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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bottom-up energy end-use" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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1

China's energy and emissions outlook to 2050: Perspectives from bottom-up energy end-use model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Development Plan for Renewable Energy in China. Availabledevelopment-plan-for-renewable-energy.pdf Tu, J. , Jaccard,further expansion of renewable and nuclear power capacity.

Zhou, Nan

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Implications of maximizing China's technical potential for residential end-use energy efficiency: A 2030 outlook from the bottom-up  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of electric and gas water heaters, both of which areMEPS revisions. For gas water heaters, the energy factor isDOE 2010). For electric water heaters, continued efficiency

Khanna, Nina

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Bottom-Up Energy Analysis System - Methodology and Results  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TSL 4 TSL 4 TSL 4 TSL 4 Group End Use Water HeatersWater HeatersWater Heaters Water Heaters Water Heaters Water Heaters

McNeil, Michael A.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Bottom-Up Energy Analysis System (BUENAS) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160Benin: EnergyBoston Area Solar Energy Association Jump to:Botetourt

5

Bottom-Up Energy Analysis System (BUENAS) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160Benin: EnergyBoston Area Solar Energy Association Jump to:Botetourt

6

Bottom-Up Energy Analysis System - Methodology and Results  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Agency, World Energy Outlook 2006. 2006, OECD. ILO,by the trend of IEA’s World Energy Outlook (WEO) 2006 [71],to trends in the World Energy Outlook [71]. The projection

McNeil, Michael A.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Bottom-Up Energy Analysis System - Methodology and Results  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

country energy coverage will total 77% of global demand. Thetotal energy demand in 2005[6], the countries covered account for 62% of global

McNeil, Michael A.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Bottom-Up Energy Analysis System - Methodology and Results  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

World Energy Outlook [71]. The projection of electricity carbon factors is based on expectations of the carbon intensity

McNeil, Michael A.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Bottom-Up Energy Analysis System - Methodology and Results  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

market shares Industrial electric motors activity parametersInitiative. in IEA Electric Motor Systems Workshop. 2006.Standards for Electric Motors in Brazilian Industry. Energy

McNeil, Michael A.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Bottom-Up Energy Analysis System - Methodology and Results  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy-Efficiency Standards for Electric Motors in Brazilianefficiency definitions Product class market shares Industrial electric motorsMotor Efficiency Standards - SEEEM Harmonization Initiative. in IEA Electric

McNeil, Michael A.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Bottoms Up  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Broadcast Transcript: "Bottoms up!" Or, "gan bei," as they say here in China. But what are you drinking? It could either be the authentic 144-proof sorghum-based liquor Moutai, or a clever counterfeit. Moutai has been dubbed the "national wine...

Hacker, Randi; Boyd, David

2011-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

12

Two Paths to Transforming Markets through Public Sector Energy Efficiency: Bottom Up versus Top Down  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Two Paths to Transforming Markets through Public Sector Energy Efficiency: Bottom Up versus Top agencies, reduced demand on capacity-constrained electric utility systems, increased energy system sector's buying power and visible leadership offer a powerful, non-regulatory means to stimulate market

13

Representing energy technologies in top-down economic models using bottom-up information  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper uses bottom-up engineering information as a basis for modeling new technologies within the MIT Emissions Prediction and Policy Analysis (EPPA) model, a computable general equilibrium model of the world economy. ...

McFarland, James R.; Reilly, John M.; Herzog, Howard J.

14

Two Paths to Transforming Markets through Public Sector EnergyEfficiency: Bottom Up versus Top Down  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The evolution of government purchasing initiatives in Mexicoand China, part of the PEPS (Promoting an Energy-efficient Public Sector)program, demonstrates the need for flexibility in designingenergy-efficiency strategies in the public sector. Several years ofpursuing a top-down (federally led) strategy in Mexico produced fewresults, and it was not until the program was restructured in 2004 tofocus on municipal-level purchasing that the program gained momentum.Today, a new partnership with the Mexican federal government is leadingto an intergovernmental initiative with strong support at the federallevel. By contrast, the PEPS purchasing initiative in China wassuccessfully initiated and led at the central government level withstrategic support from international experts. The very different successtrajectories in these two countries provide valuable lessons fordesigning country-specific public sector energy-efficiency initiatives.Enabling conditions for any successful public sector purchasinginitiative include the existence of mandatory energy-efficiencyperformance standards, an effective energy-efficiency endorsementlabeling program, an immediate need for energy conservation, a simplepilot phase (focusing on a limited number of strategically chosenproducts), and specialized technical assistance. Top-down purchasingprograms are likely to be more successful where there is high-levelpolitical endorsement and a national procurement law in place, supportedby a network of trained purchasers. Bottom-up (municipally led)purchasing programs require that municipalities have the authority to settheir own purchasing policies, and also benefit from existing networks ofcities, supported by motivated municipal leaders and trained purchasingofficials.

Van Wie McGrory, Laura; Coleman, Philip; Fridley, David; Harris,Jeffrey; Villasenor Franco, Edgar

2006-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

15

Energy efficiency and the cost of GHG abatement: A comparison of bottom-up and hybrid models for the US  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy efficiency and the cost of GHG abatement: A comparison of bottom-up and hybrid models marginal cost, as well as a smaller contribution from energy efficiency relative to other abatement of energy efficiency potential and green- house gas (GHG) abatement potential that have been highly

16

Two Paths to Transforming Markets through Public Sector Energy Efficiency: Bottom Up versus Top Down  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

public sector buildings in four provinces to develop a baseline of equipment usage and energy consumption;

Van Wie McGrory, Laura; Coleman, Philip; Fridley, David; Harris, Jeffrey; Villasenor Franco, Edgar

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

China's energy and emissions outlook to 2050: Perspectives from bottom-up energy end-use model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Qin, H. , , 2007. China Wind Power Report. Beijing: Chinachina/ en/press/reports/wind-power-report.pdf NBS (NationalAIS scenarios CIS AIS Wind power Nuclear power Natural gas

Zhou, Nan

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

India Energy Outlook: End Use Demand in India to 2020  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Integrated economic models have been used to project both baseline and mitigation greenhouse gas emissions scenarios at the country and the global level. Results of these scenarios are typically presented at the sectoral level such as industry, transport, and buildings without further disaggregation. Recently, a keen interest has emerged on constructing bottom up scenarios where technical energy saving potentials can be displayed in detail (IEA, 2006b; IPCC, 2007; McKinsey, 2007). Analysts interested in particular technologies and policies, require detailed information to understand specific mitigation options in relation to business-as-usual trends. However, the limit of information available for developing countries often poses a problem. In this report, we have focus on analyzing energy use in India in greater detail. Results shown for the residential and transport sectors are taken from a previous report (de la Rue du Can, 2008). A complete picture of energy use with disaggregated levels is drawn to understand how energy is used in India and to offer the possibility to put in perspective the different sources of end use energy consumption. For each sector, drivers of energy and technology are indentified. Trends are then analyzed and used to project future growth. Results of this report provide valuable inputs to the elaboration of realistic energy efficiency scenarios.

de la Rue du Can, Stephane; McNeil, Michael; Sathaye, Jayant

2009-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

19

Bottom Up and Country Led: A New Framework for Climate Action | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectricEnergyCTBarre BiomassTHIS PAGEFairfield(CTI PFAN) | Open

20

Healthcare Energy End-Use Monitoring  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

NREL partnered with two hospitals (MGH and SUNY UMU) to collect data on the energy used for multiple thermal and electrical end-use categories, including preheat, heating, and reheat; humidification; service water heating; cooling; fans; pumps; lighting; and select plug and process loads. Additional data from medical office buildings were provided for an analysis focused on plug loads. Facility managers, energy managers, and engineers in the healthcare sector will be able to use these results to more effectively prioritize and refine the scope of investments in new metering and energy audits.

Sheppy, M.; Pless, S.; Kung, F.

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bottom-up energy end-use" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Assessment of Historic Trend in Mobility and Energy Use in India Transportation Sector Using Bottom-up Approach  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Transportation mobility in India has increased significantly in the past decades. From 1970 to 2000, motorized mobility (passenger-km) has risen by 888%, compared with an 88% population growth (Singh,2006). This contributed to many energy and environmental issues, and an energy strategy incorporates efficiency improvement and other measures needs to be designed. Unfortunately, existing energy data do not provide information on driving forces behind energy use and sometime show large inconsistencies. Many previous studies address only a single transportation mode such as passenger road travel; did not include comprehensive data collection or analysis has yet been done, or lack detail on energy demand by each mode and fuel mix. The current study will fill a considerable gap in current efforts, develop a data base on all transport modes including passenger air and water, and freight in order to facilitate the development of energy scenarios and assess significance of technology potential in a global climate change model. An extensive literature review and data collection has been done to establish the database with breakdown of mobility, intensity, distance, and fuel mix of all transportation modes. Energy consumption was estimated and compared with aggregated transport consumption reported in IEA India transportation energy data. Different scenarios were estimated based on different assumptions on freight road mobility. Based on the bottom-up analysis, we estimated that the energy consumption from 1990 to 2000 increased at an annual growth rate of 7% for the mid-range road freight growth case and 12% for the high road freight growth case corresponding to the scenarios in mobility, while the IEA data only shows a 1.7% growth rate in those years.

Zhou, Nan; McNeil, Michael A.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Bottom-up Representation of Industrial Energy Efficiency Technologies in Integrated Assessment Models for the Cement Sector  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Adoption of efficient end-use technologies is one of the key measures for reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. How to effectively analyze and manage the costs associated with GHG reductions becomes extremely important for the industry and policy makers around the world. Energy-climate (EC) models are often used for analyzing the costs of reducing GHG emissions for various emission-reduction measures, because an accurate estimation of these costs is critical for identifying and choosing optimal emission reduction measures, and for developing related policy options to accelerate market adoption and technology implementation. However, accuracies of assessing of GHG-emission reduction costs by taking into account the adoption of energy efficiency technologies will depend on how well these end-use technologies are represented in integrated assessment models (IAM) and other energy-climate models.

Sathaye, J.; Xu, T.; Galitsky, C.

2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

23

Detonation: From the Bottom Up  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Latest Issue:December 2014 All Issues submit Detonation: From the Bottom Up In the nuclear testing era, scientists never thoroughly characterized the properties of the...

24

Canadian Industrial Energy End-use Data and Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CIEEDAC Canadian Industrial Energy End-use Data and Analysis Centre Prospectus and Business Plan as part clearinghouse, part depository, and part analysis centre for energy data on the Canadian EXECUTIVE SUMMARY CIEEDAC ii Executive Summary 1. Background The Canadian Industrial Energy End-use Data

25

Comparison of Bottom-Up and Top-Down Forecasts: Vision Industry Energy Forecasts with ITEMS and NEMS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Comparisons are made of energy forecasts using results from the Industrial module of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) and an industrial economic-engineering model called the Industrial Technology and Energy Modeling System (ITEMS), a model...

Roop, J. M.; Dahowski, R. T

26

Energy End-Use Flow Maps for the Buildings Sector  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Graphical presentations of energy flows are widely used within the industrial sector to depict energy production and use. PNNL developed two energy flow maps, one each for the residential and commercial buildings sectors, in response to a need for a clear, concise, graphical depiction of the flows of energy from source to end-use in the building sector.

Belzer, David B.

2006-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

27

Implications of maximizing China's technical potential for residential end-use energy efficiency: A 2030 outlook from the bottom-up  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

5 4. Efficiency Improvement and Technology5 4.1. Appliance Technology7 4.2. Residential Heating Technology

Khanna, Nina

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

1999 Commercial Buildings Characteristics--Energy Sources and End Uses  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)WyomingSquareEnd-Use Equipment Topics:

29

Development of Bottom-up Representation of Industrial Energy Efficiency Technologies in Integrated Assessment Models for the Iron and Steel Sector  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Adoption of efficient end-use technologies is one of the key measures for reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. With the working of energy programs and policies on carbon regulation, how to effectively analyze and manage the costs associated with GHG reductions become extremely important for the industry and policy makers around the world. Energy-climate (EC) models are often used for analyzing the costs of reducing GHG emissions (e.g., carbon emission) for various emission-reduction measures, because an accurate estimation of these costs is critical for identifying and choosing optimal emission reduction measures, and for developing related policy options to accelerate market adoption and technology implementation. However, accuracies of assessing of GHG-emission reduction costs by taking into account the adoption of energy efficiency technologies will depend on how well these end-use technologies are represented in integrated assessment models (IAM) and other energy-climate models. In this report, we first conduct brief overview on different representations of end-use technologies (mitigation measures) in various energy-climate models, followed by problem statements, and a description of the basic concepts of quantifying the cost of conserved energy including integrating non-regrets options. A non-regrets option is defined as a GHG reduction option that is cost effective, without considering their additional benefits related to reducing GHG emissions. Based upon these, we develop information on costs of mitigation measures and technological change. These serve as the basis for collating the data on energy savings and costs for their future use in integrated assessment models. In addition to descriptions of the iron and steel making processes, and the mitigation measures identified in this study, the report includes tabulated databases on costs of measure implementation, energy savings, carbon-emission reduction, and lifetimes. The cost curve data on mitigation measures are available over time, which allows an estimation of technological change over a decade-long historical period. In particular, the report will describe new treatment of technological change in energy-climate modeling for this industry sector, i.e., assessing the changes in costs and energy-savings potentials via comparing 1994 and 2002 conservation supply curves. In this study, we compared the same set of mitigation measures for both 1994 and 2002 -- no additional mitigation measure for year 2002 was included due to unavailability of such data. Therefore, the estimated potentials in total energy savings and carbon reduction would most likely be more conservative for year 2002 in this study. Based upon the cost curves, the rate of change in the savings potential at a given cost can be evaluated and be used to estimate future rates of change that can be the input for energy-climate models. Through characterizing energy-efficiency technology costs and improvement potentials, we have developed and presented energy cost curves for energy efficiency measures applicable to the U.S. iron and steel industry for the years 1994 and 2002. The cost curves can change significantly under various scenarios: the baseline year, discount rate, energy intensity, production, industry structure (e.g., integrated versus secondary steel making and number of plants), efficiency (or mitigation) measures, share of iron and steel production to which the individual measures can be applied, and inclusion of other non-energy benefits. Inclusion of other non-energy benefits from implementing mitigation measures can reduce the costs of conserved energy significantly. In addition, costs of conserved energy (CCE) for individual mitigation measures increase with the increases in discount rates, resulting in a general increase in total cost of mitigation measures for implementation and operation with a higher discount rate. In 1994, integrated steel mills in the U.S. produced 55.

Xu, T.T.; Sathaye, J.; Galitsky, C.

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

30

Ris Energy Report 4 Interaction between supply and end-use 4 8 Interaction between supply and end-use  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the wholesale power markets has intro- duced market-based pricing for the marginal electricity supply. PricesRisø Energy Report 4 Interaction between supply and end-use 4 8 Interaction between supply and end and consumption is a market issue, in the sense that the market balance is set some time before the physical

31

Energy End-Use Intensities in Commercial Buildings1992 -- Overview/End-Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 633 6221,237 1,471Regional Wholesaleand1995

32

End use energy consumption data base: transportation sector  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The transportation fuel and energy use estimates developed a Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) for the End Use Energy Consumption Data Base are documented. The total data base contains estimates of energy use in the United States broken down into many categories within all sectors of the economy: agriculture, mining, construction, manufacturing, commerce, the household, electric utilities, and transportation. The transportation data provided by ORNL generally cover each of the 10 years from 1967 through 1976 (occasionally 1977 and 1978), with omissions in some models. The estimtes are broken down by mode of transport, fuel, region and State, sector of the economy providing transportation, and by the use to which it is put, and, in the case of automobile and bus travel, by the income of the traveler. Fuel types include natural gas, motor and aviation gasoline, residual and diesel oil, liuqefied propane, liquefied butane, and naphtha- and kerosene-type jet engine fuels. Electricity use is also estimated. The mode, fuel, sector, and use categories themselves subsume one, two, or three levels of subcategories, resulting in a very detailed categorization and definitive accounting.

Hooker, J.N.; Rose, A.B.; Greene, D.L.

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Healthcare Energy End-Use Monitoring | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists'Montana.ProgramJulietip sheetK-4In 2013 many autoThisThe HawaiiNREL partnered with two

34

ENERGY CONSERVATION: POLICY ISSUES AND END-USE SCENARIOS OF SAVINGS POTENTIAL PT.2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

4.50 Foreign LBL 7896 ENERGY CONSERVATION: POLICY ISSUES ANDBarriers to Industrial Energy Conservation 2) The Process ofs·------------- 6. END-USE ENERGY CONSERVATION DATA BASE AND

Authors, Various

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Development of Bottom-up Representation of Industrial Energy Efficiency Technologies in Integrated Assessment Models for the Iron and Steel Sector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Efficiency Improvements in Electric Motors andEnergy Efficiency Improvements in Electric Motors and

Xu, T.T.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Bottom-up Representation of Industrial Energy Efficiency Technologies in Integrated Assessment Models for the U.S. Pulp and Paper Sector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Best Practices in the Netherlands: Top Ten Energy Saving Opportunities. Proceedings COST Strategic Workshop “Improving Energy Efficiency

Xu, Tengfang

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

India Energy Outlook: End Use Demand in India to 2020  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

11% oil, 6% coal, and traditional energy. A survey conductedand Renewable Energy Ministry of Coal Ministry of Commerce &in Figure 10, coal represents the largest energy product

de la Rue du Can, Stephane

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

India Energy Outlook: End Use Demand in India to 2020  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

10. Final and Primary Energy Consumption in the Industry35 Figure 16. Primary Energy Consumption byby end users while primary energy consumption includes final

de la Rue du Can, Stephane

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

India Energy Outlook: End Use Demand in India to 2020  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Institute, “Curbing Global Energy Demand Growth: The Energyup Assessment of Energy Demand in India Transportationa profound effect on energy demand. Policy analysts wishing

de la Rue du Can, Stephane

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

India Energy Outlook: End Use Demand in India to 2020  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

U.S. DOE, 2006, “Buildings Energy Data Book 2006”, Septembersame period (US Buildings Energy Data Book). Over the next

de la Rue du Can, Stephane

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bottom-up energy end-use" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

India Energy Outlook: End Use Demand in India to 2020  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

an estimated total energy consumption of 19 GWh (0.07PJ),to 28% in 2005. Total energy consumption in 2020 in thecan have similar total energy consumption but produce very

de la Rue du Can, Stephane

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Bottom-up Representation of Industrial Energy Efficiency Technologies in Integrated Assessment Models for the U.S. Pulp and Paper Sector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2001. The Energy Technology Systems Analysis Programme (and Institute of Paper Science and Technology (IPST) atGeorgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta. Kramer, K. J. ,

Xu, Tengfang

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Energy Information Administration - Table 2. End Uses of Fuel Consumption,  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 633 6221,2372003of Energy for allExpenditures1998 and

44

Alternative Strategies for Low Pressure End Uses | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists' ResearchThe OfficeUtility Fed.9-0s) All OtherDepartment ofThis tip sheet outlines

45

Energy End-Use Intensities in Commercial Buildings 1989 -- Executive  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 633 6221,237 1,471Regional Wholesale

46

Energy End-Use Intensities in Commercial Buildings 1992  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 633 6221,237 1,471Regional Wholesaleand

47

Engineer End Uses for Maximum Efficiency | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists'Montana.Program -Department oftoTheseClickDepartment ofFeaturing presentersThis tip

48

Residential Lighting End-Use Consumption | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists' Research |Regulation Services System:Affairs,How toDOE partnersAdvance

49

Nanowires As Building Blocks for Bottom-Up Nanotechnology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;Nanowires As Building Blocks for Bottom-Up Nanotechnology The field of nanotechnology/or combinations of function in an integrated nanosystem. To enable this bottom-up approach for nanotechnology-dimensional (1D) nanostruc- tures at the forefront of nanoscience and nanotechnology. NWs and NBs are typi- cally

Wang, Zhong L.

50

Estimates of energy consumption by building type and end use at U.S. Army installations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report discusses the use of LBNL`s End-use Disaggregation Alogrithm (EDA) to 12 US Army installations nationwide in order to obtain annual estimates of electricity use for all major building types and end uses. The building types include barrack, dining hall, gymnasium, administration, vehicle maintenance, hospital, residential, warehouse, and misc. Up to 8 electric end uses for each type were considered: space cooling, ventilation (air handling units, fans, chilled and hot water pumps), cooking, misc./plugs, refrigeration, exterior and interior lighting, and process loads. Through building simulations, we also obtained estimates of natural gas space heating energy use. Average electricity use for these 12 installations and Fort Hood are: HVAC, misc., and indoor lighting end uses consumed the most electricity (28, 27, and 26% of total[3.8, 3.5, and 3.3 kWh/ft{sup 2}]). Refrigeration, street lighting, exterior lighting, and cooking consumed 7, 7, 3, and 2% of total (0.9, 0.9, 0.4, and 0.3 kWh/ft{sup 2})

Konopacki, S.J.; Akbari, H.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Table E9. Total End-Use Energy Expenditure Estimates, 2012  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security AdministrationcontrollerNanocrystallineForeign ObjectOUR TableE9. Total End-Use Energy Expenditure

52

Energy End-Use Intensities in Commercial Buildings 1995 - Index Page  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 633 6221,237 1,471Regional Wholesaleand1995 End-Use

53

Energy Demand: Limits on the Response to Higher Energy Prices in the End-Use Sectors (released in AEO2007)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Energy consumption in the end-use demand sectorsresidential, commercial, industrial, and transportationgenerally shows only limited change when energy prices increase. Several factors that limit the sensitivity of end-use energy demand to price signals are common across the end-use sectors. For example, because energy generally is consumed in long-lived capital equipment, short-run consumer responses to changes in energy prices are limited to reductions in the use of energy services or, in a few cases, fuel switching; and because energy services affect such critical lifestyle areas as personal comfort, medical services, and travel, end-use consumers often are willing to absorb price increases rather than cut back on energy use, especially when they are uncertain whether price increases will be long-lasting. Manufacturers, on the other hand, often are able to pass along higher energy costs, especially in cases where energy inputs are a relatively minor component of production costs. In economic terms, short-run energy demand typically is inelastic, and long-run energy demand is less inelastic or moderately elastic at best.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

The Value of End-Use Energy Efficiency in Mitigation of U.S. Carbon Emissions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents a scenario analysis exploring the value of advanced technologies in the U.S. buildings, industrial, and transportation sectors in stabilizing atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations. The analysis was conducted by staff members of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), working at the Joint Global Change Research Institute (JGCRI) in support of the strategic planning process of the U.S. Department of Energy (U.S. DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE). The conceptual framework for the analysis is an integration of detailed buildings, industrial, and transportation modules into MiniCAM, a global integrated assessment model. The analysis is based on three technology scenarios, which differ in their assumed rates of deployment of new or presently available energy-saving technologies in the end-use sectors. These technology scenarios are explored with no carbon policy, and under two CO2 stabilization policies, in which an economic price on carbon is applied such that emissions follow prescribed trajectories leading to long-term stabilization of CO2 at roughly 450 and 550 parts per million by volume (ppmv). The costs of meeting the emissions targets prescribed by these policies are examined, and compared between technology scenarios. Relative to the reference technology scenario, advanced technologies in all three sectors reduce costs by 50% and 85% for the 450 and 550 ppmv policies, respectively. The 450 ppmv policy is more stringent and imposes higher costs than the 550 ppmv policy; as a result, the magnitude of the economic value of energy efficiency is four times greater for the 450 ppmv policy than the 550 ppmv policy. While they substantially reduce the costs of meeting emissions requirements, advanced end-use technologies do not lead to greenhouse gas stabilization without a carbon policy. This is due mostly to the effects of increasing service demands over time, the high consumption of fossil fuels in the electricity sector, and the use of unconventional feedstocks in the liquid fuel refining sector. Of the three end-use sectors, advanced transportation technologies have the greatest potential to reduce costs of meeting carbon policy requirements. Services in the buildings and industrial sectors can often be supplied by technologies that consume low-emissions fuels such as biomass or, in policy cases, electricity. Passenger transportation, in contrast, is especially unresponsive to climate policies, as the fuel costs are small compared to the time value of transportation and vehicle capital and operating costs. Delaying the transition from reference to advanced technologies by 15 years increases the costs of meeting 450 ppmv stabilization emissions requirements by 21%, but the costs are still 39% lower than the costs assuming reference technology. The report provides a detailed description of the end-use technology scenarios and provides a thorough analysis of the results. Assumptions are documented in the Appendix.

Kyle, G. Page; Smith, Steven J.; Clarke, Leon E.; Kim, Son H.; Wise, Marshall A.

2007-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

55

Development of an Energy Savings Benchmark for All Residential End-Uses: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To track progress toward aggressive multi-year whole-house energy savings goals of 40-70% and onsite power production of up to 30%, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Residential Buildings Program and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) developed the Building America Research Benchmark in 2003. The Benchmark is generally consistent with mid-1990s standard practice, as reflected in the Home Energy Rating System (HERS) Technical Guidelines, with additional definitions that allow the analyst to evaluate all residential end-uses, an extension of the traditional HERS rating approach that focuses on space conditioning and hot water. A series of user profiles, intended to represent the behavior of a''standard'' set of occupants, was created for use in conjunction with the Benchmark. Finally, a set of tools was developed by NREL and other Building America partners to help analysts compare whole-house energy use for a Prototype house to the Benchmark in a fair and consistent manner.

Hendron, R.; Anderson, R.; Christensen, C.; Eastment, M.; Reeves, P.

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Bottom-up graphene nanoribbon field-effect transistors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recently developed processes have enabled bottom-up chemical synthesis of graphene nanoribbons (GNRs) with precise atomic structure. These GNRs are ideal candidates for electronic devices because of their uniformity, extremely narrow width below 1?nm, atomically perfect edge structure, and desirable electronic properties. Here, we demonstrate nano-scale chemically synthesized GNR field-effect transistors, made possible by development of a reliable layer transfer process. We observe strong environmental sensitivity and unique transport behavior characteristic of sub-1?nm width GNRs.

Bennett, Patrick B. [Applied Science and Technology, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States) [Applied Science and Technology, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Pedramrazi, Zahra [Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)] [Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Madani, Ali [Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)] [Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Chen, Yen-Chia; Crommie, Michael F. [Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States) [Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratories, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Oteyza, Dimas G. de [Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States) [Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Centro de Física de Materiales CSIC/UPV-EHU-Materials Physics Center, San Sebastián E-20018 (Spain); Chen, Chen [Department of Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)] [Department of Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Fischer, Felix R. [Department of Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States) [Department of Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratories, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Bokor, Jeffrey, E-mail: jbokor@eecs.berkeley.edu [Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States) [Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratories, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

2013-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

57

Estimates of Energy Consumption by Building Type and End Use at U.S. Army Installations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

4. Figure 5-5. 1993 Electricity Consumption Estimates by EndkWh/ft ) 1993 Electricity Consumption Estimates by End Useof Total) 1993 Electricity Consumption Estimates by End Use

Konopacki, S.J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Data on energy end-use patterns and energy efficiencies in major CO sub 2 emitting countries  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is a report of the basic data regarding energy end-uses and efficiencies in major CO{sub 2} emitting countries. The task is part of the multi-lab carbon dioxide energy system research program. Fossil energy production and use are the largest anthropogenic source of CO{sub 2} emissions. To gain an insight into the relationship between CO{sub 2} emission and energy use, the global energy consumption patterns and the changing energy efficiencies must be better analyzed and understood. This work attempts to collect and organize the data on energy use and energy efficiency for the ten major CO{sub 2} emitting countries: USA, USSR, the People's Republic of China, Japan, the Federal Republic of Germany, the United Kingdom, France, Canada, Italy, and Australia. A wide variety of information sources have been examined. The data base is presented in tabular format. It is documented by three main parts, the first shows the total final energy consumption by fuel type and end-use sector for each nation. The second shows the detailed energy use by fuel type and function for each end-use sector: residential, commercial, transportation and industrial. The third part shows the country-specific energy balances for electricity generation and use. The data base is a living document and will be updated as additional information becomes available. The data base is to be used to accomplish the ultimate objective of improving the reliability of future CO{sub 2}-emissions estimates. 7 refs., 12 tabs.

Cheng, Hsing C.

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Public Health Benefits of End-Use Electrical Energy Efficiency in California: An Exploratory Study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study assesses for California how increasing end-use electrical energy efficiency from installing residential insulation impacts exposures and disease burden from power-plant pollutant emissions. Installation of fiberglass attic insulation in the nearly 3 million electricity-heated homes throughout California is used as a case study. The pollutants nitrous oxides (NO{sub x}), sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}), fine particulate matter (PM2.5), benzo(a)pyrene, benzene, and naphthalene are selected for the assessment. Exposure is characterized separately for rural and urban environments using the CalTOX model, which is a key input to the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Tool for the Reduction and Assessment of Chemicals and other environmental Impacts (TRACI). The output of CalTOX provides for urban and rural populations emissions-to-intake factors, which are expressed as an individual intake fraction (iFi). The typical iFi from power plant emissions are on the order of 10{sup -13} (g intake per g emitted) in urban and rural regions. The cumulative (rural and urban) product of emissions, population, and iFi is combined with toxic effects factors to determine human damage factors (HDFs). HDF are expressed as disability adjusted life years (DALYs) per kilogram pollutant emitted. The HDF approach is applied to the insulation case study. Upgrading existing residential insulation to US Department of Energy (DOE) recommended levels eliminates over the assmned 50-year lifetime of the insulation an estimated 1000 DALYs from power-plant emissions per million tonne (Mt) of insulation installed, mostly from the elimination of PM2.5 emissions. In comparison, the estimated burden from the manufacture of this insulation in DALYs per Mt is roughly four orders of magnitude lower than that avoided.

McKone, Thomas E.; Lobscheid, A.B.

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Measured commercial load shapes and energy-use intensities and validation of the LBL end-use disaggregation algorithm  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Southern California Edison Company (SCE) has conducted an extensive metering project in which electricity end use in 53 commercial buildings in Southern California has been measured. The building types monitored include offices, retail stores, groceries, restaurants, and warehouses. One year (June 1989 through May 1990) of the SCE measured hourly end-use data are reviewed in this report. Annual whole-building and end-use energy use intensities (EUIs) and monthly load shapes (LSs) have been calculated for the different building types based on the monitored data. This report compares the monitored buildings' EUIs and LSs to EUIs and LSs determined using whole-building load data and the End-Use Disaggregation Algorithm (EDA). Two sets of EDA determined EUIs and LSs are compared to the monitored data values. The data sets represent: (1) average buildings in the SCE service territory and (2) specific buildings that were monitored.

Akbari, H.; Rainer, L.; Heinemeier, K.; Huang, J.; Franconi, E.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bottom-up energy end-use" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

A Bottom-Up Approach to SUSY Analyses  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper proposes a new way to do event generation and analysis in searches for new physics at the LHC. An abstract notation is used to describe the new particles on a level which better corresponds to detector resolution of LHC experiments. In this way the SUSY discovery space can be decomposed into a small number of eigenmodes each with only a few parameters, which allows to investigate the SUSY parameter space in a model-independent way. By focusing on the experimental observables for each process investigated the Bottom-Up Approach allows to systematically study the boarders of the experimental efficiencies and thus to extend the sensitivity for new physics.

Horn, Claus; /SLAC

2011-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

62

A Bottom-Up Approach to SUSY Analyses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper proposes a new way to do event generation and analysis in searches for new physics at the LHC. An abstract notation is used to describe the new particles on a level which better corresponds to detector resolution of LHC experiments. In this way the SUSY discovery space can be decomposed into a small number of eigenmodes each with only a few parameters, which allows to investigate the SUSY parameter space in a model-independent way. By focusing on the experimental observables for each process investigated the Bottom-Up Approach allows to systematically study the boarders of the experimental efficiencies and thus to extend the sensitivity for new physics.

Claus Horn

2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

63

" Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ <Information Administration (EIA) 10 MECSPropane PAD2006..........A49. Total2 End Uses of5 End Uses of

64

" Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ <Information Administration (EIA) 10 MECSPropane PAD2006..........A49. Total2 End Uses of5 End Uses

65

2 Large CO2 reductions via offshore wind power matched to inherent 3 storage in energy end-uses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2 Large CO2 reductions via offshore wind power matched to inherent 3 storage in energy end-uses 4 by matching the winds of the 14 Middle-Atlantic Bight (MAB) to energy demand in the 15 adjacent states] We develop methods for assessing offshore wind 9 resources, using a model of the vertical structure

Firestone, Jeremy

66

Energy Information Administration - Energy Efficiency-Table 6a- End uses of  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 633 6221,2372003of Energy for all Purposes (Firstfuel

67

Energy Information Administration - Energy Efficiency-Table 6a- End uses of  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 633 6221,2372003of Energy for all Purposes

68

Table C1. Energy Consumption Overview: Estimates by Energy Source and End-Use Sector, 2012  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security AdministrationcontrollerNanocrystallineForeign ObjectOUR Table 1. Summary:Principal shaleMajor U.S.6:6.

69

Energy Information Administration - Energy Efficiency, Table 6b-End Uses of  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 633 6221,2372003 Detailed200320032003 Detailedenergy

70

" Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ <Information Administration (EIA) 10 MECSPropane PAD2006..........A49. Total2 End Uses of

71

Bottom-up, social innovation for addressing climate change Noam Bergman, University of Oxford  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Bottom-up, social innovation for addressing climate change Noam Bergman, University of Oxford and practice in the area of bottom-up, social innovation could yield benefits if integrated into wider employing new technical solutions, we identify these as warranting more research, policy and support. Bottom-up

72

" Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ <Information Administration (EIA) 10 MECSPropane PAD2006..........A49. Total2 End Uses of Fuel388

73

" Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ <Information Administration (EIA) 10 MECSPropane PAD2006..........A49. Total2 End Uses of Fuel3882.

74

" Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ <Information Administration (EIA) 10 MECSPropane PAD2006..........A49. Total2 End Uses of Fuel3882.5

75

" Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ <Information Administration (EIA) 10 MECSPropane PAD2006..........A49. Total2 End Uses of Fuel3882.56

76

" Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ <Information Administration (EIA) 10 MECSPropane PAD2006..........A49. Total2 End Uses of Fuel3882.565

77

Architectures built using bottom-up self-assembly of nanoelectronic devices will need to tolerate defect rates that  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the lithography process, the high energy associated with shorter wavelengths and the accuracy needed to fabricate1 Abstract Architectures built using bottom-up self-assembly of nanoelectronic devices will need isolation. Simulations show that, for a fail-stop model of node failure, the broadcast connects all nodes

Sorin, Daniel J.

78

Architectures built using bottom-up self-assembly of nanoelectronic devices will need to tolerate defect rates that  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the lithography process, the high energy associated with shorter wavelengths and the accuracy needed to fabricateAbstract Architectures built using bottom-up self-assembly of nanoelectronic devices will need isolation. Simulations show that, for a fail-stop model of node failure, the broadcast connects all nodes

Dwyer, Chris

79

Public Health Benefits of End-Use Electrical Energy Efficiency in California: An Exploratory Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

assessments for the current mix of energy technologies, thenaphthalene. The current mix of energy technologies employedis used to establish the mix of energy technologies that

McKone, Thomas E.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

ENERGY CONSERVATION: POLICY ISSUES AND END-USE SCENARIOS OF SAVINGS POTENTIAL PT.2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

State Solid Waste Management Board Energy Analysis ofto Solid Waste Utilization as an Energy Source. Gordianto Solid Waste Utilization as an Energy Source. Washington,

Authors, Various

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bottom-up energy end-use" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

ENERGY CONSERVATION: POLICY ISSUES AND END-USE SCENARIOS OF SAVINGS POTENTIAL PT.1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

savings due to energy conservation. This report was done4.50 Foreign LBL 7896 ENERGY CONSERVATION: POLICY ISSUES ANDBarriere to Industrial Energy Conservation 2) The Process of

Authors, Various

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Public Health Benefits of End-Use Electrical Energy Efficiency in California: An Exploratory Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for urban and rural electricity energy generating powerurban and rural counties, the reduction in energy generationb) Rural power plants PLANTNAME Jackson Valley Energy Lp

McKone, Thomas E.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Bottom-Up Energy Analysis System - Methodology and Results  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Statement Household Refrigerators and Freezers. 2008. EC,technologies (e.g. refrigerators and freezers are groupedresidential refrigerators and freezers: function derivation

McNeil, Michael A.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Bottom-Up Energy Analysis System - Methodology and Results  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Documents U.S. Rulemaking Documents TSL 4 PHP IncandescentLamps Incandescent Lamps Fluorescent Lamp Ballasts kWh/yrand T5 fluorescent tubes, incandescent lamps, CFLs, Halogen

McNeil, Michael A.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Bottom-Up Energy Analysis System - Methodology and Results  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2008 Water Heater Water Heater Gas Storage Gas Storage GJ/yryr USA MEX DOE, FR 2010 CONUEE Water Heater Gas Storage GJ/yr CAN Water Heater Gas Storage Gas Instantaneous Gas

McNeil, Michael A.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Control Limits for Building Energy End Use Based on Engineering Judgment, Frequency Analysis, and Quantile Regression  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Approaches are needed to continuously characterize the energy performance of commercial buildings to allow for (1) timely response to excess energy use by building operators; and (2) building occupants to develop energy awareness and to actively engage in reducing energy use. Energy information systems, often involving graphical dashboards, are gaining popularity in presenting energy performance metrics to occupants and operators in a (near) real-time fashion. Such an energy information system, called Building Agent, has been developed at NREL and incorporates a dashboard for public display. Each building is, by virtue of its purpose, location, and construction, unique. Thus, assessing building energy performance is possible only in a relative sense, as comparison of absolute energy use out of context is not meaningful. In some cases, performance can be judged relative to average performance of comparable buildings. However, in cases of high-performance building designs, such as NREL's Research Support Facility (RSF) discussed in this report, relative performance is meaningful only when compared to historical performance of the facility or to a theoretical maximum performance of the facility as estimated through detailed building energy modeling.

Henze, G. P.; Pless, S.; Petersen, A.; Long, N.; Scambos, A. T.

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

ENERGY CONSERVATION: POLICY ISSUES AND END-USE SCENARIOS OF SAVINGS POTENTIAL PT.2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Comprehensive Studies of Solid Waste Disposal," Chapter6 ofSystems for Municipal Solid Waste A Technical/EconomicDerivatives from Municipal Solid Waste. In Energy from Solid

Authors, Various

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

art bottom-up methods: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

liquor Moutai, or a clever counterfeit. Moutai has been dubbed the "national wine... Hacker, Randi; Boyd, David 2011-03-30 2 introduction videogame stimuli bottom-up...

89

Public Health Benefits of End-Use Electrical Energy Efficiency in California: An Exploratory Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Natural Gas Kern Natural Gas/Eor Gas Turbine Kern Ag. &enhanced oil recovery (EOR), and NOx and S02 from digesterEnergy Information Agency EOR: enhanced oil recovery EP A:

McKone, Thomas E.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Table E2. Total End-Use Energy Price Estimates, 2012  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security AdministrationcontrollerNanocrystallineForeign ObjectOUR Table 1.NumberRefinerMotorSummary5. Energy6.E2.

91

Letter Report on Testing of Distributed Energy Resource, Microgrid, and End-Use  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the same support to the grid. Figure 1 indicates that 1 MW of storage (provided by a battery or ramping as an Enabling Technology. Subtask 8.2: Use of Hydrogen for Energy Storage Under this subtask, HNEI evaluated the use of hydrogen as part of an integrated storage system with emphasis on the use of hydrogen

92

America's Bottom-Up Climate Change Mitigation Policy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

US Department of Energy’s Transportation Energy Data Book (Davis and Diegel, 2006). Baseline gasoline and ethanol usage

Lutsey, Nicholas P.; Sperling, Dan

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Healthcare Energy: Using End-Use Data to Inform Decisions | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists'Montana.ProgramJulietip sheetK-4In 2013 many autoThisThe

94

Table C4. Total End-Use Energy Consumption Estimates, 2012  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security AdministrationcontrollerNanocrystallineForeign ObjectOUR Table 1. Summary:Principal shaleMajorC3.C4.

95

Energy End-Use Intensities in Commercial Buildings 1989 data -- Publication  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 633 6221,237 1,471Regional Wholesaleand Tables

96

CBECS 1989 - Energy End-use Intensities in Commercial Buildings -- Detailed  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS98,,,1999,0,0,1e+15,1469,6,01179,"WAT","HY"Tables andA 6 J (MillionCubic35775 84 8711757

97

"Table B25. Energy End Uses, Floorspace for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ <Information Administration (EIA) 103. Relative Standard Errors for7. Average Prices1.5. Energy End

98

End-use energy characterization and conservation potentials at DoD Facilities: An analysis of electricity use at Fort Hood, Texas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report discusses the application of the LBL`s End-use Disaggregation Algorithm (EDA) to a DoD installation and presents hourly reconciled end-use data for all major building types and end uses. The project initially focused on achieving these objectives and pilot-testing the methodology at Fort Hood, Texas. Fort Hood, with over 5000 buildings was determined to have representative samples of nearly all of the major building types in use on DoD installations. These building types at Fort Hood include: office, administration, vehicle maintenance, shop, hospital, grocery store, retail store, car wash, church, restaurant, single-family detached housing, two and four-plex housings, and apartment building. Up to 11 end uses were developed for each prototype, consisting of 9 electric and 2 gas; however, only electric end uses were reconciled against known data and weather conditions. The electric end uses are space cooling, ventilation, cooking, miscellaneous/plugs, refrigeration, exterior lighting, interior lighting, process loads, and street lighting. The gas end uses are space heating and hot water heating. Space heating energy-use intensities were simulated only. The EDA was applied to 10 separate feeders from the three substations at Fort Hood. The results from the analyses of these ten feeders were extrapolated to estimate energy use by end use for the entire installation. The results show that administration, residential, and the bar-rack buildings are the largest consumers of electricity for a total of 250GWh per year (74% of annual consumption). By end use, cooling, ventilation, miscellaneous, and indoor lighting consume almost 84% of total electricity use. The contribution to the peak power demand is highest by residential sector (35%, 24 MW), followed by administration buildings (30%), and barrack (14%). For the entire Fort Hood installation, cooling is 54% of the peak demand (38 MW), followed by interior lighting at 18%, and miscellaneous end uses by 12%.

Akbari, H.; Konopacki, S.

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Bottom-Up and Top-Down Processes in Emotion Generation: Common and Distinct Neural Mechanisms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Emotions are generally thought to arise through the interaction of bottom-up and top-down processes. However, prior work has not delineated their relative contributions. In a sample of 20 females, we used functional magnetic ...

Ochsner, Kevin N.

100

Assembly of a Molecular Needle, from the Bottom Up  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAbout theOFFICEAmesApplication2ArgonneAssembly of a Molecular Needle, from

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bottom-up energy end-use" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Assembly of a Molecular Needle, from the Bottom Up  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAbout theOFFICEAmesApplication2ArgonneAssembly of a Molecular Needle,

102

Assembly of a Molecular Needle, from the Bottom Up  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAbout theOFFICEAmesApplication2ArgonneAssembly of a Molecular

103

Assembly of a Molecular Needle, from the Bottom Up  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAbout theOFFICEAmesApplication2ArgonneAssembly of a MolecularAssembly of a

104

Assembly of a Molecular Needle, from the Bottom Up  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to someone byDear Friend,Arthur J. Nozik -Grown byAssembly of a Molecular

105

Energy Conservation: Policy Issues and End-Use Scenarios of Savings Potential -- Part 4, Energy Efficient Recreational Travel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recreation Planning for Energy Conservation. Ecology, VolumeRecreation Planning for Energy Conservation. Inter- nationalMicrofiche, LBL 7896 ENERGY CONSERVATION: POLICY ISSUES AND

Cornwall, B.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Measured commercial load shapes and energy-use intensities and validation of the LBL end-use disaggregation algorithm. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Southern California Edison Company (SCE) has conducted an extensive metering project in which electricity end use in 53 commercial buildings in Southern California has been measured. The building types monitored include offices, retail stores, groceries, restaurants, and warehouses. One year (June 1989 through May 1990) of the SCE measured hourly end-use data are reviewed in this report. Annual whole-building and end-use energy use intensities (EUIs) and monthly load shapes (LSs) have been calculated for the different building types based on the monitored data. This report compares the monitored buildings` EUIs and LSs to EUIs and LSs determined using whole-building load data and the End-Use Disaggregation Algorithm (EDA). Two sets of EDA determined EUIs and LSs are compared to the monitored data values. The data sets represent: (1) average buildings in the SCE service territory and (2) specific buildings that were monitored.

Akbari, H.; Rainer, L.; Heinemeier, K.; Huang, J.; Franconi, E.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Integrated estimation of commercial sector end-use load shapes and energy use intensities in the PG&E service area  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project represents a unique research effort to address the commercial sector end-use energy forecasting data needs of the Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG&E) and the California Energy Commission (CEC). The object of the project was to develop an updated set of commercial sector end-use energy use intensity (EUI) data that has been fully reconciled with measured data. The research was conducted in two stages. First, we developed reconciled electricity end-use EUIs and load shapes for each of the 11 building types in the inland and coastal regions of the PG&E service territory using information collected in 1986. Second, we developed procedures to translate these results into a consistent set of commercial sector forecasting model inputs recognizing the separate modeling conventions used by PG&E and CEC. EUIs have been developed for: II commercial building types; up to 10 end uses; up to 3 fuel types; 2 and 5 subservice territory forecasting regions (as specified by the PG&E and CEC forecasting models, respectively); and up to 2 distinct vintages corresponding to the period prior to and immediately following the adoption of the first generation of California building and equipment standards. For the electricity end uses, 36 sets of daily load shapes have been developed representing average weekday, average weekend, and peak weekday electricity use for each month of the year by building type for both the inland and coastal climate zones.

Akbari, H.; Eto, J.; Konopacki, S.; Afzal, A.; Heinemeier, K.; Rainer, L.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

TOP-DOWN/BOTTOM-UP APPROACH FOR DEVELOPING SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT INDICATORS FOR MINING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: APPLICATION TO THE ARLIT URANIUM MINES (NIGER) A. Chamareta)b) , M. O'Connor a) and G. Récoché b) a, undertaken at the Arlit uranium mines in Niger. Our objective was to define indicators that are understood1 TOP-DOWN/BOTTOM-UP APPROACH FOR DEVELOPING SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT INDICATORS FOR MINING

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

109

Programmable Self-Assembly Control of Concurrent Systems From the Bottom Up  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Programmable Self-Assembly Control of Concurrent Systems From the Bottom Up Eric Klavins Self-assembly. Self-assembly is ubiquitous in nature. For example, virus capsids, cell membranes, and tissues are all self-assembled from smaller com- ponents in a completely distributed fashion. Self-assembly

110

Bottom-Up Self-Organization of Unpredictable Demand and Supply under Decentralized Power Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, distributed power production at lower voltage levels (through wind turbines or solar panels) is considered, as this depends on external environmental conditions (e.g. solar and wind power). In Electrical EngineeringBottom-Up Self-Organization of Unpredictable Demand and Supply under Decentralized Power Management

Wedde, Horst F.

111

An integrated top-down and bottom-up strategy for characterization protein isoforms and modifications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Bottom-up and top-down strategies are two commonly used methods for mass spectrometry (MS) based protein identification; each method has its own advantages and disadvantages. In this chapter, we describe an integrated top-down and bottom-up approach facilitated by concurrent liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) analysis and fraction collection for comprehensive high-throughput intact protein profiling. The approach employs a high resolution reversed phase (RP) LC separation coupled with LC eluent fraction collection and concurrent on-line MS with a high field (12 Tesla) Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR) mass spectrometer. Protein elusion profiles and tentative modified protein identification are made using detected intact protein mass in conjunction with bottom-up protein identifications from the enzymatic digestion and analysis of corresponding LC fractions. Specific proteins of biological interest are incorporated into a target ion list for subsequent off-line gas-phase fragmentation that uses an aliquot of the original collected LC fraction, an aliquot of which was also used for bottom-up analysis.

Wu, Si; Tolic, Nikola; Tian, Zhixin; Robinson, Errol W.; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana

2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

112

A bottom-up analysis of including aviation within theEU's Emissions Trading Scheme  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A bottom-up analysis of including aviation within theEU's Emissions Trading Scheme Alice Bows-up analysis of including aviation within the EU's Emissions Trading Scheme Alice Bows & Kevin Anderson Tyndall's emissions trading scheme. Results indicate that unless the scheme adopts both an early baseline year

Watson, Andrew

113

End-use taxes: Current EIA practices  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There are inconsistencies in the EIA published end-use price data with respect to Federal, state, and local government sales and excise taxes; some publications include end-use taxes and others do not. The reason for including these taxes in end-use energy prices is to provide consistent and accurate information on the total cost of energy purchased by the final consumer. Preliminary estimates are made of the effect on prices (bias) reported in SEPER (State Energy Price and Expenditure Report) resulting from the inconsistent treatment of taxes. EIA has undertaken several actions to enhance the reporting of end-use energy prices.

Not Available

1994-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

114

A bottom up approach to on-road CO2 emissions estimates: improved spatial accuracy and applications for regional  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A bottom up approach to on-road CO2 emissions estimates: improved spatial accuracy and applications Environment Environmental Science & Technology #12;1 A bottom up approach to on-road CO2 emissions estimates-road transportation is responsible for 28% of all U.S. fossil-fuel CO2 emissions. Mapping vehicle emissions

Wing, Ian Sue

115

Large CO2 reductions via offshore wind power matched to inherent storage in energy end-uses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the Middle-Atlantic Bight (MAB) to energy demand in the adjacent states (Massachusetts through North Carolina exceeding the region's current summed demand for 73 GW of electricity, 29 GW of light vehicle fuels (now; Gregory et al., 2004; Thomas et al., 2004] increasingly appear to require a response faster than

Jacobson, Mark

116

Power applications of high-temperature superconductivity: Variable speed motors, current switches, and energy storage for end use  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to conduct joint research and development activities related to certain electric power applications of high-temperature superconductivity (HTS). The new superconductors may allow development of an energy-efficient switch to control current to variable speed motors, superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) systems, and other power conversion equipment. Motor types that were considered include induction, permanent magnet, and superconducting ac motors. Because it is impractical to experimentally alter certain key design elements in radial-gap motors, experiments were conducted on an axial field superconducting motor prototype using 4 NbTi magnets. Superconducting magnetic energy storage technology with 0.25--5 kWh stored energy was studied as a viable solution to short duration voltage sag problems on the customer side of the electric meter. The technical performance characteristics of the device wee assembled, along with competing technologies such as active power line conditioners with storage, battery-based uninterruptible power supplies, and supercapacitors, and the market potential for SMES was defined. Four reports were prepared summarizing the results of the project.

Hawsey, R.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Banerjee, B.B.; Grant, P.M. [Electric Power Research Inst., Palo Alto, CA (United States)

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Bottom-up superconducting and Josephson junction devices inside a group-IV semiconductor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Superconducting circuits are exceptionally flexible, enabling many different devices from sensors to quantum computers. Separately, epitaxial semiconductor devices such as spin qubits in silicon offer more limited device variation but extraordinary quantum properties for a solid-state system. It might be possible to merge the two approaches, making single-crystal superconducting devices out of a semiconductor by utilizing the latest atomistic fabrication techniques. Here we propose superconducting devices made from precision hole-doped regions within a silicon (or germanium) single crystal. We analyze the properties of this superconducting semiconductor and show that practical superconducting wires, Josephson tunnel junctions or weak links, superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs), and qubits are feasible. This work motivates the pursuit of "bottom-up" superconductivity for improved or fundamentally different technology and physics.

Yun-Pil Shim; Charles Tahan

2014-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

118

Energy Conservation Policy Issues and End-Use Scenarios of Savings Potential--Part 5. Energy Efficient Buildings: The Cause of Litigation Against Energy Conservation Building Codes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LITIGATION AGAINST ENERGY CONSERVATION BUILDING CODES I TWO-OF LITIGATION AGAINST ENERGY CONSERVATION BUILDING CODESDIFFERENT PURPOSES OF ENERGY CONSERVATION BUILDING CODES B.

Benenson, P.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

End Use and Fuel Certification  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Breakout Session 2: Frontiers and Horizons Session 2–B: End Use and Fuel Certification John Eichberger, Vice President of Government Relations, National Association for Convenience Stores

120

Energy Conservation Policy Issues and End-Use Scenarios of Savings Potential--Part 5. Energy Efficient Buildings: The Cause of Litigation Against Energy Conservation Building Codes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Impact Evaluation of New York State Energy Code (ASHRAE 90-N.Y. , N.Y. : New York State Energy Research and DevelopmentJ. "New York Puts Together Its Own State Energy Policy and

Benenson, P.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bottom-up energy end-use" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Energy Conservation Policy Issues and End-Use Scenarios of Savings Potential--Part 5. Energy Efficient Buildings: The Cause of Litigation Against Energy Conservation Building Codes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

could be persuaded that energy efficient design is a "good"energy savings (Cochran 1978:4). More efficient techniques would include improved conservation methods or passive solar designs.

Benenson, P.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Energy Conservation Policy Issues and End-Use Scenarios of Savings Potential--Part 5. Energy Efficient Buildings: The Cause of Litigation Against Energy Conservation Building Codes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

C. RECOMMENDATIONS MAKE CODES TRULY PERFORMANCE BASED WORKENERGY CONSERVATION BUILDING CODES I TWO-WEEK LOAN COPY I iENERGY CONSERVATION BUILDING CODES INTRODUCTION DIFFERENT

Benenson, P.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Energy Conservation Policy Issues and End-Use Scenarios of Savings Potential--Part 5. Energy Efficient Buildings: The Cause of Litigation Against Energy Conservation Building Codes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

New York State Energy Code (ASHRAE 90-75) on Office Buildinga model code known as ASHRAE 90-75. Codes based on thisthe lighting section of ASHRAE 90-75 (Los Angeles Federal

Benenson, P.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

www.sciencemag.org SCIENCE VOL 313 22 SEPTEMBER 2006 1737 Top-Down Vs. Bottom-Up  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for nutrients or pri- mary production in nearshore kelp forests and despite evidence to the contrary [e.g., (9www.sciencemag.org SCIENCE VOL 313 22 SEPTEMBER 2006 1737 Top-Down Vs. Bottom-Up Effects in Kelp Forests IN THEIR REPORT "STRONG TOP-DOWN CON- trol in southern California kelp forest ecosystems" (26 May

Edwards, Matthew

125

A Top-down and Bottom-up look at Emissions Abatement in Germany in response to the EU ETS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper uses top-down trend analysis and a bottom-up power sector model to define upper and lower boundaries on abatement in Germany in the first phase of the EU Emissions Trading Scheme (2005-2007). Long-term trend ...

Feilhauer, Stephan M. (Stephan Marvin)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Teaching application-orientated mathematics and developing didactic from the bottom up Regina Puscher and Rdiger Vernay  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

261 Teaching application-orientated mathematics and developing didactic from the bottom up Regina the possibilities of didactic development from the bottom, from the work of practising teachers, and illustrate of the MUED the latest developements in math-didactics can be discussed from the view of schoolteachers

Spagnolo, Filippo

127

A Bottom-Up Approach to Verification of Hybrid Model-Based Hierarchical Controllers with application to Underwater Vehicles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Bottom-Up Approach to Verification of Hybrid Model-Based Hierarchical Controllers with application to Underwater Vehicles M. O'Connor, S. Tangirala, R. Kumar, S. Bhattacharyya, M. Sznaier and L.E. Holloway Abstract -- We present a systematic method of verification for a hierarchical hybrid system

Kumar, Ratnesh

128

Two Paths to Transforming Markets through Public Sector Energy Efficiency: Bottom Up versus Top Down  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Table 1. Enabling Conditions for PEPS Success in China andsuccesses and the barriers confronting each, and concludes with several lessons and “enabling conditions”success in China than it did in Mexico. A number of conditions

Van Wie McGrory, Laura; Coleman, Philip; Fridley, David; Harris, Jeffrey; Villasenor Franco, Edgar

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Representing energy technologies in top-down economic models using bottom-up information  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

example (e.g., a 500 megawatt coal fired power plant, or a 1-MW wind turbine). The technologies production may be treated as a single sector with capital, labor, material, and fuel inputs. Continuous

130

Benchmarking Non-Hardware Balance-of-System (Soft) Costs for U.S. Photovoltaic Systems, Using a Bottom-Up Approach and Installer Survey - Second Edition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents results from the second U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sponsored, bottom-up data-collection and analysis of non-hardware balance-of-system costs -- often referred to as 'business process' or 'soft' costs -- for U.S. residential and commercial photovoltaic (PV) systems. In service to DOE's SunShot Initiative, annual expenditure and labor-hour-productivity data are analyzed to benchmark 2012 soft costs related to (1) customer acquisition and system design (2) permitting, inspection, and interconnection (PII). We also include an in-depth analysis of costs related to financing, overhead, and profit. Soft costs are both a major challenge and a major opportunity for reducing PV system prices and stimulating SunShot-level PV deployment in the United States. The data and analysis in this series of benchmarking reports are a step toward the more detailed understanding of PV soft costs required to track and accelerate these price reductions.

Friedman, B.; Ardani, K.; Feldman, D.; Citron, R.; Margolis, R.; Zuboy, J.

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Biomass Resource Allocation among Competing End Uses  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Biomass Scenario Model (BSM) is a system dynamics model developed by the U.S. Department of Energy as a tool to better understand the interaction of complex policies and their potential effects on the biofuels industry in the United States. However, it does not currently have the capability to account for allocation of biomass resources among the various end uses, which limits its utilization in analysis of policies that target biomass uses outside the biofuels industry. This report provides a more holistic understanding of the dynamics surrounding the allocation of biomass among uses that include traditional use, wood pellet exports, bio-based products and bioproducts, biopower, and biofuels by (1) highlighting the methods used in existing models' treatments of competition for biomass resources; (2) identifying coverage and gaps in industry data regarding the competing end uses; and (3) exploring options for developing models of biomass allocation that could be integrated with the BSM to actively exchange and incorporate relevant information.

Newes, E.; Bush, B.; Inman, D.; Lin, Y.; Mai, T.; Martinez, A.; Mulcahy, D.; Short, W.; Simpkins, T.; Uriarte, C.; Peck, C.

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

The Bottom-Up Approach forThermoelectric Nanocomposites, plusƒ |  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energy Usage »of Energy StrainClientDesignOfficeThe 21st

133

Energy Conservation: Policy Issues and End-Use Scenarios of Savings Potential -- Part 3, Policy Barriers and Investment Decisions in Industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on Nu- clear and Alternative Energy Systems ( CONAES) andCommittee on Nuclear and Alternative Energy Systems (CONAES)on Nu- clear and Alternative Energy Systems (CONAES) and FEA

Benenson, Peter

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Energy Conservation: Policy Issues and End-Use Scenarios of Savings Potential -- Part 3, Policy Barriers and Investment Decisions in Industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ct3_ 3.of 6 UC-95c ENERGY CONSERVATION: POLICY ISSUES ANDBARRIERS TO INDUSTRIAL ENERGY CONSERVATION I. II. III.. IV.II. RETROFIT OF ENERGY CONSERVATION EQUIPMENT A. CONCEPT

Benenson, Peter

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Humans Strengthen Bottom-Up Effects and Weaken Trophic Cascades in a Terrestrial Food Web  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Canada, Shell Canada, the Institute for Sustainable Energy, Environment and Economy, the Canadian.pone.0064311 Editor: Jon Moen, Umea University, Sweden Received December 31, 2012; Accepted April 11, 2013 Association, Alberta Tourism, Parks and Recreation, Alberta Sustainable Resource Development, Alberta

Hebblewhite, Mark

136

Enzyme Design From the Bottom Up: An Active Nickel Electrocatalyst with a  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsing ZirconiaPolicy and Assistance Environmental

137

A Computational Strategy to Analyze Label-Free Temporal Bottom-up  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert SouthwestTechnologies |November 2011 Mon,Electrocatalysis |Framework GlobalProteomics

138

An integrated top-down and bottom-up proteomic approach to characterize the  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to someone by E-mail ShareRed CrossAn IridatePrinceton Plasma

139

An integrated top-down and bottom-up strategy for broadly characterizing  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to someone by E-mail ShareRed CrossAn IridatePrinceton Plasmaprotein

140

,"Colorado Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Colorado Natural Gas Consumption by End Use",6,"Monthly","112014","1151989" ,"Release...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bottom-up energy end-use" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Conservative and dissipative force field for simulation of coarse-grained alkane molecules: A bottom-up approach  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We apply operational procedures available in the literature to the construction of coarse-grained conservative and friction forces for use in dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) simulations. The full procedure rely on a bottom-up approach: large molecular dynamics trajectories of n-pentane and n-decane modeled with an anisotropic united atom model serve as input for the force field generation. As a consequence, the coarse-grained model is expected to reproduce at least semi-quantitatively structural and dynamical properties of the underlying atomistic model. Two different coarse-graining levels are studied, corresponding to five and ten carbon atoms per DPD bead. The influence of the coarse-graining level on the generated force fields contributions, namely, the conservative and the friction part, is discussed. It is shown that the coarse-grained model of n-pentane correctly reproduces self-diffusion and viscosity coefficients of real n-pentane, while the fully coarse-grained model for n-decane at ambient temperature over-predicts diffusion by a factor of 2. However, when the n-pentane coarse-grained model is used as a building block for larger molecule (e.g., n-decane as a two blobs model), a much better agreement with experimental data is obtained, suggesting that the force field constructed is transferable to large macro-molecular systems.

Trément, Sébastien; Rousseau, Bernard, E-mail: bernard.rousseau@u-psud.fr [Laboratoire de Chimie-Physique, UMR 8000 CNRS, Université Paris-Sud, Orsay (France)] [Laboratoire de Chimie-Physique, UMR 8000 CNRS, Université Paris-Sud, Orsay (France); Schnell, Benoît; Petitjean, Laurent; Couty, Marc [Manufacture Française des Pneumatiques MICHELIN, Centre de Ladoux, 23 place des Carmes, 63000 Clermont-Ferrand (France)] [Manufacture Française des Pneumatiques MICHELIN, Centre de Ladoux, 23 place des Carmes, 63000 Clermont-Ferrand (France)

2014-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

142

Bottom-up Representation of Industrial Energy Efficiency Technologies in Integrated Assessment Models for the Cement Sector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the NEMA Premium Efficiency Electric Motor specification wasElectric Apparatus Service Association (EASA) (2003). The Effect of Repair/Rewinding on Motor Efficiency.

Sathaye, J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Assessment of Historic Trend in Mobility and Energy Use in India Transportation Sector Using Bottom-up Approach  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a corresponding increase in both diesel and electric trains.Diesel IEA Gas/Diesel Oil Estimated Electric IEA Heavy FuelDiesel use increased from 50% to 64%, and electric train

Zhou, Nan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Bottom-up Representation of Industrial Energy Efficiency Technologies in Integrated Assessment Models for the Cement Sector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

use of the wastes (e.g. incineration with or without energyefficiency of use (e.g. incineration with or without heat

Sathaye, J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Bottom-up Representation of Industrial Energy Efficiency Technologies in Integrated Assessment Models for the Cement Sector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Advanced Concepts of Waste Heat Recovery in Cement Plants”building controls, waste heat recovery or adjustable speedquantities of low grade waste heat from the kilns or clinker

Sathaye, J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Bottom-up Representation of Industrial Energy Efficiency Technologies in Integrated Assessment Models for the Cement Sector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

developers also market ‘fuzzy logic’ control systems, e.g. ,so- called 'fuzzy logic' or expert control, or rule-basedsystems or fuzzy logic is model-predictive control using

Sathaye, J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Bottom-up Representation of Industrial Energy Efficiency Technologies in Integrated Assessment Models for the Cement Sector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

system that runs a steam turbine system (bottom cycle).This report focuses on the steam turbine system since these

Sathaye, J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Bottom-up Representation of Industrial Energy Efficiency Technologies in Integrated Assessment Models for the Cement Sector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

d) heat recovery for cogeneration (d) conversion to dryd) heat recovery for cogeneration (d) conversion from dry tod) heat recovery for cogeneration (d) conversion from dry to

Sathaye, J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

" Row: End Uses;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ <Information Administration (EIA) 10 MECSPropane PAD2006..........A49. Total2 End Uses of Fuel3 End43.

150

" Row: End Uses;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ <Information Administration (EIA) 10 MECSPropane PAD2006..........A49. Total2 End Uses of Fuel3

151

" Row: End Uses;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ <Information Administration (EIA) 10 MECSPropane PAD2006..........A49. Total2 End Uses of Fuel38 End

152

" Row: End Uses;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ <Information Administration (EIA) 10 MECSPropane PAD2006..........A49. Total2 End Uses of Fuel38 End7

153

" Row: End Uses;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ <Information Administration (EIA) 10 MECSPropane PAD2006..........A49. Total2 End Uses of Fuel38 End78

154

" Row: End Uses;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ <Information Administration (EIA) 10 MECSPropane PAD2006..........A49. Total2 End Uses of Fuel38

155

" Row: End Uses;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ <Information Administration (EIA) 10 MECSPropane PAD2006..........A49. Total2 End Uses of Fuel388 End

156

1999 Commercial Buildings Characteristics--End-Use Equipment  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)WyomingSquareEnd-Use Equipment Topics: Energy

157

Table 5.4 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines AboutDecemberSteam Coal Import Costs for Selected CountriesU.S.134 End Uses of Fuel

158

Table 5.5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines AboutDecemberSteam Coal Import Costs for Selected CountriesU.S.134 End Uses of Fuel5 End

159

Table 5.6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines AboutDecemberSteam Coal Import Costs for Selected CountriesU.S.134 End Uses of Fuel5 End6

160

Table 5.7 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines AboutDecemberSteam Coal Import Costs for Selected CountriesU.S.134 End Uses of Fuel5

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bottom-up energy end-use" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Table 5.8 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines AboutDecemberSteam Coal Import Costs for Selected CountriesU.S.134 End Uses of Fuel58 End

162

Realizing Building End-Use Efficiency with Ermerging Technologies |  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion | Department ofT ib l L dDepartment ofList?Department of Energy Realizing Building End-Use

163

Bottom-Up Strategic Planning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Libraries Experience Jeff Williams Tammy Nickelson DearieSmith, Jennifer Tran, Mary Wickline, and Jeff Williams.Jeff Williams (jeffrey.williams@nyumc.org) is Associate

Williams, Jeff; Dearie, Tammy; Schottlaender, Brian E.C.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

The Reality and Future Scenarios of Commercial Building Energy Consumption in China  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

While China's 11th Five Year Plan called for a reduction of energy intensity by 2010, whether and how the energy consumption trend can be changed in a short time has been hotly debated. This research intends to evaluate the impact of a variety of scenarios of GDP growth, energy elasticity and energy efficiency improvement on energy consumption in commercial buildings in China using a detailed China End-use Energy Model. China's official energy statistics have limited information on energy demand by end use. This is a particularly pertinent issue for building energy consumption. The authors have applied reasoned judgments, based on experience of working on Chinese efficiency standards and energy related programs, to present a realistic interpretation of the current energy data. The bottom-up approach allows detailed consideration of end use intensity, equipment efficiency, etc., thus facilitating assessment of potential impacts of specific policy and technology changes on building energy use. The results suggest that: (1) commercial energy consumption in China's current statistics is underestimated by about 44%, and the fuel mix is misleading; (2) energy efficiency improvements will not be sufficient to offset the strong increase in end-use penetration and intensity in commercial buildings; (3) energy intensity (particularly electricity) in commercial buildings will increase; (4) different GDP growth and elasticity scenarios could lead to a wide range of floor area growth trajectories , and therefore, significantly impact energy consumption in commercial buildings.

Zhou, Nan; Lin, Jiang

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Assessment of Supply Chain Energy Efficiency Potentials: A U.S. Case Study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper summarizes a modeling framework that characterizes the key underlying technologies and processes that contribute to the supply chain energy use and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions of a variety of goods and services purchased by U.S. consumers. The framework couples an input-output supply chain modeling approach with"bottom-up" fuel end use models for individual IO sectors. This fuel end use modeling detail allows energy and policy analysts to better understand the underlying technologies and processes contributing to the supply chain energy and GHG"footprints" of goods and services. To illustrate the policy-relevance of thisapproach, a case study was conducted to estimate achievable household GHG footprint reductions associated with the adoption of best practice energy-efficient supply chain technologies.

Masanet, Eric; Kramer, Klaas Jan; Homan, Gregory; Brown, Richard; Worrell, Ernst

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Wisconsin Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30NaturalThousandExtensions (Billion2008 2009 2010from2009 2010 2011

167

Wyoming Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30NaturalThousandExtensions (Billion2008Sep-14 Oct-14 Nov-14 Dec-14Year Jan

168

Office Buildings - End-Use Equipment  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 10,998 9,933 10,998 10,643 10,998through 1996) inDecadeDecade Year-0Year Jan Feb Mar Apr

169

Ohio Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 10,998 9,933 10,998 10,643 10,998through 1996) inDecadeDecade Year-0YearSales (Billion

170

Oklahoma Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 10,998 9,933 10,998 10,643 10,998through 1996) inDecadeDecade (MillionThousandFeet)44Year Jan

171

Oregon Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 10,998 9,933 10,998 10,643 10,998through 1996) inDecadeDecadeFeet)Decade

172

Pennsylvania Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 10,998 9,933 10,998 10,643 10,998through 1996)Decade Year-0Sales (Billion CubicDecade Year-03,660

173

Alabama Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProved Reserves (Billion CubicCubic Feet) Base Gas)1,727 1,342Increases4 16

174

Alaska Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProved Reserves (Billion CubicCubic Feet) BaseSep-14Extensions

175

Arizona Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProved Reserves (Billion CubicCubic Feet)Year Jan FebForeignDecade Year-0

176

Arkansas Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProved Reserves (Billion CubicCubic Feet)Year Jan(MillionSales (BillionYear Jan

177

Tennessee Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProved ReservesFeet)per Thousand Cubic4,630.2 10,037.24. U.S.Year Jan FebYear Jan

178

Texas Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProved ReservesFeet)per Thousand Cubic4,630.2perSep-14 Oct-14 Nov-14 Dec-14Year

179

Iowa Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 6330 0 14 15 0 0 0Year Jan Feb3,151,8872009Year JanNA

180

Kansas Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 6330 0 14 15 0 0Extensions (Billion2009 20106 5

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bottom-up energy end-use" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Kentucky Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 6330 0 14 15 0MonthIncreases (Billion Cubic200941,712

182

Louisiana Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 6330 0 14343 342 3289 0 0 0 0Feet)2009Year

183

Maine Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 6330 0 14343 342CubicSep-14 Oct-14 Nov-14

184

Maryland Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 6330 0 14343 342CubicSep-140.0 0.0Sep-14Year Jan

185

Massachusetts Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 6330 0 14343Decade81 170 115 89Sep-1423,448 28,360

186

Michigan Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 6330 04 19 15 15 15 3 1979-2013 Adjustments -1 04,261

187

Minnesota Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 6330 04 19 15 15 15continues, with theMay65 70320,847

188

Mississippi Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 6330 04 19 15Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug

189

Missouri Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 6330 04 19 15Year JanThousand Cubic0 0 012,199 16,950

190

Montana Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 6330 04 19343 369 384 388 413NewSep-14 Oct-14Year

191

Colorado Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 633 622 56623 46 47ExtensionsYear Jan Feb Mar Apr

192

Connecticut Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 633 622 56623 4623 42 180Number ofFuel2009Year

193

Delaware Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 633 622 56623 4623 42Year Jan Feb Mar1320097,930

194

Florida Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 6330 0 1 0 0 0 1979-2013 Adjustments 0 1 -1 0109,108

195

Georgia Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 6330 0 1 0 058.5 57.1 54.8 49.4Year Jan Feb Mar

196

Hawaii Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 6330 0 1 0 058.588,219 719,4351998 19992009Year

197

Idaho Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 6330 0 1 0Decade Year-0 Year-1ThousandSep-14Year

198

Illinois Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 6330 0 1 0Decade (MillionSep-14 Oct-1444,805 63,652

199

Indiana Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 6330 0 14 15 0 0 0 0 1996-2005. 61,707Year Jan

200

Utah Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProved ReservesFeet)per Thousand28 198Separation 321 601 631New2009 201011,172

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bottom-up energy end-use" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Vermont Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProved ReservesFeet)per Thousand28 198Separation 321Working40 2352009470 609 994

202

Virginia Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProved ReservesFeet)per Thousand28Decreases (Billion Cubic Feet) Virginia58 81Year

203

Washington Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProved ReservesFeet)per Thousand28Decreases349,980 267,227Thousand-657 532 0

204

End-Use Taxes: Current EIA Practices  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines AboutDecemberSteam Coal Import96Nebraska NuclearDecade Year-08/03)1 Eliminating MTBE in3

205

Biomass Resource Allocation among Competing End Uses  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAboutScienceCareers Apply for aCouldBiofuelHelpBiologyB I I O O m m a a s

206

Nebraska Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProved ReservesFeet) Year Jan Feb Marthrough Monthly2. Average8 2009 2010Decade9,141

207

Nevada Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProved ReservesFeet) Year Jan Feb MarthroughYear Jan Feb MarDry NaturalYear Jan

208

California Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002;5,,"I",86,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0000,7,00000,"WAT","HY"5YearIncreases1 -5 2 7

209

,"New Mexico Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New Mexico Natural Gas Consumption by End Use",6,"Monthly","12015","1151989" ,"Release...

210

,"New York Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New York Natural Gas Consumption by End Use",6,"Monthly","102014","1151989" ,"Release...

211

Analysis of PG E's residential end-use metered data to improve electricity demand forecasts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It is generally acknowledged that improvements to end-use load shape and peak demand forecasts for electricity are limited primarily by the absence of reliable end-use data. In this report we analyze recent end-use metered data collected by the Pacific Gas and Electric Company from more than 700 residential customers to develop new inputs for the load shape and peak demand electricity forecasting models used by the Pacific Gas and Electric Company and the California Energy Commission. Hourly load shapes are normalized to facilitate separate accounting (by the models) of annual energy use and the distribution of that energy use over the hours of the day. Cooling electricity consumption by central air-conditioning is represented analytically as a function of climate. Limited analysis of annual energy use, including unit energy consumption (UEC), and of the allocation of energy use to seasons and system peak days, is also presented.

Eto, J.H.; Moezzi, M.M.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Commercial equipment loads: End-Use Load and Consumer Assessment Program (ELCAP)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Office of Energy Resources of the Bonneville Power Administration is generally responsible for the agency's power and conservation resource planning. As associated responsibility which supports a variety of office functions is the analysis of historical trends in and determinants of energy consumption. The Office of Energy Resources' End-Use Research Section operates a comprehensive data collection program to provide pertinent information to support demand-side planning, load forecasting, and demand-side program development and delivery. Part of this on-going program is known as the End-Use Load and Consumer Assessment Program (ELCAP), an effort designed to collect electricity usage data through direct monitoring of end-use loads in buildings. This program is conducted for Bonneville by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory. This report provides detailed information on electricity consumption of miscellaneous equipment from the commercial portion of ELCAP. Miscellaneous equipment includes all commercial end-uses except heating, ventilating, air conditioning, and central lighting systems. Some examples of end-uses covered in this report are office equipment, computers, task lighting, refrigeration, and food preparation. Electricity consumption estimates, in kilowatt-hours per square food per year, are provided for each end-use by building type. The following types of buildings are covered: office, retail, restaurant, grocery, warehouse, school, university, and hotel/motel. 6 refs., 35 figs., 12 tabs.

Pratt, R.G.; Williamson, M.A.; Richman, E.E.; Miller, N.E.

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Monitoring of Electrical End-Use Loads in Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Southern California Edison is currently conducting a program to collect end-use metered data from commercial buildings in its service area. The data will provide actual measurements of end-use loads and will be used in research and in designing...

Martinez, M.; Alereza, T.; Mort, D.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Residential Appliance Data, Assumptions and Methodology for End-Use Forecasting with EPRI-REEPS 2.1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LBL-34046 UC-350 Residential Appliance Data, Assumptions and Methodology for End-Use Forecasting-use forecasting of appliance energy use in the U.S. residential sector. Our analysis uses the modeling framework provided by the Appliance Model in the Residential End-Use Energy Planning System (REEPS), which

215

Residential Behavioral Savings: An Analysis of Principal Electricity End Uses in British Columbia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of residential end use electricity consumption for Britishresidential electricity consumption by end use Apply theresidential end use electricity consumption using a

Tiedemann, Kenneth Mr.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Development of Bottom-up Representation of Industrial Energy Efficiency Technologies in Integrated Assessment Models for the Iron and Steel Sector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

around 8-9% for good coking coal (IISI, 1982). Dryingof steam coal and coking coal to be $15/t (IEA, 1995). This

Xu, T.T.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Development of Bottom-up Representation of Industrial Energy Efficiency Technologies in Integrated Assessment Models for the Iron and Steel Sector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Improved Product Quality,” Ironmaking and Steel making 18(pound Investment,” Ironmaking and Steel making,” Anonymous,Oil Through Sintering," Ironmaking and Steel making Dawson,

Xu, T.T.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Development of Bottom-up Representation of Industrial Energy Efficiency Technologies in Integrated Assessment Models for the Iron and Steel Sector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We assume minimal investment costs for good housekeeping0.002 GJ/t sinter. No investment costs are assumed for this1990). We assume an investment cost of $0.3/t hot metal, to

Xu, T.T.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Development of Bottom-up Representation of Industrial Energy Efficiency Technologies in Integrated Assessment Models for the Iron and Steel Sector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Assessment of Electric Steel making Through the Year 2000,by Injection Technology” Steel Times, October 1994 pp.391-Hanes, C. , 1999. USS/Kobe Steel, Personal communication,

Xu, T.T.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Bottom-up Representation of Industrial Energy Efficiency Technologies in Integrated Assessment Models for the U.S. Pulp and Paper Sector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

building controls, waste heat recovery or adjustable speedoptimizing ventilation) Waste heat recovery Condebelt dryingand optimizing  ventilation) Waste heat recovery Condebelt 

Xu, Tengfang

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bottom-up energy end-use" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Development of Bottom-up Representation of Industrial Energy Efficiency Technologies in Integrated Assessment Models for the Iron and Steel Sector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

building controls, waste heat recovery or adjustable speeddrives in the rolling mill Waste heat recovery from coolingdrives in the rolling mill Waste heat recovery from cooling

Xu, T.T.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

India Energy Outlook: End Use Demand in India to 2020  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

5% of its reserve is coking coal used by the steel industry.imports around 70% of coking coal annually. More recently,

de la Rue du Can, Stephane

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

India Energy Outlook: End Use Demand in India to 2020  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Activity, 2005-06 8India's GDP, with 54% in 2005-06 (MOSPI, 2007b) and is alsoby Economic Activity, 2005-06 GDP Share AAGR (billion of GDP

de la Rue du Can, Stephane

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

India Energy Outlook: End Use Demand in India to 2020  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Efficiency in Electricity Consumption", HWWA Discussionconsumption. Even electricity consumption, which isData Adjustment Electricity consumption from farmers is un-

de la Rue du Can, Stephane

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

India Energy Outlook: End Use Demand in India to 2020  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

8 Table 3. Electric and Diesel Pump Characteristics andhectare by fuel type (electric or diesel pump) in number perTable 3. Electric and Diesel Pump Characteristics and

de la Rue du Can, Stephane

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

India Energy Outlook: End Use Demand in India to 2020  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

s=retail k=electricity, s=private office k=electricity, s==private office s=gov office s=hotel s=other k=electricity k

de la Rue du Can, Stephane

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Energy End-Use Intensities in Commercial Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia,(Million Barrels) Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs U.S.Wyoming ElectricityCapacity ConductorA.Annual/2

228

Energy End-Use Intensities in Commercial Buildings 1989  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia,(Million Barrels) Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs U.S.Wyoming ElectricityCapacity ConductorA.Annual/29

229

India Energy Outlook: End Use Demand in India to 2020  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

rural, k=Kerosene m=rural, k=biogas m =urban, k=LPG m=urban,k=LPG k=wood k=kerosene k=biogas k=electricity k=electricity

de la Rue du Can, Stephane

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Distribution Infrastructure and End Use | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector General Office of Audit Services AuditTransatlanticDirect-Cooled PowerDishwasher:Report

231

Optimizing U.S. Mitigation Strategies for the Light-Duty Transportation Sector: What We Learn from a Bottom-Up Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2005; Energy Information Administration, U.S. Department of0383(2007); Energy Information Administration: 2007. http://0383(2006); Energy Information Administration: Washington,

Yeh, Sonia; Farrell, Alexander E.; Plevin, Richard J; Sanstad, Alan; Weyant, John

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

A bottom-up engineering estimate of the aggregate heating and cooling loads of the entire U.S. building stock  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the amount of commercial building energy usage, particularlycommercial building sector. To compare the aggregated energy usagecommercial buildings. For the residential sector, the total heating and cooling energy usages

Huang, Yu Joe; Brodrick, Jim

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Optimizing U.S. Mitigation Strategies for the Light-Duty Transportation Sector: What We Learn from a Bottom-Up Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

leg/leginx.asp 4. EIA Annual Energy Outlook 2007 with22, (4), 10. EIA Annual Energy Outlook 2006 with Projectionsto the Annual Energy Outlook 2007. Transportation Demand

Yeh, Sonia; Farrell, Alexander E.; Plevin, Richard J; Sanstad, Alan; Weyant, John

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

End-Use Load and Consumer Assessment Program: Analysis of residential refrigerator/freezer performance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Bonneville Power Administration (Bonneville) is conducting a large end-use data acquisition program in an effort to understand how energy is utilized in buildings with permanent electric space heating equipment in the Pacific Northwest. The initial portion of effort, known as the End-Use Load and Consumer Assessment Program (ELCAP), was conducted for Bonneville by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). The collection of detailed end-use data provided an opportunity to analyze the amount of energy consumed by both refrigerators and separate freezers units located in residential buildings. By obtaining this information, the uncertainty of long- term regional end-use forecasting can be improved and potential utility marketing programs for new appliances with a reduced overall energy demand can be identified. It was found that standby loads derived from hourly averages between 4 a.m. and 5 a.m. reflected the minimum consumption needed to maintain interior refrigerator temperatures at a steady-state condition. Next, an average 24-hour consumption that included cooling loads from door openings and cooling food items was also determined. Later, analyses were conducted to develop a model capable of predicting refrigerator standby loads and 24-hour consumption for comparison with national refrigerator label ratings. Data for 140 residential sites with a refrigeration end-use were screened to develop a sample of 119 residences with pure refrigeration for use in this analysis. To identify those refrigerators that were considered to be pure (having no other devices present on the circuit) in terms of their end-use classification, the screening procedure used a statistical clustering technique that was based on standby loads with 24-hour consumption. 5 refs., 18 figs., 4 tabs.

Ross, B.A.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

GridLAB-D Technical Support Document: Residential End-Use Module Version 1.0  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

1.0 Introduction The residential module implements the following end uses and characteristics to simulate the power demand in a single family home: • Water heater • Lights • Dishwasher • Range • Microwave • Refrigerator • Internal gains (plug loads) • House (heating/cooling loads) The house model considers the following four major heat gains/losses that contribute to the building heating/cooling load: 1. Conduction through exterior walls, roof and fenestration (based on envelope UA) 2. Air infiltration (based on specified air change rate) 3. Solar radiation (based on CLTD model and using tmy data) 4. Internal gains from lighting, people, equipment and other end use objects. The Equivalent Thermal Parameter (ETP) approach is used to model the residential loads and energy consumption. The following sections describe the modeling assumptions for each of the above end uses and the details of power demand calculations in the residential module.

Taylor, Zachary T.; Gowri, Krishnan; Katipamula, Srinivas

2008-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

236

Towards a Very Low Energy Building Stock: Modeling the U.S. Commercial Building Sector to Support Policy and Innovation Planning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

World Energy Outlook (IEA 2008), the bottom up models supporting IPCC “economic mitigation potentials” (IPCC 2007), the buildings chapter of the US assessment

Coffey, Brian

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

A bottom-up engineering estimate of the aggregate heating and cooling loads of the entire U.S. building stock  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EIA). 1996a. "Annual Energy Outlook 1995", DOE/EIA-0383(95).EIA). 1996b. "Annual Energy Outlook 1997", DOE/EIA-0383(97).CBECS, and the Annual Energy Outlook) and the Gas Research

Huang, Yu Joe; Brodrick, Jim

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Industrial Steam Power Cycles Final End-Use Classification  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Final end uses of steam include two major classifications: those uses that condense the steam against heat transfer surfaces to provide heat to an item of process or service equipment; and those that require a mass flow of steam for stripping...

Waterland, A. F.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

REFINING AND END USE STUDY OF COAL LIQUIDS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document summarizes all of the work conducted as part of the Refining and End Use Study of Coal Liquids. There were several distinct objectives set, as the study developed over time: (1) Demonstration of a Refinery Accepting Coal Liquids; (2) Emissions Screening of Indirect Diesel; (3) Biomass Gasification F-T Modeling; and (4) Updated Gas to Liquids (GTL) Baseline Design/Economic Study.

Unknown

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Electricity end-use efficiency: Experience with technologies, markets, and policies throughout the world  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In its August meeting in Geneva, the Energy and Industry Subcommittee (EIS) of the Policy Response Panel of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) identified a series of reports to be produced. One of these reports was to be a synthesis of available information on global electricity end-use efficiency, with emphasis on developing nations. The report will be reviewed by the IPCC and approved prior to the UN Conference on Environment and Development (UNCED), Brazil, June 1992. A draft outline for the report was submitted for review at the November 1991 meeting of the EIS. This outline, which was accepted by the EIS, identified three main topics to be addressed in the report: status of available technologies for increasing electricity end-use efficiency; review of factors currently limiting application of end-use efficiency technologies; and review of policies available to increase electricity end-use efficiency. The United States delegation to the EIS agreed to make arrangements for the writing of the report.

Levine, M.D.; Koomey, J.; Price, L. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Geller, H.; Nadel, S. [American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy, Washington, DC (United States)

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bottom-up energy end-use" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Analysis of PG&E`s residential end-use metered data to improve electricity demand forecasts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It is generally acknowledged that improvements to end-use load shape and peak demand forecasts for electricity are limited primarily by the absence of reliable end-use data. In this report we analyze recent end-use metered data collected by the Pacific Gas and Electric Company from more than 700 residential customers to develop new inputs for the load shape and peak demand electricity forecasting models used by the Pacific Gas and Electric Company and the California Energy Commission. Hourly load shapes are normalized to facilitate separate accounting (by the models) of annual energy use and the distribution of that energy use over the hours of the day. Cooling electricity consumption by central air-conditioning is represented analytically as a function of climate. Limited analysis of annual energy use, including unit energy consumption (UEC), and of the allocation of energy use to seasons and system peak days, is also presented.

Eto, J.H.; Moezzi, M.M.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

" Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ <Information Administration (EIA) 10 MECSPropane PAD2006..........A49. Total2 End Uses of Fuel

243

" Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ <Information Administration (EIA) 10 MECSPropane PAD2006..........A49. Total2 End Uses of Fuel3 End

244

" Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ <Information Administration (EIA) 10 MECSPropane PAD2006..........A49. Total2 End Uses of Fuel3 End4

245

Residential applliance data, assumptions and methodology for end-use forecasting with EPRI-REEPS 2.1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report details the data, assumptions and methodology for end-use forecasting of appliance energy use in the US residential sector. Our analysis uses the modeling framework provided by the Appliance Model in the Residential End-Use Energy Planning System (REEPS), which was developed by the Electric Power Research Institute. In this modeling framework, appliances include essentially all residential end-uses other than space conditioning end-uses. We have defined a distinct appliance model for each end-use based on a common modeling framework provided in the REEPS software. This report details our development of the following appliance models: refrigerator, freezer, dryer, water heater, clothes washer, dishwasher, lighting, cooking and miscellaneous. Taken together, appliances account for approximately 70% of electricity consumption and 30% of natural gas consumption in the US residential sector. Appliances are thus important to those residential sector policies or programs aimed at improving the efficiency of electricity and natural gas consumption. This report is primarily methodological in nature, taking the reader through the entire process of developing the baseline for residential appliance end-uses. Analysis steps documented in this report include: gathering technology and market data for each appliance end-use and specific technologies within those end-uses, developing cost data for the various technologies, and specifying decision models to forecast future purchase decisions by households. Our implementation of the REEPS 2.1 modeling framework draws on the extensive technology, cost and market data assembled by LBL for the purpose of analyzing federal energy conservation standards. The resulting residential appliance forecasting model offers a flexible and accurate tool for analyzing the effect of policies at the national level.

Hwang, R.J,; Johnson, F.X.; Brown, R.E.; Hanford, J.W.; Kommey, J.G.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Technology data characterizing refrigeration in commercial buildings: Application to end-use forecasting with COMMEND 4.0  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the United States, energy consumption is increasing most rapidly in the commercial sector. Consequently, the commercial sector is becoming an increasingly important target for state and federal energy policies and also for utility-sponsored demand side management (DSM) programs. The rapid growth in commercial-sector energy consumption also makes it important for analysts working on energy policy and DSM issues to have access to energy end-use forecasting models that include more detailed representations of energy-using technologies in the commercial sector. These new forecasting models disaggregate energy consumption not only by fuel type, end use, and building type, but also by specific technology. The disaggregation of the refrigeration end use in terms of specific technologies, however, is complicated by several factors. First, the number of configurations of refrigeration cases and systems is quite large. Also, energy use is a complex function of the refrigeration-case properties and the refrigeration-system properties. The Electric Power Research Institute`s (EPRI`s) Commercial End-Use Planning System (COMMEND 4.0) and the associated data development presented in this report attempt to address the above complications and create a consistent forecasting framework. Expanding end-use forecasting models so that they address individual technology options requires characterization of the present floorstock in terms of service requirements, energy technologies used, and cost-efficiency attributes of the energy technologies that consumers may choose for new buildings and retrofits. This report describes the process by which we collected refrigeration technology data. The data were generated for COMMEND 4.0 but are also generally applicable to other end-use forecasting frameworks for the commercial sector.

Sezgen, O.; Koomey, J.G.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

IMPACTS OF GREENHOUSE GAS AND PARTICULATE EMISSIONS FROM WOODFUEL PRODUCTION AND END-USE IN SUB-SAHARAN AFRICA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the pollution associated with production, distribution and end-use of common household fuels and assess. At the household level, energy is derived primarily from solid biomass fuels burned in simple stoves with poor & African Center for Technology Studies, Nairobi, Kenya ABSTRACT: Household energy in sub-Saharan Africa

Kammen, Daniel M.

248

End-Use Load and Consumer Assessment Program: Characterizing residential thermal performance from high resolution end-use data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is part of a two-volume set describing a series of thermal analyses of the residential buildings monitored under the End-Use Load and Consumer Assessment Program. Volume 1 describes in detail the thermal analysis methodology employed. Volume 2 presents the results of applying the methodology in a series of four distinct analyses: (1) an analysis of the first monitored heating season, 1985--1986; (2) an analysis of the second monitored heating season, (3) a comparison of first- and second-year analyses showing changes in residential consumption with changes in weather and evaluating the ability of the analytical technique to discriminate those changes; and (4) a continuation of the previous analyses evaluating the effects of foundation type and heating system type on the results.

Miller, N.E.; Williamson, M.A.; Bailey, S.A.; Pratt, R.G.; Stokes, G.M.; Sandusky, W.F.; Pearson, E.W.; Roberts, J.S.

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Issues in International Energy Consumption Analysis: Electricity...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

a bottom-up approach in their research paper from the Lawrence Berkeley National Lab (LBNL) in 2009, Residential and Transport Energy Use in India: Past Trend and Future Outlook....

250

Residential Lighting End-Use Consumption Study: Estimation Framework and Initial Estimates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. DOE Residential Lighting End-Use Consumption Study is an initiative of the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Solid-State Lighting Program that aims to improve the understanding of lighting energy usage in residential dwellings. The study has developed a regional estimation framework within a national sample design that allows for the estimation of lamp usage and energy consumption 1) nationally and by region of the United States, 2) by certain household characteristics, 3) by location within the home, 4) by certain lamp characteristics, and 5) by certain categorical cross-classifications (e.g., by dwelling type AND lamp type or fixture type AND control type).

Gifford, Will R.; Goldberg, Miriam L.; Tanimoto, Paulo M.; Celnicker, Dane R.; Poplawski, Michael E.

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Technology data characterizing space conditioning in commercial buildings: Application to end-use forecasting with COMMEND 4.0  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the US, energy consumption is increasing most rapidly in the commercial sector. Consequently, the commercial sector is becoming an increasingly important target for state and federal energy policies and also for utility-sponsored demand side management (DSM) programs. The rapid growth in commercial-sector energy consumption also makes it important for analysts working on energy policy and DSM issues to have access to energy end-use forecasting models that include more detailed representations of energy-using technologies in the commercial sector. These new forecasting models disaggregate energy consumption not only by fuel type, end use, and building type, but also by specific technology. The disaggregation of space conditioning end uses in terms of specific technologies is complicated by several factors. First, the number of configurations of heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) systems and heating and cooling plants is very large. Second, the properties of the building envelope are an integral part of a building`s HVAC energy consumption characteristics. Third, the characteristics of commercial buildings vary greatly by building type. The Electric Power Research Institute`s (EPRI`s) Commercial End-Use Planning System (COMMEND 4.0) and the associated data development presented in this report attempt to address the above complications and create a consistent forecasting framework. This report describes the process by which the authors collected space-conditioning technology data and then mapped it into the COMMEND 4.0 input format. The data are also generally applicable to other end-use forecasting frameworks for the commercial sector.

Sezgen, O.; Franconi, E.M.; Koomey, J.G.; Greenberg, S.E.; Afzal, A.; Shown, L.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Vehicle Technologies Office: Biofuels End-Use Research | Department of  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGYWomen Owned SmallOf The 2012Nuclear GuideReport | Departmentand TestingEnergy

253

Rare Earth Elements--End Use and Recyclability Scientific Investigations Report 20115094  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Rare Earth Elements--End Use and Recyclability Scientific Investigations Report 2011­5094 U outside of China. Photograph by Dan Cordier, U.S. Geological Survey. #12;Rare Earth Elements--End Use materials contained within this report. Suggested citation: Goonan, T.G., 2011, Rare earth elements--End use

254

Technology data characterizing lighting in commercial buildings: Application to end-use forecasting with commend 4.0  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

End-use forecasting models typically utilize technology tradeoff curves to represent technology options available to consumers. A tradeoff curve, in general terms, is a functional form which relates efficiency to capital cost. Each end-use is modeled by a single tradeoff curve. This type of representation is satisfactory in the analysis of many policy options. On the other hand, for policies addressing individual technology options or groups of technology options, because individual technology options are accessible to the analyst, representation in such reduced form is not satisfactory. To address this and other analysis needs, the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) has enhanced its Commercial End-Use Planning System (COMMEND) to allow modeling of specific lighting and space conditioning (HVAC) technology options. This report characterizes the present commercial floorstock in terms of lighting technologies and develops cost-efficiency data for these lighting technologies. This report also characterizes the interactions between the lighting and space conditioning end uses in commercial buildings in the US In general, lighting energy reductions increase the heating and decrease the cooling requirements. The net change in a building`s energy requirements, however, depends on the building characteristics, operating conditions, and the climate. Lighting/HVAC interactions data were generated through computer simulations using the DOE-2 building energy analysis program.

Sezgen, A.O.; Huang, Y.J.; Atkinson, B.A.; Eto, J.H.; Koomey, J.G.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Residential and Transport Energy Use in India: Past Trend and Future Outlook  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The main contribution of this report is to characterize the underlying residential and transport sector end use energy consumption in India. Each sector was analyzed in detail. End-use sector-level information regarding adoption of particular technologies was used as a key input in a bottom-up modeling approach. The report looks at energy used over the period 1990 to 2005 and develops a baseline scenario to 2020. Moreover, the intent of this report is also to highlight available sources of data in India for the residential and transport sectors. The analysis as performed in this way reveals several interesting features of energy use in India. In the residential sector, an analysis of patterns of energy use and particular end uses shows that biomass (wood), which has traditionally been the main source of primary energy used in households, will stabilize in absolute terms. Meanwhile, due to the forces of urbanization and increased use of commercial fuels, the relative significance of biomass will be greatly diminished by 2020. At the same time, per household residential electricity consumption will likely quadruple in the 20 years between 2000 and 2020. In fact, primary electricity use will increase more rapidly than any other major fuel -- even more than oil, in spite of the fact that transport is the most rapidly growing sector. The growth in electricity demand implies that chronic outages are to be expected unless drastic improvements are made both to the efficiency of the power infrastructure and to electric end uses and industrial processes. In the transport sector, the rapid growth in personal vehicle sales indicates strong energy growth in that area. Energy use by cars is expected to grow at an annual growth rate of 11percent, increasing demand for oil considerably. In addition, oil consumption used for freight transport will also continue to increase .

de la Rue du Can, Stephane; Letschert, Virginie; McNeil, Michael; Zhou, Nan; Sathaye, Jayant

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

256

West Virginia Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30NaturalThousandExtensions (Billion CubicCubic39,287Sales

257

New Hampshire Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 10,998 9,933 10,998 10,643 10,998through 1996) in KansasYear Jan FebYear Jan Feb Mar AprDecade,474

258

New Jersey Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 10,998 9,933 10,998 10,643 10,998through 1996) in KansasYear Jan FebYearDecadeYear Jan Feb Mar Apr

259

New Mexico Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 10,998 9,933 10,998 10,643 10,998through 1996) in KansasYear JanDecadeExtensions41 1,039Decade9,290

260

New York Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 10,998 9,933 10,998 10,643 10,998through 1996) in KansasYearDecadeYear JanDecreases264 21 327Year

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bottom-up energy end-use" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

North Carolina Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 10,998 9,933 10,998 10,643 10,998through 1996) inDecade Year-0 Year-18 2.415 - - -Cubic8Decade1,839

262

North Dakota Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 10,998 9,933 10,998 10,643 10,998through 1996) inDecade Year-0 Year-18Feet) New123DecadeNA 3,540

263

South Carolina Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProved ReservesFeet) YearPriceThousandThousand479,741 476,85520 40 6015,008 16,112

264

South Dakota Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProved ReservesFeet) YearPriceThousandThousand479,7416.18 5.69per4,175 4,992 7,530

265

U.S. Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines AboutDecemberSteamYearTexas--StateWinter 2013-14 WellsDecadeCubic Feet)Gulf of Mexico

266

U.S. Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S. NaturalA. Michael SchaalNovember 26,8,Coal Stocks atYear Jan Feb Mar

267

Rhode Island Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 10,998 9,933 10,998Hampshire"RhodeWest Virginia" "Emission Type",.7Decade,735

268

District of Columbia Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 633 622 56623 4623and Commercial ConsumersYear

269

Table 5.1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines AboutDecemberSteam Coal Import Costs for Selected CountriesU.S.13 Offsite-ProducedPer5.1

270

Table 5.2 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines AboutDecemberSteam Coal Import Costs for Selected CountriesU.S.13 Offsite-ProducedPer5.12

271

Table 5.3 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines AboutDecemberSteam Coal Import Costs for Selected CountriesU.S.13

272

U.S. Adjusted Sales of Kerosene by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"Click worksheet9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,,781Title: Telephone: FAX: Last Name: Email:EIA's Today0.5Area: U.S.

273

U.S. Sales of Kerosene by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"Click worksheet9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,,781Title: Telephone: FAX:9,152 8,905 8,967Sep-14Area: U.S. EastArea:

274

Residential sector end-use forecasting with EPRI-Reeps 2.1: Summary input assumptions and results  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes current and projected future energy use by end-use and fuel for the U.S. residential sector, and assesses which end-uses are growing most rapidly over time. The inputs to this forecast are based on a multi-year data compilation effort funded by the U.S. Department of Energy. We use the Electric Power Research Institute`s (EPRI`s) REEPS model, as reconfigured to reflect the latest end-use technology data. Residential primary energy use is expected to grow 0.3% per year between 1995 and 2010, while electricity demand is projected to grow at about 0.7% per year over this period. The number of households is expected to grow at about 0.8% per year, which implies that the overall primary energy intensity per household of the residential sector is declining, and the electricity intensity per household is remaining roughly constant over the forecast period. These relatively low growth rates are dependent on the assumed growth rate for miscellaneous electricity, which is the single largest contributor to demand growth in many recent forecasts.

Koomey, J.G.; Brown, R.E.; Richey, R. [and others

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

A functional analysis of electrical load curve modelling for some households specific electricity end-uses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

domestic end-uses, the development of plug-in hybrid and electric vehicles, the increase of heat pumps heating systems such as heat pumps in new building or which will replace old installed fossil fuels based systems; · integration of new end-uses such as Plug-in Electric Vehicles and an always growing number

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

276

Current Status and Future Scenarios of Residential Building Energy Consumption in China  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

China's rapid economic expansion has propelled it into the ranks of the largest energy consuming nation in the world, with energy demand growth continuing at a pace commensurate with its economic growth. Even though the rapid growth is largely attributable to heavy industry, this in turn is driven by rapid urbanization process, by construction materials and equipment produced for use in buildings. Residential energy is mostly used in urban areas, where rising incomes have allowed acquisition of home appliances, as well as increased use of heating in southern China. The urban population is expected to grow by 20 million every year, accompanied by construction of 2 billion square meters of buildings every year through 2020. Thus residential energy use is very likely to continue its very rapid growth. Understanding the underlying drivers of this growth helps to identify the key areas to analyze energy efficiency potential, appropriate policies to reduce energy use, as well as to understand future energy in the building sector. This paper provides a detailed, bottom-up analysis of residential building energy consumption in China using data from a wide variety of sources and a modeling effort that relies on a very detailed characterization of China's energy demand. It assesses the current energy situation with consideration of end use, intensity, and efficiency etc, and forecast the future outlook for the critical period extending to 2020, based on assumptions of likely patterns of economic activity, availability of energy services, technology improvement and energy intensities.

Zhou, Nan; Nishida, Masaru; Gao, Weijun

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Comparative Analysis of Modeling Studies on China's Future Energy and Emissions Outlook  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The past decade has seen the development of various scenarios describing long-term patterns of future Greenhouse Gas (GHG) emissions, with each new approach adding insights to our understanding of the changing dynamics of energy consumption and aggregate future energy trends. With the recent growing focus on China's energy use and emission mitigation potential, a range of Chinese outlook models have been developed across different institutions including in China's Energy Research Institute's 2050 China Energy and CO2 Emissions Report, McKinsey & Co's China's Green Revolution report, the UK Sussex Energy Group and Tyndall Centre's China's Energy Transition report, and the China-specific section of the IEA World Energy Outlook 2009. At the same time, the China Energy Group at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) has developed a bottom-up, end-use energy model for China with scenario analysis of energy and emission pathways out to 2050. A robust and credible energy and emission model will play a key role in informing policymakers by assessing efficiency policy impacts and understanding the dynamics of future energy consumption and energy saving and emission reduction potential. This is especially true for developing countries such as China, where uncertainties are greater while the economy continues to undergo rapid growth and industrialization. A slightly different assumption or storyline could result in significant discrepancies among different model results. Therefore, it is necessary to understand the key models in terms of their scope, methodologies, key driver assumptions and the associated findings. A comparative analysis of LBNL's energy end-use model scenarios with the five above studies was thus conducted to examine similarities and divergences in methodologies, scenario storylines, macroeconomic drivers and assumptions as well as aggregate energy and emission scenario results. Besides directly tracing different energy and CO{sub 2} savings potential back to the underlying strategies and combination of efficiency and abatement policy instruments represented by each scenario, this analysis also had other important but often overlooked findings.

Zheng, Nina; Zhou, Nan; Fridley, David

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Global warming and end-use efficiency implications of replacing CFCs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The direct contribution of CFCs to calculated global warming has been recognized for some time. As a result of the international agreement to phase out CFCs due to stratospheric ozone and the ensuing search for suitable alternatives, there has recently been increased attention on the DIRECT global warming potential (GWP) of the fluorocarbon alternatives as greenhouse gases. However, to date there has been little focus on the INDIRECT global warming effect arising from end-use efficiency changes and associated CO{sub 2} emissions. A study being conducted at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) addresses this combined or total global warming impact of viable options to replace CFCs in their major energy-related applications. This paper reviews selected results for air-conditioning, refrigeration, and heat pump applications. The analysis indicates that the CFC user industries have made substantial progress in approaching near-equal energy efficiency with the HCFC/HFC alternative refrigerants. The findings also bring into question the relative importance of the DIRECT (chemical-related) effect in many applications. Replacing CFCs is an important step in reducing the total global warming impact, and at present the HCFC and HFCS appear to offer the best efficiency and lowest total impact of options available in the relatively short time period required for the transition away from CFCs.

Fairchild, P.D.; Fischer, S.K.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

279

Service Report Energy Information Administration Office of Energy Markets and End Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ <Information Administration (EIA) 10 MECS Survey Data 2010Feet)PercentCoal1.Report

280

Residential Sector End-Use Forecasting with EPRI-REEPS 2.1: Summary Input Assumptions and Results  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

End-Use Forecasting with EPRI-REEPS 2.1. Lawrence BerkeleyEnd-Use Forecasting with EPRI-REEPS 2.1. Lawrence BerkeleyPower Research Institute. EPRI Research Project Meier, Alan

Koomey, Jonathan G.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bottom-up energy end-use" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Energy for 500 Million Homes: Drivers and Outlook for Residential Energy Consumption in China  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

China's rapid economic expansion has propelled it to the rank of the largest energy consuming nation in the world, with energy demand growth continuing at a pace commensurate with its economic growth. The urban population is expected to grow by 20 million every year, accompanied by construction of 2 billion square meters of buildings every year through 2020. Thus residential energy use is very likely to continue its very rapid growth. Understanding the underlying drivers of this growth helps to identify the key areas to analyze energy efficiency potential, appropriate policies to reduce energy use, as well as to understand future energy in the building sector. This paper provides a detailed, bottom-up analysis of residential building energy consumption in China using data from a wide variety of sources and a modelling effort that relies on a very detailed characterization of China's energy demand. It assesses the current energy situation with consideration of end use, intensity, and efficiency etc, and forecast the future outlook for the critical period extending to 2020, based on assumptions of likely patterns of economic activity, availability of energy services, technology improvement and energy intensities. From this analysis, we can conclude that Chinese residential energy consumption will more than double by 2020, from 6.6 EJ in 2000 to 15.9 EJ in 2020. This increase will be driven primarily by urbanization, in combination with increases in living standards. In the urban and higher income Chinese households of the future, most major appliances will be common, and heated and cooled areas will grow on average. These shifts will offset the relatively modest efficiency gains expected according to current government plans and policies already in place. Therefore, levelling and reduction of growth in residential energy demand in China will require a new set of more aggressive efficiency policies.

Zhou, Nan; McNeil, Michael A.; Levine, Mark

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Calendar Year 2009 Program Benefits for ENERGY STAR Labeled Products  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Administration, Office of Energy Markets and End Use.Administration, Office of Energy Markets and End Use.ICF Consulting. 2003. Energy Star Market Penetration Report

Homan, Gregory K

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Calendar Year 2008 Program Benefits for ENERGY STAR Labeled Products  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Administration, Office of Energy Markets and End Use.Administration, Office of Energy Markets and End Use.Protection Agency: ENERGY STAR Market Share of computers,

Homan, GregoryK

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Public Health Benefits of End-Use Electrical Energy Efficiency in California: An Exploratory Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gas Sonoma Internal Combustion Engine Internal Combustionwhich report internal combustion (IC) engines as technologygas, internal combustion, or reciprocating engines. 3.9 i

McKone, Thomas E.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

ENERGY CONSERVATION: POLICY ISSUES AND END-USE SCENARIOS OF SAVINGS POTENTIAL PT.2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Works Department. General Electric Company Solid Wasteavailable in MSW (General Electric 1975: Determining thein MSW (%) Source: General Electric 1975, Lidstrum 1974,

Authors, Various

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Public Health Benefits of End-Use Electrical Energy Efficiency in California: An Exploratory Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Natural Gas Reciprocating Engine Steam Turbne Cogen Cogengas turbine Steam hlrbine Reciprocating engine WTE Digestergas turbine Steam turbine Reciprocating engines WTE Digester

McKone, Thomas E.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Public Health Benefits of End-Use Electrical Energy Efficiency in California: An Exploratory Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

from electricity generation from California power plants. A-electricity generation capacity comes from coal-fired power plants (

McKone, Thomas E.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Public Health Benefits of End-Use Electrical Energy Efficiency in California: An Exploratory Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

bed and bubbling bed FBe. b Average of all boiler typesbed and bubbling bed FBe. , Because diesel is a distillate

McKone, Thomas E.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

ENERGY CONSERVATION: POLICY ISSUES AND END-USE SCENARIOS OF SAVINGS POTENTIAL PT.1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RDSF), pyrolysis and incineration. Landfilling is one of theRDSF, pyrolysis and incineration--is more economically

Authors, Various

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

ENERGY CONSERVATION: POLICY ISSUES AND END-USE SCENARIOS OF SAVINGS POTENTIAL PT.2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

$(Thousands) b Process: Incineration RDSF Generation OilCosts $/ton(2) a Process: Incineration RDSF Generation Oilprocessing tech- niques. Incineration is clearly the most

Authors, Various

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Public Health Benefits of End-Use Electrical Energy Efficiency in California: An Exploratory Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

plants relying on enhanced oil recovery (EOR), and NOx andAgency EOR: enhanced oil recovery EP A: US EnvironmentalGas Steam Turbine/Enhanced Oil Recovery Internal Combustion

McKone, Thomas E.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Public Health Benefits of End-Use Electrical Energy Efficiency in California: An Exploratory Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

3. Assumptions and conversion factors used to calculate the7human): oral ingestion conversion factor from rat to humanshuman): oral ingestion conversion factor from mouse to human

McKone, Thomas E.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

INTERNATIONAL RESIDENTIAL ENERGY END USE DATA: ANALYSIS OF HISTORICAL AND PRESENT DAY STRUCTURE AND DYNAMICS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

all fuels except district heating. Only for Germany andSweden, and Germany had district heating. The Swedish/German

Schipper, Lee

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Estimates of Energy Consumption by Building Type and End Use at U.S. Army Installations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Irwin Fort Sill Yuma Pg Fort Bliss Fort Sam Houston FortEstimated H V A C EUIs at Fort Bliss Table 5-12. Annual DOE-Estimated Electricity Use at Fort Bliss [GWh/yr] Table 5-24.

Konopacki, S.J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Public Health Benefits of End-Use Electrical Energy Efficiency in California: An Exploratory Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and NOx than natural gas combustion, the result is higherturbine Diesel Natural Gas Combustion or gas turbine Steamand gas turbine Nahual Gas Combustion or gas turbine Steam

McKone, Thomas E.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Energy End-Use Intensities in Commercial Buildings 1992 - Index Page  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia,(Million Barrels) Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs U.S.Wyoming ElectricityCapacity ConductorA.Annual/292

297

Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia,(Million Barrels) Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs Year in Review1,213 136,422 133,442 140,948844Next1 End

298

Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia,(Million Barrels) Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs Year in Review1,213 136,422 133,442 140,948844Next1

299

Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia,(Million Barrels) Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs Year in Review1,213 136,422 133,4422.49 Next MECS7 End

300

Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia,(Million Barrels) Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs Year in Review1,213 136,422 133,4422.49 Next MECS7 End

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bottom-up energy end-use" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia,(Million Barrels) Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs Year in Review1,213 136,422 133,4422.49 Next MECS7 End5

302

Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia,(Million Barrels) Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs Year in Review1,213 136,422 133,4422.49 Next MECS7

303

Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1994 - Derived measures of end-use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia,(Million Barrels) Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs Year2 Macro-Industrial WorkingYear Jan Feb(MECS)

304

Public Health Benefits of End-Use Electrical Energy Efficiency in California: An Exploratory Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Tulare Gas Fueled Reciprocating Cogen Engine Gas TurbineGas Turbine Combined Cycle Steam Turbine Cogen Not Cogen NotGas Kern Natural Gas/Eor Gas Turbine Kern Ag. & Woodwaste

McKone, Thomas E.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Public Health Benefits of End-Use Electrical Energy Efficiency in California: An Exploratory Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Woodwaste Natural Gas Steam Turbine Cogen Sierra Tulare GasGas Turbine Combined Cycle Steam Turbine Cogen Not Cogen NotNot Cogen Cogen Cogen Kern Steam Turbine Steam Turbne Lassen

McKone, Thomas E.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Public Health Benefits of End-Use Electrical Energy Efficiency in California: An Exploratory Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of upper end steam (condensing) turbines designed for largesteam turbines used in industry or e backpressure (non-condensing)

McKone, Thomas E.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Service Report Enwgy Information Administration Office of Energy Markets and End Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ <Information Administration (EIA) 10 MECS Survey Data 2010Feet)PercentCoal1.ReportEnwgy

308

Table B19. Energy End Uses, Number of Buildings and Floorspace, 1999  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative FuelsTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content API Gravity Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History71.7 588.51 " "5. Number of6.9.

309

Public Health Benefits of End-Use Electrical Energy Efficiency in California: An Exploratory Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Phase Ii Landfill Gas Sonoma Internal Combustion EngineInternal Combustion Engine Sonoma Landfill Gas Sonoma a)which report internal combustion (IC) engines as technology

McKone, Thomas E.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

INTERNATIONAL RESIDENTIAL ENERGY END USE DATA: ANALYSIS OF HISTORICAL AND PRESENT DAY STRUCTURE AND DYNAMICS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

cooking tables, only for rice-cookers and microwave ovens.cooking (microwave rice cooker). n) Disposable Income not

Schipper, Lee

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

ENERGY CONSERVATION: POLICY ISSUES AND END-USE SCENARIOS OF SAVINGS POTENTIAL PT.2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Efficiency** Process Process BTU/Ton of MSW Input* RDSF1 - Col. 2; Col. 4 = Col. 3/11.4 Million BTU/per ton of MSWfor RDSF and 9.1 Million BTU/ton for direct combustion and

Authors, Various

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Public Health Benefits of End-Use Electrical Energy Efficiency in California: An Exploratory Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

~Mwe: conversion factor from Btu to MWe-y ( 3.345 x 10- MWe-insulation R-values [fe-hr OF I Btu] for electricity heatedspecific fuel, expressed as Btu/lb coal, Btu/ gal oil, Btu/

McKone, Thomas E.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Public Health Benefits of End-Use Electrical Energy Efficiency in California: An Exploratory Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

location, whether or not cogeneration technologies are used,in rural regions use cogeneration technologies and thisof coal- powered cogeneration plants are not provided by the

McKone, Thomas E.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-08GO28308 Benchmarking Non-Hardware Balance-of-System (Soft) Costs for U.S. Photovoltaic Systems, Using-of-System (Soft) Costs for U.S. Photovoltaic Systems, Using a Bottom-Up Approach and Installer Survey ­ Second & Renewable Energy Operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC This report is available at no cost

315

Characterization of changes in commercial building structure, equipment, and occupants: End-Use Load and Consumer Assessment Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Changes in commercial building structure, equipment, and occupants result in changes in building energy use. The frequency and magnitude of those changes have substantial implications for conservation programs and resource planning. For example, changes may shorten the useful lifetime of a conservation measure as well as impact the savings from that measure. This report summarizes the frequency of changes in a commercial building sample that was end-use metered under the End-Use Load and Consumer Assessment Program (ELCAP). The sample includes offices, dry good retails, groceries, restaurants, warehouses, schools, and hotels. Two years of metered data, site visit records, and audit data were examined for evidence of building changes. The observed changes were then classified into 12 categories, which included business type, equipment, remodel, vacancy, and operating schedule. The analysis characterized changes in terms of frequency of types of change; relationship to building vintage and floor area; and variation by building type. The analysis also examined the energy impacts of various changes. The analysis determined that the rate of change in commercial buildings is high--50% of the buildings experienced one type of change during the 2 years for which monitoring data were examined. Equipment changes were found to be most frequent in offices and retail stores. Larger, older office buildings tend to experience a wider variety of changes more frequently than the smaller, newer buildings. Key findings and observations are presented in Section 2. Section 3 provides the underlying motivation and objectives. In Section 4, the methodology used is documented, including the commercial building sample and the data sources used. Included are the definitions of change events and the overall approach taken. Results are analyzed in Section 5, with additional technical details in Appendixes. 2 refs., 46 figs., 22 tabs. (JF)

Lucas, R.G.; Taylor, Z.T.; Miller, N.E.; Pratt, R.G.

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Residential Sector End-Use Forecasting with EPRI-REEPS 2.1: Summary Input Assumptions and Results  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and the size of refrigerators and freezers; for all otherwhile water heating, refrigerator, and freezer end-uses showas projected by REEPS. Refrigerator and freezer percentage

Koomey, Jonathan G.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Residential HVAC Data, Assumptions and Methodology for End-Use Forecasting with EPRI-REEPS 2.1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Administration. April. EPRI. 1982. Residential End-UseInstitute. EA-2512. July. EPRI. 1990. REEPS 2.0 HVAC ModelInstitute. October 11. EPRI, Electric Power Research

Johnson, F.X.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Calendar Year 2007 Program Benefits for U.S. EPA Energy Star Labeled Products: Expanded Methodology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Administration, Office of Energy Markets and End Use.Administration, Office of Energy Markets and End Use.Total Shipments Star Energy Market Star Share Shipments

Sanchez, Marla

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Sectoral trends in global energy use and greenhouse gas emissions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

values. Figure 7. Global Primary Energy by End-Use Sector,Scenario Figure 8. Global Primary Energy by End-Use Sector,

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Financing end-use solar technologies in a restructured electricity industry: Comparing the cost of public policies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Renewable energy technologies are capital intensive. Successful public policies for promoting renewable energy must address the significant resources needed to finance them. Public policies to support financing for renewable energy technologies must pay special attention to interactions with federal, state, and local taxes. These interactions are important because they can dramatically increase or decrease the effectiveness of a policy, and they determine the total cost of a policy to society as a whole. This report describes a comparative analysis of the cost of public policies to support financing for two end-use solar technologies: residential solar domestic hot water heating (SDHW) and residential rooftop photovoltaic (PV) systems. The analysis focuses on the cost of the technologies under five different ownership and financing scenarios. Four scenarios involve leasing the technologies to homeowners in return for a payment that is determined by the financing requirements of each form of ownership. For each scenario, the authors examine nine public policies that might be used to lower the cost of these technologies: investment tax credits (federal and state), production tax credits (federal and state), production incentives, low-interest loans, grants (taxable and two types of nontaxable), direct customer payments, property and sales tax reductions, and accelerated depreciation.

Jones, E.; Eto, J.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bottom-up energy end-use" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Evaluating Energy Efficiency Policies with Energy-Economy Models  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The growing complexities of energy systems, environmental problems and technology markets are driving and testing most energy-economy models to their limits. To further advance bottom-up models from a multidisciplinary energy efficiency policy evaluation perspective, we review and critically analyse bottom-up energy-economy models and corresponding evaluation studies on energy efficiency policies to induce technological change. We use the household sector as a case study. Our analysis focuses on decision frameworks for technology choice, type of evaluation being carried out, treatment of market and behavioural failures, evaluated policy instruments, and key determinants used to mimic policy instruments. Although the review confirms criticism related to energy-economy models (e.g. unrealistic representation of decision-making by consumers when choosing technologies), they provide valuable guidance for policy evaluation related to energy efficiency. Different areas to further advance models remain open, particularly related to modelling issues, techno-economic and environmental aspects, behavioural determinants, and policy considerations.

Mundaca, Luis; Neij, Lena; Worrell, Ernst; McNeil, Michael A.

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Target Allocation Methodology for China's Provinces: Energy Intensity in the 12th FIve-Year Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Experience with China's 20% energy intensity improvement target during the 11th Five-Year Plan (FYP) (2006-2010) has shown the challenges of rapidly setting targets and implementing measures to meet them. For the 12th FYP (2011-2015), there is an urgent need for a more scientific methodology to allocate targets among the provinces and to track physical and economic indicators of energy and carbon saving progress. This report provides a sectoral methodology for allocating a national energy intensity target - expressed as percent change in energy per unit gross domestic product (GDP) - among China's provinces in the 12th FYP. Drawing on international experience - especially the European Union (EU) Triptych approach for allocating Kyoto carbon targets among EU member states - the methodology here makes important modifications to the EU approach to address an energy intensity rather than a CO{sub 2} emissions target, and for the wider variation in provincial energy and economic structure in China. The methodology combines top-down national target projections and bottom-up provincial and sectoral projections of energy and GDP to determine target allocation of energy intensity targets. Total primary energy consumption is separated into three end-use sectors - industrial, residential, and other energy. Sectoral indicators are used to differentiate the potential for energy saving among the provinces. This sectoral methodology is utilized to allocate provincial-level targets for a national target of 20% energy intensity improvement during the 12th FYP; the official target is determined by the National Development and Reform Commission. Energy and GDP projections used in the allocations were compared with other models, and several allocation scenarios were run to test sensitivity. The resulting allocations for the 12th FYP offer insight on past performance and offer somewhat different distributions of provincial targets compared to the 11th FYP. Recommendations for reporting and monitoring progress on the targets, and methodology improvements, are included.

Ohshita, Stephanie; Price, Lynn

2011-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

323

America's Bottom-Up Climate Change Mitigation Policy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

large conventional hydroelectric power, municipal solidconventional large hydroelectric power). To quantify theby states that large hydroelectric is not counted toward the

Lutsey, Nicholas P.; Sperling, Dan

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

America's Bottom-Up Climate Change Mitigation Policy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

stabilize US GHG emissions at their 2010 levels until thefor US light-duty vehicle GHG emissions under varying levelsUS GHG emissions would be stabilized at 2010 levels by 2020—

Lutsey, Nicholas P.; Sperling, Dan

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

America's Bottom-Up Climate Change Mitigation Policy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and developing emissions trading mechanisms to connect andand development of emissions trading or cap-and-tradesector market-based emissions trading system in the Western

Lutsey, Nicholas P.; Sperling, Dan

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

DNA-inspired materials for 'bottom-up' nanotechnology.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??DNA is a remarkable material that is both an inspiration for polymer nanotechnology and a versatile building block for assembling well-defined nanostructures. To create polymeric… (more)

Ishihara, Yoshihiro.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

America's Bottom-Up Climate Change Mitigation Policy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

large conventional hydroelectric power, municipal solidconventional large hydroelectric power). To quantify thelarge conventional hydroelectric power is not included (this

Lutsey, Nicholas P.; Sperling, Dan

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

America's Bottom-Up Climate Change Mitigation Policy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

US 1990 GHG emissions None 684 US cities representing 26% ofGHG emissions by states sources and sectors 684 US cities,The overall US GHG emissions effect of the state and city

Lutsey, Nicholas P.; Sperling, Dan

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

America's Bottom-Up Climate Change Mitigation Policy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EC (2004). c US MCPA (2007). d RGGI (2005). e WGA (2006). fGHG emissions PTP WGA US MCPA WCG RGGI NEG/ECP Year Fig. 5.Greenhouse Gas Initiative (RGGI), 2007. About RGGI /http://

Lutsey, Nicholas P.; Sperling, Dan

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

1980 survey and evaluation of utility conservation, load management, and solar end-use projects. Volume 3: utility load management projects. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The results of the 1980 survey of electric utility-sponsored energy conservation, load management, and end-use solar energy conversion projects are described. The work is an expansion of a previous survey and evaluation and has been jointly sponsored by EPRI and DOE through the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. There are three volumes and a summary document. Each volume presents the results of an extensive survey to determine electric utility involvement in customer-side projects related to the particular technology (i.e., conservation, solar, or load management), selected descriptions of utility projects and results, and first-level technical and economic evaluations.

Not Available

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Residential Behavioral Savings: An Analysis of Principal Electricity End Uses in British Columbia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Center for the Study of Energy Markets. California EnergyThe Economics of Energy Market Transformation Programs,”and J.E. Eto. 1996. Market Barriers to Energy Efficiency: A

Tiedemann, Kenneth Mr.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Ecosystem Energy-Use Efficiency: Positive Effects of Predation on Productivity Joseph Hakam  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ecosystem Energy-Use Efficiency: Positive Effects of Predation on Productivity Joseph Hakam Brown systems will be able to utilize more of the primary energy source and display higher productivity. While processing as much energy as possible within given resource and growth constraints. Bottom-up and top

Vallino, Joseph J.

333

July 11 Public Meeting: Physical Characterization of Grid-Connected Commercial And Residential Building End-Use Equipment And Appliances  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

These documents contain the three slide decks presented at the public meeting on the Physical Characterization of Grid-Connected Commercial and Residential Buildings End-Use Equipment and Appliances, held on July 11, 2014 in Washington, DC.

334

Residential Sector End-Use Forecasting with EPRI-REEPS 2.1: Summary Input Assumptions and Results  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Richard E. Brown, James W. Hanford, Alan H . Sanstad, andFrancis X . , James W. Hanford, Richard E. Brown, Alan H.place for these end-uses (Hanford et al. 1994, Hwang et al.

Koomey, Jonathan G.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

to totals. Source: Energy Information Administration, Office of Energy Markets and End Use, Forms EIA-871A, C, and E of the 2003 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey....

336

Residential Behavioral Savings: An Analysis of Principal Electricity End Uses in British Columbia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fowlie. 2007. Demand-Side Management and Energy Efficiencyand building shells. Demand side management programs have

Tiedemann, Kenneth Mr.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Significant ELCAP analysis results: Summary report. [End-use Load and Consumer Assessment Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The evolution of the End-Use Load and Consumer Assessment Program (ELCAP) since 1983 at Bonneville Power Administration (Bonneville) has been eventful and somewhat tortuous. The birth pangs of a data set so large and encompassing as this have been overwhelming at times. The early adolescent stage of data set development and use has now been reached and preliminary results of early analyses of the data are becoming well known. However, the full maturity of the data set and the corresponding wealth of analytic insights are not fully realized. This document is in some sense a milestone in the brief history of the program. It is a summary of the results of the first five years of the program, principally containing excerpts from a number of previous reports. It is meant to highlight significant accomplishments and analytical results, with a focus on the principal results. Many of the results have a broad application in the utility load research community in general, although the real breadth of the data set remains largely unexplored. The first section of the document introduces the data set: how the buildings were selected, how the metering equipment was installed, and how the data set has been prepared for analysis. Each of the sections that follow the introduction summarize a particular analytic result. A large majority of the analyses to date involve the residential samples, as these were installed first and had highest priority on the analytic agenda. Two exploratory analyses using commercial data are included as an introduction to the commercial analyses that are currently underway. Most of the sections reference more complete technical reports which the reader should refer to for details of the methodology and for more complete discussion of the results. Sections have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base.

Pratt, R.G.; Conner, C.C.; Drost, M.K.; Miller, N.E.; Cooke, B.A.; Halverson, M.A.; Lebaron, B.A.; Lucas, R.G.; Jo, J.; Richman, E.E.; Sandusky, W.F. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (USA)); Ritland, K.G. (Ritland Associates, Seattle, WA (USA)); Taylor, M.E. (USDOE Bonneville Power Administration, Portland, OR (USA)); Hauser, S.G. (Solar Energy Research Inst., Golden, CO (USA))

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

End-use electrification in the residential sector : a general equilibrium analysis of technology advancements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The residential sector in the U.S. is responsible for about 20% of the country's primary energy use (EIA, 2011). Studies estimate that efficiency improvements in this sector can reduce household energy consumption by over ...

Madan, Tanvir Singh

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Table 3. Top Five Retailers of Electricity, with End Use Sectors...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

NewEnergy, Inc","Investor-Owned",974715,0,653377,321338,0 3,"Unitil Energy Systems","Investor-Owned",778111,491106,231528,55477,0 4,"TransCanada Power Marketing,...

340

Energy Conservation: Policy Issues and End-Use Scenarios of Savings Potential -- Part 4, Energy Efficient Recreational Travel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

arrive by car (Booz, Allen & Hamilton 1974:27). SuchD.C. October. f of Booz, Allen & Hamilton Sensitivity of the

Cornwall, B.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bottom-up energy end-use" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Robust ASR front-end using spectral-based and discriminant features: experiments on the Aurora tasks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Robust ASR front-end using spectral-based and discriminant features: experiments on the Aurora was tested on the set of speech corpora used for the "Aurora" evaluation. Using the feature stream generated and server side ASR processing, a standartization initiative called "Aurora" was initiated within European

Dupont, Stéphane

342

Control Policy: End-User and End-Use Based Part 744--page 1 Export Administration Regulations October 1, 2001  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of items subject to the EAR to defined nuclear, missile, chemical and biological weapons, and nuclear nuclear, missile, chemical, or biological end- uses regardless of whether that support involves the export items for certain aircraft and vessels. In addition, these sections include license review standards

Bernstein, Daniel

343

Distribution Category UC-98 Consumption End-Use A Comparison of Measures  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed Newcatalyst phasesDataTranslocation oftheAmperometricEnergyDISTRIBUTED

344

,"U.S. Adjusted Distillate Fuel Oil and Kerosene Sales by End Use"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: EnergyShale ProvedTexas"Brunei (Dollars per ThousandPriceDryCoalbedCrude OilShale Proved

345

,"U.S. Adjusted Sales of Distillate Fuel Oil by End Use"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: EnergyShale ProvedTexas"Brunei (Dollars per ThousandPriceDryCoalbedCrude OilShale

346

,"U.S. Adjusted Sales of Residual Fuel Oil by End Use"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: EnergyShale ProvedTexas"Brunei (Dollars per ThousandPriceDryCoalbedCrude OilShaleResidual Fuel

347

,"U.S. Distillate Fuel Oil and Kerosene Sales by End Use"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: EnergyShale ProvedTexas"Brunei (Dollars perReserves (Billion Cubic Feet)"+ LeaseDistillate

348

,"U.S. Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: EnergyShale ProvedTexas"Brunei (Dollars perReserves (BillionCanadaNorwayQatarYemenAnnual

349

,"U.S. Total Sales of Residual Fuel Oil by End Use"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: EnergyShale ProvedTexas"BruneiReserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (MillionNatural GasRefinerSales

350

Developing Information on Energy Savings and Associated Costs and Benefits of Energy Efficient Emerging Technologies Applicable in California  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on energy efficiency, energy savings, market adoption, andIndustries End-use(s) Energy types Market segment 2015Industries End-use(s) Energy types Market segment 2015

Xu, Tengfang

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Table 3. Top Five Retailers of Electricity, with End Use Sectors, 2012  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 10,998 9,933

352

Table 3. Top Five Retailers of Electricity, with End Use Sectors, 2012  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 10,998 9,933Montana"

353

Refining and end use study of coal liquids. Quarterly report, January--March 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Bechtel, with Southwest Research Institute, Amoco Oil R&D, and the M. W. Kellogg Co. as subcontractors, initiated a study on November 1, 1993, for the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC) to determine the most cost effective and suitable combination of existing petroleum refinery processes needed to make specification transportation fuels or blending stocks, from direct and indirect coal liquefaction product liquids. A key objective is to determine the most desirable ways of integrating coal liquefaction liquids into existing petroleum refineries to produce transportation fuels meeting current and future, e.g. year 2000, Clean Air Act Amendment (CAAA) standards. An integral part of the above objectives is to test the fuels or blends produced and compare them with established ASTM fuels. The comparison will include engine tests to ascertain compliance of the fuels produced with CAAA and other applicable fuel quality and performance standards. The final part of the project includes a detailed economic evaluation of the cost of processing the coal liquids to their optimum products. The cost analyses is for the incremental processing cost; in other words, the feed is priced at zero dollars. The study reflects costs for operations using state of the art refinery technology; no capital costs for building new refineries is considered. Some modifications to the existing refinery may be required. Economy of scale dictates the minimum amount of feedstock that should be processed. The major efforts conducted during the first quarter of 1996 were in the areas of: DL2 light distillate hydrotreating; and DL2 heave distillate catalytic cracking.

NONE

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

An Assessment of Interval Data and Their Potential Application to Residential Electricity End-Use Modeling  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"Click worksheet9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,,781Title: Telephone:short version)ecTotalnerrSpring:7)An Assessment

355

Microsoft Word - Major end uses front page v2 2015-03-31.docx  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines AboutDecember 2005 (Thousand9,0,InformationU.S. Crude Oil3 1 Short-TermJuly8 11 1 Market2

356

Microsoft Word - Major end uses front page v2 2015-03-31.docx  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines AboutDecember 2005 (Thousand9,0,InformationU.S. Crude Oil3 1 Short-TermJuly8 11 1

357

Microsoft Word - Major end uses front page v2 2015-03-31.docx  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines AboutDecember 2005 (Thousand9,0,InformationU.S. Crude Oil3 1 Short-TermJuly8 11 14

358

Microsoft Word - Major end uses front page v2 2015-03-31.docx  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines AboutDecember 2005 (Thousand9,0,InformationU.S. Crude Oil3 1 Short-TermJuly8 11 145

359

Microsoft Word - Major end uses front page v2 2015-03-31.docx  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines AboutDecember 2005 (Thousand9,0,InformationU.S. Crude Oil3 1 Short-TermJuly8 11

360

Table 3. Top Five Retailers of Electricity, with End Use Sectors, 2012  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 10,998 9,933 10,998Hampshire"RhodeWestThousand CubicYear Jan Feb92 207After

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bottom-up energy end-use" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Table 3. Top Five Retailers of Electricity, with End Use Sectors, 2012  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 10,998 9,933 10,998Hampshire"RhodeWestThousand CubicYear Jan Feb92 207AfterArizona"

362

Table 3. Top Five Retailers of Electricity, with End Use Sectors, 2012  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 10,998 9,933 10,998Hampshire"RhodeWestThousand CubicYear Jan Feb92

363

Table 3. Top Five Retailers of Electricity, with End Use Sectors, 2012  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 10,998 9,933 10,998Hampshire"RhodeWestThousand CubicYear Jan Feb92Colorado"

364

Table 3. Top Five Retailers of Electricity, with End Use Sectors, 2012  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 10,998 9,933 10,998Hampshire"RhodeWestThousand CubicYear Jan Feb92Colorado"Connecticut"

365

Table 3. Top Five Retailers of Electricity, with End Use Sectors, 2012  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 10,998 9,933 10,998Hampshire"RhodeWestThousand CubicYear Jan

366

Table 3. Top Five Retailers of Electricity, with End Use Sectors, 2012  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 10,998 9,933 10,998Hampshire"RhodeWestThousand CubicYear JanDistrict of Columbia"

367

Table 3. Top Five Retailers of Electricity, with End Use Sectors, 2012  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 10,998 9,933 10,998Hampshire"RhodeWestThousand CubicYear JanDistrict of

368

Table 3. Top Five Retailers of Electricity, with End Use Sectors, 2012  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 10,998 9,933 10,998Hampshire"RhodeWestThousand CubicYear JanDistrict ofGeorgia"

369

Table 3. Top Five Retailers of Electricity, with End Use Sectors, 2012  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 10,998 9,933 10,998Hampshire"RhodeWestThousand CubicYear JanDistrict ofGeorgia"Hawaii"

370

Table 3. Top Five Retailers of Electricity, with End Use Sectors, 2012  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 10,998 9,933 10,998Hampshire"RhodeWestThousand CubicYear JanDistrict

371

Table 3. Top Five Retailers of Electricity, with End Use Sectors, 2012  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 10,998 9,933 10,998Hampshire"RhodeWestThousand CubicYear JanDistrictIllinois"

372

Table 3. Top Five Retailers of Electricity, with End Use Sectors, 2012  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 10,998 9,933 10,998Hampshire"RhodeWestThousand CubicYear JanDistrictIllinois"Indiana"

373

Table 3. Top Five Retailers of Electricity, with End Use Sectors, 2012  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 10,998 9,933 10,998Hampshire"RhodeWestThousand CubicYear

374

Table 3. Top Five Retailers of Electricity, with End Use Sectors, 2012  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 10,998 9,933 10,998Hampshire"RhodeWestThousand CubicYearKansas"

375

Table 3. Top Five Retailers of Electricity, with End Use Sectors, 2012  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 10,998 9,933 10,998Hampshire"RhodeWestThousand CubicYearKansas"Kentucky"

376

Table 3. Top Five Retailers of Electricity, with End Use Sectors, 2012  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 10,998 9,933 10,998Hampshire"RhodeWestThousand CubicYearKansas"Kentucky"Louisiana"

377

Table 3. Top Five Retailers of Electricity, with End Use Sectors, 2012  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 10,998 9,933 10,998Hampshire"RhodeWestThousand

378

Table 3. Top Five Retailers of Electricity, with End Use Sectors, 2012  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 10,998 9,933 10,998Hampshire"RhodeWestThousandMaryland" ,"Entity","Type of

379

Table 3. Top Five Retailers of Electricity, with End Use Sectors, 2012  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 10,998 9,933 10,998Hampshire"RhodeWestThousandMaryland" ,"Entity","Type

380

Table 3. Top Five Retailers of Electricity, with End Use Sectors, 2012  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 10,998 9,933 10,998Hampshire"RhodeWestThousandMaryland"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bottom-up energy end-use" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Table 3. Top Five Retailers of Electricity, with End Use Sectors, 2012  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 10,998 9,933 10,998Hampshire"RhodeWestThousandMaryland"Minnesota"

382

Table 3. Top Five Retailers of Electricity, with End Use Sectors, 2012  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 10,998 9,933 10,998Hampshire"RhodeWestThousandMaryland"Minnesota"Mississippi"

383

Table 3. Top Five Retailers of Electricity, with End Use Sectors, 2012  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 10,998 9,933Montana" ,"Entity","Type of Provider","All

384

Table 3. Top Five Retailers of Electricity, with End Use Sectors, 2012  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 10,998 9,933Montana" ,"Entity","Type of Provider","AllNebraska"

385

Table 3. Top Five Retailers of Electricity, with End Use Sectors, 2012  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 10,998 9,933Montana" ,"Entity","Type of

386

Table 3. Top Five Retailers of Electricity, with End Use Sectors, 2012  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 10,998 9,933Montana" ,"Entity","Type ofHampshire"

387

Table 3. Top Five Retailers of Electricity, with End Use Sectors, 2012  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 10,998 9,933Montana" ,"Entity","Type ofHampshire"Jersey"

388

Table 3. Top Five Retailers of Electricity, with End Use Sectors, 2012  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 10,998 9,933Montana" ,"Entity","Type ofHampshire"Jersey"Mexico"

389

Table 3. Top Five Retailers of Electricity, with End Use Sectors, 2012  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 10,998 9,933Montana" ,"Entity","Type

390

Table 3. Top Five Retailers of Electricity, with End Use Sectors, 2012  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 10,998 9,933Montana" ,"Entity","TypeCarolina" ,"Entity","Type

391

Table 3. Top Five Retailers of Electricity, with End Use Sectors, 2012  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 10,998 9,933Montana" ,"Entity","TypeCarolina"

392

Table 3. Top Five Retailers of Electricity, with End Use Sectors, 2012  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 10,998 9,933Montana" ,"Entity","TypeCarolina"Ohio"

393

Table 3. Top Five Retailers of Electricity, with End Use Sectors, 2012  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 10,998 9,933Montana" ,"Entity","TypeCarolina"Ohio"Oklahoma"

394

Table 3. Top Five Retailers of Electricity, with End Use Sectors, 2012  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 10,998 9,933Montana"Pennsylvania" ,"Entity","Type of Provider","All

395

Table 3. Top Five Retailers of Electricity, with End Use Sectors, 2012  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 10,998 9,933Montana"Pennsylvania" ,"Entity","Type of

396

Table 3. Top Five Retailers of Electricity, with End Use Sectors, 2012  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 10,998 9,933Montana"Pennsylvania" ,"Entity","Type ofCarolina"

397

Table 3. Top Five Retailers of Electricity, with End Use Sectors, 2012  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 10,998 9,933Montana"Pennsylvania" ,"Entity","Type

398

Table 3. Top Five Retailers of Electricity, with End Use Sectors, 2012  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 10,998 9,933Montana"Pennsylvania" ,"Entity","TypeTennessee"

399

Table 3. Top Five Retailers of Electricity, with End Use Sectors, 2012  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 10,998 9,933Montana"Pennsylvania" ,"Entity","TypeTennessee"Texas"

400

Table 3. Top Five Retailers of Electricity, with End Use Sectors, 2012  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 10,998 9,933Montana"Pennsylvania"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bottom-up energy end-use" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Table 3. Top Five Retailers of Electricity, with End Use Sectors, 2012  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 10,998 9,933Montana"Pennsylvania"Utah" ,"Entity","Type of

402

Table 3. Top Five Retailers of Electricity, with End Use Sectors, 2012  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 10,998 9,933Montana"Pennsylvania"Utah" ,"Entity","Type ofVermont"

403

Table 3. Top Five Retailers of Electricity, with End Use Sectors, 2012  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 10,998 9,933Montana"Pennsylvania"Utah" ,"Entity","Type

404

Table 3. Top Five Retailers of Electricity, with End Use Sectors, 2012  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 10,998 9,933Montana"Pennsylvania"Utah" ,"Entity","TypeWashington"

405

Table 3. Top Five Retailers of Electricity, with End Use Sectors, 2012  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 10,998 9,933Montana"Pennsylvania"Utah"

406

Table 3. Top Five Retailers of Electricity, with End Use Sectors, 2012  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 10,998 9,933Montana"Pennsylvania"Utah"Wisconsin" ,"Entity","Type of

407

Table 3. Top Five Retailers of Electricity, with End Use Sectors, 2012  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 10,998 9,933Montana"Pennsylvania"Utah"Wisconsin" ,"Entity","Type

408

U.S. Adjusted Distillate Fuel Oil and Kerosene Sales by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"Click worksheet9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,,781Title: Telephone: FAX: Last Name: Email:EIA's Today0.5 hoursArea:

409

U.S. Adjusted Sales of Distillate Fuel Oil by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"Click worksheet9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,,781Title: Telephone: FAX: Last Name: Email:EIA's Today0.5

410

U.S. Adjusted Sales of Residual Fuel Oil by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"Click worksheet9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,,781Title: Telephone: FAX: Last Name: Email:EIA's Today0.5Area:

411

U.S. Distillate Fuel Oil and Kerosene Sales by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"Click worksheet9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,,781Title: Telephone: FAX: Last Name:4, 2014 U.S. diesel

412

U.S. Sales of Distillate Fuel Oil by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"Click worksheet9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,,781Title: Telephone: FAX:9,152 8,905 8,967Sep-14Area: U.S. East

413

U.S. Sales of Residual Fuel Oil by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"Click worksheet9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,,781Title: Telephone: FAX:9,152 8,905 8,967Sep-14Area: U.S.

414

Renewable Electricity Futures Study. Volume 3: End-Use Electricity Demand  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Renewable Electricity Futures (RE Futures) Study investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. The analysis focused on the sufficiency of the geographically diverse U.S. renewable resources to meet electricity demand over future decades, the hourly operational characteristics of the U.S. grid with high levels of variable wind and solar generation, and the potential implications of deploying high levels of renewables in the future. RE Futures focused on technical aspects of high penetration of renewable electricity; it did not focus on how to achieve such a future through policy or other measures. Given the inherent uncertainties involved with analyzing alternative long-term energy futures as well as the multiple pathways that might be taken to achieve higher levels of renewable electricity supply, RE Futures explored a range of scenarios to investigate and compare the impacts of renewable electricity penetration levels (30%-90%), future technology performance improvements, potential constraints to renewable electricity development, and future electricity demand growth assumptions. RE Futures was led by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT).

Hostick, D.; Belzer, D.B.; Hadley, S.W.; Markel, T.; Marnay, C.; Kintner-Meyer, M.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Energy for 500 Million Homes: Drivers and Outlook for Residential Energy Consumption in China  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

end-use Residential primary energy consumption was 6.6 EJ inof primary energy. Primary energy consumption includes final14 Residential Primary Energy Consumption by Fuel (with

Zhou, Nan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

How many people actually see the price signal? Quantifying market failures in the end use of energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

landlords select the water heaters but their tenants mustin a high efficiency water heater. Another example is in thefamily home select the water heater and pay for the water

Meier, Alan; Eide, Anita

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia,(Million Barrels) Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs Year in Review1,213 136,422 133,442 140,948844Next MECS

418

Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia,(Million Barrels) Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs Year in Review1,213 136,422 133,442 140,948844Next

419

Review of Existing Energy Retrofit Tools  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Commercial End-Use Survey (CEUS) database and other sources. The data fields include the building's energy usage,

Lee, Sang Hoon

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Residential HVAC Data, Assumptions and Methodology for End-Use Forecasting with EPRI-REEPS 2.1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Conservation and Renewable Energy, Building EquipmentConservation and Renewable Energy, Building EquipmentEnergy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Building Equipment

Johnson, F.X.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bottom-up energy end-use" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

or fewer than 20 buildings were sampled. NNo responding cases in sample. Notes: Statistics for the "Energy End Uses" category represent total consumption in buildings that...

422

The Boom of Electricity Demand in the Residential Sector in the Developing World and the Potential for Energy Efficiency  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With the emergence of China as the world's largest energy consumer, the awareness of developing country energy consumption has risen. According to common economic scenarios, the rest of the developing world will probably see an economic expansion as well. With this growth will surely come continued rapid growth in energy demand. This paper explores the dynamics of that demand growth for electricity in the residential sector and the realistic potential for coping with it through efficiency. In 2000, only 66% of developing world households had access to electricity. Appliance ownership rates remain low, but with better access to electricity and a higher income one can expect that households will see their electricity consumption rise significantly. This paper forecasts developing country appliance growth using econometric modeling. Products considered explicitly - refrigerators, air conditioners, lighting, washing machines, fans, televisions, stand-by power, water heating and space heating - represent the bulk of household electricity consumption in developing countries. The resulting diffusion model determines the trend and dynamics of demand growth at a level of detail not accessible by models of a more aggregate nature. In addition, the paper presents scenarios for reducing residential consumption through cost-effective and/or best practice efficiency measures defined at the product level. The research takes advantage of an analytical framework developed by LBNL (BUENAS) which integrates end use technology parameters into demand forecasting and stock accounting to produce detailed efficiency scenarios, which allows for a realistic assessment of efficiency opportunities at the national or regional level. The past decades have seen some of the developing world moving towards a standard of living previously reserved for industrialized countries. Rapid economic development, combined with large populations has led to first China and now India to emerging as 'energy giants', a phenomenon that is expected to continue, accelerate and spread to other countries. This paper explores the potential for slowing energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions in the residential sector in developing countries and evaluates the potential of energy savings and emissions mitigation through market transformation programs such as, but not limited to Energy Efficiency Standards and Labeling (EES&L). The bottom-up methodology used allows one to identify which end uses and regions have the greatest potential for savings.

Letschert, Virginie; McNeil, Michael A.

2008-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

423

Measured electric hot water standby and demand loads from Pacific Northwest homes. End-Use Load and Consumer Assessment Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Bonneville Power Administration began the End-Use Load and Consumer Assessment Program (ELCAP) in 1983 to obtain metered hourly end-use consumption data for a large sample of new and existing residential and commercial buildings in the Pacific Northwest. Loads and load shapes from the first 3 years of data fro each of several ELCAP residential studies representing various segments of the housing population have been summarized by Pratt et al. The analysis reported here uses the ELCAP data to investigate in much greater detail the relationship of key occupant and tank characteristics to the consumption of electricity for water heating. The hourly data collected provides opportunities to understand electricity consumption for heating water and to examine assumptions about water heating that are critical to load forecasting and conservation resource assessments. Specific objectives of this analysis are to: (A) determine the current baseline for standby heat losses by determining the standby heat loss of each hot water tank in the sample, (B) examine key assumptions affecting standby heat losses such as hot water temperatures and tank sizes and locations, (C) estimate, where possible, impacts on standby heat losses by conservation measures such as insulating tank wraps, pipe wraps, anticonvection valves or traps, and insulating bottom boards, (D) estimate the EF-factors used by the federal efficiency standards and the nominal R-values of the tanks in the sample, (E) develop estimates of demand for hot water for each home in the sample by subtracting the standby load from the total hot water load, (F) examine the relationship between the ages and number of occupants and the hot water demand, (G) place the standby and demand components of water heating electricity consumption in perspective with the total hot water load and load shape.

Pratt, R.G.; Ross, B.A.

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

ENERGY EFFICIENCY TECHNOLOGY ROADMAP  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

renewable generation, grid supply, energy storage, distribution, communication, demand control, and end uses. Workshop findings are pending as of March 2013. Lawrence...

425

CHARACTERIZING COSTS, SAVINGS AND BENEFITS OF A SELECTION OF ENERGY EFFICIENT EMERGING TECHNOLOGIES IN THE UNITED STATES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on energy efficiency, energy savings, market adoption, andIndustries End-use(s) Energy types Market segment 2015Industries End-use(s) Energy types Market segment 2020

Xu, T.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Residential Sector End-Use Forecasting with EPRI-REEPS 2.1: Summary Input Assumptions and Results  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

US DOE. 1995a. Annual Energy Outlook 1995, with ProjectionsAdministration (ELA) 1995 Annual Energy Outlook (AEO); 1990of Energy's Annual Energy Outlook ( US DOE 1995a). A l l

Koomey, Jonathan G.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Residential HVAC Data, Assumptions and Methodology for End-Use Forecasting with EPRI-REEPS 2.1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

loans Energy Doctor Energy Audits Incentives to Builders/Developers New building/shell technologies Passive solar

Johnson, F.X.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Analysis of Michigan's demand-side electricity resources in the residential sector: Volume 3, End-use studies: Revised final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This volume of the ''Analysis of Michigan's Demand-Side Electricity Resources in the Residential Sector'' contains end-use studies on various household appliances including: refrigerators, freezers, lighting systems, water heaters, air conditioners, space heaters, and heat pumps. (JEF)

Krause, F.; Brown, J.; Connell, D.; DuPont, P.; Greely, K.; Meal, M.; Meier, A.; Mills, E.; Nordman, B.

1988-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

2014-04-30 Public Meeting Presentation Slides: Physical Characterization of Smart and Grid-Connected Commercial and Residential Buildings End-Use Equipment and Appliances  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

These documents contain slide decks presented at the Physical Characterization of Smart and Grid-Connected Commercial and Residential Buildings End-Use Equipment and Appliances public meeting held on April 30, 2014.

430

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

sum to totals. Source: Energy Information Administration, Office of Energy Markets and End Use, Forms EIA-871A, C, and E of the 2003 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey....

431

Residential Sector End-Use Forecasting with EPRI-REEPS 2.1: Summary Input Assumptions and Results  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Consumption and Expenditures 1992. Energy Information Administration, U.S.92). April. US DOE. 1995c. Residential Energy ConsumptionConsumption and Expenditures 1993. EIA, Energy Information Administration, U.S.

Koomey, Jonathan G.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

RESIDENTIAL SECTOR END-USE FORECASTING WITH EPRI-REEPS 2.1: SUMMARY INPUT ASSUMPTIONS AND RESULTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-76SF00098. #12;#12;i ABSTRACT This paper describes current and projected future energy use by end energy intensity per household of the residential sector is declining, and the electricity intensity per. Sanstad, and Leslie Shown Energy Analysis Program Energy and Environment Division Ernest Orlando Lawrence

433

Energy Conservation Policy Issues and End-Use Scenarios of Savings Potential--Part 5. Energy Efficient Buildings: The Cause of Litigation Against Energy Conservation Building Codes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for mortgage payments (Booz-Allen and Hamilton 1977). SuchREFERENCES Booz-Allen and Hamilton, Inc. Methodology to

Benenson, P.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Energy Conservation Policy Issues and End-Use Scenarios of Savings Potential--Part 5. Energy Efficient Buildings: The Cause of Litigation Against Energy Conservation Building Codes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

methods or passive solar designs. C. CASES REVIEWEDmany proposed designs, such as passive solar plans. At the

Benenson, P.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Estimating Total Energy Consumption and Emissions of China's Commercial and Office Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

18 Figure 6 Primary Energy Consumption by End-Use in24 Figure 7 Primary Energy Consumption by Fuel in Commercialbased on total primary energy consumption (source energy),

Fridley, David G.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Residential and Transport Energy Use in India: Past Trend and Future Outlook  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by end users while primary energy consumption includes finalelectricity. When primary energy consumption in the end use37%) in terms of primary energy consumption. However, energy

de la Rue du Can, Stephane

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Department of Energy Announces First Quadrennial Energy Review...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

The Nation's current infrastructure is increasingly challenged by transformations in energy supply, markets, and patterns of end use; issues of ageing and capacity; impacts of...

438

China Energy Databook - Rev. 4  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1992 12. End Use Electricity Consumption by Sector, 1992 13.Sources) Per Capita Electricity Consumption, 1990 EnergyUrban Rural 2. Electricity Consumption Shares Year Urban TWh

Sinton Editor, J.E.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Residential Sector End-Use Forecasting with EPRI-REEPS 2.1: Summary Input Assumptions and Results  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

$/household 10e3 Site Energy Prices Electricity ElectricityAverage electricity price Average household disposableAverage price of electricity Average household disposable

Koomey, Jonathan G.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Paraho environmental data. Part IV. Land reclamation and revegetation. Part V. Biological effects. Part VI. Occupational health and safety. Part VII. End use  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Characteristics of the environment and ecosystems at Anvil Points, reclamation of retorted shale, revegetation of retorted shale, and ecological effects of retorted shale are reported in the first section of this report. Methods used in screening shale oil and retort water for mutagens and carcinogens as well as toxicity studies are reported in the second section of this report. The third section contains information concerning the industrial hygiene and medical studies made at Anvil Points during Paraho research operations. The last section discusses the end uses of shale crude oil and possible health effects associated with end use. (DMC)

Limbach, L.K.

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bottom-up energy end-use" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Methodology for Modeling Building Energy Performance across the Commercial Sector  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report uses EnergyPlus simulations of each building in the 2003 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) to document and demonstrate bottom-up methods of modeling the entire U.S. commercial buildings sector (EIA 2006). The ability to use a whole-building simulation tool to model the entire sector is of interest because the energy models enable us to answer subsequent 'what-if' questions that involve technologies and practices related to energy. This report documents how the whole-building models were generated from the building characteristics in 2003 CBECS and compares the simulation results to the survey data for energy use.

Griffith, B.; Long, N.; Torcellini, P.; Judkoff, R.; Crawley, D.; Ryan, J.

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Residential HVAC Data, Assumptions and Methodology for End-Use Forecasting with EPRI-REEPS 2.1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

volume) of the equipment (AHAM 1991, ARI1991, G A M A 1992).Energy Factors (SWEFs), (AHAM 1991). b. 1990 RECS (EIAdata for their members (AHAM 1991, ARI1991, G A M A 1992).

Johnson, F.X.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Alternative Strategies for Low-Pressure End Uses; Industrial Technologies Program (ITP) Compressed Air Tip Sheet #11 (Fact Sheet)  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up fromDepartment ofEnergy Natural Gas:Austin, T X S9-0s)Department of Energy1 *

444

TECHNOLOGY DATA CHARACTERIZING LIGHTING IN COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS: APPLICATION TO END-USE FORECASTING WITH COMMEND 4.0  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LBL-34243 UC - 1600 TECHNOLOGY DATA CHARACTERIZING LIGHTING IN COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS: APPLICATION Technologies, and the Office of Environmental Analysis, Office of Policy, Planning, and Analysis of the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC03-76SF00098. #12;Technology Data Characterizing Lighting

445

Opportunities for Energy Efficiency and Demand Response in the California Cement Industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Opportunities for Energy  Efficiency and Demand Response in Agricultural/Water End?Use Energy Efficiency Program.    i 1   4.0   Energy Efficiency and Demand Response 

Olsen, Daniel

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

ResPoNSe: modeling the wide variability of residential energy consumption.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

affect appliance energy consumption. For example, differentStates, 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: HousingModeling of End-Use Energy Consumption in the Residential

Peffer, Therese; Burke, William; Auslander, David

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Current Status and Future Scenarios of Residential Building Energy Consumption in China  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

liters Figure 7 Primary Energy Consumption (EJ) Refrigeratorby Efficiency Class Primary Energy Consumption (EJ) Figure 8by Fuel Figure 1 Primary Energy Consumption by End-use)

Zhou, Nan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Energy Use in China: Sectoral Trends and Future Outlook  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides a detailed, bottom-up analysis ofenergy consumption in China. It recalibrates official Chinese governmentstatistics by reallocating primary energy into categories more commonlyused in international comparisons. It also provides an analysis of trendsin sectoral energy consumption over the past decades. Finally, itassesses the future outlook for the critical period extending to 2020,based on assumptions of likely patterns of economic activity,availability of energy services, and energy intensities. The followingare some highlights of the study's findings: * A reallocation of sectorenergy consumption from the 2000 official Chinese government statisticsfinds that: * Buildings account for 25 percent of primary energy, insteadof 19 percent * Industry accounts for 61 percent of energy instead of 69percent * Industrial energy made a large and unexpected leap between2000-2005, growing by an astonishing 50 percent in the 3 years between2002 and 2005. * Energy consumption in the iron and steel industry was 40percent higher than predicted * Energy consumption in the cement industrywas 54 percent higher than predicted * Overall energy intensity in theindustrial sector grew between 2000 and 2003. This is largely due tointernal shifts towards the most energy-intensive sub-sectors, an effectwhich more than counterbalances the impact of efficiency increases. *Industry accounted for 63 percent of total primary energy consumption in2005 - it is expected to continue to dominate energy consumption through2020, dropping only to 60 percent by that year. * Even assuming thatgrowth rates in 2005-2020 will return to the levels of 2000-2003,industrial energy will grow from 42 EJ in 2005 to 72 EJ in 2020. * Thepercentage of transport energy used to carry passengers (instead offreight) will double from 37 percent to 52 percent between 2000 to 2020,.Much of this increase is due to private car ownership, which willincrease by a factor of 15 from 5.1 million in 2000 to 77 million in2020. * Residential appliance ownership will show signs of saturation inurban households. The increase in residential energy consumption will belargely driven by urbanization, since rural homes will continue to havelow consumption levels. In urban households, the size of appliances willincrease, but its effect will be moderated by efficiency improvements,partially driven by government standards. * Commercial energy increaseswill be driven both by increases in floor space and by increases inpenetration of major end uses such as heating and cooling. Theseincreases will be moderated somewhat, however, by technology changes,such as increased use of heat pumps. * China's Medium- and Long-TermDevelopment plan drafted by the central government and published in 2004calls for a quadrupling of GDP in the period from 2000-2020 with only adoubling in energy consumption during the same period. A bottom-upanalysis with likely efficiency improvements finds that energyconsumption will likely exceed the goal by 26.12 EJ, or 28 percent.Achievements of these goals will there fore require a more aggressivepolicy of encouraging energy efficiency.

Zhou, Nan; McNeil, Michael A.; Fridley, David; Lin, Jiang; Price,Lynn; de la Rue du Can, Stephane; Sathaye, Jayant; Levine, Mark

2007-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

449

Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) Program White Paper  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

&D program areas: · Buildings End-Use Energy Efficiency · Energy Innovations Small Grants · Energy/Agricultural/Water End-Use Energy Efficiency · Renewable Energy Technologies · Transportation In 2003, the CaliforniaPublic Interest Energy Research (PIER) Program White Paper CLIMATE VULNERABILITY AND ADAPTATION

Kammen, Daniel M.

450

Refining and end use study of coal liquids. Second quarter 1995 technical progress report, April--June 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Bechtel, with Southwest Research Institute, Amoco Oil R&D, and the M.W. Kellogg Co. as subcontractors, initiated a study on November 1, 1993, for the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC) to determine the most cost effective and suitable combination of existing petroleum refinery processes needed to make specification transportation fuels or blending stocks, from direct and indirect coal liquefaction product liquids. This 47-month study, with an approved budget of $4.4 million dollars, is being performed under DOE Contract Number DE-AC22-93PC91029. A key objective is to determine the most desirable ways of integrating coal liquefaction liquids into existing petroleum refineries to produce transportation fuels meeting current and future, e.g. year 2000, Clean Air Act Amendment (CAAA) standards. An integral part of the above objectives is to test the fuels or blends produced and compare them with established ASTM fuels. The comparison will include engine tests to ascertain compliance of the fuels produced with CAAA and other applicable fuel quality and performance standards. The final part of the project includes a detailed economic evaluation of the cost of processing the coal liquids to their optimum products.

NONE

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

China Energy Databook - Rev. 4  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

continued growth of its coal- dominated energy system, Chinasectoral end use from coal China Energy Databook IX-3 (TableAND EXPORTS Net Energy Exports Coal Imports and Exports by

Sinton Editor, J.E.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

National Energy Efficiency Evaluation, Measurement and Verification (EM&V) Standard: Scoping Study of Issues and Implementation Requirements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is a scoping study that identifies issues associated with developing a national evaluation, measurement and verification (EM&V) standard for end-use, non-transportation, energy efficiency activities. The objectives of this study are to identify the scope of such a standard and define EM&V requirements and issues that will need to be addressed in a standard. To explore these issues, we provide and discuss: (1) a set of definitions applicable to an EM&V standard; (2) a literature review of existing guidelines, standards, and 'initiatives' relating to EM&V standards as well as a review of 'bottom-up' versus 'top-down' evaluation approaches; (3) a summary of EM&V related provisions of two recent federal legislative proposals (Congressman Waxman's and Markey's American Clean Energy and Security Act of 2009 and Senator Bingaman's American Clean Energy Leadership Act of 2009) that include national efficiency resource requirements; (4) an annotated list of issues that that are likely to be central to, and need to be considered when, developing a national EM&V standard; and (5) a discussion of the implications of such issues. There are three primary reasons for developing a national efficiency EM&V standard. First, some policy makers, regulators and practitioners believe that a national standard would streamline EM&V implementation, reduce costs and complexity, and improve comparability of results across jurisdictions; although there are benefits associated with each jurisdiction setting its own EM&V requirements based on their specific portfolio and evaluation budgets and objectives. Secondly, if energy efficiency is determined by the US Environmental Protection Agency to be a Best Available Control Technology (BACT) for avoiding criteria pollutant and/or greenhouse gas emissions, then a standard can be required for documenting the emission reductions resulting from efficiency actions. The third reason for a national EM&V standard is that such a standard is likely to be required as a result of future federal energy legislation that includes end-use energy efficiency, either as a stand-alone energy-efficiency resource standard (EERS) or as part of a clean energy or renewable energy standard. This study is focused primarily on this third reason and thus explores issues associated with a national EM&V standard if energy efficiency is a qualifying resource in federal clean energy legislation. Developing a national EM&V standard is likely to be a lengthy process; this study focuses on the critical first step of identifying the issues that must be addressed in a future standard. Perhaps the most fundamental of these issues is 'how good is good enough?' This has always been the fundamental issue of EM&V for energy efficiency and is a result of the counter-factual nature of efficiency. Counter-factual in that savings are not measured, but estimated to varying degrees of accuracy by comparing energy consumption after a project (program) is implemented with what is assumed to have been the consumption of energy in the absence of the project (program). Therefore, the how good is good enough question is a short version of asking how certain does one have to be of the energy savings estimate that results from EM&V activities and is that level of certainty properly balanced against the amount of effort (resources, time, money) that is utilized to obtain that level of certainty. The implication is that not only should energy efficiency investments be cost-effective, but EM&V investments should consider risk management principles and thus also balance the costs and value of information derived from EM&V (EM&V should also be cost-effective).

Schiller Consulting, Inc.; Schiller, Steven R.; Goldman, Charles A.; Galawish, Elsia

2011-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

453

Engineer End Uses for Maximum Efficiency; Industrial Technologies Program (ITP) Compressed Air Tip Sheet #10 (Fact Sheet)  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeat PumpRecord ofESPCof Energy 12, 2004DepartmentWaste Heat Recoveryfor Heavy

454

April 30 Public Meeting: Physical Characterization of Smart and Grid-Connected Commercial and Residential Building End-Use Equipment and Appliances  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

These documents contain slide decks presented at the Physical Characterization of Smart and Grid-Connected Commercial and Residential Buildings End-Use Equipment and Appliances public meeting held on April 30, 2014. The first document includes the first presentation from the meeting: DOE Vision and Objectives. The second document includes all other presentations from the meeting: Terminology and Definitions; End-User and Grid Services; Physical Characterization Framework; Value, Benefits & Metrics.

455

Manufacturing consumption of energy 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides estimates on energy consumption in the manufacturing sector of the US economy. These estimates are based on data from the 1991 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS). This survey--administered by the Energy End Use and Integrated Statistics Division, Office of Energy Markets and End Use, Energy Information Administration (EIA)--is the most comprehensive source of national-level data on energy-related information for the manufacturing industries.

Not Available

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Low-energy holographic models for QCD  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider the bottom-up holographic models for QCD which contain the ultraviolet (UV) cutoff. Such models are supposed to describe exclusively the low-energy sector of QCD. The introduction of UV cutoff in the soft wall model is shown to result in a model with qualitatively different predictions. The ensuing model seems to be able to incorporate the constituent quark mass. It is also demonstrated that in order to reproduce the results of the usual soft wall model for the vector and higher spin mesons in the presence of the UV cutoff one can consider the flat bulk space with a modified dilaton background.

S. S. Afonin

2011-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

457

China Energy and Emissions Paths to 2030  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

After over two decades of staggering economic growth and soaring energy demand, China has started taking serious actions to reduce its economic energy and carbon intensity by setting short and medium-term intensity reduction targets, renewable generation targets and various supporting policies and programs. In better understanding how further policies and actions can be taken to shape China's future energy and emissions trajectory, it is important to first identify where the largest opportunities for efficiency gains and emission reduction lie from sectoral and end-use perspectives. Besides contextualizing China's progress towards reaching the highest possible efficiency levels through the adoption of the most advanced technologies from a bottom-up perspective, the actual economic costs and benefits of adopting efficiency measures are also assessed in this study. This study presents two modeling methodologies that evaluate both the technical and economic potential of raising China's efficiency levels to the technical maximum across sectors and the subsequent carbon and energy emission implications through 2030. The technical savings potential by efficiency measure and remaining gap for improvements are identified by comparing a reference scenario in which China continues the current pace of with a Max Tech scenario in which the highest technically feasible efficiencies and advanced technologies are adopted irrespective of costs. In addition, from an economic perspective, a cost analysis of selected measures in the key industries of cement and iron and steel help quantify the actual costs and benefits of achieving the highest efficiency levels through the development of cost of conserved energy curves for the sectors. The results of this study show that total annual energy savings potential of over one billion tonne of coal equivalent exists beyond the expected reference pathway under Max Tech pathway in 2030. CO2 emissions will also peak earlier under Max Tech, though the 2020s is a likely turning point for both emission trajectories. Both emission pathways must meet all announced and planned policies, targets and non-fossil generation targets, or an even wider efficiency gap will exist. The savings potential under Max Tech varies by sector, but the industrial sector appears to hold the largest energy savings and emission reduction potential. The primary source of savings is from electricity rather than fuel, and electricity savings are magnified by power sector decarbonization through increasing renewable generation and coal generation efficiency improvement. In order to achieve the maximum energy savings and emission reduction potential, efficiency improvements and technology switching must be undertaken across demand sectors as well as in the growing power sector. From an economic perspective, the cost of conserved energy analysis indicates that nearly all measures for the iron and steel and cement industry are cost-effective. All 23 efficiency measures analyzed for the cement industry are cost-effective, with combined CO2 emission reduction potential of 448 Mt CO2. All of the electricity savings measures in the iron and steel industry are cost-effective, but the cost-effective savings potential for fuel savings measures is slightly lower than total technical savings potential. The total potential savings from these measures confirm the magnitude of savings in the scenario models, and illustrate the remaining efficiency gap in the cement and iron and steel industries.

Fridley, David; Zheng, Nina; Zhou, Nan; Ke, Jing; Hasanbeigi, Ali; Morrow, Bill; Price, Lynn

2011-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

458

Energy Efficiency Program Impact Evaluation Guide  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

This Energy Efficiency Program Impact Evaluation Guide describes and provides guidance on approaches for determining and documenting energy and non-energy benefits resulting from end-use energy efficiency programs and portfolios of programs.

459

Opportunities for Energy Efficiency and Open Automated Demand Response in Wastewater Treatment Facilities in California -- Phase I Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Processing Industry Energy Efficiency Initiative, CaliforniaK. (2004). Bringing Energy Efficiency to the Water andAgricultural/Water End-Use Energy Efficiency Program. Lyco

Lekov, Alex

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Top-down modification of bottom-up processes: selective grazing reduces macroalgal nitrogen uptake  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

morphology associated with kelp crab Pugettia productauptake SA:V (cm 2 ml –1 ) kelp crab grazing simulatedmenziesii. Influences of kelp crab Pugettia producta grazing

Bracken, MES; Stachowicz, J J

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bottom-up energy end-use" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Top-down modification of bottom-up processes: selective grazing reduces macroalgal nitrogen uptake  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the kelp’s subsequent ability to acquire nutrients. Becauseof nutrient enhancement on the inter- tidal kelp Hedophyllumkelps and other large, dominant macrophytes. In our study, Pugettia producta reduced the biomass- specific nutrient-

Bracken, MES; Stachowicz, J J

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Ethics from the Bottom-Up: Recursive depth in technosocial networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

groups and modern technology, such as the use of fractal patterns in African architecture, art and Sustainability Wednesday, March 6, 2013 | 6:30 pm | Kane Hall, Room 120 Computational sciences provide us applying computing to problems in social justice and sustainability, but using those challenges as drivers

Queitsch, Christine

463

Top-Down, Bottom-Up, or Both? Toward an Integrative Perspective on Operations Strategy Formation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and process ? Car components: axles, gearboxes, shaft drives ? Metalworking and assembly ? Power controllers (electrical and electronics) for machine tools ? Engineering and assembly ? SME, two manager-owners ? Medical kits for ambulances... . MEDICAL is a family-owned firm—a “small or medium-sized enterprise” (SME)—that develops and manufactures medical devices for ambulances and homes; it has a total of some 800 employees. The heads of manufacturing and technology and of sales are members...

Kim, Yoon Hee; Sting, Fabian J.; Loch, Christopher H.

2014-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

464

Peace Corps Volunteers and the Boundaries of Bottom-up Development  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

countries. As stated by Amartya Sen, “If freedom is whatonly makes sense. Amartya Sen, Development as freedom (Newof Kentucky, 1997. Sen, Amartya. Development as Freedom [in

Schuckman, Hugh Erik

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Use of Building Automation System Trend Data for Inputs Generation in Bottom-Up Simulation Calibration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for analysis and use in simulation is very large. This paper explores automating the process of generating inputs from Building Automation System (BAS) trend data for use in building simulation software. A proof-of-concept prototype called the Automatic...

Zibin, N. F.; Zmeureanu, R. G.; Love, J. A.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Peace Corps Volunteers and the Boundaries of Bottom-up Development  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

agricultural volunteers in Africa sidestepped these organizationally initiated projects just as Peace Corps Mongolia volunteers avoided showing the Alcohol Task Force film “

Schuckman, Hugh Erik

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

A new class of high ZT doped bulk nanothermoelectrics through bottom-up  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up from theDepartment(October-DecemberBasedToward a MoreA RisingA1AFrom The

468

Home Energy Saver Web Site Documentation Version 1.2 Documentation of Calculation Methodology, Input Data,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for estimating energy consumption. Using engineering models, the site estimates energy consumption for six major of the house and energy consuming appliances. Outputs include energy consumption (by fuel and end use), energy-related emissions (carbon dioxide), energy bills (total and by fuel and end use), and energy saving recommendations

469

China Energy Group - Sustainable Growth Through Energy Efficiency  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

full end-use model of China’s energy economy for 2020.Assessed ways for China to meet its goal of reducing energyCenter (BSDC) Beijing University China Academy of Building

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Monthly energy review, March 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Contains summary data on petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, and nuclear energy relative to consumption, distribution, end-use, generation, imports, supply and demand, production, prices, global aspects, and international energy.

Not Available

1993-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

471

Energy-Efficiency Labels and Standards: A Guidebook for Appliances, Equipment, and Lighting - 2nd Edition  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

minimum efficiency standards, initiated in 1989, was strengthened by the Energy Conservation Law in 1997, which put end- use energy efficiency and standards

Wiel, Stephen; McMahon, James E.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Estimating Total Energy Consumption and Emissions of China's Commercial and Office Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Central Government Buildings. ” Available at: http://Energy Commission, PIER Building End-Use Energy Efficiencythe total lifecycle of a building such as petroleum and

Fridley, David G.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) Program FINAL PROJECT REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(RD&D) projects to benefit the electricity and natural gas ratepayers in California. The Energy for natural gas RD&D. The PIER program strives to conduct the most promising public interest energy: · Buildings EndUse Energy Efficiency · Industrial/Agricultural/Water EndUse Energy Efficiency · Renewable

474

Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) Program FINAL PROJECT REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and demonstration (RD&D) projects to benefit the electricity and natural gas ratepayers in California. The Energy EndUse Energy Efficiency · Industrial/Agricultural/Water EndUse Energy Efficiency · Renewable Energy for natural gas RD&D. PIER funding efforts are focused on the following RD&D program areas: · Buildings

475

Energy Conservation: Policy Issues and End-Use Scenarios of Savings Potential -- Part 3, Policy Barriers and Investment Decisions in Industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TECHNOLOGY, AND ECONOMIC EVALUATION DEPARTMENTS CONSTRUCTIONchannels. The Economic Evaluation and the Operations andinformation, banks for economic evaluations, etc. ). This

Benenson, Peter

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Energy Conservation: Policy Issues and End-Use Scenarios of Savings Potential -- Part 3, Policy Barriers and Investment Decisions in Industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

New Plant Construction, Waste Heat Recovery, and Processattributes associated with Waste Heat Recovery and Processin place of new stock. 3) Waste Heat Recovery--use of waste

Benenson, Peter

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

California Energy Commission DRAFT STAFF REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

demand forecasts, demand-side management and energy efficiency impacts, private supply impacts, forecast, peak, self-generation, conservation, demand-side, energy, efficiency, price, retail, end use and Instructions for Electricity Demand Forecasts. California Energy Commission, Electricity Supply Analysis

478

Local Energy Policy and Managing the Low Carbon Transition: The Case of Leicester  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

 Energy Cities network, which has 1000 towns and cities as members.3 Reasons for this  include bottom?up local initiatives such as the setting of local carbon emission reduction targets,  upgrading the District Heating (DH) scheme, installing solar...  homes. The Government’s “golden rule” of the Green  Deal is that the consumer will save more money on their energy bills than the cost of the loan  required for installation of the energy saving measure. Also, instead of paying capital upfront for the  improvements, the costs will be attached to...

Lemon, Mark; Pollitt, Michael C; Steer, Steven J.

479

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Source  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

moderate population growth, an extended economic recovery, and increasing energy efficiency in end-use applications....Read full section With modest economic growth,...

480

Representation of Energy Use in the Food Products Industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Traditional representations of energy in the manufacturing sector have tended to represent energy end-uses rather than actual energy service demands. While this representation if quite adequate for understanding how energy is used today...

Elliott, N. R.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bottom-up energy end-use" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Achieving Energy Savings Through Residential Energy Use Behavior  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Achieving Energy Savings Through Residential Energy Use Behavior Studies Energy Efficiency Research Office PIER Buildings End-use Energy Efficiency Research Program www.energy.ca.gov/research/buildings May 2012 The Issue Understanding the factors that influence energy use behavior is a largely uninvestigated

482

Energy Demand Staff Scientist  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Demand in China Lynn Price Staff Scientist February 2, 2010 #12;Founded in 1988 Focused on End-Use Energy Efficiency ~ 40 Current Projects in China Collaborations with ~50 Institutions in China Researcher #12;Talk OutlineTalk Outline · Overview · China's energy use and CO2 emission trends · Energy

Eisen, Michael

483

Monthly energy review, March 1993. [Contains Glossary  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Contains summary data on petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, and nuclear energy relative to consumption, distribution, end-use, generation, imports, supply and demand, production, prices, global aspects, and international energy.

Not Available

1993-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

484

China Energy and Emissions Paths to 2030  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to consume more energy than rural households, particularlym2) Residential: Rural Residential: Urban Macro-level EnergykWh per day. Rural household other end-use energy intensity

Fridley, David

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

485

Monthly energy review, November 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Contains summary data on petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, and nuclear energy relative to consumption, distribution, end-use, generation, imports, supply and demand, production, prices, global aspects, and international markets.

Not Available

1992-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

486

Monthly energy review, February 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Contains summary data on petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, and nuclear energy relative to consumption, distribution, end-use, generation, imports, supply and demand, production, prices, global aspects, and international markets.

Not Available

1993-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

487

Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) Program FINAL PROJECT REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TO THE CALIFORNIA SMART GRID OF 2020 FOR PUBLICLY OWNED UTILITIES Prepared for: California Energy Integration · Environmentally Preferred Advanced Generation · Industrial/Agricultural/Water EndUse Energy Efficiency · Renewable Energy Technologies · Transportation Defining the Pathway to the California Smart

488

Energy Data Sourcebook for the U.S. Residential Sector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that forecast US residential energy consumption by end-use.new unit energy consumption in the U.S. DOE appliancethe Residential Energy Consumption Survey, or RECS (US DOE

Wenzel, T.P.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

489

Improved Analysis Methods for Retrofit Savings and Energy Accounting (ERAP #227)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

an end-use data base for commercial and institutional buildings to facilitate the comparison and exchange of building energy use information....

Claridge, D. E.; Haberl, J. S.; Kissock, J. K.; Ruch, D. K.; Katipamula, S.; Chen, L.; Wang, J.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

Energy Data Sourcebook for the U.S. Residential Sector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

J.E. 1986. The LBL Residential Energy Model. LawrenceInc. MEANS. 1992. Residential Cost Data: 11th Annual EditionInstitute. 1989. Residential End-Use Energy Consumption: A

Wenzel, T.P.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

491

Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) Program INTERIM PROJECT REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for the Smart Grid Information Assurance and Security Technology Assessment project (Contract Number 50008027 Generation · Industrial/Agricultural/Water EndUse Energy Efficiency · Renewable Energy Technologies

492

Energy and GHG Emissions in British Columbia 1990 -2010  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

supply and use, greenhouse gas emissions and energy efficiency in British Columbia Canadian Industrial Energy End-use Data and Analysis Centre (CIEEDAC) Simon Fraser University June 2012 Environment Canada, Natural Resources Canada, Aluminium Industry Association, Canadian Chemical Producers

Pedersen, Tom

493

Sectoral trends in global energy use and greenhouse gas emissions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Agency (IEA), 2004c. CO2 emissions from fuel combustion,12. Global Energy-Related CO2 Emissions by End-Use Sector,2030. Energy-Related CO2 Emissions (GtC) Transport Buildings

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

494

Monthly energy review, February 1993. [Contains Glossary  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Contains summary data on petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, and nuclear energy relative to consumption, distribution, end-use, generation, imports, supply and demand, production, prices, global aspects, and international markets.

Not Available

1993-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

495

Monthly energy review, November 1992. [Contains Glossary  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Contains summary data on petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, and nuclear energy relative to consumption, distribution, end-use, generation, imports, supply and demand, production, prices, global aspects, and international markets.

Not Available

1992-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

496

Energy Audit Practices in China: National and Local Experiences and Issues  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

factor to standard coal of energy source i; n—Number ofin standard coal equivalent) ? sectoral energy consumptiontable (standard coal) End-use energy consumption by P303-5

Shen, Bo

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

497

Current Status and Future Scenarios of Residential Building Energy Consumption in China  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LPG is a major energy source, while coal and electricity arethe total residential energy and coal is the dominant fuel.1 Residential Energy consumption by End-use Coal Renewables

Zhou, Nan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

498

Energy Reduction in California Pipeline Operations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

technologies that can help California's industrial sectors reduce their energy consumption, their water use. In addition to significant baseline energy consumption, more energy is often required by pipelines Energy Commission Public Interest Energy Research Program Industrial/Agriculture/Water EndUse Phone

499

High-Energy Permanent Magnets for Hybrid Vehicles and Alternative Energy Uses  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The report summarizes research undertaken by a multidisciplinary team aimed at the development of the next generation high-energy permanent magnets. The principal approach was relied on bottom-up fabrication of anisotropic nanocomposite magnets. Our efforts resulted in further development of the theoretical concept and fabrication principles for the nanocomposites and in synthesis of a range of rare-earth-based hard magnetic nanoparticles. Even though we did not make a breakthrough in the assembly of these hard magnetic particles with separately prepared Fe(Co) nanoparticles and did not obtain a compact nanocomposite magnet, our performed research will help to direct the future efforts, in particular, towards nano-assembly via coating, when the two phases which made the nanocomposite are first organized in core-shell-structured particles. Two other approaches were to synthesize (discover) new materials for the traditional singe-material magnets and the nanocomposite magnets. Integrated theoretical and experimental efforts lead to a significant advance in nanocluster synthesis technique and yielded novel rare-earth-free nanostructured and nanocomposite materials. Examination of fifteen R-Fe-X alloy systems (R = rare earth), which have not been explored earlier due to various synthesis difficulties reveal several new ferromagnetic compounds. The research has made major progress in bottom-up manufacturing of rare-earth-containing nanocomposite magnets with superior energy density and open new directions in development of higher-energy-density magnets that do not contain rare earths. The advance in the scientific knowledge and technology made in the course of the project has been reported in 50 peer-reviewed journal articles and numerous presentations at scientific meetings.

Hadjipanayis, George C. [University of Delaware] [University of Delaware; McCallum, William R. [Ames Laboratory] [Ames Laboratory; Sellmyer, David J. [University of Nebraska, Lincoln] [University of Nebraska, Lincoln; Harris, Vincent [Northeastern University] [Northeastern University; Carpenter, Everett E. [Virginia Commonwealth University] [Virginia Commonwealth University; Liu, Jinfang [Electron Energy Corporation] [Electron Energy Corporation

2013-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

500

Towards a Very Low Energy Building Stock: Modeling the U.S. Commercial Building Sector to Support Policy and Innovation Planning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and energy use intensity by fuel type and end use), based on historical data and user-defined scenarios for future projections.

Coffey, Brian

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z