National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for boundary layer clouds

  1. Boundary Layer Cloud Turbulence Characteristics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  2. Lidar Investigation of Tropical Nocturnal Boundary Layer Aerosols and Cloud Macrophysics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Manoj, M. G.; Devara, PC S.; Taraphdar, Sourav

    2013-10-01

    Observational evidence of two-way association between nocturnal boundary layer aerosols and cloud macrophysical properties under different meteorological conditions is reported in this paper. The study has been conducted during 2008-09 employing a high space-time resolution polarimetric micro-pulse lidar over a tropical urban station in India. Firstly, the study highlights the crucial role of boundary layer aerosols and background meteorology on the formation and structure of low-level stratiform clouds in the backdrop of different atmospheric stability conditions. Turbulent mixing induced by the wind shear at the station, which is associated with a complex terrain, is found to play a pivotal role in the formation and structural evolution of nocturnal boundary layer clouds. Secondly, it is shown that the trapping of energy in the form of outgoing terrestrial radiation by the overlying low-level clouds can enhance the aerosol mixing height associated with the nocturnal boundary layer. To substantiate this, the long-wave heating associated with cloud capping has been quantitatively estimated in an indirect way by employing an Advanced Research Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF-ARW) model version 2.2 developed by National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), Colorado, USA, and supplementary data sets; and differentiated against other heating mechanisms. The present investigation as well establishes the potential of lidar remote-sensing technique in exploring some of the intriguing aspects of the cloud-environment relationship.

  3. RACORO continental boundary layer cloud investigations. 3. Separation...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    shallow cumulus Climatically important low-level clouds are commonly misrepresented in climate models. The FAst-physics System TEstbed and Research (FASTER) project has constructed...

  4. Clouds, aerosol, and precipitation in the Marine Boundary Layer: An ARM mobile facility deployment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wood, Robert; Luke, Ed; Wyant, Matthew; Bretherton, Christopher S.; Remillard, Jasmine; Kollias, Pavlos; Fletcher, Jennifer; Stemmler, Jayson; deSzoeke, S.; Yuter, Sandra; Miller, Matthew; Mechem, David; Tselioudis, George; Chiu, Christine; Mann, Julia; O Connor, Ewan; Hogan, Robin; Dong, Xiquan; Miller, Mark; Ghate, Virendra; Jefferson, Anne; Min, Qilong; Minnis, Patrick; Palinkonda, Rabindra; Albrecht, Bruce; Hannay, Cecile; Lin, Yanluan

    2014-04-27

    The Clouds, Aerosol, and Precipitation in the Marine Boundary Layer (CAP-MBL) deployment at Graciosa Island in the Azores generated a 21-month (April 2009-December 2010) comprehensive dataset documenting clouds, aerosols, and precipitation using the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program (ARM) Mobile Facility (AMF). The scientific aim of the deployment is to gain improved understanding of the interactions of clouds, aerosols, and precipitation in the marine boundary layer. Graciosa Island straddles the boundary between the subtropics and midlatitudes in the Northeast Atlantic Ocean and consequently experiences a great diversity of meteorological and cloudiness conditions. Low clouds are the dominant cloud type, with stratocumulus and cumulus occurring regularly. Approximately half of all clouds contained precipitation detectable as radar echoes below the cloud base. Radar and satellite observations show that clouds with tops from 1-11 km contribute more or less equally to surface-measured precipitation at Graciosa. A wide range of aerosol conditions was sampled during the deployment consistent with the diversity of sources as indicated by back-trajectory analysis. Preliminary findings suggest important two-way interactions between aerosols and clouds at Graciosa, with aerosols affecting light precipitation and cloud radiative properties while being controlled in part by precipitation scavenging.The data from Graciosa are being compared with short-range forecasts made with a variety of models. A pilot analysis with two climate and two weather forecast models shows that they reproduce the observed time-varying vertical structure of lower-tropospheric cloud fairly well but the cloud-nucleating aerosol concentrations less well. The Graciosa site has been chosen to be a permanent fixed ARM site that became operational in October 2013.

  5. Clouds, aerosol, and precipitation in the Marine Boundary Layer: An ARM mobile facility deployment

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wood, Robert; Luke, Ed; Wyant, Matthew; Bretherton, Christopher S.; Remillard, Jasmine; Kollias, Pavlos; Fletcher, Jennifer; Stemmler, Jayson; deSzoeke, S.; Yuter, Sandra; et al

    2014-04-27

    The Clouds, Aerosol, and Precipitation in the Marine Boundary Layer (CAP-MBL) deployment at Graciosa Island in the Azores generated a 21-month (April 2009-December 2010) comprehensive dataset documenting clouds, aerosols, and precipitation using the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program (ARM) Mobile Facility (AMF). The scientific aim of the deployment is to gain improved understanding of the interactions of clouds, aerosols, and precipitation in the marine boundary layer. Graciosa Island straddles the boundary between the subtropics and midlatitudes in the Northeast Atlantic Ocean and consequently experiences a great diversity of meteorological and cloudiness conditions. Low clouds are the dominant cloud type, with stratocumulusmore »and cumulus occurring regularly. Approximately half of all clouds contained precipitation detectable as radar echoes below the cloud base. Radar and satellite observations show that clouds with tops from 1-11 km contribute more or less equally to surface-measured precipitation at Graciosa. A wide range of aerosol conditions was sampled during the deployment consistent with the diversity of sources as indicated by back-trajectory analysis. Preliminary findings suggest important two-way interactions between aerosols and clouds at Graciosa, with aerosols affecting light precipitation and cloud radiative properties while being controlled in part by precipitation scavenging.The data from Graciosa are being compared with short-range forecasts made with a variety of models. A pilot analysis with two climate and two weather forecast models shows that they reproduce the observed time-varying vertical structure of lower-tropospheric cloud fairly well but the cloud-nucleating aerosol concentrations less well. The Graciosa site has been chosen to be a permanent fixed ARM site that became operational in October 2013.« less

  6. Joint retrievals of cloud and drizzle in marine boundary layer clouds using ground-based radar, lidar and zenith radiances

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Fielding, M. D.; Chiu, J. C.; Hogan, R. J.; Feingold, G.; Eloranta, E.; O'Connor, E. J.; Cadeddu, M. P.

    2015-07-02

    Active remote sensing of marine boundary-layer clouds is challenging as drizzle drops often dominate the observed radar reflectivity. We present a new method to simultaneously retrieve cloud and drizzle vertical profiles in drizzling boundary-layer clouds using surface-based observations of radar reflectivity, lidar attenuated backscatter, and zenith radiances under conditions when precipitation does not reach the surface. Specifically, the vertical structure of droplet size and water content of both cloud and drizzle is characterised throughout the cloud. An ensemble optimal estimation approach provides full error statistics given the uncertainty in the observations. To evaluate the new method, we first perform retrievalsmore »using synthetic measurements from large-eddy simulation snapshots of cumulus under stratocumulus, where cloud water path is retrieved with an error of 31 g m-2. The method also performs well in non-drizzling clouds where no assumption of the cloud profile is required. We then apply the method to observations of marine stratocumulus obtained during the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement MAGIC deployment in the Northeast Pacific. Here, retrieved cloud water path agrees well with independent three-channel microwave radiometer retrievals, with a root mean square difference of 10–20 g m-2.« less

  7. Joint retrievals of cloud and drizzle in marine boundary layer clouds using ground-based radar, lidar and zenith radiances

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Fielding, M. D.; Chiu, J. C.; Hogan, R. J.; Feingold, G.; Eloranta, E.; O'Connor, E. J.; Cadeddu, M. P.

    2015-02-16

    Active remote sensing of marine boundary-layer clouds is challenging as drizzle drops often dominate the observed radar reflectivity. We present a new method to simultaneously retrieve cloud and drizzle vertical profiles in drizzling boundary-layer cloud using surface-based observations of radar reflectivity, lidar attenuated backscatter, and zenith radiances. Specifically, the vertical structure of droplet size and water content of both cloud and drizzle is characterised throughout the cloud. An ensemble optimal estimation approach provides full error statistics given the uncertainty in the observations. To evaluate the new method, we first perform retrievals using synthetic measurements from large-eddy simulation snapshots of cumulusmore »under stratocumulus, where cloud water path is retrieved with an error of 31 g m?2. The method also performs well in non-drizzling clouds where no assumption of the cloud profile is required. We then apply the method to observations of marine stratocumulus obtained during the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement MAGIC deployment in the northeast Pacific. Here, retrieved cloud water path agrees well with independent 3-channel microwave radiometer retrievals, with a root mean square difference of 10–20 g m?2.« less

  8. Comparison of marine boundary layer cloud properties from CERES-MODIS Edition 4 and DOE ARM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dong, Xiquan

    Comparison of marine boundary layer cloud properties from CERES-MODIS Edition 4 and DOE ARM AMF are compared with observations taken at the Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Mobile from ARM ground-based observations were averaged over a 1h interval centered at the satellite overpass

  9. Multidimensional Longwave Forcing of Boundary Layer Cloud Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mechem, David B.; Kogan, Yefim L.; Ovtchinnikov, Mikhail; Davis, Anthony B.; Evans, K. Franklin; Ellingson, Robert G.

    2008-12-01

    The importance of multidimensional (MD) longwave radiative effects on cloud dynamics is evaluated in an eddy-resolving model (ERM)—the two-dimensional analog to large-eddy simulation (LES)—framework employing multidimensional radiative transfer...

  10. Clouds, Precipitation, and Marine Boundary Layer Structure during the MAGIC Field Campaign

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhou, Xiaoli; Kollias, Pavlos; Lewis, Ernie R.

    2015-03-01

    The recent ship-based MAGIC (Marine ARM GCSS Pacific Cross-Section Intercomparison (GPCI) Investigation of Clouds) field campaign with the marine-capable Second ARM Mobile Facility (AMF2) deployed on the Horizon Lines cargo container M/V Spirit provided nearly 200 days of intraseasonal high-resolution observations of clouds, precipitation, and marine boundary layer (MBL) structure on multiple legs between Los Angeles, California, and Honolulu, Hawaii. During the deployment, MBL clouds exhibited a much higher frequency of occurrence than other cloud types and occurred more often in the warm season than in the cold season. MBL clouds demonstrated a propensity to produce precipitation, which often evaporatedmore »before reaching the ocean surface. The formation of stratocumulus is strongly correlated to a shallow MBL with a strong inversion and a weak transition, while cumulus formation is associated with a much weaker inversion and stronger transition. The estimated inversion strength is shown to depend seasonally on the potential temperature at 700 hPa. The location of the commencement of systematic MBL decoupling always occurred eastward of the locations of cloud breakup, and the systematic decoupling showed a strong moisture stratification. The entrainment of the dry warm air above the inversion appears to be the dominant factor triggering the systematic decoupling, while surface latent heat flux, precipitation, and diurnal circulation did not play major roles. MBL clouds broke up over a short spatial region due to the changes in the synoptic conditions, implying that in real atmospheric conditions the MBL clouds do not have enough time to evolve as in the idealized models. (auth)« less

  11. Clouds, Precipitation, and Marine Boundary Layer Structure during the MAGIC Field Campaign

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhou, Xiaoli [McGill Univ., Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Dept. of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences; Kollias, Pavlos [McGill Univ., Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Dept. of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences; Lewis, Ernie R. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States). Biological, Environmental, and Climate Sciences Dept.

    2015-03-01

    The recent ship-based MAGIC (Marine ARM GCSS Pacific Cross-Section Intercomparison (GPCI) Investigation of Clouds) field campaign with the marine-capable Second ARM Mobile Facility (AMF2) deployed on the Horizon Lines cargo container M/V Spirit provided nearly 200 days of intraseasonal high-resolution observations of clouds, precipitation, and marine boundary layer (MBL) structure on multiple legs between Los Angeles, California, and Honolulu, Hawaii. During the deployment, MBL clouds exhibited a much higher frequency of occurrence than other cloud types and occurred more often in the warm season than in the cold season. MBL clouds demonstrated a propensity to produce precipitation, which often evaporated before reaching the ocean surface. The formation of stratocumulus is strongly correlated to a shallow MBL with a strong inversion and a weak transition, while cumulus formation is associated with a much weaker inversion and stronger transition. The estimated inversion strength is shown to depend seasonally on the potential temperature at 700 hPa. The location of the commencement of systematic MBL decoupling always occurred eastward of the locations of cloud breakup, and the systematic decoupling showed a strong moisture stratification. The entrainment of the dry warm air above the inversion appears to be the dominant factor triggering the systematic decoupling, while surface latent heat flux, precipitation, and diurnal circulation did not play major roles. MBL clouds broke up over a short spatial region due to the changes in the synoptic conditions, implying that in real atmospheric conditions the MBL clouds do not have enough time to evolve as in the idealized models. (auth)

  12. Transforming the representation of the boundary layer and low clouds for high-resolution regional climate modeling: Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Hsin-Yuan; Hall, Alex

    2013-07-24

    Stratocumulus and shallow cumulus clouds in subtropical oceanic regions (e.g., Southeast Pacific) cover thousands of square kilometers and play a key role in regulating global climate (e.g., Klein and Hartmann, 1993). Numerical modeling is an essential tool to study these clouds in regional and global systems, but the current generation of climate and weather models has difficulties in representing them in a realistic way (e.g., Siebesma et al., 2004; Stevens et al., 2007; Teixeira et al., 2011). While numerical models resolve the large-scale flow, subgrid-scale parameterizations are needed to estimate small-scale properties (e.g. boundary layer turbulence and convection, clouds, radiation), which have significant influence on the resolved scale due to the complex nonlinear nature of the atmosphere. To represent the contribution of these fine-scale processes to the resolved scale, climate models use various parameterizations, which are the main pieces in the model that contribute to the low clouds dynamics and therefore are the major sources of errors or approximations in their representation. In this project, we aim to 1) improve our understanding of the physical processes in thermal circulation and cloud formation, 2) examine the performance and sensitivity of various parameterizations in the regional weather model (Weather Research and Forecasting model; WRF), and 3) develop, implement, and evaluate the advanced boundary layer parameterization in the regional model to better represent stratocumulus, shallow cumulus, and their transition. Thus, this project includes three major corresponding studies. We find that the mean diurnal cycle is sensitive to model domain in ways that reveal the existence of different contributions originating from the Southeast Pacific land-masses. The experiments suggest that diurnal variations in circulations and thermal structures over this region are influenced by convection over the Peruvian sector of the Andes cordillera, while the mostly dry mountain-breeze circulations force an additional component that results in semi-diurnal variations near the coast. A series of numerical tests, however, reveal sensitivity of the simulations to the choice of vertical grid, limiting the possibility of solid quantitative statements on the amplitudes and phases of the diurnal and semidiurnal components across the domain. According to our experiments, the Mellor-Yamada-Nakanishi-Niino (MYNN) boundary layer scheme and the WSM6 microphysics scheme is the combination of schemes that performs best. For that combination, mean cloud cover, liquid water path, and cloud depth are fairly wellsimulated, while mean cloud top height remains too low in comparison to observations. Both microphysics and boundary layer schemes contribute to the spread in liquid water path and cloud depth, although the microphysics contribution is slightly more prominent. Boundary layer schemes are the primary contributors to cloud top height, degree of adiabaticity, and cloud cover. Cloud top height is closely related to surface fluxes and boundary layer structure. Thus, our study infers that an appropriate tuning of cloud top height would likely improve the low-cloud representation in the model. Finally, we show that entrainment governs the degree of adiabaticity, while boundary layer decoupling is a control on cloud cover. In the intercomparison study using WRF single-column model experiments, most parameterizations show a poor agreement of the vertical boundary layer structure when compared with large-eddy simulation models. We also implement a new Total-Energy/Mass- Flux boundary layer scheme into the WRF model and evaluate its ability to simulate both stratocumulus and shallow cumulus clouds. Result comparisons against large-eddy simulation show that this advanced parameterization based on the new Eddy-Diffusivity/Mass-Flux approach provides a better performance than other boundary layer parameterizations.

  13. Global and regional modeling of clouds and aerosols in the marine boundary layer during VOCALS: the VOCA intercomparison

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wyant, M. C.; Bretherton, Christopher S.; Wood, Robert; Carmichael, Gregory; Clarke, A. D.; Fast, Jerome D.; George, R.; Gustafson, William I.; Hannay, Cecile; Lauer, Axel; et al

    2015-01-09

    A diverse collection of models are used to simulate the marine boundary layer in the southeast Pacific region during the period of the October–November 2008 VOCALS REx (VAMOS Ocean Cloud Atmosphere Land Study Regional Experiment) field campaign. Regional models simulate the period continuously in boundary-forced free-running mode, while global forecast models and GCMs (general circulation models) are run in forecast mode. The models are compared to extensive observations along a line at 20° S extending westward from the South American coast. Most of the models simulate cloud and aerosol characteristics and gradients across the region that are recognizably similar tomore »observations, despite the complex interaction of processes involved in the problem, many of which are parameterized or poorly resolved. Some models simulate the regional low cloud cover well, though many models underestimate MBL (marine boundary layer) depth near the coast. Most models qualitatively simulate the observed offshore gradients of SO2, sulfate aerosol, CCN (cloud condensation nuclei) concentration in the MBL as well as differences in concentration between the MBL and the free troposphere. Most models also qualitatively capture the decrease in cloud droplet number away from the coast. However, there are large quantitative intermodel differences in both means and gradients of these quantities. Many models are able to represent episodic offshore increases in cloud droplet number and aerosol concentrations associated with periods of offshore flow. Most models underestimate CCN (at 0.1% supersaturation) in the MBL and free troposphere. The GCMs also have difficulty simulating coastal gradients in CCN and cloud droplet number concentration near the coast. The overall performance of the models demonstrates their potential utility in simulating aerosol–cloud interactions in the MBL, though quantitative estimation of aerosol–cloud interactions and aerosol indirect effects of MBL clouds with these models remains uncertain.« less

  14. Global and regional modeling of clouds and aerosols in the marine boundary layer during VOCALS: the VOCA intercomparison

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wyant, M. C.; Bretherton, Christopher S.; Wood, Robert; Carmichael, Gregory; Clarke, A. D.; Fast, Jerome D.; George, R.; Gustafson, William I.; Hannay, Cecile; Lauer, Axel; Lin, Yanluan; Morcrette, J. -J.; Mulcahay, Jane; Saide, Pablo; Spak, S. N.; Yang, Qing

    2015-01-01

    A diverse collection of models are used to simulate the marine boundary layer in the southeast Pacific region during the period of the October–November 2008 VOCALS REx (VAMOS Ocean Cloud Atmosphere Land Study Regional Experiment) field campaign. Regional models simulate the period continuously in boundary-forced free-running mode, while global forecast models and GCMs (general circulation models) are run in forecast mode. The models are compared to extensive observations along a line at 20° S extending westward from the South American coast. Most of the models simulate cloud and aerosol characteristics and gradients across the region that are recognizably similar to observations, despite the complex interaction of processes involved in the problem, many of which are parameterized or poorly resolved. Some models simulate the regional low cloud cover well, though many models underestimate MBL (marine boundary layer) depth near the coast. Most models qualitatively simulate the observed offshore gradients of SO2, sulfate aerosol, CCN (cloud condensation nuclei) concentration in the MBL as well as differences in concentration between the MBL and the free troposphere. Most models also qualitatively capture the decrease in cloud droplet number away from the coast. However, there are large quantitative intermodel differences in both means and gradients of these quantities. Many models are able to represent episodic offshore increases in cloud droplet number and aerosol concentrations associated with periods of offshore flow. Most models underestimate CCN (at 0.1% supersaturation) in the MBL and free troposphere. The GCMs also have difficulty simulating coastal gradients in CCN and cloud droplet number concentration near the coast. The overall performance of the models demonstrates their potential utility in simulating aerosol–cloud interactions in the MBL, though quantitative estimation of aerosol–cloud interactions and aerosol indirect effects of MBL clouds with these models remains uncertain.

  15. RACORO continental boundary layer cloud investigations. Part I: Case study development and ensemble large-scale forcings

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Vogelmann, Andrew M.; Fridlind, Ann M.; Toto, Tami; Endo, Satoshi; Lin, Wuyin; Wang, Jian; Feng, Sha; Zhang, Yunyan; Turner, David D.; Liu, Yangang; et al

    2015-06-19

    Observation-based modeling case studies of continental boundary layer clouds have been developed to study cloudy boundary layers, aerosol influences upon them, and their representation in cloud- and global-scale models. Three 60-hour case study periods span the temporal evolution of cumulus, stratiform, and drizzling boundary layer cloud systems, representing mixed and transitional states rather than idealized or canonical cases. Based on in-situ measurements from the RACORO field campaign and remote-sensing observations, the cases are designed with a modular configuration to simplify use in large-eddy simulations (LES) and single-column models. Aircraft measurements of aerosol number size distribution are fit to lognormal functionsmore »for concise representation in models. Values of the aerosol hygroscopicity parameter, ?, are derived from observations to be ~0.10, which are lower than the 0.3 typical over continents and suggestive of a large aerosol organic fraction. Ensemble large-scale forcing datasets are derived from the ARM variational analysis, ECMWF forecasts, and a multi-scale data assimilation system. The forcings are assessed through comparison of measured bulk atmospheric and cloud properties to those computed in 'trial' large-eddy simulations, where more efficient run times are enabled through modest reductions in grid resolution and domain size compared to the full-sized LES grid. Simulations capture many of the general features observed, but the state-of-the-art forcings were limited at representing details of cloud onset, and tight gradients and high-resolution transients of importance. Methods for improving the initial conditions and forcings are discussed. The cases developed are available to the general modeling community for studying continental boundary clouds.« less

  16. Transitions of cloud-topped marine boundary layers characterized by AIRS, MODIS, and a large eddy simulation model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yue, Qing; Kahn, Brian; Xiao, Heng; Schreier, Mathias; Fetzer, E. J.; Teixeira, J.; Suselj, Kay

    2013-08-16

    Cloud top entrainment instability (CTEI) is a hypothesized positive feedback between entrainment mixing and evaporative cooling near the cloud top. Previous theoretical and numerical modeling studies have shown that the persistence or breakup of marine boundary layer (MBL) clouds may be sensitive to the CTEI parameter. Collocated thermodynamic profile and cloud observations obtained from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instruments are used to quantify the relationship between the CTEI parameter and the cloud-topped MBL transition from stratocumulus to trade cumulus in the northeastern Pacific Ocean. Results derived from AIRS and MODIS are compared with numerical results from the UCLA large eddy simulation (LES) model for both well-mixed and decoupled MBLs. The satellite and model results both demonstrate a clear correlation between the CTEI parameter and MBL cloud fraction. Despite fundamental differences between LES steady state results and the instantaneous snapshot type of observations from satellites, significant correlations for both the instantaneous pixel-scale observations and the long-term averaged spatial patterns between the CTEI parameter and MBL cloud fraction are found from the satellite observations and are consistent with LES results. This suggests the potential of using AIRS and MODIS to quantify global and temporal characteristics of the cloud-topped MBL transition.

  17. Toward ice formation closure in Arctic mixedphase boundary layer clouds during ISDAC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    above water saturation) and another in which initial IN concentrations were vertically uniform. A key aspect of the latter was an IN reservoir under the wellmixed cloud layer: as the simulations progressed, the reservoir IN slowly mixed upward, helping to maintain ice concentrations close to those observed. Given

  18. RACORO continental boundary layer cloud investigations. 2. Large-eddy simulations of cumulus clouds and evaluation with in-situ and ground-based observations

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Endo, Satoshi; Fridlind, Ann M.; Lin, Wuyin; Vogelmann, Andrew M.; Toto, Tami; Ackerman, Andrew S.; McFarquhar, Greg M.; Jackson, Robert C.; Jonsson, Haflidi H.; Liu, Yangang

    2015-06-19

    A 60-hour case study of continental boundary layer cumulus clouds is examined using two large-eddy simulation (LES) models. The case is based on observations obtained during the RACORO Campaign (Routine Atmospheric Radiation Measurement [ARM] Aerial Facility [AAF] Clouds with Low Optical Water Depths [CLOWD] Optical Radiative Observations) at the ARM Climate Research Facility's Southern Great Plains site. The LES models are driven by continuous large-scale and surface forcings, and are constrained by multi-modal and temporally varying aerosol number size distribution profiles derived from aircraft observations. We compare simulated cloud macrophysical and microphysical properties with ground-based remote sensing and aircraft observations.more »The LES simulations capture the observed transitions of the evolving cumulus-topped boundary layers during the three daytime periods, and generally reproduce variations of droplet number concentration with liquid water content (LWC), corresponding to the gradient between the cloud centers and cloud edges at given heights. The observed LWC values fall within the range of simulated values; the observed droplet number concentrations are commonly higher than simulated, but differences remain on par with potential estimation errors in the aircraft measurements. Sensitivity studies examine the influences of bin microphysics versus bulk microphysics, aerosol advection, supersaturation treatment, and aerosol hygroscopicity. Simulated macrophysical cloud properties are found to be insensitive in this non-precipitating case, but microphysical properties are especially sensitive to bulk microphysics supersaturation treatment and aerosol hygroscopicity.« less

  19. RACORO continental boundary layer cloud investigations. 3. Separation of parameterization biases in single-column model CAM5 simulations of shallow cumulus

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lin, Wuyin; Liu, Yangang; Vogelmann, Andrew M.; Fridlind, Ann; Endo, Satoshi; Song, Hua; Feng, Sha; Toto, Tami; Li, Zhijin; Zhang, Minghua

    2015-06-19

    Climatically important low-level clouds are commonly misrepresented in climate models. The FAst-physics System TEstbed and Research (FASTER) project has constructed case studies from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility's Southern Great Plain site during the RACORO aircraft campaign to facilitate research on model representation of boundary-layer clouds. This paper focuses on using the single-column Community Atmosphere Model version 5 (SCAM5) simulations of a multi-day continental shallow cumulus case to identify specific parameterization causes of low-cloud biases. Consistent model biases among the simulations driven by a set of alternative forcings suggest that uncertainty in the forcing plays only amore »relatively minor role. In-depth analysis reveals that the model's shallow cumulus convection scheme tends to significantly under-produce clouds during the times when shallow cumuli exist in the observations, while the deep convective and stratiform cloud schemes significantly over-produce low-level clouds throughout the day. The links between model biases and the underlying assumptions of the shallow cumulus scheme are further diagnosed with the aid of large-eddy simulations and aircraft measurements, and by suppressing the triggering of the deep convection scheme. It is found that the weak boundary layer turbulence simulated is directly responsible for the weak cumulus activity and the simulated boundary layer stratiform clouds. Increased vertical and temporal resolutions are shown to lead to stronger boundary layer turbulence and reduction of low-cloud biases.« less

  20. Clouds, Aerosol, and Precipitation in the Marine Boundary Layer: Analysis of Results from the ARM Mobile Facility Deployment to the Azores (2009/2010)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wood, Robert

    2013-05-31

    The project focuses upon dataset analysis and synthesis of datasets from the AMF deployment entitled “Clouds, Aerosols, and Precipitation in the Marine Boundary Layer (CAP?MBL)” at Graciosa Island in the Azores. Wood is serving a PI for this AMF deployment.

  1. RACORO LONG-TERM, SYSTEMATIC AIRCRAFT OBSERVATIONS OF BOUNDARY LAYER CLOUDS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ). This type of cloud is common globally, and the Earth's radiative energy balance is particularly sensitive Contract No. DE-AC02- 98CH10886 with the U.S. Department of Energy. The publisher by accepting-up, irrevocable, world-wide license to publish or reproduce the published form of this manuscript, or allow others

  2. Reply to Comments on ``Seasonal Variation of the Physical Properties of Marine Boundary Layer Clouds off the California Coast''

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clouds off the California Coast'' WUYIN LIN* AND MINGHUA ZHANG School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, New York NORMAN G. LOEB NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradi- ometer­Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (MODIS

  3. Geography 104 Boundary Layer Climates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geography 104 Boundary Layer Climates Assignment #5 Question 1: The Urban Heat Island The following briefly how the use of giant windmills or fans can be effective in preventing frost in an orchard. Refer

  4. Improving Subtropical Boundary Layer Cloudiness in the 2011 NCEP GFS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fletcher, J. K.; Bretherton, Christopher S.; Xiao, Heng; Sun, Ruiyu N.; Han, J.

    2014-09-23

    The current operational version of National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) Global Forecasting System (GFS) shows significant low cloud bias. These biases also appear in the Coupled Forecast System (CFS), which is developed from the GFS. These low cloud biases degrade seasonal and longer climate forecasts, particularly of short-wave cloud radiative forcing, and affect predicted sea surface temperature. Reducing this bias in the GFS will aid the development of future CFS versions and contributes to NCEP's goal of unified weather and climate modelling. Changes are made to the shallow convection and planetary boundary layer parameterisations to make them more consistent with current knowledge of these processes and to reduce the low cloud bias. These changes are tested in a single-column version of GFS and in global simulations with GFS coupled to a dynamical ocean model. In the single-column model, we focus on changing parameters that set the following: the strength of shallow cumulus lateral entrainment, the conversion of updraught liquid water to precipitation and grid-scale condensate, shallow cumulus cloud top, and the effect of shallow convection in stratocumulus environments. Results show that these changes improve the single-column simulations when compared to large eddy simulations, in particular through decreasing the precipitation efficiency of boundary layer clouds. These changes, combined with a few other model improvements, also reduce boundary layer cloud and albedo biases in global coupled simulations.

  5. NOTES AND CORRESPONDENCE An Analytic Longwave Radiation Formula for Liquid Layer Clouds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NOTES AND CORRESPONDENCE An Analytic Longwave Radiation Formula for Liquid Layer Clouds VINCENT E of boundary layer clouds have used a convenient but idealized longwave radiation formula for clouds in their large-eddy simulations (LESs). Under what conditions is this formula justified? Can it be extended

  6. A Simple Parameterization Coupling the Convective Daytime Boundary Layer and Fair-Weather Cumuli

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berg, Larry K.; Stull, Roland B.

    2005-06-15

    A new parameterization for boundary-layer cumulus clouds, called the Cumulus Potential (CuP) scheme is introduced. This scheme uses Joint Probability Density Functions (JPDFs) of virtual potential temperature and water-vapor mixing ratio, as well as the mean vertical profiles of virtual potential temperature to predict the amount and size distribution of boundary-layer cloud cover. This model considers the diversity of air parcels over a heterogeneous surface, and recognizes that some parcels rise above their lifting condensation level to become cumulus, while other parcels might rise as non-cloud updrafts. This model has several unique features: (1) cloud cover is determined from the boundary-layer JPDF of virtual potential temperature vs. water-vapor mixing ratio , (2) clear and cloudy thermals are allowed to coexist at the same altitude, and (3) a range of cloud-base heights, cloud-top heights, and cloud thicknesses are predicted within any one cloud field, as observed. Using data from Boundary Layer Experiment 1996, and a model intercomparsion study using Large Eddy Simulation (LES) based on BOMEX, it is shown that the CuP model does a good job predicting cloud-base height and cloud-top height. The model also shows promise in predicting cloud cover, and is found to give better cloud-cover estimates than three other cumulus parameterizations: one based on relative humidity, a statistical scheme based on the saturation deficit, and a slab model.

  7. Clouds, Aerosols and Precipitation in the Marine Boundary Layer (CAP-MBL) AMF Deployment Graciosa Island, Azores, NE Atlantic Ocean May 2009-December 2010

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D BGene NetworkNuclearDNP 20082 P r o j eCommitteeCloud-Resolving3

  8. Planetary Boundary Layer from AERI and MPL

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Sawyer, Virginia

    The distribution and transport of aerosol emitted to the lower troposphere is governed by the height of the planetary boundary layer (PBL), which limits the dilution of pollutants and influences boundary-layer convection. Because radiative heating and cooling of the surface strongly affect the PBL top height, it follows diurnal and seasonal cycles and may vary by hundreds of meters over a 24-hour period. The cap the PBL imposes on low-level aerosol transport makes aerosol concentration an effective proxy for PBL height: the top of the PBL is marked by a rapid transition from polluted, well-mixed boundary-layer air to the cleaner, more stratified free troposphere. Micropulse lidar (MPL) can provide much higher temporal resolution than radiosonde and better vertical resolution than infrared spectrometer (AERI), but PBL heights from all three instruments at the ARM SGP site are compared to one another for validation. If there is agreement among them, the higher-resolution remote sensing-derived PBL heights can accurately fill in the gaps left by the low frequency of radiosonde launches, and thus improve model parameterizations and our understanding of boundary-layer processes.

  9. Planetary Boundary Layer from AERI and MPL

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Sawyer, Virginia

    2014-02-13

    The distribution and transport of aerosol emitted to the lower troposphere is governed by the height of the planetary boundary layer (PBL), which limits the dilution of pollutants and influences boundary-layer convection. Because radiative heating and cooling of the surface strongly affect the PBL top height, it follows diurnal and seasonal cycles and may vary by hundreds of meters over a 24-hour period. The cap the PBL imposes on low-level aerosol transport makes aerosol concentration an effective proxy for PBL height: the top of the PBL is marked by a rapid transition from polluted, well-mixed boundary-layer air to the cleaner, more stratified free troposphere. Micropulse lidar (MPL) can provide much higher temporal resolution than radiosonde and better vertical resolution than infrared spectrometer (AERI), but PBL heights from all three instruments at the ARM SGP site are compared to one another for validation. If there is agreement among them, the higher-resolution remote sensing-derived PBL heights can accurately fill in the gaps left by the low frequency of radiosonde launches, and thus improve model parameterizations and our understanding of boundary-layer processes.

  10. Thick diffusion limit boundary layer test problems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bailey, T. S.; Warsa, J. S.; Chang, J. H.; Adams, M. L.

    2013-07-01

    We develop two simple test problems that quantify the behavior of computational transport solutions in the presence of boundary layers that are not resolved by the spatial grid. In particular we study the quantitative effects of 'contamination' terms that, according to previous asymptotic analyses, may have a detrimental effect on the solutions obtained by both discontinuous finite element (DFEM) and characteristic-method (CM) spatial discretizations, at least for boundary layers caused by azimuthally asymmetric incident intensities. Few numerical results have illustrated the effects of this contamination, and none have quantified it to our knowledge. Our test problems use leading-order analytic solutions that should be equal to zero in the problem interior, which means the observed interior solution is the error introduced by the contamination terms. Results from DFEM solutions demonstrate that the contamination terms can cause error propagation into the problem interior for both orthogonal and non-orthogonal grids, and that this error is much worse for non-orthogonal grids. This behavior is consistent with the predictions of previous analyses. We conclude that these boundary layer test problems and their variants are useful tools for the study of errors that are introduced by unresolved boundary layers in diffusive transport problems. (authors)

  11. Laminar boundary layers in convective heat transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christian Seis

    2012-12-12

    We study Rayleigh-Benard convection in the high-Rayleigh-number and high-Prandtl-number regime, i.e., we consider a fluid in a container that is exposed to strong heating of the bottom and cooling of the top plate in the absence of inertia effects. While the dynamics in the bulk are characterized by a chaotic convective heat flow, the boundary layers at the horizontal container plates are essentially conducting and thus the fluid is motionless. Consequently, the average temperature exhibits a linear profile in the boundary layers. In this article, we rigorously investigate the average temperature and oscillations in the boundary layer via local bounds on the temperature field. Moreover, we deduce that the temperature profile is indeed essentially linear close to the horizontal container plates. Our results are uniform in the system parameters (e.g. the Rayleigh number) up to logarithmic correction terms. An important tool in our analysis is a new Hardy-type estimate for the convecting velocity field, which can be used to control the fluid motion in the layer. The bounds on the temperature field are derived with the help of local maximal regularity estimates for convection-diffusion equations.

  12. Laminar boundary layers in convective heat transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seis, Christian

    2012-01-01

    We study Rayleigh-Benard convection in the high-Rayleigh-number and high-Prandtl-number regime, i.e., we consider a fluid in a container that is exposed to strong heating of the bottom and cooling of the top plate in the absence of inertia effects. While the dynamics in the bulk are characterized by a chaotic convective heat flow, the boundary layers at the horizontal container plates are essentially conducting and thus the fluid is motionless. Consequently, the average temperature exhibits a linear profile in the boundary layers. In this article, we rigorously investigate the average temperature and oscillations in the boundary layer via local bounds on the temperature field. Moreover, we deduce that the temperature profile is indeed essentially linear close to the horizontal container plates. Our results are uniform in the system parameters (e.g. the Rayleigh number) up to logarithmic correction terms. An important tool in our analysis is a new Hardy-type estimate for the convecting velocity field, which ca...

  13. RACORO continental boundary layer cloud investigations. Part...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    + Show Author Affiliations Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States) NASA Goddard Inst. for Space Studies (GISS), New York, NY (United States) UCLA Joint...

  14. ARM - Field Campaign - Boundary Layer Cloud IOP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach HomeA Better Anode Design to Improve4AJ01) (See22, 2012IIIAtlanticMarine

  15. Small Scale Processes and Entrainment in a Stratocumulus Marine Boundary Layer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bell, John B.

    Small Scale Processes and Entrainment in a Stratocumulus Marine Boundary Layer David E. Stevens of entrainment into the tops of marine stratus in a moist generalization of the 1995 GCSS (GEWEX Cloud System of entrainment rate and discuss how these predictions relate to the structure of the numerical solutions. 1 #12

  16. SUPERSONIC SHEAR INSTABILITIES IN ASTROPHYSICAL BOUNDARY LAYERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Belyaev, Mikhail A.; Rafikov, Roman R., E-mail: rrr@astro.princeton.edu [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Ivy Lane, Princeton, NJ 08540 (United States)

    2012-06-20

    Disk accretion onto weakly magnetized astrophysical objects often proceeds via a boundary layer (BL) that forms near the object's surface, in which the rotation speed of the accreted gas changes rapidly. Here, we study the initial stages of formation for such a BL around a white dwarf or a young star by examining the hydrodynamical shear instabilities that may initiate mixing and momentum transport between the two fluids of different densities moving supersonically with respect to each other. We find that an initially laminar BL is unstable to two different kinds of instabilities. One is an instability of a supersonic vortex sheet (implying a discontinuous initial profile of the angular speed of the gas) in the presence of gravity, which we find to have a growth rate of order (but less than) the orbital frequency. The other is a sonic instability of a finite width, supersonic shear layer, which is similar to the Papaloizou-Pringle instability. It has a growth rate proportional to the shear inside the transition layer, which is of order the orbital frequency times the ratio of stellar radius to the BL thickness. For a BL that is thin compared to the radius of the star, the shear rate is much larger than the orbital frequency. Thus, we conclude that sonic instabilities play a dominant role in the initial stages of nonmagnetic BL formation and give rise to very fast mixing between disk gas and stellar fluid in the supersonic regime.

  17. Collaborative Research: ARM observations for the development and evaluation of models and parameterizations of cloudy boundary layers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Albrecht, Bruce,

    2013-07-12

    This is a collaborative project with Dr. Ping Zhu at Florida International University. It was designed to address key issues regarding the treatment of boundary layer cloud processes in climate models with UM’s research focusing on the analyses of ARM cloud radar observations from MMCR and WACR and FIU’s research focusing on numerical simulations of boundary layer clouds. This project capitalized on recent advancements in the ARM Millimeter Cloud Radar (MMCR) processing and the development of the WACR (at the SGP) to provide high temporal and spatial resolution Doppler cloud radar measurements for characterizing in-cloud turbulence, large-eddy circulations, and high resolution cloud structures of direct relevance to high resolution numerical modeling studies. The principal focus of the observational component of this collaborative study during this funding period was on stratocumulus clouds over the SGP site and fair-weather cumuli over the Nauru site. The statistical descriptions of the vertical velocity structures in continental stratocumulus clouds and in the Nauru shallow cumuli that are part of this study represents the most comprehensive observations of the vertical velocities in boundary layer clouds to date and were done in collaboration with Drs. Virendra Ghate and Pavlos Kollias.

  18. ROUTINE CLOUD-BOUNDARY ALGORITHM DEVELOPMENT FOR ARM MICROPULSE LIDAR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Energy Office of Science ABSTRACT An operational cloud boundary algorithm (Wang and Sassen 2001) has been Associates, LLC under Contract No. DE-AC02- 98CH10886 with the U.S. Department of Energy. The publisher-exclusive, paid-up, irrevocable, world-wide license to publish or reproduce the published form of this manuscript

  19. Testing Cloud Microphysics Parameterizations in NCAR CAM5 with...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    fraction for single-layer boundary layer mixed-phase stratocumulus, and multilayer or deep frontal clouds. However, for low-level clouds, the model significantly underestimates...

  20. LARGE EDDY SIMULATION OF TURBULENT BOUNDARY LAYERS OVER ROUGH BEDS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pawlak, Geno

    that determines the response of the boundary layer is not clear. One method to characterize the irregular nature with different spectral slopes using 2D 10 % loading square waves as basis functions. These square waves can) is then used to simulate the turbulent boundary layer over the rough beds. The LES solver is first validated

  1. Aero-Optical Effects of Supersonic Boundary Layers Stanislav Gordeyev

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gordeyev, Stanislav

    Aero-Optical Effects of Supersonic Boundary Layers Stanislav Gordeyev and Eric Jumper University, Colorado 80840 DOI: 10.2514/1.J051266 Aero-optical measurements of a zero-pressure-gradient, supersonic to describe aero-optical effects of both the subsonic and the supersonic boundary layers. Finally, this new

  2. The impact of explicit cloud boundary information on ice cloud microphysical property retrievals from infrared radiances

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stephens, Graeme L.

    from infrared radiances Steven J. Cooper, Tristan S. L'Ecuyer, and Graeme L. Stephens Department inclusion of explicit cloud boundary information from complementary sensors as well as providing a suite of diagnostic tools for evaluating the dominant sources of uncertainty in all retrieved quantities. Errors

  3. Examining A Hypersonic Turbulent Boundary Layer at Low Reynolds Number 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Semper, Michael Thomas

    2013-05-15

    The purpose of the current study was to answer several questions related to hypersonic, low Reynolds number, turbulent boundary layers, of which available data related to turbulence quantities is scarce. To that end, a ...

  4. Performance of a boundary layer ingesting propulsion system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plas, Angélique (Angélique Pascale)

    2006-01-01

    This thesis presents an assessment of the aerodynamic performance of an aircraft propulsion system, with embedded engines, in the presence of aircraft fuselage boundary layer ingestion (BLI). The emphasis is on defining ...

  5. Analysis of civil aircraft propulsors with boundary layer ingestion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, David Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    This thesis describes (i) guidelines for propulsor sizing, and (ii) strategies for fan turbomachinery conceptual design, for a boundary layer ingesting (BLI) propulsion system for advanced civil transport aircraft. For the ...

  6. Distributed Roughness Receptivity in a Flat Plate Boundary Layer 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuester, Matthew Scott

    2014-04-18

    the incoming boundary layer. This dissertation describes an experiment specifically designed to study the shielding effect. Three roughness configurations, a deterministic distributed roughness patch, a slanted rectangle, and the combination of the two, were...

  7. Interaction between surface and atmosphere in a convective boundary layer /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garai, Anirban

    2013-01-01

    of cold fluid constitute most of the heat transport andevent cold air descends to the ground, heat transport fromcold air during sweep events. The convective boundary layer has a great influence on moisture transport,

  8. ARM: ARSCL: cloud boundaries from first Clothiaux algorithms on Vaisala or Belfort ceilometers, Micropulse lidar, and MMCR

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Karen Johnson; Michael Jensen

    ARSCL: cloud boundaries from first Clothiaux algorithms on Vaisala or Belfort ceilometers, Micropulse lidar, and MMCR

  9. Stability of High-Speed, Three-Dimensional Boundary Layers 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Craig, Stuart A

    2015-04-02

    Boundary-layer experiments are performed in the low-disturbance, Mach 6 Quiet Tunnel (M6QT) at Texas A&M University. The experiments are focused specifically on investigating the physics of two three-dimensional phenomena in hypersonic boundary...

  10. Ozone Chemistry in the High-Latitude Boundary Layer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toohey, Darin W.

    Ozone Chemistry in the High-Latitude Boundary Layer Linnea Avallone Department of Atmospheric layer ozone loss phenomenon · In situ observations of BrO at Arctic sites · Preliminary results from Antarctic experiments in 2002 and 2004 #12;Brief History · Springtime ozone loss observed at many sites

  11. Boundary-layer control by electric fields A feasibility study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mendes, R V

    1998-01-01

    A problem of great concern in aviation and submarine propulsion is the control of the boundary layer and, in particular, the methods to extend the laminar region as a means to decrease noise and fuel consumption. In this paper we study the flow of air along an airfoil when a layer of ionized gas and a longitudinal electric field are created in the boundary layer region. By deriving scaling solutions and more accurate numerical solutions we discuss the possibility of achieving significant boundary layer control for realistic physical parameters. Practical design formulas and criteria are obtained. We also discuss the perspectives for active control of the laminar-to-turbulent transition fluctuations by electromagnetic field modulation.

  12. Marine boundary layer structure as observed by space-based Lidar

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Luo, T.; Wang, Z.; Zhang, D.

    2015-12-03

    The marine boundary layer (MBL) structure is important to the exchange of heat, momentum, and moisture between oceans and the low atmosphere and to the marine low cloud processes. This paper explores MBL structure over the eastern Pacific region with a new 4 year satellite-based dataset. The MBL aerosol lidar backscattering from the CALIPSO (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations) was used to identify the MBL top (BLH) and the mixing layer height (MLH). Results showed that MBL is generally decoupled with MLH / BLH ratio ranging from ? 0.5 to ? 0.8 and the MBL decoupling magnitude ismore »mainly controlled by estimated inversion strength (EIS) that affects the cloud top entrainment process. The systematic differences between drizzling and non-drizzling stratocumulus tops, which may relate to the meso-scale circulations or gravity wave in MBL, also show dependence on EIS. Further analysis indicated that the MBL shows similar decoupled structure for clear sky and cumulus cloud-topped conditions, but is better mixed under stratiform cloud breakup and overcast conditions.« less

  13. Intercomparison of model simulations of mixed-phase clouds observed during the ARM Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment. Part I: Single layer cloud

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klein, S A; McCoy, R B; Morrison, H; Ackerman, A; Avramov, A; deBoer, G; Chen, M; Cole, J; DelGenio, A; Golaz, J; Hashino, T; Harrington, J; Hoose, C; Khairoutdinov, M; Larson, V; Liu, X; Luo, Y; McFarquhar, G; Menon, S; Neggers, R; Park, S; Poellot, M; von Salzen, K; Schmidt, J; Sednev, I; Shipway, B; Shupe, M; Spangenberg, D; Sud, Y; Turner, D; Veron, D; Falk, M; Foster, M; Fridlind, A; Walker, G; Wang, Z; Wolf, A; Xie, S; Xu, K; Yang, F; Zhang, G

    2008-02-27

    Results are presented from an intercomparison of single-column and cloud-resolving model simulations of a cold-air outbreak mixed-phase stratocumulus cloud observed during the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program's Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment. The observed cloud occurred in a well-mixed boundary layer with a cloud top temperature of -15 C. The observed liquid water path of around 160 g m{sup -2} was about two-thirds of the adiabatic value and much greater than the mass of ice crystal precipitation which when integrated from the surface to cloud top was around 15 g m{sup -2}. The simulations were performed by seventeen single-column models (SCMs) and nine cloud-resolving models (CRMs). While the simulated ice water path is generally consistent with the observed values, the median SCM and CRM liquid water path is a factor of three smaller than observed. Results from a sensitivity study in which models removed ice microphysics indicate that in many models the interaction between liquid and ice-phase microphysics is responsible for the large model underestimate of liquid water path. Despite this general underestimate, the simulated liquid and ice water paths of several models are consistent with the observed values. Furthermore, there is some evidence that models with more sophisticated microphysics simulate liquid and ice water paths that are in better agreement with the observed values, although considerable scatter is also present. Although no single factor guarantees a good simulation, these results emphasize the need for improvement in the model representation of mixed-phase microphysics. This case study, which has been well observed from both aircraft and ground-based remote sensors, could be a benchmark for model simulations of mixed-phase clouds.

  14. THE SIMULATION OF FINE SCALE NOCTURNAL BOUNDARY LAYER MOTIONS WITH A MESO-SCALE ATMOSPHERIC MODEL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Werth, D.; Kurzeja, R.; Parker, M.

    2009-04-02

    A field project over the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement-Clouds and Radiation Testbed (ARM-CART) site during a period of several nights in September, 2007 was conducted to explore the evolution of the low-level jet (LLJ). Data was collected from a tower and a sodar and analyzed for turbulent behavior. To study the full range of nocturnal boundary layer (NBL) behavior, the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS) was used to simulate the ARM-CART NBL field experiment and validated against the data collected from the site. This model was run at high resolution, and is ideal for calculating the interactions among the various motions within the boundary layer and their influence on the surface. The model reproduces adequately the synoptic situation and the formation and dissolution cycles of the low-level jet, although it suffers from insufficient cloud production and excessive nocturnal cooling. The authors suggest that observed heat flux data may further improve the realism of the simulations both in the cloud formation and in the jet characteristics. In a higher resolution simulation, the NBL experiences motion on a range of timescales as revealed by a wavelet analysis, and these are affected by the presence of the LLJ. The model can therefore be used to provide information on activity throughout the depth of the NBL.

  15. Comparison between active sensor and radiosonde cloud boundaries over the ARM Southern Great Plains site

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to test the strengths and limitations of cloud boundary retrievals from radiosonde profiles, 4 yearsComparison between active sensor and radiosonde cloud boundaries over the ARM Southern Great Plains radiosonde-based methods applied to 200 m resolution profiles obtained at the same site. The lidar

  16. Stratified Flow over Topography: Wave Generation and Boundary Layer Separation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sutherland, Bruce

    Stratified Flow over Topography: Wave Generation and Boundary Layer Separation B. R. Sutherland topography. We have chosen to use periodic, finite­amplitude hills which are representative of the Earth upon internal waves generated by flow over rough topography. 1 Introduction Internal waves propagate

  17. Stratified Flow over Topography: Wave Generation and Boundary Layer Separation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sutherland, Bruce

    Stratified Flow over Topography: Wave Generation and Boundary Layer Separation B. R. Sutherland Abstract We have performed laboratory experiments to study wave generation over and in the lee of model upon internal waves generated by flow over rough topography. 1 Introduction Internal waves propagate

  18. Carbon transport in the bottom boundary layer. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Agrawal, Y.C.

    1998-10-05

    This report summarizes the activities and findings from a field experiment devised to estimate the rates and mechanisms of transport of carbon across the continental shelves. The specific site chosen for the experiment was the mid-Atlantic Bight, a region off the North Carolina coast. The experiment involved a large contingent of scientists from many institutions. The specific component of the program was the transport of carbon in the bottom boundary layer. The postulate mechanisms of transport of carbon in the bottom boundary layer are: resuspension and advection, downward deposition, and accumulation. The high turbulence levels in the bottom boundary layer require the understanding of the coupling between turbulence and bottom sediments. The specific issues addressed in the work reported here were: (a) What is the sediment response to forcing by currents and waves? (b) What is the turbulence climate in the bottom boundary layer at this site? and (c) What is the rate at which settling leads to carbon sequestering in bottom sediments at offshore sites?

  19. ORIGINAL PAPER Mechanical filtering by the boundary layer and fluidstructure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McHenry, Matt

    ORIGINAL PAPER Mechanical filtering by the boundary layer and fluid­structure interaction force coefficient for fluid c speed of sound in water C integration constant Em Young's modulus moment of area k viscous drag coefficient L hydrodynamic force coefficient M bending moment N number

  20. Mass exchange in the stable boundary layer by coherent structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leclerc, Monique Y.

    ) and a dense array of wind sensors to observe an indirect representation of roll vortices and plumes over the surface appears to pump energy near the surface thereby supporting the development of coherent structures gaseous exchange 1. Introduction Mass and energy exchange in the stable boundary layer remains poorly

  1. Large-Scale Streamwise Turbulent Structures in Hypersonic Boundary Layers 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    English, Benjamin L.

    2013-04-22

    Prior research in the field of boundary layer turbulence has identified streamwise-elongated large-scale turbulence structures in both low speed compressible and high speed (M=2.0) flow. No experimental work has been done in any flow of M> or =3...

  2. Edge Plasma Boundary Layer Generated By Kink Modes in Tokamaks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L.E. Zakharov

    2010-11-22

    This paper describes the structure of the electric current generated by external kink modes at the plasma edge using the ideally conducting plasma model. It is found that the edge current layer is created by both wall touching and free boundary kink modes. Near marginal stability, the total edge current has a universal expression as a result of partial compensation of the ?-functional surface current by the bulk current at the edge. The resolution of an apparent paradox with the pressure balance across the plasma boundary in the presence of the surface currents is provided.

  3. Polymer Effects on Heat Transport in Laminar Boundary Layer Flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roberto Benzi; Emily S. C. Ching; Vivien W. S. Chu

    2011-04-27

    We consider a laminar Blasius boundary-layer flow above a slightly heated horizontal plate and study the effect of polymer additives on the heat transport. We show that the action of the polymers can be understood as a space-dependent effective viscosity that first increases from the zero-shear value then decreases exponentially back to the zero-shear value as one moves away from the boundary. We find that with such an effective viscosity, both the horizontal and vertical velocities near the plate are decreased thus leading to an increase in the friction drag and a decrease in the heat transport in the flow.

  4. On the Interaction between Marine Boundary Layer Cellular Cloudiness and Surface Heat Fluxes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kazil, J.; Feingold, G.; Wang, Hailong; Yamaguchi, T.

    2014-01-02

    The interaction between marine boundary layer cellular cloudiness and surface uxes of sensible and latent heat is investigated. The investigation focuses on the non-precipitating closed-cell state and the precipitating open-cell state at low geostrophic wind speed. The Advanced Research WRF model is used to conduct cloud-system-resolving simulations with interactive surface fluxes of sensible heat, latent heat, and of sea salt aerosol, and with a detailed representation of the interaction between aerosol particles and clouds. The mechanisms responsible for the temporal evolution and spatial distribution of the surface heat fluxes in the closed- and open-cell state are investigated and explained. It is found that the horizontal spatial structure of the closed-cell state determines, by entrainment of dry free tropospheric air, the spatial distribution of surface air temperature and water vapor, and, to a lesser degree, of the surface sensible and latent heat flux. The synchronized dynamics of the the open-cell state drives oscillations in surface air temperature, water vapor, and in the surface fluxes of sensible and latent heat, and of sea salt aerosol. Open-cell cloud formation, cloud optical depth and liquid water path, and cloud and rain water path are identified as good predictors of the spatial distribution of surface air temperature and sensible heat flux, but not of surface water vapor and latent heat flux. It is shown that by enhancing the surface sensible heat flux, the open-cell state creates conditions by which it is maintained. While the open-cell state under consideration is not depleted in aerosol, and is insensitive to variations in sea-salt fluxes, it also enhances the sea-salt flux relative to the closed-cell state. In aerosol-depleted conditions, this enhancement may replenish the aerosol needed for cloud formation, and hence contribute to the perpetuation of the open-cell state as well. Spatial homogenization of the surface fluxes is found to have only a small effect on cloud properties in the investigated cases. This indicates that sub-grid scale spatial variability in the surface flux of sensible and latent heat and of sea salt aerosol may not be required in large scale and global models to describe marine boundary layer cellular cloudiness.

  5. Coupled wake boundary layer model of wind-farms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stevens, Richard J A M; Meneveau, Charles

    2014-01-01

    We present and test a coupled wake boundary layer (CWBL) model that describes the distribution of the power output in a wind-farm. The model couples the traditional, industry-standard wake expansion/superposition approach with a top-down model for the overall wind-farm boundary layer structure. The wake expansion/superposition model captures the effect of turbine positioning, while the top-down portion adds the interaction between the wind-turbine wakes and the atmospheric boundary layer. Each portion of the model requires specification of a parameter that is not known a-priori. For the wake model the wake expansion coefficient is required, while the top-down model requires an effective span-wise turbine spacing within which the model's momentum balance is relevant. The wake expansion coefficient is obtained by matching the predicted mean velocity at the turbine from both approaches, while the effective span-wise turbine spacing depends on turbine positioning and thus can be determined from the wake expansion...

  6. An Examination of Configurations for Using Infrared to Measure Boundary Layer Transition 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Freels, Justin Reed

    2012-10-19

    Infrared transition location estimates can be fast and useful measurements in wind tunnel and flight tests. Because turbulent boundary layers have a much higher rate of convective heat transfer than laminar boundary layers, a difference in surface...

  7. Response of the bottom boundary layer over a sloping shelf to variations in alongshore wind

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to a great extent by flows in the surface and bottom boundary layers (BBL). Wind forcing generates crossResponse of the bottom boundary layer over a sloping shelf to variations in alongshore wind A boundary layer over a sloping shelf to variations in alongshore wind, J. Geophys. Res., 110, C10S09, doi:10

  8. Thermographic analysis of turbulent non-isothermal water boundary layer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Znamenskaya, Irina A

    2015-01-01

    The paper is devoted to the investigation of the turbulent water boundary layer in the jet mixing flows using high-speed infrared (IR) thermography. Two turbulent mixing processes were studied: a submerged water jet impinging on a flat surface and two intersecting jets in a round disc-shaped vessel. An infrared camera (FLIR Systems SC7700) was focused on the window transparent for IR radiation; it provided high-speed recordings of heat fluxes from a thin water layer close to the window. Temperature versus time curves at different points of water boundary layer near the wall surface were acquired using the IR camera with the recording frequency of 100 Hz. The time of recording varied from 3 till 20 min. The power spectra for the temperature fluctuations at different points on the hot-cold water mixing zone were calculated using the Fast Fourier Transform algorithm. The obtained spectral behavior was compared to the Kolmogorov "-5/3 spectrum" (a direct energy cascade) and the dual-cascade scenario predicted for...

  9. ARM - Field Campaign - Complex Layered Cloud Experiment (CLEX)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach HomeA Better Anode Design to Improve4AJ01) (See22,MicrophysicalgovCampaignsComplex Layered Cloud

  10. Aerodynamic Models for Hurricanes III. Modeling hurricane boundary layer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leonov, Arkady I

    2008-01-01

    The third paper of the series (see previous ones in Refs.[1-2]) discusses basic physicalprocesses in the (quasi-) steady hurricane boundary layer (HBL), develops an approximate airflow model, establishes the HBL structure, and presents integral balance relations for dynamic and thermodynamic variables in HBL. Models of evaporation and condensation are developed, where the condensation is treated similarly to the slow combustion theory. A turbulent approximation for the lower sub-layer of HBL is applied to the sea-air interaction to establish the observed increase in angular momentum in the outer region of HBL.A closed set of balance relations has been obtained. Simple analytical solution of the set yields expressions for the basic dynamic variables - maximal tangential and radial velocities in hurricane, maximal vertical speed in eye wall, the affinity speed of hurricane travel, and the maximal temperature increase after condensation. Estimated values of the variables seem to be realistic. An attempt is also ...

  11. HAIL: A High-Availability and Integrity Layer for Cloud Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR)

    HAIL: A High-Availability and Integrity Layer for Cloud Storage Kevin D. Bowers RSA Laboratories imple- mentation. 1 Introduction Cloud storage denotes a family of increasingly popular on-line services for archiving, backup, and even primary storage of files. Amazon S3 [1] is a well known exam- ple. Cloud-storage

  12. Large-Eddy Simulation of Evaporatively Driven Entrainment in Cloud-Topped Mixed Layers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collett Jr., Jeffrey L.

    Large-Eddy Simulation of Evaporatively Driven Entrainment in Cloud-Topped Mixed Layers TAKANOBU, Colorado (Manuscript received 1 March 2007, in final form 19 July 2007) ABSTRACT Cloud-top entrainment instability (CTEI) is a hypothesized positive feedback between cloud-top entrain- ment and enhanced turbulence

  13. RACORO continental boundary layer cloud investigations. 2. Large...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    + Show Author Affiliations Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States) NASA Goddard Inst. for Space Studies (GISS), New York, NY (United States) Univ. of Illinois,...

  14. RACORO continental boundary layer cloud investigations. 2. Large-eddy

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTech ConnectSpeedingConnect Pulse energy(Conference) | SciTechQuirkssimulations of

  15. RACORO continental boundary layer cloud investigations. 3. Separation of

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTech ConnectSpeedingConnect Pulse energy(Conference) | SciTechQuirkssimulations

  16. RACORO continental boundary layer cloud investigations. Part I: Case study

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTech ConnectSpeedingConnect Pulse energy(Conference) |

  17. Vertical Velocities in Continental Boundary Layer Stratocumulus Clouds

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorking WithTelecentricN A County roadFeet) Deliveries DennisVertical

  18. Heat transport by laminar boundary layer flow with polymers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roberto Benzi; Emily S. C. Ching.; Vivien W. S. Chu

    2011-04-23

    Motivated by recent experimental observations, we consider a steady-state Prandtl-Blasius boundary layer flow with polymers above a slightly heated horizontal plate and study how the heat transport might be affected by the polymers. We discuss how a set of equations can be derived for the problem and how these equations can be solved numerically by an iterative scheme. By carrying out such a scheme, we find that the effect of the polymers is equivalent to producing a space-dependent effective viscosity that first increases from the zero-shear value at the plate then decreases rapidly back to the zero-shear value far from the plate. We further show that such an effective viscosity leads to an enhancement in the drag, which in turn leads to a reduction in heat transport.

  19. Further development and testing of a second-order bulk boundary layer model. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krasner, R.D.

    1993-05-03

    A one-layer bulk boundary layer model is developed. The model predicts the mixed layer values of the potential temperature, mixing ratio, and u- and v-momentum. The model also predicts the depth of the boundary layer and the vertically integrated turbulence kinetic energy (TKE). The TKE is determined using a second-order closure that relates the rate of dissipation to the TKE. The fractional area covered by rising motion sigma and the entrainment rate (E) are diagnostically determined. The model is used to study the clear convective boundary layer (CBL) using data from the Wangara, Australia boundary layer experiment. The Wangara data is also used as an observation base to validate model results. A further study is accomplished by simulating the planetary boundary layer (PBL) over an ocean surface. This study is designed to find the steady-state solutions of the prognostic variable.

  20. Primary, secondary instabilities and control of the rotating-disk boundary layer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ;Typical 3D boundary layers rotating disk swept wing Common features: · crossflow component near the wall · inflection point · strong inviscid instability · secondary instabilities ; growth and saturation of crossflow

  1. ARM: 10-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol depolarization profiles and single layer cloud optical depths from first Turner algorithm

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Chitra Sivaraman; Connor Flynn

    1998-03-01

    10-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol depolarization profiles and single layer cloud optical depths from first Turner algorithm

  2. ARM: 10-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol depolarization profiles and single layer cloud optical depths from first Turner algorithm

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Chitra Sivaraman; Connor Flynn

    10-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol depolarization profiles and single layer cloud optical depths from first Turner algorithm

  3. Wave mediated angular momentum transport in astrophysical boundary layers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hertfelder, Marius

    2015-01-01

    Context. Disk accretion onto weakly magnetized stars leads to the formation of a boundary layer (BL) where the gas loses its excess kinetic energy and settles onto the star. There are still many open questions concerning the BL, for instance the transport of angular momentum (AM) or the vertical structure. Aims. It is the aim of this work to investigate the AM transport in the BL where the magneto-rotational instability (MRI) is not operating owing to the increasing angular velocity $\\Omega(r)$ with radius. We will therefore search for an appropriate mechanism and examine its efficiency and implications. Methods. We perform 2D numerical hydrodynamical simulations in a cylindrical coordinate system $(r, \\varphi)$ for a thin, vertically inte- grated accretion disk around a young star. We employ a realistic equation of state and include both cooling from the disk surfaces and radiation transport in radial and azimuthal direction. The viscosity in the disk is treated by the {\\alpha}-model; in the BL there is no v...

  4. Boundary Layer Energy Transport and Cumulus Development over a Heated Mountain: An Observational Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geerts, Bart

    Boundary Layer Energy Transport and Cumulus Development over a Heated Mountain: An Observational an isolated, heated mountain are presented. The data were collected around the Santa Catalina Mountains congestus to cumulonimbus development over the mountain. Flights in the boundary layer around the mountain

  5. A 3 km atmospheric boundary layer on Titan indicated by dune spacing and Huygens data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Claudin, Philippe

    Note A 3 km atmospheric boundary layer on Titan indicated by dune spacing and Huygens data Ralph D a b s t r a c t Some 20% of Titan's surface is covered in large linear dunes that resemble parameter limiting the growth of giant dunes, namely the boundary layer thickness (Andreotti et al., 2009

  6. Separation of Radiances from a Cirrus Layer and Broken Cumulus Clouds in Multispectral Images

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferguson, Thomas S.

    in the climate system such as global warming; these are the so-called cloud feedbacks on climate [4], [5. After setting up synthetic "truth" scenarios, we evaluate the accuracy of the two-layer separation

  7. TOWARDS A CLOUD CEILOMETER NETWORK REPORTING MIXING LAYER HEIGHT Wiel M.F. Wauben

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wauben, Wiel

    profiles if the aerosol concentrations are not too low. Since aerosol is well mixed in the atmospheric in the backscatter profile (cf. Wauben et al., 2006). Sometimes, medium and low clouds can also be missed or falsely1 TOWARDS A CLOUD CEILOMETER NETWORK REPORTING MIXING LAYER HEIGHT Wiel M.F. Wauben 1 , Marijn de

  8. Active Control of Instabilities in Laminar BoundaryLayer Flow --Part II: Use of Sensors and Spectral Controller

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Erlebacher, Gordon

    Active Control of Instabilities in Laminar Boundary­Layer Flow -- Part II: Use of Sensors growth and stabilize the instabilities within the laminar boundary layer. This scenario is shown in Fig

  9. Effect of unsteady wake passing frequency on boundary layer transition on the concave surface of a curved plate 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Read, Robert Kevin

    1997-01-01

    The unsteady boundary layer behavior on the concave surface of a curved plate is investigated. Detailed experimental investigations are carried out to study the effect of unsteady wakes on the boundary layer transition under varying wake passing...

  10. Cloud climatology at the Southern Great Plains and the layer structure, drizzle, and atmospheric modes of continental stratus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cloud climatology at the Southern Great Plains and the layer structure, drizzle, and atmospheric.5 years) cloud observations from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurements (ARM) program Southern Great Plains (SGP) climate research facility in Oklahoma are used to develop detailed cloud climatology. Clouds

  11. The interaction between the post-perovskite phase change and a thermo-chemical boundary layer near the coremantle boundary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tackley, Paul J.

    The interaction between the post-perovskite phase change and a thermo-chemical boundary layer near convection with the newly-discovered post-perovskite (PPV) phase change are used to characterize its depth. The strongly exothermic nature of the post-perovskite phase change induces an anti

  12. Stratification Prediction and Bottom Boundary Layer Dynamics over the Texas-Louisiana Continental Shelf 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Wenxia

    2015-03-02

    and hypoxia formation. In this research, Both observations and numerical models are used to study models' ability of reproducing observed stratification and bottom boundary layer dynamics over the Texas-Louisiana shelf. Simulated vertical stratification...

  13. Analysis and interpretation of tidal currents in the coastal boundary layer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    May, Paul Wesley, 1950-

    1979-01-01

    Concern with the impact of human activities on the coastal region of the world's oceans has elicited interest in the so-called "coastal boundary layer"-that band of water adjacent to the coast where ocean currents adjust ...

  14. A time-varying subsidence parameterization for the atmospheric boundary layer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flagg, David D. (David Douglas)

    2005-01-01

    This study examines the effect of a time-varying parameterization for subsidence in the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) on a one-dimensional coupled land-atmosphere model. Measurements of large-scale divergence in the ABL ...

  15. Design of a model propulsor for a boundary layer ingesting aircraft

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grasch, Adam D. (Adam Davis)

    2013-01-01

    This thesis presents contributions to the analysis and design of propulsion simulators for 1:11 and 1:4 scale model wind tunnel investigations of an advanced civil transport aircraft with boundary layer ingestion (BLI). ...

  16. Turbulent combined wave-current boundary layer model for application in coastal waters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Humbyrd, Chelsea Joy

    2012-01-01

    Accurately predicting transport processes, including sediment transport, in the coastal environment is impossible without correct current velocity and shear stress information. A combined wave-current boundary layer theory ...

  17. The hydrodynamic stability of crossflow vortices in the Bdewadt boundary layer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The hydrodynamic stability of crossflow vortices in the Bödewadt boundary layer N. A. Culverhouse the critical Reynolds number. extends the laminar flow region. decreasing the magnitude of the crossflow

  18. Nonlinear equilibration of baroclinic eddies : the role of boundary layer processes and seasonal forcing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Yang, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2009-01-01

    In this thesis, the influence of boundary layer processes and seasonal forcing on baroclinic eddy equilibration is studied to understand how the baroclinic adjustment is modified when taking into account these two factors. ...

  19. Spectral properties of parabolic layer potentials and transmission boundary problems in nonsmooth domains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mitrea, Marius

    Spectral properties of parabolic layer potentials and transmission boundary problems in nonsmooth, and is a Lipschitz domain. Applications to transmission boundary value problems are also presented. 1 Introduction. While, in principle, this seems flexible enough a program to be worth pursuing in the case of the heat

  20. Spectral properties of parabolic layer potentials and transmission boundary problems in nonsmooth domains #

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mitrea, Marius

    Spectral properties of parabolic layer potentials and transmission boundary problems in nonsmooth# is a Lipschitz domain. Applications to transmission boundary value problems are also presented. 1 Introduction of the heat operator, the algebra associated with the problem at hand is di#erent. In particular

  1. Spectral properties of parabolic layer potentials and transmission boundary problems in nonsmooth domains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hofmann, Steve

    Spectral properties of parabolic layer potentials and transmission boundary problems in nonsmooth potential operator, and is a Lipschitz domain. Applications to transmission boundary value problems in the case of the heat operator, the algebra associated with the problem at hand is di#11;erent

  2. Turbulence Structure and Wall Signature in Hypersonic Turbulent Boundary Layer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martín, Pino

    layers have been mostly studied in the subsonic flow regime (for example, Tomkins and Adrian;7 del ´Alamo and Jim´enez;8 Ganapathisubramani, Longmire and Marusic;9 del ´Alamo et al.;10 del ´Alamo et al.;11 Guala

  3. Turbulence Structure and Wall Signature in Hypersonic Boundary Layer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martín, Pino

    layers have been mostly studied in the subsonic flow regime (for example, Tomkins and Adrian;7 del ´Alamo and Jim´enez;8 Ganapathisubramani, Longmire and Marusic;9 del ´Alamo et al.;10 del ´Alamo et al.;11 Guala

  4. Multilayer Separation and its Application to Separating Layers of Clouds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferguson, Thomas S.

    , Pasadena, CA 91109 2 University of California, Los Angeles, Joint Institute for Regional Earth System that one of the layers may obstruct another layer in large parts of an image, thus block- ing features to problems that arise frequently in compressed sensing [4, 8]. We define an energy functional and propose

  5. ARM - Field Campaign - Boundary Layer CO2 Using CW Lidar

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach HomeA Better Anode Design to Improve4AJ01) (See22, 2012IIIAtlanticMarine BoundarygovCampaignsBoundary

  6. ARM - Field Campaign - Lower Atmospheric Boundary Layer Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach HomeA Better Anode Design to Improve4AJ01)govCampaignsFIRE-Arctic-govCampaignsLower Atmospheric Boundary

  7. Combustion-turbulence interaction in the turbulent boundary layer over a hot surface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ng, T.T.; Cheng, R.K.; Robben, F.; Talbot, L.

    1982-01-01

    The turbulence-combustion interaction in a reacting turbulent boundary layer over a heated flat plate was studied. Ethylene/air mixture with equivalence ratio of 0.35 was used. The free stream velocity was 10.5 m/s and the wall temperature was 1250/sup 0/K. Combustion structures visualization was provided by high-speed schlieren photographs. Fluid density statistics were deduced from Rayleigh scattering intensity measurements. A single-component laser Doppler velocimetry system was used to obtain mean and root-mean-square velocity distributions, the Reynolds stress, the streamwise and the cross-stream turbulent kinetic energy diffusion, and the production of turbulent kinetic energy by Reynolds stress. The combustion process was dominated by large-scale turbulent structures of the boundary layer. Combustion causes expansion of the boundary layer. No overall self-similarity is observed in either the velocity or the density profiles. Velocity fluctuations were increased in part of the boundary layer and the Reynolds stress was reduced. The turbulent kinetic energy diffusion pattern was changed significantly and a modification of the boundary layer assumption will be needed when dealing with this problem analytically. 11 figures, 1 table.

  8. Homework on the instability of a cloud layer due to entrainment of its basis or its top

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Legras, Bernard

    Homework on the instability of a cloud layer due to entrainment of its basis or its top Bernard. A parcel of clear air is entrained across the cloud basis and is mixed with the cloudy air located above. 2. A parcel of cloudy air is entrained across the cloud top and is mixed with clear air located above. 3

  9. Temporal variability of the trade wind inversion: Measured with a boundary layer vertical profiler. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grindinger, C.M.

    1992-05-01

    This study uses Hawaiian Rainband Project (HaRP) data, from the summer of 1991, to show a boundary layer wind profiler can be used to measure the trade wind inversion. An algorithm has been developed for the profiler that objectively measures the depth of the moist oceanic boundary layer. The Hilo inversion, measured by radiosonde, is highly correlated with the moist oceanic boundary layer measured by the profiler at Paradise Park. The inversion height on windward Hawaii is typically 2253 + or - 514 m. The inversion height varies not only on a daily basis, but on less than an hourly basis. It has a diurnal, as well as a three to four day cycle. There appears to be no consistent relationship between inversion height and precipitation. Currently, this profiler is capable of making high frequency (12 minute) measurements of the inversion base variation, as well as other features.

  10. Layered Atlantic Smoke Interactions with Clouds (LASIC) Science Plan

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJesse Bergkamp GraduateResidential Energy ConsumptionMaps Layer Information for7

  11. Wave-driven wind jets in the marine atmospheric boundary layer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reading, University of

    Wave-driven wind jets in the marine atmospheric boundary layer Kirsty E. Hanley Stephen E. Belcher;Abstract The interaction between ocean surface waves and the overlying wind leads to a transfer of momentum can also be transferred upwards when long wavelength waves, characteristic of re- motely generated

  12. Active Control of Instabilities in Laminar BoundaryLayer Flow--Part I: An Overview

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Erlebacher, Gordon

    Active Control of Instabilities in Laminar Boundary­Layer Flow-- Part I: An Overview Ronald D laminar flow in a region of the flow in which the natural instabilities, if left unattended, lead have been restricted to maintaining laminar flow through use of a technique termed ``wave cancellation

  13. Wind Energy-Related Atmospheric Boundary Layer Large-Eddy Simulation Using OpenFOAM: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Churchfield, M.J.; Vijayakumar, G.; Brasseur, J.G.; Moriarty, P.J.

    2010-08-01

    This paper develops and evaluates the performance of a large-eddy simulation (LES) solver in computing the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) over flat terrain under a variety of stability conditions, ranging from shear driven (neutral stratification) to moderately convective (unstable stratification).

  14. Elements of comparison between Martian and terrestrial mesoscale meteorological phenomena: Katabatic winds and boundary layer convection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spiga, Aymeric

    Elements of comparison between Martian and terrestrial mesoscale meteorological phenomena Keywords: Mesoscale meteorology Katabatic winds Boundary layer convection Comparative planetology a b s t r a c t Terrestrial and Martian atmospheres are both characterised by a large variety of mesoscale

  15. Sensitivity of Swept-Wing, Boundary-Layer Transition to Spanwise-Periodic Discrete Roughness Elements 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    West, David Edward

    2014-12-12

    ) was unexpectedly farther aft than the polished. Transport unit Reynolds numbers were achieved using a Cessna O-2A Skymaster. Infrared thermography, coupled with a post-processing code, was used to globally extract a quantitative boundary-layer transition location...

  16. Modeling the Atmospheric Boundary Layer Wind Response to Mesoscale Sea Surface Temperature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurapov, Alexander

    Modeling the Atmospheric Boundary Layer Wind Response to Mesoscale Sea Surface Temperature The wind speed response to mesoscale SST variability is investigated over the Agulhas Return Current region-Atmosphere Mesoscale Prediction System (COAMPS) atmospheric models. The SST-induced wind response is assessed from

  17. Modeling the Atmospheric Boundary Layer Wind Response to Mesoscale Sea Surface Temperature Perturbations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurapov, Alexander

    Modeling the Atmospheric Boundary Layer Wind Response to Mesoscale Sea Surface Temperature received 25 October 2013, in final form 24 July 2014) ABSTRACT The wind speed response to mesoscale SST Research and Forecasting (WRF) Model and the U.S. Navy Coupled Ocean­Atmosphere Mesoscale Prediction System

  18. DNS of a Mach 4 Boundary Layer with Chemical Reactions M. Pino Martin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martín, Pino

    DNS of a Mach 4 Boundary Layer with Chemical Reactions M. Pino Mart´in Graham V. Candler Aerospace understanding of the interaction between turbulent motion and chemical reactions in hypersonic flows is limited to perform a fundamental study of isotropic turbulence interacting with finite-rate chemical reactions

  19. Effect of Finite-rate Chemical Reactions on Turbulence in Hypersonic Turbulent Boundary Layers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martín, Pino

    Effect of Finite-rate Chemical Reactions on Turbulence in Hypersonic Turbulent Boundary Layers Lian reaction. The influence of chemical reactions on temperature fluctuation variance, Reynolds stresses that the recombination reaction enhances turbulence, while the dissociation reaction damps turbulence. Chemical reactions

  20. Recent Measurements of Aero-Optical Effects Caused by Subsonic Boundary Layers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gordeyev, Stanislav

    Recent Measurements of Aero-Optical Effects Caused by Subsonic Boundary Layers Adam E. Smith Dame, Notre Dame, IN, USA 46545 ABSTRACT Results of recent experimental measurements of aero aperture sizes on levels of aero-optical aberrations and detailed statistical analysis of spatial

  1. Aero-optical measurements in a subsonic, turbulent boundary layer with non-adiabatic walls

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gordeyev, Stanislav

    Aero-optical measurements in a subsonic, turbulent boundary layer with non-adiabatic walls to IP: 129.74.64.123 On: Wed, 29 Apr 2015 14:08:38 #12;PHYSICS OF FLUIDS 27, 045110 (2015) Aero online 29 April 2015) This paper presents experimental studies of aero-optical distortions due

  2. Numerical Simulations of the Wave Bottom Boundary Layer over Sand Ripples

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Slinn, Donald

    Numerical Simulations of the Wave Bottom Boundary Layer over Sand Ripples by Thomas Pierro A Thesis over sand ripples, and to compare the results with flows over a smooth bed to determine how wave energy energy dissipation rates are quantified and a better understanding of oscillatory flow over sand ripples

  3. American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics Shock/Boundary Layer Interaction Effects of Transverse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Arlington, University of

    of Transverse Jets in Crossflow over a Body of Revolution Dean A. Dickmann* Lockheed Martin Missiles and Fire 76019 Shock/boundary layer interaction present in transverse jets in supersonic crossflow alteres suggested a transverse jet in crossflow can be represented by a solid body of given length and shape

  4. Local and Bi-Global Stability Analysis of a Plasma Actuated Boundary Layer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roy, Subrata

    velocities ¯p Mean pressure ~u, ~v, ~w Disturbance flow velocities ~p Disturbance pressure u , v , w Complex disturbance flow velocities p Complex disturbance pressure u Freestream velocity up Induced velocity Complex spatial frequency in x Complex spatial frequency in z Complex temporal frequency 99% Boundary layer

  5. Large Eddy Simulation of Stable Boundary Layer Turbulent Processes in Complex Terrain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eric D. Skyllingstad

    2005-01-26

    Research was performed using a turbulence boundary layer model to study the behavior of cold, dense flows in regions of complex terrain. Results show that flows develop a balance between turbulent entrainment of warm ambient air and dense, cold air created by surface cooling. Flow depth and strength is a function of downslope distance, slope angle and angle changes, and the ambient air temperature.

  6. DNS of laminar-turbulent boundary layer transition induced by solid obstacles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Orlandi, Paolo; Bernardini, Matteo

    2015-01-01

    Results of numerical simulations obtained by a staggered finite difference scheme together with an efficient immersed boundary method are presented to understand the effects of the shape of three-dimensional obstacles on the transition of a boundary layer from a laminar to a turbulent regime. Fully resolved Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS), highlight that the closer to the obstacle the symmetry is disrupted the smaller is the transitional Reynolds number. It has been also found that the transition can not be related to the critical roughness Reynolds number used in the past. The simulations highlight the differences between wake and inflectional instabilities, proving that two-dimensional tripping devices are more efficient in promoting the transition. Simulations at high Reynolds number demonstrate that the reproduction of a real experiment with a solid obstacle at the inlet is an efficient tool to generate numerical data bases for understanding the physics of boundary layers. The quality of the numerical ...

  7. Characterizing synoptic and cloud variability in the Northern Atlantic using self-organizing maps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fish, Carly Sue

    2014-08-31

    Low ? level clouds have a significant influence on the Earth's radiation budget and it is thus imperative to understand their behavior within the marine boundary layer (MBL). The cloud properties in the Northeast ...

  8. Resuspension of Small Particles from Multilayer Deposits in Turbulent Boundary Layers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Zhang; M. Reeks; M. Kissane; R. J. Perkins

    2012-06-09

    We present a hybrid stochastic model for the resuspension of micron-size particles from multilayer deposits in a fully-developed turbulent boundary layer. The rate of removal of particles from any given layer depends upon the rate of removal of particles from the layer above which acts as a source of uncovering and exposure of particles to the resuspending flow. The primary resuspension rate constant for an individual particle within a layer is based on the Rock'n'Roll (R'n'R) model using non-Gaussian statistics for the aerodynamic forces acting on the particles (Zhang et al., 2012). The coupled layer equations that describe multilayer resuspension of all the particles in each layer are based on the generic lattice model of Friess & Yadigaroglu (2001) which is extended here to include the influence of layer coverage and particle size distribution. We consider the influence of layer thickness on the resuspension along with the spread of adhesion within layers, and the statistics of non-Gaussian versus Gaussian removal forces including their timescale. Unlike its weak influence on long-term resuspension rates for monolayers, this timescale plays a crucial and influential role in multilayer resuspension. Finally we compare model predictions with those of a large-scale and a mesoscale resuspension test, STORM (Castelo et al., 1999) and BISE (Alloul-Marmor, 2002).

  9. Many-body microhydrodynamics of colloidal particles with active boundary layers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rajesh Singh; Somdeb Ghose; R. Adhikari

    2015-07-13

    Colloidal particles with active boundary layers - regions surrounding the particles where nonequilibrium processes produce large velocity gradients - are common in many physical, chemical and biological contexts. The velocity or stress at the edge of the boundary layer determines the exterior fluid flow and, hence, the many-body interparticle hydrodynamic interaction. Here, we present a method to compute the many-body hydrodynamic interaction between $N$ spherical active particles induced by their exterior microhydrodynamic flow. First, we use a boundary integral representation of the Stokes equation to eliminate bulk fluid degrees of freedom. Then, we expand the boundary velocities and tractions of the integral representation in an infinite-dimensional basis of tensorial spherical harmonics and, on enforcing boundary conditions in a weak sense on the surface of each particle, obtain a system of linear algebraic equations for the unknown expansion coefficients. The truncation of the infinite series, fixed by the degree of accuracy required, yields a finite linear system that can be solved accurately and efficiently by iterative methods. The solution linearly relates the unknown rigid body motion to the known values of the expansion coefficients, motivating the introduction of propulsion matrices. These matrices completely characterize hydrodynamic interactions in active suspensions just as mobility matrices completely characterize hydrodynamic interactions in passive suspensions. The reduction in the dimensionality of the problem, from a three-dimensional partial differential equation to a two-dimensional integral equation, allows for dynamic simulations of hundreds of thousands of active particles on multi-core computational architectures.

  10. Experimental investigation of sound generation by a protuberance in a laminar boundary layer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kobayashi, M.; Asai, M.; Inasawa, A. [Department of Aerospace Engineering, Tokyo Metropolitan University, 6-6 Asahigaoka, Hino, Tokyo 191-0065 (Japan)

    2014-08-15

    Sound radiation from a two-dimensional protuberance glued on the wall in a laminar boundary layer was investigated experimentally at low Mach numbers. When the protuberance was as high as the boundary-layer thickness, a feedback-loop mechanism set in between protuberance-generated sound and Tollmien-Schlichting (T-S) waves generated by the leading-edge receptivity to the upstream-propagating sound. Although occurrence of a separation bubble immediately upstream of the protuberance played important roles in the evolution of instability waves into vortices interacting with the protuberance, the frequency of tonal vortex sound was determined by the selective amplification of T-S waves in the linear instability stage upstream of the separation bubble and was not affected by the instability of the separation bubble.

  11. Viscous boundary layers of radiation-dominated, relativistic jets. I. The two-stream model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coughlin, Eric R

    2015-01-01

    Using the relativistic equations of radiation hydrodynamics in the viscous limit, we analyze the boundary layers that develop between radiation-dominated jets and their environments. In this paper we present the solution for the self-similar, 2-D, plane-parallel two-stream problem, wherein the jet and the ambient medium are considered to be separate, interacting fluids, and we compare our results to those of previous authors. (In a companion paper we investigate an alternative scenario, known as the free-streaming jet model.) Consistent with past findings, we show that the boundary layer that develops between the jet and its surroundings creates a region of low-density material. These models may be applicable to sources such as super-Eddington tidal disruption events and long gamma-ray bursts.

  12. Viscous boundary layers of radiation-dominated, relativistic jets. II. The free-streaming jet model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coughlin, Eric R

    2015-01-01

    We analyze the interaction of a radiation-dominated jet and its surroundings using the equations of radiation hydrodynamics in the viscous limit. In a previous paper we considered the two-stream scenario, which treats the jet and its surroundings as distinct media interacting through radiation viscous forces. Here we present an alternative boundary layer model, known as the free-streaming jet model -- where a narrow stream of fluid is injected into a static medium -- and present solutions where the flow is ultrarelativistic and the boundary layer is dominated by radiation. It is shown that these jets entrain material from their surroundings and that their cores have a lower density of scatterers and a harder spectrum of photons, leading to observational consequences for lines of sight that look "down the barrel of the jet." These jetted outflow models may be applicable to the jets produced during long gamma-ray bursts and super-Eddington phases of tidal disruption events.

  13. Surface heterogeneity impacts on boundary layer dynamics via energy balance partitioning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brunsell, Nathaniel A.; Mechem, David B.; Anderson, M. C.

    2011-04-11

    vegetation types and phenological patterns be examined for altering the conversion of net radi- ation into turbulent heat fluxes and the potential impacts this may have on boundary layer dynamics. Our results are important for understanding the mechanis- tic... stream_size 62188 stream_content_type text/plain stream_name Brunsell_2011_Surface-heterogeneity-impacts.pdf.txt stream_source_info Brunsell_2011_Surface-heterogeneity-impacts.pdf.txt Content-Encoding UTF-8 Content-Type text...

  14. Intercomparison of model simulations of mixed-phase clouds observed during the ARM Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment. Part I: Single layer cloud

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klein, Stephen A.

    2009-01-01

    humidity above stratiform clouds on indirect aerosol climateOverview of Arctic cloud and radiation characteristics. J.of Arctic low-level clouds observed during the FIRE Arctic

  15. Quantification of the boundary layer ingestion benet for the D8-series aircraft using a pressure rake system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lieu, Michael K

    2015-01-01

    This thesis presents the results of experiments carried out at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) 14'x22' Subsonic Wind Tunnel to determine the aerodynamic boundary layer ingestion (BLI) benet for the D8 aircraft advanced ...

  16. The effect of periodic unsteady wakes on boundary layer transition and heat transfer on a curved plate 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wright, Lance Cole

    1996-01-01

    The effect of unsteady periodic wakes on heat transfer and boundary layer transition was investigated on a constant curvature heat transfer curved plate in a subsonic wind tunnel facility. The local heat transfer coefficient ...

  17. The chemistry of OH and HO2 radicals in the boundary layer over the tropical Atlantic Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01

    J. M. C. : Peroxy radical chemistry and the control of ozoneImpact of halogen monoxide chemistry upon boundary layer OHL. K. Whalley et al. : Chemistry of OH and HO 2 radicals

  18. An empirical model for the mean-velocity profiles of a turbulent boundary layer under the effects of surface curvature 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huynh, Long Quang

    1994-01-01

    An empirical model has been developed to predict the mean-velocity profile of a turbulent boundary layer under the influence of surface curvature. The model proposed is able to determine the profiles for both a convex and concave curvature...

  19. Secondary ow and forced convection heat transfer near endwall boundary layer fences in a 90 turning duct

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Camci, Cengiz

    ° turning duct Cengiz Camci *, Dean H. Rizzo Turbomachinery Heat Transfer Laboratory, Department with the secondary ¯ow and heat transfer aspects of endwall boundary layer fences in 90° turning ducts. Boundary coolant channel is simulated by a 90° turning duct (ReD 360,000) to study the aerothermal interaction

  20. Accretion Disk Boundary Layers Around Neutron Stars: X-ray Production in Low-Mass X-ray Binaries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robert Popham; Rashid Sunyaev

    2000-04-03

    We present solutions for the structure of the boundary layer where the accretion disk meets the neutron star, which is expected to be the dominant source of high-energy radiation in low-mass X-ray binaries which contain weakly magnetized accreting neutron stars. We find that the main portion of the boundary layer gas is hot (> ~10^8 K), low in density, radially and vertically extended, and optically thick to scattering but optically thin to absorption. It will produce large X-ray luminosity by Comptonization. Energy is transported inward by viscosity, concentrating the energy dissipation in the dense, optically thick zone close to the stellar surface. We explore the dependence of the boundary layer structure on the mass accretion rate, the rotation rate of the star, the alpha viscosity parameter and the viscosity prescription. Radiation pressure is the dominant source of pressure in the boundary layer; the flux is close to the Eddington limiting flux even for luminosities well below (~0.01 times) L(Edd). At luminosities near L(Edd), the boundary layer expands radially, and has a radial extent larger than one stellar radius. Based on the temperatures and optical depths which characterize the boundary layer, we expect that Comptonization will produce a power-law spectrum at low source luminosities. At high luminosities, a Planckian spectrum will be produced in the dense region where most of the energy is released, and modified by Comptonization as the radiation propagates outward.

  1. Behavior of Turbulent Structures within a Mach 5 Mechanically Distorted Boundary Layer 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peltier, Scott Jacob

    2013-08-05

    stream_source_info PELTIER-DISSERTATION-2013.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 560918 Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 stream_name PELTIER-DISSERTATION-2013.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859...-1 BEHAVIOR OF TURBULENT STRUCTURES WITHIN A MACH 5 MECHANICALLY DISTORTED BOUNDARY LAYER A Dissertation by SCOTT JACOB PELTIER Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements...

  2. Numerical modeling of boundary layer flow under shoaling and breaking waves 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pattipawaej, Olga Catherina

    1998-01-01

    velocities and shear stresses in the bottom boundary layer under breaking waves. The experiment wss conducted in the Precision Wave Tank located in the Ocean Engineering Laboratory at the University of Delaware. The flume was 33 m long, 0. 6 m wide, and 1... modeling of surf zone hydrodynamics. " Rep. No. CACR-95-97, Center for Applied Coastal Research, University Delaware, Newark, Delaware. Cox, D. T. , Kobayashi, N. , and Okayasu, A. (1996). "Bottom shear stress in the surf zone. " J. Geophys. Res. , 101(C...

  3. Boundary layer modeling of reactive flow over a porous surface with angled injection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Shiling; Fotache, Catalin G.; Hautman, Donald J.; Ochs, Stuart S. [United Technologies Research Center, MS 129-29, 411 Silver Lane, East Hartford, CT 06108 (United States); Chao, Beei-Huan [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States)

    2008-08-15

    An analytical model was developed to investigate the dynamics of nonpremixed flames in a shear layer established between a mainstream flow of fuel-rich combustion products and a porous surface with an angled injection of air. In the model, a one-step overall chemical reaction was employed, together with boundary layer conservation equations solved using similarity solutions. Parametric studies were performed to understand the effects of equivalence ratio, temperature, and mass flow rate of the fuel and air streams on the flame standoff distance, surface temperature, and heat flux at the surface. The analytical model predictions were compared with computational fluid dynamics results obtained using the FLUENT commercial code for both the laminar and the turbulent flow models. Qualitative agreement in surface temperature was observed. Finally, the flame stability limits predicted by the model were compared with available experimental data and found to agree qualitatively, as well. (author)

  4. Clouds 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unknown

    2011-08-17

    Uncertainties associated with the microphysical and radiative properties of ice clouds remain an active research area because of the importance these clouds have in atmospheric radiative transfer problems and the energy balance of the Earth...

  5. Soft repulsive mixtures under gravity: brazil-nut effect, depletion bubbles, boundary layering, nonequilibrium shaking

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tobias Kruppa; Tim Neuhaus; René Messina; Hartmut Löwen

    2011-12-28

    A binary mixture of particles interacting via long-ranged repulsive forces is studied in gravity by computer simulation and theory. The more repulsive A-particles create a depletion zone of less repulsive B-particles around them reminiscent to a bubble. Applying Archimedes' principle effectively to this bubble, an A-particle can be lifted in a fluid background of B-particles. This "depletion bubble" mechanism explains and predicts a brazil-nut effect where the heavier A-particles float on top of the lighter B-particles. It also implies an effective attraction of an A-particle towards a hard container bottom wall which leads to boundary layering of A-particles. Additionally, we have studied a periodic inversion of gravity causing perpetual mutual penetration of the mixture in a slit geometry. In this nonequilibrium case of time-dependent gravity, the boundary layering persists. Our results are based on computer simulations and density functional theory of a two-dimensional binary mixture of colloidal repulsive dipoles. The predicted effects also occur for other long-ranged repulsive interactions and in three spatial dimensions. They are therefore verifiable in settling experiments on dipolar or charged colloidal mixtures as well as in charged granulates and dusty plasmas.

  6. Clouds

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the radiative influence of mixed-phase clouds. Further, its impact on the development and evaluation of retrieval schemes from ground- and satellite-based remote sensors is...

  7. Model of the boundary layer of a vacuum-arc magnetic filter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Minotti, F.; Giuliani, L.; Grondona, D.; Della Torre, H.; Kelly, H.

    2013-03-21

    A model is developed to describe the electrostatic boundary layer in a positively biased magnetic filter in filtered arcs with low collisionality. The set of equations used includes the electron momentum equation, with an anomalous collision term due to micro-instabilities leading to Bohm diffusion, electron mass conservation, and Poisson equation. Analytical solutions are obtained, valid for the regimes of interest, leading to an explicit expression to determine the electron density current to the filter wall as a function of the potential of the filter and the ratio of electron density at the plasma to that at the filter wall. Using a set of planar and cylindrical probes it is verified experimentally that the mentioned ratio of electron densities remains reasonably constant for different magnetic field values and probe bias, which allows to obtain a closed expression for the current. Comparisons are made with the experimentally determined current collected at different sections of a positively biased straight filter.

  8. Coupled Mesoscale-Large-Eddy Modeling of Realistic Stable Boundary Layer Turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yao; Manuel, Lance

    2013-01-01

    Site-specific flow and turbulence information are needed for various practical applications, ranging from aerodynamic/aeroelastic modeling for wind turbine design to optical diffraction calculations. Even though highly desirable, collecting on-site meteorological measurements can be an expensive, time-consuming, and sometimes a challenging task. In this work, we propose a coupled mesoscale-large-eddy modeling framework to synthetically generate site-specific flow and turbulence data. The workhorses behind our framework are a state-of-the-art, open-source atmospheric model called the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model and a tuning-free large-eddy simulation (LES) model. Using this coupled framework, we simulate a nighttime stable boundary layer (SBL) case from the well-known CASES-99 field campaign. One of the unique aspects of this work is the usage of a diverse range of observations for characterization and validation. The coupled models reproduce certain characteristics of observed low-level jets....

  9. Experimental observations on transition to turbulence in confined coaxial jets and other boundary layer flows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gore, R.A. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA)); Crowe, C.T. (Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (USA). Dept. of Mechanical and Materials Engineering); Bejan, A. (Duke Univ., Durham, NC (USA). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science)

    1990-01-01

    Experiments performed demonstrate the transition to turbulent flow of water jets discharging coaxially into a stream confined in a round duct. The critical Reynolds number is shown to be a strong function of velocity ratio. From the flow visualization it is shown that a proportionality between the laminar length of the jet (L) and the wavelength ({lambda}) can be seen in the region of transition to turbulence. The proportionality coincides with similar observations concerning the transition to turbulence in various other flows. A brief argument based on scale analysis is presented for the confined coaxial jet and round plume. The apparent universality of the L/{lambda} {approximately} O(10) scaling law supports the conclusion that the laminar sections of all naturally progressing boundary layer-type flows are geometrically similar. 21 refs., 8 figs.

  10. Pulsed Plasma with Synchronous Boundary Voltage for Rapid Atomic Layer Etching

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Economou, Demetre J.; Donnelly, Vincent M.

    2014-05-13

    Atomic Layer ETching (ALET) of a solid with monolayer precision is a critical requirement for advancing nanoscience and nanotechnology. Current plasma etching techniques do not have the level of control or damage-free nature that is needed for patterning delicate sub-20 nm structures. In addition, conventional ALET, based on pulsed gases with long reactant adsorption and purging steps, is very slow. In this work, novel pulsed plasma methods with synchronous substrate and/or “boundary electrode” bias were developed for highly selective, rapid ALET. Pulsed plasma and tailored bias voltage waveforms provided controlled ion energy and narrow energy spread, which are critical for highly selective and damage-free etching. The broad goal of the project was to investigate the plasma science and engineering that will lead to rapid ALET with monolayer precision. A combined experimental-simulation study was employed to achieve this goal.

  11. Electron distributions observed with Langmuir waves in the plasma sheet boundary layer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hwang, Junga [Solar and Space Weather Research Group, Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute, Daejeon 305-348 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Astronomy and Space Science, University of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Rha, Kicheol [Department of Physics, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Seough, Jungjoon [Solar and Space Weather Research Group, Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute, Daejeon 305-348 (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Peter H. [School of Space Research, Kyung Hee University, Yongin-Si, Gyeonggi-Do 446-701 (Korea, Republic of); Institute for Physical Science and Technology, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States)

    2014-09-15

    The present paper investigates the Langmuir turbulence driven by counter-streaming electron beams and its plausible association with observed features in the Earth's plasma sheet boundary layer region. A one-dimensional electrostatic particle-in-cell simulation code is employed in order to simulate broadband electrostatic waves with characteristic frequency in the vicinity of the electron plasma frequency ?/?{sub pe}?1.0. The present simulation confirms that the broadband electrostatic waves may indeed be generated by the counter-streaming electron beams. It is also found that the observed feature associated with low energy electrons, namely quasi-symmetric velocity space plateaus, are replicated according to the present simulation. However, the present investigation only partially succeeds in generating the suprathermal tails such that the origin of observed quasi power-law energetic population formation remains outstanding.

  12. Turbulent flow over a house in a simulated hurricane boundary layer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Zachary; Gurka, Roi; Kopp, Gregory

    2009-01-01

    Every year hurricanes and other extreme wind storms cause billions of dollars in damage worldwide. For residential construction, such failures are usually associated with roofs, which see the largest aerodynamic loading. However, determining aerodynamic loads on different portions of North American houses is complicated by the lack of clear load paths and non-linear load sharing in wood frame roofs. This problem of fluid-structure interaction requires both wind tunnel testing and full-scale structural testing. A series of wind tunnel tests have been performed on a house in a simulated atmospheric boundary layer (ABL), with the resulting wind-induced pressures applied to the full-scale structure. The ABL was simulated for flow over open country terrain where both velocity and turbulence intensity profiles, as well as spectra, were matched with available full scale measurements for this type of terrain. The first set of measurements was 600 simultaneous surface pressure measurements over the entire house. A key...

  13. Simulating the Transition from Drizzling Marine Stratocumulus to Boundary Layer Cumulus with a Mesoscale Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mechem, David B.; Kogan, Yefim L.

    2003-10-01

    variability is analogous to the drizzle-induced cloud breakup produced in large eddy simulation studies. The dynamics of the pure stratocumulus cloud are dictated by the model's subgrid parameterization, while the more convective regime exhibits appreciable...

  14. Boundary-Layer Meteorol (2009) 131:441463 DOI 10.1007/s10546-009-9371-9

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gohm, Alexander

    2009-01-01

    Boundary-Layer Meteorol (2009) 131:441­463 DOI 10.1007/s10546-009-9371-9 ARTICLE Air Pollution, Austria, is analysed in order to study mechanisms of air pollution transport in an Alpine valley in the dispersion of air pollutants in mountainous terrain. Dynamically or thermally forced winds may enhance

  15. Wind profile above the surface boundary layer S.-E. Gryning (1), E. Batchvarova (2) and B. Brmmer (3)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wind profile above the surface boundary layer S.-E. Gryning (1), E. Batchvarova (2) and B. Brümmer in predictions of the wind profile in the lowest hundreds me- ters of the atmosphere, being connected to the general increase in height of structures such as bridges, high houses and wind turbines. The hub height

  16. Distribution of Energy Spectra, Reynolds Stresses, Turbulence Production, and Dissipation in a Tidally Driven Bottom Boundary Layer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Distribution of Energy Spectra, Reynolds Stresses, Turbulence Production, and Dissipation in a Tidally Driven Bottom Boundary Layer L. LUZNIK,* R. GURKA,*, W. A. M. NIMMO SMITH,# W. ZHU,* J. KATZ) site] are examined, covering the accelerating and decelerating phases of a single tidal cycle

  17. Nature of the Mesoscale Boundary Layer Height and Water Vapor Variability Observed 14 June 2002 during the IHOP_2002 Campaign

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nature of the Mesoscale Boundary Layer Height and Water Vapor Variability Observed 14 June 2002, Boulder, Colorado (Manuscript received 4 September 2007, in final form 23 June 2008) ABSTRACT Mesoscale at the mesoscale, with the spatial pattern and the magnitude of the variability changing from day to day. On 14

  18. Evolution and lifetimes of flow topology in a turbulent boundary layer G. E. Elsinga and I. Marusic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marusic, Ivan

    Evolution and lifetimes of flow topology in a turbulent boundary layer G. E. Elsinga and I. Marusic of Physics. Related Articles Lagrangian evolution of the invariants of the velocity gradient tensor subject to AIP license or copyright; see http://pof.aip.org/about/rights_and_permissions #12;Evolution

  19. Boundary-Layer Meteorol (2014) 150:107130 DOI 10.1007/s10546-013-9864-4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xue, Ming

    2014-01-01

    Processes in Nocturnal Atmospheric Boundary Layer on Urban Ozone Concentrations Petra M. Klein · Xiao ozone. The prevalence of southerly winds and LLJs in the U.S. Southern Great Plains during summer makes on urban air quality. Ozone (O3) and nitrogen oxide concentrations measured at regulatory monitoring sites

  20. Two-equation model computations of high-speed (ma=2.25, 7.2), turbulent boundary layers 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arasanipalai, Sriram Sharan

    2009-05-15

    of the Boussinesq coefficient (Cu) and turbulenttransport coefficients (sigmak; sigmaE; sigma; sigma*) on the boundary layer ow is examined. Further,the performance of a new model with realizability-based correction to Cu and corresponding modifications to sigma...

  1. Characterizing the Separation and Reattachment of Suction Surface Boundary Layer in Low Pressure Turbine Using Massively Parallel Large Eddy Simulations 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jagannathan, Shriram

    2012-02-14

    The separation and reattachment of the suction surface boundary layer in a low pressure turbine is characterized using large-eddy simulation at Re=68,000 based on freestream velocity and suction surface length. A high pass filtered Smagorinsky model...

  2. European Journal of Mechanics B/Fluids 25 (2006) 117 Algebraic growth in a Blasius boundary layer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zuccher, Simone

    2006-01-01

    . 2005 Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved. Keywords: Boundary layer; Stability; Transient growth). 0997-7546/$ ­ see front matter 2005 Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved. doi:10.1016/j.euromechflu.2005 April 2005; accepted 9 July 2005 Available online 1 September 2005 Abstract The three

  3. Impacts of boundary layer mixing on pollutant vertical profiles in the lower troposphere: Implications to satellite remote sensing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacob, Daniel J.

    primarily by the extent of parameteriza- tion, several types of PBL mixing scheme have been employed-local scheme Full-mixing Satellite remote sensing a b s t r a c t Mixing in the planetary boundary layer (PBL recently been supplemented with a non-local PBL scheme. This study analyzes the impact of the non

  4. THE URBAN BOUNDARY-LAYER FIELD CAMPAIGN IN MARSEILLE (UBL/CLU-ESCOMPTE): SET-UP AND FIRST RESULTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) Abstract. The UBL/CLU (urban boundary layer/couche limite urbaine) observation and modelling campaign to the heat and moisture exchanges between the urban canopy and the atmosphere during periods of low wind mapping of urban land cover, land-use and aerodynamic parameters used in UBL models, and (iv) testing

  5. Immersed Boundary Methods for High-Resolution Simulation of Atmospheric Boundary-Layer Flow Over Complex Terrain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chow, Fotini Katopodes

    models, such as the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model, are in- creasingly used for high facilitates explicit resolution of complex terrain, even urban terrain, in the WRF mesoscale model. First gradient boundary conditions. Specified diurnal heating in a valley, producing anabatic winds, is used

  6. A method for the direct numerical simulation of hypersonic boundary-layer instability with finite-rate chemistry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marxen, Olaf, E-mail: olaf.marxen@vki.ac.be [Center for Turbulence Research, Building 500, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305-3035 (United States) [Center for Turbulence Research, Building 500, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305-3035 (United States); Aeronautics and Aerospace Department, von Karman Institute for Fluid Dynamics, Chaussée de Waterloo, 72, 1640 Rhode-St-Genèse (Belgium); Magin, Thierry E. [Aeronautics and Aerospace Department, von Karman Institute for Fluid Dynamics, Chaussée de Waterloo, 72, 1640 Rhode-St-Genèse (Belgium)] [Aeronautics and Aerospace Department, von Karman Institute for Fluid Dynamics, Chaussée de Waterloo, 72, 1640 Rhode-St-Genèse (Belgium); Shaqfeh, Eric S.G.; Iaccarino, Gianluca [Center for Turbulence Research, Building 500, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305-3035 (United States)] [Center for Turbulence Research, Building 500, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305-3035 (United States)

    2013-12-15

    A new numerical method is presented here that allows to consider chemically reacting gases during the direct numerical simulation of a hypersonic fluid flow. The method comprises the direct coupling of a solver for the fluid mechanical model and a library providing the physio-chemical model. The numerical method for the fluid mechanical model integrates the compressible Navier–Stokes equations using an explicit time advancement scheme and high-order finite differences. This Navier–Stokes code can be applied to the investigation of laminar-turbulent transition and boundary-layer instability. The numerical method for the physio-chemical model provides thermodynamic and transport properties for different gases as well as chemical production rates, while here we exclusively consider a five species air mixture. The new method is verified for a number of test cases at Mach 10, including the one-dimensional high-temperature flow downstream of a normal shock, a hypersonic chemical reacting boundary layer in local thermodynamic equilibrium and a hypersonic reacting boundary layer with finite-rate chemistry. We are able to confirm that the diffusion flux plays an important role for a high-temperature boundary layer in local thermodynamic equilibrium. Moreover, we demonstrate that the flow for a case previously considered as a benchmark for the investigation of non-equilibrium chemistry can be regarded as frozen. Finally, the new method is applied to investigate the effect of finite-rate chemistry on boundary layer instability by considering the downstream evolution of a small-amplitude wave and comparing results with those obtained for a frozen gas as well as a gas in local thermodynamic equilibrium.

  7. Boundary layers and incompressible Navier-Stokes-Fourier limit of the Boltzmann Equation in Bounded Domain (I)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ning Jiang; Nader Masmoudi

    2015-10-10

    We establish the incompressible Navier-Stokes-Fourier limit for solutions to the Boltzmann equation with a general cut-off collision kernel in a bounded domain. Appropriately scaled families of DiPerna-Lions-(Mischler) renormalized solutions with Maxwell reflection boundary conditions are shown to have fluctuations that converge as the Knudsen number goes to zero. Every limit point is a weak solution to the Navier-Stokes-Fourier system with different types of boundary conditions depending on the ratio between the accommodation coefficient and the Knudsen number. The main new result of the paper is that this convergence is strong in the case of Dirichlet boundary condition. Indeed, we prove that the acoustic waves are damped immediately, namely they are damped in a boundary layer in time. This damping is due to the presence of viscous and kinetic boundary layers in space. As a consequence, we also justify the first correction to the infinitesimal Maxwellian that one obtains from the Chapman-Enskog expansion with Navier-Stokes scaling. This extends the work of Golse and Saint-Raymond \\cite{Go-Sai04, Go-Sai05} and Levermore and Masmoudi \\cite{LM} to the case of a bounded domain. The case of a bounded domain was considered by Masmoudi and Saint-Raymond \\cite{M-S} for linear Stokes-Fourier limit and Saint-Raymond \\cite{SRM} for Navier-Stokes limit for hard potential kernels. Both \\cite{M-S} and \\cite{SRM} didn't study the damping of the acoustic waves. This paper extends the result of \\cite{M-S} and \\cite{SRM} to the nonlinear case and includes soft potential kernels. More importantly, for the Dirichlet boundary condition, this work strengthens the convergence so as to make the boundary layer visible. This answers an open problem proposed by Ukai \\cite{Ukai}.

  8. Aerosol properties and their influences on marine boundary layer cloud condensation nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dong, Xiquan

    and early spring months had the highest mean surface wind speed (> 5 m sÀ1 ) and greatest contribution of aerosols found in the atmosphere such as mineral dust, urban/industrial pollution, biomass burning, and sea by using observations and model simulations [Rosenfeld et al., 2008; Li et al., 2011; Feingold et al., 2006

  9. Sensitivity of Boundary-layer and Deep Convective Cloud Simulations to

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effect Photovoltaics - Energy InnovationOscillation ResultsSystemsVertical

  10. Simulation of Post-Frontal Boundary Layers Observed During the ARM 2000 Cloud IOP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effect Photovoltaics -7541 UnlimitedShift

  11. Posters Triggering of Boundary Layer Cumulus Clouds Over a Heterogeneous Surface

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass mapSpeedingProgram Guidelines This document outlines the majorL.Posters955

  12. Local Correlations and Multi-Fractal Behaviour in Marine Boundary Layer Cloud Dynamics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverseIMPACTThousand CubicResourcelogo and-E CChinaC L S C O

  13. Sensitivity of a global climate model to the critical Richardson number in the boundary layer parameterization

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhang, Ning; Liu, Yangang; Gao, Zhiqiu; Li, Dan

    2015-04-27

    The critical bulk Richardson number (Ricr) is an important parameter in planetary boundary layer (PBL) parameterization schemes used in many climate models. This paper examines the sensitivity of a Global Climate Model, the Beijing Climate Center Atmospheric General Circulation Model, BCC_AGCM to Ricr. The results show that the simulated global average of PBL height increases nearly linearly with Ricr, with a change of about 114 m for a change of 0.5 in Ricr. The surface sensible (latent) heat flux decreases (increases) as Ricr increases. The influence of Ricr on surface air temperature and specific humidity is not significant. The increasingmore »Ricr may affect the location of the Westerly Belt in the Southern Hemisphere. Further diagnosis reveals that changes in Ricr affect stratiform and convective precipitations differently. Increasing Ricr leads to an increase in the stratiform precipitation but a decrease in the convective precipitation. Significant changes of convective precipitation occur over the inter-tropical convergence zone, while changes of stratiform precipitation mostly appear over arid land such as North Africa and Middle East.« less

  14. Discovery of Drifting High-frequency QPOs in Global Simulations of Magnetic Boundary Layers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. M. Romanova; A. K. Kulkarni

    2009-06-02

    We report on the numerical discovery of quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) associated with accretion through a non-axisymmetric magnetic boundary layer in the unstable regime, when two ordered equatorial streams form and rotate synchronously at approximately the angular velocity of the inner disk The streams hit the star's surface producing hot spots. Rotation of the spots leads to high-frequency QPOs. We performed a number of simulation runs for different magnetospheric sizes from small to tiny, and observed a definite correlation between the inner disk radius and the QPO frequency: the frequency is higher when the magnetosphere is smaller. In the stable regime a small magnetosphere forms and accretion through the usual funnel streams is observed, and the frequency of the star is expected to dominate the lightcurve. We performed exploratory investigations of the case in which the magnetosphere becomes negligibly small and the disk interacts with the star through an equatorial belt. We also performed investigation of somewhat larger magnetospheres where one or two ordered tongues may dominate over other chaotic tongues. In application to millisecond pulsars we obtain QPO frequencies in the range of 350 Hz to 990 Hz for one spot. The frequency associated with rotation of one spot may dominate if spots are not identical or antipodal. If the spots are similar and antipodal then the frequencies are twice as high. We show that variation of the accretion rate leads to drift of the QPO peak.

  15. On the boundary layer structure near a highly permeable porous interface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dalwadi, Mohit P; Waters, Sarah L; Oliver, James M

    2015-01-01

    The method of matched asymptotic expansions is used to study the canonical problem of steady laminar flow through a narrow two-dimensional channel blocked by a tight-fitting finite-length highly permeable porous obstacle. We investigate the behaviour of the local flow close to the interface between the single-phase and porous regions (governed by the incompressible Navier--Stokes and Darcy flow equations, respectively). We solve for the local flow in the limits of low and high Reynolds number, facilitating an understanding of the nature of the transition from Poiseuille to plug to Poiseuille flow in each of these limits. Significant analytic progress is made in the high-Reynolds-number limit, as we are able to explore in detail the rich boundary layer structure that occurs. We derive general results for the interfacial stress and for the conditions that couple the flow in the regions away from the interface. We consider the three-dimensional generalization to unsteady laminar flow through and around a tight-f...

  16. Technical notes Experiments in Fluids 22 (1997) 351--353 Springer-Verlag 1997 Vortex stretching in a laminar boundary layer flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wesfreid, José Eduardo

    1997-01-01

    in a laminar boundary layer flow P. Petitjeans, J. E. Wesfreid, J. C. Attiach Abstract A new technique the effects of stretching on a controlled vorticity sheet coming from a laminar boundary layer flow on a flat. A diffuser keeps the flow laminar with a minimum of perturbation. The key elements of the channel

  17. A new cloud and aerosol layer detection method based on micropulse lidar measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zeng, Ning

    aerosols and clouds are subject to more uncertainties depending on the thresholds selected. Compared. Introduction Clouds play an essential role in the Earth's climate by modulating the energy budget and water cycle. They can change the Earth's energy balance by reflecting solar radiation and by trapping longwave

  18. Dipole tilt angle effects on the latitude of the cusp and cleft/low-latitude boundary layer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newell, P.T.; Meng, C.I. (Johns Hopkins Univ., Laurel, MD (USA))

    1989-06-01

    A large data set of approximately 12,000 Defense Meteorological Satellite Program satellite F7 crossings of the cusp or the cleft (i.e., the dayside magnetospheric boundary layer) over a 3-year period is studied for seasonal dependence in latitudinal position. A carefully tested algorithm is used to distinguish the various dayside particle precipitation regions and boundaries. It is found that in the 1,100-1,300 MLT sector, the cusp proper exhibits about {minus}0.06{degree} magnetic latitude (MLAT) shift for each degree increase in dipole tilt angle. Thus the difference between the average summer and winter cusp positions is close to 4{degree} MLAT, approximately symmetric about equinox. For the cleft (magnetospheric boundary layer) the variation is smaller. For example, in the 0700-0900 MLT sector the cleft equatorward boundary shift is {minus} 0.027{degree} MLAT/1{degree} dipole tilt. These results are in general agreement with the predictions of empirical magnetospheric magnetic field models. Various ground-based and low-altitude observations can be systematically affected by the seasonal latitudinal shift herein documented.

  19. Vehicle cabin cooling system for capturing and exhausting heated boundary layer air from inner surfaces of solar heated windows

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Farrington, Robert B. (Golden, CO); Anderson, Ren (Broomfield, CO)

    2001-01-01

    The cabin cooling system includes a cooling duct positioned proximate and above upper edges of one or more windows of a vehicle to exhaust hot air as the air is heated by inner surfaces of the windows and forms thin boundary layers of heated air adjacent the heated windows. The cabin cooling system includes at least one fan to draw the hot air into the cooling duct at a flow rate that captures the hot air in the boundary layer without capturing a significant portion of the cooler cabin interior air and to discharge the hot air at a point outside the vehicle cabin, such as the vehicle trunk. In a preferred embodiment, the cooling duct has a cross-sectional area that gradually increases from a distal point to a proximal point to the fan inlet to develop a substantially uniform pressure drop along the length of the cooling duct. Correspondingly, this cross-sectional configuration develops a uniform suction pressure and uniform flow rate at the upper edge of the window to capture the hot air in the boundary layer adjacent each window.

  20. Seismic and gravitational studies of melting in the mantle's thermal boundary layers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Ark, Emily M

    2007-01-01

    This thesis presents three studies which apply geophysical tools to the task of better understanding mantle melting phenomena at the upper and lower boundaries of the mantle. The first study uses seafloor bathymetry and ...

  1. UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, SAN DIEGO Numerical Simulations of the Stratified Oceanic Bottom Boundary Layer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, John R.

    UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, SAN DIEGO Numerical Simulations of the Stratified Oceanic Bottom Boundary of Philosophy in Mechanical Engineering by John R. Taylor Committee in charge: Sutanu Sarkar, Chair Thomas Simulation of Stably Stratified Open Channel Flow . . . . . 6 1. Introduction

  2. Characterization of the Influence of a Favorable Pressure Gradient on the Basic Structure of a Mach 5.0 High Reynolds Number Supersonic Turbulent Boundary Layer 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tichenor, Nathan R.

    2010-10-12

    High-speed high Reynolds number boundary layer flows with mechanical non-equilibrium effects have numerous practical applications; examples include access-to-space ascent, re-entry and descent, and military hypersonic ...

  3. Combined effects of Reynolds number, turbulence intensity and periodic unsteady wake flow conditions on boundary layer development and heat transfer of a low pressure turbine blade 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ozturk, Burak

    2009-05-15

    Detailed experimental investigation has been conducted to provide a detailed insight into the heat transfer and aerodynamic behavior of a separation zone that is generated as a result of boundary layer development along ...

  4. On the use of a nascent delta function in radiative-transfer calculations for multi-layer media subject to Fresnel boundary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siewert, Charles E.

    subject to Fresnel boundary and interface conditions R.D.M. Garcia a,Ã, C.E. Siewert b a Instituto de: Radiative transfer Nascent delta function Fresnel conditions Discrete-ordinates method a b s t r a c in a plane-parallel, multi-layer medium subject to Fresnel boundary and interface conditions. As a result

  5. Wind speed response of marine non-precipitating stratocumulus clouds over a diurnal cycle in cloud-system resolving simulations

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kazil, J.; Feingold, G.; Yamaguchi, T.

    2015-10-21

    Observed and projected trends in large scale wind speed over the oceans prompt the question: how might marine stratocumulus clouds and their radiative properties respond to future changes in large scale wind speed? Wind speed drives the surface fluxes of sensible heat, moisture, and momentum, and thereby acts on cloud liquid water path (LWP) and cloud radiative properties. We present an investigation of the dynamical response of non-precipitating, overcast marine stratocumulus clouds to different wind speeds, all else equal. In cloud-system resolving simulations, we find that higher wind speed leads to faster boundary layer growth and stronger entrainment. The dynamicalmore »driver is enhanced buoyant production of turbulence kinetic energy (TKE) from latent heat release in cloud updrafts. LWP is enhanced during the night and in the morning at higher wind speed, and more strongly suppressed later in the day. Wind speed hence accentuates the diurnal LWP cycle by expanding the morning – afternoon contrast. The higher LWP at higher wind speed does not, however, enhance cloud top cooling because in clouds with LWP ⪆ 50 g m?2, long wave emissions are very insensitive to LWP. This leads to the more general conclusion that in sufficiently thick stratocumulus clouds, additional boundary layer growth and entrainment due to a boundary layer moistening arises by stronger production of TKE from latent heat release in cloud updrafts, rather than from enhanced longwave cooling. We find furthermore that large scale wind modulates boundary layer decoupling. At nighttime and at low wind speed during daytime, it enhances decoupling in part by faster boundary layer growth and stronger entrainment, and in part because circulation driven by shear from large scale wind in the sub-cloud layer hinders vertical moisture transport between the surface and cloud base. With increasing wind speed, however, in decoupled daytime conditions, shear-driven circulation due to large scale wind takes over from buoyancy-driven circulation in transporting moisture from the surface to cloud base, and thereby reduces decoupling and helps maintain LWP. The cloud radiative effect (CRE) responds to changes in LWP and cloud fraction, and higher wind speed translates to a stronger diurnally averaged CRE. However, the sensitivity of the diurnally averaged CRE to wind speed decreases with increasing wind speed.« less

  6. Ice properties of single-layer stratocumulus during the Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    September 2007; published 20 December 2007. [1] Measurements from the US Department of Energy Atmospheric or activation through cloud-phase chemistry could provide alternative explanations for M-PACE observations in general cir- culation models, the US Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM

  7. A boundary perturbation method for recovering interface shapes in layered media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Malcolm, Alison E.

    The scattering of linear acoustic radiation by a periodic layered structure is a fundamental model in the geosciences as it closely approximates the propagation of pressure waves in the earth's crust. In this contribution, ...

  8. XMM-Newton observations of the dwarf nova RU Peg in quiescence: Probe of the boundary layer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balman, S; Sion, E M; Ness, J -U; Schlegel, E; Barrett, P E; Szkody, P

    2011-01-01

    We present an analysis of X-ray and UV data obtained with the XMM-Newton Observatory of the long period dwarf nova RU Peg. RU Peg contains a massive white dwarf, possibly the hottest white dwarf in a dwarf nova, it has a low inclination, thus optimally exposing its X-ray emitting boundary layer, and has an excellent trigonometric parallax distance. We modeled the X-ray data using XSPEC assuming a multi-temperature plasma emission model built from the MEKAL code. We obtained a maximum temperature of 31.7 keV, based on the EPIC MOS1, 2 and pn data, indicating that RU Peg has an X-ray spectrum harder than most dwarf novae, except U Gem. This result is consistent with and indirectly confirms the large mass of the white dwarf in RU Peg. The X-ray luminosity we computed corresponds to a boundary layer luminosity for a mass accretion rate of 2.E-11 Msun/yr (assuming Mwd=1.3Msun), in agreement with an expected quiescent accretion rate. The modeling of the O VIII emission line at 19A as observed by the RGS implies a p...

  9. Wake Turbulence of Two NREL 5-MW Wind Turbines Immersed in a Neutral Atmospheric Boundary-Layer Flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bashioum, Jessica L; Schmitz, Sven; Duque, Earl P N

    2013-01-01

    The fluid dynamics video considers an array of two NREL 5-MW turbines separated by seven rotor diameters in a neutral atmospheric boundary layer (ABL). The neutral atmospheric boundary-layer flow data were obtained from a precursor ABL simulation using a Large-Eddy Simulation (LES) framework within OpenFOAM. The mean wind speed at hub height is 8m/s, and the surface roughness is 0.2m. The actuator line method (ALM) is used to model the wind turbine blades by means of body forces added to the momentum equation. The fluid dynamics video shows the root and tip vortices emanating from the blades from various viewpoints. The vortices become unstable and break down into large-scale turbulent structures. As the wakes of the wind turbines advect further downstream, smaller-scale turbulence is generated. It is apparent that vortices generated by the blades of the downstream wind turbine break down faster due to increased turbulence levels generated by the wake of the upstream wind turbine.

  10. Eddy-resolving Lidar Measurements and Numerical Simulations of the Convective Internal Boundary Layer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eloranta, Edwin W.

    in speed. The vertical gradient of wind-speed decreases offshore because of strong vertical mixing caused Layer Shane D. Mayor, Gregory J. Tripoli, and Edwin W. Eloranta Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic 10 January 1998, 14:16-14:57 UT divergence(s-1) Distance east of VIL (offshore distance) km 0 1 2 3 4

  11. Confinement of the Sun's interior magnetic field: some exact boundary-layer solutions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. S. Wood; M. E. McIntyre

    2007-09-10

    High-latitude laminar confinement of the Sun's interior magnetic field is shown to be possible, as originally proposed by Gough and McIntyre (1998) but contrary to a recent claim by Brun and Zahn (A&A 2006). Mean downwelling as weak as 2x10^-6cm/s -- gyroscopically pumped by turbulent stresses in the overlying convection zone and/or tachocline -- can hold the field in advective-diffusive balance within a confinement layer of thickness scale ~ 1.5Mm ~ 0.002 x (solar radius) while transmitting a retrograde torque to the Ferraro-constrained interior. The confinement layer sits at the base of the high-latitude tachocline, near the top of the radiative envelope and just above the `tachopause' marking the top of the helium settling layer. A family of exact, laminar, frictionless, axisymmetric confinement-layer solutions is obtained for uniform downwelling in the limit of strong rotation and stratification. A scale analysis shows that the flow is dynamically stable and the assumption of laminar flow realistic. The solution remains valid for downwelling values of the order of 10^-5cm/s but not much larger. This suggests that the confinement layer may be unable to accept a much larger mass throughput. Such a restriction would imply an upper limit on possible internal field strengths, perhaps of the order of hundreds of gauss, and would have implications also for ventilation and lithium burning. The solutions have interesting chirality properties not mentioned in the paper owing to space restrictions, but described at http://www.atmos-dynamics.damtp.cam.ac.uk/people/mem/papers/SQBO/solarfigure.html

  12. Cloud properties and associated radiative heating rates in the tropical western Pacific

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cloud properties and associated radiative heating rates in the tropical western Pacific James H radiative fluxes and heating rates. Maxima in cloud occurrence are found in the boundary layer and the upper radiative heating rates in the tropical western Pacific, J. Geophys. Res., 112, D05201, doi:10.1029/2006JD

  13. Process-model Simulations of Cloud Albedo Enhancement by Aerosols in the Arctic

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kravitz, Benjamin S.; Wang, Hailong; Rasch, Philip J.; Morrison, H.; Solomon, Amy

    2014-11-17

    A cloud-resolving model is used to simulate the effectiveness of Arctic marine cloud brightening via injection of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). An updated cloud microphysical scheme is employed, with prognostic CCN and cloud particle numbers in both liquid and mixed-phase marine low clouds. Injection of CCN into the marine boundary layer can delay the collapse of the boundary layer and increase low-cloud albedo. Because nearly all of the albedo effects are in the liquid phase due to the removal of ice water by snowfall when ice processes are involved, albedo increases are stronger for pure liquid clouds than mixed-phase clouds. Liquid precipitation can be suppressed by CCN injection, whereas ice precipitation (snow) is affected less; thus the effectiveness of brightening mixed-phase clouds is lower than for liquid-only clouds. CCN injection into a clean regime results in a greater albedo increase than injection into a polluted regime, consistent with current knowledge about aerosol-cloud interactions. Unlike previous studies investigating warm clouds, dynamical changes in circulation due to precipitation changes are small.

  14. Ice at the Interface: Atmosphere-Ice-Ocean Boundary Layer Processes and Their Role in Polar Change---Workshop Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hunke, Elizabeth C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-07-23

    The atmosphere-ocean boundary layer in which sea ice resides includes many complex processes that require a more realistic treatment in GCMs, particularly as models move toward full earth system descriptions. The primary purpose of the workshop was to define and discuss such coupled processes from observational and modeling points of view, including insight from both the Arctic and Antarctic systems. The workshop met each of its overarching goals, including fostering collaboration among experimentalists, theorists and modelers, proposing modeling strategies, and ascertaining data availability and needs. Several scientific themes emerged from the workshop, such as the importance of episodic or extreme events, precipitation, stratification above and below the ice, and the marginal ice zone, whose seasonal Arctic migrations now traverse more territory than in the past.

  15. Boundary Layer Structure in the Inn Valley during High Air Pollution (INNAP) Institute of Meteorology and Geophysics (IMGI), University of Innsbruck, Austria

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gohm, Alexander

    Boundary Layer Structure in the Inn Valley during High Air Pollution (INNAP) 1 Institute sources, may be affected by air pollution since slope winds are able to transport pollutants even above project INNAP. DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSIONS In general, the three-dimensional distribution of air

  16. Marine biogenic and anthropogenic contributions to non-sea-salt sulfate in the marine boundary layer over the North Atlantic Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prospero, Joseph M.

    Experiment (AEROCE), daily aerosol samples were collected in the marine boundary layer at Barbados, West at Bermuda and Barbados, the marine nss SO4 2À /MSA mass ratios (19.6 ± 2.1 and 18.8 ± 2.2) were consistent sources dominate. Intermediate values occurred at Barbados (18,000) and Izan~a (24,000) where both

  17. Ellipsometry characterization of polycrystalline ZnO layers with the modeling of carrier concentration gradient: Effects of grain boundary, humidity, and surface texture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sago, Keisuke; Fujiwara, Hiroyuki; Kuramochi, Hideto; Iigusa, Hitoshi; Utsumi, Kentaro

    2014-04-07

    Spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) has been applied to study the effects of grain boundary, humidity, and surface texture on the carrier transport properties of Al-doped ZnO layers fabricated by dc and rf magnetron sputtering. In the SE analysis, the variation in the free carrier absorption toward the growth direction, induced by the ZnO grain growth on foreign substrates, has been modeled explicitly by adopting a multilayer model in which the optical carrier concentration (N{sub opt}) varies continuously with a constant optical mobility (?{sub opt}). The effect of the grain boundary has been studied by comparing ?{sub opt} with Hall mobility (?{sub Hall}). The change in ?{sub Hall}/?{sub opt} indicates a sharp structural transition of the ZnO polycrystalline layer at a thickness of d???500?nm, which correlates very well with the structure confirmed by transmission electron microscopy. In particular, below the transition thickness, the formation of the high density grain boundary leads to the reduction in the ?{sub Hall}/?{sub opt} ratio as well as N{sub opt}. As a result, we find that the thickness dependence of the carrier transport properties is almost completely governed by the grain boundary formation. On the other hand, when the ZnO layer is exposed to wet air at 85?°C, ?{sub Hall} reduces drastically with a minor variation of ?{sub opt} due to the enhanced grain boundary scattering. We have also characterized textured ZnO:Al layers prepared by HCl wet etching by SE. The analysis revealed that the near-surface carrier concentration increases slightly after the etching. We demonstrate that the SE technique can be applied to distinguish various rough textured structures (size???1??m) of the ZnO layers prepared by the HCl etching.

  18. Testing Cloud Microphysics Parameterizations in NCAR CAM5 with ISDAC and M-PACE Observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Xiaohong; Xie, Shaocheng; Boyle, James; Klein, Stephen A.; Shi, Xiangjun; Wang, Zhien; Lin, Wuyin; Ghan, Steven J.; Earle, Michael; Liu, Peter; Zelenyuk, Alla

    2011-12-24

    Arctic clouds simulated by the NCAR Community Atmospheric Model version 5 (CAM5) are evaluated with observations from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC) and Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (M-PACE), which were conducted at its North Slope of Alaska site in April 2008 and October 2004, respectively. Model forecasts for the Arctic Spring and Fall seasons performed under the Cloud- Associated Parameterizations Testbed (CAPT) framework generally reproduce the spatial distributions of cloud fraction for single-layer boundary layer mixed-phase stratocumulus, and multilayer or deep frontal clouds. However, for low-level clouds, the model significantly underestimates the observed cloud liquid water content in both seasons and cloud fraction in the Spring season. As a result, CAM5 significantly underestimates the surface downward longwave (LW) radiative fluxes by 20-40 W m-2. The model with a new ice nucleation parameterization moderately improves the model simulations by increasing cloud liquid water content in mixed-phase clouds through the reduction of the conversion rate from cloud liquid to ice by the Wegener-Bergeron- Findeisen (WBF) process. The CAM5 single column model testing shows that change in the homogeneous freezing temperature of rain to form snow from -5 C to -40 C has a substantial impact on the modeled liquid water content through the slowing-down of liquid and rain-related processes. In contrast, collections of cloud ice by snow and cloud liquid by rain are of minor importance for single-layer boundary layer mixed-phase clouds in the Arctic.

  19. Fig 2 -Cloud energy collect infrastructure Energy Efficient (Green) Cloud !

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lefèvre, Laurent

    Fig 2 - Cloud energy collect infrastructure Energy Efficient (Green) Cloud ! The Compatible software components Energy Monitoring of physical and virtual resources Energy usage exposing for users and clouds managers Energy monitoring streams for upper layers software Design Energy aware software

  20. The Diurnal Cycle of the Boundary Layer, Convection, Clouds, and Surface Radiation in a Coastal Monsoon Environment (Darwin, Australia)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Protat, Alain

    : A partnership between the Bureau of Meteorology and CSIRO, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia CHARLES N. LONG by monsoon rains are of great importance as such regions include major population areas around the globe. One; Keenan and Carbone 1992; Mapes and Houze 1992). The ``wet'' season across Northern Australia begins

  1. Diagnosis and testing of low-level cloud parameterizations for the NCEP/GFS model using satellite and ground-based

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zeng, Ning

    condensate water through strong turbulent diffusion and/or an improper boundary layer scheme. To circumvent in the current GFS cloud scheme, was largely underestimated due presumably to excessive removal of cloud scheme that requires inputs of atmospheric dynamic and thermody- namic variables. Much closer agreements

  2. Mars Exploration Rover (MER) Panoramic Camera (Pancam) Twilight Image Analysis for Determination of Planetary Boundary Layer and Dust Particle Size Parameters 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grounds, Stephanie Beth

    2012-02-14

    Thermal Emission Spectrometer (Mini- TES) thermal infrared spectra (Smith et al., 2006). MER-based Mini-TES spectra have been used in the determination of generalized boundary layer parameters for Martian GCMs. Mini-TES spectra were collected in both... superadiabatic layer found near the surface (Smith et al., 2006). Mini-TES observations were used to observe general timescales, duration times, and overall intensities of multiple local- and regional-scale dust storms, and upward-looking Mini-TES research can...

  3. Intercomparison of model simulations of mixed-phase clouds observed...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Intercomparison of model simulations of mixed-phase clouds observed during the ARM Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment. Part I: Single layer cloud Results are presented...

  4. XMM-NEWTON OBSERVATIONS OF THE DWARF NOVA RU Peg IN QUIESCENCE: PROBE OF THE BOUNDARY LAYER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balman, Soelen [Department of Physics, Middle East Technical University, Ankara (Turkey); Godon, Patrick; Sion, Edward M. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Villanova University, Villanova, PA 19085 (United States); Ness, Jan-Uwe [XMM-Newton Science Operations Centre, European Space Agency (ESA/ESAC), E-28691 Villanueva de la Canada, Madrid (Spain); Schlegel, Eric [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Texas at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX 78249 (United States); Barrett, Paul E. [United States Naval Observatory, Washington, DC 20392 (United States); Szkody, Paula, E-mail: solen@astroa.physics.metu.edu.tr, E-mail: patrick.godon@villanova.edu, E-mail: edward.sion@villanova.edu, E-mail: juness@sciops.esa.int, E-mail: eric.schlegel@utsa.edu, E-mail: barrett.paul@usno.navy.mil, E-mail: szkody@astro.washington.edu [Astronomy Department, University of Seattle, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States)

    2011-11-10

    We present an analysis of X-ray and UV data obtained with the XMM-Newton Observatory of the long-period dwarf nova RU Peg. RU Peg contains a massive white dwarf (WD), possibly the hottest WD in a dwarf nova (DN), it has a low inclination, thus optimally exposing its X-ray emitting boundary layer (BL), and has an excellent trigonometric parallax distance. We modeled the X-ray data using XSPEC assuming a multi-temperature plasma emission model built from the MEKAL code (i.e., CEVMKL). We obtained a maximum temperature of 31.7 keV, based on the European Photon Imaging Camera MOS1, 2 and pn data, indicating that RU Peg has an X-ray spectrum harder than most DNe, except U Gem. This result is consistent with and indirectly confirms the large mass of the WD in RU Peg. The X-ray luminosity we computed corresponds to a BL luminosity for a mass accretion rate of 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -11} M{sub sun} yr{sup -1} (assuming M{sub wd} = 1.3 M{sub sun}), in agreement with the expected quiescent accretion rate. The modeling of the O VIII emission line at 19 A as observed by the Reflection Grating Spectrometer implies a projected stellar rotational velocity v{sub rot}sin i = 695 km s{sup -1}, i.e., the line is emitted from material rotating at {approx}936-1245 km s{sup -1} (i {approx} 34 Degree-Sign -48 Degree-Sign) or about 1/6 of the Keplerian speed; this velocity is much larger than the rotation speed of the WD inferred from the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer spectrum. Cross-correletion analysis yielded an undelayed (time lag {approx} 0) component and a delayed component of 116 {+-} 17 s where the X-ray variations/fluctuations lagged the UV variations. This indicates that the UV fluctuations in the inner disk are propagated into the X-ray emitting region in about 116 s. The undelayed component may be related to irradiation effects.

  5. The chemistry of OH and HO2 radicals in the boundary layer over the tropical Atlantic Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01

    fore passing near to the Canary Islands on its way to Capepassing close to the Canary Islands before approaching CapePolarstern north of the Canary Islands. Significant boundary

  6. Contributions of the wall boundary layer to the formation of the counter-rotating vortex pair in transverse jets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schlegel, Fabrice

    Using high-resolution 3-D vortex simulations, this study seeks a mechanistic understanding of vorticity dynamics in transverse jets at a finite Reynolds number. A full no-slip boundary condition, rigorously formulated in ...

  7. Existence and stability of noncharacteristic boundary-layers for the compressible Navier-Stokes and viscous MHD equations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Métivier, Guy

    @cmi.univ-mrs.fr. Universit´e de Bordeaux; IMB; metivier@math.u-bordeaux.fr. University of North Carolina; williams spectral stability condition on layer profiles that is expressible in terms of an Evans function (uniform above, we carry out energy estimates showing that constant (and thus small-amplitude) layers always

  8. Testing cloud microphysics parameterizations in NCAR CAM5 with ISDAC and M-PACE observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu X.; Lin W.; Xie, S.; Boyle, J.; Klein, S. A.; Shi, X.; Wang, Z.; Ghan, S. J.; Earle, M.; Liu, P. S. K.; Zelenyuk, A.

    2011-12-24

    Arctic clouds simulated by the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Community Atmospheric Model version 5 (CAM5) are evaluated with observations from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC) and Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (M-PACE), which were conducted at its North Slope of Alaska site in April 2008 and October 2004, respectively. Model forecasts for the Arctic spring and fall seasons performed under the Cloud-Associated Parameterizations Testbed framework generally reproduce the spatial distributions of cloud fraction for single-layer boundary-layer mixed-phase stratocumulus and multilayer or deep frontal clouds. However, for low-level stratocumulus, the model significantly underestimates the observed cloud liquid water content in both seasons. As a result, CAM5 significantly underestimates the surface downward longwave radiative fluxes by 20-40 W m{sup -2}. Introducing a new ice nucleation parameterization slightly improves the model performance for low-level mixed-phase clouds by increasing cloud liquid water content through the reduction of the conversion rate from cloud liquid to ice by the Wegener-Bergeron-Findeisen process. The CAM5 single-column model testing shows that changing the instantaneous freezing temperature of rain to form snow from -5 C to -40 C causes a large increase in modeled cloud liquid water content through the slowing down of cloud liquid and rain-related processes (e.g., autoconversion of cloud liquid to rain). The underestimation of aerosol concentrations in CAM5 in the Arctic also plays an important role in the low bias of cloud liquid water in the single-layer mixed-phase clouds. In addition, numerical issues related to the coupling of model physics and time stepping in CAM5 are responsible for the model biases and will be explored in future studies.

  9. On Techniques to Characterize and Correlate Grain Size, Grain Boundary Orientation and the Strength of the SiC Layer of TRISO Coated Particles: A Preliminary Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    I.J.van Rooyen; J.L. Dunzik Gougar; T. Trowbridge; Philip M van Rooyen

    2012-10-01

    The mechanical properties of the silicon carbide (SiC) layer of the TRi-ISOtropic (TRISO) coated particle (CP) for high temperature gas reactors (HTGR) are performance parameters that have not yet been standardized by the international HTR community. Presented in this paper are the results of characterizing coated particles to reveal the effect of annealing temperature (1000 to 2100°C) on the strength and grain size of unirradiated coated particles. This work was further expanded to include possible relationships between the grain size and strength values. The comparative results of two strength measurement techniques and grain size measured by the Lineal intercept method are included. Preliminary grain boundary characterization results determined by electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) are included. These results are also important for future fission product transport studies, as grain boundary diffusion is identified as a possible mechanism by which 110mAg, one of the fission activation products, might be released through intact SiC layers. Temperature is a parameter known to influence the grain size of SiC and therefore it is important to investigate the effect of high temperature annealing on the SiC grain size. Recommendations and future work will also be briefly discussed.

  10. Boundary-Layer Meteorol (2009) 132:129149 DOI 10.1007/s10546-009-9380-8

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Porté-Agel, Fernando

    2009-01-01

    is related to the power loss from the wind turbine; and (b) the turbulence levels, which may affect flow velocity deficit is essential to optimizing the design (turbine siting) of wind farms. UBoundary-Layer Meteorol (2009) 132:129­149 DOI 10.1007/s10546-009-9380-8 ARTICLE A Wind

  11. The dissipation of trapped lee waves. Part II: The relative importance of the1 boundary layer and the stratosphere2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frierson, Dargan

    , including the roughness of the un-36 derlying surface, the efficiency with which wave energy can leak upward studied in isolation, their relative impor- tance has not been previously assessed. Here we conduct waves in the two-layer case do not leak much energy upwards is that the resonant wavelength is greatly

  12. The dissipation of trapped lee waves. Part II: The relative importance of the1 boundary layer and the stratosphere2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blossey, Peter

    , including the roughness of the un-35 derlying surface, the efficiency with which wave energy can leak upward each of these decay mechanisms has been studied in isolation, their relative impor- tance has not been that trapped waves in the two-layer case do not leak much energy upwards is that the resonant wavelength

  13. Interface boundary conditions for dynamic magnetization and spin wave dynamics in a ferromagnetic layer with the interface Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kostylev, M.

    2014-06-21

    In this work, we derive the interface exchange boundary conditions for the classical linear dynamics of magnetization in ferromagnetic layers with the interface Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction (IDMI). We show that IDMI leads to pinning of dynamic magnetization at the interface. An unusual peculiarity of the IDMI-based pinning is that its scales as the spin-wave wave number. We incorporate these boundary conditions into an existing numerical model for the dynamics of the Damon-Eshbach spin wave in ferromagnetic films. IDMI affects the dispersion and the frequency non-reciprocity of the travelling Damon-Eshbach spin wave. For a broad range of film thicknesses L and wave numbers, the results of the numerical simulations of the spin wave dispersion are in a good agreement with a simple analytical expression, which shows that the contribution of IDMI to the dispersion scales as 1/L, similarly to the effect of other types of interfacial anisotropy. Suggestions to experimentalists how to detect the presence of IDMI in a spin wave experiment are given.

  14. Investigation of warm-cloud microphysics using a multi-component cloud model: Interactive effects of the aerosol spectrum. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zahn, S.G.

    1993-12-01

    Clouds, especially low, warm, boundary-layer clouds, play an important role in regulating the earth's climate due to their significant contribution to the global albedo. The radiative effects of individual clouds are controlled largely by cloud microstructure, which is itself sensitive to the concentration and spectral distribution of the atmospheric aerosol. Increases in aerosol particle concentrations from anthropogenic activity could result in increased cloud albedo and global cloudiness, increasing the amount of reflected solar radiation. However, the effects of increased aerosol particle concentrations could be offset by the presence of giant or ultragiant aerosol particles. A one-dimensional, multi-component microphysical cloud model has been used to demonstrate the effects of aerosol particle spectral variations on the microstructure of warm clouds. Simulations performed with this model demonstrate that the introduction of increased concentrations of giant aerosol particles has a destabilizing effect on the cloud microstructure. Also, it is shown that warm-cloud microphysical processes modify the aerosol particle spectrum, favoring the generation of the largest sized particles via the collision-coalescence process. These simulations provide further evidence that the effect of aerosol particles on cloud microstructure must be addressed when considering global climate forecasts.

  15. CGILS: Results from the First Phase of an International Project to Understand the Physical Mechanisms of Low Cloud Feedbacks in Single Column Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Minghua; Bretherton, Christopher S.; Blossey, Peter; Austin, Phillip A.; Bacmeister, J.; Bony, Sandrine; Brient, Florent; Cheedela, Suvarchal K.; Cheng, Anning; Del Genio, Anthony D.; De Roode, Stephan R.; Endo , Satoshi; Franklin, Charmaine N.; Golaz, Jean-Christophe; Hannay, Cecile; Heus, Thijs; Isotta, Francesco A.; Jean-Louis, Dufresne; Kang, In-Sik; Kawai, Hideaki; Koehler, M.; Larson, Vincent E.; Liu, Yangang; Lock, Adrian; Lohmann, U.; Khairoutdinov, Marat; Molod, Andrea M.; Neggers, Roel; Rasch, Philip J.; Sandu, Irina; Senkbeil, Ryan; Siebesma, A. P.; Siegenthaler-Le Drian, Colombe; Stevens, Bjorn; Suarez, Max; Xu, Kuan-Man; Von Salzen, Knut; Webb, Mark; Wolf, Audrey; Zhao, M.

    2013-12-26

    Large Eddy Models (LES) and Single Column Models (SCM) are used in a surrogate climate change 101 to investigate the physical mechanism of low cloud feedbacks in climate models. Enhanced surface-102 driven boundary layer turbulence and shallow convection in a warmer climate are found to be 103 dominant mechanisms in SCMs.

  16. Boundary layer methods in Biomecanics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lagrée, Pierre-Yves

    x u+v r u = - p x + 2 x2 u+ rr r u rX v t +u x v+v r v = - p r + 2 x2 v+ rr r v r X RNS/P #12;u = - p r + 2 x2 v+ rr r v r X XXXX RNS/P #12;RNS/P u x + rv rr = 0 X u t +u x u+v r u = - p x + rr r u r 0 = - p r #12;RNS/P u x + rv rr = 0 X u t +u x u+v r u = - p x + rr r u r 0 = - p r 1 R2 #12

  17. Polluting of Winter Convective Clouds upon Transition from Ocean Inland Over Central California: Contrasting Case Studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosenfeld, Daniel; Chemke, Rei; Prather, Kimberly; Suski, Kaitlyn; Comstock, Jennifer M.; Schmid, Beat; Tomlinson, Jason M.; Jonsson, Haf

    2014-01-01

    In-situ aircraft measurements of aerosol chemical and cloud microphysical properties were conducted during the CalWater campaign in February and March 2011 over the Sierra Nevada Mountains and the coastal waters of central California. The main objective was to elucidate the impacts of aerosol properties on clouds and precipitation forming processes. In order to accomplish this, we compared contrasting cases of clouds that ingested aerosols from different sources. The results showed that clouds containing pristine oceanic air had low cloud drop concentrations and started to develop rain 500 m above their base. This occurred both over the ocean and over the Sierra Nevada, mainly in the early morning when the radiatively cooled stable continental boundary layer was decoupled from the cloud base. Supercooled rain dominated the precipitation that formed in growing convective clouds in the pristine air, up to the -21°C isotherm level. A contrasting situation was documented in the afternoon over the foothills of the Sierra Nevada, when the clouds ingested high pollution aerosol concentrations produced in the Central Valley. This led to slow growth of the cloud drop effective radius with height and suppressed and even prevented the initiation of warm rain while contributing to the development of ice hydrometeors in the form of graupel. Our results show that cloud condensation and ice nuclei were the limiting factors that controlled warm rain and ice processes, respectively, while the unpolluted clouds in the same air mass produced precipitation quite efficiently. These findings provide the motivation for deeper investigations into the nature of the aerosols seeding clouds.

  18. Evaluating Global Aerosol Models and Aerosol and Water Vapor Properties Near Clouds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turner, David, D.; Ferrare, Richard, A.

    2011-07-06

    The 'Evaluating Global Aerosol Models and Aerosol and Water Vapor Properties Near Clouds' project focused extensively on the analysis and utilization of water vapor and aerosol profiles derived from the ARM Raman lidar at the Southern Great Plains ARM site. A wide range of different tasks were performed during this project, all of which improved quality of the data products derived from the lidar or advanced the understanding of atmospheric processes over the site. These activities included: upgrading the Raman lidar to improve its sensitivity; participating in field experiments to validate the lidar aerosol and water vapor retrievals; using the lidar aerosol profiles to evaluate the accuracy of the vertical distribution of aerosols in global aerosol model simulations; examining the correlation between relative humidity and aerosol extinction, and how these change, due to horizontal distance away from cumulus clouds; inferring boundary layer turbulence structure in convective boundary layers from the high-time-resolution lidar water vapor measurements; retrieving cumulus entrainment rates in boundary layer cumulus clouds; and participating in a field experiment that provided data to help validate both the entrainment rate retrievals and the turbulent profiles derived from lidar observations.

  19. Measurement of Boundary-Layer Temperature Profiles by a Scanning 5-MM Radiometer During the 1999 Winter NSA/AAO Radiometer Exp

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shines light on dark matter By SarahMODELING CLOUD1 H( 7 Be, 8Measurement

  20. New insights to cloud seeding for enhancing precipitation and hail suppression

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel, Rosenfeld

    that seeding of thin super-cooled layer clouds could glaciate the cloud and so create light snow. This has been (Rosenfeld, 2000) particulate air pollution. We "seed" the clouds negatively by pollution aerosols on a much

  1. Preface: Crowds and Clouds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-01-01

    crowdsourcing, cloud computing, big data, and Internetdata include “cloud computing,” “algorithms,” “filters,” “cloud of claims about cloud computing and big data settle

  2. Methane on Uranus: The case for a compact CH4 cloud layer at low latitudes and a severe CH4 depletion at high-latitudes based on re-analysis of Voyager occultation measurements and STIS spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sromovsky, Lawrence; Kim, Joo Hyeon

    2015-01-01

    Lindal et al. (1987, J. Geophys. Res. 92, 14987-15001) presented a range of temperature and CH4 profiles for Uranus that were consistent with 1986 Voyager radio occultation measurements. A localized refractivity slope variation near 1.2 bars was interpreted to be the result of a condensed CH4 cloud layer. However, models fit to near-IR spectra found particle concentrations in the 1.5-3 bar range (Sromovsky et al. 2006, Icarus 182, 577-593, Sromovsky and Fry 2008, Icarus 193, 211-229, Irwin et al. 2010, Icarus 208, 913-926), and a recent analysis of STIS spectra argued that aerosol particles formed diffusely distributed hazes, with no compact condensation layer (Karkoschka and Tomasko 2009, Icarus 202, 287-309). Trying to reconcile these results, we reanalyzed the occultation observations with a He volume mixing ratio reduced from 0.15 to 0.116, which is near the edge of the 0.033 range given by Conrath et al. (1987, J. Geophys. Res., 15003-10). This allowed us to obtain saturated CH4 mixing ratios within the ...

  3. Three Different Behaviors of Liquid Water Path of Water Clouds in Aerosol-Cloud Interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Han, Quingyuan

    third of the cases, a minus one third (-1/3) power law relation between effective droplet radius droplet size and enhance evaporation just below cloud base, which decouples the cloud from the boundary explanation for the observed decrease of the diurnal temperature cycle (Hansen et al., 1997). Significant

  4. Cloud Property Retrieval Products for Graciosa Island, Azores

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Dong, Xiquan

    2014-05-05

    The motivation for developing this product was to use the Dong et al. 1998 method to retrieve cloud microphysical properties, such as cloud droplet effective radius, cloud droplets number concentration, and optical thickness. These retrieved properties have been used to validate the satellite retrieval, and evaluate the climate simulations and reanalyses. We had been using this method to retrieve cloud microphysical properties over ARM SGP and NSA sites. We also modified the method for the AMF at Shouxian, China and some IOPs, e.g. ARM IOP at SGP in March, 2000. The ARSCL data from ARM data archive over the SGP and NSA have been used to determine the cloud boundary and cloud phase. For these ARM permanent sites, the ARSCL data was developed based on MMCR measurements, however, there were no data available at the Azores field campaign. We followed the steps to generate this derived product and also include the MPLCMASK cloud retrievals to determine the most accurate cloud boundaries, including the thin cirrus clouds that WACR may under-detect. We use these as input to retrieve the cloud microphysical properties. Due to the different temporal resolutions of the derived cloud boundary heights product and the cloud properties product, we submit them as two separate netcdf files.

  5. Cloud Property Retrieval Products for Graciosa Island, Azores

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Dong, Xiquan

    The motivation for developing this product was to use the Dong et al. 1998 method to retrieve cloud microphysical properties, such as cloud droplet effective radius, cloud droplets number concentration, and optical thickness. These retrieved properties have been used to validate the satellite retrieval, and evaluate the climate simulations and reanalyses. We had been using this method to retrieve cloud microphysical properties over ARM SGP and NSA sites. We also modified the method for the AMF at Shouxian, China and some IOPs, e.g. ARM IOP at SGP in March, 2000. The ARSCL data from ARM data archive over the SGP and NSA have been used to determine the cloud boundary and cloud phase. For these ARM permanent sites, the ARSCL data was developed based on MMCR measurements, however, there were no data available at the Azores field campaign. We followed the steps to generate this derived product and also include the MPLCMASK cloud retrievals to determine the most accurate cloud boundaries, including the thin cirrus clouds that WACR may under-detect. We use these as input to retrieve the cloud microphysical properties. Due to the different temporal resolutions of the derived cloud boundary heights product and the cloud properties product, we submit them as two separate netcdf files.

  6. Evaluation of convection-permitting model simulations of cloud populations associated with the Madden-Julian Oscillation using data collected during the AMIE/DYNAMO field campaign

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hagos, Samson M.; Feng, Zhe; Burleyson, Casey D.; Lim, Kyo-Sun; Long, Charles N.; Wu, Di; Thompson, Gregory

    2014-11-12

    Regional cloud permitting model simulations of cloud populations observed during the 2011 ARM Madden Julian Oscillation Investigation Experiment/ Dynamics of Madden-Julian Experiment (AMIE/DYNAMO) field campaign are evaluated against radar and ship-based measurements. Sensitivity of model simulated surface rain rate statistics to parameters and parameterization of hydrometeor sizes in five commonly used WRF microphysics schemes are examined. It is shown that at 2 km grid spacing, the model generally overestimates rain rate from large and deep convective cores. Sensitivity runs involving variation of parameters that affect rain drop or ice particle size distribution (more aggressive break-up process etc) generally reduce the bias in rain-rate and boundary layer temperature statistics as the smaller particles become more vulnerable to evaporation. Furthermore significant improvement in the convective rain-rate statistics is observed when the horizontal grid-spacing is reduced to 1 km and 0.5 km, while it is worsened when run at 4 km grid spacing as increased turbulence enhances evaporation. The results suggest modulation of evaporation processes, through parameterization of turbulent mixing and break-up of hydrometeors may provide a potential avenue for correcting cloud statistics and associated boundary layer temperature biases in regional and global cloud permitting model simulations.

  7. A Secure Cloud Backup System with Assured Deletion and Version Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lui, John C.S.

    A Secure Cloud Backup System with Assured Deletion and Version Control Arthur Rahumed, Henry C. H at a low cost. However, cloud clients must enforce security guarantees of their outsourced data backups. We present FadeVersion, a secure cloud backup system that serves as a security layer on top of today's cloud

  8. GEOGRAPHY 104: BOUNDARY LAYER CLIMATES Assignment #2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    at equinox at the two different locations given below for the local apparent times 6:00 a.m., 9:00a.m., 12

  9. Boundary Layer Analysis of Membraneless Electrochemical Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Braff, William

    A mathematical theory is presented for the charging and discharging behavior of membraneless electrochemical cells that rely on slow diffusion in laminar flow to separate the half reactions. Ion transport is described by ...

  10. Boundary layer flows in large vessels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lagrée, Pierre-Yves

    x u+v r u = - p x + 2 x2 u+ rr r u rX v t +u x v+v r v = - p r + 2 x2 v+ rr r v r X RNS/P #12;u = - p r + 2 x2 v+ rr r v r X XXXX RNS/P #12;RNS/P u x + rv rr = 0 X u t +u x u+v r u = - p x + rr r u r 0 = - p r #12;RNS/P u x + rv rr = 0 X u t +u x u+v r u = - p x + rr r u r 0 = - p r 1 R2 #12

  11. ARM - Measurement - Planetary boundary layer height

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Comments?govInstrumentsnoaacrnBarrow, Alaska Outreach Home Roomparticlecontentnumber concentration

  12. Boundary Layer Lubrication Mechanisms | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum Based Fuels Researchof Energy|Make6,Energy1 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells

  13. Boundary Layer Lubrication Mechanisms | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum Based Fuels Researchof Energy|Make6,Energy1 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells0

  14. Boundary Layer Lubrication | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum Based Fuels Researchof Energy|Make6,Energy1 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel

  15. Dispelling Clouds of Uncertainty

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lewis, Ernie; Teixeira, João

    2015-06-15

    How do you build a climate model that accounts for cloud physics and the transitions between cloud regimes? Use MAGIC.

  16. Cloud Computing Adam Barker

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    St Andrews, University of

    Cloud Computing 1 Adam Barker #12;Overview · Introduction to Cloud computing · Enabling technologies · Di erent types of cloud: IaaS, PaaS and SaaS · Cloud terminology · Interacting with a cloud: management consoles · Launching an instance · Connecting to an instance · Running your application · Clouds

  17. Layered Atlantic Smoke Interactions with Clouds

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverseIMPACTThousand CubicResourcelogo and- EnergyNews

  18. Tropical and subtropical cloud transitions in weather and climate prediction models: the GCSS/WGNE Pacific Cross-Section Intercomparison (GPCI)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Teixeira, J.; Cardoso, S.; Bonazzola, M.; Cole, Jason N.; DelGenio, Anthony D.; DeMott, C.; Franklin, A.; Hannay, Cecile; Jakob, Christian; Jiao, Y.; Karlsson, J.; Kitagawa, H.; Koehler, M.; Kuwano-Yoshida, A.; LeDrian, C.; Lock, Adrian; Miller, M.; Marquet, P.; Martins, J.; Mechoso, C. R.; Meijgaard, E. V.; Meinke, I.; Miranda, P.; Mironov, D.; Neggers, Roel; Pan, H. L.; Randall, David A.; Rasch, Philip J.; Rockel, B.; Rossow, William B.; Ritter, B.; Siebesma, A. P.; Soares, P.; Turk, F. J.; Vaillancourt, P.; Von Engeln, A.; Zhao, M.

    2011-11-01

    A model evaluation approach is proposed where weather and climate prediction models are analyzed along a Pacific Ocean cross-section, from the stratocumulus regions off the coast of California, across the shallow convection dominated trade-winds, to the deep convection regions of the ITCZ: the GCSS/WGNE Pacific Cross-section Intercomparison (GPCI). The main goal of GPCI is to evaluate, and help understand and improve the representation of tropical and sub-tropical cloud processes in weather and climate prediction models. In this paper, a detailed analysis of cloud regime transitions along the cross-section from the sub-tropics to the tropics for the season JJA of 1998 is presented. This GPCI study confirms many of the typical weather and climate prediction model problems in the representation of clouds: underestimation of clouds in the stratocumulus regime by most models with the corresponding consequences in terms of shortwave radiation biases; overestimation of clouds by the ECMWF Re-Analysis (ERA40) in the deep tropics (in particular) with the corresponding impact in the outgoing longwave radiation; large spread between the different models in terms of cloud cover, liquid water path and shortwave radiation; significant differences between the models in terms of vertical crosssections of cloud properties (in particular), vertical velocity and relative humidity. An alternative analysis of cloud cover mean statistics is proposed where sharp gradients in cloud cover along the GPCI transect are taken into account. This analysis shows that the negative cloud bias of some models and ERA40 in the stratocumulus regions (as compared to ISCCP) is associated not only with lower values of cloud cover in these regimes, but also with a stratocumulus-to-cumulus transition that occurs too early along the trade-wind Lagrangian trajectory. Histograms of cloud cover along the cross-section differ significantly between models. Some models exhibit a quasi-bimodal structure with cloud cover being either very large (close to 100%) or very small, while other models show a more continuous transition. The ISCCP observations suggest that reality is in-between these two extreme examples. These different patterns reflect the diverse nature of the cloud, boundary layer, and convection parameterizations in the participating weather and climate prediction models.

  19. Cloud Tracking in Cloud-Resolving Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plant, Robert

    Cloud Tracking in Cloud-Resolving Models RMetS Conference 4th September 2007 Bob Plant Department of Meteorology, University of Reading, UK #12;Introduction Obtain life cycle statistics for clouds in CRM simulations What is the distribution of cloud lifetimes? What factors determine the lifetime of an individual

  20. Distributed Boundary Estimation using Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramamritham, Krithi

    where such boundaries need to be detected include monitoring the spread of toxic gases [1], oil spills in oceans [2], or even tracking storm cloud front. Oil companies are interested in deploying off-shore sensor networks to monitor the area where oil spills normally happen. The focus in these cases

  1. Cloud and Autonomic Computing Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gelfond, Michael

    boundary layers and wind turbine aerodynamics Siva Parameswarn, Ph.D. Professor in the Department vehicles » Wake development behind wind turbines PHYSICS Ismael Regis de Farias Jr., Ph.D. Associate of Mechanical Engineering Areas of expertise » Modeling HF oscillatory ventilators » Aerodynamics of ground

  2. Toward Securing Sensor Clouds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Router Cloud Computing Cloud Computing Cloud Computing Tower-mount Antenna Tower-mount Antenna Wireless-Features-1GHz-Tegra-2-HigherRes-Screen/ #12;Router Router Router Router Mini Computer Mini Computer Mini Computer Mini Computer External Storage External Storage Router Router Router Router Cloud Computing Cloud

  3. Photolysis rates in correlated overlapping cloud fields: Cloud-J 7.3c

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Prather, M. J.

    2015-08-14

    A new approach for modeling photolysis rates (J values) in atmospheres with fractional cloud cover has been developed and is implemented as Cloud-J – a multi-scattering eight-stream radiative transfer model for solar radiation based on Fast-J. Using observations of the vertical correlation of cloud layers, Cloud-J 7.3c provides a practical and accurate method for modeling atmospheric chemistry. The combination of the new maximum-correlated cloud groups with the integration over all cloud combinations by four quadrature atmospheres produces mean J values in an atmospheric column with root mean square (rms) errors of 4 % or less compared with 10–20 % errorsmore »using simpler approximations. Cloud-J is practical for chemistry–climate models, requiring only an average of 2.8 Fast-J calls per atmosphere vs. hundreds of calls with the correlated cloud groups, or 1 call with the simplest cloud approximations. Another improvement in modeling J values, the treatment of volatile organic compounds with pressure-dependent cross sections, is also incorporated into Cloud-J.« less

  4. Photolysis rates in correlated overlapping cloud fields: Cloud-J 7.3

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Prather, M. J.

    2015-05-27

    A new approach for modeling photolysis rates (J values) in atmospheres with fractional cloud cover has been developed and implemented as Cloud-J – a multi-scattering eight-stream radiative transfer model for solar radiation based on Fast-J. Using observed statistics for the vertical correlation of cloud layers, Cloud-J 7.3 provides a practical and accurate method for modeling atmospheric chemistry. The combination of the new maximum-correlated cloud groups with the integration over all cloud combinations represented by four quadrature atmospheres produces mean J values in an atmospheric column with root-mean-square errors of 4% or less compared with 10–20% errors using simpler approximations. Cloud-Jmore »is practical for chemistry-climate models, requiring only an average of 2.8 Fast-J calls per atmosphere, vs. hundreds of calls with the correlated cloud groups, or 1 call with the simplest cloud approximations. Another improvement in modeling J values, the treatment of volatile organic compounds with pressure-dependent cross sections is also incorporated into Cloud-J.« less

  5. GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL. 28, NO. 13, PAGES 2609-2612, JULY 1, 2001 The death of an altocumulus cloud

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of an altocumulus cloud Vincent E. Larson Atmospheric Science Group, Department of Mathematical Sciences, University altocumulus clouds to decay? To address this question, the authors examine an observational case study of a mid-level cloud that was measured during the Complex Layered Cloud Experiments (CLEX). The budget

  6. Ad hoc cloud computing 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGilvary, Gary Andrew

    2014-11-27

    Commercial and private cloud providers offer virtualized resources via a set of co-located and dedicated hosts that are exclusively reserved for the purpose of offering a cloud service. While both cloud models appeal to ...

  7. The Structure of the Local Interstellar Medium IV: Dynamics, Morphology, Physical Properties, and Implications of Cloud-Cloud Interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seth Redfield; Jeffrey L. Linsky

    2007-09-27

    We present an empirical dynamical model of the local interstellar medium based on 270 radial-velocity measurements for 157 sight lines toward nearby stars. Physical-parameter measurements (i.e., temperature, turbulent velocity, depletions) are available for 90 components, or one-third of the sample, enabling initial characterizations of the physical properties of LISM clouds. The model includes 15 warm clouds located within 15 pc of the Sun, each with a different velocity vector. We derive projected morphologies of all clouds and estimate the volume filling factor of warm partially ionized material in the LISM to be between ~5.5% and 19%. Relative velocities of potentially interacting clouds are often supersonic, consistent with heating, turbulent, and metal-depletion properties. Cloud-cloud collisions may be responsible for the filamentary morphologies found in ~1/3 of LISM clouds, the distribution of clouds along the boundaries of the two nearest clouds (LIC and G), the detailed shape and heating of the Mic Cloud, the location of nearby radio scintillation screens, and the location of a LISM cold cloud. Contrary to previous claims, the Sun appears to be located in the transition zone between the LIC and G Clouds.

  8. CloudTransport: Using Cloud Storage for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Houmansadr, Amir

    users' network traffic by tunneling it through a cloud storage ser- vice such as Amazon S3. The goal the bridge or identify other connections. CloudTransport can be used as a standalone service, a gateway

  9. On Demand Surveillance Service in Vehicular Cloud

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weng, Jui-Ting

    2013-01-01

    Toward Vehicular Service Cloud . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4.2 Open Mobile Cloud Requirement . . . . .3.1 Mobile Cloud

  10. The GCM Oriented Calipso Cloud Product (CALIPSO-GOCCP) H. Chepfer(1)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dufresne, Jean-Louis

    ;2 Abstract. This paper presents the GCM-Oriented Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) Cloud Product (CALIPSO-GOCCP) designed to evaluate the cloudiness simulated by General the effects of viewing geometry, sensors' sensitivity and vertical overlap of cloud layers. For this purpose

  11. AN ARSCL-BASED CLOUD TYPE CLIMATOLOGY FROM RETRIEVALS AND IT'S USE IN MODEL EVALUATION STUDIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    AN ARSCL-BASED CLOUD TYPE CLIMATOLOGY FROM RETRIEVALS AND IT'S USE IN MODEL EVALUATION STUDIES Laboratory P.O. Box, Upton, NY www.bnl.gov ABSTRACT A climatology of cloud types is developed using long in tandem with satellite observations for model cloud layering and property evaluation. Therefore, satellite

  12. On Demand Surveillance Service in Vehicular Cloud

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weng, Jui-Ting

    2013-01-01

    1.2 Cloud computing to Vehicular CloudM. Gerla. Vehicular Cloud Computing, VCA 2012 Proceedings,single vehicle cannot. Cloud computing to Vehicular Cloud

  13. Cloud Security by Max Garvey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tolmach, Andrew

    Cloud Security Survey by Max Garvey #12;Cloudy Cloud is Cloudy What is the cloud? On Demand Service, performance SECaaS - Cloud hosted security measures Certifications - measurements for cloud security. #12;Cloud Questions If you have $0 security budget, could cloud be a security improvement? Who owns the data

  14. ARM Cloud Retrieval Ensemble Data Set (ACRED)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao, C; Xie, S; Klein, SA; McCoy, R; Comstock, JM; Delanoë, J; Deng, M; Dunn, M; Hogan, RJ; Jensen, MP; Mace, GG; McFarlane, SA; O’Connor, EJ; Protat, A; Shupe, MD; Turner, D; Wang, Z

    2011-09-12

    This document describes a new Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) data set, the ARM Cloud Retrieval Ensemble Data Set (ACRED), which is created by assembling nine existing ground-based cloud retrievals of ARM measurements from different cloud retrieval algorithms. The current version of ACRED includes an hourly average of nine ground-based retrievals with vertical resolution of 45 m for 512 layers. The techniques used for the nine cloud retrievals are briefly described in this document. This document also outlines the ACRED data availability, variables, and the nine retrieval products. Technical details about the generation of ACRED, such as the methods used for time average and vertical re-grid, are also provided.

  15. Program Analyses for Cloud Computations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tetali, Sai Deep

    2015-01-01

    search. ” In CCSW 09: Cloud Computing Security Workshop, pp.ACM workshop on Cloud computing security workshop, CCSW ’11,aspects of cloud computing, including security, performance

  16. Finite element analysis of shells with layers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hiller, Jean-François, 1974-

    2002-01-01

    It is well established that thin shell structures frequently feature narrow bands of strain concentration and localized displacement irregularities referred to as boundary and internal layers. It is crucial to capture these ...

  17. Development of Cloud Microphysical Property Retrievals Using the University of Wisconsin Arctic High Spectral Resolution Lidar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eloranta, Edwin W.

    .6 2.8 1/(m str) 1e-14 1e-13 1e-12 1e-11 1e-10 1e-9 1e-8 1e-7 October 9,2004 Time (UT) Altitude:50 21:55 22:00 22:05 22:10 22:15 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.8 1.0 1.2 1.4 1.6 1.8 1/(m str) 1e-14 1e-13 1e-12 1e-11 1- eterization and Modeling Workgroup to increase our ability to simu- late mixed-phase boundary layer clouds

  18. PC Windows Adobe Creative Cloud PC Windows Adobe Creative Cloud

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PC Windows Adobe Creative Cloud 1 PC Windows Adobe Creative Cloud 2015-05-25 1 Web Windows Adobe Creative Cloud PC | Creative Cloud https://helpx.adobe.com/jp/creative-cloud Adobe Creative Cloud 5.1 Web TTInstaller(Windows )() http://www.officesoft.gsic.titech.ac

  19. ESTABLISHMENT OF CLOUD REGIMES FOR SYSTEMATIC EVALUATION OF CLOUD MODELING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ESTABLISHMENT OF CLOUD REGIMES FOR SYSTEMATIC EVALUATION OF CLOUD MODELING Wuyin Lin1 , Yangang Liu Distinct cloud regimes can exist locally and globally. Such cloud regimes usually have close association, the classification of cloud regimes may be based on cloud properties and/or meteorological conditions. This study

  20. Towards Elastic Transactional Cloud Storage with Range Query Support

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ooi, Beng Chin

    storage that can elastically scale on- demand with minimal startup cost. In this paper, we propose ecStore ­ an elastic cloud storage sys- tem that supports automated data partitioning and replication, load balancing with a replication layer in the middle and a transaction management layer on top. ecStore pro- vides adaptive read

  1. Diagnosis of the Marine Low Cloud Simulation in the NCAR Community Earth System Model (CESM) and the NCEP Global Forecast System (GFS)-Modular Ocean Model v4 (MOM4) coupled model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xiao, Heng; Mechoso, C. R.; Sun, Rui; Han, J.; Pan, H. L.; Park, S.; Hannay, Cecile; Bretherton, Christopher S.; Teixeira, J.

    2014-07-25

    We present a diagnostic analysis of the marine low cloud climatology simulated by two state-of-the-art coupled atmosphere-ocean models: the NCAR Community Earth System Model (CESM) and the NCEP Global Forecasting System (GFS). In both models, the shallow convection and boundary layer turbulence parameterizations have been recently updated: both models now use a mass-flux scheme for the parameterization of shallow convection, and a turbulence parameterization capable of handling Stratocumulus (Sc)-topped Planetary Boundary Layers (PBLs). For shallow convection, both models employ a convective trigger function based on the concept of convective inhibition and both include explicit convective overshooting/penetrative entrainment formulation. For Sc-topped PBL, both models treat explicitly turbulence mixing and cloud-top entrainment driven by cloud-top radiative cooling. Our focus is on the climatological transition from Sc to shallow Cumulus (Cu)-topped PBL in the subtropical eastern oceans. We show that in the CESM the coastal Sc-topped PBLs in the subtropical Eastern Pacific are well-simulated but the climatological transition from Sc to shallow Cu is too abrupt and happens too close to the coast. By contrast, in the GFS coupled simulation the coastal Sc amount and PBL depth are severely underestimated while the transition from Sc to shallow Cu is ³delayed² and offshore Sc cover is too extensive in the subtropical Eastern Pacific. We discuss the possible connections between such differences in the simulations and differences in the parameterizations of shallow convection and boundary layer turbulence in the two models.

  2. Hyperscale Cloud Technical White Paper

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chaudhuri, Surajit

    Hyperscale Cloud Technical White Paper Published: May 2015 Applies to: SQL Server 2016 CTP2, SQL in the cloud with greater scale and flexibility. Microsoft SQL Server is built for cloud integration--your organization can easily deploy SQL Server in a private cloud, hybrid cloud, or public cloud, and can use

  3. XSEDE Cloud Survey Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Tsuhan

    XSEDE Cloud Survey Report David Lifka, Cornell Center for Advanced Computing Ian Foster, ANL, ANL and The University of Chicago A National Science Foundation-sponsored cloud user survey was conducted from September 2012 to April 2013 by the XSEDE Cloud Integration Investigation Team to better

  4. Research Cloud Computing Recommendations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qian, Ning

    Research Cloud Computing Recommendations SRCPAC December 3, 2014 #12;Mandate and Membership SRCPAC convened this committee in Sept 2014 to investigate the role that cloud computing should play in our & Academic Affairs (Social Work) #12;Questions discussed · What cloud resources are available? · Which kinds

  5. How do A-train Sensors Intercompare in the Retrieval of Above-Cloud Aerosol Optical Depth? A Case Study-based Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jethva, H. T.; Torres, O.; Waquet, F.; Chand, Duli; Hu, Yong X.

    2014-01-16

    We inter-compare the above-cloud aerosol optical depth (ACAOD) of biomass burning plumes retrieved from different A-train sensors, i.e., MODIS, CALIOP, POLDER, and OMI. These sensors have shown independent capabilities to detect and retrieve aerosol loading above marine boundary layer clouds--a kind of situation often found over the Southeast Atlantic Ocean during dry burning season. A systematic one-to-one comparison reveals that, in general, all passive sensors and CALIOP-based research methods derive comparable ACAOD with differences mostly within 0.2 over homogeneous cloud fields. The 532-nm ACAOD retrieved by CALIOP operational algorithm is largely underestimated; however, it’s 1064-nm AOD when converted to 500 nm shows closer agreement to the passive sensors. Given the different types of sensor measurements processed with different algorithms, the close agreement between them is encouraging. Due to lack of adequate direct measurements above cloud, the validation of satellite-based ACAOD retrievals remains an open challenge. The inter-satellite comparison, however, can be useful for the relative evaluation and consistency check.

  6. Cloud Properties and Radiative Heating Rates for TWP

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Comstock, Jennifer

    2013-11-07

    A cloud properties and radiative heating rates dataset is presented where cloud properties retrieved using lidar and radar observations are input into a radiative transfer model to compute radiative fluxes and heating rates at three ARM sites located in the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) region. The cloud properties retrieval is a conditional retrieval that applies various retrieval techniques depending on the available data, that is if lidar, radar or both instruments detect cloud. This Combined Remote Sensor Retrieval Algorithm (CombRet) produces vertical profiles of liquid or ice water content (LWC or IWC), droplet effective radius (re), ice crystal generalized effective size (Dge), cloud phase, and cloud boundaries. The algorithm was compared with 3 other independent algorithms to help estimate the uncertainty in the cloud properties, fluxes, and heating rates (Comstock et al. 2013). The dataset is provided at 2 min temporal and 90 m vertical resolution. The current dataset is applied to time periods when the MMCR (Millimeter Cloud Radar) version of the ARSCL (Active Remotely-Sensed Cloud Locations) Value Added Product (VAP) is available. The MERGESONDE VAP is utilized where temperature and humidity profiles are required. Future additions to this dataset will utilize the new KAZR instrument and its associated VAPs.

  7. Cloud Properties and Radiative Heating Rates for TWP

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Comstock, Jennifer

    A cloud properties and radiative heating rates dataset is presented where cloud properties retrieved using lidar and radar observations are input into a radiative transfer model to compute radiative fluxes and heating rates at three ARM sites located in the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) region. The cloud properties retrieval is a conditional retrieval that applies various retrieval techniques depending on the available data, that is if lidar, radar or both instruments detect cloud. This Combined Remote Sensor Retrieval Algorithm (CombRet) produces vertical profiles of liquid or ice water content (LWC or IWC), droplet effective radius (re), ice crystal generalized effective size (Dge), cloud phase, and cloud boundaries. The algorithm was compared with 3 other independent algorithms to help estimate the uncertainty in the cloud properties, fluxes, and heating rates (Comstock et al. 2013). The dataset is provided at 2 min temporal and 90 m vertical resolution. The current dataset is applied to time periods when the MMCR (Millimeter Cloud Radar) version of the ARSCL (Active Remotely-Sensed Cloud Locations) Value Added Product (VAP) is available. The MERGESONDE VAP is utilized where temperature and humidity profiles are required. Future additions to this dataset will utilize the new KAZR instrument and its associated VAPs.

  8. Computing and Partitioning Cloud Feedbacks Using Cloud Property Histograms. Part I: Cloud Radiative Kernels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hartmann, Dennis

    Computing and Partitioning Cloud Feedbacks Using Cloud Property Histograms. Part I: Cloud Radiative 2011) ABSTRACT This study proposes a novel technique for computing cloud feedbacks using histograms integrated cloud feedbacks computed in this manner agree remarkably well with the adjusted change in cloud

  9. Taiwan UniCloud: A Cloud Testbed with Collaborative Cloud Services Wu-Chun Chung*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chung, Yeh-Ching

    Taiwan UniCloud: A Cloud Testbed with Collaborative Cloud Services Wu-Chun Chung* , Po-Chi Shih}@cs.nthu.edu.tw Abstract--This paper introduces a prototype of Taiwan UniCloud, a community-driven hybrid cloud platform for academics in Taiwan. The goal is to leverage resources in multiple clouds among different organizations

  10. Optimized capping layers for EUV multilayers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bajt, Sasa (Livermore, CA); Folta, James A. (Livermore, CA); Spiller, Eberhard A. (Livermore, CA)

    2004-08-24

    A new capping multilayer structure for EUV-reflective Mo/Si multilayers consists of two layers: A top layer that protects the multilayer structure from the environment and a bottom layer that acts as a diffusion barrier between the top layer and the structure beneath. One embodiment combines a first layer of Ru with a second layer of B.sub.4 C. Another embodiment combines a first layer of Ru with a second layer of Mo. These embodiments have the additional advantage that the reflectivity is also enhanced. Ru has the best oxidation resistance of all materials investigated so far. B.sub.4 C is an excellent barrier against silicide formation while the silicide layer formed at the Si boundary is well controlled.

  11. Vortex rings impinging on permeable boundaries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mujal-Colilles, Anna; Dalziel, Stuart B.; Bateman, Allen

    2015-01-17

    of the boundary layer inside 548 the porous media or the flux exchange between the downstream and upstream sides of the 549 grid. 550 Recalling that one of the main differences between our experiments and the thin grid 551 research already published...

  12. Relationship between Cloud Condensation Nuclei and Satellite Retrievals of Cloud Droplet Effective Radius

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delene, David J.

    ` Relationship between Cloud Condensation Nuclei and Satellite Retrievals of Cloud Droplet is the relationship between below cloud base cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and satellite retrievals of cloud droplet cloud effective radius; however, satellites can not measure cloud condensation nuclei (CCN

  13. Community Cloud Computing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marinos, Alexandros

    2009-01-01

    Cloud Computing is rising fast, with its data centres growing at an unprecedented rate. However, this has come with concerns over privacy, efficiency at the expense of resilience, and environmental sustainability, because of the dependence on Cloud vendors such as Google, Amazon and Microsoft. Our response is an alternative model for the Cloud conceptualisation, providing a paradigm for Clouds in the community, utilising networked personal computers for liberation from the centralised vendor model. Community Cloud Computing (C3) offers an alternative architecture, created by combing the Cloud with paradigms from Grid Computing, principles from Digital Ecosystems, and sustainability from Green Computing, while remaining true to the original vision of the Internet. It is more technically challenging than Cloud Computing, having to deal with distributed computing issues, including heterogeneous nodes, varying quality of service, and additional security constraints. However, these are not insurmountable challenge...

  14. The Radiative Role of Free Tropospheric Aerosols and Marine Clouds over the Central North Atlantic

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mazzoleni, Claudio; Kumar, Sumit; Wright, Kendra; Kramer, Louisa; Mazzoleni, Lynn; Owen, Robert; Helmig, Detlev

    2014-12-09

    The scientific scope of the project was to exploit the unique location of the Pico Mountain Observatory (PMO) located in the summit caldera of the Pico Volcano in Pico Island in the Azores, for atmospheric studies. The observatory, located at 2225m a.s.l., typically samples free tropospheric aerosols laying above the marine low-level clouds and long-range transported from North America. The broad purpose of this research was to provide the scientific community with a better understanding of fundamental physical processes governing the effects of aerosols on radiative forcing and climate; with the ultimate goal of improving our abilities to understand past climate and to predict future changes through numerical models. The project was 'exploratory' in nature, with the plan to demonstrate the feasibility of deploying for the first time, an extensive aerosol research package at PMO. One of the primary activities was to test the deployment of these instruments at the site, to collect data during the 2012 summer season, and to further develop the infrastructure and the knowledge for performing novel research at PMO in follow-up longer-term aerosol-cloud studies. In the future, PMO could provide an elevated research outpost to support the renewed DOE effort in the Azores that was intensified in 2013 with the opening of the new sea-level ARM-DOE Eastern North Atlantic permanent facility at Graciosa Island. During the project period, extensive new data sets were collected for the planned 2012 season. Thanks to other synergistic activities and opportunities, data collection was then successfully extended to 2013 and 2014. Highlights of the scientific findings during this project include: a) biomass burning contribute significantly to the aerosol loading in the North Atlantic free troposphere; however, long-range transported black carbon concentrations decreased substantially in the last decade. b) Single black carbon particles – analyzed off-line at the electron microscope – were often very compacted, suggesting cloud processing and exhibiting different optical properties from fresh emissions. In addition, black carbon was found to be sometimes mixed with mineral dust, affecting its optical properties and potential forcing. c) Some aerosols collected at PMO acted as ice nuclei, potentially contributing to cirrus cloud formation during their transport in the upper free troposphere. Identified good ice nuclei were often mineral dust particles. d) The free tropospheric aerosols studied at PMO have relevance to low level marine clouds due, for example, to synoptic subsidence entraining free tropospheric aerosols into the marine boundary layer. This has potentially large consequences on cloud condensation nuclei concentrations and compositions in the marine boundary layer; therefore, having an effect on the marine stratus clouds, with potentially important repercussions on the radiative forcing. The scientific products of this project currently include contributions to two papers published in the Nature Publishing group (Nature Communications and Scientific Reports), one paper under revision for Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, one in review in Geophysical Research Letters and one recently submitted to Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Discussion. In addition, four manuscripts are in advanced state of preparation. Finally, twenty-eight presentations were given at international conferences, workshops and seminars.

  15. Federated Cloud Security Architecture for Secure and Agile Clouds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Shouhuai

    Federated Cloud Security Architecture for Secure and Agile Clouds Weiliang Luo, Li Xu, Zhenxin Zhan. This chapter introduces the novel federated cloud security architecture that includes proactive cloud defense technologies for secure and agile cloud development. The federated security architecture consists of a set

  16. The proposed connection between clouds and cosmic rays: Cloud

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The proposed connection between clouds and cosmic rays: Cloud behaviour during the past 50 of cloud factors using both satellite and ground­based data. In particular, we search for evidence for the low cloud decrease predicted by the rising levels of solar activity and the low cloud­cosmic ray flux

  17. An Autonomous Reliabilit Cloud Comput

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buyya, Rajkumar

    An Autonomous Reliabilit Ami Cloud Comput Department of Computing and Informa Abstract--Cloud computing paradigm allo based access to computing and storages s Internet. Since with advances of Cloud. Keywords- Cloud computing; SLA negotiat I. INTRODUCTION Cloud computing has transferred the services

  18. Environment and the Lifetime of Tropical Deep Convection in a Cloud-Permitting Regional Model Simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hagos, Samson M.; Feng, Zhe; McFarlane, Sally A.; Leung, Lai-Yung R.

    2013-08-01

    By applying a cloud tracking algorithm to tropical convective systems simulated by a regional high resolution model, the study documents environmental conditions before and after convective systems are initiated over ocean and land by following them during their lifetime. The comparative roles of various environmental fields in affecting the lifetime of convection are also quantified. The statistics of lifetime, maximum area, propagation speed and direction of the simulated deep convection agrees well with geostationary satellite observations. Over ocean, convective systems enhance surface fluxes through the associated wind gusts as well as cooling and drying of the boundary layer. A significant relationship is found between the mean surface fluxes during their lifetime and the longevity of the systems which in turn is related to the initial intensity of the moist updraft and to a lesser extent upper level shear. Over land, on the other hand, convective activity suppresses surface fluxes through cloud cover and the lifetime of convection is related to the upper level shear during their lifetime and strength of the heat fluxes several hours before the initiation of convection. For systems of equal lifetime, those over land are significantly more intense than those over ocean especially during early stages of their lifetime.

  19. Star Formation triggered by cloud-cloud collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balfour, S K; Hubber, D A; Jaffa, S E

    2015-01-01

    We present the results of SPH simulations in which two clouds, each having mass $M_{_{\\rm{o}}}\\!=\\!500\\,{\\rm M}_{_\\odot}$ and radius $R_{_{\\rm{o}}}\\!=\\!2\\,{\\rm pc}$, collide head-on at relative velocities of $\\Delta v_{_{\\rm{o}}} =2.4,\\;2.8,\\;3.2,\\;3.6\\;{\\rm and}\\;4.0\\,{\\rm km}\\,{\\rm s}^{-1}$. There is a clear trend with increasing $\\Delta v_{_{\\rm{o}}}$. At low $\\Delta v_{_{\\rm{o}}}$, star formation starts later, and the shock-compressed layer breaks up into an array of predominantly radial filaments; stars condense out of these filaments and fall, together with residual gas, towards the centre of the layer, to form a single large-$N$ cluster, which then evolves by competitive accretion, producing one or two very massive protostars and a diaspora of ejected (mainly low-mass) protostars; the pattern of filaments is reminiscent of the hub and spokes systems identified recently by observers. At high $\\Delta v_{_{\\rm{o}}}$, star formation occurs sooner and the shock-compressed layer breaks up into a network of f...

  20. Finance Idol Word Cloud

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This word cloud represents the topics discussed during the Big and Small Ideas: How to Lower Solar Financing Costs breakout session at the SunShot Grand Challenge.

  1. Testing outer boundary treatments for the Einstein equations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oliver Rinne; Lee Lindblom; Mark A. Scheel

    2007-07-25

    Various methods of treating outer boundaries in numerical relativity are compared using a simple test problem: a Schwarzschild black hole with an outgoing gravitational wave perturbation. Numerical solutions computed using different boundary treatments are compared to a `reference' numerical solution obtained by placing the outer boundary at a very large radius. For each boundary treatment, the full solutions including constraint violations and extracted gravitational waves are compared to those of the reference solution, thereby assessing the reflections caused by the artificial boundary. These tests use a first-order generalized harmonic formulation of the Einstein equations. Constraint-preserving boundary conditions for this system are reviewed, and an improved boundary condition on the gauge degrees of freedom is presented. Alternate boundary conditions evaluated here include freezing the incoming characteristic fields, Sommerfeld boundary conditions, and the constraint-preserving boundary conditions of Kreiss and Winicour. Rather different approaches to boundary treatments, such as sponge layers and spatial compactification, are also tested. Overall the best treatment found here combines boundary conditions that preserve the constraints, freeze the Newman-Penrose scalar Psi_0, and control gauge reflections.

  2. Program Analyses for Cloud Computations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tetali, Sai Deep

    2015-01-01

    search. ” In CCSW 09: Cloud Computing Security Workshop, pp.and M. Walfish. “Depot: Cloud storage with minimal trust. ”the 3rd ACM workshop on Cloud computing security workshop,

  3. An Embedded Boundary Integral Solver for the Unsteady Incompressible Navier-Stokes Equations1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zorin, Denis

    An Embedded Boundary Integral Solver for the Unsteady Incompressible Navier-Stokes Equations1-Stokes operator discretization is done using boundary integrals and structured-grid finite elements. We use a two is formulated as a double-layer boundary integral equation. Domain integrals are computed via finite elements

  4. Matched interface and boundary (MIB) method for elliptic problems with sharp-edged interfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Yongcheng

    Matched interface and boundary (MIB) method for elliptic problems with sharp-edged interfaces with sharp-edged interfaces, thin-layered interfaces and interfaces that intersect with geometric boundary. This work generalizes the matched interface and boundary (MIB) method previously designed for solving

  5. Sandia Energy - Cloud Computing Services

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Services Home Stationary Power Safety, Security & Resilience of Energy Infrastructure Grid Modernization Cyber Security for Electric Infrastructure Cloud Computing Services Cloud...

  6. CONTRIBUTED Green Cloud Computing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tucker, Rod

    as well as data processing and data storage. We show that energy consumption in transport and switching | Cloud computing; core networks; data centers; energy consumption I. INTRODUCTION The increasing to energy consumption and cloud computing seems to be an alternative to office-based computing. By Jayant

  7. RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN CLOUD FRACTION AND CLOUD ALBEDO: COMBINED OBSERVATIONAL-MODELING-THEORETICAL INVESTIGATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN CLOUD FRACTION AND CLOUD ALBEDO: COMBINED OBSERVATIONAL of Energy Office of Science ABSTRACT Cloud fraction and cloud albedo have long occupied the central stage as key cloud quantities in studying cloud-climate interaction; however their quantitative relationship

  8. Cloud computing security.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shin, Dongwan; Claycomb, William R.; Urias, Vincent E.

    2010-10-01

    Cloud computing is a paradigm rapidly being embraced by government and industry as a solution for cost-savings, scalability, and collaboration. While a multitude of applications and services are available commercially for cloud-based solutions, research in this area has yet to fully embrace the full spectrum of potential challenges facing cloud computing. This tutorial aims to provide researchers with a fundamental understanding of cloud computing, with the goals of identifying a broad range of potential research topics, and inspiring a new surge in research to address current issues. We will also discuss real implementations of research-oriented cloud computing systems for both academia and government, including configuration options, hardware issues, challenges, and solutions.

  9. Filament formation in wind-cloud interactions. I. Spherical clouds in uniform magnetic fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Banda-Barragán, Wladimir; Federrath, Christoph; Crocker, Roland; Bicknell, Geoffrey

    2015-01-01

    Filamentary structures are ubiquitous in the interstellar medium, yet their formation, internal structure, and longevity have not been studied in detail. We report the results from a comprehensive numerical study that investigates the characteristics, formation, and evolution of filaments arising from magnetohydrodynamic interactions between supersonic winds and dense clouds. Here we improve on previous simulations by utilising sharper density contrasts and higher numerical resolutions. By following multiple density tracers, we find that material in the envelopes of the clouds is removed and deposited downstream to form filamentary tails, while the cores of the clouds serve as footpoints and late-stage outer layers of these tails. Aspect ratios >12, subsonic velocity dispersions ~0.1-0.3 of the wind sound speed, and magnetic field amplifications ~100 are found to be characteristic of these filaments. We also report the effects of different magnetic field strengths and orientations. The magnetic field strength...

  10. At this meeting: Oral presentation: Cloud Properties From (A)ATSR (Caroline Poulsen)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oxford, University of

    sensors including radars, an infrared and microwave sounder unit, and microwave radiometer integrated vertically over each layer separated by cloud base. This strategy makes it possible to evaluate. Recent progress in satellite sensor technology, exempli- fied by hyperspectral sounders and cloud

  11. The role of ice nuclei recycling in the maintenance of cloud ice in Arctic mixed-phase stratocumulus

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Solomon, A.; Feingold, G.; Shupe, M. D.

    2015-09-25

    This study investigates the maintenance of cloud ice production in Arctic mixed-phase stratocumulus in large eddy simulations that include a prognostic ice nuclei (IN) formulation and a diurnal cycle. Balances derived from a mixed-layer model and phase analyses are used to provide insight into buffering mechanisms that maintain ice in these cloud systems. We find that, for the case under investigation, IN recycling through subcloud sublimation considerably prolongs ice production over a multi-day integration. This effective source of IN to the cloud dominates over mixing sources from above or below the cloud-driven mixed layer. Competing feedbacks between dynamical mixing andmore »recycling are found to slow the rate of ice lost from the mixed layer when a diurnal cycle is simulated. The results of this study have important implications for maintaining phase partitioning of cloud ice and liquid that determine the radiative forcing of Arctic mixed-phase clouds.« less

  12. The role of ice nuclei recycling in the maintenance of cloud ice in Arctic mixed-phase stratocumulus

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Solomon, A.; Feingold, G.; Shupe, M. D.

    2015-04-21

    This study investigates the maintenance of cloud ice production in Arctic mixed phase stratocumulus in large-eddy simulations that include a prognostic ice nuclei (IN) formulation and a diurnal cycle. Balances derived from a mixed-layer model and phase analyses are used to provide insight into buffering mechanisms that maintain ice in these cloud systems. We find that for the case under investigation, IN recycling through subcloud sublimation considerably prolongs ice production over a multi-day integration. This effective source of IN to the cloud dominates over mixing sources from above or below the cloud-driven mixed layer. Competing feedbacks between dynamical mixing andmore »recycling are found to slow the rate of ice lost from the mixed layer when a diurnal cycle is simulated. The results of this study have important implications for maintaining phase partitioning of cloud ice and liquid that determine the radiative forcing of Arctic mixed-phase clouds.« less

  13. Convective Cloud Lifecycles Lunchtime seminar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plant, Robert

    Convective Cloud Lifecycles Lunchtime seminar 19th May 2009 Bob Plant Department of Meteorology, University of Reading, UK #12;Introduction Obtain life cycle statistics for clouds in CRM simulations Why Conclusions Convective Cloud Lifecycles ­ p.1/3 #12;Why bother? Convective Cloud Lifecycles ­ p.2/3 #12;Some

  14. Layer inflow into precipitating convection over the western tropical Pacific

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mechem, David B.; Houze, Robert A. Jr.; Chen, Shuyi S.

    2002-07-01

    A conceptual model of tropical convection frequently used in convective parametrization schemes is that of a parcel process in which boundary-layer air, characterized by high equivalent potential temperature, ascends to ...

  15. Constructing a Merged Cloud-Precipitation Radar Dataset for Tropical Convective Clouds during the DYNAMO/AMIE Experiment at Addu Atoll

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feng, Zhe; McFarlane, Sally A.; Schumacher, Courtney; Ellis, Scott; Comstock, Jennifer M.; Bharadwaj, Nitin

    2014-05-16

    To improve understanding of the convective processes key to the Madden-Julian-Oscillation (MJO) initiation, the Dynamics of the MJO (DYNAMO) and Atmospheric Radiation Measurement MJO Investigation Experiment (AMIE) collected four months of observations from three radars, the S-band Polarization Radar (S-Pol), the C-band Shared Mobile Atmospheric Research & Teaching Radar (SMART-R), and Ka-band Zenith Radar (KAZR) on Addu Atoll in the tropical Indian Ocean. This study compares the measurements from the S-Pol and SMART-R to those from the more sensitive KAZR in order to characterize the hydrometeor detection capabilities of the two scanning precipitation radars. Frequency comparisons for precipitating convective clouds and non-precipitating high clouds agree much better than non-precipitating low clouds for both scanning radars due to issues in ground clutter. On average, SMART-R underestimates convective and high cloud tops by 0.3 to 1.1 km, while S-Pol underestimates cloud tops by less than 0.4 km for these cloud types. S-Pol shows excellent dynamic range in detecting various types of clouds and therefore its data are well suited for characterizing the evolution of the 3D cloud structures, complementing the profiling KAZR measurements. For detecting non-precipitating low clouds and thin cirrus clouds, KAZR remains the most reliable instrument. However, KAZR is attenuated in heavy precipitation and underestimates cloud top height due to rainfall attenuation 4.3% of the time during DYNAMO/AMIE. An empirical method to correct the KAZR cloud top heights is described, and a merged radar dataset is produced to provide improved cloud boundary estimates, microphysics and radiative heating retrievals.

  16. First observations of tracking clouds using scanning ARM cloud radars

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Borque, Paloma; Giangrande, Scott; Kollias, Pavlos

    2014-12-01

    Tracking clouds using scanning cloud radars can help to document the temporal evolution of cloud properties well before large drop formation (‘‘first echo’’). These measurements complement cloud and precipitation tracking using geostationary satellites and weather radars. Here, two-dimensional (2-D) Along-Wind Range Height Indicator (AW-RHI) observations of a population of shallow cumuli (with and without precipitation) from the 35-GHz scanning ARM cloud radar (SACR) at the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Measurements (ARM) program Southern Great Plains (SGP) site are presented. Observations from the ARM SGP network of scanning precipitation radars are used to provide the larger scale context of the cloud fieldmore »and to highlight the advantages of the SACR to detect the numerous, small, non-precipitating cloud elements. A new Cloud Identification and Tracking Algorithm (CITA) is developed to track cloud elements. In CITA, a cloud element is identified as a region having a contiguous set of pixels exceeding a preset reflectivity and size threshold. The high temporal resolution of the SACR 2-D observations (30 sec) allows for an area superposition criteria algorithm to match cloud elements at consecutive times. Following CITA, the temporal evolution of cloud element properties (number, size, and maximum reflectivity) is presented. The vast majority of the designated elements during this cumulus event were short-lived non-precipitating clouds having an apparent life cycle shorter than 15 minutes. The advantages and disadvantages of cloud tracking using an SACR are discussed.« less

  17. First observations of tracking clouds using scanning ARM cloud radars

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borque, Paloma; Giangrande, Scott; Kollias, Pavlos

    2014-12-01

    Tracking clouds using scanning cloud radars can help to document the temporal evolution of cloud properties well before large drop formation (‘‘first echo’’). These measurements complement cloud and precipitation tracking using geostationary satellites and weather radars. Here, two-dimensional (2-D) Along-Wind Range Height Indicator (AW-RHI) observations of a population of shallow cumuli (with and without precipitation) from the 35-GHz scanning ARM cloud radar (SACR) at the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Measurements (ARM) program Southern Great Plains (SGP) site are presented. Observations from the ARM SGP network of scanning precipitation radars are used to provide the larger scale context of the cloud field and to highlight the advantages of the SACR to detect the numerous, small, non-precipitating cloud elements. A new Cloud Identification and Tracking Algorithm (CITA) is developed to track cloud elements. In CITA, a cloud element is identified as a region having a contiguous set of pixels exceeding a preset reflectivity and size threshold. The high temporal resolution of the SACR 2-D observations (30 sec) allows for an area superposition criteria algorithm to match cloud elements at consecutive times. Following CITA, the temporal evolution of cloud element properties (number, size, and maximum reflectivity) is presented. The vast majority of the designated elements during this cumulus event were short-lived non-precipitating clouds having an apparent life cycle shorter than 15 minutes. The advantages and disadvantages of cloud tracking using an SACR are discussed.

  18. A developer's survey on different cloud platforms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doan, Dzung

    2009-01-01

    1 Introduction Cloud computing is a computing paradigm inFor this reason, cloud computing has also been describedparallel processing. Cloud computing can be contrasted with

  19. The Magellan Final Report on Cloud Computing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coghlan, Susan

    2013-01-01

    their research efforts in cloud security. Experiences andinvolving cloud resources and security guidance is thedynamic nature of cloud systems, the security controls must

  20. Migrating enterprise storage applications to the cloud

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vrable, Michael Daniel

    2011-01-01

    outsourcing to the cloud and data security. Depending onconcerned about data security in the cloud. Data stored inrun in the cloud, while protecting data security guarantees.

  1. Migrating enterprise storage applications to the cloud

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vrable, Michael Daniel

    2011-01-01

    2.1 Cloud Providers . . . . . . . . . . . .2.1.1 Cloud Storage . . . . . . . . .2.1.2 Cloud Computation . . . . . . 2.2 Enterprise Storage

  2. Diffusion and stochastic heating of a dust cloud in tokamak edge plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marmolino, C. [Department STAT, University of Molise, Pesche (Italy); Bacharis, M.; Willis, C. [Imperial College, London SW7 2BW (United Kingdom); Allen, J. E. [Imperial College, London SW7 2BW (United Kingdom); OCIAM Mathematical Institute, Oxford OX1 3LB (United Kingdom); Angelis, U. de [Department of Physical Sciences, University of Naples and INFN Sezione di Napoli (Italy)

    2011-10-15

    The diffusion due to collisions with ions of a cloud of nano-meter dust particles in the region of the scrape-off-layer (SOL) of a tokamak is considered and it is shown that for the conditions in the Frascati tokamak upgrade, the cloud can expand to reach the SOL limit in very short times without ablating. The conditions for stochastic heating of the cloud and acceleration of a larger particle to hyper-velocities, taking into account the effect of decreasing dust density in the cloud, are established.

  3. Boundaries and Topological Algorithms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fleck, Margaret Morrison

    1988-09-01

    This thesis develops a model for the topological structure of situations. In this model, the topological structure of space is altered by the presence or absence of boundaries, such as those at the edges of objects. ...

  4. The effect of tangential blowing on boundary-layer profiles 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olson, Milford Eugene

    1967-01-01

    . 2065 Blowing Rate Sys&ho 1 " hw (in. H20) Pf (p ~ s i) (Slot width-0. 033 inches) Cl C C 3. 1 7. 5 9. 7 14. 980 15. 5l 0 15. 820 534 534 534 . 2935 . 4670 . 5370 (Slot wi. dth-0. 0415 inches) Dl D2 D 5. 0 11. 5 15. 9 15. 040...; Blowing Rate Symbols B) B2 B 3 Cl C 2 C 3 D V (fps) J 163 246 2 75 163 246 275 163 Bjowing Rale (ft /sec) . 3 0. 0418 0. 0630 0. 0705 0. 1061 0. 1600 0. 1790 0. 1333 D D 3 246 275 0. 2013 0. 2250 A theory which expressed a...

  5. Boundary layer ingesting inlet design for a silent aircraft

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Freuler, Patrick N., 1980-

    2005-01-01

    (cont.) common nacelle, L/D ratios between 2.5 and 3.0, fan face to throat area ratios above 1.06, and offsets lower than 11%. Curvature ahead of the inlet should be avoided as well as bifurcations inside the duct. Inlet ...

  6. Chambry, France, 4 8 June 2007 On boundary layer processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gohm, Alexander

    distribution of air pollutants in an Alpine valley Alexander Gohm* F. Harnisch, R. Schnitzhofer, A. Hansel, A University of Innsbruck #12;2Spatial distribution of air pollutants in an Alpine valley Motivation: High air: Preliminary analysis of two different air pollution cases #12;3Spatial distribution of air pollutants

  7. DIFFUSION OF A CHEMICAL SPECIES THROUGH A VISCOUS BOUNDARY LAYER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keller, J.

    2011-01-01

    2.3 Evaluation of a Coal Gasification Atmosphere. . -iv-a highly cor- rosive coal gasification mixture. It is shown2.3 Evaluation of a Coal Gasification Atmosphere The purpose

  8. Numerical simulations of the stratified oceanic bottom boundary layer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, John R.

    2008-01-01

    · x ? ?t)], the kinetic and potential energy dissipation canuid that releases potential energy to kinetic energy. Komoriturbulent kinetic energy to the potential energy de?cit

  9. Thermal boundary layer development in dispersed flow film boiling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hull, Lawrence M.

    1982-01-01

    Dispersed flow film boiling consists of a dispersion of droplets which are carried over a very hot surface by their vapor. This process occurs in cryogenic equipment and wet steam turbines. It is also of interest in the ...

  10. Experimental and theoretical study of turbulent oscillatory boundary layers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuan, Jing, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2013-01-01

    Sediment transport is of crucial importance to engineering projects in coastal regions, so it is of primary interest in coastal engineering. The driving forces for sediment transport are mostly determined by the hydrodynamics ...

  11. IMPACT OF BOUNDARY-LAYER CUTTING ON FREE-SURFACE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ;5 Flow Loop A Pump H 400 gal tank B Bypass line I Butterfly valve C Flow meter J 700 gal tank D Pressure) "Standard design" · Contracting nozzle Contraction ratio = 3x y z HC PP FS 3.9 cm 3.0 cm 14.7 cm #12 of inclination, = 6.5° · Samples acquired over 0.5 ­ 1 hr · Collected mass used to calculate: Mass flux, G [kg

  12. A Note on the Intermediate Region in Turbulent Boundary Layers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. I. Barenblatt; A. J. Chorin; V. M. Prostokishin

    2000-02-16

    We demonstrate that the processing of the experimental data for the average velocity profiles obtained by J. M. \\"Osterlund (www.mesh.kth.se/$\\sim$jens/zpg/) presented in [1] was incorrect. Properly processed these data lead to the opposite conclusion: they confirm the Reynolds-number-dependent scaling law and disprove the conclusion that the flow in the intermediate (`overlap') region is Reynolds-number-independent.

  13. Numerical simulations of the stratified oceanic bottom boundary layer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, John R.

    2008-01-01

    found that only 6% of the wave energy was re?ected back fromfound that the internal wave energy spec- trum in the outerenergy to the internal wave energy ?ux, and it was found

  14. DIFFUSION OF A CHEMICAL SPECIES THROUGH A VISCOUS BOUNDARY LAYER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keller, J.

    2011-01-01

    use an operating coal gasifier will be discussed. ofof the products of the gasifier with H S removed, then theconditions existing in coal gasifiers the con- centration

  15. BOUNDARY LAYER CONTROL IN PIPES THROUGH STRONG INJECTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yeung, William Chor Chun

    2014-01-01

    the environment in a gasifier contains hydrogen, water,compo- nents of the gasifier must be corrosion resistant atis used in existing coal gasifiers. Since hydrogen sulfide

  16. Linear Stability Analysis of a Boundary Layer with Plasma Actuators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roy, Subrata

    in the ith direction p Pressure ¯ui Mean flow velocity in the ith direction ¯p Mean pressure ~ui Disturbance flow velocity in the ith direction ~p Disturbance pressure ui Complex 1D disturbance flow velocity Complex spatial frequency in x1 Complex spatial frequency in x3 Complex temporal frequency cp Complex

  17. Small-Scale Forcing of a Turbulent Boundary Layer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lorkowski, Thomas

    In order to understand the effect of small scale forcing on turbulent flows and its implications on control, an experimental investigation is made into the forcing of the inertial scales in the wall region of a turbulent ...

  18. Boundary-Layer Meteorology An International Journal of Physical,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lebedev, Vladimir

    atmosphere is of great importance for a variety of disciplines, from meteorology and urban planning to botany is highly anisotropic and inhomogeneous, since both the mean wind velocity and the turbulent diffusivity transport in a turbulent environment we adopt a standard model of turbulent diffusion, which is based

  19. Numerical simulations of the stratified oceanic bottom boundary layer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, John R.

    2008-01-01

    approximation that the mean wave energy and the backgroundfound that only 6% of the wave energy was re?ected back fromfound that the internal wave energy spec- trum in the outer

  20. Supersonic turbulent boundary layers with periodic mechanical non-equilibrium 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ekoto, Isaac Wesley

    2007-04-25

    is essential. Turbulence reduction has applications for reentry vehicles. On their undersurface they have a heat shield that is composed of uniformly shaped materials (e.g. tiles, ablative materiel, etc.). Shape selection that can reduce turbulent heat... of the literature reveals roughness elements with sharp leading edges have not been explored. Much could be revealed by an investigation into a these type of roughness elements. The thought is that the blunt shaped roughness elements used in the past (e.g. square...

  1. ARM - Field Campaign - 2013 Lower Atmospheric Boundary Layer Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach HomeA Better Anode Design to Improve4AJ01) (See22, 2012 [DataJulyMarch 27,5 Southern2

  2. A dual mass flux framework for boundary layer convection

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach HomeA Better Anode Design to Improve Lithium-Ion Batteries PrintA New SolarAComplexA dual mass flux

  3. ARM - PI Product - Planetary Boundary Layer from AERI and MPL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Comments?govInstrumentsnoaacrnBarrow, Alaska OutreachCalendar NSAProductsMerged and corrected 915Dust

  4. CloudSafe: Securing Data Processing within Vulnerable Virtualization Environments in the Cloud

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ryder, Barbara G.

    CloudSafe: Securing Data Processing within Vulnerable Virtualization Environments in the Cloud large-scale cloud applications. Index Terms--cloud security, outsourced computation, side- channel, newly discovered vulnerabilities in cloud virtualization envi- ronment have threatened the security

  5. Cloud Based Applications and Platforms (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brodt-Giles, D.

    2014-05-15

    Presentation to the Cloud Computing East 2014 Conference, where we are highlighting our cloud computing strategy, describing the platforms on the cloud (including Smartgrid.gov), and defining our process for implementing cloud based applications.

  6. Minimalist Model of Ice Microphysics in Mixed-phase Stratiform Clouds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, F.; Ovchinnikov, Mikhail; Shaw, Raymond A.

    2013-07-28

    The question of whether persistent ice crystal precipitation from super cooled layer clouds can be explained by time-dependent, stochastic ice nucleation is explored using an approximate, analytical model, and a large-eddy simulation (LES) cloud model. The updraft velocity in the cloud defines an accumulation zone, where small ice particles cannot fall out until they are large enough, which will increase the residence time of ice particles in the cloud. Ice particles reach a quasi-steady state between growth by vapor deposition and fall speed at cloud base. The analytical model predicts that ice water content (wi) has a 2.5 power law relationship with ice number concentration ni. wi and ni from a LES cloud model with stochastic ice nucleation also confirm the 2.5 power law relationship. The prefactor of the power law is proportional to the ice nucleation rate, and therefore provides a quantitative link to observations of ice microphysical properties.

  7. CloudMan: A Platform for Portable Cloud Manufacturing Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dustdar, Schahram

    CloudMan: A Platform for Portable Cloud Manufacturing Services Soheil Qanbari, Samira Mahdi Zadeh Education (BIHE), Iran soroush.vedaeei@bihe.org Abstract--Cloud manufacturing refers to "as a Service" pro- duction model that exploits an on-demand access to a distributed pool of diversified manufacturing

  8. Transport Layer Cornell University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Low, Steven H.

    Transport Layer Ao Tang Cornell University Ithaca, NY 14853 Lachlan L. H. Andrew California. Low California Institute of Technology Pasadena, CA 91125 I. INTRODUCTION The Internet has evolved of the physical layer, the link layer, the network layer, the transport layer and the application layer1 . See

  9. Attribution Analysis of Cloud Feedback 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Chen

    2014-07-15

    Uncertainty on cloud feedback is the primary contributor to the large spread of equilibrium climate sensitivity (ECS) in climate models. In this study, we compare the short-term cloud feedback in climate models with observations, and evaluate...

  10. Software-Defined Mobile Cloud

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ku, Ian

    2014-01-01

    M. Gerla. “Towards Software- Defined VANETs: ArchitectureI. Ku, Y. Lu, and M. Gerla. “Software-Defined Mobile Cloud:C. Peylo, “CloudMAC: towards software defined WLANs,” ACM

  11. Opaque cloud detection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Roskovensky, John K. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2009-01-20

    A method of detecting clouds in a digital image comprising, for an area of the digital image, determining a reflectance value in at least three discrete electromagnetic spectrum bands, computing a first ratio of one reflectance value minus another reflectance value and the same two values added together, computing a second ratio of one reflectance value and another reflectance value, choosing one of the reflectance values, and concluding that an opaque cloud exists in the area if the results of each of the two computing steps and the choosing step fall within three corresponding predetermined ranges.

  12. Review Article Layer-specific anatomical, physiological and functional MRI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duong, Timothy Q.

    ­3). Starting from the vitreous boundary, they include the ganglion cell layer (GCL), inner plexiform layer (IPL: the retinal and choroidal circulations (1,4,5). Retinal vessels exist in the GCL, INL, IPL and OPL. Choroidal the choroid, has been reported to be $217 mm (2,3) and the choroidal thickness, which is less well documented

  13. CLOUD CHEMISTRY STEPHEN E. SCHWARTZ

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schwartz, Stephen E.

    is considered bere to comprise both cloud composition and reactions that take place in clouds. Clouds are a very special subset of tbe atmosphere because they present substantial amounts of condensed-phase water (liquid, the examples developed bere focus on these chemical systems. However, much of the resulting undetstanding

  14. Cloud Formation, Evolution and Destruction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Estalella, Robert

    Chapter 4 Cloud Formation, Evolution and Destruction We now begin to trace the journey towards a star. How long does this take? The answer is surprisingly short: a good many clouds already contain new stars and these stars tend to be young. The typical cloud cannot spend long, if any time at all

  15. SGP and TWP (Manus) Ice Cloud Vertical Velocities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kalesse, Heike

    2013-06-27

    Daily netcdf-files of ice-cloud dynamics observed at the ARM sites at SGP (Jan1997-Dec2010) and Manus (Jul1999-Dec2010). The files include variables at different time resolution (10s, 20min, 1hr). Profiles of radar reflectivity factor (dbz), Doppler velocity (vel) as well as retrieved vertical air motion (V_air) and reflectivity-weighted particle terminal fall velocity (V_ter) are given at 10s, 20min and 1hr resolution. Retrieved V_air and V_ter follow radar notation, so positive values indicate downward motion. Lower level clouds are removed, however a multi-layer flag is included.

  16. SGP and TWP (Manus) Ice Cloud Vertical Velocities

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kalesse, Heike

    Daily netcdf-files of ice-cloud dynamics observed at the ARM sites at SGP (Jan1997-Dec2010) and Manus (Jul1999-Dec2010). The files include variables at different time resolution (10s, 20min, 1hr). Profiles of radar reflectivity factor (dbz), Doppler velocity (vel) as well as retrieved vertical air motion (V_air) and reflectivity-weighted particle terminal fall velocity (V_ter) are given at 10s, 20min and 1hr resolution. Retrieved V_air and V_ter follow radar notation, so positive values indicate downward motion. Lower level clouds are removed, however a multi-layer flag is included.

  17. RISK ASSESSMENT CLOUD COMPUTING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    SECURITY RESEARCH PRIVACY RISK ASSESSMENT AMC DATA FISMA CLOUD COMPUTING MOBILE DEVICES OPERATIONS PRACTICES TRENDS AUDITS policies #12;2 Privacy & Information Security Annual Update Thursday, June 20, 2013 of Breach statistics Plan to comply with requirements · Training and Education Information Security · Risk

  18. Use of the ARM Measurements of Spectral Zenith Radiance for Better Understanding of 3D Cloud-Radiation Processes & Aerosol-Cloud Interaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alexander Marshak; Warren Wiscombe; Yuri Knyazikhin; Christine Chiu

    2011-05-24

    We proposed a variety of tasks centered on the following question: what can we learn about 3D cloud-radiation processes and aerosol-cloud interaction from rapid-sampling ARM measurements of spectral zenith radiance? These ARM measurements offer spectacular new and largely unexploited capabilities in both the temporal and spectral domains. Unlike most other ARM instruments, which average over many seconds or take samples many seconds apart, the new spectral zenith radiance measurements are fast enough to resolve natural time scales of cloud change and cloud boundaries as well as the transition zone between cloudy and clear areas. In the case of the shortwave spectrometer, the measurements offer high time resolution and high spectral resolution, allowing new discovery-oriented science which we intend to pursue vigorously. Research objectives are, for convenience, grouped under three themes: â?¢ Understand radiative signature of the transition zone between cloud-free and cloudy areas using data from ARM shortwave radiometers, which has major climatic consequences in both aerosol direct and indirect effect studies. â?¢ Provide cloud property retrievals from the ARM sites and the ARM Mobile Facility for studies of aerosol-cloud interactions. â?¢ Assess impact of 3D cloud structures on aerosol properties using passive and active remote sensing techniques from both ARM and satellite measurements.

  19. Boundary Plasma Turbulence Simulations for Tokamaks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, X; Umansky, M; Dudson, B; Snyder, P

    2008-05-15

    The boundary plasma turbulence code BOUT models tokamak boundary-plasma turbulence in a realistic divertor geometry using modified Braginskii equations for plasma vorticity, density (ni), electron and ion temperature (T{sub e}; T{sub i}) and parallel momenta. The BOUT code solves for the plasma fluid equations in a three dimensional (3D) toroidal segment (or a toroidal wedge), including the region somewhat inside the separatrix and extending into the scrape-off layer; the private flux region is also included. In this paper, a description is given of the sophisticated physical models, innovative numerical algorithms, and modern software design used to simulate edge-plasmas in magnetic fusion energy devices. The BOUT code's unique capabilities and functionality are exemplified via simulations of the impact of plasma density on tokamak edge turbulence and blob dynamics.

  20. Analysis of global radiation budgets and cloud forcing using three-dimensional cloud nephanalysis data base. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mitchell, B.

    1990-12-01

    A one-dimensional radiative transfer model was used to compute the global radiative budget at the top of the atmosphere (TOA) and the surface for January and July. 1979. The model was also used to determine the global cloud radiative forcing for all clouds and for high and low cloud layers. In the computations. the authors used the monthly cloud data derived from the Air Force Three-Dimensional Cloud Nephanalysis (3DNEPH). These data were used in conjunction with conventional temperature and humidity profiles analyzed during the 1979 First GARP (Global Atmospheric Research Program) Global Experiment (FGGE) year. Global surface albedos were computed from available data and were included in the radiative transfer analysis. Comparisons of the model-produced outgoing solar and infrared fluxes with those derived from Nimbus 7 Earth Radiation Budget (ERS) data were made to validate the radiative model and cloud cover. For reflected solar and emitted infrared (IR) flux, differences within 20 w/sq m meters were shown.

  1. Friction and Diapycnal Mixing at a Slope: Boundary Control of Potential Vorticity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benthuysen, Jessica

    Although atmospheric forcing by wind stress or buoyancy flux is known to change the ocean’s potential vorticity (PV) at the surface, less is understood about PV modification in the bottom boundary layer. The adjustment of ...

  2. Preprint of the paper "A General Formulation based on the Boundary Element Method for the Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colominas, Ignasi

    cost) to the analysis of large grounding systems in electrical substations. In this paper we present a new Boundary Element formulation for substation grounding systems embedded in layered soils of the substation site. Obviously, from a technical (and

  3. 3D cloud detection and tracking system for solar forecast using multiple sky imagers

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Peng, Zhenzhou; Yu, Dantong; Huang, Dong; Heiser, John; Yoo, Shinjae; Kalb, Paul

    2015-06-23

    We propose a system for forecasting short-term solar irradiance based on multiple total sky imagers (TSIs). The system utilizes a novel method of identifying and tracking clouds in three-dimensional space and an innovative pipeline for forecasting surface solar irradiance based on the image features of clouds. First, we develop a supervised classifier to detect clouds at the pixel level and output cloud mask. In the next step, we design intelligent algorithms to estimate the block-wise base height and motion of each cloud layer based on images from multiple TSIs. Thus, this information is then applied to stitch images together intomore »larger views, which are then used for solar forecasting. We examine the system’s ability to track clouds under various cloud conditions and investigate different irradiance forecast models at various sites. We confirm that this system can 1) robustly detect clouds and track layers, and 2) extract the significant global and local features for obtaining stable irradiance forecasts with short forecast horizons from the obtained images. Finally, we vet our forecasting system at the 32-megawatt Long Island Solar Farm (LISF). Compared with the persistent model, our system achieves at least a 26% improvement for all irradiance forecasts between one and fifteen minutes.« less

  4. Cluster analysis of cloud properties : a method for diagnosing cloud-climate feedbacks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gordon, Neil D.

    2008-01-01

    Zhang (2004), Comparing clouds and their seasonal variationstropical greenhouse effect and cloud radiative forcing. J.thermodynamic components of cloud changes. Clim. Dyn. , 22,

  5. Building biomedical materials layer-by-layer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hammond, Paula T.

    In this materials perspective, the promise of water based layer-by-layer (LbL) assembly as a means of generating drug-releasing surfaces for biomedical applications, from small molecule therapeutics to biologic drugs and ...

  6. Gas-surface interaction and boundary conditions for the Boltzmann equation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mieussens, Luc

    Gas-surface interaction and boundary conditions for the Boltzmann equation St´ephane Brull, Pierre Equation. The interaction between the wall atoms and the gas molecules within a thin surface layer of the gas in the bulk flow. Boundary conditions are formally derived from this model by using classical

  7. Disjoint BoundaryBoundary Paths in Critical Circular Planar Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morrow, James A.

    Disjoint Boundary­Boundary Paths in Critical Circular Planar Networks Ryan Sturgell December 8 that in a critical circular planar network every interior vertex has three disjoint paths to the boundary. 1, 1998 Abstract This paper explores some properties of critical circular planar net­ works. The main

  8. A Simple Multi-Directional Absorbing Layer Method to Simulate Elastic Wave Propagation in Unbounded Domains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Semblat, Jean-François; Gandomzadeh, Ali

    2010-01-01

    The numerical analysis of elastic wave propagation in unbounded media may be difficult due to spurious waves reflected at the model artificial boundaries. This point is critical for the analysis of wave propagation in heterogeneous or layered solids. Various techniques such as Absorbing Boundary Conditions, infinite elements or Absorbing Boundary Layers (e.g. Perfectly Matched Layers) lead to an important reduction of such spurious reflections. In this paper, a simple absorbing layer method is proposed: it is based on a Rayleigh/Caughey damping formulation which is often already available in existing Finite Element softwares. The principle of the Caughey Absorbing Layer Method is first presented (including a rheological interpretation). The efficiency of the method is then shown through 1D Finite Element simulations considering homogeneous and heterogeneous damping in the absorbing layer. 2D models are considered afterwards to assess the efficiency of the absorbing layer method for various wave types and inci...

  9. CloudAnalyst: A CloudSim-based Visual Modeller for Analysing Cloud Computing Environments and Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buyya, Rajkumar

    CloudAnalyst: A CloudSim-based Visual Modeller for Analysing Cloud Computing Environments and Applications Bhathiya Wickremasinghe1 , Rodrigo N. Calheiros2 , and Rajkumar Buyya1 1 The Cloud Computing and Distributed Systems (CLOUDS) Laboratory Department of Computer Science and Software Engineering The University

  10. Cloud in a Bottle Demonstrate how pressure relates to cloud formation by making a cloud in a soda bottle.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Cari

    Cloud in a Bottle Demonstrate how pressure relates to cloud formation by making a cloud in a soda doesn't escape. 5. Squeeze the soda bottle and release, repeating several times. Eventually, a cloud construction paper (or anything dark) on half of the bottle may make the cloud easier to see. What Happened

  11. Retrievals of cloud optical depth and effective radius from Thin-Cloud Rotating Shadowband Radiometer measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Retrievals of cloud optical depth and effective radius from Thin-Cloud Rotating Shadowband December 2011. [1] A Thin-Cloud Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (TCRSR) was developed and deployed) through an optically thin cloud (optical depth

  12. Application of Stochastic Radiative Transfer Theory to the ARM Cloud-Radiative Parameterization Problem

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dana E. Veron

    2012-04-09

    This project had two primary goals: (1) development of stochastic radiative transfer as a parameterization that could be employed in an AGCM environment, and (2) exploration of the stochastic approach as a means for representing shortwave radiative transfer through mixed-phase layer clouds. To achieve these goals, climatology of cloud properties was developed at the ARM CART sites, an analysis of the performance of the stochastic approach was performed, a simple stochastic cloud-radiation parameterization for an AGCM was developed and tested, a statistical description of Arctic mixed phase clouds was developed and the appropriateness of stochastic approach for representing radiative transfer through mixed-phase clouds was assessed. Significant progress has been made in all of these areas and is detailed in the final report.

  13. Model-Driven Integration for a Service Placement Optimizer in a Sustainable Cloud of Clouds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suzuki, Jun

    --"Cloud of clouds" (or federated cloud) is an emerg- ing style of software deployment and execution to interoperate, federated clouds, model-driven system integration and sustainable clouds I. INTRODUCTION Cloud computing, cost effective (e.g., energy effi- cient) service/data placement and avoidance of "lock

  14. CLOUD CLASSIFICATION AND CLOUD PROPERTY RETRIEVAL FROM MODIS , W. Paul Menzel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Jun

    6.4 CLOUD CLASSIFICATION AND CLOUD PROPERTY RETRIEVAL FROM MODIS AND AIRS Jun Li * , W. Paul Menzel Observing System's (EOS) Aqua satellite enable global monitoring of the distribution of clouds. The MODIS is able to provide at high spatial resolution (1 ~ 5km) a cloud mask, surface and cloud types, cloud phase

  15. PC Mac OS Adobe Creative Cloud PC Mac OS Adobe Creative Cloud

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PC Mac OS Adobe Creative Cloud 1 PC Mac OS Adobe Creative Cloud 2015-05-25 1 Web Mac OS Adobe Creative Cloud PC | Creative Cloud https://helpx.adobe.com/jp/creative-cloud Adobe Creative Cloud 5.1 Web TTInstaller (Mac OS X )() http://www.officesoft.gsic.titech.ac.jp/pdf

  16. Migrating enterprise storage applications to the cloud

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vrable, Michael Daniel

    2011-01-01

    1.1 Cloud Computing Applications 1.2Zaharia. A view of cloud computing. Communications of theM. Voelker, Co-Chair Cloud computing has emerged as a model

  17. The Magellan Final Report on Cloud Computing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coghlan, Susan

    2013-01-01

    4.3.1 Cloud Computing Attractive Features . 4.3.2A berkeley view of cloud computing. Technical Report UCB/matching computations on cloud computing platforms and hpc

  18. The Cloud Computing and Other Variables

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borjon-Kubota, Martha Estela

    2011-01-01

    12. Fragments in Six 13. Cloud Computing 14. Phase 15.Note 48. Devoured vi Cloud Computing and other Variables I.CALIFORNIA RIVERSIDE Cloud Computing and Other Variables A

  19. Magellan: experiences from a Science Cloud

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramakrishnan, Lavanya

    2013-01-01

    the security implications of user-controlled cloud images?key security practices and policies on private clouds, suchand security poli- cies will remain, and sites moving to cloud

  20. Trusted Cloud: Microsoft Azure Security, Privacy,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chaudhuri, Surajit

    Trusted Cloud: Microsoft Azure Security, Privacy, and Compliance April 2015 #12;Trusted Cloud................................................................. 18 #12;Trusted Cloud: Microsoft Azure Security, Privacy, and Compliance | April, 2015 Introduction: Microsoft Azure Security, Privacy, and Compliance | April, 2015 #12;3 Contents Introduction

  1. Cicada: Predictive Guarantees for Cloud Network Bandwidth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LaCurts, Katrina

    2014-03-24

    In cloud-computing systems, network-bandwidth guarantees have been shown to improve predictability of application performance and cost. Most previous work on cloud-bandwidth guarantees has assumed that cloud tenants know ...

  2. Electron-Cloud Build-Up: Summary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Furman, M.A.

    2007-01-01

    Properties In?uencing Electron Cloud Phenomena,” Appl. Surf.Dissipation of the Electron Cloud,” Proc. PAC03 (Portland,is no signi?cant electron-cloud under nominal operating

  3. Magellan: experiences from a Science Cloud

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramakrishnan, Lavanya

    2013-01-01

    2010. From Clusters To Clouds: xCAT 2 Is Out Of The Bag.Cost of Doing Science on the Cloud: The Montage Example. Incost of doing science on the cloud: the montage example. In

  4. Bringing Clouds into Focus

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D B L OBransen Plasma Asher An O2 RFand1120019Bringing Clouds into

  5. Digital Ecosystems in the Clouds: Towards Community Cloud Computing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Briscoe, Gerard

    2009-01-01

    Cloud Computing is rising fast, with its data centres growing at an unprecedented rate. However, this has come with concerns of privacy, efficiency at the expense of resilience, and environmental sustainability, because of the dependence on Cloud vendors such as Google, Amazon, and Microsoft. Community Cloud Computing makes use of the principles of Digital Ecosystems to provide a paradigm for Clouds in the community, offering an alternative architecture for the use cases of Cloud Computing. Its more technically challenging, dealing with issues of distributed computing, such as latency, differential resource management, and additional security requirements. However, these are not insurmountable challenges, and with the need to retain control over our digital lives and the potential environmental consequences, its one we must pursue.

  6. Brunnian Braids Boundary Brunnian Braids Main Results Boundary Brunnian braids, mirror reflection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Jie

    Brunnian Braids Boundary Brunnian Braids Main Results Boundary Brunnian braids, mirror reflection December 17, 2007 #12;Brunnian Braids Boundary Brunnian Braids Main Results Boundary Brunnian braids, mirror reflection and the homotopy groups Brunnian Braids Boundary Brunnian Braids Main Results #12

  7. Implementation of the Immersed Boundary Method in the Weather Research and Forecasting model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lundquist, K A

    2006-12-07

    Accurate simulations of atmospheric boundary layer flow are vital for predicting dispersion of contaminant releases, particularly in densely populated urban regions where first responders must react within minutes and the consequences of forecast errors are potentially disastrous. Current mesoscale models do not account for urban effects, and conversely urban scale models do not account for mesoscale weather features or atmospheric physics. The ultimate goal of this research is to develop and implement an immersed boundary method (IBM) along with a surface roughness parameterization into the mesoscale Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. IBM will be used in WRF to represent the complex boundary conditions imposed by urban landscapes, while still including forcing from regional weather patterns and atmospheric physics. This document details preliminary results of this research, including the details of three distinct implementations of the immersed boundary method. Results for the three methods are presented for the case of a rotation influenced neutral atmospheric boundary layer over flat terrain.

  8. Cloud Computing and Validation of Expandable In Silico Livers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ropella, Glen EP; Hunt, C Anthony

    2010-01-01

    with access to computer clusters. Cloud technology coupledto computer clusters. The availability of cloud technology

  9. Gradient zone boundary control in salt gradient solar ponds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hull, John R. (Downers Grove, IL)

    1984-01-01

    A method and apparatus for suppressing zone boundary migration in a salt gradient solar pond includes extending perforated membranes across the pond at the boundaries, between the convective and non-convective zones, the perforations being small enough in size to prevent individual turbulence disturbances from penetrating the hole, but being large enough to allow easy molecular diffusion of salt thereby preventing the formation of convective zones in the gradient layer. The total area of the perforations is a sizable fraction of the membrane area to allow sufficient salt diffusion while preventing turbulent entrainment into the gradient zone.

  10. The Magellan Final Report on Cloud Computing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coghlan, Susan

    2013-01-01

    of computer security are evolving for cloud computingcomputer forensic space a way to integrate their tools with the cloudthe cloud business model. In addition to answering computer

  11. WEATHER MODIFICATION BY AIRCRAFT CLOUD SEEDING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vali, Gabor

    WEATHER MODIFICATION BY AIRCRAFT CLOUD SEEDING BERYULEV G.P. Head, Department of Cloud Physics and Weather Modification Central Aerological Observatory Rosgidromet, Russian Federation #12

  12. Cloud Seeding By: Julie Walter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toohey, Darin W.

    , smoke, that then are cooled because of the high altitudes. As the water or condensation nuclei cool more titled "Cat's Cradle" a young scientist has in his possession an ice crystal that has the power to freeze of those clouds. Winds can form suddenly and blow clouds away from the targeted area. Some experiments show

  13. Photovoltaic devices comprising zinc stannate buffer layer and method for making

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wu, Xuanzhi (Golden, CO); Sheldon, Peter (Lakewood, CO); Coutts, Timothy J. (Lakewood, CO)

    2001-01-01

    A photovoltaic device has a buffer layer zinc stannate Zn.sub.2 SnO.sub.4 disposed between the semiconductor junction structure and the transparent conducting oxide (TCO) layer to prevent formation of localized junctions with the TCO through a thin window semiconductor layer, to prevent shunting through etched grain boundaries of semiconductors, and to relieve stresses and improve adhesion between these layers.

  14. Security and the Cloud: Cloud Trust BrokersCloud Trust Brokers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sandhu, Ravi

    analogs of previously existing enterprise centric Future applications and application layer tecnologies will be fundamentallypreviously existing enterprise-centric applications · on-line banking brokerage layer tecnologies

  15. Boundary Degeneracy of Topological Order

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Juven Wang; Xiao-Gang Wen

    2015-01-15

    We introduce the concept of boundary degeneracy of topologically ordered states on a compact orientable spatial manifold with boundaries, and emphasize that the boundary degeneracy provides richer information than the bulk degeneracy. Beyond the bulk-edge correspondence, we find the ground state degeneracy of the fully gapped edge modes depends on boundary gapping conditions. By associating different types of boundary gapping conditions as different ways of particle or quasiparticle condensations on the boundary, we develop an analytic theory of gapped boundaries. By Chern-Simons theory, this allows us to derive the ground state degeneracy formula in terms of boundary gapping conditions, which encodes more than the fusion algebra of fractionalized quasiparticles. We apply our theory to Kitaev's toric code and Levin-Wen string-net models. We predict that the $Z_2$ toric code and $Z_2$ double-semion model (more generally, the $Z_k$ gauge theory and the $U(1)_k \\times U(1)_{-k}$ non-chiral fractional quantum Hall state at even integer $k$) can be numerically and experimentally distinguished, by measuring their boundary degeneracy on an annulus or a cylinder.

  16. Evidence that ice forms primarily in supercooled liquid clouds at temperatures > -27C2 C. D. Westbrook and A. J. Illingworth3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reading, University of

    layer of supercooled liquid water droplets at the25 top of ice-phase clouds has been observed in several cases (Rauber and Tokay 1991), but the26 fraction of ice clouds which have liquid water at the top has case where the air35 was supersaturated with respect to ice but below liquid water saturation: ice

  17. An interfacial transport theory for electro-chemical phenomena with emphasis on electric double layers 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ambati, Muralidhar S

    2002-01-01

    -dimensional theory in which the effects of the double layer are included as boundary conditions for the volume equations. Example solutions are provided for electroosmosis, including electro-Poiseuille flow and electro-Couette flow....

  18. Photonic layered media

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fleming, James G. (Albuquerque, NM); Lin, Shawn-Yu (Albuquerque, NM)

    2002-01-01

    A new class of structured dielectric media which exhibit significant photonic bandstructure has been invented. The new structures, called photonic layered media, are easy to fabricate using existing layer-by-layer growth techniques, and offer the ability to significantly extend our practical ability to tailor the properties of such optical materials.

  19. Draft NISTIR 80061 NIST Cloud Computing2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Draft NISTIR 80061 NIST Cloud Computing2 Forensic Science Challenges NIST Cloud Computing Forensic Computing11 Forensic Science Challenges 12 NIST Cloud Computing Forensic Science Working Group13 Information challenges77 faced by experts when responding to incidents that have occurred in a cloud-computing ecosystem

  20. Secure Cloud Computing With Brokered Trusted

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Secure Cloud Computing With Brokered Trusted Sensor Networks Profs. Steven Myers,Apu Kapadia, Xiao-mount Antenna Tower-mount Antenna Wireless Bridge Security Threats 1. Cloud or Grid 2. Communication Channels 3 Computing Cloud Computing Cloud Computing Tower-mount Antenna Tower-mount Antenna Wireless Bridge Security

  1. An Architecture for Trusted Clouds Mike Burmester

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burmester, Mike

    reasoning will play a major role. In this paper we analyze the cloud paradigm from a security point of view, but it is also technically easier to secure. Finally, the Cloud has a dark side, at least from a security point regulatory and security policies; and hybrid clouds. Services. There are three basic cloud on demand

  2. Why the network matters in cloud computing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenberg, Albert

    this promise, and security concerns still loom AT&T NetBond AT&T network enabled cloud computing provides highly-secure access, with the cloud functioning just like another MPLS VPN site. It also allowsWhy the network matters in cloud computing The promise of cloud hinges on flexibility, agility

  3. NIST Cloud Computing Forum and Workshop VIII

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NIST Cloud Computing Forum and Workshop VIII Kevin Mills, NIST July 9, 2015 #12;NIST Cloud Project Research Goals Kevin Mills, NIST #12;NIST Cloud Computing Forum and Workshop VIII July 2 015 failure scenarios in a cloud system · Ongoing work on run-time methods · Where to find more information 3

  4. EWI PDS A.Iosup Research Cloud Computing Cloud Computing Research, PDS Group, TU Delft

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iosup, Alexandru

    EWI PDS A.Iosup Research Cloud Computing Cloud Computing Research, PDS Group, TU Delft Cloud Computing Research http://www.pds.ewi.tudelft.nl/~iosup/research_cloud.html Rationale why and how is this work relevant? Cloud computing is an emerging commercial infrastructure paradigm that promises

  5. Storm Clouds Rising: Security Challenges for IaaS Cloud Computing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bishop, Matt

    Storm Clouds Rising: Security Challenges for IaaS Cloud Computing Brian Hay Kara Nance Matt Bishop on security concerns for computational cloud computing from the perspectives of cloud service users, cloud.hay@alaska.edu klnance@alaska.edu bishop@cs.ucdavis.edu Abstract Securing our digital assets has become increasingly

  6. Vision: Cloud-Powered Sight for All Showing the Cloud What You See

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhong, Lin

    General Terms Algorithms, Design, Human Factors, Languages, Performance, Security Keywords Camera, cloudVision: Cloud-Powered Sight for All Showing the Cloud What You See Paramvir Bahl Matthai Philipose argue that for computers to do more for us, we need to show the cloud what we see and embrace cloud

  7. EVALUATION OF INTERNATIONAL SATELLITE CLOUD CLIMATOLOGY PROJECT (ISCCP) D2 CLOUD AMOUNT CHANGES AND THEIR CONNECTIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schubert, Wayne H.

    EVALUATION OF INTERNATIONAL SATELLITE CLOUD CLIMATOLOGY PROJECT (ISCCP) D2 CLOUD AMOUNT CHANGES #12;ii #12;iii ABSTRACT EVALUATION OF INTERNATIONAL SATELLITE CLOUD CLIMATOLOGY PROJECT (ISCCP) D2 Climatology Project (ISCCP) D2 dataset exhibits a 2.6% per decade decrease in the global all-cloud cloud

  8. Decomposing aerosol cloud radiative effects into cloud cover, liquid water path and Twomey components

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel, Rosenfeld

    Decomposing aerosol cloud radiative effects into cloud cover, liquid water path and Twomey December 2013 A method for separating the three components of the marine stratocumulus (MSC) aerosol cloud interactions radiative effects, i.e., the cloud cover, liquid water path (LWP) and cloud drop radius (Twomey

  9. Cloud Futures Workshop 2010 Cloud Computing Support for Massively Social Gaming Alexandru Iosup

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iosup, Alexandru

    1 Cloud Futures Workshop 2010 ­ Cloud Computing Support for Massively Social Gaming Alexandru Iosup Pierre (Vrije U.). Cloud Computing Support for Massively Social Gaming (Rain for the Thirsty) #12;Cloud Futures Workshop 2010 ­ Cloud Computing Support for Massively Social Gaming 2 Intermezzo: Tips on how

  10. Cloud radar Doppler spectra in drizzling stratiform clouds: 2. Observations and microphysical modeling of drizzle evolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cloud radar Doppler spectra in drizzling stratiform clouds: 2. Observations and microphysical I, the influence of cloud microphysics and dynamics on the shape of cloud radar Doppler spectra in warm stratiform clouds was discussed. The traditional analysis of radar Doppler moments was extended

  11. Cloud water contents and hydrometeor sizes during the FIRE Arctic Clouds Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shupe, Matthew

    Cloud water contents and hydrometeor sizes during the FIRE Arctic Clouds Experiment Matthew D a 35-GHz cloud radar and the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program operated a suite Clouds Experiment took place during April­July 1998, with the primary goal of investigating cloud

  12. A CloudSat cloud object partitioning technique and assessment and integration of deep

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collett Jr., Jeffrey L.

    A CloudSat cloud object partitioning technique and assessment and integration of deep convective, USA Abstract A cloud object partitioning algorithm is developed to provide a widely useful database of deep convective clouds. It takes contiguous CloudSat cloudy regions and identifies various length

  13. COLD WATER VAPOR IN THE BARNARD 5 MOLECULAR CLOUD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wirström, E. S.; Persson, C. M.; Charnley, S. B.; Cordiner, M. A.; Buckle, J. V.; Takakuwa, S.

    2014-06-20

    After more than 30 yr of investigations, the nature of gas-grain interactions at low temperatures remains an unresolved issue in astrochemistry. Water ice is the dominant ice found in cold molecular clouds; however, there is only one region where cold (?10 K) water vapor has been detected—L1544. This study aims to shed light on ice desorption mechanisms under cold cloud conditions by expanding the sample. The clumpy distribution of methanol in dark clouds testifies to transient desorption processes at work—likely to also disrupt water ice mantles. Therefore, the Herschel HIFI instrument was used to search for cold water in a small sample of prominent methanol emission peaks. We report detections of the ground-state transition of o-H{sub 2}O (J = 1{sub 10}-1{sub 01}) at 556.9360 GHz toward two positions in the cold molecular cloud, Barnard 5. The relative abundances of methanol and water gas support a desorption mechanism which disrupts the outer ice mantle layers, rather than causing complete mantle removal.

  14. Scintillator reflective layer coextrusion

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yun, Jae-Chul (Naperville, IL); Para, Adam (St. Charles, IL)

    2001-01-01

    A polymeric scintillator has a reflective layer adhered to the exterior surface thereof. The reflective layer comprises a reflective pigment and an adhesive binder. The adhesive binder includes polymeric material from which the scintillator is formed. A method of forming the polymeric scintillator having a reflective layer adhered to the exterior surface thereof is also provided. The method includes the steps of (a) extruding an inner core member from a first amount of polymeric scintillator material, and (b) coextruding an outer reflective layer on the exterior surface of the inner core member. The outer reflective layer comprises a reflective pigment and a second amount of the polymeric scintillator material.

  15. Vacuum Structure and Boundary Renormalization Group

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Asorey; J. M. Munoz-Castaneda

    2007-12-28

    The vacuum structure is probed by boundary conditions. The behaviour of thermodynamical quantities like free energy, boundary entropy and entanglement entropy under the boundary renormalization group flow are analysed in 2D conformal field theories. The results show that whereas vacuum energy and boundary entropy turn out to be very sensitive to boundary conditions, the vacuum entanglement entropy is independent of boundary properties when the boundary of the entanglement domain does not overlap the boundary of the physical space. In all cases the second law of thermodynamics holds along the boundary renormalization group flow.

  16. Bifurcations from steady sliding to stick slip in boundary lubrication A. A. Batista and J. M. Carlson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carlson, Jean

    Bifurcations from steady sliding to stick slip in boundary lubrication A. A. Batista and J. M in models for boundary lubrication introduced in J. M. Carlson and A. A. Batista, Phys. Rev. E 53, 4153 1996 distinguishing features associated with surfaces separated by a few molecular layers of lubricant. Here we find

  17. Prospects for Simulating Macromolecular Surfactant Chemistry at the Ocean-Atmosphere Boundary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elliott, S.; Burrows, Susannah M.; Deal, C.; Liu, Xiaohong; Long, M.; Ogunro, O.; Russell, Lynn M.; Wingenter, O.

    2014-05-01

    Biogenic lipids and polymers are surveyed for their ability to adsorb at the water-air interfaces associated with bubbles, marine microlayers and particles in the overlying boundary layer. Representative ocean biogeochemical regimes are defined in order to estimate local concentrations for the major macromolecular classes. Surfactant equilibria and maximum excess are then derived based on a network of model compounds. Relative local coverage and upward mass transport follow directly, and specific chemical structures can be placed into regional rank order. Lipids and denatured protein-like polymers dominate at the selected locations. The assigned monolayer phase states are variable, whether assessed along bubbles or at the atmospheric spray droplet perimeter. Since oceanic film compositions prove to be irregular, effects on gas and organic transfer are expected to exhibit geographic dependence as well. Moreover, the core arguments extend across the sea-air interface into aerosol-cloud systems. Fundamental nascent chemical properties including mass to carbon ratio and density depend strongly on the geochemical state of source waters. High surface pressures may suppress the Kelvin effect, and marine organic hygroscopicities are almost entirely unconstrained. While bubble adsorption provides a well-known means for transporting lipidic or proteinaceous material into sea spray, the same cannot be said of polysaccharides. Carbohydrates tend to be strongly hydrophilic so that their excess carbon mass is low despite stacked polymeric geometries. Since sugars are abundant in the marine aerosol, gel-based mechanisms may be required to achieve uplift. Uncertainties in the surfactant logic distill to a global scale dearth of information regarding two dimensional kinetics and equilibria. Nonetheless simulations are recommended, to initiate the process of systems level quantification.

  18. CumuloNimbo: A Cloud Scalable Multi-tier SQL Database Ricardo Jimenez-Peris

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Politécnica de Madrid, Universidad

    complex due to the data and transaction management that must be spread across and between different layers Cloud4BigData (S2013/ICE-2894) cofunded by FSE & FEDER and CoherentPaaS and LeanBigData FP7 projects

  19. Towards Composing Data Aware Systems Biology Workflows on Cloud Platforms: A MeDICi-based Approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gorton, Ian; Liu, Yan; Yin, Jian; Kulkarni, Anand V.; Wynne, Adam S.

    2011-09-08

    Cloud computing is being increasingly adopted for deploying systems biology scientific workflows. Scientists developing these workflows use a wide variety of fragmented and competing data sets and computational tools of all scales to support their research. To this end, the synergy of client side workflow tools with cloud platforms is a promising approach to share and reuse data and workflows. In such systems, the location of data and computation is essential consideration in terms of quality of service for composing a scientific workflow across remote cloud platforms. In this paper, we describe a cloud-based workflow for genome annotation processing that is underpinned by MeDICi - a middleware designed for data intensive scientific applications. The workflow implementation incorporates an execution layer for exploiting data locality that routes the workflow requests to the processing steps that are colocated with the data. We demonstrate our approach by composing two workflowswith the MeDICi pipelines.

  20. Photolysis rates in correlated overlapping cloud fields: Cloud-J 7.3c

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prather, MJ

    2015-01-01

    Collins, W. : Effect of clouds on photolysis and oxidants insimulation of in- and below-cloud photolysis in troposphericS. , and Liu, X. : Effects of cloud overlap in photochemical

  1. A SYNERGY OF MICROWAVE CLOUD TOMOGRAPHY AND SCANNING RADAR: MOVING TOWARD A 3D VIEW OF CLOUDS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A SYNERGY OF MICROWAVE CLOUD TOMOGRAPHY AND SCANNING RADAR: MOVING TOWARD A 3D VIEW OF CLOUDS D complementary techniques, i.e., cloud microwave tomography and scanning radar, to retrieve 3D cloud properties the sixth moment of cloud droplets, while cloud tomography, by remotely probing cloud microwave emission

  2. Redefining the Cloud based on Beneficial Service Characteristics A New Cloud Taxonomy Leads to Economically Reasonable Semi-cloudification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Redefining the Cloud based on Beneficial Service Characteristics A New Cloud Taxonomy Leads, Germany kemmler@lrz.de Keywords: Cloud, Semi-cloud, Service, Cloud Service, Semi-cloud Service, Service Management. Abstract: Cloud services promise benefits for customers and providers such as scalability

  3. Resource Allocation and Scheduling in Heterogeneous Cloud Environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Gunho

    2012-01-01

    1] Open Cirrus cloud computing testbed. http://10] Early experiments in cloud computing. http://on Hot topics in cloud computing, pages 12–12, 2009. [29

  4. Cloud Computing and Validation of Expandable In Silico Livers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ropella, Glen EP; Hunt, C Anthony

    2010-01-01

    benefit analysis of cloud computing versus desktop grids.as: Ropella and Hunt: Cloud computing and validation ofCloud computing and validation of expandable in silico

  5. RFID Asset Management Solution with Cloud Computation Service

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chattopadhyay, Arunabh

    2012-01-01

    A berkeley view of cloud computing”, EECS Department,and S. Sarma, “Cloud computing, rest and mashups to simplifyand/or frameworks. Cloud computing can be defined as

  6. Simulations of Midlatitude Frontal Clouds by Single-Column and...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    and 4 cloud resolving models (CRMs) in simulating a strong midlatitude frontal cloud system taken from the Spring 2000 Cloud Intensive Observational Period at the ARM Southern...

  7. Collapse and fragmentation of magnetic molecular cloud cores with the Enzo AMR MHD code. II. Prolate and oblate cores

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boss, Alan P.; Keiser, Sandra A.

    2014-10-10

    We present the results of a large suite of three-dimensional models of the collapse of magnetic molecular cloud cores using the adaptive mesh refinement code Enzo2.2 in the ideal magnetohydrodynamics approximation. The cloud cores are initially either prolate or oblate, centrally condensed clouds with masses of 1.73 or 2.73 M {sub ?}, respectively. The radial density profiles are Gaussian, with central densities 20 times higher than boundary densities. A barotropic equation of state is used to represent the transition from low density isothermal phases, to high density optically thick phases. The initial magnetic field strength ranges from 6.3 to 100 ?G, corresponding to clouds that are strongly to marginally supercritical, respectively, in terms of the mass to magnetic flux ratio. The magnetic field is initially uniform and aligned with the clouds' rotation axes, with initial ratios of rotational to gravitational energy ranging from 10{sup –4} to 0.1. Two significantly different outcomes for collapse result: (1) formation of single protostars with spiral arms, and (2) fragmentation into multiple protostar systems. The transition between these two outcomes depends primarily on the initial magnetic field strength, with fragmentation occurring for mass to flux ratios greater than about 14 times the critical ratio for prolate clouds. Oblate clouds typically fragment into several times more clumps than prolate clouds. Multiple, rather than binary, system formation is the general rule in either case, suggesting that binary stars are primarily the result of the orbital dissolution of multiple protostar systems.

  8. Layered plasma polymer composite membranes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Babcock, W.C.

    1994-10-11

    Layered plasma polymer composite fluid separation membranes are disclosed, which comprise alternating selective and permeable layers for a total of at least 2n layers, where n is [>=]2 and is the number of selective layers. 2 figs.

  9. The Evolution of Cloud Computing in ATLAS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Ryan P.; The ATLAS collaboration; Love, Peter; Leblanc, Matthew Edgar; Di Girolamo, Alessandro; Paterson, Michael; Gable, Ian; Sobie, Randall; Field, Laurence

    2015-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment has successfully incorporated cloud computing technology and cloud resources into its primarily grid-based model of distributed computing. Cloud R&D activities continue to mature and transition into stable production systems, while ongoing evolutionary changes are still needed to adapt and refine the approaches used, in response to changes in prevailing cloud technology. In addition, completely new developments are needed to handle emerging requirements. This work will describe the overall evolution of cloud computing in ATLAS. The current status of the VM management systems used for harnessing IAAS resources will be discussed. Monitoring and accounting systems tailored for clouds are needed to complete the integration of cloud resources within ATLAS' distributed computing framework. We are developing and deploying new solutions to address the challenge of operation in a geographically distributed multi-cloud scenario, including a system for managing VM images across multiple clouds, ...

  10. UNDERSTANDING TRENDS ASSOCIATED WITH CLOUDS IN IRRADIATED EXOPLANETS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heng, Kevin; Demory, Brice-Olivier E-mail: demory@mit.edu

    2013-11-10

    Unlike previously explored relationships between the properties of hot Jovian atmospheres, the geometric albedo and the incident stellar flux do not exhibit a clear correlation, as revealed by our re-analysis of Q0-Q14 Kepler data. If the albedo is primarily associated with the presence of clouds in these irradiated atmospheres, a holistic modeling approach needs to relate the following properties: the strength of stellar irradiation (and hence the strength and depth of atmospheric circulation), the geometric albedo (which controls both the fraction of starlight absorbed and the pressure level at which it is predominantly absorbed), and the properties of the embedded cloud particles (which determine the albedo). The anticipated diversity in cloud properties renders any correlation between the geometric albedo and the stellar flux weak and characterized by considerable scatter. In the limit of vertically uniform populations of scatterers and absorbers, we use an analytical model and scaling relations to relate the temperature-pressure profile of an irradiated atmosphere and the photon deposition layer and to estimate whether a cloud particle will be lofted by atmospheric circulation. We derive an analytical formula for computing the albedo spectrum in terms of the cloud properties, which we compare to the measured albedo spectrum of HD 189733b by Evans et al. Furthermore, we show that whether an optical phase curve is flat or sinusoidal depends on whether the particles are small or large as defined by the Knudsen number. This may be an explanation for why Kepler-7b exhibits evidence for the longitudinal variation in abundance of condensates, while Kepler-12b shows no evidence for the presence of condensates despite the incident stellar flux being similar for both exoplanets. We include an 'observer's cookbook' for deciphering various scenarios associated with the optical phase curve, the peak offset of the infrared phase curve, and the geometric albedo.

  11. Dynamics of thermochemical plumes: 1. Plume formation and entrainment of a dense layer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Keken, Peter

    Dynamics of thermochemical plumes: 1. Plume formation and entrainment of a dense layer Shu investigate the formation of plumes from a thermochemical boundary layer and the entrainment of the dense three factors influence the nature of plume formation and entrainment of dense material. The complexity

  12. The influence of mixed and phase clouds on surface shortwave irradiance during the Arctic spring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lubin D.; Vogelmann A.

    2011-10-13

    The influence of mixed-phase stratiform clouds on the surface shortwave irradiance is examined using unique spectral shortwave irradiance measurements made during the Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC), supported by the U.S. Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program. An Analytical Spectral Devices (ASD, Inc.) spectroradiometer measured downwelling spectral irradiance from 350 to 2200 nm in one-minute averages throughout April-May 2008 from the ARM Climate Research Facility's North Slope of Alaska (NSA) site at Barrow. This study examines spectral irradiance measurements made under single-layer, overcast cloud decks having geometric thickness < 3000 m. Cloud optical depth is retrieved from irradiance in the interval 1022-1033 nm. The contrasting surface radiative influences of mixed-phase clouds and liquid-water clouds are discerned using irradiances in the 1.6-{micro}m window. Compared with liquid-water clouds, mixed-phase clouds during the Arctic spring cause a greater reduction of shortwave irradiance at the surface. At fixed conservative-scattering optical depth (constant optical depth for wavelengths {lambda} < 1100 nm), the presence of ice water in cloud reduces the near-IR surface irradiance by an additional several watts-per-meter-squared. This additional reduction, or supplemental ice absorption, is typically {approx}5 W m{sup -2} near solar noon over Barrow, and decreases with increasing solar zenith angle. However, for some cloud decks this additional absorption can be as large as 8-10 W m{sup -2}.

  13. An Inter-Cloud Architecture for Future Internet Infrastructures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petrakis, Euripides G.M.

    An Inter-Cloud Architecture for Future Internet Infrastructures STELIOS SOTIRIADIS, Technical, Technical University of Crete, Greece Iaan latest years, the concept of interconnecting clouds to allow of cloud resources from Internet users. An efficient common management between different clouds

  14. Multiple density layered insulator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Alger, Terry W. (Tracy, CA)

    1994-01-01

    A multiple density layered insulator for use with a laser is disclosed wh provides at least two different insulation materials for a laser discharge tube, where the two insulation materials have different thermoconductivities. The multiple layer insulation materials provide for improved thermoconductivity capability for improved laser operation.

  15. Evidence for Cloud Disruption in the L/T Dwarf Transition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adam J. Burgasser; Mark S. Marley; Andrew S. Ackerman; Didier Saumon; Katharina Lodders; Conard C. Dahn; Hugh C. Harris; J. Davy Kirkpatrick

    2002-05-03

    Clouds of metal-bearing condensates play a critical role in shaping the emergent spectral energy distributions of the coolest classes of low-mass stars and brown dwarfs, L and T dwarfs. Because condensate clouds in planetary atmospheres show distinct horizontal structure, we have explored a model for partly cloudy atmospheres in brown dwarfs. Our model successfully reproduces the colors and magnitudes of both L and T dwarfs for the first time, including the unexpected brightning of the early- and mid-type T dwarfs at J-band, provided that clouds are rapidly removed from the photosphere at T_eff ~ 1200 K. The clearing of cloud layers also explains the surprising persistence and strengthening of gaseous FeH bands in early- and mid-type T dwarfs. The breakup of cloud layers is likely driven by convection in the troposphere, analogous to phenomena observed on Jupiter. Our results demonstrate that planetary-like atmospheric dynamics must be considered when examining the evolution of free-floating brown dwarfs.

  16. Disruptive technology business models in cloud computing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krikos, Alexis Christopher

    2010-01-01

    Cloud computing, a term whose origins have been in existence for more than a decade, has come into fruition due to technological capabilities and marketplace demands. Cloud computing can be defined as a scalable and flexible ...

  17. The Evolution of Cloud Computing in ATLAS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Ryan P; The ATLAS collaboration; Brasolin, Franco; Cordeiro, Cristovao; Desmarais, Ron; Field, Laurence; Gable, Ian; Giordano, Domenico; Di Girolamo, Alessandro; Hover, John; Leblanc, Matthew Edgar; Love, Peter; Paterson, Michael; Sobie, Randall; Zaytsev, Alexandr

    2015-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment has successfully incorporated cloud computing technology and cloud resources into its primarily grid-based model of distributed computing. Cloud R&D activities continue to mature and transition into stable production systems, while ongoing evolutionary changes are still needed to adapt and refine the approaches used, in response to changes in prevailing cloud technology. In addition, completely new developments are needed to handle emerging requirements. This paper describes the overall evolution of cloud computing in ATLAS. The current status of the virtual machine (VM) management systems used for harnessing infrastructure as a service (IaaS) resources are discussed. Monitoring and accounting systems tailored for clouds are needed to complete the integration of cloud resources within ATLAS' distributed computing framework. We are developing and deploying new solutions to address the challenge of operation in a geographically distributed multi-cloud scenario, including a system for ma...

  18. VOLUMETRIC SNAPPING: WATERTIGHT TRIANGULATION OF POINT CLOUDS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Floater, Michael S.

    VOLUMETRIC SNAPPING: WATERTIGHT TRIANGULATION OF POINT CLOUDS Tim Volodine KULeuven, Department: meshing, surface reconstruction, volumetric grid, contouring, point clouds. Abstract: We propose, a volumetric method that does not rely on a signed distance function was proposed recently by Hornung

  19. Changes in high cloud conditions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Himebrook, Richard Frank

    1974-01-01

    of contrails, while in a more humid environment contrails wi. ll form. ilovis et al. (1970) showed that, over the 0. 68-2. 4p wavelength interval, "naturally" formed ice clouds and a fresh contrail show different signatures (which could be observed... prime cause for a change in the amount of high clouds, the Location of stations with respect to the jet routes was also reviewed. Atlanta, Ceorgia, was selected because it is a ma ~or air Lr r- minal and its upper-air liow advects jet...

  20. AnonymousCloud: A Data Ownership Privacy Provider Framework in Cloud Computing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamlen, Kevin W.

    AnonymousCloud: A Data Ownership Privacy Provider Framework in Cloud Computing Safwan Mahmud Khan their computation results are ultimately delivered. To provide this data ownership privacy, the cloud's distributed-anonymity; authentication; cloud computing; in- formation security; privacy; Tor I. INTRODUCTION Revolutionary advances

  1. CloudHKA: A Cryptographic Approach for Hierarchical Access Control in Cloud Computing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR)

    CloudHKA: A Cryptographic Approach for Hierarchical Access Control in Cloud Computing Yi-Ruei Chen1, cloud computing, proxy re-encryption 1 Introduction Outsourcing data to cloud server (CS) becomes , Cheng-Kang Chu2 , Wen-Guey Tzeng3 , and Jianying Zhou4 1,3 Department of Computer Science, National

  2. CLOUD COMPUTING AND INFORMATION POLICY 1 Cloud Computing and Information Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daume III, Hal

    . Keywords: cloud computing, information policy, rechnology policy, grid computing, security, privacyCLOUD COMPUTING AND INFORMATION POLICY 1 Cloud Computing and Information Policy: Computing in a Policy Cloud? Forthcoming in the Journal of Information Technology and Politics, 5(3). Paul T. Jaeger

  3. IsYour Network Cloud Ready? Network EnableYour Cloud With MPLSVPNs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenberg, Albert

    -enabled cloud that is highly-secure and reliable. It is critical for enterprises to evaluate a network, but the high level of shared infrastructure creates concerns about security risks.As a result, the public cloudIsYour Network Cloud Ready? Network EnableYour Cloud With MPLSVPNs A FROST & SULLIVAN EXECUTIVE

  4. Home is Safer than the Cloud! Privacy Concerns for Consumer Cloud Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for sensitive data over cloud storage. However, users desire better security and are ready to pay for services storage systems. General Terms Human Factors, Security, Privacy. Keywords Cloud Storage, Social FactorsHome is Safer than the Cloud! Privacy Concerns for Consumer Cloud Storage Iulia Ion , Niharika

  5. CloudWatcher: Network Security Monitoring Using OpenFlow in Dynamic Cloud Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gu, Guofei

    CloudWatcher: Network Security Monitoring Using OpenFlow in Dynamic Cloud Networks (or: How to Provide Security Monitoring as a Service in Clouds?) Seungwon Shin SUCCESS Lab Texas A&M University Email, basically, we can employ existing network security devices, but applying them to a cloud network requires

  6. StressCloud: A Tool for Analysing Performance and Energy Consumption of Cloud Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Yun

    StressCloud: A Tool for Analysing Performance and Energy Consumption of Cloud Applications Feifei. It requires the evaluation of system performance and energy consumption under a wide variety of realistic and energy consumption analysis tool for cloud applications in real-world cloud environments. Stress

  7. THREE-DIMENSIONAL CLOUD STRUCTURE OBSERVED DURING DOE ARM'S 2009 CLOUD TOMOGRAPHY FIELD EXPERIMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    THREE-DIMENSIONAL CLOUD STRUCTURE OBSERVED DURING DOE ARM'S 2009 CLOUD TOMOGRAPHY FIELD EXPERIMENT on Cloud Physics, Portland, OR June 28-July 2, 2010 Environmental Sciences Department/Atmospheric Sciences Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM)'s cloud tomography Intensive Observation Period (IOP

  8. Cloud radar Doppler spectra in drizzling stratiform clouds: 1. Forward modeling and remote sensing applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cloud radar Doppler spectra in drizzling stratiform clouds: 1. Forward modeling and remote sensing broadening and drizzle growth in shallow liquid clouds remain not well understood. Detailed, cloudscale. Profiling, millimeterwavelength (cloud) radars can provide such observations. In particular, the first three

  9. Cloud seeding as a technique for studying aerosol-cloud interactions in marine stratocumulus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miami, University of

    Cloud seeding as a technique for studying aerosol-cloud interactions in marine stratocumulus hygroscopic aerosols were introduced into a solid marine stratocumulus cloud (200 m thick) by burning hygroscopic flares mounted on an aircraft. The cloud microphysical response in two parallel seeding plumes

  10. Cloud Verifier: Verifiable Auditing Service for IaaS Clouds Joshua Schiffman

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jaeger, Trent

    Cloud Verifier: Verifiable Auditing Service for IaaS Clouds Joshua Schiffman Security Architecture University Park, PA, USA yus138,hvijay,tjaeger@cse.psu.edu Abstract--Cloud computing has commoditized compute paradigm, its adoption has been stymied by cloud platform's lack of trans- parency, which leaves customers

  11. Cloud Tracking in Cloud-Resolving Models R. S. Plant1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plant, Robert

    Cloud Tracking in Cloud-Resolving Models R. S. Plant1 1 Department of Meteorology, University. INTRODUCTION In recent years Cloud Resolving Models (CRMs) have become an increasingly important tool for CRM data, which allows one to investigate statistical prop- erties of the lifecycles of the "clouds

  12. The Cloud Adoption Toolkit: Supporting Cloud Adoption Decisions in the Enterprise

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sommerville, Ian

    1 The Cloud Adoption Toolkit: Supporting Cloud Adoption Decisions in the Enterprise Ali Khajeh-Hosseini, David Greenwood, James W. Smith, Ian Sommerville Cloud Computing Co-laboratory, School of Computer Science University of St Andrews, UK {akh, dsg22, jws7, ifs}@cs.st-andrews.ac.uk Abstract Cloud computing

  13. Comparison of MISR and MODIS cloud-top heights in the presence of cloud overlap

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baum, Bryan A.

    Comparison of MISR and MODIS cloud-top heights in the presence of cloud overlap C.M. Naud a, , B July 2006; accepted 3 September 2006 Abstract Coincident MISR and MODIS cloud-top heights retrieved March 2000 and October 2003. The difference between MODIS and MISR cloud-top heights is assessed

  14. Ralf Klessen: PPV, Oct. 24, 2005 Molecular CloudMolecular Cloud

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klessen,Ralf

    Ralf Klessen: PPV, Oct. 24, 2005 Molecular CloudMolecular Cloud Turbulence and Star formation three ,,steps" of star formation: 1.1. formation of molecular clouds in the disk of ourformation of molecular clouds in the disk of our galaxygalaxy 2.2. formation of protostellar coresformation

  15. Moving magnetic cloud -1Moving magnetic cloud -1 "Double change of frame" calculation...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hörandel, Jörg R.

    #12;19 Moving magnetic cloud - 1Moving magnetic cloud - 1 "Double change of frame" calculation... #12;eb. 2005 -- Cosmic-rays & Particle Acceleration -- E. Parizot (IPN Orsay) 21 Moving magnetic cloud - 2Moving magnetic cloud - 2 #12;Karlsruhe, 23-25 Feb. 2005 -- Cosmic-rays & Particle Acceleration

  16. To Cloud or Not to Cloud: Measuring the Performance of Mobile Gaming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Sheng-Wei

    To Cloud or Not to Cloud: Measuring the Performance of Mobile Gaming Chun-Ying Huang Department Tsing-Hua University Hsinchu, Taiwan chsu@cs.nthu.edu.tw ABSTRACT Mobile cloud gaming allows gamers an open source cloud gaming platform to conduct extensive experiments on real mobile clients. Our

  17. Determination of cloud liquid water distribution using 3D cloud tomography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Determination of cloud liquid water distribution using 3D cloud tomography Dong Huang,1 Yangang Liu; published 2 July 2008. [1] The cloud microwave tomography method for remotely retrieving 3D distributions of cloud Liquid Water Content (LWC) was originally proposed by Warner et al. in the 1980s but has lain

  18. CloudTracker: Using Execution Provenance to Optimize the Cost of Cloud Use

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bigelow, Stephen

    CloudTracker: Using Execution Provenance to Optimize the Cost of Cloud Use Geoffrey Douglas, Brian simulations using commercial clouds. We present a framework, called CLOUDTRACKER, that transparently records information from a simula- tion that is executed in a commercial cloud so that it may be "replayed" exactly

  19. The Open Cloud Testbed: A Wide Area Testbed for Cloud Computing Utilizing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossman, Robert

    The Open Cloud Testbed: A Wide Area Testbed for Cloud Computing Utilizing High Performance Network of cloud platforms and services have been developed for data intensive computing, including Hadoop, Sector, CloudStore (formerly KFS), HBase, and Thrift. In order to benchmark the performance of these systems

  20. Simulation study of electron cloud induced instabilities and emittance growth for the CERN Large Hadron Collider proton beam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benedetto, Elena; Schulte, Daniel; Rumolo, Giovanni

    2005-01-01

    The electron cloud may cause transverse single-bunch instabilities of proton beams such as those in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS). We simulate these instabilities and the consequent emittance growth with the code HEADTAIL, which models the turn-by-turn interaction between the cloud and the beam. Recently some new features were added to the code, in particular, electric conducting boundary conditions at the chamber wall, transverse feedback, and variable beta functions. The sensitivity to several numerical parameters has been studied by varying the number of interaction points between the bunch and the cloud, the phase advance between them, and the number of macroparticles used to represent the protons and the electrons. We present simulation results for both LHC at injection and SPS with LHC-type beam, for different electron-cloud density levels, chromaticities, and bunch intensities. Two regimes with qualitatively different emittance growth are observed: above th...

  1. The Cloud Computing and Other Variables

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borjon-Kubota, Martha Estela

    2011-01-01

    bodies. Saturated. We watch clouds simmer over the stillnessnoise like a fountain spring simmers between your thighs. A

  2. Auditing the Structural Reliability of the Clouds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haller, Gary L.

    . Icebergs in the Clouds: the Other Risks of Cloud Computing. In HotCloud, 2012. #12;Correlated Failures of occurrences. #12;Talk Outline Challenges Our approach Evaluation #12;Talk Outline Challenges Our approach Evaluation #12;Challenges 1. How to acquire dependency information automatically? 2. How to organize

  3. Towards a Ubiquitous Cloud Computing Infrastructure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van der Merwe, Kobus

    Towards a Ubiquitous Cloud Computing Infrastructure Jacobus Van der Merwe, K.K. Ramakrishnan of a number of cloud computing use cases. We specifically consider cloudbursting and follow-the-sun and focus that are also network service providers. I. INTRODUCTION Cloud computing is rapidly gaining acceptance

  4. Cloud Security: Issues and Concerns Pierangela Samarati*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Samarati, Pierangela

    1 Cloud Security: Issues and Concerns Authors Pierangela Samarati* Università degli Studi di Milano, Italy sabrina.decapitani@unimi.it Keywords cloud security confidentiality integrity availability secure data storage and processing Summary The cloud has emerged as a successful computing paradigm

  5. Security Architecture for Federated Mobile Cloud Computing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Shouhuai

    Security Architecture for Federated Mobile Cloud Computing Shouhuai Xu and E. Paul Ratazzi, federated mobile cloud computing imposes a diverse set of new chal- lenges, especially from a security clouds for security purposes? How should we deal with the tar- geted attackers that attempt to launch

  6. VULCAN: Vulnerability Assessment Framework for Cloud Computing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kavi, Krishna

    services on Cloud is complex because the security depends on the vulnerability of infrastructure, platform services on Cloud is complex because the security depends on the vulnerability of infrastruc- ture?". Or "I want to host this software application in this cloud environment, what security vulnerabilities I

  7. Cloud Enterprise Storage and Data Migration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christensen, Henrik Bærbak

    Cloud Enterprise Storage and Data Migration 20097733 Bobby Nielsen, 20003686 Frederik Kierbye}@cs.au.dk 20130324 Abstract This document presents a research in Enterprise Cloud Storage and Data Migration. The hypothesis is that, it is easy to migrate data between cloud platforms, including changing api

  8. MEBSURIXG CLOUD MOVEMENTS A Science Service Feature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -.- - MEBSURIXG CLOUD MOVEMENTS I A Science Service Feature Released upon receist but intended on Meteorology Vatching the clouds drift by, a traditional pastime of idle people, i s part Of the professional his head. He makes his cloud observations w i t h the aid of an instrument known as a nei

  9. Computer Modeling of Transport of Oxidizing Species in Grain Boundaries during Zirconium Corrosion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xian-Ming Bai; Yongfeng Zhang; Michael R. Tonks

    2014-06-01

    Zirconium (Zr) based alloys are widely used as the cladding materials in light-water reactors. The water-side corrosion of these alloys degrades their structural integrity and poses serious safety concerns. During the Zr corrosion process, a thin Zr oxide (ZrO2) layer forms on the alloy surface and serves as a barrier layer for further corrosion. The majority of the oxide has the monoclinic phase. At the transition region between the oxide and the metal, the oxide contains a thin layer of stabilized tetragonal phase. It is found that the texture of the tetragonal layer determines the protectiveness of the oxide for corrosion. The transport of oxidizing species, such as anion defects, cation defects, and electron through the tetragonal oxide layer could be the rate limiting step of the corrosion. The defect diffusion can be affected by the growing stresses and microstructures such as grain boundaries and dislocations. In this work molecular dynamics simulations are used to investigate the anion and cation diffusion in bulk and at grain boundaries in tetragonal ZrO2. The results show that defect diffusion at grain boundaries is complex and the behavior strongly depends on the grain boundary type. For most of the grain boundaries studied the defect diffusion are much slower than in the bulk, implying that grain boundaries may not be fast defect transport paths during corrosion. The connection between the modeling results and published experimental work will also be discussed. This work is funded by the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program at Idaho National Laboratory.

  10. Estimation of the cloud transmittance from radiometric measurements at the ground level

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Costa, Dario; Mares, Oana

    2014-11-24

    The extinction of solar radiation due to the clouds is more significant than due to any other atmospheric constituent, but it is always difficult to be modeled because of the random distribution of clouds on the sky. Moreover, the transmittance of a layer of clouds is in a very complex relation with their type and depth. A method for estimating cloud transmittance was proposed in Paulescu et al. (Energ. Convers. Manage, 75 690–697, 2014). The approach is based on the hypothesis that the structure of the cloud covering the sun at a time moment does not change significantly in a short time interval (several minutes). Thus, the cloud transmittance can be calculated as the estimated coefficient of a simple linear regression for the computed versus measured solar irradiance in a time interval ?t. The aim of this paper is to optimize the length of the time interval ?t. Radiometric data measured on the Solar Platform of the West University of Timisoara during 2010 at a frequency of 1/15 seconds are used in this study.

  11. Unlocking the Secrets of Clouds

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Clouds may look soft, fluffy and harmless to the untrained eye, but to an expert climate model scientist they represent great challenges. Fortunately the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate and Research Facility is kicking off a five-month study which should significantly clear the air.

  12. POTENTIAL OF CLOUD-BASED

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Jason R.

    .!! Cover!photos!courtesy!of!the!National!Energy!Research!Scientific!Computing!Center!and!Google.! #12;! ! ! The Energy Efficiency Potential of Cloud-Based Software: A U.S. Case Study ! Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory June, 2013 Research Team Eric!Masanet! Arman!Shehabi! Jiaqi!Liang! Lavanya!Ramakrishnan! Xiao

  13. ARM Data for Cloud Parameterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Kuan-Man

    2006-10-02

    The PI's ARM investigation (DE-IA02-02ER633 18) developed a physically-based subgrid-scale saturation representation that fully considers the direct interactions of the parameterized subgrid-scale motions with subgrid-scale cloud microphysical and radiative processes. Major accomplishments under the support of that interagency agreement are summarized in this paper.

  14. Measurements of grain boundary properties in nanocrystalline ceramics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chiang, Y.M.; Smyth, I.P.; Terwilliger, C.D. (Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (USA). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering); Petuskey, W.T. (Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (USA). Dept. of Chemistry); Eastman, J.A. (Argonne National Lab., IL (USA))

    1990-11-01

    The advent of nanocrystalline ceramics prepared by a variety of solution-chemical and vapor deposition methods offers a unique opportunity for the determination grain boundary properties by bulk'' thermodynamic methods. In this paper we discuss results from two types of measurements on model nanocrystalline ceramics. The first is a solution thermodynamic measurement of the activity of nanocrystalline SiC in polycarbosilane-derived silicon carbide fibers (Nicalon). Structural studies have shown that Nicalon consists of well-ordered cubic ({beta} or 3C polytype) SiC grains separated by a very thin grain boundary layer (<1 nm thick) containing the oxygen. The physical properties and chemical reactivity of these fibers are distinctly different from that of bulk silicon carbide. Direct measurement of the alloy composition and analysis of the microstructure has allowed the dissolution reaction to be identified and a lower limit for the SiC activity in the nanocrystalline form to be determined. A second method of measuring grain boundary properties we have investigated for nanocrystalline Si and TiO{sub 2} is high temperature calorimetry. In appropriate samples the grain boundary enthalpy can be measured through the heat evolved during grain growth. Preliminary results on nanocrystalline Si prepared by the recrystallization of amorphous evaporated films and on TiO{sub 2} condensed from the vapor phase are discussed. 29 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  15. How Long Can Tiny HI Clouds Survive?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masahiro Nagashima; Shu-ichiro Inutsuka; Hiroshi Koyama

    2006-03-10

    We estimate the evaporation timescale for spherical HI clouds consisting of the cold neutral medium surrounded by the warm neutral medium. We focus on clouds smaller than 1pc, which corresponds to tiny HI clouds recently discovered by Braun & Kanekar and Stanimirovi{\\'c} & Heiles. By performing one-dimensional spherically symmetric numerical simulations of the two-phase interstellar medium (ISM), we derive the timescales as a function of the cloud size and of pressure of the ambient warm medium. We find that the evaporation timescale of the clouds of 0.01 pc is about 1Myr with standard ISM pressure, $p/k_{B}\\sim 10^{3.5}$ K cm$^{-3}$, and for clouds larger than about 0.1 pc it depends strongly on the pressure. In high pressure cases, there exists a critical radius for clouds growing as a function of pressure, but the minimum critical size is $\\sim$ 0.03 pc for a standard environment. If tiny HI clouds exist ubiquitously, our analysis suggests two implications: tiny HI clouds are formed continuously with the timescale of 1Myr, or the ambient pressure around the clouds is much higher than the standard ISM pressure. We also find that the results agree well with those obtained by assuming quasi-steady state evolution. The cloud-size dependence of the timescale is well explained by an analytic approximate formula derived by Nagashima, Koyama & Inutsuka. We also compare it with the evaporation rate given by McKee & Cowie.

  16. A Scalable Multi-Datacenter Layer-2 Network Architecture University of Pennsylvania

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenberg, Albert

    A Scalable Multi-Datacenter Layer-2 Network Architecture Chen Chen University of Pennsylvania University of Pennsylvania lingding@cis.upenn.edu ABSTRACT Cloud today is evolving towards multi-datacenter deployment, with each datacenter serving customers in different geographical areas. The independence between

  17. Boundary Behavior of the GinzburgLandau Order Parameter in the Surface Superconductivity Regime

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Recanati, Catherine

    Boundary Behavior of the Ginzburg­Landau Order Parameter in the Surface Superconductivity Regime M­Landau theory for a type­II superconductor in an applied magnetic field varying between the second and third of this energy expansion, which allows us to prove the desired uniformity of the surface superconductivity layer

  18. Boundary lubrication with a glassy interface Anal Lematre1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carlson, Jean

    Boundary lubrication with a glassy interface Anaël Lemaître1,2 and Jean Carlson1 1 Department lubrication. The model is based on a generalization of the shear transformation zone (STZ) theory, in which mea- surements on a microscopically thin layer of lubricant, sepa- rating atomically smooth (typically

  19. Wavelet analysis study of microbubble drag reduction in a boundary channel flow 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhen, Ling

    2006-04-12

    components in streamwise-near-wall normal plane of a turbulent channel flow at Reynolds number of 5128 based on the half height of the channel were measured. The influence of the presence of microbubbles in the boundary layer was assessed and compared...

  20. Layered electrode for electrochemical cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Swathirajan, Swathy (West Bloomfield, MI); Mikhail, Youssef M. (Sterling Heights, MI)

    2001-01-01

    There is provided an electrode structure comprising a current collector sheet and first and second layers of electrode material. Together, the layers improve catalyst utilization and water management.

  1. Radiative Energy Balance in the Tropical Tropopause Layer: An Investigation with ARM Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fu, Qiang

    2013-10-22

    The overall objective of this project is to use the ARM observational data to improve our understanding of cloud-radiation effects in the tropical tropopause layer (TTL), which is crucial for improving the simulation and prediction of climate and climate change. In last four and half years, we have been concentrating on (i) performing the comparison of the ice cloud properties from the ground-based lidar observations with those from the satellite CALIPSO lidar observations at the ARM TWP sites; (ii) analyzing TTL cirrus and its relation to the tropical planetary waves; (iii) calculating the radiative heating rates using retrieved cloud microphysical properties by combining the ground-based lidar and radar observations at the ARM TWP sites and comparing the results with those using cloud properties retrieved from CloudSat and CALIPSO observations; (iv) comparing macrophysical properties of tropical cirrus clouds from the CALIPSO satellite and from ground-based micropulse and Raman lidar observations; (v) improving the parameterization of optical properties of cirrus clouds with small effective ice particle sizes; and (vi) evaluating the enhanced maximum warming in the tropical upper troposphere simulated by the GCMs. The main results of our research efforts are reported in the 12 referred journal publications that acknowledge the DOE Grant No. DE-FG02-09ER64769.

  2. THE LOCAL LEO COLD CLOUD AND NEW LIMITS ON A LOCAL HOT BUBBLE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peek, J. E. G.; Heiles, Carl; Peek, Kathryn M. G.; Meyer, David M.; Lauroesch, J. T.

    2011-07-10

    We present a multi-wavelength study of the local Leo cold cloud (LLCC), a very nearby, very cold cloud in the interstellar medium (ISM). Through stellar absorption studies we find that the LLCC is between 11.3 pc and 24.3 pc away, making it the closest known cold neutral medium cloud and well within the boundaries of the local cavity. Observations of the cloud in the 21 cm H I line reveal that the LLCC is very cold, with temperatures ranging from 15 K to 30 K, and is best fit with a model composed of two colliding components. The cloud has associated 100 {mu}m thermal dust emission, pointing to a somewhat low dust-to-gas ratio of 48 x10{sup -22} MJy sr{sup -1} cm{sup 2}. We find that the LLCC is too far away to be generated by the collision among the nearby complex of local interstellar clouds but that the small relative velocities indicate that the LLCC is somehow related to these clouds. We use the LLCC to conduct a shadowing experiment in 1/4 keV X-rays, allowing us to differentiate between different possible origins for the observed soft X-ray background (SXRB). We find that a local hot bubble model alone cannot account for the low-latitude SXRB, but that isotropic emission from solar wind charge exchange (SWCX) does reproduce our data. In a combined local hot bubble and SWCX scenario, we rule out emission from a local hot bubble with an 1/4 keV emissivity greater than 1.1 Snowdens pc{sup -1} at 3{sigma}, four times lower than previous estimates. This result dramatically changes our perspective on our local ISM.

  3. Irradiation Assisted Grain Boundary Segregation in Steels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, Zheng; Faulkner, Roy G.

    2008-07-01

    The understanding of radiation-induced grain boundary segregation (RIS) has considerably improved over the past decade. New models have been introduced and much effort has been devoted to obtaining comprehensive information on segregation from the literature. Analytical techniques have also improved so that chemical analysis of layers 1 nm thick is almost routine. This invited paper will review the major methods used currently for RIS prediction: namely, Rate Theory, Inverse Kirkendall, and Solute Drag approaches. A summary is made of the available data on phosphorus RIS in reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels. This will be discussed in the light of the predictions of the various models in an effort to show which models are the most reliable and easy to use for forecasting P segregation behaviour in steels. A consequence of RIS in RPV steels is a radiation induced shift in the ductile to brittle transition temperature (DBTT). It will be shown how it is possible to relate radiation-induced P segregation levels to DBTT shift. Examples of this exercise will be given for RPV steels and for ferritic steels being considered for first wall fusion applications. Cr RIS in high alloy stainless steels and associated irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) will be briefly discussed. (authors)

  4. Cloud speed impact on solar variability scaling â?? Application to the wavelet variability model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lave, Matthew; Kleissl, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Kleissl, J. , 2013. Deriving cloud velocity from an array ofCloud Speed Impact on Solar Variability Scaling -this work, we determine from cloud speeds. Cloud simulator

  5. Large-Eddy Simulation of Post-Cold-Frontal Continental Stratocumulus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mechem, David B.; Kogan, Yefim L.; Schultz, David M.

    2010-12-01

    Previous large-eddy simulations (LES) of stratocumulus-topped boundary layers have been exclusively set in marine environments. Boundary layer stratocumulus clouds are also prevalent over the continent but have not been ...

  6. LMDZ5B: the atmospheric component of the IPSL climate model with revisited parameterizations for clouds and convection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hourdin, Chez Frédéric

    , as well as a parameterization of the cold pools generated below cumulonimbus by re- evaporation processes in the sub-cloud layer. An available lifting energy and lifting power are provided both represented and (2) the diurnal cycle of convective rainfall over conti- nents is delayed by several hours

  7. Immersed Boundary Methods for High-Resolution Simulation of Atmospheric Boundary-Layer Flow Over Complex Terrain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lundquist, Katherine Ann

    2010-01-01

    Wind Energy Association Windpower 2008 Conference, AmericanWind Energy Association Windpower 2006 Conference, American

  8. Immersed Boundary Methods for High-Resolution Simulation of Atmospheric Boundary-Layer Flow Over Complex Terrain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lundquist, Katherine Ann

    2010-01-01

    wall region, the first off wall grid point should be locatedwall point. If the first off wall grid point is located innoting that the first off wall grid point was located in the

  9. Building BoundariesTM Information for Parents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    Building BoundariesTM Information for Parents Even very young children can learn some skills of 2 #12;Building BoundariesTM: Information for Parents How to Recognize Warning Signs in Your Child

  10. Boundary learning by optimization with topological constraints

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Helmstaedter, Moritz N.

    Recent studies have shown that machine learning can improve the accuracy of detecting object boundaries in images. In the standard approach, a boundary detector is trained by minimizing its pixel-level disagreement with ...

  11. Layered semiconductor neutron detectors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mao, Samuel S; Perry, Dale L

    2013-12-10

    Room temperature operating solid state hand held neutron detectors integrate one or more relatively thin layers of a high neutron interaction cross-section element or materials with semiconductor detectors. The high neutron interaction cross-section element (e.g., Gd, B or Li) or materials comprising at least one high neutron interaction cross-section element can be in the form of unstructured layers or micro- or nano-structured arrays. Such architecture provides high efficiency neutron detector devices by capturing substantially more carriers produced from high energy .alpha.-particles or .gamma.-photons generated by neutron interaction.

  12. Localization length of nearly periodic layered metamaterials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    del Barco, O

    2015-01-01

    We have analyzed numerically the localization length of light $\\xi$ for nearly periodic arrangements of homogeneous stacks (formed exclusively by right-handed materials) and mixed stacks (with alternating right and left-handed metamaterials). Layers with index of refraction $n_1$ and thickness $L_1$ alternate with layers of index of refraction $n_2$ and thickness $L_2$. Positional disorder has been considered by shifting randomly the positions of the layer boundaries with respect to periodic values. For homogeneous stacks, we have shown that the localization length is modulated by the corresponding bands and that $\\xi$ is enhanced at the center of each allowed band. In the limit of long-wavelengths $\\lambda$, the parabolic behavior previously found in purely disordered systems is recovered, whereas for $\\lambda \\ll L_1 + L_2$ a saturation is reached. In the case of nearly periodic mixed stacks with the condition $|n_1 L_1|=|n_2 L_2|$, instead of bands there is a periodic arrangement of Lorenztian resonances, ...

  13. Energy and water vapor transport across a simplified cloud-clear air interface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gallana, Luca; De Santi, Francesca; Iovieno, Michele; Tordella, Daniela

    2015-01-01

    We consider a simplified physics of the could interface where condensation, evaporation and radiation are neglected and momentum, thermal energy and water vapor transport is represented in terms of the Boussinesq model coupled to a passive scalar transport equation for the vapor. The interface is modeled as a layer separating two isotropic turbulent regions with different kinetic energy and vapor concentration. In particular, we focus on the small scale part of the inertial range as well as on the dissipative range of scales which are important to the micro-physics of warm clouds. We have numerically investigated stably stratified interfaces by locally perturbing at an initial instant the standard temperature lapse rate at the cloud interface and then observing the temporal evolution of the system. When the buoyancy term becomes of the same order of the inertial one, we observe a spatial redistribution of the kinetic energy which produce a concomitant pit of kinetic energy within the mixing layer. In this sit...

  14. Secure Cloud Computing with a Virtualized Network Infrastructure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akella, Aditya

    Secure Cloud Computing with a Virtualized Network Infrastructure Fang Hao, T.V. Lakshman, Sarit the rapid development in the field of cloud com- puting, security is still one of the major hurdles to cloud to users. At the other end of the spectrum, highly secured cloud services (e.g. Google "government cloud

  15. Fog Computing: Mitigating Insider Data Theft Attacks in the Cloud

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keromytis, Angelos D.

    approach for securing data in the cloud using offensive decoy technology. We monitor data access security in a Cloud environment. I. INTRODUCTION Businesses, especially startups, small and medium busi. This is considered as one of the top threats to cloud computing by the Cloud Security Alliance [1]. While most Cloud

  16. Page 1Securing the Microsoft Cloud Securing the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chaudhuri, Surajit

    Page 1Securing the Microsoft Cloud Securing the Microsoft Cloud #12;Page 2Securing the Microsoft to have confidence in Microsoft as their preferred cloud provider. Our security policies and practices their security and compliance related needs. Securing the Microsoft Cloud #12;Page 3Securing the Microsoft Cloud

  17. Organizational challenges in cloud adoption and enablers of cloud transition program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rajendran, Sneha

    2013-01-01

    With the proliferation of cloud computing, organizations have been able to get access to never seen before computing power and resources. Cloud computing has revolutionized the utilization of computing resources through ...

  18. Aircraft Observations of Sub-cloud Aerosol and Convective Cloud Physical Properties 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Axisa, Duncan

    2011-02-22

    This research focuses on aircraft observational studies of aerosol-cloud interactions in cumulus clouds. The data were collected in the summer of 2004, the spring of 2007 and the mid-winter and spring of 2008 in Texas, ...

  19. ARM - Field Campaign - Azores: Clouds, Aerosol and Precipitation in the

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach HomeA Better Anode Design to Improve4AJ01) (See22, 2012IIIAtlanticMarine Boundary Layer (CAP-MBL)

  20. ARM - Field Campaign - Biogenic Aerosols - Effects on Clouds and Climate

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach HomeA Better Anode Design to Improve4AJ01) (See22, 2012IIIAtlanticMarine Boundary LayerClimate Campaign

  1. ARM - Field Campaign - Biogenic Aerosols - Effects on Clouds and Climate:

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach HomeA Better Anode Design to Improve4AJ01) (See22, 2012IIIAtlanticMarine Boundary LayerClimate

  2. ARM - Field Campaign - Biogenic Aerosols - Effects on Clouds and Climate:

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach HomeA Better Anode Design to Improve4AJ01) (See22, 2012IIIAtlanticMarine Boundary LayerClimateExtended

  3. Assessing Cloud Spatial and Vertical Distribution with Infrared Cloud Analyzer

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D B L O O DBiomass and Biofuels BiomassAssembly of aCloud Spatial and

  4. Fragmentation in rotating isothermal protostellar clouds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bodenheimer, P.; Tohline, J.E.; Black, D.C.

    1980-01-01

    Results of an extensive set of 3-D hydrodynamic calculations that have been performed to investigate the susceptibility of rotating clouds to gravitational fragmentation are presented. (GHT)

  5. Interstellar Turbulence, Cloud Formation and Pressure Balance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Enrique Vazquez-Semadeni

    1998-10-23

    We discuss HD and MHD compressible turbulence as a cloud-forming and cloud-structuring mechanism in the ISM. Results from a numerical model of the turbulent ISM at large scales suggest that the phase-like appearance of the medium, the typical values of the densities and magnetic field strengths in the intercloud medium, as well as Larson's velocity dispersion-size scaling relation in clouds may be understood as consequences of the interstellar turbulence. However, the density-size relation appears to only hold for the densest simulated clouds, there existing a large population of small, low-density clouds, which, on the other hand, are hardest to observe. We then discuss several tests and implications of a fully dynamical picture of interstellar clouds. The results imply that clouds are transient, constantly being formed, distorted and disrupted by the turbulent velocity field, with a fraction of these fluctuations undergoing gravitational collapse. Simulated line profiles and estimated cloud lifetimes are consistent with observational data. In this scenario, we suggest it is quite unlikely that quasi-hydrostatic structures on any scale can form, and that the near pressure balance between clouds and the intercloud medium is an incidental consequence of the density field driven by the turbulence and in the presence of appropriate cooling, rather than a driving or confining mechanism.

  6. CHARACTERIZATION OF CLOUDS IN TITAN'S TROPICAL ATMOSPHERE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Griffith, Caitlin A.; Penteado, Paulo; Rodriguez, Sebastien; Baines, Kevin H.; Buratti, Bonnie; Sotin, Christophe; Clark, Roger; Nicholson, Phil; Jaumann, Ralf

    2009-09-10

    Images of Titan's clouds, possible over the past 10 years, indicate primarily discrete convective methane clouds near the south and north poles and an immense stratiform cloud, likely composed of ethane, around the north pole. Here we present spectral images from Cassini's Visual Mapping Infrared Spectrometer that reveal the increasing presence of clouds in Titan's tropical atmosphere. Radiative transfer analyses indicate similarities between summer polar and tropical methane clouds. Like their southern counterparts, tropical clouds consist of particles exceeding 5 {mu}m. They display discrete structures suggestive of convective cumuli. They prevail at a specific latitude band between 8 deg. - 20 deg. S, indicative of a circulation origin and the beginning of a circulation turnover. Yet, unlike the high latitude clouds that often reach 45 km altitude, these discrete tropical clouds, so far, remain capped to altitudes below 26 km. Such low convective clouds are consistent with the highly stable atmospheric conditions measured at the Huygens landing site. Their characteristics suggest that Titan's tropical atmosphere has a dry climate unlike the south polar atmosphere, and despite the numerous washes that carve the tropical landscape.

  7. Modeling microwave/electron-cloud interaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mattes, M; Zimmermann, F

    2013-01-01

    Starting from the separate codes BI-RME and ECLOUD or PyECLOUD, we are developing a novel joint simulation tool, which models the combined effect of a charged particle beam and of microwaves on an electron cloud. Possible applications include the degradation of microwave transmission in tele-communication satellites by electron clouds; the microwave-transmission tecchniques being used in particle accelerators for the purpose of electroncloud diagnostics; the microwave emission by the electron cloud itself in the presence of a magnetic field; and the possible suppression of electron-cloud formation in an accelerator by injecting microwaves of suitable amplitude and frequency. A few early simulation results are presented.

  8. Validating computed grain boundary energies in fcc metals using the grain boundary character distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rohrer, Gregory S.

    Validating computed grain boundary energies in fcc metals using the grain boundary character. Since the GBCD is inversely related to the grain boundary energy distribution, it offers a useful metric for validating grain boundary energy calculations. Comparisons between the measured GBCD and calculated energies

  9. April 12, 2014: The Era of Cloud Computing is coming Headline: The Era of Cloud Computing is coming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buyya, Rajkumar

    April 12, 2014: The Era of Cloud Computing is coming #12;Headline: The Era of Cloud Computing of Cloud Computing at a seminar in MANIT and RGPV on Saturday. Inset headline: This is the right time to build a career in Cloud Computing Article: Prof. Rajkumar Buyya gave guidance to students about Cloud

  10. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON CLOUD COMPUTING, VOL. XX, NO. X, XXXX 1 Cloud Federations in the Sky: Formation Game

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grosu, Daniel

    IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON CLOUD COMPUTING, VOL. XX, NO. X, XXXX 1 Cloud Federations in the Sky for cloud resources. The cloud providers' available resources may not be sufficient enough to cope with such demands. Therefore, the cloud providers need to reshape their business structures and seek to improve

  11. RETRIEVALS OF CLOUD OPTICAL DEPTH AND EFFECTIVE RADIUS FROM A THIN-CLOUD ROTATING SHADOWBAND RADIOMETER (TC-RSR)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    RETRIEVALS OF CLOUD OPTICAL DEPTH AND EFFECTIVE RADIUS FROM A THIN-CLOUD ROTATING SHADOWBAND Division Brookhaven National Laboratory U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science ABSTRACT A thin cloud cloud. We applied Min and Duan's retrieval algorithm to the field measurements of TC-RSR to derive cloud

  12. QUANTITATIVELY ASSESSING THE ROLE OF CLOUDS IN THE TRANSMISSION SPECTRUM OF GJ 1214b

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morley, Caroline V.; Fortney, Jonathan J.; Kempton, Eliza M.-R.; Marley, Mark S.; Zahnle, Kevin; Vissher, Channon

    2013-09-20

    Recent observations of the super-Earth GJ 1214b show that it has a relatively featureless transmission spectrum. One suggestion is that these observations indicate that the planet's atmosphere is vertically compact, perhaps due to a water-rich composition that yields a large mean molecular weight. Another suggestion is that the atmosphere is hydrogen/helium-rich with clouds that obscure predicted absorption features. Previous models that incorporate clouds have included their effect without a strong physical motivation for their existence. Here, we present model atmospheres of GJ 1214b that include physically motivated clouds of two types. We model the clouds that are present in chemical equilibrium, as has been suggested to occur on brown dwarfs, which include KCl and ZnS for this planet. We also include clouds that form as a result of photochemistry, forming a hydrocarbon haze layer. We use a photochemical kinetics model to understand the vertical distribution and available mass of haze-forming molecules. We model both solar and enhanced-metallicity cloudy models and determine the cloud properties necessary to match observations. In enhanced-metallicity atmospheres, we find that the equilibrium clouds can match the observations of GJ 1214b if they are lofted high into the atmosphere and have a low sedimentation efficiency (f{sub sed} = 0.1). We find that models with a variety of hydrocarbon haze properties can match the observations. Particle sizes from 0.01 to 0.25 ?m can match the transmission spectrum with haze-forming efficiencies as low as 1%-5%.

  13. Aircraft Microphysical Documentation from Cloud Base to Anvils of Hailstorm Feeder Clouds in Argentina

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel, Rosenfeld

    in Argentina DANIEL ROSENFELD The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem, Israel WILLIAM L. WOODLEY Woodley, Argentina, with a cloud-physics jet aircraft penetrating the major feeder clouds from cloud base to the 45°C. Introduction The province of Mendoza in western Argentina (32°S, 68°W), which is known worldwide for its wine

  14. CloudBridge: A Cloud-Powered System Enabling Mobile Devices to Control Peripherals Without Drivers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Young, R. Michael

    , CloudBridge. CloudBridge user ap- plication running on a smart device works as a TCP bridge relaying on the other. Through the bridge, it is possible to issue operations from a smart device without having network Figure 1: The smart device in the middle works as a bridge connecting a cloud server

  15. Cloud K-SVD: Computing data-adaptive representations in the cloud

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bajwa, Waheed U.

    Cloud K-SVD: Computing data-adaptive representations in the cloud Haroon Raja and Waheed U. Bajwa Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ 08854 Emails: haroon a distributed algorithm, termed as cloud K-SVD, for learning a UoS structure underlying distributed data

  16. A Study of Entropy Sources in Cloud Random Number Generation on Cloud Hosts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Yu

    A Study of Entropy Sources in Cloud Computers: Random Number Generation on Cloud Hosts Brendan Kerrigan and Yu Chen Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering, SUNY - Binghamton Abstract. Cloud security practices are based on assumptions that hold true for physical machines, but don't translate

  17. JP2.3 CLOUD RADIATIVE HEATING RATE FORCING FROM PROFILES OF RETRIEVED ARCTIC CLOUD MICROPHYSICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shupe, Matthew

    JP2.3 CLOUD RADIATIVE HEATING RATE FORCING FROM PROFILES OF RETRIEVED ARCTIC CLOUD MICROPHYSICS). This data allows for observationally-based calculations ofradiative heating rate profiles within the Arctic atmosphere. In this paper we define cloud radiative heating rate forcing (CRHF) as the difference between

  18. ENTRAINMENT AND MIXING AND THEIR EFFECTS ON CLOUD DROPLET SIZE DISTRIBUTIONS OF THE STRATOCUMULUS CLOUDS OBSERVED

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ENTRAINMENT AND MIXING AND THEIR EFFECTS ON CLOUD DROPLET SIZE DISTRIBUTIONS OF THE STRATOCUMULUS clouds due to entrainment and mixing of the clear air, which then affect the cloud droplet size distribution. How the entrained clear air mixes with cloudy air has been of great interest for the last several

  19. A 3D STOCHASTIC CLOUD MODEL FOR INVESTIGATING THE RADIATIVE PROPERTIES OF INHOMOGENEOUS CIRRUS CLOUDS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hogan, Robin

    A 3D STOCHASTIC CLOUD MODEL FOR INVESTIGATING THE RADIATIVE PROPERTIES OF INHOMOGENEOUS CIRRUS CLOUDS Robin J. Hogan and Sarah F. Kew ¡ Department of Meteorology, University of Reading, Reading, Berkshire, United Kingdom 1 INTRODUCTION The importance of ice clouds on the earth's radiation budget

  20. Modeling aerosol growth by aqueous chemistry in nonprecipitating stratiform cloud

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ovchinnikov, Mikhail; Easter, Richard C.

    2010-07-29

    A new microphysics module based on a two-dimensional (2D) joint size distribution function representing both interstitial and cloud particles is developed and applied to studying aerosol processing in non-precipitating stratocumulus clouds. The module is implemented in a three-dimensional dynamical framework of a large-eddy simulation (LES) model and in a trajectory ensemble model (TEM). Both models are used to study the modification of sulfate aerosol by the activation - aqueous chemistry - resuspension cycle in shallow marine stratocumulus clouds. The effect of particle mixing and different size-distribution representations on modeled aerosol processing are studied in a comparison of the LES and TEM simulations with the identical microphysics treatment exposes and a comparison of TEM simulations with a 2D fixed and moving bin microphysics. Particle mixing which is represented in LES and neglected in the TEM leads to the mean relative per particle dry mass change in the TEM simulations being about 30% lower than in analogous subsample of LES domain. Particles in the final LES spectrum are mixed in from different “parcels”, some of which have experienced longer in-cloud residence times than the TEM parcels, all of which originated in the subcloud layer, have. The mean relative per particle dry mass change differs by 14% between TEM simulations with fixed and moving bin microphysics. Finally, the TEM model with the moving bin microphysics is used to evaluate assumptions about liquid water mass partitioning among activated cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) of different dry sizes. These assumptions are used in large-scale models to map the bulk aqueous chemistry sulfate production, which is largely proportional to the liquid water mass, to the changes in aerosol size distribution. It is shown that the commonly used assumptions that the droplet mass is independent of CCN size or that the droplet mass is proportional to the CCN size to the third power do not perform well in the considered case. The explicitly predicted water partitioning indicates that the mean mass of droplets participating in the models aqueous chemistry calculations is proportional to the dry CCN size.