National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for boone cabell clay

  1. BooNE: About BooNE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    BooNE Collaboration BooNE Experiment BooNE vs MiniBooNE Interesting Facts Posters Virtual Tour Picture Gallery News Articles BooNE photo montage Technical Information BooNE...

  2. BooNE Collaboration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    research universities, predominantly undergraduate institutions, as well as a high school physics teacher. List of Collaborators The BooNE Collaboration The BooNE Collaboration...

  3. BooNE Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Experiment Goals of BooNE BooNE in a Nutshell Making Neutrinos Detecting Neutrinos schematic of BooNE experiment A sample event (3M animated PDF file) A cosmic ray event as displayed by the MiniBooNE detector.

  4. BooNE: Booster Neutrino Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Picture Gallery BooNE Collaboration Members of the BooNE collaboration Civil Construction Pictorial progress of BooNE civil construction work Detector Installation Pictorial...

  5. BooNE: Booster Neutrino Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Booster Neutrino Experiment (BooNE) Goals of BooNE BooNE in a Nutshell Making Neutrinos Detecting Neutrinos

  6. BooNE: Picture Gallery

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Picture Gallery BooNE Collaboration Members of the BooNE collaboration Civil Construction Pictorial progress of BooNE civil construction work Detector Installation Pictorial progress of MiniBooNE detector installation BooNE Scrapbook A selection from BooNE Audio Gallery Horn Concerto The Horn Concerto is a recording of the BooNE horn and the NuMI horn sounding at the same time. The rat-a-tat is BooNE; the syncopated boom is NuMI.

  7. BooNE: Interesting Facts

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Interesting Facts About the BooNE experiment: BooNE is the only experiment to search the entire range covered by the LSND oscillation signal. First proposed in 1997, BooNE will be ready to collect data in summer, 2002. The BooNE collaboration is small by high energy physics standards, having 65 physicists from 13 instiutions. If BooNE detects a supernova, it will send an automatic signal to telescopes around the world describing its position. BooNE collaboration - click to enlarge About the

  8. BooNE: Booster Neutrino Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Booster Neutrino Experiment (BooNE) BooNE vs MiniBooNE Interesting Facts Posters Virtual Tour Picture Gallery News Articles Technical Information BooNE Proposal Original...

  9. BooNE: Booster Neutrino Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (505) 695 8364 BooNE Experiment: contact-boone@fnal.gov Current Shifter: (505) 500 5511 Detector Enclosure: (630) 840 6881 or 6081 BooNE Collaborators and Associates:...

  10. BooNE: Booster Neutrino Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Interesting Facts About the Booster Neutrino Experiment (BooNE): BooNE is the only experiment to search the entire range covered by the LSND oscillation signal. First proposed in 1997, BooNE has been collecting data since August 2002. The BooNE collaboration is small by high energy physics standards, comprising 75 physicists from 16 instiutions. If BooNE detects a supernova, it will send an automatic signal to telescopes around the world describing its position. BooNE collaboration - click to

  11. Boone Electric Coop | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Phone Number: (573) 449-4181 Website: www.booneelectric.coop Twitter: @BooneElectric Facebook: http:www.facebook.comBooneElectric Outage Hotline: (800) 225-8143 Outage Map:...

  12. BooNE: Booster Neutrino Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Goals of BooNE BooNE's primary goal is to investigate the neutrino oscillation signal reported by the Los Alamos Liquid Scintillator Neutrino Detector (LSND) experiment. In 1995,...

  13. BooNE: Booster Neutrino Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Scrapbook Page 2 The BooNE collaboration in winter. A tour of the construction site. Working with the BooNE Horn. BooNE in the winter A tour of the construction site. A day with the Horn Janet, Bonnie, and Jen in the Tank. Janet and Bill: the early years. Bill, Richard, Jeff, and Shawn in the midst of discussion. Preparing the tubes Janet and Bill: the early days Discussion in progress The oil tanker arrives. The final stages of oil filling. The BooNE Collaboration in the summer. The oil tanker

  14. BooNE: Booster Neutrino Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    BooNE will investigate the question of neutrino mass by searching for oscillations of muon neutrinos into electron neutrinos. This will be done by directing a muon neutrino beam...

  15. BooNE: Booster Neutrino Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    by the Los Alamos LSND experiment. MiniBooNE represents the first phase for the BooNE collaboration and consists of a 1 GeV neutrino beam and a single, 800-ton mineral oil...

  16. BooNE: Booster Neutrino Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Experiment Details This page provides information on the MiniBooNE experiment. Images are linked in their own page with captions. Additional resources are the Talks, Slides and Posters page, Publications page, and Data Release page Beamline Flux Detector Cross sections Light Propagation (Optical Model) Calibration Particle Identification BooNE photo montage

  17. Boone County, Missouri: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    is classified as ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Number 4 Climate Zone Subtype A. Registered Energy Companies in Boone County, Missouri AFuels Technologies LLC Renewable Alternatives...

  18. Boone County, Nebraska: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Albion, Nebraska Cedar Rapids, Nebraska Petersburg, Nebraska Primrose, Nebraska St. Edward, Nebraska Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleBooneCounty,Nebrask...

  19. BooNE: Booster Neutrino Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Proceedings This page contains links to conference proceedings submitted by members of the MiniBooNE collaboration New Guidelines for Submitting Proceedings at MiniBooNE: As of June 2007, we have changed the rules on conference proceedings. Proceedings must be read by one other MiniBooNE person (besides the author) of postdoc level or above before being submitted. Proceedings should also be sent to boone-talks@fnal.gov for archiving on this website. back to Talks page Speaker Proceedings Info

  20. BooNE versus MiniBooNE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    by the Los Alamos LSND experiment. MiniBooNE represents the first phase for the BooNE collaboration and consists of a 1 GeV neutrino beam and a single, 800-ton mineral oil...

  1. Clay Minerals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mueller, Karl T.; Sanders, Rebecca L.; Washton, Nancy M.

    2014-03-14

    Clay minerals are important components of the environment and are involved or implicated in processes such as the uptake of pollutants and the release of nutrients and as potential platforms for a number of chemical reactions. Owing to their small particle sizes (typically, on the order of microns or smaller) and mixing with a variety of other minerals and soil components, advanced characterization methods are needed to study their structures, dynamics, and reactivities. In this article, we describe the use of solid-state NMR methods to characterize the structures and chemistries of clay minerals. Early one-pulse magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR studies of 27Al and 29Si have now been enhanced and extended with new studies utilizing advanced methodologies (such as Multiple Quantum MAS) as well as studies of less-sensitive nuclei. In additional work, the issue of reactivity of clay minerals has been addressed, including studies of reactive surface area in the environment. Utilizations of NMR-sensitive nuclides within the clay minerals themselves, and in molecules that react with speci?c sites on the clay mineral surfaces, have aided in understanding the reactivity of these complex aluminosilicate systems.

  2. Modified clay sorbents

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fogler, H. Scott; Srinivasan, Keeran R.

    1990-01-01

    A novel modified clay sorbent and method of treating industrial effluents to remove trace pollutants, such as dioxins, biphenyls, and polyaromatics such as benzo(a)pyrene and pentachlorophenol. The novel clay sorbent has a composite structure in which the interlayer space of an expandable clay, such as smectite, is filled with polyvalent or multivalent inorganic cations which forces weaker surfactant cations to locate on the surface of the clay in such an orientation that the resulting composite is hydrophilic in nature. A specific example is cetylpyridinium-hydroxy aluminum-montmorillonite. In certain embodiments, a non-expanding clay, such as kaolinite, is used and surfactant cations are necessarily located on an external surface of the clay. A specific example is cetylpyridinium-kaolinite.

  3. Novel Enzyme from Tiny Gribble Could Prove a Boon for Biofuels Research -

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    News Releases | NREL Novel Enzyme from Tiny Gribble Could Prove a Boon for Biofuels Research Wood borer makes its own enzyme, which could thrive in industrial setting June 11, 2013 Researchers from the United Kingdom, the Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), and the University of Kentucky have recently published a paper describing a novel cellulose-degrading enzyme from a marine wood borer Limnoria quadripunctata, commonly known as the gribble. Gribbles are

  4. Webster Co. Kanawha Co. Cabell C

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    BOE Reserve Class No 2001 reserves 0.1 - 10 MBOE 10.1 - 100 MBOE 100.1 - 1,000 MBOE 1,000.1 - 10,000 MBOE 10,000.1 - 100,000 MBOE > 100,000 MBOE Appalachian Basin Boundary Appalachian Basin, Southern OH (Panel 4 of 7) Oil and Gas Fields By 2001 BOE Reserve Class Total Total Total Number Liquid Gas BOE of Reserves Reserves Reserves Basin Fields (Mbbl) (MMcf) (Mbbl) Appalachian 3354 79,141 9,550,156 1,670,834 2001 Proved Reserves for Entire Applachian Basin OH WV The mapped oil and gas field

  5. Webster Co. Kanawha Co. Cabell C

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Authors: Sam Limerick (1), Lucy Luo (1), Gary Long (2), David Morehouse (2), Jack Perrin (1), Steve Jackson (1) and Robert King (2) (1) Z, Inc., (2) Energy Information ...

  6. Webster Co. Kanawha Co. Cabell C

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    - 1,000 MMCF 1,000.1 - 10,000 MMCF 10,000.1 - 100,000 MMCF > 100,000 MMCF Appalachian Basin Boundary Appalachian Basin, Southern OH (Panel 4 of 7) Oil and Gas Fields By 2001 Gas

  7. Webster Co. Kanawha Co. Cabell C

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    No 2001 liquids reserves 0.1 - 10 Mbbl 10.1 - 100 Mbbl 100.1 - 1,000 Mbbl 1,000.1 - 10,000 Mbbl Appalachian Basin Boundary Appalachian Basin, Southern OH (Panel 4 of 7) Oil and Gas ...

  8. Webster Co. Kanawha Co. Cabell C

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gas Reserve Class No 2001 gas reserves 0.1 - 10 MMCF 10.1 - 100 MMCF 100.1 - 1,000 MMCF 1,000.1 - 10,000 MMCF 10,000.1 - 100,000 MMCF > 100,000 MMCF Appalachian Basin Boundary ...

  9. Webster Co. Kanawha Co. Cabell C

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Liquids Reserve Class No 2001 liquids reserves 0.1 - 10 Mbbl 10.1 - 100 Mbbl 100.1 - 1,000 Mbbl 1,000.1 - 10,000 Mbbl Appalachian Basin Boundary Appalachian Basin, Southern OH ...

  10. Quantum Chemistry of CO2 Interaction with Swelling Clays | netl...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Chemistry of CO2 Interaction with Swelling Clays Quantum Chemistry of CO2 Interaction with Swelling Clays Ubiquitous clay minerals can play an important role in assessing the ...

  11. Potassium hydroxide clay stabilization process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sydansk, R.

    1981-07-28

    An aqueous solution having potassium hydroxide dissolved therein is injected into a subterranean sandstone formation containing water-sensitive fine particles, including clays. Potassium hydroxide stabilizes the fine particles for a substantial period of time thereby substantially preventing formation permeability damage caused by encroachment of aqueous solutions having a distinct ionic makeup into the treated formation.

  12. Clay Electric Coop Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Clay Electric Coop Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name: Clay Electric Coop Inc Place: Illinois Phone Number: 1-800-582-9012 Website: www.clayelectric.com Facebook: https:...

  13. Clay complexes support HDS catalyst.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marshall, C. L.; Carrado, K.; Chemical Engineering

    2000-01-01

    Hydroprocessing represents a crucial component of petroleum refining operations both in terms of environmental and economic considerations. Regulations concerning maximum amount of sulfur content of gasoline and emissions of sulfur-oxide compounds upon combustion are becoming more and more stringent. One 1994-2000 focus of Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) has been the development of catalysts for hydrodesulfurization (HDS). Typical HDS catalysts are comprised of Co-Mo sulfides or Ni-Mo sulfides on an alumina support. Modification of the pore structure of the support has generated great attention among researchers. Most desulfurization test reactions have used dibenzothiophene (DBT) as the model compound to test various configurations of support material with Co-Mo-S and Ni-Mo-S catalysts. In this testing, the desired product would be biphenyl and hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S). A competing reaction creates cyclohexylbenzene by saturating one aromatic ring prior to desulfurization. Ring saturation requires more costly hydrogen and is not desirable. Fortunately, a more effective catalyst for adding hydrogen at the sulfur site with hydrogenating the aromatic rings has been found. However, this has only been tested on DBT. HDS uses various types of catalysts to add hydrogen to reduce unwanted sulfur compounds. Typically this requires expensive, high-pressure, high-temperature equipment to produce the environmentally friendly low-sulfur fuels. ANL scientists identified several new desulfurization catalysts with improved HDS activity and selectivity. From these new catalysts, it may be possible to achieve HDS processing at lower temperature and pressure. The catalysts used for HDS at ANL are various clay complexes. Natural clays have a history of use in the hydroprocessing industry since they are abundant and inexpensive. ANL's approach is to create synthetic organo-clay complexes (SOCC). An advantage of SOCCs is that the pore size and distribution can be controlled by

  14. Contact micromechanics in granular media with clay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ita, S.L.

    1994-08-01

    Many granular materials, including sedimentary rocks and soils, contain clay particles in the pores, grain contacts, or matrix. The amount and location of the clays and fluids can influence the mechanical and hydraulic properties of the granular material. This research investigated the mechanical effects of clay at grain-to-grain contacts in the presence of different fluids. Laboratory seismic wave propagation tests were conducted at ultrasonic frequencies using spherical glass beads coated with Montmorillonite clay (SWy-1) onto which different fluids were adsorbed. For all bead samples, seismic velocity increased and attenuation decreased as the contact stiffnesses increased with increasing stress demonstrating that grain contacts control seismic transmission in poorly consolidated and unconsolidated granular material. Coating the beads with clay added stiffness and introduced viscosity to the mechanical contact properties that increased the velocity and attenuation of the propagating seismic wave. Clay-fluid interactions were studied by allowing the clay coating to absorb water, ethyl alcohol, and hexadecane. Increasing water amounts initially increased seismic attenuation due to clay swelling at the contacts. Attenuation decreased for higher water amounts where the clay exceeded the plastic limit and was forced from the contact areas into the surrounding open pore space during sample consolidation. This work investigates how clay located at grain contacts affects the micromechanical, particularly seismic, behavior of granular materials. The need for this work is shown by a review of the effects of clays on seismic wave propagation, laboratory measurements of attenuation in granular media, and proposed mechanisms for attenuation in granular media.

  15. Clay Electric Cooperative, Inc- Solar Thermal Loans

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Clay Electric Cooperative (CEC), a Touchstone Energy Cooperative, covers 14 counties in northern Florida, including Gainesville, Keystone Heights, Lake City, Orange Park, Palatka, and Salt Springs....

  16. Clay Electric Cooperative, Inc- Energy Conservation Loans

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Clay Electric Cooperative (CEC), a Touchstone Energy Cooperative, covers 14 North Florida counties, including Gainesville, Keystone Heights, Lake City, Orange Park, Palatka, and Salt Springs. It...

  17. Active containment systems incorporating modified pillared clays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lundie, P. |; McLeod, N.

    1997-12-31

    The application of treatment technologies in active containment systems provides a more advanced and effective method for the remediation of contaminated sites. These treatment technologies can be applied in permeable reactive walls and/or funnel and gate systems. The application of modified pillared clays in active containment systems provides a mechanism for producing permeable reactive walls with versatile properties. These pillared clays are suitably modified to incorporate reactive intercalatants capable of reacting with both a broad range of organic pollutants of varying molecular size, polarity and reactivity. Heavy metals can be removed from contaminated water by conventional ion-exchange and other reactive processes within the clay structure. Complex contamination problems can be addressed by the application of more than one modified clay on a site specific basis. This paper briefly describes the active containment system and the structure/chemistry of the modified pillared clay technology, illustrating potential applications of the in-situ treatment process for contaminated site remediation.

  18. Molecular Simulation of Carbon Dioxide, Brine, and Clay Mineral...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: Molecular Simulation of Carbon Dioxide, Brine, and Clay Mineral Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Molecular Simulation of Carbon Dioxide, Brine, and Clay ...

  19. Clay County, Missouri: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Registered Energy Companies in Clay County, Missouri Alternative Energy Sources Inc Smith Electric Vehicles US SEV US Registered Financial Organizations in Clay County,...

  20. Clay Electric Cooperative, Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Inc Place: Florida Phone Number: 1-888-434-9844 Website: www.clayelectric.com Facebook: https:www.facebook.comClayElectric Outage Hotline: 1-888-434-9844 Outage Map:...

  1. Testing of hollow clay tile masonry prisms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, W.D.; Butala, M.B.

    1993-10-15

    This paper presents test results of 610-mm wide (24-in.) by 1219-mm high (48-in.) by 203-or 330-mm (8- or 13-in.) thick prisms constructed of hollow clay tiles. Three prisms were extracted fro existing hollow clay title walls and 69 were constructed in laboratories at The University of Tennessee and the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) in Gaithersburg, Maryland. Modulus of Elasticity, E, and compressive strength f{prime}{sub m} were calculated from the results.

  2. Enchanted Clays: 44th Annual Meeting of the Clay Minerals Society (June 2007)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Randall T. Cygan

    2007-06-01

    “Enchanted Clays: 44th Annual Meeting of the Clay Minerals Society” was held in early June 2007 in beautiful and historic Santa Fe, New Mexico, USA. Santa Fe provided an idyllic location in the southwestern United States for the attendees to enjoy technical and social sessions while soaking up the diverse culture and wonderful climate of New Mexico—The Land of Enchantment. The meeting included a large and varied group of scientists, sharing knowledge and ideas, benefitting from technical interactions, and enjoying the wonderful historic and enchanted environs of Santa Fe. Including significant number of international scientists, the meeting was attended by approximately two hundred participants. The meeting included three days of technical sessions (oral and poster presentations), three days of field trips to clay and geological sites of northern New Mexico, and a full day workshop on the stabilization of carbon by clays. Details can be found at the meeting web site: www.sandia.gov/clay.

  3. Organic or organometallic template mediated clay synthesis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gregar, Kathleen C.; Winans, Randall E.; Botto, Robert E.

    1994-01-01

    A method for incorporating diverse Varieties of intercalants or templates directly during hydrothermal synthesis of clays such as hectorite or montmorillonite-type layer-silicate clays. For a hectorite layer-silicate clay, refluxing a gel of silica sol, magnesium hydroxide sol and lithium fluoride for two days in the presence of an organic or organometallic intercalant or template results in crystalline products containing either (a) organic dye molecules such as ethyl violet and methyl green, (b) dye molecules such as alcian blue that are based on a Cu(II)-phthalocyannine complex, or (c) transition metal complexes such as Ru(II)phenanthroline and Co(III)sepulchrate or (d) water-soluble porphyrins and metalloporphyrins. Montmorillonite-type clays are made by the method taught by U.S. Pat. No. 3,887,454 issued to Hickson, Jun. 13, 1975; however, a variety of intercalants or templates may be introduced. The intercalants or templates should have (i) water-solubility, (ii) positive charge, and (iii) thermal stability under moderately basic (pH 9-10) aqueous reflux conditions or hydrothermal pressurized conditions for the montmorillonite-type clays.

  4. Organic or organometallic template mediated clay synthesis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gregar, K.C.; Winans, R.E.; Botto, R.E.

    1994-05-03

    A method is described for incorporating diverse varieties of intercalates or templates directly during hydrothermal synthesis of clays such as hectorite or montmorillonite-type layer-silicate clays. For a hectorite layer-silicate clay, refluxing a gel of silica sol, magnesium hydroxide sol and lithium fluoride for two days in the presence of an organic or organometallic intercalate or template results in crystalline products containing either (a) organic dye molecules such as ethyl violet and methyl green, (b) dye molecules such as alcian blue that are based on a Cu(II)-phthalocyannine complex, or (c) transition metal complexes such as Ru(II)phenanthroline and Co(III)sepulchrate or (d) water-soluble porphyrins and metalloporphyrins. Montmorillonite-type clays are made by the method taught by U.S. Pat. No. 3,887,454 issued to Hickson, Jun. 13, 1975; however, a variety of intercalates or templates may be introduced. The intercalates or templates should have (i) water-solubility, (ii) positive charge, and (iii) thermal stability under moderately basic (pH 9-10) aqueous reflux conditions or hydrothermal pressurized conditions for the montmorillonite-type clays. 22 figures.

  5. Microsoft Word - Clay Memo PMC Coburn Obama 11_9_06.doc | Department...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Clay Memo PMC Coburn Obama 11906.doc Microsoft Word - Clay Memo PMC Coburn Obama 11906.doc Microsoft Word - Clay Memo PMC Coburn Obama 11906.doc More Documents & Publications...

  6. Clay-Union Electric Coop | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Clay-Union Electric Coop Jump to: navigation, search Name: Clay-Union Electric Coop Place: South Dakota Phone Number: 605-624-2673 Website: www.clayunionelectric.coop Facebook:...

  7. Platte-Clay Electric Coop, Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Platte-Clay Electric Coop, Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name: Platte-Clay Electric Coop, Inc Place: Missouri Phone Number: 816-628-3121 Website: www.pcec.coop Twitter:...

  8. Cabell County, West Virginia: Energy Resources | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Barboursville, West Virginia Culloden, West Virginia Huntington, West Virginia Milton, West Virginia Pea Ridge, West Virginia Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgw...

  9. Coatings and films derived from clay/wax nanocomposites

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chaiko, David J.; Leyva, Argentina A.

    2006-11-14

    The invention provides methods for making clay/wax nanocomposites and coatings and films of same with improved chemical resistance and gas barrier properties. The invention further provides methods for making and using emulsions of such clay/wax nanocomposites. Typically, an organophillic clay is combined with a wax or wax/polymer blend such that the cohesion energy of the clay matches that of the wax or wax/polymer blend. Suitable organophilic clays include mica and phyllosilicates that have been surface-treated with edge or edge and surface modifying agents. The resulting nanocomposites have applications as industrial coatings and in protective packaging.

  10. Clay-based geothermal drilling fluids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guven, N.; Carney, L.L.; Lee, L.J.; Bernhard, R.P.

    1982-11-01

    The rheological properties of fluids based on fibrous clays such as sepiolite and attapulgite have been systematically examined under conditions similar to those of geothermal wells, i.e. at elevated temperatures and pressures in environments with concentrated brines. Attapulgite- and sepiolite-based fluids have been autoclaved at temperatures in the range from 70 to 800/sup 0/F with the addition of chlorides and hydroxides of Na, K, Ca, and Mg. The rheological properties (apparent and plastic viscosity, fluid loss, gel strength, yield point, and cake thickness) of the autoclaved fluids have been studied and correlated with the chemical and physical changes that occur in the clay minerals during the autoclaving process.

  11. boone1.pdf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

  12. boone2.pdf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

  13. boone3.pdf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

  14. boone4.pdf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

  15. BooNE: Posters

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Posters What's a Neutrino? How neutrinos fit into our understanding of the universe. Recipe for a Neutrino Beam Start with some protons... concocting the MiniBooNE beam. The MiniBooNE Detector Tracking the traces of neutrino interactions. Of Neutrino Mass, and Oscillation What oscillates in neutrino oscillations, and why it matters

  16. Preparation of Clay Brick Using Coal Waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoo, Jung W.; Jung, Jin H.; Kim, Jae M.; Lee, Sung M.; Kim, Hyung T.

    2004-03-31

    A great deal of coal waste produced during the development of a mine was accumulated around the mine, which caused many problems such as traffic, acid mine drainage and damage of forest and scenery. Carbon in the coal waste helps calcination of the brick even at low temperature. Considering the reuse of natural waste and energy saving, clay brick was prepared using coal waste under various conditions, including particle size, amount of coal waste mixed, calcination temperature and pressing pressure. The specimens were characterized by XRD, SEM and TG-DTA and interpreted in terms of water absorption and compressive strength.

  17. Deputy Secretary Clay Sell Touts Georgian Efforts to Advance Regional

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Cooperation and Non-Proliferation | Department of Energy Clay Sell Touts Georgian Efforts to Advance Regional Energy Cooperation and Non-Proliferation Deputy Secretary Clay Sell Touts Georgian Efforts to Advance Regional Energy Cooperation and Non-Proliferation March 16, 2007 - 10:55am Addthis Visits National Nuclear Waste Repository in Mtskheta, Georgia TBILISI, Georgia - U.S. Deputy Secretary of Energy Clay Sell today visited the National Radioactive Waste Repository in Mtskheta,

  18. Molecular Simulation of Carbon Dioxide Brine and Clay Mineral...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    of Carbon Dioxide Brine and Clay Mineral Interactions and Determination of Contact Angles. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Molecular Simulation of Carbon Dioxide ...

  19. Molecular Simulation of Carbon Dioxide Nanodroplets on Clay in...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Molecular Simulation of Carbon Dioxide Nanodroplets on Clay in Deep Saline Aquifers. Authors: Tenney, Craig M. Publication Date: ...

  20. Molecular Simulation of Carbon Dioxide Nanodroplets on Clay Surfaces...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Surfaces in Deep Saline Aquifers. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Molecular Simulation of Carbon Dioxide Nanodroplets on Clay Surfaces in Deep Saline Aquifers. Authors: ...

  1. Clay Electric Cooperative, Inc- Energy Smart Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Rebates are available only to Clay Electric Cooperative (CEC) residential members who are making efficiency upgrades to primary residence served by CEC. Rebates are available for residential...

  2. Clay Central Everly School Dist Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Everly School District Energy Purchaser Clay CentralEverly School District Location IA Coordinates 43.1392, -95.2644 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservi...

  3. Deputy Secretary Clay Sell Touts Georgian Efforts to Advance...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    to Advance Regional Energy Cooperation and Non-Proliferation Deputy Secretary Clay Sell Touts Georgian Efforts to Advance Regional Energy Cooperation and Non-Proliferation March ...

  4. Clay County, Florida: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Clay County, Florida: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 29.9943564, -81.7787021 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappings...

  5. The washability of lignites for clay removal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oteyaka, B.; Yamik, A.; Ucar, A.; Sahbaz, O.; Demir, U.

    2008-07-01

    In the washability research of the Seyitomer Lignites (Kutahya-Turkey), with lower calorific value (1,863 kcal/kg) and high ash content (51.91%), by heavy medium separation, it was found out that middling clay in the coal had an effect to change the medium density. To prevent this problem, a trommel sieve with 18 and 5 mm aperture diameter was designed, and the clay in the coal was tried to be removed using it before the coal was released to heavy medium. Following that, the obtained coal in -100 + 18 mm and -18 + 5 mm fractions was subjected to sink and float test having 1.4 gcm{sup -3} and 1.7 gcm{sup -3} medium densities (-5 mm fraction will be evaluated in a separate work). Depending on the raw coal, with the floating of -100 + 18 mm and -18 + 5 mm size fraction in 1.4 gcm{sup -3} medium density, clean coal with 60.10% combustible matter recovery, 19.12% ash, and 3,150 kcal/kg was obtained. Also floating of the samples sinking in 1.4 gcm{sup -3} in the medium density (1.7 gcm{sup -3}), middling with 18.70% combustible matter recovery, 41.93% ash, 2,150 kcal/kg, and tailing having 78.31% ash were obtained.

  6. Geosynthetic clay liners - slope stability field study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carson, D.A.; Daniel, D.E.; Koerner, R.M.; Bonaparte, R.

    1997-12-31

    A field research project was developed to examine the internal shear performance of geosynthetic clay liners (GCLs). Several combinations of cross sections were assembled using GCL materials that were available at the time of project initiation. The cross sections utilized were intended to simulate landfill cover applications. Thirteen (13) resulting test plots were constructed on two different slope angles, and each plot is instrumented for physical displacement and soil moisture characteristics. Test plots were constructed in a manner that dictated the shear plane in the clay portion of the GCL product. The project purpose is to assess field performance and to verify design parameters associated with the application of GCLs in waste containment applications. Interim research data shows that test slopes on 2H:1V show global deformation, but little internal shear evidence, and the 3H:1V slopes show little deformation at approximately 650 days. The research is ongoing, and this paper presents the most recent information available from the project.

  7. City of Clay Center, Kansas (Utility Company) | Open Energy Informatio...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    commu Facebook: https:www.facebook.compagesCity-of-Clay-Center172525069449548?refbrrs Outage Hotline: 785-632-2139 or (785) 632-5454 References: EIA Form EIA-861 Final...

  8. Modeling Coupled Processes in Clay Formations for Radioactive Waste Disposal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Hui-Hai; Rutqvist, Jonny; Zheng, Liange; Sonnenthal, Eric; Houseworth, Jim; Birkholzer, Jens

    2010-08-31

    As a result of the termination of the Yucca Mountain Project, the United States Department of Energy (DOE) has started to explore various alternative avenues for the disposition of used nuclear fuel and nuclear waste. The overall scope of the investigation includes temporary storage, transportation issues, permanent disposal, various nuclear fuel types, processing alternatives, and resulting waste streams. Although geologic disposal is not the only alternative, it is still the leading candidate for permanent disposal. The realm of geologic disposal also offers a range of geologic environments that may be considered, among those clay shale formations. Figure 1-1 presents the distribution of clay/shale formations within the USA. Clay rock/shale has been considered as potential host rock for geological disposal of high-level nuclear waste throughout the world, because of its low permeability, low diffusion coefficient, high retention capacity for radionuclides, and capability to self-seal fractures induced by tunnel excavation. For example, Callovo-Oxfordian argillites at the Bure site, France (Fouche et al., 2004), Toarcian argillites at the Tournemire site, France (Patriarche et al., 2004), Opalinus clay at the Mont Terri site, Switzerland (Meier et al., 2000), and Boom clay at Mol site, Belgium (Barnichon et al., 2005) have all been under intensive scientific investigations (at both field and laboratory scales) for understanding a variety of rock properties and their relations with flow and transport processes associated with geological disposal of nuclear waste. Clay/shale formations may be generally classified as indurated and plastic clays (Tsang et al., 2005). The latter (including Boom clay) is a softer material without high cohesion; its deformation is dominantly plastic. For both clay rocks, coupled thermal, hydrological, mechanical and chemical (THMC) processes are expected to have a significant impact on the long-term safety of a clay repository. For

  9. Clay County Electric Coop Corp | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Corp Jump to: navigation, search Name: Clay County Electric Coop Corp Place: Arkansas Service Territory: Arkansas, Missouri Phone Number: 870.857.3521 or 870.892.5251 or...

  10. Hollow clay tile wall program summary report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henderson, R.C.; Jones, W.D.

    1995-07-30

    Many of the Y-12 Plant buildings, constructed during the 1940s and 1950s, consist of steel ed concrete framing infilled with hollow clay tile (HCT). The infill was intended to provide for building enclosure and was not designed to have vertical or lateral load-carrying capacity. During the late 1970s and early 1980s, seismic and wind evaluations were performed on many of these buildings in conjunction with the preparation of a site-wide safety analysis report. This analytical work, based on the best available methodology, considered lateral load-carrying capacity of the HCT infill on the basis of building code allowable shear values. In parallel with the analysis effort, DOE initiated a program to develop natural phenomena capacity and performance criteria for existing buildings, but these criteria did not specify guidelines for determining the lateral force capacity of frames infilled with HCT. The evaluation of infills was, therefore, based on the provisions for the design of unreinforced masonry as outlined in standard masonry codes. When the results of the seismic and wind evaluations were compared with the new criteria, the projected building capacities fell short of the requirements. Apparently, if the buildings were to meet the new criteria, many millions of dollars would be required for building upgrades. Because the upgrade costs were significant, the assumptions and approaches used in the analyses were reevaluated. Four issues were identified: (1) Once the infilled walls cracked, what capacity (nonlinear response), if any, would the walls have to resist earthquake or wind loads applied in the plane of the infill (in-plane)? (2) Would the infilled walls remain within the steel or reinforced concrete framing when subjected to earthquake or high wind loads applied perpendicular to the infill (out-of-plane)? (3) What was the actual shear capacity of the HCT infill? (4) Was modeling the HCT infill as a shear wall the best approach?

  11. Constitutive relationships for elastic deformation of clay rock: Data Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, H.H.; Rutqvist, J.; Birkholzer, J.T.

    2011-04-15

    Geological repositories have been considered a feasible option worldwide for storing high-level nuclear waste. Clay rock is one of the rock types under consideration for such purposes, because of its favorable features to prevent radionuclide transport from the repository. Coupled hydromechanical processes have an important impact on the performance of a clay repository, and establishing constitutive relationships for modeling such processes are essential. In this study, we propose several constitutive relationships for elastic deformation in indurated clay rocks based on three recently developed concepts. First, when applying Hooke's law in clay rocks, true strain (rock volume change divided by the current rock volume), rather than engineering strain (rock volume change divided by unstressed rock volume), should be used, except when the degree of deformation is very small. In the latter case, the two strains will be practically identical. Second, because of its inherent heterogeneity, clay rock can be divided into two parts, a hard part and a soft part, with the hard part subject to a relatively small degree of deformation compared with the soft part. Third, for swelling rock like clay, effective stress needs to be generalized to include an additional term resulting from the swelling process. To evaluate our theoretical development, we analyze uniaxial test data for core samples of Opalinus clay and laboratory measurements of single fractures within macro-cracked Callovo-Oxfordian argillite samples subject to both confinement and water reduced swelling. The results from this evaluation indicate that our constitutive relationships can adequately represent the data and explain the related observations.

  12. Modification of clay-based waste containment materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adu-Wusu, K.; Whang, J.M.; McDevitt, M.F.

    1997-12-31

    Bentonite clays are used extensively for waste containment barriers to help impede the flow of water in the subsurface because of their low permeability characteristics. However, they do little to prevent diffusion of contaminants, which is the major transport mechanism at low water flows. A more effective way of minimizing contaminant migration in the subsurface is to modify the bentonite clay with highly sorptive materials. Batch sorption studies were conducted to evaluate the sorptive capabilities of organo-clays and humic- and iron-based materials. These materials proved to be effective sorbents for the organic contaminants 1,2,4-trichlorobenzene, nitrobenzene, and aniline in water, humic acid, and methanol solution media. The sorption capacities were several orders of magnitude greater than that of unmodified bentonite clay. Modeling results indicate that with small amounts of these materials used as additives in clay barriers, contaminant flux through walls could be kept very small for 100 years or more. The cost of such levels of additives can be small compared to overall construction costs.

  13. Application of hard X-ray microprobe methods to clay-rich materials...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Application of hard X-ray microprobe methods to clay-rich materials Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Application of hard X-ray microprobe methods to clay-rich materials ...

  14. Quantum Chemistry of CO2 Interaction with Swelling Clays | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Chemistry of CO2 Interaction with Swelling Clays Quantum Chemistry of CO2 Interaction with Swelling Clays Ubiquitous clay minerals can play an important role in assessing the suitability of geologic formations for secure storage of carbon dioxide (CO2). The minerals may affect the reservoir storage capacity as well as the integrity of its natural seals such as caprock formations. CO2 interaction with swelling clays such as smectites is a complex process involving physisorption in micropores and

  15. BooNE Neutrino Oscillations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

  16. BooNE News Articles

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    News Articles FermiNews Fermilab's biweekly magazine (several stories) Beam Line: Special Neutrino Issue A special issue of SLAC's quarterly magazine. Earth & Sky "Catching Ghost...

  17. OIL WELL REMEDIATION IN CLAY AND WAYNE COUNTIES, IL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peter L. Dakuras; Larry Stieber; Dick Young

    2003-02-01

    This is the first technical progress report of the remediation of two wells and a water injection well in Clay County, Illinois. The location is identified as the Routt lease and the wells will be identified as the Routt No.3 and Routt No.4 respectively throughout this report. The Clay County portion of this project has met all legal, financial, and environmental requirements to drill and /or pump oil at this lease. We have also obtained all available information about this site and have taken the necessary steps to improve access roads, dig the necessary pits and build the necessary firewalls. Both wells have been drilled to the Salem formation. Gas gun technology was used to stimulate the reservoir of the Routt No.3. This report will address the technical aspects of the remediation.

  18. On sorption and swelling of CO2 in clays

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Busch, A.; Bertier, P.; Gensterblum, Y.; Rother, G.; Spiers, C. J.; Zhang, M.; Wentinck, H. M.

    2016-03-23

    One well-studied technology is the geological storage of carbon dioxide (CO2), and a number of demonstration projects around the world have proven its feasibility and challenges. Storage conformance and seal integrity are among the most important aspects, as they determine risk of leakage as well as limits for storage capacity and injectivity. By providing evidence for safe storage is critical for improving public acceptance. Most caprocks are composed of clays as dominant mineral type which can typically be illite, kaolinite, chlorite or smectite. A number of recent studies addressed the interaction between CO2 and these different clays and it wasmore » shown that clay minerals adsorb considerable quantities of CO2. For smectite this uptake can lead to volumetric expansion followed by the generation of swelling pressures. On the one hand CO2 adsorption traps CO2, on the other hand swelling pressures can potentially change local stress regimes and in unfavourable situations shear-type failure is assumed to occur. Moreover, for storage in a reservoir having high clay contents the CO2 uptake can add to storage capacity which is widely underestimated so far. Smectite-rich seals in direct contact with a dry CO2 plume at the interface to the reservoir might dehydrate leading to dehydration cracks. Such dehydration cracks can provide pathways for CO2 ingress and further accelerate dewatering and penetration of the seal by supercritical CO2. At the same time, swelling may also lead to the closure of fractures or the reduction of fracture apertures, thereby improving seal integrity. Finally, the goal of this communication is to theoretically evaluate and discuss these scenarios in greater detail in terms of phenomenological mechanisms, but also in terms of potential risks or benefits for carbon storage.« less

  19. Engineered clay-shredded tyre mixtures as barrier materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Al-Tabbaa, A.; Aravinthan, T.

    1997-12-31

    An engineered clay consisting of kaolin and bentonite was mixed with shredded tyre in various weight percentages and examined for use as a constituent in a landfill liner. The clay-tyre mixtures properties in terms of compaction, unconfined compressive strength, permeability to water and paraffin, leachability, stress-strain behaviour, free swell behaviour and swelling pressure were investigated. The results show that the dry density and strength reduced with the addition of tyre and also with increased tyre content but that good interaction was developed between the clay and tyre. The strain at failure increased showing reinforcing effect of the tyre. The permeability to paraffin was considerably reduced compared to that to water due to the presence of the tyre which caused high swelling pressures to develop. The leachability results indicate initial high concentrations leaching out of the soil-tyre mixtures which will be subjected to dilution in the environment. This work adds evidence to the potential advantages of using soil-tyre mixtures as a landfill liner material.

  20. Photocatalytic properties of titania pillared clays by different drying methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ding, Z.; Zhu, H.Y.; Lu, G.Q.; Greenfield, P.F.

    1999-01-01

    Photocatalysts based on titania pillared clays (TiO{sub 2} PILCs) have been prepared through a sol-gel method. Different drying methods, air drying (AD), air drying after ethanol extraction (EAD), and supercritical drying (SCD) have been employed and found to have significant effects on the photocatalytic efficiency of the resultant catalysts for the oxidation of phenol in water. Titania pillared clay (TiO{sub 2} PILC) obtained by SCD has the highest external and micropore surface area, largest amount and smallest crystallite size of anatase, and exhibited the highest photocatalytic activity. Furthermore, silica titania pillared clay (SiO{sub 2}-TiO{sub 2} PILC) after SCD, titania coated TiO{sub 2} PILC (SCD) and SiO{sub 2}-TiO{sub 2} PILC (SCD) were synthesized to study the key factors controlling the photocatalytic activity. It is concluded that the dispersion of nanometer-sized anatase on the surface of the PILC particles and the suspensibility of the particles are the most important factors for high photocatalytic efficiency.

  1. Evaluation of Used Fuel Disposition in Clay-Bearing Rock

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jové Colón, Carlos F.; Weck, Philippe F.; Sassani, David H.; Zheng, Liange; Rutqvist, Jonny; Steefel, Carl I.; Kim, Kunhwi; Nakagawa, Seiji; Houseworth, James; Birkholzer, Jens; Caporuscio, Florie A.; Cheshire, Michael; Rearick, Michael S.; McCarney, Mary K.; Zavarin, Mavrik; Benedicto, Ana; Kersting, Annie B.; Sutton, Mark; Jerden, James; Frey, Kurt E.; Copple, Jacqueline M.; Ebert, William

    2014-08-01

    Radioactive waste disposal in shale/argillite rock formations has been widely considered given its desirable isolation properties (low permeability), geochemically reduced conditions, anomalous groundwater pressures, and widespread geologic occurrence. Clay/shale rock formations are characterized by their high content of clay minerals such as smectites and illites where diffusive transport and chemisorption phenomena predominate. These, in addition to low permeability, are key attributes of shale to impede radionuclide mobility. Shale host-media has been comprehensively studied in international nuclear waste repository programs as part of underground research laboratories (URLs) programs in Switzerland, France, Belgium, and Japan. These investigations, in some cases a decade or more long, have produced a large but fundamental body of information spanning from site characterization data (geological, hydrogeological, geochemical, geomechanical) to controlled experiments on the engineered barrier system (EBS) (barrier clay and seals materials). Evaluation of nuclear waste disposal in shale formations in the USA was conducted in the late 70’s and mid 80’s. Most of these studies evaluated the potential for shale to host a nuclear waste repository but not at the programmatic level of URLs in international repository programs. This report covers various R&D work and capabilities relevant to disposal of heat-generating nuclear waste in shale/argillite media. Integration and cross-fertilization of these capabilities will be utilized in the development and implementation of the shale/argillite reference case planned for FY15. Disposal R&D activities under the UFDC in the past few years have produced state-of-the-art modeling capabilities for coupled Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical-Chemical (THMC), used fuel degradation (source term), and thermodynamic modeling and database development to evaluate generic disposal concepts. The THMC models have been developed for shale

  2. Clay slurry and engineered soils as containment technologies for remediation of contaminated sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, J.R.; Dudka, S.; Miller, W.P.; Johnson, D.O.

    1997-12-31

    Clay Slurry and Engineered Soils are containment technologies for remediation of waste disposal sites where leaching, groundwater plumes and surface runoff of contaminants are serious ecological hazards to adjacent environments. This technology is a patent-pending process which involves the use of conditioned clay materials mixed with sand and water to form a readily pourable suspension, a clay slurry, which is either placed into a trench barrier system or allowed to de-water to create Engineered Soils. The Engineered Soil forms a layer impervious to water and air, therefore by inhibiting both water and oxygen from penetrating through the soil the material. This material can be installed in layers and as a vertical barrier to create a surface barrier containment system. The clay percentage in the clay slurry and Engineered Soils varies depending on site characteristics and desired performance standards. For example Engineered Soils with 1-2% of clay (dry wt.) had a hydraulic conductivity (K) of 10{sup -8} to 10{sup -1} cm/sec. Tests of tailing materials from a kyanite and pyrite mine showed that the clay slurry was effective not only in reducing the permeability of the treated tailings, but also in decreasing their acidity due to the inherent alkalinity of the clay. The untreated tailings had pH values in the range of 2.4 - 3.1; whereas, the effluent from clay and tailings mixtures had pH values in a slightly alkaline range (7.7-7.9). Pug-mills and high volume slurry pumps can be readily adapted for use in constructing and placing caps and creating Engineered Soils. Moreover, material on site or from a local sand supply can be used to create clay slurries and engineered soils. Clay materials used in cap construction are likewise readily available commercially. As a result, the clay slurry system is very cost effective compared to other capping systems, including the commonly used High Density Polyethylene (HDPE) liner systems.

  3. Kathryn Clay, Ph.D. Vice President of Policy Strategy American...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Remarks of Kathryn Clay, Ph.D. Vice President of Policy Strategy American Gas Association PUBLIC MEETING ON ENERGY INFRASTRUCTURE SITING DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY QUADRENNIAL ENERGY ...

  4. Evaluation of Used Fuel Disposition in Clay-Bearing Rock (Technical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... and Thermodynamic Database Development: Evaluation Strategy, Modeling Tools, First-Principles Modeling of Clay, and Sorption Database Assessment;ANL Mixed Potential Model For Used Fuel ...

  5. Clay Sell Sworn in as Deputy Secretary of Energy | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Clay Sell Sworn in as Deputy Secretary of Energy Clay Sell Sworn in as Deputy Secretary of Energy March 21, 2005 - 10:53am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - Jeffrey Clay Sell was sworn in today as Deputy Secretary of Energy at a small ceremony held at the Department of Energy headquarters in Washington, DC. Mr. Sell was sworn in by Energy Secretary Samuel W. Bodman after being unanimously confirmed by the United States Senate on Thursday, March 17, 2005. "Clay brings a tremendous amount of knowledge

  6. Diagenesis and clay mineral formation at Gale Crater, Mars

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bridges, J. C.; Schwenzer, S. P.; Leveille, R.; Westall, F.; Wiens, R. C.; Mangold, N.; Bristow, T.; Edwards, P.; Berger, G.

    2015-01-18

    The Mars Science Laboratory rover Curiosity found host rocks of basaltic composition and alteration assemblages containing clay minerals at Yellowknife Bay, Gale Crater. On the basis of the observed host rock and alteration minerals, we present results of equilibrium thermochemical modeling of the Sheepbed mudstones of Yellowknife Bay in order to constrain the formation conditions of its secondary mineral assemblage. Building on conclusions from sedimentary observations by the Mars Science Laboratory team, we assume diagenetic, in situ alteration. The modeling shows that the mineral assemblage formed by the reaction of a CO₂-poor and oxidizing, dilute aqueous solution (Gale Portage Water)more » in an open system with the Fe-rich basaltic-composition sedimentary rocks at 10–50°C and water/rock ratio (mass of rock reacted with the starting fluid) of 100–1000, pH of ~7.5–12. Model alteration assemblages predominantly contain phyllosilicates (Fe-smectite, chlorite), the bulk composition of a mixture of which is close to that of saponite inferred from Chemistry and Mineralogy data and to that of saponite observed in the nakhlite Martian meteorites and terrestrial analogues. To match the observed clay mineral chemistry, inhomogeneous dissolution dominated by the amorphous phase and olivine is required. We therefore deduce a dissolving composition of approximately 70% amorphous material, with 20% olivine, and 10% whole rock component.« less

  7. Formulation of cracking catalyst based on zeolite and natural clays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aliev, R.R.; Lupina, M.I.

    1995-11-01

    Domestically manufactured cracking catalysts are based on a synthetic amorphous aluminosilicate matrix and Y zeolite. A multistage {open_quotes}gel{close_quotes} technology is used in manufacturing the catalysts. The process includes mixing solutions of sodium silicate and acidic aluminum sulfate, forming, syneresis, and activation of the beaded gel. In the manufacture of bead catalysts, the next steps in the process are washing, drying, and calcining; in the manufacture of microbead catalysts, the next steps are dispersion and formation of a hydrogel slurry, spray-drying, and calcining. The Y zeolite is either introduced into the alumina-silica sol in the stage of forming the beads, or introduced in the dispersion stage. With the aim of developing an active and selective cracking catalyst based on Y zeolite and natural clays, with improved physicomechanical properties, the authors carried out a series of studies, obtaining results that are set forth in the present article.

  8. Radiolysis of alanine adsorbed in a clay mineral

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aguilar-Ovando, Ellen Y.; Negron-Mendoza, Alicia

    2013-07-03

    Optical activity in molecules is a chemical characteristic of living beings. In this work, we examine the hypothesis of the influence of different mineral surfaces on the development of a specific chirality in organic molecules when subjected to conditions simulating the primitive Earth during the period of chemical evolution. By using X-ray diffraction techniques and HPLC/ELSD to analyze aqueous suspensions of amino acids adsorbed on minerals irradiated in different doses with a cobalt-60 gamma source, the experiments attempt to prove the hypothesis that some solid surfaces (like clays and meteorite rocks) may have a concentration capacity and protective role against external sources of ionizing radiation (specifically {gamma}-ray) for some organic compounds (like some amino acids) adsorbed on them. Preliminary results show a slight difference in the adsorption and radiolysis of the D-and L-alanine.

  9. Lanthanides-clay nanocomposites: Synthesis, characterization and optical properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Celedon, Salvador; Quiroz, Carolina; Gonzalez, Guillermo; Sotomayor Torres, Clivia M.; Benavente, Eglantina

    2009-05-06

    Complexes of Europium(III) and Terbium(III) with 2,2-bipyridine and 1,10-phenanthroline were inserted into Na-bentonite by ion exchange reactions at room temperature. The products display interlaminar distances and stoichiometries in agreement with the ion exchange capacity and the interlayer space available in the clay. The optical properties of the intercalates, being qualitatively similar to those of the free complexes, are additionally improved with respect to exchange processes with the medium, especially in a moist environment. The protection again hydrolysis, together with the intensity of the optical transition {sup 5}D{sub 0}-{sup 5}F{sub 2} observed in the nanocomposite, makes these products promising for the development of novel optical materials.

  10. Characterization of Interlayer Cs+ in Clay Samples Using Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry with Laser Sample Modification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G. S. Groenewold; R. Avci; C. Karahan; K. Lefebre; R. V. Fox; M. M. Cortez; A. K. Gianotto; J. Sunner; W. L. Manner

    2004-04-01

    Ultraviolet laser irradiation was used to greatly enhance the secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) detection of Cs+ adsorbed to soil consisting of clay and quartz. Imaging SIMS showed that the enhancement of the Cs+ signal was spatially heterogeneous: the intensity of the Cs+ peak was increased by factors up to 100 for some particles but not at all for others. Analysis of standard clay samples exposed to Cs+ showed a variable response to laser irradiation depending on the type of clay analyzed. The Cs+ abundance was significantly enhanced when Cs+-exposed montmorillonite was irradiated and then analyzed using SIMS, which contrasted with the behavior of Cs+-exposed kaolinite, which displayed no Cs+ enhancement. Exposed illitic clays displayed modest enhancement of Cs+ upon laser irradiation, intermediate between that of kaolinite and montmorillonite. The results for Cs+ were rationalized in terms of adsorption to interlayer sites within the montmorillonite, which is an expandable phyllosilicate. In these locations, Cs+ was not initially detectable using SIMS. Upon irradiation, Cs+ was thermally redistributed, which enabled detection using SIMS. Since neither the illite nor the kaolinite is an expandable clay, adsorption to inner-layer sites does not occur, and either modest or no laser enhancement of the Cs+ signal is observed. Laser irradiation also produced unexpected enhancement of Ti+ from illite and kaolinite clays that contained small quantities of Ti, which indicates the presence of microscopic titanium oxide phases in the clay materials.

  11. Mineralogical evaluation and industrial applications of the Triassic clay deposits, Southern Tunisia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baccour, H. Medhioub, M.; Jamoussi, F.; Mhiri, T.; Daoud, A.

    2008-11-15

    This study deals with the mineralogical and thermal analysis of Triassic clays in the south-Eastern Tunisia (Medenine area) in order to use them in the faience ceramic. That is why the study had recourse to several quantitative and qualitative research instruments: chemical analysis, mineralogical study, thermal analyses and analyses of geotechnical traits. The data collected from these techniques show that illite and kaolinite are the major clay phases. The accessory minerals detected in powdered rock are; quartz, dolomite and hematite. Geotechnical characterization was carried out on the three representative mixtures of Triassic clay samples. Each mixture is fired at three different temperatures 850,900 and 950 deg. C. Firing characteristics (shrinkage, water absorption, and mechanical resistance to the inflection) were measured and the neomineralization processes were investigated principally by X-ray diffraction. At the end of this study, one can affirm that these clays have qualities necessary for the manufacture of faience ceramic and earthenware production.

  12. Clay Electric Cooperative, Inc- Energy Smart Solar Water Heater Rebate Program

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Clay Electric Cooperative (CEC) provides a rebate of $0.01 per BTU output to its residential members when they purchase qualified solar water heaters. This rebate is capped at 60,000 BTUs per...

  13. Spherules from the Cretaceous/Tertiary boundary clay at Gubbio, Italy: the problem of outcrop contamination

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Montanari, A.

    1986-12-01

    Surficial outcrop contamination has occurred in some well-known stratigraphic sections of carbonate rocks in the northern Apennines. A critical case involves several contaminated clay partings, including the Cretaceous/Tertiary boundary clay in the classic Bottaccione section near Gubbio, Italy. These clay layers contain shiny spherules which, in several recent studies, have been said to consist of volcanic glass and have been used to support the hypothesis that the terminal Cretaceous mass extinction was caused by widespread volcanism. Laboratory tests, however, indicate that these shiny spherules are made of HF-insoluble and combustible material and are therefore of recent biological origin. These objects were introduced into the Cretaceous/Tertiary boundary clay and other clay layers from the surrounding soil along with abundant detrital contaminants derived from erosion of the middle Miocene flysch exposed at the head of the Bottaccione Gorge. They are completely different from the altered and flattened microtektitelike spheroids that are found only in the iridium-rich Cretaceous/Tertiary boundary clay and that provide strong evidence for a large impact.

  14. Formation of hydrocarbons from acid-Clay suspensions by gamma irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cruz-Castaneda, J.; Negron-Mendoza, A.; Ramos-Bernal, S.

    2013-07-03

    The adsorption of certain organic compounds by clays gives rise to the transformation of the adsorbate through the action of the clays. This phenomenon can be enhanced using ionizing radiation. In this context, these kinds of reactions play an important role in many natural and industrial processes. For example, in oil and gas exploration, the source and trap of petroleum hydrocarbons is frequently clay-rich rocks. Clay-water-based muds are also seen as environmentally friendly alternatives to toxic oil-based fluids. The principal processes that occur in sediments are usually held to be of bacterial action and thermal transformation, which may include thermally induced catalytic alteration of the organic debris. On the other hand, radioactive materials are widely distributed throughout Earth. They were more abundant in the past, but are present in petroleum reservoirs. Their presence induced radioactive bombardment, which may have altered these sediments. This important subject has not been extensively studied. The aim of this work is to study the behavior of fatty acids-like behenic acid-and dicarboxylic acids-like fumaric acid-as model compounds, which are adsorbed in a clay mineral (Na-montmorillonite) and exposed to gamma radiation. The results show that the radiation-induced decomposition of the clay-acid system goes along a definitive path (oxidation), rather than following several modes of simultaneous decomposition, as happens in radiolysis without clay or by heating the system. The main radiolytic products for fatty acids are their corresponding hydrocarbons, with one C-atom less than the original acid.

  15. Materials derived from synthetic organo-clay complexes as novel hydrodesulfurization catalyst supports.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carrado, K. A.; Marshall, C. L.; Brenner, J. R.; Song, K.; Chemistry

    1998-01-01

    A series of mesoporous synthetic organo-clay complexes has been prepared by hydrothermal crystallization of gels containing silica, magnesium hydroxide, lithium fluoride, and an organic of choice, followed by calcination to remove the organics. The organic serves to impart structural order to the inorganic network that does not disappear upon its removal. The choice of organic modifier can be used to control the pore structure of the resulting mesoporous materials. Pore size distributions appear in some cases to be related to the type of polymer packing upon clay formation in situ. These materials are being explored as Co Mo hydrodesulfurization (HDS) catalyst supports. Preliminary HDS results show performance commensurate with commercial catalysis for the mesoporous materials when a model heavy oil feed is used (1 wt% S as dibenzothiophene in hexadecane). Temperature programmed reduction experiments of used catalysts suggest a relationship between HDS activity and ease of reduction of the CoMo/clay catalysts. Reactivity of the CoMo clay also correlates with the percentage of mesopore volume remaining after reaction. Losses in mesopore volume are largely recouped by recalcination, suggesting that reversible coke is formed inside the pore structure of clays faster than inside conventional alumina.

  16. Report on Modeling Coupled Processes in the Near Field of a Clay Repository

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Clay/shale has been considered as potential host rock for geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste throughout the world. Coupled thermal, hydrological, mechanical, and chemical (THMC) processes have a significant impact on the long-term safety of a clay repository. This report documents results from three R&D activities: (1) implementation and validation of constitutive relationships, (2) development of a discrete fracture network (DFN) model for investigating coupled processes in the excavation damaged zone, and (3) development of a THM model for the Full-Scale Emplacement Experiment tests at Mont Terri, Switzerland, for the purpose of model validation. One major goal is to provide a better understanding of the evolution of the excavation damage zone in clay repositories.

  17. Dynamics of confined reactive water in smectite clay-zeolite composites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pitman, Michael C.; Van Duin, Adri C. T.

    2012-01-01

    The dynamics of water confined to mesoporous regions in minerals such as swelling clays and zeolites is fundamental to a wide range of resource management issues impacting many processes on a global scale, including radioactive waste containment, desalination, and enhanced oil recovery. Large-scale atomic models of freely diffusing multilayer smectite particles at low hydration confined in a silicalite cage are used to investigate water dynamics in the composite environment with the ReaxFF reactive force field over a temperature range of 300 647 K. The reactive capability of the force field enabled a range of relevant surface chemistry to emerge, including acid/base equilibria in the interlayer calcium hydrates and silanol formation on the edges of the clay and inner surface of the zeolite housing. After annealing, the resulting clay models exhibit both mono- and bilayer hydration structures. Clay surface hydration redistributed markedly and yielded to silicalite water loading. We find that the absolute rates and temperature dependence of water dynamics compare well to neutron scattering data and pulse field gradient measures from relevant samples of Ca-montmorillonite and silicalite, respectively. Within an atomistic, reactive context, our results distinguish water dynamics in the interlayer Ca(OH)2 nH2O environment from water flowing over the clay surface, and from water diffusing within silicalite. We find that the diffusion of water when complexed to Ca hydrates is considerably slower than freely diffusing water over the clay surface, and the reduced mobility is well described by a difference in the Arrhenius pre-exponential factor rather than a change in activation energy.

  18. Dynamics of confined reactive water in Smectic clay-zeolite composites.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pitman, Michael C.; Van Duin, Adri C. T.

    2012-01-01

    The dynamics of water confined to mesoporous regions in minerals such as swelling clays and zeolites is fundamental to a wide range of resource management issues impacting many processes on a global scale, including radioactive waste containment, desalination, and enhanced oil recovery. Large-scale atomic models of freely diffusing multilayer smectite particles at low hydration confined in a silicalite cage are used to investigate water dynamics in the composite environment with the ReaxFF reactive force field over a temperature range of 300 647 K. The reactive capability of the force field enabled a range of relevant surface chemistry to emerge, including acid/base equilibria in the interlayer calcium hydrates and silanol formation on the edges of the clay and inner surface of the zeolite housing. After annealing, the resulting clay models exhibit both mono- and bilayer hydration structures. Clay surface hydration redistributed markedly and yielded to silicalite water loading. We find that the absolute rates and temperature dependence of water dynamics compare well to neutron scattering data and pulse field gradient measures from relevant samples of Ca-montmorillonite and silicalite, respectively. Within an atomistic, reactive context, our results distinguish water dynamics in the interlayer Ca(OH)2 nH2O environment from water flowing over the clay surface, and from water diffusing within silicalite. We find that the diffusion of water when complexed to Ca hydrates is considerably slower than freely diffusing water over the clay surface, and the reduced mobility is well described by a difference in the Arrhenius pre-exponential factor rather than a change in activation energy.

  19. In situ synthesis of polymer-clay nanocomposites from silicate gels.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carrado, K. A.; Xu, L.; Chemistry

    1998-01-01

    Polymer-containing silicate gels were hydrothermally crystallized to form layered magnesium silicate hectorite clays containing polymers that are incorporated in situ. Gels consist of silica sol, magnesium hydroxide sol, lithium fluoride, and the polymer of choice. Dilute solutions of gel in water are refluxed for various lengths of time and then isolated via centrifugation, washed, and air-dried. Polymer loadings up to 86% were attained by adding more polymer to the solutions after 2-day reaction times, reacting for another 24 h, and continuing this process prior to isolation. Polyaniline (PANI)- and polyacrylonitrile (PACN)-clay samples contain up to 57% and 76% polymer, respectively, after just one sequential addition at high polymer loading. Series of PANI-, PACN-, poly(vinylpyrrolidone) (PVP)-, and hydroxypropylmethylcellulose (HPMC)-clays also were prepared by several sequential additions of lower polymer loading to the silicate gel during crystallization. Final polymer loadings were determined by thermal analysis. Basal spacings between clay interlayers were measured by X-ray powder diffraction for all samples. Increases in polymer loadings and basal spacings were observed for all the neutral polymers studied, until or unless delamination occurred. Delamination was evident for PACN- and PANI-clay nanocomposites. The highest loadings were observed for the PACN-clays, up to 86%. For the cationic polymer polydimethyldiallylammonium chloride, however, the loading could not be increased beyond about 20%. This is due to electrostatic interactions that balance the negatively charged sites on the silicate lattice with those on the cationic polymer chain. Beyond charge compensation, there is no driving force for further incorporation. Charge compensation in the case of the neutral polymers is attained by interlayer lithium(I) cations.

  20. BooNE: Booster Neutrino Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    expert on the subject matter shown in the plot. Plots marked RESTRICTED are approved for public viewing but are not to be distributed. A few examples of where these plots may not...

  1. BooNE: Booster Neutrino Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Some neutrino interactions produce the neutrino's namesake lepton (electron, muon, or tau); this allows the type of neutrino to be tagged. Since neutrino oscillation searches...

  2. BooNE: Booster Neutrino Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Data Releases This page provides MiniBooNE data (histograms, error matrices, ntuples, etc) released in association with particular publications. Only the subset of MiniBooNE papers...

  3. BooNE: Booster Neutrino Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

  4. BooNE: Booster Neutrino Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MiniBooNE-darkmatter collaboration Original MiniBooNE collaboration From script reading a simple data base, last updated 2008. from inspirehep.net Booster Neutrino...

  5. BooNE: Booster Neutrino Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    & Events Milestones Latest Beam Progress

  6. BooNE: Booster Neutrino Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    from major neutrino experiments and important results in neutrino physics. Includes java applets. Janet's Neutrino Oscillation Page More extensive material about neutrino...

  7. BooNE: Booster Neutrino Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    includes scientists from national laboratories, research universities, predominantly undergraduate institutions, as well as a high school physics teacher. List of Collaborators...

  8. Special purpose revenue bonds: boon or bane

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taussig, R.A.

    1985-02-21

    Utilities are looking with increasing interest at the advantages offered by industrial development bonds (IDBs), a financing tool made available to investor-owned utilities through provision of federal law. IDBs are not without problems, however, particularly if regulatory agencies account for them improperly in rate cases. Regulatory agencies should allow returns based on the funds-used rather than the total-funds approach or the tariffs will not compensate investors adequately. The author examines both the risks to be avoided and the benefits when using IDBs.

  9. BooNE: Booster Neutrino Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (numbers, plots, details) of the MiniBooNE experiment and analysis pieces. Images are linked in their own page with captions. Additional resources are the Talks, Slides and...

  10. BooNE: Booster Neutrino Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sept. 3, 1999 - The MiniBooNE Detector: The Teletubby Design 1998: Oct. 30, 1998 - Good Physics in a Small Package June 5, 1998 - MiniBooNE Faces the PAC May 1, 1998 - The...

  11. BooNE: Booster Neutrino Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Start the tour here... This tour was created by Jessica Falco in 2000 and updated by Kelly O'Hear in 2002. Jessica and Kelly were high school students who spent a summer at...

  12. BooNE: Booster Neutrino Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Articles FermiNews Fermilab's biweekly magazine (several stories) Beam Line: Special Neutrino Issue A special issue of SLAC's quarterly magazine. Earth & Sky "Catching Ghost Particles": Interview with Janet Conrad Columbia Magazine "The Nature of the Neutrino": MiniBooNE and neutrinos The Los Angeles Times "It's No Small Matter": K. C. Cole's article detailing her summer 2003 stint at Fermilab working on MiniBooNE [text only]

  13. BooNE: Booster Neutrino Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Data Releases This page provides MiniBooNE data (histograms, error matrices, ntuples, etc) released in association with particular publications. Only the subset of MiniBooNE papers with released data are listed here. Refer to the Publications page for a complete list of MiniBooNE publications. Other MiniBooNE Data Releases: Data Released with A.A. Aguilar-Arevalo et al., "First Measurement of the Muon Antineutrino Double-Differential Charged-Current Quasielastic Cross section",

  14. BooNE: Booster Neutrino Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Milestones 2008: January 1 1E21 protons on target recorded by MiniBooNE 2007: April 10 25m absorber repaired 2006: August 23 9e16 protons delivered in a single hour (Booster champagne goal) January 18 first antineutrino beam 2004: April 26 Record week (04/19-04/26) 6.83E18 protons delivered. 2003: March 28 Record day: 9.6E17 protons delivered March 18 Record day: 8.18E17 protons delivered March 06 5.5E17 protons delivered to MiniBooNE in 1 hour. (passed the official BD 5E16 milestone) March 01

  15. BooNE: Booster Neutrino Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Progress in Delivering Beam to MiniBooNE

  16. BooNE: Booster Neutrino Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Author Resources The following is a randomly ordered set of useful resources for people writing MiniBooNE publications:- Have a journal in mind when first putting together the paper. Each journal has LaTeX style files that can be downloaded from their web pages. There is a nice little LaTeX macro that will put line numbers by each line of your document. This makes it much easier for people to feedback comments on the paper. To use it just put \RequirePackage{lineno} just before the

  17. BooNE: Booster Neutrino Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Password protected link to page containing future talks schedule and unassigned talks list. Password protected link to seminar schedule. Conference talks Other talks Proceedings ...

  18. BooNE: Booster Neutrino Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    at work Most of the links on this page are password protected. Operational Operations Beam Line Detector Calibrations Analysis Teams Beam Dump Nue Nucleon-DarkMatter ...

  19. BooNE: Booster Neutrino Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    elastic cross-section paper is on the archive (arXiv:1309.7257) and has been published in Phys. Rev. D91, 012004 (2015). MiniBooNE's antineutrino charged current quasi-elastic...

  20. BooNE: Booster Neutrino Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Posters What's a Neutrino? How neutrinos fit into our understanding of the universe. Recipe for a Neutrino Beam Start with some protons... concocting the MiniBooNE beam. The...

  1. BooNE: Booster Neutrino Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    from one of the Fermilab proton accelerators -- the Booster -- are used to generate muon neutrinos, one of the three types of neutrinos presently known. In the first stage of...

  2. BooNE: Booster Neutrino Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Beamline Proton beam 8.89 GeV/c protons from the Fermilab Booster are incident on a beryllium target. The beam is modeled with measured mean position and angle with Gaussian smearing. MiniBooNE simulates the effects of varying the spread in the beam and different focus points of the beam. The typical proton beam contains 4 x 10¹² protons delivered in a spill approximately 1.6 µs in duration. The absolute number of protons on target (p.o.t) is measured by two toroids upstream of the target.

  3. BooNE: Booster Neutrino Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Calibration methods Laser Flasks Laser flasks in the tank emit isotropic light at a fixed wavelength. This is used to check the modeling of the different time components of light in the oil. image of laser light time components Muon Tracker Two hodoscope planes trigger muons that enter the tank. If the muon stops in one of 3 scintillation cubes, we know the distance it has travelled, and tag it with the decay michel electron. These cubes can be used to study the energy deposited by muons, as

  4. BooNE: Booster Neutrino Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cross Sections MiniBooNE's neutrino flux (with a mean energy of ~700 MeV) dictates the type of neutrino interactions the experiment sees. At these energies, quasi-elastic (QE) and single pion production processes dominate. For MiniBooNE, the contributions from multi-pion production and deep inelastic scattering (DIS) are small. image: neutrino cross sections vs energy There are several cross sections which contribute at these energies. Here is a plot of the charged current (CC) cross section

  5. BooNE: Booster Neutrino Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Detector The MiniBooNE tank is 12 m diameter sphere, filled with approximately 800 tons of mineral oil, CH2, which has a density of 0.845 ± 0.001 g/cm3. 1280 PMTs provide about 10% coverage of the inner tank region, and 240 PMTs cover the outer, optically isolated "veto" region in the last 1.3 m in the tank. Most of the tubes were recovered from LSND, and are 'old' tubes, some additional ones were bought for MiniBooNE, and are 'new'; differences in the new vs the old tube function are

  6. BooNE: Booster Neutrino Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Flux The MiniBooNE neutrino flux calculations are described in detail in PRD 79, 072002 (2009) and arXiv:0806.1449 General neutrino fluxes vs true neutrino energy, for MiniBooNE: image:muon neutrino flux image:electron neutrino flux image:final muon and electron neutrino fluxes π+ production Data sets: M.G. Catanesi et al. [HARP Collaboration], ``Measurement of the production cross-section of positive pions in the collision of 8.9-GeV/c protons on beryllium,'', arXiv:hep-ex/0702024 E910

  7. BooNE: Booster Neutrino Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Light propagation in mineral oil Though the dominant light observed in MiniBooNE is Cherenkov light, scintillation and fluorescence (here, reabsorbed Cherenkov light re-emitted) account for about 25% of the light. We model: scintillation light (yield, decay times, spectrum), fluorescence, scattering (Rayleigh, Raman), absorption, reflection (off tank walls, PMT faces) and PMT effects (single pe charge response). External measurements Scintillation from p beam (IUCF) Scintillation from cosmic mu

  8. BooNE: Booster Neutrino Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Particle Identification (PID) We use hit topology and timing to identify events. Particles produce Cherenkov light in our tank, as well as some scintillation light, dependent on particle type. Two independent methods to identify electron neutrinos in MiniBooNE: Boosted Decision Trees, and Track Based. The two methods use different event reconstruction fitters. Boosted Decision Trees (BDT) Decision trees are similar to neural nets, but don't suffer from the same pathologies. To form a decision

  9. BooNE: Booster Neutrino Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Civil Construction Pictures The civil construction required for the MiniBooNE experiment consists of two independent construction projects. The Detector Construction: This project was started on October 15, 1999. The 8-GeV Beamline and Target Hall: This project started on June 7, 2000.

  10. BooNE: Booster Neutrino Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Phys. Rev. D88, 032001 (2013), Result of the Week, Data Release G. Cheng et al., "Dual Baseline search for Muon Antineutrino Disappearance at 0.1

  11. Report on THMC Modeling of the Near Field Evolution of a Generic Clay Repository: Model Validation and Demonstration Rev 2

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Shale and clay-rich rock formations have been considered as potential host rocks for geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste throughout the world: modeling thermal, hydrological, mechanical, and chemical (THMC) of the near field of generic clay repository is discussed.

  12. Multiphase flow and multicomponent reactive transport model of the ventilation experiment in Opalinus clay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zheng, L.; Samper, J.; Montenegro, L.; Major, J.C.

    2008-10-15

    During the construction and operational phases of a high-level radioactive waste (HLW) repository constructed in a clay formation, ventilation of underground drifts will cause desaturation and oxidation of the rock. The Ventilation Experiment (VE) was performed in a 1.3 m diameter unlined horizontal microtunnel on Opalinus clay at Mont Terri underground research laboratory in Switzerland to evaluate the impact of desaturation on rock properties. A multiphase flow and reactive transport model of VE is presented here. The model accounts for liquid, vapor and air flow, evaporation/condensation and multicomponent reactive solute transport with kinetic dissolution of pyrite and siderite and local-equilibrium dissolution/precipitation of calcite, ferrihydrite, dolomite, gypsum and quartz. Model results reproduce measured vapor flow, liquid pressure and hydrochemical data and capture the trends of measured relative humidities, although such data are slightly overestimated near the rock interface due to uncertainties in the turbulence factor. Rock desaturation allows oxygen to diffuse into the rock and triggers pyrite oxidation, dissolution of calcite and siderite, precipitation of ferrihydrite, dolomite and gypsum and cation exchange. pH in the unsaturated rock varies from 7.8 to 8 and is buffered by calcite. Computed changes in the porosity and the permeability of Opalinus clay in the unsaturated zone caused by oxidation and mineral dissolution/precipitation are smaller than 5%. Therefore, rock properties are not expected to be affected significantly by ventilation of underground drifts during construction and operational phases of a HLW repository in clay.

  13. Unearthing the Antibacterial Mechanism of Medicinal Clay: A Geochemical Approach to Combating Antibiotic Resistance

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Morrison, Keith D.; Misra, Rajeev; Williams, Lynda B.

    2016-01-08

    Natural antibacterial clays, when hydrated and applied topically, kill human pathogens including antibiotic resistant strains proliferating worldwide. Only certain clays are bactericidal; those containing soluble reduced metals and expandable clay minerals that absorb cations, providing a capacity for extended metal release and production of toxic hydroxyl radicals. Here we show the critical antibacterial components are soluble Fe2+ and Al3+ that synergistically attack multiple cellular systems in pathogens normally growth-limited by Fe supply. This geochemical process is more effective than metal solutions alone and provides an alternative antibacterial strategy to traditional antibiotics. Advanced bioimaging methods and genetic show that Al3+ misfoldsmore » cell membrane proteins, while Fe2+ evokes membrane oxidation and enters the cytoplasm inflicting hydroxyl radical attack on intracellular proteins and DNA. The lethal reaction precipitates Fe3+-oxides as biomolecular damage proceeds. In conclusion, discovery of this bactericidal mechanism demonstrated by natural clays should guide designs of new mineral-based antibacterial agents.« less

  14. Clay mineralogy of Lower Cretaceous deep-sea fan sediments, western North Atlantic basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holmes, M.A.

    1986-05-01

    The Lower Cretaceous of the eastern North American continent was a time of extensive deltaic progradation. The effects of deltaic deposition on sedimentation in the western North Atlantic were unknown until May 1982, when, at Deep Sea Drilling Project Site 603 off Cape Hatteras, over 260 m of micaceous, muddy turbidites were recovered that correlate with deltaic progradation on eastern North America. The results of clay mineral studies from onshore and offshore equivalents indicate that during the Cretaceous, some sorting of clay minerals by transport processes occurred. Kaolinite tends to accumulate in continental environments, illite in transitional to marine environments, and smectite in deep sea sediments as pelagic clay. In the sediments from the western North Atlantic, illite tended to be more abundant in thick bedded sandy muds, whereas kaolinite tended to be more abundant in thin bedded muddy sands. Although the occurrence of illite and kaolinite in pelagic sediments indicates a general increased terrigenous influence, the results of this study indicate that these two clays behave independently in these sediments. The presence of large amounts of kaolinite at certain levels in these sediments corresponds to phases of maximum deep-sea fan development, and so indicates a more direct input of continental material, with less sorting of sediments by continental and shelf processes (pericontinental fractionation) prior to redeposition.

  15. Status of LANL investigations of temperature constraints on clay in repository environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caporuscio, Florie A; Cheshire, Michael C; Newell, Dennis L; McCarney, Mary Kate

    2012-08-22

    The Used Fuel Disposition (UFD) Campaign is presently evaluating various generic options for disposal of used fuel. The focus of this experimental work is to characterize and bound Engineered Barrier Systems (EBS) conditions in high heat load repositories. The UFD now has the ability to evaluate multiple EBS materials, waste containers, and rock types at higher heat loads and pressures (including deep boreholes). The geologic conditions now available to the U.S.A. and the international community for repositories include saturated and reduced water conditions, along with higher pressure and temperature (P, T) regimes. Chemical and structural changes to the clays, in either backfill/buffer or clay-rich host rock, may have significant effects on repository evolution. Reduction of smectite expansion capacity and rehydration potential due to heating could affect the isolation provided by EBS. Processes such as cementation by silica precipitation and authigenic illite could change the hydraulic and mechanical properties of clay-rich materials. Experimental studies of these repository conditions at high P,T have not been performed in the U.S. for decades and little has been done by the international community at high P,T. The experiments to be performed by LANL will focus on the importance of repository chemical and mineralogical conditions at elevated P,T conditions. This will provide input to the assessment of scientific basis for elevating the temperature limits in clay barriers.

  16. Mesoporous materials derived from synthetic organo-clays as novel hydrodesulfurization catalysts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carrado, K.A.; Marshall, C.L.; Brenner, J.R.

    1996-12-31

    Various pore size distributions are found for synthetic organo-clay complexes from which the organic portion has been removed via calcination. The clays are prepared by hydrothermal crystallization of gels containing silica, magnesium hydroxide, lithium fluoride, and an organic of choice. The organic serves to impart long-range structural order to the inorganic network that does not disappear upon its removal. Mesoporous materials are prepared from a host of organic modifiers. For example, pore diameters of 40-50{Angstrom} result from tetraethyl ammonium and celluloses, and polydimethyl diallyl ammonium imparts diameters of about 110{Angstrom} on average. These materials have begun to be explored as hydrodesulfurization (HDS) catalyst supports. Preliminary results show performance commensurate with commercial catalysts for the mesoporous materials when a model oil feed is used (1% dibenzothiophene in hexadecane). The target application is HDS of an actual heavy crude oil from California.

  17. In situ clay formation : evaluation of a proposed new technology for stable containment barriers.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nagy, Kathryn L.; DiGiovanni, Anthony Albert; Fredrich, Joanne T.

    2004-03-01

    Containment of chemical wastes in near-surface and repository environments is accomplished by designing engineered barriers to fluid flow. Containment barrier technologies such as clay liners, soil/bentonite slurry walls, soil/plastic walls, artificially grouted sediments and soils, and colloidal gelling materials are intended to stop fluid transport and prevent plume migration. However, despite their effectiveness in the short-term, all of these barriers exhibit geochemical or geomechanical instability over the long-term resulting in degradation of the barrier and its ability to contain waste. No technologically practical or economically affordable technologies or methods exist at present for accomplishing total remediation, contaminant removal, or destruction-degradation in situ. A new type of containment barrier with a potentially broad range of environmental stability and longevity could result in significant cost-savings. This report documents a research program designed to establish the viability of a proposed new type of containment barrier derived from in situ precipitation of clays in the pore space of contaminated soils or sediments. The concept builds upon technologies that exist for colloidal or gel stabilization. Clays have the advantages of being geologically compatible with the near-surface environment and naturally sorptive for a range of contaminants, and further, the precipitation of clays could result in reduced permeability and hydraulic conductivity, and increased mechanical stability through cementation of soil particles. While limited success was achieved under certain controlled laboratory conditions, the results did not warrant continuation to the field stage for multiple reasons, and the research program was thus concluded with Phase 2.

  18. Stereo soft x-ray microscopy and elemental mapping of hematite and clay suspensions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gleber, S.-C.; Thieme, J.; Chao, W.; Fischer, P.

    2008-09-01

    The spatial arrangements of hematite particles within aqueous soil and clay samples are investigated with soft X-ray microscopy, taking advantage of the elemental contrast at the Fe-L edge around E = 707 eV. In combination with stereo microscopy, information about spatial arrangements are revealed and correlated to electrostatic interactions of the different mixtures. Manipulation of a sample mounted to the microscope is possible and particles added while imaging can be detected.

  19. Effect of pH on the heavy metal-clay mineral interaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Altyn, O.; Oezbelge, H.O.; Dogu, T.; Oezbelge, T.A.

    1997-12-31

    Adsorption and ion exchange of Pb and Cd on the surface of kaolinite and montmorillonite were studied with a strong emphasis on the pH values of solutions containing heavy metal ions. The pH range studied was 2.5 - 9. For kaolinite at a clay/solution ratio of 1/10 (w/w), Pb removal changes from 20 to 30% for an initial Pb concentration of 1640 ppm, and Cd removal changes from 10 to 20% for an initial Cd concentration of 1809 ppm. Due to its high exchange capacity, montmorillonite can remove more heavy metal than kaolinite. Removal rates for montmorillonite can reach up to 90% for both Pb and Cd. In the pH range of 3-6, there is a plateau for the removal rates. At pH values higher than 6, removal seems to increase artificially due to the precipitation of heavy metals. Under similar conditions for both clays, the rate of removal of Pb is always higher than that of Cd. As the pH value decreases for montmorillonite, there is a strong tendency for decreased surface area and swelling, as indicated by BET surface area measurements, adsorbed layer thickness and pore size distribution data. In the range of pH values studied, X-ray diffraction analysis showed the appearance of a characteristic (001) peak for montmorillonite, indicating that the crystalline structure of the clay was intact during the experiments.

  20. Investigations of Near-Field Thermal-Hydrologic-Mechanical-Chemical Models for Radioactive Waste Disposal in Clay/Shale Rock

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, H.H.; Li, L.; Zheng, L.; Houseworth, J.E.; Rutqvist, J.

    2011-06-20

    Clay/shale has been considered as potential host rock for geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste throughout the world, because of its low permeability, low diffusion coefficient, high retention capacity for radionuclides, and capability to self-seal fractures. For example, Callovo-Oxfordian argillites at the Bure site, France (Fouche et al., 2004), Toarcian argillites at the Tournemire site, France (Patriarche et al., 2004), Opalinus Clay at the Mont Terri site, Switzerland (Meier et al., 2000), and Boom clay at the Mol site, Belgium (Barnichon and Volckaert, 2003) have all been under intensive scientific investigation (at both field and laboratory scales) for understanding a variety of rock properties and their relationships to flow and transport processes associated with geological disposal of radioactive waste. Figure 1-1 presents the distribution of clay/shale formations within the USA.

  1. Variations in clay mineralogy and sediment texture of salt marsh soils on the Eastern Shore of Virginia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robinson, S.E.; Furman, T. . Dept. of Environmental Sciences)

    1993-03-01

    On the Eastern Shore of VA, relative sea level rise has resulted in encroachment of marsh onto upland areas. The amount and type of sediment determines the morphologic environment of the system: lagoon, mudflat, low marsh, high marsh or upland. This research is part of a study to examine the relationship between marsh soil characteristics and the production of Spartina alterniflora. The productivity of marsh vegetation depends on the import and entrapment of sediments that maintain marsh elevation and control water and nutrient availability. This work focused on distribution patterns of sediment texture and mineralogy. One meter deep cores were taken at marsh sites with 10 cm intervals homogenized for analysis. In order to distinguish potential sediment sources, samples were also taken from upland soil pits on the mainland and dredged one-half mile seaward of the barrier islands. Samples have undergone size analysis with a hydrometer and the clay fraction has been analyzed by XRD. Results from the marsh surface indicate large variations in sediment texture, but only slight differences in clay mineralogy between marshes. Barrier island marshes contain a higher average sand content than mainland marshes because of their closer proximity to barrier island beaches and inputs from overwash deposits. The clay minerals found in all marsh surface deposits are illite and chlorite, indicative of oceanic clays. The clay mineralogy of upland soils (kaolinite, chlorite, illite, vermiculite mixed-layer clay) differs from marsh surface clays, indicating that recent sediment deposited on the marsh surface is no upland soil but rather material brought in through tidal inlets. The sediment texture and clay mineralogy at different depths varies as a function of the past geomorphic and depositional history of the site. These data will be used to determine the timing of marsh development on flooded upland sites and to determine the pre-Holocene source of inorganic sediment inputs.

  2. Molecular Simulation of Structure and Diffusion at Smectite-Water Interfaces: Using Expanded Clay Interlayers as Model Nanopores

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greathouse, Jeffery A.; Hart, David; Bowers, Geoffrey M.; Kirkpatrick, R. James; Cygan, Randall Timothy

    2015-07-20

    In geologic settings relevant to a number of extraction and potential sequestration processes, nanopores bounded by clay mineral surfaces play a critical role in the transport of aqueous species. Solution structure and dynamics at claywater interfaces are quite different from their bulk values, and the spatial extent of this disruption remains a topic of current interest. We have used molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the structure and diffusion of aqueous solutions in clay nanopores approximately 6 nm thick, comparing the effect of clay composition with model Na-hectorite and Na-montmorillonite surfaces. In addition to structural properties at the interface, water and ion diffusion coefficients were calculated within each aqueous layer at the interface, as well as in the central bulk-like region of the nanopore. The results show similar solution structure and diffusion properties at each surface, with subtle differences in sodium adsorption complexes and water structure in the first adsorbed layer due to different arrangements of layer hydroxyl groups in the two clay models. Interestingly, the extent of surface disruption on bulk-like solution structure and diffusion extends to only a few water layers. Additionally, a comparison of sodium ion residence times confirms similar behavior of inner-sphere and outer-sphere surface complexes at each clay surface, but ~1% of sodium ions adsorb in ditrigonal cavities on the hectorite surface. Thus, the presence of these anhydrous ions is consistent with highly immobile anhydrous ions seen in previous nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopic measurements of hectorite pastes.

  3. Synthesis and characterization of a PbO{sub 2}-clay nanocomposite: Removal of lead from water using montmorillonite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aroui, L.; Zerroual, L.; Boutahala, M.

    2012-02-15

    Graphical abstract: The replacement of Na by Pb in the interlayer space of the smectite leads to a decrease in the intensity of the the (0 0 1) reflection as the concentration of lead nitrate increases. A significant restructuring at the particle scale is observed leading probably to the exfoliation of the caly. In addition, the thermal behaviour of the montmorillonite samples with regard to their dehydration and dehydroxilation capacities is significantly influenced. This leads to a lowering of the water content and a decrease in the ionic conductivity of the clay. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In the clay, Pb replaces Na ions and a significant restructuring at the particle scale is observed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pb influenced significantly the thermal behaviour of the clay with regard to its dehydration. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In the interlayer space, the exchange of Na by Pb leads to a decrease in the protonic conductivity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A PbO{sub 2}-clay nanocomposite material with good conductivity is synthesized. -- Abstract: The aim of this paper is to present the results obtained with Pb(II) sorption on an Algerian Clay. The experiments were carried out using a batch process. Powder X-rays diffraction patterns (PXRD) prove that in the montmorillonite Pb replaces Na ions. A significant restructuring at the particle scale is observed leading to the disappearance of the d{sub 001} reflection of the clay at high concentrations of lead. The replacement of hydrated Na with Pb ions influenced significantly the thermal behaviour of the montmorillonite samples with regard to their dehydration and dehydroxilation capacities with a lowering of the water content. A PbO{sub 2}-clay composite material with good electrical conductivity is synthesized.

  4. Clay-sewage sludge co-pyrolysis. A TG-MS and Py-GC study on potential advantages afforded by the presence of clay in the pyrolysis of wastewater sewage sludge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ischia, Marco; Maschio, Roberto Dal; Grigiante, Maurizio; Baratieri, Marco

    2011-01-15

    Wastewater sewage sludge was co-pyrolyzed with a well characterized clay sample, in order to evaluate possible advantages in the thermal disposal process of solid waste. Characterization of the co-pyrolysis process was carried out both by thermogravimetric-mass spectrometric (TG-MS) analysis, and by reactor tests, using a lab-scale batch reactor equipped with a gas chromatograph for analysis of the evolved gas phase (Py-GC). Due to the presence of clay, two main effects were observed in the instrumental characterization of the process. Firstly, the clay surface catalyzed the pyrolysis reaction of the sludge, and secondly, the release of water from the clay, at temperatures of approx. 450-500 deg. C, enhanced gasification of part of carbon residue of the organic component of sludge following pyrolysis. Moreover, the solid residue remaining after pyrolysis process, composed of the inorganic component of sludge blended with clay, is characterized by good features for possible disposal by vitrification, yielding a vitreous matrix that immobilizes the hazardous heavy metals present in the sludge.

  5. Effects of biogenic silica on acoustic and physical properties of clay-rich marine sediments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tribble, J.S.; Mackenzie, F.T.; Urmos, J.; O'Brien, D.K.; Manghnani, M.H. )

    1992-06-01

    The physical properties of marine sediments are influenced by compaction and diagenesis during burial. Changes in mineralogy, chemistry, density, porosity, and microfabric all affect a sediment's acoustic and electrical properties. Sediments from the Japan Trench illustrate the dependence of physical properties on biogenic silica content. Increased opal-A content is correlated with increased porosity and decreased grain density and compressional velocity. Variations with depth in opal-A concentration are therefore reflected in highly variable and, at times, inverse velocity-depth gradients. The diagenetic conversion of opal-A to opal-CT and finally to quartz was investigated at a site in the San Miguel Gap, California. Distinct changes in microfabric, particularly in the porosity distribution, accompany the diagenetic reactions and contribute to a sharp velocity discontinuity at the depth of the opal-A to opal-CT conversion. Evaluation of this reaction at several sites indicates a systematic dependence on temperature and age in clay-rich and moderately siliceous sediments. In ocean margin regions, sediments are buried rapidly, and opal-A may be converted to opal-CT in less than 10 m.y. Temperatures of conversion range from 30{degree} to 50{degree}C. Much longer times (>40 m.y.) are required to complete the conversion in open ocean deposits which are exposed to temperatures less than 15{degree}C. In the absence of silica diagenesis, velocity-depth gradients of most clay-rich and moderately siliceous sediments fall in the narrow range of 0.15 to 0.25 km/s/km which brackets the gradient (0.18 km/s/km) determined for a type pelagic clay section. Relationships such as these can be useful in unraveling the history of a sediment sequence, including the evolution with time of reservoir properties and seismic signatures.

  6. Laboratory measurements of contaminant attenuation of uranium mill tailings leachates by sediments and clay liners

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Serne, R.J.; Peterson, S.R.; Gee, G.W.

    1983-04-01

    We discuss FY82 progress on the development of laboratory tools to aid in the prediction of migration potential of contaminants present in acidic uranium mill tailings leachate. Further, empirical data on trace metal and radionuclide migration through a clay liner are presented. Acidic uranium mill tailings solution from a Wyoming mill was percolated through a composite sediment called Morton Ranch Clay liner. These laboratory columns and subsequent sediment extraction data show: (1) As, Cr, Pb, Ag, Th and V migrate very slowly; (2) U, Cd, Ni, Zn, Fe, Mn and similar transition metals are initially immobilized during acid neutralization but later are remobilized as the tailings solution exhausts the clay liner's acid buffering capacity. Such metals remain immobilized as long as the effluent pH remains above a pH value of 4 to 4.5, but they become mobile once the effluent pH drops below this range; and (3) fractions of the Se and Mo present in the influent tailings solution are very mobile. Possible controlling mechanisms for the pH-dependent immobilization-mobilization of the trace metals are discussed. More study is required to understand the controlling mechanisms for Se and Mo and Ra for which data were not successfully collected. Using several column lengths (from 4.5 to 65 cm) and pore volume residence times (from 0.8 to 40 days) we found no significant differences in contaminant migration rates or types and extent of controlling processes. Thus, we conclude that the laboratory results may be capable of extrapolation to actual disposal site conditions.

  7. Inelastic neutron scattering and molecular simulation of the dynamics of interlayer water in smectite clay minerals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cygan, Randall T.; Daemen, Luke L.; Ilgen, Anastasia G.; Krumhansl, James L.; Nenoff, Tina M.

    2015-11-16

    The study of mineral–water interfaces is of great importance to a variety of applications including oil and gas extraction, gas subsurface storage, environmental contaminant treatment, and nuclear waste repositories. Understanding the fundamentals of that interface is key to the success of those applications. Confinement of water in the interlayer of smectite clay minerals provides a unique environment to examine the interactions among water molecules, interlayer cations, and clay mineral surfaces. Smectite minerals are characterized by a relatively low layer charge that allows the clay to swell with increasing water content. Montmorillonite and beidellite varieties of smectite were investigated to compare the impact of the location of layer charge on the interlayer structure and dynamics. Inelastic neutron scattering of hydrated and dehydrated cation-exchanged smectites was used to probe the dynamics of the interlayer water (200–900 cm–1 spectral region) and identify the shift in the librational edge as a function of the interlayer cation. Molecular dynamics simulations of equivalent phases and power spectra, derived from the resulting molecular trajectories, indicate a general shift in the librational behavior with interlayer cation that is generally consistent with the neutron scattering results for the monolayer hydrates. Both neutron scattering and power spectra exhibit librational structures affected by the location of layer charge and by the charge of the interlayer cation. Furthermore, divalent cations (Ba2+ and Mg2+) characterized by large hydration enthalpies typically exhibit multiple broad librational peaks compared to monovalent cations (Cs+ and Na+), which have relatively small hydration enthalpies.

  8. Inelastic neutron scattering and molecular simulation of the dynamics of interlayer water in smectite clay minerals

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Cygan, Randall T.; Daemen, Luke L.; Ilgen, Anastasia G.; Krumhansl, James L.; Nenoff, Tina M.

    2015-11-16

    The study of mineral–water interfaces is of great importance to a variety of applications including oil and gas extraction, gas subsurface storage, environmental contaminant treatment, and nuclear waste repositories. Understanding the fundamentals of that interface is key to the success of those applications. Confinement of water in the interlayer of smectite clay minerals provides a unique environment to examine the interactions among water molecules, interlayer cations, and clay mineral surfaces. Smectite minerals are characterized by a relatively low layer charge that allows the clay to swell with increasing water content. Montmorillonite and beidellite varieties of smectite were investigated to comparemore » the impact of the location of layer charge on the interlayer structure and dynamics. Inelastic neutron scattering of hydrated and dehydrated cation-exchanged smectites was used to probe the dynamics of the interlayer water (200–900 cm–1 spectral region) and identify the shift in the librational edge as a function of the interlayer cation. Molecular dynamics simulations of equivalent phases and power spectra, derived from the resulting molecular trajectories, indicate a general shift in the librational behavior with interlayer cation that is generally consistent with the neutron scattering results for the monolayer hydrates. Both neutron scattering and power spectra exhibit librational structures affected by the location of layer charge and by the charge of the interlayer cation. Furthermore, divalent cations (Ba2+ and Mg2+) characterized by large hydration enthalpies typically exhibit multiple broad librational peaks compared to monovalent cations (Cs+ and Na+), which have relatively small hydration enthalpies.« less

  9. GLADY CASSIT Y VANDALIA MURPHY CR EEK BU CKHN-CENT URY CLAY

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    GLADY CASSIT Y VANDALIA MURPHY CR EEK BU CKHN-CENT URY CLAY GLENVILLE N MINNORA JARVISVILLE FAR MINGTON PH ILIPPI BELIN GT ON WAYN ESBUR G PR UNT Y GLENVILLE S CAVE RUN TAYLOR DRAIN ROSEDALE ST MPT-N RMNT-SHK WESTON-JAN E LEW SWN DL-WID EN VADIS STANL EY DEKALB UNION TALLM AN SVILL E ASPINALL-FIN ST ER ZOLLARSVILLE WILBU R RAMSEY HEATER S BR IDGEPORT-PRUNT YTOWN ALEXAND ER LILLY FORK SH ERMAN HIRAM ST FK-BLST N CK BU RNS CH APEL S BR WN -LUM BER PORT CON INGS PR ATT BOSWELL REVEL ELK C REEK

  10. Molecular simulation of structure and diffusion at smectite-water interfaces: Using expanded clay interlayers as model nanopores

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greathouse, Jeffery A.; Hart, David; Bowers, Geoffrey M.; Kirkpatrick, R. James; Cygan, Randall Timothy

    2015-07-20

    In geologic settings relevant to a number of extraction and potential sequestration processes, nanopores bounded by clay mineral surfaces play a critical role in the transport of aqueous species. Solution structure and dynamics at clay–water interfaces are quite different from their bulk values, and the spatial extent of this disruption remains a topic of current interest. We have used molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the structure and diffusion of aqueous solutions in clay nanopores approximately 6 nm thick, comparing the effect of clay composition with model Na-hectorite and Na-montmorillonite surfaces. In addition to structural properties at the interface, water and ion diffusion coefficients were calculated within each aqueous layer at the interface, as well as in the central bulk-like region of the nanopore. The results show similar solution structure and diffusion properties at each surface, with subtle differences in sodium adsorption complexes and water structure in the first adsorbed layer due to different arrangements of layer hydroxyl groups in the two clay models. Interestingly, the extent of surface disruption on bulk-like solution structure and diffusion extends to only a few water layers. Additionally, a comparison of sodium ion residence times confirms similar behavior of inner-sphere and outer-sphere surface complexes at each clay surface, but ~1% of sodium ions adsorb in ditrigonal cavities on the hectorite surface. Thus, the presence of these anhydrous ions is consistent with highly immobile anhydrous ions seen in previous nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopic measurements of hectorite pastes.

  11. Steep-Slope Assembly Testing of Clay and Concrete Tile With and Without Cool Pigmented Colors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, William A

    2005-11-01

    Cool color pigments and sub-tile venting of clay and concrete tile roofs significantly impact the heat flow crossing the roof deck of a steep-slope roof. Field measures for the tile roofs revealed a 70% drop in the peak heat flow crossing the deck as compared to a direct-nailed asphalt shingle roof. The Tile Roofing Institute (TRI) and its affiliate members are keenly interested in documenting the magnitude of the drop for obtaining solar reflectance credits with state and federal "cool roof" building efficiency standards. Tile roofs are direct-nailed or are attached to a deck with batten or batten and counter-batten construction. S-Misson clay and concrete tile roofs, a medium-profile concrete tile roof, and a flat slate tile roof were installed on fully nstrumented attic test assemblies. Temperature measures of the roof, deck, attic, and ceiling, heat flows, solar reflectance, thermal emittance, and the ambient weather were recorded for each of the tile roofs and also on an adjacent attic cavity covered with a conventional pigmented and directnailed asphalt shingle roof. ORNL measured the tile's underside temperature and the bulk air temperature and heat flows just underneath the tile for batten and counter-batten tile systems and compared the results to the conventional asphalt shingle.

  12. Characterization of Two Different Clay Materials by Thermogravimetry (TG), Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC), Dilatometry (DIL) and Mass Spectrometry (MS) - 12215

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Post, Ekkehard; Henderson, Jack B.

    2012-07-01

    An illitic clay containing higher amounts of organic materials was investigated by dilatometry, thermogravimetry and differential scanning calorimetric. The evolved gases were studied during simultaneous TG-DSC (STA) and dilatometer measurements with simultaneous mass spectrometry in inert gas and oxidizing atmosphere. The dilatometer results were compared with the STA-MS results which confirmed and explained the reactions found during heating of the clay, like dehydration, dehydroxylation, shrinkage, sintering, quartz phase transition, combustion or pyrolysis of organics and the solid state reactions forming meta-kaolinite and mullite. The high amount of organic material effects in inert gas atmosphere most probably a reduction of the oxides which leads to a higher mass loss than in oxidizing atmosphere. Due to this reduction an additional CO{sub 2} emission at around 1000 deg. C was detected which did not occur in oxidizing atmosphere. Furthermore TG-MS results of a clay containing alkali nitrates show that during heating, in addition to water and CO{sub 2}, NO and NO{sub 2} are also evolved, leading to additional mass loss steps. These types of clays showed water loss starting around 100 deg. C or even earlier. This relative small mass loss affects only less shrinkage during the expansion of the sample. The dehydroxylation and the high crystalline quartz content result in considerable shrinkage and expansion of the clay. During the usual solid state reaction where the clay structure collapses, the remaining material finally shrinks down to a so-called clinker. With the help of MS the TG steps can be better interpreted as the evolved gases are identified. With the help of the MS it is possible to distinguish between CO{sub 2} and water (carbonate decomposition, oxidation of organics or dehydration/dehydroxylation). The MS also clearly shows that mass number 44 is found during the TG step of the illitic clay at about 900 deg. C in inert gas, which was interpreted

  13. CO2 Storage by Sorption on Organic Matter and Clay in Gas Shale

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bacon, Diana H.; Yonkofski, Catherine MR; Schaef, Herbert T.; White, Mark D.; McGrail, B. Peter

    2015-10-10

    Simulations of methane production and supercritical carbon dioxide injection were developed that consider competitive adsorption of CH4 and CO2 on both organic matter and montmorillonite. The results were used to assess the potential for storage of CO2 in a hydraulically fractured shale gas reservoir and for enhanced recovery of CH4. Assuming equal volume fractions of organic matter and montmorillonite, amounts of CO2 adsorbed on both materials were comparable, while methane desorption was from clays was two times greater than desorption from organic material. The most successful strategy considered CO2 injection from a separate well and enhanced methane recovery by 73%, while storing 240 kmt of CO2.

  14. Molecular simulation of structure and diffusion at smectite-water interfaces: Using expanded clay interlayers as model nanopores

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Greathouse, Jeffery A.; Hart, David; Bowers, Geoffrey M.; Kirkpatrick, R. James; Cygan, Randall Timothy

    2015-07-20

    In geologic settings relevant to a number of extraction and potential sequestration processes, nanopores bounded by clay mineral surfaces play a critical role in the transport of aqueous species. Solution structure and dynamics at clay–water interfaces are quite different from their bulk values, and the spatial extent of this disruption remains a topic of current interest. We have used molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the structure and diffusion of aqueous solutions in clay nanopores approximately 6 nm thick, comparing the effect of clay composition with model Na-hectorite and Na-montmorillonite surfaces. In addition to structural properties at the interface, water andmore » ion diffusion coefficients were calculated within each aqueous layer at the interface, as well as in the central bulk-like region of the nanopore. The results show similar solution structure and diffusion properties at each surface, with subtle differences in sodium adsorption complexes and water structure in the first adsorbed layer due to different arrangements of layer hydroxyl groups in the two clay models. Interestingly, the extent of surface disruption on bulk-like solution structure and diffusion extends to only a few water layers. Additionally, a comparison of sodium ion residence times confirms similar behavior of inner-sphere and outer-sphere surface complexes at each clay surface, but ~1% of sodium ions adsorb in ditrigonal cavities on the hectorite surface. Thus, the presence of these anhydrous ions is consistent with highly immobile anhydrous ions seen in previous nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopic measurements of hectorite pastes.« less

  15. Replacemernt of thermally produced calcined clay with chemically structured pigments and methods for the same, quarterly report, January 1, 1995-April 1, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whalen-Shaw, M.

    1995-04-25

    The business objective is to manufacture an economically viable chemically structured clay to replace thermally structured calcined clay. The technology will provide substantial benefit in paper coating. The structured pigment containing 90% clay and 10% TiO2 vs the loose blend of these materials as a filler for paper was evaluated. A plan to improve the permanence of the structured pigment using dual functional dispersed pigments is in place. The cationic dispersant for TiO2 will also be a binder. Spray drying will be use to fix the structure of the internally bound structured pigment.

  16. Capillary suction-time tests on selected clays and shales. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hart, K.M.

    1989-05-01

    Shale stability has been an ongoing problem in the drilling of oil wells. The Capillary Suction Time test is simple and easy to use, allowing operators to conduct the test at the rigsite. However because of difficulty in reproducing results, the test should be used only qualitatively. The CST, along with the Methylene Blue, Specific Surface Area and Ensilin tests, accurately predicts shale swelling and dispersion. The tests have the added advantage of being able to be conducted relatively quickly. These tests could be carried out at the rigsite while the drilling is taking place. The experiments conducted also demonstrated the usefulness of KCL as an inhibitor of shale swelling and dispersion. From the CST data, it can be seen that KCL concentrations as low as 0.5% are effective in controlling the swelling of Phillips Ekofisk, Phillips Andrews County, Texaco Mississippi Canyon and Pierre Texaco. However a greater concentration of KCL is required to inhibit the swelling of Gold Seal Bentonite, Standard Arizona, Standard Wyoming and Standard Texas. It is recommended that more concentrations of KCL be tested of the high swelling clays to determine the minimum concentration required to inhibit swelling and dispersion.

  17. Swelling properties of montmorillonite and beidellite clay minerals from molecular simulation: Comparison of temperature interlayer cation, and charge location effects

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Teich-McGoldrick, Stephanie L.; Greathouse, Jeffery A.; Jove-Colon, Carlos F.; Cygan, Randall Timothy

    2015-08-27

    In this study, the swelling properties of smectite clay minerals are relevant to many engineering applications including environmental remediation, repository design for nuclear waste disposal, borehole stability in drilling operations, and additives for numerous industrial processes and commercial products. We used molecular dynamics and grand canonical Monte Carlo simulations to study the effects of layer charge location, interlayer cation, and temperature on intracrystalline swelling of montmorillonite and beidellite clay minerals. For a beidellite model with layer charge exclusively in the tetrahedral sheet, strong ion–surface interactions shift the onset of the two-layer hydrate to higher water contents. In contrast, for amore » montmorillonite model with layer charge exclusively in the octahedral sheet, weaker ion–surface interactions result in the formation of fully hydrated ions (two-layer hydrate) at much lower water contents. Clay hydration enthalpies and interlayer atomic density profiles are consistent with the swelling results. Water adsorption isotherms from grand canonical Monte Carlo simulations are used to relate interlayer hydration states to relative humidity, in good agreement with experimental findings.« less

  18. Swelling properties of montmorillonite and beidellite clay minerals from molecular simulation: Comparison of temperature interlayer cation, and charge location effects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Teich-McGoldrick, Stephanie L.; Greathouse, Jeffery A.; Jove-Colon, Carlos F.; Cygan, Randall Timothy

    2015-08-27

    In this study, the swelling properties of smectite clay minerals are relevant to many engineering applications including environmental remediation, repository design for nuclear waste disposal, borehole stability in drilling operations, and additives for numerous industrial processes and commercial products. We used molecular dynamics and grand canonical Monte Carlo simulations to study the effects of layer charge location, interlayer cation, and temperature on intracrystalline swelling of montmorillonite and beidellite clay minerals. For a beidellite model with layer charge exclusively in the tetrahedral sheet, strong ion–surface interactions shift the onset of the two-layer hydrate to higher water contents. In contrast, for a montmorillonite model with layer charge exclusively in the octahedral sheet, weaker ion–surface interactions result in the formation of fully hydrated ions (two-layer hydrate) at much lower water contents. Clay hydration enthalpies and interlayer atomic density profiles are consistent with the swelling results. Water adsorption isotherms from grand canonical Monte Carlo simulations are used to relate interlayer hydration states to relative humidity, in good agreement with experimental findings.

  19. Petrographic report on clay-rich samples from Permian Unit 4 salt, G. Friemel No. 1 well, Palo Duro Basin, Deaf Smith County, Texas: unanalyzed data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fukui, L M

    1983-09-01

    This report presents the results of mineralogic and petrographic analyses performed on five samples of clay-rich rock from salt-bearing Permian strata sampled by drill core from G. Friemel No. 1 Well, Deaf Smith County, Texas. Five samples of clay-rich rock from depths of about 2457, 2458, 2521, 2548, and 2568 feet were analyzed to determine the amounts of soluble phase (halite) and the amounts and mineralogy of the insoluble phases. The amounts of halite found were 59, 79, 47, 40, and 4 weight percent, respectively, for the samples. The insoluble minerals are predominately clay (20 to 60 volume percent) and anhydrite (up to 17 volume percent), with minor (about 1.0%) and trace amounts of quartz, dolomite, muscovite, and gypsum. The clays include illite, chlorite, and interstratified chlorite-smectite. The results presented in this petrographic report are descriptive, uninterpreted data. 2 references, 7 tables.

  20. Field test of plutonium and thorium contaminated clay soils from the Mound Site using the ACT*DE*CON Process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, J.O.; Swift, N.A.; Church, R.H.; Neff, R.A.

    1998-12-31

    A treatability test was run during the summer and fall of 1997 to demonstrate the effectiveness of ACT*DE*CON for removing plutonium and thorium from the clay soils around Mound. ACT*DE*CON is a proprietary solution patented by Selentec. The process utilized a highly selective dissolution of the contaminants by the use of a chemical wash. The pilot scale process involved pretreatment of the soil in an attrition scrubber with ACT*DE*CON solution. This blended solution was then passed through a counter-current extraction chamber where additional contact with ACT*DE*CON solution occurred, followed by a rinse cycle. During this process sand was added to aid contact of the solution with the soil particles. The sand is removed during the rinse step and reused. The chelating agent is separated from the contaminant and recycled back into the process, along with the reverse osmosis permeate. The resulting solution can be further treated to concentrate the contaminant. Three different types of environmental soils were tested -- plutonium and thorium contaminated soils with the natural clay content, and plutonium contaminated soils with a high percentage of fine clay particles. The goal of these tests was to reduce the plutonium levels from several hundreds of pCi/g to between 25 and 75 pCi/g and the thorium from a couple hundred pCi/g to less than 5 pCi/g. The results of these four tests are presented along with a discussion of the operating parameters and the lessons learned relating to full scale implementation at Mound as well as other potential applications of this process.

  1. Boone County, Arkansas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Bellefonte, Arkansas Bergman, Arkansas Diamond City, Arkansas Everton, Arkansas Harrison, Arkansas Lead Hill, Arkansas Omaha, Arkansas South Lead Hill, Arkansas Valley...

  2. Solar Viewed as Triple Boon for Bishop Paiute Tribe | Department...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    For the Bishop Paiute Tribe of California, clean energy projects offer a way to feed three ... Bishop Paiute Tribe is the fifth largest Tribe in California with 1,700 enrolled members. ...

  3. Boone County, West Virginia: Energy Resources | Open Energy Informatio...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    West Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 37.9838605, -81.734942 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice":...

  4. Stimulus Spending at Oak Ridge: A Boon or A Bust?

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Regardless of any political or personal beliefs, ARRA funding enabled the Department of Energy’s Environmental Management program (DOE EM) to achieve major milestones well ahead of schedule in the environmental clean-up at nuclear sites across the United States.

  5. Multiaxial deformation of polyethylene and polyethylene/clay nanocomposites: In situ synchrotron small angle and wide angle X-ray scattering study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gurun, Bilge; Bucknall, David G.; Thio, Yonathan S.; Teoh, Chin Ching; Harkin-Jones, Eileen

    2013-01-10

    A unique in situ multiaxial deformation device has been designed and built specifically for simultaneous synchrotron small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and wide angle X-ray scattering (WAXS) measurements. SAXS and WAXS patterns of high-density polyethylene (HDPE) and HDPE/clay nanocomposites were measured in real time during in situ multiaxial deformation at room temperature and at 55 C. It was observed that the morphological evolution of polyethylene is affected by the existence of clay platelets as well as the deformation temperature and strain rate. Martensitic transformation of orthorhombic into monoclinic crystal phases was observed under strain in HDPE, which is delayed and hindered in the presence of clay nanoplatelets. From the SAXS measurements, it was observed that the thickness of the interlamellar amorphous region increased with increasing strain, which is due to elongation of the amorphous chains. The increase in amorphous layer thickness is slightly higher for the nanocomposites compared to the neat polymer.

  6. Relationship between crystal structure and thermo-mechanical properties of kaolinite clay: Beyond standard density functional theory

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Weck, Philippe F.; Kim, Eunja; Jove-Colon, Carlos F.

    2015-03-04

    In this study, the structural, mechanical and thermodynamic properties of 1 : 1 layered dioctahedral kaolinite clay, with ideal Al2Si2O5(OH)4 stoichiometry, were investigated using density functional theory corrected for dispersion interactions (DFT-D2). The bulk moduli of 56.2 and 56.0 GPa predicted at 298 K using the Vinet and Birch–Murnaghan equations of state, respectively, are in good agreement with the recent experimental value of 59.7 GPa reported for well-crystallized samples. The isobaric heat capacity computed for uniaxial deformation of kaolinite along the stacking direction reproduces calorimetric data within 0.7–3.0% from room temperature up to its thermal stability limit.

  7. Relationship between crystal structure and thermo-mechanical properties of kaolinite clay: Beyond standard density functional theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weck, Philippe F.; Kim, Eunja; Jove-Colon, Carlos F.

    2015-03-04

    In this study, the structural, mechanical and thermodynamic properties of 1 : 1 layered dioctahedral kaolinite clay, with ideal Al2Si2O5(OH)4 stoichiometry, were investigated using density functional theory corrected for dispersion interactions (DFT-D2). The bulk moduli of 56.2 and 56.0 GPa predicted at 298 K using the Vinet and BirchMurnaghan equations of state, respectively, are in good agreement with the recent experimental value of 59.7 GPa reported for well-crystallized samples. The isobaric heat capacity computed for uniaxial deformation of kaolinite along the stacking direction reproduces calorimetric data within 0.73.0% from room temperature up to its thermal stability limit.

  8. Relationship between crystal structure and thermo-mechanical properties of kaolinite clay: Beyond standard density functional theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weck, Philippe F.; Kim, Eunja; Jove-Colon, Carlos F.

    2015-03-04

    In this study, the structural, mechanical and thermodynamic properties of 1 : 1 layered dioctahedral kaolinite clay, with ideal Al2Si2O5(OH)4 stoichiometry, were investigated using density functional theory corrected for dispersion interactions (DFT-D2). The bulk moduli of 56.2 and 56.0 GPa predicted at 298 K using the Vinet and Birch–Murnaghan equations of state, respectively, are in good agreement with the recent experimental value of 59.7 GPa reported for well-crystallized samples. The isobaric heat capacity computed for uniaxial deformation of kaolinite along the stacking direction reproduces calorimetric data within 0.7–3.0% from room temperature up to its thermal stability limit.

  9. Origin and diagenesis of clay minerals in relation to sandstone paragenesis: An example in eolian dune reservoirs and associated rocks, Permian upper part of the Minnelusa Formation, Powder River basin, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pollastro, R.M.; Schenk, C.J. )

    1991-06-01

    Eolian dune sandstones are the principal reservoir rocks in the Permian upper part of the Minnelusa Formation, Powder River basin, Wyoming. These sandstones formed as shorelines retreated and dunes migrated across siliciclastic sabkhas. Sandstones are mainly quartzarenites; on average, clay minerals constitute about 5 wt.% the whole rock. Although present in minor amounts, clay minerals play an important role in the diagenetic evolution of these sandstones. Allogenic clay minerals are present in shaly rock fragments and laminae. Early infiltration of clays into porous sabkha sands commonly form characteristic menisei or bridges between framework grains or, when more extensive, form coatings or rims on grain surfaces. Authigenic clays include nearly pure smectite, mixed-layer illite/smectite (I/S), and late diagenetic illite and corrensite; these clay minerals are present as pore-lining cements. In addition to the deposition and neoformation of clay minerals throughout sandstone paragenesis, the conversion of smectite to illite occurred as temperatures increased with progressive burial. A temperature of 103C is calculated at a present depth of 3,200 m using a geothermal gradient of 30C/km and a mean annual surface temperature of 7C. After correction for uplift and erosion (250 m), the maximum calculated temperature for the conversion of all random I/S to ordered I/S is 100C. This calculated temperature is in excellent agreement with temperatures of 100-110C implied from I/S geothermometry.

  10. Efficiency of clay-TiO2 nanocomposites on the photocatalytic eliminationof a model hydrophobic air pollutant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kibanova, Daria; Cervini-Silva, Javiera; Destaillats, Hugo

    2009-01-01

    Clay-supported TiO2 photocatalysts can potentially improve the performance of air treatment technologies via enhanced adsorption and reactivity of target volatile organic compounds (VOCs). In this study, a bench-top photocatalytic flow reactor was used to evaluate the efficiency of hectorite-TiO2 and kaolinite-TiO2, two novel composite materials synthesized in our laboratory. Toluene, a model hydrophobic VOC and a common indoor air pollutant, was introduced in the air stream at realistic concentrations, and reacted under UVA (gamma max = 365 nm) or UVC (gamma max = 254 nm) irradiation. The UVC lamp generated secondary emission at 185 nm, leading to the formation of ozone and other short-lived reactive species. Performance of clay-TiO2 composites was compared with that of pure TiO2 (Degussa P25), and with UV irradiation in the absence of photocatalyst under identical conditions. Films of clay-TiO2 composites and of P25 were prepared by a dip-coating method on the surface of Raschig rings, which were placed inside the flow reactor. An upstream toluene concentration of ~;;170 ppbv was generated by diluting a constant flow of toluene vapor from a diffusion source with dry air, or with humid air at 10, 33 and 66percent relative humidity (RH). Toluene concentrations were determined by collecting Tenax-TA (R) sorbent tubes downstream of the reactor, with subsequent thermal desorption -- GC/MS analysis. The fraction of toluene removed, percentR, and the reaction rate, Tr, were calculated for each experimental condition from the concentration changes measured with and without UV irradiation. Use of UVC light (UV/TiO2/O3) led to overall higher reactivity, which can be partially attributed to the contribution of gas phase reactions by short-lived radical species. When the reaction rate was normalized to the light irradiance, Tr/I gamma, the UV/TiO2 reaction under UVA irradiation was more efficient for samples with a higher content of TiO2 (P25 and Hecto-TiO2), but not for Kao

  11. In-situ studies on the performance of landfill caps (compacted soil liners, geomembranes, geosynthetic clay liners, capillary barriers)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Melchior, S.

    1997-12-31

    Since 1986 different types of landfill covers have been studied in-situ on the Georgswerder landfill in Hamburg, Germany. Water balance data are available for eight years. The performance of different carriers has been measured by collecting the leakage on areas ranging from 100 m{sup 2} to 500 m{sup 2}. Composite liners with geomembranes performed best, showing no leakage. An extended capillary barrier also performed well. The performance of compacted soil liners, however, decreased severely within five years due to desiccation, shrinkage and plant root penetration (liner leakage now ranging from 150 mm/a to 200 mm/a). About 50 % of the water that reaches the surface of the liner is leaking through it. The maximum leakage rates have increased from 2 x 10{sup -10} m{sup 3} m{sup -2} s{sup -1} to 4 x 10{sup -8} m{sup 3} m{sup -2} s{sup -1}. Two types of geosynthetic clay liners (GCL) have been tested for two years now with disappointing results. The GCL desiccated during the first dry summer of the study. High percolation rates through the GCL were measured during the following winter (45 mm resp. 63 mm in four months). Wetting of the GCL did not significantly reduce the percolation rates.

  12. {sup 31}P NMR study of the complexation of TBP with lanthanides and actinides in solution and in a clay matrix

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartzell, C.J.

    1994-07-24

    Goal was to use NMR to study TBP/lanthanide complexes in the interlayer or on edge sites of clays. Work in this laboratory yielded details of the complexation of Eu(NO{sub 3}){sub 3} and Pr(NO{sub 3}){sub 3} with TBP in hexane solution; this information is crucial to interpretation of results of NMR studies of the complexes exchanged into clays. The solution {sup 31}P-chemical shift values were improved by repeating the studies on the lanthanide salts dissolved directly into neat TBP. NMR studies of these neat solutions of the Eu(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}{lg_bullet}3TBP-complex and the Pr(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}{lg_bullet}3TBP-complex show that the {sup 31}P chemical shift remains relatively constant for TBP: lanthanide ratios below 3: 1. At higher ratios, the chemical shift approaches that of free TBP, indicating rapid exchange of TBP between the free and complexed state. Exchange of these complexes into the clay hectorite yielded discrete {sup 31}P-NMR signals for the Eu{lg_bullet}TBP complex at -190 ppm and free TBP at -6 ppm. Adsorption of the Pr{lg_bullet}TBP complex yielded broad signals at 76 ppm for the complex and -6 ppm for free TBP. There was no evidence of exchange between the incorporated complex and the free TBP.

  13. Thermal and mechanical properties of palm oil-based polyurethane acrylate/clay nanocomposites prepared by in-situ intercalative method and electron beam radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salih, A. M.; Ahmad, Mansor Bin; Ibrahim, Nor Azowa; Dahlan, Khairul Zaman Hj Mohd; Tajau, Rida; Mahmood, Mohd Hilmi; Yunus, Wan Md. Zin Wan

    2014-02-12

    Palm oil based-polyurethane acrylate (POBUA)/clay nanocomposites were prepared via in-situ intercalative polymerization using epoxidized palm oil acrylate (EPOLA) and 4,4' methylene diphenyl diisocyante (MDI). Organically modified Montmorillonite (ODA-MMT) was incorporated in EPOLA (1, 3 and 5%wt), and then subjected to polycondensation reaction with MDI. Nanocomposites solid films were obtained successfully by electron beam radiation induced free radical polymerization (curing). FTIR results reveal that the prepolymer was obtained successfully, with nanoclay dispersed in the matrix. The intercalation of the clay in the polymer matrix was investigated by XRD and the interlayer spacing of clay was found to be increased up to 37 , while the structure morphology of the nanocomposites was investigated by TEM and SEM. The nanocomposites were found to be a mixture of exfoliated and intercalated morphologies. The thermal stability of the nanocomposites was significantly increased by incorporation of nanoclay into the polymer matrix. DSC results reveal that the Tg was shifted to higher values, gradually with increasing the amount of filler in the nanocomposites. Tensile strength and Young's modulus of the nanocomposites showed remarkable improvement compared to the neat POBUA.

  14. The effect of clay catalyst on the chemical composition of bio-oil obtained by co-pyrolysis of cellulose and polyethylene

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Solak, Agnieszka; Rutkowski, Piotr

    2014-02-15

    Highlights: • Non-catalytic and catalytic fast pyrolysis of cellulose/polyethylene blend was carried out in a laboratory scale reactor. • Optimization of process temperature was done. • Optimization of clay catalyst type and amount for co-pyrolysis of cellulose and polyethylene was done. • The product yields and the chemical composition of bio-oil was investigated. - Abstract: Cellulose/polyethylene (CPE) mixture 3:1, w/w with and without three clay catalysts (K10 – montmorillonite K10, KSF – montmorillonite KSF, B – Bentonite) addition were subjected to pyrolysis at temperatures 400, 450 and 500 °C with heating rate of 100 °C/s to produce bio-oil with high yield. The pyrolytic oil yield was in the range of 41.3–79.5 wt% depending on the temperature, the type and the amount of catalyst. The non-catalytic fast pyrolysis at 500 °C gives the highest yield of bio-oil (79.5 wt%). The higher temperature of catalytic pyrolysis of cellulose/polyethylene mixture the higher yield of bio-oil is. Contrarily, increasing amount of montmorillonite results in significant, almost linear decrease in bio-oil yield followed by a significant increase of gas yield. The addition of clay catalysts to CPE mixture has a various influence on the distribution of bio-oil components. The addition of montmorillonite K10 to cellulose/polyethylene mixture promotes the deepest conversion of polyethylene and cellulose. Additionally, more saturated than unsaturated hydrocarbons are present in resultant bio-oils. The proportion of liquid hydrocarbons is the highest when a montmorillonite K10 is acting as a catalyst.

  15. Microsoft Word - FINAL 2013 HydropowerCouncilAgenda 060513

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Southwestern Federal Hydropower Council The Earl Cabell Federal Building 1100 Commerce Street Red River Room Floor 7, Room 752A Dallas, Texas June 11 - 12, 2013 Monday, June 10 ...

  16. EIS-0169-SA-08: Supplement Analysis

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project, Boone Pond Acclimation Site, Cle Elum, Kittitas County, Washington

  17. Carbon Emissions: Stone, Clay, and Glass Industry

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Contact: Stephanie Battles Stephanie.Battles@eia.doe.gov (Phone: (202) 586-7237) FAX: 202-586-0018 Contact Us URL: http:www.eia.govemeuefficiencycarbonemissionsstone...

  18. Material characterization of the clay bonded silicon carbide candle filters and ash formations in the W-APF system after 500 hours of hot gas filtration at AEP. Appendix to Advanced Particle Filter: Technical progress report No. 11, January--March 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alvin, M.A.

    1993-04-05

    (1) After 500 hours of operation in the pressurized fluidized-bed combustion gas environment, the fibrous outer membrane along the clay bonded silicon carbide Schumacher Dia Schumalith candles remained intact. The fibrous outer membrane did not permit penetration of fines through the filter wall. (2) An approximate 10-15% loss of material strength occurred within the intact candle clay bonded silicon carbide matrix after 500 hours of exposure to the PFBC gas environment. A relatively uniform strength change resulted within the intact candles throughout the vessel (i.e., top to bottom plenums), as well as within the various cluster ring positions (i.e., outer versus inner ring candle filters). A somewhat higher loss of material strength, i.e., 25% was detected in fractured candle segments removed from the W-APF ash hopper. (3) Sulfur which is present in the pressurized fluidized-bed combustion gas system induced phase changes along the surface of the binder which coats the silicon carbide grains in the Schumacher Dia Schumalith candle filter matrix.

  19. North Carolina Residential Energy Code Field Study

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Lead Performer: Appalachian State University – Boone, NCPartners: North Carolina Energy Efficiency Alliance – Boone, NCDOE Total Funding: $774,723Cost Share: $89,301Project Term: 2014 – 2017Funding...

  20. Diagenesis and clay mineral formation at Gale Crater, Mars (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    On the basis of the observed host rock and alteration minerals, we present results of equilibrium thermochemical modeling of the Sheepbed mudstones of Yellowknife Bay in order to ...

  1. Use of Reinforced Lightweight Clay Aggregates for Landslide Stabilisation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herle, Vitezslav

    2008-07-08

    In spring 2006 a large landslide combined with rock fall closed a highway tunnel near Svitavy in NE part of Czech Republic and cut the main highway connecting Bohemia with Moravia regions. Stabilisation work was complicated by steep mountainous terrain and large inflow of surface and underground water. The solution was based on formation of a stabilisation fill made of reinforced free draining aggregates at the toe of the slope with overlying lightweight fill up to 10 m high reinforced with PET geogrid and steel mesh protecting soft easily degrading sandstone against weathering. Extensive monitoring made possible to compare the FEM analysis with real values. The finished work fits very well in the environment and was awarded a special prize in the 2007 transport structures contest.

  2. Modeling Coupled Processes in Clay Formations for Radioactive...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... To understand and model the coupled processes and their impact on repository performance ... of Nuclear Energy, LBNL's research activities have focused on understanding and ...

  3. Diagenesis and clay mineral formation at Gale Crater, Mars

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    dilute aqueous solution (Gale Portage Water) in an open system with the Fe-rich basaltic-composition sedimentary rocks at 10-50C and waterrock ratio (mass of rock reacted with ...

  4. Deputy Secretary of Energy Clay Sell to Depart | Department of...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    WASHINGTON, DC - U.S. Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman today released the following ... Sell previously worked at the White House as a Special Assistant to President George W. ...

  5. Evaluation Of Used Fuel Disposition In Clay-Bearing Rock

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Radioactive waste disposal in shale/argillite rock formations has been widely considered given its desirable isolation properties, e.g., low permeability, potential geochemically reduced conditions...

  6. Tensile strengths of problem shales and clays. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rechner, F.J.

    1990-01-01

    The greatest single expense faced by oil companies involved in the exploration for crude oil is that of drilling wells. The most abundant rock drilled is shale. Some of these shales cause wellbore stability problems during the drilling process. These can range from slow rate of penetration and high torque up to stuck pipe and hole abandonment. The mechanical integrity of the shale must be known when the shalers are subjected to drilling fluids to develop an effective drilling plan.

  7. Clay County, Kentucky: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Kentucky: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 37.1738044, -83.7199136 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"goo...

  8. Clay County, Arkansas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Arkansas: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 36.3492244, -90.3748354 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"goo...

  9. Clay County, Indiana: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Indiana: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 39.368622, -87.1422895 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googl...

  10. Clay County, North Carolina: Energy Resources | Open Energy Informatio...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    North Carolina: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 35.0964003, -83.7199136 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice...

  11. Clay County, Tennessee: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Tennessee: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 36.5701766, -85.56121 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"goog...

  12. Clay County, South Dakota: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    South Dakota: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 42.8829344, -97.0068393 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice":...

  13. Clay County, Kansas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Kansas: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 39.34792, -97.179026 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlema...

  14. Clay County, West Virginia: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    West Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 38.4417717, -81.1196075 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice"...

  15. Clay County, Alabama: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Alabama: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 33.279527, -85.8486236 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googl...

  16. Clay Center, Ohio: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ohio: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.5633831, -83.3618725 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlem...

  17. Clay County, Iowa: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Iowa: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 43.1368038, -95.1432068 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlem...

  18. Clay County, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Texas: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 33.7900416, -98.2212979 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"google...

  19. Clay Minerals Related To The Hydrothermal Activity Of The Bouillante...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Minerals Related To The Hydrothermal Activity Of The Bouillante Geothermal Field (Guadeloupe) Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article:...

  20. Clay County, Nebraska: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Nebraska: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 40.5975479, -98.0465185 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"goo...

  1. Clay County, Illinois: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Illinois: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 38.7279431, -88.556531 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"goog...

  2. Clay County, Minnesota: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Minnesota: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 46.878186, -96.4257589 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"goo...

  3. Clay County, Georgia: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Georgia: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 31.6447931, -85.0025539 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"goog...

  4. Clay County, Mississippi: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Mississippi: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 33.6567838, -88.8263006 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"...

  5. The early development of neutron diffraction: Science in the...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Authors: Mason, Thom 1 ; Gawne, Timothy J 1 ; Nagler, Stephen E 1 ; Nestor, Margaret Boone 2 ; Carpenter, John M 1 + Show Author Affiliations ORNL ORNL Bonnie ORNL ...

  6. Two former longtime employees pass away | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    employees pass away Former Ames Laboratory metallurgy program chair John (Jack) Smith of Ames passed away Sept. 26 and long-time facilities plumber Pat Stowell of Boone,...

  7. PowerPoint Presentation

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Normetex Pump Replacement Tritium Programs Engineering Louis Boone P. J. Foster Tritium Facilities Normetex Pump Alternatives Rev Date: 4-9-13 Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC ...

  8. Greater Cincinnati Energy Alliance- Residential Loan Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Greater Cincinnati Energy Alliance provides loans for single family residencies and owner occupied duplexes in Hamilton, Butler, Warren, and Clermont counties in Ohio and Boone, Kenton, and...

  9. STARTING TODAY: Bloomberg, Daniels, Musk, Pickens, Chu and Energy...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Bank Regulatory Affairs Blythe Masters Tesla Motors CEO Elon Musk Entrepreneur T. Boone ... Addthis Related Articles Elon Musk, CEO of Tesla Motors, and Secretary Chu during a ...

  10. South Dakota begins to reap benefits of underground lab

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feder, Toni

    2015-04-15

    The boon to the states education and economy will be amplified if the Long-Baseline Neutrino Facility is realized.

  11. Ames Laboratory Middle School Science Bowl Feb. 20 | The Ames...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (Adel), Ames, Boone, Clarion-Goldfield, Dallas Center-Grimes, Eleanor Roosevelt (Dubuque), Glenwood, Le Mars, Lenox, Madrid, Melcher-Dallas, New Hampton, North Union (Swea City), ...

  12. PowerFilm Solar Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Solar Inc Place: Boone, Iowa Zip: 50036 7538 Product: Developer of a method for manufacturing thin-film amorphous silicon modules, from silane gas and plastic substrate, using...

  13. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    provides loans for single family residencies and owner occupied duplexes in Hamilton, Butler, Warren, and Clermont counties in Ohio and Boone, Kenton, and... Eligibility:...

  14. Tritium High Vacuum Pump Test Plan

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    High Vacuum Pump Test Plan Tritium Programs Engineering Louis Boone Joel Bennett ... Shimming will have to be internal to the pump. Test System Measure ultimate vacuum with ...

  15. Microsoft Word - Comments received at White Rock Scoping Mtg...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    ... Proliferation of nuclear weapons the actuality of the proposed CMRR nuclear facility is actually a boon to terrorists. The existence and proliferation of nuclear weapons threaten ...

  16. Statement by Deputy Secretary of Energy Clay Sell on NRG’s License Application

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    "Today marks the most significant and tangible step to date, towards the construction of the first new nuclear power plant in the United States in over 30 years.

  17. K-Ar Dates Of Hydrothermal Clays From Core Hole Vc-2B, Valles...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    (765 m) gives an age of 6.74 Ma. Two dates on illite from sandstones in Permian red beds (1008 and 1187 m) are 4.33 and 4.07 Ma, respectively. Surprisingly, three dates on...

  18. Strong-Sludge Gas Retention and Release Mechanisms in Clay Simulants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Buchmiller, William C.; Probert, Samuel G.; Owen, Antionette T.; Brockman, Fred J.

    2012-02-24

    The Hanford Site has 28 double-shell tanks (DSTs) and 149 single-shell tanks (SSTs) containing radioactive wastes that are complex mixes of radioactive and chemical products. The mission of the Department of Energy's River Protection Project is to retrieve and treat the Hanford tank waste for disposal and close the tank farms. A key aspect of the mission is to retrieve and transfer waste from the SSTs, which are at greater risk for leaking, into DSTs for interim storage until the waste is transferred to and treated in the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant. There is, however, limited space in the existing DSTs to accept waste transfers from the SSTs, and approaches to overcoming the limited DST space will benefit the overall mission. The purpose of this study is to summarize and analyze the key previous experiment that forms the basis for the relaxed controls and to summarize progress and results on new experiments focused on understanding the conditions that result in low gas retention. The previous large-scale test used about 50 m3 of sediment, which would be unwieldy for doing multiple parametric experiments. Accordingly, experiments began with smaller-scale tests to determine whether the desired mechanisms can be studied without the difficulty of conducting very large experiments. The most significant results from the current experiments are that progressively lower gas retention occurs in tests with progressively deeper sediment layers and that the method of gas generation also affects the maximum retention. Based on the results of this study, it is plausible that relatively low gas retention could occur in sufficiently deep tank waste in DSTs. The current studies and previous work, however, have not explored how gas retention and release will behave when two or more layers with different properties are present.

  19. Permeameter studies of water flow through cement and clay borehole seals in granite, basalt and tuff

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    South, D.L.; Daemen, J.J.K.

    1986-10-01

    Boreholes near a repository must be sealed to prevent rapid migration of radionuclide-contaminated water to the accessible environment. The objective of this research is to assess the performance of borehole seals under laboratory conditions, particularly with regard to varying stress fields. Flow through a sealed borehole is compared with flow through intact rock. Cement or bentonite seals have been tested in granite, basalt, and welded tuff. The main conclusion is that under laboratory conditions, existing commercial materials can form high quality seals. Triaxial stress changes about a borehole do not significantly affect seal performance if the rock is stiffer than the seal. Temperature but especially moisture variations (drying) significantly degrade the quality of cement seals. Performance partially recovers upon resaturation. A skillfully sealed borehole may be as impermeable as the host rock. Analysis of the influence of relative seal-rock permeabilities shows that a plug with permeability one order of magnitude greater than that of the rock results in a flow increase through the hole and surrounding rock of only 1-1/2 times compared to the undisturbed rock. Since a borehole is only a small part of the total rock mass, the total effect is even less pronounced. The simplest and most effective way to decrease flow through a rock-seal system is to increase the seal length, assuming it can be guaranteed that no dominant by-pass flowpath through the rock exists.

  20. Predicting Porosity in Clean and Clay-Ricj Sediments Using Resistivity...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Sponsoring Org: USDOE Office of Environmental Management (EM) (US) Country of Publication: United States Language: English Subject: 54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; 58 GEOSCIENCES; ...

  1. Clay enhancement of methane, low molecular weight hydrocarbon and halocarbon conversion by methanotrophic bacteria

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Apel, William A.; Dugan, Patrick R.

    1995-01-01

    An apparatus and method for increasing the rate of oxidation of toxic vapors by methanotrophic bacteria. The toxic vapors of interest are methane and trichloroethylene. The apparatus includes a gas phase bioreactor within a closed loop pumping system or a single pass system. The methanotrophic bacteria include Methylomonas methanica, Methylosinus trichosporium, and uncharacterized environmental enrichments.

  2. GLADY CASSIT Y VANDALIA MURPHY CR EEK BU CKHN-CENT URY CLAY

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    WAYN ESBUR G PR UNT Y GLENVILLE S CAVE RUN TAYLOR DRAIN ROSEDALE ST MPT-N RMNT-SHK ... Authors: Sam Limerick (1), Lucy Luo (1), Gary Long (2), David Morehouse (2), Jack Perrin ...

  3. Clay enhancement of methane, low molecular weight hydrocarbon and halocarbon conversion by methanotrophic bacteria

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Apel, William A.; Dugan, Patrick R.

    1995-04-04

    An apparatus and method for increasing the rate of oxidation of toxic vapors by methanotrophic bacteria. The toxic vapors of interest are methane and trichloroethylene. The apparatus includes a gas phase bioreactor within a closed loop pumping system or a single pass system. The methanotrophic bacteria include Methylomonas methanica, Methylosinus trichosporium, and uncharacterized environmental enrichments.

  4. Morgan Wascko Imperial College London M.O. Wascko FNAL User's Meeting

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    from the BooNEs Morgan Wascko Imperial College London M.O. Wascko FNAL User's Meeting M. Sorel Goals of the BooNEs * MiniBooNE: Confirm or rule out LSND * SciBooNE: * Near detector measurements for MiniBooNE * Precise cross section measurements * Especially useful for T2K 2 M.O. Wascko FNAL User's Meeting Goals of the BooNEs * MiniBooNE: Confirm or rule out LSND * SciBooNE: * Near detector measurements for MiniBooNE * Precise cross section measurements * Especially useful for T2K 2 W + ν µ n p

  5. Geoffrey Mills Los Alamos National Laboratory SBNP Workshop

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SBNP Workshop 12 May, 2011 MiniBooNE and BooNE 1. MiniBooNE Appearance Results 2. Other Anomalies 3. Resolution: The BooNE Proposal 4. Conclusions Synopsis: " A number of anomalies are appearing in neutrino data in the region of m 2 ~ an eV 2 " Predominantly from single detector experiments... " There is some possibility that the effects are due to oscillations between sterile neutrinos and active neutrinos " A definitive experiment is warranted " BooNE would be such an

  6. Graphene's 3D Counterpart

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    All of these novel properties can be a boon for future electronic technologies. Future 3DTDS systems can also serve as an ideal platform for applications in spintronics. A ...

  7. CX-007548: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Boone County Sewer District - Waste Water Treatment Plant Upgrades CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 01/10/2012 Location(s): Missouri Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  8. Sheldahl, Iowa: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Sheldahl is a city in Boone County and Polk County and Story County, Iowa. It falls under Iowa's 4th congressional district and...

  9. CX-005747: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Biobased Materials Automotive Value Chain Market Development AnalysisCX(s) Applied: A9Date: 05/04/2011Location(s): Boone County, IllinoisOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office

  10. 2016 Middle School Science Bowl Participating Teams | The Ames...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Adel-DeSoto-Minburn (Adel) Ames - Team 1 Ames - Team 2 Boone Clarion-Goldfield Eleanor Roosevelt (Dubuque) Glenwood Le Mars Lenox Lynnville-Sully Madrid Melcher-Dallas New ...

  11. LE & ME n Highlights

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Appearance Results (talk by Zarko Pavlovic) * MiniBooNE Disappearance Results * Global 3+1 Fits to World Data * Preliminary MINOS Experiments * Future Experiment: BooNE (talk by...

  12. BioenergizeME Virtual Science Fair: Is Algae the Next Big Thing

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This infographic was created by students from Daniel Boone Area High School in Birdsboro, PA, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME Virtual Science Fair.

  13. Z-Bed Recovery Water Disposal

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Z-Bed Recovery Water Disposal Tritium Programs Engineering Louis Boone Josh Segura ... detailed explanation of the plan to capture and dispose of Z-Bed Recovery (ZR) water. ...

  14. Computing Information

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Information From here you can find information relating to: Obtaining the right computer accounts. Using NIC terminals. Using BooNE's Computing Resources, including: Choosing your desktop. Kerberos. AFS. Printing. Recommended applications for various common tasks. Running CPU- or IO-intensive programs (batch jobs) Commonly encountered problems Computing support within BooNE Bringing a computer to FNAL, or purchasing a new one. Laptops. The Computer Security Program Plan for MiniBooNE The

  15. TFG Apr 2014 Attendance SRS.xlsx

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Affiliation Attendee Presenter Topic Antoniazzi, Armando Kinectrics, Inc.   Tritium in Molecular Sieves Boniface, Hugh AECL   Aspects of current tritium R&D at AECL Boone, Louis SRNL   Normatex Pump Replacement Progress Boone, Louis SRNL   Tritiated Water Disposal Buley, Rex Leidos/NA-123  Busigin, Anthony Nitek   Comparison of Water-Hydrogen Catalytic Exchange Processes versus Water Distillation for Water Detritiation Clark, Jared SRNL   Diffuser Stage

  16. International Collaborations on Engineered Barrier Systems: Experiment...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and clay barrier performance; 2) EBS Experiment -thermo-hydro-mechanical-chemical ... DR-A (diffusion and retention) borehole experiment in Opalinus Clay, and cement-clay ...

  17. Sandia Energy - Study Could Help Improve Nuclear Waste Repositories

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    underground clay formations for nuclear waste disposal, because clay offers low permeability and high radionuclide retention. Even when a repository isn't sited in clay,...

  18. Computing Resources

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Resources This page is the repository for sundry items of information relevant to general computing on BooNE. If you have a question or problem that isn't answered here, or a suggestion for improving this page or the information on it, please mail boone-computing@fnal.gov and we'll do our best to address any issues. Note about this page Some links on this page point to www.everything2.com, and are meant to give an idea about a concept or thing without necessarily wading through a whole website

  19. BioenergizeME Virtual Science Fair: History of Biomass | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy History of Biomass BioenergizeME Virtual Science Fair: History of Biomass BioenergizeME Virtual Science Fair: History of Biomass This infographic was created by students from Daniel Boone Area High School in Birdsboro, PA, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME Virtual Science

  20. TR1P~TTOUPQIH?RurJn#ll

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    * - - I 1' MP .b- j3 4 --5 +,' *i Q--k 9 July 13, l9S4 w-0 TR1PTTOUPQIH?RurJnll JULY 9, 2956 TooeAHY,MID8ow,-- J. A. Q&by, M.D. P. w. Boone ObJectin of TrAq...

  1. Hydrothermal Alteration of Glass from Underground Nuclear Tests: Formation and Transport of Pu-clay Colloids at the Nevada National Security Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zavarin, M.; Zhao, P.; Joseph, C.; Begg, J.; Boggs, M.; Dai, Z.; Kersting, A. B.

    2015-05-27

    The testing of nuclear weapons at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS), formerly the Nevada Test Site (NTS), has led to the deposition of substantial quantities of plutonium into the environment. Approximately 2.8 metric tons (3.1×104 TBq) of Pu were deposited in the NNSS subsurface as a result of underground nuclear testing. While 3H is the most abundant anthropogenic radionuclide deposited in the NNSS subsurface (4.7×106 TBq), plutonium is the most abundant from a molar standpoint. The only radioactive elements in greater molar abundance are the naturally occurring K, Th, and U isotopes. 239Pu and 240Pu represent the majority of alpha-emitting Pu isotopes. The extreme temperatures associated with underground nuclear tests and the refractory nature of Pu results in most of the Pu (98%) being sequestered in melted rock, referred to as nuclear melt glass (Iaea, 1998). As a result, Pu release to groundwater is controlled, in large part, by the leaching (or dissolution) of nuclear melt glass over time. The factors affecting glass dissolution rates have been studied extensively. The dissolution of Pu-containing borosilicate nuclear waste glasses at 90ºC has been shown to lead to the formation of dioctahedral smectite colloids. Colloid-facilitated transport of Pu at the NNSS has been observed. Recent groundwater samples collected from a number of contaminated wells have yielded a wide range of Pu concentrations from 0.00022 to 2.0 Bq/L. While Pu concentrations tend to fall below the Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) established by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for drinking water (0.56 Bq/L), we do not yet understand what factors limit the Pu concentration or its transport behavior. To quantify the upper limit of Pu concentrations produced as a result of melt glass dissolution and determine the nature of colloids and Pu associations, we performed a 3 year nuclear melt glass dissolution experiment across a range of temperatures (25-200 °C) that represent hydrothermal conditions representative of the underground nuclear test cavities (when groundwater has re-saturated the nuclear melt glass and glass dissolution occurs). Colloid loads and Pu concentrations were monitored along with the mineralogy of both the colloids and the secondary mineral phases. The intent was to establish an upper limit for Pu concentrations at the NNSS, provide context regarding the Pu concentrations observed at the NNSS to date and the Pu concentrations that may be observed in the future. The results provide a conceptual model for the risks posed by Pu migration at the NNSS.

  2. Introduction to computed microtomography and applications in...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Resource Relation: Related Information: CMS Workshop Lectures, Advanced Applications of Synchrotron Radiation in Clay Science Publisher: 2014; Tha Clay Minerals Society ;Urbana, IL ...

  3. Experimental and Modeling Investigation of Radionuclide Interaction...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    interactions with clay minerals with results suggesting that iodide may directly interact with clays by forming ion-pairs which may concentrate within the interlayer space as...

  4. Magnetotelluric Techniques | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    cap, and also in determining the boundary between the alteration zone and the geothermal reservoir. The clay cap composition typically consists of a conductive clay from the...

  5. Remote Sensing For Geothermal Exploration Over Buffalo Valley...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and spectral resolution of the data allows for the identification of carbonate, sulfate, silica and clay minerals. Quartz- and clay-rich regions of Buffalo Valley were...

  6. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Clay Electric Cooperative, Inc- Energy Conservation Loans Clay Electric Cooperative (CEC), a Touchstone Energy Cooperative, covers 14 North Florida counties, including Gainesville,...

  7. Liquefaction Triggering Evaluations at DOE Sites - An Update | Department

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    of Energy Liquefaction Triggering Evaluations at DOE Sites - An Update Liquefaction Triggering Evaluations at DOE Sites - An Update Liquefaction Triggering Evaluations at DOE Sites - An Update 2014 Natural Phenomena Hazards Meeting October 21-22, 2014 Germantown, Maryland Michael R. Lewis, Bechtel Corporation Michael D. Boone, Bechtel Corporation Rucker J. Williams, Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC Brent Gutierrez, U.S. Department of Energy, Savannah River Site Liquefaction Triggering

  8. Radiocarbon (Geochronology)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    radiocarbon geochronology Radiocarbon (Geochronology) With regards to geochronology, radiocarbon is both blessed and cursed-the boon is that it is ubiquitous in nature and often we can date the exact carrier of the biogeochemical or paleoclimate proxy that we are studying, including studying the carbon cycle. However, due to the variable production of 14C, and its partitioning between the atmosphere-ocean-land reservoirs, a fundamental tenet of decay-based radioisotope geochronology is

  9. Supernova Twins: Making Standard Candles More Standard Than Ever

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Supernova Twins: Making Standard Candles More Standard Than Ever Supernova Twins: Making Standard Candles More Standard Than Ever New Modeling Method Measures Cosmological Distances With Far Greater Accuracy January 13, 2016 Contact: Paul Preuss, paul_preuss@lbl.gov, +1 415 272 3253 supernovatwins From left, Greg Aldering, Kyle Boone, Hannah Fakhouri and Saul Perlmutter of the Nearby Supernova Factory. Behind them is a poster of a supernova spectrum. Matching spectra among different supernovae

  10. This is the title of the presentation on three lines if you need it

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Polymers for Tritium Service Laura Tovo Jay Gaillard 1 , Steven Serkiz 1 , Hector Colon-Mercado 1 , Brent Peters 1 , Timothy DeVol 2 , Richard Czerw 3 Tritium Engineer: Louis Boone September 24, 2014 1 Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken, SC 2 Clemson University, Clemson, SC 2 NanoTechLabs, Inc., Yadkinville, NC Tritium Focus Group (TFG) meeting 23-25 Sept. 2014, Energy Innovation Laboratory Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID Project Team 2 * Jay Gaillard - SRNL/Material Science