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1

Model accurately predicts directional borehole trajectory  

SciTech Connect

Theoretical investigations and field data analyses helped develop a new method of predicting the rate of inclination change in a deviated well bore to help reduce the frequency and magnitude of doglegs. Predicting borehole dogleg severity is one of the main problems in directional drilling. Predicting the tendency and magnitude of borehole deviation and comparing them to the planned well path makes it possible to improve bottom hole assembly (BHA) design and to reduce the number of correction runs. The application of adaptation models for predicting the rate of inclination change if measurement-while-drilling systems are used results in improved accuracy of prediction, and therefore a reduction in correction runs.

Mamedbekov, O.K. (Azerbaijan State Petroleum Academy, Baku (Azerbaijan))

1994-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

2

Borehole Calibration Facilities to Support Gamma Logging for Hanford Subsurface Investigation and Contaminant Monitoring - 13516  

SciTech Connect

Repeated gamma logging in cased holes represents a cost-effective means to monitor gamma-emitting contamination in the deep vadose zone over time. Careful calibration and standardization of gamma log results are required to track changes and to compare results over time from different detectors and logging systems. This paper provides a summary description of Hanford facilities currently available for calibration of logging equipment. Ideally, all logging organizations conducting borehole gamma measurements at the Hanford Site will take advantage of these facilities to produce standardized and comparable results. (authors)

McCain, R.G.; Henwood, P.D.; Pope, A.D.; Pearson, A.W. [S M Stoller Corporation, 2439 Robertson Drive, Richland, WA 99354 (United States)] [S M Stoller Corporation, 2439 Robertson Drive, Richland, WA 99354 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Modeling and visualizing borehole information on virtual globes using KML  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Advances in virtual globes and Keyhole Markup Language (KML) are providing the Earth scientists with the universal platforms to manage, visualize, integrate and disseminate geospatial information. In order to use KML to represent and disseminate subsurface geological information on virtual globes, we present an automatic method for modeling and visualizing a large volume of borehole information. Based on a standard form of borehole database, the method first creates a variety of borehole models with different levels of detail (LODs), including point placemarks representing drilling locations, scatter dots representing contacts and tube models representing strata. Subsequently, the level-of-detail based (LOD-based) multi-scale representation is constructed to enhance the efficiency of visualizing large numbers of boreholes. Finally, the modeling result can be loaded into a virtual globe application for 3D visualization. An implementation program, termed Borehole2KML, is developed to automatically convert borehole data into KML documents. A case study of using Borehole2KML to create borehole models in Shanghai shows that the modeling method is applicable to visualize, integrate and disseminate borehole information on the Internet. The method we have developed has potential use in societal service of geological information.

Liang-feng Zhu; Xi-feng Wang; Bing Zhang

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

FMI Borehole Geology, Geomechanics and 3D Reservoir Modeling...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geomechanics and 3D Reservoir Modeling Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: FMI Borehole Geology, Geomechanics and 3D Reservoir Modeling...

5

Calibrated Properties Model  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this model report is to document the calibrated properties model that provides calibrated property sets for unsaturated zone (UZ) flow and transport process models (UZ models). The calibration of the property sets is performed through inverse modeling. This work followed, and was planned in, ''Technical Work Plan (TWP) for: Unsaturated Zone Flow Analysis and Model Report Integration'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169654], Sections 1.2.6 and 2.1.1.6). Direct inputs to this model report were derived from the following upstream analysis and model reports: ''Analysis of Hydrologic Properties Data'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170038]); ''Development of Numerical Grids for UZ Flow and Transport Modeling'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169855]); ''Simulation of Net Infiltration for Present-Day and Potential Future Climates'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170007]); ''Geologic Framework Model'' (GFM2000) (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170029]). Additionally, this model report incorporates errata of the previous version and closure of the Key Technical Issue agreement TSPAI 3.26 (Section 6.2.2 and Appendix B), and it is revised for improved transparency.

T. Ghezzehej

2004-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

6

Calibration of a Neutron Hydroprobe for Moisture Measurements in Small-Diameter Steel-Cased Boreholes  

SciTech Connect

Computation of soil moisture content from thermalized neutron counts for the T-Farm Interim cover requires a calibration relationship but none exists for 2-in tubes. A number of calibration options are available for the neutron probe, including vendor calibration, field calibration, but none of these methods were deemed appropriate for the configuration of interest. The objective of this work was to develop a calibration relation for converting neutron counts measured in 2-in access tubes to soil water content. The calibration method chosen for this study was a computational approach using the Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport Code (MCNP). Model calibration was performed using field measurements in the Hanford calibration models with 6-in access tubes, in air and in the probe shield. The bet-fit model relating known water content to measured neutron counts was an exponential model that was essentially equivalent to that currently being used for 6-in steel cased wells. The MCNP simulations successfully predicted the neutron count rate for the neutron shield and the three calibration models for which data were collected in the field. However, predictions for air were about 65% lower than the measured counts . This discrepancy can be attributed to uncertainties in the configuration used for the air measurements. MCNP-simulated counts for the physical models were essentially equal to the measured counts with values. Accurate prediction of the response in 6-in casings in the three calibration models was motivation to predict the response in 2-in access tubes. Simulations were performed for six of the seven calibration models as well as 4 virtual models with the entire set covering a moisture range of 0 to 40%. Predicted counts for the calibration models with 2-in access tubes were 40 to 50% higher than in the 6-inch tubes. Predicted counts for water were about 60% higher in the 2-in tube than in the 6-in tube. The discrepancy between the 2-in and 6-in tube can be attributed to the smaller air gap between the probe and the 2-in access tube. The best-fit model relating volumetric water content to count ratio (CR) is of the form e^A x CR^B with A=0.3596 ± 0.0216 and B=0.4629 ± 0.0629 and r^2= 0.9998. It is recommended that the calibration function based on the count ratio, rather than raw counts, be used to avoid the effects of electronic noise in the probe that may arise due to the conditions at the time of measurement. These results suggest that the MCNP code can be used to extend calibrations for the neutron probe to different conditions including access tube size as well as composition without the need to construct additional physical models.

Ward, Anderson L.; Wittman, Richard S.

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Calibrated Properties Model  

SciTech Connect

This report has documented the methodologies and the data used for developing rock property sets for three infiltration maps. Model calibration is necessary to obtain parameter values appropriate for the scale of the process being modeled. Although some hydrogeologic property data (prior information) are available, these data cannot be directly used to predict flow and transport processes because they were measured on scales smaller than those characterizing property distributions in models used for the prediction. Since model calibrations were done directly on the scales of interest, the upscaling issue was automatically considered. On the other hand, joint use of data and the prior information in inversions can further increase the reliability of the developed parameters compared with those for the prior information. Rock parameter sets were developed for both the mountain and drift scales because of the scale-dependent behavior of fracture permeability. Note that these parameter sets, except those for faults, were determined using the 1-D simulations. Therefore, they cannot be directly used for modeling lateral flow because of perched water in the unsaturated zone (UZ) of Yucca Mountain. Further calibration may be needed for two- and three-dimensional modeling studies. As discussed above in Section 6.4, uncertainties for these calibrated properties are difficult to accurately determine, because of the inaccuracy of simplified methods for this complex problem or the extremely large computational expense of more rigorous methods. One estimate of uncertainty that may be useful to investigators using these properties is the uncertainty used for the prior information. In most cases, the inversions did not change the properties very much with respect to the prior information. The Output DTNs (including the input and output files for all runs) from this study are given in Section 9.4.

H. H. Liu

2003-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

8

Analysis of noncircular fluid-filled boreholes in elastic formations using a perturbation model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

underbalance drilling in the pres- ence of large tectonic stresses, can cause complex perturbationsAnalysis of noncircular fluid-filled boreholes in elastic formations using a perturbation model a perturbation model to obtain flexural mode dispersions of noncircular fluid-filled boreholes in homogeneous

Simsek, Ergun

9

Next Generation Calibration Models with Dimensional Modeling...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Documents & Publications Reduction of Transient Particulate Matter Spikes with Decision Tree Based Control Model-Based Transient Calibration Optimization for Next Generation Diesel...

10

Seepage Calibration Model and Seepage Testing Data  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this Model Report is to document the Seepage Calibration Model (SCM). The SCM is developed (1) to establish the conceptual basis for the Seepage Model for Performance Assessment (SMPA), and (2) to derive seepage-relevant, model-related parameters and their distributions for use in the SMPA and seepage abstraction in support of the Total System Performance Assessment for License Application (TSPA-LA). The SCM is intended to be used only within this Model Report for the estimation of seepage-relevant parameters through calibration of the model against seepage-rate data from liquid-release tests performed in several niches along the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) Main Drift and in the Cross Drift. The SCM does not predict seepage into waste emplacement drifts under thermal or ambient conditions. Seepage predictions for waste emplacement drifts under ambient conditions will be performed with the SMPA (see upcoming REV 02 of CRWMS M&O 2000 [153314]), which inherits the conceptual basis and model-related parameters from the SCM. Seepage during the thermal period is examined separately in the Thermal Hydrologic (TH) Seepage Model (see BSC 2003 [161530]). The scope of this work is (1) to evaluate seepage rates measured during liquid-release experiments performed in several niches in the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) and in the Cross Drift, which was excavated for enhanced characterization of the repository block (ECRB); (2) to evaluate air-permeability data measured in boreholes above the niches and the Cross Drift to obtain the permeability structure for the seepage model; (3) to use inverse modeling to calibrate the SCM and to estimate seepage-relevant, model-related parameters on the drift scale; (4) to estimate the epistemic uncertainty of the derived parameters, based on the goodness-of-fit to the observed data and the sensitivity of calculated seepage with respect to the parameters of interest; (5) to characterize the aleatory uncertainty of the parameters as a result of spatial variability; (6) to evaluate prediction uncertainty based on linear uncertainty-propagation analyses and Monte Carlo simulations; (7) to validate the SCM during model development, and validate using the post-development activities outlined in the Technical Work Plan (TWP); (8) to provide the technical basis for the resolution of unconfirmed issues previously labeled ''to be verified'' (TBV); and (9) to provide the basis for a screening argument for certain seepage-related features, events, and processes (FEPs).

P. Dixon

2004-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

11

Development of a Dynamic DOE Calibration Model  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

A dynamic heavy duty diesel engine model was developed. The model can be applied for calibration and control system optimization.

12

Seepage Calibration Model and Seepage Testing Data  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this Model Report is to document the Seepage Calibration Model (SCM). The SCM was developed (1) to establish the conceptual basis for the Seepage Model for Performance Assessment (SMPA), and (2) to derive seepage-relevant, model-related parameters and their distributions for use in the SMPA and seepage abstraction in support of the Total System Performance Assessment for License Application (TSPA-LA). This Model Report has been revised in response to a comprehensive, regulatory-focused evaluation performed by the Regulatory Integration Team [''Technical Work Plan for: Regulatory Integration Evaluation of Analysis and Model Reports Supporting the TSPA-LA'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169653])]. The SCM is intended to be used only within this Model Report for the estimation of seepage-relevant parameters through calibration of the model against seepage-rate data from liquid-release tests performed in several niches along the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) Main Drift and in the Cross-Drift. The SCM does not predict seepage into waste emplacement drifts under thermal or ambient conditions. Seepage predictions for waste emplacement drifts under ambient conditions will be performed with the SMPA [''Seepage Model for PA Including Drift Collapse'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 167652])], which inherits the conceptual basis and model-related parameters from the SCM. Seepage during the thermal period is examined separately in the Thermal Hydrologic (TH) Seepage Model [see ''Drift-Scale Coupled Processes (DST and TH Seepage) Models'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170338])]. The scope of this work is (1) to evaluate seepage rates measured during liquid-release experiments performed in several niches in the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) and in the Cross-Drift, which was excavated for enhanced characterization of the repository block (ECRB); (2) to evaluate air-permeability data measured in boreholes above the niches and the Cross-Drift to obtain the permeability structure for the seepage model; (3) to use inverse modeling to calibrate the SCM and to estimate seepage-relevant, model-related parameters on the drift scale; (4) to estimate the epistemic uncertainty of the derived parameters, based on the goodness-of-fit to the observed data and the sensitivity of calculated seepage with respect to the parameters of interest; (5) to characterize the aleatory uncertainty of the parameters as a result of spatial variability; (6) to evaluate prediction uncertainty based on linear uncertainty-propagation analyses and Monte Carlo simulations; (7) to validate the SCM during model development, and validate the SCM using the post-development activities outlined in the Technical Work Plan (TWP); (8) to provide the technical basis for the resolution of unconfirmed issues previously labeled ''to be verified'' (TBV); and (9) to provide the technical basis for screening of certain seepage-related features, events, and processes (FEPs).

S. Finsterle

2004-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

13

Modelling Of Downhole Seismic Sources I: Literature Review, Review Of Fundamentals, Impulsive Point Source In A Borehole  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper represents the first of a two paper sequence comprising a multi-faceted introduction to the numerical and analytical modelling of seismic sources in a borehole.

Meredith, J. A.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Fast 3D Modeling of Borehole Induction Measurements in Dipping and Anisotropic Formations using a Novel Approximation Technique  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fast 3D Modeling of Borehole Induction Measurements in Dipping and Anisotropic Formations using of subsurface geophysical problems have been reported, including 3D EM scattering in the presence of complex introduces a novel efficient 3D EM approx- imation based on a new integral equation formulation. The main

Torres-Verdín, Carlos

15

Borehole logging for uranium by measurement of natural ?-radiation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

?-Ray measurements have been made in boreholes since 1939, for the purpose of detecting the radiation from naturally occuring radioelements in rocks. Logs of the ?-radiation in boreholes have evolved to their present acceptance as a quantitative measurement of uranium concentration for uranium exploration and mining development projects. Many factors influence these ?-ray measurements and consequently new methods of overcoming previous problems have had to be developed. Calibration facilities with model holes have been established in several countries to support quantitative borehole measurements. New high density detector materials have been evaluated and have shown to yield considerable improvements for operation in the restricted environment of the borehole. ?-Ray spectral logging has become available partially as a result of spin-off from parallel developments in surface and airborne ?-ray spectrometric survey equipment. The use of the high resolution solid state detector has proceeded through a series of developments to its present availability as a commercial borehole logging service in spite of the inherent detector cooling problems. Digital measurements are replacing the earlier analog measurements, and minicomputer- or micro processor-based logging systems have enabled new data processing techniques such as inverse filtering, to be implemented in real time at the site of the borehole.

P.G. Killeen

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Dynamically dimensioned search algorithm for computationally efficient watershed model calibration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

search (DDS), is introduced for automatic calibration of watershed simulation models. DDS is designed. Introduction [2] Almost all watershed simulation models contain effective physical and/or conceptual model. This study will focus on the automatic calibration of watershed simulation models. The results of this study

Hutter, Frank

17

Calibration Facilities | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Calibration Facilities Calibration Facilities Calibration Facilities Calibration Facilities Calibration Facilities Calibration Facilities Calibration Facilities DOE supports the development, standardization, and maintenance of calibration facilities for environmental radiation sensors. Radiation standards at the facilities are primarily used to calibrate portable surface gamma-ray survey meters and borehole logging instruments used for uranium and other mineral exploration and remedial action measurements. Standards for calibrating borehole fission neutron devices are also available, but are used infrequently. Radiation standards are constructed of concrete with elevated, uniform concentrations of naturally occurring potassium, uranium, and/or thorium. Pad standards have large, flat surfaces suitable for calibration

18

Neural network modelling and classification of lithofacies using well log data: A case study from KTB borehole site  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......study from KTB borehole site Saumen Maiti...Continental Deep Drilling Project (KTB...from the KTB borehole log data and...and require a large amount of data...Continental Deep Drilling Project (KTB...the problems of borehole geophysics...to interpret large amount of borehole......

Saumen Maiti; Ram Krishna Tiwari; Hans-Joachim Kümpel

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

The Hull-White Model: Calibration with Irregular Trinomial Trees  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Hull-White Model: Calibration with Irregular Trinomial Trees · The previous calibration of the tree's irregular shape. c 2011 Prof. Yuh-Dauh Lyuu, National Taiwan University Page 1019 #12;The Hull-White the spot rates exactly. c 2011 Prof. Yuh-Dauh Lyuu, National Taiwan University Page 1020 #12;The Hull-White

Lyuu, Yuh-Dauh

20

A Calibrated Computer Model for the Thermal Simulation of Courtyard Microclimates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper describes a calibrated stand-alone courtyard microclimate model. This model is considered to be the fIrst calibrated computer program for the simulation of courtyard microclimates. In order to accomplish this a calibrated simplif...

Bagneid, A.; Haberl, J.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "borehole calibration models" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

142: Model Calibration and Uncertainty HOSHIN V GUPTA1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

interrelated water, energy, and vegetation processes. Any computer-based model intended to represent. The model components are aggregated descriptions of real-world hydrologic processes. One consequence measurements of the system response through a process known as model calibration. The objective

Wagener, Thorsten

22

Cloud-Based Model Calibration Using OpenStudio: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

OpenStudio is a free, open source Software Development Kit (SDK) and application suite for performing building energy modeling and analysis. The OpenStudio Parametric Analysis Tool has been extended to allow cloud-based simulation of multiple OpenStudio models parametrically related to a baseline model. This paper describes the new cloud-based simulation functionality and presents a model cali-bration case study. Calibration is initiated by entering actual monthly utility bill data into the baseline model. Multiple parameters are then varied over multiple iterations to reduce the difference between actual energy consumption and model simulation results, as calculated and visualized by billing period and by fuel type. Simulations are per-formed in parallel using the Amazon Elastic Cloud service. This paper highlights model parameterizations (measures) used for calibration, but the same multi-nodal computing architecture is available for other purposes, for example, recommending combinations of retrofit energy saving measures using the calibrated model as the new baseline.

Hale, E.; Lisell, L.; Goldwasser, D.; Macumber, D.; Dean, J.; Metzger, I.; Parker, A.; Long, N.; Ball, B.; Schott, M.; Weaver, E.; Brackney, L.

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

3D geological modelling from boreholes, cross-sections and geological maps, application over former natural gas storages in coal mines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In a wide range of applications involving geological modelling, geological data available at low cost usually consist of documents such as cross-sections or geological maps and punctual data like borehole logs or outcrop descriptions. In order to build ... Keywords: 3D geological modelling, Data structuration, GIS, Geomodeler

Olivier Kaufmann; Thierry Martin

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Three Dimensional Non-linear Anisotropic Thermo-Chemo-Poro-Elastoplastic Modelling of Borehole Stability in Chemically Active Rocks.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Borehole stability problems are mostly encountered when drilling through chemically active formations such as shales. Shales are highly laminated rocks with transversely isotropic behaviour, and… (more)

Roshan, Hamid

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Using Utility Information to Calibrate Customer Demand Management Behavior Models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using Utility Information to Calibrate Customer Demand Management Behavior Models Murat Fahrio ­ Madison Report PSerc 99­06 June 10, 1999 Abstract In times of stress customers can help a utility by means be optimized if the utility can estimate the outage or substitution costs of its customers. This report

26

An Expectation-Maximization Method for Calibrating Synchronous Machine Models  

SciTech Connect

The accuracy of a power system dynamic model is essential to its secure and efficient operation. Lower confidence in model accuracy usually leads to conservative operation and lowers asset usage. To improve model accuracy, this paper proposes an expectation-maximization (EM) method to calibrate the synchronous machine model using phasor measurement unit (PMU) data. First, an extended Kalman filter (EKF) is applied to estimate the dynamic states using measurement data. Then, the parameters are calculated based on the estimated states using maximum likelihood estimation (MLE) method. The EM method iterates over the preceding two steps to improve estimation accuracy. The proposed EM method’s performance is evaluated using a single-machine infinite bus system and compared with a method where both state and parameters are estimated using an EKF method. Sensitivity studies of the parameter calibration using EM method are also presented to show the robustness of the proposed method for different levels of measurement noise and initial parameter uncertainty.

Meng, Da; Zhou, Ning; Lu, Shuai; Lin, Guang

2013-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

27

Calibration facilities at Hanford for gamma-ray and fission-neutron well logging  

SciTech Connect

Well-logging tools that detect gamma rays emitted from earth formations need to be calibrated in appropriate facilities to provide quantitative assessments of concentrations o radionuclides based on detected gamma rays. These facilities are typically special models having a hole to insert tools and having sufficient physical size to simulate actual earth formations containing known amounts of radionuclides. The size, generally 3 to 5 feet in diameter and 4 to 6 feet tall, is such that the source of radiation appears infinite in extent to a tool detecting the radiation inside the model. Such models exist at Hanford as concrete cylinders having a central borehole and containing known, enhanced amounts of K, U, and Th. Data collected in these models allow calibration of the logging system to measure radionuclide concentrations in formations around boreholes in the field. The accuracy of the calculated field concentrations depends on the correctness of the original calibration, the statistical precision of the data, and the similarity of the logging conditions to the calibration conditions. Possible methods for analyzing the data collected in the calibration facilities are presented for both spectral and total-count gamma-ray systems. Corrections are typically needed for the effects of steel casing in boreholes and the presence of water rather than air in the holes. Data collected in the calibration models with various steel casings and borehole fluids allow such correction factors to be determined.

Stromswold, D.C.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Interpretation and mathematical modeling of temporal changes of temperature observed in borehole Yaxcopoil-1 within the Chicxulub impact structure, Mexico  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Summary Geothermal research of the Chicxulub impact structure on the Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico, included repeated temperature logs following 0.3–0.8, 15, 24, 34 and 50 months after shut-in of drilling operations at the 1.5 km deep Yaxcopoil-1 borehole. A gradual distortion of the linear temperature profile by a cold wave propagating downward from 145 m to 317 m was detected within the observational period of 49 months (March 2002–April 2006). The amplitude of the cold wave was increasing with depth and time in the range of 0.8–1.6 °C. As an explanation of this unusual phenomenon, the hypothesis of downward migration of a large volume of drilling mud, reported lost during drilling within the overlying and cooler highly porous and permeable karstic rocks, has been proposed. The thermal effects of the migrating fluid have been evaluated by solving numerically the heat conduction–convection equation in appropriate geothermal models. The best coincidence between the observed data and the simulations was yielded by the model of the drilling mud migrating as a large body. Parameters of this model are constrained by the measured temperature logs relatively tightly: (i) the vertical extent of the downward migrating fluid body is about 5–10 m, possibly increasing within the observational period of 49 months by a factor of 2; (ii) the horizontal extent of the body must be at least 15–20 m, i.e. by order(s) of magnitude larger than the diameter of the borehole; (iii) the average speed of the migration is about 5 metres per month and (iv) the fluid must migrate through a highly porous rock (80% porosity or more). This high porosity, which is necessary for the model to fit the observed data, and the observed relatively stable velocity of the migration indicate the existence of a well-developed system of interconnected cavities down to more than 300 m about 150 m more than the deepest cave system known in Yucatan yet.

Jan Šafanda; Helmut Wilhelm; Philipp Heidinger; Vladimír ?ermák

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Formation temperatures determined from stochastic inversion of borehole observations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......relatively large a priori...following the borehole model and...represents the borehole with drilling fluid while...R. R is large enough that...returning drilling fluid, exists...be given large a priori...basins. A borehole thermal conductivity......

S. B. Nielsen; N. Balling; H. S. Christiansen

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Borehole Summary Report for Waste Treatment Plant Seismic Borehole C4993  

SciTech Connect

A core hole (C4998) and three boreholes (C4993, C4996, and C4997) were drilled to acquire stratigraphic and downhole seismic data to model potential seismic impacts and to refine design specifications and seismic criteria for the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) under construction on the Hanford Site. Borehole C4993 was completed through the Saddle Mountains Basalt, the upper portion of the Wanapum Basalt, and associated sedimentary interbeds, to provide a continuous record of the rock penetrated by all four holes and to provide access to the subsurface for geophysical measure¬ment. Presented and compiled in this report are field-generated records for the deep mud rotary borehole C4993 at the WTP site. Material for C4993 includes borehole logs, lithologic summary, and record of rock chip samples collected during drilling through the months of August through early October. The borehole summary report also includes documentation of the mud rotary drilling, borehole logging, and sample collection.

Rust, Colleen F.; Barnett, D. BRENT; Bowles, Nathan A.; Horner, Jake A.

2007-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

31

Using Parallel MCMC Sampling to Calibrate a Computer Model of a Geothermal Reservoir  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using Parallel MCMC Sampling to Calibrate a Computer Model of a Geothermal Reservoir by T. Cui, C. 686 ISSN 1178-360 #12;Using Parallel MCMC Sampling to Calibrate a Computer Model of a Geothermal of a geothermal field to achieve model `calibration' from measured well-test data. We explore three scenarios

Fox, Colin

32

borehole | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

borehole borehole Dataset Summary Description NOAA borehole data with temperatures at different depths. http://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/paleo/borehole/nam.html Source NOAA Date Released April 08th, 2010 (4 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords borehole geothermal NOAA Data application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.spreadsheetml.sheet icon NOAA_borehole_data_4-8-10.xlsx (xlsx, 478.7 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review No Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Time Period License License Other or unspecified, see optional comment below Comment http://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/oa/about/open-access-climate-data-policy.pdf Rate this dataset Usefulness of the metadata Average vote Your vote Usefulness of the dataset Average vote Your vote Ease of access Average vote Your vote

33

Adapting and calibration of existing wake models to meet the conditions inside offshore wind farms. Page 1 Adapting and calibration of existing wake models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Adapting and calibration of existing wake models to meet the conditions inside offshore wind farms@emd.dk #12;Adapting and calibration of existing wake models to meet the conditions inside offshore wind farms inside offshore wind farms" has as purpose to improve the existing PARK models for calculating the wake

34

Fracture compliance estimation using borehole tube waves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We tested two models, one for tube-wave generation and the other for tube-wave attenuation at a fracture intersecting a borehole that can be used to estimate fracture compliance, fracture aperture, and lateral extent. In ...

Bakku, Sudhish Kumar

35

A Genetic Algorithm for the Calibration of a Micro-Simulation Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper describes the process followed to calibrate a micro-simulation model for the Altmark region in Germany and a Derbyshire region in the UK. The calibration process is performed in three main steps: first, a subset of input and output variables to use for the calibration process is selected from the complete parameter space in the model; second, the calibration process is performed using a genetic algorithm calibration approach; finally, a comparison between the real data and the data obtained from the best fit model is done to verify the accuracy of the model.

Espinosa, Omar Baqueiro

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Borehole data transmission apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A borehole data transmission apparatus is described whereby a centrifugal pump impeller(s) is used to provide a turbine stage having substantial pressure characteristics in response to changing rotational speed of a shaft for the pressure pulsing of data from the borehole through the drilling mud to the surface of the earth.

Kotlyar, O.M.

1993-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

37

Calibrating Steady-State Traffic Stream and Car-Following Models Using Loop Detector Data  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The research reported in this paper develops a heuristic automated tool (SPD_CAL) for calibrating steady-state traffic stream and car-following models using loop detector data. The performance of the automated procedure is then compared to off-the-shelf ... Keywords: calibration of traffic simulation software, car-following models, traffic modeling, traffic stream models

Hesham Rakha; Mazen Arafeh

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

A Workflow for Parameter Calibration and and Model Validation in SST: Interim Report.  

SciTech Connect

This brief report explains the method used for parameter calibration and model validation in SST/Macro and the set of tools and workflow developed for this purpose.

Pebay, Philippe Pierre; Wilke, Jeremiah J; Sargsyan, Khachik

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

CALIBRATION OFTHE FINITE ELEMENT MODEL OFA TWELVE-SPAN PRESTRESSED CONCRETE BRIDGE USING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CALIBRATION OFTHE FINITE ELEMENT MODEL OFA TWELVE-SPAN PRESTRESSED CONCRETE BRIDGE USING AMBIENT health monitoring system was designed and installed in the bridge. As a critical part in the SHM process the implementation of the FE model calibration using ambient vibration data. The initial model of the bridge

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

40

Generator Dynamic Model Validation and Parameter Calibration Using Phasor Measurements at the Point of Connection  

SciTech Connect

Disturbance data recorded by phasor measurement units (PMU) offers opportunities to improve the integrity of dynamic models. However, manually tuning parameters through play-back events demands significant efforts and engineering experiences. In this paper, a calibration method using the extended Kalman filter (EKF) technique is proposed. The formulation of EKF with parameter calibration is discussed. Case studies are presented to demonstrate its validity. The proposed calibration method is cost-effective, complementary to traditional equipment testing for improving dynamic model quality.

Huang, Zhenyu; Du, Pengwei; Kosterev, Dmitry; Yang, Steve

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "borehole calibration models" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

NSLS-II: Nonlinear Model Calibration for Synchrotrons  

SciTech Connect

This tech note is essentially a summary of a lecture we delivered to the Acc. Phys. Journal Club Apr, 2010. However, since the estimated accuracy of these methods has been naive and misleading in the field of particle accelerators, i.e., ignores the impact of noise, we will elaborate on this in some detail. A prerequisite for a calibration of the nonlinear Hamiltonian is that the quadratic part has been understood, i.e., that the linear optics for the real accelerator has been calibrated. For synchrotron light source operations, this problem has been solved by the interactive LOCO technique/tool (Linear Optics from Closed Orbits). Before that, in the context of hadron accelerators, it has been done by signal processing of turn-by-turn BPM data. We have outlined how to make a basic calibration of the nonlinear model for synchrotrons. In particular, we have shown how this was done for LEAR, CERN (antiprotons) in the mid-80s. Specifically, our accuracy for frequency estimation was {approx} 1 x 10{sup -5} for 1024 turns (to calibrate the linear optics) and {approx} 1 x 10{sup -4} for 256 turns for tune footprint and betatron spectrum. For a comparison, the estimated tune footprint for stable beam for NSLS-II is {approx}0.1. Since the transverse damping time is {approx}20 msec, i.e., {approx}4,000 turns. There is no fundamental difference for: antiprotons, protons, and electrons in this case. Because the estimated accuracy for these methods in the field of particle accelerators has been naive, i.e., ignoring the impact of noise, we have also derived explicit formula, from first principles, for a quantitative statement. For e.g. N = 256 and 5% noise we obtain {delta}{nu} {approx} 1 x 10{sup -5}. A comparison with the state-of-the-arts in e.g. telecomm and electrical engineering since the 60s is quite revealing. For example, Kalman filter (1960), crucial for the: Ranger, Mariner, and Apollo (including the Lunar Module) missions during the 60s. Or Claude Shannon et al since the 40s for that matter. Conclusion: what's elementary in the latter is considered 'advanced', if at all, in the former. It is little surprise then that published measurements typically contains neither error bars (for the random errors) nor estimates for the systematic in the former discipline. We have also showed how to estimate the state space by turn-by-turn data from two adjacent BPMs. And how to improve the resolution of the nonlinear resonance spectrum by Fourier analyzing the linear action variables instead of the betatron motion. In fact, the state estimator could be further improved by adding a Kalman filter. For transparency, we have also summarized on how these techniques provide a framework- and method for a TQM (Total Quality Management) approach for the main ring. Of course, to make the ($2.5M) turn-by-turn data acquisition system that is being implemented (for all the BPMs) useful, a means ({approx}10% contingency for the BPM system) to drive the beam is obviously required.

Bengtsson, J.

2010-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

42

Exploratory Boreholes | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Exploratory Boreholes Exploratory Boreholes Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Exploratory Boreholes Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Drilling Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Exploration Drilling Parent Exploration Technique: Exploration Drilling Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Can provide core or cuttings Stratigraphic/Structural: Identify stratigraphy and structural features within a borehole Hydrological: -Water samples can be used for geochemical analysis -Fluid pressures can be used to estimate flow rates Thermal: -Temperatures can be measured within the hole -Information about the heat source Dictionary.png Exploratory Boreholes: An exploratory borehole is drilled for the purpose of identifying the

43

Reprint of "3D geological modelling from boreholes, cross-sections and geological maps, application over former natural gas storages in coal mines" [Comput. Geosci. 34 (2008) 278-290  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In a wide range of applications involving geological modelling, geological data available at low cost usually consist of documents such as cross-sections or geological maps and punctual data like borehole logs or outcrop descriptions. In order to build ... Keywords: 3D geological modelling, Data structuration, GIS, Geomodeler

Olivier Kaufmann; Thierry Martin

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Grade Assignments for Models Used for Calibration of Gross-Count Gamma-Ray Logging Systems (December 1983)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Grade Assignments for Models Used for Calibration of Gross-Count Gamma-Ray Logging Systems (December 1983)

45

Calibration of Stochastic Convenience Yield Models For Crude Oil Using the Kalman Filter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Calibration of Stochastic Convenience Yield Models For Crude Oil Using the Kalman Filter A and variance of the Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 2.2 Market price of a future delivery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 2.4 Price valuation

Vuik, Kees

46

Simultaneous calibration of a microscopic traffic simulation model and OD matrix  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

With the recent widespread deployment of intelligent transportation systems (ITS) in North America there is an abundance of data on traffic systems and thus an opportunity to use these data in the calibration of microscopic traffic simulation models...

Kim, Seung-Jun

2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

47

Behavioral modeling and digital calibration of pipeline analog to digital converters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This research focuses on digital calibration of pipeline analog to digital converters (ADCs) and also modeling of error sources and design parameters of pipeline ADCs. Modern applications such as communications systems require high resolution ADCs...

Bilhan, Erkan

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

48

BOREHOLE PRECONDITIONING OF GEOTHERMAL WELLS FOR ENHANCED GEOTHERMAL SYSTEM  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

BOREHOLE PRECONDITIONING OF GEOTHERMAL WELLS FOR ENHANCED GEOTHERMAL SYSTEM BOREHOLE PRECONDITIONING OF GEOTHERMAL WELLS FOR ENHANCED GEOTHERMAL SYSTEM RESERVOIR DEVELOPMENT Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: BOREHOLE PRECONDITIONING OF GEOTHERMAL WELLS FOR ENHANCED GEOTHERMAL SYSTEM RESERVOIR DEVELOPMENT Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Thermal stimulation can be utilized to precondition a well to optimize fracturing and production during Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) reservoir development. A finite element model was developed for the fully coupled processes consisting of: thermoporoelastic deformation, hydraulic conduction, thermal osmosis, heat conduction, pressure thermal effect, and the interconvertibility of mechanical and thermal energy. The model has

49

Calibration of Building Energy Models: Supercomputing, Big-Data and Machine-Learning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Modeling (BEM) is an approach to model the energy usage in buildings for design and retrofit purposesCalibration of Building Energy Models: Supercomputing, Big-Data and Machine-Learning Jibonananda Sanyal, Joshua New, Richard Edwards Energy and Environmental Sciences Directorate Building Energy

Wang, Xiaorui "Ray"

50

Evaluation of Automated Model Calibration Techniques for Residential Building Energy Simulation  

SciTech Connect

This simulation study adapts and applies the general framework described in BESTEST-EX (Judkoff et al 2010) for self-testing residential building energy model calibration methods. BEopt/DOE-2.2 is used to evaluate four mathematical calibration methods in the context of monthly, daily, and hourly synthetic utility data for a 1960's-era existing home in a cooling-dominated climate. The home's model inputs are assigned probability distributions representing uncertainty ranges, random selections are made from the uncertainty ranges to define 'explicit' input values, and synthetic utility billing data are generated using the explicit input values. The four calibration methods evaluated in this study are: an ASHRAE 1051-RP-based approach (Reddy and Maor 2006), a simplified simulated annealing optimization approach, a regression metamodeling optimization approach, and a simple output ratio calibration approach. The calibration methods are evaluated for monthly, daily, and hourly cases; various retrofit measures are applied to the calibrated models and the methods are evaluated based on the accuracy of predicted savings, computational cost, repeatability, automation, and ease of implementation.

Robertson, J.; Polly, B.; Collis, J.

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Model-based development and calibration of last generation diesel powertrains for passenger cars  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents an original model-based approach to the system level development and calibration of diesel powertrains for passenger cars, implemented in a comprehensive software tool. The models for the different subsystems are coupled to execute optimisation loops, involving also the system calibration, and are characterised by flexibility of usage, limited tuning effort and reduced computational time. As an example of the general approach, the engine model is described and some results from its execution are shown and compared with the measurements. Finally, a practical example is given of the usage of the tool for system level optimisation through a specifically developed methodology.

Fabio Mallamo; Federico Millo; Luciano Rolando

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Stochastic Modeling of Overtime Occupancy and Its Application in Building Energy Simulation and Calibration  

SciTech Connect

Overtime is a common phenomenon around the world. Overtime drives both internal heat gains from occupants, lighting and plug-loads, and HVAC operation during overtime periods. Overtime leads to longer occupancy hours and extended operation of building services systems beyond normal working hours, thus overtime impacts total building energy use. Current literature lacks methods to model overtime occupancy because overtime is stochastic in nature and varies by individual occupants and by time. To address this gap in the literature, this study aims to develop a new stochastic model based on the statistical analysis of measured overtime occupancy data from an office building. A binomial distribution is used to represent the total number of occupants working overtime, while an exponential distribution is used to represent the duration of overtime periods. The overtime model is used to generate overtime occupancy schedules as an input to the energy model of a second office building. The measured and simulated cooling energy use during the overtime period is compared in order to validate the overtime model. A hybrid approach to energy model calibration is proposed and tested, which combines ASHRAE Guideline 14 for the calibration of the energy model during normal working hours, and a proposed KS test for the calibration of the energy model during overtime. The developed stochastic overtime model and the hybrid calibration approach can be used in building energy simulations to improve the accuracy of results, and better understand the characteristics of overtime in office buildings.

Sun, Kaiyu; Yan , Da; Hong , Tianzhen; Guo, Siyue

2014-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

53

Formal Calibration Methodology for CFD Model Development to Support the Operation of Energy Efficient Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

controlled internal environments. In this research a CFD model of the internal environment of an office space will be developed. The CFD model will then be calibrated using real data taken from a well-positioned wireless sensor network and weather station...

Hajdukiewicz, M.; Keane, M.; O'Flynn, B.; O'Grady, W.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Statistics Useful for Deterministic Models: Evaluation, Calibration, Extension, Integration,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

processing) Data assimilation · Postprocessing of model output ­ Model evaluation/assessment ­ Model in the manipulated data 6 #12;Comparison of GOES satellite data with EPA PM observations · half-hourly GOES aerosol 1, 2006 www.biostat.harvard.edu/~paciorek LYX - FoilTEX - pdfLATEX #12;Uses of Data and Statistics

Paciorek, Chris

55

Long Gamma-Ray Bursts Calibrated by Pade Method and Constraints on Cosmological Models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are among the most powerful sources in the universe. In the recent years, GRBs have been proposed as a complementary probe to type Ia supernovae (SNIa). However, as is well known, there is a circularity problem in the use of GRBs to study cosmology. In this work, based on the Pad\\'e approximant, we propose a new cosmology-independent method to calibrate GRBs. We consider a sample consisting 138 long GRBs and obtain 79 calibrated long GRBs at high redshift $z>1.4$ (named Mayflower sample) which can be used to constrain cosmological models without the circularity problem. Then, we consider the constraints on several cosmological models with these 79 calibrated GRBs and other observational data. We show that GRBs are competent to be a complementary probe to the other well-established cosmological observations.

Jing Liu; Hao Wei

2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

56

Long Gamma-Ray Bursts Calibrated by Pade Method and Constraints on Cosmological Models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are among the most powerful sources in the universe. In the recent years, GRBs have been proposed as a complementary probe to type Ia supernovae (SNIa). However, as is well known, there is a circularity problem in the use of GRBs to study cosmology. In this work, based on the Pad\\'e approximant, we propose a new cosmology-independent method to calibrate GRBs. We consider a sample consisting 138 long GRBs and obtain 79 calibrated long GRBs at high redshift $z>1.4$ (named Mayflower sample) which can be used to constrain cosmological models without the circularity problem. Then, we consider the constraints on several cosmological models with these 79 calibrated GRBs and other observational data. We show that GRBs are competent to be a complementary probe to the other well-established cosmological observations.

Liu, Jing

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Estimation of formation temperature from borehole measurements  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......obtained if the borehole rock system...between the drilling muds used...boreholes, the largest being between...properties of drilling muds (see...v) The borehole radius should...this shows large variations...100-1000 times larger than the...the finite drilling rate is more...that the borehole is created......

M. N. Luheshi

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Calibration and validation of a thermal energy storage model: Influence on simulation results  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In this paper a 1-D model of a thermal energy storage (TES) was experimentally validated and calibrated. The experimental tests showed an overall heat transfer coefficient for heat losses four times higher than the theoretical value. This was due to the thermal bridges associated with the hydraulic and sensor connections. Moreover, the lack of thermal insulation at the bottom of the TES causes an increase in dissipation through thermal bridges. The experimental data enabled the evaluation of effective TES heat capacity, which differed from the theoretical value instead based on net storage tank volume. By means of an optimization tool, a fictitious value of the TES volume was calculated. In order to model the natural convection heat transfer coefficient of the heat exchanger immersed in the water storage tank, a Nusselt–Rayleigh correlation was experimentally calibrated. The data derived from tests conducted in a test facility of Università degli Studi del Sannio (Italy) were then compared with a computer simulation based on a calibrated TES model by means of commercial software. The validation procedure showed a satisfactory agreement between experimentally measured temperature values and those predicted by the model. Finally, different dynamic simulations of solar thermal heating systems are carried out in order to highlight the influence of the TES model and its calibration and validation on annual energy performance.

Giovanni Angrisani; Michele Canelli; Carlo Roselli; Maurizio Sasso

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Columbia River Salmon Passage Model Theory and Calibration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for their support and suggestions in the development of this model. David Askren - Bonneville Power Administration James Geiselman - Bonneville Power Administration Albert E. Giorgi - Bioanalysts, Inc. Dale Johnson - Bureau of Land Management Funding Model development was funded by the Bonneville Power Administration

Washington at Seattle, University of

60

UNCERTAINTY CALIBRATION OF LARGE-ORDER MODELS OF BRIDGES USING AMBIENT VIBRATION MEASUREMENTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

UNCERTAINTY CALIBRATION OF LARGE-ORDER MODELS OF BRIDGES USING AMBIENT VIBRATION MEASUREMENTS frequencies and mode shapes based on ambient vibration measurements collected from a wireless mobile measuring, such as modal frequencies, modal damping ratios and mode shapes, through vibration measurements, as well

Boyer, Edmond

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "borehole calibration models" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Author's personal copy Calibration procedures for a computational model of ductile fracture  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Author's personal copy Calibration procedures for a computational model of ductile fracture Z. Xue fracture Computational fracture Shear fracture Damage parameters a b s t r a c t A recent extension of the cup-cone fracture mode in the neck of a round tensile bar. Ductility of a notched round bar provides

Hutchinson, John W.

62

Calibration under uncertainty for finite element models of masonry monuments  

SciTech Connect

Historical unreinforced masonry buildings often include features such as load bearing unreinforced masonry vaults and their supporting framework of piers, fill, buttresses, and walls. The masonry vaults of such buildings are among the most vulnerable structural components and certainly among the most challenging to analyze. The versatility of finite element (FE) analyses in incorporating various constitutive laws, as well as practically all geometric configurations, has resulted in the widespread use of the FE method for the analysis of complex unreinforced masonry structures over the last three decades. However, an FE model is only as accurate as its input parameters, and there are two fundamental challenges while defining FE model input parameters: (1) material properties and (2) support conditions. The difficulties in defining these two aspects of the FE model arise from the lack of knowledge in the common engineering understanding of masonry behavior. As a result, engineers are unable to define these FE model input parameters with certainty, and, inevitably, uncertainties are introduced to the FE model.

Atamturktur, Sezer,; Hemez, Francois,; Unal, Cetin

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

A real-time borehole correction of electromagnetic wave resistivity logging while drilling  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The response of electromagnetic wave logging while drilling is influenced greatly by borehole and drilling fluid resistivity when the size of borehole is relatively large and drilling fluid resistivity is low. Borehole radius and drilling fluid resistivity were introduced to obtain more accurate transformed resistivity on the basis of the commonly used resistivity transformation model. The influence of borehole was considered in the newly established three dimensional transformation model, and a new borehole correction method was proposed. The resistivity transformation database can be established by calculation according to a certain instrument, and the true resistivity is obtained by three dimensional interpolation search technology of real-time correction in practical use. The results of numerical simulation and modeling verification show that the transformed resistivity by real-time correction coincides with the resistivity corrected by charts. The method can eliminate the borehole influence, reduce calculation dimension, and improve the inversion efficiency of highly deviated and horizontal wells logging data.

Zhen YANG; Jinzhou YANG; Laiju HAN

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Calibrating Bayesian Network Representations of Social-Behavioral Models  

SciTech Connect

While human behavior has long been studied, recent and ongoing advances in computational modeling present opportunities for recasting research outcomes in human behavior. In this paper we describe how Bayesian networks can represent outcomes of human behavior research. We demonstrate a Bayesian network that represents political radicalization research – and show a corresponding visual representation of aspects of this research outcome. Since Bayesian networks can be quantitatively compared with external observations, the representation can also be used for empirical assessments of the research which the network summarizes. For a political radicalization model based on published research, we show this empirical comparison with data taken from the Minorities at Risk Organizational Behaviors database.

Whitney, Paul D.; Walsh, Stephen J.

2010-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

65

Model calibration and validation for OFMSW and sewage sludge co-digestion reactors  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: > Disintegration is the limiting step of the anaerobic co-digestion process. > Disintegration kinetic constant does not depend on the waste particle size. > Disintegration kinetic constant depends only on the waste nature and composition. > The model calibration can be performed on organic waste of any particle size. - Abstract: A mathematical model has recently been proposed by the authors to simulate the biochemical processes that prevail in a co-digestion reactor fed with sewage sludge and the organic fraction of municipal solid waste. This model is based on the Anaerobic Digestion Model no. 1 of the International Water Association, which has been extended to include the co-digestion processes, using surface-based kinetics to model the organic waste disintegration and conversion to carbohydrates, proteins and lipids. When organic waste solids are present in the reactor influent, the disintegration process is the rate-limiting step of the overall co-digestion process. The main advantage of the proposed modeling approach is that the kinetic constant of such a process does not depend on the waste particle size distribution (PSD) and rather depends only on the nature and composition of the waste particles. The model calibration aimed to assess the kinetic constant of the disintegration process can therefore be conducted using organic waste samples of any PSD, and the resulting value will be suitable for all the organic wastes of the same nature as the investigated samples, independently of their PSD. This assumption was proven in this study by biomethane potential experiments that were conducted on organic waste samples with different particle sizes. The results of these experiments were used to calibrate and validate the mathematical model, resulting in a good agreement between the simulated and observed data for any investigated particle size of the solid waste. This study confirms the strength of the proposed model and calibration procedure, which can thus be used to assess the treatment efficiency and predict the methane production of full-scale digesters.

Esposito, G., E-mail: giovanni.esposito@unicas.it [Department of Mechanics, Structures and Environmental Engineering, University of Cassino, via Di Biasio 43, 03043 Cassino (Italy); Frunzo, L., E-mail: luigi.frunzo@unina.it [Department of Mathematics and Applications Renato Caccioppoli, University of Naples Federico II, via Cintia, Monte S. Angelo, I-80126 Naples (Italy); Panico, A., E-mail: anpanico@unina.it [Department of Hydraulic, Geotechnical and Environmental Engineering, University of Naples Federico II, via Claudio 21, 80125 Naples (Italy); Pirozzi, F., E-mail: francesco.pirozzi@unina.it [Department of Hydraulic, Geotechnical and Environmental Engineering, University of Naples Federico II, via Claudio 21, 80125 Naples (Italy)

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

66

Calibrating DOE-2 to Weather and Non-Weather-Dependent Loads for a Commercial Building: Data Processing Routines to Calibrate a DOE-2 Model, Volume II  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ESL-TR-92-04/02 CALIBRATING DOE-2 TO WEATHER AND NON-WEATHER-DEPENDENT LOADS FOR A COMMERCIAL BUILDING, VOLUME 2: DATA PROCESSING ROUTINES TO CALIBRATE A DOE-2 MODEL Written by: John Douglas Bronson May 1992 (C) Copyright 1992 Texas Engineering... Plots 8 Temperature-Specific Humidity Carpet Plots 11 'PACKING' SITE MONITORED WEATHER DATA INTO TRY 16 APPENDIX A -- Data Processing Routines' Example Data Files and Routine Hard-copies 21 APPENDIX B -- Example Data Files and Progam Hard-copies to Pack...

Bronson, J. D.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Deep Borehole Disposal Research: Demonstration Site Selection...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Site Selection Guidelines, Borehole Seals Design, and RD&D Needs The U.S. Department of Energy has been investigating deep borehole disposal as one alternative for the disposal...

68

Maine Geological Survey Borehole Temperature Profiles  

SciTech Connect

This dataset includes temperature profiles from 30 boreholes throughout Maine that were selected for their depth, location, and lithologies encountered. Depths range from about 300 feet to 2,200 feet. Most of the boreholes selected for measurement were completed in granite because this lithology can be assumed to be nearly homogeneous over the depth of the borehole. Boreholes were also selected to address gaps in existing geothermal datasets. Temperature profiles were collected in October and November, 2012.

Marvinney, Robert

2013-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

69

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant borehole data  

SciTech Connect

Data pertaining to all the surface boreholes used at the WIPP site for site characterization hydrological testing and resource evaluation exist in numerous source documents. This project was initiated to develop a comprehensive data base that would include the data on all WIPP related surface boreholes from the Atomic Energy Commission, Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Energy Research and Development Administration, Department of Energy, and Hydrologic Test Borehole Programs. The data compiled from each borehole includes: operator, permit number, location, total depth, type of well, driller, drilling record, casing record, plugging schedule, and stratigraphic summary. There are six groups of boreholes contained in this data base, they are as follows: Commercially Drilled Potash Boreholes, Energy Department Wells, Geologic Exploration Boreholes, Hydrologic Test Boreholes, Potash Boreholes, and Subsurface Exploration Boreholes. There were numerous references which contained borehole data. In some cases the data found in one document was inconsistent with data in another document. In order to ensure consistency and accuracy in the data base, the same references were used for as many of the boreholes as possible. For example, all elevations and locations were taken from Compilation and Comparison of Test-Hole Location Surveys in the Vicinity of the WIPP Site. SAND 88-1065, Table 3-5. There are some sections where a data field is left blank. In this case, the information was either not applicable or was unavailable.

NONE

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

GENERALIZED CALIBRATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

work is done using NIR-spectra for gasoline and wheat. Keywords Calibration, NIR spectroscopy, linear;5 Contents 1 Introduction 9 2 Gasoline example 11 2.1 Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 4.1.1 Model selection by cross-validation . . . . . . . . . . 26 4.2 MLLS applied to gasoline

71

Cosmological model-independent Gamma-ray bursts calibration and its cosmological constraint to dark energy  

SciTech Connect

As so far, the redshift of Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) can extend to z ? 8 which makes it as a complementary probe of dark energy to supernova Ia (SN Ia). However, the calibration of GRBs is still a big challenge when they are used to constrain cosmological models. Though, the absolute magnitude of GRBs is still unknown, the slopes of GRBs correlations can be used as a useful constraint to dark energy in a completely cosmological model independent way. In this paper, we follow Wang's model-independent distance measurement method and calculate their values by using 109 GRBs events via the so-called Amati relation. Then, we use the obtained model-independent distances to constrain ?CDM model as an example.

Xu, Lixin, E-mail: lxxu@dlut.edu.cn [Institute of Theoretical Physics, School of Physics and Optoelectronic Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian, 116024 (China)

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

CONSTRUCTION AND CALIBRATION OF A LARGE-SCALE MICRO-SIMULATION MODEL OF THE SALT LAKE AREA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CONSTRUCTION AND CALIBRATION OF A LARGE-SCALE MICRO-SIMULATION MODEL OF THE SALT LAKE AREA H. Rakha-scale network using a microscopic simulation model. The requirements of a validated microscopic model for large of Intelligent Transportation System (ITS) applications. Typically, microscopic simulation models have been

Rakha, Hesham A.

73

Borehole geophysics evaluation of the Raft River geothermal reservoir,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

reservoir, reservoir, Idaho Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Borehole geophysics evaluation of the Raft River geothermal reservoir, Idaho Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: GEOTHERMAL ENERGY; GEOTHERMAL FIELDS; GEOPHYSICAL SURVEYS; RAFT RIVER VALLEY; GEOTHERMAL EXPLORATION; BOREHOLES; EVALUATION; HOT-WATER SYSTEMS; IDAHO; MATHEMATICAL MODELS; WELL LOGGING; CAVITIES; EXPLORATION; GEOTHERMAL SYSTEMS; HYDROTHERMAL SYSTEMS; NORTH AMERICA; PACIFIC NORTHWEST REGION; USA Author(s): Applegate, J.K.; Donaldson, P.R.; Hinkley, D.L.; Wallace, T.L. Published: Geophysics, 2/1/1977 Document Number: Unavailable DOI: Unavailable Source: View Original Journal Article Geophysical Method At Raft River Geothermal Area (1977) Raft River Geothermal Area

74

Electrical resistance tomography using steel cased boreholes as electrodes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrical resistance tomography method is described which uses steel cased boreholes as electrodes. The method enables mapping the electrical resistivity distribution in the subsurface from measurements of electrical potential caused by electrical currents injected into an array of electrodes in the subsurface. By use of current injection and potential measurement electrodes to generate data about the subsurface resistivity distribution, which data is then used in an inverse calculation, a model of the electrical resistivity distribution can be obtained. The inverse model may be constrained by independent data to better define an inverse solution. The method utilizes pairs of electrically conductive (steel) borehole casings as current injection electrodes and as potential measurement electrodes. The greater the number of steel cased boreholes in an array, the greater the amount of data is obtained. The steel cased boreholes may be utilized for either current injection or potential measurement electrodes. The subsurface model produced by this method can be 2 or 3 dimensional in resistivity depending on the detail desired in the calculated resistivity distribution and the amount of data to constrain the models. 2 figs.

Daily, W.D.; Ramirez, A.L.

1999-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

75

Electrical resistance tomography using steel cased boreholes as electrodes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrical resistance tomography method using steel cased boreholes as electrodes. The method enables mapping the electrical resistivity distribution in the subsurface from measurements of electrical potential caused by electrical currents injected into an array of electrodes in the subsurface. By use of current injection and potential measurement electrodes to generate data about the subsurface resistivity distribution, which data is then used in an inverse calculation, a model of the electrical resistivity distribution can be obtained. The inverse model may be constrained by independent data to better define an inverse solution. The method utilizes pairs of electrically conductive (steel) borehole casings as current injection electrodes and as potential measurement electrodes. The greater the number of steel cased boreholes in an array, the greater the amount of data is obtained. The steel cased boreholes may be utilized for either current injection or potential measurement electrodes. The subsurface model produced by this method can be 2 or 3 dimensional in resistivity depending on the detail desired in the calculated resistivity distribution and the amount of data to constain the models.

Daily, William D. (Livermore, CA); Ramirez, Abelardo L. (Pleasanton, CA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Working Group Reports Calibration of Radiation Codes Used in Climate Models:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Working Group Reports Calibration of Radiation Codes Used in Climate Models: Comparison of Clear-Sky Calculations with Observations from the Spectral Radiation Experiment and the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program R. G. Ellingson, S. Shen, and J. Warner University of Maryland College Park, Maryland Background The InterComparison of Radiation Codes in Climate Models (ICRCCM) showed large differences between model calculations of longwave fluxes and heating rates-even for clear-sky conditions (Luther et al. 1988). The discrepancies could not be resolved with either pyrgeometer measurements or line-by-line calculations because * Pyrgeometer errors are the magnitude of the discrepancies. * Uncertainties in the physics of line wings and in the proper treatment of the continuum make it impossible

77

Comment on ``Dynamically dimensioned search algorithm for computationally efficient watershed model calibration''  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

calibration'' by Bryan A. Tolson and Christine A. Shoemaker Ali Behrangi,1 Behnaz Khakbaz,1 Jasper A. Vrugt,2

Vrugt, Jasper A.

78

NOAA Borehole Data | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

NOAA Borehole Data NOAA Borehole Data Dataset Summary Description NOAA borehole data with temperatures at different depths. http://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/paleo/borehole/nam.html Source NOAA Date Released April 08th, 2010 (4 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords borehole geothermal NOAA Data application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.spreadsheetml.sheet icon NOAA_borehole_data_4-8-10.xlsx (xlsx, 478.7 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review No Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Time Period License License Other or unspecified, see optional comment below Comment http://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/oa/about/open-access-climate-data-policy.pdf Rate this dataset Usefulness of the metadata Average vote Your vote Usefulness of the dataset Average vote Your vote Ease of access Average vote Your vote

79

Borehole Seismic Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Borehole Seismic Techniques Borehole Seismic Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Borehole Seismic Techniques Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Downhole Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Borehole Seismic Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Downhole Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Rock unit density influences elastic wave velocities Stratigraphic/Structural: Structural geology- faults, folds, grabens, horst blocks, sedimentary layering, discontinuities, etc Hydrological: Combining compressional and shear wave results can indicate the presence of fluid saturation in the formation Thermal: High temperatures and pressure impact the compressional and shear wave velocities

80

A new approach to the borehole temperature relaxation method  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......disturbance in a borehole may be generated...effects. The drilling process itself...conditions of the drilling process, and...available disturbed borehole temperature...to produce a large initial disturbance To in the borehole, to measure......

H. Wilhelm

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "borehole calibration models" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Borehole geophysics evaluation of the Raft River geothermal reservoir |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

reservoir reservoir Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Book: Borehole geophysics evaluation of the Raft River geothermal reservoir Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Borehole geophysics techniques were used in evaluating the Raft River geothermal reservoir to establish a viable model for the system. The assumed model for the hot water (145/sup 0/C) reservoir was a zone of higher conductivity, increased porosity, decreased density, and lower sonic velocity. It was believed that the long term contact with the hot water would cause alteration producing these effects. With this model in mind, cross-plots of the above parameters were made to attempt to delineate the reservoir. It appears that the most meaningful data include smoothed and

82

Combining multi-objective optimization and bayesian model averaging to calibrate forecast ensembles of soil hydraulic models  

SciTech Connect

Most studies in vadose zone hydrology use a single conceptual model for predictive inference and analysis. Focusing on the outcome of a single model is prone to statistical bias and underestimation of uncertainty. In this study, we combine multi-objective optimization and Bayesian Model Averaging (BMA) to generate forecast ensembles of soil hydraulic models. To illustrate our method, we use observed tensiometric pressure head data at three different depths in a layered vadose zone of volcanic origin in New Zealand. A set of seven different soil hydraulic models is calibrated using a multi-objective formulation with three different objective functions that each measure the mismatch between observed and predicted soil water pressure head at one specific depth. The Pareto solution space corresponding to these three objectives is estimated with AMALGAM, and used to generate four different model ensembles. These ensembles are post-processed with BMA and used for predictive analysis and uncertainty estimation. Our most important conclusions for the vadose zone under consideration are: (1) the mean BMA forecast exhibits similar predictive capabilities as the best individual performing soil hydraulic model, (2) the size of the BMA uncertainty ranges increase with increasing depth and dryness in the soil profile, (3) the best performing ensemble corresponds to the compromise (or balanced) solution of the three-objective Pareto surface, and (4) the combined multi-objective optimization and BMA framework proposed in this paper is very useful to generate forecast ensembles of soil hydraulic models.

Vrugt, Jasper A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wohling, Thomas [NON LANL

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Kimberly Well - Borehole Geophysics Database  

SciTech Connect

The Snake River Plain (SRP), Idaho, hosts potential geothermal resources due to elevated groundwater temperatures associated with the thermal anomaly Yellowstone-Snake River hotspot. Project HOTSPOT has coordinated international institutions and organizations to understand subsurface stratigraphy and assess geothermal potential. Over 5.9km of core were drilled from three boreholes within the SRP in an attempt to acquire continuous core documenting the volcanic and sedimentary record of the hotspot: (1) Kimama, (2) Kimberly, and (3) Mountain Home. The Kimberly drill hole was selected to document continuous volcanism when analysed in conjunction with the Kimama and is located near the margin of the plain. Data submitted by project collaborator Doug Schmitt, University of Alberta

John Shervais

2011-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

84

Kimama Well - Borehole Geophysics Database  

SciTech Connect

The Snake River Plain (SRP), Idaho, hosts potential geothermal resources due to elevated groundwater temperatures associated with the thermal anomaly Yellowstone-Snake River hotspot. Project HOTSPOT has coordinated international institutions and organizations to understand subsurface stratigraphy and assess geothermal potential. Over 5.9km of core were drilled from three boreholes within the SRP in an attempt to acquire continuous core documenting the volcanic and sedimentary record of the hotspot: (1) Kimama, (2) Kimberly, and (3) Mountain Home. The Kimama drill site was set up to acquire a continuous record of basaltic volcanism along the central volcanic axis and to test the extent of geothermal resources beneath the Snake River aquifer. Data submitted by project collaborator Doug Schmitt, University of Alberta

John Shervais

2011-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

85

A Multi-Model Approach for Uncertainty Propagation and Model Calibration in CFD Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Proper quantification and propagation of uncertainties in computational simulations are of critical importance. This issue is especially challenging for CFD applications. A particular obstacle for uncertainty quantifications in CFD problems is the large model discrepancies associated with the CFD models used for uncertainty propagation. Neglecting or improperly representing the model discrepancies leads to inaccurate and distorted uncertainty distribution for the Quantities of Interest. High-fidelity models, being accurate yet expensive, can accommodate only a small ensemble of simulations and thus lead to large interpolation errors and/or sampling errors; low-fidelity models can propagate a large ensemble, but can introduce large modeling errors. In this work, we propose a multi-model strategy to account for the influences of model discrepancies in uncertainty propagation and to reduce their impact on the predictions. Specifically, we take advantage of CFD models of multiple fidelities to estimate the model ...

Wang, Jian-xun; Xiao, Heng

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Use of a comprehensive calibration ``gauntlet`` approach for improved contaminants transport modeling at the F and H Area Seepage Basins  

SciTech Connect

Many types of facility and monitoring data have been collected to support operation, closure and envirorunental restoration of the F and H-Area Seepage Basins at the Savannah River Site. Based on the various types of data, we developed contaminant transpose models to allow projection of contaminant releases and comparison of restoration alternatives. The modeling was performed in the following three stages: postulation of a conceptual model of the flow and transport system; development of a simplified analytical model based on a transfer function; development of a numerical model. A key feature of the work was use of both traditional data sources and calibration targets such as heads, geological data and pump test results, and non-traditional data sources and calibration targets, such as plume arrival times and shapes, contaminant release rates, and surface water concentrations. Throughout the process, the intermediate and final results were compared to all of the various data types and the earlier modeling stages. The result was a calibration ``gauntlet`` with explicit criteria for refinement and acceptance of the final model. Failure to match at any step within the gauntlet necessitated appropriate reformulation or modification of the model and rechecking for acceptable matches.

Looney, B.B.; Haselow, J.S.; Pidcoe, W.W.; Lewis, C.M. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Andersen, P.F.; Spalding, C.P. [GeoTrans, Inc., Sterling, VA (United States)

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Advanced motor driven clamped borehole seismic receiver  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A borehole seismic tool including a borehole clamp which only moves perpendicular to the borehole. The clamp is driven by an electric motor, via a right angle drive. When used as a seismic receiver, the tool has a three part housing, two of which are hermetically sealed. Accelerometers or geophones are mounted in one hermetically sealed part, the electric meter in the other hermetically sealed part, and the clamp and right angle drive in the third part. Preferably the tool includes cable connectors at both ends. Optionally a shear plate can be added to the clamp to extend the range of the tool.

Engler, Bruce P. (Sandoval County, NM); Sleefe, Gerard E. (Bernalillo County, NM); Striker, Richard P. (Bernalillo County, NM)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Advanced motor driven clamped borehole seismic receiver  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A borehole seismic tool is described including a borehole clamp which only moves perpendicular to the borehole. The clamp is driven by an electric motor, via a right angle drive. When used as a seismic receiver, the tool has a three part housing, two of which are hermetically sealed. Accelerometers or geophones are mounted in one hermetically sealed part, the electric motor in the other hermetically sealed part, and the clamp and right angle drive in the third part. Preferably the tool includes cable connectors at both ends. Optionally a shear plate can be added to the clamp to extend the range of the tool.

Engler, B.P.; Sleefe, G.E.; Striker, R.P.

1993-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

89

Deep Borehole Disposal Research: Demonstration Site Selection Guidelines,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Deep Borehole Disposal Research: Demonstration Site Selection Deep Borehole Disposal Research: Demonstration Site Selection Guidelines, Borehole Seals Design, and RD&D Needs Deep Borehole Disposal Research: Demonstration Site Selection Guidelines, Borehole Seals Design, and RD&D Needs The U.S. Department of Energy has been investigating deep borehole disposal as one alternative for the disposal of spent nuclear fuel and other radioactive waste forms, along with research and development for mined repositories in salt, granite, and clay, as part of the used fuel disposition (UFD) campaign. The deep borehole disposal concept consists of drilling a borehole on the order of 5,000 m deep, emplacing waste canisters in the lower part of the borehole, and sealing the upper part of the borehole with bentonite and concrete seals. A reference design of the

90

Borehole Summary Report for Waste Treatment Plant Seismic Borehole C4996  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the field-generated borehole log, lithologic summary, and the record of samples collected during the recent drilling and sampling of the basalt interval of borehole C4996 at the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) on the Hanford Site. Borehole C4996 was one of four exploratory borings, one core hole and three boreholes, drilled to investigate and acquire detailed stratigraphic and down-hole seismic data. This data will be used to define potential seismic impacts and refine design specifications for the Hanford Site WTP.

Adams , S. C.; Ahlquist, Stephen T.; Fetters, Jeffree R.; Garcia, Ben; Rust, Colleen F.

2007-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

91

Automatic Calibration of a Building Energy Simulation Model Using a Global Optimization Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

optimization process minimizing the error between measured and simulated energy consumption. The ?measured? data used in this case was generated by the simulation program and will be referred to as synthetic measured data. The accuracy of calibration...). It is used to prove the possibility of automatic calibration through an optimization process. Synthetic ?data? was generated by the simulation program. This synthetic measured heating and cooling energy consumption data for the prototype building...

Lee, S. U.; Claridge, D.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Data Qualification Report: Borehole Straigraphic Contacts  

SciTech Connect

The data set considered here is the borehole stratigraphic contacts data (DTN: M09811MWDGFM03.000) used as input to the Geologic Framework Model. A Technical Assessment method used to evaluate these data with a two-fold approach: (1) comparison to the geophysical logs on which the contacts were, in part, based; and (2) evaluation of the data by mapping individual units using the entire data set. Qualification of the geophysical logs is being performed in a separate activity. A representative subset of the contacts data was chosen based on importance of the contact and representativeness of that contact in the total data set. An acceptance window was established for each contact based on the needs of the data users. Data determined to be within the acceptance window were determined to be adequate for their intended use in three-dimensional spatial modeling and were recommended to be Qualified. These methods were chosen to provide a two-pronged evaluation that examines both the origin and results of the data. The result of this evaluation is a recommendation to qualify all contacts. No data were found to lie outside the pre-determined acceptance window. Where no geophysical logs are available, data were evaluated in relation to surrounding data and by impact assessment. These data are also recommended to be qualified. The stratigraphic contact data contained in this report (Attachment VII; DTN: M00004QGFMPICK.000) are intended to replace the source data, which will remain unqualified.

R.W. Clayton; C. Lum

2000-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

93

Building a three-dimensional near-surface geologic and petrophysical model based on borehole data: A case study from Chémery, Paris Basin, France  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...or away from the gas storage facility), the model...using 3-D modeling tools: Society of Petroleum...using 3-D modeling tools: Society of Petroleum...approach to some basic mine valuation problems on the Witwatersrand...geology, geology of energy sources Applied geophysics...

Paola Sala; Marcel Frehner; Nicola Tisato; O. Adrian Pfiffner

94

Effects of oil charge on illite dates and stopping quartz cement: calibration of basin models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract Effects of oil charge on illite dates and stopping quartz cement: calibration of basin Oil can fill pores in reservoir sandstones at any burial depth by long or short distance migration. There has been a debate since 1920 concerning the effect of oil charge. We have made detailed local

Haszeldine, Stuart

95

Calibration and Validation of a Spar-Type Floating Offshore Wind Turbine Model using the FAST Dynamic Simulation Tool: Preprint  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Calibration and Validation of a Calibration and Validation of a Spar-Type Floating Offshore Wind Turbine Model using the FAST Dynamic Simulation Tool Preprint J.R. Browning University of Colorado-Boulder J. Jonkman and A. Robertson National Renewable Energy Laboratory A.J. Goupee University of Maine Presented at the Science of Making Torque from Wind Oldenburg, Germany October 9-11, 2012 Conference Paper NREL/CP-5000-56138 November 2012 NOTICE The submitted manuscript has been offered by an employee of the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC (Alliance), a contractor of the US Government under Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308. Accordingly, the US Government and Alliance retain a nonexclusive royalty-free license to publish or reproduce the published form of this contribution, or allow others to do so, for US Government purposes.

96

Development of a geothermal acoustic borehole televiewer  

SciTech Connect

Most geothermal wells are drilled in hard rock formations where fluid flow is through systems of open fractures. Productivity of these wells is usually determined by the extent of intersection of the wellbore with the fracture system. A need exists for fracture mapping methods and tools which can operate in a geothermal environment. In less hostile environments, the acoustic borehole televiewer has been shown to be a useful tool for determining location, orientation, and characterization of fractures as they intersect the borehole and for general wellbore and casing inspection. The development conducted at Sandia National Laboratories to adapt an acoustic borehole televiewer for operation in a geothermal environment is described. The modified instrument has been successfully tested at temperatures as high as 280/sup 0/C and pressures up to 5000 psi, and used successfully to map fractures and casing damage in geothermal wells.

Heard, F.E.; Bauman, T.J.

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Stochastic Bayesian inversion of borehole self-potential measurements  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......occurs if the drilling fluid infiltrates...flows into the borehole (Hearst Nelson...resistivity of the drilling mud (or borehole fluid) and rho...invasion of the drilling mud in the formation...minimal. Areas of large separation in......

W. F. Woodruff; A. Revil; A. Jardani; D. Nummedal; S. Cumella

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

A Systematic Methodology to Underpin the CC® Process Using Calibrated BES Models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

supplies all heating systems in the building. Stand-alone direct exchange units cool the computer rooms. Using the whole building energy simulation package EnergyPlus it was possible to simulate these HVAC systems. Complexities in drafting the BES... (ppm); ? Electrical Energy Consumption (kWh); ? Heat Energy Consumption (kWh). Initial investigations revealed that data was being discarded every 10 days. The EMCS was modified to record all values to allow for the calibration of an annual BES...

White, G.; Keane, M.; Raftery, P.; Coakley, D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Anisotropic models to account for large borehole washouts to estimate gas hydrate saturations in the Gulf of Mexico Gas Hydrate Joint Industry Project Leg II Alaminos Canyon 21 B well  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Through the use of 3-D seismic amplitude mapping, several gas hydrate prospects were identified in the Alaminos Canyon (AC) area of the Gulf of Mexico. Two locations were drilled as part of the Gulf of Mexico Gas Hydrate Joint Industry Project Leg II (JIP Leg II) in May of 2009 and a comprehensive set of logging-while-drilling (LWD) logs were acquired at each well site. LWD logs indicated that resistivity in the range of ?2 ohm-m and P-wave velocity in the range of ?1.9 km/s were measured in the target sand interval between 515 and 645 feet below sea floor. These values were slightly elevated relative to those measured in the sediment above and below the target sand. However, the initial well log analysis was inconclusive regarding the presence of gas hydrate in the logged sand interval, mainly because large washouts caused by drilling in the target interval degraded confidence in the well log measurements. To assess gas hydrate saturations in the sedimentary section drilled in the Alaminos Canyon 21 B (AC21-B) well, a method of compensating for the effect of washouts on the resistivity and acoustic velocities was developed. The proposed method models the washed-out portion of the borehole as a vertical layer filled with sea water (drilling fluid) and the apparent anisotropic resistivity and velocities caused by a vertical layer are used to correct the measured log values. By incorporating the conventional marine seismic data into the well log analysis, the average gas hydrate saturation in the target sand section in the AC21-B well can be constrained to the range of 8–28%, with 20% being our best estimate.

M.W. Lee; T.S. Collett; K.A. Lewis

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Inversion of borehole weak motion records observed in Istanbul (Turkey)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......sets, might be large. This indicates...the inversion of borehole weak and strong...2005 December, a drilling program consisting...the 140-m-deep borehole, based on the encountered...applicable also to borehole sites where other...velocities (with a large change of impedance......

S. Parolai; R. Wang; D. Bindi

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "borehole calibration models" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

RESEARCH PAPER Compaction bands induced by borehole drilling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: boreholes are often drilled deep into weak porous sandstone formations for the purpose of extracting oil Introduction Boreholes drilled into the Earth's crust for facilitating the extraction of water, oil, naturalRESEARCH PAPER Compaction bands induced by borehole drilling R. Katsman Ã? E. Aharonov Ã? B. C

Einat, Aharonov

102

Kinematic calibration of the parallel Argos mechanism  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper deals with the kinematic calibration of the Argos mechanism which is a novel, spherical parallel structure having 3 rotational degrees of freedom. Its design is based on 3 actuators carrying a pantograph each which are connected to the end-effector ... Keywords: Argos mechanism, Implicit calibration, Kinematic calibration, Parametric calibration models

Peter Vischer; Reymond Clavel

2000-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Transient Inverse Calibration of Site-Wide Groundwater Model to Hanford Operational Impacts from 1943 to 1996--Alternative Conceptual Model Considering Interaction with Uppermost Basalt Confined Aquifer  

SciTech Connect

The baseline three-dimensional transient inverse model for the estimation of site-wide scale flow parameters, including their uncertainties, using data on the transient behavior of the unconfined aquifer system over the entire historical period of Hanford operations, has been modified to account for the effects of basalt intercommunication between the Hanford unconfined aquifer and the underlying upper basalt confined aquifer. Both the baseline and alternative conceptual models (ACM-1) considered only the groundwater flow component and corresponding observational data in the 3-Dl transient inverse calibration efforts. Subsequent efforts will examine both groundwater flow and transport. Comparisons of goodness of fit measures and parameter estimation results for the ACM-1 transient inverse calibrated model with those from previous site-wide groundwater modeling efforts illustrate that the new 3-D transient inverse model approach will strengthen the technical defensibility of the final model(s) and provide the ability to incorporate uncertainty in predictions related to both conceptual model and parameter uncertainty. These results, however, indicate that additional improvements are required to the conceptual model framework. An investigation was initiated at the end of this basalt inverse modeling effort to determine whether facies-based zonation would improve specific yield parameter estimation results (ACM-2). A description of the justification and methodology to develop this zonation is discussed.

Vermeul, Vincent R.; Cole, Charles R.; Bergeron, Marcel P.; Thorne, Paul D.; Wurstner, Signe K.

2001-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

104

Remotely sensing the thickness of the Bushveld Complex UG2 platinum reef using borehole radar  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The planar, 80 cm thick, lossy dielectric reefs of the Bushveld are embedded in rocks that are almost transparent at ground penetrating radar frequencies of 10–125 MHz. Pothole sensing practices are based largely on using borehole radars to observe departures of the reefs from planarity. Surveys are run in ~200 m near-horizontal boreholes that are drilled into the footwalls of the reef. Careful laboratory measurements of the Jonscher dielectric parameters of the stratigraphic column through the UG2 reef are translated by electro-dynamic modelling into a prediction that platinum reef thinning can be sensed remotely by footwall borehole radars. This proposition sheds light on the results of a recent borehole radar survey that was shot in ~180 m long AXT (48 mm diameter) boreholes. Areas of sub-economical UG2 thickness (typically less than ~50 cm) were mapped by studying the relative amplitudes of echoes from the reef and a pyroxenite–anorthosite interface in its hanging wall, with the radar deployed beneath the UG2 in its footwall.

C M Simmat; P Le R Herselman; M Rütschlin; I M Mason; J H Cloete

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Category:Borehole Seismic Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Borehole Seismic Techniques page? Borehole Seismic Techniques page? For detailed information on Borehole Seismic Techniques as exploration techniques, click here. Category:Borehole Seismic Techniques Add.png Add a new Borehole Seismic Techniques Technique Pages in category "Borehole Seismic Techniques" The following 2 pages are in this category, out of 2 total. S Single-Well And Cross-Well Seismic V Vertical Seismic Profiling Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Category:Borehole_Seismic_Techniques&oldid=601962" Category: Downhole Techniques What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties About us Disclaimers Energy blogs Linked Data Developer services OpenEI partners with a broad range of international organizations to grow

106

Electrical resistance tomography from measurements inside a steel cased borehole  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Electrical resistance tomography (ERT) produced from measurements taken inside a steel cased borehole. A tomographic inversion of electrical resistance measurements made within a steel casing was then made for the purpose of imaging the electrical resistivity distribution in the formation remotely from the borehole. The ERT method involves combining electrical resistance measurements made inside a steel casing of a borehole to determine the electrical resistivity in the formation adjacent to the borehole; and the inversion of electrical resistance measurements made from a borehole not cased with an electrically conducting casing to determine the electrical resistivity distribution remotely from a borehole. It has been demonstrated that by using these combined techniques, highly accurate current injection and voltage measurements, made at appropriate points within the casing, can be tomographically inverted to yield useful information outside the borehole casing.

Daily, William D. (Livermore, CA); Schenkel, Clifford (Walnut Creek, CA); Ramirez, Abelardo L. (Pleasanton, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Stochastic Modeling of Overtime Occupancy and Its Application in Building Energy Simulation and Calibration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is a whole-building energy modeling program developed byZ. Energy modeling of two office buildings with data centerand Modeling of Occupancy Patterns in Open-Plan Offices using Measured Lighting-Switch Data, Journal of Building

Sun, Kaiyu

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Advances in borehole geophysics for hydrology  

SciTech Connect

Borehole geophysical methods provide vital subsurface information on rock properties, fluid movement, and the condition of engineered borehole structures. Within the first category, salient advances include the continuing improvement of the borehole televiewer, refinement of the electrical conductivity dipmeter for fracture characterization, and the development of a gigahertz-frequency electromagnetic propagation tool for water saturation measurements. The exploration of the rock mass between boreholes remains a challenging problem with high potential; promising methods are now incorporating high-density spatial sampling and sophisticated data processing. Flow-rate measurement methods appear adequate for all but low-flow situations. At low rates the tagging method seems the most attractive. The current exploitation of neutron-activation techniques for tagging means that the wellbore fluid itself is tagged, thereby eliminating the mixing of an alien fluid into the wellbore. Another method uses the acoustic noise generated by flow through constrictions and in and behind casing to detect and locate flaws in the production system. With the advent of field-recorded digital data, the interpretation of logs from sedimentary sequences is now reaching a sophisticated level with the aid of computer processing and the application of statistical methods. Lagging behind are interpretive schemes for the low-porosity, fracture-controlled igneous and metamorphic rocks encountered in the geothermal reservoirs and in potential waste-storage sites. Progress is being made on the general problem of fracture detection by use of electrical and acoustical techniques, but the reliable definition of permeability continues to be an elusive goal.

Nelson, P.H.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Calibration and validation of a solar thermal system model in Modelica  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Recent advancements in the domain of modeling physical processes offer opportunities to use equation based modeling environments, such as Modelica, for the simulation of building heating, ... (HVAC) systems. The ...

Giuliano Fontanella; Daniele Basciotti; Florian Dubisch…

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Application of Fast Marching Method in Shale Gas Reservoir Model Calibration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) microseismic event; b) a DFN model; c) generated heterogeneous permeability field ............... 41 Fig.24 Genearted permeability field ................................................................................. 42 Fig.25 Visualization....28 Simulation results with initial eighty models (green) compared to reference model (red): a) in semi-log scale; b) in log-log scale ........................................... 45 Fig.29 The objective function versus generation number...

Yang, Changdong

2013-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

111

Hostile wells: the borehole seismic challenge | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hostile wells: the borehole seismic challenge Hostile wells: the borehole seismic challenge Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Hostile wells: the borehole seismic challenge Author William Wills Published Oil and Gas Engineer - Subsea & Seismic, 2013 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for Hostile wells: the borehole seismic challenge Citation William Wills. Hostile wells: the borehole seismic challenge [Internet]. 2013. Oil and Gas Engineer - Subsea & Seismic. [cited 2013/10/01]. Available from: http://www.engineerlive.com/content/22907 Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Hostile_wells:_the_borehole_seismic_challenge&oldid=690045" Categories: References Geothermal References

112

Borehole-Wall Imaging with Acoustic and Optical Televiewers for  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Borehole-Wall Imaging with Acoustic and Optical Televiewers for Borehole-Wall Imaging with Acoustic and Optical Televiewers for Fractured-Bedrock Aquifer Investigations Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Borehole-Wall Imaging with Acoustic and Optical Televiewers for Fractured-Bedrock Aquifer Investigations Abstract Imaging with acoustic and optical televiewers results in continuous and oriented 360 degree views of the borehole wall from which the character and orientation of lithologic and structural features can be defined for fractured-bedrock aquifer investigations. Fractures are more clearly defined under a wider range of conditions on acoustic images than on optical images including dark-colored rocks, cloudy borehole water, and coated borehole walls. However, optical images allow for the direct viewing

113

Research, Development, and Demonstration Roadmap for Deep Borehole Disposal  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Research, Development, and Demonstration Roadmap for Deep Borehole Research, Development, and Demonstration Roadmap for Deep Borehole Disposal Research, Development, and Demonstration Roadmap for Deep Borehole Disposal This roadmap is intended to advance deep borehole disposal (DBD) from its current conceptual status to potential future deployment as a disposal system for spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high-level waste (HLW). The objectives of the DBD RD&D roadmap include providing the technical basis for fielding a DBD demonstration project, defining the scientific research activities associated with site characterization and postclosure safety, as well as defining the engineering demonstration activities associated with deep borehole drilling, completion, and surrogate waste canister emplacement. Research, Development, and Demonstration Roadmap for Deep Borehole Disposal

114

Evaluatoni of Automated Utility Bill Calibration Methods  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. Evaluation of Automated Utility Bill Calibration Methods BA Technical Update Meeting Ben Polly, Joe Robertson 04/30/13 Utility Bill Calibration * "Calibrate" or "true-up" building energy models to utility bill data to increase the accuracy of retrofit savings predictions * Calibration methods typically involve adjusting input parameters * Predict retrofit savings using the adjusted (calibrated) model 2 Background: BESTEST-EX * BESTEST-EX is a suite for testing calibration methods and retrofit savings predictions associated with audit software * Field trials showed that:

115

Exploratory Boreholes At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Exploration Technique Exploratory Boreholes Activity Date 1992 - 2002 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Mammoth Pacific LP drilled several...

116

Exploratory Boreholes At Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (Parr...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Exploration Technique Exploratory Boreholes Activity Date 1984 - 1990 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis This exploration was originally done as part of a...

117

Canister design for deep borehole disposal of nuclear waste .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The objective of this thesis was to design a canister for the disposal of spent nuclear fuel and other high-level waste in deep borehole repositories… (more)

Hoag, Christopher Ian.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Borehole-Wall Imaging with Acoustic and Optical Televiewers for...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

data from packer testing and monitoring. Authors John H. Williams and Carole D. Johnson Conference Seventh International Symposium on Borehole Geophysics for Minerals,...

119

Combining multiobjective optimization and Bayesian model averaging to calibrate forecast ensembles of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of soil hydraulic models Thomas Wo¨hling1 and Jasper A. Vrugt2 Received 12 May 2008; revised 8 September

Vrugt, Jasper A.

120

A Novel Approach to Process Modeling for Instrument Surveillance and Calibration Verification  

SciTech Connect

This work presents an empirical modeling approach combining a bilinear modeling technique, partial least squares, with the universal function approximation abilities of single hidden layer nonlinear artificial neural networks. This approach, referred to as neural network partial least squares (NNPLS), is compared to the common autoassociative artificial neural network. The NNPLS model is embedded into a graphical user interface and implemented at the Electrical Power Research Institute's Instrumentation and Control Center located at Tennessee Valley Authority's Kingston fossil power plant. Results are presented for 51 process signals with an average absolute estimation error of {approx}1.7% of the mean value, and sample drift detection performances are shown.

Rasmussen, Brandon; Hines, J. Wesley; Uhrig, Robert E. [University of Tennessee (United States)

2003-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "borehole calibration models" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Mountain Home Well - Borehole Geophysics Database  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The Snake River Plain (SRP), Idaho, hosts potential geothermal resources due to elevated groundwater temperatures associated with the thermal anomaly Yellowstone-Snake River hotspot. Project HOTSPOT has coordinated international institutions and organizations to understand subsurface stratigraphy and assess geothermal potential. Over 5.9km of core were drilled from three boreholes within the SRP in an attempt to acquire continuous core documenting the volcanic and sedimentary record of the hotspot: (1) Kimama, (2) Kimberly, and (3) Mountain Home. The Mountain Home drill hole is located along the western plain and documents older basalts overlain by sediment. Data submitted by project collaborator Doug Schmitt, University of Alberta

Shervais, John

122

Mountain Home Well - Borehole Geophysics Database  

SciTech Connect

The Snake River Plain (SRP), Idaho, hosts potential geothermal resources due to elevated groundwater temperatures associated with the thermal anomaly Yellowstone-Snake River hotspot. Project HOTSPOT has coordinated international institutions and organizations to understand subsurface stratigraphy and assess geothermal potential. Over 5.9km of core were drilled from three boreholes within the SRP in an attempt to acquire continuous core documenting the volcanic and sedimentary record of the hotspot: (1) Kimama, (2) Kimberly, and (3) Mountain Home. The Mountain Home drill hole is located along the western plain and documents older basalts overlain by sediment. Data submitted by project collaborator Doug Schmitt, University of Alberta

John Shervais

2012-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

123

The Model 5000-16C 1000 WATT FEL Lamp Standard pro-vides absolute calibration of spectral irradiance from 250 nm to  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Model 5000-16C 1000 WATT FEL Lamp Standard pro- vides absolute calibration of spectral. It has been selected by the National Institute of Standards and Technology to replace the 1000 watt, DXW-pin 1000 watt lamp that is adapted by Gamma Scientific into a bi-post configuration. It is used

124

Observation and scaling of microearthquakes from the Taiwan Chelungpu-fault borehole seismometers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Chelungpu-fault borehole seismometers...Chelungpu-fault Drilling Project Borehole Seismometers...Despite the large coseismic slip...stress drops of larger events including...Taiwan Chelungpu drilling project (TCDP...seven-level vertical borehole seismic array......

Yen-Yu Lin; Kuo-Fong Ma; Volker Oye

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Second ILAW Site Borehole Characterization Plan  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy's Hanford Site has the most diverse and largest amounts of radioactive tank waste in the US. High-level radioactive waste has been stored at Hanford since 1944. Approximately 209,000 m{sup 3} (54 Mgal) of waste are currently stored in 177 tanks. Vitrification and onsite disposal of low-activity tank waste (LAW) are embodied in the strategy described in the Tri-Party Agreement. The tank waste is to be retrieved, separated into low- and high-level fractions, and then immobilized. The low-activity vitrified waste will be disposed of in the 200 East Area of the Hanford Site. This report is a plan to drill and characterize the second borehole for the Performance Assessment. The first characterization borehole was drilled in 1998. The plan describes data collection activities for determining physical and chemical properties of the vadose zone and saturated zone on the northeast side of the proposed disposal site. These data will then be used in the 2005 Performance Assessment.

SP Reidel

2000-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

126

Multi-objective calibration of forecast ensembles using Bayesian model averaging  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

weather prediction models. The BMA predictive probability density function (PDF) of any weather quantity but complementary metrics of forecast skill, and uses a numerical algorithm to solve for the Pareto set of parameters that have consistently good performance across multiple performance metrics. Two illustrative case

Vrugt, Jasper A.

127

Determination of Retrofit Savings Using a Calibrated Building Energy Simulation Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in commercial buildings (Katipamula and Claridge 1991. Wu et al. 1992). Of all the modeling approaches, use of building energy simulation programs is considered most comprehensive. However, owing to the considerable uncertainty involved with various input... presents the results of a study lucted to develop a robust methodology to mine retrofit energy and cost savings in commercial buildings when few measured data are available for the preretrofit condition. Although the study focuses on commercial...

Reddy, S. N.; Hunn, B. D.; Hood, D. B.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

The EAGLE simulations of galaxy formation: calibration of subgrid physics and model variations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present results from thirteen cosmological simulations that explore the parameter space of the "Evolution and Assembly of GaLaxies and their Environments" (EAGLE) simulation project. Four of the simulations follow the evolution of a periodic cube L = 50 cMpc on a side, and each employs a different subgrid model of the energetic feedback associated with star formation. The relevant parameters were adjusted so that the simulations each reproduce the observed galaxy stellar mass function at z = 0.1. Three of the simulations fail to form disc galaxies as extended as observed, and we show analytically that this is a consequence of numerical radiative losses that reduce the efficiency of stellar feedback in high-density gas. Such losses are greatly reduced in the fourth simulation - the EAGLE reference model - by injecting more energy in higher density gas. This model produces galaxies with the observed size distribution, and also reproduces many galaxy scaling relations. In the remaining nine simulations, a sin...

Crain, Robert A; Bower, Richard G; Furlong, Michelle; Schaller, Matthieu; Theuns, Tom; Vecchia, Claudio Dalla; Frenk, Carlos S; McCarthy, Ian G; Helly, John C; Jenkins, Adrian; Rosas-Guevara, Yetli M; White, Simon D M; Trayford, James W

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Calibration Model Assignments expressed as %U3O8, Summary Table ES-1  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ES-1. Assignments for Logging Models ES-1. Assignments for Logging Models Model Location Primary Use a Enriched-Zone Grade % e U 3 O 8 b ppm e U b Enriched- Zone Thickness (ft) b Enriched- Zone Moisture (wt-%) c Dry Bulk Density (g/cc) c U1 U2 U3 WF N3 D U A1 A2 A3 Grand Junction, Colorado TC TC TC TC TC FN KUT FN FN FN 2.636 ± 0.082 1.229 ± 0.038 0.4516 ± 0.0091 0.3003 ± 0.0053 0.2310 ± 0.0041 0.0772 ± 0.0012 0.05569 ± 0.00097 0.03051 ± 0.00044 0.0794 ± 0.0012 0.1611 ± 0.0024 22355 ± 697 10424 ± 326 3830 ± 77 2547 ± 45 1959 ± 35 654.5 ± 9.8 472.3 ± 8.2 258.7 ± 3.7 673.5 ± 9.8 1366 ± 20 4.06 ± 0.01 4.01 ± 0.00 4.01 ± 0.00 4.02 ± 0.00 4.19 ± 0.00 5.80 ± 0.00 4.98 ± 0.00 6.01 ± 0.00 5.94 ± 0.00

130

An improved procedure for developing a calibrated hourly simulation model of an electrically heated and cooled commercial building  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

overwhelmed with data and suffer from data overlap. In order to improve upon previously established techniques, this thesis presents new calibration methods including temperature binned box-whisker-mean analysis to improve x-y scatter plots, 24-hour weather...

Bou-Saada, Tarek Edmond

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

131

Sampling and Analysis Plan - Waste Treatment Plant Seismic Boreholes Project  

SciTech Connect

This sampling and analysis plan (SAP) describes planned data collection activities for four entry boreholes through the sediment overlying the basalt, up to three new deep rotary boreholes through the basalt and sedimentary interbeds, and one corehole through the basalt and sedimentary interbeds at the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) site. The SAP will be used in concert with the quality assurance plan for the project to guide the procedure development and data collection activities needed to support borehole drilling, geophysical measurements, and sampling. This SAP identifies the American Society of Testing Materials standards, Hanford Site procedures, and other guidance to be followed for data collection activities.

Reidel, Steve P.

2006-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

132

High-resolution velocity field imaging around a borehole: Excavation Damaged Zone characterization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the laboratory offers a large number of boreholes. These boreholes form linear excavations with a perfectly round to deploy significant resources with a large number of sensors and boreholes (Balland et al, 2009). Instead induced around a borehole drilled for survey purposes. This would involve the installation of several

Boyer, Edmond

133

CALIBRATION Galileo Scale Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-spun section) is driven by an electric motor in the opposite direction so it stands still. The parts

134

Methods and apparatus for measurement of electronic properties of geological formations through borehole casing  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods and apparatus are provided for measuring electronic properties of geological formations and cement layers adjacent to cased boreholes including resistivities, polarization phenomena and dielectric constants. Current is passed from an electrode in electrical contact with the interior of the borehole casing to an electrode on the surface of the earth. At least three voltage measuring electrodes in electrical contact with the interior of the casing measure the voltage at various points thereon. The voltage differences between discrete pairs of the voltage measuring electrodes provide a measurement of differential current conducted into formation in the vicinity of those electrodes. These measurements facilitate calculation of the resistivities of the adjacent geological formations as well as an indication of whether cement is present. Measurements of the differential voltage response to transient currents provide a measurement of the polarization phenomena in formation as well as the capacitance of the casing in contact with the formation which is useful for determining whether oil and gas are present. Lithological characteristics of the formation such as the presence or absence of clay can also be determined. A calibration procedure is provided for minimizing errors induced by variations in the casing. The device also may be placed within the pipe attached to a drill bit while drilling open holes.

Vail, III, William B. (Bothell, WA)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Methods and apparatus for measurement of electronic properties of geological formations through borehole casing  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods and apparatus are provided for measuring electronic properties of geological formations and cement layers adjacent to cased boreholes including resistivities, polarization phenomena and dielectric constants. Current is passed from an electrode in electrical contact with the interior of the borehole casing to an electrode on the surface of the earth. At least three voltage measuring electrodes in electrical contact with the interior of the casing measure the voltage at various points thereon. The voltage differences between discrete pairs of the voltage measuring electrodes provide a measurement of the differential current conducted into formation in the vicinity of those electrodes. These measurements facilitate calculation of the resistivities of the adjacent geological formations as well as an indication of whether cement is present. Measurements of the differential voltage response to transient currents provide a measurement of the polarization phenomena in formation as well as the capacitance of the casing in contact with the formation which is useful for determining whether oil and gas present. Lithological characteristics of the formation such as the pressence or absence of clay can also be determined. A calibration procedure is provided for minimizing errors induced by variations in the casing. The device also may be placed within the pipe attached to a drill bit while drilling open holes.

Vail, III, William B. (Bothell, WA)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Methods and apparatus for measurement of electronic properties of geological formations through borehole casing  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods and apparatus are provided for measuring electronic properties of geological formations and cement layers adjacent to cased boreholes including resistivities, polarization phenomena and dielectric constants. Current is passed from an electrode in electrical contact with the interior of the borehole casing to an electrode on the surface of the earth. At least three voltage measuring electrodes in electrical contact with the interior of the casing measure the voltage at various points thereon. The voltage differences between discrete pairs of the voltage measuring electrodes provide a measurement of the differential current conducted into the formation in the vicinity of those electrodes. These measurements facilitate calculation of the resistivities of the adjacent geological formations as well as an indication of whether cement is present. Measurements of the differential voltage response to transient currents provide a measurement of the polarization phenomena in formation as well as the capacitance of the casing in contact with the formation which is useful for determining whether oil and gas are present. Lithological characteristics of the formation such as the presence or absence of clay can also be determined. A calibration procedure is provided for minimizing errors induced by variations in the casing. The device also may be placed within the pipe attached to a drill bit while drilling open holes. 48 figures.

Vail, W.B. III.

1991-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

137

Methods and apparatus for measurement of electronic properties of geological formations through borehole casing  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods and apparatus are provided for measuring electronic properties of geological formations and cement layers adjacent to cased boreholes including resistivities, polarization phenomena and dielectric constants. Current is passed from an electrode in electrical contact with the interior of the borehole casing to an electrode on the surface of the earth. At least three voltage measuring electrodes in electrical contact with the interior of the casing measure the voltage at various points thereon. The voltage differences between discrete pairs of the voltage measuring electrodes provide a measurement of differential current conducted into formation in the vicinity of those electrodes. These measurements facilitate calculation of the resistivities of the adjacent geological formations as well as an indication of whether cement is present. Measurements of the differential voltage response to transient currents provide a measurement of the polarization phenomena in formation as well as the capacitance of the casing in contact with the formation which is useful for determining whether oil and gas are present. Lithological characteristics of the formation such as the presence or absence of clay can also be determined. A calibration procedure is provided for minimizing errors induced by variations in the casing. The device also may be placed within the pipe attached to a drill bit while drilling open holes. 48 figs.

Vail, W.B. III.

1989-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

138

Temperature Measurements in Boreholes: An Overview of Engineering and  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Temperature Measurements in Boreholes: An Overview of Engineering and Temperature Measurements in Boreholes: An Overview of Engineering and Scientific Applications Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Temperature Measurements in Boreholes: An Overview of Engineering and Scientific Applications Abstract Temperature data obtained in boreholes serve as critical input to many fields of engineering, exploration, and research: (1) in well completions, (2) gas and fluid production engineering, (3) in the exploration for hydrocarbons and ore minerals, and (4) for testing hypotheses concerning the evolution of the Earth's crust and tectonic processes. Wireline-conveyed maximum-recording thermometers and continuous-reading thermistors are used to measure absolute temperatures, differential

139

Canister design for deep borehole disposal of nuclear waste  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The objective of this thesis was to design a canister for the disposal of spent nuclear fuel and other high-level waste in deep borehole repositories using currently available and proven oil, gas, and geothermal drilling ...

Hoag, Christopher Ian

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

A drop-in-concept for deep borehole canister emplacement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Disposal of high-level nuclear waste in deep boreholes drilled into crystalline bedrock (i.e., "granite") is an interesting repository alternative of long standing. Work at MIT over the past two decades, and more recently ...

Bates, Ethan Allen

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "borehole calibration models" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Mercury Continuous Emmission Monitor Calibration  

SciTech Connect

Mercury continuous emissions monitoring systems (CEMs) are being implemented in over 800 coal-fired power plant stacks throughput the U.S. Western Research Institute (WRI) is working closely with the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to facilitate the development of the experimental criteria for a NIST traceability protocol for dynamic elemental mercury vapor calibrators/generators. These devices are used to calibrate mercury CEMs at power plant sites. The Clean Air Mercury Rule (CAMR) which was published in the Federal Register on May 18, 2005 and vacated by a Federal appeals court in early 2008 required that calibration be performed with NIST-traceable standards. Despite the vacature, mercury emissions regulations in the future will require NIST traceable calibration standards, and EPA does not want to interrupt the effort towards developing NIST traceability protocols. The traceability procedures will be defined by EPA. An initial draft traceability protocol was issued by EPA in May 2007 for comment. In August 2007, EPA issued a conceptual interim traceability protocol for elemental mercury calibrators. The protocol is based on the actual analysis of the output of each calibration unit at several concentration levels ranging initially from about 2-40 {micro}g/m{sup 3} elemental mercury, and in the future down to 0.2 {micro}g/m{sup 3}, and this analysis will be directly traceable to analyses by NIST. The EPA traceability protocol document is divided into two separate sections. The first deals with the qualification of calibrator models by the vendors for use in mercury CEM calibration. The second describes the procedure that the vendors must use to certify the calibrators that meet the qualification specifications. The NIST traceable certification is performance based, traceable to analysis using isotope dilution inductively coupled plasma/mass spectrometry (ID/ICP/MS) performed by NIST in Gaithersburg, MD. The outputs of mercury calibrators are compared to one another using a nesting procedure which allows direct comparison of one calibrator with another at specific concentrations and eliminates analyzer variability effects. The qualification portion of the EPA interim traceability protocol requires the vendors to define calibrator performance as affected by variables such as pressure, temperature, line voltage, and shipping. In 2007 WRI developed and conducted a series of simplified qualification experiments to determine actual calibrator performance related to the variables defined in the qualification portion of the interim protocol.

John Schabron; Eric Kalberer; Ryan Boysen; William Schuster; Joseph Rovani

2009-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

142

A wireless sensor system for validation of real-time automatic calibration of groundwater transport models q  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Division of Environmental Sciences and Engineering, Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO 80401, United Contaminant monitoring Data acquisition a b s t r a c t In this paper, we present the use of a wireless sensor network in a lab for subsurface contaminant plume monitoring with the objective of automatic calibration

Han, Qi "Chee"

143

COMPLETION OF THE TRANSURANIC GREATER CONFINEMENT DISPOSAL BOREHOLE PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT FOR THE NEVADA TEST SITE  

SciTech Connect

Classified transuranic material that cannot be shipped to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant in New Mexico is stored in Greater Confinement Disposal boreholes in the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site on the Nevada Test Site. A performance assessment was completed for the transuranic inventory in the boreholes and submitted to the Transuranic Waste Disposal Federal Review Group. The performance assessment was prepared by Sandia National Laboratories on behalf of the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office using an iterative methodology that assessed radiological releases from the intermediate depth disposal configuration against the regulatory requirements of the 1985 version of 40 CFR 191 of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. The transuranic materials are stored at 21 to 37 m depth (70 to 120 ft) in large diameter boreholes constructed in the unsaturated alluvial deposits of Frenchman Flat. Hydrologic processes that affect long- term isolation of the radionuclides are dominated by extremely slow upward rates of liquid/vapor advection and diffusion; there is no downward pathway under current climatic conditions and there is no recharge to groundwater under future ''glacial'' climatic conditions. A Federal Review Team appointed by the Transuranic Waste Disposal Federal Review Group reviewed the Greater Confinement Disposal performance assessment and found that the site met the majority of the regulatory criteria of the 1985 and portions of the 1993 versions of 40 CFR 191. A number of technical and procedural issues required development of supplemental information that was incorporated into a final revision of the performance assessment. These issues include inclusion of radiological releases into the complementary cumulative distribution function for the containment requirements associated with drill cuttings from inadvertent human intrusion, verification of mathematical models used in the performance assessment, inclusion of dose calculations from collocated low-level waste in the boreholes for the individual protection requirements, further assessments of engineered barriers and conditions associated with the assurance requirements, and expansion of documentation provided for assessing the groundwater protection requirements. The Transuranic Waste Disposal Federal Review Group approved the performance assessment for Greater Confinement Disposal boreholes in 2001 and did not approve the Application of the Assurance Requirements. Remaining issues concerned with engineered barriers and the multiple aspects of the Assurance Requirements will be resolved at the time of closure of the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site. This is the first completion and acceptance of a performance assessment for transuranic materials under the U.S. Department of Energy self-regulation. The Greater Confinement Disposal boreholes are only the second waste disposal configuration to meet the safety regulatory requirements of 40 CFR 191.

Colarusso, Angela; Crowe, Bruce; Cochran, John R.

2003-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

144

Numerical simulation of borehole acoustic logging in the frequency and time domains with hp-adaptive finite elements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Numerical simulation of borehole acoustic logging in the frequency and time domains with hp elasticity Coupled problems hp-adaptive finite elements a b s t r a c t Accurate numerical simulation physical modeling combined with accurate and efficient numerical dis- cretization and solution techniques

Torres-Verdín, Carlos

145

Hydrologic testing methodology and results from deep basalt boreholes  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the hydrologic field-testing program is to provide data for characterization of the groundwater systems wihin the Pasco Basin that are significant to understanding waste isolation. The effort is directed toward characterizing the areal and vertical distributions of hydraulic head, hydraulic properties, and hydrochemistry. Data obtained from these studies provide input for numerical modeling of groundwater flow and solute transport. These models are then used for evaluating potential waste migration as a function of space and time. The groundwater system beneath the Hanford Site and surrounding area consists of a thick, accordantly layered sequence of basalt flows and associated sedimentary interbed that primarily occur in the upper part of the Columbia River basalt. Permeable horizons of the sequence are associated with the interbeds and the interflow zones within the basalt. The columnar interiors of a flow act as low-permeability aquitards, separating the more-permeable interflows or interbeds. This paper discusses the hydrologic field-gathering activities, specifically, field-testing methodology and test results from deep basalt boreholes.

Strait, S R; Spane, F A; Jackson, R L; Pidcoe, W W

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Borehole breakdown pressure with drilling fluids—I. Empirical results  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Mining and civil engineering industries sometimes use drilling muds for stabilizing a borehole during drilling wells for methane drainage, geothermal energy and radioactive waste disposal. Standard theories predicting borehole breakdown pressure assume breakdown occurs when a small fracture initiates at a location where the largest tangential stress at the borehole reaches the tensile strength of formation. Fracturing tests conducted in this study, however, showed that when drilling fluid was used as an injection fluid, borehole breakdown did not occur even if a fracture initiated at a borehole wall. Borehole breakdown occurred when the initiated fracture became unstable after significant growth [with 0.76 cm (0.3 in.) to 7.62 cm (3 in.) in length]. The test results showed that all drilling muds had a tendency to seal narrow natural fractures or fractures induced by high borehole pressure. The sealing effect of the mud stabilized fractures and prevented fracture propagation. This effect is one of the primary factors for controlling wellbore stability. In this work [1], more than 40 large rock samples [76.2 × 76.2 × 76.2 cm (30 × 30 × 30 in.)] were fractured to test the drilling fluid effect on fracture initiation and fracture propagation around a borehole. The results show that borehole breakdown pressure is highly dependent on the Young's modulus of the formation, wellbore size and type of the drilling fluids. Note that the conventional linear wellbore stability theory has ignored all these facts. The results of this experiment are intended to apply to the lost circulation problems from an induced fracture or to the interpretation of the in situ stress measurements with gelled fluids where drilling or fracturing fluids contain significant amount of solid components. Similar phenomena occur for the standard hydraulic fracturing fluids; however, the process zone and the high flow friction at the narrow fracture tip become as important as the gel and solid plugging effect shown in this paper. Hence, the results should be modified before being applied to standard fracturing fluids.

N. Morita; A.D. Black; G.-F. Fuh

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Three-component borehole wall-locking seismic detector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A seismic detector for boreholes is described that has an accelerometer sensor block for sensing vibrations in geologic formations of the earth. The density of the seismic detector is approximately matched to the density of the formations in which the detector is utilized. A simple compass is used to orient the seismic detector. A large surface area shoe having a radius approximately equal to the radius of the borehole in which the seismic detector is located may be pushed against the side of the borehole by actuating cylinders contained in the seismic detector. Hydraulic drive of the cylinders is provided external to the detector. By using the large surface area wall-locking shoe, force holding the seismic detector in place is distributed over a larger area of the borehole wall thereby eliminating concentrated stresses. Borehole wall-locking forces up to ten times the weight of the seismic detector can be applied thereby ensuring maximum detection frequency response up to 2,000 hertz using accelerometer sensors in a triaxial array within the seismic detector.

Owen, Thomas E. (Helotes, TX)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Integrated Calibration Sphere and Calibration Step Fixture for Improved  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Integrated Calibration Sphere and Calibration Step Fixture for Integrated Calibration Sphere and Calibration Step Fixture for Improved Coordinate Measurement Machine Calibration Integrated Calibration Sphere and Calibration Step Fixture for Improved Coordinate Measurement Machine Calibration A method and apparatus for mounting a calibration sphere to a calibration fixture for Coordinate Measurement Machine (CMM) calibration and qualification is described, decreasing the time required for such qualification, thus allowing the CMM to be used more productively. Available for thumbnail of Feynman Center (505) 665-9090 Email Integrated Calibration Sphere and Calibration Step Fixture for Improved Coordinate Measurement Machine Calibration A method and apparatus for mounting a calibration sphere to a calibration fixture for Coordinate Measurement Machine (CMM) calibration and

149

An Improved Procedure for Developing a Calibrated Hourly Simulation Model of an Electrically Heated and Cooled Commercial Buildling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, this thesis presents new calibration methods including temperature binned box-whisker-mean analysis to improve x-y scatter plots, 24-hour weather-daytype box-whisker-mean graphs to show IV hourly temperature-dependent energy use profiles, and 52-week box... using a case study building located in Washington, D.C. In the case study building, nine months of hourly whole-building electricity data and site-specific weather data were measured and used with the D0E-2.1D building simulation program to test the new...

Bou-Saada, Tarek Edmond

150

Spatial distribution of shear wave anisotropy in the crust of the southern Hyogo region by borehole observations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......resulting in a large apparent intensity...also suggests that borehole waveforms with a...earthquake from a large number of high-quality...in particular borehole data. At stations...the active fault drilling borehole at Nojima Hirabayashi......

Takashi Mizuno; Kiyoshi Yomogida; Hisao Ito; Yasuto Kuwahara

2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

An electromagnetic sounding experiment in Germany using the vertical gradient of geomagnetic variations observed in a deep borehole  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......penetration depth is large against the depth of the borehole magnetometer. As...neither influence the borehole measurements, since the drilling did not encounter...surrounding the drilling site. 9 Conclusions The borehole in Konigshofen provided......

Ulrich Schmucker; Klaus Spitzer; Erich Steveling

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Deep borehole disposal of high-level radioactive waste.  

SciTech Connect

Preliminary evaluation of deep borehole disposal of high-level radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel indicates the potential for excellent long-term safety performance at costs competitive with mined repositories. Significant fluid flow through basement rock is prevented, in part, by low permeabilities, poorly connected transport pathways, and overburden self-sealing. Deep fluids also resist vertical movement because they are density stratified. Thermal hydrologic calculations estimate the thermal pulse from emplaced waste to be small (less than 20 C at 10 meters from the borehole, for less than a few hundred years), and to result in maximum total vertical fluid movement of {approx}100 m. Reducing conditions will sharply limit solubilities of most dose-critical radionuclides at depth, and high ionic strengths of deep fluids will prevent colloidal transport. For the bounding analysis of this report, waste is envisioned to be emplaced as fuel assemblies stacked inside drill casing that are lowered, and emplaced using off-the-shelf oilfield and geothermal drilling techniques, into the lower 1-2 km portion of a vertical borehole {approx}45 cm in diameter and 3-5 km deep, followed by borehole sealing. Deep borehole disposal of radioactive waste in the United States would require modifications to the Nuclear Waste Policy Act and to applicable regulatory standards for long-term performance set by the US Environmental Protection Agency (40 CFR part 191) and US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (10 CFR part 60). The performance analysis described here is based on the assumption that long-term standards for deep borehole disposal would be identical in the key regards to those prescribed for existing repositories (40 CFR part 197 and 10 CFR part 63).

Stein, Joshua S.; Freeze, Geoffrey A.; Brady, Patrick Vane; Swift, Peter N.; Rechard, Robert Paul; Arnold, Bill Walter; Kanney, Joseph F.; Bauer, Stephen J.

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Application of borehole geophysics to fracture identification and characterization in low porosity limestones and dolostones  

SciTech Connect

Geophysical logging was conducted in exploratory core holes drilled for geohydrological investigations at three sites used for waste disposal on the US Department of Energy's Oak Ridge Reservation. Geophysical log response was calibrated to borehole geology using the drill core. Subsequently, the logs were used to identify fractures and fractured zones and to characterize the hydrologic activity of such zones. Results of the study were used to identify zones of ground water movement and to select targets for subsequent piezometer and monitoring well installation. Neutron porosity, long- and short-normal resistivity, and density logs exhibit anomalies only adjacent to pervasively fractured zones and rarely exhibit anomalies adjacent to individual fractures, suggesting that such logs have insufficient resolution to detect individual fractures. Spontaneous potential, single point resistance, acoustic velocity, and acoustic variable density logs, however, typically exhibit anomalies adjacent to both individual fractures and fracture zones. Correlation is excellent between fracture density logs prepared from the examination of drill core and fractures identified by the analysis of a suite of geophysical logs that have differing spatial resolution characteristics. Results of the study demonstrate the importance of (1) calibrating geophysical log response to drill core from a site, and (2) running a comprehensive suite of geophysical logs that can evaluate both large- and small-scale rock features. Once geophysical log responses to site-specific geological features have been established, logs provide a means of identifying fracture zones and discriminating between hydrologically active and inactive fracture zones. 9 figs.

Haase, C.S.; King, H.L.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Characterization of Vadose Zone Sediments Below the T Tank Farm: Boreholes C4104, C4105, 299-W10-196 and RCRA Borehole 299-W11-39  

SciTech Connect

This report contains geologic, geochemical, and physical characterization data collected on sediment recovered from boreholes C4104 and C4105 in the T Tank Farm, and 299-W-11-39 installed northeast of the T Tank Farm. The measurements on sediments from borehole C4104 are compared to a nearby borehole 299-W10-196 placed through the plume from the 1973 T-106 tank leak. This report also presents the data in the context of sediment types, the vertical extent of contamination, the migration potential of the contaminants, and the likely source of the contamination in the vadose zone and groundwater below the T Tank Farm. Sediment samples were characterized for: moisture content, gamma-emission radionuclides, one-to-one water extracts (which provide soil pH, electrical conductivity, cation, trace metal, radionuclide and anion data), total carbon and inorganic carbon content, and 8 M nitric acid extracts (which provide a measure of the total leachable sediment content of contaminants). Overall, our analyses showed that common ion exchange is a key mechanism that influences the distribution of contaminants within that portion of the vadose zone affected by tank liquor. We observed slight elevated pH values in samples from borehole C4104. The sediments from the three boreholes, C4104, C4105, and 299-W10-196 do show that sodium-, nitrate-, and sulfate-dominated fluids are present below tank T-106 and have formed a salt plume. The fluids are more dilute than tank fluids observed below tanks at the SX and BX Tank Farms and slightly less than those from the most saline porewater found in contaminated TX tank farm sediments. The boreholes could not penetrate below the gravel-rich strata of the Ringold Formation Wooded Island member (Rwi) (refusal was met at about 130 ft bgs); therefore, we could not identify the maximum vertical penetration of the tank related plumes. The moisture content, pH, electrical conductivity, nitrate, and technetium-99 profiles versus depth in the three contaminated boreholes around T-106 do not clearly identify the leading edge of the plume. However, the profiles do collectively suggest that bulk of tank-related fluids (center of mass) still resides in Ringold Formation Taylor Flats member fine-grained sediments. Most of the chemical data, especially the nitrate and technetium-99 distributions with depth, support a flow conceptual model that suggests vertical percolation through the Hanford formation H2 unit near T-106 and then a strong horizontal spreading within the CCUu unit followed by more slow vertical percolation, perhaps via diffusion, into the deeper strata. Slow flushing by enhanced recharge and rapid snow melt events (Feb. 1979) appear to lead to more horizontal movement of the tank fluids downgradient towards C4105. The inventories as a function of depth of potential contaminants of concern, nitrate, technetium, uranium, and chromium, are provided. In-situ Kd values were calculated from water and acid extract measurements. For conservative modeling purposes we recommend using Kd values of 0 mL/g for nitrate, Co-60, and technetium-99, a value of 0.1 mL/g for uranium near borehole C4104 and 10 mL/g for U near borehole C4105, and 1 mL/g for chromium to represent the entire vadose zone profile from the bottoms of the tanks to the water table. A technetium-99 groundwater plume exists northeast and east of T WMA. The highest technetium-99 concentration in fiscal year 2003 was 9,200 pCi/L in well 299-W11-39. The most probable source for the technetium-99 is the T waste management area. Groundwater from wells in the west (upgradient) and north of WMA T appear to be highly influenced by wastes disposed to the cribs and trenches on the west side of the WMA. Groundwater from wells at the northeast corner and the east side of the WMA appears to be evolving towards tank waste that has leaked from T-101 or T-106.

Serne, R JEFFREY.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Horton, Duane G.; Lanigan, David C.; Lindenmeier, Clark W.; Lindberg, Michael J.; Clayton, Ray E.; LeGore, Virginia L.; Geiszler, Keith N.; Baum, Steven R.; Valenta, Michelle M.; Kutnyakov, Igor V.; Vickerman, Tanya S.; Orr, Robert D.; Brown, Christopher F.

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

SPI energy calibration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The status of the SPI energy calibration after the first year of INTEGRAL operations is reported. We have studied the gain variations and we have demonstrated that the most important parameter is the germanium detector temperature. This study permits us to determine the limits of our calibration method and the frequency of calibrations needed.

V. Lonjou; J. Knodlseder; J. P. Roques; G. K. Skinner; P. von Ballmoos; P. Jean; P. Paul; G. Weidenspointner; C. Wunderer; S. Schanne

2005-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

156

Cross borehole induced polarization to detect subsurface NAPL at the Savannah River Site, South Carolina  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Spectral induced polarization measurements were acquired in six cross-borehole panels within four boreholes at the Savannah River Site. The investigation was performed to delineate the presence of dense non-aqueous phase ...

Lambert, Michael B. (Michael Brian), 1980-

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Chapter 13 - Plugging In-Mine Boreholes and CBM Wells Drilled from Surface  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Horizontal degasification boreholes drilled from within the mine or from the surface have proven to be effective in recovering coalbed methane (CBM) for degasification and commercial marketing. However, the inability to completely plug horizontal boreholes still producing gas prior to mine through has caused unsafe situations and significant coal production delays. To date, cement slurry has commonly been used to plug underground horizontal degasification boreholes CBM wells, including sidetracks. Over 546,000 gallons of cross-linked polymer gel has been pumped to seal these 80 boreholes. The quantity of gel pumped is almost two times the calculated volume of the boreholes, including sidetracks. The gel effectively flows into the fracture system of the coal displacing gas and water. Finally, with an affinity to attach itself to everything, except for itself, the gel adhered to the inner wall of the borehole providing an impenetrable skin, minimizing gas, and water migrating back into the borehole as evidenced by mining into the boreholes.

Gary DuBois; Stephen Kravits; Joe Kirley; Doug Conklin; Joanne Reilly

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Methods for enhancing the efficiency of creating a borehole using high power laser systems  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods for utilizing 10 kW or more laser energy transmitted deep into the earth with the suppression of associated nonlinear phenomena to enhance the formation of Boreholes. Methods for the laser operations to reduce the critical path for forming a borehole in the earth. These methods can deliver high power laser energy down a deep borehole, while maintaining the high power to perform operations in such boreholes deep within the earth.

Zediker, Mark S.; Rinzler, Charles C.; Faircloth, Brian O.; Koblick, Yeshaya; Moxley, Joel F.

2014-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

159

Method and system for advancement of a borehole using a high power laser  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

There is provided a system, apparatus and methods for the laser drilling of a borehole in the earth. There is further provided with in the systems a means for delivering high power laser energy down a deep borehole, while maintaining the high power to advance such boreholes deep into the earth and at highly efficient advancement rates, a laser bottom hole assembly, and fluid directing techniques and assemblies for removing the displaced material from the borehole.

Moxley, Joel F.; Land, Mark S.; Rinzler, Charles C.; Faircloth, Brian O.; Zediker, Mark S.

2014-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

160

Methods and apparatus for removal and control of material in laser drilling of a borehole  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The removal of material from the path of a high power laser beam during down hole laser operations including drilling of a borehole and removal of displaced laser effected borehole material from the borehole during laser operations. In particular, paths, dynamics and parameters of fluid flows for use in conjunction with a laser bottom hole assembly.

Rinzler, Charles C; Zediker, Mark S; Faircloth, Brian O; Moxley, Joel F

2014-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "borehole calibration models" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

On the imaging of radio-frequency electromagnetic data forcross-borehole mineral exploration  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......the subsurface. borehole|electromagnetic...determine future drilling or excavation targets...the Chinese JW-4 borehole electric-field...targets are rare. The large conductivity contrast...the transmitter borehole (Fig. 12). The...separations much larger than a characteristic......

L. Yu; M. Chouteau; D. E. Boerner; J. Wang

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

SH Propagator Matrix and Qs Estimates From Borehole- and Surface-Recorded Earthquake Data  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......M.,1986. Borehole seismology and...seismic regime of large industrial centres...Long period borehole seismology had...problems such as larger dimensions of...in 1356 by a large destructive earthquake...telephone time borehole seismometer surface...determined during the drilling and are shown......

Jeannot Trampert; Michel Cara; Michel Frogneux

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Analysis of Heat Flow Data—I Detailed Observations in a Single Borehole  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......determination of a single borehole may be considerablygreater...selected30-msection of borehole may yield a useful heat...Resourcesfor financing the drilling of the borehole; to the National Research...for pointing out the large amount of climatic information......

A. E. Beck; A. S. Judge

1969-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Deep borehole log evidence for fractal distribution of fractures in crystalline rock  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......as well as large scale-lengths...fractures seen in drilling cores and...register on a borehole scanning...rock in the borehole wall. In...evidence in the drilling logs or retrieved...core that large-scale fractures...samples, and drilling history...control the large-scale trend...sensitive to borehole lithology......

Peter Leary

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Volcanic eruption through a geothermal borehole at Námafjall, Iceland  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... THE eruption on 8 September 1977 in the Nmaf jail geothermal field was a part of a rifting event that took place during that day, ... the main rifting took place south of the caldera, just north of the Nmaf jail geothermal field. We give here a short account of this event and the borehole eruption. ...

Gudrún Larsen; Karl Grönvold; Sigurdur Thorarinsson

1979-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

166

Sampling and Analysis Plan Waste Treatment Plant Seismic Boreholes Project.  

SciTech Connect

This sampling and analysis plan (SAP) describes planned data collection activities for four entry boreholes through the sediment overlying the Saddle Mountains Basalt, up to three new deep rotary boreholes through the Saddle Mountains Basalt and sedimentary interbeds, and one corehole through the Saddle Mountains Basalt and sedimentary interbeds at the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) site. The SAP will be used in concert with the quality assurance plan for the project to guide the procedure development and data collection activities needed to support borehole drilling, geophysical measurements, and sampling. This SAP identifies the American Society of Testing Materials standards, Hanford Site procedures, and other guidance to be followed for data collection activities. Revision 3 incorporates all interim change notices (ICN) that were issued to Revision 2 prior to completion of sampling and analysis activities for the WTP Seismic Boreholes Project. This revision also incorporates changes to the exact number of samples submitted for dynamic testing as directed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. Revision 3 represents the final version of the SAP.

Brouns, Thomas M.

2007-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

167

Apparatus for vibrating a pipe string in a borehole  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes an apparatus for vibrating a drill string having a central axis in a borehole. The apparatus comprising means for generating at a downhole location longitudinally directional vibrations along the central axis of the drill string in response to flow of fluid through the interior of the drill string and a shock absorbing element mounted in the drill string between the apparatus and a drill bit carried by the drill string effective to substantially isolate the drill bit from the vibration induced in the drill string. Also described is a method of feeding a drill string through a mon-vertical section of borehole comprising: generating a downhole location a longitudinally directional vibration along the central axis of the drill string by oscillating a body in a axial direction relative to the drill string in response to flow of fluid through the interior of the drill string. The vibrations preventing frictional sticking of the drill string against the borehole wall; isolating a drill bit at the end of the drill string from the effects of the vibration during drilling operations; and moving the pipe longitudinally in the borehole.

Worrall, R.N.; Stulemeijer, I.P.J.M.

1990-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

168

An Attempt to Calibrate and Validate a Simple Ductile Failure Model Against Axial-Torsion Experiments on Al 6061-T651.  

SciTech Connect

This report details a work in progress. We have attempted to calibrate and validate a Von Mises plasticity model with the Johnson-Cook failure criterion ( Johnson & Cook , 1985 ) against a set of experiments on various specimens of Al 6061-T651. As will be shown, the effort was not successful, despite considerable attention to detail. When the model was com- pared against axial-torsion experiments on tubes, it over predicted failure by 3 x in tension, and never predicted failure in torsion, even when the tube was twisted by 4 x further than the experiment. While this result is unfortunate, it is not surprising. Ductile failure is not well understood. In future work, we will explore whether more sophisticated material mod- els of plasticity and failure will improve the predictions. Selecting the appropriate advanced material model and interpreting the results of said model are not trivial exercises, so it is worthwhile to fully investigate the behavior of a simple plasticity model before moving on to an anisotropic yield surface or a similarly complicated model.

Reedlunn, Benjamin; Lu, Wei-Yang [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Radiometer Calibration Trends  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wilcox, T. L. Stoffel, and D. R. Myers National Renewable Energy Laboratory Golden, Colorado Abstract Calibrations of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) broadband...

170

Development of a decadal-scale estuarine geomorphic model for Suisun Bay, California: calibration, validation, and idealized time-stepping  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the model code, the salinity gradient is calculated as afreshwater flow. This salinity gradient is applied on floodsolved with a gradient condition. For salinity, the method

Ganju, Neil K; Schoellhamer, David H; Younis, Bassam A

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Thermo-Hydrological-Mechanical Analysis of a Clay Barrier for Radioactive Waste Isolation: Probabilistic Calibration and Advanced Modeling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

............................................................................. 129 5.2 Micro Structural Model .............................................................................. 136 5.3 Interaction Between Micro and Macro Structures ..................................... 138 6. MODELING OF FULL SCALE FEBEX INSITU... Conditions .................................................... 154 6.2.4 Results of Thermo-Hydro-Mechanical Analysis ............................ 156 6.2.5 Analysis of Mechanical Behavior .................................................. 161 6...

Dontha, Lakshman

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

172

A transmission calibration method for superconducting resonators  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A method is proposed and experimentally explored for \\textit{in-situ} calibration of complex transmission data for superconducting microwave resonators. This cryogenic calibration method accounts for the instrumental transmission response between the vector network analyzer reference plane and the device calibration plane. Once calibrated, the observed resonator response was modeled in detail by two approaches. The first, a phenomenological model based on physically realizable rational functions, enables the extraction of multiple resonance frequencies and widths for coupled resonators without explicit specification of the circuit network. In the second, an ABCD-matrix representation for the distributed transmission line circuit is used to model the observed response from the characteristic impedance and propagation constant. When used in conjunction with electromagnetic simulations, the kinetic inductance fraction can be determined with this method with an accuracy of 2%. Datasets for superconducting microst...

Cataldo, Giuseppe; Barrentine, Emily M; Brown, Ari D; Moseley, Samuel H; U-Yen, Kongpop

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Calibration method for spectroscopic systems  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Calibration spots of optically-characterized material placed in the field of view of a spectroscopic system allow calibration of the spectroscopic system. Response from the calibration spots is measured and used to calibrate for varying spectroscopic system operating parameters. The accurate calibration achieved allows quantitative spectroscopic analysis of responses taken at different times, different excitation conditions, and of different targets. 3 figs.

Sandison, D.R.

1998-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

174

Bore-hole survey at Camp Century, 1989  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A combination of the directional surveys of the Camp Century borehole from 1966, 1967, 1969 and 1989 has revealed a deformation pattern similar to that measured at Dye-3, South Greenland and Byrd Station, Antarctica showing high deformation rate for Wisconsin ice. Compared to the Dye-3 profile, the deformation shows the same pattern even in details. The surface velocity obtained by integrating the bore hole deformation is in agreement with that obtained from satellite measurements.

N.S Gundestrup; D Dahl-Jensen; B.L Hansen; J Kelty

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Stability analysis of a borehole wall during horizontal directional drilling  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper, numerical simulation strategies are proposed and numerical analyses are performed to investigate the stability of a borehole wall during horizontal directional drilling in loose sand with an emphasis on the role of the filter cake in borehole stability. Two computational scenarios, one in the absence of a filter cake and one with the presence of a filter cake in a borehole wall, are investigated by considering both deep and shallow borehole situations. In the case where no filter cake is formed, the soil–drilling fluid interaction analysis shows that the effective pressure on soil particles will quickly decrease to zero even at a low drilling fluid pressure because of the rapid drainage of the drilling fluids into the loose sands. This conforms to the classical liquefaction criterion, indicating that static (flow) liquefaction-based soil crumbling and sloughing will occur even at a very low drilling fluid pressure if an effective filter cake is not formed. Soil’s permeability effect on pore pressure and the transition to a steady flow are also studied. In the second scenario in which a filter cake is formed, the hydraulic fracture failures around the bores are investigated, which are caused by the expansion of the yielding zones. The yield zone sizes and critical drilling fluid pressures at the moment of hydraulic fracturing failure are calculated from the finite element analyses and the closed-form solution, which is based on classical plasticity theories. The critical fluid pressures from the finite element analyses and the closed-form solutions are very close, but there is a large discrepancy between the yield zone sizes.

X. Wang; R.L. Sterling

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Sandia WIPP calibration traceability  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the work performed to establish calibration traceability for the instrumentation used by Sandia National Laboratories at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) during testing from 1980-1985. Identifying the calibration traceability is an important part of establishing a pedigree for the data and is part of the qualification of existing data. In general, the requirement states that the calibration of Measuring and Test equipment must have a valid relationship to nationally recognized standards or the basis for the calibration must be documented. Sandia recognized that just establishing calibration traceability would not necessarily mean that all QA requirements were met during the certification of test instrumentation. To address this concern, the assessment was expanded to include various activities.

Schuhen, M.D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)] [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Dean, T.A. [RE/SPEC, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)] [RE/SPEC, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Borehole gravity meter survey in drill hole USW G-4, Yucca Mountain Area, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

Drill hole USW G-4 was logged with the US Geological Survey borehole gravity meter (BHGM) BH-6 as part of a detailed study of the lithostratigraphic units penetrated by this hole. Because the BHGM measures a larger volume of rock than the conventional gamma-gamma density tool, it provides an independent and more accurate measurement of the in situ average bulk density of thick lithologic units. USW G-4 is an especially important hole because of its proximity to the proposed exploratory shaft at Yucca Mountain. The BHGM data were reduced to interval densities using a free-air gradient (F) of 0.3083 mGal./m (0.09397 mGal/ft) measured at the drill site. The interval densities were further improved by employing an instrument correction factor of 1.00226. This factor was determined from measurements obtained by taking gravity meter BH-6 over the Charleston Peak calibration loop. The interval density data reported herein, should be helpful for planning the construction of the proposed shaft.

Healey, D.L.; Clutsom, F.G.; Glover, D.A.

1986-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

178

Parametric Analyses of Alternative Flow Models at Yucca Mountain, Nevada Calibrations and Controls - State of Nevada-Funded Research  

SciTech Connect

The controls on the potentiometric surface and temperature distribution at Yucca Mountain have long been thought to be related to major fault zones. The exact way the faults influence these distributions has been somewhat elusive. The parametric studies discussed in this paper show that the fault zone x, y and z permeability tensors, as well as the alignment of the fault zone in relation to the flow field (1), are major contributing factors in the pressure and temperature distributions. A series of runs were conducted for the State of Nevada with a 3-dimensional model utilizing the AT2VOC version of the A-TOUGH code (2),(3). The runs were conducted under steady state conditions and utilized fully coupled heat and flow conditions. The model setup and boundary conditions are fully described. Comparisons were done with varying degrees of anisotropic permeability ratios in the fault zones. The resulting temperature and pressure profiles are compared. The model, while simple, allowed us to examine the relationship of the head and temperature distributions to the position and permeability of major fault zones. It is our conclusion that the major faults included in this model do significantly affect the observed head and temperature distributions. Performance Assessments currently may not reflect actual doses at the Compliance boundary due to the potential for radionuclide flow to be captured in the Ghost Dance Fault and be transported primarily south with little dilution and dispersion.

Lehman, L.; Brown, T. P.

2002-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

179

Borehole Imaging of In Situ Stress Tests at Mirror Lake Research Site |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Borehole Imaging of In Situ Stress Tests at Mirror Lake Research Site Borehole Imaging of In Situ Stress Tests at Mirror Lake Research Site Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Borehole Imaging of In Situ Stress Tests at Mirror Lake Research Site Author U.S. Geological Survey Published U.S. Geological Survey, 2013 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for Borehole Imaging of In Situ Stress Tests at Mirror Lake Research Site Citation U.S. Geological Survey. Borehole Imaging of In Situ Stress Tests at Mirror Lake Research Site [Internet]. 2013. U.S. Geological Survey. [cited 2013/10/16]. Available from: http://water.usgs.gov/ogw/bgas/toxics/ml_bips.html Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Borehole_Imaging_of_In_Situ_Stress_Tests_at_Mirror_Lake_Research_Site&oldid=688729"

180

Calibrating page sized Gafchromic EBT3 films  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: The purpose is the development of a novel calibration method for dosimetry with Gafchromic EBT3 films. The method should be applicable for pretreatment verification of volumetric modulated arc, and intensity modulated radiotherapy. Because the exposed area on film can be large for such treatments, lateral scan errors must be taken into account. The correction for the lateral scan effect is obtained from the calibration data itself. Methods: In this work, the film measurements were modeled using their relative scan values (Transmittance, T). Inside the transmittance domain a linear combination and a parabolic lateral scan correction described the observed transmittance values. The linear combination model, combined a monomer transmittance state (T{sub 0}) and a polymer transmittance state (T{sub {infinity}}) of the film. The dose domain was associated with the observed effects in the transmittance domain through a rational calibration function. On the calibration film only simple static fields were applied and page sized films were used for calibration and measurements (treatment verification). Four different calibration setups were considered and compared with respect to dose estimation accuracy. The first (I) used a calibration table from 32 regions of interest (ROIs) spread on 4 calibration films, the second (II) used 16 ROIs spread on 2 calibration films, the third (III), and fourth (IV) used 8 ROIs spread on a single calibration film. The calibration tables of the setups I, II, and IV contained eight dose levels delivered to different positions on the films, while for setup III only four dose levels were applied. Validation was performed by irradiating film strips with known doses at two different time points over the course of a week. Accuracy of the dose response and the lateral effect correction was estimated using the dose difference and the root mean squared error (RMSE), respectively. Results: A calibration based on two films was the optimal balance between cost effectiveness and dosimetric accuracy. The validation resulted in dose errors of 1%-2% for the two different time points, with a maximal absolute dose error around 0.05 Gy. The lateral correction reduced the RMSE values on the sides of the film to the RMSE values at the center of the film. Conclusions: EBT3 Gafchromic films were calibrated for large field dosimetry with a limited number of page sized films and simple static calibration fields. The transmittance was modeled as a linear combination of two transmittance states, and associated with dose using a rational calibration function. Additionally, the lateral scan effect was resolved in the calibration function itself. This allows the use of page sized films. Only two calibration films were required to estimate both the dose and the lateral response. The calibration films were used over the course of a week, with residual dose errors Less-Than-Or-Slanted-Equal-To 2% or Less-Than-Or-Slanted-Equal-To 0.05 Gy.

Crijns, W.; Maes, F.; Heide, U. A. van der; Van den Heuvel, F. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospitals Leuven, Herestraat 49, 3000 Leuven (Belgium); Department ESAT/PSI-Medical Image Computing, Medical Imaging Research Center, KU Leuven, Herestraat 49, 3000 Leuven (Belgium); Department of Radiation Oncology, The Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Plesmanlaan 121, 1066 CX Amsterdam (Netherlands); Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospitals Leuven, Herestraat 49, 3000 Leuven (Belgium)

2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "borehole calibration models" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

A strategy to seal exploratory boreholes in unsaturated tuff; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project  

SciTech Connect

This report presents a strategy for sealing exploratory boreholes associated with the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project. Over 500 existing and proposed boreholes have been considered in the development of this strategy, ranging from shallow (penetrating into alluvium only) to deep (penetrating into the groundwater table). Among the comprehensive list of recommendations are the following: Those boreholes within the potential repository boundary and penetrating through the potential repository horizon are the most significant boreholes from a performance standpoint and should be sealed. Shallow boreholes are comparatively insignificant and require only nominal sealing. The primary areas in which to place seals are away from high-temperature zones at a distance from the potential repository horizon in the Paintbrush nonwelded tuff and the upper portion of the Topopah Spring Member and in the tuffaceous beds of the Calico Hills Unit. Seals should be placed prior to waste emplacement. Performance goals for borehole seals both above and below the potential repository are proposed. Detailed construction information on the boreholes that could be used for future design specifications is provided along with a description of the environmental setting, i.e., the geology, hydrology, and the in situ and thermal stress states. A borehole classification scheme based on the condition of the borehole wall in different tuffaceous units is also proposed. In addition, calculations are presented to assess the significance of the boreholes acting as preferential pathways for the release of radionuclides. Design calculations are presented to answer the concerns of when, where, and how to seal. As part of the strategy development, available technologies to seal exploratory boreholes (including casing removal, borehole wall reconditioning, and seal emplacement) are reviewed.

Fernandez, J.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Case, J.B.; Givens, C.A.; Carney, B.C. [IT Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Feasibility of very deep borehole disposal of US nuclear defense wastes .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis analyzes the feasibility of emplacing DOE-owned defense nuclear waste from weapons production into a permanent borehole repository drilled ~4 km into granite basement… (more)

Dozier, Frances Elizabeth

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Condensed listing of surface boreholes at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Project through 31 December 1995  

SciTech Connect

This report contains a condensed listing of Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) project surface boreholes drilled for the purpose of site selection and characterization through 31 December 1995. The US Department of Energy (DOE) sponsored the drilling activities, which were conducted primarily by Sandia National Laboratories. The listing provides physical attributes such as location (township, range, section, and state-plane coordinates), elevation, and total borehole depth, as well as the purpose for the borehole, drilling dates, and information about extracted cores. The report also presents the hole status (plugged, testing, monitoring, etc.) and includes salient findings and references. Maps with borehole locations and times-of-drilling charts are included.

Hill, L.R.; Aguilar, R.; Mercer, J.W. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Newman, G. [GRAM, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Borehole Seismic Monitoring at Otway Using the Naylor-1 Instrument String  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LBNL-2337E Borehole Seismic Monitoring at Otway Using thefor performing three distinct seismic measurements, hightime (HRTT), walkaway vertical seismic profiling (WVSP), and

Daley, T.M.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Integrated calibration sphere and calibration step fixture for improved coordinate measurement machine calibration  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for mounting a calibration sphere to a calibration fixture for Coordinate Measurement Machine (CMM) calibration and qualification is described, decreasing the time required for such qualification, thus allowing the CMM to be used more productively. A number of embodiments are disclosed that allow for new and retrofit manufacture to perform as integrated calibration sphere and calibration fixture devices. This invention renders unnecessary the removal of a calibration sphere prior to CMM measurement of calibration features on calibration fixtures, thereby greatly reducing the time spent qualifying a CMM.

Clifford, Harry J. (Los Alamos, NM)

2011-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

186

Reconstruction of microseismogram from various waves in a borehole  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. D. Neve s (Member) T. W. encer (M ber) T. R. Fischer (Member) W. B. Jones, Jr. (Head of Department) August 1983 ABSTRACT Reconstruct1on of Microseismograms from Various Waves in a Borehole (August 1983) Soetjipno Soetandio, B. S. , Texas... function in time-domain Source function in frequency-domain 20 21 Laplace contour in the complex w-plane and the singularities in the k - plane z 23 Compressional and shear wave travel paths . 26 Location of Bessel functions arguments 28 Acoustic...

Soetandio, Soetjipno

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Multidetector calibration for mass spectrometers  

SciTech Connect

The International Atomic Energy Agency`s Safeguards Analytical Laboratory has performed calibration experiments to measure the different efficiencies among multi-Faraday detectors for a Finnigan-MAT 261 mass spectrometer. Two types of calibration experiments were performed: (1) peak-shift experiments and (2) peak-jump experiments. For peak-shift experiments, the ion intensities were measured for all isotopes of an element in different Faraday detectors. Repeated measurements were made by shifting the isotopes to various Faraday detectors. Two different peak-shifting schemes were used to measure plutonium (UK Pu5/92138) samples. For peak-jump experiments, ion intensities were measured in a reference Faraday detector for a single isotope and compared with those measured in the other Faraday detectors. Repeated measurements were made by switching back-and-forth between the reference Faraday detector and a selected Faraday detector. This switching procedure is repeated for all Faraday detectors. Peak-jump experiments were performed with replicate measurements of {sup 239}Pu, {sup 187}Re, and {sup 238}U. Detector efficiency factors were estimated for both peak-jump and peak-shift experiments using a flexible calibration model to statistically analyze both types of multidetector calibration experiments. Calculated detector efficiency factors were shown to depend on both the material analyzed and the experimental conditions. A single detector efficiency factor is not recommended for each detector that would be used to correct routine sample analyses. An alternative three-run peak-shift sample analysis should be considered. A statistical analysis of the data from this peak-shift experiment can adjust the isotopic ratio estimates for detector differences due to each sample analysis.

Bayne, C.K. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Donohue, D.L.; Fiedler, R. [IAEA, Seibersdorf (Austria). Safeguards Analytical Lab.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Field Calibration Facilities for Environmental Measurement of Radium,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Field Calibration Facilities for Environmental Measurement of Field Calibration Facilities for Environmental Measurement of Radium, Thorium, and Potassium (October 2013) Field Calibration Facilities for Environmental Measurement of Radium, Thorium, and Potassium (October 2013) The first edition of this report, released in October 1982, presented physical-characteristic information for the various DOE radiologic-instrument calibration facilities located throughout the U.S. Three subsequent editions have been released in an effort to update information regarding the current status of the facilities. Field Calibration Facilities for Environmental Measurement of Radium, Thorium, and Potassium (October 2013) More Documents & Publications Calibration Model Assignments expressed as U3O8, Summary Table ES-1 Field Calibration Facilities for Environmental Measurement of Radium,

189

Understanding the Chena Hot Springs, Alaska, geothermal system using temperature and pressure data from exploration boreholes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Chena Hot Springs is a small, moderate temperature, deep circulating geothermal system, apparently typical of those associated to hot springs of interior Alaska. Multi-stage drilling was used in some exploration boreholes and was found to be useful for understanding subsurface flow characteristics and developing a conceptual model of the system. The results illustrate how temperature profiles illuminate varying pressure versus depth characteristics and can be used alone in cases where staged drilling is not practical. The extensive exploration activities helped define optimal fluid production and injection areas, and showed that the system could provide sufficient hot fluids (?57 °C) to run a 400-kWe binary power plant, which came on line in 2006.

Kamil Erkan; Gwen Holdmann; Walter Benoit; David Blackwell

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Reversible rigid coupling apparatus and method for borehole seismic transducers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus and method of high resolution reverse vertical seismic profile (VSP) measurements is shown. By encapsulating the seismic detector and heaters in a meltable substance (such as wax), the seismic detector can be removably secured in a borehole in a manner capable of measuring high resolution signals in the 100 to 1000 hertz range and higher. The meltable substance is selected to match the overall density of the detector package with the underground formation, yet still have relatively low melting point and rigid enough to transmit vibrations to accelerometers in the seismic detector. To minimize voids in the meltable substance upon solidification, the meltable substance is selected for minimum shrinkage, yet still having the other desirable characteristics. Heaters are arranged in the meltable substance in such a manner to allow the lowermost portion of the meltable substance to cool and solidify first. Solidification continues upwards from bottom-to-top until the top of the meltable substance is solidified and the seismic detector is ready for use. To remove, the heaters melt the meltable substance and the detector package is pulled from the borehole.

Owen, Thomas E. (Helotes, TX); Parra, Jorge O. (Helotes, TX)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Interim reclamation report, Basalt Waste Isolation project: Boreholes, 1989  

SciTech Connect

In 1968, a program was started to assess the feasibility of storing Hanford Site defense waste in deep caverns constructed in basalt. This program was expanded in 1976 to include investigations of the Hanford Site as a potential location for a mined commercial nuclear waste repository. An extensive site characterization program was begun to determine the feasibility of using the basalts beneath the Hanford Site for the repository. Site research focused primarily on determining the direction and speed of groundwater movement, the uniformity of basalt layers, and tectonic stability. Some 98 boreholes were sited, drilled, deepened, or modified by BWIP between 1977 and 1988 to test the geologic properties of the Site. On December 22, 1987, President Reagan signed into law the Nuclear Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1987, which effectively stopped all repository-related activities except reclamation of disturbed lands at the Hanford Site. This report describes the development of the reclamation program for the BWIP boreholes, its implementation, and preliminary estimates of its success. The goal of the reclamation program is to return sites disturbed by the repository program as nearly as practicable to their original conditions using native plant species. 48 refs., 28 figs., 14 tabs.

Brandt, C.A.; Rickard, W.H. Jr.; Hefty, M.G.

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Wave propagation along a cylindrical borehole in an anisotropic poroelastic solid  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......borehole is filled with liquid. anisotropic|borehole|dispersion...porous solid. Generally, anisotropic parameters characterize the...felt to be necessary. Since shale and finely layered sedimentary...which is not possible in an anisotropic medium. The waves are quasi-waves......

Anil K. Vashishth; Poonam Khurana

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

The Determination of Virgin Strata Temperatures from Observations in Deep Survey Boreholes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Hopton Pool Borehole changed in diameter...temperature of the drilling fluid for differentboreholes...effect of a larger hole in rock...the hole was large in diameter in the Hopton Pool Borehole at least 27...virgin strata and drilling fluid temperatures......

L. R. Cooper; C. Jones

1959-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Geochemistry of Samples from Borehole C3177(299-E24-21)  

SciTech Connect

This report contains the results of geochemical and physical property analyses of twelve samples from the Immobilized Low-Activity Waste (ILAW) borehole #2. The borehole is in the middle of the 200 East Area, at the northeast corner of the ILAW disposal site.

Horton, Duane G.; Schaef, Herbert T.; Serne, R. Jeffrey; Brown, Christopher F.; Valenta, Michelle M.; Vickerman, Tanya S.; Kutnyakov, Igor V.; Baum, Steven R.; Geiszler, Keith N.; Parker, Kent E.

2003-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

195

Device and method for imaging of non-linear and linear properties of formations surrounding a borehole  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In some aspects of the disclosure, a method and an apparatus is disclosed for investigating material surrounding the borehole. The method includes generating within a borehole an intermittent low frequency vibration that propagates as a tube wave longitudinally to the borehole and induces a nonlinear response in one or more features in the material that are substantially perpendicular to a longitudinal axis of the borehole; generating within the borehole a sequence of high frequency pulses directed such that they travel longitudinally to the borehole within the surrounding material; and receiving, at one or more receivers positionable in the borehole, a signal that includes components from the low frequency vibration and the sequence of high frequency pulses during intermittent generation of the low frequency vibration, to investigate the material surrounding the borehole.

Johnson, Paul A; Tencate, James A; Le Bas, Pierre-Yves; Guyer, Robert; Vu, Cung Khac; Skelt, Christopher

2013-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

196

Calibrated Hydrothermal Parameters, Barrow, Alaska, 2013  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

A model-observation-experiment process (ModEx) is used to generate three 1D models of characteristic micro-topographical land-formations, which are capable of simulating present active thaw layer (ALT) from current climate conditions. Each column was used in a coupled calibration to identify moss, peat and mineral soil hydrothermal properties to be used in up-scaled simulations. Observational soil temperature data from a tundra site located near Barrow, AK (Area C) is used to calibrate thermal properties of moss, peat, and sandy loam soil to be used in the multiphysics Advanced Terrestrial Simulator (ATS) models. Simulation results are a list of calibrated hydrothermal parameters for moss, peat, and mineral soil hydrothermal parameters.

Adam Atchley; Scott Painter; Dylan Harp; Ethan Coon; Cathy Wilson; Anna Liljedahl; Vladimir Romanovsky

197

Mapping DNAPL transport contamination in sedimentary and fractured rock aquifers with high resolution borehole seismic imaging Project No. SF11SS13 FY01 Annual Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

rig-installed boreholes have been successful at other sedimentary sites, additional boreholes at the Northeast site should be installed with rotary

Geller, J.T.; Majer, E.L.; Peterson, J.E.; Williams, K.H.; Flexser, S.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Borehole Geologic Data for the 216-Z Crib Facilities, A Status of Data Assembled through the Hanford Borehole Geologic Information System (HBGIS)  

SciTech Connect

The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is assembling existing borehole geologic information to aid in determining the distribution and potential movement of contaminants released to the environment and to aid selection of remedial alternatives. This information is being assembled via the Hanford Borehole Geologic Information System (HBGIS), which is being developed as part of the Characterization of Systems Project, managed by PNNL, and the Remediation Decision Support Task of the Groundwater Remediation Project, managed by Fluor Hanford, Inc. The purpose of this particular study was to assemble the existing borehole geologic data pertaining to sediments underlying the 216-Z Crib Facilities and the Plutonium Finishing Plant Closure Zone. The primary objective for Fiscal Year 2006 was to assemble the data, complete log plots, and interpret the location of major geologic contacts for each major borehole in and around the primary disposal facilities that received carbon tetrachloride. To date, 154 boreholes located within or immediately adjacent to 19 of the 216-Z crib facilities have been incorporated into HBGIS. Borehole geologic information for the remaining three Z-crib facilities is either lacking (e.g. 216-Z-13, -14, and -15), or has been identified as a lesser priority to be incorporated at a later date.

Last, George V.; Mackley, Rob D.; Lanigan, David C.

2006-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

199

Multipathing and spectral modulation of the downgoing wavefield in a complex crust: An example from the KTB (Germany) borehole  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......depths in spite of large amounts of data...frequently have access to borehole seismic data, which...costs involved in borehole drilling in crystalline crust...fluids exist at even larger depths. Another...1999 in the KTB borehole to a depth of 8......

Jose Pujol; Thomas Bohlen; Thies Beilecke; Wolfgang Rabbel

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Fracture detection using crosshole surveys and reverse vertical seismic profiles at the Conoco Borehole Test Facility, Oklahoma  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......profiles at the Conoco Borehole Test Facility, Oklahoma...RVSPs) at the Conoco Borehole Test Facility, Oklahoma...than 50 m, suggest large fracture densities...granite, Scientific Drilling, 1, 21-26. Crampin...system at the Conoco Borehole Test Facility, Kay......

Enru Liu; Stuart Crampin; John H. Queen

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "borehole calibration models" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Measurement of 238U, 232Th and 40K in boreholes at Gosa and Lugbe, Abuja, north central Nigeria  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......concentrations at Site A borehole for 238U have a mean...concentrations at Site B borehole for 238U have a mean...earth crust which to a large extent constitute the...sources come from the borehole/aquifer-bearing...treatment and during drilling processes; it cuts......

Omeje Maxwell; Husin Wagiran; Noorddin Ibrahim; Siak Kuan Lee; Soheil Sabri

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Thermistor mount efficiency calibration  

SciTech Connect

Thermistor mount efficiency calibration is accomplished by use of the power equation concept and by complex signal-ratio measurements. A comparison of thermistor mounts at microwave frequencies is made by mixing the reference and the reflected signals to produce a frequency at which the amplitude and phase difference may be readily measured.

Cable, J.W.

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Neutron calibration facilities  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......shut down. A recent development for a thermal neutron calibration field is a neutron guide used at the research reactor GKSS Geesthacht(35). The result is a high-intensity thermal beam providing a flux of up to 106 s1 with a field size of about 2.5 2......

H. Schuhmacher

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

5, 89258977, 2005 calibration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ACPD 5, 8925­8977, 2005 SCIAMACHY calibration G. Lichtenberg et al. Title Page Abstract. Stammes 2 , and M. Wuttke3 1 SRON National Institute of Space Research, Utrecht, the Netherlands 2 Royal Netherlands Meteorological Institute (KNMI), de Bilt, the Netherlands 3 Institute of Remote Sensing (If

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

205

Calibrating transport lines using LOCO techniques  

SciTech Connect

With the 12GeV upgrade underway at CEBAF, there is a need to re-characterize the beamlines after the modifications made to it to accommodate running at higher energies. We present a linear perturbation approach to calibrating the optics model of transport lines. This method is adapted from the LOCO method in use for storage rings. We consider the effect of quadrupole errors, dipole construction errors as well as beam position monitors and correctors calibrations. The ideal model is expanded to first order in Taylor series of the quadrupole errors. A set of difference orbits obtained by exciting the correctors along the beamline is taken, yielding the measured response matrix. An iterative procedure is invoked and the quadrupole errors as well as beam position monitors and corrector calibration factors are obtained. Here we present details of the method and results of first measurements at CEBAF in early 2011.

Yves Roblin

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Mercury Calibration System  

SciTech Connect

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Performance Specification 12 in the Clean Air Mercury Rule (CAMR) states that a mercury CEM must be calibrated with National Institute for Standards and Technology (NIST)-traceable standards. In early 2009, a NIST traceable standard for elemental mercury CEM calibration still does not exist. Despite the vacature of CAMR by a Federal appeals court in early 2008, a NIST traceable standard is still needed for whatever regulation is implemented in the future. Thermo Fisher is a major vendor providing complete integrated mercury continuous emissions monitoring (CEM) systems to the industry. WRI is participating with EPA, EPRI, NIST, and Thermo Fisher towards the development of the criteria that will be used in the traceability protocols to be issued by EPA. An initial draft of an elemental mercury calibration traceability protocol was distributed for comment to the participating research groups and vendors on a limited basis in early May 2007. In August 2007, EPA issued an interim traceability protocol for elemental mercury calibrators. Various working drafts of the new interim traceability protocols were distributed in late 2008 and early 2009 to participants in the Mercury Standards Working Committee project. The protocols include sections on qualification and certification. The qualification section describes in general terms tests that must be conducted by the calibrator vendors to demonstrate that their calibration equipment meets the minimum requirements to be established by EPA for use in CAMR monitoring. Variables to be examined include linearity, ambient temperature, back pressure, ambient pressure, line voltage, and effects of shipping. None of the procedures were described in detail in the draft interim documents; however they describe what EPA would like to eventually develop. WRI is providing the data and results to EPA for use in developing revised experimental procedures and realistic acceptance criteria based on actual capabilities of the current calibration technology. As part of the current effort, WRI worked with Thermo Fisher elemental mercury calibrator units to conduct qualification experiments to demonstrate their performance characteristics under a variety of conditions and to demonstrate that they qualify for use in the CEM calibration program. Monitoring of speciated mercury is another concern of this research. The mercury emissions from coal-fired power plants are comprised of both elemental and oxidized mercury. Current CEM analyzers are designed to measure elemental mercury only. Oxidized mercury must first be converted to elemental mercury prior to entering the analyzer inlet in order to be measured. CEM systems must demonstrate the ability to measure both elemental and oxidized mercury. This requires the use of oxidized mercury generators with an efficient conversion of the oxidized mercury to elemental mercury. There are currently two basic types of mercuric chloride (HgCl{sub 2}) generators used for this purpose. One is an evaporative HgCl{sub 2} generator, which produces gas standards of known concentration by vaporization of aqueous HgCl{sub 2} solutions and quantitative mixing with a diluent carrier gas. The other is a device that converts the output from an elemental Hg generator to HgCl{sub 2} by means of a chemical reaction with chlorine gas. The Thermo Fisher oxidizer system involves reaction of elemental mercury vapor with chlorine gas at an elevated temperature. The draft interim protocol for oxidized mercury units involving reaction with chlorine gas requires the vendors to demonstrate high efficiency of oxidation of an elemental mercury stream from an elemental mercury vapor generator. The Thermo Fisher oxidizer unit is designed to operate at the power plant stack at the probe outlet. Following oxidation of elemental mercury from reaction with chlorine gas, a high temperature module reduces the mercuric chloride back to elemental mercury. WRI conducted work with a custom laboratory configured stand-alone oxidized mercury generator unit prov

John Schabron; Eric Kalberer; Joseph Rovani; Mark Sanderson; Ryan Boysen; William Schuster

2009-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

207

Room Q data report: Test borehole data from April 1989 through November 1991  

SciTech Connect

Pore-pressure and fluid-flow tests were performed in 15 boreholes drilled into the bedded evaporites of the Salado Formation from within the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). The tests measured fluid flow and pore pressure within the Salado. The boreholes were drilled into the previously undisturbed host rock around a proposed cylindrical test room, Room Q, located on the west side of the facility about 655 m below ground surface. The boreholes were about 23 m deep and ranged over 27.5 m of stratigraphy. They were completed and instrumented before excavation of Room Q. Tests were conducted in isolated zones at the end of each borehole. Three groups of 5 isolated zones extend above, below, and to the north of Room Q at increasing distances from the room axis. Measurements recorded before, during, and after the mining of the circular test room provided data about borehole closure, pressure, temperature, and brine seepage into the isolated zones. The effects of the circular excavation were recorded. This data report presents the data collected from the borehole test zones between April 25, 1989 and November 25, 1991. The report also describes test development, test equipment, and borehole drilling operations.

Jensen, A.L. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Howard, C.L. [RE/SPEC, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Jones, R.L.; Peterson, T.P. [Tech. Reps., Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Calibrated vapor generator source  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A portable vapor generator is disclosed that can provide a controlled source of chemical vapors, such as, narcotic or explosive vapors. This source can be used to test and calibrate various types of vapor detection systems by providing a known amount of vapors to the system. The vapor generator is calibrated using a reference ion mobility spectrometer. A method of providing this vapor is described, as follows: explosive or narcotic is deposited on quartz wool, placed in a chamber that can be heated or cooled (depending on the vapor pressure of the material) to control the concentration of vapors in the reservoir. A controlled flow of air is pulsed over the quartz wool releasing a preset quantity of vapors at the outlet. 10 figs.

Davies, J.P.; Larson, R.A.; Goodrich, L.D.; Hall, H.J.; Stoddard, B.D.; Davis, S.G.; Kaser, T.G.; Conrad, F.J.

1995-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

209

Internet-based calibration of a multifunction calibrator  

SciTech Connect

A new way of providing calibration services is evolving which employs the Internet to expand present capabilities and make the calibration process more interactive. Sandia National Laboratories and the National Institute of Standards and Technology are collaborating to set up and demonstrate a remote calibration of multifunction calibrators using this Internet-based technique that is becoming known as e-calibration. This paper describes the measurement philosophy and the Internet resources that can provide real-time audio/video/data exchange, consultation and training, as well as web-accessible test procedures, software and calibration reports. The communication system utilizes commercial hardware and software that should be easy to integrate into most calibration laboratories.

BUNTING BACA,LISA A.; DUDA JR.,LEONARD E.; WALKER,RUSSELL M.; OLDHAM,NILE; PARKER,MARK

2000-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

210

Mesoscale hybrid calibration artifact  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A mesoscale calibration artifact, also called a hybrid artifact, suitable for hybrid dimensional measurement and the method for make the artifact. The hybrid artifact has structural characteristics that make it suitable for dimensional measurement in both vision-based systems and touch-probe-based systems. The hybrid artifact employs the intersection of bulk-micromachined planes to fabricate edges that are sharp to the nanometer level and intersecting planes with crystal-lattice-defined angles.

Tran, Hy D. (Albuquerque, NM); Claudet, Andre A. (Albuquerque, NM); Oliver, Andrew D. (Waltham, MA)

2010-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

211

New developments in high resolution borehole seismology and their applications to reservoir development and management  

SciTech Connect

Single-well seismology, Reverse Vertical Seismic Profiles (VSP`s) and Crosswell seismology are three new seismic techniques that we jointly refer to as borehole seismology. Borehole seismic techniques are of great interest because they can obtain much higher resolution images of oil and gas reservoirs than what is obtainable with currently used seismic techniques. The quality of oil and gas reservoir management decisions depend on the knowledge of both the large and the fine scale features in the reservoirs. Borehole seismology is capable of mapping reservoirs with an order of magnitude improvement in resolution compared with currently used technology. In borehole seismology we use a high frequency seismic source in an oil or gas well and record the signal in the same well, in other wells, or on the surface of the earth.

Paulsson, B.N.P. [Chevron Petroleum Technology Company, La Habra, CA (United States)

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Borehole data package for the 100-K area ground water wells, CY 1994  

SciTech Connect

Borehole, hydrogeologic and geophysical logs, drilling, as-built diagrams, sampling, and well construction information and data for RCRA compliant groundwater monitoring wells installed in CY 1994 at the 100-K Basins.

Williams, B.A.

1994-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

213

Borehole Seismic Monitoring of Injected CO2 at the Frio Site  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

D. , 2001, Orbital vibrator seismic source for simultaneous5: Tomographic image of seismic velocity change due to CO 2Borehole Seismic Monitoring of Injected CO 2 at the Frio

Daley, Thomas M.; Myer, Larry R.; Hoversten, G.M.; Peterson, John E.; Korneev, Valeri A.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Test instructions for the horizontal borehole demonstration at the Near-Surface Test Facility  

SciTech Connect

This test outlines the planned activities designed to demonstrate the horizontal borehole drilling and testing operations at the Near Surface Test Facility prior to the performance of these methods within the Exploratory Shaft underground facility. This document will also lead to establishing the operating and safety procedures which will be implemented in the Exploratory Shaft long exploratory borehole drilling and testing program. 7 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

McLellan, G.W. (Rockwell International Corp., Richland, WA (USA). Energy Systems Group)

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Spreader Calibration for Turfgrass  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by the operator. On spreaders equipped with an adjustable port or a pattern adjustment, the drop point of the material onto the impeller can be adjusted. Because so many factors affect the distribution pattern, spreader calibration can change with different... minimum, and 1 to 2 inches deep for small spreaders or 2 to 4 inches deep for larger spreaders is recommended. Material bouncing into or out of the pans can affect results. Make several passes in the same direction over the pans. Make sure the spreader...

Taylor, Gene R.; Abernathy, Scott

1999-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

216

24-CHANNEL GEOPHONE ARRAY FOR HORIZONTAL OR VERTICAL BOREHOLES  

SciTech Connect

Improved ground-imaging capabilities have enormous potential to increase energy, environmental, and economic benefits by improving exploration accuracy and reducing energy consumption during the mining cycle. Seismic tomography has been used successfully to monitor and evaluate geologic conditions ahead of a mining face. A primary limitation to existing seismic tomography, however, is the placement of sensors. The goal of this project is to develop an array of 24 seismic sensors capable of being mounted in either a vertical or horizontal borehole. Development of this technology reduces energy usage in excavation, transportation, ventilation, and processing phases of the mining operation because less waste is mined and the mining cycle suffers fewer interruptions. This new technology benefits all types of mines, including metal/nonmetal, coal, and quarrying. The primary research tasks focused on sensor placement method, sensor housing and clamping design, and cabling and connector selection. An initial design is described in the report. Following assembly, a prototype was tested in the laboratory as well as at a surface stone quarry. Data analysis and tool performance were used for subsequent design modifications. A final design is described, of which several components are available for patent application. Industry partners have shown clear support for this research and demonstrated an interest in commercialization following project completion.

Erik C. Westman

2003-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

217

Photometric calibrations for 21st century science  

SciTech Connect

The answers to fundamental science questions in astrophysics, ranging from the history of the expansion of the universe to the sizes of nearby stars, hinge on our ability to make precise measurements of diverse astronomical objects. As our knowledge of the underlying physics of objects improves along with advances in detectors and instrumentation, the limits on our capability to extract science from measurements is set, not by our lack of understanding of the nature of these objects, but rather by the most mundane of all issues: the precision with which we can calibrate observations in physical units. In principle, photometric calibration is a solved problem - laboratory reference standards such as blackbody furnaces achieve precisions well in excess of those needed for astrophysics. In practice, however, transferring the calibration from these laboratory standards to astronomical objects of interest is far from trivial - the transfer must reach outside the atmosphere, extend over 4{pi} steradians of sky, cover a wide range of wavelengths, and span an enormous dynamic range in intensity. Virtually all spectrophotometric observations today are calibrated against one or more stellar reference sources, such as Vega, which are themselves tied back to laboratory standards in a variety of ways. This system's accuracy is not uniform. Selected regions of the electromagnetic spectrum are calibrated extremely well, but discontinuities of a few percent still exist, e.g., between the optical and infrared. Independently, model stellar atmospheres are used to calibrate the spectra of selected white dwarf stars, e.g. the HST system, but the ultimate accuracy of this system should be verified against laboratory sources. Our traditional standard star systems, while sufficient until now, need to be improved and extended in order to serve future astrophysics experiments. This white paper calls for a program to improve upon and expand the current networks of spectrophotometrically calibrated stars to provide precise calibration with an accuracy of equal to and better than 1% in the ultraviolet, visible and near-infrared portions of the spectrum, with excellent sky coverage and large dynamic range.

Kent, Stephen; /Fermilab; Kaiser, Mary Elizabeth; /Johns Hopkins U.; Deustua, Susana E.; /Baltimore, Space Telescope Sci.; Smith, J.Allyn; /Austin Peay State U.; Adelman, Saul; /Citadel Military Coll.; Allam, Sahar S.; /Fermilab; Baptista, Brian; /Indiana U.; Bohlin, Ralph C.; /Baltimore, Space Telescope Sci.; Clem, James L.; /Louisiana State U.; Conley, Alex; /Colorado U.; Edelstein, Jerry; /UC, Berkeley, Space Sci. Dept. /NOAO, Tucson

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Device and method for imaging of non-linear and linear properties of formations surrounding a borehole  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In some aspects of the disclosure, a method and an apparatus is disclosed for investigating material surrounding the borehole. The method includes generating a first low frequency acoustic wave within the borehole, wherein the first low frequency acoustic wave induces a linear and a nonlinear response in one or more features in the material that are substantially perpendicular to a radius of the borehole; directing a first sequence of high frequency pulses in a direction perpendicularly with respect to the longitudinal axis of the borehole into the material contemporaneously with the first acoustic wave; and receiving one or more second high frequency pulses at one or more receivers positionable in the borehole produced by an interaction between the first sequence of high frequency pulses and the one or more features undergoing linear and nonlinear elastic distortion due to the first low frequency acoustic wave to investigate the material surrounding the borehole.

Johnson, Paul A; Tencate, James A; Le Bas, Pierre-Yves; Guyer, Robert; Vu, Cung Khac; Skelt, Christopher

2013-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

219

Reference design and operations for deep borehole disposal of high-level radioactive waste.  

SciTech Connect

A reference design and operational procedures for the disposal of high-level radioactive waste in deep boreholes have been developed and documented. The design and operations are feasible with currently available technology and meet existing safety and anticipated regulatory requirements. Objectives of the reference design include providing a baseline for more detailed technical analyses of system performance and serving as a basis for comparing design alternatives. Numerous factors suggest that deep borehole disposal of high-level radioactive waste is inherently safe. Several lines of evidence indicate that groundwater at depths of several kilometers in continental crystalline basement rocks has long residence times and low velocity. High salinity fluids have limited potential for vertical flow because of density stratification and prevent colloidal transport of radionuclides. Geochemically reducing conditions in the deep subsurface limit the solubility and enhance the retardation of key radionuclides. A non-technical advantage that the deep borehole concept may offer over a repository concept is that of facilitating incremental construction and loading at multiple perhaps regional locations. The disposal borehole would be drilled to a depth of 5,000 m using a telescoping design and would be logged and tested prior to waste emplacement. Waste canisters would be constructed of carbon steel, sealed by welds, and connected into canister strings with high-strength connections. Waste canister strings of about 200 m length would be emplaced in the lower 2,000 m of the fully cased borehole and be separated by bridge and cement plugs. Sealing of the upper part of the borehole would be done with a series of compacted bentonite seals, cement plugs, cement seals, cement plus crushed rock backfill, and bridge plugs. Elements of the reference design meet technical requirements defined in the study. Testing and operational safety assurance requirements are also defined. Overall, the results of the reference design development and the cost analysis support the technical feasibility of the deep borehole disposal concept for high-level radioactive waste.

Herrick, Courtney Grant; Brady, Patrick Vane; Pye, Steven; Arnold, Bill Walter; Finger, John Travis; Bauer, Stephen J.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Application Of A Spherical-Radial Heat Transfer Model To Calculate...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Spherical-Radial Heat Transfer Model To Calculate Geothermal Gradients From Measurements In Deep Boreholes Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "borehole calibration models" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Calibration Facilities Documents | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Services » Calibration Facilities » Calibration Facilities Services » Calibration Facilities » Calibration Facilities Documents Calibration Facilities Documents October 17, 2013 Field Calibration Facilities for Environmental Measurement of Radium, Thorium, and Potassium (October 2013) The first edition of this report, released in October 1982, presented physical-characteristic information for the various DOE radiologic-instrument calibration facilities located throughout the U.S. Three subsequent editions have been released in an effort to update information regarding the current status of the facilities. June 30, 1994 Field Calibration Facilities for Environmental Measurement of Radium, Thorium, and Potassium (June 1994) Field Calibration Facilities for Environmental Measurement of Radium, Thorium, and Potassium (June 1994)

222

Automatic Preparation, Calibration, and Simulation of Deformable Objects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

simulation method in the interest of focusing on automation of model preparation (rather than simulation), prohibiting manual intervention in the model preparation process. This paper provides a pipeline for rapid (preparing solid meshes from surface models), automated calibration of models to finite element reference

Stanford University

223

Extending Sensor Calibration Intervals in Nuclear Power Plants  

SciTech Connect

Currently in the USA, sensor recalibration is required at every refueling outage, and it has emerged as a critical path item for shortening outage duration. International application of calibration monitoring, such as at the Sizewell B plant in UK, has shown that sensors may operate for eight years, or longer, within calibration tolerances. Online monitoring can be employed to identify those sensors which require calibration, allowing for calibration of only those sensors which need it. The US NRC accepted the general concept of online monitoring for sensor calibration monitoring in 2000, but no plants have been granted the necessary license amendment to apply it. This project addresses key issues in advanced recalibration methodologies and provides the science base to enable adoption of best practices for applying online monitoring, resulting in a public domain standardized methodology for sensor calibration interval extension. Research to develop this methodology will focus on three key areas: (1) quantification of uncertainty in modeling techniques used for calibration monitoring, with a particular focus on non-redundant sensor models; (2) accurate determination of acceptance criteria and quantification of the effect of acceptance criteria variability on system performance; and (3) the use of virtual sensor estimates to replace identified faulty sensors to extend operation to the next convenient maintenance opportunity.

Coble, Jamie B.; Meyer, Ryan M.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Bond, Leonard J.; Shumaker, Brent; Hashemian, Hash

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

224

Role of borehole geophysics in defining the physical characteristics of the  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Role of borehole geophysics in defining the physical characteristics of the Role of borehole geophysics in defining the physical characteristics of the Raft River geothermal reservoir, Idaho Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Role of borehole geophysics in defining the physical characteristics of the Raft River geothermal reservoir, Idaho Details Activities (4) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Numerous geophysical logs have been made in three deep wells and in several intermediate depth core holes in the Raft River geothermal reservoir, Idaho. Laboratory analyses of cores from the intermediate depth holes were used to provide a qualitative and quantitative basis for a detailed interpretation of logs from the shallow part of the reservoir. A less detailed interpretation of logs from the deeper part of the reservoir

225

Device and method for generating a beam of acoustic energy from a borehole, and applications thereof  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In some aspects of the invention, a method of generating a beam of acoustic energy in a borehole is disclosed. The method includes generating a first acoustic wave at a first frequency; generating a second acoustic wave at a second frequency different than the first frequency, wherein the first acoustic wave and second acoustic wave are generated by at least one transducer carried by a tool located within the borehole; transmitting the first and the second acoustic waves into an acoustically non-linear medium, wherein the composition of the non-linear medium produces a collimated beam by a non-linear mixing of the first and second acoustic waves, wherein the collimated beam has a frequency based upon a difference between the first frequency and the second frequency; and transmitting the collimated beam through a diverging acoustic lens to compensate for a refractive effect caused by the curvature of the borehole.

Vu, Cung Khac; Sinha, Dipen N; Pantea, Cristian; Nihei, Kurt T; Schmitt, Denis P; Skelt, Christopher

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Weed Busters: Sprayer Calibration Guide  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Final mixing Once a sprayer is calibrated, you will then be able to mix the herbicide in the spray tank properly. For example, if your recommended herbicide rate is 1 quart per acre and your sprayer is calibrated to deliver 15 gpa, you would... then add 1 quart of herbicide for every 15 gallons of spray in the tank. Keep these points in mind ?To properly calibrate a herbicide sprayer, you must be able to accurately set and maintain speed and pressure. ? Make sure all the nozzles are in good...

McGinty, Allan; Hanselka, C. Wayne; Lyons, Robert K.; Hart, Charles R.; Cadenhead, J. F.

2005-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

227

Rotary mode system initial instrument calibration  

SciTech Connect

The attached report contains the vendor calibration procedures used for the initial instrument calibration of the rotary core sampling equipment. The procedures are from approved vendor information files.

Johns, B.R.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Gearbox Reliability Collaborative High-Speed Shaft Calibration  

SciTech Connect

Instrumentation has been added to the high-speed shaft, pinion, and tapered roller bearing pair of the Gearbox Reliability Collaborative gearbox to measure loads and temperatures. The new shaft bending moment and torque instrumentation was calibrated and the purpose of this document is to describe this calibration process and results, such that the raw shaft bending and torque signals can be converted to the proper engineering units and coordinate system reference for comparison to design loads and simulation model predictions.

Keller, J.; McNiff, B.

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

System and method to estimate compressional to shear velocity (VP/VS) ratio in a region remote from a borehole  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In some aspects of the disclosure, a method for creating three-dimensional images of non-linear properties and the compressional to shear velocity ratio in a region remote from a borehole using a conveyed logging tool is disclosed. In some aspects, the method includes arranging a first source in the borehole and generating a steered beam of elastic energy at a first frequency; arranging a second source in the borehole and generating a steerable beam of elastic energy at a second frequency, such that the steerable beam at the first frequency and the steerable beam at the second frequency intercept at a location away from the borehole; receiving at the borehole by a sensor a third elastic wave, created by a three wave mixing process, with a frequency equal to a difference between the first and second frequencies and a direction of propagation towards the borehole; determining a location of a three wave mixing region based on the arrangement of the first and second sources and on properties of the third wave signal; and creating three-dimensional images of the non-linear properties using data recorded by repeating the generating, receiving and determining at a plurality of azimuths, inclinations and longitudinal locations within the borehole. The method is additionally used to generate three dimensional images of the ratio of compressional to shear acoustic velocity of the same volume surrounding the borehole.

Vu, Cung; Nihei, Kurt T; Schmitt, Denis P; Skelt, Christopher; Johnson, Paul A; Guyer, Robert; TenCate, James A; Le Bas, Pierre-Yves

2012-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

230

Borehole deviation surveys are necessary for hydraulic fracture monitoring Leo Eisner, Schlumberger Cambridge Research, Petr Bulant, Charles University in Prague, Jol H. Le Calvez*,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Borehole deviation surveys are necessary for hydraulic fracture monitoring Leo Eisner, Schlumberger Not performing accurate borehole deviation surveys for hydraulic fracture monitoring (HFM) and neglecting fracture parameters. Introduction Recently a large number of hydraulic fracture treatments have been

Cerveny, Vlastislav

231

Calibrating Pesticide Application Ground Equipment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This pocket-sized guide gives step-by-step instructions for calibrating ground sprayers. Tables provide instructions, examples and sample formulas for determining speed of application, flow rate and the amount of pesticide to add to the tank....

Shaw, Bryan W.

2000-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

232

Recommended inorganic chemicals for calibration  

SciTech Connect

All analytical techniques depend on the use of calibration chemicals to relate analyte concentration to an instrumental parameter. A fundamental component in the preparation of calibration solutions is the weighing of a pure chemical or metal before preparing a solution standard. The analyst must be assured that the purity, stoichiometry, and assay of the chemical are known. These terms have different meanings, and each has an important influence. This report is intended to assist the analyst in the selection and use of chemical standards for instrumental calibration. Purity, stoichiometry, and preparation of solutions for different purposes are discussed, and a critical evaluation of the best materials available for each element is presented for use in preparing solutions or calibration standards. Information on the chemical form, source, purity, drying, and appropriate precautions is given. In some cases, multiple sources or chemical forms are available. Certain radioactive elements, the transuranic elements, and the noble gases are not considered.

Moody, J.R.; Greenberg, R.R.; Pratt, K.W.; Rains, T.C.

1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Validation of Simulated Thermal Comfort using a Calibrated Building Energy Simulation (BES) model in the context of Building Performance Evaluation & Optimisation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Building Energy Simulation (BES) models play a significant role in the design and optimisation of buildings. Simulation models may be used to compare the cost-effectiveness of Energy- Conservation Measures (ECMs) in the design stage as well...

Coakley, D.; Corry, E. J.; Keane, M. M.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Online Sensor Calibration Monitoring Uncertainty Estimation  

SciTech Connect

Empirical modeling techniques have been applied to online process monitoring to detect equipment and instrumentation degradations. However, few applications provide prediction uncertainty estimates, which can provide a measure of confidence in decisions. This paper presents the development of analytical prediction interval estimation methods for three common nonlinear empirical modeling strategies: artificial neural networks, neural network partial least squares, and local polynomial regression. The techniques are applied to nuclear power plant operational data for sensor calibration monitoring, and the prediction intervals are verified via bootstrap simulation studies.

Hines, J. Wesley; Rasmussen, Brandon [University of Tennessee (United States)

2005-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

235

Seismic wave attenuation from borehole and surface records in the top 2.5km beneath the city of Basel, Switzerland  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Figure 2 Overview of the borehole profile in the injection...from surface (top of drilling basement). 3 Seismic...separate institutions. Borehole sensors of Geothermal...also seen for other borehole stations. The number...stacking and the generally large number of spectra......

Falko Bethmann; Nicholas Deichmann; P. Martin Mai

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

From Behavioral Psychology to Acceleration Modeling: Calibration, Validation, and Exploration of Drivers Cognitive and Safety Parameters in a Risk-Taking Environment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate a utility-based approach for driver car-following behavioral modeling while analyzing different aspects of the model characteristics especially in terms of capturing different fundamental diagram regions and safety proxy indices. The adopted model came from an elementary thought where drivers associate subjective utilities for accelerations (i.e. gain in travel times) and subjective dis-utilities for decelerations (i.e. loss in travel time) with a perceived probability of being involved in rear-end collision crashes. Following the testing of the model general structure, the authors translate the corresponding behavioral psychology theory - prospect theory - into an efficientmicroscopic traffic modeling with more elaborate stochastic characteristics considered in a risk-taking environment. The formulated model offers a better understanding of drivers behavior, particularly under extreme/incident conditions.

Hamdar, Samer H; Treiber, Martin

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Application of short-radius horizontal boreholes in the naturally fractured Yates field  

SciTech Connect

This paper discusses the performance and simulation of short-radius horizontal boreholes being used in the Marathon-operated Yates field Unit in west Texas to minimize drawdown and therefore to reduce gas and water coning in a thin oil column. Yates is a very prolific field with extensive fracturing and high-quality reservoir rock. Superimposed on a high-density orthogonal fracture network are widely spaced regional joints with a strong directional tendency. Major questions are how these directional joints affect the horizontal-well performance and whether wells should be drilled parallel or perpendicular to the joints. Dual-permeability reservoir simulation studies were performed to study optimum orientation of the borehole with respect to the natural fracture network. Additionally, optimum well-completion elevation was studied. Forty-six vertical wells have been recompleted as short-radius horizontal boreholes since 1986. The large productivity increase of the horizontal boreholes compared with the previous vertical completions indicates that the wells are intersecting the regional joints.

Gilman, J.R.; Rothkopf, B.W. (Marathon Petroleum Technology Center, Littleton, CO (United States)); Bowzer, J.L. (Marathon Oil Co., Midland, TX (United States))

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

THE VALUE OF BOREHOLE -TO-SURFACE INFORMATION IN NEAR-SURFACE CROSSWELL SEISMIC TOMOGRAPHY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

seismic reflection cannot (e.g. Liberty et al., 1999; Musil et al., 2002). The images producedTHE VALUE OF BOREHOLE -TO-SURFACE INFORMATION IN NEAR-SURFACE CROSSWELL SEISMIC TOMOGRAPHY Geoff J properties is important in many fields. One method that can image the seismic velocity structure

Barrash, Warren

239

Surface temperature trends in Russia over the past five centuries reconstructed from borehole temperatures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Surface temperature trends in Russia over the past five centuries reconstructed from borehole in Russia and nearby areas to reconstruct the ground surface temperature history (GSTH) over the past five Siberia. We derive GSTHs for each region individually, and a composite ``all-Russia'' GSTH from the full

Smerdon, Jason E.

240

Using borehole images for target-zone evaluation in horizontal wells  

SciTech Connect

Horizontal wells are rarely horizontal. Instead, operators commonly try to drill such wells into particular rock layers, or target zones, which may or may not be truly horizontal. Thicknesses of target zones commonly range from a few feet to a few tens of feet (1-10 m). Target-zone evaluation concerns whether a horizontal well was successfully located and drilled in a given rock layer. Borehole-imaging logs provide a powerful tool for stratigraphic interpretation and target-zone evaluation in the Austin Chalk, Niobrara Formation, San Andres Formation, and other units. This study uses borehole images generated by Schlumberger's Formation MicroScanner (FMS), a microconductivity logging device. Open fractures and clay-rich interbeds appear as dark, high-conductivity tracers on the FMS log. These traces can be fit with sinusoidal curves and oriented on a computer workstation. The shape of the sinusoidal curve that fits a particular bedding plane tells the interpreter whether the borehole was moving upward or downward through the strata. STRATLOG (trademark of Sierra Geophysics, Inc., a Halliburton Company) software has been used to display borehole profiles by combining FMS data on fracture intensities and bedding-plane intersections with gamma-ray logs, mud logs, and borehole-deviation surveys. To aid in planning future wells, multiple penetrations of the same horizon can be detected and used to calculate highly accurate bedding-plane dips. Fault interpretation, including the detection of rollover beds, it also possible. Finally, stratigraphic interpretation can be combined with observed fractures to determine which rock layers are most highly fractured, and, therefore, should be target zones.9 refs., 5 figs.

Hurley, N.F.; Carlson, J.L. (Marathon Oil Company, Littleton, CO (United States)); Thorn, D.R. (Schlumberger Well Services, Aurora (Colombia)); Eichelberger, L.W. (Marathon Oil Company, Tyler, TX (United States))

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "borehole calibration models" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Basic data report: borehole WIPP-12 deepening. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Project, southeastern New Mexico  

SciTech Connect

Borehole WIPP-12 was originally drilled in 1978 as an exploratory borehole to characterize the geology of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site in Eddy County, New Mexico. WIPP-12 was reentered and deepened in late 1981. WIPP-12 is located in Section 17, T22S, R31E, just outside the limit of Zone II, approximately one mile north of the exploratory shaft site. The deepening of WIPP-12 was undertaken for several reasons: to investigate the presence of an anticlinal or domal structure and thickening of halite indicated by surface seismic reflection surveys conducted in the area; to determine the nature and extent of deformation in the Castile Formation, in a location adjacent to the zone of anomalous seismic reflections found north of the well location (''Disturbed Zone''); and to characterize any fluid-bearing zones encountered in the Castile Formation while drilling. Field operations related to deepening of the borehole began November 16, 1981 and were completed January 1, 1982. The borehole was deepened through the Castile Formation to a total depth of 3927.5 ft by coring. Pressurized brine was encountered on November 22, 1981 at a depth of about 3016 ft. The brine reservoir is apparently related to a system of near-vertical fractures of unknown extent observed in Anhydrite III. The Halite I member is about 200 ft thicker than observed in undisturbed areas in the vicinity of WIPP (for example, Borehole DOE-1). Small-scale lithologic features such as folding of anhydrite stringers in halite and halite lineation appear to confirm the presence of a structural disturbance at this location. This Basic Data Report includes geologic information gathered during WIPP-12 deepening.

Black, S.R.

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Hanford Borehole Geologic Information System (HBGIS) Updated User’s Guide for Web-based Data Access and Export  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Borehole Geologic Information System (HBGIS) is a prototype web-based graphical user interface (GUI) for viewing and downloading borehole geologic data. The HBGIS is being developed as part of the Remediation Decision Support function of the Soil and Groundwater Remediation Project, managed by Fluor Hanford, Inc., Richland, Washington. Recent efforts have focused on improving the functionality of the HBGIS website in order to allow more efficient access and exportation of available data in HBGIS. Users will benefit from enhancements such as a dynamic browsing, user-driven forms, and multi-select options for selecting borehole geologic data for export. The need for translating borehole geologic data into electronic form within the HBGIS continues to increase, and efforts to populate the database continue at an increasing rate. These new web-based tools should help the end user quickly visualize what data are available in HBGIS, select from among these data, and download the borehole geologic data into a consistent and reproducible tabular form. This revised user’s guide supersedes the previous user’s guide (PNNL-15362) for viewing and downloading data from HBGIS. It contains an updated data dictionary for tables and fields containing borehole geologic data as well as instructions for viewing and downloading borehole geologic data.

Mackley, Rob D.; Last, George V.; Allwardt, Craig H.

2008-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

243

Self-calibrating multiplexer circuit  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A time domain multiplexer system with automatic determination of acceptable multiplexer output limits, error determination, or correction is comprised of a time domain multiplexer, a computer, a constant current source capable of at least three distinct current levels, and two series resistances employed for calibration and testing. A two point linear calibration curve defining acceptable multiplexer voltage limits may be defined by the computer by determining the voltage output of the multiplexer to very accurately known input signals developed from predetermined current levels across the series resistances. Drift in the multiplexer may be detected by the computer when the output voltage limits, expected during normal operation, are exceeded, or the relationship defined by the calibration curve is invalidated.

Wahl, Chris P. (North Huntingdon, PA)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Calibrated Probabilistic Forecasting at the Stateline Wind Energy Center  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Calibrated Probabilistic Forecasting at the Stateline Wind Energy Center: The Regime at wind energy sites are becoming paramount. Regime-switching space-time (RST) models merge meteorological forecast regimes at the wind energy site and fits a conditional predictive model for each regime

Washington at Seattle, University of

245

Thermal reconstruction of a crime scene using calibrated simulation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study utilized energy simulation in support of a forensic pathology time of death analysis for a corpse discovered in a single family residence two years prior to the study. In order to produce an accurate estimate of the interior temperature profile ... Keywords: energy model accuracy, energy model calibration, free floating energy simulation, legal application of thermal simulation

Nathan Brown; M. Susan Ubbelohde; George Loisos; Santosh Philip; Ibone Santiago

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Uranium in Hanford Site 300 Area: Extraction Data on Borehole Sediments  

SciTech Connect

In this study, sediments collected from boreholes drilled in 2010 and 2011 as part of a remedial investigation/feasibility study were characterized. The wells, located within or around two process ponds and one process trench waste site, were characterized in terms of total uranium concentration, mobile fraction of uranium, particle size, and moisture content along the borehole depth. In general, the gravel-dominated sediments of the vadose zone Hanford formation in all investigated boreholes had low moisture contents. Based on total uranium content, a total of 48 vadose zone and periodically rewetted zone sediment samples were selected for more detailed characterization, including measuring the concentration of uranium extracted with 8 M nitric acid, and leached using bicarbonate mixed solutions to determine the liable uranium (U(VI)) contents. In addition, water extraction was conducted on 17 selected sediments. Results from the sediment acid and bicarbonate extractions indicated the total concentrations of anthropogenic labile uranium in the sediments varied among the investigated boreholes. The peak uranium concentration (114.84 µg/g, acid extract) in <2-mm size fractions was found in borehole 399 1-55, which was drilled directly in the southwest corner of the North Process Pond. Lower uranium concentrations (~0.3–2.5 µg/g, acid extract) in <2-mm size fractions were found in boreholes 399-1-57, 399-1-58, and 399-1-59, which were drilled either near the Columbia River or inland and upgradient of any waste process ponds or trenches. A general trend of “total” uranium concentrations was observed that increased as the particle size decreased when relating the sediment particle size and acid extractable uranium concentrations in two selected sediment samples. The labile uranium bicarbonate leaching kinetic experiments on three selected sediments indicated a two-step leaching rate: an initial rapid release, followed by a slow continual release of uranium from the sediment. Based on the uranium leaching kinetic results, quasi equilibrium can be assumed after 1000-h batch reaction time in this study.

Wang, Guohui; Serne, R. Jeffrey; Lindberg, Michael J.; Um, Wooyong; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Williams, Benjamin D.; Kutynakov, I. V.; Wang, Zheming; Qafoku, Nikolla

2012-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

247

Numerical Modeling of the Nucleation Conditions of Petal-Centerline  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

the Nucleation Conditions of Petal-Centerline the Nucleation Conditions of Petal-Centerline Fractures below a Borehole Floor, A Sensitivity Study and Application to the Coso Geothermal Field Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Numerical Modeling of the Nucleation Conditions of Petal-Centerline Fractures below a Borehole Floor, A Sensitivity Study and Application to the Coso Geothermal Field Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: A boundary element model using Poly3D© has been developed to investigate the conditions in which the stress concentration below the floor of a borehole can cause tensile stress necessary to nucleate petal-centerline fractures. The remote stress state, borehole geometry, and traction boundary conditions on the borehole surface are taken from direct

248

Borehole Stability Analysis of Horizontal Drilling in Shale Gas Reservoirs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Serious wellbore instability occurs frequently during horizontal drilling in shale gas reservoirs. The conventional forecast model of in ... not suitable for wellbore stability analysis in laminated shale gas for...

Jun-Liang Yuan; Jin-Gen Deng; Qiang Tan; Bao-Hua Yu…

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Evaluating Local Elastic Anisotropy of Rocks and Sediments by Means of Optoacoustics While Drilling Oil and Gas Boreholes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The optoacoustic method of evaluation of local elastic anisotropy while drilling oil or gas boreholes usually assumes laboratory tests...1]. These are so-called “go-through” tests. The pick-up of the pulse is pro...

A. V. Gladilin; S. V. Egerev; O. B. Ovchinnikov

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

3-D Inversion Of Borehole-To-Surface Electrical Data Using A  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » 3-D Inversion Of Borehole-To-Surface Electrical Data Using A Back-Propagation Neural Network Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: 3-D Inversion Of Borehole-To-Surface Electrical Data Using A Back-Propagation Neural Network Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: The "fluid-flow tomography", an advanced technique for geoelectrical survey based on the conventional mise-a-la-masse measurement, has been developed by Exploration Geophysics Laboratory at the Kyushu University. This technique is proposed to monitor fluid-flow behavior

251

Borehole data package for well 699-37-47A, PUREX Plant Cribs, CY 1996  

SciTech Connect

A new groundwater monitoring well (699-37-47A) was installed in 1996 as a downgradient well near the PUREX Plant Cribs Treatment, Storage, and Disposal Facility at Hanford. This document provides data from the well drilling and construction operations, as well as data from subsequent characterization of groundwater and sediment samples collected during the drilling process. The data include: well construction documentation, geologist`s borehole logs, results of laboratory analysis of groundwater samples collected during drilling and of physical tests conducted on sediment samples collected during drilling, borehole geophysics, and results of aquifer testing including slug tests and flowmeter analysis. This well (699-37-47A) was constructed in support of the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) milestone M-24-00H and interim milestone M-24-35 (Ecology et al. 1994), and was funded under Project W-152.

Lindberg, J.W.; Williams, B.A.; Spane, F.A.

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Use of an acoustic borehole televiewer to investigate casing corrosion in geothermal wells  

SciTech Connect

Corrosion of well and surface equipment due to the presence of hot, corrosive brines is one of the major problems facing geothermal operators. For wellbore casing, this problem is complicated by the fact that in-place inspection is difficult at best. In an attempt to improve this situation, a prototype acoustic borehole televiewer designed to operate in geothermal wells was used to study the corrosion damage to casing in three commercial wells. The results of this experiment were promising. The televiewer returns helped to define areas of major corrosion damage and to indicate the extent of the damage. This paper briefly discusses the corrosion problem, describes the acoustic borehole televiewer, and then summarizes the results of the field test of the televiewer's capability for investigating corrosion.

Carson, C.C.; Bauman, T.

1986-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

NREL: Buildings Research - Utility Bill Calibration Test Cases  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Utility Bill Calibration Test Cases Utility Bill Calibration Test Cases The diagram below illustrates the utility bill calibration test cases in BESTEST-EX. In these cases, participants are given input ranges and synthetic utility bills. Software tools calibrate key model inputs using the utility bills and then predict energy savings for the different retrofit cases. Participant energy savings predictions using calibrated models are compared to NREL predictions using state-of-the-art building energy simulation programs. For self-testing, participants should not view reference results until after tested software results have been generated. This diagram provides an overview of the BESTEST-EX utility bill calibration case process. On the left side of the diagram is a box labeled "BESTEST-EX Document" with a list that contains two bulleted items. The first bullet reads "Defines a representative existing home and several retrofit measures." The second bullet reads "Provides input ranges for key model inputs." Underneath this list is an image of a house and to the right of the house is a listing of the measures: R-wall=4.5-6.2; ELA=137-216 in2 ; Tsat=60-75°F, etc. Underneath this grouping is another bullet that reads "Presents utility bills that were generated by: A) randomly selecting key model inputs within ranges (values remain hidden); B) running test cases with selected inputs in EnergyPlus, DOE2.1E, and SUNREL." Below this bullet is a bar graph showing energy savings on the y axis and retrofit measure on the x axis. Inside the graph area is text reading "Reference results remains hidden for utility bill calibration cases." An arrow labeled "Results" points horizontally to the right to the results box. From the top half of this box are two arrows that are labeled "Input Ranges" and "Utility Bills" and points horizontally to the right to another smaller box that is labeled "Audit Software Provider." Underneath this heading are three bullets: one reads "Creates model of existing home knowing input ranges from test," the next one reads "Calibrates model inputs using utility bills," and the third one reads "Predicts retrofit energy savings. Underneath these bullets is an image of a house; to the right of this is a bar graph showing energy savings on the y axis and retrofit measure on the x axis. From this box an arrow labeled "Results" points directly below

254

1 Calibration against independent human travel datasets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Calibration against independent human travel datasets 1.1 Calibration against United States at www.bts.gov. Although the BTS dataset is large, the movements were histogrammed 1 #12;with a low

Shull, Kenneth R.

255

Borehole Logging Methods for Exploration and Evaluation of Uranium Deposits (1967)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Borehole logging methods for exploration Borehole logging methods for exploration and evaluation o f uranium deposits . Philip H. O d d , Robert F. Bmullad and Carl P. Lathan rej~rinkttl fnlm Mining and Groundwater Geophysiall967 Borehole logging methods for exploration and evaluation of uranium deposits Philip H. Dodd, Robert F. Droullard and Carl P. Lathan US. Atomic Energy Commhwn GmrPd Jtinct&n, Colorado Abstract, M o l e 1 - i s thc geophysical methad mast exten&@ w r t i n the Udtrrd States for exploratio~ md edwtim of wanhi &pod&. dammow lop, C o r n r n d j suppkrnentd with a singbz-pobt msfstailee log, m t l y supply about 80 percent of the bask data for om regerve c W t i o R a d mu& of the w ~ k r 6 . p ~ &ngk inf~nnatio~ Tmck-mounted 'rotmy eqnipmcnt i s EMhmody emphy&& holes usually hwre a nominai b

256

A Robust MEMS Based Multi-Component Sensor for 3D Borehole Seismic Arrays  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project was to develop, prototype and test a robust multi-component sensor that combines both Fiber Optic and MEMS technology for use in a borehole seismic array. The use such FOMEMS based sensors allows a dramatic increase in the number of sensors that can be deployed simultaneously in a borehole seismic array. Therefore, denser sampling of the seismic wave field can be afforded, which in turn allows us to efficiently and adequately sample P-wave as well as S-wave for high-resolution imaging purposes. Design, packaging and integration of the multi-component sensors and deployment system will target maximum operating temperature of 350-400 F and a maximum pressure of 15000-25000 psi, thus allowing operation under conditions encountered in deep gas reservoirs. This project aimed at using existing pieces of deployment technology as well as MEMS and fiber-optic technology. A sensor design and analysis study has been carried out and a laboratory prototype of an interrogator for a robust borehole seismic array system has been assembled and validated.

Paulsson Geophysical Services

2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

257

Fundamental solution method for reconstructing past climate change from borehole temperature gradients  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Deep borehole temperature profiles have successfully been used to reconstruct past ground surface temperature history and the results are dependent on the inversion methods. These methods are tedious and sometimes unstable in iterative computation. In this paper, we propose a new fundamental solution method to reconstruct the past ground surface temperature variation, which depends on the assumption that ground temperature field in a homogeneous region is governed by a one-dimensional heat conductive equation. To regularize the resultant ill-conditioned linear system of equations, we apply successfully both the Tikhonov regularization technique and the generalized cross validation parameter choice rule to obtain a stable approximation solution of the ill-posed inverse problem. Our new method is stable and meshless, and it does not require iteration. We conducted idealized simulations with good results. We also used in-situ borehole data of RU-Yakutia329 from Yakutia, Siberia and CN-XZ-naqu903 from Naqu, Qinghai–Xizang (Tibetan) Plateau to validate our new approach. Results from these borehole studies show a warming of 0.1 and 2.3 °C, respectively, in the past 450 years. When comparing to the results from previous studies, the RU-Yakutia329 study has the same magnitude of warming, while the magnitude of warming at Naqu is slightly smaller.

Jia Liu; Tingjun Zhang

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Energy calibration issues in nuclear resonant vibrational spectroscopy: observing small spectral shifts and making fast calibrations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Two fast energy calibration procedures have been established: (i) an in situ calibration tracks the energies scan-by-scan for observing tiny spectral shifts; (ii) a quick-switching calibration reduces the calibration time dramatically and is suitable for normal NRVS measurements.

Wang, H.

2013-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

259

Spinning angle optical calibration apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An optical calibration apparatus is provided for calibrating and reproducing spinning angles in cross-polarization, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. An illuminated magnifying apparatus enables optical setting an accurate reproducing of spinning "magic angles" in cross-polarization, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy experiments. A reference mark scribed on an edge of a spinning angle test sample holder is illuminated by a light source and viewed through a magnifying scope. When the "magic angle" of a sample material used as a standard is attained by varying the angular position of the sample holder, the coordinate position of the reference mark relative to a graduation or graduations on a reticle in the magnifying scope is noted. Thereafter, the spinning "magic angle" of a test material having similar nuclear properties to the standard is attained by returning the sample holder back to the originally noted coordinate position.

Beer, Stephen K. (Morgantown, WV); Pratt, II, Harold R. (Morgantown, WV)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

FRONT CURVATURE RATE STICK MEASUREMENTS AND DETONATION SHOCK DYNAMICS CALIBRATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FRONT CURVATURE RATE STICK MEASUREMENTS AND DETONATION SHOCK DYNAMICS CALIBRATION FOR PBX 9502 OVER 87545 Detonation velocities and wave shapes were measured for PBX 9502 (95 wt.% TATB, 5 wt.% Kel­F 800 and diameter effect data. For each T 0 , the simplest detonation shock dynamics model assumes that the local

Aslam, Tariq

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "borehole calibration models" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

FRONT CURVATURE RATE STICK MEASUREMENTS AND DETONATION SHOCK DYNAMICS CALIBRATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FRONT CURVATURE RATE STICK MEASUREMENTS AND DETONATION SHOCK DYNAMICS CALIBRATION FOR PBX 9502 OVER 87545 Detonation velocities and wave shapes were measured for PBX 9502 95 wt. TATB, 5 wt. Kel-F 800 rate and diameter e ect data. For each T0, the simplest detonation shock dynamics model assumes that the local

Aslam, Tariq

262

Calibrating Speed-Density Functions for ff SMesoscopic Traffic Simulation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Greece 3The Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden 4Massachusetts Institute of Technology USAMassachusetts (2002), Balakrishna et al. (2007) · On-line - Adjustments in response to real-time data · Doan et al-line) · DynaMIT: Mesoscopic model to be calibrated - Disaggregate (microscopic) demand - Aggregate (macroscopic

Bertini, Robert L.

263

Calibration of hydraulic and tracer tests in fractured media  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Calibration of hydraulic and tracer tests in fractured media represented by a DFN Model L. D. Donado, X. Sanchez-Vila, E. Ruiz* & F. J. Elorza** * Enviros Spain S.L. ** UPM #12;Fractured Media Water flows through fractures (matrix basically impervious ­ though relevant to transport) Fractures at all

Politècnica de Catalunya, Universitat

264

Quantification of Wellbore Leakage Risk Using Non?destructive Borehole Logging Techniques  

SciTech Connect

Well integrity is important at all potential CCS locations and may play a crucial role establishing leakage risk in areas where there is a high density of existing wells that could be impacted by the storage operations including depleted petroleum fields where EOR or CCS will occur. To address a need for risk quantification methods that can be directly applied to individual wells using borehole logging tools a study was conducted using data from five wells in Wyoming. The objectives of the study were: Objective 1 Develop methods to establish the baseline flow parameters (porosity and permeability or mobility) from individual measurements of the material properties and defects in a well. Objective 2 Develop a correlation between field flow?property data and cement logs that can be used to establish the flow?properties of well materials and well features using cement mapping tools. Objective 3 Establish a method that uses the flow?property model (Objective 2) to analyze the statistical uncertainties associated with individual well leakage that can provide basis for uncertainty in risk calculations. The project objectives were met through the logging of five wells in Carbon and Natrona County Wyoming to collect data that was used to estimate individual and average well flow properties and model the results using ultrasonic data collected during the logging. Three of the five wells provided data on point and average flow properties for well annuli. Data from the other two wells were used to create models of cement permeability and test whether information collected in one well could be used to characterize another well. The results of the in?situ point measurements were confirmed by the lab measurements sidewall cores collected near the same depths Objective 1 was met using the data collected through logging, testing, and sampling. The methods were developed that can establish baseline flow parameters of wells by both point and average test methods. The methods to estimate the flow properties modeling of point pressure tests, modeling of vertical interference tests, and laboratory measurement of cased?hole sidewall cores The wells were in sufficiently good shape to allow the development of the characterization methods while still having enough defects to study differences in results as they relate to well integrity. Samples and tests analyzed from three of five wells studied in showed the cements were largely intact and had not degraded from exposure native brines. Log results taken in conjunction with the core measurements indicate that interfaces and/or problems with cement placement due to eccentering provide preferential flow paths for fluids, which can increase the effective permeability of the barrier several orders of magnitude above the permeability of intact cement. The results of the maps created using logging tools indicating that the cement condition and bond are generally good identify a need for more research to understand how logs can be used to predict effective well permeabilities such as those measured by the VITs in this study.

Duguid, Andrew; Butsch, Robert; Cary, J.; Celia, Michael; Chugunov, Nikita; Gasda, Sarah; Hovorka, Susan; Ramakrishnan, T. S.; Stamp, Vicki; Thingelstad, Rebecca; Wang, James

2014-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

265

Characterisation of pulsed Carbon fiber illuminators for FIR instrument calibration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We manufactured pulsed illuminators emitting in the far infrared for the Planck-HFI bolometric instrument ground calibrations. Specific measurements have been conducted on these light sources, based on Carbon fibers, to understand and predict their properties. We present a modelisation of the temperature dependence of the thermal conductivity and the calorific capacitance of the fibers. A comparison between simulations and bolometer data is given, that shows the coherence of our model. Their small time constants, their stability and their emission spectrum pointing in the submm range make these illuminators a very usefull tool for calibrating FIR instruments.

S. Henrot-Versille; R. Cizeron; F. Couchot

2007-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

266

Characterisation of pulsed Carbon fiber illuminators for FIR instrument calibration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We manufactured pulsed illuminators emitting in the far infrared for the Planck-HFI bolometric instrument ground calibrations. Specific measurements have been conducted on these light sources, based on Carbon fibers, to understand and predict their properties. We present a modelisation of the temperature dependence of the thermal conductivity and the calorific capacitance of the fibers. A comparison between simulations and bolometer data is given, that shows the coherence of our model. Their small time constants, their stability and their emission spectrum pointing in the submm range make these illuminators a very usefull tool for calibrating FIR instruments.

Henrot-Versillé, S; Couchot, F

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Calibration curves for some standard Gap Tests  

SciTech Connect

The relative shock sensitivities of explosive compositions are commonly assessed using a family of experiments that can be described by the generic term ''Gap Test.'' Gap tests include a donor charge, a test sample, and a spacer, or gap, between two explosives charges. The donor charge, gap material, and test dimensions are held constant within each different version of the gap test. The thickness of the gap is then varied to find the value at which 50% of the test samples will detonate. The gap tests measure the ease with a high-order detonation can be established in the test explosive, or the ''detonability,'' of the explosive. Test results are best reported in terms of the gap thickness at the 50% point. It is also useful to define the shock pressure transmitted into the test sample at the detonation threshold. This requires calibrating the gap test in terms of shock pressure in the gap as a function of the gap thickness. It also requires a knowledge of the shock Hugoniot of the sample explosive. We used the 2DE reactive hydrodynamic code with Forest Fire burn rates for the donor explosives to calculate calibration curves for several gap tests. The model calculations give pressure and particle velocity on the centerline of the experimental set-up and provide information about the curvature and pulse width of the shock wave. 10 refs., 1 fig.

Bowman, A.L.; Sommer, S.C.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Calibrated nanoscale dopant profiling using a scanning microwave microscope  

SciTech Connect

The scanning microwave microscope is used for calibrated capacitance spectroscopy and spatially resolved dopant profiling measurements. It consists of an atomic force microscope combined with a vector network analyzer operating between 1-20 GHz. On silicon semiconductor calibration samples with doping concentrations ranging from 10{sup 15} to 10{sup 20} atoms/cm{sup 3}, calibrated capacitance-voltage curves as well as derivative dC/dV curves were acquired. The change of the capacitance and the dC/dV signal is directly related to the dopant concentration allowing for quantitative dopant profiling. The method was tested on various samples with known dopant concentration and the resolution of dopant profiling determined to 20% while the absolute accuracy is within an order of magnitude. Using a modeling approach the dopant profiling calibration curves were analyzed with respect to varying tip diameter and oxide thickness allowing for improvements of the calibration accuracy. Bipolar samples were investigated and nano-scale defect structures and p-n junction interfaces imaged showing potential applications for the study of semiconductor device performance and failure analysis.

Huber, H. P.; Hochleitner, M.; Hinterdorfer, P. [University of Linz, Christian Doppler Laboratory for Nanoscopic Methods in Biophysics, Altenbergerstrasse 69, 4040 Linz (Austria); Humer, I.; Smoliner, J. [Technical University of Vienna, Institute for Solid State Electronics, 1040 Vienna (Austria); Fenner, M.; Moertelmaier, M.; Rankl, C.; Tanbakuchi, H.; Kienberger, F. [Agilent Technologies, Inc., 5301 Stevens Creek Blvd., Santa Clara, California 95051 (United States); Imtiaz, A.; Wallis, T. M.; Kabos, P. [National Institute for Standards and Technology, Electromagnetic Division, 325 Broadway, Boulder, Colorado 80305-3337 (United States); Kopanski, J. J. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Semiconductor Measurements Division, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899-8120 (United States)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Gemini Planet Imager Observational Calibrations II: Detector Performance and Calibration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Gemini Planet Imager is a newly commissioned facility instrument designed to measure the near-infrared spectra of young extrasolar planets in the solar neighborhood and obtain imaging polarimetry of circumstellar disks. GPI's science instrument is an integral field spectrograph that utilizes a HAWAII-2RG detector with a SIDECAR ASIC readout system. This paper describes the detector characterization and calibrations performed by the GPI Data Reduction Pipeline to compensate for effects including bad/hot/cold pixels, persistence, non-linearity, vibration induced microphonics and correlated read noise.

Ingraham, Patrick; Sadakuni, Naru; Ruffio, Jean-Baptiste; Maire, Jerome; Chilcote, Jeff; Larkin, James; Marchis, Franck; Galicher, Raphael; Weiss, Jason

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Deformation within polar ice sheets: An analysis of the Byrd Station and Camp Century borehole-tilting measurements  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Analysis of the inclinometer surveys of the boreholes at Byrd Station, Antarctica, and Camp Century, Greenland, yields the following results. The measured strain rates at both stations, in ice deposited in the last (Wisconsin) glaciation, reduced to a standard temperature and shear stress, are only about one-third those in the Holocene ice, even though the Wisconsin ice has a strong single-maximum fabric. Variations in strain rate in the Wisconsin ice at Byrd Station are negatively correlated with the number of volcanic dust bands in the ice. It is inferred that the ice below 1800 m at Byrd Station, which has a multiple-maximum fabric, deforms much less readily than the remainder of the ice. A flow model of Nye, with index n = 3, provides a relation between shear strain rate and shear stress that fits the data from both stations satisfactorily, even though the assumption of plane strain is not strictly valid at Byrd Station. A value of flow parameter A fifteen to twenty times that given by recent data compilations and predicted by dislocation theory, has to be used for the Holocene ice. These data cover a stress range (20–45 kPa) lower than in any other field experiment.

W.S.B. Paterson

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

TOUGH: Model use, calibration and validation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Richland, Wash. : Rockwell Hanford Operations. Storn, R. ,U.S. Department of Energy’s Hanford site in Washington. Theet al. (2005). At the Hanford site, highly radioactive waste

Finsterle, S.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Development of a Dynamic DOE Calibration Model  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

MI Dr. Michael Hegmann, Dr. Wolf Baumann, Dr. Karsten Rpke IAV GmbH, Berlin, Germany Eduardo B. Nigro, James R. Cigler Navistar, Inc., Melrose Park, IL Poster P-22 IAV...

273

Multivariate Calibration Models for Sorghum Composition using...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

M.A.; Agblevor, F.; Collins, M.; Johnson, D.K. "Compositional Analysis of Biomass Feedstocks by Near Infrared Reflectance Spectroscopy." Biomass and Bioenergy (11:5), 1996;...

274

Absolute calibration of imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A calibrated laser pulse propagating through the atmosphere produces a flash of Rayleigh scattered light with an intensity that can be calculated very accurately when atmospheric conditions are good. This is used in a technique developed for the absolute calibration of ultra high energy cosmic ray fluorescence telescopes, and it can also be applied to imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes (IACTs). In this paper we present the absolute calibration system being constructed and tested for the VERITAS project.

N. Shepherd; J. H. Buckley; O. Celik; J. Holder; S. LeBohec; H. Manseri; F. Pizlo; M. Roberts

2005-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

275

Optical Calibration For Jefferson Lab HKS Spectrometer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In order to accept very forward angle scattering particles, Jefferson Lab HKS experiment uses an on-target zero degree dipole magnet. The usual spectrometer optics calibration procedure has to be modified due to this on-target field. This paper describes a new method to calibrate HKS spectrometer system. The simulation of the calibration procedure shows the required resolution can be achieved from initially inaccurate optical description.

L. Yuan; L. Tang

2005-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

276

Uncertainty Quantification Techniques for Sensor Calibration...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Uncertainty Quantification Techniques for Sensor Calibration Monitoring in Nuclear Power Plants Re-direct Destination: Temp Data Fields Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Lin, Guang; Crawford,...

277

Users manual for the Acromag calibration system  

SciTech Connect

This document describes how to use the Acromag calibration system software. It includes the requirements and procedures for operating the ACS.

Fordham, C.R.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

E-Print Network 3.0 - actual flow calibration Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Saiers1, David P. Genereux2, and Carl H... of data in automated calibration of a ground water flow and solute transport model at a complex field site... Targets ... Source:...

279

Calibrated Precipitation Forecasts for a Limited-Area Ensemble Forecast System Using Reforecasts  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The calibration of numerical weather forecasts using reforecasts has been shown to increase the skill of weather predictions. Here, the precipitation forecasts from the Consortium for Small Scale Modeling Limited Area Ensemble Prediction System (...

Felix Fundel; Andre Walser; Mark A. Liniger; Christoph Frei; Christof Appenzeller

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Device and method for generating a beam of acoustic energy from a borehole, and applications thereof  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In some aspects of the invention, a method of generating a beam of acoustic energy in a borehole is disclosed. The method includes generating a first broad-band acoustic pulse at a first broad-band frequency range having a first central frequency and a first bandwidth spread; generating a second broad-band acoustic pulse at a second broad-band frequency range different than the first frequency range having a second central frequency and a second bandwidth spread, wherein the first acoustic pulse and second acoustic pulse are generated by at least one transducer arranged on a tool located within the borehole; and transmitting the first and the second broad-band acoustic pulses into an acoustically non-linear medium, wherein the composition of the non-linear medium produces a collimated pulse by a non-linear mixing of the first and second acoustic pulses, wherein the collimated pulse has a frequency equal to the difference in frequencies between the first central frequency and the second central frequency and a bandwidth spread equal to the sum of the first bandwidth spread and the second bandwidth spread.

Vu, Cung Khac; Sinha, Dipen N; Pantea, Cristian; Nihei, Kurt T; Schmitt, Denis P; Skelt, Christopher

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "borehole calibration models" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Recording and interpretation/analysis of tilt signals with five ASKANIA borehole tiltmeters at the KTB  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In June 2003 a large scale injection experiment started at the Continental Deep Drilling site (KTB) in Germany. A tiltmeter array was installed which consisted of five high resolution borehole tiltmeters of the ASKANIA type also equipped with three dimensional seismometers. For the next 11 months 86 000 m 3 were injected into the KTB pilot borehole 4000 m deep. The average injection rate was approximately 200 l ? min . The research objective was to observe and to analyzedeformation caused by the injection into the upper crust at the kilometer range. A new data acquisition system was developed by Geo-Research Center Potsdam (GFZ) to master the expected huge amount of seismic and tilt data. Furthermore it was necessary to develop a new preprocessing software called PREANALYSE for long-period time series. This software includes different useful functions such as step and spike correction interpolation filtering and spectral analysis. This worldwide unique installation offers the excellent opportunity of the separation of signals due to injection and due to environment by correlation of the data of the five stations with the ground water table and meteorological data.

André Gebauer; Thomas Jahr; Gerhard Jentzsch

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Method and system for generating a beam of acoustic energy from a borehole, and applications thereof  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A compact array of transducers is employed as a downhole instrument for acoustic investigation of the surrounding rock formation. The array is operable to generate simultaneously a first acoustic beam signal at a first frequency and a second acoustic beam signal at a second frequency different than the first frequency. These two signals can be oriented through an azimuthal rotation of the array and an inclination rotation using control of the relative phases of the signals from the transmitter elements or electromechanical linkage. Due to the non-linearity of the formation, the first and the second acoustic beam signal mix into the rock formation where they combine into a collimated third signal that propagates in the formation along the same direction than the first and second signals and has a frequency equal to the difference of the first and the second acoustic signals. The third signal is received either within the same borehole, after reflection, or another borehole, after transmission, and analyzed to determine information about rock formation. Recording of the third signal generated along several azimuthal and inclination directions also provides 3D images of the formation, information about 3D distribution of rock formation and fluid properties and an indication of the dynamic acoustic non-linearity of the formation.

Johnson Paul A. (Santa Fe, NM); Ten Cate, James A. (Los Alamos, NM); Guyer, Robert (Reno, NV); Le Bas, Pierre-Yves (Los Alamos, NM); Vu, Cung (Houston, TX); Nihei, Kurt (Oakland, CA); Schmitt, Denis P. (Katy, TX); Skelt, Christopher (Houston, TX)

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

283

System and method to create three-dimensional images of non-linear acoustic properties in a region remote from a borehole  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In some aspects of the disclosure, a method for creating three-dimensional images of non-linear properties and the compressional to shear velocity ratio in a region remote from a borehole using a conveyed logging tool is disclosed. In some aspects, the method includes arranging a first source in the borehole and generating a steered beam of elastic energy at a first frequency; arranging a second source in the borehole and generating a steerable beam of elastic energy at a second frequency, such that the steerable beam at the first frequency and the steerable beam at the second frequency intercept at a location away from the borehole; receiving at the borehole by a sensor a third elastic wave, created by a three wave mixing process, with a frequency equal to a difference between the first and second frequencies and a direction of propagation towards the borehole; determining a location of a three wave mixing region based on the arrangement of the first and second sources and on properties of the third wave signal; and creating three-dimensional images of the non-linear properties using data recorded by repeating the generating, receiving and determining at a plurality of azimuths, inclinations and longitudinal locations within the borehole. The method is additionally used to generate three dimensional images of the ratio of compressional to shear acoustic velocity of the same volume surrounding the borehole.

Vu, Cung; Nihei, Kurt T.; Schmitt, Denis P.; Skelt, Christopher; Johnson, Paul A.; Guyer, Robert; TenCate, James A.; Le Bas, Pierre-Yves

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Confinement Vessel Assay System: Calibration and Certification Report  

SciTech Connect

Los Alamos National Laboratory has a number of spherical confinement vessels (CVs) remaining from tests involving nuclear materials. These vessels have an inner diameter of 6 feet with 1 to 2 inch thick steel walls. The goal of the Confinement Vessel Disposition (CVD) project is to remove debris and reduce contamination inside the vessels. The Confinement Vessel Assay System (CVAS) was developed to measure the amount of SNM in CVs before and after cleanout. Prior to cleanout, the system will be used to perform a verification measurement of each vessel. After cleanout, the system will be used to perform safeguards-quality assays of {le} 100-g {sup 239}Pu equivalent in a vessel for safeguards termination. The system was calibrated in three different mass regions (low, medium, and high) to cover the entire plutonium mass range that will be assayed. The low mass calibration and medium mass calibration were verified for material positioned in the center of an empty vessel. The systematic uncertainty due to position bias was estimated using an MCNPX model to simulate the response of the system to material localized at various points along the inner surface of the vessel. The background component due to cosmic ray spallation was determined by performing measurements of an empty vessel and comparing to measurements in the same location with no vessel present. The CVAS has been tested and calibrated in preparation for verification and safeguards measurements of CVs before and after cleanout.

Frame, Katherine C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bourne, Mark M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Crooks, William J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Evans, Louise [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gomez, Cipriano [Retired CMR-OPS: OPERATIONS; Mayo, Douglas R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Miko, David K. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Salazar, William R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Stange, Sy [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Vigil, Georgiana M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

285

Borehole closure and test zone volume determination program for brine-permeability test results within the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant underground facility  

SciTech Connect

Until recently, hydrologic characterization in closed sections of boreholes at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) has relied on measurements of pressure and temperature to establish the permeability of the host geological formations. There were no provisions for monitoring tool compliance and salt creep resulting from borehole closure. The new permeability test tool used to characterize the WIPP underground facility has been equipped with a series of sensors to measure the movement of the tool with respect to the borehole and borehole wall movement. A FORTRAN program can interpret the output data from each test and calculate the change in borehole radius, test zone length, and test zone volume. These values provide a correlation of fluid compressibility and tool compliance with the permeability results derived from the test data. 4 figs., 3 tabs.

Jensen, A.L.

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

ROBOT CALIBRATION USING LEAST-SQUARES AND  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ROBOT CALIBRATION USING LEAST-SQUARES AND P OLAR-DEC OMP O SITION FILTERING Gregory Ioannldes 1-axis robotic manipulators. The method proposed by the authors is based on a least-square estimation of the Yaskawa Motoman Robot was calibrated. The measurements of the Cartesian coordinates of points were

Flanagan, Randy

287

SPACETELESCOPESCIENCEINSTITUTE WFPC2 Cycle 14 Calibration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

/chip combinations used for science in Cycle 14 + Close Out ~10% reserve 2 Placeholder for unexpected items. TOTALSPACETELESCOPESCIENCEINSTITUTE WFPC2 Cycle 14 Calibration Director's Review 8 August 2005 John Biretta 1 Cycle 14 WFPC2 Calibration Plan Overall Goals: · Monitor & maintain WFPC2 health & safety

Sirianni, Marco

288

Radiological standards and calibration laboratory capabilities  

SciTech Connect

The Radiological Standards and Calibrations Laboratory, a part of Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), performs calibrations and upholds reference standards necessary to maintain traceability to national radiological standards. The facility supports U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) programs at the Hanford Site, programs sponsored by DOE Headquarters and other federal agencies, radiological protection programs at other DOE sites, and research programs sponsored through the commercial sector. The laboratory is located in the 318 Building of the Hanford Site`s 300 Area. The facility contains five major exposure rooms and several laboratories used for exposure work preparation, low-activity instrument calibrations, instrument performance evaluations, instrument maintenance, instrument design and fabrication work, and thermoluminescent and radiochromic dosimetry. The major exposure facilities are a low-scatter room used for neutron and photon exposures, a source well room used for high-volume instrument calibration work, an x-ray facility used for energy response studies, a high-exposure facility used for high-rate photon calibration work, and a beta standards laboratory used for beta energy response studies and beta reference calibrations. Calibrations are routinely performed for personnel dosimeters, health physics instrumentations, photon transfer standards and alpha, beta and gamma field sources used throughout the Hanford Site. This report describes the standards and calibrations laboratory. Photographs that accompany the text appear in the Appendix and are designated Figure A.1 through A.29.

Goles, R.W.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Advanced LD Engine Systems and Emissions Control Modeling and...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

(2): Continued updating LNT aftertreatment device model based on BMW catalyst data Automated bench reactor for CLEERS catalyst calibration New calibrations for lean GDI LNT...

290

Workshop on borehole measurements and interpretation in scientific drilling - identification of problems and proposals for their solution: proceedings  

SciTech Connect

Critical instrumentation needs for borehole-oriented, geoscience research were identified in a program consisting of formal presentations, psoter sessions and a workshop. The proceedings include results of the workshops, abstracts of the papers and poster sessions, and the attendance list. Details of any of the presentations should be obtained from the individual authors. Separate entries were prepared for individual presentations.

Cooper, D.L.; Traeger, R.K. (eds.)

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Detection and quantification of 3D hydraulic fractures with multi-component low-frequency borehole resistivity measurements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-bearing shale but no commercial in-situ borehole methods are available except microseismic monitoring to enhance hydrocarbon production from organic shales and tight-gas sands. While hydro-fracture technology and arbitrarily-oriented fractures in electrically complex backgrounds, such as in anisotropic layered media

Torres-Verdín, Carlos

292

Measurement of 238U, 232Th and 40K in boreholes at Gosa and Lugbe, Abuja, north central Nigeria  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......boreholes to augment public water supplies which...beneath the 300 areas, Hanford Site, Washington...partners Coordinating Meeting, Daily Triumph Newspaper...Geol. Surv. of Nig. Public. 11-43. 17 Caby R...Soc. Lond. Speci. Public. (2008) 294:121-136......

Omeje Maxwell; Husin Wagiran; Noorddin Ibrahim; Siak Kuan Lee; Soheil Sabri

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

A Fresh Look at Greater Confinement Boreholes for Greater-Than-Class C Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal  

SciTech Connect

The United States Federal government has responsibility for disposal of low-level radioactive waste (LLW) with concentrations of radionuclides that exceed limits established by the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for Class C LLW. Since Greater-Than-Class-C (GTCC) LLW is from activities licensed by NRC or NRC Agreement States, a disposal facility by law must be licensed by NRC. The United States (U.S.) Department of Energy (DOE) has the responsibility to site, design, construct, operate, decommission, and provide long-term care for GTCC LLW disposal facilities. On May 11, 2005, DOE issued an advance notice of intent to begin preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for GTCC LLW disposal. Since the initiation of the EIS, analysis has focused on compiling the inventory of commercial GTCC LLW and DOE GTCC-like wastes, reviewing disposal technologies, and other preliminary studies. One of the promising disposal technologies being considered is intermediate depth greater confinement boreholes. Greater confinement boreholes have been used effectively to safely dispose of long-lived radioactive waste at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The DOE took a fresh look at global experiences with the use of greater confinement borehole disposal, including current considerations being given for future applications in the U.S., and concluded that the U.S. is positioned to benefit from international collaboration on borehole disposal technology, and could ultimately become a pilot project, if the technology is selected. (authors)

Tonkay, D.W.; Joyce, J.L. [U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Disposal Operations, Washington, DC (United States); Cochran, J.R. [Sandia National Laboratories1, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

INTERNATIONALJOURNAL FOR NUMERICALAND ANALYTICAL METHODS IN GEOMECHANICS. VOL 17, 659-667 (1993) TENSILE STRESSES AROUND BOREHOLES DUE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to the efficient recovery of coalbed methane, and the avoidance of borehole stability problems in conventional gas naturally in coal. Specifically,Logan et al." give a description of a coalbed methane completion technology called 'openhole cavity completion'. In this techno- logy, a coalbed methane well is shut-in so

Chan, Derek Y C

295

Calibration of photomultipliers gain used in the J-PET detector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Photomultipliers are commonly used in commercial PET scanner as devices which convert light produced in scintillator by gamma quanta from positron-electron annihilation into electrical signal. For proper analysis of obtained electrical signal, a photomultiplier gain curve must be known, since gain can be significantly different even between photomultipliers of the same model. In this article we describe single photoelectron method used for photomultipliers calibration applied for J-PET scanner, a novel PET detector being developed at the Jagiellonian University. Description of calibration method, an example of calibration curve and gain of few R4998 Hamamatsu photomultipliers are presented.

T. Bednarski; E. Czerwi?ski; P. Moskal; P. Bia?as; K. Giergiel; ?. Kap?on; A. Kochanowski; G. Korcyl; J. Kowal; P. Kowalski; T. Kozik; W. Krzemie?; M. Molenda; I. Moskal; Sz. Nied?wiecki; M. Pa?ka; M. Pawlik; L. Raczy?ski; Z. Rudy; P. Salabura; N. G. Sharma; M. Silarski; A. S?omski; J. Smyrski; A. Strzelecki; K. Szyma?ski; W. Wi?licki; P. Witkowski; M. Zieli?ski; N. Zo?

2013-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

296

A Cryogenic Infrared Calibration Target  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A compact cryogenic calibration target is presented that has a peak diffuse reflectance, $R \\le 0.003$, from $800-4,800\\,{\\rm cm}^{-1}$ $(12-2\\,\\mu$m). Upon expanding the spectral range under consideration to $400-10,000\\,{\\rm cm}^{-1}$ $(25-1\\,\\mu$m) the observed performance gracefully degrades to $R \\le 0.02$ at the band edges. In the implementation described, a high-thermal-conductivity metallic substrate is textured with a pyramidal tiling and subsequently coated with a thin lossy dielectric coating that enables high absorption and thermal uniformity across the target. The resulting target assembly is lightweight, has a low-geometric profile, and has survived repeated thermal cycling from room temperature to $\\sim4\\,$K. Basic design considerations, governing equations, and test data for realizing the structure described are provided. The optical properties of selected absorptive materials -- Acktar Fractal Black, Aeroglaze Z306, and Stycast 2850 FT epoxy loaded with stainless steel powder -- are character...

Wollack, Edward J; Rinehart, Stephan A

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Pressure perturbations from geologic carbon sequestration: Area-of-review boundaries and borehole leakage driving forces  

SciTech Connect

We investigate the possibility that brine could be displaced upward into potable water through wells. Because of the large volumes of CO2 to be injected, the influence of the zone of elevated pressure on potential conduits such as well boreholes could extend many kilometers from the injection site-farther than the CO2 plume itself. The traditional approach to address potential brine leakage related to fluid injection is to set an area of fixed radius around the injection well/zone and to examine wells and other potentially open pathways located in the ''Area-of-Review'' (AoR). This suggests that the AoR eeds to be defined in terms of the potential for a given pressure perturbation to drive upward fluid flow in any given system rather than on some arbitrary pressure rise. We present an analysis that focuses on the changes in density/salinity of the fluids in the potentially leaking wellbore.

Nicot, J.-P.; Oldenburg, C.M.; Bryant, S.L.; Hovorka, S.D.

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

System for generating a beam of acoustic energy from a borehole, and applications thereof  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In some aspects of the invention, a device, positioned within a well bore, configured to generate and direct an acoustic beam into a rock formation around a borehole is disclosed. The device comprises a source configured to generate a first signal at a first frequency and a second signal at a second frequency; a transducer configured to receive the generated first and the second signals and produce acoustic waves at the first frequency and the second frequency; and a non-linear material, coupled to the transducer, configured to generate a collimated beam with a frequency equal to the difference between the first frequency and the second frequency by a non-linear mixing process, wherein the non-linear material includes one or more of a mixture of liquids, a solid, a granular material, embedded microspheres, or an emulsion.

Vu, Cung Khac; Sinha, Dipen N.; Pantea, Cristian; Nihei, Kurt T.; Schmitt, Denis P.; Skelt, Christopher

2012-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

299

Device and method for generating a beam of acoustic energy from a borehole, and applications thereof  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In some aspects of the invention, a device, positioned within a well bore, configured to generate and direct an acoustic beam into a rock formation around a borehole is disclosed. The device comprises a source configured to generate a first signal at a first frequency and a second signal at a second frequency; a transducer configured to receive the generated first and the second signals and produce acoustic waves at the first frequency and the second frequency; and a non-linear material, coupled to the transducer, configured to generate a collimated beam with a frequency equal to the difference between the first frequency and the second frequency by a non-linear mixing process, wherein the non-linear material includes one or more of a mixture of liquids, a solid, a granular material, embedded microspheres, or an emulsion.

Vu, Cung Khac (Houston, TX); Sinha, Dipen N. (Los Alamos, NM); Pantea, Cristian (Los Alamos, NM); Nihei, Kurt (Oakland, CA); Schmitt, Denis P. (Katy, TX); Skelt, Christopher (Houston, TX)

2010-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

300

System for generating a beam of acoustic energy from a borehole, and applications thereof  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In some aspects of the invention, a device, positioned within a well bore, configured to generate and direct an acoustic beam into a rock formation around a borehole is disclosed. The device comprises a source configured to generate a first signal at a first frequency and a second signal at a second frequency; a transducer configured to receive the generated first and the second signals and produce acoustic waves at the first frequency and the second frequency; and a non-linear material, coupled to the transducer, configured to generate a collimated beam with a frequency equal to the difference between the first frequency and the second frequency by a non-linear mixing process, wherein the non-linear material includes one or more of a mixture of liquids, a solid, a granular material, embedded microspheres, or an emulsion.

Vu, Cung Khac (Houston, TX); Sinha, Dipen N. (Los Alamos, NM); Pantea, Cristian (Los Alamos, NM); Nihei, Kurt T. (Oakland, CA); Schmitt, Denis P. (Katy, TX); Skelt, Christopher (Houston, TX)

2012-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "borehole calibration models" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Justification Of The Use Of Boreholes For Disposal Of Sealed Radiological Sources  

SciTech Connect

Soon there will be only 14 states in two compacts that are able to dispose of Low Level Waste (LLW): the Northwest and Rocky Mountain compact with disposal options in Richland, Washington, and the Atlantic compact with disposal options in Barnwell, South Carolina. How do states not in one of the two compacts dispose of their LLW? The Off-Site Source Recovery Project can take possession and dispose of some of the unwanted transuranic sources at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). However, there will be no path forward for states outside of the two compacts for disposal of their non-transuranic LLW. A solution that has been much discussed, debated and researched, but has not been put into wide scale practice, is the borehole disposal concept. It is the author's position that companies that drill and explore for oil have been disposing of sources in borehole-like structures for years. It should be noted that these companies are not purposely disposing of these sources, but the sources are irretrievable and must be abandoned. Additionally, there are Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) regulations that must be followed to seal the well that contains the lost and abandoned source. According to the NRC Event Notification Reports database, there were a minimum of 29 reports of lost and abandoned sources in oil wells between December 1999 and October 2006. The sources were lost at depths between 2,018-18,887 feet, or 600-5,750 meters. The companies that are performing explorations with the aid of sealed radiological sources must follow regulation 10 CFR Part 39. Subsection 15 outlines the procedures that must be followed if sources are determined to be irretrievable and abandoned in place. If the NRC allows and has regulations in place for oil companies, why can't states and/or companies be allowed to dispose of LLW in a similar fashion?

Zarling, John [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Johnson, Peter [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

An automated vacuum gauge calibration system  

SciTech Connect

An automated system for calibrating vacuum gauges over the pressure range of 10{sup {minus}6} to 0.1 Pa was designed and constructed at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) for the Department of Energy (DOE) Primary Standards Laboratory at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). Calculable pressures are generated by passing a known flow of gas through an orifice of known conductance. The orifice conductance is derived from dimensional measurements and accurate flows are generated using metal capillary leaks. The expanded uncertainty (k = 2) in the generated pressure is estimated to be between 1% and 4% over the calibration range. The design, calibration results. and component uncertainties will be discussed.

Abbott, P.J. [NIST, GAithersburg, MD (United States); Benner, M.S. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Calibrating X-ray Imaging Devices for Accurate Intensity Measurement  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the project presented is to develop methods to accurately calibrate X-ray imaging devices. The approach was to develop X-ray source systems suitable for this endeavor and to develop methods to calibrate solid state detectors to measure source intensity. NSTec X-ray sources used for the absolute calibration of cameras are described, as well as the method of calibrating the source by calibrating the detectors. The work resulted in calibration measurements for several types of X-ray cameras. X-ray camera calibration measured efficiency and efficiency variation over the CCD. Camera types calibrated include: CCD, CID, back thinned (back illuminated), front illuminated.

Haugh, M. J.

2011-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

304

Non-Destructive Analysis Calibration Standards for Gaseous Diffusion...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Non-Destructive Analysis Calibration Standards for Gaseous Diffusion Plant (GDP) Decommissioning Non-Destructive Analysis Calibration Standards for Gaseous Diffusion Plant (GDP)...

305

Results of hydraulic tests at Gibson Dome No. 1, Elk Ridge No. 1, and E. J. Kubat boreholes, Paradox Basin, Utah  

SciTech Connect

Hydraulic testing was conducted in three boreholes in southeastern Utah to provide a portion of the data needed to characterize the hydrogeology of the Elk Ridge and Gibson Dome areas of the western Paradox Basin, Utah. The tests at the E. J. Kubat borehole yielded representative values of transmissivity, hydraulic conductivity, storativity, and potentiometric levels of the Leadville Limestone. Testing at Elk Ridge No. 1 provided values of similar parameters for the combined thickness of the upper Honaker Trail, Elephant Canyon, and Cedar Mesa formations. Composite transmissivities of similar zones from these borehole tests compared closely with the results of testing at borehole GD-1. A comparison of results from lab tests on core with results of extensive borehole testing at GD-1 indicates that short-term drill stem tests in a single well can provide representative estimates of bulk transmissivities and hydraulic conductivities in this field area for test zones that have a hydraulic conductivity of greater than about 1 x 10/sup -7/ cm/sec. However, lab tests produce more representative values of effective porosity and matrix permeability of individual strata. Results of lab tests and long-term borehole tests confirm that the lower Honaker Trail and upper Paradox formations have extremely low conductivities in the vicinity of the GD-1 borehole. The results of these tests were complete as of January 1981. 22 references, 29 figures, 5 tables.

Thackston, J.W.; Preslo, L.M.; Hoexter, D.E.; Donnelly, N.

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Metallicity calibration of theoretical stellar SEDs using UBVRIJHKL photometry of globular clusters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Although stellar SED models are constantly improving and seem to show similar differential tendencies as measured spectra, their absolute properties (eg. absolute flux in different wavelength regions) can still differ significantly from the measured ones. Therefore, it is necessary to "color-calibrate" the theoretical spectra to obtain realistic model-based stellar spectra, which can then be used for many purposes, such as population synthesis models. In order to calibrate a hybrid library (consisting of the Kurucz -, the Allard and Hauschild -, and the Scholz-models) of theoretical SEDs, UBVRIJHKLM photometric data of solar neighborhood stars were collected from the literature, and the solar metallicity models were calibrated using an algorithm developed by Cuisinier et. al. The corrections were then propagated through the whole grid of models, resulting in the "semi-empirical" models (available on ftp from the university of Basel). In order to extend the calibration to non-solar abundances, we have collected UBVRIJHKL photometric data from well-known Galactic globular clusters, covering a wide range of metallicities. We shall present first results, using the metallicity-calibrated library for calculating isochrones of metal-poor clusters. In particular, the observed slope and/or curvature of the RGB appears to be reproducible in a systematically correct manner for the first time.

P. Westera; Th. Lejeune; R. Buser

1999-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

307

Seismic anisotropy in the crystalline upper crust: observations and modelling from the Outokumpu scientific borehole, Finland  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......anisotropy of schists and shales, J. geophys. Res., 111...A review of wave motion in anisotropic and cracked elastic-media...1994. Overall properties of anisotropic materials containing cracks...R., 1997. Ultrasonic anisotropic phase velocity determination......

Heather Schijns; Douglas R. Schmitt; Pekka J. Heikkinen; Ilmo T. Kukkonen

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

DEVELOPMENT OF A 400 LEVEL 3C CLAMPED DOWNHOLE SEISMIC RECEIVER ARRAY FOR 3D BOREHOLE SEISMIC IMAGING OF GAS RESERVOIRS  

SciTech Connect

Borehole seismology is the highest resolution geophysical imaging technique available to the oil and gas industry for characterization and monitoring of oil and gas reservoirs. However, the industry's ability to economically do high resolution 3D imaging of deep and complex gas reservoirs using borehole seismology is currently frustrated by the lack of the acquisition technology necessary to record the large volumes of the high frequency, high signal-to-noise-ratio borehole seismic data needed to do 3D imaging. This proposal takes direct aim at this shortcoming. P/GSI is developing a 400 level 3C clamped downhole seismic receiver array for borehole seismic 3D imaging. This array will remove the acquisition barrier to record the necessary volumes of data to do high resolution 3D VSP or 3D cross well seismic imaging. 3D VSP and long range Cross-Well Seismology (CWS) are two of the borehole seismic techniques that will allow the Gas industry to take the next step in their quest for higher resolution images of the gas reservoirs. Today only a fraction of the original Oil or Gas in place is produced when reservoirs are considered depleted. This is primarily due to our lack of understanding of the detailed compartmentalization of the oil and gas reservoirs. The 400 level 3C borehole seismic receiver array will allow for economic use of 3D borehole seismic imaging for reservoir characterization and monitoring. By using 3C surface seismic or borehole seismic sources the 400 level receiver array will furthermore facilitate 9C reservoir imaging. The 9C borehole seismic data will provide P, SH and SV information for imaging of the complex deep gas reservoirs and allow quantitative prediction of the rock and the fluid types. The data quality and the data volumes from a 400 level 3C array will allow us to develop the data processing technology necessary for high resolution reservoir imaging.

Bjorn N.P Paulsson

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

DEVELOPMENT OF A 400 LEVEL 3C CLAMPED DOWNHOLE SEISMIC RECEIVER ARRAY FOR 3D BOREHOLE SEISMIC IMAGING OF GAS RESERVOIRS  

SciTech Connect

Borehole seismology is the highest resolution geophysical imaging technique available to the oil and gas industry for characterization and monitoring of oil and gas reservoirs. However, the industry's ability to economically do high resolution 3D imaging of deep and complex gas reservoirs using borehole seismology is currently frustrated by the lack of the acquisition technology necessary to record the large volumes of the high frequency, high signal-to-noise-ratio borehole seismic data needed to do 3D imaging. This proposal takes direct aim at this shortcoming. P/GSI is developing a 400 level 3C clamped downhole seismic receiver array for borehole seismic 3D imaging. This array will remove the acquisition barrier to record the necessary volumes of data to do high resolution 3D VSP or 3D cross well seismic imaging. 3D VSP and long range Cross-Well Seismology (CWS) are two of the borehole seismic techniques that will allow the Gas industry to take the next step in their quest for higher resolution images of the gas reservoirs. Today only a fraction of the original Oil or Gas in place is produced when reservoirs are considered depleted. This is primarily due to our lack of understanding of the detailed compartmentalization of the oil and gas reservoirs. The 400 level 3C borehole seismic receiver array will allow for economic use of 3D borehole seismic imaging for reservoir characterization and monitoring. By using 3C surface seismic or 3C borehole seismic sources the 400 level receiver array will furthermore facilitate 9C reservoir imaging. The 9C borehole seismic data will provide P, SH and SV information for imaging of the complex deep gas reservoirs and allow quantitative prediction of the rock and the fluid types. The data quality and the data volumes from a 400 level 3C array will allow us to develop the data processing technology necessary for high resolution reservoir imaging.

Bjorn N.P. Paulsson

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Flow through electrode with automated calibration  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is an improved automated flow through electrode liquid monitoring system. The automated system has a sample inlet to a sample pump, a sample outlet from the sample pump to at least one flow through electrode with a waste port. At least one computer controls the sample pump and records data from the at least one flow through electrode for a liquid sample. The improvement relies upon (a) at least one source of a calibration sample connected to (b) an injection valve connected to said sample outlet and connected to said source, said injection valve further connected to said at least one flow through electrode, wherein said injection valve is controlled by said computer to select between said liquid sample or said calibration sample. Advantages include improved accuracy because of more frequent calibrations, no additional labor for calibration, no need to remove the flow through electrode(s), and minimal interruption of sampling.

Szecsody, James E [Richland, WA; Williams, Mark D [Richland, WA; Vermeul, Vince R [Richland, WA

2002-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

311

ACS calibration pipeline testing: error propagation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 ACS calibration pipeline testing: error propagation Doug Van Orsow, Max Mutchler, Warren Hack files (see ISRs 99-03 "CALACS Operation and Implementation" by Hack and 99-04 "ACS calibra- tion

Sirianni, Marco

312

4-D seismic technologies: intersurvey calibration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

seismic data sets at different times in the production life of a reservoir, calibrating, then comparing the data sets and interpreting intersurvey differences in terms of fluid change or movement. In practice 4-D (time-lapse) analysis is typically...

Kelley, Jeffrey Paul

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

313

Temperature calibration of Gulf of Mexico corals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for measurement of extension, density, and isotopes ([]¹?O, []¹³C). The coral oxygen isotope signature was calibrated against high-resolution daily temperature and salinity data sets spanning 1990-1997. Coralline estimates of water temperature demonstrate only...

Smith, Jennifer Mae

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

314

ARM - Evaluation Product - Calibrated KAZR Data  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

not be calibrated and corrected due to their size and the associated heavy reprocessing load. Data Details Contact NitinBharadwaj nitin@pnnl.gov (509) 372-4267 PO Box 999, MS...

315

Neutron Scattering in ORNL'S Calibration Facility  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Dosimetry Article Neutron Scattering in ORNL'S Calibration...C. Francis Room scattering corrections for several common neutron detectors in a new...and enclosed room scattering situations are compared...good. A personnel neutron spectrometer was......

J.C. Liu; C.S. Sims; W.H. Casson; H. Murakami; C. Francis

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Calibration for Frequencies of Stellar Spectral Lines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

When studying the expansion of the universe, a significant problem is measuring the red shifts of stellar absorption lines with sufficiently high accuracy; this requires extremely accurate reference frequencies for calibration. An important recent...

Gomez, Juana

2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

317

Calibration and Rating of Photovoltaics: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

Rating the performance of photovoltaic (PV) modules is critical to determining the cost per watt, and efficiency is useful to assess the relative progress among PV concepts. Procedures for determining the efficiency for PV technologies from 1-sun to low concentration to high concentration are discussed. We also discuss the state of the art in primary and secondary calibration of PV reference cells used by calibration laboratories around the world. Finally, we consider challenges to rating PV technologies and areas for improvement.

Emery, K.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Automated intraoperative calibration for prostate cancer brachytherapy  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Prostate cancer brachytherapy relies on an accurate spatial registration between the implant needles and the TRUS image, called ''calibration''. The authors propose a new device and a fast, automatic method to calibrate the brachytherapy system in the operating room, with instant error feedback. Methods: A device was CAD-designed and precision-engineered, which mechanically couples a calibration phantom with an exact replica of the standard brachytherapy template. From real-time TRUS images acquired from the calibration device and processed by the calibration system, the coordinate transformation between the brachytherapy template and the TRUS images was computed automatically. The system instantly generated a report of the target reconstruction accuracy based on the current calibration outcome. Results: Four types of validation tests were conducted. First, 50 independent, real-time calibration trials yielded an average of 0.57 {+-} 0.13 mm line reconstruction error (LRE) relative to ground truth. Second, the averaged LRE was 0.37 {+-} 0.25 mm relative to ground truth in tests with six different commercial TRUS scanners operating at similar imaging settings. Furthermore, testing with five different commercial stepper systems yielded an average of 0.29 {+-} 0.16 mm LRE relative to ground truth. Finally, the system achieved an average of 0.56 {+-} 0.27 mm target registration error (TRE) relative to ground truth in needle insertion tests through the template in a water tank. Conclusions: The proposed automatic, intraoperative calibration system for prostate cancer brachytherapy has achieved high accuracy, precision, and robustness.

Kuiran Chen, Thomas; Heffter, Tamas; Lasso, Andras; Pinter, Csaba; Abolmaesumi, Purang; Burdette, E. Clif; Fichtinger, Gabor [Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario K7L 3N6 (Canada); University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia V6T 1Z4 (Canada); Acoustic MedSystems, Inc., Champaign, Illinois 61820-3979 (United States); Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario K7L 3N6 (Canada) and Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21218-2682 (United States)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

319

Calibration facility for environment dosimetry instruments  

SciTech Connect

In the last ten years, the nuclear activities, as well as the major nuclear events (see Fukushima accident) had an increasing impact on the environment, merely by contamination with radioactive materials. The most conferment way to quickly identify the presence of some radioactive elements in the environment, is to measure the dose-equivalent rate H. In this situation, information concerning the values of H due only to the natural radiation background must exist. Usually, the values of H due to the natural radiation background, are very low (?10{sup ?9} - 10{sup ?8} Sv/h). A correct measurement of H in this range involve a performing calibration of the measuring instruments in the measuring range corresponding to the natural radiation background lead to important problems due to the presence of the natural background itself the best way to overlap this difficulty is to set up the calibration stand in an area with very low natural radiation background. In Romania, we identified an area with such special conditions at 200 m dept, in a salt mine. This paper deals with the necessary requirements for such a calibration facility, as well as with the calibration stand itself. The paper includes also, a description of the calibration stand (and images) as well as the radiological and metrological parameters. This calibration facilities for environment dosimetry is one of the few laboratories in this field in Europe.

Bercea, Sorin; Celarel, Aurelia; Cenusa, Constantin [Horia Hulubei National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering, 30 Reactorului St, Magurele, Jud Ilfov, P.O.B. MG-6, RO-077125 (Romania)

2013-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

320

Auto calibration of a cone-beam-CT  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: This paper introduces a novel autocalibration method for cone-beam-CTs (CBCT) or flat-panel CTs, assuming a perfect rotation. The method is based on ellipse-fitting. Autocalibration refers to accurate recovery of the geometric alignment of a CBCT device from projection images alone, without any manual measurements. Methods: The authors use test objects containing small arbitrarily positioned radio-opaque markers. No information regarding the relative positions of the markers is used. In practice, the authors use three to eight metal ball bearings (diameter of 1 mm), e.g., positioned roughly in a vertical line such that their projection image curves on the detector preferably form large ellipses over the circular orbit. From this ellipse-to-curve mapping and also from its inversion the authors derive an explicit formula. Nonlinear optimization based on this mapping enables them to determine the six relevant parameters of the system up to the device rotation angle, which is sufficient to define the geometry of a CBCT-machine assuming a perfect rotational movement. These parameters also include out-of-plane rotations. The authors evaluate their method by simulation based on data used in two similar approaches [L. Smekal, M. Kachelriess, S. E, and K. Wa, 'Geometric misalignment and calibration in cone-beam tomography,' Med. Phys. 31(12), 3242-3266 (2004); K. Yang, A. L. C. Kwan, D. F. Miller, and J. M. Boone, 'A geometric calibration method for cone beam CT systems,' Med. Phys. 33(6), 1695-1706 (2006)]. This allows a direct comparison of accuracy. Furthermore, the authors present real-world 3D reconstructions of a dry human spine segment and an electronic device. The reconstructions were computed from projections taken with a commercial dental CBCT device having two different focus-to-detector distances that were both calibrated with their method. The authors compare their reconstruction with a reconstruction computed by the manufacturer of the CBCT device to demonstrate the achievable spatial resolution of their calibration procedure. Results: Compared to the results published in the most closely related work [K. Yang, A. L. C. Kwan, D. F. Miller, and J. M. Boone, 'A geometric calibration method for cone beam CT systems,' Med. Phys. 33(6), 1695-1706 (2006)], the simulation proved the greater accuracy of their method, as well as a lower standard deviation of roughly 1 order of magnitude. When compared to another similar approach [L. Smekal, M. Kachelriess, S. E, and K. Wa, 'Geometric misalignment and calibration in cone-beam tomography,' Med. Phys. 31(12), 3242-3266 (2004)], their results were roughly of the same order of accuracy. Their analysis revealed that the method is capable of sufficiently calibrating out-of-plane angles in cases of larger cone angles when neglecting these angles negatively affects the reconstruction. Fine details in the 3D reconstruction of the spine segment and an electronic device indicate a high geometric calibration accuracy and the capability to produce state-of-the-art reconstructions. Conclusions: The method introduced here makes no requirements on the accuracy of the test object. In contrast to many previous autocalibration methods their approach also includes out-of-plane rotations of the detector. Although assuming a perfect rotation, the method seems to be sufficiently accurate for a commercial CBCT scanner. For devices which require higher dimensional geometry models, the method could be used as a initial calibration procedure.

Gross, Daniel; Heil, Ulrich; Schulze, Ralf; Schoemer, Elmar; Schwanecke, Ulrich [Department of Design, Computer Science and Media, RheinMain University of Applied Sciences, 65195 Wiesbaden, Germany and Institute of Computer Science, Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, 55128 Mainz (Germany); Department of Oral Surgery (and Oral Radiology), University Medical Center of the Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, 55131 Mainz (Germany); Institute of Computer Science, Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, 55128 Mainz (Germany); Department of Design, Computer Science and Media, RheinMain University of Applied Sciences, 65195 Wiesbaden (Germany)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "borehole calibration models" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Estimation of Dry-Rock Elastic Moduli Based on the Simulation of Mud-Filtrate Invasion Effects on Borehole Acoustic Logs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Effects on Borehole Acoustic Logs Tobiloluwa Odumosu, SPE, Carlos Torres-Verdín, SPE, Jesús M Salazar, SPE. Jun Ma, Ben Voss, and Gong Li Wang, SPE, The University of Texas at Austin Copyright 2007, Society

Torres-Verdín, Carlos

322

Gafchromic EBT2 film dosimetry in reflection mode with a novel plan-based calibration method  

SciTech Connect

Purpose:A dosimetric system formed by Gafchromic EBT2 radiochromic film and Epson Expression 10000XL flatbed scanner was commissioned for dosimetry. In this paper, several open questions concerning the commissioning of radiochromic films for dosimetry were addressed: (a) is it possible to employ this dosimetric system in reflection mode; (b) if so, can the methods used in transmission mode also be used in reflection mode; (c) is it possible to obtain accurate absolute dose measurements with Gafchromic EBT2 films; (d) which calibration method should be followed; (e) which calibration models should be used; and (f) does three-color channel dosimetry offer a significant improvement over single channel dosimetry. The purpose of this paper is to help clarify these questions. Methods: In this study, films were scanned in reflection mode, the effect of surrounding film was evaluated and the feasibility of EBT2 film dosimetry in reflection mode was studied. EBT2's response homogeneity has been reported to lead to excessive dose uncertainties. To overcome this problem, a new plan-based calibration method was implemented. Plan-based calibration can use every pixel and each of the three color channels of the scanned film to obtain the parameters of the calibration model. A model selection analysis was conducted to select lateral correction and sensitometric curve models. The commonly used calibration with fragments was compared with red-channel plan-based calibration and with three-channel plan-based calibration. Results: No effect of surrounding film was found in this study. The film response inhomogeneity in EBT2 films was found to be important not only due to differences in the fog but also due to differences in sensitivity. The best results for lateral corrections were obtained using absolute corrections independent of the dose. With respect to the sensitometric curves, an empirical polynomial fit of order 4 was found to obtain results equivalent to a gamma-distributed single hit model based on physical assumptions. Three-channel dosimetry was found to be substantially superior to red-channel dosimetry. Conclusions: Reflection mode with Gafchromic EBT2 radiochromic film was found to be a viable alternative to transmission mode. The same methods that are used in transmission mode can be followed in reflection mode. A novel plan-based method was developed for calibration and multichannel dosimetry. This novel method offers increased robustness against film response inhomogeneities and reduces considerably the time required for calibration.

Mendez, I.; Hartman, V.; Hudej, R.; Strojnik, A.; Casar, B. [Department of Medical Physics, Institute of Oncology Ljubljana, Zaloska cesta 2, Ljubljana 1000 (Slovenia)

2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

323

Research and Application of Auger-air Drilling and Sieve Tube Borehole Protection in Soft Outburst-prone Coal Seams  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Hole accidents during drilling and borehole collapse during extracting are bottlenecks restricting gas drainage efficiency in soft outburst-prone coal seams in China. The auger-air combined drilling technique and sieve tube mounting method are an alternative solution to these technology bottlenecks. The auger-air drilling technique combines the advantages of “dry style” auger drilling and air drilling. Specially designed blade in drill rod can stir up large particles of coal so that large particles can be brought to ground smoothly using compressed air and is efficient to prevent borehole accidents. After drilling is completed, the sieve tube is tripped in through the inner hole of drilling pipes, and then lifting up drilling pipes, the tube sieve will provide a complete tunnel for gas extraction. Field application proves that with proper drilling parameter selection and appropriate tube install control, it is more promising to double drilling depth and raise gas drainage efficiency.

Ji Qianhui

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Accessible calibration technique for mechanical impedance measurements  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A velocity pickup for stereo disk playback can be calibrated for magnitude of velocity response by using commercially available test records modulated by pure sinusoidal signals. The records may be calibrated independently by using a collimated light beam (sealed beam headlamp) and measuring (with divider and ruler) the extent of the “Christmas Tree” pattern reflected from the grooves. During playback at measured speeds the record becomes a source of calibrated velocity amplitude for each of the pickup channels. Summing and differencing the pickup outputs convert right and left to vertical and horizontal outputs. The phase difference between the stylus velocity and the electrical output of the pickup is calibrated by placing the cartridge tip in a dimple cut into the ground electrode of a piezoelectric force transducer driven electrically well below its resonant frequency. The driving voltage and the pickup output then exhibit the same phase relation as the groove displacement and the pickup output. The force/velocity ratio measuring system is calibrated as a function of frequency by using known masses as loads. For measuring an unknown mechanical impedance the force pickup is interposed between a driver and the load with the pickup stylus mounted either in the dimple in the electrode or on the surface of the load. [This work has been performed using the facilities of the National Bureau of Standards.

Edith L. R. Corliss

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Calibrated Langevin-dynamics simulations of intrinsically disordered proteins  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We perform extensive coarse-grained (CG) Langevin dynamics simulations of intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs), which possess fluctuating conformational statistics between that for excluded volume random walks and collapsed globules. Our CG model includes repulsive steric, attractive hydrophobic, and electrostatic interactions between residues and is calibrated to a large collection of single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer data on the interresidue separations for 36 pairs of residues in five IDPs: ??, ??, and ?-synuclein, the microtubule-associated protein ?, and prothymosin ?. We find that our CG model is able to recapitulate the average interresidue separations regardless of the choice of the hydrophobicity scale, which shows that our calibrated model can robustly capture the conformational dynamics of IDPs. We then employ our model to study the scaling of the radius of gyration with chemical distance in 11 known IDPs. We identify a strong correlation between the distance to the dividing line between folded proteins and IDPs in the mean charge and hydrophobicity space and the scaling exponent of the radius of gyration with chemical distance along the protein.

W. Wendell Smith; Po-Yi Ho; Corey S. O'Hern

2014-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

326

Final report on decommissioning boreholes and wellsite restoration, Gulf Coast Interior Salt Domes of Mississippi  

SciTech Connect

In 1978, eight salt domes in Texas, Louisiana, and Mississippi were identified for study as potential locations for a nuclear waste repository as part of the National Waste Terminal Storage (NWTS) program. Three domes were selected in Mississippi for ``area characterization`` phase study as follows: Lampton Dome near Columbia, Cypress Creek Dome near New Augusta, and Richton Dome near Richton. The purpose of the studies was to acquire geologic and geohydrologic information from shallow and deep drilling investigations to enable selection of sites suitable for more intensive study. Eleven deep well sites were selected for multiple-well installations to acquire information on the lithologic and hydraulic properties of regional aquifers. In 1986, the Gulf Coast salt domes were eliminated from further consideration for repository development by the selection of three candidate sites in other regions of the country. In 1987, well plugging and restoration of these deferred sites became a closeout activity. The primary objectives of this activity are to plug and abandon all wells and boreholes in accordance with state regulations, restore all drilling sites to as near original condition as feasible, and convey to landowners any wells on their property that they choose to maintain. This report describes the activities undertaken to accomplish these objectives, as outlines in Activity Plan 1--2, ``Activity Plan for Well Plugging and Site Restoration of Test Hole Sites in Mississippi.``

Not Available

1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Preliminary Estimates of Specific Discharge and TransportVelocities near Borehole NC-EWDP-24PB  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes fluid electrical conductivity (FEC)and thermal logging data collected in Borehole NC-EWDP-24PB, locatedapproximately 15 km south of the proposed repository at Yucca Mountain.Preliminary analyses of a small fraction of the FEC and temperature dataindicate that relatively large, localized fluid fluxes are likely toexist at this location. The implication that considerable flow is inducedby small gradients, and that flow is highly localized, is significant forthe estimation of groundwater transport velocities and radionuclidetravel times. The sensitivity of the data to potential perturbationsduring testing (i.e., internal wellbore flow in the case of FEC data, andbuoyancy effects in the case of thermal logging data) make it difficultto conclusively derive fluid fluxes and transport velocities without adetailed analysis of all data and processes involved. Such acomprehensive analysis has not yet been performed. However, thepreliminary results suggest that the ambient component of the estimatedflow rates is significant and on the order of liters per minute, yieldinggroundwater transport velocities in the range of kilometers per year. Oneparticular zone in the Bullfrog tuff exhibits estimated velocities on theorder of 10 km/yr. Given that the preliminary estimates of ambient flowrates and transport velocities are relatively high, and considering thepotential impact of high rates and velocities on saturated-zone flow andtransport behavior, we recommend that a comprehensive analysis of all theavailable data be performed. Moreover, additional data sets at otherlocations should be collected to examine whether the current data set isrepresentative of the regional flow system near YuccaMountain.

Freifeld, Barry; Doughty, Christine; Finsterle, Stefan

2006-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

328

WAVELENGTH CALIBRATION OF THE HAMILTON ECHELLE SPECTROGRAPH  

SciTech Connect

We present the wavelength calibration of the Hamilton Echelle Spectrograph at Lick Observatory. The main problem with the calibration of this spectrograph arises from the fact that thorium lines are absent in the spectrum of the presumed ThAr hollow-cathode lamp now under operation; numerous unknown strong lines, which have been identified as titanium lines, are present in the spectrum. We estimate the temperature of the lamp's gas which permits us to calculate the intensities of the lines and to select a large number of relevant Ti I and Ti II lines. The resulting titanium line list for the Lick hollow-cathode lamp is presented. The wavelength calibration using this line list was made with an accuracy of about 0.006 Å.

Pakhomov, Yu. V. [Institute of Astronomy, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Zhao, G., E-mail: pakhomov@inasan.ru [Key Laboratory of Optical Astronomy, National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China)

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

EnergyPlus as a forensic tool: Thermal reconstruction of a crime scene using calibrated simulation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study utilized energy simulation in support of a forensic pathology time-of-death analysis for a corpse discovered in a single-family residence two years prior to the study. In order to produce an accurate estimate of the interior temperature profile ... Keywords: Energy model calibration, energy model accuracy, free-floating energy simulation, legal application of thermal simulation

Nathan Brown, M Susan Ubbelohde, George Loisos, Santosh Philip, Ibone Santiago

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Eagle Mountain Watershed: Calibration, Validation, and Best Management Practices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to be represented in a computationally efficient manner, in turn providing greater spatial detail. SWAT is a combination of applications, ROTO (Routing Outputs to Outlets (Arnold et al., 1995b) and the SWRRB (Simulator for Water Resources in Rural Basins... to Eagle Mountain Lake (Baseline condition) from 1971 to 2004 Sediment (t/y)* Total N (kg/y) Total P (kg/y) Calibrated model estimation (baseline) 296,400 1,055,220 173,020 * Units are metric units ANALYSES 1. Average annual load by landuse...

Lee, Taesoo; Narasimhan, Balaji; Srinivasan, Raqhavan

331

Multiplexed absorption tomography with calibration-free wavelength modulation spectroscopy  

SciTech Connect

We propose a multiplexed absorption tomography technique, which uses calibration-free wavelength modulation spectroscopy with tunable semiconductor lasers for the simultaneous imaging of temperature and species concentration in harsh combustion environments. Compared with the commonly used direct absorption spectroscopy (DAS) counterpart, the present variant enjoys better signal-to-noise ratios and requires no baseline fitting, a particularly desirable feature for high-pressure applications, where adjacent absorption features overlap and interfere severely. We present proof-of-concept numerical demonstrations of the technique using realistic phantom models of harsh combustion environments and prove that the proposed techniques outperform currently available tomography techniques based on DAS.

Cai, Weiwei; Kaminski, Clemens F., E-mail: cfk23@cam.ac.uk [Department of Chemical Engineering and Biotechnology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 3RA (United Kingdom)

2014-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

332

Planck 2015 results. VIII. High Frequency Instrument data processing: Calibration and maps  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper describes the processing applied to the Planck High Frequency Instrument (HFI) cleaned, time-ordered information to produce photometrically calibrated maps in temperature and (for the first time) in polarization. The data from the 2.5 year full mission include almost five independent full-sky surveys. HFI observes the sky over a broad range of frequencies, from 100 to 857 GHz. To get the best accuracy on the calibration over such a large range, two different photometric calibration schemes have been used. The 545 and 857 GHz data are calibrated using models of planetary atmospheric emission. The lower frequencies (from 100 to 353 GHz) are calibrated using the time-variable cosmological microwave background dipole which we call the orbital dipole. This source of calibration only depends on the satellite velocity with respect to the solar system and permits an independent measurement of the amplitude of the CMB solar dipole (3364.5 +/- 0.8 \\mu K) which is 1\\sigma\\ higher than the WMAP measurement wit...

Adam, R; Aghanim, N; Arnaud, M; Ashdown, M; Aumont, J; Baccigalupi, C; Banday, A J; Barreiro, R B; Bartolo, N; Battaner, E; Benabed, K; Benoît, A; Benoit-Lévy, A; Bernard, J -P; Bersanelli, M; Bertincourt, B; Bielewicz, P; Bonavera, L; Bond, J R; Borrill, J; Bouchet, F R; Boulanger, F; Bucher, M; Burigana, C; Calabrese, E; Cardoso, J -F; Catalano, A; Challinor, A; Chamballu, A; Chiang, H C; Christensen, P R; Clements, D L; Colombi, S; Colombo, L P L; Combet, C; Couchot, F; Coulais, A; Crill, B P; Curto, A; Cuttaia, F; Danese, L; Davies, R D; Davis, R J; de Bernardis, P; de Rosa, A; de Zotti, G; Delabrouille, J; Delouis, J -M; Désert, F -X; Diego, J M; Dole, H; Donzelli, S; Doré, O; Douspis, M; Ducout, A; Dupac, X; Efstathiou, G; Elsner, F; Enßlin, T A; Eriksen, H K; Falgarone, E; Fergusson, J; Finelli, F; Forni, O; Frailis, M; Fraisse, A A; Franceschi, E; Frejsel, A; Galeotta, S; Galli, S; Ganga, K; Ghosh, T; Giard, M; Giraud-Héraud, Y; Gjerløw, E; González-Nuevo, J; Górski, K M; Gratton, S; Gruppuso, A; Gudmundsson, J E; Hansen, F K; Hanson, D; Harrison, D L; Henrot-Versillé, S; Herranz, D; Hildebrandt, S R; Hivon, E; Hobson, M; Holmes, W A; Hornstrup, A; Hovest, W; Huffenberger, K M; Hurier, G; Jaffe, A H; Jaffe, T R; Jones, W C; Juvela, M; Keihänen, E; Keskitalo, R; Kisner, T S; Kneissl, R; Knoche, J; Kunz, M; Kurki-Suonio, H; Lagache, G; Lamarre, J -M; Lasenby, A; Lattanzi, M; Lawrence, C R; Jeune, M Le; Leahy, J P; Lellouch, E; Leonardi, R; Lesgourgues, J; Levrier, F; Liguori, M; Lilje, P B; Linden-Vørnle, M; López-Caniego, M; Lubin, P M; Macías-Pérez, J F; Maggio, G; Maino, D; Mandolesi, N; Mangilli, A; Martin, P G; Martínez-González, E; Masi, S; Matarrese, S; Mazzotta, P; McGehee, P; Melchiorri, A; Mendes, L; Mennella, A; Migliaccio, M; Mitra, S; Miville-Deschênes, M -A; Moneti, A; Montier, L; Moreno, R; Morgante, G; Mortlock, D; Moss, A; Mottet, S; Munshi, D; Murphy, J A; Naselsky, P; Nati, F; Natoli, P; Netterfield, C B; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H U; Noviello, F; Novikov, D; Novikov, I; Oxborrow, C A; Paci, F; Pagano, L; Pajot, F; Paoletti, D; Pasian, F; Patanchon, G; Pearson, T J; Perdereau, O; Perotto, L; Perrotta, F; Pettorino, V; Piacentini, F; Piat, M; Pierpaoli, E; Pietrobon, D; Plaszczynski, S; Pointecouteau, E; Polenta, G; Pratt, G W; Prézeau, G; Prunet, S; Puget, J -L; Rachen, J P; Reinecke, M; Remazeilles, M; Renault, C; Renzi, A; Ristorcelli, I; Rocha, G; Rosset, C; Rossetti, M; Roudier, G; Rusholme, B; Sandri, M; Santos, D; Sauvé, A; Savelainen, M; Savini, G; Scott, D; Seiffert, M D; Shellard, E P S; Spencer, L D; Stolyarov, V; Stompor, R; Sudiwala, R; Sutton, D; Suur-Uski, A -S; Sygnet, J -F; Tauber, J A; Terenzi, L; Toffolatti, L; Tomasi, M; Tristram, M; Tucci, M; Tuovinen, J; Valenziano, L; Valiviita, J; Van Tent, B; Vielva, P; Villa, F; Wade, L A; Wandelt, B D; Watson, R; Wehus, I K; Yvon, D; Zacchei, A; Zonca, A

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Calibration of X-ray Imaging Devices for Accurate Intensity Measurement  

SciTech Connect

National Security Technologies (NSTec) has developed calibration procedures for X-ray imaging systems using NIST traceable sources. The X-ray sources that are used for calibration are both diode type and diode/fluorescer combinations. Calibrating the X-ray detectors is the key to accurate calibration of the X-ray sources. Both energy dispersive detectors and photodiodes measuring total flux were used. We have developed calibration techniques for the detectors using radioactive sources that are traceable to the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). The German synchrotron at Physikalische Technische Bundestalt (PTB) is used to calibrate silicon photodiodes over the energy range from 50 eV to 60 keV. The measurements on X-ray cameras made using the NSTec X-ray sources have included the quantum efficiency averaged over all pixels, the camera counts per photon per pixel, and response variation across the sensor. The instrumentation required to accomplish the calibrations is described. X-ray energies ranged from 720 eV to 22.7 keV. The X-ray sources produce narrow energy bands, allowing us to determine the properties as a function of X-ray energy. The calibrations were done for several types of imaging devices. There were back illuminated and front illuminated CCD (charge coupled device) sensors, and a CID (charge injection device) type camera. The CCD and CID camera types differ significantly in some of their properties that affect the accuracy of X-ray intensity measurements. All cameras discussed here are silicon based. The measurements of quantum efficiency variation with X-ray energy are compared to models for the sensor structure. Cameras that are not back-thinned are compared to those that are.

Haugh, M. J., Charest, M., Ross, P., Lee, J. Schneider, M., Palmer, N., Teruya,

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

DEVELOPMENT OF A 400 LEVEL 3C CLAMPED DOWNHOLE SEISMIC RECEIVER ARRAY FOR 3D BOREHOLE SEISMIC IMAGING OF GAS RESERVOIRS  

SciTech Connect

Borehole seismology is the highest resolution geophysical imaging technique available today to the oil and gas industry for characterization and monitoring of oil and gas reservoirs. However, the industry's ability to economically do high resolution 3D imaging of deep and complex gas reservoirs using borehole seismology is currently hampered by the lack of the acquisition technology necessary to record the large volumes of the high frequency, high signal-to-noise-ratio borehole seismic data needed to do 3D imaging. This project takes direct aim at this shortcoming by developing a 400 level 3C clamped downhole seismic receiver array, and accompanying software, for borehole seismic 3D imaging. This large borehole seismic array will remove the technical acquisition barrier for recording the necessary volumes of data to do high resolution 3D VSP or 3D cross well seismic imaging. Massive 3D VSP{reg_sign} and long range Cross-Well Seismology (CWS) are two of the borehole seismic techniques that will allow the Gas industry to take the next step in their quest for higher resolution images of the gas reservoirs for the purpose of improving the recovery of the natural gas resources. Today only a fraction of the original Oil or Gas in place is produced when reservoirs are considered depleted. This is primarily due to our lack of understanding of the detailed compartmentalization of the oil and gas reservoirs. The 400 level 3C borehole seismic receiver array will allow for the economic use of 3D borehole seismic imaging for reservoir characterization and monitoring by allowing the economic recording of the required large data volumes that have a sufficiently dense spatial sampling. By using 3C surface seismic or 3C borehole seismic sources the 400 level receiver arrays will furthermore allow 3D reservoir imaging using 9C data. The 9C borehole seismic data will provide P, SH and SV information for imaging of the complex deep gas reservoirs and allow quantitative prediction of the rock and the fluid types. The data quality and the data volumes from a 400 level 3C array will allow us to develop the data processing technology necessary for high resolution reservoir imaging.

Bjorn N.P. Paulsson

2005-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

335

DEVELOPMENT OF A 400 LEVEL 3C CLAMPED DOWNHOLE SEISMIC RECEIVER ARRAY FOR 3D BOREHOLE SEISMIC IMAGING OF GAS RESERVOIRS.  

SciTech Connect

Borehole seismology is the highest resolution geophysical imaging technique available today to the oil and gas industry for characterization and monitoring of oil and gas reservoirs. However, the industry's ability to economically do high resolution 3D imaging of deep and complex gas reservoirs using borehole seismology is currently frustrated by the lack of the acquisition technology necessary to record the large volumes of the high frequency, high signal-to-noise-ratio borehole seismic data needed to do 3D imaging. This project takes direct aim at this shortcoming by developing a 400 level 3C clamped downhole seismic receiver array, and accompanying software, for borehole seismic 3D imaging. This large borehole seismic array will remove the technical acquisition barrier for recording the necessary volumes of data to do high resolution 3D VSP or 3D cross well seismic imaging. 3D VSP and long range Cross-Well Seismology (CWS) are two of the borehole seismic techniques that will allow the Gas industry to take the next step in their quest for higher resolution images of the gas reservoirs for the purpose of improving the recovery of the natural gas resources. Today only a fraction of the original Oil or Gas in place is produced when reservoirs are considered depleted. This is primarily due to our lack of understanding of the detailed compartmentalization of the oil and gas reservoirs. The 400 level 3C borehole seismic receiver array will allow for the economic use of 3D borehole seismic imaging for reservoir characterization and monitoring by allowing the economic recording of the required large data volumes that have a sufficiently dense spatial sampling. By using 3C surface seismic or 3C borehole seismic sources the 400 level receiver array will furthermore allow 3D reservoir imaging using 9C data. The 9C borehole seismic data will provide P, SH and SV information for imaging of the complex deep gas reservoirs and allow quantitative prediction of the rock and the fluid types. The data quality and the data volumes from a 400 level 3C array will allow us to develop the data processing technology necessary for high resolution reservoir imaging.

Bjorn N.P Paulsson

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Development of a 400 Level 3C Clamped Downhole Seismic Receiver Array for 3D Borehole Seismic Imaging of Gas Reservoirs  

SciTech Connect

Borehole seismology is the highest resolution geophysical imaging technique available today to the oil and gas industry for characterization and monitoring of oil and gas reservoirs. However, the industry's ability to economically do high resolution 3D imaging of deep and complex gas reservoirs using borehole seismology is currently hampered by the lack of the acquisition technology necessary to record the large volumes of the high frequency, high signal-to-noise-ratio borehole seismic data needed to do 3D imaging. This project takes direct aim at this shortcoming by developing a 400 level 3C clamped downhole seismic receiver array, and accompanying software, for borehole seismic 3D imaging. This large borehole seismic array will remove the technical acquisition barrier for recording the necessary volumes of data to do high resolution 3D VSP or 3D cross well seismic imaging. Massive 3D VSP{reg_sign} and long range Cross-Well Seismology (CWS) are two of the borehole seismic techniques that will allow the Gas industry to take the next step in their quest for higher resolution images of the gas reservoirs for the purpose of improving the recovery of the natural gas resources. Today only a fraction of the original Oil or Gas in place is produced when reservoirs are considered depleted. This is primarily due to our lack of understanding of the detailed compartmentalization of the oil and gas reservoirs. The 400 level 3C borehole seismic receiver array will allow for the economic use of 3D borehole seismic imaging for reservoir characterization and monitoring by allowing the economic recording of the required large data volumes that have a sufficiently dense spatial sampling. By using 3C surface seismic or 3C borehole seismic sources the 400 level receiver arrays will furthermore allow 3D reservoir imaging using 9C data. The 9C borehole seismic data will provide P, SH and SV information for imaging of the complex deep gas reservoirs and allow quantitative prediction of the rock and the fluid types. The data quality and the data volumes from a 400 level 3C array will allow us to develop the data processing technology necessary for high resolution reservoir imaging.

Bjorn N.P. Paulsson

2005-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

337

DEVELOPMENT OF A 400 LEVEL 3C CLAMPED DOWNHOLE SEISMIC RECEIVER ARRAY FOR 3D BOREHOLE SEISMIC IMAGING OF GAS RESERVOIRS  

SciTech Connect

Borehole seismology is the highest resolution geophysical imaging technique available today to the oil and gas industry for characterization and monitoring of oil and gas reservoirs. However, the industry's ability to economically do high resolution 3D imaging of deep and complex gas reservoirs using borehole seismology is currently frustrated by the lack of the acquisition technology necessary to record the large volumes of the high frequency, high signal-to-noise-ratio borehole seismic data needed to do 3D imaging. This project takes direct aim at this shortcoming by developing a 400 level 3C clamped downhole seismic receiver array, and accompanying software, for borehole seismic 3D imaging. This large borehole seismic array will remove the technical acquisition barrier for recording the necessary volumes of data to do high resolution 3D VSP or 3D cross well seismic imaging. 3D VSP and long range Cross-Well Seismology (CWS) are two of the borehole seismic techniques that will allow the Gas industry to take the next step in their quest for higher resolution images of the gas reservoirs for the purpose of improving the recovery of the natural gas resources. Today only a fraction of the original Oil or Gas in place is produced when reservoirs are considered depleted. This is primarily due to our lack of understanding of the detailed compartmentalization of the oil and gas reservoirs. The 400 level 3C borehole seismic receiver array will allow for the economic use of 3D borehole seismic imaging for reservoir characterization and monitoring by allowing the economic recording of the required large data volumes that have a sufficiently dense spatial sampling. By using 3C surface seismic or 3C borehole seismic sources the 400 level receiver array will furthermore allow 3D reservoir imaging using 9C data. The 9C borehole seismic data will provide P, SH and SV information for imaging of the complex deep gas reservoirs and allow quantitative prediction of the rock and the fluid types. The data quality and the data volumes from a 400 level 3C array will allow us to develop the data processing technology necessary for high resolution reservoir imaging.

Bjorn N.P. Paulsson

2004-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

338

DEVELOPMENT OF A 400 LEVEL 3C CLAMPED DOWNHOLE SEISMIC RECEIVER ARRAY FOR 3D BOREHOLE SEISMIC IMAGING OF GAS RESERVOIRS  

SciTech Connect

Borehole seismology is the highest resolution geophysical imaging technique available today to the oil and gas industry for characterization and monitoring of oil and gas reservoirs. However, the industry's ability to economically do high resolution 3D imaging of deep and complex gas reservoirs using borehole seismology is currently frustrated by the lack of the acquisition technology necessary to record the large volumes of the high frequency, high signal-to-noise-ratio borehole seismic data needed to do 3D imaging. This project takes direct aim at this shortcoming by developing a 400 level 3C clamped downhole seismic receiver array, and accompanying software, for borehole seismic 3D imaging. This large borehole seismic array will remove the technical acquisition barrier for recording the necessary volumes of data to do high resolution 3D VSP or 3D cross well seismic imaging. Massive 3D VSP{reg_sign} and long range Cross-Well Seismology (CWS) are two of the borehole seismic techniques that will allow the Gas industry to take the next step in their quest for higher resolution images of the gas reservoirs for the purpose of improving the recovery of the natural gas resources. Today only a fraction of the original Oil or Gas in place is produced when reservoirs are considered depleted. This is primarily due to our lack of understanding of the detailed compartmentalization of the oil and gas reservoirs. The 400 level 3C borehole seismic receiver array will allow for the economic use of 3D borehole seismic imaging for reservoir characterization and monitoring by allowing the economic recording of the required large data volumes that have a sufficiently dense spatial sampling. By using 3C surface seismic or 3C borehole seismic sources the 400 level receiver arrays will furthermore allow 3D reservoir imaging using 9C data. The 9C borehole seismic data will provide P, SH and SV information for imaging of the complex deep gas reservoirs and allow quantitative prediction of the rock and the fluid types. The data quality and the data volumes from a 400 level 3C array will allow us to develop the data processing technology necessary for high resolution reservoir imaging.

Bjorn N.P. Paulsson

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

339

DEVELOPMENT OF A 400 LEVEL 3C CLAMPED DOWNHOLE SEISMIC RECEIVER ARRAY FOR 3D BOREHOLE SEISMIC IMAGING OF GAS RESERVOIRS  

SciTech Connect

Borehole seismology is the highest resolution geophysical imaging technique available today to the oil and gas industry for characterization and monitoring of oil and gas reservoirs. However, the industry's ability to economically do high resolution 3D imaging of deep and complex gas reservoirs using borehole seismology is currently frustrated by the lack of the acquisition technology necessary to record the large volumes of the high frequency, high signal-to-noise-ratio borehole seismic data needed to do 3D imaging. This project takes direct aim at this shortcoming by developing a 400 level 3C clamped downhole seismic receiver array, and accompanying software, for borehole seismic 3D imaging. This large borehole seismic array will remove the technical acquisition barrier for recording the necessary volumes of data to do high resolution 3D VSP or 3D cross well seismic imaging. 3D VSP and long range Cross-Well Seismology (CWS) are two of the borehole seismic techniques that will allow the Gas industry to take the next step in their quest for higher resolution images of the gas reservoirs for the purpose of improving the recovery of the natural gas resources. Today only a fraction of the original Oil or Gas in place is produced when reservoirs are considered depleted. This is primarily due to our lack of understanding of the detailed compartmentalization of the oil and gas reservoirs. The 400 level 3C borehole seismic receiver array will allow for the economic use of 3D borehole seismic imaging for reservoir characterization and monitoring by allowing the economic recording of the required large data volumes that have a sufficiently dense spatial sampling. By using 3C surface seismic or 3C borehole seismic sources the 400 level receiver array will furthermore allow 3D reservoir imaging using 9C data. The 9C borehole seismic data will provide P, SH and SV information for imaging of the complex deep gas reservoirs and allow quantitative prediction of the rock and the fluid types. The data quality and the data volumes from a 400 level 3C array will allow us to develop the data processing technology necessary for high resolution reservoir imaging.

Bjorn N.P. Paulsson

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

DEVELOPMENT OF A 400 LEVEL 3C CLAMPED DOWNHOLE SEISMIC RECEIVER ARRAY FOR 3D BOREHOLE SEISMIC IMAGING OF GAS RESERVOIRS  

SciTech Connect

Borehole seismology is the highest resolution geophysical imaging technique available today to the oil and gas industry for characterization and monitoring of oil and gas reservoirs. However, the industry's ability to economically do high resolution 3D imaging of deep and complex gas reservoirs using borehole seismology is currently frustrated by the lack of the acquisition technology necessary to record the large volumes of the high frequency, high signal-to-noise-ratio borehole seismic data needed to do 3D imaging. This project takes direct aim at this shortcoming by developing a 400 level 3C clamped downhole seismic receiver array, and accompanying software, for borehole seismic 3D imaging. This large borehole seismic array will remove the technical acquisition barrier for recording the necessary volumes of data to do high resolution 3D VSP or 3D cross well seismic imaging. 3D VSP and long range Cross-Well Seismology (CWS) are two of the borehole seismic techniques that will allow the Gas industry to take the next step in their quest for higher resolution images of the gas reservoirs for the purpose of improving the recovery of the natural gas resources. Today only a fraction of the original Oil or Gas in place is produced when reservoirs are considered depleted. This is primarily due to our lack of understanding of the detailed compartmentalization of the oil and gas reservoirs. The 400 level 3C borehole seismic receiver array will allow for the economic use of 3D borehole seismic imaging for reservoir characterization and monitoring by allowing the economic recording of the required large data volumes that have a sufficiently dense spatial sampling. By using 3C surface seismic or 3C borehole seismic sources the 400 level receiver array will furthermore allow 3D reservoir imaging using 9C data. The 9C borehole seismic data will provide P, SH and SV information for imaging of the complex deep gas reservoirs and allow quantitative prediction of the rock and the fluid types. The data quality and the data volumes from a 400 level 3C array will allow us to develop the data processing technology necessary for high resolution reservoir imaging.

Bjorn N.P. Paulsson

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "borehole calibration models" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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341

DEVELOPMENT OF A 400 LEVEL 3C CLAMPED DOWNHOLE SEISMIC RECEIVER ARRAY FOR 3D BOREHOLE SEISMIC IMAGING OF GAS RESERVOIRS  

SciTech Connect

Borehole seismology is the highest resolution geophysical imaging technique available today to the oil and gas industry for characterization and monitoring of oil and gas reservoirs. However, the industry's ability to economically do high resolution 3D imaging of deep and complex gas reservoirs using borehole seismology is currently frustrated by the lack of the acquisition technology necessary to record the large volumes of the high frequency, high signal-to-noise-ratio borehole seismic data needed to do 3D imaging. This project takes direct aim at this shortcoming by developing a 400 level 3C clamped downhole seismic receiver array, and accompanying software, for borehole seismic 3D imaging. This large borehole seismic array will remove the technical acquisition barrier for recording the necessary volumes of data to do high resolution 3D VSP or 3D cross well seismic imaging. 3D VSP and long range Cross-Well Seismology (CWS) are two of the borehole seismic techniques that will allow the Gas industry to take the next step in their quest for higher resolution images of the gas reservoirs for the purpose of improving the recovery of the natural gas resources. Today only a fraction of the original Oil or Gas in place is produced when reservoirs are considered depleted. This is primarily due to our lack of understanding of the detailed compartmentalization of the oil and gas reservoirs. The 400 level 3C borehole seismic receiver array will allow for the economic use of 3D borehole seismic imaging for reservoir characterization and monitoring by allowing the economic recording of the required large data volumes that have a sufficiently dense spatial sampling. By using 3C surface seismic or 3C borehole seismic sources the 400 level receiver array will furthermore allow 3D reservoir imaging using 9C data. The 9C borehole seismic data will provide P, SH and SV information for imaging of the complex deep gas reservoirs and allow quantitative prediction of the rock and the fluid types. The data quality and the data volumes from a 400 level 3C array will allow us to develop the data processing technology necessary for high resolution reservoir imaging.

Bjorn N.P. Paulsson

2004-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

342

DEVELOPMENT OF A 400 LEVEL 3C CLAMPED DOWNHOLE SEISMIC RECEIVER ARRAY FOR 3D BOREHOLE SEISMIC IMAGING OF GAS RESERVOIRS  

SciTech Connect

Borehole seismology is the highest resolution geophysical imaging technique available today to the oil and gas industry for characterization and monitoring of oil and gas reservoirs. However, the industry's ability to economically do high resolution 3D imaging of deep and complex gas reservoirs using borehole seismology is currently frustrated by the lack of the acquisition technology necessary to record the large volumes of the high frequency, high signal-to-noise-ratio borehole seismic data needed to do 3D imaging. This project takes direct aim at this shortcoming by developing a 400 level 3C clamped downhole seismic receiver array, and accompanying software, for borehole seismic 3D imaging. This large borehole seismic array will remove the technical acquisition barrier for recording the necessary volumes of data to do high resolution 3D VSP or 3D cross well seismic imaging. 3D VSP and long range Cross-Well Seismology (CWS) are two of the borehole seismic techniques that will allow the Gas industry to take the next step in their quest for higher resolution images of the gas reservoirs for the purpose of improving the recovery of the natural gas resources. Today only a fraction of the original Oil or Gas in place is produced when reservoirs are considered depleted. This is primarily due to our lack of understanding of the detailed compartmentalization of the oil and gas reservoirs. The 400 level 3C borehole seismic receiver array will allow for the economic use of 3D borehole seismic imaging for reservoir characterization and monitoring by allowing the economic recording of the required large data volumes that have a sufficiently dense spatial sampling. By using 3C surface seismic or 3C borehole seismic sources the 400 level receiver array will furthermore allow 3D reservoir imaging using 9C data. The 9C borehole seismic data will provide P, SH and SV information for imaging of the complex deep gas reservoirs and allow quantitative prediction of the rock and the fluid types. The data quality and the data volumes from a 400 level 3C array will allow us to develop the data processing technology necessary for high resolution reservoir imaging.

Bjorn N.P Paulsson

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

DEVELOPMENT OF A 400 LEVEL 3C CLAMPED DOWNHOLE SEISMIC RECEIVER ARRAY FOR 3D BOREHOLE SEISMIC IMAGING OF GAS RESERVOIRS  

SciTech Connect

Borehole seismology is the highest resolution geophysical imaging technique available today to the oil and gas industry for characterization and monitoring of oil and gas reservoirs. However, the industry's ability to economically do high resolution 3D imaging of deep and complex gas reservoirs using borehole seismology is currently frustrated by the lack of the acquisition technology necessary to record the large volumes of the high frequency, high signal-to-noise-ratio borehole seismic data needed to do 3D imaging. This project takes direct aim at this shortcoming by developing a 400 level 3C clamped downhole seismic receiver array, and accompanying software, for borehole seismic 3D imaging. This large borehole seismic array will remove the technical acquisition barrier for recording the necessary volumes of data to do high resolution 3D VSP or 3D cross well seismic imaging. 3D VSP and long range Cross-Well Seismology (CWS) are two of the borehole seismic techniques that will allow the Gas industry to take the next step in their quest for higher resolution images of the gas reservoirs for the purpose of improving the recovery of the natural gas resources. Today only a fraction of the original Oil or Gas in place is produced when reservoirs are considered depleted. This is primarily due to our lack of understanding of the detailed compartmentalization of the oil and gas reservoirs. The 400 level 3C borehole seismic receiver array will allow for the economic use of 3D borehole seismic imaging for reservoir characterization and monitoring by allowing the economic recording of the required large data volumes that have a sufficiently dense spatial sampling. By using 3C surface seismic or 3C borehole seismic sources the 400 level receiver array will furthermore allow 3D reservoir imaging using 9C data. The 9C borehole seismic data will provide P, SH and SV information for imaging of the complex deep gas reservoirs and allow quantitative prediction of the rock and the fluid types. The data quality and the data volumes from a 400 level 3C array will allow us to develop the data processing technology necessary for high resolution reservoir imaging.

Bjorn N.P Paulsson

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

DEVELOPMENT OF A 400 LEVEL 3C CLAMPED DOWNHOLE SEISMIC RECEIVER ARRAY FOR 3D BOREHOLE SEISMIC IMAGING OF GAS RESERVOIRS  

SciTech Connect

Borehole seismology is the highest resolution geophysical imaging technique available today to the oil and gas industry for characterization and monitoring of oil and gas reservoirs. However, the industry's ability to economically do high resolution 3D imaging of deep and complex gas reservoirs using borehole seismology is currently frustrated by the lack of the acquisition technology necessary to record the large volumes of the high frequency, high signal-to-noise-ratio borehole seismic data needed to do 3D imaging. This project takes direct aim at this shortcoming by developing a 400 level 3C clamped downhole seismic receiver array, and accompanying software, for borehole seismic 3D imaging. This large borehole seismic array will remove the technical acquisition barrier for recording the necessary volumes of data to do high resolution 3D VSP or 3D cross well seismic imaging. Massive 3D VSP{reg_sign} and long range Cross-Well Seismology (CWS) are two of the borehole seismic techniques that will allow the Gas industry to take the next step in their quest for higher resolution images of the gas reservoirs for the purpose of improving the recovery of the natural gas resources. Today only a fraction of the original Oil or Gas in place is produced when reservoirs are considered depleted. This is primarily due to our lack of understanding of the detailed compartmentalization of the oil and gas reservoirs. The 400 level 3C borehole seismic receiver array will allow for the economic use of 3D borehole seismic imaging for reservoir characterization and monitoring by allowing the economic recording of the required large data volumes that have a sufficiently dense spatial sampling. By using 3C surface seismic or 3C borehole seismic sources the 400 level receiver arrays will furthermore allow 3D reservoir imaging using 9C data. The 9C borehole seismic data will provide P, SH and SV information for imaging of the complex deep gas reservoirs and allow quantitative prediction of the rock and the fluid types. The data quality and the data volumes from a 400 level 3C array will allow us to develop the data processing technology necessary for high resolution reservoir imaging.

Bjorn N.P. Paulsson

2004-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

345

Development of a 400 Level 3C Clamped Downhole Seismic Receiver Array for 3D Borehole Seismic Imaging of Gas Reservoirs  

SciTech Connect

Borehole seismology is the highest resolution geophysical imaging technique available today to the oil and gas industry for characterization and monitoring of oil and gas reservoirs. However, the industry's ability to economically do high resolution 3D imaging of deep and complex gas reservoirs using borehole seismology is currently hampered by the lack of the acquisition technology necessary to record the large volumes of the high frequency, high signal-to-noise-ratio borehole seismic data needed to do 3D imaging. This project takes direct aim at this shortcoming by developing a 400 level 3C clamped downhole seismic receiver array, and accompanying software, for borehole seismic 3D imaging. This large borehole seismic array will remove the technical acquisition barrier for recording the necessary volumes of data to do high resolution 3D VSP or 3D cross well seismic imaging. Massive 3D VSP{reg_sign} and long range Cross-Well Seismology (CWS) are two of the borehole seismic techniques that will allow the Gas industry to take the next step in their quest for higher resolution images of the gas reservoirs for the purpose of improving the recovery of the natural gas resources. Today only a fraction of the original Oil or Gas in place is produced when reservoirs are considered depleted. This is primarily due to our lack of understanding of the detailed compartmentalization of the oil and gas reservoirs. The 400 level 3C borehole seismic receiver array will allow for the economic use of 3D borehole seismic imaging for reservoir characterization and monitoring by allowing the economic recording of the required large data volumes that have a sufficiently dense spatial sampling. By using 3C surface seismic or 3C borehole seismic sources the 400 level receiver arrays will furthermore allow 3D reservoir imaging using 9C data. The 9C borehole seismic data will provide P, SH and SV information for imaging of the complex deep gas reservoirs and allow quantitative prediction of the rock and the fluid types. The data quality and the data volumes from a 400 level 3C array will allow us to develop the data processing technology necessary for high resolution reservoir imaging.

Bjorn N.P Paulsson

2006-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

346

Development of a 400 Level 3C Clamped Downhole Seismic Receiver Array for 3D Borehole Seismic Imaging of Gas Reservoirs  

SciTech Connect

Borehole seismology is the highest resolution geophysical imaging technique available today to the oil and gas industry for characterization and monitoring of oil and gas reservoirs. However, the industry's ability to economically do high resolution 3D imaging of deep and complex gas reservoirs using borehole seismology is currently hampered by the lack of the acquisition technology necessary to record the large volumes of the high frequency, high signal-to-noise-ratio borehole seismic data needed to do 3D imaging. This project takes direct aim at this shortcoming by developing a 400 level 3C clamped downhole seismic receiver array, and accompanying software, for borehole seismic 3D imaging. This large borehole seismic array will remove the technical acquisition barrier for recording the necessary volumes of data to do high resolution 3D VSP or 3D cross well seismic imaging. Massive 3D VSP{reg_sign} and long range Cross-Well Seismology (CWS) are two of the borehole seismic techniques that will allow the Gas industry to take the next step in their quest for higher resolution images of the gas reservoirs for the purpose of improving the recovery of the natural gas resources. Today only a fraction of the original Oil or Gas in place is produced when reservoirs are considered depleted. This is primarily due to our lack of understanding of the detailed compartmentalization of the oil and gas reservoirs. The 400 level 3C borehole seismic receiver array will allow for the economic use of 3D borehole seismic imaging for reservoir characterization and monitoring by allowing the economic recording of the required large data volumes that have a sufficiently dense spatial sampling. By using 3C surface seismic or 3C borehole seismic sources the 400 level receiver arrays will furthermore allow 3D reservoir imaging using 9C data. The 9C borehole seismic data will provide P, SH and SV information for imaging of the complex deep gas reservoirs and allow quantitative prediction of the rock and the fluid types. The data quality and the data volumes from a 400 level 3C array will allow us to develop the data processing technology necessary for high resolution reservoir imaging.

Bjorn N. P. Paulsson

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

347

DEVELOPMENT OF A 400 LEVEL 3C CLAMPED DOWNHOLE SEISMIC RECEIVER ARRAY FOR 3D BOREHOLE SEISMIC IMAGING OF GAS RESERVOIRS  

SciTech Connect

Borehole seismology is the highest resolution geophysical imaging technique available today to the oil and gas industry for characterization and monitoring of oil and gas reservoirs. However, the industry's ability to economically do high resolution 3D imaging of deep and complex gas reservoirs using borehole seismology is currently frustrated by the lack of the acquisition technology necessary to record the large volumes of the high frequency, high signal-to-noise-ratio borehole seismic data needed to do 3D imaging. This project takes direct aim at this shortcoming by developing a 400 level 3C clamped downhole seismic receiver array, and accompanying software, for borehole seismic 3D imaging. This large borehole seismic array will remove the technical acquisition barrier for recording the necessary volumes of data to do high resolution 3D VSP or 3D cross well seismic imaging. 3D VSP and long range Cross-Well Seismology (CWS) are two of the borehole seismic techniques that will allow the Gas industry to take the next step in their quest for higher resolution images of the gas reservoirs for the purpose of improving the recovery of the natural gas resources. Today only a fraction of the original Oil or Gas in place is produced when reservoirs are considered depleted. This is primarily due to our lack of understanding of the detailed compartmentalization of the oil and gas reservoirs. The 400 level 3C borehole seismic receiver array will allow for the economic use of 3D borehole seismic imaging for reservoir characterization and monitoring by allowing the economic recording of the required large data volumes that have a sufficiently dense spatial sampling. By using 3C surface seismic or 3C borehole seismic sources the 400 level receiver array will furthermore allow 3D reservoir imaging using 9C data. The 9C borehole seismic data will provide P, SH and SV information for imaging of the complex deep gas reservoirs and allow quantitative prediction of the rock and the fluid types. The data quality and the data volumes from a 400 level 3C array will allow us to develop the data processing technology necessary for high resolution reservoir imaging.

Bjorn N.P. Paulsson

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Field Calibration Facilities for Environmental Measurement of Radium,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Field Calibration Facilities for Environmental Measurement of Field Calibration Facilities for Environmental Measurement of Radium, Thorium, and Potassium (October 2013) Field Calibration Facilities for Environmental Measurement of Radium, Thorium, and Potassium (October 2013) The first edition of this report, released in October 1982, presented physical-characteristic information for the various DOE radiologic-instrument calibration facilities located throughout the U.S. Three subsequent editions have been released in an effort to update information regarding the current status of the facilities. Field Calibration Facilities for Environmental Measurement of Radium, Thorium, and Potassium (October 2013) More Documents & Publications Field Calibration Facilities for Environmental Measurement of Radium, Thorium, and Potassium (June 1994)

349

Evaluation of expanded uncertainties in luminous intensity and illuminance calibrations  

SciTech Connect

Detector-based calibrating methods and expressions for calculation of photometric uncertainties related to uncertainties in the calibrations of luminous intensity of a light source, illuminance responsivity of a photometer head, and calibration factors of an illuminance meter are discussed. These methods permit luminous intensity calibrations of incandescent light sources, luminous responsivity calibrations of photometer heads, and calibration factors of illuminance meters to be carried out with relative expanded uncertainties (with a level of confidence of 95.45%) of 0.4%, 0.4%, and 0.6%, respectively.

Sametoglu, Ferhat

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Retained Gas Sampler Calibration and Simulant Tests  

SciTech Connect

This test plan provides a method for calibration of the retained gas sampler (RGS) for ammonia gas analysis. Simulant solutions of ammonium hydroxide at known concentrations will be diluted with isotopically labeled 0.04 M ammonium hydroxide solution. Sea sand solids will also be mixed with ammonium hydroxide solution and diluent to determine the accuracy of the system for ammonia gas analysis.

CRAWFORD, B.A.

2000-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

351

Photometric Calibration of High Dynamic Range Cameras  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

calibration of cameras with a dynamic range of more than six orders of magnitude such as complex camera re with a total dynamic range of 8 orders of luminance magnitude. Three acquisitions: without filter, using to the measurements of 6 gray patches of GretagMacbeth ColorChecker chart under 6 different illumination conditions. 0

Durand, Frédo

352

Cell 15: Hybrid Calibration - July 8, 2010  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

11.47000 + 0.58795*I -4.56*10 -8 *I 3 I -19.50360 + 1.70045*B +2.57*10 -7 *B 3 Calibration Data I kA Field T Error T 0.1 11.5304 0.00260 2.0 12.6449 0.00155 4.0 13.8223...

353

Auto-Calibration and Control Strategy Determination for a Variable-Speed Heat Pump Water Heater Using Optimization  

SciTech Connect

This paper introduces applications of the GenOpt optimizer coupled with a vapor compression system model for auto-calibration and control strategy determination towards the development of a variable-speed ground-source heat pump water heating unit. The GenOpt optimizer can be linked with any simulation program using input and output text files. It effectively facilitates optimization runs. Using our GenOpt wrapper program, we can flexibly define objectives for optimizations, targets, and constraints. Those functionalities enable running extensive optimization cases for model calibration, configuration design and control strategy determination. In addition, we describe a methodology to improve prediction accuracy using functional calibration curves. Using the calibrated model, we investigated control strategies of the ground-source heat pump water heater, considering multiple control objectives, covering the entire operation range.

Shen, Bo [ORNL] [ORNL; Abdelaziz, Omar [ORNL] [ORNL; Rice, C Keith [ORNL] [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

A chemostratigraphic investigation of the prehistoric Vavalaci lava sequence on Mount Etna: Simulating borehole drilling  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Scientific drilling of volcanic successions has been suggested as a way of establishing stratigraphic sequences of unexposed lava flows on large complex volcanoes, with the aim of in-depth study of magmatic processes and source geochemistry of otherwise inaccessible lava sequences. To simulate the core drilling of such sequences, lava flows from the prehistoric Vavalaci Centre exposed in the south wall of the Valle del Bove, Mount Etna, Sicily, were sampled in four stratigraphic sections. The fresh, generally strongly porphyritic Na-alkaline trachybasalts and trachyandesites show diverging sub-parallel trends of high- and low-alkali concentrations in total alkali versus silica (TAS) diagrams, whilst variations of other major and trace elements reveal two further distinct chemical groups enriched in K, REE and Ti which follow separate fractionation paths. A set of control samples was used to establish geochemical variations within a single lava flow. Primitive mantle normalised incompatible element patterns demonstrate that the lavas have highly enriched OIB signatures with a clear division in LREE, Ba, Th, Nb and Zr concentrations between the four different chemical groups. Comparison of data for the Vavalaci lavas with the compositions of other prehistoric, historic and recent eruptions of Mt. Etna indicates a temporal trend towards more basic magma compositions. The chemostratigraphy of the lavas was statistically analysed to give correlations between flows from different sections. Whilst a good number of geologically meaningful correlations were revealed, we can demonstrate that only one set of lavas was actually sampled in all four sections, whilst a number of unique lavas remain uncorrelated. Thus no individual section, or simulated borehole core, provided samples of the complete lava flow sequence without significant gaps in the stratigraphy. The trends in lava compositions are also defined in the stratigraphy, showing their evolution from low- to high-alkali lavas through the series, which may be related to temporal decrease in degree of partial melting of the mantle rather than through simple fractionation processes or mixing of magmas.

Ann Spence; Hilary Downes

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Deep Downhole Seismic Testing at the Waste Treatment Plant Site, Hanford, WA. Volume V S-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4996 Seismic Records, Wave-Arrival Identifications and Interpreted S-Wave Velocity Profile.  

SciTech Connect

Velocity measurements in shallow sediments from ground surface to approximately 370 to 400 feet bgs were collected by Redpath Geophysics using impulsive S- and P-wave seismic sources (Redpath 2007). Measurements below this depth within basalt and sedimentary interbeds were made by UTA between October and December 2006 using the T-Rex vibratory seismic source in each of the three boreholes. Results of these measurements including seismic records, wave-arrival identifications and interpreted velocity profiles are presented in the following six volumes: I. P-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4993 II. P-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4996 III. P-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4997 IV. S-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4993 V. S-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4996 VI. S-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4997 In this volume (V), all S-wave measurements are presented that were performed in Borehole C4996 at the WTP with T-Rex as the seismic source and the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) 3-D wireline geophone as the at-depth borehole receiver.

Stokoe, Kenneth H.; Li, Song Cheng; Cox, Brady R.; Menq, Farn-Yuh

2007-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

356

Deep Downhole Seismic Testing at the Waste Treatment Plant Site, Hanford, WA. Volume VI S-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4997 Seismic Records, Wave-Arrival Identifications and Interpreted S-Wave Velocity Profile.  

SciTech Connect

Velocity measurements in shallow sediments from ground surface to approximately 370 to 400 feet bgs were collected by Redpath Geophysics using impulsive S- and P-wave seismic sources (Redpath 2007). Measurements below this depth within basalt and sedimentary interbeds were made by UTA between October and December 2006 using the T-Rex vibratory seismic source in each of the three boreholes. Results of these measurements including seismic records, wave-arrival identifications and interpreted velocity profiles are presented in the following six volumes: I. P-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4993 II. P-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4996 III. P-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4997 IV. S-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4993 V. S-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4996 VI. S-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4997 In this volume (VI), all S-wave measurements are presented that were performed in Borehole C4997 at the WTP with T-Rex as the seismic source and the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) 3-D wireline geophone as the at-depth borehole receiver.

Stokoe, Kenneth H.; Li, Song Cheng; Cox, Brady R.; Menq, Farn-Yuh

2007-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

357

Modelling household electricity consumption.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A number of conclusions are drawn, however given the limited and non-representative na- ture of the data on which the model is calibrated, these can… (more)

de la Rue, Philip Martin

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

CU-LASP Test Facilities ! and Instrument Calibration Capabilities"  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

­ Star tracker ­ Solar position sensors ­ Test & calibration applications ­ End-to-end instrument;Total Solar Irradiance Radiometer Facility (TRF) · Total Solar Irradiance (TSI) instrument calibrations

Mojzsis, Stephen J.

359

THE PENA BLANCA NATURAL ANALOGUE PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT MODEL  

SciTech Connect

The Nopal I uranium mine in the Sierra Pena Blanca, Chihuahua, Mexico serves as a natural analogue to the Yucca Mountain repository. The Pena Blanca Natural Analogue Performance Assessment Model simulates the mobilization and transport of radionuclides that are released from the mine and transported to the saturated zone. the Pena Blanca Natural Analogue Model uses probabilistic simulations of hydrogeologic processes that are analogous to the processes that occur at the Yucca Mountain site. The Nopal I uranium deposit lies in fractured, welded, and altered rhyolitic ash flow tuffs that overlie carbonate rocks, a setting analogous to the geologic formations at the Yucca Mountain site. The Nopal I mine site has the following characteristics as compared to the Yucca Mountain repository site. (1) Analogous source: UO{sub 2} uranium ore deposit = spent nuclear fuel in the repository; (2) Analogous geologic setting: fractured, welded, and altered rhyolitic ash flow tuffs overlying carbonate rocks; (3) Analogous climate: Semiarid to arid; (4) Analogous geochemistry: Oxidizing conditions; and (5) Analogous hydrogeology: The ore deposit lies in the unsaturated zone above the water table. The Nopal I deposit is approximately 8 {+-} 0.5 million years old and has been exposed to oxidizing conditions during the last 3.2 to 3.4 million years. The Pena Blanca Natural Analogue Model considers that the uranium oxide and uranium silicates in the ore deposit were originally analogous to uranium-oxide spent nuclear fuel. The Pena Blanca site has been characterized using field and laboratory investigations of its fault and fracture distribution, mineralogy, fracture fillings, seepage into the mine adits, regional hydrology, and mineralization that shows the extent of radionuclide migration. Three boreholes were drilled at the Nopal I mine site in 2003 and these boreholes have provided samples for lithologic characterization, water-level measurements, and water samples for laboratory analysis of the saturated zone water chemistry. The results of the field investigations and laboratory analyses of rock and water samples collected at Nopal I are used to calibrate the Pena Blanca Natural Analogue Model.

G.J. Saulnier Jr; W. Statham

2006-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

360

NIST Measurement Services: Natural Gas Flow Calibration Service (NGFCS)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NIST Measurement Services: Natural Gas Flow Calibration Service (NGFCS) NIST Special Publication of Standards and Technology #12;i Table of Contents for the Natural Gas Flowmeter Calibration Service (NGFCS;1 Abstract This document describes NIST's high pressure natural gas flow calibration service (NGFCS). Flow

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "borehole calibration models" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Poster: environment-adaptive clock calibration for wireless sensor networks  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper, we propose a novel clock calibration approach, which addresses two key challenges for clock calibration in Wireless Sensor Networks: excessive communication overhead and the trade-off between accuracy and cost. To achieve this, our approach ... Keywords: clock calibration, environment adaptive, wsns

Meng Jin; Dingyi Fang; Xiaojiang Chen; Zhe Yang; Chen Liu; Dan Xu; Xiaoyan Yin

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Error Analysis on ClosedForm Solutions for Kinematic Calibration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and even for designing a robot head or a robot arm when considering the calibration task. In this paper, we@iis.sinica.edu.tw #12; 2 Abstract Many closed­form solutions have been developed for calibrating robot kinematic method using 3D point measurements for calibrating robot kinematic parameters. Relatively less work has

Chen, Sheng-Wei

363

Statement of Work for Direct Push Technology Characterization Borehole Installations During Fiscal Year 2006, 300-FF-5 Operable Unit  

SciTech Connect

This document specifies activities to be performed by FHI to fulfill Part II of the 300-FF-5 Operable Unit Limited Field Investigation. The scope includes driving up to 15 direct push technology boreholes to the water table for radiological geophysical logging of the vadose zone to define the vertical extent and concentration of process uranium waste in the subsurface. Drilling and sampling field activates will follow FHI waste management, risk assessment and QA process and procedures. The sampling and analysis of information recovered during this characterization will meet the Hanford Performance Assessment Project QAAP requirements.

Williams, Bruce A.

2005-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

364

Project EARTH-13-CMN1: Determining and calibrating the tempo of Early Jurassic environmental change.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as Mochras Borehole ­ was drilled on the coast of West Wales in 1967-1969. The borehole revealed a complete of global significance, characterized worldwide by hugely enhanced organic carbon burial, multiple large in the Early Jurassic, some associated with carbon-cycle anomalies at least as large as that now well

Henderson, Gideon

365

FY07 Final Report for Calibration Systems  

SciTech Connect

Remote infrared (IR) sensing provides a valuable method for detection and identification of materials associated with nuclear proliferation. Current challenges for remote sensors include minimizing the size, mass, and power requirements for cheaper, smaller, and more deployable instruments without affecting the measurement performance. One area that is often overlooked is sensor calibration design that is optimized to minimize the cost, size, weight, and power of the payload. Yet, an on-board calibration system is essential to account for changes in the detector response once the instrument has been removed from the laboratory. The Calibration Systems project at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is aimed towards developing and demonstrating compact quantum cascade (QC) laser-based calibration systems for infrared sensor systems in order to provide both a spectral and radiometric calibration while minimizing the impact on the instrument payload. In FY05, PNNL demonstrated a multi-level radiance scheme that provides six radiance levels for an enhanced linearity check compared to the currently accepted two-point scheme. PNNL began testing the repeatability of this scheme using a cryogenically cooled, single-mode quantum cascade laser (QCL). A cyclic variation in the power was observed that was attributed to the thermal cycling of the laser's dewar. In FY06, PNNL continued testing this scheme and installed an auxiliary liquid nitrogen reservoir to limit the thermal cycling effects. Although better repeatability was achieved over a longer time period, power fluctuations were still observed due to the thermal cycling. Due to the limitations with the cryogenic system, PNNL began testing Fabry-Perot QCLs that operate continuous-wave (cw) or quasi-cw at room temperature (RT) in FY06. PNNL demonstrated a multi-level scheme that provides five radiance levels in 105 seconds with excellent repeatability. We have continued testing this repeatability in FY07. A burn-in effect appears in which the power increases over a certain time period. Repeatability better than 1%, however, is demonstrated for most of the radiance levels after this initial burn-in. In FY06, PNNL also began investigating a fiber-coupled RT QCL for a compact IR calibration source. PNNL demonstrated a uniform beam profile by measuring a time-averaged response and modulating the fiber optic with a motor to minimize the effects of speckle. In FY07, PNNL examined the power stability of fiber-coupled QCLs. Feedback appears to degrade the stability so that anti-reflective coatings for fibers may be essential. In FY07, PNNL continued to investigate the stability of room temperature QCLs as well as the measurement technique to provide a quantitative estimate for the measurement uncertainty. We designed and built a custom environmental enclosure to reduce the measurement uncertainty. After an initial burn-in, we have achieved uncertainties better than 0.1% for data collected over almost 100 hours of operation. We also built a bench-top system to demonstrate how the QC laser can be used to calibrate a microbolometer array and illustrated the importance of a multi-point calibration.

Myers, Tanya L.; Broocks, Bryan T.; Cannon, Bret D.; Ho, Nicolas

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Calibration method for video and radiation imagers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The relationship between the high energy radiation imager pixel (HERIP) coordinate and real-world x-coordinate is determined by a least square fit between the HERIP x-coordinate and the measured real-world x-coordinates of calibration markers that emit high energy radiation imager and reflect visible light. Upon calibration, a high energy radiation imager pixel position may be determined based on a real-world coordinate of a moving vehicle. Further, a scale parameter for said high energy radiation imager may be determined based on the real-world coordinate. The scale parameter depends on the y-coordinate of the moving vehicle as provided by a visible light camera. The high energy radiation imager may be employed to detect radiation from moving vehicles in multiple lanes, which correspondingly have different distances to the high energy radiation imager.

Cunningham, Mark F. (Oak Ridge, TN); Fabris, Lorenzo (Knoxville, TN); Gee, Timothy F. (Oak Ridge, TN); Goddard, Jr., James S. (Knoxville, TN); Karnowski, Thomas P. (Knoxville, TN); Ziock, Klaus-peter (Clinton, TN)

2011-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

367

Calibration of the interaction energy between Bose and Fermi superfluids  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper we study the interaction energy in a mixture of Bose and Fermi superfluids realized in recent cold atom experiments. On the Bose-Einstein-condensate (BEC) side of a Feshbach resonance between fermionic atoms, this interaction energy can be directly related to the scattering length between a bosonic atom and a dimer composed of fermions. We calculate the atom-dimer scattering length from a three-body analysis with both a zero-range model and a separable model, including the van der Waals length scale, and we find significant deviation from the result given by a mean-field approach. We also find that the multiple scattering between atom and dimer can account for such a deviation. Our results provide a calibration to the mean-field interaction energy, which can be verified by measuring the shift of collective oscillation frequency.

Ren Zhang; Wei Zhang; Hui Zhai; Peng Zhang

2014-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

368

Introduction Application of numerical models of ground water flow  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(Portniaguine and Solomon 1998), and ground water temperature (Doussan et al. 1994). Compared to calibration depended on calibration methodology; models calibrated with multiple targets simulated q more accurately of Calibration Methodology on Ground Water Flow Predictions by James E. Saiers1, David P. Genereux2, and Carl H

Saiers, James

369

Length = 3750 Words + 10 Figures + 1 Table = 6500 Automatic Calibration of the Fundamental Diagram and Empirical  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

density, which are key inputs to many macroscopic traffic simulation models. The method consists of data. al. 1 ABSTRACT We present a method for automated, empirical calibration of freeway traffic flow characteristics. The method uses 5-min flow and density values for a section of freeway and rapidly and reliably

Varaiya, Pravin

370

Development of a Long-Range Lightning Detection Network for the Pacific: Construction, Calibration, and Performance*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Net/LLDN was carefully assessed. Long-range lightning flash detection efficiency (DE) and location accuracy (LA) modelsDevelopment of a Long-Range Lightning Detection Network for the Pacific: Construction, Calibration-frequency (VLF) emis- sions generated by lightning, called sferics, to propagate over long distances. The new

Businger, Steven

371

Calibrated Probabilistic Forecasting at the Stateline Wind Energy Center: The Regime-Switching  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Calibrated Probabilistic Forecasting at the Stateline Wind Energy Center: The Regime at a wind energy site and fits a conditional predictive model for each regime. Geographically dispersed was applied to 2-hour-ahead forecasts of hourly average wind speed near the Stateline wind energy center

Genton, Marc G.

372

Cumulative sum quality control for calibrated breast density measurements  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Breast density is a significant breast cancer risk factor. Although various methods are used to estimate breast density, there is no standard measurement for this important factor. The authors are developing a breast density standardization method for use in full field digital mammography (FFDM). The approach calibrates for interpatient acquisition technique differences. The calibration produces a normalized breast density pixel value scale. The method relies on first generating a baseline (BL) calibration dataset, which required extensive phantom imaging. Standardizing prospective mammograms with calibration data generated in the past could introduce unanticipated error in the standardized output if the calibration dataset is no longer valid. Methods: Sample points from the BL calibration dataset were imaged approximately biweekly over an extended timeframe. These serial samples were used to evaluate the BL dataset reproducibility and quantify the serial calibration accuracy. The cumulative sum (Cusum) quality control method was used to evaluate the serial sampling. Results: There is considerable drift in the serial sample points from the BL calibration dataset that is x-ray beam dependent. Systematic deviation from the BL dataset caused significant calibration errors. This system drift was not captured with routine system quality control measures. Cusum analysis indicated that the drift is a sign of system wear and eventual x-ray tube failure. Conclusions: The BL calibration dataset must be monitored and periodically updated, when necessary, to account for sustained system variations to maintain the calibration accuracy.

Heine, John J.; Cao Ke; Beam, Craig [Cancer Prevention and Control Division, Moffitt Cancer Center, 12902 Magnolia Drive, Tampa, Florida 33612 (United States); Division of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, University of Illinois at Chicago, 1603 W. Taylor St., Chicago, Illinois 60612 (United States)

2009-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

373

Numerical Modeling At Coso Geothermal Area (2010) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

10) 10) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Numerical Modeling At Coso Geothermal Area (2010) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Numerical Modeling Activity Date 2010 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis To determine conditions when fractures nucleate Notes A numerical model was developed using Poly3D to simulate the distribution and magnitude of stress concentration in the vicinity of the borehole floor, and determine the conditions under which petal-centerline fractures nucleate. As a whole, the simulations have demonstrated that a borehole under the stress boundary conditions present at the Coso 58A-10 borehole is able to amplify the stress concentration to produce tension below the

374

1. INTRODUCTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 2. HIGH-ACCURACY LASER POWER AND ENERGY METER CALIBRATION SYSTEM . . . . . . . . 2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 2. HIGH-ACCURACY LASER POWER AND ENERGY METER CALIBRATION SYSTEM . . . . . . . . 2 2.1 Calibration

375

Stacking-velocity inversion with borehole constraints for tilted TI media Xiaoxiang Wang1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- ing an accurate anisotropic velocity model remains a challenging problem. For TI models, transverse isotropy with a tilted symmetry axis TTI is an ap- propriate model for dipping shale layers near

Tsvankin, Ilya

376

A MAGNETIC CALIBRATION OF PHOTOSPHERIC DOPPLER VELOCITIES  

SciTech Connect

The zero point of measured photospheric Doppler shifts is uncertain for at least two reasons: instrumental variations (from, e.g., thermal drifts); and the convective blueshift, a known correlation between intensity and upflows. Accurate knowledge of the zero point is, however, useful for (1) improving estimates of the Poynting flux of magnetic energy across the photosphere, and (2) constraining processes underlying flux cancellation, the mutual apparent loss of magnetic flux in closely spaced, opposite-polarity magnetogram features. We present a method to absolutely calibrate line-of-sight (LOS) velocities in solar active regions (ARs) near disk center using three successive vector magnetograms and one Dopplergram coincident with the central magnetogram. It exploits the fact that Doppler shifts measured along polarity inversion lines (PILs) of the LOS magnetic field determine one component of the velocity perpendicular to the magnetic field, and optimizes consistency between changes in LOS flux near PILs and the transport of transverse magnetic flux by LOS velocities, assuming that ideal electric fields govern the magnetic evolution. Previous calibrations fitted the center-to-limb variation of Doppler velocities, but this approach cannot, by itself, account for residual convective shifts at the limb. We apply our method to vector magnetograms of AR 11158, observed by the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager aboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory, and find clear evidence of offsets in the Doppler zero point in the range of 50-550 m s{sup -1}. In addition, we note that a simpler calibration can be determined from an LOS magnetogram and Dopplergram pair from the median Doppler velocity among all near-disk-center PIL pixels. We briefly discuss shortcomings in our initial implementation, and suggest ways to address these. In addition, as a step in our data reduction, we discuss the use of temporal continuity in the transverse magnetic field direction to correct apparently spurious fluctuations in resolution of the 180 Degree-Sign ambiguity.

Welsch, Brian T.; Fisher, George H. [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-7450 (United States); Sun, Xudong [W. W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States)

2013-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

377

The JANA Calibrations and Conditions Database API  

SciTech Connect

Calibrations and conditions databases can be accessed from within the JANA Event Processing framework through the API defined in its JCalibration base class. The API is designed to support everything from databases, to web services to flat files for the backend. A Web Service backend using the gSOAP toolkit has been implemented which is particularly interesting since it addresses many modern cybersecurity issues including support for SSL. The API allows constants to be retrieved through a single line of C++ code with most of the context, including the transport mechanism, being implied by the run currently being analyzed and the environment relieving developers from implementing such details.

David Lawrence

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Water-Level Data Analysis for the Saturated Zone Site-Scale Flow and Transport Model  

SciTech Connect

This Analysis/Model Report (AMR) documents an updated analysis of water-level data performed to provide the saturated-zone, site-scale flow and transport model (CRWMS M&O 2000) with the configuration of the potentiometric surface, target water-level data, and hydraulic gradients for model calibration. The previous analysis was presented in ANL-NBS-HS-000034, Rev 00 ICN 01, Water-Level Data Analysis for the Saturated Zone Site-Scale Flow and Transport Model (USGS 2001). This analysis is designed to use updated water-level data as the basis for estimating water-level altitudes and the potentiometric surface in the SZ site-scale flow and transport model domain. The objectives of this revision are to develop computer files containing (1) water-level data within the model area (DTN: GS010908312332.002), (2) a table of known vertical head differences (DTN: GS0109083 12332.003), and (3) a potentiometric-surface map (DTN: GS010608312332.001) using an alternate concept from that presented in ANL-NBS-HS-000034, Rev 00 ICN 01 for the area north of Yucca Mountain. The updated water-level data include data obtained from the Nye County Early Warning Drilling Program (EWDP) and data from borehole USW WT-24. In addition to being utilized by the SZ site-scale flow and transport model, the water-level data and potentiometric-surface map contained within this report will be available to other government agencies and water users for ground-water management purposes. The potentiometric surface defines an upper boundary of the site-scale flow model, as well as provides information useful to estimation of the magnitude and direction of lateral ground-water flow within the flow system. Therefore, the analysis documented in this revision is important to SZ flow and transport calculations in support of total system performance assessment.

P. Tucci

2001-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

379

Radio interferometric calibration via ordered-subsets algorithms: OS–LS and OS–SAGE calibrations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......such that the baselines cover all the receivers of the...until the complete data set estimate is reconstructed...colours, where every colour covers all the nodes by number...calibration's sub-data set where Thus, Figure 7...colours. Every colour covers all the nodes by number......

S. Kazemi; S. Yatawatta; S. Zaroubi

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Quantitative comparison of processes of oil-and water-based mud-filtrate invasion and corresponding effects on borehole resistivity measurements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for hydrocarbon exploration and production, drilling fluids sustain a pressure higher than that of formationQuantitative comparison of processes of oil- and water-based mud-filtrate invasion-filtrate invasion on borehole resistivity measurements. We simulate the process of mud-fil- trate invasion

Torres-Verdín, Carlos

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "borehole calibration models" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Geophysical Prospecting, 2007, 55, 891899 doi:10.1111/j.1365-2478.2007.00654.x Importance of borehole deviation surveys for monitoring of hydraulic  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of borehole deviation surveys for monitoring of hydraulic fracturing treatments Petr Bulant1 , Leo Eisner2 accepted April 2007 ABSTRACT During seismic monitoring of hydraulic fracturing treatment, it is very common-system geometry derived from microseismic event locations. For common hydraulic fracturing geometries, a 2

Cerveny, Vlastislav

382

An effective medium inversion algorithm for gas hydrate quantification and its application to laboratory and borehole measurements of gas hydrate-bearing sediments  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......reconstituted natural samples showed a large increase in velocities for...in Proceedings of the Ocean Drilling Program, Scientific Results...R.J., Suess E., Ocean Drilling Program, College Station...application to laboratory and borehole measurements of gas hydrate-bearing......

Shyam Chand; Tim A. Minshull; Jeff A. Priest; Angus I. Best; Christopher R. I. Clayton; William F. Waite

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

MFRSR Head Refurbishment, Data Logger Upgrade and Calibration Improvements  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MFRSR Head Refurbishment, Data Logger Upgrade MFRSR Head Refurbishment, Data Logger Upgrade and Calibration Improvements Gary Hodges, CIRES/NOAA and John Schmelzer, PNL gary.hodges@noaa.gov, john.schmelzer@pnl.gov 17th Annual ARM Science Team Meeting 26-30 March 2006 Monterey, CA Head Refurbishment The Process Includes: * New filter detectors * Relocate internal thermistors * New connectors * Gain resistors moved to head * Improved insulation The Finished Heads: * Are lamp calibrated * Have filter profiles measured * Cosine characterized * Are out-of-band tested What Does This Mean For Data Users? * Fewer data gaps * Fewer DQRs * Confidence in the data * Well calibrated data Calibration Improvements 5 6 7 8 0 2 4 6 Airmass ln Direct Data will now be calibrated by the Langley method Extrapolate to TOA to get V 0 Benefits of Langley vs. Lamp calibrations:

384

Silicon Micromachined Dimensional Calibration Artifact for Mesoscale Measurement Machines  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Silicon Micromachined Dimensional Calibration Silicon Micromachined Dimensional Calibration Artifact for Mesoscale Measurement Machines 1 Silicon Micromachined Dimensional Calibration Artifact for Mesoscale Measurement Machines 2 Sandia National Laboratories PO Box 5800 Albuquerque, NM 87185 USA Hy D. Tran, PhD, PE Phone: (505)844-5417 Fax: (505)844-4372 hdtran@sandia.gov AFFIRMATION: I affirm that all information submitted as a part of, or supplemental to, this entry is a fair and accurate representation of this product. ___________________________________ Hy D. Tran Not a joint entry. Silicon Micromachined Dimensional Calibration Artifact for Mesoscale Measurement Machines The silicon hybrid artifact is an anisotropic-etched silicon standard that is used as a calibration reference artifact to calibrate vision-based and

385

Method and apparatus for calibrating a particle emissions monitor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The instant invention discloses method and apparatus for calibrating particulate emissions monitors, in particular, and sampling probes, in general, without removing the instrument from the system being monitored. A source of one or more specific metals in aerosol (either solid or liquid) or vapor form is housed in the instrument. The calibration operation is initiated by moving a focusing lens, used to focus a light beam onto an analysis location and collect the output light response, from an operating position to a calibration position such that the focal point of the focusing lens is now within a calibration stream issuing from a calibration source. The output light response from the calibration stream can be compared to that derived from an analysis location in the operating position to more accurately monitor emissions within the emissions flow stream.

Flower, William L. (Livermore, CA); Renzi, Ronald F. (Tracy, CA)

1998-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

386

In situ ultrahigh vacuum residual gas analyzer 'calibration'  

SciTech Connect

Knowing the residual gas spectrum is essential for many applications and research in ultrahigh vacuum (UHV). Residual gas analyzers (RGAs) are used for both qualitative and quantitative gas analyses, where the quadrupole mass analyzers are now the most popular. It was found that RGAs supplied by different manufacturers are not necessarily well calibrated for quantitative gas analysis. A procedure applied for in situ RGA 'calibration' against a calibrated UHV total pressure gauge is described in this article. It was found that special attention should be paid to H{sub 2} calibration, as RGAs are usually much more sensitive to H{sub 2} than ionization gauges. The calibration coefficients are quite reproducible in Faraday cup mode, however, using the secondary electron multiplier requires frequent checks of the calibration coefficients. The coefficients obtained for the RGA allow the use of the RGA as an accurate device for gas spectrum analysis.

Malyshev, O. B.; Middleman, K. J. [ASTeC, STFC Daresbury Laboratory, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom)

2008-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

387

Characterization of the Neutron Fields in the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Radiation Calibration Laboratory Low Scatter Calibration Facility  

SciTech Connect

In June 2007, the Department of Energy (DOE) revised its rule on Occupational Radiation Protection, Part 10 CFR 835. A significant aspect of the revision was the adoption of the recommendations outlined in International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) Report 60 (ICRP-60), including new radiation weighting factors for neutrons, updated internal dosimetric models, and dose terms consistent with the newer ICRP recommendations. ICRP-60 uses the quantities defined by the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU) for personnel and area monitoring including the ambient dose equivalent H*(d). A Joint Task Group of ICRU and ICRP has developed various fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients which are published in ICRP-74 for both protection and operational quantities. In February 2008, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) replaced its old pneumatic transport neutron irradiation system in the Radiation Calibration Laboratory (RCL) Low Scatter Calibration Facility (B255, Room 183A) with a Hopewell Designs irradiator model N40. The exposure tube for the Hopewell system is located close to, but not in exactly the same position as the exposure tube for the pneumatic system. Additionally, the sources for the Hopewell system are stored in Room 183A where, prior to the change, they were stored in a separate room (Room 183C). The new source configuration and revision of the 10 CFR 835 radiation weighting factors necessitate a re-evaluation of the neutron dose rates in B255 Room 183A. This report deals only with the changes in the operational quantities ambient dose equivalent and ambient dose rate equivalent for neutrons as a result of the implementation of the revised 10 CFR 835. In the report, the terms 'neutron dose' and 'neutron dose rate' will be used for convenience for ambient neutron dose equivalent and ambient neutron dose rate equivalent unless otherwise stated.

Radev, R

2009-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

388

QAS 2.4 Instrument Calibration 5/26/95  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The objective of this surveillance is to evaluate the implementation of the contractor's program to routinely calibrate instruments, alarms, and sensors.  The Facility Representative observes...

389

Electrically calibrated absolute radiometer suitable for measurement automation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

New electrically calibrated absolute radiometers (ESRs) were developed having fast response and high responsivity; these ESRs are specially useful for measurement automation. They are...

Boivin, Louis-Philippe; McNeely, Francis T

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Multivariate calibration applied to the quantitative analysis of infrared spectra  

SciTech Connect

Multivariate calibration methods are very useful for improving the precision, accuracy, and reliability of quantitative spectral analyses. Spectroscopists can more effectively use these sophisticated statistical tools if they have a qualitative understanding of the techniques involved. A qualitative picture of the factor analysis multivariate calibration methods of partial least squares (PLS) and principal component regression (PCR) is presented using infrared calibrations based upon spectra of phosphosilicate glass thin films on silicon wafers. Comparisons of the relative prediction abilities of four different multivariate calibration methods are given based on Monte Carlo simulations of spectral calibration and prediction data. The success of multivariate spectral calibrations is demonstrated for several quantitative infrared studies. The infrared absorption and emission spectra of thin-film dielectrics used in the manufacture of microelectronic devices demonstrate rapid, nondestructive at-line and in-situ analyses using PLS calibrations. Finally, the application of multivariate spectral calibrations to reagentless analysis of blood is presented. We have found that the determination of glucose in whole blood taken from diabetics can be precisely monitored from the PLS calibration of either mind- or near-infrared spectra of the blood. Progress toward the non-invasive determination of glucose levels in diabetics is an ultimate goal of this research. 13 refs., 4 figs.

Haaland, D.M.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Parameter Tuning and Calibration of RegCM3 with MIT–Emanuel Cumulus Parameterization Scheme over CORDEX East Asia Domain  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this study, the authors calibrated the performance of the Regional Climate Model, version 3 (RegCM3), with the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)–Emanuel cumulus parameterization scheme over the Coordinated Regional Climate Downscaling ...

Liwei Zou; Yun Qian; Tianjun Zhou; Ben Yang

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Isotropic Events Observed with a Borehole Array in the Chelungpu Fault Zone, Taiwan  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...finite-difference simulation [fig. S3...tensors. The modeling shows that the...source in the modeling. The observed...and BHS4. Our modeling suggests that the...injection layer. The rapid attenuation...Roth M. , Automated seismic event...ground motion simulation of the 1999...

Kuo-Fong Ma; Yen-Yu Lin; Shiann-Jong Lee; Jim Mori; Emily E. Brodsky

2012-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

393

Simulation and inversion of borehole temperature profiles in surrogate climates: Spatial distribution and surface coupling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

simulations with the state-of-the-art ECHO-g model has been used to simulate underground temperature of the ECHO-g model to show that SAT-GST variations were closely related at low frequencies, suggesting-conduction forward model is driven by surface temperature time series provided with the ECHO-g integra- tions

Beltrami, Hugo

394

Flying height calibration with bump disk  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

It is a big challenge to determine ultralow slider Flying Height (FH) accurately. The standard bump disk method is probably a reliable and acceptable method. The accuracy of the bump disk method on FH calibration depends on two key factors. One is the detection of the occurrence of sliderâ??bump contact. The other is the understanding of the complicated sliderâ??bump interaction process and the possible disturbance of the bumps on the slider flying performance. In this paper, the research work aiming to resolve these two key issues is reviewed. Key parameters that limit the accuracy of the bump disk method are discussed. Possible strategies to further improve the accuracy of the method are proposed.

Yansheng Ma; Bo Liu

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Concentration Independent Calibration of ?-? Coincidence Detector Using 131mXe and 133Xe  

SciTech Connect

Absolute efficiency calibration of radiometric detectors is frequently difficult and requires careful detector modeling and accurate knowledge of the radioactive source used. In the past we have calibrated the b-g coincidence detector of the Automated Radioxenon Sampler/Analyzer (ARSA) using a variety of sources and techniques which have proven to be less than desirable.[1] A superior technique has been developed that uses the conversion-electron (CE) and x-ray coincidence of 131mXe to provide a more accurate absolute gamma efficiency of the detector. The 131mXe is injected directly into the beta cell of the coincident counting system and no knowledge of absolute source strength is required. In addition, 133Xe is used to provide a second independent means to obtain the absolute efficiency calibration. These two data points provide the necessary information for calculating the detector efficiency and can be used in conjunction with other noble gas isotopes to completely characterize and calibrate the ARSA nuclear detector. In this paper we discuss the techniques and results that we have obtained.

McIntyre, Justin I.; Cooper, Matthew W.; Carman, April J.; Bowyer, Ted W.; Day, Anthony R.; Haas, Derek A.; Hayes, James C.; Heimbigner, Tom R.; Hubbard, Charles W.; Litke, Kevin E.; Ripplinger, Michael D.; Schrom, Brian T.; Suarez, Reynold

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

A practical means for calibrating an LED-based photometric stereo system  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Conventional Photometric Stereo (PS) techniques are usually based on the assumption that the light sources are assumed sufficiently far from the object that all incoming light can be modeled using parallel rays. Meanwhile, for near-field lighting conditions the light sources are close to the object so the parallel ray model cannot be used. To determine the surface normal for each point on the object more accurately, the incoming light direction should be calculated individually for each point. In this work, based on a simple PS setup consisting of LED lamps and one camera, we present a practical method for calibrating lighting directions. First, an optical model of an LED was introduced in the calibration procedure to represent the surface irradiance and image irradiance more accurately. A reference sphere was used for the calibration so that the LED optical axis could be estimated by extracting the specular points from the reference sphere. By introducing the LED emitting model, distance between the LED and the specular point along the optical axis can be calculated. Thus, the incident lighting directions for various image points can be estimated individually. To improve the estimation robustness, a non-linear fitting approach was also applied. Experiments were conducted using objects and the results are compared with traditional methods to demonstrate its feasibility and improvement.

Limin Xie; Zhan Song; Guohua Jiao; Xinhan Huang; Kui Jia

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

A TIME EFFICIENT ADAPTIVE GRIDDING APPROACH AND IMPROVED CALIBRATIONS IN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

measurement times. Additionally, manu- al pitch and yaw calibration increases uncertainty. A new FHP pitch and yaw calibrator is designed and built to reduce the uncertainty of the measurements by precise and computer controlla- ble traversing system is implemented using an adaptive grid method for the refinement

Camci, Cengiz

398

Simultaneous multi-headed imager geometry calibration method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for calibrating multi-headed high sensitivity and high spatial resolution dynamic imaging systems, especially those useful in the acquisition of tomographic images of small animals. The method of the present invention comprises: simultaneously calibrating two or more detectors to the same coordinate system; and functionally correcting for unwanted detector movement due to gantry flexing.

Tran, Vi-Hoa (Newport News, VA); Meikle, Steven Richard (Penshurst, AU); Smith, Mark Frederick (Yorktown, VA)

2008-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

399

Calibrated Peer Review Texas A&M University  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Calibrated Peer Review at Texas A&M University By Wendy L. Keeney-Kennicutt, Ph.D. Master with 3 of their peers' essays (randomly selected and anonymous) and their own · Review and rate using calibration questions · The scoring of peers is weighted by the student reviewer's competency score. 7 #12

400

Calibration methodology for proportional counters applied to yield measurements of a neutron burst  

SciTech Connect

This paper introduces a methodology for the yield measurement of a neutron burst using neutron proportional counters. This methodology is to be applied when single neutron events cannot be resolved in time by nuclear standard electronics, or when a continuous current cannot be measured at the output of the counter. The methodology is based on the calibration of the counter in pulse mode, and the use of a statistical model to estimate the number of detected events from the accumulated charge resulting from the detection of the burst of neutrons. The model is developed and presented in full detail. For the measurement of fast neutron yields generated from plasma focus experiments using a moderated proportional counter, the implementation of the methodology is herein discussed. An experimental verification of the accuracy of the methodology is presented. An improvement of more than one order of magnitude in the accuracy of the detection system is obtained by using this methodology with respect to previous calibration methods.

Tarifeño-Saldivia, Ariel, E-mail: atarifeno@cchen.cl, E-mail: atarisal@gmail.com; Pavez, Cristian; Soto, Leopoldo [Comisión Chilena de Energía Nuclear, Casilla 188-D, Santiago (Chile) [Comisión Chilena de Energía Nuclear, Casilla 188-D, Santiago (Chile); Center for Research and Applications in Plasma Physics and Pulsed Power, P4, Santiago (Chile); Departamento de Ciencias Fisicas, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Universidad Andres Bello, Republica 220, Santiago (Chile); Mayer, Roberto E. [Instituto Balseiro and Centro Atómico Bariloche, Comisión Nacional de Energía Atómica and Universidad Nacional de Cuyo, San Carlos de Bariloche R8402AGP (Argentina)] [Instituto Balseiro and Centro Atómico Bariloche, Comisión Nacional de Energía Atómica and Universidad Nacional de Cuyo, San Carlos de Bariloche R8402AGP (Argentina)

2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "borehole calibration models" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Characterization of Vadose Zone Sediment: RCRA Borehole 299-E33-338 Located Near the B-BX-BY Waste Management Area  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes data collected from samples in borehole 299-E33-338 (C3391). Borehole 299-E33-338 was drilled for two purposes. One purpose was for installation of a RCRA ground-water monitoring well and the other was to characterize the in situ soils and background porewater chemistry near WMA B-BX-BY that have been largely uncontaminated by tank farm and crib and trench discharge operations. This borehole was drilled just outside the southeast fence line of the B tank farm. The borehole was drilled between July 23 and August 8, 2001 to a total depth of 80.05 m (275.75 ft) bgs using the cable-tool method (Horton 2002). The water table was contacted at 77.5 m (254.2 ft) bgs and the top of basalt at 82.6 m (271 ft) bgs. Samples to the top of basalt were collected via a drive barrel/splitspoon, before switching to a hard tool to drill 5 feet into the basalt. Nearly continuous core was obtained down to a depth of ~78.6 m (258 ft) bgs. Two hundred and two 2-ft long by 4-in diameter cores were retrieved, which accounts for ~75% the total length of the borehole. Each 2-ft splitspoon contained two 1-ft lexan-lined core segments. The lithology of this borehole was summarized onto a field geologist's log by a CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. geologist (L. D. Walker); subsequently visual inspection of the cores was performed in the laboratory by K. A. Lindsey (Kennedy/Jenks), K. D. Reynolds (Duratek), and B. N. Bjornstad (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory), who also collected 24 samples for paleomagnetic analysis. Subsamples were taken from all 102 cores for moisture content (Table B.1). In addition, 21 core subsamples were collected from a depth of geological interest for mineralogical and geochemical analysis. Data from these samples allow for comparison of uncontaminated versus contaminated soils to better understand the contributions of tank wastes and other wastewaters on the vadose zone in and around WMA B-BX-BY.

Lindenmeier, Clark W.; Serne, R. Jeffrey; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Gee, Glendon W.; Schaef, Herbert T.; Lanigan, David C.; Lindberg, Michael J.; Clayton, Ray E.; Legore, Virginia L.; Kutnyakov, Igor V.; Baum, Steven R.; Geiszler, Keith N.; Brown, Christopher F.; Valenta, Michelle M.; Vickerman, Tanya S.; Royack, Lisa J.

2003-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

402

CALIBRATION OF EQUILIBRIUM TIDE THEORY FOR EXTRASOLAR PLANET SYSTEMS. II  

SciTech Connect

We present a new empirical calibration of equilibrium tidal theory for extrasolar planet systems, extending a prior study by incorporating detailed physical models for the internal structure of planets and host stars. The resulting strength of the stellar tide produces a coupling that is strong enough to reorient the spins of some host stars without causing catastrophic orbital evolution, thereby potentially explaining the observed trend in alignment between stellar spin and planetary orbital angular momentum. By isolating the sample whose spins should not have been altered in this model, we also show evidence for two different processes that contribute to the population of planets with short orbital periods. We apply our results to estimate the remaining lifetimes for short-period planets, examine the survival of planets around evolving stars, and determine the limits for circularization of planets with highly eccentric orbits. Our analysis suggests that the survival of circularized planets is strongly affected by the amount of heat dissipated, which is often large enough to lead to runaway orbital inflation and Roche lobe overflow.

Hansen, Brad M. S., E-mail: hansen@astro.ucla.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy and Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States)

2012-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

403

Estimation of fracture compliance from tubewaves generated at a fracture intersecting a borehole  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Understanding fracture compliance is important for characterizing fracture networks and for inferring fluid flow in the subsurface. In an attempt to estimate fracture compliance in the field, we developed a new model to ...

Bakku, Sudhish Kumar

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Generic Disposal System Modeling, Fiscal Year 2011 Progress Report |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Disposal System Modeling, Fiscal Year 2011 Progress Report Disposal System Modeling, Fiscal Year 2011 Progress Report Generic Disposal System Modeling, Fiscal Year 2011 Progress Report The UFD Campaign is developing generic disposal system models (GDSM) of different disposal environments and waste form options. Currently, the GDSM team is investigating four main disposal environment options: mined repositories in three geologic media (salt, clay, and granite) and the deep borehole concept in crystalline rock (DOE 2010d). Further developed the individual generic disposal system (GDS) models for salt, granite, clay, and deep borehole disposal environments. GenericDisposalSystModelFY11.pdf More Documents & Publications Integration of EBS Models with Generic Disposal System Models TSPA Model Development and Sensitivity Analysis of Processes Affecting

405

A method for calculation of radiation quantities at all points in gamma radiation calibration fields  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Chi-square test in a gamma radiation calibration field was...dimensions) in a gamma radiation calibration field can...be used in dosimetry software of gamma radiation calibration fields...2000) Vienna: IAEA. Safety Reports Series, No......

S. M. Hosseini-Pooya; M. Khoshnoodi; A. Ansarinejad; F. Torkzadeh; M. Jafarizadeh

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Model-Based Transient Calibration Optimization for Next Generation...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Economy Cost Stability Transient Response Development Time Offline Development Fuzzy Logic Neural-Net Control Predictive Control Emissions Reduction 2005 Detroit Diesel...

407

Model-Based Transient Calibration Optimization for Next Generation...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Improvement andn Emissions Control Technology Integrated Engine and Aftertreatment Technology Roadmap for EPA 2010 Heavy-duty Emissions Regulations Thermal Efficiency...

408

Calibrating Building Energy Models Using Supercomputer Trained Machine Learning Agents  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

% of all natural gas produced in the United States thereby contributing 40% of the carbon dioxide a significant stake in improving the energy footprint and efficiency of the build- ings sector for economic- ergy savings. The large number of existing buildings that do not employ energy efficient technologies

Wang, Xiaorui "Ray"

409

Polarization imaging apparatus with auto-calibration  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A polarization imaging apparatus measures the Stokes image of a sample. The apparatus consists of an optical lens set, a first variable phase retarder (VPR) with its optical axis aligned 22.5.degree., a second variable phase retarder with its optical axis aligned 45.degree., a linear polarizer, a imaging sensor for sensing the intensity images of the sample, a controller and a computer. Two variable phase retarders were controlled independently by a computer through a controller unit which generates a sequential of voltages to control the phase retardations of the first and second variable phase retarders. A auto-calibration procedure was incorporated into the polarization imaging apparatus to correct the misalignment of first and second VPRs, as well as the half-wave voltage of the VPRs. A set of four intensity images, I.sub.0, I.sub.1, I.sub.2 and I.sub.3 of the sample were captured by imaging sensor when the phase retardations of VPRs were set at (0,0), (.pi.,0), (.pi.,.pi.) and (.pi./2,.pi.), respectively. Then four Stokes components of a Stokes image, S.sub.0, S.sub.1, S.sub.2 and S.sub.3 were calculated using the four intensity images.

Zou, Yingyin Kevin; Zhao, Hongzhi; Chen, Qiushui

2013-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

410

MESERAN Calibration for Low Level Organic Residues  

SciTech Connect

Precision cleaning studies done at Honeywell Federal Manufacturing & Technologies (FM&T), the Kansas City Plant (KCP), and at other locations within the Department of Energy (DOE) Weapons complex over the last 30 years have depended upon results from MESERAN Evaporative Rate Analysis for detecting low levels of organic contamination. The characterization of the surface being analyzed is carried out by depositing a Carbon-14 tagged radiochemical onto the test surface and monitoring the rate at which the radiochemical disappears from the surface with a Geiger-Mueller counter. In the past, the total number of counts over a 2-minute span have been used to judge whether a surface is contaminated or not and semi-quantitatively to what extent. This technique is very sensitive but has not enjoyed the broad acceptance of a purely quantitative analysis. The work on this project developed calibrations of various organic contaminants typically encountered in KCP operations. In addition, a new analysis method was developed to enhance the ability of MESERAN Analyzers to detect organic contamination and yield quantitative data in the microgram and nanogram levels.

Benkovich, M.G.

2004-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

411

Shake Table for Calibration of Velocity Pickups  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A Shake Table was developed and built by the Engineering Research Institute to calibrate low?frequency (0 to 200 cps) velocity pickups. The platform that supports the pickup to be tested is 6 in. in diameter and will support a load of approximately 30 lb. This makes the use of a table limited by force it can deliver except at very low frequencies. The table will operate with a 10 lb load to a frequency of 150 cps. The platform displacement is 0.125 in. peak?to?peak. The platform and its load are supported by air bellows. This is an improvement over a spring support due to the fact that it has greater damping and it is more easily adjusted to different loads. The adjustment consists of just putting more air in the bellows. The table is driven by a dc push?pull power amplifier. This delivers a current to a tapped coil on the Shake Table that is located in a magnetic field. The field is set up by a coil energized by 24 volts. The power amplifier can be driven by any convenient source delivering about 1 volt. (Parts of this research were supported by Tri?service Contract No. DA?36?039?sc?52654.)

J. W. Wescott; J. H. Prout; W. H. Follett

1957-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) Radiance Calibration Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This document describes the radiance calibrations used for all ISCCP Stage B3 data for the period July 1983 through June 1991 (Schiffer and Rossow 1985; Rossow et al. 1987; Brest and Rossow 1992; Desormeaux et al. 1992). Calibration is reported in three stages, called nominal, normalized and absolute. Equations and tables in the following sections define each of these calibrations. 1.1. NOMINAL CALIBRATION The nominal calibration (first set of tables on Stage B3 data tapes) represents the best information available at the start of processing of data from a particular satellite, usually the pre-launch calibration supplied by the satellite operator for the visible (VIS) channel (and other channels at solar wavelengths) and an equation or table used to interpret on-board calibration information for the infrared (IR) channel (and other channels at thermal infrared wavelengths). Specific details are given for each satellite in sections to follow. In this document, VIS radiances are given as "scaled radiances", L

William Rossow; Yves Desormeaux; Christopher L. Brest; Alison Walker

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

A Coulomb stress model for induced seismicity distribution due to fluid injection and withdrawal in deep boreholes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......plane of maximum cumulative Coulomb stress...that used in the field injection experiments...equivalent manner, to oil/gas withdrawal...the injection and production wells (over 650...differences in the stress field changes for injection...the regional stress field, as the injection......

Antonio Troiano; Maria Giulia Di Giuseppe; Claudia Troise; Anna Tramelli; Giuseppe De Natale

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

A Coulomb stress model for induced seismicity distribution due to fluid injection and withdrawal in deep boreholes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......seismology| INTRODUCTION Geothermal resources represent...fossil fuels. Enhanced geothermal system (EGS) technologies...powerful way to produce geothermal electric energy in almost every area...depending on the drilling costs needed to reach a suitable......

Antonio Troiano; Maria Giulia Di Giuseppe; Claudia Troise; Anna Tramelli; Giuseppe De Natale

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Borehole Data Package for Two RCRA Wells 299-W11-25B and 299-W11-46 at Single-Shell Tank Waste Management Area T, Hanford Site, Washington  

SciTech Connect

One new Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) groundwater monitoring and assessment well was installed at single-shell tank Waste Management Area (WMA) T in calendar year 2005 in partial fulfillment of commitments for well installations proposed in Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, Milestone M-24-57 (2004). The need for increased monitoring capability at this WMA was identified during a data quality objectives process for establishing a RCRA/Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA)/Atomic Energy Act (AEA) integrated 200 West and 200 East Area Groundwater Monitoring Network. The initial borehole, 299-W11-25B, was located about 20 ft from existing downgradient well 299 W11-39. The specific objective for the borehole was to determine the vertical distribution of contaminants in the unconfined aquifer at the northeast corner of WMA T. The permanent casing in borehole 299-W11-25B was damaged beyond repair during well construction and replacement borehole, 299-W11-46, was drilled about 10 ft from borehole 299-W11-25B (Figure 1). Borehole 299-W11-46 was completed as a RCRA monitoring well. This document provides a compilation of all available geologic data, geophysical logs, hydrogeologic data and well information obtained during drilling, well construction, well development, pump installation, groundwater sampling and analysis activities, and preliminary results of slug tests associated with wells 299-W11-25B and 299-W11-46. Appendix A contains geologists logs, Well Construction Summary Reports, Well Summary Sheets (as-built diagrams), and Well Development and Testing Data sheets. Appendix B contains the results of chemical analysis of groundwater samples. Appendix C contains complete spectral gamma-ray logs and borehole deviation surveys and Appendix D contains initial results of slug tests. The non-conformance report for borehole 299-W11-46 is provided in Appendix E.

Horton, Duane G.; Chamness, Mickie A.

2006-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

416

Downhole Measurements of Shear- and Compression-Wave Velocities in Boreholes C4993, C4996, C4997 and C4998 at the Waste Treatment Plant DOE Hanford Site.  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the procedures and the results of a series of downhole measurements of shear- and compression-wave velocities performed as part of the Seismic Boreholes Project at the site of the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP). The measurements were made in several stages from October 2006 through early February 2007. Although some fieldwork was carried out in conjunction with the University of Texas at Austin (UT), all data acquired by UT personnel are reported separately by that organization.

Redpath, Bruce B.

2007-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

417

Non-Destructive Analysis Calibration Standards for Gaseous Diffusion Plant  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Non-Destructive Analysis Calibration Standards for Gaseous Non-Destructive Analysis Calibration Standards for Gaseous Diffusion Plant (GDP) Decommissioning Non-Destructive Analysis Calibration Standards for Gaseous Diffusion Plant (GDP) Decommissioning The decommissioning of Gaseous Diffusion Plant facilities requires accurate, non-destructive assay (NDA) of residual enriched uranium in facility components for safeguards and nuclear criticality safety purposes. Current practices used to perform NDA measurements frequently have poorly defined uncertainties due to multiple factors. Working reference material (WRM) standards and container-specific surrogates are required to verify and validate NDA methods used to support characterization of gaseous diffusion equipment within the D&D project. Because working reference

418

Simbol-X Telescope Scientific Calibrations: Requirements and Plans  

SciTech Connect

The Simbol-X telescope characteristics and the mission scientific requirements impose a challenging calibration plan with a number of unprecedented issues. The 20 m focal length implies for the incoming X-ray beam a divergence comparable to the incidence angle of the mirror surface also for 100 m-long facilities. Moreover this is the first time that a direct focussing X-ray telescope will be calibrated on an energy band covering about three decades, and with a complex focal plane. These problems require a careful plan and organization of the measurements, together with an evaluation of the calibration needs in terms of both hardware and software.

Malaguti, G.; Raimondi, L.; Trifoglio, M. [INAF-IASF Bologna (Italy); Angelini, L. [NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center (United States); Moretti, A. [INAF-OABrera (Italy)

2009-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

419

E-Print Network 3.0 - absolute efficiency calibration Sample...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ray Conference 453 Calibration of the Pierre Auger fluorescence detector Summary: , Argentina Abstract The absolute calibration of an air fluorescence detector (FD) is an...

420

Low-Cost Approaches to Robust Temperature Compensation in Near-Infrared Calibration and Prediction Situations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The traditional way of handling temperature shifts and other perturbations in calibration situations is to incorporate the non-relevant spectral variation in the calibration set by...

Segtnan, Vegard H; Mevik, Bjørn-Helge; Isaksson, Tomas; NÆs, Tormod

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "borehole calibration models" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Calibration and application of the `clumped isotope' thermometer to foraminifera for high-resolution climate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Calibration and application of the `clumped isotope' thermometer to foraminifera for high proxies. Here, we present a new calibration of the `clumped isotope' thermometer to foraminifera based

Gilli, Adrian

422

Localized rotation of principal stress around faults and fractures determined from borehole breakouts in hole B of the Taiwan Chelungpu-fault Drilling Project (TCDP)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

To reveal details of stress perturbations associated with faults and fractures, we investigated the faults and large fractures accompanied by stress-induced borehole breakouts or drilling-induced tensile fractures in hole B of the Taiwan Chelungpu-fault Drilling Project (TCDP). Then, we determined the relationship between the faults and fractures and stress orientation changes. We identified faults and fractures from electrical images of the borehole wall obtained by downhole logging but also from photographs and descriptions of retrieved core samples, and measured the variations in the principal horizontal stress orientation ascertained from borehole breakouts observed on the electrical images in the vicinity of the faults and fractures. Identification of geological structures (faults, fractures, and lithologic boundaries) by electrical images only is difficult and may sometimes yield incorrect results. In a novel approach, therefore, we used both the electrical images and core photographs to identify geological structures. We found four patterns of stress orientation change, or no change, in the vicinity of faults and fractures in TCDP hole B: (i) abrupt (discontinuous) rotation in the vicinity of faults or fractures; (ii) gradual rotation; (iii) suppression of breakouts at faults, fractures, or lithologic boundaries; and (iv) no change in the stress orientation. We recognized stress fluctuations, that is, heterogeneous mesoscale (? 10 cm) stress distributions with respect to both stress orientation and magnitude. In addition, we found that stress state changes occurred frequently in the vicinity of faults, fractures, and lithologic boundaries.

Weiren Lin; En-Chao Yeh; Jih-Hao Hung; Bezalel Haimson; Tetsuro Hirono

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Final report on decommissioning of wells, boreholes, and tiltmeter sites, Gulf Coast Interior Salt Domes of Louisiana  

SciTech Connect

In the late 1970s, test holes were drilled in northern Louisiana in the vicinity of Vacherie and Rayburn`s Salt Domes as part of the Department of Energy`s (DOE) National Waste Terminal Storage (NWTS) (rename the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (CRWM)) program. The purpose of the program was to evaluate the suitability of salt domes for long term storage or disposal of high-level nuclear waste. The Institute for Environmental Studies at Louisiana State University (IES/LSU) and Law Engineering Testing Company (LETCo) of Marietta, Georgia performed the initial field studies. In 1982, DOE awarded a contract to the Earth Technology Corporation (TETC) of Long Beach, California to continue the Gulf Coast Salt Dome studies. In 1986, DOE deferred salt domes from further consideration as repository sites. This report describes test well plugging and site abandonment activities performed by SWEC in accordance with Activity Plan (AP) 1--3, Well Plugging and Site Restoration of Work Sites in Louisiana. The objective of the work outlined in this AP was to return test sites to as near original condition as possible by plugging boreholes, removing equipment, regrading, and seeding. Appendices to this report contain forms required by State of Louisiana, used by SWEC to document decommissioning activities, and pertinent documentation related to lease/access agreements.

Not Available

1989-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Electromagnetic Borehole Flowmeter Surveys at Selected In Situ Redox Manipulation Barrier Wells, Zero-Valent Iron Site, Hanford, Washington  

SciTech Connect

Ambient (i.e., static) and dynamic (i.e., pumping-induced) electromagnetic borehole flowmeter (EBF) surveys were performed in 10 selected In Situ Redox Manipulation (ISRM) barrier wells to characterize the distribution of in-well vertical flow conditions and to infer the relative hydraulic conductivity distribution in the upper-part of the unconfined aquifer. These wells are located in two areas where the aquifer is targeted for testing of zero-valent iron injection to mend a failed portion of the ISRM barrier at the 100 D Area, Hanford Site. Each of these two areas consists of a group of five wells, one group to the southwest and one group to the northeast. The upper ~15 to 20 ft (~4.6 to 6.1 m) of the unconfined aquifer was characterized for in-well vertical flow conditions and vertical profile information regarding relative hydraulic conductivity. At some well site locations, the upper ~2 to 3 ft (~0.6 to 1 m) of the well-screen interval could not be characterized under pumping (dynamic) conditions because of the presence of the pump.

Newcomer, Darrell R.

2009-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

425

E-Print Network 3.0 - analytic computer model Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Calibration of Traffic Simulation Models Summary: users. INTRODUCTION Background With the rapid advancement of computer technology, numerical modeling has... the traffic model is...

426

Calibration of Quantitative PCR Assays A. M. I. Roberts, C. M. Theobald, and M. McNeil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

calibration model for measuring the quantity of the fungus common bunt (Tilletia caries) on wheat seed, based (PCR) assays (Edwards, Logan, and Saunders 2004) have been produced for a wide range of applications Biometric Society Journal of Agricultural, Biological, and Environmental Statistics, Volume 12, Number 3

Theobald, Chris

427

Appendix D: Facility Process Data and Appendix E: Equipment Calibration  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

D: Facility Process Data and Appendix E: Equipment D: Facility Process Data and Appendix E: Equipment Calibration Data Sheets Appendix D: Facility Process Data and Appendix E: Equipment Calibration Data Sheets Docket No. EO-05-01: Appendix D: Facility Process Data and Appendix E: Equipment Calibration Data Sheets from Final Report: Particulate Emissions Testing, Unit 1, Potomac River Generating Station, Alexandria, Virginia Appendix D: Facility Process Data and Appendix E: Equipment Calibration Data Sheets More Documents & Publications Comments on Department of Energy's Emergency Order To Resume Limited Operation at Mirant's Potomac River Generating Station and Proposed Mirant Compliance Plan Answer of Potomac Electric Power Company and PJM lnterconnection, L.L.C. to the October 6, 2005 motion filed by the Virginia Department of

428

Surveillance Guides - QAS 2.4 Instrument Calibration  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

INSTRUMENT CALIBRATION INSTRUMENT CALIBRATION 1.0 Objective The objective of this surveillance is to evaluate the implementation of the contractor's program to routinely calibrate instruments, alarms, and sensors. The Facility Representative observes calibration testing of instruments and channels and reviews supporting documentation to verify compliance with applicable Department of Energy requirements and implementation of best industry practices. 2.0 References 2.1 DOE 5700.6C, Quality Assurance 2.2 DOE 4330.4B, Maintenance Management Program 3.0 Requirements Implemented This surveillance is conducted to implement requirement QA-0009 from the RL S/RID. This requirement is extracted from DOE 5700.6C. 4.0 Surveillance Activities

429

Method and Appartus for Calibrating a Linear Variable Differential Transformer  

SciTech Connect

A calibration apparatus for calibrating a linear variable differential transformer (LVDT) having an armature positioned in au LVDT armature orifice, and the armature able to move along an axis of movement. The calibration apparatus includes a heating mechanism with an internal chamber, a temperature measuring mechanism for measuring the temperature of the LVDT, a fixture mechanism with an internal chamber for at least partially accepting the LVDT and for securing the LVDT within the heating mechanism internal chamber, a moving mechanism for moving the armature, a position measurement mechanism for measuring the position of the armature, and an output voltage measurement mechanism. A method for calibrating an LVDT, including the steps of powering the LVDT; heating the LVDT to a desired temperature; measuring the position of the armature with respect to the armature orifice; and measuring the output voltage of the LVDT.

Pokrywka, Robert J.

2005-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

430

Automatic calibration of modulated fractional-N frequency synthesizers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The focus of this research has been the development of a low power, radio frequency transmitter architecture. Specifically, a technique for in service automatic calibration of a modulated phase locked loop (PLL) frequency ...

McMahill, Dan

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

On the Interpretation and Use of Neutron Calibration Coefficients  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this paper is to clarify some of the philosophy behind the procedures used at the National Institute of Standards and Technology and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for neutron calibrations.

Schwartz, R B.; McDonald, Joseph C.

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Steady and unsteady calibration of multi-hole probes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis presents the development of a data crographics. reduction algorithm for multi-hole pressure probes. The algorithm has been developed for the reduction of calibration data from miniature non-nulling multi-hole probes in compressible...

Johansen, Espen S

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Neural network calibration for miniature multi-hole pressure probes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A robust and accurate neural network based algorithm phics. for the calibration of miniature multi-hole pressure probes has been developed and a detailed description of its features and use is presented. The code that was developed was intended...

Vijayagopal, Rajesh

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

A Practical Calibration Method for Spray Painting Robot in Factory  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Calibration techniques played an essential role of improving the pose accuracy of the industrial robot before delivery. Due to the intense competition among the industrial robot market, numerous complicated calib...

Xiaoping Zhang; Wenyu Yang; Xuegang Cheng; Wei Zhu

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Uncertainty Quantification and Calibration in Well Construction Cost Estimates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

or to individual cost components. Application of the methodology to estimation of well construction costs for horizontal wells in a shale gas play resulted in well cost estimates that were well calibrated probabilistically. Overall, average estimated...

Valdes Machado, Alejandro

2013-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

436

New PTB thermal neutron calibration facility: first results  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......physikalisch-technische bundesanstalt (PTB) operated for almost 10 y an installation at the research reactor of the GKSS in Geesthacht/Germany for irradiations with thermal neutrons. After its shutdown in 2008, no thermal neutron calibration facility was......

M. Luszik-Bhadra; M. Reginatto; H. Wershofen; B. Wiegel; A. Zimbal

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Method and apparatus for calibrating a linear variable differential transformer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A calibration apparatus for calibrating a linear variable differential transformer (LVDT) having an armature positioned in au LVDT armature orifice, and the armature able to move along an axis of movement. The calibration apparatus includes a heating mechanism with an internal chamber, a temperature measuring mechanism for measuring the temperature of the LVDT, a fixture mechanism with an internal chamber for at least partially accepting the LVDT and for securing the LVDT within the heating mechanism internal chamber, a moving mechanism for moving the armature, a position measurement mechanism for measuring the position of the armature, and an output voltage measurement mechanism. A method for calibrating an LVDT, including the steps of: powering the LVDT; heating the LVDT to a desired temperature; measuring the position of the armature with respect to the armature orifice; and measuring the output voltage of the LVDT.

Pokrywka, Robert J. (North Huntingdon, PA)

2005-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

438

Digitally-Calibrated Reconfigurable Analog-to-Digital Converters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

accuracy for a 4-bit thermometer-coded DAC calibrated withresistor ladder, CMOS thermometer-to-binary encoder Fig.et al. , “A binary-to-thermometer decoder with built-in

Awad, Ramy Mohamed Yousry Ahmed

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Laser calibration system for the CERES Time Projection Chamber  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Nd:YAG laser was used to simulate charged particle tracks at known positions in the CERES Time Projection Chamber at the CERN SPS. The system was primarily developed to study the response of the readout electronics and to calibrate the electron drift velocity. Further applications were the determination of the gating grid transparency, the chamber position calibration, and long-term monitoring of drift properties of the gas in the detector.

Dariusz Miskowiec; Peter Braun-Munzinger

2008-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

440

A robot manipulator calibration procedure with experimental verification  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A ROBOT MANIPULATOR CALIBRATION PROCEDURE WITH EXPERIMENTAL VERIFICATION A Thesis by SATYA SRINIVAS PADAVALA Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ARM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE May 1988 Major Subject: Mechanical Engineering A ROBOT MANIPULATOR CALIBRATION PROCEDURE WITH EXPERIMENTAL VERIFICATION A Thesis by SATYA SRINIVAS PADAVALA Approved as to style and content by: njamin W. M ng (Chairman of Co 'ttee) jr gi...

Padavala, Satya Srinivas

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "borehole calibration models" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Calibrating Artificial Neural Networks by Global Optimization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Jul 21, 2010 ... Abstract: An artificial neural network (ANN) is a computational model - implemented as a computer program - that is aimed at emulating the key ...

Janos D. Pinter

2010-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

442

Optimization of the multivariate calibration of a Vis–NIR sensor for the on-line monitoring of marine diesel engine lubricating oil by variable selection methods  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper deals with the description of the optimization by variable selection methods of the multivariate calibration process of a low-cost Visible–Near Infrared (400–1100 nm) sensor, developed for the on-line monitoring of the insoluble content in diesel marine engine lubricating oil. The performance of the calibration model developed for the Vis–NIR sensor was compared with the performance of the calibration model developed with spectra obtained with a UV/Vis–NIR laboratory spectrometer. The calibration results obtained with the two devices were compared to determine the limitations of the sensor system with respect to the laboratory equipment. First, the spectra were correlated with the insoluble content analyzed in Wearcheckiberica's oil laboratories obtaining a calibration model based on Partial Least Squares-regression (PLSR). Once the pre-processing strategy had been defined, the most significant predictor variables were chosen with the help of Martens uncertainty test, interval Partial Least Squares (iPLS) and Genetic Algorithms (GA) variable selection techniques. Finally, the two models were compared based on the number of latent variables of each model of the values of the Root Mean Square Error of the Cross Validation (RMSECV), the Standard Error of Performance (SECV) and the Ratio of Prediction to Deviation (RPD).

Alberto Villar; Santiago Fernández; Eneko Gorritxategi; José I. Ciria; Luis A. Fernández

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Calibration and verification of thermographic cameras for geometric measurements  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Infrared thermography is a technique with an increasing degree of development and applications. Quality assessment in the measurements performed with the thermal cameras should be achieved through metrology calibration and verification. Infrared cameras acquire temperature and geometric information, although calibration and verification procedures are only usual for thermal data. Black bodies are used for these purposes. Moreover, the geometric information is important for many fields as architecture, civil engineering and industry. This work presents a calibration procedure that allows the photogrammetric restitution and a portable artefact to verify the geometric accuracy, repeatability and drift of thermographic cameras. These results allow the incorporation of this information into the quality control processes of the companies. A grid based on burning lamps is used for the geometric calibration of thermographic cameras. The artefact designed for the geometric verification consists of five delrin spheres and seven cubes of different sizes. Metrology traceability for the artefact is obtained from a coordinate measuring machine. Two sets of targets with different reflectivity are fixed to the spheres and cubes to make data processing and photogrammetric restitution possible. Reflectivity was the chosen material propriety due to the thermographic and visual cameras ability to detect it. Two thermographic cameras from Flir and Nec manufacturers, and one visible camera from Jai are calibrated, verified and compared using calibration grids and the standard artefact. The calibration system based on burning lamps shows its capability to perform the internal orientation of the thermal cameras. Verification results show repeatability better than 1 mm for all cases, being better than 0.5 mm for the visible one. As it must be expected, also accuracy appears higher in the visible camera, and the geometric comparison between thermographic cameras shows slightly better results for the Nec camera.

S. Lagüela; H. González-Jorge; J. Armesto; P. Arias

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Nuclear power plant on-line sensor calibration monitoring implementation issues  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The use of empirical models for on-line monitoring (OLM) of safety-critical instrumentation for calibration reduction has been investigated for over a decade. To help support the regulatory review of possible licence amendments for US nuclear power plants, a series of three NUREG/CRs is being developed for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The third of these volumes, entitled 'Limiting Case Studies', presents the results of applying OLM models to a wide variety of plant data. Specifically, Volume III summarises seven case studies investigating the effects of model development and data assumptions on model performance, and offers recommendations for identifying and handling these limiting cases. This paper discusses the seven case studies. Although this study is not an exhaustive review of the many issues in OLM system development, it provides a base set of considerations that must be accounted for and a method for testing these considerations with other model architectures.

Jamie Garvey; Dustin Garvey; Rebecca Seibert; J. Wesley Hines

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

On the Predictive Uncertainty of a Distributed Hydrologic Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We use models to simulate the real world mainly for prediction purposes. However, since any model is a simplification of reality, there remains a great deal of uncertainty even after the calibration of model parameters. The model’s identifiability...

Cho, Huidae

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

446

Calibrations of filter radiometers for determination of atmospheric optical depth  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Atmospheric optical depths are determined by relating ground-based measurements of direct solar radiation to the extraterrestrial value, I0, that a filter radiometer would read outside the atmosphere. Usually I0 is determined by the Langley extrapolation technique from a high-altitude site, where clear and highly stable atmospheric conditions may be found. Alternatively, I0 can be measured in situ from a stratospheric balloon experiment. We have employed both methods and found agreement to better than 1 %. Filter radiometers tend to change over time, especially when used operationally outdoors. Absolute calibrations in the laboratory are used to monitor the radiometric stability of filter radiometers at the Physikalisch-Meteorologisches Observatorium Davos (PMOD/WRC, Switzerland). A spectral calibration facility based on a calibrated trap detector from the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB, Germany) is used to relate the filter radiometer to an accurate and long-term traceable standard. An FEL-lamp-based standard, previously used for several years, was compared with the new trap standard via a filter radiometer at four wavelengths between 368 nm and 862 nm and revealed a systematic difference of the order of 5 %. The link between radiometric and I0 calibration is the value of the extraterrestrial solar spectrum at the filter radiometer wavelengths which can be determined from these two calibrations and compared with published values.

Ch Wehrli

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

BPM calibration: Test measurements of the electronics Calibration measurements for Q9ACC7 and Q9/10ACC4  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

· BPM calibration: Test measurements of the electronics · Calibration measurements for Q9ACC7 and Q to correct the optics at off-crest operation (bunch compression) HOPE:HOPE: #12;BPM Calibration: Test of electronics · BPM response needs to be monitored: Response has not changed over the past 3 months · Find

448

Characterization of Vadose Zone Sediment: Borehole 299-E33-45 Near BX-102 in the B-BX-BY Waste Management Area  

SciTech Connect

The goal of the Tank Farm Vadose Zone Project is to define risks from past and future single-shell tank farm activities. This report contains all the geologic, geochemical, and selected physical characterization data collected on vadose zone sediment recovered from a borehole installed northeast of tank BX-102 (borehole 299-E33-45). This report also presents data on the sediment lithologies, the vertical extent of contamination, their migration potential, and the source of the contamination in the vadose zone and perched water east of the BX Tank Farm. The near horizontally bedded, northeasterly dipping sediment likely caused horizontal flow of the migrating contaminants. At borehole 299-E33-45, there are several fine-grained lens within the H2 unit that cause horizontally spreading of percolating fluids. The 21-ft thick Plio-pleistocene fine grained silt/clay unit is also an important horizontal flow conduit as evidenced by the perched water between 227-232 ft bgs. Based on comparing the depth of penetration of contaminants and comparing the percentages that are water leachable, uranium migrates slower than technetium-99 and nitrate. The technetium-99 desorption data are consistently near zero, meaning that the technetium-99 is not interacting with the sediment. In summary, the moisture content, pH, electrical conductivity, sodium, tritium, and uranium profiles do not suggest that plume has penetrated below 170 ft bgs. In general, the majority of the ratios of constituents found in the porewater in the Hanford formation sediments are closer to being from the 1951 metals waste solution that escaped tank BX-102 during a cascading accident. There may be a source of water, containing nitrate but not technetium, that is feeding the perched water zone. The deep vadose, perched and groundwater data do not present a clear picture on what might be occurring in the Pliopleistocene units.

Serne, R. Jeffrey; Last, George V.; Gee, Glendon W.; Schaef, Herbert T.; Lanigan, David C.; Lindenmeier, Clark W.; Lindberg, Michael J.; Clayton, Ray E.; Legore, Virginia L.; Orr, Robert D.; Kutnyakov, Igor V.; Baum, Steven R.; Geiszler, Keith N.; Brown, Christopher F.; Valenta, Michelle M.; Vickerman, Tanya S.

2002-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

449

System for characterizing semiconductor materials and photovoltaic devices through calibration  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for measuring characteristics of a piece of material, typically semiconductor materials including photovoltaic devices. The characteristics may include dislocation defect density, grain boundaries, reflectance, external LBIC, internal LBIC, and minority carrier diffusion length. The apparatus includes a light source, an integrating sphere, and a detector communicating with a computer. The measurement or calculation of the characteristics is calibrated to provide accurate, absolute values. The calibration is performed by substituting a standard sample for the piece of material, the sample having a known quantity of one or more of the relevant characteristics. The quantity measured by the system of the relevant characteristic is compared to the known quantity and a calibration constant is created thereby.

Sopori, Bhushan L. (Denver, CO); Allen, Larry C. (Arvada, CO); Marshall, Craig (Littleton, CO); Murphy, Robert C. (Golden, CO); Marshall, Todd (Littleton, CO)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

System for characterizing semiconductor materials and photovoltaic devices through calibration  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus are disclosed for measuring characteristics of a piece of material, typically semiconductor materials including photovoltaic devices. The characteristics may include dislocation defect density, grain boundaries, reflectance, external LBIC, internal LBIC, and minority carrier diffusion length. The apparatus includes a light source, an integrating sphere, and a detector communicating with a computer. The measurement or calculation of the characteristics is calibrated to provide accurate, absolute values. The calibration is performed by substituting a standard sample for the piece of material, the sample having a known quantity of one or more of the relevant characteristics. The quantity measured by the system of the relevant characteristic is compared to the known quantity and a calibration constant is created thereby. 44 figs.

Sopori, B.L.; Allen, L.C.; Marshall, C.; Murphy, R.C.; Marshall, T.

1998-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

451

Calibration & Test Group The LASP Calibration & Test Group (Cal Group) is involved  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and rejection efficiency modeling · Strong (0.08 T) inner field, reduced (Radiation dose models and analysis · Full 3-D radiation shielding and dose analysis using SolidWorks models of instruments · Material-dependent models (high-Z, low-Z) · Radiation signal and noise contribution estimates

Mojzsis, Stephen J.

452

Calibration of Predicted Hourly Zone-Level Supply Air Flows with Measurements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the chemical composition, then sends a signal to the control system to increase the ventilation rate, if necessary. This system cannot be modeled in eQuest. The null hypothesis H0 is true only if the t-value is less than tcritical; if t-value is greater..., daily and monthly calibration analysis: CV-RMSE[%] vs. t-test CV-RMSE [%] Zone Interval Time step t t,cr 2.1 NE Summer Hourly 18.8 Daily 9.5 Monthly 4.2 3 days Hourly 24.2 2.4 SW Summer Hourly 28.4 Daily 12.7 Monthly 4...

Mihai, A.; Zmeureanu, R.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Interval estimation in calibration problems: an alternate approach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

measurement of the dependent varia- ble. This interval will depend upon the dependent variable and also on the outcome of the calibration experiment. For each unknown a state- ment is made in the sense that it belongs to the interval. Then he searches... is computed as 2 n , 1(yi ? y) Ss n ? 2 and will also be denoted by NSE. (2. 2) In the calibration problem, the classical estimator of x* given an obsezvation y* is y* ? b 0 x* bl Under the normality assumption x" is the NLE of x* (Graybill 1976...

Quaino, Oscar Rodolfo

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

454

Network analyzer calibration for cryogenic on-wafer measurements  

SciTech Connect

A cryogenic probe station for on-wafer microwave measurements has been developed at Sandia National Laboratories to explore the basic device physics and characterize advanced components for low-temperature applications. The station was designed to operate over a temperature range of 20 to 300 K with a frequency range of DC to 50 GHz. Due to the vacuum and the low temperature environment, the use of microwave probes and the calibration of network analyzer measurements are somewhat elaborate. This paper presents guidelines for probe use and calibration in this environment.

Hietala, V.M.; Housel, M.S.; Caldwell, R.B.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

The luminosity calibration of the uvby-$\\beta$ photometry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The ESA HIPPARCOS satellite has provided astrometry of unprecedented accuracy, allowing to reassess, improve and refine the pre-HIPPARCOS luminosity calibrations. We review the "classical" absolute magnitude calibrations with the Stroemgren-Crawford intermediate-band photometric system. A small zero point correction of about 2-4% seems necessary, as well as to refine the dependences on metallicity and projected rotational velocity. The need of a rigorous statistical treatment of the extremely precise HIPPARCOS to derive definite dependences of the luminosity on physical stellar parameters is emphasized.

Jordi, C; Masana, E; Torra, J; Figueras, F; Domingo, A; Gómez, A E; Mennessier, M O

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Thermal calibration of photodiode sensitivity for atomic force microscopy  

SciTech Connect

The photodiode sensitivity in the atomic force microscope is calibrated by relating the voltage noise to the thermal fluctuations of the cantilever angle. The method accounts for the ratio of the thermal fluctuations measured in the fundamental vibration mode to the total, and also for the tilt and extended tip of the cantilever. The method is noncontact and is suitable for soft or deformable surfaces where the constant compliance method cannot be used. For hard surfaces, the method can also be used to calibrate the cantileve