible-light irradation. The excellent photocatalytic activity of flower-like Ag/AgBr/BiOBr microspheres can be attributed to the large specific surface area, strong visible-light absorption, suitable energy band structure and surface plasmon resonance effect of Ag nanoparticles. The possible photocatalytic mechanism was proposed based on the active species test and band gap structure analysis. - Graphical abstract: The photocatalytic reaction mechanisms of the as-prepared Ag/AgBr/BiOBr. Display Omitted - Highlights: Successful synthesis of flower-like Ag/AgBr/BiOBr microspheres. The Ag/AgBr/BiOBr showed much higher photocatalytic activity towards p-nitrophenol as compared to BiOBr and Ag/AgBr. The reasons for the excellent photocatalytic activity are the large specific surface area, strong visible-light absorption and surface plasmon resonance effect of Ag nanoparticles. The O{sub 2}{sup ?}, Br{sup 0} and photogenerated h{sup +} play key roles in the photocatalytic degradation process.

  14. LiCl Dehumidifier LiBr absorption chiller hybrid air conditioning system with energy recovery

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ko, Suk M. (Huntsville, AL)

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention relates to a hybrid air conditioning system that combines a solar powered LiCl dehumidifier with a LiBr absorption chiller. The desiccant dehumidifier removes the latent load by absorbing moisture from the air, and the sensible load is removed by the absorption chiller. The desiccant dehumidifier is coupled to a regenerator and the desiccant in the regenerator is heated by solar heated hot water to drive the moisture therefrom before being fed back to the dehumidifier. The heat of vaporization expended in the desiccant regenerator is recovered and used to partially preheat the driving fluid of the absorption chiller, thus substantially improving the overall COP of the hybrid system.

  15. Robust CsBr/Cu Photocathodes for the Linac Coherent Light Source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maldonado, Juan R.; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Liu, Zhi; Dowell, D.H.; Kirby, Robert E.; Sun, Yun; Pianetta, Piero; /SLAC; Pease, Fabian; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

    2011-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The linac coherent light source (LCLS), an x-ray free-electron laser project presently under construction at SLAC, uses a 2.856 GHz rf photocathode gun with a copper cathode for its electron source. While the copper cathode is performing well for the LCLS project, a cathode material with higher quantum efficiency would reduce the drive laser requirements and allow a greater range of operating conditions. Therefore a robust CsBr/Cu photocathode with greater than 50 times the quantum yield at 257 nm relative to the present LCLS copper cathode has been investigated. Preliminary experiments using a dedicated electron source development test stand at SLAC/SSRL are encouraging and are presented in this paper.

  16. Infrared phonon modes in multiferroic single-crystal FeTe2O5Br

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Miller, K. H.; Xu, X. S.; Berger, H.; Craciun, V.; Xi, Xiaoxiang; Martin, C.; Carr, G. L.; Tanner, D. B.

    2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Reflection and transmission as a function of temperature (7300 K and 5300 K respectively) have been measured on single crystals of the multiferroic compound FeTe2O5Br utilizing light spanning from the far infrared to the visible. The complex dielectric function and other optical properties were obtained via Kramers-Kronig analysis and by fits to a Drude-Lortentz model. Analysis of the anisotropic excitation spectra via Drude-Lorentz fitting and lattice dynamical calculations have led to the observation of 43 of the 53 modes predicted along the b axis of the monoclinic cell. The phonon response parallel to the a and c axes are also presented. Assignments to groups (clusters) of phonons have been made and trends within them are discussed in light of our calculated displacement patterns.

  17. Reactive halogens (BrO and OClO) detected in the plume of Soufrire Hills Volcano during an eruption hiatus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Donovan, Amy; Tsanev, Vitchko; Oppenheimer, Clive; Edmonds, Marie

    2014-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

    published data from petrological studies of SHV. Pumiceous clasts with high vesicularity at SHV have higher Cl and Br content than dome rocks, and both spe- cies appear to have similar degassing behaviors [Villemant et al., 2008] (using whole-rock Br content... , the work of Bobrowski et al. [2003] and that of Villemant et al. [2008], and compare this with results from the experimental petrology literature. The decrease of Br relative to Cl suggests that the relative partition- ing of Cl and Br into the fluid phase...

  18. State-of-the-Art Review on Crystallization Control Technologies for water/LiBr Absorption Heat Pumps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Kai [ORNL; Abdelaziz, Omar [ORNL; Kisari, Padmaja [ORNL; Vineyard, Edward Allan [ORNL

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The key technical barrier to using water/lithium bromide (LiBr) as the working fluid in aircooled absorption chillers and absorption heat-pump systems is the risk of crystallization when the absorber temperature rises at fixed evaporating pressure. This article reviews various crystallization control technologies available to resolve this problem: chemical inhibitors, heat and mass transfer enhancement methods, thermodynamic cycle modifications, and absorption system-control strategies. Other approaches, such as boosting absorber pressure and J-tube technology, are reviewed as well. This review can help guide future efforts to develop water/LiBr air-cooled absorption chillers and absorption heatpump systems.

  19. Comparison of LaBr3:Ce and NaI(Tl) Scintillators for Radio-Isotope Identification Devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Milbrath, Brian D.; Choate, Bethany J.; Fast, Jim E.; Hensley, Walter K.; Kouzes, Richard T.; Schweppe, John E.

    2006-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Lanthanum halide (LaBr3:Ce) scintillators offer significantly better resolution (<3 percent at 662 kilo-electron volt [keV]) relative to sodium iodide (NaI(Tl)) and have recently become commercially available in sizes large enough for the hand-held radio-isotope identification device (RIID) market. There are drawbacks to lanthanum halide detectors, however. These include internal radioactivity that contributes to spectral counts and a low-energy response that can cause detector resolution to be lower than that of NaI(Tl) below 100 keV. To study the potential of this new material for RIIDs, we performed a series of measurements comparing a 1.5?1.5 inch LaBr?3:Ce detector with an Exploranium GR 135 RIID, which contains a 1.5-2.2 inch NaI(Tl) detector. Measurements were taken for short time frames, as typifies RIID usage. Measurements included examples of naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM), typically found in cargo, and special nuclear materials. Some measurements were noncontact, involving short distances or cargo shielding scenarios. To facilitate direct comparison, spectra from the different detectors were analyzed with the same isotope identification software (ORTEC ScintiVision TM). In general, the LaBr3:Ce detector was able to find more peaks and find them faster than the NaI(Tl) detector. To the same level of significance, the LaBr3:Ce detector was usually two to three times faster. The notable exception was for 40K containing NORM where interfering internal contamination in the LaBr3:Ce detector exist. NaI(Tl) consistently outperformed LaBr3:Ce for this important isotope. LaBr3:Ce currently costs much more than NaI(Tl), though this cost-difference is expected to diminish (but not completely) with time. As is true of all detectors, LaBr3:Ce will need to be gain-stabilized for RIID applications. This could possibly be done using the internal contaminants themselves. It is the experience of the authors that peak finding software in RIIDs needs to be improved, regardless of the detector material.

  20. Synthesis, crystal structure, spectroscopic and thermal properties of [Et{sub 4}N][Ta{sub 6}Br{sub 12}(H{sub 2}O){sub 6}]Br{sub 4}.4H{sub 2}O (Et=ethyl)-A new compound with the paramagnetic [Ta{sub 6}Br{sub 12}]{sup 3+} cluster core

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peric, Berislav, E-mail: bperic@irb.h [Ruder Boskovic Institute, Bijenicka cesta 54, 10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Jozic, Drazan [Ruder Boskovic Institute, Bijenicka cesta 54, 10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Planinic, Pavica, E-mail: planinic@irb.h [Ruder Boskovic Institute, Bijenicka cesta 54, 10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Brnicevic, Nevenka [Ruder Boskovic Institute, Bijenicka cesta 54, 10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Giester, Gerald [Institut fuer Mineralogie und Kristallographie, Universitaet Wien-Geozentrum Althanstrasse, 14, 1090 Wien (Austria)

    2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A new hexanuclear cluster compound, [Et{sub 4}N][Ta{sub 6}Br{sub 12}(H{sub 2}O){sub 6}]Br{sub 4}.4H{sub 2}O (Et=ethyl) (1), with the paramagnetic [Ta{sub 6}Br{sub 12}]{sup 3+} cluster entity, was synthesized and characterized by elemental and TG/DTA analyses, IR and UV/Vis spectroscopy and by a single-crystal X-ray diffraction study. The presence of the paramagnetic [Ta{sub 6}Br{sub 12}]{sup 3+} unit was confirmed also by the room-temperature magnetic and EPR measurements. The compound crystallizes in the tetragonal I4{sub 1}/a space group, with a=14.299(5), c=21.241(5) A, Z=4, R{sub 1}(F)/wR{sub 2}(F{sup 2})=0.0296/0.0811. The structure contains discrete [Ta{sub 6}Br{sub 12}(H{sub 2}O){sub 6}]{sup 3+} cations with an octahedron of metal atoms edge-bridged by bromine atoms and with water molecules occupying all six terminal positions. The cluster units are positioned in the vertices of the three-dimensional (pseudo)diamond lattice. The structure shows similarities with literature reported structures of cluster compounds crystallizing in the diamond (Fd3-barm) space group. - Graphical abstract: Two interpenetrating (pseudo)diamond nets formed by packing of the paramagnetic [Ta{sub 6}Br{sub 12}(H{sub 2}O)]{sup 3+} (octahedral) and diamagnetic [Et{sub 4}N]{sup +} (spheres) cations.

  1. Multimodal Vessel Visualization of Mouse Aorta PET/CT Scans Timo Ropinski, Member, IEEE, Sven Hermann, Rainer Reich, Michael Schafers, and Klaus Hinrichs, Member, IEEE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hinrichs, Klaus

    Multimodal Vessel Visualization of Mouse Aorta PET/CT Scans Timo Ropinski, Member, IEEE, Sven present a visualization system for the visual analysis of PET/CT scans of aortic arches of mice

  2. Characterization studies of Silicon Photomultipliers and crystals matrices for a novel time of flight PET detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Auffray, Etiennette; Cortinovis, Daniele; Doroud, Katayoun; Garutti, Erika; Lecoq, Paul; Liu, Zheng; Martinez, Rosana; Paganoni, Marco; Pizzichemi, Marco; Silenzi, Alessandro; Xu, Chen; Zvolsk, Milan

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the characterization of crystal matrices and silicon photomultiplier arrays for a novel Positron Emission Tomography (PET) detector, namely the external plate of the EndoTOFPET-US system. The EndoTOFPET-US collaboration aims to integrate Time-Of-Flight PET with ultrasound endoscopy in a novel multimodal device, capable to support the development of new biomarkers for prostate and pancreatic tumors. The detector consists in two parts: a PET head mounted on an ultrasound probe and an external PET plate. The challenging goal of 1 mm spatial resolution for the PET image requires a detector with small crystal size, and therefore high channel density: 4096 LYSO crystals individually readout by Silicon Photomultipliers (SiPM) make up the external plate. The quality and properties of these components must be assessed before the assembly. The dark count rate, gain, breakdown voltage and correlated noise of the SiPMs are measured, while the LYSO crystals are evaluated in terms of light yield and en...

  3. Preventive maintenance system for the photomultiplier detector blocks of PET scanners

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Levy, A.V.; Warner, D.

    1995-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A system including a method and apparatus for preventive maintenance of PET scanner photomultiplier detector blocks is disclosed. The qualitative comparisons used in the method of the present invention to provide an indication in the form of a display or printout advising the user that the photomultiplier block is stable, intermittently unstable, or drifting unstable, and also advising of the expected date of failure of a photomultiplier block in the PET scanner. The system alerts the user to replace the defective photomultiplier block prior to catastrophic failure in a scheduled preventative maintenance program, thus eliminating expensive and unscheduled downtime of the PET scanner due to photomultiplier failure. The apparatus for carrying out the method of the present invention preferably resides in the host computer controlling a PET scanner. It includes a memory adapted for storing a record of a number of iterative adjustments that are necessary to calibrate the gain of a photomultiplier detector block i at a time t[sub 0], a time t[sub 1] and a time T, where T>t[sub 1]>t[sub 0], which is designated as Histo(i,j(t)). The apparatus also includes a processor configured by a software program or a combination of programmed RAM and ROM devices to perform a number of calculations and operations on these values, and also includes a counter for analyzing each photomultiplier detector block i=1 through I of a PET scanner. 40 figures.

  4. Preventive maintenance system for the photomultiplier detector blocks of pet scanners

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Levy, Alejandro V. (Center Moriches, NY); Warner, Donald (Shirley, NY)

    1995-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A system including a method and apparatus for preventive maintenance of PET scanner photomultiplier detector blocks is disclosed. The quantitive comparisons used in the method of the present invention to provide an indication in the form of a display or printout advising the user that the photomultiplier block is stable, intermittently unstable, or drifting unstable, and also advising of the expected date of failure of a photomultiplier block in the PET scanner. The system alerts the user to replace the defective photomultiplier block prior to catastrophic failure in a scheduled preventative maintenance program, thus eliminating expensive and unscheduled downtime of the PET scanner due to photomultiplier failure. The apparatus for carrying out the method of the present invention preferably resides in the host computer controlling a PET scanner. It includes a memory adapted for storing a record of a number of iterative adjustments that are necessary to calibrate the gain of a photomultiplier detector block i at a time t.sub.0, a time t.sub.1 and a time T, where T>t.sub.1 >t.sub.0, which is designated as Histo(i,j(t)). The apparatus also includes a processor configured by a software program or a combination of programmed RAM and ROM devices to perform a number of calculations and operations on these values, and also includes a counter for analyzing each photomultiplier detector block i=1 through I of a PET scanner.

  5. Thermal characterization of polymer blends prepared by reactive blending of PC and PET

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fiorini, M.; Marchese, P. [Univ. of Bologna (Italy); Pilati, F. [Univ. of Modena (Italy)] [and others

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Several Poly(ethylene terephthalate)-Bisphenol A polycarbonate (PC/PET) blends were prepared by reactive blending poly(ethylene terephthalate) and Bisphenol A polycarbonate in a batch mixer in the presence of ester exchange catalysts with different catalytic activity, such as Titanium, Terbium, Cerium, Samarium, Europium and Calcium/Antimony compounds. The catalytic activity and mixing time have been correlated with the extent of ester-carbonate exchange reactions and hence the influence of the PET/PC block copolymers formed during the blending on miscibility has been investigated by differential scanning calorimetry. The results of the thermal characterization showed that blends with a single glass transition temperature can be prepared at different mixing time determined by the ester-carbonate exchange reaction activity of the different catalysts employed. In addition, the Tg`s values for the miscible blends were lower than those predicted by the widely used Flory-Fox equation, except from the blends prepared with the Titanium catalyst. Crystallization of PET in PC/PET blends was also investigated. Thermal analysis is a powerful technique that can be applied to the determination of miscibility in polymer blends. In this communication, the results of a differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) study on blends prepared by reactive blending PC and PET are reported.

  6. Core-to-valence spectroscopic detection of the CH{sub 2}Br radical and element-specific femtosecond photodissociation dynamics of CH{sub 2}IBr

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Attar, Andrew R.; Piticco, Lorena [Department of Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Chemical Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Leone, Stephen R. [Department of Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Chemical Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    2014-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Element-specific single photon photodissociation dynamics of CH{sub 2}IBr and core-to-valence absorption spectroscopy of CH{sub 2}Br radicals are investigated using femtosecond high-harmonic extreme ultraviolet (XUV) transient absorption spectroscopy. Photodissociation of CH{sub 2}IBr along both the CI or CBr reaction coordinates is observed in real-time following excitation at 266 nm. At this wavelength, CI dissociation is the dominant reaction channel and CBr dissociation is observed as a minor pathway. Both photodissociation pathways are probed simultaneously through individual 4d(I) N{sub 4/5} and 3d(Br) M{sub 4/5} core-to-valence transitions. The 3d(Br) M{sub 4/5} pre-edge absorption spectrum of the CH{sub 2}Br radical photoproduct corresponding to the CI dissociation channel is characterized for the first time. Although the radical's singly occupied molecular orbital (SOMO) is mostly localized on the central carbon atom, the 3d(Br) ? ?{sup *}(SOMO) resonances at 68.5 eV and 69.5 eV are detected 2 eV below the parent molecule 3d(Br) ? ?{sup *}(LUMO) transitions. Core-to-valence XUV absorption spectroscopy provides a unique probe of the local electronic structure of the radical species in reference to the Br reporter atom. The measured times for CI dissociation leading to I and I{sup *} atomic products are 48 12 fs and 44 4 fs, respectively, while the measured CBr dissociation time leading to atomic Br is 114 17 fs. The investigation performed here demonstrates the capability of femtosecond time-resolved core-level spectroscopy utilizing multiple reporter atoms simultaneously.

  7. 866 IEEE COMMUNICATIONS LETTERS, VOL. 16, NO. 6, JUNE 2012 ICE: Intelligent Cell BrEathing to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ansari, Nirwan

    Eathing to Optimize the Utilization of Green Energy Tao Han, Student Member, IEEE, and Nirwan Ansari, Fellow, IEEE Abstract--This letter proposes Intelligent Cell brEathing (ICE) to optimize the utilization of green energy by green energy. Minimizing the maximal depleting rate is an NP-hard problem. ICE is thus proposed

  8. IEEE TRIWSA~IONSON NUCLEAR SCIENCB,VOL. 47, NO. 3, JUNE 2000 1011 PerformanceResults of A PrototypeDepth-encoding PET Detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    He, Zhong

    Depth-encoding PET Detector L.J. Meng and D. Ramsden Department of Physics and Astronomy University of Southampton, Southampton, SO17 1BJ Abstract The results of a feasibility study for a high-resolution PET detector system simulation of the proposed small animal PET imager. I.INTRODUCTION It is well-known that a lack

  9. Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research A 571 (2007) 102105 Preliminary studies of a simultaneous PET/MRI scanner based on the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of a simultaneous PET/MRI scanner based on the RatCAP small animal tomograph C. Woodya,?, D. Schlyera , P. Vaskaa data using positron emission tomography (PET). The approach is based on the technology used for the RatCAP conscious small animal PET tomograph which utilizes block detectors consisting of pixelated arrays of LSO

  10. 2012 IEEE Nuclear Science Symposium and Medical Imaging Conference Record (NSSIMIC) M07-4 Myocardial Blood Flow from Dynamic PET

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duncan, James S.

    -4 Myocardial Blood Flow from Dynamic PET using Independent Component Analysis Alexander Karpikov, Hemant Tagare) from dynamic PET requires a reproducible and reliable method to obtain left and right ventricular time-activity curves. We propose the use of Independent Component Analysis (ICA) on PET temporal information to segment

  11. Eur J Nucl Med Mol Imaging. Author manuscript Non-invasive estimation of hepatic blood perfusion from H2 15O PET

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    perfusion from H2 15O PET images using tissue-derived arterial and portal input functions Kudomi Nobuyuki 1 Timo 2 , Knuuti Juhani 1 , Iida Hirokazu 3 , Nuutila Pirjo 1 4 , Iozzo Patricia 1 5 Turku PET Centre1 artery. When its perfusion is assessed using PET and O-labeled water15 (H O), calculations require a dual

  12. Accuracy and Sensitivity of Detection of Activation Foci in the Brain via Statistical Parametric Mapping: A Study Using a PET Simulator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plotkin, Joshua B.

    Mapping: A Study Using a PET Simulator Christos Davatzikos,* Henry H. Li,* Edward Herskovits,* and Susan M a realistic simulator of PET image formation, which accounted for the main physical processes in- volved in PET, including attenuation, scatter, ran- doms, Poisson noise, and limited detector resolution

  13. Abstract --An experimental small animal PET using two 3-D position sensitive CdZnTe detectors was developed and tested.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    He, Zhong

    Abstract -- An experimental small animal PET using two 3-D position sensitive CdZnTe detectors scattering angle reconstruction are reported and discussed. I. INTRODUCTION onventional PET systems use, for molecular imaging and drug development using high resolution PET is gaining more and more interests. One

  14. Pet191 is a cytochrome c oxidase assembly factor in Saccharomyces cerevisiae1 Oleh Khalimonchuk, Kevin Rigby, Megan Bestwick, Fabien Pierrel, Paul A. Cobine and Dennis R.2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    1 Pet191 is a cytochrome c oxidase assembly factor in Saccharomyces cerevisiae1 Oleh Khalimonchuk Running title: Role of Pet191 in Assembly of Complex IV8 9 * Address correspondence to: Dennis Winge protein Pet191 is essential for cytochrome c oxidase maturation. The motif14 Cys residues are functionally

  15. PET Imaging of Brain 5-HT1A Receptors in Rat In Vivo with 18F-FCWAY and Improvement by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shen, Jun

    PET Imaging of Brain 5-HT1A Receptors in Rat In Vivo with 18F-FCWAY and Improvement by Successful)cyclohexanecarboxamide) is useful in clinical research with PET for measuring serotonin 1A (5-HT1A) re- ceptor densities in brain applicability to measuring brain regional 5-HT1A receptor densities. Methods: PET of rat head after

  16. Effect of temperature on the release of intentionally and non-intentionally added substances from polyethylene terephthalate (PET) bottles into water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Short, Daniel

    polyethylene terephthalate (PET) bottles into water: Chemical analysis and potential toxicity Cristina Bach a January 2013 Keywords: PET-bottled water By-products Chemical mixtures Cyto-genotoxicity Endocrine on the release of PET-bottle con- stituents into water and to assess the potential health hazard using in vitro

  17. Controls for TTS identification using PET A series of controls were implemented in order to evaluate the potential contamination by internal priming in the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jordan, King

    Controls for TTS identification using PET A series of controls were implemented in order to evaluate the potential contamination by internal priming in the set of PET-characterized TTS described here. In particular, Alu sequences contain two A-rich regions, the longer at their 3'-ends. As the PET technique

  18. Regional dynamics of -amyloid deposition in healthy elderly, Mild Cognitive Impairment and Alzheimer's disease: a voxelwise PiB-PET longitudinal study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    and Alzheimer's disease: a voxelwise PiB-PET longitudinal study Nicolas Villain1,2,3,4 , Gaël Chételat1 CHU de Caen, U1077, Caen, France 5. Dept of Nuclear Medicine and Centre for PET, Austin Health, VIC;2 Corresponding author: Victor Villemagne, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Centre for PET, Austin Health, 145

  19. Sclerosing angiomatoid nodular transformation of the spleen: CT, MR, PET, and 99mTc-sulfur colloid SPECT CT findings with gross and histopathological correlation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thacker, Curtis; Korn, Ronald; Millstine, John; Harvin, Howard; Lier Ribbink, Jeffrey A.; Gotway, Michael B.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    computed tomography-CT (FDG-PET CT) survey which revealed aof the spleen: CT, MR, PET, and 99m Tc-sulfur colloid SPECTT2, no enhancement US CT MR FDG-PET N/A uptake N/A N/A N/A

  20. A comprehensive plant-wide assessment of Amcor PET Packaging at Fairfield, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kevin Losh; Hui Choi; Yin Yin Wu; Bryan W. Hackett; Ahmad R. Ganji

    2008-02-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This report includes the results of the plant-wide assessment of AMCOR PET plants in Fairfield, City of Commerce, and Lathrop California. The project (except the assessment of Lathrop plant) was a cost shared effort between US Department of Energy through Golden Field Office, Golden CO and AMCOR PET Packaging Co. The DOE share of the plant-wide assessment cost was awarded to AMCOR PET in response to the RFP DE-PS36-05GO95009, the 2005 round of funding for Plant-Wide Energy Efficiency Opportunity Assessments. The plant-wide assessment included the processes, electrical and gas equipment. Current production practices have been evaluated against best practice standards, as well as utilization of modern technology to improve energy efficiency, reduce the wastes, and improve productivity.

  1. Ag/AgBr/g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4}: A highly efficient and stable composite photocatalyst for degradation of organic contaminants under visible light

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cao, Jing, E-mail: caojing@mail.ipc.ac.cn [College of Chemistry and Materials Science, Huaibei Normal University, Huaibei 235000, Anhui (China); State Key Laboratory of Crystal Materials, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China); Zhao, Yijie; Lin, Haili; Xu, Benyan [College of Chemistry and Materials Science, Huaibei Normal University, Huaibei 235000, Anhui (China); Chen, Shifu, E-mail: chshifu@chnu.edu.cn [College of Chemistry and Materials Science, Huaibei Normal University, Huaibei 235000, Anhui (China)

    2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Graphical abstract: Ag/AgBr/g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} composite photocatalysts displayed excellent photocatalytic activities on the degradation of methyl orange (MO) under visible light. The improved photocatalytic performance and stability of Ag/AgBr/g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} originated from the synergetic effects of AgBr/g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} interface and metallic Ag nanoparticles. O{sub 2}?, one of the reactive species, was responsible for the photodegradation of MO compared to H+ and OH. - Highlights: Novel Ag/AgBr/g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} composite photocatalyst was reported. Ag/AgBr/g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} had novel energy band combination between AgBr and g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4}. Synergetic effects of AgBr/g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} interface and metallic Ag nanoparticles. Electron trapping role of metallic Ag dominated the stability of Ag/AgBr/g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4}. - Abstract: Novel Ag/AgBr/g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} composite photocatalysts were constructed via depositionprecipitation method and extensively characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and UVvis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS). Under visible light (? > 420 nm), Ag/AgBr/g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} composite photocatalysts displayed much higher photocatalytic activities than those of Ag/AgBr and g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} for degradation of methyl orange (MO). 50% Ag/AgBr/g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} presented the best photocatalytic performance, which was mainly attributed to the synergistic effects of AgBr/g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} interface and the in situ metallic Ag nanoparticles for efficiently separating electronhole pairs. Furthermore, Ag/AgBr/g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} remained good photocatalytic activity through 5 times of cycle experiments. Additionally, the radical scavengers experiment indicated that O{sub 2}{sup ?} was the main reactive species for the MO degradation under visible light.

  2. The Mercer Clinic Holiday Pet Basket program was started in 1995 by Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital staff members of the "VOICE" staff newsletter. It has grown due to need over the years from only 25 baskets to 130

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schladow, S. Geoffrey

    The Mercer Clinic Holiday Pet Basket program was started in 1995 by Veterinary Medical Teaching that every year we rely on the kindness of others to help these very special pets who are more than a pet this wonderful tradition alive by contributing any time of year to the Mercer Veterinary Clinic Holiday Pet

  3. Tumor delineation using PET in head and neck cancers: Threshold contouring and lesion volumes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ford, Eric C.; Kinahan, Paul E.; Hanlon, Lorraine; Alessio, Adam; Rajendran, Joseph; Schwartz, David L.; Phillips, Mark [University of Washington, Department of Radiation Oncology, 1959 N. E. Pacific Street, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States) and Puget Sound Veterans Administration, 18801 S. Columbian Way, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States); University of Washington, Department of Radiology, 1959 N. E. Pacific Street, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States); University of Washington, Department of Radiation Oncology, 1959 N. E. Pacific Street, Seattle, Washington 98195 and School of Physics, University College Dublin (Ireland); University of Washington, Department of Radiology, 1959 N. E. Pacific Street, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States); University of Texas, M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Department of Radiation Oncology, 1515 Holcombe Blvd., Houston, Texas 77030 and Puget Sound Veterans Administration, 1880 S. Columbian Way, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States); University of Washington, Department of Radiation Oncology, 1959 N. E. Pacific Street, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States)

    2006-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Tumor boundary delineation using positron emission tomography (PET) is a promising tool for radiation therapy applications. In this study we quantify the uncertainties in tumor boundary delineation as a function of the reconstruction method, smoothing, and lesion size in head and neck cancer patients using FDG-PET images and evaluate the dosimetric impact on radiotherapy plans. FDG-PET images were acquired for eight patients with a GE Advance PET scanner. In addition, a 20 cm diameter cylindrical phantom with six FDG-filled spheres with volumes of 1.2 to 26.5 cm{sup 3} was imaged. PET emission scans were reconstructed with the OSEM and FBP algorithms with different smoothing parameters. PET-based tumor regions were delineated using an automatic contouring function set at progressively higher threshold contour levels and the resulting volumes were calculated. CT-based tumor volumes were also contoured by a physician on coregistered PET/CT patient images. The intensity value of the threshold contour level that returns 100% of the actual volume, I{sub V100}, was measured. We generated intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plans for an example head and neck patient, treating 66 Gy to CT-based gross disease and 54 Gy to nodal regions at risk, followed by a boost to the FDG-PET-based tumor. The volumes of PET-based tumors are a sensitive function of threshold contour level for all patients and phantom datasets. A 5% change in threshold contour level can translate into a 200% increase in volume. Phantom data indicate that I{sub V100} can be set as a fraction, f, of the maximum measured uptake. Fractional threshold values in the cylindrical water phantom range from 0.23 to 0.51. Both the fractional threshold and the threshold-volume curve are dependent on lesion size, with lesions smaller than approximately 5 cm{sup 3} displaying a more pronounced sensitivity and larger fractional threshold values. The threshold-volume curves and fractional threshold values also depend on the reconstruction algorithm and smoothing filter with more smoothing requiring a higher fractional threshold contour level. The threshold contour level affects the tumor size, and therefore the ultimate boost dose that is achievable with IMRT. In an example head and neck IMRT plan, the D95 of the planning target volume decreased from 7770 to 7230 cGy for 42% vs 55% contour threshold levels. PET-based tumor volumes are strongly affected by the choice of threshold level. This can have a significant dosimetric impact. The appropriate threshold level depends on lesion size and image reconstruction parameters. These effects should be carefully considered when using PET contour and/or volume information for radiotherapy applications.

  4. Regarding Autocontouring and Manual Contouring: Which Is the Better Method for Target Delineation Using 18F-FDG PET/CT in NonSmall Cell Lung Cancer? By K. Wu et al

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Using 18F-FDG PET/CT in NonSmall Cell Lung Cancer? By K. Wu et al M Hatt, D Visvikis, C Cheze Le Rest delineation in PET/CT for NSCLC. 17 NSCLC tumors were delineated with both automated and manual approaches, using either combined PET/CT or CT and PET independently. As expected, the manual contouring of the PET

  5. Combined 3D PET and Optical Projection Tomography Techniques for Plant Root Phenotyping

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Qiang; Mathews, Aswin J; Li, Ke; Topp, Christopher; O'Sullivan, Joseph A; Tai, Yuan-Chuan

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    New imaging techniques are in great demand for investigating underground plant roots systems which play an important role in crop production. Compared with other non-destructive imaging modalities, PET can image plant roots in natural soil and produce dynamic 3D functional images which reveal the temporal dynamics of plant-environment interactions. In this study, we combined PET with optical projection tomography (OPT) to evaluate its potential for plant root phenotyping. We used a dedicated high resolution plant PET imager that has a 14 cm transaxial and 10 cm axial field of views, and multi-bed imaging capability. The image resolution is around 1.25 mm using ML-EM reconstruction algorithm. B73 inbred maize seeds were germinated and then grown in a sealed jar with transparent gel-based media. PET scanning started on the day when the first green leaf appeared, and was carried out once a day for 5 days. Each morning, around 10 mCi of 11CO2 was administrated into a custom built plant labeling chamber. After 10 ...

  6. Multiple scattering and accidental coincidences in the J-PET detector simulated using GATE package

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kowalski, P; Wi?licki, W; Raczy?ski, L; Bednarski, T; Bia?as, P; Bu?ka, J; Czerwi?ski, E; Gajos, A; Gruntowski, A; Kami?ska, D; Kap?on, ?; Kochanowski, A; Korcyl, G; Kowal, J; Kozik, T; Krzemie?, W; Kubicz, E; Nied?wiecki, Sz; Pa?ka, M; Rudy, Z; Salabura, P; Sharma, N G; Silarski, M; S?omski, A; Smyrski, J; Strzelecki, A; Wieczorek, A; Wochlik, I; Zieli?ski, M; Zo?, N

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Novel Positron Emission Tomography system, based on plastic scintillators, is developed by the J-PET collaboration. In order to optimize geometrical configuration of built device, advanced computer simulations are performed. Detailed study is presented of background given by accidental coincidences and multiple scattering of gamma quanta.

  7. ausbreitungsdiagnostik mittels fdg-pet: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ausbreitungsdiagnostik mittels fdg-pet First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Eur J Nucl Med...

  8. Missouri AHEC Housing *no pets allowed at any of the AHEC housing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gering, Jon C.

    Missouri AHEC Housing *no pets allowed at any of the AHEC housing * Students are responsible for cleaning up after themselves Housing is occasionally shared with other healthcare professions students7146 Cost: No charge to students (utilities included) (limited number of units available) Housing in St

  9. PET: A PErsonalized Trust Model with Reputation and Risk Evaluation for P2P Resource Sharing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shi, Weisong

    PET: A PErsonalized Trust Model with Reputation and Risk Evaluation for P2P Resource Sharing the construction of a good cooperation, especially in the context of economic-based solutions for the P2P resource sharing. The trust model consists of two parts: reputation evaluation and risk evaluation. Reputation

  10. 4D PET Image Reconstruction from List Mode Data 1 Evren Asma, Thomas E. Nichols,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leahy, Richard M.

    functions that are based on assumptions about the physiological processes generating the data, e.g. blood4D PET Image Reconstruction from List Mode Data 1 Evren Asma, Thomas E. Nichols, Jinyi Qi, Richard M. Leahy Signal and Image Processing Institute, University of Southern California, Los Angeles

  11. 3D PET image reconstruction based on Maximum Likelihood Estimation Method (MLEM) algorithm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S?omski, Artur; Bednarski, Tomasz; Bia?as, Piotr; Czerwi?ski, Eryk; Kap?on, ?ukasz; Kochanowski, Andrzej; Korcyl, Grzegorz; Kowal, Jakub; Kowalski, Pawe?; Kozik, Tomasz; Krzemie?, Wojciech; Molenda, Marcin; Moskal, Pawe?; Nied?wiecki, Szymon; Pa?ka, Marek; Pawlik, Monika; Raczy?ski, Lech; Salabura, Piotr; Gupta-Sharma, Neha; Silarski, Micha?; Smyrski, Jerzy; Strzelecki, Adam; Wi?licki, Wojciech; Zieli?ski, Marcin; Zo?, Natalia

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Positron emission tomographs (PET) do not measure an image directly. Instead, they measure at the boundary of the field-of-view (FOV) of PET tomograph a sinogram that consists of measurements of the sums of all the counts along the lines connecting two detectors. As there is a multitude of detectors build-in typical PET tomograph structure, there are many possible detector pairs that pertain to the measurement. The problem is how to turn this measurement into an image (this is called imaging). Decisive improvement in PET image quality was reached with the introduction of iterative reconstruction techniques. This stage was reached already twenty years ago (with the advent of new powerful computing processors). However, three dimensional (3D) imaging remains still a challenge. The purpose of the image reconstruction algorithm is to process this imperfect count data for a large number (many millions) of lines-of-responce (LOR) and millions of detected photons to produce an image showing the distribution of the l...

  12. A Central Positron Source to Perform the Timing Alignment of Detectors in a PET

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, Chris

    . The time delay before the gamma ray is detected by the scanner's conventional gamma ray detectors for the apparent time at which a gamma ray is detected by each crystal, so that when a true coincidence is detected a precise time reference. Aligning the detectors in a PET scanner so that they can detect coincident gamma

  13. Factors affecting degradation of polyethylene terephthalate (PET) during pre-flotation conditioning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caparanga, Alvin R. [School of Chemical Engineering and Chemistry, Mapua Institute of Technology, Intramuros, Manila 1002 (Philippines); School of Graduate Studies, Mapua Institute of Technology, Intramuros, Manila 1002 (Philippines)], E-mail: arcaparanga@mapua.edu.ph; Basilia, Blessie A. [School of Chemical Engineering and Chemistry, Mapua Institute of Technology, Intramuros, Manila 1002 (Philippines); School of Graduate Studies, Mapua Institute of Technology, Intramuros, Manila 1002 (Philippines); Dagbay, Kevin B. [School of Chemical Engineering and Chemistry, Mapua Institute of Technology, Intramuros, Manila 1002 (Philippines); Salvacion, Jonathan W.L. [School of Graduate Studies, Mapua Institute of Technology, Intramuros, Manila 1002 (Philippines)

    2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In general, plastics are exposed to different degrading agents in every procedure involved in their recovery from waste mixture and from subsequent recycling. In this study, two methods of pre-flotation conditioning were used to determine how these methods affect the general properties of the pre-conditioned PET particles to be recovered from the PET-PVC mixture. The first method comprised the conditioning of PET samples using an alkaline solution of nonionic surfactant (Triton X-100) based on the patent by the Goodyear Tire and Rubber Company. The second method, developed in this study, was a conditioning process which used an alkali-less solution of the same nonionic surfactant (Triton X-100) used in the first method. The following analytical methods were used to characterize properties of the pre-conditioned PET samples that were correlated to relative degradation of the samples: differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), for thermal behavior of the samples; FT-IR spectroscopy, for functional groups present in the samples; and, Pohl's method, for carboxyl end-group concentration count. Results show that in addition to water the presence of NaOH in the conditioning solution contributes to the further degradation of the polymer.

  14. Measurement of electron capture and loss cross section for 41.67 MeV ??Br ions in H?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burns, James Martin

    1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . The lab frame is the rest frame of the ion. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51 Schematic diagram of the Tandem Van de Graaff Accel- erator as used to accelerate 7 Br ions. . . . . , . . . . . . . . . . 52 Schematic diagram of experimental apparatus... of this century. Initial investigations concerned the pas- sage of protons and alpha particles through matter as these were essentially the only high speed particles available at that time. Consequently, much information has been accumulated concerning...

  15. Research to understand the embrittlement behavior of Yankee/BR3 surveillance plate and other outlier RPV steels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fabry, A.; Velde, J. van de; Puzzolante, J.L.; Ransbeeck, T. van; Verstrepen, A. [SCK/CEN, Mol (Belgium); Biemiller, E.C. [Yankee Atomic Electric Co., Bolton, MA (United States); Carter, R.G. [Electric Power Research Inst., Charlotte, NC (United States); Petrova, T. [INRNE, Sofia (Bulgaria)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The reactor pressure vessels at the Yankee Rowe and Belgian BR3 nuclear plants were constructed by Babcock and Wilcox in 1958. The plates of an open-hearth fabrication were welded using a submerged-arc process with Linde 80 flux as the filler. The original surveillance programs at the two plants were limited to representative A302B specimens; they feature similar chemistries as the ASTM reference plate, but coarser microstructure. The present testing program includes sixteen Charpy-V and four tensile specimens of the surveillance plate, irradiated at BR3 at a dose rate of {approx} 7 E10 cm{sup {minus}2}.s-1 (> 1 MeV) over a period of 25 years; the investigation also addresses annealing and notch orientation effects. The new experimental results are compared to previously published data for the same and/or related melts. The Yankee/BR3 surveillance plate displays an anomalously large 41J C{sub v}-shift as compared to the ASTM reference plate and to Regulatory predictions. Some of the Linde 80 welds investigated by the BR3 program are also found to behave as outliers. The data are evaluated in the light of state-of-the-art damage modeling and fracture micromechanics concepts, which are currently being incorporated into a new, consolidated strategy for improved RPV surveillance. The approach makes extensive use of the information contained in the load-deflection response of the instrumented C{sub v} test. The implications of such analysis in terms of RPV steel embrittlement trend curve development are discussed. 90 refs.

  16. A multifractal approach to space-filling recovery for PET quantification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Willaime, Julien M. Y., E-mail: julien.willaime@siemens.com; Aboagye, Eric O. [Comprehensive Cancer Imaging Centre, Imperial College London, Hammersmith Hospital, London W12 0NN (United Kingdom); Tsoumpas, Charalampos [Division of Medical Physics, University of Leeds, LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); Turkheimer, Federico E. [Department of Neuroimaging, Institute of Psychiatry, Kings College London, London SE5 8AF (United Kingdom)

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: A new image-based methodology is developed for estimating the apparent space-filling properties of an object of interest in PET imaging without need for a robust segmentation step and used to recover accurate estimates of total lesion activity (TLA). Methods: A multifractal approach and the fractal dimension are proposed to recover the apparent space-filling index of a lesion (tumor volume, TV) embedded in nonzero background. A practical implementation is proposed, and the index is subsequently used with mean standardized uptake value (SUV {sub mean}) to correct TLA estimates obtained from approximate lesion contours. The methodology is illustrated on fractal and synthetic objects contaminated by partial volume effects (PVEs), validated on realistic {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose PET simulations and tested for its robustness using a clinical {sup 18}F-fluorothymidine PET testretest dataset. Results: TLA estimates were stable for a range of resolutions typical in PET oncology (46 mm). By contrast, the space-filling index and intensity estimates were resolution dependent. TLA was generally recovered within 15% of ground truth on postfiltered PET images affected by PVEs. Volumes were recovered within 15% variability in the repeatability study. Results indicated that TLA is a more robust index than other traditional metrics such as SUV {sub mean} or TV measurements across imaging protocols. Conclusions: The fractal procedure reported here is proposed as a simple and effective computational alternative to existing methodologies which require the incorporation of image preprocessing steps (i.e., partial volume correction and automatic segmentation) prior to quantification.

  17. zimas para entender evoluo de leveduras -Terra Brasil 1/1...terra.com.br/.../cientistas-recriam-enzimas-para-entender-evolucao-de-leveduras,a996ed7e34c...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    como enzima ligada ao câncer funciona http://noticias.terra.com.br/ciencia parte do tratamento contra... http://noticias.terra.com.br/ciencia evolução de cromossomos sexuais http://noticias.terra.com.br/ciencia

  18. Fabrication and characterization of a 0.5-mm lutetium oxyorthosilicate detector array for high-resolution PET applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stickel, Jennifer R; Qi, Jinyi; Cherry, Simon R

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Med Biol. 2006;51:21312142. 0.5- MM LSO A RRAY FOR PET and Characterization of a 0.5-mm Lutetium Oxyorthosilicatelicate (LSO) arrays with 0.5-mm pixels was coupled to

  19. Field of view extension and truncation correction for MR-based human attenuation correction in simultaneous MR/PET imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blumhagen, Jan O., E-mail: janole.blumhagen@siemens.com; Ladebeck, Ralf; Fenchel, Matthias [Magnetic Resonance, Siemens AG Healthcare Sector, Erlangen 91052 (Germany)] [Magnetic Resonance, Siemens AG Healthcare Sector, Erlangen 91052 (Germany); Braun, Harald; Quick, Harald H. [Institute of Medical Physics, Friedrich-Alexander-University Erlangen-Nrnberg, Erlangen 91052 (Germany)] [Institute of Medical Physics, Friedrich-Alexander-University Erlangen-Nrnberg, Erlangen 91052 (Germany); Faul, David [Siemens Medical Solutions, New York, New York 10015 (United States)] [Siemens Medical Solutions, New York, New York 10015 (United States); Scheffler, Klaus [MRC Department, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Tbingen 72076, Germany and Department of Biomedical Magnetic Resonance, University Hospital Tbingen, Tbingen 72076 (Germany)] [MRC Department, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Tbingen 72076, Germany and Department of Biomedical Magnetic Resonance, University Hospital Tbingen, Tbingen 72076 (Germany)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: In quantitative PET imaging, it is critical to accurately measure and compensate for the attenuation of the photons absorbed in the tissue. While in PET/CT the linear attenuation coefficients can be easily determined from a low-dose CT-based transmission scan, in whole-body MR/PET the computation of the linear attenuation coefficients is based on the MR data. However, a constraint of the MR-based attenuation correction (AC) is the MR-inherent field-of-view (FoV) limitation due to static magnetic field (B{sub 0}) inhomogeneities and gradient nonlinearities. Therefore, the MR-based human AC map may be truncated or geometrically distorted toward the edges of the FoV and, consequently, the PET reconstruction with MR-based AC may be biased. This is especially of impact laterally where the patient arms rest beside the body and are not fully considered. Methods: A method is proposed to extend the MR FoV by determining an optimal readout gradient field which locally compensates B{sub 0} inhomogeneities and gradient nonlinearities. This technique was used to reduce truncation in AC maps of 12 patients, and the impact on the PET quantification was analyzed and compared to truncated data without applying the FoV extension and additionally to an established approach of PET-based FoV extension. Results: The truncation artifacts in the MR-based AC maps were successfully reduced in all patients, and the mean body volume was thereby increased by 5.4%. In some cases large patient-dependent changes in SUV of up to 30% were observed in individual lesions when compared to the standard truncated attenuation map. Conclusions: The proposed technique successfully extends the MR FoV in MR-based attenuation correction and shows an improvement of PET quantification in whole-body MR/PET hybrid imaging. In comparison to the PET-based completion of the truncated body contour, the proposed method is also applicable to specialized PET tracers with little uptake in the arms and might reduce the computation time by obviating the need for iterative calculations of the PET emission data beyond those required for reconstructing images.

  20. LQES Laboratrio de Qumica do Estado Slido Instituto de Qumica -UNICAMP http://lqes.iqm.unicamp.br Nanocincia e Nanotecnologia: um bom motivo para a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Campinas, Universidade Estadual de

    ://lqes.iqm.unicamp.br Nanociência e Nanotecnologia: um bom motivo para a Cooperação Científica Brasil-Argentina Oswaldo Luiz Alves, Campinas, SP, Brasil. oalves@iqm.unicamp.br 1. Introdução A Nanociência e a Nanotecnologia (N&N) - áreas do, energia, tratamento de água (potabilidade), saúde pública, entre tantos outros3 . Uma das características

  1. Evaluating the purity of a {sup 57}Co flood source by PET

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DiFilippo, Frank P., E-mail: difilif@ccf.org [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio 44195 (United States)

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Flood sources of {sup 57}Co are commonly used for quality control of gamma cameras. Flood uniformity may be affected by the contaminants {sup 56}Co and {sup 58}Co, which emit higher energy photons. Although vendors specify a maximum combined {sup 56}Co and {sup 58}Co activity, a convenient test for flood source purity that is feasible in a clinical environment would be desirable. Methods: Both {sup 56}Co and {sup 58}Co emit positrons with branching 19.6% and 14.9%, respectively. As is known from {sup 90}Y imaging, a positron emission tomography (PET) scanner is capable of quantitatively imaging very weak positron emission in a high single-photon background. To evaluate this approach, two {sup 57}Co flood sources were scanned with a clinical PET/CT multiple times over a period of months. The {sup 56}Co and {sup 58}Co activity was clearly visible in the reconstructed PET images. Total impurity activity was quantified from the PET images after background subtraction of prompt gamma coincidences. Results: Time-of-flight PET reconstruction was highly beneficial for accurate image quantification. Repeated measurements of the positron-emitting impurities showed excellent agreement with an exponential decay model. For both flood sources studied, the fit parameters indicated a zero intercept and a decay half-life consistent with a mixture of {sup 56}Co and {sup 58}Co. The total impurity activity at the reference date was estimated to be 0.06% and 0.07% for the two sources, which was consistent with the vendors specification of <0.12%. Conclusions: The robustness of the repeated measurements and a thorough analysis of the detector corrections and physics suggest that the accuracy is acceptable and that the technique is feasible. Further work is needed to validate the accuracy of this technique with a calibrated high resolution gamma spectrometer as a gold standard, which was not available for this study, and for other PET detector models.

  2. The use of multi-gap resistive plate chambers for in-beam PET in proton and carbon ion therapy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watts, David; Sauli, Fabio; Amaldi, Ugo

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    On-line verification of the delivered dose during proton and carbon ion radiotherapy is currently a very desirable goal for quality assurance of hadron therapy treatment plans. In-beam positron emission tomography (ibPET), which can provide an image of the ?+ activity induced in the patient during irradiation, which in turn is correlated to the range of the ion beam, is one of the modalities for achieving this goal. Application to hadron therapy requires that the scanner geometry be modified from that which is used in nuclear medicine. In particular, PET detectors that allow a sub-nanosecond time-of-flight (TOF) registration of the collinear photons have been proposed. Inclusion of the TOF information in PET data leads to more effective PET sensitivity. Considering the challenges inherent in the ibPET technique, namely limited ?+ activity and the effect of biological washout due to blood flow, TOF-PET technologies are very attractive. In this context, the TERA Foundation is investigating the use of resistiv...

  3. Dedicated mobile high resolution prostate PET imager with an insertable transrectal probe

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Majewski, Stanislaw (Yorktown, VA); Proffitt, James (Newport News, VA)

    2010-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A dedicated mobile PET imaging system to image the prostate and surrounding organs. The imaging system includes an outside high resolution PET imager placed close to the patient's torso and an insertable and compact transrectal probe that is placed in close proximity to the prostate and operates in conjunction with the outside imager. The two detector systems are spatially co-registered to each other. The outside imager is mounted on an open rotating gantry to provide torso-wide 3D images of the prostate and surrounding tissue and organs. The insertable probe provides closer imaging, high sensitivity, and very high resolution predominately 2D view of the prostate and immediate surroundings. The probe is operated in conjunction with the outside imager and a fast data acquisition system to provide very high resolution reconstruction of the prostate and surrounding tissue and organs.

  4. A systematic investigation of PET Radionuclide Specific Activity on Miniaturization of Radiochemistry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jeanne M Link, PhD

    2012-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The PET radionuclides, 18F and 11C consist of very high radiation to mass amounts and should be easily adapted to new technologies such as â??chip chemistryâ? with nanofluidics. However, environmental contamination with nonradioactive fluorine, carbon and other trace contaminants add sufficient mass, micrograms to milligrams, to prevent adapting PET radiochemistry to the nanochip technologies. In addition, the large volumes of material required for beam irradiation make it necessary to also remove the 18F and 11C from their chemical matrices. These steps add contaminants. The work described in this report was a systematic investigation of sources of these contaminants and methods to reduce these contaminants and the reaction volumes for radiochemical synthesis. Several methods were found to lower the contaminants and matrices to within a factor of 2 to 100 of those needed to fully implement chip technology but further improvements are needed.

  5. A modular VME or IBM PC based data acquisition system for multi-modality PET/CT scanners of different sizes and detector types

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crosetto, D B

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A modular VME or IBM PC based data acquisition system for multi-modality PET/CT scanners of different sizes and detector types

  6. Real-time, programmable, digital signal-processing electronics for extracting the information from a detector module for multi-modality PET/SPECT/CT scanners

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crosetto, D B

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Real-time, programmable, digital signal-processing electronics for extracting the information from a detector module for multi-modality PET/SPECT/CT scanners

  7. SU-E-J-86: Lobar Lung Function Quantification by PET Galligas and CT Ventilation Imaging in Lung Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eslick, E; Kipritidis, J; Keall, P [University of Sydney, Camperdown, NSW (Australia); Bailey, D; Bailey, E [Royal North Shore Hospital, St. Leonards, NSW (Australia)

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to quantify the lobar lung function using the novel PET Galligas ([68Ga]-carbon nanoparticle) ventilation imaging and the investigational CT ventilation imaging in lung cancer patients pre-treatment. Methods: We present results on our first three lung cancer patients (2 male, mean age 78 years) as part of an ongoing ethics approved study. For each patient a PET Galligas ventilation (PET-V) image and a pair of breath hold CT images (end-exhale and end-inhale tidal volumes) were acquired using a Siemens Biograph PET CT. CT-ventilation (CT-V) images were created from the pair of CT images using deformable image registration (DIR) algorithms and the Hounsfield Unit (HU) ventilation metric. A comparison of ventilation quantification from each modality was done on the lobar level and the voxel level. A Bland-Altman plot was used to assess the difference in mean percentage contribution of each lobe to the total lung function between the two modalities. For each patient, a voxel-wise Spearmans correlation was calculated for the whole lungs between the two modalities. Results: The Bland-Altman plot demonstrated strong agreement between PET-V and CT-V for assessment of lobar function (r=0.99, p<0.001; range mean difference: ?5.5 to 3.0). The correlation between PET-V and CT-V at the voxel level was moderate(r=0.60, p<0.001). Conclusion: This preliminary study on the three patients data sets demonstrated strong agreement between PET and CT ventilation imaging for the assessment of pre-treatment lung function at the lobar level. Agreement was only moderate at the level of voxel correlations. These results indicate that CT ventilation imaging has potential for assessing pre-treatment lobar lung function in lung cancer patients.

  8. Longitudinal, intermodality registration of quantitative breast PET and MRI data acquired before and during neoadjuvant chemotherapy: Preliminary results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Atuegwu, Nkiruka C.; Williams, Jason M. [Institute of Imaging Science, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee 37232-2310 and Department of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee 37232-2675 (United States)] [Institute of Imaging Science, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee 37232-2310 and Department of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee 37232-2675 (United States); Li, Xia; Arlinghaus, Lori R. [Institute of Imaging Science, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee 37232-2310 (United States)] [Institute of Imaging Science, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee 37232-2310 (United States); Abramson, Richard G. [Institute of Imaging Science, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee 37232-2310 (United States) [Institute of Imaging Science, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee 37232-2310 (United States); Department of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee 37232-2675 (United States); Vanderbilt Ingram Cancer Center, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee 37232-6838 (United States); Chakravarthy, A. Bapsi [Department of Radiation Oncology, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee 37232-5671 and Vanderbilt Ingram Cancer Center, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee 37232-6838 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee 37232-5671 and Vanderbilt Ingram Cancer Center, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee 37232-6838 (United States); Abramson, Vandana G. [Department of Medical Oncology, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee 37232-6307 and Vanderbilt Ingram Cancer Center, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee 37232-6838 (United States)] [Department of Medical Oncology, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee 37232-6307 and Vanderbilt Ingram Cancer Center, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee 37232-6838 (United States); Yankeelov, Thomas E., E-mail: thomas.yankeelov@vanderbilt.edu [Institute of Imaging Science, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee 37232-2310 (United States); Department of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee 37232-2675 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee 37240-1807 (United States); Department of Cancer Biology, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee 37232-6838 (United States); Department of Biomedical Engineering, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee 37235-1631 (United States); Vanderbilt Ingram Cancer Center, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee 37232-6838 (United States)

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: The authors propose a method whereby serially acquired DCE-MRI, DW-MRI, and FDG-PET breast data sets can be spatially and temporally coregistered to enable the comparison of changes in parameter maps at the voxel level. Methods: First, the authors aligned the PET and MR images at each time point rigidly and nonrigidly. To register the MR images longitudinally, the authors extended a nonrigid registration algorithm by including a tumor volume-preserving constraint in the cost function. After the PET images were aligned to the MR images at each time point, the authors then used the transformation obtained from the longitudinal registration of the MRI volumes to register the PET images longitudinally. The authors tested this approach on ten breast cancer patients by calculating a modified Dice similarity of tumor size between the PET and MR images as well as the bending energy and changes in the tumor volume after the application of the registration algorithm. Results: The median of the modified Dice in the registered PET and DCE-MRI data was 0.92. For the longitudinal registration, the median tumor volume change was ?0.03% for the constrained algorithm, compared to ?32.16% for the unconstrained registration algorithms (p = 8 10{sup ?6}). The medians of the bending energy were 0.0092 and 0.0001 for the unconstrained and constrained algorithms, respectively (p = 2.84 10{sup ?7}). Conclusions: The results indicate that the proposed method can accurately spatially align DCE-MRI, DW-MRI, and FDG-PET breast images acquired at different time points during therapy while preventing the tumor from being substantially distorted or compressed.

  9. Microfluidics without channels: highly-flexible synthesis on a digital-microfluidic chip for production of diverse PET tracers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Dam, Robert M

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging is used for fundamental studies of living biological organisms and microbial ecosystems in applications ranging from biofuel production to environmental remediation to the study, diagnosis, and treatment monitoring of human disease. Routine access to PET imaging, to monitor biochemical reactions in living organisms in real time, could accelerate a broad range of research programs of interest to DOE. Using PET requires access to short-lived radioactive-labeled compounds that specifically probe the desired living processes. The overall aims of this project were to develop a miniature liquid-handling technology platform (called microfluidics) that increases the availability of diverse PET probes by reducing the cost and complexity of their production. Based on preliminary experiments showing that microfluidic chips can synthesis such compounds, we aimed to advance this technology to improve its robustness, increase its flexibility for a broad range of probes, and increase its user-friendliness. Through the research activities of this project, numerous advances were made. Tools were developed to enable the visualization of radioactive materials within microfluidic chips. Fundamental advances were made in the microfluidic chip architecture and fabrication process to increase its robustness and reliability The microfluidic chip technology was shown to produce useful quantities of an example PET probes, and methods to further increase the output were successfully pursued. A universal chip was developed that could produce multiple types of PET probes, enabling the possibility of on demand synthesis of different probes Operation of the chip was automated to ensure minimal radiation exposure to the operator Based on the demonstrations of promising technical feasibility and performance, the microfluidic chip technology is currently being commercialized. It is anticipated that costs of microfluidic chips can be dramatically reduced in the future by leveraging economies of scale in the microelectronics industry, leading to low cost production of PET probes.

  10. Preliminary design report: Babcock and Wilcox BR-100 100-ton rail/barge spent fuel shipping cask

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this document is to provide information on burnup credit as applied to the preliminary design of the BR-100 shipping cask. There is a brief description of the preliminary basket design and the features used to maintain a critically safe system. Following the basket description is a discussion of various criticality analyses used to evaluate burnup credit. The results from these analyses are then reviewed in the perspective of fuel burnups expected to be shipped to either the final repository or a Monitored Retrievable Storage (MRS) facility. The hurdles to employing burnup credit in the certification of any cask are then outlines and reviewed. the last section gives conclusions reached as to burnup credit for the BR-100 cask, based on our analyses and experience. All information in this study refers to the cask configured to transport PWR fuel. Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) fuel satisfies the criticality requirements so that burnup credit is not needed. All calculations generated in the preparation of this report were based upon the preliminary design which will be optimized during the final design. 8 refs., 19 figs., 16 tabs.

  11. The Synergism Between Heat and Mass Transfer Additive and Advanced Surfaces in Aqueous LiBr Horizontal Tube Absorbers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, W.A.

    1999-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Experiments were conducted in a laboratory to investigate the absorption of water vapor into a falling-film of aqueous lithium bromide (LiBr). A mini-absorber test stand was used to test smooth tubes and a variety of advanced tube surfaces placed horizontally in a single-row bundle. The bundle had six copper tubes; each tube had an outside diameter of 15.9-mm and a length of 0.32-m. A unique feature of the stand is its ability to operate continuously and support testing of LiBr brine at mass fractions {ge} 0.62. The test stand can also support testing to study the effect of the failing film mass flow rate, the coolant mass flow rate, the coolant temperature, the absorber pressure and the tube spacing. Manufacturers of absorption chillers add small quantities of a heat and mass transfer additive to improve the performance of the absorbers. The additive causes surface stirring which enhances the transport of absorbate into the bulk of the film. Absorption may also be enhanced with advanced tube surfaces that mechanically induce secondary flows in the falling film without increasing the thickness of the film. Several tube geometry's were identified and tested with the intent of mixing the film and renewing the interface with fresh solution from the tube wall. Testing was completed on a smooth tube and several different externally enhanced tube surfaces. Experiments were conducted over the operating conditions of 6.5 mm Hg absorber pressure, coolant temperatures ranging from 20 to 35 C and LiBr mass fractions ranging from 0.60 through 0.62. Initially the effect of tube spacing was investigated for the smooth tube surface, tested with no heat and mass transfer additive. Test results showed the absorber load and the mass absorbed increased as the tube spacing increased because of the improved wetting of the tube bundle. However, tube spacing was not a critical factor if heat and mass transfer additive was active in the mini-absorber. The additive dramatically affected the hydrodynamics of the falling film and a droplet flow regime was evident for testing at all tube spacings. The mechanical mixing of the advanced surfaces increased the mass transfer to about 75% of that observed on a smooth tube bundle, tested with heat and mass transfer additive. Testing with heat and mass transfer additive and advanced surfaces demonstrated a synergistic effect which doubled the mass absorbed from that observed with only the advanced surface. The overall film-side heat transfer coefficient for the advanced tube bundles doubled with the addition of 500-wppm of 2-ethyl-1- hexanol.

  12. Runs 5 through 7 were stopped prematurely due to the fact that the PET product severely plugged the vent to the condenser. These were also completed after several modifications to the autoclave setup

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Runs 5 through 7 were stopped prematurely due to the fact that the PET product severely plugged modifications did not cause the plug. Conclusions Qualitatively, the objective was for the PET to be clear of the runs were varying degrees of yellow indicating that the PET began to degrade in the autoclave

  13. Improved UTE-based attenuation correction for cranial PET-MR using dynamic magnetic field monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aitken, A. P.; Giese, D.; Tsoumpas, C.; Schleyer, P.; Kozerke, S.; Prieto, C.; Schaeffter, T., E-mail: Tobias.Schaeffter@kcl.ac.uk [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Division of Imaging Sciences and Biomedical Engineering, King's College London, King's Health Partners, St. Thomas Hospital, London SE1 7EH (United Kingdom)

    2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Ultrashort echo time (UTE) MRI has been proposed as a way to produce segmented attenuation maps for PET, as it provides contrast between bone, air, and soft tissue. However, UTE sequences require samples to be acquired during rapidly changing gradient fields, which makes the resulting images prone to eddy current artifacts. In this work it is demonstrated that this can lead to misclassification of tissues in segmented attenuation maps (AC maps) and that these effects can be corrected for by measuring the true k-space trajectories using a magnetic field camera. Methods: The k-space trajectories during a dual echo UTE sequence were measured using a dynamic magnetic field camera. UTE images were reconstructed using nominal trajectories and again using the measured trajectories. A numerical phantom was used to demonstrate the effect of reconstructing with incorrect trajectories. Images of an ovine leg phantom were reconstructed and segmented and the resulting attenuation maps were compared to a segmented map derived from a CT scan of the same phantom, using the Dice similarity measure. The feasibility of the proposed method was demonstrated ininvivo cranial imaging in five healthy volunteers. Simulated PET data were generated for one volunteer to show the impact of misclassifications on the PET reconstruction. Results: Images of the numerical phantom exhibited blurring and edge artifacts on the bonetissue and airtissue interfaces when nominal k-space trajectories were used, leading to misclassification of soft tissue as bone and misclassification of bone as air. Images of the tissue phantom and theinvivo cranial images exhibited the same artifacts. The artifacts were greatly reduced when the measured trajectories were used. For the tissue phantom, the Dice coefficient for bone in MR relative to CT was 0.616 using the nominal trajectories and 0.814 using the measured trajectories. The Dice coefficients for soft tissue were 0.933 and 0.934 for the nominal and measured cases, respectively. For air the corresponding figures were 0.991 and 0.993. Compared to an unattenuated reference image, the mean error in simulated PET uptake in the brain was 9.16% when AC maps derived from nominal trajectories was used, with errors in the SUV{sub max} for simulated lesions in the range of 7.17%12.19%. Corresponding figures when AC maps derived from measured trajectories were used were 0.34% (mean error) and ?0.21% to +1.81% (lesions). Conclusions: Eddy current artifacts in UTE imaging can be corrected for by measuring the true k-space trajectories during a calibration scan and using them in subsequent image reconstructions. This improves the accuracy of segmented PET attenuation maps derived from UTE sequences and subsequent PET reconstruction.

  14. Macrocyclic polyaminocarboxylates for stable radiometal antibody conjugates for therapy, SPECT and PET imaging

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mease, R.C.; Mausner, L.F.; Srivastava, S.C.

    1997-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A simple method for the synthesis of 1,4,7, 10-tetraazacyclododecane N,N{prime}N{double_prime},N{prime}{double_prime}-tetraacetic acid and 1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradecane N,N{prime},N{double_prime},N{prime}{double_prime}-tetraacetic acid involves cyanomethylating 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane or 1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradecane to form a tetranitrile and hydrolyzing the tetranitrile. These macrocyclic compounds are functionalized through one of the carboxylates and then conjugated to various biological molecules including monoclonal antibodies. The resulting conjugated molecules are labeled with radiometals for SPECT and PET imaging and for radiotherapy. 4 figs.

  15. Macrocyclic polyaminocarboxylates for stable radiometal antibody conjugates for therapy, spect and pet imaging

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mease, Ronnie C. (Fairfax, VA); Mausner, Leonard F. (Stony Brook, NY); Srivastava, Suresh C. (Setauket, NY)

    1997-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A simple method for the synthesis of 1,4,7, 10-tetraazacyclododecane N,N'N",N'"-tetraacetic acid and 1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradecane N,N',N",N'"-tetraacetic acid involves cyanomethylating 1,4,7, 10-tetraazacyclododecane or 1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradecane to form a tetranitrile and hydrolyzing the tetranitrile. These macrocyclic compounds are functionalized through one of the carboxylates and then conjugated to various biological molecules including monoclonal antibodies. The resulting conjugated molecules are labeled with radiometals for SPECT and PET imaging and for radiotherapy.

  16. Compartment modeling of dynamic brain PETThe impact of scatter corrections on parameter errors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hggstrm, Ida, E-mail: ida.haggstrom@radfys.umu.se; Karlsson, Mikael; Larsson, Anne [Department of Radiation Sciences, Ume University, Ume 90187 (Sweden); Schmidtlein, C. Ross [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York 10065 (United States)

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of scatter and its correction on kinetic parameters in dynamic brain positron emission tomography (PET) tumor imaging. The 2-tissue compartment model was used, and two different reconstruction methods and two scatter correction (SC) schemes were investigated. Methods: The GATE Monte Carlo (MC) software was used to perform 2 15 full PET scan simulations of a voxelized head phantom with inserted tumor regions. The two sets of kinetic parameters of all tissues were chosen to represent the 2-tissue compartment model for the tracer 3?-deoxy-3?-({sup 18}F)fluorothymidine (FLT), and were denoted FLT{sub 1} and FLT{sub 2}. PET data were reconstructed with both 3D filtered back-projection with reprojection (3DRP) and 3D ordered-subset expectation maximization (OSEM). Images including true coincidences with attenuation correction (AC) and true+scattered coincidences with AC and with and without one of two applied SC schemes were reconstructed. Kinetic parameters were estimated by weighted nonlinear least squares fitting of image derived timeactivity curves. Calculated parameters were compared to the true input to the MC simulations. Results: The relative parameter biases for scatter-eliminated data were 15%, 16%, 4%, 30%, 9%, and 7% (FLT{sub 1}) and 13%, 6%, 1%, 46%, 12%, and 8% (FLT{sub 2}) for K{sub 1}, k{sub 2}, k{sub 3}, k{sub 4}, V{sub a}, and K{sub i}, respectively. As expected, SC was essential for most parameters since omitting it increased biases by 10 percentage points on average. SC was not found necessary for the estimation of K{sub i} and k{sub 3}, however. There was no significant difference in parameter biases between the two investigated SC schemes or from parameter biases from scatter-eliminated PET data. Furthermore, neither 3DRP nor OSEM yielded the smallest parameter biases consistently although there was a slight favor for 3DRP which produced less biased k{sub 3} and K{sub i} estimates while OSEM resulted in a less biased V{sub a}. The uncertainty in OSEM parameters was about 26% (FLT{sub 1}) and 12% (FLT{sub 2}) larger than for 3DRP although identical postfilters were applied. Conclusions: SC was important for good parameter estimations. Both investigated SC schemes performed equally well on average and properly corrected for the scattered radiation, without introducing further bias. Furthermore, 3DRP was slightly favorable over OSEM in terms of kinetic parameter biases and SDs.

  17. MR-based Attenuation Correction for PET/MR M. Hofmann1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MR-based Attenuation Correction for PET/MR M. Hofmann1,2 , F. Steinke1 , I. Bezrukov1,2 , A. Kolb2 acquired at 3T an ultra short echo time (UTE) MR image with TE=0.07ms and 1.1x1.1x1.1 mm3 resolution , P. Aschoff2 , M. Lichy2 , M. Erb2 , T. Nägele2 , M. Brady3 , B. Schölkopf1 , and B. Pichler2 1 Max

  18. Growing up in Karachi, Pakistan, Ayesha Muhammad br '14 excelled in the science and math courses that were the focus of her studies, but it was the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Growing up in Karachi, Pakistan, Ayesha Muhammad br '14 excelled in the science and math courses like Introduction to Art History and The Near East from Alexander to Muhammad," she said. "In Pakistan at an orphanage in Mexico. Looking ahead, Ayesha intends to earn her medical degree and work in rural Pakistan. "I

  19. High Spin Co(I): High-Frequency and -Field EPR Spectroscopy of CoX(PPh3)3 (X = Cl, Br)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McQuade, D. Tyler

    High Spin Co(I): High-Frequency and -Field EPR Spectroscopy of CoX(PPh3)3 (X = Cl, Br) J. Krzystek Supporting Information ABSTRACT: The previously reported pseudotetrahedral Co(I) complexes, CoX(PR3)3, where is uncommon for Co(I), although expected for this geometry. Described here are studies using electronic

  20. Study of the ArBr-, AC, and Krl-anions and the corresponding neutral van der Waals complexes by anion zero electron kinetic energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neumark, Daniel M.

    by anion zero electron kinetic energy spectroscopy Yuexing Zhao, Ivan Yourshaw, Georg Reiser, Caroline C a zero electron kinetic energy @EKE) spectroscopy study of sev- eral rare gas halide (RgX-) anionsI-, and the corresponding open-shell van der Waals complexes, ArBr, ArI, and KrI, were studied with anion zero electron

  1. 80 K anomaly and its effect on the superconducting and magnetic transition in deuterated -,,BEDT-TTF...2CuN,,CN...2Br

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zuo, Fulin

    careful transport and magnetic measurements on single crystals of deuterated - ET 2Cu N CN 2 Br cooling through 80 K will freeze the high temperature magnetic phase to low temperatures and the presence ordering of the chains. In this paper, we report careful transport and magnetic measurements on several

  2. Infrared absorption of gaseous CH{sub 2}BrOO detected with a step-scan Fourier-transform absorption spectrometer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Yu-Hsuan [Department of Applied Chemistry and Institute of Molecular Science, National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu 30010, Taiwan (China); Lee, Yuan-Pern, E-mail: yplee@mail.nctu.edu.tw [Department of Applied Chemistry and Institute of Molecular Science, National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu 30010, Taiwan (China); Institute of Atomic and Molecular Sciences, Academia Sinica, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China)

    2014-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    CH{sub 2}BrOO radicals were produced upon irradiation, with an excimer laser at 248 nm, of a flowing mixture of CH{sub 2}Br{sub 2} and O{sub 2}. A step-scan Fourier-transform spectrometer coupled with a multipass absorption cell was employed to record temporally resolved infrared (IR) absorption spectra of reaction intermediates. Transient absorption with origins at 1276.1, 1088.3, 961.0, and 884.9 cm{sup ?1} are assigned to ?{sub 4} (CH{sub 2}-wagging), ?{sub 6} (OO stretching), ?{sub 7} (CH{sub 2}-rocking mixed with CO stretching), and ?{sub 8} (CO stretching mixed with CH{sub 2}-rocking) modes of syn-CH{sub 2}BrOO, respectively. The assignments were made according to the expected photochemistry and a comparison of observed vibrational wavenumbers, relative IR intensities, and rotational contours with those predicted with the B3LYP/aug-cc-pVTZ method. The rotational contours of ?{sub 7} and ?{sub 8} indicate that hot bands involving the torsional (?{sub 12}) mode are also present, with transitions 7{sub 0}{sup 1}12{sub v}{sup v} and 8{sub 0}{sup 1}12{sub v}{sup v}, v = 110. The most intense band (?{sub 4}) of anti-CH{sub 2}BrOO near 1277 cm{sup ?1} might have a small contribution to the observed spectra. Our work provides information for directly probing gaseous CH{sub 2}BrOO with IR spectroscopy, in either the atmosphere or laboratory experiments.

  3. Specific in vivo binding to the norepinephrine transporter demonstrated with the PET radioligand, (S,S)-[11

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shen, Jun

    to striatum. Pretreatment with the NET ligand, desipramine, decreased the specific binding of (S,S)-[11 C of [11 C]desipramine has been reported [27] but preliminary in vivo data obtained with PET indicated data has not been reported up to date. (S,S)-MeNER (1, Fig. 1) is an O-methyl analog of rebox- etine (2

  4. Flexible dye-sensitized solar cells with ZnO nanoparticles grown by Sonochemistry over Graphene/PET substrates.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pala, Nezih

    Flexible dye-sensitized solar cells with ZnO nanoparticles grown by Sonochemistry over Graphene and Engineering University of North Texas, Denton, Texas Flexible Dye sensitized solar cells (FDSSCs) are light characteristics of ZnO nanostructures over Graphene/PET as photoanode for flexible dye sensitized solar cells. #12;

  5. Reducing Modeling Error of Graphical Methods for Estimating Volume of Distribution Measurements in PIB-PET study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Renaut, Rosemary

    in PIB-PET study Hongbin Guo,a, Rosemary A Renauta, Kewei Chenb, Eric M Reimanb a Arizona State. Tel: 1-480-965-8002, Fax: 1-480-965-4160. Email address: hb guo@asu.edu (Hongbin Guo) Preprint

  6. Electron nuclear double resonance study of photostimulated luminescence active centers in CsBr:Eu{sup 2+} medical imaging plates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vrielinck, H.; Loncke, F.; Matthys, P.; Callens, F. [Department of Solid State Sciences, Ghent University, Krijgslaan 281-S1, B-9000 Gent (Belgium); Tahon, J.-P.; Leblans, P. [Agfa HealthCare NV, Septestraat 27, B-2640 Mortsel (Belgium)

    2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CsBr:Eu{sup 2+} needle image plates exhibit an electron-paramagnetic-resonance (EPR) spectrum at room temperature (RT), whose intensity is correlated with the photostimulated luminescence sensitivity of the plate. This EPR spectrum shows a strong temperature dependence: At RT it is owing to a single Eu{sup 2+} (S =7/2) center with axial symmetry, whereas at T<35 K the spectra can only be explained when two distinct centers are assumed to be present, a minority axial center and a majority center with nearly extremely rhombic symmetry. In this paper these low-temperature centers are studied with electron nuclear double resonance (ENDOR) spectroscopy, which reveals the presence of {sup 1}H nuclei close to the central Eu{sup 2+} ions in the centers. Analysis of the angular dependence of the ENDOR spectra allows to propose models for these centers, providing an explanation for the observed difference in intensity between the spectral components and for their temperature dependence.

  7. Compressive Sensing of Signals Generated in Plastic Scintillators in a Novel J-PET Instrument

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raczynski, L; Kowalski, P; Wislicki, W; Bednarski, T; Bialas, P; Czerwinski, E; Gajos, A; Kaplon, L; Kochanowski, A; Korcyl, G; Kowal, J; Kozik, T; Krzemien, W; Kubicz, E; Niedzwiecki, Sz; Palka, M; Rudy, Z; Rundel, O; Salabura, P; Sharma, N G; Silarski, M; lomski, A S; Smyrski, J; Strzelecki, A; Wieczorek, A; Zielinski, M; Zon, N

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The J-PET scanner, which allows for single bed imaging of the whole human body, is currently under development at the Jagiellonian University. The dis- cussed detector offers improvement of the Time of Flight (TOF) resolution due to the use of fast plastic scintillators and dedicated electronics allowing for sam- pling in the voltage domain of signals with durations of few nanoseconds. In this paper we show that recovery of the whole signal, based on only a few samples, is possible. In order to do that, we incorporate the training signals into the Tikhonov regularization framework and we perform the Principal Component Analysis decomposition, which is well known for its compaction properties. The method yields a simple closed form analytical solution that does not require iter- ative processing. Moreover, from the Bayes theory the properties of regularized solution, especially its covariance matrix, may be easily derived. This is the key to introduce and prove the formula for calculations of the signal recove...

  8. Active barrier films of PET for solar cell application: Processing and characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rossi, Gabriella; Scarfato, Paola; Incarnato, Loredana [Department of Industrial Engineering, University of Salerno, Via Giovanni Paolo II, 132 - 84084 Fisciano (Italy)

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A preliminary investigation was carried out on the possibility to improve the protective action offered by the standard multilayer structures used to encapsulate photovoltaic devices. With this aim, a commercial active barrier PET-based material, able to absorb oxygen when activated by liquid water, was used to produce flexible and transparent active barrier films, by means of a lab-scale film production plant. The obtained film, tested in terms of thermal, optical and oxygen absorption properties, shows a slow oxygen absorption kinetics, an acceptable transparency and an easy roll-to-roll processability, so proving itself as a good candidate for the development of protective coating for solar cells against the atmospheric degradation agents like the rain.

  9. Cholecystokinin-Assisted Hydrodissection of the Gallbladder Fossa during FDG PET/CT-guided Liver Ablation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tewari, Sanjit O., E-mail: tewaris@mskcc.org [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Molecular Imaging and Therapy Service, Department of Radiology (United States); Petre, Elena N., E-mail: petree@mskcc.org [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Interventional Radiology Service, Department of Radiology (United States); Osborne, Joseph, E-mail: osbornej@mskcc.org [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Molecular Imaging and Therapy Service, Department of Radiology (United States)] [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Molecular Imaging and Therapy Service, Department of Radiology (United States); Sofocleous, Constantinos T., E-mail: sofoclec@mskcc.org [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Interventional Radiology Service, Department of Radiology (United States)

    2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A 68-year-old female with colorectal cancer developed a metachronous isolated fluorodeoxyglucose-avid (FDG-avid) segment 5/6 gallbladder fossa hepatic lesion and was referred for percutaneous ablation. Pre-procedure computed tomography (CT) images demonstrated a distended gallbladder abutting the segment 5/6 hepatic metastasis. In order to perform ablation with clear margins and avoid direct puncture and aspiration of the gallbladder, cholecystokinin was administered intravenously to stimulate gallbladder contraction before hydrodissection. Subsequently, the lesion was ablated successfully with sufficient margins, of greater than 1.0 cm, using microwave with ultrasound and FDG PET/CT guidance. The patient tolerated the procedure very well and was discharged home the next day.

  10. SU-E-I-07: An Improved Technique for Scatter Correction in PET

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, S; Wang, Y; Lue, K; Lin, H; Chuang, K [Chuang, National Tsing Hua University, Hsichu, Taiwan (China)

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: In positron emission tomography (PET), the single scatter simulation (SSS) algorithm is widely used for scatter estimation in clinical scans. However, bias usually occurs at the essential steps of scaling the computed SSS distribution to real scatter amounts by employing the scatter-only projection tail. The bias can be amplified when the scatter-only projection tail is too small, resulting in incorrect scatter correction. To this end, we propose a novel scatter calibration technique to accurately estimate the amount of scatter using pre-determined scatter fraction (SF) function instead of the employment of scatter-only tail information. Methods: As the SF depends on the radioactivity distribution and the attenuating material of the patient, an accurate theoretical relation cannot be devised. Instead, we constructed an empirical transformation function between SFs and average attenuation coefficients based on a serious of phantom studies with different sizes and materials. From the average attenuation coefficient, the predicted SFs were calculated using empirical transformation function. Hence, real scatter amount can be obtained by scaling the SSS distribution with the predicted SFs. The simulation was conducted using the SimSET. The Siemens Biograph 6 PET scanner was modeled in this study. The Software for Tomographic Image Reconstruction (STIR) was employed to estimate the scatter and reconstruct images. The EEC phantom was adopted to evaluate the performance of our proposed technique. Results: The scatter-corrected image of our method demonstrated improved image contrast over that of SSS. For our technique and SSS of the reconstructed images, the normalized standard deviation were 0.053 and 0.182, respectively; the root mean squared errors were 11.852 and 13.767, respectively. Conclusion: We have proposed an alternative method to calibrate SSS (C-SSS) to the absolute scatter amounts using SF. This method can avoid the bias caused by the insufficient tail information and therefore improve the accuracy of scatter estimation.

  11. Correction for FDG PET dose extravasations: Monte Carlo validation and quantitative evaluation of patient studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Silva-Rodrguez, Jess, E-mail: jesus.silva.rodriguez@sergas.es; Aguiar, Pablo, E-mail: pablo.aguiar.fernandez@sergas.es [Fundacin Ramn Domnguez, Santiago de Compostela, Galicia (Spain) [Fundacin Ramn Domnguez, Santiago de Compostela, Galicia (Spain); Servicio de Medicina Nuclear, Complexo Hospitalario Universidade de Santiago de Compostela (USC), 15782, Galicia (Spain); Grupo de Imaxe Molecular, Instituto de Investigacin Sanitarias (IDIS), Santiago de Compostela, 15706, Galicia (Spain); Snchez, Manuel; Mosquera, Javier; Luna-Vega, Vctor [Servicio de Radiofsica y Proteccin Radiolgica, Complexo Hospitalario Universidade de Santiago de Compostela (USC), 15782, Galicia (Spain)] [Servicio de Radiofsica y Proteccin Radiolgica, Complexo Hospitalario Universidade de Santiago de Compostela (USC), 15782, Galicia (Spain); Corts, Julia; Garrido, Miguel [Servicio de Medicina Nuclear, Complexo Hospitalario Universitario de Santiago de Compostela, 15706, Galicia, Spain and Grupo de Imaxe Molecular, Instituto de Investigacin Sanitarias (IDIS), Santiago de Compostela, 15706, Galicia (Spain)] [Servicio de Medicina Nuclear, Complexo Hospitalario Universitario de Santiago de Compostela, 15706, Galicia, Spain and Grupo de Imaxe Molecular, Instituto de Investigacin Sanitarias (IDIS), Santiago de Compostela, 15706, Galicia (Spain); Pombar, Miguel [Servicio de Radiofsica y Proteccin Radiolgica, Complexo Hospitalario Universitario de Santiago de Compostela, 15706, Galicia (Spain)] [Servicio de Radiofsica y Proteccin Radiolgica, Complexo Hospitalario Universitario de Santiago de Compostela, 15706, Galicia (Spain); Ruibal, lvaro [Servicio de Medicina Nuclear, Complexo Hospitalario Universidade de Santiago de Compostela (USC), 15782, Galicia (Spain) [Servicio de Medicina Nuclear, Complexo Hospitalario Universidade de Santiago de Compostela (USC), 15782, Galicia (Spain); Grupo de Imaxe Molecular, Instituto de Investigacin Sanitarias (IDIS), Santiago de Compostela, 15706, Galicia (Spain); Fundacin Tejerina, 28003, Madrid (Spain)

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Current procedure guidelines for whole body [18F]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG)-positron emission tomography (PET) state that studies with visible dose extravasations should be rejected for quantification protocols. Our work is focused on the development and validation of methods for estimating extravasated doses in order to correct standard uptake value (SUV) values for this effect in clinical routine. Methods: One thousand three hundred sixty-seven consecutive whole body FDG-PET studies were visually inspected looking for extravasation cases. Two methods for estimating the extravasated dose were proposed and validated in different scenarios using Monte Carlo simulations. All visible extravasations were retrospectively evaluated using a manual ROI based method. In addition, the 50 patients with higher extravasated doses were also evaluated using a threshold-based method. Results: Simulation studies showed that the proposed methods for estimating extravasated doses allow us to compensate the impact of extravasations on SUV values with an error below 5%. The quantitative evaluation of patient studies revealed that paravenous injection is a relatively frequent effect (18%) with a small fraction of patients presenting considerable extravasations ranging from 1% to a maximum of 22% of the injected dose. A criterion based on the extravasated volume and maximum concentration was established in order to identify this fraction of patients that might be corrected for paravenous injection effect. Conclusions: The authors propose the use of a manual ROI based method for estimating the effectively administered FDG dose and then correct SUV quantification in those patients fulfilling the proposed criterion.

  12. High density polyethylene (HDPE) containers as an alternative to polyethylene terephthalate (PET) bottles for solar disinfection of drinking water in northern region, Ghana

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yazdani, Iman

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the technical feasibility of high density polyethylene (HDPE) containers as an alternative to polyethylene terephthalate (PET) bottles for the solar disinfection of drinking water ...

  13. Presseinformation Pressesprecherin: Katja Br

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mannheim, Universität

    Studierendenorganisation Students in Free Enterprises erfolgreich / Mannheimer Team tritt in Washington D.C. beim internationalen Wettbewerb an Die Studierendenorganisation SIFE Mannheim (Students in Free Enterprises) tritt beim

  14. Presseinformation Pressesprecherin: Katja Br

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mannheim, Universität

    in einem Auto mit Elektro- oder Verbrennungsmotor. Neben den Leistungen in verschiedenen Renndisziplinen

  15. Presseinformation Pressesprecherin: Katja Br

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mannheim, Universität

    tatsächlich gefunden: das sogenannte Higgs-Boson. Ein Teilchen, das zur Erklärung der Masse dient. Heute

  16. Geothermal br Resource br Area Geothermal br Resource br Area Geothermal

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdf Jump1946865°,Park,2005)Energy

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    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdf Jump1946865°,Park,2005)EnergyAmatitlan Geothermal Area Amatitlan Geothermal

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    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdf Jump1946865°,Park,2005)EnergyAmatitlan Geothermal Area Amatitlan

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    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdf Jump1946865°,Park,2005)EnergyAmatitlan Geothermal Area AmatitlanExtensional

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    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdf Jump1946865°,Park,2005)EnergyAmatitlan Geothermal Area

  1. Bi{sub 6}(SeO{sub 3}){sub 3}O{sub 5}Br{sub 2}: A new bismuth oxo-selenite bromide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berdonosov, Peter S., E-mail: berdonosov@inorg.chem.msu.ru [Department of Chemistry, Lomonosov Moscow State University, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); Olenev, Andrei V. [SineTheta Ltd., MSU Building 1-77, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation)] [SineTheta Ltd., MSU Building 1-77, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); Kirsanova, Maria A. [Department of Chemistry, Lomonosov Moscow State University, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation)] [Department of Chemistry, Lomonosov Moscow State University, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); Lebed, Julia B. [Institute for nuclear research RAS, 142190, Troitsk, Moscow region (Russian Federation)] [Institute for nuclear research RAS, 142190, Troitsk, Moscow region (Russian Federation); Dolgikh, Valery A. [Department of Chemistry, Lomonosov Moscow State University, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation)] [Department of Chemistry, Lomonosov Moscow State University, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A new bismuth oxo-selenite bromide Bi{sub 6}(SeO{sub 3}){sub 3}O{sub 5}Br{sub 2} was synthesized and structurally characterized. The crystal structure belongs to the triclinic system (space group P1-bar , Z=2, a=7.1253(7) A, b=10.972(1) A, c=12.117(1) A, {alpha}=67.765(7) Degree-Sign , {beta}=82.188(8) Degree-Sign , {gamma}=78.445(7) Degree-Sign ) and is unrelated to those of other known oxo-selenite halides. It can be considered as an open framework composed of BiO{sub x} or BiO{sub y}Br{sub z} polyhedrons forming channels running along [1 0 0] direction which contain the selenium atoms in pyramidal shape oxygen coordination (SeO{sub 3}E). The spectroscopic properties and thermal stability were studied. The new compound is stable up to 400 Degree-Sign C. - graphical abstract: New bismuth oxo-selenite bromide with new open framework structure. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer New bismuth oxo-selenite bromide was found and structurally characterized. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Bi{sub 6}(SeO{sub 3}){sub 3}O{sub 5}Br{sub 2} exhibit a new open framework structure type. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer BiO{sub x} or BiO{sub y}Br{sub z} polyhedrons form channels in the structure which are decorated by [SeO{sub 3}E] groups.

  2. Simulation and performance analysis of basic GAX and advanced GAX cycles with ammonia/water and ammonia/water/LiBr absorption fluids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zaltash, A.; Grossman, G.

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The generator-absorber heat exchange (GAX) and branched GAX cycles are generally considered with NH{sub 3}/H{sub 2}O as their working fluid. The potential consequences of using a ternary mixture of NH{sub 3}/H{sub 2}O/LiBr (advanced fluids) in the GAX and Branched GAX (advanced cycles) are discussed in this study. A modular steady state absorption simulation model(ABSIM) was used to investigate the potential of combining the above advanced cycles with the advanced fluids. ABSIM is capable of modeling varying cycle configurations with different working fluids. Performance parameters of the cycles, including coefficient of performance (COP) and heat duties, were investigated as functions of different operating parameters in the cooling mode for both the NH {sub 3}/H{sub 2}O binary and the NH{sub 3}/H{sub 2}O/LiBr ternary mixtures. High performance potential of GAX and branched GAX cycles using the NH{sub 3}/H{sub 2}O/LiBr ternary fluid mixture was achieved especially at the high range of firing temperatures exceeding 400{degrees}F. The cooling COP`s have been improved by approximately 21% over the COP achieved with the NH{sub 3}/H{sub 2}O binary mixtures. These results show the potential of using advanced cycles with advanced fluid mixtures (ternary or quaternary fluid mixtures).

  3. Vapor-liquid equilibria in the system NH{sub 3} + H{sub 2}O + LiBr. 2: Data correlation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peters, R.; Korinth, C.; Keller, J.U. [Univ. of Siegen (Germany). Institute Fluid- and Thermodynamics

    1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The systems ammonia + water (NH{sub 3} + H{sub 2}O) and water + lithium bromide (H{sub 2}O + LiBr) provide two working pairs most often used today in air-conditioning systems and systems for reusing industrial waste heat, such as absorption heat pumps and heat transformers. A quasi-chemical reaction model has been developed to correlate vapor-liquid equilibrium data for the system ammonia (NH{sub 3}) + water (H{sub 2}O) + lithium bromide (LiBr) in the temperature range form 303.15 to 473.15 K and at pressures up to 2.0 MPa. this model assumes the formation of ion clusters, i.e., Li{sup +} and Br{sup {minus}} ions surrounded by ammonia and water molecules. Further, ammonia nd water molecules are assumed to form a second species of complexes. The activities of the various components in the liquid phase are modeled by the NRTL equation. The vapor phase, assumed to consist of ammonia and water only, is modeled by the equation of state of Ishikawa, Chung, and Lu.

  4. The effects of demographics and pet ownership on attachment towards and opinion about owned and unowned free-roaming cats

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramon, Melanie Elaine

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    THE EFFECTS OF DEMOGRAPHICS AND PET OWNERSHIP ON ATTACHMENT TOWARDS AND OPINION ABOUT OWNED AND UNOWNED FREE-ROAMING CATS A Thesis by MELANIE ELAINE RAMON Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial... A Thesis by MELANIE ELAINE RAMON Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE Approved by: Chair of Committee, Margaret Slater...

  5. Radiofrequency Ablation of Non-Small-Cell Carcinoma of the Lung Under Real-Time FDG PET CT Guidance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schoellnast, Helmut; Larson, Steven M. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiology (United States); Nehmeh, Sadek A. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Medical Physics (United States); Carrasquillo, Jorge A.; Thornton, Raymond H.; Solomon, Stephen B., E-mail: solomons@mskcc.org [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiology (United States)

    2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is a well-established method in treatment of patients with lung carcinomas who are not candidates for surgical resection. Usually computed tomographic (CT) guidance is used for the procedure, thus enabling needle placement and permitting evaluation of complications such as pneumothorax and bleeding. {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) is generally used for tumor activity assessment and is therefore useful in follow-up after tumor treatment. A method that provides real-time image-based monitoring of RFA to ensure complete tumor ablation would be a valuable tool. In this report, we describe the behavior of preinjected FDG during PET CT-guided RFA of a non-small-cell lung carcinoma and discuss the value of FDG as a tool to provide intraprocedure monitor ablation. The size and the form of the activity changed during ablation. Ablation led to increase of the size and blurring and irregularity of the contour compared to pretreatment imaging. The maximal standardized uptake value decreased only slightly during the procedure. Therefore, before RFA, FDG PET can guide initial needle placement, but it does not serve as a monitoring tool to evaluate residual viable tissue during the procedure.

  6. Radiolabeled Peptide Scaffolds for PET/SPECT - Optical in Vivo Imaging of Carbohydrate-Lectin Interactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deutscher, Susan

    2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this research is to develop phage display-selected peptides into radio- and fluoresecently- labeled scaffolds for the multimodal imaging of carbohydrate-lectin interactions. While numerous protein and receptor systems are being explored for the development of targeted imaging agents, the targeting and analysis of carbohydrate-lectin complexes in vivo remains relatively unexplored. Antibodies, nanoparticles, and peptides are being developed that target carbohydrate-lectin complexes in living systems. However, antibodies and nanoparticles often suffer from slow clearance and toxicity problems. Peptides are attractive alternative vehicles for the specific delivery of radionuclides or fluorophores to sites of interest in vivo, although, because of their size, uptake and retention may be less than antibodies. We have selected high affinity peptides that bind a specific carbohydrate-lectin complex involved in cell-cell adhesion and cross-linking using bacteriophage (phage) display technologies (1,2). These peptides have allowed us to probe the role of these antigens in cell adhesion. Fluorescent versions of the peptides have been developed for optical imaging and radiolabeled versions have been used in single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and positron emission tomography (PET) in vivo imaging (3-6). A benefit in employing the radiolabeled peptides in SPECT and PET is that these imaging modalities are widely used in living systems and offer deep tissue sensitivity. Radiolabeled peptides, however, often exhibit poor stability and high kidney uptake in vivo. Conversely, optical imaging is sensitive and offers good spatial resolution, but is not useful for deep tissue penetration and is semi-quantitative. Thus, multimodality imaging that relies on the strengths of both radio- and optical- imaging is a current focus for development of new in vivo imaging agents. We propose a novel means to improve the efficacy of radiolabeled and fluorescently labeled peptides, including our lectin/carbohydrate- targeting peptides, by displaying the targeting epitopes on small ~29 amino acid cyclic plant protein scaffolds known as cyclotides. Cyclotides are extremely stable molecules with long serum half-lives and low kidney uptake (7). More than one copy of the peptide can be engineered into the cyclotide loops, thus increasing the avidity of the peptide construct for its target.

  7. Aromatase imaging with [N-methyl-C-11]vorozole PET in healthy men and women

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Biegon, Anat [Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States). School of Medicine; Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Fowler, Joanna S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); State University of New York, Stony Brook, NY (United States); Alexoff, David L. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Kim, Sung Won [National Institute on Alcoholism and Alcohol Abuse, Bethesda, MD (United States); Logan, Jean [New York University Langone Medical Center, New York, NY (United States); Pareto, Deborah [Institut de Recerca Hospital Universitari Vall d'Hebron, Universitat Autnoma de Barcelona, Alta Tecnologia, Barcelona (Spain); Schlyer, David [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Wang, Gene-Jack [National Institute on Alcoholism and Alcohol Abuse, Bethesda, MD (United States)

    2015-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Aromatase, the last and obligatory enzyme catalyzing estrogen biosynthesis from androgenic precursors, can be labeled in vivo with C-vorozole. Aromatase inhibitors are widely used in breast cancer and other endocrine conditions. The present study aims to provide baseline information defining aromatase distribution in healthy men and women, against which its perturbation in pathological situations can be studied. Methods: C-vorozole (111-296 MBq/subject) was injected I.V in 13 men and 20 women (age range 23 to 67). PET data were acquired over a 90 minute period. Each subject had 4 scans, 2/day separated by 2-6 weeks, including brain and torso or pelvis scans. Young women were scanned at 2 discrete phases of the menstrual cycle (midcycle and late luteal). Men and postmenopausal women were also scanned following pretreatment with a clinical dose of the aromatase inhibitor letrozole (blocking studies). Time activity curves were obtained and standard uptake values (SUV) calculated for major organs including brain, heart, lungs, liver, kidneys, spleen, muscle, bone and male and female reproductive organs (penis, testes, uterus, ovaries). Organ and whole body radiation exposures were calculated using Olinda software. Results: Liver uptake was higher than all other organs, but was not blocked by pretreatment with letrozole. Mean SUVs in men were higher than in women, and brain uptake was blocked by letrozole. Male brain SUVs were also higher than all other organs (ranging from 0.480.05 in lungs to 1.50.13 in kidneys). Mean ovarian SUVs (3.080.7) were comparable to brain levels and higher than all other organs. Furthermore, ovarian SUVs In young women around the time of ovulation (midcycle) were significantly higher than those measured in the late luteal phase, while aging and cigarette smoking reduced C-vorozole uptake. Conclusions: PET with C-vorozole is useful for assessing physiological changes in estrogen synthesis capacity in the human body. Baseline levels in breasts, lungs and bones are low, supporting further investigation of this tracer as a new tool for detection of aromatase-overexpressing primary tumors or metastases in these organs and optimization of treatment in cancer and other disorders in which aromatase inhibitors are useful.

  8. Test of a single module of the J-PET scanner based on plastic scintillators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Moskal; Sz. Nied?wiecki; T. Bednarski; E. Czerwi?ski; ?. Kap?on; E. Kubicz; I. Moskal; M. Pawlik-Nied?wiecka; N. G. Sharma; M. Silarski; M. Zieli?ski; N. Zo?; P. Bia?as; A. Gajos; A. Kochanowski; G. Korcyl; J. Kowal; P. Kowalski; T. Kozik; W. Krzemie?; M. Molenda; M. Pa?ka; L. Raczy?ski; Z. Rudy; P. Salabura; A. S?omski; J. Smyrski; A. Strzelecki; A. Wieczorek; W. Wi?licki

    2014-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Time of Flight Positron Emission Tomography scanner based on plastic scintillators is being developed at the Jagiellonian University by the J-PET collaboration. The main challenge of the conducted research lies in the elaboration of a method allowing application of plastic scintillators for the detection of low energy gamma quanta. In this article we report on tests of a single detection module built out from BC-420 plastic scintillator strip (with dimensions of 5x19x300mm^3) read out at two ends by Hamamatsu R5320 photomultipliers. The measurements were performed using collimated beam of annihilation quanta from the 68Ge isotope and applying the Serial Data Analyzer (Lecroy SDA6000A) which enabled sampling of signals with 50ps intervals. The time resolution of the prototype module was established to be better than 80ps (sigma) for a single level discrimination. The spatial resolution of the determination of the hit position along the strip was determined to be about 0.93cm (sigma) for the annihilation quanta. The fractional energy resolution for the energy E deposited by the annihilation quanta via the Compton scattering amounts to sigma(E)/E = 0.044/sqrt(E[MeV]) and corresponds to the sigma(E)/E of 7.5% at the Compton edge.

  9. Synthesis of reduced graphene oxide/ZnO nanorods composites on graphene coated PET flexible substrates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Lei, E-mail: leihuang@shnu.edu.cn; Guo, Guilue; Liu, Yang; Chang, Quanhong; Shi, Wangzhou

    2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: ZnO nanorods synthesized on CVD-graphene and rGO surfaces, respectively. ZnO/CVD-graphene and ZnO/rGO form a distinctive porous 3D structure. rGO/ZnO nanostructures possibility in energy storage devices. - Abstract: In this work, reduced graphene oxide (rGO)/ZnO nanorods composites were synthesized on graphene coated PET flexible substrates. Both chemical vapor deposition (CVD) graphene and reduced graphene oxide (rGO) films were prepared following by hydrothermal growth of vertical aligned ZnO nanorods. Reduced graphene sheets were then spun coated on the ZnO materials to form a three dimensional (3D) porous nanostructure. The morphologies of the ZnO/CVD graphene and ZnO/rGO were investigated by SEM, which shows that the ZnO nanorods grown on rGO are larger in diameters and have lower density compared with those grown on CVD graphene substrate. As a result of fact, the rough surface of nano-scale ZnO on rGO film allows rGO droplets to seep into the large voids of ZnO nanorods, then to form the rGO/ZnO hierarchical structure. By comparison of the different results, we conclude that rGO/ZnO 3D nanostructure is more desirable for the application of energy storage devices.

  10. A Novel Time-Based Readout Scheme for a Combined PET-CT Detector Using APDs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Powolny, F; Hillemanns, H; Jarron, P; Lecoq, P; Meyer, T C; Moraes, D

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper summarizes CERN R&D work done in the framework of the European Commission's FP6 BioCare Project. The objective was to develop a novel "time-based" signal processing technique to read out LSO-APD photodetectors for medical imaging. An important aspect was to employ the technique in a combined scenario for both computer tomography (CT) and positron emission tomography (PET) with effectively no tradeoffs in efficiency and resolution compared to traditional single mode machines. This made the use of low noise and yet very high-speed monolithic front-end electronics essential so as to assure the required timing characteristics together with a high signal-to-noise ratio. Using APDs for photon detection, two chips, traditionally employed for particle physics, could be identified to meet the above criteria. Although both were not optimized for their intended new medical application, excellent performance in conjunction with LSO-APD sensors could be derived. Whereas a measured energy resolution of 16% (...

  11. Lead (II) selenite halides Pb{sub 3}(SeO{sub 3}){sub 2}X{sub 2} (X = Br, I): Synthesis and crystal structure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berdonosov, P. S., E-mail: berdonosov@inorg.chem.msu.ru; Olenev, A. V.; Dolgikh, V. A. [Moscow State University (Russian Federation)

    2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Two lead selenite halides, Pb{sub 3}(SeO{sub 3}){sub 2}Br{sub 2} and Pb{sub 3}(SeO{sub 3}){sub 2}I{sub 2}, have been prepared by solid-phase synthesis and structurally characterized. These compounds are isotypic and can be considered 3D with a microporous framework composed of lead polyhedra (distorted Archimedean antiprisms formed by oxygen and halogen atoms). The framework contains channels oriented in the [010] direction. These channels contain selenium atoms, which are bound with framework oxygen atoms belonging to different lead polyhedra.

  12. Parity violation in nuclear magnetic resonance frequencies of chiral tetrahedral tungsten complexes NWXYZ (X, Y, Z = H, F, Cl, Br or I)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nahrwold, Sophie, E-mail: nahrwold@fias.uni-frankfurt.de; Berger, Robert, E-mail: r.berger@fias.uni-frankfurt.de [Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies, Goethe-University Frankfurt am Main, Ruth-Moufang-Str. 1, D-60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany) [Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies, Goethe-University Frankfurt am Main, Ruth-Moufang-Str. 1, D-60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Clemens-Schpf-Institute, Technical University Darmstadt, Petersenstr. 22, D-64287 Darmstadt (Germany); Schwerdtfeger, Peter, E-mail: p.a.schwerdtfeger@massey.ac.nz [Centre for Theoretical Chemistry and Physics, The New Zealand Institute for Advanced Study, Massey University Albany, Private Bag 102904, North Shore City, Auckland 0745 (New Zealand) [Centre for Theoretical Chemistry and Physics, The New Zealand Institute for Advanced Study, Massey University Albany, Private Bag 102904, North Shore City, Auckland 0745 (New Zealand); Fachbereich Chemie, Philipps-Universitt Marburg, Hans-Meerwein-Str., D-35032 Marburg (Germany)

    2014-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Density functional theory within the two-component quasi-relativistic zeroth-order regular approximation (ZORA) is used to predict parity violation shifts in {sup 183}W nuclear magnetic resonance shielding tensors of chiral, tetrahedrally bonded tungsten complexes of the form NWXYZ (X, Y, Z = H, F, Cl, Br or I), as well as for the heavier systems NWHAtF and NWH(117)F for comparison. The calculations reveal that sub-mHz accuracy is required to detect such tiny effects in this class of compounds, and that parity violation effects are very sensitive to the choice of ligands.

  13. Synthesis and the crystal and molecular structures of 4-(piperidyl-1)-2-phenylpyrido[2,3-a]anthraquinone-7,12 Mono- and dibromohydrates (HL)Br . 3H{sub 2}O and (H{sub 2}L)Br{sub 2} . 3H{sub 2}O

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kovalchukova, O. V., E-mail: okovalchukova@mail.ru [Peoples' Friendship University of Russia (Russian Federation); Stash, A. I.; Belsky, V. K. [Karpov Institute of Physical Chemistry (Russian Federation); Strashnova, S. B.; Zaitsev, B. E.; Ryabov, M. A. [Peoples' Friendship University of Russia (Russian Federation)

    2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    4-(Piperidyl-1)-2-phenylpyrido[2,3-a]anthraquinone-7,12 monobromohydrate (HL)Br . 3H{sub 2}O (I) and 4-(piperidyl-1)-2-phenylpyrido[2,3-a]anthraquinone-7,12 dibromohydrate (H{sub 2}L)Br{sub 2} . 3H{sub 2}O (II) are isolated in the crystalline state. The crystal structures of compounds I and II are determined using X-ray diffraction. It is established that the protonation of 4-(piperidyl-1)-2-phenylpyrido[2,3-a]anthraquinone-7,12 proceeds primarily through the pyridine atom at pH 2-3. The attachment of the second proton occurs through the piperidine nitrogen atom at pH {approx} 1.

  14. Gamma-Ray Simulated Spectrum Deconvolution of a LaBr3 1- 1-in. Scintillator for Nondestructive ATR Fuel Burnup On-Site Predictions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Navarro, Jorge; Ring, Terry A.; Nigg, David W.

    2015-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A deconvolution method for a LaBr3 1"x1" detector for nondestructive Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) fuel burnup applications was developed. The method consisted of obtaining the detector response function, applying a deconvolution algorithm to 1x1 LaBr3 simulated, data along with evaluating the effects that deconvolution have on nondestructively determining ATR fuel burnup. The simulated response function of the detector was obtained using MCNPX as well with experimental data. The Maximum-Likelihood Expectation Maximization (MLEM) deconvolution algorithm was selected to enhance one-isotope source-simulated and fuel- simulated spectra. The final evaluation of the study consisted of measuring the performance of the fuel bumup calibrationmorecurve for the convoluted and deconvoluted cases. The methodology was developed in order to help design a reliable, high resolution, rugged and robust detection system for the ATR fuel canal capable of collecting high performance data for model validation, along with a system that can calculate burnup and using experimental scintillator detector data.less

  15. Gamma-Ray Simulated Spectrum Deconvolution of a LaBr3 1- 1-in. Scintillator for Nondestructive ATR Fuel Burnup On-Site Predictions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Navarro, Jorge; Ring, Terry A.; Nigg, David W.

    2015-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A deconvolution method for a LaBr3 1"x1" detector for nondestructive Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) fuel burnup applications was developed. The method consisted of obtaining the detector response function, applying a deconvolution algorithm to 1x1 LaBr3 simulated, data along with evaluating the effects that deconvolution have on nondestructively determining ATR fuel burnup. The simulated response function of the detector was obtained using MCNPX as well with experimental data. The Maximum-Likelihood Expectation Maximization (MLEM) deconvolution algorithm was selected to enhance one-isotope source-simulated and fuel- simulated spectra. The final evaluation of the study consisted of measuring the performance of the fuel bumup calibration curve for the convoluted and deconvoluted cases. The methodology was developed in order to help design a reliable, high resolution, rugged and robust detection system for the ATR fuel canal capable of collecting high performance data for model validation, along with a system that can calculate burnup and using experimental scintillator detector data.

  16. Gamma-Ray Simulated Spectrum Deconvolution of a LaBr? 1-in. x 1-in. Scintillator for Nondestructive ATR Fuel Burnup On-Site Predictions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Navarro, Jorge; Ring, Terry A.; Nigg, David W.

    2015-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A deconvolution method for a LaBr? 1"x1" detector for nondestructive Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) fuel burnup applications was developed. The method consisted of obtaining the detector response function, applying a deconvolution algorithm to 1x1 LaBr? simulated, data along with evaluating the effects that deconvolution have on nondestructively determining ATR fuel burnup. The simulated response function of the detector was obtained using MCNPX as well with experimental data. The Maximum-Likelihood Expectation Maximization (MLEM) deconvolution algorithm was selected to enhance one-isotope source-simulated and fuel- simulated spectra. The final evaluation of the study consisted of measuring the performance of the fuel burnup calibrationmorecurve for the convoluted and deconvoluted cases. The methodology was developed in order to help design a reliable, high resolution, rugged and robust detection system for the ATR fuel canal capable of collecting high performance data for model validation, along with a system that can calculate burnup and using experimental scintillator detector data.less

  17. Band Structure Parameters and Fermi Resonances of Exciton-Polaritons in CsI and CsBr under Hydrostatic Pressure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lipp, M J; Yoo, C H; Strachan, D; Daniels, W B

    2005-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Most alkali halides crystallize in the fcc sodium chloride structure. In contrast, with the exception of CsF, the Cs-halides form the simple cubic cesium chloride (CsCl) structure at ambient conditions and they have a substantially different electronic structure than other alkali halides; in particular, they have several nearly degenerate electronic levels near the Brillouin zone center. Highly resolved Three-Photon Spectroscopy (TPS) measurements allow direct observation of the near band edge structure and, in the case of CsI, probe more states than one-photon techniques. A number of interesting phenomena, among them level repulsion (Fermi resonance), occur as these levels are tuned through one another by application of hydrostatic pressure. To the best of our knowledge, this has been observed for CsBr for the first time. Doubling the photon energy range compared to a previous publication [see Yoo et al. PRL 84, 3875 (2000)] allows direct observation of the n=1, 2 and 3 exciton-polariton members of the {Lambda}{sub 8}{sup -}-{Lambda}{sub 6}{sup +} transition in CsI and lets us establish unambiguous values for the bandgap (6.139 eV), binding energy (0.265 eV) and their pressure dependence up to 7 kbar. Similarly to CsI, the CsBr linewidth of the lowest {Lambda}{sub 4}{sup -} polariton (A) decreases upon compression.

  18. Design and experimental testing of the performance of an outdoor LiBr/H{sub 2}O solar thermal absorption cooling system with a cold store

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Agyenim, Francis; Knight, Ian; Rhodes, Michael [The Welsh School of Architecture, Bute Building, King Edward VII Avenue, Cardiff University, Cardiff, CF10 3NB Wales (United Kingdom)

    2010-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A domestic-scale prototype experimental solar cooling system has been developed based on a LiBr/H{sub 2}O absorption system and tested during the 2007 summer and autumn months in Cardiff University, UK. The system consisted of a 12 m{sup 2} vacuum tube solar collector, a 4.5 kW LiBr/H{sub 2}O absorption chiller, a 1000 l cold storage tank and a 6 kW fan coil. The system performance, as well as the performances of the individual components in the system, were evaluated based on the physical measurements of the daily solar radiation, ambient temperature, inlet and outlet fluid temperatures, mass flow rates and electrical consumption by component. The average coefficient of thermal performance (COP) of the system was 0.58, based on the thermal cooling power output per unit of available thermal solar energy from the 12 m{sup 2} Thermomax DF100 vacuum tube collector on a hot sunny day with average peak insolation of 800 W/m{sup 2} (between 11 and 13.30 h) and ambient temperature of 24 C. The system produced an electrical COP of 3.6. Experimental results prove the feasibility of the new concept of cold store at this scale, with chilled water temperatures as low as 7.4 C, demonstrating its potential use in cooling domestic scale buildings. (author)

  19. Automatic Channel Fault Detection and Diagnosis System for a Small Animal APD-Based Digital PET Scanner

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jonathan Charest; Jean-Franois Beaudoin; Jules Cadorette; Roger Lecomte; Charles-Antoine Brunet; Rjean Fontaine

    2014-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Fault detection and diagnosis is critical to many applications in order to ensure proper operation and performance over time. Positron emission tomography (PET) systems that require regular calibrations by qualified scanner operators are good candidates for such continuous improvements. Furthermore, for scanners employing one-to-one coupling of crystals to photodetectors to achieve enhanced spatial resolution and contrast, the calibration task is even more daunting because of the large number of independent channels involved. To cope with the additional complexity of the calibration and quality control procedures of these scanners, an intelligent system (IS) was designed to perform fault detection and diagnosis (FDD) of malfunctioning channels. The IS can be broken down into four hierarchical modules: parameter extraction, channel fault detection, fault prioritization and diagnosis. Of these modules, the first two have previously been reported and this paper focuses on fault prioritization and diagnosis. The purpose of the fault prioritization module is to help the operator to zero in on the faults that need immediate attention. The fault diagnosis module will then identify the causes of the malfunction and propose an explanation of the reasons that lead to the diagnosis. The FDD system was implemented on a LabPET avalanche photodiode (APD)-based digital PET scanner. Experiments demonstrated a FDD Sensitivity of 99.3 % (with a 95% confidence interval (CI) of: [98.7, 99.9]) for major faults. Globally, the Balanced Accuracy of the diagnosis for varying fault severities is 92 %. This suggests the IS can greatly benefit the operators in their maintenance task.

  20. Isotope specific resolution recovery image reconstruction in high resolution PET imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kotasidis, Fotis A. [Division of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Geneva University Hospital, CH-1211 Geneva, Switzerland and Wolfson Molecular Imaging Centre, MAHSC, University of Manchester, M20 3LJ, Manchester (United Kingdom)] [Division of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Geneva University Hospital, CH-1211 Geneva, Switzerland and Wolfson Molecular Imaging Centre, MAHSC, University of Manchester, M20 3LJ, Manchester (United Kingdom); Angelis, Georgios I. [Faculty of Health Sciences, Brain and Mind Research Institute, University of Sydney, NSW 2006, Sydney (Australia)] [Faculty of Health Sciences, Brain and Mind Research Institute, University of Sydney, NSW 2006, Sydney (Australia); Anton-Rodriguez, Jose; Matthews, Julian C. [Wolfson Molecular Imaging Centre, MAHSC, University of Manchester, Manchester M20 3LJ (United Kingdom)] [Wolfson Molecular Imaging Centre, MAHSC, University of Manchester, Manchester M20 3LJ (United Kingdom); Reader, Andrew J. [Montreal Neurological Institute, McGill University, Montreal QC H3A 2B4, Canada and Department of Biomedical Engineering, Division of Imaging Sciences and Biomedical Engineering, King's College London, St. Thomas Hospital, London SE1 7EH (United Kingdom)] [Montreal Neurological Institute, McGill University, Montreal QC H3A 2B4, Canada and Department of Biomedical Engineering, Division of Imaging Sciences and Biomedical Engineering, King's College London, St. Thomas Hospital, London SE1 7EH (United Kingdom); Zaidi, Habib [Division of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Geneva University Hospital, CH-1211 Geneva (Switzerland) [Division of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Geneva University Hospital, CH-1211 Geneva (Switzerland); Geneva Neuroscience Centre, Geneva University, CH-1205 Geneva (Switzerland); Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, PO Box 30 001, Groningen 9700 RB (Netherlands)

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Measuring and incorporating a scanner-specific point spread function (PSF) within image reconstruction has been shown to improve spatial resolution in PET. However, due to the short half-life of clinically used isotopes, other long-lived isotopes not used in clinical practice are used to perform the PSF measurements. As such, non-optimal PSF models that do not correspond to those needed for the data to be reconstructed are used within resolution modeling (RM) image reconstruction, usually underestimating the true PSF owing to the difference in positron range. In high resolution brain and preclinical imaging, this effect is of particular importance since the PSFs become more positron range limited and isotope-specific PSFs can help maximize the performance benefit from using resolution recovery image reconstruction algorithms. Methods: In this work, the authors used a printing technique to simultaneously measure multiple point sources on the High Resolution Research Tomograph (HRRT), and the authors demonstrated the feasibility of deriving isotope-dependent system matrices from fluorine-18 and carbon-11 point sources. Furthermore, the authors evaluated the impact of incorporating them within RM image reconstruction, using carbon-11 phantom and clinical datasets on the HRRT. Results: The results obtained using these two isotopes illustrate that even small differences in positron range can result in different PSF maps, leading to further improvements in contrast recovery when used in image reconstruction. The difference is more pronounced in the centre of the field-of-view where the full width at half maximum (FWHM) from the positron range has a larger contribution to the overall FWHM compared to the edge where the parallax error dominates the overall FWHM. Conclusions: Based on the proposed methodology, measured isotope-specific and spatially variant PSFs can be reliably derived and used for improved spatial resolution and variance performance in resolution recovery image reconstruction. The benefits are expected to be more substantial for more energetic positron emitting isotopes such as Oxygen-15 and Rubidium-82.

  1. Mixing in the human carotid artery during carotid drug infusion studied with PET

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Junck, L.; Koeppe, R.A.; Greenberg, H.S. (Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor (USA))

    1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The safety and efficacy of drug infusion into the carotid artery require adequate mixing of the infused solution with carotid blood. Using positron emission tomography (PET), we studied the mixing of solutions infused into the human carotid artery in seven patients by analyzing the distribution of (15O)H2O infused into the carotid artery and by vein. At four infusion rates ranging from 0.5 to 10 ml/min, the variability in distribution averaged 16.5-17.8% among the pixels in a large volume of interest, without dependence on the infusion rate. The overall correlation between (15O)H2O influx with arterial infusion and (15O)H2O influx with venous injection was 0.78-0.82 at the four infusion rates, with no trend toward higher correlations at the faster infusion rates. The distribution into the anterior, middle, and posterior cerebral artery territories differed from distribution throughout the entire carotid territory by an average of 6.2-9.6% at the four infusion rates, with no trend toward smaller differences at the faster infusion rates. Infusions performed into a vinyl tube simulating the carotid artery indicated that at 0.5 ml/min, the velocity of fluid exiting the catheter makes no apparent contribution to mixing. We conclude that with infusions at the carotid bifurcation, mixing in the human carotid artery is complete or nearly complete over a wide range of infusion rates. The mixing appears to result from the patterns of blood flow within the artery, and not from jet effects at the catheter tip.

  2. Synthesis of macrocyclic polyaminocarboxylates and their use for preparing stable radiometal antibody immunoconjugates for therapy, SPECT and PET imaging

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mease, R.C.; Mausner, L.F.; Srivastava, S.C.

    1995-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A simple method for the synthesis of 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane N,N{prime}N{double_prime},N{prime}{double_prime}-tetraacetic acid and 1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradecane N,N{prime},N{double_prime},N{prime}{double_prime}-tetraacetic acid involves cyanomethylating 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane or 1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradecane to form a tetranitrile and hydrolyzing the tetranitrile. These macrocyclic compounds are functionalized through one of the carboxylates and then conjugated to various biological molecules including monoclonal antibodies. The resulting conjugated molecules are labeled with radiometals for SPECT and PET imaging and for radiotherapy. 4 figs.

  3. Hit time and hit position reconstruction in the J-PET detector based on a library of averaged model signals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moskal, P; Silarski, M; Bednarski, T; Bia?as, P; Bu?ka, J; Czerwi?ski, E; Gajos, A; Kami?ska, D; Kap?on, L; Kochanowski, A; Korcyl, G; Kowal, J; Kowalski, P; Kozik, T; Krzemie?, W; Kubicz, E; Nied?wiecki, Sz; Pa?ka, M; Raczy?ski, L; Rudy, Z; Rundel, O; Salabura, P; S?omski, A; Smyrski, J; Strzelecki, A; Wieczorek, A; Wi?licki, W; Wochlik, I; Zieli?ski, M; Zo?, N

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this article we present a novel method of hit time and hit position reconstruction in long scintillator detectors. We take advantage of the fact that for this kind of detectors amplitude and shape of registered signals depends strongly on the position where particle hit the detector. The reconstruction is based on determination of the degree of similarity between measured and averaged signals stored in a library for a set of well-defined positions along the scintillator. Preliminary results of validation of the introduced method with experimental data obtained by means of the double strip prototype of the J-PET detector are presented.

  4. Synthesis of macrocyclic polyaminocarboxylates and their use for preparing stable radiometal antibody immunoconjugates for therapy, spect and pet imaging

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mease, Ronnie C. (Fairfax, VA); Mausner, Leonard F. (Stony Brook, NY); Srivastava, Suresh C. (Setauket, NY)

    1995-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A simple method for the synthesis of 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane N,N'N",N'"-tetraacetic acid and 1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradecane N,N',N",N'"-tetraacetic acid involves cyanomethylating 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane or 1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradecane to form a tetranitrile and hydrolyzing the tetranitrile. These macrocyclic compounds are functionalized through one of the carboxylates and then conjugated to various biological molecules including monoclonal antibodies. The resulting conjugated molecules are labeled with radiometals for SPECT and PET imaging and for radiotherapy.

  5. Calibration methodology for a dual-ended readout silicon photomultiplier based depth-of-interaction PET detector module

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xi, Wenze [JLAB; McKisson, John E. [JLAB; Weisenberger, Andrew G. [JLAB; Lee, Seung Joon [JLAB; Taylor, William Mark [JLAB; Stepanyan, Armenak [JLAB; Zorn, Carl J. [JLAB

    2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We developed a novel calibration methodology for a PET detector with dual-ended readout of an LYSO array by two silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs). By introducing a detector gain balancing step in the calibration process, improved depth-of-interaction calibration uniformity and accuracy can be achieved. The entire calibration process has four steps: scintillation crystal array mappings for two SiPM readouts, detector gain balancing, energy calibration, and depth-of-interaction calibration. This document provides a detailed description on the detector calibration system setup.

  6. FDG-PET Assessment of the Effect of Head and Neck Radiotherapy on Parotid Gland Glucose Metabolism

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roach, Michael C. [School of Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Duke University, Durham, NC (United States); Turkington, Timothy G. [Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Duke University, Durham, NC (United States); Department of Biomedical Engineering, Duke University Medical Center, Duke University, Durham, NC (United States); Higgins, Kristin A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Duke University, Durham, NC (United States); Hawk, Thomas C. [Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Duke University, Durham, NC (United States); Hoang, Jenny K. [Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Duke University, Durham, NC (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Duke University, Durham, NC (United States); Brizel, David M., E-mail: david.brizel@duke.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Duke University, Durham, NC (United States); Department of Surgery, Duke University Medical Center, Duke University, Durham, NC (United States)

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Functional imaging with [F-18]-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) provides the opportunity to define the physiology of the major salivary glands before and after radiation therapy. The goal of this retrospective study was to identify the radiation dose-response relationship of parotid gland glucose metabolism in patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Materials and Methods: Forty-nine adults with HNSCC were identified who had curative intent intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and FDG-PET imaging before and after treatment. Using a graphical user interface, contours were delineated for the parotid glands on axial CT slices while all authors were blinded to paired PET slices. Average and maximal standard uptake values (SUV) were measured within these anatomic regions. Changes in SUV and volume after radiation therapy were correlated with parotid gland dose-volume histograms from IMRT plans. Results: The average parotid gland volume was 30.7 mL and contracted 3.9 {+-} 1.9% with every increase of 10 Gy in mean dose (p = 0.04). However, within the first 3 months after treatment, there was a uniform reduction of 16.5% {+-} 7.3% regardless of dose. The average SUV{sub mean} of the glands was 1.63 {+-} 0.48 pretreatment and declined by 5.2% {+-} 2.5% for every increase of 10 Gy in mean dose (p = 0.04). The average SUV{sub max} was 4.07 {+-} 2.85 pretreatment and decreased in a sigmoid manner with mean dose. A threshold of 32 Gy for mean dose existed, after which SUV{sub max} declined rapidly. Conclusion: Radiation dose responses of the parotid glands can be measured by integrated CT/FDG-PET scans. Retrospective analysis showed sigmoidal declines in the maximum metabolism but linear declines in the average metabolism of the glands with dose. Future studies should correlate this decline in FDG uptake with saliva production to improve treatment planning.

  7. SU-C-9A-03: Simultaneous Deconvolution and Segmentation for PET Tumor Delineation Using a Variational Method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, L; Tan, S [Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei (China); Lu, W; D'Souza, W [University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To implement a new method that integrates deconvolution with segmentation under the variational framework for PET tumor delineation. Methods: Deconvolution and segmentation are both challenging problems in image processing. The partial volume effect (PVE) makes tumor boundaries in PET image blurred which affects the accuracy of tumor segmentation. Deconvolution aims to obtain a PVE-free image, which can help to improve the segmentation accuracy. Conversely, a correct localization of the object boundaries is helpful to estimate the blur kernel, and thus assist in the deconvolution. In this study, we proposed to solve the two problems simultaneously using a variational method so that they can benefit each other. The energy functional consists of a fidelity term and a regularization term, and the blur kernel was limited to be the isotropic Gaussian kernel. We minimized the energy functional by solving the associated Euler-Lagrange equations and taking the derivative with respect to the parameters of the kernel function. An alternate minimization method was used to iterate between segmentation, deconvolution and blur-kernel recovery. The performance of the proposed method was tested on clinic PET images of patients with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, and compared with seven other segmentation methods using the dice similarity index (DSI) and volume error (VE). Results: Among all segmentation methods, the proposed one (DSI=0.81, VE=0.05) has the highest accuracy, followed by the active contours without edges (DSI=0.81, VE=0.25), while other methods including the Graph Cut and the Mumford-Shah (MS) method have lower accuracy. A visual inspection shows that the proposed method localizes the real tumor contour very well. Conclusion: The result showed that deconvolution and segmentation can contribute to each other. The proposed variational method solve the two problems simultaneously, and leads to a high performance for tumor segmentation in PET. This work was supported in part by National Natural Science Foundation of China (NNSFC), under Grant Nos. 60971112 and 61375018, and Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities, under Grant No. 2012QN086. Wei Lu was supported in part by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Grant No. R01 CA172638.

  8. Hit time and hit position reconstruction in the J-PET detector based on a library of averaged model signals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Moskal; N. G. Sharma; M. Silarski; T. Bednarski; P. Bia?as; J. Bu?ka; E. Czerwi?ski; A. Gajos; D. Kami?ska; L. Kap?on; A. Kochanowski; G. Korcyl; J. Kowal; P. Kowalski; T. Kozik; W. Krzemie?; E. Kubicz; Sz. Nied?wiecki; M. Pa?ka; L. Raczy?ski; Z. Rudy; O. Rundel; P. Salabura; A. S?omski; J. Smyrski; A. Strzelecki; A. Wieczorek; W. Wi?licki; I. Wochlik; M. Zieli?ski; N. Zo?

    2015-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    In this article we present a novel method of hit time and hit position reconstruction in long scintillator detectors. We take advantage of the fact that for this kind of detectors amplitude and shape of registered signals depends strongly on the position where particle hit the detector. The reconstruction is based on determination of the degree of similarity between measured and averaged signals stored in a library for a set of well-defined positions along the scintillator. Preliminary results of validation of the introduced method with experimental data obtained by means of the double strip prototype of the J-PET detector are presented.

  9. SU-E-J-104: Single Photon Image From PET with Insertable SPECT Collimator for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy: A Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jung, J; Yoon, D; Suh, T [The catholic University of Korea, College of Medicine/Graduate School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Hong, K [Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford (MIPS), Palo Alto, CA (United States)

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: The aim of our proposed system is to confirm the feasibility of extraction of two types of images from one positron emission tomography (PET) module with an insertable collimator for brain tumor treatment during the BNCT. Methods: Data from the PET module, neutron source, and collimator was entered in the Monte Carlo n-particle extended (MCNPX) source code. The coincidence events were first compiled on the PET detector, and then, the events of the prompt gamma ray were collected after neutron emission by using a single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) collimator on the PET. The obtaining of full width at half maximum (FWHM) values from the energy spectrum was performed to collect effective events for reconstructed image. In order to evaluate the images easily, five boron regions in a brain phantom were used. The image profiles were extracted from the region of interest (ROI) of a phantom. The image was reconstructed using the ordered subsets expectation maximization (OSEM) reconstruction algorithm. The image profiles and the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve were compiled for quantitative analysis from the two kinds of reconstructed image. Results: The prompt gamma ray energy peak of 478 keV appeared in the energy spectrum with a FWHM of 41 keV (6.4%). On the basis of the ROC curve in Region A to Region E, the differences in the area under the curve (AUC) of the PET and SPECT images were found to be 10.2%, 11.7%, 8.2% (center, Region C), 12.6%, and 10.5%, respectively. Conclusion: We attempted to acquire the PET and SPECT images simultaneously using only PET without an additional isotope. Single photon images were acquired using an insertable collimator on a PET detector. This research was supported by the Leading Foreign Research Institute Recruitment Program through the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) funded by the Ministry of Science, Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) and Future Planning (MSIP)(Grant No.2009 00420) and the Radiation Technology R and D program (Grant No.2013M2A2A7043498), Republic of Korea.

  10. Ab initio reaction path energetics for the CX dissociations of C{sub 6}H{sub 5}X{sup +} with X = H, F, Cl, and Br.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klippenstein, S. J.; Chemistry

    1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The energetics of the CX dissociations of C{sub 6}H{sub 6}{sup +}, C{sub 6}H{sub 5}F{sup +}, C{sub 6}H{sub 5}Cl{sup +}, C{sub 6}H{sub 5}Br{sup +}, and C{sub 10}H{sub 8}{sup +} are investigated with various ab initio quantum chemical simulators. The primary focus is the determination of the energetics as a function of the CX bond length at the MP2 level for the C{sub 6}H{sub 5}X{sup +}dissociation paths leading to the lowest energy products [C{sub 6}H{sub 5}({sup 1}A{sub 1}) + X]. The bending force constants along this path are determined at either the HF or MP2 level. The absolute energetics of the various reactants and products are also studied at the MP2 and B3LYP levels including the dissociation of C{sub 10}H{sub 8}{sup +}. A combination of CCSD(T)/6-31G* and MP2/6-311G(2df,2p) calculations are employed in the determination of higher level estimates for the key reactants and products in the dissociation of the benzene cation. The key dissociation paths for this dissociation are also studied at a higher level (CASPT2). For the halogen-producing dissociations the energetics are investigated for each of the three separate orientations of the radical p-orbital in the halogen atom. The various results obtained illustrate the increasing strength of the long-range interactions for the progression from H to F to Cl to Br. Correspondingly, one expects the transition state to be more and more phase space theory like for this same progression. For the C---Br dissociation it seems very unlikely that short-range interactions will play any role in determining the reactive flux. In contrast, short-range repulsions are again expected to play an important role for the C---H dissociations in both C{sub 6}H{sub 6}{sup +}and C{sub 10}H{sub 8}{sup +}. The present results also indicate the dominant importance of the singlet phenyl cation channel to the dissociation dynamics.

  11. Infrared phonon modes in multiferroic single-crystal FeTe2O5Br

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, K. H.; Xu, X. S.; Berger, H.; Craciun, V.; Xi, Xiaoxiang; Martin, C.; Carr, G. L.; Tanner, D. B.

    2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Reflection and transmission as a function of temperature (7300 K and 5300 K respectively) have been measured on single crystals of the multiferroic compound FeTe2O5Br utilizing light spanning from the far infrared to the visible. The complex dielectric function and other optical properties were obtained via Kramers-Kronig analysis and by fits to a Drude-Lortentz model. Analysis of the anisotropic excitation spectra via Drude-Lorentz fitting and lattice dynamical calculations have led to the observation of 43 of the 53 modes predicted along the b axis of the monoclinic cell. The phonon response parallel to the a and c axes are also presented. Assignments to groups (clusters) of phonons have been made and trends within them are discussed in light of our calculated displacement patterns.

  12. Neutron scattering evidence for isolated spin-1/2 ladders in (C5D12N)2CuBr4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Savici, Andrei T [ORNL; Granroth, Garrett E [ORNL; Broholm, Collin L [ORNL; Pajerowski, Daniel M. [University of Florida, Gainesville; Brown, Craig [National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST); Talham, Daniel R. [University of Florida, Gainesville; Meisel, Mark W. [University of Florida, Gainesville; Schmidt, K. P. [Technische Universit Dortmund, Germany; Uhrig, G. S. [Technische Universit Dortmund, Germany; Nagler, Stephen E [ORNL

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Inelastic neutron scattering was used to determine the spin Hamiltonian for the singlet ground state system (C5D12N)2CuBr4 (BPCB). A 2-leg spin 1/2 ladder model, with J? = 1:084 0:005 meV and Jk = 0:321 0:008 meV, accurately describes the data. The experimental limit on the inter-ladder exchange constant is jJ0j 0.005 meV, and the limit on diagonal, intra-ladder exchange is jJF j 0.1 meV. The experimental ratios of intra-ladder bond energies are consistent with the predictions of continuous unitary transformations calculations.

  13. Energy resolution of gamma-ray spectroscopy of JET plasmas with a LaBr{sub 3} scintillator detector and digital data acquisition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nocente, M.; Tardocchi, M.; Grosso, G.; Perelli Cippo, E.; Pietropaolo, A.; Proverbio, I.; Gorini, G. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita degli Studi di Milano-Bicocca and Istituto di Fisica del Plasma, Associazione EURATOM-ENEA-CNR, 20125 Milano (Italy); Chugunov, I.; Gin, D.; Shevelev, A. [A. F. Ioffe Physico-Technical Institute, St. Petersburg 194021 (Russian Federation); Pereira, R. C.; Fernandes, A. M.; Neto, A.; Sousa, J. [Associacao EURATOM/IST Centro de Fusao Nuclear, Instituto Superior Tecnico, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Edlington, T.; Kiptily, V.; Syme, B. [Culham Centre for Fusion Energy, Culham OX143DB (United Kingdom); Murari, A. [Consorzio RFX, 35127 Padova (Italy); Collaboration: JET-EFDA Contributors

    2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A new high efficiency, high resolution, fast {gamma}-ray spectrometer was recently installed at the JET tokamak. The spectrometer is based on a LaBr{sub 3}(Ce) scintillator coupled to a photomultiplier tube. A digital data acquisition system is used to allow spectrometry with event rates in excess of 1 MHz expected in future JET DT plasmas. However, at the lower rates typical of present day experiments, digitization can degrade the energy resolution of the system, depending on the algorithms used for extracting pulse height information from the digitized pulses. In this paper, the digital and analog spectrometry methods were compared for different experimental conditions. An algorithm based on pulse shape fitting was developed, providing energy resolution equivalent to the traditional analog spectrometry method.

  14. Compared Raman study of the phase transitions in K2ZnCl4 and Rb2ZnCl4, Rb2ZnBr4, K2SeO4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    787 Compared Raman study of the phase transitions in K2ZnCl4 and Rb2ZnCl4, Rb2ZnBr4, K2SeO4 M to the incommensurate phase is discussed for the four compounds K2SeO4, K2ZnCl4, Rb2ZnCl4 and Rb2ZnBr4 on the basis measurements on K2ZnC'4 known to exhibit successive phase transitions similar to those of K2SeO4

  15. SU-E-J-82: Intra-Fraction Proton Beam-Range Verification with PET Imaging: Feasibility Studies with Monte Carlo Simulations and Statistical Modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lou, K [U.T M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Rice University, Houston, TX (United States); Mirkovic, D; Sun, X; Zhu, X; Poenisch, F; Grosshans, D; Shao, Y [U.T M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Clark, J [Rice University, Houston, TX (United States)

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To study the feasibility of intra-fraction proton beam-range verification with PET imaging. Methods: Two phantoms homogeneous cylindrical PMMA phantoms (290 mm axial length, 38 mm and 200 mm diameter respectively) were studied using PET imaging: a small phantom using a mouse-sized PET (61 mm diameter field of view (FOV)) and a larger phantom using a human brain-sized PET (300 mm FOV). Monte Carlo (MC) simulations (MCNPX and GATE) were used to simulate 179.2 MeV proton pencil beams irradiating the two phantoms and be imaged by the two PET systems. A total of 50 simulations were conducted to generate 50 positron activity distributions and correspondingly 50 measured activity-ranges. The accuracy and precision of these activity-ranges were calculated under different conditions (including count statistics and other factors, such as crystal cross-section). Separate from the MC simulations, an activity distribution measured from a simulated PET image was modeled as a noiseless positron activity distribution corrupted by Poisson counting noise. The results from these two approaches were compared to assess the impact of count statistics on the accuracy and precision of activity-range calculations. Results: MC Simulations show that the accuracy and precision of an activity-range are dominated by the number (N) of coincidence events of the reconstructed image. They are improved in a manner that is inversely proportional to 1/sqrt(N), which can be understood from the statistical modeling. MC simulations also indicate that the coincidence events acquired within the first 60 seconds with 10{sup 9} protons (small phantom) and 10{sup 10} protons (large phantom) are sufficient to achieve both sub-millimeter accuracy and precision. Conclusion: Under the current MC simulation conditions, the initial study indicates that the accuracy and precision of beam-range verification are dominated by count statistics, and intra-fraction PET image-based beam-range verification is feasible. This work was supported by a research award RP120326 from Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas.

  16. Erratum to Measurement of $?(p \\bar p \\to Z) \\cdot Br(Z \\to ??)$ at $\\bm{\\sqrt{s}=}$1.96 TeV, published in Phys. Rev. D {71}, 072004 (2005)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. M. Abazov; for the D0 Collaboration

    2008-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A change in estimated integrated luminosity (from 226 pb$^{-1} to 257 pb$^{-1}$ leads to a corrected value for ${\\sigma (p \\bar p \\to Z) \\cdot}$Br${(Z \\to \\tau \\tau)}$ of $209\\pm13(stat.)\\pm16(syst.)\\pm13(lum) pb.

  17. Julian, B.R. and G.R. Foulger, Monitoring Geothermal Processes with Microearthquake Mechanisms, Thirty-Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 9-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foulger, G. R.

    Julian, B.R. and G.R. Foulger, Monitoring Geothermal Processes with Microearthquake Mechanisms, Thirty- Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 9- 11, 2009. Monitoring Geothermal Processes with Microearthquake Mechanisms Bruce R. Julian, U. S

  18. Investigation of realistic PET simulations incorporating tumor patient's specificity using anthropomorphic models: Creation of an oncology database

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Papadimitroulas, Panagiotis; Efthimiou, Nikos; Nikiforidis, George C.; Kagadis, George C. [Department of Medical Physics, School of Medicine, University of Patras, Rion, GR 265 04 (Greece)] [Department of Medical Physics, School of Medicine, University of Patras, Rion, GR 265 04 (Greece); Loudos, George [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Technological Educational Institute of Athens, Ag. Spyridonos Street, Egaleo GR 122 10, Athens (Greece)] [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Technological Educational Institute of Athens, Ag. Spyridonos Street, Egaleo GR 122 10, Athens (Greece); Le Maitre, Amandine; Hatt, Mathieu; Tixier, Florent; Visvikis, Dimitris [Medical Information Processing Laboratory (LaTIM), National Institute of Health and Medical Research (INSERM), 29609 Brest (France)] [Medical Information Processing Laboratory (LaTIM), National Institute of Health and Medical Research (INSERM), 29609 Brest (France)

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: The GATE Monte Carlo simulation toolkit is used for the implementation of realistic PET simulations incorporating tumor heterogeneous activity distributions. The reconstructed patient images include noise from the acquisition process, imaging system's performance restrictions and have limited spatial resolution. For those reasons, the measured intensity cannot be simply introduced in GATE simulations, to reproduce clinical data. Investigation of the heterogeneity distribution within tumors applying partial volume correction (PVC) algorithms was assessed. The purpose of the present study was to create a simulated oncology database based on clinical data with realistic intratumor uptake heterogeneity properties.Methods: PET/CT data of seven oncology patients were used in order to create a realistic tumor database investigating the heterogeneity activity distribution of the simulated tumors. The anthropomorphic models (NURBS based cardiac torso and Zubal phantoms) were adapted to the CT data of each patient, and the activity distribution was extracted from the respective PET data. The patient-specific models were simulated with the Monte Carlo Geant4 application for tomography emission (GATE) in three different levels for each case: (a) using homogeneous activity within the tumor, (b) using heterogeneous activity distribution in every voxel within the tumor as it was extracted from the PET image, and (c) using heterogeneous activity distribution corresponding to the clinical image following PVC. The three different types of simulated data in each case were reconstructed with two iterations and filtered with a 3D Gaussian postfilter, in order to simulate the intratumor heterogeneous uptake. Heterogeneity in all generated images was quantified using textural feature derived parameters in 3D according to the ground truth of the simulation, and compared to clinical measurements. Finally, profiles were plotted in central slices of the tumors, across lines with heterogeneous activity distribution for visual assessment.Results: The accuracy of the simulated database was assessed against the original clinical images. The PVC simulated images matched the clinical ones best. Local, regional, and global features extracted from the PVC simulated images were closest to the clinical measurements, with the exception of the size zone variability and the mean intensity values, where heterogeneous tumors showed better reproducibility. The profiles on PVC simulated tumors after postfiltering seemed to represent the more realistic heterogeneous regions with respect to the clinical reference.Conclusions: In this study, the authors investigated the input activity map heterogeneity in the GATE simulations of tumors with heterogeneous activity distribution. The most realistic heterogeneous tumors were obtained by inserting PVC activity distributions from the clinical image into the activity map of the simulation. Partial volume effect (PVE) can play a crucial role in the quantification of heterogeneity within tumors and have an important impact on applications such as patient follow-up during treatment and assessment of tumor response to therapy. The development of such a database incorporating patient anatomical and functional variability can be used to evaluate new image processing or analysis algorithms, while providing control of the ground truth, which is not available when dealing with clinical datasets. The database includes all images used and generated in this study, as well as the sinograms and the attenuation phantoms for further investigation. It is freely available to the interested reader of the journal at http://www.med.upatras.gr/oncobase/.

  19. 3D inpatient dose reconstruction from the PET-CT imaging of {sup 90}Y microspheres for metastatic cancer to the liver: Feasibility study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fourkal, E.; Veltchev, I.; Lin, M.; Meyer, J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19111 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19111 (United States); Koren, S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Beth Israel Comprehensive Cancer Center, New York, New York 10011 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Beth Israel Comprehensive Cancer Center, New York, New York 10011 (United States); Doss, M.; Yu, J. Q. [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19111 (United States)] [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19111 (United States)

    2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: The introduction of radioembolization with microspheres represents a significant step forward in the treatment of patients with metastatic disease to the liver. This technique uses semiempirical formulae based on body surface area or liver and target volumes to calculate the required total activity for a given patient. However, this treatment modality lacks extremely important information, which is the three-dimensional (3D) dose delivered by microspheres to different organs after their administration. The absence of this information dramatically limits the clinical efficacy of this modality, specifically the predictive power of the treatment. Therefore, the aim of this study is to develop a 3D dose calculation technique that is based on the PET imaging of the infused microspheres.Methods: The Fluka Monte Carlo code was used to calculate the voxel dose kernel for {sup 90}Y source with voxel size equal to that of the PET scan. The measured PET activity distribution was converted to total activity distribution for the subsequent convolution with the voxel dose kernel to obtain the 3D dose distribution. In addition, dose-volume histograms were generated to analyze the dose to the tumor and critical structures.Results: The 3D inpatient dose distribution can be reconstructed from the PET data of a patient scanned after the infusion of microspheres. A total of seven patients have been analyzed so far using the proposed reconstruction method. Four patients underwent treatment with SIR-Spheres for liver metastases from colorectal cancer and three patients were treated with Therasphere for hepatocellular cancer. A total of 14 target tumors were contoured on post-treatment PET-CT scans for dosimetric evaluation. Mean prescription activity was 1.7 GBq (range: 0.583.8 GBq). The resulting mean maximum measured dose to targets was 167 Gy (range: 71311 Gy). Mean minimum dose to 70% of target (D70) was 68 Gy (range: 25155 Gy). Mean minimum dose to 90% of target (D90) was 53 Gy (range: 13125 Gy).Conclusions: A three-dimensional inpatient dose reconstruction method has been developed that is based on the PET/CT data of a patient treated with {sup 90}Y microspheres. It allows for a complete description of the absorbed dose by the tumor and critical structures. It represents the first step in building predictive models for treatment outcomes for patients receiving this therapeutic modality as well as it allows for better analysis of patients' dose response and will ultimately improve future treatment administration.

  20. Energy levels, radiative rates and electron impact excitation rates for transitions in He-like Ga XXX, Ge XXXI, As XXXII, Se XXXIII and Br XXXIV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aggarwal, Kanti M

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report calculations of energy levels, radiative rates and electron impact excitation cross sections and rates for transitions in He-like Ga XXX, Ge XXXI, As XXXII, Se XXXIII and Br XXXIV. The {\\sc grasp} (general-purpose relativistic atomic structure package) is adopted for calculating energy levels and radiative rates. For determining the collision strengths, and subsequently the excitation rates, the Dirac Atomic R-matrix Code ({\\sc darc}) is used. Oscillator strengths, radiative rates and line strengths are reported for all E1, E2, M1 and M2 transitions among the lowest 49 levels of each ion. Additionally, theoretical lifetimes are provided for all 49 levels of the above five ions. Collision strengths are averaged over a Maxwellian velocity distribution and the effective collision strengths obtained listed over a wide temperature range up to 10$^{8}$ K. Comparisons are made with similar data obtained using the Flexible Atomic Code ({\\sc fac}) to highlight the importance of resonances, included in calcul...

  1. Intrinsic vs. extrinsic inelastic scattering contributions in kappa-(BEDT-TTF){sub 2}Cu[N(CN){sub 2}]Br - transport measurements under hydrostatic pressure.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strack, C.; Akinci, C.; Paschenko, V.; Wolf, B.; Uhrig, E.; Assmus, W.; Schreuer, J.; Wiehl, L.; Schlueter, J.; Wosnitza, J.; Schweitzer, D.; Lang , M.; Materials Science Division; J.W. Goethe-Universitat Frankfurt; Inst.fur Festkorperphysik; Univ. Stuttgart

    2006-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Interlayer-resistivity measurements have been performed on a variety of single crystals of the quasi-two-dimensional organic superconductor {kappa}-(BEDT-TTF){sub 2}Cu[N(CN){sub 2}]Br. These crystals, which have been synthesized along two somewhat different routes, reveal strongly sample-dependent resistivity profiles: while the majority of samples shows a more or less pronounced {rho}(T) maximum around 90 K with a semiconducting behavior above, some crystals remain metallic at all temperatures T {le} 300 K. In the absence of significant differences in the crystals' structural parameters and chemical compositions, as proved by high-resolution X-ray and electron-probe-microanalysis, these results indicate that real structure phenomena, i.e. disorder and/or defects, may strongly affect the inelastic scattering. Comparative resistivity measurements under He-gas pressure on two crystals with strongly differing {rho}(T) profiles indicate that these additional, sample-dependent scattering contributions are characterized by an extraordinarily strong pressure response which is highly non-monotonous as a function of temperature. No correlations have been found between the strength of these scattering contributions and other characteristic properties such as the glass transition at T{sub g} = 77 K, the temperature T* {approx} 40 K, where the temperature dependence of the resistivity changes rather abruptly, or the superconducting transition temperature T{sub c}.

  2. Repeatability of quantitative FDG-PET/CT and contrast enhanced CT in recurrent ovarian carcinoma: test retest measurements for tumor FDG uptake, diameter and volume

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rockall, Andrea G.; Avril, Norbert; Lam, Raymond; Iannone, Robert; Mozley, P. David; Parkinson, Christine; Bergstrom, Donald; Sala, Evis; Sarker, Shah-Jalal; McNeish, Iain A.; Brenton, James D.

    2014-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    as appropriate, the same target lesions were chosen on PET and CECT. However, when an FDG-avid lesion was not suitable for RECIST measurements or vice versa, measurements on the other modality were not enforced. Thirty-five percent of subjects had different... , the majority of patients eventually develop progressive platinum-resistance. There is a clear unmet clinical need to identify new treatments for women with ovarian cancer. Evaluation of the effectiveness of new drug treatments in EOC depends upon...

  3. Crystal structure and magnetic properties of two new cobalt selenite halides: Co{sub 5}(SeO{sub 3}){sub 4} X {sub 2} (X=Cl, Br)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Becker, Richard [Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Stockholm University, S-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden)], E-mail: richard@inorg.su.se; Prester, Mladen [Institute of Physics, P.O. Box 304, HR-10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Berger, Helmuth [Institut de Physique de la Matiere Complexe, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Hui Lin, Ping [Institut de Physique de la Matiere Complexe, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Institute of Physics, Academia Sinica Nankang, Taipei 11529, Taiwan, ROC (China); Johnsson, Mats [Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Stockholm University, S-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Drobac, Djuro [Institute of Physics, P.O. Box 304, HR-10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Zivkovic, Ivica [Institute of Physics, P.O. Box 304, HR-10000 Zagreb (Croatia)

    2007-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Two new isostructural cobalt selenite halides Co{sub 5}(SeO{sub 3}){sub 4}Cl{sub 2} and Co{sub 5}(SeO{sub 3}){sub 4}Br{sub 2} have been synthesized. They crystallize in the triclinic system space group P-1 with the following lattice parameters for Co{sub 5}(SeO{sub 3}){sub 4}Cl{sub 2}: a=6.4935(8) A, b=7.7288(8) A, c=7.7443(10) A, {alpha}=66.051(11){sup o}, {beta}=73.610(11){sup o}, {gamma}=81.268(9){sup o}, and Z=1. The crystal structures were solved from single-crystal X-ray data, R1=3.73 and 4.03 for Co{sub 5}(SeO{sub 3}){sub 4}Cl{sub 2} and Co{sub 5}(SeO{sub 3}){sub 4}Br{sub 2}, respectively. The new compounds are isostructural to Ni{sub 5}(SeO{sub 3}){sub 4}Br{sub 2}. Magnetic susceptibility measurements on oriented single-crystalline samples show anisotropic response in a broad temperature range. The anisotropic susceptibility is quantitatively interpreted within the zero-field splitting schemes for Co{sup 2+} and Ni{sup 2+} ions. Sharp low-temperature susceptibility features, at T {sub N}=18 and 20 K for Co{sub 5}(SeO{sub 3}){sub 4}Cl{sub 2} and Co{sub 5}(SeO{sub 3}){sub 4}Br{sub 2}, respectively, are ascribed to antiferromagnetic ordering in a minority magnetic subsystem. In isostructural Ni{sub 5}(SeO{sub 3}){sub 4}Br{sub 2} magnetically ordered subsystem represents a majority fraction (T {sub N}=46 K). Nevertheless, anisotropic susceptibility of Ni{sub 5}(SeO{sub 3}){sub 4}Br{sub 2} is dominated at low temperatures by a minority fraction, subject to single-ion anisotropy effects and increasing population of S{sub z} =0 (singlet) ground state of octahedrally coordinated Ni{sup 2+}. - Graphical abstract: Two new iso-structural cobalt selenite halides Co{sub 5}(SeO{sub 3}){sub 4}Cl{sub 2} and Co{sub 5}(SeO{sub 3}){sub 4}Br{sub 2} have been synthesized which are iso-structural to Ni{sub 5}(SeO{sub 3}){sub 4}Br{sub 2}. Magnetic susceptibility measurements on oriented single-crystalline samples show anisotropic response in a broad temperature range, revealing significant single-ion anisotropy effects.

  4. Improvement of {gamma}-ray energy resolution of LaBr{sub 3}:Ce{sup 3+} scintillation detectors by Sr{sup 2+} and Ca{sup 2+} co-doping

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alekhin, M. S.; Haas, J. T. M. de; Khodyuk, I. V.; Dorenbos, P. [Department of Radiation Science and Technology, Faculty of Applied Sciences, Delft University of Technology, Mekelweg 15, 2629 JB Delft (Netherlands)] [Department of Radiation Science and Technology, Faculty of Applied Sciences, Delft University of Technology, Mekelweg 15, 2629 JB Delft (Netherlands); Kraemer, K. W. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Bern, Freiestrasse 3, 3012 Bern (Switzerland)] [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Bern, Freiestrasse 3, 3012 Bern (Switzerland); Menge, P. R. [Saint-Gobain Crystals, 17900 Great Lakes Parkway, Hiram, Ohio 44234 (United States)] [Saint-Gobain Crystals, 17900 Great Lakes Parkway, Hiram, Ohio 44234 (United States); Ouspenski, V. [Saint Gobain Recherche, 39, Quai Lucien Lefranc, 93303 Aubervilliers (France)] [Saint Gobain Recherche, 39, Quai Lucien Lefranc, 93303 Aubervilliers (France)

    2013-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Commercially available LaBr{sub 3}:5% Ce{sup 3+} scintillators show with photomultiplier tube readout about 2.7% energy resolution for the detection of 662 keV {gamma}-rays. Here we will show that by co-doping LaBr{sub 3}:Ce{sup 3+} with Sr{sup 2+} or Ca{sup 2+} the resolution is improved to 2.0%. Such an improvement is attributed to a strong reduction of the scintillation light losses that are due to radiationless recombination of free electrons and holes during the earliest stages (1-10 ps) inside the high free charge carrier density parts of the ionization track.

  5. High field magnetotransport and point contact Andreev reflection measurements on CuCr{sub 2}Se{sub 4} and CuCr{sub 2}Se{sub 3}BrDegenerate magnetic semiconductor single crystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borisov, K., E-mail: borisovk@tcd.ie; Coey, J. M. D.; Stamenov, P. [School of Physics and CRANN, Trinity College, Dublin 2 (Ireland); Alaria, J. [Department of Physics, University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 7ZE (United Kingdom)

    2014-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Single crystals of the metallically degenerate fully magnetic semiconductors CuCr{sub 2}Se{sub 4} and CuCr{sub 2}Se{sub 3}Br have been prepared by the Chemical Vapour Transport method, using either Se or Br as transport agents. The high-quality, millimetre-sized, octahedrally faceted, needle- and platelet-shaped crystals are characterised by means of high field magnetotransport (?{sub 0}H? 14?T) and Point Contact Andreev Reflection. The relatively high spin polarisation observed |P|>0.56, together with the relatively low minority carrier effective mass of 0.25 m{sub e}, and long scattering time 10{sup ?13}?s, could poise these materials for integration in low- and close-to-room temperature minority injection bipolar heterojunction transistor demonstrations.

  6. Clinical Value of [{sup 11}C]Methionine PET for Stereotactic Radiation Therapy With Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy to Metastatic Brain Tumors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miwa, Kazuhiro, E-mail: doctor.3@jasmine.ocn.ne.jp [Chubu Medical Center for Prolonged Traumatic Brain Dysfunction, Kizawa Memorial Hospital, Minokamo, Gifu (Japan) [Chubu Medical Center for Prolonged Traumatic Brain Dysfunction, Kizawa Memorial Hospital, Minokamo, Gifu (Japan); Department of Clinical Brain Sciences, Gifu University Graduate School of Medicine, Minokamo, Gifu (Japan); Matsuo, Masayuki [Department of Radiation Oncology, Kizawa Memorial Hospital, Minokamo, Gifu (Japan)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Kizawa Memorial Hospital, Minokamo, Gifu (Japan); Shinoda, Jun; Aki, Tatsuki; Yonezawa, Shingo [Chubu Medical Center for Prolonged Traumatic Brain Dysfunction, Kizawa Memorial Hospital, Minokamo, Gifu (Japan) [Chubu Medical Center for Prolonged Traumatic Brain Dysfunction, Kizawa Memorial Hospital, Minokamo, Gifu (Japan); Department of Clinical Brain Sciences, Gifu University Graduate School of Medicine, Minokamo, Gifu (Japan); Ito, Takeshi [Department of Neurosurgery, Kizawa Memorial Hospital, Minokamo, Gifu (Japan)] [Department of Neurosurgery, Kizawa Memorial Hospital, Minokamo, Gifu (Japan); Asano, Yoshitaka [Chubu Medical Center for Prolonged Traumatic Brain Dysfunction, Kizawa Memorial Hospital, Minokamo, Gifu (Japan) [Chubu Medical Center for Prolonged Traumatic Brain Dysfunction, Kizawa Memorial Hospital, Minokamo, Gifu (Japan); Department of Clinical Brain Sciences, Gifu University Graduate School of Medicine, Minokamo, Gifu (Japan); Yamada, Mikito; Yokoyama, Kazutoshi; Yamada, Jitsuhiro [Department of Neurosurgery, Kizawa Memorial Hospital, Minokamo, Gifu (Japan)] [Department of Neurosurgery, Kizawa Memorial Hospital, Minokamo, Gifu (Japan); Yano, Hirohito; Iwama, Toru [Department of Neurosurgery, Gifu University Graduate School of Medicine, Gifu (Japan)] [Department of Neurosurgery, Gifu University Graduate School of Medicine, Gifu (Japan)

    2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: This study investigated the clinical impact of {sup 11}C-labeled methionine-positron emission tomography (MET-PET) for stereotactic radiation therapy with intensity modulated radiation therapy (SRT-IMRT) in metastatic brain tumors. Methods and Materials: Forty-two metastatic brain tumors were examined. All tumors were treated with SRT-IMRT using a helical tomotherapy system. Gross tumor volume (GTV) was defined and drawn on the stereotactic magnetic resonance (MR) image, taking into account the respective contributions of MR imaging and MET-PET. Planning target volume (PTV) encompassed the GTV-PET plus a 2-mm margin. SRT-IMRT was performed, keeping the dose for PTV at 25-35 Gy in 5 fractions. The ratio of the mean value of MET uptake to the contralateral normal brain (L/N ratio) was plotted for the PTV prior to SRT-IMRT, at 3 months following SRT-IMRT, and at 6 months following SRT-IMRT. Tumor characteristic changes of MET uptake before and after SRT-IMRT were evaluated quantitatively, comparing them with MRI examination. Results: Mean {+-} SD L/N ratios were 1.95 {+-} 0.83, 1.18 {+-} 0.21, and 1.12 {+-} 0.25 in the pre-SRT-IMRT group, in the 3 months post-SRT-IMRT group, and in the 6 months post-SRT-IMRT group, respectively. Differences in the mean L/N ratio between the pre-SRT-IMRT group and the 3-month post-SRT-IMRT group and between the pre-SRT-IMRT group and the 6 month post-SRT-IMRT group were statistically significant, irrespective of MRI examination. Conclusions: We showed examples of metastatic lesions demonstrating significant decreases in MET uptake following SRT-IMRT. MET-PET seems to have a potential role in providing additional information, although MRI remains the gold standard for diagnosis and follow-up after SRT-IMRT. The present study is a preliminary approach, but to more clearly define the impact of PET-based radiosurgical assessment, further experimental and clinical analyses are required.

  7. Effect of time-of-flight and point spread function modeling on detectability of myocardial defects in PET

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schaefferkoetter, Joshua, E-mail: dnrjds@nus.edu.sg [A-STAR-NUS Clinical Imaging and Research Centre (CIRC), Singapore 117599 (Singapore)] [A-STAR-NUS Clinical Imaging and Research Centre (CIRC), Singapore 117599 (Singapore); Ouyang, Jinsong; Rakvongthai, Yothin; El Fakhri, Georges [Center for Advanced Medical Imaging Sciences, Division of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02114 and Radiology Department, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 (United States)] [Center for Advanced Medical Imaging Sciences, Division of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02114 and Radiology Department, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 (United States); Nappi, Carmela [Radiology Department, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 Department of Advanced Biomedical Sciences, University of Naples Federico II, Naples 80131 (Italy) [Radiology Department, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 Department of Advanced Biomedical Sciences, University of Naples Federico II, Naples 80131 (Italy); SDN Foundation, Institute of Diagnostic and Nuclear Development, Naples 80142 (Italy)

    2014-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: A study was designed to investigate the impact of time-of-flight (TOF) and point spread function (PSF) modeling on the detectability of myocardial defects. Methods: Clinical FDG-PET data were used to generate populations of defect-present and defect-absent images. Defects were incorporated at three contrast levels, and images were reconstructed by ordered subset expectation maximization (OSEM) iterative methods including ordinary Poisson, alone and with PSF, TOF, and PSF+TOF. Channelized Hotelling observer signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) was the surrogate for human observer performance. Results: For three iterations, 12 subsets, and no postreconstruction smoothing, TOF improved overall defect detection SNR by 8.6% as compared to its non-TOF counterpart for all the defect contrasts. Due to the slow convergence of PSF reconstruction, PSF yielded 4.4% less SNR than non-PSF. For reconstruction parameters (iteration number and postreconstruction smoothing kernel size) optimizing observer SNR, PSF showed larger improvement for faint defects. The combination of TOF and PSF improved mean detection SNR as compared to non-TOF and non-PSF counterparts by 3.0% and 3.2%, respectively. Conclusions: For typical reconstruction protocol used in clinical practice, i.e., less than five iterations, TOF improved defect detectability. In contrast, PSF generally yielded less detectability. For large number of iterations, TOF+PSF yields the best observer performance.

  8. Hydrogen for X-group exchange in CH3X, X = Cl, Br, I, OMe and NMe2 by Monomeric [1,2,4-(Me3C)3C5H2]2CeH: Experimental and Computational Support for a Carbenoid Mechanism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Werkema, Evan

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydrogen for X-group exchange in CH 3 X, X = Cl, Br, I, OMespectrum in which a single hydrogen atom is statisticallyprobability ellipsoids. The non-hydrogen atoms are refined

  9. SU-D-9A-02: Relative Effects of Threshold Choice and Spatial Resolution Modeling On SUV and Volume Quantification in F18-FDG PET Imaging of Anal Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao, F [Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Shandong Cancer Hospital and Insititute, Jinan, Shandong (China); Bowsher, J; Palta, M; Czito, B; Willett, C; Yin, F [Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States)

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: PET imaging with F18-FDG is utilized for treatment planning, treatment assessment, and prognosis. A region of interest (ROI) encompassing the tumor may be determined on the PET image, often by a threshold T on the PET standard uptake values (SUVs). Several studies have shown prognostic value for relevant ROI properties including maximum SUV value (SUVmax), metabolic tumor volume (MTV), and total glycolytic activity (TGA). The choice of threshold T may affect mean SUV value (SUVmean), MTV, and TGA. Recently spatial resolution modeling (SRM) has been introduced on many PET systems. SRM may also affect these ROI properties. The purpose of this work is to investigate the relative influence of SRM and threshold choice T on SUVmean, MTV, TGA, and SUVmax. Methods: For 9 anal cancer patients, 18F-FDG PET scans were performed prior to treatment. PET images were reconstructed by 2 iterations of Ordered Subsets Expectation Maximization (OSEM), with and without SRM. ROI contours were generated by 5 different SUV threshold values T: 2.5, 3.0, 30%, 40%, and 50% of SUVmax. Paired-samples t tests were used to compare SUVmean, MTV, and TGA (a) for SRM on versus off and (b) between each pair of threshold values T. SUVmax was also compared for SRM on versus off. Results: For almost all (57/60) comparisons of 2 different threshold values, SUVmean, MTV, and TGA showed statistically significant variation. For comparison of SRM on versus off, there were no statistically significant changes in SUVmax and TGA, but there were statistically significant changes in MTV for T=2.5 and T=3.0 and in SUVmean for all T. Conclusion: The near-universal statistical significance of threshold choice T suggests that, regarding harmonization across sites, threshold choice may be a greater concern than choice of SRM. However, broader study is warranted, e.g. other iterations of OSEM should be considered.

  10. Mathematical modeling of positron emission tomography (PET) data to assess radiofluoride transport in living plants following petiolar administration

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Converse, Alexander K.; Ahlers, Elizabeth O.; Bryan, Tom W.; Hetue, Jackson D.; Lake, Katherine A.; Ellison, Paul A.; Engle, Jonathan W.; Barnhart, Todd E.; Nickles, Robert J.; Williams, Paul H.; et al

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Background: Ion transport is a fundamental physiological process that can be studied non-invasively in living plants with radiotracer imaging methods. Fluoride is a known phytotoxic pollutant and understanding its transport in plants after leaf absorption is of interest to those in agricultural areas near industrial sources of airborne fluoride. Here we report the novel use of a commercial, high-resolution, animal positron emission tomography (PET) scanner to trace a bolus of [?F]fluoride administered via bisected petioles of Brassica oleracea, an established model species, to simulate whole plant uptake of atmospheric fluoride. This methodology allows for the first time mathematical compartmental modelingmoreof fluoride transport in the living plant. Radiotracer kinetics in the stem were described with a single-parameter free- and trapped-compartment model and mean arrival times at different stem positions were calculated from the free-compartment time-activity curves. Results: After initiation of administration at the bisected leaf stalk, [?F] radioactivity climbed for approximately 10 minutes followed by rapid washout from the stem and equilibration within leaves. Kinetic modeling of transport in the stem yielded a trapping rate of 1.5 +/- 0.3%/min (mean +/- s.d., n = 3), velocity of 2.2 +/- 1.1 cm/min, and trapping fraction of 0.8 +/- 0.5%/cm. Conclusion: Quantitative assessment of physiologically meaningful transport parameters of fluoride in living plants is possible using standard positron emission tomography in combination with petiolar radiotracer administration. Movement of free fluoride was observed to be consistent with bulk flow in xylem, namely a rapid and linear change in position with respect to time. Trapping, likely in the apoplast, was observed. Future applications of the methods described here include studies of transport of other ions and molecules of interest in plant physiology.less

  11. Analysis of Pretreatment FDG-PET SUV Parameters in Head-and-Neck Cancer: Tumor SUV{sub mean} Has Superior Prognostic Value

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Higgins, Kristin A., E-mail: kristin.higgins@duke.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Hoang, Jenny K. [Department of Radiology, Division of Neuroradiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Roach, Michael C.; Chino, Junzo; Yoo, David S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Turkington, Timothy G. [Department of Radiology, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Department of Biomedical Engineering, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Graduate Program in Medical Physics, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Brizel, David M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Department of Surgery, Division of Head and Neck Surgery, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States)

    2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To evaluate the prognostic significance of different descriptive parameters in head-and-neck cancer patients undergoing pretreatment [F-18] fluoro-D-glucose-positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) imaging. Patients and Methods: Head-and-neck cancer patients who underwent FDG-PET before a course of curative intent radiotherapy were retrospectively analyzed. FDG-PET imaging parameters included maximum (SUV{sub max}), and mean (SUV{sub mean}) standard uptake values, and total lesion glycolysis (TLG). Tumors and lymph nodes were defined on co-registered axial computed tomography (CT) slices. SUV{sub max} and SUV{sub mean} were measured within these anatomic regions. The relationships between pretreatment SUV{sub max}, SUV{sub mean}, and TLG for the primary site and lymph nodes were assessed using a univariate analysis for disease-free survival (DFS), locoregional control (LRC), and distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS). Kaplan-Meier survival curves were generated and compared via the log-rank method. SUV data were analyzed as continuous variables. Results: A total of 88 patients was assessed. Two-year OS, LRC, DMFS, and DFS for the entire cohort were 85%, 78%, 81%, and 70%, respectively. Median SUV{sub max} for the primary tumor and lymph nodes was 15.4 and 12.2, respectively. Median SUV{sub mean} for the primary tumor and lymph nodes was 7 and 5.2, respectively. Median TLG was 770. Increasing pretreatment SUV{sub mean} of the primary tumor was associated with decreased disease-free survival (p = 0.01). Neither SUV{sub max} in the primary tumor or lymph nodes nor TLG was prognostic for any of the clinical endpoints. Patients with pretreatment tumor SUV{sub mean} that exceeded the median value (7) of the cohort demonstrated inferior 2-year DFS relative to patients with SUV{sub mean} {<=} the median value of the cohort, 58% vs. 82%, respectively, p = 0.03. Conclusion: Increasing SUV{sub mean} in the primary tumor was associated with inferior DFS. Although not routinely reported, pretreatment SUV{sub mean} may be a useful prognostic FDG-PET parameter and should be further evaluated prospectively.

  12. =E2s5"J,@O$NJQ?tA*Br$K$*$1$k%Y%$%:E*J}K! --J?6Q>l6a;w$K4p$E$/%"%W%m!<%A --

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iba, Yukito

    =E2s5"J,@O$NJQ?tA*Br$K$*$1$k%Y%$%:E*J}K! -- J?6Q>l6a;w$K4p$E$/%"%W%m! alization $N:$Fq)!#$3$l$OE}7W3XE*$K$$$($PEvA3$N$3$H $G$"$j!"B?AX%Q!s5"%b%k%.!s5"J,@O$G$O%j%C%82s5"$KAjEv)!# $,$"$k$,!"$h$j6=L#?

  13. N 9, quinta-feira, 12 de janeiro de 2012 17ISSN 1677-7042 Este documento pode ser verificado no endereo eletrnico http://www.in.gov.br/autenticidade.html,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Floeter, Sergio Ricardo

    : Coordenação de Aperfeiçoamento de Pessoal de Nível Superior (CAPES/MEC) Assunto: Aprecia a proposta de://portal.mec.gov.br/cne/). Brasília, 11 de janeiro de 2012. ATAÍDE ALVES Secretário Executivo COORDENA??O DE APERFEI?OAMENTO DE docentes. O Presidente da Coordenação de Aperfeiçoamento de Pes- soal de Nível Superior - Capes, no uso das

  14. *** Prices are subject to change. Please contact properties directly to confirm latest prices. Updated: 2/8/2013 1 BR 2 BR 2 BR 2 BR 3 BR 3 BR 4 BR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Behmer, Spencer T.

    -8981 12 months $555 $665 9 months Hunter's Point 12 months $575 $650-$730 9 months Lincoln Townhomes (979

  15. {sup 18}F-FLT uptake kinetics in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma: A PET imaging study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Dan, E-mail: dan.liu@oncology.ox.ac.uk; Fenwick, John D. [Department of Oncology, University of Oxford, Old Road Campus Research Building, Roosevelt Drive, Oxford OX3 7DQ (United Kingdom)] [Department of Oncology, University of Oxford, Old Road Campus Research Building, Roosevelt Drive, Oxford OX3 7DQ (United Kingdom); Chalkidou, Anastasia; Landau, David B.; Marsden, Paul K. [Division of Imaging Sciences and Biomedical Engineering, School of Medicine, King's College London, St Thomas' Hospital, Westminster Bridge Road, London SE1 7EH (United Kingdom)] [Division of Imaging Sciences and Biomedical Engineering, School of Medicine, King's College London, St Thomas' Hospital, Westminster Bridge Road, London SE1 7EH (United Kingdom)

    2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To analyze the kinetics of 3{sup ?}-deoxy-3{sup ?}-[F-18]-fluorothymidine (18F-FLT) uptake by head and neck squamous cell carcinomas and involved nodes imaged using positron emission tomography (PET). Methods: Two- and three-tissue compartment models were fitted to 12 tumor time-activity-curves (TACs) obtained for 6 structures (tumors or involved nodes) imaged in ten dynamic PET studies of 1 h duration, carried out for five patients. The ability of the models to describe the data was assessed using a runs test, the Akaike information criterion (AIC) and leave-one-out cross-validation. To generate parametric maps the models were also fitted to TACs of individual voxels. Correlations between maps of different parameters were characterized using Pearson'sr coefficient; in particular the phosphorylation rate-constants k{sub 3-2tiss} and k{sub 5} of the two- and three-tissue models were studied alongside the flux parameters K{sub FLT-2tiss} and K{sub FLT} of these models, and standardized uptake values (SUV). A methodology based on expectation-maximization clustering and the Bayesian information criterion (EM-BIC clustering) was used to distil the information from noisy parametric images. Results: Fits of two-tissue models 2C3K and 2C4K and three-tissue models 3C5K and 3C6K comprising three, four, five, and six rate-constants, respectively, pass the runs test for 4, 8, 10, and 11 of 12 tumor TACs. The three-tissue models have lower AIC and cross-validation scores for nine of the 12 tumors. Overall the 3C6K model has the lowest AIC and cross-validation scores and its fitted parameter values are of the same orders of magnitude as literature estimates. Maps ofK{sub FLT} and K{sub FLT-2tiss} are strongly correlated (r = 0.85) and also correlate closely with SUV maps (r = 0.72 for K{sub FLT-2tiss}, 0.64 for K{sub FLT}). Phosphorylation rate-constant maps are moderately correlated with flux maps (r = 0.48 for k{sub 3-2tiss} vs K{sub FLT-2tiss} and r = 0.68 for k{sub 5} vs K{sub FLT}); however, neither phosphorylation rate-constant correlates significantly with SUV. EM-BIC clustering reduces the parametric maps to a small number of levelson average 5.8, 3.5, 3.4, and 1.4 for K{sub FLT-2tiss}, K{sub FLT}, k{sub 3-2tiss}, and k{sub 5.} This large simplification is potentially useful for radiotherapy dose-painting, but demonstrates the high noise in some maps. Statistical simulations show that voxel level noise degrades TACs generated from the 3C6K model sufficiently that the average AIC score, parameter bias, and total uncertainty of 2C4K model fits are similar to those of 3C6K fits, whereas at the whole tumor level the scores are lower for 3C6K fits. Conclusions: For the patients studied here, whole tumor FLT uptake time-courses are represented better overall by a three-tissue than by a two-tissue model. EM-BIC clustering simplifies noisy parametric maps, providing the best description of the underlying information they contain and is potentially useful for radiotherapy dose-painting. However, the clustering highlights the large degree of noise present in maps of the phosphorylation rate-constantsk{sub 5} and k{sub 3-2tiss}, which are conceptually tightly linked to cellular proliferation. Methods must be found to make these maps more robusteither by constraining other model parameters or modifying dynamic imaging protocols.

  16. Positron emission tomography study on pancreatic somatostatin receptors in normal and diabetic rats with {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-octreotide: A potential PET tracer for beta cell mass measurement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sako, Takeo [Division of Bio-function Dynamics Imaging, RIKEN Center for Life Science Technologies, 6-7-3 Minatojima-minamimachi, Chuo-ku, Kobe, Hyogo 650-0047 (Japan) [Division of Bio-function Dynamics Imaging, RIKEN Center for Life Science Technologies, 6-7-3 Minatojima-minamimachi, Chuo-ku, Kobe, Hyogo 650-0047 (Japan); Division of Molecular Imaging, Institute of Biomedical Research and Innovation, 2-2 Minatojima-minamimachi, Chuo-ku, Kobe, Hyogo 650-0047 (Japan); Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, 7-5-1 Kusunoki-cho, Chuo-ku, Kobe, Hyogo 650-0017 (Japan); Hasegawa, Koki; Nishimura, Mie; Kanayama, Yousuke; Wada, Yasuhiro; Hayashinaka, Emi; Cui, Yilong; Kataoka, Yosky [Division of Bio-function Dynamics Imaging, RIKEN Center for Life Science Technologies, 6-7-3 Minatojima-minamimachi, Chuo-ku, Kobe, Hyogo 650-0047 (Japan)] [Division of Bio-function Dynamics Imaging, RIKEN Center for Life Science Technologies, 6-7-3 Minatojima-minamimachi, Chuo-ku, Kobe, Hyogo 650-0047 (Japan); Senda, Michio [Division of Bio-function Dynamics Imaging, RIKEN Center for Life Science Technologies, 6-7-3 Minatojima-minamimachi, Chuo-ku, Kobe, Hyogo 650-0047 (Japan) [Division of Bio-function Dynamics Imaging, RIKEN Center for Life Science Technologies, 6-7-3 Minatojima-minamimachi, Chuo-ku, Kobe, Hyogo 650-0047 (Japan); Division of Molecular Imaging, Institute of Biomedical Research and Innovation, 2-2 Minatojima-minamimachi, Chuo-ku, Kobe, Hyogo 650-0047 (Japan); Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, 7-5-1 Kusunoki-cho, Chuo-ku, Kobe, Hyogo 650-0017 (Japan); Watanabe, Yasuyoshi, E-mail: yywata@riken.jp [Division of Bio-function Dynamics Imaging, RIKEN Center for Life Science Technologies, 6-7-3 Minatojima-minamimachi, Chuo-ku, Kobe, Hyogo 650-0047 (Japan)] [Division of Bio-function Dynamics Imaging, RIKEN Center for Life Science Technologies, 6-7-3 Minatojima-minamimachi, Chuo-ku, Kobe, Hyogo 650-0047 (Japan)

    2013-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: PET images showed high uptake of {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-octreotide in the normal pancreas. {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-octreotide specifically binds to somatostatin receptors in the pancreas. The pancreatic uptake of {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-octreotide was decreased in the diabetic rats. {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-octreotide could be a candidate PET probe to measure the beta cell mass. -- Abstract: Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a metabolic disorder characterized by hyperglycemia, and the loss or dysfunction of pancreatic beta cells has been reported before the appearance of clinical symptoms and hyperglycemia. To evaluate beta cell mass (BCM) for improving the detection and treatment of DM at earlier stages, we focused on somatostatin receptors that are highly expressed in the pancreatic beta cells, and developed a positron emission tomography (PET) probe derived from octreotide, a metabolically stable somatostatin analog. Octreotide was conjugated with 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA), a chelating agent, and labeled with {sup 68}Gallium ({sup 68}Ga). After intravenous injection of {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-octreotide, a 90-min emission scan of the abdomen was performed in normal and DM model rats. The PET studies showed that {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-octreotide radioactivity was highly accumulated in the pancreas of normal rats and that the pancreatic accumulation was significantly reduced in the rats administered with an excess amount of unlabeled octreotide or after treatment with streptozotocin, which was used for the chemical induction of DM in rats. These results were in good agreement with the ex vivo biodistribution data. These results indicated that the pancreatic accumulation of {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-octreotide represented specific binding to the somatostatin receptors and reflected BCM. Therefore, PET imaging with {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-octreotide could be a potential tool for evaluating BCM.

  17. A Method for Measurement of 3-Bromotyrosine Concentrations in Canine Serum and Its Clinical Application

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sattasathuchana, Panpicha

    2014-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    in canine serum, (2) establish a reference interval for serum 3-BrY concentrations in healthy pet dogs, (3) determine the short-term stability of canine serum 3-BrY concentrations, and (4) evaluate the clinical usefulness of measuring 3-BrY concentrations...

  18. Solid-state synthesis, structure and properties of a novel open-framework cadmium selenite bromide: [Cd{sub 10}(SeO{sub 3}){sub 8}Br{sub 4}]HBrH{sub 2}O

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Wen-Tong [State Key Laboratory of Structural Chemistry, Fujian Institute of Research on the Structure of Matter, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Fuzhou, Fujian 350002 (China); School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Institute of Applied Chemistry, JingGangShan University, 343009 Ji'an, JiangXi (China); Wang, Ming-Sheng; Wang, Guan-E; Chen, Hui-Fen [State Key Laboratory of Structural Chemistry, Fujian Institute of Research on the Structure of Matter, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Fuzhou, Fujian 350002 (China); Guo, Guo-Cong, E-mail: gcguo@ms.fjirsm.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Structural Chemistry, Fujian Institute of Research on the Structure of Matter, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Fuzhou, Fujian 350002 (China)

    2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel open-framework cadmium selenite bromide, [Cd{sub 10}(SeO{sub 3}){sub 8}Br{sub 4}]HBrH{sub 2}O (1), has been obtained by a solid-state reaction at 450 C, and the structure has been determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. Compound 1 crystallizes in Pbcm of the orthorhombic system: a=10.882(3), b=16.275(5), c=18.728(6) , V=3317(2) {sup 3}, R1/wR2=0.0411/0.0659. Compound 1 is characteristic of a novel 3-D open-framework structure, composing {sub ?}{sup 2}[CdSeO{sub 3}] layers and the pillars of edge-shared CdO{sub 3}Br{sub 2} square pyramids. The lattice water molecules and the HBr molecules locate in the voids of the framework. Optical absorption spectrum of 1 reveals the presence of an optical gap of 1.65 eV. Solid-state photoluminescent study indicates that compound 1 exhibits strong violet emission. TGDSC measurement shows that compound 1 is thermally stable up to 200 C. - Graphical abstract: A metal selenite halide has been synthesized and features a 3-D open-framework structure, composing edge-shared CdO{sub 8} decahedra and pillars of edge-sharing pentahedra. UVvis, TGDSC and luminescent measurements are also reported. Highlights: This paper reports a novel cadmium selenite bromide obtained by an intermediate-temperature solid-state reaction. The title compound is characteristic of a novel 3-D open-framework structure, composing {sub ?}{sup 2}[CdSeO{sub 3}] layers and the pillars of edge-shared CdO{sub 3}Br{sub 2} square pyramids. The title compound is thermally stable up to 200 C. The title compound has an optical gap of 1.65 eV and exhibits strong violet emission.

  19. Pet Waste Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mechell, Justin; Lesikar, Bruce J.

    2008-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

    :Roundwormsusuallytransmittedfromdogstohumans, oftenwithoutnoticeablesymptoms.Maycausevisionloss,rash,fever orcough. JustinMechellandBruceLesikar* *Extension Assistant, Biological and Agricultural Engineering; and Professor, Associate Department Head and Extension Program Leader for Biological and Agricultural Engineering...

  20. Experimental and ab initio studies of the reactive processes in gas phase i-C{sub 3}H{sub 7}Br and i-C{sub 3}H{sub 7}OH collisions with potassium ions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lpez, E.; Lucas, J. M.; Andrs, J. de; Albert, M.; Aguilar, A., E-mail: a.aguilar@ub.edu [Departament de Qumica Fsica, Institut de Qumica Terica i Computacional (IQTCUB), Universitat de Barcelona, Mart i Franqus, 1, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Bofill, J. M. [Departament de Qumica Orgnica, Institut de Qumica Terica i Computacional (IQTCUB), Universitat de Barcelona, Mart i Franqus, 1, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Bassi, D. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universit degli Studi di Trento, 38123 Povo-Trento (Italy)

    2014-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Collisions between potassium ions and neutral i-C{sub 3}H{sub 7}Br and i-C{sub 3}H{sub 7}OH, all in their electronic ground state, have been studied in the 0.1010.00 eV center of mass (CM) collision energy range, using the radiofrequency-guided ion beam technique. In K{sup +} + i-C{sub 3}H{sub 7}Br collisions KHBr{sup +} formation was observed and quantified, while the analogous KH{sub 2}O{sup +} formation in K{sup +} + i-C{sub 3}H{sub 7}OH was hardly detected. Moreover, formation of the ion-molecule adducts and their decomposition leading to C{sub 3}H{sub 7}{sup +} and either KBr or KOH, respectively, have been observed. For all these processes, absolute cross-sections were measured as a function of the CM collision energy. Ab initio structure calculations at the MP2 level have given information about the potential energy surfaces (PESs) involved. In these, different stationary points have been characterized using the reaction coordinate method, their connectivity being ensured by using the intrinsic-reaction-coordinate method. From the measured excitation function for KHBr{sup +} formation the corresponding thermal rate constant at 303 K has been calculated. The topology of the calculated PESs allows an interpretation of the main features of the reaction dynamics of both systems, and in particular evidence the important role played by the potential energy wells in controlling the reactivity for the different reaction channels.

  1. SU-E-I-100: Heterogeneity Studying for Primary and Lymphoma Tumors by Using Multi-Scale Image Texture Analysis with PET-CT Images

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Dengwang [Shandong Normal University, Jinan, Shandong Province (China); Wang, Qinfen [Shandong Normal University, Jinan, Shandong (China); Li, H; Chen, J [Shandong Cancer Hospital and Institute, Jinan, Shandong (China)

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: The purpose of this research is studying tumor heterogeneity of the primary and lymphoma by using multi-scale texture analysis with PET-CT images, where the tumor heterogeneity is expressed by texture features. Methods: Datasets were collected from 12 lung cancer patients, and both of primary and lymphoma tumors were detected with all these patients. All patients underwent whole-body 18F-FDG PET/CT scan before treatment.The regions of interest (ROI) of primary and lymphoma tumor were contoured by experienced clinical doctors. Then the ROI of primary and lymphoma tumor is extracted automatically by using Matlab software. According to the geometry size of contour structure, the images of tumor are decomposed by multi-scale method.Wavelet transform was performed on ROI structures within images by L layers sampling, and then wavelet sub-bands which have the same size of the original image are obtained. The number of sub-bands is 3L+1.The gray level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM) is calculated within different sub-bands, thenenergy, inertia, correlation and gray in-homogeneity were extracted from GLCM.Finally, heterogeneity statistical analysis was studied for primary and lymphoma tumor using the texture features. Results: Energy, inertia, correlation and gray in-homogeneity are calculated with our experiments for heterogeneity statistical analysis.Energy for primary and lymphomatumor is equal with the same patient, while gray in-homogeneity and inertia of primaryare 2.595950.00855, 0.64390.0007 respectively. Gray in-homogeneity and inertia of lymphoma are 2.601150.00635, 0.644350.00055 respectively. The experiments showed that the volume of lymphoma is smaller than primary tumor, but thegray in-homogeneity and inertia were higher than primary tumor with the same patient, and the correlation with lymphoma tumors is zero, while the correlation with primary tumor isslightly strong. Conclusion: This studying showed that there were effective heterogeneity differences between primary and lymphoma tumor by multi-scale image texture analysis. This work is supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 61201441), Research Fund for Excellent Young and Middle-aged Scientists of Shandong Province (No. BS2012DX038), Project of Shandong Province Higher Educational Science and Technology Program (No. J12LN23), Jinan youth science and technology star (No.20120109)

  2. Tumor Metabolism and Perfusion in Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma: Pretreatment Multimodality Imaging With {sup 1}H Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy, Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI, and [{sup 18}F]FDG-PET

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jansen, Jacobus F.A. [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Department of Radiology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Department of Radiology, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht (Netherlands); Schoeder, Heiko [Department of Radiology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Lee, Nancy Y. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Stambuk, Hilda E. [Department of Radiology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Wang Ya [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Fury, Matthew G. [Department of Medical Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Patel, Senehal G. [Department of Surgery, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Pfister, David G. [Department of Medical Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Shah, Jatin P. [Department of Surgery, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Koutcher, Jason A. [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Department of Radiology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Department of Medical Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Shukla-Dave, Amita, E-mail: davea@mskcc.org [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Department of Radiology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To correlate proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ({sup 1}H-MRS), dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI), and {sup 18}F-labeled fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography ([{sup 18}F]FDG PET) of nodal metastases in patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) for assessment of tumor biology. Additionally, pretreatment multimodality imaging was evaluated for its efficacy in predicting short-term response to treatment. Methods and Materials: Metastatic neck nodes were imaged with {sup 1}H-MRS, DCE-MRI, and [{sup 18}F]FDG PET in 16 patients with newly diagnosed HNSCC, before treatment. Short-term patient radiological response was evaluated at 3 to 4 months. Correlations among {sup 1}H-MRS (choline concentration relative to water [Cho/W]), DCE-MRI (volume transfer constant [K{sup trans}]; volume fraction of the extravascular extracellular space [v{sub e}]; and redistribution rate constant [k{sub ep}]), and [{sup 18}F]FDG PET (standard uptake value [SUV] and total lesion glycolysis [TLG]) were calculated using nonparametric Spearman rank correlation. To predict short-term responses, logistic regression analysis was performed. Results: A significant positive correlation was found between Cho/W and TLG ({rho} = 0.599; p = 0.031). Cho/W correlated negatively with heterogeneity measures of standard deviation std(v{sub e}) ({rho} = -0.691; p = 0.004) and std(k{sub ep}) ({rho} = -0.704; p = 0.003). Maximum SUV (SUVmax) values correlated strongly with MRI tumor volume ({rho} = 0.643; p = 0.007). Logistic regression indicated that std(K{sup trans}) and SUVmean were significant predictors of short-term response (p < 0.07). Conclusion: Pretreatment multimodality imaging using {sup 1}H-MRS, DCE-MRI, and [{sup 18}F]FDG PET is feasible in HNSCC patients with nodal metastases. Additionally, combined DCE-MRI and [{sup 18}F]FDG PET parameters were predictive of short-term response to treatment.

  3. Usefulness of Interim FDG-PET After Induction Chemotherapy in Patients With Locally Advanced Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck Receiving Sequential Induction Chemotherapy Followed by Concurrent Chemoradiotherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoon, Dok Hyun; Cho, Yoojin [Department of Oncology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sang Yoon; Nam, Soon Yuhl; Choi, Seung-Ho; Roh, Jong-Lyel [Department of Otolaryngology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sang-wook; Song, Si Yeol [Department of Radiation Oncology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jeong Hyun [Department of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jae Seung [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Kyung-Ja [Department of Pathology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sung-Bae, E-mail: sbkim3@amc.seoul.kr [Department of Oncology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Induction chemotherapy (ICT) has been used to select patients for organ preservation and determine subsequent treatments in patients with locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (LASCCHN). Still, the clinical outcomes of LASCCHN patients who showed response to ICT are heterogeneous. We evaluated the efficacy of interim 18-fluoro-2-deoxy-glucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) after ICT in this specific subgroup of LASCCHN patients who achieved partial response (PR) after ICT to predict clinical outcomes after concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT). Methods and Materials: Twenty-one patients with LASCCHN who showed PR to ICT by Response Evaluation Criteria In Solid Tumors before definitive CCRT were chosen in this retrospective analysis. FDG-PET was performed before and 2-4 weeks after ICT to assess the extent of disease at baseline and the metabolic response to ICT, respectively. We examined the correlation of the metabolic response by the percentage decrease of maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) on the primary tumor or lymph node after ICT or a specific threshold of SUVmax on interim FDG-PET with clinical outcomes including complete response (CR) rate to CCRT, progression-free survival (PFS), and overall survival (OS). Results: A SUVmax of 4.8 on interim FDG-PET could predict clinical CR after CCRT (100% vs. 20%, p = 0.001), PFS (median, not reached vs. 8.5 mo, p < 0.001), and OS (median, not reached vs. 12.0 months, p = 0.001) with a median follow-up of 20.3 months in surviving patients. A 65% decrease in SUVmax after ICT from baseline also could predict clinical CR after CCRT (100% vs. 33.3%, p = 0.003), PFS (median, not reached vs. 8.9 months, p < 0.001) and OS (median, not reached vs. 24.4 months, p = 0.001) of the patients. Conclusion: These data suggest that interim FDG-PET after ICT might be a useful determinant to predict clinical outcomes in patients with LASCCHN receiving sequential ICT followed by CCRT.

  4. Use of InSpector{sup TM} 1 1000 Instrument with LaBr{sub 3} for Nuclear Criticality Safety (NCS) Applications at the Westinghouse Hematite Decommissioning Project (HDP) - 13132

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pritchard, Megan [Nuclear Safety Associates, P.O. Box 471488, Charlotte, NC 28247 (United States)] [Nuclear Safety Associates, P.O. Box 471488, Charlotte, NC 28247 (United States); Guido, Joe [System One Services, 12 Federal St. Ste. 205, Pittsburgh, PA 15212 (United States)] [System One Services, 12 Federal St. Ste. 205, Pittsburgh, PA 15212 (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Westinghouse Hematite Decommissioning Project (HDP) is a former nuclear fuel cycle facility that is currently undergoing decommissioning. One aspect of the decommissioning scope is remediation of buried nuclear waste in unlined burial pits. The current Nuclear Criticality Safety program relies on application of criticality controls based on radiological setpoints from a 2 x 2 Sodium Iodide (NaI) detector. Because of the nature of the material buried (Low Enriched Uranium (LEU), depleted uranium, thorium, and radium) and the stringent threshold for application of criticality controls based on waste management (0.1 g {sup 235}U/L), a better method for {sup 235}U identification and quantification has been developed. This paper outlines the early stages of a quick, in-field nuclear material assay and {sup 235}U mass estimation process currently being deployed at HDP. Nuclear material initially classified such that NCS controls are necessary can be demonstrated not to require such controls and dispositioned as desired by project operations. Using Monte Carlo techniques and a high resolution Lanthanum Bromide (LaBr) detector with portable Multi-Channel Analyzer (MCA), a bounding {sup 235}U mass is assigned to basic geometries of nuclear material as it is excavated. The deployment of these methods and techniques has saved large amounts of time and money in the nuclear material remediation process. (authors)

  5. Radiative rates for E1, E2, M1, and M2 transitions in the Br-like ions Sr IV, Y V, Zr VI, Nb VII, and Mo VIII

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aggarwal, K M

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Energies and lifetimes are reported for the lowest 375 levels of five Br-like ions, namely Sr~IV, Y~V, Zr~VI, Nb~VII, and Mo~VIII, mostly belonging to the 4s$^2$4p$^5$, 4s$^2$4p$^4$4$\\ell$, 4s4p$^6$, 4s$^2$4p$^4$5$\\ell$, 4s$^2$4p$^3$4d$^2$, 4s4p$^5$4$\\ell$, and 4s4p$^5$5$\\ell$ configurations. Extensive configuration interaction has been included and the general-purpose relativistic atomic structure package ({\\sc grasp}) has been adopted for the calculations. Additionally, radiative rates are listed among these levels for all E1, E2, M1, and M2 transitions. From a comparison with the measurements, the majority of our energy levels are assessed to be accurate to better than 2\\%, although discrepancies between theory and experiment for a few are up to 6\\%. An accuracy assessment of the calculated radiative rates (and lifetimes) is more difficult, because no prior results exist for these ions.

  6. JOB DESCRIPTION Requisition ID 3165BR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    is seeking a qualified individual to design game-infused experience in our Center for Games and Impact of technology to enhance instruction and create new game-infused learning environments. · Coordinates production of instructional concepts, required media, tutorials, assignments, and consideration of modality within our game-infused

  7. 7, 18231847, 2007 tropospheric BrO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    . Ibrahim 2 , R. Sinreich 2 , U. Frie 2 , and U. Platt 2 1 Max-Planck-Institute for Chemistry, Mainz of tropo- spheric ozone depletion (Hausmann and Platt, 1994; Platt and Lehrer, 1996; Krehe

  8. (Development of Br-77 from LAMPF Facility)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The research goals of 1984--1985 included continued studies of the 1-halogenated estradiol derivatives and preparation of B- and C- ring vinyl halides of estradiol. The radiohalogenated analogs of these target compounds are proposed to be useful as receptor-binding radiopharmaceuticals in breast cancer therapy. To date, all 1-halogenated derivatives have been prepared and studied. Their 17 {proportional to}-ethynyl derivatives have also been prepared. In vitro receptor-binding studies with estrogen receptors show definite trends with respect to type of halogen attached versus observed receptor-binding affinity. These results were further substantiated using x-ray crystallographic methods. The proposed B- and C- ring vinyl halides have not been successfully synthesized; however, work toward these target compounds is still underway. Other related compounds of current interest include the B-, C-, and D- ring substituted estradiol derivatives. Much of the synthetic work leaking to these compounds has been accomplished and in vitro studies will be performed soon. 10 refs.

  9. A novel method for the line-of-response and time-of-flight reconstruction in TOF-PET detectors based on a library of synchronized model signals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Moskal; N. Zo?; T. Bednarski; P. Bia?as; E. Czerwi?ski; A. Gajos; D. Kami?ska; ?. Kap?on; A. Kochanowski; G. Korcyl; J. Kowal; P. Kowalski; T. Kozik; W. Krzemie?; E. Kubicz; Sz. Nied?wiecki; M. Pa?ka; L. Raczy?ski; Z. Rudy; O. Rundel; P. Salabura; N. G. Sharma; M. Silarski; A. S?omski; J. Smyrski; A. Strzelecki; A. Wieczorek; W. Wi?licki; M. Zieli?ski

    2015-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel method of hit time and hit position reconstruction in scintillator detectors is described. The method is based on comparison of detector signals with results stored in a library of synchronized model signals registered for a set of well-defined positions of scintillation points. The hit position is reconstructed as the one corresponding to the signal from the library which is most similar to the measurement signal. The time of the interaction is determined as a relative time between the measured signal and the most similar one in the library. A degree of similarity of measured and model signals is defined as the distance between points representing the measurement- and model-signal in the multi-dimensional measurement space. Novelty of the method lies also in the proposed way of synchronization of model signals enabling direct determination of the difference between time-of-flights (TOF) of annihilation quanta from the annihilation point to the detectors. The introduced method was validated using experimental data obtained by means of the double strip prototype of the J-PET detector and $^{22}$Na sodium isotope as a source of annihilation gamma quanta.The detector was built out from plastic scintillator strips with dimensions of 5 mm x 19 mm x 300 mm, optically connected at both sides to photomultipliers,from which signals were sampled by means of the Serial Data Analyzer.Using the introduced method, the spatial and TOF resolution of about 1.3 cm ($\\sigma$) and 125 ps ($\\sigma$) were established, respectively.

  10. Method for selective recovery of PET-usable quantities of [.sup.18 F] fluoride and [.sup.13 N] nitrate/nitrite from a single irradiation of low-enriched [.sup.18 O] water

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ferrieri, Richard A. (Patchogue, NY); Schlyer, David J. (Bellport, NY); Shea, Colleen (Wading River, NY)

    1995-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for simultaneously producing PET-usable quantities of [.sup.13 N]NH.sub.3 and [.sup.18 F]F.sup.- for radiotracer synthesis is disclosed. The process includes producing [.sup.13 N]NO.sub.2.sup.- /NO.sub.3.sup.- and [.sup.18 F]F.sup.- simultaneously by exposing a low-enriched (20%-30%) [.sup.18 O]H.sub.2 O target to proton irradiation, sequentially isolating the [.sup.13 N]NO.sub.2.sup.- /NO.sub.3.sup.- and [.sup.18 F]F.sup.- from the [.sup.18 O]H.sub.2 O target, and reducing the [.sup.13 N]NO.sub.2.sup.- /NO.sub.3.sup.- to [.sup.13 N]NH.sub.3. The [.sup.13 N]NH.sub.3 and [.sup.18 F]F.sup.- products are then conveyed to a laboratory for radiotracer applications. The process employs an anion exchange resin for isolation of the isotopes from the [.sup.18 O]H.sub.2 O, and sequential elution of [.sup.13 N]NO.sub.2.sup.- /NO.sub.3.sup.- and [ .sup.18 F]F.sup.- fractions. Also the apparatus is disclosed for simultaneously producing PET-usable quantities of [.sup.13 N]NH.sub.3 and [.sup.18 F]F.sup.- from a single irradiation of a single low-enriched [.sup.18 O]H.sub.2 O target.

  11. Application of Two Phase (Liquid/Gas) Xenon Gamma-Camera for the Detection of Special Nuclear Material and PET Medical Imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKinsey, Daniel Nicholas [Yale University] [Yale University

    2013-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The McKinsey group at Yale has been awarded a grant from DTRA for the building of a Liquid Xenon Gamma Ray Color Camera (LXe-GRCC), which combines state-of-the-art detection of LXe scintillation light and time projection chamber (TPC) charge readout. The DTRA application requires a movable detector and hence only a single phase (liquid) xenon detector can be considered in this case. We propose to extend the DTRA project to applications that allow a two phase (liquid/gas) xenon TPC. This entails additional (yet minimal) hardware and extension of the research effort funded by DTRA. The two phase detector will have better energy and angular resolution. Such detectors will be useful for PET medical imaging and detection of special nuclear material in stationary applications (e.g. port of entry). The expertise of the UConn group in gas phase TPCs will enhance the capabilities of the Yale group and the synergy between the two groups will be very beneficial for this research project as well as the education and research projects of the two universities. The LXe technology to be used in this project has matured rapidly over the past few years, developed for use in detectors for nuclear physics and astrophysics. This technology may now be applied in a straightforward way to the imaging of gamma rays. According to detailed Monte Carlo simulations recently performed at Yale University, energy resolution of 1% and angular resolution of 3 degrees may be obtained for 1.0 MeV gamma rays, using existing technology. With further research and development, energy resolution of 0.5% and angular resolution of 1.3 degrees will be possible at 1.0 MeV. Because liquid xenon is a high density, high Z material, it is highly efficient for scattering and capturing gamma rays. In addition, this technology scales elegantly to large detector areas, with several square meter apertures possible. The Yale research group is highly experienced in the development and use of noble liquid detectors for astrophysics, most recently in the XENON10 experiment. The existing facilities at Yale are fully adequate for the completion of this project. The facilities of the UConn group at the LNS at Avery Point include a (clean) lab for detector development and this group recently delivered an Optical Readout TPC (O-TPC) for research in Nuclear Astrophysics at the TUNL in Duke University. The machine shop at UConn will be used (free of charge) for producing the extra hardware needed for this project including grids and frames.

  12. Volumetric-modulated arc therapy (RapidArc) vs. conventional fixed-field intensity-modulated radiotherapy for {sup 18}F-FDG-PET-guided dose escalation in oropharyngeal cancer: A planning study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Teoh, May, E-mail: m.teoh@nhs.net [Department of Oncology, St. Luke's Cancer Centre, Royal Surrey County Hospital, Guildford, Surrey (United Kingdom); Beveridge, Sabeena [Department of Medical Physics, St. Luke's Cancer Centre, Royal Surrey County Hospital, Guildford, Surrey (United Kingdom); Wood, Katie; Whitaker, Stephen [Department of Oncology, St. Luke's Cancer Centre, Royal Surrey County Hospital, Guildford, Surrey (United Kingdom); Adams, Elizabeth; Rickard, Donna; Jordan, Tom; Nisbet, Andrew [Department of Medical Physics, St. Luke's Cancer Centre, Royal Surrey County Hospital, Guildford, Surrey (United Kingdom); Clark, Catharine H. [Department of Medical Physics, St. Luke's Cancer Centre, Royal Surrey County Hospital, Guildford, Surrey (United Kingdom); National Physical Laboratory, Hampton Road, Teddington, Middlesex (United Kingdom)

    2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fluorine-18-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography ({sup 18}F-FDG-PET)guided focal dose escalation in oropharyngeal cancer may potentially improve local control. We evaluated the feasibility of this approach using volumetric-modulated arc therapy (RapidArc) and compared these plans with fixed-field intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) focal dose escalation plans. Materials and methods: An initial study of 20 patients compared RapidArc with fixed-field IMRT using standard dose prescriptions. From this cohort, 10 were included in a dose escalation planning study. Dose escalation was applied to {sup 18}F-FDG-PETpositive regions in the primary tumor at dose levels of 5% (DL1), 10% (DL2), and 15% (DL3) above standard radical dose (65 Gy in 30 fractions). Fixed-field IMRT and double-arc RapidArc plans were generated for each dataset. Dose-volume histograms were used for plan evaluation and comparison. The Paddick conformity index (CI{sub Paddick}) and monitor units (MU) for each plan were recorded and compared. Both IMRT and RapidArc produced clinically acceptable plans and achieved planning objectives for target volumes. Dose conformity was significantly better in the RapidArc plans, with lower CI{sub Paddick} scores in both primary (PTV1) and elective (PTV2) planning target volumes (largest difference in PTV1 at DL3; 0.81 0.03 [RapidArc] vs. 0.77 0.07 [IMRT], p = 0.04). Maximum dose constraints for spinal cord and brainstem were not exceeded in both RapidArc and IMRT plans, but mean doses were higher with RapidArc (by 2.7 1 Gy for spinal cord and 1.9 1 Gy for brainstem). Contralateral parotid mean dose was lower with RapidArc, which was statistically significant at DL1 (29.0 vs. 29.9 Gy, p = 0.01) and DL2 (29.3 vs. 30.3 Gy, p = 0.03). MU were reduced by 39.849.2% with RapidArc (largest difference at DL3, 641 94 vs. 1261 118, p < 0.01). {sup 18}F-FDG-PETguided focal dose escalation in oropharyngeal cancer is feasible with RapidArc. Compared with conventional fixed-field IMRT, RapidArc can achieve better dose conformity, improve contralateral parotid sparing, and uses fewer MU.

  13. PET Studies of CX-157

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fowler, Joanna

    2008-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We completed measuring Brain MAO A activity in 15 subjects at baseline and after different doses of CX157 and also at different times after each dose. Fifty five scans were completed. We determined that plasma levels of the drug are a surrogate marker for the degree of MAO A inhibition in the brain.

  14. Enhancement of Br ( B d ? ? + ? - ) / Br ( B s ? ? + ? - ) in supersymmetric unified models

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Dutta, Bhaskar; Mimura, Yukihiro

    2015-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We explain the 2.3? deviation in the recent measurements of the neutral B meson decays into muon pairs from the standard model prediction in the framework of supersymmetric grand unified models using antisymmetric coupling as a new source of flavor violation. We show a correlation between the Bd????? decay and the CP phase in the Bd?J/?K decay and that their deviations from the standard model predictions can be explained after satisfying constraints arising from various hadronic and leptonic rare decay processes, B-B, K-K oscillation data, and electric dipole moments of electron and neutron. The allowed parameter space is typically represented by pseudoscalar Higgs mass mA?1 TeV and tan?H(?vu/vd)?20 for squark and gluino masses around 2 TeV.

  15. C6H5Br+ f C6H5 + + Br Occurs via Orbiting Transition State

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Myung Soo

    -analyzed ion kinetic energy spectrometry. The rate constant and kinetic energy release distribution have been at high internal energy. The completely loose transition state model, namely the reaction occurring via compared with theoretical calculations. The rate-energy data available over 6 orders of magnitude in time

  16. BR UFF BIG PINEY WILD ROSE BLU E GAP BR UFF UNIT WAMSUT TER

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041cloth DocumentationProductsAlternativeOperationalAugustDecade5-F, 2012June-19,-2015DecemberI-5BOE

  17. BR UFF BIG PINEY WILD ROSE BLU E GAP BR UFF UNIT WAMSUT TER

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041cloth DocumentationProductsAlternativeOperationalAugustDecade5-F, 2012June-19,-2015DecemberI-5BOEGas

  18. BR UFF BIG PINEY WILD ROSE BLU E GAP BR UFF UNIT WAMSUT TER

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041cloth DocumentationProductsAlternativeOperationalAugustDecade5-F,

  19. Hanford Speakers Bureau<br><br>Frequently Asked Questions - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem NotEnergy,ARMFormsGasReleaseSpeechesHallNot Logged3 Hanford Speakers

  20. Method for selective recovery of PET-usable quantities of [{sup 18}F] fluoride and [{sup 13}N] nitrate/nitrite from a single irradiation of low-enriched [{sup 18}O] water

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ferrieri, R.A.; Schlyer, D.J.; Shea, C.

    1995-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for simultaneously producing PET-usable quantities of [{sup 13}N]NH{sub 3} and [{sup 18}F]F{sup {minus}} for radiotracer synthesis is disclosed. The process includes producing [{sup 13}N]NO{sub 2}{sup {minus}}/NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}and [{sup 18}F]F{sup {minus}} simultaneously by exposing a low-enriched (20%-30%) [{sup 18}O]H{sub 2}O target to proton irradiation, sequentially isolating the [{sup 13}N]NO{sub 2}{sup {minus}}/NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} and [{sup 18}F]F{sup {minus}} from the [{sup 18}O]H{sub 2}O target, and reducing the [{sup 13}N]NO{sub 2}{sup {minus}}/NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} to [{sup 13}N]NH{sub 3}. The [{sup 13}N]NH{sub 3} and [{sup 18}F]F{sup {minus}} products are then conveyed to a laboratory for radiotracer applications. The process employs an anion exchange resin for isolation of the isotopes from the [{sup 18}O]H{sub 2}O, and sequential elution of [{sup 13}N]NO{sub 2}{sup {minus}}/NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} and [{sup 18}F]F{sup {minus}} fractions. Also the apparatus is disclosed for simultaneously producing PET-usable quantities of [{sup 13}N]NH{sub 3} and [{sup 18}F]F{sup {minus}} from a single irradiation of a single low-enriched [{sup 18}O]H{sub 2}O target. 2 figs.

  1. Properties and nature of Be stars 30. Reliable physical properties of a semi-detached B9.5e+G8III binary BR CMi = HD 61273 compared to those of other well studied semi-detached emission-line binaries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harmanec, P; Nemravov, J A; Royer, F; Briot, D; North, P; Lampens, P; Frmat, Y; Yang, S; Boi?, H; Kotkov, L; koda, P; lechta, M; Kor?kov, D; Wolf, M; Zasche, P

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Reliable determination of the basic physical properties of hot emission-line binaries with Roche-lobe filling secondaries is important for developing the theory of mass exchange in binaries. It is a very hard task, however, which is complicated by the presence of circumstellar matter in these systems. So far, only a small number of systems with accurate values of component masses, radii, and other properties are known. Here, we report the first detailed study of a new representative of this class of binaries, BR CMi, based on the analysis of radial velocities and multichannel photometry from several observatories, and compare its physical properties with those for other well-studied systems. BR CMi is an ellipsoidal variable seen under an intermediate orbital inclination of ~51 degrees, and it has an orbital period of 12.919059(15) d and a circular orbit. We used the disentangled component spectra to estimate the effective temperatures 9500(200) K and 4655(50) K by comparing them with model spectra. They corr...

  2. Bando con scadenza 24 aprile 2009 promuoVere la SoSteNIbIlIt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De Cindio, Fiorella

    'alte- razione della funzionalità degli ecosistemi ha quindi anche un impatto economico: variazioni della

  3. Liberi di respirare Sensori innovativi per misurare la concentrazione del gas Radon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    qualsiasi materiale di origine naturale che presenta tracce, anche piccole, di uranio (es. granito, tufo

  4. Tiziana Catarci www.sapienzafutura.it -tiziana@sapienzafutura.it -info@sapienzafutura.it mob. +39 3661216427

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Di Pillo, Gianni

    , unita, partecipe, egualitaria, condivisa, immaginifica, ma anche decorosa, efficiente, seria, concreta e

  5. Adaptation of the modified BoucWen model to compensate for hysteresis in respiratory motion for the list-mode binning of cardiac SPECT and PET acquisitions: Testing using MRI

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dasari, Paul K. R.; Shazeeb, Mohammed Salman [Department of Radiology, Division of Nuclear Medicine, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, Massachusetts 01655 and Department of Biomedical Engineering, Worcester Polytechnic Institute, Worcester, Massachusetts 01609 (United States); Knik, Arda; Lindsay, Clifford; Mukherjee, Joyeeta M.; Johnson, Karen L.; King, Michael A., E-mail: Michael.King@umassmed.edu [Department of Radiology, Division of Nuclear Medicine, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, Massachusetts 01655 (United States)

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Binning list-mode acquisitions as a function of a surrogate signal related to respiration has been employed to reduce the impact of respiratory motion on image quality in cardiac emission tomography (SPECT and PET). Inherent in amplitude binning is the assumption that there is a monotonic relationship between the amplitude of the surrogate signal and respiratory motion of the heart. This assumption is not valid in the presence of hysteresis when heart motion exhibits a different relationship with the surrogate during inspiration and expiration. The purpose of this study was to investigate the novel approach of using the BoucWen (BW) model to provide a signal accounting for hysteresis when binning list-mode data with the goal of thereby improving motion correction. The study is based on the authors previous observations that hysteresis between chest and abdomen markers was indicative of hysteresis between abdomen markers and the internal motion of the heart. Methods: In 19 healthy volunteers, they determined the internal motion of the heart and diaphragm in the superiorinferior direction during free breathing using MRI navigators. A visual tracking system (VTS) synchronized with MRI acquisition tracked the anteriorposterior motions of external markers placed on the chest and abdomen. These data were employed to develop and test the BoucWen model by inputting the VTS derived chest and abdomen motions into it and using the resulting output signals as surrogates for cardiac motion. The data of the volunteers were divided into training and testing sets. The training set was used to obtain initial values for the model parameters for all of the volunteers in the set, and for set members based on whether they were or were not classified as exhibiting hysteresis using a metric derived from the markers. These initial parameters were then employed with the testing set to estimate output signals. Pearsons linear correlation coefficient between the abdomen, chest, average of chest and abdomen markers, and BoucWen derived signals versus the true internal motion of the heart from MRI was used to judge the signals match to the heart motion. Results: The results show that the BoucWen model generated signals demonstrated strong correlation with the heart motion. This correlation was slightly larger on average than that of the external surrogate signals derived from the abdomen marker, and average of the abdomen and chest markers, but was not statistically significantly different from them. Conclusions: The results suggest that the proposed model has the potential to be a unified framework for modeling hysteresis in respiratory motion in cardiac perfusion studies and beyond.

  6. Working Title Scientist 3 Auto req ID 1024BR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mazzotti, Frank

    of these vegetation management efforts. Will work with the staff and management at the field stations. Reports to the Vegetation Management Section's Invasive Species Unit Lead Scientist and will work closely. Prepares required work orders and reports for planning, implementing and documenting vegetation management

  7. antibody chimeric br96: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (15-17) and that the interaction between CD2 and LFA-3 can mediate adhesion of J Clark; Debbie A Law; David J Paterson; Michael Puklavec; Alan; F. Williams 1988-01-01 342...

  8. 4, 48774913, 2004 BrO in the free

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    . G. Lawrence3 , U. Platt2 , and P. J. Crutzen2, 3 1 Institute for Environmental Physics, Universit depletion events (ODEs)15 (Hausmann and Platt, 1994), over salt lakes (Hebestreit et al., 1999; Stutz et al (Wagner and Platt, 1998; Pundt et al.,20 2000; Fitzenberger et al., 2000; Wagner et al., 2001; Van

  9. au br cu: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    I; Read, K F; Rembeczki, S; Reuter, M; Reygers, K; Riabov, V; Riabov, Y; Richardson, E; Roach, D; Roche, G; Rolnick, S D; Romana, A; Rosati, M 2011-01-01 12 Production of omega...

  10. Course syllabus for Math 231br Advanced Algebraic Topology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quick, Gereon

    Email: gquick@math.harvard.edu Office: Science Center 341 (in the back of the library) Office Hours questions, e.g., the classification of vector bundles and K-theory, and learn about more sophisticated

  11. BaBrI:Eu2 + , a new bright scintillator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bourret-Courchesne, E.D.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of a divalent europium 5d-4f transition. F igureto the divalent europium 5d-4f broadband

  12. SynchroPET LLC | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    is developing a low-cost, advanced lithium-ion battery that employs a novel silicon graphene composite material that will substantially improve battery cycle life. When combined...

  13. Commodifying Fido: pets as status symbols

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plemons, April

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    of the dead and food. Man and dog adopted each other in a mutual association after about 6,000 B.C. when humans began using dogs for hunting and warfare (Mery, 1968). Dogs served a utilitarian function for humans; they served a purpose. They pulled sleds... used dogs as temple guards and the Persians as "defenders of man" (Mery, 33). In Eastern Asia, smaller "sleeve dogs" were bred to hide in the sleeves of kings' robes and trained to attack at any sign of human threat. Essentially, dogs had evolved...

  14. Nuclide Imaging: Planar Scintigraphy, SPECT, PET

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suel, Torsten

    Capture Also known as Beta Plus decay A proton changes to a neutron, a positron (positive electron) A nucleus (which is unstable) changes from a higher energy state to a lower energy state through: energy of each photon 2 4 r AE I = #12;EL5823 Nuclear Imaging Yao Wang, Polytechnic U., Brooklyn 9

  15. Positron Emission Tomography (PET) and Positron Scanning

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)IntegratedSpeeding accessPeptoidLabPhysicsPits |RegulationsPortableDOE R&D

  16. Universit deg Centro di Serv

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guidoni, Leonardo

    pre razione il num a e riducend etente (anch scritti ai cor e iscrizione a rso del propr enuto almen

  17. B A N D O D I C O N C O R S O PREMIO DI CULTURA "AURELIO MARCANTONI"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Di Pillo, Gianni

    verranno, in nessun caso, prese in conside- razione le domande pervenute dopo il 31 ottobre 2012, anche se

  18. Disegnare con le equazioni Bacciotti Andrea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bacciotti, Andrea

    magari, anche un po' di fortuna) si possono ottenere dei disegni non solo interessanti dal punto di vista

  19. Home | in English Silvio Greco: un profilo biografico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ceragioli, Francesca

    tutti i suoi allievi, ed anche da tutti i colleghi e amici che hanno avuto la fortuna di incontrarlo

  20. Foglio illustrativo del corso di Elettromagnetismo e Ottica

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marrucci, Lorenzo

    ) gli esami di meccanica e termodinamica, di analisi matematica 1 e di geometria, anche se solo il primo

  1. Abraham Hot Springs Geothermal Area Northern Basin and Range...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Brophy br Model br Moeck br Beardsmore br Type br Volume br Geothermal br Region Mean br Reservoir br Temp br Mean br Capacity Abraham Hot Springs Geothermal Area Northern Basin...

  2. Petroleum Technology (AS) Curriculum Guide Student Name: PS#

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiang, Huiqiang

    PET 0201 Petroleum & Natural Gas Chemistry PET 0203 Oil & Gas Gathering & Transportation PET 0204 Well

  3. QSAR study of structurally unrelated substrates of MDR efflux pump VmrA from V. parahaemolyticus Rudolf Kiralj and Mrcia Miguel Castro Ferreira. marcia@iqm.unicamp.br, rudolf@iqm.unicamp.br, http://lqta.iqm.unicamp.br

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferreira, Márcia M. C.

    QSAR study of structurally unrelated substrates of MDR efflux pump VmrA from V. parahaemolyticus classes can be observed: good (G), moderately good (M) and poor (P1, P2) substrates of the VmrA pump, and periplasmic). This provokes allosteric changes in the structure of this MDR efflux pump, and opens its

  4. Chemometric and QSAR prediction of the multidrug resistance of VmrA efflux pump from Vibrio parahaemolyticus Rudolf Kiralj and Mrcia Miguel Castro Ferreira. marcia@iqm.unicamp.br, rudolf@iqm.unicamp.br, http://lqta.iqm.unicamp.br

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferreira, Mrcia M. C.

    HO H NH OH Tetracycline (8) O O O H H HO H H OH H OH H H H O O O O H HO H H NH H HHO O OO O O H H H H OH H OHH H OH NH2 H OH H O H HN HHN NH2 OH H OH HHO H H HN NH2 NH2 Streptomycin (10) H O OH HH H H H

  5. UNiVErSiT LiBrE DE BrUXELLES -cole de Sant Publique MASTEr EN ScienceS de la Sant Publique

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cerf, Nicolas

    S), Maisons de repos pour personnes ges (MrPA) > Gestion du dpartement infirmier et des services infirmiers > Soins infirmiers cliniques. Cette deuxime anne comprend les cours de spcialisation, les stages (9, 10 dpartement infirmier et des services infirmiers), soit vers une orientation plus clinique (Soins infirmiers

  6. Geometria Numerativa dai primordi alle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Procesi, Claudio

    . In realt`a anche per dare un senso pre ciso a questo semplice Teorema `e neces #12; 7 sario un lungo

  7. Ruolo dellintellettuale e 'guerra di posizione:' da Gramsci a Carlo Giuliani, ragazzo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sassi, Mauro

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    di evidente rilevanza politica. I termini della battagliadelle fasi della battaglia politica e militare, che potevaesempio lideologia e la politica, ma anche le fluttuazioni

  8. amino groups pet: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of the family of malarial causing parasites Plasmodia is complex because of the life-cycle of the organism, where it interacts with a number of different hosts and goes through...

  9. axial 3-d pet: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    was performed to understand the correlation between printing parameters in the FDM 3D printing process, and the force required to remove a part from the build platform of a 3D...

  10. advancing pet science: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in Plant Fields Modern Physical Chemistry). It is designed for undergraduates majoring in science and engineering. We will offer cutting edge classes in advanced sciences and...

  11. Timing Calibration in PET Using a Time Alignment Probe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moses, William W.; Thompson, Christopher J.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    when the two sets of calibration factors are loaded into theare equivalent. Inde, .er/#calibration, positron emissionB. Conventional Time-Delay Calibration Method 4> >,? '- -'#$

  12. Use of PET in the understanding of Addiction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schlyer D. J.; Schlyer, D.J.

    2013-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this research is to understand the factors contributing to addiction in the human and to understand the effects of addiction on the brain.

  13. animal pet studies: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    objects to communicate with other persons, although Gutkin, Boris 30 Record Keeping and Care for Animals in Study Areas Definitions Computer Technologies and Information Sciences...

  14. animal pet study: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    objects to communicate with other persons, although Gutkin, Boris 30 Record Keeping and Care for Animals in Study Areas Definitions Computer Technologies and Information Sciences...

  15. PET And Bioluminescent Imaging Aid Evaluation Of Stem Cells'...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    interactive.snm.orgindex.cfm?PageID903&CFID27713770&CFTOKEN13840564 Submitted: Tuesday, December 4, 2007 - 1...

  16. Sinking a Pet's Teeth into Energy Saving | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO Overview OCHCO OverviewRepositoryManagement | Department of EnergyShaneShawn

  17. I 'RADIOPHARNACEUTICALS IN PET, PROGRESS AND PROMISE F

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh School footballHydrogen andHypernuclei in Hall C High2 - _ I - .Ii

  18. Sinking a Pet's Teeth into Energy Saving | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn April 23, 2014,Zaleski - PolicyWork Force Retention WorkStephenLED CostThis

  19. Characterization of Thallium Bromide (TlBr) for Room Temperature Radiation Detectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Holland McTyeire

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    efficiency in GaAs radiation detectors, Nuclear Instrumentscrystals used for radiation detectors, Nuclear Instrumentscrystals used as radiation detectors, Nuclear Science, IEEE

  20. SPECTRUM AND ENERGY LEVELS OF Pr3+ IN ThBr4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Conway, J.G.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy under Contract W-7405-ENG-48 DISCLAIMER This documentunder Contract No. W-7405-Eng-48. REFERENCES 1. M. GENET, P.D.O.E. under contrcct W-7405-ENG-48 This manuscript was

  1. Longpath DOAS observations of surface BrO at Summit, Greenland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    D. J. , Friess, U. , Platt, U. , Flocke, F. M. , Orlando, J.Chipperfield, M. , Harder, H. , Platt, U. , Sinnhuber, B. ,Peleg, M. , Luria, M. , and Platt, U. : DOAS measurements of

  2. Observations of Cl2, Br2, and I2 in coastal marine air

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Finley, B. D; Saltzman, E. S

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    K. Hebestreit, and U. Platt (1999), Short-lived alkylJ. , K. Hebestreit, U. Platt, and P. S. Liss (2001), CoastalO. Sebastian, and U. Platt (2004), Ground-based measurements

  3. Bull. Br. arachnol. Soc. (2007) 14 (1), 2729 Zelotes mundus (Araneae: Gnaphosidae) in the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richner, Heinz

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    : a continental species reaches the western Mediterranean coast Martin H. Schmidt* Zoological Institute the Camargue belong to Zelotes mundus (Kulczynski, 1897), which is known from Austria, Hungary and the Balkan

  4. Optimization strategies for sustainable fuel cycle of the BR2 Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kalcheva, S.; Van Den Branden, G.; Koonen, E. [SCK-CEN, BR2 Reactor, Boeretang 200, Mol, 2400 (Belgium)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the present study is to achieve a sustainable fuel cycle in a long term of reactor operation applying advanced in-core loading strategies. The optimization criteria concern mainly enhancement of nuclear safety by means of reactivity margins and minimization of the operational fuel cycle cost at a given (constant) power level and same or longer cycle length. An important goal is also to maintain the same or to improve the experimental performances. Current developments are focused on optimization of control rods localization; optimization of fresh and burnt fuel assemblies in-core distribution; optimization of azimuth and axial fuel burn up strategies, including fuel assembly rotating and flipping upside down. (authors)

  5. Comparison of CsBr and KBr coated Cu photocathodes: Effects of...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    processes, that introduce defect states into the alkali halide bandgap, induced by UV laser irradiation. It is possible that alkali metal formation occurs during UV irradiation...

  6. 144 J.Br.Astron.Assoc. 115,3, 2005 1 Meade LX200

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Norton, Andrew J.

    (BCF), offset from the central secondary mirror, in a simple mask with two windows, one of which down to an 80mm glass solar neutral density (ND) filter, as available from Broadhurst Clarkson & Fuller

  7. A mathematical model of a Zn/Br? cell on charge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mader, Michael Joseph

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    technique such as Simpson's rule is not applicable. Instead. the average current density should actually be calculated as a Riemann sum (19). That is. &nnaug = P tng (k) &c(k) k= 1 )14 v:here t, g(k) is the current density of reaction j associated...

  8. Preliminary LEU fuel cycle analyses for the Belgian BR2 reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deen, J.R.; Snelgrove, J.L.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fuel cycle calculations have been performed with reference HEU fuel and LEU fuel using Cd wires or boron as burnable absorbers. The /sup 235/U content in the LEU element has increased 20% to 480g compared to the reference HEU element. The number of fuel plates has remained unchanged while the fuel meat thickness has increased to 0.76 mm from 0.51 mm. The LEU meat density is 5.1 Mg U/m/sup 3/. The reference fuel cycle was a 31 element core operating at 56 MW with a 19.8 day cycle length and eight fresh elements loaded per cycle. Comparable fuel cycle characteristics can be achieved using the proposed LEU fuel element with either Cd wires or boron burnable absorbers. The neutron flux for E/sub n/ > 1 eV changes very little (<5%) in LEU relative to HEU cores. Thermal flux reductions are 5 to 10% in non-fueled positions, and 20 to 30% in fuel elements.

  9. BrUCE BUrGETT School of Interdisciplinary Arts and Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Queitsch, Christine

    monoxide, ozone, nitrogen oxides, aerosols and other metals and in long-range transport of air pollution. Jaffe is a leading expert in global and regional atmospheric pollution, especially mercury, carbon and local air quality impact. T he University of Washington Board of Regents has approved a proposal to name

  10. In AprIl, the BrIdges Center will host a confer-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hochberg, Michael

    feudalism with labor laws suited to an industrial economy. The new guarantees of workers' rights helped

  11. Observations of Cl2, Br2, and I2 in coastal marine air

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Finley, B. D; Saltzman, E. S

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ABS pipe filled with a carbonate-coated glass wool scrubber.The scrubber was prepared by soaking glass wool in a 1% (w/methyl halides, etc. The scrubber should remove acidic

  12. Kurze Mitteilungen-Brief Reports -Communications br6ve Half-space Analysis Basic to the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siewert, Charles E.

    to the Linearized Boltzmann Equation By C. E. SiewerO), Instituto de Energia At6mica, Cidade Universit/tria, S~o Paulo, Brasil 1. Introduction We wish to consider here the linearized Boltzmann equation written

  13. Vertical-tube aqueous LiBr falling film absorption using advanced surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, W.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Perez-Blanco, H. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)

    1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A heat and mass transfer test stand was fabricated and used to investigate nonisothermal falling film absorption of water vapor into a solution of aqueous lithium bromide. The absorber was made of borosilicate glass for visual inspection of the failing film. Experiments were conducted on internally cooled tubes of about 0.019 m outside diameter and of 1.53 m length. Testing evaluated a single absorber tube`s performance at varying operating conditions, namely different cooling-water flow rates, solution flow rates, pressures, temperatures, and concentrations. Advanced surfaces were identified that enhanced absorber load and the mass of absorbed vapor. A pin-fin tube with 6.4mm pitch absorbed about 225% more mass than did a smooth tube. A grooved tube was the d best performer with 175% enhancement over the smooth tube. Increasing the cooling water flow rate to 1.893 {times} 10{sup {minus}4} m{sup 3}/s caused about a 300% increase in the mass absorbed for the grooved tube compared with the smooth tube. Results showed that the pin-fin tube with 6.4-mm pitch and the grooved tubes may enhance absorption to levels comparable to chemical enhancement in horizontal smooth tube absorbers. Absorber load, the transport coefficients, and pertinent absorption data are presented as functions of dimensionless numbers. These experimental data will prove useful in formulating analytical tools to predict vertical-tube absorber performance.

  14. Method of increments for the halogen molecular crystals: Cl, Br, and I

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steenbergen, Krista G. [Physikalische und Theoretische Chemie, Freie Universitt Berlin, Takustr. 3, 14195 Berlin (Germany); MacDiarmid Institute for Advanced Materials and Nanotechnology, Victoria University of Wellington, P.O. Box 600, Wellington 6012 (New Zealand); Gaston, Nicola [MacDiarmid Institute for Advanced Materials and Nanotechnology, Victoria University of Wellington, P.O. Box 600, Wellington 6012 (New Zealand); Mller, Carsten; Paulus, Beate [Physikalische und Theoretische Chemie, Freie Universitt Berlin, Takustr. 3, 14195 Berlin (Germany)

    2014-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Method of increments (MI) calculations reveal the n-body correlation contributions to binding in solid chlorine, bromine, and iodine. Secondary binding contributions as well as d-correlation energies are estimated and compared between each solid halogen. We illustrate that binding is entirely determined by two-body correlation effects, which account for >80% of the total correlation energy. One-body, three-body, and exchange contributions are repulsive. Using density-fitting (DF) local coupled-cluster singles, doubles, and perturbative triples for incremental calculations, we obtain excellent agreement with the experimental cohesive energies. MI results from DF local second-order Mller-Plesset perturbation (LMP2) yield considerably over-bound cohesive energies. Comparative calculations with density functional theory and periodic LMP2 method are also shown to be less accurate for the solid halogens.

  15. Characterization of Thallium Bromide (TlBr) for Room Temperature Radiation Detectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Holland McTyeire

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1.1 Motivation: Radiation Detection for Homelandgermanium (HPGe) radiation detection technology is superior2006. G. F. Knoll, Radiation Detection and Measurement. John

  16. Spectroscopic Evidence for a High-Spin Br-Fe(IV)-Oxo Intermediate in the

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our Instagram Secretary900 Special Report: IG-0900 DecemberAmes: Phil

  17. Guide to Developing Air-Cooled Lithium Bromide (LiBr) Absorption for CHP

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy ChinaofSchaefer To: CongestionDevelopment ofofthe Public Participation2.Applications,

  18. LAKESHORE AVON BR ANT-EDEN ALD EN-LANC ASTER AU BURN W SH ELDON

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto17 3400, U.S.MajorMarketsNov-14 Dec-14Has|Issues L EONARDO

  19. LAKESHORE AVON BR ANT-EDEN ALD EN-LANC ASTER AU BURN W SH ELDON

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto17 3400, U.S.MajorMarketsNov-14 Dec-14Has|Issues L EONARDO81 § ¨

  20. LAKESHORE AVON BR ANT-EDEN ALD EN-LANC ASTER AU BURN W SH ELDON

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto17 3400, U.S.MajorMarketsNov-14 Dec-14Has|Issues L EONARDO81 §

  1. Br-rich Tips of Calcified Crab Claws are Less Hard but More Fracture

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced Materials Find FindRewindParticleBorn on

  2. Tank Farm Closure & Waste Management Environmental Impact Statement <br>

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengthening a solidSynthesis of 2D AlloysTrails Taking CareNEPA

  3. B.Sc) ,1999(M.Sc)2001(-Ph.D.) ,2003( . -)2003-2005(

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rimon, Elon

    , , . )hybrid imaging(- )PET/CT, SPECT/CT( - ) , .( " D.M)1986( ,. , )1989(" " , ". ")1991-1996.(Pet Fellowship " " )1998-2000.( -PET " -2002. " . ," " . : , PET

  4. Image and Signal Processing with Non-Gaussian Noise: EM-Type Algorithms and Adaptive Outlier Pursuit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yan, Ming

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    reconstruction from PET and CT with undersampled data, wetomography (PET) and computed tomography (CT), analytical

  5. Pyrrolo isoquinolines

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Goodman, Mark M. (Atlanta, GA); Shi, Bing Z. (Cincinnati, OH)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Compounds of the formula: ##STR1## wherein X, Y, and R, independently of one another, is each a H; halogen, wherein said halogen is selected from the group consisting of .sup.123 I, .sup.124 I, .sup.125 I, .sup.131 I, .sup.75 Br, .sup.76 Br, .sup.77 Br, .sup.82 Br, .sup.18 F, or .sup.210 At; small alkyl, small alkenyl, or small alkynyl, any of which contains from one to about six carbon atoms and optionally having a carbon atom replaced by an O or S; or halogen substituted-small alkyl, halogen substituted-small alkenyl, or halogen substituted-small alkynyl wherein said compound contains at least one radioacitve halogen. The compounds bind to the serotonin transporter. Depending upon the choice of halogen substituent, the compounds are useful for PET or SPECT imaging, diagnosis and treatment of psychiatric disorders such as depression, anxiety, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and other conditions associated with defects of serotonin transporter function.

  6. First measurement of the ratio of branching fractions BR(Lambda(b) to Lambda(c) mu nu)/BR(Lambda(b) to Lambda(c) pi) at CDF II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, Shin-shan; /Pennsylvania U.

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this dissertation, we measure the properties of the lowest-mass beauty baryon, {Lambda}{sub b}. Baryons are the bound states of three quarks. Protons and neutrons, constituents of atomic nuclei, are the most common baryons. Other types of baryons can be produced and studied in the high-energy collider environment. Three-body dynamics makes baryons composed of low mass quarks difficult to study. On the other hand, baryons with one heavy quark simplify the theoretical treatment of baryon structure, since the heavy quark can be treated the same way as the nucleus in the atom. The {Lambda}{sub b} is composed of u, d, and b quarks, where the b quark is much heavier than the other two. Although, it is accessible, little is known about {Lambda}{sub b}. In 1991, UA1 [1] reconstructed 9 {+-} 1 {Lambda}{sub b} {yields} J/{Psi}{Lambda} candidates. In 1996, ALEPH and DELPHI reconstructed the decay {Lambda}{sub b} {yields} {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} and found only 3-4 candidates [2, 3]. ALEPH measured a {Lambda}{sub b} mass of 5614 {+-} 21 MeV/c{sup 2}, while DELPHI measured 5668 {+-} 18 MeV/c{sup 2}, about 2 {sigma} higher. Subsequently, CDF-I observed 20 {Lambda}{sub b} {yields} J/{Psi}{Lambda} events [4], confirmed the existence of {Lambda}{sub b} unambiguously and made a more precise measurement of {Lambda}{sub b} mass, 5621 {+-} 5 MeV/c{sup 2}. A recent CDF-II measurement by Korn [5] yields 5619.7 {+-} 1.7 MeV/c{sup 2}, which will significantly improve the current world average, 5624 {+-} 9 MeV/c{sup 2}, and resolve the discrepancy of ALEPH and DELPHI.

  7. Biomechanics and tennis Br J Sports Med 2006;40:392396. doi: 10.1136/bjsm.2005.023150

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cooper, Robin L.

    . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Correspondence to: Professor Elliott, University of Western Australia, Perth, WA, Australia; bruce this development. Muscle pre-tension (elastic energy) In a stretch-shorten cycle, elastic energy stored during

  8. Br J Nutr . Author manuscript Maternal fatty acid intake and fetal growth: evidence for an association in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -Guillain 1 , Olivier Thi baugeorges 2 , Val rie Goua 3 , Guillaume Magnin 3 , Michel Schweitzer 2 , Monique and lactation. Essential fatty acids (EFA) play a major role during pregnancy. They provide the precursors

  9. Finding the missing stratospheric Bry: a global modeling study of CHBr3 and CH2Br2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Methanol Ethanol Acetone MEK MTBE CO Methane UCI UCI TOGA/methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE), and toluene all ratioedthe observed decay. For MTBE, also a species that is not

  10. Quim. Nova, Vol. 29, No. 3, 555-562, 2006 *e-mail: ebmelo@unioeste.br

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferreira, Mrcia M. C.

    outros homens, e por um nvel de esco- laridade alto dos pacientes; 2 uma segunda fase, caracterizada

  11. Observations of hydroxyl and peroxy radicals and the impact of BrO at Summit, Greenland in 2007 and 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    D. J. , Friess, U. , Platt, U. , Flocke, F. M. , Orlando, P.1980. Hausmann, M. and Platt, U. : Spectroscopic measurement826833, 1982. Stutz, J. and Platt, U. : Improving long-path

  12. Finding the missing stratospheric Bry: a global modeling study of CHBr3 and CH2Br2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and dispersion of a Mexico City pollution out- flow eventon air pollution in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area,pollution transport during the MILAGRO-2006 campaign: a case study of a major Mexico

  13. 12-BR-UT 43-2310-1 Important: Please see the Notice on the first page of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feschotte, Cedric

    required by the health care reform law for restrictions on annual dollar limits. The annual dollar limits concerning student health insurance coverage. 2013-2014 Designed Especially for the Students of LIMITED BENEFIT HEALTH COVERAGE BENEFITS PROVIDED ARE SUPPLEMENTAL AND ARE NOT INTENDED TO COVER ALL MEDICAL

  14. Marker-Assisted Verification of Hybrids in Pearl Millet-Napiergrass (Pennisetum glaucum [L.] R. Br. x Pennisetum purpureum Schumach.)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dowling, Charlie

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    ; Lewandowski et al., 2003; Khanna et al., 2010). There is a tremendous rate of return of energy production in perennial biomass systems with such low-input requirements. The incorporation of low-input management practices with biomass feedstocks... giganteus Keng., and Brachypodium P. Beauv. (USDA Press Release, 08/12/11). None of these crops, however, are capable of producing both a high biomass feedstock that have superior yield in the establishment year and can be direct seeded. Switchgrass can...

  15. Finding the missing stratospheric Bry: a global modeling study of CHBr3 and CH2Br2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    C-130 T0 T1 G1 Ethane Propane i-Butane n-Butane i-Pentane n-ppbv) Ethane Ethene Ethyne Propane Propene i-Butane n-Butanee.g. , ethane, ethene, propane, propane, methanol, ethanol,

  16. Synergistic effects of 2-aminoethylisothiuronoium.Br.HBr (AET) and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) in chemical radioprotection of mice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frei, Melvin Ray

    1968-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of ten each, were exposed to various levels of acute whole body gamma irradiation from a 60 Cc . ource, A dose of 690 rads was established as th" LD 50/30 dost. by probit analysis. Phase II consisted of intraperitoneal injection of either AET, DMSO...& or various combinations of these two chemicals into mice 5 minutes prior to a whole body exposure of 1200 rads. Results of Phase II show that administration of 250 mg AET/kg resulted in 80X survival at 30 days. AET doses below 250 mg/kg did not result...

  17. Revista Brasileira de Ensino de Fisica, v. 27, n. 1, p. 101 -102, (2005) www.sbfisica.org.br

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Aguiar, Marcus A. M.

    de F´isica `Gleb Wataghin', Universidade Estadual de Campinas, Campinas, SP, Brasil O trabalho de¸c~ao experimental da quantiza¸c~ao dos n´iveis de energia dos ´atomos. As propostas de Bohr e Sommerfeld indicavam

  18. Revista Brasileira de Ensino de Fisica, v. 27, n. 1, p. 103 -107, (2005) www.sbfisica.org.br

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Aguiar, Marcus A. M.

    fun¸c~ao energia1 . Seja ainda J(t, q1 . . . ql, 1 . . . l) uma integral completa da equa~ao Carlos, SP, Brasil. Revis~ao t´ecnica de Marcus A.M. de Aguiar. Instituto de F´isica "Gleb Wataghin", Universidade Estadual de Campinas, Campinas, SP, Brasil. 1Pois tem-se neste caso dH dt = i H qi . qi + i H pi

  19. Observations of hydroxyl and peroxy radicals and the impact of BrO at Summit, Greenland in 2007 and 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    investigations at Summit, Greenland: An overview, J.upon ice particles in the Greenland snowpack, Geophys. Res.the snowpack at Summit, Greenland, Atmos. Environ. , 36,

  20. 8534 J. Am. Chem. SOC.1991, 113, 8534-8535 The transfer of Br+ between the two ethylenes requires a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chait, Brian T.

    gratefully acknowledge the financial support of the Natural Sciencesand Engineering Research Council, and nuclear magnetic resonance have been applied to monitor these conformational changes in my SrrucfureA Practical Approach; Creighton, T. E.,Ed.; IRL Press: Oxford, England, 1990. (2) Rossi-Fanelli, A