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1

ARM - Measurement - Planetary boundary layer height  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

govMeasurementsPlanetary boundary layer height govMeasurementsPlanetary boundary layer height ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Planetary boundary layer height Top of the planetary boundary layer; also known as depth or height of the mixing layer. Categories Atmospheric State Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments VCEIL : Vaisala Ceilometer External Instruments NCEPGFS : National Centers for Environment Prediction Global Forecast System Field Campaign Instruments

2

Boundary Layer  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Sea Spray on the Thermodynamics of the Hurricane Boundary Layer For original submission and image(s), see ARM Research Highlights http:www.arm.govsciencehighlights Research...

3

DOE/SC-ARM/TR-132 Planetary Boundary Layer (PBL) Height Value  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

determination of the PBL height in models can significantly impact the formation and maintenance of low-level clouds (Zeng et al. 2004). Routine estimates of PBL height are useful...

4

Wind Structure in the Atmospheric Boundary Layer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

13 May 1971 research-article Wind Structure in the Atmospheric Boundary Layer...semi-empirical laws for the variation of mean wind speed with height and for the statistical...provide some useful ordering of the mean wind profile characteristics in relation to...

1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Magnetohydrodynamic boundary layer control system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Accordingly, it is an object of the present invention to provide an active boundary layer control system which is lightweight, operates with low in put power, and occupies little physical space. It is a further object of the invention to provide a boundary layer control system which is robust and can be operated in a damaged condition without creating a hazard to the vehicle. It is yet object of the invention to provide a magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) boundary layer control system for marine vehicles which provides a force directly on the water adjacent to the vehicle hull to provide flow separation control. The invention is a boundary layer control system using magnetic and electric fields interaction to providea driving force to energize boundary layer flow around a marine vehicle. A plurality of magnets are located circumferentially around the hull. Seawater electrodes are placed between each of the magnets and between the poles of each magnet. The resulting interaction of the electric and magnetic fields produces a Lorentz force which reduces the turbulence and may even relaminarize the flow in the boundary layer.

Meng, J.C.

1993-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

6

Boundary-Layer Effects in Reverse Osmosis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Boundary-Layer Effects in Reverse Osmosis ... In FO, water is extracted from a feed solution using the high osmotic pressure of a hypertonic solution that flows on ... ...

Ulrich Merten; H. K. Lonsdale; R. L. Riley

1964-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Similarity Equations for Wind and Temperature Profiles in the Radix Layer, at the Bottom of the Convective Boundary Layer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the middle of the convective boundary layer, also known as the mixed layer, is a relatively thick region where wind speed and potential temperature are nearly uniform with height. Below this uniform layer (UL), wind speed decreases to zero at ...

Edi Santoso; Roland Stull

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

ARM - Field Campaign - Boundary Layer Cloud IOP  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

govCampaignsBoundary Layer Cloud IOP govCampaignsBoundary Layer Cloud IOP Campaign Links Campaign Images Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Boundary Layer Cloud IOP 2005.07.11 - 2005.08.07 Lead Scientist : William Shaw For data sets, see below. Description Investigators from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, in collaboration with scientists from a number of other institutions, carried out a month of intensive measurements at the ARM Climate Research Facility on the North Slope of Alaska in the summer of 2005. The purpose of these measurements was to determine how much the arctic land surface modifies the way low clouds reflect, absorb, and transmit solar and infrared radiation. This is an important problem because arctic clouds play a prominent role in

9

Processes in the Magnetospheric Boundary Layer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The earth's magnetopause is a boundary that separates two distinctly different plasma regions - the (shocked) solar wind and the hot magnetospheric plasma controlled by the terrestrial magnetic field. Through this boundary a small fraction of the solar wind energy and momentum is transferred. This energy powers all major plasma processes within the magnetosphere. Thus, a proper understanding of boundary layer phenomena is of vital importance for magnetospheric plasma physics. An overview of the two main theories put forward to explain the energy and momentum transfer processes near the earth's magnetospheric boundary - magnetic merging/reconnection and the boundary layer dynamo model - will be given. The theories are compared with recent in situ plasma observations in the vicinity of the magnetopause. It is suggested here that internal processes in the magnetospheric boundary layer are decisive for the transfer of energy and momentum into the inner magnetosphere, which is coupled to the high latitude ionosphere. On the other hand, external conditions at the magnetopause proper determine the coupling to the solar wind. Means of relating transient magnetic field signatures, such as flux transfer events, with plasma dynamo induced currents will also be discussed.

Rickard Lundin

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

TURBULENCE IN SUPERSONIC AND HYPERSONIC BOUNDARY LAYERS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TURBULENCE IN SUPERSONIC AND HYPERSONIC BOUNDARY LAYERS Alexander J. Smits and M. Pino Martin in supersonic and hypersonic flow where the effects of compressibility have a direct influence on the turbulence. Experimental and DNS results are presented and compared. Key words: Turbulence, supersonic, hypersonic, shocks

MartĂ­n, Pino

11

Viscous drag reduction in boundary layers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The present volume discusses the development status of stability theory for laminar flow control design, applied aspects of laminar-flow technology, transition delays using compliant walls, the application of CFD to skin friction drag-reduction, active-wave control of boundary-layer transitions, and such passive turbulent-drag reduction methods as outer-layer manipulators and complex-curvature concepts. Also treated are such active turbulent drag-reduction technique applications as those pertinent to MHD flow drag reduction, as well as drag reduction in liquid boundary layers by gas injection, drag reduction by means of polymers and surfactants, drag reduction by particle addition, viscous drag reduction via surface mass injection, and interactive wall-turbulence control.

Bushnell, D.M.; Hefner, J.N.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Laminar boundary layers in convective heat transport  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study Rayleigh-Benard convection in the high-Rayleigh-number and high-Prandtl-number regime, i.e., we consider a fluid in a container that is exposed to strong heating of the bottom and cooling of the top plate in the absence of inertia effects. While the dynamics in the bulk are characterized by a chaotic convective heat flow, the boundary layers at the horizontal container plates are essentially conducting and thus the fluid is motionless. Consequently, the average temperature exhibits a linear profile in the boundary layers. In this article, we rigorously investigate the average temperature and oscillations in the boundary layer via local bounds on the temperature field. Moreover, we deduce that the temperature profile is indeed essentially linear close to the horizontal container plates. Our results are uniform in the system parameters (e.g. the Rayleigh number) up to logarithmic correction terms. An important tool in our analysis is a new Hardy-type estimate for the convecting velocity field, which can be used to control the fluid motion in the layer. The bounds on the temperature field are derived with the help of local maximal regularity estimates for convection-diffusion equations.

Christian Seis

2012-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

13

Characteristics of wind speed and wind direction in the atmospheric boundary layer on the southern coast of Bulgaria  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The characteristics of wind speed and wind direction in the boundary atmospheric layer measured ... meteorological station. The sodar measurement data on wind parameters at different heights in different months ....

M. A. Novitskii; L. K. Kulizhnikova…

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Boundary layer response to wind gusts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the wind tunnel sir stress caused by tbe addition of the in)actors, the decision was osde to use flew visuslstion ?echniques to detsreine if it wss possible to generate s lsuinar boundary layer on the flat plate. Loup black wss suspended in light..., 8. The data reduction procedure used in this thesis follcwed pxi- maxily the procsduxes of rafax'ence 8. Velocity fluctuations were detected using the constant current technique and computed based on square wave calibration. yor the constant...

Morland, Bruce Thomas

1968-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Inferring the scale height of the lunar nightside double layer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

compared to the solar wind plasma, due to the ambipolar potential drop across the wake boundary identified that across the wake boundary. [3] The MAG/ER instrument uses vector magnetic field data and measurements angle on field lines with higher tip angles encounter a smaller average potential before reflecting (the

California at Berkeley, University of

16

Numerical Study of Freestream Waves Receptivity and Nonlinear Breakdown in Hypersonic Boundary Layer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Numerical Methods for Hypersonic Boundary Layer Stability.of Instability in a Hypersonic Boundary Layer. TheoreticalA. P. , Receptivity of Hypersonic Boundary Layer to Wall

Lei, Jia

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

ARM - Field Campaign - Lower Atmospheric Boundary Layer Experiment  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

govCampaignsLower Atmospheric Boundary Layer Experiment govCampaignsLower Atmospheric Boundary Layer Experiment Campaign Links LABLE Website Related Campaigns 2013 Lower Atmospheric Boundary Layer Experiment 2013.05.28, Turner, SGP Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Lower Atmospheric Boundary Layer Experiment 2012.09.17 - 2012.11.13 Lead Scientist : David Turner Description Boundary layer turbulence is an important process that is parameterized in most atmospheric numerical models. Turbulence redistributes energy and mass within the boundary layer. Many different characteristics can impact the character of turbulence in the boundary layer, including different surface types, horizontal wind speed and direction, and the vertical temperature structure of the atmosphere. However, there have been few studies that have

18

Application of acoustic sounding to estimating fusion in an atmospheric boundary layer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An acoustic sounder system can be configured to provide estimates of the vertical profile of velocity and dissipation rate of kinetic and potential energy. A method based on the concepts of boundary?layer similarity theory is outlined by which the characteristicvelocity in a freely convective boundary layer is deduced from the inversion height and the asymptotic value of the dissipation rate of kinetic energy near the inversion. These values in conjunction with the mean velocity are used to establish the normalized heights downwind and cross?wind distances and cross?wind integrated concentrations. The normalized lateral and vertical standard deviations are then deduced from empirically established laboratory relationships for nonbuoyant particulates. Preliminary analysis indicate a similar methodology may be applicable to the stable boundary layer.

Bryan R. Kerman

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Acoustic sounding of the tropical marine boundary layer during GATE  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A vertically pointed monostatic acoustic sounder was installed on the NOAA ShipOCEANOGRAPHER during the Global Atmospheric Research Program Atlantic Tropical Experiment (GATE). The sounderantenna was mounted on a gyrocontrolled platform to compensate for the ship'spitch and roll motions. Extensive measures such as mounting the antenna assembly on a vibration isolator and installing absorbing cuffs had to be taken to reduce interference by ship?generated noise. Back?scattered acoustic data obtained from up to 850 m height describe the tropical marine boundary layer in unique and hitherto unseen detail. During undisturbed weather conditions the facsimile record showed convective plumes rising from the surface of the water up to 400 m. Storm?generated disturbances resulted in a substantial modification of the boundary layer; low?level multilayered undulating inversions formed from cool outflow currents. The inversions persisted for up to 16 hours. Low?level patchy cumulus clouds produced characteristic hummock?shaped acoustic echoes. Analysis of the Doppler frequency shift of the returns allowed the determination of vertical velocities within these clouds and underlying convective plumes.

P. A. Mandics; J. E. Gaynor; F. F. Hall Jr.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Model of Trace Gas Flux in Boundary Layer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mathematical model of the turbulent flux in the three-layer boundary system is presented. Turbulence is described as a presence of the nonzero vorticity. Generalized advection-diffusion-reaction equation is derived for arbitrary number components in the flux. The fluxes in the layers are objects for matching requirements on the boundaries between the layers.

I. I. Vasenev; I. S. Nurgaliev

2013-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "boundary layer height" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Wind profile above the surface boundary layer S.-E. Gryning (1), E. Batchvarova (2) and B. Brmmer (3)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wind profile above the surface boundary layer S.-E. Gryning (1), E. Batchvarova (2) and B. BrĂĽmmer in predictions of the wind profile in the lowest hundreds me- ters of the atmosphere, being connected to the general increase in height of structures such as bridges, high houses and wind turbines. The hub height

22

Turbulence Structure and Wall Signature in Hypersonic Turbulent Boundary Layer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Turbulence Structure and Wall Signature in Hypersonic Turbulent Boundary Layer Yin-Chiu Kan , Clara and hypersonic turbulent boundary layer datasets from direct numerical simulation (DNS). Contour plots and Marusic5 and Mathis, Hutchins and Marusic16 ). In contrast to supersonic and hypersonic flow regimes

MartĂ­n, Pino

23

Numerical Simulation of the Wave Bottom Boundary Layer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are coupled to the wave cycle; phases of accelerating ow organize the boundary layer structure, decelerating; Zhao and Anastasiou, 1993; Feddersen and Guza, 2000; and Rankin and Hires, 2000]; others have the boundary layer and induce an in ectional instability at ow reversal, while accelerations tend to organize

Slinn, Donald

24

Performance of a boundary layer ingesting propulsion system  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis presents an assessment of the aerodynamic performance of an aircraft propulsion system, with embedded engines, in the presence of aircraft fuselage boundary layer ingestion (BLI). The emphasis is on defining ...

Plas, Angélique (Angélique Pascale)

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Examining A Hypersonic Turbulent Boundary Layer at Low Reynolds Number  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The purpose of the current study was to answer several questions related to hypersonic, low Reynolds number, turbulent boundary layers, of which available data related to turbulence quantities is scarce. To that end, a unique research facility...

Semper, Michael Thomas

2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

26

Scaling Laws for the Heterogeneously Heated Free Convective Boundary Layer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The heterogeneously heated free convective boundary layer (CBL) is investigated by means of dimensional analysis and results from large-eddy simulations (LES) and direct numerical simulations (DNS). The investigated physical model is a CBL that ...

Chiel C. van Heerwaarden; Juan Pedro Mellado; Alberto De Lozar

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Mixing Line Analysis of Clouds and Cloudy Boundary Layers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The diagnostic study of the thermodynamic structure of nonprecipitating clouds and cloudy boundary layers is formulated using a mixing line and saturation point approach. A parametric model for the mean structure is developed as a tool for ...

Alan K. Betts

1985-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Upstream influence in boundary layers 45 years ago  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...0) = M2 2 ikH(k); (2.19) because M(y) takes the value M2, given by equation (2.15), at the location (here rede ned as y = 0) where the inviscid boundary condition has to be satis ed. Also, at the edge y = of the boundary layer, disturbances...

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Posters Triggering of Boundary Layer Cumulus Clouds Over a Heterogeneous Surface  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

5 5 Posters Triggering of Boundary Layer Cumulus Clouds Over a Heterogeneous Surface K. Schrieber, R. Stull, and Q. Zhang Boundary Layer Research Team Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Science University of Wisconsin Madison, Wisconsin Complex multimodal joint frequency distributions of LCL height versus θ v in surface-layer air over a large heteroge- neous surface area are modeled as the superposition of simpler mono-modal distributions. These simpler distri- butions, which apply to quasi-homogeneous subdomains, are approximated with bivariate distribution models. The shape of each of these modeled distributions depends on variations of the Bowen ratio and heat input forcings. These forcings are a function of the landscape, insolation, surface albedo, cloud-shading, soil moisture, and other

30

Aircraft Observations of the Marine Boundary Layer Adjustment near Point Arguello, California  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.g., Parish 2000). Several authors (e.g., Dorman 1985; Samelson 1992; Burk et al. 1999; Haack et al. 2001) represent the fluid system near the coast in terms of a two-layer shallow water model with the coastal terrain serving as a lateral boundary. The Froude... of the layer. Discontinuities such as hy- draulic jumps can result as the flow transitions from supercritical (Fr. 1) to subcritical (Fr, 1). As the flow in the MBL impinges on coastal points, significant modulation of the MBL height and wind field occurs...

Parish, Thomas R.; Rahn, David A.; Leon, David

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

A dual mass flux framework for boundary layer convection  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

A dual mass flux framework for boundary layer convection A dual mass flux framework for boundary layer convection Neggers, Roel European Centre for Medium-range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) Category: Modeling A new convective boundary layer scheme is presented that is currently being developed for the Integrated Forecasting System (IFS) of the European Centre for Medium-range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF). Part of the total turbulent flux is modeled through advective mass flux by multiple updrafts, initialized at the surface. Two groups of updrafts are explicitly represented; i) updrafts that never reach their lifting condensation level, and ii) updrafts that condensate and become cloudy. Key new ingredient is the flexibility of the associated updraft area fractions, as a function of model state. As a result, an extra degree of freedom is introduced in the

32

ARM - Field Campaign - Boundary Layer CO2 Using CW Lidar  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

govCampaignsBoundary Layer CO2 Using CW Lidar govCampaignsBoundary Layer CO2 Using CW Lidar Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Boundary Layer CO2 Using CW Lidar 2005.05.21 - 2005.05.24 Lead Scientist : Michael Dobbs Description Overflights Underway at ACRF Southern Great Plains Site (M.Dobbs/J.Liljegren) Science collaborators at ITT Industries and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Langley Research Center (LaRC) conducted flights over the Central Facility at ACRF's Southern Great Plains (SGP) site as part of the Climate Sources and Sink (CO2) Intensive Operational Period (IOP), using a CW lidar. The objective of the flights was to validate, by demonstration and comparison with SGP ground observations, the performance of the ITT system when used in conjunction with retrieval

33

Distributed boundary layer suction utilizing wing tip effects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that this is not the case. The rotational force at the tip accounts for the suction power. Since this power is utilized to suck air from the boundary, energy is dissipated, thereby weakening the vortex strength. Providing this assumption is valid, the effect would... was done. TABLE OF CONTENTS Chapter Page INTRODUCTION OBJECTIVES AND SCOPE EXPERIMENTAL FACILITY AND PROCEDURES Wing Model . Wake Rake Boundary Layer Probe . . Multiple Tube Manometers Wind Tunnel and Related Equipment Procedures Computation...

Edwards, Jay Thomas

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

34

Unexpected vertical wind speed profiles in the boundary layer over the southern North Sea  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Shallow atmospheric internal boundary layers over the southern part of the North Sea are common. Analysis of one year of meteorological data from the FINO1 research platform in the German Bight reveals that vertical wind speed profiles frequently do not conform to the expected modified logarithmic profile of Monin–Obukhov similarity theory. The wind profiles are mostly characterized by local maxima or kinks within the first 100 m over the sea surface. The data reveals the most frequent occurrence of a single maximum, but multiple maxima are often present, and there are sometimes even reversed profiles with the wind speed decreasing with height. The expected modified logarithmic profile occurs for a minority of cases. The evidence suggests the frequent presence of internal boundary layers that propagate from coastal land masses that surround the North Sea. A census of vertical wind speed profiles is presented that shows how different inflection states are linked with wind speed and atmospheric stability. The kinks are most prevalent in the upper part of the measurement range near the 100 m hub height of modern offshore the wind turbines, so that internal boundary layers represent a possible concern for the offshore wind energy industry in the North Sea region.

Anthony J. Kettle

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Lidar Investigation of Tropical Nocturnal Boundary Layer Aerosols and Cloud Macrophysics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Observational evidence of two-way association between nocturnal boundary layer aerosols and cloud macrophysical properties under different meteorological conditions is reported in this paper. The study has been conducted during 2008-09 employing a high space-time resolution polarimetric micro-pulse lidar over a tropical urban station in India. Firstly, the study highlights the crucial role of boundary layer aerosols and background meteorology on the formation and structure of low-level stratiform clouds in the backdrop of different atmospheric stability conditions. Turbulent mixing induced by the wind shear at the station, which is associated with a complex terrain, is found to play a pivotal role in the formation and structural evolution of nocturnal boundary layer clouds. Secondly, it is shown that the trapping of energy in the form of outgoing terrestrial radiation by the overlying low-level clouds can enhance the aerosol mixing height associated with the nocturnal boundary layer. To substantiate this, the long-wave heating associated with cloud capping has been quantitatively estimated in an indirect way by employing an Advanced Research Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF-ARW) model version 2.2 developed by National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), Colorado, USA, and supplementary data sets; and differentiated against other heating mechanisms. The present investigation as well establishes the potential of lidar remote-sensing technique in exploring some of the intriguing aspects of the cloud-environment relationship.

Manoj, M. G.; Devara, PC S.; Taraphdar, Sourav

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Modeling the Interaction between the Atmospheric and Oceanic Boundary Layers, Including a Surface Wave Layer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The interaction between the atmospheric and oceanic boundary layers is simulated by solving a closed system of equations including equations of motion, turbulent kinetic energy (TKE), turbulent exchange coefficient (TEC), expressions for air and ...

Le Ngoc Ly

1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Four-Dimensional Data Assimilation Boundary-Layer Observations Over the Southern  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Boundary-Layer Observations Over the Southern Boundary-Layer Observations Over the Southern Great Plains Cloud and Radiation Testbed Site During the November Flux-Profiler Test s. P. Oncley and J. Van Baelen National Center for Atmospheric Research(8) Boulder, CO 80307-3000 Introduction Resu Its Figure 1 shows the raw data from two of the ten profile patterns flown during this experiment. Each aircraft profile consisted of a descent to the profiler site followed by 3-5 legs at increasing heights. Note that because of this flightpattern, the downward and upward profiles may differ due to temporal changes during the time of the pattern (about 50 minutes) and due to horizontal gradients. The profiler was operated in DBS mode alternating between two sets of three beams. Thus, two sets of consensus- averaged winds were available. Finally, several

38

Carbon transport in the bottom boundary layer. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the activities and findings from a field experiment devised to estimate the rates and mechanisms of transport of carbon across the continental shelves. The specific site chosen for the experiment was the mid-Atlantic Bight, a region off the North Carolina coast. The experiment involved a large contingent of scientists from many institutions. The specific component of the program was the transport of carbon in the bottom boundary layer. The postulate mechanisms of transport of carbon in the bottom boundary layer are: resuspension and advection, downward deposition, and accumulation. The high turbulence levels in the bottom boundary layer require the understanding of the coupling between turbulence and bottom sediments. The specific issues addressed in the work reported here were: (a) What is the sediment response to forcing by currents and waves? (b) What is the turbulence climate in the bottom boundary layer at this site? and (c) What is the rate at which settling leads to carbon sequestering in bottom sediments at offshore sites?

Agrawal, Y.C.

1998-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

39

Turbulence Structure and Wall Signature in Hypersonic Boundary Layer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Turbulence Structure and Wall Signature in Hypersonic Boundary Layer Yin-Chiu Kan , Beekman Izaak and low- speed features, found in subsonic experiments, are present in our supersonic and hypersonic and hypersonic regimes due to the lack of detailed flow field data, and the studies have been mostly restricted

MartĂ­n, Pino

40

OFFSHORE BOUNDARY-LAYER MODELLING H. Bergstrm1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OFFSHORE BOUNDARY-LAYER MODELLING H. Bergström1 and R. Barthelmie2 1) Uppsala Univ., Dept. of Earth) of the ENDOW (EfficieNt Development of Offshore Windfarms) project, where the objectives are to provide currently be incorporated into a wind farm design tool. The offshore thermal stratification climate is also

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "boundary layer height" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Boundary layer transition as a source of noise and vibration  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

When laminar flow over a rigid or flexible surface becomes unstable an intermittent flow state occurs. This intermittent flow regime called the transition region is where turbulent spots are created and then grow as they convect downstream at a velocity typically equal to 0.7 times the free?stream velocity. The spots eventually coalesce to form the beginning of the fully developed turbulent boundary layer. The statistics of the velocity or pressure fluctuations in the transition region are essentially stationary in time but nonhomogeneous in the streamwise direction. Fundamentally it has been argued that this region is capable of creating monopole sound radiation e.g. Lauchle [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 69 665–671 (1981)] and Sornette and Lagier [Acustica 55 255–267 (1984)]. Also it has been suspected that a transitional boundary layer can induce wall vibrations. These issues have been under study for some time. We have completed a set of measurements on the. space?time statistics of turbulent spots in a naturally occurring transition zone and from them developed an analytical model for the wavenumber?frequency spectrum of the pressure fluctuations. Based on this model it appears that the transition zone wall pressure is less intense than that of a fully developed turbulent layer by a factor equal approximately to the intermittency factor. This presentation will review the current research findings on wall pressure fluctuations and radiated sound caused by boundary layer transition. [Work supported by Applied Research Laboratory under NAVSEA contract.

Gerald C. Lauchle; M. A. Josserand

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Characterization of wind noise by the boundary layer meteorology  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The fluctuations in pressure generated by turbulent motions of the atmospheric boundary layer are a principal noise source in outdoor acoustic measurements. The mechanics of wind noise involve not only stagnation pressure fluctuations at the sensor but also shearing and self-interaction of turbulence throughout the flow particularly at low frequencies. The contributions of these mechanisms can be described by the boundary-layer meteorology. An experiment was conducted at the National Wind Institute's 200-meter meteorological tower located outside Lubbock Texas in the Llano Estacado region. For two days a 44-element 400-meter diameter array of unscreened NCPA-UMX infrasound sensors recorded wind noise continuously while the tower and a Doppler SODAR measured vertical profiles of the boundary layer. Analysis of the fluctuating pressure with the meteorological data shows that the statistical structure of wind noise depends on both mean velocity distribution and buoyant stability. The root-mean-square pressure exhibits distinct scalings for stable and unstable stratification. Normalization of the pressure power spectral density depends on the outer scales. In stable conditions the kurtosis of the wind noise increases with Reynolds number. Measures of noise intermittency are explored with respect to the meteorology.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Multi-dimensional Longwave Forcing of Boundary Layer Cloud Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The importance of multi-dimensional (MD) longwave radiative effects on cloud dynamics is evaluated in a large eddy simulation (LES) framework employing multi-dimensional radiative transfer (Spherical Harmonics Discrete Ordinate Method —SHDOM). Simulations are performed for a case of unbroken, marine boundary layer stratocumulus and a broken field of trade cumulus. “Snapshot” calculations of MD and IPA (independent pixel approximation —1D) radiative transfer applied to LES cloud fields show that the total radiative forcing changes only slightly, although the MD effects significantly modify the spatial structure of the radiative forcing. Simulations of each cloud type employing MD and IPA radiative transfer, however, differ little. For the solid cloud case, relative to using IPA, the MD simulation exhibits a slight reduction in entrainment rate and boundary layer TKE relative to the IPA simulation. This reduction is consistent with both the slight decrease in net radiative forcing and a negative correlation between local vertical velocity and radiative forcing, which implies a damping of boundary layer eddies. Snapshot calculations of the broken cloud case suggest a slight increase in radiative cooling, though few systematic differences are noted in the interactive simulations. We attribute this result to the fact that radiative cooling is a relatively minor contribution to the total energetics. For the cloud systems in this study, the use of IPA longwave radiative transfer is sufficiently accurate to capture the dynamical behavior of BL clouds. Further investigations are required in order to generalize this conclusion for other cloud types and longer time integrations. 1

Mechem, David B.; Kogan, Y. L.; Ovtchinnikov, Mikhail; Davis, Anthony B; Evans, K. F.; Ellingson, Robert G.

2008-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

44

Improving Subtropical Boundary Layer Cloudiness in the 2011 NCEP GFS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The current operational version of National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) Global Forecasting System (GFS) shows significant low cloud bias. These biases also appear in the Coupled Forecast System (CFS), which is developed from the GFS. These low cloud biases degrade seasonal and longer climate forecasts, particularly of short-wave cloud radiative forcing, and affect predicted sea surface temperature. Reducing this bias in the GFS will aid the development of future CFS versions and contributes to NCEP's goal of unified weather and climate modelling. Changes are made to the shallow convection and planetary boundary layer parameterisations to make them more consistent with current knowledge of these processes and to reduce the low cloud bias. These changes are tested in a single-column version of GFS and in global simulations with GFS coupled to a dynamical ocean model. In the single-column model, we focus on changing parameters that set the following: the strength of shallow cumulus lateral entrainment, the conversion of updraught liquid water to precipitation and grid-scale condensate, shallow cumulus cloud top, and the effect of shallow convection in stratocumulus environments. Results show that these changes improve the single-column simulations when compared to large eddy simulations, in particular through decreasing the precipitation efficiency of boundary layer clouds. These changes, combined with a few other model improvements, also reduce boundary layer cloud and albedo biases in global coupled simulations.

Fletcher, J. K.; Bretherton, Christopher S.; Xiao, Heng; Sun, Ruiyu N.; Han, J.

2014-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

45

BOUNDARY LAYER (BL) THERMAL EDDIES OVER A PINE FOREST FROM CARES 2010  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BOUNDARY LAYER (BL) THERMAL EDDIES OVER A PINE FOREST FROM CARES 2010 Gunnar Senum and Stephen are three thermal eddies, about 250 meters wide, in the boundary layer. These thermal eddies are formed from the solar heating of the surface and help to form the boundary layer. The eddy updrafts are transporting

46

Simulation of bubble migration in a turbulent boundary layer M. Mattson and K. Mahesha  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Simulation of bubble migration in a turbulent boundary layer M. Mattson and K. Mahesha Aerospace of bubbles injected into a turbulent boundary layer. The Reynolds number of the turbulent boundary layer varies from 420 Re 1800, and the bubble Reynolds number Reb 1. Simulation parameters were chosen to match

Mahesh, Krishnan

47

A case study of boundary layer ventilation by convection and coastal processes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the pollution in the atmosphere originates from emissions in the atmospheric boundary layer, the region; published 12 September 2007. [1] It is often assumed that ventilation of the atmospheric boundary layer responsible for ventilation of the atmospheric boundary layer during a nonfrontal day that occurred on 9 May

Dacre, Helen

48

Transition in Hypersonic Boundary Layers: Role of Dilatational Waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Transition and turbulence production in a hypersonic boundary layer is investigated in a Mach 6 quiet wind tunnel using Rayleigh-scattering visualization, fast-response pressure measurements, and particle image velocimetry. It is found that the second instability acoustic mode is the key modulator of the transition process. The second mode experiences a rapid growth and a very fast annihilation due to the effect of bulk viscosity. The second mode interacts strongly with the first vorticity mode to directly promote a fast growth of the latter and leads to immediate transition to turbulence.

Zhu, Yiding; Yuan, Huijing; Wu, Jiezhi; Chen, Shiyi; Lee, Cunbiao; Gad-el-Hak, Mohamed

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Transforming the representation of the boundary layer and low clouds for high-resolution regional climate modeling: Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Stratocumulus and shallow cumulus clouds in subtropical oceanic regions (e.g., Southeast Pacific) cover thousands of square kilometers and play a key role in regulating global climate (e.g., Klein and Hartmann, 1993). Numerical modeling is an essential tool to study these clouds in regional and global systems, but the current generation of climate and weather models has difficulties in representing them in a realistic way (e.g., Siebesma et al., 2004; Stevens et al., 2007; Teixeira et al., 2011). While numerical models resolve the large-scale flow, subgrid-scale parameterizations are needed to estimate small-scale properties (e.g. boundary layer turbulence and convection, clouds, radiation), which have significant influence on the resolved scale due to the complex nonlinear nature of the atmosphere. To represent the contribution of these fine-scale processes to the resolved scale, climate models use various parameterizations, which are the main pieces in the model that contribute to the low clouds dynamics and therefore are the major sources of errors or approximations in their representation. In this project, we aim to 1) improve our understanding of the physical processes in thermal circulation and cloud formation, 2) examine the performance and sensitivity of various parameterizations in the regional weather model (Weather Research and Forecasting model; WRF), and 3) develop, implement, and evaluate the advanced boundary layer parameterization in the regional model to better represent stratocumulus, shallow cumulus, and their transition. Thus, this project includes three major corresponding studies. We find that the mean diurnal cycle is sensitive to model domain in ways that reveal the existence of different contributions originating from the Southeast Pacific land-masses. The experiments suggest that diurnal variations in circulations and thermal structures over this region are influenced by convection over the Peruvian sector of the Andes cordillera, while the mostly dry mountain-breeze circulations force an additional component that results in semi-diurnal variations near the coast. A series of numerical tests, however, reveal sensitivity of the simulations to the choice of vertical grid, limiting the possibility of solid quantitative statements on the amplitudes and phases of the diurnal and semidiurnal components across the domain. According to our experiments, the Mellor-Yamada-Nakanishi-Niino (MYNN) boundary layer scheme and the WSM6 microphysics scheme is the combination of schemes that performs best. For that combination, mean cloud cover, liquid water path, and cloud depth are fairly wellsimulated, while mean cloud top height remains too low in comparison to observations. Both microphysics and boundary layer schemes contribute to the spread in liquid water path and cloud depth, although the microphysics contribution is slightly more prominent. Boundary layer schemes are the primary contributors to cloud top height, degree of adiabaticity, and cloud cover. Cloud top height is closely related to surface fluxes and boundary layer structure. Thus, our study infers that an appropriate tuning of cloud top height would likely improve the low-cloud representation in the model. Finally, we show that entrainment governs the degree of adiabaticity, while boundary layer decoupling is a control on cloud cover. In the intercomparison study using WRF single-column model experiments, most parameterizations show a poor agreement of the vertical boundary layer structure when compared with large-eddy simulation models. We also implement a new Total-Energy/Mass- Flux boundary layer scheme into the WRF model and evaluate its ability to simulate both stratocumulus and shallow cumulus clouds. Result comparisons against large-eddy simulation show that this advanced parameterization based on the new Eddy-Diffusivity/Mass-Flux approach provides a better performance than other boundary layer parameterizations.

Huang, Hsin-Yuan; Hall, Alex

2013-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

50

EART 265 Lecture Notes: Boundary Layers We're interested here mainly in boundary layers relevant to planets, i.e. those of planetary atmo-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the bounding surface. Note that the vertical shear caused by the surface generates turbulence, whichEART 265 Lecture Notes: Boundary Layers We're interested here mainly in boundary layers relevant and the surface, thus mediating all interactions between the two. If we look back at the Navier-Stokes equations

Nimmo, Francis

51

Predictive Inner-Outer Model for Turbulent Boundary Layers Applied to Hypersonic DNS Data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Predictive Inner-Outer Model for Turbulent Boundary Layers Applied to Hypersonic DNS Data Clara numerical simulation (DNS) data of supersonic and hypersonic turbulent boundaries with Mach 3 and Mach 7, and Martin12­14 on DNS of hypersonic turbulent boundary layers demonstrates the existence of large scale

MartĂ­n, Pino

52

Heat transport by laminar boundary layer flow with polymers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Motivated by recent experimental observations, we consider a steady-state Prandtl-Blasius boundary layer flow with polymers above a slightly heated horizontal plate and study how the heat transport might be affected by the polymers. We discuss how a set of equations can be derived for the problem and how these equations can be solved numerically by an iterative scheme. By carrying out such a scheme, we find that the effect of the polymers is equivalent to producing a space-dependent effective viscosity that first increases from the zero-shear value at the plate then decreases rapidly back to the zero-shear value far from the plate. We further show that such an effective viscosity leads to an enhancement in the drag, which in turn leads to a reduction in heat transport.

Roberto Benzi; Emily S. C. Ching.; Vivien W. S. Chu

2011-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

53

Friction of a slider on a granular layer: Nonmonotonic thickness dependence and effect of boundary conditions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Friction of a slider on a granular layer: Nonmonotonic thickness dependence and effect of boundary the effective friction encountered by a mass sliding on a granular layer as a function of bed thickness and boundary roughness conditions. The observed friction has minima for a small number of layers before

Kudrolli, Arshad

54

Estimation of boundary layer transition noise from velocity measurements  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Velocity measurements of artificially generatedflow structures in the transition region of an incompressible boundary layer with zero pressure gradient are described. These measurements made in a laminar flow water channel allow calculation of the velocity normal to the wall in a turbulent spot. This velocity specifies the linearized boundary condition for the acoustic equation at the wall. The approach relates the radiated noise to fluctuations in the normal velocity at the plate through fluctuations in the displacement thickness. Although this approach has been previously proposed [H. W. Liepmann unpublished (1954) J. Laufer J. E. Ffowcs?Williams and S. Childress AGARDograph 90 39–42 (1964) G. C. Lauchle J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 69 665–671 (1981) G. C. Lauchle ASME NCA 5 31–38 (1989)] it has never been applied. The results of these experiments will be compared to concurrent experiments run in an anechoic wind tunnel. Ultimately this work will be extended to naturally occurring structures in the transition region. [Work supported by ONR under Grant ?N00014?90?J?1365.

Michael H. Krane; Wayne R. Pauley

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

A first order geometric auto regressive process for boundary layer wind speed simulation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Under certain conditions the first order geometric auto regressive (AR) process has statistical properties similar to atmospheric boundary layer wind speed. In this contribution, we investigate ... this stochas...

T. Laubrich; H. Kantz

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

About First Order Geometric Auto Regressive Processes for Boundary Layer Wind Speed Simulation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Under certain conditions the first order geometric auto regressive process has statistical properties similar to atmospheric boundary layer wind speed. In this contribution, we investigate ... this stochastic pro...

Thomas Laubrich; Holger Kantz

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Wind-Tunnel Simulation of the Wake of a Large Wind Turbine in a Stable Boundary Layer. Part 1: The Boundary-Layer Simulation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Measurements have been made in both a neutral and a stable boundary layer as part of an investigation of the wakes of wind turbines in an offshore environment, in the EnFlo stratified flow wind tunnel. The wor...

Philip E. Hancock; Frauke Pascheke

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Annual Variability of Sea Surface Height and Upper Layer Thickness in the Pacific Ocean  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The annual variabilities of the sea surface height in the Pacific Ocean were investigated by analyzing the TOPEX/POSEIDON ... the model results suggests that the eastern equatorial Pacific Ocean is relatively cal...

Yoshinobu Wakata; Shouko Kitaya

59

High resolution properties of the marine atmospheric boundary layer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) participated in the Central Equatorial Pacific Experiment (CEPEX) by fielding a water-vapor Raman lidar on board the Research Vessel Vickers. The lidar measured water vapor concentration from the surface to lower tropospheric altitudes in order to support the CEPEX goal of evaluating a hypothesis regarding feedback mechanisms for global circulation models. This report describes some of the features observed within the marine Atmospheric Boundary Layer (ABL) and the lower troposphere. Data was collected continuously 24 hours per day over the equatorial Pacific from March 8th to March 2 1st of 1993 while in route between Guadalcanal and Christmas Island (the transect was at approximately 2{degree} south latitude). The lidar collected vertical transects of water vapor concentration up to 10 km during night operations and 4 km in the day. The vertical lidar profiles of water vapor were produced by summing the data over a period up to 600 seconds. The water-vapor Raman lidar measured the properties of the marine ABL as well as the lower and mid-troposphere. From the lidar water vapor profiles, ``images`` of water vapor concentration versus altitude and date or sea surface temperature will be produced along with other products such as latent heat fluxes. The Raman water vapor lidar data will be used to better understand the role of transport and exchange at the ocean-atmosphere interface and throughout the marine atmosphere.

Cooper, D.; Cottingame, W.; Eichinger, W.; Forman, P.; Lebeda, C.; Poling, D.; Thorton, R.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Simulation of Hypersonic Shock Wave/Boundary Layer Interaction Using High Order WENO Scheme  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Simulation of Hypersonic Shock Wave/Boundary Layer Interaction Using High Order WENO Scheme Yiqing for predicting hypersonic shock wave/boundary layer interaction. The implicit time marching method number of 1.09 Ă? 105 /ft. 1 Introduction Hypersonic aerothermodynamics is one of the most challenging

Zha, Gecheng

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "boundary layer height" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Study of Emission TurbulenceRadiation Interaction in Hypersonic Boundary Layers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Study of Emission Turbulence­Radiation Interaction in Hypersonic Boundary Layers L. Duan and M. P of emission turbulence­radiation interaction in hypersonic turbulent boundary layers, representative interaction between turbulence and emission at the hypersonic environment under investigation. An explanation

MartĂ­n, Pino

62

Assessment of TurbulenceChemistry Interaction in Hypersonic Turbulent Boundary Layers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Assessment of Turbulence­Chemistry Interaction in Hypersonic Turbulent Boundary Layers L. Duan of the turbulence­chemistry interaction are performed in hypersonic turbulent boundary layers using direct numerical simulation flowfields under typical hypersonic conditions representative of blunt-body and slender- body

MartĂ­n, Pino

63

Study of turbulence-chemistry interaction in hypersonic turbulent boundary layers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Study of turbulence-chemistry interaction in hypersonic turbulent boundary layers Lian Duan and M of the turbulence-chemistry interaction (TCI) are performed in hypersonic tur- bulent boundary layers using direct numerical simulation (DNS) flow fields under typical hypersonic conditions representative of blunt

MartĂ­n, Pino

64

Development and propagation of a pollution gradient in the marine boundary layer during INDOEX (1999)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Development and propagation of a pollution gradient in the marine boundary layer during INDOEX (1999) Matthew Simpson and Sethu Raman Department of Marine, Earth, and Atmospheric Sciences, North and propagation of a pollution gradient in the marine boundary layer over the Arabian Sea during the Intensive

Raman, Sethu

65

Direct injection of ionospheric O sup + into the dayside low latitude boundary layer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Observations from the AMPTE/Charge Composition Explorer (AMPTE/CCE) indicate the presence of two distinct O{sup +} populations in the dayside subsolar low latitude boundary layer during some periods of northward Interplanetary Magnetic Field (IMF). The first population is O{sup +} convected into the boundary layer from the outer magnetosphere and has been reported previously. It is suggested here that the new, second, O{sup +} population is injected into the dayside boundary layer directly from the high latitude ionosphere. This second population can have a significant density and distinct characteristics such as field-aligned flow relative to boundary layer H{sup +} that modify both the plasma composition and dynamics in the low latitude boundary layer. {copyright} American Geophysical Union 1989

Fuselier, S.A.; Klumpar, D.M.; Peterson, W.K.; Shelley, E.G. (Lockheed Palo Alto Research Laboratory, Palo Alto, California (US))

1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

A study of wind speed modification and internal boundary-layer heights in a coastal region  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Wind profile data within the first two kilometres of a coast have been used to study the wind field modification downstream of this surface discontinuity. The land area is generally very flat, having an overal...

Hans Bergström; Per-Erik Johansson; Ann-Sofi Smedman

1988-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Boundary Layer Dynamics and Cross-Equatorial Hadley Circulation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The behavior of the Hadley circulation is analyzed in the context of an idealized axisymmetric atmosphere. It is argued that the cross-equatorial Hadley circulation exhibits two different regimes depending on the depth of the planetary boundary ...

Olivier Pauluis

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Observations of turbulent fluxes and turbulence dynamics in the ocean surface boundary layer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This study presents observations of turbulence dynamics made during the low winds portion of the Coupled Boundary Layers and Air-Sea Transfer experiment (CBLAST-Low). Observations were made of turbulent fluxes, turbulent ...

Gerbi, Gregory Peter

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Observational Boundary Layer Energy and Water Budgets of the Stratocumulus-to-Cumulus Transition  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The authors estimate summer mean boundary layer water and energy budgets along a northeast Pacific transect from 35° to 15°N, which includes the transition from marine stratocumulus to trade cumulus clouds. Observational data is used from three A-...

Peter Kalmus; Matthew Lebsock; Joăo Teixeira

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Properties of a Simulated Convective Boundary Layer in an Idealized Supercell Thunderstorm Environment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nearly all previous numerical simulations of supercell thunderstorms have neglected surface fluxes of heat, moisture, and momentum. This choice precludes horizontal inhomogeneities associated with dry boundary layer convection in the near-storm ...

Christopher J. Nowotarski; Paul M. Markowski; Yvette P. Richardson; George H. Bryan

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Wind Direction Dependence of Atmospheric Boundary Layer Turbulence Parameters in the Urban Roughness Sublayer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A variety of atmospheric boundary layer parameters are examined as a function of wind direction in both urban and suburban settings in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, derived from measurements during the Joint Urban 2003 field campaign. Heterogeneous ...

Cheryl Klipp

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Observations of Turbulence in the Ocean Surface Boundary Layer: Energetics and Transport  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Observations of turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) dynamics in the ocean surface boundary layer are presented here and compared with results from previous observational, numerical, and analytic studies. As in previous studies, ...

Gerbi, Gregory P.

73

Airship Measurements of Ship’s Exhaust Plumes and Their Effect on Marine Boundary Layer Clouds  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

High-resolution aerosol, trace gas, and cloud microphysical measurements were made from an airship during transects across ships exhaust plumes advecting downwind of ships in the marine boundary layer (MBL). This study was part of the Office of ...

G. M. Frick; W. A. Hoppel

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

The surface roughness effects in computation of the turbulent boundary layer on slender ship-hull  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An improved version of an integral method for computing turbulent boundary layers on a slender ship-hull with auxiliary shape parameter and lag- ... modifying an approximate technique of scaling model-to-ship rou...

Si-Young Kim; A. K. Lewkowicz

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Quantifying the Hygroscopic Growth of Marine Boundary Layer Aerosols by Satellite-base and Buoy Observations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this study, collocated satellite and buoy observations as well as satellite observations over an extended region during 2006-2010 were used to quantify the humidity effects on marine boundary layer (MBL) aerosols. Although the near-surface ...

Tao Luo; Renmin Yuan; Zhien Wang; Damao Zhang

76

Magnetic reconnection structures in the boundary layer of an interplanetary magnetic cloud  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An interplanetary magnetic diffusion region was detected by WIND during 0735-0850 UT on May 15, 1997 when the front boundary layer of a magnetic cloud passed through the spacecraft about 190 earth radii upstre...

Fengsi Wei; Rui Liu; Xueshang Feng…

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Near-surface wind estimates using statistics from a planetary boundary-layer model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper shows the possibilities of a procedure for estimating near-surface wind statistics, by means of the numerical integration of a simple boundary-layer model with a second-order turbulent closure. Stan...

J. C. Labraga

1988-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

An experimental study of the airflow over a hill in the atmospheric boundary layer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Between 1975 and 1977, the Centre Scientifique et Technique du Bâtiment (CSTB) carried out a study of the overspeed effect over a hill in the surface boundary layer. The hill in question was situated in open c...

C. Sacré

1979-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Nonlinear equilibration of baroclinic eddies : the role of boundary layer processes and seasonal forcing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this thesis, the influence of boundary layer processes and seasonal forcing on baroclinic eddy equilibration is studied to understand how the baroclinic adjustment is modified when taking into account these two factors. ...

Zhang, Yang, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Stability Analysis for a Saline Boundary Layer Formed by Uniform Up ow Using Finite Elements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

density in the deeper underground and high salt water density at the boundary layer), gravitation plays and Darcy's law. In this report we #12;rst give an overview of semi-analytical methods to analyse

Eindhoven, Technische Universiteit

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "boundary layer height" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

A Case Study of Mid-Atlantic Nocturnal Boundary Layer Events during WAVES 2006  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Water Vapor Variability-Satellite/Sondes (WAVES) 2006 field campaign provided a contiguous 5-day period of concentrated high-resolution measurements to examine finescale boundary layer phenomena under the influence of a summertime subtropical ...

S. Rabenhorst; D. N. Whiteman; D.-L. Zhang; B. Demoz

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Large-Eddy Simulation of Marine Atmospheric Boundary Layers above a Spectrum of Moving Waves  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Momentum and scalar transport in the marine atmospheric boundary layer (MABL) is driven by a turbulent mix of winds, buoyancy, and surface gravity waves. To investigate the interaction between these processes, a large-eddy simulation (LES) model ...

Peter P. Sullivan; James C. McWilliams; Edward G. Patton

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Numerical Modeling of the Propagation Environment in the Atmospheric Boundary Layer over the Persian Gulf  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Strong vertical gradients at the top of the atmospheric boundary layer affect the propagation of electromagnetic waves and can produce radar ducts. A three-dimensional, time-dependent, nonhydrostatic numerical model was used to simulate the ...

B. W. Atkinson; J-G. Li; R. S. Plant

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Advances in the visualization and analysis of boundary layer flow in swimming fish  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In biology, the importance of fluid drag, diffusion, and heat transfer both internally and externally, suggest the boundary layer as an important subject of investigation, however, the complexities of biological systems ...

Anderson, Erik J

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Transport Processes in the Tropical Warm Pool Boundary Layer. Part II: Vertical Structure and Variability  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The structure of the intertropical convergence zone ITCZ cloud-topped marine atmospheric boundary layer away from the most intense mesoscale convective systems during the Tropical Ocean Global Atmosphere Coupled Ocean–Atmosphere Response ...

A. G. Williams; J. M. Hacker; H. Kraus

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Uncertainty in Contaminant Concentration Fields Resulting from Atmospheric Boundary Layer Depth Uncertainty  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The relationship between atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) depth uncertainty and uncertainty in atmospheric transport and dispersion (ATD) simulations is investigated by examining profiles of predicted concentrations of a contaminant. Because ...

Brian P. Reen; Kerrie J. Schmehl; George S. Young; Jared A. Lee; Sue Ellen Haupt; David R. Stauffer

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Lidar-Observed Stress Vectors and Veer in the Atmospheric Boundary Layer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study demonstrates that a pulsed wind lidar is a reliable instrument for measuring angles between horizontal vectors of significance in the atmospheric boundary layer. Three different angles are considered: the wind turning, the angle between ...

Jacob Berg; Jakob Mann; Edward G. Patton

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

On the magnetospheric boundary layer and solar wind energy transfer into the magnetosphere  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The magnetopause and the magnetospheric boundary layer constitute the interface between the shocked solar wind plasma and the terrestrial magnetic cavity populated by a predominantly hot plasma in the outer po...

Rickard Lundin

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Investigation of the Diurnal Variation of Marine Boundary Layer Cloud Microphysical Properties at the Azores  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A new method has been developed to retrieve the nighttime marine boundary layer (MBL) cloud microphysical properties, which provides a complete 19-month dataset to investigate the diurnal variation of MBL cloud microphysical properties at the ...

Xiquan Dong; Baike Xi; Peng Wu

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Influence of surface heating on the boundary layer stability of flows with favorable pressure gradients  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INFLUENCE OF SURFACE HEATING ON THE BOUNDARY LAYER STABILITY OF FLOWS WITH FAVORABI E PRESSURE GRADIENTS A Thesis by DAVID BRIAN LANDRUM Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas AAM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1986 Major Subject: Aerospace Engineering INFLUENCE OF SURFACE HEATING ON THE BOUNDARY LAYER STABILITY OF FLOWS WITH FAVORABLE PRESSURE GRADIENTS A Thesis by DAVID BRIAN LANDRUM Approved as to style and content...

Landrum, David Brian

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

91

Effect of a surface boundary layer on an intensifying, downward-propagating vortex  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EFFECT OF A SURFACE BOUNDARY LAYER ON AN INTENSIFYING, DOWNWARD-PROPAGATING VORTEX A Thesis by VINCENT TUNSTALL WOOD Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE May 1977 Major Subject: Meteorology EFFECT OF A SURFACE BOUNDARY LAYER ON AN INTENSIFYING, DOWNWARD-PROPAGATING VORTEX A Thesis by VINCENT TUNSTALL WOOD Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of Committee) (Head of Department...

Wood, Vincent Tunstall

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

92

The development of a low velocity wind tunnel with instrumentation for boundary layer investigations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE DEVELOPMENT OF A LOW VELOCITY WIND TUNNEL WITH INSTRUMENTATION FOR BOUNDARY LAYER INVESTIGATIONS A Dissertation B y John Robert Massey Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas in partial... fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY May 1958 Major Subject: Mechanical Engineering THE DEVELOPMENT OF A LOW VELOCITY WIND TUNNEL WITH INSTRUMENTATION FOR BOUNDARY LAYER INVESTIGATIONS A Dissertation By John Robert...

Massey, John Robert

2013-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

93

Tide-Induced Sediment Resuspension and the Bottom Boundary Layer in an Idealized Estuary with a Muddy Bed  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Sediment transport and bottom boundary layer (BBL) in an idealized estuary with a muddy bed were studied by numerical simulations. The focus was placed on description and prediction of the dynamics of nepheloid layer (a fluid–mud layer) developed ...

X. H. Wang

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

THE HORIZONTAL BOUNDARY-LAYER STRUCTURE FOR THE CONVECTIVE REGIME IN A LATERALLY HEATED VERTICAL SLOT  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......for the case when the horizontal walls of the slot are...and a main two-tier horizontal boundary layer is identified...closed form for the outer horizontal layer which is dominated...reactor cooling systems, solar collectors and cavity insulation......

P. G. DANIELS

1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Role of Amorphous Boundary Layer in Enhancing Ionic Conductivity of Lithium–lanthanum–titanate Electrolyte  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The low ionic conductivity is a bottleneck of the inorganic solid state electrolyte used for lithium ion battery. In ceramic electrolytes, grain boundary usually dominates the total conductivity. In order to improve the grain boundary effect, an amorphous silica layer is introduced into grain boundary of ceramic electrolytes based on lithium-lanthanum-titanate, as evidenced by electron microscopy. The results showed that the total ionic conductivity could be to be enhanced over 1 x 10{sup -4} S/cm at room temperature. The reasons can be attributed to removing the anisotropy of outer-shell of grains, supplement of lithium ions in various sites in grain boundary and close bindings among grains by the amorphous boundary layer among grains.

Mei, A.; Wang, X.; Lana, J.-L.; Fenga, Y.-C.; Genga, H.-X.; Lina, Y.-H.; Nana, C.-W.

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Thermal boundary layer effects in an annular acoustic Stirling engine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A stability and transport analysis is performed for a simplified model of a strongly coupled thermoacoustic prime mover stack in an annular resonator. The result demonstrates that even in the limit that other flow impedances of the resonator and stack can be ignored there is a thermal impedance mismatch created in the boundary region at the ends of the stack. This can cause the gain predicted for the wave traversing the interior of the stack to differ significantly from the gain that drives sound in the resonator. The analysis is used to derive scaling relations between the heat and mass transport around the annulus and to show how different scaling regimes relate to the maximum sound intensity that the stack can induce in the absence of other losses.

Eric Smith

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Wake Turbulence of Two NREL 5-MW Wind Turbines Immersed in a Neutral Atmospheric Boundary-Layer Flow  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The fluid dynamics video considers an array of two NREL 5-MW turbines separated by seven rotor diameters in a neutral atmospheric boundary layer (ABL). The neutral atmospheric boundary-layer flow data were obtained from a precursor ABL simulation using a Large-Eddy Simulation (LES) framework within OpenFOAM. The mean wind speed at hub height is 8m/s, and the surface roughness is 0.2m. The actuator line method (ALM) is used to model the wind turbine blades by means of body forces added to the momentum equation. The fluid dynamics video shows the root and tip vortices emanating from the blades from various viewpoints. The vortices become unstable and break down into large-scale turbulent structures. As the wakes of the wind turbines advect further downstream, smaller-scale turbulence is generated. It is apparent that vortices generated by the blades of the downstream wind turbine break down faster due to increased turbulence levels generated by the wake of the upstream wind turbine.

Bashioum, Jessica L; Schmitz, Sven; Duque, Earl P N

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

A novel Whole Air Sample Profiler (WASP) for the quantification of volatile organic compounds in the boundary layer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The emission and fate of reactive VOCs is of inherent interest to those studying chemical biosphere-atmosphere interactions. In-canopy VOC observations are obtainable using tower-based samplers, but the lack of suitable sampling systems for the full boundary 5 layer has limited the data characterizing the vertical structure of such gases above the canopy height and still in the boundary layer. This is the important region where many reactive VOCs are oxidized or otherwise removed. Here we describe an airborne sampling system designed to collect a vertical profile of air into a 3/800 OD tube 150m in length. The inlet ram air pressure is used to flow sampled air through the 10 tube, which results in a varying flow rate based on aircraft speed and altitude. Since aircraft velocity decreases during ascent, it is necessary to account for the variable flow rate into the tube. This is accomplished using a reference gas that is pulsed into the air stream so that the precise altitude of the collected air can be reconstructed post-collection. The pulsed injections are also used to determine any significant effect 15 from diffusion/mixing within the sampling tube, either during collection or subsequent extraction for gas analysis. This system has been successfully deployed, and we show some measured vertical profiles of isoprene and its oxidation products methacrolein and methyl vinyl ketone from a mixed canopy near Columbia, Missouri.

Mak, J. E.; Su, L.; Guenther, Alex B.; Karl, Thomas G.

2013-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

99

Comparison of two-equation turbulence models for boundary layers with pressure gradient  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper compares the performance of eight low Reynolds number k-epsilon and k-omega models for high Reynolds number, incompressible turbulent boundary layers with favorable, zero, and adverse pressure gradients. Results obtained underscore the k-epsilon model's unsuitability for such flows. Even more seriously, the k-epsilon model is demonstrated to be inconsistent with the well-established physical structure of the turbulent boundary layer, and low Reynolds number corrections cannot remove the inconsistency. By contrast, the k-omega model, with and without low Reynolds number modifications, proves to be very accurate for all of the tests conducted. 16 refs.

Wilcox, D.C. (DCW Industries, Inc., La Canada, CA (United States))

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

The effect of periodic unsteady wakes on boundary layer transition and heat transfer on a curved plate.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The effect of unsteady periodic wakes on heat transfer and boundary layer transition was investigated on a constant curvature heat transfer curved plate in a… (more)

Wright, Lance Cole

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "boundary layer height" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Effects of passive porous walls on the first Mack mode instability of hypersonic boundary layers over a sharp cone.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Passive porous coatings have been proposed in literature as a means of delaying transition to turbulence in hypersonic boundary layers. The nonlinear stability of hypersonic… (more)

Michael, Vipin George

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

On the Representation of High-Latitude Boundary Layer Mixed-Phase Cloud in the ECMWF Global Model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Supercooled liquid water (SLW) layers in boundary layer clouds are abundantly observed in the atmosphere at high latitudes, but remain a challenge to represent in numerical weather prediction (NWP) and climate models. Unresolved processes such as ...

Richard M. Forbes; Maike Ahlgrimm

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

BOUNDARY LAYER ASSOCIATED WITH THE DARCY-BRINKMAN-BOUSSINESQ MODEL FOR  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BOUNDARY LAYER ASSOCIATED WITH THE DARCY-BRINKMAN-BOUSSINESQ MODEL FOR CONVECTION IN POROUS MEDIA of the infinite Darcy- Prandtl number Darcy-Brinkman-Boussinesq system for convection in porous media at small number Darcy-Brinkman-Boussinesq system, infinite Darcy-Prandtl number Darcy-Boussinesq sys- tem

Wang, Xiaoming

104

Acoustic boundary layer and acoustic radiation from a ribbed flat plate  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The acoustic boundary?layer theory(patterned after the viscous boundary?layer theory) is derived by noting that for low frequencies where the structural wavelength is much less than the fluid acoustic wavelength there is a region about the vibrating structure which behaves as if the fluid was incompressible. The dimension of this region depends upon the particular conditions of the problem. In a paper presented by the author [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 62 S32(A) (1977)] the theory behind the acoustic boundary layer was developed and applied to simple unit problems. In this paper the near and the far field of a force driven plate is obtained by the use of the acoustic boundary?layer theory. Two different problems are addressed. In the first instance the structure is assumed to be homogeneous while in the second problem presented a rib is attached to the flat plate. In both instances the fully coupled fluid structure problem is solved and comparisons between the exact classical approach and the proposed theory are discussed.

Mauro Pierucci

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Transport and Resuspension of Fine Particles in a Tidal Boundary Layer near a Small Peninsula  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The authors present a theory on the transport and resuspension of fine particles in a tidal boundary layer when the ambient tidal flow is nonuniform due to a peninsula along the coastline. As a first step toward better physical understanding the ...

Chiang C. Mei; Chimin Chian; Feng Ye

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Device for measuring the boundary layer parameters in a high-temperature gas stream  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors describe a device enabling one to simultaneously measure the distributions of electrical conductivity and electron density of the working substance of an MHD generator. The structure and a block diagram of the device are shown. The measured results give information on the thermal boundary layer thickness, and temperature profiles are calculated.

Kosov, V.F.; Molotkov, V.I.; Nefedov, A.P.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

The Impact of Horizontal Model Grid Resolution on the Boundary Layer Structure over an Idealized Valley  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The role of horizontal model grid resolution on the development of the daytime boundary layer over mountainous terrain is studied. A simple idealized valley topography with a cross-valley width of 20 km, a valley depth of 1.5 km, and a constant ...

Johannes S. Wagner; Alexander Gohm; Mathias W. Rotach

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Acoustic Properties of Porous Coatings for Hypersonic Boundary-Layer Control  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Acoustic Properties of Porous Coatings for Hypersonic Boundary-Layer Control Guillaume A. Brès for hypersonic laminar flow control. The reflection coefficient, characterizing the ratio of the reflected wave of incidence, for coatings of different porosities, at various acoustic Reynolds numbers relevant to hypersonic

Dabiri, John O.

109

Effect of Finite-rate Chemical Reactions on Turbulence in Hypersonic Turbulent Boundary Layers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Effect of Finite-rate Chemical Reactions on Turbulence in Hypersonic Turbulent Boundary Layers Lian on future air-breathing hypersonic cruise vehicles will be turbulent and chemically reacting. To aid the design of such vehicles, a greater understanding of turbulent hypersonic flows is needed. Although

MartĂ­n, Pino

110

Direct Numerical Simulation of a Hypersonic Turbulent Boundary Layer on a Large Domain  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Direct Numerical Simulation of a Hypersonic Turbulent Boundary Layer on a Large Domain Stephan Priebe , M. Pino Mart´in The direct numerical simulation (DNS) of a spatially-developing hypersonic There are few studies of hypersonic flows at Mach number greater than 5 and few involve the measurement of mean

MartĂ­n, Pino

111

EUROPEAN CONFERENCE FOR AEROSPACE SCIENCES Shock Wave / Boundary Layer Interactions in Hypersonic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and a combina- tion of laminar and turbulent (transitional) computations as well as preliminary 3D simulations the impact on the shock / boundary layer interaction and on the size of the shock induced separation. Laminar have been conducted and show the experimental shock-tunnel results to be influenced by transition and 3

112

Performance of an Eddy Diffusivity–Mass Flux Scheme for Shallow Cumulus Boundary Layers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Comparisons between single-column (SCM) simulations with the total energy–mass flux boundary layer scheme (TEMF) and large-eddy simulations (LES) are shown for four cases from the Gulf of Mexico Atmospheric Composition and Climate Study (GoMACCS) ...

Wayne M. Angevine; Hongli Jiang; Thorsten Mauritsen

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

The Minimum Wind Speed for Sustainable Turbulence in the Nocturnal Boundary Layer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The collapse of turbulence in the nocturnal boundary layer is studied by means of a simple bulk model that describes the basic physical interactions in the surface energy balance. It is shown that for a given mechanical forcing, the amount of ...

B. J. H. Van de Wiel; A. F. Moene; H. J. J. Jonker; P. Baas; S. Basu; J. M. M. Donda; J. Sun; A. A. M. Holtslag

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Modeling the Atmospheric Boundary Layer Wind Response to Mesoscale Sea Surface Temperature  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(WRF) and COAMPS atmospheric models. The SST-induced wind response is assessed from eight simulations of the surface wind relative to the SST gradient. #12;3 1. Introduction Positive correlations of local surfaceModeling the Atmospheric Boundary Layer Wind Response to Mesoscale Sea Surface Temperature Natalie

Kurapov, Alexander

115

Shock-like structures in the tropical cyclone boundary layer Gabriel J. Williams,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the horizontal and vertical velocity data shown by the blue curves in Figure 1. The extreme horizontal wind m in the northeast sector. Since these extreme structures in the boundary layer wind field occur produces a shock-like structure in the radial wind, i.e., near the radius of maximum tangential wind

Schubert, Wayne H.

116

Computation of hypersonic shock boundary layer interaction on a double wedge using a differential Reynolds Stress Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Computation of hypersonic shock boundary layer interaction on a double wedge using a differential The simulation of hypersonic flows presents some difficulties due to the interaction between boundary layers on the standard test case of a subsonic flat plate and on a hypersonic configuration. The results show a good

117

Accumulation mode aerosol, pockets of open cells, and particle nucleation in the remote subtropical Pacific marine boundary layer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Accumulation mode aerosol, pockets of open cells, and particle nucleation in the remote subtropical in the remote subtropical Pacific marine boundary layer, J. Geophys. Res., 111, D02206, doi:10.1029/2004JD005694 the boundary layer via its action on the budgets of heat and water substance. A plausible consequence may

Russell, Lynn

118

Surface barrier height for different Al compositions and barrier layer thicknesses in AlGaN/GaN heterostructure field effect transistors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper, we present a physics based analytical model for the calculation of surface barrier height for given values of barrier layer thicknesses and Al mole fractions. An explicit expression for the two dimensional electron gas density is also developed incorporating the change in polarization charges for different Al mole fractions.

Goyal, Nitin, E-mail: goyalnitin.iitr@gmail.com; Fjeldly, Tor A. [Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim (Norway); Iniguez, Benjamin [Universitat Rovira i Virgili, Tarragona (Spain)

2013-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

119

Resuspension of Small Particles from Multilayer Deposits in Turbulent Boundary Layers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a hybrid stochastic model for the resuspension of micron-size particles from multilayer deposits in a fully-developed turbulent boundary layer. The rate of removal of particles from any given layer depends upon the rate of removal of particles from the layer above which acts as a source of uncovering and exposure of particles to the resuspending flow. The primary resuspension rate constant for an individual particle within a layer is based on the Rock'n'Roll (R'n'R) model using non-Gaussian statistics for the aerodynamic forces acting on the particles (Zhang et al., 2012). The coupled layer equations that describe multilayer resuspension of all the particles in each layer are based on the generic lattice model of Friess & Yadigaroglu (2001) which is extended here to include the influence of layer coverage and particle size distribution. We consider the influence of layer thickness on the resuspension along with the spread of adhesion within layers, and the statistics of non-Gaussian versus Gaussian removal forces including their timescale. Unlike its weak influence on long-term resuspension rates for monolayers, this timescale plays a crucial and influential role in multilayer resuspension. Finally we compare model predictions with those of a large-scale and a mesoscale resuspension test, STORM (Castelo et al., 1999) and BISE (Alloul-Marmor, 2002).

F. Zhang; M. Reeks; M. Kissane; R. J. Perkins

2012-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

120

Resuspension of small particles from multilayer deposits in turbulent boundary layers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper describes a hybrid kinetic model for the resuspension of micron-size particles from multilayer deposits in a fully developed turbulent boundary layer. The rate of removal of particles from any given layer depends upon the rate of removal of particles from the layer above which acts as a source of uncovering and exposure of particles to the resuspending flow. The primary resuspension rate constant for an individual particle within a layer is based on the Rock'n'Roll (R'n'R) model using non-Gaussian statistics for the aerodynamic removal forces acting on the particles (Zhang et al., 2013). The coupled layer equations that describe multilayer resuspension of all the particles in each layer are based on the generic lattice model of Friess & Yadigaroglu (2001) which is extended here to include the influence of layer coverage and particle size distribution. The model is used to investigate a range of effects, including the influence of layer thickness on resuspension, the spread of inter-particle adhesive forces within layers, Gaussian and non-Gaussian pdfs for the removal forces and the associated timescales. Finally model predictions are compared with data from two resuspension experiments – STORM (Castelo et al., 1999) and BISE (Alloul-Marmor, 2002).

F. Zhang; M.W. Reeks; M.P. Kissane; R.J. Perkins

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "boundary layer height" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Raman lidar/AERI PBL Height Product  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

Planetary Boundary Layer (PBL) heights have been computed using potential temperature profiles derived from Raman lidar and AERI measurements. Raman lidar measurements of the rotational Raman scattering from nitrogen and oxygen are used to derive vertical profiles of potential temperature. AERI measurements of downwelling radiance are used in a physical retrieval approach (Smith et al. 1999, Feltz et al. 1998) to derive profiles of temperature and water vapor. The Raman lidar and AERI potential temperature profiles are merged to create a single potential temperature profile for computing PBL heights. PBL heights were derived from these merged potential temperature profiles using a modified Heffter (1980) technique that was tailored to the SGP site (Della Monache et al., 2004). PBL heights were computed on an hourly basis for the period January 1, 2009 through December 31, 2011. These heights are provided as meters above ground level.

Ferrare, Richard

122

The effects of sound on the boundary layer of an airfoil at high angles of attack  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

* Numbers in parentheses refer to the References. introducing sound waves into the airstream by means of a variable-frequency oscillator and a loudspeaker mounted near the leading edge of a flat plate. Eventually, another method of producing... these disturbances was settled upon, but several interesting results caused by the use of sound were noted. Laminar boundary layer oscillations could be induced, depending upon the proper combination of sound frequency, speaker position, and free stream velocity...

Hutchinson, Thomas Ira

1963-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Modelling the Effect of Ocean Waves on the Atmospheric and Ocean Boundary Layers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Ocean waves, in addition to generating direct forces on fixed and floating offshore wind generator structures, also have significant indirect effects via their influence on the atmospheric and oceanic boundary layers above and below the water surface. In the atmospheric boundary layer the waves act as roughness elements, influencing the turbulent flow and the vertical wind speed profile, and induce oscillatory motions in the airflow. Spray droplets from breaking wave crests enhance structure corrosion, and may lead to icing under low-temperature conditions. Below the water surface, the air-sea momentum flux and mechanical energy flux, mediated by the waves and wave-generated turbulence, affect the vertical profiles of ocean current, temperature, and salinity. Effects include modifying the structural forces and dynamics, and the movement and dispersion of marine organisms, pollutants, and air bubbles generated by breaking waves, with consequences for fouling, corrosion, and environmental impact. Measurement of relevant airflow and ocean dynamical variables is also challenging, as near the water surface it is often necessary to use instruments mounted on moving measurement platforms. Modelling such boundary-layer effects is a complex task, as a result of feedbacks between the airflow, wave field, current field, and turbulence in the atmosphere and the ocean. We present results from a coupled model study of the North Sea and Norwegian Sea area. We employ a mesoscale atmosphere model (WRF) and a spectral wave model (WAM), running simultaneously and coupled using the open-source coupler MCEL which can interpolate between different model grids and time steps. To investigate the ocean boundary layer, one-dimensional model experiments were performed for an idealized Ekman layer and for locations in the North Sea, Atlantic Ocean, and the northern Pacific, using a version of the GOTM turbulence model, modified to take wave dynamics into account. Results show how the wave field alters the ocean's aerodynamic roughness and the air–sea momentum flux, depending on the relation between the surface wind speed and the propagation speed of the wave crests (the wave age). These effects will feed back into the airflow, wind speed and turbulence profile in the boundary layer. The ocean dynamics experiments showed results which compare favourably with field observations from the LOTUS3 and PROVESS experiments in the north Atlantic and North Sea, and Ocean Weather Station Papa in the Pacific Ocean.

Alastair D. Jenkins; Mostafa Bakhoday Paskyabi; Ilker Fer; Alok Gupta; Muralidhar Adakudlu

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Observations of the Evolution of the Nocturnal and Convective Boundary Layers and the Structure of Open-Celled Convection on 14 June 2002  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Boundary Layer Evolution (BLE) missions of the International H2O Project (IHOP_2002) were designed to provide comprehensive observations of the distribution of water vapor in the quiescent boundary layer and its evolution during the early ...

Lindsay J. Bennett; Tammy M. Weckwerth; Alan M. Blyth; Bart Geerts; Qun Miao; Yvette P. Richardson

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

34th AIAA Fluid Dynamics Conference and Exhibit, June 28July 1, 2004/Portland, OR DNS of Hypersonic Turbulent Boundary Layers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Hypersonic Turbulent Boundary Layers M. Pino Martin Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering and hypersonic turbu- lent boundary layers. The systematic procedure for initializing the turbulent flow fields layers is important in advancing supersonic and hypersonic flight technology. In a high-speed boundary

MartĂ­n, Pino

126

Continuous daily observation of the marine atmospheric boundary layer over the Kuroshio current by a helicopter shuttle service  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We describe a new initiative in which in-situ observations of the marine atmospheric boundary layer (MABL) are made by a helicopter shuttle connecting six islands south of Tokyo. This observation method aims to make frequent measurements of ...

Youichi Tanimoto; Kou Shimoyama; Shoichi Mori

127

The Effect of Heavy Oil Viscosity Reduction by Solvent Dissolution on Natural Convection in the Boundary Layer of VAPEX  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We have studied the effect of viscosity on natural convection in the boundary layer of the vapor extraction (VAPEX) process. VAPEX is a heavy oil recovery method that uses solvents to reduce oil viscosity, and...

Mohammad Javaheri; Jalal Abedi

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

A Climatological Study of Boundary Layer Wind Speed Using a Meso-?-Scale Higher-Order Closure Model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A mesoscale higher-order closure atmospheric boundary layer model has been used to get more detailed information than is possible from observations regarding horizontal and vertical variations of the wind in an area in southeastern Sweden. To ...

Hans Bergström

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Mean Structure and diurnal cycle of Southeast Atlantic boundary layer clouds: Insights from satellite observations and multiscale modeling framework simulations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The mean structure and diurnal cycle of Southeast (SE) Atlantic boundary layer clouds are described with satellite observations and multi-scale modeling framework (MMF) simulations during austral spring (September-November). Hourly resolution ...

David Painemal; Kuan-Man Xu; Anning Cheng; Patrick Minnis; Rabindra Palikonda

130

Effect of Finite Spatial Resolution on the Turbulent Energy Spectrum Measured in the Coastal Ocean Bottom Boundary Layer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The effect of finite spatial resolution on the measured energy spectrum is examined via a parametric study using in situ particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurements performed in the bottom boundary layer on the Atlantic continental shelf. Two-...

Erin E. Hackett; Luksa Luznik; Joseph Katz; Thomas R. Osborn

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Doppler Lidar–Based Wind-Profile Measurement System for Offshore Wind-Energy and Other Marine Boundary Layer Applications  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Accurate measurement of wind speed profiles aloft in the marine boundary layer is a difficult challenge. The development of offshore wind energy requires accurate information on wind speeds above the surface at least at the levels occupied by ...

Yelena L. Pichugina; Robert M. Banta; W. Alan Brewer; Scott P. Sandberg; R. Michael Hardesty

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Preliminary Results from Long-Term Measurements of Atmospheric Moisture in the Marine Boundary Layer in the Gulf of Mexico*  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Measurements of boundary layer moisture have been acquired from Rotronic MP-100 sensors deployed on two National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) buoys in the northern Gulf of Mexico from June through November 1993. For one sensor that was retrieved ...

Laurence C. Breaker; David B. Gilhousen; Lawrence D. Burroughs

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Glacial Cooling in the Tropics: Exploring the Roles of Tropospheric Water Vapor, Surface Wind Speed, and Boundary Layer Processes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper is a modeling study of possible roles for tropospheric water vapor, surface wind speed, and boundary layer processes in glacial cooling in the Tropics. The authors divide the Tropics into a region of persistent deep convection and a ...

Richard Seager; Amy C. Clement; Mark A. Cane

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

A Comparison Between Boundary Layer Measurements in a Laminar Separation Bubble Flow and Linear Stability Theory Calculations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This research examines the details of the boundary layer flowfield from wind tunnel measurements of a two-dimensional Liebeck LA2573A airfoil over a range of Reynolds numbers from 235000 to 500000. In this range,...

P. LeBlanc; R. Blackwelder; R. Liebeck

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Highly Accurate Solutions of the Blasius and Falkner-Skan Boundary Layer Equations via Convergence Acceleration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A new highly accurate algorithm for the solution of the Falkner-Skan equation of boundary layer theory is presented. The algorithm, based on a Maclaurin series representation, finds its coefficients from recurrence. In addition, Wynn-epsilon convergence acceleration and continuous analytical continuation enable an accurate evaluation. The most accurate skin friction coefficients (shooting angle) to date are presented along with comparisons to past and present values found in the literature. The algorithm, coded in FORTRAN, uses neither enhanced precision arithmetic beyond quadruple precision nor computer algebra to achieve results in a timely fashion. Key Words: Falkner-Skan flow; Blasius flow; Wynn-epsilon acceleration; Romberg acceleration; Continuous analytical continuation

B. D. Ganapol

2010-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

136

Planetary boundary layer depth in Global climate models induced biases in surface climatology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Earth has warmed in the last century with the most rapid warming occurring near the surface in the arctic. This enhanced surface warming in the Arctic is partly because the extra heat is trapped in a thin layer of air near the surface due to the persistent stable-stratification found in this region. The warming of the surface air due to the extra heat depends upon the amount of turbulent mixing in the atmosphere, which is described by the depth of the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL). In this way the depth of the ABL determines the effective response of the surface air temperature to perturbations in the climate forcing. The ABL depth can vary from tens of meters to a few kilometers which presents a challenge for global climate models which cannot resolve the shallower layers. Here we show that the uncertainties in the depth of the ABL can explain up to 60 percent of the difference between the simulated and observed surface air temperature trends and 50 percent of the difference in temperature variability...

Davy, Richard

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Model of the boundary layer of a vacuum-arc magnetic filter  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A model is developed to describe the electrostatic boundary layer in a positively biased magnetic filter in filtered arcs with low collisionality. The set of equations used includes the electron momentum equation, with an anomalous collision term due to micro-instabilities leading to Bohm diffusion, electron mass conservation, and Poisson equation. Analytical solutions are obtained, valid for the regimes of interest, leading to an explicit expression to determine the electron density current to the filter wall as a function of the potential of the filter and the ratio of electron density at the plasma to that at the filter wall. Using a set of planar and cylindrical probes it is verified experimentally that the mentioned ratio of electron densities remains reasonably constant for different magnetic field values and probe bias, which allows to obtain a closed expression for the current. Comparisons are made with the experimentally determined current collected at different sections of a positively biased straight filter.

Minotti, F.; Giuliani, L.; Grondona, D.; Della Torre, H.; Kelly, H. [Departamento de Fisica, FCEyN, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Instituto de Fisica del Plasma, CONICET-UBA, Cdad. Universitaria, Pab.I, 1428 Buenos Aires (Argentina)

2013-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

138

Pulsed Plasma with Synchronous Boundary Voltage for Rapid Atomic Layer Etching  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Atomic Layer ETching (ALET) of a solid with monolayer precision is a critical requirement for advancing nanoscience and nanotechnology. Current plasma etching techniques do not have the level of control or damage-free nature that is needed for patterning delicate sub-20 nm structures. In addition, conventional ALET, based on pulsed gases with long reactant adsorption and purging steps, is very slow. In this work, novel pulsed plasma methods with synchronous substrate and/or “boundary electrode” bias were developed for highly selective, rapid ALET. Pulsed plasma and tailored bias voltage waveforms provided controlled ion energy and narrow energy spread, which are critical for highly selective and damage-free etching. The broad goal of the project was to investigate the plasma science and engineering that will lead to rapid ALET with monolayer precision. A combined experimental-simulation study was employed to achieve this goal.

Economou, Demetre J.; Donnelly, Vincent M.

2014-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

139

Electron distributions observed with Langmuir waves in the plasma sheet boundary layer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The present paper investigates the Langmuir turbulence driven by counter-streaming electron beams and its plausible association with observed features in the Earth's plasma sheet boundary layer region. A one-dimensional electrostatic particle-in-cell simulation code is employed in order to simulate broadband electrostatic waves with characteristic frequency in the vicinity of the electron plasma frequency ?/?{sub pe}?1.0. The present simulation confirms that the broadband electrostatic waves may indeed be generated by the counter-streaming electron beams. It is also found that the observed feature associated with low energy electrons, namely quasi-symmetric velocity space plateaus, are replicated according to the present simulation. However, the present investigation only partially succeeds in generating the suprathermal tails such that the origin of observed quasi power-law energetic population formation remains outstanding.

Hwang, Junga [Solar and Space Weather Research Group, Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute, Daejeon 305-348 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Astronomy and Space Science, University of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Rha, Kicheol [Department of Physics, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Seough, Jungjoon [Solar and Space Weather Research Group, Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute, Daejeon 305-348 (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Peter H. [School of Space Research, Kyung Hee University, Yongin-Si, Gyeonggi-Do 446-701 (Korea, Republic of); Institute for Physical Science and Technology, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States)

2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

140

Boundary layer flow and heat transfer analysis of a second-grade fluid  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Boundary layer flow and heat transfer analysis of a homogeneous, incompressible, non-Newtonian fluid of grade two at a stagnation point is presented. The flow is assumed to be steady and laminar. A power-law representation is assumed for the velocity distribution and wall temperature variation. The governing equations are solved using an iterative central difference approximation method in a non-uniform grid domain. This analysis show the effect of non-Newtonian nature of the fluid and the effect of suction/injection on the velocity profile. The effect of non-Newtonian nature of the fluid on the heat transfer coefficient at the wall for different values of Prandtl number and wall-temperature variation is also presented. (VC)

Massoudi, M. [USDOE Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center, PA (United States); Ramezan, M. [Burns and Roe Services Corp., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "boundary layer height" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

LES of a Spatially Developing Atmospheric Boundary Layer: Application of a Fringe Method for the Stratocumulus to Shallow Cumulus Cloud Transition  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An arrangement of a large-eddy simulation (LES) is described that facilitates a spatially developing thermally stratified atmospheric boundary layer (ABL). When the inflow and outflow boundary conditions are specified, the LES of stably stratified ...

M. Inoue; G. Matheou; J. Teixeira

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Boundary-Layer Meteorol (2008) 127:7395 DOI 10.1007/s10546-007-9255-9  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-scale (SFS) models to reproduce the statistical proper- ties of SFS stresses and energy transfers over boundary layer. In this study, several SFS models are evaluated a priori using experimental data acquired down- wind of a rough-to-smooth transition in a wind tunnel. The SFS models studied include the eddy

Porté-Agel, Fernando

143

IMPACT OF BOUNDARY-LAYER CUTTING AND FLOW CONDITIONING ON FREE-SURFACE BEHAVIOR IN TURBULENT LIQUID SHEETS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IMPACT OF BOUNDARY-LAYER CUTTING AND FLOW CONDITIONING ON FREE-SURFACE BEHAVIOR IN TURBULENT LIQUID dimension) = 1 cm into ambient air are compared with empirical correlations at a nearly prototypical term, for a well- conditioned jet but is not a substitute for well-designed flow conditioning. I

California at San Diego, University of

144

Measurement of Vertical Kinetic Energy and Vertical Velocity Skewness in Oceanic Boundary Layers by Imperfectly Lagrangian Floats  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The effects of upward buoyancy on the accuracy with which Lagrangian floats can measure the Eulerian mean variance ?ww?E and skewness SwE of vertical fluid velocity w in the wind-driven upper-ocean boundary layer is investigated using both ...

Ramsey R. Harcourt; Eric A. D’Asaro

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

On the Interaction between Marine Boundary Layer Cellular Cloudiness and Surface Heat Fluxes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The interaction between marine boundary layer cellular cloudiness and surface uxes of sensible and latent heat is investigated. The investigation focuses on the non-precipitating closed-cell state and the precipitating open-cell state at low geostrophic wind speed. The Advanced Research WRF model is used to conduct cloud-system-resolving simulations with interactive surface fluxes of sensible heat, latent heat, and of sea salt aerosol, and with a detailed representation of the interaction between aerosol particles and clouds. The mechanisms responsible for the temporal evolution and spatial distribution of the surface heat fluxes in the closed- and open-cell state are investigated and explained. It is found that the horizontal spatial structure of the closed-cell state determines, by entrainment of dry free tropospheric air, the spatial distribution of surface air temperature and water vapor, and, to a lesser degree, of the surface sensible and latent heat flux. The synchronized dynamics of the the open-cell state drives oscillations in surface air temperature, water vapor, and in the surface fluxes of sensible and latent heat, and of sea salt aerosol. Open-cell cloud formation, cloud optical depth and liquid water path, and cloud and rain water path are identified as good predictors of the spatial distribution of surface air temperature and sensible heat flux, but not of surface water vapor and latent heat flux. It is shown that by enhancing the surface sensible heat flux, the open-cell state creates conditions by which it is maintained. While the open-cell state under consideration is not depleted in aerosol, and is insensitive to variations in sea-salt fluxes, it also enhances the sea-salt flux relative to the closed-cell state. In aerosol-depleted conditions, this enhancement may replenish the aerosol needed for cloud formation, and hence contribute to the perpetuation of the open-cell state as well. Spatial homogenization of the surface fluxes is found to have only a small effect on cloud properties in the investigated cases. This indicates that sub-grid scale spatial variability in the surface flux of sensible and latent heat and of sea salt aerosol may not be required in large scale and global models to describe marine boundary layer cellular cloudiness.

Kazil, J.; Feingold, G.; Wang, Hailong; Yamaguchi, T.

2014-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

146

Open-loop control of noise amplification in a separated boundary layer flow  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Linear optimal gains are computed for the subcritical two-dimensional separated boundary-layer flow past a bump. Very large optimal gain values are found, making it possible for small-amplitude noise to be strongly amplified and to destabilize the flow. The optimal forcing is located close to the summit of the bump, while the optimal response is the largest in the shear layer. The largest amplification occurs at frequencies corresponding to eigenvalues which first become unstable at higher Reynolds number. Nonlinear direct numerical simulations show that a low level of noise is indeed sufficient to trigger random flow unsteadiness, characterized here by large-scale vortex shedding. Next, a variational technique is used to compute efficiently the sensitivity of optimal gains to steady control (through source of momentum in the flow, or blowing/suction at the wall). A systematic analysis at several frequencies identifies the bump summit as the most sensitive region for control with wall actuation. Based on these results, a simple open-loop control strategy is designed, with steady wall suction at the bump summit. Linear calculations on controlled base flows confirm that optimal gains can be drastically reduced at all frequencies. Nonlinear direct numerical simulations also show that this control allows the flow to withstand a higher level of stochastic noise without becoming nonlinearly unstable, thereby postponing bypass transition. In the supercritical regime, sensitivity analysis of eigenvalues supports the choice of this control design. Full restabilization of the flow is obtained, as evidenced by direct numerical simulations and linear stability analysis.

Boujo, E., E-mail: edouard.boujo@epfl.ch; Gallaire, F., E-mail: francois.gallaire@epfl.ch [Laboratory of Fluid Mechanics and Instabilities, École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Ehrenstein, U., E-mail: ehrenstein@irphe.univ-mrs.fr [Aix Marseille Université, CNRS, Centrale Marseille, IRPHE UMR 7342, F-13384 Marseille (France)

2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

147

Particle resuspension in turbulent boundary layers and the influence of non-Gaussian removal forces  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The work described is concerned with the way micron-size particles attached to a surface are resuspended when exposed to a turbulent flow. An improved version of the Rock’n’Roll model (Reeks & Hall, 2001) is developed where this model employs a stochastic approach to resuspension involving the rocking and rolling of a particle about surface asperities arising from the moments of the fluctuating drag forces acting on the particle close to the surface. In this work, the model is improved by using values of both the streamwise fluid velocity and acceleration close to the wall obtained from Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) of turbulent channel flow. Using analysis and numerical calculations of the drag force on a sphere near a wall in shear flow (O’Neill, 1968; Lee & Balachandar, 2010) these values are used to obtain the joint distribution of the moments of the fluctuating drag force f(t) and its derivative f ? ( t ) acting on a particle attached to a surface. In so doing the influence of highly non-Gaussian forces (associated with the sweeping and ejection events in a turbulent boundary layer) on short and long term resuspension rates is examined for a sparse monolayer coverage of particles, along with the dependence of the resuspension upon the timescale of the particle motion attached to the surface, the ratio of the rms/mean of the removal force and the distribution of adhesive forces. Model predictions of the fraction resuspended are compared with experimental results.

F. Zhang; M. Reeks; M. Kissane

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Experimental study of acoustic radiation from a boundary layer transition region  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Wall pressurefluctuations were measured on a rigid axisymmetric body in the CEPRA 19 low?noise anechoic wind tunnel using flush?mounted microphones placed from the laminar region to the fully turbulent boundary layer. Microphones placed in the laminar flow region are used to detect noise radiated from the transition region which occurs naturally without separation under a slightly positive pressure gradient. Cross?spectral analyses show upstream acoustic propagation in a very wide frequency band 4–30 kHz detected in the laminar region. A method of conditional analysis is then used to establish the sequence of events from the onset of near?harmonic instability wave packets to the generation about 10 ms later of turbulent spots leading to the acoustic emission. This intermittent acoustic radiation is detected in the nearfield for wind velocities ranging from 20–70 ms. Farfield detection was not achieved probably because of instrument limitations and propagation effects. [Work supported by DRET Direction des Recherches et Etudes Techniques.

J. C. Perraud; A. Julienne

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Stability and Turbulence in the Atmospheric Boundary Layer: A Comparison of Remote Sensing and Tower Observations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

When monitoring winds and atmospheric stability for wind energy applications, remote sensing instruments present some advantages to in-situ instrumentation such as larger vertical extent, in some cases easy installation and maintenance, measurements of vertical humidity profiles throughout the boundary layer, and no restrictions on prevailing wind directions. In this study, we compare remote sensing devices, Windcube lidar and microwave radiometer, to meteorological in-situ tower measurements to demonstrate the accuracy of these measurements and to assess the utility of the remote sensing instruments in overcoming tower limitations. We compare temperature and wind observations, as well as calculations of Brunt-Vaisala frequency and Richardson numbers for the instrument deployment period in May-June 2011 at the U.S. Department of Energy National Renewable Energy Laboratory's National Wind Technology Center near Boulder, Colorado. The study reveals that a lidar and radiometer measure wind and temperature with the same accuracy as tower instruments, while also providing advantages for monitoring stability and turbulence. We demonstrate that the atmospheric stability is determined more accurately when the liquid-water mixing ratio derived from the vertical humidity profile is considered under moist-adiabatic conditions.

Friedrich, K.; Lundquist, J. K.; Aitken, M.; Kalina, E. A.; Marshall, R. F.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Boundary-Layer Stability and Transition on a Flared Cone in a Mach 6 Quiet Wind Tunnel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

quality features. .................................. 31? 2?4 Upstream settling chamber flow conditioning components. .............................. 31? 2?5 Cross-section of contraction?nozzle assembly, with bleed lip and plenum. ...... 33? 3?1 Cross... by maximizing the laminar extent of the nozzle-wall boundary layer. After much research, success was achieved with a design as depicted by Figure 1?5(b). A bleed slot is employed upstream of the nozzle throat for the extraction of the contraction...

Hofferth, Jerrod William

2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

151

Nitric oxide emissions from the high-temperature viscous boundary layers of hypersonic aircraft within the stratosphere  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors study the nitric oxide emission characteristics of supersonic aircraft resulting from heating of viscous boundary layers along the skin of the aircraft. Previous study has concentrated on nitric oxide emissions coming from combustion products from the scramjet engines. This work shows that above mach 8, emissions from viscous heating become a significant factor in total emission of nitric oxide. Above mach 16 it becomes the dominant source of emission.

Brooks, S.B.; Lewis, M.J.; Dickerson, R.R. [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States)

1993-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

152

Collaborative Research: ARM observations for the development and evaluation of models and parameterizations of cloudy boundary layers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is a collaborative project with Dr. Ping Zhu at Florida International University. It was designed to address key issues regarding the treatment of boundary layer cloud processes in climate models with UM’s research focusing on the analyses of ARM cloud radar observations from MMCR and WACR and FIU’s research focusing on numerical simulations of boundary layer clouds. This project capitalized on recent advancements in the ARM Millimeter Cloud Radar (MMCR) processing and the development of the WACR (at the SGP) to provide high temporal and spatial resolution Doppler cloud radar measurements for characterizing in-cloud turbulence, large-eddy circulations, and high resolution cloud structures of direct relevance to high resolution numerical modeling studies. The principal focus of the observational component of this collaborative study during this funding period was on stratocumulus clouds over the SGP site and fair-weather cumuli over the Nauru site. The statistical descriptions of the vertical velocity structures in continental stratocumulus clouds and in the Nauru shallow cumuli that are part of this study represents the most comprehensive observations of the vertical velocities in boundary layer clouds to date and were done in collaboration with Drs. Virendra Ghate and Pavlos Kollias.

Albrecht, Bruce,

2013-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

153

Nitrogen Oxides in the Nocturnal Boundary Layer: Chemistry of Nitrous Acid (HONO) and the Nitrate Radical (N03)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Summary Chemical processes occurring at night in the lowest part of the urban atmosphere, the so called nocturnal boundary layer (NBL), can influence the composition of the atmosphere during the night as well as the following day. They may impact the budgets of some of the most important pollutants, such as ozone and nitrogen oxides, as well as influence size and composition of particular matter. Few studies have thus far concentrated on the nocturnal chemistry of the urban NBL, most likely due to the strong influence of vertical transport and mixing, which requires the measurement of trace gas profiles instead of simple point observations. Motivated by our lack of observations and understanding of nocturnal chemistry, the focus of this project was the study of the vertical distribution of trace gases and the altitude dependence of nocturnal chemistry under polluted conditions through field observations and modeling studies. The analysis of three field experiments (TEXAQS, Houston, 2000; Phoenix Sunrise Ozone Experiment, 2001; NAPOX, Boston, 2002), two of which were performed in this project, showed that ozone concentrations typically increase with height in the lowest 150m, while NO2 typically decreases. NO3, the dominant nocturnal radical species, showed much higher concentrations in the upper part of the NBL, and was often not present at the ground. With the help of a one-dimensional chemical transport model, developed in this project, we found that the interaction of ground emissions of NOx and hydrocarbons, together with their vertical transport, is responsible for the vertical profiles. The dominant chemical reactions influencing ozone, NO2 and NO3 are the reaction of ozone and NO3 with freshly emitted NO. Sensitivity studies with our model showed that the magnitude of the trace gas gradients depend both on the emission rates and the vertical stability of the NBL. Observations and model analysis clearly show that nocturnal chemistry in urban areas is altitude dependent. Measurements at one altitude, for example at the ground, where most air quality monitoring stations are located, are not representative for the rest of the NBL. Our model also revealed that radical chemistry is, in general, altitude dependent at night. We distinguish three regions: an unreactive, NO rich, ground layer; an upper, O3 and NO3 dominated layer, and a reactive mixing layer, where RO2 radicals are mixed from aloft with NO from the ground. In this reactive layer an active radical chemistry and elevated OH radical levels can be found. The downward transport of N2O5 and HO2NO2, followed by their thermal decay, was also identified as a radical source in this layer. Our observations also gave insight into the formation of HONO in the NBL. Based on our field experiments we were able to show that the NO2 to HONO conversion was relative humidity dependent. While this fact was well known, we found that it is most likely the uptake of HONO onto surfaces which is R.H. dependent, rather than the NO2 to HONO conversion. This finding led to the proposal of a new NO2 to HONO conversion mechanism, which is based on solid physical chemical principles. Noteworthy is also the observation of enhanced NO2 to HONO conversion during a dust storm event in Phoenix. The final activity in our project investigated the influence of the urban canopy, i.e. building walls and surfaces, on nocturnal chemistry. For the first time the surface area of a city was determined based on a Geographical Information System database of the city of Santa Monica. The surface to volume areas found in this study showed that, in the 2 lower part of the NBL, buildings provide a much larger surface area than the aerosol. In addition, buildings take up a considerable amount of the volume near the ground. The expansion of our model and sensitivity studies based on the Santa Monica data revealed that the surface area of buildings considerably influences HONO levels in urban areas. The volume reduction leads to a decrease of O3 and an increase of NO2 near the ground due to the stronger impact o

Jochen Stutz

2005-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

154

Time-dependent laser ignition of a combustible stagnant boundary layer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......research-article Articles Time-dependent laser ignition of a combustible stagnant boundary...55,257-268 Time-dependent laser ignition of a combustible stagnant boundary...examines the conditions for laser ignition of a number of industrial gases......

J. ADLER

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Friction of a slider on a granular layer: Non-monotonic thickness dependence and effect of boundary conditions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate the effective friction encountered by a mass sliding on a granular layer as a function of bed thickness and boundary roughness conditions. The observed friction has minima for a small number of layers before it increases and saturates to a value which depends on the roughness of the sliding surface. We use an index-matched interstitial liquid to probe the internal motion of the grains with fluorescence imaging in a regime where the liquid has no significant effect on the measured friction. The shear profiles obtained as a function of depth show decrease in slip near the sliding surface as the layer thickness is increased. We propose that the friction depends on the degree of grain confinement relative to the sliding surfaces.

Saloome Siavoshi; Ashish V. Orpe; Arshad Kudrolli

2005-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

156

Seismic and gravitational studies of melting in the mantle's thermal boundary layers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis presents three studies which apply geophysical tools to the task of better understanding mantle melting phenomena at the upper and lower boundaries of the mantle. The first study uses seafloor bathymetry and ...

Van Ark, Emily M

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Modeling the Atmospheric Boundary Layer Wind Response to Mesoscale Sea Surface Temperature  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to local SST perturbations decreases rapidly with height to near-zero at 150-300m. The simulated wind speed of local SST perturbations, and the orientation of the surface wind to the SST gradient. #12;3 1. Introduction Positive correlations of local surface wind anomalies with sea surface temperature (SST) anomalies

158

Large-Eddy Simulation of Stratified Turbulence. Part II: Application of the Stretched-Vortex Model to the Atmospheric Boundary Layer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The buoyancy-adjusted stretched-vortex subgrid-scale (SGS) model is assessed for a number of large-eddy simulations (LESs) corresponding to diverse atmospheric boundary layer conditions. The cases considered are free convection, a moderately ...

Georgios Matheou; Daniel Chung

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Separation of climatological imprints of the Kuroshio Extension and Oyashio fronts on the wintertime atmospheric boundary layer: Their sensitivity to SST resolution prescribed for atmospheric reanalysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Mesoscale structures of the wintertime marine atmospheric boundary layer (MABL) as climatological imprints of oceanic fronts within the Kuroshio-Oyashio Extension (KOE) region east of Japan are investigated, by taking advantage of high horizontal ...

Ryusuke Masunaga; Hisashi Nakamura; Takafumi Miyasaka; Kazuaki Nishii; Youichi Tanimoto

160

A Numerical Study of the Evolving Convective Boundary Layer and Orographic Circulation around the Santa Catalina Mountains in Arizona. Part I: Circulation without Deep Convection  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The daytime evolution of the thermally forced boundary layer (BL) circulation over an isolated mountain, about 30 km in diameter and 2 km high, is examined by means of numerical simulations validated with data collected in the Cumulus ...

J. Cory Demko; Bart Geerts

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "boundary layer height" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

ARM - Measurement - Cloud top height  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

to hear from you Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Cloud top height For a given cloud or cloud layer, the highest level of the atmosphere where...

162

The effect of tangential mass addition on the boundary layer velocity distribution of a flat plate at zero angle of attack  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. V . RESULTS AND DISCUSSION 16 18 20 21 24 Boundary Layer Conditions Downstream of Blowing Slot . Boundary Layer Conditions Upstream of Slot Accuracy of Data 24 40 47 VI. CONCLUSIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS ~ 51 LITERATURE CITED 54 APPENDIX... 55 Estimation of Error Caused by Leaks in the Pressure Measuring System 56 LIST OF FIGURES Figure Page 3" x 48" Smoke Tunnel 2. Flat Plate Model 3. Schematic of Pressure System 4. Volume Flow Rates of Working Pipe Tap Orifice 14 Variation...

Miller, Edward Peter

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

163

Characterization of particle cloud droplet activity and composition in the free troposphere and the boundary layer during INTEX-B  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Measurements of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), aerosol size distributions, and submicron aerosol composition were made as part of the Intercontinental Chemical Transport Experiment Phase B (INTEX-B) campaign during spring 2006. Measurements were conducted from an aircraft platform over the northeastern Pacific and western North America with a focus on how the transport and evolution of Asian pollution across the Pacific Ocean affected CCN properties. A broad range of air masses were sampled and here we focus on three distinct air mass types defined geographically: the Pacific free troposphere (FT), the marine boundary layer (MBL), and the polluted continental boundary layer in the California Central Valley (CCV). These observations add to the few observations of CCN in the FT. CCN concentrations showed a large range of concentrations between air masses, however CCN activity was similar for the MBL and CCV ({kappa} {approx} 0.2-0.25). FT air masses showed evidence of long-range transport from Asia and CCN activity was consistently higher than for the boundary layer air masses. Bulk chemical measurements predicted CCN activity reasonably well for the CCV and FT air masses. Decreasing trends in {kappa} with organic mass fraction were observed for the combination of the FT and CCV air masses and can be explained by the measured soluble inorganic chemical components. Changes in hygroscopicity associated with differences in the non-refractory organic composition were too small to be distinguished from the simultaneous changes in inorganic ion composition in the FT and MBL, although measurements for the large organic fractions (0.6-0.8) found in the CCV showed values of the organic fraction hygroscopicity consistent with other polluted regions ({kappa}{sub org} {approx} 0.1-0.2). A comparison of CCN-derived {kappa} (for particles at the critical diameter) to H-TDMA-derived {kappa} (for particles at 100 nm diameter) showed similar trends, however the CCN-derived {kappa} values were significantly higher.

Roberts, G. C.; Day, D. A.; Russell, Lynn M.; Dunlea, E. J.; Jimenez, J. L.; Tomlinson, Jason M.; Collins, Donald R.; Shinozuka, Y.; Clarke, A. D.

2010-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

164

A Lagrangian stochastic model for estimating the high order statistics of a fluctuating plume in the neutral boundary layer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We use a Lagrangian stochastic micromixing model to predict the concentration fluctuations of a continuous release in a neutral boundary layer. We present the computational algorithm that implements the interaction by exchange with the conditional mean model and we compare the numerical solutions with the experimental values in order to evaluate the reliability of the model. The influence of the source size on the concentration probability density function in the near and far-field is discussed and some shortcomings of the model are pointed out.

Massimo Marro; Chiara Nironi; Pietro Salizzoni; Lionel Soulhac

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Experimental development of the predictive relations for the eddy exchange coefficients for momentum and heat in the atmospheric boundary layer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, increase in w by removing the dummy -1 bases was 4. 2 cm/sec , and u for these runs was 330 cm/sec -I ?? Using sin [w/u] as a measure of the tilt of the wind field gave an inclination of . 72', in fair agreement with KAIMAL's relation. Therefore.... '?'illlam H. Clayton Direct measurements of the eddy fluxes of mo. . . entum and heat were. made in the atmospheric boundary layer simultaneously with measurements of the profiles of average wind velocity and tempera- ture to evaluate the capability...

Jensen, Paul Alfred

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

166

Microstructure of Josephson junctions: Effect on supercurrent transport in YBCO grain boundary and barrier layer junctions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The electric transport of high-temperature superconductors, such as YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7{minus}x} (YBCO), can be strongly restricted by the presence of high-angle grain boundaries (GB). This weak-link behavior is governed by the macroscopic GB geometry and the microscopic grain boundary structure and composition at the atomic level. Whereas grain boundaries present a considerable impediment to high current applications of high T{sub c} materials, there is considerable commercial interest in exploiting the weak-link-nature of grain boundaries for the design of microelectronic devices, such as superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs). The Josephson junctions which form the basis of this technology can also be formed by introducing artificial barriers into the superconductor. The authors have examined both types of Josephson junctions by EM techniques in an effort to understand the connection between microstructure/chemistry and electrical transport properties. This knowledge is a valuable resource for the design and production of improved devices.

Merkle, K.L.; Huang, Y.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Alternate Designs of Ultrasonic Absorptive Coatings for Hypersonic Boundary Layer Control  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-wall boundary condition. A particular case with a relatively shallow cavities and very high porosity showed number, wawb/µw Re Reynolds number, eUe/µe s Cavity spacing T Temperature t Time U Freestream streamwise of thermal protection systems (TPS).2,3 State-of- the-art active and reactive lam- inar flow control (LFC

Dabiri, John O.

168

Atmospheric Environment 34 (2000) 2851}2863 Resolution of pollutant concentrations in the boundary layer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Atmospheric Environment 34 (2000) 2851}2863 Resolution of pollutant concentrations in the boundary 1999 Abstract This paper investigates the solution of a 3D atmospheric dispersion problem using a time to solve the atmospheric di!usion equation. Preliminary studies of dispersion from a single source

Utah, University of

169

An Examination of Configurations for Using Infrared to Measure Boundary Layer Transition  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

reflections are the driving issues in designing an IR system for detecting transition. Aluminum has a high thermal diffusivity so is a poor choice for this method. However, its performance can be improved using an insulating layer. Internal fluid circulation...

Freels, Justin Reed

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

170

Modeling scatterers embedded in plane?layered media by a hybrid Haskell?Thompson and boundary integral equation method  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A hybrid Haskell?Thompson and Boundary IntegralEquation (BIE) method is formulated which can model the acoustic and elastic response of scatterers embedded in plane?layered media. The scatterers can have an arbitrary smooth shape but must not intersect layer interfaces. The Green's function of the scatterer is computed by BIEs in the (x z w) domain and the Green's functions of the layers is computed by a Haskell?Thompson method in the (kx z w) domain. Their fields are coupled by the appropriate combination of FFTs and extrapolation operators and are finally summed up in a Born series. For notational convenience this hybrid method will be called a Generalized Born Series (GBS) method. Two advantages of the GBS method are (1) it is more efficient than finite elements or finite differences for small scatterers embedded in thickly layered media; and (2) no artificial side reflections are generated from the infinitely extended plane interfaces. The disadvantages are (1) the convergence rate of the GBS depends on the model and is unknown a priori; and (2) the computation time increases with the size of the scatterer. [Work supported by MIDAS a consortium of oil and geophysical companies.

Gerard T. Schuster; Lance Smith

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Modeling scatterers embedded in plane?layered media by a hybrid Haskell–Thomson and boundary integral equation method  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A hybrid Haskell–Thomson and boundary integralequation (BIE) method is formulated which can model the acoustic or elastic response of scatterers embedded in plane?layered media. The scatterers can have an arbitrary smooth shape but must not intersect layer interfaces. The Green’s function of the scatterer is computed by BIEs in the (x z ?) domain and the Green’s function of the layers is computed by a Haskell–Thomson method in the (k x z ?) domain. Their fields are coupled by the appropriate combination of FFTs and extrapolation operators and are finally summed up in a Born series. For notational convenience this hybrid method will be called a generalized Born series (GBS) method. Two advantages of the GBS method are (1) it is more efficient than finite elements or finite differences for small scatterers embedded in thickly layered media and (2) no artificial side reflections are generated from the infinitely extended plane interfaces. The disadvantages are (1) the convergence rate of the GBS depends on the model and is unknown a p r i o r i and (2) the computation time increases with the size of the scatterer.

Gerard T. Schuster; Lance C. Smith

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Use of shear-stress-sensitive, temperature-insensitive liquid crystals for hypersonic boundary-layer transition detection  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The use of shear-stress-sensitive, temperature-insensitive (SSS/TI) liquid crystals (LCs) has been evaluated as a boundary-layer transition detection technique for hypersonic flows. Experiments were conducted at Mach 8 in the Sandia National Laboratories Hypersonic Wind Tunnel using a flat plate model at near zero-degree angle of attack over the freestream unit Reynolds number range 1.2-5.8x10{sup 6}/ft. Standard 35mm color photography and Super VHS color video were used to record LC color changes due to varying surface shear stress during the transition process for a range of commercial SSS liquid crystals. Visual transition data were compared to an established method using calorimetric surface heat-transfer measurements to evaluate the LC technique. It is concluded that the use of SSS/TI LCs can be an inexpensive, safe, and easy to use boundary-layer transition detection method for hypersonic flows. However, a valid interpretation of the visual records requires careful attention to illumination intensity levels and uniformity, lighting and viewing angles, some prior understanding of the general character of the flow, and the selection of the appropriate liquid crystal for the particular flow conditions.

Aeschliman, D.P.; Croll, R.H.; Kuntz, D.W.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

A physical model of the turbulent boundary layer consonant with mean momentum balance structure  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...compared with the prevalent, well-established, model. Some...O(U ) ((u tau /kappa)log(delta/C)) D (wake layer...Engineering, University of Alabama. Wark, C.E , and H.M Nagib1991Experimental...comparison, the prevalent, well-established, physical model...

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Squeezout phenomena and boundary layer formation of a model ionic liquid under confinement and charging  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Electrical charging of parallel plates confining a model ionic liquid down to nanoscale distances yields a variety of charge-induced changes in the structural features of the confined film. That includes even-odd switching of the structural layering and charging-induced solidification and melting, with important changes of local ordering between and within layers, and of squeezout behavior. By means of molecular dynamics simulations, we explore this variety of phenomena in the simplest charged Lennard-Jones coarse-grained model including or excluding the effect a neutral tail giving an anisotropic shape to one of the model ions. Using these models and open conditions permitting the flow of ions in and out of the interplate gap, we simulate the liquid squeezout to obtain the distance dependent structure and forces between the plates during their adiabatic appraoch under load. Simulations at fixed applied force illustrate an effective electrical pumping of the ionic liquid, from a thick nearly solid film that withstands the interplate pressure for high plate charge to complete squeezout following melting near zero charge. Effective enthalpy curves obtained by integration of interplate forces versus distance show the local minima that correspond to layering, and predict the switching between one minimum and another under squeezing and charging.

R. Capozza; A. Vanossi; A. Benassi; E. Tosatti

2014-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

175

Ice at the Interface: Atmosphere-Ice-Ocean Boundary Layer Processes and Their Role in Polar Change---Workshop Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The atmosphere-ocean boundary layer in which sea ice resides includes many complex processes that require a more realistic treatment in GCMs, particularly as models move toward full earth system descriptions. The primary purpose of the workshop was to define and discuss such coupled processes from observational and modeling points of view, including insight from both the Arctic and Antarctic systems. The workshop met each of its overarching goals, including fostering collaboration among experimentalists, theorists and modelers, proposing modeling strategies, and ascertaining data availability and needs. Several scientific themes emerged from the workshop, such as the importance of episodic or extreme events, precipitation, stratification above and below the ice, and the marginal ice zone, whose seasonal Arctic migrations now traverse more territory than in the past.

Hunke, Elizabeth C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

176

Data/model integration for vertical mixing in the stable Arctic boundary layer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the final report of a short Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Data on atmospheric trace constituents and the vertical structure of stratus clouds from a 1996 expedition to the central Arctic reveal mechanisms of vertical mixing that have not been observed in mid-latitudes. Time series of the altitude and thickness of summer arctic stratus have been observed using an elastic backscatter lidar aboard an icebreaker. With the ship moored to the pack ice during 14 data collection stations and the lidar staring vertically, the time series represent advected cloud fields. The lidar data reveal a significant amount of vertical undulation in the clouds, strongly suggestive of traveling waves in the buoyantly damped atmosphere that predominates in the high Arctic. Concurrent observations of trace gases associated with the natural sulfur cycle (dimethyl sulfide, SO{sub 2}, NH{sub 3}, H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) and aerosols show evidence of vertical mixing events that coincide with a characteristic signature in the cloud field that may be called dropout or lift out. A segment of a cloud deck appears to be relocated from the otherwise quasicontinuous layer to another altitude a few hundred meters lower or higher. Atmospheric models have been applied to identify the mechanism that cause the dropout phenomenon and connect it dynamically to the surface layer mixing.

Barr, S.; ReVelle, D.O.; Kao, C.Y.J.; Bigg, E.K.

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

177

Multi-Sensor Estimation of Mixing Heights Over a Coastal City  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An airborne Microwave Temperature Profiler (MTP) was deployed during the An airborne Microwave Temperature Profiler (MTP) was deployed during the Texas 2000 Air Quality Study (TexAQS-2000) to make measurements of boundary layer thermal structure. An objective technique is developed and tested for estimating the mixed layer (ML) height from the MTP vertical temperature profiles. The technique identifies the ML height as a threshold increase of potential temperature from its minimum value within the boundary layer. In order to calibrate the technique and evaluate the usefulness of this approach, coincident estimates from radiosondes, radar wind profilers, an aerosol backscatter lidar, and in situ aircraft measurements were compared with each other and with the MTP. Relative biases among all instruments were generally less than 50 m, and the agreement between MTP ML height estimates and other estimates was at least as good as the agreement among the other estimates. The ML height estimates from the MTP and other instruments are utilized to determine the spatial and temporal evolution of ML height in the Houston area on 1 Sept. 2000. An elevated temperature inversion was present, so ML growth was inhibited until early afternoon. In the afternoon, large spatial variations in ML height developed across the Houston area. The highest ML heights, well over 2 km, were observed to the north of Houston, while downwind of Galveston Bay and within the late afternoon sea breeze ML heights were much lower. The spatial variations that were found away from the immediate influence of coastal circulations were unexpected, and multiple independent ML height estimates were essential for documenting this feature.

Nielsen-Gammon, John W.; Powell, Christina L.; Mahoney, Michael J.; Angevine, Wayne M.; Senff, Christoph; White, Allen B.; Berkowitz, Carl M.; Doran, J. C.; Knupp, Kevin

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Wind-Tunnel Simulation of the Wake of a Large Wind Turbine in a Stable Boundary Layer: Part 2, the Wake Flow  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Measurements have been made in the wake of a model wind turbine in both a neutral and a stable atmospheric boundary layer, in the EnFlo stratified-flow wind tunnel, between 0.5 and 10 rotor diameters from the ...

Philip E. Hancock; Frauke Pascheke

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Measurements of diurnal variations and Eddy Covariance (EC) fluxes of glyoxal in the1 tropical marine boundary layer: description of the Fast LED-CE-DOAS instrument2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

marine boundary layer: description of the Fast LED-CE-DOAS instrument2 3 4 S. Coburn1,2 , I. Ortega1 Emitting Diode Cavity Enhanced Differential Optical Absorption24 Spectroscopy (Fast LED-CE-DOAS) instrument Halogens28 and OVOC (TORERO) field experiment (January to March 2012). The Fast LED-CE-DOAS is a29

180

Clouds, Aerosol, and Precipitation in the Marine Boundary Layer: Analysis of Results from the ARM Mobile Facility Deployment to the Azores (2009/2010)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The project focuses upon dataset analysis and synthesis of datasets from the AMF deployment entitled “Clouds, Aerosols, and Precipitation in the Marine Boundary Layer (CAP?MBL)” at Graciosa Island in the Azores. Wood is serving a PI for this AMF deployment.

Wood, Robert [University of Washington, Dept of Atmos Sci

2013-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "boundary layer height" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Transitions of cloud-topped marine boundary layers characterized by AIRS, MODIS, and a large eddy simulation model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cloud top entrainment instability (CTEI) is a hypothesized positive feedback between entrainment mixing and evaporative cooling near the cloud top. Previous theoretical and numerical modeling studies have shown that the persistence or breakup of marine boundary layer (MBL) clouds may be sensitive to the CTEI parameter. Collocated thermodynamic profile and cloud observations obtained from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instruments are used to quantify the relationship between the CTEI parameter and the cloud-topped MBL transition from stratocumulus to trade cumulus in the northeastern Pacific Ocean. Results derived from AIRS and MODIS are compared with numerical results from the UCLA large eddy simulation (LES) model for both well-mixed and decoupled MBLs. The satellite and model results both demonstrate a clear correlation between the CTEI parameter and MBL cloud fraction. Despite fundamental differences between LES steady state results and the instantaneous snapshot type of observations from satellites, significant correlations for both the instantaneous pixel-scale observations and the long-term averaged spatial patterns between the CTEI parameter and MBL cloud fraction are found from the satellite observations and are consistent with LES results. This suggests the potential of using AIRS and MODIS to quantify global and temporal characteristics of the cloud-topped MBL transition.

Yue, Qing; Kahn, Brian; Xiao, Heng; Schreier, Mathias; Fetzer, E. J.; Teixeira, J.; Suselj, Kay

2013-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

182

Boundary Layer Lubrication  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

2009 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, May 18-22, 2009 -- Washington D.C.

183

Boundary Layer Lubrication  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation from the U.S. DOE Office of Vehicle Technologies "Mega" Merit Review 2008 on February 25, 2008 in Bethesda, Maryland.

184

Boundary Layer Lubrication Mechanisms  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

2010 DOE Vehicle Technologies and Hydrogen Programs Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, June 7-11, 2010 -- Washington D.C.

185

Boundary Layer Lubrication Mechanisms  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation

186

Solar wind energy transfer regions inside the dayside magnetopause: Accelerated heavy ions as tracers for MHD-processes in the dayside boundary layer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Plasma and magnetic field data from PROGNOZ-7 have revealed that solar wind (magnetosheath) plasma elements may penetrate the dayside magnetopause surface and form high density regions with enhanced cross-field flow in the boundary layer. The injected magnetosheath plasma is observed to have an excess drift velocity as compared to the local boundary layer plasma, comprising both “cold” plasma of terrestrial origin and a hot ring current component. A differential drift between two plasma components can be understood in terms of a momentum transfer process driven by an injected magnetosheath plasma population. The braking action of the injected plasma may be described as a dynamo process where particle kinetic energy is transferred into electromagnetic energy (electric field). The generated electric field will force the local plasma to ?×B-drift, and the dynamo region therefore also constitutes an accelerator region for the local plasma. Whenever energy is dissipated from the energy transfer process (a net current is flowing through a load), there will also be a difference between the induced electric field and the v×B term of the generator plasma. Thus, the local plasma will drift more slowly than the injected generator plasma. We will present observations showing that a relation between the momentum transferred, the injected plasma and the momentum taken up by the local plasma exists. For instance, if the local plasma density is sufficiently high, the differential drift velocity of the injected and local plasma will be small. A large fraction of the excess momentum is then transferred to the local plasma. Conversely, a low local plasma density results in a high velocity difference and a low fraction of local momentum transfer. In our study cases the “cold” plasma component was frequently found to dominate the local magnetospheric plasma density in the boundary layer. Accordingly, this component may have the largest influence on the local momentum transfer process. We will demonstrate that this also seems to be the case. Moreover we show that the accelerated “cold” plasma component may be used as a tracer element reflecting both the momentum and energy transfer and the penetration process in the dayside boundary layer. The high He+ percentage of the accelerated “cold” plasma indicates a plasmaspheric origin. Considering the quite high densities of energetic He+ found in the boundary layer, the overall low abundance of He+ (as compared to e.g. O+) found in the plasma sheet and outer ring current evidently reduces the importance of the dayside boundary layer as a plasma source in the large scale magnetospheric circulation system.

R. Lundin; E.M. Dubinin

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Diabatic wind speed profiles in coastal regions: Comparison of an internal boundary layer (IBL) model with observations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A model is presented to transform wind speed observations at a single height over sea ... of 100 m). Only moderate and strong winds from the sea are considered, which are particularly important for wind energy ap...

A. C. M. Beljaars; A. A. M. Holtslag; W. C. Turkenburg

1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Measurement of Boundary-Layer Temperature Profiles by a Scanning 5-MM Radiometer During the 1999 Winter NSA/AAO Radiometer Exp  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Boundary-Layer Temperature Profiles by Boundary-Layer Temperature Profiles by a Scanning 5-MM Radiometer During the 1999 Winter NSA/AAO Radiometer Experiment and WVIOP 2000 V. Y. Leuski and E. R. Westwater Cooperative Institute for Research in the Environmental Sciences National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Environmental Technology Laboratory University of Colorado Boulder, Colorado Introduction A scanning 5-mm-wavelength radiometer was deployed during two Intensive Operational Periods (IOPs) at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program's Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) facilities. The first was conducted at the North Slope of Alaska (NSA) and Adjacent arctic Ocean (AAO) site near Barrow, Alaska, during March 1999. One goal was to evaluate the ability of an

189

ARM - Measurement - Cloud base height  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

base height base height ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Cloud base height For a given cloud or cloud layer, the lowest level of the atmosphere where cloud properties are detectable. Categories Cloud Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments BLC : Belfort Laser Ceilometer MPL : Micropulse Lidar MWRP : Microwave Radiometer Profiler RL : Raman Lidar VCEIL : Vaisala Ceilometer External Instruments NOAASURF : NOAA Surface Meteorology Data, collected by NWS and NCDC

190

Heat transfer in a horizontal fluid layer heated from below upon rotation of one of the boundaries  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The mixed convection in a horizontal fluid layer which is generated by uniform heating from below and by rotation of one ... studied experimentally. The region occupied by the fluid is a cylinder of radius320 mm ...

V. S. Berdnikov; V. A. Markov

191

On Techniques to Characterize and Correlate Grain Size, Grain Boundary Orientation and the Strength of the SiC Layer of TRISO Coated Particles: A Preliminary Study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The mechanical properties of the silicon carbide (SiC) layer of the TRi-ISOtropic (TRISO) coated particle (CP) for high temperature gas reactors (HTGR) are performance parameters that have not yet been standardized by the international HTR community. Presented in this paper are the results of characterizing coated particles to reveal the effect of annealing temperature (1000 to 2100°C) on the strength and grain size of unirradiated coated particles. This work was further expanded to include possible relationships between the grain size and strength values. The comparative results of two strength measurement techniques and grain size measured by the Lineal intercept method are included. Preliminary grain boundary characterization results determined by electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) are included. These results are also important for future fission product transport studies, as grain boundary diffusion is identified as a possible mechanism by which 110mAg, one of the fission activation products, might be released through intact SiC layers. Temperature is a parameter known to influence the grain size of SiC and therefore it is important to investigate the effect of high temperature annealing on the SiC grain size. Recommendations and future work will also be briefly discussed.

I.J.van Rooyen; J.L. Dunzik Gougar; T. Trowbridge; Philip M van Rooyen

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Clouds, Aerosols and Precipitation in the Marine Boundary Layer (CAP-MBL) AMF Deployment Graciosa Island, Azores, NE Atlantic Ocean May 2009-December 2010  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the Marine Boundary Layer (CAP-MBL) Graciosa Island, Azores, NE Atlantic Ocean May 2009-December 2010 Rob Wood, University of Washington CAP-MBL Proposal Team AMF Deployment Team Thanks to Mark Miller: AMF Site Scientist Kim Nitschke: AMF Site Manager Importance of Low-Clouds for Climate Imperative that we understand the processes controlling the formation, maintenance and dissipation of low clouds in order to improve their representation in climate models. Which clouds matter for climate sensitivity? Climate Feedbacks Model Intercomparison Project (CFMIP) 12 slab ocean models 2xCO 2 - control Correlation of global mean CRF with local values Mark Webb, Hadley Center 90 N 45 N 0 45 S 90S 0 90 E 180 90 W 0

193

Interface boundary conditions for dynamic magnetization and spin wave dynamics in a ferromagnetic layer with the interface Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this work, we derive the interface exchange boundary conditions for the classical linear dynamics of magnetization in ferromagnetic layers with the interface Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction (IDMI). We show that IDMI leads to pinning of dynamic magnetization at the interface. An unusual peculiarity of the IDMI-based pinning is that its scales as the spin-wave wave number. We incorporate these boundary conditions into an existing numerical model for the dynamics of the Damon-Eshbach spin wave in ferromagnetic films. IDMI affects the dispersion and the frequency non-reciprocity of the travelling Damon-Eshbach spin wave. For a broad range of film thicknesses L and wave numbers, the results of the numerical simulations of the spin wave dispersion are in a good agreement with a simple analytical expression, which shows that the contribution of IDMI to the dispersion scales as 1/L, similarly to the effect of other types of interfacial anisotropy. Suggestions to experimentalists how to detect the presence of IDMI in a spin wave experiment are given.

Kostylev, M. [School of Physics, M013, University of Western Australia, Crawley, Perth 6009, Western Australia (Australia)

2014-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

194

Driver eye height measurement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

was establish d in the early sixties when passenger vehicles were styled differentl; than tnda; . The changing design of passenger cars has resulted in a considerable lowering in the eye heights of drivers between 1960 and 1978. The objective of this ress rch... was to determine sI. atistically reliable measures of current driver eye height for different classes of vehicles and to determine the impact of these dat- on design and operating standards for streets and highways. It was found that 68 percent of drivers...

Abrahamson, Anthony Daniel

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

195

Analysis of mixing layer heights inferred from radiosonde, wind profiler, airborne lidar, airborne microwave temperature profiler, and in-situ aircraft data during the Texas 2000 air quality study in Houston, TX  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by wind profilers at the Wharton (WH), Liberty (LB), Houston Southwest (HSW), Ellington (EL), and LaMarque (LM) sites.................................................................. 93 18 Skew-T of WH radiosonde data at 1100 UTC...), Houston Southwest (HSW), Ellington (EL), and LaMarque (LM) sites ....................................... 97 21 The ML height distribution at 1600 UTC around the city of Houston...

Smith, Christina Lynn

2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

196

Providence Heights Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wind Farm Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Providence Heights Wind Farm Facility Providence Heights Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Iberdrola Renewables Developer Midwest Wind Energy Location Bureau County IL Coordinates 41.264075°, -89.580853° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.264075,"lon":-89.580853,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

197

Complex-plasma boundaries  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study deals with the boundary between a normal plasma of ions and electrons, and an adjacent complex plasma of ions, electrons, and microparticles, as found in innumerable examples in nature. Here we show that the matching between the two plasmas involve electrostatic double layers. These double layers explain the sharp boundaries observed in the laboratory and in astrophysics. A modified theory is derived for the double layers that form at the discontinuity between two different complex plasmas and at the point of contact of three complex plasmas. The theory is applied to the first measurements from the Plasma Kristall Experiment (PKE) Nefedov Laboratory in the International Space Station.

B. M. Annaratone; S. A. Khrapak; P. Bryant; G. E. Morfill; H. Rothermel; H. M. Thomas; M. Zuzic; V. E. Fortov; V. I. Molotkov; A. P. Nefedov; S. Krikalev; Yu. P. Semenov

2002-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

198

A Study on the Effect of Nudging on Long-Term Boundary Layer Profiles of Wind and Weibull Distribution Parameters in a Rural Coastal Area  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

By use of 1 yr of measurements performed with a wind lidar up to 600-m height, in combination with a tall meteorological tower, the impact of nudging on the simulated wind profile at a flat coastal site (Hřvsřre) in western Denmark using the ...

S.-E. Gryning; E. Batchvarova; R. Floors

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Correlation Between Grain and Grain-Boundary Critical Current Densities in ex situ Coated Conductors with Variable YBa2Cu3O7- ? Layer Thickness  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The dependence of the percolative critical current density at low magnetic fields on YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-{delta}} (YBCO) layer thickness is studied by comparing grain, J{sub c}{sup G}, and grain-boundary, J{sub c}{sup GB}, critical current densities for a series of ex situ processed YBCO films on a RABiTS template. Both critical current densities decrease as a function of thickness and the values of J{sub c}{sup G} and J{sub c}{sup GB} show a clear correlation which suggests the existence of an interaction between Abrikosov-Josephson vortices on the grain boundaries and Abrikosov vortices in the bulk of the grains. This opens the possibility to improve J{sub c}{sup GB} by optimizing the pinning capabilities of the grains.

Palau, A. [ICMAB, Barcelona, Spain; Puig, T. [ICMAB, Barcelona, Spain; Obradors, X. [ICMAB, Barcelona, Spain; Feenstra, Roeland [ORNL; Gapud, Albert Agcaoili [ORNL

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Boundary County, Idaho: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Boundary County, Idaho: Energy Resources Boundary County, Idaho: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 48.7987617°, -116.5627065° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":48.7987617,"lon":-116.5627065,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "boundary layer height" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

South Miami Heights, Florida: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Heights, Florida: Energy Resources Heights, Florida: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 25.597606°, -80.3806096° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":25.597606,"lon":-80.3806096,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

202

South Chicago Heights, Illinois: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Heights, Illinois: Energy Resources Heights, Illinois: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.4808681°, -87.6378211° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.4808681,"lon":-87.6378211,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

203

Palos Heights, Illinois: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Palos Heights, Illinois: Energy Resources Palos Heights, Illinois: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.6680885°, -87.7964416° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.6680885,"lon":-87.7964416,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

204

Rowland Heights, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Heights, California: Energy Resources Heights, California: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 33.9761238°, -117.9053395° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":33.9761238,"lon":-117.9053395,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

205

Day Heights, Ohio: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Heights, Ohio: Energy Resources Heights, Ohio: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 39.1739494°, -84.226325° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.1739494,"lon":-84.226325,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

206

Middleburg Heights, Ohio: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

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Middleburg Heights, Ohio: Energy Resources Middleburg Heights, Ohio: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.3614401°, -81.812912° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.3614401,"lon":-81.812912,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

207

Hacienda Heights, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

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Hacienda Heights, California: Energy Resources Hacienda Heights, California: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 33.9930677°, -117.9686755° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":33.9930677,"lon":-117.9686755,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

208

Harwood Heights, Illinois: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

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Harwood Heights, Illinois: Energy Resources Harwood Heights, Illinois: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.9672532°, -87.8075612° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.9672532,"lon":-87.8075612,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

209

Barker Heights, North Carolina: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

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Barker Heights, North Carolina: Energy Resources Barker Heights, North Carolina: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 35.3112279°, -82.444008° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.3112279,"lon":-82.444008,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

210

Maple Heights-Lake Desire, Washington: Energy Resources | Open Energy  

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Heights-Lake Desire, Washington: Energy Resources Heights-Lake Desire, Washington: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 47.4521975°, -122.0984885° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":47.4521975,"lon":-122.0984885,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

211

Holden Heights, Florida: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

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Holden Heights, Florida: Energy Resources Holden Heights, Florida: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 28.4966702°, -81.3878481° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":28.4966702,"lon":-81.3878481,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

212

Wofford Heights, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

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Wofford Heights, California: Energy Resources Wofford Heights, California: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 35.7068961°, -118.4561967° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.7068961,"lon":-118.4561967,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

213

Yorktown Heights, New York: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Yorktown Heights, New York: Energy Resources Yorktown Heights, New York: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.2709274°, -73.7776336° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.2709274,"lon":-73.7776336,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

214

Holiday Heights, New Jersey: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

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Holiday Heights, New Jersey: Energy Resources Holiday Heights, New Jersey: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 39.9459512°, -74.2540324° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.9459512,"lon":-74.2540324,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

215

Mount Healthy Heights, Ohio: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

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Heights, Ohio: Energy Resources Heights, Ohio: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 39.2703349°, -84.568001° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.2703349,"lon":-84.568001,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

216

Wheatley Heights, New York: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

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Wheatley Heights, New York: Energy Resources Wheatley Heights, New York: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 40.76371°, -73.3698426° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.76371,"lon":-73.3698426,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

217

Ladera Heights, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ladera Heights, California: Energy Resources Ladera Heights, California: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 33.9941792°, -118.3753543° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":33.9941792,"lon":-118.3753543,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

218

Shelter Island Heights, New York: Energy Resources | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Heights, New York: Energy Resources Heights, New York: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.0839883°, -72.3559166° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.0839883,"lon":-72.3559166,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

219

Newburgh Heights, Ohio: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Newburgh Heights, Ohio: Energy Resources Newburgh Heights, Ohio: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.450052°, -81.6634617° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.450052,"lon":-81.6634617,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

220

Olympia Heights, Florida: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

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Heights, Florida: Energy Resources Heights, Florida: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 25.726768°, -80.3553306° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":25.726768,"lon":-80.3553306,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "boundary layer height" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Glenvar Heights, Florida: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Glenvar Heights, Florida: Energy Resources Glenvar Heights, Florida: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 25.7076018°, -80.3256076° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":25.7076018,"lon":-80.3256076,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

222

Preston Heights, Illinois: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Preston Heights, Illinois: Energy Resources Preston Heights, Illinois: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 37.343056°, -88.719722° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.343056,"lon":-88.719722,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

223

Arlington Heights, Illinois: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

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Arlington Heights, Illinois: Energy Resources Arlington Heights, Illinois: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 42.0883603°, -87.9806265° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.0883603,"lon":-87.9806265,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

224

La Habra Heights, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Habra Heights, California: Energy Resources Habra Heights, California: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 33.9608461°, -117.9506186° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":33.9608461,"lon":-117.9506186,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

225

Hasbrouck Heights, New Jersey: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

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Hasbrouck Heights, New Jersey: Energy Resources Hasbrouck Heights, New Jersey: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 40.8581553°, -74.0806971° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.8581553,"lon":-74.0806971,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

226

Huber Heights, Ohio: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Huber Heights, Ohio: Energy Resources Huber Heights, Ohio: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 39.843947°, -84.1246608° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.843947,"lon":-84.1246608,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

227

Warrensville Heights, Ohio: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

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Warrensville Heights, Ohio: Energy Resources Warrensville Heights, Ohio: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.4386°, -81.523419° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.4386,"lon":-81.523419,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

228

Vadnais Heights, Minnesota: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Vadnais Heights, Minnesota: Energy Resources Vadnais Heights, Minnesota: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 45.0574658°, -93.0738305° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":45.0574658,"lon":-93.0738305,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

229

Madison Heights, Michigan: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Heights, Michigan: Energy Resources Heights, Michigan: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 42.4858692°, -83.1052028° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.4858692,"lon":-83.1052028,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

230

Airway Heights, Washington: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Airway Heights, Washington: Energy Resources Airway Heights, Washington: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 47.644611°, -117.5932728° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":47.644611,"lon":-117.5932728,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

231

Grandview Heights, Ohio: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Grandview Heights, Ohio: Energy Resources Grandview Heights, Ohio: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 39.9797863°, -83.0407403° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.9797863,"lon":-83.0407403,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

232

Billington Heights, New York: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Billington Heights, New York: Energy Resources Billington Heights, New York: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 42.7842264°, -78.6264151° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.7842264,"lon":-78.6264151,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

233

San Antonio Heights, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Antonio Heights, California: Energy Resources Antonio Heights, California: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 34.1555638°, -117.6564437° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":34.1555638,"lon":-117.6564437,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

234

Avocado Heights, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Avocado Heights, California: Energy Resources Avocado Heights, California: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 34.0361217°, -117.9911765° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":34.0361217,"lon":-117.9911765,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

235

Shaker Heights, Ohio: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Shaker Heights, Ohio: Energy Resources Shaker Heights, Ohio: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.4739419°, -81.5370671° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.4739419,"lon":-81.5370671,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

236

Parma Heights, Ohio: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Parma Heights, Ohio: Energy Resources Parma Heights, Ohio: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.3900518°, -81.7595769° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.3900518,"lon":-81.7595769,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

237

Colonial Heights County, Virginia: Energy Resources | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Heights County, Virginia: Energy Resources Heights County, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 37.2656873°, -77.3956004° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.2656873,"lon":-77.3956004,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

238

Plant community composition and vegetation height, Barrow, Alaska, Ver. 1  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

This dataset contains i) the results of field surveys of plant community composition and vegetation height made between 17th and 29th July 2012 in 48, 1 x 1 m plots located in areas A-D of Intensive Site 1 at the Next-Generation Ecosystem Experiments (NGEE) Arctic site near Barrow, Alaska and ii) results of a mapping exercise undertaken in August 2013 using two perpendicular transects across each polygon containing vegetation plots to determine the boundaries of vegetation communities described in 2012.

Sloan, Victoria; Norby, Richard; Siegrist, Julia; Iversen, Colleen; Brooks, Jonathan; Liebig, Jennifer; Wood, Sarah

239

Plant community composition and vegetation height, Barrow, Alaska, Ver. 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This dataset contains i) the results of field surveys of plant community composition and vegetation height made between 17th and 29th July 2012 in 48, 1 x 1 m plots located in areas A-D of Intensive Site 1 at the Next-Generation Ecosystem Experiments (NGEE) Arctic site near Barrow, Alaska and ii) results of a mapping exercise undertaken in August 2013 using two perpendicular transects across each polygon containing vegetation plots to determine the boundaries of vegetation communities described in 2012.

Sloan, Victoria; Norby, Richard; Siegrist, Julia; Iversen, Colleen; Brooks, Jonathan; Liebig, Jennifer; Wood, Sarah

2014-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

240

Entropy Production in Relativistic Jet Boundary Layers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hot relativistic jets, passing through a background medium with a pressure gradient p \\propto r^{-\\eta} where 2 gamma-ray bursts from ...

Kohler, Susanna

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "boundary layer height" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Dynamic Balances in a Wavy Boundary Layer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The authors analyze the influence of waves on the budgets of momentum flux and kinetic energy in the atmospheric flow over sea surface waves and use the findings to reinterpret the results from the earlier empirical studies on the subject. This ...

Tihomir Hristov; Jesus Ruiz-Plancarte

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Boundary layer induced by a conical vortex  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......for later convenience. On the other hand, in order to improve the accuracy of the computations as the axis is approached, we rede fi ne the radial coordinate as l =? ln ?, (29) so that the interval 1 ? ? ? 0 is mapped onto 0 ? l < ?. Substituting (26......

R. Fernandez-Feria; J. C. Arrese

2000-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Numerical Experiments in Supersonic Boundary Layer Stability  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

advances in supersonic and hypersonic aerospace technology have led to a renewed interest in the stability Methods Branch M. Y. Hussaini Institute for Computer Applications in Science and Engineering NASA Langley­dimensional quantity superscripts T : transpose â?? : Fourier component 0 : perturbation variable 2 Introduction Recent

Erlebacher, Gordon

244

Thunderstorm influence on boundary layer winds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

moisture convergence The ambient condition, horizontal moisture convergence, through the vertical, was determined using the vector identity v . qv2 = v2 v q + q v ' V2 p p p (2) where q is specific humidity. Term 1 was computed by the centered finite... the relationship rpo J (v qv) dp ? 7 ('v. . qv) 1 p=900 1 =1 14 where N is the number of 50 mb pressure levels beginning with the 900 mb level to the level of zero divergence, p , the integral of horizontal 0' moisture convergence was determined by summing...

Schmidt, Jill Marie

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

245

Evaluation of WRF predicted near hub-height winds and ramp events over a Pacific Northwest site with complex terrain  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The WRF model version 3.3 is used to simulate near hub-height winds and power ramps utilizing three commonly used planetary boundary-layer (PBL) schemes: Mellor-Yamada-Janji? (MYJ), University of Washington (UW), and Yonsei University (YSU). The predicted winds have small mean biases compared with observations. Power ramps and step changes (changes within an hour) consistently show that the UW scheme performed better in predicting up ramps under stable conditions with higher prediction accuracy and capture rates. Both YSU and UW scheme show good performance predicting up- and down- ramps under unstable conditions with YSU being slightly better for ramp durations longer than an hour. MYJ is the most successful simulating down-ramps under stable conditions. The high wind speed and large shear associated with low-level jets are frequently associated with power ramps, and the biases in predicted low-level jet explain some of the shown differences in ramp predictions among different PBL schemes. Low-level jets were observed as low as ~200 m in altitude over the Columbia Basin Wind Energy Study (CBWES) site, located in an area of complex terrain. The shear, low-level peak wind speeds, as well as the height of maximum wind speed are not well predicted. Model simulations with 3 PBL schemes show the largest variability among them under stable conditions.

Yang, Qing; Berg, Larry K.; Pekour, Mikhail S.; Fast, Jerome D.; Newsom, Rob K.; Stoelinga, Mark; Finley, Cathy

2013-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

246

Vantage Pomona Heights | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

EIS at na for na Environmental Impact Statement for the Vanage to Pomona Heights 239kV Transmission Line Project General NEPA Document Info Energy Sector Transmission...

247

Space variations in axis height of the jet stream core  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

height of the jet axis relative to the height of the jet maximum for slow vs. fast cases. 13 Mean height of the jet axis relative to the height at the trough. 13 Mean height of the jet axis relative to the height at the ridge. 15 Mean height... of the jet axis relative to the height at the jet maximum, when the maximum is near a trough. 15 Mean height of the jet axis relative to the height at the minimum, when the minimum is near a ridge. 17 Mean height of the jet axis relative to the height...

Leutwyler, Cooke Hearon

1965-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

NEW HEIGHTS A Handbook for Developing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

REACHING NEW HEIGHTS A Handbook for Developing Community Based Ecosystem Health Goals, Objectives and Indicators REACHING NEW HEIGHTS A Handbook for Developing Community Based Ecosystem Health Goals, Objectives's Fraser River Action Plan. The content of this report does not necessarily reflect the views and policies

249

Garfield Heights, Ohio: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

1.6059581° 1.6059581° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.4169974,"lon":-81.6059581,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

250

Cleveland Heights, Ohio: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

1.556235° 1.556235° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.5200518,"lon":-81.556235,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

251

Maple Heights, Ohio: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

1.565956° 1.565956° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.4153313,"lon":-81.565956,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

252

Highland Heights, Ohio: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

1.4784522° 1.4784522° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.5519954,"lon":-81.4784522,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

253

University Heights, Ohio: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

°, -81.5373456° °, -81.5373456° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.4978306,"lon":-81.5373456,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

254

Brooklyn Heights, Ohio: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

1.665391° 1.665391° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.415601,"lon":-81.665391,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

255

A comparison of cloud top heights computed from airborne lidar and MAS radiance data using CO2 slicing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A comparison of cloud top heights computed from airborne lidar and MAS radiance data using CO2 in assessing the accuracy of the CO2-slicing cloud height algorithm. Infrared measurements of upwelling which included various single- layer and multilayer cloud conditions. Overall, the CO2-slicing method

Sheridan, Jennifer

256

Stack Height Requirements (Ohio) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Stack Height Requirements (Ohio) Stack Height Requirements (Ohio) Stack Height Requirements (Ohio) < Back Eligibility Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Utility Program Info State Ohio Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Ohio Environmental Protection Agency This chapter of the law establishes that the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency provides regulations for stacks for industrial facilities. "Stack" means any chimney, flue, conduit or duct arranged to conduct any emissions to the ambient air, excluding flares. "Stack height" means the distance from the ground-level elevation at the base of the stack to the crown of the stack. If a stack arises from a building or other structure, the ground-level elevation of that building or structure will be

257

Property:Height (m) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Height (m) Height (m) Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Height (m) Property Type Number Pages using the property "Height (m)" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) M MHK Technologies/Aegir Dynamo + 12 + MHK Technologies/AirWEC + 8 + MHK Technologies/Deep Green + 2.5 + MHK Technologies/Deep water capable hydrokinetic turbine + 5 + MHK Technologies/European Pico Pilot Plant + 22 + MHK Technologies/Evopod E35 + 4.25 + MHK Technologies/Float Wave Electric Power Station + 12 + MHK Technologies/Floating anchored OTEC plant + 540 + MHK Technologies/GyroWaveGen + 4.5 + MHK Technologies/HyPEG + 20 + MHK Technologies/HydroGen 10 + 3.5 + MHK Technologies/Hydroflo + 5 + MHK Technologies/ITRI WEC + 17.9 + MHK Technologies/IVEC Floating Wave Power Plant + 5 +

258

Hempstead Rd FederalHeightsDr.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WolcottSt 2030 East Hempstead Rd FederalHeightsDr. MedicalDr. North 100 South ConnorRd Red Butte Canyon Rd W asatch D r. FortDouglasBlvd UniversityStreet W akaraW ay 500 South North Campus Dr. North Care ACC Parking Terrace Eccles Business Building Health Professions Merrill Engineering The Children

Tipple, Brett

259

Architecture TAKING ARCHITECTURE TO NEW HEIGHTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

School of Architecture #12;TAKING ARCHITECTURE TO NEW HEIGHTS This is a time of tremendous momentum at the School of Architecture. Looking ahead, we have the unique opportunity to build on our strengths immediate and long term, and enable us to stake our ground as one of the country's premier architecture

McConnell, Terry

260

Layering Technologies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Planar technology requires that thin layers of materials be formed and patterned sequentially, commencing with a flat rigid substrate. The key aspects of each layer are its Thi...

Ivor Brodie; Julius J. Muray

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "boundary layer height" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Taft Heights, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

5.1346895°, -119.4726196° 5.1346895°, -119.4726196° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.1346895,"lon":-119.4726196,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

262

Federal Heights, Colorado: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Colorado: Energy Resources Colorado: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 39.8513747°, -104.9985922° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.8513747,"lon":-104.9985922,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

263

Paradise Heights, Florida: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

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Florida: Energy Resources Florida: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 28.6236102°, -81.5439618° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":28.6236102,"lon":-81.5439618,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

264

Broadview Heights, Ohio: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

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6°, -81.6851271° 6°, -81.6851271° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.3139426,"lon":-81.6851271,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

265

East Richmond Heights, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

California: Energy Resources California: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 37.944924°, -122.3135811° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.944924,"lon":-122.3135811,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

266

Arlington Heights, Ohio: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

150583°, -84.4554978° 150583°, -84.4554978° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.2150583,"lon":-84.4554978,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

267

Bedford Heights, Ohio: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

4169982°, -81.5273428° 4169982°, -81.5273428° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.4169982,"lon":-81.5273428,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

268

Citrus Heights, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

8.7071247°, -121.2810611° 8.7071247°, -121.2810611° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.7071247,"lon":-121.2810611,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

269

Muskegon Heights, Michigan: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Michigan: Energy Resources Michigan: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 43.2011264°, -86.2389464° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.2011264,"lon":-86.2389464,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

270

Monfort Heights South, Ohio: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

73251°, -84.606362° 73251°, -84.606362° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.173251,"lon":-84.606362,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

271

Richmond Heights, Florida: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Florida: Energy Resources Florida: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 25.6314936°, -80.3689426° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":25.6314936,"lon":-80.3689426,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

272

Ford Heights, Illinois: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

506424°, -87.5917092° 506424°, -87.5917092° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.506424,"lon":-87.5917092,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

273

Boston Heights, Ohio: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

778°, -81.5131709° 778°, -81.5131709° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.264778,"lon":-81.5131709,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

274

Berlin Heights, Ohio: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

3253277°, -82.4932261° 3253277°, -82.4932261° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.3253277,"lon":-82.4932261,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

275

Seaside Heights, New Jersey: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jersey: Energy Resources Jersey: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 39.944285°, -74.0729139° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.944285,"lon":-74.0729139,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

276

Lincoln Heights, Ohio: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

389469°, -84.4554979° 389469°, -84.4554979° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.2389469,"lon":-84.4554979,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

277

Sewickley Heights, Pennsylvania: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

343°, -80.1631139° 343°, -80.1631139° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.5567343,"lon":-80.1631139,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

278

Chicago Heights, Illinois: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

46°, -87.6355995° 46°, -87.6355995° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.506146,"lon":-87.6355995,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

279

Richmond Heights, Ohio: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

288°, -81.5101208° 288°, -81.5101208° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.5528288,"lon":-81.5101208,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

280

Island Heights, New Jersey: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jersey: Energy Resources Jersey: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 39.9420626°, -74.1498616° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.9420626,"lon":-74.1498616,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "boundary layer height" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Champion Heights, Ohio: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

288128°, -80.848759° 288128°, -80.848759° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.288128,"lon":-80.848759,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

282

Ben Avon Heights, Pennsylvania: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Pennsylvania: Energy Resources Pennsylvania: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 40.5136795°, -80.0731112° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.5136795,"lon":-80.0731112,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

283

Alamo Heights, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

29.4849531°, -98.4658502° 29.4849531°, -98.4658502° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":29.4849531,"lon":-98.4658502,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

284

Prospect Heights, Illinois: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2.0953049°, -87.9375694° 2.0953049°, -87.9375694° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.0953049,"lon":-87.9375694,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

285

Gordon Heights, New York: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

York: Energy Resources York: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 40.8587097°, -72.9706607° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.8587097,"lon":-72.9706607,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

286

Windsor Heights, Iowa: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Iowa: Energy Resources Iowa: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.6048°, -93.711899° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.6048,"lon":-93.711899,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

287

Glendale Heights, Illinois: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

9202°, -88.078849° 9202°, -88.078849° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.9202,"lon":-88.078849,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

288

Mayfield Heights, Ohio: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

189°, -81.457896° 189°, -81.457896° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.5192189,"lon":-81.457896,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

289

Porter Heights, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

30.151883°, -95.3218803° 30.151883°, -95.3218803° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":30.151883,"lon":-95.3218803,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

290

Braddock Heights, Maryland: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Maryland: Energy Resources Maryland: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 39.4187127°, -77.503598° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.4187127,"lon":-77.503598,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

291

Perry Heights, Ohio: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

0.7953357°, -81.4734515° 0.7953357°, -81.4734515° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.7953357,"lon":-81.4734515,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

292

Monfort Heights East, Ohio: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ohio: Energy Resources Ohio: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 39.182151°, -84.583915° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.182151,"lon":-84.583915,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

293

Height modification in grain sorghum lines homozygous for four major height genes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is mainly controlled by four major genes which affect elon. ai ion of internodcs. Tl. ere is variation. Eor height aazong and within varier. i. es identical and homozygous for these known genes . Three varietie. . of th height genotype dw ~a dw. du... and three vsrieries of t'ne genotype cw dw dH dwa wore used to dote mine th effectiveness of election for height within major I:e-'. ht genoty:. ;-, . grd ries consisted of each variety as well as progenIes from all possi- ble cro=s s and reciprocal...

Thompson, Tommy Earl

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

294

TECHNICAL PAPER Time dependent simulation of active flying height control  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) sliders have been recently used to reduce flying height at the head disk interface and obtain more stableTECHNICAL PAPER Time dependent simulation of active flying height control of TFC sliders Pablo- dure is implemented to simulate the flying height response of a typical thermal flying height control

Fainman, Yeshaiahu

295

Effects of flying height deviations on glide height tests for manufacturing hard disks  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this study, theoretical analysis and experiments were carried out to investigate the effects of avalanche-point deviation and the deviation between the calibration and test-flying heights during the glide head...

Z.W. Zhong; Z. Zheng

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Finite element analysis of shells with layers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

It is well established that thin shell structures frequently feature narrow bands of strain concentration and localized displacement irregularities referred to as boundary and internal layers. It is crucial to capture these ...

Hiller, Jean-François, 1974-

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Influence of Thermal Stratification on Wind Profiles for Heights up to 140 m  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.energiemeteorologie.de The vertical wind speed profile has to be know for many wind power applications. Although the large effect speeds are not measured or predicted in the hubheight of the wind turbine. For the vertical trans stratification of the boundary layer has also an important influence on the vertical wind speed profile. Only

Heinemann, Detlev

298

Flying height adjustment technologies for high-density magnetic recording  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The flying height adjustment technology becomes important to achieve the stable ultra low flying height for recording density 1 Tb/in˛ in hard disk drive. The possible approaches towards flying height adjustment, advantages and disadvantages of different adjusting methods are discussed. Finally, the flying stability of thermal actuated slider is studied taking into account the short-range interaction forces. It is noticed that the flying height of thermal actuated slider is less sensitive to the short-range interactions than the normal slider and can sustain larger shocks. The thermal actuated flying height adjusting technology is more suitable for ultra-low flying height applications.

Mingsheng Zhang; Bo Liu

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Compressed absorbing boundary conditions for the Helmholtz equation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Absorbing layers are sometimes required to be impractically thick in order to offer an accurate approximation of an absorbing boundary condition for the Helmholtz equation in a heterogeneous medium. It is always possible ...

Bélanger-Rioux, Rosalie

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Wind Turbine Towers Establish New Height Standards and Reduce...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Wind Turbine Towers Establish New Height Standards and Reduce Cost of Wind Energy Wind Turbine Towers Establish New Height Standards and Reduce Cost of Wind Energy Case study that...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "boundary layer height" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Comparison of instruments for measuring step heights and surface profiles  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Data for step heights and surface profiles obtained using two commercially available instruments are compared. It is shown that step height data obtained with the Dektak IIA are good...

Bennett, Jean M

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Wind Turbine Scaling Enables Projects to Reach New Heights |...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Turbine Scaling Enables Projects to Reach New Heights Wind Turbine Scaling Enables Projects to Reach New Heights August 18, 2014 - 9:42am Addthis Turbines at the National Wind...

303

Effects of Altitude on Thermal Flying-Height Control Actuation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Thermal flying-height control (TFC) is now a key technology used in hard-disk drives (HDD) as an effective way ... Precise control of the TFC sliders’ actuated flying-height (FH) is a major consideration...

Jinglin Zheng; David B. Bogy; Shuyu Zhang; Wentao Yan

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Slider–bump contact and flying height calibration  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

It is a big challenge to determine ultra-low slider flying height accurately. The standard bump disk method is probably the most reliable and ... One of the key issues to determine slider-flying height with the b...

Y. S. Ma; B. Liu; W. J. Wang; K. D. Ye

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Optimization of micro-thermal actuator for flying height control  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Thermal flying height control (TFC) sliders were successfully used in commercial products to compensate the flying height (FH) loss and reduce the risk of head-disk contacts (Gupta et al. 2001; Wang et al. 2001; ...

Jin Liu; Jianhua Li; Junguo Xu; Shinobu Yoshida

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Degenerate Metric Phase Boundaries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The structure of boundaries between degenerate and nondegenerate solutions of Ashtekar's canonical reformulation of Einstein's equations is studied. Several examples are given of such "phase boundaries" in which the metric is degenerate on one side of a null hypersurface and non-degenerate on the other side. These include portions of flat space, Schwarzschild, and plane wave solutions joined to degenerate regions. In the last case, the wave collides with a planar phase boundary and continues on with the same curvature but degenerate triad, while the phase boundary continues in the opposite direction. We conjecture that degenerate phase boundaries are always null.

Ingemar Bengtsson; Ted Jacobson

1999-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

307

Flying height calibration with bump disk  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

It is a big challenge to determine ultralow slider Flying Height (FH) accurately. The standard bump disk method is probably a reliable and acceptable method. The accuracy of the bump disk method on FH calibration depends on two key factors. One is the detection of the occurrence of sliderâ??bump contact. The other is the understanding of the complicated sliderâ??bump interaction process and the possible disturbance of the bumps on the slider flying performance. In this paper, the research work aiming to resolve these two key issues is reviewed. Key parameters that limit the accuracy of the bump disk method are discussed. Possible strategies to further improve the accuracy of the method are proposed.

Yansheng Ma; Bo Liu

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Active flying-height control slider using MEMS thermal actuator  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Today’s head/disk interface design has a wide flying height distribution due to manufacturing tolerances, environmental...

Masayuki Kurita; Toshiya Shiramatsu; Kouji Miyake; Atsushi Kato…

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

A comparison of fine particle and aerosol strong acidity at the interface zone (1540 m) and within (452 m) the planetary boundary layer of the Great Gulf and Presidential-Dry River Class I Wildernesses on the Presidential Range, New Hampshire USA  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Mount Washington, NH in the White Mountain National Forest, is flanked to the north-northeast and south by two Class I Wilderness areas, the Great Gulf and Presidential Range-Dry River Wildernesses, respectively. The Clean Air Act protects Class I Area natural resource values from air pollution. Aerosol sulfate, a fine particulate component that is often transported long distances, is a known contributor to visibility degradation and acidic deposition. We examined summertime fine particulate aerosol mass and sulfate, strong acidity and ammonium concentrations from 1988 to 2007 on Mount Washington at two elevations, 452 and 1540 m (msl). The former site is often within, and the latter at the interface of, the planetary boundary layer. Comparisons of sampling interval durations (10 and 24 h) and site vs. site are made. We also examine the extent to which aerosol sulfate is neutralized. Ten hour (daytime) compared to 24 h samples have higher mass and aerosol sulfate concentrations, however paired samples are well correlated. Fine mass concentrations compared between the 452 m and 1540 m sites (standard temperature and pressure corrected) show a weak positive linear relationship with the later being approximately 32% lower. We attribute the lack of a strong correlation to the facts that the 1540 m site is commonly at the interface of and even above the regional planetary boundary layer in summer and that it can intercept different air masses relative to the 452 m site. Sulfate is ?18% lower at the higher elevation site, but comprises a greater percentage of total fine mass; 42% compared to 37% for the high and low elevation site, respectively. Aerosol strong acidity was found to increase with increasing sulfate concentrations at both sites. Further the ratio of hydrogen to sulfate ion was greater in 24 h than 10 h samples at the higher elevation site likely due to overnight transport of fresh acidic aerosols.

Georgia L.D. Murray; Kenneth Kimball; L. Bruce Hill; George A. Allen; Jack M. Wolfson; Alex Pszenny; Thomas Seidel; Bruce G. Doddridge; Alexandra Boris

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Testing outer boundary treatments for the Einstein equations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Various methods of treating outer boundaries in numerical relativity are compared using a simple test problem: a Schwarzschild black hole with an outgoing gravitational wave perturbation. Numerical solutions computed using different boundary treatments are compared to a `reference' numerical solution obtained by placing the outer boundary at a very large radius. For each boundary treatment, the full solutions including constraint violations and extracted gravitational waves are compared to those of the reference solution, thereby assessing the reflections caused by the artificial boundary. These tests use a first-order generalized harmonic formulation of the Einstein equations. Constraint-preserving boundary conditions for this system are reviewed, and an improved boundary condition on the gauge degrees of freedom is presented. Alternate boundary conditions evaluated here include freezing the incoming characteristic fields, Sommerfeld boundary conditions, and the constraint-preserving boundary conditions of Kreiss and Winicour. Rather different approaches to boundary treatments, such as sponge layers and spatial compactification, are also tested. Overall the best treatment found here combines boundary conditions that preserve the constraints, freeze the Newman-Penrose scalar Psi_0, and control gauge reflections.

Oliver Rinne; Lee Lindblom; Mark A. Scheel

2007-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

311

The effect of pnictogen height on spin waves in iron pnictides  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We use inelastic neutron scattering to study spin waves in the antiferromagnetic ordered phase of iron pnictide NaFeAs throughout the Brillouin zone. Comparing with the well-studied AFe2As2 (A = Ca,Sr,Ba) family, spin waves in NaFeAs have considerably lower zone boundary energies and more isotropic effective in-plane magnetic exchange couplings. These results are consistent with calculations from a combined density functional theory (DFT) and dynamical mean field theory (DMFT), and provide strong evidence that pnictogen height controls the strength of electron-electron correlations, and consequently the effective bandwidth of magnetic excitations.

Abernathy, Douglas L [ORNL; Zhang, Chenglin [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Harriger, Leland W. [NIST Center for Neutron Research (NCRN), Gaithersburg, MD; Yin, Zhiping [Rutgers University; Lv, Weicheng [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Wang, Miaoyin [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Tan, Guotai [University of Tennessee (UT); Song, Yu [Rice University; Egami, Takeshi [ORNL; Haule, Kristjan [Rutgers University; Kotliar, Gabriel [Rutgers University; Dai, Pengcheng [Rice University; Tian, Wei [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Running Boundary Condition  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper we argue that boundary condition may run with energy scale. As an illustrative example, we consider one-dimensional quantum mechanics for a spinless particle that freely propagates in the bulk yet interacts only at the origin. In this setting we find the renormalization group flow of U(2) family of boundary conditions exactly. We show that the well-known scale-independent subfamily of boundary conditions are realized as fixed points. We also discuss the duality between two distinct boundary conditions from the renormalization group point of view. Generalizations to conformal mechanics and quantum graph are also discussed.

Ohya, Satoshi; Tachibana, Motoi

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Running Boundary Condition  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper we argue that boundary condition may run with energy scale. As an illustrative example, we consider one-dimensional quantum mechanics for a spinless particle that freely propagates in the bulk yet interacts only at the origin. In this setting we find the renormalization group flow of U(2) family of boundary conditions exactly. We show that the well-known scale-independent subfamily of boundary conditions are realized as fixed points. We also discuss the duality between two distinct boundary conditions from the renormalization group point of view. Generalizations to conformal mechanics and quantum graph are also discussed.

Satoshi Ohya; Makoto Sakamoto; Motoi Tachibana

2010-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

314

TECHNICAL PAPER Numerical simulation of thermal flying height control sliders  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the flying characteristics at the head-disk interface. In this paper, a finite element model is developed hard disk drives. Thermal flying height control sliders are presently in common use to compensate and the magnetic disk (Schultz 2007). Dietzel et al. (2002) dem- onstrated the feasibility of dynamic flying height

Fainman, Yeshaiahu

315

Boundaries and Topological Algorithms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis develops a model for the topological structure of situations. In this model, the topological structure of space is altered by the presence or absence of boundaries, such as those at the edges of objects. ...

Fleck, Margaret Morrison

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Terrestrial magma ocean solidification and formation of a candidate D" layer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this thesis we investigate the solidification of early magma oceans on the Earth and the formation of a deep dense layer at the core-mantle boundary. We also study the concentrations and densities of the last layers of ...

Springmann, Alessondra

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

IMPACT OF BOUNDARY-LAYER CUTTING ON FREE-SURFACE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

issue into air at atmospheric pressure Working fluids: water and ethanol #12;11 Surface Breakup Efficiency Factor · Radial droplet velocity relative to jet surface · Surface breakup efficiency factor Gives area of liquid surface · Efficiency factor correlation (valid for Wed = 235­270,000) L mass flux

California at San Diego, University of

318

Experimental and theoretical study of turbulent oscillatory boundary layers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sediment transport is of crucial importance to engineering projects in coastal regions, so it is of primary interest in coastal engineering. The driving forces for sediment transport are mostly determined by the hydrodynamics ...

Yuan, Jing, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Interaction between surface and atmosphere in a convective boundary layer /  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

II.4) to measure vertical profiles of wind speed, direction,a larger vertical gradient of horizontal wind-speed in theintense vertical mixing, resulting in constant wind speed,

Garai, Anirban

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

BOUNDARY LAYER CONTROL IN PIPES THROUGH STRONG INJECTION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

normal-injection model. y Coal gasification gas mixture ,ZUSAMMENFASSUNG) In coal gasification, oxidation andthan that in the coal gasification mixture. Outside the

Yeung, William Chor Chun

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "boundary layer height" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

DIFFUSION OF A CHEMICAL SPECIES THROUGH A VISCOUS BOUNDARY LAYER  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2.3 Evaluation of a Coal Gasification Atmosphere. . -iv-a highly cor- rosive coal gasification mixture. It is shown2.3 Evaluation of a Coal Gasification Atmosphere The purpose

Keller, J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Turbulent boundary-layer control with plasma actuators  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...oscillation. When the non-dimensional...discharge (DBD) plasma actuators in air at atmospheric conditions. 2...corrected for any thermal influence of the plasma based on temperature...2007Airflow control by non-thermal plasma actuatorsJ. Phys...

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Distributed Roughness Receptivity in a Flat Plate Boundary Layer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- Distributed Receptivity . . . . . 6 2. FACILITY DESCRIPTION - THE KLEBANOFF–SARIC WIND TUNNEL 11 2.1 Test Section . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 2.2 Fan and Motor... of this dissertation describes the Klebanoff–Saric Wind Tunnel facility, which was used for this experiment. Section 3 describes the experimental setup (roughness design and the flat plate model) and defines the metrics by which the flow field is decomposed...

Kuester, Matthew Scott

2014-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

324

Thermal boundary layer development in dispersed flow film boiling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dispersed flow film boiling consists of a dispersion of droplets which are carried over a very hot surface by their vapor. This process occurs in cryogenic equipment and wet steam turbines. It is also of interest in the ...

Hull, Lawrence M.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Boundary layer ingesting inlet design for a silent aircraft  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(cont.) common nacelle, L/D ratios between 2.5 and 3.0, fan face to throat area ratios above 1.06, and offsets lower than 11%. Curvature ahead of the inlet should be avoided as well as bifurcations inside the duct. Inlet ...

Freuler, Patrick N., 1980-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Computation of Hypersonic Double Wedge Shock / Boundary Layer Interaction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of a Scramjet Demonstrator for Future Space Transportation Systems" a combined numerical as well as experimental

327

Interface modes and their instabilities in accretion disc boundary layers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......magnetosphere with and low plasma density, while the...terminated at the stellar atmosphere with high density and...systems and 300 Hz for kHz QPOs in the NS systems...uniformly rotating stellar atmosphere. This simplified model...compressible stellar atmosphere truncating the accretion......

David Tsang; Dong Lai

2009-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

328

DIFFUSION OF A CHEMICAL SPECIES THROUGH A VISCOUS BOUNDARY LAYER  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

use an operating coal gasifier will be discussed. ofof the products of the gasifier with H S removed, then theconditions existing in coal gasifiers the con- centration

Keller, J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

BOUNDARY LAYER CONTROL IN PIPES THROUGH STRONG INJECTION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the environment in a gasifier contains hydrogen, water,compo- nents of the gasifier must be corrosion resistant atis used in existing coal gasifiers. Since hydrogen sulfide

Yeung, William Chor Chun

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Turbulent flux events in a nearly neutral atmospheric boundary layer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Abstract Algorithm Technologies Pvt. LtdHebbal...not suited to handling questions of...event detection procedure; a classification...anemometer (Applied Technologies, Inc., USA...figure 3). This procedure results in a...

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Large-Scale Streamwise Turbulent Structures in Hypersonic Boundary Layers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Marine Corps for allowing me the time off during my career and necessary financial support to complete this endeavor. The help and guidance provided by Scott Peltier and Dr. Ray Humble have been indispensable in the completion of this work. Scott... helped greatly in the initial setup and design of this experiment. He has also been completely open in sharing his data and findings to help complete and emphasize my own. Dr. Humble was a source of inspiration and both conceptual and technical...

English, Benjamin L.

2013-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

332

Control of cavity-driven separated boundary layer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and D. S. Henningson1 1 KTH Mechanics, S-100 44 Stockholm, Sweden 2 Laboratoire J.A. Dieudonn´e, Parc, like for instances the Tollmien-Schlichting waves on an aeroplane wing (see e.g. H¨ogberg & Henningson, thanks to increasing computational power and the use of Arnoldi method (see Edwards et al. (1994

Hoepffner, JĂ©rĂ´me

333

ccsd00002450, Boundary layers and emitted excitations in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Bose-Einstein condensates of ultra-cold atomic vapor. In the case of super uid 4 He, the NLSE can to be negligible. This is clearly the case in recent experiments [5] that are performed at temperatures below 130 mK

334

Interaction between surface and atmosphere in a convective boundary layer /  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

heat, and thermal conductivity of the ground and grid sizegrid was stretched uniformly to 0.1 m resolution. The heatheat flux) are friction velocity and convective velocity respectively. The grid

Garai, Anirban

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Supersonic turbulent boundary layers with periodic mechanical non-equilibrium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. It was documented that proper roughness selection coupled with a sufficiently strong favorable pressure gradient produced regions of �negative� production in the transport of turbulent stress. This led to localized areas of significant turbulence stress...

Ekoto, Isaac Wesley

2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

336

Boundary-Layer Meteorology An International Journal of Physical,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

simulations agree well with observed soundings in temperature, wind speed, and wind direc- tion and their interactions with local-scale processes are analyzed to understand the factors that influence the onset-valley · Numerical simulation · Salt Lake City · Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model 1 Introduction

Pu, Zhaoxia

337

Z(N) model of grain-boundary wetting  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Even though van der Waals forces should prevent the wetting of a grain boundary by a liquid at the melting temperature, experiment and simulations indicate an instability in grain-boundary structure in the vicinity of this temperature. We study the structure of analogous boundaries in a Z(N) model in which a region of solid with a given orientation is replaced by a spin in that orientation. Different interfacial behaviors are found for different regions of a model parameter which is related to N. For the value appropriate to grain boundaries, our model suggests that boundaries of a sufficiently large angle should be unstable, not to the intrusion of a layer of liquid, however, but to the intrusion of solid of intermediate orientation. Such an intrusion can occur below the melting temperature.

M. Schick and Wei-Heng Shih

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Fermi level de-pinning of aluminium contacts to n-type germanium using thin atomic layer deposited layers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fermi-level pinning of aluminium on n-type germanium (n-Ge) was reduced by insertion of a thin interfacial dielectric by atomic layer deposition. The barrier height for aluminium contacts on n-Ge was reduced from 0.7?eV to a value of 0.28?eV for a thin Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} interfacial layer (?2.8?nm). For diodes with an Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} interfacial layer, the contact resistance started to increase for layer thicknesses above 2.8?nm. For diodes with a HfO{sub 2} interfacial layer, the barrier height was also reduced but the contact resistance increased dramatically for layer thicknesses above 1.5?nm.

Gajula, D. R., E-mail: dgajula01@qub.ac.uk; Baine, P.; Armstrong, B. M.; McNeill, D. W. [School of Electronics, Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Queen's University Belfast, Ashby Building, Stranmillis Road, Belfast BT9 5AH (United Kingdom)] [School of Electronics, Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Queen's University Belfast, Ashby Building, Stranmillis Road, Belfast BT9 5AH (United Kingdom); Modreanu, M.; Hurley, P. K. [Tyndall National Institute, University College Cork, Lee Maltings, Cork (Ireland)] [Tyndall National Institute, University College Cork, Lee Maltings, Cork (Ireland)

2014-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

339

Turbulent Vertical Kinetic Energy in the Ocean Mixed Layer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Vertical velocities in the ocean boundary layer were measured for two weeks at an open ocean, wintertime site using neutrally buoyant floats. Simultaneous measurements of the surface meteorology and surface waves showed a large variability in ...

Eric A. D'Asaro

2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Property:Building/InteriorHeight | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Building/InteriorHeight Building/InteriorHeight Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Number. Interior height, m Pages using the property "Building/InteriorHeight" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) S Sweden Building 05K0001 + 3.5 + Sweden Building 05K0002 + 3 + Sweden Building 05K0003 + 3 + Sweden Building 05K0004 + 3 + Sweden Building 05K0005 + 2.8 + Sweden Building 05K0006 + 3 + Sweden Building 05K0007 + 3.5 + Sweden Building 05K0008 + 3 + Sweden Building 05K0009 + 3 + Sweden Building 05K0010 + 3 + Sweden Building 05K0011 + 3 + Sweden Building 05K0012 + 3 + Sweden Building 05K0013 + 3 + Sweden Building 05K0014 + 3 + Sweden Building 05K0015 + 3.2 + Sweden Building 05K0016 + 3 + Sweden Building 05K0017 + 3 + Sweden Building 05K0018 + 3 +

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "boundary layer height" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents: The height distribution  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

The height distribution of tropical convective clouds The height distribution of tropical convective clouds May, Peter Bureau or Meteorology Research Centre The maximum height that towering convection reaches in the tropics has been studied using operational radar data from Northern Australia as well as cloud radar (MMCR) and polarimetric radar operating in a vertical cloud mode. This analysis was partly driven by the suggestion of Johnson et al (1999) and May and Rajopadhyaya (1999) that there were two distinct modes of deep convection, one nearing the tropopause and the other "topping" in the region 5-10 km. Operational radar storm cell tracks have been utilized and the maximum height that these cells reach in each "volume" scan has been recorded. The data has been separated into "break" season

342

City of Seaside Heights, New Jersey (Utility Company) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Seaside Heights, New Jersey (Utility Company) Seaside Heights, New Jersey (Utility Company) Jump to: navigation, search Name Seaside Heights City of Place New Jersey Utility Id 16864 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location RFC NERC RFC Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Floodlights 1000 W Lighting Floodlights 150W Lighting Floodlights 250W Lighting Floodlights 400W Lighting Residential Residential Average Rates Residential: $0.2410/kWh Commercial: $0.2060/kWh References ↑ "EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=City_of_Seaside_Heights,_New_Jersey_(Utility_Company)&oldid=410221

343

Particle Contamination on a Thermal Flying-Height Control Slider  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Particle contamination on a slider in a hard disk drive (HDD) affects the HDD’s reliability. With the introduction of the thermal flying-height control (TFC) slider, the temperature in the head–disk interface (HD...

Nan Liu; David B. Bogy

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Flying Height Drop Due to Air Entrapment in Lubricant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Recently, it is found experimentally that the flying height of an air bearing slider is influenced by the lubricant on the disk. It is explained as the air molecules ... in air bearing force, and hence, the flying

Wei Hua; Kang Kee Ng; Shengkai Yu; Bo Liu; Vivian Ng

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Analogs in the Wintertime 500 mb Height Field  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A 15-winter sample of daily gridded values of Northern Hemisphere 500 mb heights is examined for the existence of recurrent flow patterns (“analogs”). The analog search is repeated several times after degrees of freedom are successively removed ...

David S. Gutzler; Jagadish Shukla

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Incorporating Rigorous Height Determination into Unified Fracture Design  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

; height, length and width. Unified fracture design (UFD) offers a method to determine the fracture dimensions providing the maximum productivity index for a specific proppant amount. Then, in order to achieve the maximum productivity index, the treatment...

Pitakbunkate, Termpan

2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

347

Height premiums for seaside community condominiums : an empirical analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis investigates the value that condominium buyers in oceanfront communities place on how high above the ground their home will be. It is assumed that buyers will pay a premium for height, but to date no study has ...

Loker, Randall (Randall David)

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Superconducting nano-layer coating without insulator  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The superconducting nano-layer coating without insulator layer is studied. The magnetic-field distribution and the forces acting on a vortex are derived. Using the derived forces, the vortex-penetration field and the lower critical magnetic field can be discussed. The vortex-penetration field is identical with the multilayer coating, but the lower critical magnetic field is not. Forces acting on a vortex from the boundary of two superconductors play an important role in evaluations of the free energy.

Kubo, Takayuki

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Microprocessor-based ultrasonic height controller for sugarcane harvesters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EVALUATION OF ULTRASONIC SENSING. Introduction. Accuracy and Response to Height Changes Performance in Ground Detection Soil-Stalk Detection and Discrimination Parameter Adjustments in the System's Software CONCLUSIONS. REFERENCES APPENDIX A.... Ultrasonic Response and Accuracy Test on Wooden Dowels 60 24 Strip-Chart Record'ng of Ultrasonic Height Sensor Output with Various Weights in the Weighted Running Average. 62 25. Single Level Threshold Detection Scheme 64 26. Bilevel Threshold...

Coad, Craig Allan

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Creation of Data Pattern for High Accuracy Flying Height Measurement  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A common technique for measuring flying height is using the ratio of the 1st and the 3rd harmonic of a periodic data pattern. Since the 3rd harmonic is typically smaller than the 1st, and the recording channel usually rolls off at higher harmonics, the magnitude of the 3rd harmonic dominates the signal to noise ratio of the measured flying height. Therefore it is desirable to create a data pattern that has a large 3rd harmonic component for flying height measurement. This paper describes a method to create data patterns with a high frequency component larger than the 1st harmonic. The method multiplies a high frequency signal to a basic periodic signal to create a high frequency component and a low frequency component. The high frequency signal may be the 3rd harmonic and can be larger than the low frequency one. In addition, newly created data pattern was applied to real hard disk drive, and the accuracy of measured flying height was demonstrated in comparison with measured flying height based on conventional data pattern.

Yawshing Tang; Sung-Chang Lee; Mike Suk

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Wave height forecasting in Dayyer, the Persian Gulf  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Forecasting of wave parameters is necessary for many marine and coastal operations. Different forecasting methodologies have been developed using the wind and wave characteristics. In this paper, artificial neural network (ANN) as a robust data learning method is used to forecast the wave height for the next 3, 6, 12 and 24 h in the Persian Gulf. To determine the effective parameters, different models with various combinations of input parameters were considered. Parameters such as wind speed, direction and wave height of the previous 3 h, were found to be the best inputs. Furthermore, using the difference between wave and wind directions showed better performance. The results also indicated that if only the wind parameters are used as model inputs the accuracy of the forecasting increases as the time horizon increases up to 6 h. This can be due to the lower influence of previous wave heights on larger lead time forecasting and the existing lag between the wind and wave growth. It was also found that in short lead times, the forecasted wave heights primarily depend on the previous wave heights, while in larger lead times there is a greater dependence on previous wind speeds.

B. Kamranzad; A. Etemad-Shahidi; M.H. Kazeminezhad

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

CHIP House Takes Design to Different Heights (Literally) | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

CHIP House Takes Design to Different Heights (Literally) CHIP House Takes Design to Different Heights (Literally) CHIP House Takes Design to Different Heights (Literally) May 12, 2011 - 5:49pm Addthis A model of the SCI-Arc/Caltech Solar Deacthlon team's CHIP house. | Photo Courtesy of the Solar Decathlon's Flickr photostream A model of the SCI-Arc/Caltech Solar Deacthlon team's CHIP house. | Photo Courtesy of the Solar Decathlon's Flickr photostream April Saylor April Saylor Former Digital Outreach Strategist, Office of Public Affairs How can I participate? The next Solar Decathlon will be held Sept. 23-Oct. 2, 2011, at the National Mall's West Potomac Park in Washington, D.C. In honor of the U.S Department of Energy's Solar Decathlon -- which challenges 20 collegiate teams to design, build, and operate solar-powered

353

Town of Kingsford Heights, Indiana (Utility Company) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Kingsford Heights, Indiana (Utility Company) Kingsford Heights, Indiana (Utility Company) Jump to: navigation, search Name Town of Kingsford Heights Place Indiana Utility Id 10330 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location RFC NERC RFC Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Churches, Schools, Commercial and Small Power Service Commercial General Power Service Rate C- Demand Metered Commercial General Power Service Rate C- Non Demand Metered Commercial General Service Rate M- Demand Metered Commercial General Service Rate M- Non Demand Metered Commercial

354

Wind Industry Soars to New Heights | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Wind Industry Soars to New Heights Wind Industry Soars to New Heights Wind Industry Soars to New Heights August 5, 2013 - 8:13am Addthis Watch the video to learn more about the new records reached by the U.S. industry as found in the 2012 Wind Technologies Market Report. | Video by Matty Greene, Energy Department. Matty Greene Matty Greene Videographer Wind capacity additions in the United States reached record levels in 2012, as detailed in the 2012 Wind Technologies Market Report. In a video narrated by Jose Zayas, Director of the Energy Department's Wind and Water Power Technologies Office, he highlights the wind energy accomplishments in 2012. This includes adding 13 gigawatts in new installations -- enough to surpass any other country -- as well as employing 80,000 American workers. After watching the video, make sure to checkout the report in its entirety

355

Wind Industry Soars to New Heights | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Industry Soars to New Heights Industry Soars to New Heights Wind Industry Soars to New Heights August 5, 2013 - 8:13am Addthis Watch the video to learn more about the new records reached by the U.S. industry as found in the 2012 Wind Technologies Market Report. | Video by Matty Greene, Energy Department. Matty Greene Matty Greene Videographer Wind capacity additions in the United States reached record levels in 2012, as detailed in the 2012 Wind Technologies Market Report. In a video narrated by Jose Zayas, Director of the Energy Department's Wind and Water Power Technologies Office, he highlights the wind energy accomplishments in 2012. This includes adding 13 gigawatts in new installations -- enough to surpass any other country -- as well as employing 80,000 American workers. After watching the video, make sure to checkout the report in its entirety

356

Property:Maximum Wave Height(m) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Property Property Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Property:Maximum Wave Height(m) Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Maximum Wave Height(m) Property Type String Pages using the property "Maximum Wave Height(m)" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) 1 1.5-ft Wave Flume Facility + 0.2 + 10-ft Wave Flume Facility + 0.5 + 11-ft Wave Flume Facility + 0.4 + 2 2-ft Flume Facility + 0.6 + 3 3-ft Wave Flume Facility + 0.2 + 5 5-ft Wave Flume Facility + 0.5 + 6 6-ft Wave Flume Facility + 0.4 + A Alden Large Flume + 0.0 + Alden Small Flume + 0.2 + Alden Wave Basin + 0.3 + B Breakwater Research Facility + 0.0 + C Carderock Maneuvering & Seakeeping Basin + 0.6 + Carderock Tow Tank 2 + 0.6 + Carderock Tow Tank 3 + 0.6 +

357

An automatic cutting height control system for a sugarcane harvester  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

). . . . . 53 22. 23. Effect of the soil-stalk weight factor on the ground average, and the stalk average A comparison of Avg and Avs calculated from laboratory data with both real numbers, and integer numbers. . . . . . . 57 24 . A graph of a portion... factor, W. By calculating the difference between Avg and Avs, as equation (5) shows, the height of the sugarcane stubble remaining after cutting, 0, was to be determined. D = Avg - Avs (5) where: D - the height of the sugarcane stubble remaining...

Hale, Scott Andrew

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

358

Boundaries on Spacetimes: An Outline  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The causal boundary construction of Geroch, Kronheimer, and Penrose has some universal properties of importance for general studies of spacetimes, particularly when equipped with a topology derived from the causal structure. Properties of the causal boundary are detailed for spacetimes with spacelike boundaries, for multi-warped spacetimes, for static spacetimes, and for spacetimes with group actions.

Steven G. Harris

2003-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

359

Topology of the Future Chronological Boundary: Universality for Spacelike Boundaries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A method is presented for imputing a topology for any chronological set, i.e., a set with a chronology relation, such as a spacetime or a spacetime with some sort of boundary. This topology is shown to have several good properties, such as replicating the manifold topology for a spacetime and replicating the expected topology for some simple examples of spacetime-with-boundary; it also allows for a complete categorical characterization, in topological categories, of the Future Causal Boundary construction of Geroch, Kronheimer, and Penrose, showing that construction to have a universal property for future-completing chronological sets with spacelike boundaries. Rigidity results are given for any reasonable future completion of a spacetime, in terms of the GKP boundary: In the imputed topology, any such boundary must be homeomorphic to the GKP boundary (if all points have indecomposable pasts) or to a topological quotient of a closely related boundary (if boundaries are spacelike). A large class of warped-product-type spacetimes with spacelike boundaries is examined, calculating the GKP and other possible boundaries, and showing that the imputed topology gives expected results; included among these are the Schwarzschild singularity and those Robertson-Walker singularities which are spacelike.

Steven G. Harris

1999-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

360

Patch antennas with new artificial magnetic layers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A new type of high-impedance surfaces (HIS) has been introduced by C.R. Simovski et al. recently. In this paper, we propose to use such layers as artificial magnetic materials in the design of patch antennas. The new HIS is simulated and patch antennas partially filled by these composite layers are measured in order to test how much the antenna dimensions can be reduced. In order to experimentally investigate the frequency behavior of the material, different sizes of the patches are designed and tested with the same material layer. Also the height of the patch is changed in order to find the best possible position for minimizing the antenna size. This composite layer of an artificial magnetic material has made the antenna smaller while keeping the bandwidth characteristics of the antenna about the same. About 40% of size reduction has been achieved.

M. Ermutlu; C. R. Simovski; M. Karkainen; P. Ikonen; A. A. Sochava; S. A. Tretyakov

2005-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "boundary layer height" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Model-Based Estimation of Forest Canopy Height in Red and Austrian Pine Stands Using Shuttle Radar Topography Mission and Ancillary Data: a Proof-of-Concept Study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper, accurate tree stand height retrieval is demonstrated using C-band Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) height and ancillary data. The tree height retrieval algorithm is based on modeling uniform tree stands with a single layer of randomly oriented vegetation particles. For such scattering media, the scattering phase center height, as measured by SRTM, is a function of tree height, incidence angle, and the extinction coefficient of the medium. The extinction coefficient for uniform tree stands is calculated as a function of tree height and density using allometric equations and a fractal tree model. The accuracy of the proposed algorithm is demonstrated using SRTM and TOPSAR data for 15 red pine and Austrian pine stands (TOPSAR is an airborne interferometric synthetic aperture radar). The algorithm yields root-mean-square (rms) errors of 2.5-3.6 m, which is a substantial improvement over the 6.8-8.3-m rms errors from the raw SRTM minus National Elevation Dataset Heights.

Brown Jr., C G; Sarabandi, K; Pierce, L E

2007-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

362

Time dependent simulation of active flying height control of TFC sliders  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Thermal Flying-height Control (TFC) sliders have been recently used to reduce flying height at the head disk interface and obtain more stable flying heights (Kurita et al. 2005; Song et al. 2007; Liu et al. 2008....

Pablo Antonio Salas; Uwe Boettcher; Frank E. Talke

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Preprint of the paper "A Boundary Element Numerical Approach for Substation Grounding in a Two  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Preprint of the paper "A Boundary Element Numerical Approach for Substation Grounding in a Two://caminos.udc.es/gmni #12;A BOUNDARY ELEMENT NUMERICAL APPROACH FOR SUBSTATION GROUNDING IN A TWO LAYER EARTH STRUCTURE3~na, SPAIN SUMMARY Analysis and design of substation grounding requires computing the distribution

Colominas, Ignasi

364

Gas-surface interaction and boundary conditions for the Boltzmann equation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gas-surface interaction and boundary conditions for the Boltzmann equation St´ephane Brull, Pierre Equation. The interaction between the wall atoms and the gas molecules within a thin surface layer of the gas in the bulk flow. Boundary conditions are formally derived from this model by using classical

Mieussens, Luc

365

Stratigraphic Boundaries | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Stratigraphic Boundaries Stratigraphic Boundaries Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Stratigraphic Boundaries Dictionary.png Stratigraphic Boundaries: No definition has been provided for this term. Add a Definition Controlling Structures List of controlling structures typically associated with geothermal systems: Major Normal Fault Termination of a Major Normal Fault Stepover or Relay Ramp in Normal Fault Zones Apex or Salient of Normal Fault Fault Intersection Accommodation Zone Displacement Transfer Zone Pull-Apart in Strike-Slip Fault Zone Intrusion Margins and Associated Fractures Stratigraphic Boundaries Fissure Swarms Caldera Rim Margins Lithologically Controlled Hydrothermal circulation may occur at the contacts between different lithologies. Examples

366

LEVY PROCESS CONDITIONED BY ITS HEIGHT PROCESS June 11, 2011  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-called exploration process defined in [10], T0 is the hitting time of 0 for X. When the process X is a compensatedL´EVY PROCESS CONDITIONED BY ITS HEIGHT PROCESS June 11, 2011 MATHIEU RICHARD Abstract. In the present work, we consider spectrally positive L´evy processes (Xt, t 0) not drifting to + and we

367

Resonant Instability in Mountain Waves: Breaking at Subcritical Mountain Heights  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Resonant Instability in Mountain Waves: Breaking at Subcritical Mountain Heights Kevin Viner1 and breaks subcritical critical Nh/U = 0.5 Nh/U = 0.8 #12;Subcritical Instability: An Example three peaks · Nh/U = 0.6 · U/NL = 0.1 · nonrotating · Time-dependent model initialized with subcritical steady wave

368

Exploiting the Height of Vehicles in Vehicular Communication  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Exploiting the Height of Vehicles in Vehicular Communication Mate Boban1,3, Rui Meireles2,3, Jo@ece.cmu.edu, prs@cs.cmu.edu} 1 Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Carnegie Mellon University, USA 2 networks (VANETs) is how to efficiently relay messages between vehicles. We propose a heuristic that uses

Garlan, David

369

Injection Solvent Effect on Peak Height in Ion Exchange HPLC  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......2. To further evaluate the effect of the injection volume only...injection volume were varied. Effect of weak injection solvent There...same eluent ion strength. The effect of eluent ion strength. Figure...nitrate in the mobile phase. 418 ship of the peak height of phenylacetate......

Hyunjoo Kim Lee; Norman E. Hoffman

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Offshore Series Wind Turbine Variable Hub heights & rotor diameters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

3.6MW Offshore Series Wind Turbine GE Energy #12;Feature Variable Hub heights & rotor diameters-savings feature, considering the rigors of offshore power generation. The 3.6 MW offshore wind turbine also, for both on and offshore use. Special features include... As the world's first commercially available wind

Firestone, Jeremy

371

Adult Height, Insulin, and 17?-Estradiol in Young Women  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...17beta-estradiol vary in response to adult height...puberty and fat storage, and may influence...the Norwegian Energy Balance and...in means and frequencies of selected...of childhood energy intake; it...insulin (dose response and no threshold...Predictive Adaptive Response hypothesis...Lukanova A. Energy balance and...

Sissi Espetvedt Finstad; Aina Emaus; Steinar Tretli; Grazyna Jasienska; Peter T. Ellison; Anne-Sofie Furberg; Erik A. Wist; and Inger Thune

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Forecasting wave height probabilities with numerical weather prediction models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Forecasting wave height probabilities with numerical weather prediction models Mark S. Roulstona; Numerical weather prediction 1. Introduction Wave forecasting is now an integral part of operational weather methods for generating such forecasts from numerical model output from the European Centre for Medium

Stevenson, Paul

373

Adult Height, Insulin, and 17?-Estradiol in Young Women  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...in the Norwegian Energy Balance and Breast...locally in Northern Norway during 2000 to...daily intake of energy and nutrients was...University of Oslo, Norway (15). Height...World War II in Norway (18) support that energy restriction, as...

Sissi Espetvedt Finstad; Aina Emaus; Steinar Tretli; Grazyna Jasienska; Peter T. Ellison; Anne-Sofie Furberg; Erik A. Wist; and Inger Thune

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Surface Temperature and Surface-Layer Turbulence in a Convective Boundary Layer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The vertical gradient of horizontal wind-speed was estimateda larger vertical gradient of horizontal wind-speed in thewind speed, direction, temperature, humidity up to 20 km with a vertical

Garai, Anirban; Pardyjak, Eric; Steeneveld, Gert-Jan; Kleissl, Jan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Surface Temperature and Surface-Layer Turbulence in a Convective Boundary Layer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are density, specific heat of the soil, and grid size in theThe ground heat-flux G then computed from T g as grid was

Garai, Anirban; Pardyjak, Eric; Steeneveld, Gert-Jan; Kleissl, Jan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Historical variability in Atlantic meridional baroclinic transport at 26.51N from boundary dynamic height observations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, an approach that forms the basis of studies at 26.51N to compute circulation snapshots from transatlantic snapshots resulting from transatlantic hydrographic sections (e.g. Bryden et al., 2005). This contrasted

377

Building biomedical materials layer-by-layer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this materials perspective, the promise of water based layer-by-layer (LbL) assembly as a means of generating drug-releasing surfaces for biomedical applications, from small molecule therapeutics to biologic drugs and ...

Hammond, Paula T.

378

Zoning for Small Wind: The Importance of Tower Height  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

1 1 Zoning for Small Wind: The Importance of Tower Height An ASES Small Wind Webinar Mick Sagrillo-Wisconsin's Focus on Energy © 2008 by Mick Sagrillo 2 Definitions: rotor L&S Tech. Assoc., Inc. Rotor = "collector" for a wind system 3 Definitions: wind * Wind = the 'fuel' * Wind has two 'components' - Quantity = wind speed (velocity or V) - Quality = 'clean' flowing wind 4 Quantity * = average annual wind speed * Climate, not weather * Akin to annual average sun hours for PV or head and flow for hydro * Wind speed increases with height above ground... * ...Due to diminished ground drag (friction) 5 Power in the wind V³ * Wind speed = V * Power available is proportional to wind speed x wind speed x wind speed - or P ~ V x V x V - or P ~ V ³ * Therefore, 10% V = 33% P * Lesson !

379

Limiting Factors for Convective Cloud Top Height in the Tropics  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Limiting Factors for Convective Cloud Top Limiting Factors for Convective Cloud Top Height in the Tropics M. P. Jensen and A. D. Del Genio National Aeronautics and Space Administration Goddard Institute for Space Studies Columbia University New York, New York Introduction Populations of tropical convective clouds are mainly comprised of three types: shallow trade cumulus, mid-level cumulus congestus and deep convective clouds (Johnson et al. 1999). Each of these cloud types has different impacts on the local radiation and water budgets. For climate model applications it is therefore important to understand the factors which determine the type of convective cloud that will occur. In this study, we concentrate on describing the factors that limit the cloud-top heights of mid-

380

Intermittent Turbulence in the Very Stable Ekman Layer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

INTERMITTENT TURBULENCE IN THE VERY STABLE EKMAN LAYER This study describes a Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) of a very stable Ekman layer in which a constant downward heat flux is applied at the lower boundary, thus cooling the fluid above. Numerical experiments were performed in which the strength of the imposed heat flux was varied. For downward heat fluxes above a certain critical value the turbulence becomes intermittent and, as the heat flux increases beyond this value, the flow tends to relaminarize because of the very strong ambient stratification. We adopt Mahrt?s (1999) definition of the very stable boundary layer as a boundary layer in which intermittent, rather than continuous turbulence, is observed. Numerical experiments were used to test various hypothesis of where in ?stability parameter space? the very stable boundary layer is found. These experiments support the findings of Howell and Sun (1999) that the boundary layer will exhibit intermittency and therefore be categorized as ?very stable?, when the stability parameter, z/L, exceeds unity. Another marker for the very stable boundary layer, Derbyshire?s (1990) maximum heat flux criterion, was also examined. Using a case study drawn from the simulations where turbulence intermittency was observed, the mechanism that causes the intermittence was investigated. It was found that patchy turbulence originates from a vigorous inflectional, Ekman-like instability -- a roll cell -- that lifts colder air over warmer air. The resulting convective instability causes an intense burst of turbulence. This turbulence is short-lived because the lifting motion of the roll cell, as well as the roll cell itself, is partially destroyed after the patchy turbulence is generated. Examples of intermittent turbulence obtained from the simulations appear to be consistent with observations of intermittency even though the Reynolds number of the DNS is relatively low (400).

Barnard, James C.

2001-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "boundary layer height" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

2. System boundaries; Balance equations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

;5/28 Systems and boundaries /3 An isolated system is a special kind of closed system Pictures: KJ05 Q = heat W Example: an electric hot water heater in a house ­ The electric heater is a closed system ­ The water1/28 2. System boundaries; Balance equations Ron Zevenhoven �bo Akademi University Thermal and flow

Zevenhoven, Ron

382

Sensitivity Analysis for Decision Boundaries  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A novel approach is presented to visualize and analyze decision boundaries for feedforward neural networks. First order sensitivity analysis of the neural network output function with respect to input perturbations is used to visualize the position ... Keywords: decision boundary, feature extraction, feedforward neural network, irrelevant parameters, pruning, sensitivity analysis

A. P. Engelbrecht

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Algorithms for processing ultrasonic echo data for height control systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

estimation was affected by the value of the weighting factor (M) in equation (1). The accuracy of this stubble height estimation was evaluated by using the Student's t test technique. ESTH(n) = AVS(n) ? AVG(n) (3) Computer program: A FORTRAN program... YES IS HTs'P READ AVS & AVG, STALK AND GROUND AVERAGES r---- RAISE BLADES t, READ THD OR THH & THL, SINGLE THRESHOLD OR GET NEW SAMPLE ECHO ECHO DISCRIMINATION GROUND STALK OR GROUND ? STALK AVS ~AVS + Y(I)-AVS n n-I AVG =AVG Y...

Lin, Reng Rong

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

384

A general boundary integral approach to elliptical boundary value problems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Based upon basic principles of continuum theory a unified direct boundary integral representation of three-dimensional elliptical boundary value problems is presented. Within this framework many interesting engineering problems, e.g. elastostatics, manetostatic and heat conduction may be considered. The special analysis of the problem under consideration appears in the fundamental solutions. A general procedure for derivation of fundamental solutions with regard to an effecient numerical realisation of the boundary element method is discussed. In the appendix a FORTRAN IV code concerning the calculation of fundamental solutions in anisotropic elastostatics is presented.

H. Gründemann

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Intermediate layers in the a-Si:H growth processes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The intermediate layers (IL) exist at the boundary between liquid (plasma, gas) and solid phases during production processes of a-Si:H. The IL properties differ from the properties of the boundary regions anomaly. The substance in IL is in a strong nonequilibrium state of the bifurcation or the cascade of bifurcations. The processes in the IL determine the properties and the structure of the material being produced.

Aivazov, A.A.; Bodyagin, N.V. [Moscow Inst. of Electronic Technology (Russian Federation); Vikhrov, S.P. [Radiotechnical Academy, Ryazan (Russian Federation). CR Faculty

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

386

Flow boundary conditions for chain-end adsorbing polymer blends  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Using the phenol-terminated polycarbonate blend as an example, we demonstrate that the hydrodynamic boundary conditions for a flow of an adsorbing polymer melt are extremely sensitive to the structure of the epitaxial layer. Under shear, the adsorbed parts (chain ends) of the polymer melt move along the equipotential lines of the surface potential whereas the adsorbed additives serve as the surface defects. In response to the increase of the number of the adsorbed additives the surface layer becomes thinner and solidifies. This results in a gradual transition from the slip to the no-slip boundary condition for the melt flow, with a non-monotonic dependence of the slip length on the surface concentration of the adsorbed ends.

X. Zhou; D. Andrienko; L. Delle Site; K. Kremer

2005-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

387

Graphene-layered steps and their fields visualized by 4D electron microscopy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Graphene-layered steps and their fields visualized...Enhanced image contrast has been seen at graphene-layered steps a few nanometers in height...observed steps are formed by the edges of graphene strips lying on the surface of a graphene...

Sang Tae Park; Aycan Yurtsever; John Spencer Baskin; Ahmed H. Zewail

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Studies of the 3D surface roughness height  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nowadays nano-coatings occupy more and more significant place in technology. Innovative, functional coatings acquire new aspects from the point of view of modern technologies, considering the aggregate of physical properties that can be achieved manipulating in the production process with the properties of coatings’ surfaces on micro- and nano-level. Nano-coatings are applied on machine parts, friction surfaces, contacting parts, corrosion surfaces, transparent conducting films (TCF), etc. The equipment available at present for the production of transparent conducting oxide (TCO) coatings with highest quality is based on expensive indium tin oxide (ITO) material; therefore cheaper alternatives are being searched for. One such offered alternative is zink oxide (ZnO) nano-coatings. Evaluating the TCF physical and mechanical properties and in view of the new ISO standard (EN ISO 25178) on the introduction of surface texture (3D surface roughness) in the engineering calculations, it is necessary to examine the height of 3D surface roughness, which is one of the most significant roughness parameters. The given paper studies the average values of 3D surface roughness height and the most often applied distribution laws are as follows: the normal distribution and Rayleigh distribution. The 3D surface is simulated by a normal random field.

Avisane, Anita; Rudzitis, Janis; Kumermanis, Maris [Institute of Mechanical Engineering, Riga Technical University, Ezermalas str. 6k, Riga (Latvia)

2013-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

389

Growth mode evolution of hafnium oxide by atomic layer deposition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

HfO{sub 2} thin films were deposited using tetrakis-ethylmethylamido hafnium and H{sub 2}O as precursors on silicon by atomic layer deposition (ALD). The morphology and microstructures at different ALD cycles were characterized by atomic force microscopy and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. Based on the height–height correlation function and power spectral density function, quantitative analysis of surface morphologies was performed. Three characteristic dimensions (?{sub 1}, ?{sub 2}, and ?{sub 3}) corresponding to three surface structures, islands, local and global fluctuations, were identified. The evolution of ALD growth mode at range of the three critical scales was investigated, respectively. It suggests the transformation of growth mode from quasi two-dimensional layer-by-layer to three-dimensional island for global fluctuations.

Nie, Xianglong; Ma, Fei; Ma, Dayan, E-mail: madayan@mail.xjtu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory for Mechanical Behavior of Materials, Xi'an Jiaotong University, Xi'an 710049, Shaanxi (China); Xu, Kewei [State Key Laboratory for Mechanical Behavior of Materials, Xi'an Jiaotong University, Xi'an 710049, Shaanxi, People's Republic of China and Department of Physics and Opt-electronic Engineering, Xi'an University of Arts and Science, Xi'an 710065, Shaanxi (China)

2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

390

Theory of Grain Boundary Diffusion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The previously proposed dependence of the structure of grain boundaries upon the angle of disorientation of the two grains is used as a basis of a quantitative consideration of diffusion along grain boundaries and in particular of the apparent activation energies. At small angles in the dislocation range the diffusion is controlled by volume diffusion mechanism. At high angles near 45° the model of a uniform grain boundary is applicable. In the intermediate range an array of rod-like areas of distorted lattice leads to low or even negative apparent activation energies. The theory is in good agreement with experiment.

R. Smoluchowski

1952-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Earth's Core Hottest Layer  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Earth's Core Hottest Layer Earth's Core Hottest Layer Name: Alfred Status: Grade: 6-8 Location: FL Country: USA Date: Spring 2011 Question: Why is the inner core the hottest layer? How is that possible? Replies: There are two factors causing the center of the Earth hotter than various layers of the Earth's. First, the more dense is the layer. The denser layer, the hotter it will be. In addition, the source of the heating is due to heat produced by nuclear decay. These substances tend to be more dense than lower dense substances. So the source of heat (temperature) is higher, the greater will be the temperature. Having said all that, the reasons are rather more complicated in the "real" Earth. If the inner layers were less dense they would rise (bubble) to the "surface" leaving the inner layers more dense and thus hotter layers.

392

The Method of Boundary Perturbation,  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Method of Boundary Perturbation, Method of Boundary Perturbation, and Its Application to Wakefield Calculationst Weiren Chou+ Advanced Photon Source Argonne National Laboratory 9700 S. Cass Ave. Argonne, IL 60439 USA Spring Meeting of The American Physical Society Division of Physics of Beams Washington, D.C. April 16-19, 1990 tWork supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, under Contract W-31-109-ENG-38. tPresent address: SSC Laboratory, Accelerator Division, MS-I046, 2550 Beckleymeade Ave., Dallas, TX 75237, USA. LS-/~ Boundary Perturbation, and Its Application to Wakefield Calculations ABSTRACT The boundary perturbation method, suggested by Zhang and, independently, by Chatard-Moulin, Cooper, and their colleagues, is employed to the wakefield cal-

393

South Campus Boundary/Landscape  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

South Campus Boundary/Landscape April 18, 2012 #12;#12;7:00 - 7:05 Introductions and Review of the Agenda 7:05 - 7:20 Principles of the South Campus Boundary/Landscape from the Feb 21 Design Charette 7:20 - 7:30 Landscape Examples 7:30 - 7:45 Concepts and Ideas for LeMarchant St. 7:45 - 7:50 Break

Brownstone, Rob

394

U.S. Wind Manufacturing: Taller Hub Heights to Access Higher...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

U.S. Wind Manufacturing: Taller Hub Heights to Access Higher Wind Resources and Lower Cost of Energy U.S. Wind Manufacturing: Taller Hub Heights to Access Higher Wind Resources and...

395

Ways of improving efficiency of turbine stages having high blade height to mean diameter ratio  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We propose an approximate method for profiling the blades of steam-turbine last stages with a high height to ... variable slope along the height that allows better efficiency of the turbine unit to be obtained.

G. A. Filippov; A. R. Avetisyan

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Parametric simulation of piezoelectric flying height control slider using shear-mode deformation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The piezoelectric flying height control slider has recently been implemented in magnetic recording disk drives to reduce the flying height. This paper performs the electromechanical simulation ... of the shear-mo...

Shengnan Shen; Hui Li; Bo Liu; Hejun Du; Nobutoshi Sagawa

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Experimental study of slider–disk interaction process with thermal-flying-height controlled slider  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Thermal flying height (TFC) controlled slider has been introduced in hard disk drive recently. Flying height at the read/write elements of ... protrusion. Interactions between the TFC slider and disk can be very ...

Yansheng Ma; Bo Liu

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Drive level measurement of flying height modulation and control of slider disk contact  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A drive level measurement of flying height modulation and a demonstration of slider-disk contact control was conducted. The results of the flying height modulation strongly agree with those obtained ... modulatio...

J. Xu; Y. Shimizu; L. Su

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

An efficient thermal actuator design for the thermal flying height control slider  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Thermal flying height control (TFC) has recently been implemented in magnetic recording disk drives to reduce the flying height at the read/write element for...2000; Suk et al. 2005; Kurita et al. 2005; Song et a...

Hui Li; Shengnan Shen

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Contact between a thermal flying height control slider and a disk asperity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Contact between a thermal flying height control slider and an asperity on a disk is investigated using finite element analysis. The ... write element are determined as a function of flying height of the slider, l...

Wenping Song; Andrey Ovcharenko; Min Yang; Hao Zheng…

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "boundary layer height" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Characterization of light contact in head disk interface with dynamic flying height control  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents an investigation of the light contact in a head disk interface with dynamic flying height control. The touchdown test is conducted for a dynamic flying height control slider and the response i...

Jianfeng Xu; Gang Sheng

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Servo signal processing for flying height control in hard disk drives  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In recent years, thermal actuated flying height control has been implemented in hard disk drives (HDD) to reduce the effect of flying height variations due to manufacturing tolerances or...2005). A stable low flying

Uwe Boettcher; Christopher A. Lacey; Hui Li; Kensuke Amemiya…

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Improvement of measurement sensitivity near contact in intensity-interferometry flying height testers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the hard disk drive, the spacing between the read/write head and the magnetic disk or flying height has been greatly reduced to a ... to achieve ultrahigh-density magnetic storage. At flying heights below 10 n...

Korakoch Phetdee; Alongkorn Pimpin; Werayut Srituravanich

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Charge Transport Anisotropy Due to Grain Boundaries in Directionally  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Charge Transport Anisotropy Due to Grain Charge Transport Anisotropy Due to Grain Boundaries in Directionally Crystallized Thin Films of Regio-Regular Poly(3-hexylthiophene) Semicrystalline polymers, such as polythiophenes, hold much promise as active layers in printable electronic devices such as photovoltaic cells, sensors, and thin film transistors. As organic semiconductors approach commercialization, there is a need to better understand the relationship between charge transport and microstructure, in particular, to identify the inherent bottlenecks to charge transport. In semicrystalline and polycrystalline materials, charge transport is most likely dominated by grain-boundary effects, although the exact mechanism is not well understood. Unfortunately, grain boundaries in semicrystalline thin films are difficult to characterize: the grains are too small to allow for measurements across individual grain boundaries (as is often done for polycrystalline films of small molecules) and bulk measurements are complicated by the unknown orientation of polymer chains within the grain. To better understand the effect of chain orientation on grain boundaries, we use anisotropic thin films of poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) - one of the most well-studied polymeric semiconductors, as a tool to study charge transport.

405

Dilution calculations for determining laboratory exhaust stack heights  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Laboratory exhaust stacks should be designed with sufficient height and exit momentum to avoid re-entry of exhaust and possible air quality problems, and the design should be evaluated before construction. One evaluation method is presented in this paper that combines dilution prediction equations from the 1997 ASHRAE Handbook--Fundamentals (1997) and a dilution criteria of Halitsky (1988). This method is less conservative than a geometric method in the ASHRAE Handbook and is less costly than wind-tunnel modeling. The method should only be applied to relatively simple building geometries with no larger buildings adjacent to them. A planned change to the ASHRAE equations, which would result in larger stacks being necessary, is discussed. Further investigation of this change is recommended using comparisons to wind tunnel data.

Ratcliff, M.A.; Sandru, E.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Convective heat transfer in a locally heated plane incompressible fluid layer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The problem of convection in a plane horizontal layer of incompressible fluid with rigid boundaries when the temperature is ... . Together with the wellknown solutions which describe heat transfer for the linear ...

S. N. Aristov; K. G. Shvarts

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

A Perfectly Matched Layer Method for the Navier-Stokes equations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Perfectly Matched Layer Method (PML) has found widespread application as a high-accuracy, non-reflecting boundary treatment in many wave propagation simulations. However, in the area of computational fluid dynamics, ...

Whitney, John Peter, 1982-

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Using Height Sensors for Biometric Identification in Multi-resident Homes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Using Height Sensors for Biometric Identification in Multi-resident Homes Vijay Srinivasan, John the doorways in a home. Height sensors are cheap, are convenient for the residents, are simple to install in an existing home, and are perceived to be less invasive than cameras or microphones. Height is typically only

Stankovic, John A.

409

A perfectly matched layer formulation for the nonlinear shallow water equations models: The split  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In a limited-area numerical weather prediction model, the lateral boundaries are not physical boundaries interest since the early days of numerical weather prediction. Several good reviews are availableA perfectly matched layer formulation for the nonlinear shallow water equations models: The split

Navon, Michael

410

Two-windows Ionospheric Drift Measurement at Heights 90150 km During Sporadic E-layer Occurrence Using Digisonde DPS-4  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

­2.6 MHz) we recorded plasma motion each 15 minutes also in a higher frequency window (3.2­4.7 MHz). Our of Mathematics and Physics, Department of Surface and Plasma Science, V Holesovickách 2, 18000 Prague 8, Czech Republic. 2 Institute of Atmospheric Physics, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Bocní II/1401, 141

Santolik, Ondrej

411

Modeling open boundaries in dissipative MHD simulation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The truncation of large physical domains to concentrate computational resources is necessary or desirable in simulating many natural and man-made plasma phenomena. Three open boundary condition (BC) methods for such domain truncation of dissipative magnetohydrodynamics ... Keywords: Approximate Riemann, Artificial boundary, Calderon method, Dissipative, Lacuna, Lacunae, MHD, Magnetohydrodynamics, Non-reflecting boundary, Nonlinear, Open boundary, hyperbolic-parabolic

E. T. Meier; A. H. Glasser; V. S. Lukin; U. Shumlak

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Multidelay Model Relating Tide Height to Underwater Acoustic Phase  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Observed relationships between environmental parameters and underwater acoustic phase were earlier reported and a multi?input nonrealizable model was analyzed showing that among several parameters tide height has the strongest coherence with measured phase fluctuations. This work is concerned with a special case of the above model where the system is single input with a realizable impulse response consisting of few delays. Several cases are considered such as a single delay two or more delays. Among these a special case is found where one of the delays is fixed at zero time (in phase no delay component). Two kinds of results are reported—one where optimization is carried out on all energy bands another where optimization is carried out on selected bands that are least corrupted by noise and the effect of other parameters. The resulting transfer function is calculated and errors from measured values are given individually for each band and also collectively as a figure of merit for that solution. [Work supported by Office of Naval Research Code 468.

Kamal Yacoub; Jose Almeida

1970-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Identifying Chemicals That Are Planetary Boundary Threats  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Identifying Chemicals That Are Planetary Boundary Threats ... Our point of departure to develop profiles for chemicals that are potential planetary boundary threats is to identify scenarios in which a chemical could fulfill each of the three conditions for being a planetary boundary threat. ... Note that chemicals named as examples do not necessarily represent planetary boundary threats since at least one scenario from each of the three conditions must be fulfilled for a chemical to pose a planetary boundary threat. ...

Matthew MacLeod; Magnus Breitholtz; Ian T. Cousins; Cynthia A. de Wit; Linn M. Persson; Christina Rudén; Michael S. McLachlan

2014-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

414

Genetic Determinants of Height Growth Assessed Longitudinally from Infancy to Adulthood in the Northern Finland Birth Cohort 1966  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recent genome-wide association (GWA) studies have identified dozens of common variants associated with adult height. However, it is unknown how these variants influence height growth during childhood. We derived peak height ...

Peltonen, Leena

415

Layered plasma polymer composite membranes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Layered plasma polymer composite fluid separation membranes are disclosed, which comprise alternating selective and permeable layers for a total of at least 2n layers, where n is [>=]2 and is the number of selective layers. 2 figs.

Babcock, W.C.

1994-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

416

Lagrangian Variational Framework for Boundary Value Problems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A boundary value problem is commonly associated with constraints imposed on a system at its boundary. We advance here an alternative point of view treating the system as interacting "boundary" and "interior" subsystems. This view is implemented through a Lagrangian framework that allows to account for (i) a variety of forces including dissipative acting at the boundary; (ii) a multitude of features of interactions between the boundary and the interior fields when the boundary fields may differ from the boundary limit of the interior fields; (iii) detailed pictures of the energy distribution and its flow; (iv) linear and nonlinear effects. We provide a number of elucidating examples of the structured boundary and its interactions with the system interior. We also show that the proposed approach covers the well known boundary value problems.

Alexander Figotin; Guillermo Reyes

2014-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

417

Managing across boundaries: identity, differentiation and interaction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The impact of organisational restructuring on organisational boundaries has become increasingly important, especially because modernisation of work practices within large organisations generates increasing boundary complexity. Psychoanalytic theory offers a means of exploring boundaries and emphasises the importance of boundary in the emergence of an integrated sense of identity. In the UK, restructuring of health services has resulted in changes to organisational, professional and work group boundaries, seemingly, without attention being given to what may constitute a healthy set of boundary relationships. Four interrelated case studies illustrate a variety of organisational relationships and cross-boundary processes in mental health services, and how threats to particular boundaries can lead organisational members to engage in defensive activity. Whilst defences may be healthy for the individual or the organisation, they may generate more problems than they solve. Although the examples given here are highly specific, they may illuminate boundary systems more generally within organisations.

Paula Hyde

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Computer Modeling of Transport of Oxidizing Species in Grain Boundaries during Zirconium Corrosion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Zirconium (Zr) based alloys are widely used as the cladding materials in light-water reactors. The water-side corrosion of these alloys degrades their structural integrity and poses serious safety concerns. During the Zr corrosion process, a thin Zr oxide (ZrO2) layer forms on the alloy surface and serves as a barrier layer for further corrosion. The majority of the oxide has the monoclinic phase. At the transition region between the oxide and the metal, the oxide contains a thin layer of stabilized tetragonal phase. It is found that the texture of the tetragonal layer determines the protectiveness of the oxide for corrosion. The transport of oxidizing species, such as anion defects, cation defects, and electron through the tetragonal oxide layer could be the rate limiting step of the corrosion. The defect diffusion can be affected by the growing stresses and microstructures such as grain boundaries and dislocations. In this work molecular dynamics simulations are used to investigate the anion and cation diffusion in bulk and at grain boundaries in tetragonal ZrO2. The results show that defect diffusion at grain boundaries is complex and the behavior strongly depends on the grain boundary type. For most of the grain boundaries studied the defect diffusion are much slower than in the bulk, implying that grain boundaries may not be fast defect transport paths during corrosion. The connection between the modeling results and published experimental work will also be discussed. This work is funded by the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program at Idaho National Laboratory.

Xian-Ming Bai; Yongfeng Zhang; Michael R. Tonks

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

The viscosity structure of the D00 layer of the Earth's mantle inferred  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The viscosity structure of the D00 layer of the Earth's mantle inferred from the analysis layer Core�mantle boundary Viscosity Maxwell body a b s t r a c t The viscosity structure of the D00-diurnal to 18.6 years tidal deformations combined with model viscosity�depth profiles corresponding to a range

420

Kinetic Alfven double layer formed by electron viscosity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effect of the electron viscosity on the kinetic Alfven solitary wave is investigated. It is found that small electron viscosity changes the electron motion along the magnetic field producing a boundary layer, and thus that in a low beta electron-ion plasma({beta} Much-Less-Than m{sub e}/m{sub i}), an obliquely propagating kinetic solitary Alfven wave can become a double layer. This double layer can exist in the sub-Alfvenic and super-Alfvenic regimes. The length scale of density drop for this double layer is on the order of that of the conventional kinetic solitary Alfven wave, and thus this double layer can accelerate electrons on a very short length scale.

Woo, M. H.; Ryu, C.-M. [Department of Physics, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, C. R. [Department of Physics, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Taejon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "boundary layer height" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Formation of nickel germanide on SiO{sub 2}-capped n-Ge to lower its Schottky barrier height  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this Letter, NiGe/SiO{sub 2}/n-Ge ohmic contacts were demonstrated with Ge, rather than Ni, diffusion through the ion-implanted SiO{sub 2} films to form NiGe. The equivalent Schottky barrier height reduced from 0.58?eV for NiGe/n-Ge to ohmic contact. The anomalous diffusion behavior and accumulation of Ge in the SiO{sub 2} near the NiGe/SiO{sub 2} interface can be explained by vacancy-enhanced Ge diffusion. It is proposed that the presence of vacancies and Ge atoms embedded in the SiO{sub 2} layer play a significant role in the current enhancement by generation of multiple levels in the SiO{sub 2} band gap.

Lin, Guangyang; Tang, Mengrao; Li, Cheng, E-mail: lich@xmu.edu.cn; Huang, Shihao; Lu, Weifang; Wang, Chen; Yan, Guangming; Chen, Songyan [Semiconductor Photonics Research Center, Department of Physics, Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian 361005 (China)] [Semiconductor Photonics Research Center, Department of Physics, Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian 361005 (China)

2013-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

422

Science on Stage: Science in Action competition hits the heights in Madrid  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Science on Stage: Science in Action competition hits the heights in Madrid Conference: New year brings ASE conference Exhibition: BETT 2007 sells hard and plays hard

423

EIS-0505: Vantage to Pomona Heights 230 kV Transmission Line...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

of the following ways: Online at: http:www.blm.govordistrictsspokaneplansvph230.php. By email to: blmorvantagepomona@blm.gov (please specify Vantage to Pomona Heights...

424

Multiple density layered insulator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A multiple density layered insulator for use with a laser is disclosed wh provides at least two different insulation materials for a laser discharge tube, where the two insulation materials have different thermoconductivities. The multiple layer insulation materials provide for improved thermoconductivity capability for improved laser operation.

Alger, Terry W. (Tracy, CA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Layering as Optimization Decomposition 3-1 Layering as OptimizationLayering as Optimization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Layering as Optimization Decomposition 3-1 Layering as OptimizationLayering as Optimization DecompositionDecomposition Layering as Optimization Decomposition 3-2 CONTENTSCONTENTS Introduction (Marta;2 Layering as Optimization Decomposition 3-3 Layering as Optimization Decomposition Introduction By Marta

Fan, Xingzhe

426

Multiple layer insulation cover  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A multiple layer insulation cover for preventing heat loss in, for example, a greenhouse, is disclosed. The cover is comprised of spaced layers of thin foil covered fabric separated from each other by air spaces. The spacing is accomplished by the inflation of spaced air bladders which are integrally formed in the cover and to which the layers of the cover are secured. The bladders are inflated after the cover has been deployed in its intended use to separate the layers of the foil material. The sizes of the material layers are selected to compensate for sagging across the width of the cover so that the desired spacing is uniformly maintained when the cover has been deployed. The bladders are deflated as the cover is stored thereby expediting the storage process and reducing the amount of storage space required.

Farrell, James J. (Livingston Manor, NY); Donohoe, Anthony J. (Ovid, NY)

1981-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

427

Grain boundary loops in graphene  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Topological defects can affect the physical properties of graphene in unexpected ways. Harnessing their influence may lead to enhanced control of both material strength and electrical properties. Here we present a class of topological defects in graphene composed of a rotating sequence of dislocations that close on themselves, forming grain boundary loops that either conserve the number of atoms in the hexagonal lattice or accommodate vacancy or interstitial reconstruction, while leaving no unsatisfied bonds. One grain boundary loop is observed as a “flower” pattern in scanning tunneling microscopy studies of epitaxial graphene grown on SiC(0001). We show that the flower defect has the lowest energy per dislocation core of any known topological defect in graphene, providing a natural explanation for its growth via the coalescence of mobile dislocations.

Eric Cockayne; Gregory M. Rutter; Nathan P. Guisinger; Jason N. Crain; Phillip N. First; Joseph A. Stroscio

2011-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

428

HVDC ground electrode heat dissipation in an N-layer soil  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The temperature distribution in an N-layer soil, due to High Voltage Direct Current (HVDC) injection via ground electrodes was computed using finite difference methods. The temperature profiles using various ground electrode shapes buried in a two-layer soil were computed using these same techniques. The results obtained were then compared with results obtained experimentally in a laboratory at Ecole Polytecnique. A sensitivity analysis was performed on the effect of the height of the top layer of a two-layer earth model and the results were tabulated.

Greiss, H.; Mukhedkar, D.; Houle, J.L.; Do, X.D.; Gervais, Y. (Ecole Polytechnique, Montreal, Quebec (CA))

1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Irradiation Assisted Grain Boundary Segregation in Steels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The understanding of radiation-induced grain boundary segregation (RIS) has considerably improved over the past decade. New models have been introduced and much effort has been devoted to obtaining comprehensive information on segregation from the literature. Analytical techniques have also improved so that chemical analysis of layers 1 nm thick is almost routine. This invited paper will review the major methods used currently for RIS prediction: namely, Rate Theory, Inverse Kirkendall, and Solute Drag approaches. A summary is made of the available data on phosphorus RIS in reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels. This will be discussed in the light of the predictions of the various models in an effort to show which models are the most reliable and easy to use for forecasting P segregation behaviour in steels. A consequence of RIS in RPV steels is a radiation induced shift in the ductile to brittle transition temperature (DBTT). It will be shown how it is possible to relate radiation-induced P segregation levels to DBTT shift. Examples of this exercise will be given for RPV steels and for ferritic steels being considered for first wall fusion applications. Cr RIS in high alloy stainless steels and associated irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) will be briefly discussed. (authors)

Lu, Zheng; Faulkner, Roy G. [IPTME, Loughborough University, Loughborough, Leics (United Kingdom)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Market boundaries for coking-coal concentrates  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The construction of geographic and commodity boundaries is considered in relation to the Russian market for coking-coal concentrates. In this market, uniform commodities ... construction of the market boundaries....

V. A. Brodskii

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Solitons induced by boundary conditions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Although soliton phenomena have attracted wide attention since 1965, there are still not enough efforts paid to mixed-boundary - initial-value problems that are important in real physical cases. The main purpose of this thesis is to study carefully the various boundary-induced soliton under different initial conditions. The author states with three sets of nonlinear equations: KdV equations and Boussinesq equations (for water); two-fluid equations for cold-ion plasma. He was interested in four types of problems involved with water solitons: excitation by different time-dependent boundary conditions under different initial conditions; head-on and over-taking collisions; reflection at a wall and the excitation by pure initial conditions. For KdV equations, only cases one and four are conducted. The results from two fully nonlinear KdV and Boussinesq equations are compared, and agree extremely well. The Boussinesq equations permit solition head-on collisions and reflections, studied the first time. The results from take-over collision agree with KdV results. For the ion-acoustic plasma, a set of Boussinesq-type equations was derived from the standard two-fluid equations for the ion-acoustic plasma. It theoretically proves the essential nature of the solitary wave solutions of the cold-ion plasma. The ion acoustic solitons are also obtained by prescribing a potential phi/sub 0/ at one grid point.

Zhou, R.L.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Atmospheric Boundary SUMMARY: This chapter considers the physics of the lowest portion of the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, water the crops and pro- vide a freshwater supply to us on land. Second, turbulent mixing generates and reaches the surface. Land surface, by contrast, is #12;12.1. LOWER ATMOSPHERE 167 opaque, while waterChapter 12 Atmospheric Boundary Layer SUMMARY: This chapter considers the physics of the lowest

Cushman-Roisin, Benoit

433

Multiple Equilibria and Hysteresis of Two Unequal-Transport Western Boundary Currents Colliding at a Gap  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The nonlinear collision of two western boundary currents (WBCs) of Munk thickness LM colliding near a gap of width 2a is studied using a 1.5-layer, reduced-gravity, quasigeostrophic ocean model. The work is a continuation of our recent study on ...

Zheng Wang; Dongliang Yuan

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

SLE($?,?$)and Boundary Coulomb Gas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider the coulomb gas model on the upper half plane with different boundary conditions, namely Drichlet, Neuman and mixed. We related this model to SLE($\\kappa,\\rho$) theories. We derive a set of conditions connecting the total charge of the coulomb gas, the boundary charges, the parameters $\\kappa$ and $\\rho$. Also we study a free fermion theory in presence of a boundary and show with the same methods that it would lead to logarithmic boundary changing operators.

S. Moghimi-Araghi; M. A. Rajabpour; S. Rouhani

2005-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

435

Immersed Boundary Methods for High-Resolution Simulation of Atmospheric Boundary-Layer Flow Over Complex Terrain  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wind Energy Association Windpower 2008 Conference, AmericanWind Energy Association Windpower 2006 Conference, American

Lundquist, Katherine Ann

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Immersed Boundary Methods for High-Resolution Simulation of Atmospheric Boundary-Layer Flow Over Complex Terrain  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in today’s numerical weather prediction models is stillability of a numerical weather prediction model to predictthe context of numerical weather prediction models. The two-

Lundquist, Katherine Ann

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

DC's Marble ceiling : urban height and its regulation in Washington, DC  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Washington, DC has a unique urban form that is the result of a century-old law. Through the narrow lens of DC's height limit, I survey a range of topics related to urban height, starting with a review of its history of ...

Trueblood, Andrew Tyson

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Slider design for sub-3-nm flying height head–disk systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

It is important to further push slider's gap flying height from the current value of 7–8 nm in mass production to 2.5–3 nm, in order to increase the areal density of magnetic data storage technology from the current 60–80 Gb/in2 in mass production to 1 Tb/in2. Furthermore, perpendicular magnetic recording will be the only choice for area densities beyond 300 Gb/in2, though it might be more sensitive to the fluctuation of the flying height and needs higher flying height stability. This paper reports the authors’ efforts in both reducing slider's gap flying height and increasing the stability of the flying height. Analysis suggests that heat energy generation in both reading and writing operations affects the stability of the flying height, in addition to the intermolecular forces and the flying height modulations caused by disk waviness. An important design strategy is to have high air pressure and pressure gradient around the read/write element. Results suggest that introducing a sub-shallow step in slider's trailing part is an effective approach of achieving high air pressure and pressure gradient. A new type of slider is designed accordingly. Aerodynamic performance analysis indicates that the proposed slider can fly stably at a flying height below 3 nm.

Bo Liu; Jin Liu; Tow-Chong Chong

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

TECHNICAL PAPER Contact and temperature rise of thermal flying height control  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TECHNICAL PAPER Contact and temperature rise of thermal flying height control sliders in hard disk the flying height in hard disk drives (HDDs) has decreased to only a few nanometers, intermittent contacts Abstract Contact and interfacial temperature rise upon slider-disk contact in hard disk drives

Fainman, Yeshaiahu

440

Structured luminescence conversion layer  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus device such as a light source is disclosed which has an OLED device and a structured luminescence conversion layer deposited on the substrate or transparent electrode of said OLED device and on the exterior of said OLED device. The structured luminescence conversion layer contains regions such as color-changing and non-color-changing regions with particular shapes arranged in a particular pattern.

Berben, Dirk; Antoniadis, Homer; Jermann, Frank; Krummacher, Benjamin Claus; Von Malm, Norwin; Zachau, Martin

2012-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "boundary layer height" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Universality of the Future Chronological Boundary  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The purpose of this note is to establish, in a categorical manner, the universality of the Geroch-Kronheimer-Penrose causal boundary when considering the types of causal structures that may profitably be put on any sort of boundary for a spacetime. Actually, this can only be done for the future causal boundary (or the past causal boundary) separately; furthermore, only the chronology relation, not the causality relation, is considered, and the GKP topology is eschewed. The final result is that there is a unique map, with the proper causal properties, from the future causal boundary of a spacetime onto any ``reasonable" boundary which supports some sort of chronological structure and which purports to consist of a future completion of the spacetime. Furthermore, the future causal boundary construction is categorically unique in this regard.

Steven G. Harris

1997-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

442

Geometric Boundary Data for the Gravitational Field  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An outstanding issue in the treatment of boundaries in general relativity is the lack of a local geometric interpretation of the necessary boundary data. For the Cauchy problem, the initial data is supplied by the 3-metric and extrinsic curvature of the initial Cauchy hypersurface.. This Cauchy data determines a solution to Einstein's equations which is unique up to a diffeomorphism. Here, we show how three pieces of boundary data, which are associated locally with the geometry of the boundary, likewise determine a solution of the initial-boundary value problem which is unique up to a diffeomorphism. One piece of this data, constructed from the extrinsic curvature of the boundary, determines the dynamical evolution of the boundary. The other two pieces constitute a conformal class of rank-2, positive definite metrics, which represent the two gravitational degrees of freedom.

H-O. Kreiss; J. Winicour

2014-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

443

Topography, complex refractive index, and conductivity of graphene layers measured by correlation of optical interference contrast, atomic force, and back scattered electron microscopy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The optical phase shift by reflection on graphene is measured by interference contrast microscopy. The height profile across graphene layers on 300?nm thick SiO{sub 2} on silicon is derived from the phase profile. The complex refractive index and conductivity of graphene layers on silicon with 2?nm thin SiO{sub 2} are evaluated from a phase profile, while the height profile of the layers is measured by atomic force microscopy. It is observed that the conductivity measured on thin SiO{sub 2} is significantly greater than on thick SiO{sub 2}. Back scattered electron contrast of graphene layers is correlated to the height of graphene layers.

Vaupel, Matthias, E-mail: Matthias.vaupel@zeiss.com; Dutschke, Anke [Training Application Support Center, Carl Zeiss Microscopy GmbH, Königsallee 9-21, 37081 Göttingen (Germany); Wurstbauer, Ulrich; Pasupathy, Abhay [Department of Physics, Columbia University New York, 538 West 120th Street, New York, New York 10027 (United States); Hitzel, Frank [DME Nanotechnologie GmbH, Geysostr. 13, D-38106 Braunschweig (Germany)

2013-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

444

Layered electrode for electrochemical cells  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

There is provided an electrode structure comprising a current collector sheet and first and second layers of electrode material. Together, the layers improve catalyst utilization and water management.

Swathirajan, Swathy (West Bloomfield, MI); Mikhail, Youssef M. (Sterling Heights, MI)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Dissipative expansion chambers with two concentric layers of fibrous material  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The acoustic performance of a dissipative expansion chamber lined with two concentric, annular layers of fibrous material with different resistances is investigated. A two-dimensional analytical approach is used to determine the transmission loss of this dissipative silencer. From the boundary conditions at the rigid wall, and the interfaces between the fibre layers and the central airway, the characteristic function and thus eigenvalues and eigenfunctions for sound propagation in the dissipative chamber are obtained, leading to transmission loss through application of pressure and velocity matching. The effects of geometry and fibre properties on the acoustic attenuation are also discussed.

A. Selamet; M.B. Xu; I.J. Lee; N.T. Huff

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Excitonic fine-structure splitting in telecom-wavelength InAs/GaAs quantum dots: Statistical distribution and height-dependence  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The variation of the excitonic fine-structure splitting is studied for semiconductor quantum dots under the influence of a strain-reducing layer, utilized to shift the emission wavelength of the excitonic transition into the telecom-wavelength regime of 1.3–1.5 ?m. By means of a sp{sup 3}s{sup *}-tight-binding model and configuration interaction, we calculate wavelength shifts and fine-structure splittings for various quantum dot geometries. We find the splittings remaining small and even decreasing with strain-reducing layer composition for quantum dots with large height. Combined with an observed increased emission efficiency, the applicability for generation of entanglement photons is persistent.

Goldmann, Elias, E-mail: goldmann@itp.uni-bremen.de; Barthel, Stefan; Florian, Matthias; Jahnke, Frank [Institute of Theoretical Physics, University of Bremen, Otto-Hahn-Allee 1, 28359 Bremen (Germany)] [Institute of Theoretical Physics, University of Bremen, Otto-Hahn-Allee 1, 28359 Bremen (Germany); Schuh, Kolja [College of Optical Sciences, University of Arizona, 1630 E. University Blvd., Tucson, Arizona 85721-0094 (United States)] [College of Optical Sciences, University of Arizona, 1630 E. University Blvd., Tucson, Arizona 85721-0094 (United States)

2013-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

447

Plasma transport near material boundaries  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The fluid theory of two-dimensional (2-d) plasma transport in axisymmetric devices is reviewed. The forces which produce flow across the magnetic field in a collisional plasma are described. These flows may lead to up-down asymmetries in the poloidal rotation and radial fluxes. Emphasis is placed on understanding the conditions under which the known 2-d plasma fluid equations provide a valid description of these processes. Attempts to extend the fluid treatment to less collisional, turbulent plasmas are discussed. A reduction to the 1-d fluid equations used in many computer simulations is possible when sources or boundary conditions provide a large enough radial scale length. The complete 1-d fluid equations are given in the text, and 2-d fluid equations are given in the Appendix.

Singer, C.E.

1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Real-time variable rate Pix® application system using a plant height sensor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The objective of this study was to develop a chemical application system that could measure plant size, determine the optimum chemical rate to apply and control that application. A plant height sensor, the MEPRT growth relationship software...

Beck, Andy Dwayne

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

449

The Leading Ideal of a Complete Intersection of Height Two in a 2 ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Goto, W. Heinzer, and M.-K. Kim, The leading ideal of a complete intersection of height two, J. Algebra, 298 (206), 238-247. [GHK2]GHK2S. Goto, W. Heinzer ...

450

Height change detection in Antarcita using satellite altimetry data and Kriging / Kalman filtering techniques  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Studies of the response of ice sheets to climate change require data sets with high accuracy and uniform ice-sheet coverage. The most common technique used in analyzing satellite altimetry data to study height change in ...

Nguyen, An Thanh-Thuy

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Adaptive flying height modulation control of hybrid active slider with thermal and piezoelectric actuators  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Hybrid active slider is an effective means to increase the storage density of hard disk, but its effectiveness is compromised by the flying height modulation (FHM), the bounding vibrations ... proposes an adaptiv...

L. Huang; G. Sheng; J. -Y. Chang

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Contact and temperature rise of thermal flying height control sliders in hard disk drives  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Contact and interfacial temperature rise upon slider-disk contact in hard disk drives is investigated using thermal flying height control (TFC) sliders. To achieve ... increasing bias. The temperature rise during...

Liane Matthes; Uwe Boettcher; Bernhard Knigge…

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Active-head sliders using piezoelectric thin films for flying height control  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper describes design and fabrication of a MEMS-based active-head slider using a PZT thin film for flying height control in hard disk drives. A piezoelectric cantilever integrated in the ... air bearing sli...

Kenji Suzuki; Takayuki Akimatsu; Kenji Sasaki; Masayuki Kurita

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Effects of environmental temperature and humidity on thermal flying height adjustment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Thermal actuated sliders are being widely used in today’s hard disk drive industry for its advantages of easier control of flying height (FH) and less risk of contacts with the disk. This article uses a coupled-f...

Weidong Zhou; Bo Liu; Shengkai Yu; Wei Hua; Chee How Wong

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

A parameter identification method for thermal flying-height control sliders  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The MEMS thermal actuated flying-height control (TFC) sliders have been ... industry as an effective design to reduce head-disk spacing in disk drives to achieve Terabit per square inch...2006; Li et al. 2009; Zh...

Gang Sheng; Jianfeng Xu

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Dynamic instability of thermal-flying-height-control sliders at touchdown  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

With the wide application of thermal flying-height control (TFC) technology in the hard disk drive industry, the head-disk clearance can be controlled to as low ... experiences more complicated dynamics, compared...

Jinglin Zheng; David B. Bogy

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Polarization interferometer for measuring the flying height of magnetic read–write heads  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Traditional optical flying-height testers use only the normal-incidence reflectivity of the interface between the read–write slider and a glass disk surrogate. We propose a tester that...

de Groot, Peter; Deck, Leslie; Soobitsky, James; Biegen, James

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

A numerical investigation of different touchdown patterns of thermal-flying-height-control sliders  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this study we employ a numerical approach to explore the touchdown patterns of a thermal-flying-height-control (TFC) slider. Depending on the roughness of the head disk interface and thickness of the lubricant...

Jinglin Zheng; David B. Bogy

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Ocean Currents and Sea Surface Heights Estimated across the West Florida Shelf  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The across-shelf structures of the ocean circulation and the associated sea surface height (SSH) variability are examined on the west Florida shelf (WFS) for the 3-yr interval from September 1998 to December 2001. Five sets of characteristic ...

Yonggang Liu; Robert H. Weisberg

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Wind Speeds at Heights Crucial for Wind Energy: Measurements and Verification of Forecasts  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Wind speed measurements from one year from meteorological towers and wind turbines at heights between 20 and 250 m for various European sites are analyzed and are compared with operational short-term forecasts of the global ECMWF model. The ...

Susanne Drechsel; Georg J. Mayr; Jakob W. Messner; Reto Stauffer

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "boundary layer height" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Tornadoes in Environments with Small Helicity and/or High LCL Heights  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Recent studies have suggested that supercell tornado environments are usually associated with large 0–1-km storm-relative helicity (SRH) and relatively low lifting condensation levels (LCL heights). However, occasional tornadoes of significance ...

Jonathan M. Davies

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

The Relationship between Height and Precipitation Characteristics of Summertime Convective Cells in South Florida  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Radar volume scan studies employed two radars simultaneously to measure heights and other echo characteristics of convective cells. Maps produced from the date were used to identify and track cells, whose properties were then related to one ...

A. Gagin; D. Rosenfeld; R. E. López

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Marine wind and wave height trends at different ERA-Interim forecast ranges  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Trends in marine wind speed and significant wave height are investigated using the global reanalysis ERA-Interim over the period 1979-2012, based on monthly mean and maximum data. Besides the traditional reanalysis, we include trends obtained at ...

Ole Johan Aarnes; Saleh Abdalla; Jean-Raymond Bidlot; Řyvind Breivik

464

Wind Speed Dependence of Single-Site Wave-Height Retrievals from High-Frequency Radars  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Wave-height observations derived from single-site high-frequency (HF) radar backscattered Doppler spectra are generally recognized to be less accurate than overlapping radar techniques but can provide significantly larger sampling regions. The ...

Brian K. Haus; Lynn K. Shay; Paul A. Work; George Voulgaris; Rafael J. Ramos; Jorge Martinez-Pedraja

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

A WRF Ensemble for Improved Wind Speed Forecasts at Turbine Height  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Weather Research and Forecasting Model (WRF) with 10-km horizontal grid spacing was used to explore improvements in wind speed forecasts at a typical wind turbine hub height (80 m). An ensemble consisting of WRF model simulations with ...

Adam J. Deppe; William A. Gallus Jr.; Eugene S. Takle

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

BLOCKS WITH EQUAL HEIGHT ZERO DEGREES GUNTER MALLE AND GABRIEL NAVARRO  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BLOCKS WITH EQUAL HEIGHT ZERO DEGREES GUNTER MALLE AND GABRIEL NAVARRO Abstract. We investigate of this work. 1 #12;2 Gunter Malle and Gabriel Navarro unipotent blocks of general linear groups GLn

Malle, Gunter

467

Disembodied boundary data for Einstein's equations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A strongly well-posed initial boundary value problem based upon constraint-preserving boundary conditions of the Sommerfeld type has been established for the harmonic formulation of the vacuum Einstein's equations. These Sommerfeld conditions have been previously presented in a four-dimensional geometric form. Here we recast the associated boundary data as three-dimensional tensor fields intrinsic to the boundary. This provides a geometric presentation of the boundary data analogous to the three-dimensional presentation of Cauchy data in terms of three-metric and extrinsic curvature. In particular, diffeomorphisms of the boundary data lead to vacuum spacetimes with isometric geometries. The proof of well-posedness is valid for the harmonic formulation and its generalizations. The Sommerfeld conditions can be directly applied to existing harmonic codes which have been used in simulating binary black holes, thus ensuring boundary stability of the underlying analytic system. The geometric form of the boundary conditions also allows them to be formally applied to any metric formulation of Einstein's equations, although well-posedness of the boundary problem is no longer ensured. We discuss to what extent such a formal application might be implemented in a constraint-preserving manner to 3+1 formulations, such as the Baumgarte-Shapiro-Shibata-Nakamura system which has been highly successful in binary black hole simulation.

Winicour, Jeffrey [Department of Physics and Astronomy University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15260 (United States); Max-Planck-Institut fuer Gravitationsphysik, Albert-Einstein-Institut, 14476 Golm (Germany)

2009-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

468

Casimir pistons with hybrid boundary conditions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Casimir effect giving rise to an attractive or repulsive force between the configuration boundaries that confine the massless scalar field is reexamined for one to three-dimensional pistons in this paper. Especially, we consider Casimir pistons with hybrid boundary conditions, where the boundary condition on the piston is Neumann and those on other surfaces are Dirichlet. We show that the Casimir force on the piston is always repulsive, in contrast with the same problem where the boundary conditions are Dirichlet on all surfaces.

Xiang-hua Zhai; Xin-zhou Li

2007-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

469

PIA - Savannah River Remediation Accreditation Boundary (SRR...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solution IBARS Srs Site Apps. Accreditation Boundary PIA - WEB Physical Security Major Application Occupational Medical Surveillance System (OMSS)...

470

Gradient zone-boundary control in salt-gradient solar ponds  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and apparatus for suppressing zone boundary migration in a salt gradient solar pond includes extending perforated membranes across the pond at the boundaries, between the convective and non-convective zones, the perforations being small enough in size to prevent individual turbulence disturbances from penetrating the hole, but being large enough to allow easy molecular diffusion of salt thereby preventing the formation of convective zones in the gradient layer. The total area of the perforations is a sizeable fraction of the membrane area to allow sufficient salt diffusion while preventing turbulent entrainment into the gradient zone.

Hull, J.R.

1982-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

471

Reflection of Waterborne acoustic waves from a viscoelastic layer on a rigid hacking with perforations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The reflection coefficient is calculated for a plane acoustic wave normally incident on a viscoelasticrubber cover layer submerged in water. The rubber layer is mounted on a rigid backing with air?filled cylindrical perforations. Acoustical losses are attributed to motion of the layer over the perforations. This motion is calculated by treating the layer above each perforation as a vibrating circular viscoelastic plate. Different boundary conditions are assumed and in each case the soundreflection coefficient is calculated. The results are compared with the experimental data of R. Lane [Ultrason. 19 28–30 (1981)].

J. Jarzynski

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Modeling and inversion of PS-wave moveout asymmetry for tilted TI media: Part 2 --Dipping TTI layer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for anisotropic imaging beneath TTI formations and characterization of dipping fracture systems. Mode-converted PS to the anisotropic parameters. In Part 1 Dewangan and Tsvankin, 2006a , we proposed a modi- fication of the PP + PS to the layer boundaries. Dipping shale layers of this type are commonly ob- Manuscript received by the Editor

Tsvankin, Ilya

473

Engineering issue study of triple harmonic method for in situ flying height analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In situ flying height testing technology is becoming more and more important in slider–disk interaction analysis and manufacturing quality control of disk drives and head-related components. Triple harmonic method is a quite promising choice for in situ flying height analysis, compared with other in situ methods reported up to now. This paper reports results of investigations on engineering issues of applying triple harmonic method for in situ flying height analysis. The paper reports results of analysis on the effects of various testing conditions on flying height testing repeatability and accuracy. Results suggest that working at reasonable high channel density and working on the ratio between third and first harmonics will be an advantage in terms of both flying height testing sensitivity and testing repeatability. Comparing with media thickness effect, the gap-length variation among different heads will be important if it is to study flying height difference among different heads and the testing is at high channel density. Also, it is suggested to work at AC erased track, in order to reduce the non-linearity caused by hard transition.

Yipin Zhou; Bo Liu; Lewei Li

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Simulation of Piezoelectric Flying Height Control Slider Using Shear-Mode Deformation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The piezoelectric flying height control slider has recently been implemented in magnetic recording disk drives to reduce the flying height. This paper has examined the piezoelectric flying height control slider using shear-model deformation of piezoelectric transducer (PZT). A finite element model of the PZT slider using shear-model deformation has been built, and the electromechanical simulation and air-bearing simulation have been performed to investigate the effects of the shear-model deformation on the static flying attitude of the PZT slider. The results show that the flying height and pitch angle of the PZT slider can be significantly reduced with an increase in the drive voltage on the PZT sheet. However, beyond the drive voltage of 80 V for the proposed PZT slider, the reduction in the flying height of PZT slider is limited owing to the high air bearing stiffness at low flying height region. Furthermore, the PZT slider can be rotated and balanced at a negative pitch angle.

Hui Li; Shengnan Shen; Kensuke Amemiya; Bo Liu; Hejun Du

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

CRITICAL HEIGHT FOR THE DESTABILIZATION OF SOLAR PROMINENCES: STATISTICAL RESULTS FROM STEREO OBSERVATIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

At which height is a prominence inclined to be unstable, or where is the most probable critical height for the prominence destabilization? This question was statistically studied based on 362 solar limb prominences well recognized by Solar Limb Prominence Catcher and Tracker from 2007 April to the end of 2009. We found that there are about 71% disrupted prominences (DPs), among which about 42% of them did not erupt successfully and about 89% of them experienced a sudden destabilization process. After a comprehensive analysis of the DPs, we discovered the following: (1) Most DPs become unstable at a height of 0.06-0.14 R{sub Sun} from the solar surface, and there are two most probable critical heights at which a prominence is very likely to become unstable, the first one is 0.13 R{sub Sun} and the second one is 0.19 R{sub Sun }. (2) An upper limit for the erupting velocity of eruptive prominences (EPs) exists, which decreases following a power law with increasing height and mass; accordingly, the kinetic energy of EPs has an upper limit too, which decreases as the critical height increases. (3) Stable prominences are generally longer and heavier than DPs, and not higher than 0.4 R{sub Sun }. (4) About 62% of the EPs were associated with coronal mass ejections (CMEs); but there is no difference in apparent properties between EPs associated with CMEs and those that are not.

Liu Kai; Wang Yuming; Wang Shui; Shen Chenglong, E-mail: ymwang@ustc.edu.cn [CAS Key Laboratory of Geospace Environment, Department of Geophysics and Planetary Sciences, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China)

2012-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

476

Control System For Cryogenic THD Layering At The National Ignition Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The National Ignition Facility (NIF) is the world largest and most energetic laser system for Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF). In 2010, NIF began ignition experiments using cryogenically cooled targets containing layers of the tritium-hydrogen-deuterium (THD) fuel. The 75 {micro}m thick layer is formed inside of the 2 mm target capsule at temperatures of approximately 18 K. The ICF target designs require sub-micron smoothness of the THD ice layers. Formation of such layers is still an active research area, requiring a flexible control system capable of executing the evolving layering protocols. This task is performed by the Cryogenic Target Subsystem (CTS) of the NIF Integrated Computer Control System (ICCS). The CTS provides cryogenic temperature control with the 1 mK resolution required for beta-layering and for the thermal gradient fill of the capsule. The CTS also includes a 3-axis x-ray radiography engine for phase contrast imaging of the ice layers inside of the plastic and beryllium capsules. In addition to automatic control engines, CTS is integrated with the Matlab interactive programming environment to allow flexibility in experimental layering protocols. The CTS Layering Matlab Toolbox provides the tools for layer image analysis, system characterization and cryogenic control. The CTS Layering Report tool generates qualification metrics of the layers, such as concentricity of the layer and roughness of the growth boundary grooves. The CTS activities are automatically coordinated with other NIF controls in the carefully orchestrated NIF Shot Sequence.

Fedorov, M; Blubaugh, J; Edwards, O; Mauvais, M; Sanchez, R; Wilson, B

2011-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

477

Layered permeable systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Permeability is a second rank tensor relating flow rate to pressure gradient in a porous medium. If the permeability is a constant times the identity tensor the permeable medium is isotropic; otherwise it is anisotropic. A formalism is presented for the simple calculation of the permeability tensor of a heterogeneous layered system composed of interleaved thin layers of several permeable constituent porous media in the static limit. Corresponding to any cumulative thickness {ital H} of a constituent is an element consisting of scalar {ital H} and a matrix which is {ital H} times a hybrid matrix function of permeability. The calculation of the properties of a medium equivalent to the combination of permeable constituents may then be accomplished by simple addition of the corresponding scalar/matrix elements. Subtraction of an element removes a permeable constituent, providing the means to decompose a permeable medium into many possible sets of permeable constituents, all of which have the same flow properties. A set of layers of a constituent medium in the heterogeneous layered system with permeability of the order of 1{ital h} as {ital h} {r arrow} 0, where {ital h} is that constituent's concentration, acts as a set of infinitely thin channels and is a model for a set of parallel cracks or fractures. Conversely, a set of layers of a given constituent with permeability of the order of {ital h} as {ital h} {r arrow} 0 acts as a set of parallel flow barriers and models a set of parallel, relatively impermeable, interfaces, such as shale stringers or some faults.

Schoenberg, M. (Schlumberger-Doll Research, Ridgefield, CT (US))

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

EMISSION HEIGHT AND TEMPERATURE DISTRIBUTION OF WHITE-LIGHT EMISSION OBSERVED BY HINODE/SOT FROM THE 2012 JANUARY 27 X-CLASS SOLAR FLARE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

White-light emissions were observed from an X1.7 class solar flare on 2012 January 27, using three continuum bands (red, green, and blue) of the Solar Optical Telescope on board the Hinode satellite. This event occurred near the solar limb, and so differences in the locations of the various emissions are consistent with differences in heights above the photosphere of the various emission sources. Under this interpretation, our observations are consistent with the white-light emissions occurring at the lowest levels of where the Ca II H emission occurs. Moreover, the centers of the source regions of the red, green, and blue wavelengths of the white-light emissions are significantly displaced from each other, suggesting that those respective emissions are emanating from progressively lower heights in the solar atmosphere. The temperature distribution was also calculated from the white-light data, and we found the lower-layer emission to have a higher temperature. This indicates that high-energy particles penetrated down to near the photosphere, and deposited heat into the ambient lower layers of the atmosphere.

Watanabe, Kyoko; Shimizu, Toshifumi [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, 3-1-1 Yoshinodai, Chuo-ku, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5210 (Japan); Masuda, Satoshi [Solar-Terrestrial Environment Laboratory, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8601 (Japan); Ichimoto, Kiyoshi [Kwasan and Hida Observatories, Kyoto University, Yamashina, Kyoto 607-8471 (Japan); Ohno, Masanori, E-mail: watanabe.kyoko@isas.jaxa.jp [Department of Physical Sciences, Hiroshima University, 1-3-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8516 (Japan)

2013-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

479

Investigation of wear resistance and lifetime of diamond-like carbon (DLC) coated glass disk in flying height measurement process  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Flying height has been greatly reduced to less ... -density magnetic storage. This leads to significant disk wear especially, glass disks used in flying height measurement process. This paper reports the ... the ...

Korakoch Phetdee; Alongkorn Pimpin; Werayut Srituravanich

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

Simulation of Static Flying Attitudes with Different Heat Transfer Models for a Flying-Height Control Slider with Thermal Protrusion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The thermal flying height control (TFC), aka dynamic fly height (DFH), technique has been recently used in the head disk interface of hard disk drives to obtain a lower head-media ... effects are included in the ...

Du Chen; David B. Bogy

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "boundary layer height" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Spatially Resolved Mapping of Electrical Conductivity around Individual Domain (Grain) Boundaries in Graphene  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Graphene films can now be produced on the scale of up to meters. However, all large-scale graphene films contain topological defects that can significantly affect the characteristic transport behaviors of graphene. Here, we spatially map the structures and electronic transport near specific domain and grain boundaries in graphene, and evaluate effects of different types of defect on the electronic conductivity in epitaxial graphene grown on SiC and CVD graphene on Cu subsequently transferred to a SiO2 substrate. We use a combined approach with a multi-probe scanning tunneling potentiometry to investigate both structures and transport at individual grain boundaries and domain boundaries that are defined by coalesced grains, surface steps, and changes in layer thickness. It is found that the substrate step on SiC presents a significant potential barrier for electron transport of epitaxial graphene due to the reduced charge transport from the substrate at the step edges, monolayer-bilayer boundaries exhibit a high resistivity that can change depending on directions of the current across the boundary, and the resistivity of grain boundaries changes with the transition width of the disordered region between two adjacent grains in graphene. The detailed understanding of graphene defects will provide the feedback for controlled engineering of defects in large-scale graphene films.

Li, An-Ping [ORNL; Clark, Kendal W [ORNL; Zhang, Xiaoguang [ORNL; Vlassiouk, Ivan V [ORNL; He, Guowei [Carnegie Mellon University (CMU); Feenstra, Randall [Carnegie Mellon University (CMU)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

Cherokee Clitics: The Word Boundary Problem  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The problem of identifying Cherokee clitics is complicated by the fact that the prosodic word, marked by the presence of a tonal boundary, may not match the morphological word. Clitics may or may not respect the the word boundary as marked by tone...

Haag, Marcia

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

Green's functions for Neumann boundary conditions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Green's functions for Neumann boundary conditions have been considered in Math Physics and Electromagnetism textbooks, but special constraints and other properties required for Neumann boundary conditions have generally not been noticed or treated correctly. In this paper, we derive an appropriate Neumann Green's function with these constraints and properties incorporated.

Jerrold Franklin

2012-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

484

Ion transport and structure of layer-by-layer assemblies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Layer-by-layer (LbL) films of various architectures were examined as potential solid state electrolytes for electrochemical systems (e.g. batteries and fuel cells). The relationship between materials properties and ion ...

Lutkenhaus, Jodie Lee

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

485

Theory of Leakage Preventing Layer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

It is a brand new concept for leakage prevention layer. The practice to place HEPA filter at the terminal is improved when the theory of leakage prevention layer applies, which becomes the core of novel air distr...

Zhonglin Xu

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

NREL GIS Data: U.S. Great Lakes Offshore Windspeed 90m Height High  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Great Lakes Offshore Windspeed 90m Height High Great Lakes Offshore Windspeed 90m Height High Resolution Dataset Summary Description This dataset is a geographic shapefile generated from the original raster data. The original raster data resolution is a 200-meter cell size. The data provide an estimate of annual average wind speed at 90 meter height above surface for specific offshore regions of the United States. To learn more, please see the Assessment of Offshore Wind Energy Resources for the United States. These data were produced in cooperation with U.S. Department of Energy, and have been validated by NREL. To download state wind resource maps, visit Wind Powering America. In order to ensure the downloadable shapefile is current, please compare the date updated on this page to the last updated date on the NREL GIS Wind Data webpage.

487

Airports Soar to New Heights with Alternative Fuels | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Airports Soar to New Heights with Alternative Fuels Airports Soar to New Heights with Alternative Fuels Airports Soar to New Heights with Alternative Fuels February 22, 2011 - 2:27pm Addthis Shannon Brescher Shea Communications Manager, Clean Cities Program A recent flight to a conference inspired me to think about the impact of airports on our environment and society. Although modern planes have made it safe and fun to travel around the world, they use a vast amount of fuel. The petroleum used by the array of behind-the-scenes equipment, from shuttle buses to luggage carriers, adds up as well. Although Clean Cities doesn't address planes, our 87 local coalitions have helped airports limit their petroleum use in other ways, reducing their smog-forming and greenhouse gas emissions. A number of airports have adopted the use of alternative fuels and advanced

488

NREL GIS Data: U.S. Hawaii Offshore Windspeed 90m Height High Resolution |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hawaii Offshore Windspeed 90m Height High Resolution Hawaii Offshore Windspeed 90m Height High Resolution Dataset Summary Description This dataset is a geographic shapefile generated from the original raster data. The original raster data resolution is a 200-meter cell size. The data provide an estimate of annual average wind speed at 90 meter height above surface for specific offshore regions of the United States. To learn more, please see the Assessment of Offshore Wind Energy Resources for the United States. These data were produced in cooperation with U.S. Department of Energy, and have been validated by NREL. To download state wind resource maps, visit Wind Powering America. In order to ensure the downloadable shapefile is current, please compare the date updated on this page to the last updated date on the NREL GIS Wind Data webpage.

489

Comparison of Cloud Top Height and Optical Depth Histograms from ISCCP,  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Comparison of Cloud Top Height and Optical Depth Histograms from ISCCP, Comparison of Cloud Top Height and Optical Depth Histograms from ISCCP, MISR, and MODIS Marchand, Roger Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Ackerman, Thomas Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Category: Cloud Properties Joint histograms of Cloud Top Height (CTH) and Optical Depth (OD) derived by the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) are being widely used by the climate modeling community in evaluating global climate models. Similar joint histograms of CTH-OD are now being produced by the NASA Multi-angle Imaging Spectro-Radiometer (MISR) and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instruments. There are notable differences in the histograms being produced by these three projects. In this poster we analyze some of the differences and discuss how the

490

Airports Soar to New Heights with Alternative Fuels | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Airports Soar to New Heights with Alternative Fuels Airports Soar to New Heights with Alternative Fuels Airports Soar to New Heights with Alternative Fuels February 22, 2011 - 2:27pm Addthis Shannon Brescher Shea Communications Manager, Clean Cities Program A recent flight to a conference inspired me to think about the impact of airports on our environment and society. Although modern planes have made it safe and fun to travel around the world, they use a vast amount of fuel. The petroleum used by the array of behind-the-scenes equipment, from shuttle buses to luggage carriers, adds up as well. Although Clean Cities doesn't address planes, our 87 local coalitions have helped airports limit their petroleum use in other ways, reducing their smog-forming and greenhouse gas emissions. A number of airports have adopted the use of alternative fuels and advanced

491

NREL GIS Data: U.S. Gulf of Mexico Coast Offshore Windspeed 90m Height High  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gulf of Mexico Coast Offshore Windspeed 90m Height High Gulf of Mexico Coast Offshore Windspeed 90m Height High Resolution Dataset Summary Description This dataset is a geographic shapefile generated from the original raster data. The original raster data resolution is a 200-meter cell size. The data provide an estimate of annual average wind speed at 90 meter height above surface for specific offshore regions of the United States. To learn more, please see the Assessment of Offshore Wind Energy Resources for the United States. These data were produced in cooperation with U.S. Department of Energy, and have been validated by NREL. To download state wind resource maps, visit Wind Powering America. In order to ensure the downloadable shapefile is current, please compare the date updated on this page to the last updated date on the NREL GIS Wind Data webpage.

492

About ÂŤEffectiveÂŽ Height of the Aerosol Atmosphere in Visible and IR Wavelength Range  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

"Effective" Height of the Aerosol Atmosphere in "Effective" Height of the Aerosol Atmosphere in Visible and IR Wavelength Range V. N. Uzhegov, D. M. Kabanov, M. V. Panchenko, Yu. A. Pkhalagov, and S. M. Sakerin Institute of Atmospheric Optics Tomsk, Russia Introduction Aerosol component of the atmosphere is one of the important factors affecting the radiation budget of the space - atmosphere - underlying surface system in visible and infrared (IR) wavelength ranges. It is extremely important to take into account the contribution of this component into the extinction of solar radiation under cloudless sky conditions. Sometimes it is important to know not only the total value of the aerosol component of extinction, but also to have the possibility to estimate the "effective" height of

493

A gap capacitance method for slider flying height measurement in near-field optical disk drives  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In order to overcome the diffraction limit of conventional optical disk drives, and substantially increase data storage capacity and density, near-field optical disk drives remain to be realized. The slider of a flying pickup head in a near-field optical disk drive has to fly at a stable spacing above the disk surface. To sense the slider flying height, a gap capacitance method is developed in this study to measure capacitance variation between the pickup head and disk surface. The capacitance varying with the flying height is modulated by a Colpitts oscillator. Subsequent demodulation accounts for height variation of the flying pickup head. Measurement results of this method are verified by using a laser Doppler interferometer.

J.W. Chen; T.S. Liu

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

494

Large-eddy simulation of flows over two-dimensional idealised street canyons with height variation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A series of large-eddy simulation (LES) models consisting of two-dimensional (2D) idealised street canyons with building height variability (BHV) are examined. Building blocks with two different heights are placed alternately in the computational domains, constructing repeated street canyons of building-height-to-street-width (aspect) ratio (AR) = 1, 0.5, 0.25 and 0.125 together with BHV = 0.2, 0.4 and 0.6. LES results show that the air exchange rate (ACH) increases with increasing aerodynamic resistance. Apart from AR, BHV is another factor affecting the aerodynamic resistance and thus the ACH. The (vertical) dispersion coefficient ?z of plume transport is also closely related to the aerodynamic resistance, suggesting that introducing BHV in urban areas could help improve the air quality.

Colman C.C. Wong; Chun-Ho Liu

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

495

cohn(2)-98.pdf  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

7 Boundary Layer Height Determination With the LIFT Dataset S. A. Cohn NCAR-Atmospheric Technology Division Boulder, Colorado C. L. Holloway NTIA-Institute for Telecommunications...

496

Lattice Boltzmann boundary conditions via singular forces: irregular expansion analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Lattice Boltzmann boundary conditions via singular forces: irregular expansion analysis. We benchmark the method on lattice Boltzmann flows past a rigid disk, comparing its numerical performances with standard boundary condition approaches. Key words: lattice Boltzmann method, boundary

497

Property:Building/Boundaries | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Boundaries Boundaries Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type String. Boundaries Pages using the property "Building/Boundaries" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) S Sweden Building 05K0001 + Several buildings + Sweden Building 05K0002 + Part of a building + Sweden Building 05K0003 + One building + Sweden Building 05K0004 + One building + Sweden Building 05K0005 + One building + Sweden Building 05K0006 + Several buildings + Sweden Building 05K0007 + One building + Sweden Building 05K0008 + One building + Sweden Building 05K0009 + One building + Sweden Building 05K0010 + One building + Sweden Building 05K0011 + One building + Sweden Building 05K0012 + One building + Sweden Building 05K0013 + One building + Sweden Building 05K0014 + One building +

498

Boundary conditions for the lattice Boltzmann method.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? Based on the no-slip boundary condition for walls at rest for the lattice Boltzmann Bathnagar-Gross-Krook method by J.C.G. Verschaeve [Phys. Rev. 80,036703 (2009)], a… (more)

le coupanec, erwan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

499

Nonlinear boundary value problem of magnetic insulation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

On the basis of generalization of upper and lower solution method to the singular two point boundary value problems, the existence theorem of solutions for the system, which models a process of magnetic insulation in plasma is proved.

A. V. Sinitsyn

2000-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

500

Brownian walkers within subdiffusing territorial boundaries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Inspired by the collective phenomenon of territorial emergence, whereby animals move and interact through the scent marks they deposit, we study the dynamics of a 1D Brownian walker in a random environment consisting of confining boundaries that are themselves diffusing anomalously. We show how to reduce, in certain parameter regimes, the non-Markovian, many-body problem of territoriality to the analytically tractable one-body problem studied here. The mean square displacement (MSD) of the 1D Brownian walker within subdiffusing boundaries is calculated exactly and generalizes well known results when the boundaries are immobile. Furthermore, under certain conditions, if the boundary dynamics are strongly subdiffusive, we show the appearance of an interesting non-monotonicity in the time dependence of the MSD, giving rise to transient negative diffusion.

Luca Giuggioli; Jonathan R. Potts; Stephen Harris

2011-02-04T23:59:59.000Z