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1

ARM - Field Campaign - Boundary Layer Cloud IOP  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govCampaignsBoundary Layer Cloud IOP govCampaignsBoundary Layer Cloud IOP Campaign Links Campaign Images Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Boundary Layer Cloud IOP 2005.07.11 - 2005.08.07 Lead Scientist : William Shaw For data sets, see below. Description Investigators from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, in collaboration with scientists from a number of other institutions, carried out a month of intensive measurements at the ARM Climate Research Facility on the North Slope of Alaska in the summer of 2005. The purpose of these measurements was to determine how much the arctic land surface modifies the way low clouds reflect, absorb, and transmit solar and infrared radiation. This is an important problem because arctic clouds play a prominent role in

2

Mixing Line Analysis of Clouds and Cloudy Boundary Layers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The diagnostic study of the thermodynamic structure of nonprecipitating clouds and cloudy boundary layers is formulated using a mixing line and saturation point approach. A parametric model for the mean structure is developed as a tool for ...

Alan K. Betts

1985-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Multi-dimensional Longwave Forcing of Boundary Layer Cloud Systems  

SciTech Connect

The importance of multi-dimensional (MD) longwave radiative effects on cloud dynamics is evaluated in a large eddy simulation (LES) framework employing multi-dimensional radiative transfer (Spherical Harmonics Discrete Ordinate Method —SHDOM). Simulations are performed for a case of unbroken, marine boundary layer stratocumulus and a broken field of trade cumulus. “Snapshot” calculations of MD and IPA (independent pixel approximation —1D) radiative transfer applied to LES cloud fields show that the total radiative forcing changes only slightly, although the MD effects significantly modify the spatial structure of the radiative forcing. Simulations of each cloud type employing MD and IPA radiative transfer, however, differ little. For the solid cloud case, relative to using IPA, the MD simulation exhibits a slight reduction in entrainment rate and boundary layer TKE relative to the IPA simulation. This reduction is consistent with both the slight decrease in net radiative forcing and a negative correlation between local vertical velocity and radiative forcing, which implies a damping of boundary layer eddies. Snapshot calculations of the broken cloud case suggest a slight increase in radiative cooling, though few systematic differences are noted in the interactive simulations. We attribute this result to the fact that radiative cooling is a relatively minor contribution to the total energetics. For the cloud systems in this study, the use of IPA longwave radiative transfer is sufficiently accurate to capture the dynamical behavior of BL clouds. Further investigations are required in order to generalize this conclusion for other cloud types and longer time integrations. 1

Mechem, David B.; Kogan, Y. L.; Ovtchinnikov, Mikhail; Davis, Anthony B; Evans, K. F.; Ellingson, Robert G.

2008-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

4

Investigation of the Diurnal Variation of Marine Boundary Layer Cloud Microphysical Properties at the Azores  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A new method has been developed to retrieve the nighttime marine boundary layer (MBL) cloud microphysical properties, which provides a complete 19-month dataset to investigate the diurnal variation of MBL cloud microphysical properties at the ...

Xiquan Dong; Baike Xi; Peng Wu

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Airship Measurements of Ship’s Exhaust Plumes and Their Effect on Marine Boundary Layer Clouds  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

High-resolution aerosol, trace gas, and cloud microphysical measurements were made from an airship during transects across ships exhaust plumes advecting downwind of ships in the marine boundary layer (MBL). This study was part of the Office of ...

G. M. Frick; W. A. Hoppel

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Magnetic reconnection structures in the boundary layer of an interplanetary magnetic cloud  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An interplanetary magnetic diffusion region was detected by WIND during 0735-0850 UT on May 15, 1997 when the front boundary layer of a magnetic cloud passed through the spacecraft about 190 earth radii upstre...

Fengsi Wei; Rui Liu; Xueshang Feng…

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Lidar Investigation of Tropical Nocturnal Boundary Layer Aerosols and Cloud Macrophysics  

SciTech Connect

Observational evidence of two-way association between nocturnal boundary layer aerosols and cloud macrophysical properties under different meteorological conditions is reported in this paper. The study has been conducted during 2008-09 employing a high space-time resolution polarimetric micro-pulse lidar over a tropical urban station in India. Firstly, the study highlights the crucial role of boundary layer aerosols and background meteorology on the formation and structure of low-level stratiform clouds in the backdrop of different atmospheric stability conditions. Turbulent mixing induced by the wind shear at the station, which is associated with a complex terrain, is found to play a pivotal role in the formation and structural evolution of nocturnal boundary layer clouds. Secondly, it is shown that the trapping of energy in the form of outgoing terrestrial radiation by the overlying low-level clouds can enhance the aerosol mixing height associated with the nocturnal boundary layer. To substantiate this, the long-wave heating associated with cloud capping has been quantitatively estimated in an indirect way by employing an Advanced Research Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF-ARW) model version 2.2 developed by National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), Colorado, USA, and supplementary data sets; and differentiated against other heating mechanisms. The present investigation as well establishes the potential of lidar remote-sensing technique in exploring some of the intriguing aspects of the cloud-environment relationship.

Manoj, M. G.; Devara, PC S.; Taraphdar, Sourav

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

On the Representation of High-Latitude Boundary Layer Mixed-Phase Cloud in the ECMWF Global Model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Supercooled liquid water (SLW) layers in boundary layer clouds are abundantly observed in the atmosphere at high latitudes, but remain a challenge to represent in numerical weather prediction (NWP) and climate models. Unresolved processes such as ...

Richard M. Forbes; Maike Ahlgrimm

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Posters Triggering of Boundary Layer Cumulus Clouds Over a Heterogeneous Surface  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 5 Posters Triggering of Boundary Layer Cumulus Clouds Over a Heterogeneous Surface K. Schrieber, R. Stull, and Q. Zhang Boundary Layer Research Team Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Science University of Wisconsin Madison, Wisconsin Complex multimodal joint frequency distributions of LCL height versus θ v in surface-layer air over a large heteroge- neous surface area are modeled as the superposition of simpler mono-modal distributions. These simpler distri- butions, which apply to quasi-homogeneous subdomains, are approximated with bivariate distribution models. The shape of each of these modeled distributions depends on variations of the Bowen ratio and heat input forcings. These forcings are a function of the landscape, insolation, surface albedo, cloud-shading, soil moisture, and other

10

Boundary Layer  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sea Spray on the Thermodynamics of the Hurricane Boundary Layer For original submission and image(s), see ARM Research Highlights http:www.arm.govsciencehighlights Research...

11

Mean Structure and diurnal cycle of Southeast Atlantic boundary layer clouds: Insights from satellite observations and multiscale modeling framework simulations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The mean structure and diurnal cycle of Southeast (SE) Atlantic boundary layer clouds are described with satellite observations and multi-scale modeling framework (MMF) simulations during austral spring (September-November). Hourly resolution ...

David Painemal; Kuan-Man Xu; Anning Cheng; Patrick Minnis; Rabindra Palikonda

12

Transforming the representation of the boundary layer and low clouds for high-resolution regional climate modeling: Final report  

SciTech Connect

Stratocumulus and shallow cumulus clouds in subtropical oceanic regions (e.g., Southeast Pacific) cover thousands of square kilometers and play a key role in regulating global climate (e.g., Klein and Hartmann, 1993). Numerical modeling is an essential tool to study these clouds in regional and global systems, but the current generation of climate and weather models has difficulties in representing them in a realistic way (e.g., Siebesma et al., 2004; Stevens et al., 2007; Teixeira et al., 2011). While numerical models resolve the large-scale flow, subgrid-scale parameterizations are needed to estimate small-scale properties (e.g. boundary layer turbulence and convection, clouds, radiation), which have significant influence on the resolved scale due to the complex nonlinear nature of the atmosphere. To represent the contribution of these fine-scale processes to the resolved scale, climate models use various parameterizations, which are the main pieces in the model that contribute to the low clouds dynamics and therefore are the major sources of errors or approximations in their representation. In this project, we aim to 1) improve our understanding of the physical processes in thermal circulation and cloud formation, 2) examine the performance and sensitivity of various parameterizations in the regional weather model (Weather Research and Forecasting model; WRF), and 3) develop, implement, and evaluate the advanced boundary layer parameterization in the regional model to better represent stratocumulus, shallow cumulus, and their transition. Thus, this project includes three major corresponding studies. We find that the mean diurnal cycle is sensitive to model domain in ways that reveal the existence of different contributions originating from the Southeast Pacific land-masses. The experiments suggest that diurnal variations in circulations and thermal structures over this region are influenced by convection over the Peruvian sector of the Andes cordillera, while the mostly dry mountain-breeze circulations force an additional component that results in semi-diurnal variations near the coast. A series of numerical tests, however, reveal sensitivity of the simulations to the choice of vertical grid, limiting the possibility of solid quantitative statements on the amplitudes and phases of the diurnal and semidiurnal components across the domain. According to our experiments, the Mellor-Yamada-Nakanishi-Niino (MYNN) boundary layer scheme and the WSM6 microphysics scheme is the combination of schemes that performs best. For that combination, mean cloud cover, liquid water path, and cloud depth are fairly wellsimulated, while mean cloud top height remains too low in comparison to observations. Both microphysics and boundary layer schemes contribute to the spread in liquid water path and cloud depth, although the microphysics contribution is slightly more prominent. Boundary layer schemes are the primary contributors to cloud top height, degree of adiabaticity, and cloud cover. Cloud top height is closely related to surface fluxes and boundary layer structure. Thus, our study infers that an appropriate tuning of cloud top height would likely improve the low-cloud representation in the model. Finally, we show that entrainment governs the degree of adiabaticity, while boundary layer decoupling is a control on cloud cover. In the intercomparison study using WRF single-column model experiments, most parameterizations show a poor agreement of the vertical boundary layer structure when compared with large-eddy simulation models. We also implement a new Total-Energy/Mass- Flux boundary layer scheme into the WRF model and evaluate its ability to simulate both stratocumulus and shallow cumulus clouds. Result comparisons against large-eddy simulation show that this advanced parameterization based on the new Eddy-Diffusivity/Mass-Flux approach provides a better performance than other boundary layer parameterizations.

Huang, Hsin-Yuan; Hall, Alex

2013-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

13

Transitions of cloud-topped marine boundary layers characterized by AIRS, MODIS, and a large eddy simulation model  

SciTech Connect

Cloud top entrainment instability (CTEI) is a hypothesized positive feedback between entrainment mixing and evaporative cooling near the cloud top. Previous theoretical and numerical modeling studies have shown that the persistence or breakup of marine boundary layer (MBL) clouds may be sensitive to the CTEI parameter. Collocated thermodynamic profile and cloud observations obtained from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instruments are used to quantify the relationship between the CTEI parameter and the cloud-topped MBL transition from stratocumulus to trade cumulus in the northeastern Pacific Ocean. Results derived from AIRS and MODIS are compared with numerical results from the UCLA large eddy simulation (LES) model for both well-mixed and decoupled MBLs. The satellite and model results both demonstrate a clear correlation between the CTEI parameter and MBL cloud fraction. Despite fundamental differences between LES steady state results and the instantaneous snapshot type of observations from satellites, significant correlations for both the instantaneous pixel-scale observations and the long-term averaged spatial patterns between the CTEI parameter and MBL cloud fraction are found from the satellite observations and are consistent with LES results. This suggests the potential of using AIRS and MODIS to quantify global and temporal characteristics of the cloud-topped MBL transition.

Yue, Qing; Kahn, Brian; Xiao, Heng; Schreier, Mathias; Fetzer, E. J.; Teixeira, J.; Suselj, Kay

2013-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

14

Aerosol-Cloud-Precipitation Interactions in the Trade Wind Boundary Layer.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This dissertation includes an overview of aerosol, cloud, and precipitation properties associated with shallow marine cumulus clouds observed during the Barbados Aerosol Cloud Experiment (BACEX,… (more)

Jung, Eunsil

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Characterization of particle cloud droplet activity and composition in the free troposphere and the boundary layer during INTEX-B  

SciTech Connect

Measurements of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), aerosol size distributions, and submicron aerosol composition were made as part of the Intercontinental Chemical Transport Experiment Phase B (INTEX-B) campaign during spring 2006. Measurements were conducted from an aircraft platform over the northeastern Pacific and western North America with a focus on how the transport and evolution of Asian pollution across the Pacific Ocean affected CCN properties. A broad range of air masses were sampled and here we focus on three distinct air mass types defined geographically: the Pacific free troposphere (FT), the marine boundary layer (MBL), and the polluted continental boundary layer in the California Central Valley (CCV). These observations add to the few observations of CCN in the FT. CCN concentrations showed a large range of concentrations between air masses, however CCN activity was similar for the MBL and CCV ({kappa} {approx} 0.2-0.25). FT air masses showed evidence of long-range transport from Asia and CCN activity was consistently higher than for the boundary layer air masses. Bulk chemical measurements predicted CCN activity reasonably well for the CCV and FT air masses. Decreasing trends in {kappa} with organic mass fraction were observed for the combination of the FT and CCV air masses and can be explained by the measured soluble inorganic chemical components. Changes in hygroscopicity associated with differences in the non-refractory organic composition were too small to be distinguished from the simultaneous changes in inorganic ion composition in the FT and MBL, although measurements for the large organic fractions (0.6-0.8) found in the CCV showed values of the organic fraction hygroscopicity consistent with other polluted regions ({kappa}{sub org} {approx} 0.1-0.2). A comparison of CCN-derived {kappa} (for particles at the critical diameter) to H-TDMA-derived {kappa} (for particles at 100 nm diameter) showed similar trends, however the CCN-derived {kappa} values were significantly higher.

Roberts, G. C.; Day, D. A.; Russell, Lynn M.; Dunlea, E. J.; Jimenez, J. L.; Tomlinson, Jason M.; Collins, Donald R.; Shinozuka, Y.; Clarke, A. D.

2010-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

16

Clouds, Aerosol, and Precipitation in the Marine Boundary Layer: Analysis of Results from the ARM Mobile Facility Deployment to the Azores (2009/2010)  

SciTech Connect

The project focuses upon dataset analysis and synthesis of datasets from the AMF deployment entitled “Clouds, Aerosols, and Precipitation in the Marine Boundary Layer (CAP?MBL)” at Graciosa Island in the Azores. Wood is serving a PI for this AMF deployment.

Wood, Robert [University of Washington, Dept of Atmos Sci

2013-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

17

Dissipation of Marine Stratiform Clouds and Collapse of the Marine Boundary Layer Due to the Depletion of Cloud Condensation Nuclei by Clouds  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...JOURNAL OF THE ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCES...of cloud condensation nuclei by...and 2533 water molecules...Department of Atmospheric Sciences...of cloud condensation nuclei...of cloud water. Albrecht...liquid-water content...depending on the atmospheric conditions...the-6-hour recovery from the...

Andrew S. Ackerman; Owen B. Toon; Peter V. Hobbs

1993-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

18

Clouds, Aerosols and Precipitation in the Marine Boundary Layer (CAP-MBL) AMF Deployment Graciosa Island, Azores, NE Atlantic Ocean May 2009-December 2010  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the Marine Boundary Layer (CAP-MBL) Graciosa Island, Azores, NE Atlantic Ocean May 2009-December 2010 Rob Wood, University of Washington CAP-MBL Proposal Team AMF Deployment Team Thanks to Mark Miller: AMF Site Scientist Kim Nitschke: AMF Site Manager Importance of Low-Clouds for Climate Imperative that we understand the processes controlling the formation, maintenance and dissipation of low clouds in order to improve their representation in climate models. Which clouds matter for climate sensitivity? Climate Feedbacks Model Intercomparison Project (CFMIP) 12 slab ocean models 2xCO 2 - control Correlation of global mean CRF with local values Mark Webb, Hadley Center 90 N 45 N 0 45 S 90S 0 90 E 180 90 W 0

19

LES of a Spatially Developing Atmospheric Boundary Layer: Application of a Fringe Method for the Stratocumulus to Shallow Cumulus Cloud Transition  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An arrangement of a large-eddy simulation (LES) is described that facilitates a spatially developing thermally stratified atmospheric boundary layer (ABL). When the inflow and outflow boundary conditions are specified, the LES of stably stratified ...

M. Inoue; G. Matheou; J. Teixeira

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Magnetohydrodynamic boundary layer control system  

SciTech Connect

Accordingly, it is an object of the present invention to provide an active boundary layer control system which is lightweight, operates with low in put power, and occupies little physical space. It is a further object of the invention to provide a boundary layer control system which is robust and can be operated in a damaged condition without creating a hazard to the vehicle. It is yet object of the invention to provide a magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) boundary layer control system for marine vehicles which provides a force directly on the water adjacent to the vehicle hull to provide flow separation control. The invention is a boundary layer control system using magnetic and electric fields interaction to providea driving force to energize boundary layer flow around a marine vehicle. A plurality of magnets are located circumferentially around the hull. Seawater electrodes are placed between each of the magnets and between the poles of each magnet. The resulting interaction of the electric and magnetic fields produces a Lorentz force which reduces the turbulence and may even relaminarize the flow in the boundary layer.

Meng, J.C.

1993-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "boundary layer clouds" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Improving Subtropical Boundary Layer Cloudiness in the 2011 NCEP GFS  

SciTech Connect

The current operational version of National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) Global Forecasting System (GFS) shows significant low cloud bias. These biases also appear in the Coupled Forecast System (CFS), which is developed from the GFS. These low cloud biases degrade seasonal and longer climate forecasts, particularly of short-wave cloud radiative forcing, and affect predicted sea surface temperature. Reducing this bias in the GFS will aid the development of future CFS versions and contributes to NCEP's goal of unified weather and climate modelling. Changes are made to the shallow convection and planetary boundary layer parameterisations to make them more consistent with current knowledge of these processes and to reduce the low cloud bias. These changes are tested in a single-column version of GFS and in global simulations with GFS coupled to a dynamical ocean model. In the single-column model, we focus on changing parameters that set the following: the strength of shallow cumulus lateral entrainment, the conversion of updraught liquid water to precipitation and grid-scale condensate, shallow cumulus cloud top, and the effect of shallow convection in stratocumulus environments. Results show that these changes improve the single-column simulations when compared to large eddy simulations, in particular through decreasing the precipitation efficiency of boundary layer clouds. These changes, combined with a few other model improvements, also reduce boundary layer cloud and albedo biases in global coupled simulations.

Fletcher, J. K.; Bretherton, Christopher S.; Xiao, Heng; Sun, Ruiyu N.; Han, J.

2014-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

22

Boundary-Layer Effects in Reverse Osmosis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Boundary-Layer Effects in Reverse Osmosis ... In FO, water is extracted from a feed solution using the high osmotic pressure of a hypertonic solution that flows on ... ...

Ulrich Merten; H. K. Lonsdale; R. L. Riley

1964-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Observational Boundary Layer Energy and Water Budgets of the Stratocumulus-to-Cumulus Transition  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The authors estimate summer mean boundary layer water and energy budgets along a northeast Pacific transect from 35° to 15°N, which includes the transition from marine stratocumulus to trade cumulus clouds. Observational data is used from three A-...

Peter Kalmus; Matthew Lebsock; Joăo Teixeira

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Transport Processes in the Tropical Warm Pool Boundary Layer. Part II: Vertical Structure and Variability  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The structure of the intertropical convergence zone ITCZ cloud-topped marine atmospheric boundary layer away from the most intense mesoscale convective systems during the Tropical Ocean Global Atmosphere Coupled Ocean–Atmosphere Response ...

A. G. Williams; J. M. Hacker; H. Kraus

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Shipboard measurements of the cloud-capped marine boundary layer during FIRE/ASTEX. Technical progress report, October 1, 1992--September 30, 1993  

SciTech Connect

ASTEX is a large multi-agency program to investigate all aspects of marine stratus clouds because of their overall importance in regulating the earth`s climate system. The program focused on clouds in the Eastern Atlantic during the month of June, 1992 because of the expected frequency of low clouds in that area. The experiment was based on the islands of Santa Maria in the Azores and Porto Santo about 800 km away in the Madeira Archipelago with large complements of remote sensors operated from both islands. To form an equilateral triangle of remote sensors, a ship was used as the third platform.

Kropfil, R.A.

1993-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

26

ARM - Measurement - Planetary boundary layer height  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govMeasurementsPlanetary boundary layer height govMeasurementsPlanetary boundary layer height ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Planetary boundary layer height Top of the planetary boundary layer; also known as depth or height of the mixing layer. Categories Atmospheric State Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments VCEIL : Vaisala Ceilometer External Instruments NCEPGFS : National Centers for Environment Prediction Global Forecast System Field Campaign Instruments

27

Processes in the Magnetospheric Boundary Layer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The earth's magnetopause is a boundary that separates two distinctly different plasma regions - the (shocked) solar wind and the hot magnetospheric plasma controlled by the terrestrial magnetic field. Through this boundary a small fraction of the solar wind energy and momentum is transferred. This energy powers all major plasma processes within the magnetosphere. Thus, a proper understanding of boundary layer phenomena is of vital importance for magnetospheric plasma physics. An overview of the two main theories put forward to explain the energy and momentum transfer processes near the earth's magnetospheric boundary - magnetic merging/reconnection and the boundary layer dynamo model - will be given. The theories are compared with recent in situ plasma observations in the vicinity of the magnetopause. It is suggested here that internal processes in the magnetospheric boundary layer are decisive for the transfer of energy and momentum into the inner magnetosphere, which is coupled to the high latitude ionosphere. On the other hand, external conditions at the magnetopause proper determine the coupling to the solar wind. Means of relating transient magnetic field signatures, such as flux transfer events, with plasma dynamo induced currents will also be discussed.

Rickard Lundin

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Chemical Speciation of Sulfur in Marine Cloud Droplets and Particles: Analysis of Individual Particles from Marine Boundary Layer over the California Current  

SciTech Connect

Detailed chemical speciation of the dry residue particles from individual cloud droplets and interstitial aerosol collected during the Marine Stratus Experiment (MASE) was performed using a combination of complementary microanalysis techniques. Techniques include computer controlled scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersed analysis of X-rays (CCSEM/EDX), time-of-flight secondary ionization mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS), and scanning transmission X-ray microscopy with near edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (STXM/NEXAFS). Samples were collected at the ground site located in Point Reyes National Seashore, approximately 1 km from the coast. This manuscript focuses on the analysis of individual particles sampled from air masses that originated over the open ocean and then passed through the area of the California current located along the northern California coast. Based on composition, morphology, and chemical bonding information, two externally mixed, distinct classes of sulfur containing particles were identified: chemically modified (aged) sea salt particles and secondary formed sulfate particles. The results indicate substantial heterogeneous replacement of chloride by methanesulfonate (CH3SO3-) and non-sea salt sulfate (nss-SO42-) in sea-salt particles with characteristic ratios of nss-S/Na>0.10 and CH3SO3-/nss-SO42->0.6.

William R. Wiley Environmental Sciences Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory; Gilles, Mary K; Hopkins, Rebecca J.; Desyaterik, Yury; Tivanski, Alexei V.; Zaveri, Rahul A.; Berkowitz, Carl M.; Tyliszczak, Tolek; Gilles, Mary K.; Laskin, Alexander

2008-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

29

Wind Structure in the Atmospheric Boundary Layer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

13 May 1971 research-article Wind Structure in the Atmospheric Boundary Layer...semi-empirical laws for the variation of mean wind speed with height and for the statistical...provide some useful ordering of the mean wind profile characteristics in relation to...

1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

TURBULENCE IN SUPERSONIC AND HYPERSONIC BOUNDARY LAYERS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TURBULENCE IN SUPERSONIC AND HYPERSONIC BOUNDARY LAYERS Alexander J. Smits and M. Pino Martin in supersonic and hypersonic flow where the effects of compressibility have a direct influence on the turbulence. Experimental and DNS results are presented and compared. Key words: Turbulence, supersonic, hypersonic, shocks

MartĂ­n, Pino

31

Viscous drag reduction in boundary layers  

SciTech Connect

The present volume discusses the development status of stability theory for laminar flow control design, applied aspects of laminar-flow technology, transition delays using compliant walls, the application of CFD to skin friction drag-reduction, active-wave control of boundary-layer transitions, and such passive turbulent-drag reduction methods as outer-layer manipulators and complex-curvature concepts. Also treated are such active turbulent drag-reduction technique applications as those pertinent to MHD flow drag reduction, as well as drag reduction in liquid boundary layers by gas injection, drag reduction by means of polymers and surfactants, drag reduction by particle addition, viscous drag reduction via surface mass injection, and interactive wall-turbulence control.

Bushnell, D.M.; Hefner, J.N.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Laminar boundary layers in convective heat transport  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study Rayleigh-Benard convection in the high-Rayleigh-number and high-Prandtl-number regime, i.e., we consider a fluid in a container that is exposed to strong heating of the bottom and cooling of the top plate in the absence of inertia effects. While the dynamics in the bulk are characterized by a chaotic convective heat flow, the boundary layers at the horizontal container plates are essentially conducting and thus the fluid is motionless. Consequently, the average temperature exhibits a linear profile in the boundary layers. In this article, we rigorously investigate the average temperature and oscillations in the boundary layer via local bounds on the temperature field. Moreover, we deduce that the temperature profile is indeed essentially linear close to the horizontal container plates. Our results are uniform in the system parameters (e.g. the Rayleigh number) up to logarithmic correction terms. An important tool in our analysis is a new Hardy-type estimate for the convecting velocity field, which can be used to control the fluid motion in the layer. The bounds on the temperature field are derived with the help of local maximal regularity estimates for convection-diffusion equations.

Christian Seis

2012-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

33

Acoustic sounding of the tropical marine boundary layer during GATE  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A vertically pointed monostatic acoustic sounder was installed on the NOAA ShipOCEANOGRAPHER during the Global Atmospheric Research Program Atlantic Tropical Experiment (GATE). The sounderantenna was mounted on a gyrocontrolled platform to compensate for the ship'spitch and roll motions. Extensive measures such as mounting the antenna assembly on a vibration isolator and installing absorbing cuffs had to be taken to reduce interference by ship?generated noise. Back?scattered acoustic data obtained from up to 850 m height describe the tropical marine boundary layer in unique and hitherto unseen detail. During undisturbed weather conditions the facsimile record showed convective plumes rising from the surface of the water up to 400 m. Storm?generated disturbances resulted in a substantial modification of the boundary layer; low?level multilayered undulating inversions formed from cool outflow currents. The inversions persisted for up to 16 hours. Low?level patchy cumulus clouds produced characteristic hummock?shaped acoustic echoes. Analysis of the Doppler frequency shift of the returns allowed the determination of vertical velocities within these clouds and underlying convective plumes.

P. A. Mandics; J. E. Gaynor; F. F. Hall Jr.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Boundary layer response to wind gusts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the wind tunnel sir stress caused by tbe addition of the in)actors, the decision was osde to use flew visuslstion ?echniques to detsreine if it wss possible to generate s lsuinar boundary layer on the flat plate. Loup black wss suspended in light..., 8. The data reduction procedure used in this thesis follcwed pxi- maxily the procsduxes of rafax'ence 8. Velocity fluctuations were detected using the constant current technique and computed based on square wave calibration. yor the constant...

Morland, Bruce Thomas

1968-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Numerical Study of Freestream Waves Receptivity and Nonlinear Breakdown in Hypersonic Boundary Layer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Numerical Methods for Hypersonic Boundary Layer Stability.of Instability in a Hypersonic Boundary Layer. TheoreticalA. P. , Receptivity of Hypersonic Boundary Layer to Wall

Lei, Jia

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

ARM - Field Campaign - Lower Atmospheric Boundary Layer Experiment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govCampaignsLower Atmospheric Boundary Layer Experiment govCampaignsLower Atmospheric Boundary Layer Experiment Campaign Links LABLE Website Related Campaigns 2013 Lower Atmospheric Boundary Layer Experiment 2013.05.28, Turner, SGP Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Lower Atmospheric Boundary Layer Experiment 2012.09.17 - 2012.11.13 Lead Scientist : David Turner Description Boundary layer turbulence is an important process that is parameterized in most atmospheric numerical models. Turbulence redistributes energy and mass within the boundary layer. Many different characteristics can impact the character of turbulence in the boundary layer, including different surface types, horizontal wind speed and direction, and the vertical temperature structure of the atmosphere. However, there have been few studies that have

37

Collaborative Research: ARM observations for the development and evaluation of models and parameterizations of cloudy boundary layers  

SciTech Connect

This is a collaborative project with Dr. Ping Zhu at Florida International University. It was designed to address key issues regarding the treatment of boundary layer cloud processes in climate models with UM’s research focusing on the analyses of ARM cloud radar observations from MMCR and WACR and FIU’s research focusing on numerical simulations of boundary layer clouds. This project capitalized on recent advancements in the ARM Millimeter Cloud Radar (MMCR) processing and the development of the WACR (at the SGP) to provide high temporal and spatial resolution Doppler cloud radar measurements for characterizing in-cloud turbulence, large-eddy circulations, and high resolution cloud structures of direct relevance to high resolution numerical modeling studies. The principal focus of the observational component of this collaborative study during this funding period was on stratocumulus clouds over the SGP site and fair-weather cumuli over the Nauru site. The statistical descriptions of the vertical velocity structures in continental stratocumulus clouds and in the Nauru shallow cumuli that are part of this study represents the most comprehensive observations of the vertical velocities in boundary layer clouds to date and were done in collaboration with Drs. Virendra Ghate and Pavlos Kollias.

Albrecht, Bruce,

2013-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

38

Analysis of cloud layer structure in Shouxian, China using RS92 radiosonde aided by 95 GHz cloud radar  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Analysis of cloud layer structure in Shouxian, China using RS92 radiosonde aided by 95 GHz cloud to analyze cloud vertical structure over this area by taking advantage of the first direct measurements of cloud vertical layers from the 95 GHz radar. Singlelayer, twolayer, and threelayer clouds account for 28

Li, Zhanqing

39

Model of Trace Gas Flux in Boundary Layer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mathematical model of the turbulent flux in the three-layer boundary system is presented. Turbulence is described as a presence of the nonzero vorticity. Generalized advection-diffusion-reaction equation is derived for arbitrary number components in the flux. The fluxes in the layers are objects for matching requirements on the boundaries between the layers.

I. I. Vasenev; I. S. Nurgaliev

2013-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

40

Cloud Controlling Factors --Low Clouds BJORN STEVENS,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cloud Controlling Factors -- Low Clouds BJORN STEVENS, Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic conspire to determine the statistics and cli- matology of layers of shallow (boundary layer) clouds of low-cloud control- ling processes are offered: these include renewing our focus on theory, model

Stevens, Bjorn

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "boundary layer clouds" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Turbulence Structure and Wall Signature in Hypersonic Turbulent Boundary Layer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Turbulence Structure and Wall Signature in Hypersonic Turbulent Boundary Layer Yin-Chiu Kan , Clara and hypersonic turbulent boundary layer datasets from direct numerical simulation (DNS). Contour plots and Marusic5 and Mathis, Hutchins and Marusic16 ). In contrast to supersonic and hypersonic flow regimes

MartĂ­n, Pino

42

Numerical Simulation of the Wave Bottom Boundary Layer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

are coupled to the wave cycle; phases of accelerating ow organize the boundary layer structure, decelerating; Zhao and Anastasiou, 1993; Feddersen and Guza, 2000; and Rankin and Hires, 2000]; others have the boundary layer and induce an in ectional instability at ow reversal, while accelerations tend to organize

Slinn, Donald

43

ARM - Field Campaign - Complex Layered Cloud Experiment (CLEX)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govCampaignsComplex Layered Cloud Experiment (CLEX) govCampaignsComplex Layered Cloud Experiment (CLEX) Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Complex Layered Cloud Experiment (CLEX) 1996.06.20 - 1996.07.02 Lead Scientist : Graeme Stephens Data Availability TABLE 1 Locations and Status of Extended Facilitiesa SMOS(c) Comments Site Elevation(b) Latitude, Surface Flux SIROS(c) (m) Longitude Type Station(c) (deg) Larned, KS 632 38.202 N Wheat ECOR Yes Yes Power and communication center EF-1 99.316 W 9/95 9/95 9/95 installation planned for July 1995 Hillsboro, 450 38.306 N Pasture EBBR 8/95 No Yes 8/95 Power and communication center

44

Performance of a boundary layer ingesting propulsion system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis presents an assessment of the aerodynamic performance of an aircraft propulsion system, with embedded engines, in the presence of aircraft fuselage boundary layer ingestion (BLI). The emphasis is on defining ...

Plas, Angélique (Angélique Pascale)

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Examining A Hypersonic Turbulent Boundary Layer at Low Reynolds Number  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of the current study was to answer several questions related to hypersonic, low Reynolds number, turbulent boundary layers, of which available data related to turbulence quantities is scarce. To that end, a unique research facility...

Semper, Michael Thomas

2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

46

Scaling Laws for the Heterogeneously Heated Free Convective Boundary Layer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The heterogeneously heated free convective boundary layer (CBL) is investigated by means of dimensional analysis and results from large-eddy simulations (LES) and direct numerical simulations (DNS). The investigated physical model is a CBL that ...

Chiel C. van Heerwaarden; Juan Pedro Mellado; Alberto De Lozar

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Upstream influence in boundary layers 45 years ago  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...0) = M2 2 ikH(k); (2.19) because M(y) takes the value M2, given by equation (2.15), at the location (here rede ned as y = 0) where the inviscid boundary condition has to be satis ed. Also, at the edge y = of the boundary layer, disturbances...

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

A dual mass flux framework for boundary layer convection  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A dual mass flux framework for boundary layer convection A dual mass flux framework for boundary layer convection Neggers, Roel European Centre for Medium-range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) Category: Modeling A new convective boundary layer scheme is presented that is currently being developed for the Integrated Forecasting System (IFS) of the European Centre for Medium-range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF). Part of the total turbulent flux is modeled through advective mass flux by multiple updrafts, initialized at the surface. Two groups of updrafts are explicitly represented; i) updrafts that never reach their lifting condensation level, and ii) updrafts that condensate and become cloudy. Key new ingredient is the flexibility of the associated updraft area fractions, as a function of model state. As a result, an extra degree of freedom is introduced in the

49

ARM - Field Campaign - Boundary Layer CO2 Using CW Lidar  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govCampaignsBoundary Layer CO2 Using CW Lidar govCampaignsBoundary Layer CO2 Using CW Lidar Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Boundary Layer CO2 Using CW Lidar 2005.05.21 - 2005.05.24 Lead Scientist : Michael Dobbs Description Overflights Underway at ACRF Southern Great Plains Site (M.Dobbs/J.Liljegren) Science collaborators at ITT Industries and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Langley Research Center (LaRC) conducted flights over the Central Facility at ACRF's Southern Great Plains (SGP) site as part of the Climate Sources and Sink (CO2) Intensive Operational Period (IOP), using a CW lidar. The objective of the flights was to validate, by demonstration and comparison with SGP ground observations, the performance of the ITT system when used in conjunction with retrieval

50

Distributed boundary layer suction utilizing wing tip effects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that this is not the case. The rotational force at the tip accounts for the suction power. Since this power is utilized to suck air from the boundary, energy is dissipated, thereby weakening the vortex strength. Providing this assumption is valid, the effect would... was done. TABLE OF CONTENTS Chapter Page INTRODUCTION OBJECTIVES AND SCOPE EXPERIMENTAL FACILITY AND PROCEDURES Wing Model . Wake Rake Boundary Layer Probe . . Multiple Tube Manometers Wind Tunnel and Related Equipment Procedures Computation...

Edwards, Jay Thomas

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

51

Four-Dimensional Data Assimilation Boundary-Layer Observations Over the Southern  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Boundary-Layer Observations Over the Southern Boundary-Layer Observations Over the Southern Great Plains Cloud and Radiation Testbed Site During the November Flux-Profiler Test s. P. Oncley and J. Van Baelen National Center for Atmospheric Research(8) Boulder, CO 80307-3000 Introduction Resu Its Figure 1 shows the raw data from two of the ten profile patterns flown during this experiment. Each aircraft profile consisted of a descent to the profiler site followed by 3-5 legs at increasing heights. Note that because of this flightpattern, the downward and upward profiles may differ due to temporal changes during the time of the pattern (about 50 minutes) and due to horizontal gradients. The profiler was operated in DBS mode alternating between two sets of three beams. Thus, two sets of consensus- averaged winds were available. Finally, several

52

Modeling the Interaction between the Atmospheric and Oceanic Boundary Layers, Including a Surface Wave Layer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The interaction between the atmospheric and oceanic boundary layers is simulated by solving a closed system of equations including equations of motion, turbulent kinetic energy (TKE), turbulent exchange coefficient (TEC), expressions for air and ...

Le Ngoc Ly

1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Carbon transport in the bottom boundary layer. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the activities and findings from a field experiment devised to estimate the rates and mechanisms of transport of carbon across the continental shelves. The specific site chosen for the experiment was the mid-Atlantic Bight, a region off the North Carolina coast. The experiment involved a large contingent of scientists from many institutions. The specific component of the program was the transport of carbon in the bottom boundary layer. The postulate mechanisms of transport of carbon in the bottom boundary layer are: resuspension and advection, downward deposition, and accumulation. The high turbulence levels in the bottom boundary layer require the understanding of the coupling between turbulence and bottom sediments. The specific issues addressed in the work reported here were: (a) What is the sediment response to forcing by currents and waves? (b) What is the turbulence climate in the bottom boundary layer at this site? and (c) What is the rate at which settling leads to carbon sequestering in bottom sediments at offshore sites?

Agrawal, Y.C.

1998-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

54

Turbulence Structure and Wall Signature in Hypersonic Boundary Layer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Turbulence Structure and Wall Signature in Hypersonic Boundary Layer Yin-Chiu Kan , Beekman Izaak and low- speed features, found in subsonic experiments, are present in our supersonic and hypersonic and hypersonic regimes due to the lack of detailed flow field data, and the studies have been mostly restricted

MartĂ­n, Pino

55

OFFSHORE BOUNDARY-LAYER MODELLING H. Bergstrm1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

OFFSHORE BOUNDARY-LAYER MODELLING H. Bergström1 and R. Barthelmie2 1) Uppsala Univ., Dept. of Earth) of the ENDOW (EfficieNt Development of Offshore Windfarms) project, where the objectives are to provide currently be incorporated into a wind farm design tool. The offshore thermal stratification climate is also

56

On the Interaction between Marine Boundary Layer Cellular Cloudiness and Surface Heat Fluxes  

SciTech Connect

The interaction between marine boundary layer cellular cloudiness and surface uxes of sensible and latent heat is investigated. The investigation focuses on the non-precipitating closed-cell state and the precipitating open-cell state at low geostrophic wind speed. The Advanced Research WRF model is used to conduct cloud-system-resolving simulations with interactive surface fluxes of sensible heat, latent heat, and of sea salt aerosol, and with a detailed representation of the interaction between aerosol particles and clouds. The mechanisms responsible for the temporal evolution and spatial distribution of the surface heat fluxes in the closed- and open-cell state are investigated and explained. It is found that the horizontal spatial structure of the closed-cell state determines, by entrainment of dry free tropospheric air, the spatial distribution of surface air temperature and water vapor, and, to a lesser degree, of the surface sensible and latent heat flux. The synchronized dynamics of the the open-cell state drives oscillations in surface air temperature, water vapor, and in the surface fluxes of sensible and latent heat, and of sea salt aerosol. Open-cell cloud formation, cloud optical depth and liquid water path, and cloud and rain water path are identified as good predictors of the spatial distribution of surface air temperature and sensible heat flux, but not of surface water vapor and latent heat flux. It is shown that by enhancing the surface sensible heat flux, the open-cell state creates conditions by which it is maintained. While the open-cell state under consideration is not depleted in aerosol, and is insensitive to variations in sea-salt fluxes, it also enhances the sea-salt flux relative to the closed-cell state. In aerosol-depleted conditions, this enhancement may replenish the aerosol needed for cloud formation, and hence contribute to the perpetuation of the open-cell state as well. Spatial homogenization of the surface fluxes is found to have only a small effect on cloud properties in the investigated cases. This indicates that sub-grid scale spatial variability in the surface flux of sensible and latent heat and of sea salt aerosol may not be required in large scale and global models to describe marine boundary layer cellular cloudiness.

Kazil, J.; Feingold, G.; Wang, Hailong; Yamaguchi, T.

2014-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

57

Comparison of POLDER Apparent and Corrected Oxygen Pressure to ARM/MMCR Cloud Boundary Pressures  

SciTech Connect

POLDER (POLarization and Directionality of the Earth’s Reflectances) cloud oxygen pressures are compared to cloud boundary pressures obtained from the combination of Lidar and Millimeter Wave Cloud Radar ground measurements located at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern Great Plains (SGP) site. Without ground reflection correction, the apparent pressures are found to be closer to the mean cloud pressure than to the cloud top pressure. Nevertheless, for almost a quarter of our comparison cases the apparent pressure level is found to be below the cloud base level. This problem practically disappears applying a simple correction for the surface reflection effect. The corrected oxygen pressures are then found to be very close (12 hPa on average) to the mean cloud pressure.

Vanbauce, Claudine; Cadet, Bertrand; Marchand, Roger T.

2003-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

58

Boundary layer transition as a source of noise and vibration  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

When laminar flow over a rigid or flexible surface becomes unstable an intermittent flow state occurs. This intermittent flow regime called the transition region is where turbulent spots are created and then grow as they convect downstream at a velocity typically equal to 0.7 times the free?stream velocity. The spots eventually coalesce to form the beginning of the fully developed turbulent boundary layer. The statistics of the velocity or pressure fluctuations in the transition region are essentially stationary in time but nonhomogeneous in the streamwise direction. Fundamentally it has been argued that this region is capable of creating monopole sound radiation e.g. Lauchle [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 69 665–671 (1981)] and Sornette and Lagier [Acustica 55 255–267 (1984)]. Also it has been suspected that a transitional boundary layer can induce wall vibrations. These issues have been under study for some time. We have completed a set of measurements on the. space?time statistics of turbulent spots in a naturally occurring transition zone and from them developed an analytical model for the wavenumber?frequency spectrum of the pressure fluctuations. Based on this model it appears that the transition zone wall pressure is less intense than that of a fully developed turbulent layer by a factor equal approximately to the intermittency factor. This presentation will review the current research findings on wall pressure fluctuations and radiated sound caused by boundary layer transition. [Work supported by Applied Research Laboratory under NAVSEA contract.

Gerald C. Lauchle; M. A. Josserand

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Characterization of wind noise by the boundary layer meteorology  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The fluctuations in pressure generated by turbulent motions of the atmospheric boundary layer are a principal noise source in outdoor acoustic measurements. The mechanics of wind noise involve not only stagnation pressure fluctuations at the sensor but also shearing and self-interaction of turbulence throughout the flow particularly at low frequencies. The contributions of these mechanisms can be described by the boundary-layer meteorology. An experiment was conducted at the National Wind Institute's 200-meter meteorological tower located outside Lubbock Texas in the Llano Estacado region. For two days a 44-element 400-meter diameter array of unscreened NCPA-UMX infrasound sensors recorded wind noise continuously while the tower and a Doppler SODAR measured vertical profiles of the boundary layer. Analysis of the fluctuating pressure with the meteorological data shows that the statistical structure of wind noise depends on both mean velocity distribution and buoyant stability. The root-mean-square pressure exhibits distinct scalings for stable and unstable stratification. Normalization of the pressure power spectral density depends on the outer scales. In stable conditions the kurtosis of the wind noise increases with Reynolds number. Measures of noise intermittency are explored with respect to the meteorology.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

BOUNDARY LAYER (BL) THERMAL EDDIES OVER A PINE FOREST FROM CARES 2010  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BOUNDARY LAYER (BL) THERMAL EDDIES OVER A PINE FOREST FROM CARES 2010 Gunnar Senum and Stephen are three thermal eddies, about 250 meters wide, in the boundary layer. These thermal eddies are formed from the solar heating of the surface and help to form the boundary layer. The eddy updrafts are transporting

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "boundary layer clouds" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Simulation of bubble migration in a turbulent boundary layer M. Mattson and K. Mahesha  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Simulation of bubble migration in a turbulent boundary layer M. Mattson and K. Mahesha Aerospace of bubbles injected into a turbulent boundary layer. The Reynolds number of the turbulent boundary layer varies from 420 Re 1800, and the bubble Reynolds number Reb 1. Simulation parameters were chosen to match

Mahesh, Krishnan

62

A case study of boundary layer ventilation by convection and coastal processes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the pollution in the atmosphere originates from emissions in the atmospheric boundary layer, the region; published 12 September 2007. [1] It is often assumed that ventilation of the atmospheric boundary layer responsible for ventilation of the atmospheric boundary layer during a nonfrontal day that occurred on 9 May

Dacre, Helen

63

A new cloud and aerosol layer detection method based on micropulse lidar measurements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A new cloud and aerosol layer detection method based on micropulse lidar measurements Chuanfeng algorithm to detect aerosols and clouds based on micropulse lidar measurements. A semidiscretization is then introduced. Combined with empirical threshold values, we determine if the signal waves indicate clouds

Li, Zhanqing

64

Transition in Hypersonic Boundary Layers: Role of Dilatational Waves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Transition and turbulence production in a hypersonic boundary layer is investigated in a Mach 6 quiet wind tunnel using Rayleigh-scattering visualization, fast-response pressure measurements, and particle image velocimetry. It is found that the second instability acoustic mode is the key modulator of the transition process. The second mode experiences a rapid growth and a very fast annihilation due to the effect of bulk viscosity. The second mode interacts strongly with the first vorticity mode to directly promote a fast growth of the latter and leads to immediate transition to turbulence.

Zhu, Yiding; Yuan, Huijing; Wu, Jiezhi; Chen, Shiyi; Lee, Cunbiao; Gad-el-Hak, Mohamed

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

EART 265 Lecture Notes: Boundary Layers We're interested here mainly in boundary layers relevant to planets, i.e. those of planetary atmo-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the bounding surface. Note that the vertical shear caused by the surface generates turbulence, whichEART 265 Lecture Notes: Boundary Layers We're interested here mainly in boundary layers relevant and the surface, thus mediating all interactions between the two. If we look back at the Navier-Stokes equations

Nimmo, Francis

66

Predictive Inner-Outer Model for Turbulent Boundary Layers Applied to Hypersonic DNS Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Predictive Inner-Outer Model for Turbulent Boundary Layers Applied to Hypersonic DNS Data Clara numerical simulation (DNS) data of supersonic and hypersonic turbulent boundaries with Mach 3 and Mach 7, and Martin12­14 on DNS of hypersonic turbulent boundary layers demonstrates the existence of large scale

MartĂ­n, Pino

67

Heat transport by laminar boundary layer flow with polymers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Motivated by recent experimental observations, we consider a steady-state Prandtl-Blasius boundary layer flow with polymers above a slightly heated horizontal plate and study how the heat transport might be affected by the polymers. We discuss how a set of equations can be derived for the problem and how these equations can be solved numerically by an iterative scheme. By carrying out such a scheme, we find that the effect of the polymers is equivalent to producing a space-dependent effective viscosity that first increases from the zero-shear value at the plate then decreases rapidly back to the zero-shear value far from the plate. We further show that such an effective viscosity leads to an enhancement in the drag, which in turn leads to a reduction in heat transport.

Roberto Benzi; Emily S. C. Ching.; Vivien W. S. Chu

2011-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

68

Friction of a slider on a granular layer: Nonmonotonic thickness dependence and effect of boundary conditions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Friction of a slider on a granular layer: Nonmonotonic thickness dependence and effect of boundary the effective friction encountered by a mass sliding on a granular layer as a function of bed thickness and boundary roughness conditions. The observed friction has minima for a small number of layers before

Kudrolli, Arshad

69

Estimation of boundary layer transition noise from velocity measurements  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Velocity measurements of artificially generatedflow structures in the transition region of an incompressible boundary layer with zero pressure gradient are described. These measurements made in a laminar flow water channel allow calculation of the velocity normal to the wall in a turbulent spot. This velocity specifies the linearized boundary condition for the acoustic equation at the wall. The approach relates the radiated noise to fluctuations in the normal velocity at the plate through fluctuations in the displacement thickness. Although this approach has been previously proposed [H. W. Liepmann unpublished (1954) J. Laufer J. E. Ffowcs?Williams and S. Childress AGARDograph 90 39–42 (1964) G. C. Lauchle J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 69 665–671 (1981) G. C. Lauchle ASME NCA 5 31–38 (1989)] it has never been applied. The results of these experiments will be compared to concurrent experiments run in an anechoic wind tunnel. Ultimately this work will be extended to naturally occurring structures in the transition region. [Work supported by ONR under Grant ?N00014?90?J?1365.

Michael H. Krane; Wayne R. Pauley

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Evolution of Prolate Molecular Clouds at Hii Boundaries: II. Formation of BRCs of asymmetrical morphology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A systematic investigation on the evolution of a prolate cloud at an Hii boundary is conducted using Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) in order to understand the mechanism for a variety of irregular morphological structures found at the boundaries of various Hii regions. The prolate molecular clouds in this investigation are set with their semi-major axes at inclinations between 0 and 90 degrees to a plane parallel ionizing radiation flux. A set of 4 parameters, the number density n, the ratio of major to minor axis gamma, the inclination angle phi and the incident flux F_EUV, are used to define the initial state of the simulated clouds. The dependence of the evolution of a prolate cloud under Radiation Driven Implosion (RDI) on each of the four parameters is investigated. It is found that: i) in addition to the well studied standard type A, B or C Bright Rimmed Clouds (BRCs), many other types such as asymmetrical BRCs, filamentary structures and irregular horse-head structures could also be developed at ...

Kinnear, T M; White, G J; Sugitani, K; Goodwin, S

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

A first order geometric auto regressive process for boundary layer wind speed simulation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Under certain conditions the first order geometric auto regressive (AR) process has statistical properties similar to atmospheric boundary layer wind speed. In this contribution, we investigate ... this stochas...

T. Laubrich; H. Kantz

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

About First Order Geometric Auto Regressive Processes for Boundary Layer Wind Speed Simulation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Under certain conditions the first order geometric auto regressive process has statistical properties similar to atmospheric boundary layer wind speed. In this contribution, we investigate ... this stochastic pro...

Thomas Laubrich; Holger Kantz

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Wind-Tunnel Simulation of the Wake of a Large Wind Turbine in a Stable Boundary Layer. Part 1: The Boundary-Layer Simulation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Measurements have been made in both a neutral and a stable boundary layer as part of an investigation of the wakes of wind turbines in an offshore environment, in the EnFlo stratified flow wind tunnel. The wor...

Philip E. Hancock; Frauke Pascheke

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Similarity Equations for Wind and Temperature Profiles in the Radix Layer, at the Bottom of the Convective Boundary Layer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the middle of the convective boundary layer, also known as the mixed layer, is a relatively thick region where wind speed and potential temperature are nearly uniform with height. Below this uniform layer (UL), wind speed decreases to zero at ...

Edi Santoso; Roland Stull

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

High resolution properties of the marine atmospheric boundary layer  

SciTech Connect

Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) participated in the Central Equatorial Pacific Experiment (CEPEX) by fielding a water-vapor Raman lidar on board the Research Vessel Vickers. The lidar measured water vapor concentration from the surface to lower tropospheric altitudes in order to support the CEPEX goal of evaluating a hypothesis regarding feedback mechanisms for global circulation models. This report describes some of the features observed within the marine Atmospheric Boundary Layer (ABL) and the lower troposphere. Data was collected continuously 24 hours per day over the equatorial Pacific from March 8th to March 2 1st of 1993 while in route between Guadalcanal and Christmas Island (the transect was at approximately 2{degree} south latitude). The lidar collected vertical transects of water vapor concentration up to 10 km during night operations and 4 km in the day. The vertical lidar profiles of water vapor were produced by summing the data over a period up to 600 seconds. The water-vapor Raman lidar measured the properties of the marine ABL as well as the lower and mid-troposphere. From the lidar water vapor profiles, ``images`` of water vapor concentration versus altitude and date or sea surface temperature will be produced along with other products such as latent heat fluxes. The Raman water vapor lidar data will be used to better understand the role of transport and exchange at the ocean-atmosphere interface and throughout the marine atmosphere.

Cooper, D.; Cottingame, W.; Eichinger, W.; Forman, P.; Lebeda, C.; Poling, D.; Thorton, R.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Simulation of Hypersonic Shock Wave/Boundary Layer Interaction Using High Order WENO Scheme  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Simulation of Hypersonic Shock Wave/Boundary Layer Interaction Using High Order WENO Scheme Yiqing for predicting hypersonic shock wave/boundary layer interaction. The implicit time marching method number of 1.09 Ă? 105 /ft. 1 Introduction Hypersonic aerothermodynamics is one of the most challenging

Zha, Gecheng

77

Study of Emission TurbulenceRadiation Interaction in Hypersonic Boundary Layers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Study of Emission Turbulence­Radiation Interaction in Hypersonic Boundary Layers L. Duan and M. P of emission turbulence­radiation interaction in hypersonic turbulent boundary layers, representative interaction between turbulence and emission at the hypersonic environment under investigation. An explanation

MartĂ­n, Pino

78

Assessment of TurbulenceChemistry Interaction in Hypersonic Turbulent Boundary Layers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Assessment of Turbulence­Chemistry Interaction in Hypersonic Turbulent Boundary Layers L. Duan of the turbulence­chemistry interaction are performed in hypersonic turbulent boundary layers using direct numerical simulation flowfields under typical hypersonic conditions representative of blunt-body and slender- body

MartĂ­n, Pino

79

Study of turbulence-chemistry interaction in hypersonic turbulent boundary layers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Study of turbulence-chemistry interaction in hypersonic turbulent boundary layers Lian Duan and M of the turbulence-chemistry interaction (TCI) are performed in hypersonic tur- bulent boundary layers using direct numerical simulation (DNS) flow fields under typical hypersonic conditions representative of blunt

MartĂ­n, Pino

80

Development and propagation of a pollution gradient in the marine boundary layer during INDOEX (1999)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Development and propagation of a pollution gradient in the marine boundary layer during INDOEX (1999) Matthew Simpson and Sethu Raman Department of Marine, Earth, and Atmospheric Sciences, North and propagation of a pollution gradient in the marine boundary layer over the Arabian Sea during the Intensive

Raman, Sethu

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "boundary layer clouds" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Direct injection of ionospheric O sup + into the dayside low latitude boundary layer  

SciTech Connect

Observations from the AMPTE/Charge Composition Explorer (AMPTE/CCE) indicate the presence of two distinct O{sup +} populations in the dayside subsolar low latitude boundary layer during some periods of northward Interplanetary Magnetic Field (IMF). The first population is O{sup +} convected into the boundary layer from the outer magnetosphere and has been reported previously. It is suggested here that the new, second, O{sup +} population is injected into the dayside boundary layer directly from the high latitude ionosphere. This second population can have a significant density and distinct characteristics such as field-aligned flow relative to boundary layer H{sup +} that modify both the plasma composition and dynamics in the low latitude boundary layer. {copyright} American Geophysical Union 1989

Fuselier, S.A.; Klumpar, D.M.; Peterson, W.K.; Shelley, E.G. (Lockheed Palo Alto Research Laboratory, Palo Alto, California (US))

1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Cloud climatology at the Southern Great Plains and the layer structure, drizzle, and atmospheric modes of continental stratus  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with other data sets, climate-scale relation- ships between cloud properties and dynamical or micro- physical of cloud layers, an issue that is important in calculating both the radiative and the hydro- logic effects

83

Boundary Layer Dynamics and Cross-Equatorial Hadley Circulation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The behavior of the Hadley circulation is analyzed in the context of an idealized axisymmetric atmosphere. It is argued that the cross-equatorial Hadley circulation exhibits two different regimes depending on the depth of the planetary boundary ...

Olivier Pauluis

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Observations of turbulent fluxes and turbulence dynamics in the ocean surface boundary layer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study presents observations of turbulence dynamics made during the low winds portion of the Coupled Boundary Layers and Air-Sea Transfer experiment (CBLAST-Low). Observations were made of turbulent fluxes, turbulent ...

Gerbi, Gregory Peter

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Properties of a Simulated Convective Boundary Layer in an Idealized Supercell Thunderstorm Environment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nearly all previous numerical simulations of supercell thunderstorms have neglected surface fluxes of heat, moisture, and momentum. This choice precludes horizontal inhomogeneities associated with dry boundary layer convection in the near-storm ...

Christopher J. Nowotarski; Paul M. Markowski; Yvette P. Richardson; George H. Bryan

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Wind Direction Dependence of Atmospheric Boundary Layer Turbulence Parameters in the Urban Roughness Sublayer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A variety of atmospheric boundary layer parameters are examined as a function of wind direction in both urban and suburban settings in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, derived from measurements during the Joint Urban 2003 field campaign. Heterogeneous ...

Cheryl Klipp

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Observations of Turbulence in the Ocean Surface Boundary Layer: Energetics and Transport  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Observations of turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) dynamics in the ocean surface boundary layer are presented here and compared with results from previous observational, numerical, and analytic studies. As in previous studies, ...

Gerbi, Gregory P.

88

The surface roughness effects in computation of the turbulent boundary layer on slender ship-hull  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An improved version of an integral method for computing turbulent boundary layers on a slender ship-hull with auxiliary shape parameter and lag- ... modifying an approximate technique of scaling model-to-ship rou...

Si-Young Kim; A. K. Lewkowicz

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Quantifying the Hygroscopic Growth of Marine Boundary Layer Aerosols by Satellite-base and Buoy Observations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this study, collocated satellite and buoy observations as well as satellite observations over an extended region during 2006-2010 were used to quantify the humidity effects on marine boundary layer (MBL) aerosols. Although the near-surface ...

Tao Luo; Renmin Yuan; Zhien Wang; Damao Zhang

90

Near-surface wind estimates using statistics from a planetary boundary-layer model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper shows the possibilities of a procedure for estimating near-surface wind statistics, by means of the numerical integration of a simple boundary-layer model with a second-order turbulent closure. Stan...

J. C. Labraga

1988-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

An experimental study of the airflow over a hill in the atmospheric boundary layer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Between 1975 and 1977, the Centre Scientifique et Technique du Bâtiment (CSTB) carried out a study of the overspeed effect over a hill in the surface boundary layer. The hill in question was situated in open c...

C. Sacré

1979-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Nonlinear equilibration of baroclinic eddies : the role of boundary layer processes and seasonal forcing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this thesis, the influence of boundary layer processes and seasonal forcing on baroclinic eddy equilibration is studied to understand how the baroclinic adjustment is modified when taking into account these two factors. ...

Zhang, Yang, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Stability Analysis for a Saline Boundary Layer Formed by Uniform Up ow Using Finite Elements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

density in the deeper underground and high salt water density at the boundary layer), gravitation plays and Darcy's law. In this report we #12;rst give an overview of semi-analytical methods to analyse

Eindhoven, Technische Universiteit

94

A Case Study of Mid-Atlantic Nocturnal Boundary Layer Events during WAVES 2006  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Water Vapor Variability-Satellite/Sondes (WAVES) 2006 field campaign provided a contiguous 5-day period of concentrated high-resolution measurements to examine finescale boundary layer phenomena under the influence of a summertime subtropical ...

S. Rabenhorst; D. N. Whiteman; D.-L. Zhang; B. Demoz

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Large-Eddy Simulation of Marine Atmospheric Boundary Layers above a Spectrum of Moving Waves  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Momentum and scalar transport in the marine atmospheric boundary layer (MABL) is driven by a turbulent mix of winds, buoyancy, and surface gravity waves. To investigate the interaction between these processes, a large-eddy simulation (LES) model ...

Peter P. Sullivan; James C. McWilliams; Edward G. Patton

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Numerical Modeling of the Propagation Environment in the Atmospheric Boundary Layer over the Persian Gulf  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Strong vertical gradients at the top of the atmospheric boundary layer affect the propagation of electromagnetic waves and can produce radar ducts. A three-dimensional, time-dependent, nonhydrostatic numerical model was used to simulate the ...

B. W. Atkinson; J-G. Li; R. S. Plant

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Advances in the visualization and analysis of boundary layer flow in swimming fish  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In biology, the importance of fluid drag, diffusion, and heat transfer both internally and externally, suggest the boundary layer as an important subject of investigation, however, the complexities of biological systems ...

Anderson, Erik J

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Uncertainty in Contaminant Concentration Fields Resulting from Atmospheric Boundary Layer Depth Uncertainty  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The relationship between atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) depth uncertainty and uncertainty in atmospheric transport and dispersion (ATD) simulations is investigated by examining profiles of predicted concentrations of a contaminant. Because ...

Brian P. Reen; Kerrie J. Schmehl; George S. Young; Jared A. Lee; Sue Ellen Haupt; David R. Stauffer

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Lidar-Observed Stress Vectors and Veer in the Atmospheric Boundary Layer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study demonstrates that a pulsed wind lidar is a reliable instrument for measuring angles between horizontal vectors of significance in the atmospheric boundary layer. Three different angles are considered: the wind turning, the angle between ...

Jacob Berg; Jakob Mann; Edward G. Patton

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

On the magnetospheric boundary layer and solar wind energy transfer into the magnetosphere  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The magnetopause and the magnetospheric boundary layer constitute the interface between the shocked solar wind plasma and the terrestrial magnetic cavity populated by a predominantly hot plasma in the outer po...

Rickard Lundin

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "boundary layer clouds" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Influence of surface heating on the boundary layer stability of flows with favorable pressure gradients  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

INFLUENCE OF SURFACE HEATING ON THE BOUNDARY LAYER STABILITY OF FLOWS WITH FAVORABI E PRESSURE GRADIENTS A Thesis by DAVID BRIAN LANDRUM Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas AAM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1986 Major Subject: Aerospace Engineering INFLUENCE OF SURFACE HEATING ON THE BOUNDARY LAYER STABILITY OF FLOWS WITH FAVORABLE PRESSURE GRADIENTS A Thesis by DAVID BRIAN LANDRUM Approved as to style and content...

Landrum, David Brian

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

102

Effect of a surface boundary layer on an intensifying, downward-propagating vortex  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

EFFECT OF A SURFACE BOUNDARY LAYER ON AN INTENSIFYING, DOWNWARD-PROPAGATING VORTEX A Thesis by VINCENT TUNSTALL WOOD Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE May 1977 Major Subject: Meteorology EFFECT OF A SURFACE BOUNDARY LAYER ON AN INTENSIFYING, DOWNWARD-PROPAGATING VORTEX A Thesis by VINCENT TUNSTALL WOOD Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of Committee) (Head of Department...

Wood, Vincent Tunstall

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

103

The development of a low velocity wind tunnel with instrumentation for boundary layer investigations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

THE DEVELOPMENT OF A LOW VELOCITY WIND TUNNEL WITH INSTRUMENTATION FOR BOUNDARY LAYER INVESTIGATIONS A Dissertation B y John Robert Massey Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas in partial... fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY May 1958 Major Subject: Mechanical Engineering THE DEVELOPMENT OF A LOW VELOCITY WIND TUNNEL WITH INSTRUMENTATION FOR BOUNDARY LAYER INVESTIGATIONS A Dissertation By John Robert...

Massey, John Robert

2013-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

104

Ice in Clouds Experiment—Layer Clouds. Part I: Ice Growth Rates Derived from Lenticular Wave Cloud Penetrations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Lenticular wave clouds are used as a natural laboratory to estimate the linear and mass growth rates of ice particles at temperatures from ?20° to ?32°C and to characterize the apparent rate of ice nucleation at water saturation at a nearly ...

Andrew J. Heymsfield; Paul R. Field; Matt Bailey; Dave Rogers; Jeffrey Stith; Cynthia Twohy; Zhien Wang; Samuel Haimov

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Tide-Induced Sediment Resuspension and the Bottom Boundary Layer in an Idealized Estuary with a Muddy Bed  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Sediment transport and bottom boundary layer (BBL) in an idealized estuary with a muddy bed were studied by numerical simulations. The focus was placed on description and prediction of the dynamics of nepheloid layer (a fluid–mud layer) developed ...

X. H. Wang

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

THE HORIZONTAL BOUNDARY-LAYER STRUCTURE FOR THE CONVECTIVE REGIME IN A LATERALLY HEATED VERTICAL SLOT  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......for the case when the horizontal walls of the slot are...and a main two-tier horizontal boundary layer is identified...closed form for the outer horizontal layer which is dominated...reactor cooling systems, solar collectors and cavity insulation......

P. G. DANIELS

1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Role of Amorphous Boundary Layer in Enhancing Ionic Conductivity of Lithium–lanthanum–titanate Electrolyte  

SciTech Connect

The low ionic conductivity is a bottleneck of the inorganic solid state electrolyte used for lithium ion battery. In ceramic electrolytes, grain boundary usually dominates the total conductivity. In order to improve the grain boundary effect, an amorphous silica layer is introduced into grain boundary of ceramic electrolytes based on lithium-lanthanum-titanate, as evidenced by electron microscopy. The results showed that the total ionic conductivity could be to be enhanced over 1 x 10{sup -4} S/cm at room temperature. The reasons can be attributed to removing the anisotropy of outer-shell of grains, supplement of lithium ions in various sites in grain boundary and close bindings among grains by the amorphous boundary layer among grains.

Mei, A.; Wang, X.; Lana, J.-L.; Fenga, Y.-C.; Genga, H.-X.; Lina, Y.-H.; Nana, C.-W.

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Data/model integration for vertical mixing in the stable Arctic boundary layer  

SciTech Connect

This is the final report of a short Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Data on atmospheric trace constituents and the vertical structure of stratus clouds from a 1996 expedition to the central Arctic reveal mechanisms of vertical mixing that have not been observed in mid-latitudes. Time series of the altitude and thickness of summer arctic stratus have been observed using an elastic backscatter lidar aboard an icebreaker. With the ship moored to the pack ice during 14 data collection stations and the lidar staring vertically, the time series represent advected cloud fields. The lidar data reveal a significant amount of vertical undulation in the clouds, strongly suggestive of traveling waves in the buoyantly damped atmosphere that predominates in the high Arctic. Concurrent observations of trace gases associated with the natural sulfur cycle (dimethyl sulfide, SO{sub 2}, NH{sub 3}, H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) and aerosols show evidence of vertical mixing events that coincide with a characteristic signature in the cloud field that may be called dropout or lift out. A segment of a cloud deck appears to be relocated from the otherwise quasicontinuous layer to another altitude a few hundred meters lower or higher. Atmospheric models have been applied to identify the mechanism that cause the dropout phenomenon and connect it dynamically to the surface layer mixing.

Barr, S.; ReVelle, D.O.; Kao, C.Y.J.; Bigg, E.K.

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

109

Thermal boundary layer effects in an annular acoustic Stirling engine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A stability and transport analysis is performed for a simplified model of a strongly coupled thermoacoustic prime mover stack in an annular resonator. The result demonstrates that even in the limit that other flow impedances of the resonator and stack can be ignored there is a thermal impedance mismatch created in the boundary region at the ends of the stack. This can cause the gain predicted for the wave traversing the interior of the stack to differ significantly from the gain that drives sound in the resonator. The analysis is used to derive scaling relations between the heat and mass transport around the annulus and to show how different scaling regimes relate to the maximum sound intensity that the stack can induce in the absence of other losses.

Eric Smith

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Application of acoustic sounding to estimating fusion in an atmospheric boundary layer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An acoustic sounder system can be configured to provide estimates of the vertical profile of velocity and dissipation rate of kinetic and potential energy. A method based on the concepts of boundary?layer similarity theory is outlined by which the characteristicvelocity in a freely convective boundary layer is deduced from the inversion height and the asymptotic value of the dissipation rate of kinetic energy near the inversion. These values in conjunction with the mean velocity are used to establish the normalized heights downwind and cross?wind distances and cross?wind integrated concentrations. The normalized lateral and vertical standard deviations are then deduced from empirically established laboratory relationships for nonbuoyant particulates. Preliminary analysis indicate a similar methodology may be applicable to the stable boundary layer.

Bryan R. Kerman

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Measurement of Boundary-Layer Temperature Profiles by a Scanning 5-MM Radiometer During the 1999 Winter NSA/AAO Radiometer Exp  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Boundary-Layer Temperature Profiles by Boundary-Layer Temperature Profiles by a Scanning 5-MM Radiometer During the 1999 Winter NSA/AAO Radiometer Experiment and WVIOP 2000 V. Y. Leuski and E. R. Westwater Cooperative Institute for Research in the Environmental Sciences National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Environmental Technology Laboratory University of Colorado Boulder, Colorado Introduction A scanning 5-mm-wavelength radiometer was deployed during two Intensive Operational Periods (IOPs) at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program's Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) facilities. The first was conducted at the North Slope of Alaska (NSA) and Adjacent arctic Ocean (AAO) site near Barrow, Alaska, during March 1999. One goal was to evaluate the ability of an

112

Comparison of two-equation turbulence models for boundary layers with pressure gradient  

SciTech Connect

This paper compares the performance of eight low Reynolds number k-epsilon and k-omega models for high Reynolds number, incompressible turbulent boundary layers with favorable, zero, and adverse pressure gradients. Results obtained underscore the k-epsilon model's unsuitability for such flows. Even more seriously, the k-epsilon model is demonstrated to be inconsistent with the well-established physical structure of the turbulent boundary layer, and low Reynolds number corrections cannot remove the inconsistency. By contrast, the k-omega model, with and without low Reynolds number modifications, proves to be very accurate for all of the tests conducted. 16 refs.

Wilcox, D.C. (DCW Industries, Inc., La Canada, CA (United States))

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

The effect of periodic unsteady wakes on boundary layer transition and heat transfer on a curved plate.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The effect of unsteady periodic wakes on heat transfer and boundary layer transition was investigated on a constant curvature heat transfer curved plate in a… (more)

Wright, Lance Cole

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Effects of passive porous walls on the first Mack mode instability of hypersonic boundary layers over a sharp cone.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Passive porous coatings have been proposed in literature as a means of delaying transition to turbulence in hypersonic boundary layers. The nonlinear stability of hypersonic… (more)

Michael, Vipin George

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

BOUNDARY LAYER ASSOCIATED WITH THE DARCY-BRINKMAN-BOUSSINESQ MODEL FOR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BOUNDARY LAYER ASSOCIATED WITH THE DARCY-BRINKMAN-BOUSSINESQ MODEL FOR CONVECTION IN POROUS MEDIA of the infinite Darcy- Prandtl number Darcy-Brinkman-Boussinesq system for convection in porous media at small number Darcy-Brinkman-Boussinesq system, infinite Darcy-Prandtl number Darcy-Boussinesq sys- tem

Wang, Xiaoming

116

Acoustic boundary layer and acoustic radiation from a ribbed flat plate  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The acoustic boundary?layer theory(patterned after the viscous boundary?layer theory) is derived by noting that for low frequencies where the structural wavelength is much less than the fluid acoustic wavelength there is a region about the vibrating structure which behaves as if the fluid was incompressible. The dimension of this region depends upon the particular conditions of the problem. In a paper presented by the author [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 62 S32(A) (1977)] the theory behind the acoustic boundary layer was developed and applied to simple unit problems. In this paper the near and the far field of a force driven plate is obtained by the use of the acoustic boundary?layer theory. Two different problems are addressed. In the first instance the structure is assumed to be homogeneous while in the second problem presented a rib is attached to the flat plate. In both instances the fully coupled fluid structure problem is solved and comparisons between the exact classical approach and the proposed theory are discussed.

Mauro Pierucci

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Transport and Resuspension of Fine Particles in a Tidal Boundary Layer near a Small Peninsula  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The authors present a theory on the transport and resuspension of fine particles in a tidal boundary layer when the ambient tidal flow is nonuniform due to a peninsula along the coastline. As a first step toward better physical understanding the ...

Chiang C. Mei; Chimin Chian; Feng Ye

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Device for measuring the boundary layer parameters in a high-temperature gas stream  

SciTech Connect

The authors describe a device enabling one to simultaneously measure the distributions of electrical conductivity and electron density of the working substance of an MHD generator. The structure and a block diagram of the device are shown. The measured results give information on the thermal boundary layer thickness, and temperature profiles are calculated.

Kosov, V.F.; Molotkov, V.I.; Nefedov, A.P.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

The Impact of Horizontal Model Grid Resolution on the Boundary Layer Structure over an Idealized Valley  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The role of horizontal model grid resolution on the development of the daytime boundary layer over mountainous terrain is studied. A simple idealized valley topography with a cross-valley width of 20 km, a valley depth of 1.5 km, and a constant ...

Johannes S. Wagner; Alexander Gohm; Mathias W. Rotach

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Acoustic Properties of Porous Coatings for Hypersonic Boundary-Layer Control  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Acoustic Properties of Porous Coatings for Hypersonic Boundary-Layer Control Guillaume A. Brès for hypersonic laminar flow control. The reflection coefficient, characterizing the ratio of the reflected wave of incidence, for coatings of different porosities, at various acoustic Reynolds numbers relevant to hypersonic

Dabiri, John O.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "boundary layer clouds" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Effect of Finite-rate Chemical Reactions on Turbulence in Hypersonic Turbulent Boundary Layers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Effect of Finite-rate Chemical Reactions on Turbulence in Hypersonic Turbulent Boundary Layers Lian on future air-breathing hypersonic cruise vehicles will be turbulent and chemically reacting. To aid the design of such vehicles, a greater understanding of turbulent hypersonic flows is needed. Although

MartĂ­n, Pino

122

Direct Numerical Simulation of a Hypersonic Turbulent Boundary Layer on a Large Domain  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Direct Numerical Simulation of a Hypersonic Turbulent Boundary Layer on a Large Domain Stephan Priebe , M. Pino Mart´in The direct numerical simulation (DNS) of a spatially-developing hypersonic There are few studies of hypersonic flows at Mach number greater than 5 and few involve the measurement of mean

MartĂ­n, Pino

123

EUROPEAN CONFERENCE FOR AEROSPACE SCIENCES Shock Wave / Boundary Layer Interactions in Hypersonic  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and a combina- tion of laminar and turbulent (transitional) computations as well as preliminary 3D simulations the impact on the shock / boundary layer interaction and on the size of the shock induced separation. Laminar have been conducted and show the experimental shock-tunnel results to be influenced by transition and 3

124

Performance of an Eddy Diffusivity–Mass Flux Scheme for Shallow Cumulus Boundary Layers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Comparisons between single-column (SCM) simulations with the total energy–mass flux boundary layer scheme (TEMF) and large-eddy simulations (LES) are shown for four cases from the Gulf of Mexico Atmospheric Composition and Climate Study (GoMACCS) ...

Wayne M. Angevine; Hongli Jiang; Thorsten Mauritsen

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

The Minimum Wind Speed for Sustainable Turbulence in the Nocturnal Boundary Layer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The collapse of turbulence in the nocturnal boundary layer is studied by means of a simple bulk model that describes the basic physical interactions in the surface energy balance. It is shown that for a given mechanical forcing, the amount of ...

B. J. H. Van de Wiel; A. F. Moene; H. J. J. Jonker; P. Baas; S. Basu; J. M. M. Donda; J. Sun; A. A. M. Holtslag

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Modeling the Atmospheric Boundary Layer Wind Response to Mesoscale Sea Surface Temperature  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(WRF) and COAMPS atmospheric models. The SST-induced wind response is assessed from eight simulations of the surface wind relative to the SST gradient. #12;3 1. Introduction Positive correlations of local surfaceModeling the Atmospheric Boundary Layer Wind Response to Mesoscale Sea Surface Temperature Natalie

Kurapov, Alexander

127

Shock-like structures in the tropical cyclone boundary layer Gabriel J. Williams,1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the horizontal and vertical velocity data shown by the blue curves in Figure 1. The extreme horizontal wind m in the northeast sector. Since these extreme structures in the boundary layer wind field occur produces a shock-like structure in the radial wind, i.e., near the radius of maximum tangential wind

Schubert, Wayne H.

128

Computation of hypersonic shock boundary layer interaction on a double wedge using a differential Reynolds Stress Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Computation of hypersonic shock boundary layer interaction on a double wedge using a differential The simulation of hypersonic flows presents some difficulties due to the interaction between boundary layers on the standard test case of a subsonic flat plate and on a hypersonic configuration. The results show a good

129

Accumulation mode aerosol, pockets of open cells, and particle nucleation in the remote subtropical Pacific marine boundary layer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Accumulation mode aerosol, pockets of open cells, and particle nucleation in the remote subtropical in the remote subtropical Pacific marine boundary layer, J. Geophys. Res., 111, D02206, doi:10.1029/2004JD005694 the boundary layer via its action on the budgets of heat and water substance. A plausible consequence may

Russell, Lynn

130

Resuspension of Small Particles from Multilayer Deposits in Turbulent Boundary Layers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a hybrid stochastic model for the resuspension of micron-size particles from multilayer deposits in a fully-developed turbulent boundary layer. The rate of removal of particles from any given layer depends upon the rate of removal of particles from the layer above which acts as a source of uncovering and exposure of particles to the resuspending flow. The primary resuspension rate constant for an individual particle within a layer is based on the Rock'n'Roll (R'n'R) model using non-Gaussian statistics for the aerodynamic forces acting on the particles (Zhang et al., 2012). The coupled layer equations that describe multilayer resuspension of all the particles in each layer are based on the generic lattice model of Friess & Yadigaroglu (2001) which is extended here to include the influence of layer coverage and particle size distribution. We consider the influence of layer thickness on the resuspension along with the spread of adhesion within layers, and the statistics of non-Gaussian versus Gaussian removal forces including their timescale. Unlike its weak influence on long-term resuspension rates for monolayers, this timescale plays a crucial and influential role in multilayer resuspension. Finally we compare model predictions with those of a large-scale and a mesoscale resuspension test, STORM (Castelo et al., 1999) and BISE (Alloul-Marmor, 2002).

F. Zhang; M. Reeks; M. Kissane; R. J. Perkins

2012-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

131

Resuspension of small particles from multilayer deposits in turbulent boundary layers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper describes a hybrid kinetic model for the resuspension of micron-size particles from multilayer deposits in a fully developed turbulent boundary layer. The rate of removal of particles from any given layer depends upon the rate of removal of particles from the layer above which acts as a source of uncovering and exposure of particles to the resuspending flow. The primary resuspension rate constant for an individual particle within a layer is based on the Rock'n'Roll (R'n'R) model using non-Gaussian statistics for the aerodynamic removal forces acting on the particles (Zhang et al., 2013). The coupled layer equations that describe multilayer resuspension of all the particles in each layer are based on the generic lattice model of Friess & Yadigaroglu (2001) which is extended here to include the influence of layer coverage and particle size distribution. The model is used to investigate a range of effects, including the influence of layer thickness on resuspension, the spread of inter-particle adhesive forces within layers, Gaussian and non-Gaussian pdfs for the removal forces and the associated timescales. Finally model predictions are compared with data from two resuspension experiments – STORM (Castelo et al., 1999) and BISE (Alloul-Marmor, 2002).

F. Zhang; M.W. Reeks; M.P. Kissane; R.J. Perkins

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

A Study to Investigate Cloud Feedback Processes and Evaluate GCM Cloud Variations Using Statistical Cloud Property Composites From ARM Data  

SciTech Connect

The representation of clouds in Global Climate Models (GCMs) remains a major source of uncertainty in climate change simulations. Cloud climatologies have been widely used to either evaluate climate model cloud fields or examine, in combination with other data sets, climate-scale relationships between cloud properties and dynamical or microphysical parameters. Major cloud climatologies have been based either on satellite observations of cloud properties or on surface observers views of cloud type and amount. Such data sets provide either the top-down view of column-integrated cloud properties (satellites) or the bottom-up view of the cloud field morphology (surface observers). Both satellite-based and surface cloud climatologies have been successfully used to examine cloud properties, to support process studies, and to evaluate climate and weather models. However, they also present certain limitations, since the satellite cloud types are defined using radiative cloud boundaries and surface observations are based on cloud boundaries visible to human observers. As a result, these data sets do not resolve the vertical distribution of cloud layers, an issue that is important in calculating both the radiative and the hydrologic effects of the cloud field. Ground-based cloud radar observations, on the other hand, resolve with good accuracy the vertical distribution of cloud layers and could be used to produce cloud type climatologies with vertical layering information. However, these observations provide point measurements only and it is not immediately clear to what extent they are representative of larger regimes. There are different methods that can be applied to minimize this problem and to produce cloud layering climatologies useful for both cloud process and model evaluation studies. If a radar system is run continuously over a number of years, it eventually samples a large number of dynamical and microphysical regimes. If additional data sets are used to put the cloud layering information into the context of large-scale dynamical regimes, such information can be used to study interactions among cloud vertical distributions and dynamical and microphysical processes and to evaluate the ability of models to simulate those interactions. The U.S. Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program has established several Climate Research Facilities (ACRF) that provide continuous, long-term observations of clouds and radiation. ARM, with its overall goal of improving the treatment of radiation and clouds in climate models has provided unique observing systems for accelerating progress on the representation of cloud processes. In this project, six and a half years (January 1998 to June 2004) of cloud observations collected at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) Oklahoma ACRF were used to produce a cloud-type climatology. The climatology provides cloud amounts for seven different cloud types as well as information on the detailed structure of multi-layer cloud occurrences. Furthermore, the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) model output was used to define the dynamic regimes present during the observations of the cloud conditions by the vertically pointing radars at the SGP ACRF. The cloud-type climatology and the ECMWF SGP data set were then analyzed to examine and map dynamical conditions that favor the creation of single-layer versus multi-layer cloud structures as well as dynamical conditions that favor the occurrence of drizzle in continental stratus clouds. In addition, output from the ECMWF weather model forecasts was analyzed with the objective to compare model and radar derived cloud type statistics, in order to identify the major model deficiencies in cloud vertical distribution and map their seasonal variations. The project included two primary goals. The first was to create a cloud type climatology over the Southern Great Planes site that will show how cloud vertical distribution varies with dynamic and thermodynamic regime and how these variations would affect cloud climate fe

George Tselioudis

2009-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

133

Aircraft Observations of the Marine Boundary Layer Adjustment near Point Arguello, California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.g., Parish 2000). Several authors (e.g., Dorman 1985; Samelson 1992; Burk et al. 1999; Haack et al. 2001) represent the fluid system near the coast in terms of a two-layer shallow water model with the coastal terrain serving as a lateral boundary. The Froude... of the layer. Discontinuities such as hy- draulic jumps can result as the flow transitions from supercritical (Fr. 1) to subcritical (Fr, 1). As the flow in the MBL impinges on coastal points, significant modulation of the MBL height and wind field occurs...

Parish, Thomas R.; Rahn, David A.; Leon, David

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

The effects of sound on the boundary layer of an airfoil at high angles of attack  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

* Numbers in parentheses refer to the References. introducing sound waves into the airstream by means of a variable-frequency oscillator and a loudspeaker mounted near the leading edge of a flat plate. Eventually, another method of producing... these disturbances was settled upon, but several interesting results caused by the use of sound were noted. Laminar boundary layer oscillations could be induced, depending upon the proper combination of sound frequency, speaker position, and free stream velocity...

Hutchinson, Thomas Ira

1963-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Modelling the Effect of Ocean Waves on the Atmospheric and Ocean Boundary Layers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Ocean waves, in addition to generating direct forces on fixed and floating offshore wind generator structures, also have significant indirect effects via their influence on the atmospheric and oceanic boundary layers above and below the water surface. In the atmospheric boundary layer the waves act as roughness elements, influencing the turbulent flow and the vertical wind speed profile, and induce oscillatory motions in the airflow. Spray droplets from breaking wave crests enhance structure corrosion, and may lead to icing under low-temperature conditions. Below the water surface, the air-sea momentum flux and mechanical energy flux, mediated by the waves and wave-generated turbulence, affect the vertical profiles of ocean current, temperature, and salinity. Effects include modifying the structural forces and dynamics, and the movement and dispersion of marine organisms, pollutants, and air bubbles generated by breaking waves, with consequences for fouling, corrosion, and environmental impact. Measurement of relevant airflow and ocean dynamical variables is also challenging, as near the water surface it is often necessary to use instruments mounted on moving measurement platforms. Modelling such boundary-layer effects is a complex task, as a result of feedbacks between the airflow, wave field, current field, and turbulence in the atmosphere and the ocean. We present results from a coupled model study of the North Sea and Norwegian Sea area. We employ a mesoscale atmosphere model (WRF) and a spectral wave model (WAM), running simultaneously and coupled using the open-source coupler MCEL which can interpolate between different model grids and time steps. To investigate the ocean boundary layer, one-dimensional model experiments were performed for an idealized Ekman layer and for locations in the North Sea, Atlantic Ocean, and the northern Pacific, using a version of the GOTM turbulence model, modified to take wave dynamics into account. Results show how the wave field alters the ocean's aerodynamic roughness and the air–sea momentum flux, depending on the relation between the surface wind speed and the propagation speed of the wave crests (the wave age). These effects will feed back into the airflow, wind speed and turbulence profile in the boundary layer. The ocean dynamics experiments showed results which compare favourably with field observations from the LOTUS3 and PROVESS experiments in the north Atlantic and North Sea, and Ocean Weather Station Papa in the Pacific Ocean.

Alastair D. Jenkins; Mostafa Bakhoday Paskyabi; Ilker Fer; Alok Gupta; Muralidhar Adakudlu

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Unexpected vertical wind speed profiles in the boundary layer over the southern North Sea  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Shallow atmospheric internal boundary layers over the southern part of the North Sea are common. Analysis of one year of meteorological data from the FINO1 research platform in the German Bight reveals that vertical wind speed profiles frequently do not conform to the expected modified logarithmic profile of Monin–Obukhov similarity theory. The wind profiles are mostly characterized by local maxima or kinks within the first 100 m over the sea surface. The data reveals the most frequent occurrence of a single maximum, but multiple maxima are often present, and there are sometimes even reversed profiles with the wind speed decreasing with height. The expected modified logarithmic profile occurs for a minority of cases. The evidence suggests the frequent presence of internal boundary layers that propagate from coastal land masses that surround the North Sea. A census of vertical wind speed profiles is presented that shows how different inflection states are linked with wind speed and atmospheric stability. The kinks are most prevalent in the upper part of the measurement range near the 100 m hub height of modern offshore the wind turbines, so that internal boundary layers represent a possible concern for the offshore wind energy industry in the North Sea region.

Anthony J. Kettle

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Cloud Computing Fundamentals  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the introductory chapter we define the concept of cloud computing and cloud services, and we introduce layers and types of cloud computing. We discuss the differences between cloud computing and cloud servi...

Borko Furht

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Observations of the Evolution of the Nocturnal and Convective Boundary Layers and the Structure of Open-Celled Convection on 14 June 2002  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Boundary Layer Evolution (BLE) missions of the International H2O Project (IHOP_2002) were designed to provide comprehensive observations of the distribution of water vapor in the quiescent boundary layer and its evolution during the early ...

Lindsay J. Bennett; Tammy M. Weckwerth; Alan M. Blyth; Bart Geerts; Qun Miao; Yvette P. Richardson

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

34th AIAA Fluid Dynamics Conference and Exhibit, June 28July 1, 2004/Portland, OR DNS of Hypersonic Turbulent Boundary Layers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Hypersonic Turbulent Boundary Layers M. Pino Martin Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering and hypersonic turbu- lent boundary layers. The systematic procedure for initializing the turbulent flow fields layers is important in advancing supersonic and hypersonic flight technology. In a high-speed boundary

MartĂ­n, Pino

140

Continuous daily observation of the marine atmospheric boundary layer over the Kuroshio current by a helicopter shuttle service  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We describe a new initiative in which in-situ observations of the marine atmospheric boundary layer (MABL) are made by a helicopter shuttle connecting six islands south of Tokyo. This observation method aims to make frequent measurements of ...

Youichi Tanimoto; Kou Shimoyama; Shoichi Mori

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "boundary layer clouds" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

The Effect of Heavy Oil Viscosity Reduction by Solvent Dissolution on Natural Convection in the Boundary Layer of VAPEX  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We have studied the effect of viscosity on natural convection in the boundary layer of the vapor extraction (VAPEX) process. VAPEX is a heavy oil recovery method that uses solvents to reduce oil viscosity, and...

Mohammad Javaheri; Jalal Abedi

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

A Climatological Study of Boundary Layer Wind Speed Using a Meso-?-Scale Higher-Order Closure Model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A mesoscale higher-order closure atmospheric boundary layer model has been used to get more detailed information than is possible from observations regarding horizontal and vertical variations of the wind in an area in southeastern Sweden. To ...

Hans Bergström

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Effect of Finite Spatial Resolution on the Turbulent Energy Spectrum Measured in the Coastal Ocean Bottom Boundary Layer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The effect of finite spatial resolution on the measured energy spectrum is examined via a parametric study using in situ particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurements performed in the bottom boundary layer on the Atlantic continental shelf. Two-...

Erin E. Hackett; Luksa Luznik; Joseph Katz; Thomas R. Osborn

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Doppler Lidar–Based Wind-Profile Measurement System for Offshore Wind-Energy and Other Marine Boundary Layer Applications  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Accurate measurement of wind speed profiles aloft in the marine boundary layer is a difficult challenge. The development of offshore wind energy requires accurate information on wind speeds above the surface at least at the levels occupied by ...

Yelena L. Pichugina; Robert M. Banta; W. Alan Brewer; Scott P. Sandberg; R. Michael Hardesty

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Preliminary Results from Long-Term Measurements of Atmospheric Moisture in the Marine Boundary Layer in the Gulf of Mexico*  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Measurements of boundary layer moisture have been acquired from Rotronic MP-100 sensors deployed on two National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) buoys in the northern Gulf of Mexico from June through November 1993. For one sensor that was retrieved ...

Laurence C. Breaker; David B. Gilhousen; Lawrence D. Burroughs

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Glacial Cooling in the Tropics: Exploring the Roles of Tropospheric Water Vapor, Surface Wind Speed, and Boundary Layer Processes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper is a modeling study of possible roles for tropospheric water vapor, surface wind speed, and boundary layer processes in glacial cooling in the Tropics. The authors divide the Tropics into a region of persistent deep convection and a ...

Richard Seager; Amy C. Clement; Mark A. Cane

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

A Comparison Between Boundary Layer Measurements in a Laminar Separation Bubble Flow and Linear Stability Theory Calculations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This research examines the details of the boundary layer flowfield from wind tunnel measurements of a two-dimensional Liebeck LA2573A airfoil over a range of Reynolds numbers from 235000 to 500000. In this range,...

P. LeBlanc; R. Blackwelder; R. Liebeck

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Characteristics of wind speed and wind direction in the atmospheric boundary layer on the southern coast of Bulgaria  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The characteristics of wind speed and wind direction in the boundary atmospheric layer measured ... meteorological station. The sodar measurement data on wind parameters at different heights in different months ....

M. A. Novitskii; L. K. Kulizhnikova…

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Highly Accurate Solutions of the Blasius and Falkner-Skan Boundary Layer Equations via Convergence Acceleration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A new highly accurate algorithm for the solution of the Falkner-Skan equation of boundary layer theory is presented. The algorithm, based on a Maclaurin series representation, finds its coefficients from recurrence. In addition, Wynn-epsilon convergence acceleration and continuous analytical continuation enable an accurate evaluation. The most accurate skin friction coefficients (shooting angle) to date are presented along with comparisons to past and present values found in the literature. The algorithm, coded in FORTRAN, uses neither enhanced precision arithmetic beyond quadruple precision nor computer algebra to achieve results in a timely fashion. Key Words: Falkner-Skan flow; Blasius flow; Wynn-epsilon acceleration; Romberg acceleration; Continuous analytical continuation

B. D. Ganapol

2010-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

150

Planetary boundary layer depth in Global climate models induced biases in surface climatology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Earth has warmed in the last century with the most rapid warming occurring near the surface in the arctic. This enhanced surface warming in the Arctic is partly because the extra heat is trapped in a thin layer of air near the surface due to the persistent stable-stratification found in this region. The warming of the surface air due to the extra heat depends upon the amount of turbulent mixing in the atmosphere, which is described by the depth of the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL). In this way the depth of the ABL determines the effective response of the surface air temperature to perturbations in the climate forcing. The ABL depth can vary from tens of meters to a few kilometers which presents a challenge for global climate models which cannot resolve the shallower layers. Here we show that the uncertainties in the depth of the ABL can explain up to 60 percent of the difference between the simulated and observed surface air temperature trends and 50 percent of the difference in temperature variability...

Davy, Richard

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Model of the boundary layer of a vacuum-arc magnetic filter  

SciTech Connect

A model is developed to describe the electrostatic boundary layer in a positively biased magnetic filter in filtered arcs with low collisionality. The set of equations used includes the electron momentum equation, with an anomalous collision term due to micro-instabilities leading to Bohm diffusion, electron mass conservation, and Poisson equation. Analytical solutions are obtained, valid for the regimes of interest, leading to an explicit expression to determine the electron density current to the filter wall as a function of the potential of the filter and the ratio of electron density at the plasma to that at the filter wall. Using a set of planar and cylindrical probes it is verified experimentally that the mentioned ratio of electron densities remains reasonably constant for different magnetic field values and probe bias, which allows to obtain a closed expression for the current. Comparisons are made with the experimentally determined current collected at different sections of a positively biased straight filter.

Minotti, F.; Giuliani, L.; Grondona, D.; Della Torre, H.; Kelly, H. [Departamento de Fisica, FCEyN, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Instituto de Fisica del Plasma, CONICET-UBA, Cdad. Universitaria, Pab.I, 1428 Buenos Aires (Argentina)

2013-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

152

Pulsed Plasma with Synchronous Boundary Voltage for Rapid Atomic Layer Etching  

SciTech Connect

Atomic Layer ETching (ALET) of a solid with monolayer precision is a critical requirement for advancing nanoscience and nanotechnology. Current plasma etching techniques do not have the level of control or damage-free nature that is needed for patterning delicate sub-20 nm structures. In addition, conventional ALET, based on pulsed gases with long reactant adsorption and purging steps, is very slow. In this work, novel pulsed plasma methods with synchronous substrate and/or “boundary electrode” bias were developed for highly selective, rapid ALET. Pulsed plasma and tailored bias voltage waveforms provided controlled ion energy and narrow energy spread, which are critical for highly selective and damage-free etching. The broad goal of the project was to investigate the plasma science and engineering that will lead to rapid ALET with monolayer precision. A combined experimental-simulation study was employed to achieve this goal.

Economou, Demetre J.; Donnelly, Vincent M.

2014-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

153

Electron distributions observed with Langmuir waves in the plasma sheet boundary layer  

SciTech Connect

The present paper investigates the Langmuir turbulence driven by counter-streaming electron beams and its plausible association with observed features in the Earth's plasma sheet boundary layer region. A one-dimensional electrostatic particle-in-cell simulation code is employed in order to simulate broadband electrostatic waves with characteristic frequency in the vicinity of the electron plasma frequency ?/?{sub pe}?1.0. The present simulation confirms that the broadband electrostatic waves may indeed be generated by the counter-streaming electron beams. It is also found that the observed feature associated with low energy electrons, namely quasi-symmetric velocity space plateaus, are replicated according to the present simulation. However, the present investigation only partially succeeds in generating the suprathermal tails such that the origin of observed quasi power-law energetic population formation remains outstanding.

Hwang, Junga [Solar and Space Weather Research Group, Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute, Daejeon 305-348 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Astronomy and Space Science, University of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Rha, Kicheol [Department of Physics, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Seough, Jungjoon [Solar and Space Weather Research Group, Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute, Daejeon 305-348 (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Peter H. [School of Space Research, Kyung Hee University, Yongin-Si, Gyeonggi-Do 446-701 (Korea, Republic of); Institute for Physical Science and Technology, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States)

2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

154

Boundary layer flow and heat transfer analysis of a second-grade fluid  

SciTech Connect

Boundary layer flow and heat transfer analysis of a homogeneous, incompressible, non-Newtonian fluid of grade two at a stagnation point is presented. The flow is assumed to be steady and laminar. A power-law representation is assumed for the velocity distribution and wall temperature variation. The governing equations are solved using an iterative central difference approximation method in a non-uniform grid domain. This analysis show the effect of non-Newtonian nature of the fluid and the effect of suction/injection on the velocity profile. The effect of non-Newtonian nature of the fluid on the heat transfer coefficient at the wall for different values of Prandtl number and wall-temperature variation is also presented. (VC)

Massoudi, M. [USDOE Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center, PA (United States); Ramezan, M. [Burns and Roe Services Corp., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

3. New Cloud Climatology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

New Cloud Climatology New Cloud Climatology Computed for the summers (May-Au- gust) 2000 through 2004 (Berg and Kassianov 2008). Uses ARSCL VAP, Total Sky Imager, and radar wind profiler. * * Initial Evaluation of the Cumulus Potential Scheme at the ACRF SGP Site Larry Berg, William Gustafson, and Evgueni Kassianov Pacific Northwest National Laboratory 1. Motivation Shallow clouds are poorly predicted by current global and regional scale models. A new parameterization has been devel- oped that links the boundary-layer turbu- lence and the shallow clouds. 2. The CuP Parameterization The Cumulus Potential (CuP) param- eterization uses Probability Density Functions (PDFs) of temperature and moisture to represent the subgrid scale

156

Climate zones for maritime clouds  

SciTech Connect

In this paper we use a commercially available lidar ceilometer to investigate how the basic structure of marine boundary-layer clouds varies for four different marine climate regimes. We obtained most of the data used in this analysis from ship-based ceilometer measurements recorded during several different atmospheric and oceanographic field programs conducted in the Atlantic and Pacific oceans. For comparison, we show the results obtained at a mid-latitude continental location and at an ice camp on the Arctic ice shelf. For each analyzed case, we use an extended time series to generate meaningful cloud base and cloud fraction statistics. The Vaisala CT 12K ceilometer uses a GaAs diode laser to produce short (150 ns), high-intensity pulses of infrared radiation (904 nm wavelength). The return signals from a large number of consecutive pulses are coherently summed to boost the signal-to-noise ratio. Each resulting 30-s profile of backscattered power (15-m resolution) is analyzed to detect cloud layers using a specified cloud detection limit. In addition to measurements of cloud base, the ceilometer can also provide information on cloud fraction using a time series of the {open_quotes}cloud{close_quotes} or {open_quotes} no cloud{close_quotes} status reported in the 30-s data.

White, A.B.; Ruffieux, D. [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States); [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Boulder, CO (United States); Fairall, C.W. [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Boulder, CO (United States)

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Boundary-Layer Meteorol (2008) 127:7395 DOI 10.1007/s10546-007-9255-9  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-scale (SFS) models to reproduce the statistical proper- ties of SFS stresses and energy transfers over boundary layer. In this study, several SFS models are evaluated a priori using experimental data acquired down- wind of a rough-to-smooth transition in a wind tunnel. The SFS models studied include the eddy

Porté-Agel, Fernando

158

Wind profile above the surface boundary layer S.-E. Gryning (1), E. Batchvarova (2) and B. Brmmer (3)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wind profile above the surface boundary layer S.-E. Gryning (1), E. Batchvarova (2) and B. BrĂĽmmer in predictions of the wind profile in the lowest hundreds me- ters of the atmosphere, being connected to the general increase in height of structures such as bridges, high houses and wind turbines. The hub height

159

IMPACT OF BOUNDARY-LAYER CUTTING AND FLOW CONDITIONING ON FREE-SURFACE BEHAVIOR IN TURBULENT LIQUID SHEETS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

IMPACT OF BOUNDARY-LAYER CUTTING AND FLOW CONDITIONING ON FREE-SURFACE BEHAVIOR IN TURBULENT LIQUID dimension) = 1 cm into ambient air are compared with empirical correlations at a nearly prototypical term, for a well- conditioned jet but is not a substitute for well-designed flow conditioning. I

California at San Diego, University of

160

Measurement of Vertical Kinetic Energy and Vertical Velocity Skewness in Oceanic Boundary Layers by Imperfectly Lagrangian Floats  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The effects of upward buoyancy on the accuracy with which Lagrangian floats can measure the Eulerian mean variance ?ww?E and skewness SwE of vertical fluid velocity w in the wind-driven upper-ocean boundary layer is investigated using both ...

Ramsey R. Harcourt; Eric A. D’Asaro

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "boundary layer clouds" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Open-loop control of noise amplification in a separated boundary layer flow  

SciTech Connect

Linear optimal gains are computed for the subcritical two-dimensional separated boundary-layer flow past a bump. Very large optimal gain values are found, making it possible for small-amplitude noise to be strongly amplified and to destabilize the flow. The optimal forcing is located close to the summit of the bump, while the optimal response is the largest in the shear layer. The largest amplification occurs at frequencies corresponding to eigenvalues which first become unstable at higher Reynolds number. Nonlinear direct numerical simulations show that a low level of noise is indeed sufficient to trigger random flow unsteadiness, characterized here by large-scale vortex shedding. Next, a variational technique is used to compute efficiently the sensitivity of optimal gains to steady control (through source of momentum in the flow, or blowing/suction at the wall). A systematic analysis at several frequencies identifies the bump summit as the most sensitive region for control with wall actuation. Based on these results, a simple open-loop control strategy is designed, with steady wall suction at the bump summit. Linear calculations on controlled base flows confirm that optimal gains can be drastically reduced at all frequencies. Nonlinear direct numerical simulations also show that this control allows the flow to withstand a higher level of stochastic noise without becoming nonlinearly unstable, thereby postponing bypass transition. In the supercritical regime, sensitivity analysis of eigenvalues supports the choice of this control design. Full restabilization of the flow is obtained, as evidenced by direct numerical simulations and linear stability analysis.

Boujo, E., E-mail: edouard.boujo@epfl.ch; Gallaire, F., E-mail: francois.gallaire@epfl.ch [Laboratory of Fluid Mechanics and Instabilities, École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Ehrenstein, U., E-mail: ehrenstein@irphe.univ-mrs.fr [Aix Marseille Université, CNRS, Centrale Marseille, IRPHE UMR 7342, F-13384 Marseille (France)

2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

162

Particle resuspension in turbulent boundary layers and the influence of non-Gaussian removal forces  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The work described is concerned with the way micron-size particles attached to a surface are resuspended when exposed to a turbulent flow. An improved version of the Rock’n’Roll model (Reeks & Hall, 2001) is developed where this model employs a stochastic approach to resuspension involving the rocking and rolling of a particle about surface asperities arising from the moments of the fluctuating drag forces acting on the particle close to the surface. In this work, the model is improved by using values of both the streamwise fluid velocity and acceleration close to the wall obtained from Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) of turbulent channel flow. Using analysis and numerical calculations of the drag force on a sphere near a wall in shear flow (O’Neill, 1968; Lee & Balachandar, 2010) these values are used to obtain the joint distribution of the moments of the fluctuating drag force f(t) and its derivative f ? ( t ) acting on a particle attached to a surface. In so doing the influence of highly non-Gaussian forces (associated with the sweeping and ejection events in a turbulent boundary layer) on short and long term resuspension rates is examined for a sparse monolayer coverage of particles, along with the dependence of the resuspension upon the timescale of the particle motion attached to the surface, the ratio of the rms/mean of the removal force and the distribution of adhesive forces. Model predictions of the fraction resuspended are compared with experimental results.

F. Zhang; M. Reeks; M. Kissane

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Experimental study of acoustic radiation from a boundary layer transition region  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Wall pressurefluctuations were measured on a rigid axisymmetric body in the CEPRA 19 low?noise anechoic wind tunnel using flush?mounted microphones placed from the laminar region to the fully turbulent boundary layer. Microphones placed in the laminar flow region are used to detect noise radiated from the transition region which occurs naturally without separation under a slightly positive pressure gradient. Cross?spectral analyses show upstream acoustic propagation in a very wide frequency band 4–30 kHz detected in the laminar region. A method of conditional analysis is then used to establish the sequence of events from the onset of near?harmonic instability wave packets to the generation about 10 ms later of turbulent spots leading to the acoustic emission. This intermittent acoustic radiation is detected in the nearfield for wind velocities ranging from 20–70 ms. Farfield detection was not achieved probably because of instrument limitations and propagation effects. [Work supported by DRET Direction des Recherches et Etudes Techniques.

J. C. Perraud; A. Julienne

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Stability and Turbulence in the Atmospheric Boundary Layer: A Comparison of Remote Sensing and Tower Observations  

SciTech Connect

When monitoring winds and atmospheric stability for wind energy applications, remote sensing instruments present some advantages to in-situ instrumentation such as larger vertical extent, in some cases easy installation and maintenance, measurements of vertical humidity profiles throughout the boundary layer, and no restrictions on prevailing wind directions. In this study, we compare remote sensing devices, Windcube lidar and microwave radiometer, to meteorological in-situ tower measurements to demonstrate the accuracy of these measurements and to assess the utility of the remote sensing instruments in overcoming tower limitations. We compare temperature and wind observations, as well as calculations of Brunt-Vaisala frequency and Richardson numbers for the instrument deployment period in May-June 2011 at the U.S. Department of Energy National Renewable Energy Laboratory's National Wind Technology Center near Boulder, Colorado. The study reveals that a lidar and radiometer measure wind and temperature with the same accuracy as tower instruments, while also providing advantages for monitoring stability and turbulence. We demonstrate that the atmospheric stability is determined more accurately when the liquid-water mixing ratio derived from the vertical humidity profile is considered under moist-adiabatic conditions.

Friedrich, K.; Lundquist, J. K.; Aitken, M.; Kalina, E. A.; Marshall, R. F.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

ISLAND AND SHIP TRAIL CLOUDS: THE ROSETTA STONE OF CLOUDS, POLLUTION, AND CLIMATE?  

SciTech Connect

Cloud/Climate Feedback is a combination of words known to be important but extremely difficult to quantify or even assign a direction. A 4 % increase in boundary layer clouds would cool the earth as much as a doubling of CO{sub 2} would warm it (Randall et al, 1984). Studies have shown that warmer sea surface temperatures are associated with fewer clouds (Oreopoulos and Davies, 1992). We do not know how much of this effect is due to direct solar warming of surface water in the absence of clouds. We also know there are more eastern ocean marine boundary layer clouds in summer than winter. Do warmer sea surface temperatures or more summer-like conditions best represent global warming? Twomey, 1974 has proposed that increasing aerosol pollution would lead to brighter clouds (indirect aerosol effect). This relationship does have determined sign (i.e. cooling) but is very difficult to quantify. Cloud trails from ships and islands hold the potential of addressing Cloud/Climate Feedback by observing atmospheric response to large perturbations in turbulence and aerosol. However, before cloud trails can be used as a Rosetta Stone connecting pollution and climate, much more needs to be understood about the micro- and macrophysics of cloud trails.

W. PORCH; S. WINIECKI; L. O'STEEN

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

A Global Climatology of Single-Layer and Overlapped Clouds and their Optical Properties Developed Using a New Algorithm Applied to Terra/MODIS Data  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Global Climatology of Single-Layer and Overlapped Global Climatology of Single-Layer and Overlapped Clouds and their Optical Properties Developed Using a New Algorithm Applied to Terra/MODIS Data F.-L. Chang and Z. Li Earth System Science Interdisciplinary Center University of Maryland College Park, Maryland Z. Li Department of Meteorology University of Maryland College Park, Maryland Introduction To date, weather satellites are the only tool to measure cloud and climate variables on a global scale, an objective addressed by the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) (Rossow and Schiffer 1991; Rossow and Schiffer 1999). However, there is a dearth of information concerning the global climatology of cloud vertical structure and cirrus cloud properties. This is because the often-used

167

DOE/SC-ARM/TR-132 Planetary Boundary Layer (PBL) Height Value  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

determination of the PBL height in models can significantly impact the formation and maintenance of low-level clouds (Zeng et al. 2004). Routine estimates of PBL height are useful...

168

Boundary-Layer Stability and Transition on a Flared Cone in a Mach 6 Quiet Wind Tunnel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

quality features. .................................. 31? 2?4 Upstream settling chamber flow conditioning components. .............................. 31? 2?5 Cross-section of contraction?nozzle assembly, with bleed lip and plenum. ...... 33? 3?1 Cross... by maximizing the laminar extent of the nozzle-wall boundary layer. After much research, success was achieved with a design as depicted by Figure 1?5(b). A bleed slot is employed upstream of the nozzle throat for the extraction of the contraction...

Hofferth, Jerrod William

2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

169

Nitric oxide emissions from the high-temperature viscous boundary layers of hypersonic aircraft within the stratosphere  

SciTech Connect

The authors study the nitric oxide emission characteristics of supersonic aircraft resulting from heating of viscous boundary layers along the skin of the aircraft. Previous study has concentrated on nitric oxide emissions coming from combustion products from the scramjet engines. This work shows that above mach 8, emissions from viscous heating become a significant factor in total emission of nitric oxide. Above mach 16 it becomes the dominant source of emission.

Brooks, S.B.; Lewis, M.J.; Dickerson, R.R. [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States)

1993-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

170

Time-dependent laser ignition of a combustible stagnant boundary layer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......research-article Articles Time-dependent laser ignition of a combustible stagnant boundary...55,257-268 Time-dependent laser ignition of a combustible stagnant boundary...examines the conditions for laser ignition of a number of industrial gases......

J. ADLER

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Dynamical Model Simulation of the Morning Boundary Layer Development in Deep Mountain Valleys  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A dry, two-dimensional version of the Colorado State University Multi-dimensional Cloud/Mesoscale Model was used to study the cross-valley evolution of the wind and temperature structures in an idealized east-west oriented mountain valley. Two ...

David C. Bader; Thomas B. Mckee

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Friction of a slider on a granular layer: Non-monotonic thickness dependence and effect of boundary conditions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate the effective friction encountered by a mass sliding on a granular layer as a function of bed thickness and boundary roughness conditions. The observed friction has minima for a small number of layers before it increases and saturates to a value which depends on the roughness of the sliding surface. We use an index-matched interstitial liquid to probe the internal motion of the grains with fluorescence imaging in a regime where the liquid has no significant effect on the measured friction. The shear profiles obtained as a function of depth show decrease in slip near the sliding surface as the layer thickness is increased. We propose that the friction depends on the degree of grain confinement relative to the sliding surfaces.

Saloome Siavoshi; Ashish V. Orpe; Arshad Kudrolli

2005-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

173

Seismic and gravitational studies of melting in the mantle's thermal boundary layers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis presents three studies which apply geophysical tools to the task of better understanding mantle melting phenomena at the upper and lower boundaries of the mantle. The first study uses seafloor bathymetry and ...

Van Ark, Emily M

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Clouds, Aerosols and Precipitation in  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the Marine Boundary Layer (CAP-MBL) Graciosa Island, Azores, NE Atlantic Ocean Graciosa Island, Azores, NE Atlantic Ocean May 2009-December 2010 May 2009-December 2010 Rob Wood, University of Washington Rob Wood, University of Washington AMF Deployment Team Thanks to Mark Miller: AMF Site Scientist Mark Miller: AMF Site Scientist Kim Nitschke: AMF Site Manager CAP-MBL Proposal Team Importance of Low-Clouds for Climate Imperative that we understand the processes controlling the formation, maintenance and dissipation of low clouds in order to formation, maintenance and dissipation of low clouds in order to improve their representation in climate models. Which clouds matter for climate sensitivity? Cli t F db k

175

Large-Eddy Simulation of Stratified Turbulence. Part II: Application of the Stretched-Vortex Model to the Atmospheric Boundary Layer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The buoyancy-adjusted stretched-vortex subgrid-scale (SGS) model is assessed for a number of large-eddy simulations (LESs) corresponding to diverse atmospheric boundary layer conditions. The cases considered are free convection, a moderately ...

Georgios Matheou; Daniel Chung

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Separation of climatological imprints of the Kuroshio Extension and Oyashio fronts on the wintertime atmospheric boundary layer: Their sensitivity to SST resolution prescribed for atmospheric reanalysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Mesoscale structures of the wintertime marine atmospheric boundary layer (MABL) as climatological imprints of oceanic fronts within the Kuroshio-Oyashio Extension (KOE) region east of Japan are investigated, by taking advantage of high horizontal ...

Ryusuke Masunaga; Hisashi Nakamura; Takafumi Miyasaka; Kazuaki Nishii; Youichi Tanimoto

177

A Numerical Study of the Evolving Convective Boundary Layer and Orographic Circulation around the Santa Catalina Mountains in Arizona. Part I: Circulation without Deep Convection  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The daytime evolution of the thermally forced boundary layer (BL) circulation over an isolated mountain, about 30 km in diameter and 2 km high, is examined by means of numerical simulations validated with data collected in the Cumulus ...

J. Cory Demko; Bart Geerts

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

The effect of tangential mass addition on the boundary layer velocity distribution of a flat plate at zero angle of attack  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. V . RESULTS AND DISCUSSION 16 18 20 21 24 Boundary Layer Conditions Downstream of Blowing Slot . Boundary Layer Conditions Upstream of Slot Accuracy of Data 24 40 47 VI. CONCLUSIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS ~ 51 LITERATURE CITED 54 APPENDIX... 55 Estimation of Error Caused by Leaks in the Pressure Measuring System 56 LIST OF FIGURES Figure Page 3" x 48" Smoke Tunnel 2. Flat Plate Model 3. Schematic of Pressure System 4. Volume Flow Rates of Working Pipe Tap Orifice 14 Variation...

Miller, Edward Peter

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

179

Process-model Simulations of Cloud Albedo Enhancement by Aerosols in the Arctic  

SciTech Connect

A cloud-resolving model is used to simulate the effectiveness of Arctic marine cloud brightening via injection of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). An updated cloud microphysical scheme is employed, with prognostic CCN and cloud particle numbers in both liquid and mixed-phase marine low clouds. Injection of CCN into the marine boundary layer can delay the collapse of the boundary layer and increase low-cloud albedo. Because nearly all of the albedo effects are in the liquid phase due to the removal of ice water by snowfall when ice processes are involved, albedo increases are stronger for pure liquid clouds than mixed-phase clouds. Liquid precipitation can be suppressed by CCN injection, whereas ice precipitation (snow) is affected less; thus the effectiveness of brightening mixed-phase clouds is lower than for liquid-only clouds. CCN injection into a clean regime results in a greater albedo increase than injection into a polluted regime, consistent with current knowledge about aerosol-cloud interactions. Unlike previous studies investigating warm clouds, dynamical changes in circulation due to precipitation changes are small.

Kravitz, Benjamin S.; Wang, Hailong; Rasch, Philip J.; Morrison, H.; Solomon, Amy

2014-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

180

A Lagrangian stochastic model for estimating the high order statistics of a fluctuating plume in the neutral boundary layer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We use a Lagrangian stochastic micromixing model to predict the concentration fluctuations of a continuous release in a neutral boundary layer. We present the computational algorithm that implements the interaction by exchange with the conditional mean model and we compare the numerical solutions with the experimental values in order to evaluate the reliability of the model. The influence of the source size on the concentration probability density function in the near and far-field is discussed and some shortcomings of the model are pointed out.

Massimo Marro; Chiara Nironi; Pietro Salizzoni; Lionel Soulhac

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "boundary layer clouds" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Experimental development of the predictive relations for the eddy exchange coefficients for momentum and heat in the atmospheric boundary layer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, increase in w by removing the dummy -1 bases was 4. 2 cm/sec , and u for these runs was 330 cm/sec -I ?? Using sin [w/u] as a measure of the tilt of the wind field gave an inclination of . 72', in fair agreement with KAIMAL's relation. Therefore.... '?'illlam H. Clayton Direct measurements of the eddy fluxes of mo. . . entum and heat were. made in the atmospheric boundary layer simultaneously with measurements of the profiles of average wind velocity and tempera- ture to evaluate the capability...

Jensen, Paul Alfred

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

182

Microstructure of Josephson junctions: Effect on supercurrent transport in YBCO grain boundary and barrier layer junctions  

SciTech Connect

The electric transport of high-temperature superconductors, such as YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7{minus}x} (YBCO), can be strongly restricted by the presence of high-angle grain boundaries (GB). This weak-link behavior is governed by the macroscopic GB geometry and the microscopic grain boundary structure and composition at the atomic level. Whereas grain boundaries present a considerable impediment to high current applications of high T{sub c} materials, there is considerable commercial interest in exploiting the weak-link-nature of grain boundaries for the design of microelectronic devices, such as superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs). The Josephson junctions which form the basis of this technology can also be formed by introducing artificial barriers into the superconductor. The authors have examined both types of Josephson junctions by EM techniques in an effort to understand the connection between microstructure/chemistry and electrical transport properties. This knowledge is a valuable resource for the design and production of improved devices.

Merkle, K.L.; Huang, Y.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Alternate Designs of Ultrasonic Absorptive Coatings for Hypersonic Boundary Layer Control  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-wall boundary condition. A particular case with a relatively shallow cavities and very high porosity showed number, wawb/µw Re Reynolds number, eUe/µe s Cavity spacing T Temperature t Time U Freestream streamwise of thermal protection systems (TPS).2,3 State-of- the-art active and reactive lam- inar flow control (LFC

Dabiri, John O.

184

Atmospheric Environment 34 (2000) 2851}2863 Resolution of pollutant concentrations in the boundary layer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Atmospheric Environment 34 (2000) 2851}2863 Resolution of pollutant concentrations in the boundary 1999 Abstract This paper investigates the solution of a 3D atmospheric dispersion problem using a time to solve the atmospheric di!usion equation. Preliminary studies of dispersion from a single source

Utah, University of

185

An Examination of Configurations for Using Infrared to Measure Boundary Layer Transition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

reflections are the driving issues in designing an IR system for detecting transition. Aluminum has a high thermal diffusivity so is a poor choice for this method. However, its performance can be improved using an insulating layer. Internal fluid circulation...

Freels, Justin Reed

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

186

Modeling scatterers embedded in plane?layered media by a hybrid Haskell?Thompson and boundary integral equation method  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A hybrid Haskell?Thompson and Boundary IntegralEquation (BIE) method is formulated which can model the acoustic and elastic response of scatterers embedded in plane?layered media. The scatterers can have an arbitrary smooth shape but must not intersect layer interfaces. The Green's function of the scatterer is computed by BIEs in the (x z w) domain and the Green's functions of the layers is computed by a Haskell?Thompson method in the (kx z w) domain. Their fields are coupled by the appropriate combination of FFTs and extrapolation operators and are finally summed up in a Born series. For notational convenience this hybrid method will be called a Generalized Born Series (GBS) method. Two advantages of the GBS method are (1) it is more efficient than finite elements or finite differences for small scatterers embedded in thickly layered media; and (2) no artificial side reflections are generated from the infinitely extended plane interfaces. The disadvantages are (1) the convergence rate of the GBS depends on the model and is unknown a priori; and (2) the computation time increases with the size of the scatterer. [Work supported by MIDAS a consortium of oil and geophysical companies.

Gerard T. Schuster; Lance Smith

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Modeling scatterers embedded in plane?layered media by a hybrid Haskell–Thomson and boundary integral equation method  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A hybrid Haskell–Thomson and boundary integralequation (BIE) method is formulated which can model the acoustic or elastic response of scatterers embedded in plane?layered media. The scatterers can have an arbitrary smooth shape but must not intersect layer interfaces. The Green’s function of the scatterer is computed by BIEs in the (x z ?) domain and the Green’s function of the layers is computed by a Haskell–Thomson method in the (k x z ?) domain. Their fields are coupled by the appropriate combination of FFTs and extrapolation operators and are finally summed up in a Born series. For notational convenience this hybrid method will be called a generalized Born series (GBS) method. Two advantages of the GBS method are (1) it is more efficient than finite elements or finite differences for small scatterers embedded in thickly layered media and (2) no artificial side reflections are generated from the infinitely extended plane interfaces. The disadvantages are (1) the convergence rate of the GBS depends on the model and is unknown a p r i o r i and (2) the computation time increases with the size of the scatterer.

Gerard T. Schuster; Lance C. Smith

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Wake Turbulence of Two NREL 5-MW Wind Turbines Immersed in a Neutral Atmospheric Boundary-Layer Flow  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The fluid dynamics video considers an array of two NREL 5-MW turbines separated by seven rotor diameters in a neutral atmospheric boundary layer (ABL). The neutral atmospheric boundary-layer flow data were obtained from a precursor ABL simulation using a Large-Eddy Simulation (LES) framework within OpenFOAM. The mean wind speed at hub height is 8m/s, and the surface roughness is 0.2m. The actuator line method (ALM) is used to model the wind turbine blades by means of body forces added to the momentum equation. The fluid dynamics video shows the root and tip vortices emanating from the blades from various viewpoints. The vortices become unstable and break down into large-scale turbulent structures. As the wakes of the wind turbines advect further downstream, smaller-scale turbulence is generated. It is apparent that vortices generated by the blades of the downstream wind turbine break down faster due to increased turbulence levels generated by the wake of the upstream wind turbine.

Bashioum, Jessica L; Schmitz, Sven; Duque, Earl P N

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

A novel Whole Air Sample Profiler (WASP) for the quantification of volatile organic compounds in the boundary layer  

SciTech Connect

The emission and fate of reactive VOCs is of inherent interest to those studying chemical biosphere-atmosphere interactions. In-canopy VOC observations are obtainable using tower-based samplers, but the lack of suitable sampling systems for the full boundary 5 layer has limited the data characterizing the vertical structure of such gases above the canopy height and still in the boundary layer. This is the important region where many reactive VOCs are oxidized or otherwise removed. Here we describe an airborne sampling system designed to collect a vertical profile of air into a 3/800 OD tube 150m in length. The inlet ram air pressure is used to flow sampled air through the 10 tube, which results in a varying flow rate based on aircraft speed and altitude. Since aircraft velocity decreases during ascent, it is necessary to account for the variable flow rate into the tube. This is accomplished using a reference gas that is pulsed into the air stream so that the precise altitude of the collected air can be reconstructed post-collection. The pulsed injections are also used to determine any significant effect 15 from diffusion/mixing within the sampling tube, either during collection or subsequent extraction for gas analysis. This system has been successfully deployed, and we show some measured vertical profiles of isoprene and its oxidation products methacrolein and methyl vinyl ketone from a mixed canopy near Columbia, Missouri.

Mak, J. E.; Su, L.; Guenther, Alex B.; Karl, Thomas G.

2013-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

190

Use of shear-stress-sensitive, temperature-insensitive liquid crystals for hypersonic boundary-layer transition detection  

SciTech Connect

The use of shear-stress-sensitive, temperature-insensitive (SSS/TI) liquid crystals (LCs) has been evaluated as a boundary-layer transition detection technique for hypersonic flows. Experiments were conducted at Mach 8 in the Sandia National Laboratories Hypersonic Wind Tunnel using a flat plate model at near zero-degree angle of attack over the freestream unit Reynolds number range 1.2-5.8x10{sup 6}/ft. Standard 35mm color photography and Super VHS color video were used to record LC color changes due to varying surface shear stress during the transition process for a range of commercial SSS liquid crystals. Visual transition data were compared to an established method using calorimetric surface heat-transfer measurements to evaluate the LC technique. It is concluded that the use of SSS/TI LCs can be an inexpensive, safe, and easy to use boundary-layer transition detection method for hypersonic flows. However, a valid interpretation of the visual records requires careful attention to illumination intensity levels and uniformity, lighting and viewing angles, some prior understanding of the general character of the flow, and the selection of the appropriate liquid crystal for the particular flow conditions.

Aeschliman, D.P.; Croll, R.H.; Kuntz, D.W.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

A physical model of the turbulent boundary layer consonant with mean momentum balance structure  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...compared with the prevalent, well-established, model. Some...O(U ) ((u tau /kappa)log(delta/C)) D (wake layer...Engineering, University of Alabama. Wark, C.E , and H.M Nagib1991Experimental...comparison, the prevalent, well-established, physical model...

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Cloud Services Cloud Services  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cloud Services Cloud Services In 2012 UCD IT Services launched an exciting new set of cloud solutions called CloudEdu, which includes cloud servers, cloud storage, cloud hosting and cloud network. The CloudEdu package includes a consultancy service in design, deployment, management and utilisation

193

Squeezout phenomena and boundary layer formation of a model ionic liquid under confinement and charging  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electrical charging of parallel plates confining a model ionic liquid down to nanoscale distances yields a variety of charge-induced changes in the structural features of the confined film. That includes even-odd switching of the structural layering and charging-induced solidification and melting, with important changes of local ordering between and within layers, and of squeezout behavior. By means of molecular dynamics simulations, we explore this variety of phenomena in the simplest charged Lennard-Jones coarse-grained model including or excluding the effect a neutral tail giving an anisotropic shape to one of the model ions. Using these models and open conditions permitting the flow of ions in and out of the interplate gap, we simulate the liquid squeezout to obtain the distance dependent structure and forces between the plates during their adiabatic appraoch under load. Simulations at fixed applied force illustrate an effective electrical pumping of the ionic liquid, from a thick nearly solid film that withstands the interplate pressure for high plate charge to complete squeezout following melting near zero charge. Effective enthalpy curves obtained by integration of interplate forces versus distance show the local minima that correspond to layering, and predict the switching between one minimum and another under squeezing and charging.

R. Capozza; A. Vanossi; A. Benassi; E. Tosatti

2014-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

194

Analysis of two independent methods for retrieving liquid water profiles in spring and summer Arctic boundary clouds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-based remote sensing, optimal estimation, LES model with explicit microphysics, cloud liquid water algorithms Heat Budget of the Arctic Ocean (SHEBA) project. An algorithm developed by Frisch et al. [1995, 1998 matrix of the LWC profile is calculated, an optimal estimation method is applied to the SHEBA data

Shupe, Matthew

195

Ice at the Interface: Atmosphere-Ice-Ocean Boundary Layer Processes and Their Role in Polar Change---Workshop Report  

SciTech Connect

The atmosphere-ocean boundary layer in which sea ice resides includes many complex processes that require a more realistic treatment in GCMs, particularly as models move toward full earth system descriptions. The primary purpose of the workshop was to define and discuss such coupled processes from observational and modeling points of view, including insight from both the Arctic and Antarctic systems. The workshop met each of its overarching goals, including fostering collaboration among experimentalists, theorists and modelers, proposing modeling strategies, and ascertaining data availability and needs. Several scientific themes emerged from the workshop, such as the importance of episodic or extreme events, precipitation, stratification above and below the ice, and the marginal ice zone, whose seasonal Arctic migrations now traverse more territory than in the past.

Hunke, Elizabeth C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

196

Testing Cloud Microphysics Parameterizations in NCAR CAM5 with ISDAC and M-PACE Observations  

SciTech Connect

Arctic clouds simulated by the NCAR Community Atmospheric Model version 5 (CAM5) are evaluated with observations from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC) and Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (M-PACE), which were conducted at its North Slope of Alaska site in April 2008 and October 2004, respectively. Model forecasts for the Arctic Spring and Fall seasons performed under the Cloud- Associated Parameterizations Testbed (CAPT) framework generally reproduce the spatial distributions of cloud fraction for single-layer boundary layer mixed-phase stratocumulus, and multilayer or deep frontal clouds. However, for low-level clouds, the model significantly underestimates the observed cloud liquid water content in both seasons and cloud fraction in the Spring season. As a result, CAM5 significantly underestimates the surface downward longwave (LW) radiative fluxes by 20-40 W m-2. The model with a new ice nucleation parameterization moderately improves the model simulations by increasing cloud liquid water content in mixed-phase clouds through the reduction of the conversion rate from cloud liquid to ice by the Wegener-Bergeron- Findeisen (WBF) process. The CAM5 single column model testing shows that change in the homogeneous freezing temperature of rain to form snow from -5 C to -40 C has a substantial impact on the modeled liquid water content through the slowing-down of liquid and rain-related processes. In contrast, collections of cloud ice by snow and cloud liquid by rain are of minor importance for single-layer boundary layer mixed-phase clouds in the Arctic.

Liu, Xiaohong; Xie, Shaocheng; Boyle, James; Klein, Stephen A.; Shi, Xiangjun; Wang, Zhien; Lin, Wuyin; Ghan, Steven J.; Earle, Michael; Liu, Peter; Zelenyuk, Alla

2011-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

197

ARM - Measurement - Cloud top height  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to hear from you Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Cloud top height For a given cloud or cloud layer, the highest level of the atmosphere where...

198

Detecting and Evaluating the Effect of Overlaying Thin Cirrus Cloud on MODIS Retrieved Water-Cloud Droplet Effective Radius  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Detecting and Evaluating the Effect Detecting and Evaluating the Effect of Overlaying Thin Cirrus Cloud on MODIS Retrieved Water-Cloud Droplet Effective Radius F.-L Chang and Z. Li Earth System Science Interdisciplinary Center University of Maryland College Park, Maryland Z. Li Department of Meteorology University of Maryland College Park, Maryland Introduction Cirrus clouds can largely modify the solar reflected and terrestrial emitted radiances. The ubiquitous presence of cirrus clouds has a global coverage of about 20% to30% and more than 70% in the tropics (Wylie et al. 1994). The probability of cirrus clouds overlaying a low-level boundary layer cloud system is greater than 50% (Hahn et al. 1982, 1984; Tian and Curry 1989; Mace et al. 1997). They are often optically thin and semitransparent and frequently reside in high altitude overlapping with a low-level

199

Wind-Tunnel Simulation of the Wake of a Large Wind Turbine in a Stable Boundary Layer: Part 2, the Wake Flow  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Measurements have been made in the wake of a model wind turbine in both a neutral and a stable atmospheric boundary layer, in the EnFlo stratified-flow wind tunnel, between 0.5 and 10 rotor diameters from the ...

Philip E. Hancock; Frauke Pascheke

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Measurements of diurnal variations and Eddy Covariance (EC) fluxes of glyoxal in the1 tropical marine boundary layer: description of the Fast LED-CE-DOAS instrument2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

marine boundary layer: description of the Fast LED-CE-DOAS instrument2 3 4 S. Coburn1,2 , I. Ortega1 Emitting Diode Cavity Enhanced Differential Optical Absorption24 Spectroscopy (Fast LED-CE-DOAS) instrument Halogens28 and OVOC (TORERO) field experiment (January to March 2012). The Fast LED-CE-DOAS is a29

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "boundary layer clouds" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Boundary Layer Lubrication  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

2009 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, May 18-22, 2009 -- Washington D.C.

202

Boundary Layer Lubrication  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Presentation from the U.S. DOE Office of Vehicle Technologies "Mega" Merit Review 2008 on February 25, 2008 in Bethesda, Maryland.

203

Boundary Layer Lubrication Mechanisms  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

2010 DOE Vehicle Technologies and Hydrogen Programs Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, June 7-11, 2010 -- Washington D.C.

204

Boundary Layer Lubrication Mechanisms  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation

205

Toward Understanding of Differences in Current Cloud Retrievals of ARM Ground-based Measurements  

SciTech Connect

Accurate observations of cloud microphysical properties are needed for evaluating and improving the representation of cloud processes in climate models. However, large differences are found in current cloud products retrieved from ground-based remote sensing measurements using various retrieval algorithms. Understanding the differences is an important step to address uncertainties in the cloud retrievals. In this study, an in-depth analysis of nine existing ground-based cloud retrievals using ARM remote sensing measurements is carried out. We place emphasize on boundary layer overcast clouds and high level ice clouds, which are the focus of many current retrieval development efforts due to their radiative importance and relatively simple structure. Large systematic discrepancies in cloud microphysical properties are found in these two types of clouds among the nine cloud retrieval products, particularly for the cloud liquid and ice effective radius. It is shown that most of these large differences have their roots in the retrieval algorithms used by these cloud products, including the retrieval theoretical bases, assumptions, as well as input and constraint parameters. This study suggests the need to further validate current retrieval theories and assumptions and even the development of new retrieval algorithms with more observations under different cloud regimes.

Zhao, Chuanfeng; Xie, Shaocheng; Klein, Stephen A.; Protat, Alain; Shupe, Matthew D.; McFarlane, Sally A.; Comstock, Jennifer M.; Delanoe, Julien; Deng, Min; Dunn, Maureen; Hogan, Robin; Huang, Dong; Jensen, Michael; Mace, Gerald G.; McCoy, Renata; O'Conner, Ewan J.; Turner, Dave; Wang, Zhien

2012-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

206

Solar wind energy transfer regions inside the dayside magnetopause: Accelerated heavy ions as tracers for MHD-processes in the dayside boundary layer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Plasma and magnetic field data from PROGNOZ-7 have revealed that solar wind (magnetosheath) plasma elements may penetrate the dayside magnetopause surface and form high density regions with enhanced cross-field flow in the boundary layer. The injected magnetosheath plasma is observed to have an excess drift velocity as compared to the local boundary layer plasma, comprising both “cold” plasma of terrestrial origin and a hot ring current component. A differential drift between two plasma components can be understood in terms of a momentum transfer process driven by an injected magnetosheath plasma population. The braking action of the injected plasma may be described as a dynamo process where particle kinetic energy is transferred into electromagnetic energy (electric field). The generated electric field will force the local plasma to ?×B-drift, and the dynamo region therefore also constitutes an accelerator region for the local plasma. Whenever energy is dissipated from the energy transfer process (a net current is flowing through a load), there will also be a difference between the induced electric field and the v×B term of the generator plasma. Thus, the local plasma will drift more slowly than the injected generator plasma. We will present observations showing that a relation between the momentum transferred, the injected plasma and the momentum taken up by the local plasma exists. For instance, if the local plasma density is sufficiently high, the differential drift velocity of the injected and local plasma will be small. A large fraction of the excess momentum is then transferred to the local plasma. Conversely, a low local plasma density results in a high velocity difference and a low fraction of local momentum transfer. In our study cases the “cold” plasma component was frequently found to dominate the local magnetospheric plasma density in the boundary layer. Accordingly, this component may have the largest influence on the local momentum transfer process. We will demonstrate that this also seems to be the case. Moreover we show that the accelerated “cold” plasma component may be used as a tracer element reflecting both the momentum and energy transfer and the penetration process in the dayside boundary layer. The high He+ percentage of the accelerated “cold” plasma indicates a plasmaspheric origin. Considering the quite high densities of energetic He+ found in the boundary layer, the overall low abundance of He+ (as compared to e.g. O+) found in the plasma sheet and outer ring current evidently reduces the importance of the dayside boundary layer as a plasma source in the large scale magnetospheric circulation system.

R. Lundin; E.M. Dubinin

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Nitrogen Oxides in the Nocturnal Boundary Layer: Chemistry of Nitrous Acid (HONO) and the Nitrate Radical (N03)  

SciTech Connect

Summary Chemical processes occurring at night in the lowest part of the urban atmosphere, the so called nocturnal boundary layer (NBL), can influence the composition of the atmosphere during the night as well as the following day. They may impact the budgets of some of the most important pollutants, such as ozone and nitrogen oxides, as well as influence size and composition of particular matter. Few studies have thus far concentrated on the nocturnal chemistry of the urban NBL, most likely due to the strong influence of vertical transport and mixing, which requires the measurement of trace gas profiles instead of simple point observations. Motivated by our lack of observations and understanding of nocturnal chemistry, the focus of this project was the study of the vertical distribution of trace gases and the altitude dependence of nocturnal chemistry under polluted conditions through field observations and modeling studies. The analysis of three field experiments (TEXAQS, Houston, 2000; Phoenix Sunrise Ozone Experiment, 2001; NAPOX, Boston, 2002), two of which were performed in this project, showed that ozone concentrations typically increase with height in the lowest 150m, while NO2 typically decreases. NO3, the dominant nocturnal radical species, showed much higher concentrations in the upper part of the NBL, and was often not present at the ground. With the help of a one-dimensional chemical transport model, developed in this project, we found that the interaction of ground emissions of NOx and hydrocarbons, together with their vertical transport, is responsible for the vertical profiles. The dominant chemical reactions influencing ozone, NO2 and NO3 are the reaction of ozone and NO3 with freshly emitted NO. Sensitivity studies with our model showed that the magnitude of the trace gas gradients depend both on the emission rates and the vertical stability of the NBL. Observations and model analysis clearly show that nocturnal chemistry in urban areas is altitude dependent. Measurements at one altitude, for example at the ground, where most air quality monitoring stations are located, are not representative for the rest of the NBL. Our model also revealed that radical chemistry is, in general, altitude dependent at night. We distinguish three regions: an unreactive, NO rich, ground layer; an upper, O3 and NO3 dominated layer, and a reactive mixing layer, where RO2 radicals are mixed from aloft with NO from the ground. In this reactive layer an active radical chemistry and elevated OH radical levels can be found. The downward transport of N2O5 and HO2NO2, followed by their thermal decay, was also identified as a radical source in this layer. Our observations also gave insight into the formation of HONO in the NBL. Based on our field experiments we were able to show that the NO2 to HONO conversion was relative humidity dependent. While this fact was well known, we found that it is most likely the uptake of HONO onto surfaces which is R.H. dependent, rather than the NO2 to HONO conversion. This finding led to the proposal of a new NO2 to HONO conversion mechanism, which is based on solid physical chemical principles. Noteworthy is also the observation of enhanced NO2 to HONO conversion during a dust storm event in Phoenix. The final activity in our project investigated the influence of the urban canopy, i.e. building walls and surfaces, on nocturnal chemistry. For the first time the surface area of a city was determined based on a Geographical Information System database of the city of Santa Monica. The surface to volume areas found in this study showed that, in the 2 lower part of the NBL, buildings provide a much larger surface area than the aerosol. In addition, buildings take up a considerable amount of the volume near the ground. The expansion of our model and sensitivity studies based on the Santa Monica data revealed that the surface area of buildings considerably influences HONO levels in urban areas. The volume reduction leads to a decrease of O3 and an increase of NO2 near the ground due to the stronger impact o

Jochen Stutz

2005-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

208

Testing cloud microphysics parameterizations in NCAR CAM5 with ISDAC and M-PACE observations  

SciTech Connect

Arctic clouds simulated by the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Community Atmospheric Model version 5 (CAM5) are evaluated with observations from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC) and Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (M-PACE), which were conducted at its North Slope of Alaska site in April 2008 and October 2004, respectively. Model forecasts for the Arctic spring and fall seasons performed under the Cloud-Associated Parameterizations Testbed framework generally reproduce the spatial distributions of cloud fraction for single-layer boundary-layer mixed-phase stratocumulus and multilayer or deep frontal clouds. However, for low-level stratocumulus, the model significantly underestimates the observed cloud liquid water content in both seasons. As a result, CAM5 significantly underestimates the surface downward longwave radiative fluxes by 20-40 W m{sup -2}. Introducing a new ice nucleation parameterization slightly improves the model performance for low-level mixed-phase clouds by increasing cloud liquid water content through the reduction of the conversion rate from cloud liquid to ice by the Wegener-Bergeron-Findeisen process. The CAM5 single-column model testing shows that changing the instantaneous freezing temperature of rain to form snow from -5 C to -40 C causes a large increase in modeled cloud liquid water content through the slowing down of cloud liquid and rain-related processes (e.g., autoconversion of cloud liquid to rain). The underestimation of aerosol concentrations in CAM5 in the Arctic also plays an important role in the low bias of cloud liquid water in the single-layer mixed-phase clouds. In addition, numerical issues related to the coupling of model physics and time stepping in CAM5 are responsible for the model biases and will be explored in future studies.

Liu X.; Lin W.; Xie, S.; Boyle, J.; Klein, S. A.; Shi, X.; Wang, Z.; Ghan, S. J.; Earle, M.; Liu, P. S. K.; Zelenyuk, A.

2011-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

209

Toward understanding of differences in current cloud retrievals of ARM ground-based measurements  

SciTech Connect

Accurate observations of cloud microphysical properties are needed for evaluating and improving the representation of cloud processes in climate models and better estimate of the Earth radiative budget. However, large differences are found in current cloud products retrieved from ground-based remote sensing measurements using various retrieval algorithms. Understanding the differences is an important step to address uncertainties in the cloud retrievals. In this study, an in-depth analysis of nine existing ground-based cloud retrievals using ARM remote sensing measurements is carried out. We place emphasis on boundary layer overcast clouds and high level ice clouds, which are the focus of many current retrieval development efforts due to their radiative importance and relatively simple structure. Large systematic discrepancies in cloud microphysical properties are found in these two types of clouds among the nine cloud retrieval products, particularly for the cloud liquid and ice particle effective radius. Note that the differences among some retrieval products are even larger than the prescribed uncertainties reported by the retrieval algorithm developers. It is shown that most of these large differences have their roots in the retrieval theoretical bases, assumptions, as well as input and constraint parameters. This study suggests the need to further validate current retrieval theories and assumptions and even the development of new retrieval algorithms with more observations under different cloud regimes.

Zhao C.; Dunn M.; Xie, S.; Klein, S. A.; Protat, A.; Shupe, M. D.; McFarlane, S. A.; Comstock, J. M.; Delanoë, J.; Deng, M.; Hogan, R. J.; Huang, D.; Jensen, M. P.; Mace, G. G.; McCoy, R.; O’Connor, E. J.; Turner, D. D.; Wang, Z.

2012-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

210

ARM - Field Campaign - Azores: Above-Cloud Radiation Budget near Graciosa  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Above-Cloud Radiation Budget near Graciosa Island Above-Cloud Radiation Budget near Graciosa Island Related Campaigns Azores: Clouds, Aerosol and Precipitation in the Marine Boundary Layer (CAP-MBL) 2009.05.01, Wood, AMF Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Azores: Above-Cloud Radiation Budget near Graciosa Island 2010.04.15 - 2010.09.15 Lead Scientist : Mark Miller For data sets, see below. Description The scientific focus is to measure the cloud-top downwelling radiative fluxes in coincidence with trace gas measurements made at Pico Observatory, Pico Island Azores. To enhance measurement capabilities in the vicinity of Graciosa and to take advantage of a unique opportunity to measure cloud transmittance in the marine, instruments associated with the ARM Ancillary

211

Posters Ship-Based Measurements of Cloud Optical Properties  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7 7 Posters Ship-Based Measurements of Cloud Optical Properties During the Atlantic Stratocumulus Transition Experiment A. B. White Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences University of Colorado at Boulder National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Boulder, Colorado C. W. Fairall National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Environmental Research Laboratories Environmental Technology Laboratory Boulder, Colorado Introduction The Atlantic Stratocumulus Transition Experiment (ASTEX), conducted in June 1992, was designed with the broad goal of improving the dynamical, radiative, and microphysical models of marine boundary layer (MBL) clouds. This goal was pursued by combining measurements from a number of different platforms including aircraft,

212

Heat transfer in a horizontal fluid layer heated from below upon rotation of one of the boundaries  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The mixed convection in a horizontal fluid layer which is generated by uniform heating from below and by rotation of one ... studied experimentally. The region occupied by the fluid is a cylinder of radius320 mm ...

V. S. Berdnikov; V. A. Markov

213

Jupiter as an exoplanet: UV to NIR transmission spectrum reveals hazes, a Na layer and possibly stratospheric H2O-ice clouds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Currently, the analysis of transmission spectra is the most successful technique to probe the chemical composition of exoplanet atmospheres. But the accuracy of these measurements is constrained by observational limitations and the diversity of possible atmospheric compositions. Here we show the UV-VIS-IR transmission spectrum of Jupiter, as if it were a transiting exoplanet, obtained by observing one of its satellites, Ganymede, while passing through Jupiter's shadow i.e., during a solar eclipse from Ganymede. The spectrum shows strong extinction due to the presence of clouds (aerosols) and haze in the atmosphere, and strong absorption features from CH4. More interestingly, the comparison with radiative transfer models reveals a spectral signature, which we attribute here to a Jupiter stratospheric layer of crystalline H2O ice. The atomic transitions of Na are also present. These results are relevant for the modeling and interpretation of giant transiting exoplanets. They also open a new technique to explore...

Montańes-Rodriguez, P; Palle, E; Lopez-Puertas, M; Garcia-Melendo, E

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Ship-Track Clouds, Aerosol, and Ship Dynamic Effects; A Climate Perspective from Ship-Based Measurements  

SciTech Connect

Ship-track clouds are marine boundary layer clouds that form behind ocean ships and are observed from satellites in the visible and near infrared. Ship-track clouds provide a rare opportunity to connect aerosol cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) emissions and observable changes in marine stratiform clouds. A very small change in the reflectivity of these eastern Pacific and Atlantic clouds (about 4%) provides a climate feedback of similar magnitude to doubling CO{sub 2} (increasing cloud reflectivity corresponds to global cooling). The Department of Energy sponsored research from 1991 to 1995 to study ship-track clouds including two ocean-based experiments in the summers of 1991 and 1994. These experiments showed that ship-track cloud properties were often more complex those related to a reduction of droplet size with an increase in number associated with increasing CCN from the ship's plume. The clouds showed evidence of morphological changes more likely to be associated with cloud dynamic effects either initiated by the increased CCN or directly by the ship's heat output or turbulent air wake. The fact that marine stratiform clouds, that are susceptible to ship track formation, are starved for both CCN and convective turbulence complicates the separation of the two effects.

Porch, W.M.

1998-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

215

On Techniques to Characterize and Correlate Grain Size, Grain Boundary Orientation and the Strength of the SiC Layer of TRISO Coated Particles: A Preliminary Study  

SciTech Connect

The mechanical properties of the silicon carbide (SiC) layer of the TRi-ISOtropic (TRISO) coated particle (CP) for high temperature gas reactors (HTGR) are performance parameters that have not yet been standardized by the international HTR community. Presented in this paper are the results of characterizing coated particles to reveal the effect of annealing temperature (1000 to 2100°C) on the strength and grain size of unirradiated coated particles. This work was further expanded to include possible relationships between the grain size and strength values. The comparative results of two strength measurement techniques and grain size measured by the Lineal intercept method are included. Preliminary grain boundary characterization results determined by electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) are included. These results are also important for future fission product transport studies, as grain boundary diffusion is identified as a possible mechanism by which 110mAg, one of the fission activation products, might be released through intact SiC layers. Temperature is a parameter known to influence the grain size of SiC and therefore it is important to investigate the effect of high temperature annealing on the SiC grain size. Recommendations and future work will also be briefly discussed.

I.J.van Rooyen; J.L. Dunzik Gougar; T. Trowbridge; Philip M van Rooyen

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Identifying the top of the tropical tropopause layer from vertical mass flux analysis and CALIPSO lidar cloud observations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

defined as the level of zero net radiative heating, which occurs near 14.5­15 km [e.g., Folkins et al layer (TTL) by analyzing the vertical mass flux profile based on radiative transfer calculations will rise into the stratosphere. Thus convection has to transport air at least to the zero radiative heating

Hochberg, Michael

217

Toward a Diurnal Climatology of Cold-Season Turbulence Statistics in Continental Stratocumulus as Observed by the Atmospheric Radiation Millimeter- Wavelength Cloud Radars  

SciTech Connect

Numerous observational studies of marine stratocumulus have demonstrated a pronounced diurnal cycle. At night, longwave flux divergence at the top of the cloud drives negatively buoyant eddies that tend to keep the boundary layer well mixed. During the day, solar absorption by the cloud tends to reduce the turbulent intensity and often decouples the planetary boundary layer (PBL) into cloud- and sub-cloud circulations. The delicate balance between turbulent intensity, entrainment, and fluxes dictates cloud geometry and persistence, which can significantly impact the shortwave radiation budget. Millimeter-wavelength cloud radars (MMCRs) have been used to study the turbulent structure of boundary layer stratocumulus (e.g. Frisch et al. 1995; Kollias and Albrecht 2000). Analysis is confined to nondrizzling or lightly drizzling cloud systems for which precipitation contamination is negligible. Under such assumptions the Doppler velocity field becomes a proxy for vertical velocity. Prior research has mainly consisted of a few case studies of specific cloud systems using radar scan strategies optimized for this particular cloud type. The MMCR operating at the Southern Great Plains Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility is broadly configured to be able to detect many different cloud types over a broad range of reflectivities and altitudes, so it is not specifically optimized for PBL clouds. Being in more-or-less continuous operation since the end of 1996, it does, however, have the advantage of long data coverage, which suggests that statistically significant measures of the diurnal cycle of turbulence should be attainable. This abstract summarizes the first few steps toward this goal, using 7 months of cold season MMCR data.

Mechem, D.B.; Kogan, Y.L.; Childers, M.E.; Donner, K.M.

2005-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

218

Millimeter Wave Cloud Radar (MMCR) Handbook  

SciTech Connect

The millimeter cloud radar (MMCR) systems probe the extent and composition of clouds at millimeter wavelengths. The MMCR is a zenith-pointing radar that operates at a frequency of 35 GHz. The main purpose of this radar is to determine cloud boundaries (e.g., cloud bottoms and tops). This radar will also report radar reflectivity (dBZ) of the atmosphere up to 20 km. The radar possesses a doppler capability that will allow the measurement of cloud constituent vertical velocities.

KB Widener; K Johnson

2005-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

219

Representing Cloud Processing of Aerosol in Numerical Models  

SciTech Connect

The satellite imagery in Figure 1 provides dramatic examples of how aerosol influences the cloud field. Aerosol from ship exhaust can serve as nucleation centers in otherwise cloud-free regions, forming ship tracks (top image), or can enhance the reflectance/albedo in already cloudy regions. This image is a demonstration of the first indirect effect, in which changes in aerosol modulate cloud droplet radius and concentration, which influences albedo. It is thought that, through the effects it has on precipitation (drizzle), aerosol can also affect the structure and persistence of planetary boundary layer (PBL) clouds. Regions of cellular convection, or open pockets of cloudiness (bottom image) are thought to be remnants of strongly drizzling PBL clouds. Pockets of Open Cloudiness (POCs) (Stevens et al. 2005) or Albrecht's ''rifts'' are low cloud fraction regions characterized by anomalously low aerosol concentrations, implying they result from precipitation. These features may in fact be a demonstration of the second indirect effect. To accurately represent these clouds in numerical models, we have to treat the coupled cloud-aerosol system. We present the following series of mesoscale and large eddy simulation (LES) experiments to evaluate the important aspects of treating the coupled cloud-aerosol problem. 1. Drizzling and nondrizzling simulations demonstrate the effect of drizzle on a mesoscale forecast off the California coast. 2. LES experiments with explicit (bin) microphysics gauge the relative importance of the shape of the aerosol spectrum on the 3D dynamics and cloud structure. 3. Idealized mesoscale model simulations evaluate the relative roles of various processes, sources, and sinks.

Mechem, D.B.; Kogan, Y.L.

2005-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

220

Interface boundary conditions for dynamic magnetization and spin wave dynamics in a ferromagnetic layer with the interface Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction  

SciTech Connect

In this work, we derive the interface exchange boundary conditions for the classical linear dynamics of magnetization in ferromagnetic layers with the interface Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction (IDMI). We show that IDMI leads to pinning of dynamic magnetization at the interface. An unusual peculiarity of the IDMI-based pinning is that its scales as the spin-wave wave number. We incorporate these boundary conditions into an existing numerical model for the dynamics of the Damon-Eshbach spin wave in ferromagnetic films. IDMI affects the dispersion and the frequency non-reciprocity of the travelling Damon-Eshbach spin wave. For a broad range of film thicknesses L and wave numbers, the results of the numerical simulations of the spin wave dispersion are in a good agreement with a simple analytical expression, which shows that the contribution of IDMI to the dispersion scales as 1/L, similarly to the effect of other types of interfacial anisotropy. Suggestions to experimentalists how to detect the presence of IDMI in a spin wave experiment are given.

Kostylev, M. [School of Physics, M013, University of Western Australia, Crawley, Perth 6009, Western Australia (Australia)

2014-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "boundary layer clouds" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Complex-plasma boundaries  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study deals with the boundary between a normal plasma of ions and electrons, and an adjacent complex plasma of ions, electrons, and microparticles, as found in innumerable examples in nature. Here we show that the matching between the two plasmas involve electrostatic double layers. These double layers explain the sharp boundaries observed in the laboratory and in astrophysics. A modified theory is derived for the double layers that form at the discontinuity between two different complex plasmas and at the point of contact of three complex plasmas. The theory is applied to the first measurements from the Plasma Kristall Experiment (PKE) Nefedov Laboratory in the International Space Station.

B. M. Annaratone; S. A. Khrapak; P. Bryant; G. E. Morfill; H. Rothermel; H. M. Thomas; M. Zuzic; V. E. Fortov; V. I. Molotkov; A. P. Nefedov; S. Krikalev; Yu. P. Semenov

2002-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

222

Cloud Computing  

SciTech Connect

Chicago Matters: Beyond Burnham (WTTW). Chicago has become a world center of "cloud computing." Argonne experts Pete Beckman and Ian Foster explain what "cloud computing" is and how you probably already use it on a daily basis.

Pete Beckman and Ian Foster

2009-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

223

Liquid layers were observed in the Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (M-PACE) at temperatures down to 30C.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

down to ­30°C. S ignificant and interrelated atmospheric, oceanic, and terrestrial changes have been to be related to complex feedback processes unique to the Arctic. Arctic clouds have been identified | #12;playing a central role in several hypothesized feed- back processes (Curry et al. 1996; Vavrus

Eloranta, Edwin W.

224

Z .Atmospheric Research 51 1999 4575 Cloud resolving simulations of Arctic stratus  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on the evolution of the simulated mixed-phase ASC layer are studied. Cloud layers either collapse through rapid glaciation and ice precipitation from the cloud layer or maintain a quasi-steady state. Sensitivity studies show that the stability of the mixed-phase cloud layer is dependent upon the temperature, ice

Harrington, Jerry Y.

225

Cloud Computing at NERSC  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Home R & D Archive Cloud Computing Cloud Computing Cloud computing is gaining a foothold in the business world, but can clouds meet the specialized needs of scientists?...

226

Cloud shading retrieval and assimilation in a satellite-model coupled mesoscale analysis system  

SciTech Connect

A retrieval-assimilation method has been developed as a quantitative means to exploit the information in satellite imagery regarding shading of the ground by clouds, as applied to mesoscale weather analysis. Cloud radiative parameters are retrieved from satellite visible image data and used, along with parameters computed by a numerical model, to control the model's computation of downward radiative fluxes at the ground. These fluxes influence the analysis of ground surface temperatures under clouds. The method is part of a satellite-model coupled four-dimensional analysis system that merges information from visible image data in cloudy areas with infrared sounder data in clear areas, where retrievals of surface temperatures and water vapor concentrations are assimilated. The substantial impact of shading on boundary-layer development and mesoscale circulations was demonstrated in simulations, and the value of assimilating shading retrievals was demonstrated with a case study and with a simulated analysis that included the effects of several potential sources of error. The case study was performed in the northwestern Texas area, where convective cloud development was influenced by the shading effects of a persistent region of stratiform cloud cover. Analyses that included shading retrieval assimilation had consistently smaller shelter-height temperature errors than analyses without shading retrievals. When clear-area surface temperature retrievals from sounder data were analyzed along with cloudy-area shading retrievals, the contrast in heating between the shaded and clear parts of the domain led to large variations in analyzed boundary-layer depths and had a modest impact on analyzed wind flow. The analyzed locations of upward vertical motion corresponded roughly to areas of convective cloud development observed in satellite imagery. 29 refs., 17 figs., 2 tabs.

Lipton, A.E. (Phillips Lab., Hanscom AFB, MA (United States))

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Correlation Between Grain and Grain-Boundary Critical Current Densities in ex situ Coated Conductors with Variable YBa2Cu3O7- ? Layer Thickness  

SciTech Connect

The dependence of the percolative critical current density at low magnetic fields on YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-{delta}} (YBCO) layer thickness is studied by comparing grain, J{sub c}{sup G}, and grain-boundary, J{sub c}{sup GB}, critical current densities for a series of ex situ processed YBCO films on a RABiTS template. Both critical current densities decrease as a function of thickness and the values of J{sub c}{sup G} and J{sub c}{sup GB} show a clear correlation which suggests the existence of an interaction between Abrikosov-Josephson vortices on the grain boundaries and Abrikosov vortices in the bulk of the grains. This opens the possibility to improve J{sub c}{sup GB} by optimizing the pinning capabilities of the grains.

Palau, A. [ICMAB, Barcelona, Spain; Puig, T. [ICMAB, Barcelona, Spain; Obradors, X. [ICMAB, Barcelona, Spain; Feenstra, Roeland [ORNL; Gapud, Albert Agcaoili [ORNL

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Cloud Computing.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Cloud computing has been given a great deal of attention during recent years. Almost all the technology market leaders and leading hosting service providers… (more)

Siddiqui, Muhammad Anas

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

ARM - Measurement - Cloud base height  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

base height base height ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Cloud base height For a given cloud or cloud layer, the lowest level of the atmosphere where cloud properties are detectable. Categories Cloud Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments BLC : Belfort Laser Ceilometer MPL : Micropulse Lidar MWRP : Microwave Radiometer Profiler RL : Raman Lidar VCEIL : Vaisala Ceilometer External Instruments NOAASURF : NOAA Surface Meteorology Data, collected by NWS and NCDC

230

Large Eddy Simulation of Trade Wind Cumulus Clouds  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A large eddy simulation (LES) model, used for studying the dry convective boundary layer, has been extended with an equation for the total water specific humidity and a condensation scheme to simulate the partly cloudy convective boundary layer. ...

J. W. M. Cuijpers; P. G. Duynkerke

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

ARM - Field Campaign - Cloud IOP  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govCampaignsCloud IOP govCampaignsCloud IOP Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Cloud IOP 1998.04.27 - 1998.05.17 Lead Scientist : Gerald Mace For data sets, see below. Summary Monday, April 27, 1998 IOP Opening Activities: Heavy rain (nearly 2.5" since 12Z 4/26/98) at the central facility (CF) dominated the first day of the Cloud Physics/Single Column Model IOP and limited the daily activities. A 1430 GMT sonde launch commenced the 3-hour sonde launch schedule at the CF and 4 boundary facilities (BFs). Scientists/Instrumentation on Site: Citation: Has arrived and is located at the Ponca City Airport. No flights are currently planned. Flights are tentatively planned for stratus sampling when precipitation ends.

232

Cloud Property Retrieval Products for Graciosa Island, Azores  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The motivation for developing this product was to use the Dong et al. 1998 method to retrieve cloud microphysical properties, such as cloud droplet effective radius, cloud droplets number concentration, and optical thickness. These retrieved properties have been used to validate the satellite retrieval, and evaluate the climate simulations and reanalyses. We had been using this method to retrieve cloud microphysical properties over ARM SGP and NSA sites. We also modified the method for the AMF at Shouxian, China and some IOPs, e.g. ARM IOP at SGP in March, 2000. The ARSCL data from ARM data archive over the SGP and NSA have been used to determine the cloud boundary and cloud phase. For these ARM permanent sites, the ARSCL data was developed based on MMCR measurements, however, there were no data available at the Azores field campaign. We followed the steps to generate this derived product and also include the MPLCMASK cloud retrievals to determine the most accurate cloud boundaries, including the thin cirrus clouds that WACR may under-detect. We use these as input to retrieve the cloud microphysical properties. Due to the different temporal resolutions of the derived cloud boundary heights product and the cloud properties product, we submit them as two separate netcdf files.

Dong, Xiquan

233

Cloud Property Retrieval Products for Graciosa Island, Azores  

SciTech Connect

The motivation for developing this product was to use the Dong et al. 1998 method to retrieve cloud microphysical properties, such as cloud droplet effective radius, cloud droplets number concentration, and optical thickness. These retrieved properties have been used to validate the satellite retrieval, and evaluate the climate simulations and reanalyses. We had been using this method to retrieve cloud microphysical properties over ARM SGP and NSA sites. We also modified the method for the AMF at Shouxian, China and some IOPs, e.g. ARM IOP at SGP in March, 2000. The ARSCL data from ARM data archive over the SGP and NSA have been used to determine the cloud boundary and cloud phase. For these ARM permanent sites, the ARSCL data was developed based on MMCR measurements, however, there were no data available at the Azores field campaign. We followed the steps to generate this derived product and also include the MPLCMASK cloud retrievals to determine the most accurate cloud boundaries, including the thin cirrus clouds that WACR may under-detect. We use these as input to retrieve the cloud microphysical properties. Due to the different temporal resolutions of the derived cloud boundary heights product and the cloud properties product, we submit them as two separate netcdf files.

Dong, Xiquan

2014-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

234

A numerical study of the effect of different aerosol types on East Asian summer clouds and precipitation  

SciTech Connect

The impact of anthropogenic aerosol on the East Asian summer monsoon (EASM) is investigated with NCAR CAM5, a state-of-the-art climate model with aerosol’s direct and indirect effects. Results indicate that anthropogenic aerosol tends to cause a weakened EASM with a southward shift of precipitation in East Asia mostly by its radiative effect. Anthropogenic aerosol induced surface cooling stabilizes the boundary layer, suppresses the convection and latent heat release in northern China, and reduces the tropospheric temperature over land and land-sea thermal contrast, thus leading to a weakened EASM. Meanwhile, acting as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), anthropogenic aerosol can significantly increase the cloud droplet number concentration but decrease the cloud droplet effective radius over Indochina and Indian Peninsulas as well as over southwestern and northern China, inhibiting the precipitation in these regions. Thus, anthropogenic aerosol tends to reduce Southeast and South Asian summer monsoon precipitation by its indirect effect.

Jiang, Yiquan; Liu, Xiaohong; Yang, Xiuqun; Wang, Minghuai

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Dynamic Cloud Infrastructure.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis will explore and investigate the possibility of implementing nested clouds to increase flexibility. A nested cloud is a private cloud running inside another… (more)

Gundersen, Espen

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Securing Cloud Storage Service.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Cloud computing brought flexibility, scalability, and capital cost savings to the IT industry. As more companies turn to cloud solutions, securing cloud based services… (more)

Zapolskas, Vytautas

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Cloud Computing - Software as a Service (SaaS) - CRM Application  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. While a comprehensive API offered by SaaS is a must-have, in most scenarios a custom SaaS integration layer will be needed to comply with SOA (Service Oriented Architecture) principles and to facilitate integration with existing systems. This section...’s cloud reference architecture addresses the three major roles in any cloud computing environment: cloud service provider, cloud service creator and cloud service consumer. With this strict separation of concerns, the cloud architecture enables...

Hassan, Sikander

2012-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

238

Cloud Computing Adam Barker  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cloud Computing 1 Adam Barker #12;Overview · Introduction to Cloud computing · Enabling technologies · Di erent types of cloud: IaaS, PaaS and SaaS · Cloud terminology · Interacting with a cloud: management consoles · Launching an instance · Connecting to an instance · Running your application · Clouds

St Andrews, University of

239

VM Leakage & Orphan Control in Open-Source Clouds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Institute of Standards and Technology IEEE CloudCom 2011, Athens, Greece Dec. 1, 2011 #12;Presentation NODE CONTROLLER #1 NODE RESOURCES INTRANET INTRANET INTRANET VMs Shown for One Node Only VMs Shown Layer: N/A (5) Internet/Intranet Layer: Web services communications (4) 12/1/2011 IEEE CloudCom 2011 3

240

Evaluation of convection-permitting model simulations of cloud populations associated with the Madden-Julian Oscillation using data collected during the AMIE/DYNAMO field campaign  

SciTech Connect

Regional cloud permitting model simulations of cloud populations observed during the 2011 ARM Madden Julian Oscillation Investigation Experiment/ Dynamics of Madden-Julian Experiment (AMIE/DYNAMO) field campaign are evaluated against radar and ship-based measurements. Sensitivity of model simulated surface rain rate statistics to parameters and parameterization of hydrometeor sizes in five commonly used WRF microphysics schemes are examined. It is shown that at 2 km grid spacing, the model generally overestimates rain rate from large and deep convective cores. Sensitivity runs involving variation of parameters that affect rain drop or ice particle size distribution (more aggressive break-up process etc) generally reduce the bias in rain-rate and boundary layer temperature statistics as the smaller particles become more vulnerable to evaporation. Furthermore significant improvement in the convective rain-rate statistics is observed when the horizontal grid-spacing is reduced to 1 km and 0.5 km, while it is worsened when run at 4 km grid spacing as increased turbulence enhances evaporation. The results suggest modulation of evaporation processes, through parameterization of turbulent mixing and break-up of hydrometeors may provide a potential avenue for correcting cloud statistics and associated boundary layer temperature biases in regional and global cloud permitting model simulations.

Hagos, Samson M.; Feng, Zhe; Burleyson, Casey D.; Lim, Kyo-Sun; Long, Charles N.; Wu, Di; Thompson, Gregory

2014-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "boundary layer clouds" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Cloud-Resolving Model Simulation and Mosaic Treatment of Subgrid Cloud-Radiation Interaction  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cloud-Resolving Model Simulation and Mosaic Treatment Cloud-Resolving Model Simulation and Mosaic Treatment of Subgrid Cloud-Radiation Interaction X. Wu Department of Geological and Atmospheric Sciences Iowa State University Ames, Iowa X.-Z. Liang Illinois State Water Survey University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Champaign, Illinois Introduction Improving the representation of cloud-radiation interaction is a major challenge for the global climate simulation. The development of cloud-resolving models (CRMs) and the extensive Atmospheric Radiation Measurements (ARMs) provide a unique opportunity for shading some lights on this problem. Current general circulation models (GCMs) predict cloud cover fractions and hydrometeor concentra- tions only in individual model layers, where clouds are assumed to be horizontally homogeneous in a

242

Cloud Controlling Factors --Low Clouds BJORN STEVENS,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cloud Controlling Factors -- Low Clouds BJORN STEVENS, Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic) clouds is reviewed, with an emphasis on factors that may be expected to change in a changing climate of low-cloud control- ling processes are offered: these include renewing our focus on theory, model

Stevens, Bjorn

243

Cloud Tracking in Cloud-Resolving Models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cloud Tracking in Cloud-Resolving Models RMetS Conference 4th September 2007 Bob Plant Department of Meteorology, University of Reading, UK #12;Introduction Obtain life cycle statistics for clouds in CRM simulations What is the distribution of cloud lifetimes? What factors determine the lifetime of an individual

Plant, Robert

244

Cloud Computing: Rain-Clouds System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract — Cloud Computing is the on demand service can be provided to the users at any time. It delivers the software, data access, computing as a service rather than the product. The Cloud application simplifies the computing technology by providing pay-per-use customer relationship. It is the theory that familiar to cheaper devices with low processing power, lower storage capacities, great flexibility and many more things. The security of cloud computing is a major factor as users store sensitive and confidential information with cloud storage providers. The range of these providers may be un trusted and harmful. The purpose of adopting cloud computing in an organization is to decide between a „public cloud ? and „private cloud ? by means of privacy. Public clouds often known as provider clouds are administrated by third parties and services are offered on pay-per-use basis. Private clouds or internal clouds are owned by the single firm but it has some metrics such as lacking of availability of services (such as memory, server) and network resources which leads it to down. Due to this, technology moves toward the concept of “Multi clouds ” or “Rain Clouds”. This paper displays the use of multi-clouds or rain clouds due to its ability to handle the huge amount of data traffic that affect the cloud computing user.

Harinder Kaur

245

Cloud Security by Max Garvey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cloud Security Survey by Max Garvey #12;Cloudy Cloud is Cloudy What is the cloud? On Demand Service Network access Resource pooling Elasticity of Resources Measured Service #12;Cloud Types/Variants Iaa Cloud Public Cloud Hybrid Cloud combination. Private cloud with overflow going to public cloud. #12

Tolmach, Andrew

246

Tropical and subtropical cloud transitions in weather and climate prediction models: the GCSS/WGNE Pacific Cross-Section Intercomparison (GPCI)  

SciTech Connect

A model evaluation approach is proposed where weather and climate prediction models are analyzed along a Pacific Ocean cross-section, from the stratocumulus regions off the coast of California, across the shallow convection dominated trade-winds, to the deep convection regions of the ITCZ: the GCSS/WGNE Pacific Cross-section Intercomparison (GPCI). The main goal of GPCI is to evaluate, and help understand and improve the representation of tropical and sub-tropical cloud processes in weather and climate prediction models. In this paper, a detailed analysis of cloud regime transitions along the cross-section from the sub-tropics to the tropics for the season JJA of 1998 is presented. This GPCI study confirms many of the typical weather and climate prediction model problems in the representation of clouds: underestimation of clouds in the stratocumulus regime by most models with the corresponding consequences in terms of shortwave radiation biases; overestimation of clouds by the ECMWF Re-Analysis (ERA40) in the deep tropics (in particular) with the corresponding impact in the outgoing longwave radiation; large spread between the different models in terms of cloud cover, liquid water path and shortwave radiation; significant differences between the models in terms of vertical crosssections of cloud properties (in particular), vertical velocity and relative humidity. An alternative analysis of cloud cover mean statistics is proposed where sharp gradients in cloud cover along the GPCI transect are taken into account. This analysis shows that the negative cloud bias of some models and ERA40 in the stratocumulus regions (as compared to ISCCP) is associated not only with lower values of cloud cover in these regimes, but also with a stratocumulus-to-cumulus transition that occurs too early along the trade-wind Lagrangian trajectory. Histograms of cloud cover along the cross-section differ significantly between models. Some models exhibit a quasi-bimodal structure with cloud cover being either very large (close to 100%) or very small, while other models show a more continuous transition. The ISCCP observations suggest that reality is in-between these two extreme examples. These different patterns reflect the diverse nature of the cloud, boundary layer, and convection parameterizations in the participating weather and climate prediction models.

Teixeira, J.; Cardoso, S.; Bonazzola, M.; Cole, Jason N.; DelGenio, Anthony D.; DeMott, C.; Franklin, A.; Hannay, Cecile; Jakob, Christian; Jiao, Y.; Karlsson, J.; Kitagawa, H.; Koehler, M.; Kuwano-Yoshida, A.; LeDrian, C.; Lock, Adrian; Miller, M.; Marquet, P.; Martins, J.; Mechoso, C. R.; Meijgaard, E. V.; Meinke, I.; Miranda, P.; Mironov, D.; Neggers, Roel; Pan, H. L.; Randall, David A.; Rasch, Philip J.; Rockel, B.; Rossow, William B.; Ritter, B.; Siebesma, A. P.; Soares, P.; Turk, F. J.; Vaillancourt, P.; Von Engeln, A.; Zhao, M.

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Cloud Computing For Bioinformatics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cloud Computing For Bioinformatics #12;Cloud Computing: what is it? · Cloud Computing is a distributed infrastructure where resources, software, and data are provided in an on-demand fashion. · Cloud Computing abstracts infrastructure from application. · Cloud Computing should save you time the way software

Ferrara, Katherine W.

248

Cloud Computing og availability  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cloud Computing og availability Projekt i pålidelighed Henrik Lavdal - 20010210 Søren Bardino Kaa - 20011654 Gruppe 8 19-03-2010 #12;Cloud Computing og availability Side 2 af 28 Indholdsfortegnelse ...........................................................................................5 Cloud computing

Christensen, Henrik Bærbak

249

Federal Cloud Computing: The Definitive Guide for Cloud Service Providers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Federal Cloud Computing: The Definitive Guide for Cloud Service Providers offers an in-depth look at topics surrounding federal cloud computing within the federal government, including the Federal Cloud Computing Strategy, Cloud Computing Standards, ...

Matthew Metheny

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Entropy Production in Relativistic Jet Boundary Layers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hot relativistic jets, passing through a background medium with a pressure gradient p \\propto r^{-\\eta} where 2 gamma-ray bursts from ...

Kohler, Susanna

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Dynamic Balances in a Wavy Boundary Layer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The authors analyze the influence of waves on the budgets of momentum flux and kinetic energy in the atmospheric flow over sea surface waves and use the findings to reinterpret the results from the earlier empirical studies on the subject. This ...

Tihomir Hristov; Jesus Ruiz-Plancarte

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Boundary layer induced by a conical vortex  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......for later convenience. On the other hand, in order to improve the accuracy of the computations as the axis is approached, we rede fi ne the radial coordinate as l =? ln ?, (29) so that the interval 1 ? ? ? 0 is mapped onto 0 ? l < ?. Substituting (26......

R. Fernandez-Feria; J. C. Arrese

2000-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Numerical Experiments in Supersonic Boundary Layer Stability  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

advances in supersonic and hypersonic aerospace technology have led to a renewed interest in the stability Methods Branch M. Y. Hussaini Institute for Computer Applications in Science and Engineering NASA Langley­dimensional quantity superscripts T : transpose â?? : Fourier component 0 : perturbation variable 2 Introduction Recent

Erlebacher, Gordon

254

Thunderstorm influence on boundary layer winds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

moisture convergence The ambient condition, horizontal moisture convergence, through the vertical, was determined using the vector identity v . qv2 = v2 v q + q v ' V2 p p p (2) where q is specific humidity. Term 1 was computed by the centered finite... the relationship rpo J (v qv) dp ? 7 ('v. . qv) 1 p=900 1 =1 14 where N is the number of 50 mb pressure levels beginning with the 900 mb level to the level of zero divergence, p , the integral of horizontal 0' moisture convergence was determined by summing...

Schmidt, Jill Marie

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

255

Using Doppler spectra to separate hydrometeor populations and analyze ice precipitation in multilayered mixed-phase clouds  

SciTech Connect

Multimodality of cloud radar Doppler spectra is used to partition cloud particle phases and to separate distinct ice populations in the radar sample volume, thereby facilitating analysis of individual ice showers in multilayered mixed-phase clouds. A 35-GHz cloud radar located at Barrow, Alaska, during the Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment collected the Doppler spectra. Data from a pair of collocated depolarization lidars confirmed the presence of two liquid cloud layers reported in this study. Surprisingly, both of these cloud layers were embedded in ice precipitation yet maintained their liquid. Our spectral separation of the ice precipitation yielded two distinct ice populations: ice initiated within the two liquid cloud layers and ice precipitation formed in higher cloud layers. Comparisons of ice fall velocity versus radar reflectivity relationships derived for distinct showers reveal that a single relationship might not properly represent the ice showers during this period.

Rambukkange, Mahlon P.; Verlinde, J.; Eloranta, E. W.; Flynn, Connor J.; Clothiaux, Eugene E.

2011-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

256

The Structure of the Local Interstellar Medium IV: Dynamics, Morphology, Physical Properties, and Implications of Cloud-Cloud Interactions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present an empirical dynamical model of the local interstellar medium based on 270 radial-velocity measurements for 157 sight lines toward nearby stars. Physical-parameter measurements (i.e., temperature, turbulent velocity, depletions) are available for 90 components, or one-third of the sample, enabling initial characterizations of the physical properties of LISM clouds. The model includes 15 warm clouds located within 15 pc of the Sun, each with a different velocity vector. We derive projected morphologies of all clouds and estimate the volume filling factor of warm partially ionized material in the LISM to be between ~5.5% and 19%. Relative velocities of potentially interacting clouds are often supersonic, consistent with heating, turbulent, and metal-depletion properties. Cloud-cloud collisions may be responsible for the filamentary morphologies found in ~1/3 of LISM clouds, the distribution of clouds along the boundaries of the two nearest clouds (LIC and G), the detailed shape and heating of the Mic Cloud, the location of nearby radio scintillation screens, and the location of a LISM cold cloud. Contrary to previous claims, the Sun appears to be located in the transition zone between the LIC and G Clouds.

Seth Redfield; Jeffrey L. Linsky

2007-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

257

Interactions Between the Daytime Mixed Layer and the Surface: Oklahoma Mesonet and EBBR Heat Fluxes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Interactions Between the Daytime Mixed Layer Interactions Between the Daytime Mixed Layer and the Surface: Oklahoma Mesonet and EBBR Heat Fluxes R. L. Coulter Argonne National Laboratory Argonne, Illinois Introduction Surface layer estimates of surface sensible heat flux have been made at 10 - 14 locations within the Central Facility (CF) of the Southern Great Plains (SGP) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program site by using energy balance Bowen ratio (EBBR) stations located mostly in uncultivated areas. The advent of the Oklahoma Mesonet (OKM) with approximately 50 stations within the boundaries of the Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) site that measure a variety of meteorological parameters leads to the possibility of using the OKM to provide additional estimates of surface energy budget to augment

258

On Demand Surveillance Service in Vehicular Cloud  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Toward Vehicular Service Cloud . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4.2 Open Mobile Cloud Requirement . . . . .3.1 Mobile Cloud

Weng, Jui-Ting

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Cloud Computing For Bioinformatics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cloud Computing For Bioinformatics EC2 and AMIs #12;Quick-starting an EC2 instance (let's get our feet wet!) Cloud Computing #12;Cloud Computing: EC2 instance Quick Start · On EC2 console, we can click on Launch Instance · This will let us get up and going quickly #12;Cloud Computing: EC2 instance

Ferrara, Katherine W.

260

Formation and Spread of Aircraft-Induced Holes in Clouds  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...cloud layer; a local sounding showed that...identified from local radiosondes, wind profilers, and...and Forecasting (WRF) model (10). The WRF model was configured...thermodynamic and wind conditions. The...surface and therefore local meteorology and...

Andrew J. Heymsfield; Gregory Thompson; Hugh Morrison; Aaron Bansemer; Roy M. Rasmussen; Patrick Minnis; Zhien Wang; Damao Zhang

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "boundary layer clouds" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

ARM Cloud Aerosol Precipitation Experiment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Satellite Observation CAS Cloud Aerosol Spectrometer CCN Cloud Condensation Nuclei CIP Cloud Imaging Probe CPC Condensation Particle Counter CSPHOT Cimel sunphotometer CVI...

262

SURFACE CLOUD RADIATIVE FORCING, CLOUD FRACTION AND CLOUD ALBEDO: THEIR RELATIONSHIP AND MULTISCALE VARIATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SURFACE CLOUD RADIATIVE FORCING, CLOUD FRACTION AND CLOUD ALBEDO: THEIR RELATIONSHIP AND MULTISCALE/Atmospheric Sciences Division Brookhaven National Laboratory P.O. Box, Upton, NY www.bnl.gov ABSTRACT Cloud-induced climate change. Cloud-radiative forcing, cloud fraction, and cloud albedo are three key quantities

263

Flying Cloud Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Flying Cloud Wind Farm Flying Cloud Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Flying Cloud Wind Farm Facility Flying Cloud Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner PPM Energy Inc Developer Clipper Windpower Energy Purchaser Alliant/IES Utilities Location West of Spirit Lake IA Coordinates 43.416975°, -95.422282° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.416975,"lon":-95.422282,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

264

A Global Cloud Resolving Model Goals  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cloud Resolving Model Cloud Resolving Model Goals Uniform global horizontal grid spacing of 4 km or better ("cloud permitting") 100 or more layers up to at least the stratopause Parameterizations of microphysics, turbulence (including small clouds), and radiation Execution speed of at least several simulated days per wall-clock day on immediately available systems Annual cycle simulation by end of 2011. Motivations Parameterizations are still problematic. There are no spectral gaps. The equations themselves change at high resolution. GCRMs will be used for NWP within 10 years. GCRMs will be used for climate time-slices shortly thereafter. It's going to take some time to learn how to do GCRMs well. Scaling Science Length, Spatial extent, #Atoms, Weak scaling Time scale

265

First Observations of Tracking Clouds Using Scanning ARM Cloud Radars  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Tracking clouds using scanning cloud radars can help to document the temporal evolution of cloud properties well before large-drop formation (weather radar “first echo”). These measurements also complement cloud and precipitation tracking using ...

Paloma Borque; Pavlos Kollias; Scott Giangrande

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

ARM - Measurement - Cloud fraction  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to hear from you Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Cloud fraction Fraction of sky covered by clouds, observed directly or derived from SW...

267

ARM - Measurement - Cloud size  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to hear from you Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Cloud size Information about the physical dimensions of a cloud, including such measurements...

268

North Australian Cloud Lines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A satellite classification and climatology of propagating mesoscale cloud fines in northern Australia is presented. These cloud fines range from long, narrow lines of shallow convection to extensive deep convective squall lines with mesoscale ...

W. Drosdowsky; G. J. Holland

1987-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Marine cloud brightening  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...will not be as effective in marine stratocumulus clouds that are...Engineering steps to implement marine cloud brightening (a) Introduction...brightening by increasing the CCN of marine stratus clouds (by way of...vessel and the optimum means of propulsion. In fact, both these aspects...

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

XSEDE Cloud Survey Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

XSEDE Cloud Survey Report David Lifka, Cornell Center for Advanced Computing Ian Foster, ANL, ANL and The University of Chicago A National Science Foundation-sponsored cloud user survey was conducted from September 2012 to April 2013 by the XSEDE Cloud Integration Investigation Team to better

Walter, M.Todd

271

Research Cloud Computing Recommendations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Research Cloud Computing Recommendations SRCPAC December 3, 2014 #12;Mandate and Membership SRCPAC convened this committee in Sept 2014 to investigate the role that cloud computing should play in our & Academic Affairs (Social Work) #12;Questions discussed · What cloud resources are available? · Which kinds

Qian, Ning

272

Cloud Properties and Radiative Heating Rates for TWP  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

A cloud properties and radiative heating rates dataset is presented where cloud properties retrieved using lidar and radar observations are input into a radiative transfer model to compute radiative fluxes and heating rates at three ARM sites located in the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) region. The cloud properties retrieval is a conditional retrieval that applies various retrieval techniques depending on the available data, that is if lidar, radar or both instruments detect cloud. This Combined Remote Sensor Retrieval Algorithm (CombRet) produces vertical profiles of liquid or ice water content (LWC or IWC), droplet effective radius (re), ice crystal generalized effective size (Dge), cloud phase, and cloud boundaries. The algorithm was compared with 3 other independent algorithms to help estimate the uncertainty in the cloud properties, fluxes, and heating rates (Comstock et al. 2013). The dataset is provided at 2 min temporal and 90 m vertical resolution. The current dataset is applied to time periods when the MMCR (Millimeter Cloud Radar) version of the ARSCL (Active Remotely-Sensed Cloud Locations) Value Added Product (VAP) is available. The MERGESONDE VAP is utilized where temperature and humidity profiles are required. Future additions to this dataset will utilize the new KAZR instrument and its associated VAPs.

Comstock, Jennifer

273

Cloud Properties and Radiative Heating Rates for TWP  

SciTech Connect

A cloud properties and radiative heating rates dataset is presented where cloud properties retrieved using lidar and radar observations are input into a radiative transfer model to compute radiative fluxes and heating rates at three ARM sites located in the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) region. The cloud properties retrieval is a conditional retrieval that applies various retrieval techniques depending on the available data, that is if lidar, radar or both instruments detect cloud. This Combined Remote Sensor Retrieval Algorithm (CombRet) produces vertical profiles of liquid or ice water content (LWC or IWC), droplet effective radius (re), ice crystal generalized effective size (Dge), cloud phase, and cloud boundaries. The algorithm was compared with 3 other independent algorithms to help estimate the uncertainty in the cloud properties, fluxes, and heating rates (Comstock et al. 2013). The dataset is provided at 2 min temporal and 90 m vertical resolution. The current dataset is applied to time periods when the MMCR (Millimeter Cloud Radar) version of the ARSCL (Active Remotely-Sensed Cloud Locations) Value Added Product (VAP) is available. The MERGESONDE VAP is utilized where temperature and humidity profiles are required. Future additions to this dataset will utilize the new KAZR instrument and its associated VAPs.

Comstock, Jennifer

2013-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

274

W-band ARM Cloud Radar (WACR) Handbook  

SciTech Connect

The W-band Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Cloud Radar (WACR) systems are zenith pointing Doppler radars that probe the extent and composition of clouds at 95.04 GHz. The main purpose of this radar is to determine cloud boundaries (e.g., cloud bottoms and tops). This radar reports estimates for the first three spectra moments for each range gate up to 15 km. The 0th moment is reflectivity, the 1st moment is radial velocity, and the 2nd moment is spectral width. Also available are the raw spectra files. Unlike the millimeter wavelength cloud radar (MMCR), the WACR does not use pulse coding and operates in only copolarization and cross-polarization modes.

Widener, KB; Johnson, K

2005-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

275

Evaluation of cloud fraction and its radiative effect simulated by IPCC AR4 global models against ARM surface observations  

SciTech Connect

Cloud Fraction (CF) is the dominant modulator of radiative fluxes. In this study, we evaluate CF simulations in the IPCC AR4 GCMs against ARM ground measurements, with a focus on the vertical structure, total amount of cloud and its effect on cloud shortwave transmissivity, for both inter-model deviation and model-measurement discrepancy. Our intercomparisons of three CF or sky-cover related dataset reveal that the relative differences are usually less than 10% (5%) for multi-year monthly (annual) mean values, while daily differences are quite significant. The results also show that the model-observation and the inter-model deviations have a similar magnitude for the total CF (TCF) and the normalized cloud effect, and they are twice as large as the surface downward solar radiation and cloud transmissivity. This implies that the other cloud properties, such as cloud optical depth and height, have a similar magnitude of disparity to TCF among the GCMs, and suggests that a better agreement among the GCMs in solar radiative fluxes could be the result of compensating errors in either cloud vertical structure, cloud optical depth or cloud fraction. Similar deviation pattern between inter-model and model-measurement suggests that the climate models tend to generate larger bias against observations for those variables with larger inter-model deviation. The simulated TCF from IPCC AR4 GCMs are very scattered through all seasons over three ARM sites: Southern Great Plains (SGP), Manus, Papua New Guinea and North Slope of Alaska (NSA). The GCMs perform better at SGP than at Manus and NSA in simulating the seasonal variation and probability distribution of TCF; however, the TCF in these models is remarkably underpredicted and cloud transmissivity is less susceptible to the change of TCF than the observed at SGP. Much larger inter-model deviation and model bias are found over NSA than the other sites in estimating the TCF, cloud transmissivity and cloud-radiation interaction, suggesting that the Arctic region continues to challenge cloud simulations in climate models. Most of the GCMs tend to underpredict CF and fail to capture the seasonal variation of CF at middle and low levels in the tropics. The high altitude CF is much larger in the GCMs than the observation and the inter-model variability of CF also reaches maximum at high levels in the tropics. Most of the GCMs tend to underpredict CF by 50-150% relative to the measurement average at low and middle levels over SGP. While the GCMs generally capture the maximum CF in the boundary layer and vertical variability, the inter-model deviation is largest near surface over the Arctic. The internal variability of CF simulated in ensemble runs with the same model is very minimal.

Qian, Yun; Long, Charles N.; Wang, Hailong; Comstock, Jennifer M.; McFarlane, Sally A.; Xie, Shaocheng

2012-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

276

Migrating enterprise storage applications to the cloud  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

hybrid cloud combines aspects of public and private clouds: a company may build a compute cloud own its own infrastructure,

Vrable, Michael Daniel

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Layering Technologies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Planar technology requires that thin layers of materials be formed and patterned sequentially, commencing with a flat rigid substrate. The key aspects of each layer are its Thi...

Ivor Brodie; Julius J. Muray

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

How do A-train Sensors Intercompare in the Retrieval of Above-Cloud Aerosol Optical Depth? A Case Study-based Assessment  

SciTech Connect

We inter-compare the above-cloud aerosol optical depth (ACAOD) of biomass burning plumes retrieved from different A-train sensors, i.e., MODIS, CALIOP, POLDER, and OMI. These sensors have shown independent capabilities to detect and retrieve aerosol loading above marine boundary layer clouds--a kind of situation often found over the Southeast Atlantic Ocean during dry burning season. A systematic one-to-one comparison reveals that, in general, all passive sensors and CALIOP-based research methods derive comparable ACAOD with differences mostly within 0.2 over homogeneous cloud fields. The 532-nm ACAOD retrieved by CALIOP operational algorithm is largely underestimated; however, it’s 1064-nm AOD when converted to 500 nm shows closer agreement to the passive sensors. Given the different types of sensor measurements processed with different algorithms, the close agreement between them is encouraging. Due to lack of adequate direct measurements above cloud, the validation of satellite-based ACAOD retrievals remains an open challenge. The inter-satellite comparison, however, can be useful for the relative evaluation and consistency check.

Jethva, H. T.; Torres, O.; Waquet, F.; Chand, Duli; Hu, Yong X.

2014-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

279

Cloud Properties Working Group Low Clouds Update  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cloud Properties Working Group Cloud Properties Working Group Low Clouds Update Low Clouds Update Jennifer Comstock Jennifer Comstock Dave Turner Dave Turner Andy Andy Vogelmann Vogelmann Instruments Instruments 90/150 GHz microwave radiometer 90/150 GHz microwave radiometer Deployed during COPS AMF Deployed during COPS AMF Exploring calibration w/ DPR ( Exploring calibration w/ DPR ( Crewell Crewell & & L L ö ö hnert hnert ) ) See COPS Breakout, Wednesday evening See COPS Breakout, Wednesday evening 183 GHz (GVR) deployed at the NSA 183 GHz (GVR) deployed at the NSA Neural network algorithm to retrieve PWV & LWP (Maria Neural network algorithm to retrieve PWV & LWP (Maria Cadeddu Cadeddu ) ) Potential VAP candidate (RPWG) Potential VAP candidate (RPWG)

280

A comparison of cloud top heights computed from airborne lidar and MAS radiance data using CO2 slicing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A comparison of cloud top heights computed from airborne lidar and MAS radiance data using CO2 in assessing the accuracy of the CO2-slicing cloud height algorithm. Infrared measurements of upwelling which included various single- layer and multilayer cloud conditions. Overall, the CO2-slicing method

Sheridan, Jennifer

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "boundary layer clouds" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

BNL | Cloud Lifecycle Infrastructure  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cloud Life Cycle Infrastructure Cloud Life Cycle Infrastructure An important component of any long-term atmospheric measurement program is the quality control and maintenance of the datastreams from instrument systems. Further, the raw measurements from atmospheric remote sensing instrumentation are not directly useable by the majority of the scientific community. These raw measurements must be interpreted and converted to geophysical quantities that can be more readily used by a greater number of scientists to address important questions regarding the Earth's climate system. The cloud life cycle infrastructure group at BNL is led by Dr. Michael Jensen and is responsible for the development and production of cloud-related value-added products (VAPs). The cloud life cycle infrastructure group also provides mentorships for the millimeter cloud

282

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents: Atmospheric...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

layer is sensitive to the boundary layer scheme. Furthermore, little is known on the climatology of drizzling or precipitating boundary layer clouds, their seasonal variability and...

283

Dispersion of Cloud Droplet Size Distributions, Cloud Parameterization...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Dispersion of Cloud Droplet Size Distributions, Cloud Parameterizations, and Indirect Aerosol Effects P. H. Daum and Y. Liu Brookhaven National Laboratory Upton, New York...

284

Koala: A DiscreteEvent Simulation Model of Infrastructure Clouds Koala is a discrete-event simulator that can model infrastructure as a service (IaaS) clouds of up  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of configurations for node platforms), (4) Internet/Intranet layer (including the ability to locate cloud clusters, the node, the Internet/Intranet and the VM behavior layers. Further, Koala can record temporally varying behavioral characteristics: (1) congestion, (2) cloud-wide resource usage, (3) variance in cluster load, (4

285

Relationship between cloud radiative forcing, cloud fraction and cloud albedo, and new surface-based approach for determining cloud albedo  

SciTech Connect

This paper focuses on three interconnected topics: (1) quantitative relationship between surface shortwave cloud radiative forcing, cloud fraction, and cloud albedo; (2) surface-based approach for measuring cloud albedo; (3) multiscale (diurnal, annual and inter-annual) variations and covariations of surface shortwave cloud radiative forcing, cloud fraction, and cloud albedo. An analytical expression is first derived to quantify the relationship between cloud radiative forcing, cloud fraction, and cloud albedo. The analytical expression is then used to deduce a new approach for inferring cloud albedo from concurrent surface-based measurements of downwelling surface shortwave radiation and cloud fraction. High-resolution decade-long data on cloud albedos are obtained by use of this surface-based approach over the US Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiaton Measurement (ARM) Program at the Great Southern Plains (SGP) site. The surface-based cloud albedos are further compared against those derived from the coincident GOES satellite measurements. The three long-term (1997-2009) sets of hourly data on shortwave cloud radiative forcing, cloud fraction and cloud albedo collected over the SGP site are analyzed to explore the multiscale (diurnal, annual and inter-annual) variations and covariations. The analytical formulation is useful for diagnosing deficiencies of cloud-radiation parameterizations in climate models.

Liu, Y.; Wu, W.; Jensen, M. P.; Toto, T.

2011-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

286

Cloud Computing: An Architectural Perspective .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Cloud Computing is a term heavily used in today's world. Not even a day passes by without hearing the words "Cloud Computing". It has become… (more)

Pandya, Hetalben

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Profiling clouds' inner life | EMSL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

inner life Subgrid modeling pinpoints cloud transformation to uncover true reflective power An accurate understanding of clouds over the ocean is important for climate change...

288

BNL | Aerosol, Cloud, Precipitation Interactions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Atmospheric aerosols exert important "indirect effects" on clouds and climate by serving as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and ice nuclei that affect cloud radiative and microphysical properties. For example, an increase in CCN increases the number concentration of droplets enhances cloud albedo, and suppresses precipitation that alters cloud coverage and lifetime. However, in the case of moist and strong convective clouds, increasing aerosols may increase precipitation and enhance storm development. Although aerosol-induced indirect effects on climate are believed to have a significant impact on global climate change, estimating their impact continues to be one of the most uncertain climate forcings.

289

Finite element analysis of shells with layers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is well established that thin shell structures frequently feature narrow bands of strain concentration and localized displacement irregularities referred to as boundary and internal layers. It is crucial to capture these ...

Hiller, Jean-François, 1974-

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Environment and the Lifetime of Tropical Deep Convection in a Cloud-Permitting Regional Model Simulation  

SciTech Connect

By applying a cloud tracking algorithm to tropical convective systems simulated by a regional high resolution model, the study documents environmental conditions before and after convective systems are initiated over ocean and land by following them during their lifetime. The comparative roles of various environmental fields in affecting the lifetime of convection are also quantified. The statistics of lifetime, maximum area, propagation speed and direction of the simulated deep convection agrees well with geostationary satellite observations. Over ocean, convective systems enhance surface fluxes through the associated wind gusts as well as cooling and drying of the boundary layer. A significant relationship is found between the mean surface fluxes during their lifetime and the longevity of the systems which in turn is related to the initial intensity of the moist updraft and to a lesser extent upper level shear. Over land, on the other hand, convective activity suppresses surface fluxes through cloud cover and the lifetime of convection is related to the upper level shear during their lifetime and strength of the heat fluxes several hours before the initiation of convection. For systems of equal lifetime, those over land are significantly more intense than those over ocean especially during early stages of their lifetime.

Hagos, Samson M.; Feng, Zhe; McFarlane, Sally A.; Leung, Lai-Yung R.

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Factors influencing the microphysics and radiative properties of liquid-dominated Arctic clouds: insight from observations of aerosol and clouds during ISDAC  

SciTech Connect

Aircraft measurements during the Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC) in April 2008 are used to investigate aerosol indirect effects in Arctic clouds. Two aerosol-cloud regimes are considered in this analysis: single-layer stratocumulus cloud with below-cloud aerosol concentrations (N{sub a}) below 300 cm{sup -3} on April 8 and April 26-27 (clean cases); and inhomogeneous layered cloud with N{sub a} > 500 cm{sup -3} below cloud base on April 19-20, concurrent with a biomass burning episode (polluted cases). Vertical profiles through cloud in each regime are used to determine average cloud microphysical and optical properties. Positive correlations between the cloud droplet effective radius (Re) and cloud optical depth ({tau}) are observed for both clean and polluted cases, which are characteristic of optically-thin, non-precipitating clouds. Average Re values for each case are {approx} 6.2 {mu}m, despite significantly higher droplet number concentrations (Nd) in the polluted cases. The apparent independence of Re and Nd simplifies the description of indirect effects, such that {tau} and the cloud albedo (A) can be described by relatively simple functions of the cloud liquid water path. Adiabatic cloud parcel model simulations show that the marked differences in Na between the regimes account largely for differences in droplet activation, but that the properties of precursor aerosol also play a role, particularly for polluted cases where competition for vapour amongst the more numerous particles limits activation to larger and/or more hygroscopic particles. The similarity of Re for clean and polluted cases is attributed to compensating droplet growth processes for different initial droplet size distributions.

Earle, Michael; Liu, Peter S.; Strapp, J. Walter; Zelenyuk, Alla; Imre, D.; McFarquhar, Greg; Shantz, Nicole C.; Leaitch, W. R.

2011-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

292

ARM - Measurement - Cloud extinction  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

extinction extinction ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Cloud extinction The removal of radiant energy from an incident beam by the process of cloud absorption and/or scattering. Categories Cloud Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments NEPHELOMETER : Nephelometer Field Campaign Instruments CEP : Cloud Extinction Probe CLDAEROSMICRO : Cloud and Aerosol Microphysical Properties EC-CONVAIR580-BULK : Environment Canada Convair 580 Bulk Parameters

293

Decision Boundaries Using Bayes Factors: The Case of Cloud Masks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Comunicaciones, U.L.P.G.C, Campus Univ. de Tafira, 35017 Las Pal- mas de Gran Canaria, Spain, and was at Queen- ciones, U.L.P.G.C, Campus Univ. de Tafira, 35017 Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, Spain. Author

Murtagh, Fionn

294

Compressed absorbing boundary conditions for the Helmholtz equation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Absorbing layers are sometimes required to be impractically thick in order to offer an accurate approximation of an absorbing boundary condition for the Helmholtz equation in a heterogeneous medium. It is always possible ...

Bélanger-Rioux, Rosalie

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

A 25-month database of stratus cloud properties generated from ground-based measurements at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Southern Great Plains Site  

SciTech Connect

A 25-month database of the macrophysical, microphysical, and radiative properties of isolated and overcast low-level stratus clouds has been generated using a newly developed parameterization and surface measurements from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement central facility in Oklahoma. The database (5-min resolution) includes two parts: measurements and retrievals. The former consist of cloud base and top heights, layer-mean temperature, cloud liquid water path, and solar transmission ratio measured by a ground-based lidar/ceilometer and radar pair, radiosondes, a microwave radiometer, and a standard Eppley precision spectral pyranometer, respectively. The retrievals include the cloud-droplet effective radius and number concentration and broadband shortwave optical depth and cloud and top-of-atmosphere albedos. Stratus without any overlying mid or high-level clouds occurred most frequently during winter and least often during summer. Mean cloud-layer altitudes and geometric thicknesses were higher and greater, respectively, in summer than in winter. Both quantities are positively correlated with the cloud-layer mean temperature. Mean cloud-droplet effective radii range from 8.1 {mu}m in winter to 9.7 {mu}m during summer, while cloud-droplet number concentrations during winter are nearly twice those in summer. Since cloud liquid water paths are almost the same in both seasons, cloud optical depth is higher during the winter, leading to greater cloud albedos and lower cloud transmittances. (c) 2000 American Geophysical Union.

Dong, Xiquan [Meteorology Department, University of Utah, Salt Lake City (United States)] [Meteorology Department, University of Utah, Salt Lake City (United States); Minnis, Patrick [NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, Virginia (United States)] [NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, Virginia (United States); Ackerman, Thomas P. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, DOE, Richland, Washington (United States)] [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, DOE, Richland, Washington (United States); Clothiaux, Eugene E. [Department of Meteorology, Pennsylvania State University, University Park (United States)] [Department of Meteorology, Pennsylvania State University, University Park (United States); Mace, Gerald G. [Meteorology Department, University of Utah, Salt Lake City (United States)] [Meteorology Department, University of Utah, Salt Lake City (United States); Long, Charles N. [Department of Meteorology, Pennsylvania State University, University Park (United States)] [Department of Meteorology, Pennsylvania State University, University Park (United States); Liljegren, James C. [Ames Laboratory, DOE, Ames, Iowa (United States)] [Ames Laboratory, DOE, Ames, Iowa (United States)

2000-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

296

Cloud Computing Synopsis and Recommendations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This document reprises the NIST-established definition of cloud computing, describes cloud computing benefits and open issues, presents an overview of major classes of cloud technology, and provides guidelines and recommendations on how organizations ... Keywords: cloud computing, computer security, virtualization

Mark Lee Badger; Timothy Grance; Robert Patt-Corner; Jeffery M, Voas

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Convective Cloud Lifecycles Lunchtime seminar  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Convective Cloud Lifecycles Lunchtime seminar 19th May 2009 Bob Plant Department of Meteorology, University of Reading, UK #12;Introduction Obtain life cycle statistics for clouds in CRM simulations Why Conclusions Convective Cloud Lifecycles ­ p.1/3 #12;Why bother? Convective Cloud Lifecycles ­ p.2/3 #12;Some

Plant, Robert

298

Degenerate Metric Phase Boundaries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The structure of boundaries between degenerate and nondegenerate solutions of Ashtekar's canonical reformulation of Einstein's equations is studied. Several examples are given of such "phase boundaries" in which the metric is degenerate on one side of a null hypersurface and non-degenerate on the other side. These include portions of flat space, Schwarzschild, and plane wave solutions joined to degenerate regions. In the last case, the wave collides with a planar phase boundary and continues on with the same curvature but degenerate triad, while the phase boundary continues in the opposite direction. We conjecture that degenerate phase boundaries are always null.

Ingemar Bengtsson; Ted Jacobson

1999-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

299

A comparison of fine particle and aerosol strong acidity at the interface zone (1540 m) and within (452 m) the planetary boundary layer of the Great Gulf and Presidential-Dry River Class I Wildernesses on the Presidential Range, New Hampshire USA  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Mount Washington, NH in the White Mountain National Forest, is flanked to the north-northeast and south by two Class I Wilderness areas, the Great Gulf and Presidential Range-Dry River Wildernesses, respectively. The Clean Air Act protects Class I Area natural resource values from air pollution. Aerosol sulfate, a fine particulate component that is often transported long distances, is a known contributor to visibility degradation and acidic deposition. We examined summertime fine particulate aerosol mass and sulfate, strong acidity and ammonium concentrations from 1988 to 2007 on Mount Washington at two elevations, 452 and 1540 m (msl). The former site is often within, and the latter at the interface of, the planetary boundary layer. Comparisons of sampling interval durations (10 and 24 h) and site vs. site are made. We also examine the extent to which aerosol sulfate is neutralized. Ten hour (daytime) compared to 24 h samples have higher mass and aerosol sulfate concentrations, however paired samples are well correlated. Fine mass concentrations compared between the 452 m and 1540 m sites (standard temperature and pressure corrected) show a weak positive linear relationship with the later being approximately 32% lower. We attribute the lack of a strong correlation to the facts that the 1540 m site is commonly at the interface of and even above the regional planetary boundary layer in summer and that it can intercept different air masses relative to the 452 m site. Sulfate is ?18% lower at the higher elevation site, but comprises a greater percentage of total fine mass; 42% compared to 37% for the high and low elevation site, respectively. Aerosol strong acidity was found to increase with increasing sulfate concentrations at both sites. Further the ratio of hydrogen to sulfate ion was greater in 24 h than 10 h samples at the higher elevation site likely due to overnight transport of fresh acidic aerosols.

Georgia L.D. Murray; Kenneth Kimball; L. Bruce Hill; George A. Allen; Jack M. Wolfson; Alex Pszenny; Thomas Seidel; Bruce G. Doddridge; Alexandra Boris

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Using ARM data to correct plane-parallel satellite retrievals of cloud  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Using ARM data to correct plane-parallel satellite retrievals of cloud Using ARM data to correct plane-parallel satellite retrievals of cloud properties Dong, Xiquan University of North Dakota Minnis, Patrick NASA Langley Research Center Xi, Baike University of North Dakota Khaiyer, Mandana Analytical Services and Material, Inc. Category: Cloud Properties The angular variations of cloud properties derived from GOES data are examined using simultaneously collocated ARM surface observations/retrievals at the DOE ARM SGP site during the 6-yr period from January 1997 to December 2002. The dependencies of GOES cloud retrievals on solar zenith angle (SZA), scattering angle (SCA), and relative azimuth angle (RZA) are investigated for single-layer and overcast low-level stratus clouds. The GOES-retrieved cloud-droplet effective radius (re),

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301

Contrail Virtual Execution Platform Challenges in Being Part of a Cloud Federation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Contrail Virtual Execution Platform Challenges in Being Part of a Cloud Federation Piyush Harsh will provide a federation layer support for bringing a multitude of cloud providers, both private and public, health care providers to name a few. This paper describes the novel features we are building

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

302

ENVISAT Symposium 2007 Montreux, 26 April 2007 The Relationship Between Absorbing Aerosols And Clouds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: aerosols over cloud #12;Solar irradiance I [W m-2 nm-1 ] Absorbed energy 25.6 Wm-2 Reflectance R I . 0E0 R aerosol / cloud layer #12; SCIAMACHY sees smoke in cloudy scene biomass burning in SW Africa, 09

Graaf, Martin de

303

In Clouds We Trust  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......can bring. Many have realised that giving a third party control of part of the IT infrastructure can help reduce capital expenditure and maximise asset utilisation to provide a quantitative return on investment (ROI). Cloud can also remove resource......

Jim Damoulakis

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Moving into the Cloud.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Cloud computing is the notion of abstracting and outsourcing hardware or software resources over the Internet, often to a third party on a pay-as-you-go basis.… (more)

Mikalsen, Christian

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

ARM - Evaluation Product - Active Remote Sensing of Clouds from Ka-band ARM  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ProductsActive Remote Sensing of Clouds from Ka-band ProductsActive Remote Sensing of Clouds from Ka-band ARM Zenith Radars Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Evaluation Product : Active Remote Sensing of Clouds from Ka-band ARM Zenith Radars Site(s) GAN SGP General Description The Ka-band ARM Zenith Radars (KAZRs) have replaced the long-serving Millimeter Cloud Radars, or MMCRs. Accordingly, the primary MMCR Value Added Product (VAP), the Active Remote Sensing of CLouds (ARSCL) product, is being replaced by a KAZR-based version, the KAZR-ARSCL VAP. KAZR-ARSCL provides cloud boundaries and best-estimate time-height fields of radar moments. KAZR observations are corrected for water vapor attenuation and velocity aliasing and significant detection masks are produced. KAZR-ARSCL

306

Constructing a Merged Cloud-Precipitation Radar Dataset for Tropical Convective Clouds during the DYNAMO/AMIE Experiment at Addu Atoll  

SciTech Connect

To improve understanding of the convective processes key to the Madden-Julian-Oscillation (MJO) initiation, the Dynamics of the MJO (DYNAMO) and Atmospheric Radiation Measurement MJO Investigation Experiment (AMIE) collected four months of observations from three radars, the S-band Polarization Radar (S-Pol), the C-band Shared Mobile Atmospheric Research & Teaching Radar (SMART-R), and Ka-band Zenith Radar (KAZR) on Addu Atoll in the tropical Indian Ocean. This study compares the measurements from the S-Pol and SMART-R to those from the more sensitive KAZR in order to characterize the hydrometeor detection capabilities of the two scanning precipitation radars. Frequency comparisons for precipitating convective clouds and non-precipitating high clouds agree much better than non-precipitating low clouds for both scanning radars due to issues in ground clutter. On average, SMART-R underestimates convective and high cloud tops by 0.3 to 1.1 km, while S-Pol underestimates cloud tops by less than 0.4 km for these cloud types. S-Pol shows excellent dynamic range in detecting various types of clouds and therefore its data are well suited for characterizing the evolution of the 3D cloud structures, complementing the profiling KAZR measurements. For detecting non-precipitating low clouds and thin cirrus clouds, KAZR remains the most reliable instrument. However, KAZR is attenuated in heavy precipitation and underestimates cloud top height due to rainfall attenuation 4.3% of the time during DYNAMO/AMIE. An empirical method to correct the KAZR cloud top heights is described, and a merged radar dataset is produced to provide improved cloud boundary estimates, microphysics and radiative heating retrievals.

Feng, Zhe; McFarlane, Sally A.; Schumacher, Courtney; Ellis, Scott; Comstock, Jennifer M.; Bharadwaj, Nitin

2014-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

307

Migrating enterprise storage applications to the cloud  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2.1 Cloud Providers . . . . . . . . . . . .2.1.1 Cloud Storage . . . . . . . . .2.1.2 Cloud Computation . . . . . . 2.2 Enterprise Storage

Vrable, Michael Daniel

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Testing outer boundary treatments for the Einstein equations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Various methods of treating outer boundaries in numerical relativity are compared using a simple test problem: a Schwarzschild black hole with an outgoing gravitational wave perturbation. Numerical solutions computed using different boundary treatments are compared to a `reference' numerical solution obtained by placing the outer boundary at a very large radius. For each boundary treatment, the full solutions including constraint violations and extracted gravitational waves are compared to those of the reference solution, thereby assessing the reflections caused by the artificial boundary. These tests use a first-order generalized harmonic formulation of the Einstein equations. Constraint-preserving boundary conditions for this system are reviewed, and an improved boundary condition on the gauge degrees of freedom is presented. Alternate boundary conditions evaluated here include freezing the incoming characteristic fields, Sommerfeld boundary conditions, and the constraint-preserving boundary conditions of Kreiss and Winicour. Rather different approaches to boundary treatments, such as sponge layers and spatial compactification, are also tested. Overall the best treatment found here combines boundary conditions that preserve the constraints, freeze the Newman-Penrose scalar Psi_0, and control gauge reflections.

Oliver Rinne; Lee Lindblom; Mark A. Scheel

2007-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

309

Running Boundary Condition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we argue that boundary condition may run with energy scale. As an illustrative example, we consider one-dimensional quantum mechanics for a spinless particle that freely propagates in the bulk yet interacts only at the origin. In this setting we find the renormalization group flow of U(2) family of boundary conditions exactly. We show that the well-known scale-independent subfamily of boundary conditions are realized as fixed points. We also discuss the duality between two distinct boundary conditions from the renormalization group point of view. Generalizations to conformal mechanics and quantum graph are also discussed.

Ohya, Satoshi; Tachibana, Motoi

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Running Boundary Condition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we argue that boundary condition may run with energy scale. As an illustrative example, we consider one-dimensional quantum mechanics for a spinless particle that freely propagates in the bulk yet interacts only at the origin. In this setting we find the renormalization group flow of U(2) family of boundary conditions exactly. We show that the well-known scale-independent subfamily of boundary conditions are realized as fixed points. We also discuss the duality between two distinct boundary conditions from the renormalization group point of view. Generalizations to conformal mechanics and quantum graph are also discussed.

Satoshi Ohya; Makoto Sakamoto; Motoi Tachibana

2010-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

311

Thin Cloud Length Scales Using CALIPSO and CloudSat Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thin clouds are the most difficult cloud type to observe. The recent availability of joint cloud products from the active remote sensing instruments aboard CloudSat and the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite (CALIPSO) facilitates...

Solbrig, Jeremy E.

2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

312

Observing Warm Clouds in 3D Using ARM Scanning Cloud  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Observing Warm Clouds in 3D Using ARM Scanning Cloud Radars and a Novel Ensemble Method For original submission and image(s), see ARM Research Highlights http:www.arm.gov...

313

A Modeling Study of Irrigation Effects on Surface Fluxes and Land-Air-Cloud Interactions in the Southern Great Plains  

SciTech Connect

In this study, the authors incorporate an operational-like irrigation scheme into the Noah land surface model as part of the Weather Research and Forecasting Model (WRF). A series of simulations, with and without irrigation, is conducted over the Southern Great Plains (SGP) for an extremely dry (2006) and wet (2007) year. The results show that including irrigation reduces model bias in soil moisture and surface latent heat (LH) and sensible heat (SH) fluxes, especially during a dry year. Irrigation adds additional water to the surface, leading to changes in the planetary boundary layer. The increase in soil moisture leads to increases in the surface evapotranspiration and near-surface specific humidity but decreases in the SH and surface temperature. Those changes are local and occur during daytime. There is an irrigation-induced decrease in both the lifting condensation level (ZLCL) and mixed-layer depth. The decrease in ZLCL is larger than the decrease in mixed-layer depth, suggesting an increasing probability of shallow clouds. The simulated changes in precipitation induced by irrigation are highly variable in space, and the average precipitation over the SGP region only slightly increases. A high correlation is found among soil moisture, SH, and ZLCL. Larger values of soil moisture in the irrigated simulation due to irrigation in late spring and summer persist into the early fall, suggesting that irrigation-induced soil memory could last a few weeks to months. The results demonstrate the importance of irrigation parameterization for climate studies and improve the process-level understanding on the role of human activity in modulating land–air–cloud interactions.

Qian, Yun; Huang, Maoyi; Yang, Ben; Berg, Larry K.

2013-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

314

Ice Heating Up Cold Clouds | EMSL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ice Heating Up Cold Clouds Ice Heating Up Cold Clouds In a heated battle, ice crystals win the competition for cloud water vapor The mighty cloud ice crystal appears deceptively...

315

Cloud Based Applications and Platforms (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

Presentation to the Cloud Computing East 2014 Conference, where we are highlighting our cloud computing strategy, describing the platforms on the cloud (including Smartgrid.gov), and defining our process for implementing cloud based applications.

Brodt-Giles, D.

2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

316

Cloud Condensation Nuclei Retrievals at Cloud Base in North Dakota  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cloud Condensation Nuclei Retrievals at Cloud Base in North Dakota · Mariusz Starzec #12;Motivation Compare University of Wyoming (UWyo) and Droplet Measurement Technologies (DMT) cloud condensation nuclei condensation nuclei concentration (CCNC) at any supersaturation (SS) #12;Background Aerosols act as nuclei

Delene, David J.

317

Application of new simulation algorithms for modeling rf diagnostics of electron clouds  

SciTech Connect

Traveling wave rf diagnostics of electron cloud build-up show promise as a non-destructive technique for measuring plasma density and the efficacy of mitigation techniques. However, it is very difficult to derive an absolute measure of plasma density from experimental measurements for a variety of technical reasons. Detailed numerical simulations are vital in order to understand experimental data, and have successfully modeled build-up. Such simulations are limited in their ability to reproduce experimental data due to the large separation of scales inherent to the problem. Namely, one must resolve both rf frequencies in the GHz range, as well as the plasma modulation frequency of tens of MHz, while running for very long simulations times, on the order of microseconds. The application of new numerical simulation techniques allow us to bridge the simulation scales in this problem and produce spectra that can be directly compared to experiments. The first method is to use a plasma dielectric model to measure plasma-induced phase shifts in the rf wave. The dielectric is modulated at a low frequency, simulating the effects of multiple bunch crossings. This allows simulations to be performed without kinetic particles representing the plasma, which both speeds up the simulations as well as reduces numerical noise from interpolation of particle charge and currents onto the computational grid. Secondly we utilize a port boundary condition model to simultaneously absorb rf at the simulation boundaries, and to launch the rf into the simulation. This method improves the accuracy of simulations by restricting rf frequencies better than adding an external (finite) current source to drive rf, and absorbing layers at the boundaries. We also explore the effects of non-uniform plasma densities on the simulated spectra.

Veitzer, Seth A.; Smithe, David N.; Stoltz, Peter H. [Tech-X Corporation, Boulder, CO, 80303 (United States)

2012-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

318

HNCO in molecular clouds  

SciTech Connect

In a survey of 18 molecular clouds, HNCO J/sub K/-1K1..-->..J'/sub K/'-1K'1 = 5/sub 05/..-->..4/sub 05/ and 4/sub 04/..-->..3/sub 03/ emission was etected in seven clouds, and possibly in one other. Emission in these transitions originates in high-density regions (n> or approx. =10/sup 6/ cm/sup -3/). The molecule's excitation requirements allow us to derive limits to excitation temperatures an optical depths. We discuss the possibility of clumping with respect to the beam and compare our results with data from other molecular species. The HNCO emission from Sgr A is an ordder of magnitude larger than the other detected sources as is the ratio ..delta..T +- /sub A/(HNCO 5/sub 05/..-->..4/sub 04/)/..delta..T +- /sub A/(C/sup 18/O 1..-->..0). HNCO is probably a constituent of most molecular clouds.

Jackson, J.M.; Armstrong, J.T.; Barrett, A.H.

1984-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

319

Attribution Analysis of Cloud Feedback  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Uncertainty on cloud feedback is the primary contributor to the large spread of equilibrium climate sensitivity (ECS) in climate models. In this study, we compare the short-term cloud feedback in climate models with observations, and evaluate...

Zhou, Chen

2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

320

Constrained water cloud generator  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The fast generation of large cloudy volumes with imposed cloud cover fractions and ambient vertical profiles is very important for the realistic simulation of atmospheric scenes. The model proposed here is the second step of a two-step model composed on the one hand of a volume generator based on a Fourier filtering method and on the other hand of a physical generator filling the volume with physical parameters. After a description of the general generation scheme, this paper focuses on the simulation of vertical profiles of water content (liquid, vapour) coupled with other state parameters (temperature, pressure, vertical velocity) via thermodynamic and hydrodynamic equations by local forcing of ambient conditions. The method for solving these equations is explained and applied to practical cases. First, by assuming that the actual temperature at the cloud base is equal to the dew temperature and by imposing a moist pseudo-adiabatic temperature gradient between the cloud top and bottom, the temperature profile in the cloud is found. When conditional instability occurs, the initial temperature profile between the ground and the cloud base is iteratively shifted to lower values until absolute stability is reached. Then the liquid water content is calculated by integrating the equation of water conservation, and the water vapour content by assuming that the cloud is everywhere saturated. Eventually, the vertical velocity is estimated by integration of the momentum equation. This method gives results in good agreement with published measurements, analytical and numerical models. Eventually, further developments of the column model, including the effects of phase transitions, turbulence, horizontal motions and mixing with the surrounding medium, are proposed in the concluding section.

Roland P.H. Berton

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "boundary layer clouds" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Opaque cloud detection  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of detecting clouds in a digital image comprising, for an area of the digital image, determining a reflectance value in at least three discrete electromagnetic spectrum bands, computing a first ratio of one reflectance value minus another reflectance value and the same two values added together, computing a second ratio of one reflectance value and another reflectance value, choosing one of the reflectance values, and concluding that an opaque cloud exists in the area if the results of each of the two computing steps and the choosing step fall within three corresponding predetermined ranges.

Roskovensky, John K. (Albuquerque, NM)

2009-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

322

5, 60136039, 2005 FRESCO cloud  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ACPD 5, 6013­6039, 2005 FRESCO cloud algorithm N. Fournier et al. Title Page Abstract Introduction cloud information over deserts from SCIAMACHY O2 A-band N. Fournier 1 , P. Stammes 1 , M. de Graaf 1 , R, 6013­6039, 2005 FRESCO cloud algorithm N. Fournier et al. Title Page Abstract Introduction Conclusions

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

323

3, 33013333, 2003 Cirrus cloud  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ACPD 3, 3301­3333, 2003 Cirrus cloud occurrence as function of ambient relative humidity J. Str and Physics Discussions Cirrus cloud occurrence as function of ambient relative humidity: A comparison¨om (johan@itm.su.se) 3301 #12;ACPD 3, 3301­3333, 2003 Cirrus cloud occurrence as function of ambient

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

324

8, 96979729, 2008 FRESCO+ cloud  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ACPD 8, 9697­9729, 2008 FRESCO+ cloud retrieval algorithm P. Wang et al. Title Page Abstract Chemistry and Physics Discussions FRESCO+: an improved O2 A-band cloud retrieval algorithm for tropospheric on behalf of the European Geosciences Union. 9697 #12;ACPD 8, 9697­9729, 2008 FRESCO+ cloud retrieval

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

325

Cloud Formation, Evolution and Destruction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chapter 4 Cloud Formation, Evolution and Destruction We now begin to trace the journey towards a star. How long does this take? The answer is surprisingly short: a good many clouds already contain new stars and these stars tend to be young. The typical cloud cannot spend long, if any time at all

Estalella, Robert

326

Minimalist Model of Ice Microphysics in Mixed-phase Stratiform Clouds  

SciTech Connect

The question of whether persistent ice crystal precipitation from super cooled layer clouds can be explained by time-dependent, stochastic ice nucleation is explored using an approximate, analytical model, and a large-eddy simulation (LES) cloud model. The updraft velocity in the cloud defines an accumulation zone, where small ice particles cannot fall out until they are large enough, which will increase the residence time of ice particles in the cloud. Ice particles reach a quasi-steady state between growth by vapor deposition and fall speed at cloud base. The analytical model predicts that ice water content (wi) has a 2.5 power law relationship with ice number concentration ni. wi and ni from a LES cloud model with stochastic ice nucleation also confirm the 2.5 power law relationship. The prefactor of the power law is proportional to the ice nucleation rate, and therefore provides a quantitative link to observations of ice microphysical properties.

Yang, F.; Ovchinnikov, Mikhail; Shaw, Raymond A.

2013-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

327

Chapter 23 - Emerging Security Challenges in Cloud Computing, from Infrastructure-Based Security to Proposed Provisioned Cloud Infrastructure  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this chapter, we discuss the threats, challenges, and guidance associated with securing an organization’s core IT infrastructure at the network, host, and application levels in the cloud. According to the best knowledge of the authors, up to now, there are no research with this perspective on cloud security in the literature. This chapter represents our first discussion of this infrastructure security in the context of SPI service delivery models (SaaS, PaaS, and IaaS). Non-information security professionals are cautioned not to simply equate infrastructure security to infrastructure-as-a-service (IaaS) security. Although infrastructure security is more highly relevant to customers of IaaS, similar consideration should be given to providers’ platform-as-a-service (PaaS) and software-as-a-service (SaaS) environments, since they have ramifications to customer threat, risk, and compliance management. Another dimension is the cloud business model (public, private, and hybrid clouds), which is orthogonal to the SPI service delivery model; what we highlight is the relevance of discussion points as they apply to public and private clouds. When discussing public clouds, the scope of infrastructure security is limited to the layers of infrastructure that move beyond the organization’s control and into the hands of service providers (i.e., when responsibility to a secure infrastructure is transferred to the cloud service provider [CSP], based on the SPI delivery model). Information in this chapter is critical for customers in gaining an understanding of what security a CSP provides and what security the customer is responsible for providing. This chapter discusses conceptual issues, basic requirements, and practical suggestions for designing dynamically configured security infrastructure provisioned on demand as part of the cloud-based infrastructure. We end this chapter by describing general-use cases for provisioning cloud infrastructure that provide bases for defining security infrastructure requirements.

Mohammad Reza Movahedisefat; Seyyed Mohammad Reza Farshchi; Davud Mohammadpur

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Who is this cloud?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

WHO IS THIS CLOUD? is a generative artwork in progress. It is a piece of art dedicated to the memory of a loved one and the idea of existence and transformation. The computer "Beings" will be animated according to their inner program, to weather sensors ... Keywords: Turing pattern, artificial life art, cellular automata, generative art, transhumanism

Lola B. Deswarte; Alain Lioret; Barbara Tannery

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Use of the ARM Measurements of Spectral Zenith Radiance for Better Understanding of 3D Cloud-Radiation Processes & Aerosol-Cloud Interaction  

SciTech Connect

We proposed a variety of tasks centered on the following question: what can we learn about 3D cloud-radiation processes and aerosol-cloud interaction from rapid-sampling ARM measurements of spectral zenith radiance? These ARM measurements offer spectacular new and largely unexploited capabilities in both the temporal and spectral domains. Unlike most other ARM instruments, which average over many seconds or take samples many seconds apart, the new spectral zenith radiance measurements are fast enough to resolve natural time scales of cloud change and cloud boundaries as well as the transition zone between cloudy and clear areas. In the case of the shortwave spectrometer, the measurements offer high time resolution and high spectral resolution, allowing new discovery-oriented science which we intend to pursue vigorously. Research objectives are, for convenience, grouped under three themes: â?˘ Understand radiative signature of the transition zone between cloud-free and cloudy areas using data from ARM shortwave radiometers, which has major climatic consequences in both aerosol direct and indirect effect studies. â?˘ Provide cloud property retrievals from the ARM sites and the ARM Mobile Facility for studies of aerosol-cloud interactions. â?˘ Assess impact of 3D cloud structures on aerosol properties using passive and active remote sensing techniques from both ARM and satellite measurements.

Alexander Marshak; Warren Wiscombe; Yuri Knyazikhin; Christine Chiu

2011-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

330

Boundaries and Topological Algorithms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis develops a model for the topological structure of situations. In this model, the topological structure of space is altered by the presence or absence of boundaries, such as those at the edges of objects. ...

Fleck, Margaret Morrison

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Ship-produced cloud line of 13 July 1991  

SciTech Connect

Steaming ships can produce long linear cloud lines in regions of fog and broken stratus as well as in marine stratus layers. The lines are not always detected in 0.63 {mu}m satellite images, but are often detected in the corresponding 3.7 {mu}m images because the lines contain smaller and more numerous droplets than the stratus in which they are embedded as deduced by Coakley, et al. and measured by Radke, et al. They postulate cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) from steaming ships produced the more numerous and, hence, smaller cloud droplets. The ship-produced clouds are not always detected in 0.63 {mu}m images because this wavelength is not as sensitive to changes in droplet size as is 3.7 {mu}m. On 13 July 1991 a dramatic, ship-produced cloud line formed offshore of Baja California. The authors present satellite images of the line and corresponding photographs from the R/V EGABRAG III which passed under the line. The images and photos reveal the structure of the line. The EGABRAG was a source of CCN but did not produce a cloud line; they attempt to explain this important finding.

Hindman, E.E. [City Coll. of New York, NY (US); Porch, W.M. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (US); Hudson, J.G. [Desert Research Inst., Reno, NV (US); Durkee, P.A. [Navel Postgraduate School, Monterey, CA (US)

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

332

Ship-produced cloud line of 13 July 1991  

SciTech Connect

Steaming ships can produce long linear cloud lines in regions of fog and broken stratus as well as in marine stratus layers. The lines are not always detected in 0.63 [mu]m satellite images, but are often detected in the corresponding 3.7 [mu]m images because the lines contain smaller and more numerous droplets than the stratus in which they are embedded as deduced by Coakley, et al. and measured by Radke, et al. They postulate cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) from steaming ships produced the more numerous and, hence, smaller cloud droplets. The ship-produced clouds are not always detected in 0.63 [mu]m images because this wavelength is not as sensitive to changes in droplet size as is 3.7 [mu]m. On 13 July 1991 a dramatic, ship-produced cloud line formed offshore of Baja California. The authors present satellite images of the line and corresponding photographs from the R/V EGABRAG III which passed under the line. The images and photos reveal the structure of the line. The EGABRAG was a source of CCN but did not produce a cloud line; they attempt to explain this important finding.

Hindman, E.E. (City Coll. of New York, NY (United States)); Porch, W.M. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)); Hudson, J.G. (Desert Research Inst., Reno, NV (United States)); Durkee, P.A. (Navel Postgraduate School, Monterey, CA (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Recent changes in the coverage of high cloud  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Midland 1022 1114 1087 1115 1058 1134 1170 1120 (54-61) 1074 (5I-56) 25 Corrections For Cloud Overlap Van Allen (1962a) calculated the correction factor for the overlap of different cloud layers by using data from the Baltimore, Maryland... individual probability of occurrence. Cirrus and cirrostratus each accounted for "about 6 per cent annual sky coverage" for the Baltimore sta- tion; the correction factor for "total overlap" for cirrus was 2). 2 per cent and for cirrostratus was 49. 2...

Harriman, Roy Edward

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

334

Terrestrial magma ocean solidification and formation of a candidate D" layer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this thesis we investigate the solidification of early magma oceans on the Earth and the formation of a deep dense layer at the core-mantle boundary. We also study the concentrations and densities of the last layers of ...

Springmann, Alessondra

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

IMPACT OF BOUNDARY-LAYER CUTTING ON FREE-SURFACE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

issue into air at atmospheric pressure Working fluids: water and ethanol #12;11 Surface Breakup Efficiency Factor · Radial droplet velocity relative to jet surface · Surface breakup efficiency factor Gives area of liquid surface · Efficiency factor correlation (valid for Wed = 235­270,000) L mass flux

California at San Diego, University of

336

Experimental and theoretical study of turbulent oscillatory boundary layers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sediment transport is of crucial importance to engineering projects in coastal regions, so it is of primary interest in coastal engineering. The driving forces for sediment transport are mostly determined by the hydrodynamics ...

Yuan, Jing, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Interaction between surface and atmosphere in a convective boundary layer /  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

II.4) to measure vertical profiles of wind speed, direction,a larger vertical gradient of horizontal wind-speed in theintense vertical mixing, resulting in constant wind speed,

Garai, Anirban

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

BOUNDARY LAYER CONTROL IN PIPES THROUGH STRONG INJECTION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

normal-injection model. y Coal gasification gas mixture ,ZUSAMMENFASSUNG) In coal gasification, oxidation andthan that in the coal gasification mixture. Outside the

Yeung, William Chor Chun

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

DIFFUSION OF A CHEMICAL SPECIES THROUGH A VISCOUS BOUNDARY LAYER  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2.3 Evaluation of a Coal Gasification Atmosphere. . -iv-a highly cor- rosive coal gasification mixture. It is shown2.3 Evaluation of a Coal Gasification Atmosphere The purpose

Keller, J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Turbulent boundary-layer control with plasma actuators  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...oscillation. When the non-dimensional...discharge (DBD) plasma actuators in air at atmospheric conditions. 2...corrected for any thermal influence of the plasma based on temperature...2007Airflow control by non-thermal plasma actuatorsJ. Phys...

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "boundary layer clouds" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Distributed Roughness Receptivity in a Flat Plate Boundary Layer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- Distributed Receptivity . . . . . 6 2. FACILITY DESCRIPTION - THE KLEBANOFF–SARIC WIND TUNNEL 11 2.1 Test Section . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 2.2 Fan and Motor... of this dissertation describes the Klebanoff–Saric Wind Tunnel facility, which was used for this experiment. Section 3 describes the experimental setup (roughness design and the flat plate model) and defines the metrics by which the flow field is decomposed...

Kuester, Matthew Scott

2014-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

342

Thermal boundary layer development in dispersed flow film boiling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dispersed flow film boiling consists of a dispersion of droplets which are carried over a very hot surface by their vapor. This process occurs in cryogenic equipment and wet steam turbines. It is also of interest in the ...

Hull, Lawrence M.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Boundary layer ingesting inlet design for a silent aircraft  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(cont.) common nacelle, L/D ratios between 2.5 and 3.0, fan face to throat area ratios above 1.06, and offsets lower than 11%. Curvature ahead of the inlet should be avoided as well as bifurcations inside the duct. Inlet ...

Freuler, Patrick N., 1980-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Computation of Hypersonic Double Wedge Shock / Boundary Layer Interaction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of a Scramjet Demonstrator for Future Space Transportation Systems" a combined numerical as well as experimental

345

Interface modes and their instabilities in accretion disc boundary layers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......magnetosphere with and low plasma density, while the...terminated at the stellar atmosphere with high density and...systems and 300 Hz for kHz QPOs in the NS systems...uniformly rotating stellar atmosphere. This simplified model...compressible stellar atmosphere truncating the accretion......

David Tsang; Dong Lai

2009-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

346

DIFFUSION OF A CHEMICAL SPECIES THROUGH A VISCOUS BOUNDARY LAYER  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

use an operating coal gasifier will be discussed. ofof the products of the gasifier with H S removed, then theconditions existing in coal gasifiers the con- centration

Keller, J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

BOUNDARY LAYER CONTROL IN PIPES THROUGH STRONG INJECTION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the environment in a gasifier contains hydrogen, water,compo- nents of the gasifier must be corrosion resistant atis used in existing coal gasifiers. Since hydrogen sulfide

Yeung, William Chor Chun

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Turbulent flux events in a nearly neutral atmospheric boundary layer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Abstract Algorithm Technologies Pvt. LtdHebbal...not suited to handling questions of...event detection procedure; a classification...anemometer (Applied Technologies, Inc., USA...figure 3). This procedure results in a...

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Large-Scale Streamwise Turbulent Structures in Hypersonic Boundary Layers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Marine Corps for allowing me the time off during my career and necessary financial support to complete this endeavor. The help and guidance provided by Scott Peltier and Dr. Ray Humble have been indispensable in the completion of this work. Scott... helped greatly in the initial setup and design of this experiment. He has also been completely open in sharing his data and findings to help complete and emphasize my own. Dr. Humble was a source of inspiration and both conceptual and technical...

English, Benjamin L.

2013-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

350

Control of cavity-driven separated boundary layer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and D. S. Henningson1 1 KTH Mechanics, S-100 44 Stockholm, Sweden 2 Laboratoire J.A. Dieudonn´e, Parc, like for instances the Tollmien-Schlichting waves on an aeroplane wing (see e.g. H¨ogberg & Henningson, thanks to increasing computational power and the use of Arnoldi method (see Edwards et al. (1994

Hoepffner, JĂ©rĂ´me

351

ccsd00002450, Boundary layers and emitted excitations in  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Bose-Einstein condensates of ultra-cold atomic vapor. In the case of super uid 4 He, the NLSE can to be negligible. This is clearly the case in recent experiments [5] that are performed at temperatures below 130 mK

352

Interaction between surface and atmosphere in a convective boundary layer /  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

heat, and thermal conductivity of the ground and grid sizegrid was stretched uniformly to 0.1 m resolution. The heatheat flux) are friction velocity and convective velocity respectively. The grid

Garai, Anirban

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Supersonic turbulent boundary layers with periodic mechanical non-equilibrium  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. It was documented that proper roughness selection coupled with a sufficiently strong favorable pressure gradient produced regions of �negative� production in the transport of turbulent stress. This led to localized areas of significant turbulence stress...

Ekoto, Isaac Wesley

2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

354

Boundary-Layer Meteorology An International Journal of Physical,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

simulations agree well with observed soundings in temperature, wind speed, and wind direc- tion and their interactions with local-scale processes are analyzed to understand the factors that influence the onset-valley · Numerical simulation · Salt Lake City · Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model 1 Introduction

Pu, Zhaoxia

355

A Catalog of HI Clouds in the Large Magellanic Cloud  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A 21 cm neutral hydrogen interferometric survey of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) combined with the Parkes multi-beam HI single-dish survey clearly shows that the HI gas is distributed in the form of clumps or clouds. The HI clouds and clumps have been identified using a thresholding method with three separate brightness temperature thresholds ($T_b$). Each catalog of HI cloud candidates shows a power law relationship between the sizes and the velocity dispersions of the clouds roughly following the Larson Law scaling $\\sigma_v \\propto R^{0.5}$, with steeper indices associated with dynamically hot regions. The clouds in each catalog have roughly constant virial parameters as a function mass suggesting that that the clouds are all in roughly the same dynamical state, but the values of the virial parameter are significantly larger than unity showing that turbulent motions dominate gravity in these clouds. The mass distribution of the clouds is a power law with differential indices between -1.6 and -2.0 for the three catalogs. In contrast, the distribution of mean surface densities is a log-normal distribution.

S. Kim; E. Rosolowsky; Y. Lee; Y. Kim; Y. C. Jung; M. A. Dopita; B. G. Elmegreen; K. C. Freeman; R. J. Sault; M. J. Kesteven; D. McConnell; Y. -H. Chu

2007-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

356

Z(N) model of grain-boundary wetting  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Even though van der Waals forces should prevent the wetting of a grain boundary by a liquid at the melting temperature, experiment and simulations indicate an instability in grain-boundary structure in the vicinity of this temperature. We study the structure of analogous boundaries in a Z(N) model in which a region of solid with a given orientation is replaced by a spin in that orientation. Different interfacial behaviors are found for different regions of a model parameter which is related to N. For the value appropriate to grain boundaries, our model suggests that boundaries of a sufficiently large angle should be unstable, not to the intrusion of a layer of liquid, however, but to the intrusion of solid of intermediate orientation. Such an intrusion can occur below the melting temperature.

M. Schick and Wei-Heng Shih

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Size of Cloud from Shadow  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Size of Cloud from Shadow Size of Cloud from Shadow Name: mike Status: other Grade: other Location: N/A Country: USA Date: Summer 2011 Question: I see a cloud and I see its shadow in a field - knowing high sun angles - is there a way of telling how far away the cloud is or how big? - I am thinking if the shadow is 30' wide and the sun is at 2:00 pm- ? Replies: Hi Mike, Try this, draw a small circle representing the Sun. Somewhere below this circle and maybe to the right, draw an oblong, make this oblong bigger than the circle. Now connect the leftmost edge of the circle with the leftmost edge of the oblong with a straight line. Do the same for the rightmost edges. The oblong now represent the shadow of a cloud on the ground, and the lines represent the rays of the sun passing along the edges of the cloud.

358

ARM - Measurement - Total cloud water  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

cloud water cloud water ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Total cloud water The total concentration (mass/vol) of ice and liquid water particles in a cloud; this includes condensed water content (CWC). Categories Cloud Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. External Instruments NCEPGFS : National Centers for Environment Prediction Global Forecast System Field Campaign Instruments CSI : Cloud Spectrometer and Impactor PDI : Phase Doppler Interferometer

359

ARM - Measurement - Cloud droplet size  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

droplet size droplet size ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Cloud droplet size Linear size (e.g. radius or diameter) of a cloud particle Categories Cloud Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. Field Campaign Instruments CPI : Cloud Particle Imager CVI-AIR : Counterflow Virtual Impactor MIRAI : JAMSTEC Research Vessel Mirai PDI : Phase Doppler Interferometer UAV-PROTEUS-MICRO : Proteus Cloud Microphysics Instruments SPEC-CPI : Stratton Park Engineering Company - Cloud particle imager

360

Cumulus Clouds and Reflected Sunlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cumulus Clouds and Reflected Sunlight Cumulus Clouds and Reflected Sunlight from Landsat ETM+ G. Wen and L. Oreopoulos National Aeronautics and Space Administration Goddard Space Flight Center University of Maryland Baltimore County Joint Center of Earth System Technology Greenbelt, Maryland R. F. Cahalan and S. C. Tsay National Aeronautics and Space Administration Goddard Space Flight Center Greenbelt, Maryland Introduction Cumulus clouds attenuate solar radiation casting shows on the ground. Cumulus clouds can also enhance solar radiation in the clear region nearby. The enhancement of down-welling solar radiation has been observed at the ground level in the clear region near cumulus clouds (Mims and Frederick 1994). The additional diffuse radiation source from cumulus clouds makes the clear gaps appear to be

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "boundary layer clouds" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Turbulent Vertical Kinetic Energy in the Ocean Mixed Layer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Vertical velocities in the ocean boundary layer were measured for two weeks at an open ocean, wintertime site using neutrally buoyant floats. Simultaneous measurements of the surface meteorology and surface waves showed a large variability in ...

Eric A. D'Asaro

2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Superconducting nano-layer coating without insulator  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The superconducting nano-layer coating without insulator layer is studied. The magnetic-field distribution and the forces acting on a vortex are derived. Using the derived forces, the vortex-penetration field and the lower critical magnetic field can be discussed. The vortex-penetration field is identical with the multilayer coating, but the lower critical magnetic field is not. Forces acting on a vortex from the boundary of two superconductors play an important role in evaluations of the free energy.

Kubo, Takayuki

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Evaluating regional cloud-permitting simulations of the WRF model for the Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE, Darwin 2006)  

SciTech Connect

Data from the Tropical Warm Pool I5 nternational Cloud Experiment (TWPICE) were used to evaluate two suites of high-resolution (4-7 km, convection-resolving) simulations of the Advanced Research Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model with a focus on the performance of different cloud microphysics (MP) schemes. The major difference between these two suites of simulations is with and without the reinitializing process. Whenreinitialized every three days, the four cloud MP schemes evaluated can capture the general profiles of cloud fraction, temperature, water vapor, winds, and cloud liquid and ice water content (LWC and IWC, respectively). However, compared with surface measurements of radiative and moisture fluxes and satellite retrieval of top-of-the-atmosphere (TOA) fluxes, disagreements do exist. Large discrepancies with observed LWC and IWC and derived radiative heating profiles can be attributed to both the limitations of the cloud property retrievals and model performance. The simulated precipitation also shows a wide range of uncertainty as compared with observations, which could be caused by the cloud MP schemes, complexity of land-sea configuration, and the high temporal and spatial variability. In general, our result indicates the importance of large-scale initial and lateral boundary conditions in re-producing basic features of cloudiness and its vertical structures. Based on our case study, we find overall the six-hydrometer single-moment MP scheme(WSM6) [Hong and Lim, 2006] in the WRF model si25 mulates the best agree- ment with the TWPICE observational analysis.

Wang, Yi; Long, Charles N.; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Dudhia, Jimy; McFarlane, Sally A.; Mather, James H.; Ghan, Steven J.; Liu, Xiaodong

2009-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

364

TC_CLOUD_REGIME.cdr  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tropical cloud properties as a function of regime Regimes? Monsoon versus Break * Different synoptic vertical velocity profiles - Changes convective inhibition, corresponding...

365

Declarative Automated Cloud Resource Orchestration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

orchestration · Cloud resource orchestration constraint optimization problems 4 Provider operational] · Orchestration procedures Transactions · Either commit or abort Distributed communication and optimization

Plotkin, Joshua B.

366

Cicada: Predictive Guarantees for Cloud Network Bandwidth  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In cloud-computing systems, network-bandwidth guarantees have been shown to improve predictability of application performance and cost. Most previous work on cloud-bandwidth guarantees has assumed that cloud tenants know ...

LaCurts, Katrina

2014-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

367

DIRSIG Cloud Modeling Capabilities; A Parametric Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 DIRSIG Cloud Modeling Capabilities; A Parametric Study Kristen Powers powers:................................................................................................................... 13 Calculation of Sensor Reaching Radiance Truth Values for Cloudless & Stratus Cloud Scenes and Atmospheric Database Creation for Stratus Cloud Scene & Calculation of Associated Sensor Reaching Radiance

Salvaggio, Carl

368

Magellan: experiences from a Science Cloud  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2010. From Clusters To Clouds: xCAT 2 Is Out Of The Bag.Cost of Doing Science on the Cloud: The Montage Example. Incost of doing science on the cloud: the montage example. In

Ramakrishnan, Lavanya

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Electron-Cloud Build-Up: Summary  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Properties In?uencing Electron Cloud Phenomena,” Appl. Surf.Dissipation of the Electron Cloud,” Proc. PAC03 (Portland,is no signi?cant electron-cloud under nominal operating

Furman, M.A.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Comparison of the CALIPSO satellite and ground-based observations of cirrus clouds at the ARM TWP sites  

SciTech Connect

Statistics of ice cloud macrophysical and optical properties from the Cloud-Aerosol LIdar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) instrument on board the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) satellite are compared with those from ground-based lidar observations over a 31 month period. Ground-based lidar observations are taken from the micropulse lidars (MPL) at the three Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) tropical western pacific (TWP) sites: Manus, Nauru and Darwin. CALIPSO observations show a larger cloud fraction at high altitudes while the ground-based MPLs show a larger cloud fraction at low altitudes. The difference in mean ice cloud top and base heights at the Manus and Nauru sites are all within 0.51 km, although differences are statistically significant. Mean ice cloud geometrical thickness agree to within 0.05 km at the Manus and Nauru sites. Larger differences exist at Darwin due to excessive degradation of the MPL output power during our sampling period. Both sets of observations show thicker clouds during the nighttime which may be real but could also be partially an artifact of the decreased signal-to-noise ratio during the daytime. The number of ice cloud layers per profile are also shown to be consistent after accounting for the difference in spatial resolution. For cloud optical depths, four different retrieval methods are compared, two for each set of observations. All products show that the majority of ice cloud optical depths ({approx}60%) fall below an optical depth of 0.2. For most comparisons all four retrievals agree to within the uncertainty intervals. We find that both CALIPSO retrievals agree best to ground-based optical depths when the lidar ratio in the latter is retrieved instead of set to a fixed value. Also thoroughly compared is the cloud properties for the subset of ice clouds which reside in the tropical tropopause layer (TTL).

Thorsen, Tyler J.; Fu, Q.; Comstock, Jennifer M.

2011-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

371

ARM - PI Product - SGP and TWP (Manus) Ice Cloud Vertical Velocities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ProductsSGP and TWP (Manus) Ice Cloud Vertical ProductsSGP and TWP (Manus) Ice Cloud Vertical Velocities Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send PI Product : SGP and TWP (Manus) Ice Cloud Vertical Velocities 1997.01.01 - 2010.12.31 Site(s) SGP TWP General Description Daily netcdf-files of ice-cloud dynamics observed at the ARM sites at SGP (Jan1997-Dec2010) and Manus (Jul1999-Dec2010). The files include variables at different time resolution (10s, 20min, 1hr). Profiles of radar reflectivity factor (dbz), Doppler velocity (vel) as well as retrieved vertical air motion (V_air) and reflectivity-weighted particle terminal fall velocity (V_ter) are given at 10s, 20min and 1hr resolution. Lower level clouds are removed, however a multi-layer flag is included.

372

Application of Stochastic Radiative Transfer Theory to the ARM Cloud-Radiative Parameterization Problem  

SciTech Connect

This project had two primary goals: (1) development of stochastic radiative transfer as a parameterization that could be employed in an AGCM environment, and (2) exploration of the stochastic approach as a means for representing shortwave radiative transfer through mixed-phase layer clouds. To achieve these goals, climatology of cloud properties was developed at the ARM CART sites, an analysis of the performance of the stochastic approach was performed, a simple stochastic cloud-radiation parameterization for an AGCM was developed and tested, a statistical description of Arctic mixed phase clouds was developed and the appropriateness of stochastic approach for representing radiative transfer through mixed-phase clouds was assessed. Significant progress has been made in all of these areas and is detailed in the final report.

Dana E. Veron

2012-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

373

A TRUSTED STORAGE SYSTEM FOR THE CLOUD.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Data stored in third party storage systems like the cloud might not be secure since confidentiality and integrity of data are not guaranteed. Though cloud… (more)

Karumanchi, Sushama

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Fraunhofer ISST CLOUD COMPUTING APPLICATIONS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

#12;© Fraunhofer ISST Fraunhofer Innovation Cluster »Cloud Computing for Logistics« Budget 3 * 3 Mio© Fraunhofer ISST CLOUD COMPUTING APPLICATIONS FOR LOGISTICS Jakob Rehof Professor, Chair of Software Engineering, Technical University of Dortmund Director, Fraunhofer-ISST Dortmund and Berlin First

Rajamani, Sriram K.

375

An enigmatic HI cloud  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The discovery of an HI cloud with peculiar properties at equatorial coordinates (J2000) ra=07h49m, dec=04d30m is presented. The HI object was detected at 21cm using the 300-m NAIC Arecibo telescope. Subsequent follow-up high-resolution observations with the NRAO Very Large Array (VLA) telescope at L-Band revealed more details about its morphology. The most intriguing aspect of the object is the clear velocity gradient of 1 km/s, which is present in the data, an indication of either rotation or expansion. The gas appears to be cold, and its morphology is somewhat elliptical with clumpy substructure. Assuming disk rotation, the dynamical mass could be determined as a function of distance.Depending on the exact nature of the velocity gradient in the HI cloud, we can reach some preliminary conclusions about the nature of the object. Expansion would imply association with a circumstellar envelope of an evolved AGB star, while in the case of rotation, a comparison between the visible and the dynamical mass can lead...

Dedes, L; Kalberla, P W M

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

An enigmatic HI cloud  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The discovery of an HI cloud with peculiar properties at equatorial coordinates (J2000) ra=07h49m, dec=04d30m is presented. The HI object was detected at 21cm using the 300-m NAIC Arecibo telescope. Subsequent follow-up high-resolution observations with the NRAO Very Large Array (VLA) telescope at L-Band revealed more details about its morphology. The most intriguing aspect of the object is the clear velocity gradient of 1 km/s, which is present in the data, an indication of either rotation or expansion. The gas appears to be cold, and its morphology is somewhat elliptical with clumpy substructure. Assuming disk rotation, the dynamical mass could be determined as a function of distance.Depending on the exact nature of the velocity gradient in the HI cloud, we can reach some preliminary conclusions about the nature of the object. Expansion would imply association with a circumstellar envelope of an evolved AGB star, while in the case of rotation, a comparison between the visible and the dynamical mass can lead to some preliminary conclusions. A common feature of those conclusions is the presence of a gravitational potential well, which is required to account for the rotation of the trapped HI gas. This potential well could be associated with a dark galaxy or some other exotic object.

L. Dedes; C. Dedes; P. W. M Kalberla

2008-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

377

ARM - Measurement - Cloud ice particle  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ice particle ice particle ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Cloud ice particle Particles made of ice found in clouds. Categories Cloud Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments MET : Surface Meteorological Instrumentation Field Campaign Instruments REPLICATOR : Balloon-borne Ice Crystal Replicator CPI : Cloud Particle Imager CVI-AIR : Counterflow Virtual Impactor LEARJET : Lear Jet PARTIMG : Particle imager UAV-PROTEUS-MICRO : Proteus Cloud Microphysics Instruments

378

TWP Island Cloud Trail Studies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pacific Island Cloud Trail Studies Pacific Island Cloud Trail Studies W. M. Porch Los Alamos National Laboratory Los Alamos, New Mexico S. Winiecki University of Chicago Chicago, Illinois Introduction Images and surface temperature measurements from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Multi- spectral Thermal Imaging (MTI) satellite are combined with geostationary meteorological satellite (GMS) images during 2000 and 2001 to better understand cloud trail formation characteristics from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) site. Figure 1 shows a comparison on two consecutive days in December 2000. The day for which a cloud trail developed was more moist and cooler at the altitude the cloud developed (about 600 m) and there was very little

379

ARM - Measurement - Cloud condensation nuclei  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

condensation nuclei condensation nuclei ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Cloud condensation nuclei Small particles (typically 0.0002 mm, or 1/100 th the size of a cloud droplet) about which cloud droplets coalesce. Categories Aerosols, Cloud Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments AOS : Aerosol Observing System CCN : Cloud Condensation Nuclei Particle Counter Field Campaign Instruments AOS : Aerosol Observing System

380

Comparison of POLDER Cloud Phase Retrievals to Active Remote Sensors Measurements at the ARM SGP Site  

SciTech Connect

In our present study, cloud boundaries derived from a combination of active remote sensors at the ARM SGP site are compared to POLDER cloud top phase index which is derived from polarimetric measurements using an innovative method. This approach shows the viability of the POLDER phase retrieval algorithm, and also leads to interesting results. In particular, the analysis demonstrates the sensitivity of polarization measurements to ice crystal shape and indicates that occurrence of polycrystalline ice clouds has to be taken into account in order to improve the POLDER phase retrieval algorithm accuracy. Secondly, the results show that a temperature threshold of 240 K could serve for cloud top particle phase classification. Considering the limitations of the analysis, the temperature threshold could be biased high, but not by more than about 5 degrees.

Riedi, J.; Goloub, P.; Marchand, Roger T.

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "boundary layer clouds" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Zenith Radiance Retrieval of Cloud Properties  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

retrievals of cloud properties retrievals of cloud properties from the AMF/COPS campaign Preliminary retrievals of cloud properties from the AMF/COPS campaign Christine Chiu, UMBC/JCET Alexander Marshak, GSFC Yuri Knyazikhin, Boston University Warren Wiscombe, GSFC Christine Chiu, UMBC/JCET Alexander Marshak, GSFC Yuri Knyazikhin, Boston University Warren Wiscombe, GSFC The cloud optical properties of interest are: The cloud optical properties of interest are: * Cloud optical depth Ď„ - the great unknown * Radiative cloud fraction * Cloud effective drop size, r eff * Cloud optical depth Ď„ - the great unknown * Radiative cloud fraction * Cloud effective drop size, r eff Ď„ = 3 2 LWP r eff r eff in ÎĽm, LWP in g/m 2 The 2-ch narrow-field-of-view radiometer (2NFOV) The 2-ch narrow-field-of-view radiometer

382

Boundaries on Spacetimes: An Outline  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The causal boundary construction of Geroch, Kronheimer, and Penrose has some universal properties of importance for general studies of spacetimes, particularly when equipped with a topology derived from the causal structure. Properties of the causal boundary are detailed for spacetimes with spacelike boundaries, for multi-warped spacetimes, for static spacetimes, and for spacetimes with group actions.

Steven G. Harris

2003-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

383

Topology of the Future Chronological Boundary: Universality for Spacelike Boundaries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A method is presented for imputing a topology for any chronological set, i.e., a set with a chronology relation, such as a spacetime or a spacetime with some sort of boundary. This topology is shown to have several good properties, such as replicating the manifold topology for a spacetime and replicating the expected topology for some simple examples of spacetime-with-boundary; it also allows for a complete categorical characterization, in topological categories, of the Future Causal Boundary construction of Geroch, Kronheimer, and Penrose, showing that construction to have a universal property for future-completing chronological sets with spacelike boundaries. Rigidity results are given for any reasonable future completion of a spacetime, in terms of the GKP boundary: In the imputed topology, any such boundary must be homeomorphic to the GKP boundary (if all points have indecomposable pasts) or to a topological quotient of a closely related boundary (if boundaries are spacelike). A large class of warped-product-type spacetimes with spacelike boundaries is examined, calculating the GKP and other possible boundaries, and showing that the imputed topology gives expected results; included among these are the Schwarzschild singularity and those Robertson-Walker singularities which are spacelike.

Steven G. Harris

1999-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

384

ATLAS Cloud R&D  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The computing model of the ATLAS experiment was designed around the concept of grid computing and, since the start of data taking, this model has proven very successful. However, new cloud computing technologies bring attractive features to improve the operations and elasticity of scientific distributed computing. ATLAS sees grid and cloud computing as complementary technologies that will coexist at different levels of resource abstraction, and two years ago created an R&D working group to investigate the different integration scenarios. The ATLAS Cloud Computing R&D has been able to demonstrate the feasibility of offloading work from grid to cloud sites and, as of today, is able to integrate transparently various cloud resources into the PanDA workload management system. The ATLAS Cloud Computing R&D is operating various PanDA queues on private and public resources and has provided several hundred thousand CPU days to the experiment. As a result, the ATLAS Cloud Computing R&D group has gained...

Panitkin, S; The ATLAS collaboration; Caballero Bejar, J; Benjamin, D; DiGirolamo, A; Gable, I; Hendrix, V; Hover, J; Kucharczuk, K; Medrano LLamas, R; Love, P; Ohman, H; Paterson, M; Sobie, R; Taylor, R; Walker, R; Zaytsev, A

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Preprint of the paper "A Boundary Element Numerical Approach for Substation Grounding in a Two  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Preprint of the paper "A Boundary Element Numerical Approach for Substation Grounding in a Two://caminos.udc.es/gmni #12;A BOUNDARY ELEMENT NUMERICAL APPROACH FOR SUBSTATION GROUNDING IN A TWO LAYER EARTH STRUCTURE3~na, SPAIN SUMMARY Analysis and design of substation grounding requires computing the distribution

Colominas, Ignasi

386

Gas-surface interaction and boundary conditions for the Boltzmann equation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gas-surface interaction and boundary conditions for the Boltzmann equation St´ephane Brull, Pierre Equation. The interaction between the wall atoms and the gas molecules within a thin surface layer of the gas in the bulk flow. Boundary conditions are formally derived from this model by using classical

Mieussens, Luc

387

IBM Software Solution Brief Safeguarding the cloud  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

IBM Software Solution Brief Safeguarding the cloud with IBM Security solutions Maintain visibility and control with proven security solutions for public, private and hybrid clouds Highlights Address cloud internal and external users, data, applications and workloads as they move to and from the cloud Regain

388

CLOUD COMPUTING INFRASTRUCTURE AND OPERATIONS PROGRAM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CLOUD COMPUTING INFRASTRUCTURE AND OPERATIONS PROGRAM A six-week in-depth program in the architectures, infrastructure, and operations of Cloud Computing DePaul University's Cloud Computing Infrastructure and Operations Program provides specialized knowledge in Cloud infrastructure with emphasis

Schaefer, Marcus

389

Locus Technologies 2014 Lost in the Cloud?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

© Locus Technologies 2014 Lost in the Cloud? There's an App for That David McConaughy Locus Technologies 1997-2014 4 #12;Cloud-based EMIS 2014© Locus Technologies 1997-2014 5 #12; Cloud Synch data back to EIM cloud for analysis 2014© Locus Technologies 1997-2014 9 #12;Mobile Apps for Data

Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of

390

7, 1711717146, 2007 Dependence of cloud  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ACPD 7, 17117­17146, 2007 Dependence of cloud fraction and cloud height on temperature T. Wagner et a Creative Commons License. Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Discussions Dependence of cloud fraction and cloud top height on surface temperature derived from spectrally resolved UV/vis satellite observations T

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

391

Cloud Computing An enterprise perspective Raghavan Subramanian  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cloud Computing ­ An enterprise perspective Raghavan Subramanian Infosys Technologies Limited #12;2Infosys Confidential Overview of cloud computing? Cloud computing* Computing in which dynamically scalable of cloud computing 1. On-demand self-service 2. Ubiquitous network access 3. Location independent resource

Rajamani, Sriram K.

392

Stratigraphic Boundaries | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Stratigraphic Boundaries Stratigraphic Boundaries Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Stratigraphic Boundaries Dictionary.png Stratigraphic Boundaries: No definition has been provided for this term. Add a Definition Controlling Structures List of controlling structures typically associated with geothermal systems: Major Normal Fault Termination of a Major Normal Fault Stepover or Relay Ramp in Normal Fault Zones Apex or Salient of Normal Fault Fault Intersection Accommodation Zone Displacement Transfer Zone Pull-Apart in Strike-Slip Fault Zone Intrusion Margins and Associated Fractures Stratigraphic Boundaries Fissure Swarms Caldera Rim Margins Lithologically Controlled Hydrothermal circulation may occur at the contacts between different lithologies. Examples

393

Cloud Futures Workshop 2010 Cloud Computing Support for Massively Social Gaming Alexandru Iosup  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Cloud Futures Workshop 2010 ­ Cloud Computing Support for Massively Social Gaming Alexandru Iosup Pierre (Vrije U.). Cloud Computing Support for Massively Social Gaming (Rain for the Thirsty) #12;Cloud Futures Workshop 2010 ­ Cloud Computing Support for Massively Social Gaming 2 Intermezzo: Tips on how

Iosup, Alexandru

394

CLOUD, DRIZZLE, AND TURBULENCE OBSERVATIONS IN MARINE STRATOCUMULUS CLOUDS IN THE AZORES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CLOUD, DRIZZLE, AND TURBULENCE OBSERVATIONS IN MARINE STRATOCUMULUS CLOUDS IN THE AZORES Jasmine at the Azores provided a unique, long-term record (May 2009 to December 2010) of cloud observations in a regime dominated by low-level stratiform clouds. First, a comprehensive cloud classification scheme that utilizes

395

Cloud radar Doppler spectra in drizzling stratiform clouds: 2. Observations and microphysical modeling of drizzle evolution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cloud radar Doppler spectra in drizzling stratiform clouds: 2. Observations and microphysical I, the influence of cloud microphysics and dynamics on the shape of cloud radar Doppler spectra in warm stratiform clouds was discussed. The traditional analysis of radar Doppler moments was extended

396

Vision: Cloud-Powered Sight for All Showing the Cloud What You See  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Vision: Cloud-Powered Sight for All Showing the Cloud What You See Paramvir Bahl Matthai Philipose argue that for computers to do more for us, we need to show the cloud what we see and embrace cloud General Terms Algorithms, Design, Human Factors, Languages, Performance, Security Keywords Camera, cloud

Zhong, Lin

397

Cloud Computing for Telecom Systems.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Context: Cloud computing is reshaping the service-delivery and business-models in Information and Communications Technology (ICT). The Information Technology (IT) sector has benefited from it in… (more)

Sapkota, Sagar

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Energy-Efficient Cloud Computing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Centre & IT Equipment Energy Use. Proc. Digital Power...2007. pp. 1323. ACM, New York. [7] Energy Star, http://www...pp. 164177. ACM, New York. [32] Pratt, I...Vol. 53 No. 7, 2010 Energy-Efficient Cloud Computing......

Andreas Berl; Erol Gelenbe; Marco Di Girolamo; Giovanni Giuliani; Hermann De Meer; Minh Quan Dang; Kostas Pentikousis

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Surface Temperature and Surface-Layer Turbulence in a Convective Boundary Layer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The vertical gradient of horizontal wind-speed was estimateda larger vertical gradient of horizontal wind-speed in thewind speed, direction, temperature, humidity up to 20 km with a vertical

Garai, Anirban; Pardyjak, Eric; Steeneveld, Gert-Jan; Kleissl, Jan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Surface Temperature and Surface-Layer Turbulence in a Convective Boundary Layer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

are density, specific heat of the soil, and grid size in theThe ground heat-flux G then computed from T g as grid was

Garai, Anirban; Pardyjak, Eric; Steeneveld, Gert-Jan; Kleissl, Jan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "boundary layer clouds" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Layer inflow into precipitating convection over the western tropical Pacific  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and the relativecoarseness of the TOGA COARE soundings.The available input data from the mesoscale model consist of three wind components(u, v and w), temperature, pressure, water vapour, rain water, cloud water and cloudice. The last two quantities, by de? nition, have zero... by linear interpolation of the hourly supplied MM5 data, to the right-hand side of the u, v, w, temperature, pressure and water vapour equations in a narrowzone near the lateral boundaries. The forcing is strongest at the boundary and decreasesto a ? fth...

Mechem, David B.; Houze, Robert A. Jr.; Chen, Shuyi S.

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Cloud condensation nuclei in Western Colorado : observations and model predictions.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Variations in the warm cloud?active portion of atmospheric aerosols, or cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), have been shown to impact cloud droplet number concentration and subsequently… (more)

Ward, Daniel Stewart

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Building biomedical materials layer-by-layer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this materials perspective, the promise of water based layer-by-layer (LbL) assembly as a means of generating drug-releasing surfaces for biomedical applications, from small molecule therapeutics to biologic drugs and ...

Hammond, Paula T.

404

Title: Networking the Cloud: Enabling Enterprise Computing and Storage Cloud computing has been changing how enterprises run and manage their IT systems. Cloud  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Title: Networking the Cloud: Enabling Enterprise Computing and Storage Abstract: Cloud computing has been changing how enterprises run and manage their IT systems. Cloud computing platforms provide introduction on Cloud Computing. We propose a Virtual Cloud Pool abstraction to logically unify cloud

405

Simulating mixed-phase Arctic stratus clouds: sensitivity to ice initiation mechanisms  

SciTech Connect

The importance of Arctic mixed-phase clouds on radiation and the Arctic climate is well known. However, the development of mixed-phase cloud parameterization for use in large scale models is limited by lack of both related observations and numerical studies using multidimensional models with advanced microphysics that provide the basis for understanding the relative importance of different microphysical processes that take place in mixed-phase clouds. To improve the representation of mixed-phase cloud processes in the GISS GCM we use the GISS single-column model coupled to a bin resolved microphysics (BRM) scheme that was specially designed to simulate mixed-phase clouds and aerosol-cloud interactions. Using this model with the microphysical measurements obtained from the DOE ARM Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (MPACE) campaign in October 2004 at the North Slope of Alaska, we investigate the effect of ice initiation processes and Bergeron-Findeisen process (BFP) on glaciation time and longevity of single-layer stratiform mixed-phase clouds. We focus on observations taken during 9th-10th October, which indicated the presence of a single-layer mixed-phase clouds. We performed several sets of 12-h simulations to examine model sensitivity to different ice initiation mechanisms and evaluate model output (hydrometeors concentrations, contents, effective radii, precipitation fluxes, and radar reflectivity) against measurements from the MPACE Intensive Observing Period. Overall, the model qualitatively simulates ice crystal concentration and hydrometeors content, but it fails to predict quantitatively the effective radii of ice particles and their vertical profiles. In particular, the ice effective radii are overestimated by at least 50%. However, using the same definition as used for observations, the effective radii simulated and that observed were more comparable. We find that for the single-layer stratiform mixed-phase clouds simulated, process of ice phase initiation due to freezing of supercooled water in both saturated and undersaturated (w.r.t. water) environments is as important as primary ice crystal origination from water vapor. We also find that the BFP is a process mainly responsible for the rates of glaciation of simulated clouds. These glaciation rates cannot be adequately represented by a water-ice saturation adjustment scheme that only depends on temperature and liquid and solid hydrometeors contents as is widely used in bulk microphysics schemes and are better represented by processes that also account for supersaturation changes as the hydrometeors grow.

Sednev, Igor; Sednev, I.; Menon, S.; McFarquhar, G.

2008-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

406

Simulating mixed-phase Arctic stratus clouds: Sensitivity to ice initiationmechanisms  

SciTech Connect

The importance of Arctic mixed-phase clouds on radiation and the Arctic climate is well known. However, the development of mixed-phase cloud parameterization for use in large scale models is limited by lack of both related observations and numerical studies using multidimensional models with advanced microphysics that provide the basis for understanding the relative importance of different microphysical processes that take place in mixed-phase clouds. To improve the representation of mixed-phase cloud processes in the GISS GCM we use the GISS single-column model coupled to a bin resolved microphysics (BRM) scheme that was specially designed to simulate mixed-phase clouds and aerosol-cloud interactions. Using this model with the microphysical measurements obtained from the DOE ARM Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (MPACE) campaign in October 2004 at the North Slope of Alaska, we investigate the effect of ice initiation processes and Bergeron-Findeisen process (BFP) on glaciation time and longevity of single-layer stratiform mixed-phase clouds. We focus on observations taken during October 9th-10th, which indicated the presence of a single-layer mixed-phase clouds. We performed several sets of 12-hour simulations to examine model sensitivity to different ice initiation mechanisms and evaluate model output (hydrometeors concentrations, contents, effective radii, precipitation fluxes, and radar reflectivity) against measurements from the MPACE Intensive Observing Period. Overall, the model qualitatively simulates ice crystal concentration and hydrometeors content, but it fails to predict quantitatively the effective radii of ice particles and their vertical profiles. In particular, the ice effective radii are overestimated by at least 50%. However, using the same definition as used for observations, the effective radii simulated and that observed were more comparable. We find that for the single-layer stratiform mixed-phase clouds simulated, process of ice phase initiation due to freezing of supercooled water in both saturated and subsaturated (w.r.t. water) environments is as important as primary ice crystal origination from water vapor. We also find that the BFP is a process mainly responsible for the rates of glaciation of simulated clouds. These glaciation rates cannot be adequately represented by a water-ice saturation adjustment scheme that only depends on temperature and liquid and solid hydrometeors contents as is widely used in bulk microphysics schemes and are better represented by processes that also account for supersaturation changes as the hydrometeors grow.

Sednev, I.; Menon, S.; McFarquhar, G.

2009-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

407

ARM - Evaluation Product - MicroPulse LIDAR Cloud Optical Depth (MPLCOD)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ProductsMicroPulse LIDAR Cloud Optical Depth ProductsMicroPulse LIDAR Cloud Optical Depth (MPLCOD) Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Evaluation Product : MicroPulse LIDAR Cloud Optical Depth (MPLCOD) 1999.05.01 - 2004.05.14 Site(s) SGP General Description The MPLCOD VAP retrieves the column cloud visible optical depth using LIDAR derived backscatter from the MPLNOR (Micro Pulse Lidar Normalized Backscatter) and radiosonde thermodynamic profiles. The optical depth retrieval is derived following Comstock et al. (2001), which retrieves visible optical depth and layer average backscatter-to-extinction ratio (k) at the lidar wavelength for each backscatter profile. Data Information Data Directory Contacts Principal Investigator Jennifer Comstock (509) 372-424

408

Intermittent Turbulence in the Very Stable Ekman Layer  

SciTech Connect

INTERMITTENT TURBULENCE IN THE VERY STABLE EKMAN LAYER This study describes a Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) of a very stable Ekman layer in which a constant downward heat flux is applied at the lower boundary, thus cooling the fluid above. Numerical experiments were performed in which the strength of the imposed heat flux was varied. For downward heat fluxes above a certain critical value the turbulence becomes intermittent and, as the heat flux increases beyond this value, the flow tends to relaminarize because of the very strong ambient stratification. We adopt Mahrt?s (1999) definition of the very stable boundary layer as a boundary layer in which intermittent, rather than continuous turbulence, is observed. Numerical experiments were used to test various hypothesis of where in ?stability parameter space? the very stable boundary layer is found. These experiments support the findings of Howell and Sun (1999) that the boundary layer will exhibit intermittency and therefore be categorized as ?very stable?, when the stability parameter, z/L, exceeds unity. Another marker for the very stable boundary layer, Derbyshire?s (1990) maximum heat flux criterion, was also examined. Using a case study drawn from the simulations where turbulence intermittency was observed, the mechanism that causes the intermittence was investigated. It was found that patchy turbulence originates from a vigorous inflectional, Ekman-like instability -- a roll cell -- that lifts colder air over warmer air. The resulting convective instability causes an intense burst of turbulence. This turbulence is short-lived because the lifting motion of the roll cell, as well as the roll cell itself, is partially destroyed after the patchy turbulence is generated. Examples of intermittent turbulence obtained from the simulations appear to be consistent with observations of intermittency even though the Reynolds number of the DNS is relatively low (400).

Barnard, James C.

2001-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

409

Cloud County, Kansas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cloud County, Kansas: Energy Resources Cloud County, Kansas: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 39.4795571°, -97.6982272° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.4795571,"lon":-97.6982272,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

410

2. System boundaries; Balance equations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

;5/28 Systems and boundaries /3 An isolated system is a special kind of closed system Pictures: KJ05 Q = heat W Example: an electric hot water heater in a house ­ The electric heater is a closed system ­ The water1/28 2. System boundaries; Balance equations Ron Zevenhoven �bo Akademi University Thermal and flow

Zevenhoven, Ron

411

Sensitivity Analysis for Decision Boundaries  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A novel approach is presented to visualize and analyze decision boundaries for feedforward neural networks. First order sensitivity analysis of the neural network output function with respect to input perturbations is used to visualize the position ... Keywords: decision boundary, feature extraction, feedforward neural network, irrelevant parameters, pruning, sensitivity analysis

A. P. Engelbrecht

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

UNDERSTANDING TRENDS ASSOCIATED WITH CLOUDS IN IRRADIATED EXOPLANETS  

SciTech Connect

Unlike previously explored relationships between the properties of hot Jovian atmospheres, the geometric albedo and the incident stellar flux do not exhibit a clear correlation, as revealed by our re-analysis of Q0-Q14 Kepler data. If the albedo is primarily associated with the presence of clouds in these irradiated atmospheres, a holistic modeling approach needs to relate the following properties: the strength of stellar irradiation (and hence the strength and depth of atmospheric circulation), the geometric albedo (which controls both the fraction of starlight absorbed and the pressure level at which it is predominantly absorbed), and the properties of the embedded cloud particles (which determine the albedo). The anticipated diversity in cloud properties renders any correlation between the geometric albedo and the stellar flux weak and characterized by considerable scatter. In the limit of vertically uniform populations of scatterers and absorbers, we use an analytical model and scaling relations to relate the temperature-pressure profile of an irradiated atmosphere and the photon deposition layer and to estimate whether a cloud particle will be lofted by atmospheric circulation. We derive an analytical formula for computing the albedo spectrum in terms of the cloud properties, which we compare to the measured albedo spectrum of HD 189733b by Evans et al. Furthermore, we show that whether an optical phase curve is flat or sinusoidal depends on whether the particles are small or large as defined by the Knudsen number. This may be an explanation for why Kepler-7b exhibits evidence for the longitudinal variation in abundance of condensates, while Kepler-12b shows no evidence for the presence of condensates despite the incident stellar flux being similar for both exoplanets. We include an 'observer's cookbook' for deciphering various scenarios associated with the optical phase curve, the peak offset of the infrared phase curve, and the geometric albedo.

Heng, Kevin [University of Bern, Center for Space and Habitability, Sidlerstrasse 5, CH-3012 Bern (Switzerland); Demory, Brice-Olivier, E-mail: kevin.heng@csh.unibe.ch, E-mail: demory@mit.edu [Department of Earth, Atmospheric and Planetary Sciences, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)

2013-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

413

ARM - Measurement - Cloud optical depth  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

optical depth optical depth ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Cloud optical depth Amount of light cloud droplets or ice particles prevent from passing through a column of atmosphere. Categories Cloud Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. External Instruments GOES : Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites Field Campaign Instruments EC-CONVAIR580-BULK : Environment Canada Convair 580 Bulk Parameters GOES : Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites

414

ARM - Field Campaign - Spring Cloud IOP  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govCampaignsSpring Cloud IOP govCampaignsSpring Cloud IOP Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Spring Cloud IOP 2000.03.01 - 2000.03.26 Lead Scientist : Gerald Mace For data sets, see below. Summary The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program conducted a Cloud Intensive Operational Period (IOP) in March 2000 that was the first-ever effort to document the 3-dimensional cloud field from observational data. Prior numerical studies of solar radiation propagation through the atmosphere in the presence of clouds have been limited by the necessity to use theoretical representations of clouds. Three-dimensional representations of actual clouds and their microphysical properties, such as the distribution of ice and water, had previously not been possible

415

Ground-based Microwave Cloud Tomography  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Microwave Cloud Tomography Microwave Cloud Tomography Experiment, SGP, May 15-June 15, 2009 Lead Scientist Dong Huang, BNL Co-Investigators Al Gasiewski, UC Boulder Maria Cadeddu, ANL Warren Wiscombe, BNL Radiation Processes Working Group March 30, 2009 multiple radiometers All good cloud radiation modelers should close their airplane window shades so as not to be corrupted by the spectacle of real 3D clouds. - Roger Davies In case you forget to do this, you see 3/30/2009 ARM RPWG 2 Effects of cloud structure on radiation 3/30/2009 ARM RPWG 3 Typical climate model - Cloud fraction & mean water content - Horizontally uniform clouds, no side radiation - Assumption on overlap Courtesy of Bernhard Mayer Cloud structure important to radiation - Cumulus (Benner & Evans 2001, Pincus et al. 2005), deep convection (DiGiuseppe &

416

Widget:LogoCloud | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Widget Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon Widget:LogoCloud Jump to: navigation, search This widget adds css selectors and javascript for the Template:LogoCloud. For...

417

Multiscale Models for Cumulus Cloud Dynamics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Cumulus clouds involve processes on a vast range of scales—including cloud droplets, turbulent mixing, and updrafts and downdrafts—and it is often difficult to determine how processes on different scales interact with each other. In this article, ...

Samuel N. Stechmann; Bjorn Stevens

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Template:LogoCloud | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

TODO: Would be nice if logos could be vertically centered within each line of the cloud TODO: Provide a way to toggle the mouse-over behavior Usage For rendering a cloud of logos....

419

IBM research division cloud computing initiative  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Cloud computing represents the latest phase in the evolution of Internet-based computing. In this paper, we describe the fundamental building blocks of cloud computing and the initiative undertaken by the IBM Research Division in this area, which includes ...

M. Naghshineh; R. Ratnaparkhi; D. Dillenberger; J. R. Doran; C. Dorai; L. Anderson; G. Pacifici; J. L. Snowdon; A. Azagury; M. VanderWiele; Y. Wolfsthal

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Disruptive technology business models in cloud computing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cloud computing, a term whose origins have been in existence for more than a decade, has come into fruition due to technological capabilities and marketplace demands. Cloud computing can be defined as a scalable and flexible ...

Krikos, Alexis Christopher

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "boundary layer clouds" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Cloud seeding as a technique for studying aerosol-cloud interactions in marine stratocumulus  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cloud seeding as a technique for studying aerosol-cloud interactions in marine stratocumulus hygroscopic aerosols were introduced into a solid marine stratocumulus cloud (200 m thick) by burning hygroscopic flares mounted on an aircraft. The cloud microphysical response in two parallel seeding plumes

Miami, University of

422

Cloud Service Security Requirements Questionnaire 1. What Cloud service will you be providing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cloud Service Security Requirements Questionnaire Exhibit G 1. What Cloud service will you) as Low/Moderate/High? If so, which? 4. Has your cloud service been audited by any eternal agencies for security and quality control? If so, please provide evidence. 5. Has your cloud service been industry

423

Cloud Tracking in Cloud-Resolving Models R. S. Plant1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cloud Tracking in Cloud-Resolving Models R. S. Plant1 1 Department of Meteorology, University. INTRODUCTION In recent years Cloud Resolving Models (CRMs) have become an increasingly important tool for CRM data, which allows one to investigate statistical prop- erties of the lifecycles of the "clouds

Plant, Robert

424

HPI Cloud Symposium ,Operating The Cloud` 25.09.2013, Hasso-Plattner-Institut, Auditorium Building  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Agenda HPI Cloud Symposium ,Operating The Cloud` 25.09.2013, Hasso-Plattner-Institut, Auditorium Building 09:30h Registration 10:00h Opening Prof. Dr. Christoph Meinel, HPI Potsdam 10:30h Cloud-RAID: Eine Methode zur Bereitstellung zuverlässiger Speicherressourcen in �ffentlichen Clouds Maxim Schnajkin, HPI

Weske, Mathias

425

The Cloud Adoption Toolkit: Supporting Cloud Adoption Decisions in the Enterprise  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 The Cloud Adoption Toolkit: Supporting Cloud Adoption Decisions in the Enterprise Ali Khajeh-Hosseini, David Greenwood, James W. Smith, Ian Sommerville Cloud Computing Co-laboratory, School of Computer Science University of St Andrews, UK {akh, dsg22, jws7, ifs}@cs.st-andrews.ac.uk Abstract Cloud computing

Sommerville, Ian

426

Cloud Verifier: Verifiable Auditing Service for IaaS Clouds Joshua Schiffman  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cloud Verifier: Verifiable Auditing Service for IaaS Clouds Joshua Schiffman Security Architecture University Park, PA, USA yus138,hvijay,tjaeger@cse.psu.edu Abstract--Cloud computing has commoditized compute paradigm, its adoption has been stymied by cloud platform's lack of trans- parency, which leaves customers

Jaeger, Trent

427

Cloud radar Doppler spectra in drizzling stratiform clouds: 1. Forward modeling and remote sensing applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cloud radar Doppler spectra in drizzling stratiform clouds: 1. Forward modeling and remote sensing broadening and drizzle growth in shallow liquid clouds remain not well understood. Detailed, cloudscale. Profiling, millimeterwavelength (cloud) radars can provide such observations. In particular, the first three

428

CLOUD COMPUTING AND INFORMATION POLICY 1 Cloud Computing and Information Policy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CLOUD COMPUTING AND INFORMATION POLICY 1 Cloud Computing and Information Policy: Computing in a Policy Cloud? Forthcoming in the Journal of Information Technology and Politics, 5(3). Paul T. Jaeger University of Maryland Jimmy Lin University of Maryland Justin M. Grimes University of Maryland #12;CLOUD

Lin, Jimmy

429

Cloud networking and communications Cloud computing is having an important impact on  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Editorial Cloud networking and communications Cloud computing is having an important impact attention has been devoted to system aspects of Cloud computing. More recently, however, the focus is shifting towards Cloud net- working and communications with evolutionary and revo- lutionary propositions

Boutaba, Raouf

430

A general boundary integral approach to elliptical boundary value problems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Based upon basic principles of continuum theory a unified direct boundary integral representation of three-dimensional elliptical boundary value problems is presented. Within this framework many interesting engineering problems, e.g. elastostatics, manetostatic and heat conduction may be considered. The special analysis of the problem under consideration appears in the fundamental solutions. A general procedure for derivation of fundamental solutions with regard to an effecient numerical realisation of the boundary element method is discussed. In the appendix a FORTRAN IV code concerning the calculation of fundamental solutions in anisotropic elastostatics is presented.

H. Gründemann

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Securely Managing Cryptographic Keys used within a Cloud Environment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to rapidly develop/host cloud applications Infrastructure as a Service (Iaas) - Networked access to processing power, storage Cloud Deployment Models Public Cloud Private Cloud Community Cloud Hybrid administers the Cloud Infrastructure? Who has access to my data? My activity history? Key Management Where

432

Intermediate layers in the a-Si:H growth processes  

SciTech Connect

The intermediate layers (IL) exist at the boundary between liquid (plasma, gas) and solid phases during production processes of a-Si:H. The IL properties differ from the properties of the boundary regions anomaly. The substance in IL is in a strong nonequilibrium state of the bifurcation or the cascade of bifurcations. The processes in the IL determine the properties and the structure of the material being produced.

Aivazov, A.A.; Bodyagin, N.V. [Moscow Inst. of Electronic Technology (Russian Federation); Vikhrov, S.P. [Radiotechnical Academy, Ryazan (Russian Federation). CR Faculty

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

433

Flow boundary conditions for chain-end adsorbing polymer blends  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using the phenol-terminated polycarbonate blend as an example, we demonstrate that the hydrodynamic boundary conditions for a flow of an adsorbing polymer melt are extremely sensitive to the structure of the epitaxial layer. Under shear, the adsorbed parts (chain ends) of the polymer melt move along the equipotential lines of the surface potential whereas the adsorbed additives serve as the surface defects. In response to the increase of the number of the adsorbed additives the surface layer becomes thinner and solidifies. This results in a gradual transition from the slip to the no-slip boundary condition for the melt flow, with a non-monotonic dependence of the slip length on the surface concentration of the adsorbed ends.

X. Zhou; D. Andrienko; L. Delle Site; K. Kremer

2005-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

434

6, 93519388, 2006 Aerosol-cloud  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ACPD 6, 9351­9388, 2006 Aerosol-cloud interaction inferred from MODIS and models G. Myhre et al Chemistry and Physics Discussions Aerosol-cloud interaction inferred from MODIS satellite data and global 6, 9351­9388, 2006 Aerosol-cloud interaction inferred from MODIS and models G. Myhre et al. Title

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

435

Cloud Microphysics Spring 2013 **odd years?**  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ATS724 Cloud Microphysics (2-0-0) Spring 2013 **odd years?** Prerequisites: ATS620, ATS621; Ph, as the class will involve designing and building a simple cloud microphysical model. Course Description: **Sue and observations of nucleation, mechanisms of cloud droplet-spectra broadening, precipitation particle growth

436

Level Set Implementations on Unstructured Point Cloud  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Level Set Implementations on Unstructured Point Cloud by HO, Hon Pong A Thesis Submitted;Level Set Implementations on Unstructured Point Cloud by HO, Hon Pong This is to certify that I have implementations on unstructured point cloud 15 3.1 Level set initialization

Duncan, James S.

437

Cloud Security: Issues and Concerns Pierangela Samarati*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Cloud Security: Issues and Concerns Authors Pierangela Samarati* UniversitĂ  degli Studi di Milano, Italy sabrina.decapitani@unimi.it Keywords cloud security confidentiality integrity availability secure data storage and processing Summary The cloud has emerged as a successful computing paradigm

Samarati, Pierangela

438

Cloud Computing: Centralization and Data Sovereignty  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Cloud Computing: Centralization and Data Sovereignty Primavera De Filippi, Smari McCarthy Abstract: Cloud computing can be defined as the provision of computing resources on-demand over and elasticity of costs, problems arise concerning the collection of personal information in the Cloud

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

439

Theory of Grain Boundary Diffusion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The previously proposed dependence of the structure of grain boundaries upon the angle of disorientation of the two grains is used as a basis of a quantitative consideration of diffusion along grain boundaries and in particular of the apparent activation energies. At small angles in the dislocation range the diffusion is controlled by volume diffusion mechanism. At high angles near 45° the model of a uniform grain boundary is applicable. In the intermediate range an array of rod-like areas of distorted lattice leads to low or even negative apparent activation energies. The theory is in good agreement with experiment.

R. Smoluchowski

1952-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Electron cloud observations : a retrospective.  

SciTech Connect

A growing number of observations of electron cloud effects (ECEs) have been reported in positron and proton rings. Low-energy, background electrons ubiquitous in high-intensity particle accelerators. Amplification of electron cloud (EC) can occur under certain operating conditions, potentially giving rise to numerous effects that can seriously degrade accelerator performance. EC observations and diagnostics have contributed to a better understanding of ECEs, in particular, details of beam-induced multipacting and cloud saturation effects. Such experimental results can be used to provide realistic limits on key input parameters for modeling efforts and analytical calculations to improve prediction capability. Electron cloud effects are increasingly important phenomena in high luminosity, high brightness, or high intensity machines - Colliders, Storage rings, Damping rings, Heavy ion beams. EC generation and instability modeling increasingly complex and benchmarked against in situ data: {delta}, {delta}{sub 0}, photon reflectivity, and SE energy distributions important. Surface conditioning and use of solenoidal windings in field-free regions are successful cures: will they be enough? What are new observations and how do they contribute to body of work and understanding physics of EC?

Harkay, K.; Accelerator Systems Division (APS)

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "boundary layer clouds" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

The dependence of ice microphysics on aerosol concentration in arctic mixed-phase stratus clouds during ISDAC and M-PACE  

SciTech Connect

Cloud and aerosol data acquired by the National Research Council of Canada (NRC) Convair-580 aircraft in, above, and below single-layer arctic stratocumulus cloud during the Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC) in April 2008 were used to test three aerosol indirect effects hypothesized to act in mixed-phase clouds: the riming indirect effect, the glaciation indirect effect, and the cold second indirect effect. The data showed a correlation of R= 0.75 between liquid drop number concentration, Nliq, inside cloud and ambient aerosol number concentration NPCASP below cloud. This, combined with increasing liquid water content LWC with height above cloud base and the nearly constant profile of Nliq, suggested that liquid drops were nucleated from aerosol at cloud base. No strong evidence of a riming indirect effect was observed, but a strong correlation of R = 0.69 between ice crystal number concentration Ni and NPCASP above cloud was noted. Increases in ice nuclei (IN) concentration with NPCASP above cloud combined with the subadiabatic LWC profiles suggest possible mixing of IN from cloud top consistent with the glaciation indirect effect. The higher Nice and lower effective radius rel for the more polluted ISDAC cases compared to data collected in cleaner single-layer stratocumulus conditions during the Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment is consistent with the operation of the cold second indirect effect. However, more data in a wider variety of meteorological and surface conditions, with greater variations in aerosol forcing, are required to identify the dominant aerosol forcing mechanisms in mixed-phase arctic clouds.

Jackson, Robert C.; McFarquhar, Greg; Korolev, Alexei; Earle, Michael; Liu, Peter S.; Lawson, R. P.; Brooks, Sarah D.; Wolde, Mengistu; Laskin, Alexander; Freer, Matthew

2012-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

442

Separating Cloud Forming Nuclei from Interstitial Aerosol  

SciTech Connect

It has become important to characterize the physicochemical properties of aerosol that have initiated the warm and ice clouds. The data is urgently needed to better represent the aerosol-cloud interaction mechanisms in the climate models. The laboratory and in-situ techniques to separate precisely the aerosol particles that act as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and ice nuclei (IN), termed as cloud nuclei (CN) henceforth, have become imperative in studying aerosol effects on clouds and the environment. This review summarizes these techniques, design considerations, associated artifacts and challenges, and briefly discusses the need for improved designs to expand the CN measurement database.

Kulkarni, Gourihar R.

2012-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

443

Earth's Core Hottest Layer  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Earth's Core Hottest Layer Earth's Core Hottest Layer Name: Alfred Status: Grade: 6-8 Location: FL Country: USA Date: Spring 2011 Question: Why is the inner core the hottest layer? How is that possible? Replies: There are two factors causing the center of the Earth hotter than various layers of the Earth's. First, the more dense is the layer. The denser layer, the hotter it will be. In addition, the source of the heating is due to heat produced by nuclear decay. These substances tend to be more dense than lower dense substances. So the source of heat (temperature) is higher, the greater will be the temperature. Having said all that, the reasons are rather more complicated in the "real" Earth. If the inner layers were less dense they would rise (bubble) to the "surface" leaving the inner layers more dense and thus hotter layers.

444

The Method of Boundary Perturbation,  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Method of Boundary Perturbation, Method of Boundary Perturbation, and Its Application to Wakefield Calculationst Weiren Chou+ Advanced Photon Source Argonne National Laboratory 9700 S. Cass Ave. Argonne, IL 60439 USA Spring Meeting of The American Physical Society Division of Physics of Beams Washington, D.C. April 16-19, 1990 tWork supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, under Contract W-31-109-ENG-38. tPresent address: SSC Laboratory, Accelerator Division, MS-I046, 2550 Beckleymeade Ave., Dallas, TX 75237, USA. LS-/~ Boundary Perturbation, and Its Application to Wakefield Calculations ABSTRACT The boundary perturbation method, suggested by Zhang and, independently, by Chatard-Moulin, Cooper, and their colleagues, is employed to the wakefield cal-

445

South Campus Boundary/Landscape  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

South Campus Boundary/Landscape April 18, 2012 #12;#12;7:00 - 7:05 Introductions and Review of the Agenda 7:05 - 7:20 Principles of the South Campus Boundary/Landscape from the Feb 21 Design Charette 7:20 - 7:30 Landscape Examples 7:30 - 7:45 Concepts and Ideas for LeMarchant St. 7:45 - 7:50 Break

Brownstone, Rob

446

Exploiting Virtualization and Cloud Computing in ATLAS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The ATLAS Computing Model was designed around the concept of grid computing; since the start of data-taking, this model has proven very successful in the federated operation of more than one hundred Worldwide LHC Computing Grid (WLCG) sites for offline data distribution, storage, processing and analysis. However, new paradigms in computing, namely virtualization and cloud computing, present improved strategies for managing and provisioning IT resources that could allow ATLAS to more flexibly adapt and scale its storage and processing workloads on varied underlying resources. In particular, ATLAS is developing a "grid-of-clouds" infrastructure in order to utilize WLCG sites that make resources available via a cloud API. This work will present the current status of the Virtualization and Cloud Computing R&D project in ATLAS Distributed Computing. First, strategies for deploying PanDA queues on cloud sites will be discussed, including the introduction of a "cloud factory" for managing cloud VM instances. Nex...

Barreiro Megino, FH; The ATLAS collaboration; De, K; Gable, I; Hendrix, V; Panitkin, S; Paterson, M; De Silva, A; van der Ster, D; Taylor, R; Vitillo, RA; Walker, R

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Charge Transport Anisotropy Due to Grain Boundaries in Directionally  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Charge Transport Anisotropy Due to Grain Charge Transport Anisotropy Due to Grain Boundaries in Directionally Crystallized Thin Films of Regio-Regular Poly(3-hexylthiophene) Semicrystalline polymers, such as polythiophenes, hold much promise as active layers in printable electronic devices such as photovoltaic cells, sensors, and thin film transistors. As organic semiconductors approach commercialization, there is a need to better understand the relationship between charge transport and microstructure, in particular, to identify the inherent bottlenecks to charge transport. In semicrystalline and polycrystalline materials, charge transport is most likely dominated by grain-boundary effects, although the exact mechanism is not well understood. Unfortunately, grain boundaries in semicrystalline thin films are difficult to characterize: the grains are too small to allow for measurements across individual grain boundaries (as is often done for polycrystalline films of small molecules) and bulk measurements are complicated by the unknown orientation of polymer chains within the grain. To better understand the effect of chain orientation on grain boundaries, we use anisotropic thin films of poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) - one of the most well-studied polymeric semiconductors, as a tool to study charge transport.

448

New Electron Cloud Detectors for the PS Main Magnets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electron cloud (EC) has already been observed during normal operation of the PS, therefore it is necessary to study its in fluence on any beam instability for the future LHC Injector Upgrade (LIU). Two new electron cloud detectors have been discussed, developed and installed during the Long Shutdown (LS1) in one of the PS main magnets. The first measurement method is based on current measurement by using a shielded button-type pick-up. Due to the geometry and space limitation in the PS magnet, the button-type pick-up made of a 96%Al2O3 block coated with a thin layer of solvent-based Ag painting, placed 30 degrees to the bottom part of the vacuum chamber was installed in the horizontal direction where the only opening of the magnet coil is. The other newly developed measurement method is based on detection of photons emitted by the electrons from the electron cloud impinging on the vacuum chamber walls. The emitted photons are reected to a quartz window. A MCP-PMT (Micro-Channel Plate Photomultiplier Tube) wit...

Yin Vallgren, Ch; Gilardoni, S; Taborelli, M; Neupert, H; Ferreira Somoza, J

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

EA-1852: Cloud County Community College Wind Energy Project, Cloud County,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2: Cloud County Community College Wind Energy Project, Cloud 2: Cloud County Community College Wind Energy Project, Cloud County, Kansas EA-1852: Cloud County Community College Wind Energy Project, Cloud County, Kansas Summary This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal to authorize the expenditure of federal funds by Cloud County Community College (CCCC) for a wind energy project. CCCC has installed three wind turbines and proposes to install a fourth turbine on their campus in Concordia, Kansas, for use in their wind energy training curriculum and to provide electricity for their campus. Public Comment Opportunities No public comment opportunities available at this time. Documents Available for Download January 10, 2011 EA-1852: Notice of Scoping Cloud County Community College Wind Energy Technology Project, Cloud

450

Convective heat transfer in a locally heated plane incompressible fluid layer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The problem of convection in a plane horizontal layer of incompressible fluid with rigid boundaries when the temperature is ... . Together with the wellknown solutions which describe heat transfer for the linear ...

S. N. Aristov; K. G. Shvarts

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

A Perfectly Matched Layer Method for the Navier-Stokes equations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Perfectly Matched Layer Method (PML) has found widespread application as a high-accuracy, non-reflecting boundary treatment in many wave propagation simulations. However, in the area of computational fluid dynamics, ...

Whitney, John Peter, 1982-

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Cloud speed impact on solar variability scaling â?? Application to the wavelet variability model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Kleissl, J. , 2013. Deriving cloud velocity from an array ofCloud Speed Impact on Solar Variability Scaling -this work, we determine from cloud speeds. Cloud simulator

Lave, Matthew; Kleissl, Jan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

A perfectly matched layer formulation for the nonlinear shallow water equations models: The split  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In a limited-area numerical weather prediction model, the lateral boundaries are not physical boundaries interest since the early days of numerical weather prediction. Several good reviews are availableA perfectly matched layer formulation for the nonlinear shallow water equations models: The split

Navon, Michael

454

Modeling open boundaries in dissipative MHD simulation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The truncation of large physical domains to concentrate computational resources is necessary or desirable in simulating many natural and man-made plasma phenomena. Three open boundary condition (BC) methods for such domain truncation of dissipative magnetohydrodynamics ... Keywords: Approximate Riemann, Artificial boundary, Calderon method, Dissipative, Lacuna, Lacunae, MHD, Magnetohydrodynamics, Non-reflecting boundary, Nonlinear, Open boundary, hyperbolic-parabolic

E. T. Meier; A. H. Glasser; V. S. Lukin; U. Shumlak

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

TROPIC: Transactional Resource Orchestration Platform In the Cloud  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TROPIC: Transactional Resource Orchestration Platform In the Cloud Changbin Liu, Yun Mao*, Xu Chen ­ InfrastructureasaService (IaaS) Cloud · Provide cloud infrastructure services: virtual machines (VMs), virtual block devices, VPNs · Widely adopted, e.g. Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud (EC2) ­ Cloud resource

Plotkin, Joshua B.

456

International Cloud Workshop, Locarno, Switzerland, 3 Feb 2009  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

International Cloud Workshop, Locarno, Switzerland, 3 Feb 2009 Impact of broken and inhomogeneous clouds on satellite cloud-phase retrieval Erwin Wolters ­ KNMI Hartwig Deneke ­ KNMI/University of Bonn;Contents Introduction CM-SAF cloud-phase retrieval method The problem ­ research question Broken clouds

Haak, Hein

457

Interconnecting Federated Clouds by Using Publish-Subscribe Service  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Cloud Federation is an emerging computing model where multiple resources from independent Cloud providers are leveraged to create large-scale distributed virtual computing clusters, operating as into a single Cloud organization. This model enables the ... Keywords: Cloud Computing, Cloud Federation, Denial of Service, Intercommunication, Publish/Subscribe Service, Reliability

Christian Esposito; Massimo Ficco; Francesco Palmieri; Aniello Castiglione

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

ARM - Measurement - Cloud particle size distribution  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

size distribution size distribution ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Cloud particle size distribution The number of cloud particles present in any given volume of air within a specified size range, including liquid and ice. Categories Cloud Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments WSACR : Scanning ARM Cloud Radar, tuned to W-Band (95GHz) Field Campaign Instruments CPI : Cloud Particle Imager CLDAEROSMICRO : Cloud and Aerosol Microphysical Properties

459

Organizational challenges in cloud adoption and enablers of cloud transition program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

With the proliferation of cloud computing, organizations have been able to get access to never seen before computing power and resources. Cloud computing has revolutionized the utilization of computing resources through ...

Rajendran, Sneha

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

A Global Climatology of Outgoing Longwave Spectral Cloud Radiative Effect and Associated Effective Cloud Properties  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Longwave (LW) spectral flux and cloud radiative effect (CRE) are important for understanding the earth’s radiation budget and cloud–radiation interaction. Here, the authors extend their previous algorithms to collocated Atmospheric Infrared ...

Xianglei Huang; Xiuhong Chen; Gerald L. Potter; Lazaros Oreopoulos; Jason N. S. Cole; Dongmin Lee; Norman G. Loeb

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "boundary layer clouds" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

CloudML : A DSL for model-based realization of applications in the cloud.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Cloud Computing offers a vast amount of resources, available for end users on a pay-as-you-go basis. The opportunity to choose between several cloud providers is… (more)

Brandtzćg, Eirik

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Posters A One-Dimensional Radiative Convective Model with Detailed Cloud Microphysics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 5 Posters A One-Dimensional Radiative Convective Model with Detailed Cloud Microphysics J. Simmons, O. Lie-Svendsen, and K. Stamnes Geophysical Institute University of Alaska Fairbanks, Alaska The Arctic is a key element in determining the radiation budget of the earth. Within the polar regions, the net radiation (incoming solar radiation minus outgoing infrared radiation) is negative. To understand the role this energy deficit plays in the overall radiation budget, one must examine the prevalent atmospheric features of the Arctic. One such feature is a persistent layer of low-altitude, stratiform clouds found over the central Arctic predominantly from April to September (Tsay et al. 1984). These Arctic stratus clouds (ASC) modulate the earth's radiation budget

463

Validation of the Poisson Stochastic Radiative Transfer Model Against Cloud Cascade Models  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Poisson Stochastic Radiative Transfer Poisson Stochastic Radiative Transfer Model Against Cloud Cascade Models T. B. Zhuravleva Institute of Atmospheric Optics Tomsk, Russia A. Marshak National Aeronautics and Space Administration Goddard Space Flight Center Greenbelt, Maryland Background Starting from a very simple stochastic cloud model by Mullamaa et al. (1972), several different stochastic models have been developed to describe radiative transfer regime in single-layer broken clouds (Kargin 1984; Titov 1990; Malvagi and Pomraning 1992; Barker et al. 1992; Malvagi et al. 1993; Kargin and Prigarin 1994; Prigarin and Titov 1996; Marshak et al. 1998; Prigarin et al. 1998, 2001; Evans et al. 1999, 2001). Recently Kassianov (2003a) generalized the Titov's (1990) stochastic model

464

Identifying Chemicals That Are Planetary Boundary Threats  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Identifying Chemicals That Are Planetary Boundary Threats ... Our point of departure to develop profiles for chemicals that are potential planetary boundary threats is to identify scenarios in which a chemical could fulfill each of the three conditions for being a planetary boundary threat. ... Note that chemicals named as examples do not necessarily represent planetary boundary threats since at least one scenario from each of the three conditions must be fulfilled for a chemical to pose a planetary boundary threat. ...

Matthew MacLeod; Magnus Breitholtz; Ian T. Cousins; Cynthia A. de Wit; Linn M. Persson; Christina Rudén; Michael S. McLachlan

2014-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

465

Validation of Surface Retrieved Cloud Optical Properties with in situ Measurements at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program (ARM) South Great Plains Site  

SciTech Connect

The surface inferred cloud optical properties from a multifilter rotating shadowband radiometer have been validated against the in situ measurements during the second ARM Enhanced Shortwave Experiment (ARESE II) field campaign at the ARM South Great Plains (SGP) site. On the basis of eight effective radius profiles measured by the in situ Forward Spectra Scattering Probe (FSSP), our retrieved cloud effective radii for single-layer warm water clouds agree well with in situ measurements, within 5.5%. The sensitivity study also illustrates that for this case a 13% uncertainty in observed liquid water path (LWP, 20 g/m2) results in 1.5% difference in retrieved cloud optical depth and 12.7% difference in referred cloud effective radius, on average. The uncertainty of the LWP measured by the microwave radiometer (MWR) is the major contributor to the uncertainty of retrieved cloud effective radius. Further, we conclude that the uncertainty of our inferred cloud optical properties is better than 5% for warm water clouds based on a surface closure study, in which cloud optical properties inferred from narrowband irradiances are applied to a shortwave model and the modeled broadband fluxes are compared to a surface pyranometer.

Min, Qilong; Duan, M.; Marchand, Roger T.

2003-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

466

Prediction of Cloud Points of Biodiesel  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Prediction of Cloud Points of Biodiesel† ... Despite the lack of accurate data for the cloud points of biodiesel, the results obtained here allow for an adequate evaluation of the model proposed, showing that it can produce good predictions of the cloud points of mixtures of fatty acid esters. ... Because of its environmental benefits, resulting from a decrease in CO2 emissions, its origin from renewable resources, and the increase in crude oil costs, biodiesel is become increasingly attractive. ...

J. C. A. Lopes; L. Boros; M. A. Krähenbühl; A. J. A. Meirelles; J. L. Daridon; J. Pauly; I. M. Marrucho; J. A. P. Coutinho

2007-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

467

Technical Sessions Parameterization of Convective Clouds, Mesoscale...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Convective-Generated Clouds W. R. Cotton Department of Atmospheric Science Colorado State University Fort Collins, CO 80523 This presentation is a summary of research...

468

Radiative Effects of Cloud Inhomogeneity and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radiative Effects of Cloud Inhomogeneity and Geometric Association Over the Tropical Western Pacific Warm Pool X. Wu National Center for Atmospheric Research (a) Boulder, Colorado...

469

The Magellan Final Report on Cloud Computing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

supported images and site security policies. A cloud systemcertain implications on site security policies. Our securityactivities—both in terms of site security policy as well as

Coghlan, Susan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

An Analysis of Cloud Absorption During  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Analysis of Cloud Absorption During ARESE II (Spring 2000) D. M. Powell, R. T. Marchand, and T. P. Ackerman Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington Introduction...

471

Automated Security Compliance Tool for the Cloud.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Security, especially security compliance, is a major concern that is slowing down the large scale adoption of cloud computing in the enterprise environment. Business… (more)

Ullah, Kazi Wali

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Cloud Computing and Sustainability: Energy Efficiency Aspects.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Cloud computing promises a new era of service delivery and deployment in such a way that every person can access any kind of services… (more)

Gholamhosseinian, Ashkan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Tropical Cloud Life Cycle and Overlap Structure  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tropical Cloud Life Cycle and Overlap Structure Vogelmann, Andrew Brookhaven National Laboratory Jensen, Michael Brookhaven National Laboratory Kollias, Pavlos Brookhaven National...

474

Cloud Computing Organizational Benefits: A Managerial concern.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Context: Software industry is looking for new methods and opportunities to reduce the project management problems and operational costs. Cloud Computing concept is providing answers… (more)

Mandala, Venkata

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Cloud Computing - Trends and Performance Issues.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Context: Cloud Computing is a very fascinating concept these days, it is attracting so many organiza-tions to move their utilities and applications into a dedicated… (more)

Al-Refai, Ali

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Migrating enterprise storage applications to the cloud.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Cloud computing has emerged as a model for hosting computing infrastructure and outsourcing management of that infrastructure. It offers the promise of simplified provisioning and… (more)

Vrable, Michael Daniel

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Prediction of blast damage from vapor cloud explosions  

SciTech Connect

The process industries handle a wide range of different materials and use them in different types of chemical reaction. Of particular concern is the prospect of damage and injury affecting the general public outside the boundary wall of the chemical plant. It is not wise to permit the construction of homes, schools or hospitals so close to chemical plants that they, and the people within, might be damaged or injured should there be an accidental explosion in the plant. The major hazard outside the plant is over-pressure, a consequence of an accidental explosion in a cloud of flammable gas or vapor (Vapor Cloud Explosion or VCE). It is the responsibility of plant management to ensure that any such accidental explosion is not so large as to endanger the public, and of the local planning authorities to ensure that homes, schools or hospitals are not sited so close to chemical plants that they may be endangered by accidental explosion. A vital tool for such authorities is a simple method of assessing the possible consequences of an accidental VCE. In this paper those methods of assessing the consequences are examined.

Phillips, H. [Phillips (H.), Buxton (United Kingdom)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

478

A COMPARISON OF CLOUD MICROPHYSICAL QUANTITIES WITH FORECASTS FROM CLOUD PREDICTION MODELS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the Atmospheric System Research (ASR) Program, Bethesda, MD March 15-19, 2010 Environmental Sciences Department/Atmospheric Plains (SGP) site. Cloud forecasts generated by the models are compared with cloud microphysical and radiosonde) are used to derive the cloud microphysical quantities: ice water content, liquid water content

479

Testing a cloud application: IBM SmartCloud inotes: methodologies and tools  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

IBM SmartCloud is a branded collection of Cloud products and solutions from IBM. It includes Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS), Software as a Service (SaaS), and Platform as a Service (PaaS) offered through public, private and hybrid cloud delivery ... Keywords: Software testing, methodology, tool

Michael Lynch; Thomas Cerqueus; Christina Thorpe

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

AirCloud: a cloud-based air-quality monitoring system for everyone  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We present the design, implementation, and evaluation of AirCloud -- a novel client-cloud system for pervasive and personal air-quality monitoring at low cost. At the frontend, we create two types of Internet-connected particulate matter (PM2:5) ... Keywords: PM2.5, air quality, client-cloud calibration system

Yun Cheng, Xiucheng Li, Zhijun Li, Shouxu Jiang, Yilong Li, Ji Jia, Xiaofan Jiang

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "boundary layer clouds" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Cloud-Top Temperatures for Precipitating Winter Clouds JAY W. HANNA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Cloud-Top Temperatures for Precipitating Winter Clouds JAY W. HANNA NOAA/NESDIS Satellite for each precipitation type, as well as light, moderate and heavy snow and rain. The light the cloud microphysics in producing precipitation. For example, ice will only nucleate from the vapor phase

Schultz, David

482

Contribution of Microbial Activity to Carbon Chemistry in Clouds  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...of their atmospheric transport that atmospheric particles...undergo several condensation-evaporation...in cloud water. Clouds...of cloud water, precipitation...Microbiology and atmospheric processes...resource recovery. IWA Publishing...

Mickaël Vaďtilingom; Pierre Amato; Martine Sancelme; Paolo Laj; Maud Leriche; Anne-Marie Delort

2009-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

483

V-041: Red Hat CloudForms Multiple Vulnerabilities | Department...  

Energy Savers (EERE)

V-041: Red Hat CloudForms Multiple Vulnerabilities V-041: Red Hat CloudForms Multiple Vulnerabilities December 6, 2012 - 4:01am Addthis PROBLEM: Red Hat CloudForms Multiple...

484

Building mobile multimedia services: a hybrid cloud computing approach  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Second, we use a hybrid cloud computing...strategy. That means the i5Cloud takes advantage of in-house commodity hardware infrastructure which is usually available in most organizations, ... , i5Cloud can automat...

Dejan Kovachev; Yiwei Cao; Ralf Klamma

2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

485

E-Cloud Build-up in Grooved Chambers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and F. Zimmermann, ”LC e-Cloud Activities at CERN”, talkal. , Simulations of the Electron Cloud for Vari- ous Con?E-CLOUD BUILD-UP IN GROOVED CHAMBERS ? M. Venturini † LBNL,

Venturini, Marco

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

A cloud-assisted design for autonomous driving  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents Carcel, a cloud-assisted system for autonomous driving. Carcel enables the cloud to have access to sensor data from autonomous vehicles as well as the roadside infrastructure. The cloud assists autonomous ...

Suresh Kumar, Swarun

487

Deriving cloud velocity from an array of solar radiation measurements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

K. , 2011. US20110060475. Cloud tracking. U.S. Patent Bedka,technique for obtaining cloud motion from geosynchronouson advection of a frozen cloud field (Chow et al. (2011);

Bosch, J.L.; Zheng, Y.; Kleissl, J.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

Layered plasma polymer composite membranes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Layered plasma polymer composite fluid separation membranes are disclosed, which comprise alternating selective and permeable layers for a total of at least 2n layers, where n is [>=]2 and is the number of selective layers. 2 figs.

Babcock, W.C.

1994-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

489

Lagrangian Variational Framework for Boundary Value Problems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A boundary value problem is commonly associated with constraints imposed on a system at its boundary. We advance here an alternative point of view treating the system as interacting "boundary" and "interior" subsystems. This view is implemented through a Lagrangian framework that allows to account for (i) a variety of forces including dissipative acting at the boundary; (ii) a multitude of features of interactions between the boundary and the interior fields when the boundary fields may differ from the boundary limit of the interior fields; (iii) detailed pictures of the energy distribution and its flow; (iv) linear and nonlinear effects. We provide a number of elucidating examples of the structured boundary and its interactions with the system interior. We also show that the proposed approach covers the well known boundary value problems.

Alexander Figotin; Guillermo Reyes

2014-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

490

Managing across boundaries: identity, differentiation and interaction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The impact of organisational restructuring on organisational boundaries has become increasingly important, especially because modernisation of work practices within large organisations generates increasing boundary complexity. Psychoanalytic theory offers a means of exploring boundaries and emphasises the importance of boundary in the emergence of an integrated sense of identity. In the UK, restructuring of health services has resulted in changes to organisational, professional and work group boundaries, seemingly, without attention being given to what may constitute a healthy set of boundary relationships. Four interrelated case studies illustrate a variety of organisational relationships and cross-boundary processes in mental health services, and how threats to particular boundaries can lead organisational members to engage in defensive activity. Whilst defences may be healthy for the individual or the organisation, they may generate more problems than they solve. Although the examples given here are highly specific, they may illuminate boundary systems more generally within organisations.

Paula Hyde

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

491

Computer Modeling of Transport of Oxidizing Species in Grain Boundaries during Zirconium Corrosion  

SciTech Connect

Zirconium (Zr) based alloys are widely used as the cladding materials in light-water reactors. The water-side corrosion of these alloys degrades their structural integrity and poses serious safety concerns. During the Zr corrosion process, a thin Zr oxide (ZrO2) layer forms on the alloy surface and serves as a barrier layer for further corrosion. The majority of the oxide has the monoclinic phase. At the transition region between the oxide and the metal, the oxide contains a thin layer of stabilized tetragonal phase. It is found that the texture of the tetragonal layer determines the protectiveness of the oxide for corrosion. The transport of oxidizing species, such as anion defects, cation defects, and electron through the tetragonal oxide layer could be the rate limiting step of the corrosion. The defect diffusion can be affected by the growing stresses and microstructures such as grain boundaries and dislocations. In this work molecular dynamics simulations are used to investigate the anion and cation diffusion in bulk and at grain boundaries in tetragonal ZrO2. The results show that defect diffusion at grain boundaries is complex and the behavior strongly depends on the grain boundary type. For most of the grain boundaries studied the defect diffusion are much slower than in the bulk, implying that grain boundaries may not be fast defect transport paths during corrosion. The connection between the modeling results and published experimental work will also be discussed. This work is funded by the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program at Idaho National Laboratory.

Xian-Ming Bai; Yongfeng Zhang; Michael R. Tonks

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

492

ICE AND DUST IN THE PRESTELLAR DARK CLOUD LYNDS 183: PREPLANETARY MATTER AT THE LOWEST TEMPERATURES  

SciTech Connect

Dust grains are nucleation centers and catalysts for the growth of icy mantles in quiescent interstellar clouds, the products of which may accumulate into preplanetary matter when new stars and solar systems form within the clouds. In this paper, we present the first spectroscopic detections of silicate dust and the molecular ices H{sub 2}O, CO, and CO{sub 2} in the vicinity of the prestellar core L183 (L134N). An infrared photometric survey of the cloud was used to identify reddened background stars, and we present spectra covering solid-state absorption features in the wavelength range 2-20 {mu}m for nine of them. The mean composition of the ices in the best-studied line of sight (toward J15542044-0254073) is H{sub 2}O:CO:CO{sub 2} Almost-Equal-To 100:40:24. The ices are amorphous in structure, indicating that they have been maintained at low temperature ({approx}< 15 K) since formation. The ice column density N(H{sub 2}O) correlates with reddening by dust, exhibiting a threshold effect that corresponds to the transition from unmantled grains in the outer layers of the cloud to ice-mantled grains within, analogous to that observed in other dark clouds. A comparison of results for L183 and the Taurus and IC 5146 dark clouds suggests common behavior, with mantles first appearing in each case at a dust column corresponding to a peak optical depth {tau}{sub 9.7} = 0.15 {+-} 0.03 in the silicate feature. Our results support a previous conclusion that the color excess E{sub J-K} does not obey a simple linear correlation with the total dust column in lines of sight that intercept dense clouds. The most likely explanation is a systematic change in the optical properties of the dust as the density increases.

Whittet, D. C. B.; Poteet, C. A.; Bajaj, V. M.; Horne, D. [Department of Physics, Applied Physics and Astronomy and New York Center for Astrobiology, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, 110 Eighth Street, Troy, NY 12180 (United States); Chiar, J. E. [SETI Institute, Carl Sagan Center, 189 Bernardo Avenue, Mountain View, CA 94043 (United States); Pagani, L. [LERMA, UMR 8112 du CNRS, Observatoire de Paris, 61 Av. de l'Observatoire, F-75014 Paris (France); Shenoy, S. S. [SOFIA Science Center, NASA Ames Research Center, MS 232-12, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States); Adamson, A. J. [Gemini Observatory, Southern Operations Center, Casilla 603, La Serena (Chile)

2013-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

493

Electron Cloud Effects in Accelerators  

SciTech Connect

Abstract We present a brief summary of various aspects of the electron-cloud effect (ECE) in accelerators. For further details, the reader is encouraged to refer to the proceedings of many prior workshops, either dedicated to EC or with significant EC contents, including the entire ?ECLOUD? series [1?22]. In addition, the proceedings of the various flavors of Particle Accelerator Conferences [23] contain a large number of EC-related publications. The ICFA Beam Dynamics Newsletter series [24] contains one dedicated issue, and several occasional articles, on EC. An extensive reference database is the LHC website on EC [25].

Furman, M.A.

2012-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

494

The viscosity structure of the D00 layer of the Earth's mantle inferred  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The viscosity structure of the D00 layer of the Earth's mantle inferred from the analysis layer Core�mantle boundary Viscosity Maxwell body a b s t r a c t The viscosity structure of the D00-diurnal to 18.6 years tidal deformations combined with model viscosity�depth profiles corresponding to a range

495

Physical Properties of High-Level Cloud over Land and Ocean from CloudSat–CALIPSO Data  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Unlike other cloud types, high-level clouds play an important role, often imposing a warming effect, in the earth–atmosphere radiative energy budget. In this paper, macro- and microphysical characteristics of cirrus clouds, such as their ...

Juan Huo; Daren Lu

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

496

Modeling aerosol growth by aqueous chemistry in nonprecipitating stratiform cloud  

SciTech Connect

A new microphysics module based on a two-dimensional (2D) joint size distribution function representing both interstitial and cloud particles is developed and applied to studying aerosol processing in non-precipitating stratocumulus clouds. The module is implemented in a three-dimensional dynamical framework of a large-eddy simulation (LES) model and in a trajectory ensemble model (TEM). Both models are used to study the modification of sulfate aerosol by the activation - aqueous chemistry - resuspension cycle in shallow marine stratocumulus clouds. The effect of particle mixing and different size-distribution representations on modeled aerosol processing are studied in a comparison of the LES and TEM simulations with the identical microphysics treatment exposes and a comparison of TEM simulations with a 2D fixed and moving bin microphysics. Particle mixing which is represented in LES and neglected in the TEM leads to the mean relative per particle dry mass change in the TEM simulations being about 30% lower than in analogous subsample of LES domain. Particles in the final LES spectrum are mixed in from different “parcels”, some of which have experienced longer in-cloud residence times than the TEM parcels, all of which originated in the subcloud layer, have. The mean relative per particle dry mass change differs by 14% between TEM simulations with fixed and moving bin microphysics. Finally, the TEM model with the moving bin microphysics is used to evaluate assumptions about liquid water mass partitioning among activated cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) of different dry sizes. These assumptions are used in large-scale models to map the bulk aqueous chemistry sulfate production, which is largely proportional to the liquid water mass, to the changes in aerosol size distribution. It is shown that the commonly used assumptions that the droplet mass is independent of CCN size or that the droplet mass is proportional to the CCN size to the third power do not perform well in the considered case. The explicitly predicted water partitioning indicates that the mean mass of droplets participating in the models aqueous chemistry calculations is proportional to the dry CCN size.

Ovchinnikov, Mikhail; Easter, Richard C.

2010-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

497

Boundary County, Idaho: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Boundary County, Idaho: Energy Resources Boundary County, Idaho: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 48.7987617°, -116.5627065° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":48.7987617,"lon":-116.5627065,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

498

Kinetic Alfven double layer formed by electron viscosity  

SciTech Connect

The effect of the electron viscosity on the kinetic Alfven solitary wave is investigated. It is found that small electron viscosity changes the electron motion along the magnetic field producing a boundary layer, and thus that in a low beta electron-ion plasma({beta} Much-Less-Than m{sub e}/m{sub i}), an obliquely propagating kinetic solitary Alfven wave can become a double layer. This double layer can exist in the sub-Alfvenic and super-Alfvenic regimes. The length scale of density drop for this double layer is on the order of that of the conventional kinetic solitary Alfven wave, and thus this double layer can accelerate electrons on a very short length scale.

Woo, M. H.; Ryu, C.-M. [Department of Physics, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, C. R. [Department of Physics, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Taejon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

499

Network Performance of a Video Application in the Cloud.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Cloud computing is a technology that uses the internet and central remote servers to maintain data and applications. There are different cloud services of which… (more)

NARISETTY, SHRAVAN

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

500

Detecting Cirrus-Overlapping-Water Clouds and Retrieving their...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

channel (0.6 m) to retrieve cloud optical depth. Both channels are common to all weather satellite sensors. Because cirrus clouds are mostly semitransparent at infrared...