Powered by Deep Web Technologies
Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bowline bull moose" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Bull Moose Energy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160Benin: EnergyBoston Areais a villageBucyrus, NorthBuhler, Kansas:> PostsBullMoose

2

Bull Moose Energy LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160Benin: EnergyBoston Areais a villageBucyrus, NorthBuhler, Kansas:> PostsBull

3

MOOSE  

Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

002565WKSTN01 Multiphysics Object Oriented Simulation Environment  https://github.com/idaholab/moose 

4

MOOSE: Multiphysics Object-Oriented Simulation Environment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An overview of Idaho National Laboratory's MOOSE: Multiphysics Object-Oriented Simulation Environment

Gaston, Derek

2014-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

5

MOOSE: Multiphysics Object-Oriented Simulation Environment  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

An overview of Idaho National Laboratory's MOOSE: Multiphysics Object-Oriented Simulation Environment

Gaston, Derek

2014-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

6

Bull Test ID 1140 2013 Florida Bull Test  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bull Test ID 1140 2013 Florida Bull Test #12;Bull Test ID 1141 2013 Florida Bull Test #12;Bull Test ID 1142 2013 Florida Bull Test #12;Bull Test ID 1143 2013 Florida Bull Test #12;Bull Test ID 1144 2013 Florida Bull Test #12;Bull Test ID 1145 2013 Florida Bull Test #12;Bull Test ID 1146 2013 Florida

Jawitz, James W.

7

Bull Test ID 1098 2013 Florida Bull Test  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bull Test ID 1098 2013 Florida Bull Test #12;Bull Test ID 1099 2013 Florida Bull Test #12;Bull Test ID 1100 2013 Florida Bull Test #12;Bull Test ID 1101 2013 Florida Bull Test #12;Bull Test ID 1102 2013 Florida Bull Test #12;Bull Test ID 1103 2013 Florida Bull Test #12;Bull Test ID 1104 2013 Florida

Jawitz, James W.

8

Bull Test ID 1181 2013 Florida Bull Test  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bull Test ID 1181 2013 Florida Bull Test #12;Bull Test ID 1182 2013 Florida Bull Test #12;Bull Test ID 1183 2013 Florida Bull Test #12;Bull Test ID 1184 2013 Florida Bull Test #12;Bull Test ID 1185 2013 Florida Bull Test #12;Bull Test ID 1186 2013 Florida Bull Test #12;Bull Test ID 1187 2013 Florida

Jawitz, James W.

9

Bull Test ID 1160 2013 Florida Bull Test  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bull Test ID 1160 2013 Florida Bull Test #12;Bull Test ID 1161 2013 Florida Bull Test #12;Bull Test ID 1162 2013 Florida Bull Test #12;Bull Test ID 1163 2013 Florida Bull Test #12;Bull Test ID 1164 2013 Florida Bull Test #12;Bull Test ID 1165 2013 Florida Bull Test #12;Bull Test ID 1166 2013 Florida

Jawitz, James W.

10

Bull Test ID 1118 2013 Florida Bull Test  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bull Test ID 1118 2013 Florida Bull Test #12;Bull Test ID 1119 2013 Florida Bull Test #12;Bull Test ID 1120 2013 Florida Bull Test #12;Bull Test ID 1121 2013 Florida Bull Test #12;Bull Test ID 1122 2013 Florida Bull Test #12;Bull Test ID 1123 2013 Florida Bull Test #12;Bull Test ID 1124 2013 Florida

Jawitz, James W.

11

Bull Test ID 1077 2013 Florida Bull Test  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

14th Annual Florida Bull Test #12;Bull Test ID 1077 2013 Florida Bull Test #12;Bull Test ID 1078 2013 Florida Bull Test #12;Bull Test ID 1079 2013 Florida Bull Test #12;Bull Test ID 1080 2013 Florida Bull Test #12;Bull Test ID 1081 2013 Florida Bull Test #12;Bull Test ID 1082 2013 Florida Bull Test #12

Jawitz, James W.

12

Pervasive Restart In MOOSE-based Applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Multiphysics applications are inherently complicated. Solving for multiple, interacting physical phenomena involves the solution of multiple equations, and each equation has its own data dependencies. Feeding the correct data to these equations at exactly the right time requires extensive effort in software design. In an ideal world, multiphysics applications always run to completion and produce correct answers. Unfortunately, in reality, there can be many reasons why a simulation might fail: power outage, system failure, exceeding a runtime allotment on a supercomputer, failure of the solver to converge, etc. A failure after many hours spent computing can be a significant setback for a project. Therefore, the ability to “continue” a solve from the point of failure, rather than starting again from scratch, is an essential component of any high-quality simulation tool. This process of “continuation” is commonly termed “restart” in the computational community. While the concept of restarting an application sounds ideal, the aforementioned complexities and data dependencies present in multiphysics applications make its implementation decidedly non-trivial. A running multiphysics calculation accumulates an enormous amount of “state”: current time, solution history, material properties, status of mechanical contact, etc. This “state” data comes in many different forms, including scalar, tensor, vector, and arbitrary, application-specific data types. To be able to restart an application, you must be able to both store and retrieve this data, effectively recreating the state of the application before the failure. When utilizing the Multiphysics Object Oriented Simulation Environment (MOOSE) framework developed at Idaho National Laboratory, this state data is stored both internally within the framework itself (such as solution vectors and the current time) and within the applications that use the framework. In order to implement restart in MOOSE-based applications, the total state of the system (both within the framework and without) must be stored and retrieved. To this end, the MOOSE team has implemented a “pervasive” restart capability which allows any object within MOOSE (or within a MOOSE-based application) to be declared as “state” data, and handles the storage and retrieval of said data.

Derek Gaston; Cody Permann; David Andrs; John Peterson; Andrew Slaughter; Jason Miller

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

The Moose and Boreal Forests of Isle Royale and Sweden  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Moose and Boreal Forests of Isle Royale and Sweden John Pastor Dept. of Biology Univ #12;Exclosures in Sweden #12;Exclosures in Sweden Inga älgar 50 älgar / 1000 ha #12;McInnes et al. 1992. Ecology Moose browsing decreases aboveground productivity on Isle Royale #12;Pine Birch In Sweden

14

Testing Bulls for Fertility.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, but this seasonal dif- ference is not shown by the survey. However, there is a trend toward lower fertility in late summer if the questionable bulls are included with the cull bulls. funnel which reduces breakage and hjui The reproductive organs should... OF THE TESTS --------_-_ 6 Sa~isfactor~ ............................ 6 Questionable ........................... 6 Cull ................................... 6 WHEN TO CHECK FOR FERTILITY -_-_-_----_-- 6 Just Before the Breeding Season ----_--_-_- 6 Soon...

Berry, R. O.; Thompson, U. D.; Sorensen, A. M.; Maddox, L. A. Jr.

1958-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Florida Bull Test 2014 Health Form (This form must accompany bulls at delivery to the Bull Test.)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Florida Bull Test 2014 Health Form (This form must accompany bulls at delivery to the Bull Test Inspection** (Health Paper) Date________________ Brucellosis Test Date_____________ or Certification Number_______________ Tuberculosis Test Date_____________ or Certification Number_______________ or T.B. free state ____________(yes

Jawitz, James W.

16

Moose Creek, Alaska: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to:46 -Energieprojekte3 Climate ZoneMontrose, Wisconsin: EnergyMoodyMoose Creek, Alaska:

17

Moose Pass, Alaska: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to:46 -Energieprojekte3 Climate ZoneMontrose, Wisconsin: EnergyMoodyMoose Creek,

18

Moose Wilson Road, Wyoming: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to:46 -Energieprojekte3 Climate ZoneMontrose, Wisconsin: EnergyMoodyMoose Creek,Road,

19

Status of Oregon's Bull Trout.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Limited historical references indicate that bull trout Salvelinus confluentus in Oregon were once widely spread throughout at least 12 basins in the Klamath River and Columbia River systems. No bull trout have been observed in Oregon's coastal systems. A total of 69 bull trout populations in 12 basins are currently identified in Oregon. A comparison of the 1991 bull trout status (Ratliff and Howell 1992) to the revised 1996 status found that 7 populations were newly discovered and 1 population showed a positive or upgraded status while 22 populations showed a negative or downgraded status. The general downgrading of 32% of Oregon's bull trout populations appears largely due to increased survey efforts and increased survey accuracy rather than reduced numbers or distribution. However, three populations in the upper Klamath Basin, two in the Walla Walla Basin, and one in the Willamette Basin showed decreases in estimated population abundance or distribution.

Buchanan, David V.; Hanson, Mary L.; Hooton, Robert M.

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

ORIGINAL PAPER Space and habitat use of moose in southwestern Sweden  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ORIGINAL PAPER Space and habitat use of moose in southwestern Sweden Mattias Olsson & John J. Cox species found throughout most of Sweden, little is known about its ecology throughout the southern part southwestern Sweden by fitting 22 adult moose (13 F, nine M) with global positioning system (GPS) radio collars

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bowline bull moose" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Using a Bull Call Spread  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Bull Call Spread can be used to hedge against or to benefit from a rising market. The user buys a call option at a particular strike price and sells a call option at a higher strike price. Margin requirements, advantages and disadvantages...

Bevers, Stan; Amosson, Stephen H.; Waller, Mark L.; Dhuyvetter, Kevin C.

2008-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

22

MOOSE: A PARALLEL COMPUTATIONAL FRAMEWORK FOR COUPLED SYSTEMS OF NONLINEAR EQUATIONS.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Systems of coupled, nonlinear partial di?erential equations often arise in sim- ulation of nuclear processes. MOOSE: Multiphysics Ob ject Oriented Simulation Environment, a parallel computational framework targeted at solving these systems is presented. As opposed to traditional data / ?ow oriented com- putational frameworks, MOOSE is instead founded on mathematics based on Jacobian-free Newton Krylov (JFNK). Utilizing the mathematical structure present in JFNK, physics are modularized into “Kernels” allowing for rapid production of new simulation tools. In addition, systems are solved fully cou- pled and fully implicit employing physics based preconditioning allowing for a large amount of ?exibility even with large variance in time scales. Background on the mathematics, an inspection of the structure of MOOSE and several rep- resentative solutions from applications built on the framework are presented.

G. Hansen; C. Newman; D. Gaston

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Bull Hill | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectricEnergyCTBarre BiomassTHISBrickyardRepowerBull Creek Wind Farm Jump

25

Redwing: A MOOSE application for coupling MPACT and BISON  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fuel performance and whole core neutron transport programs are often used to analyze fuel behavior as it is depleted in a reactor. For fuel performance programs, internal models provide the local intra-pin power density, fast neutron flux, burnup, and fission rate density, which are needed for a fuel performance analysis. The fuel performance internal models have a number of limitations. These include effects on the intra-pin power distribution by nearby assembly elements, such as water channels and control rods, and the further limitation of applicability to a specified fuel type such as low enriched UO2. In addition, whole core neutron transport codes need an accurate intra-pin temperature distribution in order to calculate neutron cross sections. Fuel performance simulations are able to model the intra-pin fuel displacement as the fuel expands and densifies. These displacements must be accurately modeled in order to capture the eventual mechanical contact of the fuel and the clad; the correct radial gap width is needed for an accurate calculation of the temperature distribution of the fuel rod. Redwing is a MOOSE-based application that enables coupling between MPACT and BISON for transport and fuel performance coupling. MPACT is a 3D neutron transport and reactor core simulator based on the method of characteristics (MOC). The development of MPACT began at the University of Michigan (UM) and now is under the joint development of ORNL and UM as part of the DOE CASL Simulation Hub. MPACT is able to model the effects of local assembly elements and is able calculate intra-pin quantities such as the local power density on a volumetric mesh for any fuel type. BISON is a fuel performance application of Multi-physics Object Oriented Simulation Environment (MOOSE), which is under development at Idaho National Laboratory. BISON is able to solve the nonlinearly coupled mechanical deformation and heat transfer finite element equations that model a fuel element as it is depleted in a nuclear reactor. Redwing couples BISON and MPACT in a single application. Redwing maps and transfers the individual intra-pin quantities such as fission rate density, power density, and fast neutron flux from the MPACT volumetric mesh to the individual BISON finite element meshes. For a two-way coupling Redwing maps and transfers the individual pin temperature field and axially dependent coolant densities from the BISON mesh to the MPACT volumetric mesh. Details of the mapping are given. Redwing advances the simulation with the MPACT solution for each depletion time step and then advances the multiple BISON simulations for fuel performance calculations. Sub-cycle advancement can be applied to the individual BISON simulations and allows multiple time steps to be applied to the fuel performance simulations. Currently, only loose coupling where data from a previous time step is applied to the current time step is performed.

Frederick N. Gleicher; Michael Rose; Tom Downar

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Palatability of beef from young bulls  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

beef; hower et, previous research (Adams and Arthaud, 1963; Aitken er al. , 1963; Reagan et al. , 1971; Gortsema et al. , 1974) has shown that meat from young bulls is not as tender as that from steers and that the palatability of young bull beef...

Riley, Ray Renfrow

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

HF radar in French Mediterranean Sea: an element of MOOSE Mediterranean Ocean Observing System on Environment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sea in the context of climate change and anthropogenic pressure and to supply and maintain longHF radar in French Mediterranean Sea: an element of MOOSE Mediterranean Ocean Observing System , Pascal Guterman2 , Karim Bernardet2 1 Mediterranean Institute of Oceanography (MIO, UM 110, USTV

Boyer, Edmond

28

Price determination for breeding bulls  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Oammittee) Ra A. ietrzch C. J ~) Daru. I (Heai of August l987 Price Detezlainatian for Breeding Bulls. (August 1987) Jerry Carl Namkan, B. S. , Texas A&M University; Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. Donald E. Ferris A study using two different data... sets was conducted to determine the factors affecting the price of zmg~ Hereford hulls. In the first data set, both ~ and lagged national ~ feeder steer, utility cow, and crude oil prices, and net farm income were analyzed in a regzmsion procedure...

Namken, Jerry Carl

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Protecting Oregon's Bull Kelp April 14, 2006  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Protecting Oregon's Bull Kelp April 14, 2006 Megan Mackey Ocean Policy Analyst Pacific Marine........................................................................................... 3 Oregon Kelp Ecology................................................................................3 Effects of Kelp Harvest on Marine Fish and Other Species....................................4

California at Santa Cruz, University of

30

Bull Creek Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectricEnergyCTBarre BiomassTHISBrickyardRepowerBull Creek Wind Farm Jump to:

31

Evaluation of traits associated with bucking bull performance and behavior  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

aunt and uncle, Robert and Kim Romero, for all of their love and support during my academic career. vi NOMENCLATURE DAB Dataset ?All Bulls? DBG Dataset ?Bull Groups? DS Dataset ?Sires? DS1 Dataset ?Sires with more than 1 son................................................................................................................. 21 Average score................................................................................................ 22 Career average score ..................................................................................... 22 Datasets...

Romero, Natasha Elizabeth

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

32

Annual Status of the Fisheries Report 2-1 2. BULL KELP  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Annual Status of the Fisheries Report 2-1 2. BULL KELP Overview of Use and Harvest Bull kelp-consumptive users such as scuba divers. Because of the multiple uses of bull kelp, management concerns are much more complex than for most species. Until the late 1980s, there was little targeted harvest of bull kelp

California at Santa Cruz, University of

33

Ecology and Management of the Bull Kelp, Nereocystis luetkeana: A Synthesis with Recommendations for Future Research  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ecology and Management of the Bull Kelp, Nereocystis luetkeana: A Synthesis with Recommendations: Bull kelp (Nereocystis luetkeana) with surf perch. Photo by Steve Clabuesch. #12;TABLE OF CONTENTS I. INTRODUCTION Why the interest in ecology and management of the bull kelp? 1 Approach, scope of synthesis

Carr, Mark H.

34

The role of the bull's vomeronasal organ in estrous determination  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE ROLE OF THE BULL'S VOMERONASAL ORGAN IN ESTROUS DETERMINATION A Thesis by THOMAS JAMES McGRATH Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM Uni ver s i ty i n partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE... May 19B1 Major Subject: Veterinary Anatomy THE ROLE OF THE BULL'S VOMERONASAL ORGAN IN ESTROUS DETERMINATION A Thesis by THOMAS JAMES MCGRATH Approved As To Style and Content By: (Chair of Committee) (M er) (Member) (Head epartment) May 1981...

McGrath, Thomas James

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Evaluation of INL Supplied MOOSE/OSPREY Model: Modeling Water Adsorption on Type 3A Molecular Sieve  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was to evaluate Idaho National Lab’s Multiphysics Object-Oriented Simulation Environment (MOOSE) software in modeling the adsorption of water onto type 3A molecular sieve (3AMS). MOOSE can be thought-of as a computing framework within which applications modeling specific coupled-phenomena can be developed and run. The application titled Off-gas SeParation and REcoverY (OSPREY) has been developed to model gas sorption in packed columns. The sorbate breakthrough curve calculated by MOOSE/OSPREY was compared to results previously obtained in the deep bed hydration tests conducted at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The coding framework permits selection of various options, when they exist, for modeling a process. For example, the OSPREY module includes options to model the adsorption equilibrium with a Langmuir model or a generalized statistical thermodynamic adsorption (GSTA) model. The vapor solid equilibria and the operating conditions of the process (e.g., gas phase concentration) are required to calculate the concentration gradient driving the mass transfer between phases. Both the Langmuir and GSTA models were tested in this evaluation. Input variables were either known from experimental conditions, or were available (e.g., density) or were estimated (e.g., thermal conductivity of sorbent) from the literature. Variables were considered independent of time, i.e., rather than having a mass transfer coefficient that varied with time or position in the bed, the parameter was set to remain constant. The calculated results did not coincide with data from laboratory tests. The model accurately estimated the number of bed volumes processed for the given operating parameters, but breakthrough times were not accurately predicted, varying 50% or more from the data. The shape of the breakthrough curves also differed from the experimental data, indicating a much wider sorption band. Model modifications are needed to improve its utility and predictive capability. Recommended improvements include: greater flexibility for input of mass transfer parameters, time-variable gas inlet concentration, direct output of loading and temperature profiles along the bed, and capability to conduct simulations of beds in series.

Pompilio, L. M. [Syracuse University; DePaoli, D. W. [ORNL; Spencer, B. B. [ORNL

2014-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

36

Temporary Restoration of Bull Trout Passage at Albeni Falls Dam  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study was designed to monitor movements of bull trout that were provided passage above Albeni Falls Dam, Pend Oreille River. Electrofishing and angling were used to collect bull trout below the dam. Tissue samples were collected from each bull trout and sent to the U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service Abernathy Fish Technology Center Conservation Genetics Lab, Washington. The DNA extracted from tissue samples were compared to a catalog of bull trout population DNA from the Priest River drainage, Lake Pend Oreille tributaries, and the Clark Fork drainage to determine the most probable tributary of origin. A combined acoustic radio or radio tag was implanted in each fish prior to being transported and released above the dam. Bull trout relocated above the dam were able to volitionally migrate into their natal tributary, drop back downstream, or migrate upstream to the next dam. A combination of stationary radio receiving stations and tracking via aircraft, boat, and vehicle were used to monitor the movement of tagged fish to determine if the spawning tributary it selected matched the tributary assigned from the genetic analysis. Seven bull trout were captured during electrofishing surveys in 2008. Of these seven, four were tagged and relocated above the dam. Two were tagged and left below the dam as part of a study monitoring movements below the dam. One was immature and too small at the time of capture to implant a tracking tag. All four fish released above the dam passed by stationary receivers stations leading into Lake Pend Oreille and no fish dropped back below the dam. One of the radio tags was recovered in the tributary corresponding with the results of the genetic test. Another fish was located in the vicinity of its assigned tributary, which was impassable due to low water discharge at its mouth. Two fish have not been located since entering the lake. Of these fish, one was immature and not expected to enter its natal tributary in the fall of 2008. The other fish was large enough to be mature, but at the time of capture its sex was unable to be determined, indicating it may not have been mature at the time of capture. These fish are expected to enter their natal tributaries in early summer or fall of 2009.

Paluch, Mark; Scholz, Allan; McLellan, Holly [Eastern Washington University Department of Biology; Olson, Jason [Kalispel Tribe of Indians Natural Resources Department

2009-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

37

Glandless cottonseed flour in preweaning diets for holstein bull calves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GLANDLESS COTTONSEED FLOUR IN PRENEANING DIETS FOR HOLSTEIN BULL CALVFS A Thesis by RICARDO CERRON SILVA Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM University in Partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE... December 1979 Major Subject: Dairy Science GLANDLESS COTTONSEED FLOUR IN PREWEANING DIETS FOR HOLSTEIN HULL CALVES A Thesis by RICARDO CERRON SILVA Approved as to style and content by: ~rv '. V- ~J Ag, ~= Chairman of Committee Member ember , n...

Silva, Ricardo Cerron

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Monitor and Protect Wigwam River Bull Trout for Koocanusa Reservoir : Summary of the Skookumchuck Creek Bull Trout Enumeration Project Final Report 2000-2002.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the third and final year of a bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) enumeration project on Skookumchuck Creek in southeastern British Columbia. The fence and traps were operated from September 6th to October 11th 2002 in order to enumerate post-spawning bull trout. During the study period a total of 309 bull trout were captured at the fence. In total, 16 fish of undetermined sex, 114 males and 179 females were processed at the fence. Length and weight data, as well as recapture information, were collected for these fish. An additional 41 bull trout were enumerated upstream of the fence by snorkeling prior to fence removal. Coupled with the fence count, the total bull trout enumerated during the project was 350 individuals. Several fish that were tagged in the lower Bull River were recaptured in 2002, as were repeat and alternate year spawners previously enumerated in past years at the fence. A total of 149 bull trout redds were enumerated on the ground in 2002, of which 143 were in the 3.0 km index section (river km 27.5-30.5) that has been surveyed over the past six years. The results of the three year project are summarized, and population characteristics are discussed.

Baxter, Jeremy; Baxter, James S.

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

4.1 Bull Trout (Salvelinus confluentus) 4.1.1 Background  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Panhandle National Forests have named bull trout as Management Indicator Species (MIS) in their Forest Plan to guide stream and riparian management and to monitor progress toward achieving Forest Plan objectivesTribes of the Salish and Kootenai consider bull trout a sensitive species and an important cultural resource

40

Bull Trout Population Assessment in the Columbia River Gorge : Annual Report 2000.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We summarized existing knowledge regarding the known distribution of bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) across four sub-basins in the Columbia River Gorge in Washington. The Wind River, Little White Salmon River, White Salmon River, and the Klickitat River sub-basins were analyzed. Cold water is essential to the survival, spawning, and rearing of bull trout. We analyzed existing temperature data, installed Onset temperature loggers in the areas of the four sub-basins where data was not available, and determined that mean daily water temperatures were <15 C and appropriate for spawning and rearing of bull trout. We snorkel surveyed more than 74 km (46.25 mi.) of rivers and streams in the four sub-basins (13.8 km at night and 60.2 km during the day) and found that night snorkeling was superior to day snorkeling for locating bull trout. Surveys incorporated the Draft Interim Protocol for Determining Bull Trout Presence (Peterson et al. In Press). However, due to access and safety issues, we were unable to randomly select sample sites nor use block nets as recommended. Additionally, we also implemented the Bull Trout/Dolly Varden sampling methodology described in Bonar et al. (1997). No bull trout were found in the Wind River, Little White Salmon, or White Salmon River sub-basins. We found bull trout in the West Fork Klickitat drainage of the Klickitat River Sub-basin. Bull trout averaged 6.7 fish/100m{sup 2} in Trappers Creek, 2.6 fish/100m{sup 2} on Clearwater Creek, and 0.4 fish/100m{sup 2} in Little Muddy Creek. Bull trout was the only species of salmonid encountered in Trappers Creek and dominated in Clearwater Creek. Little Muddy Creek was the only creek where bull trout and introduced brook trout occurred together. We found bull trout only at night and typically in low flow regimes. A single fish, believed to be a bull trout x brook trout hybrid, was observed in the Little Muddy Creek. Additional surveys are needed in the West Fork Klickitat and mainstem Klickitat to determine the distribution of bull trout throughout the drainage and to determine the extent of hybridization with brook trout.

Byrne, Jim; McPeak, Ron

2001-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bowline bull moose" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Bull Frog Green Energy LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160Benin: EnergyBoston Areais a villageBucyrus, NorthBuhler, Kansas:> PostsBull Frog

42

Bull Outdoor Products: Order (2015-CE-14014) | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in Review: Top FiveDepartment of Energy Buildings PerspectiveBUILDINGS-TO-GRIDofBull

43

Temporary Restoration of Bull Trout Passage at Albeni Falls Dam, 2008 Progress Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of this project is to provide temporary upstream passage of bull trout around Albeni Falls Dam on the Pend Oreille River, Idaho. Our specific objectives are to capture fish downstream of Albeni Falls Dam, tag them with combination acoustic and radio transmitters, release them upstream of Albeni Falls Dam, and determine if genetic information on tagged fish can be used to accurately establish where fish are located during the spawning season. In 2007, radio receiving stations were installed at several locations throughout the Pend Oreille River watershed to detect movements of adult bull trout; however, no bull trout were tagged during that year. In 2008, four bull trout were captured downstream of Albeni Falls Dam, implanted with transmitters, and released upstream of the dam at Priest River, Idaho. The most-likely natal tributaries of bull trout assigned using genetic analyses were Grouse Creek (N = 2); a tributary of the Pack River, Lightning Creek (N = 1); and Rattle Creek (N = 1), a tributary of Lightning Creek. All four bull trout migrated upstream from the release site in Priest River, Idaho, were detected at monitoring stations near Dover, Idaho, and were presumed to reside in Lake Pend Oreille from spring until fall 2008. The transmitter of one bull trout with a genetic assignment to Grouse Creek was found in Grouse Creek in October 2008; however, the fish was not found. The bull trout assigned to Rattle Creek was detected in the Clark Fork River downstream from Cabinet Gorge Dam (approximately 13 km from the mouth of Lightning Creek) in September but was not detected entering Lightning Creek. The remaining two bull trout were not detected in 2008 after detection at the Dover receiving stations. This report details the progress by work element in the 2008 statement of work, including data analyses of fish movements, and expands on the information reported in the quarterly Pisces status reports.

Bellgraph, Brian J. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

44

Wigwam River Juvenile Bull Trout and Fish Habitat Monitoring Program : 2000 Data Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Wigwam River bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) and fish habitat monitoring program is a trans-boundary initiative implemented by the British Columbia Ministry of Environment, Lands and Parks (MOE), in cooperation with Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). The Wigwam River is an important fisheries stream located in southeastern British Columbia that supports healthy populations of both bull trout and Westslope cutthroat trout (Figure 1.1). This river has been characterized as the single most important bull trout spawning stream in the Kootenay Region (Baxter and Westover 2000, Cope 1998). In addition, the Wigwam River supports some of the largest Westslope cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarki lewisi) in the Kootenay Region. These fish are highly sought after by anglers (Westover 1999a, 1999b). Bull trout populations have declined in many areas of their range within Montana and throughout the northwest including British Columbia. Bull trout were blue listed as vulnerable in British Columbia by the B.C. Conservation Data Center (Cannings 1993) and although there are many healthy populations of bull trout in the East Kootenays they remain a species of special concern. Bull trout in the United States portion of the Columbia River were listed as threatened in 1998 under the Endangered Species Act by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. The upper Kootenay River is within the Kootenai sub-basin of the Mountain Columbia Province, one of the eleven Eco-provinces that make up the Columbia River Basin. MOE applied for and received funding from BPA to assess and monitor the status of wild, native stocks of bull trout in tributaries to Lake Koocanusa (Libby Reservoir) and the upper Kootenay River. This task is one of many that was undertaken to ''Monitor and Protect Bull Trout for Koocanusa Reservoir'' (BPA Project Number 2000-04-00).

Cope, R.S.; Morris, K.J.

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Pubertal changes in the expression of fertility associated antigen in Bos indicus and Bos taurus bulls  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PUBERTAL CHANGES IN THE EXPRESSION OF FERTILITY ASSOCIATED ANTIGEN IN BOS INDICUS AND BOS TAURUS BULLS A Thesis by AARON M. NOVOSAD Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial... TAURUS BULLS A Thesis by AARON M. NOVOSAD Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE Approved by: Co...

Novosad, Aaron M.

2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

46

Cornelis Zwaan (1928 1999) All Publications Zwaan, C.: 1959, "Curves of growth for a large sunspot", Bull. Astronom. Institutes Netherlands  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

sunspot", Bull. Astronom. Institutes Netherlands 14, 288­298 Zwaan, C.: 1960, "Note on partition functions and ultraviolet region", Bull. Astronom. Institutes Netherlands 16, 225­233 Zwaan, C.: 1965a, "On the influence Physics, Pro- ceedings NATO Advanced Study Institute Lagonissi, Interscience Publishers, Page Bros

Rutten, Rob

47

Bull Trout Population Assessment in the White Salmon and Klickitat Rivers, Columbia River Gorge, Washington, 2001 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We utilized night snorkeling and single pass electroshocking to determine the presence or absence of bull trout Salvelinus confluentus in 26 stream reaches (3,415 m) in the White Salmon basin and in 71 stream reaches (9,005 m) in the Klickitat River basin during summer and fall 2001. We did not find any bull trout in the White Salmon River basin. In the Klickitat River basin, bull trout were found only in the West Fork Klickitat River drainage. We found bull trout in two streams not previously reported: Two Lakes Stream and an unnamed tributary to Fish Lake Stream (WRIA code number 30-0550). We attempted to capture downstream migrant bull trout in the West Fork Klickitat River by fishing a 1.5-m rotary screw trap at RM 4.3 from July 23 through October 17. Although we caught other salmonids, no bull trout were captured. The greatest limiting factor for bull trout in the West Fork Klickitat River is likely the small amount of available habitat resulting in a low total abundance, and the isolation of the population. Many of the streams are fragmented by natural falls, which are partial or complete barriers to upstream fish movement. To date, we have not been able to confirm that the occasional bull trout observed in the mainstem Klickitat River are migrating upstream into the West Fork Klickitat River.

Thiesfeld, Steven L.; McPeak, Ronald H.; McNamara, Brian S. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife); Honanie, Isadore (Confederated Tribes and Bands, Yakama Nation)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Evaluate Bull Trout Movements in the Tucannon and Lower Snake Rivers, 2002-2003 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We collected 279 adult bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) in the Tucannon River during the Spring and Fall of 2003. Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) tags were inserted in 191 of them, and we detected existing PIT tags in an additional 31bull trout. Thirty five of these were also surgically implanted with radio-tags, and we monitored the movements of these fish throughout the year. Fourteen radio-tags were recovered shortly after tagging, and as a result, 21 remained in the river through December 31, 2003. Four bull trout that were radio-tagged in spring 2002 were known to survive and carry their tags through the spring and/or summer of 2003. One of these fish spent the winter near river mile (RM) 13.0; the other 3 over-wintered in the vicinity of the Tucannon Hatchery between RM 34 and 36. Twenty-one radio tags from bull trout tagged in 2002 were recovered during the spring and summer, 2003. These tags became stationary the winter of 2002/2003, and were recovered between RM 11 and 55. We were unable to recover the remaining 15 tags from 2002. During the month of July, radio-tagged bull trout exhibited a general upstream movement into the upper reaches of the Tucannon subbasin. We observed some downstream movements of radio-tagged bull trout in mid to late September and throughout October. By late November and early December, radio tagged bull trout were relatively stationary, and were distributed from the headwaters downstream to river mile 6.4, near Lower Monumental Pool. As in 2002, we did not conduct work associated with objectives 2, 3, or 4 of this study, because we were unable to monitor migratory movement of radio-tagged bull trout into the Federal hydropower system on the mainstem Snake River. Transmission tests of submerged ATS model F1830 radio-tags in Lower Granite Pool showed that audible detection and individual tag identification was possible at depths of 20 and 30 ft. Tests were conducted using an ATS R-4000 Receiver equipped with an ''H'' antenna at 200 and 700 feet above water surface from a helicopter. Audible detection and frequency separation were possible at both elevations. Two years of high tag loss, particularly after spawning, has prevented us from documenting fall and winter movements with an adequate sample of radio tagged bull trout. The high transmitter loss after spawning may be a reflection of high natural mortality for large, older age fish that we have been radio tagging to accommodate the longer life transmitters. Therefore, we are planning to reduce the size of the radio tags that we implant, and delay most of our collection and tagging of bull trout until after spawning. These changes are a new approach to try to maximize the number of radio tagged bull trout available post spawning to adequately document fall and winter movements and any use of the Snake River by bull trout from the Tucannon River.

Faler, Michael P. (US Fish and Wildlife Service, Idaho Fishery Resource Office, Ahsahka, ID); Mendel, Glen W.; Fulton, Carl (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Fish Management Division, Dayton, WA)

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Evaluate Bull Trout Movements in the Tucannon and Lower Snake Rivers, 2001-2002 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We collected, radio-tagged, and PIT-tagged 41 bull trout at the Tucannon River Hatchery trap from May 17, through June 14, 2002. An additional 65 bull trout were also collected and PIT tagged by June 24, at which time we ceased PIT tagging operations because water temperatures were reaching 16.0 C or higher on a regular basis. Six radio-tags were recovered shortly after tagging, and as a result, 35 remained in the river through November 30, 2002. During the month of July, radio-tagged bull trout exhibited a general upstream movement into the upper reaches of the Tucannon Subbasin. We began to observe some downstream movements of radio-tagged bull trout in mid to late September and throughout October. These movements appeared to be associated with post spawning migrations. As of November 30, radio tagged bull trout were relatively stationary, and distributed from the headwaters downstream to river mile 11.3, near Pataha Creek. None of the radio-tagged bull trout left the Tucannon Subbasin and entered the federal hydropower system on the mainstem Snake River. We conducted some initial transmission tests of submerged radio tags at depths of 25, 35, 45, and 55 ft. in Lower Monumental Pool to test our capability of detection at these depths. Equipment used included Lotek model MCFT-3A transmitters, an SRX 400 receiver, a 4 element Yagi antenna, and a Lotek ''H'' antenna. Test results indicated that depth transmission of these tags was poor; only the transmitter placed at 25 ft. was audibly detectable.

Faler, Michael P. (US Fish and Wildlife Service, Idaho Fishery Resource Office, Ahsahka, ID); Mendel, Glen W.; Fulton, Carl (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Fish Management Division, Dayton, WA)

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Evaluate Bull Trout Movements in the Tucannon and Lower Snake Rivers, 2004 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We sampled and released 313 bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) from the Tucannon River in 2004. Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) tags were inserted in 231 of these individuals, and we detected existing PIT tags in an additional 44 bull trout. Twenty-five of these were also surgically implanted with radio-tags, and we monitored the movements of these fish throughout the year. Ten bull trout that were radio-tagged in 2003 were known to survive and carry their tags through the spring of 2004. One of these fish outmigrated into the Snake River in the fall, and remained undetected until February, when it's tag was located near the confluence of Alkali Flat Creek and the Snake River. The remaining 9 fish spent the winter between Tucannon River miles 2.1 (Powers Road) and 36.0 (Tucannon Fish Hatchery). Seven of these fish retained their tags through the summer, and migrated to known spawning habitat prior to September 2004. During June and July, radio-tagged bull trout again exhibited a general upstream movement into the upper reaches of the Tucannon subbasin. As in past years, we observed some downstream movements of radio-tagged bull trout in mid to late September and throughout October, suggesting post spawning outmigrations. By late November and early December, radio tagged bull trout were relatively stationary, and were distributed from river mile 42 at Camp Wooten downstream to river mile 17, near the Highway 12 bridge. As in previous years, we did not collect data associated with objectives 2, 3, or 4 of this study, because we were unable to monitor migratory movement of radio-tagged bull trout into the vicinity of the hydropower dams on the main stem Snake River. Transmission tests of submerged Lotek model NTC-6-2 nano-tags in Lower Granite Pool showed that audible detection and individual tag identification was possible at depths of 20, 30, and 40 ft. We were able to maintain tag detection and code separation at all depths from both a boat and 200 ft. above water surface in a helicopter. However, we lost detection capability from 40 ft. water depth when we passed 700 ft. above the water surface in a helicopter. Two years of high tag loss, particularly after spawning, has prevented us from documenting fall and winter movements with an adequate sample of radio tagged bull trout. The high transmitter loss after spawning may be a reflection of high natural mortality for large, older age fish that we have been radio tagging to accommodate the longer life transmitters. Therefore, we reduced the size of the radio tags that we implanted, and delayed most of our collection and tagging of bull trout until after spawning. These changes are a new approach to try to maximize the number of radio tagged bull trout available post spawning to adequately document fall and winter movements and any use of the Snake River by bull trout from the Tucannon River.

Faler, Michael P. (US Fish and Wildlife Service, Idaho Fishery Resource Office, Ahsahka, ID); Mendel, Glen W.; Fulton, Carl (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Fish Management Division, Dayton, WA)

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

OurStory: All Aboard the Train! John Bull Riding the Rails  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the Brass is a book about a young boy who learns words used by railroad workers of the steam-engine era. Cars in these trains were almost always arranged in a specific order. Coal-burning steam engines sent an early American steam locomotive, the John Bull. WHY Seeing historical objects as they were used

Mathis, Wayne N.

52

PEFC-Certified Fencing for 2010 Pamplona Bull Run JUL 05 2010 | SPAIN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PEFC-Certified Fencing for 2010 Pamplona Bull Run JUL 05 2010 | SPAIN This year, the fences marking and to create local jobs. Welcoming the decision, PEFC Spain Director, Ana Noriega commented "we are delighted to PEFC, the world's largest forest certification system and the leading system in Spain, ensuring

53

Reference: Biol. Bull. 196: 257-264. (June 1999) Physiological Functioning of Carbonic Anhydrase in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, high levels of carbonic anhydrase. Introduction The giant hydrothermal vent tubeworm Riftia pachyptilaReference: Biol. Bull. 196: 257-264. (June 1999) Physiological Functioning of Carbonic Anhydrase in the Hydrothermal Vent Tubeworm Riftia Pachyptila SHANA K. GOFFREDI", PETER R. GIRGUIS, JAMES J. CHILDRESS

Girguis, Peter R.

54

Bull-switching in African Bovid Herds: Assessing Best Practices for Breeding Management in Waterbuck  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with an intact male during the optimal breeding season. However, information is needed on the effects of vasectomy and the long-term effects on social well-being of individuals used in this "bull-switching" treatment, which is designed to enhance well...

Jones, Renee Crystal Michelle

2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

55

Bull Trout Population and Habitat Surveys in the Middle Fork Willamette and McKenzie Rivers, Annual Report 2002.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Bull trout in the Willamette River Basin were historically distributed throughout major tributaries including the Middle Fork Willamette and McKenzie rivers. Habitat degradation, over-harvest, passage barriers, fish removal by rotenone, and hybridization and competition with non-native brook trout are all likely factors that have led to the decline of bull trout in the Willamette Basin (Ratliff and Howell 1992). The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service listed the Columbia River bull trout population segment as Threatened under the federal Endangered Species Act in 1998. Four bull trout populations were isolated in the upper Willamette River following the construction of flood control dams on the South Fork McKenzie River, McKenzie River, and Middle Fork Willamette River that created Cougar, Trail Bridge, and Hills Creek reservoirs. Buchanan et al. (1997) described the population in the main stem McKenzie as 'of special concern', the South Fork McKenzie population as 'high risk of extinction', the population above Trail Bridge Reservoir as 'high risk of extinction', and bull trout in the Middle Fork Willamette as 'probably extinct'. Various management efforts such as strict angling regulations and passage improvement projects have been implemented to stabilize and rehabilitate bull trout habitat and populations in the McKenzie River over the past 10 years. Since 1997, bull trout fry from Anderson Creek on the upper McKenzie River have been transferred to the Middle Fork Willamette basin above Hills Creek Reservoir in an attempt to re-establish a reproducing bull trout population. This project was developed in response to concerns over the population status and management of bull trout in the McKenzie and Middle Fork Willamette Rivers by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife during the early 1990s. The project was conducted under measure 9.3G(2) of the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program to monitor the status, life history, habitat needs, and limiting factors for bull trout within sub basins of the Columbia River. Also, this project provides information to develop native fish recovery plans such as the Oregon Plan for Salmon and Watersheds and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Bull Trout Recovery Plan.

Seals, Jason; Reis, Kelly

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

The eating quality of bulls compared with steers and a study of methods for predicting chronological age of beef cattle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE EATING QUALITY OF BULLS COMPARED WITH STEERS AND A STUDY OF METHODS FOR PREDICTING CHRONOLOGICAL AGE OF BEEF CATTLE . A Thesis by JAMES 0. REAGAN Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM University in partial fulfi. llment... to the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE January 1970 Major Subject: Animal Science (Meats) THE EATING QUALITY OF BULLS COMPARED WITH STEERS AND A STUDY OF METHODS FOR PREDICTING CHRONOLOGICAL AGE OF BEEF CATTLE. A Thests JAMES 0. REAGAN...

Reagan, James Oliver

1970-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

TEE-0068 - In the Matter of Bowlin Travel Centers, Inc. | Department of  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energy Usage »of Energy StrainClient update resolve008Energy 8 - In the Matter of

58

Dynamique d'une bulle cylindrique de cavitation : tude analytique et validation de la mthode  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dynamique d'une bulle cylindrique de cavitation : étude analytique et validation de la méthode. Introduction La présente étude a pour objectif dans un premier temps d'étudier analytiquement la cavitation permettra par la suite d'étudier la cavitation numériquement. La méthode numérique Lagrangienne SPH est

59

Bull Trout Distribution and Abundance in the Waters on and Bordering the Warm Springs Reservation : 2002 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The range of bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) in the Deschutes River basin has decreased from historic levels due to many factors including dam construction, habitat degradation, brook trout introduction and eradication efforts. While the bull trout population appears to be healthy in the Metolius River-Lake Billy Chinook system they have been largely extirpated from the upper Deschutes River (Buchanan et al. 1997). Little was known about bull trout in the lower Deschutes basin until BPA funded project No.9405400 began during 1998. In this progress report we describe the findings to date from this multi-year study aimed at determining the life history, habitat needs and limiting factors of bull trout in the lower Deschutes subbasin. Juvenile bull trout and brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) relative abundance has been assessed in the Warm Springs River and Shitike Creek since 1999. In the Warm Springs R. the relative densities of juvenile bull trout and brook trout were .003 fish/m{sup 2} and .001 fish/m{sup 2} respectively during 2002. These densities were the lowest recorded in the Warm Springs River during the period of study. In Shitike Cr. the relative densities of juvenile bull trout and brook trout were .025 fish/m{sup 2} and .01 fish/m{sup 2} respectively during 2002. The utility of using index reaches to monitor trends in juvenile bull trout and brook trout relative abundance in the Warm Springs R. has been assessed since 1999. During 2002 the mean relative densities of juvenile bull trout within the 2.4 km study area was higher than what was observed in four index reaches. However, the mean relative densities of brook trout was slightly higher in the index reaches than what was observed in the 2.4 km study area. Habitat use by both juvenile bull trout and brook trout was determined in the Warm Springs R. Juvenile bull trout and brook trout were most abundant in pools and glides. However pools and glides comprised less than 20% of the available habitat in the study area during 2002. Multiple-pass spawning ground surveys were conducted during late August through October in the Warm Springs R. and Shitike Cr. during 2002. One-hundred and thirteen (113) redds were enumerated in the Warm Springs R. and 204 redds were found in Shitike Cr. The number of redds enumerated in both the Warm Springs R. and Shitike Cr. were the most redds observed since surveys began in 1998. Spatial and temporal distribution in spawning within the Warm Springs R. and Shitike Cr. is discussed. Juvenile emigration has been monitored in Shitike Creek since 1996. A total of 312 juveniles were estimated to have emigrated from Shitike Cr. during the spring, 2002. Adult escapement was monitored in the Warm Springs R. and Shitike Cr. Thirty adults were recorded at the Warm Springs National Fish Hatchery weir during 2002. This was the highest number of spawning adults recorded to date. A weir equipped with an underwater video camera near the spawning grounds was operated in the Warm Springs R. Thirty-one adults were recorded at the weir in day counts. The adult trap in Shitike Cr. was unsuccessful in capturing adult bull trout during 2002 due to damage from a spring high water event. Thermographs were placed throughout Warm Springs R. and Shitike Cr. to monitor water temperatures during bull trout migration, holding and spawning/rearing periods. During 1999-2002 water temperatures ranged from 11.8-15.4 C near the mouths during adult migration; 11.4-14.6 C during pre-spawning holding; and 6.5-8.4 C during adult spawning and juvenile rearing.

Brun, Christopher V.; Dodson, Rebekah

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Evaluation of Bull Trout Movements in the Tucannon and Lower Snake Rivers, 2002-2006 Project Completion Summary.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Columbia River Distinct Population Segment of bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) was listed as threatened under the Endangered Species Act in 1998. One of the identified major threats to the species is fragmentation resulting from dams on over-wintering habitats of migratory subpopulations. A migratory subgroup in the Tucannon River appeared to utilize the Snake River reservoirs for adult rearing on a seasonal basis. As a result, a radio telemetry study was conducted on this subgroup from 2002-2006, to help meet Reasonable and Prudent Measures, and Conservation Recommendations associated with the lower Snake River dams in the FCRPS Biological Opinion, and to increase understanding of bull trout movements within the Tucannon River drainage. We sampled 1,109 bull trout in the Tucannon River; 124 of these were surgically implanted with radio tags and PIT tagged, and 681 were only PIT tagged. The remaining 304 fish were either recaptures, or released unmarked. Bull trout seasonal movements within the Tucannon River were similar to those described for other migratory bull trout populations. Bull trout migrated upstream in spring and early summer to the spawning areas in upper portions of the Tucannon River watershed. They quickly moved off the spawning areas in the fall, and either held or continued a slower migration downstream through the winter until early the following spring. During late fall and winter, bull trout were distributed in the lower half of the Tucannon River basin, down to and including the mainstem Snake River below Little Goose Dam. We were unable to adequately radio track bull trout in the Snake River and evaluate their movements or interactions with the federal hydroelectric dams for the following reasons: (1) none of our radio-tagged fish were detected attempting to pass a Snake River dam, (2) our radio tags had poor transmission capability at depths greater than 12.2 m, and (3) the sample size of fish that actually entered the Snake River was small (n=6). In spite of this project's shortcomings, bull trout continue to be observed in low numbers at Snake River dam fish facilities. It is highly possible that bull trout observed at the Snake River dam fish facilities are originating from sources other than the Tucannon River. We suggest that these fish might come from upstream sources like the Clearwater or Salmon rivers in Idaho, and are simply following the outmigration of juvenile anadromous fish (a food supply) as they emigrate toward the Pacific Ocean. Based on our study results, we recommend abandoning radio telemetry as a tool to monitor bull trout movements in the mainstem Snake River. We do recommend continuing PIT tagging and tag interrogation activities to help determine the origin of bull trout using the Snake River hydropower facilities. As a complementary approach, we also suggest the use of genetic assignment tests to help determine the origin of these fish. Lastly, several recommendations are included in the report to help manage and recover bull trout in the Tucannon subbasin.

Faler, Michael P. [U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service; Mendel, Glen; Fulton, Carl [Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife

2008-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bowline bull moose" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Does Beta React to Market Conditions?: Estimates of Bull and Bear Betas using a Nonlinear Market Model with Endogenous Threshold Parameter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Does Beta React to Market Conditions?: Estimates of Bull and Bear Betas using a Nonlinear Market Model with Endogenous Threshold Parameter by George Woodward and Heather Anderson Department transition between bull and bear states and allows the data to determine the threshold value. The estimated

Kearns, Michael

62

JOURNAL DE PHYSIQUE Colloque C 2, supplment au no 5-6, Tome 30, Mai-Juin 1969,page C 2 -47 LES GRANDES CHAMBRES A BULLES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

principales caractéristiques de chambres à bulles à hydrogène et de chambres à bulles à propane, quelques the building of giant bubble chambers are discussed. The main characteristics of hydrogen and propane bubble énergies ? La raison essentielle est probablement que les phénomènes de collisions à grande énergie pro

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

63

Energy requirements of bulls and genotype and age effects on body composition  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. g), being simply the energy content of gains, was expressed in the following manner: N. E. = (52. 72g + 6. 84g )W' ; where N. E. g is in keel. , g is daily gain . 75 in kg. and W is body weight in kg. (Lofgreen and Garrett, 1968). Attempts.... No differences attributable to genotype-age in- teraction were observed. The mean value for lipid content of edible tissue for all bulls was 41. 48X; the r value was . 6221 and the coef- ficient of variation was 13. 24X. Significant differences (P& F 01...

Leverette, Eldridge Andes

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Wilson Bull., 11l(l), 1999, pp. 100-104 EFFECTS OF WIND TURBINES ON UPLAND NESTING BIRDS IN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wilson Bull., 11l(l), 1999, pp. 100-104 EFFECTS OF WIND TURBINES ON UPLAND NESTING BIRDS in southwestern Minnesota to determine the relative influence of wind turbines on overall densities of upland transects that were placed along wind turbine strings within three CRP fields and in three CRP fields

65

Effects of zeranol, sex and forage versus concentrate feeding regimens on performance and carcass characteristics of bulls and steers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in Trial 2 were February 28, 1985. Implanted calves were reimplanted at 90 day intervals throughout the trials, (9 months) each year. Trial 1 bulls began the experiment on September 28, 1983 and were slaughtered on June 27, 1984. Steers in Trial 1...

Polser, David Meredith

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Bull. Soc. gol. Fr., 2008, no The alkaline intraplate volcanism of the Antalya nappes (Turkey): a Late  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bull. Soc. géol. Fr., 2008, no 4 The alkaline intraplate volcanism of the Antalya nappes (Turkey-words. ­ Alkali basalt, Intraplate volcanism, Triassic (Upper), Neotethys, Turkey, Geochemistry. Abstract. ­ Late belonging to the Kara Dere ­ Sayrun unit of the Middle Antalya nappes, southwestern Turkey. New

Demouchy, Sylvie

67

Bull Trout (Salvelinus Confluentus) Population and Habitat Surveys in the McKenzie and Middle Fork Willamette Basins, 2000 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Prior to 1978, Dolly Varden Salvelinus malma were classified into an anadromous and interior form. Cavender (1978) classified the interior form as a distinct species, Salvelinus confluentus, the bull trout. Bull trout are large char weighing up to 18 kg and growing to over one meter in length (Goetz 1989). They are distinguished by a broad flat head, large downward curving maxillaries that extend beyond the eye, a well developed fleshy knob and a notch in the lower terminus of the snout, and light colored spots normally smaller than the pupil of the eye (Cavender 1978). Bull trout are found throughout northwestern North America from lat. 41{sup o}N to lat. 60{sup o}N. In Oregon, bull trout were once distributed throughout 12 basins in the Klamath and Columbia River systems including the Clackamas, Santiam, McKenzie and Middle Fork Willamette sub-basins west of the Cascades (Buchanan et al. 1997). However, it is believed bull trout have been extirpated from west of the Cascades with the exception of the McKenzie sub-basin. Before 1963, bull trout in the McKenzie sub-basin were a contiguous population from the mouth to Tamolitch Falls. Following the construction of Cougar and Trail Bridge Reservoirs there are three isolated populations: (1) mainstem McKenzie and tributaries from the mouth to Trail Bridge Reservoir. (2) mainstem McKenzie and tributaries above Trail Bridge Reservoir to Tamolitch Falls. (3) South Fork McKenzie and tributaries above Cougar Reservoir. The study area includes the three aforementioned McKenzie populations, and the Middle Fork Willamette and tributaries above Hills Creek Reservoir. We monitored bull trout populations in the McKenzie and Middle Fork Willamette basins using a combination of sampling techniques including: spawning surveys, standard pool counts, juvenile trapping, radio tracking, electronic fish counters, and a modified Hankin and Reeves protocol to estimate juvenile abundance and density. In addition, we continued to reintroduce bull trout fry from Anderson Creek (McKenzie Basin) to the Middle Fork Willamette above Hills Creek Reservoir in an attempt to rehabilitate the bull trout population in the Middle Fork Willamette Basin. By monitoring population trends and determining life history characteristics of bull trout in McKenzie and Middle Fork Willamette basins we can make informed management decisions that will help maintain long term and sustainable bull trout populations in the Upper Willamette Basin.

Taylor, Greg

2000-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

68

Evaluation of the Life History of Native Salmonids in the Malheur River Basin; Cooperative Bull Trout/Redband Trout Research Project, 1999-2000 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this study is to document the seasonal distribution of adult/sub-adult bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) in the Malheur River basin. Due to the decline of bull trout in the Columbia Basin, the United States Fish and Wildlife Service listed bull trout as a threatened species in June 1998. Past land management activities; construction of dams; and fish eradication projects in the North Fork and Middle Fork Malheur River by poisoning have worked in concert to cumulatively impact native species in the Malheur Basin (Bowers et. al. 1993). Survival of the remaining bull trout populations is severely threatened (Buchanan 1997). 1999 Research Objects are: (1) Document the migratory patterns of adult/sub-adult bull trout in the North Fork Malheur River; (2) Determine the seasonal bull trout use of Beulah Reservoir and bull trout entrainment; and (3) Timing and location of bull trout spawning in the North Fork Malheur River basin. The study area includes the Malheur basin from the mouth of the Malheur River located near Ontario, Oregon to the headwaters of the North Fork Malheur River (Map 1). All fish collected and most of the telemetry effort was done on the North Fork Malheur River subbasin (Map 2). Fish collection was conducted on the North Fork Malheur River at the tailwaters of Beulah Reservoir (RK 29), Beulah Reservoir (RK 29-RK 33), and in the North Fork Malheur River at Crane Crossing (RK 69) to the headwaters of the North Fork Malheur. Radio telemetry was done from the mouth of the Malheur River in Ontario, Oregon to the headwaters of the North Fork Malheur. This report will reflect all migration data collected from 3/1/99 to 12/31/99.

Schwabe, Lawrence; Tiley, Mark (Burns Paiute Tribe, Department of Fish and Wildlife, Burns, OR); Perkins, Raymond R. (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, Ontario, OR)

2000-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

SUR LA POSSIBILIT D'UTILISATION D'UNE CHAMBRE A BULLES A PROPANE POUR L'TUDE DES RACTIONS NUCLAIRES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

175 A. SUR LA POSSIBILIT� D'UTILISATION D'UNE CHAMBRE A BULLES A PROPANE POUR L'�TUDE DES R�ACTIONS. - Mise au point et étude des caractéristiques du fonctionnement d'une chambre à bulles à propane de 6 135 MeV. Abstract. 2014 Adjustment and studies of some characteristics of a 6 litre propane bubble

Boyer, Edmond

70

Bull Trout (Salvelinus Confluentus) Population and Habitat Surveys in the McKenzie and Middle Fork Willamette Basins, 2001 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Prior to 1978, bull trout were commonly known as dolly varden (Salvelinus malma) and were classified into an anadromous and interior form. Cavender (1978) described the interior form as a distinct species, classifying it as Salvelinus confluentus, the bull trout. Bull trout are large char weighing up to 18 kg and growing to over one meter in length (Goetz 1994). They are distinguished by a broad flat head, large downward curving maxillaries that extend beyond the eye, a fleshy knob and a notch in the lower terminus of the snout, and light colored spots normally smaller than the pupil of the eye (Cavender 1978). Bull trout are found throughout northwestern North America from latitude 41{sup o}N to 60{sup o}N. In Oregon, bull trout were once distributed throughout 12 basins in the Klamath and Columbia River systems including the Clackamas, Santiam, McKenzie and Middle Fork Willamette subbasins west of the Cascades (Buchanan et al. 1997). However, it is likely that bull trout have been extirpated from west of the Cascades with the exception of the McKenzie sub-basin. McKenzie River bull trout were a contiguous population from the mouth to Tamolitch Falls prior to 1963. Three populations were isolated following the construction of Cougar and Trail Bridge Reservoirs which include the mainstem McKenzie and tributaries from the mouth to Trail Bridge Reservoir, mainstem McKenzie and tributaries above Trail Bridge Reservoir to Tamolitch Falls, and the South Fork McKenzie and tributaries above Cougar Reservoir. On June 10, 1998 the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) listed the Columbia River bull trout population segment as Threatened under the federal Endangered Species Act and Buchanan et al. (1997) listed the bull trout population in the mainstem McKenzie as ''of special concern'', the South Fork McKenzie population as ''high risk of extinction,'' and the population above Trail Bridge Reservoir as ''high risk of extinction.'' Bull trout in the Middle Fork Willamette were listed as ''probably extinct.'' Our study area includes the three McKenzie populations, and a reintroduced population in the Middle Fork Willamette and tributaries above Hills Creek Reservoir. We monitored bull trout populations in the McKenzie and Middle Fork Willamette basins using a combination of sampling techniques that include spawning surveys, juvenile trapping, electronic fish counters, and night snorkeling. We continued to reintroduce bull trout fry from Anderson Creek (McKenzie Basin) to the Middle Fork Willamette above Hills Creek Reservoir in an attempt to rehabilitate the bull trout population in the Middle Fork Willamette Basin. By monitoring population trends and determining life history characteristics of bull trout in McKenzie and Middle Fork Willamette basins, we can make informed management decisions that will help maintain long term and sustainable bull trout populations in the upper Willamette Basin.

Taylor, Greg

2003-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Comparison of F1 cows sired by Brahman, Boran and Tuli bulls for reproductive, maternal, and cow longevity traits  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by ASSALIA HASSIMI MAIGA Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE Approved by: Chair of Committee, James O. Sanders Committee...COMPARISON OF F1 COWS SIRED BY BRAHMAN, BORAN AND TULI BULLS FOR REPRODUCTIVE, MATERNAL, AND COW LONGEVITY TRAITS A Thesis by ASSALIA HASSIMI MAIGA Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial...

Maiga, Assalia Hassimi

2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

72

User Modelling in I-Help: What, Why, When and How Susan Bull, Jim Greer, Gordon McCalla, Lori Kettel, Jeff Bowes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

User Modelling in I-Help: What, Why, When and How Susan Bull, Jim Greer, Gordon McCalla, Lori. This paper describes user modelling in I-Help, a system to facilitate communication amongst learners. There are two I-Help components: Private and Public Discussions. In the Private Discussions learners take part

Bull, Susan

73

Numerical modeling of the Snowmass Creek paleoglacier, Colorado, and climate in the Rocky Mountains during the Bull Lake glaciation (MIS 6)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Well-preserved moraines from the penultimate, or Bull Lake, glaciation of Snowmass Creek Valley in the Elk Range of Colorado present an opportunity to examine the character of the high-altitude climate in the Rocky Mountains during Marine Oxygen Isotope Stage 6. This study employs a 2-D coupled mass/energy balance and flow model to assess the magnitudes of temperature and precipitation change that could have sustained the glacier in mass-balance equilibrium at its maximum extent during the Bull Lake glaciation. Variable substrate effects on glacier flow and ice thickness make the modeling somewhat more complex than in geologically simpler settings. Model results indicate that a temperature depression of about 6.7°C compared with the present (1971–2000 AD) would have been necessary to sustain the Snowmass Creek glacier in mass-balance equilibrium during the Bull Lake glaciation, assuming no change in precipitation amount or seasonality. A 50% increase or decrease from modern precipitation would have been coupled with 5.2°C and 9.1°C Bull Lake temperature depressions respectively. Uncertainty in these modeled temperature depressions is about 1°C.

Eric M. Leonard; Mitchell A. Plummer; Paul E. Carrara

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

MOOSE simulating nuclear reactor CRUD buildup  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This simulation uses multiple physical models to show how the buildup of boron deposits on reactor fuel can affect performance and the reactor's power profile.

None

2014-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

75

Multiphysics Object-Oriented Simulation Environment (MOOSE)  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Nuclear reactor operators can expand safety margins with more precise information about how materials behave inside operating reactors. INL's new simulation platform makes such studies easier & more informative by letting researchers "plug-n-play" their mathematical models, skipping years of computer code development.

None

2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

76

MOOSE simulating nuclear reactor CRUD buildup  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

This simulation uses multiple physical models to show how the buildup of boron deposits on reactor fuel can affect performance and the reactor's power profile.

None

2014-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

77

Bull. U. 5. F. C.1892. Fykc Nets. (To face page 299.) PLATELXXII. &-THE FYKE NETS AND FYKE-NET FISHERIES OF THE UNITED STATES,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bull. U. 5. F. C.1892. Fykc Nets. (To face page 299.) PLATELXXII. ti P W n W a Y .- W Y >LL a 0 0: n W Y tLL Y 0 0 n m #12;&-THE FYKE NETS AND FYKE-NET FISHERIES OF THE UNITED STATES, WITH NOTES ON THE FYKE NETS OF OTHER COUNTRIES. BY HUGH M. SMITH, M. D. DEFINITION OF THE FYKE NET. The inquirer who goes

78

Evaluation of the Life History of Native Salmonids in the Malheur River Basin; Cooperative Bull Trout/Redband Trout Research Project, 2002-2003 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Malheur River is a 306-kilometer tributary to the Snake River, which drains 12,950 square kilometers. The Malheur River originates in the Blue Mountains and flows into the Snake River near Ontario, Oregon. The climate of the basin is characterized by hot dry summers, occasionally exceeding 38 C, and cold winters that may drop below -29 C. Average annual precipitation is 30 centimeters in the lower reaches. Wooded areas consist primarily of mixed fir and pine forest in the higher elevations. Sagebrush and grass communities dominate the flora in the lower elevations. Efforts to document salmonid life histories, water quality, and habitat conditions have continued in fiscal year 2002. Bull trout Salvelinus confluentus are considered to be cold water species and are temperature-dependant. Due to the interest of bull trout from various state and Federal agencies, a workgroup was formed to develop project objectives related to bull trout. Table 1 lists individuals that participated in the 2002 work group. This report will reflect work completed during the Bonneville Power Administration contract period starting April 1, 2002, and ending March 31, 2003. All tasks were conducted within this timeframe, and a more detailed timeframe may be referred to in each individual report.

Miller, Alan; Soupir, Jim (US Forest Service, Prairie City Ranger District, Prairie City, OR); Schwabe, Lawrence (Burns Paiute Tribe, Department of Fish and Wildlife, Burns, OR)

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

2014 Bull Evaluation Station Senior Bull Test  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Duck River, TN 38454 2200 1 45 AN Joe Faulkner 4795 Ash Hill Road Spring Hill, TN 37174 2750 1 47, TN 37091 3800 1 10 AN W & D Farms Inc. 699 White Tail Road Holladay, TN 38341 5000 1 12 AN Douglas Grove, TN 37046 4750 1 17 AN Larry James 3495 Joe Yates Rd Obion, TN 38240 4500 1 20 AN Jason Sommers

Wang, Xiaorui "Ray"

80

Evaluation of the Life History of Native Salmonids in the Malheur River Basin; Cooperative Bull Trout/Redband Trout Research Project, 2000-2001 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Malheur basin lies within southeastern Oregon. The Malheur River is a tributary to the Snake River, entering at about River Kilometer (RK) 595. The hydrological drainage area of the Malheur River is approximately 12,950 km{sup 2} and is roughly 306 km in length. The headwaters of the Malheur River originate in the Blue Mountains at elevations of 6,500 to 7,500 feet, and drops to an elevation of 2000 feet at the confluence with the Snake River near Ontario, Oregon. The climate of the Malheur basin is characterized by hot dry summers, occasionally exceeding 38 C and cold winters that may drop below -29 C. Average annual precipitation is 300 centimeters and ranges from 100 centimeters in the upper mountains to less than 25 centimeters in the lower reaches (Gonzalez 1999). Wooded areas consist primarily of mixed fir and pine forest in the higher elevations. Sagebrush and grass communities dominate the flora in the lower elevations. Efforts to document salmonid life histories, water quality, and habitat conditions have continued in fiscal year 2000. The Burns Paiute Tribe (BPT), United States Forest Service (USFS), and Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW), have been working cooperatively to achieve this common goal. Bull trout ''Salvenlinus confluentus'' have specific environmental requirements and complex life histories making them especially susceptible to human activities that alter their habitat (Howell and Buchanan 1992). Bull trout are considered to be a cold-water species and are temperature dependent. This presents a challenge for managers, biologists, and private landowners in the Malheur basin. Because of the listing of bull trout under the Endangered Species Act as threatened and the current health of the landscape, a workgroup was formed to develop project objectives related to bull trout. This report will reflect work completed during the Bonneville Power contract period starting 1 April 2000 and ending 31 March 2001. The study area will include the North Fork Malheur River and the Upper Malheur River from Warm Springs Reservoir upstream to the headwaters.

Gonzales, Dan; Schwabe, Lawrence; Wenick, Jess (Burns Paiute Tribe, Department of Fish and Wildlife, Burns, OR)

2001-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bowline bull moose" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Efficiency of Gas-Phase Ion Formation in Matrix-Assisted Laser Bull. Korean Chem. Soc. 2013, Vol. 34, No. 3 907 http://dx.doi.org/10.5012/bkcs.2013.34.3.907  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Efficiency of Gas-Phase Ion Formation in Matrix-Assisted Laser Bull. Korean Chem. Soc. 2013, Vol. 34, No. 3 907 http://dx.doi.org/10.5012/bkcs.2013.34.3.907 Efficiency of Gas-Phase Ion Formation-1 for peptides and 10-5 -10-3 for matrices speculated by Hillenkamp and Karas. Number of gas-phase ions generated

Kim, Myung Soo

82

ORIGINAL PAPER Does off-trail backcountry skiing disturb moose?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

consequences on wildlife's energy budget if wildlife resists habituation, if an animal's risk perception and Gutzwiller 1995; Stankowich 2008). Human-induced disturbances may affect wildlife ecology because they may

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

83

Moose Lake Water & Light Comm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating Solar Powerstories onFocus Area EnergyMohawk MunicipalMontvale, New Jersey:Water &

84

Editorials and fiction in "The Craftsman Magazine" (1901-1916): mirror of an age  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

new party, a party that became the Bull Moose faction. Other 28 editorials in 1910, 1912 and 1913 further substantiate his increasing concern for political issues. The line adhered to in the editorials is the Progressive platform ? -equal... opportunities, honesty and loyalty from representatives, control of corporations, social welfare and recognition of the government as existing for the people. In December 1913, he states that "The nation has learned to think in terms of welfare instead...

Holm, Judith Stout

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Documentation of Hybrid Hydride Model for Incorporation into Moose-Bison and Validation Strategy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the development, demonstration and validation of a mesoscale, microstructural evolution model for simulation of zirconium hydride ?-ZrH1.5 precipitation in the cladding of used nuclear fuels that may occur during long-term dry storage. While the Zr-based claddings are manufactured free of any hydrogen, they absorb hydrogen during service, in the reactor by a process commonly termed ‘hydrogen pick-up’. The precipitation and growth of zirconium hydrides during dry storage is one of the most likely fuel rod integrity failure mechanisms either by embrittlement or delayed hydride cracking of the cladding (Hanson et al., 2011). While the phenomenon is well documented and identified as a potential key failure mechanism during long-term dry storage (Birk et al., 2012 and NUREG/CR-7116), the ability to actually predict the formation of hydrides is poor. The model being documented in this work is a computational capability for the prediction of hydride formation in different claddings of used nuclear fuels. This work supports the Used Fuel Disposition Research and Development Campaign in assessing the structural engineering performance of the cladding during and after long-term dry storage. In this work, a model to numerically simulate hydride precipitation at the microstructural scale, in a wide variety of Zr-based claddings, under dry-storage conditions is being developed. It will be used to aid in the evaluation of the mechanical integrity of used fuel rods during dry storage and transportation by providing the structural conditions from the microstructural scale to the continuum scale to engineering component scale models to predict if the used fuel rods will perform without failure under normal and off-normal conditions. The microstructure, especially, the hydride structure is thought to be a primary determinant of cladding failure, thus this component of UFD’s storage and transportation analysis program is critical. The model development, application and validation of the model are documented and the limitations of the current model are discussed. The model has been shown to simulate hydride precipitation in Zircaloy-4 cladding with correct morphology, thermodynamics and kinetics. An unexpected insight obtained from simulations hydride formation in Zircaloy-4 is that small (sub-micron) precipitates need to order themselves to form the larger hydrides typically described as radially-reoriented precipitates. A limitation of this model is that it does not currently solve the stress state that forms dynamically in the precipitate or matrix surrounding the precipitate. A method to overcome the limitations is suggested and described in detail. The necessary experiments to provide key materials physics and to validate the model are also recommended.

Veena Tikare; Philippe Weck; Peter Schultz; Blythe Clark; John Mitchell; Michael Glazoff; Eric Homer

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Bull Solar GmbH Bull Holding AG | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160Benin: EnergyBoston Areais a villageBucyrus, NorthBuhler, Kansas:>

87

The Method of Manufactured Solutions for RattleSnake A SN Radiation Transport Solver Inside the MOOSE Framework  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Method of Manufactured Solutions (MMS) is an accepted technique to verify that a numerical discretization for the radiation transport equation has been implemented correctly. This technique offers a few advantages over other methods such as benchmark problems or analytical solutions. The solution can be manufactured such that properties for the angular flux are either stressed or preserved. For radiation transport, these properties can include desired smoothness, positiveness and arbitrary order of anisotropy in angle. Another advantage is that the angular flux solution can be manufactured for multidimensional problems where analytical solutions are difficult to obtain in general.

Yaqi Wang

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

The composition and diagenesis of the Queen Formation (Guadalupian, Permian) at Virey and Moose Queen fields, Midland County, Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. The detrital grains were counted and classified into six different species: monocrystalline quartz, polycrystalline quartz, chert, plagioclase and potassium feldspar, rock fiagments, accessory minerals, and other grains. These detrital species were chosen...) for the ocular on the microscope using a scale bar and Image Pro Plus, a prognun that allows the measurement and scaling of images. The apparent long axis of two hundred monocrystalline quartz grains were measured &om each thin section using the Lancelot...

Voncannon, Jennifer Catherine

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Lean color characteristics of beef from steers and young bulls  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, appropriate di iutions on pr epoured plates of trypcic soy agar (TSA, Difco). Plates were incuoated 11 TABLE 1. SCORING SYSTEM FOR MUSCLE COLOR Description Bri ght cherry red Moderately bright cherry red Slightly light cherry red Cherry red Slightly... dark red Moderately dark cherry red Dark red or brown Very dark red or brown Extreme1y dark red or brown Score TABLE 2. SCORING SYSTEM FOR SURFACE DISCOLORATION Descri tion Score No surface discoloration Less than 10% surface discoloration 10...

Purser, David Elbert

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Bulls, Bears and Excess Volatility: can currency intervention help?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(Figure 1). From early 2002, the currency experienced a reversal that was to take it well above the launch price, reaching a peak of $1.36 near the end of 2004. Currently, with the euro standing close to $1.30, there is talk of further dollar devaluation... et al (1998), a representative risk neutral investor is assumed to switch between two ‘sentiments’ in respect to stock earnings – trend ex- trapolation and mean-reversion. While earnings actually follow a random walk, the investor switches between...

Corrado, Luisa; Miller, Marcus; Zhang, Lei

91

Genetic Analysis of Bull Trout in Glacier National Park  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

communication). A fin clip was taken non-lethally from each individual and stored in 95% ethanol. DNA

92

Bronze Age Representations of Aegean Bull-Games, III  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

depictions of agrimia and should not be anatomical indications -- might itrey Ue some kind of girth allowing the leaper to get a secure grip? And if so, then perhaps this particular representation depicts a type of practice vault. Unclassifiable Re...*ilthw*rtrrrr LI5A. A p;rirrling hy Rud*lph F. Z;rll*rr**r, origin*lly. l*r ir xeri*: gf'article* i1 l..ite nrag*:ri{te and rrprnducerl in tlir:'l'lnrr-'l-i1'* htxrk, '{'ht ff1tit o.{' ,l.fr*r 11, ci*pir:lx lltc tp*rt taking plttc* trt.ltrrt rttr lt ,rrl irrf ll...

Younger, John G.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

BULL MOUNTAIN BASIN, MONTANA By G.D. Stricker  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Paper 1625-A 1999 Resource assessment of selected Tertiary coal beds and zones in the Northern Rocky in the toolbar to return. 1999 Resource assessment of selected Tertiary coal beds and zones in the Northern Rocky in vertical scale from that in figure SM-3. 1999 Resource assessment of selected Tertiary coal beds and zones

94

Kalispel Tribe of Indians joins federal agencies to protect bull...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

in an unprecedented set of agreements designed to improve habitat and strengthen fish stocks in the upper Columbia River Basin over the next 10 years. The new agreement...

95

Bull Outdoor Products: Proposed Penalty (2015-CE-14014) | Department of  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up fromDepartmentTie Ltd:June 2015 < prevBuilding theINNOVATION &Bulk

96

Quantification and comparison of terpene concentrations in various balsam fir growth forms and foliage ages, and a simulation of moose browsing on balsam fir trees at Isle Royale  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) and twigs (T) of growth form samples collected from Windigo and Beaver Island. . . . . . . . . . 10 Table 2. Means and standard deviations for foliage age samples (means followed by the same letter are not significantly different... terpene compounds from the needles and twigs of balsam fir samples collected by Risenhoover (unpubl. data) at 2 sites in the Washington Harbor area of Isle Royale during late February of 1985 (Windigo) and 1986 (Beaver Island). The following classes...

Terra-Berns, Mary Helen

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Lithologic characteristics, depositional environments and geometries of reservoir and nonreservoir facies in the Queen Formation (Guadalupian, Permian) of Moose and Virey Fields, Midland County, Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the stratigraphic limit of LQE halite unit ?3 28 Map of the stratigraphic limit of LQE halite unit ?4 Page . 85 . . 86 . 87 29 Net sand thickness contour map of the Middle Queen Sandstone (MQS) unit . . . 88 30 Net sand thickness contour map of the MQS 'D...' Member . . . 31 Map of the stratigraphic limit of the lower MQS halite unit . , . . . 91 32 Net sand thickness contour map of the MQS 'C' Member . . . 33 Net sand thickness contour map of the MQS 'B' Member . . . 34 Net sand thickness contour map...

Aller, Gregory Shane

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Mathematical Biology, Part 2: Continuous Models and Diff. Eqns  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-Prey Dynamics: The wolves and moose of Isle Royale, Michigan #12;? Plant Carbon Soil Carbon "Feedback Loop

Saleska, Scott

99

Most impacts on wildlife will likely be indirect as wildlife species respond to slow changes in plant  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: status and concerns. Ecological relationships of winter ticks, moose, and climate change. Moose) changes · "moose sickness" · deer keds · forestry impacts ("sprucification") Russia: poaching#12; Most impacts on wildlife will likely be indirect as wildlife species respond to slow changes

New Hampshire, University of

100

Peer Reviewed Publications 7 October 2011 41 Chilson, PB, WF Frick, JF Kelly, KW Howard, RP Larkin, RH Diehl, JK Westbrook, TA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Peer Reviewed Publications 7 October 2011 41 Chilson, PB, WF Frick, JF Kelly, KW Howard, RP Larkin, RH Diehl, JK Westbrook, TA Kelly, TH Kunz. In Press. Partly cloudy with a chance of migration, MS Bowlin, PB Chilson, RH Diehl, RW Fléron, P Hartl, R Kays, JF Kelly, WD Robinson, M Wikelski. 2011

Kelly, Jeff

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bowline bull moose" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Eye-Tracking: Characteristics and Methods Eye-Tracking: Research Areas and Applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Part 1 Eye-Tracking: Characteristics and Methods Part 2 Eye-Tracking: Research Areas. & Bowlin, G. (Eds.) [ PREPRINT, FEB 2004. PLEASE DO NOT QUOTE ] #12;2 Eye-Tracking: Characteristics and Methods Introduction Eye movements are arguably the most frequent of all human movements (Bridgeman, 1992

Richardson, Daniel C.

102

Curriculum Vitae Jeffrey F. Kelly 7 October 2011 Oklahoma Biological Survey and Department of Zoology Office: 405-325-2440  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Supervisors ­ D.M. Finch and F.R. Moore (Univ. of Southern Mississippi) 1996 Instructor, Dept. of Biology, MS Bowlin, PB Chilson, RH Diehl, RW Fléron, P Hartl, R Kays, JF Kelly, WD Robinson, M Wikelski. 2011 Marra, LI Wassenaar, CA Stricker and RR Doucett. 2009. Does a Lack of Design and Repeatability

Kelly, Jeff

103

Curriculum Vitae Jeffrey F. Kelly 25 January 2012 Oklahoma Biological Survey and Department of Zoology Office: 405-325-2440  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Supervisors ­ D.M. Finch and F.R. Moore (Univ. of Southern Mississippi) 1996 Instructor, Dept. of Biology Thorup, MS Bowlin, PB Chilson, RH Diehl, RW Fléron, P Hartl, R Kays, JF Kelly, WD Robinson, M Wikelski, JF Kelly, PP Marra, LI Wassenaar, CA Stricker and RR Doucett. 2009. Does a Lack of Design

Kelly, Jeff

104

Bull Volcanol (2003) 65:486504 DOI 10.1007/s00445-003-0276-z  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

condensed above the thermal anomalies. We suspect that water accumulates below the Small Fossa crater Fossa crater fault where high gas flux and low air contamination made gas monitoring possible near the active vents using the alkaline bottle sampling technique. Editorial responsibility: J. Gilbert A

Sailhac, Pascal

105

Bull Volcanol (2006) 68: 313322 DOI 10.1007/s00445-005-0026-5  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Jeff Sutton · Clive Oppenheimer · Keith A. Horton · Harold Garbeil · Vitchko Tsanev · Andrew J. S. McGonigle · Glyn Williams-Jones Comparison of COSPEC and two miniature ultraviolet spectrometer systems for SO2 G. Williams-Jones Department of Earth Sciences, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, British Columbia V

Williams-Jones, Glyn

106

Bull Volcanol (2006) 68: 328332 DOI 10.1007/s00445-005-0013-x  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Williams-Jones · Keith A. Horton · Tamar Elias · Harold Garbeil · Peter J. Mouginis-Mark · A. Jeff Sutton correlation spectrometer Editorial responsibility: A. Woods G. Williams-Jones ( ) Department of Earth Sciences al. 1983; Williams-Jones et al. 2000). Gas flux is typically calculated by multiplying the average

Williams-Jones, Glyn

107

Bull Volcanol (2006) 68: 323327 DOI 10.1007/s00445-005-0014-9  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A. Horton · Glyn Williams-Jones · Harold Garbeil · Tamar Elias · A. Jeff Sutton · Peter Mouginis-956-6322 G. Williams-Jones Department of Earth Sciences, Simon Fraser University, 8888 University Drive.g., Caltabiano et al. 1992; Casadevall et al. 1987; Elias et al. 1998; Stoiber et al. 1986; Williams et al. 1990

Williams-Jones, Glyn

108

Bull. Soc. Herp. Fr., (1987) 43' 18 RECENSEMENT DES PONTES DE TORTUE LUTH,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(évaluations mathé- matiques). De 1978 à 1982, le nombre de Luths nidi fiant au Surinam a oscillé entre 1500 et

Girondot, Marc

109

Characterization of carcass traits of bulls in five cattle breeds and their diallel crosses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ir. the analyses with slaughter weight as the covariate. Little or no char ge of rank of the straightbreds was observed for condition core (scale i-g), marbling, conformation or final grade. Mod- erate rani; change was seen for head weight, hide... fall before goirg into the feedlot (deferred management). Steers showed a greater advantage over heifers in th" deferred manage- ment system then when both were put directly into the feedlot. Anderson et al. (1978) compared the effects of creep...

Baker, Jerome Frank

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

ASSOCIATION AMONG FLUID, GRAIN INTAKE AND WEIGHT GAIN IN HOLSTEIN BULL CALVES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

= Soft, Does not hold form, piles but spreads slightly. (i.e., pudding like consistency) as defined by Dr. Glenn Holub (personal communication); 3 = Runny, Spreads readily to about 6 mm depth, (i.e., pancake batter like consistency); and 4 = Watery...

Gonzalez Ferreira, Marcelo A.

2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

111

Bull. Environm. Contam. Toxicol. 29, 268-272 (1982) Preparation and Characterization of Water-soluble  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Materials: A crude oil designated as Arabian Crude and a lubricating oil (MACOMBA 82) were obtained from 3 4 5 6 7 DAYS DAYS LUBRICATING OIL ARABIAN CRUDE ~g/L 16 14 12 i0 8 6 Fig. 2. Variation of total-soluble Fractions of Crude and Refined Oils for Use in Toxicity Studies W. A. Maher Department of Physical

Canberra, University of

112

The Bull-Leaping Scenes from Tell el-Dab'a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

chronological conclusions on the basis of costume types, which he argued were used as the occasion required,30 but it seems significant that the Egyp tian painters felt it necessary to correct the already-painted codpieces worn by the men in the procession...

Younger, John G.; Shaw, Maria

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Reference: Biol. Bull. 196: 1-17. (February, 1999) Dynamics of Gastrovascular Circulation in the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(Bevan et al., 1995). Murray (1926) pro- posed that tree-like vascular designs minimize the total energy 87131-1091; `Departments qf Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, 4Electrical Engineering, `Geology

Wagner, Andreas

114

Weed Busters: How to take the Sting out of Texas Bull Nettle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the Sting out of Texas Bullnettle Safe and effective three-step ways to control Texas bullnettle Weed Treatment Series Charles R. Hart, Extension Range Specialist, Stephenville Robert K. Lyons, Extension Range Specialist, Uvalde Allan McGinty, Extension...

Hart, Charles R.; Lyons, Robert K.; McGinty, Allan

2007-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

115

Bull Volcanol (1997) 58:441448 Q Springer-Verlag 1997 ORIGINAL PAPER  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-temperature discharges, are the result of near-surface boiling of a brine composed of the al- most pure condensed.F., Mexico e-mail: taran6tonatiuh.igeofcu.unam.mx Abstract Volcanic gas and condensate samples were collected the 1991 eruption, and are suggested to be derived from partially condensed magmatic gases at shallow depth

Connor, Charles

116

Bull Volcanol (2000) 62 : 130142 Springer-Verlag 2000 RESEARCH ARTICLE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gustavo Garzón V. INGEOMINAS, Observatorio Volcanológico y Sismológico, Pasto, A.A. 1795, Pasto, Colombia

Williams-Jones, Glyn

117

Reference: Bid. Bull. 192: 364-374. (June. 1997) Laboratory Culture of the Sepiolid Squid  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, was cultured through one complete life cycle in 4 months. Paralarval squid hatchlings were actively planktonic- ganism of this symbiosis can soon be cultured with con- sistency through its brief life cycle, thus development of this marine model system has been hampered by the inability to cul- ture the host organism

Ruby, Edward G.

118

CELL DIVISION, CELL MOTILITY, AND DEVELOPMENT Reference: Biol. Bull. 187: 231-232. (October, 1994)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

while reducing the time required to process the digital images and the amount of digital storage) 231 High Resolution Multimode Digital Imaging System for Mitosis Studies In Viva and In Vitro E. D segregation can be answered by quantitative measurements of digital images obtained from several optical modes

Murray, Andrew W.

119

AIED 2009 Tutorial: Categorisation and Educational Benefits of Open Learner Models Susan Bull & Judy Kay  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of (I)OLM Screens 7 Motivation for SMILI OLM Framework 8 SMILI Framework Description: Examples 8 1. Mr is an Open Learner Model (OLM)? Usually learner models are hidden from the learner they represent difficulties. IOLMs and OLMs may use similar externalisations of the learner model contents. You believ

Bull, Susan

120

Seasonal variations in seminal characteristics and libido in Angus and Brahman bulls  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, 1979 February 26, 1979 February 27~ 1979 February 28~ 1979 March 7, 1979 9 A March 28~ 1979 9 B April 4, 1979 9 A~ 8 B May 9g 1979 9 A, 9 B June 1, 1979 9 A~ 9 B June 27 ~ 9 A, 8 B August 1, 1979 9 A~ 9 B August 29, 1979 January 5, 1979... collections which occurred within a week of each other were assigned a single adjusted collection date. The collec- tions involved were collections on February 26, 1979, February 27, 1979, and February 28, 1979, which were as- signed an adjusted collection...

Scott, Carlton Ray

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bowline bull moose" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Bull Volcanol (2005) 00: DOI 10.1007/s00445-005-0016-7  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and foremost, for leaving BV in such great shape and for making the transition easy for me. I also thank Fran Dingwell, Julie Donnelly-Nolan, and Jocelyn McPhie--have ensured a smooth transition and continuity algorithms to locate and analyze volcanic and fire-related hot spots in satellite data, includ- ing

Long, Bernard

122

Using Bulls-Eye Commissioning to Save Energy in Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

facility survey of system loads (kW). Information gathered included the nominal power ratings of equipment such as: exterior lights, interior lights, HVAC (fans, pumps, compressors, cooling towers), hot water, and plug loads (computers, copiers, fax....0 10.0 20.0 30.0 40.0 50.0 60.0 ?F Compressor cooling begins at 2:00. OSA 58 degrees at 2:00 If the economizer high limit was set higher (e.g. 65 degrees) mechanical cooling may have been avoided. In this building the set point was 55...

Price, W.; Hart, R.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

22. G. J. Demaison, E. T. Moore, Am. Assoc. Petrol. Geol. Bull. 8, 1179 (1980).  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-series (U-series) dating of stalagmites. These stalagmites, from Carlsbad Cavern and Hidden Cave, Guadalupe

Asmerom, Yemane

124

Reference: Biol. Bull., 136: 2"8.(February,1969) MAJOR ENVIRONMENTAL FACTORS INDUCING THE TERMINA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Department of Zoology, The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48104 Diapause occurs in a great in the vicinity of Ann Arbor, Michigan, swim beneath the winter ice of shallow ponds and kettle holes. -A major Arbor, Michigan. They were placed in Precision Scientific model 805 incubators at 5 ±10 C equipped

Oregon, University of

125

Bull Math Biol DOI 10.1007/s11538-014-9957-3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

hydraulics and allows us to gain a mechanistic understanding as to how flow patterns affect population widely recognized that variations in the water flow are critically important for the ecosystem integrity­biological model. The water depth and current are derived from a hydrodynamic equation for variable stream bed

Lewis, Mark

126

Reference: Bid. Bull. 181: 181-188. (August, 1991) Bioluminescence Maintenance in Juvenile  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

population (Kornicker and Baker, 1977). Its absence from northern waters led to speculation that V. tsujii or that there is a luciferin recycling or syn- 181 #12;182 A. F.

Mensinger, Allen F.

127

A descriptive evaluation of ultrasonic ribeye area measures in young beef bulls  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for ribeye area were developed within each breed. Weight was the strongest predictor of ribeye area with an average R of . 43 across all breeds. 2 Prediction equations for ribeye area were developed f' or each breed using weight as a single linear... for continuous independent variables were calculated using deviations from respective means. The effects included in the main model used for a descriptive analysis were represented by the following symbols: Y & j& observed value f or the i j k character...

Bormann, Scott Alan

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Appendix 68 Bull Trout Data for Hungry Horse and South Fork of the Flathead  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.4632 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 No.Redds #12;Figure 2

129

Reference: Bid. Bull. 187: 84-98. (August, 1994) Oxygen Consumption Rates and Metabolic Enzyme  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Nausithop rubra, were anaerobically poised, possibly as a mechanism to assist in vertical migrations at low (Childress et al., 1989). In addition, we recently measured the respiratory rates and enzyme activities measurement of the activity of the electron transport system (ETS) (Bgmstedt, 1980; Mayzaud, 1986; Packard

Thuesen, Erik V.

130

Microsoft PowerPoint - Bull Shoals U1 repair MSB edit 3.ppt  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces andMapping theEnergyInnovationMichaelGE1PlanARM A.

131

Kalispel Tribe of Indians joins federal agencies to protect bull trout and other species  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFunInfraredJeffersonJonathan Pershingrelocates 18-ton machineWednesday, July 11,

132

Anion A&ndash; &bull; HX Clusters with Reduced Electron Binding Energies:  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to someone by E-mail ShareRedAndreas E VasdekisAngela NorbeckThin

133

151 Bull. B.O.C. 2004 124(2) References  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

--a case of fraud examined. Ibis 135: 320­325. Navarro-Sigüenza, A. G., Peterson, A.T. & Gordillo Journal 1: 45­53. Peterson, A. T., Navarro-Sigüenza, A. G. & Benitez-Diaz, H. 1998. The need for continued, The University of Kansas, Lawrence, Kansas 66045, e-mail: town@ku.edu. Adolfo G. Navarro- Sigüenza, Museo de

Johnson, Kevin P.

134

E-Print Network 3.0 - availability cluster system Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

for Moose Michael Meer Summary: extract subsystems and guide their exploration of the software system. There are many available properties... which properties matter most for his...

135

Microsoft Word - INL-EXT-13-29514 Final.docx  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

series (i.e., the replacement for RELAP5). The code is being developed based on Idaho National Laboratory's modern scientific software development framework - MOOSE (the...

136

Adsorption of atmospheric organic pollutants by carbonaceous adsorbents  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

College, PA) and the Ambersorb adsorbents XE-340, XE-347 and XE-348 (donated by Rohm and Haas, Philadelphia, PA). Each of the Ambersorb adsorbents was individually ground in a U. S. Stoneware Ball Mill (Department of Mechanical Engineering, Texas A&M...ADSORPTION OF ATMOSPHERIC ORGANIC POLLUTANTS BY CARBONACEOUS ADSORBENTS A Thesis by JAMES BOWLIN McCOY COLEY Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER...

Coley, James Bowlin McCoy

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

The Effects of Metaphylaxis and Milk Replacer Additives on Health and Growth of Neonatal Holstein Bull Calves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

received a commercial milk replacer powder (22% Crude Protein / 20% Crude Fat) fed at 1.1% BW. Within metaphylaxis treatment, calves were randomly assigned to receive either: 1) 4 g/d for 7 d and then 2 g/d for 14 d of an egg-based probiotic (PR); 2) 2 g...

Dehaan, Katherine G.

2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

138

The Effects of Metaphylaxis and Milk Replacer Additives on Health and Growth of Neonatal Holstein Bull Calves.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

/d for the next 14 d of an egg-based additive (PR); 2) 2 g/d of 96% betaine (BE); 3) both PR and BE (BP); or 4) no additives (NA). Calves were housed in individual fiberglass hutches with ad libitum access to a commercial calf starter and water. Body weight...

Holloway, Kenton S.

2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

139

A study on the effects of cervical mucus of synchronized cows on the behavior of bull spermatozoa  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

February 24c February 28 March 27 March 20 March 26 March 31 96 36 36 48 56 48 672 48 72 552 48 36 Syn 12 group. Syn 16 group. cSilent estrus. 23 can be explained by the fact that a small number of animals was used in the different...

Cal, Guillermo Luis

1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

THE BULL RUN RIVER-RESERVOIR SYSTEM MODEL Robert L. Annear, Research Assistant, Civil and Environmental Engineering, Portland  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to meet water demand and fish habitat requirements. Management strategies evaluated included adding and Environmental Engineering, Portland State University, Portland, Oregon. Scott A. Wells, Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Portland State University, Portland, Oregon. Department of Civil and Environmental

Wells, Scott A.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bowline bull moose" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Bull. London Math. Soc. 39 (2007) 345347 Ce2007 London Mathematical Society doi:10.1112/blms/bdm004  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

/bdm004 AN IDENTITY FOR THE DEDEKIND ETA-FUNCTION INVOLVING TWO INDEPENDENT COMPLEX VARIABLES BRUCE C;346 BRUCE C. BERNDT AND WILLIAM B. HART one can prove the identity u2 v2 = u2 1v2 1 + u2 2v2 2, H to in any way; that is, the equation held for two completely independent complex variables. Simplification

Berndt, Bruce C.

142

Bull. Soc. gol. Fr., 2008, no The Rio Bravo fault, a major late Oligocene left-lateral shear zone  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Upper Cretaceous sequence, are both tightly folded before 30 Ma. We think this folding is associated by gravimetric data and the offsets the Palaeocene-Eocene oil fields that are displaced left laterally. We

Husson, Laurent

143

A Review of "'The Furie of the Ordnance' Artillery in the English Civil Wars" by Stephen Bull  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

industrial and military historians. C. Scott Dixon, Dagmar Freist, and Mark Greengrass, eds. Living with Religious Diversity in Early-Modern Europe. Farnham, Surrey: Ashgate Publishing Ltd., 2009. xiii + 295 pp. + 20 illus. $114.95. Review by adam swann... industrial and military historians. C. Scott Dixon, Dagmar Freist, and Mark Greengrass, eds. Living with Religious Diversity in Early-Modern Europe. Farnham, Surrey: Ashgate Publishing Ltd., 2009. xiii + 295 pp. + 20 illus. $114.95. Review by adam swann...

Furgol, Edward M

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Bull. U. S.F.C. 1890. Aquaria at Central Station. (To face pg:f.l.) PLATEI. ENTRANCETO MARINEGROTTO.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, thero is still afforciecla very realistic represolitstioil of a natural grotto or cavern in which imitation of a cavern or grotto has been very vigorously assailed by Mr. W. A. Lloyd, lato superintendent

145

Effects of implantation of Synovex (progesterone-estradiol) and castration in Holstein and Brown Swiss bull calves for beef production  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

"ra@-HE'LL 5~?. Cn?. X. . ~n?? @no Tech? yy 2~- 69? QS, TelK~ H+ K?~mezg, B, snQ G~, Q H LNA, ENeee yR ~ el eaaeeaeLm cad oC eeseosCevms p:ey~ oa migs getLe ~ CQKCSSS QQQSUECIIKXCI QS SCCQX8o ASSCo Do ETC ~ AQSZ4 Eeslhi, 4sGP~ Ki ~ +Lese's, J, lLM7+ Xke...

Vergara, Francisco de Patino

1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Bull Math Biol (2012) 74:24232445 DOI 10.1007/s11538-012-9759-4  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

September 2011 / Accepted: 13 July 2012 / Published online: 3 August 2012 © Society for Mathematical Biology. van den Driessche Department of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Victoria, Victoria, BC V8W 3

Shuai, Zhisheng

147

Bull. Fr. Pche Piscic. (2003) 370-371 : 7-14 --7 --UNDERSTANDING AND MANAGING BIODIVERSITY IN RELATION TO  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to population levels. Key-words : biodiversity, native crayfish, conservation, management. COMPRÃ?HENSION ET, conservation, gestion. INTRODUCTION Biodiversity is expressed as a core concern of a number of EC networks to biodiversity conservation and management in Europe. CRAYNET is thus linked to BIOTA Cluster and among other

Boyer, Edmond

148

Phenotypic Characterization of Feed Efficiency and Feeding Behavior Traits in Performance Tested Bulls Fed a Corn Silage-Based Diet  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by information sent from the satiety centers of the brain via feedback mechanisms from visceral organs such as distension and hypertonicity in the reticulo- rumen region, chemical and osmotic receptors located in the digestive tract, and metabolic receptors...

Moreno Rajo, Jose Gilberto

2013-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

149

Wilson Bull., 110(3), 1998, pp. 352-361 VOCALIZATIONS OF THE BLUE-FRONTED AMAZON  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of increasing interactions between individuals. The frequency containing the greatest amount of energy-fronted Amazon (Amazona aes- tiva) is a parrot whose distribution extends over northeastern Brazil, Bolivia

Fernández-Juricic, Esteban

150

Bull. Environ. Contain. Toxicol. (1987) 38:377-380 9 1987 Springer-Verlag New York Inc.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

an Alpine wetland area subject to treated effluent from a sewage treatment works (Brodrick 1985). Soil in Wetland Soils S. Brodrick, P. Cullen, and W. Maher Water Research Centre, Canberra College of Advanced, discharges secondary treated sewage effluent through an adjacent wetland area to trap suspended and dissolved

Canberra, University of

151

Revue de presse hebdomadaire 30 janvier 05 fvrier 2012  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.com o donde bulle la creatividad (por FRANCIS PISANI) : Las sociedades africanas fomentan las tareas

Rennes, Université de

152

Agents, Beliefs, and Plausible Behavior in a Temporal Setting  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Zachmann (Computer Graphics) #12;Agents, Beliefs, and Plausible Behavior in a Temporal Setting Nils Bulling

Zachmann, Gabriel

153

Thermal benefits of artificial shelters in snakes: A radiotelemetric study of two sympatric colubrids  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

successfully for conservation (Webb and Shine, 2000; Arida and Bull, 2008; Grillet et al., 2010). Artificial

Blouin-Demers, Gabriel

154

Upgrading Data Centers' Electrical Systems: Selecting the Best Electrical Design Configuration for Existing Data Centers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

like to thank my company, Black & Veatch Corporation, for the financial support provided to help me complete the Engineering Management program. Last, but not least, I would like to thank all my teachers and my committee members Dr. Tom Bowlin, Terry... systems and they are different from what data center managers are used to. The solution to data center managers’ concern with line reactive systems is to upgrade UPS modules with software such as Eaton’s Energy Saver System (ESS), which manages UPS...

Lienou, Richard T.

2012-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

155

Ab Initio Molecular Dynamics Bull. Korean Chem. Soc. 2003, Vol. 24, No. 6 1 Ab Initio Molecular Dynamics with Born-Oppenheimer and Extended  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dynamics with Born-Oppenheimer and Extended Lagrangian Methods Using Atom Centered Basis Functions H calculations. For Born-Oppenheimer methods, the electronic structure calculations are converged, whereas trajectory calculations, Born-Oppenheimer dynamics, Extended Lagrangian dynamics, ADMP Introduction

Schlegel, H. Bernhard

156

Bull. Disas. Prey. Res. Inst., Kyoto Univ., Vol. 45, Part 4, No. 393, March, 1996 A Study on the Apparent Friction Angle Mobilized  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in long run-out landslides. After residual state was obtained by constant speed shearing at a low normal. The undrained loading ring shear tests for the saturated samples taken from the alluvial deposits of the 1983Sale landslide in China, as well as for the torrent deposits of the 1984Ontake debris avalanche, Japan

Takada, Shoji

157

856 Bull. Korean Chem. Soc. 2013, Vol. 34, No. 3 Soojeong Park et al. http://dx.doi.org/10.5012/bkcs.2013.34.3.XXX  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

transfer was attained with the photoanode electrode. The power conversion efficiency (PCE) of our solarSSe/CdS /TiO2NTs) or (CdSe/CdS /TiO2NTs )] was PCE = 3.49% and 2.81% under the illumination at 100 mW/cm2 recombination, ZnS was introduced onto CdSSe/CdS. The PCE of our solar cell with the structure of a photoanode

Kim, Myung Soo

158

Octatetraene-Xe van der Waals Clusters Bull. Korean Chem. Soc. 2002, Vol. 23, No. 2 195 Fluorescence Excitation Spectroscopy of Octatetraene-Xe van der Waals Clusters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a conjugated double bond structure, playing important roles in photobiological systems. Conversion of light conversion of light in biolog- ical systems. Some years ago, this group has reported the role of the rare gas for the molecular interactions among the collision pairs and the solvation dynamics.1,2 Since the rare gas atoms

Kim, Sang Kyu

159

Bull. U.S.k.C., lW.-(To face page 225.) PLATB I. BULLETIN OF THE UNITED STATES FISH COMMISSION. 225  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and supplied liiin with such help as he needed, :kt first with ' three iiieii and snbseqnentlgv itil four

160

Owen, R.B., Sandhu, N., 2000. Heavy metal accumulation and anthro-pogenic impacts on Tolo Harbour, Hong Kong. Mar. Pollut. Bull. 40,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.-M., 2003. Pollution history of the Masan Bay, southeast Korea, from heavy metals and foraminiferaOwen, R.B., Sandhu, N., 2000. Heavy metal accumulation and anthro- pogenic impacts on Tolo Harbour and tracer elements in sediments of the Ria de Vigo (NW Spain): an assessment of metal pollution. Mar. Pollut

Yu, K.N.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bowline bull moose" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Pharmacophore Model for Itk Inhibitors Bull. Korean Chem. Soc. 2010, Vol. 31, No. 11 3333 DOI 10.5012/bkcs.2010.31.11.3333  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.1. The best hypothesis, Hypo1, comprises two hydrogen bond acceptor (HBA), one hydrophobic aromatic (HA), one and Fischer's randomization method. Furthermore, Hypo1 was used to screen NCI and May- bridge databases reduces cytokines IL-2, IL-4, IL-5 and IL-13 production, which leads inflammatory diseases

Lee, Keun Woo

162

Evaluation of postpartum udder characteristics of F1 cows sired by Angus, Gray Brahman, Gir, Indu-Brazil, Nellore and Red Brahman bulls  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SIGNIFICANCE TESTS FOR FIXED EFFECTS INCLUDED IN INDIVIDUAL TEAT LENGTH MODELS. 44 12 LEAST SQUARES MEANS AND STANDARD ERRORS FOR TEAT LENGTH AVERAGES BY SIRE BREED OF COW- PARITY 12 RECORDS EXCLUDED. 46 13 LEAST SQUARES MEANS AND STANDARD ERRORS FOR TEAT... LENGTH AVERAGES BY SIRE BREED OF COW- PARITY 10, 11 AND 12 RECORDS EXCLUDED. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48 14 LEAST SQUARES MEANS AND STANDARD ERRORS FOR INDIVIDUAL TEAT LENGTHS BY SIRE BREED OF COW ? PARITY 12 RECORDS EXCLUDED. 50 LIST OF TABLES...

Riley, David Greg

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

2014 Across-Breed EPD Adjustment Factors Released When using EPDs, bulls from one breed cannot be compared to another unless an adjustment factor is used. Since 1993,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Research Center in Clay Center, Nebraska have released adjustment factors for growth traits and maternal Tough Decisions I have heard several questions concerning 1.) Should I sell my calves at weaning?, And 2

Florida, University of

164

Temperature Dependence of Sputtered Conductive Carbon Thin Films Bull. Korean Chem. Soc. 2011, Vol. 32, No. 3 939 DOI 10.5012/bkcs.2011.32.3.939  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

°C to 700 °C in increments of 100 °C using a rapid thermal annealing method by vacuum furnace in the electronic devices such as organic thin film transistor (OTFT), dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC), and field by a vacuum furnace in vacuum ambient, and the effects of annealing temperature on struc- tural, tribological

Boo, Jin-Hyo

165

Evaluation of F1 Cows Sired by Brahman, Boran, and Tuli Bulls for Reproductive and Maternal Performance Traits and Cow Longevity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LONGEVITY A Thesis by CARL THOMAS MUNTEAN Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE Approved by: Chair of Committee, James O. Sanders... and Maternal Performance Traits and Cow Longevity. (May 2011) Carl Thomas Muntean, B.S., Texas A&M University Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. James O. Sanders Birth (BWT) (n = 1,335) and weaning weight...

Muntean, Carl

2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

166

Curcumin-Loaded PLGA Nanoparticles Coating onto Metal Stent by EPD Bull. Korean Chem. Soc. 2007, Vol. 28, No. 3 397 Curcumin-Loaded PLGA Nanoparticles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

@plaza.snu.ac.kr Received December 4, 2006 Restenosis after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) continues

Park, Jong-Sang

167

2830 Bull. Korean Chem. Soc. 2012, Vol. 33, No. 9 Hana Yoon et al. http://dx.doi.org/10.5012/bkcs.2012.33.9.2830  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of material systems including noble metals, metal silicides and metal germanides. For the single of nanostructures or simply by down- sizing existing microstructures into the nanoscale.5,6 Among various, chemical and biological sensing, nanoelectronics, and improved photovoltaics. By combining the achievement

Kim, Bongsoo

168

Notes Bull. Korean Chem. Soc. 2011, Vol. 32, No. 5 1777 DOI 10.5012/bkcs.2011.32.5.1777  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of bone metastasis and several bone disorders, such as Paget's disease and osteoporosis, in post- menopausal women and older people.1,2 Generally, because the concentrations of alendronate in the therapeutic

Park, Jong-Sang

169

Bull World Health Organ 2012;90:228235A |doi:10.2471/BLT.11.094284 Accounting for water quality in monitoring access to safe  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

access to safe drinking-water and basic sanitation".1 The World Health Organization (WHO) and the United Programme for Water Supply and Sanitation.2 However, the functioning of the Joint Monitoring Programme-, middle- and high- income countries. Moreover, data comparability between countries was poor since

Bristol, University of

170

Bull. Fish Biol. 14 (1/2) Bulletin of Fish Biology Volume 14 Nos. 1/2 30.12.2013 61-73  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

sh that has colonized two cave sys- tems in the southern state of Tabasco, Mexico. Unlike many Mexikos (Tabasco) zwei Höhlen besiedelt hat. Anders als viele andere obligate Höh- lenbewohner sind diese

Schlupp, Ingo

171

Bull World Health Organ 2012;90:878886 |doi:10.2471/BLT.12.106419 Lead exposure from soil in Peruvian mining towns: a national  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the world's top five producers of silver, zinc, lead and copper5 and has a long and conflict-ridden mining processing plants and smelters in other parts of the world have already been shown to reduce dramatically of mining silver, copper, zinc and lead deposits throughout the region. Today when a new mine enters

van Geen, Alexander

172

ECONOMIC SURVEY OF THE U.S. FISHERIES IN THE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the east side of Moose Island, while the low pool con- sists of Cobscook Bay and the shores and waters the western sides of the St. Croix River estuary and Passamaquoddy Bay, to- gether with the shores and waters

173

Field Trips (1) Boston: An Urban Ecosystem  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Reservoir and Watershed Trip Leaders: Steve DeStefano and Justin Compton, USGS Cooperative Research Unit. The Quabbin also plays an important role as wildlife habitat: moose, deer, bears, bobcats, fishers, beavers

DeStefano, Stephen

174

NEAMS Update Quarterly report for April June 2014  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

at the end of each topic. The national laboratories performing NEAMS work are Argonne (ANL), Idaho (INL MOOSE), BISON developers greatly improved the robustness of the contact algorithm. [INL]* Taken

Kemner, Ken

175

SciTech Connect: Memory Optimization for Phase-field Simulations  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

English Subject: 99 GENERAL AND MISCELLANEOUS MemoryLogger; MOOSE; Optimization Word Cloud More Like This Full Text preview image File size NAView Full Text View Full Text DOI:...

176

Tackling the Triple-Threat Genome of Miscanthus x giganteus (2010 JGI User Meeting)  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Steve Moose from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and the Energy Biosciences Institute on "Tackling the Triple-Threat Genome of Miscanthus x giganteus" on March 25, 2010 at the 5th Annual DOE JGI User Meeting

Moose, Steve

2011-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

177

W. Nejdl et al. (Eds.): AH 2008, LNCS 5149, pp. 6272, 2008. Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2008  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Models Susan Bull, Andrew Mabbott, Peter Gardner, Tim Jackson, Michael J. Lancaster, Steven Quigley.bull,axm891,p.gardner,t.j.jackson,m.j.lancaster, s.f.quigley,p.a.childs}@bham.ac.uk Abstract. Misconceptions

Bull, Susan

178

COOK, A. F., N. E. STACEY, AND R. E. PETER. 1980. Periovulatory changes in serum cortisol levels in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. 1971. The early life history of skipjack tuna. Katsuwonus pelamis, in the Pacific Ocean. Fish. Bull., U

179

EIS-0265-SA-67: Supplement Analysis  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Watershed Management Program - Install Fish Screens to Protect ESA Listed Steelhead and Bull Trout in the Walla Walla Basin

180

TSUNAMI: An Integrated Timing-Driven Place And Route Research Platform Christophe Alexandre1, Hugo Clement1, Jean-Paul Chaput1, Marek Sroka1,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, LIP6/ASIM laboratory, 2Bull SA, 3Silvaco Abstract In this paper, we present an experimental integrated

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bowline bull moose" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Individualised Recommendations for Learning Strategy ARIES Lab, Dept. of Computer Science, University of Saskatchewan,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Science, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, S7N 5A9, Canada. bull@cs.usask.ca Abstract

Bull, Susan

182

Phylogenetic and Population Genetic Studies in Grindelia (Asteraceae: Astereae)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

fraxinipratensis Reveal & Beatley Nevada Prov. Córdoba, (fraxinipratensis Reveal & Beatley, Bull. Torrey Bot. Clubfraxinipratensis Reveal & Beatley Nevada 1887 (UC) Nye Co. ,

Moore, Abigail Jane

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

851 S.W. Sixth Avenue, Suite 1100 Steve Crow 503-222-5161 Portland, Oregon 97204-1348 Executive Director 800-452-5161  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

at large landscape-size conservation areas can bring about results that will help us delist bull trout

184

Supplement 19, Part 1, Authors: A To Z  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bull. Entom. N. Delhi.-- Bulletin of Entomology. New Delhi. [IT. (421 B872) ] Bull. Entom. Soc. Egypt, Econom. s.? Bulletin of the Entomological Society of E&ypt, Economic series. Cairo. [VT.(SB 931. A1E5) ] Bull. Landbouwproefstation Suriname....? Bulletin. Land- bouwproefstation Suriname. Department of Agriculture, Animal Husbandly and Fisheries. Paramaribo, Suriname. [VIa (9.6.D95)] Bull. Soc. Amis Sc. et Let. Poznan.? Bulletin de la Soci?t? des Amis des Sciences et des Lettres de Poznai...

Segal, Dorothy B.; Humphrey, Judith M.; Edwards, Shirley J.; Kirby, Margie D.; Walker, Martha L.; Rayburn, Jane D.; Crawley, Lila R.; Podani, Jule M.

1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Bull. Mater. Sci., Vol. 37, No. 1, February 2014, pp. 7782. c Indian Academy of Sciences. NbCl5 and CrCl3 catalysts effect on synthesis and hydrogen storage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and CrCl3 catalysts effect on synthesis and hydrogen storage performance of Mg­Ni­NiO composites QI WAN on hydrogen storage performance were investigated. A microstructure analysis showed that besides the main Mg storage; Mg-based materials; hydrogen storage performance; catalyst. 1. Introduction There is a great

Volinsky, Alex A.

186

Bull. Mater. Sci., Vol. 35, No. 5, October 2012, pp. 767772. c Indian Academy of Sciences. Anti-tumor activity of self-charged (Eu,Ca):WO3 and Eu:CaWO4  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-tumor activity of self-charged (Eu,Ca):WO3 and Eu:CaWO4 nanoparticles CAO LIN , CAO JIEXIN , WANG CONG, CHE PING July 2011 Abstract. Non-stoichiometric (Eu,Ca):WO3 and Eu:CaWO4 nanoparticles with anti-tumor activity are synthe- sized in a sol­gel method by adding excessive Eu3+ and Ca2+ ions to tungsten oxide crystal

Volinsky, Alex A.

187

Coherent Vibrational Wave-Packet on Reaction Product Bull. Korean Chem. Soc. 2013, Vol. 34, No. 2 465 http://dx.doi.org/10.5012/bkcs.2013.34.2.465  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-18 Smith et al. investigated the ESIPT of anthraquinone deriva- tives by using time-resolved fluorescence

Kim, Myung Soo

188

E-Print Network 3.0 - anopheles darlingi collected Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

PIA MALANEY, SONIA EHRLICH SACHS, Summary: , 1984. Anopheles darlingi Root in the Suriname rain forest. Bull Entomol Res 74: 129-142. 35. Laubach HE... and behaviour of...

189

E-Print Network 3.0 - anopheles darlingi bionomics Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

PIA MALANEY, SONIA EHRLICH SACHS, Summary: , 1984. Anopheles darlingi Root in the Suriname rain forest. Bull Entomol Res 74: 129-142. 35. Laubach HE... and behaviour of...

190

E-Print Network 3.0 - anopheles darlingi colectados Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

PIA MALANEY, SONIA EHRLICH SACHS, Summary: , 1984. Anopheles darlingi Root in the Suriname rain forest. Bull Entomol Res 74: 129-142. 35. Laubach HE... and behaviour of...

191

E-Print Network 3.0 - anopheles darlingi reveals Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

PIA MALANEY, SONIA EHRLICH SACHS, Summary: , 1984. Anopheles darlingi Root in the Suriname rain forest. Bull Entomol Res 74: 129-142. 35. Laubach HE... and behaviour of...

192

E-Print Network 3.0 - anopheles darlingi diptera Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

PIA MALANEY, SONIA EHRLICH SACHS, Summary: , 1984. Anopheles darlingi Root in the Suriname rain forest. Bull Entomol Res 74: 129-142. 35. Laubach HE... . Environmen- tal and...

193

E-Print Network 3.0 - anopheles darlingi criado Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

PIA MALANEY, SONIA EHRLICH SACHS, Summary: , 1984. Anopheles darlingi Root in the Suriname rain forest. Bull Entomol Res 74: 129-142. 35. Laubach HE... and behaviour of...

194

Therapeutic Hypothermia for Acute Air Embolic Stroke  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

therapy with induced hypothermia after ischemic stroke.Stroke. 2009;40:126–128. 12.and emerging treatments for stroke. Brit Med Bull. 2006;77–

Chang, Matthew; Marshall, John

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Effects of competition and dispersal on the recruitment of the annual kelp Nereocystis luetkeana  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of spore release from the kelp Nereocystis luetkeana (Andrews, H. (1945). The kelp beds of the Monterey region.of petroleum products on bull kelp (Nereocystis luetkeana).

Suskiewicz, Matthew S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Collecting Sea Palms: Planning for Sustainable Use in a Variable Environment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

clear cutting” of the kelp palms. The meristem refers tohistories, including bull kelp (Nereocystis luetkeana) –the major kelp forest species in Northern California and

Nielsen, Karina J.; Blanchette, Carol A

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

E-Print Network 3.0 - achatina fulica bowdich Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Institute Collection: Biotechnology ; Chemistry 4 Amer. Malac. Bull. 27: 113-132 (2009) Alien non-marine snails and slugs of priority quarantine importance in the United Summary:...

198

E-Print Network 3.0 - africano achatina fulica Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Institute Collection: Biotechnology ; Chemistry 8 Amer. Malac. Bull. 27: 113-132 (2009) Alien non-marine snails and slugs of priority quarantine importance in the United Summary:...

199

Microsoft Word - McNary_ShuntCapAddition_CX.docx  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

to prevent any erosion andor runoff from construction activities from entering these water resources. Federally Listed Species and Critical Habitat. Bull trout (Salvelinus...

200

Standard and routine metabolic rates of juvenile sandbar sharks (Carcharhinus plumbeus), including the effects of body mass and acute temperature change  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

skipjack tuna, Katsuwonus pelamis. Fish. Bull. 1987. On theskipjack tuna (Katsuwonus pelamis), and dolphin fish (skipjack (Katsuwonus pelamis) and yellowfin (Thunnus

Dowd, William Wesley; Brill, R W; Bushnell, P G; Musick, J A

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bowline bull moose" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

E-Print Network 3.0 - artificial nerve grafts Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Coated Graft and Inflammation Bull. Korean Chem. Soc. 2010, Vol. 31, No. 2 281 DOI 10... Expanded Polytetrafluoroethylene (ePTFE) Hemodialysis Grafts in Rabbit Model Insu Baek,...

202

arousal facilitates collision: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Open learner models, communication, multiple users. 1 Introduction Open learner models (OLM) are learner models that are accessible Bull, Susan 128 Facilitating Consensus,...

203

analog fret-pair facilitating: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Open learner models, communication, multiple users. 1 Introduction Open learner models (OLM) are learner models that are accessible Bull, Susan 183 Facilitating Consensus,...

204

anterior capsular opening: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Open learner models, communication, multiple users. 1 Introduction Open learner models (OLM) are learner models that are accessible Bull, Susan 411 Understanding Requirements for...

205

aav5 vector facilitates: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Open learner models, communication, multiple users. 1 Introduction Open learner models (OLM) are learner models that are accessible Bull, Susan 169 Facilitating Consensus,...

206

access communication datac: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Open learner models, communication, multiple users. 1 Introduction Open learner models (OLM) are learner models that are accessible Bull, Susan 111 Channel modelling and relay for...

207

a3 facilitates lysosomal: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Open learner models, communication, multiple users. 1 Introduction Open learner models (OLM) are learner models that are accessible Bull, Susan 94 Facilitating Consensus,...

208

activity facilitates microtubule: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Open learner models, communication, multiple users. 1 Introduction Open learner models (OLM) are learner models that are accessible Bull, Susan 398 Facilitating Consensus,...

209

aspergillus niger facilitates: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Open learner models, communication, multiple users. 1 Introduction Open learner models (OLM) are learner models that are accessible Bull, Susan 102 Facilitating Consensus,...

210

anterior open bite: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Open learner models, communication, multiple users. 1 Introduction Open learner models (OLM) are learner models that are accessible Bull, Susan 467 Understanding Requirements for...

211

abolish response facilitation: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Open learner models, communication, multiple users. 1 Introduction Open learner models (OLM) are learner models that are accessible Bull, Susan 57 Facilitating Consensus,...

212

alkyl esters perspectives: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Open learner models, communication, multiple users. 1 Introduction Open learner models (OLM) are learner models that are accessible Bull, Susan 422 When quadrangles are completely...

213

aescula open wedge: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Open learner models, communication, multiple users. 1 Introduction Open learner models (OLM) are learner models that are accessible Bull, Susan 462 Understanding Requirements for...

214

assisted language learning: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

contents are not directly presented to the user. Open learner Bull, Susan 3 Online Mind Maps for Language Learning : Assisted Risk-Taking Josphine Rmon1 Computer Technologies...

215

The President's Lecture Series of Diverse Scholars, Rice University ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nov 28, 2006 ... Biane-Pitman-Yor: “Probability laws related to the Jacobi theta and. Riemann Zeta functions and Brownian excursions, Bull. Amer math.

Rodrigo Bauelos,

2006-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

216

Bibliography and citation count of the Lowell Observatory 21 inch telescope,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- Johnson, H. L. 1959. On the luminosities of early-type stars. Lowell Obs. Bull., 4, 87 (no. 94) 1- Sinton

Lockwood, Wes

217

Squeezer Creek.indd  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

20-acre conservation easement in northwest Montana to protect critical habitat for bull trout and westslope cutthroat trout in a reach of Squeezer Creek in Lake County. Squeezer...

218

Regional scale effects of base cation fertilization on Norway spruce and European beech stands situated on acid brown soils: soil and foliar chemistry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

net N transformations in Norway spruce (Picea abies (L. )Vascular tissue anatomy of Norway spruce needles and twigsnutrient imbalances in Norway spruce, Ecol. Bull. 44 (

Misson, Laurent

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

The Association Between Exposure to Traffic-Related Air Pollution During Pregnancy and Children's Health Outcomes in the San Joaquin Valley of California: An Example of Causal Inference Methods  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

T. Holgate (2002). "Air pollution and health." Lancet 360(Ed. (1999). Air Pollution and Health. London, Academic2003). "Ambient air pollution and health." Br Med Bull 68:

Padula, Amy Michelle

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Microsoft PowerPoint - SWL HPConf2009 (final).ppt  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Studies (continued) Little Rock District, Southwestern Division 1. Bull Shoals, Marion County ( 3 MGD) - request received November 2007. 2. Table Rock, Tri-State Water (50,000...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bowline bull moose" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

County, Idaho.  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

part due to the potential to restore altered riparian habitats for wildlife, resident fish species (i.e., rainbow trout, bull trout, westslope cutthroat trout, kokanee) and the...

222

E-Print Network 3.0 - andean flicker colaptes Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Am. Nat. ... Source: Bortolotti, Gary R. - Department of Biology, University of Saskatchewan Collection: Environmental Sciences and Ecology 2 Wilson Bull., 114(3), 2002, pp....

223

E-Print Network 3.0 - atopic dermatitis part Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Summary: plants and plant parts out of their mouths 4. Teach children to recognize poison-ivy and other dermatitis... or dermatitis Bull nettle (Cnidoscolus stimulosus)...

224

E-Print Network 3.0 - aggressive waters Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of Attachment. Hills- dale... : short-term effects of highly and mildly aggressive video games. Pers. Soc. Psychol. Bull. 12: 390 Source: Groningen, Rijksuniversiteit - Centre...

225

DOE/EIS-0312; Bonneville Power Administration, Fish and Wildlife...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Limited NZ20027j April 03, 2001 Columbia River Basin BPA Service Area Anadromous Fish Extinct Listed Anadromous Fish Species Listed Resident Fish - Bull Trout Listed...

226

alternative inspection survey: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

In a pilot study for a population study of travel behaviour, physical activity and the environment, 1000... Sahlqvist, Shannon; Song, Yena; Bull, Fiona; Adams, Emma; Preston,...

227

B O N N E V I L L E P O W E R A D M I N I S T R A T I O N  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and municipal water supply. The system is also operated to protect the river's fish, including salmon, steelhead, sturgeon and bull trout listed as threatened or...

228

Microsoft Word - Fish Letter _2_.doc  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and municipal water supply. The system is also operated to protect the river's fish, including salmon, steelhead, sturgeon and bull trout listed as threatened or...

229

E-Print Network 3.0 - avian encephalomyelitis virus Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

age determination of nestling Brown-headed Cowbirds. Wilson Bull. Summary: . A simulation model for the vector-host transmission system of a mosquito-borne avian virus,...

230

E-Print Network 3.0 - alaska pollack theragra Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

(P Summary: and early larval stages of the Alaska pollack, Theragra chalcogramma (Pallas). Bull. Fac. Fish., Hokkaido... development of the fish, Theragra chalcogramma...

231

Ecology 2007 21, 154161  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of contexts, both reproductive and routine. For example, large antlers of moose are effective weapons in male Ecological Society Blackwell Publishing Ltd Costs of bearing a sexually selected ornamental weapon be costly to produce and maintain. 2. Male fiddler crabs use a single greatly enlarged claw as both a weapon

Levinton, Jeffrey

232

GETTING STARTED TWICE COOKED FRIES 4  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SOUP & SALADS THE THIRSTY MOOSE PUB Add grilled chicken Add garlic toast Add dressing EDAMAME 6 Steamed with cherry tomatoes, crumbled feta and sunflower seeds w/ your choice of dressing Half order 4 Our dressings include: House (Lemon poppy seed), ranch, Italian, Balsamic and creamy blue cheese. THE CLASSIC CAESAR 10

Northern British Columbia, University of

233

OIMB GK12 CURRICULUM 4th Grade 45-60 minutes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ten different kinds of seaweed of all colors and sizes Overhead and worksheet of bull kelp (to label to contain the mess. 2. The lesson begins with a review of kelp anatomy, and students label a drawing of Bull Kelp. 3. Students are then split into two groups and told to go look at the seaweed at their station

234

Marine Biology (1995) 122:23-31 9 Springer-Verlag 1995 L. D. Antrim -R. M. Thorn 9W. W. Gardiner  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. I. Cullinan - D. K. Shreffler. R. W. Bienert Effects of petroleum products on bull kelp on the effects of oil on the giant kelp Macrocystis pyrifera, no similar studies have been completed on bull kelp, Nereo- cystis luetkeana, the dominant kelp in Washington State, British Columbia, and Alaska

California at Santa Cruz, University of

235

Iced Coffee Iced Yerba Mate "Tea"  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Iced Coffee Iced Yerba Mate "Tea" Iced Yerba Mate Latte Iced Chai Tea Latte Original, Green Tea Canned Soda Xing Tea Bottled Water Arizona Teas Energy Drinks Red Bull, SF Red Bull & Bing Jones Sodas $0 Cafe au Lait Hot Tea Yerba Mate "Tea" Yerba Mate Latte Chai Tea Latte - Original, Green Tea, or Sugar

236

OBI Brangus Breed Testing Information 2009-2010 Please read the attached rules and regulations for Oklahoma BEEF, Incorporated (OBI).  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

designation of OBI-tested sires, if applicable. These may be designated by the breeder at sale nomination time-PI testing to be performed on your bull(s). If the test comes back positive you will be required to pick up Representatives by position are: Test Rules Committee Sale Committee T. Ray T. Ray W. Brown J. Baldwin #12;

Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

237

3D seismic imaging of buried Younger Dryas mass movement flows: Lake Windermere, UK  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, , Luke J.W. Pinson a , Jonathan M. Bull a , Justin K. Dix a , Timothy J. Henstock a , John W. Davis offshore using tradi- tional 3D seismic methods (e.g., Frey-Martinez et al., 2005; Gee et al., 2006; Bull.g., Frey-Martinez et al., 2005). From this, a well- developed set of indicators for flow direction

Southampton, University of

238

D U K E I n s t i t u t e F o r G e n o m e S c i e n c e s & P o l i c y I s s u e 2 2 M a y / J u n e 0 6  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

refused to submit to the test, the Bulls traded him. The Bulls maintained they were protecting their player's health and their investment in him, while Curry and his attorney insisted that the fight presume) and members of the public, but also from members of international sports commissions, National

Dolbow, John

239

Resource partitioning as a factor limiting gene flow in hybridizing populations of Dolly Varden  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. We examined juvenile stream ecology and adult reproductive ecology of these species in sympatry against hybrids at the juvenile stream-rearing life-history stage. Bull trout, however, are adfluvial, whereas Dolly Varden are permanent stream residents. Bull trout are also much larger at maturity (50­80 cm

Taylor, Eric B. "Rick"

240

Cl-76 T. YUASA ET E. HOURANY tendue. Nous remercions MM. Charpak, Massonnet,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

avec une chambre à bulles à propane et les pro- tons produits par le synchrocyclotron d'Orsay. Nous'aide d'une chambre à bulles à propane et avec les protons produits par lesynchrocy- clotron d'Orsay, soit by a propane bubble chamber, either for coplanar events or for al1 events, is compared with theory

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bowline bull moose" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

RELAP-7 Level 2 Milestone Report: Demonstration of a Steady State Single Phase PWR Simulation with RELAP-7  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The document contains the simulation results of a steady state model PWR problem with the RELAP-7 code. The RELAP-7 code is the next generation nuclear reactor system safety analysis code being developed at Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The code is based on INL's modern scientific software development framework - MOOSE (Multi-Physics Object-Oriented Simulation Environment). This report summarizes the initial results of simulating a model steady-state single phase PWR problem using the current version of the RELAP-7 code. The major purpose of this demonstration simulation is to show that RELAP-7 code can be rapidly developed to simulate single-phase reactor problems. RELAP-7 is a new project started on October 1st, 2011. It will become the main reactor systems simulation toolkit for RISMC (Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization) and the next generation tool in the RELAP reactor safety/systems analysis application series (the replacement for RELAP5). The key to the success of RELAP-7 is the simultaneous advancement of physical models, numerical methods, and software design while maintaining a solid user perspective. Physical models include both PDEs (Partial Differential Equations) and ODEs (Ordinary Differential Equations) and experimental based closure models. RELAP-7 will eventually utilize well posed governing equations for multiphase flow, which can be strictly verified. Closure models used in RELAP5 and newly developed models will be reviewed and selected to reflect the progress made during the past three decades. RELAP-7 uses modern numerical methods, which allow implicit time integration, higher order schemes in both time and space, and strongly coupled multi-physics simulations. RELAP-7 is written with object oriented programming language C++. Its development follows modern software design paradigms. The code is easy to read, develop, maintain, and couple with other codes. Most importantly, the modern software design allows the RELAP-7 code to evolve with time. RELAP-7 is a MOOSE-based application. MOOSE (Multiphysics Object-Oriented Simulation Environment) is a framework for solving computational engineering problems in a well-planned, managed, and coordinated way. By leveraging millions of lines of open source software packages, such as PETSC (a nonlinear solver developed at Argonne National Laboratory) and LibMesh (a Finite Element Analysis package developed at University of Texas), MOOSE significantly reduces the expense and time required to develop new applications. Numerical integration methods and mesh management for parallel computation are provided by MOOSE. Therefore RELAP-7 code developers only need to focus on physics and user experiences. By using the MOOSE development environment, RELAP-7 code is developed by following the same modern software design paradigms used for other MOOSE development efforts. There are currently over 20 different MOOSE based applications ranging from 3-D transient neutron transport, detailed 3-D transient fuel performance analysis, to long-term material aging. Multi-physics and multiple dimensional analyses capabilities can be obtained by coupling RELAP-7 and other MOOSE based applications and by leveraging with capabilities developed by other DOE programs. This allows restricting the focus of RELAP-7 to systems analysis-type simulations and gives priority to retain and significantly extend RELAP5's capabilities.

David Andrs; Ray Berry; Derek Gaston; Richard Martineau; John Peterson; Hongbin Zhang; Haihua Zhao; Ling Zou

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Part 9, Authors: L To Lyutkevich  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?che. Publi? sous les Aus- pices de la Station de Pisciculture et d'Hydrobiologie de l'Universit? de Tou- louse. Paris, Toulouse. Bull. Soc. Hist. Nat. Ardennes.?Bulletin de la Soci?t? d'Histoire Naturelle des Ar- dennes. Ciiarleville. Bull. Soc. Sc. Nat....?To kill lice Bull. Mens. Soc. Y?t. Prat. France, v. 13 (11), Nov., p. 289...

Segal, Dorothy B.; Ray, Doris H.; Hassall, Albert; Doss, Mildred A.

1946-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Craig Thomas Discovery & Visitor Center  

High Performance Buildings Database

Moose, WY Grand Teton National Park's rugged landscape and stunning array of wildlife attract nearly three million visitors every year, making it one of our most popular national parks. A new Grand Teton National Park visitor center near the park's headquarters north of Jackson, Wyoming, replaces an outdated building, educates an increased number of visitors, and inspires further exploration of this extraordinary landscape. The project site is located along the Snake River, between a riparian forest and a sagebrush meadow.

244

Moosup, Connecticut: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to:46 -Energieprojekte3 Climate ZoneMontrose, Wisconsin: EnergyMoodyMoose

245

Mora County, New Mexico: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to:46 -Energieprojekte3 Climate ZoneMontrose, Wisconsin: EnergyMoodyMooseMora County, New

246

Morada, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to:46 -Energieprojekte3 Climate ZoneMontrose, Wisconsin: EnergyMoodyMooseMora County,

247

Moraga, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to:46 -Energieprojekte3 Climate ZoneMontrose, Wisconsin: EnergyMoodyMooseMora

248

Moraine, Ohio: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to:46 -Energieprojekte3 Climate ZoneMontrose, Wisconsin: EnergyMoodyMooseMoraMoraine,

249

More In Energy Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to:46 -Energieprojekte3 Climate ZoneMontrose, Wisconsin: EnergyMoodyMooseMoraMoraine,More

250

CORI Project: 2008-44 30 June 2010 Coastal Habitat Mapping Query Manual  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GIS Query]. 5. Determining the mapped distribution and shoreline length of the canopy kelps Macrocystis (giant kelp), Nereocystis (bull kelp), and Alaria fistulosa (dragon kelp) (MAC, NER, and ALF biobands

251

PUGET SOUND AND WILLAPA BAY GUIDE TO THE MARINE LIFE OF  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

' of the ocean. Like all seaweeds, they are rootless, obtaining nutrients directly from the water. The bull kelp the mainland and islands. Hummingbirds buzz across the water at a furious pace! Kelps are the `trees

Ruesink, Jennifer

252

E-Print Network 3.0 - achatina fulica gastropoda Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Collection: Environmental Sciences and Ecology 3 Amer. Malac. Bull. 27: 113-132 (2009) Alien non-marine snails and slugs of priority quarantine importance in the United Summary:...

253

E-Print Network 3.0 - achatina fulica mollusca Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Collection: Environmental Sciences and Ecology 2 Amer. Malac. Bull. 27: 113-132 (2009) Alien non-marine snails and slugs of priority quarantine importance in the United Summary:...

254

Avoiding Calving Problems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Calving difficulty, or dystocia, is influenced largely by genetics and the age of the dam. The main cause of calving problems is heavy birthweight. Solutions include selecting the right bull and mating it to properly developed heifers....

Sprott, L. R.

1998-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

255

A CGCM Study on the Northward Propagation of Tropical Intraseasonal Oscillation over the Asian Summer Monsoon Regions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

lot study. Bull. Amer. Meteor. Soc . , 83, 1603-1630, doi:10.1175/BAMS- 83-11-1603(2002)0831603:TJPS>2.3.CO;2. [Link] Weng, S. P. and J. Y. Yu,

Weng, Shu-Ping; Yu, Jin-Yi

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

ReseaRch PRoject GRants Dr Patti Adank  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bull University of the West of England Embodied evolutionary computing design: vertical axis wind turbine case study £92,420 Professor Stephen Busby University of Birmingham New roles for old

Kalnishkan, Yuri

257

TABLE 3.-Statistics of length-weight relations for all data used in study. Number Mean Minimum Maximum  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

pelamis (Linnaeus), in North Carolina waters. Chesa- peake Sci. 13:237-244. BEARDSLEY, G. L., JR., AND W pelamis) from the Eastern Tropical Pacific Ocean. Bull. Inter-Am. Trop. Tuna Comm. 3:307- 352. PIENAAR, L

258

E-Print Network 3.0 - arteriovenous graft model Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Bull. Korean Chem. Soc. 2010, Vol. 31, No. 2 281 DOI 10.5012bkcs.2010.31.02.281 Summary: Expanded Polytetrafluoroethylene (ePTFE) Hemodialysis Grafts in Rabbit Model Insu Baek,...

259

Site Name: Granite Rock Date: 2005-2007, 2009  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Site Name: Granite Rock Date: 2005-2007, 2009 Partners/Collaborators: CC&R Description: Work-native plants identified on Granite Rock site: Bristly Ox Tongue Picris echioides Bull Thistle Cirsium vulgare

McPhee-Shaw, Erika

260

SELECTIVITY IN MULTIPLE QUANTUM NUCLEAR MAGNETIC RESONANCE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

D. Wemmer, J. Tang and S. Sinton, Bull. Am. Phys. Soc.G. Drobny, A. Pines, S. Sinton, D. Weitekamp, and D. Wemmer,Perkin II 1541 (1975). S. Sinton and A. Pines, Chem. Phys.

Warren, Warren Sloan.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bowline bull moose" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

STUDY OF CORRELATIONS IN MOLECULAR MOTION BY MULTIPLE QUANTUM NMR  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Pines, J. Chem. Phys. S. Sinton and A. Pines, Chern. Phys.G. Drobny, A. Pines, S. Sinton, D. Weitekamp, and D. Wemmer,D. Wemmer, J. Tang, and S. Sinton, Bull. of Amer. Phys. Soc.

Tang, J-H.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

NMR STUDIES OF ORIENTED MOLECULES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

D. Wemmer, J. Tang, and S. Sinton, Bull. Am. Phys. Soc.G. Drobny, A. Pines, S. Sinton, D. We itekamp, and D.Phys. Lett. W. S. Warren, S. Sinton, D. P. Weitekamp, and A.

Sinton, S.W.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

EXPERIMENTS ON SELECTIVE EXCITATION OF MULTIPLE-QUANTUM TRANSITIONS IN NMR SPECTROSCOPY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

D. Wemmer, J. Tang and S. Sinton, Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 23,G. Drobny, A. Pines, S. Sinton, D. P. Weitekamp, and D.published W. S. Warren, S. Sinton, D. P •. Weitekamp and A.

Warren, W.S.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

FOURIER TRANSFORM MULTIPLE QUANTUM NMR  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

D. Wemmer, J. Tang, S. Sinton, Bull of Amer. . Soc. ; LBL-G. Drobny, A. Pines, S. Sinton, D. Weitekamp, December 1978G. Drobny, A. Pines, S. Sinton D. Weiteka.mp and D. Wemmer

Drobny, G.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

COMPUTER STUDIES OF MULTIPLE-QUANTUM SPIN DYNAMICS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

D. Wemmer, J. Tang, and S. Sinton, Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 23,21 (1978). W. S. Warren, S. Sinton, D. P. Weitekamp, and A.G. Drobny, A. Pines, S. Sinton, W. S. Warren, and D. p.

Munioch, J.B.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

TWO DIMENSIONAL NMR OF LIQUIDS AND ORIENTED MOLECULES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

36) G. Drobny, A. Pines, S. Sinton, D.P. Weitekamp and D.75) G. Drobny, A. Pines, S. Sinton, W.S. Warren and D.P.D. Wemmer, J. Tang, and S. Sinton, Bull. of Amer. Phys. Soc.

Gochin, M.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

TIME DOMAIN MULTIPLE QUANTUM NMR  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

D. Wemmer, J. Tang and S. Sinton, Bull. Amer. Phys. Soc.G. Drobny, A. Pines, S. Sinton, D. P. Weitekamp and D.1977. 143. W. S. Warren, S. Sinton, D. P. Weitekamp and A.

Weitekamp, D.P.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

The Great Marble Drop  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

cups Marbles Fishing line or fine string Masking tape Index cards Paper clips Bull's-eye target Instructions: Students form teams Each team receives 1 Dixie cup, 1 marble, a...

269

The Great Marble Drop  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

lower point so it forms an incline. You can use a desk or chair back. 4. Set the bull's-eye paper target on the floor about halfway between the wall and the chair. 5. Challenge...

270

A major lithospheric boundary in eastern California defined by...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

and higher eNd ( approximately 5 to 8). Isotope ratios from the Coso field form a bull's-eye pattern with very low 87 Sr 86 Sr (0.7033) centered just south of the geothermal area....

271

Fact Sheet Fact Sheet Fact Sheet B O N N E V I L L E P O W E  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

chinook, bull trout and cutthroat trout. The area also is crucial for holding adult fish of all species. How would it be funded? The purchase would be funded as part of the...

272

Rob van Woesik, published literature 1. Rongo T, and R. van Woesik (In Press) Ciguatera fish poisoning in Rarotonga, southern Cook  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Harrison, KE Fabricius (In Press) River discharge reduces coral diversity in Palau. Marine Pollution-frequency distributions reflect spatially variable conditions on coral reefs of Palau. Bull Mar Sci 85(2):149- 157 16

van Woesik, Robert

273

WELDABILITY OF GRAIN-REFINED Fe-12Ni-0.25Ti STEEL FOR CRYOGENIC APPLICATIONS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the Cryogenic Nickel Steels, WRC Bull, 205, May, 1975.REFINED Fe-12Ni-0.25Ti STEEL FOR CRYOGENIC APPLICATIONS D.E.REFINED Fe-12Ni-0.25Ti STEEL FOR CRYOGENIC APPLICATIONS D.

Morris Jr., J.W.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Synthesis and luminescence properties of rare earth activated phosphors for near UV-emitting LEDs for efficacious generation of white light  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of R 2 SiO 5 (R = rare earth elements)?, Mater. Res. Bull.QE Quantum Efficiency RE Rare Earth Elements RGB Red, green,transition metal or rare earth elements. The standard

Han, Jinkyu

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

E-Print Network 3.0 - aggressive antithrombotic therapy Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

in male fire- mouth cichlids... : short-term effects of highly and mildly aggressive video games. Pers. Soc. Psychol. Bull. 12: 390... on behaviour in adult male mice. In House...

276

E-Print Network 3.0 - albimanus diptera culicidae Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Entomol. News 76: 61-62. 1965.03.09 Thompson, F. C. 1966. A new Sphegina from Nepal... (Diptera: Syrphidae). Bull. Brooklyn Entomol. Soc. 59, 60: 42-45 (1964-65)....

277

E-Print Network 3.0 - albiceps wiedemann diptera Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Entomol. News 76: 61-62. 1965.03.09 Thompson, F. C. 1966. A new Sphegina from Nepal... (Diptera: Syrphidae). Bull. Brooklyn Entomol. Soc. 59, 60: 42-45 (1964-65)....

278

E-Print Network 3.0 - albimanus wiedemann diptera Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Entomol. News 76: 61-62. 1965.03.09 Thompson, F. C. 1966. A new Sphegina from Nepal... (Diptera: Syrphidae). Bull. Brooklyn Entomol. Soc. 59, 60: 42-45 (1964-65)....

279

E-Print Network 3.0 - antiqua diptera anthomyiidae Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Entomol. News 76: 61-62. 1965.03.09 Thompson, F. C. 1966. A new Sphegina from Nepal... (Diptera: Syrphidae). Bull. Brooklyn Entomol. Soc. 59, 60: 42-45 (1964-65)....

280

E-Print Network 3.0 - anastrepha obliqua diptera Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Entomol. News 76: 61-62. 1965.03.09 Thompson, F. C. 1966. A new Sphegina from Nepal... (Diptera: Syrphidae). Bull. Brooklyn Entomol. Soc. 59, 60: 42-45 (1964-65)....

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bowline bull moose" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

E-Print Network 3.0 - aegypyti diptera culicidae Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Entomol. News 76: 61-62. 1965.03.09 Thompson, F. C. 1966. A new Sphegina from Nepal... (Diptera: Syrphidae). Bull. Brooklyn Entomol. Soc. 59, 60: 42-45 (1964-65)....

282

E-Print Network 3.0 - aconitus diptera culicidae Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Entomol. News 76: 61-62. 1965.03.09 Thompson, F. C. 1966. A new Sphegina from Nepal... (Diptera: Syrphidae). Bull. Brooklyn Entomol. Soc. 59, 60: 42-45 (1964-65)....

283

E-Print Network 3.0 - albitarsis diptera culicidae Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Entomol. News 76: 61-62. 1965.03.09 Thompson, F. C. 1966. A new Sphegina from Nepal... (Diptera: Syrphidae). Bull. Brooklyn Entomol. Soc. 59, 60: 42-45 (1964-65)....

284

E-Print Network 3.0 - aquasalis diptera culicidae Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Entomol. News 76: 61-62. 1965.03.09 Thompson, F. C. 1966. A new Sphegina from Nepal... (Diptera: Syrphidae). Bull. Brooklyn Entomol. Soc. 59, 60: 42-45 (1964-65)....

285

E-Print Network 3.0 - albifasciatus diptera culicidae Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Entomol. News 76: 61-62. 1965.03.09 Thompson, F. C. 1966. A new Sphegina from Nepal... (Diptera: Syrphidae). Bull. Brooklyn Entomol. Soc. 59, 60: 42-45 (1964-65)....

286

E-Print Network 3.0 - alto rio grande Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Sciences 73 Bull. Soc. PatJi. Ex., 89, 1996, 128-136 Summary: DEN-2, sont touchs (du nord au sud) les tats du Ceara, Rio Grande do Norte, Paraiba, Pernambuco... :...

287

CLASSIFICATION DES PHNOMNES OBSERVS comme chocs lastiques (p, p), 20 % probable-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. - L'examen de nos premiers ré- sultats montre que la chambre à bulles à propane peut être un que la simple pro- jection orthogonale. COURBES PARCOURS-�NERGIE DES PARTICULES 03B1 DANS L

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

288

tains proces vitaux de I'Arctique.) [In Russ., Fr. ab-str.] Izv. Akad. Nauk SSSR No.1, p. 175-181.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

"trash" fishery. Bull. Bingham Oceanogr. Collect., Yale Univ. 13(2), 89 p. 1979. Preliminary keys, and Boothe 1979 [Capes Hatteras and Lookout]; Wenner and Boesch 1979 [Norfolk Canyon area]; Perschbacher

289

Cancer prevention for global health: a report from the ASPO International Cancer Prevention Interest Group.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bull 14. WHO. International Agency for Research on Cancer:World Cancer Report. In Stuart BW, Kleihues P, editors.of environmental and occupational cancer. Oncogene 2004;23:

Braithwaite, Dejana; Boffetta, Paolo; Rebbeck, Timothy R; Meyskens, Frank

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Combustion Synthesis of Nanoparticulate LiMgxMn1-xPO4 (x=0, 0.1, 0.2) Carbon Composites  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

G. J. Exarhos: Glycine-nitrate Combustion Synthesis of Oxideby the Nitrate-Citrate Combustion Method. Mat. Res. Bull.Combustion Synthesis of Nanoparticulate LiMg x Mn 1-x PO 4 (

Doeff, Marca M

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Effects of Coastal Circulation on the Distributional Patterns of Pelagic Juvenile Fishes and Otolith Chemistry, and on the Timing of Juvenile Reef Fish Settlement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

off the central California coast. Fish Bull 89:523-533and abundance of pelagic juvenile fish in the Santa BarbaraWashburn. 2003. Linking Early Fish Growth and Transport to

Nishimoto, Mary M.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

New Mexico State University Department of Animal & Range Sciences  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of age with data from the Tucumcari Bull Test," Jared Decker, Pablo Luna, Manny Encinias, R. M. Enns Utsumi, Andrés Cibils, Rick Estell, Sergio Soto-Navarro, and Dawn VanLeeuwen. 2009. Small Ruminant

Johnson, Eric E.

293

Microbial interactions for 2,4,6-Trinitrotoluene biotransformation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and enhance the significance of genetic exchange between different species leading to the evolution of novel degradative activities (Bull, 1980). Nine aerobic bacterial species, isolated from a munitions waste contaminated site in Illinois, were tentatively...

Sivaraju, Muruganandam

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Jack Dongarra University of Tennessee  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) Tera-100 Bull bullx super- node S6010/S6030 France 138,368 1.050 84 4.59 229 7 DOE / NNSA Los Alamos (FZJ) Jugene / IBM Blue Gene/P Solution Germany 294,912 .825 82 2.26 365 10 DOE/ NNSA / LANL & SNL Cray) Tera-100 Bull bullx super- node S6010/S6030 France 138,368 1.050 84 4.59 229 7 DOE / NNSA Los Alamos

295

Trace fossils from two Upper Pennsylvanian sandstones in Kansas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

p. (Fischer, Jena). BUCHSBAUM, ROLF, 1948, Animals without backbone (2nd edit.): xiv + 405 P. (University Chicago Press, Chicago). CLARKE, J. M., 1924, Rosetted trails of the Paleozoic: New York State Museum Bull. 251, p. 128, fig. 1 (Albany). DESIO... p. (Fischer, Jena). BUCHSBAUM, ROLF, 1948, Animals without backbone (2nd edit.): xiv + 405 P. (University Chicago Press, Chicago). CLARKE, J. M., 1924, Rosetted trails of the Paleozoic: New York State Museum Bull. 251, p. 128, fig. 1 (Albany). DESIO...

Bandel, K.

1967-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

296

The Relationship Amongst Stress, Temperament, and Immune Function in Brahman Cattle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

but not in Temperamental bulls in response to transportation. Additionally, there were limited effects of transportation on peripheral blood mononuclear cell proliferation, IgM production, and cytokine gene expression. Specifically, proliferation tended to be greater... of temperament on stress hormones and the immune system in response to various stressors. These stressors included transportation, lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge, and adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) challenge. In the first transportation study, bulls (8 Calm...

Burdick, Nicole Cassandra

2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

297

Golden-cheeked Warbler (Dendroica chrysoparia) habitat fragmentation in Travis County, Texas: a remote sensing and geographical information system analysis of habitat extent, pattern and condition  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

analysis procedures were assessed for their utility in characterizing fragmentation patterns. Benson (1990) attempted to calculate a fractal dimension of potential GCW habitat "patches" within larger GCW habitat 'sites' and then correlate this parameter... recreational recreational Study Site Size (ha) 3, 420 1, 655 1, 202 1, 069 1, 833 504 1, 393 517 93 BULL CREEK Bull Creek (1, 655 ha) is characterized by a large, nearly contiguous block of habitat (Table 1). The topography is dominated by three...

Moses, Michael Edwin

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Studies of physical characteristics and animal response to reconstituted sorghum grain  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

USSION SUMMAR Y Z3 53 67 LITERATURE CITED 71 LIST OF TABLES Table Page Index for estimating average particle size of ground sorghum grain. 18 Feedlot performance of bulls fed two feed mix- tures for 93 days (growing period), College Station..., 1967, 24 Feedlot performance of bulls fed four feed mix- tures for 102 days (finishing period), College Station, 1967. 26 Analysis of variance of daily gain 27 t- Test for differences in average daily gain Analysis of variance for average particle...

Florence, Harold Douglas

1968-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

The role of genetic counseling in the elective termination of pregnancies involving fetuses with disabilities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

; Richards, Bentley, & Glenny, 1999). Genetic disorders are detected through two types of tests: screening procedures and diagnostic tests. Screening procedures, such as the maternal serum alfafetoprotein (AFP) test and ultrasound, are now available to most... with Down syndrome chose to termi- nate their pregnancy. Bull’s (1999) study found that 50.4% of all pregnancies with fetal diagnoses of congenital heart dis- ease were electively terminated. Brock (1996) found through screening 25,000 couples for cystic...

Stough, Laura

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Wigwam River McNeil Substrate Sampling Program : 1998-2002 Summary Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Wigwam River is an important fisheries stream in the East Kootenay region of British Columbia that supports healthy populations of both bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) and Westslope cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarki lewisi). The river has been characterized as the single most important bull trout spawning steam in the Kootenay Region (Baxter and Westover 2000), and thus has been the focus of numerous studies in the last ten years (Cope 1998; Cope and Morris 2001; Cope, Morris and Bisset 2002; Kohn Crippen Consultants Ltd. 1998; Westover 1999a; Westover 1999b; Westover and Conroy 1997). Although bull trout populations in the East Kootenay region remain healthy, bull trout populations in other parts of British Columbia and within their traditional range in northwestern United States have declined. Thus, bull trout were blue listed as vulnerable in British Columbia by the B.C. Conservation Data Centre (Cannings 1993) and remain a species of special concern. Bull trout in the north-western United States, within the Columbia River watershed, were listed as threatened in 1998 under the Endangered Species Act by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. In 1999, the Ministry of Water, Land and Air Protection applied and received funding from the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) to assess and monitor the status of wild, native stocks of bull trout in tributaries to Lake Koocanusa (Libby Reservoir) and the upper Kootenay River. The purpose of this report is to summarize one of the many studies undertaken to ''Monitor and Protect Bull Trout for Koocanusa Reservoir'' (BPA Project Number 2000-04-00). Three permanent sampling sites were established on the Wigwam River in April 1998. At each site, substrate samples were obtained using a McNeil Core sampler in April of each year from 1998 to 2002. The objectives of this study were to assess the quality of stream-bed substrates used by bull trout for spawning prior to major resource development in the Wigwam watershed, thus providing one potential measure of future impact to bull trout spawning habitat.

Tepper, Herb

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bowline bull moose" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Mechanical contact by constraints and split-based preconditioning  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An accurate implementation of glued mechanical contact was developed in MOOSE based on its Constraint system. This approach results in a superior convergence of elastic structure problems, in particular in BISON. Adaptation of this technique to frictionless and frictional contact models is under way. Additionally, the improved convergence of elastic problems results from the application of the split-based preconditioners to constraint-based systems. This yields a substantial increase in the robustness of elastic solvers when the number of nodes in contact is increased and/or the mesh is refined.

Dmitry Karpeyev; Derek Gaston; Jason Hales; Steven Novascone

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Sacrifice as the ideal hunt: ?a cosmological explanation for the origin of reindeer domestication  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

’s sources are an idealized fiction. In less extreme critiques, Anderson (2002: 127) also criticises the idea that animals surrender themselves freely, and Knight objects to the ‘hunting-as-sharing’ hypothesis promoted by Ingold (2000) and Nurit Bird... moose stood motionless, as if carved out of a rock.’ This image of immobility is strikingly similar to the way a domestic reindeer is captured by lasso, tied up and unable to run away during a sacrificial slaughter, and we interpret these techniques as a...

Willerslev, Rane; Vitebsky, Piers; Alekseyev, Anatoly

2014-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

303

Pentek concrete scabbling system: Baseline report; Summary  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Pentek concrete scabbling system consists of the MOOSE{reg_sign} scabbler, the SQUIRREL{reg_sign}-I and SQUIRREL{reg_sign}-III scabblers, and VAC-PAC. The scabblers are designed to scarify concrete floors and slabs using cross section, tungsten carbide tipped bits. The bits are designed to remove concrete in 3/8 inch increments. The bits are either 9-tooth or demolition type. The scabblers are used with a vacuum system designed to collect and filter the concrete dust and contamination that is removed from the surface. The safety and health evaluation during the human factors assessment focused on two main areas: noise and dust.

NONE

1997-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

304

Overview of the BISON Multidimensional Fuel Performance Code  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

BISON is a modern multidimensional multiphysics finite-element based nuclear fuel performance code that has been under development at the Idaho National Laboratory (USA) since 2009. A brief background is provided on the code’s computational framework (MOOSE), governing equations, and material and behavioral models. Ongoing code verification and validation work is outlined, and comparative results are provided for select validation cases. Recent applications are discussed, including specific description of two applications where 3D treatment is important. A summary of future code development and validation activities is given. Numerous references to published work are provided where interested readers can find more complete information.

R. L. Williamson; J. D. Hales; S. R. Novascone; B. W. Spencer; D. M. Perez; G. Pastore; R. C. Martineau

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Texas Bovine Trichomoniasis Control Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the following: - breed registry tattoo or brand - USDA metal ear tag (Bang?s tag) - official 840 bangle or RFID ear tag - official trichomoniasis ear tag from the state of origin b. Can be certified as a virgin bull only if it has not been commingled... for 30 days provided bulls remain separated from female cattle. a. Must be officially identified with at least one of the following: - breed registry tattoo or brand - USDA metal ear tag (Bang?s tag) - official 840 bangle or RFID ear tag - official...

Machen, Richard V.; Gill, Ronald J.; Faries Jr., Floron C.; Hairgrove, Thomas B.

2009-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

306

Inflammatory Cytokines and Risk of Coronary Heart Disease: New Prospective Study and Updated Meta-Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cambridge CB1 8RN UK Tel: +44 1223 740569 Fax:+44 1223 741339 Email: skk22@medshl.cam.ac.uk Short title: Inflammatory cytokines and CHD risk Word count: abstract 250, main text 3842 3 tables, 3 figures, 10 supplementary tables and figures... . Dan Med Bull 1999 Jun;46(3):263-268. 23. Juel K, Helweg-Larsen K. The Danish registers of causes of death. Dan Med Bull 1999 Sep;46(4):354-357. 24. Joensen AM, Jensen MK, Overvad K, Dethlefsen C, Schmidt E, Rasmussen L, Tjonneland A, Johnsen S...

Kaptoge, Stephen; Seshasai, Sreenivasa Rao Kondapally; Gao, Pei; Freitag, Daniel F.; Butterworth, Adam S.; Borglykke, Anders; Di Angelantonio, Emanuele; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Rumley, Ann; Lowe, Gordon D. O.; Jørgensen, Torben; Danesh, John

2013-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

307

The Cult of Radrap (Ra dgra), nep of Wangdue Phodrang (Bhutan)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, the local residents could not escape his malevolent nature and fell victim to it. It was only after they promised to sacrifice a bull and conduct a festival in his honour that his wrathful manifestation was calmed.12 Until a few years ago, a bull... , the villagers detach the old flags and bring them home as a gift of their deity. This cloth is used to wrap the packed meals and other items. The local residents believe that the probability of polluting the abode by woman is more resulting from...

Dorji, Tandin

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

MASSIVE HYBRID PARALLELISM FOR FULLY IMPLICIT MULTIPHYSICS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As hardware advances continue to modify the supercomputing landscape, traditional scientific software development practices will become more outdated, ineffective, and inefficient. The process of rewriting/retooling existing software for new architectures is a Sisyphean task, and results in substantial hours of development time, effort, and money. Software libraries which provide an abstraction of the resources provided by such architectures are therefore essential if the computational engineering and science communities are to continue to flourish in this modern computing environment. The Multiphysics Object Oriented Simulation Environment (MOOSE) framework enables complex multiphysics analysis tools to be built rapidly by scientists, engineers, and domain specialists, while also allowing them to both take advantage of current HPC architectures, and efficiently prepare for future supercomputer designs. MOOSE employs a hybrid shared-memory and distributed-memory parallel model and provides a complete and consistent interface for creating multiphysics analysis tools. In this paper, a brief discussion of the mathematical algorithms underlying the framework and the internal object-oriented hybrid parallel design are given. Representative massively parallel results from several applications areas are presented, and a brief discussion of future areas of research for the framework are provided.

Cody J. Permann; David Andrs; John W. Peterson; Derek R. Gaston

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Initial Coupling of the RELAP-7 and PRONGHORN Applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Modern nuclear reactor safety codes require the ability to solve detailed coupled neutronic- thermal fluids problems. For larger cores, this implies fully coupled higher dimensionality spatial dynamics with appropriate feedback models that can provide enough resolution to accurately compute core heat generation and removal during steady and unsteady conditions. The reactor analysis code PRONGHORN is being coupled to RELAP-7 as a first step to extend RELAP’s current capabilities. This report details the mathematical models, the type of coupling, and the testing results from the integrated system. RELAP-7 is a MOOSE-based application that solves the continuity, momentum, and energy equations in 1-D for a compressible fluid. The pipe and joint capabilities enable it to model parts of the power conversion unit. The PRONGHORN application, also developed on the MOOSE infrastructure, solves the coupled equations that define the neutron diffusion, fluid flow, and heat transfer in a full core model. The two systems are loosely coupled to simplify the transition towards a more complex infrastructure. The integration is tested on a simplified version of the OECD/NEA MHTGR-350 Coupled Neutronics-Thermal Fluids benchmark model.

J. Ortensi; D. Andrs; A.A. Bingham; R.C. Martineau; J.W. Peterson

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Massive hybrid parallelism for fully implicit multiphysics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As hardware advances continue to modify the supercomputing landscape, traditional scientific software development practices will become more outdated, ineffective, and inefficient. The process of rewriting/retooling existing software for new architectures is a Sisyphean task, and results in substantial hours of development time, effort, and money. Software libraries which provide an abstraction of the resources provided by such architectures are therefore essential if the computational engineering and science communities are to continue to flourish in this modern computing environment. The Multiphysics Object Oriented Simulation Environment (MOOSE) framework enables complex multiphysics analysis tools to be built rapidly by scientists, engineers, and domain specialists, while also allowing them to both take advantage of current HPC architectures, and efficiently prepare for future supercomputer designs. MOOSE employs a hybrid shared-memory and distributed-memory parallel model and provides a complete and consistent interface for creating multiphysics analysis tools. In this paper, a brief discussion of the mathematical algorithms underlying the framework and the internal object-oriented hybrid parallel design are given. Representative massively parallel results from several applications areas are presented, and a brief discussion of future areas of research for the framework are provided. (authors)

Gaston, D. R.; Permann, C. J.; Andrs, D.; Peterson, J. W. [Idaho National Laboratory, 2525 N. Fremont Ave., Idaho Falls, ID 83415 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Memory Optimization for Phase-field Simulations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Phase-field simulations are computationally and memory intensive applications. Many of the phase-field simulations being conducted in support of NEAMS were not capable of running on “normal clusters” with 2-4GB of RAM per core, and instead required specialized “big-memory” clusters with 64GB per core. To address this issue, the MOOSE team developed a new Python-based utility called MemoryLogger, and applied it to locate, diagnose, and eradicate memory bottlenecks within the MOOSE framework. MemoryLogger allows for a better understanding of the memory usage of an application being run in parallel across a cluster. Memory usage information is captured for every individual process in a parallel job, and communicated to the head node of the cluster. Console text output from the application itself is automatically matched with this memory usage information to produce a detailed picture of memory usage over time, making it straightforward to identify the subroutines which contribute most to the application’s peak memory usage. The information produced by the MemoryLogger quickly and effectively narrows the search for memory optimizations to the most data-intensive parts of the simulation.

Derek Gaston; John Peterson; Andrew Slaughter; Cody Permann; David Andrs

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Color Rapid Prototyping for Diffusion-Tensor MRI Visualization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Laidlaw, Christopher W. Bull Brown University, Providence, RI 02912, USA a) b) c) Fig. 1. (a,b) A plaster color rapid prototyping (RP) plaster mod- els as visualization tools to support scientific research by the printer software. These layers are then manufactured by putting down a thin layer of plaster powder

Laidlaw, David

313

Paul David Nabity School Address Home Contact  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

& T Heng-Moss) · Bachelor of Science. 1997-2002. University of Nebraska, Lincoln. 3.8 GPA (distinction) o' Bull. 62:37-41 8. Nabity PD, LG Higley, TM Heng-Moss. 2007. Light-induced variability in development, TM Heng-Moss, LG Higley. 2006. Effects of insect herbivory on physiological and biochemical

DeLucia, Evan H.

314

How kelp produce blade shapes suited to different flow regimes: A new wrinkle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

How kelp produce blade shapes suited to different flow regimes: A new wrinkle M. A. R. Koehl,1,Ã? W bull kelp, Nereocystis luetkeana, to investigate how these ecomorphological differences are produced, strap-like blades of kelp from habitats with rapid flow collapse into streamlined bundles and flutter

Mahadevan, L.

315

FISH ASSEMBLAGES IN MACROCYSTIS AND NEREOCYSTIS KELP FORESTS OFF CENTRAL CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FISH ASSEMBLAGES IN MACROCYSTIS AND NEREOCYSTIS KELP FORESTS OFF CENTRAL CALIFORNIA JAMES LEE canopy fonning kelp forests (giant kelp, Macrocystis 'Jl!j1'ifera, and bull kelp, NereolJlJstis luetkeana for substrate and cover within their habitat, such as rock or coral reefs or kelp beds, as well as man

316

OIMB GK12 CURRICULUM 4th Grade 60 minutes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: ! 10 specimens of live kelp and algae (including bull kelp), collected at the rocky shore or washed up to describe what they see. Include phytoplankton and kelp. Explain that they are all different forms of algae plants. 2. Kelp anatomy: Students will need to know kelp anatomy for this lesson. This can be taught

317

Studies on Nereocystis growth in British Columbia, Canada Ronald E. Foreman  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Station, Bamfield, BC, Canada VOR I BO Keywords: seaweed, Nereocystis, bull kelp, kelp inventory Introduction The kelp Nereocystis luetkeana (Mertens) P . & R . is an annual canopy-forming macrophyte surveys of major kelp beds in British Columbia, by the provincial Marine Resources Branch, have re- ported

California at Santa Cruz, University of

318

ORIGINAL PAPER Azobenzene photomechanics: prospects and potential  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of great interest for light energy harvesting applications across much of the solar spectrum, yet, the energy of the input photon amplified many thousands of times in the process. Complicated biochemical Physics, Aalto University, Aalto, Finland 123 Polym. Bull. DOI 10.1007/s00289-012-0792-0 #12;and enzymatic

Barrett, Christopher

319

Vo l . 4 4 , N o . 2 , 2 0 1 1 c o n t e n t s  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

nuclear power plant. ORNL led the effort to bring researchers together from a number of Department Accident ·RifleSightingSystemScoresa Bull's-eye ·SolarCellsCrankupEfficiency Reactor core simulation development, extending from nuclear power to medical isotopes and from naval propulsion to nuclear

Pennycook, Steve

320

A Comparison of Multi-Scale 3D X-ray Tomographic Inspection Techniques for Assessing Carbon Fibre Composite Impact Damage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

tolerance have been concerns in the development of carbon fibre composite materials, particularly Composite Impact Damage D.J. Bull1* , L. Helfen2 , I. Sinclair1 , S.M. Spearing1 , T. Baumbach2 1 Materials-scale damage assessment of carbon fibre composites subjected to impact damage, allowing various internal damage

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bowline bull moose" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Brain Research Bulletin, Vol. 8, pp. 105-107,1982.Printedin the U.S.A. Optic Nerve Regeneration in Goldfish Under  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Brain Research Bulletin, Vol. 8, pp. 105-107,1982.Printedin the U.S.A. Optic Nerve Regeneration. FRANCIS AND M. S. GAZZANIGA. Optic nerve regeneration in goldfish under light deprivation. BRAIN RES. BULL. g(l) 105-107, 1982,Regeneration following bilateral optic nerve crush was studied in groups

Gazzaniga, Michael

322

Macdonald, J. Ross SOME STATISTICAL ASPECTS OF  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Macdonald, J. Ross 1962 Physica 28 485-492 SOME STATISTICAL ASPECTS OF RELAXATION TIME DISTRIBUTIONS *) by J. ROSS MACDONALD Texas Instruments Incorporated, Dallas, Texas, U.S.A. Synopsis, meeting of the American Physical Society, November 25, 1961, [Macdonald, J. R., Bull. Am. Phys. Sot. Ser

Macdonald, James Ross

323

Invent the Future Campus Emergency Phone Locations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Athletic Center English Field Vet Med Phase 4C Career Services Building NEW BULL BARN Battery House Air Hall Cassell Coliseum VBI 2 Torgersen Hall Dietrick Hall Rector Field House Shultz Hall VBI 1 Lane Military Building Major Williams Hall Vet Med Phase 4C [Non-Client] Hutcheson Hall Layer House #1 SPH

Buehrer, R. Michael

324

Skipjack tuna, Katsuwonus pelamis, are distributed throughout the Pacific  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

343 Skipjack tuna, Katsuwonus pelamis, are distributed throughout the Pacific Ocean in tropical at processing plants in Manta (Ecuador), Assessment of skipjack tuna (Katsuwonus pelamis) spawning activity 2000. Fish. Bull. 99:343­350 (2001). Abstract­An investigation of skip- jack tuna, Katsuwonus pelamis

325

Kalispel Resident Fish Project : Annual Report, 2002.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 2002 the Kalispel Natural Resource Department (KNRD) continued monitoring enhancement projects (implemented from 1996 to 1998) for bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus), westslope cutthroat (Oncorhynchus clarki lewisi) and largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides). Additional baseline fish population and habitat assessments were conducted, in 2002, in tributaries to the Pend Oreille River. Further habitat and fish population enhancement projects were also implemented in 2002.

Andersen, Todd; Olson, Jason

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Kalispel Resident Fish Project, 2004-2005 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 2004 the Kalispel Natural Resource Department (KNRD) implemented a new enhancement monitoring project for bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) and westslope cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarki lewisi). Largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) enhancement projects were also monitored. Additional baseline fish population and habitat assessments were conducted, in tributaries to the Pend Oreille River.

Olson, Jason; Andersen, Todd

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Kalispel Resident Fish Project Annual Report, 2003.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 2003 the Kalispel Natural Resource Department (KNRD) continued monitoring enhancement projects (implemented from 1996 to 1998) for bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus), westslope cutthroat (Oncorhynchus clarki lewisi) and largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides). Additional baseline fish population and habitat assessments were conducted, in 2003, in tributaries to the Pend Oreille River. Further habitat and fish population enhancement projects were also implemented.

Olson, Jason; Andersen, Todd

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

RESEARCH ARTICLE Challenges of modeling current very large lahars at Nevado  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Department of Geography, University of Zurich, 8057 Zurich, Switzerland B. Pulgarín INGEOMINAS, Popayán, Colombia e-mail: bpulgarin@ingeominas.gov.co Bull Volcanol (2012) 74:309­324 DOI 10.1007/s00445

Stoffel, Markus

329

W. Nejdl et al. (Eds.): AH 2008, LNCS 5149, pp. 255258, 2008. Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2008  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.bull}@bham.ac.uk Abstract. Open learner models (OLM) enable users to access their learner model to view information about OLM features: the complexity of the model presentation; the level of learner control over the model consider three features of open learner models (OLMs): (i) complexity of model presentation; (ii) learner

Bull, Susan

330

B. Woolf et al. (Eds.): ITS 2008, LNCS 5091, pp. 722724, 2008. Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2008  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Edgbaston, Birmingham, B15 2TT, UK {alk584,nxa707,s.bull}@bham.ac.uk Abstract. Open learner models (OLM for developing trust in OLMs. 1 Introduction Open learner models (OLM) externalise the learner model contents to the user. Thus OLMs assist learners in tracking their knowledge, and promote independent learning

Bull, Susan

331

M. Ikeda, K. Ashley, and T.-W. Chan (Eds.): ITS 2006, LNCS 4053, pp. 443 452, 2006. Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2006  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

]). Mr. Collins [5] and STyLE-OLM [2] proposed and implemented the learner's participation model accuracy. Mr. Collins was developed with the open learner model (OLM) central to the system users by being an unnatural method for communicating beliefs. #12;444 A. Kerly and S. Bull STyLE-OLM [2

Bull, Susan

332

W. Nejdl et al. (Eds.): AH 2008, LNCS 5149, pp. 173182, 2008. Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2008  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, U.K. {GJS607,s.bull}@bham.ac.uk Abstract. Open learner models (OLM) are learner models-raising. We here introduce an open learner model to investigate the potential of OLMs to facilitate noticing. Results suggest that an OLM could be a useful way of helping students to notice lan- guage features

Bull, Susan

333

To appear in Technology, Instruction, Cognition and Learning (TICL) An Open Learner Model to Help Parents Help their Children  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

). Most open learner models (OLM) have been deployed amongst adult learners (e.g. Bull, Quigley & Mabbott, 2006; Kay, 1997; Weber & Brusilovsky, 2001). However, it has been argued that an OLM can be of benefit goals. Teacher-child access to the student's OLM could be extended to include parents, so that parents

Bull, Susan

334

V.Dimitrova, R. Mizoguchi, B. du Boulay & A. Graesser (eds). Artificial Intelligence in Education, IOS Press, Amsterdam, 2009, 617-619.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Birmingham B15 2TT, UK E-mail:{nxa707,s.bull}@bham.ac.uk Abstract. This paper introduces t-OLM, an open Introduction Open learner models (OLM) are learner models (LM) that are externalised to the user, and have been views [1][3]. Initial work suggests students may trust an OLM, but simple views may be trusted even

Bull, Susan

335

Kalispel Resident Fish Project : Annual Report, 1995.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1995 the Kalispel Natural Resource Department (KNRD) in conjunction with the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) initiated the implementation of a habitat and population enhancement project for bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus), westslope cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarki lewisi) and largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides). Habitat and population assessments were conducted in seven tributaries of the Box Canyon reach of the Pend Oreille River. Assessments were used to determine the types and quality of habitat that were limiting to native bull trout and cutthroat trout populations. Assessments were also used to determine the effects of interspecific competition within these streams. A bull trout and brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) hybridization assessment was conducted to determine the degree of hybridization between these two species. Analysis of the habitat data indicated high rates of sediment and lack of wintering habitat. The factors that contribute to these conditions have the greatest impact on habitat quality for the tributaries of concern. Population data suggested that brook trout have less stringent habitat requirements; therefore, they have the potential to outcompete the native salmonids in areas of lower quality habitat. No hybrids were found among the samples, which is most likely attributable to the limited number of bull trout. Data collected from these assessments were compiled to develop recommendations for enhancement measures. Recommendations for restoration include riparian planting and fencing, instream structures, as well as, removal of non-native brook trout to reduce interspecific competition with native salmonids in an isolated reach of Cee Cee Ah Creek.

Maroney, Joseph; Donley, Christopher; Scott, Jason; Lockwood, Jr., Neil

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

6 References Allen, D. B, B. J. Flatter, and K. Fite. 1996. Redband Trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss gairdneri)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. 1990. Status and Distribu Symposium of the Northern Wild Sheep Council. Clarkston, WA. p. 12's State of Idaho Bull Trout Conservation Plan. Bo ID. Bethesda, MD. Control-Region Sequence Data Society Special Publications, pp. 83- 138. . In: roject No. 2055). Volume 3. Prepared for Idaho Power

337

Open Archive TOULOUSE Archive Ouverte (OATAO) OATAO is an open access repository that collects the work of Toulouse researchers and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-oatao@listes-diff.inp-toulouse.fr hal-00912372,version1- #12;Dynamique de bulles traversant l'interface s´eparant deux liquides Romain of air bubbles through an initially flat horizontal interface separating two Newtonian liquids. We use) and a Cahn-Hilliard model coupled with the Navier-Stokes equations. Key words: Bubbles / triphasic flow

Boyer, Edmond

338

Managing Sierra Nevada Forests Appendix: Examples of Forest Structures That May  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

these following Bull et al.'s (1997)3 focus on five conditions: live trees with decay, hollows or brooms, snags, and brush. 1 Forester, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Southwest Region, Eldorado--Live tree with hollow structure. The tree has an old dead top with cavity nests and a new healthy top

Standiford, Richard B.

339

Microstructured porous ZnO thin film for increased light scattering and improved  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for enhancing light scattering and efficiency in inverted organic photovoltaics. High degree of porosity. References and links 1. S. R. Forrest, "The limits to organic photovoltaic cell efficiency," MRS Bull. 30Microstructured porous ZnO thin film for increased light scattering and improved efficiency

Demir, Hilmi Volkan

340

The Winter Distribution of the Western Gull-billed Tern (Gelochelidon nilotica vanrossemi)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

... gather in large groups and to spend considerable time in the air foraging. Conservation Implications Molina and Erwin (2006) ... the environment in the Gulf of California ecoregion. Marine Pollution Bull. 46:806–815. Páez-Osuna, F., and Ruiz-Fernández, A. C. ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bowline bull moose" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Proceedings of Workshop on Help Provision and Help Seeking in Interactive Learning Environments, International Conference on Artificial Intelligence in Education, San Antonio, Texas, 2001.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Proceedings of Workshop on Help Provision and Help Seeking in Interactive Learning Environments, International Conference on Artificial Intelligence in Education, San Antonio, Texas, 2001. Help-Seeking in an Asynchronous Help Forum SUSAN BULL, JIM GREER, GORD MCCALLA AND LORI KETTEL ARIES Laboratory, Department

Bull, Susan

342

Instructional Science 30(6), 2002. Modelling Cognitive Style in a Peer Help Network  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Instructional Science 30(6), 2002. Modelling Cognitive Style in a Peer Help Network Susan Bull1, Canada. mccalla@cs.usask.ca Abstract: I-Help is a computer system that assists learners as they try to solve problems while learning a subject. I-Help achieves this by supporting a network of peers that help

Bull, Susan

343

2010 the First Half of the Timber Industry Trend Analysis Quotes The tide began to recede by the financial tsunami, the dawn of hope can still be seen. The second half of 2009, with  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is a watershed year, while the economic situation in 2010 will directly determine the recovery process. In 2010 that practitioners in the initial warming to see more hope. In the economic situation, "Bear bull" crucial period? With the current domestic and international economic situation and the bamboo Quotes trends and try to make

344

PUBLICATIONS Papers and Articles in Internationally Refereed Journals  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) Acropora size-frequency distributions reflect spatially variable conditions on coral reefs of Palau. Bull, R.van Woesik (2008). Phototrophic adjustment of the foliaceous coral Echinopora lamellosa in Palau, Okaji K, Yukihira H, Iwase A, van Woesik R (2007) Palau's coral reefs show differential habitat recovery

van Woesik, Robert

345

SECTION 5 Table of Contents 5 Coeur d' Alene Subbasin Overview................................................................2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the Spokane River, which flows westerly to its confluence with the Columbia River. Water levels in Coeur d emphasis on harvesting big game and resident fish such as westslope cutthroat trout. Adfluvial and fluvial, and over-harvesting has contributed to their declines. Currently bull trout are listed as threatened under

346

Experimental studies on fast-ion transport by Alfven wave avalanches on the National Spherical Torus Experiment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-linearities may compromise a direct comparison between experiment and theory. PACS numbers: I. INTRODUCTION a linear magneto-hydrodynamics stability code. The comparison with experimental data suggests that non or neutral beams (NB), may open new avenues to control the behavior of a fusion reactor. Paper GI1 1, Bull

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

347

Shallow seismic reflection profile of the Meers fault, Comanche County, Oklahoma  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.J., The Meers fault tectonic activity in south- western Oklahoma, U. S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, NUREG ICR-4852, 1-25, A1-A25, 1987. McLean, R., and Stearns, D.W., Fault analysis in the Wichita Mountains [Abs. ], AAPG Bull. 67, 511-512, 1983. Miller...

Myers, Paul B.; Miller, Richard D.; Steeples, Don W.

1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

A study of factors affecting the separation of phosphatides from cottonseed oil  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Biol. Chem. , 75& 517 (19' ). Levene, P, k. , and Rolf, I. P. , J. Biol. Chem. , 65, 545 (1925). Lishkevich, M. I. , Nasloboino Zhirovoe Delo? 13, No. 4. , 20 (1937); 0, k. , 32, 820 (1938). (25) Nachboeuf, N. k. , and Sander, G. Bull. Soc. Chem...

Popat, Pranjivan Velji

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

349

Development of an extender protocol to enhance the viability of frozen-thawed bovine spermatozoa  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

will be egg yolk-citrate (EC), egg yolk-tris (IMV), and skim milk (milk). In experiment 1, an ejaculate from each bull was partially extended and cooled to 4 ºC for either 2 or 4 hr and then allowed to equilibrate with the glycerolated extender for 2, 4, or 6...

Griffin, Erin Michelle

2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

350

Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources Oklahoma State University Case Medlin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

feeding on bull thistle. Muskthistle(Carduusnutans)(Figure2)wasfirstdocumented in Payne County, Oklahoma from the west and is known to exist in several Oklahoma counties, including Roger Mills, Custer, Love) infestations were reported in McClain and Grady counties about 25 years ago. However, those infestations were

Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

351

Independent Scientific Review Panel for the Northwest Power Planning Council  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Independent Scientific Review Panel for the Northwest Power Planning Council Preliminary Review to ISRP comments requested Report Page # 24001 Lake Pend Oreille Predation Research Idaho Fish and Game No and conserve high priority bull and westslope cutthroat trout habitat in Trestle Creek. Idaho Department

352

Erosion dynamics modelling in a coupled catchmentfan system with constant external forcing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

at the outlets of mountain valleys, forming portions of fans in plane view, which can merge downstreamtoform, incised fans of the Central Valley (Bull, 1964), the Death Valley (Hooke, 1972; Dorn et al., 1996; Jayco, 2005), the Panamint Valley (Blair, 1999a; Blair, 1999b; Blair, 1999c; Jayco, 2005), or the Owens Valley

353

Registration required This lecture is free and open to the public  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

followed by refreshments Jessica Jewell International Energy Agency, Paris Hedley Bull Lecture Theatre University, Canberra In spite of the increasing policy importance of both climate change and energy security energy. Others argue there could be negative consequences for the climate if energy security is achieved

Botea, Adi

354

Bilan de la digestion des matires azotes du lait et des bactries cultives sur mthanol  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bilan de la digestion des matières azotées du lait et des bactéries cultivées sur méthanol à la fin digestion at the end of the small intestine and the digestive tract of the preruminant calf. Two milk and synthetic amino acids (bacteria diet). Nine Friesian bull calves were used : digestibility was measured

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

355

IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING, VOL. BME-23, NO. 3, MAY 1976 tion of Bayluscide and sodium Pentachlorophenate in the Egypt-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and sodium Pentachlorophenate in the Egypt- 49 project area," Bull. World Health Org., vol. 35, pp. 357 mansoni infections in the Egypt- 49 project area, 1. sampling techniques and procedures for mea- suring. Mallah, "The behavioural pattern of social and religious water-contact activities in the Egypt-49

356

Research Report National inventory of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Research Report National inventory of woodland and trees (1995­99): methodology #12;#12;i National inventory of woodland and trees (1995­99): methodology Steve Smith, Justin Gilbert, Graham Bull, Simon). National inventory of woodland and trees (1995­99): methodology. Forestry Commission Research Report

357

Kalispel Resident Fish Project, 2005-2006 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 2005 the Kalispel Natural Resource Department (KNRD) monitored its current enhancement projects for bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) and westslope cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarki lewisi). Largemouth Bass (Micropterus salmoides) enhancement projects were also monitored. Additional baseline fish population and habitat assessments were conducted, in East River and several of its tributaries.

Olson, Jason; Andersen, Todd (Kalispel Natural Resource Department, Usk, WA)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Investigation of plasma velocity field solar flare footpoints  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Centr. Eur. Astr. Bull. 34, 73 Battaglia, M. & Kontar, E.P. 2011, A&A 2011, 2B Battaglia, M. & Kontar, E.P. 2011, ApJ 735, 42 Battaglia, M. et al. 2012, ApJ 752, 4B #12;Chromospheric evaporation in RHESSI images

Mrozek, Tomasz

359

The biology of the sunflower moth, Homoeosoma electellum (Hulst)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

torrefacts. Ibid. 7:316-17. Dyar, H. G. 1902. A list of North American Lepidoptera. U. S. Nat. Nus. Bull. 52:434. Felt, E. P. 1938. A note on Lasioptera murtfeldtiana Felt. J. N. Y. Entomol. Soc. 46:44. Fernandez, A. T. and N. M. Randolpn. 1966...

Baxter, Michael Celus

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Leptospirosis Max Irsik DVM, MAB  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

significant effects on livestock through abortions, stillbirths and decreased milk production. Leptospira associated with abortions and a drop in milk production in the cow, bulls can be infected and act as carriers be depression, anorexia, transient and slight fever, reproductive problems, drop in milk yields with a flabby

Watson, Craig A.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bowline bull moose" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

My daughter (Penny) and myself (Hongyun Peng) I am a visiting scientist in Professor Marinus Pilon's lab. My current research work in Pilon's lab is PAA1 and PAA2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

managements on Cu, Pb, Zn and Cd fractionation and solubilization in soil under field conditions. Bull Environ's lab. My current research work in Pilon's lab is PAA1 and PAA2 transporter in chloroplast of plant. I I am from China and I work in the College of Environmental and Natural Resource, Zhejiang University

362

Validating Atmospheric Reanalysis Data Using Tropical Cyclones as Thermometers James P. Kossin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Validating Atmospheric Reanalysis Data Using Tropical Cyclones as Thermometers James P. Kossin tropical cyclones as thermometers. Bull. Amer. Meteor. Soc. doi:10.1175/BAMS-D-14-00180, in press. Capsule Tropical cyclones are used as traveling thermometers to globally sample upper-tropospheric temperatures

Kossin, James P.

363

Thse prsente pour obtenir le grande de Docteur de l'Universit Paris-Est  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

foams: Experiments at the bubble scale and on vertical film For investigating glass foams stability; stability; evaporation; glass; foam tel-00664444,version1-30Jan2012 #12;La thése été préparée dans les faiblement visqueux. Les mots clés: bulle; drainage; stabilite; évaporation; verre; mousse Stability of glass

Boyer, Edmond

364

RESEARCH ARTICLE Shallow seismicity, triggered seismicity, and ambient noise  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-dormant Uturuncu Volcano, Bolivia Jennifer A. Jay & Matthew E. Pritchard & Michael E. West & Douglas Christensen (APVC) of the central Andes in SW Bolivia (22°16S, 67°11W), southeast of the town of Quetena Chico. 39 Calixto, La Paz, Bolivia M. Sunagua SERGEOTECMIN, La Paz, Bolivia Bull Volcanol (2012) 74:817­837 DOI 10

West, Michael

365

Kootenai River Fisheries Investigations: Salmonid Studies Project Progress Report, 2007-2008 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This research report addresses bull trout Salvelinus confluentus and Redband trout Oncorhynchus mykiss redd surveys, population monitoring, trout distribution, and abundance surveys in the Kootenai River drainage of Idaho. The bull trout is one of several sport fish native to the Kootenai River, Idaho that no longer supports a fishery. Because bull trout are listed under the Endangered Species Act, population data will be vital to monitoring status relative to recovery goals. Thirty-three bull trout redds were found in North and South Callahan creeks and Boulder Creek in 2007. This is a decrease from 2006 and 2005 and less than the high count in 2003. However, because redd numbers have only been monitored since 2002, the data series is too short to determine bull trout population trends based on redd counts. Redband trout still provide an important Kootenai River sport fishery, but densities are low, at least partly due to limited recruitment. The redband trout proportional stock density (PSD) in 2007 increased from 2006 for a second year after a two-year decline in 2004 and 2005. This may indicate increased recruitment to or survival in the 201-305 mm length group due to the minimum 406 mm (16 inches) length limit initiated in 2002. We conducted 13 redd surveys and counted 44 redband trout redds from May 7 to June 3, 2007 in a 3.8 km survey reach on Twentymile Creek. We surveyed streams in the Kootenai River valley to look for barriers to trout migration. Man-made barriers, for at least part of the year, were found on Caboose, Debt, Fisher, and Twenty Mile creeks. Removing these barriers would increase spawning and rearing habitat for trout and help to restore trout fisheries in the Kootenai River.

Paragamian, Vaughn L.; Walters, Jody; Maiolie, Melo [Idaho Department of Fish and Game

2009-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

366

A New Mathematical Adjoint for the Modified SAAF-SN Equations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present a new adjoint FEM weak form, which can be directly used for evaluating the mathematical adjoint, suitable for perturbation calculations, of the self-adjoint angular flux SN equations (SAAF-SN) without construction and transposition of the underlying coecient matrix. Stabilization schemes incorporated in the described SAAF-SN method make the mathematical adjoint distinct from the physical adjoint, i.e. the solution of the continuous adjoint equation with SAAF-SN . This weak form is implemented into RattleSnake, the MOOSE (Multiphysics Object-Oriented Simulation Environment) based transport solver. Numerical results verify the correctness of the implementation and show its utility both for fixed source and eigenvalue problems.

Schunert, Sebastian (090720); Wang, Yaqi (090690); Martineau, Richard C (062281)

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

RELAP-7 Beta Release: Summary of Capabilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

RELAP-7 is a nuclear systems safety analysis code being developed at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). Building upon the decades of software development at the INL, we began the development of RELAP-7 in 2011 to support the Risk Informed Safety Margins Characterization (RISMC) Pathway. As part of this development, the first lines of RELAP-7 code were committed to the software revision control repository on November 7th, 2011. The overall design goal of RELAP-7 is to take advantage of the previous thirty years of advancements in computer architecture, software design, numerical methods, and physical models in order to provide capabilities needed for the RISMC methodology and to support nuclear power safety analysis. RELAP-7 is built using the INL’s modern scientific software development framework, MOOSE (Multi-physics Object Oriented Simulation Environment). MOOSE provides improved numerical calculations (including higher-order integration in both space and time, yielding converged second-order accuracy). The RELAP-7 code structure is based on multiple physical component models such as pipes, junctions, pumps, etc. Each component can have options for different fluid models such as single- and two-phase flow. This component-based and physics-based software architecture allows RELAP-7 to adopt different physical models for different applications. A relatively new two-phase hydrodynamic model, termed the “7-Equation model” for two phasic pressures, velocities, energies, and volumetric fraction, is incorporated into RELAP-7 for liquid-gas (water-steam) flows. This new model allows second-order integration because it is well-posed, which will reduce the numerical error associated with traditional systems analysis codes. In this paper, we provide a RELAP-7 capability list describing analysis features, range of applicability, and reactor components that will be available for the December 15th, 2014 beta release of the software.

Richard C. Martineau; Hongbin Zhang; Haihua Zhao

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Documentation of Influential Stallions in the Appaloosa Industry Since 1960  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

14.00 15 I Love Willie 8 14.62 14 Apache Double 6 15.00 1 Dudes Bonanza 6 15.00 20 Bull Nunneley 4 15.25 2 21 Table 4 Continued N M Mode The Hunter 6 15.50 1 Hot Chocolate Chip 7 15.86 4 Cherry?s Leader 5 16.80 5 Roman?s Straw Man 8 17... High Sign 2 12.00 4 Apache Double 3 12.33 1 Dudes Bonanza 2 13.00 11 Cherry?s Leader 2 14.00 5 Hot Chocolate Chip 2 14.50 12 Deep South 3 14.67 1 Mr. Spotted Bull 2 16.00 10 Time Flies 2 16.00 9 War Don 2 16.00 7 Goer 3 16.33 10 Booger Chief 2...

Kines, Brandy Nicole

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

369

Conservation of germplasm from Brucella abortus-infected bison (Bison bison) using natural service, embryo transfer, and in vitro maturation/in vitro fertilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to their high serological titers. Electroejaculations were performed on 31 July 92, 19 August 1992, 3 September 1992, and 10 September 1993 on bulls 904 and 907. All four bulls were sampled on 7 October 1992, 23 October 1992, 23 November 1992, 1 December... 813 814 814 814 815 818 820 820 825 825 825 825 829 829 829 830 830 831 835 911 911 920 923 923 923 923 923 Date of Flush 12/I I /92 10/30/92 4/1 4/93 8/27/93 3/3/93 8/27/93 12/11/92 10/30/92 4/ I 4/9 3 8/27/93 12...

Robison, Clayton Dean

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

R and D for improved efficiency small steam turbines. Phase II. Second quarterly technical report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The detailed design of a radial inflow steam turbine (RIT) comprised of two radial inflow turbine stages driving a common bull gear/output shaft designed for rated speeds of 70,000 rpm and 52,500 rpm, respectively, is described. Details are presented on: aerodynamic design; high speed rotors; high speed rotor bearings; high speed rotor sealing; gearing; output shaft; static structure; and predicted performance. (MCW)

Not Available

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Population Dynamics of the Boll Weevil and Modified Cotton Types: Implications for Pest Management.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the beneficial arthropods that normally control them. However, the bollworm- tobacco buclworm did not present a serious problem to producers for many years because these insects could be effectively and economically controlled with DDT. In summary, the new.... L. and S. J. Nemec. 1966. Comparativ effectiveness of certain insecticides for killing bollworm^ and tobacco budworms. Bull. 1048. Tex. Agr. Espt. 92, Texas A&M University, 4 p. 12. Nemec, S. J. and P. L. Adkisson. 1969. Laboratov teitj ,I...

Walker, J. K. Jr.; Niles, G. A.

1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Methemoglobin reductase in three species of bovidae  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

reductase isoenzymc patterns from a family aired by a bison bull 15 INTRODHCTION The methemoglobin reductase system is responsible for maintaining the iron moiety of hemoglobin in its reduced state. Only Fe(II) in hemoglobin is capable of binding... of the Journal of Animal Science. " LITERATI JRE REVIEW Methemoglobin is hemoglobin in which the ferrous iron of berne has been oxidized to the ferric state. Methemoglobin, incapable of binding oxygen reversibility, has characteristic absorption spectrum...

Fulton, Ronald Dale

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Cattle Management Systems in Humid Subtropical Areas of Western Bhutan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

levels. But the low milk yields of local cattle do not encourage farmers to offer adequate quantities of protein-rich feed stuff such as mustard oilcake. The diet remains largely unbalanced with high proportions of roughage and fibre, low levels... . The majority of the farms lacked proper cattle housing and feeding equipment, and the rudimentary nature of cattle management practices soon becomes apparent. Lack of Mithun breeding bulls, fodder scarcity in certain areas, labour shortages on some farms...

Tamang, N B; Perkins, J M

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Comparisons of type and volume of growth media and two cropping systems for production of greenhouse tomatoes Lycopersicon esculentum Mill  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are rela- tively high. This is perhaps the major justification for the commercial greenhouse industry in the United States. Greenhouse tomato production is an intensive cultural practice with large labor requirements. In recent years, the cost.... and J. L. Robertson. 1974. Production, marketing, and economic trends in the greenhouse tomato industry. Purdue Univ. ~A r. ~Ex . Sta. Rea. Bull. 908. 22. U. S. D. A. Consumer and Marketing Service. 1966. United States Standards for Grades...

Byrd, John Darryl

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Slide 1 Hchstleistungsrechenzentrum Stuttgart First Experiences with  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Uwe Küster Slide 1 Höchstleistungsrechenzentrum Stuttgart First Experiences with Itanium 1-Performance Computing Center Stuttgart (HLRS) www.hlrs.de Bull, Les Clayes au Bois 5.12.2002 #12;Uwe Küster Slide 2 processors each ­ 4 MB L3 cache ­ 32 GB memory ­ efc version 7.0 · some other machines #12;Uwe Küster Slide 3

Fiebig, Peter

376

CODEN: BSVAA6 Socit vaudoise des Sciences naturelles Droits de reproduction rservs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Amphibiens de la plaine de l'Orbe par Eric MORARD1, Jérôme DUPLAIN2, Jérôme PELLET3 et Alain MAIBACH4 analysis of the amphibians in the plaine de l'Orbe (Switzerland). Bull. Soc. vaud. Sc. nat. 88.3: 301-322. The amphibians of the plaine de l'Orbe (Canton de Vaud, Switzerland) and their distributions have been studied

Alvarez, Nadir

377

X-rays from Supernova Remnants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A summary of X-ray observations of supernova remnants is presented including the explosion fragment A of the Vela SNR, Tycho, N132D, RX J0852-4622, the Crab Nebula and the 'bulls eye', and SN 1987A, high-lighting the progress made with Chandra and XMM-Newton and touching upon the questions which arise from these observations and which might inspire future research.

B. Aschenbach

2002-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

378

Resistance in cotyledons, leaves, stems and bolls conferred by several B genes in Gossypium hirsutum L. as measured by races of Xanthomonas Malvacearum (E.F.Sm) Dows  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

susceptibility; (I) intermediate resistance; (-) resistant. Table 9. The increase in resistance caused by the B genes individually and in combination, above that given by the BS minor genes for the various plant parts, in the presence of variant 6, Sm Plant... A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1967 Major Subject Genetics RESISTANCE IN COTYLEDONS & LEAVES, STEMS AND BULLS CONFERRED BY SEVERAL B GENES IN GOSSYPIUM HIRSUTUM L. AS MEASURED...

Tayel, Mohamed Aly Fathalla

1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Manuel pour installer une station sismologique OSIRIS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

installation Tout d'abord, enterrer le sismom`etre, s'assurer de l'horizontalit´e du sismo c'est-`a-dire, bulle le c^able sur le sismo, v´erifier de nouveau l'horizontalit´e. GPS Batterie ` Station d "sismo" puis cd osiris puis ./nrtd -set eth0 #12;7- Lancer Firefox (web browser) depuis la barre de menu

Perrot, Julie

380

AgNIC Pre-conference 2009 “If It’s Digital and In Google – Then They Will Come”  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Uncompressed raw image files Bitmap (.bmp) Tagged Image File Format (TIFF) (.tif) Digitization Concepts -- Image Quality Compressed derivative files Used for easier transmission over the web due to smaller size Joint Photographic Experts Group (JPEG) (.jpg... or nothing Image too skewed, not straight Too much dark page gutter Adobe Acrobat Professional: Create New PDF from Multiple Files Browse to File Folder Select Multiple Files Using Control Key Added File List Processing into PDF File Save New File as Bull...

McGeachin, Robert B.

2009-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bowline bull moose" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Kalispel Resident Fish Project : Annual Report, 2001.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 2001 the Kalispel Natural Resource Department (KNRD) continued assessing habitat and population enhancement projects for bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus), westslope cutthroat (Oncorhynchus clarki lewisi) and largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides). Habitat enhancement measures, as outlined in recommendations from the 1996, 1997, and 1998 annual reports, were monitored during field season 1999, 2000, and 2001. Post assessments were used to evaluate habitat quality, stream morphology and fish populations where enhancement projects were implemented.

Andersen, Todd

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Reproduction of Cnidaria  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

international coelenterate symposia, and four hydrozoan work- shops held to date, some of them in sessions devoted to the subject. These were predominantly the results of primary re- search (e.g., Miller 1976; Fadlallah 1985; Benayahu 1991; Kubota 1997... reproduction (e.g., Bouillon 1994; Cornelius 1995; Tyler et al. 1995; Ivanova-Kazas 1996), although Walker and Bull (1983, p. 137) restricted asexual reproduction “to an increase in the number of individual animals or colonies [excluding] the case...

Fautin, Daphne G.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Bullhead City, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectricEnergyCTBarre BiomassTHISBrickyardRepowerBull Creek Wind Farm

384

Bunkerville, Nevada: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectricEnergyCTBarre BiomassTHISBrickyardRepowerBull Creek Wind FarmBunkerville,

385

Burbank, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectricEnergyCTBarre BiomassTHISBrickyardRepowerBull Creek Wind

386

Bureau Valley School District Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectricEnergyCTBarre BiomassTHISBrickyardRepowerBull Creek WindBurco Farm

387

Bureau of Indian Affairs | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectricEnergyCTBarre BiomassTHISBrickyardRepowerBull Creek WindBurco

388

Bureau of Land Management - 4.0 Chapter 4 - Environmental Effects | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectricEnergyCTBarre BiomassTHISBrickyardRepowerBull Creek WindBurcoEnergy

389

Bureau of Land Management - Examples of Scoping Reports | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectricEnergyCTBarre BiomassTHISBrickyardRepowerBull Creek WindBurcoEnergy|

390

Bureau of Land Management - Geothermal Drilling Permit | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectricEnergyCTBarre BiomassTHISBrickyardRepowerBull Creek

391

Bureau of Land Management - Land Use Planning Handbook | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectricEnergyCTBarre BiomassTHISBrickyardRepowerBull CreekInformation

392

Bureau of Land Management - Notice of Intent to Conduct Geothermal Resource  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectricEnergyCTBarre BiomassTHISBrickyardRepowerBull

393

Bureau of Land Management - Sundry Notices and Reports on Wells | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectricEnergyCTBarre BiomassTHISBrickyardRepowerBullEnergy Information

394

Bureau of Reclamation | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectricEnergyCTBarre BiomassTHISBrickyardRepowerBullEnergy

395

Burkina Faso-Reducing the GHG Impacts of Sustainable Intensification | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectricEnergyCTBarre BiomassTHISBrickyardRepowerBullEnergyEnergy Information

396

Burleigh County, North Dakota: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectricEnergyCTBarre BiomassTHISBrickyardRepowerBullEnergyEnergy

397

Burley Butte | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectricEnergyCTBarre BiomassTHISBrickyardRepowerBullEnergyEnergyButte Jump to:

398

Burley Field Office | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectricEnergyCTBarre BiomassTHISBrickyardRepowerBullEnergyEnergyButte Jump

399

Burlingame, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectricEnergyCTBarre BiomassTHISBrickyardRepowerBullEnergyEnergyButte

400

Burlington High School Wind Project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectricEnergyCTBarre BiomassTHISBrickyardRepowerBullEnergyEnergyButteBurlington

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bowline bull moose" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Long-term hydraulic properties of subsurface flow constructed wetlands  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Vegetation Hydraulic Design Removal Kinetics and Organic Loading Summary lvlATERIALS AND METHODS 5 5 6 . 15 . 16 . 17 RESULTS AND DISCUSSION . Sieve Analysis System Performance Hydraulic Conductivity Porosity Turbulent Flow Comparison of One... analysis of the bull rock. System Performance The operation of this research project generally seemed to be successful. However, there were a few problems with the operation of the appamtus which warrant attention. The major problems were leakage...

Turner, Glenn Allen

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Management Controls for Ranches Producing Breeding Cattle.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, days on feed, feedlot gain, feed required per hundred pounds gained, slaughter weight, quality and yield grade. Weaning Calves Measurement of weaning weight (205 days). Weaning weights are measured to evaluate differ- ences in mothering ability... by multiplying by 1.05 and records of any bull calves should be adjusted to a steer basis by sub- tracting 5 percent or multiplying by .95. The procedure of using adjusted 365-day weights as a measure of yearling weight will apply primarily to herds...

Maddox, L. A. Jr.

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

The Despatch Issue 14-16  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-RADIO CHATTER In talking with Mark Lenard one gets the impression that the actor is not really jumping up and down over the film footage he gets playing Aaron Stempel in ABC-TVs "Here Come the Brides." A/~"rs-\\ n r wsmrr, Tt isn,t that Lenard com.... Please send in your ques tions for "Question Mark," and answers will appear as the DLW nature allows. Tne puollcatlon schedule: three bulle tins and a yearbook per year-, and dues of $1.50 Pei year (a bit less than dues have been, because I expect...

Multiple Contributors

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Observations and seasonal periodicity of the benthic algae of Galveston Island, Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on the marine algae of Florida: The intertidal rocks at Marineland. Florida State Univ. Stud. 7: 17-23. 1956. Sea grasses of the northern Gulf coast. Bull. Mar. Sc. Gulf & Carib. 4: 305-308. 1963. Some new records and range extensions of Florida marine... an extensive study dealing with periodicity and dis- tribution of benthic marine algae in Louisiana. Offshore collec- tions were made in addition to well-spaced sites along the coast. Keatts (196g, unpublished} surveyed the algae on a rock jetty in Freeport...

Lowe, Glenn Curtis

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Tropical air mass modification over water (Gulf of Mexico Region)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Scripps Institution of Oceanography, Oceanographic Report No. 9 (Fog Pro)sot) Lopes, M. E. 194S A technique for detailed radiosonde analysis in the tropics. Bull. Amer. Meteor. Soc. , Vol. 29, No. 5. Solot, S. R. 1939 Computations of' depth... represents an aporoxi- mate equilibrium with respect to the surface beneath. Thus, an air mass may be identified by the vertical structure it acquires over a source Willett, H. D. , Papers in Phys. Ocn. and Met. , Vol. II, No. 2, 1943 region. The concept...

Sorgnit, Ernest Frederick

1952-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Productivity analysis and technology adoption for livestock in Tanzania  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

take advantage of the communal grazing tradition by increasing their herd sizes resulting in overstocking and poor utilization of the range land. This leads to low nutrition, high incidence of parasites and disease among the animals. Improved.... Table 8. Composition of the Average Traditional Livestock Herd, Tanzania 1975 Zone Total Cattle Cows Total Total Calves Heifcrs Steers Bulls Goats Sheep 26. 78 10. 59 5. 24 4. 77 2. 13 4. 06 8. 78 6. 47 26. 69 5. 09 4. 92 2. 80 3. 60 11. 40 10. 43...

Njukia, James Wambugu

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Gender Comparisons of Mechanomyographic Amplitude and Mean Power Frequency Versus Isometric Torque Relationships  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the biceps brachii. Journal of Electromyography and Kinesiology, 14, 555-564. Bichler, E. (2000). Mechanomyograms recorded during evoked contractions of single mo- tor units in the rat medial gastrocnemius muscle. European Journal of Applied Physi- ology, 83...-599. Pedhazur, E.J. (1997). Multiple regression in behavioral research: Explanation and predic- tion (3rd ed.). Fort Worth: Harcourt Brace College Publ. Perry, S.R., Housh, T.J., Johnson, G.O., Ebersole, K.T., Bull, A.J., Evetovich, T.K., & Smith, D.B. (2001a...

Beck, Travis W.; Housh, Terry J.; Johnson, Glen O.; Weir, Joseph P.; Cramer, Joel T.; Coburn, Jared W.; Malek, Moh H.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

a An evaluation of F? crosses between Bos taurus and Bos indicusunder different enviromental [sic]conditions in Ethiopia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and water. and in some areas is only watered on alternate days or even on the third day. Nature Boran bulls weigh 550-850 kg and cows 400-550 kg with 4. 5 kg of milk production/head/day under good management conditions. Horro The Horro cattle are found... showed results which, sometimes, were not readily explainable. These results were probably due to manage- ment practices that counteracted effects of season and year. Calves at the Holetta Station performed better than the other three station...

Hawariat, Girma Wolde

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Kalispel Resident Fish Project : Annual Report, 2008.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 2008, the Kalispel Natural Resource Department (KNRD) continued to implement its habitat enhancement projects for bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) and westslope cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarki lewisi). Baseline fish population and habitat assessments were conducted in Upper West Branch Priest River. Additional fish and habitat data were collected for the Granite Creek Watershed Assessment, a cooperative project between KNRD and the U.S. Forest Service Panhandle National Forest (FS) . The watershed assessment, funded primarily by the Salmon Recovery Funding Board of the State of Washington, will be completed in 2009.

Andersen, Todd [Kalispel Natural Resource Department

2009-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

410

Establishing perennial grasses on new backslopes of a highway right-of-way during the summer months  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) to aocelerate seedling development. The fert111sed areas of each looation were split into five equal parts. Each portion reoeived one of the following treatmentsi (1) peat 12 moss under the seeded row[ (2) scarification) (3) vegatativa mulch1 (&) a mulsh... of RC 2 asphalt ~ and (5) no further treatment vt ioh was used as a shook. Tha peat moss was plaoed beneath the seeded rov in a furrow opened using a bull-tongue at tacbsd to a manually-operated hams~arden plow, The peat moss vas soaked in water...

Waller, Jerry Jim

1961-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Supplement 21, Part 1, Authors: A To Z  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.?2) ] Abstr. of reports before 31. Ann. Meet. ASB. Sefe ASB Bull., v. 17 (2), Apr., 1970. Abstr. 5. Tagung Deutsch. Gesellsch. Parasitoi. (T?bingen, Apr. 9-11, 1970). See Ztschr. Parasitenk., v. ?? (l), 1970. Acrida.? Acrida. Association d1Acridologie.... Akademiia Nauk SSSR.Information Bulletin. Institute of Biology of Inland Water. Leningrad. [Wa.(QH541?5? B5)] Inform. Dent.? Information Dentaire. Paris. [Wm. (Wl. IN419)] Inform. Vet.-- L'Information V?t?rinaire. Saint-Hyacinthe, Quebec, Canada. [Wm...

Hood, Martha W.; Tolson, Deborah A.; Kirby, Margie D.; Rayburn, Jane D.; Edwards, Shirley J.; Shaw, Judith H.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Special Publication No. 3, Ticks And Tickborne Diseases, III. Checklist Of Families, Genera, Species, And Subspecies Of Ticks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hoogstraal, ?., & McCarthy, V. C., (1965B) 756-T62, figs. I-I8 (Ann. Entom. Soc. Am., v. 58 (5) 1965 : Argas (Persicargas) ablutus Schulze, P., (1933A), 1+25-1+27, ^28, 1+30, figs. 11-13 (Z. Parasitenk., v. 6 (3)) 19?? : Dermacentor silvarum aborensis...., 5. s., v. 8, Bull. (3)) I878 : Ixodes acaroideus Pallas, P. S., (1772a), 228 (Spicilegia Zoolog, pt. IX) 1772 : Pediculus 1929 : CHaemaphysalisD ^according to Oudemans, A. C., Tijdschr. Entom., v. 72, Suppl. XVII, P. acaroideus was a larva...

Doss, Mildred A.; Anastos, George

413

Supplement 24, Part 6, Parasite-Subject Catalogue, Subject Headings: A to I  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1980 West J Med San Francisco 132 (5) May 461- 46 2 Wa amebic liver abscess and its consideration in differential diagnosis of right-sided pleural effusion, 43-year-old man, case report: Keams Canyon, Arizona Abscess. Amebic Nigam ? et al 1981 J... Bull 29 (1-4) Aug 39-51 Wm E[ntamoeba] histolytica, seamen, case reports, diagnosis, clinical aspects: Japan (natives of Far East) Abscess, Amebic Ylvisaker JT; McDonald GB 1980 Western J Med 132 (2) Feb 153-157 Wa Entamoeba histolytica, two...

Edwards, Shirley J.; Hood, Martha W.; Shaw, Judith H.; Rayburn, Jane D.; Kirby, Margie D.; Hanfman, Deborah T.; Zidar, Judith A.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

More Missions, More Myths Issue 12  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

was normalcy; good old Leonard McCoy, as bitingly blunt as Spock But McCoy's grin looked strangely frozen as he bounced on his drawled, all Georgian hospi tali ty and bull pucky. "Jim, why, isn't surprise!" 5 Kirk did not remember the doctor ever looking...?" "She was afraid of losing you." threat to your time together, to Suddenly it became clear to Kirk. lIShe saw me that special relationship you two share. She was jealous." T'Beth nodded miserably, but such a Human explanation did not sway Spock...

Multiple Contributors

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Determining biological sources of variation in residual feed intake in Brahman heifers during confinement feeding and on pasture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

there was little decrease in the variation of RFI. Accuracy of measurements decreased when BW estimates were taken greater than two weeks apart. As would be expected, increasing the number of measurements taken decreases variability. Wang et al. (2006) supported... 56 d 79 d 70 d 70 d Simmental Bull 63 d 35 d 42 d 63 d Bos taurus Steers Wang et al. (2006) a FCR = Feed intake required to produce one unit of weight gain. b RFI = Difference in expected DMI for maintenance and growth at a given level...

Dittmar (III), Robert Otto

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

416

Determining biological sources of variation in residual feed intake in Brahman heifers during confinement feeding and on pasture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

there was little decrease in the variation of RFI. Accuracy of measurements decreased when BW estimates were taken greater than two weeks apart. As would be expected, increasing the number of measurements taken decreases variability. Wang et al. (2006) supported... 56 d 79 d 70 d 70 d Simmental Bull 63 d 35 d 42 d 63 d Bos taurus Steers Wang et al. (2006) a FCR = Feed intake required to produce one unit of weight gain. b RFI = Difference in expected DMI for maintenance and growth at a given level...

Dittmar (III), Robert Otto

2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

417

Hot Beverages Cold Beverages  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Juices $3.19 Vitamin Water $1.79 Java Tree Iced Coffee $2.59 Milk, 2% or Low Fat $1.39 20 oz. Coke Products $1.39 Energy Drinks Rockstar $2.39 Full Throttle $2.39 Red Bull Energy Drink $2.39 Rejuvenation in a sustainable way. 12 oz. 16 oz. 20 oz. House Blend $1.69 $1.79 $1.90 French Roast $1.69 $1.79 $1.90 Decaf Dark

New Hampshire, University of

418

The driving force of plate tectonics evaluated in spherical coordinates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the West Coast of North America, 40'N to 52'N latitude, Geol. Soc. Amer. Bull. , 82, 1267-1270, 1961. Rea, D. K. , Changes in the axial configuration of the East Pacific Rise near 6'S during the last 2 m. y. , J. Geophys. Res. , 81, 1495-1504, 1976a... Rise, Ph. D. thesis, Princeton Univ. , Princeton, N. J. , 1974. Hey, R. N. and D. S. Wilson, Propagating rift explanation for the tectonic evolution of the North-East Pacific ? the pseudo movie, Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. , 58, 167-188, 1982. Holmes...

Donahue, John Michael

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Indigenismo: The Guatemalan Experience  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

European power. This line was later established by the Treaty of Tor de sillas between Castile and Portugal in 1494 as 370 leagues west of the Cape Verde Islands. A papal bull in 1493, "Inter- Cetera, M had granted to Spain the obligation... as having been regu lated entirely by the supernatural. Catastrophe and disaster were com mon elements in this past, Their present and future were predestined and a function of the desires of a complicated set of mystical beings with extensive powers...

Casey, Dennis F.

1979-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Use of heparin to accelerate capacitation of equine spermatozoa in vivo  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

this paper and that was my driving force. Thank you for always being there for me, I love you with all of my heart. Finally, I would like to acknowledge a most special light in my life, my son, Tyler W. Nelson. You have taught me to slow down and enjoy... capacitation-inducing ability in bull spermatozoa, with the degree of sulfation being at least partially responsible for differences in capacitation-inducing efficacy (Handrow er a/. , 1982; Miller and Ax, 1989). Heparin, a more highly sulfated molecule than...

Fleet Nelson, Tami Lynn

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bowline bull moose" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Bureau of Land Management ESPC across Six States | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in Review: Top FiveDepartment of Energy Buildings PerspectiveBUILDINGS-TO-GRIDofBullBureau

422

Bulldog | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectricEnergyCTBarre BiomassTHISBrickyardRepowerBull Creek Wind Farm JumpBulldog

423

Burco Farm and Feed | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectricEnergyCTBarre BiomassTHISBrickyardRepowerBull Creek WindBurco Farm and

424

Bureau of Energy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectricEnergyCTBarre BiomassTHISBrickyardRepowerBull Creek WindBurco FarmTaiwan)

425

Bureau of Land Management - Examples of Non-LUP Prep Plan or EIS Prep Plan  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectricEnergyCTBarre BiomassTHISBrickyardRepowerBull Creek WindBurcoEnergy| Open

426

Pentek concrete scabbling system: Baseline report; Greenbook (chapter)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Pentek scabbling technology was tested at Florida International University (FIU) and is being evaluated as a baseline technology. This report evaluates it for safety and health issues. It is a commercially available technology and has been used for various projects at locations throughout the country. The Pentek concrete scabbling system consisted of the MOOSE, SQUIRREL-I, and SQUIRREL-III scabblers. The scabblers are designed to scarify concrete floors and slabs using cross-section, tungsten carbide tipped bits. The bits are designed to remove concrete in 318 inch increments. The bits are either 9-tooth or demolition type. The scabblers are used with a vacuum system designed to collect and filter the concrete dust and contamination that is removed from the surface. The safety and health evaluation conducted during the testing demonstration focused on two main areas of exposure: dust and noise. Dust exposure was minimal, but noise exposure was significant. Further testing for each of these exposures is recommended. Because of the outdoor environment where the testing demonstration took place, results may be inaccurate. It is feasible that the dust and noise levels will be higher in an enclosed operating environment. Other areas of concern were arm-hand vibration, whole-body vibration, ergonomics, heat stress, tripping hazards, electrical hazards, machine guarding, and lockout/tagout.

NONE

1997-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

427

RELAP-7 Numerical Stabilization: Entropy Viscosity Method  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The RELAP-7 code is the next generation nuclear reactor system safety analysis code being developed at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The code is based on the INL's modern scientific software development framework, MOOSE (Multi-Physics Object Oriented Simulation Environment). The overall design goal of RELAP-7 is to take advantage of the previous thirty years of advancements in computer architecture, software design, numerical integration methods, and physical models. The end result will be a reactor systems analysis capability that retains and improves upon RELAP5's capability and extends the analysis capability for all reactor system simulation scenarios. RELAP-7 utilizes a single phase and a novel seven-equation two-phase flow models as described in the RELAP-7 Theory Manual (INL/EXT-14-31366). The basic equation systems are hyperbolic, which generally require some type of stabilization (or artificial viscosity) to capture nonlinear discontinuities and to suppress advection-caused oscillations. This report documents one of the available options for this stabilization in RELAP-7 -- a new and novel approach known as the entropy viscosity method. Because the code is an ongoing development effort in which the physical sub models, numerics, and coding are evolving, so too must the specific details of the entropy viscosity stabilization method. Here the fundamentals of the method in their current state are presented.

R. A. Berry; M. O. Delchini; J. Ragusa

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Initial RattleSnake Calculations of the Hot Zero Power BEAVRS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The validation of the Idaho National Laboratory's next generation of reactor physics analysis codes is an essential and ongoing task. The validation process requires a large undertaking and includes detailed, realistic models that can accurately predict the behavior of an operational nuclear reactor. Over the past few years the INL has developed the RattleSnake application and supporting tools on the MOOSE framework to perform these reactor physics calculations. RattleSnake solves the linearized Boltzmann transport equation with a variety of solution meth­ ods. Various traditional reactor physics benchmarks have already been performed, but a more realistic light water reactor comparison was needed to solidify the status of the code and deter­ mine its fidelity. The INL team decided to use the Benchmark for Evaluation and Validation of Reactor Simulations, which was made available in early 2013. This benchmark is a one­ of-a-kind document assembled by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, which includes two cycles of detailed, measured PWR operational data. The results from this initial study of the hot zero power conditions show the current INL analysis procedure with DRAGON4 cross section preparation and using the low order diffusion solver in RattleSnake for the whole core calculations yield very encouraging results for PWR analysis. The radial assembly power distributions, radial detector measurements and control rod worths were computed with good accuracy. The computation of the isothermal temperature coefficients of reactivity require further study.

M. Ellis; J. Ortensi; Y. Wang; K. Smith; R.C. Martineau

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Advanced Pellet Cladding Interaction Modeling Using the US DOE CASL Fuel Performance Code: Peregrine  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US DOE’s Consortium for Advanced Simulation of LWRs (CASL) program has undertaken an effort to enhance and develop modeling and simulation tools for a virtual reactor application, including high fidelity neutronics, fluid flow/thermal hydraulics, and fuel and material behavior. The fuel performance analysis efforts aim to provide 3-dimensional capabilities for single and multiple rods to assess safety margins and the impact of plant operation and fuel rod design on the fuel thermomechanical- chemical behavior, including Pellet-Cladding Interaction (PCI) failures and CRUD-Induced Localized Corrosion (CILC) failures in PWRs. [1-3] The CASL fuel performance code, Peregrine, is an engineering scale code that is built upon the MOOSE/ELK/FOX computational FEM framework, which is also common to the fuel modeling framework, BISON [4,5]. Peregrine uses both 2-D and 3-D geometric fuel rod representations and contains a materials properties and fuel behavior model library for the UO2 and Zircaloy system common to PWR fuel derived from both open literature sources and the FALCON code [6]. The primary purpose of Peregrine is to accurately calculate the thermal, mechanical, and chemical processes active throughout a single fuel rod during operation in a reactor, for both steady state and off-normal conditions.

Jason Hales; Various

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Cumulative Effects of Micro-Hydro Development on the Fisheries of the Swan River Drainage, Montana, First Annual Progress Report (Covering Field Season July-November 1982).  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This fisheries study is to determine the potential cumulative biological and economic effects of 20 small or micro-hydro-electric facilities (less than 5 megawatts) proposed to be constructed on tributaries to the Swan River, a 1738 square kilometer (671 square mile) drainage located in northwestern Montana. The study addresses portions of measure 1204 (b) (2) of the Norwthwest Power Planning Council's Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. Aerial pre-surveys conducted during 1982 identified 102 stream reaches that may support fish populations in the Swan drainage between Swan and Lindbergh lakes. These reaches were located in 49 tributary streams and constituted 416 kilometers (258 miles) of potential fish habitat. Construction of all proposed small hydro projects would divert water from 54 kilometers (34 miles) or about 13 percent of the tributary system. Only two of the 20 proposed hydro sites did not support trout populations and most were populated by migratory bull trout and westslope cutthroat trout. Potential cumulative habitat losses that could result from dewatering of all proposed project areas were predicted using a stream reach classification scheme involving stream gradient, drainage ara, and fish population data. Preliminary results of this worst case analysis indicate that 23, 19 and 6 percent of the high quality rearing habitat for cutthroat, bull, and brook trout respectively would be lost.

Leathe, Stephen A.; Graham, Patrick J.

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Cumulative Effects of Micro-Hydro Development on the Fisheries of the Swan River Drainage, Montana, Volume I, Summary, 1983-1984 Final Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study was designed to develop and apply methods to evaluate the cumulative effects of 20 proposed small hydro projects on the fisheries resources of the Swan River drainage located in northwestern Montana. Fish population and reach classification information was used to estimate total populations of 107,000 brook trout, 65,000 cut-throat trout and 31,000 juvenile bull trout within the tributary system. Distribution, abundance, and life history of fish species in the drainage and their contribution to the sport fishery were considered in the cumulative impact analysis. Bull trout were chosen as the primary species of concern because of their extensive use of project areas, sensitivity to streambed sedimentation, and their importance to the lake and river sport fisheries. Dewatering of hydroelectric diversion zones and streambed sedimentation (resulting from forest and small hydro development) were the major impacts considered. The developer proposed to divert up to the entire streamflow during low flow months because maintenance of recommended minimum bypass flows would not allow profitable project operation. Dewatering was assumed to result in a total loss of fish production in these areas. 105 refs., 19 figs., 38 tabs.

Leathe, Stephen A.; Enk, Michael D.

1985-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Kalispell (i.e. Kalispel) Resident Fish Project : Annual Report, 1996.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1996 the Kalispell Natural Resource Department (KNRD) in conjunction with the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) continued the implementation of a habitat and population enhancement project for bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus), westslope cutthroat (Oncorhynchus clarki lewisi) and largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides). A habitat and population assessment was conducted on Browns Creek a tributary of Cee Cee Ah Creek, one of the priority tributaries outlined in the 1995 annual report. The assessment was used to determine the type and quality of habitat that was limiting to native bull trout and cutthroat trout populations. Analysis of the habitat data indicated high amounts of sediment in the stream, low bank cover, and a lack of winter habitat. Data collected from this assessment was used to prescribe habitat enhancement measures for Browns Creek. Habitat enhancement measures, as outlined in the recommendations from the 1995 annual report, were conducted during field season 1996. Fencing and planting of riparian areas and in stream structures were implemented. As a precursor to these enhancement efforts, pre-assessments were conducted to determine the affects of the enhancement. Habitat quality, stream morphology and fish populations were pre-assessed. The construction of the largemouth bass hatchery was started in October of 1995. The KNRD, Contractors Northwest Inc. and associated subcontractors are in the process of constructing the hatchery. The projected date of hatchery completion is summer 1997.

Maroney, Joseph; Donley, Christopher; Lockwood, Jr., Neil

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Walla Walla River Fish Passage Operations Program, 2003-2004 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the late 1990s, the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, along with many other agencies, began implementing fisheries restoration activities in the Walla Walla Basin. An integral part of these efforts is to alleviate the inadequate fish migration conditions in the basin. The migration concerns are being addressed by removing diversion structures, constructing fish passage facilities, implementing minimum instream flow requirements, and providing trap and haul efforts when needed. The objective of the Walla Walla River Fish Passage Operations Project is to increase the survival of migrating adult and juvenile salmonids in the Walla Walla River basin. The project is responsible for coordinating operation and maintenance of ladders, screen sites, bypasses, trap facilities, and transportation equipment. In addition, the project provides technical input on passage criteria and passage and trapping facility design and operation. Operation of the various passage facilities and passage criteria guidelines are outlined in an annual operations plan that the project develops. During the 2003-2004 project year, there were 379 adult summer steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss), 36 adult bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus); 108 adult and 3 jack spring chinook (O. tshawytscha) enumerated at the Nursery Bridge Dam fishway video counting window between December 21, 2003, and June 30, 2004. Summer steelhead and spring chinook were observed moving upstream while bull trout were observed moving both upstream and downstream of the facility. In addition, the old ladder trap was operated by the WWBNPME project in order to radio tag spring chinook adults. A total of 2 adult summer steelhead, 4 bull trout, and 23 adult spring chinook were enumerated at the west ladder at Nursery Bridge Dam during the trapping operations between May 6 and May 23, 2004. Operation of the Little Walla Walla River juvenile trap for trap and haul purposes was not necessary this year. The project transported adult spring chinook from Threemile Dam to the South Fork Walla Walla Brood Holding Facility. A total of 239 spring chinook were outplanted in August for natural spawning in the basin.

Bronson, James P. (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, Department of Natural Resources, Pendleton, OR)

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Off-gas Adsorption Model and Simulation - OSPREY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The absence of industrial scale nuclear fuel reprocessing in the U.S. has precluded the necessary driver for developing the advanced simulation capability now prevalent in so many other countries. Thus, it is essential to model complex series of unit operations to simulate, understand, and predict inherent transient behavior. A capability of accurately simulating the dynamic behavior of advanced fuel cycle separation processes is expected to provide substantial cost savings and many technical benefits. To support this capability, a modeling effort focused on the off-gas treatment system of a used nuclear fuel recycling facility is in progress. The off-gas separation consists of a series of scrubbers and adsorption beds to capture constituents of interest. Dynamic models are being developed to simulate each unit operation involved so each unit operation can be used as a stand-alone model and in series with multiple others. Currently, an adsorption model has been developed within Multi-physics Object Oriented Simulation Environment (MOOSE) developed at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). Off-gas Separation and REcoverY (OSPREY) models the adsorption of offgas constituents for dispersed plug flow in a packed bed under non-isothermal and non-isobaric conditions. Inputs to the model include gas composition, sorbent and column properties, equilibrium and kinetic data, and inlet conditions. The simulation outputs component concentrations along the column length as a function of time from which breakthrough data can be obtained. The breakthrough data can be used to determine bed capacity, which in turn can be used to size columns. In addition to concentration data, the model predicts temperature along the column length as a function of time and pressure drop along the column length. A description of the OSPREY model, results from krypton adsorption modeling and plans for modeling the behavior of iodine, xenon, and tritium will be discussed.

Veronica J Rutledge

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Dynamic Event Tree Analysis Through RAVEN  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Conventional Event-Tree (ET) based methodologies are extensively used as tools to perform reliability and safety assessment of complex and critical engineering systems. One of the disadvantages of these methods is that timing/sequencing of events and system dynamics is not explicitly accounted for in the analysis. In order to overcome these limitations several techniques, also know as Dynamic Probabilistic Risk Assessment (D-PRA), have been developed. Monte-Carlo (MC) and Dynamic Event Tree (DET) are two of the most widely used D-PRA methodologies to perform safety assessment of Nuclear Power Plants (NPP). In the past two years, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has developed its own tool to perform Dynamic PRA: RAVEN (Reactor Analysis and Virtual control ENvironment). RAVEN has been designed in a high modular and pluggable way in order to enable easy integration of different programming languages (i.e., C++, Python) and coupling with other application including the ones based on the MOOSE framework, developed by INL as well. RAVEN performs two main tasks: 1) control logic driver for the new Thermo-Hydraulic code RELAP-7 and 2) post-processing tool. In the first task, RAVEN acts as a deterministic controller in which the set of control logic laws (user defined) monitors the RELAP-7 simulation and controls the activation of specific systems. Moreover, RAVEN also models stochastic events, such as components failures, and performs uncertainty quantification. Such stochastic modeling is employed by using both MC and DET algorithms. In the second task, RAVEN processes the large amount of data generated by RELAP-7 using data-mining based algorithms. This paper focuses on the first task and shows how it is possible to perform the analysis of dynamic stochastic systems using the newly developed RAVEN DET capability. As an example, the Dynamic PRA analysis, using Dynamic Event Tree, of a simplified pressurized water reactor for a Station Black-Out scenario is presented.

A. Alfonsi; C. Rabiti; D. Mandelli; J. Cogliati; R. A. Kinoshita; A. Naviglio

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

OSPREY Model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The absence of industrial scale nuclear fuel reprocessing in the U.S. has precluded the necessary driver for developing the advanced simulation capability now prevalent in so many other countries. Thus, it is essential to model complex series of unit operations to simulate, understand, and predict inherent transient behavior and feedback loops. A capability of accurately simulating the dynamic behavior of advanced fuel cycle separation processes will provide substantial cost savings and many technical benefits. The specific fuel cycle separation process discussed in this report is the off-gas treatment system. The off-gas separation consists of a series of scrubbers and adsorption beds to capture constituents of interest. Dynamic models are being developed to simulate each unit operation involved so each unit operation can be used as a stand-alone model and in series with multiple others. Currently, an adsorption model has been developed within Multi-physics Object Oriented Simulation Environment (MOOSE) developed at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). Off-gas Separation and REcoverY (OSPREY) models the adsorption of off-gas constituents for dispersed plug flow in a packed bed under non-isothermal and non-isobaric conditions. Inputs to the model include gas, sorbent, and column properties, equilibrium and kinetic data, and inlet conditions. The simulation outputs component concentrations along the column length as a function of time from which breakthrough data is obtained. The breakthrough data can be used to determine bed capacity, which in turn can be used to size columns. It also outputs temperature along the column length as a function of time and pressure drop along the column length. Experimental data and parameters were input into the adsorption model to develop models specific for krypton adsorption. The same can be done for iodine, xenon, and tritium. The model will be validated with experimental breakthrough curves. Customers will be given access to OSPREY to used and evaluate the model.

Veronica J. Rutledge

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

"Aegean Seals of the Late Bronze Age: Masters and Workshops, II. The First Generation Minoan Masters"  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the popular Groups.2 The serpentine seals found armost excrusively in LM r 6..irr, .o.r,.** comprise the more naturalistic Cretan popular Gro.rf O....fr*, ,fr. Cp Group); the steatite seals.found m.osrry o.r th. M#il";,;.-.iio,r"tty in the Islands, and rarely...*p"r. the lions on IX 114 and,7D,.lor. ,o the J-L Masrer. Lions, Bulls, Stags, Boars: The Master. ].31j 11:al_{:_.1 Jap!9io and 272 (5, 6) from Rutsi (both LH ilA). Aegean seals: masters and workshops l2l animals (note the waterbirds' legs on I273). The careful...

Younger, John G.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Bonneville Power Administration, Lower Columbia Region: Noxious Weed Management, 1996 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During the 1996 season ODA executed the contract between BPA and ODA. Execution of this contract included the following activities: Survey for target noxious weeds, such as Gorse; collection and redistribution of biological control agents, for example, Apion seed weevils for Scotch broom, bioagents for diffuse and spotted knapweed, Gorse spider mite, and gall fly releases for control of Canada thistle and bull thistle; and control of isolated infestations of Gorse on BPA rights-of-way. Training was provided for line crews at the Chemawa, Alevy and North Bend districts. The purpose of the program is to assist BPA in the integrated prevention and control of noxious weed species on BPA transmission line maintenance right-of-ways.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration, Portland, OR; Oregon Department of Agriculture Noxious Weed Control Program

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

R and D for improved efficiency, small steam turbines: Phase I. Final technical report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Results of an investigation of the development of a class of highly efficient steam turbines in the 500 to 5000 horsepower range are presented; these new machines are expected to have efficiences between 70 and 85%. The turbines are based on the concept of one or more high-speed radial inflow turbine modules driving a low-speed bull gear. Each module operates then at optimal specific speed, which yields high efficiency compared to the partial admission Curtiss stages currently used. The project has two phases. Phase 1 includes investigation and interpretation of the market for small steam turbines and definition of the radial inflow turbine (RIT) configurations best suited to penetrate a significant portion of this market. Phase 1 concludes with a recommended configuration. (MCW)

None

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Kalispel Resident Fish Project : Annual Report, 1997.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1997 the Kalispel Natural Resource Department (KNRD) in conjunction with the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) continued the implementation of a habitat and population enhancement project for bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus), westslope cutthroat (Oncorhynchus clarki lewisi) and largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides). Habitat enhancement measures, as outlined in the recommendations from the 1996 annual report, were conducted during field season 1997. Fencing and planting of riparian areas and instream structures were implemented. As a precursor to these enhancement efforts, pre-assessments were conducted to determine the affects of the enhancement. Habitat quality, stream morphology and fish populations were pre-assessed. This season also began the first year of post-assessment monitoring and evaluation of measures implemented during 1996. The largemouth bass hatchery construction was completed in October and the first bass were introduced to the facility that same month. The first round of production is scheduled for 1998.

Donley, Christopher; Lockwoood, Jr., Neil

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bowline bull moose" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Filiform Lie algebras of order 3  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The aim of this work is to generalize a very important type of Lie algebras and superalgebras, i.e., filiform Lie (super)algebras, into the theory of Lie algebras of order F. Thus, the concept of filiform Lie algebras of order F is obtained. In particular, for F = 3 it has been proved that by using infinitesimal deformations of the associated model elementary Lie algebra it can be obtained families of filiform elementary lie algebras of order 3, analogously as that occurs into the theory of Lie algebras [M. Vergne, “Cohomologie des algèbres de Lie nilpotentes. Application à l’étude de la variété des algèbres de Lie nilpotentes,” Bull. Soc. Math. France 98, 81–116 (1970)]. Also we give the dimension, using an adaptation of the sl(2,C)-module Method, and a basis of such infinitesimal deformations in some generic cases.

Navarro, R. M., E-mail: rnavarro@unex.es [Rosa María Navarro. Dpto. de Matemáticas, Universidad de Extremadura, Cáceres (Spain)

2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

442

Walla Walla River Fish Passage Operations Program, 2004-2005 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the late 1990s, the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, along with many other agencies, began implementing fisheries restoration activities in the Walla Walla Basin. An integral part of these efforts is to alleviate the inadequate fish migration conditions in the basin. The migration concerns are being addressed by removing diversion structures, constructing fish passage facilities, implementing minimum instream flow requirements, and providing trap and haul efforts when needed. The objective of the Walla Walla River Fish Passage Operations Project is to increase the survival of migrating adult and juvenile salmonids in the Walla Walla River basin. The project is responsible for coordinating operation and maintenance of ladders, screen sites, bypasses, trap facilities, and transportation equipment. In addition, the project provides technical input on passage criteria and passage and trapping facility design and operation. Operation of the various passage facilities and passage criteria guidelines are outlined in an annual operations plan that the project develops. During the 2004-2005 project year, there were 590 adult summer steelhead, 31 summer steelhead kelts (Oncorhynchus mykiss), 70 adult bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus); 80 adult and 1 jack spring Chinook (O. tshawytscha) enumerated at the Nursery Bridge Dam fishway video counting window between December 13, 2004, and June 16, 2005. Summer steelhead and spring chinook were observed moving upstream while bull trout were observed moving both upstream and downstream of the facility. In addition, the old ladder trap was operated by ODFW in order to enumerate fish passage. Of the total, 143 adult summer steelhead and 15 summer steelhead kelts were enumerated at the west ladder at Nursery Bridge Dam during the video efforts between February 4 and May 23, 2005. Operation of the Little Walla Walla River juvenile trap for trap and haul purposes was not necessary this year.

Bronson, James P. (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, Department of Natural Resources, Pendleton, OR); Duke, Bill B. (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, Pendleton, OR)

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Walla Walla River Fish Passage Operations Program, 2002-2003 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the late 1990's, the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, along with many other agencies, began implementing fisheries restoration activities in the Walla Walla Basin. An integral part of these efforts is to alleviate the inadequate fish migration conditions in the basin. The migration concerns are being addressed by removing diversion structures, constructing fish passage facilities, implementing minimum instream flow requirements, and initiating trap and haul efforts. The objective of the Walla Walla River Fish Passage Operations Project is to increase the survival of migrating adult and juvenile salmonids in the Walla Walla River basin. The project is responsible for coordinating operation and maintenance of ladders, screen sites, bypasses, trap facilities, and transportation equipment. In addition, the project provides technical input on passage criteria and passage and trapping facility design and operation. Operation of the various passage facilities and passage criteria guidelines are outlined in an annual operations plan that the project develops. During the 2002-2003 project year, there were 545 adult summer steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss), 29 adult bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus); 1 adult and 1 jack spring chinook (O. tshawytscha) enumerated at the Nursery Bridge Dam fishway adult trap between January 1 and June 23, 2003. Summer steelhead and spring chinook were observed moving upstream while bull trout were observed moving both upstream and downstream of the facility. Operation of the Little Walla Walla River juvenile trap for trap and haul purposes was not necessary this year. The project transported 21 adult spring chinook from Ringold Springs Hatchery and 281 from Threemile Dam to the South Fork Walla Walla Brood Holding Facility. Of these, 290 were outplanted in August for natural spawning in the basin.

Bronson, James P. (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, Department of Natural Resources, Pendleton, OR); Duke, Bill B. (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, Pendleton, OR)

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Atomistic Simulations of Mass and Thermal Transport in Oxide Nuclear Fuels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this talk we discuss simulations of the mass and thermal transport in oxide nuclear fuels. Redistribution of fission gases such as Xe is closely coupled to nuclear fuel performance. Most fission gases have low solubility in the fuel matrix, specifically the insolubility is most pronounced for large fission gas atoms such as Xe, and as a result there is a significant driving force for segregation of gas atoms to grain boundaries or dislocations and subsequently for nucleation of gas bubbles at these sinks. The first step of the fission gas redistribution is diffusion of individual gas atoms through the fuel matrix to existing sinks, which is governed by the activation energy for bulk diffusion. Fission gas bubbles are then formed by either separate nucleation events or by filling voids that were nucleated at a prior stage; in both cases their formation and latter growth is coupled to vacancy dynamics and thus linked to the production of vacancies via irradiation or thermal events. In order to better understand bulk Xe behavior (diffusion mechanisms) in UO{sub 2{+-}x} we first calculate the relevant activation energies using density functional theory (DFT) techniques. By analyzing a combination of Xe solution thermodynamics, migration barriers and the interaction of dissolved Xe atoms with U, we demonstrate that Xe diffusion predominantly occurs via a vacancy-mediated mechanism, though other alternatives may exist in high irradiation fields. Since Xe transport is closely related to diffusion of U vacancies, we have also studied the activation energy for this process. In order to explain the low value of 2.4 eV found for U migration from independent damage experiments (not thermal equilibrium) the presence of vacancy clusters must be included in the analysis. Next a continuum transport model for Xe and U is formulated based on the diffusion mechanisms established from DFT. After combining this model with descriptions of the interaction between Xe and grain boundaries derived from separate atomistic calculations, we simulate Xe redistribution for a few simple microstructures using finite element methods (FEM), as implemented in the MOOSE framework from Idaho National Laboratory. Thermal transport together with the power distribution determines the temperature distribution in the fuel rod and it is thus one of the most influential properties on nuclear fuel performance. The fuel thermal conductivity changes as function of time due to microstructure evolution (e.g. fission gas redistribution) and compositional changes. Using molecular dynamics simulations we have studied the impact of different types of grain boundaries and fission gas bubbles on UO{sub 2} thermal conductivity.

Andersson, Anders D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Uberuaga, Blas P. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Du, Shiyu [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Liu, Xiang-Yang [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Nerikar, Pankaj [IBM; Stanek, Christopher R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tonks, Michael [Idaho National Laboratory; Millet, Paul [Idaho National Laboratory; Biner, Bulent [Idaho National Laboratory

2012-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

445

NEAMS update quarterly report for January - March 2012.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Quarterly highlights are: (1) The integration of Denovo and AMP was demonstrated in an AMP simulation of the thermo-mechanics of a complete fuel assembly; (2) Bison was enhanced with a mechanistic fuel cracking model; (3) Mechanistic algorithms were incorporated into various lower-length-scale models to represent fission gases and dislocations in UO2 fuels; (4) Marmot was improved to allow faster testing of mesoscale models using larger problem domains; (5) Component models of reactor piping were developed for use in Relap-7; (6) The mesh generator of Proteus was updated to accept a mesh specification from Moose and equations were formulated for the intermediate-fidelity Proteus-2D1D module; (7) A new pressure solver was implemented in Nek5000 and demonstrated to work 2.5 times faster than the previous solver; (8) Work continued on volume-holdup models for two fuel reprocessing operations: voloxidation and dissolution; (9) Progress was made on a pyroprocessing model and the characterization of pyroprocessing emission signatures; (10) A new 1D groundwater waste transport code was delivered to the used fuel disposition (UFD) campaign; (11) Efforts on waste form modeling included empirical simulation of sodium-borosilicate glass compositions; (12) The Waste team developed three prototypes for modeling hydride reorientation in fuel cladding during very long-term fuel storage; (13) A benchmark demonstration problem (fission gas bubble growth) was modeled to evaluate the capabilities of different meso-scale numerical methods; (14) Work continued on a hierarchical up-scaling framework to model structural materials by directly coupling dislocation dynamics and crystal plasticity; (15) New 'importance sampling' methods were developed and demonstrated to reduce the computational cost of rare-event inference; (16) The survey and evaluation of existing data and knowledge bases was updated for NE-KAMS; (17) The NEAMS Early User Program was launched; (18) The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Office of Regulatory Research was introduced to the NEAMS program; (19) The NEAMS overall software quality assurance plan (SQAP) was revised to version 1.5; and (20) Work continued on NiCE and its plug-ins and other utilities, such as Cubit and VisIt.

Bradley, K.S.; Hayes, S.; Pointer, D.; Summers, R.; Sadasivan, P.; Sun, X.; Bernholdt, D.; Miller, M.; Stewart, J. (Nuclear Engineering Division); (ORNL); (INL); (LLNL); (ORNL); (SNL); (PNNL)

2012-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

446

Secure & Restore Critical Fisheries Habitat, Flathead Subbasin, FY2008 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The construction of Hungry Horse Dam inundated 125 km of adfluvial trout habitat in the South Fork of the Flathead River and its tributaries, impacting natural fish reproduction and rearing. Rapid residential and commercial growth in the Flathead Watershed now threaten the best remaining habitats and restrict our opportunities to offset natural resource losses. Hydropower development and other land disturbances caused severe declines in the range and abundance of our focal resident fish species, bull trout and westslope cutthroat trout. Bull trout were listed as threatened in 1998 under the Endangered Species Act and westslope cutthroat were petitioned for listing under ESA. Westslope cutthroat are a species of special concern in Montana and a species of special consideration by the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes. The Secure & Protect Fisheries Habitat project follows the logical progression towards habitat restoration outlined in the Hungry Horse Dam Fisheries Mitigation Implementation Plan approved by the NWPPC in 1993. This project is also consistent with the 2000 Fish and Wildlife Program and the Flathead River Subbasin Plan that identifies the protection of habitats for these populations as one of the most critical needs in the subbasin and directs actions to offset habitat losses. The Flathead basin is one of the fastest growing human population centers in Montana. Riparian habitats are being rapidly developed and subdivided, causing habitat degradation and altering ecosystem functions. Remaining critical habitats in the Flathead Watershed need to be purchased or protected with conservation easements if westslope cutthroat and bull trout are to persist and expand within the subbasin. In addition, habitats degraded by past land uses need to be restored to maximize the value of remaining habitats and offset losses caused by the construction of Hungry Horse Dam. Securing and restoring remaining riparian habitat will benefit fish by shading and moderating water temperatures, stabilizing banks and protecting the integrity of channel dimension, improving woody debris recruitment for in-channel habitat features, producing terrestrial insects and leaf litter for recruitment to the stream, and helping to accommodate and attenuate flood flows. The purpose of this project is to work with willing landowners to protect the best remaining habitats in the Flathead subbasin as identified in the Flathead River Subbasin Plan. The target areas for land protection activities follow the priorities established in the Flathead subbasin plan and include: (1) Class 1 waters as identified in the Flathead River Subbasin Plan; (2) Class 2 watersheds as identified in the Flathead River Subbasin Plan; and (3) 'Offsite mitigation' defined as those Class 1 and Class 2 watersheds that lack connectivity to the mainstem Flathead River or Flathead Lake. This program focuses on conserving the highest quality or most important riparian or fisheries habitat areas consistent with program criteria. The success of our efforts is subject to a property's actual availability and individual landowner negotiations. The program is guided using biological and project-based criteria that reflect not only the priority needs established in the Flathead subbasin plan, but also such factors as cost, credits, threats, and partners. The implementation of this project requires both an expense and a capital budget to allow work to be completed. This report addresses accomplishments under both budgets during FY08 as the two budgets are interrelated. The expense budget provided pre-acquisition funding to conduct activities such as surveys, appraisals, staff support, etc. The capital budget was used to purchase the interest in each parcel including closing costs. Both the pre-acquisition contract funds and the capital funds used to purchase fee title or conservation easements were spent in accordance with the terms negotiated within the FY08 through FY09 MOA between the Tribes, State, and BPA. In FY08, the focus of this project was to pursue all possible properties

DuCharme, Lynn [Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes; Tohtz, Joel [Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks

2008-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

447

Rainwater Wildlife Area Management Plan Executive Summary : A Columbia Basin Wildlife Mitigation Project.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Executive Summary provides an overview of the Draft Rainwater Wildlife Area Management Plan. The comprehensive plan can be viewed on the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) website at: www.umatilla.nsn.us or requested in hard copy from the CTUIR at the address below. The wildlife area was established in September 1998 when the CTUIR purchased the Rainwater Ranch through Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for purposes of fish and wildlife mitigation for the McNary and John Day dams. The Management Plan has been developed under a standardized planning process developed by BPA for Columbia River Basin Wildlife Mitigation Projects (See Guiding Policies Section below). The plan outlines the framework for managing the project area, provides an assessment of existing conditions and key resource issues, and presents an array of habitat management and enhancement strategies. The plan culminates into a 5-Year Action Plan that will focus management actions and prioritize funding during the 2002-2006 planning period. Since acquisition of the property in late 1998, the CTUIR has conducted an extensive baseline resource assessment in preparation for the management plan, initiated habitat restoration in the Griffin Fork drainage to address road-related resource damage caused by roads constructed for forest practices and an extensive flood event in 1996, and initiated infrastructure developments associated with the Access and Travel Management Plan (i.e., installed parking areas, gates, and public information signs). In addition to these efforts, the CTUIR has worked to set up a long-term funding mechanism with BPA through the NPPC Fish and Wildlife Program. The CTUIR has also continued to coordinate closely with local and state government organizations to ensure consistency with local land use laws and maintain open lines of communication regarding important issues such as big game hunting, tribal member exercise of treaty rights, and public access. During the past two years, non-Indian public concern over big game hunting issues has at times overwhelmed other issues related to the wildlife area. In 2001, the CTUIR Fish and Wildlife Committee closed the wildlife area to tribal branch antlered bull elk harvest in response to harvest data that indicated harvest rates were greater than expected. In addition, illegal harvest of mature bull elk in southeastern Washington during the 2001 season exceeded the legal tribal and nontribal harvest combined which has created a potential significant regression in the bull;cow ratio in the Blue Mountain Elk herd. CTUIR Fish and Wildlife Committee and staff and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife Regional Director and staff have been coordinating regularly to develop strategies to address harvest rates and ensure protection of viable big game herds in southeastern Washington. The CTUIR Fish and Wildlife Committee and WDFW has jointly agreed to continue close coordination on this and other issues and continue working together to ensure the long-term vigor of the elk herd on the Rainwater Wildlife Area. The purpose of the project is to protect, enhance, and mitigate fish and wildlife resources impacted by Columbia River Basin hydroelectric development. The effort is one of several wildlife mitigation projects in the region developed to compensate for terrestrial habitat losses resulting from the construction of McNary and John Day Hydroelectric facilities located on the mainstem Columbia River. While this project is driven primarily by the purpose and need to mitigate for wildlife habitat losses, it is also recognized that management strategies will also benefit many other non-target fish and wildlife species and associated natural resources.

Childs, Allen B.

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Kalispel Non-Native Fish Suppression Project 2007 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Non-native salmonids are impacting native salmonid populations throughout the Pend Oreille Subbasin. Competition, hybridization, and predation by non-native fish have been identified as primary factors in the decline of some native bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) and westslope cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarki lewisi) populations. In 2007, the Kalispel Natural Resource Department (KNRD) initiated the Kalispel Nonnative Fish Suppression Project. The goal of this project is to implement actions to suppress or eradicate non-native fish in areas where native populations are declining or have been extirpated. These projects have previously been identified as critical to recovering native bull trout and westslope cutthroat trout (WCT). Lower Graham Creek was invaded by non-native rainbow (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) after a small dam failed in 1991. By 2003, no genetically pure WCT remained in the lower 700 m of Graham Creek. Further invasion upstream is currently precluded by a relatively short section of steep, cascade-pool stepped channel section that will likely be breached in the near future. In 2008, a fish management structure (barrier) was constructed at the mouth of Graham Creek to preclude further invasion of non-native fish into Graham Creek. The construction of the barrier was preceded by intensive electrofishing in the lower 700 m to remove and relocate all captured fish. Westslope cutthroat trout have recently been extirpated in Cee Cee Ah Creek due to displacement by brook trout. We propose treating Cee Cee Ah Creek with a piscicide to eradicate brook trout. Once eradication is complete, cutthroat trout will be translocated from nearby watersheds. In 2004, the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) proposed an antimycin treatment within the subbasin; the project encountered significant public opposition and was eventually abandoned. However, over the course of planning this 2004 project, little public involvement or education was conducted prior to the planned implementation. Therefore, in 2007 we implemented an extensive process to provide public education, address public concerns and provide opportunity for public involvement in implementing piscicides and other native fish recovery actions in the subbasin.

Wingert, Michele; Andersen, Todd [Kalispel Natural Resource Department

2008-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

449

Evaluation of the Biological Effects of the Northwest Power Conservation Council's Mainstem Amendment on the Fisheries Upstream and Downstream of Libby Dam, Montana, 2007-2008 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new project began in 2005 to monitor the biological and physical effects of improved operations of Hungry Horse and Libby Dams, Montana, called for by the Northwest Power and Conservation Council (NPCC) Mainstem Amendment. This operating strategy was designed to benefit resident fish impacted by hydropower and flood control operations. Under the new operating guidelines, July through September reservoir drafts will be limited to 10 feet from full pool during the highest 80% of water supply years and 20 feet from full pool during the lowest 20% of water supply (drought) years. Limits were also established on how rapidly discharge from the dams can be increased or decreased depending on the season. The NPCC also directed the federal agencies that operate Libby and Hungry Horse Dams to implement a new flood control strategy (VARQ) and directed Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks to evaluate biological responses to this operating strategy. The Mainstem Amendment operating strategy has not been fully implemented at the Montana dams as of June 2008 but the strategy will be implemented in 2009. This report highlights the monitoring methods used to monitor the effects of the Mainstem Amendment operations on fishes, habitat, and aquatic invertebrates upstream and downstream of Libby Dam. We also present initial assessments of data and the effects of various operating strategies on physical and biological components of the systems upstream and downstream of Libby Dam. Annual electrofishing surveys in the Kootenai River and selected tributaries, along with gill net surveys in the reservoir, are being used to quantify the impacts of dam operations on fish populations upstream and downstream of Libby Dam. Scales and otoliths are being used to determine the age structure and growth of focal species. Annual population estimates and tagging experiments provide estimates of survival and growth in the mainstem Kootenai River and selected tributaries. Radio telemetry will be used to validate an existing Instream Flow Incremental Methodology (IFIM) model developed for the Kootenai River and will also be used to assess the effect of changes in discharge on fish movements and habitat use downstream of Libby Dam. Passive integrated transponder (PIT) tags will be injected into rainbow, bull, and cutthroat trout throughout the mainstem Kootenai River and selected tributaries to provide information on growth, survival, and migration patterns in relation to abiotic and biotic variables. Model simulations (RIVBIO) are used to calculate the effects of dam operations on the wetted perimeter and benthic biomass in the Kootenai River below Libby Dam. Additional models (IFIM) will also be used to evaluate the impacts of dam operations on the amount of available habitat for different life stages of rainbow and bull trout in the Kootenai River.

Sylvester, Ryan; Stephens, Brian; Tohtz, Joel [Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks

2009-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

450

Machine Cognition Models: EPAM and GPS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Through history, the human being tried to relay its daily tasks to other creatures, which was the main reason behind the rise of civilizations. It started with deploying animals to automate tasks in the field of agriculture(bulls), transportation (e.g. horses and donkeys), and even communication (pigeons). Millenniums after, come the Golden age with "Al-jazari" and other Muslim inventors, which were the pioneers of automation, this has given birth to industrial revolution in Europe, centuries after. At the end of the nineteenth century, a new era was to begin, the computational era, the most advanced technological and scientific development that is driving the mankind and the reason behind all the evolutions of science; such as medicine, communication, education, and physics. At this edge of technology engineers and scientists are trying to model a machine that behaves the same as they do, which pushed us to think about designing and implementing "Things that-Thinks", then artificial intelligence was. In this...

Elouafiq, Ali

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Habitat Projects Completed within the Asotin Creek Watershed, 1999 Completion Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Asotin Creek Model Watershed Program (ACMWP) is the primary entity coordinating habitat projects on both private and public lands within the Asotin Creek watershed. The Asotin Creek watershed covers approximately 325 square miles in the Blue Mountains of southeastern Washington in WRIA 35. According to WDFW's Priority WRIA's by At-Risk Stock Significance Map, it is the highest priority in southeastern WA. Snake River spring chinook salmon, summer steelhead and bull trout, which are listed under the Endangered Species Act (ESA), are present in the watershed. The ACMWP began coordinating habitat projects in 1995. Approximately two hundred seventy-six projects have been implemented through the ACMWP as of 1999. Twenty of these projects were funded in part through Bonneville Power Administration's 1999 Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. These projects used a variety of methods to enhance and protect watershed conditions. In-stream work for fish habitat included construction of hard structures (e.g. vortex rock weirs), meander reconstruction, placement of large woody debris (LWD) and whole trees and improvements to off-channel rearing habitat; thirty-eight were created with these structures. Three miles of stream benefited from riparian improvements such as vegetative plantings (17,000 trees and shrubs) and noxious weed control. Two sediment basin constructions, 67 acres of grass seeding, and seven hundred forty-five acres of minimum till were implemented to reduce sediment production and delivery to streams in the watershed.

Johnson, Bradley J.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Assessment of Salmonids and their Habitat Conditions in the Walla Walla River Basin within Washington, 2001 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Concerns about the decline of native salmon and trout populations have increased among natural resource managers and the public in recent years. As a result, a multitude of initiatives have been implemented at the local, state, and federal government levels. These initiatives include management plans and actions intended to protect and restore salmonid fishes and their habitats. In 1998 bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) were listed under the Endangered Species Act (ESA), as ''Threatened'', for the Walla Walla River and its tributaries. Steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss) were listed as ''Threatened'' in 1999 for the mid-Columbia River and its tributaries. These ESA listings emphasize the need for information about these threatened salmonid populations and their habitats. The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) is entrusted with ''the preservation, protection, and perpetuation of fish and wildlife....[and to] maximize public recreational or commercial opportunities without impairing the supply of fish and wildlife (WAC 77.12.010).'' In consideration of this mandate, the WDFW submitted a proposal in December 1997 to the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for a study to assess salmonid distribution, relative abundance, genetics, and the condition of salmonid habitats in the Walla Walla River basin. The primary purposes of this project are to collect baseline biological and habitat data, to identify major data gaps, and to draw conclusions whenever possible. The study reported herein details the findings of the 2001 field season (March to November, 2001).

Mendel, Glen Wesley; Trump, Jeremy; Karl, David

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Fisheries Enhancement on the Coeur d'Alene Indian Reservation; Hangman Creek, Annual Report 2001-2002.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Historically, Hangman Creek produced Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) and Steelhead trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) for the Upper Columbia Basin Tribes. One weir, located at the mouth of Hangman Creek was reported to catch 1,000 salmon a day for a period of 30 days a year (Scholz et al. 1985). The current town of Tekoa, Washington, near the state border with Idaho, was the location of one of the principle anadromous fisheries for the Coeur d'Alene Tribe (Scholz et al. 1985). The construction, in 1909, of Little Falls Dam, which was not equipped with a fish passage system, blocked anadromous fish access to the Hangman Watershed. The fisheries were further removed with the construction of Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams. As a result, the Coeur d'Alene Indian Tribe was forced to rely more heavily on native fish stocks such as Redband trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss gairdneri), Westslope Cutthroat trout (O. clarki lewisii), Bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) and other terrestrial wildlife. Historically, Redband and Cutthroat trout comprised a great deal of the Coeur d'Alene Tribe's diet (Power 1997).

Peters, Ronald; Kinkead, Bruce; Stanger, Mark

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Kootenai River Resident Fish Assessment, FY2008 KTOI Progress Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overarching goal of project 1994-049-00 is to recover a productive, healthy and biologically diverse Kootenai River ecosystem, with emphasis on native fish species rehabilitation. It is especially designed to aid the recovery of important fish stocks, i.e. white sturgeon, burbot, bull trout, kokanee and several other salmonids important to the Kootenai Tribe of Idaho and regional sport-fisheries. The objectives of the project have been to address factors limiting key fish species within an ecosystem perspective. Major objectives include: establishment of a comprehensive and thorough biomonitoring program, investigate ecosystem--level in-river productivity, test the feasibility of a large-scale Kootenai River nutrient addition experiment (completed), to evaluate and rehabilitate key Kootenai River tributaries important to the health of the lower Kootenai River ecosystem, to provide funding for Canadian implementation of nutrient addition and monitoring in the Kootenai River ecosystem (Kootenay Lake) due to lost system productivity created by construction and operation of Libby Dam, mitigate the cost of monitoring nutrient additions in Arrow Lakes due to lost system productivity created by the Libby-Arrow water swap, provide written summaries of all research and activities of the project, and, hold a yearly workshop to convene with other agencies and institutions to discuss management, research, and monitoring strategies for this project and to provide a forum to coordinate and disseminate data with other projects involved in the Kootenai River basin.

Holderman, Charles

2009-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

455

Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program Grizzly Year-End Progress Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Grizzly software application is being developed under the Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) program to address aging and material degradation issues that could potentially become an obstacle to life extension of nuclear power plants beyond 60 years of operation. Grizzly is based on INL’s MOOSE multiphysics simulation environment, and can simultaneously solve a variety of tightly coupled physics equations, and is thus a very powerful and flexible tool with a wide range of potential applications. Grizzly, the development of which was begun during fiscal year (FY) 2012, is intended to address degradation in a variety of critical structures. The reactor pressure vessel (RPV) was chosen for an initial application of this software. Because it fulfills the critical roles of housing the reactor core and providing a barrier to the release of coolant, the RPV is clearly one of the most safety-critical components of a nuclear power plant. In addition, because of its cost, size and location in the plant, replacement of this component would be prohibitively expensive, so failure of the RPV to meet acceptance criteria would likely result in the shutting down of a nuclear power plant. The current practice used to perform engineering evaluations of the susceptibility of RPVs to fracture is to use the ASME Master Fracture Toughness Curve (ASME Code Case N-631 Section III). This is used in conjunction with empirically based models that describe the evolution of this curve due to embrittlement in terms of a transition temperature shift. These models are based on an extensive database of surveillance coupons that have been irradiated in operating nuclear power plants, but this data is limited to the lifetime of the current reactor fleet. This is an important limitation when considering life extension beyond 60 years. The currently available data cannot be extrapolated with confidence further out in time because there is a potential for additional damage mechanisms (i.e. late blooming phases) to become active later in life beyond the current operational experience. To develop a tool that can eventually serve a role in decision-making, it is clear that research and development must be perfomed at multiple scales. At the engineering scale, a multiphysics analysis code that can capture the thermomechanical response of the RPV under accident conditions, including detailed fracture mechanics evaluations of flaws with arbitrary geometry and orientation, is needed to assess whether the fracture toughness, as defined by the master curve, including the effects of embrittlement, is exceeded. At the atomistic scale, the fundamental mechanisms of degradation need to be understood, including the effects of that degradation on the relevant material properties. In addition, there is a need to better understand the mechanisms leading to the transition from ductile to brittle fracture through improved continuum mechanics modeling at the fracture coupon scale. Work is currently being conducted at all of these levels with the goal of creating a usable engineering tool informed by lower length-scale modeling. This report summarizes progress made in these efforts during FY 2013.

Benjamin Spencer; Yongfeng Zhang; Pritam Chakraborty; S. Bulent Biner; Marie Backman; Brian Wirth; Stephen Novascone; Jason Hales

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

2013 Estorm - Invited Paper - Cathode Materials Review  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The electrochemical potential of cathode materials defines the positive side of the terminal voltage of a battery. Traditionally, cathode materials are the energy-limiting or voltage-limiting electrode. One of the first electrochemical batteries, the voltaic pile invented by Alessandro Volta in 1800 (Phil. Trans. Roy. Soc. 90, 403 431) had a copper-zinc galvanic element with a terminal voltage of 0.76 V. Since then, the research community has increased capacity and voltage for primary (nonrechargeable) batteries and round-trip efficiency for secondary (rechargeable) batteries. Successful secondary batteries have been the lead acid with a lead oxide cathode and a terminal voltage of 2.1 V and later the NiCd with a nickel(III) oxide hydroxide cathode and a 1.2 V terminal voltage. The relatively low voltage of those aqueous systems and the low round-trip efficiency due to activation energies in the conversion reactions limited their use. In 1976, Wittingham (J. Electrochem. Soc., 123, 315) and Besenhard (J Power Sources 1(3), 267) finally enabled highly reversible redox reactions by intercalation of lithium ions instead of by chemical conversion. In 1980, Goodenough and Mizushima (Mater. Res. Bull. 15, 783 789) demonstrated a high-energy and high-power LiCoO2 cathode, allowing for an increase of terminal voltage far beyond 3 V. Over the past four decades, the international research community has further developed cathode materials of many varieties. Current state-of-the-art cathodes demonstrate voltages beyond any known electrolyte stability window, bringing electrolyte research once again to the forefront of battery research.

Daniel, Claus [ORNL] [ORNL; Mohanty, Debasish [ORNL] [ORNL; Li, Jianlin [ORNL] [ORNL; Wood III, David L [ORNL] [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Cathode materials review  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The electrochemical potential of cathode materials defines the positive side of the terminal voltage of a battery. Traditionally, cathode materials are the energy-limiting or voltage-limiting electrode. One of the first electrochemical batteries, the voltaic pile invented by Alessandro Volta in 1800 (Phil. Trans. Roy. Soc. 90, 403-431) had a copper-zinc galvanic element with a terminal voltage of 0.76 V. Since then, the research community has increased capacity and voltage for primary (nonrechargeable) batteries and round-trip efficiency for secondary (rechargeable) batteries. Successful secondary batteries have been the lead-acid with a lead oxide cathode and a terminal voltage of 2.1 V and later the NiCd with a nickel(III) oxide-hydroxide cathode and a 1.2 V terminal voltage. The relatively low voltage of those aqueous systems and the low round-trip efficiency due to activation energies in the conversion reactions limited their use. In 1976, Wittingham (J. Electrochem. Soc., 123, 315) and Besenhard (J. Power Sources 1(3), 267) finally enabled highly reversible redox reactions by intercalation of lithium ions instead of by chemical conversion. In 1980, Goodenough and Mizushima (Mater. Res. Bull. 15, 783-789) demonstrated a high-energy and high-power LiCoO{sub 2} cathode, allowing for an increase of terminal voltage far beyond 3 V. Over the past four decades, the international research community has further developed cathode materials of many varieties. Current state-of-the-art cathodes demonstrate voltages beyond any known electrolyte stability window, bringing electrolyte research once again to the forefront of battery research.

Daniel, Claus, E-mail: danielc@ornl.gov; Mohanty, Debasish, E-mail: danielc@ornl.gov; Li, Jianlin, E-mail: danielc@ornl.gov; Wood, David L., E-mail: danielc@ornl.gov [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, 1 Bethel Valley Road, MS6472 Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6472 (United States)

2014-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

458

Entiat 4Mile WELLs Completion Report, 2006.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Entiat 4-mile Wells (Entiat 4-mile) project is located in the Entiat subbasin and will benefit Upper Columbia steelhead, spring Chinook and bull trout. The goal of this project is to prevent juvenile fish from being diverted into an out-of-stream irrigation system and to eliminate impacts due to the annual maintenance of an instream pushup dam. The objectives include eliminating a surface irrigation diversion and replacing it with two wells, which will provide Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation) with a Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) BiOp metric credit of one. Wells were chosen over a new fish screen based on biological benefits and costs. Long-term biological benefits are provided by completely eliminating the surface diversion and the potential for fish entrainment in a fish screen. Construction costs for a new fish screen were estimated at $150,000, which does not include other costs associated with implementing and maintaining a fish screening project. Construction costs for a well were estimated at $20,000 each. The diversion consisted of a pushup dam that diverted water into an off-channel pond. Water was then pumped into a pressurized system for irrigation. There are 3 different irrigators who used water from this surface diversion, and each has multiple water right claims totaling approximately 5 cfs. Current use was estimated at 300 gallons per minute (approximately 0.641 cfs). Some irrigated acreage was taken out of orchard production less than 5 years ago. Therefore, approximately 6.8 acre-feet will be put into the State of Washington Trust Water Right program. No water will be set aside for conservation savings. The construction of the two irrigation wells for three landowners was completed in September 2006. The Lower Well (Tippen/Wick) will produce up to 175 gpm while the Upper Well (Griffith) will produce up to 275 gpm during the irrigation season. The eight inch diameter wells were developed to a depth of 75 feet and 85 feet, respectively, and will be pumped with Submersible Turbine pumps. The irrigation wells have been fitted with new electric boxes and Siemens flowmeters (MAG8000).

Malinowksi, Richard

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Flathead River Focus Watershed Coordinator, 2005-2006 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has long been involved with funding of the Cooperative Habitat Protection and Improvement with Private Landowners program in accordance with the Northwest Power Planning Council's (NPPC) Fish & Wildlife Program (Section 7.7). Section 7.7B.1 requires the establishment of ''at least one model watershed coordinator selected by each representative state''. This project was initiated in 1997 with the purpose of fulfilling the NWPCC's watershed program within the Flathead River basin in western Montana. Currently, the Flathead watershed has been radically altered by hydropower and other land uses. With the construction of Hungry Horse, Bigfork and Kerr dams, the Flathead River system has been divided into isolated populations. Bull trout have been listed as threatened by the US Fish and Wildlife Service and westslope cutthroat trout have been petitioned for listing. Many streams in the drainage have been destabilized during recent decades. Past legal and illegal species introductions are also causing problems. This project fosters in-kind, out-of-place mitigation to offset the impacts of hydroelectric power to 72 miles of the South Fork of the Flathead River and its tributaries upstream of Hungry Horse Dam. Key subbasins within the Flathead drainage, which are critical to native species restoration, are experiencing rapid changes in land ownership and management direction. Subdivision and residential development of agricultural and timber lands adjacent to waterways in the drainage pose one of the greatest threats to weak but recoverable stocks of trout species. Plum Creek Timber Company, a major landholder in the Flathead drainage is currently divesting itself of large tracks of its lakeshore and streamside holdings. Growth of small tract development throughout the area and its tributaries is occurring at a record rate. Immediate to short-term action is required to protect stream corridors through many of these areas if cost-effective recovery efforts are to be implemented. In order to adequately address the issues, other segments of society and other (non-BPA) funding sources must be incorporated into the solution. As stated in the 1994 Fish and Wildlife Program (section 7.7), ''Comprehensive watershed management should enhance and expedite implementation of actions by clearly identifying gaps in programs and knowledge, by striving over time to resolve conflicts, and by keying on activities that address priorities''. A watershed coordinator helps to initiate and facilitate efforts for addressing the issues mentioned above and pulling together a plan for mitigation. Local support is essential before local governments and individual citizens are going to allow government initiatives to be implemented.

DuCharme, Lynn (Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes of the Flathead Nation, Pablo, MT)

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Flathead River Focus Watershed Coordinator, 2002 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has long been involved with funding of the Cooperative Habitat Protection and Improvement with Private Landowners program in accordance with the Northwest Power Planning Council's (NPPC) Fish & Wildlife Program (Section 7.7). Section 7.7B.1 requires the establishment of ''at least one model watershed coordinator selected by each representative state''. This project was initiated in 1997 with the purpose of fulfilling the NPPC's watershed program within the Flathead River basin in western Montana. Currently, the Flathead watershed has been radically altered by hydropower and other land uses. With the construction of Hungry Horse, Bigfork and Kerr dams, the Flathead River system has been divided into isolated populations. Bull trout have been listed as threatened by the US Fish and Wildlife Service and westslope cutthroat trout have been petitioned for listing. Many streams in the drainage have been destabilized during recent decades. Past legal and illegal species introductions are also causing problems. This project fosters in-kind, out-of-place mitigation to offset the impacts of hydroelectric power to 72 miles of the South Fork of the Flathead River and its tributaries upstream of Hungry Horse Dam. Key subbasins within the Flathead drainage, which are critical to native species restoration, are experiencing rapid changes in land ownership and management direction. Subdivision and residential development of agricultural and timber lands adjacent to waterways in the drainage pose one of the greatest threats to weak but recoverable stocks of trout species. Plum Creek Timber Company, a major landholder in the Flathead drainage is currently divesting itself of large tracks of its lakeshore and streamside holdings. Growth of small tract development throughout the area and its tributaries is occurring at a record rate. Immediate to short-term action is required to protect stream corridors through many of these areas if cost-effective recovery efforts are to be implemented. In order to adequately address the issues, other segments of society and other (non-BPA) funding sources must be incorporated into the solution. As stated in the 1994 Fish and Wildlife Program (section 7.7), ''Comprehensive watershed management should enhance and expedite implementation of actions by clearly identifying gaps in programs and knowledge, by striving over time to resolve conflicts, and by keying on activities that address priorities''. A watershed coordinator helps to initiate and facilitate efforts for addressing the issues mentioned above and pulling together a plan for mitigation. Local support is essential before local governments and individual citizens are going to allow government initiatives to be implemented.

DuCharme, Lynn (Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes of the Flathead Nation, Pablo, MT)

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bowline bull moose" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Flathead River Focus Watershed Coordinator, 2004-2005 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has long been involved with funding of the Cooperative Habitat Protection and Improvement with Private Landowners program in accordance with the Northwest Power Planning Council's (NPPC) Fish & Wildlife Program (Section 7.7). Section 7.7B.1 requires the establishment of ''at least one model watershed coordinator selected by each representative state''. This project was initiated in 1997 with the purpose of fulfilling the NWPCC's watershed program within the Flathead River basin in western Montana. Currently, the Flathead watershed has been radically altered by hydropower and other land uses. With the construction of Hungry Horse, Bigfork and Kerr dams, the Flathead River system has been divided into isolated populations. Bull trout have been listed as threatened by the US Fish and Wildlife Service and westslope cutthroat trout have been petitioned for listing. Many streams in the drainage have been destabilized during recent decades. Past legal and illegal species introductions are also causing problems. This project fosters in-kind, out-of-place mitigation to offset the impacts of hydroelectric power to 72 miles of the South Fork of the Flathead River and its tributaries upstream of Hungry Horse Dam. Key subbasins within the Flathead drainage, which are critical to native species restoration, are experiencing rapid changes in land ownership and management direction. Subdivision and residential development of agricultural and timber lands adjacent to waterways in the drainage pose one of the greatest threats to weak but recoverable stocks of trout species. Plum Creek Timber Company, a major landholder in the Flathead drainage is currently divesting itself of large tracks of its lakeshore and streamside holdings. Growth of small tract development throughout the area and its tributaries is occurring at a record rate. Immediate to short-term action is required to protect stream corridors through many of these areas if cost-effective recovery efforts are to be implemented. In order to adequately address the issues, other segments of society and other (non-BPA) funding sources must be incorporated into the solution. As stated in the 1994 Fish and Wildlife Program (section 7.7), ''Comprehensive watershed management should enhance and expedite implementation of actions by clearly identifying gaps in programs and knowledge, by striving over time to resolve conflicts, and by keying on activities that address priorities''. A watershed coordinator helps to initiate and facilitate efforts for addressing the issues mentioned above and pulling together a plan for mitigation. Local support is essential before local governments and individual citizens are going to allow government initiatives to be implemented.

DuCharme, Lynn (Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes of the Flathead Nation, Pablo, MT)

2006-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

462

Flathead River Focus Watershed Coordinator, 2003-2004 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has long been involved with funding of the Cooperative Habitat Protection and Improvement with Private Landowners program in accordance with the Northwest Power Planning Council's (NPPC) Fish & Wildlife Program (Section 7.7). Section 7.7B.1 requires the establishment of ''at least one model watershed coordinator selected by each representative state''. This project was initiated in 1997 with the purpose of fulfilling the NWPCC's watershed program within the Flathead River basin in western Montana. Currently, the Flathead watershed has been radically altered by hydropower and other land uses. With the construction of Hungry Horse, Bigfork and Kerr dams, the Flathead River system has been divided into isolated populations. Bull trout have been listed as threatened by the US Fish and Wildlife Service and westslope cutthroat trout have been petitioned for listing. Many streams in the drainage have been destabilized during recent decades. Past legal and illegal species introductions are also causing problems. This project fosters in-kind, out-of-place mitigation to offset the impacts of hydroelectric power to 72 miles of the South Fork of the Flathead River and its tributaries upstream of Hungry Horse Dam. Key subbasins within the Flathead drainage, which are critical to native species restoration, are experiencing rapid changes in land ownership and management direction. Subdivision and residential development of agricultural and timber lands adjacent to waterways in the drainage pose one of the greatest threats to weak but recoverable stocks of trout species. Plum Creek Timber Company, a major landholder in the Flathead drainage is currently divesting itself of large tracks of its lakeshore and streamside holdings. Growth of small tract development throughout the area and its tributaries is occurring at a record rate. Immediate to short-term action is required to protect stream corridors through many of these areas if cost-effective recovery efforts are to be implemented. In order to adequately address the issues, other segments of society and other (non-BPA) funding sources must be incorporated into the solution. As stated in the 1994 Fish and Wildlife Program (section 7.7), ''Comprehensive watershed management should enhance and expedite implementation of actions by clearly identifying gaps in programs and knowledge, by striving over time to resolve conflicts, and by keying on activities that address priorities''. A watershed coordinator helps to initiate and facilitate efforts for addressing the issues mentioned above and pulling together a plan for mitigation. Local support is essential before local governments and individual citizens are going to allow government initiatives to be implemented.

DuCharme, Lynn (Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes of the Flathead Nation, Pablo, MT)

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Regenerating cellulose from ionic liquids for an accelerated enzymatic hydrolysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The efficient conversion of lignocellulosic materials into fuel ethanol has become a research priority in producing affordable and renewable energy. The pretreatment of lignocelluloses is known to be key to the fast enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose. Recently, certain ionic liquids (ILs)were found capable of dissolving more than 10 wt% cellulose. Preliminary investigations [Dadi, A.P., Varanasi, S., Schall, C.A., 2006. Enhancement of cellulose saccharification kinetics using an ionic liquid pretreatment step. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 95, 904 910; Liu, L., Chen, H., 2006. Enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose materials treated with ionic liquid [BMIM]Cl. Chin. Sci. Bull. 51, 2432 2436; Dadi, A.P., Schall, C.A., Varanasi, S., 2007. Mitigation of cellulose recalcitrance to enzymatic hydrolysis by ionic liquid pretreatment. Appl. Biochem. Biotechnol. 137 140, 407 421] suggest that celluloses regenerated from IL solutions are subject to faster saccharification than untreated substrates. These encouraging results offer the possibility of using ILs as alternative and nonvolatile solvents for cellulose pretreatment. However, these studies are limited to two chloride-based ILs: (a) 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride ([BMIM]Cl), which is a corrosive, toxic and extremely hygroscopic solid (m.p. 70 C), and (b) 1-allyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride ([AMIM]Cl), which is viscous and has a reactive side-chain. Therefore, more in-depth research involving other ILs is much needed to explore this promising pretreatment route. For this reason, we studied a number of chloride- and acetate-based ILs for cellulose regeneration, including several ILs newly developed in our laboratory. This will enable us to select inexpensive, efficient and environmentally benign solvents for processing cellulosic biomass. Our data confirm that all regenerated celluloses are less crystalline (58 75% lower) and more accessible to cellulase (>2 times) than untreated substrates. As a result, regenerated Avicel cellulose, filter paper and cottonwere hydrolyzed 2 10 times faster than the respective untreated celluloses. A complete hydrolysis of Avicel cellulose could be achieved in 6 h given the Trichoderma reesei cellulase/substrate ratio (w/w) of 3:20 at 50 C. In addition,we observed that cellulase is more thermally stable (up to 60 C) in the presence of regenerated cellulose. Furthermore, our systematic studies suggest that the presence of various ILs during the hydrolysis induced different degrees of cellulase inactivation. Therefore, a thorough removal of IL residues after cellulose regeneration is highly recommended, and a systematic investigation on this subject is much needed.

Zhao, Hua [Savannah State University; Jones, Cecil L [Savannah State University; Baker, Gary A [ORNL; Xia, Shuqian [Tianjin University, Tianjin, China; Olubajo, Olarongbe [Savannah State University; Person, Vernecia [Savannah State University

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

3D Model of the Tuscarora Geothermal Area  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Tuscarora geothermal system sits within a ~15 km wide left-step in a major west-dipping range-bounding normal fault system. The step over is defined by the Independence Mountains fault zone and the Bull Runs Mountains fault zone which overlap along strike. Strain is transferred between these major fault segments via and array of northerly striking normal faults with offsets of 10s to 100s of meters and strike lengths of less than 5 km. These faults within the step over are one to two orders of magnitude smaller than the range-bounding fault zones between which they reside. Faults within the broad step define an anticlinal accommodation zone wherein east-dipping faults mainly occupy western half of the accommodation zone and west-dipping faults lie in the eastern half of the accommodation zone. The 3D model of Tuscarora encompasses 70 small-offset normal faults that define the accommodation zone and a portion of the Independence Mountains fault zone, which dips beneath the geothermal field. The geothermal system resides in the axial part of the accommodation, straddling the two fault dip domains. The Tuscarora 3D geologic model consists of 10 stratigraphic units. Unconsolidated Quaternary alluvium has eroded down into bedrock units, the youngest and stratigraphically highest bedrock units are middle Miocene rhyolite and dacite flows regionally correlated with the Jarbidge Rhyolite and modeled with uniform cumulative thickness of ~350 m. Underlying these lava flows are Eocene volcanic rocks of the Big Cottonwood Canyon caldera. These units are modeled as intracaldera deposits, including domes, flows, and thick ash deposits that change in thickness and locally pinch out. The Paleozoic basement of consists metasedimenary and metavolcanic rocks, dominated by argillite, siltstone, limestone, quartzite, and metabasalt of the Schoonover and Snow Canyon Formations. Paleozoic formations are lumped in a single basement unit in the model. Fault blocks in the eastern portion of the model are tilted 5-30 degrees toward the Independence Mountains fault zone. Fault blocks in the western portion of the model are tilted toward steeply east-dipping normal faults. These opposing fault block dips define a shallow extensional anticline. Geothermal production is from 4 closely-spaced wells, that exploit a west-dipping, NNE-striking fault zone near the axial part of the accommodation zone.

Faulds, James E.

2013-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

465

3D Model of the Tuscarora Geothermal Area  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

The Tuscarora geothermal system sits within a ~15 km wide left-step in a major west-dipping range-bounding normal fault system. The step over is defined by the Independence Mountains fault zone and the Bull Runs Mountains fault zone which overlap along strike. Strain is transferred between these major fault segments via and array of northerly striking normal faults with offsets of 10s to 100s of meters and strike lengths of less than 5 km. These faults within the step over are one to two orders of magnitude smaller than the range-bounding fault zones between which they reside. Faults within the broad step define an anticlinal accommodation zone wherein east-dipping faults mainly occupy western half of the accommodation zone and west-dipping faults lie in the eastern half of the accommodation zone. The 3D model of Tuscarora encompasses 70 small-offset normal faults that define the accommodation zone and a portion of the Independence Mountains fault zone, which dips beneath the geothermal field. The geothermal system resides in the axial part of the accommodation, straddling the two fault dip domains. The Tuscarora 3D geologic model consists of 10 stratigraphic units. Unconsolidated Quaternary alluvium has eroded down into bedrock units, the youngest and stratigraphically highest bedrock units are middle Miocene rhyolite and dacite flows regionally correlated with the Jarbidge Rhyolite and modeled with uniform cumulative thickness of ~350 m. Underlying these lava flows are Eocene volcanic rocks of the Big Cottonwood Canyon caldera. These units are modeled as intracaldera deposits, including domes, flows, and thick ash deposits that change in thickness and locally pinch out. The Paleozoic basement of consists metasedimenary and metavolcanic rocks, dominated by argillite, siltstone, limestone, quartzite, and metabasalt of the Schoonover and Snow Canyon Formations. Paleozoic formations are lumped in a single basement unit in the model. Fault blocks in the eastern portion of the model are tilted 5-30 degrees toward the Independence Mountains fault zone. Fault blocks in the western portion of the model are tilted toward steeply east-dipping normal faults. These opposing fault block dips define a shallow extensional anticline. Geothermal production is from 4 closely-spaced wells, that exploit a west-dipping, NNE-striking fault zone near the axial part of the accommodation zone.

Faulds, James E.

466

The Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Indian Reservation of Oregon John Day Basin Office : Watershed Restoration Projects : 2003 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The John Day is the nation's second longest free-flowing river in the contiguous United States and the longest containing entirely unsupplemented runs of anadromous fish. Located in eastern Oregon, the basin drains over 8,000 square miles, Oregon's fourth largest drainage basin, and incorporates portions of eleven counties. Originating in the Strawberry Mountains near Prairie City, the John Day River flows 284 miles in a northwesterly direction, entering the Columbia River approximately four miles upstream of the John Day dam. With wild runs of spring Chinook salmon and summer steelhead, westslope cutthroat, and redband and bull trout, the John Day system is truly a basin with national significance. The majority of the John Day basin was ceded to the Federal government in 1855 by the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon (Tribes). In 1997, the Tribes established an office in the basin to coordinate restoration projects, monitoring, planning and other watershed activities on private and public lands. Once established, the John Day Basin Office (JDBO) formed a partnership with the Grant Soil and Water Conservation District (GSWCD), which contracts the majority of the construction implementation activities for these projects from the JDBO. The GSWCD completes the landowner contact, preliminary planning, engineering design, permitting, construction contracting, and construction implementation phases of most projects. The JDBO completes the planning, grant solicitation/defense, environmental compliance, administrative contracting, monitoring, and reporting portion of the program. Most phases of project planning, implementation, and monitoring are coordinated with the private landowners and basin agencies, such as the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife and Oregon Water Resources Department. In 2003, the JDBO and GSWCD proposed continuation of their successful partnership between the two agencies and basin landowners to implement an additional twelve (12) watershed conservation projects. The types of projects include off channel water developments, juniper control, permanent diversions, pump stations, and return-flow cooling systems. Due to funding issues and delays, permitting delays, fire closures and landowner contracting problems, 2 projects were canceled and 7 projects were rescheduled to the 2004 construction season. Project costs in 2003 totaled $115,554.00 with a total amount of $64,981.00 (56%) provided by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the remainder coming from other sources such as the Bureau of Reclamation (BOR), Oregon Watershed Enhancement Board, the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service Partners in Wildlife Program and individual landowners.

Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon. John Day Basin Office.

2004-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

467

John Day Watershed Restoration Projects, annual report 2003.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The John Day is the nation's second longest free-flowing river in the contiguous United States and the longest containing entirely unsupplemented runs of anadromous fish. Located in eastern Oregon, the basin drains over 8,000 square miles, Oregon's fourth largest drainage basin, and incorporates portions of eleven counties. Originating in the Strawberry Mountains near Prairie City, the John Day River flows 284 miles in a northwesterly direction, entering the Columbia River approximately four miles upstream of the John Day dam. With wild runs of spring Chinook salmon and summer steelhead, westslope cutthroat, and redband and bull trout, the John Day system is truly a basin with national significance. The majority of the John Day basin was ceded to the Federal government in 1855 by the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon (Tribes). In 1997, the Tribes established an office in the basin to coordinate restoration projects, monitoring, planning and other watershed activities on private and public lands. Once established, the John Day Basin Office (JDBO) formed a partnership with the Grant Soil and Water Conservation District (GSWCD), which contracts the majority of the construction implementation activities for these projects from the JDBO. The GSWCD completes the landowner contact, preliminary planning, engineering design, permitting, construction contracting, and construction implementation phases of most projects. The JDBO completes the planning, grant solicitation/defense, environmental compliance, administrative contracting, monitoring, and reporting portion of the program. Most phases of project planning, implementation, and monitoring are coordinated with the private landowners and basin agencies, such as the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife and Oregon Water Resources Department. In 2003, the JDBO and GSWCD proposed continuation of their successful partnership between the two agencies and basin landowners to implement an additional twelve (12) watershed conservation projects. The types of projects include off channel water developments, juniper control, permanent diversions, pump stations, and return-flow cooling systems. Due to funding issues and delays, permitting delays, fire closures and landowner contracting problems, 2 projects were canceled and 7 projects were rescheduled to the 2004 construction season. Project costs in 2003 totaled $115,554.00 with a total amount of $64,981.00 (56%) provided by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the remainder coming from other sources such as the Bureau of Reclamation (BOR), Oregon Watershed Enhancement Board, the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service Partners in Wildlife Program and individual landowners.

Brown, Linda (Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon, John Day Basin Office, John Day, OR)

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

The Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Indian Reservation of Oregon John Day Basin Office : Watershed Restoration Projects : Annual Report, 2001.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The John Day River is the nation's second longest free-flowing river in the contiguous United States, which is entirely unsupplemented for it's runs of anadromous fish. Located in eastern Oregon, the John Day Basin drains over 8,000 square miles, is Oregon's fourth largest drainage basin, and the basin incorporates portions of eleven counties. Originating in the Strawberry Mountains near Prairie City, the mainstem John Day River flows 284 miles in a northwesterly direction entering the Columbia River approximately four miles upstream of the John Day dam. With wild runs of spring Chinook salmon, summer steelhead, westslope cutthroat, and redband and bull trout, the John Day system is truly a basin with national significance. The Majority of the John Day Basin was ceded to the Federal government in 1855 by the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon (Tribes). In 1997, the Tribes established an office in John Day to coordinate basin restoration projects, monitoring, planning, and other watershed restoration activities on private and public lands. Once established, the John Day Basin Office (JDBO) formed a partnership with the Grant Soil and Water Conservation District (GSWCD), also located in John Day, who subcontracts the majority of the construction implementation activities for these restoration projects from the JDBO. The GSWCD completes the landowner contact, preliminary planning, engineering design, permitting, construction contracting, and construction implementation phases of most projects. The JDBO completes the planning, grant solicitation/defense, environmental compliance, administrative contracting, monitoring, and reporting portion of the program. Most phases of project planning, implementation, and monitoring are coordinated with the private landowners and basin agencies, such as the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife and Oregon Water Resources Department. In 2001, the JDBO and GSWCD continued their successful partnership between the two agencies and basin landowners to implement an additional ten (10) watershed conservation projects. The project types include permanent lay flat diversions, pump stations, and return-flow cooling systems. Project costs in 2001 totaled $572,766.00 with $361,966.00 (67%) provided by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the remainder coming from other sources, such as the Bureau of Reclamation (BOR), Oregon Watershed Enhancement Board (OWEB), and individual landowners.

Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon. John Day Basin Office.

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

A Multiple Watershed Approach to Assessing the Effects of Habitat Restoration Actions on Anadromous and Resident Fish Populations, Technical Report 2003-2004.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Habitat protection and restoration is a cornerstone of current strategies to restore ecosystems, recover endangered fish species, and rebuild fish stocks within the Columbia River Basin. Strategies featuring habitat restoration include the 2000 Biological Opinion on operation of the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS BiOp) developed by the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), the 2000 Biological Opinion on Bull Trout developed by the US Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), and Sub-Basin Plans developed under the Fish and Wildlife Program of the Northwest Power and Conservation Council (NWPCC). There is however little quantitative information about the effectiveness of different habitat restoration techniques. Such information is crucial for helping scientists and program managers allocate limited funds towards the greatest benefits for fish populations. Therefore, it is critical to systematically test the hypotheses underlying habitat restoration actions for both anadromous and resident fish populations. This pilot project was developed through a proposal to the Innovative Projects fund of the NWPCC (ESSA 2002). It was funded by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) following reviews by the Independent Scientific Review Panel (ISRP 2002), the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority (CBFWA 2002), the NWPCC and BPA. The study was designed to respond directly to the above described needs for information on the effectiveness of habitat restoration actions, including legal measures specified in the 2000 FCRPS BiOp (RPA 183, pg. 9-133, NMFS 2000). Due to the urgency of addressing these measures, the timeline of the project was accelerated from a duration of 18 months to 14 months. The purpose of this pilot project was to explore methods for evaluating past habitat restoration actions and their effects on fish populations. By doing so, the project will provide a foundation of retrospective analyses, on which to build prospective, multi-watershed designs for future habitat restoration actions. Such designs are being developed concurrently with this project by several other groups in the Columbia Basin (RME Workgroup 2003, NMFS 2003, Hillman and Paulsen 2002, Hillman 2003). By addressing questions about habitat restoration and monitoring (in coordination with other related efforts), we hope that this project will catalyze a shift in the Basin's paradigm of habitat restoration, moving from implementation of individual watershed projects towards rigorously designed and monitored, multiwatershed, adaptive management experiments. The project involved three phases of work, which were closely integrated with various related and ongoing efforts in the region: (1) Scoping - We met with a Core Group of habitat experts and managers to scope out a set of testable habitat restoration hypotheses, identify candidate watersheds and recommend participants for a data evaluation workshop. (2) Data Assembly - We contacted over 80 scientists and managers to help evaluate the suitability of each candidate watershed's historical data for assessing the effectiveness of past restoration actions. We eventually settled on the Yakima, Wenatchee, Clearwater, and Salmon subbasins, and began gathering relevant data for these watersheds at a workshop with habitat experts and managers. Data assembly continued for several months after the workshop. (3) Data Analysis and Synthesis - We explored statistical approaches towards retrospectively analyzing the effects of restoration 'treatments' at nested spatial scales across multiple watersheds (Chapters 2-5 of this report). These analyses provided a foundation for identifying existing constraints to testing restoration hypotheses, and opportunities to overcome these constraints through improved experimental designs, monitoring protocols and project selection strategies (Chapters 6 and 7 of this report). Finally, we developed a set of recommendations to improve the design, implementation, and monitoring of prospective habitat restoration programs in the Columbia River Basin (Chapter 8).

Marmorek, David

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Collaborative Systemwide Monitoring and Evaluation Project (CSMEP) - Year 5 : Annual Report for FY 2008.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Collaborative Systemwide Monitoring and Evaluation Project (CSMEP) is a coordinated effort to improve the quality, consistency, and focus of fish population and habitat data to answer key monitoring and evaluation questions relevant to major decisions in the Columbia River Basin. CSMEP was initiated by the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority (CBFWA) in October 2003. The project is funded by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) through the Northwest Power and Conservation Council's Fish and Wildlife Program (NPCC). CSMEP is a major effort of the federal state and Tribal fish and wildlife managers to develop regionally integrated monitoring and evaluation (M&E) across the Columbia River Basin. CSMEP has focused its work on five monitoring domains: status and trends monitoring of populations and action effectiveness monitoring of habitat, harvest, hatcheries, and the hydrosystem. CSMEP's specific goals are to: (1) interact with federal, state and tribal programmatic and technical entities responsible for M&E of fish and wildlife, to ensure that work plans developed and executed under this project are well integrated with ongoing work by these entities; (2) document, integrate, and make available existing monitoring data on listed salmon, steelhead, bull trout and other fish species of concern; (3) critically assess strengths and weaknesses of these data for answering key monitoring questions; and (4) collaboratively design, implement and evaluate improved M&E methods with other programmatic entities in the Pacific Northwest. During FY2008 CSMEP biologists continued their reviews of the strengths and weaknesses (S&W) of existing subbasin inventory data for addressing monitoring questions about population status and trends at different spatial and temporal scales. Work was focused on Lower Columbia Chinook and steelhead, Snake River fall Chinook, Upper Columbia Spring Chinook and steelhead, and Middle Columbia River Chinook and steelhead. These FY2008 data assessments and others assembled over the years of the CSMEP project can be accessed on the CBFWA public website. The CSMEP web database (http://csmep.streamnet.org/) houses metadata inventories from S&W assessments of Columbia River Basin watersheds that were completed prior to FY2008. These older S&W assessments are maintained by StreamNet, but budget cutbacks prevented us from adding the new FY2008 assessments into the database. Progress was made in FY2008 on CSMEP's goals of collaborative design of improved M&E methods. CSMEP convened two monitoring design workshops in Portland (December 5 and 6, 2007 and February 11 and 12, 2008) to continue exploration of how best to integrate the most robust features of existing M&E programs with new approaches. CSMEP continued to build on this information to develop improved designs and analytical tools for monitoring the status and trends of fish populations and the effectiveness of hatchery and hydrosystem recovery actions within the Columbia River Basin. CSMEP did not do any new work on habitat or harvest effectiveness monitoring designs in FY2008 due to budget cutbacks. CSMEP presented the results of the Snake Basin Pilot Study to the Independent Scientific Review Panel (ISRP) in Portland on December 7, 2008. This study is the finalization of CSMEP's pilot exercise of developing design alternatives across different M&E domains within the Snake River Basin spring/summer Chinook ESU. This work has been summarized in two linked reports (CSMEP 2007a and CSMEP 2007b). CSMEP participants presented many of the analyses developed for the Snake Basin Pilot work at the Western Division American Fisheries Society (AFS) conference in Portland on May 4 to 7, 2008. For the AFS conference CSMEP organized a symposium on regional monitoring and evaluation approaches. A presentation on CSMEP's Cost Integration Database Tool and Salmon Viability Monitoring Simulation Model developed for the Snake Basin Pilot Study was also given to the Pacific Northwest Aquatic monitoring Partnership (PNAMP) stee

Marmorek, David R.; Porter, Marc; Pickard, Darcy; Wieckowski, Katherine

2008-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

471

Yakima River Species Interactions Studies; Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project Monitoring and Evaluation, 2004-2005 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is intended to satisfy two concurrent needs: (1) provide a contract deliverable from the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) to the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), with emphasis on identification of salient results of value to ongoing Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project (YKFP) planning, and (2) summarize results of research that have broader scientific relevance. This is the thirteenth of a series of progress reports that address species interactions research and supplementation monitoring of fishes in response to supplementation of salmon and steelhead in the upper Yakima River basin (Hindman et al. 1991; McMichael et al. 1992; Pearsons et al. 1993; Pearsons et al. 1994; Pearsons et al. 1996; Pearsons et al. 1998, Pearsons et al. 1999, Pearsons et al. 2001a, Pearsons et al. 2001b, Pearsons et al. 2002, Pearsons et al. 2003, Pearsons et al. 2004). Journal articles and book chapters have also been published from our work (McMichael 1993; Martin et al. 1995; McMichael et al. 1997; McMichael and Pearsons 1998; McMichael et al. 1998; Pearsons and Fritts 1999; McMichael et al. 1999; McMichael et al. 1999; Pearsons and Hopley 1999; Ham and Pearsons 2000; Ham and Pearsons 2001; Amaral et al. 2001; McMichael and Pearsons 2001; Pearsons 2002, Fritts and Pearsons 2004, Pearsons et al. in press, Major et al. in press). This progress report summarizes data collected between January 1, 2004 and December 31, 2004. These data were compared to findings from previous years to identify general trends and make preliminary comparisons. Interactions between fish produced as part of the YKFP, termed target species or stocks, and other species or stocks (non-target taxa) may alter the population status of non-target species or stocks. This may occur through a variety of mechanisms, such as competition, predation, and interbreeding (Pearsons et al. 1994; Busack et al. 1997; Pearsons and Hopley 1999). Furthermore, the success of a supplementation program may be limited by strong ecological interactions such as predation or competition (Busack et al. 1997). Our work has adapted to new information needs as the YKFP has evolved. Initially, our work focused on interactions between anadromous steelhead and resident rainbow trout (for explanation see Pearsons et al. 1993), then interactions between spring chinook salmon and rainbow trout, and recently interactions between spring chinook salmon and highly valued non-target taxa (NTT; e.g., bull trout); and interactions between strong interactor taxa (e.g., those that may strongly influence the abundance of spring chinook salmon; e.g., smallmouth bass) and spring chinook salmon. The change in emphasis to spring chinook salmon has largely been influenced by the shift in the target species planned for supplementation (Bonneville Power Administration et al. 1996; Fast and Craig 1997). Originally, steelhead and spring chinook salmon were proposed to be supplemented simultaneously (Clune and Dauble 1991). However, due in part to the uncertainties associated with interactions between steelhead and rainbow trout, spring chinook and coho salmon were supplemented before steelhead. This redirection in the species to be supplemented has prompted us to prioritize interactions between spring chinook and rainbow trout, while beginning to investigate other ecological interactions of concern. Prefacility monitoring of variables such as rainbow trout density, distribution, and size structure was continued and monitoring of other NTT was initiated in 1997. This report is organized into five chapters that represent major topics associated with monitoring stewardship, utilization, and strong interactor taxa. Chapter 1 reports the results of non-target taxa monitoring after the sixth release of hatchery salmon smolts in the upper Yakima River Basin. Chapter 2 reports on the impacts of supplementation and reintroduction of salmon to trout. Chapter 2 was submitted as a manuscript to the North American Journal of Fisheries Management. Chapter 3 is an essay that describes the problems associated

Pearsons, Todd N.; Temple, Gabriel M.; Fritts, Anthony L. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA)

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

SUPPORT FOR HU CFRT SUMMER HIGH SCHOOL FUSION WORKSHOP  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nine summer fusion science research workshops for minority and female high school students were conducted at the Hampton University Center for Fusion Research and Training from 1996 to 2005. Each workshop was of the duration of eight weeks. In all 35 high school students were mentored. The students presented 28 contributed papers at the annual meetings of the American Physical Society Division of Plasma Physics. These contributed papers were very well received by the plasma physics and fusion science research community. The students won a number of prestigious local, state, and national honors, awards, prizes, and scholarships. The notable among these are the two regional finalist positions in the 1999 Siemens-Westinghouse Science and Technology Competitions; 1st Place U.S. Army Award, 2006; 1st Place U.S. Naval Science Award, 2006; Yale Science and Engineering Association Best 11th Grade Project, 2006; Society of Physics Students Book Award, 2006; APS Corporate Minority Scholarship and others. This workshop program conducted by the HU CFRT has been an exemplary success, and served the minority and female students exceptionally fruitfully. The Summer High School Fusion Science Workshop is an immensely successful outreach activity conducted by the HU CFRT. In this workshop, we train, motivate, and provide high quality research experiences to young and talented high school scholars with emphasis on under-represented minorities and female students in fusion science and related areas. The purpose of this workshop is to expose minority and female students to the excitement of research in science at an early stage in their academic lives. It is our hope that this may lead the high school students to pursue higher education and careers in physical sciences, mathematics, and perhaps in fusion science. To our knowledge, this workshop is the first and only one to date, of fusion science for under-represented minorities and female high school students at an HBCU. The faculty researchers in the HU CFRT mentor the students during summers. Mentors spend a considerable amount of time and efforts in training, teaching, guiding and supervising research projects. The HU CFRT has so far conducted nine workshops during the summers of 1996-2000 and 2002-2005. The first workshop was conducted in summer 1996. Students for the workshop are chosen from a national pool of exceptionally talented high school rising seniors/juniors. To our knowledge, most of these students have gone on to prestigious universities such as Duke University, John Hopkins University, CalTech, UCLA, Hampton University, etc. after completing their high school. For instance, Tiffany Fisher, participant of the 1996 summer workshop completed her BS in Mathematics at Hampton University in May 2001. She then went on to Wake Forest University at Winston-Salem, North Carolina to pursue graduate studies. Anshul Haldipur, participant of the 1999 summer workshop, began his undergraduate studies at Duke University in 2000. Christina Nguyen and Ilissa Martinez, participants of the 2000 summer workshop, are pursuing their undergraduate degrees at the UCLA and Florida State University respectively. The organizing committee of the APS DPP annual meeting invited Dr. Punjabi to deliver an invited talk on training the next generation of fusion scientists and engineers at the 2005 APS DPP meeting in Denver, CO. The organizing committee distributed a special flier with the Bulletin to highlight this invited talk and another talk on education as well the expo. This has given wide publicity and recognition to our workshops and Hampton University. Prof. Punjabi's talk: 'LI2 2: Training the next generation of fusion scientists and engineers: summer high school fusion science workshop, Bull. Amer. Phys. Soc. 50, 221 (2005)' was very well-received. He talked about HU education and outreach initiative and the HU CFRT Summer High School Workshop. The audience had a considerable number of questions about our workshops and the High School to PhD Pipeline in fusion science. Professor William Mathews of

Alkesh Punjabi

2010-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

473

Hangman Restoration Project : Annual Report, August 1, 2001 - July 31, 2002.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The construction of hydroelectric facilities in the Columbia Basin resulted in the extirpation of anadromous fish stocks in Hangman Creek and its tributaries within the Coeur d'Alene Reservation. Thus, the Coeur d'Alene Indian Tribe was forced to rely more heavily on native fish stocks such as redband trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss garideini), westslope cutthroat trout (O. clarki lewisii) and bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) as well as local wildlife populations. Additionally, the Tribe was forced to convert prime riparian habitat into agricultural lands to supply sustenance for their changed needs. Wildlife habitats within the portion of the Hangman Creek Watershed that lies within the Coeur d'Alene Indian Reservation have been degraded from a century of land management practices that include widespread conversion of native habitats to agricultural production and intensive silvicultural practices. Currently, wildlife and fish populations have been marginalized and water quality is significantly impaired. In the fall of 2000 the Coeur d'Alene Tribe Wildlife Program, in coordination with the Tribal Fisheries Program, submitted a proposal to begin addressing the degradations to functioning habitats within the Coeur d'Alene Reservation in the Hangman Watershed. That proposal led to the implementation of this project during BPA's FY2001 through FY2003 funding cycle. The project is intended to protect, restore and/or enhance priority riparian, wetland and upland areas within the headwaters of Hangman Creek and its tributaries in order to promote healthy self-sustaining fish and wildlife populations. A key goal of this project is the implementation of wildlife habitat protection efforts in a manner that also secures areas with the potential to provide stream and wetland habitats essential to native salmonid populations. This goal is critical in our efforts to address both resident fish and wildlife habitat needs in the Hangman Watershed. All proposed implementation activities are conducted in the headwaters of the system and are expected to prove beneficial to the natural functions of the entire Hangman Watershed. The following is the FY2001 annual report of Project activities and is submitted as partial fulfillment of Operation and Maintenance Task 2.a. The Objectives and Tasks for this first year were designed to position this Project for a long-term habitat restoration effort. As such, efforts were largely directed at information gathering and project orientation. The major task for this first year was development of a Habitat Prioritization Plan (attached) to guide implementation efforts by selecting areas that will be of greatest benefit to the native ecology. Completion of the first year tasks has positioned the project to move forward with implementing restoration activities using the latest information to accomplish the greatest possible results. The Project will be looking to implement on-the-ground protection and restoration efforts in the coming fiscal year using the data and information gathered in the last fiscal year. Continually refining our understanding of the natural watershed functions and fish and wildlife habitats within the Project Area will result in an increase in the efficiency of project implementation. Research and data gathering efforts will remain a strong emphasis in the coming fiscal year, as it will throughout the life of this Project.

Green, Gerald I.; Coeur D'Alene Tribe.

2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Coeur d'Alene Tribe Fish and Wildlife Program Habitat Protection Plan; Implementation of Fisheries Enhancement Opportunities on the Coeur d'Alene Reservation, 1997-2002 Technical Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Throughout the last century, the cumulative effects of anthropogenic disturbances have caused drastic watershed level landscape changes throughout the Reservation and surrounding areas (Coeur d'Alene Tribe 1998). Changes include stream channelization, wetland draining, forest and palouse prairie conversion for agricultural use, high road density, elimination of old growth timber stands, and denuding riparian communities. The significance of these changes is manifested in the degradation of habitats supporting native flora and fauna. Consequently, populations of native fish, wildlife, and plants, which the Tribe relies on as subsistence resources, have declined or in some instances been extirpated (Apperson et al. 1988; Coeur d'Alene Tribe 1998; Lillengreen et al. 1996; Lillengreen et al. 1993; Gerry Green Coeur d'Alene Tribe wildlife Biologist, personal communication 2002). For example, bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) are not present at detectable levels in Reservation tributaries, westslope cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarki lewisi) are not present in numbers commensurate with maintaining harvestable fisheries (Lillengreen et al. 1993, 1996), and the Sharp-tailed grouse (Tympanuchus phasianellus) are not present at detectable levels on the Reservation (Gerry Green, Coeur d'Alene Tribe wildlife biologist, personal communication). The Coeur d'Alene Tribe added Fisheries and Wildlife Programs to their Natural Resources Department to address these losses and protect important cultural, and subsistence resources for future generations. The Tribal Council adopted by Resolution 89(94), the following mission statement for the Fisheries Program: 'restore, protect, expand and re-establish fish populations to sustainable levels to provide harvest opportunities'. This mission statement, focused on fisheries restoration and rehabilitation, is a response to native fish population declines throughout the Tribe's aboriginal territory, including the Coeur d'Alene Indian Reservation (Coeur d'Alene Tribe 1998). Implicit in this statement is a commitment to provide native subsistence resources in the present and near future as well as the long-term by employing all the mitigation and conservation measures available to them. The development of this Habitat Protection Plan is intended to provide additional planning level guidance as the implementation of conservation measures moves forward. The purpose of this plan is to develop a systematic approach to habitat restoration that will ultimately lead to self-perpetuating, harvestable populations of native fish, wildlife and botanical species. Specifically, it is our intention to apply the principles and analyses presented in this plan to prioritize future restoration efforts that receive funding under the Northwest Power Planning Council's Resident Fish and Wildlife Mitigation Programs. Using an ecosystem restoration approach based on landscape ecology concepts (Primack 1993), the basic premise of the plan is to (1) protect functioning habitat conditions and (2) restore degraded habitat conditions. This plan focuses on habitat conditions at the watershed scale (macrohabitat) rather than on the needs of single species and/or species guilds. By focusing restoration efforts at a macrohabitat level, restoration efforts target all native species inhabiting that area. This approach marks a paradigm shift that emphasizes ecological based restoration rather than species-specific restoration. Traditionally, fish managers and wildlife managers have approached restoration independently, often dedicating resources to a single species by focusing on specific habitat types on a small spatial scale (microhabitat) (Robinson and Bolen 1989, Marcot et al. 2002). This management technique has done little to curb declines despite large budgets (Pianka 1994). Restoration on a landscape level has shown promising results (Holling 1992) and many riparian and wetland restoration projects throughout the northwest have inadvertently improved habitats for non-targeted species. Landscape level restoration addresses

Vitale, Angelo; Roberts, Frank; Peters, Ronald

2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Y-12 National Security Complex Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program 2007 Calendar Yeare Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit issued for the Oak Ridge Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12 Complex) which became effective May 1, 2006, continued a requirement for a Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP). The BMAP was originally developed in 1985 to demonstrate that the effluent limitations established for the Y-12 Complex protected the classified uses of the receiving stream (East Fork Poplar Creek: EFPC), in particular, the growth and propagation of aquatic life (Loar et al. 1989). The objectives of the current BMAP are similar, specifically to assess stream ecological conditions relative to regulatory limits and criteria, to assess ecological impacts as well as recovery in response to Y-12 operations, and to investigate the causes of continuing impacts. The BMAP consists of three tasks that reflect complementary approaches to evaluating the effects of the Y-12 Complex discharges on the biotic integrity of EFPC. These tasks include: (1) bioaccumulation monitoring, (2) benthic macroinvertebrate community monitoring, and (3) fish community monitoring. As required by the NPDES permit, the BMAP benthic macroinvertebrate community monitoring task includes studies to annually evaluate the receiving stream's biological integrity in comparison to TN Water Quality Criteria. BMAP monitoring is currently being conducted at five primary EFPC sites, although sites may be excluded or added depending upon the specific objectives of the various tasks. Criteria used in selecting the sites include: (1) location of sampling sites used in other studies, (2) known or suspected sources of downstream impacts, (3) proximity to U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) boundaries, (4) appropriate habitat distribution, and (5) access. The primary sampling sites include upper EFPC at kilometers (EFKs) 24.4 and 23.4 [upstream and downstream of Lake Reality (LR) respectively]; EFK 18.7 (also EFK 18.2 and 19), located off the ORR and below an area of intensive commercial and light industrial development; EFK 13.8, located upstream from the Oak Ridge Wastewater Treatment Facility (ORWTF); and EFK 6.3 located approximately 1.4 km below the ORR boundary (Fig. 1.1). Actual sampling locations on EFPC may differ slightly by task according to specific requirements of the task. Brushy Fork (BF) at kilometer (BFK) 7.6 and Hinds Creek at kilometer (HCK) 20.6 are the most commonly used reference sites for the Y-12 BMAP. Additional sites off the ORR are also occasionally used for reference, including Beaver Creek, Bull Run, Cox Creek, and Paint Rock Creek (Fig. 1.2). Summaries of the sampling designs for the three primary tasks of the Y-12 Complex BMAP for EFPC are presented in Tables 1.1-1.3. This report covers the 2007 study period, although data collected outside this time period are included as appropriate. To address the biological monitoring requirements for Bear Creek and McCoy Branch, CERCLA-funded data is summarized in Appendix A (for Bear Creek) and Appendix B (for McCoy Branch). Data for these two watersheds is provided herein to address Section IX of the NPDES Permit for Y-12, where 'Results of these CERCLA programs can be used to meet the biological monitoring requirements of this permit'. For potential comparison with instream biological measures, a summary of the toxicity testing results for Y-12 outfalls into upper EFPC is provided in Appendix C (these results have been previously reported).

Peterson, M.J.; Greeley, M. S. Jr.; Morris, G. W.; Roy, W. K.; Ryan, M. G.; Smith, J. G.; Southworth, G. R.

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Monitoring of Downstream Salmon and Steelhead at Federal Hydroelectric Facilities, 2005-2006 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

2005 was an average to below average flow year at John Day and Bonneville Dams. A large increase in flow in May improved migration conditions for that peak passage month. Spill was provided April through August and averaged about 30% and 48% of river flow at John Day and Bonneville Dams, respectively. Water temperature graphs were added this year that show slightly lower than average water temperature at John Day and slightly higher than average temperatures at Bonneville. The number of fish handled at John Day decreased from 412,797 in 2004 to 195,293 this year. Of the 195,293 fish, 120,586 (61.7%) were collected for researchers. Last year, 356,237 (86.3%) of the fish sampled were for researchers. This dramatic decline is the result of (1) fewer research fish needed (2) a smaller, lighter tag which allowed for tagging of smaller fish, and (3) a larger average size for subyearling chinook. These factors combined to reduce the average sample rate to 10.8%, about half of last year's rate of 18.5%. Passage timing at John Day was similar to previous years, but the pattern was distinguished by larger than average passage peaks for spring migrants, especially sockeye. The large spike in mid May for sockeye created a very short middle 80% passage duration of just 16 days. Other spring migrants also benefited from the large increase in flow in May. Descaling was lower than last year for all species except subyearling chinook and below the historical average for all species. Conversely, the incidence of about 90% of the other condition factors increased. Mortality, while up from last year for all species and higher than the historical average for all species except sockeye, continued to be low, less than 1% for all species. On 6 April a slide gate was left closed at John Day and 718 fish were killed. A gate position indicator light was installed to prevent reoccurrences. Also added this year was a PIT tag detector on the adult return-to-river flume. For the first time this year, we successfully held Pacific lamprey ammocetes. The number of fish sampled at Bonneville Dam was also down this year to 260,742, from 444,580 last year. Reasons for the decline are the same as stated above for John Day. Passage timing at Bonneville Dam was quite similar to previous years with one notable exception, sockeye. Sockeye passage was dominated by two large spikes in late May that greatly condensed the passage pattern, with the middle 80% passing Bonneville in just 18 days. Unlike John Day, passage for the rest of the species was well disbursed from late April through early June. Fish condition was good, with reductions in descaling rates for all species except unclipped steelhead and sockeye. Sockeye mortality matched last year's rate but was considerably lower for all other species. Rare species sampled at Bonneville this year included a bull trout and a eulachon.

Martinson, Rick D.; Kovalchuk, Gregory M.; Ballinger, Dean (Pacific States Marine Fisheries Commission, The Dalles, OR)

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Yakima River Species Interactions Study; Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project Monitoring and Evaluation Report 7 of 7, 2003-2004 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is intended to satisfy two concurrent needs: (1) provide a contract deliverable from the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) to the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), with emphasis on identification of salient results of value to ongoing Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project (YKFP) planning, and (2) summarize results of research that have broader scientific relevance. This is the twelfth of a series of progress reports that address species interactions research and supplementation monitoring of fishes in response to supplementation of salmon and steelhead in the upper Yakima River basin (Hindman et al. 1991; McMichael et al. 1992; Pearsons et al. 1993; Pearsons et al. 1994; Pearsons et al. 1996; Pearsons et al. 1998, Pearsons et al. 1999, Pearsons et al. 2001a, Pearsons et al. 2001b, Pearsons et al. 2002, Pearsons et al. 2003). Journal articles and book chapters have also been published from our work (McMichael 1993; Martin et al. 1995; McMichael et al. 1997; McMichael and Pearsons 1998; McMichael et al. 1998; Pearsons and Fritts 1999; McMichael et al. 1999; McMichael et al. 1999; Pearsons and Hopley 1999; Ham and Pearsons 2000; Ham and Pearsons 2001; Amaral et al. 2001; McMichael and Pearsons 2001; Pearsons 2002, Fritts and Pearsons 2004, Pearsons et al. in press, Major et al. in press). This progress report summarizes data collected between January 1, 2003 and December 31, 2003. These data were compared to findings from previous years to identify general trends and make preliminary comparisons. Interactions between fish produced as part of the YKFP, termed target species or stocks, and other species or stocks (non-target taxa) may alter the population status of non-target species or stocks. This may occur through a variety of mechanisms, such as competition, predation, and interbreeding (Pearsons et al. 1994; Busack et al. 1997; Pearsons and Hopley 1999). Furthermore, the success of a supplementation program may be limited by strong ecological interactions such as predation or competition (Busack et al. 1997). Our work has adapted to new information needs as the YKFP has evolved. Initially, our work focused on interactions between anadromous steelhead and resident rainbow trout (for explanation see Pearsons et al. 1993), then interactions between spring chinook salmon and rainbow trout, and recently interactions between spring chinook salmon and highly valued non-target taxa (NTT; e.g., bull trout); and interactions between strong interactor taxa (e.g., those that may strongly influence the abundance of spring chinook salmon; e.g., smallmouth bass) and spring chinook salmon. The change in emphasis to spring chinook salmon has largely been influenced by the shift in the target species planned for supplementation (Bonneville Power Administration et al. 1996; Fast and Craig 1997). Originally, steelhead and spring chinook salmon were proposed to be supplemented simultaneously (Clune and Dauble 1991). However, due in part to the uncertainties associated with interactions between steelhead and rainbow trout, spring chinook and coho salmon were supplemented before steelhead. This redirection in the species to be supplemented has prompted us to prioritize interactions between spring chinook and rainbow trout, while beginning to investigate other ecological interactions of concern. Prefacility monitoring of variables such as rainbow trout density, distribution, and size structure was continued and monitoring of other NTT was initiated in 1997. This report is organized into three chapters that represent major topics associated with monitoring stewardship, utilization, and strong interactor taxa. Chapter 1 reports the results of non-target taxa monitoring after the fifth release of hatchery salmon smolts in the upper Yakima River basin. Chapter 2 describes our tributary sampling methodology for monitoring the status of tributary NTT. Chapter 3 describes predation on juvenile salmonids by smallmouth bass and channel catfish in the lower Yakima River. The chapters in this report are in various stages of d

Pearsons, Todd N.; Fritts, Anthony L.; Temple, Gabriel M. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA)

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Yakima River Species Interactions Studies, Annual Report 2002.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is intended to satisfy two concurrent needs: (1) provide a contract deliverable from the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) to the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), with emphasis on identification of salient results of value to ongoing Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project (YKFP) planning, and (2) summarize results of research that have broader scientific relevance. This is the eleventh of a series of progress reports that address species interactions research and supplementation monitoring of fishes in response to supplementation of salmon and steelhead in the upper Yakima River basin. This progress report summarizes data collected between January 1, 2002 and December 31, 2002. These data were compared to findings from previous years to identify general trends and make preliminary comparisons. Interactions between fish produced as part of the YKFP, termed target species or stocks, and other species or stocks (non-target taxa) may alter the population status of non-target species or stocks. This may occur through a variety of mechanisms, such as competition, predation, and interbreeding. Furthermore, the success of a supplementation program may be limited by strong ecological interactions such as predation or competition. Our work has adapted to new information needs as the YKFP has evolved. Initially, our work focused on interactions between anadromous steelhead and resident rainbow trout (for explanation see Pearsons et al. 1993), then interactions between spring chinook salmon and rainbow trout, and recently interactions between spring chinook salmon and highly valued nontarget taxa (NTT; e.g., bull trout); and interactions between strong interactor taxa (e.g., those that may strongly influence the abundance of spring chinook salmon; e.g., smallmouth bass) and spring chinook salmon. The change in emphasis to spring chinook salmon has largely been influenced by the shift in the target species planned for supplementation (Bonneville Power Administration et al. 1996; Fast and Craig 1997). Originally, steelhead and spring chinook salmon were proposed to be supplemented simultaneously (Clune and Dauble 1991). However, due in part to the uncertainties associated with interactions between steelhead and rainbow trout, spring chinook and coho salmon were supplemented before steelhead. This redirection in the species to be supplemented has prompted us to prioritize interactions between spring chinook and rainbow trout, while beginning to investigate other ecological interactions of concern. Prefacility monitoring of variables such as rainbow trout density, distribution, and size structure was continued and monitoring of other NTT was initiated in 1997. This report is organized into two chapters that represent major topics associated with monitoring stewardship, utilization, and strong interactor taxa. Chapter 1 reports the results of non-target taxa monitoring after the fourth release of hatchery salmon smolts in the upper Yakima Basin. Chapter 2 describes predation on juvenile salmonids by smallmouth bass and channel catfish in the lower Yakima River.

Pearsons, Todd N.

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

Snake River Sockeye Salmon Captive Broodstock Program Research Elements : 2007 Annual Project Progess Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On November 20, 1991, the National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration listed Snake River sockeye salmon Oncorhynchus nerka as endangered under the Endangered Species Act of 1973. In 1991, the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes (SBT) and Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG) initiated the Snake River Sockeye Salmon Captive Broodstock Program to conserve and rebuild populations in Idaho. Restoration efforts are focused on Redfish, Pettit, and Alturas lakes within the Sawtooth Valley. The first release of hatchery-produced adults occurred in 1993. The first release of juvenile sockeye salmon from the captive broodstock program occurred in 1994. In 1999, the first anadromous adult returns from the captive broodstock program were recorded when six jacks and one jill were captured at the IDFG Sawtooth Fish Hatchery. In 2007, progeny from the captive broodstock program were released using four strategies: (1) eyed-eggs were planted in Pettit Lake in November; (2) age-0 presmolts were released to Alturas, Pettit, and Redfish lakes in October; (3) age-1 smolts were released into Redfish Lake Creek and the upper Salmon River in May; and (4) hatchery-produced adult sockeye salmon were released to Redfish Lake for volitional spawning in September. Oncorhynchus nerka population monitoring was conducted on Redfish, Alturas, and Pettit lakes using a midwater trawl in September 2007. Population abundances were estimated at 73,702 fish for Redfish Lake, 124,073 fish for Alturas Lake, and 14,746 fish for Pettit Lake. Angler surveys were conducted from May 26 through August 7, 2007 on Redfish Lake to estimate kokanee harvest. On Redfish Lake, we interviewed 102 anglers and estimated that 56 kokanee were harvested. The calculated kokanee catch rate was 0.03 fish/hour for each kokanee kept. The juvenile out-migrant trap on Redfish Lake Creek was operated from April 14 to June 13, 2007. We estimated that 5,280 natural origin and 14,256 hatchery origin sockeye salmon smolts out-migrated from Redfish Lake in 2007. The hatchery origin component originated from a 2006 fall presmolt direct-release. The juvenile out-migrant traps on Alturas Lake Creek and Pettit Lake Creek were operated by the SBT from April 19 to May 23, 2007 and April 18 to May 29, 2007, respectively. The SBT estimated 1,749 natural origin and 4,695 hatchery origin sockeye salmon smolts out-migrated from Pettit Lake and estimated 8,994 natural origin and 6,897 hatchery origin sockeye salmon smolts out-migrated from Alturas Lake in 2007. The hatchery origin component of sockeye salmon out-migrants originated from fall presmolt direct-releases made to Pettit and Alturas lakes in 2006. In 2007, the Stanley Basin Sockeye Technical Oversight Committee (SBSTOC) chose to have all Snake River sockeye salmon juveniles (tagged and untagged) transported due to potential enhanced survival. Therefore, mainstem survival evaluations were only conducted to Lower Granite Dam. Unique PIT tag interrogations from Sawtooth Valley juvenile out-migrant traps to Lower Granite Dam were utilized to estimate survival rates for out-migrating sockeye salmon smolts. Survival rate comparisons were made between smolts originating from Redfish, Alturas, and Pettit lakes and the various release strategies. Alturas Lake hatchery origin smolts tagged at the out-migrant trap recorded the highest survival rate of 78.0%. In 2007, 494 hatchery origin adult sockeye salmon were released to Redfish Lake for natural spawning. We observed 195 areas of excavation in the lake from spawning events. This was the highest number of redds observed in Redfish Lake since the program was initiated. Suspected redds were approximately 3 m x 3 m in size and were constructed by multiple pairs of adults. To monitor the predator population found within the lakes, we monitored bull trout spawning in Fishhook Creek, a tributary to Redfish Lake; and in Alpine Creek, a tributary to Alturas Lake. This represented the tenth consecutive year that the index reaches have been surveyed on these two streams. Adult counts (41 adults) and redd counts (22 redds

Peterson, Mike; Plaster, Kurtis; Redfield, Laura; Heindel, Jeff; Kline, Paul

2008-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

480

Kootenay Lake Fertilization Experiment, Year 15 (North Arm) and Year 3 (South Arm) (2006) Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes results from the fifteenth year (2006) of nutrient additions to the North Arm of Kootenay Lake and three years of nutrient additions to the South Arm. Experimental fertilization of the lake has been conducted using an adaptive management approach in an effort to restore lake productivity lost as a result of nutrient uptake in upstream reservoirs. The primary objective of the experiment is to restore kokanee (Oncorhynchus nerka) populations, which are the main food source for Gerrard rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus). The quantity of agricultural grade liquid fertilizer (10-34-0, ammonium polyphosphate and 28-0-0, urea ammonium nitrate) added to the North Arm in 2006 was 44.7 tonnes of P and 248.4 tonnes of N. The total fertilizer load added to the South Arm was 257 tonnes of nitrogen; no P was added. Kootenay Lake has an area of 395 km{sup 2}, a maximum depth of 150 m, a mean depth of 94 m, and a water renewal time of approximately two years. Kootenay Lake is a monomictic lake, generally mixing from late fall to early spring and stratifying during the summer. Surface water temperatures generally exceed 20 C for only a few weeks in July. Results of oxygen profiles were similar to previous years with the lake being well oxygenated from the surface to the bottom depths at all stations. Similar to past years, Secchi disc measurements at all stations in 2006 indicate a typical seasonal pattern of decreasing depths associated with the spring phytoplankton bloom, followed by increasing depths as the bloom gradually decreases by the late summer and fall. Total phosphorus (TP) ranged from 2-7 {micro}g/L and tended to decrease as summer advanced. Over the sampling season dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) concentrations decreased, with the decline corresponding to nitrate (the dominant component of DIN) being utilized by phytoplankton during summer stratification. Owing to the importance of epilimnetic nitrate that is required for optimal phytoplankton growth discrete depth water sampling occurred in 2006 to measure more accurately changes in the nitrate concentrations. As expected there was a seasonal decline in nitrate concentrations, thus supporting the strategy of increasing the nitrogen loading in both arms. These in-season changes emphasize the need for an adaptive management approach to ensure the nitrogen to phosphorus (N:P) ratio does not decrease below 15:1 (weight:weight) during the fertilizer application period. Phytoplankton composition determined from the integrated samples (0-20m) was dominated by diatoms, followed by cryptophytes and chrysophytes. The contribution of cryptophytes to total biomass was higher in 2006 than in 2005. Cryptophytes, considered being edible biomass for zooplankton and Daphnia spp., increased in 2006. Phytoplankton in the discrete depth samples (2, 5, 10, 15 and 20m) demonstrated a clear north to south gradient in average phytoplankton density and biomass among the three stations sampled, with highest values at the North Arm station (KLF 2) and lowest values in the most southern station in the South Arm (KLF 7). Populations were dominated by flagellates at all stations and depths in June and July, then dominated by diatoms in August and September in the North and South arms of the lake. There were no large bluegreen (cyanobacteria) populations in either arm of the lake in 2006. Seasonal average zooplankton abundance and biomass in both the main body of the lake and in the West Arm increased in 2006 compared to 2005. Zooplankton density was numerically dominated by copepods and biomass was dominated by Daphnia spp. The annual average mysid biomass data at deep stations indicated that the North Arm of Kootenay Lake was more productive than the South Arm in 2006. Mysid densities increased through the summer and declined in the winter; mean whole lake values remain within prefertilization densities. Kokanee escapement to Meadow Creek declined in 2006 to approximately 400,000 spawners. The Lardeau River escapement also declined wit

Schindler, E.U.; Sebastian, D.; Andrusak, G.F. [Fish and Wildlife Science and Allocation, Ministry of Environment, Province of British Columbia

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bowline bull moose" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Impacts of Water Level Fluctuations on Kokanee Reproduction in Flathead Lake; Effects of Operation of Kerr and Hungry Horse Dam on Reproductive Success, 1983 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Koktneesalmon (Oncorhvnchusnerka), the land-locked form of sockeye salmon, were originally introduced to Flathead Lake in 1916. My 1933, kokanee had become established in the lake and provided a popular summer trolling fishery as well as a fall snagging fishery in shoreline areas. Presently, Flathead Lake supports the second highest fishing pressure of any lake or reservoir in Montana (Montana Department of Fish and Game 1976). During 1981-82, the lake provided 168,792 man-days of fishing pressure. Ninety-two percent of the estimated 536,870 fish caught in Flathead Lake in 1981-82 were kokanee salmon. Kokanee also provided forage for bull trout seasonally and year round for lake trout. Kokanee rear to maturity in Flathead Lake, then return to various total grounds to spawn. Spawning occurred in lake outlet streams, springs, larger rivers and lake shoreline areas in suitable but often limited habitat. Shoreline spawning in Flathead Lake was first documented in the mid-1930's. Spawning kokanee were seized from shoreline areas in 1933 and 21,000 cans were processed and packed for distribution to the needy. Stefanich (1953 and 1954) later documented extensive but an unquantified amount of spawning along the shoreline as well as runs in Whitefish River and McDonald Creek in the 1950's. A creel census conducted in 1962-63 determined 11 to 13 percent of the kokanee caught annually were taken during the spawning period (Robbins 1966). During a 1981-82 creel census, less than one percent of the fishermen on Flathead Lake were snagging kokanee (Graham and Fredenberg 1982). The operation of Kerr Dam, located below Flathead Lake on the Flathead River, has altered seasonal fluctuations of Flathead Lake. Lake levels presently remain high during kokanee spawning in November and decline during the incubation and emergence periods. Groundwater plays an important role in embryo and fry survival in redds of shoreline areas exposed by lake drawdown. Stefanich (1954) and Domrose (1968) found live eggs and fry only in shoreline spawning areas wetted by groundwater seeps. Impacts of the operation of Kerr Dam on lakeshore spawning have not been quantified. Recent studies have revealed that operation of Hungry Horse Dam severely impacted successful kokanee spawning and incubation in the Flathead River above Flathead Lake (Graham et al. 1980, McMullin and Graham 1981, Fraley and Graham 1982 and Fraley and McMullin 1983). Flows from Hungry Horse Dam to enhance kokanee reproduction in the river system have been voluntarily met by the Bureau of Reclamation since 1981. In lakeshore spawning areas in other Pacific Northwest systems, spawning habitat for kokanee and sockeye salmon was characterized by seepage or groundwater flow where suitable substrate composition existed (Foerster 1968). Spawning primarily occurred in shallower depths (<6 m) where gravels were cleaned by wave action (Hassemer and Rieman 1979 and 1980, Stober et al. 1979a). Seasonal drawdown of reservoirs can adversely affect survival of incubating kokanee eggs and fry spawned in shallow shoreline areas. Jeppon (1955 and 1960) and Whitt (1957) estimated 10-75 percent kokanee egg loss in shoreline areas of Pend Oreille Lake, Idaho after regulation of the upper three meters occurred in 1952. After 20 years of operation, Bowler (1979) found Pend Oreille shoreline spawning to occur in fewer areas with generally lower numbers of adults. In studies on Priest Lake, Idaho, Bjornn (1957) attributed frozen eggs and stranded fry to winter fluctuations of the upper three meters of the lake. Eggs and fry frozen during winter drawdown accounted for a 90 percent loss to shoreline spawning kokanee in Donner Lake, California (Kimsey 1951). Stober et al. (1979a) determined irrigation drawdown of Banks Lake, Washington reduced shoreline survival during five of the seven years the system was studied. The goal of this phase of the study was to evaluate and document effects of the operation of Kerr Dam on kokanee shoreline reproduction in Flathead Lake. Specific objectives to meet this goal are: (1) Del

Decker-Hess, Janet; McMullin, Steve L.

1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

Acoustic Imaging Evaluation of Juvenile Salmonid Behavior in the Immediate Forebay of the Water Temperature Control Tower at Cougar Dam, 2010  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the results of an evaluation of juvenile Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) behavior at Cougar Dam on the south fork of the McKenzie River in Oregon in 2010. The study was conducted by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE). The overall goal of the study was to characterize juvenile salmonid behavior and movement patterns in the immediate forebay of the Water Temperature Control (WTC) tower of the dam for USACE and fisheries resource managers use in making decisions about bioengineering designs for long-term structures and/or operations to facilitate safe downstream passage for juvenile salmonids. We collected acoustic imaging (Dual-Frequency Identification Sonar; DIDSON) data from March 1, 2010, through January 31, 2011. Juvenile salmonids (hereafter, called 'fish') were present in the immediate forebay of the WTC tower throughout the study. Fish abundance index was low in early spring (<200 fish per sample-day), increased in late April, and peaked on May 19 (6,039 fish). A second peak was observed on June 6 (2904 fish). Fish abundance index decreased in early June and remained low in the summer months (<100 fish per sample-day). During the fall and winter, fish numbers varied with a peak on November 10 (1881 fish) and a minimum on December 7 (12 fish). A second, smaller, peak occurred on December 22 (607 fish). A univariate statistical analysis indicated fish abundance index (log10-transformed) was significantly (P<0.05) positively correlated with forebay elevation, velocity over the WTC tower intake gate weirs, and river flows into the reservoir. A subsequent multiple regression analysis resulted in a model (R2=0.70) predicting fish abundance (log-transformed index values) using two independent variables of mean forebay elevation and the log10 of the forebay elevation range. From the approximate fish length measurements made using the DIDSON imaging software, the average fish length during early spring 2010 was 214 {+-} 86 mm (standard deviation). From May through early November, the average fish length remained relatively consistent (132 {+-} 54 mm), after which average lengths increased to 295 {+-} 148 mm for mid-November though early December. From mid-December through January the average fish length decreased to 151 {+-} 76 mm. Milling in front of the WTC tower was the most common fish behavior observed throughout the study period. Traversing along the front of the tower, east-to-west and west-to-east, was the next common behavior. The percentage of fish events showing movement from the forebay to the tower or from the tower to the forebay was generally low throughout the spring, summer, and early fall (0 to 30% for both directions combined, March through early November). From mid-November 2010 through the end of the study (January 31, 2011), the combined percentages of fish moving into and out of the tower were higher (25 to 70%) than during previous months of the study. Schooling behavior was most distinct in the spring. Schooling events were present in 30 to 96% of the fish events during that period, with a peak on May 19. Schooling events were also present in the summer, but at lower numbers. With the exception of some schooling in mid-December, few to no schooling events were observed in the fall and winter months. Diel distributions for schooling fish during spring and fall months indicate schooling was concentrated during daylight hours and no schooling was observed at night. However, in December, schooling occurred at night, after midnight, and during daylight hours. Predator activity, most likely bull trout or rainbow trout according to a USACE biologist, was observed during late spring, when fish abundance index and schooling were highest for the year, and again in the fall months when fish events increased from a summer low. No predator activity was observed in the summer, and little activity occurred during the winter months.

Khan, Fenton; Johnson, Gary E.; Royer, Ida M.; Phillips, Nathan RJ; Hughes, James S.; Fischer, Eric S.; Ham, Kenneth D.; Ploskey, Gene R.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z