National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for boundary creek anderson

  1. Boundary Creek Thermal areas of Yellowstone National Park I: thermal activity and geologic setting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hutchinson, R.A.

    1980-09-01

    Proposed geothermal leasing in the Island Park Geothermal Area (IPGA) in national forest and public lands adjacent to Yellowstone National Park has called attention to the moderate to high temperature springs of the Boundary Creek Thermal Areas. Up until late 1977 no description or geochemical inventory studies had been conducted in these areas. The thermal springs are scattered in four major groups along the Boundary Creek drainage with three to six km. of the IPGA - park border. Observations and analyses of physical and chemical indicators suggest that the source is under the Madison Plateau and that the waters are generally similar in the lower three thermal units. These hot springs should be monitored so as to provide early warning of change in the event that geothermal development in the IPGA causes withdrawal of groundwater from Yellow Stone National Park.

  2. Boundary Creek thermal areas of Yellowstone National Park: II, thermal water analyses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thompson, J.M. (Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA); Hutchinson, R.A.

    1980-09-01

    Water samples from 28 thermal springs, 2 non-thermal springs, and 2 creeks from the Boundary Creek Thermal Areas (BCTA) in the southwestern corner of Yellowstone National Park were analyzed to help establish a chemical water-quality base line prior to possible geothermal exploitation of the Island Park Geothermal Area (IPGA). The springs, situated at the southwestern end of the Madison Plateau, are the Yellowstone Park thermal waters nearest to the IPGA and might respond to geothermal exploitation in the IPGA. Water temperatures ranging from 50/sup 0/ to 90/sup 0/C and low Cl concentrations (< 110 mgL/sup -1/) characterize spring waters in the BCTA. They are chemically distinct from the major geysers and hot springs in Yellowstone Park. The Na-K-Ca and silica geothermometers are in general agreement, usually within 10/sup 0/C, and indicate reservoir temperatures of 150 to 170/sup 0/C.

  3. The Anderson Quin Cycle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, J.H.; Bilbow, W.M.

    1993-03-18

    The objective of this study was to make a more refined evaluation of the Anderson Quin Cycle based on most recent information on the performance of various elements that will be used in the Anderson Quin Cycle. My original estimate of the work plan for evaluating and optimizing the Anderson Quin Cycle called for 7000 man hours of work. Since this grant was limited to 2150 man hours, we could not expect to achieve all the objectives within the allotted period of work. However, the most relevant program objectives have been completed as reported here. The analysis generally confirms the results originally estimated in my paper on the subject. (Ref. 2) Further optimizations should show even higher efficiencies. The Anderson Quin Cycle (US Patent applied for) basically consists of 5 elements in the power cycle: A refrigeration system to cool and clean the inlet air before it enters the compressor that supplies air for the gas turbine; a gas turbine consisting of a compressor, combustor, and turbine; a steam boiler and steam turbine system using the heat from the exhaust gas out of the gas turbine; a vapor turbine cycle, which utilizes the condensed heat from the exhaust of the steam turbine and the exhaust gas heat leaving the steam boiler to operate a vapor turbine cycle which utilizes another fluid than water, in this case isobutane; and the fifth element consists of a gas cooler and heat pump system, which removes the heat from the exhaust gas to lower its temperature essentially to atmospheric temperature, and at the same time permits treatment of the exhaust gas to remove acid components such as sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxides. Current industry accepted component characteristics were incorporated in the performance analysis of the overall cycle, ensuring accurate and meaningful operating predictions. The characteristics and performance of each of the elements are described. The thermal efficiency of the optimized calculated Anderson Quin Cycle is 62 percent.

  4. ANDERSON LOCALIZATION FOR TIME PERIODIC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    disorder, Anderson localization in Z d is stable un- der localized time-periodic perturbations by proving random Schrodinger operators at large disorder has been well known since the seminal work of Fr is approximated by the potential V . The equation governing the system is (1.5) i @ @t = (#1; + V ) on Z d #2

  5. Biodiversity Corridors in Alamo Creek, Vacaville, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Urrechaga, Jose; Wei, Xinghan

    2012-01-01

    Troy Horn, Oct, 2003 4.   Alamo Creek final report, 2005Biodiversity Corridors in Alamo Creek, Vacaville, Californiain the city and uses Alamo Creek, in Vacaville, California,

  6. A discrete fourth-order Lidstone problem with parameters Douglas R. Anderson a,*, Feliz Minhs b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Douglas R.

    A discrete fourth-order Lidstone problem with parameters Douglas R. Anderson a,*, Feliz Minhós b Symmetric Green's function Fixed points Fourth-order Discrete Beam Lidstone Semipositone a b s t r a c discrete fourth-order Lidstone boundary value problem with dependence on two parameters are given, using

  7. Carl Anderson and the Discovery of the Positron

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Particles, The Physical Review, Volume 51, Issue 10, pp. 884-886; May 1937 Top Additional Web Pages: Carl David Anderson Physicist, Caltech Archives Interview with Carl Anderson,...

  8. Anderson named 2015 TMS Fellow | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Anderson, Ames Laboratory senior metallurgist, has been named a 2015 Fellow of The Minerals, Metals & Materials Society (TMS). Anderson is one of six new Society members who...

  9. Diana Anderson | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submit theCovalent BondingMeeting |DesignCommunitiesYuDiamondoidDiana Anderson

  10. Waller Creek Urban Redevelopment 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, S.

    2013-01-01

    Winkler Melba Whatley Waller Creek Conservancy Directors – November 2013 ESL-KT-13-12-51 CATEE 2013: Clean Air Through Energy Efficiency Conference, San Antonio, Texas Dec. 16-18 CITY COUNCIL APPROVES DESIGN PLAN... Antonio, Texas Dec. 16-18 Thomas Phifer ESL-KT-13-12-51 CATEE 2013: Clean Air Through Energy Efficiency Conference, San Antonio, Texas Dec. 16-18 8Waller Creek and a Chain of Parks Palm Park Shaded Respite The Narrows Intensified Urbanity The Refuge...

  11. //exeCutivesummary This report synthesizes historical evidence into a picture of how Coyote Creek looked and functioned

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    South Babb Creek Laguna Socayre Norwood Creek Thompson Creek Upper Silver Creek Tulare Hill Laguna Seca

  12. Declared Wolf Creek

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    15-Nov 22-Nov 29-Nov 6-Dec 13-Dec 20-Dec 27-Dec 115% Nameplate Declared Wolf Creek UNIT 1 (MW) 52 45 52 52 52 52 52 52 52 52 52 52 52 UNIT 2 (MW) 52 45 52 52 52 52 52 52 52 52...

  13. Manufacturing Battle Creek

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Doncker, Elise

    to the manufacturing sector in Western Michigan. In addition to serving as director of the MRC, Dr. Patten is alsoManufacturing Research Center Kalamazoo Battle Creek The College of Engineering and Applied Sciences The Supporting manufacturing industries by providing opportunities for collaboration with faculty

  14. Lower East Fork Poplar Creek

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    is safe for limited water-contact recreational uses, such as wading in footwear. Eating fish from the creek is not recommended based upon the level of mercury in the fish. Are...

  15. Stream sediment detailed geochemical survey for Date Creek Basin, Arizona

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Butz, T.R.; Tieman, D.J.; Grimes, J.G.; Bard, C.S.; Helgerson, R.N.; Pritz, P.M.

    1980-06-30

    Results of the Date Creek Basin detailed geochemical survey are reported. Field and laboratory data are reported for 239 stream sediment samples. Statistical and areal distributions of uranium and possible uranium-related variables are displayed. A generalized geologic map of the area is provided, and pertinent geologic factors which may be of significance in evaluating the potential for uranium mineralization are briefly discussed. Based on stream sediment geochemical data, significant concentrations of uranium are restricted to the Anderson Mine area. The 84th percentile concentrations of U-FL, U-NT, and U-FL/U-NT combined with low thorium/U-NT values reflect increased mobility and enrichment of uranium in the carbonate host rocks of that area. Elements characteristically associated with the uranium mineralization include lithium and arsenic. No well defined diffusion halos suggesting outliers of similar uranium mineralization were observed from the stream sediment data in other areas of the Date Creek Basin. Significant concentrations of U-FL or U-NT found outside the mine area are generally coincident with low U-FL/U-NT values and high concentrations of zirconium, titanium, and phosphorus. This suggests that the uranium is related to a resistate mineral assemblage derived from surrounding crystalline igneous and metamorphic rocks.

  16. Professions Shannon Anderson, Ph.D.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Health Professions at SFSU #12;Shannon Anderson, Ph.D. Instructor, Biology Department Health Professions Advisor Co-Director, Formal Post-Bacc Program E-Mail: smanders@sfsu.edu #12;Barry S. Rothman, Ph@sfsu.edu Web: http://online.sfsu.edu/~brothman #12;Professions I Cover Medicine Allopathic & Osteopathic

  17. UNIVERSALITIES: FROM ANDERSON LOCALIZATION TO QUANTUM CHAOS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simons, Ben

    COURSE 1 UNIVERSALITIES: FROM ANDERSON LOCALIZATION TO QUANTUM CHAOS BORIS L. ALTSHULER AND B. D, and Quantum Chaos 73 8.1. Quantum Billiards 74 8.2. Numerics 75 8.3. Hard and Soft Chaos 77 8.4. Periodic

  18. The Anderson Quin Cycle. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, J.H.; Bilbow, W.M.

    1993-03-18

    The objective of this study was to make a more refined evaluation of the Anderson Quin Cycle based on most recent information on the performance of various elements that will be used in the Anderson Quin Cycle. My original estimate of the work plan for evaluating and optimizing the Anderson Quin Cycle called for 7000 man hours of work. Since this grant was limited to 2150 man hours, we could not expect to achieve all the objectives within the allotted period of work. However, the most relevant program objectives have been completed as reported here. The analysis generally confirms the results originally estimated in my paper on the subject. (Ref. 2) Further optimizations should show even higher efficiencies. The Anderson Quin Cycle (US Patent applied for) basically consists of 5 elements in the power cycle: A refrigeration system to cool and clean the inlet air before it enters the compressor that supplies air for the gas turbine; a gas turbine consisting of a compressor, combustor, and turbine; a steam boiler and steam turbine system using the heat from the exhaust gas out of the gas turbine; a vapor turbine cycle, which utilizes the condensed heat from the exhaust of the steam turbine and the exhaust gas heat leaving the steam boiler to operate a vapor turbine cycle which utilizes another fluid than water, in this case isobutane; and the fifth element consists of a gas cooler and heat pump system, which removes the heat from the exhaust gas to lower its temperature essentially to atmospheric temperature, and at the same time permits treatment of the exhaust gas to remove acid components such as sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxides. Current industry accepted component characteristics were incorporated in the performance analysis of the overall cycle, ensuring accurate and meaningful operating predictions. The characteristics and performance of each of the elements are described. The thermal efficiency of the optimized calculated Anderson Quin Cycle is 62 percent.

  19. Big Bayou Creek and Little Bayou Creek Watershed Monitoring Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kszos, L.A.; Peterson, M.J.; Ryon; Smith, J.G.

    1999-03-01

    Biological monitoring of Little Bayou and Big Bayou creeks, which border the Paducah Site, has been conducted since 1987. Biological monitoring was conducted by University of Kentucky from 1987 to 1991 and by staff of the Environmental Sciences Division (ESD) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) from 1991 through March 1999. In March 1998, renewed Kentucky Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (KPDES) permits were issued to the US Department of Energy (DOE) and US Enrichment Corporation. The renewed DOE permit requires that a watershed monitoring program be developed for the Paducah Site within 90 days of the effective date of the renewed permit. This plan outlines the sampling and analysis that will be conducted for the watershed monitoring program. The objectives of the watershed monitoring are to (1) determine whether discharges from the Paducah Site and the Solid Waste Management Units (SWMUs) associated with the Paducah Site are adversely affecting instream fauna, (2) assess the ecological health of Little Bayou and Big Bayou creeks, (3) assess the degree to which abatement actions ecologically benefit Big Bayou Creek and Little Bayou Creek, (4) provide guidance for remediation, (5) provide an evaluation of changes in potential human health concerns, and (6) provide data which could be used to assess the impact of inadvertent spills or fish kill. According to the cleanup will result in these watersheds [Big Bayou and Little Bayou creeks] achieving compliance with the applicable water quality criteria.

  20. SPI Anderson Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onRAPID/Geothermal/Exploration/ColoradoRemsenburg-Speonk, NewMichigan:Roxbury,RushS.KSPARQL Query Form DefaultSPI Anderson

  1. Biodiversity Corridors in Alamo Creek, Vacaville, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Urrechaga, Jose; Wei, Xinghan

    2012-01-01

    The primary information source is from our field trip oninformation about Alamo Creek comes from three primary sources.

  2. Asotin Creek Model Watershed Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Browne, D.; Holzmiller, J.; Koch, F.; Polumsky, S.; Schlee, D.; Thiessen, G.; Johnson, C.

    1995-04-01

    The Asotin Creek Model Watershed Plan is the first to be developed in Washington State which is specifically concerned with habitat protection and restoration for salmon and trout. The plan is consistent with the habitat element of the ``Strategy for Salmon``. Asotin Creek is similar in many ways to other salmon-bearing streams in the Snake River system. Its watershed has been significantly impacted by human activities and catastrophic natural events, such as floods and droughts. It supports only remnant salmon and trout populations compared to earlier years. It will require protection and restoration of its fish habitat and riparian corridor in order to increase its salmonid productivity. The watershed coordinator for the Asotin County Conservation District led a locally based process that combined local concerns and knowledge with technology from several agencies to produce the Asotin Creek Model Watershed Plan.

  3. TURKEY CREEK BASIN Kansas and Missouri

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    TURKEY CREEK BASIN Kansas and Missouri MODIFICATION REQUEST Modification to the authorized total the Turkey Creek channel and runoff from the adjacent hillsides, and the current depth of flooding along in the past decade. Additionally, the Turkey Creek tunnel constructed in 1919 to divert the channel away from

  4. DOE Cites Bechtel National Inc. for Price-Anderson Violations...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    practices that contributed to the problems. The Price-Anderson Amendments Act of 1988 authorizes the Energy Department to impose civil penalties on its contractors for...

  5. Anderson-Cook wins William G. Hunter Award

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Anderson-Cook received a doctorate in Statistics from the University of Waterloo, Ontario, Canada. She joined the Statistical Sciences Group at LANL in 2004. Currently, she...

  6. Anderson-Cook named American Society for Quality Fellow

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    explained. Anderson-Cook holds a master's degree in statistics from the University of Toronto and a doctoral degree in statistics from the University of Waterloo, Ontario, Canada...

  7. Federal Energy and Water Management Award Winners Kate Anderson...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Federal Energy and Water Management Award Winners Kate Anderson, Scott Clark, Matthew Ellis, Vincent Guthrie, Mark Hunsickler Federal Energy and Water Management Award Winners Kate...

  8. Historical Ecology of Alameda Creek

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    flowing under bridge Would always have to drive through water running water "excessively deep" hole Always the water comes out again." (Danti 1795) #12;Pools in Alameda Creek ca. 1860-1875 4-6 feet deep Always sure of finding water Swim until July/Aug 6-10 feet deep Standing, not running water "swimming in there at any

  9. Lyapunov Exponents for Unitary Anderson Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eman Hamza; Günter Stolz

    2006-11-28

    We study a unitary version of the one-dimensional Anderson model, given by a five diagonal deterministic unitary operator multiplicatively perturbed by a random phase matrix. We fully characterize positivity and vanishing of the Lyapunov exponent for this model throughout the spectrum and for arbitrary distributions of the random phases. This includes Bernoulli distributions, where in certain cases a finite number of critical spectral values, with vanishing Lyapunov exponent, exists. We establish similar results for a unitary version of the random dimer model.

  10. Case Study: Goose Creek CISD 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    White, D.

    2014-01-01

    GOOSE CREEK CISD FINANCIALS • $4,866,124 project • $600k annual savings • 5,954,383 kWh annual savings IMPROVEMENTS • Lighting and water efficiency, computer power management, HVAC, controls redesign case study McKinstry first worked with Goose... • $693,866 project • $87k annual savings • 682,228 kWh annual savings IMPROVEMENTS • HVAC, lighting and water efficiency, computer power management case study Lake Dallas ISD was interested in improving the energy efficiency and aging infrastructure...

  11. Kansas Nuclear Profile - Wolf Creek Generating Station

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    April 2012" "Next Release Date: February 2013" "Wolf Creek Generating Station" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor...

  12. New Jersey Nuclear Profile - Oyster Creek

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Oyster Creek" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date"...

  13. An eigensystem approach to Anderson localization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander Elgart; Abel Klein

    2015-09-28

    We introduce a new approach for proving localization (pure point spectrum with exponentially decaying eigenfunctions, dynamical localization) for the Anderson model at high disorder. In contrast to the usual strategy, we do not study finite volume Green's functions. Instead, we perform a multiscale analysis based on finite volume eigensystems (eigenvalues and eigenfunctions). Information about eigensystems at a given scale is used to derive information about eigensystems at larger scales. This eigensystem multiscale analysis treats all energies of the finite volume operator at the same time, establishing level spacing and localization of eigenfunctions in a fixed box with high probability. A new feature is the labeling of the eigenvalues and eigenfunctions by the sites of the box.

  14. Anderson localization of partially incoherent light

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Capeta, D.; Radic, J.; Buljan, H.; Szameit, A.; Segev, M.

    2011-07-15

    We study Anderson localization and propagation of partially spatially incoherent wavepackets in linear disordered potentials, motivated by the insight that interference phenomena resulting from multiple scattering are affected by the coherence of the waves. We find that localization is delayed by incoherence: the more incoherent the waves are, the longer they diffusively spread while propagating in the medium. However, if all the eigenmodes of the system are exponentially localized (as in one- and two-dimensional disordered systems), any partially incoherent wavepacket eventually exhibits localization with exponentially decaying tails, after sufficiently long propagation distances. Interestingly, we find that the asymptotic behavior of the incoherent beam is similar to that of a single instantaneous coherent realization of the beam.

  15. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Hoe Creek Underground Coal...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Hoe Creek Underground Coal Gasification Site - 045 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Hoe Creek Underground Coal Gasification Site (045) Designated Name: Alternate Name: Location:...

  16. Bennett Creek | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop IncIowaWisconsin: EnergyYorkColoradoBelcher Homes JumpCreek Jump to: navigation,

  17. Panther Creek | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsourceII JumpQuarterly Smart GridNorth Carolina: EnergyIncPan AfricanHomePantexCreek Jump

  18. Carly Anderson and Emily Davidson April 23, 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Budker, Dmitry

    Conducting Polymers Carly Anderson and Emily Davidson April 23, 2013 http://www.polymersolutions.com/blog/demand for conductive polymers: The original thought: Replace copper in printed circuits and transmission lines

  19. Moments and Lyapunov exponents for the parabolic Anderson model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borodin, Alexei

    We study the parabolic Anderson model in (1+1) dimensions with nearest neighbor jumps and space–time white noise (discrete space/continuous time). We prove a contour integral formula for the second moment and compute the ...

  20. A struggle for freedom; Maxwell Anderson, 1938-1952 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Odeski, Thomas Francis

    1979-01-01

    's main interests were drama, Greek philosophy, and English history and literature. During his freshman year he wrote his first play--a musical comedy with a Shakespearean title, "Lost Labors Love. " After graduating in 1911, Anderson married Margaret... heaven would be if both Allied and German armies prayed for victory before an upcoming battle. Now thirty years old, Anderson retired from academics and turned his full 4 attention to journalism. In 1918 he returned to San Francisco to become...

  1. Sediment dynamics of an impounded river: Yegua Creek, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martinez, Adriana Elizabeth

    2009-05-15

    , Yegua Creek drainage basin ................................. 22 6 Annual peak discharge 1925-1991............................................................. 24 7 Flood frequency curve for Yegua Creek before and after stream impoundment... ....... 85 44 Depositional and erosional features upstream of Y50US .......................... 86 45 Yegua Creek depositional feature downstream of Somerville Dam .......... 87 46 Same location on Yegua Creek after major flood event...

  2. Reintroduction of Native FishReintroduction of Native Fish Species to Coal CreekSpecies to Coal Creek

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Matthew

    1 Reintroduction of Native FishReintroduction of Native Fish Species to Coal CreekSpecies to Coal Control and Reclamation ActSurface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977of 1977 Coal Creek Watershed Foundation (2000)Coal Creek Watershed Foundation (2000) BackgroundBackground Fish populations in Coal Creek

  3. Landowners lead successful Buck Creek restoration 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boutwell, Kathryn S.

    2012-01-01

    manager for Buck Creek, said that in ????, landowners took the initiative to secure the scienti?c information needed to be?er evaluate both water quality in the creek as well as potential sources of bacteria across the watershed. Using funding secured... from the Texas State Soil and Water Conservation Board?s Clean Water Act provided by the EPA, the Buck Creek restoration e?ort began. Initially, AgriLife sta? collected water quality data and conducted a source survey of the watershed, according...

  4. Panther Creek, Idaho, Habitat Rehabilitation, Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reiser, Dudley W.

    1986-01-01

    The purpose of the project was to achieve full chinook salmon and steelhead trout production in the Panther Creek, Idaho, basin. Plans were developed to eliminate the sources of toxic effluent entering Panther Creek. Operation of a cobalt-copper mine since the 1930's has resulted in acid, metal-bearing drainage entering the watershed from underground workings and tailings piles. The report discusses plans for eliminating and/or treating the effluent to rehabilitate the water quality of Panther Creek and allow the reestablishment of salmon and trout spawning runs. (ACR)

  5. Cerrito Creek step-pools: An opportunity for restoration and education at Blake Garden

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Behrends, Nathaniel

    2008-01-01

    Post-Project Assessment of the Alamo Creek Restoration (EastBerkeley campus, East Alamo Creek at the Windemereand stepping- stones. East Alamo Creek Case Study: This

  6. A post project appraisal of the restoration/rehabilitation of Alamo Creek

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smolko, Darrell

    2003-01-01

    Associates, Ltd. , Alamo Creek: Conceptual Restoration Plan/Basis of Design Summary Alamo Creek Restoration, Phase 1aRestoration/Rehabilitation of Alamo Creek Darrell Smolko UC

  7. Rainwater in the Urban Landscape: The Garrison Creek Demonstration Project [Infrastructure as Landscape, Landscape as Infrastructure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, James; Storey, Kim

    1996-01-01

    public space. Toronto's Garrison Creek is a typical exampleit V ..-v..-. Urban The Garrison Creek Bemonstration Projectl Co-evolving systems: Toronto's Garrison Creek Ravine, city

  8. San Francisquit LosTrancosCreek

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kay, Mark A.

    San Francisquit o C reek LosTrancosCreek Lake Lagunita Felt Lake Searville Lake Bear Gulch HOOVER PARK PEERS PARK SHORELINE GOLF LINKS SHORELINE AT MOUNTAIN VIEW SEALE PARK KELLOG PARK BOWLING

  9. EIS-0346: Salmon Creek Project, WA

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EIS analyzes BPA's proposal to fund activities that would restore sufficient water flows to Salmon Creek and rehabilitate its streambed as necessary to provide adequate passage for summer steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and possibly spring chinook (O. tshawytscha).

  10. Hills Creek Powerhouse Turbine and Unit Rehabilitation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and oxygen content suitable for fish, require the project to discharge a minimum of 300 cfs throughout its entire operating head range. The Francis runners at Hills Creek have...

  11. Seminar Series Brad Anderson, PhD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Payseur, Bret

    Department of Animal Health and Biomedical Sciences and Genome Center of Wisconsin University of Wisconsin: A Novel Algorithm for Establishing Deletion Boundaries Using Comparative Genomic Hybridization Data Abstract: Genome sequencing permits the design of high-density microarrays that can be used to perform many

  12. DOE Cites Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC for Price-Anderson Violations...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    DOE Cites Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC for Price-Anderson Violations DOE Cites Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC for Price-Anderson Violations December 3, 2007 - 4:44pm Addthis...

  13. Price-Anderson Amendments Act UT-B Contracts Div Page 1 of 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Price-Anderson Amendments Act UT-B Contracts Div Dec 2010 Page 1 of 1 paaa-ext-dec10.docx PRICE-ANDERSON AMENDMENTS ACT (December 2010) (a) This Agreement is subject to the Price-Anderson Amendments Act, Section

  14. GEOMETRIC CHARACTERIZATION OF INTERMITTENCY IN THE PARABOLIC ANDERSON MODEL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    König, Wolfgang

    , as t , the overwhelming contribution to the total mass x u(t, x) comes from a slowly increasing number of `islands' which are located far from each other. These `islands' are local regions of those high exceedances of the field and phrases. Parabolic Anderson problem, intermittency, random environment, quenched asymptotics, heat

  15. THE UNIVERSALITY CLASSES IN THE PARABOLIC ANDERSON MODEL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hofstad, Remco van der

    . We discuss the long time behaviour of the parabolic Anderson model, the Cauchy problem for the heat setting. We show that intermittency occurs on unboundedly increasing islands whose diameter is slowly for the heat equation with random coefficients and localised initial datum, t v(t, z) = d v(t, z) + (z)v(t, z

  16. A TWO CITIES THEOREM FOR THE PARABOLIC ANDERSON MODEL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mörters, Peter

    ¨orters Nadia Sidorova Abstract: The parabolic Anderson problem is the Cauchy problem for the heat equation tu the heat equation with random potential on the integer lattice Zd and study the Cauchy problem number of spatially separated regions of small diameter, which are often called the relevant islands

  17. What Do Consumers Believe About Future Gasoline Soren T. Anderson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Silver, Whendee

    What Do Consumers Believe About Future Gasoline Prices? Soren T. Anderson Michigan State University of consumers about their expectations of future gasoline prices. Overall, we find that consumer beliefs follow a random walk, which we deem a reasonable forecast of gasoline prices, but we find a deviation from

  18. Ichnotaxonomic assessment of Mazon Creek area trace fossils, Illinois, USA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LoBue, David J.

    2010-08-12

    The Francis Creek Shale Member (FCSM) of the Mid-Pennsylvanian Carbondale Formation along Mazon Creek in northern Illinois is known for soft-bodied organisms preserved within siderite concretions. Trace fossils, though ...

  19. FIDDLER CREEK POLYMER AUGMENTATION PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lyle A. Johnson, Jr.

    2001-10-31

    The Fiddler Creek field is in Weston County, Wyoming, and was discovered in 1948. Secondary waterflooding recovery was started in 1955 and terminated in the mid-1980s with a fieldwide recovery of approximately 40%. The West Fiddler Creek Unit, the focus of this project, had a lower recovery and therefore has the most remaining oil. Before the project this unit was producing approximately 85 bbl of oil per day from 20 pumping wells and 17 swab wells. The recovery process planned for this project involved adapting two independent processes, the injection of polymer as a channel blocker or as a deep-penetrating permeability modifier, and the stabilization of clays and reduction of the residual oil saturation in the near-wellbore area around the injection wells. Clay stabilization was not conducted because long-term fresh water injection had not severely reduced the injectivity. It was determined that future polymer injection would not be affected by the clay. For the project, two adjoining project patterns were selected on the basis of prior reservoir studies and current well availability and production. The primary injection well of Pattern 1 was treated with a small batch of MARCIT gel to create channel blocking. The long-term test was designed for three phases: (1) 77 days of injection of a 300-mg/l cationic polyacrylamide, (2) 15 days of injection of a 300-mg/l anionic polymer to ensure injectivity of the polymer, and (3) 369 days of injection of the 300-mg/l anionic polymer and a 30:1 mix of the crosslinker. Phases 1 and 2 were conducted as planned. Phase 3 was started in late March 1999 and terminated in May 2001. In this phase, a crosslinker was added with the anionic polymer. Total injection for Phase 3 was 709,064 bbl. To maintain the desired injection rate, the injection pressure was slowly increased from 1,400 psig to 2,100 psig. Early in the application of the polymer, it appeared that the sweep improvement program was having a positive effect on Pattern 1 with lesser effects in Pattern 2. These early observations did not continue to develop. The oil production for both patterns remained fairly constant to the rates established by the restart of waterflooding. The water production declined but stabilized in both patterns. The stabilization of the oil at prepolymer rates and water production at the lower rates can be attributed to the polymer injection, but the effect was not as great as originally predicted. The sweep improvement for the patterns appeared to be negatively impacted by extended shutdowns in the injection and production systems. Such problems as those experienced in this project can be expected when long-term polymer injection is started in old waterflood fields. To prevent these problems, new injection and production tubulars and pumps would be required at a cost prohibitive to the present, independent operators. Unless the future results from the continued waterflood show positive effects of the long-term polymer injection, it appears that the batch-type polymer treatment may have more promise than the long-term treatment and should be more cost effective.

  20. Recommendation 195: Mitigation of Contamination in Bear Creek Burial Grounds

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The ORSSAB requests DOE provide possible remedial actions to mitigate releases of contamination from Bear Creek Burial Grounds.

  1. DRAFT ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT1 PINE CREEK DAM, OKLAHOMA2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    #12;#12;DRAFT ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT1 PINE CREEK DAM, OKLAHOMA2 DAM SAFETY MODIFICATION3 &4 Environmental Assessment Pine Creek Dam, Oklahoma Dam Safety Modification & Interim Risk Reduction Measure and risk reduction measures necessary to correct structural and maintenance deficiencies of Pine Creek Dam

  2. Clear Creek, Texas Flood Risk Management Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    ) of 1996 requires four distinct steps for an evaluation of economic benefits and costs for projects for an evaluation of economic benefits and costs for projects were conducted and displayed in the Economic Appendix ­ Economic Evaluation. The non-Federal projects (FEMA buyout and detention on Marys Creek) augments

  3. Collaborative Monitoring in Walnut Creek, California1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    that they gained insight into priorities of Preserve users and knowledge of areas that might require new management regeneration and native grass populations in target management areas in the four Open Space Preserves and had to re-examine some of their own assumptions. The City of Walnut Creek managers stated

  4. Transverse Anderson localization of light: a tutorial review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mafi, Arash

    2015-01-01

    This tutorial review gives an overview of the transverse Anderson localization of light in one and two transverse dimensions. A pedagogical approach is followed throughout the presentation, where many aspects of localization are illustrated by means of a few simple models. The tutorial starts with some basic aspects of random matrix theory, and light propagation through and reflection from a random stack of dielectric slabs. Transverse Anderson localization of light in one- and two-dimensional coupled waveguide arrays is subsequently established and discussed. Recent experimental observations of localization and image transport in disordered optical fibers are discussed. More advanced topics, such as hyper-transport in longitudinally varying disordered waveguides, the impact of nonlinearity, and propagation of partially coherent and quantum light, are also examined.

  5. Multi-Scale Jacobi Method for Anderson Localization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John Z. Imbrie

    2014-07-03

    A new KAM-style proof of Anderson localization is obtained. A sequence of local rotations is defined, such that off-diagonal matrix elements of the Hamiltonian are driven rapidly to zero. This leads to the first proof via multi-scale analysis of exponential decay of the eigenfunction correlator (this implies strong dynamical localization). The method has been used in recent work on many-body localization [arXiv:1403.7837].

  6. Types of Student Engagement and Commitment to Stream Stewardship: Strawberry Creek on University of California at Berkeley Campus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Javier, Alexander; Jones, Darryl; Tannenbaum, Sara Rose

    2011-01-01

    Charbonneau, R. B. 1987. Strawberry Creek Management Plan,R. and Resh, V.H. 1992. Strawberry Creek on the Universityto Stream Stewardship: Strawberry Creek on University of

  7. 10 CFR 850, Request for Information- Docket Number: HS-RM-10-CBDPP- Cameron Anderson

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Commenter: Cameron Anderson 10 CFR 850 - Request for Information Docket Number: HS-RM-10-CBDPP Comment Close Date: 2/22/2011

  8. DOE Cites CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc. for Price-Anderson Violations...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    CHG to address the issues and prevent recurrence. The Price-Anderson Amendments Act of 1988 authorizes the Energy Department to undertake regulatory actions against contractors...

  9. Anderson localization of ballooning modes, quantum chaos and the stability of compact quasiaxially symmetric stellarators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dewar, Robert L.

    - 1 - Anderson localization of ballooning modes, quantum chaos and the stability of compact, isosurfaces are topologically spherical, indicative of strong "quantum chaos". The complexity of QAS marginal

  10. Steel Creek primary producers: Periphyton and seston, L-Lake/Steel Creek Biological Monitoring Program, January 1986--December 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bowers, J.A. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Toole, M.A.; van Duyn, Y. [Normandeau Associates Inc., New Ellenton, SC (United States)

    1992-02-01

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) encompasses 300 sq mi of the Atlantic Coastal Plain in west-central South Carolina. Five major tributaries of the Savannah River -- Upper Three Runs Creek, Four Mile Creek, Pen Branch, Steel Creek, and Lower Three Runs Creek -- drain the site. In 1985, L Lake, a 400-hectare cooling reservoir, was built on the upper reaches of Steel Creek to receive effluent from the restart of L-Reactor and to protect the lower reaches from thermal impacts. The Steel Creek Biological Monitoring Program was designed to assess various components of the system and identify and changes due to the operation of L-Reactor or discharge from L Lake. An intensive ecological assessment program prior to the construction of the lake provided baseline data with which to compare data accumulated after the lake was filled and began discharging into the creek. The Department of Energy must demonstrate that the operation of L-Reactor will not significantly alter the established aquatic ecosystems. This report summarizes the results of six years` data from Steel Creek under the L-Lake/Steel Creek Monitoring Program. L Lake is discussed separately from Steel Creek in Volumes NAI-SR-138 through NAI-SR-143.

  11. Upper Turkey Creek, Merriam, Kansas Feasibility Report Flood Risk Management Project Report Summary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Upper Turkey Creek, Merriam, Kansas Feasibility Report Flood Risk Management Project Report Summary 1 REPORT SUMMARY UPPER TURKEY CREEK BASIN PROJECT FEASIBILITY REPORT AND INTEGRATED ENVIRONMENTAL Study Authority. The Upper Turkey Creek Basin Project, Flood Risk Management Feasibility Study (the

  12. Development of a Discharge-Stage Rating Curve for Strawberry Creek

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hunt, Lisa

    2011-01-01

    Stage Rating Curve for Strawberry Creek Lisa Hunt ReferencesCharbonneau, R. 1987. Strawberry Creek Management Plan,R. and V.H. Resh. 1992. Strawberry Creek on the University

  13. New Jersey Nuclear Profile - PSEG Hope Creek Generating Station

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    PSEG Hope Creek Generating Station" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License...

  14. Note: Work function change measurement via improved Anderson method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sabik, A. Go?ek, F.; Antczak, G.

    2015-05-15

    We propose the modification to the Anderson method of work function change (??) measurements. In this technique, the kinetic energy of the probing electrons is already low enough for non-destructive investigation of delicate molecular systems. However, in our implementation, all electrodes including filament of the electron gun are polarized positively. As a consequence, electron bombardment of any elements of experimental system is eliminated. Our modification improves cleanliness of the ultra-high vacuum system. As an illustration of the solution capabilities, we present ?? of the Ag(100) surface induced by cobalt phthalocyanine layers.

  15. Anderson-Cook wins William G. Hunter Award

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D B L O O D S TAPropaneandAn3 TableAnderson-Cook wins William G.

  16. Anderson-Cook wins William G. Hunter Award

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room News Publications TraditionalWith PropaneNaturalTestAn Evolutionary Arms|Anderson-Cook Wins

  17. Anderson County, Kansas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EAandAmminex A S Jump to: navigation,Inof Ground2008 |Anderson County,

  18. Anderson County, Kentucky: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EAandAmminex A S Jump to: navigation,Inof Ground2008 |AndersonKentucky:

  19. Dept IDDept IDDept IDDept ID Department NameDepartment NameDepartment NameDepartment Name HCM Specialist AssignedHCM Specialist AssignedHCM Specialist AssignedHCM Specialist Assigned 10001 President's Office Karla Marie Anderson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barr, Maureen

    Anderson 10035 Information Technology - Nwk Karla Marie Anderson Find Your Departments Assigned HCM Marie Anderson 10027 Office of Communications - Nwk Karla Marie Anderson 10028 Administrative Services-Acctg,Bus Ethic & Info Sys Karla Marie Anderson 10047 RBS - Finance & Economics Karla Marie Anderson 10048 Student

  20. Large Scale Numerical Analysis of Scaling Behaviour of the Anderson Transition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Katsumoto, Shingo

    - istence of a disorder-induced metal-insulator transition was suggested by Anderson [1]. This transition classes governing the critical phenomena of the Anderson transition and to verify that the crit- ical- dence of the conductance. However, the con- ductance of a disordered conductor proved to have

  1. Ferromagnetism in the two-dimensional periodic Anderson model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Batista, C. D.; Bonca, J.; Gubernatis, J. E.

    2001-05-01

    Using the constrained-path Monte Carlo method, we studied the magnetic properties of the two-dimensional periodic Anderson model for electron fillings between 1/4 and 1/2. We also derived two effective low-energy theories to assist in interpreting the numerical results. For 1/4 filling, we found that the system can be a Mott or a charge-transfer insulator, depending on the relative values of the Coulomb interaction and the charge-transfer gap between the two noninteracting bands. The insulator may be a paramagnet or antiferromagnet. We concentrated on the effect of electron doping on these insulating phases. Upon doping we obtained a partially saturated ferromagnetic phase for low concentrations of conduction electrons. If the system were a charge-transfer insulator, we would find that the ferromagnetism is induced by the well-known Ruderman-Kittel-Kasuya-Yosida interaction. However, we found a novel correlated hopping mechanism inducing the ferromagnetism in the region where the nondoped system is a Mott insulator. Our regions of ferromagnetism spanned a much smaller doping range than suggested by recent slave boson and dynamical mean-field theory calculations, but they were consistent with that obtained by density-matrix renormalization group calculations of the one-dimensional periodic Anderson model.

  2. The importance of tidal creek ecosystems Keywords: Estuary; Tidal creek; Pollution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mallin, Michael

    . They are most abundant along the Atlantic Seaboard from New Jersey to Florida, and along the Gulf Coast). Tidal creeks are especially abundant in low-energy systems such as protected areas behind barrier. As an example, the four southernmost coastal counties in North Carolina (Onslow, Pender, New Hanover

  3. Interpretation of recent seismic data from a frontier hydrocarbon province: western Rough Creek graben, southern Illinois and western Kentucky

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bertagne, A.J.; Pisasale, E.T.; Leising, T.C.

    1986-05-01

    The northern basement fault of the Rough Creek graben is seismically discernible and has surface expression in the Rough Creek fault zone. The southern basement fault is not clearly defined seismically, but can be inferred from shallow faulting and gravity data. This fault is roughly coincident with the Pennyrile fault zone. Extensional faults that formed the rift boundaries were the sites of late-stage compressional and extensional tectonics. Flower structures observed along the graben boundaries probably indicate post-Pennsylvanian wrench faulting. The basement within the graben plunges north-northwest, with the lowest point occurring south of the Rough Creek fault zone. Pre-Knox sediments thicken to approximately 12,000 in this area. The Knox Megagroup thickens toward the Mississippi Embayment, ranging from 4800 ft (southeastern graben area) to more than 7000 ft (west end of graben). Upper Ordovician to Devonian units also display westward thickening. The top of the Meramecian, New Albany, Maquoketa, and the base of the Knox generate continuous, high-amplitude seismic reflections due to large impedance contrasts between clastic and carbonate units. Shallow oil and gas production (Mississippian and Pennsylvanian) is present in this area. However, deep horizons (Knox, Lower Cambrian) remain relatively untested. Potential hydrocarbon traps in the pre-Knox sequence observed on seismic include fault blocks and updip pinch-outs.

  4. Big Canyon Creek Ecological Restoration Strategy.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rasmussen, Lynn; Richardson, Shannon

    2007-10-01

    He-yey, Nez Perce for steelhead or rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), are a culturally and ecologically significant resource within the Big Canyon Creek watershed; they are also part of the federally listed Snake River Basin Steelhead DPS. The majority of the Big Canyon Creek drainage is considered critical habitat for that DPS as well as for the federally listed Snake River fall chinook (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) ESU. The Nez Perce Soil and Water Conservation District (District) and the Nez Perce Tribe Department of Fisheries Resources Management-Watershed (Tribe), in an effort to support the continued existence of these and other aquatic species, have developed this document to direct funding toward priority restoration projects in priority areas for the Big Canyon Creek watershed. In order to achieve this, the District and the Tribe: (1) Developed a working group and technical team composed of managers from a variety of stakeholders within the basin; (2) Established geographically distinct sub-watershed areas called Assessment Units (AUs); (3) Created a prioritization framework for the AUs and prioritized them; and (4) Developed treatment strategies to utilize within the prioritized AUs. Assessment Units were delineated by significant shifts in sampled juvenile O. mykiss (steelhead/rainbow trout) densities, which were found to fall at fish passage barriers. The prioritization framework considered four aspects critical to determining the relative importance of performing restoration in a certain area: density of critical fish species, physical condition of the AU, water quantity, and water quality. It was established, through vigorous data analysis within these four areas, that the geographic priority areas for restoration within the Big Canyon Creek watershed are Big Canyon Creek from stream km 45.5 to the headwaters, Little Canyon from km 15 to 30, the mainstem corridors of Big Canyon (mouth to 7km) and Little Canyon (mouth to 7km). The District and the Tribe then used data collected from the District's stream assessment and inventory, utilizing the Stream Visual Assessment Protocol (SVAP), to determine treatment necessary to bring 90% of reaches ranked Poor or Fair through the SVAP up to good or excellent. In 10 year's time, all reaches that were previously evaluated with SVAP will be reevaluated to determine progress and to adapt methods for continued success. Over 400 miles of stream need treatment in order to meet identified restoration goals. Treatments include practices which result in riparian habitat improvements, nutrient reductions, channel condition improvements, fish habitat improvements, invasive species control, water withdrawal reductions, improved hydrologic alterations, upland sediment reductions, and passage barrier removal. The Nez Perce Soil and Water Conservation District (District) and the Nez Perce Tribe Department of Fisheries Resource Management Watershed Division (Tribe) developed this document to guide restoration activities within the Big Canyon Creek watershed for the period of 2008-2018. This plan was created to demonstrate the ongoing need and potential for anadromous fish habitat restoration within the watershed and to ensure continued implementation of restoration actions and activities. It was developed not only to guide the District and the Tribe, but also to encourage cooperation among all stakeholders, including landowners, government agencies, private organizations, tribal governments, and elected officials. Through sharing information, skills, and resources in an active, cooperative relationships, all concerned parties will have the opportunity to join together to strengthen and maintain a sustainable natural resource base for present and future generations within the watershed. The primary goal of the strategy is to address aquatic habitat restoration needs on a watershed level for resident and anadromous fish species, promoting quality habitat within a self-sustaining watershed. Seven objectives have been developed to support this goal: (1) Identify factors limiting quality

  5. Leon Creek Flood Risk Management Project San Antonio, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Leon Creek Flood Risk Management Project San Antonio, Texas 27 March 2014 ABSTRACT: Leon Creek is an important riverine system located on the western side of San Antonio in Bexar County Texas. The high flood that result in extremely rapid but relatively short-duration flood peaks and high velocity stream flows

  6. Bridge Creek Watershed Volunteer Lake Secchi Disk Monitoring Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;Bridge Creek Watershed Volunteer Lake Secchi Disk Monitoring Program 1996 DOE FRAP 1996-13 Ryan.C. December 1996 #12;ABSTRACT This document summarizes data collected during the first year of the Bridge transparency data from 22 lakes in the Bridge Creek watershed. Secchi depth readings were collected between May

  7. Edwards Creek Geothermal Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, AlabamaETEC GmbH Jump to:Providence,New Mexico: EnergyEnergyCreek Geothermal Project

  8. Fermilab | Tritium at Fermilab | Indian Creek Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation Current HABFES OctoberEvan Racah861MayArtQuestions forFeature photoIndian Creek

  9. Dry Creek Ventures | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar2-0057-EA Jump to:of the National ClimateDongyingOpen Energy3) Jump to:Creek

  10. Separation Creek Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EIS Report UrlNM-bRenewableSMUDSectional ModelofSenerSeparation Creek

  11. Smith Creek Geothermal Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EIS ReportEurope GmbH JumpSlough Heat andCreek Geothermal Project Jump

  12. Stony Creek Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EIS ReportEurope GmbHSoloPageBeforeCreek Wind Farm Jump to: navigation,

  13. Twin Creeks Technologies | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EISTJThin Film SolarTown(LECBP) | OpenTrack WindTuvalu:Creeks

  14. Willow Creek Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EISTJThinWarsaw,WhatUtilityRateNamingHelperVirginia:Willow Creek Wind

  15. Forest Creek Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoopButtePowerEdistoWhiskeyFootprint Ventures Jump to: navigation,PortalCreek Wind Farm

  16. Lava Creek Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource History ViewInformationWinds Jump to:Laredo Ridge WindHill JumpLava Creek

  17. Bear Creek Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop IncIowaWisconsin: EnergyYorkColorado StateWindInc Jump to:Baywood-LosCreek Wind

  18. Cobb Creek Geothermal Facility | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoopButtePower Ventures Jump to: navigation, searchClover HillCobalt Biofuels JumpCreek

  19. Bull Creek Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop IncIowaWisconsin:PontiacInformationAssessment ToolkitBull Creek Wind Farm Jump

  20. Bear Creek Valley Watershed | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n c i p a l De p uBUS SERVICE SUBSIDIESDepartment of585Bear Creek Valley

  1. Papalote Creek II | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsourceII JumpQuarterly Smart GridNorth Carolina: EnergyIncPan AfricanHomePantexCreek

  2. Papalote Creek Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsourceII JumpQuarterly Smart GridNorth Carolina: EnergyIncPan AfricanHomePantexCreekWind

  3. Price-Anderson Nuclear Safety Enforcement Program. 1997 annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-01-01

    This report summarizes activities in the Department of Energy's Price-Anderson Amendments Act (PAAA) Enforcement Program in calendar year 1997 and highlights improvements planned for 1998. The DOE Enforcement Program involves the Office of Enforcement and Investigation in the DOE Headquarters Office of Environment, Safety and Health, as well as numerous PAAA Coordinators and technical advisors in DOE Field and Program Offices. The DOE Enforcement Program issued 13 Notices of Violation (NOV`s) in 1997 for cases involving significant or potentially significant nuclear safety violations. Six of these included civil penalties totaling $440,000. Highlights of these actions include: (1) Brookhaven National Laboratory Radiological Control Violations / Associated Universities, Inc.; (2) Bioassay Program Violations at Mound / EG and G, Inc.; (3) Savannah River Crane Operator Uptake / Westinghouse Savannah River Company; (4) Waste Calciner Worker Uptake / Lockheed-Martin Idaho Technologies Company; and (5) Reactor Scram and Records Destruction at Sandia / Sandia Corporation (Lockheed-Martin).

  4. Water Quality Monitoring in the Buck Creek Watershed and Facilitation of Buck Creek Watershed Partnership 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gregory, L.; Dyer, P.

    2013-01-01

    & 20376); two are in AU 0207A_02 (stations 20365 & 20368) and one is located on a tributary of the creek (station 20367). Building on this recommendation, two additional sites were included in the Interim Monitoring project. These added stations... the Interim Monitoring project Table 1. Water quality monitoring station descriptions Project? Site?No.?? TCEQ? Monitoring? Station?No.? General?Station?Location?&?Description? County? TCEQ Assessment Unit Station is Located In BC 03 20365 Buck...

  5. BRUCE T. ANDERSON Professor, Department of Earth and Environment, Boston University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hutyra, Lucy R.

    TJ, Kassam KS, Templer PH, Anderson BT, Battles JJ, Campbell JL, Driscoll CT, Green MB, Rodenhouse NL.M., 2015: Monsoon dynamics, and their effects on tea yield in China based on a yield response model

  6. A guide to source materials of the life and work of Lawrence B. Anderson '30

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laguette, Victoria.

    1998-01-01

    From 1933 to 1976, Professor Lawrence B. Anderson taught in the MIT Department of Architecture, and from 1947 to 1971, he served as its chairman and dean. Concurrently, from 1937 to 1972 , he was principal partner in the ...

  7. Mr. John A. Anderson Office of Fossil Energy United States Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    14-96-LNG Support of Application for Long-Term Authorization to Export Liquefied Natural Gas Dear Mr. Anderson: On behalf of America's Natural Gas Alliance (ANGA), I write in...

  8. VIA HAND DELIVERY Mr. John A. Anderson Office of Fossil Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    No. IH 2f::B- LNG Application for Long-Term Authorization to Expmt Liquefied Natural Gas Dear Mr. Anderson: American LNG Marketing LLC ("American LNG") seeks long-term,...

  9. Supporting Nested Locking in Multiprocessor Real-Time Systems Bryan C. Ward and James H. Anderson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, James

    Supporting Nested Locking in Multiprocessor Real-Time Systems Bryan C. Ward and James H. Anderson Department of Computer Science, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Abstract This paper presents

  10. Remedial investigation/feasibility study for the Clinch River/Poplar Creek operable unit. Volume 1. Main text

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-09-01

    This is the combined Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study Report for the Clinch River/Poplar Crack (CR/PC) Operable Unit (OU). The CR/PC OU is located in Anderson and Roane Counties, Tennessee and consists of the Clinch River and several of its embayments in Melton Hill and Watts Bar Reservoirs. These waters have received hazardous substances released over a period of 50 years from the US Department of Energy`s Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), a National Priority List site established under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act. A remedial investigation has been conducted to determine the current nature and extent of any contamination and to assess the resulting risk to human health and the environment. The feasibility study evaluates remedial action alternatives to identify any that are feasible for implementation and that would effectively reduce risk. Historical studies had indicated that current problems would likely include {sup 137}Cs in sediment of the Clinch River, mercury in sediment and fish of Poplar Creek and PCBs and pesticides in fish from throughout the OU. Peak releases of mercury and {sup 137}Cs occurred over 35 years ago, and current releases are low. Past releases of PCBs from the ORR are poorly quantified, and current releases are difficult to quantify because levels are so low. The site characterization focused on contaminants in surface water, sediment, and biota. Contaminants in surface water were all found to be below Ambient Water Quality Criteria. Other findings included the following: elevated metals including cesium 137 and mercury in McCoy Branch sediments; PCBs and chlordane elevated in several fish species, presenting the only major human health risk, significant ecological risks in Poplar Creek but not in the Clinch River.

  11. Alternative Perspectives on the Battle of Wolf Creek of 1938

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Warde, Mary Jane

    2001-09-01

    The Battle of Wolf Creek in northwestern Oklahoma in 1838 was highly significant to the Cheyenne, Arapaho, Kiowa, Comanche, and Plains Apache tribes, but little known beyond their mutual frontier. Their oral accounts of the battle allow us...

  12. The battle of Sailor's Creek: a study in leadership 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Cloyd Allen, Jr.

    2007-04-25

    The Battle of Sailor's Creek, 6 April 1865, has been overshadowed by Lee's surrender at Appomattox Court House several days later, yet it is an example of the Union military war machine reaching its apex of war making ...

  13. HYDROLOGY OF BISHOP CREEK, CALIFORNIA: AN ISOTOPIC ANALYSIS 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    diverting Bishop creek water for hydroelectric power for many years. Recently there has been concern that must be released from the hydroelectric power plants to the channel, during certain times of the year

  14. C(re)ek-storation Community Collaboration Site: North Fork of Strawberry Creek by La Loma and Le Conte Avenues

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tannenbaum, Sara Rose

    2011-01-01

    1987. Excerpts from: The Strawberry Creek Management Plan.and Vince Resh. 1992. Strawberry Creek on the University ofSite: North Fork of Strawberry Creek by La Loma and Le Conte

  15. Crab Creek Subbasin Plan Prepared for the Washington Department

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    alphabetical order): Juli Anderson, WDFW Paul Ashley, WDFW Jim Blanchard, United States Bureau of Reclamation of Fish and Wildlife and Lincoln County Conservation District's commitment is to make it possible their livelihoods and their quality of life. The NWPCC proposed a three year rolling review of subbasin plans

  16. Features and Dimensions of the Hayward fault zone in the Strawberry and Blackberry Creek Area Berkeley, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, P.L.

    2011-01-01

    Hayward Fault Zone in the Strawberry and Blackberry Creekward Fault Zone in the Strawberry and Blackberry Creek Area,Hayward fault zone in the Strawberry and Blackberry Creek

  17. Natural Recharge to the Unconfined Aquifer System on the Hanford Site from the Greater Cold Creek Watershed: Progress Report 2004

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waichler, Scott R.; Wigmosta, Mark S.; Coleman, Andre M.

    2004-09-14

    Movement of contaminants in groundwater at the Hanford Site is heavily dependent on recharge to the unconfined aquifer. As the effects of past artificial discharges dissipate, the water table is expected to return to more natural conditions, and natural recharge will become the driving force when evaluating future groundwater flow conditions and related contaminant transport. Previous work on the relationship of natural recharge to groundwater movement at the Hanford Site has focused on direct recharge from infiltrating rainfall and snowmelt within the area represented by the Sitewide Groundwater Model (SGM) domain. However, part of the groundwater recharge at Hanford is provided by flow from Greater Cold Creek watershed (GCC), a large drainage area on the western boundary of the Hanford Site that includes Cold Creek Valley, Dry Creek Valley, and the Hanford side of Rattlesnake Mountain. This study was undertaken to estimate the recharge from GCC, which is believed to enter the unconfined aquifer as both infiltrating streamflow and shallow subsurface flow. To estimate recharge, the Distributed Hydrology-Soil-Vegetation Model (DHSVM) was used to simulate a detailed water balance of GCC from 1956 to 2001 at a spatial resolution of 200~m and a temporal resolution of one hour. For estimating natural recharge to Hanford from watersheds along its western and southwestern boundaries, the most important aspects that need to be considered are 1)~distribution and relative magnitude of precipitation and evapotranspiration over the watershed, 2)~streamflow generation at upper elevations and infiltration at lower elevations during rare runoff events, and 3)~permeability of the basalt bedrock surface underlying the soil mantle.

  18. Recurrent faulting and petroleum accumulation, Cat Creek Anticline, central Montana

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, W.J. (Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign (United States))

    1991-06-01

    The Cat Creek anticline, scene of central Montana's first significant oil discovery, is underlain by a south-dipping high-angle fault (Cat Creek fault) that has undergone several episodes of movement with opposite sense of displacement. Borehole data suggest that the Cat Creek fault originated as a normal fault during Proterozoic rifting concurrent with deposition of the Belt Supergroup. Reverse faulting took place in Late Cambrian time, and again near the end of the Devonian Period. The Devonian episode, coeval with the Antler orogeny, raised the southern block several hundred feet. The southern block remained high through Meramecian time, then began to subside. Post-Atokan, pre-Middle Jurassic normal faulting lowered the southern block as much as 1,500 ft. During the Laramide orogeny (latest Cretaceous-Eocene) the Cat Creek fault underwent as much as 4,000 ft of reverse displacement and a comparable amount of left-lateral displacement. The Cat Creek anticline is a fault-propagation fold; en echelon domes and listric normal faults developed along its crest in response to wrenching. Oil was generated mainly in organic-rich shales of the Heath Formation (upper Chesterian Series) and migrated upward along tectonic fractures into Pennsylvanian, Jurassic, and Cretaceous reservoir rocks in structural traps in en echelon domes. Production has been achieved only from those domes where structural closure was retained from Jurassic through Holocene time.

  19. EA-1219: Hoe Creek Underground Coal Gasification Test Site Remediation, Campbell County, Wyoming

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts for the proposed Hoe Creek Underground Coal Gasification Test Site Remediation that would be performed at the Hoe Creek site in Campbell County, Wyoming.

  20. The feasibility of residential development in the newly master planned Ship Creek area of Anchorage, Alaska

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Debenham, Shaun T. (Shaun Todd), 1973-

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this thesis is to determine if a 40 unit condominium complex located in the Ship Creek area in Anchorage, Alaska, is financially feasible. Historically, Ship Creek has been an industrial area but recently the ...

  1. Transverse Anderson localization of light near Dirac points of photonic nanostructures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deng, Hanying; Malomed, Boris A; Panoiu, Nicolae C; Ye, Fangwei

    2015-01-01

    We perform a comparative study of the Anderson localization of light beams in disordered layered photonic nanostructures that, in the limit of periodic layer distribution, possess either a Dirac point or a Bragg gap in the spectrum of the wavevectors. In particular, we demonstrate that the localization length of the Anderson modes increases when the width of the Bragg gap decreases, such that in the vanishingly small bandgap limit, namely when a Dirac point is formed, even extremely high levels of disorders are unable to localize the optical modes located near the Dirac point. A comparative analysis of the key features of the propagation of Anderson modes formed in the Bragg gap or near the Dirac point is also presented. Our findings could provide valuable guidelines in assessing the influence of structural disorder on the functionality of a broad array of optical nanodevices.

  2. Fast-growing willow shrub named `Fish Creek`

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Abrahamson, Lawrence P.; Kopp, Richard F.; Smart, Lawrence B.; Volk, Timothy A.

    2007-05-08

    A distinct male cultivar of Salix purpurea named `Fish Creek`, characterized by rapid stem growth producing greater than 30% more woody biomass than either of its parents (`94001` and `94006`) and 20% more biomass than a current production cultivar (`SV1`). `Fish Creek` can be planted from dormant stem cuttings, produces multiple stems after coppice, and the stem biomass can be harvested when the plant is dormant. In the spring following harvest, the plant will re-sprout very vigorously, producing new stems that can be harvested after two to four years of growth. This harvest cycle can be repeated several times. The stem biomass can be chipped and burned as a source of renewable energy, generating heat and/or electricity. `Fish Creek` displays a low incidence of rust disease or damage by beetles or sawflies.

  3. R. E. Estell, E. L. Fredrickson, D. M. Anderson and M. D. Remmenga mixtures on alfalfa pellet intake by lambs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. E. Estell, E. L. Fredrickson, D. M. Anderson and M. D. Remmenga mixtures on alfalfa pellet and sesquiterpene mixtures on alfalfa pellet intake by lambs1 R. E. Estell,*2 E. L. Fredrickson,* D. M. Anderson. Four experiments were conducted to determine the effects of terpenes on intake of alfalfa pellets

  4. Roberts Creek Study Forest: the effects of shelterwood harvesting and blowdown

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    is sediment produc- tion in domestic water supply creeks. The effects of timber harvesting on sedimentRoberts Creek Study Forest: the effects of shelterwood harvesting and blowdown on sediment production in a small zero-order creek by Robert O. Hudson and Brian D'Anjou KEYWORDS: Shelterwood harvest

  5. Pike Creek, Delaware: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland:NPIProtectio1975) | Open EnergyPhoenicia,Creek, Ohio:Mississippi:Ohio:Creek,

  6. Coconut Creek, Florida: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, Alabama (Utility Company) JumpIowa: Energy ResourcesCreek,CoastalCochranCoconut Creek,

  7. Anderson localization of a Tonks-Girardeau gas in potentials with controlled disorder

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Radic, J.; Bacic, V.; Jukic, D.; Buljan, H.; Segev, M.

    2010-06-15

    We theoretically demonstrate features of Anderson localization in a Tonks-Girardeau gas confined in one-dimensional potentials with controlled disorder. That is, we investigate the evolution of the single-particle density and correlations of a Tonks-Girardeau wave packet in such disordered potentials. The wave packet is initially trapped, the trap is suddenly turned off, and after some time the system evolves into a localized steady state due to Anderson localization. The density tails of the steady state decay exponentially, while the coherence in these tails increases. The latter phenomenon corresponds to the same effect found in incoherent optical solitons.

  8. Evidence of Streamflow and Sediment Effects on Juvenile Coho and Benthic Macroinvertebrates of Lagunitas Creek and San Geronimo Creek, Marin County, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ball, Joanie; Diver, Sibyl; Hwan, Jason

    2009-01-01

    Resh. 2008. Quantitative linkages among sediment supply,streambed fine sediment, and benthic macroinvertebrates inData: Lagunitas Creek Sediment and Riparian Management Plan,

  9. The geoarchaeology of Buttermilk Creek, Bell County, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gibson, Brandy Deanne

    1997-01-01

    was conducted. Buttermilk Creek is a 13 km stream incised into limestone bedrock with a drainage basin size of 43 kM2 , a stream gradient of 8.5 m/km, and a sinuosity of 1.26. This project was undertaken with two objectives in mind-, to create a...

  10. Tillman Creek Mitigation Site As-Build Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gresham, Doug [Otak, Inc.

    2009-05-29

    This as-built report describes site conditions at the Tillman Creek mitigation site in South Cle Elum, Washington. This mitigation site was constructed in 2006-2007 to compensate for wetland impacts from the Yakama Nation hatchery. This as-built report provides information on the construction sequence, as-built survey, and establishment of baseline monitoring stations.

  11. ORESTIMBA CREEK, WEST STANISLAUS COUNTY, CA FLOOD RISK MANAGEMENT PROJECT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    ORESTIMBA CREEK, WEST STANISLAUS COUNTY, CA FLOOD RISK MANAGEMENT PROJECT 29 May 2013 ABSTRACT flood risk management for the City of Newman, Stanislaus County, California and the surrounding area public health risks caused by area flooding included contamination of domestic water wells and inundation

  12. ASSESSMENT OF LIVESTOCK WINTERING AREAS IN BRIDGE CREEK BASIN, 1996

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Agricultural Practice for Waste Management... 6 3.0 ASSESSMENT RESULTS................................... 7 3 with the environmental guidelines of the Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food (1992) and the Code of Agricultural Practice for Waste Management (Waste Management Act, Health Act, 1992). Bridge Creek drains a 1,550 km area

  13. Main-Chain Conformational Tendencies of Amino Acids Robert J. Anderson,1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weng, Zhiping

    Main-Chain Conformational Tendencies of Amino Acids Robert J. Anderson,1,2 Zhiping Weng,2 Robert K, Massachusetts ABSTRACT A Ramachandran plot is a visual representation of the main-chain conformational dataset. To obtain our results, we then mea- sured the pair-wise distances of main-chain confor- mational

  14. The Performance of the Container Shipping I/O System Eric Anderson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polyzos, George C.

    1 The Performance of the Container Shipping I/O System Eric Anderson Joseph Pasquale {ewa, pasquale/O system. This paper describes our implementation of this mechanism, called Container Shipping, and its for the DEC 3000 model 800. Sustained copy rates include TLB misses and imperfect cache behavior, plus

  15. On the Stability of Web Crawling and Web Reid Anderson1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borgs, Christian

    On the Stability of Web Crawling and Web Search Reid Anderson1 , Christian Borgs1 , Jennifer Chayes moti- vated by web crawling. We introduce a notion of stable cores, which is the set of web pages that are usually contained in the crawling buffer when the buffer size is smaller than the total number of web

  16. Potential energy surface for the hydrogen-iodine reaction James B. Anderson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, James B.

    Potential energy surface for the hydrogen-iodine reaction James B. Anderson Department of Chemistry of the hydrogen-iodine reaction, H2+I,-*HI +HI. He reported rate measurementsof the forward and reverse reactions of existing iodine atoms with hydrogen would have to be looked (at): 21+Hz-+2HI... ." ' It is now be- lieved

  17. Journal of Philosophy, Inc. Author(s): Alan Ross Anderson and Nuel D. Belnap, Jr.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Belnap, Nuel

    Journal of Philosophy, Inc. Enthymemes Author(s): Alan Ross Anderson and Nuel D. Belnap, Jr. Source: The Journal of Philosophy, Vol. 58, No. 23, American Philosophical Association Eastern Division Fifty: Journal of Philosophy, Inc. Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2023169 Accessed: 28/05/2009 15

  18. Evidence for Hydrogen Induced Vacancies in Plutonium Metal Scott Richmond, Joseph Anderson, Jeff Abes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evidence for Hydrogen Induced Vacancies in Plutonium Metal Scott Richmond, Joseph Anderson, Jeff@lanl.gov INTRODUCTION The solubility of hydrogen in plutonium metal was recently measured [1]. Based on the solubility data, the properties of plutonium and helium release data, the authors will show that hydrogen induced

  19. Publications for Xiaohui Sun Sun, X., Rudnick, L., Akahori, T., Anderson, C., Bell, M., Bray,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Müller, Dietmar

    Publications for Xiaohui Sun 2015 Sun, X., Rudnick, L., Akahori, T., Anderson, C., Bell, M., Bray Reich, W., Sun, X., Reich, P., Gao, X., Xiao, L., Han, J. (2014). A Sino-German λ6 cm polarisation-10. [More Information] Sun, X., Gaensler, B

  20. What Drives the Choice of a Third Party Logistics Provider? Edward Anderson , Tim Coltman*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coltman, Tim

    1 What Drives the Choice of a Third Party Logistics Provider? Edward Anderson , Tim Coltman and the direction of the research project. #12;2 What Drives the Choice of a Third Party Logistics Provider of their distinctive value propositions ­ a fact one would also expect holds true when companies choose a logistics

  1. The perceived transmittance of inhomogeneous surfaces and media Barton L. Anderson a,*, Manish Singh b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singh, Manish

    Singh b , Jeanette Meng c a University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia b Department of Psychology of contrasts model (Singh, M., & Anderson, B. L. (2002). Toward a perceptual theory of transparency; Kasrai & Kingdom, 2001; Robillotto, Khang, & Zaidi, 2002; Robillotto & Zaidi, 2004; Singh, 2004; Singh

  2. The Seismic Structure D. 0.Gough, A. G. Kosovichev, J. Toomre, E. Anderson,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Monteiro, Mário João

    The Seismic Structure of the Sun D. 0.Gough, A. G. Kosovichev, J. Toomre, E. Anderson, H. M. Antia-generatingcore,thesound-speedvariation is somewhat smoother in the sun than it is in the model. This could be a consequence SeismicWaves of chemical neglectedmacroscopicmotionthat maybepresent Acoustic seismic waves propagate through in the sun. Accurate knowledge of the sun

  3. The Economics of Online Crime Tyler Moore, Richard Clayton, and Ross Anderson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thornton, Mitchell

    from machines controlled by principals with divergent interests, microeconomic analysis and game such as privacy, spam, and phishing, but also gives insights to scholars of system dependability, conflict, economists, and even lawyers and psychologists. For a survey of security economics in general, see Anderson

  4. An Archaeological Survey for the Dogwood Springs Water Supply Corporation Water System Improvements Project in Anderson County, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, William

    2015-07-29

    An archaeological survey of a well and plant site in central Anderson County, Texas was performed on November 4, 2007 by Brazos Valley Research Associates (BVRA) for the Dogwood Springs Water Supply Corporation (WSC) under Antiquities Permit 4709...

  5. Characterization of diffuse emissions from the Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF), Los Alamos National Laboratory, New Mexico 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Montgomery, Noel Davis

    1993-01-01

    The Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) is an 800 megaelectron volt (MeV) proton accelerator operated by the University of California for the United States Department of Energy (DOE). The accelerator produces ...

  6. Fine-Grained Multiprocessor Real-Time Locking with Improved Bryan C. Ward and James H. Anderson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, James

    Fine-Grained Multiprocessor Real-Time Locking with Improved Blocking Bryan C. Ward and James H. Anderson Department of Computer Science, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Abstract Existing

  7. GPUSync: A Framework for Real-Time GPU Management Glenn A. Elliott, Bryan C. Ward, and James H. Anderson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, James

    GPUSync: A Framework for Real-Time GPU Management Glenn A. Elliott, Bryan C. Ward, and James H. Anderson Department of Computer Science, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Abstract This paper

  8. EA-1978: Sand Creek Winds, McCone County, Montana

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Western Area Power Administration (Western) is preparing an EA to analyze the potential environmental impacts of the proposed Sand Creek Winds Project, a 75-MW wind farm between the towns of Circle and Wolf Point in McCone County, Montana. The proposed wind farm would interconnect to Western’s existing Wolf Point to Circle 115-kV transmission line approximately 18 miles north of Wolf Point.

  9. Pebble Creek, Florida: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland:NPIProtectio Program |ViewIllinois: Energy ResourcesPebble Creek, Florida:

  10. On the Sum of the Non-Negative Lyapunov Exponents for Some Cocycles Related to the Anderson Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ilia Binder; Michael Goldstein; Mircea Voda

    2014-08-03

    We provide an explicit lower bound for the the sum of the non-negative Lyapunov exponents for some cocycles related to the Anderson model. In particular, for the Anderson model on a strip of width $ W $ the lower bound is proportional to $ W^{-\\epsilon} $, for any $ \\epsilon>0 $. This bound is consistent with the fact that the lowest non-negative Lyapunov exponent is conjectured to have a lower bound proportional to $ W^{-1} $.

  11. Rehabilitate Newsome Creek Watershed, 2007-2008 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bransford, Stephanie [Nez Perce Tribe Fisheries/Watershed Program

    2009-05-01

    The Nez Perce Tribe Department of Fisheries Resource Management, Watershed Division approaches watershed restoration with a ridge-top to ridgetop approach. The Nez Perce Tribe (NPT) and the Nez Perce National Forest (NPNF) have formed a partnership in completing watershed restoration activities, and through this partnership more work is accomplished by sharing funding and resources in our effort. The Nez Perce Tribe began watershed restoration projects within the Newsome Creek watershed of the South Fork Clearwater River in 1997. Progress has been made in restoring the watershed through road decommissioning and culvert replacement. Starting in FY 2001 and continuing into the present, a major stream restoration effort on the mainstem of Newsome Creek has been pursued. From completing a watershed assessment to a feasibility study of 4 miles of mainstem rehabilitation to carrying that forward into NEPA and a final design, we will begin the effort of restoring the mainstem channel of Newsome Creek to provide spawning and rearing habitat for anadromous and resident fish species. Roads have been surveyed and prioritized for removal or improvement as well as culverts being prioritized for replacement to accommodate fish passage throughout the watershed.

  12. COMPLETE LOCALISATION IN THE PARABOLIC ANDERSON MODEL WITH PARETO-DISTRIBUTED POTENTIAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mörters, Peter

    for the heat equation tu(t, z) = u(t, z) + (z)u(t, z) on (0, ) � Zd with random potential ((z): z Zd ). We and main results 1.1 The parabolic Anderson model and intermittency We consider the heat equation, Feynman-Kac formula. 1 #12;2 WOLFGANG K¨ONIG, PETER M¨ORTERS, AND NADIA SIDOROVA islands. This effect

  13. An Archaeological Survey of a Proposed Borrow Pit in Anderson County, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, William

    2015-07-10

    PIT IN ANDERSON COUNTY, TEXAS Brazos Valley Research Associates Project Number BVRA 03-27 Author and Principal Investigator William E. Moore Prepared for W. W. Webber, Inc. P.O. Box 2067.... iii ACKNOWLEDGMENTS I would like to thank those whose cooperation made the completion of this project possible. At W. W. Webber, Inc. in Corsicana, Texas maps and logistical support were provided by Bryan Donaldson, Johnny Williams, and Tommy...

  14. Magnetic frustration in the three-band Anderson lattice model for high-temperature superconductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ihle, D.; Kasner, M. )

    1990-09-01

    The three-band Anderson lattice model for the CuO{sub 2} planes in high-{Tc} superconductors is established. Treating this model by perturbation theory, the effective spin interactions are derived. The antiferromagnetic superexchange integrals are calculated as functions of the direct oxygen transfer and the hole concentration. It is found that frustration in the superexchange occurs, even in the undoped case, which increases with oxygen trnasfer and decreases with hole concentration.

  15. Islais Creek reinterpreted: An exploration of restoration designs in the urbanized context of San Francisco

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Griffith, Lucas A

    2006-01-01

    Creek: From Stream to Sewer". 2006. narrative on waterbackbone to a combined sewer system located underground inThis submerged combined sewer system persists today as

  16. Hydrologic diversity in Santa Cruz mountain creeks and implications for steelhead population survival

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peterson, Michael

    2012-01-01

    diversity in Santa Cruz mountain creeks and implications foroccurring in the Santa Cruz mountains and outlets in andto compare Santa Cruz mountain watershed responses to a

  17. Independent External Peer Review for the Clear Creek, Texas Flood Risk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Independent External Peer Review for the Clear Creek, Texas Flood Risk Management General Institute 505 King Avenue Columbus, OH 43201 for U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Flood Risk Management Planning SERVICE (STAS) on Final Independent External Peer Review Report for Clear Creek, Texas Flood Risk

  18. Wolf Creek Nuclear Operating Corporation | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-EnhancingEtGeorgia:Illinois:Wizard Power Pty Ltd Jump to: navigation, searchWolf Creek

  19. Walnut Creek, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-EnhancingEt Al.,Turin,Village ofWaialua,Wallington, New Jersey: EnergyCreek,

  20. Todd Creek, Colorado: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-EnhancingEt Al., 2013)Open EnergyTinoxOpenStatutes Jump to:bSouth Dakota: EnergyCreek,

  1. Turtle Creek, Pennsylvania: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-EnhancingEt Al.,Turin, New York: Energy Resources Jump to:Georgia:Turpin Hills,Creek,

  2. Hunters Creek, Florida: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas: Energy Resources JumpNewTexas: EnergyHunterdon County, New Jersey: EnergyCreek,

  3. Fritz Creek, Alaska: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View New PagesSustainable Urban TransportFortistar LLCNorthIdaho: EnergyTexas:Maine:FrioCreek,

  4. Grape Creek, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View New PagesSustainableGlynn County, Georgia:Oregon: Energy Resources JumpSouth,Grape Creek,

  5. Dow Chemical Company-Oyster Creek VIII | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, Alabama (UtilityInstrumentsArea (DOEDixmont,Missouri:Dow Chemical Company-Oyster Creek

  6. East Basin Creek Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, AlabamaETEC GmbH Jump to: navigation, searchEarthcare Products JumpEast Basin Creek

  7. Lost Creek, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas:Montezuma, Arizona:Oregon: EnergyLloyd, NewBranchLongweiLosCerrillos,Creek, Texas:

  8. Pigeon Creek, Ohio: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland:NPIProtectio1975) | Open EnergyPhoenicia,Creek, Ohio: Energy Resources Jump to:

  9. Smith Creek Valley Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EIS ReportEurope GmbH JumpSlough Heat andCreek Geothermal Project

  10. Ballenger Creek, Maryland: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EAandAmminex AAustriaBiofuels BrasilMaine: EnergyBallenger Creek, Maryland:

  11. Barton Creek, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EAandAmminexInformation Bartholomew County,Creek, Texas: Energy

  12. Coal Creek, Colorado: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, Alabama (Utility Company) JumpIowa: Energy ResourcesCreek, Colorado: Energy Resources

  13. Hickory Creek, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource History View NewGuam: Energyarea, CaliforniaHess Retail NaturalAreas | OpenCreek,

  14. LaCreek Electric Assn, Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource History ViewInformation Actions(Redirected fromAvoidtools <Riviera,LaCreek

  15. MHK Projects/Coal Creek Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource HistoryScenarios Towards 2050 Jump to:Projects/AlaskaInformationCreek Project

  16. Birch Creek Village Elec Util | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop IncIowaWisconsin:Pontiac Biomass Facility Jump to:Biola,BiomassBiomassCreek

  17. Deer Creek Hot Spring Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoopButtePower VenturesInformation9) WindGridDeepi has not created anyDeer Creek

  18. Cantua Creek, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoopButte County,Camilla, Georgia: Energy Resources JumpCanbyCantua Creek, California:

  19. Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: ClipperCreek, Inc. | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematics And Statistics » USAJobs SearchAMERICA'SEnergy SafelyEnergy ClipperCreek, Inc. Workplace

  20. Fermilab | Tritium at Fermilab | Kress Creek Aerial View

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverse (Journal Article) | SciTechSubmitted MoreTraffic Safety TrafficKress Creek

  1. Boundaries and Topological Algorithms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fleck, Margaret Morrison

    1988-09-01

    This thesis develops a model for the topological structure of situations. In this model, the topological structure of space is altered by the presence or absence of boundaries, such as those at the edges of objects. ...

  2. THE WILDCAT-SAN PABLO CREEK FLOOD CONTROL PROJECT AND ITS IMPLICATIONS FOR THE DESIGN OF ENVIRONMENTALLY SENSITIVE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    THE WILDCAT-SAN PABLO CREEK FLOOD CONTROL PROJECT AND ITS IMPLICATIONS FOR THE DESIGN type of joint federal and local flood control project on Wildcat and San Pablo Creeks in North Richmond on Wildcat and San Pablo Creeks in North Richmond, California, which was designed for the com- plementary

  3. Boiling Water at Hot Creek--The Dangerous and Dynamic Thermal Springs in California's Long Valley Caldera

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torgersen, Christian

    Boiling Water at Hot Creek--The Dangerous and Dynamic Thermal Springs in California's Long Valley. Because of this danger, the U.S. Forest Service has had to close parts of the Hot Creek Geologic Site the region. The attractions of Hot Creek, however, also harbor danger. The locations, dis- charge rates

  4. Asotin Creek Model Watershed Plan: Asotin County, Washington, 1995.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Browne, Dave

    1995-04-01

    The Northwest Power Planning Council completed its ``Strategy for Salmon'' in 1992. This is a plan, composed of four specific elements,designed to double the present production of 2.5 million salmon in the Columbia River watershed. These elements have been called the ``four H's'': (1) improve harvest management; (2) improve hatcheries and their production practices; (3) improve survival at hydroelectric dams; and (4) improve and protect fish habitat. The Asotin Creek Model Watershed Plan is the first to be developed in Washington State which is specifically concerned with habitat protection and restoration for salmon and trout. The plan is consistent with the habitat element of the ``Strategy for Salmon''. Asotin Creek is similar in many ways to other salmon-bearing streams in the Snake River system. Its watershed has been significantly impacted by human activities and catastrophic natural events, such as floods and droughts. It supports only remnant salmon and trout populations compared to earlier years. It will require protection and restoration of its fish habitat and riparian corridor in order to increase its salmonid productivity.

  5. Data Center Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Site Assessment: Anderson Readiness Center; Salem, Oregon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Metzger, I.; Van Geet, O.

    2014-06-01

    This report summarizes the results from the data center energy efficiency and renewable energy site assessment conducted for the Oregon Army National Guard in Salem, Oregon. A team led by NREL conducted the assessment of the Anderson Readiness Center data centers March 18-20, 2014 as part of ongoing efforts to reduce energy use and incorporate renewable energy technologies where feasible. Although the data centers in this facility account for less than 5% of the total square footage, they are estimated to be responsible for 70% of the annual electricity consumption.

  6. Positivity of Lyapunov exponents for a continuous matrix-valued Anderson model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Boumaza

    2007-03-20

    We study a continuous matrix-valued Anderson-type model. Both leading Lyapunov exponents of this model are proved to be positive and distinct for all ernergies in $(2,+\\infty)$ except those in a discrete set, which leads to absence of absolutely continuous spectrum in $(2,+\\infty)$. This result is an improvement of a previous result with Stolz. The methods, based upon a result by Breuillard and Gelander on dense subgroups in semisimple Lie groups, and a criterion by Goldsheid and Margulis, allow for singular Bernoulli distributions.

  7. Anderson Localization of Expanding Bose-Einstein Condensates in Random Potentials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanchez-Palencia, L.; Clement, D.; Lugan, P.; Bouyer, P.; Aspect, A. [Laboratoire Charles Fabry de l'Institut d'Optique, CNRS and Univ. Paris-Sud, Campus Polytechnique, RD 128, F-91127 Palaiseau cedex (France); Shlyapnikov, G. V. [Laboratoire de Physique Theorique et Modeles Statistiques, Univ. Paris-Sud, F-91405 Orsay cedex (France); Van der Waals-Zeeman Institute, Univ. Amsterdam, Valckenierstraat 65/67, 1018 XE Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2007-05-25

    We show that the expansion of an initially confined interacting 1D Bose-Einstein condensate can exhibit Anderson localization in a weak random potential with correlation length {sigma}{sub R}. For speckle potentials the Fourier transform of the correlation function vanishes for momenta k>2/{sigma}{sub R} so that the Lyapunov exponent vanishes in the Born approximation for k>1/{sigma}{sub R}. Then, for the initial healing length of the condensate {xi}{sub in}>{sigma}{sub R} the localization is exponential, and for {xi}{sub in}<{sigma}{sub R} it changes to algebraic.

  8. Lyapunov exponents, one-dimensional Anderson localisation and products of random matrices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alain Comtet; Christophe Texier; Yves Tourigny

    2012-09-11

    The concept of Lyapunov exponent has long occupied a central place in the theory of Anderson localisation; its interest in this particular context is that it provides a reasonable measure of the localisation length. The Lyapunov exponent also features prominently in the theory of products of random matrices pioneered by Furstenberg. After a brief historical survey, we describe some recent work that exploits the close connections between these topics. We review the known solvable cases of disordered quantum mechanics involving random point scatterers and discuss a new solvable case. Finally, we point out some limitations of the Lyapunov exponent as a means of studying localisation properties.

  9. Magnetic field induced quantum phase transitions in the two-impurity Anderson model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhu, Lujun; Zhu, Jian - Xin

    2010-11-17

    In the two-impurity Anderson model, the inter-impurity spin exchange interaction favors a spin singlet state between two impurities leading to the localization of quasiparticles. We show that a local uniform magnetic field can delocalize the quasiparticies to restore the Kondo resonance. This transition is found to be continuous, accompanied by not only the divergence of the staggered (anti ferromagnetic) susceptibility, but also the divergence of the uniform spin susceptibility. This implies that the magnetic field induced quantum phase transitions in Kondo systems are in favor of the local critical type.

  10. Anderson County, Kentucky ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EAandAmminex A S Jump to: navigation,Inof Ground2008 |Anderson

  11. Water Conservation Study for Manastash Creek Water Users, Kittias County, Washington, Final Report 2002.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Montgomery Watson Harza (Firm)

    2002-12-31

    Manastash Creek is tributary of the Yakima River and is located southwest and across the Yakima River from the City of Ellensburg. The creek drains mountainous terrain that ranges in elevation from 2,000 feet to over 5,500 feet and is primarily snowmelt fed, with largest flows occurring in spring and early summer. The creek flows through a narrow canyon until reaching a large, open plain that slopes gently toward the Yakima River and enters the main stem of the Yakima River at river mile 154.5. This area, formed by the alluvial fan of the Creek as it leaves the canyon, is the subject of this study. The area is presently dominated by irrigated agriculture, but development pressures are evident as Ellensburg grows and develops as an urban center. Since the mid to late nineteenth century when irrigated agriculture was established in a significant manner in the Yakima River Basin, Manastash Creek has been used to supply irrigation water for farming in the area. Adjudicated water rights dating back to 1871 for 4,465 acres adjacent to Manastash Creek allow appropriation of up to 26,273 acre-feet of creek water for agricultural irrigation and stock water. The diversion of water from Manastash Creek for irrigation has created two main problems for fisheries. They are low flows or dewatered reaches of Manastash Creek and fish passage barriers at the irrigation diversion dams. The primary goal of this study, as expressed by Yakama Nation and BPA, is to reestablish safe access in tributaries of the Yakima River by removing physical barriers and unscreened diversions and by adding instream flow where needed for fisheries. The goal expressed by irrigators who would be affected by these projects is to support sustainable and profitable agricultural use of land that currently uses Manastash Creek water for irrigation. This study provides preliminary costs and recommendations for a range of alternative projects that will partially or fully meet the goal of establishing safe access for fisheries in Manastash Creek by reducing or eliminating diversions and eliminating fish passage barriers. Further study and design will be necessary to more fully develop the alternatives, evaluate their environmental benefits and impacts and determine the effect on Manastash Creek water users. Those studies will be needed to determine which alternative has the best combination of benefits and costs, and meets the goal of the Manastash Creek water users.

  12. ANDERSON-TEIXEIRA FINAL PROOF.DOCX (DO NOT DELETE) 3/7/2011 9:29 AM DO BIOFUELS LIFE CYCLE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeLucia, Evan H.

    ANDERSON-TEIXEIRA FINAL PROOF.DOCX (DO NOT DELETE) 3/7/2011 9:29 AM 589 DO BIOFUELS LIFE CYCLE ANALYSES ACCURATELY QUANTIFY THE CLIMATE IMPACTS OF BIOFUELS-RELATED LAND USE CHANGE? Kristina J. Anderson in determining the sustainability of biofuels. To ensure that legal standards are effective in limiting climate

  13. Johnson Creek Artificial Propagation and Enhancement Project Operations and Maintenance Program; Brood Year 1998: Johnson Creek Chinook Salmon Supplementation, Biennial Report 1998-2000.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daniel, Mitch; Gebhards, John

    2003-05-01

    The Nez Perce Tribe, through funding provided by the Bonneville Power Administration, has implemented a small scale chinook salmon supplementation program on Johnson Creek, a tributary in the South Fork of the Salmon River, Idaho. The Johnson Creek Artificial Propagation Enhancement project was established to enhance the number of threatened Snake River summer chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) returning to Johnson Creek through artificial propagation. Adult chinook salmon collection and spawning began in 1998. A total of 114 fish were collected from Johnson Creek and 54 fish (20 males and 34 females) were retained for Broodstock. All broodstock were transported to Lower Snake River Compensation Plan's South Fork Salmon River adult holding and spawning facility, operated by the Idaho Department of Fish and Game. The remaining 60 fish were released to spawn naturally. An estimated 155,870 eggs from Johnson Creek chinook spawned at the South Fork Salmon River facility were transported to the McCall Fish Hatchery for rearing. Average fecundity for Johnson Creek females was 4,871. Approximately 20,500 eggs from females with high levels of Bacterial Kidney Disease were culled. This, combined with green-egg to eyed-egg survival of 62%, resulted in about 84,000 eyed eggs produced in 1998. Resulting juveniles were reared indoors at the McCall Fish Hatchery in 1999. All of these fish were marked with Coded Wire Tags and Visual Implant Elastomer tags and 8,043 were also PIT tagged. A total of 78,950 smolts were transported from the McCall Fish Hatchery and released directly into Johnson Creek on March 27, 28, 29, and 30, 2000.

  14. Electronic structure and correlations of vitamin B12 studied within the Haldane-Anderson impurity model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kandemir, Zafer; Bulut, Nejat

    2015-01-01

    We study the electronic structure and correlations of vitamin B12 (cyanocobalamine) by using the framework of the multi-orbital single-impurity Haldane-Anderson model of a transition-metal impurity in a semiconductor host. In this approach, the cobalt 3d orbitals are treated as the impurity states placed in a semiconductor host where the host consists of the rest of the molecule. The parameters of the resulting effective Haldane-Anderson model are obtained within the Hartree-Fock (HF) approximation. The quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) technique is then used to calculate the one-electron and magnetic correlation functions of this effective model. We observe that new states form inside the semiconductor gap found by HF due to the intra-orbital Coulomb interaction at the impurity 3d orbitals. In particular, the lowest unoccupied states correspond to an impurity bound state, which consists of the states from the CN axial ligand and the corring ring as well as the Co e_g orbitals. We present results on the charge distri...

  15. On one-step replica symmetry breaking in the Edwards-Anderson spin glass model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Del Ferraro, Gino; Zhou, Hai-Jun; Aurell, Erik

    2015-01-01

    We consider a one-step replica symmetry breaking description of the Edwards-Anderson spin glass model in 2D. The ingredients of this description are a Kikuchi approximation to the free energy and a second-level statistical model built on the extremal points of the Kikuchi approximation, which are also fixed points of a Generalized Belief Propagation (GBP) scheme. We show that a generalized free energy can be constructed where these extremal points are exponentially weighted by their Kikuchi free energy and a Parisi parameter y, and that the Kikuchi approximation of this generalized free energy leads to second-level, one-step replica symmetry breaking, GBP equations. We then show that contrary to the analogous case of Bethe approximations in locally tree-like graphs this second-level GBP does not have a class of simpler solutions analogous to Survey Propagation. We attribute this discrepancy to the presence of short loops in a region graph description of the Edwards-Anderson model, and argue that it should be ...

  16. Couse/Tenmile Creeks Watershed Project Implementation : 2007 Conservtion Projects. [2007 Habitat Projects Completed].

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Asotin County Conservation District

    2008-12-10

    The Asotin County Conservation District (ACCD) is the primary entity coordinating habitat projects on private lands within Asotin County watersheds. The Tenmile Creek watershed is a 42 square mile tributary to the Snake River, located between Asotin Creek and the Grande Ronde River. Couse Creek watershed is a 24 square mile tributary to the Snake River, located between Tenmile Creek and the Grande Ronde River. Both watersheds are almost exclusively under private ownership. The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife has documented wild steelhead and rainbow/redband trout spawning and rearing in Tenmile Creek and Couse Creek. The project also provides Best Management Practice (BMP) implementation throughout Asotin County, but the primary focus is for the Couse and Tenmile Creek watersheds. The ACCD has been working with landowners, Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), Washington State Conservation Commission (WCC), Natural Resource Conservation Service (NRCS), Farm Service Agency (FSA), Salmon Recovery Funding Board (SRFB), Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), U.S. Forest Service, Pomeroy Ranger District (USFS), Nez Perce Tribe (NPT), Washington Department of Ecology (DOE), National Marine Fisheries Service (NOAA Fisheries), and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) to address habitat projects in Asotin County. The Asotin Subbasin Plan identified priority areas and actions for ESA listed streams within Asotin County. Couse Creek and Tenmile Creek are identified as protection areas in the plan. The Conservation Reserve Enhancement Program (CREP) has been successful in working with landowners to protect riparian areas throughout Asotin County. Funding from BPA and other agencies has also been instrumental in protecting streams throughout Asotin County by utilizing the ridge top to ridge top approach.

  17. Campbell Creek Research Homes FY 2012 Annual Performance Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gehl, Anthony C; Munk, Jeffrey D; Jackson, Roderick K; Boudreaux, Philip R; Khowailed, Gannate A

    2013-01-01

    The Campbell Creek project is funded and managed by the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) Technology Innovation, Energy Efficiency, Power Delivery & and Utilization Office. Technical support is provided under contract by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the Electric Power Research Institute.The project was designed to determine the relative energy efficiency of typical new home construction, energy efficiency retrofitting of existing homes, and high -performance new homes built from the ground up for energy efficiency. This project will compare three houses that represented the current construction practice as a base case (Builder House CC1); a modified house that could represent a major energy- efficient retrofit (Retrofit House CC2); and a house constructed from the ground up to be a high- performance home (High Performance House CC3). In order tTo enablehave a valid comparison, it was necessary to simulate occupancy in all three houses and heavily monitor the structural components and the energy usage by component. All three houses are two story, slab on grade, framed construction. CC1 and CC2 are approximately 2,400 square feet2. CC3 has a pantry option, that is primarily used as a mechanical equipment room, that adds approximately 100 square feet2. All three houses are all-electric (with the exception of a gas log fireplace that is not used during the testing), and use air-source heat pumps for heating and cooling. The three homes are located in Knoxville in the Campbell Creek Subdivision. CC1 and CC2 are next door to each other and CC3 is across the street and a couple of houses down. The energy data collected will be used to determine the benefits of retrofit packages and high -performance new home packages. There are over 300 channels of continuous energy performance and thermal comfort data collection in the houses (100 for each house). The data will also be used to evaluate the impact of energy -efficient upgrades ton the envelope, mechanical equipment, or demand -response options. Each retrofit will be evaluated incrementally, by both short -term measurements and computer modeling, using a calibrated model. This report is intended to document the comprehensive testing, data analysis, research, and findings within the January 2011 through October 2012 timeframe at the Campbell Creek research houses. The following sections will provide an in-depth assessment of the technology progression in each of the three research houses. A detailed assessment and evaluation of the energy performance of technologies tested will also be provided. Finally, lessons learned and concluding remarks will be highlighted.

  18. EA-1988: NFSC (Northwest Fisheries Science Center) Earthen Drainage Channel, Burley Creek Hatchery, Port Orchard, Washington

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), with DOE’s Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) as a cooperating agency, prepared an EA that assesses the potential environmental impacts of a NOAA Northwest Fisheries Science Center proposal to construct an earthen drainage channel at its Burley Creek Hatchery in Kitsap County, Washington. The project would facilitate increased discharge of treated effluent from the hatchery facility into the adjacent Burley Creek. BPA’s proposal is to fund the project. The project website is http://efw.bpa.gov/environmental_services/Document_Library/Burley_Creek/.

  19. White Oak Creek Watershed topographic map and related materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farrow, N.D.

    1981-04-01

    On March 22, 1978 a contract was let to Accu-Air Surveys, Inc., of Seymour, Indiana, to produce a topographic map of the White Oak Creek Watershed. Working from photography and ground control surveys, Accu-Air produced a map to ORNL's specifications. The map is in four sections (N.W., N.E., S.W., S.E.) at a scale of 1:2400. Contour intervals are 5 ft (1.5 m) with accented delineations every 25 ft (7.6 m). The scribe method was used for the finished map. Planimetric features, roads, major fence lines, drainage features, and tree lines are included. The ORNL grid is the primary coordinate system which is superimposed on the state plain coordinates.

  20. Sherman Creek Hatchery; 1995-1996 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Combs, Mitch [Washington Dept. of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA (United States). Hatcheries Program

    1997-01-01

    The Sherman Creek Hatchery (SCH) was designed to rear 1.7 million kokanee fry for acclimation and imprinting during the spring and early summer. Additionally, it was designed to trap all available returning adult kokanee during the fall for broodstock operations and evaluations. Since the start of this program, the operations of the SCH have been modified to better achieve program goals. These strategic changes have been the result of recommendations through the Lake Roosevelt Hatcheries Coordination Team (LRHCT) and were implemented to enhance imprinting, improve survival and operate the two kokanee facilities more effectively. The primary change has been to replace the kokanee fingerling program with a kokanee yearling (post smolt) program. The second significant change has been to rear 120,000 rainbow trout fingerling at SCH from July through October to enable the Spokane Tribal Hatchery (STH) to rear additional kokanee for the yearling program.

  1. Measurements of Vapor Flow Regimes in Liquid Metal Pools M.H. ANDERSON, M. L. CORRADINI, R. BONAZZA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Los Angeles, University of

    Measurements of Vapor Flow Regimes in Liquid Metal Pools M.H. ANDERSON, M. L. CORRADINI, R. BONAZZA fractions within a pool of low-density liquid metal (NaK) during gas injection inside a horizontal magnetic of this magnetic field should not influence the vapor movement once it is outside the pool it may have

  2. Zool. (London) 177,179 (1975). 6. S. D. Twiss, P. P. Pomeroy, S. S. Anderson, ibid.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ausubel, Frederick M.

    1975-01-01

    Zool. (London) 177,179 (1975). 6. S. D. Twiss, P. P. Pomeroy, S. S. Anderson, ibid. 233, 683 (1994). 7. W. Amos, S. S. Twiss, P. P. Pomeroy, S. S. Ander- son, Proc. R. Soc. London Ser. B 252, 199 (1993. Twiss, B. J. McConnell, J. Zool. (London) 233, 429 (1994). 13. For any female, the probability of a pair

  3. Microfluidic Single-Cell mRNA Isolation and Joshua S. Marcus,, W. French Anderson,, and Stephen R. Quake*,,|

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quake, Stephen R.

    Microfluidic Single-Cell mRNA Isolation and Analysis Joshua S. Marcus,, W. French Anderson utilize microfluidics to isolate picogram and subpicogram mRNA templates, as well as to synthesize c to completion. Because of the small reaction volumes and the ability for automation, microfluidic devices

  4. www.water-alternatives.org Volume 7 | Issue 2 Bauer, C. 2014. Book review of Anderson et al. 2012.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    restrictions on private transfers] 6. Privatising in-stream flows [including water pollution issues] 7www.water-alternatives.org Volume 7 | Issue 2 Bauer, C. 2014. Book review of Anderson et al. 2012. Tapping water markets. RFF Press/Routledge. Water Alternatives 7(2): 436-438 Book Review: Tapping water

  5. The AI Technologies of the Philadelphia Area Urban Wireless Network Testbed Gustave Anderson and Andrew Burnheimer and Vincent Cicirello

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cicirello, Vincent A.

    The AI Technologies of the Philadelphia Area Urban Wireless Network Testbed Gustave Anderson Drexel University, 3141 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 Introduction Drexel University's College a Philadelphia Area Urban Wireless Network Testbed (PA-UWNT) (Cicirello et al. 2004). The PA- UWNT is a mobile ad

  6. EIGENVALUE FLUCTUATIONS FOR LATTICE ANDERSON HAMILTONIANS MAREK BISKUP 1 , RYOKI FUKUSHIMA 2 AND WOLFGANG KNIG 3,4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    König, Wolfgang

    EIGENVALUE FLUCTUATIONS FOR LATTICE ANDERSON HAMILTONIANS MAREK BISKUP 1 , RYOKI FUKUSHIMA 2. Fukushima and W. König. Reproduction, by any means, of the entire article for non­commercial purposes is permitted without charge. 1 #12; 2 BISKUP, FUKUSHIMA, K�NIG where # (d) is the standard lattice Laplacian

  7. EIGENVALUE FLUCTUATIONS FOR LATTICE ANDERSON HAMILTONIANS MAREK BISKUP1, RYOKI FUKUSHIMA2 AND WOLFGANG KNIG3,4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    König, Wolfgang

    EIGENVALUE FLUCTUATIONS FOR LATTICE ANDERSON HAMILTONIANS MAREK BISKUP1, RYOKI FUKUSHIMA2. Biskup, R. Fukushima and W. König. Reproduction, by any means, of the entire article for non-commercial purposes is permitted without charge. 1 #12;2 BISKUP, FUKUSHIMA, K�NIG where (d) is the standard lattice

  8. Error Recovery for a Boiler System with OTS PID Controller Tom Anderson, Mei Feng, Steve Riddle, Alexander Romanovsky

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Newcastle upon Tyne, University of

    1 Error Recovery for a Boiler System with OTS PID Controller Tom Anderson, Mei Feng, Steve Riddle employing an OTS (Off-The-Shelf) item. The case study used a Simulink model of a steam boiler system, employing software models of the PID controller and the steam boiler system rather than conducting

  9. Error Recovery for a Boiler System with OTS PID Controller Tom Anderson, Mei Feng, Steve Riddle, Alexander Romanovsky

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Newcastle upon Tyne, University of

    Error Recovery for a Boiler System with OTS PID Controller Tom Anderson, Mei Feng, Steve Riddle-The-Shelf) item. The case study used a Simulink model of a steam boiler system together with an OTS PID in practice, employing software models of the PID controller and the steam boiler system rather than

  10. An Archaeological Survey for the Turkey Creek Trail Project in Brazos County, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, William

    2015-07-15

    An archaeological survey of the proposed Turkey Creek Trail project in central Brazos County, Texas was performed by Brazos Valley Research Associates (BVRA) in July of 2004 under Archeology Permit 3474. The state agencies associated...

  11. Tribal Decision-Making and Intercultural Relations: Crow Creek Agency, 1863-1885

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Galler, Robert

    2002-03-01

    Lower Yanktonai residents experienced great change during the first two decades at the Crow Creek agency in Dakota Territory. This essay traces the evolution of relations between tribal members, federal agents, and ...

  12. HYDROGEOLOGIC CONSEQUENCES OF THE MODIFIED IN-SITU RETORTING PROCESS, PICEANCE CREEK BASIN, COLORADO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mehran, M.

    2014-01-01

    Water Management in Oil Shale Mining," Volumes I and II,and Technology of Oil Shale," Ann Arbor Science PublishersRequirements at an Oil Shale Surface Mine, Piceance Creek

  13. ORGANIC MATTER DISTRIBUTION AND TURNOVER ALONG A GRADIENT FROM FOREST TO TIDAL CREEK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lawrence, Deborah

    i ORGANIC MATTER DISTRIBUTION AND TURNOVER ALONG A GRADIENT FROM FOREST TO TIDAL CREEK A Thesis. A nested plot design was used to harvest vegetation, obtain soil cores, and collect quantitative data... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... .18 Qualitative Vegetation Analysis

  14. ORNL/TM-2014/666 Final Review of the Campbell Creek

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Xiaorui "Ray"

    ORNL/TM-2014/666 Final Review of the Campbell Creek Demonstrations Showcased by Tennessee Valley or reflect those of the United States Government or any agency thereof. #12;ORNL/TM-2014/666 Energy

  15. Geoarchaeology of the Burntwood Creek Rockshelter (14RW418), Northwest Kansas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murphy, Laura Renee

    2008-07-31

    The Burntwood Creek rockshelter (14RW418) in northwestern Kansas is a large, amphitheater-shaped alcove formed in the Ogallala Formation, a late Miocene/Pliocene-age lithostratigraphic unit underlying the High Plains ...

  16. Disjoint BoundaryBoundary Paths in Critical Circular Planar Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morrow, James A.

    Disjoint Boundary­Boundary Paths in Critical Circular Planar Networks Ryan Sturgell December 8 that in a critical circular planar network every interior vertex has three disjoint paths to the boundary. 1, 1998 Abstract This paper explores some properties of critical circular planar net­ works. The main

  17. An Ising-Anderson model of localisation in high-temperature QCD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matteo Giordano; Tamas G. Kovacs; Ferenc Pittler

    2015-02-09

    We discuss a possible mechanism leading to localisation of the low-lying Dirac eigenmodes in high-temperature lattice QCD, based on the spatial fluctuations of the local Polyakov lines in the partially ordered configurations above $T_c$. This mechanism provides a qualitative explanation of the dependence of localisation on the temperature and on the lattice spacing, and also of the phase diagram of QCD with an imaginary chemical potential. To test the viability of this mechanism we propose a three-dimensional effective, Anderson-like model, mimicking the effect of the Polyakov lines on the quarks. The diagonal, on-site disorder is governed by a three-dimensional Ising-like spin model with continuous spins. Our numerical results show that localised modes are indeed present in the ordered phase of the Ising model, thus supporting the proposed mechanism for localisation in QCD.

  18. An Ising-Anderson model of localisation in high-temperature QCD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giordano, Matteo; Pittler, Ferenc

    2015-01-01

    We discuss a possible mechanism leading to localisation of the low-lying Dirac eigenmodes in high-temperature lattice QCD, based on the spatial fluctuations of the local Polyakov lines in the partially ordered configurations above $T_c$. This mechanism provides a qualitative explanation of the dependence of localisation on the temperature and on the lattice spacing, and also of the phase diagram of QCD with an imaginary chemical potential. To test the viability of this mechanism we propose a three-dimensional effective, Anderson-like model, mimicking the effect of the Polyakov lines on the quarks. The diagonal, on-site disorder is governed by a three-dimensional Ising-like spin model with continuous spins. Our numerical results show that localised modes are indeed present in the ordered phase of the Ising model, thus supporting the proposed mechanism for localisation in QCD.

  19. Decoherence-induced conductivity in the one-dimensional Anderson model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stegmann, Thomas; Wolf, Dietrich E. [Department of Physics, University of Duisburg-Essen and CENIDE, 47048 Duisburg (Germany); Ujsághy, Orsolya [Department of Theoretical Physics, Budapest University of Technology and Economics, Budafoki út 8., H-1521 Budapest (Hungary)

    2014-08-20

    We study the effect of decoherence on the electron transport in the one-dimensional Anderson model by means of a statistical model [1, 2, 3, 4, 5]. In this model decoherence bonds are randomly distributed within the system, at which the electron phase is randomized completely. Afterwards, the transport quantity of interest (e.g. resistance or conductance) is ensemble averaged over the decoherence configurations. Averaging the resistance of the sample, the calculation can be performed analytically. In the thermodynamic limit, we find a decoherence-driven transition from the quantum-coherent localized regime to the Ohmic regime at a critical decoherence density, which is determined by the second-order generalized Lyapunov exponent (GLE) [4].

  20. Anderson Localization of Bogolyubov Quasiparticles in Interacting Bose-Einstein Condensates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lugan, P.; Clement, D.; Bouyer, P.; Aspect, A.; Sanchez-Palencia, L. [Laboratoire Charles Fabry de l'Institut d'Optique, CNRS and Univ. Paris-Sud, Campus Polytechnique, RD 128, F-91127 Palaiseau cedex (France)

    2007-11-02

    We study the Anderson localization of Bogolyubov quasiparticles in an interacting Bose-Einstein condensate (with a leading length {xi}) subjected to a random potential (with a finite correlation length {sigma}{sub R}). We derive analytically the Lyapunov exponent as a function of the quasiparticle momentum k, and we study the localization maximum k{sub max}. For 1D speckle potentials, we find that k{sub max}{proportional_to}1/{xi} when {xi}>>{sigma}{sub R} while k{sub max}{proportional_to}1/{sigma}{sub R} when {xi}<<{sigma}{sub R}, and that the localization is strongest when {xi}{approx}{sigma}{sub R}. Numerical calculations support our analysis, and our estimates indicate that the localization of the Bogolyubov quasiparticles is accessible in experiments with ultracold atoms.

  1. Positivity of Lyapunov exponents for Anderson-type models on two coupled strings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hakim Boumaza; Günter Stolz

    2006-11-01

    We study two models of Anderson-type random operators on two deterministically coupled continuous strings. Each model is associated with independent, identically distributed four-by-four symplectic transfer matrices, which describe the asymptotics of solutions. In each case we use a criterion by Gol'dsheid and Margulis (i.e. Zariski denseness of the group generated by the transfer matrices in the group of symplectic matrices) to prove positivity of both leading Lyapunov exponents for most energies. In each case this implies almost sure absence of absolutely continuous spectrum (at all energies in the first model and for sufficiently large energies in the second model). The methods used allow for singularly distributed random parameters, including Bernoulli distributions.

  2. Extended recursion in operator space (EROS), a new impurity solver for the single impurity Anderson model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Albers, Robert C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Julien, Jean P [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    We have developed a new efficient and accurate impurity solver for the single impurity Anderson model (SIAM), which is based on a non-perturbative recursion technique in a space of operators and involves expanding the self-energy as a continued fraction. The method has no special occupation number or temperature restrictions; the only approximation is the number of levels of the continued fraction retained in the expansion. We also show how this approach can be used as a new approach to Dynamical Mean Field Theory (DMTF) and illustrate this with the Hubbard model. The three lowest orders of recursion give the Hartree-Fock, Hubbard I, and Hubbard III approximations. A higher level of recursion is able to reproduce the expected 3-peak structure in the spectral function and Fermi liquid behavior.

  3. Sampling and analysis plan for treatment water and creek water for the Lower East Fork Poplar Creek Operable Unit, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-04-01

    This document provides the Environmental Restoration Program with information about the methodology, organizational structure, quality assurance and health and safety practices to be employed during the water sampling and analysis activities associated with the remediation of the Lower East Fork Poplar Creek Operable Unit during remediation of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and Bruner sites.

  4. Willow Creek Wildlife Mitigation Project. Final Environmental Assessment.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-04-01

    Today`s notice announces BPA`s proposal to fund land acquisition or acquisition of a conservation easement and a wildlife management plan to protect and enhance wildlife habitat at the Willow Creek Natural Area in Eugene, Oregon. This action would provide partial mitigation for wildlife and wildlife habitat lost by the development of Federal hydroelectric projects in the Willamette River Basin. The project is consistent with BPA`s obligations under provisions of the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act of 1980 as outlined by the Northwest Power Planning Council`s 1994 Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. BPA has prepared an environmental assessment (DOE/EA-1023) evaluating the proposed project. Based on the analysis in the EA, BPA has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment, within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, the preparation of an environmental impact statement (EIS) is not required and BPA is issuing this FONSI.

  5. White Oak Creek Embayment site characterization and contaminant screening analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blaylock, B.G.; Ford, C.J.; Frank, M.L.; Hoffman, F.O.; Hook, L.A.

    1993-01-01

    Analyses of sediment samples collected near the mouth of White Oak Creek during the summer of 1990 revealed [sup 137]Cs concentrations [> 10[sup 6] Bq/kg dry wt (> 10[sup 4] pCi/g dry wt)] near the sediment surface. Available evidence indicates that these relatively high concentrations of [sup 137]Cs now at the sediment surface were released from White Oak Dam in the mid-1950s and had accumulated at depositionalsites in the embayment. These accumulated sediments are being eroded and transported downstream primarily during winter low-water levels by flood events and by a combination of normal downstream flow and the water turbulence created by the release of water from Melton Hill Dam during hydropower generation cycles. This report provides a more thorough characterization of the extent of contamination in WOCE than was previously available. Environmental samples collected from WOCE were analyzed for organic, inorganic, and radiological contaminants in fish, water, and sediment. These results were used to conduct a human health effects screening analysis. Walkover radiation surveys conducted inside the fenced area surrounding the WOCE at summer-pool (741 ft MSL) and at winter-pool (733 ft MSL) level, indicated a maximum exposure rate of 3 mR h[sup 1] 1 m above the soil surface.

  6. West Foster Creek Expansion Project 2007 HEP Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ashley, Paul R.

    2008-02-01

    During April and May 2007, the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority's (CBFWA) Regional HEP Team (RHT) conducted baseline Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) (USFWS 1980, 1980a) analyses on five parcels collectively designated the West Foster Creek Expansion Project (3,756.48 acres). The purpose of the HEP analyses was to document extant habitat conditions and to determine how many baseline/protection habitat units (HUs) to credit Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for funding maintenance and enhancement activities on project lands as partial mitigation for habitat losses associated with construction of Grand Coulee and Chief Joseph Dams. HEP evaluation models included mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus), western meadowlark (Sturnella neglecta), sharp-tailed grouse, (Tympanuchus phasianellus), Bobcat (Lynx rufus), mink (Neovison vison), mallard (Anas platyrhynchos), and black-capped chickadee (Parus atricapillus). Combined 2007 baseline HEP results show that 4,946.44 habitat units were generated on 3,756.48 acres (1.32 HUs per acre). HEP results/habitat conditions were generally similar for like cover types at all sites. Unlike crediting of habitat units (HUs) on other WDFW owned lands, Bonneville Power Administration received full credit for HUs generated on these sites.

  7. Confirmatory Sampling and Analysis Plan for the Lower East Fork Poplar Creek operable unit, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-04-01

    On December 21, 1989, the EPA placed the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) on the National Priorities List (NPL). On January 1, 1992, a Federal Facilities Agreement (FFA) between the DOE Field Office in Oak Ridge (DOE-OR), EPA Region IV, and the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) went into effect. This FFA establishes the procedural framework and schedule by which DOE-OR will develop, coordinate, implement and monitor environmental restoration activities on the ORR in accordance with applicable federal and state environmental regulations. The DOE-OR Environmental Restoration Program for the ORR addresses the remediation of areas both within and outside the ORR boundaries. This sampling and analysis plan focuses on confirming the cleanup of the stretch of EFPC flowing from Lake Reality at the Y-12 Plant through the City of Oak Ridge, to Poplar Creek on the ORR and its associated floodplain. Both EFPC and its floodplain have been contaminated by releases from the Y-12 Plant since the mid-1950s. Because the EFPC site-designated as an ORR operable unit (OU) under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) is included on the NPL, its remediation must follow the specific procedures mandated by CERCLA, as amended by the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act in 1986.

  8. Brunnian Braids Boundary Brunnian Braids Main Results Boundary Brunnian braids, mirror reflection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Jie

    Brunnian Braids Boundary Brunnian Braids Main Results Boundary Brunnian braids, mirror reflection December 17, 2007 #12;Brunnian Braids Boundary Brunnian Braids Main Results Boundary Brunnian braids, mirror reflection and the homotopy groups Brunnian Braids Boundary Brunnian Braids Main Results #12

  9. Early post-restoration re-vegetation performance and critical social and institutional factors in a landowner-involved restoration project on lower Wooden Valley Creek, Napa County, CA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levy, Morgan; Post, Charles

    2010-01-01

    13. Description of Water Temperature Monitoring Stations inSuisun Creek Water Temperature Monitoring Summary (cont. )Suisun Creek Water Temperature Monitoring Summary (cont. )

  10. Evaluation of dredged material proposed for ocean disposal from Westchester Creek project area, New York

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pinza, M.R.; Gardiner, W.W.; Barrows, E.S.; Borde, A.B.

    1996-11-01

    The objective of the Westchester Creek project was to evaluate proposed dredged material from this area to determine its suitability for unconfined ocean disposal at the Mud Dump Site. Westchester Creek was one of five waterways that the US Army Corps of Engineers- New York District (USACE-NYD) requested the Battelle/Marine Sciences Laboratory (MSL) to sample and evaluate for dredging and disposal in May 1995. The evaluation of proposed dredged material from the Westchester Creek project area consisted of bulk sediment chemical analyses, chemical analyses of dredging site water and elutriate, benthic acute and water-column toxicity tests, and bioaccumulation studies. Thirteen individual sediment core samples were collected from this area and analyzed for grain size, moisture content, and total organic carbon (TOC). One composite sediment sample representing the Westchester Creek area to be dredged, was analyzed for bulk density, specific gravity, metals, chlorinated pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners, polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and 1,4-dichlorobenzene. Dredging site water and elutriate water, which is prepared from the suspended- particulate phase (SPP) of the Westchester Creek sediment composite, was analyzed for metals, pesticides, and PCBS.

  11. Commensurability effects in one-dimensional Anderson localization: Anomalies in eigenfunction statistics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kravtsov, V.E., E-mail: kravtsov@ictp.it [Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics, P.O. Box 586, 34100 Trieste (Italy); Landau Institute for Theoretical Physics, 2 Kosygina st., 117940 Moscow (Russian Federation); Yudson, V.I., E-mail: yudson@isan.troitsk.ru [Institute for Spectroscopy, Russian Academy of Sciences, 142190 Troitsk, Moscow reg. (Russian Federation)

    2011-07-15

    Highlights: > Statistics of normalized eigenfunctions in one-dimensional Anderson localization at E = 0 is studied. > Moments of inverse participation ratio are calculated. > Equation for generating function is derived at E = 0. > An exact solution for generating function at E = 0 is obtained. > Relation of the generating function to the phase distribution function is established. - Abstract: The one-dimensional (1d) Anderson model (AM), i.e. a tight-binding chain with random uncorrelated on-site energies, has statistical anomalies at any rational point f=(2a)/({lambda}{sub E}) , where a is the lattice constant and {lambda}{sub E} is the de Broglie wavelength. We develop a regular approach to anomalous statistics of normalized eigenfunctions {psi}(r) at such commensurability points. The approach is based on an exact integral transfer-matrix equation for a generating function {Phi}{sub r}(u, {phi}) (u and {phi} have a meaning of the squared amplitude and phase of eigenfunctions, r is the position of the observation point). This generating function can be used to compute local statistics of eigenfunctions of 1d AM at any disorder and to address the problem of higher-order anomalies at f=p/q with q > 2. The descender of the generating function P{sub r}({phi}){identical_to}{Phi}{sub r}(u=0,{phi}) is shown to be the distribution function of phase which determines the Lyapunov exponent and the local density of states. In the leading order in the small disorder we derived a second-order partial differential equation for the r-independent ('zero-mode') component {Phi}(u, {phi}) at the E = 0 (f=1/2 ) anomaly. This equation is nonseparable in variables u and {phi}. Yet, we show that due to a hidden symmetry, it is integrable and we construct an exact solution for {Phi}(u, {phi}) explicitly in quadratures. Using this solution we computed moments I{sub m} = N< vertical bar {psi} vertical bar {sup 2m}> (m {>=} 1) for a chain of the length N {yields} {infinity} and found an essential difference between their m-behavior in the center-of-band anomaly and for energies outside this anomaly. Outside the anomaly the 'extrinsic' localization length defined from the Lyapunov exponent coincides with that defined from the inverse participation ratio ('intrinsic' localization length). This is not the case at the E = 0 anomaly where the extrinsic localization length is smaller than the intrinsic one. At E = 0 one also observes an anomalous enhancement of large moments compatible with existence of yet another, much smaller characteristic length scale.

  12. GROUNDWATER-FED IRON-RICH MICROBIAL MATS IN A FRESHWATER CREEK: GROWTH CYCLES AND FOSSILIZATION POTENTIAL OF MICROBIAL FEATURES. J. Schieber, Department of Geological Sciences, Indi-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schieber, Juergen

    GROUNDWATER-FED IRON-RICH MICROBIAL MATS IN A FRESHWATER CREEK: GROWTH CYCLES AND FOSSILIZATION Description: We have investigated a groundwater-fed tributary to Jackson Creek in SE Bloomington/Indiana which

  13. Boundary Degeneracy of Topological Order

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Juven Wang; Xiao-Gang Wen

    2015-01-15

    We introduce the concept of boundary degeneracy of topologically ordered states on a compact orientable spatial manifold with boundaries, and emphasize that the boundary degeneracy provides richer information than the bulk degeneracy. Beyond the bulk-edge correspondence, we find the ground state degeneracy of the fully gapped edge modes depends on boundary gapping conditions. By associating different types of boundary gapping conditions as different ways of particle or quasiparticle condensations on the boundary, we develop an analytic theory of gapped boundaries. By Chern-Simons theory, this allows us to derive the ground state degeneracy formula in terms of boundary gapping conditions, which encodes more than the fusion algebra of fractionalized quasiparticles. We apply our theory to Kitaev's toric code and Levin-Wen string-net models. We predict that the $Z_2$ toric code and $Z_2$ double-semion model (more generally, the $Z_k$ gauge theory and the $U(1)_k \\times U(1)_{-k}$ non-chiral fractional quantum Hall state at even integer $k$) can be numerically and experimentally distinguished, by measuring their boundary degeneracy on an annulus or a cylinder.

  14. Seismic deformation analysis of Tuttle Creek Dam Timothy D. Stark, Michael H. Beaty, Peter M. Byrne, Gonzalo Castro,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seismic deformation analysis of Tuttle Creek Dam Timothy D. Stark, Michael H. Beaty, Peter M. Byrne, and David L. Mathews Abstract: To facilitate the design of seismic remediation for Tuttle Creek Dam in east central Kansas, a seismic finite differ- ence analysis of the dam was performed using the software FLAC

  15. An Archaeological Survey of the Proposed Hurricane Creek Detention Facility Number 1 in Central Angelina County, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, William

    2015-06-11

    OF THE PROPOSED HURRICANE CREEK DETENTION FACILITY NUMBER 1 IN CENTRAL ANGELINA COUNTY, TEXAS Texas Antiquities Permit Number 2383 by William E. Moore Brazos Valley Research Associates Contract... Report Number 71 2000 AN ARCHAEOLOGICAL SURVEY OF THE PROPOSED HURRICANE CREEK DETENTION FACILITY NUMBER 1 IN CENTRAL ANGELINA COUNTY, TEXAS BVRA Project Number 99-17 Principal Investigator: William E. Moore...

  16. An Archaeological Survey of the Proposed Hurricane Creek Detention Pond Number 4 in Central Angelina County, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, William

    2015-06-12

    HURRICANE CREEK DETENTION POND NUMBER 4 IN CENTRAL ANGELINA COUNTY, TEXAS Texas Antiquities Permit Number 2335 By William E. Moore Brazos Valley Research Associates Contract Report Number 73... 2000 AN ARCHAEOLOGICAL SURVEY OF THE PROPOSED HURRICANE CREEK DETENTION POND NUMBER 4 IN CENTRAL ANGELINA COUNTY, TEXAS BVRA Project Number 99-18 Principal Investigator William E. Moore Prepared...

  17. Biological monitoring of Upper Three Runs Creek, Savannah River Plant, Aiken County, South Carolina

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Specht, W.L.

    1991-10-01

    In anticipation of the fall 1988 start up of effluent discharges into Upper Three Creek by the F/H Area Effluent Treatment Facility of the Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC, a two and one half year biological study was initiated in June 1987. Upper Three Runs Creek is an intensively studied fourth order stream known for its high species richness. Designed to assess the potential impact of F H area effluent on the creek, the study includes qualitative and quantitative macroinvertebrate stream surveys at five sites, chronic toxicity testing of the effluent, water chemistry and bioaccumulation analysis. This final report presents the results of both pre-operational and post-operational qualitative and quantitative (artificial substrate) macroinvertebrate studies. Six quantitative and three qualitative studies were conducted prior to the initial release of the F/H ETF effluent and five quantitative and two qualitative studies were conducted post-operationally.

  18. Biomonitoring of fish communities, using the index of Biotic Integrity, as an indicator of the success of soil conservation measures in the Rabbit Creek and Middle Creek watersheds, Macon County, North Carolina

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-08-01

    Fish communities in two upper Little Tennessee River tributaries, Rabbit Creek and Middle Creek, both located in Macon County, North Carolina, were monitored using IBI methods in 1990 and again in 1992. A single site, each on the lower reaches of its respective creek, was chosen to reflect the influence of conditions throughout the watershed and to provide a measure of water quality exiting the watershed. The Rabbit Creek watershed (Holly Springs community) has a long history of settlement and agricultural use. Dominant land uses today are pasture in the bottom lands and residential development at higher elevations. Much of the upper portion of the Middle Creek watershed on the slopes of Scaly Mountain is devoted to cabbage farming, often on steep slopes and highly erodible soils. From the cabbage growing area, the creek drops 400 feet to the lower valley. Other common land uses include residential, livestock, and forest. Both streams are characterized by heavy sedimentation and frequent high turbidity. Both streams showed marked improvement between 1990 and 1992. In 1990, Rabbit Creek`s IBI score was 31.0, for a bioclass rating of ``poor.`` In 1992, the IBI score was 42.1 for a bioclass rating of ``fair.`` For Middle Creek, the corresponding figures and ratings are 42.1 (fair) and 54.5 (good). Examination of the data for Rabbit Creek shows a reduction in the proportion of pollution-tolerant species, a higher proportion of specialized insectivores, a higher catch rate (reflecting higher total numbers of fish), and an additional intolerant species. In both cases, the data (supported by visual observation) suggests the causative factor is reduced sedimentation.

  19. Atmospheric Mercury near Salmon Falls Creek Reservoir in Southern Idaho

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael L. Abbott; Jeffrey J. Einerson

    2007-12-01

    Gaseous elemental mercury (GEM) and reactive gaseous mercury (RGM) were measured over two-week seasonal field campaigns near Salmon Falls Creek Reservoir in south-central Idaho from the summer of 2005 through the fall of 2006 and over the entire summer of 2006 using automated Tekran mercury analyzers. GEM, RGM, and particulate mercury (HgP) were also measured at a secondary site 90 km to the west in southwestern Idaho during the summer of 2006. The study was performed to characterize mercury air concentrations in the southern Idaho area for the first time, estimate mercury dry deposition rates, and investigate the source of observed elevated concentrations. High seasonal variability was observed with the highest GEM (1.91 ± 0.9 ng m-3) and RGM (8.1 ± 5.6 pg m-3) concentrations occurring in the summer and lower values in the winter (1.32 ± 0.3 ng m-3, 3.2 ± 2.9 pg m-3 for GEM, RGM respectively). The summer-average HgP concentrations were generally below detection limit (0.6 ± 1 pg m-3). Seasonally-averaged deposition velocities calculated using a resistance model were 0.034 ± 0.032, 0.043 ± 0.040, 0.00084 ± 0.0017 and 0.00036 ± 0.0011 cm s-1 for GEM (spring, summer, fall, and winter, respectively) and 0.50 ± 0.39, 0.40 ± 0.31, 0.51 ± 0.43 and 0.76 ± 0.57 cm s-1 for RGM. The total annual RGM + GEM dry deposition estimate was calculated to be 11.9 ± 3.3 µg m-2, or about 2/3 of the total (wet + dry) deposition estimate for the area. Periodic elevated short-term GEM (2.2 – 12 ng m-3) and RGM (50 - 150 pg m-3) events were observed primarily during the warm seasons. Back-trajectory modeling and PSCF analysis indicated predominant source directions from the southeast (western Utah, northeastern Nevada) through the southwest (north-central Nevada) with fewer inputs from the northwest (southeastern Oregon and southwestern Idaho).

  20. Atmospheric mercury near Salmon Falls Creek Reservoir in southern Idaho

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael L. Abbott; Jeffrey J. Einerson

    2008-03-01

    Gaseous elemental mercury (GEM) and reactive gaseous mercury (RGM) were measured over 2-week seasonal field campaigns near Salmon Falls Creek Reservoir in south-central Idaho from the summer of 2005 through the fall of 2006 and over the entire summer of 2006 using automated Tekran Hg analyzers. GEM, RGM, and particulate Hg (HgP) were also measured at a secondary site 90 km to the west in southwestern Idaho during the summer of 2006. The study was performed to characterize Hg air concentrations in the southern Idaho area for the first time, estimate Hg dry deposition rates, and investigate the source of observed elevated concentrations. High seasonal variability was observed with the highest GEM (1.91 ± 0.9 ng m-3) and RGM (8.1 ± 5.6 pg m-3) concentrations occurring in the summer and lower values in the winter (1.32 ± 0.3 ng m-3, 3.2 ± 2.9 pg m-3 for GEM, RGM, respectively). The summer-average HgP concentrations were generally below detection limit (0.6 ± 1 pg m-3). Seasonally averaged deposition velocities calculated using a resistance model were 0.034 ± 0.032, 0.043 ± 0.040, 0.00084 ± 0.0017 and 0.00036 ± 0.0011 cm s-1 for GEM (spring, summer, fall and winter, respectively) and 0.50 ± 0.39, 0.40 ± 0.31, 0.51 ± 0.43 and 0.76 ± 0.57 cm s-1 for RGM. The total annual RGM + GEM dry deposition estimate was calculated to be 11.9 ± 3.3 µg m-2, or about 2/3 of the total (wet + dry) deposition estimate for the area. Periodic elevated short-term GEM (2.2–12 ng m-3) and RGM (50–150 pg m-3) events were observed primarily during the warm seasons. Back-trajectory modeling and PSCF analysis indicate predominant source directions to the SE (western Utah, northeastern Nevada) and SW (north-central Nevada) with fewer inputs from the NW (southeastern Oregon and southwestern Idaho).

  1. Vacuum Structure and Boundary Renormalization Group

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Asorey; J. M. Munoz-Castaneda

    2007-12-28

    The vacuum structure is probed by boundary conditions. The behaviour of thermodynamical quantities like free energy, boundary entropy and entanglement entropy under the boundary renormalization group flow are analysed in 2D conformal field theories. The results show that whereas vacuum energy and boundary entropy turn out to be very sensitive to boundary conditions, the vacuum entanglement entropy is independent of boundary properties when the boundary of the entanglement domain does not overlap the boundary of the physical space. In all cases the second law of thermodynamics holds along the boundary renormalization group flow.

  2. Large Woody Debris Budgets in the Caspar Creek Experimental Watersheds1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Monitoring of large woody debris (LWD) in the two mainstem channels of the Caspar Creek Experimental debris (LWD) in stream channels. Because LWD inputs are often episodic and pieces can persist for decades in the channel, an LWD budgeting approach can be a useful tool to estimate long-term effects of management

  3. Testing a blowing snow model against distributed snow measurements at Upper Sheep Creek,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tarboton, David

    Testing a blowing snow model against distributed snow measurements at Upper Sheep Creek, Idaho S. Seyfried5 Abstract. In this paper a physically based snow transport model (SnowTran-3D) was used to simulate snow drifting over a 30 m grid and was compared to detailed snow water equivalence (SWE) surveys

  4. Effects of Timber Harvest on Fog Drip and Streamflow, Caspar Creek Experimental

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    basin was clearcut. Annual water yield and summer flows increased following both timber harvestsEffects of Timber Harvest on Fog Drip and Streamflow, Caspar Creek Experimental Watersheds of fog drip. Key words: fog drip, hydrologic processes, streamflow, timber harvest Introduction

  5. FLORAL AND FAUNAL DIFFERENCES BETWEEN FRAGMENTED AND UNFRAGMENTED BAHAMIAN TIDAL CREEKS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Langerhans, Brian

    Valentine-Rose1,7 , Julia A. Cherry1,2 , J. Jacob Culp1,3 , Kathryn E. Perez1,4 , Jeff B. Pollock1 , D, mangroves, seagrass macroalgal beds, as well as tidal creeks; Dahlgren and Marr 2004), have been identified

  6. FISHTRAP CREEK WORKSHOP Watershed Response to the McLure Forest Fire

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eaton, Brett

    FISHTRAP CREEK WORKSHOP Watershed Response to the McLure Forest Fire Date: March 6th , 2008: 8 disturbance and forest harvesting. Figure 1. Location of the McLure fire. From Phillips (2007). #12;Figure 2 and after the fire (R.D. Moore, UBC) 10:00 ­ 10:30 Refreshment break Session 2: Channel morphology

  7. Storm water control plan for the Lower East Fork Poplar Creek Operable Unit, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-04-01

    This document provides the Environmental Restoration Program with information about the erosion and sediment control, storm water management, maintenance, and reporting and record keeping practices to be employed during Phase II of the remediation project for the Lower East Fork Poplar Creek (LEFPC) Operable Unit.

  8. Contribution of valley-side erosion to sedimentation problems in Wolf Pen Creek, College Station, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilson, Rachel Suzanne

    2000-01-01

    , or urbanized). However, the state of urbanization is not the controlling factor in the case of Wolf Pen Creek and many other similar urban drainage basins. Instead, the level of stability varies with other factors, namely the geology of the basin and climate...

  9. An archaeological survey along a seismic line in Village Creek State Park Hardin County, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, William

    2015-06-03

    An Archaeological Survey was conducted along 6600 feet of seismic line with a right-of-way of ten feet for TGS Onshore Geophysical Company by Brazos Valley Research Associates on November 7, 1991. The area examined is located in Village creek State...

  10. Cyanobacterial macrophytes in an Early Silurian (Llandovery) continental biota: Passage Creek, lower Massanutten Sandstone,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tomescu, Alexandru MF

    , lower Massanutten Sandstone, Virginia, USA ALEXANDRU M. F. TOMESCU, GAR W. ROTHWELL AND ROSMARIE in an Early Silurian (Llandovery) continental biota: Passage Creek, lower Massanutten Sandstone, Virginia, USA, in the lower Massanutten Sandstone (Virginia, USA). Filaments are predominantly multiseriate and consist

  11. EA-1967: Hills Creek-Lookout Point Transmission Line Rebuild, Lane County, Oregon

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Bonneville Power Administration is preparing an EA to assess potential environmental impacts of the proposed rebuild of its 26-mile 115 kilovolt (kV) wood-pole Hills Creek-Lookout Point transmission line, which is generally located between Lowell and Oakridge, in Lane County, Oregon.

  12. Geography 104 Boundary Layer Climates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geography 104 Boundary Layer Climates Assignment #5 Question 1: The Urban Heat Island The following briefly how the use of giant windmills or fans can be effective in preventing frost in an orchard. Refer

  13. Remedial investigation/feasibility study of the Clinch River/Poplar Creek operable unit. Volume 1, main text

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-03-01

    This document is the combined Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS) Report for the Clinch River/Poplar Creek Operable Unit (CR/PC OU), an off-site OU associated with environmental restoration activities at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). As a result of past, present, and potential future releases of hazardous substances into the environment, the ORR was placed on the National Priorities List in December 1989 (54 FR 48184). Sites on this list must be investigated for possible remedial action, as required by the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA, 42 U.S.C. 9601, et seq.). This report documents the findings of the remedial investigation of this OU and the feasibility of potential remedial action alternatives. These studies are authorized by Sect. 117 of CERCLA and were conducted in accordance with the requirements of the National Contingency Plan (40 CFR Part 300). DOE, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) have entered into a Federal Facility Agreement (FFA), as authorized by Sect. 120 of CERCLA and Sects. 3008(h) and 6001 of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) (42 U.S.C. 6901, et seq.). The purpose of this agreement is to ensure a coordinated and effective response for all environmental restoration activities occurring at the ORR. In addition to other responsibilities, the FFA parties mutually define the OU boundaries, set remediation priorities, establish remedial investigation priorities and strategies, and identify and select remedial actions. A copy of this FFA is available from the DOE Information Resource Center in Oak Ridge, Tennessee.

  14. Annual hydrologic data summary for the White Oak Creek Watershed: Water Year 1990 (October 1989--September 1990)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borders, D.M.; Gregory, S.M.; Clapp, R.B.; Frederick, B.J.; Moore, G.K.; Watts, J.A.; Broders, C.C.; Bednarek, A.T.

    1991-09-01

    This report summarizes, for the Water Year 1990 (October 1989-- September 1990), the dynamic hydrologic data collected on the Whiteoak Creek (WOC) Watershed's surface and subsurface flow systems. These systems affect the quality or quantity of surface water and groundwater. The collection of hydrologic data is one component of numerous, ongoing Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) environmental studies and monitoring programs and is intended to 1. characterize the quantity and quality of water in the flow system, 2. plan and assess remedial action activities, and 3. provide long-term availability of data and assure quality. Characterizing the hydrology of the WOC watershed provides a better understanding of the processes which drive contaminant transport in the watershed. Identifying of spatial and temporal trends in hydrologic parameters and mechanisms that affect the movement of contaminants supports the development of interim corrective measures and remedial restoration alternatives. Hydrologic monitoring supports long-term assessment of the effectiveness of remedial actions in limiting the transport of contaminants across Waste Area Grouping boundaries and ultimately to the off-site environment. The majority of the data summarized in this report are available from the Remedial Action Programs Data and Information Management System data base. Surface water data available within the WOC flow system include discharge and runoff, surface water quality, radiological and chemical contamination of sediments, and descriptions of the outfalls to the WOC flow system. Climatological data available for the Oak Ridge area include precipitation, temperature, humidity, wind speed, and wind direction. Information on groundwater levels, aquifer characteristics, and groundwater quality are presented. Anomalies in the data and problems with monitoring and accuracy are discussed. 58 refs., 54 figs., 15 tabs.

  15. The temporal mapping of riparian vegetation at Leon Creek in Bexar County, Texas from 1987 to 1999 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cummins, Karen Leigh

    2000-01-01

    Leon Creek's riparian vegetation was evaluated through the use of Landsat TM data, where different methods were compared and integrated. Through the use of an Image Difference Calculation, areas of 20% or more change in pixel value from 1987...

  16. Saeltzer Dam Removal on Clear Creek 11 years later: An assessment of upstream channel changes since the dam's removal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simons, Crystal; Walker, Katelyn; Zimring, Mark

    2011-01-01

    Boulder BLDR Bedrock BDRK Dam Rubble DMRB Table B1. 2011pages. Brown, M. (n.d. ). Clear Creek—McCormick-Saeltzer DamRemoval: Dam removal re-opens spring run salmon habitat. US

  17. Lateral Continuity of the Eagle Ford Group Strata in Lozier Canyon and Antonio Creek, Terrell County, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gardner, Rand D

    2013-09-24

    simplistic assumptions about relevant horizontal reservoir heterogeneities can lead to sub-optimal or uneconomical exploitation. High-resolution correlation of individual beds in the Eagle Ford Group over several miles in Lozier Canyon and Antonio Creek...

  18. Hindered amine development and operating experience at Quirk Creek Gas Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smart, P.; Devenny, I. [Imperial Oil Resources Ltd., Calgary, Alberta (Canada); Rendall, A. [Nalco/Exxon Energy Chemicals, Calgary, Alberta (Canada)

    1997-12-31

    The Imperial Oil Resources Limited Quirk Creek gas plant has a significant natural gas treating challenge. The natural gas feed contains H{sub 2}S, CO{sub 2}, carbonyl sulfide, mercaptans and elemental sulfur. The trace sulfur components are difficult to remove with conventional solvents. Over its 26 year history, three different solvents have been used. The latest solvent, a hybrid of a hindered amine and a physical solvent, has been operating for over two years, with better than expected performance. This high capacity solvent has lowered operating costs by over $500,000/yr by reducing solids formation. The development work, including pilot testing at Quirk Creek, and the operating history will be reviewed.

  19. Reintroduction of Lower Columbia River Chum Salmon into Duncan Creek, 2007 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hillson, Todd D.

    2009-06-12

    The National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) listed Lower Columbia River (LCR) chum salmon as threatened under the Endangered Species Act (ESA) in March, 1999 (64 FR 14508, March 25, 1999). The listing was in response to the reduction in abundance from historical levels of more than one-half million returning adults to fewer than 10,000 present-day spawners. Harvest, habitat degradation, changes in flow regimes, riverbed movement and heavy siltation have been largely responsible for this decline. The timing of seasonal changes in river flow and water temperatures is perhaps the most critical factor in structuring the freshwater life history of this species. This is especially true of the population located directly below Bonneville Dam, where hydropower operations can block access to spawning sites, dewater redds, strand fry, cause scour or fill of redds and increase sedimentation of spawning gravels. Prior to 1997, only two chum salmon populations were recognized as genetically distinct in the Columbia River, although spawning had been documented in many Lower Columbia River tributaries. The first population was in the Grays River (RKm 34), a tributary of the Columbia River, and the second was a group of spawners utilizing the mainstem Columbia River just below Bonneville Dam (RKm 235) adjacent to Ives Island and in Hardy and Hamilton creeks. Using additional DNA samples, Small et al. (2006) grouped chum salmon spawning in the mainstem Columbia River and the Washington State tributaries into three groups: the Coastal, the Cascade and the Gorge. The Coastal group comprises those spawning in the Grays River, Skamokawa Creek and the broodstock used at the Sea Resources facility on the Chinook River. The Cascade group comprises those spawning in the Cowlitz (both summer and fall stocks), Kalama, Lewis, and East Fork Lewis rivers, with most supporting unique populations. The Gorge group comprises those spawning in the mainstem Columbia River from the I-205 Bridge up to Bonneville Dam and those spawning in Hamilton and Hardy creeks. Response to the federal ESA listing has been primarily through direct-recovery actions: reducing harvest, hatchery supplementation using local broodstock for populations at catastrophic risk, habitat restoration (including construction of spawning channels) and flow agreements to protect spawning and rearing areas. Both state and federal agencies have built controlled spawning areas. In 1998, the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) began a chum salmon supplementation program using native stock on the Grays River. This program was expanded during 1999 - 2001 to include reintroduction into the Chinook River using eggs from the Grays River Supplementation Program. These eggs are incubated at the Grays River Hatchery, reared to release size at the Sea Resources Hatchery on the Chinook River, and the fry are released at the mouth of the Chinook River. Native steelhead, chum, and coho salmon are present in Duncan Creek, and are recognized as subpopulations of the Lower Gorge population, and are focal species in the Lower Columbia Fish Recovery Board (LCFRB) plan. Steelhead, chum and coho salmon that spawn in Duncan Creek are listed as Threatened under the ESA. Duncan Creek is classified by the LCFRB plan as a watershed for intensive monitoring (LCFRB 2004). This project was identified in the 2004 Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) revised Biological Opinion (revised BiOp) to increase survival of chum salmon, 'BPA will continue to fund the program to re-introduce Columbia River chum salmon into Duncan Creek as long as NOAA Fisheries determines it to be an essential and effective contribution to reducing the risk of extinction for this ESU'. (USACE et al. 2004, page 85-86). The Governors Forum on Monitoring and Salmon Recovery and Watershed Health recommends one major population from each ESU have adult and juvenile monitoring. Duncan Creek chum salmon are identified in this plan to be intensively monitored. Planners recommended that a combination of natural and hatchery production

  20. Geology of the Bee Branch-Mill Creek area, Mason County, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, George Howard

    1957-01-01

    . andstcns member. ?organ Creek lmesrcne res?er . Pomrt Ie rn shale m, . mber . Bio? '", . one ct' th . "oint Peck . hale '&au Saba limestcno member . Ordoeician sy;tem . 12 13 14 15 15 16 16 17 19 Ellen? urger group. Mississippian system..., Chappel '"creation. Barnet t shale. ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 4 ~ ~ 25 26 Pennsylvanian system. ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 28 N*rble Falls group 'I ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ &mithsick 'c rr, . * Lic n. \\ ~ Cretaceous system . Quaternarr sy ten...

  1. Campbell Creek TVA 2010 First Year Performance Report July 1, 2009 August 31, 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christian, Jeffrey E; Gehl, Anthony C; Boudreaux, Philip R; New, Joshua Ryan

    2010-10-01

    This research project was initiated by TVA in March 2008 and encompasses three houses that are of similar size, design and located within the same community - Campbell Creek, Farragut TN with simulated occupancy. This report covers the performance period from July 1, 2009 to August 31, 2010. It is the intent of TVA that this Valley Data will inform electric utilities future residential retrofit incentive program.

  2. Metallicity Distribution in the Milky Way Disk Dana S. Balser, R.T. Rood, T.M. Bania, L.D. Anderson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balser, Dana S.

    al. (2006) Sun GC #12;Electron Temperature Radial Gradient K200)(T R)49257()4986406(T e galeMetallicity Distribution in the Milky Way Disk Dana S. Balser, R.T. Rood, T.M. Bania, L.D. Anderson Photo: Harry Morton #12;HII Region Electron Temperature and Metallicity Shaver et al. (1983) 1.15 e C L

  3. The impacts of `run-of-river' hydropower on the physical and ecological condition of rivers Anderson et al, 2014 (Water and Environment Journal)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hinch, Scott G.

    The impacts of `run-of-river' hydropower on the physical and ecological condition of rivers Anderson et al, 2014 (Water and Environment Journal) OF HYDROPOWER AND STREAMS A tale of run-of-river hydropower facilities and their possible impacts on fish populations #12;2 #12;3 IPCC, 2014 #12;4 From left

  4. Anderson localization as position-dependent diffusion in disordered waveguides Ben Payne,1 Alexey Yamilov,1,* and Sergey E. Skipetrov2,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yamilov, Alexey

    idea of Anderson, serious complications ap- pear due to absorption of a part of the wave energy Yamilov,1,* and Sergey E. Skipetrov2, 1Department of Physics, Missouri University of Science & Technology effects and with large-scale ab initio simulations of the classical wave transport in disordered

  5. Habitat Projects Completed within the Asotin Creek Watershed, 1999 Completion Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Bradley J.

    2000-01-01

    The Asotin Creek Model Watershed Program (ACMWP) is the primary entity coordinating habitat projects on both private and public lands within the Asotin Creek watershed. The Asotin Creek watershed covers approximately 325 square miles in the Blue Mountains of southeastern Washington in WRIA 35. According to WDFW's Priority WRIA's by At-Risk Stock Significance Map, it is the highest priority in southeastern WA. Snake River spring chinook salmon, summer steelhead and bull trout, which are listed under the Endangered Species Act (ESA), are present in the watershed. The ACMWP began coordinating habitat projects in 1995. Approximately two hundred seventy-six projects have been implemented through the ACMWP as of 1999. Twenty of these projects were funded in part through Bonneville Power Administration's 1999 Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. These projects used a variety of methods to enhance and protect watershed conditions. In-stream work for fish habitat included construction of hard structures (e.g. vortex rock weirs), meander reconstruction, placement of large woody debris (LWD) and whole trees and improvements to off-channel rearing habitat; thirty-eight were created with these structures. Three miles of stream benefited from riparian improvements such as vegetative plantings (17,000 trees and shrubs) and noxious weed control. Two sediment basin constructions, 67 acres of grass seeding, and seven hundred forty-five acres of minimum till were implemented to reduce sediment production and delivery to streams in the watershed.

  6. Habitat Projects Completed within the Asotin Creek Watershed, 1998 Completion Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Bradley J.

    1999-11-01

    The Asotin Creek Model Watershed Program (ACMWP) is the primary entity coordinating habitat projects on both private and public lands within the Asotin Creek watershed. The Asotin Creek watershed covers approximately 325 square miles in the Blue Mountains of southeastern Washington. Snake River spring chinook salmon, summer steelhead and bull trout, which are listed under the Endangered Species Act (ESA), are present in the watershed. The ACMWP began coordinating habitat projects in 1995. Approximately two hundred forty-six projects have been implemented through the ACMWP as of 1998. Fifty-nine of these projects were funded in part through Bonneville Power Administration's 1998 Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. These projects used a variety of methods to enhance and protect watershed conditions. In-stream work for fish habitat included construction of hard structures (e.g. vortex rock weirs), meander reconstruction, placement of large woody debris (LWD) and whole trees and improvements to off-channel rearing habitat; one hundred thirty-nine pools were created with these structures. Three miles of stream benefited from riparian improvements such as fencing, vegetative plantings, and noxious weed control. Two alternative water developments were completed, providing off-stream-watering sources for livestock. 20,500 ft of upland terrace construction, seven sediment basin construction, one hundred eighty-seven acres of grass seeding, eight hundred fifty acres of direct seeding and eighteen sediment basin cleanouts were implemented to reduce sediment production and delivery to streams in the watershed.

  7. Sources of Mercury to East Fork Poplar Creek Downstream from the Y-12 National Security Complex: Inventories and Export Rates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Southworth, George R [ORNL; Greeley Jr, Mark Stephen [ORNL; Peterson, Mark J [ORNL; Lowe, Kenneth Alan [ORNL; Ketelle, Richard H [ORNL; Floyd, Stephanie B [ORNL

    2010-02-01

    East Fork Poplar Creek (EFPC) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, has been heavily contaminated with mercury (also referred to as Hg) since the 1950s as a result of historical activities at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (formerly the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant and hereinafter referred to as Y-12). During the period from 1950 to 1963, spills and leaks of elemental mercury (Hg{sup 0}) contaminated soil, building foundations, and subsurface drainage pathways at the site, while intentional discharges of mercury-laden wastewater added 100 metric tons of mercury directly to the creek (Turner and Southworth 1999). The inventory of mercury estimated to be lost to soil and rock within the facility was 194 metric tons, with another estimated 70 metric tons deposited in floodplain soils along the 25 km length of EFPC (Turner and Southworth 1999). Remedial actions within the facility reduced mercury concentrations in EFPC water at the Y-12 boundary from > 2500 ng/L to about 600 ng/L by 1999 (Southworth et al. 2000). Further actions have reduced average total mercury concentration at that site to {approx}300 ng/L (2009 RER). Additional source control measures planned for future implementation within the facility include sediment/soil removal, storm drain relining, and restriction of rainfall infiltration within mercury-contaminated areas. Recent plans to demolish contaminated buildings within the former mercury-use areas provide an opportunity to reconstruct the storm drain system to prevent the entry of mercury-contaminated water into the flow of EFPC. Such actions have the potential to reduce mercury inputs from the industrial complex by perhaps as much as another 80%. The transformation and bioaccumulation of mercury in the EFPC ecosystem has been a perplexing subject since intensive investigation of the issue began in the mid 1980s. Although EFPC was highly contaminated with mercury (waterborne mercury exceeded background levels by 1000-fold, mercury in sediments by more than 2000-fold) in the 1980s, mercury concentrations in EFPC fish exceeded those in fish from regional reference sites by only a little more than 10-fold. This apparent low bioavailability of mercury in EFPC, coupled with a downstream pattern of mercury in fish in which mercury decreased in proportion to dilution of the upstream source, lead to the assumption that mercury in fish would respond to decreased inputs of dissolved mercury to the stream's headwaters. However, during the past two decades when mercury inputs were decreasing, mercury concentrations in fish in Lower EFPC (LEFPC) downstream of Y-12 increased while those in Upper EFPC (UEFPC) decreased. The key assumption of the ongoing cleanup efforts, and concentration goal for waterborne mercury were both called into question by the long-term monitoring data. The large inventory of mercury within the watershed downstream presents a concern that the successful treatment of sources in the headwaters may not be sufficient to reduce mercury bioaccumulation within the system to desired levels. The relative importance of headwater versus floodplain mercury sources in contributing to mercury bioaccumulation in EFPC is unknown. A mercury transport study conducted by the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) in 1984 estimated that floodplain sources contributed about 80% of the total annual mercury export from the EFPC system (ORTF 1985). Most of the floodplain inputs were associated with wet weather, high flow events, while much of the headwater flux occurred under baseflow conditions. Thus, day-to-day exposure of biota to waterborne mercury was assumed to be primarily determined by the Y-12 source. The objective of this study was to evaluate the results of recent studies and monitoring within the EFPC drainage with a focus on discerning the magnitude of floodplain mercury sources and how long these sources might continue to contaminate the system after headwater sources are eliminated or greatly reduced.

  8. Preliminary Thermal Modeling of Hi-Storm 100S-218 Version B Storage Modules at Hope Creek Nuclear Power Station ISFSI

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cuta, Judith M.; Adkins, Harold E.

    2013-08-30

    This report fulfills the M3 milestone M3FT-13PN0810022, “Report on Inspection 1”, under Work Package FT-13PN081002. Thermal analysis is being undertaken at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in support of inspections of selected storage modules at various locations around the United States, as part of the Used Fuel Disposition Campaign of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE) Fuel Cycle Research and Development. This report documents pre-inspection predictions of temperatures for four modules at the Hope Creek Nuclear Generating Station ISFSI that have been identified as candidates for inspection in late summer or early fall/winter of 2013. These are HI-STORM 100S-218 Version B modules storing BWR 8x8 fuel in MPC-68 canisters. The temperature predictions reported in this document were obtained with detailed COBRA-SFS models of these four storage systems, with the following boundary conditions and assumptions.

  9. Hydrologic data summary for the White Oak Creek watershed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (January--December 1993)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borders, D.M.; Frederick, B.J.; Reece, D.K.; McCalla, W.L.; Watts, J.A.; Ziegler, K.S.

    1994-10-01

    This report summarizes, for the 12-month period (January through December 1993), the available dynamic hydrologic data collected, primarily, on the White Oak Creek (WOC) watershed along with information collected on the surface flow systems which affect the quality or quantity of surface water. Identification of spatial and temporal trends in hydrologic parameters and mechanisms that affect the movement of contaminants supports the development of interim corrective measures and remedial restoration alternatives. In addition, hydrologic monitoring supports long-term assessment of the effectiveness of remedial actions in limiting the transport of contaminants across Waste Area Grouping (WAG) boundaries and ultimately to the off-site environment. For these reasons, it is of paramount importance to the Environmental Restoration Program (ERP) to collect and report hydrologic data, an activity that contributes to the Site Investigations (SI) component of the ERP. This report provides and describes sources of hydrologic data for Environmental Restoration activities that use monitoring data to quantify and assess the impact from releases of contaminants from ORNL WAGs.

  10. Building BoundariesTM Information for Parents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    Building BoundariesTM Information for Parents Even very young children can learn some skills of 2 #12;Building BoundariesTM: Information for Parents How to Recognize Warning Signs in Your Child

  11. Boundary learning by optimization with topological constraints

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Helmstaedter, Moritz N.

    Recent studies have shown that machine learning can improve the accuracy of detecting object boundaries in images. In the standard approach, a boundary detector is trained by minimizing its pixel-level disagreement with ...

  12. Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Evaluation Program; Meadow Creek vs. Lake Whatcom Stock Kokanee Salmon Investigations in Lake Roosevelt, 2001 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McLellan, Holly; Scholz, Allan

    2002-03-01

    Lake Roosevelt has been stocked with Lake Whatcom stock kokanee since 1989 with the primary objective of creating a self-sustaining recreational fishery. Due to low return numbers, it was hypothesized a stock of kokanee, native to the upper Columbia River, might perform better than the coastal Lake Whatcom strain. Kokanee from Meadow Creek, a tributary of Kootenay Lake, British Columbia were selected as an alternative stock. Matched pair releases of Lake Whatcom and Meadow Creek kokanee were made from Sherman Creek Hatchery in late June 2000 and repeated in 2001. Stock performance between Lake Whatcom and Meadow Creek kokanee was evaluated using three performance measures; (1) the number of returns to Sherman Creek, the primary egg collection facility, (2) the number of returns to other tributaries and (3) the number of returns to the creel. Kokanee were collected during five passes through the reservoir via electrofishing, which included 87 tributary mouths during the fall of 2000 and 2001. Chi-square analysis indicated age two Meadow Creek kokanee returned to Sherman Creek in significantly higher numbers when compared to the Whatcom stock in 2000 ({chi}{sup 2} = 736.6; d.f. = 1; P < 0.01) and 2001 ({chi}{sup 2} = 156.2; d.f. = 1; P < 0.01). Reservoir wide recoveries of age two kokanee had similar results in 2000 ({chi}{sup 2} = 735.3; d.f. = 1; P < 0.01) and 2001 ({chi}{sup 2} = 150.1; d.f. = 1; P < 0.01). Six Lake Whatcom and seven Meadow Creek three year olds were collected in 2001. The sample size of three year olds was too small for statistical analysis. No kokanee were collected during creel surveys in 2000, and two (age three kokanee) were collected in 2001. Neither of the hatchery kokanee collected were coded wire tagged, therefore stock could not be distinguished. After two years of monitoring, neither Meadow Creek or Lake Whatcom kokanee appear to be capable of providing a run of three-year-old spawners to sustain stocking efforts. The small number of hatchery three-year-olds collected indicated that the current stocking methods will continue to produce a limited jacking run largely composed of precocious males and a small number of three-year-olds. However, supplemental creel data indicated anglers harvested two-year-old hatchery kokanee 30-45 days after release. Supplemental creel data should continue to be collected to accurately evaluate hatchery contributions to the creel.

  13. Multidimensional Computational Fluid Dynamics Modeling of the Dispersion of White Oak Creek Contaminants in the Clinch River

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Platfoot, J.H.; Wendel, M.W.; Williams, P.T.

    1996-10-01

    This report describes the simulation of the dispersion and dilution of dissolved or finely suspended contaminants entering the Clinch river from White Oak Creek. The work is accomplished through the application of a commercial computational fluid dynamics (CFD) solver. This study assumes that contaminants originating in the White Oak Creed watershed, which drains Oak Ridge National Laboratory, will eventually reach the mouth of White Oak Creek and be discharged into the clinch River. The numerical model was developed to support the analysis of the off-site consequences of releases from the ORNL liquid low-level waste system. The system contains storage tanks and transfer lines in Bethel Valley and Melton Valley. Under certain failure modes, liquid low-level waste could be released to White Oak Creek or Melton Branch to White Oak Creek and eventually be discharged to the Clinch River. Since the Clinch River has unrestricted access by the public and water usage from the Clinch River is not controlled by the Department of Energy, such a liquid low-level waste spill would create the possibility of public exposure to the contaminant. This study is limited to the dispersion of the contaminants downstream of the confluence of White Oak Creek.

  14. CTUIR Grande Ronde River Watershed Restoration Program McCoy Creek/McIntyre Creek Road Crossing, 1995-1999 Progress Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Childs, Allen B.

    2000-08-01

    The Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) and Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) entered into a contract agreement beginning in 1996 to fund watershed restoration and enhancement actions and contribute to recovery of fish and wildlife resources and water quality in the Grande Ronde River Basin. The CTUIR's habitat program is closely coordinated with the Grande Ronde Model Watershed Program and multiple agencies and organizations within the basin. The CTUIR has focused during the past 4 years in the upper portions of the Grande Ronde Subbasin (upstream of LaGrande, Oregon) on several major project areas in the Meadow, McCoy, and McIntyre Creek watersheds and along the mainstem Grande Ronde River. This Annual Report provides an overview of individual projects and accomplishments.

  15. Validating computed grain boundary energies in fcc metals using the grain boundary character distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rohrer, Gregory S.

    Validating computed grain boundary energies in fcc metals using the grain boundary character. Since the GBCD is inversely related to the grain boundary energy distribution, it offers a useful metric for validating grain boundary energy calculations. Comparisons between the measured GBCD and calculated energies

  16. Sediment and radionuclide transport in rivers: radionuclide transport modeling for Cattaraugus and Buttermilk Creeks, New York

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Onishi, Y.; Yabusaki, S.B.; Kincaid, C.T.; Skaggs, R.L.; Walters, W.H.

    1982-12-01

    SERATRA, a transient, two-dimensional (laterally-averaged) computer model of sediment-contaminant transport in rivers, satisfactorily resolved the distribution of sediment and radionuclide concentrations in the Cattaraugus Creek stream system in New York. By modeling the physical processes of advection, diffusion, erosion, deposition, and bed armoring, SERATRA routed three sediment size fractions, including cohesive soils, to simulate three dynamic flow events. In conjunction with the sediment transport, SERATRA computed radionuclide levels in dissolved, suspended sediment, and bed sediment forms for four radionuclides (/sup 137/Cs, /sup 90/Sr, /sup 239/ /sup 240/Pu, and /sup 3/H). By accounting for time-dependent sediment-radionuclide interaction in the water column and bed, SERATA is a physically explicit model of radionuclide fate and migration. Sediment and radionuclide concentrations calculated by SERATA in the Cattaraugus Creek stream system are in reasonable agreement with measured values. SERATRA is in the field performance phase of an extensive testing program designed to establish the utility of the model as a site assessment tool. The model handles not only radionuclides but other contaminants such as pesticides, heavy metals and other toxic chemicals. Now that the model has been applied to four field sites, including the latest study of the Cattaraugus Creek stream system, it is recommended that a final model be validated through comparison of predicted results with field data from a carefully controlled tracer test at a field site. It is also recommended that a detailed laboratory flume be tested to study cohesive sediment transport, deposition, and erosion characteristics. The lack of current understanding of these characteristics is one of the weakest areas hindering the accurate assessment of the migration of radionuclides sorbed by fine sediments of silt and clay.

  17. Post-Fire Debris-Flow Hazard Assessment of the Area Burned by the 2013 Beaver Creek Fire near Hailey, Central Idaho

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torgersen, Christian

    Post-Fire Debris-Flow Hazard Assessment of the Area Burned by the 2013 Beaver Creek Fire near-flow hazard assessment of the area burned by the 2013 Beaver Creek Fire near Hailey, central Idaho: U­1273 Prepared in cooperation with Blaine County, Idaho #12;#12;Post-Fire Debris-Flow Hazard Assessment

  18. Correlation of stratigraphy with revegetation conditions at the Gibbons Creek Lignite Mine, Grimes County, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parisot, Laurence D.

    1991-01-01

    (after Ott, 1988). . 2 Table for determining the tail area (after Ott, 1988). . . . 59 60 LIST OF FIGURES Figure Page 1 Lignite resources in Texas 2 Use of dragline for surface-mining at the Gibbons Creek Mine, Texas. . 3 3 Method of surface... of the lignite in a trench involves the removal of the overburden with the use of a dragline (Figure 2). When the lignite has been extracted from the cut, the trench is backfilled with the overburden of the adjacent trench. This new overburden forms the spoil...

  19. EA-1895: Lolo Creek Permanent Weir Construction near town of Weippe, Clearwater County, Idaho

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE’s Bonneville Power Administration was preparing this EA to evaluate the potential environmental impacts of replacing an existing seasonal fish weir with a permanent weir, which would have been used to monitor federally-listed Snake River steelhead and collect spring Chinook salmon adults to support ongoing supplementation programs in the watershed. The Bureau of Land Management, a cooperating agency, preliminarily determined Lolo Creek to be suitable for Congressional designation into the Wild and Scenic River System. The EA included a Wild and Scenic River Section 7 analysis. This project was canceled.

  20. Mineral resources of the Home Creek wilderness study area, Harney County, Oregon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vander Meulen, D.B.; Griscom, A.; King, H.D.; Vercoutere, T.L.; Moyle, P.R.

    1988-01-01

    This book discusses the Home Creek Wilderness Study Area, on the western slope of Steens Mountain in the northern Basin and Range physiographic province of southeastern Oregon. The area is underlain by Miocene Steens Basalt. Isolated outcrops of the Devine Canyon ash-flow tuff unconformably overlie the Steens Basalt. Pleistocene shoreline deposits and Holocene dunes are exposed in the western part of the study area, moderate potential for sand and gravel resources in lake shoreline deposits, and low potential for geothermal energy throughout the study area.

  1. EA-1978: Sand Creek Winds, McCone County, Montana | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum Based|Department of Energy 8:Final78: Sand Creek Winds, McCone County,

  2. Grain boundaries in coated conductors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weigand, Marcus

    2010-07-06

    ,757 • Bibliography: 5,087 ix Publications and Conference Presentations This thesis led to the following publications: • M. Weigand, S. C. Speller, G. M. Hughes, N. A. Rutter, S. Lozano-Perez, C. R. M. Grovenor and J. H. Durrell: “Individual grain boundary properties... and overall performance of metal-organic deposition coated conductors ”, Phys. Rev. B 81, 174537 (2010) • R. Hühne, J. Eickemeyer, V. S. Sarma, A. Güth, T. Thersleff, J. Freudenberger, O. de Haas, M. Weigand, J. H. Durrell, L. Schultz and B. Holzapfel: “Ap...

  3. Boundary Layer Cloud Turbulence Characteristics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D B L O OLaura|BilayerBiomimeticBooks Are FunBorrowingBrungerBoundary

  4. Bear Creek Valley Floodplain Hot Spot Removal Action Project Plan, Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-01-01

    The Bear Creek Valley Floodplain Hot Spot Removal Action Project Plan, Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (Y/ER-301) was prepared (1) to safely, cost-effectively, and efficiently evaluate the environmental impact of solid material in the two debris areas in the context of industrial land uses (as defined in the Bear Creek Valley Feasibility Study) to support the Engineering Evaluation/Cost Assessment and (2) to evaluate, define, and implement the actions to mitigate these impacts. This work was performed under Work Breakdown Structure 1.x.01.20.01.08.

  5. Final review of the Campbell Creek demonstrations showcased by Tennessee Valley Authority

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gehl, Anthony C.; Munk, Jeffrey D.; Jackson, Roderick K.; Boudreaux, Philip R.; Miller, William A.; New, Joshua Ryan; Khowailed, Giannate

    2015-06-01

    The Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) Technology Innovation, Energy Efficiency, Power Delivery and Utilization Office funded and managed a showcase demonstration located in the suburbs of west Knox county, Tennessee. Work started March 2008 with the goal of documenting best practices for retrofitting existing homes and for building new high-efficiency homes. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) provided technical support. An analytical base was developed for helping homeowners, homebuyers, builders, practitioners and the TVA make informed economic decisions for the materials and incentives necessary to build a new high-efficiency home or retrofit an existing home. New approaches to more efficiently control active energy subsystems and information for selecting or upgrading to Energy Star appliances, changing all lights to 100% CFL s and upgrading windows to low-E gas filled glazing yields a 40% energy savings with neutral cash flow for the homeowner. Passive designs were reviewed and recommendations made for envelope construction that is durable and energy efficient. The Campbell Creek project complements the DOE Building Technologies Program strategic goal. Results of the project created technologies and design approaches that will yield affordable energy efficient homes. The 2010 DOE retrofit goals are to find retrofit packages that attain 30% whole house energy savings as documented by pre and post Home Energy rating scores (HERS). Campbell Creek met these goals.

  6. Restoring Anadromous Fish Habitat in the Lapwai Creek Watershed, Technical Report 2003-2006.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rasmussen, Lynn

    2007-02-01

    The Restoring Anadromous Fish Habitat in the Lapwai Creek Watershed is a multi-phase project to enhance steelhead trout in the Lapwai Creek watershed by improving salmonid spawning and rearing habitat. Habitat is limited by extreme high runoff events, low summer flows, high water temperatures, poor instream cover, spawning gravel siltation, and sediment, nutrient and bacteria loading. Funded by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) as part of the Northwest Power Planning Council's Fish and Wildlife Program, the project assists in mitigating damage to steelhead runs caused by the Columbia River hydroelectric dams. The project is sponsored by the Nez Perce Soil and Water Conservation District (District). Target fish species include steelhead trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). Steelhead trout within the Snake River Basin were listed in 1997 as threatened under the Endangered Species Act. Accomplishments for the contract period December 1, 2003 through February 28, 2004 include; seven grade stabilization structures, 0.67 acres of wetland plantings, ten acres tree planting, 500 linear feet streambank erosion control, two acres grass seeding, and 120 acres weed control.

  7. Restoring Anadromous Fish Habitat in Big Canyon Creek Watershed, 2004-2005 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rasmussen, Lynn

    2006-07-01

    The ''Restoring Anadromous Fish Habitat in the Big Canyon Creek Watershed'' is a multi-phase project to enhance steelhead trout in the Big Canyon Creek watershed by improving salmonid spawning and rearing habitat. Habitat is limited by extreme high runoff events, low summer flows, high water temperatures, poor instream cover, spawning gravel siltation, and sediment, nutrient and bacteria loading. Funded by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) as part of the Northwest Power Planning Council's Fish and Wildlife Program, the project assists in mitigating damage to steelhead runs caused by the Columbia River hydroelectric dams. The project is sponsored by the Nez Perce Soil and Water Conservation District. Target fish species include steelhead trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). Steelhead trout within the Snake River Basin were listed in 1997 as threatened under the Endangered Species Act. Accomplishments for the contract period September 1, 2004 through October 31, 2005 include; 2.7 riparian miles treated, 3.0 wetland acres treated, 5,263.3 upland acres treated, 106.5 riparian acres treated, 76,285 general public reached, 3,000 students reached, 40 teachers reached, 18 maintenance plans completed, temperature data collected at 6 sites, 8 landowner applications received and processed, 14 land inventories completed, 58 habitat improvement project designs completed, 5 newsletters published, 6 habitat plans completed, 34 projects installed, 2 educational workshops, 6 displays, 1 television segment, 2 public service announcements, a noxious weed GIS coverage, and completion of NEPA, ESA, and cultural resources requirements.

  8. Anderson transition at 2 dimensional growth rate on antitrees and spectral theory for operators with one propagating channel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christian Sadel

    2015-06-15

    We show that the Anderson model has a transition from localization to delocalization at exactly 2 dimensional growth rate on antitrees with normalized edge weights which are certain discrete graphs. The kinetic part has a one-dimensional structure allowing a description through transfer matrices which involve some Schur complement. For such operators we introduce the notion of having one propagating channel and extend theorems from the theory of one-dimensional Jacobi operators that relate the behavior of transfer matrices with the spectrum. These theorems are then applied to the considered model. In essence, in a certain energy region the kinetic part averages the random potentials along shells and the transfer matrices behave similar as for a one-dimensional operator with random potential of decaying variance. At $d$ dimensional growth for $d>2$ this effective decay is strong enough to obtain absolutely continuous spectrum, whereas for some uniform $d$ dimensional growth with $denergy region. At exactly uniform $2$ dimensional growth also some singular continuous spectrum appears, at least at small disorder. As a corollary we also obtain a change from singular spectrum ($d\\leq 2$) to absolutely continuous spectrum ($d\\geq 3)$ for random operators of the type $\\mathcal{P}_r \\Delta_d \\mathcal{P}_r+\\lambda \\mathcal{V}$ on $\\mathbb{Z}^d$, where $\\mathcal{P}_r$ is an orthogonal radial projection, $\\Delta_d$ the discrete adjacency operator (Laplacian) on $\\mathbb{Z}^d$ and $\\lambda \\mathcal{V}$ a random potential.

  9. DFI JOURNAL Vol. 6 No. 1 July 2012 [3] Jet Grouting and Safety of Tuttle Creek Dam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DFI JOURNAL Vol. 6 No. 1 July 2012 [3] Jet Grouting and Safety of Tuttle Creek Dam Timothy D. Stark to assess, particu- larly when the project involves an operational dam. Usually the reservoir is operating at non- critical conditions (normal pool or non-seismic state) during jet grouting and after construc

  10. An Assessment of the Natural and Anthropogenic Geochemistry of the Red Mountain Creek Watershed: Ironton Mining District, Colorado 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Litt, Joshua

    2014-04-29

    Red Mountain Creek is located in the rich mineralized San Juan Mountains of Southwestern Colorado, where mining from the mid 1800s through the late 1970s occurred. Sampling of the Uncompahgre River in the late 1970s, which is downstream of the five...

  11. The development of an aquatic spill model for the White Oak Creek watershed, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, R.O.

    1996-05-01

    This study develops an aquatic spill model applicable to the White Oak Creek watershed draining the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Hazardous, toxic, and radioactive chemicals are handled and stored on the laboratory reservation. An accidental spill into the White Oak Creek watershed could contaminate downstream water supplies if insufficient dilution did not occur. White Oak Creek empties into the Clinch River, which flows into the Tennessee River. Both rivers serve as municipal water supplies. The aquatic spill model provides estimates of the dilution at sequential downstream locations along White Oak creek and the Clinch River after an accidental spill of a liquid containing a radioactively decaying constituent. The location of the spill on the laboratory is arbitrary, while hydrologic conditions range from drought to extreme flood are simulated. The aquatic spill model provides quantitative estimates with which to assess water quality downstream from the site of the accidental spill, allowing an informed decision to be made whether to perform mitigating measures so that the integrity of affected water supplies is not jeopardized.

  12. An Archaeological Survey for the Offsite Utilities Associated with the Proposed Thompson's Creek Wastewater Treatment Plant in Brazos County Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, William

    2015-07-30

    An archaeological survey for the proposed offsite utilities associated with the Thompson’s Creek Waste Water Treatment Plant project along a 300 meter segment of a 12-inch water line in west-central Brazos County, Texas was conducted by Brazos...

  13. 4.3 Boundary integral equations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-10-18

    62. CHAPTER 4. OBSTACLE SCATTERING. 4.3 Boundary integral equations. We introduce the equivalent sources for the Helmholtz equation and establish ...

  14. Performance Boundaries in Nb3Sn Superconductors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Godeke, Arno

    2006-01-01

    Boundaries in Nb 3 Sn Superconductors – Berkeley, CABoundaries in Nb 3 Sn Superconductors – Berkeley, CABoundaries in Nb 3 Sn Superconductors Arno Godeke Berkeley,

  15. Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Evaluation Program; Meadow Creek vs. Lake Whatcom Stock Kokanee Salmon Investigations in Lake Roosevelt, Annual Report 2002.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McLellan, Holly

    2003-03-01

    Lake Whatcom, Washington kokanee have been stocked in Lake Roosevelt since 1987 with the primary objective of creating a self-sustaining fishery. Success has been limited by low recruitment to the fishery, low adult returns to hatcheries, and a skewed sex ratio. It was hypothesized that a stock native to the upper Columbia River might perform better than the coastal Lake Whatcom stock. Kokanee from Meadow Creek, a tributary of Kootenay Lake, British Columbia were selected as an alternative stock. Post smolts from each stock were released from Sherman Creek Hatchery in late June 2000 and repeated in 2001. Stock performance was evaluated using three measures; (1) number of returns to Sherman Creek, the primary egg collection facility, (2) the number of returns to 86 tributaries sampled and, (3) the number of returns to the creel. In two repeated experiments, neither Meadow Creek or Lake Whatcom kokanee appeared to be capable of providing a run of three-year old spawners to sustain stocking efforts. Less than 10 three-years olds from either stock were collected during the study period. Chi-square analysis indicated age two Meadow Creek kokanee returned to Sherman Creek and to other tributaries in significantly higher numbers when compared to the Lake Whatcom stock in both 2000 and 2001. However, preliminary data from the Spokane Tribe of Indians indicated that a large number of both stocks were precocial before they were stocked. The small number of hatchery three-year olds collected indicated that the current hatchery rearing and stocking methods will continue to produce a limited jacking run largely composed of precocious males and a small number of three-year olds. No kokanee from the study were collected during standard lake wide creel surveys. Supplemental creel data, including fishing derbies, test fisheries, and angler diaries, indicated anglers harvested two-year-old hatchery kokanee a month after release. The majority of the two-year old kokanee harvested were from a direct stock at the Fort Spokane boat launch. Only Lake Whatcom kokanee were stocked from the boat launch, therefore stock performance was not evaluated, however the high success of the stocking location will likely increase harvest of hatchery kokanee in the future. Despite low numbers of the targeted three-year olds, Meadow Creek kokanee should be stocked when possible to promote fish native to the upper Columbia River.

  16. Sherman Creek Hatchery; Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife Fish Program, 2003 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lovrak, Jon (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Fish Management Program, Hatcheries Division, Ford, WA); Combs, Mitch (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Fish Management Program, Hatcheries Division, Kettle Falls, WA)

    2004-01-01

    Sherman Creek Hatchery's primary objective is the restoration and enhancement of the recreational and subsistence fishery in Lake Roosevelt and Banks Lake. The Sherman Creek Hatchery (SCH) was designed to rear 1.7 million kokanee fry for acclimation and imprinting during the spring and early summer. Additionally, it was designed to trap all available returning adult kokanee during the fall for broodstock operation and evaluation. Since the start of this program, the operations on Lake Roosevelt have been modified to better achieve program goals. The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Spokane Tribe of Indians and the Colville Confederated Tribes form the interagency Lake Roosevelt Hatcheries Coordination Team (LRHCT) which sets goals and objectives for both Sherman Creek and the Spokane Tribal Hatchery. The LRHCT also serves to coordinate enhancement efforts on Lake Roosevelt and Banks Lake. Since 1994 the kokanee fingerling program has changed to yearling releases. By utilizing both the hatcheries and additional net pens, up to 1,000,000 kokanee yearlings can be reared and released. The construction and operation of twenty net pens in 2001 enabled the increased production. Another significant change has been to rear up to 300,000 rainbow trout fingerling at SCH from July through October, for stocking into the volunteer net pens. This enables the Spokane Tribal Hatchery (STH) to rear additional kokanee to further the enhancement efforts on Lake Roosevelt. Current objectives include increased use of native tributary stocks where available for propagation into Upper Columbia River Basin waters. The Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Evaluation Program (LRFEP) is responsible for monitoring and evaluation on the Lake Roosevelt Projects. From 1988 to 1998, the principal sport fishery on Lake Roosevelt has shifted from walleye to include rainbow trout and kokanee salmon (Underwood et al. 1997, Tilson and Scholz 1997). The angler use, harvest rates for rainbow and kokanee and the economic value of the fishery has increased substantially during this 10-year period. The investigations on the lake also suggest that the hatchery and net pen programs have enhanced the Lake Roosevelt fishery while not negatively impacting wild and native stocks within the lake. The 2003 Fourth Annual Two Rivers Trout Derby was again a great success. The harvest and data collection were the highest level to date with 1,668 rainbow trout and 416 kokanee salmon caught. The fishermen continue to praise the volunteer net pen program and the hatchery efforts as 90% of the rainbows and 93% of the kokanee caught were of hatchery origin (Lee, 2003).

  17. Sherman Creek Hatchery; Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife Fish Program; 2002 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Combs, Mitch (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Kettle Falls, WA)

    2003-01-01

    Sherman Creek Hatchery's primary objective is the restoration and enhancement of the recreational and subsistence fishery in Lake Roosevelt and Banks Lake. The Sherman Creek Hatchery (SCH) was designed to rear 1.7 million kokanee fry for acclimation and imprinting during the spring and early summer. Additionally, it was designed to trap all available returning adult kokanee during the fall for broodstock operations and evaluations. Since the start of this program, the operations on Lake Roosevelt have been modified to better achieve program goals. The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Spokane Tribe of Indians and the Colville Confederated Tribe form the interagency Lake Roosevelt Hatcheries Coordination Team (LRHCT) which sets goals and objectives for both Sherman Creek and the Spokane Tribal Hatchery and serves to coordinate enhancement efforts on Lake Roosevelt and Banks Lake. The primary changes have been to replace the kokanee fingerling program with a yearling (post smolt) program of up to 1,000,000 fish. To construct and operate twenty net pens to handle the increased production. The second significant change was to rear up to 300,000 rainbow trout fingerling at SCH from July through October, for stocking into the volunteer net pens. This enables the Spokane Tribal Hatchery (STH) to rear additional kokanee to further the enhancement efforts on Lake Roosevelt. Current objectives include increased use of native/indigenous stocks where available for propagation into Upper Columbia River Basin Waters. The Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Evaluation Program (LRFEP) is responsible for monitoring and evaluation on the Lake Roosevelt Projects. From 1988 to 1998, the principal sport fishery on Lake Roosevelt has shifted from walleye to include rainbow trout and kokanee salmon (Underwood et al. 1997, Tilson and Scholz 1997). The angler use, harvest rates for rainbow and kokanee and the economic value of the fishery has increased substantially during this 10-year period. The investigations on the lake also suggest that the hatchery and net pen programs have enhanced the Lake Roosevelt fishery while not negatively impacting wild and native stocks within the lake. The 2002 Third Annual Two Rivers Trout Derby was again a great success with 529 rainbow trout and 80 kokanee salmon caught. The fishermen had a lot of praise for the volunteer net pen program and the hatchery efforts as 84% of the rainbows and 62% of the kokanee caught were of hatchery origin (Lee, 2002).

  18. Sherman Creek Hatchery; Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife Fish Program, 2001 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Combs, Mitch (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Kettle Falls, WA)

    2002-01-01

    Sherman Creek Hatchery's primary objective is the restoration and enhancement of the recreational and subsistence fishery in Lake Roosevelt and Banks Lake. The Sherman Creek Hatchery (SCH) was designed to rear 1.7 million kokanee fry for acclimation and imprinting during the spring and early summer. Additionally, it was designed to trap all available returning adult kokanee during the fall for broodstock operations and evaluations. Since the start of this program, the operations on Lake Roosevelt have been modified to better achieve program goals. The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Spokane Tribe of Indians and the Colville Confederated Tribe form the interagency Lake Roosevelt Hatcheries Coordination Team (LRHCT) which sets goals and objectives for both Sherman Creek and the Spokane Tribal Hatchery and serves to coordinate enhancement efforts on Lake Roosevelt and Banks Lake. The primary changes have been to replace the kokanee fingerling program with a yearling (post smolt) program of up to 1,000,000 fish. To construct and operate twenty net pens to handle the increased production. The second significant change was to rear up to 300,000 rainbow trout fingerling at SCH from July through October, for stocking into the volunteer net pens. This enables the Spokane Tribal Hatchery (STH) to rear additional kokanee to further the enhancement efforts on Lake Roosevelt. Current objectives include increased use of native/indigenous stocks where available for propagation into Upper Columbia River Basin Waters. Monitoring and evaluation is preformed by the Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Monitoring Program. From 1988 to 1998, the principle sport fishery on Lake Roosevelt has shifted from walleye to include rainbow trout and kokanee salmon (Underwood et al. 1997, Tilson and Scholz 1997). The angler use, harvest rates for rainbow and kokanee and the economic value of the fishery has increased substantially during this 10-year period. The most recent information from the monitoring program also suggests that the hatchery and net pen rearing programs have been beneficial to enhancing the Lake Roosevelt fishery while not negatively impacting wild and native stocks within the lake. The 2001 fishing season has been especially successful with great fishing for both rainbow and kokanee throughout Lake Roosevelt. The results of the Two Rivers Fishing Derby identified 100 percent of the rainbow and 47 percent of the kokanee caught were of hatchery origin.

  19. Metal precipitation at grain boundaries in silicon: Dependence on grain boundary character and dislocation decoration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Metal precipitation at grain boundaries in silicon: Dependence on grain boundary character are combined to determine the dependence of metal silicide precipitate formation on grain boundary character and microstructure in multicrystalline silicon mc-Si . Metal silicide precipitate decoration is observed to increase

  20. Supplying LNG markets using nitrogen rejection units at Exxon Shute Creek Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hanus, P.M.; Kimble, E.L.

    1995-11-01

    Interest is growing in the United States for using Liquid Natural Gas (LNG) as an alternative transportation fuel for diesel and as a source of heating fuel. For gas producers, LNG offers a premium price opportunity versus conventional natural gas sales. To supply this developing market, two existing Nitrogen Rejection Units (NRU) at the Exxon Shute Creek Facility in Wyoming were modified allowing LNG extraction and truck loading for transport to customers. The modifications involved adding heat exchanger capacity to the NRUs to compensate for the refrigeration loss when LNG is removed. Besides allowing for LNG extraction, the modifications also debottlenecked the NRUs resulting in higher methane recovery and lower compression costs. With the modifications, the NRUs are capable of producing for sale 60,000 gpd (5 MMscfd gas equivalent) of high purity LNG. Total investment has been $5 million with initial sales of LNG occurring in September 1994.

  1. Examination of eastern oil shale disposal problems - the Hope Creek field study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koppenaal, D.W.; Kruspe, R.R.; Robl, T.L.; Cisler, K.; Allen, D.L.

    1985-02-01

    A field-based study of problems associated with the disposal of processed Eastern oil shale was initiated in mid-1983 at a private research site in Montgomery County, Kentucky. The study (known as the Hope Creek Spent Oil Shale Disposal Project) is designed to provide information on the geotechnical, revegetation/reclamation, and leachate generation and composition characteristics of processed Kentucky oil shales. The study utilizes processed oil shale materials (retorted oil shale and reject raw oil shale fines) obtained from a pilot plant run of Kentucky oil shale using the travelling grate retort technology. Approximately 1000 tons of processed oil shale were returned to Kentucky for the purpose of the study. The study, composed of three components, is described. The effort to date has concentrated on site preparation and the construction and implementation of the field study research facilities. These endeavors are described and the project direction in the future years is defined.

  2. Two-dimensional water quality modeling of Town Creek embayment on Guntersville Reservoir

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bender, M.D.; Shiao, Ming C.; Hauser, G.E. . Engineering Lab.); Butkus, S.R. . Water Quality Dept.)

    1990-09-01

    TVA investigated water quality of Town Creek embayment using a branched two-dimensional model of Guntersville Reservoir. Simulation results were compared in terms of algal biomass, nutrient concentrations, and volume of embayment with depleted dissolved oxygen. Stratification and flushing play a significant role in the embayment water quality. Storms introduce large loadings of organics, nutrients, and suspended solids. Dissolved oxygen depletion is most severe after storms followed by low flow that fails to flush the embayment. Embayment water quality responses to potential animal waste and erosion controls were explored. Modeling indicated animal waste controls were much more cost-effective than erosion controls. Erosion controls will decrease embayment suspended solids and thereby increase algal biomass due to greater light penetration. 29 refs., 16 figs., 4 tabs.

  3. Boundary conditions for the subdiffusion equation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shkilev, V. P.

    2013-04-15

    The boundary conditions for the subdiffusion equations are formulated using the continuous-time random walk model, as well as several versions of the random walk model on an irregular lattice. It is shown that the boundary conditions for the same equation in different models have different forms, and this difference considerably affects the solutions of this equation.

  4. 2001 TRAFFIC ZONE BOUNDARIES Zone Numbers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toronto, University of

    2001 TRAFFIC ZONE BOUNDARIES Zone Numbers & Detailed Definitions #12;2001 TRAFFIC ZONE BOUNDARIES of Toronto Joint Program in Transportation January 2003 #12;PREFACE This report presents the 2001 traffic zone numbers by local municipalities in the 2001 TTS survey area. The second part presents detailed

  5. Environmental boundaries to energy development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trivelpiece, A.W.

    1989-01-01

    Public concern about the environment, health and safety consequences of energy technology has been growing steadily for more than two decades in the United States. This concern forms an important boundary condition as the United States seeks to develop a new National Energy Strategy. Furthermore, the international aspects of the energy/environment interface such as acid rain global climate change and stratospheric ozone depletion are very prominent in US thinking. In fact, the energy systems of the world are becoming more closely coupled environmentally and otherwise. Now where is this coupling more important than that between the industrialized and developing world; the choices made by each will have profound effects on the other. The development of energy technologies compatible with both economic growth and improving and sustaining environmental quality represents a major R D challenge to the US and USSR. Decision about adoption of new technology and R D priorities can be improved by better measurements of how energy sources and uses are changing throughout the world and better methods to project the potential consequences of these decisions. Such projection require understanding relative risks of alternating existing and evolving technologies. All of these R D areas, technology improvement energy system monitoring and projection and comparative risk assessment are the topics of this seminar. Progress in each may be enhanced by collaboration and cooperation between our two countries. 7 refs., 27 figs., 5 tabs.

  6. Reservoir Simulation and Evaluation of the Upper Jurassic Smackover Microbial Carbonate and Grainstone-Packstone Reservoirs in Little Cedar Creek Field, Conecuh County, Alabama 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mostafa, Moetaz Y

    2013-04-25

    .......................................................................... 59 x LIST OF TABLES Page TABLE 1—PVT Samples for The Grainstone –Packstone... Reservoir Fluid ................................. 23 TABLE 2 — PVT Samples for The Microbial Boundstone Reservoir Fluid ................................. 25 1 INTRODUCTION The Little Cedar Creek Field...

  7. YOUR LOCAL WEATHER: Scottsdale: 74 | Mesa: 75 | Chandler: 73 | Queen Creek: 75 | Phoenix: 77 | Glendale: 72 | Luke AFB: 70 | More Weather... Friday, October 7, 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGraw, Kevin J.

    YOUR LOCAL WEATHER: Scottsdale: 74º | Mesa: 75º | Chandler: 73º | Queen Creek: 75º | Phoenix: 77º | Glendale: 72º | Luke AFB: 70º | More Weather... Friday, October 7, 2005 » Web Member-Login Quick Search

  8. Status and Monitoring of Natural and Supplemented Chinook Salmon in Johnson Creek, Idaho, 2006-2007 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rabe, Craig D.; Nelson, Douglas D.

    2008-11-17

    The Nez Perce Tribe Johnson Creek Artificial Propagation Enhancement Project (JCAPE) has conducted juvenile and adult monitoring and evaluation studies for its 10th consecutive year. Completion of adult and juvenile Chinook salmon studies were conducted for the purpose of evaluating a small-scale production initiative designed to increase the survival of a weak but recoverable spawning aggregate of summer Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha. The JCAPE program evaluates the life cycle of natural origin (NOR) and hatchery origin (HOR) supplementation fish to quantify the key performance measures: abundance, survival-productivity, distribution, genetics, life history, habitat, and in-hatchery metrics. Operation of a picket style weir and intensive multiple spawning ground surveys were completed to monitor adult Chinook salmon and a rotary screw trap was used to monitor migrating juvenile Chinook salmon in Johnson Creek. In 2007, spawning ground surveys were conducted on all available spawning habitat in Johnson Creek and one of its tributaries. A total of 63 redds were observed in the index reach and 11 redds for all other reaches for a combined count of 74 redds. Utilization of carcass recovery surveys and adult captures at an adult picket weir yielded a total estimated adult escapement to Johnson Creek of 438 Chinook salmon. Upon deducting fish removed for broodstock (n=52), weir mortality/ known strays (n=12), and prespawning mortality (n=15), an estimated 359 summer Chinook salmon were available to spawn. Estimated total migration of brood year 2005 NOR juvenile Chinook salmon at the rotary screw trap was calculated for three seasons (summer, fall, and spring). The total estimated migration was 34,194 fish; 26,671 of the NOR migrants left in the summer (July 1 to August 31, 2005) as fry/parr, 5,852 left in the fall (September 1 to November 21, 2005) as presmolt, and only 1,671 NOR fish left in the spring (March 1 to June 30, 2006) as smolt. In addition, there were 120,415 HOR supplementation smolts released into Johnson Creek during the week of March 12, 2007. Life stage-specific juvenile survival from Johnson Creek to Lower Granite and McNary dams was calculated for brood year 2005 NOR and HOR supplementation juvenile Chinook salmon. Survival of NOR parr Chinook salmon migrating from Johnson Creek to Lower Granite and McNary dams was 28.2% and 16.2%. Survival of NOR presmolt Chinook salmon migrating from Johnson Creek to Lower Granite and McNary dams was 28.2% and 22.3%. Survival of NOR smolt Chinook salmon migrating from Johnson Creek to Lower Granite and McNary dams was 44.7% and 32.9%. Survival of HOR smolt Chinook salmon migrating from Johnson Creek to Lower Granite and McNary dams was 31.9% and 26.2%. Multi-year analysis on smolt to adult return rate's (SAR's) and progeny to parent ratio's (P:P's) were calculated for NOR and HOR supplementation Brood Year 2002 Chinook salmon. SAR's were calculated from Johnson Creek to Johnson Creek (JC to JC), Lower Granite Dam to Lower Granite (LGD to LGD), and Lower Granite Dam to Johnson Creek (LGD to JC); for NOR fish SAR's were 0.16%, 1.16% and 1.12%, while HOR supplementation SAR's from JC to JC, LGD to LGD and LGD to JC were 0.04%, 0.19% and 0.13%. P:P's for all returning NOR and HOR supplemented adults were under replacement levels at 0.13 and 0.65, respectively. Recruit per spawner estimates (R/S) for Brood Year 2005 adult Chinook salmon were also calculated for NOR and HOR supplemented Chinook salmon at JC and LGD. R/S estimates for NOR and HOR supplemented fish at JC were 231 and 1,745, while R/S estimates at LGD were 67 and 557. Management recommendations address (1) effectiveness of data collection methods, (2) sufficiency of data quality (statistical power) to enable management recommendations, (3) removal of uncertainty and subsequent cessation of M&E activities, and (4) sufficiency of findings for program modifications prior to five-year review.

  9. New Boundaries for the B-Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bergman, Aaron

    2008-01-01

    Witten couples the open topological B-model to a holomorphic vector bundle by adding to the boundary of the worldsheet a Wilson loop for an integrable connection on the bundle. Using the descent procedure for boundary vertex operators in this context, I generalize this construction to write a worldsheet coupling for a graded vector bundle with an integrable superconnection. I then compute the open string vertex operators between two such boundaries. A theorem of J. Block gives that this is equivalent to coupling the B-model to an arbitrary object in the derived category.

  10. A FREE BOUNDARY PROBLEM ARISING FROM SEGREGATION ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-06-18

    In this work, we show how to obtain a free boundary problem as the limit of a fully non linear elliptic .... b) to find the solution for a optimal partition problem.

  11. PRE-PRECIPITATION PHENOMENA AT GRAIN BOUNDARIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Briceno-Valero, J.

    2010-01-01

    13820 DE82 0 1 2 7 9 4 PRE-PRECIPITATION PHENOMENA AT GRAINof any evidence suggesting precipitation has occurred. Theand grain boundary precipitation have shown (1) that there

  12. Sediment and radionuclide transport in rivers. Phase 2. Field sampling program for Cattaraugus and Buttermilk Creeks, New York

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walters, W.H.; Ecker, R.M.; Onishi, Y.

    1982-04-01

    As part of a study on sediment and radionuclide transport in rivers, Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is investigating the effect of sediment on the transport of radionuclides in Cattaraugus and Buttermilk Creeks, New York. A source of radioactivity in these creeks is the Western New York Nuclear Service Center which consists of a low-level waste disposal site and a nuclear fuel reprocessing plant. Other sources of radioactivity include fallout from worldwide weapons testing and natural background radioactivity. The major objective of the PNL Field Sampling Program is to provide data on sediment and radionuclide characteristics in Cattaraugus and Buttermilk Creeks to verify the use of the Sediment and Radionuclide Transport model, SERATRA, for nontidal rivers. This report covers the results of field data collection conducted during September 1978. Radiological analysis of sand, silt, and clay size fractions of suspended and bed sediment, and water were performed. Results of these analyses indicate that the principal radionuclides occurring in these two water courses, with levels significantly higher than background levels, during the Phase 2 sampling program were Cesium-137 and Strontium-90. These radionuclides had significantly higher activity levels above background in the bed sediment, suspended sediment, and water samples. Other radionuclides that are possibly being released into the surface water environment by the Nuclear Fuel Services facilities are Plutonium-238, 239, and 240, Americium-241, Curium-244, and Tritium. More radionuclides were consistently found in the bed sediment as compared to suspended sediment. The fewest radionuclides were found in the water of Buttermilk and Cattaraugus Creeks. The higher levels were found in the bed sediments for the gamma-emitters and in the suspended sediment for the alpha and beta-emitters (not including Tritium).

  13. Phase 2 confirmatory sampling data report, Lower East Fork Poplar Creek, Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-01-01

    A Remedial Investigation of East Fork Poplar Creek (EFPC) concluded that mercury is the principal contaminant of concern in the EFPC floodplain. The highest concentrations of mercury were found to be in a visually distinct black layer of soil that typically lies 15 to 30 cm (6 to 12 in.) below the surface. Mercury contamination was found to be situated in distinct areas along the floodplain, and generally at depths > 20 cm (8 in.) below the surface. In accordance with Comprehensive, Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), a feasibility study was prepared to assess alternatives for remediation, and a proposed plan was issued to the public in which a preferred alternative was identified. In response to public input, the plan was modified and US Department of Energy (DOE) issued a Record of Decision in 1995 committing to excavating all soil in the EFPC floodplain exceeding a concentration of 400 parts per million (ppm) of mercury. The Lower East Fork Poplar Creek (LEFPC) remedial action (RA) focuses on the stretch of EFPC flowing from Lake Reality at the Y-12 Plant, through the city of Oak Ridge, to Poplar Creek on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) and its associated floodplain. Specific areas were identified that required remediation at the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Site along Illinois Avenue and at the Bruner Site along the Oak Ridge Turnpike. The RA was conducted in two separate phases. Phase 2, conducted from February to October 1997, completed the remediation efforts at the NOAA facility and fully remediated the Bruner Site. During both phases, data were collected to show that the remedial efforts performed at the NOAA and Bruner sites were successful in implementing the Record of Decision and had no adverse impact on the creek water quality or the city of Oak Ridge publicly owned treatment works.

  14. Confirmatory Sampling and Analysis Plan for the Lower East Fork Poplar Creek Operable Unit, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-12-01

    This document describes the organization, strategy, and procedures to be used to confirm that mercury concentrations in soils in the remediated areas are statistically less than, or equal to, the cleanup standard of 400 ppm. It focuses on confirming the cleanup of the stretch of the Lower East Fork Popular Creed flowing from Lake Reality at the Y-12 Plant, through the City of Oak Ridge, to Poplar Creek on the Oak Ridge Reservation and its associated flood plain.

  15. Suppression of Grain Boundaries in Graphene Growth on Superstructured...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Suppression of Grain Boundaries in Graphene Growth on Superstructured Mn-Cu(111) Surface Prev Next Title: Suppression of Grain Boundaries in Graphene Growth on...

  16. Heat content asymptotics with transmittal and transmission boundary conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peter Gilkey; Klaus Kirsten

    2002-06-14

    We study the heat content asymptotics on a Riemannian manifold with smoooth boundary defined by Dirichlet, Neumann, transmittal and transmission boundary conditions.

  17. Singular perturbation problem in boundary/fractional combustion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-08-18

    reaction-diffusion equation, where the reaction term is of combustion type. ... Free boundary problem, combustion theory, boundary reaction- diffusion, fractional ...

  18. EA-1973: Kootenai River Restoration at Bonners Ferry, Boundary...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    73: Kootenai River Restoration at Bonners Ferry, Boundary County, Idaho EA-1973: Kootenai River Restoration at Bonners Ferry, Boundary County, Idaho Summary Bonneville Power...

  19. Technoeconomic Boundary Analysis of Biological Pathways to Hydrogen...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Boundary Analysis of Biological Pathways to Hydrogen Production Technoeconomic Boundary Analysis of Biological Pathways to Hydrogen Production Report documenting the biological and...

  20. Sediment and radionuclide transport in rivers. Phase 3. Field sampling program for Cattaraugus and Buttermilk Creeks, New York

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ecker, R.M.; Walters, W.H.; Onishi, Y.

    1982-08-01

    A field sampling program was conducted on Cattaraugus and Buttermilk Creeks, New York during April 1979 to investigate the transport of radionuclides in surface waters as part of a continuing program to provide data for application and verification of Pacific Northwest Laboratory's (PNL) sediment and radionuclide transport model, SERATRA. Bed sediment, suspended sediment and water samples were collected during unsteady flow conditions over a 45 mile reach of stream channel. Radiological analysis of these samples included gamma ray spectrometry analysis, and radiochemical separation and analysis of Sr-90, Pu-238, Pu-239, 240, Am-241 and Cm-244. Tritium analysis was also performed on water samples. Based on the evaluation of radionuclide levels in Cattaraugus and Buttermilk Creeks, the Nuclear Fuel Services facility at West Valley, New York, may be the source of Cs-137, Sr-90, Cs-134, Co-60, Pu-238, Pu-239, 240, Am-241, Cm-244 and tritium found in the bed sediment, suspended sediment and water of Buttermilk and Cattaraugus Creeks. This field sampling effort was the last of a three phase program to collect hydrologic and radiologic data at different flow conditions.

  1. Analysis of dust samples collected from spent nuclear fuel interim storage containers at Hope Creek, Delaware, and Diablo Canyon, California.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bryan, Charles R.; Enos, David George

    2014-07-01

    Potentially corrosive environments may form on the surface of spent nuclear fuel dry storage canisters by deliquescence of deposited dusts. To assess this, samples of dust were collected from in-service dry storage canisters at two near-marine sites, the Hope Creek and Diablo Canyon storage installations, and have been characterized with respect to mineralogy, chemistry, and texture. At both sites, terrestrially-derived silicate minerals, including quartz, feldspars, micas, and clays, comprise the largest fraction of the dust. Also significant at both sites were particles of iron and iron-chromium metal and oxides generated by the manufacturing process. Soluble salt phases were minor component of the Hope Creek dusts, and were compositionally similar to inland salt aerosols, rich in calcium, sulfate, and nitrate. At Diablo Canyon, however, sea-salt aerosols, occurring as aggregates of NaCl and Mg-sulfate, were a major component of the dust samples. The seasalt aerosols commonly occurred as hollow spheres, which may have formed by evaporation of suspended aerosol seawater droplets, possibly while rising through the heated annulus between the canister and the overpack. The differences in salt composition and abundance for the two sites are attributed to differences in proximity to the open ocean and wave action. The Diablo Canyon facility is on the shores of the Pacific Ocean, while the Hope Creek facility is on the shores of the Delaware River, several miles from the open ocean.

  2. Oak Ridge National Laboratory Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program for White Oak Creek Watershed and the Clinch River

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loar, J.M.; Adams, S.M.; Allison, L.J.; Blaylock, B.G.; Boston, H.L.; Huston, M.A.; Kimmel, B.L.; Smith, J.G.; Southworth, G.R.; Stewart, A.J.; Walton, B.T.; Kitchings, J.T.; Olsen, C.R.

    1991-09-01

    On April 1, 1986, a National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit was issued for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) (EPA 1986). As specified in Part 3: Special Conditions (Item H) of the permit, a plan for biological monitoring of the Clinch River, White Oak Creek (WOC), Northwest Tributary (NWT) of WOC, Melton Branch (MB), Fifth Creek, and First Creek shall be submitted for approval to the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Tennessee Department of Health and Environment (TDHE) within 90 days of the effective date of the permit. The plan, which is referred to in Part 3 (H) of the permit as the Biological Monitoring Plan and Abatement Program (BMPAP), describes characterization monitoring studies to be conducted for the duration of the permit (5 years). In order to be consistent with the terminology used for the Biological Monitoring and Abatement Programs for the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plan and the Oak Ridge K-25 Plant, BMPAP will subsequently be referred to as the Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP). The proposed BMAP outlined in this document is based on preliminary discussions held on December 9, 1985, between staff of Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. (ORNL and Central Management), the US Department of Energy (DOE), EPA, and TDHE. 232 refs., 11 figs., 7 tabs.

  3. Behaviour of boundary functions for quantum billiards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Bäcker; S. Fürstberger; R. Schubert; F. Steiner

    2002-10-16

    We study the behaviour of the normal derivative of eigenfunctions of the Helmholtz equation inside billiards with Dirichlet boundary condition. These boundary functions are of particular importance because they uniquely determine the eigenfunctions inside the billiard and also other physical quantities of interest. Therefore they form a reduced representation of the quantum system, analogous to the Poincar\\'e section of the classical system. For the normal derivatives we introduce an equivalent to the standard Green function and derive an integral equation on the boundary. Based on this integral equation we compute the first two terms of the mean asymptotic behaviour of the boundary functions for large energies. The first term is universal and independent of the shape of the billiard. The second one is proportional to the curvature of the boundary. The asymptotic behaviour is compared with numerical results for the stadium billiard, different limacon billiards and the circle billiard, and good agreement is found. Furthermore we derive an asymptotic completeness relation for the boundary functions.

  4. Isotopic dating of Lava Creek B tephra in terrace deposits along the Wind River, Wyoming--Implications for post 0. 6 Ma uplift of the Yellowstone hotspot

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Izett, G.A.; Pierce, K.L.; Naeser, N.D. (U.S.G.S., Denver, CO (United States)); Jaworowski, C. (Univ. of Wyoming, Laramie, WY (United States). Dept. of Geology and Geophysics)

    1992-01-01

    Along the Wind River near Kinnear (Pavillon quadrangle), a meter-thick tephra layer occurs near the middle of a main-stem gravel deposit about 100 m above the river. On Muddy Ridge 25 km east of Kinnear, a Lava Creek B tephra layer occurs at the base of a terrace deposit about 100 m above Muddy Creek. Another Lava Creek B tephra site 67 km northwest and upstream from Kinnear occurs within main-stem gravels of a terrace deposit 145 m above the river. This upstream increase of 45 m of the tephra horizon raises the concern that the two tephra layers might not be of the same age. All three tephras contain the same assemblage of phenocrysts as that in the Lava Creek Tuff, Member B in Yellowstone National Park and the Lava Creek B volcanic ash bed of the Western U.S., and therefore they are arguably correlatives. The authors confirmed this petrographic correlation by isotopic dating of sanidine crystals recovered from cm-size pumice lapilli in the Kinnear tephra and from coarse-grained tephra at the Muddy Creek site. Laser total-fusion Ar-40-Ar-39 ages of sanidine from the two sites are coeval, 0.66[plus minus]0.01 Ma and 0.67[plus minus]0.01 Ma at Muddy Creek. Conventional K-Ar dating of sanidine from the tephra at the Cl453 site resulted in an age of 0.60[plus minus]0.02 Ma. Glass-mantled zircon crystals from the Cl453 site yielded a fission-track age of 0.67[plus minus]0.16 Ma. These isotopic ages are compatible with conventional K-Ar, Ar-40-Ar-39, and fission-track ages of the Lava Creek Tuff, Member B in Yellowstone National Park and other occurrences of Lava Creek B ash beds. The authors suggest that the terrace deposit that contains the Lava Creek B tephra rises from the Kinnear site northwest up the Wind River as a result of Quaternary uplift in the area of the Yellowstone hotspot.

  5. Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Evaluation Program : Meadow Creek vs. Lake Whatcom Stock Kokanee Salmon Investigations in Lake Roosevelt Annual Report 2000-2001.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McLellan, Holly J.; Scholz, Allan T.

    2001-07-01

    Lake Roosevelt has been stocked with Whatcom stock kokanee since 1989 to mitigate for anadromous salmon losses caused by the construction of Grand Coulee Dam. The primary objective of the hatchery plantings was to create a self-sustaining recreational fishery. Due to low return numbers, it was hypothesized a native stock of kokanee might perform better than the coastal Whatcom strain. Therefore, kokanee from Meadow Creek, a tributary of Kootenay Lake, British Columbia were selected as an alternative stock. Matched pair releases of Whatcom stock and Meadow Creek kokanee were made from Sherman Creek in late June 2000. Stock performance between Lake Whatcom and Meadow Creek kokanee was evaluated through three performance measures (1) returns to Sherman Creek, the primary egg collection facility, (2) returns to other tributaries, indicating availability for angler harvest, and (3) returns to the creel. A secondary objective was to evaluate the numbers collected at downstream fish passage facilities. Age 2 kokanee were collected during five passes through the reservoir, which included 89 tributaries between August 17th and November 7th, 2000. Sherman Creek was sampled once a week because it was the primary egg collection location. A total of 2,789 age 2 kokanee were collected, in which 2,658 (95%) were collected at Sherman Creek. Chi-square analysis indicated the Meadow Creek kokanee returned to Sherman Creek in significantly higher numbers compared to the Whatcom stock ({chi}{sup 2} = 734.4; P < 0.01). Reservoir wide recoveries indicated similar results ({chi}{sup 2} = 733.1; P < 0.01). No age 2 kokanee were collected during creel surveys. Age 3 kokanee are expected to recruit to the creel in 2001. No age 2 kokanee were collected at the fish passage facilities due to a 170 mm size restriction at the fish passage centers. Age 3 kokanee are expected to be collected at the fish passage centers during 2001. Stock performance cannot be properly evaluated until 2001, when age 3 kokanee are expected to return to Sherman Creek.

  6. White Oak Creek Embayment site characterization and contaminant screening analysis. Environmental Restoration Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blaylock, B.G.; Ford, C.J.; Frank, M.L.; Hoffman, F.O.; Hook, L.A.

    1993-01-01

    Analyses of sediment samples collected near the mouth of White Oak Creek during the summer of 1990 revealed {sup 137}Cs concentrations [> 10{sup 6} Bq/kg dry wt (> 10{sup 4} pCi/g dry wt)] near the sediment surface. Available evidence indicates that these relatively high concentrations of {sup 137}Cs now at the sediment surface were released from White Oak Dam in the mid-1950s and had accumulated at depositionalsites in the embayment. These accumulated sediments are being eroded and transported downstream primarily during winter low-water levels by flood events and by a combination of normal downstream flow and the water turbulence created by the release of water from Melton Hill Dam during hydropower generation cycles. This report provides a more thorough characterization of the extent of contamination in WOCE than was previously available. Environmental samples collected from WOCE were analyzed for organic, inorganic, and radiological contaminants in fish, water, and sediment. These results were used to conduct a human health effects screening analysis. Walkover radiation surveys conducted inside the fenced area surrounding the WOCE at summer-pool (741 ft MSL) and at winter-pool (733 ft MSL) level, indicated a maximum exposure rate of 3 mR h{sup 1} 1 m above the soil surface.

  7. E ective boundary conditions for laminar ows over periodic rough boundaries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Achdou, Yves

    E#27;ective boundary conditions for laminar #29;ows over periodic rough boundaries Yves Achdou #3 are proposed for a laminar #29;ow over a rough wall with periodic roughness elements. These e#27;ective is such an approach ? In this paper, we wish to answer these questions for laminar #29;ows over periodic rough walls

  8. Surface and grain boundary scattering in nanometric Cu thin films: A quantitative analysis including twin boundaries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barmak, Katayun [Department of Applied Physics and Applied Mathematics, Columbia University, New York, New York 10027 and Department of Materials Science and Engineering and Materials Research Science and Engineering Center, Carnegie Mellon University, 5000 Forbes Avenue, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213 (United States); Darbal, Amith [Department of Materials Science and Engineering and Materials Research Science and Engineering Center, Carnegie Mellon University, 5000 Forbes Avenue, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213 (United States); Ganesh, Kameswaran J.; Ferreira, Paulo J. [Materials Science and Engineering, The University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States); Rickman, Jeffrey M. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering and Department of Physics, Lehigh University, Bethlehem, Pennsylvania 18015 (United States); Sun, Tik; Yao, Bo; Warren, Andrew P.; Coffey, Kevin R., E-mail: kb2612@columbia.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Central Florida, 4000 Central Florida Boulevard, Orlando, Florida 32816 (United States)

    2014-11-01

    The relative contributions of various defects to the measured resistivity in nanocrystalline Cu were investigated, including a quantitative account of twin-boundary scattering. It has been difficult to quantitatively assess the impact twin boundary scattering has on the classical size effect of electrical resistivity, due to limitations in characterizing twin boundaries in nanocrystalline Cu. In this study, crystal orientation maps of nanocrystalline Cu films were obtained via precession-assisted electron diffraction in the transmission electron microscope. These orientation images were used to characterize grain boundaries and to measure the average grain size of a microstructure, with and without considering twin boundaries. The results of these studies indicate that the contribution from grain-boundary scattering is the dominant factor (as compared to surface scattering) leading to enhanced resistivity. The resistivity data can be well-described by the combined Fuchs–Sondheimer surface scattering model and Mayadas–Shatzkes grain-boundary scattering model using Matthiessen's rule with a surface specularity coefficient of p?=?0.48 and a grain-boundary reflection coefficient of R?=?0.26.

  9. Reduce Building Energy Consumption by Improving the Supply Air Temperature Schedule and Recommissioning the Terminal Boxes, Submitted to the Energy Management and Operations Division at the M.D. Anderson Cancer Center 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, M.; Athar, A.; Zhu, Y.; Claridge, D. E.

    1995-01-01

    At the request of the Energy Management and Operations Department at M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, the Energy Systems Laboratory of Texas A&M University performed a study of optimizing the HVAC operation at its Basic Research Building. The Basic...

  10. Wireless boundary monitor system and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Haynes, Howard D. (Knoxville, TN); Ayers, Curtis W. (Kingston, TN)

    1997-01-01

    A wireless boundary monitor system used to monitor the integrity of a boundary surrounding an area uses at least two housings having at least one transmitting means for emitting ultrasonic pressure waves to a medium. Each of the housings has a plurality of receiving means for sensing the pressure waves in the medium. The transmitting means and the receiving means of each housing are aimable and communicably linked. At least one of the housings is equipped with a local alarm means for emitting a first alarm indication whereby, when the pressure waves propagating from a transmitting means to a receiving means are sufficiently blocked by an object a local alarm means or a remote alarm means or a combination thereof emit respective alarm indications. The system may be reset either manually or automatically. This wireless boundary monitor system has useful applications in both indoor and outdoor environments.

  11. Wireless boundary monitor system and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Haynes, H.D.; Ayers, C.W.

    1997-12-09

    A wireless boundary monitor system used to monitor the integrity of a boundary surrounding an area uses at least two housings having at least one transmitting means for emitting ultrasonic pressure waves to a medium. Each of the housings has a plurality of receiving means for sensing the pressure waves in the medium. The transmitting means and the receiving means of each housing are aimable and communicably linked. At least one of the housings is equipped with a local alarm means for emitting a first alarm indication whereby, when the pressure waves propagating from a transmitting means to a receiving means are sufficiently blocked by an object a local alarm means or a remote alarm means or a combination thereof emit respective alarm indications. The system may be reset either manually or automatically. This wireless boundary monitor system has useful applications in both indoor and outdoor environments. 4 figs.

  12. Resonant transitions due to changing boundaries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Anzà; A. Messina; B. Militello

    2015-01-10

    The problem of a particle confined in a box with moving walls is studied, focusing on the case of small perturbations which do not alter the shape of the boundary (\\lq pantography\\rq). The presence of resonant transitions involving the natural transition frequencies of the system and the Fourier transform of the velocity of the walls of the box is brought to the light. The special case of a pantographic change of a circular box is analyzed in dept, also bringing to light the fact that the movement of the boundary cannot affect the angular momentum of the particle.

  13. Flow Characteristics Analysis of Widows' Creek Type Control Valve for Steam Turbine Control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoo, Yong H.; Sohn, Myoung S.; Suh, Kune Y.

    2006-07-01

    The steam turbine converts the kinetic energy of steam to mechanical energy of rotor blades in the power conversion system of fossil and nuclear power plants. The electric output from the generator of which the rotor is coupled with that of the steam turbine depends on the rotation velocity of the steam turbine bucket. The rotation velocity is proportional to the mass flow rate of steam entering the steam turbine through valves and nozzles. Thus, it is very important to control the steam mass flow rate for the load following operation of power plants. Among various valves that control the steam turbine, the control valve is most significant. The steam flow rate is determined by the area formed by the stem disk and the seat of the control valve. While the ideal control valve linearly controls the steam mass flow rate with its stem lift, the real control valve has various flow characteristic curves pursuant to the stem lift type. Thus, flow characteristic curves are needed to precisely design the control valves manufactured for the operating conditions of nuclear power plants. OMEGA (Optimized Multidimensional Experiment Geometric Apparatus) was built to experimentally study the flow characteristics of steam flowing inside the control valve. The Widows' Creek type control valve was selected for reference. Air was selected as the working fluid in the OMEGA loop to exclude the condensation effect in this simplified approach. Flow characteristic curves were plotted by calculating the ratio of the measured mass flow rate versus the theoretical mass flow rate of the air. The flow characteristic curves are expected to be utilized to accurately design and operate the control valve for fossil as well as nuclear plants. (authors)

  14. Sherman Creek Hatchery; Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife Fish Program, 2000 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Combs, Mitch (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Kettle Falls, WA)

    2001-03-01

    The Sherman Creek Hatchery (SCH) was designed to rear 1.7 million kokanee fry for acclimation and imprinting during the spring and early summer. Additionally, it was designed to trap all available returning adult kokanee during the fall for broodstock operations and evaluations. Since the start of this program, the operations on Lake Roosevelt have been modified to better achieve program goals. These strategic changes have been the result of recommendations through the Lake Roosevelt Hatcheries Coordination Team (LRHCT) and were done to enhance imprinting, improve survival and operate the two kokanee facilities more effectively. The primary changes have been to replace the kokanee fingerling program with a yearling (post smolt) program of up to 1,000,000 fish. To construct and operate twenty net pens to handle the increased production. The second significant change was to rear 200,000 rainbow trout fingerling at SCH from July through October, for stocking into the volunteer net pens. This enables the Spokane Tribal Hatchery (STH) to rear additional kokanee to further the enhancement efforts on Lake Roosevelt. Monitoring and evaluation is preformed by the Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Monitoring Program. From 1988 to 1998, the principle sport fishery on Lake Roosevelt has shifted from walleye to include rainbow trout and kokanee salmon (Underwood et al. 1997, Tilson and Scholz 1997). The angler use, harvest rates for rainbow and kokanee and the economic value of the fishery has increased substantially during this 10-year period. The most recent information from the monitoring program also suggests that the hatchery and net pen rearing programs have been beneficial to enhancing the Lake Roosevelt fishery while not negatively impacting wild and native stocks within the lake.

  15. The London-Anderson-Englert-Brout-Higgs-Guralnik-Hagen-Kibble-Weinberg mechanism and Higgs boson reveal the unity and future excitement of physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roland E. Allen

    2013-06-18

    The particle recently discovered by the CMS and ATLAS collaborations at CERN is almost certainly a Higgs boson, fulfilling a quest that can be traced back to three seminal high energy papers of 1964, but which is intimately connected to ideas in other areas of physics that go back much further. One might oversimplify the history of the features which (i) give mass to the W and Z particles that mediate the weak nuclear interaction, (ii) effectively break gauge invariance, (iii) eliminate physically unacceptable Nambu-Goldstone bosons, and (iv) give mass to fermions (like the electron) by collectively calling them the London-Anderson-Englert-Brout-Higgs-Guralnik-Hagen-Kibble-Weinberg mechanism. More important are the implications for the future: a Higgs boson appears to point toward supersymmetry, since new physics is required to protect its mass from enormous quantum corrections, while the discovery of neutrino masses seems to point toward grand unification of the nongravitational forces.

  16. Planetary Boundary Layer from AERI and MPL

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Sawyer, Virginia

    The distribution and transport of aerosol emitted to the lower troposphere is governed by the height of the planetary boundary layer (PBL), which limits the dilution of pollutants and influences boundary-layer convection. Because radiative heating and cooling of the surface strongly affect the PBL top height, it follows diurnal and seasonal cycles and may vary by hundreds of meters over a 24-hour period. The cap the PBL imposes on low-level aerosol transport makes aerosol concentration an effective proxy for PBL height: the top of the PBL is marked by a rapid transition from polluted, well-mixed boundary-layer air to the cleaner, more stratified free troposphere. Micropulse lidar (MPL) can provide much higher temporal resolution than radiosonde and better vertical resolution than infrared spectrometer (AERI), but PBL heights from all three instruments at the ARM SGP site are compared to one another for validation. If there is agreement among them, the higher-resolution remote sensing-derived PBL heights can accurately fill in the gaps left by the low frequency of radiosonde launches, and thus improve model parameterizations and our understanding of boundary-layer processes.

  17. Planetary Boundary Layer from AERI and MPL

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Sawyer, Virginia

    2014-02-13

    The distribution and transport of aerosol emitted to the lower troposphere is governed by the height of the planetary boundary layer (PBL), which limits the dilution of pollutants and influences boundary-layer convection. Because radiative heating and cooling of the surface strongly affect the PBL top height, it follows diurnal and seasonal cycles and may vary by hundreds of meters over a 24-hour period. The cap the PBL imposes on low-level aerosol transport makes aerosol concentration an effective proxy for PBL height: the top of the PBL is marked by a rapid transition from polluted, well-mixed boundary-layer air to the cleaner, more stratified free troposphere. Micropulse lidar (MPL) can provide much higher temporal resolution than radiosonde and better vertical resolution than infrared spectrometer (AERI), but PBL heights from all three instruments at the ARM SGP site are compared to one another for validation. If there is agreement among them, the higher-resolution remote sensing-derived PBL heights can accurately fill in the gaps left by the low frequency of radiosonde launches, and thus improve model parameterizations and our understanding of boundary-layer processes.

  18. Determining environmental boundaries: asynchronous communication and physical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferguson, Thomas S.

    to cooperatively locate the boundary of a given environmental function in two space dimensions using a combi this substitution is successfully taking place are de-mining operations [7], military urban operations [20 [23], or energy-minimizing curve. This process simulates elastic material which can dynamically

  19. Origin of morphotropic phase boundaries in ferroelectrics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Zhigang

    , Peter Liermann3 & Zhigang Wu4 A piezoelectric material is one that generates a voltage in response to a mechanical strain (and vice versa). The most useful piezo- electric materials display a transition region boundary under pressure. The results are consistent with first- principles theoretical predictions3

  20. Thick diffusion limit boundary layer test problems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bailey, T. S.; Warsa, J. S.; Chang, J. H.; Adams, M. L.

    2013-07-01

    We develop two simple test problems that quantify the behavior of computational transport solutions in the presence of boundary layers that are not resolved by the spatial grid. In particular we study the quantitative effects of 'contamination' terms that, according to previous asymptotic analyses, may have a detrimental effect on the solutions obtained by both discontinuous finite element (DFEM) and characteristic-method (CM) spatial discretizations, at least for boundary layers caused by azimuthally asymmetric incident intensities. Few numerical results have illustrated the effects of this contamination, and none have quantified it to our knowledge. Our test problems use leading-order analytic solutions that should be equal to zero in the problem interior, which means the observed interior solution is the error introduced by the contamination terms. Results from DFEM solutions demonstrate that the contamination terms can cause error propagation into the problem interior for both orthogonal and non-orthogonal grids, and that this error is much worse for non-orthogonal grids. This behavior is consistent with the predictions of previous analyses. We conclude that these boundary layer test problems and their variants are useful tools for the study of errors that are introduced by unresolved boundary layers in diffusive transport problems. (authors)

  1. The Importance of Carbon Footprint Estimation Boundaries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    The Importance of Carbon Footprint Estimation Boundaries H . S C O T T M A T T H E W S , C H R I and organizations are pursuing "carbon footprint" projects to estimate their own contributions to global climate change. Protocol definitions from carbon registries help organizations analyze their footprints

  2. Vortex rings impinging on permeable boundaries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mujal-Colilles, Anna; Dalziel, Stuart B.; Bateman, Allen

    2015-01-17

    of the boundary layer inside 548 the porous media or the flux exchange between the downstream and upstream sides of the 549 grid. 550 Recalling that one of the main differences between our experiments and the thin grid 551 research already published...

  3. Lateral boundary errors in regional numerical weather

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ?umer, Slobodan

    Lateral boundary errors in regional numerical weather prediction models Author: Ana Car Advisor, they describe evolution of atmospher - weather forecast. Every NWP model solves the same system of equations (1: assoc. prof. dr. Nedjeljka Zagar January 5, 2015 Abstract Regional models are used in many national

  4. Accuracy Requirements for Rural Land Parcel Boundaries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stock, Kristin

    Accuracy Requirements for Rural Land Parcel Boundaries Kristin M. Stock School of Planning accuracy of about +/-0.2m. Utilities companies and local authorities in rural areas have more relaxed of Planning, Landscape Architecture and Surveying at Queensland University of Technology, and the Geodetic

  5. 1. Integrated Database 2. Boundary Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of research? Data storage needs Meta data: legacy information Data processing diagrams Pastures Ecological that change in response to these processes Key processes that act as "drivers" of the system Key ecosystem of physical, ecological, social, and political boundaries using geographic information system Hypothesis 2

  6. Title: Ontario Greenbelt Boundary File Data Creator /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Title: Ontario Greenbelt Boundary File Data Creator / Copyright Owner: Ontario Ministry of Municipal Affairs and Housing Publisher: Ontario Ministry of Municipal Affairs and Housing Edition: N/A Versions: N/A Publication Date: N/A Coverage Date(s): N/A Updates: N/A Abstract: The Ontario Greenbelt

  7. Differential-Equation Based Absorbing Boundary Conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schneider, John B.

    Chapter 6 Differential-Equation Based Absorbing Boundary Conditions 6.1 Introduction A simple in the analysis of a wide range of FDTD-related topics. 6.2 The Advection Equation The wave equation that governs.2) The second form represents the equation in terms of an operator operating on Ez where the operator

  8. Distributed Boundary Estimation using Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramamritham, Krithi

    where such boundaries need to be detected include monitoring the spread of toxic gases [1], oil spills in oceans [2], or even tracking storm cloud front. Oil companies are interested in deploying off-shore sensor networks to monitor the area where oil spills normally happen. The focus in these cases

  9. TRACKING DYNAMIC BOUNDARIES BY EVOLVING Tingting Jiang

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tingting Jiang

    TRACKING DYNAMIC BOUNDARIES BY EVOLVING CURVES by Tingting Jiang Department of Computer Science Duke University Date: Approved: Carlo Tomasi, Supervisor Ron Parr Scott C. Schmidler Xiaobai Sun in the Department of Computer Science in the Graduate School of Duke University 2007 #12;ABSTRACT TRACKING DYNAMIC

  10. Elementary Differential Equations with Boundary Value Problems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    William F. Trench

    2014-02-24

    Dec 1, 2013 ... For more information, please contact jcostanz@trinity.edu. ..... (Laplace's Equation), the functions defining the boundary conditions on a given side of the rectangular .... change in heat of the object as its temperature changes from T0 to T is a(T ...... Let y be the angle measured from the rest position (vertically ...

  11. Second report on the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program for White Oak Creek Watershed and the Clinch River

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loar, J.M.; Adams, S.M.; Bailey, R.D.; Blaylock, B.G.; Boston, H.L.; Cox, D.K.; Huston, M.A.; Kimmel, B.L.; Loar, J.M.; Olsen, C.R.; Ryon, M.G.; Shugart, L.R.; Smith, J.G.; Southworth, G.R.; Stewart, A.J.; Walton, B.T.; Talmage, S.S.; Murphy, J.B.; Valentine, C.K.; Appellanis, S.M.; Jimenez, B.D.; Huq, M.V.; Meyers-Schone, L.J.; Mohrbacher, D.A.; Olsen, C.R.; Stout, J.G.

    1992-12-01

    As a condition of the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit issued to Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) on April 1, 1986, a Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP) was developed for White Oak Creek (WOC); selected tributaries of WOC, including Fifth Creek, First Creek, Melton Branch, and Northwest Tributary; and the Clinch River. BMAP consists of seven major tasks that address both radiological and nonradiological contaminants in the aquatic and terrestrial environs on-site and the aquatic environs off-site. These tasks are (1) toxicity monitoring; (2) bioaccumulation monitoring of nonradiological contaminants in aquatic biota; (3) biological indicator studies; (4) instream ecological monitoring; (5) assessment of contaminants in the terrestrial environment; (6) radioecology of WOC and White Oak Lake (WOL); and (7) contaminant transport, distribution, and fate in the WOC embayment-Clinch River-Watts Bar Reservoir system. This document, the second of a series of annual reports, described the results of BMAP studies conducted in 1987.

  12. The relationship between grain boundary structure, defect mobility, and grain boundary sink efficiency

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Uberuaga, Blas Pedro; Vernon, Louis J.; Martinez, Enrique; Voter, Arthur F.

    2015-03-13

    Nanocrystalline materials have received great attention due to their potential for improved functionality and have been proposed for extreme environments where the interfaces are expected to promote radiation tolerance. However, the precise role of the interfaces in modifying defect behavior is unclear. Using long-time simulations methods, we determine the mobility of defects and defect clusters at grain boundaries in Cu. We find that mobilities vary significantly with boundary structure and cluster size, with larger clusters exhibiting reduced mobility, and that interface sink efficiency depends on the kinetics of defects within the interface via the in-boundary annihilation rate of defects. Thus,more »sink efficiency is a strong function of defect mobility, which depends on boundary structure, a property that evolves with time. Further, defect mobility at boundaries can be slower than in the bulk, which has general implications for the properties of polycrystalline materials. Finally, we correlate defect energetics with the volumes of atomic sites at the boundary.« less

  13. Remedial investigation/feasibility study of the Clinch River/Poplar Creek operable unit. Volume 1: Main text

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-06-01

    This report presents the findings of an investigation into contamination of the Clinch River and Poplar Creek near the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) in eastern Tennessee. For more than 50 years, various hazardous and radioactive substances have been released to the environment as a result of operations and waste management activities at the ORR. In 1989, the ORR was placed on the National Priorities List (NPL), established and maintained under the federal Comprehensive environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA). Under CERCLA, NPL sites must be investigated to determine the nature and extent of contamination at the site, assess the risk to human health and the environment posed by the site, and, if necessary, identify feasible remedial alternatives that could be used to clean the site and reduce risk. To facilitate the overall environmental restoration effort at the ORR, CERCLA activities are being implemented individually as distinct operable units (OUs). This document is the combined Remedial Investigation and Feasibility Study Report for the Clinch River/Poplar Creek OU.

  14. Environmental geophysics of the Pilot Plant on the west branch of Canal Creek, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McGinnis, L.D.; Miller, S.F.; Daudt, C.R.; Thompson, M.D.; Borden, H.; Benson, M.; Wrobel, J.

    1994-05-01

    Plans to demolish and remediate the Pilot Plant complex in the Edgewood Area of Aberdeen Proving Ground have served to initiate a series of nonintrusive, environmental-geophysical studies. The studies are assisting in the location and identification of pipes, tanks, trenches, and liquid waste in the subsurface. Multiple databases have been integrated to provide support for detection of underground utilities and to determine the stratigraphy and lithology of the subsurface. The studies were conducted within the double security fence and exterior to the double fence, down gradient toward the west branch of Canal Creek. To determine if contaminants found in the creek were associated with the Pilot Plant, both the east and west banks were included in the study area. Magnetic, conductivity, inductive emf, and ground-penetrating-radar anomalies outline buried pipes, trenches, and various pieces of hardware associated with building activities. Ground-penetrating-radar imagery also defines a paleovalley cut 30 ft into Potomac Group sediments of Cretaceous age. The paleovalley crosses the site between Building E5654 and the Pilot Plant fence. The valley is environmentally significant because it may control the pathways of contaminants. The Pilot Plant complex was used to manufacture CC2 Impregnite and incapacitating agents; it also served as a production facility for nerve agents.

  15. Phase 1 report on the Bear Creek Valley treatability study, Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-04-01

    Bear Creek Valley (BCV) is located within the US Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Reservation and encompasses multiple waste units containing hazardous and radioactive wastes associated with past operations at the adjacent Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. The BCV Remedial Investigation determined that disposal of wastes at the S-3 Site, Boneyard/Burnyard (BYBY), and Bear Creek Burial Grounds (BCBG) has caused contamination of both deep and shallow groundwater. The primary contaminants include uranium, nitrate, and VOCs, although other metals such as aluminum, magnesium, and cadmium persist. The BCV feasibility study will describe several remedial options for this area, including both in situ and ex situ treatment of groundwater. This Treatability Study Phase 1 Report describes the results of preliminary screening of treatment technologies that may be applied within BCV. Four activities were undertaken in Phase 1: field characterization, laboratory screening of potential sorbents, laboratory testing of zero valent iron products, and field screening of three biological treatment systems. Each of these activities is described fully in technical memos attached in Appendices A through G.

  16. Boundary Plasma Turbulence Simulations for Tokamaks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, X; Umansky, M; Dudson, B; Snyder, P

    2008-05-15

    The boundary plasma turbulence code BOUT models tokamak boundary-plasma turbulence in a realistic divertor geometry using modified Braginskii equations for plasma vorticity, density (ni), electron and ion temperature (T{sub e}; T{sub i}) and parallel momenta. The BOUT code solves for the plasma fluid equations in a three dimensional (3D) toroidal segment (or a toroidal wedge), including the region somewhat inside the separatrix and extending into the scrape-off layer; the private flux region is also included. In this paper, a description is given of the sophisticated physical models, innovative numerical algorithms, and modern software design used to simulate edge-plasmas in magnetic fusion energy devices. The BOUT code's unique capabilities and functionality are exemplified via simulations of the impact of plasma density on tokamak edge turbulence and blob dynamics.

  17. Open Boundary Conditions for Dissipative MHD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meier, E T

    2011-11-10

    In modeling magnetic confinement, astrophysics, and plasma propulsion, representing the entire physical domain is often difficult or impossible, and artificial, or 'open' boundaries are appropriate. A novel open boundary condition (BC) for dissipative MHD, called Lacuna-based open BC (LOBC), is presented. LOBC, based on the idea of lacuna-based truncation originally presented by V.S. Ryaben'kii and S.V. Tsynkov, provide truncation with low numerical noise and minimal reflections. For hyperbolic systems, characteristic-based BC (CBC) exist for separating the solution into outgoing and incoming parts. In the hyperbolic-parabolic dissipative MHD system, such separation is not possible, and CBC are numerically unstable. LOBC are applied in dissipative MHD test problems including a translating FRC, and coaxial-electrode plasma acceleration. Solution quality is compared to solutions using CBC and zero-normal derivative BC. LOBC are a promising new open BC option for dissipative MHD.

  18. Proteoglycan 4 metabolism and boundary lubrication of articular cartilage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmidt, Tannin A.

    2006-01-01

    ability to act as boundary lubricants. Ann Rheum Dis 43:641-load-bearing boundary lubricant in the joint. Br J Rheumatolof the cartilage and lubricant. Arthritis Rheum 11:674-82,

  19. Crystallographically consistent percolation theory for grain boundary networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frary, Megan

    2005-01-01

    Grain boundaries are known to play a role in many important material properties including creep resistance, ductility and cracking resistance. Although the structure and properties of individual boundaries are important, ...

  20. Cylinder kernel expansion of Casimir energy with a Robin boundary 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Zhonghai

    2006-10-30

    We compute the Casimir energy of a massless scalar field obeying the Robin boundary condition on one plate and the Dirichlet boundary condition on another plate for two parallel plates with a separation of alpha. The ...

  1. Thermodynamic stability and implications of anisotropic boundary particles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siem, Ellen J. (Ellen Jane), 1979-

    2005-01-01

    (cont.) Generally, a boundary is nonplanar in the neighborhood of an attached particle--even when anisotropic interfacial free energies do not produce faceting-and maintains a icKy = 0 while the boundary particles maintain ...

  2. Ising Interfaces and Free Boundary Conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clément Hongler; Kalle Kytölä

    2011-10-17

    We study the interfaces arising in the two-dimensional Ising model at critical temperature, without magnetic field. We show that in the presence of free boundary conditions between plus and minus spins, the scaling limit of these interfaces can be described by a variant of SLE, called dipolar SLE(3). This generalizes a celebrated result of Chelkak and Smirnov and proves a conjecture of Bauer, Bernard and Houdayer. We mention two possible applications of our result.

  3. The effect of a small creek valley on drainage flows in the Rocky Flats region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Porch, W.

    1996-12-31

    Regional scale circulation and mountain-plain interactions and effects on boundary layer development are important for understanding the fate of an atmospheric release from Rocky Flats, Colorado. Numerical modeling of Front Range topographic effects near Rocky Flats have shown that though the Front Range dominates large scale flow features, small-scale terrain features near Rocky Flats are important to local transport during nighttime drainage flow conditions. Rocky Flats has been the focus of interest for the Department of Energy`s Atmospheric Studies in Complex Terrain (ASCOT) program.

  4. Laminar boundary layers in convective heat transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christian Seis

    2012-12-12

    We study Rayleigh-Benard convection in the high-Rayleigh-number and high-Prandtl-number regime, i.e., we consider a fluid in a container that is exposed to strong heating of the bottom and cooling of the top plate in the absence of inertia effects. While the dynamics in the bulk are characterized by a chaotic convective heat flow, the boundary layers at the horizontal container plates are essentially conducting and thus the fluid is motionless. Consequently, the average temperature exhibits a linear profile in the boundary layers. In this article, we rigorously investigate the average temperature and oscillations in the boundary layer via local bounds on the temperature field. Moreover, we deduce that the temperature profile is indeed essentially linear close to the horizontal container plates. Our results are uniform in the system parameters (e.g. the Rayleigh number) up to logarithmic correction terms. An important tool in our analysis is a new Hardy-type estimate for the convecting velocity field, which can be used to control the fluid motion in the layer. The bounds on the temperature field are derived with the help of local maximal regularity estimates for convection-diffusion equations.

  5. Laminar boundary layers in convective heat transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seis, Christian

    2012-01-01

    We study Rayleigh-Benard convection in the high-Rayleigh-number and high-Prandtl-number regime, i.e., we consider a fluid in a container that is exposed to strong heating of the bottom and cooling of the top plate in the absence of inertia effects. While the dynamics in the bulk are characterized by a chaotic convective heat flow, the boundary layers at the horizontal container plates are essentially conducting and thus the fluid is motionless. Consequently, the average temperature exhibits a linear profile in the boundary layers. In this article, we rigorously investigate the average temperature and oscillations in the boundary layer via local bounds on the temperature field. Moreover, we deduce that the temperature profile is indeed essentially linear close to the horizontal container plates. Our results are uniform in the system parameters (e.g. the Rayleigh number) up to logarithmic correction terms. An important tool in our analysis is a new Hardy-type estimate for the convecting velocity field, which ca...

  6. Mesoscale coupled ocean-atmosphere feedbacks in boundary current systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Putrasahan, Dian Ariyani

    2012-01-01

    productive oceanic eastern boundary current, providing anCurrent System and the Kuroshio Extension uses OFES products for their oceanic

  7. Defining window-boundaries for genomic analyses using smoothing...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    undesirable window boundary specifications, or highly correlated test statistics. We introduce a method for defining windows based on statistically guided...

  8. Correct traction boundary conditions in the indeterminate couple stress model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patrizio Neff; Ionel-Dumitrel Ghiba; Angela Madeo; Ingo Münch

    2015-04-02

    In this paper we consider the Grioli-Koiter-Mindlin-Toupin indeterminatecouple stress model. The main aim is to show that the traction boundary conditions were not yet completely deduced. As it turns out, and to our own surprise, restricting the boundary condition framework from the strain gradient models to the couple stress model does not reduce to Mindlin's set of accepted boundary conditions. We present therefore, for the first time the complete, consistent set of traction boundary conditions.

  9. Effects of Boundary Conditions on Single-File Pedestrian Flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Jun; Seyfried, Armin

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we investigate effects of boundary conditions on one dimensional pedestrian flow which involves purely longitudinal interactions. Qualitatively, stop-and-go waves are observed under closed boundary condition and dissolve when the boundary is open. To get more detailed information the fundamental diagrams of the open and closed systems are compared using Voronoi-based measurement method. Higher maximal specific flow is observed from the pedestrian movement at open boundary condition.

  10. Nonuniqeness in a free boundary problem from combustion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014-10-31

    Nonuniqeness in a free boundary problem from combustion. Arshak Petrosyan joint with Aaron Yip. Department of Mathematics. Purdue University.

  11. Fusion for AdS/CFT boundary S-matrices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rafael I. Nepomechie; Rodrigo A. Pimenta

    2015-09-14

    We propose a fusion formula for AdS/CFT worldsheet boundary S-matrices. We show that, starting from the fundamental Y=0 boundary S-matrix, this formula correctly reproduces the two-particle bound-state boundary S-matrices.

  12. Testing outer boundary treatments for the Einstein equations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oliver Rinne; Lee Lindblom; Mark A. Scheel

    2007-07-25

    Various methods of treating outer boundaries in numerical relativity are compared using a simple test problem: a Schwarzschild black hole with an outgoing gravitational wave perturbation. Numerical solutions computed using different boundary treatments are compared to a `reference' numerical solution obtained by placing the outer boundary at a very large radius. For each boundary treatment, the full solutions including constraint violations and extracted gravitational waves are compared to those of the reference solution, thereby assessing the reflections caused by the artificial boundary. These tests use a first-order generalized harmonic formulation of the Einstein equations. Constraint-preserving boundary conditions for this system are reviewed, and an improved boundary condition on the gauge degrees of freedom is presented. Alternate boundary conditions evaluated here include freezing the incoming characteristic fields, Sommerfeld boundary conditions, and the constraint-preserving boundary conditions of Kreiss and Winicour. Rather different approaches to boundary treatments, such as sponge layers and spatial compactification, are also tested. Overall the best treatment found here combines boundary conditions that preserve the constraints, freeze the Newman-Penrose scalar Psi_0, and control gauge reflections.

  13. Assess Current and Potential Salmonid Production in Rattlesnake Creek Associated with Restoration Efforts; US Geological Survey Reports, 2002-2003 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Connolly, Patrick J. (US Geological Survey, Columbia River Research Laboratory, Western Fisheries Research Center, Cook, WA)

    2003-12-01

    This project was designed to document existing habitat conditions and fish populations within the Rattlesnake Creek watershed (White Salmon River subbasin, Washington) before major habitat restoration activities are implemented and prior to the reintroduction of salmon and steelhead above Condit Dam. Returning adult salmon Oncorhynchus spp. and steelhead O. mykiss have not had access to Rattlesnake Creek since 1913. An assessment of resident trout populations should serve as a good surrogate for evaluation of factors that would limit salmon and steelhead production in the watershed. Personnel from United States Geological Survey's Columbia River Research Laboratory (USGS-CRRL) attend to three main objectives of the Rattlesnake Creek project. The first is to characterize stream and riparian habitat conditions. This effort includes measures of water quality, water quantity, stream habitat, and riparian conditions. The second objective is to determine the status of fish populations in the Rattlesnake Creek drainage. To accomplish this, we derived estimates of salmonid population abundance, determined fish species composition, assessed distribution and life history attributes, obtained tissue samples for genetic analysis, and assessed fish diseases in the watershed. The third objective is to use the collected habitat and fisheries information to help identify and prioritize areas in need of restoration. As this report covers the second year of at least a three-year study, it is largely restricted to describing our efforts and findings for the first two objectives.

  14. Assess Current and Potential Salmonid Production in Rattlesnake Creek Associated with Restoration Efforts; US Geological Survey Reports, 2001-2002 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Connolly, Patrick J. (US Geological Survey, Western Fisheries Research Center, Columbia River Research Laboratory, Cook, WA)

    2003-01-01

    This project was designed to document existing habitat conditions and fish populations within the Rattlesnake Creek watershed (White Salmon River subbasin, Washington) before major habitat restoration activities are implemented and prior to the reintroduction of salmon and steelhead above Condit Dam. Returning adult salmon Oncorhynchus spp. and steelhead O. mykiss have not had access to Rattlesnake Creek since 1914. An assessment of resident trout populations should serve as a good surrogate for evaluation of factors that would limit salmon and steelhead production in the watershed. Personnel from United States Geological Survey's Columbia River Research Laboratory (USGS-CRRL) attend to three main objectives of the Rattlesnake Creek project. The first is to characterize stream and riparian habitat conditions. This effort includes measures of water quality, water quantity, stream habitat, and riparian conditions. The second objective is to determine the status of fish populations in the Rattlesnake Creek drainage. To accomplish this, we derived estimates of salmonid population abundance, determined fish species composition, assessed distribution and life history attributes, obtained tissue samples for future genetic analysis, and assessed fish diseases in the watershed. The third objective is to use the collected habitat and fisheries information to help identify and prioritize areas in need of restoration. As this report covers the first year of a three-year study, this report is restricted to describing our work on the first two objectives only.

  15. Opal Creek Forest Preserve Act of 1994. Introduced in the House of Representatives, One Hundred Third Congress, Second Session, August 8, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1994-12-31

    The legislative text proposes to provide for the establishment and management of the Opal Creek Forest Reserve in Oregon. The purpose of the Act is to protect and preserve the forests and watersheds in the Reserve. And to promote and conduct research regarding old-growth forests and for educators to provide scientifically credible information to the public.

  16. Harmonic Initial-Boundary Evolution in General Relativity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maria C. Babiuc; Bela Szilagyi; Jeffrey Winicour

    2006-03-14

    Computational techniques which establish the stability of an evolution-boundary algorithm for a model wave equation with shift are incorporated into a well-posed version of the initial-boundary value problem for gravitational theory in harmonic coordinates. The resulting algorithm is implemented as a 3-dimensional numerical code which we demonstrate to provide stable, convergent Cauchy evolution in gauge wave and shifted gauge wave testbeds. Code performance is compared for Dirichlet, Neumann and Sommerfeld boundary conditions and for boundary conditions which explicitly incorporate constraint preservation. The results are used to assess strategies for obtaining physically realistic boundary data by means of Cauchy-characteristic matching.

  17. Grain boundary characterization in an X750 alloy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kevin Fisher; Sebastien Teysseyre; Emmanuelle Marquis

    2012-11-01

    Grain boundary chemistry in an X750 Ni alloy was analyzed by atom probe tomography in an effort to clarify the possible roles of elemental segregation and carbide presence on the stress corrosion cracking behavior of Ni alloys. Two types of cracks are observed: straight cracks along twin boundaries and wavy cracks at general boundaries. It was found that carbides (M23C6 and TiC) are present at both twin and general boundaries, with comparable B and P segregation for all types of grain boundaries. Twin boundaries intercept ?’ precipitates while the general boundaries wave around the ?’ and carbide precipitates. Near a crack tip, oxidation takes place on the periphery of carbide precipitate.

  18. Microfluidics: The no-slip boundary condition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eric Lauga; Michael P. Brenner; Howard A. Stone

    2005-09-28

    The no-slip boundary condition at a solid-liquid interface is at the center of our understanding of fluid mechanics. However, this condition is an assumption that cannot be derived from first principles and could, in theory, be violated. We present a review of recent experimental, numerical and theoretical investigations on the subject. The physical picture that emerges is that of a complex behavior at a liquid/solid interface, involving an interplay of many physico-chemical parameters, including wetting, shear rate, pressure, surface charge, surface roughness, impurities and dissolved gas.

  19. A study on boundary separation in an idealized ocean model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Düben, Peter D

    2015-01-01

    In numerical ocean models coast lines change the direction from one grid cell to its neighbor and the value for viscosity is set to be as small as possible. Therefore, model simulations are not converged with resolution and boundary separation points differ in essential properties from flow separation in continuous flow fields. In this paper, we investigate the quality of the representation of boundary separation points in global ocean models. To this end, we apply well established criteria for boundary separation within an idealized ocean model setup. We investigate an eddy-resolving as well as a steady test case with idealized and unstructured coast lines in a shallow water model that is based on a finite element discretization method. The results show that well established criteria for separation fail to detect boundary separation points due to an insufficient representation of ocean flows along free-slip boundaries. Along no-slip boundaries, most separation criteria provide adequate results. However, a ve...

  20. First order gravity: Actions, topological terms and boundaries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Corichi, Alejandro; Vukasinac, Tatjana

    2013-01-01

    We consider first order gravity in four dimensions. This means that the fundamental variables are a tetrad $e$ and a SO(3,1) connection $\\omega$. We study the most general action principle compatible with diffeomorphism invariance. This implies, in particular, considering besides the standard Einstein-Hilbert term, other terms that either do not change the equations of motion, or are topological in nature. Having a well defined action principle also implies adding additional boundary terms, whose detailed form may depend on the particular boundary conditions at hand. We consider spacetimes that include a boundary at infinity, satisfying asymptotically flat boundary conditions and/or an internal boundary satisfying isolated horizons boundary conditions. For our analysis we employ the covariant Hamiltonian formalism where the phase space $\\Gamma$ is given by solutions to the equation of motion. For each of the possible terms contributing to the action we study the well posedness of the action, its finiteness, t...

  1. Minthorn Springs Creek Summer Juvenile Release and Adult Collection Facility; 1992 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rowan, Gerald D.

    1993-08-01

    The Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CT'UIR) and Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) are cooperating in a joint effort to supplement steelhead and re-establish salmon runs in the Umatilla River Basin. As an integral part of this program, Bonifer and Minthorn Acclimation Facilities are operated for holding and spawning adult steelhead and fall chinook salmon and acclimation and release of juvenile salmon and steelhead. Acclimation of 109,101 spring chinook salmon and 19,977 summer steelhead was completed at Bonifer in the spring of 1992. At Minthorn, 47,458 summer steelhead were acclimated and released. Control groups of spring chinook salmon were released instream concurrent with the acclimated releases to evaluate the effects of acclimation on adult returns to the Umatilla River. Acclimation studies with summer steelhead were not conducted in 1992. A total of 237 unmarked adult steelhead were collected for broodstock at Three Mile Dam from October 18, 1991 through April 24, 1992 and held at Minthorn. Utilizing a 3 x 3 spawning matrix, a total of 476,871 green eggs were taken from 86 females. The eggs were transferred to Umatilla Hatchery for incubation, rearing, and later release into the Umatilla River. A total of 211 fall chinook salmon were also collected for broodstock at Three Mile Dam and held at Minthorn. Using a 1:1 spawning ratio, a total of 195,637 green eggs were taken from 58 females. They were also transferred to Umatilla Hatchery for incubation, rearing, and later release into the Umatilla River. Personnel from the ODFW Eastern Oregon Fish Pathology Laboratory in La Grande took samples of tissues and reproductive fluids from Umatilla River summer steelhead and fall chinook salmon broodstock for monitoring and evaluation purposes. Cell culture assays for replicating agents, including IHNV virus, on all spawned fish were negative. One of 60 summer steelhead tested positive for EIBS virus, while all fall chinook tested we re negative for inclusions. One of 73 summer steelhead sampled for BKD had a high level of antigen, while all others had very low or negative antigen levels. All fall chinook tested had low or negative antigen levels. Regularly-scheduled maintenance of pumps, equipment and facilities was performed in 1992. The progress of outmigration for juvenile releases was monitored at the Westland Canal fish trapping facility by CTUIR and ODFW personnel. Coho and spring chinook yearlings were released in mid-March at Umatilla rivermile (RM) 56 and 60. The peak outmigration period past Westland (RM 27) was mid-April to early May, approximately four to seven weeks after release. Groups of summer steelhead were released from Minthorn (RM 63) and Bonifer (RM 81) in late March and into Meacham Creek near Bonifer in late April. The peak outmigration period past Westland for all groups appeared to be the first two to three weeks in May. Spring chinook yearlings released in mid-April from Bonifer and at Umatilla RM 89, migrated rapidly downriver and the peak outmigration period past Westland appeared to be within a week or two after release. Fall and spring chinook subyearlings released in mid-May at RM 42 and 60, respectively, also migrated rapidly downriver and the peak outmigration period was within days after release. Coded-wire tag recovery information was accessed to determine the contribution of Umatilla River releases to the ocean, Columbia River and Umatilla River fisheries. Total estimated summer steelhead survival have ranged from 0.03 to 0.61% for releases in which recovery information is complete. Coho survival rates have ranged from 0.15 to 4.14%, and spring chinook yearling survival rates from spring releases have ranged from 0.72 to 0.74%. Survival rates of fall chinook yearlings have ranged from 0.08 to 3.01%, while fall chinook subyearling survival rates have ranged from 0.25 to 0.87% for spring released groups.

  2. Effective Hydrodynamic Boundary Conditions for Corrugated Surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mongruel, Anne; Asmolov, Evgeny S; Vinogradova, Olga I

    2012-01-01

    We report measurements of the hydrodynamic drag force acting on a smooth sphere falling down under gravity to a plane decorated with microscopic periodic grooves. Both surfaces are lyophilic, so that a liquid (silicone oil) invades the surface texture being in the Wenzel state. A significant decrease in the hydrodynamic resistance force as compared with that predicted for two smooth surfaces is observed. To quantify the effect of roughness we use the effective no-slip boundary condition, which is applied at the imaginary smooth homogeneous isotropic surface located at an intermediate position between top and bottom of grooves. Such an effective condition fully characterizes the force reduction measured with the real surface, and the location of this effective plane is related to geometric parameters of the texture by a simple analytical formula.

  3. Evaluation of wall boundary condition parameters for gas-solids...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    predictions of various gas-solids fluidized beds. Several models for the granular flow wall boundary condition are available in the open literature for numerical modeling of...

  4. A major lithospheric boundary in eastern California defined by...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    ratios of Miocene-Recent basalts in eastern California, when screened for crustal contamination, vary dramatically and indicate the presence of a major lithospheric boundary that...

  5. [Perovskite and Fluorite Grain Boundary Properties]. Final Project Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Browning, N. D.

    2004-02-24

    One of the main areas of research in the last two years in this program has been the properties of grain boundaries in perovskite and fluorite structure materials.

  6. Short wavelength topography on the inner-core boundary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cao, A.; Masson, Y.; Romanowicz, B.

    2006-01-01

    Short wavelength topography on the inner-core boundary Aimin94720 Constraining the topography of the inner-core boundaryindicates the presence of topography at the inner- core

  7. OPTIMAL REGULARITY AND THE FREE BOUNDARY IN THE ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-06-25

    nomenon of osmosis and osmotic pressure in biochemistry), and the problems on the temperature control on the boundary in thermics. We refer to the book of.

  8. An outflow boundary condition and algorithm for incompressible two ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Dong

    2014-03-05

    Feb 22, 2014 ... conditions for the phase field function on each boundary, which ...... These velocity histories indicate that the oil–water two-phase flow has ...

  9. Mineral Deformation at Earth's Core-Mantle Boundary

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    At the core-mantle boundary (CMB), 2900 km deep, seismologists have discovered that seismic waves travel faster in certain directions. This seismic anisotropy appears to be...

  10. Friction of Steel Sliding Under Boundary Lubrication Regime in...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    how to increase engine efficiency by reducing parasitic boundary regime friction losses and enable operation with lower viscosity oils while maintaining engine durability....

  11. Sandia Energy - Elucidating the Role of Twin Boundaries in Deformation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Impact Coupled experiment and modeling reveal the dramatic and complex impact of high-density twin boundaries on microstructure evolution and deformation mechanisms Research...

  12. Wildlife and Wildlife Habitat Loss Assessment at Hills Creek Dam and Reservoir Project, Middle Fork Willamette River, Oregon, 1985 Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Noyes, J.H.

    1985-09-01

    A habitat based assessment was conducted of the US Army Corps of Engineers' Hills Creek Dam and Reservoir Project on the Middle Fork Willamette River, Oregon, to determine losses or gains resulting from the development and operation of the hydroelectric related components of the project. Preconstruction, postconstruction, and recent vegetation cover types of the project site were mapped based on aerial photographs from 1944, 1964, and 1979, respectively. Vegetation cover types were identified within the affected area and acreages of each type at each period were determined. Fifteen wildlife target species were selected to represent a cross-section of species groups affected by the project. An interagency team evaluated the suitability of the habitat to support the target species at each time period. An evaluation procedure which accounted for both the quantity and quality of habitat was used to aid in assessing impacts resulting from the project. The Hills Creek Project extensively altered or affected 4662 acres of land and river in the Middle Fork Willamette River drainage. Impacts to wildlife centered around the loss of 2694 acres of old-growth forest and 207 acres of riparian habitat. Impacts resulting from the Hills Creek Project included the loss of winter range for Roosevelt elk, and the loss of year-round habitat for black-tailed deer, black bear, cougar, river otter, beaver, ruffed grouse, spotted owl, and other nongame species. Bald eagle and osprey were benefited by an increase in foraging habitat. The potential of the affected area to support wildlife was greatly altered as a result of the Hills Creek Project, losses or gains in the potential of the habitat to support wildlife will exist over the life of the project.

  13. An Assessment of health risk associated with mercury in soil and sediment from East Fork Poplar Creek, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Revis, N.; Holdsworth, G.; Bingham, G.; King, A.; Elmore, J.

    1989-04-01

    This report presents results from a study conducted to determine the toxicity of Mercury in soils sediments samples. Mice were fed via diet, soils and sediment, from various locations along the East Fork Poplar creek. Tissue distribution of pollutants was determined at various intervals. The tissue level relative to toxicity was used to determine the effect of a complex matrix on the gastrointestinal absorption and tissue distribution of the pollutants (other pollutants included cadmium and selenium).

  14. Third report on the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program for White Oak Creek Watershed and the Clinch River

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loar, J.M. [ed.] [ed.; Adams, S.M.; Bailey, R.D. [and others] [and others

    1994-03-01

    As a condition of the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit issued to Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) on April 1, 1985, a Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP) was developed for White Oak Creek (WOC); selected tributaries of WOC, including Fifth Creek, First Creek, Melton Branch, and Northwest Tributary; and the Clinch River. The BMAP currently consists of six major tasks that address both radiological and nonradiological contaminants in the aquatic and terrestrial environs at ORNL. These are (1) toxicity monitoring, (2) bioaccumulation monitoring of nonradiological contaminants in aquatic biota, (3) biological indicator studies, (4) instream ecological monitoring, (5) assessment of contaminants in the terrestrial environment, and (6) radioecology of WOC and White Oak Lake (WOL). The investigation of contaminant transport, distribution, and fate in the WOC embayment-Clinch River-Watts Bar Reservoir system was originally a task of the BMAP but, in 1988, was incorporated into the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Facility Investigation for the Clinch River, a separate study to assess offsite contamination from all three Department of Energy facilities in Oak Ridge.

  15. Sampling and analysis plan for the Bear Creek Valley Boneyard/Burnyard Accelerated Action Project, Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-03-01

    In the Bear Creek Valley Watershed Remedial Investigation, the Boneyard/Burnyard was identified as the source of the largest releases of uranium into groundwater and surface water in Bear Creek Valley. The proposed action for remediation of this site is selective excavation and removal of source material and capping of the remainder of the site. The schedule for this action has been accelerated so that this is the first remedial action planned to be implemented in the Bear Creek Valley Record of Decision. Additional data needs to support design of the remedial action were identified at a data quality objectives meeting held for this project. Sampling at the Boneyard/Burnyard will be conducted through the use of a phased approach. Initial or primary samples will be used to make in-the-field decisions about where to locate follow-up or secondary samples. On the basis of the results of surface water, soil, and groundwater analysis, up to six test pits will be dug. The test pits will be used to provide detailed descriptions of source materials and bulk samples. This document sets forth the requirements and procedures to protect the personnel involved in this project. This document also contains the health and safety plan, quality assurance project plan, waste management plan, data management plan, implementation plan, and best management practices plan for this project as appendices.

  16. White Oak Creek Watershed: Melton Valley Area Remedial Investigation Report, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee: Volume 3 Appendix C

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-11-01

    This report provides details on the baseline ecological risk assessment conducted in support of the Remedial Investigation (RI) Report for the Melton Valley areas of the White Oak Creek watershed (WOCW). The RI presents an analysis meant to enable the US Department of Energy (DOE) to pursue a series of remedial actions resulting in site cleanup and stabilization. The ecological risk assessment builds off of the WOCW screening ecological risk assessment. All information available for contaminated sites under the jurisdiction of the US Department of Energy`s Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act Federal Facilities Agreement within the White Oak Creek (WOC) RI area has been used to identify areas of potential concern with respect to the presence of contamination posing a potential risk to ecological receptors within the Melton Valley area of the White Oak Creek watershed. The risk assessment report evaluates the potential risks to receptors within each subbasin of the watershed as well as at a watershed-wide scale. The WOC system has been exposed to contaminant releases from Oak Ridge National Laboratory and associated operations since 1943 and continues to receive contaminants from adjacent waste area groupings.

  17. T-duality trivializes bulk-boundary correspondence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Varghese Mathai; Guo Chuan Thiang

    2015-07-26

    Recently we introduced T-duality in the study of topological insulators. In this paper, we study the bulk-boundary correspondence for three phenomena in condensed matter physics, namely, the quantum Hall effect, the Chern insulator, and time reversal invariant topological insulators. In all of these cases, we show that T-duality trivializes the bulk-boundary correspondence.

  18. Boundary lubrication under water Wuge H. Briscoe1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klein, Jacob

    LETTERS Boundary lubrication under water Wuge H. Briscoe1 , Simon Titmuss1 , Fredrik Tiberg1 {, Robert K. Thomas1 , Duncan J. McGillivray1 { & Jacob Klein1,2 Boundary lubrication, in which the rubbing. This process, wide- spread in engineering applications, is also predicted to occur in biological lubrication

  19. Modal Analysis of Homogeneous Optical Waveguides by Boundary Integral Method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Modal Analysis of Homogeneous Optical Waveguides by Boundary Integral Method Lei Wang J. Allen Cox of the waveguide. Two dierent systems of boundary integral equations are derived for the numerical solutions of the discrete propagation constants; one of them is in the form of Fredholm integral equations of the second

  20. ANNIVERSARY REVIEW Grain boundary energy anisotropy: a review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rohrer, Gregory S.

    energy (B) gained when the two surfaces are brought together and new bonds are formed. The grain boundary with the stiffness of the material. The excess energy of the grANNIVERSARY REVIEW Grain boundary energy anisotropy: a review Gregory S. Rohrer Received: 29 April

  1. Stability of High-Speed, Three-Dimensional Boundary Layers 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Craig, Stuart A

    2015-04-02

    Boundary-layer experiments are performed in the low-disturbance, Mach 6 Quiet Tunnel (M6QT) at Texas A&M University. The experiments are focused specifically on investigating the physics of two three-dimensional phenomena in hypersonic boundary...

  2. LARGE EDDY SIMULATION OF TURBULENT BOUNDARY LAYERS OVER ROUGH BEDS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pawlak, Geno

    that determines the response of the boundary layer is not clear. One method to characterize the irregular nature with different spectral slopes using 2D 10 % loading square waves as basis functions. These square waves can) is then used to simulate the turbulent boundary layer over the rough beds. The LES solver is first validated

  3. Aero-Optical Effects of Supersonic Boundary Layers Stanislav Gordeyev

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gordeyev, Stanislav

    Aero-Optical Effects of Supersonic Boundary Layers Stanislav Gordeyev and Eric Jumper University, Colorado 80840 DOI: 10.2514/1.J051266 Aero-optical measurements of a zero-pressure-gradient, supersonic to describe aero-optical effects of both the subsonic and the supersonic boundary layers. Finally, this new

  4. Detecting Subject Boundaries Within Text: A Language Independent Statistical Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edinburgh, University of

    Detecting Subject Boundaries Within Text: A Language Independent Statistical Approach Korin describe here an algorithm for detect­ ing subject boundaries within text based on a statistical lexical assumptions is that a change in subject is accompanied by a change in vo­ cabulary. Using this assumption

  5. SUPERSONIC SHEAR INSTABILITIES IN ASTROPHYSICAL BOUNDARY LAYERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Belyaev, Mikhail A.; Rafikov, Roman R., E-mail: rrr@astro.princeton.edu [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Ivy Lane, Princeton, NJ 08540 (United States)

    2012-06-20

    Disk accretion onto weakly magnetized astrophysical objects often proceeds via a boundary layer (BL) that forms near the object's surface, in which the rotation speed of the accreted gas changes rapidly. Here, we study the initial stages of formation for such a BL around a white dwarf or a young star by examining the hydrodynamical shear instabilities that may initiate mixing and momentum transport between the two fluids of different densities moving supersonically with respect to each other. We find that an initially laminar BL is unstable to two different kinds of instabilities. One is an instability of a supersonic vortex sheet (implying a discontinuous initial profile of the angular speed of the gas) in the presence of gravity, which we find to have a growth rate of order (but less than) the orbital frequency. The other is a sonic instability of a finite width, supersonic shear layer, which is similar to the Papaloizou-Pringle instability. It has a growth rate proportional to the shear inside the transition layer, which is of order the orbital frequency times the ratio of stellar radius to the BL thickness. For a BL that is thin compared to the radius of the star, the shear rate is much larger than the orbital frequency. Thus, we conclude that sonic instabilities play a dominant role in the initial stages of nonmagnetic BL formation and give rise to very fast mixing between disk gas and stellar fluid in the supersonic regime.

  6. Irradiation Assisted Grain Boundary Segregation in Steels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, Zheng; Faulkner, Roy G.

    2008-07-01

    The understanding of radiation-induced grain boundary segregation (RIS) has considerably improved over the past decade. New models have been introduced and much effort has been devoted to obtaining comprehensive information on segregation from the literature. Analytical techniques have also improved so that chemical analysis of layers 1 nm thick is almost routine. This invited paper will review the major methods used currently for RIS prediction: namely, Rate Theory, Inverse Kirkendall, and Solute Drag approaches. A summary is made of the available data on phosphorus RIS in reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels. This will be discussed in the light of the predictions of the various models in an effort to show which models are the most reliable and easy to use for forecasting P segregation behaviour in steels. A consequence of RIS in RPV steels is a radiation induced shift in the ductile to brittle transition temperature (DBTT). It will be shown how it is possible to relate radiation-induced P segregation levels to DBTT shift. Examples of this exercise will be given for RPV steels and for ferritic steels being considered for first wall fusion applications. Cr RIS in high alloy stainless steels and associated irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) will be briefly discussed. (authors)

  7. A boundary-value problem in weighted Hölder spaces for elliptic equations which degenerate at the boundary of the domain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bazalii, B V; Degtyarev, S P

    2013-07-31

    An elliptic boundary-value problem for second-order equations with nonnegative characteristic form is investigated in the situation when there is a weak degeneracy on the boundary of the domain. A priori estimates are obtained for solutions and the problem is proved to be solvable in some weighted Hölder spaces. Bibliography: 18 titles.

  8. The Relationship Between Grain Boundary Energy, Grain Boundary Complexion Transitions, and Grain Size in Ca-doped Yttria

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rohrer, Gregory S.

    The Relationship Between Grain Boundary Energy, Grain Boundary Complexion Transitions, and Grain complexions. One idea is that complexion transitions occur to lower the average energy of the interface energy. Experiments on doped aluminas have shown that a complexion transition can change the relative

  9. Second report on the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program for East Fork Poplar Creek

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hinzman, R.L.; Adams, S.M.; Black, M.C.

    1993-06-01

    As stipulated in the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NDPES) permit issued to the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant on May 24, 1986, a Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP) was developed for the receiving stream, East Fork Poplar Creek (EFPC). The objectives of BMAP are (1) to demonstrate that the current effluent limitations established for the Y-12 Plant protect the classified uses of EFPC (e.g., the growth and propagation of fish and aquatic life), as designated by the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) and (2) to document the ecological effects resulting from implementation of a Water Pollution Control Program that includes construction of several large wastewater treatment facilities. BMAP consists of four major tasks: (1) ambient toxicity testing; (2) bioaccumulation studies; (3) biological indicator studies; and (4) ecological surveys of stream communities, including periphyton (attached algae), benthic (bottom-dwelling) macroinvertebrates, and fish. This document, the second in a series of reports on the results of the Y-12 Plant BMAP, describes studies that were conducted between July 1986 and July 1988, although additional data collected outside this time period are included, as appropriate.

  10. First report on the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program for East Fork Poplar Creek

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loar, J.M.; Adams, S.M.; Allison, L.J.; Boston, H.L.; Huston, M.A.; McCarthy, J.F.; Smith, J.G.; Southworth, G.R.; Stewart, A.J. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Black, M.C. (Oklahoma State Univ., Stillwater, OK (United States)); Gatz, A.J. Jr. (Ohio Wesleyan Univ., Delaware, OH (United States)); Hinzman, R.L. (Oak Ridge Research Inst., TN (United States)); Jimenez, B.D. (Puerto Rico Univ.,

    1992-07-01

    As stipulated in the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit issued to the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant on May 24, 1985, a Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP) was developed for the receiving stream, East Fork Poplar Creek (EFPC). The objectives of the BMAP are (1) to demonstrate that the current effluent limitations established for the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant protect the uses of EFPC (e.g., the growth and propagation of fish and aquatic life), as designated by the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) [formerly the Tennessee Department of Health and Environment (TDHE)], and (2) to document the ecological effects resulting from implementation of a water pollution control program that includes construction of several large wastewater treatment facilities. The BMAP consists of four major tasks: (1) ambient toxicity testing, (2) bioaccumulation studies, (3) biological indicator studies, and (4) ecological surveys of stream communities, including periphyton (attached algae), benthic macroinvertebrates, and fish. This document, the first in a series of reports on the results of the Y-12 Plant BMAP, describes studies that were conducted from May 1985 through September 1986.

  11. Conceptual design of the solar repowering system for West Texas Utilities Company Paint Creek Power Station Unit No. 4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-07-15

    A conceptual design of a sodium-cooled, solar, central-receiver repowering system for West Texas Utilities' Paint Creek Unit 4 was prepared, solely under funds provided by West Texas Utilities (WTU), the Energy Systems Group (ESG) of Rockwell International, and four other support groups. A central-receiver repowering system is one in which a tower, surrounded by a large field of mirrors, is placed adjacent to an existing electric power plant. A receiver, located on top of the tower, absorbs solar energy reflected onto it by the mirrors and converts this solar energy to heat energy. The heat energy is transported by the liquid sodium to a set of sodium-to-steam steam generators. The steam generators produce steam at the same temperature and pressure as that produced by the fossil boiler in the existing plant. When solar energy is available, steam is produced by the solar part of the plant, thus displacing steam from the fossil boiler, and reducing the consumption of fossil fuel while maintaining the original plant output. A means for storing the solar energy is usually provided, so that some energy obtained from the solar source can be used to displace natural gas or oil fuels when the sun is not shining. This volume presents an executive summary of the conceptual design, performance, economics, development plans, and site owner's assessment. (WHK)

  12. Science at the interface : grain boundaries in nanocrystalline metals.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rodriguez, Mark Andrew; Follstaedt, David Martin; Knapp, James Arthur; Brewer, Luke N.; Holm, Elizabeth Ann; Foiles, Stephen Martin; Hattar, Khalid M.; Clark, Blythe B.; Olmsted, David L.; Medlin, Douglas L.

    2009-09-01

    Interfaces are a critical determinant of the full range of materials properties, especially at the nanoscale. Computational and experimental methods developed a comprehensive understanding of nanograin evolution based on a fundamental understanding of internal interfaces in nanocrystalline nickel. It has recently been shown that nanocrystals with a bi-modal grain-size distribution possess a unique combination of high-strength, ductility and wear-resistance. We performed a combined experimental and theoretical investigation of the structure and motion of internal interfaces in nanograined metal and the resulting grain evolution. The properties of grain boundaries are computed for an unprecedented range of boundaries. The presence of roughening transitions in grain boundaries is explored and related to dramatic changes in boundary mobility. Experimental observations show that abnormal grain growth in nanograined materials is unlike conventional scale material in both the level of defects and the formation of unfavored phases. Molecular dynamics simulations address the origins of some of these phenomena.

  13. Grain Boundary (GB) Studies in Nano- and Micro- Crystalline Materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tanju, Mst Sohanazaman

    2011-01-01

    boundaries in silicon? Materials research society, Vol.122,bicrystal? Journal of Materials Science, 40(2005)3137- 5.in ZnO? Journal of Materials Science, 40(2005)3067-3074. 6.

  14. Examining A Hypersonic Turbulent Boundary Layer at Low Reynolds Number 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Semper, Michael Thomas

    2013-05-15

    The purpose of the current study was to answer several questions related to hypersonic, low Reynolds number, turbulent boundary layers, of which available data related to turbulence quantities is scarce. To that end, a ...

  15. Static electric field in one-dimensional insulators without boundaries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Kuang-Ting

    In this brief report, we show that in a one-dimensional insulating system with periodic boundary conditions, the coefficient of the ? term in the effective theory is not only determined by the topological index ?i?[superscript ...

  16. Performance of a boundary layer ingesting propulsion system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plas, Angélique (Angélique Pascale)

    2006-01-01

    This thesis presents an assessment of the aerodynamic performance of an aircraft propulsion system, with embedded engines, in the presence of aircraft fuselage boundary layer ingestion (BLI). The emphasis is on defining ...

  17. Reconfiguring Boundary Relations: Robotic Innovations in Pharmacy Work

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrett, Michael

    Robotics is a rapidly expanding area of digital innovation with important implications for organizational practice in multioccupational settings. This paper explores the influence of robotic innovations on the boundary ...

  18. Mineral Deformation at Earth's Core-Mantle Boundary

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for its liquid-iron outer core), this convection causes deformation of solid rocks by plastic flow. At the core-mantle boundary (CMB), 2900 km deep, seismologists have discovered...

  19. Mineral Deformation at Earth's Core-Mantle Boundary

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mineral Deformation at Earth's Core-Mantle Boundary Print Earth is a dynamic planet in which convection takes place on the scale of thousands of kilometers. Because Earth is mostly...

  20. Analysis of civil aircraft propulsors with boundary layer ingestion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, David Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    This thesis describes (i) guidelines for propulsor sizing, and (ii) strategies for fan turbomachinery conceptual design, for a boundary layer ingesting (BLI) propulsion system for advanced civil transport aircraft. For the ...

  1. Distributed Roughness Receptivity in a Flat Plate Boundary Layer 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuester, Matthew Scott

    2014-04-18

    the incoming boundary layer. This dissertation describes an experiment specifically designed to study the shielding effect. Three roughness configurations, a deterministic distributed roughness patch, a slanted rectangle, and the combination of the two, were...

  2. Mineral Deformation at Earth's Core-Mantle Boundary

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Because Earth is mostly solid (except for its liquid-iron outer core), this convection causes deformation of solid rocks by plastic flow. At the core-mantle boundary (CMB), 2900 km...

  3. Technology adaptation and boundary management in bona fide virtual groups. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Huiyan

    2006-04-12

    and norms of media combination and media use. Group boundaries were preserved when the influence of outgroup members were constrained through media use, such as excluding them from team conference calls, filtering messages from external groups or members...

  4. A distributed boundary detection algorithm for multi-robot systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McLurkin, James

    We describe a distributed boundary detection algorithm suitable for use on multi-robot systems with dynamic network topologies. We assume that each robot has access to its local network geometry, which is the combination ...

  5. Uniformly Loaded Rectangular Thin Plates with Symmetrical Boundary Conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Milan Batista

    2010-01-27

    In the article the Fourier series analytical solutions of uniformly loaded rectangular thin plates with symmetrical boundary conditions are considered. For all the cases the numerical values are tabulated.

  6. Fusion of conformal interfaces and bulk induced boundary RG flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anatoly Konechny

    2015-09-25

    We consider the basic radius changing conformal interface for a free compact boson. After investigating different theoretical aspects of this object we focus on the fusion of this interface with conformal boundary conditions. At fractions of the self-dual radius there exist exceptional D-branes. It was argued in [1] that changing the radius in the bulk induces a boundary RG flow. Following [2] we conjecture that fusing the basic radius changing interface (that changes the radius from a fraction of the self-dual radius) with the exceptional boundary conditions gives the boundary condition which is the end point of the RG flow considered in [1]. By studying the fusion singularities we recover RG logarithms and see, in particular instances, how they get resummed into power singularities. We discuss what quantities need to be calculated to gain full non-perturbative control over the fusion.

  7. Quantum Brownian motion near a point-like reflecting boundary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. A. De Lorenci; E. S. Moreira Jr.; M. M. Silva

    2014-07-07

    The Brownian motion of a test particle interacting with a quantum scalar field in the presence of a perfectly reflecting boundary is studied in (1 + 1)-dimensional flat spacetime. Particularly, the expressions for dispersions in velocity and position of the particle are explicitly derived and their behaviors examined. The results are similar to those corresponding to an electric charge interacting with a quantum electromagnetic field near a reflecting plane boundary, mainly regarding the divergent behavior of the dispersions at the origin (where the boundary is placed), and at the time interval corresponding to a round trip of a light pulse between the particle and the boundary. We close by addressing some effects of allowing the position of the particle to fluctuate.

  8. Boundary Circles of Mixed Phase Space, Hamiltonian Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Or Alus; Shmuel Fishman; James D. Meiss

    2014-10-28

    The phase space of an area-preserving map typically contains infinitely many elliptic islands embedded in a chaotic sea. Orbits near the boundary of a chaotic region have been observed to stick for long times, strongly influencing their transport properties. The boundary is composed of invariant circles, called "Boundary circles." We investigate the distribution of rotation numbers of boundary circles for the Henon quadratic map and show that the probability of occurrence of small elements of their continued fraction expansions is larger than would be expected for a number chosen at random. However, large elements occur with probabilities distributed proportionally to the random case. These results have implications for models of transport in mixed phase space.

  9. Atomic Scale Details of Defect-Boundary Interactions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Di

    2014-12-18

    The study is aimed to understand atomic scale details of defect-boundary interactions, which are critical to develop radiation tolerant fuel cladding materials for harsher neutron environments. By means of molecular dynamics simulations, we...

  10. Casimir Energy due to a Semi-Infinite Plane Boundary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Ahmedov; I. H. Duru

    2006-08-25

    Following the derivation of the Green function for the massless scalar field satisfying the Dirichlet boundary condition on the Plane (x > 0, y = 0), we calculate the Casimir energy.

  11. Interaction between surface and atmosphere in a convective boundary layer /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garai, Anirban

    2013-01-01

    of cold fluid constitute most of the heat transport andevent cold air descends to the ground, heat transport fromcold air during sweep events. The convective boundary layer has a great influence on moisture transport,

  12. Computation of Mixed Type Functional Differential Boundary Value Problems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abell, Kate A.; Elmer, Christopher E.; Humphries, A. R.; Van Vleck, Erik

    2005-09-05

    We study boundary value differential-difference equations where the difference terms may contain both advances and delays. Special attention is paid to connecting orbits, in particular to the modeling of the tails after ...

  13. Grain boundary relaxation strengthening of nanocrystalline Ni–W alloys

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rupert, Timothy J.

    The hardening effect caused by the relaxation of nonequilibrium grain boundary structure has been explored in nanocrystalline Ni–W alloys. First, the kinetics of relaxation hardening are studied, showing that higher annealing ...

  14. Eddy-mean flow interactions in western boundary current jets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waterman, Stephanie N

    2009-01-01

    This thesis examines the nature of eddy-mean flow interactions in western boundary current jets and recirculation gyre dynamics from both theoretical and observational perspectives. It includes theoretical studies of ...

  15. Fusion of conformal interfaces and bulk induced boundary RG flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Konechny, Anatoly

    2015-01-01

    We consider the basic radius changing conformal interface for a free compact boson. After investigating different theoretical aspects of this object we focus on the fusion of this interface with conformal boundary conditions. At fractions of the self-dual radius there exist exceptional D-branes. It was argued in [1] that changing the radius in the bulk induces a boundary RG flow. Following [2] we conjecture that fusing the basic radius changing interface (that changes the radius from a fraction of the self-dual radius) with the exceptional boundary conditions gives the boundary condition which is the end point of the RG flow considered in [1]. By studying the fusion singularities we recover RG logarithms and see, in particular instances, how they get resummed into power singularities. We discuss what quantities need to be calculated to gain full non-perturbative control over the fusion.

  16. Grain boundary and triple junction diffusion in nanocrystalline copper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wegner, M. Leuthold, J.; Peterlechner, M.; Divinski, S. V.; Song, X.; Wilde, G.

    2014-09-07

    Grain boundary and triple junction diffusion in nanocrystalline Cu samples with grain sizes, ?d?, of ?35 and ?44?nm produced by spark plasma sintering were investigated by the radiotracer method using the {sup 63}Ni isotope. The measured diffusivities, D{sub eff}, are comparable with those determined previously for Ni grain boundary diffusion in well-annealed, high purity, coarse grained, polycrystalline copper, substantiating the absence of a grain size effect on the kinetic properties of grain boundaries in a nanocrystalline material at grain sizes d???35?nm. Simultaneously, the analysis predicts that if triple junction diffusion of Ni in Cu is enhanced with respect to the corresponding grain boundary diffusion rate, it is still less than 500?D{sub gb} within the temperature interval from 420?K to 470?K.

  17. Numerical simulations of supercell interactions with thermal boundaries 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kay, Michael Paul

    1999-01-01

    to examine the effects of the interaction of simulated supercede thunderstorms with thermal boundaries on storm morphology and low-level rotation. This study differs from previous supercede modeling studies that use homogeneous initial conditions. A non...

  18. Flavor twisted boundary conditions in the Breit frame

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jiang, F.-J.; Tiburzi, B. C.

    2008-08-01

    We use a generalization of chiral perturbation theory to account for the effects of flavor twisted boundary conditions in the Breit frame. The relevant framework for two light flavors is an SU(6|4) partially quenched theory, where the extra valence quarks differ only by their boundary conditions. Focusing on the pion electromagnetic form factor, finite volume corrections are calculated at next-to-leading order in the chiral expansion and are estimated to be small on current lattices.

  19. Biofuel Boundaries: Estimating the Medium-Term Supply Potential of Domestic Biofuels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Andrew; O'Hare, Michael; Farrell, Alexander

    2007-01-01

    Biofuel Boundaries: Estimating the Medium-Term SupplyAugust 22, 2007 Biofuel Boundaries: Estimating the Medium-significant amount of liquid biofuel (equivalent to 30-100%

  20. Why Cryptosystems Fail Ross Anderson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perrig, Adrian

    and other organisations to keep in- formation secure. It is a complex subject, and its national security. In this article, we present the results of a survey of the failure modes of retail banking systems, which, there is no such learning mechanism. The history of the subject ([K1], [W1]) shows the same mistakes being made over

  1. Alan Levander John B. Anderson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    Structural Geology ESCI 428 Geologic Interpretation of Reflection Seismic Profiles ESCI 464 Global Tectonics

  2. Alan Levander John B. Anderson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    Advanced Structural Geology ESCI 428 Geologic Interpretation of Reflection Seismic Profiles ESCI 464 Global

  3. Kelliher, Joseph From: Anderson, Margot

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    modules to form a sirgle, uriform glass pare Thvugh a ret- retenri arrngarent with Cetral Maine Powe; surplus solar electnaty is oqprted to the utility gnct effectivly spirug tde...

  4. Christine Anderson-Cook: An

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D BGene NetworkNuclearDNP 2008 1 NeutrinoAjinjeru Christine

  5. Cover Illustration by Stephen Anderson

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room News PublicationsAuditsClusterInformationContractCorporate CultureCounting smallN N O V A T I O

  6. Amanda Anderson | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n c i p a l De p u t y AEfficiency RebateFederal Energyaluminum

  7. Arlene Anderson | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirley Ann JacksonDepartment of EnergyResearchers atDayWhen do WeatherizationEnergy Poneman |Arlene

  8. Anita Anderson | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels DataEnergy Webinar:I Due Date Adv.Alison MarkovitzAmped Up!AnalyticalAnita

  9. Mantle helium and carbon isotopes in Separation Creek Geothermal Springs, Three Sisters area, Central Oregon: Evidence for renewed volcanic activity or a long term steady state system?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    van Soest, M.C.; Kennedy, B.M.; Evans, W.C.; Mariner, R.H.

    2002-04-30

    Cold bubbling springs in the Separation Creek area, the locus of current uplift at South Sister volcano show strong mantle signatures in helium and carbon isotopes and CO{sub 2}/{sup 3}He. This suggests the presence of fresh basaltic magma in the volcanic plumbing system. Currently there is no evidence to link this system directly to the uplift, which started in 1998. To the contrary, all geochemical evidence suggests that there is a long-lived geothermal system in the Separation Creek area, which has not significantly changed since the early 1990s. There was no archived helium and carbon data, so a definite conclusion regarding the strong mantle signature observed in these tracers cannot yet be drawn. There is a distinct discrepancy between the yearly magma supply required to explain the current uplift (0.006 km{sup 3}/yr) and that required to explain the discharge of CO{sub 2} from the system (0.0005 km{sup 3}/yr). This discrepancy may imply that the chemical signal associated with the increase in magma supply has not reached the surface yet. With respect to this the small changes observed at upper Mesa Creek require further attention, due to the recent volcanic vent in that area it may be the location were the chemical signal related to the uplift can most quickly reach the surface. Occurrence of such strong mantle signals in cold/diffuse geothermal systems suggests that these systems should not be ignored during volcano monitoring or geothermal evaluation studies. Although the surface-expression of these springs in terms of heat is minimal, the chemistry carries important information concerning the size and nature of the underlying high-temperature system and any changes taking place in it.

  10. Computational and theoretical aspects of a grain-boundary model that accounts for grain misorientation and grain-boundary orientation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Gottschalk; A. McBride; B. D. Reddy; A. Javili; P. Wriggers; C. B. Hirschberger

    2015-05-06

    A detailed theoretical and numerical investigation of the infinitesimal single-crystal gradient plasticity and grain-boundary theory of Gurtin (2008) "A theory of grain boundaries that accounts automatically for grain misorientation and grain-boundary orientation". Journal of the Mechanics and Physics of Solids 56 (2), 640-662, is performed. The governing equations and flow laws are recast in variational form. The associated incremental problem is formulated in minimization form and provides the basis for the subsequent finite element formulation. Various choices of the kinematic measure used to characterize the ability of the grain boundary to impede the flow of dislocations are compared. An alternative measure is also suggested. A series of three-dimensional numerical examples serve to elucidate the theory.

  11. Biological monitoring of Upper Three Runs Creek, Savannah River Plant, Aiken County, South Carolina. Final report on macroinvertebrate stream assessments for F/H area ETF effluent discharge, July 1987--February 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Specht, W.L.

    1991-10-01

    In anticipation of the fall 1988 start up of effluent discharges into Upper Three Creek by the F/H Area Effluent Treatment Facility of the Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC, a two and one half year biological study was initiated in June 1987. Upper Three Runs Creek is an intensively studied fourth order stream known for its high species richness. Designed to assess the potential impact of F?H area effluent on the creek, the study includes qualitative and quantitative macroinvertebrate stream surveys at five sites, chronic toxicity testing of the effluent, water chemistry and bioaccumulation analysis. This final report presents the results of both pre-operational and post-operational qualitative and quantitative (artificial substrate) macroinvertebrate studies. Six quantitative and three qualitative studies were conducted prior to the initial release of the F/H ETF effluent and five quantitative and two qualitative studies were conducted post-operationally.

  12. Research by its nature explores the unknown, constantly pushing the boundaries of our experience. It is work best performed by those with deep

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    National Renewable Energy Laboratory Michael Schlender Chief Operating Officer, Associate Laboratory of Research was produced through a collaborative effort across Battelle-affiliated laboratories and has been Deputy Laboratory Director for Management Idaho National Laboratory Jack Anderson Deputy Director

  13. Diagenesis of sandstones from the Douglas Creek member of the Green River Formation (Eocene) at Red Wash field, Uintay County, Utah 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ray, Earl Scott

    1985-01-01

    . These wells, units 271 and 278 (Figure 2) are located near the edge of Red Wash field. Samples from Chevron uni t 278 were used in this study. Petrography Petrographic sections were prepared from core samples at intervals varying from . 25 to 1O m. A... OF SANDSTONES FROM THE DOUGLAS CREEK MEMBER OF THE GREEN RIVER FORMATION(EOCENE) AT RED WASH FIELDS UINTAH COUNTY@ UTAH A Thesis by EARL SCOTT RAY Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement...

  14. Homogenization of boundary value problems for monotone operators in perforated domains with rapidly oscillating boundary conditions of Fourier type

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrey Piatnitski; Volodymyr Rybalko

    2010-06-03

    The paper deals with homogenization problem for nonlinear elliptic and parabolic equations in a periodically perforated domain, a nonlinear Fourier boundary conditions being imposed on the perforation border. Under the assumptions that the studied differential equation satisfies monotonicity and 2-growth conditions and that the coefficient of the boundary operator is centered at each level set of unknown function, we show that the problem under consideration admits homogenization and derive the effective model.

  15. Homogenization of boundary value problems for monotone operators in perforated domains with rapidly oscillating boundary conditions of Fourier type

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piatnitski, Andrey

    2010-01-01

    The paper deals with homogenization problem for nonlinear elliptic and parabolic equations in a periodically perforated domain, a nonlinear Fourier boundary conditions being imposed on the perforation border. Under the assumptions that the studied differential equation satisfies monotonicity and 2-growth conditions and that the coefficient of the boundary operator is centered at each level set of unknown function, we show that the problem under consideration admits homogenization and derive the effective model.

  16. untitled

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    PRIEST RAPIDS I I I LOST CREEK SAVAGE RAPIDS I I I I I I I CHANDLER BIG CLIFF DETROIT GREEN PETER COUGAR FOSTER BLACK CANYON ANDERSON RANCH I DEXTER LOOKOUT POINT HILLS...

  17. Migration and reorientation of grain boundaries in Zn bicrystals during annealing in a high magnetic field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garmestani, Hamid

    Migration and reorientation of grain boundaries in Zn bicrystals during annealing in a high angles to the free surfaces are annealed in the field of 17 T. Boundaries migrate reorienting almost driven boundary migration. The absolute boundary mobility was measured to be about 2:5 Â 10À8 m4 /J s. Ó

  18. Structure and Chemistry of Yttria-Stabilized Cubic-Zirconia Symmetric Tilt Grain Boundaries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    Structure and Chemistry of Yttria-Stabilized Cubic-Zirconia Symmetric Tilt Grain Boundaries boundaries in yttria-stabilized cubic-zirconia, 5 (310) and near- 13 (510), are studied by Z [001] symmetric tilt grain boundaries in yttria-stabilized cubic-zirconia (YSZ). The grain boundaries

  19. Remedial investigation/feasibility study of the Clinch River/Poplar Creek Operable Unit. Volume 2. Biota and representative concentrations of contaminants. Appendixes A, B, C, D

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-03-01

    This report presents the findings of an investigation into contamination of the Clinch River and Poplar Creek near the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) in eastern Tennessee. For more than 50 years, various hazardous and radioactive substances have been released to the environment as a result of operations and waste management activities at the ORR. In 1989, the ORR was placed on the National Priorities List (NPL), established and maintained under the federal Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA). Under CERCLA, NPL sites must be investigated to determine the nature and extent of contamination at the site, assess the risk to human health and the environment posed by the site, and, if necessary, identify feasible remedial alternatives that could be used to clean the site and reduce risk. To facilitate the overall environmental restoration effort at the ORR, CERCLA activities are being implemented individually as distinct operable units (OU`s). This document is the combined Remedial Investigation and Feasibility Study Report for the Clinch River/Poplar Creek OU.

  20. Numerical modeling of the Snowmass Creek paleoglacier, Colorado, and climate in the Rocky Mountains during the Bull Lake glaciation (MIS 6)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eric M. Leonard; Mitchell A. Plummer; Paul E. Carrara

    2014-04-01

    Well-preserved moraines from the penultimate, or Bull Lake, glaciation of Snowmass Creek Valley in the Elk Range of Colorado present an opportunity to examine the character of the high-altitude climate in the Rocky Mountains during Marine Oxygen Isotope Stage 6. This study employs a 2-D coupled mass/energy balance and flow model to assess the magnitudes of temperature and precipitation change that could have sustained the glacier in mass-balance equilibrium at its maximum extent during the Bull Lake glaciation. Variable substrate effects on glacier flow and ice thickness make the modeling somewhat more complex than in geologically simpler settings. Model results indicate that a temperature depression of about 6.7°C compared with the present (1971–2000 AD) would have been necessary to sustain the Snowmass Creek glacier in mass-balance equilibrium during the Bull Lake glaciation, assuming no change in precipitation amount or seasonality. A 50% increase or decrease from modern precipitation would have been coupled with 5.2°C and 9.1°C Bull Lake temperature depressions respectively. Uncertainty in these modeled temperature depressions is about 1°C.

  1. Remedial investigation/feasibility study of the Clinch River/Poplar Creek operable unit. Volume 3: Appendixes E and F -- Risk assessment information

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-06-01

    This report presents the findings of an investigation into contamination of the Clinch River and Poplar Creek near the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) in eastern Tennessee. For more than 50 years, various hazardous and radioactive substances have been released to the environment as a result of operations and waste management activities at the ORR. In 1989, the ORR was placed on the National Priorities List (NPL), established and maintained under the federal Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA). Under CERCLA, NPL sites must be investigated to determine the nature and extent of contamination at the site, assess the risk to human health and the environment posed by the site, and, if necessary, identify feasible remedial alternatives that could be used to clean the site and reduce risk. To facilitate the overall environmental restoration effort at the ORR, CERCLA activities are being implemented individually as distinct operable units (OUs). This document is the combined Remedial Investigation and Feasibility Study Report for the Clinch River/Poplar Creek OU.

  2. Remedial investigation/feasibility study of the Clinch River/Poplar Creek Operable Unit. Volume 3. Risk assessment information. Appendixes E, F

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-03-01

    This report presents the findings of an investigation into contamination of the Clinch River and Poplar Creek near the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) in eastern Tennessee. For more than 50 years, various hazardous and radioactive substances have been released to the environment as a result of operations and waste management activities at the ORR. In 1989, the ORR was placed on the National Priorities List (NPL), established and maintained under the federal Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA). Under CERCLA, NPL sites must be investigated to determine the nature and extent of contamination at the site, assess the risk to human health and the environment posed by the site, and, if necessary, identify feasible remedial alternatives that could be used to clean the site and reduce risk. To facilitate the overall environmental restoration effort at the ORR, CERCLA activities are being implemented individually as distinct operable units (OUs). This document is Volume 3 of the combined Remedial Investigation and Feasibility Study Report for the Clinch River/Poplar Creek OU.

  3. Waste area grouping 2 Phase I task data report: Ecological risk assessment and White Oak Creek watershed screening ecological risk assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Efroymson, R.A.; Jackson, B.L.; Jones, D.S. [and others] [and others

    1996-05-01

    This report presents an ecological risk assessment for Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 2 based on the data collected in the Phase I remedial investigation (RI). It serves as an update to the WAG 2 screening ecological risk assessment that was performed using historic data. In addition to identifying potential ecological risks in WAG 2 that may require additional data collection, this report serves to determine whether there are ecological risks of sufficient magnitude to require a removal action or some other expedited remedial process. WAG 2 consists of White Oak Creek (WOC) and its tributaries downstream of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) main plant area, White Oak Lake (WOL), the White Oak Creek Embayment of the Clinch River, associated flood plains, and the associated groundwater. The WOC system drains the WOC watershed, an area of approximately 16.8 km{sup 2} that includes ORNL and associated WAGs. The WOC system has been exposed to contaminants released from ORNL and associated operations since 1943 and continues to receive contaminants from adjacent WAGs.

  4. Sedimentological, mineralogical and geochemical definition of oil-shale facies in the lower Parachute Creek Member of Green River Formation, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cole, R.D.

    1984-04-01

    Sedimentological, mineralogical and geochemical studies of two drill cores penetrating the lower Saline zone of the Parachute Creek Member (middle L-4 oil-shale zone through upper R-2 zone) of the Green River Formation in north-central Piceance Creek basin, Colorado, indicate the presence of two distinct oil-shale facies. The most abundant facies has laminated stratification and frequently occurs in the L-4, L-3 and L-2 oil-shale zones. The second, and subordinate facies, has ''streaked and blebby'' stratification and is most abundant in the R-4, R-3 and R-2 zones. Laminated oil shale originated by slow, regular sedimentation during meromictic phases of ancient Lake Uinta, whereas streaked and blebby oil shale was deposited by episodic, non-channelized turbidity currents. Laminated oil shale has higher contents of nahcolite, dawsonite, quartz, K-feldspar and calcite, but less dolomite/ankerite and albite than streaked and blebby oil shale. Ca-Mg-Fe carbonate minerals in laminated oil shale have more variable compositions than those in streaked and blebby shales. Streaked and blebby oil shale has more kerogen and a greater diversity of kerogen particles than laminated oil shale. Such variations may produce different pyrolysis reactions when each shale type is retorted.

  5. Report on the remedial investigation of Bear Creek Valley at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 6: Appendix G -- Baseline ecological risk assessment report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-09-01

    This Remedial Investigation (RI) Report characterizes the nature and extent of contamination, evaluates the fate and transport of contaminants, and assesses risk to human health and the environment resulting from waste disposal and other US Department of Energy (DOE) operations in Bear Creek Valley (BCV). BCV, which is located within the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) encompasses multiple waste units containing hazardous and radioactive wastes arising from operations at the adjacent Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. The primary waste units discussed in this RI Report are the S-3 Site, Oil Landfarm (OLF), Boneyard/Burnyard (BYBY), Sanitary Landfill 1 (SL 1), and Bear Creek Burial Grounds (BCBG). These waste units, plus the contaminated media resulting from environmental transport of the wastes from these units, are the subject of this RI. This BCV RI Report represents the first major step in the decision-making process for the BCV watershed. The RI results, in concert with the follow-on FS will form the basis for the Proposed Plan and Record of Decision for all BCV sites. This comprehensive decision document process will meet the objectives of the watershed approach for BCV. Appendix G contains ecological risks for fish, benthic invertebrates, soil invertebrates, plants, small mammals, deer, and predator/scavengers (hawks and fox). This risk assessment identified significant ecological risks from chemicals in water, sediment, soil, and shallow ground water. Metals and PCBs are the primary contaminants of concern.

  6. Pipeline corridors through wetlands -- Impacts on plant communities: Little Timber Creek Crossing, Gloucester County, New Jersey. Topical report, August 1991--January 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shem, L.M.; Zimmerman, R.E.; Alsum, S.K.; Van Dyke, G.D. |

    1994-12-01

    The goal of the Gas Research Institute Wetland Corridors Program is to document impacts of existing pipelines on the wetlands they traverse. To accomplish this goal, 12 existing wetland crossings were surveyed. These sites varied in elapsed time since pipeline construction, wetland type, pipeline installation techniques, and right-of-way (ROW) management practices. This report presents results of a survey conducted over the period of August 5--7, 1991, at the Little Timber Creek crossing in Gloucester County, New Jersey, where three pipelines, constructed in 1950, 1960, and 1990, cross the creek and associated wetlands. The old side of the ROW, created by the installation of the 1960 pipeline, was designed to contain a raised peat bed over the 1950 pipeline and an open-water ditch over the 1960 pipeline. The new portion of the ROW, created by installation of the 1990 pipeline, has an open-water ditch over the pipeline (resulting from settling of the backfill) and a raised peat bed (resulting from rebound of compacted peat). Both the old and new ROWs contain dense stands of herbs; the vegetation on the old ROW was more similar to that in the adjacent natural area than was vegetation in the new ROW. The ROW increased species and habitat diversity in the wetlands. It may contribute to the spread of purple loosestrife and affect species sensitive to habitat fragmentation.

  7. Twenty-Five Years of Ecological Recovery of East Fork Poplar Creek: Review of Environmental Problems and Remedial Actions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, John G; Loar, James M; Stewart, Arthur J

    2011-01-01

    In May 1985, a National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System permit was issued for the Department of Energy s Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12 Complex) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, USA, allowing discharge of effluents to East Fork Poplar Creek (EFPC). The effluents ranged from large volumes of chlorinated oncethrough cooling water and cooling tower blow-down to smaller discharges of treated and untreated process wastewaters, which contained a mixture of heavy metals, organics, and nutrients, especially nitrates. As a condition of the permit, a Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP) was developed to meet two major objectives: demonstrate that the established effluent limitations were protecting the classified uses of EFPC, and document the ecological effects resulting from implementing a Water Pollution Control Program at the Y-12 Complex. The second objective is the primary focus of the other papers in this special series. This paper provides a history of pollution and the remedial actions that were implemented; describes the geographic setting of the study area; and characterizes the physicochemical attributes of the sampling sites, including changes in stream flow and temperature that occurred during implementation of the BMAP. Most of the actions taken under the Water Pollution Control Program were completed between 1986 and 1998, with as many as four years elapsing between some of the most significant actions. The Water Pollution Control Program included constructing nine new wastewater treatment facilities and implementation of several other pollution-reducing measures, such as a best management practices plan; area-source pollution control management; and various spill-prevention projects. Many of the major actions had readily discernable effects on the chemical and physical conditions of EFPC. As controls on effluents entering the stream were implemented, pollutant concentrations generally declined and, at least initially, the volume of water discharged from the Y-12 Complex declined. This reduction in discharge was of ecological concern and led to implementation of a flow management program for EFPC. Implementing flow management, in turn, led to substantial changes in chemical and physical conditions of the stream: stream discharge nearly doubled and stream temperatures decreased, becoming more similar to those in reference streams. While water quality clearly improved, meeting water quality standards alone does not guarantee protection of a waterbody s biological integrity. Results from studies on the ecological changes stemming from pollution-reduction actions, such as those presented in this series, also are needed to understand how best to restore or protect biological integrity and enhance ecological recovery in stream ecosystems. With a better knowledge of the ecological consequences of their decisions, environmental managers can better evaluate alternative actions and more accurately predict their effects.

  8. Effective velocity boundary condition at a mixed slip surface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sbragaglia, M

    2006-01-01

    This paper studies the nature of the effective velocity boundary conditions for liquid flow over a plane boundary on which small free-slip islands are randomly distributed. It is found that, to lowest order in the area fraction $\\beta$ covered by free-slip regions with characteristic size $a$, a macroscopic Navier-type slip condition emerges with a slip length of the order of $a\\beta$. The study is motivated by recent experiments which suggest that gas nano-bubbles may form on solid walls and may be responsible for the appearance of a partial slip boundary conditions for liquid flow. The results are also relevant for ultra-hydrophobic surfaces exploiting the so-called ``lotus effect''.

  9. Explicit Expressions for 3D Boundary Integrals in Potential Theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nintcheu Fata, Sylvain

    2009-01-01

    On employing isoparametric, piecewise linear shape functions over a flat triangular domain, exact expressions are derived for all surface potentials involved in the numerical solution of three-dimensional singular and hyper-singular boundary integral equations of potential theory. These formulae, which are valid for an arbitrary source point in space, are represented as analytic expressions over the edges of the integration triangle. They can be used to solve integral equations defined on polygonal boundaries via the collocation method or may be utilized as analytic expressions for the inner integrals in the Galerkin technique. Also, the constant element approximation can be directly obtained with no extra effort. Sample problems solved by the collocation boundary element method for the Laplace equation are included to validate the proposed formulae.

  10. Boundary-layer control by electric fields A feasibility study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mendes, R V

    1998-01-01

    A problem of great concern in aviation and submarine propulsion is the control of the boundary layer and, in particular, the methods to extend the laminar region as a means to decrease noise and fuel consumption. In this paper we study the flow of air along an airfoil when a layer of ionized gas and a longitudinal electric field are created in the boundary layer region. By deriving scaling solutions and more accurate numerical solutions we discuss the possibility of achieving significant boundary layer control for realistic physical parameters. Practical design formulas and criteria are obtained. We also discuss the perspectives for active control of the laminar-to-turbulent transition fluctuations by electromagnetic field modulation.

  11. Experimental studies of pedestrian flows under different boundary conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Jun

    2015-01-01

    In this article the dynamics of pedestrian streams in four different scenarios are compared empirically to investigate the influence of boundary conditions on it. The Voronoi method, which allows high resolution and small fluctuations of measured density in time and space, is used to analyze the experiments. It is found that pedestrian movement in systems with different boundary conditions (open, periodic boundary conditions and outflow restrained) presents various characteristics especially when the density is larger than 2 m-2. In open corridor systems the specific flow increases continuously with increasing density till 4 m-2. The specific flow keeps constant in systems with restrained outflow, whereas it decreases from 1 (m.s)-1 to zero in system with closed periodical condition.

  12. Wind on the boundary for the Abelian sandpile model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Philippe Ruelle

    2007-07-25

    We continue our investigation of the two-dimensional Abelian sandpile model in terms of a logarithmic conformal field theory with central charge c=-2, by introducing two new boundary conditions. These have two unusual features: they carry an intrinsic orientation, and, more strangely, they cannot be imposed uniformly on a whole boundary (like the edge of a cylinder). They lead to seven new boundary condition changing fields, some of them being in highest weight representations (weights -1/8, 0 and 3/8), some others belonging to indecomposable representations with rank 2 Jordan cells (lowest weights 0 and 1). Their fusion algebra appears to be in full agreement with the fusion rules conjectured by Gaberdiel and Kausch.

  13. Edge Plasma Boundary Layer Generated By Kink Modes in Tokamaks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L.E. Zakharov

    2010-11-22

    This paper describes the structure of the electric current generated by external kink modes at the plasma edge using the ideally conducting plasma model. It is found that the edge current layer is created by both wall touching and free boundary kink modes. Near marginal stability, the total edge current has a universal expression as a result of partial compensation of the ?-functional surface current by the bulk current at the edge. The resolution of an apparent paradox with the pressure balance across the plasma boundary in the presence of the surface currents is provided.

  14. Controlling Electromagnetic Fields at Boundaries of Arbitrary Geometries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Teo, Jonathon Yi Han; Molardi, Carlo; Genevet, Patrice

    2015-01-01

    Rapid developments in the emerging field of stretchable and conformable photonics necessitate analytical expressions for boundary conditions at metasurfaces of arbitrary geometries. Here, we introduce the concept of conformal boundary optics: a design theory that determines the optical response for designer input and output fields at such interfaces. Given any object, we can realise coatings to achieve exotic effects like optical illusions and anomalous diffraction behaviour. This approach is relevant to a broad range of applications from conventional refractive optics to the design of the next-generation of wearable optical components. This concept can be generalized to other fields of research where designer interfaces with nontrivial geometries are encountered.

  15. Boundary conditions control for a Shallow-Water model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kazantsev, Eugene

    2012-01-01

    A variational data assimilation technique was used to estimate optimal discretization of interpolation operators and derivatives in the nodes adjacent to the rigid boundary. Assimilation of artificially generated observational data in the shallow-water model in a square box and assimilation of real observations in the model of the Black sea are discussed. It is shown in both experiments that controlling the discretization of operators near a rigid boundary can bring the model solution closer to observations as in the assimilation window and beyond the window. This type of control allows also to improve climatic variability of the model.

  16. Gradient zone boundary control in salt gradient solar ponds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hull, John R. (Downers Grove, IL)

    1984-01-01

    A method and apparatus for suppressing zone boundary migration in a salt gradient solar pond includes extending perforated membranes across the pond at the boundaries, between the convective and non-convective zones, the perforations being small enough in size to prevent individual turbulence disturbances from penetrating the hole, but being large enough to allow easy molecular diffusion of salt thereby preventing the formation of convective zones in the gradient layer. The total area of the perforations is a sizable fraction of the membrane area to allow sufficient salt diffusion while preventing turbulent entrainment into the gradient zone.

  17. Logarithmic CFT on the Boundary and the World-Sheet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alex Lewis

    2000-09-12

    The correspondences between logarithmic operators in the CFTs on the boundary of AdS_3 and on the world-sheet and dipole fields in the bulk are studied using the free field formulation of the SL(2,C)/SU(2) WZNW model. We find that logarithmic operators on the boundary are related to operators on the world-sheet which are in indecomposable representations of SL(2). The Knizhnik-Zamolodchikov equation is used to determine the conditions for those representations to appear in the operator product expansions of the model.

  18. Polymer Effects on Heat Transport in Laminar Boundary Layer Flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roberto Benzi; Emily S. C. Ching; Vivien W. S. Chu

    2011-04-27

    We consider a laminar Blasius boundary-layer flow above a slightly heated horizontal plate and study the effect of polymer additives on the heat transport. We show that the action of the polymers can be understood as a space-dependent effective viscosity that first increases from the zero-shear value then decreases exponentially back to the zero-shear value as one moves away from the boundary. We find that with such an effective viscosity, both the horizontal and vertical velocities near the plate are decreased thus leading to an increase in the friction drag and a decrease in the heat transport in the flow.

  19. Rocky Mountain Geology, v. 33, no. 2, p. 161-179, 7 figs., October, 1998 161 Persistent influence of Proterozoic accretionary boundaries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Humphreys, Eugene

    , Transcontinental arch, and Yavapai­ Mazatzal province boundary), suggesting that older boundaries influenced

  20. Falls Creek Hydroelectric Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gustavus Electric Company; Richard Levitt; DOE Project Officer - Keith Bennett

    2007-06-12

    This project was for planning and construction of a 700kW hydropower project on the Fall River near Gustavus, Alaska.

  1. Declared Wolf Creek

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum Based| Department8, 20153Daniel Boff AboutofPlumbing Manufacturers Institute

  2. Static plane symmetric relativistic fluids and empty repelling singular boundaries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ricardo E. Gamboa Saravi

    2007-12-18

    We present a detailed analysis of the general exact solution of Einstein's equation corresponding to a static and plane symmetric distribution of matter with density proportional to pressure. We study the geodesics in it and we show that this simple spacetime exhibits very curious properties. In particular, it has a free of matter repelling singular boundary and all geodesics bounce off it.

  3. Higher-dimensional perfect fluids and empty singular boundaries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ricardo E. Gamboa Saravi

    2012-04-22

    In order to find out whether empty singular boundaries can arise in higher dimensional Gravity, we study the solution of Einstein's equations consisting in a ($N+2$)-dimensional static and hyperplane symmetric perfect fluid satisfying the equation of state $\\rho=\\eta\\, p$, being $\\rho$ an arbitrary constant and $N\\geq2$. We show that this spacetime has some weird properties. In particular, in the case $\\eta>-1$, it has an empty (without matter) repulsive singular boundary. We also study the behavior of geodesics and the Cauchy problem for the propagation of massless scalar field in this spacetime. For $\\eta>1$, we find that only vertical null geodesics touch the boundary and bounce, and all of them start and finish at $z=\\infty$; whereas non-vertical null as well as all time-like ones are bounded between two planes determined by initial conditions. We obtain that the Cauchy problem for the propagation of a massless scalar field is well-posed and waves are completely reflected at the singularity, if we only demand the waves to have finite energy, although no boundary condition is required.

  4. Modeling of dislocationgrain boundary interactions in FCC metals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cai, Wei

    - dynamics simulations (DD). The conceptual approach to be followed for single-crystal plasticity is straight using atomistic methods. For polycrystal plasticity, however, the prob- lem is significantly more complex due to the role of grain boundaries (GB) in plastic deformation. While the in- teractions between

  5. Extending Boundaries with Meta-Design and Cultures of Participation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fischer, Gerhard

    urban planning problems, (3) modeling the buildings of the world in 3D, and (4) using Smart Grids to support energy sustainability. These examples show how meta- design and cultures of participation of participation, systemic problems, boundaries, distances, motivation, control, socio-technical environments ACM

  6. Measurements of grain boundary properties in nanocrystalline ceramics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chiang, Y.M.; Smyth, I.P.; Terwilliger, C.D. (Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (USA). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering); Petuskey, W.T. (Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (USA). Dept. of Chemistry); Eastman, J.A. (Argonne National Lab., IL (USA))

    1990-11-01

    The advent of nanocrystalline ceramics prepared by a variety of solution-chemical and vapor deposition methods offers a unique opportunity for the determination grain boundary properties by bulk'' thermodynamic methods. In this paper we discuss results from two types of measurements on model nanocrystalline ceramics. The first is a solution thermodynamic measurement of the activity of nanocrystalline SiC in polycarbosilane-derived silicon carbide fibers (Nicalon). Structural studies have shown that Nicalon consists of well-ordered cubic ({beta} or 3C polytype) SiC grains separated by a very thin grain boundary layer (<1 nm thick) containing the oxygen. The physical properties and chemical reactivity of these fibers are distinctly different from that of bulk silicon carbide. Direct measurement of the alloy composition and analysis of the microstructure has allowed the dissolution reaction to be identified and a lower limit for the SiC activity in the nanocrystalline form to be determined. A second method of measuring grain boundary properties we have investigated for nanocrystalline Si and TiO{sub 2} is high temperature calorimetry. In appropriate samples the grain boundary enthalpy can be measured through the heat evolved during grain growth. Preliminary results on nanocrystalline Si prepared by the recrystallization of amorphous evaporated films and on TiO{sub 2} condensed from the vapor phase are discussed. 29 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  7. PPRODO: Prediction of Protein Domain Boundaries Using Neural Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Jooyoung

    PPRODO: Prediction of Protein Domain Boundaries Using Neural Networks Jaehyun Sim, Seung-Yeon Kim-BLAST. A 10-fold cross-validation technique is performed to obtain the parameters of neural networks using; neural network INTRODUCTION Domains are semi-independent 3-dimensional (3D) units in proteins, and often

  8. Subjective surfaces: a geometric model for boundary completion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sarti, Alessandro; Malladi, Ravi; Sethian, J.A.

    2000-06-01

    We present a geometric model and a computational method for segmentation of images with missing boundaries. In many situations, the human visual system fills in missing gaps in edges and boundaries, building and completing information that is not present. Boundary completion presents a considerable challenge in computer vision, since most algorithms attempt to exploit existing data. A large body of work concerns completion models, which postulate how to construct missing data; these models are often trained and specific to particular images. In this paper, we take the following, alternative perspective: we consider a reference point within an image as given, and then develop an algorithm which tries to build missing information on the basis of the given point of view and the available information as boundary data to the algorithm. Starting from this point of view, a surface is constructed. It is then evolved with the mean curvature flow in the metric induced by the image until a piecewise constant solution is reached. We test the computational model on modal completion, amodal completion, texture, photo and medical images. We extend the geometric model and the algorithm to 3D in order to extract shapes from low signal/noise ratio medical volumes. Results in 3D echocardiography and 3D fetal echography are presented.

  9. A Navier boundary value problem for Willmore surfaces of revolution #

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grunau, Hans-Christoph

    A Navier boundary value problem for Willmore surfaces of revolution # Klaus Deckelnick + and Hans Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG) is gratefully acknowledged + e­mail: Klaus.Deckelnick@ovgu.de # e­mail: Hans of closed Willmore surfaces of prescribed genus was proved by Simon [Sn] and Bauer & Kuwert [BK]. Con

  10. Boundary value problems for the onedimensional Willmore equation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grunau, Hans-Christoph

    Boundary value problems for the one­dimensional Willmore equation Klaus Deckelnick # and Hans--known that the corresponding surface # has to satisfy the Willmore equation #H + 2H(H 2 -K) = 0 on #, (1) # e­mail: Klaus Willmore surfaces of prescribed genus has been proved by Simon [Sn] and Bauer & Kuwert [BK]. Also, local

  11. Boundary value problems for the one-dimensional Willmore equation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grunau, Hans-Christoph

    Boundary value problems for the one-dimensional Willmore equation Klaus Deckelnick and Hans­known that the corresponding surface has to satisfy the Willmore equation H + 2H(H2 - K) = 0 on , (1) e-mail: Klaus Willmore surfaces of prescribed genus has been proved by Simon [Sn] and Bauer & Kuwert [BK]. Also, local

  12. NASA/TM2014218280 Analysis of Well-Clear Boundary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muñoz, César A.

    NASA/TM­2014­218280 Analysis of Well-Clear Boundary Models for the Integration of UAS in the NAS Research Center, Hampton, Virginia June 2014 #12;NASA STI Program . . . in Profile Since its founding, NASA has been dedicated to the advancement of aeronautics and space science. The NASA scientific

  13. Zoning boundaries can make good neighbors in conservation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zoning boundaries can make good neighbors in conservation A panda with a GPS collar in the Wolong changes might be needed." A unique case study that does of one of the world's renowned nature reserves giant panda census, geographic data on locations of roads and human establishments, and new data

  14. well posedness of Hyperbolic Initial Boundary Value Problems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Métivier, Guy

    direction, we show on an example that, even for symmetric systems in the sense of Friedrichs, with variable and the class M . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 2.3 The incoming bundle, block decomposition and if the boundary condition is maximal 2 #12;strictly dissipative , then for all T 0, u0 L2(Rd), f L1([0, T]; L2

  15. Meta-Design: Expanding Boundaries and Redistributing Control in Design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fischer, Gerhard

    Meta-Design: Expanding Boundaries and Redistributing Control in Design Gerhard Fischer Center for Lifelong Learning and Design University of Colorado, Boulder http://l3d.cs.colorado.edu/~gerhard/ Abstract. Meta-design is an emerging conceptual framework aimed at defining and creating socio

  16. UNCORRECTED 2 Multiscale boundary conditions in crystalline solids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qian, Dong

    UNCORRECTED PROOF 1 2 Multiscale boundary conditions in crystalline solids: 3 Theory scale simulations of crystalline solids. Based on Fourier analysis of regular lattices structures with a crystalline gold substrate. Complete atomistic resolution on the coarse grain is alternatively 19 employed

  17. Radiating Instability of a Meridional Boundary Current HRISTINA G. HRISTOVA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    energy away from the source of instability. It can be contrasted with a trapped instability ocean basins. Un- stable boundary currents can be an important source of eddy kinetic energy. Radiating instabilities propagate energy away from the locally unstable region by coupling to the free

  18. Two-Baryon Systems with Twisted Boundary Conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zohreh Davoudi

    2014-11-07

    I derive the most general quantization condition for energy eigenvalues of two interacting baryons in a finite cubic volume when arbitrary twisted boundary conditions are imposed on their finite-volume wavefunctions. These quantization conditions are used, along with experimentally known scattering parameters of two-nucleon systems in the coupled 3S1-3D1 channels, to demonstrate the expected effect of a selection of twisted boundary conditions on the spectrum of the deuteron. It is shown that an order of magnitude reduction in the finite-volume corrections to the deuteron binding energy arise in moderate volumes with a proper choice of boundary conditions on the proton and the neutron, or by averaging the result of periodic and anti-periodic boundary conditions. These observations mean that a sub-percent accuracy can be achieved in the determination of the deuteron binding energy at (spatial) volumes as small as ~(9[fm])^3 in upcoming lattice QCD calculations of this nucleus with physical light-quark masses. The results reviewed in this talk are presented in details in Ref. [1].

  19. Boundary Integral Methods for Multicomponent Fluids and Multiphase Materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . An important and complicating property of such systems is surface tension (or surface energy in the materials of Mathematical Sciences, New York University, New York, NY 10012. 1 #12;governing the bulk fluid or materialBoundary Integral Methods for Multicomponent Fluids and Multiphase Materials T.Y. Hou J

  20. Stratified Flow over Topography: Wave Generation and Boundary Layer Separation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sutherland, Bruce

    Stratified Flow over Topography: Wave Generation and Boundary Layer Separation B. R. Sutherland topography. We have chosen to use periodic, finite­amplitude hills which are representative of the Earth upon internal waves generated by flow over rough topography. 1 Introduction Internal waves propagate