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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bottom-up energy end-use" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

China's energy and emissions outlook to 2050: Perspectives from bottom-up energy end-use model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Implications for Chinese energy demand and imports in 2020.for China to reduce energy demand and emissions. Thisand physical drivers of energy demand and thereby help

Zhou, Nan

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Implications of maximizing China's technical potential for residential end-use energy efficiency: A 2030 outlook from the bottom-up  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

4 3. Basis for Residential Energy Demandand the subsequent energy demand and CO 2 emissionsa smaller share of total energy demand followed by space

Khanna, Nina

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Bottom-Up Energy Analysis System (BUENAS) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

form form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Bottom-Up Energy Analysis System (BUENAS) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: BUENAS Agency/Company /Organization: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Sector: Energy Focus Area: Buildings, Energy Efficiency Topics: Baseline projection, - Macroeconomic, Pathways analysis Resource Type: Software/modeling tools Website: www.superefficient.org/Resource%20Library/BUENAS%20-%20Bottom-Up%20Ene References: BUENAS Homepage[1] BUENAS for SEAD[2] Logo: BUENAS BUENAS stands for "Bottom-Up Energy Analysis System". It is used to project

4

Bottom Up and Country Led: A New Framework for Climate Action | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bottom Up and Country Led: A New Framework for Climate Action Bottom Up and Country Led: A New Framework for Climate Action Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Bottom Up and Country Led: A New Framework for Climate Action Agency/Company /Organization: Booz and Company Sector: Energy, Land, Climate Topics: Low emission development planning Resource Type: Publications Website: www.booz.com/global/home/what_we_think/reports_and_white_papers/ic-dis Cost: Free Bottom Up and Country Led: A New Framework for Climate Action Screenshot References: Bottom Up and Country Led: A New Framework for Climate Action[1] "As delegates gather for the Climate Change Conference in Cancun in late 2010, they can benefit from familiarizing themselves with the set of tools available for mitigation and adaptation, as well as how these tools can fit

5

Bottom-Up Energy Analysis System - Methodology and Results  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

country energy coverage will total 77% of global demand. Thetotal energy demand in 2005[6], the countries covered account for 62% of global

McNeil, Michael A.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Bottoms Up  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Broadcast Transcript: "Bottoms up!" Or, "gan bei," as they say here in China. But what are you drinking? It could either be the authentic 144-proof sorghum-based liquor Moutai, or a clever counterfeit. Moutai has been ...

Hacker, Randi; Boyd, David

2011-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

7

Bottom-Up Energy Analysis System - Methodology and Results  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

World Energy Outlook [71]. The projection of electricity carbon factors is based on expectations of the carbon intensity

McNeil, Michael A.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Bottom-Up Energy Analysis System - Methodology and Results  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

market shares Industrial electric motors activity parametersInitiative. in IEA Electric Motor Systems Workshop. 2006.Standards for Electric Motors in Brazilian Industry. Energy

McNeil, Michael A.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Bottom-Up Energy Analysis System - Methodology and Results  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy-Efficiency Standards for Electric Motors in Brazilianefficiency definitions Product class market shares Industrial electric motorsMotor Efficiency Standards - SEEEM Harmonization Initiative. in IEA Electric

McNeil, Michael A.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Two Paths to Transforming Markets through Public Sector Energy Efficiency: Bottom Up versus Top Down  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Two Paths to Transforming Markets through Public Sector Energy Efficiency: Bottom Up versus Top National Laboratory (LBNL) Edgar Villaseñor Franco, Promoting an Energy-efficient Public Sector (PEPS (Promoting an Energy-efficient Public Sector) program, demonstrates the need for flexibility in designing

11

Two Paths to Transforming Markets through Public Sector EnergyEfficiency: Bottom Up versus Top Down  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The evolution of government purchasing initiatives in Mexicoand China, part of the PEPS (Promoting an Energy-efficient Public Sector)program, demonstrates the need for flexibility in designingenergy-efficiency strategies in the public sector. Several years ofpursuing a top-down (federally led) strategy in Mexico produced fewresults, and it was not until the program was restructured in 2004 tofocus on municipal-level purchasing that the program gained momentum.Today, a new partnership with the Mexican federal government is leadingto an intergovernmental initiative with strong support at the federallevel. By contrast, the PEPS purchasing initiative in China wassuccessfully initiated and led at the central government level withstrategic support from international experts. The very different successtrajectories in these two countries provide valuable lessons fordesigning country-specific public sector energy-efficiency initiatives.Enabling conditions for any successful public sector purchasinginitiative include the existence of mandatory energy-efficiencyperformance standards, an effective energy-efficiency endorsementlabeling program, an immediate need for energy conservation, a simplepilot phase (focusing on a limited number of strategically chosenproducts), and specialized technical assistance. Top-down purchasingprograms are likely to be more successful where there is high-levelpolitical endorsement and a national procurement law in place, supportedby a network of trained purchasers. Bottom-up (municipally led)purchasing programs require that municipalities have the authority to settheir own purchasing policies, and also benefit from existing networks ofcities, supported by motivated municipal leaders and trained purchasingofficials.

Van Wie McGrory, Laura; Coleman, Philip; Fridley, David; Harris,Jeffrey; Villasenor Franco, Edgar

2006-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

12

Applying bottom-up analysis to identify the system boundaries of non-energy use data in international energy statistics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Data on the non-energy use of fossil fuels in energy statistics are subject to major uncertainties. We apply a simple bottom-up methodology to recalculate non-energy use for the entire world and for the 50 countries with the highest consumption of fossil fuels for non-energy purposes. We quantify worldwide non-energy use in the year 2000 to be 242exajoules (EJ), thereby accounting for 6% of the global total primary energy supply (TPES). Our bottom-up estimates are in line with data from international energy statistics for the entire world and for 14 individual countries. Our estimates exceed official non-energy use data for 22 countries, whereas they are lower than official data in the case of 14 countries. Inconsistent system boundaries of non-energy use data in international energy statistics can explain parts of the observed deviations. We regard our bottom-up methodology as reliable albeit being attached with uncertainties. We recommend its use for energy statisticians and greenhouse gas (GHG) inventory makers to generate a shortlist of countries, for which efforts should be made to clarify and improve the quality of non-energy use data in national and international energy statistics.

M. Weiss; M.L. Neelis; M.C. Zuidberg; M.K. Patel

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Energy efficiency and the cost of GHG abatement: A comparison of bottom-up and hybrid models for the US  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy efficiency and the cost of GHG abatement: A comparison of bottom-up and hybrid models of energy efficiency potential and green- house gas (GHG) abatement potential that have been highly, and that profitable energy efficiency improvements are the reason. For the US, McKinsey estimates that GHG emissions

14

Energy End-Use Intensities in Commercial Buildings1992 -- Overview/End-Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

> Overview > Overview 1992 Energy End-Use Intensities Overview Energy Consumption by End Use, 1992 Figure on Energy Consumption By End Use, 1992 Source: Energy Information Administration, Office of Energy Markets and End Use, Forms EIA-871A through F of the 1992 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey. End-Use Estimation Methodology The end-use estimates had two main sources: (1) survey data collected by the Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) and (2) building energy simulations provided by the Facility Energy Decision Screening (FEDS) system. The CBECS provided data on building characteristics and total energy consumption (i.e., for all end uses) for a national sample of commercial buildings. Using data collected by the CBECS, the FEDS engineering modules were used to produce estimates of energy consumption by end use. The FEDS engineering estimates were then statistically adjusted to match the CBECS total energy consumption.

15

Healthcare Energy End-Use Monitoring  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This report describes the NREL partnership with two hospitals (MGH and SUNY UMU) to collect data on the energy used for multiple thermal and electrical end-use categories, which can be used to more effectively prioritize and refine the scope of investments in new metering and energy audits.

16

Bottom-up characterisation of the Spanish building stock Archetype buildings and energy demand.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??In developed economies, such as the European Unions member states, the largest potential for energy efficiency improvements lies in retrofitting existing buildings. Yet, there is (more)

Medina Benejam, Georgina

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

China's energy and emissions outlook to 2050: Perspectives from bottom-up energy end-use model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CCS) technology and demand side management. 2.1. Scenariosgeneration and demand-side management that differentiate thedispatch order Demand side management Installed capacity of

Zhou, Nan

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

China's energy and emissions outlook to 2050: Perspectives from bottom-up energy end-use model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Qin, H. , , 2007. China Wind Power Report. Beijing: Chinachina/ en/press/reports/wind-power-report.pdf NBS (NationalAIS scenarios CIS AIS Wind power Nuclear power Natural gas

Zhou, Nan

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

China End-Use Energy Demand Modeling  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

China End-Use Energy Demand Modeling China End-Use Energy Demand Modeling Speaker(s): Nan Zhou Date: October 8, 2009 (All day) Location: 90-3122 As a consequence of soaring energy demand due to the staggering pace of its economic growth, China overtook the United States in 2007 to become the world's biggest contributor to CO2 emissions (IEA, 2007). Since China is still in an early stage of industrialization and urbanization, economic development promises to keep China's energy demand growing strongly. Furthermore, China's reliance on fossil fuel is unlikely to change in the long term, and increased needs will only heighten concerns about energy security and climate change. In response, the Chinese government has developed a series of policies and targets aimed at improving energy efficiency, including both short-term targets and long-term strategic

20

Assessment of Historic Trend in Mobility and Energy Use in India Transportation Sector Using Bottom-up Approach  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Transportation mobility in India has increased significantly in the past decades. From 1970 to 2000, motorized mobility (passenger-km) has risen by 888%, compared with an 88% population growth (Singh,2006). This contributed to many energy and environmental issues, and an energy strategy incorporates efficiency improvement and other measures needs to be designed. Unfortunately, existing energy data do not provide information on driving forces behind energy use and sometime show large inconsistencies. Many previous studies address only a single transportation mode such as passenger road travel; did not include comprehensive data collection or analysis has yet been done, or lack detail on energy demand by each mode and fuel mix. The current study will fill a considerable gap in current efforts, develop a data base on all transport modes including passenger air and water, and freight in order to facilitate the development of energy scenarios and assess significance of technology potential in a global climate change model. An extensive literature review and data collection has been done to establish the database with breakdown of mobility, intensity, distance, and fuel mix of all transportation modes. Energy consumption was estimated and compared with aggregated transport consumption reported in IEA India transportation energy data. Different scenarios were estimated based on different assumptions on freight road mobility. Based on the bottom-up analysis, we estimated that the energy consumption from 1990 to 2000 increased at an annual growth rate of 7% for the mid-range road freight growth case and 12% for the high road freight growth case corresponding to the scenarios in mobility, while the IEA data only shows a 1.7% growth rate in those years.

Zhou, Nan; McNeil, Michael A.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bottom-up energy end-use" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Healthcare Energy End-Use Monitoring  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

NREL partnered with two hospitals (MGH and SUNY UMU) to collect data on the energy used for multiple thermal and electrical end-use categories, including preheat, heating, and reheat; humidification; service water heating; cooling; fans; pumps; lighting; and select plug and process loads. Additional data from medical office buildings were provided for an analysis focused on plug loads. Facility managers, energy managers, and engineers in the healthcare sector will be able to use these results to more effectively prioritize and refine the scope of investments in new metering and energy audits.

Sheppy, M.; Pless, S.; Kung, F.

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Energy End-Use Intensities in Commercial Buildings 1992 - Index...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Energy End-Use Intensities 1992 Energy End-Use Intensities Overview Tables National estimates of energy consumption by fuel (electricity and natural gas) and end use (heating,...

23

Bottom-up Representation of Industrial Energy Efficiency Technologies in Integrated Assessment Models for the Cement Sector  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Adoption of efficient end-use technologies is one of the key measures for reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. How to effectively analyze and manage the costs associated with GHG reductions becomes extremely important for the industry and policy makers around the world. Energy-climate (EC) models are often used for analyzing the costs of reducing GHG emissions for various emission-reduction measures, because an accurate estimation of these costs is critical for identifying and choosing optimal emission reduction measures, and for developing related policy options to accelerate market adoption and technology implementation. However, accuracies of assessing of GHG-emission reduction costs by taking into account the adoption of energy efficiency technologies will depend on how well these end-use technologies are represented in integrated assessment models (IAM) and other energy-climate models.

Sathaye, J.; Xu, T.; Galitsky, C.

2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

24

Energy End-Use Intensities in Commercial Buildings 1995 - Index...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1995 End-Use Data 1995 End-Use Data Overview Tables National estimates of energy consumption by fuel (electricity and natural gas) and end use (heating, cooling, lighting, etc.)...

25

Healthcare Energy: Using End-Use Data to Inform Decisions  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The relative magnitude of the energy consumption of different end uses can be a starting point for prioritizing energy investments and action, whether the scope under consideration involves new metering, targeted energy audits, or end-use equipment upgrades.

26

Detonation: From the Bottom Up  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Latest Issue:December 2014 All Issues submit Detonation: From the Bottom Up In the nuclear testing era, scientists never thoroughly characterized the properties of the...

27

Energy End-Use Intensities in Commercial Buildings 1992  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Overview > Tables Overview > Tables 1992 Energy End-Use Intensities Tables Energy Consumption by End Use, 1992 Figure on Energy Consumption By End Use, 1992 Source: Energy Information Administration, Office of Energy Markets and End Use, Forms EIA-871A through F of the 1992 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey. divider line To View and/or Print Reports (requires Adobe Acrobat Reader) - Download Adobe Acrobat Reader If you experience any difficulties, visit our Technical Frequently Asked Questions. divider line Tables - (file size 31,655 bytes), pages 6. - requires Adobe Acrobat Reader Consumption of All Major Fuels by End Uses, 1992 Energy End-Use Intensities for All Major Fuels, 1992 Consumption of Electricity by End Uses, 1992 Energy End-Use Intensities for Electricity, 1992

28

Energy End-Use Intensities in Commercial Buildings 1989 -- Executive  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9 Energy End-Use Intensities > Executive Summary 9 Energy End-Use Intensities > Executive Summary Executive Summary Energy End Uses Ranked by Energy Consumption, 1989 Energy End Uses Ranked by Energy Consumption, 1989 Source: Energy Information Administration, Office of Energy Markets and End Use, Forms EIA-871A through F of the 1989 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey. divider line The demand for energy in U.S. stores, offices, schools, hospitals, and other commercial buildings has been increasing. This report examines energy intensities in commercial buildings for nine end uses: space heating, cooling, ventilation, lighting, water heating, cooking, refrigeration, office equipment, and "other." The objective of this analysis was to increase understanding of how energy is used in commercial buildings and to identify targets for greater energy efficiency which could moderate future growth in demand.

29

1999 Commercial Buildings Characteristics--Energy Sources and End Uses  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Sources and End Uses Energy Sources and End Uses Topics: Energy Sources and End Uses End-Use Equipment Conservation Features and Practices Energy Sources and End Uses CBECS collects information that is used to answer questions about the use of energy in the commercial buildings sector. Questions such as: What kind of energy sources are used? What is energy used for? and What kinds of equipment use energy? Energy Sources Nearly all commercial buildings used at least one source of energy for some end use (Figure 1). Electricity was the most commonly used energy source in commercial buildings (94 percent of buildings comprising 98 percent of commercial floorspace). More than half of commercial buildings (57 percent) and two-thirds of commercial floorspace (68 percent) were served by natural gas. Three sources-fuel oil, district heat, and district chilled water-when used, were used more often in larger buildings.

30

Comparison of Bottom-Up and Top-Down Forecasts: Vision Industry Energy Forecasts with ITEMS and NEMS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the Department of Energy's Office of Industrial Technologies, EIA extracted energy use infonnation from the Annual Energy Outlook (AEO) - 2000 (8) for each of the seven # The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle Memorial Institute...-6, 2000 NEMS The NEMS industrial module is the official forecasting model for EIA and thus the Department of Energy. For this reason, the energy prices and output forecasts used to drive the ITEMS model were taken from EIA's AEO 2000. Understanding...

Roop, J. M.; Dahowski, R. T

31

Energy End-Use Flow Maps for the Buildings Sector  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Graphical presentations of energy flows are widely used within the industrial sector to depict energy production and use. PNNL developed two energy flow maps, one each for the residential and commercial buildings sectors, in response to a need for a clear, concise, graphical depiction of the flows of energy from source to end-use in the building sector.

Belzer, David B.

2006-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

32

Energy end-use intensities in commercial buildings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report examines energy intensities in commercial buildings for nine end uses: space heating, cooling, ventilation, lighting, water heating, cooking, refrigeration, office equipment, and other. The objective of this analysis was to increase understanding of how energy is used in commercial buildings and to identify targets for greater energy efficiency which could moderate future growth in demand. The source of data for the analysis is the 1989 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption survey (CBECS), which collected detailed data on energy-related characteristics and energy consumption for a nationally representative sample of approximately 6,000 commercial buildings. The analysis used 1989 CBECS data because the 1992 CBECS data were not yet available at the time the study was initiated. The CBECS data were fed into the Facility Energy Decision Screening (FEDS) system, a building energy simulation program developed by the US Department of Energy`s Pacific Northwest Laboratory, to derive engineering estimates of end-use consumption for each building in the sample. The FEDS estimates were then statistically adjusted to match the total energy consumption for each building. This is the Energy Information Administration`s (EIA) first report on energy end-use consumption in commercial buildings. This report is part of an effort to address customer requests for more information on how energy is used in buildings, which was an overall theme of the 1992 user needs study. The end-use data presented in this report were not available for publication in Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption and Expenditures 1989 (DOE/EIA-0318(89), Washington, DC, April 1992). However, subsequent reports on end-use energy consumption will be part of the Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption and Expenditures series, beginning with a 1992 data report to be published in early 1995.

Not Available

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Implications of maximizing China's technical potential for residential end-use energy efficiency: A 2030 outlook from the bottom-up  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

5 4. Efficiency Improvement and Technology5 4.1. Appliance Technology7 4.2. Residential Heating Technology

Khanna, Nina

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Public Health Benefits of End-Use Electrical Energy Efficiency in California: An Exploratory Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

used to produce electrical energy and the technologies usedHealth Benefits of End-Use Electrical Energy Efficiency inhow increasing end-use electrical energy efficiency from

McKone, Thomas E.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Commercial building end-use energy metering inventory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest Laboratory conducted a comprehensive inventory of end-use metered data. The inventory did not discover many sources of metered end-use data; however, research into existing data bases and extensive discussions with professionals associated with building energy conservation have enabled a clear characterization to be developed of the types of metered data that are required to further energy conservation in commercial buildings. Based on the results of the inventory and this clarification of data requirements, the adequacy of existing data bases has been assessed, and recommendations have been developed for future federal data collection efforts. A summary of sources of existing metered end-use data is provided in Section 2.1 and its adequacy has been summarized. Collection of further end-use metered data is both desirable and valuable for many areas of building energy conservation research. Empirical data are needed to address many issues which to date have been addressed using only simulation techniques. The adequacy of using simulation techniques for various purposes needs to be assessed through comparison with measured data. While these data are expensive to acquire, it is cost-effective to do so in the long run, and the need is not being served by the private market. The preceding conclusion based on results from the inventory of existing data highlights two important facts: First, although the data are widely desired in the private sector, they are not widely available. Second, where suitable data are publicly available and contain the desired supporting information, their collection has generally been funded by government-sponsored research.

Heidell, J.A.; Mazzucchi, R.P.; Reilly, R.W.

1985-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Energy Information Administration - Table 2. End Uses of Fuel Consumption,  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Page Last Modified: June 2010 Table 2. End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 1998, 2002, and 2006 (trillion Btu) MECS Survey Years Iron and Steel Mills (NAICS1 331111) 1998 2002 2006 Total 2 1,672 1,455 1,147 Net Electricity 3 158 184 175 Natural Gas 456 388 326 Coal 48 36 14 Boiler Fuel -- -- -- Coal 8 W 1 Residual Fuel Oil 10 * 4 Natural Gas 52 39 27 Process Heating -- -- -- Net Electricity 74 79 76 Residual Fuel Oil 19 * 11 Natural Gas 369 329 272 Machine Drive -- -- -- Net Electricity 68 86 77 Notes 1. The North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) has replaced the Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) system. NAICS 331111 includes steel works, blast furnaces (including coke ovens), and rolling mills. 2. 'Total' is the sum of all energy sources listed below, including net steam (the sum of purchases, generation from renewable resources, and net transfers), and other energy that respondents indicated was used to produce heat and power. It is the fuel quantities across all end-uses.

37

United States Industrial Sector Energy End Use Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

natural gas, petroleum, coal, steam, and biomass/byproducts, respectively disaggregated by end-use for each of the NAICS

Shehabi, Arman

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Engineer End Uses for Maximum Efficiency | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

for Maximum Efficiency (August 2004) More Documents & Publications Maintaining System Air Quality Compressed Air Storage Strategies Alternative Strategies for Low Pressure End Uses...

39

United States Industrial Sector Energy End Use Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by end uses (e.g. , boilers, process, electric drives,MECS 2002, and MECS 1998 data. Indirect Uses-Boiler FuelConventional Boiler Use CHP and/or Cogeneration Process

Shehabi, Arman

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

CBECS 1989 - Energy End-use Intensities in Commercial Buildings -- Detailed  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Publication > Detailed Tables Publication > Detailed Tables 1989 Energy End-Use Intensities Detailed Tables Energy End Uses Ranked by Energy Consumption, 1989 Energy End Uses Ranked by Energy Consumption, 1989 Source: Energy Information Administration, Office of Energy Markets and End Use, Forms EIA-871A through F of the 1989 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey. Table Organization The following 13 tables present detailed energy end-use consumption data from the 1989 CBECS. Summary tables for all major fuels (electricity, natural gas, fuel oil, and district heat) appear first, followed by separate tables for each of the four major fuels. Within each energy source’s group of tables, there is a table showing end-use consumption, a table showing end-use intensities (consumption per square foot), and a table (except for fuel oil and district heat) showing the end-use shares of total consumption.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bottom-up energy end-use" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2007 - Energy Consumption by End-Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy Consumption by End-Use Sector Energy Consumption by End-Use Sector International Energy Outlook 2007 Chapter 2 - Energy Consumption by End-Use Sector In the IEO2007 projections, end-use energy consumption depends on resource endowment, economic growth, and other political, social, and demographic factors.. One way of looking at the future of world energy markets is to consider trends in energy consumption at the end-use sector level. With the exception of the transportation sector, which is dominated by petroleum-based liquids products at present, the mix of energy use in the residential, commercial, and industrial sectors varies widely by region, depending on a combination of regional factors, such as the availability of energy resources, the level of economic development, and political, social,

42

Development of Bottom-up Representation of Industrial Energy Efficiency Technologies in Integrated Assessment Models for the Iron and Steel Sector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Efficiency Improvements in Electric Motors andEnergy Efficiency Improvements in Electric Motors and

Xu, T.T.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Bottom-up Representation of Industrial Energy Efficiency Technologies in Integrated Assessment Models for the U.S. Pulp and Paper Sector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Assessment to Identify Energy and Cost Saving Opportunities.to Identify Energy and Cost Savings Opportunities. Accesscan add up to big energy and cost savings. For example, one

Xu, Tengfang

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Bottom-up Representation of Industrial Energy Efficiency Technologies in Integrated Assessment Models for the U.S. Pulp and Paper Sector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Best Practices in the Netherlands: Top Ten Energy Saving Opportunities. Proceedings COST Strategic Workshop Improving Energy Efficiency

Xu, Tengfang

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

India Energy Outlook: End Use Demand in India to 2020  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for cooking and lighting. Biomass energy consumption willused in an economy, biomass energy consumption is certainlyby a large share of biomass energy use representing 50% of

de la Rue du Can, Stephane

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

India Energy Outlook: End Use Demand in India to 2020  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

10. Final and Primary Energy Consumption in the Industry35 Figure 16. Primary Energy Consumption byby end users while primary energy consumption includes final

de la Rue du Can, Stephane

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

India Energy Outlook: End Use Demand in India to 2020  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Institute, Curbing Global Energy Demand Growth: The Energyup Assessment of Energy Demand in India Transportationa profound effect on energy demand. Policy analysts wishing

de la Rue du Can, Stephane

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Energy End-Use Intensities in Commercial Buildings 1989 data -- Publication  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

End-Use Intensities Executive Summary > Publication and Tables End-Use Intensities Executive Summary > Publication and Tables Publication and Tables Energy End Uses Ranked by Energy Consumption, 1989 Figure on Energy End Uses Ranked by Energy Consumption, 1989 Source: Energy Information Administration, Office of Energy Markets and End Use, Forms EIA-871A through F of the 1989 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey. Divider Bar To View and/or Print Reports (requires Adobe Acrobat Reader) - Download Adobe Acrobat Reader If you experience any difficulties, visit our Technical Frequently Asked Questions. Divider Bar You have the option of downloading the entire report or selected sections of the report. Full Report - Energy End-Use Intensities in Commercial Buildings (1989 data) (file size .89 MB) pages: 140

49

" Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" 6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," " " ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" " "," ","Net","Residual","and",,"LPG and","(excluding Coal"," " "End Use","Total","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","Natural Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coke and Breeze)","Other(e)"

50

" Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 1998;" 2. End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 1998;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," "," " " ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal",,"RSE" " "," ","Net","Residual","and",,"LPG and","(excluding Coal"," ","Row" "End Use","Total","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","Natural Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coke and Breeze)","Other(e)","Factors"

51

" Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;" 6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," " " ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" " "," ","Net","Residual","and",,"LPG and","(excluding Coal"," " "End Use","Total","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","Natural Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coke and Breeze)","Other(e)"

52

" Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" 6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," "," " " ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal",,"RSE" " "," ","Net","Residual","and","Natural ","LPG and","(excluding Coal"," ","Row" "End Use","Total","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coke and Breeze)","Other(e)","Factors"

53

Service Report Energy Information Administration Office of Energy Markets and End Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Information Administration Energy Information Administration Office of Energy Markets and End Use U.S. Department of Energy Washington, D C 20585 SR/EEUD/86/01 Residential Conservation Measures Energy End Use Division Office of Energy Markets and End Use Energy Information Administration July 1986 This report has not received a complete technical review by the Energy In formation Administration (EIA) and, therefore, should not be represented as an official EIA product. PREFACE This study was undertaken at the request of Senator James A. McClure, Chairman, Committee on Energy and Natural Resources, United States Senate. The purpose of the study is to examine the potential for achieving energy savings in the residential sector through conservation measures. The report is to be submitted

54

India Energy Outlook: End Use Demand in India to 2020  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

an estimated total energy consumption of 19 GWh (0.07PJ),to 28% in 2005. Total energy consumption in 2020 in thecan have similar total energy consumption but produce very

de la Rue du Can, Stephane

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Bottom-up Representation of Industrial Energy Efficiency Technologies in Integrated Assessment Models for the U.S. Pulp and Paper Sector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2001. The Energy Technology Systems Analysis Programme (and Institute of Paper Science and Technology (IPST) atGeorgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta. Kramer, K. J. ,

Xu, Tengfang

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

A bottom-up energy analysis across a diverse urban building portfolio: retrofits for the buildings at the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, UK  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract A methodology for the analysis of building energy retrofits has been developed for a diverse set of buildings at the Royal Botanic Gardens (RBG), Kew in southwest London, UK. The methodology requires selection of appropriate building simulation tools dependent on the nature of the principal energy demand. This has involved the development of a stand-alone model to simulate the heat flow in botanical glasshouses, as well as stochastic simulation of electricity demand for buildings with high equipment density and occupancy-led operation. Application of the methodology to the buildings at RBG Kew illustrates the potential reduction in energy consumption at the building scale achievable from the application of retrofit measures deemed appropriate for heritage buildings and the potential benefit to be gained from onsite generation and supply of energy.

R.M. Ward; R. Choudhary

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Canadian Industrial Energy End-use Data and Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

an inventory of existing databases related to industry in Canada. CIEEDAC is strategically working towards publications include: enerInfo Industrial (newsletter, published 3 times annually) An Inventory of Energy in Canadian Oil Refineries, 1990, 1994 to the current year Detailed reports on energy consumption

58

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2007-Energy Consumption by End-Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy Consumption by End Use Sector Energy Consumption by End Use Sector International Energy Outlook 2007 Figure 25. OECD and Non-OECD Transportation Sector Delivered Energy Consumption, 2004-2030 Figure 25 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure 26. OECD and Non-OECD Residential Sector Delivered Energy Consumption, 2004-2030 Figure 26 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure 27. Growth in OECD and Non-OECD Residential Sector Delivered Energy Consumption by Fuel, 2004 and 2030 Figure 27 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure 28. OECD and Non-OECD Commercial Sector Delivered Energy Consumption, 2004-2030 Figure 28 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

59

" Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 1998;" 1. End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 1998;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ","Coal"," "," " " ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"(excluding Coal" " "," ","Net","Residual","and","Natural Gas(c)","LPG and","Coke and Breeze)"," ","RSE" " ","Total","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","(billion","NGL(d)","(million","Other(e)","Row"

60

" Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;" 5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ","Coal"," " " ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"(excluding Coal" " "," ","Net","Residual","and","Natural Gas(c)","LPG and","Coke and Breeze)"," " " ","Total","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","(billion","NGL(d)","(million","Other(e)"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bottom-up energy end-use" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

" Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" 5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," "," " " ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" " "," ","Net","Residual","and","Natural ","LPG and","(excluding Coal"," ","RSE" " ","Total","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coke and Breeze)","Other(e)","Row"

62

" Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" 5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ","Coal"," " " ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"(excluding Coal" " "," ","Net","Residual","and","Natural Gas(c)","LPG and","Coke and Breeze)"," " " ","Total","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","(billion","NGL(d)","(million","Other(e)"

63

Service Report Enwgy Information Administration Office of Energy Markets and End Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Enwgy Information Administration Enwgy Information Administration Office of Energy Markets and End Use U;S. Department of Energy Washington, O.C. 20585 ^ ± SR-EEUD--84-I leather izat ion Program Evaluation §]*: b? .. Gerald E. Pealjody of Energy Markets and End Use Energy End Use Division August 20, 1984 This raport has not received a complete technical review by the Energy In formation Administration (E1A) and, therefore, should not be represented as an official EIA product. |||lsS|; program in 198 l^^lRia; study is based -on a scatii;f|^ipiiii|', national samp 1* Of : - households chac aarcicipscac in the pr; 3 §S||tMi-lfc|Sis2?ia covers ;he ^tiecrr^n: of conditions under vhich the p This ,s«;;5^H:«lil-lSi|iuGcaG ac che requesic of :rva

64

A new approach to estimate commercial sector end-use load shapes and energy use intensities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We discuss the application of an end-use load shape estimation technique to develop annual energy use intensities (EUIs) and hourly end-use load shapes (LSs) for commercial buildings in the Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG&E) service territory. Results will update inputs for the commercial sector energy and peak demand forecasting models used by PG&E and the California Energy Commission (CEC). EUIs were estimated for 11 building types, up to 10 end uses, 3 fuel types, 2 building vintages, and up to 5 climate regions. The integrated methodology consists of two major parts. The first part is the reconciliation of initial end-use load-shape estimates with measured whole-building load data to produce intermediate EUIs and load shapes, using LBL`s End-use Disaggregation Algorithm, EDA. EDA is a deterministic hourly algorithm that relies on the observed characteristics of the measured hourly whole-building electricity use and disaggregates it into major end-use components. The end-use EUIs developed through the EDA procedure represent a snap-shot of electricity use by building type and end-use for two regions of the PG&E service territory, for the year that disaggregation is performed. In the second part of the methodology, we adjust the EUIs for direct application to forecasting models based on factors such as climatic impacts on space-conditioning EUIs, fuel saturation effects, building and equipment vintage, and price impacts. Core data for the project are detailed on-site surveys for about 800 buildings, mail surveys ({approximately}6000), load research data for over 1000 accounts, and hourly weather data for five climate regions.

Akbari, H.; Eto, J.; Konopacki, S.; Afzal, A.; Heinemeier, K.; Rainer, L.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

The Bottom-Up Approach forThermoelectric Nanocomposites, plus?  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Contains an overview of the synthetic strategies for preparing bulk nanocomposite TE materials using a two-step bottom-up approach and associated experimental and theoretical results.

66

Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; 6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Trillion Btu. Distillate Fuel Oil Coal Net Residual and LPG and (excluding Coal End Use Total Electricity(a) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(b) Natural Gas(c) NGL(d) Coke and Breeze) Other(e) Total United States TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 15,658 2,850 251 129 5,512 79 1,016 5,820 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fue -- 41 133 23 2,119 8 547 -- Conventional Boiler Use 41 71 17 1,281 8 129 CHP and/or Cogeneration Process 0 62 6 838 1 417 Direct Uses-Total Process -- 2,244 62 52 2,788 39 412 -- Process Heating -- 346 59 19 2,487 32 345 -- Process Cooling and Refrigeration -- 206 * 1 32 * * -- Machine Drive

67

Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; 2 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Trillion Btu. Distillate Fuel Oil Coal NAICS Net Residual and LPG and (excluding Coal Code(a) End Use Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(c) Natural Gas(d) NGL(e) Coke and Breeze) Other(f) Total United States 311 - 339 ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 15,658 2,850 251 129 5,512 79 1,016 5,820 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel -- 41 133 23 2,119 8 547 -- Conventional Boiler Use -- 41 71 17 1,281 8 129 -- CHP and/or Cogeneration Process -- -- 62 6 838 1 417 -- Direct Uses-Total Process -- 2,244 62 52 2,788 39 412 -- Process Heating -- 346 59 19 2,487

68

Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; 1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Coal Fuel Oil (excluding Coal Net Residual and Natural Gas(d) LPG and Coke and Breeze) NAICS Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(c) (billion NGL(e) (million Other(f) Code(a) End Use (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) (trillion Btu) Total United States 311 - 339 ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 15,658 835,382 40 22 5,357 21 46 5,820 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel -- 12,109 21 4 2,059 2 25 -- Conventional Boiler Use -- 12,109 11 3 1,245 2 6 -- CHP and/or Cogeneration Process

69

Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; 7 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Coal Fuel Oil (excluding Coal Net Demand Residual and Natural Gas(c) LPG and Coke and Breeze) for Electricity(a) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(b) (billion NGL(d) (million End Use (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) Total United States TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 977,338 40 22 5,357 21 46 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel 24,584 21 4 2,059 2 25 Conventional Boiler Use 24,584 11 3 1,245 2 6 CHP and/or Cogeneration Process 0 10 1 814 * 19 Direct Uses-Total Process 773,574 10 9 2,709 10 19 Process Heating

70

Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; 5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Coal Fuel Oil (excluding Coal Net Residual and Natural Gas(c) LPG and Coke and Breeze) Total Electricity(a) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(b) (billion NGL(d) (million Other(e) End Use (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) (trillion Btu) Total United States TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 15,658 835,382 40 22 5,357 21 46 5,820 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel -- 12,109 21 4 2,059 2 25 -- Conventional Boiler Use 12,109 11 3 1,245 2 6 CHP and/or Cogeneration Process 0 10 1 814 * 19 Direct Uses-Total Process

71

Nanowires As Building Blocks for Bottom-Up Nanotechnology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;Nanowires As Building Blocks for Bottom-Up Nanotechnology The field of nanotechnology/or combinations of function in an integrated nanosystem. To enable this bottom-up approach for nanotechnology-dimensional (1D) nanostruc- tures at the forefront of nanoscience and nanotechnology. NWs and NBs are typi- cally

Wang, Zhong L.

72

Estimates of Energy Consumption by Building Type and End Use at U.S. Army Installations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

energy use intensity (EUI) by end use for major buildingare shown in Table 3-4. EDA_EUI j k u a l ) l A v a C j i jk annualihvaCii jjj x EDA_EUI ai,hvac,FtHood = EDA.EUIaniiu^

Konopacki, S.J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Next MECS will be conducted in 2010 Table 5.8 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity; Unit: Trillion Btu. Distillate Fuel Oil Coal Net Demand Residual and LPG and (excluding Coal End Use for Electricity(a) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(b) Natural Gas(c) NGL(d) Coke and Breeze) Total United States TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 3,335 251 129 5,512 79 1,016 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel 84 133 23 2,119 8 547 Conventional Boiler Use 84 71 17 1,281 8 129 CHP and/or Cogeneration Process 0 62 6 838 1 417 Direct Uses-Total Process 2,639 62 52 2,788 39 412 Process Heating 379 59 19 2,487 32 345 Process Cooling and Refrigeration

74

Microsoft Word - US Industrial Sector Energy End Use Analysis_051812.docx  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

United States Industrial Sector Energy End Use Analysis United States Industrial Sector Energy End Use Analysis Arman Shehabi, William R. Morrow, Eric Masanet This work was supported by the Advanced Manufacturing Office of the Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Program through the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231. 2 Disclaimer This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States Government. While this document is believed to contain correct information, neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor The Regents of the University of California, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process

75

Energy Information Administration - Energy Efficiency, Table 6b-End Uses of  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

and 2002 > Table 6b and 2002 > Table 6b Table 6b. End Uses of Energy per Ton of Steel, 1998, 2002, and 2006 (thousand Btu per ton) MECS Survey Years Iron and Steel Mills (NAICS1 331111) 19982 20022 20062 Total3 16,957 15,884 17,796 Net Electricity 4 1,602 2,009 4,673 Natural Gas 4,625 4,236 5,969 Coal 487 393 214 Boiler Fuel -- -- -- Coal 81 W 10 Residual Fuel Oil 101 W 266 Natural Gas 527 426 276 Process Heating -- -- -- Net Electricity 751 862 830 Residual Fuel Oil 193 W 112 Natural Gas 3,742 3,592 2,776 Machine Drive -- -- -- Net Electricity 690 939 786 Notes: 1. The North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) has replaced the Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) system. NAICS 331111 includes steel works, blast furnaces (including coke ovens), and rolling mills.

76

"Table B25. Energy End Uses, Floorspace for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5. Energy End Uses, Floorspace for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" 5. Energy End Uses, Floorspace for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Total Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"All Buildings*","Energy Used For (more than one may apply)" ,,"Space Heating","Cooling","Water Heating","Cooking","Manu- facturing" "All Buildings* ...............",64783,60028,56940,56478,22237,3138 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",6789,5668,5007,4759,997,"Q" "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",6585,5786,5408,5348,1136,214 "10,001 to 25,000 .............",11535,10387,9922,9562,1954,472 "25,001 to 50,000 .............",8668,8060,7776,7734,2511,"Q"

77

End-use energy consumption estimates for U.S. commercial buildings, 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An accurate picture of how energy is used in the nation`s stock of commercial buildings can serve a variety of program planning and policy needs of the US Department of Energy, utilities, and other groups seeking to improve the efficiency of energy use in the building sector. This report describes an estimation of energy consumption by end use based upon data from the 1992 Commercial Building Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS). The methodology used in the study combines elements of engineering simulations and statistical analysis to estimate end-use intensities for heating, cooling, ventilation, lighting, refrigeration, hot water, cooking, and miscellaneous equipment. Statistical Adjusted Engineering (SAE) models were estimated by building type. The nonlinear SAE models used variables such as building size, vintage, climate region, weekly operating hours, and employee density to adjust the engineering model predicted loads to the observed consumption (based upon utility billing information). End-use consumption by fuel was estimated for each of the 6,751 buildings in the 1992 CBECS. The report displays the summary results for 11 separate building types as well as for the total US commercial building stock. 4 figs., 15 tabs.

Belzer, D.B.; Wrench, L.E.

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Estimates of energy consumption by building type and end use at U.S. Army installations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report discusses the use of LBNL`s End-use Disaggregation Alogrithm (EDA) to 12 US Army installations nationwide in order to obtain annual estimates of electricity use for all major building types and end uses. The building types include barrack, dining hall, gymnasium, administration, vehicle maintenance, hospital, residential, warehouse, and misc. Up to 8 electric end uses for each type were considered: space cooling, ventilation (air handling units, fans, chilled and hot water pumps), cooking, misc./plugs, refrigeration, exterior and interior lighting, and process loads. Through building simulations, we also obtained estimates of natural gas space heating energy use. Average electricity use for these 12 installations and Fort Hood are: HVAC, misc., and indoor lighting end uses consumed the most electricity (28, 27, and 26% of total[3.8, 3.5, and 3.3 kWh/ft{sup 2}]). Refrigeration, street lighting, exterior lighting, and cooking consumed 7, 7, 3, and 2% of total (0.9, 0.9, 0.4, and 0.3 kWh/ft{sup 2})

Konopacki, S.J.; Akbari, H.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Integrated estimation of commercial sector end-use load shapes and energy use intensities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Southern California Edison Company (SCE) and the California Energy Commission (CEC) have contracted with the Energy Analysis Program of the Applied Science Division at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) to develop an integrated set of commercial sector load shapes (LS) and energy utilization indices (EUI) for use in forecasting electricity demand. The objectives of this project are to conduct detailed analyses of SCE data on commercial building characteristics, energy use, and whole-building load shapes; and in conjunction with other data, to develop, test, and apply an integrated approach for the estimation of end-use LSs and EUIs. The project represents one of the first attempts to combine simulation-based, prototypical building analyses with direct reconciliation to measured hourly load data. The project examined electricity and gas use for nine building types, including large offices, small offices, large retails, small retails, food stores, sitdown restaurants, fastfood restaurants, refrigerated warehouses, and non-refrigerated warehouses. For each building type, nine end uses were examined, including cooling, heating, ventilation, indoor lighting, outdoor lighting, miscellaneous equipment, water heating, cooking, and refrigeration. For the HVAC end uses (cooling, ventilation, and heating), separate analyses were performed for three climate zones: coastal, inland, and desert.

Akbari, H.; Eto, J.; Turiel, I.; Heinemeier, K.; Lebot, B.; Nordman, B.; Rainer, L.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Integrated estimation of commercial sector end-use load shapes and energy use intensities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Southern California Edison Company (SCE) and the California Energy Commission (CEC) have contracted with Energy Analysis Program of the Applied Science Division at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) to develop an integrated set of commercial sector load shapes (LS) and energy utilization indices (EUI) for use in forecasting electricity demand. The overall objectives of this project are to conduct detailed analyses of SCE data on commercial building characteristics, energy use, and whole-building load shapes, and, in conjunction with other data, to develop, test, and apply an integrated approach for the estimation of end-use LSs and EUIs. The project is one of the first attempts ever to combine simulation-based, prototypical building analyses with direct reconciliation to measured hourly load data.

Akbari, H.; Eto, J.; Turiel, I.; Heinemeier, K.; Lebot, B.; Nordman, B.; Rainer, L.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bottom-up energy end-use" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

A Coupled Bottom-Up/Top-Down Model for GHG Abatement Scenarios in the Swiss Housing Sector  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper we report on the coordinated development of a regional module within a world computable general equilibrium model (CGEM) and of a bottom up energy-technology-environment model (ETEM) describing long...

Laurent Drouet; Alain Haurie; Maryse Labriet; Philippe Thalmann

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

The Value of End-Use Energy Efficiency in Mitigation of U.S. Carbon Emissions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents a scenario analysis exploring the value of advanced technologies in the U.S. buildings, industrial, and transportation sectors in stabilizing atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations. The analysis was conducted by staff members of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), working at the Joint Global Change Research Institute (JGCRI) in support of the strategic planning process of the U.S. Department of Energy (U.S. DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE). The conceptual framework for the analysis is an integration of detailed buildings, industrial, and transportation modules into MiniCAM, a global integrated assessment model. The analysis is based on three technology scenarios, which differ in their assumed rates of deployment of new or presently available energy-saving technologies in the end-use sectors. These technology scenarios are explored with no carbon policy, and under two CO2 stabilization policies, in which an economic price on carbon is applied such that emissions follow prescribed trajectories leading to long-term stabilization of CO2 at roughly 450 and 550 parts per million by volume (ppmv). The costs of meeting the emissions targets prescribed by these policies are examined, and compared between technology scenarios. Relative to the reference technology scenario, advanced technologies in all three sectors reduce costs by 50% and 85% for the 450 and 550 ppmv policies, respectively. The 450 ppmv policy is more stringent and imposes higher costs than the 550 ppmv policy; as a result, the magnitude of the economic value of energy efficiency is four times greater for the 450 ppmv policy than the 550 ppmv policy. While they substantially reduce the costs of meeting emissions requirements, advanced end-use technologies do not lead to greenhouse gas stabilization without a carbon policy. This is due mostly to the effects of increasing service demands over time, the high consumption of fossil fuels in the electricity sector, and the use of unconventional feedstocks in the liquid fuel refining sector. Of the three end-use sectors, advanced transportation technologies have the greatest potential to reduce costs of meeting carbon policy requirements. Services in the buildings and industrial sectors can often be supplied by technologies that consume low-emissions fuels such as biomass or, in policy cases, electricity. Passenger transportation, in contrast, is especially unresponsive to climate policies, as the fuel costs are small compared to the time value of transportation and vehicle capital and operating costs. Delaying the transition from reference to advanced technologies by 15 years increases the costs of meeting 450 ppmv stabilization emissions requirements by 21%, but the costs are still 39% lower than the costs assuming reference technology. The report provides a detailed description of the end-use technology scenarios and provides a thorough analysis of the results. Assumptions are documented in the Appendix.

Kyle, G. Page; Smith, Steven J.; Clarke, Leon E.; Kim, Son H.; Wise, Marshall A.

2007-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

83

Energy Information Administration - Energy Efficiency-Table 6a- End uses of  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6a 6a Page Last Modified: June 2010 Table 6a. End Uses of Fuel Consumption per Value of Production, 1998, 2002, and 2006 (thousand Btu per constant 2000 dollar 1) MECS Survey Years Iron and Steel Mills (NAICS2 331111) 1998 3 2002 3 2006 3 Total 4 32.0 30.2 18.7 Net Electricity 5 3.0 3.8 2.8 Natural Gas 8.7 8.1 5.3 Coal 0.9 0.7 0.2 Boiler Fuel -- -- -- Coal 0.2 W 0.02 Residual Fuel Oil 0.2 * 0.1 Natural Gas 1.0 0.8 0.4 Process Heating -- -- -- Net Electricity 1.4 1.6 1.2 Residual Fuel Oil 0.4 * 0.2 Natural Gas 7.1 6.8 4.4 Machine Drive -- -- -- Net Electricity 1.3 1.8 1.3 Notes:1. Value of production is deflated by the chain-type price indices for iron and steel mills shipments. 2. The North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) has replaced the Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) system. NAICS 331111 includes steel works, blast furnaces (including coke ovens), and rolling mills.

84

Data on energy end-use patterns and energy efficiencies in major CO sub 2 emitting countries  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is a report of the basic data regarding energy end-uses and efficiencies in major CO{sub 2} emitting countries. The task is part of the multi-lab carbon dioxide energy system research program. Fossil energy production and use are the largest anthropogenic source of CO{sub 2} emissions. To gain an insight into the relationship between CO{sub 2} emission and energy use, the global energy consumption patterns and the changing energy efficiencies must be better analyzed and understood. This work attempts to collect and organize the data on energy use and energy efficiency for the ten major CO{sub 2} emitting countries: USA, USSR, the People's Republic of China, Japan, the Federal Republic of Germany, the United Kingdom, France, Canada, Italy, and Australia. A wide variety of information sources have been examined. The data base is presented in tabular format. It is documented by three main parts, the first shows the total final energy consumption by fuel type and end-use sector for each nation. The second shows the detailed energy use by fuel type and function for each end-use sector: residential, commercial, transportation and industrial. The third part shows the country-specific energy balances for electricity generation and use. The data base is a living document and will be updated as additional information becomes available. The data base is to be used to accomplish the ultimate objective of improving the reliability of future CO{sub 2}-emissions estimates. 7 refs., 12 tabs.

Cheng, Hsing C.

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Estimates of Energy Consumption by Building Type and End Use at U.S. Army Installations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

4. Figure 5-5. 1993 Electricity Consumption Estimates by EndkWh/ft ) 1993 Electricity Consumption Estimates by End Useof Total) 1993 Electricity Consumption Estimates by End Use

Konopacki, S.J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Public Health Benefits of End-Use Electrical Energy Efficiency in California: An Exploratory Study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study assesses for California how increasing end-use electrical energy efficiency from installing residential insulation impacts exposures and disease burden from power-plant pollutant emissions. Installation of fiberglass attic insulation in the nearly 3 million electricity-heated homes throughout California is used as a case study. The pollutants nitrous oxides (NO{sub x}), sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}), fine particulate matter (PM2.5), benzo(a)pyrene, benzene, and naphthalene are selected for the assessment. Exposure is characterized separately for rural and urban environments using the CalTOX model, which is a key input to the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Tool for the Reduction and Assessment of Chemicals and other environmental Impacts (TRACI). The output of CalTOX provides for urban and rural populations emissions-to-intake factors, which are expressed as an individual intake fraction (iFi). The typical iFi from power plant emissions are on the order of 10{sup -13} (g intake per g emitted) in urban and rural regions. The cumulative (rural and urban) product of emissions, population, and iFi is combined with toxic effects factors to determine human damage factors (HDFs). HDF are expressed as disability adjusted life years (DALYs) per kilogram pollutant emitted. The HDF approach is applied to the insulation case study. Upgrading existing residential insulation to US Department of Energy (DOE) recommended levels eliminates over the assmned 50-year lifetime of the insulation an estimated 1000 DALYs from power-plant emissions per million tonne (Mt) of insulation installed, mostly from the elimination of PM2.5 emissions. In comparison, the estimated burden from the manufacture of this insulation in DALYs per Mt is roughly four orders of magnitude lower than that avoided.

McKone, Thomas E.; Lobscheid, A.B.

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; 4 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity; Unit: Trillion Btu. Distillate Fuel Oil Coal NAICS Net Demand Residual and LPG and (excluding Coal Code(a) End Use for Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(c) Natural Gas(d) NGL(e) Coke and Breeze) Total United States 311 - 339 ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 3,335 251 129 5,512 79 1,016 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel 84 133 23 2,119 8 547 Conventional Boiler Use 84 71 17 1,281 8 129 CHP and/or Cogeneration Process 0 62 6 838 1 417 Direct Uses-Total Process 2,639 62 52 2,788 39 412 Process Heating 379 59 19 2,487 32 345 Process Cooling and Refrigeration

88

Measured commercial load shapes and energy-use intensities and validation of the LBL end-use disaggregation algorithm  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Southern California Edison Company (SCE) has conducted an extensive metering project in which electricity end use in 53 commercial buildings in Southern California has been measured. The building types monitored include offices, retail stores, groceries, restaurants, and warehouses. One year (June 1989 through May 1990) of the SCE measured hourly end-use data are reviewed in this report. Annual whole-building and end-use energy use intensities (EUIs) and monthly load shapes (LSs) have been calculated for the different building types based on the monitored data. This report compares the monitored buildings' EUIs and LSs to EUIs and LSs determined using whole-building load data and the End-Use Disaggregation Algorithm (EDA). Two sets of EDA determined EUIs and LSs are compared to the monitored data values. The data sets represent: (1) average buildings in the SCE service territory and (2) specific buildings that were monitored.

Akbari, H.; Rainer, L.; Heinemeier, K.; Huang, J.; Franconi, E.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Assembly of a Molecular Needle, from the Bottom Up  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Assembly of a Molecular Needle, Assembly of a Molecular Needle, from the Bottom Up Assembly of a Molecular Needle, from the Bottom Up Print Wednesday, 21 December 2005 00:00 Many pathogenic bacteria use a specialized secretion system to inject virulence proteins directly into the cells they infect. The injected proteins, by mimicking host-cell mechanisms, can then subvert normal cellular function. The type III secretion system (TTSS) is a sophisticated protein complex with an overall shape similar to a hypodermic needle. More than twenty unique types of proteins are required for its assembly, most of which are found among a wide variety of animal as well as plant pathogens. Electron microscopy has sketched the broad outlines of TTSS structure, but it does not have sufficient resolution to reveal the details required to understand, and eventually inhibit, the needle's function. At the ALS, researchers from Canada and the U.S. performed crystallographic studies of EscJ, the protein that makes up the needle's ring-shaped base. Their analysis of the EscJ ring not only presents a snapshot of one of the earliest structures generated in the TTSS assembly process, but also reveals features indicative of its role as the molecular platform for subsequent construction of the secretion apparatus.

90

Integrating hospital information systems: a bottom-up approach  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The growing complexity of hospital information systems has prompted information systems managers to seek applicable solutions for integrating their systems. While many successful applications of information systems have been introduced and implemented in the hospital environment, the integration of heterogeneous applications in existing, multi-vendor, computing environments into a cohesive hospital-wide information system has proved to be complicated and difficult to accomplish. This paper discusses systems integration in hospitals and presents a conceptual framework for bottom-up integration of hospital information systems. The scope of the proposed framework is the integration of stand-alone clinical, administrative and financial information elements of a hospital into a unified system environment with a central medical data warehouse.

Moshe Zviran; Aviad Armoni

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Next MECS will be conducted in 2010 Next MECS will be conducted in 2010 Table 5.3 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Coal Fuel Oil (excluding Coal Net Demand Residual and Natural Gas(d) LPG and Coke and Breeze) NAICS for Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(c) (billion NGL(e) (million Code(a) End Use (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) Total United States 311 - 339 ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 977,338 40 22 5,357 21 46 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel 24,584 21 4 2,059 2 25 Conventional Boiler Use 24,584 11 3

92

Public Health Benefits of End-Use Electrical Energy Efficiency in California: An Exploratory Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

assessments for the current mix of energy technologies, thenaphthalene. The current mix of energy technologies employedis used to establish the mix of energy technologies that

McKone, Thomas E.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

ENERGY CONSERVATION: POLICY ISSUES AND END-USE SCENARIOS OF SAVINGS POTENTIAL PT.2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

State Solid Waste Management Board Energy Analysis ofto Solid Waste Utilization as an Energy Source. Gordianto Solid Waste Utilization as an Energy Source. Washington,

Authors, Various

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Bottom-Up Energy Analysis System - Methodology and Results  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Statement Household Refrigerators and Freezers. 2008. EC,technologies (e.g. refrigerators and freezers are groupedresidential refrigerators and freezers: function derivation

McNeil, Michael A.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Bottom-Up Energy Analysis System - Methodology and Results  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Documents U.S. Rulemaking Documents TSL 4 PHP IncandescentLamps Incandescent Lamps Fluorescent Lamp Ballasts kWh/yrand T5 fluorescent tubes, incandescent lamps, CFLs, Halogen

McNeil, Michael A.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Control Limits for Building Energy End Use Based on Engineering Judgment, Frequency Analysis, and Quantile Regression  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Approaches are needed to continuously characterize the energy performance of commercial buildings to allow for (1) timely response to excess energy use by building operators; and (2) building occupants to develop energy awareness and to actively engage in reducing energy use. Energy information systems, often involving graphical dashboards, are gaining popularity in presenting energy performance metrics to occupants and operators in a (near) real-time fashion. Such an energy information system, called Building Agent, has been developed at NREL and incorporates a dashboard for public display. Each building is, by virtue of its purpose, location, and construction, unique. Thus, assessing building energy performance is possible only in a relative sense, as comparison of absolute energy use out of context is not meaningful. In some cases, performance can be judged relative to average performance of comparable buildings. However, in cases of high-performance building designs, such as NREL's Research Support Facility (RSF) discussed in this report, relative performance is meaningful only when compared to historical performance of the facility or to a theoretical maximum performance of the facility as estimated through detailed building energy modeling.

Henze, G. P.; Pless, S.; Petersen, A.; Long, N.; Scambos, A. T.

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Assessment of U.S. Electric End-Use Energy Efficiency Potential  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Demand-side management holds significant potential to reduce growth in U.S. energy consumption and peak demand, and in a cost-effective manner. But significant policy interventions will be required to achieve these benefits. (author)

Gellings, Clark W.; Wikler, Greg; Ghosh, Debyani

2006-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

98

Public Health Benefits of End-Use Electrical Energy Efficiency in California: An Exploratory Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Natural Gas Kern Natural Gas/Eor Gas Turbine Kern Ag. &enhanced oil recovery (EOR), and NOx and S02 from digesterEnergy Information Agency EOR: enhanced oil recovery EP A:

McKone, Thomas E.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1994 - Derived measures of end-use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

eialogo eialogo Calculation of MECS Energy Measures Reported energy values were used to construct several derived values, which, in turn, were used to prepare the estimates appearing in MECS consumption tables--First Use, Total Inputs, Offsite-Produced. These derived values are displayed in Table 1 and defined as follows: Energy produced offsite and consumed as a fuel. This derived value represents onsite consumption of fuels that were originally produced offsite. That is, they arrived at the establishment as the result of a purchase or were transferred to the establishment from outside sources. As such, this derived value is equivalent to consumption of "purchased" fuels as reported by the Census Bureau for the years 1974-1981. The Census Bureau defines "purchased" fuels to include those actually purchased plus those

100

America's Bottom-Up Climate Change Mitigation Policy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

US Department of Energys Transportation Energy Data Book (Davis and Diegel, 2006). Baseline gasoline and ethanol usage

Lutsey, Nicholas P.; Sperling, Dan

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bottom-up energy end-use" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Bottom-up, social innovation for addressing climate change Noam Bergman, University of Oxford  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Bottom-up, social innovation for addressing climate change Noam Bergman, University of Oxford and practice in the area of bottom-up, social innovation could yield benefits if integrated into wider considerations of research and policy development concerning climate change. Taking social innovation to include

102

The evolution of carbon dioxide emissions from energy use in industrialized countries: an end-use analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There has been much attention drawn to plans for reductions or restraint in future C02 emissions, yet little analysis of the recent history of those emissions by end use or economic activity. Understanding the components of C02 emissions, particularly those related to combustion of fossil fuels, is important for judging the likely success of plans for dealing with future emissions. Knowing how fuel switching, changes in economic activity and its structure, or changes in energy-use efficiency affected emissions in the past, we can better judge both the realism of national proposals to restrain future emissions and the outcome as well. This study presents a first step in that analysis. The organization of this paper is as follows. We present a brief background and summarize previous work analyzing changes in energy use using the factorial method. We then describe our data sources and method. We then present a series of summary results, including a comparison of C02 emissions in 1991 by end use or sector. We show both aggregate change and change broken down by factor, highlighting briefly the main components of change. We then present detailed results, sector by sector. Next we highlight recent trends. Finally, we integrate our results, discussing -the most important factors driving change - evolution in economic structure, changes in energy intensities, and shifts in the fuel mix. We discuss briefly some of the likely causes of these changes - long- term technological changes, effects of rising incomes, the impact of overall changes in energy prices, as well as changes in the relative prices of energy forms.

Schipper, L.; Ting, M.; Khrushch, M.; Unander, F.; Monahan, P.; Golove, W.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

" Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," " " "," ",,,"Fuel...

104

Measured commercial load shapes and energy-use intensities and validation of the LBL end-use disaggregation algorithm. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Southern California Edison Company (SCE) has conducted an extensive metering project in which electricity end use in 53 commercial buildings in Southern California has been measured. The building types monitored include offices, retail stores, groceries, restaurants, and warehouses. One year (June 1989 through May 1990) of the SCE measured hourly end-use data are reviewed in this report. Annual whole-building and end-use energy use intensities (EUIs) and monthly load shapes (LSs) have been calculated for the different building types based on the monitored data. This report compares the monitored buildings` EUIs and LSs to EUIs and LSs determined using whole-building load data and the End-Use Disaggregation Algorithm (EDA). Two sets of EDA determined EUIs and LSs are compared to the monitored data values. The data sets represent: (1) average buildings in the SCE service territory and (2) specific buildings that were monitored.

Akbari, H.; Rainer, L.; Heinemeier, K.; Huang, J.; Franconi, E.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

" Row: End Uses;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

","LPG and","(excluding Coal","RSE" " ","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coke and Breeze)","Row" "End Use","(million kWh)","(million...

106

Integrated estimation of commercial sector end-use load shapes and energy use intensities in the PG&E service area  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project represents a unique research effort to address the commercial sector end-use energy forecasting data needs of the Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG&E) and the California Energy Commission (CEC). The object of the project was to develop an updated set of commercial sector end-use energy use intensity (EUI) data that has been fully reconciled with measured data. The research was conducted in two stages. First, we developed reconciled electricity end-use EUIs and load shapes for each of the 11 building types in the inland and coastal regions of the PG&E service territory using information collected in 1986. Second, we developed procedures to translate these results into a consistent set of commercial sector forecasting model inputs recognizing the separate modeling conventions used by PG&E and CEC. EUIs have been developed for: II commercial building types; up to 10 end uses; up to 3 fuel types; 2 and 5 subservice territory forecasting regions (as specified by the PG&E and CEC forecasting models, respectively); and up to 2 distinct vintages corresponding to the period prior to and immediately following the adoption of the first generation of California building and equipment standards. For the electricity end uses, 36 sets of daily load shapes have been developed representing average weekday, average weekend, and peak weekday electricity use for each month of the year by building type for both the inland and coastal climate zones.

Akbari, H.; Eto, J.; Konopacki, S.; Afzal, A.; Heinemeier, K.; Rainer, L.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

" Row: End Uses;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" 8 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," " " ","Net Demand",,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal","RSE" " ","for ","Residual","and","Natural ","LPG and","(excluding Coal","Row" "End Use","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coke and Breeze)","Factors"

108

TOP-DOWN/BOTTOM-UP APPROACH FOR DEVELOPING SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT INDICATORS FOR MINING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: APPLICATION TO THE ARLIT URANIUM MINES (NIGER) A. Chamareta)b) , M. O'Connor a) and G. Récoché b) a, undertaken at the Arlit uranium mines in Niger. Our objective was to define indicators that are understood1 TOP-DOWN/BOTTOM-UP APPROACH FOR DEVELOPING SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT INDICATORS FOR MINING

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

109

Using MAS Technologies for Intelligent Organizations: A Report of Bottom-Up Results  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Using MAS Technologies for Intelligent Organizations: A Report of Bottom-Up Results Armando Robles1 Organizations us- ing MAS Technology. We discuss our experience of implementing different types of server agents institutional prescription, and having that prescription control the information system that handles the day

Luck, Michael

110

Programmable Self-Assembly Control of Concurrent Systems From the Bottom Up  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Programmable Self-Assembly Control of Concurrent Systems From the Bottom Up Eric Klavins Self-assembly. Self-assembly is ubiquitous in nature. For example, virus capsids, cell membranes, and tissues are all self-assembled from smaller com- ponents in a completely distributed fashion. Self-assembly

111

Alternative Strategies for Low Pressure End Uses  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This tip sheet outlines alternative strategies for low-pressure end uses as a pathway to reduced compressed air energy costs.

112

End-use taxes: Current EIA practices  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There are inconsistencies in the EIA published end-use price data with respect to Federal, state, and local government sales and excise taxes; some publications include end-use taxes and others do not. The reason for including these taxes in end-use energy prices is to provide consistent and accurate information on the total cost of energy purchased by the final consumer. Preliminary estimates are made of the effect on prices (bias) reported in SEPER (State Energy Price and Expenditure Report) resulting from the inconsistent treatment of taxes. EIA has undertaken several actions to enhance the reporting of end-use energy prices.

Not Available

1994-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

113

Nanomaterial processing using self-assembly-bottom-up chemical and biological approaches  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nanotechnology is touted as the next logical sequence in technological evolution. This has led to a substantial surge in research activities pertaining to the development and fundamental understanding of processes and assembly at the nanoscale. Both top-down and bottom-up fabrication approaches may be used to realize a range of well-defined nanostructured materials with desirable physical and chemical attributes. Among these, the bottom-up self-assembly process offers the most realistic solution toward the fabrication of next-generation functional materials and devices. Here, we present a comprehensive review on the physical basis behind self-assembly and the processes reported in recent years to direct the assembly of nanoscale functional blocks into hierarchically ordered structures. This paper emphasizes assembly in the synthetic domain as well in the biological domain, underscoring the importance of biomimetic approaches toward novel materials. In particular, two important classes of directed self-assembly, namely, (i) self-assembly among nanoparticlepolymer systems and (ii) external field-guided assembly are highlighted. The spontaneous self-assembling behavior observed in nature that leads to complex, multifunctional, hierarchical structures within biological systems is also discussed in this review. Recent research undertaken to synthesize hierarchically assembled functional materials have underscored the need as well as the benefits harvested in synergistically combining top-down fabrication methods with bottom-up self-assembly.

Rajagopalan Thiruvengadathan; Venumadhav Korampally; Arkasubhra Ghosh; Nripen Chanda; Keshab Gangopadhyay; Shubhra Gangopadhyay

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

" Row: End Uses;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 1998;" 3. End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 1998;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " ",," ","Distillate"," "," ","Coal"," " " ",,,"Fuel Oil",,,"(excluding Coal" " ","Net Demand","Residual","and","Natural Gas(c)","LPG and","Coke and Breeze)","RSE" " ","for Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","(billion","NGL(d)","(million","Row"

115

" Row: End Uses;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;" 8 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." ,,,"Distillate" ,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" ,"Net Demand","Residual","and",,"LPG and","(excluding Coal" "End Use","for Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","Natural Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coke and Breeze)" ,"Total United States" "TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION",2886,79,130,5211,69,868

116

" Row: End Uses;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" 7 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." ,,,"Distillate",,,"Coal" ,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"(excluding Coal" ,"Net Demand","Residual","and","Natural Gas(c)","LPG and","Coke and Breeze)" ,"for Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","(billion","NGL(d)","(million" "End Use","(million kWh)","(million bbl)","(million bbl)","cu ft)","(million bbl)","short tons)"

117

Energy Conservation Policy Issues and End-Use Scenarios of Savings Potential--Part 5. Energy Efficient Buildings: The Cause of Litigation Against Energy Conservation Building Codes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Impact Evaluation of New York State Energy Code (ASHRAE 90-N.Y. , N.Y. : New York State Energy Research and DevelopmentJ. "New York Puts Together Its Own State Energy Policy and

Benenson, P.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

End Use and Fuel Certification  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Breakout Session 2: Frontiers and Horizons Session 2B: End Use and Fuel Certification John Eichberger, Vice President of Government Relations, National Association for Convenience Stores

119

Energy Conservation Policy Issues and End-Use Scenarios of Savings Potential--Part 5. Energy Efficient Buildings: The Cause of Litigation Against Energy Conservation Building Codes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

New York State Energy Code (ASHRAE 90-75) on Office Buildinga model code known as ASHRAE 90-75. Codes based on thisthe lighting section of ASHRAE 90-75 (Los Angeles Federal

Benenson, P.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Learning Joint Top-Down and Bottom-up Processes for 3D Visual Inference Cristian Sminchisescu  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-down and bottom-up processing for monocular 3d human motion reconstruction. Learning progresses in alter- native. Introduction Analyzing three-dimensional human motion in real world environments is an actively growing field and surveillance. The problem has been traditionally attacked using the powerful machinery of top-down, generative

Sminchisescu, Cristian

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bottom-up energy end-use" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

A Top-down and Bottom-up look at Emissions Abatement in Germany in response to the EU ETS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper uses top-down trend analysis and a bottom-up power sector model to define upper and lower boundaries on abatement in Germany in the first phase of the EU Emissions Trading Scheme (2005-2007). Long-term trend ...

Feilhauer, Stephan M. (Stephan Marvin)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Warming shifts top-down and bottom-up control of pond food web structure and function  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...top-down and bottom-up control of pond food web structure and function Jonathan B. Shurin...structuring experimental freshwater pond food webs in western Canada over 16 months. Experimental...temperatures produced top-heavy food webs with lower biomass of benthic and pelagic...

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Implementing nuclear energy policy in Japan top-down and bottom-up perspectives  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Although crucial to Japan, nuclear power has been confronted with increasing siting obstacles. This paper analyses Japan's nuclear policy from the perspective of implementation analysis. It suggests that implementation processes in Japan can and do get delayed more often than many would like to acknowledge because of a reliance on indirect policy instruments by the central government for facilitating bargaining between implementing organizations and target groups. The paper concludes that a site auctioning approach which stresses greater regional input into decisionmaking may assist in the management of siting difficulties.

S. Hayden Lesbirel

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Representing energy technologies in top-down economic models using bottom-up information  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of a technology such as natural gas combined cycle power generation if, for example, its widespread use causes gas example (e.g., a 500 megawatt coal fired power plant, or a 1-MW wind turbine). The technologies for two carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) technologies in the electric power sector into the EPPA

125

Two Paths to Transforming Markets through Public Sector Energy Efficiency: Bottom Up versus Top Down  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Table 1. Enabling Conditions for PEPS Success in China andsuccesses and the barriers confronting each, and concludes with several lessons and enabling conditionssuccess in China than it did in Mexico. A number of conditions

Van Wie McGrory, Laura; Coleman, Philip; Fridley, David; Harris, Jeffrey; Villasenor Franco, Edgar

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Biomass Resource Allocation among Competing End Uses  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Biomass Resource Allocation Biomass Resource Allocation among Competing End Uses Emily Newes, Brian Bush, Daniel Inman, Yolanda Lin, Trieu Mai, Andrew Martinez, David Mulcahy, Walter Short, Travis Simpkins, and Caroline Uriarte National Renewable Energy Laboratory Corey Peck Lexidyne, LLC Technical Report NREL/TP-6A20-54217 May 2012 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden, Colorado 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 Biomass Resource Allocation among Competing End Uses Emily Newes, Brian Bush, Daniel Inman,

127

" Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 1998;" 1. End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 1998;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ","Coal"," "," " " "," ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"(excluding Coal" " "," "," ","Net","Residual","and","Natural Gas(d)","LPG and","Coke and Breeze)"," ","RSE"

128

" Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" 2 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." ,,,,,"Distillate" ,,,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" "NAICS",,,"Net","Residual","and",,"LPG and","(excluding Coal" "Code(a)","End Use","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","Natural Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coke and Breeze)","Other(f)" ,,"Total United States"

129

" Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" 2 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," "," " " "," ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal",,"RSE" "NAICS"," "," ","Net","Residual","and","Natural ","LPG and","(excluding Coal"," ","Row" "Code(a)","End Use","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coke and Breeze)","Other(f)","Factors"

130

" Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;" 4 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," " " "," ",,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" "NAICS"," ","Net Demand","Residual","and",,"LPG and","(excluding Coal" "Code(a)","End Use","for Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","Natural Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coke and Breeze)"

131

" Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" 4 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," " " "," ",,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" "NAICS"," ","Net Demand","Residual","and",,"LPG and","(excluding Coal" "Code(a)","End Use","for Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","Natural Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coke and Breeze)"

132

" Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 1998;" 2. End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 1998;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," "," " " "," ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal",,"RSE" "NAICS"," "," ","Net","Residual","and",,"LPG and","(excluding Coal"," ","Row" "Code(a)","End Use","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","Natural Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coke and Breeze)","Other(f)","Factors"

133

" Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" 4 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," " " "," ","Net Demand",,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal","RSE" "NAICS"," ","for ","Residual","and","Natural ","LPG and","(excluding Coal","Row" "Code(a)","End Use","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coke and Breeze)","Factors"

134

" Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;" 2 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." ,,,,,"Distillate" ,,,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" "NAICS",,,"Net","Residual","and",,"LPG and","(excluding Coal" "Code(a)","End Use","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","Natural Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coke and Breeze)","Other(f)" ,,"Total United States"

135

Bottom-up and top-down effects on insects herbivores along a natural salinity gradient in a florida salt marsh.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??I compared the strength of bottom- up and top-down effects on insect herbivores along a natural salinity gradient in salt marsh communities in West - (more)

Albarracin, Maria Teresa

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Residential Lighting End-Use Consumption  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The U.S. DOE Residential Lighting End-Use Consumption Study aims to improve the understanding of lighting energy usage in U.S. residential dwellings using a regional estimation framework. The framework allows for the estimation of lamp usage and energy consumption 1) nationally and by region of the United States, 2) by certain household characteristics, 3) by location within the home, 4) by certain lamp characteristics, and 5) by certain categorical cross-classifications.

137

Table 5.3 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Coal Fuel Oil (excluding Coal Net Demand...

138

Enhanced End-Use Efficiency  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Energy efficiency has been dubbed the sixth source of energy (Fig. 14.1). The other five sources of energy are coal, natural gas, petroleum, nuclear and renewable energy. This chapter is about energy success s...

David Hafemeister

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

" Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;" 3 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ","Coal" " "," ",,,"Fuel Oil",,,"(excluding Coal" " "," ","Net Demand","Residual","and","Natural Gas(d)","LPG and","Coke and Breeze)" "NAICS"," ","for Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","(billion","NGL(e)","(million"

140

" Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" 1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," "," " " "," ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" " "," "," ","Net","Residual","and","Natural ","LPG and","(excluding Coal"," ","RSE" "NAICS"," ","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coke and Breeze)","Other(f)","Row"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bottom-up energy end-use" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

" Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 1998;" 3. End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 1998;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ","Coal"," " " "," ",,,"Fuel Oil",,,"(excluding Coal" " "," ","Net Demand","Residual","and","Natural Gas(d)","LPG and","Coke and Breeze)","RSE" "NAICS"," ","for Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","(billion","NGL(e)","(million","Row"

142

" Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" 3 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ","Coal" " "," ",,,"Fuel Oil",,,"(excluding Coal" " "," ","Net Demand","Residual","and","Natural Gas(d)","LPG and","Coke and Breeze)" "NAICS"," ","for Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","(billion","NGL(e)","(million"

143

" Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" 3 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," " " "," ","Net Demand",,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" " "," ","for ","Residual","and","Natural ","LPG and","(excluding Coal","RSE" "NAICS"," ","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coke and Breeze)","Row"

144

Supersymmetry from Bottom Up and the Top Jerusalem Winter School, Jerusalem, 2011  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

order of severity): 1 The dark energy (10-120) (The problem of the Cosmological Constant (The CCP) 2 after 5 fb-1 at LHC 1 Discovery of the Higgs ­ almost. The Standard Model is Complete!(?) 2 Is particle Model cannot be a complete theory of nature; fails to account for known facts. Top down (energy scales

California at Santa Cruz, University of

145

" Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" 1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." ,,,,,"Distillate",,,"Coal" ,,,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"(excluding Coal" ,,,"Net","Residual","and","Natural Gas(d)","LPG and","Coke and Breeze)" "NAICS",,"Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","(billion","NGL(e)","(million","Other(f)" "Code(a)","End Use","(trillion Btu)","(million kWh)","(million bbl)","(million bbl)","cu ft)","(million bbl)","short tons)","(trillion Btu)"

146

" Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;" 1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." ,,,,,"Distillate",,,"Coal" ,,,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"(excluding Coal" ,,,"Net","Residual","and","Natural Gas(d)","LPG and","Coke and Breeze)" "NAICS",,"Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","(billion","NGL(e)","(million","Other(f)" "Code(a)","End Use","(trillion Btu)","(million kWh)","(million bbl)","(million bbl)","cu ft)","(million bbl)","short tons)","(trillion Btu)"

147

Counter-Based Power Modeling Methods: Top-Down vs. Bottom-Up  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......fundamental properties. The benefits of having a single model...IEEE/ACM Int. Conf. Grid Computing (GRID) 2010, Piscataway...Bellosa, F. (2000) The Benefits of Event: Driven Energy...info/. [39] SBSIF. SMART specification rev.1......

Ramon Bertran; Marc Gonzlez; Xavier Martorell; Nacho Navarro; Eduard Ayguad

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Summer School 2010 Explore NCN's Electronics from the Bottom Up and previous summer school materials at  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

nanoscale transistors, energy conversion devices and bio-sensors. The 2010 Summer School will feature pioneering studies of carrier transport in nanoscale transistors. Vidhyadhiraja Sudhindra received a PhD from

Ginzel, Matthew

149

Energy Conservation: Policy Issues and End-Use Scenarios of Savings Potential -- Part 3, Policy Barriers and Investment Decisions in Industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on Nu- clear and Alternative Energy Systems ( CONAES) andCommittee on Nuclear and Alternative Energy Systems (CONAES)on Nu- clear and Alternative Energy Systems (CONAES) and FEA

Benenson, Peter

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Bottom-up regulation of a pole-ward migratory predator population  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...prey availability and quality, further compromising...emissions continue to increase [59-61], it can...energy reserves) and the quality of food available to...there were 12 periods of increase (black circles) and...Several discussions over a wines with Scott Carpentier...

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Enhanced End-Use Efficiency  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This chapter is about energy success stories and potential success stories. Since the oil embargo, the United States has reduced its energy-use growth rate from 4.4% per year (196070) to about 1% per year. Th...

David Hafemeister

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Distribution Infrastructure and End Use  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The expanded Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS2) created under the Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA) of 2007 requires 36 billion gallons of biofuels to be blended into transportation fuel by...

153

,"Colorado Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Colorado Natural Gas Consumption by End Use",6,"Monthly","112014","1151989" ,"Release...

154

,"California Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","California Natural Gas Consumption by End Use",11,"Annual",2013,"6301967" ,"Release...

155

Forecasting aggregate demand: Analytical comparison of top-down and bottom-up approaches in a multivariate exponential smoothing framework  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Forecasting aggregate demand represents a crucial aspect in all industrial sectors. In this paper, we provide the analytical prediction properties of top-down (TD) and bottom-up (BU) approaches when forecasting the aggregate demand using a multivariate exponential smoothing as demand planning framework. We extend and generalize the results achieved by Widiarta et al. (2009) by employing an unrestricted multivariate framework allowing for interdependency between its variables. Moreover, we establish the necessary and sufficient condition for the equality of mean squared errors (MSEs) of the two approaches. We show that the condition for the equality of \\{MSEs\\} holds even when the moving average parameters of the individual components are not identical. In addition, we show that the relative forecasting accuracy of TD and BU depends on the parametric structure of the underlying framework. Simulation results confirm our theoretical findings. Indeed, the ranking of TD and BU forecasts is led by the parametric structure of the underlying data generation process, regardless of possible misspecification issues.

Giacomo Sbrana; Andrea Silvestrini

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Conservative and dissipative force field for simulation of coarse-grained alkane molecules: A bottom-up approach  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We apply operational procedures available in the literature to the construction of coarse-grained conservative and friction forces for use in dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) simulations. The full procedure rely on a bottom-up approach: large molecular dynamics trajectories of n-pentane and n-decane modeled with an anisotropic united atom model serve as input for the force field generation. As a consequence, the coarse-grained model is expected to reproduce at least semi-quantitatively structural and dynamical properties of the underlying atomistic model. Two different coarse-graining levels are studied, corresponding to five and ten carbon atoms per DPD bead. The influence of the coarse-graining level on the generated force fields contributions, namely, the conservative and the friction part, is discussed. It is shown that the coarse-grained model of n-pentane correctly reproduces self-diffusion and viscosity coefficients of real n-pentane, while the fully coarse-grained model for n-decane at ambient temperature over-predicts diffusion by a factor of 2. However, when the n-pentane coarse-grained model is used as a building block for larger molecule (e.g., n-decane as a two blobs model), a much better agreement with experimental data is obtained, suggesting that the force field constructed is transferable to large macro-molecular systems.

Trment, Sbastien; Rousseau, Bernard, E-mail: bernard.rousseau@u-psud.fr [Laboratoire de Chimie-Physique, UMR 8000 CNRS, Universit Paris-Sud, Orsay (France)] [Laboratoire de Chimie-Physique, UMR 8000 CNRS, Universit Paris-Sud, Orsay (France); Schnell, Benot; Petitjean, Laurent; Couty, Marc [Manufacture Franaise des Pneumatiques MICHELIN, Centre de Ladoux, 23 place des Carmes, 63000 Clermont-Ferrand (France)] [Manufacture Franaise des Pneumatiques MICHELIN, Centre de Ladoux, 23 place des Carmes, 63000 Clermont-Ferrand (France)

2014-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

157

Table 5.2 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; 2 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Trillion Btu. Distillate Fuel Oil Coal NAICS Net Residual and LPG and (excluding Coal Code(a) End Use Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(c) Natural Gas(d) NGL(e) Coke and Breeze) Other(f) Total United States 311 - 339 ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 14,228 2,437 79 130 5,211 69 868 5,435 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel -- 27 46 19 2,134 10 572 -- Conventional Boiler Use -- 27 20 4 733 3 72 -- CHP and/or Cogeneration Process -- 0 26 15 1,401 7 500 -- Direct Uses-Total Process -- 1,912 26 54 2,623 29 289 -- Process Heating -- 297 25 14 2,362 24 280

158

Table 5.1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5.1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; 5.1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Coal Fuel Oil (excluding Coal Net Residual and Natural Gas(d) LPG and Coke and Breeze) NAICS Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(c) (billion NGL(e) (million Other(f) Code(a) End Use (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) (trillion Btu) Total United States 311 - 339 ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 14,228 714,166 13 22 5,064 18 39 5,435 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel -- 7,788 7 3 2,074 3 26 -- Conventional Boiler Use -- 7,788 3 1 712 1 3 -- CHP and/or Cogeneration Process

159

Table 5.7 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; 7 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Coal Fuel Oil (excluding Coal Net Demand Residual and Natural Gas(c) LPG and Coke and Breeze) for Electricity(a) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(b) (billion NGL(d) (million End Use (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) Total United States TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 845,727 13 22 5,064 18 39 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel 12,979 7 3 2,074 3 26 Conventional Boiler Use 12,979 3 1 712 1 3 CHP and/or Cogeneration Process -- 4 3 1,362 2 23 Direct Uses-Total Process 675,152 4 9 2,549 7 13 Process Heating

160

Table 5.5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; 5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Coal Fuel Oil (excluding Coal Net Residual and Natural Gas(c) LPG and Coke and Breeze) Total Electricity(a) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(b) (billion NGL(d) (million Other(e) End Use (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) (trillion Btu) Total United States TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 14,228 714,166 13 22 5,064 18 39 5,435 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel -- 7,788 7 3 2,074 3 26 -- Conventional Boiler Use -- 7,788 3 1 712 1 3 -- CHP and/or Cogeneration Process -- 0 4 3 1,362 2 23 -- Direct Uses-Total Process

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bottom-up energy end-use" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Table 5.6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; 6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Trillion Btu. Distillate Fuel Oil Coal Net Residual and LPG and (excluding Coal End Use Total Electricity(a) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(b) Natural Gas(c) NGL(d) Coke and Breeze) Other(e) Total United States TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 14,228 2,437 79 130 5,211 69 868 5,435 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel -- 27 46 19 2,134 10 572 -- Conventional Boiler Use -- 27 20 4 733 3 72 -- CHP and/or Cogeneration Process -- 0 26 15 1,401 7 500 -- Direct Uses-Total Process -- 1,912 26 54 2,623 29 289 -- Process Heating -- 297 25 14 2,362 24 280 -- Process Cooling and Refrigeration -- 182 * Q 25

162

Table 5.4 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; 4 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity; Unit: Trillion Btu. Distillate Fuel Oil Coal NAICS Net Demand Residual and LPG and (excluding Coal Code(a) End Use for Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(c) Natural Gas(d) NGL(e) Coke and Breeze) Total United States 311 - 339 ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 2,886 79 130 5,211 69 868 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel 44 46 19 2,134 10 572 Conventional Boiler Use 44 20 4 733 3 72 CHP and/or Cogeneration Process -- 26 15 1,401 7 500 Direct Uses-Total Process 2,304 26 54 2,623 29 289 Process Heating 318 25 14 2,362 24 280 Process Cooling and Refrigeration

163

Realizing Building End-Use Efficiency with Ermerging Technologies  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Realizing Building End-Use Efficiency Realizing Building End-Use Efficiency with Emerging Technologies Jonathan Livingston Livingston Energy Innovations, LLC What is End-Use Efficiency (EE)? * EE is an energy resource * Broadly accepted in the U.S. as the single most effective step toward reducing pollution, power costs and price volatility * Treated as equivalent to supply-side resources * Recognized by states and regions as first priority when costs are comparable (CA, MO, NM, Pacific Northwest) The Northwest Power Act 839b(e)(1). The plan shall, as provided in this paragraph, give priority to resources which the Council determines to be cost-effective. Priority shall be given: first, to conservation; second, to renewable resources; third, to generating resources utilizing waste heat or generating resources of high fuel conversion

164

Assessment of Historic Trend in Mobility and Energy Use in India Transportation Sector Using Bottom-up Approach  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a corresponding increase in both diesel and electric trains.Diesel IEA Gas/Diesel Oil Estimated Electric IEA Heavy FuelDiesel use increased from 50% to 64%, and electric train

Zhou, Nan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Bottom-up Representation of Industrial Energy Efficiency Technologies in Integrated Assessment Models for the Cement Sector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

system that runs a steam turbine system (bottom cycle).This report focuses on the steam turbine system since these

Sathaye, J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Bottom-up Representation of Industrial Energy Efficiency Technologies in Integrated Assessment Models for the Cement Sector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

developers also market fuzzy logic control systems, e.g. ,so- called 'fuzzy logic' or expert control, or rule-basedsystems or fuzzy logic is model-predictive control using

Sathaye, J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Bottom-up Representation of Industrial Energy Efficiency Technologies in Integrated Assessment Models for the Cement Sector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the NEMA Premium Efficiency Electric Motor specification wasElectric Apparatus Service Association (EASA) (2003). The Effect of Repair/Rewinding on Motor Efficiency.

Sathaye, J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Bottom-up Representation of Industrial Energy Efficiency Technologies in Integrated Assessment Models for the Cement Sector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Advanced Concepts of Waste Heat Recovery in Cement Plantsbuilding controls, waste heat recovery or adjustable speedquantities of low grade waste heat from the kilns or clinker

Sathaye, J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

EIA - Appendix F-Reference Case Projections by End-Use Sector and Country  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Reference Case Projections by End-Use Sector and Country Grouping Data Tables (2005-2030) Reference Case Projections by End-Use Sector and Country Grouping Data Tables (2005-2030) International Energy Outlook 2008 Reference Case Projections by End-Use Sector and Country Grouping Data Tables (2005-2030) Formats Data Table Titles (1 to 19 complete) Reference Case Projections by End-Use Sector and Country Gruping Data Tables. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Projections of Nuclear Generating Capacity Data Tables. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. F1 Total World Delivered Energy Consumption by End-Use Sector and Fuel Table F1. Total World Delivered Energy Consumption by End-Use Sector and Fuel. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

170

Office Buildings - End-Use Equipment  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

End-Use Equipment End-Use Equipment The types of space heating equipment used in office buildings were similar to those of the commercial buildings sector as a whole (Table 8 and Figure 5). Furnaces were most used followed by packaged heating systems. Individual space heaters were third-most used but were primarily used to supplement the building's main heating system. Boilers and district heat systems were more often used in larger buildings. Table 8. Types of Heating Equipment Used in Office Buildings, 2003 Number of Buildings (thousand) Total Floorspace (million square feet) All Buildings* All Office Buildings All Buildings* All Office Buildings All Buildings 4,645 824 64,783 12,208 All Buildings with Space Heating 3,982 802 60,028 11,929 Heating Equipment (more than one may apply)

171

High-performance hollow sulfur nanostructured battery cathode through a scalable, room temperature, one-step, bottom-up approach  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...FreedomCAR Program R&D on Energy Storage Systems (Department of Energy, Washington, DC). Available at http://www1.eere.energy.gov/solar/pdfs/sda_03duong.pdf. Accessed December 12, 2005 . 31 Elazari R ( 2010 ) Morphological and structural...

Weiyang Li; Guangyuan Zheng; Yuan Yang; Zhi Wei Seh; Nian Liu; Yi Cui

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Realizing Building End-Use Efficiency with Ermerging Technologies  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

Information about the implementation of emerging technologies to maximize end-use efficiency in buildings.

173

Top-down or bottom-up strategy approach for promotion of cleaner production in Egypt? Reflections on China's experiences  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Egypt has been undergoing intense dynamics since the 25 January 2011 revolution, with people aspiring for positive democratic and social changes. As Egypt attempts to further industrialise and modernise its economy, energy and water security are some of the most pressing challenges. The time to address these problems is now, but through a different economic paradigm of low carbon, resource efficient and socially inclusive national development, known as 'green economy' or 'circular economy' (CE) in China. The experience of China was selected because its challenges were similar to Egypt: accelerating economic growth and industrial expansion. After China's rapid industrialisation in the 1980s, serious environmental pollution stimulated Chinese leaders to develop an alternative economic model based on sustainable development. Focusing on the CE of the manufacturing sector in China, this paper reflects on and draws lessons from China's experiences in implementing cleaner production (CP). The research reviews the systems implemented to promote CP in China as well as gaps in their efforts to reach CE at the firm-level. It reflects on the adequacy of Egypt's current policies to attain a green economy in its manufacturing industries.

Dalia Sakr; Salah El-Haggar; Donald Huisingh; Leenard Baas

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Distribution Category UC-98 Consumption End-Use A Comparison of Measures  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Distribution Category UC-98 Distribution Category UC-98 Consumption End-Use A Comparison of Measures by Consumption and Supply Surveys Energy information Administration Office of Energy Markets and End Use U.S. Department of Energy Washington, D.C. 20585 General information concerning the contents of the report may be obtained from Lynda T. Carlson, Director of the Energy End Use Division (202/586-1112). Specific information regarding the contents or preparation of the publication may be obtained from Nancy L. Leach, Chief of the Residential and Commercial Branch (202/586-1114). The Residential Energy Consumption Survey manager and a major contributor to this report is Wendel Thompson (202/586-1119). The report was written by Gerald Peabody (202/586-6160). Energy Consumption by End-Use Sector

175

EIA - Reference Case Projections by End-Use Sector and Region Tables  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 > Reference Case Projections by End-Use Sector and Region Tables (2003-2030) 6 > Reference Case Projections by End-Use Sector and Region Tables (2003-2030) International Energy Outlook 2006 Reference Case Projections by End-Use Sector and Region Tables (2003-2030) Formats Data Table Titles (1 to 19 complete) Reference Case Projections by End-Use Sector and Region Data Tables. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Reference Case Projections by End-Use Sector and Region Data Tables. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Table D1 Total World Delivered Energy Consumption Reference Case Projections by End-Use Sector and Region Data Tables. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Reference Case Projections by End-Use Sector and Region Data Tables. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

176

Bottom-Up Strategic Planning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Libraries Experience Jeff Williams Tammy Nickelson DearieSmith, Jennifer Tran, Mary Wickline, and Jeff Williams.Jeff Williams (jeffrey.williams@nyumc.org) is Associate

Williams, Jeff; Dearie, Tammy; Schottlaender, Brian E.C.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

On the Contribution of Compressed Air Systems to Energy Efficiency Targets  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

On the Contribution of Compressed Air Systems to Energy Efficiency Targets On the Contribution of Compressed Air Systems to Energy Efficiency Targets - A Function-Based Bottom-Up Approach Speaker(s): Patrick Plötz Date: May 4, 2012 - 2:00pm Location: 90-4133 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Sanaee Iyama Achieving current EU energy targets as stipulated in the energy service directive and in the energy strategy for 2020 implies substantial efficiency improvements across a variety of industrial end-uses. The achievable saving potential of an end-use depends considerably on the age structure of the existing stock and on the technology definition, i.e. whether a product approach, an extended product approach or a system-approach is used. Within this context, important ErP studies on air compressors are in preparation. In this paper, we address the possible

178

Metering Campaign on All Cooking End-Uses in 100 Households  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents the findings of an experimental study performed in 100 French households on the end-use power demand and energy consumption of domestic appliances focusing on cooking appliances [1].

Olivier Sidler

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

The Reality and Future Scenarios of Commercial Building Energy Consumption in China  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

While China's 11th Five Year Plan called for a reduction of energy intensity by 2010, whether and how the energy consumption trend can be changed in a short time has been hotly debated. This research intends to evaluate the impact of a variety of scenarios of GDP growth, energy elasticity and energy efficiency improvement on energy consumption in commercial buildings in China using a detailed China End-use Energy Model. China's official energy statistics have limited information on energy demand by end use. This is a particularly pertinent issue for building energy consumption. The authors have applied reasoned judgments, based on experience of working on Chinese efficiency standards and energy related programs, to present a realistic interpretation of the current energy data. The bottom-up approach allows detailed consideration of end use intensity, equipment efficiency, etc., thus facilitating assessment of potential impacts of specific policy and technology changes on building energy use. The results suggest that: (1) commercial energy consumption in China's current statistics is underestimated by about 44%, and the fuel mix is misleading; (2) energy efficiency improvements will not be sufficient to offset the strong increase in end-use penetration and intensity in commercial buildings; (3) energy intensity (particularly electricity) in commercial buildings will increase; (4) different GDP growth and elasticity scenarios could lead to a wide range of floor area growth trajectories , and therefore, significantly impact energy consumption in commercial buildings.

Zhou, Nan; Lin, Jiang

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Assessment of Supply Chain Energy Efficiency Potentials: A U.S. Case Study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper summarizes a modeling framework that characterizes the key underlying technologies and processes that contribute to the supply chain energy use and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions of a variety of goods and services purchased by U.S. consumers. The framework couples an input-output supply chain modeling approach with"bottom-up" fuel end use models for individual IO sectors. This fuel end use modeling detail allows energy and policy analysts to better understand the underlying technologies and processes contributing to the supply chain energy and GHG"footprints" of goods and services. To illustrate the policy-relevance of thisapproach, a case study was conducted to estimate achievable household GHG footprint reductions associated with the adoption of best practice energy-efficient supply chain technologies.

Masanet, Eric; Kramer, Klaas Jan; Homan, Gregory; Brown, Richard; Worrell, Ernst

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bottom-up energy end-use" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

,"U.S. Total Sales of Residual Fuel Oil by End Use"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Residual Fuel Oil by End Use" Residual Fuel Oil by End Use" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Total Sales of Residual Fuel Oil by End Use",8,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1984" ,"Release Date:","11/15/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","10/31/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_cons_821rsd_dcu_nus_a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_cons_821rsd_dcu_nus_a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov"

182

,"U.S. Adjusted Sales of Residual Fuel Oil by End Use"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Residual Fuel Oil by End Use" Residual Fuel Oil by End Use" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Adjusted Sales of Residual Fuel Oil by End Use",8,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1984" ,"Release Date:","11/15/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","10/31/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_cons_821rsda_dcu_nus_a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_cons_821rsda_dcu_nus_a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov"

183

,"New York Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New York Natural Gas Consumption by End Use",6,"Monthly","102014","1151989" ,"Release...

184

,"New York Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New York Natural Gas Consumption by End Use",10,"Annual",2013,"6301967" ,"Release Date:","10...

185

Assessment of Interval Data and Their Potential Application to Residential Electricity End-Use Modeling, An  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

The Energy Information Administration (EIA) is investigating the potential benefits of incorporating interval electricity data into its residential energy end use models. This includes interval smart meter and submeter data from utility assets and systems. It is expected that these data will play a significant role in informing residential energy efficiency policies in the future. Therefore, a long-term strategy for improving the RECS end-use models will not be complete without an investigation of the current state of affairs of submeter data, including their potential for use in the context of residential building energy modeling.

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Development of an End-Use Sector- Based Low-Carbon Indicator System for  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Development of an End-Use Sector- Based Low-Carbon Indicator System for Development of an End-Use Sector- Based Low-Carbon Indicator System for Cities in China Title Development of an End-Use Sector- Based Low-Carbon Indicator System for Cities in China Publication Type Conference Proceedings Year of Publication 2012 Authors Price, Lynn K., Nan Zhou, David Fridley, Hongyou Lu, Nina Zheng, Cecilia Fino-Chen, and Stephanie Ohshita Conference Name the ACEEE's 2012 Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings Date Published 08/2012 Publisher the American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy Conference Location Pacific Grove, California, U.S.A. Keywords 12th five year plan, buildings, china, china energy, china energy group, co2 emissions, energy analysis and environmental impacts department, low carbon indicator, policy studies

187

Monitoring of Electrical End-Use Loads in Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Southern California Edison is currently conducting a program to collect end-use metered data from commercial buildings in its service area. The data will provide actual measurements of end-use loads and will be used in research and in designing...

Martinez, M.; Alereza, T.; Mort, D.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Optimizing U.S. Mitigation Strategies for the Light-Duty Transportation Sector: What We Learn from a Bottom-Up Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy carrier input (PJ): Corn Energy carrier input (PJ):energy requirement (in natural gas, specifically) for corn

Yeh, Sonia; Farrell, Alexander E.; Plevin, Richard J; Sanstad, Alan; Weyant, John

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Benchmarking Non-Hardware Balance-of-System (Soft) Costs for U.S. Photovoltaic Systems Using a Bottom-Up Approach and Installer Survey  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ability to deploy solar technology rapidly across numerousRenewable Energy (Solar Energy Technologies Program) of theRenewable Energy (Solar Energy Technologies Program) of the

Ardani, Kristen

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Bottom-up Representation of Industrial Energy Efficiency Technologies in Integrated Assessment Models for the U.S. Pulp and Paper Sector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

screen out thick chips, boiler maintenance, steam trapSteamProductionandEfficiency Boilermaintenance Improvedofblackliquorinrecoveryboiler Hightemperaturevideo

Xu, Tengfang

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Bottom-up Representation of Industrial Energy Efficiency Technologies in Integrated Assessment Models for the U.S. Pulp and Paper Sector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

stream through the high efficiency turbine connected to themechanical drive turbines or zero efficiency pressure

Xu, Tengfang

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Development of Bottom-up Representation of Industrial Energy Efficiency Technologies in Integrated Assessment Models for the Iron and Steel Sector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

around 8-9% for good coking coal (IISI, 1982). Dryingof steam coal and coking coal to be $15/t (IEA, 1995). This

Xu, T.T.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Bottom-up Representation of Industrial Energy Efficiency Technologies in Integrated Assessment Models for the U.S. Pulp and Paper Sector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Production Experience with LWC. TAPPI Papermakers ConferenceProceedings, 1995. TAPPI, Atlanta, Georgia. Cannell, E.for mini Mill Applications. TAPPI Papermakers Conference

Xu, Tengfang

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Bottom-up Representation of Industrial Energy Efficiency Technologies in Integrated Assessment Models for the U.S. Pulp and Paper Sector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

building controls, waste heat recovery or adjustable speedoptimizingventilation) Wasteheatrecovery Condebeltdryingandoptimizing ventilation) Wasteheatrecovery Condebelt

Xu, Tengfang

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Development of Bottom-up Representation of Industrial Energy Efficiency Technologies in Integrated Assessment Models for the Iron and Steel Sector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

building controls, waste heat recovery or adjustable speeddrives in the rolling mill Waste heat recovery from coolingdrives in the rolling mill Waste heat recovery from cooling

Xu, T.T.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Residential HVAC Data, Assumptions and Methodology for End-Use Forecasting with EPRI-REEPS 2.1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LBL-34045 UC-1600 Residential HVAC Data, Assumptions and Methodology for End-Use Forecasting-uses include Heating, Ventilation and Air Conditioning (HVAC). Our analysis uses the modeling framework provided by the HVAC module in the Residential End-Use Energy Planning System (REEPS), which was developed

197

AEO2011: Natural Gas Delivered Prices by End-Use Sector and Census Division  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Delivered Prices by End-Use Sector and Census Division Delivered Prices by End-Use Sector and Census Division Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 137, and contains only the reference case. This dataset is in trillion cubic feet. The data is broken down into residential, commercial, industrial, electric power and transportation. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Natural Gas Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Natural Gas Delivered Prices by End-Use Sector and Census Division- Reference Case (xls, 140.7 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually

198

AEO2011: Natural Gas Consumption by End-Use Sector and Census Division |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Consumption by End-Use Sector and Census Division Consumption by End-Use Sector and Census Division Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 136, and contains only the reference case. This dataset is in trillion cubic feet. The data is broken down into residential, commercial, industrial, electric power and transportation. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Natural gas consumption Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Natural Gas Consumption by End-Use Sector and Census Division- Reference Case (xls, 138.4 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage

199

Optimizing U.S. Mitigation Strategies for the Light-Duty Transportation Sector: What We Learn from a Bottom-Up Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

carrier output (PJ): Ethanol Energy carrier input (PJ): Corncarrier output (PJ): Ethanol Energy carrier input (PJ):D. M. , Ethanol can contribute to energy and environmental

Yeh, Sonia; Farrell, Alexander E.; Plevin, Richard J; Sanstad, Alan; Weyant, John

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

A bottom-up engineering estimate of the aggregate heating and cooling loads of the entire U.S. building stock  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the amount of commercial building energy usage, particularlycommercial building sector. To compare the aggregated energy usagecommercial buildings. For the residential sector, the total heating and cooling energy usages

Huang, Yu Joe; Brodrick, Jim

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bottom-up energy end-use" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

India Energy Outlook: End Use Demand in India to 2020  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

8 Table 3. Electric and Diesel Pump Characteristics andhectare by fuel type (electric or diesel pump) in number perTable 3. Electric and Diesel Pump Characteristics and

de la Rue du Can, Stephane

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

India Energy Outlook: End Use Demand in India to 2020  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

rural, k=Kerosene m=rural, k=biogas m =urban, k=LPG m=urban,k=LPG k=wood k=kerosene k=biogas k=electricity k=electricity

de la Rue du Can, Stephane

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

United States Industrial Sector Energy End Use Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fuel Conventional Boiler Use CHP and/or Cogeneration ProcessFuel Conventional Boiler Use CHP and/or Cogeneration ProcessFuel Conventional Boiler Use CHP and/or Cogeneration Process

Shehabi, Arman

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

India Energy Outlook: End Use Demand in India to 2020  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Efficiency in Electricity Consumption", HWWA Discussionelectricity includes electricity consumption plus thedistribution. Total electricity consumption represents 1,654

de la Rue du Can, Stephane

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

India Energy Outlook: End Use Demand in India to 2020  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

s=retail k=electricity, s=private office k=electricity, s==private office s=gov office s=hotel s=other k=electricity k

de la Rue du Can, Stephane

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

India Energy Outlook: End Use Demand in India to 2020  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

5% of its reserve is coking coal used by the steel industry.imports around 70% of coking coal annually. More recently,

de la Rue du Can, Stephane

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Benchmarking Non-Hardware Balance-of-System (Soft) Costs for U.S. Photovoltaic Systems Using a Bottom-Up Approach and Installer Survey  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Distributed Renewable Energy. New York, NY: Network for NewProcedures. New York, NY: Network for New Energy Choices.

Ardani, Kristen

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

End-Use Load and Consumer Assessment Program: Analysis of residential refrigerator/freezer performance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Bonneville Power Administration (Bonneville) is conducting a large end-use data acquisition program in an effort to understand how energy is utilized in buildings with permanent electric space heating equipment in the Pacific Northwest. The initial portion of effort, known as the End-Use Load and Consumer Assessment Program (ELCAP), was conducted for Bonneville by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). The collection of detailed end-use data provided an opportunity to analyze the amount of energy consumed by both refrigerators and separate freezers units located in residential buildings. By obtaining this information, the uncertainty of long- term regional end-use forecasting can be improved and potential utility marketing programs for new appliances with a reduced overall energy demand can be identified. It was found that standby loads derived from hourly averages between 4 a.m. and 5 a.m. reflected the minimum consumption needed to maintain interior refrigerator temperatures at a steady-state condition. Next, an average 24-hour consumption that included cooling loads from door openings and cooling food items was also determined. Later, analyses were conducted to develop a model capable of predicting refrigerator standby loads and 24-hour consumption for comparison with national refrigerator label ratings. Data for 140 residential sites with a refrigeration end-use were screened to develop a sample of 119 residences with pure refrigeration for use in this analysis. To identify those refrigerators that were considered to be pure (having no other devices present on the circuit) in terms of their end-use classification, the screening procedure used a statistical clustering technique that was based on standby loads with 24-hour consumption. 5 refs., 18 figs., 4 tabs.

Ross, B.A.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Industrial Steam Power Cycles Final End-Use Classification  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Final end uses of steam include two major classifications: those uses that condense the steam against heat transfer surfaces to provide heat to an item of process or service equipment; and those that require a mass flow of steam for stripping...

Waterland, A. F.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

REFINING AND END USE STUDY OF COAL LIQUIDS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document summarizes all of the work conducted as part of the Refining and End Use Study of Coal Liquids. There were several distinct objectives set, as the study developed over time: (1) Demonstration of a Refinery Accepting Coal Liquids; (2) Emissions Screening of Indirect Diesel; (3) Biomass Gasification F-T Modeling; and (4) Updated Gas to Liquids (GTL) Baseline Design/Economic Study.

Unknown

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Calculation method for electricity end-use for residential lighting  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Knowledge of the electricity demand for different electrical appliances in households is very important in the work to reduce electricity use in households. Metering of end-uses is expensive and time consuming and therefore other methods for calculation of end-use electricity can be very useful. This paper presents a method to calculate the electricity used for lighting in households based on regression analysis of daily electricity consumption, out-door temperatures and the length of daylight at the same time and location. The method is illustrated with analyses of 45 Norwegian households. The electricity use for lighting in an average Norwegian household is calculated to 1050kWh/year or 6% of total electricity use. The results are comparable to metering results of lighting in other studies in the Nordic countries. The methodology can also be used to compensate for the seasonal effect when metering electricity for lighting less than a year. When smart meters are more commonly available, the possible adaption of this method will increase, and the need for end-use demand calculations will still be present.

Eva Rosenberg

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Benchmarking Non-Hardware Balance-of-System (Soft) Costs for U.S. Photovoltaic Systems Using a Bottom-Up Approach and Installer Survey  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Department of Energy). (2012). SunShot Vision Study. DOE/GO-prices and stimulating SunShot-level PV deployment in thetoward achieving the DOE SunShot Initiatives soft-cost-

Ardani, Kristen

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Optimizing U.S. Mitigation Strategies for the Light-Duty Transportation Sector: What We Learn from a Bottom-Up Model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Mitigating transportation emission reductions can result in significant changes in personal vehicle technologies, increases in vehicle fuel efficiency, and decreases in overall transportation fuel use. ... The Energy Independence and Security Act (H.R. 6), which includes a 36 billion gallon renewable fuel mandate, was passed by Congress and signed by President Bush on December 19, 2007. ... Mitigation strategies with the potential to achieve significant long-term transportation emission reductions often face significant competition for primary resources with other sectors, including biomass, natural gas, renewables, and coal, and for secondary energy sources such as electricity. ...

Sonia Yeh; Alex Farrell; Richard Plevin; Alan Sanstad; John Weyant

2008-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

214

Technology data characterizing refrigeration in commercial buildings: Application to end-use forecasting with COMMEND 4.0  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the United States, energy consumption is increasing most rapidly in the commercial sector. Consequently, the commercial sector is becoming an increasingly important target for state and federal energy policies and also for utility-sponsored demand side management (DSM) programs. The rapid growth in commercial-sector energy consumption also makes it important for analysts working on energy policy and DSM issues to have access to energy end-use forecasting models that include more detailed representations of energy-using technologies in the commercial sector. These new forecasting models disaggregate energy consumption not only by fuel type, end use, and building type, but also by specific technology. The disaggregation of the refrigeration end use in terms of specific technologies, however, is complicated by several factors. First, the number of configurations of refrigeration cases and systems is quite large. Also, energy use is a complex function of the refrigeration-case properties and the refrigeration-system properties. The Electric Power Research Institute`s (EPRI`s) Commercial End-Use Planning System (COMMEND 4.0) and the associated data development presented in this report attempt to address the above complications and create a consistent forecasting framework. Expanding end-use forecasting models so that they address individual technology options requires characterization of the present floorstock in terms of service requirements, energy technologies used, and cost-efficiency attributes of the energy technologies that consumers may choose for new buildings and retrofits. This report describes the process by which we collected refrigeration technology data. The data were generated for COMMEND 4.0 but are also generally applicable to other end-use forecasting frameworks for the commercial sector.

Sezgen, O.; Koomey, J.G.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

End-Use Load and Consumer Assessment Program: motivation and overview  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The End-Use Load and Consumer Assessment Program (ELCAP) was a major end-use data collection program undertaken by the Bonneville Power Administration from 1983 through 1990 to obtain specific information to support a variety of conservation and forecasting activities. The objectives of the program were to test key assumptions used in current engineering and forecasting models, provide insights regarding how various factors affect energy consumption, provide information to support load management conservation and marketing programs, and identify conservation resource potential from new demand-side technologies or programs. To accomplish this, a well-designed experiment was required that accounted for adequate representation of both existing and new buildings in the residential and commercial sector of the Pacific Northwest. This paper summarizes the motivations for obtaining the data, information regarding the sample, an overview of the analysis agenda, and specifics regarding the data set, both engineering and characteristics.

F.J. Peterson; J.E. Patton; M.E. Miller; R.A. Gillman; W.M. Warwick; W.F. Sandusky

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Substation automation -- a ``bottoms up`` approach  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The proliferation of multi-purpose intelligent electronic devices in substations brought the availability of abundant and often overlapping data at the substation. This data can be used for improving the operation and maintenance of the substations and the entire power system. The objective of substation automation is to use technology to gather, consolidate and utilize this data for increasing the efficiency of power system operation and maintenance. Often automation functions are developed and offered around the capabilities of the preferred hardware and software of the integrator. Emphasis is placed on hardware, software and communication protocols rather than need, methodology and application. This can result in over-automation with complex, expensive and ineffective systems, or under-automation that fails to achieve the user`s objectives. The objective is to select appropriate hardware, software and methodology to build the most cost effective system to get the desired results. This paper describes steps to ensure the successful implementation of substation automation.

Thomas, J. [General Electric, Malvern, PA (United States)

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Residential Lighting End-Use Consumption Study: Estimation Framework and Initial Estimates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. DOE Residential Lighting End-Use Consumption Study is an initiative of the U.S. Department of Energys (DOEs) Solid-State Lighting Program that aims to improve the understanding of lighting energy usage in residential dwellings. The study has developed a regional estimation framework within a national sample design that allows for the estimation of lamp usage and energy consumption 1) nationally and by region of the United States, 2) by certain household characteristics, 3) by location within the home, 4) by certain lamp characteristics, and 5) by certain categorical cross-classifications (e.g., by dwelling type AND lamp type or fixture type AND control type).

Gifford, Will R.; Goldberg, Miriam L.; Tanimoto, Paulo M.; Celnicker, Dane R.; Poplawski, Michael E.

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Technology data characterizing space conditioning in commercial buildings: Application to end-use forecasting with COMMEND 4.0  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the US, energy consumption is increasing most rapidly in the commercial sector. Consequently, the commercial sector is becoming an increasingly important target for state and federal energy policies and also for utility-sponsored demand side management (DSM) programs. The rapid growth in commercial-sector energy consumption also makes it important for analysts working on energy policy and DSM issues to have access to energy end-use forecasting models that include more detailed representations of energy-using technologies in the commercial sector. These new forecasting models disaggregate energy consumption not only by fuel type, end use, and building type, but also by specific technology. The disaggregation of space conditioning end uses in terms of specific technologies is complicated by several factors. First, the number of configurations of heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) systems and heating and cooling plants is very large. Second, the properties of the building envelope are an integral part of a building`s HVAC energy consumption characteristics. Third, the characteristics of commercial buildings vary greatly by building type. The Electric Power Research Institute`s (EPRI`s) Commercial End-Use Planning System (COMMEND 4.0) and the associated data development presented in this report attempt to address the above complications and create a consistent forecasting framework. This report describes the process by which the authors collected space-conditioning technology data and then mapped it into the COMMEND 4.0 input format. The data are also generally applicable to other end-use forecasting frameworks for the commercial sector.

Sezgen, O.; Franconi, E.M.; Koomey, J.G.; Greenberg, S.E.; Afzal, A.; Shown, L.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Cost-effective retrofitting of Swedish residential buildings: effects of energy price developments and discount rates  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper investigates how the cost-effectiveness of different energy-saving measures (ESMs) in buildings is dependent upon energy prices and discount rates. A bottom-up ... different ESMs for Swedish residentia...

rika Mata; Angela Sasic Kalagasidis; Filip Johnsson

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Technology data characterizing water heating in commercial buildings: Application to end-use forecasting  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Commercial-sector conservation analyses have traditionally focused on lighting and space conditioning because of their relatively-large shares of electricity and fuel consumption in commercial buildings. In this report we focus on water heating, which is one of the neglected end uses in the commercial sector. The share of the water-heating end use in commercial-sector electricity consumption is 3%, which corresponds to 0.3 quadrillion Btu (quads) of primary energy consumption. Water heating accounts for 15% of commercial-sector fuel use, which corresponds to 1.6 quads of primary energy consumption. Although smaller in absolute size than the savings associated with lighting and space conditioning, the potential cost-effective energy savings from water heaters are large enough in percentage terms to warrant closer attention. In addition, water heating is much more important in particular building types than in the commercial sector as a whole. Fuel consumption for water heating is highest in lodging establishments, hospitals, and restaurants (0.27, 0.22, and 0.19 quads, respectively); water heating`s share of fuel consumption for these building types is 35%, 18% and 32%, respectively. At the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, we have developed and refined a base-year data set characterizing water heating technologies in commercial buildings as well as a modeling framework. We present the data and modeling framework in this report. The present commercial floorstock is characterized in terms of water heating requirements and technology saturations. Cost-efficiency data for water heating technologies are also developed. These data are intended to support models used for forecasting energy use of water heating in the commercial sector.

Sezgen, O.; Koomey, J.G.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bottom-up energy end-use" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Analysis of PG&E`s residential end-use metered data to improve electricity demand forecasts -- final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes findings from a unique project to improve the end-use electricity load shape and peak demand forecasts made by the Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG&E) and the California Energy Commission (CEC). First, the direct incorporation of end-use metered data into electricity demand forecasting models is a new approach that has only been made possible by recent end-use metering projects. Second, and perhaps more importantly, the joint-sponsorship of this analysis has led to the development of consistent sets of forecasting model inputs. That is, the ability to use a common data base and similar data treatment conventions for some of the forecasting inputs frees forecasters to concentrate on those differences (between their competing forecasts) that stem from real differences of opinion, rather than differences that can be readily resolved with better data. The focus of the analysis is residential space cooling, which represents a large and growing demand in the PG&E service territory. Using five years of end-use metered, central air conditioner data collected by PG&E from over 300 residences, we developed consistent sets of new inputs for both PG&E`s and CEC`s end-use load shape forecasting models. We compared the performance of the new inputs both to the inputs previously used by PG&E and CEC, and to a second set of new inputs developed to take advantage of a recently added modeling option to the forecasting model. The testing criteria included ability to forecast total daily energy use, daily peak demand, and demand at 4 P.M. (the most frequent hour of PG&E`s system peak demand). We also tested the new inputs with the weather data used by PG&E and CEC in preparing their forecasts.

Eto, J.H.; Moezzi, M.M.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Realizing Building End-Use Efficiency with Ermerging Technologies  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

通过新兴技术实现终端能效 通过新兴技术实现终端能效 Jonathan Livingston Livingston Energy Innovations, LLC 第二届中美能效论坛 5月5-6日,2011|劳伦斯伯克利国家实验室,伯克利市,加州 什么是终端能效(EE)? * 能效是一种能源资源 * 在美国广泛认为,就单一措施效果而言,能效是降低污 染、降低发电成本和减少能源价格波动的最有效的方法 * 能效是供应侧资源的一种 * 在价格可比的情况下,各州和地方政府将能效当作他们 的首要选择 (加州、密苏里州、新墨西哥州和美国西北 地区) 西北电力法案 839b(e)(1). 项目规划将把委员会认为是成本有效的资源

223

An analysis of the cost-effectiveness of energy efficiency measures and factors affecting their implementation: a case study of Thai sugar industry  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We use bottom-up conservation supply curves (CSC) to analyze the cost-effectiveness of various energy efficiency measures for the Thai sugar industry. ... study was conducted in two parts. First, energy efficienc...

Sumate Sathitbun-anan; Bundit Fungtammasan; Mirko Barz

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

A functional analysis of electrical load curve modelling for some households specific electricity end-uses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

domestic end-uses, the development of plug-in hybrid and electric vehicles, the increase of heat pumps heating systems such as heat pumps in new building or which will replace old installed fossil fuels based systems; · integration of new end-uses such as Plug-in Electric Vehicles and an always growing number

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

225

Comparative Analysis of Modeling Studies on China's Future Energy and Emissions Outlook  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The past decade has seen the development of various scenarios describing long-term patterns of future Greenhouse Gas (GHG) emissions, with each new approach adding insights to our understanding of the changing dynamics of energy consumption and aggregate future energy trends. With the recent growing focus on China's energy use and emission mitigation potential, a range of Chinese outlook models have been developed across different institutions including in China's Energy Research Institute's 2050 China Energy and CO2 Emissions Report, McKinsey & Co's China's Green Revolution report, the UK Sussex Energy Group and Tyndall Centre's China's Energy Transition report, and the China-specific section of the IEA World Energy Outlook 2009. At the same time, the China Energy Group at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) has developed a bottom-up, end-use energy model for China with scenario analysis of energy and emission pathways out to 2050. A robust and credible energy and emission model will play a key role in informing policymakers by assessing efficiency policy impacts and understanding the dynamics of future energy consumption and energy saving and emission reduction potential. This is especially true for developing countries such as China, where uncertainties are greater while the economy continues to undergo rapid growth and industrialization. A slightly different assumption or storyline could result in significant discrepancies among different model results. Therefore, it is necessary to understand the key models in terms of their scope, methodologies, key driver assumptions and the associated findings. A comparative analysis of LBNL's energy end-use model scenarios with the five above studies was thus conducted to examine similarities and divergences in methodologies, scenario storylines, macroeconomic drivers and assumptions as well as aggregate energy and emission scenario results. Besides directly tracing different energy and CO{sub 2} savings potential back to the underlying strategies and combination of efficiency and abatement policy instruments represented by each scenario, this analysis also had other important but often overlooked findings.

Zheng, Nina; Zhou, Nan; Fridley, David

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Global warming and end-use efficiency implications of replacing CFCs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The direct contribution of CFCs to calculated global warming has been recognized for some time. As a result of the international agreement to phase out CFCs due to stratospheric ozone and the ensuing search for suitable alternatives, there has recently been increased attention on the DIRECT global warming potential (GWP) of the fluorocarbon alternatives as greenhouse gases. However, to date there has been little focus on the INDIRECT global warming effect arising from end-use efficiency changes and associated CO{sub 2} emissions. A study being conducted at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) addresses this combined or total global warming impact of viable options to replace CFCs in their major energy-related applications. This paper reviews selected results for air-conditioning, refrigeration, and heat pump applications. The analysis indicates that the CFC user industries have made substantial progress in approaching near-equal energy efficiency with the HCFC/HFC alternative refrigerants. The findings also bring into question the relative importance of the DIRECT (chemical-related) effect in many applications. Replacing CFCs is an important step in reducing the total global warming impact, and at present the HCFC and HFCS appear to offer the best efficiency and lowest total impact of options available in the relatively short time period required for the transition away from CFCs.

Fairchild, P.D.; Fischer, S.K.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

227

Energy Information Administration - Energy Efficiency-Table 6a- End uses of  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

a a Table 7a. Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption per Value Of Production 1998, 2002, and 2006 (Btu per constant 2000 dollar 1) MECS Survey Years Iron and Steel Mills (NAICS2 331111) 19983 20024 20064 Total NA 19,716 12,179 Electricity NA 3,839 2,846 Natural Gas NA 8,052 5,301 Coal NA 747 228 Residual Fuel NA 21 309 Coke and Breeze NA 6,496 3,025 Notes: 1. Value of production is deflated by the chain-type price indices for iron and steel mills shipments. 2. The North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) has replaced the Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) system. NAICS 331111 includes steel works, blast furnaces (including coke ovens), and rolling mills. 3. 1998 data unavailable due to disclosure avoidance procedures in place at the time. 4. Denominators represent the value of production for the entire iron and still mills (NAICS 331111), not those based mainly on electric, natural gas, coal, residual fuel oil or coke.

228

Calendar Year 2009 Program Benefits for ENERGY STAR Labeled Products  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Administration, Office of Energy Markets and End Use.Administration, Office of Energy Markets and End Use.ICF Consulting. 2003. Energy Star Market Penetration Report

Homan, Gregory K

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Calendar Year 2008 Program Benefits for ENERGY STAR Labeled Products  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Administration, Office of Energy Markets and End Use.Administration, Office of Energy Markets and End Use.Protection Agency: ENERGY STAR Market Share of computers,

Homan, GregoryK

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Calendar Year 2007 Program Benefits for ENERGY STAR Labeled Products  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Administration, Office of Energy Markets and End Use.Administration, Office of Energy Markets and End Use.Protection Agency: ENERGY STAR Market Share of computers,

Sanchez, Marla Christine

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

INTERNATIONAL RESIDENTIAL ENERGY END USE DATA: ANALYSIS OF HISTORICAL AND PRESENT DAY STRUCTURE AND DYNAMICS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

all fuels except district heating. Only for Germany andSweden, and Germany had district heating. The Swedish/German

Schipper, Lee

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Public Health Benefits of End-Use Electrical Energy Efficiency in California: An Exploratory Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Woodwaste Natural Gas Steam Turbine Cogen Sierra Tulare GasGas Turbine Combined Cycle Steam Turbine Cogen Not Cogen NotNot Cogen Cogen Cogen Kern Steam Turbine Steam Turbne Lassen

McKone, Thomas E.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Public Health Benefits of End-Use Electrical Energy Efficiency in California: An Exploratory Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of upper end steam (condensing) turbines designed for largesteam turbines used in industry or e backpressure (non-condensing)

McKone, Thomas E.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Public Health Benefits of End-Use Electrical Energy Efficiency in California: An Exploratory Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hanford Woodwaste Steam Turbine, Cfb Fresno Petroleum Coke,Woodwaste MSW Steam Turbine, Cfb Riverside Corona Landfill

McKone, Thomas E.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Public Health Benefits of End-Use Electrical Energy Efficiency in California: An Exploratory Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Natural Gas Reciprocating Engine Steam Turbne Cogen Cogengas turbine Steam hlrbine Reciprocating engine WTE Digestergas turbine Steam turbine Reciprocating engines WTE Digester

McKone, Thomas E.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Public Health Benefits of End-Use Electrical Energy Efficiency in California: An Exploratory Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cogen Cogen Natural Gas Landfill Gas Tulare Tulare Woodwasteand wood waste, landfill gas, and mlmicipal solid waste andscf digester gas, or Btu/ scf landfill gas. HVs are given in

McKone, Thomas E.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Public Health Benefits of End-Use Electrical Energy Efficiency in California: An Exploratory Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

fuel, lignite, and petroleum coke and/ or crude oil), 86% ofalternatives such as petroleum coke and/ or crude oil withinEFj,js relevant to petroleum coke and crude oil were not

McKone, Thomas E.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Public Health Benefits of End-Use Electrical Energy Efficiency in California: An Exploratory Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gas Turbine Gas Turbine Combined Cycle Steam Turbine CogenEastridge Sunrise Ii Combined Cycle Expansion Midway-Sunset0.33-0.39 a CHP/cogen/ Combined cycle O.4 b c 0.58-0.84 d

McKone, Thomas E.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Public Health Benefits of End-Use Electrical Energy Efficiency in California: An Exploratory Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

3. Assumptions and conversion factors used to calculate the7human): oral ingestion conversion factor from rat to humanshuman): oral ingestion conversion factor from mouse to human

McKone, Thomas E.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

ENERGY CONSERVATION: POLICY ISSUES AND END-USE SCENARIOS OF SAVINGS POTENTIAL PT.2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Waste Landfilled and Landfill Closure Dates For The Lostradeoffs between landfill and com- bined programs ofare the tradeoffs between landfill and com- bined resource

Authors, Various

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bottom-up energy end-use" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Public Health Benefits of End-Use Electrical Energy Efficiency in California: An Exploratory Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cogen Cogen Natural Gas Landfill Gas Tulare Tulare Woodwasteas agricultural and wood waste, landfill gas, and mlmicipalscf digester gas, or Btu/ scf landfill gas. HVs are given in

McKone, Thomas E.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

ENERGY CONSERVATION: POLICY ISSUES AND END-USE SCENARIOS OF SAVINGS POTENTIAL PT.1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

tradeotts between landfill and coa- bined programs otare the tradeoffs between landfill and com- bined resourceprocessing or disposal ( landfill) techniques, and to

Authors, Various

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Estimates of Energy Consumption by Building Type and End Use at U.S. Army Installations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Irwin Fort Sill Yuma Pg Fort Bliss Fort Sam Houston FortEstimated H V A C EUIs at Fort Bliss Table 5-12. Annual DOE-Estimated Electricity Use at Fort Bliss [GWh/yr] Table 5-24.

Konopacki, S.J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

INTERNATIONAL RESIDENTIAL ENERGY END USE DATA: ANALYSIS OF HISTORICAL AND PRESENT DAY STRUCTURE AND DYNAMICS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

cooking tables, only for rice-cookers and microwave ovens.cooking (microwave rice cooker). n) Disposable Income not

Schipper, Lee

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Residential Sector End-Use Forecasting with EPRI-REEPS 2.1: Summary Input Assumptions and Results  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and the size of refrigerators and freezers; for all otherwhile water heating, refrigerator, and freezer end-uses showas projected by REEPS. Refrigerator and freezer percentage

Koomey, Jonathan G.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Calendar Year 2007 Program Benefits for U.S. EPA Energy Star Labeled Products: Expanded Methodology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Administration, Office of Energy Markets and End Use.Administration, Office of Energy Markets and End Use.Total Shipments Star Energy Market Star Share Shipments

Sanchez, Marla

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Sectoral trends in global energy use and greenhouse gas emissions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

values. Figure 7. Global Primary Energy by End-Use Sector,Scenario Figure 8. Global Primary Energy by End-Use Sector,

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Estimating the energy consumption and power demand of small power equipment in office buildings  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Small power is a substantial energy end-use in office buildings in its own right, but also significantly contributes to internal heat gains. Technological advancements have allowed for higher efficiency computers, yet current working practices are demanding more out of digital equipment. Designers often rely on benchmarks to inform predictions of small power consumption, power demand and internal gains. These are often out of date and fail to account for the variability in equipment speciation and usage patterns in different offices. This paper details two models for estimating small power consumption in office buildings, alongside typical power demand profiles. The first model relies solely on the random sampling of monitored data, and the second relies on a bottom-up approach to establish likely power demand and operational energy use. Both models were tested through a blind validation demonstrating a good correlation between metered data and monthly predictions of energy consumption. Prediction ranges for power demand profiles were also observed to be representative of metered data with minor exceptions. When compared to current practices, which often rely solely on the use of benchmarks, both proposed methods provide an improved approach to predicting the operational performance of small power equipment in offices.

A.C. Menezes; A. Cripps; R.A. Buswell; J. Wright; D. Bouchlaghem

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Evaluating Energy Efficiency Policies with Energy-Economy Models  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The growing complexities of energy systems, environmental problems and technology markets are driving and testing most energy-economy models to their limits. To further advance bottom-up models from a multidisciplinary energy efficiency policy evaluation perspective, we review and critically analyse bottom-up energy-economy models and corresponding evaluation studies on energy efficiency policies to induce technological change. We use the household sector as a case study. Our analysis focuses on decision frameworks for technology choice, type of evaluation being carried out, treatment of market and behavioural failures, evaluated policy instruments, and key determinants used to mimic policy instruments. Although the review confirms criticism related to energy-economy models (e.g. unrealistic representation of decision-making by consumers when choosing technologies), they provide valuable guidance for policy evaluation related to energy efficiency. Different areas to further advance models remain open, particularly related to modelling issues, techno-economic and environmental aspects, behavioural determinants, and policy considerations.

Mundaca, Luis; Neij, Lena; Worrell, Ernst; McNeil, Michael A.

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

America's Bottom-Up Climate Change Mitigation Policy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

US 1990 GHG emissions None 684 US cities representing 26% ofGHG emissions by states sources and sectors 684 US cities,The overall US GHG emissions effect of the state and city

Lutsey, Nicholas P.; Sperling, Dan

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

America's Bottom-Up Climate Change Mitigation Policy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EC (2004). c US MCPA (2007). d RGGI (2005). e WGA (2006). fGHG emissions PTP WGA US MCPA WCG RGGI NEG/ECP Year Fig. 5.Greenhouse Gas Initiative (RGGI), 2007. About RGGI /http://

Lutsey, Nicholas P.; Sperling, Dan

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

DNA-inspired materials for 'bottom-up' nanotechnology.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??DNA is a remarkable material that is both an inspiration for polymer nanotechnology and a versatile building block for assembling well-defined nanostructures. To create polymeric (more)

Ishihara, Yoshihiro.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

America's Bottom-Up Climate Change Mitigation Policy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

than 100% reduction in GHG emission rates from baseline non-generation). We assume a 95% GHG reduction from renewableElectricity Generation GHG Emissions (MMT CO 2 -equivalent)

Lutsey, Nicholas P.; Sperling, Dan

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

America's Bottom-Up Climate Change Mitigation Policy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

large conventional hydroelectric power, municipal solidconventional large hydroelectric power). To quantify theby states that large hydroelectric is not counted toward the

Lutsey, Nicholas P.; Sperling, Dan

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

America's Bottom-Up Climate Change Mitigation Policy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

stabilize US GHG emissions at their 2010 levels until thefor US light-duty vehicle GHG emissions under varying levelsUS GHG emissions would be stabilized at 2010 levels by 2020

Lutsey, Nicholas P.; Sperling, Dan

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

America's Bottom-Up Climate Change Mitigation Policy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

large conventional hydroelectric power, municipal solidconventional large hydroelectric power). To quantify thelarge conventional hydroelectric power is not included (this

Lutsey, Nicholas P.; Sperling, Dan

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Residential Behavioral Savings: An Analysis of Principal Electricity End Uses in British Columbia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Center for the Study of Energy Markets. California EnergyThe Economics of Energy Market Transformation Programs,and J.E. Eto. 1996. Market Barriers to Energy Efficiency: A

Tiedemann, Kenneth Mr.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Ecosystem Energy-Use Efficiency: Positive Effects of Predation on Productivity Joseph Hakam  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ecosystem Energy-Use Efficiency: Positive Effects of Predation on Productivity Joseph Hakam Brown systems will be able to utilize more of the primary energy source and display higher productivity. While processing as much energy as possible within given resource and growth constraints. Bottom-up and top

Vallino, Joseph J.

259

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

to totals. Source: Energy Information Administration, Office of Energy Markets and End Use, Forms EIA-871A, C, and E of the 2003 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey....

260

Public Meeting: Physical Characterization of Smart and Grid-Connected Commercial and Residential Building End-Use Equipment and Appliances  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

These documents contain slide decks presented at the Physical Characterization of Smart and Grid-Connected Commercial and Residential Buildings End-Use Equipment and Appliances public meeting held on April 30, 2014.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bottom-up energy end-use" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Residential Sector End-Use Forecasting with EPRI-REEPS 2.1: Summary Input Assumptions and Results  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Richard E. Brown, James W. Hanford, Alan H . Sanstad, andFrancis X . , James W. Hanford, Richard E. Brown, Alan H.place for these end-uses (Hanford et al. 1994, Hwang et al.

Koomey, Jonathan G.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Table 3. Top Five Retailers of Electricity, with End Use Sectors...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

NewEnergy, Inc","Investor-Owned",23069067,628346,18074330,3584569,781822 3,"Ameren Illinois Company","Investor-Owned",14319873,9507424,3198994,1594862,18593 4,"Ameren Energy...

263

Significant ELCAP analysis results: Summary report. [End-use Load and Consumer Assessment Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The evolution of the End-Use Load and Consumer Assessment Program (ELCAP) since 1983 at Bonneville Power Administration (Bonneville) has been eventful and somewhat tortuous. The birth pangs of a data set so large and encompassing as this have been overwhelming at times. The early adolescent stage of data set development and use has now been reached and preliminary results of early analyses of the data are becoming well known. However, the full maturity of the data set and the corresponding wealth of analytic insights are not fully realized. This document is in some sense a milestone in the brief history of the program. It is a summary of the results of the first five years of the program, principally containing excerpts from a number of previous reports. It is meant to highlight significant accomplishments and analytical results, with a focus on the principal results. Many of the results have a broad application in the utility load research community in general, although the real breadth of the data set remains largely unexplored. The first section of the document introduces the data set: how the buildings were selected, how the metering equipment was installed, and how the data set has been prepared for analysis. Each of the sections that follow the introduction summarize a particular analytic result. A large majority of the analyses to date involve the residential samples, as these were installed first and had highest priority on the analytic agenda. Two exploratory analyses using commercial data are included as an introduction to the commercial analyses that are currently underway. Most of the sections reference more complete technical reports which the reader should refer to for details of the methodology and for more complete discussion of the results. Sections have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base.

Pratt, R.G.; Conner, C.C.; Drost, M.K.; Miller, N.E.; Cooke, B.A.; Halverson, M.A.; Lebaron, B.A.; Lucas, R.G.; Jo, J.; Richman, E.E.; Sandusky, W.F. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (USA)); Ritland, K.G. (Ritland Associates, Seattle, WA (USA)); Taylor, M.E. (USDOE Bonneville Power Administration, Portland, OR (USA)); Hauser, S.G. (Solar Energy Research Inst., Golden, CO (USA))

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

China Energy Databook - Rev. 4  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Consumption: Commercial and Biomass Energy, 1979 and 1987;Consumption: Commercial and Biomass Energy Energy IntensityEnd Use, Commercial and Biomass Energy Shares of Total

Sinton Editor, J.E.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Table 3. Top Five Retailers of Electricity, with End Use Sectors...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1,"Commonwealth Edison Co","Investor-Owned",31650966,21724278,9244133,682555,0 2,"Constellation NewEnergy, Inc","Investor-Owned",23069067,628346,18074330,3584569,781822...

266

Table 3. Top Five Retailers of Electricity, with End Use Sectors...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Provider","All Sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"First Energy Solutions Corp.","Investor-Owned",18912606,3579076,8038708,7294822,0...

267

,"U.S. Total Adjusted Distillate Fuel Oil and Kerosene Sales by End Use"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Distillate Fuel Oil and Kerosene Sales by End Use" Distillate Fuel Oil and Kerosene Sales by End Use" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Residential",4,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1984" ,"Data 2","Commercial",10,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1984" ,"Data 3","Industrial",9,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1984" ,"Data 4","Farm",4,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1984" ,"Data 5","Electric Power",2,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1984" ,"Data 6","Oil Company",2,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1984"

268

Table 3. Top Five Retailers of Electricity, with End Use Sectors, 2010  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

District of Columbia" District of Columbia" "1. Potomac Electric Power Co","Investor-Owned",3388490,2014044,1374446,"-","-" "2. Constellation NewEnergy, Inc","Other Provider",2427380,"-",2369901,12091,45388 "3. PEPCO Energy Services","Other Provider",2099946,1012,2098934,"-","-" "4. Washington Gas Energy Services","Other Provider",1759773,39513,1720260,"-","-" "5. Hess Retail Natural Gas and Elec. Acctg.","Other Provider",801256,"-",536225,265031,"-" "Total Sales, Top Five Providers",,10476845,2054569,8099766,277122,45388 "Percent of Total State Sales",,88,97,88,100,14

269

Table 3. Top Five Retailers of Electricity, with End Use Sectors, 2010  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Maine" Maine" "1. NextEra Energy Power Marketing LLC","Other Provider",3876276,3548267,316308,11701,"-" "2. Dominion Retail Inc","Other Provider",1308742,"-",1308742,"-","-" "3. Constellation NewEnergy, Inc","Other Provider",987998,"-",704002,283996,"-" "4. Hess Retail Natural Gas and Elec. Acctg.","Other Provider",593324,"-",593324,"-","-" "5. Suez Energy Resources North America","Other Provider",483466,"-",483466,"-","-" "Total Sales, Top Five Providers",,7249806,3548267,3405842,295697,"-" "Percent of Total State Sales",,63,81,83,10

270

Table 3. Top Five Retailers of Electricity, with End Use Sectors...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4857,978053,226804,0,0 3,"City of Dover - (DE)","Public",710086,196389,230572,283125,0 4,"Constellation NewEnergy, Inc","Investor-Owned",701449,0,524400,177049,0 5,"Washington Gas...

271

Table 3. Top Five Retailers of Electricity, with End Use Sectors...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas & Electric Co","Investor-Owned",12341895,9273225,2912064,156606,0 2,"Washington Gas Energy Services","Investor-Owned",7980574,1259564,6721010,0,0 3,"Potomac Electric Power...

272

Distribution Load Modelling for Demand Side Management and End-Use Efficiency  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The problem of electric load modelling for low aggregation levels is addressed in the paper, being the object to obtain good response behaviour models of any group of loads in an electric energy distribution...

C. lvarez; A. Gabaldn

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Table 3. Top Five Retailers of Electricity, with End Use Sectors, 2010  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Massachusetts" Massachusetts" "1. Massachusetts Electric Co","Investor-Owned",12522051,8884116,3167592,470343,"-" "2. NSTAR Electric Company","Investor-Owned",8946038,5484797,2382635,1078606,"-" "3. Constellation NewEnergy, Inc","Other Provider",4767773,"-",3478609,1289164,"-" "4. Strategic Energy LLC","Other Provider",3708146,"-",3708146,"-","-" "5. Consolidated Edison Sol Inc","Other Provider",2891778,1290581,1601197,"-","-" "Total Sales, Top Five Providers",,32835786,15659494,14338179,2838113,"-" "Percent of Total State Sales",,57,73,79,17

274

Table 3. Top Five Retailers of Electricity, with End Use Sectors, 2010  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Rhode Island" Rhode Island" "1. The Narragansett Electric Co","Investor-Owned",5287440,3068731,1938910,279799,"-" "2. Constellation NewEnergy, Inc","Other Provider",594900,"-",387627,191168,16105 "3. TransCanada Power Mktg Ltd","Other Provider",501659,"-","-",501659,"-" "4. Hess Retail Natural Gas and Elec. Acctg.","Other Provider",389583,"-",116875,272708,"-" "5. Glacial Energy Holdings","Other Provider",283973,"-",283973,"-","-" "Total Sales, Top Five Providers",,7057555,3068731,2727385,1245334,16105 "Percent of Total State Sales",,90,98,74,100,59

275

Developing Information on Energy Savings and Associated Costs and Benefits of Energy Efficient Emerging Technologies Applicable in California  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on energy efficiency, energy savings, market adoption, andIndustries End-use(s) Energy types Market segment 2015Industries End-use(s) Energy types Market segment 2015

Xu, Tengfang

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Refining and end use study of coal liquids. Quarterly report, April--June 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Bechtel, with Southwest Research Institute, Amoco Oil R&D, and the M.W. Kellogg Co. as subcontractors, initiated a study on November 1, 1993, for the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC) to determine the most cost effective and suitable combination of existing petroleum refinery processes needed to make specification transportation fuels or blending stocks, from direct and indirect coal liquefaction product liquids. This 47-month study, with an approved budget of $4.4 million dollars, is being performed under DOE Contract Number DE-AC22-93PC91029. A key objective is to determine the most desirable ways of integrating coal liquefaction liquids into existing petroleum refineries to produce transportation fuels meeting current and future, e.g. year 2000, Clean Air Act Amendment (CAAA) standards. An integral part of the above objectives is to test the fuels or blends produced and compare them with established ASTM fuels. The comparison will include engine tests to ascertain compliance of the fuels produced with CAAA and other applicable fuel quality and performance standards.

NONE

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

277

Refining and end use study of coal liquids. Quarterly report, July - September 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Bechtel, with Southwest Research Institute, Amoco Oil R&D, and the M. W. Kellogg Co. as subcontractors, initiated a study on November 1, 1993, for the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC) to determine the most cost effective and suitable combination of existing petroleum refinery processes needed to make specification transportation fuels or blending stocks, from direct and indirect coal liquefaction product liquids. This 47-month study, with an approved budget of $4.4 million dollars, is being performed under DOE Contract Number DE-AC22-93PC91029. A key objective is to determine the most desirable ways of integrating coal liquefaction liquids into existing petroleum refineries to produce transportation fuels meeting current and future, e.g. year 2000, Clean Air Act Amendment (CAAA) standards. An integral part of the above objectives is to test the fuels or blends produced and compare them with established ASTM fuels. The comparison will include engine tests to ascertain compliance of the fuels produced with CAAA and other applicable fuel quality and performance standards. The final part of the project includes a detailed economic evaluation of the cost of processing the coal liquids to their optimum products. The cost analyses is for the incremental processing cost; in other words, the feed is priced at zero dollars. The study reflects costs for operations using state of the art refinery technology; no capital costs for building new refineries is considered. Some modifications to the existing refinery may be required. Economy of scale dictates the minimum amount of feedstock that should be processed. The major efforts conducted during the third quarter of 1996 were in the areas of hydrotreating production runs and FCC production run. 3 figs., 8 tabs.

NONE

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

278

Refining and end use study of coal liquids. Quarterly report, January--March 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Bechtel, with Southwest Research Institute, Amoco Oil R&D, and the M. W. Kellogg Co. as subcontractors, initiated a study on November 1, 1993, for the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC) to determine the most cost effective and suitable combination of existing petroleum refinery processes needed to make specification transportation fuels or blending stocks, from direct and indirect coal liquefaction product liquids. A key objective is to determine the most desirable ways of integrating coal liquefaction liquids into existing petroleum refineries to produce transportation fuels meeting current and future, e.g. year 2000, Clean Air Act Amendment (CAAA) standards. An integral part of the above objectives is to test the fuels or blends produced and compare them with established ASTM fuels. The comparison will include engine tests to ascertain compliance of the fuels produced with CAAA and other applicable fuel quality and performance standards. The final part of the project includes a detailed economic evaluation of the cost of processing the coal liquids to their optimum products. The cost analyses is for the incremental processing cost; in other words, the feed is priced at zero dollars. The study reflects costs for operations using state of the art refinery technology; no capital costs for building new refineries is considered. Some modifications to the existing refinery may be required. Economy of scale dictates the minimum amount of feedstock that should be processed. The major efforts conducted during the first quarter of 1996 were in the areas of: DL2 light distillate hydrotreating; and DL2 heave distillate catalytic cracking.

NONE

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Renewable Electricity Futures Study. Volume 3: End-Use Electricity Demand  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Renewable Electricity Futures (RE Futures) Study investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. The analysis focused on the sufficiency of the geographically diverse U.S. renewable resources to meet electricity demand over future decades, the hourly operational characteristics of the U.S. grid with high levels of variable wind and solar generation, and the potential implications of deploying high levels of renewables in the future. RE Futures focused on technical aspects of high penetration of renewable electricity; it did not focus on how to achieve such a future through policy or other measures. Given the inherent uncertainties involved with analyzing alternative long-term energy futures as well as the multiple pathways that might be taken to achieve higher levels of renewable electricity supply, RE Futures explored a range of scenarios to investigate and compare the impacts of renewable electricity penetration levels (30%-90%), future technology performance improvements, potential constraints to renewable electricity development, and future electricity demand growth assumptions. RE Futures was led by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT).

Hostick, D.; Belzer, D.B.; Hadley, S.W.; Markel, T.; Marnay, C.; Kintner-Meyer, M.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Energy for 500 Million Homes: Drivers and Outlook for Residential Energy Consumption in China  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

end-use Residential primary energy consumption was 6.6 EJ inof primary energy. Primary energy consumption includes final14 Residential Primary Energy Consumption by Fuel (with

Zhou, Nan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bottom-up energy end-use" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Agenda for Public Meeting on the Physical Characterization of Grid-Connected Commercial and Residential Buildings End-Use Equipment and Appliances  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Download the agenda below for the July 11 Public Meeting on the Physical Characterization of Grid-Connected Commercial and Residential Buildings End-Use Equipment and Appliances.

282

Review of Existing Energy Retrofit Tools  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Commercial End-Use Survey (CEUS) database and other sources. The data fields include the building's energy usage,

Lee, Sang Hoon

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Residential HVAC Data, Assumptions and Methodology for End-Use Forecasting with EPRI-REEPS 2.1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Conservation and Renewable Energy, Building EquipmentConservation and Renewable Energy, Building EquipmentEnergy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Building Equipment

Johnson, F.X.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

or fewer than 20 buildings were sampled. NNo responding cases in sample. Notes: Statistics for the "Energy End Uses" category represent total consumption in buildings that...

285

The Quadrennial Energy Review (QER) | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

energy infrastructure, the QER analyses will consider the impacts of transformations in energy supply, markets, and patterns of end use; issues of aging and capacity; impacts of...

286

Researching Energy Use in Hospitals | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Use in Hospitals Historically, when hospital facility and energy managers have compared alternative energy efficiency investments for various end-use systems, their benchmarks...

287

The Energy Journal, Vol. 26, No. 1. Copyright 2005 by the IAEE. All rights reserved. * School of Resource and Environment Management, Simon Fraser University.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of alternative industrial steam generation technologies, including boilers and cogeneration systems. We also show high costs of greenhouse gas emission reduction policies while bottom-up models usually predict low an `energy efficiency gap'. However, this type of analysis ignores several important factors. 1. Consumers

288

Gold Standard Program Model | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gold Standard Program Model Gold Standard Program Model Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Gold Standard Program Model Agency/Company /Organization: World Wildlife Fund Sector: Climate, Energy User Interface: Other Complexity/Ease of Use: Moderate Website: www.cdmgoldstandard.org/project-certification/rules-and-toolkit Cost: Paid Related Tools Environmental Benefits Mapping and Analysis Program (BenMAP) MIT Emissions Prediction and Policy Analysis (EPPA) Model ProForm ... further results Find Another Tool FIND DEVELOPMENT IMPACTS ASSESSMENT TOOLS A bottom-up method of certifying Kyoto Protocol Clean Development Mechanism projects and voluntary programs that result in verifiable co-benefits. Approach It is a bottom up method of certifying Kyoto Protocol Clean Development Mechanism projects as well as voluntary programs that result in verifiable

289

Residential HVAC Data, Assumptions and Methodology for End-Use Forecasting with EPRI-REEPS 2.1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

loans Energy Doctor Energy Audits Incentives to Builders/Developers New building/shell technologies Passive solar

Johnson, F.X.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

CHARACTERIZING COSTS, SAVINGS AND BENEFITS OF A SELECTION OF ENERGY EFFICIENT EMERGING TECHNOLOGIES IN THE UNITED STATES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on energy efficiency, energy savings, market adoption, andIndustries End-use(s) Energy types Market segment 2015Industries End-use(s) Energy types Market segment 2020

Xu, T.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

sum to totals. Source: Energy Information Administration, Office of Energy Markets and End Use, Forms EIA-871A, C, and E of the 2003 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey....

292

Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) - Energy Information...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Heating and cooling no longer majority of U.S. home energy use Pie chart of energy consumption in homes by end uses Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Residential...

293

Residential Sector End-Use Forecasting with EPRI-REEPS 2.1: Summary Input Assumptions and Results  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Consumption and Expenditures 1992. Energy Information Administration, U.S.92). April. US DOE. 1995c. Residential Energy ConsumptionConsumption and Expenditures 1993. EIA, Energy Information Administration, U.S.

Koomey, Jonathan G.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

2014-04-30 Public Meeting Agenda: Physical Characterization of Smart and Grid-Connected Commercial and Residential Buildings End-Use Equipment and Appliances  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This document is the agenda for the Physical Characterization of Smart and Grid-Connected Commercial and Residential Buildings End-Use Equipment and Appliances public meeting being held on April 30, 2014.

295

Analysis of Michigan's demand-side electricity resources in the residential sector: Volume 3, End-use studies: Revised final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This volume of the ''Analysis of Michigan's Demand-Side Electricity Resources in the Residential Sector'' contains end-use studies on various household appliances including: refrigerators, freezers, lighting systems, water heaters, air conditioners, space heaters, and heat pumps. (JEF)

Krause, F.; Brown, J.; Connell, D.; DuPont, P.; Greely, K.; Meal, M.; Meier, A.; Mills, E.; Nordman, B.

1988-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

RESIDENTIAL SECTOR END-USE FORECASTING WITH EPRI-REEPS 2.1: SUMMARY INPUT ASSUMPTIONS AND RESULTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-76SF00098. #12;#12;i ABSTRACT This paper describes current and projected future energy use by end energy intensity per household of the residential sector is declining, and the electricity intensity per. Sanstad, and Leslie Shown Energy Analysis Program Energy and Environment Division Ernest Orlando Lawrence

297

CBECS - Buildings and Energy in the 1980's - Detailed Tables  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Consumption by Type of Building Sources: Energy Information Administration, Office of Energy Markets and End Use, EIA-457 of the 1980 Residential Energy Consumption Survey and...

298

Understanding Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprints, October 2012  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprints provide a mapping of energy use and carbon emissions from energy supply to end use

299

Healthcare Energy: Spotlight on Medical Equipment  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Building Technologies Office conducted a healthcare energy end-use monitoring project for two sites. Read details about large medical imaging equipment energy results.

300

Healthcare Energy: Spotlight on Fans and Pumps  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Building Technologies Office conducted a healthcare energy end-use monitoring project for two sites. Read details about the fan and pump energy results.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bottom-up energy end-use" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Healthcare Energy: Spotlight on Reheat and Heating  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Building Technologies Office conducted a healthcare energy end-use monitoring project in partnership with two hospitals. Read highlights from monitoring heating and reheating energy.

302

Healthcare Energy: Spotlight on Chiller Plants  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Building Technologies Office conducted a healthcare energy end-use monitoring project for two sites. Read details about the chiller plant energy results.

303

Estimating Total Energy Consumption and Emissions of China's Commercial and Office Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

18 Figure 6 Primary Energy Consumption by End-Use in24 Figure 7 Primary Energy Consumption by Fuel in Commercialbased on total primary energy consumption (source energy),

Fridley, David G.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Residential and Transport Energy Use in India: Past Trend and Future Outlook  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by end users while primary energy consumption includes finalelectricity. When primary energy consumption in the end use37%) in terms of primary energy consumption. However, energy

de la Rue du Can, Stephane

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) - U.S. Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Estimation of Energy End-use Consumption Estimation of Energy End-use Consumption 2003 CBECS The energy end-use consumption tables for 2003 (Detailed Tables E1-E11 and E1A-E11A) provide estimates of the amount of electricity, natural gas, fuel oil, and district heat used for ten end uses: space heating, cooling, ventilation, water heating, lighting, cooking, refrigeration, personal computers, office equipment (including servers), and other uses. Although details vary by energy source (Table 1), there are four basic steps in the end-use estimation process: Regressions of monthly consumption on degree-days to establish reference temperatures for the engineering models, Engineering modeling by end use, Cross-sectional regressions to calibrate the engineering estimates and account for additional energy uses, and

306

Methods and tools for community energy planning: A review  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract High consumption of fossil fuels in urban area leads to environmental pollution and energy shortages, which threaten to reverse human progress. Community energy system planning makes great contributions to reducing fossil energy consumption. This paper focused on the Community Energy Planning (CEP) method at the Community Master Plan (CMP), Community Regulatory Plan (CRP), Community Site Plan (CSP) and Architectural Design (AD) stages. Top-down and bottom-up models for CEP at different stages of community construction were introduced. The present situation and development of research on energy demand forecasting, renewable energy resource assessments and whole community energy system optimization, which are three highly important components of bottom-up models, were introduced. After surveying the methods and tools that have contributed to CEP, the framework of computer tools for community energy system simulation and design was outlined. The functions (particularly focused on the existence of the functions of energy demand prediction, renewable energy resource assessment and whole community energy system optimization) and characteristics of these computer tools for community energy system design (CESD) were listed and compared. One of the current challenges is predicting community energy demand. There is still a shortage of available tools for determining energy-related indictors at the CRP stage. A built Community Energy Consumption data Monitoring and Statistic System (CECMSS) may help to predict a community?s secondary energy demand. Ultimately, a framework for a new community energy analysis model that determines energy-related indicators was introduced.

Zishuo Huang; Hang Yu; Zhenwei Peng; Mei Zhao

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Department of Energy Announces First Quadrennial Energy Review...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

The Nation's current infrastructure is increasingly challenged by transformations in energy supply, markets, and patterns of end use; issues of ageing and capacity; impacts of...

308

The Program Administrator Cost of Saved Energy for Utility Customer-Funded Energy Efficiency Programs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Energy Demand-Side Management Energy Informationcomparing the Demand-Side Management (DSM) Program relativexvii Introduction Demand side management (DSM), and end-use

Billingsley, Megan A.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

China Energy Databook - Rev. 4  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1992 12. End Use Electricity Consumption by Sector, 1992 13.Sources) Per Capita Electricity Consumption, 1990 EnergyUrban Rural 2. Electricity Consumption Shares Year Urban TWh

Sinton Editor, J.E.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Methodology for Modeling Building Energy Performance across the Commercial Sector  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report uses EnergyPlus simulations of each building in the 2003 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) to document and demonstrate bottom-up methods of modeling the entire U.S. commercial buildings sector (EIA 2006). The ability to use a whole-building simulation tool to model the entire sector is of interest because the energy models enable us to answer subsequent 'what-if' questions that involve technologies and practices related to energy. This report documents how the whole-building models were generated from the building characteristics in 2003 CBECS and compares the simulation results to the survey data for energy use.

Griffith, B.; Long, N.; Torcellini, P.; Judkoff, R.; Crawley, D.; Ryan, J.

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Paraho environmental data. Part IV. Land reclamation and revegetation. Part V. Biological effects. Part VI. Occupational health and safety. Part VII. End use  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Characteristics of the environment and ecosystems at Anvil Points, reclamation of retorted shale, revegetation of retorted shale, and ecological effects of retorted shale are reported in the first section of this report. Methods used in screening shale oil and retort water for mutagens and carcinogens as well as toxicity studies are reported in the second section of this report. The third section contains information concerning the industrial hygiene and medical studies made at Anvil Points during Paraho research operations. The last section discusses the end uses of shale crude oil and possible health effects associated with end use. (DMC)

Limbach, L.K.

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Iron and Steel Energy Intensities  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

If you are having trouble, call 202-586-8800 for help. Home > >Energy Users > Energy Efficiency Page > Iron and Steel Energy Intensities First Use of Energy Blue Bullet First Use/Value of Production Blue Bullet First Use/Ton of steel End Uses of Consumption Blue Bullet Total End Use/Value of Production Blue Bullet Total End Use/Ton of Steel Boiler Fuel as End Use Blue Bullet Boiler Fuel /Value of Production Blue Bullet Boiler Fuel /Ton of Steel Process Heating as End Use Blue Bullet Process Heating Fuel /Ton of Steel Blue Bullet Process Heating /Value of Production Machine Drive as End Use Blue Bullet Machine Drive Fuel/Ton of Steel Blue Bullet Machine Drive Fuel /Value of Production Expenditures Blue Bullet Purchased Fuel /Ton of Steel Blue Bullet Purchased Fuel /Value of Production

313

Residential HVAC Data, Assumptions and Methodology for End-Use Forecasting with EPRI-REEPS 2.1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

volume) of the equipment (AHAM 1991, ARI1991, G A M A 1992).Energy Factors (SWEFs), (AHAM 1991). b. 1990 RECS (EIAdata for their members (AHAM 1991, ARI1991, G A M A 1992).

Johnson, F.X.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Energy Use of Home Audio Products in the U.S.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We conducted a bottom-up analysis using stock and usage estimates from secondary sources, and our own power measurements. We measured power levels of the most common audio products in their most commonly used operating modes. We found that the combined energy consumption of standby, idle, and play modes of clock radios, portable stereos, compact stereos, and component stereos was 20 TWh/yr, representing about 1.8% of the 1998 national residential electricity consumption.

Rosen, K.B.; Meier, A.K.

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

International Energy Outlook 2007  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 projections, end-use energy consumption depends on 7 projections, end-use energy consumption depends on resource endowment, economic growth, and other political, social, and demographic factors. One way of looking at the future of world energy mar- kets is to consider trends in energy consumption at the end-use sector level. With the exception of the transpor- tation sector, which is dominated by petroleum-based liquids products at present, the mix of energy use in the residential, commercial, and industrial sectors varies widely by region, depending on a combination of regional factors, such as the availability of energy resources, the level of economic development, and polit- ical, social, and demographic factors. This chapter out- lines IEO2007 reference case projections for delivered energy consumption by end-use sector in the OECD and non-OECD regions. Transportation Sector Energy use in the transportation

316

Buildings Energy Data Book  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

Most Popular Tables PDFXLS 3.1.4 2010 Commercial Energy End-Use Splits, by Fuel Type PDFXLS 1.1.1 U.S. Residential and Commercial Buildings Total Primary Energy Consumption PDFXLS...

317

Uncertainty in Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions from United States Natural Gas End-Uses and its Effects on Policy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The U.S. imports LNG from a number of countries such as Trinidad and Tobago, Egypt, Nigeria and Norway. ... A study by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL)(43) reports that nearly 25% of U.S. transit buses purchased over the past decade and a half were CNG powered. ...

Aranya Venkatesh; Paulina Jaramillo; W. Michael Griffin; H. Scott Matthews

2011-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

318

TECHNOLOGY DATA CHARACTERIZING LIGHTING IN COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS: APPLICATION TO END-USE FORECASTING WITH COMMEND 4.0  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LBL-34243 UC - 1600 TECHNOLOGY DATA CHARACTERIZING LIGHTING IN COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS: APPLICATION Technologies, and the Office of Environmental Analysis, Office of Policy, Planning, and Analysis of the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC03-76SF00098. #12;Technology Data Characterizing Lighting

319

Opportunities for Energy Efficiency and Demand Response in the California Cement Industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OpportunitiesforEnergy EfficiencyandDemandResponseinAgricultural/WaterEnd?UseEnergyEfficiencyProgram. i1 4.0 EnergyEfficiencyandDemandResponse

Olsen, Daniel

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

ResPoNSe: modeling the wide variability of residential energy consumption.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

affect appliance energy consumption. For example, differentStates, 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: HousingModeling of End-Use Energy Consumption in the Residential

Peffer, Therese; Burke, William; Auslander, David

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bottom-up energy end-use" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Current Status and Future Scenarios of Residential Building Energy Consumption in China  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

liters Figure 7 Primary Energy Consumption (EJ) Refrigeratorby Efficiency Class Primary Energy Consumption (EJ) Figure 8by Fuel Figure 1 Primary Energy Consumption by End-use)

Zhou, Nan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Deadline for public comments for the Quadrennial Energy Review...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

energy infrastructure, the QER analyses will consider the impacts of transformations in energy supply, markets, and patterns of end use; issues of aging and capacity; impacts of...

323

Healthcare Energy: Spotlight on Lighting and Other Electric Loads  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Building Technologies Office conducted a healthcare energy end-use monitoring project for two sites. Read details about the lighting and plug load energy results.

324

Workshop Proceedings of the Industrial Building Energy Use  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

energy savings are more than those predicted by the auditors!energy end uses were, and also to get an idea of what the PG&E auditors

Akbari, H.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

EIA - Forecasts and Analysis of Energy Data  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Projections by End-Use Sector and Region Tables (2002-2025) Projections by End-Use Sector and Region Tables (2002-2025) Formats Reference Case Projections by End-Use Sector and Region Data Tables (1 to 15 complete) Excel PDF Table Title Table D1 Delivered Energy Consumption in the United States by End-Use Sector and Fuel Excel PDF Table D2 Delivered Energy Consumption in Canada by End-Use Sector and Fuel Excel PDF Table D3 Delivered Energy Consumption in Mexico by End-Use Sector and Fuel Excel PDF Table D4 Delivered Energy Consumption in Western Europe by End-Use Sector and Fuel Excel PDF Table D5 Delivered Energy Consumption in Japan by End-Use Sector and Fuel Excel PDF Table D6 Delivered Energy Consumption in Australia/New Zealand by End-Use Sector and Fuel Excel PDF Table D7 Delivered Energy Consumption in the Former Soviet Union by End-Use Sector and Fuel

326

Refining and end use study of coal liquids. Second quarter 1995 technical progress report, April--June 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Bechtel, with Southwest Research Institute, Amoco Oil R&D, and the M.W. Kellogg Co. as subcontractors, initiated a study on November 1, 1993, for the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC) to determine the most cost effective and suitable combination of existing petroleum refinery processes needed to make specification transportation fuels or blending stocks, from direct and indirect coal liquefaction product liquids. This 47-month study, with an approved budget of $4.4 million dollars, is being performed under DOE Contract Number DE-AC22-93PC91029. A key objective is to determine the most desirable ways of integrating coal liquefaction liquids into existing petroleum refineries to produce transportation fuels meeting current and future, e.g. year 2000, Clean Air Act Amendment (CAAA) standards. An integral part of the above objectives is to test the fuels or blends produced and compare them with established ASTM fuels. The comparison will include engine tests to ascertain compliance of the fuels produced with CAAA and other applicable fuel quality and performance standards. The final part of the project includes a detailed economic evaluation of the cost of processing the coal liquids to their optimum products.

NONE

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

International Energy Outlook 2006  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 projections, end-use energy consumption in the 6 projections, end-use energy consumption in the residential, commercial, industrial, and transportation sectors varies widely among regions and from country to country. One way of looking at the future of world energy mar- kets is to consider trends in energy consumption at the end-use sector level. With the exception of the transpor- tation sector, which is almost universally dominated by petroleum products at present, the mix of energy use in the residential, commercial, and industrial sectors varies widely by region, depending on a combination of regional factors, such as the availability of energy resources, the level of economic development, and polit- ical, social, and demographic factors. This chapter out- lines the IEO2006 projections for delivered energy consumption by end-use sector in the OECD and non- OECD regions. Residential Sector

328

Refining and end use study of coal liquids. Sixth quarterly technical progress report, December 19, 1994--March 26, 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Bechtel, with Southwest Research Institute, Amoco Oil R&D, and the M.W. Kellogg Co. as subcontractors, initiated a study on November 1, 1993, for the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC) to determine the most cost effective and suitable combination of existing petroleum refinery processes needed to make specification transportation fuels or blending stocks, from direct and indirect coal liquefaction product liquids. This 47-month study, with an approved budget of $4.4 million dollars, is being performed under DOE Contract Number DE-AC22-93PC91029. A key objective is to determine the most desirable ways of integrating coal liquefaction liquids into existing petroleum refineries to produce transportation fuels meeting current and future, e.g. year 2000, Clean Air Act Amendment (CAAA) standards. An integral part of the above objectives is to test the fuels or blends produced and compare them with established ASTM fuels. The comparison will include engine tests to ascertain compliance of the fuels produced with CAAA and other applicable fuel quality and performance standards. The final part of the project includes a detailed economic evaluation of the cost of processing the coal liquids to their optimum products. The cost analyses is for the incremental processing cost; in other words, the feed is priced at zero dollars. The study reflects costs for operations using state of the art refinery technology; no capital costs for building new refineries is considered. Some modifications to the existing refinery may be required. Economy of scale dictates the minimum amount of feedstock that should be processed.

NONE

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Manufacturing consumption of energy 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides estimates on energy consumption in the manufacturing sector of the US economy. These estimates are based on data from the 1991 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS). This survey--administered by the Energy End Use and Integrated Statistics Division, Office of Energy Markets and End Use, Energy Information Administration (EIA)--is the most comprehensive source of national-level data on energy-related information for the manufacturing industries.

Not Available

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Energy Efficiency Program Impact Evaluation Guide  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

This Energy Efficiency Program Impact Evaluation Guide describes and provides guidance on approaches for determining and documenting energy and non-energy benefits resulting from end-use energy efficiency programs and portfolios of programs.

331

April 30 Public Meeting: Physical Characterization of Smart and Grid-Connected Commercial and Residential Building End-Use Equipment and Appliances  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

These documents contain slide decks presented at the Physical Characterization of Smart and Grid-Connected Commercial and Residential Buildings End-Use Equipment and Appliances public meeting held on April 30, 2014. The first document includes the first presentation from the meeting: DOE Vision and Objectives. The second document includes all other presentations from the meeting: Terminology and Definitions; End-User and Grid Services; Physical Characterization Framework; Value, Benefits & Metrics.

332

China Energy and Emissions Paths to 2030  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

After over two decades of staggering economic growth and soaring energy demand, China has started taking serious actions to reduce its economic energy and carbon intensity by setting short and medium-term intensity reduction targets, renewable generation targets and various supporting policies and programs. In better understanding how further policies and actions can be taken to shape China's future energy and emissions trajectory, it is important to first identify where the largest opportunities for efficiency gains and emission reduction lie from sectoral and end-use perspectives. Besides contextualizing China's progress towards reaching the highest possible efficiency levels through the adoption of the most advanced technologies from a bottom-up perspective, the actual economic costs and benefits of adopting efficiency measures are also assessed in this study. This study presents two modeling methodologies that evaluate both the technical and economic potential of raising China's efficiency levels to the technical maximum across sectors and the subsequent carbon and energy emission implications through 2030. The technical savings potential by efficiency measure and remaining gap for improvements are identified by comparing a reference scenario in which China continues the current pace of with a Max Tech scenario in which the highest technically feasible efficiencies and advanced technologies are adopted irrespective of costs. In addition, from an economic perspective, a cost analysis of selected measures in the key industries of cement and iron and steel help quantify the actual costs and benefits of achieving the highest efficiency levels through the development of cost of conserved energy curves for the sectors. The results of this study show that total annual energy savings potential of over one billion tonne of coal equivalent exists beyond the expected reference pathway under Max Tech pathway in 2030. CO2 emissions will also peak earlier under Max Tech, though the 2020s is a likely turning point for both emission trajectories. Both emission pathways must meet all announced and planned policies, targets and non-fossil generation targets, or an even wider efficiency gap will exist. The savings potential under Max Tech varies by sector, but the industrial sector appears to hold the largest energy savings and emission reduction potential. The primary source of savings is from electricity rather than fuel, and electricity savings are magnified by power sector decarbonization through increasing renewable generation and coal generation efficiency improvement. In order to achieve the maximum energy savings and emission reduction potential, efficiency improvements and technology switching must be undertaken across demand sectors as well as in the growing power sector. From an economic perspective, the cost of conserved energy analysis indicates that nearly all measures for the iron and steel and cement industry are cost-effective. All 23 efficiency measures analyzed for the cement industry are cost-effective, with combined CO2 emission reduction potential of 448 Mt CO2. All of the electricity savings measures in the iron and steel industry are cost-effective, but the cost-effective savings potential for fuel savings measures is slightly lower than total technical savings potential. The total potential savings from these measures confirm the magnitude of savings in the scenario models, and illustrate the remaining efficiency gap in the cement and iron and steel industries.

Fridley, David; Zheng, Nina; Zhou, Nan; Ke, Jing; Hasanbeigi, Ali; Morrow, Bill; Price, Lynn

2011-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

333

EIA - Forecasts and Analysis of Energy Data  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy Consumption by End-Use Sector Energy Consumption by End-Use Sector In the IEO2005 projections, end-use energy consumption in the residential, commercial, industrial, and transportation sectors varies widely among regions and from country to country. One way of looking at the future of world energy markets is to consider trends in energy consumption at the end-use sector level. With the exception of the transportation sector, which is almost universally dominated by petroleum products at present, the mix of energy use in the residential, commercial, and industrial sectors can vary widely from country to country, depending on a combination of regional factors, such as the availability of energy resources, the level of economic development, and political, social, and demographic factors. This chapter outlines the International Energy Outlook 2005 (IEO2005) forecast for regional energy consumption by end-use sector.

334

Opportunities for Energy Efficiency and Open Automated Demand Response in Wastewater Treatment Facilities in California -- Phase I Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Processing Industry Energy Efficiency Initiative, CaliforniaK. (2004). Bringing Energy Efficiency to the Water andAgricultural/Water End-Use Energy Efficiency Program. Lyco

Lekov, Alex

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Patterns in the fermion mixing matrix, a bottom-up approach  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We first obtain the most general and compact parametrization of the unitary transformation diagonalizing any 3x3 Hermitian matrix H, as a function of its elements and eigenvalues. We then study a special class of fermion mass matrices, defined by the requirement that all of the diagonalizing unitary matrices (in the up, down, charged lepton, and neutrino sectors) contain at least one mixing angle much smaller than the other two. Our new parametrization allows us to quickly extract information on the patterns and predictions emerging from this scheme. In particular we find that the phase difference between two elements of the two mass matrices (of the sector in question) controls the generic size of one of the observable fermion mixing angles: i.e. just fixing that particular phase difference will predict the generic value of one of the mixing angles, irrespective of the value of anything else.

Couture, Gilles; Hamzaoui, Cherif [Groupe de Physique Theorique des Particules, Departement des Sciences de la Terre et de L'Atmosphere, Universite du Quebec a Montreal, Case Postale 8888, Succ. Centre-Ville, Montreal, Quebec, H3C 3P8 (Canada); Lu, Steven S. Y. [Departement de Mathematiques, Universite du Quebec a Montreal, Case Postale 8888, Succ. Centre-Ville, Montreal, Quebec, H3C 3P8 (Canada); Toharia, Manuel [Maryland Center for Fundamental Physics, Department of Physics, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States)

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Forecasting aggregate time series with intermittent subaggregate components: top-down versus bottom-up forecasting  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......optimum value through a grid-search algorithm...method outperformed TD for estimating the aggregate data series...variable, there is no benefit of forecasting each subaggregate...forecasting strategies in estimating the `component'-level...WILLEMAIN, T. R., SMART, C. N., SHOCKOR......

S. Viswanathan; Handik Widiarta; Rajesh Piplani

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Ethics from the Bottom-Up: Recursive depth in technosocial networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

groups and modern technology, such as the use of fractal patterns in African architecture, art and Sustainability Wednesday, March 6, 2013 | 6:30 pm | Kane Hall, Room 120 Computational sciences provide us applying computing to problems in social justice and sustainability, but using those challenges as drivers

Queitsch, Christine

338

Nanotechnology from the Bottom up: Light-Directed Synthesis of DNA Molecules  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Maskless photolithography and light-protected phosphoramidite precursors are used to generate large libraries of DNA oligonucleotides. We discuss merits and challenges of using these...

Cerrina, Franco

339

A new class of high ZT doped bulk nanothermoelectrics through bottom-up synthesis  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Reports on synthesis of large quantities of p- and n-type nanocrystals then sintered into bulk samples with high power factors and low thermal conductivity through impurity doping and nanostructuring

340

E-Print Network 3.0 - art bottom-up methods Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

to be taken at UTA for Advanced BA in Art History ART 2300 - Methods for the Study of Art History... at Arlington Bachelor of Art in Art & Bachelor of Fine Arts This articulation...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bottom-up energy end-use" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Trait-based approaches to conservation physiology: forecasting environmental change risks from the bottom up  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Such trait-based conservation physiology is illustrated...rising temperatures on water loss in ectotherms...especially to inform conservation biology. At times such...from the regional pool of individuals), a...performance (e.g. water-efficient organisms...

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Peace Corps Volunteers and the Boundaries of Bottom-up Development  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

countries. As stated by Amartya Sen, If freedom is whatonly makes sense. Amartya Sen, Development as freedom (Newof Kentucky, 1997. Sen, Amartya. Development as Freedom [in

Schuckman, Hugh Erik

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Nutrient thresholds for bottom-up control of macroalgal blooms on ...  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

(Los Alamos, New Mexico). ..... injection wells .for wastcwater disposal and vertical upward .... seawater related to geothermal heating in the Floridan aquifer.

344

Top-Down, Bottom-Up, or Both? Toward an Integrative Perspective on Operations Strategy Formation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

University 1255 Western Road London, ON N6G 0N1 Canada Ph: +1 519 933-6343 Fax: 519-661-3485 E-mail: ykim@ivey.ca Fabian J. Sting Rotterdam School of Management Erasmus University Rotterdam Burgemeester Qudlaan 50 3062 PA, Rotterdam... initiated the building of a new glass-smelting reactor that enabled the plant to produce specialized solar-thermal glass tubes. Top management planned this project down to the smallest detail and led it from inception to completion. Action Plans...

Kim, Yoon Hee; Sting, Fabian J.; Loch, Christopher H.

2014-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

345

Energy Information Administration (EIA)- Commercial Buildings Energy  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 CBECS Survey Data 2003 | 1999 | 1995 | 1992 | Previous 5 CBECS Survey Data 2003 | 1999 | 1995 | 1992 | Previous Building Characteristics Consumption & Expenditures Microdata Methodology Building Characteristics Data from the 1995 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) are presented in three groups of detailed tables: Buildings Characteristics Tables, number of buildings and amount of floorspace for major building characteristics. Energy Consumption and Expenditures Tables, energy consumption and expenditures for major energy sources. Energy End-Use Data, total, electricity and natural gas consumption and energy intensities for nine specific end-uses. All Principal Buildings Activities Number of Buildings, Total Floorspace, and Total Site and Primary Energy Consumption for All Principal Building Activities, 1995

346

Estimating Total Energy Consumption and Emissions of China's Commercial and Office Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

rate of technology penetration and rate of intensity change,energy. In addition, the penetration rate of each end-use isinstalled base (i.e. penetration rate) for each end-use set

Fridley, David G.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT PRODUCTION, and reliable energy services and products to the marketplace. The Energy Research and Development Division Generation · Industrial/Agricultural/Water EndUse Energy Efficiency · Renewable Energy Technologies

348

The Program Administrator Cost of Saved Energy for Utility Customer-Funded Energy Efficiency Programs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

capital viii Executive Summary End-use energy efficiency is increasingly being relied upon as a resource for meeting electricity and natural gas

Billingsley, Megan A.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

ENERGY ANALYSIS PROGRAM. CHAPTER FROM THE ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENT DIVISION ANNUAL REPORT 1980  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

considered too low. Because fuel prices have doubled duringin response to changing fuel prices, For each end-use (whereof energy consumption to fuel price; engineering curves

Authors, Various

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Energy-Efficiency Labels and Standards: A Guidebook for Appliances, Equipment, and Lighting - 2nd Edition  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

minimum efficiency standards, initiated in 1989, was strengthened by the Energy Conservation Law in 1997, which put end- use energy efficiency and standards

Wiel, Stephen; McMahon, James E.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Estimating Total Energy Consumption and Emissions of China's Commercial and Office Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Central Government Buildings. Available at: http://Energy Commission, PIER Building End-Use Energy Efficiencythe total lifecycle of a building such as petroleum and

Fridley, David G.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) Program FINAL PROJECT REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(RD&D) projects to benefit the electricity and natural gas ratepayers in California. The Energy for natural gas RD&D. The PIER program strives to conduct the most promising public interest energy: · Buildings EndUse Energy Efficiency · Industrial/Agricultural/Water EndUse Energy Efficiency · Renewable

353

Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) Program FINAL PROJECT REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and demonstration (RD&D) projects to benefit the electricity and natural gas ratepayers in California. The Energy EndUse Energy Efficiency · Industrial/Agricultural/Water EndUse Energy Efficiency · Renewable Energy for natural gas RD&D. PIER funding efforts are focused on the following RD&D program areas: · Buildings

354

Plastics End Use Application Fundamentals  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An important aspect of the electrical/electronic market in many applications is the fast ... such applications. Without plastics, most of the electronic products used today would not be practical ... their electr...

Donald V. Rosato

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Deep Energy Retrofits - Eleven California Case Studies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

usage of P4. The electric car energy use is not included inseasonal furnace energy. The electric car is pictured in theEnergy End Uses HVAC: Furnace DHW: Tankless Appliances Plugs Lighting Transportation: Electric Car

Less, Brennan

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Energy Conservation: Policy Issues and End-Use Scenarios of Savings Potential -- Part 3, Policy Barriers and Investment Decisions in Industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

New Plant Construction, Waste Heat Recovery, and Processattributes associated with Waste Heat Recovery and Processin place of new stock. 3) Waste Heat Recovery--use of waste

Benenson, Peter

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

DNE21+ | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

DNE21+ DNE21+ Jump to: navigation, search LEDSGP green logo.png FIND MORE DIA TOOLS This tool is part of the Development Impacts Assessment (DIA) Toolkit from the LEDS Global Partnership. Tool Summary Name: DNE21+ Agency/Company /Organization: Joint Implementation Network (JIN) Complexity/Ease of Use: Moderate Cost: Free Related Tools Global Trade and Environmental Model (GTEM) General Equilibrium Modeling Package (GEMPACK) MIT Emissions Prediction and Policy Analysis (EPPA) Model ... further results A world energy systems model that considers technological change endogenously for three technologies: wind power, photovoltaics, and fuel-cell vehicles. Approach The model is a linear programming model that employs a bottom-up approach for energy supply side technologies, and minimizes the cost of world energy

358

International Energy Outlook 2006 - World Energy and Economic Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2: Energy Consumption by End-Use Sector 2: Energy Consumption by End-Use Sector In the IEO2006 projections, end-use energy consumption in the residential, commercial, industrial, and transportation sectors varies widely among regions and from country to country. One way of looking at the future of world energy markets is to consider trends in energy consumption at the end-use sector level. With the exception of the transportation sector, which is almost universally dominated by petroleum products at present, the mix of energy use in the residential, commercial, and industrial sectors varies widely by region, depending on a combination of regional factors, such as the availability of energy resources, the level of economic development, and political, social, and demographic factors. This chapter outlines the IEO2006 projections for

359

Representation of Energy Use in the Food Products Industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Traditional representations of energy in the manufacturing sector have tended to represent energy end-uses rather than actual energy service demands. While this representation if quite adequate for understanding how energy is used today...

Elliott, N. R.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Achieving Energy Savings Through Residential Energy Use Behavior  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Achieving Energy Savings Through Residential Energy Use Behavior Studies Energy Efficiency Research Office PIER Buildings End-use Energy Efficiency Research Program www.energy.ca.gov/research/buildings May 2012 The Issue Understanding the factors that influence energy use behavior is a largely uninvestigated

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bottom-up energy end-use" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Energy Demand Staff Scientist  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Demand in China Lynn Price Staff Scientist February 2, 2010 #12;Founded in 1988 Focused on End-Use Energy Efficiency ~ 40 Current Projects in China Collaborations with ~50 Institutions in China Researcher #12;Talk OutlineTalk Outline · Overview · China's energy use and CO2 emission trends · Energy

Eisen, Michael

362

Energy Policy & Technology Analysis | Global and Regional Solutions  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Sustainable Energy Technologies Department Energy Policy and Technology Analysis The group's core focus is on long-term integrated energy, environmental, and economic analysis using the MARKAL family of models, a well-established tool for energy systems analysis. With 30 years of development under the auspices of the International Energy Agency, MARKAL has approximately 100 user institutions in more than 50 countries. A bottom-up analysis with explicit technology representation, the models include a physical description of energy technologies, and allow for "well-to-wheel" comparison of technologies and technological pathways. They study the impact of technological change/progress on energy markets, and provide a technology-rich basis for estimating energy dynamics over a multi-period

363

ENERGY CONSUMPTION SURVEY  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 RESIDENTIAL TRANSPORTATION 5 RESIDENTIAL TRANSPORTATION ENERGY CONSUMPTION SURVEY Prepared for: UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY INFORMATION ADMINISTRATION OFFICE OF ENERGY MARKETS AND END USE ENERGY END USE DIVISION RESIDENTIAL AND COMMERCIAL BRANCH WASHINGTON, DC 20585 Prepared by: THE ORKAND CORPORATION 8484 GEORGIA AVENUE SILVER SPRING, MD 20910 October 1986 Contract Number DE-AC01-84EI19658 TABLE OF CONTENTS FRONT MATTER Index to Program Descriptions........................................... vi List of Exhibits ....................................................... viii Acronyms and Abbreviations ............................................. ix SECTION 1: GENERAL INFORMATION ........................................ 1-1 1.1. Summary ....................................................... 1-1

364

Advanced Fossil Energy Projects Loan Guarantee Solicitation  

Energy Savers [EERE]

of production and use, including resource development, energy generation, and end use. Fossil fuels currently account for more than 80 percent of U.S. energy production and are...

365

Hydrogen Fuel Cell Basics | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Your H2IQ Hydrogen Fuel Cell Basics Hydrogen Fuel Cell Basics Hydrogen is a versatile energy carrier that can be used to power nearly every end-use energy need. The fuel...

366

Energy Use in China: Sectoral Trends and Future Outlook  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by Fuel (with biomass) Primary Energy Consumption (EJ) RuralEnd-use (without biomass) Commercial Energy Use by Fuel andfor 9% of primary energy excluding biomass fuels. Figure 10

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Energy Data Sourcebook for the U.S. Residential Sector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that forecast US residential energy consumption by end-use.new unit energy consumption in the U.S. DOE appliancethe Residential Energy Consumption Survey, or RECS (US DOE

Wenzel, T.P.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers 2001  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1) 1) Distribution Category UC-950 Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers 2001 January 2003 Energy Information Administration Office of Energy Markets and End Use U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. The information contained herein should be attributed to the Energy Information Administration and should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. Contacts This report was prepared in the Office of Energy Markets and End Use of the Energy Information Administration

369

China Energy Databook -- User Guide and Documentation, Version 7.0  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Commercial and Biomass Energy Table 4B.2. Actual PrimaryCommercial and Biomass Energy Figure 4B.2. Energy IntensityEnd Use, Commercial and Biomass Energy Figure 9B.10. Shares

Fridley, Ed., David

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Refining building energy modeling through aggregate analysis and probabilistic methods associated with occupant presence.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The building sector represents the largest energy consumer among the United States' end use sectors. As a result, the public and private sector will continue (more)

Stoppel, Christopher Michael

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Table A10. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation" " by Fuel Type, Industry Group, Selected Industries, and End Use, 1994:" " Part 2" " (Estimates in Trillion...

372

Two Paths to Transforming Markets through Public Sector Energy Efficiency:  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Two Paths to Transforming Markets through Public Sector Energy Efficiency: Two Paths to Transforming Markets through Public Sector Energy Efficiency: Bottom Up versus Top Down Title Two Paths to Transforming Markets through Public Sector Energy Efficiency: Bottom Up versus Top Down Publication Type Conference Paper LBNL Report Number LBNL-60144 Year of Publication 2006 Authors McGrory, Laura Van Wie, Philip Coleman, David Fridley, Jeffrey P. Harris, and Edgar Villasenor Franco Conference Name 2006 ACEEE Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings Date Published 08/2006 Conference Location Pacific Grove, CA Abstract The evolution of government purchasing initiatives in Mexico and China, part of the PEPS (Promoting an Energy-efficient Public Sector) program, demonstrates the need for flexibility in designing energy-efficiency strategies in the public sector. Several years of pursuing a top-down (federally led) strategy in Mexico produced few results, and it was not until the program was restructured in 2004 to focus on municipal-level purchasing that the program gained momentum. Today, a new partnership with the Mexican federal government is leading to an intergovernmental initiative with strong support at the federal level. By contrast, the PEPS purchasing initiative in China was successfully initiated and led at the central government level with strategic support from international experts. The very different success trajectories in these two countries provide valuable lessons for designing country-specific public sector energy-efficiency initiatives. Enabling conditions for any successful public sector purchasing initiative include the existence of mandatory energy-efficiency performance standards, an effective energy-efficiency endorsement labeling program, an immediate need for energy conservation, a simple pilot phase (focusing on a limited number of strategically chosen products), and specialized technical assistance. Top-down purchasing programs are likely to be more successful where there is high-level political endorsement and a national procurement law in place, supported by a network of trained purchasers. Bottom-up (municipally led) purchasing programs require that municipalities have the authority to set their own purchasing policies, and also benefit from existing networks of cities, supported by motivated municipal leaders and trained purchasing officials.

373

Two Paths to Transforming Markets through Public Sector Energy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Paths to Transforming Markets through Public Sector Energy Paths to Transforming Markets through Public Sector Energy Efficiency: Bottom Up versus Top Down Laura Van Wie McGrory, Philip Coleman, David Fridley, and Jeffrey Harris, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) Edgar Villaseñor Franco, Promoting an Energy-efficient Public Sector (PEPS) ABSTRACT The evolution of government purchasing initiatives in Mexico and China, part of the PEPS (Promoting an Energy-efficient Public Sector) program, demonstrates the need for flexibility in designing energy-efficiency strategies in the public sector. Several years of pursuing a top-down (federally led) strategy in Mexico produced few results, and it was not until the program was restructured in 2004 to focus on municipal-level purchasing that the program

374

International Energy Outlook 2007  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

System for the Analysis of Global Energy Markets (SAGE) System for the Analysis of Global Energy Markets (SAGE) Projections of world energy consumption and supply in IEO2007 were generated using EIA's SAGE model. SAGE is used to project energy use in detail at the end- use sector level. It is an integrated set of regional models that provide a technology-rich basis for estimating regional energy consumption. For each region, reference case estimates of 42 end-use energy service demands (e.g., car, commercial truck, and heavy truck road travel; residential lighting; steam heat requirements in the paper industry) are developed on the basis of economic and demographic projections. Projections of energy con- sumption to meet the energy demands are estimated on the basis of each region's existing energy use patterns, the existing stock of energy-using equipment, and the characteristics of available new technologies, as well

375

Assessment of Energy Use in Multibuilding Facilities  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3)/1 3)/1 Energy Information Administration Energy Consumption Series Assessment of Energy Use in Multibuilding Facilities August 1993 Energy Information Administration Office of Energy Markets and End Use U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. Contacts This publication was prepared under the general direction of W. Calvin Kilgore, Director of the Office of Energy Markets and End Use (202/586-1617) and Lynda T. Carlson, Director of the Energy End Use and Integrated Statistics Division (EEUISD) (202/586-1112). Specific information regarding the contents or preparation of

376

India-Options for Low Carbon Development | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

India-Options for Low Carbon Development India-Options for Low Carbon Development Jump to: navigation, search Name India-ESMAP Low Carbon Growth Country Studies Program Agency/Company /Organization Energy Sector Management Assistance Program of the World Bank Sector Energy, Land Focus Area Energy Efficiency, Renewable Energy, Buildings, Industry, Transportation Topics GHG inventory, Low emission development planning, Policies/deployment programs, Background analysis Website http://www.esmap.org/filez/pub Country India Southern Asia References World Bank ESMAP[1] Overview "The India study includes the development of a detailed, bottom-up, modeling framework, that serves to comment on opportunities for low carbon growth. Input data was collected across several sectors covering: power supply, household appliances, transportation, industry, and buildings. The

377

International energy outlook 2006  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents international energy projections through 2030, prepared by the Energy Information Administration. After a chapter entitled 'Highlights', the report begins with a review of world energy and economic outlook, followed by energy consumption by end-use sector. The next chapter is on world oil markets. Natural gas, world coal market and electricity consumption and supply are then discussed. The final chapter covers energy-related carbon dioxide emissions.

NONE

2006-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

378

Energy and GHG Emissions in British Columbia 1990 -2010  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

supply and use, greenhouse gas emissions and energy efficiency in British Columbia Canadian Industrial Energy End-use Data and Analysis Centre (CIEEDAC) Simon Fraser University June 2012 Environment Canada, Natural Resources Canada, Aluminium Industry Association, Canadian Chemical Producers

Pedersen, Tom

379

DOETEIAO32l/2 Residential Energy Consumption Survey; Consumption  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

General information about EIA data on energy consumption may be obtained from Wray Smith, Director, Office of Energy Markets and End Use (202- 252-1617); Lynda T. Carlson,...

380

Healthcare Energy: Massachusetts General Hospital Gray Building  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Building Technologies Office conducted a healthcare energy end-use monitoring project in partnership with two hospitals. This page contains highlights from monitoring at the Gray Building at Massachusetts General Hospital.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bottom-up energy end-use" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Renewable Energy and Climate Change Mitigation: An Overview of the IPCC Special Report  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Renewable energy systems currently meet only around 78... heating, cooling, electricity and transport end-use energy demands (Traditional biomass provides around 6.3% of global primary energy and all other ren...

Ralph E. H. Sims

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Measurement and verification strategies for energy savings certificates: meeting the challenges of an uncertain world  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

End-use energy efficiency is a cost-effective and rapidly deployable strategy for significantly reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and energy costs. Energy savings certificates (ESCs)instruments assigning t...

Steven Meyers; Steve Kromer

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Master Plan and Energy Audits at a Large Texas Medical Campus  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Audits. The Master Plan summarized our methodology for disaggregation of historical energy use by building and end use. We also defined our proposed system for prioritizing buildings for the individual Detailed Building Energy Audits. We proposed a...

Simpson, K.; Stinson, M.; Haag, S.; Hart, M.

384

Modelling useful energy demand system as derived from basic needs in the household sector  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Inter-fuel substitution in the household sector depends on whether their target energy use is similar or not. To account ... for the effect of end-use application on energy demand, the concept of useful energy is...

Zahra A. Barkhordar; Yadollah Saboohi

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Annual Energy Review, 1996  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

The The Annual Energy Review (AER) is prepared by the Energy Information Administration. General information may be obtained from W. Calvin Kilgore, Director, Office of Energy Markets and End Use, 202-586-1617, or Katherine E. Seiferlein, Chief, Integrated Statistics Branch, 202-586-5695. Questions and comments concerning the contents of the AER may be referred to Samuel E. Brown, 202-586-5103; Leigh Carleton, 202-586-1132; or the following subject specialists via telephone or Internet e-mail: Contacts 1. Energy Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sam.Brown@eia.doe.gov 202-586-5103 Leigh.Carleton@eia.doe.gov 202-586-1132 2. End-Use Energy Consumption Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey . . . . . . . Mark.Schipper@eia.doe.gov 202-586-1136 Residential Energy Consumption Survey . . . . . . . . Michael.Laurence@eia.doe.gov 202-586-2453 Residential Transportation Energy

386

Energy Information Administration (EIA)- Commercial Buildings Energy  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 CBECS Survey Data 2003 | 1999 | 1995 | 1992 | Previous 2 CBECS Survey Data 2003 | 1999 | 1995 | 1992 | Previous Building Characteristics Consumption & Expenditures Microdata Methodology Building Characteristics Data from the 1992 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) are presented in three groups of detailed tables: Buildings characteristics tables-number of buildings and amount of floorspace for major building characteristics. Energy consumption and expenditures tables-energy consumption and expenditures for major energy sources. Energy end-use tables-total, electricity and natural gas consumption and energy intensities for nine specific end-uses. Guide to the 1992 CBECS Detailed Tables Released: Nov 1999 Column Categories Row Categories The first set of detailed tables for the 1992 CBECS, Tables A1 through A70,

387

Integrated Energy Policy Report Subsidiary Volume: PUBLIC INTEREST  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Demonstration 21 Organization of this Report 22 #12;ii CHAPTER 2: ELECTRICITY AND NATURAL GAS CONSUMPTION TRENDS 23 Electricity Consumption Trends 23 Electricity Use by Sector 25 Electricity End-Use 28 Natural Gas Consumption Trends 30 Natural Gas Use by Sector 30 Natural Gas End-Use 32 CHAPTER 3: ENERGY EFFICIENCY

388

Monthly Energy Review - May 2010  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

June 30, 2010 June 30, 2010 DOE/EIA-0035(2010/06) Monthly Energy Review June 2010 U.S. Energy Information Administration Office of Energy Markets and End Use U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the United States Government. The views in this report therefore should not be construed as representing those of the Department of Energy or other Federal agencies. Contacts The Monthly Energy Review is prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration, Office of Energy Markets and End Use, Integrated Energy Statistics Division, Domestic Energy Statistics Team, under the direction of Barbara T. Fichman,

389

Monthly Energy Review - February 2010  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

February 26, 2010 February 26, 2010 DOE/EIA-0035(2010/02) Monthly Energy Review February 2010 U.S. Energy Information Administration Office of Energy Markets and End Use U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the United States Government. The views in this report therefore should not be construed as representing those of the Department of Energy or other Federal agencies. Contacts The Monthly Energy Review is prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration, Office of Energy Markets and End Use, Integrated Energy Statistics Division, Domestic Energy Statistics Team, under the direction of Barbara T. Fichman,

390

Monthly Energy Review - July 2010  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

July 30, 2010 July 30, 2010 DOE/EIA-0035(2010/07) Monthly Energy Review July 2010 U.S. Energy Information Administration Office of Energy Markets and End Use U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the United States Government. The views in this report therefore should not be construed as representing those of the Department of Energy or other Federal agencies. Contacts The Monthly Energy Review is prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration, Office of Energy Markets and End Use, Integrated Energy Statistics Division, Domestic Energy Statistics Team, under the direction of Barbara T. Fichman,

391

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2010  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Industrial Sector Energy Sector Industrial Sector Energy Sector International Energy Outlook 2010 Graphic Data - Industrial Sector Energy Sector Figure 82. Annual changes in world industrial and all other end-use energy consumption from previous year, 2006-2010 Figure 83. World delivered energy consumption in the industral and all other end-use sectors, 2005-2035 Figure 84. OECD and Non-OECD industrial sector energy consumption, 2007-2035 Figure 85. World industrial sector energy consumption by fuel, 2007 and 2035 Figure 86. World industrial sector energy consumption by major energy-intensive industry shares, 2007 Figure 87. OECD and Non-OECD major steel producers, 2008 Figure 88. OECD industrial sector energy consumption by fuel, 2007 and 2035 Figure 89. Non-OECD industrial sector energy consumption by fuel, 2007 and 2035

392

Monthly Energy Review - April 2010  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

April 30, 2010 April 30, 2010 DOE/EIA-0035(2010/04) Monthly Energy Review April 2010 U.S. Energy Information Administration Office of Energy Markets and End Use U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the United States Government. The views in this report therefore should not be construed as representing those of the Department of Energy or other Federal agencies. Contacts The Monthly Energy Review is prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration, Office of Energy Markets and End Use, Integrated Energy Statistics Division, Domestic Energy Statistics Team, under the direction of Barbara T. Fichman,

393

Monthly Energy Review - May 2010  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

May 27, 2010 May 27, 2010 DOE/EIA-0035(2010/05) Monthly Energy Review May 2010 U.S. Energy Information Administration Office of Energy Markets and End Use U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the United States Government. The views in this report therefore should not be construed as representing those of the Department of Energy or other Federal agencies. Contacts The Monthly Energy Review is prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration, Office of Energy Markets and End Use, Integrated Energy Statistics Division, Domestic Energy Statistics Team, under the direction of Barbara T. Fichman,

394

Monthly Energy Review - March 2010  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

March 31, 2010 March 31, 2010 DOE/EIA-0035(2010/03) Monthly Energy Review March 2010 U.S. Energy Information Administration Office of Energy Markets and End Use U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the United States Government. The views in this report therefore should not be construed as representing those of the Department of Energy or other Federal agencies. Contacts The Monthly Energy Review is prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration, Office of Energy Markets and End Use, Integrated Energy Statistics Division, Domestic Energy Statistics Team, under the direction of Barbara T. Fichman,

395

High-Energy Permanent Magnets for Hybrid Vehicles and Alternative Energy Uses  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The report summarizes research undertaken by a multidisciplinary team aimed at the development of the next generation high-energy permanent magnets. The principal approach was relied on bottom-up fabrication of anisotropic nanocomposite magnets. Our efforts resulted in further development of the theoretical concept and fabrication principles for the nanocomposites and in synthesis of a range of rare-earth-based hard magnetic nanoparticles. Even though we did not make a breakthrough in the assembly of these hard magnetic particles with separately prepared Fe(Co) nanoparticles and did not obtain a compact nanocomposite magnet, our performed research will help to direct the future efforts, in particular, towards nano-assembly via coating, when the two phases which made the nanocomposite are first organized in core-shell-structured particles. Two other approaches were to synthesize (discover) new materials for the traditional singe-material magnets and the nanocomposite magnets. Integrated theoretical and experimental efforts lead to a significant advance in nanocluster synthesis technique and yielded novel rare-earth-free nanostructured and nanocomposite materials. Examination of fifteen R-Fe-X alloy systems (R = rare earth), which have not been explored earlier due to various synthesis difficulties reveal several new ferromagnetic compounds. The research has made major progress in bottom-up manufacturing of rare-earth-containing nanocomposite magnets with superior energy density and open new directions in development of higher-energy-density magnets that do not contain rare earths. The advance in the scientific knowledge and technology made in the course of the project has been reported in 50 peer-reviewed journal articles and numerous presentations at scientific meetings.

Hadjipanayis, George C. [University of Delaware] [University of Delaware; McCallum, William R. [Ames Laboratory] [Ames Laboratory; Sellmyer, David J. [University of Nebraska, Lincoln] [University of Nebraska, Lincoln; Harris, Vincent [Northeastern University] [Northeastern University; Carpenter, Everett E. [Virginia Commonwealth University] [Virginia Commonwealth University; Liu, Jinfang [Electron Energy Corporation] [Electron Energy Corporation

2013-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

396

PHYSICAL REVIEW E 89, 012807 (2014) Bottom-up model of self-organized criticality on networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Pierre-Andr´e No¨el,1,2,* Charles D. Brummitt,1,3 and Raissa M. D'Souza1,2,4,5 1 Complexity Sciences Center, University of California, Davis, California 95616, USA 2 Department of Computer Science, Davis, California 95616, USA 4 Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University

D'Souza, Raissa

397

Teacher self-efficacy in Cape Town : a bottom up approach to enhancing the quality of education  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Personal teacher self-efficacy (PTE), or the belief in one's own ability to overcome a particular challenge, often acts as a catalyst for teachers to improve the effectiveness of their teaching. Gaining PTE can translate ...

Kim, YeSeul

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Stock type performance in addressing top-down and bottom-up factors for the restoration of indigenous trees  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to the initial size and biomass of seedlings. Inversely, in plantations exposed to deer, the apparency hypothesis.07) that had been almost twice their biomass at the onset of plantation. The overall browsing occurrence Exclosure Competition Plantation White-tailed deer a b s t r a c t Using planted trees to restore

Laval, Université

399

ISDA 2010, Montpellier, June 28-30, 2010 1 COMBINING TOP-DOWN AND BOTTOM-UP  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

efficiency and on the other tried to fine-tune inputs (of nutrients, agrochemicals, manure, etc) to societal

Boyer, Edmond

400

Towards a Very Low Energy Building Stock: Modeling the U.S. Commercial Building Sector to Support Policy and Innovation Planning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and energy use intensity by fuel type and end use), based on historical data and user-defined scenarios for future projections.

Coffey, Brian

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bottom-up energy end-use" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Ris Energy Report 7 This Ris Energy Report, the seventh of a series that began  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;#12;#12;#12;#12;3 1 Risø Energy Report 7 This Risø Energy Report, the seventh of a series. This report presents state-of-the-art and development per- spectives for energy supply technologies, new energy sys- tems, end-use energy efficiency improvements and new pol- icy measures. It also includes

402

"Code(a)","End Use","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)"," Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coke and Breeze)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Relative Standard Errors for Table 5.3;" 3 Relative Standard Errors for Table 5.3;" " Unit: Percents." " "," " " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," " " "," ","Net Demand",,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" "NAICS"," ","for ","Residual","and","Natural","LPG and","(excluding Coal" "Code(a)","End Use","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)"," Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coke and Breeze)" ,,"Total United States" " 311 - 339","ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES" ,"TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION",2,3,6,2,4,9

403

Methodology for estimating biomass energy potential and its application to Colombia  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper presents a methodology to estimate the biomass energy potential and its associated uncertainty at a country level when quality and availability of data are limited. The current biomass energy potential in Colombia is assessed following the proposed methodology and results are compared to existing assessment studies. The proposed methodology is a bottom-up resource-focused approach with statistical analysis that uses a Monte Carlo algorithm to stochastically estimate the theoretical and the technical biomass energy potential. The paper also includes a proposed approach to quantify uncertainty combining a probabilistic propagation of uncertainty, a sensitivity analysis and a set of disaggregated sub-models to estimate reliability of predictions and reduce the associated uncertainty. Results predict a theoretical energy potential of 0.744 EJ and a technical potential of 0.059 EJ in 2010, which might account for 1.2% of the annual primary energy production (4.93 EJ).

Miguel Angel Gonzalez-Salazar; Mirko Morini; Michele Pinelli; Pier Ruggero Spina; Mauro Venturini; Matthias Finkenrath; Witold-Roger Poganietz

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

EFFECT e-learning courses | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

EFFECT e-learning courses EFFECT e-learning courses Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: EFFECT e-learning courses Agency/Company /Organization: Energy Sector Management Assistance Program of the World Bank Sector: Climate, Energy Topics: Low emission development planning, Pathways analysis Resource Type: Guide/manual, Training materials, Software/modeling tools User Interface: Spreadsheet Website: www.esmap.org/esmap/EFFECT Cost: Free Language: English References: EFFECT e-learning courses[1] The EFFECT Model is an Excel-based, bottom-up, engineering style model designed to support open and transparent modeling and comparison of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions growth for a range of development scenarios. The EFFECT Model focuses on sectors that contribute to and are expected to

405

Current and future industrial energy service characterizations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Current and future energy demands, end uses, and cost used to characterize typical applications and resultant services in the industrial sector of the United States and 15 selected states are examined. A review and evaluation of existing industrial energy data bases was undertaken to assess their potential for supporting SERI research on: (1) market suitability analysis, (2) market development, (3) end-use matching, (3) industrial applications case studies, and (4) identification of cost and performance goals for solar systems and typical information requirements for industrial energy end use. In reviewing existing industrial energy data bases, the level of detail, disaggregation, and primary sources of information were examined. The focus was on fuels and electric energy used for heat and power purchased by the manufacturing subsector and listed by 2-, 3-, and 4-digit SIC, primary fuel, and end use. Projections of state level energy prices to 1990 are developed using the energy intensity approach. The effects of federal and state industrial energy conservation programs on future industrial sector demands were assessed. Future end-use energy requirements were developed for each 4-digit SIC industry and were grouped as follows: (1) hot water, (2) steam (212 to 300/sup 0/F, each 100/sup 0/F interval from 300 to 1000/sup 0/F, and greater than 1000/sup 0/F), and (3) hot air (100/sup 0/F intervals). Volume I details the activities performed in this effort.

Krawiec, F.; Thomas, T.; Jackson, F.; Limaye, D.R.; Isser, S.; Karnofsky, K.; Davis, T.D.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Energy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Energy newsroomassetsimagesenergy-icon.png Energy Research into alternative forms of energy, and improving and securing the power grid, is a major national security...

407

ESMAP-India-Options for Low Carbon Development | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Options for Low Carbon Development Options for Low Carbon Development Jump to: navigation, search Name India-ESMAP Low Carbon Growth Country Studies Program Agency/Company /Organization Energy Sector Management Assistance Program of the World Bank Sector Energy, Land Focus Area Energy Efficiency, Renewable Energy, Buildings, Industry, Transportation Topics GHG inventory, Low emission development planning, Policies/deployment programs, Background analysis Website http://www.esmap.org/filez/pub Country India Southern Asia References World Bank ESMAP[1] Overview "The India study includes the development of a detailed, bottom-up, modeling framework, that serves to comment on opportunities for low carbon growth. Input data was collected across several sectors covering: power supply, household appliances, transportation, industry, and buildings. The

408

A Hybrid Method for Provincial Scale Energy-related Carbon Emission Allocation in China  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Empirical studies were conducted to examine the hybrid method and three indices, per capita GDP, resource endowment index and the proportion of energy-intensive industries, were screened to preliminarily interpret the differences among Chinas regional carbon emissions. ... (4, 26-32) The approach used in these studies is often based on industrial sectors (bottom-up methodology), life-cycle methods (in which the city is considered as land with a certain boundary as well as an energy and material demand center) or input-output models (top-down approach using public data). ... The switch from coal-dominance to cleaner, renewable energies (wind, solar, natural gas, nuclear power, geothermal, biomass energy) will undoubtedly reduce CO2 emissions in China. ...

Hongtao Bai; Yingxuan Zhang; Huizhi Wang; Yanying Huang; He Xu

2014-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

409

Historical Renewable Energy Consumption by Energy Use Sector and Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Historical Renewable Energy Consumption by Energy Use Sector and Energy Historical Renewable Energy Consumption by Energy Use Sector and Energy Source, 1989-2008 Dataset Summary Description Provides annual renewable energy consumption by source and end use between 1989 and 2008. This data was published and compiled by the Energy Information Administration. Source EIA Date Released August 01st, 2010 (4 years ago) Date Updated August 01st, 2010 (4 years ago) Keywords annual energy consumption consumption EIA renewable energy Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon historical_renewable_energy_consumption_by_sector_and_energy_source_1989-2008.xls (xls, 41 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually Time Period 1989-2008 License License Creative Commons CCZero Comment Rate this dataset

410

Impacts of Temperature Variation on Energy Demand in Buildings (released in AEO2005)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

In the residential and commercial sectors, heating and cooling account for more than 40% of end-use energy demand. As a result, energy consumption in those sectors can vary significantly from year to year, depending on yearly average temperatures.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Determination of the effect of part orientation to the strength value on additive manufacturing FDM for end-use parts by physical testing and validation via three-dimensional finite element analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Determining the mechanical properties of the parts manufactured from additive manufacturing (AM) technology is important for manufacture end-use functional parts, known as rapid manufacturing (RM). It is important, within RM design, to verify to some degree of confidence that a part designed to be manufactured using this technology will be suitable and fit to function as intended, prior to committing to manufacture. The method of doing this is to perform physical testing on fabricated parts and validate via finite element analysis (FEA) on the parts.

R.H. Hambali; P. Smith; A.E.W. Rennie

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Report: An Updated Annual Energy Outlook 2009 Reference Case...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,0.3095597923,0.3089521229,0.3097482622,0.3104477823,0.3113028109,0.3122006357 "Delivered Energy Consumption by End Use" " Space Heating 1",1.659170747,1.786749244,1.892402887,1.9...

413

Report: An Updated Annual Energy Outlook 2009 Reference Case...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,0.3093057573,0.3091662526,0.3099833727,0.3105697036,0.3115277886,0.3126308322 "Delivered Energy Consumption by End Use" " Space Heating 1",1.65917182,1.786752224,1.892034054,1.96...

414

The Global Energy Challenge  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

The expected doubling of global energy demand by 2050 challenges our traditional patterns of energy production, distribution and use. The continued use of fossil fuels raises concerns about supply, security, environment and climate. New routes are needed for the efficient conversion of energy from chemical fuel, sunlight, and heat to electricity or hydrogen as an energy carrier and finally to end uses like transportation, lighting, and heating. Opportunities for efficient new energy conversion routes based on nanoscale materials will be presented, with emphasis on the sustainable energy technologies they enable.

George Crabtree

2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

415

The Global Energy Challenge  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The expected doubling of global energy demand by 2050 challenges our traditional patterns of energy production, distribution and use. The continued use of fossil fuels raises concerns about supply, security, environment and climate. New routes are needed for the efficient conversion of energy from chemical fuel, sunlight, and heat to electricity or hydrogen as an energy carrier and finally to end uses like transportation, lighting, and heating. Opportunities for efficient new energy conversion routes based on nanoscale materials will be presented, with emphasis on the sustainable energy technologies they enable.

George Crabtree

2007-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

416

Delaware Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History Volumes Delivered to Consumers

417

Connecticut Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

418

Alaska Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

419

Colorado Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History Volumes Delivered to Consumers

420

Delaware Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bottom-up energy end-use" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

California Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History Volumes Delivered to Consumers

422

Connecticut Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History Volumes Delivered to Consumers

423

Mississippi Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

424

Minnesota Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

425

Michigan Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History Volumes Delivered to Consumers

426

Minnesota Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History Volumes Delivered to Consumers

427

Arizona Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History Volumes Delivered to Consumers

428

Nevada Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

429

Arizona Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

430

Ohio Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View History Volumes Delivered to Consumers

431

Montana Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View History Volumes Delivered to Consumers

432

Minnesota Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View History Volumes Delivered to Consumers

433

Idaho Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

434

California Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View History Volumes Delivered to Consumers

435

Arkansas Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

436

Indiana Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View History Volumes Delivered to Consumers

437

Oregon Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View History Volumes Delivered to Consumers

438

Mississippi Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View History Volumes Delivered to Consumers

439

Kentucky Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

440

Pennsylvania Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View History Volumes Delivered to Consumers

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bottom-up energy end-use" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Florida Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History Volumes Delivered to Consumers

442

Idaho Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

443

Massachusetts Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

444

Nebraska Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History Volumes Delivered to Consumers

445

Maryland Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

446

Maryland Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History Volumes Delivered to Consumers

447

Missouri Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

448

Missouri Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History Volumes Delivered to Consumers

449

Alaska Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View History Volumes Delivered to Consumers

450

Kansas Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

451

Wisconsin Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

452

Alabama Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

453

Connecticut Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

454

Vermont Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View History Volumes Delivered to Consumers

455

Wyoming Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View History Volumes Delivered to Consumers

456

Arizona Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View History Volumes Delivered to Consumers

457

Montana Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

458

Wyoming Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

459

Oklahoma Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

460

Delaware Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View History Volumes Delivered to Consumers

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bottom-up energy end-use" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Ohio Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

462

Utah Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

463

Minnesota Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

464

Texas Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

465

Missouri Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

466

Delaware Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

467

Alabama Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View History Volumes Delivered to Consumers

468

Missouri Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View History Volumes Delivered to Consumers

469

Alabama Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

470

Kentucky Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History Volumes Delivered to Consumers

471

Nebraska Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

472

Maine Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

473

California Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

474

Georgia Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

475

Florida Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

476

Arkansas Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

477

Massachusetts Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View History Volumes Delivered to Consumers

478

Alaska Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

479

Louisiana Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View History Volumes Delivered to Consumers

480

Maine Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bottom-up energy end-use" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Maryland Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View History Volumes Delivered to Consumers

482

Nebraska Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View History Volumes Delivered to Consumers

483

Colorado Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

484

Arkansas Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View History Volumes Delivered to Consumers

485

Tennessee Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View History Volumes Delivered to Consumers

486

Oregon Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

487

Michigan Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View History Volumes Delivered to Consumers

488

Nebraska Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

489

Utah Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View History Volumes Delivered to Consumers

490

Washington Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View History Volumes Delivered to Consumers

491

Montana Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History Volumes Delivered to Consumers

492

Kentucky Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

493

Nevada Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View History Volumes Delivered to Consumers

494

Kansas Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View History Volumes Delivered to Consumers

495

Georgia Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View History Volumes Delivered to Consumers

496

Colorado Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View History Volumes Delivered to Consumers

497

Montana Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

498

Virginia Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View History Volumes Delivered to Consumers

499

,"Minnesota Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9644,17799,2672,2647,9363,,3117 39675,17461,2434,2198,10376,,2453 39706,16900,2855,2612,9975,,1459 39736,22563,5998,4807,10685,,1072 39767,36467,12941,9016,12702,,1808...

500

Illinois Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

1,873 40,029 42,100 44,871 63,699 114,948 2001-2014 Residential 9,662 8,878 8,234 10,615 22,431 57,532 1989-2014 Commercial 8,001 7,830 7,650 8,968 14,865 27,892 1989-2014...