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1

Efficient numerical modeling of borehole heat exchangers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a finite element modeling technique for double U-tube borehole heat exchangers (BHE) and the surrounding soil mass. Focus is placed on presenting numerical analyses describing the capability of a BHE model, previously reported, to ... Keywords: BHE, Geothermal heat pumps, Geothermic, Heat transfer, Space heating

R. Al-Khoury; T. Kölbel; R. Schramedei

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Finite element modeling of borehole heat exchanger systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Single borehole heat exchanger (BHE) and arrays of BHE are modeled by using the finite element method. Applying BHE in regional discretizations optimal conditions of mesh spacing around singular BHE nodes are derived. Optimal meshes have shown superior ... Keywords: Borehole heat exchanger, Borehole thermal energy store, FEFLOW, TRNSYS

H. -J. G. Diersch; D. Bauer; W. Heidemann; W. Rühaak; P. Schätzl

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

FMI Borehole Geology, Geomechanics and 3D Reservoir Modeling...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

NA, 2002 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http:crossref.org Online Internet link for FMI Borehole Geology, Geomechanics and 3D Reservoir Modeling Citation...

4

Logging Calibration Models for Fission Neutron Sondes (September...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Logging Calibration Models for Fission Neutron Sondes (September 1981) Logging Calibration Models for Fission Neutron Sondes (September 1981) Logging Calibration Models for Fission...

5

Numerical Modeling of Complex Porous Media For Borehole Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The diffusion/relaxation behavior of polarized spins of pore filling fluid, as often probed by NMR relaxometry, is widely used to extract information on the pore-geometry. Such information is further interpreted as an indicator of the key transport property of the formation in the oil industry. As the importance of reservoirs with complex pore geometry grows, so does the need for deeper understanding of how these properties are inter-related. Numerical modeling of relevant physical processes using a known pore geometry promises to be an effective tool in such endeavor. Using a suite of numerical techniques based on random-walk (RW) and Lattice-Boltzmann (LB) algorithms, we compare sandstone and carbonate pore geometries in their impact on NMR and flow properties. For NMR relaxometry, both laboratory measurement and simulation were done on the same source to address some of the long-standing issues in its borehole applications. Through a series of "numerical experiments" in which the interfacial relaxation properties of the pore matrix is varied systematically, we study the effect of a variable surface relaxivity while fully incorporating the complexity of the pore geometry. From combined RW and LB simulations, we also obtain diffusion-convection propagator and compare the result with experimental and network-simulation counterparts.

Seungoh Ryu; Weishu Zhao; Gabriela Leu; Philip M. Singer; Hyung Joon Cho; Youngseuk Keehm

2009-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

6

Application of evolutionary algorithms for model calibration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Calibration of plant specific parameters of a process-based plant model can represent a considerable challenge when observed data are available from multiple environments. Calibration of model parameters can be considered as a search for the optimal ... Keywords: EA-SA, evolutionary optimization, ragweed, self-adaptation, sirius

Mikhail A. Semenov; Pierre Stratonowitch

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Modelling Of Downhole Seismic Sources I: Literature Review, Review Of Fundamentals, Impulsive Point Source In A Borehole  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper represents the first of a two paper sequence comprising a multi-faceted introduction to the numerical and analytical modelling of seismic sources in a borehole.

Meredith, J. A.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Adaptable Multivariate Calibration Models for Spectral Applications  

SciTech Connect

Multivariate calibration techniques have been used in a wide variety of spectroscopic situations. In many of these situations spectral variation can be partitioned into meaningful classes. For example, suppose that multiple spectra are obtained from each of a number of different objects wherein the level of the analyte of interest varies within each object over time. In such situations the total spectral variation observed across all measurements has two distinct general sources of variation: intra-object and inter-object. One might want to develop a global multivariate calibration model that predicts the analyte of interest accurately both within and across objects, including new objects not involved in developing the calibration model. However, this goal might be hard to realize if the inter-object spectral variation is complex and difficult to model. If the intra-object spectral variation is consistent across objects, an effective alternative approach might be to develop a generic intra-object model that can be adapted to each object separately. This paper contains recommendations for experimental protocols and data analysis in such situations. The approach is illustrated with an example involving the noninvasive measurement of glucose using near-infrared reflectance spectroscopy. Extensions to calibration maintenance and calibration transfer are discussed.

THOMAS,EDWARD V.

1999-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

9

Modeling of Spectralon diffusers for radiometric calibration in remote sensing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Modeling of Spectralon diffusers for radiometric calibration in remote sensing G. Bazalgette Courre Abstract. Onboard calibration of radiometric measurements in remote sensing is often achieved for publication May 28, 2003. 1 Introduction Light diffusers are used in remote sensing applications

Sprik, Rudolf

10

A B-Spline Model for Camera Calibration.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis presents a general B-spline surface model for camera calibration. The model implicitly characterizes lens distortion by directly relating positions on the image plane… (more)

Xu, Yiming

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Using Green's Functions to Calibrate an Ocean General Circulation Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Green's functions provide a simple yet effective method to test and to calibrate general circulation model (GCM) parameterizations, to study and to quantify model and data errors, to correct model biases and trends, and to blend estimates from ...

Dimitris Menemenlis; Ichiro Fukumori; Tong Lee

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Analytical Modeling of Wave Generation by the Borehole Orbital Vibrator Source  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the source as a function of wave frequency and rockon the source-fluid boundary and the fluid-rock boundary. ToP2 1731 m/s Rock S velocity c S2 Source/borehole parameters

Nakagawa, Seiji; Daley, Thomas M.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Calibration Facilities | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Calibration Facilities Calibration Facilities Calibration Facilities Calibration Facilities Calibration Facilities Calibration Facilities Calibration Facilities DOE supports the development, standardization, and maintenance of calibration facilities for environmental radiation sensors. Radiation standards at the facilities are primarily used to calibrate portable surface gamma-ray survey meters and borehole logging instruments used for uranium and other mineral exploration and remedial action measurements. Standards for calibrating borehole fission neutron devices are also available, but are used infrequently. Radiation standards are constructed of concrete with elevated, uniform concentrations of naturally occurring potassium, uranium, and/or thorium. Pad standards have large, flat surfaces suitable for calibration

14

Calibrating subjective probabilities using hierarchical bayesian models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A body of psychological research has examined the correspondence between a judge's subjective probability of an event's outcome and the event's actual outcome. The research generally shows that subjective probabilities are noisy and do not ... Keywords: Bayesian methods, calibration, confidence, expert judgment, subjective probability

Edgar C. Merkle

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

A Multistep Automatic Calibration Scheme for River Forecasting Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Operational flood forecasting models vary in complexity, but nearly all have parameters for which values must be estimated. The traditional and widespread manual calibration approach requires considerable training and experience and is typically ...

Terri S. Hogue; Soroosh Sorooshian; Hoshin Gupta; Andrea Holz; Dean Braatz

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

How Essential is Hydrologic Model Calibration to Seasonal Streamflow Forecasting?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hydrologic model calibration is usually a central element of streamflow forecasting based on the ensemble streamflow prediction (ESP) method. Evaluation measures of forecast errors such as root-mean-square error (RMSE) are heavily influenced by ...

Xiaogang Shi; Andrew W. Wood; Dennis P. Lettenmaier

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Groundwater model calibration at Pantex using Data Fusion modeling  

SciTech Connect

The Pantex plant has operated as one of the Federal government`s key conventional and nuclear weapons facilities since the 1940`s. In recent years, the DOE has expended considerable effort to characterize the nature and extent of groundwater contamination associated with the site. That effort is still on-going with the ultimate aim of determining and implementing appropriate remedial measures. The goal of the study described in this report was to use Data Fusion modeling to calibrate a groundwater model near Zone 12 of Pantex, primarily to define the potential pathways to the Ogallala aquifer. Data Fusion is a new approach for combining different but interrelated types of information from multiple sources into a quantitative analysis of system characteristics and dynamic behavior. The Data Fusion Workstation (DFW) is a patented technique for carrying out Data Fusion analyses using specially developed computer based approaches. The technique results in the development of a calibrated model of a site consistent with the data, first principles, and geostatistical spatial continuity. A more explicit description of the Data Fusion concept and approach is presented.

NONE

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Calibration of the ring model for the NSLS rings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The mathematical model of an accelerator can be used to control its operation and also to simulate its behavior. Part of the model is the conversion between the computer controlled digital setpoints of the magnets and the actual field acting on the average particle in the magnet. We are using tune, dispersion and chromaticity measurements to calculate this conversion, thus calibrating the model rather than the magnets themselves. this is one way to include effects, not taken directly into account in the model. The model has to be calibrated at different beam momenta, and possibly at different beam intensities.

Bozoki, E.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

A framework for the calibration of social simulation models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Simulation with agent-based models is increasingly used in the study of complex socio-technical systems and in social simulation in general. This paradigm offers a number of attractive features, namely the possibility of modeling emergent phenomena within large populations. As a consequence, often the quantity in need of calibration may be a distribution over the population whose relation with the parameters of the model is analytically intractable. Nevertheless, we can simulate. In this paper we present a simulation-based framework for the calibration of agent-based models with distributional output based on indirect inference. We illustrate our method step by step on a model of norm emergence in an online community of peer production, using data from three large Wikipedia communities. Model fit and diagnostics are discussed.

Ciampaglia, Giovanni Luca

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Using Bayesian Model Averaging to Calibrate Forecast Ensembles 1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using Bayesian Model Averaging to Calibrate Forecast Ensembles 1 Adrian E. Raftery, Fadoua forecasting often exhibit a spread-skill relationship, but they tend to be underdispersive. This paper of PDFs centered around the individual (possibly bias-corrected) forecasts, where the weights are equal

Washington at Seattle, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "borehole calibration models" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Residential Vertical Geothermal Heat Pump System Models: Calibration to Data:  

SciTech Connect

A detailed component-based simulation model of a geothermal heat pump system has been calibrated to monitored data taken from a family housing unit located at Fort Polk, Louisiana. The simulation model represents the housing unit, geothermal heat pump, ground heat exchanger, thermostat, blower, and ground-loop pump. Each of these component models was 'tuned' to better match the measured data from the site. These tuned models were then interconnect to form the system model. The system model was then exercised in order to demonatrate its capabilities.

Thornton, Jeff W. [Thermal Energy Systems Specialists, Inc.; McDowell, T. P. [Thermal Energy Systems Specialists, Inc.; Shonder, John A [ORNL; Hughes, Patrick [ORNL; Pahud, D. [University of Applied Sciences of Southern Switzerland; Hellstrom, G. [Lund University

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

3D geological modelling from boreholes, cross-sections and geological maps, application over former natural gas storages in coal mines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In a wide range of applications involving geological modelling, geological data available at low cost usually consist of documents such as cross-sections or geological maps and punctual data like borehole logs or outcrop descriptions. In order to build ... Keywords: 3D geological modelling, Data structuration, GIS, Geomodeler

Olivier Kaufmann; Thierry Martin

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Calibration of a Pressure Sensor and a Radar Receiver Using Behavioral Modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An equation used to describe the calibration of an instrument is either of an arbitrary nature or based upon physics. The latter, which we call behavioral modeling, often provides a much better fit to the calibration than traditional, statistical,...

Julian M. Pike; Ronald E. Rinehart

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Calibration of LaD Model in the Northeast United States Using Observed Annual Streamflow  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Calibration of land surface models improves simulations of surface water and energy fluxes and provides important information for water resources management. However, most calibration studies focus on local sites and/or small catchments because ...

Y. Xia

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Calibrating a Land Surface Model of Varying Complexity Using Multicriteria Methods and the Cabauw Dataset  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The multicriteria methodology, which provides a means to estimate optimal ranges for land surface model parameter values via calibration, is evaluated. Following calibration, differences between schemes resulting from effective parameter values ...

Y. Xia; A. J. Pitman; H. V. Gupta; M. Leplastrier; A. Henderson-Sellers; L. A. Bastidas

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Calibration of a distributed flood forecasting model with input uncertainty using a Bayesian framework  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Calibrated probabilistic forecasting using ensemble modelSutcliffe (1970), River flow forecasting through conceptuala Distributed Flood Forecasting Model with Input Uncertainty

Li, M.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Locally Calibrated Probabilistic Temperature Forecasting Using Geostatistical Model Averaging and Local Bayesian Model Averaging  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors introduce two ways to produce locally calibrated grid-based probabilistic forecasts of temperature. Both start from the Global Bayesian model averaging (Global BMA) statistical postprocessing method, which has constant predictive bias ...

William Kleiber; Adrian E. Raftery; Jeffrey Baars; Tilmann Gneiting; Clifford F. Mass; Eric Grimit

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Borehole Summary Report for Waste Treatment Plant Seismic Borehole C4993  

SciTech Connect

A core hole (C4998) and three boreholes (C4993, C4996, and C4997) were drilled to acquire stratigraphic and downhole seismic data to model potential seismic impacts and to refine design specifications and seismic criteria for the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) under construction on the Hanford Site. Borehole C4993 was completed through the Saddle Mountains Basalt, the upper portion of the Wanapum Basalt, and associated sedimentary interbeds, to provide a continuous record of the rock penetrated by all four holes and to provide access to the subsurface for geophysical measure¬ment. Presented and compiled in this report are field-generated records for the deep mud rotary borehole C4993 at the WTP site. Material for C4993 includes borehole logs, lithologic summary, and record of rock chip samples collected during drilling through the months of August through early October. The borehole summary report also includes documentation of the mud rotary drilling, borehole logging, and sample collection.

Rust, Colleen F.; Barnett, D. BRENT; Bowles, Nathan A.; Horner, Jake A.

2007-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

29

borehole | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

borehole borehole Dataset Summary Description NOAA borehole data with temperatures at different depths. http://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/paleo/borehole/nam.html Source NOAA Date Released April 08th, 2010 (4 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords borehole geothermal NOAA Data application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.spreadsheetml.sheet icon NOAA_borehole_data_4-8-10.xlsx (xlsx, 478.7 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review No Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Time Period License License Other or unspecified, see optional comment below Comment http://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/oa/about/open-access-climate-data-policy.pdf Rate this dataset Usefulness of the metadata Average vote Your vote Usefulness of the dataset Average vote Your vote Ease of access Average vote Your vote

30

Microplane constitutive model M4L for concrete. II: Calibration and validation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper, Part II of a two-part study, presents the numerical calibration and validation of the microplane constitutive model M4L for concrete formulated in the preceding part. The model parameters are firstly calibrated through optimum fitting of ... Keywords: Concrete, Finite elements, Fracture and damage, Microplane model, Structural analysis

Jiabin Li, Nguyen V. Tue, Ferhun C. Caner

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Borehole data transmission apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A borehole data transmission apparatus whereby a centrifugal pump impeller(s) is used to provide a turbine stage having substantial pressure characteristics in response to changing rotational speed of a shaft for the pressure pulsing of data from the borehole through the drilling mud to the surface of the earth.

Kotlyar, Oleg M. (1739 Grandview #2, Idaho Falls, ID 83402)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Borehole data transmission apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A borehole data transmission apparatus is described whereby a centrifugal pump impeller(s) is used to provide a turbine stage having substantial pressure characteristics in response to changing rotational speed of a shaft for the pressure pulsing of data from the borehole through the drilling mud to the surface of the earth.

Kotlyar, O.M.

1993-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

33

Multi-objective calibration and fuzzy preference selection of a distributed hydrological model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Multi-objective evaluation of distributed hydrological models enables an analysis of prediction behaviour of individual sub-systems within a catchment. The aim of this paper is to demonstrate an application of multi-response, multisite calibration strategy ... Keywords: Distributed hydrological model, Fuzzy set, Genetic algorithm, Multi-objective calibration, Preference selection, Streamflow uncertainty, Water balance

Rajesh Raj Shrestha; Michael Rode

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Electromagnetic fields in cased borehole  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Borehole electromagnetic (EM) measurements, using fiberglass-cased boreholes, have proven useful in oil field reservoir characterization and process monitoring (Wilt et al., 1995). It has been presumed that these measurements would be impossible in steel-cased wells due to the very large EM attenuation and phase shifts. Recent laboratory and field studies have indicated that detection of EM signals through steel casing should be possible at low frequencies, and that these data provide a reasonable conductivity image at a useful scale. Thus, we see an increased application of this technique to mature oilfields, and an immediate extension to geothermal industry as well. Along with the field experiments numerical model studies have been carried out for analyzing the effect of steel casing to the EM fields. The model used to be an infinitely long uniform casing embedded in a homogeneous whole space. Nevertheless, the results indicated that the formation signal could be accurately recovered if the casing characteristics were independently known (Becker et al., 1998; Lee el al., 1998). Real steel-cased wells are much more complex than the simple laboratory models used in work to date. The purpose of this study is to develop efficient numerical methods for analyzing EM fields in realistic settings, and to evaluate the potential application of EM technologies to cross-borehole and single-hole environment for reservoir characterization and monitoring.

Lee, Ki Ha; Kim, Hee Joon; Uchida, Toshihiro

2001-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

35

Borehole induction coil transmitter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A borehole induction coil transmitter which is a part of a cross-borehole electromagnetic field system that is used for underground imaging applications. The transmitter consists of four major parts: 1) a wound ferrite or mu-metal core, 2) an array of tuning capacitors, 3) a current driver circuit board, and 4) a flux monitor. The core is wound with several hundred turns of wire and connected in series with the capacitor array, to produce a tuned coil. This tuned coil uses internal circuitry to generate sinusoidal signals that are transmitted through the earth to a receiver coil in another borehole. The transmitter can operate at frequencies from 1-200 kHz and supplies sufficient power to permit the field system to operate in boreholes separated by up to 400 meters.

Holladay, Gale (Livermore, CA); Wilt, Michael J. (Walnut Creek, CA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Improved Multivariate Calibration Models for Corn Stover Feedstock and Dilute-Acid Pretreated Corn Stover  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have studied rapid calibration models to predict the composition of a variety of biomass feedstocks by correlating near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopic data to compositional data produced using traditional wet chemical analysis techniques. The rapid calibration models are developed using multivariate statistical analysis of the spectroscopic and wet chemical data. This work discusses the latest versions of the NIR calibration models for corn stover feedstock and dilute-acid pretreated corn stover. Measures of the calibration precision and uncertainty are presented. No statistically significant differences (p = 0.05) are seen between NIR calibration models built using different mathematical pretreatments. Finally, two common algorithms for building NIR calibration models are compared; no statistically significant differences (p = 0.05) are seen for the major constituents glucan, xylan, and lignin, but the algorithms did produce different predictions for total extractives. A single calibration model combining the corn stover feedstock and dilute-acid pretreated corn stover samples gave less satisfactory predictions than the separate models.

Wolfrum, E. J.; Sluiter, A. D.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Grade Assignments for Models Used for Calibration of Gross-Count Gamma-Ray Logging Systems (December 1983)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Grade Assignments for Models Used for Calibration of Gross-Count Gamma-Ray Logging Systems (December 1983)

38

Exploratory Boreholes | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Exploratory Boreholes Exploratory Boreholes Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Exploratory Boreholes Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Drilling Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Exploration Drilling Parent Exploration Technique: Exploration Drilling Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Can provide core or cuttings Stratigraphic/Structural: Identify stratigraphy and structural features within a borehole Hydrological: -Water samples can be used for geochemical analysis -Fluid pressures can be used to estimate flow rates Thermal: -Temperatures can be measured within the hole -Information about the heat source Dictionary.png Exploratory Boreholes: An exploratory borehole is drilled for the purpose of identifying the

39

Calibrating Multimodel Forecast Ensembles with Exchangeable and Missing Members Using Bayesian Model Averaging  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Bayesian model averaging (BMA) is a statistical postprocessing technique that generates calibrated and sharp predictive probability density functions (PDFs) from forecast ensembles. It represents the predictive PDF as a weighted average of PDFs ...

Chris Fraley; Adrian E. Raftery; Tilmann Gneiting

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Multivariate Calibration Models for Sorghum Composition using Near-Infrared Spectroscopy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

NREL developed calibration models based on near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy coupled with multivariate statistics to predict compositional properties relevant to cellulosic biofuels production for a variety of sorghum cultivars. A robust calibration population was developed in an iterative fashion. The quality of models developed using the same sample geometry on two different types of NIR spectrometers and two different sample geometries on the same spectrometer did not vary greatly.

Wolfrum, E.; Payne, C.; Stefaniak, T.; Rooney, W.; Dighe, N.; Bean, B.; Dahlberg, J.

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "borehole calibration models" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Reprint of "3D geological modelling from boreholes, cross-sections and geological maps, application over former natural gas storages in coal mines" [Comput. Geosci. 34 (2008) 278-290  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In a wide range of applications involving geological modelling, geological data available at low cost usually consist of documents such as cross-sections or geological maps and punctual data like borehole logs or outcrop descriptions. In order to build ... Keywords: 3D geological modelling, Data structuration, GIS, Geomodeler

Olivier Kaufmann; Thierry Martin

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Validation and Calibration of Nuclear Thermal Hydraulics Multiscale Multiphysics Models - Subcooled Flow Boiling Study  

SciTech Connect

In addition to validation data plan, development of advanced techniques for calibration and validation of complex multiscale, multiphysics nuclear reactor simulation codes are a main objective of the CASL VUQ plan. Advanced modeling of LWR systems normally involves a range of physico-chemical models describing multiple interacting phenomena, such as thermal hydraulics, reactor physics, coolant chemistry, etc., which occur over a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. To a large extent, the accuracy of (and uncertainty in) overall model predictions is determined by the correctness of various sub-models, which are not conservation-laws based, but empirically derived from measurement data. Such sub-models normally require extensive calibration before the models can be applied to analysis of real reactor problems. This work demonstrates a case study of calibration of a common model of subcooled flow boiling, which is an important multiscale, multiphysics phenomenon in LWR thermal hydraulics. The calibration process is based on a new strategy of model-data integration, in which, all sub-models are simultaneously analyzed and calibrated using multiple sets of data of different types. Specifically, both data on large-scale distributions of void fraction and fluid temperature and data on small-scale physics of wall evaporation were simultaneously used in this work’s calibration. In a departure from traditional (or common-sense) practice of tuning/calibrating complex models, a modern calibration technique based on statistical modeling and Bayesian inference was employed, which allowed simultaneous calibration of multiple sub-models (and related parameters) using different datasets. Quality of data (relevancy, scalability, and uncertainty) could be taken into consideration in the calibration process. This work presents a step forward in the development and realization of the “CIPS Validation Data Plan” at the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of LWRs to enable quantitative assessment of the CASL modeling of Crud-Induced Power Shift (CIPS) phenomenon, in particular, and the CASL advanced predictive capabilities, in general. This report is prepared for the Department of Energy’s Consortium for Advanced Simulation of LWRs program’s VUQ Focus Area.

Anh Bui; Nam Dinh; Brian Williams

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Calibration of a FE model of masonry shear panels strengthened by metal sheathing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In order to calibrate advanced FE Model experimental tests on masonry wall panel specimens in shear as well as on some panels strengthened by ductile steel are used. Application of finite element material models to simulate the behavior of masonry is ... Keywords: FE model, innovative retrofitting techniques, masonry shear panels, material models

A. Dogariu; F. Campitiello

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

A hierarchical analysis of terrestrial ecosystem model Biome-BGC: Equilibrium analysis and model calibration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The increasing complexity of ecosystem models represents a major difficulty in tuning model parameters and analyzing simulated results. To address this problem, this study develops a hierarchical scheme that simplifies the Biome-BGC model into three functionally cascaded tiers and analyzes them sequentially. The first-tier model focuses on leaf-level ecophysiological processes; it simulates evapotranspiration and photosynthesis with prescribed leaf area index (LAI). The restriction on LAI is then lifted in the following two model tiers, which analyze how carbon and nitrogen is cycled at the whole-plant level (the second tier) and in all litter/soil pools (the third tier) to dynamically support the prescribed canopy. In particular, this study analyzes the steady state of these two model tiers by a set of equilibrium equations that are derived from Biome-BGC algorithms and are based on the principle of mass balance. Instead of spinning-up the model for thousands of climate years, these equations are able to estimate carbon/nitrogen stocks and fluxes of the target (steady-state) ecosystem directly from the results obtained by the first-tier model. The model hierarchy is examined with model experiments at four AmeriFlux sites. The results indicate that the proposed scheme can effectively calibrate Biome-BGC to simulate observed fluxes of evapotranspiration and photosynthesis; and the carbon/nitrogen stocks estimated by the equilibrium analysis approach are highly consistent with the results of model simulations. Therefore, the scheme developed in this study may serve as a practical guide to calibrate/analyze Biome-BGC; it also provides an efficient way to solve the problem of model spin-up, especially for applications over large regions. The same methodology may help analyze other similar ecosystem models as well.

Thornton, Peter E [ORNL; Wang, Weile [ORNL; Law, Beverly E. [Oregon State University; Nemani, Ramakrishna R [NASA Ames Research Center

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Calibrating the Simple Biosphere Model for Amazonian Tropical Forest Using Field and Remote Sensing Data. Part I: Average Calibration with Field Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the operation and calibration of the simple biosphere model (SiB) of Sellers et al. using micrometeorological and hydrological measurements taken in and above tropical forest in the central Amazon basin. The paper provides:

Piers J. Sellers; W. James Shuttleworth; Jeff L. Dorman; Amnon Dalcher; John M. Roberts

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Supercomputer assisted generation of machine learning agents for the calibration of building energy models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Building Energy Modeling (BEM) is an approach to model the energy usage in buildings for design and retrofit purposes. EnergyPlus is the flagship Department of Energy software that performs BEM for different types of buildings. The input to EnergyPlus ... Keywords: big data, building energy modeling, calibration, machine learning, parametric ensemble, supercomputer

Jibonananda Sanyal; Joshua New; Richard Edwards

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Formal Calibration Methodology for CFD Model Development to Support the Operation of Energy Efficient Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) is a robust tool for modeling interactions within and between fluids and solids. CFD can help understand and predict phenomena that are difficult to test experimentally leading to cleaner, healthier, and better controlled internal environments. In this research a CFD model of the internal environment of an office space will be developed. The CFD model will then be calibrated using real data taken from a well-positioned wireless sensor network and weather station. The work focuses on developing systematically calibrated CFD models for controlled environments that include clean rooms, health environments, pharmaceutical storage rooms and information and communication technology locations, utilizing wireless sensor networks. The calibrated CFD model will be used to optimize the positions of the physical sensors for the control of energy efficient internal environments by building operators. This could result in significant energy and economic savings and lead to more accurately controlled internal environments.

Hajdukiewicz, M.; Keane, M.; O'Flynn, B.; O'Grady, W.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Evaluation of Automated Model Calibration Techniques for Residential Building Energy Simulation  

SciTech Connect

This simulation study adapts and applies the general framework described in BESTEST-EX (Judkoff et al 2010) for self-testing residential building energy model calibration methods. BEopt/DOE-2.2 is used to evaluate four mathematical calibration methods in the context of monthly, daily, and hourly synthetic utility data for a 1960's-era existing home in a cooling-dominated climate. The home's model inputs are assigned probability distributions representing uncertainty ranges, random selections are made from the uncertainty ranges to define 'explicit' input values, and synthetic utility billing data are generated using the explicit input values. The four calibration methods evaluated in this study are: an ASHRAE 1051-RP-based approach (Reddy and Maor 2006), a simplified simulated annealing optimization approach, a regression metamodeling optimization approach, and a simple output ratio calibration approach. The calibration methods are evaluated for monthly, daily, and hourly cases; various retrofit measures are applied to the calibrated models and the methods are evaluated based on the accuracy of predicted savings, computational cost, repeatability, automation, and ease of implementation.

Robertson, J.; Polly, B.; Collis, J.

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Evaluating Density Forecasts: Forecast Combinations, Model Mixtures, Calibration and Sharpness  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In a recent article Gneiting, Balabdaoui and Raftery (JRSSB, 2007) propose the criterion of sharpness for the evaluation of predictive distributions or density forecasts. They motivate their proposal by an example in which standard evaluation procedures based on probability integral transforms cannot distinguish between the ideal forecast and several competing forecasts. In this paper we show that their example has some unrealistic features from the perspective of the time-series forecasting literature, hence it is an insecure foundation for their argument that existing calibration procedures are inadequate in practice. We present an alternative, more realistic example in which relevant statistical methods, including information-based methods, provide the required discrimination between competing forecasts. We conclude that there is no need for a subsidiary criterion of sharpness.

James Mitchell; Kenneth F. Wallis

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Model Reduction, Validation, and Calibration of Wind Power Plants for Dynamic Studies  

SciTech Connect

Accurate representation of wind power plants (WPP) in both offline and online power system stability studies has gained importance because of the rapid increase in installation of wind generation around the world. On the other hand, reduced WPP representation is preferred due to computational efficiency. To improve the accuracy, other authors have proposed changes in structure of the reduced model for large WPPs. The use of model validation and calibration is an alternative to improve the accuracy of the reduced WPP model. In this paper, we compare accuracy improvements brought by changes in model structure with accuracy improvements brought by validation and calibration of the reduced WPP model with minimal changes in structure. We illustrate our findings using a 168-machine WPP connected to the IEEE-39-bus test system. The parameters of the reduced WPP model are either calculated with current equivalencing techniques or validated and calibrated against a more accurate model. The changes in structure of the reduced model are 1-machine or 2-machine reduced models connected with a 1-line or 2-line collector equivalents. We show that the most accurate response is obtained by calibrating the parameters of the reduced model with minimum changes in structure.

Elizondo, Marcelo A.; Lu, Shuai; Zhou, Ning; Samaan, Nader A.

2011-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

51

A hybrid analytical-heuristic method for calibrating land-use change models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Spatially explicit land-use models simulate the patterns of change on the landscape in response to coupled human-ecological dynamics. As these models become more complex involving larger than ever data sets, the need to improve calibration techniques ... Keywords: Amazon deforestation, Dinamica EGO, Genetic algorithm, Map comparison method, Spatial transition probability

Britaldo Soares-Filho; Hermann Rodrigues; Marco Follador

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Data & model conditioning for multivariate systematic uncertainty in model calibration, validation, and extrapolation.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper discusses implications and appropriate treatment of systematic uncertainty in experiments and modeling. Systematic uncertainty exists when experimental conditions, and/or measurement bias errors, and/or bias contributed by post-processing the data, are constant over the set of experiments but the particular values of the conditions and/or biases are unknown to within some specified uncertainty. Systematic uncertainties in experiments do not automatically show up in the output data, unlike random uncertainty which is revealed when multiple experiments are performed. Therefore, the output data must be properly 'conditioned' to reflect important sources of systematic uncertainty in the experiments. In industrial scale experiments the systematic uncertainty in experimental conditions (especially boundary conditions) is often large enough that the inference error on how the experimental system maps inputs to outputs is often quite substantial. Any such inference error and uncertainty thereof also has implications in model validation and calibration/conditioning; ignoring systematic uncertainty in experiments can lead to 'Type X' error in these procedures. Apart from any considerations of modeling and simulation, reporting of uncertainty associated with experimental results should include the effects of any significant systematic uncertainties in the experiments. This paper describes and illustrates the treatment of multivariate systematic uncertainties of interval and/or probabilistic natures, and combined cases. The paper also outlines a practical and versatile 'real-space' framework and methodology within which experimental and modeling uncertainties (correlated and uncorrelated, systematic and random, aleatory and epistemic) are treated to mitigate risk in model validation, calibration/conditioning, hierarchical modeling, and extrapolative prediction.

Romero, Vicente Jose

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Behavioral modeling and digital calibration of pipeline analog to digital converters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This research focuses on digital calibration of pipeline analog to digital converters (ADCs) and also modeling of error sources and design parameters of pipeline ADCs. Modern applications such as communications systems require high resolution ADCs at high rates of conversion speed. Pipeline ADCs show great potential for high-speed high-resolution applications. But limited matching property of available process technologies does not permit implementation of high-resolution pipeline ADCs unless a calibration scheme is used. There are two major methods of calibration. The first uses some redundant analog components implemented during the design of the ADC to adjust some of the analog components. These redundant analog components also have limited accuracy and cause some additional problems such as loading and area consumption. Laser trimming of analog components cannot solve the problem due to difficulty of accurate trimming beyond 12-bit. Correcting the component's matching error in digital domain is the second method of calibration. This thesis presents detailed analyses for the possibility of digital correction of the errors due to analog circuitry. As a result an efficient method for the digital calibration method is proposed. This method has the advantage of measuring the required calibration coefficients by sweeping the input voltage through the whole dynamic range.

Bilhan, Erkan

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Using Bayesian Model Averaging to Calibrate Forecast Ensembles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ensembles used for probabilistic weather forecasting often exhibit a spread-error correlation, but they tend to be underdispersive. This paper proposes a statistical method for postprocessing ensembles based on Bayesian model averaging (BMA), ...

Adrian E. Raftery; Tilmann Gneiting; Fadoua Balabdaoui; Michael Polakowski

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Calibration under uncertainty for finite element models of masonry monuments  

SciTech Connect

Historical unreinforced masonry buildings often include features such as load bearing unreinforced masonry vaults and their supporting framework of piers, fill, buttresses, and walls. The masonry vaults of such buildings are among the most vulnerable structural components and certainly among the most challenging to analyze. The versatility of finite element (FE) analyses in incorporating various constitutive laws, as well as practically all geometric configurations, has resulted in the widespread use of the FE method for the analysis of complex unreinforced masonry structures over the last three decades. However, an FE model is only as accurate as its input parameters, and there are two fundamental challenges while defining FE model input parameters: (1) material properties and (2) support conditions. The difficulties in defining these two aspects of the FE model arise from the lack of knowledge in the common engineering understanding of masonry behavior. As a result, engineers are unable to define these FE model input parameters with certainty, and, inevitably, uncertainties are introduced to the FE model.

Atamturktur, Sezer,; Hemez, Francois,; Unal, Cetin

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

BOREHOLE PRECONDITIONING OF GEOTHERMAL WELLS FOR ENHANCED GEOTHERMAL SYSTEM  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

BOREHOLE PRECONDITIONING OF GEOTHERMAL WELLS FOR ENHANCED GEOTHERMAL SYSTEM BOREHOLE PRECONDITIONING OF GEOTHERMAL WELLS FOR ENHANCED GEOTHERMAL SYSTEM RESERVOIR DEVELOPMENT Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: BOREHOLE PRECONDITIONING OF GEOTHERMAL WELLS FOR ENHANCED GEOTHERMAL SYSTEM RESERVOIR DEVELOPMENT Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Thermal stimulation can be utilized to precondition a well to optimize fracturing and production during Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) reservoir development. A finite element model was developed for the fully coupled processes consisting of: thermoporoelastic deformation, hydraulic conduction, thermal osmosis, heat conduction, pressure thermal effect, and the interconvertibility of mechanical and thermal energy. The model has

57

Calibrating Bayesian Network Representations of Social-Behavioral Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

While human behavior has long been studied, recent and ongoing advances in computational modeling present opportunities for recasting research outcomes in human behavior. In this paper we describe how Bayesian networks can represent outcomes of human behavior research. We demonstrate a Bayesian network that represents political radicalization research – and show a corresponding visual representation of aspects of this research outcome. Since Bayesian networks can be quantitatively compared with external observations, the representation can also be used for empirical assessments of the research which the network summarizes. For a political radicalization model based on published research, we show this empirical comparison with data taken from the Minorities at Risk Organizational Behaviors database.

Whitney, Paul D.; Walsh, Stephen J.

2010-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

58

Automatic Calibration of a Building Energy Simulation Model Using a Global Optimization Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A simulation model used to analyze the energy performance of an existing building should be calibrated to measured consumption data from the building so the simulation output closely follows the measured time series energy consumption data and shows the same temperature dependence. This paper has used optimization software to show that a simple simulation program which is a coding of the ASHRAE 'Simplified Energy Analysis Procedure' can be automatically calibrated to “measured” data. The “measured data” used in this case study was simulation data to which a small amount of white noise had been added.

Lee, S. U.; Claridge, D.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Definition: Borehole CCTV | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

CCTV Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Borehole CCTV A borehole CCTV survey is a technique used to assess the inner workings of a borehole. Video footage allows...

60

Model calibration and validation for OFMSW and sewage sludge co-digestion reactors  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: > Disintegration is the limiting step of the anaerobic co-digestion process. > Disintegration kinetic constant does not depend on the waste particle size. > Disintegration kinetic constant depends only on the waste nature and composition. > The model calibration can be performed on organic waste of any particle size. - Abstract: A mathematical model has recently been proposed by the authors to simulate the biochemical processes that prevail in a co-digestion reactor fed with sewage sludge and the organic fraction of municipal solid waste. This model is based on the Anaerobic Digestion Model no. 1 of the International Water Association, which has been extended to include the co-digestion processes, using surface-based kinetics to model the organic waste disintegration and conversion to carbohydrates, proteins and lipids. When organic waste solids are present in the reactor influent, the disintegration process is the rate-limiting step of the overall co-digestion process. The main advantage of the proposed modeling approach is that the kinetic constant of such a process does not depend on the waste particle size distribution (PSD) and rather depends only on the nature and composition of the waste particles. The model calibration aimed to assess the kinetic constant of the disintegration process can therefore be conducted using organic waste samples of any PSD, and the resulting value will be suitable for all the organic wastes of the same nature as the investigated samples, independently of their PSD. This assumption was proven in this study by biomethane potential experiments that were conducted on organic waste samples with different particle sizes. The results of these experiments were used to calibrate and validate the mathematical model, resulting in a good agreement between the simulated and observed data for any investigated particle size of the solid waste. This study confirms the strength of the proposed model and calibration procedure, which can thus be used to assess the treatment efficiency and predict the methane production of full-scale digesters.

Esposito, G., E-mail: giovanni.esposito@unicas.it [Department of Mechanics, Structures and Environmental Engineering, University of Cassino, via Di Biasio 43, 03043 Cassino (Italy); Frunzo, L., E-mail: luigi.frunzo@unina.it [Department of Mathematics and Applications Renato Caccioppoli, University of Naples Federico II, via Cintia, Monte S. Angelo, I-80126 Naples (Italy); Panico, A., E-mail: anpanico@unina.it [Department of Hydraulic, Geotechnical and Environmental Engineering, University of Naples Federico II, via Claudio 21, 80125 Naples (Italy); Pirozzi, F., E-mail: francesco.pirozzi@unina.it [Department of Hydraulic, Geotechnical and Environmental Engineering, University of Naples Federico II, via Claudio 21, 80125 Naples (Italy)

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "borehole calibration models" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Borehole Geophysical Methods | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Not Provided DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http:crossref.org Online Internet link for Borehole Geophysical Methods Citation Carole D. Johnson. Borehole...

62

THE PROPAGATION OF UNCERTAINTIES IN STELLAR POPULATION SYNTHESIS MODELING. III. MODEL CALIBRATION, COMPARISON, AND EVALUATION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Stellar population synthesis (SPS) provides the link between the stellar and dust content of galaxies and their observed spectral energy distributions. In the present work, we perform a comprehensive calibration of our own flexible SPS (FSPS) model against a suite of data. These data include ultraviolet, optical, and near-IR photometry, surface brightness fluctuations, and integrated spectra of star clusters in the Magellanic Clouds (MCs), M87, M31, and the Milky Way (MW), and photometry and spectral indices of both quiescent and post-starburst galaxies at z {approx} 0. Several public SPS models are intercompared, including the models of Bruzual and Charlot (BC03), Maraston (M05), and FSPS. The relative strengths and weaknesses of these models are evaluated, with the following conclusions: (1) the FSPS and BC03 models compare favorably with MC data at all ages, whereas M05 colors are too red and the age dependence is incorrect; (2) all models yield similar optical and near-IR colors for old metal-poor systems, and yet they all provide poor fits to the integrated J - K and V - K colors of both MW and M31 star clusters; (3) FSPS is able to fit all of the ultraviolet data because both the post-asymptotic giant branch (post-AGB) and horizontal branch evolutionary phases are handled flexibly, while the BC03 and M05 models fail in the far-UV, and both far- and near-UV, respectively; (4) all models predict ugr colors too red, D{sub n}4000 strengths too strong, and Hdelta{sub A} strengths too weak compared to massive red sequence galaxies, under the assumption that such galaxies are composed solely of old metal-rich stars; and (5) FSPS and, to a lesser extent, BC03 can reproduce the optical and near-IR colors of post-starburst galaxies, while M05 cannot. Reasons for these discrepancies are explored. The failure at predicting the ugr colors, D{sub n}4000, and Hdelta{sub A} strengths can be explained by some combination of a minority population of metal-poor stars, young stars, blue straggler and/or blue horizontal branch (HB) stars, but not by appealing to inadequacies in either theoretical stellar atmospheres or canonical evolutionary phases (e.g., the main-sequence turnoff). The different model predictions in the near-IR for intermediate age systems are due to different treatments of the thermally pulsating asymptotic giant branch stellar evolutionary phase. We emphasize that due to a lack of calibrating star cluster data in regions of the metallicity-age plane relevant for galaxies, all of these models continue to suffer from serious uncertainties that are difficult to quantify.

Conroy, Charlie; Gunn, James E. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States)

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Coupled gas flow/solid dynamics model for predicting the formation of fracture patterns in gas well simulation experiments. [Propellant mixture used instead of explosives to fracture rock surrounding borehole  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A two-dimensional finite element model for predicting fracture patterns obtained in high energy gas fracture experiments is presented. In these experiments, a mixture of propellants is used instead of explosives to fracture the rock surrounding the borehole. The propellant mixture is chosen to tailor the pressure pulse so that multiple fractures emanate from the borehole. The model allows the fracture pattern and pressure pulse to be calculated for different combinations of propellant mixture, in situ stress conditions, and rock properties. The model calculates the amount of gas generated by the burning propellants using a burn rate given by a power law in pressure. By assuming that the gas behaves as a perfect gas and that the flow down the fractures is isothermal, the loss of gas from the borehole due to flow down the cracks is accounted for. The flow of gas down the cracks is included in an approximate manner by assuming self-similar pressure profiles along the fractures. Numerical examples are presented and compared to three different full-scale experiments. Results show a good correlation with the experimental data over a wide variety of test parameters. 9 reference, 10 figures, 3 tables.

Taylor, L.M.; Swenson, D.V.; Cooper, P.W.

1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

A truncated Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm for the calibration of highly parameterized nonlinear models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We propose a modification to the Levenberg-Marquardt minimization algorithm for a more robust and more efficient calibration of highly parameterized, strongly nonlinear models of multiphase flow through porous media. The new method combines the advantages of truncated singular value decomposition with those of the classical Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm, thus enabling a more robust solution of underdetermined inverse problems with complex relations between the parameters to be estimated and the observable state variables used for calibration. The truncation limit separating the solution space from the calibration null space is re-evaluated during the iterative calibration process. In between these re-evaluations, fewer forward simulations are required, compared to the standard approach, to calculate the approximate sensitivity matrix. Truncated singular values are used to calculate the Levenberg-Marquardt parameter updates, ensuring that safe small steps along the steepest-descent direction are taken for highly correlated parameters of low sensitivity, whereas efficient quasi-Gauss-Newton steps are taken for independent parameters with high impact. The performance of the proposed scheme is demonstrated for a synthetic data set representing infiltration into a partially saturated, heterogeneous soil, where hydrogeological, petrophysical, and geostatistical parameters are estimated based on the joint inversion of hydrological and geophysical data.

Finsterle, S.; Kowalsky, M.B.

2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

65

Agent-based Ecological Model Calibration - on the Edge of a New Approach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of this paper is to present a new approach to ecological model calibration -- an agent-based software. This agent works on three stages: 1- It builds a matrix that synthesizes the inter-variable relationships; 2- It analyses the steady-state sensitivity of different variables to different parameters; 3- It runs the model iteratively and measures model lack of fit, adequacy and reliability. Stage 3 continues until some convergence criteria are attained. At each iteration, the agent knows from stages 1 and 2, which parameters are most likely to produce the desired shift on predicted results.

Pereira, Antonio; Reis, Luis Paulo

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Low Noise Borehole Triaxial Seismometer Phase II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the preliminary design and the effort to date of Phase II of a Low Noise Borehole Triaxial Seismometer for use in networks of seismic stations for monitoring underground nuclear explosions. The design uses the latest technology of broadband seismic instrumentation. Each parameter of the seismometer is defined in terms of the known physical limits of the parameter. These limits are defined by the commercially available components, and the physical size constraints. A theoretical design is proposed, and a preliminary prototype model of the proposed instrument has been built. This prototype used the sensor module of the KS2000. The installation equipment (hole locks, etc.) has been designed and one unit has been installed in a borehole. The final design of the sensors and electronics and leveling mechanism is in process. Noise testing is scheduled for the last quarter of 2006.

Kerr, James D; McClung, David W

2006-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

67

A Hybrid MPI/OpenMP Approach for Parallel Groundwater Model Calibration on Multicore Computers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Groundwater model calibration is becoming increasingly computationally time intensive. We describe a hybrid MPI/OpenMP approach to exploit two levels of parallelism in software and hardware to reduce calibration time on multicore computers with minimal parallelization effort. At first, HydroGeoChem 5.0 (HGC5) is parallelized using OpenMP for a uranium transport model with over a hundred species involving nearly a hundred reactions, and a field scale coupled flow and transport model. In the first application, a single parallelizable loop is identified to consume over 97% of the total computational time. With a few lines of OpenMP compiler directives inserted into the code, the computational time reduces about ten times on a compute node with 16 cores. The performance is further improved by selectively parallelizing a few more loops. For the field scale application, parallelizable loops in 15 of the 174 subroutines in HGC5 are identified to take more than 99% of the execution time. By adding the preconditioned conjugate gradient solver and BICGSTAB, and using a coloring scheme to separate the elements, nodes, and boundary sides, the subroutines for finite element assembly, soil property update, and boundary condition application are parallelized, resulting in a speedup of about 10 on a 16-core compute node. The Levenberg-Marquardt (LM) algorithm is added into HGC5 with the Jacobian calculation and lambda search parallelized using MPI. With this hybrid approach, compute nodes at the number of adjustable parameters (when the forward difference is used for Jacobian approximation), or twice that number (if the center difference is used), are used to reduce the calibration time from days and weeks to a few hours for the two applications. This approach can be extended to global optimization scheme and Monte Carol analysis where thousands of compute nodes can be efficiently utilized.

Tang, Guoping [ORNL; D'Azevedo, Ed F [ORNL; Zhang, Fan [ORNL; Parker, Jack C. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Watson, David B [ORNL; Jardine, Philip M [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Calibrating DOE-2 to Weather and Non-Weather-Dependent Loads for a Commercial Building: Data Processing Routines to Calibrate a DOE-2 Model, Volume II  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DOE-2 yields hourly data on specific variables provided the user specifies the HOURLY-REPORT instruction. Analyzing the simulation results with hourly data gives a more detailed picture of how well the model is predicting the monitored energy consumption. The difficulties of using hourly data to calibrate a model are the extraction of data from DOE-2's well documented output reports and processing the data into graphs which are meaningful. This chapter demonstrates the data processing routines that extract hourly end-use energy consumption and weather data from DOE-2's hourly output reports and process the data into three-dimensional plots and temperature-specific humidity carpet plots.

Bronson, J. D.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Model Calibration, Drainage Volume Calculation and Optimization in Heterogeneous Fractured Reservoirs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We propose a rigorous approach for well drainage volume calculations in gas reservoirs based on the flux field derived from dual porosity finite-difference simulation and demonstrate its application to optimize well placement. Our approach relies on a high frequency asymptotic solution of the diffusivity equation and emulates the propagation of a 'pressure front' in the reservoir along gas streamlines. The proposed approach is a generalization of the radius of drainage concept in well test analysis (Lee 1982), which allows us not only to compute rigorously the well drainage volumes as a function of time but also to examine the potential impact of infill wells on the drainage volumes of existing producers. Using these results, we present a systematic approach to optimize well placement to maximize the Estimated Ultimate Recovery. A history matching algorithm is proposed that sequentially calibrates reservoir parameters from the global-to-local scale considering parameter uncertainty and the resolution of the data. Parameter updates are constrained to the prior geologic heterogeneity and performed parsimoniously to the smallest spatial scales at which they can be resolved by the available data. In the first step of the workflow, Genetic Algorithm is used to assess the uncertainty in global parameters that influence field-scale flow behavior, specifically reservoir energy. To identify the reservoir volume over which each regional multiplier is applied, we have developed a novel approach to heterogeneity segmentation from spectral clustering theory. The proposed clustering can capture main feature of prior model by using second eigenvector of graph affinity matrix. In the second stage of the workflow, we parameterize the high-resolution heterogeneity in the spectral domain using the Grid Connectivity based Transform to severely compress the dimension of the calibration parameter set. The GCT implicitly imposes geological continuity and promotes minimal changes to each prior model in the ensemble during the calibration process. The field scale utility of the workflow is then demonstrated with the calibration of a model characterizing a structurally complex and highly fractured reservoir.

Kang, Suk Sang 1975-

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Working Group Reports Calibration of Radiation Codes Used in Climate Models:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Working Group Reports Calibration of Radiation Codes Used in Climate Models: Comparison of Clear-Sky Calculations with Observations from the Spectral Radiation Experiment and the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program R. G. Ellingson, S. Shen, and J. Warner University of Maryland College Park, Maryland Background The InterComparison of Radiation Codes in Climate Models (ICRCCM) showed large differences between model calculations of longwave fluxes and heating rates-even for clear-sky conditions (Luther et al. 1988). The discrepancies could not be resolved with either pyrgeometer measurements or line-by-line calculations because * Pyrgeometer errors are the magnitude of the discrepancies. * Uncertainties in the physics of line wings and in the proper treatment of the continuum make it impossible

71

ICRCCM Phase 2: Verification and calibration of radiation codes in climate models  

SciTech Connect

Following the finding by the InterComparison of Radiation Codes used in Climate Models (ICRCCM) of large differences among fluxes predicted by sophisticated radiation models that could not be sorted out because of the lack of a set of accurate atmospheric spectral radiation data measured simultaneously with the important radiative properties of the atmosphere, our team of scientists proposed to remedy the situation by carrying out a comprehensive program of measurement and analysis called SPECTRE (Spectral Radiance Experiment). SPECTRE will establish an absolute standard against which to compare models, and will aim to remove the hidden variables'' (unknown humidities, aerosols, etc.) which radiation modelers have invoked to excuse disagreements with observation. The data to be collected during SPECTRE will form the test bed for the second phase of ICRCCM, namely verification and calibration of radiation codes used in climate models. This should lead to more accurate radiation models for use in parameterizing climate models, which in turn play a key role in the prediction of trace-gas greenhouse effects.

Ellingson, R.G.; Wiscombe, W.J.; Murcray, D.; Smith, W.; Strauch, R.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Supercomputer Assisted Generation of Machine Learning Agents for the Calibration of Building Energy Models  

SciTech Connect

Building Energy Modeling (BEM) is an approach to model the energy usage in buildings for design and retrot pur- poses. EnergyPlus is the agship Department of Energy software that performs BEM for dierent types of buildings. The input to EnergyPlus can often extend in the order of a few thousand parameters which have to be calibrated manu- ally by an expert for realistic energy modeling. This makes it challenging and expensive thereby making building en- ergy modeling unfeasible for smaller projects. In this paper, we describe the \\Autotune" research which employs machine learning algorithms to generate agents for the dierent kinds of standard reference buildings in the U.S. building stock. The parametric space and the variety of building locations and types make this a challenging computational problem necessitating the use of supercomputers. Millions of En- ergyPlus simulations are run on supercomputers which are subsequently used to train machine learning algorithms to generate agents. These agents, once created, can then run in a fraction of the time thereby allowing cost-eective cali- bration of building models.

Sanyal, Jibonananda [ORNL; New, Joshua Ryan [ORNL; Edwards, Richard [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Borehole geophysics evaluation of the Raft River geothermal reservoir,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

reservoir, reservoir, Idaho Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Borehole geophysics evaluation of the Raft River geothermal reservoir, Idaho Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: GEOTHERMAL ENERGY; GEOTHERMAL FIELDS; GEOPHYSICAL SURVEYS; RAFT RIVER VALLEY; GEOTHERMAL EXPLORATION; BOREHOLES; EVALUATION; HOT-WATER SYSTEMS; IDAHO; MATHEMATICAL MODELS; WELL LOGGING; CAVITIES; EXPLORATION; GEOTHERMAL SYSTEMS; HYDROTHERMAL SYSTEMS; NORTH AMERICA; PACIFIC NORTHWEST REGION; USA Author(s): Applegate, J.K.; Donaldson, P.R.; Hinkley, D.L.; Wallace, T.L. Published: Geophysics, 2/1/1977 Document Number: Unavailable DOI: Unavailable Source: View Original Journal Article Geophysical Method At Raft River Geothermal Area (1977) Raft River Geothermal Area

74

An improved procedure for developing a calibrated hourly simulation model of an electrically heated and cooled commercial building  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

With the increased use of building energy simulation programs, calibration of simulated data to measured data has been recognized as an important factor in substantiating how well the model fits a real building. Model calibration to measured monthly utility data has been utilized for many years. Recently, efforts have reported calibrated models at the hourly level. Most of the previous methods have relied on very simple comparisons including bar charts, monthly percent difference time-series graphs, and x-y scatter plots. A few advanced methods have been proposed as well which include carpet plots and comparative 3-D time-series plots. Unfortunately, at hourly levels of calibration, many of the traditional graphical calibration techniques become overwhelmed with data and suffer from data overlap. In order to improve upon previously established techniques, this thesis presents new calibration methods including temperature binned box-whisker-mean analysis to improve x-y scatter plots, 24-hour weather-daytype box-whisker-mean graphs to show hourly temperature-dependent energy use profiles, and 52-week box-whisker-mean plots to display long-term trends. In addition to the graphical calibration techniques, other methods are also used including indoor temperature calibration to improve thermostat schedules and architectural rendering as a means of verifying the building envelope dimensions and shading placement. Several statistical methods are also reviewed for their appropriateness including percent difference, mean bias error (MBE), and the coefficient of variation of the root mean squared error. Results are presented using a case study building located in Washington, D.C. In the case study building, nine months of hourly whole-building electricity data and site-specific weather data were measured and used with the DOE-2. 1D building simulation program to test the new techniques. Use of the new calibration procedures were able to produce a MBE of-0.7% and a CV(RMSE) of 23. 1 % which compare favorably with the most accurate hourly neural network models.

Bou-Saada, Tarek Edmond

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

High-temperature borehole instrumentation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A new method of extracting natural heat from the earth's crust was invented at the Los Alamos National Laboratory in 1970. It uses fluid pressures (hydraulic fracturing) to produce cracks that connect two boreholes drilled into hot rock formations of low initial permeability. Pressurized water is then circulated through this connected underground loop to extract heat from the rock and bring it to the surface. The creation of the fracture reservior began with drilling boreholes deep within the Precambrian basement rock at the Fenton Hill Test Site. Hydraulic fracturing, flow testing, and well-completion operations required unique wellbore measurements using downhole instrumentation systems that would survive the very high borehole temperatures, 320/sup 0/C (610/sup 0/F). These instruments were not available in the oil and gas industrial complex, so the Los Alamos National Laboratory initiated an intense program upgrading existing technology where applicable, subcontracting materials and equipment development to industrial manufactures, and using the Laboratory resource to develop the necessary downhole instruments to meet programmatic schedules. 60 refs., 11 figs.

Dennis, B.R.; Koczan, S.P.; Stephani, E.L.

1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

High-temperature borehole instrumentation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Research in materials, equipment, and instrument development was required in the Hot Dry Rock Energy Extraction Demonstration at Fenton Hill located in northern New Mexico. The new Phase II Energy Extraction System at the Fenton Hill Test Site will consist of two wellbores drilled to a depth of about 4570 m (15,000 ft) and then connected by a series of hydraulic-induced fractures. The first borehole (EE-2) was completed in May of 1980, at a depth of 4633 m (15,200 ft) of which approximately 3960 m (13,000 ft) is in Precambrian granitic rock. Starting at a depth of approximately 2930 m (9600 ft), the borehole was inclined up to 35/sup 0/ from vertical. Bottom-hole temperature in EE-2 is 317/sup 0/C. The EE-3 borehole was then drilled to a depth of 4236 m (13,900 ft). Its inclined part is positioned directly over the EE-2 wellbore with a vertical separation of about 450 m (1500 ft) between them. The materials development programs cover all aspects of geothermal energy extraction. Research on drilling, hydraulic fracturing, and wellbore logging were necessary to determine the technical and economic feasibility of the hot dry rock concepts.

Dennis, B.R.; Koczan, S.; Cruz, J.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Electrical resistance tomography using steel cased boreholes as electrodes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrical resistance tomography method using steel cased boreholes as electrodes. The method enables mapping the electrical resistivity distribution in the subsurface from measurements of electrical potential caused by electrical currents injected into an array of electrodes in the subsurface. By use of current injection and potential measurement electrodes to generate data about the subsurface resistivity distribution, which data is then used in an inverse calculation, a model of the electrical resistivity distribution can be obtained. The inverse model may be constrained by independent data to better define an inverse solution. The method utilizes pairs of electrically conductive (steel) borehole casings as current injection electrodes and as potential measurement electrodes. The greater the number of steel cased boreholes in an array, the greater the amount of data is obtained. The steel cased boreholes may be utilized for either current injection or potential measurement electrodes. The subsurface model produced by this method can be 2 or 3 dimensional in resistivity depending on the detail desired in the calculated resistivity distribution and the amount of data to constain the models.

Daily, William D. (Livermore, CA); Ramirez, Abelardo L. (Pleasanton, CA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Electrical resistance tomography using steel cased boreholes as electrodes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrical resistance tomography method is described which uses steel cased boreholes as electrodes. The method enables mapping the electrical resistivity distribution in the subsurface from measurements of electrical potential caused by electrical currents injected into an array of electrodes in the subsurface. By use of current injection and potential measurement electrodes to generate data about the subsurface resistivity distribution, which data is then used in an inverse calculation, a model of the electrical resistivity distribution can be obtained. The inverse model may be constrained by independent data to better define an inverse solution. The method utilizes pairs of electrically conductive (steel) borehole casings as current injection electrodes and as potential measurement electrodes. The greater the number of steel cased boreholes in an array, the greater the amount of data is obtained. The steel cased boreholes may be utilized for either current injection or potential measurement electrodes. The subsurface model produced by this method can be 2 or 3 dimensional in resistivity depending on the detail desired in the calculated resistivity distribution and the amount of data to constrain the models. 2 figs.

Daily, W.D.; Ramirez, A.L.

1999-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

79

Combining multi-objective optimization and bayesian model averaging to calibrate forecast ensembles of soil hydraulic models  

SciTech Connect

Most studies in vadose zone hydrology use a single conceptual model for predictive inference and analysis. Focusing on the outcome of a single model is prone to statistical bias and underestimation of uncertainty. In this study, we combine multi-objective optimization and Bayesian Model Averaging (BMA) to generate forecast ensembles of soil hydraulic models. To illustrate our method, we use observed tensiometric pressure head data at three different depths in a layered vadose zone of volcanic origin in New Zealand. A set of seven different soil hydraulic models is calibrated using a multi-objective formulation with three different objective functions that each measure the mismatch between observed and predicted soil water pressure head at one specific depth. The Pareto solution space corresponding to these three objectives is estimated with AMALGAM, and used to generate four different model ensembles. These ensembles are post-processed with BMA and used for predictive analysis and uncertainty estimation. Our most important conclusions for the vadose zone under consideration are: (1) the mean BMA forecast exhibits similar predictive capabilities as the best individual performing soil hydraulic model, (2) the size of the BMA uncertainty ranges increase with increasing depth and dryness in the soil profile, (3) the best performing ensemble corresponds to the compromise (or balanced) solution of the three-objective Pareto surface, and (4) the combined multi-objective optimization and BMA framework proposed in this paper is very useful to generate forecast ensembles of soil hydraulic models.

Vrugt, Jasper A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wohling, Thomas [NON LANL

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Using Bayesian Model Averaging to Calibrate Forecast Ensembles ADRIAN E. RAFTERY, TILMANN GNEITING, FADOUA BALABDAOUI, AND MICHAEL POLAKOWSKI  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using Bayesian Model Averaging to Calibrate Forecast Ensembles ADRIAN E. RAFTERY, TILMANN GNEITING for probabilistic weather forecasting often exhibit a spread-error correlation, but they tend to be underdispersive centered on the individual bias-corrected forecasts, where the weights are equal to posterior probabilities

Raftery, Adrian

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While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

NOAA Borehole Data | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

NOAA Borehole Data NOAA Borehole Data Dataset Summary Description NOAA borehole data with temperatures at different depths. http://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/paleo/borehole/nam.html Source NOAA Date Released April 08th, 2010 (4 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords borehole geothermal NOAA Data application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.spreadsheetml.sheet icon NOAA_borehole_data_4-8-10.xlsx (xlsx, 478.7 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review No Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Time Period License License Other or unspecified, see optional comment below Comment http://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/oa/about/open-access-climate-data-policy.pdf Rate this dataset Usefulness of the metadata Average vote Your vote Usefulness of the dataset Average vote Your vote Ease of access Average vote Your vote

82

Immobilized low-activity waste site borehole 299-E17-21  

SciTech Connect

The Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) is the group at the Hanford Site responsible for the safe underground storage of liquid waste from previous Hanford Site operations, the storage and disposal of immobilized tank waste, and closure of underground tanks. The current plan is to dispose of immobilized low-activity tank waste (ILAW) in new facilities in the southcentral part of 200-East Area and in four existing vaults along the east side of 200-East Area. Boreholes 299-E17-21, B8501, and B8502 were drilled at the southwest corner of the ILAW site in support of the Performance Assessment activities for the disposal options. This report summarizes the initial geologic findings, field tests conducted on those boreholes, and ongoing studies. One deep (480 feet) borehole and two shallow (50 feet) boreholes were drilled at the southwest corner of the ILAW site. The primary factor dictating the location of the boreholes was their characterization function with respect to developing the geohydrologic model for the site and satisfying associated Data Quality Objectives. The deep borehole was drilled to characterize subsurface conditions beneath the ILAW site, and two shallow boreholes were drilled to support an ongoing environmental tracer study. The tracer study will supply information to the Performance Assessment. All the boreholes provide data on the vadose zone and saturated zone in a previously uncharacterized area.

Reidel, S.P.; Reynolds, K.D.; Horton, D.G.

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Evidence-based calibration of a building energy simulation model: Application to an office building in Belgium  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy services play a growing role in the control of energy consumption and the improvement of energy efficiency in non-residential buildings. This work consists in the application of a simulation-based approach dedicated to whole-building energy use analysis for use in the frame of an energy efficiency service process. Focus is given to the calibration of a simplified dynamic hourly building energy simulation model by means of available energy use data and to the integration of the calibration process into the Energy Service Process. The developed simulation tool and the associated calibration method are applied to a real case study building located in Brussels, Belgium. The use of an evidence-based method ensures sticking to reality and avoids bad representation and hazardous adjustment of the parameters. Moreover, it is shown that the use of a sensitivity analysis method is of a great help to orient data collection and parameters adjustment processes.

Bertagnolio, S.; Randaxhe, F.; Lemort, V.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Borehole Seismic Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Borehole Seismic Techniques Borehole Seismic Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Borehole Seismic Techniques Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Downhole Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Borehole Seismic Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Downhole Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Rock unit density influences elastic wave velocities Stratigraphic/Structural: Structural geology- faults, folds, grabens, horst blocks, sedimentary layering, discontinuities, etc Hydrological: Combining compressional and shear wave results can indicate the presence of fluid saturation in the formation Thermal: High temperatures and pressure impact the compressional and shear wave velocities

85

Borehole Geophysical Logging | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2013 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http:crossref.org Online Internet link for Borehole Geophysical Logging Citation Hager-Richter Geoscience, Inc.....

86

Borehole Summary Report for Core Hole C4998 – Waste Treatment Plant Seismic Boreholes Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Seismic borehole C4998 was cored through the upper portion of the Columbia River Basalt Group and Ellensburg Formation to provide detailed lithologic information and intact rock samples that represent the geology at the Waste Treatment Plant. This report describes the drilling of borehole C4998 and documents the geologic data collected during the drilling of the cored portion of the borehole.

Barnett, D. BRENT; Garcia, Benjamin J.

2006-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

87

Shear wave transducer for boreholes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A technique and apparatus is provided for estimating in situ stresses by measuring stress-induced velocity anisotropy around a borehole. Two sets each of radially and tangentially polarized transducers are placed inside the hole with displacement directions either parallel or perpendicular to the principal stress directions. With this configuration, relative travel times are measured by both a pulsed phase-locked loop technique and a cross correlation of digitized waveforms. The biaxial velocity data are used to back-calculate the applied stress.

Mao, N.H.

1984-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

88

Multi-array borehole resistivity and induced polarization method with mathematical inversion of redundant data  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Multiple arrays of electric or magnetic transmitters and receivers are used in a borehole geophysical procedure to obtain a multiplicity of redundant data suitable for processing into a resistivity or induced polarization model of a subsurface region of the earth.

Ward, Stanley H. (Salt Lake City, UT)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Automating calibration, sensitivity and uncertainty analysis of complex models using the R package Flexible Modeling Environment (FME): SWAT as an example  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Parameter optimization and uncertainty issues are a great challenge for the application of large environmental models like the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT), which is a physically-based hydrological model for simulating water and nutrient cycles ... Keywords: Calibration, FME, Monte Carlo, R, SWAT, Sensitivity and uncertainty analysis

Yiping Wu; Shuguang Liu

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Borehole Logging Methods for Exploration and Evaluation of Uranium...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

You are here Home Borehole Logging Methods for Exploration and Evaluation of Uranium Deposits (1967) Borehole Logging Methods for Exploration and Evaluation of Uranium...

91

Complete model of a spherical gravitational wave detector with capacitive transducers. Calibration and sensitivity optimization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report the results of a detailed numerical analysis of a real resonant spherical gravitational wave antenna operating with six resonant two-mode capacitive transducers read out by superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUID) amplifiers. We derive a set of equations to describe the electro-mechanical dynamics of the detector. The model takes into account the effect of all the noise sources present in each transducer chain: the thermal noise associated with the mechanical resonators, the thermal noise from the superconducting impedance matching transformer, the back-action noise and the additive current noise of the SQUID amplifier. Asymmetries in the detector signal-to-noise ratio and bandwidth, coming from considering the transducers not as point-like objects but as sensor with physically defined geometry and dimension, are also investigated. We calculate the sensitivity for an ultracryogenic, 30 ton, 2 meter in diameter, spherical detector with optimal and non-optimal impedance matching of the electrical read-out scheme to the mechanical modes. The results of the analysis is useful not only to optimize existing smaller mass spherical detector like MiniGrail, in Leiden, but also as a technological guideline for future massive detectors. Furthermore we calculate the antenna patterns when the sphere operates with one, three and six resonators. The sky coverage for two detectors based in The Netherlands and Brasil and operating in coincidence is also estimated. Finally, we describe and numerically verify a calibration and filtering procedure useful for diagnostic and detection purposes in analogy with existing resonant bar detectors.

Luciano Gottardi

2006-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

92

Borehole geophysics evaluation of the Raft River geothermal reservoir |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

reservoir reservoir Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Book: Borehole geophysics evaluation of the Raft River geothermal reservoir Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Borehole geophysics techniques were used in evaluating the Raft River geothermal reservoir to establish a viable model for the system. The assumed model for the hot water (145/sup 0/C) reservoir was a zone of higher conductivity, increased porosity, decreased density, and lower sonic velocity. It was believed that the long term contact with the hot water would cause alteration producing these effects. With this model in mind, cross-plots of the above parameters were made to attempt to delineate the reservoir. It appears that the most meaningful data include smoothed and

93

Modeling Study of Proposed Field Calibration Source Using K-40 Source and High-Z Targets for Sodium Iodide Detector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE) has ruled that all sealed radioactive sources, even those considered exempt under Nuclear Regulatory Commission regulations, are subject to radioactive material controls. However, sources based on the primordial isotope potassium-40 (40K) are not subject to these restrictions. Potassium-40’s beta spectrum and 1460.8 keV gamma ray can be used to induce K-shell fluorescence x rays in high-Z metals between 60 and 80 keV. A gamma ray calibration source is thus proposed that uses potassium chloride salt and a high-Z metal to create a two-point calibration for a sodium iodide field gamma spectroscopy instrument. The calibration source was designed in collaboration with Sandia National Laboratory using the Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended (MCNPX) transport code. The x ray production was maximized while attempting to preserve the detector system’s sensitivity to external sources by minimizing the count rate and shielding effect of the calibration source. Since the source is intended to be semi-permanently fixed to the detector, the weight of the calibration source was also a design factor. Two methods of x-ray production were explored. First, a thin high-Z layer (HZL) was interposed between the detector and the potassium chloride-urethane source matrix. Second, bismuth metal powder was homogeneously mixed with a urethane binding agent to form a potassium chloride-bismuth matrix (KBM). The two methods were directly compared using a series of simulations, including their x ray peak strengths, pulse-height spectral characteristics, and response to a simulated background environment. The bismuth-based source was selected as the development model because it is cheap, nontoxic, and outperforms the high-Z layer method in simulation. The overall performance for the bismuth-based source was significantly improved by splitting the calibration source longitudinally into two halves and placing them on either side of the detector. The performance was improved further by removing the binding agent and simulating a homogeneous mixture of potassium chloride and bismuth powder in a 0.1 cm plastic casing. The split plastic-encased potassium chloride-bismuth matrix would serve as a light, cheap, field calibration source that is not subject to DOE restrictions.

Rogers, Jeremy 1987-

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

KINKFOLD: an AutoLISP program for construction of geological cross-sections using borehole image data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

KINKFOLD is an AutoLISP program designed to construct geological cross-sections from borehole image or dip meter logs. The program uses the kink-fold method for cross-section construction. Beds are folded around hinge lines as angle bisectors so that ... Keywords: borehole image logs, cross-section, dip meter logs, kink-fold method, structural model

Sait Ismail Özkaya

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Effects of oil charge on illite dates and stopping quartz cement: calibration of basin models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract Effects of oil charge on illite dates and stopping quartz cement: calibration of basin Oil can fill pores in reservoir sandstones at any burial depth by long or short distance migration. There has been a debate since 1920 concerning the effect of oil charge. We have made detailed local

Haszeldine, Stuart

96

Advanced motor driven clamped borehole seismic receiver  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A borehole seismic tool is described including a borehole clamp which only moves perpendicular to the borehole. The clamp is driven by an electric motor, via a right angle drive. When used as a seismic receiver, the tool has a three part housing, two of which are hermetically sealed. Accelerometers or geophones are mounted in one hermetically sealed part, the electric motor in the other hermetically sealed part, and the clamp and right angle drive in the third part. Preferably the tool includes cable connectors at both ends. Optionally a shear plate can be added to the clamp to extend the range of the tool.

Engler, B.P.; Sleefe, G.E.; Striker, R.P.

1993-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

97

Calibration and Validation of a Spar-Type Floating Offshore Wind Turbine Model using the FAST Dynamic Simulation Tool: Preprint  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Calibration and Validation of a Calibration and Validation of a Spar-Type Floating Offshore Wind Turbine Model using the FAST Dynamic Simulation Tool Preprint J.R. Browning University of Colorado-Boulder J. Jonkman and A. Robertson National Renewable Energy Laboratory A.J. Goupee University of Maine Presented at the Science of Making Torque from Wind Oldenburg, Germany October 9-11, 2012 Conference Paper NREL/CP-5000-56138 November 2012 NOTICE The submitted manuscript has been offered by an employee of the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC (Alliance), a contractor of the US Government under Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308. Accordingly, the US Government and Alliance retain a nonexclusive royalty-free license to publish or reproduce the published form of this contribution, or allow others to do so, for US Government purposes.

98

Calibration Highlights  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... In Natural Gas Pipelines. A Primary Voltage Standard for the Whole World. A Primary Voltage Standard. ... Large Mass Calibrations -- A Matter Scale. ...

2013-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

99

Calibration and validation of a distributed energy water balance model using satellite data of land surface temperature and ground discharge measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Distributed hydrological models of energy and mass balance need as inputs many soil and vegetation parameters, which are usually difficult to define. This paper will try to approach this problem by performing a pixel to pixel calibration procedure ...

Chiara Corbari; Marco Mancini

100

Deep Borehole Disposal Research: Demonstration Site Selection Guidelines,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Deep Borehole Disposal Research: Demonstration Site Selection Deep Borehole Disposal Research: Demonstration Site Selection Guidelines, Borehole Seals Design, and RD&D Needs Deep Borehole Disposal Research: Demonstration Site Selection Guidelines, Borehole Seals Design, and RD&D Needs The U.S. Department of Energy has been investigating deep borehole disposal as one alternative for the disposal of spent nuclear fuel and other radioactive waste forms, along with research and development for mined repositories in salt, granite, and clay, as part of the used fuel disposition (UFD) campaign. The deep borehole disposal concept consists of drilling a borehole on the order of 5,000 m deep, emplacing waste canisters in the lower part of the borehole, and sealing the upper part of the borehole with bentonite and concrete seals. A reference design of the

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "borehole calibration models" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Borehole Summary Report for Waste Treatment Plant Seismic Borehole C4996  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the field-generated borehole log, lithologic summary, and the record of samples collected during the recent drilling and sampling of the basalt interval of borehole C4996 at the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) on the Hanford Site. Borehole C4996 was one of four exploratory borings, one core hole and three boreholes, drilled to investigate and acquire detailed stratigraphic and down-hole seismic data. This data will be used to define potential seismic impacts and refine design specifications for the Hanford Site WTP.

Adams , S. C.; Ahlquist, Stephen T.; Fetters, Jeffree R.; Garcia, Ben; Rust, Colleen F.

2007-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

102

Rapid Calibration of High Resolution Geologic Models to Dynamic Data Using Inverse Modeling: Field Application and Validation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Streamline-based assisted and automatic history matching techniques have shown great potential in reconciling high resolution geologic models to production data. However, a major drawback of these approaches has been incompressibility or slight compressibility assumptions that have limited applications to two-phase water-oil displacements only. We propose an approach to history matching three-phase flow using a novel compressible streamline formulation and streamline-derived analytic sensitivities. First, we utilize a generalized streamline model to account for compressible flow by introducing an 'effective density' of total fluids along streamlines. Second, we analytically compute parameter sensitivities that define the relationship between the reservoir properties and the production response, viz. water-cut and gas/oil ratio (GOR). These sensitivities are an integral part of history matching, and streamline models permit efficient computation of these sensitivities through a single flow simulation. We calibrate geologic models to production data by matching the water-cut and gas/oil ratio using our previously proposed generalized travel time inversion (GTTI) technique. For field applications, however, the highly non-monotonic profile of the gas/oil ratio data often presents a challenge to this technique. In this work we present a transformation of the field production data that makes it more amenable to GTTI. Further, we generalize the approach to incorporate bottom-hole flowing pressure during three-phase history matching. We examine the practical feasibility of the method using a field-scale synthetic example (SPE-9 comparative study) and a field application. Recently Ensemble Kalman Filtering (EnKF) has gained increased attention for history matching and continuous reservoir model updating using data from permanent downhole sensors. It is a sequential Monte-Carlo approach that works with an ensemble of reservoir models. Specifically, the method utilizes cross-covariances between measurements and model parameters estimated from the ensemble. For practical field applications, the ensemble size needs to be kept small for computational efficiency. However, this leads to poor approximations of the cross-covariance matrix, resulting in loss of geologic realism. Specifically, the updated parameter field tends to become scattered with a loss of connectivities of extreme values such as high permeability channels and low permeability barriers, which are of special significance during reservoir characterization. We propose a novel approach to overcome this limitation of the EnKF through a 'covariance localization' method that utilizes sensitivities that quantify the influence of model parameters on the observed data. These sensitivities are used in the EnKF to modify the cross-covariance matrix in order to reduce unwanted influences of distant observation points on model parameter updates. The key to the success of the sensitivity-based covariance-localization is its close link to the underlying physics of flow compared to a simple distance-dependent covariance function as used in the past. This flow-relevant conditioning leads to an efficient and robust approach for history matching and continuous reservoir model updating, avoiding much of the problems in traditional EnKF associated with instabilities, parameter overshoots and loss of geologic continuity. We illustrate the power and utility of our approach using both synthetic and field applications.

Akhil Datta-Gupta

2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

103

Borehole stability in densely welded tuffs  

SciTech Connect

The stability of boreholes, or more generally of underground openings (i.e. including shafts, ramps, drifts, tunnels, etc.) at locations where seals or plugs are to be placed is an important consideration in seal design for a repository (Juhlin and Sandstedt, 1989). Borehole instability or borehole breakouts induced by stress redistribution could negate the effectiveness of seals or plugs. Breakout fractures along the wall of repository excavations or exploratory holes could provide a preferential flowpath for groundwater or gaseous radionuclides to bypass the plugs. After plug installation, swelling pressures exerted by a plug could induce radial cracks or could open or widen preexisting cracks in the rock at the bottom of the breakouts where the tangential compressive stresses have been released by the breakout process. The purpose of the work reported here is to determine experimentally the stability of a circular hole in a welded tuff sample subjected to various external boundary loads. Triaxial and biaxial borehole stability tests have been performed on densely welded Apache Leap tuff samples and Topopah Spring tuff samples. The nominal diameter of the test hole is 13.3 or 14.4 mm for triaxial testing, and 25.4 mm for biaxial testing. The borehole axis is parallel to one of the principal stress axes. The boreholes are drilled through the samples prior to applying external boundary loads. The boundary loads are progressively increased until breakouts occur or until the maximum load capacity of the loading system has been reached. 74 refs.

Fuenkajorn, K.; Daemen, J.J.K. [Arizona Univ., Tucson, AZ (United States). Dept. of Mining and Geological Engineering

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Some logistical considerations in designing a system of deep boreholes for disposal of high-level radioactive waste.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Deep boreholes could be a relatively inexpensive, safe, and rapidly deployable strategy for disposing Americas nuclear waste. To study this approach, Sandia invested in a three year LDRD project entitled %E2%80%9CRadionuclide Transport from Deep Boreholes.%E2%80%9D In the first two years, the borehole reference design and backfill analysis were completed and the supporting modeling of borehole temperature and fluid transport profiles were done. In the third year, some of the logistics of implementing a deep borehole waste disposal system were considered. This report describes what was learned in the third year of the study and draws some conclusions about the potential bottlenecks of system implementation.

Gray, Genetha Anne; Brady, Patrick Vane [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM; Arnold, Bill Walter [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Some logistical considerations in designing a system of deep boreholes for disposal of high-level radioactive waste.  

SciTech Connect

Deep boreholes could be a relatively inexpensive, safe, and rapidly deployable strategy for disposing Americas nuclear waste. To study this approach, Sandia invested in a three year LDRD project entitled %E2%80%9CRadionuclide Transport from Deep Boreholes.%E2%80%9D In the first two years, the borehole reference design and backfill analysis were completed and the supporting modeling of borehole temperature and fluid transport profiles were done. In the third year, some of the logistics of implementing a deep borehole waste disposal system were considered. This report describes what was learned in the third year of the study and draws some conclusions about the potential bottlenecks of system implementation.

Gray, Genetha Anne; Brady, Patrick Vane [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM; Arnold, Bill Walter [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Calibration and Validation of a Spar-Type Floating Offshore Wind Turbine Model using the FAST Dynamic Simulation Tool: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 2007, the FAST wind turbine simulation tool, developed and maintained by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), was expanded to include capabilities that are suitable for modeling floating offshore wind turbines. In an effort to validate FAST and other offshore wind energy modeling tools, DOE funded the DeepCwind project that tested three prototype floating wind turbines at 1/50th scale in a wave basin, including a semisubmersible, a tension-leg platform, and a spar buoy. This paper describes the use of the results of the spar wave basin tests to calibrate and validate the FAST offshore floating simulation tool, and presents some initial results of simulated dynamic responses of the spar to several combinations of wind and sea states.

Browning, J. R.; Jonkman, J.; Robertson, A.; Goupee, A. J.

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Calibration and Validation of a Spar-Type Floating Offshore Wind Turbine Model using the FAST Dynamic Simulation Tool: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

In 2007, the FAST wind turbine simulation tool, developed and maintained by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), was expanded to include capabilities that are suitable for modeling floating offshore wind turbines. In an effort to validate FAST and other offshore wind energy modeling tools, DOE funded the DeepCwind project that tested three prototype floating wind turbines at 1/50th scale in a wave basin, including a semisubmersible, a tension-leg platform, and a spar buoy. This paper describes the use of the results of the spar wave basin tests to calibrate and validate the FAST offshore floating simulation tool, and presents some initial results of simulated dynamic responses of the spar to several combinations of wind and sea states.

Browning, J. R.; Jonkman, J.; Robertson, A.; Goupee, A. J.

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Development of a geothermal acoustic borehole televiewer  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Most geothermal wells are drilled in hard rock formations where fluid flow is through systems of open fractures. Productivity of these wells is usually determined by the extent of intersection of the wellbore with the fracture system. A need exists for fracture mapping methods and tools which can operate in a geothermal environment. In less hostile environments, the acoustic borehole televiewer has been shown to be a useful tool for determining location, orientation, and characterization of fractures as they intersect the borehole and for general wellbore and casing inspection. The development conducted at Sandia National Laboratories to adapt an acoustic borehole televiewer for operation in a geothermal environment is described. The modified instrument has been successfully tested at temperatures as high as 280/sup 0/C and pressures up to 5000 psi, and used successfully to map fractures and casing damage in geothermal wells.

Heard, F.E.; Bauman, T.J.

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Excess plutonium disposition: The deep borehole option  

SciTech Connect

This report reviews the current status of technologies required for the disposition of plutonium in Very Deep Holes (VDH). It is in response to a recent National Academy of Sciences (NAS) report which addressed the management of excess weapons plutonium and recommended three approaches to the ultimate disposition of excess plutonium: (1) fabrication and use as a fuel in existing or modified reactors in a once-through cycle, (2) vitrification with high-level radioactive waste for repository disposition, (3) burial in deep boreholes. As indicated in the NAS report, substantial effort would be required to address the broad range of issues related to deep bore-hole emplacement. Subjects reviewed in this report include geology and hydrology, design and engineering, safety and licensing, policy decisions that can impact the viability of the concept, and applicable international programs. Key technical areas that would require attention should decisions be made to further develop the borehole emplacement option are identified.

Ferguson, K.L.

1994-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

110

Assembly for directional drilling of boreholes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This patent describes a drilling assembly for directional drilling of boreholes in subsurface formations. The assembly comprising a downhole drilling motor. The motor having an output shaft which is suitable to drive a rotary drill bit and a motor housing which is suitable to be arranged at the lower end of a drill string; stabilizing means for stabilizing the assembly; means in the assembly for permanently tilting the central axis of the output shaft with respect to the longitudinal axis of the drill string in the borehole. It is characterized in that the stabilizing means include a lower-most stabilizer which is secured to and rotates with the output shaft.

Steiginga, A.; Worrall, R.N.

1989-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

111

Development, calibration and evaluation of two mathematical models for pollutant transport in a small river  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The present research has two main objectives (1) to build two models for concentration prediction in a stream subject to a pollutant release and (2) to investigate options for estimating the parameters of the models. The models rely on the fundamental ... Keywords: Advection-dispersion equation, Dispersion coefficient estimation, Murray Burn, Pollutant transport modelling, River water quality, Tracer experiments, Velocity estimation

Elisabeta-Cristina Ani; Steve Wallis; Andrzej Kraslawski; Paul Serban Agachi

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

A truncated Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm for the calibration of highly parameterized nonlinear models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

models of multiphase flow through porous media. The newmultiphase, multicomponent flow in fractured-porous media.

Finsterle, S.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Method for establishing high permeability flow path between boreholes  

SciTech Connect

A method for linking adjacent boreholes in a subterranean formation, particularly in a coal gasification array, by firing a high velocity terradynamic projectile from one borehole to the other.

Dow, Jerome P. (Pleasanton, CA)

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Method for isolating two aquifers in a single borehole  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for isolating and individually instrumenting separate aquifers within a single borehole is disclosed. A borehole is first drilled from the ground surface, through an upper aquifer, and into a separating confining bed. A casing, having upper and lower sections separated by a coupling collar, is lowered into the borehole. The borehole is grouted in the vicinity of the lower section of the casing. A borehole is then drilled through the grout plug and into a lower aquifer. After the lower aquifer is instrumented, the borehole is grouted back into the lower portion of the casing. Then the upper section of the casing is unscrewed via the coupling collar and removed from the borehole. Finally, instrumentation is added to the upper aquifer and the borehole is appropriately grouted. The coupling collar is designed to have upper right-hand screw threads and lower left-hand screw thread, whereby the sections of the casing can be readily separated.

Burklund, P.W.

1984-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

115

Methods and apparatus for measurement of the resistivity of geological formations from within cased boreholes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods and apparatus are disclosed which allow measurement of the resistivity of a geological formation through borehole casing which may be surrounded by brine saturated cement. A.C. current is passed from an electrode in electrical contact with the interior of the borehole casing to an electrode on the surface of the earth. The A.C. voltage difference is measured between two additional vertically disposed electrodes on the interior of the casing which provides a measure of the resistivity of the geological formation. A calibration and nulling procedure is presented which minimizes the influence of variations in the thickness of the casing. The procedure also minimizes the influence of inaccurate placements of the additional vertically disposed electrodes.

Vail, III, William B. (Bothell, WA)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Methods and apparatus for measurement of the resistivity of geological formations from within cased boreholes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods and apparatus are disclosed which allow measurement of the resistivity of a geological formation through borehole casing which may be surrounded by brine saturated cement. A.C. current is passed from an electrode in electrical contact with the interior of the borehole casing to an electrode on the surface of the earth. The A.C. voltage difference is measured between two additional vertically disposed electrodes on the interior of the casing which provides a measure of the resistivity of the geological formation. A calibration and nulling procedure is presented which minimizes the influence of variations in the thickness of the casing. The procedure also minimizes the influence of inaccurate placements of the additional vertically disposed electrodes. 3 figs.

Vail, W.B. III.

1989-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

117

Properties of cell death models calibrated and compared using Bayesian approaches  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using models to simulate and analyze biological networks requires principled approaches to parameter estimation and model discrimination. We use Bayesian and Monte Carlo methods to recover the full probability distributions ...

Eydgahi, Hoda

118

Predictor Screening, Calibration, and Observational Constraints in Climate Model Ensembles: An Illustration Using Climate Sensitivity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Climate projections have been remarkably difficult to constrain by comparing the simulated climatological state from different models with observations, in particular for small ensembles with structurally different models. In this study, the ...

David Masson; Reto Knutti

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Elucidating Model Inadequacies in a Cloud Parameterization by Use of an Ensemble-Based Calibration Framework  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Every cloud parameterization contains structural model errors. The source of these errors is difficult to pinpoint because cloud parameterizations contain nonlinearities and feedbacks. To elucidate these model inadequacies, this paper uses a ...

Jean-Christophe Golaz; Vincent E. Larson; James A. Hansen; David P. Schanen; Brian M. Griffin

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Calibration of the Forward-scattering Spectrometer Probe: Modeling Scattering from a Multimode Laser Beam  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Scattering calculations using a more detailed model of the multimode laser beam in the forward-scattering spectrometer probe (FSSP) were carried out by using a recently developed extension to Mie scattering theory. From this model, new ...

Edward A. Hovenac; James A. Lock

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "borehole calibration models" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Calibration of a distributed flood forecasting model with input uncertainty using a Bayesian framework  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

model formulation and Bayesian inference, J. Hydrol. , 340(to develop the Bayesian inference equations. We assume thatof the current Bayesian inference of using only outlet

Li, M.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Calibration of a distributed flood forecasting model with input uncertainty using a Bayesian framework  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An integrated hydrologic Bayesian multimodel combinationon "An integrated hydrologic Bayesian multimodel combinationand Z. S. Hou (2007), A Bayesian model for gas saturation

Li, M.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Calibration of Chemical Kinetic Models Using Simulations of Small-Scale Cookoff Experiments  

SciTech Connect

Establishing safe handling limits for explosives in elevated temperature environments is a difficult problem that often requires extensive simulation. The largest influence on predicting thermal cookoff safety lies in the chemical kinetic model used in these simulations, and these kinetic model reaction sequences often contain multiple steps. Several small-scale cookoff experiments, notably Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC), Thermogravimetric Analysis (TGA), One-Dimensional Time-to-Explosion (ODTX), and the Scaled Thermal Explosion (STEX) have been performed on various explosives to aid in cookoff behavior determination. Past work has used a single test from this group to create a cookoff model, which does not guarantee agreement with the other experiments. In this study, we update the kinetic parameters of an existing model for the common explosive 2,4,6-Trinitrotoluene (TNT) using DSC and ODTX experimental data at the same time by minimizing a global Figure of Merit based on hydrodynamic simulated data. We then show that the new kinetic model maintains STEX agreement, reduces DSC agreement, and improves ODTX and TGA agreement when compared to the original model. In addition, we describe a means to use implicit hydrodynamic simulations of DSC experiments to develop a reaction model for TNT melting.

Wemhoff, A P; Becker, R C; Burnham, A K

2008-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

124

Calibrated Probabilistic Forecasting Using Ensemble Model Output Statistics and Minimum CRPS Estimation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ensemble prediction systems typically show positive spread-error correlation, but they are subject to forecast bias and dispersion errors, and are therefore uncalibrated. This work proposes the use of ensemble model output statistics (EMOS), an ...

Tilmann Gneiting; Adrian E. Raftery; Anton H. Westveld III; Tom Goldman

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Calibrated Surface Temperature Forecasts from the Canadian Ensemble Prediction System Using Bayesian Model Averaging  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Bayesian model averaging (BMA) has recently been proposed as a way of correcting underdispersion in ensemble forecasts. BMA is a standard statistical procedure for combining predictive distributions from different sources. The output of BMA is a ...

Laurence J. Wilson; Stephane Beauregard; Adrian E. Raftery; Richard Verret

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Category:Borehole Seismic Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Borehole Seismic Techniques page? Borehole Seismic Techniques page? For detailed information on Borehole Seismic Techniques as exploration techniques, click here. Category:Borehole Seismic Techniques Add.png Add a new Borehole Seismic Techniques Technique Pages in category "Borehole Seismic Techniques" The following 2 pages are in this category, out of 2 total. S Single-Well And Cross-Well Seismic V Vertical Seismic Profiling Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Category:Borehole_Seismic_Techniques&oldid=601962" Category: Downhole Techniques What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties About us Disclaimers Energy blogs Linked Data Developer services OpenEI partners with a broad range of international organizations to grow

127

Electrical resistance tomography from measurements inside a steel cased borehole  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Electrical resistance tomography (ERT) produced from measurements taken inside a steel cased borehole. A tomographic inversion of electrical resistance measurements made within a steel casing was then made for the purpose of imaging the electrical resistivity distribution in the formation remotely from the borehole. The ERT method involves combining electrical resistance measurements made inside a steel casing of a borehole to determine the electrical resistivity in the formation adjacent to the borehole; and the inversion of electrical resistance measurements made from a borehole not cased with an electrically conducting casing to determine the electrical resistivity distribution remotely from a borehole. It has been demonstrated that by using these combined techniques, highly accurate current injection and voltage measurements, made at appropriate points within the casing, can be tomographically inverted to yield useful information outside the borehole casing.

Daily, William D. (Livermore, CA); Schenkel, Clifford (Walnut Creek, CA); Ramirez, Abelardo L. (Pleasanton, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Explosive Model Tarantula 4d/JWL++ Calibration of LX-17  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tarantula is an explosive kinetic package intended to do detonation, shock initiation, failure, corner-turning with dead zones, gap tests and air gaps in reactive flow hydrocode models. The first, 2007-2008 version with monotonic Q is here run inside JWL++ with square zoning from 40 to 200 zones/cm on ambient LX-17. The model splits the rate behavior in every zone into sections set by the hydrocode pressure, P + Q. As the pressure rises, we pass through the no-reaction, initiation, ramp-up/failure and detonation sections sequentially. We find that the initiation and pure detonation rate constants are largely insensitive to zoning but that the ramp-up/failure rate constant is extremely sensitive. At no time does the model pass every test, but the pressure-based approach generally works. The best values for the ramp/failure region are listed here in Mb units.

Souers, P C; Vitello, P A

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

129

THERMAL MODEL CALIBRATION FOR MINOR PLANETS OBSERVED WITH WIDE-FIELD INFRARED SURVEY EXPLORER/NEOWISE  

SciTech Connect

With the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE), we have observed over 157,000 minor planets. Included in these are a number of near-Earth objects, main-belt asteroids, and irregular satellites which have well measured physical properties (via radar studies and in situ imaging) such as diameters. We have used these objects to validate models of thermal emission and reflected sunlight using the WISE measurements, as well as the color corrections derived in Wright et al. for the four WISE bandpasses as a function of effective temperature. We have used 50 objects with diameters measured by radar or in situ imaging to characterize the systematic errors implicit in using the WISE data with a faceted spherical near-Earth asteroid thermal model (NEATM) to compute diameters and albedos. By using the previously measured diameters and H magnitudes with a spherical NEATM model, we compute the predicted fluxes (after applying the color corrections given in Wright et al.) in each of the four WISE bands and compare them to the measured magnitudes. We find minimum systematic flux errors of 5%-10%, and hence minimum relative diameter and albedo errors of {approx}10% and {approx}20%, respectively. Additionally, visible albedos for the objects are computed and compared to the albedos at 3.4 {mu}m and 4.6 {mu}m, which contain a combination of reflected sunlight and thermal emission for most minor planets observed by WISE. Finally, we derive a linear relationship between subsolar temperature and effective temperature, which allows the color corrections given in Wright et al. to be used for minor planets by computing only subsolar temperature instead of a faceted thermophysical model. The thermal models derived in this paper are not intended to supplant previous measurements made using radar or spacecraft imaging; rather, we have used them to characterize the errors that should be expected when computing diameters and albedos of minor planets observed by WISE using a spherical NEATM model.

Mainzer, A.; Masiero, J.; Bauer, J.; Ressler, M.; Eisenhardt, P. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Grav, T. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, 366 Bloomberg Center, 3400 N. Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Wright, E. [UCLA Astronomy, P.O. Box 91547, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1547 (United States); Cutri, R. M. [Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); McMillan, R. S. [Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, University of Arizona, 1629 East University Blvd., Kuiper Space Science Bldg. 92, Tucson, AZ 85721-0092 (United States); Cohen, M., E-mail: amainzer@jpl.nasa.gov [Radio Astronomy Laboratory, 601 Campbell Hall, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Evaluatoni of Automated Utility Bill Calibration Methods  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. Evaluation of Automated Utility Bill Calibration Methods BA Technical Update Meeting Ben Polly, Joe Robertson 04/30/13 Utility Bill Calibration * "Calibrate" or "true-up" building energy models to utility bill data to increase the accuracy of retrofit savings predictions * Calibration methods typically involve adjusting input parameters * Predict retrofit savings using the adjusted (calibrated) model 2 Background: BESTEST-EX * BESTEST-EX is a suite for testing calibration methods and retrofit savings predictions associated with audit software * Field trials showed that:

131

Calibration Model Assignments expressed as %U3O8, Summary Table ES-1  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ES-1. Assignments for Logging Models ES-1. Assignments for Logging Models Model Location Primary Use a Enriched-Zone Grade % e U 3 O 8 b ppm e U b Enriched- Zone Thickness (ft) b Enriched- Zone Moisture (wt-%) c Dry Bulk Density (g/cc) c U1 U2 U3 WF N3 D U A1 A2 A3 Grand Junction, Colorado TC TC TC TC TC FN KUT FN FN FN 2.636 ± 0.082 1.229 ± 0.038 0.4516 ± 0.0091 0.3003 ± 0.0053 0.2310 ± 0.0041 0.0772 ± 0.0012 0.05569 ± 0.00097 0.03051 ± 0.00044 0.0794 ± 0.0012 0.1611 ± 0.0024 22355 ± 697 10424 ± 326 3830 ± 77 2547 ± 45 1959 ± 35 654.5 ± 9.8 472.3 ± 8.2 258.7 ± 3.7 673.5 ± 9.8 1366 ± 20 4.06 ± 0.01 4.01 ± 0.00 4.01 ± 0.00 4.02 ± 0.00 4.19 ± 0.00 5.80 ± 0.00 4.98 ± 0.00 6.01 ± 0.00 5.94 ± 0.00

132

Building and Calibration of a FAST Model of the SWAY Prototype Floating Wind Turbine: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Present efforts to verify and validate aero-hydro-servo-elastic numerical simulation tools that predict the dynamic response of a floating offshore wind turbine are primarily limited to code-to-code comparisons or code-to-data comparisons using data from wind-wave basin tests. In partnership with SWAY AS, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) installed scientific wind, wave, and motion measurement equipment on the 1/6.5th-scale prototype SWAY floating wind system to collect data to validate a FAST model of the SWAY design in an open-water condition. Nanyang Technological University (NTU), through a collaboration with NREL, assisted in this validation.

Koh, J. H.; Robertson, A.; Jonkman, J.; Driscoll, F.; Ng, E. Y. K.

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Multi-array borehole resistivity and induced polarization method with mathematical inversion of redundant data  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Multiple arrays of electric or magnetic transmitters and receivers are used in a borehole geophysical procedure to obtain a multiplicity of redundant data suitable for processing into a resistivity or induced polarization model of a subsurface region of the earth. 30 figs.

Ward, S.H.

1989-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

134

Calibration and Validation of a FAST Floating Wind Turbine Model of the DeepCwind Scaled Tension-Leg Platform: Preprint  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With the intent of improving simulation tools, a 1/50th-scale floating wind turbine atop a TLP was designed based on Froude scaling by the University of Maine under the DeepCwind Consortium. This platform was extensively tested in a wave basin at MARIN to provide data to calibrate and validate a full-scale simulation model. The data gathered include measurements from static load tests and free-decay tests, as well as a suite of tests with wind and wave forcing. A full-scale FAST model of the turbine-TLP system was created for comparison to the results of the tests. Analysis was conducted to validate FAST for modeling the dynamics of this floating system through comparison of FAST simulation results to wave tank measurements. First, a full-scale FAST model of the as-tested scaled configuration of the system was constructed, and this model was then calibrated through comparison to the static load, free-decay, regular wave only, and wind-only tests. Next, the calibrated FAST model was compared to the combined wind and wave tests to validate the coupled hydrodynamic and aerodynamic predictive performance. Limitations of both FAST and the data gathered from the tests are discussed.

Stewart, G.; Lackner, M.; Robertson, A.; Jonkman, J.; Goupee, A.

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Hostile wells: the borehole seismic challenge | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hostile wells: the borehole seismic challenge Hostile wells: the borehole seismic challenge Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Hostile wells: the borehole seismic challenge Author William Wills Published Oil and Gas Engineer - Subsea & Seismic, 2013 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for Hostile wells: the borehole seismic challenge Citation William Wills. Hostile wells: the borehole seismic challenge [Internet]. 2013. Oil and Gas Engineer - Subsea & Seismic. [cited 2013/10/01]. Available from: http://www.engineerlive.com/content/22907 Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Hostile_wells:_the_borehole_seismic_challenge&oldid=690045" Categories: References Geothermal References

136

Borehole-Wall Imaging with Acoustic and Optical Televiewers for  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Borehole-Wall Imaging with Acoustic and Optical Televiewers for Borehole-Wall Imaging with Acoustic and Optical Televiewers for Fractured-Bedrock Aquifer Investigations Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Borehole-Wall Imaging with Acoustic and Optical Televiewers for Fractured-Bedrock Aquifer Investigations Abstract Imaging with acoustic and optical televiewers results in continuous and oriented 360 degree views of the borehole wall from which the character and orientation of lithologic and structural features can be defined for fractured-bedrock aquifer investigations. Fractures are more clearly defined under a wider range of conditions on acoustic images than on optical images including dark-colored rocks, cloudy borehole water, and coated borehole walls. However, optical images allow for the direct viewing

137

Research, Development, and Demonstration Roadmap for Deep Borehole Disposal  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Research, Development, and Demonstration Roadmap for Deep Borehole Research, Development, and Demonstration Roadmap for Deep Borehole Disposal Research, Development, and Demonstration Roadmap for Deep Borehole Disposal This roadmap is intended to advance deep borehole disposal (DBD) from its current conceptual status to potential future deployment as a disposal system for spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high-level waste (HLW). The objectives of the DBD RD&D roadmap include providing the technical basis for fielding a DBD demonstration project, defining the scientific research activities associated with site characterization and postclosure safety, as well as defining the engineering demonstration activities associated with deep borehole drilling, completion, and surrogate waste canister emplacement. Research, Development, and Demonstration Roadmap for Deep Borehole Disposal

138

Feasibility of a borehole VHF radar technique for fracture mapping  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Experiments were conducted to establish the feasibility of a downhole high-frequency electromagnetic technique for location of fractures in the vicinity of boreholes. An existing flame-cut slot in granite was filled with salt water to simulate a brine-filled fracture. A transmitter consisting of a phased dual-dipole array arranged to provide a directional signal toward the fracture was installed in a borehole opposite the fracture. A receiver operated at 30 to 300 MHz was also located in the same borehole. The radar returns from the simulated fracture were detectable in boreholes located at distances of up to 12 meters from the fracture. These results indicate for the first time the feasibility of a downhole VHF radar for use in a single borehole for detection of fractures located away from the borehole.

Chang, H.T.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

INVESTIGATION OF USAGE OF VELOCITY AND PRESSURE DATA WITHIN A WATER DISTRIBUTION LAB MODEL FOR CALIBRATING HYDRAULIC MODELS.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Water distribution modeling for hydraulics and water quality is an important tool for managing system performance of water utilities. An important component of a water… (more)

Ashby, Robert Craig

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

The feasibility of developing a borehole sparker for geothermal wells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A feasibility study was undertaken to determine the practicality of designing a borehole sparker (underwater electric discharge) seismic source for use in an extremely harsh environment (69MPa @ 275{degrees}C = 10,000 psi @ 527{degrees}F). Important electrical and hydrodynamic parameters of underwater spark discharges, component availability, and past accomplishments of others in the field of borehole-to-borehole sparker surveying are discussed. It is concluded that this instrument could be economically developed.

McClung, J.B.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "borehole calibration models" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Temperature Measurements in Boreholes: An Overview of Engineering...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Temperature Measurements in Boreholes: An Overview of Engineering and Scientific Applications Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article:...

142

Borehole geophysics evaluation of the Raft River geothermal reservoir...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

reservoir, Idaho Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Borehole geophysics evaluation of the Raft River geothermal reservoir, Idaho Details...

143

Borehole survey instrumentation development for geothermal applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The creation and subsequent study of hot dry rock geothermal reservoirs requires sophisticated tools and instruments that can function for relatively long periods of time in the hostile downhole environment. Detection of fracture dimensions and orientation of the geothermal reservoir is critical for the successful completion of the hot dry rock energy extraction system. The development of downhole instrumentation capable of characterizing the hydraulic-fracture systems must emphasize reliability of measuring devices and electro-mechanical components to function properly at borehole temperature exceeding 275/sup 0/C and pressures of 69 MPa (10,000 psi).

Dennis, B.R.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Description, calibration and sensitivity analysis of the local ecosystem submodel of a global model of carbon and nitrogen cycling and the water balance in the terrestrial biosphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have developed a geographically-distributed ecosystem model for the carbon, nitrogen, and water dynamics of the terrestrial biosphere TERRA. The local ecosystem model of TERRA consists of coupled, modified versions of TEM and DAYTRANS. The ecosystem model in each grid cell calculates water fluxes of evaporation, transpiration, and runoff; carbon fluxes of gross primary productivity, litterfall, and plant and soil respiration; and nitrogen fluxes of vegetation uptake, litterfall, mineralization, immobilization, and system loss. The state variables are soil water content; carbon in live vegetation; carbon in soil; nitrogen in live vegetation; organic nitrogen in soil and fitter; available inorganic nitrogen aggregating nitrites, nitrates, and ammonia; and a variable for allocation. Carbon and nitrogen dynamics are calibrated to specific sites in 17 vegetation types. Eight parameters are determined during calibration for each of the 17 vegetation types. At calibration, the annual average values of carbon in vegetation C, show site differences that derive from the vegetation-type specific parameters and intersite variation in climate and soils. From calibration, we recover the average C{sub v} of forests, woodlands, savannas, grasslands, shrublands, and tundra that were used to develop the model initially. The timing of the phases of the annual variation is driven by temperature and light in the high latitude and moist temperate zones. The dry temperate zones are driven by temperature, precipitation, and light. In the tropics, precipitation is the key variable in annual variation. The seasonal responses are even more clearly demonstrated in net primary production and show the same controlling factors.

Kercher, J.R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)] [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Chambers, J.Q. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)] [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); [California Univ., Santa Barbara, CA (United States). Dept. of Biological Sciences

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

High Temperature Borehole Televiewer software user manual  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The High Temperature Borehole Televiewer is a downhole instrument which provides acoustic pictures of the borehole walls that are suitable for casing inspection and fracture detection in geothermal wells. The Geothermal Drilling Organization has funded the development of a commercial tool survivable to temperatures of 275{degree}C and pressures of 5000 psi. A real-time display on an IBM-compatible PC was included as part of the development effort. This report contains a User Manual which describes the operation of this software. The software is designed in a menu format allowing the user to change many of the parameters which control both the acquisition and the display of the Televiewer data. An internal data acquisition card digitizes the waveform from the tool at a rate of 100,000 samples per second. The data from the tool, both the range or arrival time and the amplitude of the return signal, are displayed in color on the CRT screen of the computer during the logging operation. This data may be stored on the hard disk for later display and analysis. The software incorporates many features which aid in the setup of the tool for proper operation. These features include displaying and storing the captured waveform data to check the voltage and time windows selected by the user. 17 refs., 28 figs., 15 tabs.

Duda, L.E.

1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Second ILAW Site Borehole Characterization Plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy's Hanford Site has the most diverse and largest amounts of radioactive tank waste in the US. High-level radioactive waste has been stored at Hanford since 1944. Approximately 209,000 m{sup 3} (54 Mgal) of waste are currently stored in 177 tanks. Vitrification and onsite disposal of low-activity tank waste (LAW) are embodied in the strategy described in the Tri-Party Agreement. The tank waste is to be retrieved, separated into low- and high-level fractions, and then immobilized. The low-activity vitrified waste will be disposed of in the 200 East Area of the Hanford Site. This report is a plan to drill and characterize the second borehole for the Performance Assessment. The first characterization borehole was drilled in 1998. The plan describes data collection activities for determining physical and chemical properties of the vadose zone and saturated zone on the northeast side of the proposed disposal site. These data will then be used in the 2005 Performance Assessment.

SP Reidel

2000-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

147

Evaluation of borehole electromagnetic and seismic detection of fractures  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Experiments were conducted to establish the feasibility of downhole high-frequency techniques for location of fractures in the vicinity of boreholes. An existing flame-cut slot in granite was filled with salt water to simulate a brine-filled fracture. The first method used an electromagnetic wave at 30 to 300 MHz, vhf frequencies. A transmitter consisting of a phased dual-dipole array arranged to provide a directional signal toward the fracture was installed in a borehole opposite the fracture. A receiver was also located in the same borehole. The radar returns from the simulated fracture were detectable in boreholes located at distances of up to 12 meters from the fracture. These results indicate for the first time the feasibility of a downhole vhf radar for use in a single borehole for detection of fractures located away from the borehole. Similar experiments were also conducted using seismic waves at 4.5 to 6 KHz. The transmitter and the receiver in this case were located in separate boreholes. During this experiment, reflections from the slot were obtained only with the transducers oriented for shear wave illumination and detection. These results suggest that a high-frequency shear wave can also be used to detect fractures away from a borehole.

Chang, H.T.; Suhler, S.A.; Owen, T.E.

1984-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Thermocouples Calibrations Services  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Only bare wires are needed for NIST thermocouple calibrations. ... The minimum length for thermocouple wire submitted for calibration should be at ...

2013-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

149

Facilities for Calibration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Our state-of-the-art property measurements require extensive calibration facilities of equal quality. Regular calibrations are essential for realistic ...

2014-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

150

Radiometer Calibration Trends  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radiometer Calibration Trends S. M. Wilcox, T. L. Stoffel, and D. R. Myers National Renewable Energy Laboratory Golden, Colorado Abstract Calibrations of Atmospheric Radiation...

151

Blasting agent for blasting in hot boreholes  

SciTech Connect

A blasting agent is described which is resistant to decomposition when exposed to elevated temperatures (e.g., 325 to 350 F) for 24 hr. It is composed of an inorganic oxidizing salt such as ammonium nitrate; a high-boiling liquid oxygen-containing organic fuel, e.g., dibutyl phthalate; a densifying agent such as ferrophosphorus and a coating agent such as calcium stearate. A primer assembly contains the thermally stable blasting agent in a cartridge can. The assembly has a well at one end containing a high-explosive booster attached to high-energy detonating cord, which is in initiating relationship with a blasting cap. The metal-cartridged blasting agent and primer assembly are useful for blasting in hot boreholes, which can be either wet or dry. 9 claims.

Schaefer, W.E.

1974-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

152

Head assembly for multiposition borehole extensometer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A head assembly for a borehole extensometer and an improved extensometer for measuring subsurface subsidence. A plurality of inflatable anchors provide discrete measurement points. A metering rod is fixed to each of the anchors which are displaced when subsidence occurs, thereby translating the attached rod. The head assembly includes a sprocket wheel rotatably mounted on a standpipe and engaged by a chain which is connected at one end to the metering rod and at the other end to a counterweight. A second sprocket wheel connected to the standpipe also engages the chain and drives a connected potentiometer. The head assembly converts the linear displacement of the metering rod to the rotary motion of the second sprocket wheel, which is measured by the potentiometer, producing a continuous electrical output.

Frank, Donald N. (Livermore, CA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

How borehole ballooning alters drilling responses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

From field observations of drilling and hole instability problems over a 30-year period, a new and more complete understanding of plastic well-bore behavior - under certain pressure imbalance conditions - is being developed and verified with detailed well histories. Rock mechanics theory, thus far primarily concerned with plastic behavior and borehole collapse on the underbalanced side, is in at least partial agreement with these observations. This article further elaborates on the pressure-responsive plastic behavior of shales under tremendous downhole stresses, particularly in the overbalanced, ballooning mode. The primary subject matter of the article is divided into the following areas: Stable operating margin; Plastic behavior region; Wellbore wall yields; Brittle sloughings; Loss of mud; Gain of mud; Shut-in pressure; Reflex gas; Charged RFT's; Preexisting balloon; Drilling rate.

Gill, J.A.

1989-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

154

Head assembly for multiposition borehole extensometer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A head assembly for a borehole extensometer and an improved extensometer for measuring subsurface subsidence. A plurality of inflatable anchors provide discrete measurement points. A metering rod is fixed to each of the anchors which are displaced when subsidence occurs, thereby translating the attached rod. The head assembly includes a sprocket wheel rotatably mounted on a standpipe and engaged by a chain which is connected at one end to the metering rod and at the other end to a counterweight. A second sprocket wheel connected to the standpipe also engages the chain and drives a connected potentiometer. The head assembly converts the linear displacement of the metering rod to the rotary motion of the second sprocket wheel, which is measured by the potentiometer, producing a continuous electrical output.

Frank, D.N.

1981-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

155

Mercury Continuous Emmission Monitor Calibration  

SciTech Connect

Mercury continuous emissions monitoring systems (CEMs) are being implemented in over 800 coal-fired power plant stacks throughput the U.S. Western Research Institute (WRI) is working closely with the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to facilitate the development of the experimental criteria for a NIST traceability protocol for dynamic elemental mercury vapor calibrators/generators. These devices are used to calibrate mercury CEMs at power plant sites. The Clean Air Mercury Rule (CAMR) which was published in the Federal Register on May 18, 2005 and vacated by a Federal appeals court in early 2008 required that calibration be performed with NIST-traceable standards. Despite the vacature, mercury emissions regulations in the future will require NIST traceable calibration standards, and EPA does not want to interrupt the effort towards developing NIST traceability protocols. The traceability procedures will be defined by EPA. An initial draft traceability protocol was issued by EPA in May 2007 for comment. In August 2007, EPA issued a conceptual interim traceability protocol for elemental mercury calibrators. The protocol is based on the actual analysis of the output of each calibration unit at several concentration levels ranging initially from about 2-40 {micro}g/m{sup 3} elemental mercury, and in the future down to 0.2 {micro}g/m{sup 3}, and this analysis will be directly traceable to analyses by NIST. The EPA traceability protocol document is divided into two separate sections. The first deals with the qualification of calibrator models by the vendors for use in mercury CEM calibration. The second describes the procedure that the vendors must use to certify the calibrators that meet the qualification specifications. The NIST traceable certification is performance based, traceable to analysis using isotope dilution inductively coupled plasma/mass spectrometry (ID/ICP/MS) performed by NIST in Gaithersburg, MD. The outputs of mercury calibrators are compared to one another using a nesting procedure which allows direct comparison of one calibrator with another at specific concentrations and eliminates analyzer variability effects. The qualification portion of the EPA interim traceability protocol requires the vendors to define calibrator performance as affected by variables such as pressure, temperature, line voltage, and shipping. In 2007 WRI developed and conducted a series of simplified qualification experiments to determine actual calibrator performance related to the variables defined in the qualification portion of the interim protocol.

John Schabron; Eric Kalberer; Ryan Boysen; William Schuster; Joseph Rovani

2009-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

156

Calibrations and Special Tests  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... assurance measurements. Periodically we perform internal quality audits equivalent to ISO 17025. Calibrations reports ...

2011-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

157

Methods and apparatus for measurement of electronic properties of geological formations through borehole casing  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods and apparatus are provided for measuring electronic properties of geological formations and cement layers adjacent to cased boreholes including resistivities, polarization phenomena and dielectric constants. Current is passed from an electrode in electrical contact with the interior of the borehole casing to an electrode on the surface of the earth. At least three voltage measuring electrodes in electrical contact with the interior of the casing measure the voltage at various points thereon. The voltage differences between discrete pairs of the voltage measuring electrodes provide a measurement of differential current conducted into formation in the vicinity of those electrodes. These measurements facilitate calculation of the resistivities of the adjacent geological formations as well as an indication of whether cement is present. Measurements of the differential voltage response to transient currents provide a measurement of the polarization phenomena in formation as well as the capacitance of the casing in contact with the formation which is useful for determining whether oil and gas are present. Lithological characteristics of the formation such as the presence or absence of clay can also be determined. A calibration procedure is provided for minimizing errors induced by variations in the casing. The device also may be placed within the pipe attached to a drill bit while drilling open holes. 48 figs.

Vail, W.B. III.

1989-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

158

Methods and apparatus for measurement of electronic properties of geological formations through borehole casing  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods and apparatus are provided for measuring electronic properties of geological formations and cement layers adjacent to cased boreholes including resistivities, polarization phenomena and dielectric constants. Current is passed from an electrode in electrical contact with the interior of the borehole casing to an electrode on the surface of the earth. At least three voltage measuring electrodes in electrical contact with the interior of the casing measure the voltage at various points thereon. The voltage differences between discrete pairs of the voltage measuring electrodes provide a measurement of the differential current conducted into the formation in the vicinity of those electrodes. These measurements facilitate calculation of the resistivities of the adjacent geological formations as well as an indication of whether cement is present. Measurements of the differential voltage response to transient currents provide a measurement of the polarization phenomena in formation as well as the capacitance of the casing in contact with the formation which is useful for determining whether oil and gas are present. Lithological characteristics of the formation such as the presence or absence of clay can also be determined. A calibration procedure is provided for minimizing errors induced by variations in the casing. The device also may be placed within the pipe attached to a drill bit while drilling open holes. 48 figures.

Vail, W.B. III.

1991-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

159

Methods and apparatus for measurement of electronic properties of geological formations through borehole casing  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods and apparatus are provided for measuring electronic properties of geological formations and cement layers adjacent to cased boreholes including resistivities, polarization phenomena and dielectric constants. Current is passed from an electrode in electrical contact with the interior of the borehole casing to an electrode on the surface of the earth. At least three voltage measuring electrodes in electrical contact with the interior of the casing measure the voltage at various points thereon. The voltage differences between discrete pairs of the voltage measuring electrodes provide a measurement of the differential current conducted into formation in the vicinity of those electrodes. These measurements facilitate calculation of the resistivities of the adjacent geological formations as well as an indication of whether cement is present. Measurements of the differential voltage response to transient currents provide a measurement of the polarization phenomena in formation as well as the capacitance of the casing in contact with the formation which is useful for determining whether oil and gas present. Lithological characteristics of the formation such as the pressence or absence of clay can also be determined. A calibration procedure is provided for minimizing errors induced by variations in the casing. The device also may be placed within the pipe attached to a drill bit while drilling open holes.

Vail, III, William B. (Bothell, WA)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Methods and apparatus for measurement of electronic properties of geological formations through borehole casing  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods and apparatus are provided for measuring electronic properties of geological formations and cement layers adjacent to cased boreholes including resistivities, polarization phenomena and dielectric constants. Current is passed from an electrode in electrical contact with the interior of the borehole casing to an electrode on the surface of the earth. At least three voltage measuring electrodes in electrical contact with the interior of the casing measure the voltage at various points thereon. The voltage differences between discrete pairs of the voltage measuring electrodes provide a measurement of differential current conducted into formation in the vicinity of those electrodes. These measurements facilitate calculation of the resistivities of the adjacent geological formations as well as an indication of whether cement is present. Measurements of the differential voltage response to transient currents provide a measurement of the polarization phenomena in formation as well as the capacitance of the casing in contact with the formation which is useful for determining whether oil and gas are present. Lithological characteristics of the formation such as the presence or absence of clay can also be determined. A calibration procedure is provided for minimizing errors induced by variations in the casing. The device also may be placed within the pipe attached to a drill bit while drilling open holes.

Vail, III, William B. (Bothell, WA)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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161

Temperature Measurements in Boreholes: An Overview of Engineering and  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Temperature Measurements in Boreholes: An Overview of Engineering and Temperature Measurements in Boreholes: An Overview of Engineering and Scientific Applications Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Temperature Measurements in Boreholes: An Overview of Engineering and Scientific Applications Abstract Temperature data obtained in boreholes serve as critical input to many fields of engineering, exploration, and research: (1) in well completions, (2) gas and fluid production engineering, (3) in the exploration for hydrocarbons and ore minerals, and (4) for testing hypotheses concerning the evolution of the Earth's crust and tectonic processes. Wireline-conveyed maximum-recording thermometers and continuous-reading thermistors are used to measure absolute temperatures, differential

162

Minor actinide waste disposal in deep geological boreholes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of this investigation was to evaluate a waste canister design suitable for the disposal of vitrified minor actinide waste in deep geological boreholes using conventional oil/gas/geothermal drilling technology. ...

Sizer, Calvin Gregory

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

A drop-in-concept for deep borehole canister emplacement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Disposal of high-level nuclear waste in deep boreholes drilled into crystalline bedrock (i.e., "granite") is an interesting repository alternative of long standing. Work at MIT over the past two decades, and more recently ...

Bates, Ethan Allen

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Canister design for deep borehole disposal of nuclear waste  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The objective of this thesis was to design a canister for the disposal of spent nuclear fuel and other high-level waste in deep borehole repositories using currently available and proven oil, gas, and geothermal drilling ...

Hoag, Christopher Ian

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Bond strength of cementitious borehole plugs in welded tuff  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Axial loads on plugs or seals in an underground repository due to gas, water pressures and temperature changes induced subsequent to waste and plug emplacement lead to shear stresses at the plug/rock contact. Therefore, the bond between the plug and rock is a critical element for the design and effectiveness of plugs in boreholes, shafts or tunnels. This study includes a systematic investigation of the bond strength of cementitious borehole plugs in welded tuff. Analytical and numerical analysis of borehole plug-rock stress transfer mechanics is performed. The interface strength and deformation are studied as a function of Young`s modulus ratio of plug and rock, plug length and rock cylinder outside-to-inside radius ratio. The tensile stresses in and near an axially loaded plug are analyzed. The frictional interface strength of an axially loaded borehole plug, the effect of axial stress and lateral external stress, and thermal effects are also analyzed. Implications for plug design are discussed. The main conclusion is a strong recommendation to design friction plugs in shafts, drifts, tunnels or boreholes with a minimum length to diameter ratio of four. Such a geometrical design will reduce tensile stresses in the plug and in the host rock to a level which should minimize the risk of long-term deterioration caused by excessive tensile stresses. Push-out tests have been used to determine the bond strength by applying an axial load to cement plugs emplaced in boreholes in welded tuff cylinders. A total of 130 push-out tests have been performed as a function of borehole size, plug length, temperature, and degree of saturation of the host tuff. The use of four different borehole radii enables evaluation of size effects. 119 refs., 42 figs., 20 tabs.

Akgun, H.; Daemen, J.J.K. [Arizona Univ., Tucson, AZ (USA). Dept. of Mining and Geological Engineering

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Borehole Optimisation System (BOS) - A case study assessing options for abstraction of urban groundwater in Nottingham, UK  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The recognition that urban groundwater is a potentially valuable resource for potable and industrial uses due to growing pressures on perceived less polluted rural groundwater has led to a requirement to assess the groundwater contamination risk in urban ... Keywords: Borehole Optimisation System, GIS, PCE, Probabilistic risk modelling, Urban groundwater

N. G. Tait; R. M. Davison; S. A. Leharne; D. N. Lerner

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Integrated Calibration Sphere and Calibration Step Fixture for Improved  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Integrated Calibration Sphere and Calibration Step Fixture for Integrated Calibration Sphere and Calibration Step Fixture for Improved Coordinate Measurement Machine Calibration Integrated Calibration Sphere and Calibration Step Fixture for Improved Coordinate Measurement Machine Calibration A method and apparatus for mounting a calibration sphere to a calibration fixture for Coordinate Measurement Machine (CMM) calibration and qualification is described, decreasing the time required for such qualification, thus allowing the CMM to be used more productively. Available for thumbnail of Feynman Center (505) 665-9090 Email Integrated Calibration Sphere and Calibration Step Fixture for Improved Coordinate Measurement Machine Calibration A method and apparatus for mounting a calibration sphere to a calibration fixture for Coordinate Measurement Machine (CMM) calibration and

168

Development of an automated methodology for calibration of simplified air-side HVAC system models and estimation of potential savings from retrofit/commissioning measures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This dissertation provides one methodology to determine potential energy savings of buildings with limited information. This methodology is based upon the simplified energy analysis procedure of HVAC systems and the control of the comfort conditions. Numerically, the algorithm is a tailored exhaustive search over all the independent variables that are commonly controlled for a specific type of HVAC system. The potential energy savings methodology has been applied in several buildings that have been retrofitted and/or commissioned previously. Results from the determined savings for the Zachry building at Texas A&M after being commissioned show a close agreement to the calculated potential energy savings (about 85%). Differences are mainly attributed to the use of simplified models. Due to the restriction of limited information about the building characteristics and operational control, the potential energy savings method requires the determination of parameters that characterize its thermal performance. Thus, a calibrated building is needed. A general procedure has been developed to carry out automated calibration of building energy use simulations. The methodology has been tested successfully on building simulations based on the simplified energy analysis procedure. The automated calibration is the minimization of the RMSE of the energy use over daily conditions. The minimization procedure is fulfilled with a non-canonical optimization algorithm, the Simulated Annealing, which mimics the Statistical Thermodynamic performance of the annealing process. That is to say, starting at a specified temperature the algorithm searches variable-space states that are steadier, while heuristically, by the Boltzmann distribution, the local minima is avoided. The process is repeated at a new lower temperature that is determined by a specific schedule until the global minimum is found. This methodology was applied to the most common air-handler units producing excellent results for ideal cases or for samples modified with a 1% white noise.

Baltazar Cervantes, Juan Carlos

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Required Calibrations Legal Document  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... This document is a Calibration Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (C-CRADA) between your company and NIST. ...

2013-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

170

The electrical resistivity method in cased boreholes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The use of downhole current sources in resistivity mapping can greatly enhance the detection and delineation of subsurface features. The purpose of this work is to examine the resistivity method for current sources in wells cased with steel. The resistivity method in cased boreholes with downhole current sources is investigated using the integral equation (IE) technique. The casing and other bodies are characterized as conductivity inhomogeneities in a half-space. For sources located along the casing axis, an axially symmetric Green's function is used to formulate the surface potential and electric field (E-field) volume integral equations. The situations involving off-axis current sources and three-dimensional (3-D) bodies is formulated using the surface potential IE method. The solution of the 3-D Green's function is presented in cylindrical and Cartesian coordinate systems. The methods of moments is used to solve the Fredholm integral equation of the second kind for the response due to the casing and other bodies. The numerical analysis revealed that the current in the casing can be approximated by its vertical component except near the source and the axial symmetric approximation of the casing is valid even for the 3-D problem. The E-field volume IE method is an effective and efficient technique to simulate the response of the casing in a half-space, whereas the surface potential approach is computationally better when multiple bodies are involved. Analyzing several configurations of the current source indicated that the casing response is influenced by four characteristic factors: conduction length, current source depth,casing depth, and casing length. 85 refs., 133 figs., 11 tabs.

Schenkel, C.J.

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Geology of the Waste Treatment Plant Seismic Boreholes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 2006, DOE-ORP initiated the Seismic Boreholes Project (SBP) to emplace boreholes at the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) site in order to obtain direct Vs measurements and other physical property measurements in Columbia River basalt and interbedded sediments of the Ellensburg Formation. The goal was to reduce the uncertainty in the response spectra and seismic design basis, and potentially recover design margin for the WTP. The characterization effort within the deep boreholes included 1) downhole measurements of the velocity properties of the suprabasalt, basalt, and sedimentary interbed sequences, 2) downhole measurements of the density of the subsurface basalt and sediments, and 3) confirmation of the geometry of the contact between the various basalt and interbedded sediments through examination of retrieved core from the corehole and data collected through geophysical logging of each borehole. This report describes the results of the geologic studies from three mud-rotary boreholes and one cored borehole at the WTP. All four boreholes penetrated the entire Saddle Mountains Basalt and the upper part of the Wanapum Basalt where thick sedimentary interbeds occur between the lava flows. The basalt flows penetrated in Saddle Mountains Basalt included the Umatilla Member, Esquatzel Member, Pomona Member and the Elephant Mountain Member. The underlying Priest Rapids Member of the Wanapum Basalt was also penetrated. The Ellensburg Formation sediments consist of the Mabton Interbed, the Cold Creek Interbed, the Selah Interbed and the Rattlesnake Ridge Interbed; the Byron Interbed occurs between two flows of the Priest Rapids Member. The Mabton Interbed marks the contact between the Wanapum and Saddle Mountains Basalts. The thicknesses of the basalts and interbedded sediments were within expected limits. However, a small reverse fault was found in the Pomona Member flow top. This fault has three periods of movement and less than 15 feet of repeated section. Most of the movement on the fault appears to have occurred before the youngest lava flow, the 10.5 million year old Elephant Mountain Member was emplaced above the Pomona Member.

Barnett, D. BRENT; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Fecht, Karl R.; Lanigan, David C.; Reidel, Steve; Rust, Colleen F.

2007-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

172

Pyranometer calibration: leveling errors and cosine effect  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The solar monitoring system for the Sandia Total Energy Systems Test Facility consists of a fixed, horizontal pyranometer and a tracking pyranometer and pyrheliometer. Readout uses a scanned A-D converter with recording via print-out, magnetic tape, or disk. The Eppley pyrheliometer is calibrated by direct comparison with a Kendall electrically-calibrated radiometer. The pyranometers, model PSP, also from Eppley, are calibrated against the pyrheliometer using shading techniques; and the parameters affecting that calibration are the subject of this summary.

Thacher, P.D.; Petterson, B.J.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Instrument calibration using the pneumatic deadweight tester  

SciTech Connect

One of the most difficult problems facing the instrument engineer is the accurate calibration of orifice meters, particularly at remote or inaccessible locations. The object of this paper is to describe a unique solution to this problem, an automatic pneumatic deadweight tester utilizing the floating ball principle. The Ametek Model PK Pneumatic Deadweight Tester is an ideal instrument to use for the calibration of orifice meters. This instrument provides unexcelled accuracy combined with reliable operation and ease of use for both field and laboratory calibration. It has been accepted by most of the gas transmission companies as a pressure standard for meter calibration.

Johnson, E.R.

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Global Calibration of the GEOS-5 L-Band Microwave Radiative Transfer Model over Nonfrozen Land Using SMOS Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A zero-order (tau-omega) microwave radiative transfer model (RTM) is coupled to the Goddard Earth Observing System, version 5 (GEOS-5) catchment land surface model in preparation for the future assimilation of global brightness temperatures (Tb) ...

Gabriëlle J. M. De Lannoy; Rolf H. Reichle; Valentijn R. N. Pauwels

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Atmospheric optical calibration system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An atmospheric optical calibration system is provided to compare actual atmospheric optical conditions to standard atmospheric optical conditions on the basis of aerosol optical depth, relative air mass, and diffuse horizontal skylight to global horizontal photon flux ratio. An indicator can show the extent to which the actual conditions vary from standard conditions. Aerosol scattering and absorption properties, diffuse horizontal skylight to global horizontal photon flux ratio, and precipitable water vapor determined on a real-time basis for optical and pressure measurements are also used to generate a computer spectral model and for correcting actual performance response of a photovoltaic device to standard atmospheric optical condition response on a real-time basis as the device is being tested in actual outdoor conditions.

Hulstrom, Roland L. (Bloomfield, CO); Cannon, Theodore W. (Golden, CO)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Atmospheric optical calibration system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An atmospheric optical calibration system is provided to compare actual atmospheric optical conditions to standard atmospheric optical conditions on the basis of aerosol optical depth, relative air mass, and diffuse horizontal skylight to global horizontal photon flux ratio. An indicator can show the extent to which the actual conditions vary from standard conditions. Aerosol scattering and absorption properties, diffuse horizontal skylight to global horizontal photon flux ratio, and precipitable water vapor determined on a real-time basis for optical and pressure measurements are also used to generate a computer spectral model and for correcting actual performance response of a photovoltaic device to standard atmospheric optical condition response on a real-time basis as the device is being tested in actual outdoor conditions. 7 figs.

Hulstrom, R.L.; Cannon, T.W.

1988-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

177

Logging technology for high-temperature geothermal boreholes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Research in materials, equipment, and instrument development was required in the Hot Dry Rock Energy Extraction Demonstration at Fenton Hill located in northern New Mexico. Results of this extensive development advanced the logging technology in geothermal boreholes to present state-of-the art. The new Phase II Energy Extraction System at the Fenton Hill Test Site will consist of two wellbores drilled to a depth of about 4570 m (15,000 ft) and then connected by a series of hydraulic-induced fractures. The first borehole (EE-2) was completed in May of 1980 at a depth of 4633 m (15,200 ft) of which approximately 3960 m (13,000 ft) is in Precambrian granitic rock. Starting at a depth of approximately 2930 m (9600 ft), the borehole was inclined up to 35/sup 0/ from vertical. Bottom-hole temperature in EE-2 is 320/sup 0/C. The EE-3 borehole was then drilled to a depth of 4236 m (13,900 ft). Its inclined part is positioned directly over the EE-2 wellbore with a vertical separation of about 450 m (1500 ft) between them. Many of the geophysical measurements needed to develop the hot dry rock concept are unique. Most of the routine instruments used in petroleum drilling fail in the hot and abrasive environment. New equipment developed includes not only the downhole sonde that houses the transducer and associated line driving electronics, but modifications also were needed on the entire data retrieval systems and associated data analysis technology. Successful performance of wellbore surveys in the EE-2 and EE-3 boreholes depended upon the capacity of the sensors, instrument sonde, cablehead, and armored logging cable to work in this severe environment. The major areas of materials development for surveying the boreholes in the high-temperature environment were on elastomeric seals, electrical insulation for logging cables, downhole sensors, and associated downhole electronic and electro-mechanical components.

Dennis, B.R.

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Acoustic wave propagation in a fluid-filled borehole surrounded by a formation with stress-relief-induced anisotropy  

SciTech Connect

The stress relief associated with the drilling of a borehole may lead to an anisotropic formation in the vicinity of the borehole, where the properties in the radial direction differ from those in the axial and tangential directions. Thus, axial and radial compressional acoustic velocities are different, and similarly, the velocity of an axial shear-wave depends on whether the polarization is radial or tangential. A model was developed to describe acoustic wave propagation in a borehole surrounded by a formation with stress-relief-induced radial transverse isotropy (RTI). Acoustic full waveforms due to a monopole source are computed using the real-axis integration method, and dispersion relations are found by tracing poles in the k[sub z] plane. An analytic expression for the low-frequency Stoneley wave is developed. The numerical results confirm the expectations that the compressional refraction is mainly given by the axial compressional velocity, while the shear refraction arrival is due to the shear wave with radial polarization. As a result, acoustic logging in an RTI formation, will indicate a higher v[sub p]/v[sub s] ratio than that existing in the virgin formation. It also follows that the shear velocity may be a better indicator of a mechanically damaged zone near the borehole than the compressional velocity. The Stoneley-wave velocity was found to decrease with the increasing degree of RTI.

Renlie, L. (IKU Petroleum Research, Trondheim (Norway)); Raaen, A.M. (Statoil, Postuttak, Trondheim (Norway))

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Elements of a continuous-wave borehole radar. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The theory is developed for the antenna array for a proposed continuous-wave, ground-penetrating radar for use in a borehole, and field measurements are presented. Accomplishments include the underground measurement of the transmitting beam in the azimuth plane, active azimuth-steering of the transmitting beam, and the development of a range-to-target algorithm. The excellent performance of the antenna array supports the concept of a continuous-wave borehole radar. A field-prototype should be developed for use in both geothermal zones and for the exploration and recovery of oil and gas.

Caffey, T.W.H. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Geophysical Technology Dept.

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Characterization of Vadose Zone Sediments Below the T Tank Farm: Boreholes C4104, C4105, 299-W10-196 and RCRA Borehole 299-W11-39  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report contains geologic, geochemical, and physical characterization data collected on sediment recovered from boreholes C4104 and C4105 in the T Tank Farm, and 299-W-11-39 installed northeast of the T Tank Farm. The measurements on sediments from borehole C4104 are compared to a nearby borehole 299-W10-196 placed through the plume from the 1973 T-106 tank leak. This report also presents the data in the context of sediment types, the vertical extent of contamination, the migration potential of the contaminants, and the likely source of the contamination in the vadose zone and groundwater below the T Tank Farm. Sediment samples were characterized for: moisture content, gamma-emission radionuclides, one-to-one water extracts (which provide soil pH, electrical conductivity, cation, trace metal, radionuclide and anion data), total carbon and inorganic carbon content, and 8 M nitric acid extracts (which provide a measure of the total leachable sediment content of contaminants). Overall, our analyses showed that common ion exchange is a key mechanism that influences the distribution of contaminants within that portion of the vadose zone affected by tank liquor. We observed slight elevated pH values in samples from borehole C4104. The sediments from the three boreholes, C4104, C4105, and 299-W10-196 do show that sodium-, nitrate-, and sulfate-dominated fluids are present below tank T-106 and have formed a salt plume. The fluids are more dilute than tank fluids observed below tanks at the SX and BX Tank Farms and slightly less than those from the most saline porewater found in contaminated TX tank farm sediments. The boreholes could not penetrate below the gravel-rich strata of the Ringold Formation Wooded Island member (Rwi) (refusal was met at about 130 ft bgs); therefore, we could not identify the maximum vertical penetration of the tank related plumes. The moisture content, pH, electrical conductivity, nitrate, and technetium-99 profiles versus depth in the three contaminated boreholes around T-106 do not clearly identify the leading edge of the plume. However, the profiles do collectively suggest that bulk of tank-related fluids (center of mass) still resides in Ringold Formation Taylor Flats member fine-grained sediments. Most of the chemical data, especially the nitrate and technetium-99 distributions with depth, support a flow conceptual model that suggests vertical percolation through the Hanford formation H2 unit near T-106 and then a strong horizontal spreading within the CCUu unit followed by more slow vertical percolation, perhaps via diffusion, into the deeper strata. Slow flushing by enhanced recharge and rapid snow melt events (Feb. 1979) appear to lead to more horizontal movement of the tank fluids downgradient towards C4105. The inventories as a function of depth of potential contaminants of concern, nitrate, technetium, uranium, and chromium, are provided. In-situ Kd values were calculated from water and acid extract measurements. For conservative modeling purposes we recommend using Kd values of 0 mL/g for nitrate, Co-60, and technetium-99, a value of 0.1 mL/g for uranium near borehole C4104 and 10 mL/g for U near borehole C4105, and 1 mL/g for chromium to represent the entire vadose zone profile from the bottoms of the tanks to the water table. A technetium-99 groundwater plume exists northeast and east of T WMA. The highest technetium-99 concentration in fiscal year 2003 was 9,200 pCi/L in well 299-W11-39. The most probable source for the technetium-99 is the T waste management area. Groundwater from wells in the west (upgradient) and north of WMA T appear to be highly influenced by wastes disposed to the cribs and trenches on the west side of the WMA. Groundwater from wells at the northeast corner and the east side of the WMA appears to be evolving towards tank waste that has leaked from T-101 or T-106.

Serne, R JEFFREY.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Horton, Duane G.; Lanigan, David C.; Lindenmeier, Clark W.; Lindberg, Michael J.; Clayton, Ray E.; LeGore, Virginia L.; Geiszler, Keith N.; Baum, Steven R.; Valenta, Michelle M.; Kutnyakov, Igor V.; Vickerman, Tanya S.; Orr, Robert D.; Brown, Christopher F.

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "borehole calibration models" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Contribution of Thermal Infrared Remote Sensing Data in Multiobjective Calibration of a Dual-Source SVAT Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study fits within the overall research on the usage of space remote sensing data to constrain land surface models (LSMs) (also called SVAT models for soil–vegetation–atmosphere transfer). The goal of this paper is to analyze the potential of ...

Benoit Coudert; Catherine Ottlé; Brice Boudevillain; Jérôme Demarty; Pierre Guillevic

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Cross borehole induced polarization to detect subsurface NAPL at the Savannah River Site, South Carolina  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Spectral induced polarization measurements were acquired in six cross-borehole panels within four boreholes at the Savannah River Site. The investigation was performed to delineate the presence of dense non-aqueous phase ...

Lambert, Michael B. (Michael Brian), 1980-

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Uncertainty and Dimensional Calibrations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... are very sensitive to the size and condition of the ... is the same as steel for our conditions. ... a calibrated linear variable differen- tial transformer (LVDT ...

2013-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

184

Thermometry Calibration Services  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Hygrometers – chilled mirror – electric ... If you are sending an SPRT for calibration, please measure the triple point of water resistance R(TPW ...

2013-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

185

Welcome to NIST Calibrations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... In general, this C-CRADA protects your calibration information as well as providing you with a firm price quote, explaining invoicing information ...

2013-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

186

Analysis and calibration of social factors in a consumer acceptance and adoption model for diffusion of diesel vehicle in Europe  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

While large scale diffusion of alternative fuel vehicles (AFVs) is widely anticipated, the mechanisms that determine their success or failure are ill understood. Analysis of an AFV transition model developed at MIT has ...

Zhang, Qi, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Size influence on the sealing performance of cementitious borehole plugs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Flow tests have been conducted on cement plugs with diameters of 158.8 mm and 196.9 mm, and length to diameter ratios of one, in boreholes in basalt blocks and in steel pipes. Expansion strains and curing temperatures have been monitored on cement plugs in boreholes in basalt blocks, in PVC and in steel pipes with diameters from 25.4 mm to 196.9 mm and length to diameter ratios of one and two. During permeability tests, basalt blocks have fractured, presumably due to water injection pressure, cement expansion and packer pressure. Falling head tests have been performed on some block fractures to study the influence of the complicated interaction between a cement borehole plug (e.g. swelling and shrinkage alternations) and the rock, as well as of the normal stress across the fracture, on the hydraulic conductivity of a fracture intersecting a plugged borehole. The hydraulic conductivity of the cement plugs in the steel pipes varies between 3.57 x 10/sup -11/ cm/min and 3.65 x 10/sup -9/ cm/min. Cement swelling tests remain inconclusive about size effects, primarily because of instrumentation problems. Cement curing temperatures increase from small to large diameter cement plugs.

Akgun, H.; Daemen, J.J.K.

1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Geology of the Waste Treatment Plant Seismic Boreholes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 2006, the U.S. Department of Energy initiated the Seismic Boreholes Project (SBP) to emplace boreholes at the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) site in order to obtain direct shear wave velocity (Vs) measurements and other physical property measurements in Columbia River basalt and interbedded sediments of the Ellensburg Formation. The goal was to reduce the uncertainty in the response spectra and seismic design basis, and potentially recover design margin for the WTP. The characterization effort within the deep boreholes included 1) downhole measurements of the velocity properties of the suprabasalt, basalt, and sedimentary interbed sequences, 2) downhole measurements of the density of the subsurface basalt and sediments, and 3) geologic studies to confirm the geometry of the contact between the various basalt and interbedded sediments through examination of retrieved core from the core hole and data collected through geophysical logging of each borehole. This report describes the results of the geologic studies from three mud-rotary boreholes and one cored borehole at the WTP. All four boreholes penetrated the entire Saddle Mountains Basalt and the upper part of the Wanapum Basalt where thick sedimentary interbeds occur between the lava flows. The basalt flows penetrated in Saddle Mountains Basalt included the Umatilla Member, Esquatzel Member, Pomona Member, and the Elephant Mountain Member. The underlying Priest Rapids Member of the Wanapum Basalt also was penetrated. The Ellensburg Formation sediments consist of the Mabton Interbed, the Cold Creek Interbed, the Selah Interbed, and the Rattlesnake Ridge Interbed; the Byron Interbed occurs between two flows of the Priest Rapids Member. The Mabton Interbed marks the contact between the Wanapum and Saddle Mountains Basalts. The thicknesses of the basalts and interbedded sediments were within expected limits. However, a small reverse fault was found in the Pomona Member flow top. This fault has three periods of movement and less than 15 ft of repeated section. Most of the movement on the fault appears to have occurred before the youngest lava flow, the 10.5-million-year-old Elephant Mountain Member, was emplaced above the Pomona Member.

Barnett, D. Brent; Fecht, Karl R.; Reidel, Stephen P.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Lanigan, David C.; Rust, Colleen F.

2007-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

189

On calibration of orthotropic elastic-plastic constitutive models for paper foils by biaxial tests and inverse analyses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper two procedures are developed for the identification of the parameters contained in an orthotropic elastic-plastic-hardening model for free standing foils, particularly of paper and paperboard. The experimental data considered are provided ... Keywords: Artificial neural networks, Paper foils, Parameter identification

Tomasz Garbowski; Giulio Maier; Giorgio Novati

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Calibration method for spectroscopic systems  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Calibration spots of optically-characterized material placed in the field of view of a spectroscopic system allow calibration of the spectroscopic system. Response from the calibration spots is measured and used to calibrate for varying spectroscopic system operating parameters. The accurate calibration achieved allows quantitative spectroscopic analysis of responses taken at different times, different excitation conditions, and of different targets. 3 figs.

Sandison, D.R.

1998-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

191

Fluid Metrology Calibration Services - Water Flow  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fluid Metrology Calibration Services - Water Flow. Water Flow Calibrations 18020C. ... NIST provides calibration services for water flow meters. ...

2011-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

192

Axial strength of cement borehole plugs in granite and basalt. Topical report on rock mass sealing  

SciTech Connect

This report describes experimental and theoretical studies of the axial strength of cement plugs installed in boreholes drilled coaxially in granite and in basalt cylinders. Experimental work has consisted of loading the cement plugs to failure while measuring loads and displacements. Such tests have been performed on borehole plugs with a diameter and a length ranging from 2.5 cm to 10 cm. Results from over one hundred experiments show that the strength is high, sufficient for anticipated loads at repository depths, but very variable, complicating the design of very short plugs. Significant residual strength (thirty to fifty percent of the peak strength) is observed. A frictional model of the interface shear strength, tau = c + sigma(tan phi), in combination with the assumption of an exponential shear stress distribution or plug-rock load transfer, provides the simplest realistic model for plug strength characterization. The integrated strength thus calculated compares moderately well with experimental results. An extensive review is given of more sophisticated analysis procedures that should be of value for general plug design applications. Generic analyses and their implications for plug performance are included. Variability of experimental results complicates the assessment of their direct detailed applicability. 115 references, 70 figures, 19 tables.

Stormont, J.C.; Daemen, J.J.K.

1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Four Years of TRMM/VIRS On-Orbit Calibrations and Characterization Using Lunar Models and Data from Terra/MODIS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Four years of on-orbit solar calibration data have been used to quantify the temporal degradation of the two reflected solar bands of the Visible and Infrared Scanner (VIRS) aboard the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite. Solar ...

Cheng-Hsuan Lyu; William L. Barnes

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Roundness calibration standard  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A roundness calibration standard is provided with a first arc constituting the major portion of a circle and a second arc lying between the remainder of the circle and the chord extending between the ends of said first arc.

Burrus, B.M.

1982-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

195

Roundness calibration standard  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A roundness calibration standard is provided with a first arc constituting the major portion of a circle and a second arc lying between the remainder of the circle and the chord extending between the ends of said first arc.

Burrus, Brice M. (6620 Wachese La., Knoxville, TN 37912)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Potential uses for a high-temperature borehole gravimeter  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

It is possible to design a canister to cool a borehole gravimeter for use in geothermal and high-temperature (up to 350/sup 0/C) gas wells. Repeat surveys with such a gravimeter could (1) help estimate the extent of reservoir plugging in geothermal injection well after one year of operation and (2) detect compaction of a geothermal aquifer if the change in thickness of the aquifer exceeds 1 m. The instrument could be used together with conventional logging tools to evaluate radial dependence of density around a well, or to estimate gas-filled porosity around wells drilled with mud. A high-temperature borehole gravimeter could also be used to evaluate structure and stratigraphy around geothermal and high-temperature gas wells.

Hearst, J.R.; Kasameyer, P.W.; Owen, L.B.

1978-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

197

Development of an acoustic sensor for a geothermal borehole televiewer  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to upgrade acoustic sensor technology such that appropriate well logging instruments can be made to operate under the hostile environment conditions anticipated in geothermal resource exploration and evaluation. The Borehole Televiewer (BHTV) was selected as the vehicle for this sensor improvement work, primarily because of its demonstrated ability to detect and characterize fractures under sub-geothermal conditions. The work done toward providing an improved sensor for the televiewer is described. An experimental sensor concept was devised, incorporating a thin metal acoustic window, an improved, high-temperature internal coupling fluid, and thermally resistant sensor internals. During an autoclave test, it was successfully demonstrated that the resulting experimental sensor design concept provides the basic target detection and characterization functions required of a fracture mapping, Borehole Televiewer under simulated geothermal conditions. In particular, the experimental sensor remained operational at 275/sup 0/C and 7000 psi.

Wonn, J.W.

1979-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Development of an acoustic sensor for a geothermal Borehole Televiewer  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to upgrade acoustic sensor technology such that appropriate well logging instruments can be made to operate under the hostile environment conditions anticipated in geothermal resource exploration and evaluation. The Borehole Televiewer (BHTV) was selected as the vehicle for this sensor improvement work, primarily because of its demonstrated ability to detect and characterize fractures under sub-geothermal conditions. The work done toward providing an improved sensor for the televiewer is described. An experimental sensor concept was devised, incorporating a thin metal acoustic window, an improved, high-temperature internal coupling fluid, and thermally resistant sensor internals. During an autoclave test, it was successfully demonstrated that the resulting experimental sensor design concept provides the basic target detection and characterization functions required of a fracture mapping, Borehole Televiewer under simulated geothermal conditions. In particular, the experimental sensor remained operational at 275/sup 0/C and 7000 psi.

Wonn, J.W.

1979-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

STANFORD ROCK PHYSICS BOREHOLE GEOPHYSICS PROJECT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B1 Velocity-pressure and porosity-pressure trends in sands Zimmer, Prasad & Mavko. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B2 Comparison between hydrostatic pressure and polyaxial stress tests in sands Vega, Prasad, Mavko to the grain material properties, porosity, pressure, and pore fluid. By comparing these models to experimental

Nur, Amos

200

STANFORD ROCK PHYSICS BOREHOLE GEOPHYSICS PROJECT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TABLE OF CONTENTS A: Rock Physics and Geology. Pressure-solution models and the velocity......................................................... A3 Pressure trends of compressional-and shear-wave velocities measured measured in sands to 20 MPA.....................................................C3 Properties of pore fluids at very high pressures from equations of state. Walls & Dvorkin

Nur, Amos

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "borehole calibration models" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Integrated calibration sphere and calibration step fixture for improved coordinate measurement machine calibration  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for mounting a calibration sphere to a calibration fixture for Coordinate Measurement Machine (CMM) calibration and qualification is described, decreasing the time required for such qualification, thus allowing the CMM to be used more productively. A number of embodiments are disclosed that allow for new and retrofit manufacture to perform as integrated calibration sphere and calibration fixture devices. This invention renders unnecessary the removal of a calibration sphere prior to CMM measurement of calibration features on calibration fixtures, thereby greatly reducing the time spent qualifying a CMM.

Clifford, Harry J. (Los Alamos, NM)

2011-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

202

Coupling the ISBA Land Surface Model and the TOPMODEL Hydrological Model for Mediterranean Flash-Flood Forecasting: Description, Calibration, and Validation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Innovative coupling between the soil–vegetation–atmosphere transfer (SVAT) model Interactions between Soil, Biosphere, and Atmosphere (ISBA) and the hydrological model TOPMODEL has been specifically designed for flash-flood forecasting in the ...

Ludovic Bouilloud; Katia Chancibault; Béatrice Vincendon; Véronique Ducrocq; Florence Habets; Georges-Marie Saulnier; Sandrine Anquetin; Eric Martin; Joel Noilhan

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

200-DV-1OU Sediment and Pore Water Analysis and Report for Samples at Borehole C8096  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is an analytical data report for sediment samples received at 200-DV-1 OU. On August 30, 2011 sediment samples were received from 200-DV-1 OU Borehole C8096 for geochemical studies. The analyses for this project were performed at the 331 building located in the 300 Area of the Hanford Site. The analyses were performed according to Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) approved procedures and/or nationally recognized test procedures. The data sets include the sample identification numbers, analytical results, estimated quantification limits (EQL), and quality control data. The preparatory and analytical quality control requirements, calibration requirements, acceptance criteria, and failure actions are defined in the on-line QA plan 'Conducting Analytical Work in Support of Regulatory Programs' (CAW). This QA plan implements the Hanford Analytical Services Quality Assurance Requirements Documents (HASQARD) for PNNL.

Lindberg, Michael J.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Multidetector calibration for mass spectrometers  

SciTech Connect

The International Atomic Energy Agency`s Safeguards Analytical Laboratory has performed calibration experiments to measure the different efficiencies among multi-Faraday detectors for a Finnigan-MAT 261 mass spectrometer. Two types of calibration experiments were performed: (1) peak-shift experiments and (2) peak-jump experiments. For peak-shift experiments, the ion intensities were measured for all isotopes of an element in different Faraday detectors. Repeated measurements were made by shifting the isotopes to various Faraday detectors. Two different peak-shifting schemes were used to measure plutonium (UK Pu5/92138) samples. For peak-jump experiments, ion intensities were measured in a reference Faraday detector for a single isotope and compared with those measured in the other Faraday detectors. Repeated measurements were made by switching back-and-forth between the reference Faraday detector and a selected Faraday detector. This switching procedure is repeated for all Faraday detectors. Peak-jump experiments were performed with replicate measurements of {sup 239}Pu, {sup 187}Re, and {sup 238}U. Detector efficiency factors were estimated for both peak-jump and peak-shift experiments using a flexible calibration model to statistically analyze both types of multidetector calibration experiments. Calculated detector efficiency factors were shown to depend on both the material analyzed and the experimental conditions. A single detector efficiency factor is not recommended for each detector that would be used to correct routine sample analyses. An alternative three-run peak-shift sample analysis should be considered. A statistical analysis of the data from this peak-shift experiment can adjust the isotopic ratio estimates for detector differences due to each sample analysis.

Bayne, C.K. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Donohue, D.L.; Fiedler, R. [IAEA, Seibersdorf (Austria). Safeguards Analytical Lab.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Field Calibration Facilities for Environmental Measurement of Radium,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Field Calibration Facilities for Environmental Measurement of Field Calibration Facilities for Environmental Measurement of Radium, Thorium, and Potassium (October 2013) Field Calibration Facilities for Environmental Measurement of Radium, Thorium, and Potassium (October 2013) The first edition of this report, released in October 1982, presented physical-characteristic information for the various DOE radiologic-instrument calibration facilities located throughout the U.S. Three subsequent editions have been released in an effort to update information regarding the current status of the facilities. Field Calibration Facilities for Environmental Measurement of Radium, Thorium, and Potassium (October 2013) More Documents & Publications Calibration Model Assignments expressed as U3O8, Summary Table ES-1 Field Calibration Facilities for Environmental Measurement of Radium,

206

Borehole Imaging of In Situ Stress Tests at Mirror Lake Research Site |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Borehole Imaging of In Situ Stress Tests at Mirror Lake Research Site Borehole Imaging of In Situ Stress Tests at Mirror Lake Research Site Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Borehole Imaging of In Situ Stress Tests at Mirror Lake Research Site Author U.S. Geological Survey Published U.S. Geological Survey, 2013 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for Borehole Imaging of In Situ Stress Tests at Mirror Lake Research Site Citation U.S. Geological Survey. Borehole Imaging of In Situ Stress Tests at Mirror Lake Research Site [Internet]. 2013. U.S. Geological Survey. [cited 2013/10/16]. Available from: http://water.usgs.gov/ogw/bgas/toxics/ml_bips.html Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Borehole_Imaging_of_In_Situ_Stress_Tests_at_Mirror_Lake_Research_Site&oldid=688729"

207

Method of correlating a core sample with its original position in a borehole  

SciTech Connect

A method of correlating a core sample with its original position in a borehole. The borehole is logged to determine the bulk density of the formation surrounding the borehole. The core sample is scanned with a computerized axial tomographic scanner (CAT) to determine the attenuation coefficients at a plurality of points in a plurality of cross sections along the core sample. The bulk density log is then compared with the attenuation coefficients to determine the position to which the core sample correlates in the borehole. Alternatively, the borehole can be logged to determine the photoelectric absorption of the formation surrounding the borehole, and this log can be compared with data derived from scanning the core sample with a CAT at two different energy levels.

Vinegar, H. J.; Wellington, S. L.

1985-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

208

A strategy to seal exploratory boreholes in unsaturated tuff; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents a strategy for sealing exploratory boreholes associated with the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project. Over 500 existing and proposed boreholes have been considered in the development of this strategy, ranging from shallow (penetrating into alluvium only) to deep (penetrating into the groundwater table). Among the comprehensive list of recommendations are the following: Those boreholes within the potential repository boundary and penetrating through the potential repository horizon are the most significant boreholes from a performance standpoint and should be sealed. Shallow boreholes are comparatively insignificant and require only nominal sealing. The primary areas in which to place seals are away from high-temperature zones at a distance from the potential repository horizon in the Paintbrush nonwelded tuff and the upper portion of the Topopah Spring Member and in the tuffaceous beds of the Calico Hills Unit. Seals should be placed prior to waste emplacement. Performance goals for borehole seals both above and below the potential repository are proposed. Detailed construction information on the boreholes that could be used for future design specifications is provided along with a description of the environmental setting, i.e., the geology, hydrology, and the in situ and thermal stress states. A borehole classification scheme based on the condition of the borehole wall in different tuffaceous units is also proposed. In addition, calculations are presented to assess the significance of the boreholes acting as preferential pathways for the release of radionuclides. Design calculations are presented to answer the concerns of when, where, and how to seal. As part of the strategy development, available technologies to seal exploratory boreholes (including casing removal, borehole wall reconditioning, and seal emplacement) are reviewed.

Fernandez, J.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Case, J.B.; Givens, C.A.; Carney, B.C. [IT Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Characterization of the Ground Thermal Response to Heating by a Deep Vertical Borehole Heat Exchanger.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis presents an experiment and an analysis that evaluates some of the long-standing assumptions in deep vertical borehole ground heat exchanger (GHX) theory. These… (more)

Olfman, Maeir Zalman

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Combined Borehole Seismic and Electromagnetic Inversion For High-Resolution Petrophysical Assessment Of Hydocarbon Reservoirs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the work performed between January 2005 and December 2007, under DOE research contract DE-FC26-04NT15507. The project is was performed by the Center for Petroleum and Geosystems Engineering of The University of Texas at Austin and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory under the auspices of the National Energy Technology Office (NETL) and the Strategic Center for Natural Gas and Oil (SCNGO). During the three-year project, we developed new methods to combine borehole sonic and electromagnetic (EM) measurements for the improved assessment of elastic and petrophysical properties of rock formations penetrated by a well. Sonic measurements consisted of full waveform acoustic amplitudes acquired with monopole and dipole sources, whereas EM measurements consisted of frequency-domain voltages acquired with multi-coil induction systems. The combination of sonic and EM measurements permitted the joint estimation of elastic and petrophysical properties in the presence of mud-filtrate invasion. It was conclusively shown that the combined interpretation of sonic and EM measurements reduced non-uniqueness in the estimation of elastic and petrophysical properties and improved the spatial resolution of the estimations compared to estimations yielded separately from the two types of measurements. Moreover, this approach enabled the assessment of dynamic petrophysical properties such as permeability, as it incorporated the physics of mud-filtrate invasion in the interpretation of the measurements. The first part of the project considered the development of fast and reliable numerical algorithms to simulate borehole sonic waveforms in 2D, 3D, and radial 1D media. Such algorithms were subsequently used in the quantitative estimation of elastic properties jointly from borehole sonic and EM measurements. In the second part of the project we developed a new algorithm to estimate water saturation, porosity, and dry-rock elastic moduli jointly from borehole sonic and EM measurements. This algorithm assumed radial 1D variations of fluid saturation due to mud-filtrate invasion. Subsequently, we adapted the estimation method to interpret borehole field measurements acquired in both a shaly-sand sedimentary sequence and a tight-gas sandstone formation. In the two cases, we simulated the process of mud-filtrate invasion and concomitantly honored sonic and EM measurements. We produced reliable estimates of permeability and dry-rock moduli that were successfully validated with rock-core measurements. Finally, we introduced a new stochastic inversion procedure to estimate elastic, electrical, and petrophysical properties of layered media jointly from waveform sonic and frequency-domain EM measurements. The procedure was based on Bayesian statistical inversion and delivered estimates of uncertainty under various forms of a-priori information about the unknown properties. Tests on realistic synthetic models confirmed the reliability of this procedure to estimate elastic and petrophysical properties jointly from sonic and EM measurements. Several extended abstracts and conference presentations stemmed from this project, including 2 SEG extended abstracts, 1 SPE extended abstract, and 2 SPWLA extended abstracts. Some of these extended abstracts have been submitted for publication in peer-reviewed journals.

Carlos Torres-Verdin; G. Michael Hoversten; Ki Ha Lee; Gregory Newman; Kurt Nihei

2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

211

Uncertainty and calibration analysis  

SciTech Connect

All measurements contain some deviation from the true value which is being measured. In the common vernacular this deviation between the true value and the measured value is called an inaccuracy, an error, or a mistake. Since all measurements contain errors, it is necessary to accept that there is a limit to how accurate a measurement can be. The undertainty interval combined with the confidence level, is one measure of the accuracy for a measurement or value. Without a statement of uncertainty (or a similar parameter) it is not possible to evaluate if the accuracy of the measurement, or data, is appropriate. The preparation of technical reports, calibration evaluations, and design calculations should consider the accuracy of measurements and data being used. There are many methods to accomplish this. This report provides a consistent method for the handling of measurement tolerances, calibration evaluations and uncertainty calculations. The SRS Quality Assurance (QA) Program requires that the uncertainty of technical data and instrument calibrations be acknowledged and estimated. The QA Program makes some specific technical requirements related to the subject but does not provide a philosophy or method on how uncertainty should be estimated. This report was prepared to provide a technical basis to support the calculation of uncertainties and the calibration of measurement and test equipment for any activity within the Experimental Thermal-Hydraulics (ETH) Group. The methods proposed in this report provide a graded approach for estimating the uncertainty of measurements, data, and calibrations. The method is based on the national consensus standard, ANSI/ASME PTC 19.1.

Coutts, D.A.

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Calibrating transport lines using LOCO techniques  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With the 12GeV upgrade underway at CEBAF, there is a need to re-characterize the beamlines after the modifications made to it to accommodate running at higher energies. We present a linear perturbation approach to calibrating the optics model of transport lines. This method is adapted from the LOCO method in use for storage rings. We consider the effect of quadrupole errors, dipole construction errors as well as beam position monitors and correctors calibrations. The ideal model is expanded to first order in Taylor series of the quadrupole errors. A set of difference orbits obtained by exciting the correctors along the beamline is taken, yielding the measured response matrix. An iterative procedure is invoked and the quadrupole errors as well as beam position monitors and corrector calibration factors are obtained. Here we present details of the method and results of first measurements at CEBAF in early 2011.

Yves Roblin

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Mercury Calibration System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Performance Specification 12 in the Clean Air Mercury Rule (CAMR) states that a mercury CEM must be calibrated with National Institute for Standards and Technology (NIST)-traceable standards. In early 2009, a NIST traceable standard for elemental mercury CEM calibration still does not exist. Despite the vacature of CAMR by a Federal appeals court in early 2008, a NIST traceable standard is still needed for whatever regulation is implemented in the future. Thermo Fisher is a major vendor providing complete integrated mercury continuous emissions monitoring (CEM) systems to the industry. WRI is participating with EPA, EPRI, NIST, and Thermo Fisher towards the development of the criteria that will be used in the traceability protocols to be issued by EPA. An initial draft of an elemental mercury calibration traceability protocol was distributed for comment to the participating research groups and vendors on a limited basis in early May 2007. In August 2007, EPA issued an interim traceability protocol for elemental mercury calibrators. Various working drafts of the new interim traceability protocols were distributed in late 2008 and early 2009 to participants in the Mercury Standards Working Committee project. The protocols include sections on qualification and certification. The qualification section describes in general terms tests that must be conducted by the calibrator vendors to demonstrate that their calibration equipment meets the minimum requirements to be established by EPA for use in CAMR monitoring. Variables to be examined include linearity, ambient temperature, back pressure, ambient pressure, line voltage, and effects of shipping. None of the procedures were described in detail in the draft interim documents; however they describe what EPA would like to eventually develop. WRI is providing the data and results to EPA for use in developing revised experimental procedures and realistic acceptance criteria based on actual capabilities of the current calibration technology. As part of the current effort, WRI worked with Thermo Fisher elemental mercury calibrator units to conduct qualification experiments to demonstrate their performance characteristics under a variety of conditions and to demonstrate that they qualify for use in the CEM calibration program. Monitoring of speciated mercury is another concern of this research. The mercury emissions from coal-fired power plants are comprised of both elemental and oxidized mercury. Current CEM analyzers are designed to measure elemental mercury only. Oxidized mercury must first be converted to elemental mercury prior to entering the analyzer inlet in order to be measured. CEM systems must demonstrate the ability to measure both elemental and oxidized mercury. This requires the use of oxidized mercury generators with an efficient conversion of the oxidized mercury to elemental mercury. There are currently two basic types of mercuric chloride (HgCl{sub 2}) generators used for this purpose. One is an evaporative HgCl{sub 2} generator, which produces gas standards of known concentration by vaporization of aqueous HgCl{sub 2} solutions and quantitative mixing with a diluent carrier gas. The other is a device that converts the output from an elemental Hg generator to HgCl{sub 2} by means of a chemical reaction with chlorine gas. The Thermo Fisher oxidizer system involves reaction of elemental mercury vapor with chlorine gas at an elevated temperature. The draft interim protocol for oxidized mercury units involving reaction with chlorine gas requires the vendors to demonstrate high efficiency of oxidation of an elemental mercury stream from an elemental mercury vapor generator. The Thermo Fisher oxidizer unit is designed to operate at the power plant stack at the probe outlet. Following oxidation of elemental mercury from reaction with chlorine gas, a high temperature module reduces the mercuric chloride back to elemental mercury. WRI conducted work with a custom laboratory configured stand-alone oxidized mercury generator unit prov

John Schabron; Eric Kalberer; Joseph Rovani; Mark Sanderson; Ryan Boysen; William Schuster

2009-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

214

Disposition of excess fissile materials in deep boreholes  

SciTech Connect

As a result of recent changes throughout the world, a substantial inventory of excess separated plutonium is expected to result from dismantlement of US nuclear weapons. The safe and secure management and eventual disposition of this plutonium, and of a similar inventory in Russia, is a high priority. A variety of options (both interim and permanent) are under consideration to manage this material. The permanent solutions can be categorized into two broad groups: direct disposal and utilization. Plutonium utilization options have in common the generation of high-level radioactive waste which will be disposed of in a mined geologic disposal system to be developed for spent reactor fuel and defense high level waste. Other final disposition forms, such as plutonium metal, plutonium oxide and plutonium immobilized without high-level radiation sources may be better suited to placement in a custom facility. This paper discusses a leading candidate for such a facility; deep (several kilometer) borehole disposition. The deep borehole disposition concept involves placing excess plutonium deep into old stable rock formations with little free water present. The safety argument centers around ancient groundwater indicating lack of migration, and thus no expected communication with the accessible environment until the plutonium has decayed.

Halsey, W.G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Danker, W. [USDOE, Washington, DC (United States); Morley, R. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Calibration Procedures: Standard Operating Procedures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 18, Calibration of Graduated Neck-Type Metal Volumetric Field Standards, Volumetric Transfer Method Revision ... 20, Standard Deviation and Range ...

2013-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

216

Calibrated vapor generator source  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A portable vapor generator is disclosed that can provide a controlled source of chemical vapors, such as, narcotic or explosive vapors. This source can be used to test and calibrate various types of vapor detection systems by providing a known amount of vapors to the system. The vapor generator is calibrated using a reference ion mobility spectrometer. A method of providing this vapor is described, as follows: explosive or narcotic is deposited on quartz wool, placed in a chamber that can be heated or cooled (depending on the vapor pressure of the material) to control the concentration of vapors in the reservoir. A controlled flow of air is pulsed over the quartz wool releasing a preset quantity of vapors at the outlet.

Davies, John P. (Idaho Falls, ID); Larson, Ronald A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Goodrich, Lorenzo D. (Shelley, ID); Hall, Harold J. (Idaho Falls, ID); Stoddard, Billy D. (Idaho Falls, ID); Davis, Sean G. (Idaho Falls, ID); Kaser, Timothy G. (Idaho Falls, ID); Conrad, Frank J. (Albuquerque, NM)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Calibrated vapor generator source  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A portable vapor generator is disclosed that can provide a controlled source of chemical vapors, such as, narcotic or explosive vapors. This source can be used to test and calibrate various types of vapor detection systems by providing a known amount of vapors to the system. The vapor generator is calibrated using a reference ion mobility spectrometer. A method of providing this vapor is described, as follows: explosive or narcotic is deposited on quartz wool, placed in a chamber that can be heated or cooled (depending on the vapor pressure of the material) to control the concentration of vapors in the reservoir. A controlled flow of air is pulsed over the quartz wool releasing a preset quantity of vapors at the outlet. 10 figs.

Davies, J.P.; Larson, R.A.; Goodrich, L.D.; Hall, H.J.; Stoddard, B.D.; Davis, S.G.; Kaser, T.G.; Conrad, F.J.

1995-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

218

Temperature logging as an aid to understanding groundwater flow in boreholes  

SciTech Connect

Borehole temperatures are affected by a range of physical phenomena, including drilling and engineering procedures, thermal resistivity of the rock, surface climatic changes, local heat sources and sinks, free convection of the borehole fluid, and water flows inside the borehole. As a result, temperature logs provide unique information not available from other logs. On the other hand, because the temperature log is sensitive to a variety of phenomena, one or more of these may obscure the effect being studied. In the case where groundwater is entering the borehole at one depth and exiting at another depth (or at the surface) the temperature disturbance resulting from this flow is likely to be a prominent feature of the temperature profile of the borehole. Because of this, water flows in boreholes are often a source of noise in temperature logs, obscuring the features of interest. Recently, however, unusual groundwater behavior was noted in several boreholes at the Nevada Test Site (NTS), and temperature logs were run as part of a program to study this phenomenon. In this case the groundwater flow has been the feature of interest in the logs, and the logs have been useful as an aid in understanding the water flow in those boreholes.

Conaway, J.G.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Automatic detection of lithologic boundaries using the Walsh transform: A case study from the KTB borehole  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An automatic method of lithologic boundary detection based on Walsh transform theory is developed and applied to the German Continental Deep Drilling Project (KTB) borehole well log data. Walsh functions are natural choices for describing binary waveforms; ... Keywords: Borehole geophysics, KTB, Low-pass filtering, Rock boundary detection, Walsh transforms

Saumen Maiti; R. K. Tiwari

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Borehole Miner - Extendible Nozzle Development for Radioactive Waste Dislodging and Retrieval from Underground Storage Tanks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes development of borehole-miner extendible-nozzle water-jetting technology for dislodging and retrieving salt cake, sludge} and supernate to remediate underground storage tanks full of radioactive waste. The extendible-nozzle development was based on commercial borehole-miner technology.

CW Enderlin; DG Alberts; JA Bamberger; M White

1998-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "borehole calibration models" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Measurement Research of Borehole-to-Surface Electric Potential Gradient Method in Monitoring Hydraulic Fracture  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As the main measures to improve oil and gas production, hydraulic fracturing has been widely applied in modern oil industry. By means of lower resistance properties of fracturing fluid, borehole-to-surface electric potential gradient method analyses ... Keywords: borehole-to-surface electric method, Ab normal depth, launch current, polar distance, electric potential gradient

Tingting Li; Kaiguang Zhu; Jia Wang; Chunling Qiu; Jun Lin

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Mesoscale hybrid calibration artifact  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A mesoscale calibration artifact, also called a hybrid artifact, suitable for hybrid dimensional measurement and the method for make the artifact. The hybrid artifact has structural characteristics that make it suitable for dimensional measurement in both vision-based systems and touch-probe-based systems. The hybrid artifact employs the intersection of bulk-micromachined planes to fabricate edges that are sharp to the nanometer level and intersecting planes with crystal-lattice-defined angles.

Tran, Hy D. (Albuquerque, NM); Claudet, Andre A. (Albuquerque, NM); Oliver, Andrew D. (Waltham, MA)

2010-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

223

TIME CALIBRATED OSCILLOSCOPE SWEEP  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The time calibrator of an electric signal displayed on an oscilloscope is described. In contrast to the conventional technique of using time-calibrated divisions on the face of the oscilloscope, this invention provides means for directly superimposing equal time spaced markers upon a signal displayed upon an oscilloscope. More explicitly, the present invention includes generally a generator for developing a linear saw-tooth voltage and a circuit for combining a high-frequency sinusoidal voltage of a suitable amplitude and frequency with the saw-tooth voltage to produce a resultant sweep deflection voltage having a wave shape which is substantially linear with respect to time between equal time spaced incremental plateau regions occurring once each cycle of the sinusoidal voltage. The foregoing sweep voltage when applied to the horizontal deflection plates in combination with a signal to be observed applied to the vertical deflection plates of a cathode ray oscilloscope produces an image on the viewing screen which is essentially a display of the signal to be observed with respect to time. Intensified spots, or certain other conspicuous indications corresponding to the equal time spaced plateau regions of said sweep voltage, appear superimposed upon said displayed signal, which indications are therefore suitable for direct time calibration purposes.

Owren, H.M.; Johnson, B.M.; Smith, V.L.

1958-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

224

Device and method for imaging of non-linear and linear properties of formations surrounding a borehole  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In some aspects of the disclosure, a method and an apparatus is disclosed for investigating material surrounding the borehole. The method includes generating within a borehole an intermittent low frequency vibration that propagates as a tube wave longitudinally to the borehole and induces a nonlinear response in one or more features in the material that are substantially perpendicular to a longitudinal axis of the borehole; generating within the borehole a sequence of high frequency pulses directed such that they travel longitudinally to the borehole within the surrounding material; and receiving, at one or more receivers positionable in the borehole, a signal that includes components from the low frequency vibration and the sequence of high frequency pulses during intermittent generation of the low frequency vibration, to investigate the material surrounding the borehole.

Johnson, Paul A; Tencate, James A; Le Bas, Pierre-Yves; Guyer, Robert; Vu, Cung Khac; Skelt, Christopher

2013-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

225

A constrained regression technique for cocomo calibration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Building cost estimation models is often considered a search problem in which the solver should return an optimal solution satisfying an objective function. This solution also needs to meet certain constraints. For example, a solution for the estimates ... Keywords: calibration, cocomo, linear programming, linear regression with constraints, optimization, quadratic programming, software cost estimation

Vu Nguyen; Bert Steece; Barry Boehm

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Method of assaying uranium with prompt fission and thermal neutron borehole logging adjusted by borehole physical characteristics  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Uranium formations are assayed by prompt fission neutron logging techniques. The uranium in the formation is proportional to the ratio of epithermal counts to thermal or eqithermal dieaway. Various calibration factors enhance the accuracy of the measurement.

Barnard, Ralston W. (Albuquerque, NM); Jensen, Dal H. (Albuquerque, NM)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Method of assaying uranium with prompt fission and thermal neutron borehole logging adjusted by borehole physical characteristics. [Patient application  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Uranium formations are assayed by prompt fission neutron logging techniques. The uranium in the formation is proportional to the ratio of epithermal counts to thermal or epithermal dieaway. Various calibration factors enhance the accuracy of the measurement.

Barnard, R.W.; Jensen, D.H.

1980-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

228

Deep Borehole Measurements for Characterizing the Magma/Hydrothermal System at Long Valley Caldera, CA  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Magma Energy Program of the Geothermal Technology Division is scheduled to begin drilling a deep (6 km) exploration well in Long Valley Caldera, California in 1989. The drilling site is near the center of the caldera which is associated with numerous shallow (5-7 km) geophysical anomalies. This deep well will present an unparalleled opportunity to test and validate geophysical techniques for locating magma as well as a test of the theory that magma is still present at drillable depths within the central portion of the caldera. If, indeed, drilling indicates magma, the geothermal community will then be afforded the unique possibility of examining the coupling between magmatic and hydrothermal regimes in a major volcanic system. Goals of planned seismic experiments that involve the well include the investigation of local crustal structure down to depths of 10 km as well as the determination of mechanisms for local seismicity and deformation. Borehole electrical and electromagnetic surveys will increase the volume and depth of rock investigated by the well through consideration of the conductive structure of the hydrothermal and underlying regimes. Currently active processes involving magma injection will be studied through observation of changes in pore pressure and strain. Measurements of in situ stress from recovered cores and hydraulic fracture tests will be used in conjunction with uplift data to determine those models for magmatic injection and inflation that are most applicable. Finally, studies of the thermal regime will be directed toward elucidating the coupling between the magmatic source region and the more shallow hydrothermal system in the caldera fill. To achieve this will require careful logging of borehole fluid temperature and chemistry. In addition, studies of rock/fluid interactions through core and fluid samples will allow physical characterization of the transition zone between hydrothermal and magmatic regimes.

Carrrigan, Charles R.

1989-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

229

Summary Report of Geophysical Logging For The Seismic Boreholes Project at the Hanford Site Waste Treatment Plant.  

SciTech Connect

During the period of June through October 2006, three deep boreholes and one corehole were drilled beneath the site of the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site near Richland, Washington. The boreholes were drilled to provide information on ground-motion attenuation in the basalt and interbedded sediments underlying the WTP site. This report describes the geophysical logging of the deep boreholes that was conducted in support of the Seismic Boreholes Project, defined below. The detailed drilling and geological descriptions of the boreholes and seismic data collected and analysis of that data are reported elsewhere.

Gardner, Martin G.; Price, Randall K.

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

HYDROCARBON LIQUID FLOW CALIBRATION SERVICE ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... and is the cross correlation coefficient ... a NIST Hydrocarbon Liquid Flow Calibration Facility ... FED2004-56790, 2004 Heat Transfer/Fluids Engineering ...

2012-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

231

Laser Power and Energy Calibrations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... calibration services for meters used with the lasers, wavelengths, and power ranges shown in the following table. Other laser wavelengths, power ...

2012-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

232

1000 Calibration Reports . . . And Counting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... day on average, with a 96 % on-time completion rate ... Photons transfer their energy to the detector as heat ... 10 pages long, with the costs of calibration ...

2013-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

233

Measurement Services (SRMs and Calibrations)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... SRMs are sold to industry for calibrating scientific instruments over an incredibly large ... G. Klouda, J. Moody, R. Parris, R. Schaffer, E. Steel, J. Taylor ...

2010-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

234

Borehole Gravity Measurements in the Salton Sea Scientific Drilling Program Well State 2-14  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Borehole gravity measurements over a depth range from 1737 to 1027 m, and the vertical gradient of gravity above ground were measured at the Salton Sea Scientific Drilling Program well State 2-14. Uncorrected borehole gravimetric densities match values from gamma-gamma logs, indicating that the high densities seen in State 2-14 in the depth range 0.5 to 3 km extend for a few kilometers from the well. The above-ground gradient was found to be 4.1 {micro}gal/m higher than expected; correcting for this value increases the gravimetric density in the borehole. Combining the borehole gravity and estimated vertical gravity gradients on the surface, they find that this densified zone coincides with much of a broad thermal anomaly that has been found to the northeast of the Salton Sea Geothermal Field.

Kasameyer, P. W.; Hearst, J. R.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Borehole Gravity Measurements in the Salton Sea Scientific Drilling Program Well State 2-14  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Borehole gravity measurements over a depth range from 1737 to 1027 m, and the vertical gradient of gravity above ground were measured at the Salton Sea Scientific Drilling Program well State 2-14. Uncorrected borehole gravimetric densities match values from gamma-gamma logs, indicating that the high densities seen in State 2-14 in the depth range 0.5 to 3 km extend for a few kilometers from the well. The above-ground gradient was found to be 0.0040 mgal/m higher than expected; correcting for this value increases the gravimetric density in the borehole. Combining the borehole gravity and estimated vertical gravity gradients on the surface, they find that this densified zone coincides with much of a broad thermal anomaly that has been found to the northeast of the Salton Sea Geothermal Field.

Kasameyer, P. W.; Hearst, J. R.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Regional Examples of Geological Settings for Nuclear Waste Disposal in Deep Boreholes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report develops and exercises broad-area site selection criteria for deep boreholes suitable for disposal of spent nuclear fuel and/or its separated constituents. Three candidates are examined: a regional site in the ...

Sapiie, B.

237

An evaluation of the feasibility of disposal of nuclear waste in very deep boreholes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Deep boreholes, 3 to 5 km into igneous rock, such as granite, are evaluated for next- generation repository use in the disposal of spent nuclear fuel and other high level waste. The primary focus is on the stability and ...

Anderson, Victoria Katherine, 1980-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Feasibility of very deep borehole disposal of US nuclear defense wastes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis analyzes the feasibility of emplacing DOE-owned defense nuclear waste from weapons production into a permanent borehole repository drilled ~4 km into granite basement rock. Two canister options were analyzed ...

Dozier, Frances Elizabeth

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Borehole Gravity Measurements In The Salton Sea Scientific Drilling Program Well State 2-14  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Borehole gravity measurements over a depth range from 1737 to 1027 m, and the vertical gradient of gravity were measured at the Salton Sea Scientific Drilling Program well State 2-14. The borehole gravimetric densities matched the well logs, but the surface gradient was found to be 0.0040 mgal/m higher than expected. When the borehole observations are corrected for the observed free air gradient above ground, they produce densities which are nearly uniformly higher than log densities by about 0.07 gm/cm{sup 3}. These measurements require densities in the depth range .5 to 3 km, for a radius of a few kilometers around State 2-14 to be as dense as those found in State 2-14. Combining the borehole gravity and calculated vertical gravity gradients on the surface, we find that this densified zone covers much of a broad thermal anomaly to the northeast of the Salton Sea Geothermal Field.

Kasameyer, P. W.; Hearst, J. R.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Calibration Facilities Documents | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Services » Calibration Facilities » Calibration Facilities Services » Calibration Facilities » Calibration Facilities Documents Calibration Facilities Documents October 17, 2013 Field Calibration Facilities for Environmental Measurement of Radium, Thorium, and Potassium (October 2013) The first edition of this report, released in October 1982, presented physical-characteristic information for the various DOE radiologic-instrument calibration facilities located throughout the U.S. Three subsequent editions have been released in an effort to update information regarding the current status of the facilities. June 30, 1994 Field Calibration Facilities for Environmental Measurement of Radium, Thorium, and Potassium (June 1994) Field Calibration Facilities for Environmental Measurement of Radium, Thorium, and Potassium (June 1994)

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "borehole calibration models" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

24-CHANNEL GEOPHONE ARRAY FOR HORIZONTAL OR VERTICAL BOREHOLES  

SciTech Connect

Improved ground-imaging capabilities have enormous potential to increase energy, environmental, and economic benefits by improving exploration accuracy and reducing energy consumption during the mining cycle. Seismic tomography has been used successfully to monitor and evaluate geologic conditions ahead of a mining face. A primary limitation to existing seismic tomography, however, is the placement of sensors. The goal of this project is to develop an array of 24 seismic sensors capable of being mounted in either a vertical or horizontal borehole. Development of this technology reduces energy usage in excavation, transportation, ventilation, and processing phases of the mining operation because less waste is mined and the mining cycle suffers fewer interruptions. This new technology benefits all types of mines, including metal/nonmetal, coal, and quarrying. The primary research tasks focused on sensor placement method, sensor housing and clamping design, and cabling and connector selection. An initial design is described in the report. Following assembly, a prototype was tested in the laboratory as well as at a surface stone quarry. Data analysis and tool performance were used for subsequent design modifications. A final design is described, of which several components are available for patent application. Industry partners have shown clear support for this research and demonstrated an interest in commercialization following project completion.

Erik C. Westman

2003-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

242

Applications of a downhole programmable microprocessor for a geothermal borehole inspection tool  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The high-temperature scanning borehole inspection system is currently being developed jointly by the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and Westfalische Berggewerkschaftskasse (WBK) of West Germany. The downhole instrument is a digital televiewer that utilized a microprocessor to digitize, process and transmit the acoustic information to the surface acquisition and control system. The primary operation of the downhole acoustic assembly uses a piezoelectric crystal acting as a receiver-transmitter which is mounted on the rotating head. The crystal emits a burst of acoustic energy that propagates through the borehole fluid with a portion of the energy reflected by the borehole wall back to the crystal. The time of travel and the amplitude of the reflected signal are conditioned by the microprocessor and transmitted along with other pertinent data to the surface data processing center. This instrument has been designed specifically for use in geothermal borehole environments to determine the location of fractures intersecting the borehole and provide information concerning overall borehole conditions. It may also be used for definitive casing inspection. The instrument essentially eliminates operator interaction for downhole control and simplifies assembly and maintenance procedures.

Jermance, R.L.; Moore, T.K.; Archuleta, J.; Hinz, K.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Basalt features observed in outcrops, cores, borehole video imagery and geophysical logs, and basalt hydrogeologic study at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Eastern Idaho  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A study was undertaken to examine permeable zones identified in boreholes open to the underlying basalt and to describe the vertical cross flows present in the boreholes. To understand the permeable zones in the boreholes detailed descriptions and measurements of three outcrops in the Snake River Plain, three cores at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) at the INEL, and over fifty borehole TV logs from the INEL were carried out. Based on the observations made on the three outcrops an idealized basalt lava flow model was generated that used a set of nomenclature that would be standard for the basalt lava flows studied. An upper vesicular zone, a sometimes absent columnar zone, central zone, and lower vesicular zone make up the basalt lava flow model. The overall distinction between the different zones are based on the vesicle shape size, vesicularity, and fractures present. The results of the studies also indicated that the basalt lava flows at the INEL are distal to medial facies pahoehoe lava flows with close fitting contacts. The most permeable zones identified in these basalts are fractured vesiculated portions of the top of the lava flow, the columnar areas, and basalt-flow contacts in order of importance. This was determined from impeller flowmeter logging at the INEL. Having this information a detailed stratigraphy of individual basalt lava flows and the corresponding permeable units were generated. From this it was concluded that groundwater flow at the ICPP prefers to travel along thin basalt lava flows or flow-units. Flow direction and velocity of intrawell flows detected by flowmeter is controlled by a nearby pumping well.

Bennecke, W.M.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

A Numerical Feasibility Study of Three-Component Induction Logging for Three Dimensional Imaging About a Single Borehole  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A theoretical analysis has been completed for a proposed induction logging tool designed to yield data which are used to generate three dimensional images of the region surrounding a well bore. The proposed tool consists of three mutually orthogonal magnetic dipole sources and multiple 3 component magnetic field receivers offset at different distances from the source. The initial study employs sensitivity functions which are derived by applying the Born Approximation to the integral equation that governs the magnetic fields generated by a magnetic dipole source located within an inhomogeneous medium. The analysis has shown that the standard coaxial configuration, where the magnetic moments of both the source and the receiver are aligned with the axis of the well bore, offers the greatest depth of sensitivity away from the borehole compared to any other source-receiver combination. In addition this configuration offers the best signal-to-noise characteristics. Due to the cylindrically symmetric nature of the tool sensitivity about the borehole, the data generated by this configuration can only be interpreted in terms of a two-dimensional cylindrical model. For a fill 3D interpretation the two radial components of the magnetic field that are orthogonal to each other must be measured. Coil configurations where both the source and receiver are perpendicular to the tool axis can also be employed to increase resolution and provide some directional information, but they offer no true 3D information.

ALUMBAUGH, DAVID L.; WILT, MICHAEL J.

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Application Of A Spherical-Radial Heat Transfer Model To Calculate...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Application Of A Spherical-Radial Heat Transfer Model To Calculate Geothermal Gradients From Measurements In Deep Boreholes Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal...

246

Calibrating a Coupled SVAT–Vegetation Growth Model with Remotely Sensed Reflectance and Surface Temperature—A Case Study for the HAPEX-Sahel Grassland Sites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Models simulating the seasonal growth of vegetation have been recently coupled to soil–vegetation–atmosphere transfer schemes (SVATS). Such coupled vegetation–SVATS models (V–S) account for changes of the vegetation leaf area index (LAI) over ...

P. Cayrol; L. Kergoat; S. Moulin; G. Dedieu; A. Chehbouni

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Method to calibrate fission chambers in Campbelling mode  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fission chambers are neutron detectors which are widely used to instrument experimental reactors such as material testing reactors or zero power reactors. In the presence of a high level mixed gamma and neutron flux, fission chambers can be operated in Campbelling mode (also known as 'fluctuation mode' or 'mean square voltage mode') to provide reliable and precise neutron related measurements. Fission chamber calibration in Campbelling mode (in terms of neutron flux) is usually done empirically using a calibrated reference detector. A major drawback of this method is that calibration measurements have to be performed in a neutron environment very similar to the one in which the calibrated detector will be used afterwards. What we propose here is a different approach based on characterizing the fission chamber response in terms of fission rate. This way, the detector calibration coefficient is independent from the neutron spectrum and can be determined prior to the experiment. The fissile deposit response to the neutron spectrum can then be assessed independently by other means (experimental or numerical). In this paper, the response of CEA made miniature fission chambers in Campbelling mode is studied. We use a theoretical model of the signal to calculate the calibration coefficient. Input parameters of the model come from statistical distribution of individual pulses. Supporting measurements have been made in the CEA Cadarache zero power reactor MINERVE. Results are compared to an empirical Campbelling mode calibration.

Benoit Geslot; Troy C. Unruh; Philippe Filliatre; Christian Jammes; Jacques Di Salvo; Stéphane Bréaud; Jean-François Villard

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Extending Sensor Calibration Intervals in Nuclear Power Plants  

SciTech Connect

Currently in the USA, sensor recalibration is required at every refueling outage, and it has emerged as a critical path item for shortening outage duration. International application of calibration monitoring, such as at the Sizewell B plant in UK, has shown that sensors may operate for eight years, or longer, within calibration tolerances. Online monitoring can be employed to identify those sensors which require calibration, allowing for calibration of only those sensors which need it. The US NRC accepted the general concept of online monitoring for sensor calibration monitoring in 2000, but no plants have been granted the necessary license amendment to apply it. This project addresses key issues in advanced recalibration methodologies and provides the science base to enable adoption of best practices for applying online monitoring, resulting in a public domain standardized methodology for sensor calibration interval extension. Research to develop this methodology will focus on three key areas: (1) quantification of uncertainty in modeling techniques used for calibration monitoring, with a particular focus on non-redundant sensor models; (2) accurate determination of acceptance criteria and quantification of the effect of acceptance criteria variability on system performance; and (3) the use of virtual sensor estimates to replace identified faulty sensors to extend operation to the next convenient maintenance opportunity.

Coble, Jamie B.; Meyer, Ryan M.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Bond, Leonard J.; Shumaker, Brent; Hashemian, Hash

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

249

Characterization of Vadose Zone Sediments Below the T Tank Farm: Boreholes C4104, C4105, 299-W10-196, and RCRA Borehole 299-W11-39  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report was revised in September 2008 to remove acid-extractable sodium data from Tables 4.8, 4.28, and 4.52. The sodium data was removed due to potential contamination introduced during the acid extraction process. The rest of the text remains unchanged from the original report issued in September 2004. The overall goal of the Tank Farm Vadose Zone Project, led by CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc., is to define risks from past and future single-shell tank farm activities at Hanford. To meet this goal, CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. tasked scientists from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to perform detailed analyses on vadose zone sediments from within Waste Management Area (WMA) T-TX-TY. This report is the second of two reports written to present the results of these analyses. Specifically, this report contains all the geologic, geochemical, and selected physical characterization data collected on vadose zone sediment recovered from boreholes C4104 and C4105 in the T Tank Farm, and from borehole 299-W-11-39 installed northeast of the T Tank Farm. Finally, the measurements on sediments from borehole C4104 are compared with a nearby borehole drilled in 1993, 299- W10-196, through the tank T-106 leak plume.

Serne, R. Jeffrey; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Horton, Duane G.; Lanigan, David C.; Schaef, Herbert T.; Lindenmeier, Clark W.; Lindberg, Michael J.; Clayton, Ray E.; Legore, Virginia L.; Geiszler, Keith N.; Baum, Steven R.; Valenta, Michelle M.; Kutnyakov, Igor V.; Vickerman, Tanya S.; Orr, Robert D.; Brown, Christopher F.

2008-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

250

Device and method for imaging of non-linear and linear properties of formations surrounding a borehole  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In some aspects of the disclosure, a method and an apparatus is disclosed for investigating material surrounding the borehole. The method includes generating a first low frequency acoustic wave within the borehole, wherein the first low frequency acoustic wave induces a linear and a nonlinear response in one or more features in the material that are substantially perpendicular to a radius of the borehole; directing a first sequence of high frequency pulses in a direction perpendicularly with respect to the longitudinal axis of the borehole into the material contemporaneously with the first acoustic wave; and receiving one or more second high frequency pulses at one or more receivers positionable in the borehole produced by an interaction between the first sequence of high frequency pulses and the one or more features undergoing linear and nonlinear elastic distortion due to the first low frequency acoustic wave to investigate the material surrounding the borehole.

Johnson, Paul A; Tencate, James A; Le Bas, Pierre-Yves; Guyer, Robert; Vu, Cung Khac; Skelt, Christopher

2013-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

251

Reference design and operations for deep borehole disposal of high-level radioactive waste.  

SciTech Connect

A reference design and operational procedures for the disposal of high-level radioactive waste in deep boreholes have been developed and documented. The design and operations are feasible with currently available technology and meet existing safety and anticipated regulatory requirements. Objectives of the reference design include providing a baseline for more detailed technical analyses of system performance and serving as a basis for comparing design alternatives. Numerous factors suggest that deep borehole disposal of high-level radioactive waste is inherently safe. Several lines of evidence indicate that groundwater at depths of several kilometers in continental crystalline basement rocks has long residence times and low velocity. High salinity fluids have limited potential for vertical flow because of density stratification and prevent colloidal transport of radionuclides. Geochemically reducing conditions in the deep subsurface limit the solubility and enhance the retardation of key radionuclides. A non-technical advantage that the deep borehole concept may offer over a repository concept is that of facilitating incremental construction and loading at multiple perhaps regional locations. The disposal borehole would be drilled to a depth of 5,000 m using a telescoping design and would be logged and tested prior to waste emplacement. Waste canisters would be constructed of carbon steel, sealed by welds, and connected into canister strings with high-strength connections. Waste canister strings of about 200 m length would be emplaced in the lower 2,000 m of the fully cased borehole and be separated by bridge and cement plugs. Sealing of the upper part of the borehole would be done with a series of compacted bentonite seals, cement plugs, cement seals, cement plus crushed rock backfill, and bridge plugs. Elements of the reference design meet technical requirements defined in the study. Testing and operational safety assurance requirements are also defined. Overall, the results of the reference design development and the cost analysis support the technical feasibility of the deep borehole disposal concept for high-level radioactive waste.

Herrick, Courtney Grant; Brady, Patrick Vane; Pye, Steven; Arnold, Bill Walter; Finger, John Travis; Bauer, Stephen J.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Borehole seismic monitoring of seismic stimulation at OccidentalPermian Ltd's -- South Wason Clear Fork Unit  

SciTech Connect

Seismic stimulation is a proposed enhanced oil recovery(EOR) technique which uses seismic energy to increase oil production. Aspart of an integrated research effort (theory, lab and field studies),LBNL has been measuring the seismic amplitude of various stimulationsources in various oil fields (Majer, et al., 2006, Roberts,et al.,2001, Daley et al., 1999). The amplitude of the seismic waves generatedby a stimulation source is an important parameter for increased oilmobility in both theoretical models and laboratory core studies. Theseismic amplitude, typically in units of seismic strain, can be measuredin-situ by use of a borehole seismometer (geophone). Measuring thedistribution of amplitudes within a reservoir could allow improved designof stimulation source deployment. In March, 2007, we provided in-fieldmonitoring of two stimulation sources operating in Occidental (Oxy)Permian Ltd's South Wasson Clear Fork (SWCU) unit, located near DenverCity, Tx. The stimulation source is a downhole fluid pulsation devicedeveloped by Applied Seismic Research Corp. (ASR). Our monitoring used aborehole wall-locking 3-component geophone operating in two nearbywells.

Daley, Tom; Majer, Ernie

2007-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

253

Using Calibrated Simulation to Quantify The energy Savings From Residential Passive Solar Design in Canada.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Energy savings from passive solar design applied to a typical Canadian house were quantified using calibrated whole building energy simulation. A detailed energy simulation model… (more)

Zirnhelt, Hayes E.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Calibration of Radiances from Space  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors compare the performance of broadband radiometers with spectrally dispersed measurements. Spectrally dispersed radiometers may be more accurately calibrated than is possible with broadband filter instruments. They also have a larger ...

Richard Goody; Robert Haskins

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Radar Calibration: Some Simple Approaches  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The proper calibration of weather radars has been at the heart of the problem of accurate reflectivity measurements for more than five decades. This paper summarizes a number of methods that have been used previously and others that areworthy of ...

David Atlas

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

IES Calibration and Mapping Procedures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The procedures used in the Synoptic Ocean Prediction experiment for calibration of inverted echo sounder (IES) travel time ? data have led to substantially improved accuracy. In previous work, ? was converted to main thermocline depth ZT using ...

Karen L. Tracey; Stephan D. Howden; D. Randolph Watts

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Transient Climate Response in a Two-Layer Energy-Balance Model. Part I: Analytical Solution and Parameter Calibration Using CMIP5 AOGCM Experiments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is the first part of a series of two articles analyzing the global thermal properties of atmosphere–ocean coupled general circulation models (AOGCMs) within the framework of a two-layer energy-balance model (EBM). In this part, the general ...

O. Geoffroy; D. Saint-Martin; D. J. L. Olivié; A. Voldoire; G. Bellon; S. Tytéca

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Measurement of the thermal performance of a Borehole Heat Exchanger while injecting air bubbles in the groundwater.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? The most common way to exchange heat with the ground in Ground Source Heat Pump (GSHP) applications is with borehole heat exchangers (energy col-lectors… (more)

Calzada, Eduard

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

LLL calibration and standards facility  

SciTech Connect

The capabilities of Lawrence Livermore Laboratory's Calibration and Standards Facility are delineated. The facility's ability to provide radiation fields and measurements for a variety of radiation safety applications and the available radiation measurement equipment are described. The need for national laboratory calibration labs to maintain traceability to a national standard are discussed as well as the areas where improved standards and standardization techniques are needed.

Campbell, G.W.; Elliott, J.H.

1980-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

260

Recombinant fluorescent protein microsphere calibration standard  

SciTech Connect

A method for making recombinant fluorescent protein standard particles for calibration of fluorescence instruments.

Nolan, John P. (Santa Fe, NM); Nolan, Rhiannon L. (Santa Fe, NM); Ruscetti, Teresa (Los Alamos, NM); Lehnert, Bruce E. (Los Alamos, NM)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "borehole calibration models" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Role of borehole geophysics in defining the physical characteristics of the  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Role of borehole geophysics in defining the physical characteristics of the Role of borehole geophysics in defining the physical characteristics of the Raft River geothermal reservoir, Idaho Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Role of borehole geophysics in defining the physical characteristics of the Raft River geothermal reservoir, Idaho Details Activities (4) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Numerous geophysical logs have been made in three deep wells and in several intermediate depth core holes in the Raft River geothermal reservoir, Idaho. Laboratory analyses of cores from the intermediate depth holes were used to provide a qualitative and quantitative basis for a detailed interpretation of logs from the shallow part of the reservoir. A less detailed interpretation of logs from the deeper part of the reservoir

262

High-temperature batteries for geothermal and oil/gas borehole applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A literature survey and technical evaluation was carried out of past and present battery technologies with the goal of identifying appropriate candidates for use in geothermal borehole and, to a lesser extent, oil/gas boreholes. The various constraints that are posed by such an environment are discussed. The promise as well as the limitations of various candidate technologies are presented. Data for limited testing of a number of candidate systems are presented and the areas for additional future work are detailed. The use of low-temperature molten salts shows the most promise for such applications and includes those that are liquid at room temperature. The greatest challenges are to develop an appropriate electrochemical couple that is kinetically stable with the most promising electrolytes--both organic as well as inorganic--over the wide operating window that spans both borehole environments.

GUIDOTTI,RONALD A.

2000-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

263

Origin of elevated water levels encountered in Pahute Mesa emplacement boreholes: Preliminary investigations  

SciTech Connect

The presence of standing water well above the predicted water table in emplacement boreholes on Pahute Mesa has been a recurring phenomenon at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). If these levels represent naturally perched aquifers, they may indicate a radionuclide migration hazard. In any case, they can pose engineering problems in the performance of underground nuclear tests. The origin of these elevated waters is uncertain. Large volumes of water are introduced during emplacement drilling, providing ample source for artificially perched water, yet elevated water levels can remain constant for years, suggesting a natural origin instead. In an effort to address the issue of unexpected standing water in emplacement boreholes, three different sites were investigated in Area 19 on Pahute Mesa by Desert Research Institute (DRI) staff from 1990-93. These sites were U-19az, U-19ba, and U-19bh. As of this writing, U-19bh remains available for access; however, nuclear tests were conducted at the former two locations subsequent to this investigations. The experiments are discussed in chronological order. Taken together, the experiments indicate that standing water in Pahute Mesa emplacement holes originates from the drainage of small-volume naturally perched zones. In the final study, the fluids used during drilling of the bottom 100 m of emplacement borehole U-19bh were labeled with a chemical tracer. After hole completion, water level rose in the borehole, while tracer concentration decreased. In fact, total mass of tracer in the borehole remained constant, while water levels rose. After water levels stabilized in this hole, no change in tracer mass was observed over two years, indicating that no movement of water out of the borehole is taking place (as at U- 19ba). Continued labeling tests of standing water are recommended to confirm the conclusions made here, and to establish their validity throughout Pahute Mesa.

Brikowski, T.; Chapman, J.; Lyles, B.; Hokett, S.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

High energy gas fracture experiments in liquid-filled boreholes: potential geothermal application  

SciTech Connect

High Energy Gas Fracturing is a tailored pulse fracturing technique which uses propellants to obtain controlled fracture initiation and extension. Borehole pressurization rates can be tailored, by suitable choice of propellants, to produce four or eight fractures radiating from the wellbore. High Energy Gas Fracture (HEGF) research is conducted at DOE's Nevada Test Site (NTS) in a tunnel complex where experiments can be done under realistic in situ stress conditions (1400 psi (9.7 MPa) overburden stress). Pressure measurements are made in the test borehole during all fracturing experiments. Experiments are mined back to provide direct observation of fracturing obtained. The initial objective of HEGF research was to develop multiple fracturing technology for application in gas well stimulation. HEGF research at NTS and in Devonian shale demonstration tests has resulted in a completed technology for multiple fracturing in uncased, liquid-free wellbores. Current resarch is directed toward extending the technique to liquid-filled boreholes for application in geothermal in addition to gas and oil wells. For liquid-free boreholes, multiple fracturing is specified in terms of pressure risetime required for a given borehole diameter. Propellants are mixed to achieve the desired risetime using a semiempirical mixing equation. The same techniques were successfully applied to fracturing in liquid-filled wellbores. However, the addition of liquid in the borehole results in a significantly more complicated fracturing behavior. Hydrodynamic effects are significant. Multiple fractures are initiated but only some propagated. Multiple- and hydraulic-type fracturing and wellbore crushing have been observed in the same experiment. The potential of using HEGB for geothermal well stimulation has been demonstrated through the present experiments. 18 refs., 40 figs., 4 tabs.

Cuderman, J.F.; Chu, T.Y.; Jung, J.; Jacobson, R.D.

1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Calibration of Digital Amateur Cameras  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We introduce a novel outlook on the self-calibration task, by considering images taken by a camera in motion, allowing for zooming and focusing. Apart from the complex relationship between the lens control settings and the intrinsic camera parameters, a prior off-line calibration allows to neglect the setting of focus, and to fix the principal point and aspect ratio throughout distinct views. Thus, the calibration matrix is dependent only on the zoom position. Given a fully calibrated reference view, one has only one parameter to estimate for any other view of the same scene, in order to calibrate it and to be able to perform metric reconstructions. We provide a close-form solution, and validate the reliability of the algorithm with experiments on real images. An important advantage of our method is a reduced - to one - number of critical camera configurations, associated with it. Moreover, we propose a method for computing the epipolar geometry of two views, taken from different positions and with different (spatial) resolutions; the idea is to take an appropriate third view, that is "easy" to match with the other two.

Magdalena Urbanek; Magdalena Urbanek; Radu Horaud; Radu Horaud; Peter Sturm; Peter Sturm; Projet Movi

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Disposition of excess weapon plutonium in deep boreholes - site selection handbook  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One of the options for disposing of excess weapons plutonium is to place it near the base of deep boreholes in stable crystalline rocks. The technology needed to begin designing this means of disposition already exists, and there are many attractive sites available within the conterminous United States. There are even more potential sites for this option within Russia. The successful design of a borehole system must address two criteria: (1) how to dispose of 50 metric tons of weapons plutonium while making it inaccessible for unauthorized retrieval, and (2) how to prevent contamination of the accessible biosphere, defined here as the Earth`s surface and usable groundwaters.

Heiken, G.; Woldegabriel, G.; Morley, R.; Plannerer, H.; Rowley, J.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

System and method to estimate compressional to shear velocity (VP/VS) ratio in a region remote from a borehole  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In some aspects of the disclosure, a method for creating three-dimensional images of non-linear properties and the compressional to shear velocity ratio in a region remote from a borehole using a conveyed logging tool is disclosed. In some aspects, the method includes arranging a first source in the borehole and generating a steered beam of elastic energy at a first frequency; arranging a second source in the borehole and generating a steerable beam of elastic energy at a second frequency, such that the steerable beam at the first frequency and the steerable beam at the second frequency intercept at a location away from the borehole; receiving at the borehole by a sensor a third elastic wave, created by a three wave mixing process, with a frequency equal to a difference between the first and second frequencies and a direction of propagation towards the borehole; determining a location of a three wave mixing region based on the arrangement of the first and second sources and on properties of the third wave signal; and creating three-dimensional images of the non-linear properties using data recorded by repeating the generating, receiving and determining at a plurality of azimuths, inclinations and longitudinal locations within the borehole. The method is additionally used to generate three dimensional images of the ratio of compressional to shear acoustic velocity of the same volume surrounding the borehole.

Vu, Cung; Nihei, Kurt T; Schmitt, Denis P; Skelt, Christopher; Johnson, Paul A; Guyer, Robert; TenCate, James A; Le Bas, Pierre-Yves

2012-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

268

Self-calibrating multiplexer circuit  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A time domain multiplexer system with automatic determination of acceptable multiplexer output limits, error determination, or correction is comprised of a time domain multiplexer, a computer, a constant current source capable of at least three distinct current levels, and two series resistances employed for calibration and testing. A two point linear calibration curve defining acceptable multiplexer voltage limits may be defined by the computer by determining the voltage output of the multiplexer to very accurately known input signals developed from predetermined current levels across the series resistances. Drift in the multiplexer may be detected by the computer when the output voltage limits, expected during normal operation, are exceeded, or the relationship defined by the calibration curve is invalidated.

Wahl, C.P.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

269

Self-calibrating multiplexer circuit  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A time domain multiplexer system with automatic determination of acceptable multiplexer output limits, error determination, or correction is comprised of a time domain multiplexer, a computer, a constant current source capable of at least three distinct current levels, and two series resistances employed for calibration and testing. A two point linear calibration curve defining acceptable multiplexer voltage limits may be defined by the computer by determining the voltage output of the multiplexer to very accurately known input signals developed from predetermined current levels across the series resistances. Drift in the multiplexer may be detected by the computer when the output voltage limits, expected during normal operation, are exceeded, or the relationship defined by the calibration curve is invalidated.

Wahl, Chris P. (North Huntingdon, PA)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Thermal reconstruction of a crime scene using calibrated simulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study utilized energy simulation in support of a forensic pathology time of death analysis for a corpse discovered in a single family residence two years prior to the study. In order to produce an accurate estimate of the interior temperature profile ... Keywords: energy model accuracy, energy model calibration, free floating energy simulation, legal application of thermal simulation

Nathan Brown; M. Susan Ubbelohde; George Loisos; Santosh Philip; Ibone Santiago

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Calibrated Probabilistic Forecasting at the Stateline Wind Energy Center  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Calibrated Probabilistic Forecasting at the Stateline Wind Energy Center: The Regime at wind energy sites are becoming paramount. Regime-switching space-time (RST) models merge meteorological forecast regimes at the wind energy site and fits a conditional predictive model for each regime

Washington at Seattle, University of

272

Method for calibrating mass spectrometers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method whereby a mass spectra generated by a mass spectrometer is calibrated by shifting the parameters used by the spectrometer to assign masses to the spectra in a manner which reconciles the signal of ions within the spectra having equal mass but differing charge states, or by reconciling ions having known differences in mass to relative values consistent with those known differences. In this manner, the mass spectrometer is calibrated without the need for standards while allowing the generation of a highly accurate mass spectra by the instrument.

Anderson, Gordon A [Benton City, WA; Brands, Michael D [Richland, WA; Bruce, James E [Schwenksville, PA; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana [Richland, WA; Smith, Richard D [Richland, WA

2002-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

273

Characterization of Vadose Zone Sediments Below the C Tank Farm: Borehole C4297 and RCRA Borehole 299-E27-22  

SciTech Connect

The overall goal of the Tank Farm Vadose Zone Project, led by CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc., is to define risks from past and future single-shell tank farm activities at Hanford. To meet this goal, CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. tasked scientists from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to perform detailed analyses on vadose zone sediments from within Waste Management Area (WMA) C. This report is the first of two reports written to present the results of these analyses. Specifically, this report contains all the geologic, geochemical, and selected physical characterization data collected on vadose zone sediment recovered from borehole C4297, installed adjacent to Tank C-105, and from borehole 299-E27-22, installed directly north of the C Tank Farm. Sediments from borehole 299-E27-22 were considered to be background uncontaminated sediments against which to compare contaminated sediments for the C Tank Farm characterization effort. This report also presents our interpretation of the data in the context of sediment types, the vertical extent of contamination, the migration potential of the contaminants, and the likely source of the contamination in the vadose zone and groundwater below the C Tank Farm. The information presented in this report supports the A-AX, C and U Waste Management Area field investigation report(a) in preparation by CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. A core log was generated for both boreholes and a geologic evaluation of all core samples was performed at the time of opening. Aliquots of sediment from the borehole core samples were analyzed and characterized in the laboratory for the following parameters: moisture content, gamma-emitting radionuclides, one-to-one water extracts (which provide soil pH, electrical conductivity, cation, trace metal, and anion data), total carbon and inorganic carbon content, and 8 M nitric acid extracts (which provide a measure of the total leachable sediment content of contaminants). Two key radiocontaminants, technetium-99 and uranium-238, along with other trace metals were determined in acid and water extracts by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

Brown, Christopher F.; Serne, R. JEFFREY; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Horton, Duane G.; Lanigan, David C.; Clayton, Ray E.; Valenta, Michelle M.; Vickerman, Tanya S.; Kutnyakov, Igor V.; Geiszler, Keith N.; Baum, Steven R.; Parker, Kent E.; Lindberg, Michael J.

2006-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

274

Borehole gravity surveys in the Cretaceous-Tertiary Sagavanirktok Formation, Kuparuk River oil field, Alaska  

SciTech Connect

Detailed borehole gravity surveys (sponsored by the US Department of Energy) were made in three wells in the Kuparuk River and westernmost Prudhoe Bay oil fields, Alaska from depths as shallow as 15 m to as great as 1,340 m through permafrost and underlying heavy oil bearing sandstones of the Sagavanirktok Formation. A subbituminous coal-bearing sequence and the stability field for methane hydrate occur partly within and partly below the permafrost zone, whose base, defined by the 0{degree}C isotherm, varies from 464 to 564 m. The surveys provided accurate, large-volume estimates of in-situ bulk density from which equivalent porosity was calculated using independent grain and pore-fluid density information. This density and porosity data helped to define the rock mass properties within the hydrate stability field and the thermal conductivity, seismic character, and compaction history of the permafrost. Bulk density of the unconsolidated to poorly consolidated sections ranges mostly from 1.9 to 2.3 g/cm{sup 3}. The shallow permafrost section appears to be slightly overcompacted in comparison to similar sedimentary sequences in nonpermafrost regions. The cause of this apparent overcompaction is unknown but may be due to freeze-thaw processes that have similarly affected sea floor and surficial deposits elsewhere in the Arctic. Fluctuations of bulk density appear to be controlled principally by (1) textural variations of the sediments, possibly exaggerated locally within the permafrost zone by excess ice, (2) presence or absence of carbonaceous material, and (3) type of pore-fluid (water-ice vs. water vs. hydrocarbons). As hypothetical models predict bulk-density is slightly lower opposite one interval of possible methane hydrate. Porosity may be as high as 40-45% for selected coarser grained units within the permafrost zone, and as high as 30-35% in a series of well sorted, heavy oil-bearing sandstones.

Beyer, L.A. (Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA (USA))

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Nonrotating, self-centering anchor assembly for anchoring a bolt in a borehole  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An expandable anchor assembly is provided for anchoring the threaded end portion of an elongated roof bolt in a borehole. The anchoring assembly includes a hollow outer sleeve in the form of a plurality of symmetrically arranged, longitudinal segmented wall portions with exterior gripping teeth and an inner expander sleeve in the form of a corresponding plurality of longitudinal wall portions symmetrically arranged about a central axis to define an inner threaded cylindrical section. The inner sleeve is captured within and moveable axially relative to the outer sleeve. As the threaded end portion of the elongated bolt is inserted into the inner threaded cylindrical section of the inner sleeve from the trailing end to the leading end thereof, the inner sleeve expands over and clamps around the threaded end portion of the elongated bolt. Thereafter, partial withdrawal of the elongated bolt from the borehole causes the inner sleeve to axially move relative to the outer sleeve from the leading end toward the trailing end of the outer sleeve in a wedging action to cause the outer sleeve to radially expand and force engagement of the gripping teeth against the sidewall of the borehole to thereby secure the expandable anchor assembly and therewith the threaded end portion of the elongated bolt within the borehole.

Bevan, John E.; King, Grant W.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Climate from borehole data: Energy fluxes and temperatures since Hugo Beltrami  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

anomaly. The vertical profile of the temperature anomaly, depends on the history of energy balance. Wang, and R. L. Bras, Energy balance at the Earth's surface: Heat flux history in eastern CanadaClimate from borehole data: Energy fluxes and temperatures since 1500 Hugo Beltrami Environmental

Beltrami, Hugo

277

Nonrotating, self-centering anchor assembly for anchoring a bolt in a borehole  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An expandable anchor assembly is provided for anchoring the threaded end portion of an elongated roof bolt in a borehole. The anchoring assembly includes a hollow outer sleeve in the form of a plurality of symmetrically arranged, longitudinal segmented wall portions with exterior gripping teeth and an inner expander sleeve in the form of a corresponding plurality of longitudinal wall portions symmetrically arranged about a central axis to define an inner threaded cylindrical section. The inner sleeve is captured within and moveable axially relative to the outer sleeve. As the threaded end portion of the elongated bolt is inserted into the inner threaded cylindrical section of the inner sleeve from the trailing end to the leading end thereof, the inner sleeve expands over and clamps around the threaded end portion of the elongated bolt. Thereafter, partial withdrawal of the elongated bolt from the borehole causes the inner sleeve to axially move relative to the outer sleeve from the leading end toward the trailing end of the outer sleeve in a wedging action to cause the outer sleeve to radially expand and force engagement of the gripping teeth against the sidewall of the borehole to thereby secure the expandable anchor assembly and therewith the threaded end portion of the elongated bolt within the borehole. 8 figs.

Bevan, J.E.; King, G.W.

1998-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

278

Utilization of melting techniques for borehole wall stabilization. [Applied to geothermal well production systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A research program on the Subterrene concept based on excavation by melting has been completed. Theoretical and experimental studies were made for a broad range of applications. Most recently, a study of Subterrene deep geothermal well production systems predicted that, compared to rotary-drilled wells, significant cost savings are possible, e.g., 2 and 4 million dollars for 10-km-deep wells and geothermal gradients of 25 and 40 K/km, respectively. It was also concluded that for most wells the rate of penetration of the melting bits should be increased several times over that attained in the Subterrene tests. Subterrene melting penetration tests showed that borehole glass liners can be formed in a wide variety of materials and structural characterization tests showed that tuff glass cylinders can be many times stronger in compression than the parent material. Also, the tests showed that the rock-glass liner permeability decreases rapidly with confining pressure. New melting devices are conceivable that could line rotary-drilled boreholes with rock glass or other materials with resultant improvements in well costs. With emphasis on borehole liners, an overview of Subterrene program results, data on rock-glass liners, and suggestions on how molten materials might be applied to the borehole wall as part of a rotary drilling operation are presented.

Altseimer, J.H.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Numerical Modeling of the Nucleation Conditions of Petal-Centerline  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

the Nucleation Conditions of Petal-Centerline the Nucleation Conditions of Petal-Centerline Fractures below a Borehole Floor, A Sensitivity Study and Application to the Coso Geothermal Field Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Numerical Modeling of the Nucleation Conditions of Petal-Centerline Fractures below a Borehole Floor, A Sensitivity Study and Application to the Coso Geothermal Field Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: A boundary element model using Poly3D© has been developed to investigate the conditions in which the stress concentration below the floor of a borehole can cause tensile stress necessary to nucleate petal-centerline fractures. The remote stress state, borehole geometry, and traction boundary conditions on the borehole surface are taken from direct

280

Hanford Borehole Geologic Information System (HBGIS) Updated User’s Guide for Web-based Data Access and Export  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Hanford Borehole Geologic Information System (HBGIS) is a prototype web-based graphical user interface (GUI) for viewing and downloading borehole geologic data. The HBGIS is being developed as part of the Remediation Decision Support function of the Soil and Groundwater Remediation Project, managed by Fluor Hanford, Inc., Richland, Washington. Recent efforts have focused on improving the functionality of the HBGIS website in order to allow more efficient access and exportation of available data in HBGIS. Users will benefit from enhancements such as a dynamic browsing, user-driven forms, and multi-select options for selecting borehole geologic data for export. The need for translating borehole geologic data into electronic form within the HBGIS continues to increase, and efforts to populate the database continue at an increasing rate. These new web-based tools should help the end user quickly visualize what data are available in HBGIS, select from among these data, and download the borehole geologic data into a consistent and reproducible tabular form. This revised user’s guide supersedes the previous user’s guide (PNNL-15362) for viewing and downloading data from HBGIS. It contains an updated data dictionary for tables and fields containing borehole geologic data as well as instructions for viewing and downloading borehole geologic data.

Mackley, Rob D.; Last, George V.; Allwardt, Craig H.

2008-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "borehole calibration models" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

NREL: Buildings Research - Utility Bill Calibration Test Cases  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Utility Bill Calibration Test Cases Utility Bill Calibration Test Cases The diagram below illustrates the utility bill calibration test cases in BESTEST-EX. In these cases, participants are given input ranges and synthetic utility bills. Software tools calibrate key model inputs using the utility bills and then predict energy savings for the different retrofit cases. Participant energy savings predictions using calibrated models are compared to NREL predictions using state-of-the-art building energy simulation programs. For self-testing, participants should not view reference results until after tested software results have been generated. This diagram provides an overview of the BESTEST-EX utility bill calibration case process. On the left side of the diagram is a box labeled "BESTEST-EX Document" with a list that contains two bulleted items. The first bullet reads "Defines a representative existing home and several retrofit measures." The second bullet reads "Provides input ranges for key model inputs." Underneath this list is an image of a house and to the right of the house is a listing of the measures: R-wall=4.5-6.2; ELA=137-216 in2 ; Tsat=60-75°F, etc. Underneath this grouping is another bullet that reads "Presents utility bills that were generated by: A) randomly selecting key model inputs within ranges (values remain hidden); B) running test cases with selected inputs in EnergyPlus, DOE2.1E, and SUNREL." Below this bullet is a bar graph showing energy savings on the y axis and retrofit measure on the x axis. Inside the graph area is text reading "Reference results remains hidden for utility bill calibration cases." An arrow labeled "Results" points horizontally to the right to the results box. From the top half of this box are two arrows that are labeled "Input Ranges" and "Utility Bills" and points horizontally to the right to another smaller box that is labeled "Audit Software Provider." Underneath this heading are three bullets: one reads "Creates model of existing home knowing input ranges from test," the next one reads "Calibrates model inputs using utility bills," and the third one reads "Predicts retrofit energy savings. Underneath these bullets is an image of a house; to the right of this is a bar graph showing energy savings on the y axis and retrofit measure on the x axis. From this box an arrow labeled "Results" points directly below

282

Calibrating Cylindrical Hot-Film Anemometer Sensors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report the results of 82 separate calibrations of cylindrical, platinum hot-film anemometer sensors in air. The calibrations for each sensor involved a determination of its temperature-resistance characteristics, a study of its heat transfer ...

Edgar L. Andreas; Brett Murphy

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Suggestions for Radiometric Calibration Coefficient Generation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The great emphasis that studies of global change have placed on accurate absolute radiometric calibration of satellite sensors has led to the development of many new onboard and vicarious calibration techniques. With the launch in 1998 of the ...

Philip N. Slater; Stuart F. Biggar

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Vicarious Radiometric Calibrations of EOS Sensors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Four methods for the in-flight radiometric calibration and cross calibration of multispectral imaging sensors are described. Three make use of ground-based reflectance, irradiance, and radiance measurements in conjunction with atmospheric ...

Phlip N. Slater; Stuart F. Biggar; Kurtis J. Thome; David I. Gellman; Paul R. Spyak

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Low-Temperature Calibration of Infrared Thermometers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method was developed for calibrating infrared thermometers to properly measure target temperatures ranging from ?70 to 0°C. Once calibrated for this range, the thermometer can then be used to measure the flux of thermal radiation from the sky. ...

B. A. Kimball; S. T. Mitchell

1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

CapLibrate: Self-Calibration of an Energy Harvesting Power Supply with Supercapacitors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CapLibrate: Self-Calibration of an Energy Harvesting Power Supply with Supercapacitors Christian and assess models for a supercapacitor- based harvesting supply. The parameters of the models are discussed

Turau, Volker

287

Calibration and Validation of the Integrated Biosphere Simulator (IBIS) for Brazilian Semi-Arid Region  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The reliability of climate and weather models predictions is linked to an adequate representation of the land surface processes. In order to evaluate performance and to improve predictions, land surface models are calibrated against observed data. ...

Ana Paula M. A. Cunha; Regina C. S. Alvalá; Gilvan Sampaio; Marília Harumi Shimizu; Marcos Heil Costa

288

Spinning angle optical calibration apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An optical calibration apparatus is provided for calibrating and reproducing spinning angles in cross-polarization, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. An illuminated magnifying apparatus enables optical setting an accurate reproducing of spinning "magic angles" in cross-polarization, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy experiments. A reference mark scribed on an edge of a spinning angle test sample holder is illuminated by a light source and viewed through a magnifying scope. When the "magic angle" of a sample material used as a standard is attained by varying the angular position of the sample holder, the coordinate position of the reference mark relative to a graduation or graduations on a reticle in the magnifying scope is noted. Thereafter, the spinning "magic angle" of a test material having similar nuclear properties to the standard is attained by returning the sample holder back to the originally noted coordinate position.

Beer, Stephen K. (Morgantown, WV); Pratt, II, Harold R. (Morgantown, WV)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Spinning angle optical calibration apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An optical calibration apparatus is provided for calibrating and reproducing spinning angles in cross-polarization, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. An illuminated magnifying apparatus enables optical setting and accurate reproducing of spinning magic angles in cross-polarization, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy experiments. A reference mark scribed on an edge of a spinning angle test sample holder is illuminated by a light source and viewed through a magnifying scope. When the magic angle of a sample material used as a standard is attained by varying the angular position of the sample holder, the coordinate position of the reference mark relative to a graduation or graduations on a reticle in the magnifying scope is noted. Thereafter, the spinning magic angle of a test material having similar nuclear properties to the standard is attained by returning the sample holder back to the originally noted coordinate position. 2 figs.

Beer, S.K.; Pratt, H.R. II.

1989-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

290

TOUGH: Model use, calibration and validation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

flow of multiphase, multicomponent fluids in porous andmultiphase fluid flow, heat transfer, and deformation in fractured porous

Finsterle, S.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

TOUGH: Model use, calibration and validation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Richland, Wash. : Rockwell Hanford Operations. Storn, R. ,U.S. Department of Energy’s Hanford site in Washington. Theet al. (2005). At the Hanford site, highly radioactive waste

Finsterle, S.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Sensitivity of Spectroradiometric Calibrations in the Near Infrared to Variations in Atmospheric Water Vapor: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Spectra of natural sunlight and artificial sources are important in photovoltaic research. Calibration of the spectroradiometers used for these measurements is derived from the response to spectral irradiance standards from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). Some photovoltaic devices respond in the near infrared, or NIR, so spectral measurements and calibrations are needed in this region. Over the course of several calibrations, we identified variations> 5% in spectroradiometer NIR calibration data for a certain spectroradiometer. A detailed uncertainty analysis did not reflect the observed variation. Reviewing calibration procedures and historical data, we noted that the variations were seen in water vapor absorption bands. We used spectral transmission models to compute changes in atmospheric transmission (as a function of water vapor content) over path lengths occurring during calibration. The results indicate that the observed variations result from varying water vapor content. A correction algorithm for adjusting measured data was developed based on our analysis.

Myers, D. R.; Andreas, A. A.

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Uranium in Hanford Site 300 Area: Extraction Data on Borehole Sediments  

SciTech Connect

In this study, sediments collected from boreholes drilled in 2010 and 2011 as part of a remedial investigation/feasibility study were characterized. The wells, located within or around two process ponds and one process trench waste site, were characterized in terms of total uranium concentration, mobile fraction of uranium, particle size, and moisture content along the borehole depth. In general, the gravel-dominated sediments of the vadose zone Hanford formation in all investigated boreholes had low moisture contents. Based on total uranium content, a total of 48 vadose zone and periodically rewetted zone sediment samples were selected for more detailed characterization, including measuring the concentration of uranium extracted with 8 M nitric acid, and leached using bicarbonate mixed solutions to determine the liable uranium (U(VI)) contents. In addition, water extraction was conducted on 17 selected sediments. Results from the sediment acid and bicarbonate extractions indicated the total concentrations of anthropogenic labile uranium in the sediments varied among the investigated boreholes. The peak uranium concentration (114.84 µg/g, acid extract) in <2-mm size fractions was found in borehole 399 1-55, which was drilled directly in the southwest corner of the North Process Pond. Lower uranium concentrations (~0.3–2.5 µg/g, acid extract) in <2-mm size fractions were found in boreholes 399-1-57, 399-1-58, and 399-1-59, which were drilled either near the Columbia River or inland and upgradient of any waste process ponds or trenches. A general trend of “total” uranium concentrations was observed that increased as the particle size decreased when relating the sediment particle size and acid extractable uranium concentrations in two selected sediment samples. The labile uranium bicarbonate leaching kinetic experiments on three selected sediments indicated a two-step leaching rate: an initial rapid release, followed by a slow continual release of uranium from the sediment. Based on the uranium leaching kinetic results, quasi equilibrium can be assumed after 1000-h batch reaction time in this study.

Wang, Guohui; Serne, R. Jeffrey; Lindberg, Michael J.; Um, Wooyong; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Williams, Benjamin D.; Kutynakov, I. V.; Wang, Zheming; Qafoku, Nikolla

2012-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

294

Calibration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Typical inductance standards are relatively robust and therefore do not require ... 2.6.8.3 If the measurement type does not match the terminal ... 1981. ...

2011-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

295

Gearbox Reliability Collaborative High Speed Shaft Tapered Roller Bearing Calibration  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Gearbox Reliability Collaborative (GRC) is a project investigating gearbox reliability primarily through testing and modeling. Previous dynamometer testing focused upon acquiring measurements in the planetary section of the test gearbox. Prior to these tests, the strain gages installed on the planetary bearings were calibrated in a load frame.

Keller, J.; Guo, Y.; McNiff, B.

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Investigation of factors affecting the calibration of strain gage based transducers (``Goodzeit gages``) for SSC magnets  

SciTech Connect

These transducers are designed to measure stresses on SSC collared coils. They are individually calibrated with a bonded ten-stack of SSC inner coil cable by applying a known load and reading corresponding output from the gages. The transducer is supported by a notched ``backing plate`` that allows for bending of the gage beam during calibration or in use with an actual coil. Several factors affecting the calibration and use of the transducers are: the number of times a ``backing plate`` is used, the similarities or difficulties between bonded ten-stacks, and the differences between the ten-stacks and the coil they represent. The latter is probably the most important because a calibration curve is a model of how a transducer should react within a coil. If the model is wrong, the calibration curve is wrong. Information will be presented regarding differences in calibrations between Brookhaven National Labs (also calibrating these transducers) and Fermilab -- what caused these differences, the investigation into the differences between coils and ten-stacks and how they relate to transducer calibration, and some suggestions for future calibrations.

Davidson, M.; Gilbertson, A.; Dougherty, M.

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Characterisation of pulsed Carbon fiber illuminators for FIR instrument calibration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We manufactured pulsed illuminators emitting in the far infrared for the Planck-HFI bolometric instrument ground calibrations. Specific measurements have been conducted on these light sources, based on Carbon fibers, to understand and predict their properties. We present a modelisation of the temperature dependence of the thermal conductivity and the calorific capacitance of the fibers. A comparison between simulations and bolometer data is given, that shows the coherence of our model. Their small time constants, their stability and their emission spectrum pointing in the submm range make these illuminators a very usefull tool for calibrating FIR instruments.

Henrot-Versillé, S; Couchot, F

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Characterisation of pulsed Carbon fiber illuminators for FIR instrument calibration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We manufactured pulsed illuminators emitting in the far infrared for the Planck-HFI bolometric instrument ground calibrations. Specific measurements have been conducted on these light sources, based on Carbon fibers, to understand and predict their properties. We present a modelisation of the temperature dependence of the thermal conductivity and the calorific capacitance of the fibers. A comparison between simulations and bolometer data is given, that shows the coherence of our model. Their small time constants, their stability and their emission spectrum pointing in the submm range make these illuminators a very usefull tool for calibrating FIR instruments.

S. Henrot-Versille; R. Cizeron; F. Couchot

2007-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

299

Amplitude and frequency experimental field measurements of a rotating?imbalance seismic source associated with changes in lithology surrounding a borehole  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Field measurements of the vibration amplitude of a rotating?imbalance seismic source in a liquid?filled borehole are described. The borehole was a cased oil well that had been characterized by gamma?ray cement bond and compensated neutron litho?density/gamma?ray logs. The well logs indicated an abrupt transition from shale to limestone at a depth of 2638 ft. The vibration amplitude and frequency of a rotating?imbalance seismic source was measured versus applied voltage as the source was raised from 2654 to 2618 ft through the shale–limestone transition. It was observed that the vibration amplitude changed by approximately 10% in magnitude and the frequency changed approximately 15% as the source passed the shale–limestone transition. The measurements were compared to predictions provided by a two?dimensional analytical model of a rotating?imbalance source located in a liquid?filled bore hole. It was observed that the sensitivity of the experimentally measured vibration amplitude of the seismic source to the properties of the surrounding geologic media was an order of magnitude greater than that predicted by the two?dimensional analytical model.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Water borne transport of high level nuclear waste in very deep borehole disposal of high level nuclear waste  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to examine the feasibility of the very deep borehole experiment and to determine if it is a reasonable method of storing high level nuclear waste for an extended period of time. The objective ...

Cabeche, Dion Tunick

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "borehole calibration models" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

3-D Inversion Of Borehole-To-Surface Electrical Data Using A  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » 3-D Inversion Of Borehole-To-Surface Electrical Data Using A Back-Propagation Neural Network Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: 3-D Inversion Of Borehole-To-Surface Electrical Data Using A Back-Propagation Neural Network Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: The "fluid-flow tomography", an advanced technique for geoelectrical survey based on the conventional mise-a-la-masse measurement, has been developed by Exploration Geophysics Laboratory at the Kyushu University. This technique is proposed to monitor fluid-flow behavior

302

Use of an acoustic borehole televiewer to investigate casing corrosion in geothermal wells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Corrosion of well and surface equipment due to the presence of hot, corrosive brines is one of the major problems facing geothermal operators. For wellbore casing, this problem is complicated by the fact that in-place inspection is difficult at best. In an attempt to improve this situation, a prototype acoustic borehole televiewer designed to operate in geothermal wells was used to study the corrosion damage to casing in three commercial wells. The results of this experiment were promising. The televiewer returns helped to define areas of major corrosion damage and to indicate the extent of the damage. This paper briefly discusses the corrosion problem, describes the acoustic borehole televiewer, and then summarizes the results of the field test of the televiewer's capability for investigating corrosion.

Carson, C.C.; Bauman, T.

1986-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Borehole data package for well 699-37-47A, PUREX Plant Cribs, CY 1996  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new groundwater monitoring well (699-37-47A) was installed in 1996 as a downgradient well near the PUREX Plant Cribs Treatment, Storage, and Disposal Facility at Hanford. This document provides data from the well drilling and construction operations, as well as data from subsequent characterization of groundwater and sediment samples collected during the drilling process. The data include: well construction documentation, geologist`s borehole logs, results of laboratory analysis of groundwater samples collected during drilling and of physical tests conducted on sediment samples collected during drilling, borehole geophysics, and results of aquifer testing including slug tests and flowmeter analysis. This well (699-37-47A) was constructed in support of the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) milestone M-24-00H and interim milestone M-24-35 (Ecology et al. 1994), and was funded under Project W-152.

Lindberg, J.W.; Williams, B.A.; Spane, F.A.

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Method of measuring material properties of rock in the wall of a borehole  

SciTech Connect

To measure the modulus of elasticity of the rock in the wall of a borehole, a plug is cut in the borehole wall. The plug, its base attached to the surrounding rock, acts as a short column in response to applied forces. A loading piston is applied to the top of the plug and compression of the plug is measured as load is increased. Measurement of piston load and plug longitudinal deformation are made to determine the elastic modulus of the plug material. Poisson's ratio can be determined by simultaneous measurements of longitudinal and lateral deformation of the plug in response to loading. To determine shear modulus, the top of the plug is twisted while measurements are taken of torsional deformation.

Overmier, D. K.

1985-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

305

Development and field testing of the high-temperature borehole televiewer  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The High-Temperature Borehole Televiewer is a downhole instrument which provides acoustic pictures of the borehole walls that are suitable for casing inspection and fracture detection in geothermal wells. The Geothermal Drilling Organization has funded the development of a commercial tool survivable to temperatures up to 275{degree}C and pressures of 5000 psi. A real-time display on an IBM-compatible PC was included as part of the developmental effort. This paper describes the three principal components are: the mechanical section, the electronics, and the computer software and hardware. Each of these three components are described with special attention to important design changes most pertinent to a high temperature environment. The results of two field tests of the televiewer system are also described. 7 refs., 4 figs.

Duda, L.E.; Uhl, J.E.; Wemple, R.P.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Characterization of Vadose Zone Sediments Below the TX Tank Farm: Boreholes C3830, C3831, C3832 and RCRA Borehole 299-W10-27  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report was revised in September 2008 to remove acid-extractable sodium data from Tables 4.8, 4.28,4.43, and 4.59. The sodium data was removed due to potential contamination introduced during the acid extraction process. The rest of the text remains unchanged from the original report issued in April 2004. The overall goal of the Tank Farm Vadose Zone Project, led by CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc., is to define risks from past and future single-shell tank farm activities at Hanford. To meet this goal, CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. tasked scientists from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to perform detailed analyses on vadose zone sediments from within Waste Management Area (WMA) T-TX-TY. This report is the first of two reports written to present the results of these analyses. Specifically, this report contains all the geologic, geochemical, and selected physical characterization data collected on vadose zone sediment recovered from boreholes C3830, C3831, and C3832 in the TX Tank Farm, and from borehole 299-W-10-27 installed northeast of the TY Tank Farm.

Serne, R. Jeffrey; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Horton, Duane G.; Lanigan, David C.; Lindenmeier, Clark W.; Lindberg, Michael J.; Clayton, Ray E.; Legore, Virginia L.; Orr, Robert D.; Kutnyakov, Igor V.; Baum, Steven R.; Geiszler, Keith N.; Valenta, Michelle M.; Vickerman, Tanya S.

2008-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

307

Characterization of Vadose Zone Sediments Below the C Tank Farm: Borehole C4297 and RCRA Borehole 299-E27-22  

SciTech Connect

This report was revised in September 2008 to remove acid-extractable sodium data from Tables 4.7 and 4.25. The sodium data was removed due to potential contamination introduced during the acid extraction process. The rest of the text remains unchanged from the original report issued in September 2006. The overall goal of the Tank Farm Vadose Zone Project, led by CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc., is to define risks from past and future single-shell tank farm activities at the Hanford Site. To meet this goal, CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. tasked scientists from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to perform detailed analyses on vadose zone sediments from within Waste Management Area (WMA) C. This report is the first of two reports written to present the results of these analyses. Specifically, this report contains all the geologic, geochemical, and selected physiochemical characterization data collected on vadose zone sediment recovered from borehole C4297, installed adjacent to tank C-105, and from borehole 299-E27-22, installed directly north of the C Tank Farm. This report also presents the interpretation of data in the context of sediment types, the vertical extent of contamination, the migration potential of the contaminants, and the likely source of the contamination in the vadose zone below the C Tank Farm. The information presented in this report supports the WMA A-AX, C, and U field investigation report in preparation by CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc.

Brown, Christopher F.; Serne, R. Jeffrey; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Horton, Duane G.; Lanigan, David C.; Clayton, Ray E.; Valenta, Michelle M.; Vickerman, Tanya S.; Kutnyakov, Igor V.; Geiszler, Keith N.; Baum, Steven R.; Parker, Kent E.; Lindberg, Michael J.

2008-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

308

LRM probe-tip calibrations using nonideal standards ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The dashed curve corresponds to repeated calibrations with identical ... LRRM calibrations with automatic determination of load inductance,” 36th ...

2013-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

309

Uranium in Hanford Site 300 Area: Extraction Data on Borehole Sediments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study, sediments collected from boreholes drilled in 2010 and 2011 as part of a remedial investigation/feasibility study were characterized. The wells, located within or around two process ponds and one process trench waste site, were characterized in terms of total uranium concentration, mobile fraction of uranium, particle size, and moisture content along the borehole depth. In general, the gravel-dominated sediments of the vadose zone Hanford formation in all investigated boreholes had low moisture contents. Based on total uranium content, a total of 48 vadose zone and periodically rewetted zone sediment samples were selected for more detailed characterization, including measuring the concentration of uranium extracted with 8 M nitric acid, and leached using bicarbonate mixed solutions to determine the liable uranium (U(VI)) contents. In addition, water extraction was conducted on 17 selected sediments. Results from the sediment acid and bicarbonate extractions indicated the total concentrations of anthropogenic labile uranium in the sediments varied among the investigated boreholes. The peak uranium concentration (114.84 µg/g, acid extract) in uranium concentrations (~0.3–2.5 µg/g, acid extract) in uranium concentrations was observed that increased as the particle size decreased when relating the sediment particle size and acid extractable uranium concentrations in two selected sediment samples. The labile uranium bicarbonate leaching kinetic experiments on three selected sediments indicated a two-step leaching rate: an initial rapid release, followed by a slow continual release of uranium from the sediment. Based on the uranium leaching kinetic results, quasi equilibrium can be assumed after 1000-h batch reaction time in this study.

Wang, Guohui; Serne, R. Jeffrey; Lindberg, Michael J.; Um, Wooyong; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Williams, Benjamin D.; Kutynakov, I. V.; Wang, Zheming; Qafoku, Nikolla

2012-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

310

Rock mass sealing: experimental assessment of borehole plug performance. Annual report, June 1983-May 1984  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes experimental field and laboratory borehole plugging performance assessment studies that have been performed, completed, started, or planned during the period June 1, 1983-May 31, 1984. Results are given from field flow tests on three cement plugs installed in vertical boreholes in basalt and on one nearly horizontal cement plug. The horizontal plus seals the borehole very well, as does one of the vertical plugs. The initial hydraulic conductivity of the other two vertical field plugs has been relatively high, and remedial action is described. Laboratory simulations have been performed to study the influence of dynamic loading on cement plug performance, and no detrimental effects have been detected. Conversely, drying of cement plugs, especially over extended periods of time and at elevated temperatures does increase the hydraulic conductivity of the plugs severely, as well as reducing their bond strength along the plug-rock interface. Microscopic inspection, strength and flow tests on boreholes in basalt have been used to identify the characteristics of a drilling-induced damaged zone in basalt. While such a damaged zone exists, and has typical features (e.g., fracture density, size, location, orientation) determined by the drilling method and the rock characteristics, it is thin and not likely to be a preferential flowpath. A comprehensive suite of standard engineering characterization tests has been performed on seven commercial bentonites, complemented by flow tests on bentonite plugs, chemical analysis and swelling tests. Experimental designs are given for the study of size and of thermal effects on plug performance, and a few preliminary results are presented. Results are included from ongoing cement push-out tests and swelling measurements.

Daemen, J.J.K.; Greer, W.B.; Adisoma, G.S.; Fuenkajorn, K.; Sawyer, W.D. Jr.; Yazdandoost, A.; Akgun, H.; Kousari, B.

1985-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Borehole Logging Methods for Exploration and Evaluation of Uranium Deposits (1967)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Borehole logging methods for exploration Borehole logging methods for exploration and evaluation o f uranium deposits . Philip H. O d d , Robert F. Bmullad and Carl P. Lathan rej~rinkttl fnlm Mining and Groundwater Geophysiall967 Borehole logging methods for exploration and evaluation of uranium deposits Philip H. Dodd, Robert F. Droullard and Carl P. Lathan US. Atomic Energy Commhwn GmrPd Jtinct&n, Colorado Abstract, M o l e 1 - i s thc geophysical methad mast exten&@ w r t i n the Udtrrd States for exploratio~ md edwtim of wanhi &pod&. dammow lop, C o r n r n d j suppkrnentd with a singbz-pobt msfstailee log, m t l y supply about 80 percent of the bask data for om regerve c W t i o R a d mu& of the w ~ k r 6 . p ~ &ngk inf~nnatio~ Tmck-mounted 'rotmy eqnipmcnt i s EMhmody emphy&& holes usually hwre a nominai b

312

A borehole fluid conductivity logging method for the determination of fracture inflow parameters  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

It is of much current interest to determine the flow characteristics of fractures intersecting a wellbore to provide data in the estimation of the hydrologic behavior of fractured rocks. The fluid inflow rates from the fractures into the wellbore are important quantities to measure. Often these inflows are at very low rates. One often finds that only a few percent of the fractures identified by core inspection and geophysical logging are water-conducting fractures, the rest being closed, clogged, or isolated from the water flow system. A new procedure is proposed and a corresponding method of analysis developed to locate water-conducting fractures and obtain fracture inflow parameters by means of a time sequence of electric conductivity logs of the borehole fluid. The physical basis of the analysis method is discussed. The procedure is applied to an existing set of data, which shows initiation and growth of nine conductivity peaks in a 900-m section of a 1690-m borehole, corresponding to nine water-conducting fractures intersecting the borehole. We are able to match all nine peaks and determine the flow rates from these fractures. 16 refs., 28 figs., 5 tabs.

Tsang, Chin-Fu

1987-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

The U-tube: A new paradigm in borehole fluid sampling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fluid samples from deep boreholes can provide insights into subsurface physical, chemical, and biological conditions. Recovery of intact, minimally altered aliquots of subsurface fluids is required for analysis of aqueous chemistry, isotopic composition, and dissolved gases, and for microbial community characterization. Unfortunately, for many reasons, collecting geofluids poses a number of challenges, from formation contamination by drilling to maintaining integrity during recovery from depths. Not only are there substantial engineering issues in retrieval of a representative sample, but there is often the practical reality that fluid sampling is just one of many activities planned for deep boreholes. The U-tube geochemical sampling system presents a new paradigm for deep borehole fluid sampling. Because the system is small, its ability to integrate with other measurement systems and technologies opens up numerous possibilities for multifunctional integrated wellbore completions. To date, the U-tube has been successfully deployed at four different field sites, each with a different deployment modality, at depths from 260 m to 2 km. While the U-tube has proven to be highly versatile, these installations have resulted in data that provide additional insights for improving future U-tube deployments.

Freifeld, B. M.

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Setup and Calibration of SLAC's Peripheral Monitoring Stations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The goals of this project were to troubleshoot, repair, calibrate, and establish documentation regarding SLAC's (Stanford Linear Accelerator Center's) PMS (Peripheral Monitoring Station) system. The PMS system consists of seven PMSs that continuously monitor skyshine (neutron and photon) radiation levels in SLAC's environment. Each PMS consists of a boron trifluoride (BF{sub 3}) neutron detector (model RS-P1-0802-104 or NW-G-20-12) and a Geiger Moeller (GM) gamma ray detector (model TGM N107 or LND 719) together with their respective electronics. Electronics for each detector are housed in Nuclear Instrument Modules (NIMs) and are plugged into a NIM bin in the station. All communication lines from the stations to the Main Control Center (MCC) were tested prior to troubleshooting. To test communication with MCC, a pulse generator (Systron Donner model 100C) was connected to each channel in the PMS and data at MCC was checked for consistency. If MCC displayed no data, the communication cables to MCC or the CAMAC (Computer Automated Measurement and Control) crates were in need of repair. If MCC did display data, then it was known that the communication lines were intact. All electronics from each station were brought into the lab for troubleshooting. Troubleshooting usually consisted of connecting an oscilloscope or scaler (Ortec model 871 or 775) at different points in the circuit of each detector to record simulated pulses produced by a pulse generator; the input and output pulses were compared to establish the location of any problems in the circuit. Once any problems were isolated, repairs were done accordingly. The detectors and electronics were then calibrated in the field using radioactive sources. Calibration is a process that determines the response of the detector. Detector response is defined as the ratio of the number of counts per minute interpreted by the detector to the amount of dose equivalent rate (in mrem per hour, either calculated or measured). Detector response for both detectors is dependent upon the energy of the incident radiation; this trend had to be accounted for in the calibration of the BF{sub 3} detector. Energy dependence did not have to be taken into consideration when calibrating the GM detectors since GM detector response is only dependent on radiation energy below 100 keV; SLAC only produces a spectrum of gamma radiation above 100 keV. For the GM detector, calibration consisted of bringing a {sup 137}Cs source and a NIST-calibrated RADCAL Radiation Monitor Controller (model 9010) out to the field; the absolute dose rate was determined by the RADCAL device while simultaneously irradiating the GM detector to obtain a scaler reading corresponding to counts per minute. Detector response was then calculated. Calibration of the BF{sub 3} detector was done using NIST certified neutron sources of known emission rates and energies. Five neutron sources ({sup 238}PuBe, {sup 238}PuB, {sup 238}PuF4, {sup 238}PuLi and {sup 252}Cf) with different energies were used to account for the energy dependence of the response. The actual neutron dose rate was calculated by date-correcting NIST source data and considering the direct dose rate and scattered dose rate. Once the total dose rate (sum of the direct and scattered dose rates) was known, the response vs. energy curve was plotted. The first station calibrated (PMS6) was calibrated with these five neutron sources; all subsequent stations were calibrated with one neutron source and the energy dependence was assumed to be the same.

Cooper, C.

2004-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

315

1987 calibration of the TFTR neutron spectrometers  

SciTech Connect

The {sup 3}He neutron spectrometer used for measuring ion temperatures and the NE213 proton recoil spectrometer used for triton burnup measurements were absolutely calibrated with DT and DD neutron generators placed inside the TFTR vacuum vessel. The details of the detector response and calibration are presented. Comparisons are made to the neutron source strengths measured from other calibrated systems. 23 refs., 19 figs., 6 tabs.

Barnes, C.W.; Strachan, J.D. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA); Princeton Univ., NJ (USA). Plasma Physics Lab.)

1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Fluid Metrology Calibration Services - Air Speed  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... National Institute of Standards and Technology provides calibration services for air speed instrumentation such as Pitot tubes, hot-wire or thermal ...

2013-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

317

Sloan Digital Sky Survey Photometric Calibration Revisited  

SciTech Connect

The Sloan Digital Sky Survey calibration is revisited to obtain the most accurate photometric calibration. A small but significant error is found in the flat-fielding of the Photometric telescope used for calibration. Two SDSS star catalogs are compared and the average difference in magnitude as a function of right ascension and declination exhibits small systematic errors in relative calibration. The photometric transformation from the SDSS Photometric Telescope to the 2.5 m telescope is recomputed and compared to synthetic magnitudes computed from measured filter bandpasses.

Marriner, John; /Fermilab

2012-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

318

NIST Measurement Services: NIST Calibration Services for ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 1. V. Gowda, TT Yeh, PI Espina, and NP Yende, “The New NIST Water Flow Calibration Facility,” Proceedings of the 2003 FLOMEKO (Groningen ...

2013-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

319

Silicon Micromachined Dimensional Calibration Artifact for Mesoscale...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Not only are we offering improved accuracy and lower cost, but we are also enabling 3D and multisensor calibration. How this Product Improves upon Competitive Products or...

320

Calibrations of Electronic Brachytherapy Sources, Traceable ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... As in traditional brachytherapy, the source is placed ... established to provide calibrations of these sources. ... through use of a primary-standard free-air ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "borehole calibration models" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

“Once is Enough” in Radiometric Calibrations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... strategy we consider one of the most popular optical radiation calibration services offered by ... 8. Drive out fear so that all may work effectively for the ...

2010-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

322

Calibrated Precipitation Forecasts for a Limited-Area Ensemble Forecast System Using Reforecasts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The calibration of numerical weather forecasts using reforecasts has been shown to increase the skill of weather predictions. Here, the precipitation forecasts from the Consortium for Small Scale Modeling Limited Area Ensemble Prediction System (...

Felix Fundel; Andre Walser; Mark A. Liniger; Christoph Frei; Christof Appenzeller

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Gearbox Reliability Collaborative Bearing Calibration  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

NREL has initiated the Gearbox Reliability Collaborative (GRC) to investigate the root cause of the low wind turbine gearbox reliability. The GRC follows a multi-pronged approach based on a collaborative of manufacturers, owners, researchers and consultants. The project combines analysis, field testing, dynamometer testing, condition monitoring, and the development and population of a gearbox failure database. At the core of the project are two 750kW gearboxes that have been redesigned and rebuilt so that they are representative of the multi-megawatt gearbox topology currently used in the industry. These gearboxes are heavily instrumented and are tested in the field and on the dynamometer. This report discusses the bearing calibrations of the gearboxes.

van Dam, J.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Guidelines for Instrument Calibration Extension/Reduction -- Revision 1: Statistical Analysis of Instrument Calibration Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Calibration reduction or fuel cycle extension efforts require an analysis of plant-specific instrument performance to demonstrate that the longer calibration interval will not result in larger than expected drift. This manual provides a methodology and guidelines for evaluating historical calibration data, and addresses technical issues associated with the application of the analysis results.

1998-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

325

Confinement Vessel Assay System: Calibration and Certification Report  

SciTech Connect

Los Alamos National Laboratory has a number of spherical confinement vessels (CVs) remaining from tests involving nuclear materials. These vessels have an inner diameter of 6 feet with 1 to 2 inch thick steel walls. The goal of the Confinement Vessel Disposition (CVD) project is to remove debris and reduce contamination inside the vessels. The Confinement Vessel Assay System (CVAS) was developed to measure the amount of SNM in CVs before and after cleanout. Prior to cleanout, the system will be used to perform a verification measurement of each vessel. After cleanout, the system will be used to perform safeguards-quality assays of {le} 100-g {sup 239}Pu equivalent in a vessel for safeguards termination. The system was calibrated in three different mass regions (low, medium, and high) to cover the entire plutonium mass range that will be assayed. The low mass calibration and medium mass calibration were verified for material positioned in the center of an empty vessel. The systematic uncertainty due to position bias was estimated using an MCNPX model to simulate the response of the system to material localized at various points along the inner surface of the vessel. The background component due to cosmic ray spallation was determined by performing measurements of an empty vessel and comparing to measurements in the same location with no vessel present. The CVAS has been tested and calibrated in preparation for verification and safeguards measurements of CVs before and after cleanout.

Frame, Katherine C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bourne, Mark M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Crooks, William J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Evans, Louise [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gomez, Cipriano [Retired CMR-OPS: OPERATIONS; Mayo, Douglas R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Miko, David K. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Salazar, William R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Stange, Sy [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Vigil, Georgiana M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

326

Brief Calibration and estimation of redundant signals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents formulation and validation of an adaptive filter for real-time calibration of redundant signals consisting of sensor data and/or analytically derived measurements. The measurement noise covariance matrix is adjusted as a function ... Keywords: Adaptive filtering, Real-time control, Redundancy management, Sensor calibration, Signal estimation

Asok Ray; Shashi Phoha

2000-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Using reforecasts for probabilistic forecast calibration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Using reforecasts for probabilistic forecast calibration Tom Hamill NOAA Earth System Research that is currently operational. #12;3 Why compute reforecasts? · For many forecast problems, such as long-lead forecasts or high-precipitation events, a few past forecasts may be insufficient for calibrating

Hamill, Tom

328

(1) Ensemble forecast calibration & (2) using reforecasts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 (1) Ensemble forecast calibration & (2) using reforecasts Tom Hamill NOAA Earth System Research · Calibration: ; the statistical adjustment of the (ensemble) forecast ­ Rationale 1: Infer large-sample probabilities from small ensemble. ­ Rationale 2: Remove bias, increase forecast reliability while preserving

Hamill, Tom

329

A New RR Lyrae Metallicity Calibration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have begun developing a new metallicity calibration for RR Lyrae stars that includes high-temperature phase regions. Our calibration is an updated and expanded version of the Delta-S, equivalent width method, but which is applicable for most phases of the pulsation, and for the hotter, shorter-period RRc stars. This calibration will be constructed from spectral observations of well studied, bright RR Lyrae stars with metallicities from published high-resolution studies, within the range $-2.5 < [Fe/H] < -0.3$. Phase information for our calibration stars were taken from the AAVSO website, and the MacAdam Student Observatory at the University of Kentucky. Low-resolution spectroscopy $(R \\sim 1000)$ was obtained using the McDonald Observatory, 2.1 meter telescope. Here we present our preliminary data, and find the phase region where the calibration will break down.

Spalding, E; De Lee, N

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Calibration case study of natural source electromagnetic array data recorded over a well in Oregon  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Natural field electromagnetic acquired conventionally, at a number of sparsely spaced single sites, can suffer from spatial aliasing and significant distortive shallow effects which severely limit its geophysical applications. A new mode of data acquisition which measures the electric field continuously along a profile has been developed by F.X. Boxtick. These data can be processed to remove shallow effects while maintaining the deep penetration characteristics of the natural electromagnetic (EM) fields. Processing and modeling techniques for such data are discussed and demonstrated on both synthetic and field data. Very good agreement with actual borehole data is demonstrated.

Shoemaker, C.L.; Shoham, Y.; Hockey, R.

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

MOISTURE MONITOR TESTING AND CALIBRATION  

SciTech Connect

ABS>Electrolytic moisture monitors which continuously analyze the moisture content of gases are commercially available. After a period of operation, these instruments may give erroneous readings, frequently because of damage to the electrolytic cell. A gas with a known and reproducible moisture content within the operating range would be useful for making operational response tests on these monltors and for checking their calibration. A paired- hydrate system of a chemical compound exhibits a water vapor pressure that is constant at a constant temperature. ff an unreactive gas is allowed to equilibrate with a paired-hydrate system, the moisture content of the gas is determined by the vapor pressure of the hydrate pair, the total pressure, and the temperature. Hydrated magnesium perchlorate was prepared which contained between four and six moles of water per mole of perchlorate. This material was pulverized lightly then packed into a stainless steel column and 100 cc/minute of air at atmospheric pressure was passed through the bed. The exit air from the column was analyzed with a moisture monitor. A gas residence time of two minutes in the column was found to be sufficient for establishing moisture equilibrium in the exit flow. The moisture content of the exit air was found to vary from 34 to 70 ppm by volume as the temperature of the paired-hydrate system varied from 20 to 28 un. Concent 85% C. Other paired-hydrate systems can extend this range to higher moisture levels. (auth)

Montgomery, C.D.; Googin, J.M.; Phillips, L.R.

1963-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

332

Deep borehole disposition of surplus fissile materials-The site selection process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One option for disposing of excess weapons plutonium is to place it near the base of deep boreholes in stable crystalline rocks. The technology exists to immediately begin the design of this means of disposition and there are many attractive sites available within the conterminous US. The borehole system utilizes mainly natural barriers to preven migration of Pu and U to the Earth`s surface. Careful site selection ensures favorable geologic conditions that provide natural long-lived migration barriers; they include deep, extremely stable rock formations, strongly reducing brines that exhibit increasing salinity with depth, and most importantly, demonstrated isolation or non-communication of deep fluids with the biosphere for millions of years. This isolation is the most important characteristic, with the other conditions mainly being those that will enhance the potential of locating and maintaining the isolated zones. Candidate sites will probably be located on the craton in very old Precambrian crystalline rocks, most likely the center of a granitic pluton. The sites will be located in tectonically stable areas with no recent volcanic or seismic activity, and situated away from tectonic features that might become active in the near geologic future.

Heiken, G.; WoldeGabriel, G.; Morley, R.; Plannerer, H

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Method and system for generating a beam of acoustic energy from a borehole, and applications thereof  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A compact array of transducers is employed as a downhole instrument for acoustic investigation of the surrounding rock formation. The array is operable to generate simultaneously a first acoustic beam signal at a first frequency and a second acoustic beam signal at a second frequency different than the first frequency. These two signals can be oriented through an azimuthal rotation of the array and an inclination rotation using control of the relative phases of the signals from the transmitter elements or electromechanical linkage. Due to the non-linearity of the formation, the first and the second acoustic beam signal mix into the rock formation where they combine into a collimated third signal that propagates in the formation along the same direction than the first and second signals and has a frequency equal to the difference of the first and the second acoustic signals. The third signal is received either within the same borehole, after reflection, or another borehole, after transmission, and analyzed to determine information about rock formation. Recording of the third signal generated along several azimuthal and inclination directions also provides 3D images of the formation, information about 3D distribution of rock formation and fluid properties and an indication of the dynamic acoustic non-linearity of the formation.

Johnson Paul A. (Santa Fe, NM); Ten Cate, James A. (Los Alamos, NM); Guyer, Robert (Reno, NV); Le Bas, Pierre-Yves (Los Alamos, NM); Vu, Cung (Houston, TX); Nihei, Kurt (Oakland, CA); Schmitt, Denis P. (Katy, TX); Skelt, Christopher (Houston, TX)

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

334

System and method to create three-dimensional images of non-linear acoustic properties in a region remote from a borehole  

SciTech Connect

In some aspects of the disclosure, a method for creating three-dimensional images of non-linear properties and the compressional to shear velocity ratio in a region remote from a borehole using a conveyed logging tool is disclosed. In some aspects, the method includes arranging a first source in the borehole and generating a steered beam of elastic energy at a first frequency; arranging a second source in the borehole and generating a steerable beam of elastic energy at a second frequency, such that the steerable beam at the first frequency and the steerable beam at the second frequency intercept at a location away from the borehole; receiving at the borehole by a sensor a third elastic wave, created by a three wave mixing process, with a frequency equal to a difference between the first and second frequencies and a direction of propagation towards the borehole; determining a location of a three wave mixing region based on the arrangement of the first and second sources and on properties of the third wave signal; and creating three-dimensional images of the non-linear properties using data recorded by repeating the generating, receiving and determining at a plurality of azimuths, inclinations and longitudinal locations within the borehole. The method is additionally used to generate three dimensional images of the ratio of compressional to shear acoustic velocity of the same volume surrounding the borehole.

Vu, Cung; Nihei, Kurt T.; Schmitt, Denis P.; Skelt, Christopher; Johnson, Paul A.; Guyer, Robert; TenCate, James A.; Le Bas, Pierre-Yves

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Calibration of the Improved Stratospheric and Mesospheric Sounder. Part II: Optical Alignment, Spatial, and Pressure Modulator Calibrations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In Part I the Improved Stratospheric and Mesospheric Sounder instrument and its calibration facility were described, and the results of the radiometric and spectral calibrations were presented. In Part II the remaining prelaunch calibrations are ...

C. W. P. Palmer; P. Venters; R. J. Knight; J. Ballard; T. J. Nightingale; P. E. Morris

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Calibrating X-ray Imaging Devices for Accurate Intensity Measurement  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the project presented is to develop methods to accurately calibrate X-ray imaging devices. The approach was to develop X-ray source systems suitable for this endeavor and to develop methods to calibrate solid state detectors to measure source intensity. NSTec X-ray sources used for the absolute calibration of cameras are described, as well as the method of calibrating the source by calibrating the detectors. The work resulted in calibration measurements for several types of X-ray cameras. X-ray camera calibration measured efficiency and efficiency variation over the CCD. Camera types calibrated include: CCD, CID, back thinned (back illuminated), front illuminated.

Haugh, M. J.

2011-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

337

Calibration of the Ogawa ozone passive sampler for aircraft cabins...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Calibration of the Ogawa ozone passive sampler for aircraft cabins. Title Calibration of the Ogawa ozone passive sampler for aircraft cabins. Publication Type Journal Article Year...

338

NIST: Calibration of Low-Energy Photon Brachytherapy ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Calibration of Low-Energy Photon Brachytherapy Sources. ... yields a calibration coefficient for the well-ionization chamber for a given seed type. ...

2013-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

339

Investigation of factors affecting the calibration of strain gage based transducers ( Goodzeit gages'') for SSC magnets  

SciTech Connect

These transducers are designed to measure stresses on SSC collared coils. They are individually calibrated with a bonded ten-stack of SSC inner coil cable by applying a known load and reading corresponding output from the gages. The transducer is supported by a notched backing plate'' that allows for bending of the gage beam during calibration or in use with an actual coil. Several factors affecting the calibration and use of the transducers are: the number of times a backing plate'' is used, the similarities or difficulties between bonded ten-stacks, and the differences between the ten-stacks and the coil they represent. The latter is probably the most important because a calibration curve is a model of how a transducer should react within a coil. If the model is wrong, the calibration curve is wrong. Information will be presented regarding differences in calibrations between Brookhaven National Labs (also calibrating these transducers) and Fermilab -- what caused these differences, the investigation into the differences between coils and ten-stacks and how they relate to transducer calibration, and some suggestions for future calibrations.

Davidson, M.; Gilbertson, A.; Dougherty, M.

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

AUTOMATIC CALIBRATING SYSTEM FOR PRESSURE TRANSDUCERS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An automatic system for calibrating a number of pressure transducers is described. The disclosed embodiment of the invention uses a mercurial manometer to measure the air pressure applied to the transducer. A servo system follows the top of the mercury column as the pressure is changed and operates an analog- to-digital converter This converter furnishes electrical pulses, each representing an increment of pressure change, to a reversible counterThe transducer furnishes a signal at each calibration point, causing an electric typewriter and a card-punch machine to record the pressure at the instant as indicated by the counter. Another counter keeps track of the calibration points so that a number identifying each point is recorded with the corresponding pressure. A special relay control system controls the pressure trend and programs the sequential calibration of several transducers.

Amonette, E.L.; Rodgers, G.W.

1958-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "borehole calibration models" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Update of Radiance Calibrations for ISCCP  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since July 1983 ISCCP has collected, normalized, and calibrated radiance data (visible and thermal infrared) from the imaging radiometers on the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration polar orbiters and from the geostationary satellites ...

Christopher L. Brest; William B. Rossow; Miriam D. Roiter

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Vicarious Calibration of the Meteosat Visible Channel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Postlaunch calibration of the Meteosat visible (VIS) channel has been performed with Meteosat-1, Meteosat-2, and Meteosat-4. The radiance at the satellite radiometer aperture has been determined by independent means and has been related to the ...

Karl-Theodor Kriebel; Volker Amann

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Calibration Systems of the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TileCal is the hadronic calorimeter covering the most central region of the ATLAS experiment at the LHC. This sampling calorimeter uses iron plates as absorber and plastic scintillating tiles as the active material. A multi-faceted calibration system allows to monitor and equalize the calorimeter response at each stage of the signal production, from scintillation light to digitization. This calibration system is based on signal generation from different sources: a Cs radioactive source, laser light, charge injection and minimum bias events produced in proton-proton collisions. A brief description of the different TileCal calibration systems is given and the latest results on their performance in terms of calibration factors, linearity and stability are presented.

Olof Lundberg

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

344

Flow through electrode with automated calibration  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is an improved automated flow through electrode liquid monitoring system. The automated system has a sample inlet to a sample pump, a sample outlet from the sample pump to at least one flow through electrode with a waste port. At least one computer controls the sample pump and records data from the at least one flow through electrode for a liquid sample. The improvement relies upon (a) at least one source of a calibration sample connected to (b) an injection valve connected to said sample outlet and connected to said source, said injection valve further connected to said at least one flow through electrode, wherein said injection valve is controlled by said computer to select between said liquid sample or said calibration sample. Advantages include improved accuracy because of more frequent calibrations, no additional labor for calibration, no need to remove the flow through electrode(s), and minimal interruption of sampling.

Szecsody, James E [Richland, WA; Williams, Mark D [Richland, WA; Vermeul, Vince R [Richland, WA

2002-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

345

Multisource Self-calibration for Sensor Arrays  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Calibration of a sensor array is more involved if the antennas have direction dependent gains and multiple calibrator sources are simultaneously present. We study this case for a sensor array with arbitrary geometry but identical elements, i.e. elements with the same direction dependent gain pattern. A weighted alternating least squares (WALS) algorithm is derived that iteratively solves for the direction independent complex gains of the array elements, their noise powers and their gains in the direction of the calibrator sources. An extension of the problem is the case where the apparent calibrator source locations are unknown, e.g., due to refractive propagation paths. For this case, the WALS method is supplemented with weighted subspace fitting (WSF) direction finding techniques. Using Monte Carlo simulations we demonstrate that both methods are asymptotically statistically efficient and converge within two iterations even in cases of low SNR.

Wijnholds, Stefan J; 10.1109/TSP.2009.2022894

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Calibration and Rating of Photovoltaics: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

Rating the performance of photovoltaic (PV) modules is critical to determining the cost per watt, and efficiency is useful to assess the relative progress among PV concepts. Procedures for determining the efficiency for PV technologies from 1-sun to low concentration to high concentration are discussed. We also discuss the state of the art in primary and secondary calibration of PV reference cells used by calibration laboratories around the world. Finally, we consider challenges to rating PV technologies and areas for improvement.

Emery, K.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Borehole Completion and Conceptual Hydrogeologic Model for the IFRC Well Field, 300 Area, Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect

A tight cluster of 35 new wells was installed over a former waste site, the South Process Pond (316-1 waste site), in the Hanford Site 300 Area in summer 2008. This report documents the details of the drilling, sampling, and well construction for the new array and presents a summary of the site hydrogeology based on the results of drilling and preliminary geophysical logging.

Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Horner, Jacob A.; Vermeul, Vincent R.; Lanigan, David C.; Thorne, Paul D.

2009-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

348

3-D Finite Di erence Modeling for Borehole and Reservoir Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ERL's in-house nite difference code (Krasovec et al., 2003) has undergone several upgrades in the past year. Most notably, a stretched grid can now be used to greatly reduce the amount of RAM memory needed by certain types ...

Krasovec, Mary L.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Workshop on borehole measurements and interpretation in scientific drilling - identification of problems and proposals for their solution: proceedings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Critical instrumentation needs for borehole-oriented, geoscience research were identified in a program consisting of formal presentations, psoter sessions and a workshop. The proceedings include results of the workshops, abstracts of the papers and poster sessions, and the attendance list. Details of any of the presentations should be obtained from the individual authors. Separate entries were prepared for individual presentations.

Cooper, D.L.; Traeger, R.K. (eds.)

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Last printed 3/16/2004 3:01 PM High-Frequency (Light) Borehole-Radar System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Last printed 3/16/2004 3:01 PM High-Frequency (Light) Borehole-Radar System Ramac from Mala Geoscience Packing List 1) Radar control unit (Ramac surface GPR system) (Old or New CU2 is O.K.). 2) Laptop computer with acquisition software, manuals, logbook and protocol sheets. 3) Backup system; zip, jaz, or CD

Barrash, Warren

351

Bayesian calibration Uncertainty Sensitivity analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

available at www.sciencedirect.com journal homepage: www.elsevier.com/locate/ecolmodel Sensitivity and uncertainty analysis from a coupled 3-PG and soil organic matter decomposition model

Monte Carlo; Markov Chain

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

System for generating a beam of acoustic energy from a borehole, and applications thereof  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In some aspects of the invention, a device, positioned within a well bore, configured to generate and direct an acoustic beam into a rock formation around a borehole is disclosed. The device comprises a source configured to generate a first signal at a first frequency and a second signal at a second frequency; a transducer configured to receive the generated first and the second signals and produce acoustic waves at the first frequency and the second frequency; and a non-linear material, coupled to the transducer, configured to generate a collimated beam with a frequency equal to the difference between the first frequency and the second frequency by a non-linear mixing process, wherein the non-linear material includes one or more of a mixture of liquids, a solid, a granular material, embedded microspheres, or an emulsion.

Vu, Cung Khac; Sinha, Dipen N.; Pantea, Cristian; Nihei, Kurt T.; Schmitt, Denis P.; Skelt, Christopher

2012-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

353

Device and method for generating a beam of acoustic energy from a borehole, and applications thereof  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In some aspects of the invention, a device, positioned within a well bore, configured to generate and direct an acoustic beam into a rock formation around a borehole is disclosed. The device comprises a source configured to generate a first signal at a first frequency and a second signal at a second frequency; a transducer configured to receive the generated first and the second signals and produce acoustic waves at the first frequency and the second frequency; and a non-linear material, coupled to the transducer, configured to generate a collimated beam with a frequency equal to the difference between the first frequency and the second frequency by a non-linear mixing process, wherein the non-linear material includes one or more of a mixture of liquids, a solid, a granular material, embedded microspheres, or an emulsion.

Vu, Cung Khac (Houston, TX); Sinha, Dipen N. (Los Alamos, NM); Pantea, Cristian (Los Alamos, NM); Nihei, Kurt (Oakland, CA); Schmitt, Denis P. (Katy, TX); Skelt, Christopher (Houston, TX)

2010-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

354

System for generating a beam of acoustic energy from a borehole, and applications thereof  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In some aspects of the invention, a device, positioned within a well bore, configured to generate and direct an acoustic beam into a rock formation around a borehole is disclosed. The device comprises a source configured to generate a first signal at a first frequency and a second signal at a second frequency; a transducer configured to receive the generated first and the second signals and produce acoustic waves at the first frequency and the second frequency; and a non-linear material, coupled to the transducer, configured to generate a collimated beam with a frequency equal to the difference between the first frequency and the second frequency by a non-linear mixing process, wherein the non-linear material includes one or more of a mixture of liquids, a solid, a granular material, embedded microspheres, or an emulsion.

Vu, Cung Khac (Houston, TX); Sinha, Dipen N. (Los Alamos, NM); Pantea, Cristian (Los Alamos, NM); Nihei, Kurt T. (Oakland, CA); Schmitt, Denis P. (Katy, TX); Skelt, Christopher (Houston, TX)

2012-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

355

Novel Chemically-Bonded Phosphate Ceramic Borehole Sealants (Ceramicretes) for Arctic Environments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Novel chemically bonded phosphate ceramic borehole sealant, i.e. Ceramicrete, has many advantages over conventionally used permafrost cement at Alaska North Slope (ANS). However, in normal field practices when Ceramicrete is mixed with water in blenders, it has a chance of being contaminated with leftover Portland cement. In order to identify the effect of Portland cement contamination, recent tests have been conducted at BJ services in Tomball, TX as well as at the University of Alaska Fairbanks with Ceramicrete formulations proposed by the Argonne National Laboratory. The tests conducted at BJ Services with proposed Ceramicrete formulations and Portland cement contamination have shown significant drawbacks which has caused these formulations to be rejected. However, the newly developed Ceramicrete formulation at the University of Alaska Fairbanks has shown positive results with Portland cement contamination as well as without Portland cement contamination for its effective use in oil well cementing operations at ANS.

Shirish Patil; Godwin A. Chukwu; Gang Chen; Santanu Khataniar

2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

356

Methane drainage with horizontal boreholes in advance of longwall mining: an analysis. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy (DOE) Morgantown Energy Technology Center has implemented a comprehensive program to demonstrate the technical and economic viability of coalbed methane as an energy resource. The program is directed toward solution of technical and institutional problems impeding the recovery and use of large quantities of methane contained in the nation's minable and unminable coalbeds. Conducted in direct support of the DOE Methane Recovery from Coalbeds Project, this study analyzes the economic aspects of a horizontal borehole methane recovery system integrated as part of a longwall mine operation. It establishes relationships between methane selling price and annual mine production, methane production rate, and the methane drainage system capital investment. Results are encouraging, indicating that an annual coal production increase of approximately eight percent would offset all associated drainage costs over the range of methane production rates and capital investments considered.

Gabello, D.P.; Felts, L.L.; Hayoz, F.P.

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Borehole and geohydrologic data for test hole USW UZ-6, Yucca Mountain area, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

Test hole USW UZ-6, located 1.8 kilometers west of the Nevada Test Site on a major north-trending ridge at Yucca Mountain, was dry drilled in Tertiary tuff to a depth of 575 meters. The area near this site is being considered by the US Department of Energy for potential construction of a high-level, radioactive-waste repository. Test hole USW UZ-6 is one of seven test holes completed in the unsaturated zone as part of the US Geological Survey`s Yucca Mountain Project to characterize the potential repository site. Data pertaining to borehole drilling and construction, lithology of geologic units penetrated, and laboratory analyses for hydrologic characteristics of samples of drill-bit cuttings are included in this report.

Whitfield, M.S. Jr.; Loskot, C.L. [Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States); Cope, C.M. [Foothill Engineering Consultants, Inc., Golden, CO (United States)

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Monitoring temperature conditions in recently drilled nonproductive industry boreholes in Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

Temperature conditions were monitored in seven industry petroleum-test wells (called holes-of-opportunity in this report) that were drilled in central and eastern Oklahoma. Five of these wells provided useful temperature information, and two wells were used to determine the length of time needed for the borehole-fluid temperature to achieve thermal equilibrium with the formation rocks. Four wells were used to verify the validity of a geothermal-gradient map of Oklahoma. Temperature surveys in two wells indicated a gradient lower than the predicted gradients on the geothermal-gradient map. When deep temperature data, between 5000 and 13,000 feet, are adjusted for mud-circulation effects, the adjusted gradients approximate the gradients on the geothermal-gradient map. The temperature-confirmation program appears to substantiate the geographic distribution of the high- and low-thermal-gradient regimes in Oklahoma. 13 refs., 18 figs., 7 tabs.

Harrison, W.E.; Luza, K.V.

1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Justification Of The Use Of Boreholes For Disposal Of Sealed Radiological Sources  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Soon there will be only 14 states in two compacts that are able to dispose of Low Level Waste (LLW): the Northwest and Rocky Mountain compact with disposal options in Richland, Washington, and the Atlantic compact with disposal options in Barnwell, South Carolina. How do states not in one of the two compacts dispose of their LLW? The Off-Site Source Recovery Project can take possession and dispose of some of the unwanted transuranic sources at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). However, there will be no path forward for states outside of the two compacts for disposal of their non-transuranic LLW. A solution that has been much discussed, debated and researched, but has not been put into wide scale practice, is the borehole disposal concept. It is the author's position that companies that drill and explore for oil have been disposing of sources in borehole-like structures for years. It should be noted that these companies are not purposely disposing of these sources, but the sources are irretrievable and must be abandoned. Additionally, there are Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) regulations that must be followed to seal the well that contains the lost and abandoned source. According to the NRC Event Notification Reports database, there were a minimum of 29 reports of lost and abandoned sources in oil wells between December 1999 and October 2006. The sources were lost at depths between 2,018-18,887 feet, or 600-5,750 meters. The companies that are performing explorations with the aid of sealed radiological sources must follow regulation 10 CFR Part 39. Subsection 15 outlines the procedures that must be followed if sources are determined to be irretrievable and abandoned in place. If the NRC allows and has regulations in place for oil companies, why can't states and/or companies be allowed to dispose of LLW in a similar fashion?

Zarling, John [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Johnson, Peter [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Fluid Metrology Calibration Services - Gas, Water, or Liquid ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fluid Metrology Calibration Services - Gas, Water, Natural Gas, or Liquid Hydrocarbon Flows Special Tests. Fluid Metrology ...

2013-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "borehole calibration models" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Nonparametric belief propagation for self-calibration in sensor networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Automatic self-calibration of ad-hoc sensor networks is a critical need for their use in military or civilian applications. In general, self-calibration involves the combination of absolute location information (e.g. GPS) with relative calibration information ... Keywords: NBP, belief propagation, calibration, localization, nonparametric, sensor network

Alexander T. Ihler; John W. Fisher, III; Randolph L. Moses; Alan S. Willsky

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Calibration of the Spectrometer aboard the INTEGRAL satellite  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SPI, the Spectrometer on board the ESA INTEGRAL satellite, to be launched in October 2002, will study the gamma-ray sky in the 20 keV to 8 MeV energy band with a spectral resolution of 2 keV for photons of 1 MeV, thanks to its 19 germanium detectors spanning an active area of 500 cm2. A coded mask imaging technique provides a 2 deg angular resolution. The 16 deg field of view is defined by an active BGO veto shield, furthermore used for background rejection. In April 2001 the flight model of SPI underwent a one-month calibration campaign at CEA in Bruy\\`eres le Ch\\^atel using low intensity radioactive sources and the CEA accelerator for homogeneity measurements and high intensity radioactive sources for imaging performance measurements. After integration of all scientific payloads (the spectrometer SPI, the imager IBIS and the monitors JEM-X and OMC) on the INTEGRAL satellite, a cross-calibration campaign has been performed at the ESA center in Noordwijk. A set of sources has been placed in the field of view of the different instruments in order to compare their performances and determine their mutual influence. Some of those sources had already been used in Bruy\\`eres during the SPI standalone test. For the lowest energy band calibration an X-ray generator has been used. We report on the scientific goals of this calibration activity, and present the measurements performed as well as some preliminary results.

Stéphane Schanne; B. Cordier; M. Gros; D. Attié; P. v. Ballmoos; L. Bouchet; R. Carli; P. Connell; R. Diehl; P. Jean; J. Kiener; A. v. Kienlin; J. Knödlseder; P. Laurent; G. Lichti; P. Mandrou; J. Paul; P. Paul; J. -P. Roques; F. Sanchez; V. Schönfelder; C. Shrader; G. Skinner; A. Strong; S. Sturner; V. Tatischeff; B. Teegarden; G. Vedrenne; G. Weidenspointner; C. Wunderer

2003-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

363

Calibration Monitoring for Sensor Calibration Interval Extension: Gaps in the Current Science Base  

SciTech Connect

Currently in the United States, periodic sensor recalibration is required for all safety-related sensors, typically occurring at every refueling outage, and it has emerged as a critical path item for shortening outage duration in some plants. International application of calibration monitoring has shown that sensors may operate for longer periods within calibration tolerances. This issue is expected to also be important as the United States looks to the next generation of reactor designs (such as small modular reactors and advanced concepts), given the anticipated longer refueling cycles, proposed advanced sensors, and digital instrumentation and control systems. Online monitoring (OLM) can be employed to identify those sensors that require calibration, allowing for calibration of only those sensors that need it. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) accepted the general concept of OLM for sensor calibration monitoring in 2000, but no U.S. plants have been granted the necessary license amendment to apply it. This paper summarizes a recent state-of-the-art assessment of online calibration monitoring in the nuclear power industry, including sensors, calibration practice, and OLM algorithms. This assessment identifies key research needs and gaps that prohibit integration of the NRC-approved online calibration monitoring system in the U.S. nuclear industry. Several technical needs were identified, including an understanding of the impacts of sensor degradation on measurements for both conventional and emerging sensors; the quantification of uncertainty in online calibration assessment; determination of calibration acceptance criteria and quantification of the effect of acceptance criteria variability on system performance; and assessment of the feasibility of using virtual sensor estimates to replace identified faulty sensors in order to extend operation to the next convenient maintenance opportunity.

Coble, Jamie B.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Meyer, Ryan M.; Hashemian, Hash; Shumaker, Brent; Cummins, Dara

2012-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

364

A Review of Sensor Calibration Monitoring for Calibration Interval Extension in Nuclear Power Plants  

SciTech Connect

Currently in the United States, periodic sensor recalibration is required for all safety-related sensors, typically occurring at every refueling outage, and it has emerged as a critical path item for shortening outage duration in some plants. Online monitoring can be employed to identify those sensors that require calibration, allowing for calibration of only those sensors that need it. International application of calibration monitoring, such as at the Sizewell B plant in United Kingdom, has shown that sensors may operate for eight years, or longer, within calibration tolerances. This issue is expected to also be important as the United States looks to the next generation of reactor designs (such as small modular reactors and advanced concepts), given the anticipated longer refueling cycles, proposed advanced sensors, and digital instrumentation and control systems. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) accepted the general concept of online monitoring for sensor calibration monitoring in 2000, but no U.S. plants have been granted the necessary license amendment to apply it. This report presents a state-of-the-art assessment of online calibration monitoring in the nuclear power industry, including sensors, calibration practice, and online monitoring algorithms. This assessment identifies key research needs and gaps that prohibit integration of the NRC-approved online calibration monitoring system in the U.S. nuclear industry. Several needs are identified, including the quantification of uncertainty in online calibration assessment; accurate determination of calibration acceptance criteria and quantification of the effect of acceptance criteria variability on system performance; and assessment of the feasibility of using virtual sensor estimates to replace identified faulty sensors in order to extend operation to the next convenient maintenance opportunity. Understanding the degradation of sensors and the impact of this degradation on signals is key to developing technical basis to support acceptance criteria and set point decisions, particularly for advanced sensors which do not yet have a cumulative history of operating performance.

Coble, Jamie B.; Meyer, Ryan M.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Bond, Leonard J.; Hashemian, Hash; Shumaker, Brent; Cummins, Dara

2012-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

365

Successful remediation of four uranium calibration pits at Technical Area II, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The first remediation of an Environmental Restoration (ER) Project site at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) was successfully conducted in May and June 1994 at Technical Area II. The removal action involved four Uranium Calibration Pits (UCPs) filled with radioactive or hazardous materials. The concrete culvert pits were used to test and calibrate borehole radiometric logging tools for uranium exploration. The removal action consisted of excavating and containerizing the pit contents and contaminated soil beneath the culverts, removing the four culverts, and backfilling the excavation. Each UCP removal had unique complexities. Sixty 208-L drums of solid radioactive waste and eight 208-L drums of liquid hazardous waste were generated during the VCM. Two of the concrete culverts will be disposed as radioactive waste and two as solid waste. Uranium-238 was detected in UCP-2 ore material at 746 pci/g, and at 59 pci/g in UCP-1 silica sand. UCP-4 was empty; sludge from UCP-3 contained 122 mg/L (ppm) chromium.

Conway, R. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Wade, M. [INTERA, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Tharp, T. [Weston (Roy F.), Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Copland, J. [Science Applications International Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

366

Automatic Projector Calibration with Embedded Light Sensors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Projection technology typically places several constraints on the geometric relationship between the projector and the projection surface to obtain an undistorted, properly sized image. In this paper we describe a simple, robust, fast, and low-cost method for automatic projector calibration that eliminates many of these constraints. We embed light sensors in the target surface, project Gray-coded binary patterns to discover the sensor locations, and then prewarp the image to accurately fit the physical features of the projection surface. This technique can be expanded to automatically stitch multiple projectors, calibrate onto nonplanar surfaces for object decoration, and provide a method for simple geometry acquisition.

Johnny C. Lee; Johnny C. Lee; Paul H. Dietz; Paul H. Dietz; Dan Maynes-Aminzade; Dan Maynes-aminzade; Scott E. Hudson; Scott E. Hudson

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Visible/infrared radiometric calibration station  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have begun construction of a visible/infrared radiometric calibration station that will allow for absolute calibration of optical and IR remote sensing instruments with clear apertures less than 16 inches in diameter in a vacuum environment. The calibration station broadband sources will be calibrated at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and allow for traceable absolute radiometric calibration to within {plus_minus}3% in the visible and near IR (0.4--2.5 {mu}m), and less than {plus_minus}1% in the infrared, up to 12 {mu}m. Capabilities for placing diffraction limited images or for sensor full-field flooding will exist. The facility will also include the calibration of polarization and spectral effects, spatial resolution, field of view performance, and wavefront characterization. The configuration of the vacuum calibration station consists of an off-axis 21 inch, f/3.2, parabolic collimator with a scanning fold flat in collimated space. The sources are placed, via mechanisms to be described, at the focal plane of the off-axis parabola. Vacuum system pressure will be in the 10{sup {minus}6} Torr range. The broadband white-light source is a custom design by LANL with guidance from Labsphere Inc. The continuous operating radiance of the integrating sphere will be from 0.0--0.006 W/cm{sup 2}/Sr/{mu}m (upper level quoted for {approximately}500 nm wavelength). The blackbody source is also custom designed at LANL with guidance from NIST. The blackbody temperature will be controllable between 250--350{degrees}K. Both of the above sources have 4.1 inch apertures with estimated radiometric instability at less than 1%. The designs of each of these units will be described. The monochromator and interferometer light sources are outside the vacuum, but all optical relay and beam shaping optics are enclosed within the vacuum calibration station. These sources are described, as well as the methodology for alignment and characterization.

Byrd, D.A.; Maier, W.B. II; Bender, S.C.; Holland, R.F.; Michaud, F.D.; Luettgen, A.L.; Christensen, R.W. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); O`Brian, T.R. [National Inst. of Standards and Technology (NML), Gaithersburg, MD (United States). Radiometric Physics Div.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

CALIBRATION OF X-RAY IMAGING DEVICES FOR ACCURATE INTENSITY MEASUREMENT  

SciTech Connect

National Security Technologies (NSTec) has developed calibration procedures for X-ray imaging systems. The X-ray sources that are used for calibration are both diode type and diode/fluorescer combinations. Calibrating the X-ray detectors is key to accurate calibration of the X-ray sources. Both energy dispersive detectors and photodiodes measuring total flux were used. We have developed calibration techniques for the detectors using radioactive sources that are traceable to the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). The German synchrotron at Physikalische Technische Bundestalt (PTB) is used to calibrate silicon photodiodes over the energy range from 50 eV to 60 keV. The measurements on X-ray cameras made using the NSTec X-ray sources have included quantum efficiency averaged over all pixels, camera counts per photon per pixel, and response variation across the sensor. The instrumentation required to accomplish the calibrations is described. X-ray energies ranged from 720 eV to 22.7 keV. The X-ray sources produce narrow energy bands, allowing us to determine the properties as a function of X-ray energy. The calibrations were done for several types of imaging devices. There were back illuminated and front illuminated CCD (charge coupled device) sensors, and a CID (charge injection device) type camera. The CCD and CID camera types differ significantly in some of their properties that affect the accuracy of X-ray intensity measurements. All cameras discussed here are silicon based. The measurements of quantum efficiency variation with X-ray energy are compared to models for the sensor structure. Cameras that are not back-thinned are compared to those that are.

Haugh, M J; Charest, M R; Ross, P W; Lee, J J; Schneider, M B; Palmer, N E; Teruya, A T

2012-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

369

Steady and unsteady calibration of multi-hole probes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis presents the development of a data crographics. reduction algorithm for multi-hole pressure probes. The algorithm has been developed for the reduction of calibration data from miniature non-nulling multi-hole probes in compressible, subsonic flow gelds. The algorithm is able to reduce data from any 5-or 7-hole probe in a subsonic flow field and generate very accurate predictions of the velocity magnitude and direction, total and static pressure, Mach and Reynolds member and fluid properties like the density and viscosity. The algorithm utilizes a local least-squares modeling technique and has been tested on 4 novel miniature 7-hole probes that have been calibrated at NASA Langley Flow Modeling and Control Branch for the entire subsonic regime. Each of the probes had a conical tip with diameter of 0.065''. Excellent prediction capabilities are demonstrated with maximum errors in angle prediction less than 0.6 degrees and maximum errors in velocity prediction less than 1%, both with 99 percent confidence. The development of Micro Electro Mechanical Systems (MEMS) -based, fast-response, multi-sensor pressure probes of miniature size for velocity and pressure measurement applications in unsteady and turbulent flow gelds is also discussed. A new type of pressure sensor has been developed with silicon-nitride diaphragm and a characteristic size of only 250 gm. These pressure sensors are small enough to be mounted close to the surface of a miniature hemispherical-tip probe, obtaining a probe bandwidth and a theoretical frequency response up to 100 kl-lz. Both computational and experimental approaches are employed to develop calibration techniques suitable for highly unsteady flow environments with strong spatial gradients.

Johansen, Espen S

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Automatic projector calibration with embedded light sensors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Projection technology typically places several constraints on the geometric relationship between the projector and the projection surface to obtain an undistorted, properly sized image. In this paper we describe a simple, robust, fast, and low-cost method ... Keywords: keystone correction, multi-projector stitching, object decoration, projector calibration, structured light

Johnny C. Lee; Paul H. Dietz; Dan Maynes-Aminzade; Ramesh Raskar; Scott E. Hudson

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Automated system for the calibration of magnetometers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A completely nonmagnetic calibration platform has been developed and constructed at DTU Space (Technical University of Denmark). It is intended for on-site scalar calibration of high-precise fluxgate magnetometers. An enhanced version of the same platform is being built at the Czech Technical University. There are three axes of rotation in this design (compared to two axes in the previous version). The addition of the third axis allows us to calibrate more complex devices. An electronic compass based on a vector fluxgate magnetometer and micro electro mechanical systems (MEMS) accelerometer is one example. The new platform can also be used to evaluate the parameters of the compass in all possible variations in azimuth, pitch, and roll. The system is based on piezoelectric motors, which are placed on a platform made of aluminum, brass, plastic, and glass. Position sensing is accomplished through custom-made optical incremental sensors. The system is controlled by a microcontroller, which executes commands from a computer. The properties of the system as well as calibration and measurement results will be presented.

Petrucha, Vojtech; Kaspar, Petr; Ripka, Pavel [Department of Measurement, Faculty of Electrical Engineering, Czech Technical University in Prague, Technicka 2, 166 27 Praha 6 (Czech Republic); Merayo, Jose M. G. [National Space Institute-DTU Space, Technical University of Denmark, Elektrovej 327, 2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark)

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

RADCAL Operations Manual Radiation Calibration Laboratory Protocol  

SciTech Connect

The Life Sciences Division (LSD) of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has a long record of radiation dosimetry research, primarily using the Health Physics Research Reactor (HPRR) and the Radiation Calibration Laboratory (RADCAL) in its Dosimetry Applications Research (DOSAR) Program. These facilities have been used by a broad segment of the research community to perform a variety of experiments in areas including, but not limited to, radiobiology, radiation dosimeter and instrumentation development and calibration, and the testing of materials in a variety of radiation environments. Operations of the HPRR were terminated in 1987 and the reactor was moved to storage at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant; however, RADCAL will continue to be operated in accordance with the guidelines of the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Secondary Calibration Laboratory program and will meet all requirements for testing dosimeters under the National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program (NVLAP). This manual is to serve as the primary instruction and operation manual for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory's RADCAL facility. Its purpose is to (1) provide operating protocols for the RADCAL facility, (2) outline the organizational structure, (3) define the Quality Assurance Action Plan, and (4) describe all the procedures, operations, and responsibilities for the safe and proper operation of all routine aspects of the calibration facility.

Bogard, J.S.

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

The Hailpad: Materials, Data Reduction and Calibration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper reports on work carried out in the National Hail Research Experiment (NHRE) on hailpad materials, on procedures for reducing hailpad data, and on hailpad calibration. A recommendation is made for a pad constructed of 2.5 cm thick type-...

Alexis B. Long; Richard J. Matson; Edwin L. Crow

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Modelling household electricity consumption.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A number of conclusions are drawn, however given the limited and non-representative na- ture of the data on which the model is calibrated, these can… (more)

de la Rue, Philip Martin

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Thoughts on VCD-145 Detector Calibration  

SciTech Connect

In 1980, Don Smith requested that the EG&G Detector Group in North Las Vegas provide a summary of calibrated sensitivities for the VCD-145 detector. The &sired information was provided in a memorandum from Sam Egdorf (Reference 1). A memo from Brent Davis issued a week later described the effect on VCD-145 detector sensitivity that resulted from changing the thickness of the stainless steel entrance window (Reference 2). This memo is intended first to effectively archive those two references, and second to record thoughts about the significance of their contents. Reference 1 lists a total of 118 calibrated values for 80 different VCD-145 detectors, from 1977 to 1980. With only four exceptions, all of the serial numbers from V004 to V087 were included. The earlier calibrations were for detectors with 1-mil entrance windows, and the later ones were for detectors with 2-mil entrance windows. Three of the earlier units were calibrated at both thicknesses by temporarily placing an extra 1-mil sheet of stainless steel across the window. Altogether six different collimator diameters were used, from 60 mm to 95 mm. Some units were calibrated for more than one collimator diameter, and 14 were at some point designated as backup detectors for a second event. Reference 2 describes the effect of window thickness on calibrated sensitivity. Quoting that reference: ''To demonstrate that the sensitivity decrease is solely a function of the window thickness, a standard VCD-145 detector with a 0.001-inch thick window was calibrated with the {sup 60}Co source. Then without changing detector or geometry, a 0.001 -inch thick stainless steel foil (same material as that of the window) was placed directly in front of the detector window, effectively making a 0.002-inch thick entrance window. The detector was again calibrated. This technique was repeated until the detector had an entrance window equivalent to 0.010-inches thick.'' There are multiple reasons to suspect that the accuracy of the sensitivity reported for a vacuum Compton detector is uncertain by one-half percent or so. Differences in collimated diameter, variations in window thickness, and unknown errors in the calibration procedures all seem to have some small uncertainty. If one looks at the situation from another angle, this can be considered good news--because there are no indications of uncertainties at the one percent level. Having studied the data from References 1 and 2 in depth, it is my opinion that an experimenter can be confident that the calibrated sensitivity reported for a vacuum Compton detector is accurate to one percent or better. This may not be the smallest error in a reaction history measurement, and it may not be negligible, but realistically it is not often a concern. The uncertainty in knowledge of energy transmission through several mean free paths of attenuating material will almost certainly be several times larger than the uncertainty in detector sensitivity. It is believed that there is a trend for the VCD-145 sensitivity to decrease as the collimator diameter is reduced. Since this likely aggravates the problem of the negative precursor, it is recommended that when detector time response is important, the detector should only be used with a collimator that is close to the largest allowed.

Morgan, W V

2005-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

376

Field Calibration Facilities for Environmental Measurement of Radium,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Field Calibration Facilities for Environmental Measurement of Field Calibration Facilities for Environmental Measurement of Radium, Thorium, and Potassium (October 2013) Field Calibration Facilities for Environmental Measurement of Radium, Thorium, and Potassium (October 2013) The first edition of this report, released in October 1982, presented physical-characteristic information for the various DOE radiologic-instrument calibration facilities located throughout the U.S. Three subsequent editions have been released in an effort to update information regarding the current status of the facilities. Field Calibration Facilities for Environmental Measurement of Radium, Thorium, and Potassium (October 2013) More Documents & Publications Field Calibration Facilities for Environmental Measurement of Radium, Thorium, and Potassium (June 1994)

377

Auto-Calibration and Control Strategy Determination for a Variable-Speed Heat Pump Water Heater Using Optimization  

SciTech Connect

This paper introduces applications of the GenOpt optimizer coupled with a vapor compression system model for auto-calibration and control strategy determination towards the development of a variable-speed ground-source heat pump water heating unit. The GenOpt optimizer can be linked with any simulation program using input and output text files. It effectively facilitates optimization runs. Using our GenOpt wrapper program, we can flexibly define objectives for optimizations, targets, and constraints. Those functionalities enable running extensive optimization cases for model calibration, configuration design and control strategy determination. In addition, we describe a methodology to improve prediction accuracy using functional calibration curves. Using the calibrated model, we investigated control strategies of the ground-source heat pump water heater, considering multiple control objectives, covering the entire operation range.

Shen, Bo [ORNL; Abdelaziz, Omar [ORNL; Rice, C Keith [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Final report on decommissioning boreholes and wellsite restoration, Gulf Coast Interior Salt Domes of Mississippi  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 1978, eight salt domes in Texas, Louisiana, and Mississippi were identified for study as potential locations for a nuclear waste repository as part of the National Waste Terminal Storage (NWTS) program. Three domes were selected in Mississippi for ``area characterization`` phase study as follows: Lampton Dome near Columbia, Cypress Creek Dome near New Augusta, and Richton Dome near Richton. The purpose of the studies was to acquire geologic and geohydrologic information from shallow and deep drilling investigations to enable selection of sites suitable for more intensive study. Eleven deep well sites were selected for multiple-well installations to acquire information on the lithologic and hydraulic properties of regional aquifers. In 1986, the Gulf Coast salt domes were eliminated from further consideration for repository development by the selection of three candidate sites in other regions of the country. In 1987, well plugging and restoration of these deferred sites became a closeout activity. The primary objectives of this activity are to plug and abandon all wells and boreholes in accordance with state regulations, restore all drilling sites to as near original condition as feasible, and convey to landowners any wells on their property that they choose to maintain. This report describes the activities undertaken to accomplish these objectives, as outlines in Activity Plan 1--2, ``Activity Plan for Well Plugging and Site Restoration of Test Hole Sites in Mississippi.``

Not Available

1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Commercialization of atom interferometers for borehole gravity gradiometry. Fourth quarterly report, July--September 1993  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The present status of tasks is: Task 1- Solution of tomography problem (completed qtrs. 1 and 2), Task 2- Study influence of vibrations (completed qtr. 3), Task 3- List of borehole imposed constraints (completed qtr.3 with update this qtr.), Task 4- Evaluate merits of various cooling schemes (completed this qtr.), Task 5- Specify magnet system requirements (completed qtr. 3), Task 6-Specify laser system (in progress), and Task 7- a. specify detector, b. specify gratings and layout, c. specify gratings and magnet spacers, d. specify vacuum system (all in progress). During this quarter, we report an update to Task 3, as well as the completion of Task 4. Work on Tasks 6 and 7 is in progress. The use of a magneto-optic trap (MOT), the choice of atomic species, state of the art for lithium MOT`s, use of lenses to increase the intensity, computerized simulation of system throughtput, and magnetic lens design are the topics addressed concerning Task 4.

Clauser, J.F.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Raytheon downhole information system. Electromagnetic borehole measurements while drilling system. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A description is given of the Raytheon Downhole Information System (RDIS), a real time electromagnetic borehole measurements while drilling system, applicable to oil, gas, and geothermal drilling. It communicates in both directions through the earth in a single hop at a downlink data rate of 3 bps and uplink rates dependent on depth--typically 6 bits/second at 10,000 ft and 2 bits/second at 15,000 ft; electromagnetic signal transmission time of approximately .1 second. Downhole hardware for communications, sensors, and power are packaged in three 30 ft subs. Downhole hardware can be developed to permit operation in a 275/sup 0/C geothermal environment. A cost analysis is included that predicts RDIS service could be economically priced at approximately $1000/day. Commercial availability depends primarily on proof of capability by demonstration in a working drilling well. The most significant portions of needed hardware are available. A description of a geothermal drilling telemetry system is included in Appendix A.

Kolker, M.; Greene, A.H.; Kasevich, R.S.; Robertson, J.C.; Grossi, M.D.

1978-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "borehole calibration models" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

First field test of NAPL detection with high resolution borehole seismic imaging  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this field test is to evaluate the detectability of NAPLs by high resolution tomographic borehole seismic imaging. The site is a former Department of Energy (DOE) manufacturing facility in Pinellas County, Florida. Cross-hole seismic and radar measurements were made in a shallow aquifer contaminated with non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPLs). Cone penetration test (CPT) and induction logging were performed for lithology and conductivity, respectively. The main challenge is to distinguish fluid phase heterogeneities from anomalies arising from geologic structure. Our approach is to compare measurements between locations of known contamination with a nearby uncontaminated location of similar lithology where differences in signal transmission may be attributed to fluid phase changes. The CPT data show similar lithologic structure at the locations both within and outside the NAPL-contaminated area. Zones of low seismic amplitude at about 7 m depth appear more extensive in the NAPL-contaminated area. These zones may be the result of fluid phase heterogeneities (NAPL or gas), or they may be due to the lithology, i.e. attenuating nature of the layer itself, or the transition between two distinct layers. The presence of lithologic contrasts, specifically from higher permeability sands to lower permeability silts and clays, also indicate potential locations of NAPL, as they could be flow barriers to downward NAPL migration.

Geller, Jil T.; Peterson, John E.; Williams, Kenneth H.; Ajo-Franklin, Jonathan B.; Majer, Ernest L.

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Rock physics characterization of Conway granite from a DOE borehole, Conway, New Hampshire  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Conway granite of New Hampshire is a highly radioactive intrusive into which a 1-km-deep borehole was drilled and continuously cored in 1975. There are two major granitic units, the Osceola and the Conway. The Conway is cut by three lamprophyre dikes. Elastic moduli and petrographic studies were on 14 samples from the core. These data and observations have been used to determine groupings in the rocks by characterizing microstructure. An important result is that carefully taken physical properties data (for example, velocities and strains) are sensitive indicators of microstructure. Based on velocity and strain data, three distinct groups are found: the lamprophyre dike rocks and two groups each of which contain samples from both the Osceola and Conway formations. These groups are also distinguished by petrographic observations of microcrack patterns. The groups are apparently controlled by grain size and by uniformity of the mixing of the mineral phases in the samples, and not by mineral modes or depth. This last result implies the coring of the Conway samples may have intensified the amount of cracking over that in the rocks in situ, but not the type of cracking. Coring does not apparently induce a distinct population of very thin (low aspect ratio) cracks; that is, such cracks are not needed to explain the low pressure stress and velocity data of these samples.

Warren, N.

1979-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

KEPLER INPUT CATALOG: PHOTOMETRIC CALIBRATION AND STELLAR CLASSIFICATION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We describe the photometric calibration and stellar classification methods used by the Stellar Classification Project to produce the Kepler Input Catalog (KIC). The KIC is a catalog containing photometric and physical data for sources in the Kepler mission field of view; it is used by the mission to select optimal targets. Four of the visible-light (g, r, i, z) magnitudes used in the KIC are tied to Sloan Digital Sky Survey magnitudes; the fifth (D51) is an AB magnitude calibrated to be consistent with Castelli and Kurucz (CK) model atmosphere fluxes. We derived atmospheric extinction corrections from hourly observations of secondary standard fields within the Kepler field of view. For these filters and extinction estimates, repeatability of absolute photometry for stars brighter than magnitude 15 is typically 2%. We estimated stellar parameters {l_brace}T{sub eff}, log (g), log (Z), E{sub B-V}{r_brace} using Bayesian posterior probability maximization to match observed colors to CK stellar atmosphere models. We applied Bayesian priors describing the distribution of solar-neighborhood stars in the color-magnitude diagram, in log (Z), and in height above the galactic plane. Several comparisons with samples of stars classified by other means indicate that for 4500 K {data archive.

Brown, Timothy M. [Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope, Goleta, CA 93117 (United States); Latham, David W.; Esquerdo, Gilbert A. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Everett, Mark E., E-mail: tbrown@lcogt.net, E-mail: latham@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: gesquerd@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: everett@noao.edu [National Optical Astronomy Observatories, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States)

2011-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

384

Realistic Uncertainties in Pressure and Temperature Calibration Reference Values  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Field instruments require calibration against standards that introduce-insignificant errors of their own in the process. This paper discusses a pressure and temperature calibration facility, analyzes the error levels attained in its routine use ...

Julian M. Pike

1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Calibration and Stability of Oxygen Sensors on Autonomous Floats  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The calibration accuracy and stability of three Aanderaa 3835 optodes and three Seabird SBE-43 oxygen sensors were evaluated over four years using in situ and laboratory calibrations. The sensors were mostly in storage, being in the ocean for ...

Eric A. D’Asaro; Craig McNeil

386

A New Method for Calibrating Reference and Field Pyranometers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A simple method for calibrating reference pyranometers is described. Called the alternate method, it requires monitoring of direct irradiance and diffuse and global irradiance voltages without the need for a calibrated diffuse pyranometer. The ...

Bruce W. Forgan

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Calibration and Stability of Oxygen Sensors on Autonomous Floats  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The calibration accuracy and stability of three Aanderaa 3835 optodes and three Sea-Bird Electronics SBE-43 oxygen sensors were evaluated over four years using in situ and laboratory calibrations. The sensors were mostly in storage, being in the ...

Eric A. D'Asaro; Craig McNeil

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Active self-calibration of multi-camera systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a method for actively calibrating a multicamera system consisting of pan-tilt zoom cameras. After a coarse initial calibration, we determine the probability of each relative pose using a probability distribution based on the camera images. ...

Marcel Brückner; Joachim Denzler

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

NIST SURF Beamline 3: Facility for Irradiance Calibration ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Beamline 3 is home to the Facility for Irradiance Calibration Using ... Source of Uncertainty, Nominal Value, Relative Uncertainty, Sensitivity Coefficient, ...

2012-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

390

Meet Phannie, NIST's Standard 'Phantom' for Calibrating MRI ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Meet Phannie, NIST's Standard 'Phantom' for Calibrating MRI Machines. ... The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has unveiled ...

2013-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

391

NIST Calibration Heart-ening for New Treatment / Transient ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NIST UPDATE - Physics Laboratory Articles April 1, 1996 HEALTH NIST Calibration Heart-ening for New Treatment. Cardiologists ...

392

THE PENA BLANCA NATURAL ANALOGUE PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT MODEL  

SciTech Connect

The Nopal I uranium mine in the Sierra Pena Blanca, Chihuahua, Mexico serves as a natural analogue to the Yucca Mountain repository. The Pena Blanca Natural Analogue Performance Assessment Model simulates the mobilization and transport of radionuclides that are released from the mine and transported to the saturated zone. the Pena Blanca Natural Analogue Model uses probabilistic simulations of hydrogeologic processes that are analogous to the processes that occur at the Yucca Mountain site. The Nopal I uranium deposit lies in fractured, welded, and altered rhyolitic ash flow tuffs that overlie carbonate rocks, a setting analogous to the geologic formations at the Yucca Mountain site. The Nopal I mine site has the following characteristics as compared to the Yucca Mountain repository site. (1) Analogous source: UO{sub 2} uranium ore deposit = spent nuclear fuel in the repository; (2) Analogous geologic setting: fractured, welded, and altered rhyolitic ash flow tuffs overlying carbonate rocks; (3) Analogous climate: Semiarid to arid; (4) Analogous geochemistry: Oxidizing conditions; and (5) Analogous hydrogeology: The ore deposit lies in the unsaturated zone above the water table. The Nopal I deposit is approximately 8 {+-} 0.5 million years old and has been exposed to oxidizing conditions during the last 3.2 to 3.4 million years. The Pena Blanca Natural Analogue Model considers that the uranium oxide and uranium silicates in the ore deposit were originally analogous to uranium-oxide spent nuclear fuel. The Pena Blanca site has been characterized using field and laboratory investigations of its fault and fracture distribution, mineralogy, fracture fillings, seepage into the mine adits, regional hydrology, and mineralization that shows the extent of radionuclide migration. Three boreholes were drilled at the Nopal I mine site in 2003 and these boreholes have provided samples for lithologic characterization, water-level measurements, and water samples for laboratory analysis of the saturated zone water chemistry. The results of the field investigations and laboratory analyses of rock and water samples collected at Nopal I are used to calibrate the Pena Blanca Natural Analogue Model.

G.J. Saulnier Jr; W. Statham

2006-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

393

Calibration method for video and radiation imagers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The relationship between the high energy radiation imager pixel (HERIP) coordinate and real-world x-coordinate is determined by a least square fit between the HERIP x-coordinate and the measured real-world x-coordinates of calibration markers that emit high energy radiation imager and reflect visible light. Upon calibration, a high energy radiation imager pixel position may be determined based on a real-world coordinate of a moving vehicle. Further, a scale parameter for said high energy radiation imager may be determined based on the real-world coordinate. The scale parameter depends on the y-coordinate of the moving vehicle as provided by a visible light camera. The high energy radiation imager may be employed to detect radiation from moving vehicles in multiple lanes, which correspondingly have different distances to the high energy radiation imager.

Cunningham, Mark F. (Oak Ridge, TN); Fabris, Lorenzo (Knoxville, TN); Gee, Timothy F. (Oak Ridge, TN); Goddard, Jr., James S. (Knoxville, TN); Karnowski, Thomas P. (Knoxville, TN); Ziock, Klaus-peter (Clinton, TN)

2011-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

394

Test surfaces useful for calibration of surface profilometers  

SciTech Connect

The present invention provides for test surfaces and methods for calibration of surface profilometers, including interferometric and atomic force microscopes. Calibration is performed using a specially designed test surface, or the Binary Pseudo-random (BPR) grating (array). Utilizing the BPR grating (array) to measure the power spectral density (PSD) spectrum, the profilometer is calibrated by determining the instrumental modulation transfer.

Yashchuk, Valeriy V; McKinney, Wayne R; Takacs, Peter Z

2013-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

395

NIST Measurement Services: Natural Gas Flow Calibration Service (NGFCS)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NIST Measurement Services: Natural Gas Flow Calibration Service (NGFCS) NIST Special Publication of Standards and Technology #12;i Table of Contents for the Natural Gas Flowmeter Calibration Service (NGFCS;1 Abstract This document describes NIST's high pressure natural gas flow calibration service (NGFCS). Flow

Magee, Joseph W.

396

Commissioning and Calibration of the ALICE TPC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ALICE (A Large Ion Collider Experiment) is the dedicated heavy ion experiment at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. The main tracking device of ALICE is a large volume TPC. The milestones of the TPC commissioning as well as the current status of the detector calibration are presented. The obtained resolutions in transverse momentum, position as well as in specific energy loss (dE/dx) are presented and results from noise and electron drift velocity measurements are addressed.

J. Wiechula; for the ALICE TPC Collaboration

2009-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

397

HLNC calibration and application to waste measurement  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using the established equations governing the counts and the underlying nuclear parameters involved in neutron coincidence measurements, the calibration procedure used in calculating the effective Pu{sup 240} mass in plutonium bearing samples is carefully reexamined and restructured in a physically and mathematically consistent form. The characteristics of this approach are described and its application to existing data illustrated. The implications for waste measurements are discussed.

Lu, Ming-Shih; Teichmann, T. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)); De Ridder, P.M.; Delegard, C. (International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

HLNC calibration and application to waste measurement  

SciTech Connect

Using the established equations governing the counts and the underlying nuclear parameters involved in neutron coincidence measurements, the calibration procedure used in calculating the effective Pu{sup 240} mass in plutonium bearing samples is carefully reexamined and restructured in a physically and mathematically consistent form. The characteristics of this approach are described and its application to existing data illustrated. The implications for waste measurements are discussed.

Lu, Ming-Shih; Teichmann, T. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); De Ridder, P.M.; Delegard, C. [International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria)

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Towards a Benchmark and Automatic Calibration for IR-Based Concept Location  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There has been a great deal of research into the use of Information Retrieval (IR)-based techniques to support concept location in source code. Much of this research has been focused on determining how to use various IR techniques to support concept ... Keywords: concept location, data model, software change reenactment, information retrieval, parameter calibration, benchmark

Scott David Ohlemacher; Andrian Marcus

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Calibration of Knollenberg FSSP Light-Scattering Counters for Measurement of Cloud Droplets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Measurement of cloud drop size distributions with the Knollenberg model FSSP-100 light-scattering counter can lead to artificial bumps or knees in the distributions at 0.6 ?m and sometimes 2–4 ?m radius if the manufacturer-supplied calibration ...

R. G. Pinnick; D. M. Garvey; L. D. Duncan

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "borehole calibration models" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Calibrated Probabilistic Forecasting at the Stateline Wind Energy Center: The Regime-Switching  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Calibrated Probabilistic Forecasting at the Stateline Wind Energy Center: The Regime at a wind energy site and fits a conditional predictive model for each regime. Geographically dispersed was applied to 2-hour-ahead forecasts of hourly average wind speed near the Stateline wind energy center

Genton, Marc G.

402

A TECHNIQUE FOR PRIMARY BEAM CALIBRATION OF DRIFT-SCANNING, WIDE-FIELD ANTENNA ELEMENTS  

SciTech Connect

We present a new technique for calibrating the primary beam of a wide-field, drift-scanning antenna element. Drift-scan observing is not compatible with standard beam calibration routines, and the situation is further complicated by difficult-to-parameterize beam shapes and, at low frequencies, the sparsity of accurate source spectra to use as calibrators. We overcome these challenges by building up an interrelated network of source 'crossing points'-locations where the primary beam is sampled by multiple sources. Using the single assumption that a beam has 180 Degree-Sign rotational symmetry, we can achieve significant beam coverage with only a few tens of sources. The resulting network of crossing points allows us to solve for both a beam model and source flux densities referenced to a single calibrator source, circumventing the need for a large sample of well-characterized calibrators. We illustrate the method with actual and simulated observations from the Precision Array for Probing the Epoch of Reionization.

Pober, Jonathan C.; Parsons, Aaron R. [Astronomy Department, University of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Jacobs, Daniel C. [School of Earth and Space Exploration, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ (United States); Aguirre, James E.; Moore, David F. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Bradley, Richard F.; Parashare, Chaitali R. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Carilli, Chris L. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Socorro, NM (United States); Gugliucci, Nicole E. [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States)

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

403

Numerical Modeling At Coso Geothermal Area (2010) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

10) 10) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Numerical Modeling At Coso Geothermal Area (2010) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Numerical Modeling Activity Date 2010 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis To determine conditions when fractures nucleate Notes A numerical model was developed using Poly3D to simulate the distribution and magnitude of stress concentration in the vicinity of the borehole floor, and determine the conditions under which petal-centerline fractures nucleate. As a whole, the simulations have demonstrated that a borehole under the stress boundary conditions present at the Coso 58A-10 borehole is able to amplify the stress concentration to produce tension below the

404

Topical report on subsurface fracture mapping from geothermal wellbores. Phase I. Pulsed radar techniques. Phase II. Conventional logging methods. Phase III. Magnetic borehole ranging  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

To advance the state-of-the-art in Hot Dry Rock technology, an evaluation is made of (i) the use of radar to map far-field fractures, (ii) the use of more than twenty different conventional well logging tools to map borehole-fracture intercepts, and (iii) the use of magnetic dipole ranging to determine the relative positions of the injection well and the production well within the fractured zone. It is found that according to calculations, VHF backscatter radar has the potential for mapping fractures within a distance of 50 +- 20 meters from the wellbore. A new technique for improving fracture identification is presented. Analyses of extant data indicate that when used synergistically the (1) caliper, (2) resistivity dipmeter, (3) televiewer, (4) television, (5) impression packer, and (6) acoustic transmission are useful for mapping borehole-fracture intercepts. Improvements in both data interpretation techniques and high temperature operation are required. The surveying of one borehole from another appears feasible at ranges of up to 200 to 500 meters by using a low frequency magnetic field generated by a moderately strong dipole source (a solenoid) located in one borehole, a sensitive B field detector that traverses part of the second borehole, narrow band filtering, and special data inversion techniques.

Hartenbaum, B.A.; Rawson, G.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Calibration prerequisite for accurate PVT measurements  

SciTech Connect

A calibration procedure improves PVT (pressure-volume-temperature) measurement accuracy, especially at high pressures. This approach can be used for both the traditional setups with mercury as the displacing fluid or with the more recent mercury-free systems. Volume is the parameter that usually varies independently during the course of PVT studies. The accuracy with which the volume variations are monitored influences directly the quality of the results. This paper describes the major parts of a typical PVT setup designed to meet the requirements for oil and gas condensate fluid studies.

Varotsis, N.; Pasadakis, N. [Technical Univ. of Crete, Chania (Greece)

1996-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

406

Waveform correlation methods for identifying populations of calibration events  

SciTech Connect

An approach for systematically screening large volumes of continuous data for repetitive events identified as mining explosions on basis of temporal and amplitude population characteristics. The method extends event clustering through waveform correlation with a new source-region-specific detector. The new signal subspace detector generalizes the matched filter and can be used to increase the number of events associated with a given cluster, thereby increasing the reliability of diagnostic cluster population characteristics. The method can be applied to obtain bootstrap ground truth explosion waveforms for testing discriminants, where actual ground truth is absent. The same events, if associated with to a particular mine, may help calibrate velocity models. The method may also assist earthquake hazard risk assessment by providing what amounts to blasting logs for identified mines. The cluster event lists can be reconciled against earthquake catalogs to screen explosions, otherwise hard to identify from the catalogs.

Harris, D.B.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

A Frequency Comb calibrated Solar Atlas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The solar spectrum is a primary reference for the study of physical processes in stars and their variation during activity cycles. In Nov 2010 an experiment with a prototype of a Laser Frequency Comb (LFC) calibration system was performed with the HARPS spectrograph of the 3.6m ESO telescope at La Silla during which high signal-to-noise spectra of the Moon were obtained. We exploit those Echelle spectra to study the optical integrated solar spectrum . The DAOSPEC program is used to measure solar line positions through gaussian fitting in an automatic way. We first apply the LFC solar spectrum to characterize the CCDs of the HARPS spectrograph. The comparison of the LFC and Th-Ar calibrated spectra reveals S-type distortions on each order along the whole spectral range with an amplitude of +/-40 m/s. This confirms the pattern found by Wilken et al. (2010) on a single order and extends the detection of the distortions to the whole analyzed region revealing that the precise shape varies with wavelength. A new da...

Molaro, P; Monai, S; Hernandez, J I Gonzalez; Hansch, T W; Holzwarth, R; Manescau, A; Pasquini, L; Probst, R A; Rebolo, R; Steinmetz, T; Udem, Th; Wilken, T

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

The ATLAS Inner Detector commissioning and calibration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The ATLAS Inner Detector is a composite tracking system consisting of silicon pixels, silicon strips and straw tubes in a 2 T magnetic field. Its installation was completed in August 2008 and the detector took part in data- taking with single LHC beams and cosmic rays. The initial detector operation, hardware commissioning and in-situ calibrations are described. Tracking performance has been measured with 7.6 million cosmic-ray events, collected using a tracking trigger and reconstructed with modular pattern-recognition and fitting software. The intrinsic hit efficiency and tracking trigger efficiencies are close to 100%. Lorentz angle measurements for both electrons and holes, specific energy-loss calibration and transition radiation turn-on measurements have been performed. Different alignment techniques have been used to reconstruct the detector geometry. After the initial alignment, a transverse impact parameter resolution of 22.1+/-0.9 {\\mu}m and a relative momentum resolution {\\sigma}p/p = (4.83+/-0.16) \\times 10-4 GeV-1 \\times pT have been measured for high momentum tracks.

The ATLAS Collaboration

2010-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

409

Calibrating Accelerometers Using an Electromagnetic Launcher  

SciTech Connect

A Pulse Forming Network (PFN), Helical Electromagnetic Launcher (HEML), Command Module (CM), and Calibration Table (CT) were built and evaluated for the combined ability to calibrate an accelerometer. The PFN has a maximum stored energy of 19.25 kJ bank and is fired by a silicon controlled rectifier (SCR), with appropriate safety precautions. The HEML is constructed out of G-10 fiberglass and is designed to accelerate 600 grams to 10 meters per second. The CM is microcontroller based running Arduino Software. The CM has a keypad input and 7 segment outputs of the bank voltage and desired voltage. After entering a desired bank voltage, the CM controls the charge of the PFN. When the two voltages are equal it allows the fire button to send a pulse to the SCR to fire the PFN and in turn, the HEML. The HEML projectile's tip hits a target that is held by the CT. The CT consists of a table to hold the PFN and HEML, a vacuum chuck, air bearing, velocity meter and catch pot. The Target is held with the vacuum chuck awaiting impact. After impact, the air bearing allows the target to fall freely for the velocity meter to get an accurate reading. A known acceleration is determined from the known change in velocity of the target. Thus, if an accelerometer was attached to the target, the measured value can be compared to the known value.

Erik Timpson

2012-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

410

MFRSR Head Refurbishment, Data Logger Upgrade and Calibration Improvements  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MFRSR Head Refurbishment, Data Logger Upgrade MFRSR Head Refurbishment, Data Logger Upgrade and Calibration Improvements Gary Hodges, CIRES/NOAA and John Schmelzer, PNL gary.hodges@noaa.gov, john.schmelzer@pnl.gov 17th Annual ARM Science Team Meeting 26-30 March 2006 Monterey, CA Head Refurbishment The Process Includes: * New filter detectors * Relocate internal thermistors * New connectors * Gain resistors moved to head * Improved insulation The Finished Heads: * Are lamp calibrated * Have filter profiles measured * Cosine characterized * Are out-of-band tested What Does This Mean For Data Users? * Fewer data gaps * Fewer DQRs * Confidence in the data * Well calibrated data Calibration Improvements 5 6 7 8 0 2 4 6 Airmass ln Direct Data will now be calibrated by the Langley method Extrapolate to TOA to get V 0 Benefits of Langley vs. Lamp calibrations:

411

Silicon Micromachined Dimensional Calibration Artifact for Mesoscale Measurement Machines  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Silicon Micromachined Dimensional Calibration Silicon Micromachined Dimensional Calibration Artifact for Mesoscale Measurement Machines 1 Silicon Micromachined Dimensional Calibration Artifact for Mesoscale Measurement Machines 2 Sandia National Laboratories PO Box 5800 Albuquerque, NM 87185 USA Hy D. Tran, PhD, PE Phone: (505)844-5417 Fax: (505)844-4372 hdtran@sandia.gov AFFIRMATION: I affirm that all information submitted as a part of, or supplemental to, this entry is a fair and accurate representation of this product. ___________________________________ Hy D. Tran Not a joint entry. Silicon Micromachined Dimensional Calibration Artifact for Mesoscale Measurement Machines The silicon hybrid artifact is an anisotropic-etched silicon standard that is used as a calibration reference artifact to calibrate vision-based and

412

Method for in-situ calibration of electrophoretic analysis systems  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrophoretic system having a plurality of separation lanes is provided with an automatic calibration feature in which each lane is separately calibrated. For each lane, the calibration coefficients map a spectrum of received channel intensities onto values reflective of the relative likelihood of each of a plurality of dyes being present. Individual peaks, reflective of the influence of a single dye, are isolated from among the various sets of detected light intensity spectra, and these can be used to both detect the number of dye components present, and also to establish exemplary vectors for the calibration coefficients which may then be clustered and further processed to arrive at a calibration matrix for the system. The system of the present invention thus permits one to use different dye sets to tag DNA nucleotides in samples which migrate in separate lanes, and also allows for in-situ calibration with new, previously unused dye sets.

Liu, Changsheng (State College, PA); Zhao, Hequan (State College, PA)

2005-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

413

Method and apparatus for calibrating a particle emissions monitor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention discloses a method and apparatus for calibrating particulate emissions monitors, in particular, sampling probes, and in general, without removing the instrument from the system being monitored. A source of one or more specific metals in aerosol (either solid or liquid) or vapor form is housed in the instrument. The calibration operation is initiated by moving a focusing lens, used to focus a light beam onto an analysis location and collect the output light response, from an operating position to a calibration position such that the focal point of the focusing lens is now within a calibration stream issuing from a calibration source. The output light response from the calibration stream can be compared to that derived from an analysis location in the operating position to more accurately monitor emissions within the emissions flow stream. 6 figs.

Flower, W.L.; Renzi, R.F.

1998-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

414

Characterization of the Neutron Fields in the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Radiation Calibration Laboratory Low Scatter Calibration Facility  

SciTech Connect

In June 2007, the Department of Energy (DOE) revised its rule on Occupational Radiation Protection, Part 10 CFR 835. A significant aspect of the revision was the adoption of the recommendations outlined in International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) Report 60 (ICRP-60), including new radiation weighting factors for neutrons, updated internal dosimetric models, and dose terms consistent with the newer ICRP recommendations. ICRP-60 uses the quantities defined by the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU) for personnel and area monitoring including the ambient dose equivalent H*(d). A Joint Task Group of ICRU and ICRP has developed various fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients which are published in ICRP-74 for both protection and operational quantities. In February 2008, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) replaced its old pneumatic transport neutron irradiation system in the Radiation Calibration Laboratory (RCL) Low Scatter Calibration Facility (B255, Room 183A) with a Hopewell Designs irradiator model N40. The exposure tube for the Hopewell system is located close to, but not in exactly the same position as the exposure tube for the pneumatic system. Additionally, the sources for the Hopewell system are stored in Room 183A where, prior to the change, they were stored in a separate room (Room 183C). The new source configuration and revision of the 10 CFR 835 radiation weighting factors necessitate a re-evaluation of the neutron dose rates in B255 Room 183A. This report deals only with the changes in the operational quantities ambient dose equivalent and ambient dose rate equivalent for neutrons as a result of the implementation of the revised 10 CFR 835. In the report, the terms 'neutron dose' and 'neutron dose rate' will be used for convenience for ambient neutron dose equivalent and ambient neutron dose rate equivalent unless otherwise stated.

Radev, R

2009-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

415

Characterization of Vadose Zone Sediment: Slant Borehole SX-108 in the S-SX Waste Management Area  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report was revised in September 2008 to remove acid-extractable sodium data from Table 4.17. The sodium data was removed due to potential contamination introduced during the acid extraction process. The rest of the text remains unchanged from the original report issued in February 2002. The overall goal of the of the Tank Farm Vadose Zone Project, led by CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc., is to define risks from past and future single-shell tank farm activities. To meet this goal, CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc., asked scientists from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to perform detailed analyses on vadose zone sediment from within the S-SX Waste Management Area. This report is the fourth in a series of four reports to present the results of these analyses. Specifically, this report contains all the geologic, geochemical, and selected physical characterization data collected on vadose zone sediment recovered from a slant borehole installed beneath tank SX-108 (or simply SX-108 slant borehole).

Serne, R. Jeffrey; Last, George V.; Schaef, Herbert T.; Lanigan, David C.; Lindenmeier, Clark W.; Ainsworth, Calvin C.; Clayton, Ray E.; Legore, Virginia L.; O'Hara, Matthew J.; Brown, Christopher F.; Orr, Robert D.; Kutnyakov, Igor V.; Wilson, Teresa C.; Wagnon, Kenneth B.; Williams, Bruce A.; Burke, Deborah S.

2008-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

416

ADVANCES IN THE RXTE PROPORTIONAL COUNTER ARRAY CALIBRATION: NEARING THE STATISTICAL LIMIT  

SciTech Connect

During its 16 years of service, the Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) mission has provided an extensive archive of data, which will serve as a primary source of high cadence observations of variable X-ray sources for fast timing studies. It is, therefore, very important to have the most reliable calibration of RXTE instruments. The Proportional Counter Array (PCA) is the primary instrument on board RXTE which provides data in 3-50 keV energy range with submillisecond time resolution in up to 256 energy channels. In 2009, the RXTE team revised the response residual minimization method used to derive the parameters of the PCA physical model. The procedure is based on the residual minimization between the model spectrum for Crab Nebula emission and a calibration data set consisting of a number of spectra from the Crab and the on-board Am{sub 241} calibration source, uniformly covering the whole RXTE mission operation period. The new method led to a much more effective model convergence and allowed for better understanding of the PCA energy-to-channel relationship. It greatly improved the response matrix performance. We describe the new version of the RXTE/PCA response generator PCARMF v11.7 (HEASOFT Release 6.7) along with the corresponding energy-to-channel conversion table (version e05v04) and their difference from the previous releases of PCA calibration. The new PCA response adequately represents the spectrum of the calibration sources and successfully predicts the energy of the narrow iron emission line in Cas-A throughout the RXTE mission.

Shaposhnikov, Nikolai [CRESST and Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Jahoda, Keith; Markwardt, Craig; Swank, Jean; Strohmayer, Tod, E-mail: nikolai.v.shaposhnikov@nasa.gov [Astrophysics Science Division, Goddard Space Flight Center, NASA, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Calibration of NRSF2 Instrument at HFIR  

SciTech Connect

The Neutron Residual Stress Mapping Facility (NRSF2) at HB-2B is a new generation-diffraction instrument, adding many new Second Generation features, such as larger beam tube, large sample XYZ goniometer, and KAPPA orienter for a broad range of materials behavior studies. One key feature is the NRSF2 monochromator, which is a double focusing, double crystal monochromator system consisting of two sets of stacked Si crystal wafers. One set of wafers has Si[400] plane normal to the surface while the other set of wafers has the Si[500] normal to the surface. The monochromator crystal diffracts at a fixed diffraction angle of 88{sup o} selecting a neutron wavelength determined by the monochromator d{sub hkl}-spacing. This 'Missouri' monochromator system has two independent monochromators, which enable diffraction from the following set of six diffraction planes: Si(511), Si(422), Si(331)AF (Anti-Fankuchen geometry), Si(400), Si(311), and Si(220). These diffraction planes can provide 6 different neutron wavelengths: approximately 1.45, 1.54, 1.73, 1.89 {angstrom}, 2.27, and 2.66 also incorporate seven position sensitive detectors located in a detector shield box. To use this advanced instrument for scientific and engineering measurements, careful calibration needs to be performed to accurately calibrate the seven position sensitive detectors, neutron wavelength, and 2{theta}{sub 0}. Just as in the X-ray diffraction technique, neutron diffraction directly measures the diffraction angle (2{theta}) or diffraction peak position, then based on Bragg's law and a strain free lattice spacing, the strain can be calculated. Therefore anything that can affect the diffracting angle measurement can influence the accuracy of the strain measurements. The sources of difficulties in achieving accurate neutron diffraction peak positions can be classified into three categories. (1) Instrument - These difficulties come from alignment of the monochromator, alignment of the incident and detector slits, leveling of the sample table, 2{theta}{sub 0} offset, and response of the position sensitive detector; (2) Counting statistics - if the peak profile count is too low, then the peak position derived from fitting a profile and background will have larger error. Therefore, adequate counting statistics and well-defined peaks are always good for precise peak position determination; and (3) Sample - Large grain size materials make it difficult to get enough diffracting grains, contributing to the different profile. With a low number the peak becomes 'spot' and results in inaccuracy in peak position. Texture in the sample can change the effective elastic constants and also affect the peak intensity. Phase and composition inhomogeneity can make it difficult to determine an accurate stress-free d{sub 0} for strain calculation. A partially buried gauge volume due to proximity to the sample surface or buried interface can also shift the peak position. The calibration method presented in this report will address the first two categories of difficulties listed above. The FWHM can be minimized for each sample d-spacing by adjusting the horizontal bending of the monochromator crystal. For the monochromator, the optimum FWHM lies between 70 and 110 degree. This range is selected in order to maintain an approximately equiaxed gauge volume and avoid significant increases in peak breadth for the detectors above and below the horizontal plane. To adequately calibrate the position sensitive detectors, 2{theta}{sub 0}, and wavelength, a set of high purity reference powders were selected. Since the selected reference powders have define grain size is, the measurement errors from sample grain size and texture can be excluded, although there may still be micro-strain in the powders, which can broaden the reference peak. In this report, the calibration procedure for the NRSF2 instrument will be presented and calibration results for five monochromator settings from HFIR cycle 403 will be presented. The monochromator settings calibrated include Si(331)AF (Anti-Fankuche n geomet

Tang, Fei [ORNL; Hubbard, Camden R [ORNL

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Efficient Finite Element Modeling of Shallow Geothermal Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a finite element modeling technique for double U-tube borehole heat exchangers (BHE) and the surrounding soil mass. Focus is placed on presenting numerical analyses describing the capability of a BHE model, previously introduced by ... Keywords: Geothermic, BHE, Heat transfer

Rafid Al-Khoury

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

On-chip Benchmarking and Calibration without External References  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the target component. A benchmark value is calculated based11  3.4 Calibration using Benchmarkthe target component. A benchmark value is calculated based

Lee, Cheol-Woong

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

BSA 08-21: Calibration Test Surface for Surface Profilometers  

Describes a test tool that can be used to calibrate surface profilometers. Surface profilometers are basic metrology tools used to characterize high ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "borehole calibration models" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

2.3.6. Instrument calibration over a regime  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... A quadratic fit to the loadcell data produces the calibration curve that is shown as the solid line. For a future measurement with the load cell, Y ...

2012-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

422

Absolute spectral radiance responsivity calibration of sun photometers  

SciTech Connect

Sun photometers are designed to measure direct solar irradiance and diffused sky radiance for the purpose of atmospheric parameters characterization. A sun photometer is usually calibrated by using a lamp-illuminated integrating sphere source for its band-averaged radiance responsivity, which normally has an uncertainty of 3%-5% at present. Considering the calibration coefficients may also change with time, a regular high precision calibration is important to maintain data quality. In this paper, a tunable-laser-based facility for spectral radiance responsivity calibration has been developed at the Key Laboratory of Optical Calibration and Characterization, Chinese Academy of Sciences. A reference standard radiance radiometer, calibrated against cryogenic radiometer, is used to determine the radiance from a laser-illuminated integrating sphere source. Spectral radiance responsivity of CIMEL CE318-2 sun photometer is calibrated using this new calibration system with a combined standard uncertainty of about 0.8%. As a validation, the derived band-averaged radiance responsivity are compared to that from a Goddard Space Flight Center lamp-based sphere calibration and good agreements (difference <1.4%) are found from 675 to 1020 nm bands.

Xu Qiuyun; Zheng Xiaobing; Zhang Wei; Wang Xianhua; Li Jianjun; Li Xin [Key Laboratory of Optical Calibration and Characterization, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Li Zhengqiang [Laboratoire d'Optique Atmospherique, Universite Lille 1, Villeneuve d'Ascq 59655 (France) and State Key Laboratory of Remote Sensing Science, Institute of Remote Sensing Applications, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101 (China)

2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

423

Gas Flowmeter Calibrations with the 26 m PVTt Standard  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... thermal mass flow meters, and turbine meters. ... the conditions of usage (ie, gas type, temperature ... a NIST calibration to conditions or gases that were ...

2012-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

424

Calibrated Broadband DC-Coupled High Impedance Pickoff ...  

Craig E. Deibele, Brian Link, and Vladimir V. Peplov, Calibrated Broadband DC-Coupled High Impedance Pickoff Circuit for Remote Monitoring

425

Increasing operational availability of H-60 calibration support equipment .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The purpose of this MBA Project was to identify inefficiencies in the H-60 support equipment calibration process at Naval Air Station, North Island and analyze… (more)

Johnson, Kelly M.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Non-Destructive Analysis Calibration Standards for Gaseous Diffusion...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Analysis Calibration Standards for Gaseous Diffusion Plant (GDP) Decommissioning The decommissioning of Gaseous Diffusion Plant facilities requires accurate, non-destructive...

427

QAS 2.4 Instrument Calibration 5/26/95  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The objective of this surveillance is to evaluate the implementation of the contractor's program to routinely calibrate instruments, alarms, and sensors.  The Facility Representative observes...

428

NIST Telescope Calibration May Help Explain Mystery of ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... They will use this information to calibrate a much larger telescope–the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope, planned for construction in Chile. ...

2011-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

429

LRM probe-tip calibrations using nonideal standards ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Design of Output Circuits for Power Amplifier,” IEEE ... the effect of line loss on this ... rigorous theory for deembedding and network analyzer calibration ...

2013-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

430

Spectrometry of X-Ray Beams Used for Calibrations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... and used to calibrate a wavelength-dispersive crystal x-ray spectrograph used by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to diagnose ...

2012-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

431

Development of a 400 Level 3C Clamped Downhole Seismic Receiver Array for 3D Borehole Seismic Imaging of Gas Reservoirs  

SciTech Connect

Borehole seismology is the highest resolution geophysical imaging technique available today to the oil and gas industry for characterization and monitoring of oil and gas reservoirs. However, the industry's ability to perform high resolution 3D imaging of deep and complex gas reservoirs using borehole seismology has been hampered by the lack of acquisition technology necessary to record large volumes of high frequency, high signal-to-noise-ratio borehole seismic data. This project took aim at this shortcoming by developing a 400 level 3C clamped downhole seismic receiver array, and accompanying software, for borehole seismic 3D imaging. This large borehole seismic array has removed the technical acquisition barrier for recording the data volumes necessary to do high resolution 3D VSP and 3D cross-well seismic imaging. Massive 3D VSP{reg_sign} and long range Cross-Well Seismology (CWS) are two of the borehole seismic techniques that promise to take the gas industry to the next level in their quest for higher resolution images of deep and complex oil and gas reservoirs. Today only a fraction of the oil or gas in place is produced when reservoirs are considered depleted. This is primarily due to our lack of understanding of detailed compartmentalization of oil and gas reservoirs. In this project, we developed a 400 level 3C borehole seismic receiver array that allows for economic use of 3D borehole seismic imaging for reservoir characterization and monitoring. This new array has significantly increased the efficiency of recording large data volumes at sufficiently dense spatial sampling to resolve reservoir complexities. The receiver pods have been fabricated and tested to withstand high temperature (200 C/400 F) and high pressure (25,000 psi), so that they can operate in wells up to 7,620 meters (25,000 feet) deep. The receiver array is deployed on standard production or drill tubing. In combination with 3C surface seismic or 3C borehole seismic sources, the 400 level receiver array can be used to obtain 3D 9C data. These 9C borehole seismic data provide both compressional wave and shear wave information that can be used for quantitative prediction of rock and pore fluid types. The 400-level borehole receiver array has been deployed successfully in a number of oil and gas wells during the course of this project, and each survey has resulted in marked improvements in imaging of geologic features that are critical for oil or gas production but were previously considered to be below the limits of seismic resolution. This added level of reservoir detail has resulted in improved well placement in the oil and gas fields that have been drilled using the Massive 3D VSP{reg_sign} images. In the future, the 400-level downhole seismic receiver array is expected to continue to improve reservoir characterization and drilling success in deep and complex oil and gas reservoirs.

Bjorn N. P. Paulsson

2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

432

Current Efficiency Predictive Model and Its Calibration and Validation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cryoscopic Data for Hall-Héroult Bath Containing Magnesium Fluoride, Calcium Fluoride, Potassium Cryolite, and Sodium Chloride · Current Distribution and ...

433

Feedstock Quality Factor Calibration and Data Model Development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goal of the feedstock assembly operation is to deliver uniform, quality-assured feedstock materials that will enhance downstream system performance by avoiding problems in the conversion equipment. In order to achieve this goal, there is a need for rapid screening tools and methodologies for assessing the thermochemical quality characteristics of biomass feedstock through the assembly process. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has been identified as potential technique that could allow rapid elemental analyses of the inorganic content of biomass feedstocks; and consequently, would complement the carbohydrate data provided by near-infrared spectrometry (NIRS). These constituents, including Si, K, Ca, Na, S, P, Cl, Mg, Fe and Al, create a number of downstream problems in thermochemical processes. In particular, they reduce the energy content of the feedstock, influence reaction pathways, contribute to fouling and corrosion within systems, poison catalysts, and impact waste streams.

Richard D. Boardman; Tyler L. Westover; Garold L. Gresham

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Simultaneous multi-headed imager geometry calibration method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for calibrating multi-headed high sensitivity and high spatial resolution dynamic imaging systems, especially those useful in the acquisition of tomographic images of small animals. The method of the present invention comprises: simultaneously calibrating two or more detectors to the same coordinate system; and functionally correcting for unwanted detector movement due to gantry flexing.

Tran, Vi-Hoa (Newport News, VA); Meikle, Steven Richard (Penshurst, AU); Smith, Mark Frederick (Yorktown, VA)

2008-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

435

A Sampling Plan for Use with Dynamic Calibration  

SciTech Connect

Dynamic calibration is a measurement control technique designed to facilitate the use of nondestructive assay for the control and accounting of special nuclear material. The implementation of dynamic calibration requires selection of an appropriate control measurement and sampling plan to provide traceability for the measurement system. A general sampling plan for use when the control measurement is an independent assay is presented with examples.

Lemming, John F.; Rudy, Clifford R.

1979-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

436

Multi-sensor calibration through iterative registration and fusion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, a new multi-sensor calibration approach, called iterative registration and fusion (IRF), is presented. The key idea of this approach is to use surfaces reconstructed from multiple point clouds to enhance the registration accuracy and robustness. ... Keywords: B-spline surface reconstruction, Iterative closest point (ICP), Kalman filter, Registration, Sensor calibration

Yunbao Huang; Xiaoping Qian; Shiliang Chen

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Absolute Calibration of a Large-diameter Light Source  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A method of absolute calibration for large aperture optical systems is presented, using the example of the Pierre Auger Observatory fluorescence detectors. A 2.5 m diameter light source illuminated by an ultra--violet light emitting diode is calibrated with an overall uncertainty of 2.1 % at a wavelength of 365 nm.

Brack, J T; Dorofeev, A; Gookin, B; Harton, J L; Petrov, Y; Rovero, A C

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Laser calibration system of TileCal in ATLAS detector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This talk presents the Laser calibration system of TileCal. After a brief introduction putting a stress on the importance of TileCal calibration and the monitoring of its stability, some example of response stability measurements obtained using the laser system are commented.

Giangiobbe, V; The ATLAS collaboration

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Calibration of solar radiation measuring instruments. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A review of solar radiation measurement of instruments and some types of errors is given; and procedures for calibrating solar radiation measuring instruments are detailed. An appendix contains a description of various agencies who perform calibration of solar instruments and a description of the methods they used at the time this report was prepared. (WHK)

Bahm, R J; Nakos, J C

1979-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Humidity effects on calibrations of radiation therapy electrometers  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To eliminate variation in electrometer calibration results caused by high humidity and suboptimal connectors on the standard capacitors and to implement hardware that prevents overloading of the input stage of electrometers during calibration. Methods: A humidity-controlled cabinet was installed to provide a low-humidity environment for the standard capacitors. All of the coaxial BNC connections were replaced with Triax (TRB) connectors with the exception of the output from the voltage source. A three-stage RC filter with cascaded RC low-pass sections was designed and tested. Results: The installation of the humidity cabinet resulted in a major improvement in the stability and reproducibility of the electrometer calibration system. For the three years since this upgrade, the Ionizing Radiation Standards (IRS) electrometer calibration results have been consistent regardless of the ambient relative humidity in the lab. The connector replacements improved grounding in the calibration circuit. The three-stage filter allows the voltage at the output to rise in an S-shaped waveform, resulting in a smooth rise of the current through the isolation resistor from zero and back again, with no abrupt transition. For the filter design chosen, 99.99% of the charge is delivered within 6 s. Conclusions: A three-way improvement to the calibration measurement system was successful in eliminating the observed variations, resulting in an electrometer calibration measurement system that is unaffected by humidity and allowing reliable year-round calibrations of any electrometer encountered since the implementation of these changes.

Downton, B.; Walker, S. [Ionizing Radiation Standards, National Research Council of Canada, Bldg. M35, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0R6 (Canada)

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "borehole calibration models" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

High temperature testing of the EDCON borehole gravity housing system conducted at Los Alamos National Laboratories, January 12-18, 1986  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A series of tests were conducted on the EDCON borehole gravity meter (BHGM) high temperature sonde. The tests were conducted to determine the suitability of this sonde for logging operations in the Department of Energy Salton Trough test well. 1 ref., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

Not Available

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Results of 1999 Spectral Gamma-Ray and Neutron Moisture Monitoring of Boreholes at Specific Retention Facilities in the 200 East Area, Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect

Twenty-eight wells and boreholes in the 200 East Are% Hanford Site, Washington were monitored in 1999. The monitored facilities were past-practice liquid waste disposal facilities and consisted of six cribs and nineteen ''specific retention'' cribs and trenches. Monitoring consisted of spectral gamma-ray and neutron moisture logging. All data are included in Appendix B. The isotopes {sup 137}Cs, {sup 60}Co, {sup 235}U, {sup 238}U, and {sup 154}Eu were identified on spectral gamma logs from boreholes monitoring the PUREX specific retention facilities; the isotopes {sup 137}Cs, {sup 60}Co, {sup 125}Sb, and {sup 154}Eu were identified on the logs from boreholes at the BC Controlled Area cribs and trenches; and {sup 137}Cs, {sup 60}Co, and {sup 125}Sb were, identified on the logs from boreholes at the BX specific retention trenches. Three boreholes in the BC Controlled Area and one at the BX trenches had previous spectral gamma logs available for comparison with 1999 logs. Two of those logs showed that changes in the subsurface distribution of {sup 137}CS and/or {sup 60}Co had occurred since 1992. Although the changes are not great, they do point to continued movement of contaminants in the vadose zone. The logs obtained in 1999 create a larger baseline for comparison with future logs. Numerous historical gross gamma logs exist from most of the boreholes logged. Qualitative comparison of those logs with the 1999 logs show many substantial changes, most of which reflect the decay of deeper short-lived isotopes, such as {sup 106}Ru and {sup 125}Sb, and the much slower decay of shallower and longer-lived isotopes such as {sup 137}Cs. The radionuclides {sup 137}Cs and {sup 60}Co have moved in two boreholes since 1992. Given the amount of movement and the half-lives of the isotopes, it is expected that they will decay to insignificant amounts before reaching groundwater. However, gamma ray logging cannot detect many of the contaminants of interest such as {sup 99}Tc, NO{sub 3}, or {sup 129}I, all of which can be highly mobile in the vadose zone and, for the radionuclides, have long half-lives.

DG Horton; RR Randall

2000-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

443

Document Number Q0029500 Ground Water Model 3.0 Ground Water...  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

and are not required by MODPATH or MT3D. 3.6.4 Flow Model Calibration The IRA Work Plan states that the model would be calibrated using October 2002 water levels. However,...

444

Generic Disposal System Modeling, Fiscal Year 2011 Progress Report |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Disposal System Modeling, Fiscal Year 2011 Progress Report Disposal System Modeling, Fiscal Year 2011 Progress Report Generic Disposal System Modeling, Fiscal Year 2011 Progress Report The UFD Campaign is developing generic disposal system models (GDSM) of different disposal environments and waste form options. Currently, the GDSM team is investigating four main disposal environment options: mined repositories in three geologic media (salt, clay, and granite) and the deep borehole concept in crystalline rock (DOE 2010d). Further developed the individual generic disposal system (GDS) models for salt, granite, clay, and deep borehole disposal environments. GenericDisposalSystModelFY11.pdf More Documents & Publications Integration of EBS Models with Generic Disposal System Models TSPA Model Development and Sensitivity Analysis of Processes Affecting

445

Detonation Shock Dynamics (DSD) Calibration for LX-17  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The goal of this report is to summarize the results of a Detonation shock dynamics (DSD) calibration for the explosive LX-17. Considering that LX-17 is very similar to PBX 9502 (LX-17 is 92.5% TATB with 7.5% Kel-F 800 binder, while PBX 9502 is 95% TATB with 5% Kel-F 800 binder), we proceed with the analysis assuming many of the DSD constants are the same. We only change the parameters D{sub CJ}, B and {bar C}{sub 6} ({