Sample records for bonners ferry 115-kilovolt

  1. EA-1973: Kootenai River Restoration at Bonners Ferry, Boundary...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Kootenai River Restoration at Bonners Ferry, Boundary County, Idaho Summary Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) is preparing an EA to assess the potential environmental impacts...

  2. EIS-0379- Rebuild of the Libby (FEC) to Troy Section of BPA’s 115-kilovolt Transmission Line in Libby, Lincoln County, Montana

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) assesses the potential environmental impacts that would result from a proposed Department of Energy (DOE) action on the proposed rebuilding, operation, and maintenance of a 17-mile-long portion of BPA’s Libby to Bonners Ferry 115-kilovolt (kV) Transmission Line in Lincoln County, Montana. The portion to be rebuilt would start at Flathead Electric Cooperative’s (FEC) Libby Substation, in the town of Libby, Montana, and proceed west along an existing right-of-way for about 17 miles, terminating at BPA’s Troy Substation just east of the town of Troy, Montana.

  3. EA-1901: Kootenai River White Sturgeon and Burbot Hatcheries Project, Bonners Ferry, Boundary County, Idaho

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal for DOE’s Bonneville Power Administration to support the Kootenai Tribe of Idaho’s construction of a new hatchery on property owned by the Tribe at the confluence of the Moyie and Kootenai Rivers, approximately eight miles upstream from Bonners Ferry, Idaho. The proposed location of the new hatchery facility is currently the site of the Twin Rivers Canyon Resort.

  4. EA-1973: Kootenai River Restoration at Bonners Ferry, Boundary County,

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China U.S.ContaminationJuly 2011DDelphiFEA-2013.pdfBasedThe U.S.Pinal County, Arizona

  5. City of Bonners Ferry, Idaho (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof EnergyInnovationin Urban Transport |City ofBlue Earth, Minnesota

  6. Alabama Nuclear Profile - Browns Ferry

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Browns Ferry" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date"...

  7. Applications of Bonner sphere detectors in neutron field dosimetry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Awschalom, M.; Sanna, R.S.

    1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The theory of neutron moderation and spectroscopy are briefly reviewed, and moderators that are useful for Bonner sphere spectrometers are discussed. The choice of the neutron detector for a Bonner sphere spectrometer is examined. Spectral deconvolution methods are briefly reviewed, including derivative, parametric, quadrature, and Monte Carlo methods. Calibration is then discussed. (LEW)

  8. Central Ferry-Lower Monumental

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWPSuccessAlamos Laboratory NastasiPASTCentral AirCentral Ferry Lower

  9. 500-kV Central Ferry Substation ...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Substation Y Y Central Ferry Substation T u c a n n o n R i v e r S n a k e R i v e r 12 U V 127 U V 127 U V 260 U V 261 12 Starbuck Starbuck W h i t m a n W h i t m a...

  10. Bonner County, Idaho: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:EzfeedflagBiomass ConversionsSouthby 2022 |BleckleyMotionBocaBondBonner County, Idaho: Energy

  11. Bonner Springs, Kansas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:EzfeedflagBiomass ConversionsSouthby 2022 |BleckleyMotionBocaBondBonner County, Idaho:

  12. Lynch Ferry Hatchery - Summer Steelhead, Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watson, M.

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the findings of the independent audit of the Lyons Ferry Hatchery (Summer Steelhead). Lyons Ferry Hatchery is located downstream of the confluence of the Palouse and Snake rivers, about 7 miles west of Starbuck, Washington. The hatchery is used for adult collection of fall chinook and summer steelhead, egg incubation of fall chinook, spring chinook, steelhead, and rainbow trout and rearing of fall chinook, spring chinook, summer steelhead, and rainbow trout. The audit was conducted in April 1996 as part of a two-year effort that will include 67 hatcheries and satellite facilities located on the Columbia and Snake River system in Idaho, Oregon, and Washington. The hatchery operating agencies include the US Fish and Wildlife Service, Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife.

  13. EA-1969: Clark Fork River Delta Restoration Project, Bonner County, Idaho

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Bonneville Power Administration prepared an environmental assessment to analyze the potential effects of a proposal to restore wetland and riparian (riverbank) habitat and to reduce erosion in the Clark Fork River delta located in Bonner County, Idaho.

  14. Central Ferry Lower Monumental | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, click here.Telluric Survey asWest, NewCenterville, Ohio:Ferry Lower Monumental

  15. Ferris, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model,DOEHazelPennsylvania:57427°, -89.4742177°Fenwick,8464991°,Ferris, Texas:

  16. Fermilab | Tritium at Fermilab | Ferry Creek Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist.New Mexico Feb. 13, 2013FocusreceivesTraffic Safety TrafficFerry

  17. The response of a Bonner Sphere spectrometer to charged hadrons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agosteo, S; Fassò, A; Silari, M; 10.1093/rpd/nch187

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Bonner sphere spectrometers (BSSs) are employed in neutron spectrometry and dosimetry since many years. Recent developments have seen the addition to a conventional BSS of one or more detectors (moderator plus thermal neutron counter) specifically designed to improve the overall response of the spectrometer to neutrons above 10 MeV. These additional detectors employ a shell of material with a high mass number (such as lead) within the polyethylene moderator, in order to slow down high-energy neutrons via (n, xn) reactions. A BSS can be used to measure neutron spectra both outside accelerator shielding and from an unshielded target. Measurements were recently performed at CERN of the neutron yield and spectral fluence at various angles from unshielded, semithick copper, silver and lead targets, bombarded by a mixed proton/pion beam with 40 GeV per c momentum. These experiments have provided evidence that under certain circumstances, the use of lead-enriched moderators may present a problem: these detectors wer...

  18. Evaluation of Methods to Increase Light Under Ferry Terminals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blanton, Susan L.; Thom, Ronald M.; Borde, Amy B.; Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Southard, John A.

    2002-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

    To address concerns of resource agencies about the potential impacts of ferry terminal expansion on valuable habitat functions and resource use of nearshore areas, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), in partnership with the Washington State Department of Transportation (WSDOT), conducted field trials with off-the-shelf products that promote light passage through dock structures. These products included a SunTunnel, deck prisms, and a metal halide greenhouse light. Light measurements (photosynthetically active radiation, PAR) were also recorded beneath glass blocks and a metal grating installed at Clinton Ferry Terminal on Whidbey Island, WA. A review of other studies measuring the effects of dock shading and alternate dock materials was conducted. PAR measurements from this study were related to minimum requirements for eelgrass Zostera marina photosynthesis and to the known maximum photosynthetic ?saturation? rate for Z. marina. We also related PAR measurements to what we know about light effects on juvenile salmonid feeding and passage under overwater structures. Of the light technologies tested, the metal halide light, SunTunnel, glass blocks, and grating potentially provide enough light for eelgrass growth underneath a ferry terminal with similar construction to the Clinton Ferry Terminal. All of these technologies would potentially provide adequate light under conditions where eelgrass is located at its upper depth limit and a dock is close to the water surface. Light levels needed to allow fish to feed and to form schools are low (~ 1-2 mmol/m2/s), and much less than those required for photosynthesis. Our research indicates that installing any of the tested light products would likely maintain light levels under the dock above those required for active feeding by juvenile salmonids.

  19. The Ferry Building - San Francisco, CA by SMWM; Baldauf Catton von Eckartsberg; Page & Turnbull [EDRA/Places Awards 2007 -- Design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sensenig, Chris

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    franchises. But as this design award to San Francisco FerryBuilding 2007 EDRA/Places Awards Design center for the saleFerry Building 2007 EDRA/Places Awards Design The second key

  20. DESINGULARIZING HOMOLOGY MANIFOLDS J. BRYANT, S. FERRY, W. MIO, AND S. WEINBERGER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mio, Washington

    DESINGULARIZING HOMOLOGY MANIFOLDS J. BRYANT, S. FERRY, W. MIO, AND S. WEINBERGER Abstract. We Date: August 24, 2005. Bryant and Mio were partially supported by NSF grants DMS-0071693 and DMS supported by NSF grant DMS-9803633. 1 #12;2 J. BRYANT, S. FERRY, W. MIO, AND S. WEINBERGER manifolds

  1. Little Ferry, New Jersey: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant Jump to:Landowners and WindLightingLinthicum, Maryland:sourceLithopolis, Ohio:Ferry,

  2. Ferry County, Washington: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model,DOEHazelPennsylvania:57427°,Ferry County, Washington: Energy Resources Jump to:

  3. CX-001536: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    City of Bonners Ferry Methane ReductionCX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B5.1Date: 04/15/2010Location(s): Bonners Ferry, IdahoOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office

  4. A Ferry-based Intrusion Detection Scheme for Sparsely Connected Ad Hoc Networks M. Chuah, P.Yang, J. Han

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chuah, Mooi-Choo "Mooi"

    A Ferry-based Intrusion Detection Scheme for Sparsely Connected Ad Hoc Networks M. Chuah, P.Yang, J University Bethlehem, PA 18015 Abstract-- Several intrusion detection approaches have been proposed in sparse ad hoc networks. In this paper, we propose a ferry-based intrusion detection and mitigation (FBIDM

  5. Applicability of a Bonner Shere technique for pulsed neutron in 120 GeV proton facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanami, T.; Hagiwara, M.; Iwase, H.; /KEK, Tsukuba; Iwamoto, Y.; Sakamoto, Y.; Nakashima, H.; /JAEA, Ibaraki; Arakawa, H.; Shigyo, N.; /Kyushu U.; Leveling, A.F.; Boehnlein, D.J.; Vaziri, K.; /Fermilab

    2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The data on neutron spectra and intensity behind shielding are important for radiation safety design of high-energy accelerators since neutrons are capable of penetrating thick shielding and activating materials. Corresponding particle transport codes--that involve physics models of neutron and other particle production, transportation, and interaction--have been developed and used world-wide [1-8]. The results of these codes have been ensured through plenty of comparisons with experimental results taken in simple geometries. For neutron generation and transport, several related experiments have been performed to measure neutron spectra, attenuation length and reaction rates behind shielding walls of various thicknesses and materials in energy range up to several hundred of MeV [9-11]. The data have been used to benchmark--and modify if needed--the simulation modes and parameters in the codes, as well as the reference data for radiation safety design. To obtain such kind of data above several hundred of MeV, Japan-Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL) collaboration for shielding experiments has been started in 2007, based on suggestion from the specialist meeting of shielding, Shielding Aspects of Target, Irradiation Facilities (SATIF), because of very limited data available in high-energy region (see, for example, [12]). As a part of this shielding experiment, a set of Bonner sphere (BS) was tested at the antiproton production target facility (pbar target station) at FNAL to obtain neutron spectra induced by a 120-GeV proton beam in concrete and iron shielding. Generally, utilization of an active detector around high-energy accelerators requires an improvement on its readout to overcome burst of secondary radiation since the accelerator delivers an intense beam to a target in a short period after relatively long acceleration period. In this paper, we employ BS for a spectrum measurement of neutrons that penetrate the shielding wall of the pbar target station in FNAL.

  6. Eric Moulton, Ferri Hassani, Pejman Nekoovaght Microwave-Assisted Heating in Rock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barthelat, Francois

    Eric Moulton, Ferri Hassani, Pejman Nekoovaght Microwave-Assisted Heating in Rock INTRODUCTION to expensive replacements. Expansive heating through microwaves breaks up the rock, which reduces the stress the mechanisms and parameters governing the heating rate of a material. Department of Mining and Materials

  7. FERRY ET AL. VOL. 5 ' NO. 12 ' 1005510064 ' 2011 www.acsnano.org

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polman, Albert

    American Chemical Society Modeling Light Trapping in Nanostructured Solar Cells Vivian E. Ferry utilized.1 This reduction in solar cell thickness has many potential benefits de- pending cell fabrica- tion processes, low-cost, and offer signifi- cant improvements beyond that achievable

  8. QUALITATIVE ASYMMETRY MEASURE FOR MELANOMA DETECTION Michele d'Amico, Massimo Ferri,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferri, Massimo

    QUALITATIVE ASYMMETRY MEASURE FOR MELANOMA DETECTION Michele d'Amico, Massimo Ferri, ARCES­validation are reported. 1. INTRODUCTION Since 1980, cutaneous malignant melanoma (CMM) was one of the ten most frequent and their discrimination between naevi and melanomas (see, e.g., [2, 3, 9, 7]). Most of them keep into account

  9. 1999 GWU, RPI, VCU All Rights Reserved Washington State Ferries Risk Assessment -Appendix II The Washington State

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    The Washington State Ferries Risk Assessment Appendix II: Collision, Allision, Grounding and Fire/Explosion..............................................................................................47 SECTION 3: HISTORICAL RATES FOR ALLISIONS, GROUNDINGS AND FIRES/EXPLOSIONS ....................................................................................................53 3.5 FIRE/EXPLOSION ANALYSIS RESULTS.

  10. EIS-0159: Record of Decision

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Flatiron-Erie 115-kilovolt Transmission Line Project, Larimer County, Boulder County, Weld County, Colorado

  11. 284:774-782, 2003. First published Jan 10, 2003; doi:10.1152/ajplung.00189.2002AJP -Lung James C. Bonner

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Santos, Janine H.

    284:774-782, 2003. First published Jan 10, 2003; doi:10.1152/ajplung.00189.2002AJP - Lung James C][Abstract] , May 1, 2005; 32 (5): 373-380.Am. J. Respir. Cell Mol. Biol. E. K. Chu, J. S. Foley, J. Cheng, A. S,2 Bennett Van Houten,2 and James C. Bonner1 Laboratories of 1 Pulmonary Pathobiology and 2 Molecular

  12. EA-1973 Public Hearing

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Comments on the Draft EA should refer to “Kootenai River Habitat Restoration at Bonners Ferry” and be submitted by March 5, 2015:

  13. Topology of Homology Manifolds J. Bryant1, S. Ferry1, W. Mio1, and S. Weinberger1; 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mio, Washington

    Topology of Homology Manifolds J. Bryant1, S. Ferry1, W. Mio1, and S. Weinberger1; 2 Florida State and Bryant-Lacher 7 , when the dimension of the singular set of the homology manifold is in the stable range

  14. A descriptive, annotated calendar of the letters from Harriet and Leon Lewis to their publisher Robert Bonner, with a critical introduction and notes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Norton, Saundra E

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to publishing the stories of Leon and Harriet Lewis, Bonner published the works of "Fanny Fern, " Alfred Lord Tennyson, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, Horace Greeley, Mrs. E. D. E. N. Southworth, Harriet Beecher Stowe, Louisa May Alcott, and William Cullen..., in the preface, there is a statement attributing this story to A. G. Piper and Julius Warren Lewis. Further connections between the Lewis name and A. G. Piper have not yet been established. The name F. Cli nron Barring ton was so popular that the The Belle...

  15. Potential effects of the fire protection system sprays at Browns Ferry on fission product transport

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Niemczyk, S.J.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The fire protection system (FPS) sprays within any nuclear plant are not intended to mitigate radioactive releases to the environment resulting from severe core-damage accidents. However, it has been shown here that during certain postulated severe accident scenarios at the Browns Ferry Nuclear Plant, the functioning of FPS sprays could have a significant impact on the radioactive releases. Thus the effects of those sprays need to be taken into account for realistic estimation of source terms for some accident scenarios. The effects would include direct ones such as cooling of the reactor building atmosphere and scrubbing of radioactivity from it, as well as indirect effects such as an altered likelihood of hydrogen burning and flooding of various safety-related pumps in the reactor building basement. Thus some of the impacts of the sprays would be beneficial with respect to mitigating releases to the environment but some others might not be. The effects of the FPS would be very scenario dependent with a wide range of potential effects often existing for a given accident sequence. Any generalization of the specific results presented here for Browns Ferry to other nuclear plants must be done cautiously, as it appears from a preliminary investigation that the relevant physical and operational characteristics of FPS spray systems differ widely among even otherwise apparently similar plants. Likewise the standby gas treatment systems, which substantially impact the effects of the FPS, differ significantly among plants. More work for both Mark I plants and other plants, BWRs and PWRs alike, is indicated so the potential effects of FPS spray systems during severe accidents can be at least ball-parked for more realistic accident analyses.

  16. Monte Carlo simulation of a Bonner sphere spectrometer for application to the determination of neutron field in the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak experimental hall

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hu, Z. M.; Xie, X. F.; Chen, Z. J.; Peng, X. Y.; Du, T. F.; Cui, Z. Q.; Ge, L. J.; Li, T.; Yuan, X.; Zhang, X.; Li, X. Q.; Zhang, G. H.; Chen, J. X.; Fan, T. S., E-mail: tsfan@pku.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Hu, L. Q.; Zhong, G. Q.; Lin, S. Y.; Wan, B. N. [Institute of Plasma Physics, CAS, Hefei 230031 (China); Gorini, G. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Milano-Bicocca, Milano 20126 (Italy); Istituto di Fisica del Plasma “P. Caldirola,” Milano 20126 (Italy)

    2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    To assess the neutron energy spectra and the neutron dose for different positions around the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST) device, a Bonner Sphere Spectrometer (BSS) was developed at Peking University, with totally nine polyethylene spheres and a SP9 {sup 3}He counter. The response functions of the BSS were calculated by the Monte Carlo codes MCNP and GEANT4 with dedicated models, and good agreement was found between these two codes. A feasibility study was carried out with a simulated neutron energy spectrum around EAST, and the simulated “experimental” result of each sphere was obtained by calculating the response with MCNP, which used the simulated neutron energy spectrum as the input spectrum. With the deconvolution of the “experimental” measurement, the neutron energy spectrum was retrieved and compared with the preset one. Good consistence was found which offers confidence for the application of the BSS system for dose and spectrum measurements around a fusion device.

  17. Ground-water temperature fluctuations at Lyons Ferry Fish Hatchery, Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oberlander, P.L.; Myers, D.A.

    1987-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The well field serving the Lyons Ferry Fish Hatchery has experienced reduced water temperatures following continued, periodic withdrawal of large volumes of water. In January 1985, the well field temperature was 49/sup 0/F, which is less than the optimal 52/sup 0/F for raising salmon and steelhead trout. The aquifer supplying the hatchery is in hydraulic and thermal connection with the Snake River and a flooded embayment of the Palouse River. Ground-water temperatures in the well field cycle on an annual basis in response to changes in surface water temperature and pumping rate. Numerical simulation of the well field, using a simplified mixing cell model, demonstrates the coupling of well field hydraulics and aquifer thermal response. Alternative pumping schedules indicate that it is feasible to adjust ground-water pumping to effectively store heat in the aquifer during the summer months when surface water temperatures are elevated. Sensitivity analysis of this model indicated that the primary controls of the system's thermal response are the volume of the aquifer assumed to contribute to the well field and temperature of the overlying surface water body.

  18. Hatchery Evaluation Report/Lyons Ferry Hatchery - Summer Steelhead : an Independent Audit Based on Integrated Hatchery Operations Team (IHOT) Performance Measures.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watson, Montgomery.

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the findings of the independent audit of the Lyons Ferry Hatchery (Summer Steelhead). Lyons Ferry Hatchery is located downstream of the confluence of the Palouse and Snake rivers, about 7 miles west of Starbuck, Washington. The hatchery is used for adult collection of tall chinook and summer steelhead, egg incubation of fall chinook, spring chinook, steelhead, and rainbow trout and rearing of fall chinook, spring chinook, summer steelhead, and rainbow trout. The audit was conducted in April 1996 as part of a two-year effort that will include 67 hatcheries and satellite facilities located on the Columbia and Snake River system in Idaho, Oregon, and Washington. The hatchery operating agencies include the U.S Fish and Wildlife Service, Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife.

  19. Hatchery Evaluation Report/Lyons Ferry Hatchery - Spring Chinook : an Independent Audit Based on Integrated Hatchery Operations Team (IHOT) Performance Measures.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watson, Montgomery.

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the findings of the independent audit of the Lyons Ferry Hatchery (Spring Chinook). Lyons Ferry Hatchery is located downstream of the confluence of the Palouse and Snake rivers, about 7 miles west of Starbuck, Washington. The hatchery is used for adult collection of fall chinook and summer steelhead, egg incubation of fall chinook, spring chinook, steelhead. and rainbow trout and rearing of fall chinook, spring chinook, summer steelhead, and rainbow trout. The audit was conducted in April 1996 as part of a two-year effort that will include 67 hatcheries and satellite facilities located on the Columbia and Snake River system in Idaho, Oregon, and Washington. The hatchery operating agencies include the U.S Fish and Wildlife Service, Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife.

  20. Central Ferry Lower Monumental

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced. C o w l i t z C oCNMSStaff Highlight

  1. Hatchery Evaluation Report / Lyons Ferry Hatchery - Fall Chinook : An Independent Audit Based on Integrated Hatchery Operations Teams (IHOT) Performance Measures : Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watson, Montgomery

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the findings of the independent audit of the Lyons Ferry Hatchery (Fall Chinook). The audit is being conducted as a requirement of the Northwest Power Planning Council (NPPC) ``Strategy for Salmon`` and the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. Under the audit, the hatcheries are evaluated against policies and related performance measures developed by the Integrated Hatchery Operations Team (IHOT). IHOT is a multi-agency group established by the NPPC to direct the development of new basinwide standards for managing and operating fish hatcheries. The audit was conducted in April 1996 as part of a two-year effort that will include 67 hatcheries and satellite facilities located on the Columbia and Snake River system in Idaho, Oregon, and Washington. The hatchery operating agencies include the US Fish and Wildlife Service, Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife.

  2. CX-009514: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    the Franklin-Badger Canyon No. 2 and Grandview-Red Mountain No. 1 115 kilovolt transmission lines. CX-009514.pdf More Documents & Publications CX-005673: Categorical Exclusion...

  3. The influence of surface interactions on the reversibility of ferri/ferrocyanide at boron-doped diamond thin-film electrodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Granger, M.C.; Swain, G.M.

    1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The electrochemistry of four redox analytes [Fe(CN){sub 6}{sup {minus}3/{minus}4}, Ru(NH{sub 3}){sub 6}{sup +2/+3}, IrCl{sub 6}{sup {minus}2/{minus}3}, and methyl viologen, MV{sup +2/+/0}] was investigated at polycrystalline, boron-doped diamond thin-film electrodes before and after anodic polarization and hydrogen plasma treatment. The as-deposited diamond surface is predominantly hydrogen treatment, and quasi-reversible cyclic voltammograms ({Delta}E{sub p} of 60--80 mV) were observed for all of these couples at 0.1 V/s. After anodic polarization in H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}, the surface atomic O/C ratio, as determined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, increased from 0.02 to ca. 0.20. Concomitant with the increase in surface oxygen, the {Delta}E{sub p} for Fe(CN){sub 6}{sup {minus}3/{minus}4} increased to over 200 mV, while the {Delta}E{sub p} values for the other redox systems remained relatively unchanged. After acid washing and rehydrogenating the surface in hydrogen plasma (i.e., atomic hydrogen), the {Delta}E{sub p} for Fe(CN){sub 6}{sup {minus}3/{minus}4} returned to ca. 80 mV, while the {Delta}E{sub p} values for the other three redox analytes remained close to the original values. The results demonstrate the electron transfer for ferri/ferrocyanide is very sensitive to the presence of surface carbon-oxygen functionalities and that the electron transfer involves a site associated with the hydrogen-terminated surface. The results also unequivocally rule out the influence of adventitious nondiamond phases as the sole sites for the electron transfer.

  4. Alabama Nuclear Profile - Browns Ferry

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS8) Distribution Category UC-950 Cost and Quality of Fuels forA 6 J 9 U B u oDecadeSame Monthtotal

  5. CX-008389: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Danger Tree Management on Estes-Pole Hill and Pole Hill-Flatiron 115 Kilovolt Transmission Lines CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 03092012 Location(s): Colorado Offices(s): Western...

  6. CX-008719: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    No. 1, Holcomb- Naselle No. 1, and Raymond-Willapa River No. 1, 115 Kilovolt Transmission Lines CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 05162012 Location(s): Washington Offices(s):...

  7. CX-008708: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    on the Chehalis-Olympia No. 1 and Chehalis-Mayfield No. 1, 115 Kilovolt Transmission Lines CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 05252012 Location(s): Washington, Washington...

  8. EA-1456: Final Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Cheyenne- Miracle Mile (CH-MM) and Ault-Cheyenne (AU-CH) 115 kilovolt (115-kV ) transmission lines to 230-kV. The proposed project consists of rebuilding these transmission lines...

  9. CX-011614: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Curecanti-Blue Mesa 115-kilovolt Transmission Line Danger Tree Management CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 12/04/2013 Location(s): Colorado Offices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Rocky Mountain Region

  10. CX-002435: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Redmond Substation 230-115-Kilovolt Transformer AdditionCX(s) Applied: B4.6Date: 05/07/2010Location(s): Deschutes County, OregonOffice(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  11. CX-008382: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Bridgeport-Sidney 115 Kilovolt Line Rejected Pole Replacement CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 03/16/2012 Location(s): Nebraska Offices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Rocky Mountain Region

  12. CX-012092: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Tucson-Apache 115-Kilovolt Transmission Line Structure Stabilization Project CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 09/06/2013 Location(s): Arizona, Arizona Offices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region

  13. CX-007985: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Acquisition of Cowlitz County Public Utility District's 115-Kilovolt Transmission Line CX(s) Applied: B1.24 Date: 02/24/2012 Location(s): Washington Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  14. CX-011180: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Shelton-Fairmont Number 2 115-Kilovolt Tap CX(s) Applied: B4.11 Date: 09/12/2013 Location(s): Washington Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  15. CX-012086: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Wray-Wray Tap 115-Kilovolt Transmission Line Construction CX(s) Applied: B4.12 Date: 02/28/2014 Location(s): Colorado Offices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Rocky Mountain Region

  16. CX-012078: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Danger Tree Management on the Great Cut Tap 115-Kilovolt Transmission Line CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 02/20/2014 Location(s): Colorado Offices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Rocky Mountain Region

  17. CX-012072: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Archer-Cheyenne North/South 115-kilovolt Transmission Line Structure Replacement CX(s) Applied: B4.13 Date: 03/18/2014 Location(s): Wyoming Offices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Rocky Mountain Region

  18. CX-012084: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Snowy Range-Happy Jack 115-Kilovolt Transmission Line Structure Replacements CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 03/10/2014 Location(s): Wyoming Offices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Rocky Mountain Region

  19. CX-006303: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Interconnection of the Pronghorn Gas Plant 115 Kilovolt Transmission LineCX(s) Applied: B4.11Date: 07/14/2011Location(s): MontanaOffice(s): Western Area Power Administration-Upper Great Plains Region

  20. CX-010686: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Cheyenne Substation KV2A 115-kilovolt Tie Line Installation CX(s) Applied: B4.6 Date: 07/02/2013 Location(s): Wyoming Offices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Rocky Mountain Region

  1. CX-012734: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Bouse Hills Pumping Plant to Harcuvar 115 Kilovolt Transmission Line, Inset Structure Installation CX(s) Applied: B4.6Date: 41878 Location(s): ArizonaOffices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region

  2. EIS-0457: Albany-Eugene Rebuild Project, Lane and Linn Counties, OR

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EIS evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal by BPA to rebuild a 32-mile section of the Albany-Eugene 115-kilovolt No. 1 Transmission Line in Lane and Linn Counties, OR.

  3. Ferry-Based Linear Wireless Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Jie

    of oil, gas, and water pipeline infrastructure using wireless sensor networks. #12;IEEE Globecom 2013 UAE (2006): 2,580 Km of gas pipelines 2,950 Km of oil pipelines 156 Km of refined products pipelines. Desalinated water. Saudi Arabia: 3,800 Km. Oil, Gas, and Water Pipeline UseOil, Gas, and Water

  4. Ferris State University | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluating A PotentialJumpGerman AerospaceEfficiencyInformationFengningFerrari

  5. Paynes Ferry Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRoseConcernsCompanyPCN TechnologyFrance) Jump to:Pay-As-You-Drive

  6. Ferry Barge | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist.New Mexico Feb. 13,Conservation Billing Credits

  7. Database Programming in Transaction Logic Anthony J. Bonner \\Lambda

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bonner, Anthony

    --- an extension of classical predicate logic that accounts in a clean and declarative fashion for the phenomenon of state changes in logic programs and databases. It has a natural model theory and a sound and complete. Finally, Transaction Logic holds promise as a logical model of hitherto non­logical phenomena, including

  8. EA-1894: Albeni Falls Flexible Winter Lake Operations, Bonner, Idaho

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE’s Bonneville Power Administration and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, as co-lead Federal agencies, prepared this EA to evaluate the potential environmental impacts of a proposal to operate Albeni Falls dam during the winter months (approximately December 15th to March 31st) and determine whether the existing Columbia River System Operation Review EIS (DOE/EIS-0170) is adequate or a supplemental or new EIS is required.

  9. Neutron spectrometry using LNL bonner spheres and FLUKA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sarchiapone, L.; Zafiropoulos, D. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro (Italy)

    2013-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The characterization of neutron fields has been made with a system based on a scintillation detector and multiple moderating spheres. The system, together with the unfolding procedure, have been tested in quasi-monochromatic neutron energy fields and in complex, mixed, cyclotron based environments. FLUKA simulations have been used to produce response functions and reference energy spectra.

  10. CX-012113: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    NREL National Wind Technology Center Offsite 115 Kilovolt Tramsmission Line - Planning, Preliminary Design, and Environmental Surveys CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.1 Date: 05/20/2014 Location(s): Colorado Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  11. CX-011718: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Electrical District 2 to Saguaro #2 115 Kilovolt Transmission Line, Marker Ball Installation at Structure 26-10. CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 01/09/2014 Location(s): Arizona Offices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region

  12. CX-005009: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Modify Two Structures Along the Vera Tap to Trentwood-Valley Way #1, 115 Kilovolt Transmission LineCX(s) Applied: B1.3, B4.6Date: 01/10/2011Location(s): Spokane County, WashingtonOffice(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  13. CX-012747: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Alcova-Miracle Mile East 115 Kilovolt Transmission Line Fiber Optic Ground Wire and Structure Replacement Project Natrona and Carbon Counties, Wyoming CX(s) Applied: B1.3, B4.7Date: 41855 Location(s): WyomingOffices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Rocky Mountain Region

  14. CX-010885: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Kiowa Creek-Weld 115-Kilovolt Transmission Line Culvert Replacement CX(s) Applied: B1.3, B1.33 Date: 08/06/2013 Location(s): Colorado Offices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Rocky Mountain Region

  15. CX-011858: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Beaver Creek-Sterling 115 Kilovolt Transmission Line Structure Relocation, Morgan County, Colorado CX(s) Applied: B4.13 Date: 01/21/2014 Location(s): Colorado Offices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Rocky Mountain Region

  16. CX-009227: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Beaver Creek- Big Sandy 115 Kilovolt Transmission Line Structure Replacements - Last Chance Fire CX(s) Applied: B4.13 Date: 08/31/2012 Location(s): Colorado Offices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Rocky Mountain Region

  17. CX-012083: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Rosedale-Willowby-Kiowa Creek 115-Kilovolt Transmission Line Wood H-Structure Replacement CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 04/10/2014 Location(s): Colorado Offices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Rocky Mountain Region

  18. CX-012758: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Danger Tree Management on Curecanti to South Canal and South Canal to Montrose 115 Kilovolt Transmission Lines, Gunnison County, Colorado CX(s) Applied: B1.3Date: 41855 Location(s): ColoradoOffices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Rocky Mountain Region

  19. CX-010108: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Danger Tree Management on Curecanti-Crystal, 115 Kilovolt Transmission Line Danger Tree and Vegetation Management CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 04/25/2013 Location(s): Colorado Offices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Rocky Mountain Region

  20. CX-010550: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Upper Molina-Lower Molina 115 Kilovolt Danger Tree Management Mesa County, Colorado CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 06/14/2013 Location(s): Colorado Offices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Rocky Mountain Region

  1. CX-006816: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Line and Load Interconnection of Coos-Curry Electric Cooperative?s New Substation to Bonneville Power Administration?s Fairview-Bandon 115-Kilovolt Transmission LineCX(s) Applied: B4.6, B4.10Date: 09/26/2011Location(s): Coos County, OregonOffice(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  2. CX-005936: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Erie to Terry Street and Lyons to Longmont Northwest 115 Kilovolt Transmission Line Structure Replacements, Boulder and Broomfield Counties, ColoradoCX(s) Applied: B4.6Date: 05/16/2011Location(s): Boulder County, ColoradoOffice(s): Western Area Power Administration-Rocky Mountain Region

  3. CX-008166: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Amended: Acquisition of a Portion of Cowlitz County Public Utility District’s 115-Kilovolt Transmission Line Washington Way Substation CX(s) Applied: B1.24 Date: 03/22/2012 Location(s): Washington Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  4. CX-011857: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Archer-Cheyenne North/South 115 Kilovolt Transmission Line Structure Replacement, Laramie County, Wyoming CX(s) Applied: B4.13 Date: 01/28/2014 Location(s): Wyoming Offices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Rocky Mountain Region

  5. CX-009088: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Curecanti-Crystal 115 Kilovolt Transmission Line Routine Maintenance of Existing Access Roads and Right-of-Ways CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 08/07/2012 Location(s): Colorado Offices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Rocky Mountain Region

  6. CX-008782: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Danger Tree Management on North Gunnison to Skito 115 Kilovolt Transmission Line Gunnison County, Colorado CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 07/02/2012 Location(s): Colorado Offices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Rocky Mountain Region

  7. CX-008781: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Danger Tree Management on Curecanti to Blue Mesa 115 Kilovolt Transmission Line Gunnison County, Colorado CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 07/02/2012 Location(s): Colorado Offices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Rocky Mountain Region

  8. CX-012356: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Lovell-Yellowtail No. 1 115-kilovolt Transmission Line Culvert Replacement Project, Big Horn County, Wyoming CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 07/01/2014 Location(s): Wyoming Offices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Rocky Mountain Region

  9. EA-1967: Hills Creek-Lookout Point Transmission Line Rebuild, Lane County, Oregon

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Bonneville Power Administration is preparing an EA to assess potential environmental impacts of the proposed rebuild of its 26-mile 115 kilovolt (kV) wood-pole Hills Creek-Lookout Point transmission line, which is generally located between Lowell and Oakridge, in Lane County, Oregon.

  10. EA-1961: Kalispell-Kerr Transmission Line Rebuild Project, Kalispell and Polson, Montana

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Bonneville Power Administration is preparing an EA to evaluate potential environmental impacts of rebuilding its 41-mile long 115 kilovolt (kV) wood-pole Kalispell-Kerr transmission line between Kalispell and Polson, Montana. Additional information is available on the project website, http://efw.bpa.gov/environmental_services/Document_Library/KALISPELL_KERR/.

  11. EA-1950: Grand Coulee-Creston Transmission Line Rebuild; Grant and Lincoln Counties, Washington

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Bonneville Power Administration prepared this EA to evaluate potential environmental impacts of rebuilding approximately 28 miles of the Grand Coulee-Creston No. 1 115-kilovolt (kV) transmission line between Coulee Dam in Grant County and Creston in Lincoln County, Washington.

  12. Opportunistic Scheduling of a Message Ferry in Sensor Veeraruna Kavitha

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    [10], of Vehicular Ad-Hoc Net- works (Vanets) [6] and of wireless sensor networks [7]. In the UmassDiesel- sages to throw boxes (http://prisms.cs.umass.edu/diesel). This project was supported by the Indo provided that copies are not made or distributed for profit or commercial advantage and that copies bear

  13. Short sea shipping : barriers, incentives and feasibility of truck ferry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Darcy, Joseph

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Many problems plague the United States' transportation infrastructure: congestion, poor roadway conditions, obsolescence, and maintenance cost not the least among these. In recent years, the Department of Transportation, ...

  14. Microsoft Word - Central Ferry Fiber Project CX.doc

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    machinery or helicopters will be operated between towers 214 and 231 as well as between towers 92 and 104 of the Little Goose-Lower Granite transmission lines until either it...

  15. August 2000 (Data-Mining ) Michael Ferris , Todd Munson Interior ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Model Problems for the Multigrid Optimization of Systems Governed by Differential Equations July 2002 (Control ..... On the Optimal On-Line Management of Photovoltaic-Hydrogen Hybrid Energy Systems .... A new step size rule in Yan et al.

  16. Washington: State Ferries Run Cleaner With Biodiesel | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradley Nickell Director ofDepartment ofof EnergyPondWashington

  17. PUD No 1 of Ferry County | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup |JilinLuOpenNorthOlympiaAnalysis) Jump to:PUD No 1 of Douglas CountyPUD

  18. Dobbs Ferry, New York: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model,DOE FacilityDimondale, Michigan:Emerling Farm <SiteLtdDixon/Lee

  19. Measurement of routinely encountered neutron field doses using portable survey instruments and a Bonner multisphere system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, Donald Reed

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ludlum Model 15 NSC-A NSC-8 NSC-C NSC-D NSC-E NSC-F NSC-G NSC-H NSC-I NSC-J NSC-K NSC-L NSC-M 30. 19 mRem/hr 4. 38 2. 70 1. 54 4. 08 4. 31 5. 42 10. 91 4. 19 0. 48 0. 46 3. 64 0. 50 1000 mRem/hr 90 58 36 140 125 90 32 25... 20 17 70 10 950 mRem/hr 120 40 32 160 135 80 45 28 16 11 86 8 2 CYC-A CYC-8 CYC-C CYC-D CYC-E CYC-F 31 . 11 25. 23 3. 19 1. 95 1. 02 1. 96 1000 190 75 32 14 20 1550 176 72 23 15 24 denotes measurement made...

  20. EIS-0483: Estes to Flatiron Substation Transmission Lines Rebuild Project, Larimer County, Colorado

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Western Area Power Administration (Western) – with USDA Forest Service, Arapaho and Roosevelt National Forest, as a cooperating agency – is preparing an EIS that analyzes the potential environmental impacts of a proposal to rebuild and upgrade two 115-kilovolt single-circuit transmission lines between the Flatiron Substation and the intersection of Mall Road and U.S. Highway 36 in Estes Park, Larimer County, Colorado. Additional information is available on Western’s project website.

  1. EA-1981: Bonneville-Hood River Transmission Line Rebuild, Multnomah and Hood River Counties, Oregon

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) is preparing an EA to assess potential environmental impacts of a proposal to rebuild its 24-mile long, 115 kilovolt Bonneville-Hood River transmission line. The existing line runs between the Bonneville Powerhouse at Bonneville Dam in Multnomah County, Oregon, and BPA's existing Hood River Substation in Hood River County, Oregon. The project would include replacing structures and conductor wires, improving access roads, and constructing new access roads or trails where needed.

  2. The Lelystad Karveel: reconstruction of a seventeenth-century Dutch passenger ferry 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saul, Melissa Dianne

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    virtual reconstruction of the exterior and interior forms of the ship was modelled on the computer. The visualization was then shown to a group of nautical archaeology students, professors and staff who were familiar with the ship. After viewing...

  3. Design projections for a commuter ferry terminal and commercial pier in Portland, Maine's historic urban waterfront

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmidt, Eric Paul

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The work is based on a design project: to connect the grid urban form, and its associated buildings, and their uses, to the larger Maine (natural) landscape, and its forms. These two contextual categories will strongly ...

  4. Controlling the Mobility of Multiple Data Transport Ferries in a Delay-Tolerant Network

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schindelhauer, Christian

    such that energy consumption in communication is minimized. In the NIMS project [18], Kaiser et al. propose the use or aerial vehicles may provide the required mobility for the carried devices. With mobility capability of infrastructure-supported mobility in sensor networks for autonomous operations and physical reconfiguration

  5. THE FINAL SERIES OF OILS TESTED AS A POTENTIAL SOLUTION TO THE GALVESTON FERRY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin, University of

    DOT) began using an ultra-low sulfur diesel fuel, Texas Low Emission Diesel (TxLED), in all of its diesel dithiophosphate (ZDP). This oil was chosen to examine the effects of a synthetic oil with a low ash content. EMD low-cost solution. Additionally, none of the GFO engines is still under warranty. Also, the oil

  6. The Lelystad Karveel: reconstruction of a seventeenth-century Dutch passenger ferry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saul, Melissa Dianne

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    T H E L E L Y S T A D K A R V E E L : RECONSTRUCTION OF A SEVENTEENTH-CENTURY D U T C H PASSENGER F E R R Y A Thesis by MELISSA DIANNE S A U L Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A & M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of M A S T E R OF SCIENCE August 1994 Major Subject: Visualization Sciences THE L E L Y S T A D K A R V E E L : RECONSTRUCTION OF A SEVENTEENTH-CENTURY D U T C H PASSENGER F E R R Y MELISSA DIANNE S A U L Submitted to Texas A...

  7. The role of photochemistry in Titans atmospheric chemistry James Ferris a,*, Buu Tran a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferris, James P.

    performed to simulate the action of long wavelength solar UV light on TitanÕs atmosphere. The exper- iments of solar ultraviolet (UV) light and SaturnÕs magnetospheric electrons on the methane and nitrogen in its of Life and Department of Chemistry, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, 110 8th Street, Troy, NY 12180, USA

  8. A List-Processing Optimizer for Curry Elvira Albert C esar Ferri Germ an Vidal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferri, Cèsar

    -processing optimizations: #15; Short Cut Deforestation: this is an adaptation of the short cut deforestation introduced by Gill et al. [7]. The goal of deforestation is the removal of some intermediate list used to compute compiler since the process is fully automatic and transparent to the user. 2 Short-cut deforestation

  9. RAMONA-3B calculations for Browns Ferry ATWS (Anticipated Transient Without Scram) study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saha, P; Slovik, G C; Neymotin, L Y

    1987-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Several aspects of the Anticipated Transient Without Scram (ATWS) initiated by an inadvertent closure of all Main Steam Isolation Valves (MSIV) in a typical BWR/4 are analyzed in the report. The analysis is performed using the Brookhaven National Laboratory code, RAMONA-3B, which employs a three-dimensional neutron kinetics model coupled with a parallel-channel thermal hydraulics in representing a Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) Core. Four different transient scenarios have been investigated: (a) downcomer water level and reactor pressure control, (b) manual control rod insertion transient, (c) high pressure boil-off, and (d) recirculation pump trip failure. Results of these calculations should provide better understanding of mitigative effects of operator actions during ATWS, thus helping in the development of adequate Emergency Procedure Guidelines (EPG) required for the BWR plant safety. A few unresolved questions subject to future investigations are also discussed.

  10. Impacts of Ferry Terminals on Juvenile Salmon Movement along Puget Sound Shorelines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    filter beneath the terminal structure. Recommendations areand operation of WSF terminals with regard to minimizing theto address whether WSF terminals alter the behavior of

  11. Microsoft Word - 2011 March 11 ROD - Central Ferry-Lower Monumental...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to the No Action Alternative, allow BPA to relieve transmission constraints in southeast Washington and to fulfill requests for long-term firm transmission service that it...

  12. 3610 Collins Ferry Road, P.O. Box 880, Morgantown, WV 26507

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China 2015ofDepartment ofCBFO-13-3322(EE)DepartmentVery5Dryers;under 3000Energy 36

  13. A "Ferris Bueller Style" Look at Small Business Contracting at the

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China 2015ofDepartmentDepartment of Energy This document summarizesDepartment of

  14. K. Aydin, V. E. Ferry, R. M. Briggs, and H. A. Atwater California Institute of Technology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes |Is Your Home as Ready for(SC)JointJournal Cover191Broadband

  15. 3610 Collins Ferry Road, P.O. Box 880, Morgantown, WV 26507

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032) -Less isNFebruaryOctober 2, 2014Energy,FNeed more4351 MEMORANDUM FOR

  16. Microsoft Word - BNRS_FERRY_3D_DEA_DRAFT_EA

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently Asked Questions forCheneyNovember S. DEPARTMENT OFMonday,APPENDIX HF UnitedKOOTENAI

  17. Microsoft Word - 2011 March 11 ROD - Central Ferry-Lower Monumental.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHighandSWPA / SPRA / USACE SWPAURTeC: 21536222 ACRF9, 2010 FINALFerry-Lower

  18. Reduction of Emissions from a High Speed Ferry | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin of ContaminationHubs+18, 2012Energy ReliabilityNewsEnergy Vehicleof

  19. EA-1931: Keeler to Tillamook Transmission Line Rebuild Project, Washington and Tillamook Counties, Oregon

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Bonneville Power Administration prepared this EA to assess the potential environmental impacts of the proposed rebuild of the Keeler-Forest Grove and Forest Grove-Tillamook 115-kilovolt (kV) transmission lines between the cities of Hillsboro and Tillamook, in Washington and Tillamook Counties, Oregon. The 58-mile-long rebuild would include replacement of all wood-pole structures over 10 years in age. Some existing access roads would be improved to accommodate construction equipment and some new road access would be acquired or constructed in areas where access is not available.

  20. El Paso Electric Company Diablo Substation to the US-Mexico border 115kV transmission line project. Final Environmental Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Environmental Assessment documents the analysis of alternative corridors for development and operation of a proposed 115 kilovolt transmission line using private lands and transporting power to the US-Mexico international border. The project will require (1) an amendment to El Paso Electric Company`s existing export authorization to transfer power across this border, and (2) a Presidential Permit for construction of the transmission line. The project would be located in Dona Ana county in southern New Mexico, approximately five miles west of El Paso, Texas. The alternative corridors, specific locations within those corridors, and structure types are identified and analyzed in the environmental studies.

  1. A descriptive, annotated calendar of the letters from Harriet and Leon Lewis to their publisher Robert Bonner, with a critical introduction and notes 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Norton, Saundra E

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    tomorrow with all the loss and scandal of such a proceeding, and take the next steamer for a new country" (see calendar item 24). Throughout their letters, the Lewises make similar requests for personal loans. The letters reveal their intention of paying...

  2. Jules Ferry and Henri Maret: The Battle of Church and State at the Sorbonne, 1879-1884

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hinkel, Troy Joseph

    2011-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    , I cannot begin to thank them all. For the sake of charity and gratitude, however, I will attempt to thank a few, for without them this work could not have been accomplished. Firstly, I wish to thank Leslie Tuttle, Ph.D., who generously agreed... me so much strength. Laura, I could not have done this without you! I also want to thank Nicolas Jaumard, Ph.D., whose overwhelming assistance and friendship helped me in so many ways that I cannot begin to thank him. I also with to thank...

  3. 1999 GWU, RPI, VCU All Rights Reserved Washington State Ferries Risk Assessment Final Report The Washington State

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    's Transportation Policy Advisor Representative Mike Cooper House Transportation Committee House of Representatives, the Washington State Office of Marine Safety, the Port of Houston, and The Government of Argentina. The tasks

  4. EIS-0470: U.S. Department of Energy Loan Guarantee for the Cape Wind Energy Project on the Outer Continental Shelf off Massachusetts, Nantucket Sound

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The DOE Loan Programs Office is proposing to offer a loan guarantee to Cape Wind Associates, LLC for the construction and start-up of the Cape Wind Energy Project in Nantucket Sound, offshore of Massachusetts. The proposed Cape Wind Energy Project would consist of up to 130, 3.6-MW turbine generators, in an area of roughly 25-square miles, and would include 12.5 miles of 115-kilovolt submarine transmission cable and an electric service platform. To inform DOE's decision regarding a loan guarantee, DOE adopted the Department of the Interior’s 2009 Final Cape Wind Energy Project EIS, in combination with two Cape Wind Environmental Assessments dated May 2010 and April 2011 (per 40 CFR 1506.4), as a DOE Final EIS (DOE/EIS-0470). The adequacy of the Department of the Interior final EIS adopted by DOE is the subject of a judicial action. This project is inactive.

  5. Institution Name Institution Name Address Place Zip Notes Website...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Drive Evergreen Colorado http www EverSealedWindows com Rockies Area Ferris State University Ferris State University Big Rapids Michigan http www ferrisstateuniversity com...

  6. A General Linear Least Squares SDOF Algorithm for Identifying Eigenvalues and J. H. Ginsberg, M. Allen, A. Ferri, and C. Moloney

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allen, Matthew S.

    points to be between the quarter- power points of a resonance peak is demonstrated to be a good criterion] and Maia et al [2] provide extensive surveys, and Alle- mang [3] gives a concise review of the more common

  7. Kootenai River Focus Watershed Coordination, 2002-2003 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Munson, Bob; Munson, Vicki (Kootenai River Network, Libby, MT); Rogers, Rox (US Fish and Wildlife Service, Libby, MT)

    2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Kootenai River Network Inc. (KRN) was incorporated in Montana in early 1995 with a mission ''to involve stakeholders in the protection and restoration of the chemical, physical and biological integrity of the Kootenai River Basin waters''. The KRN operates with funding from donations, membership dues, private, state and federal grants, and with funding through the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for a Focus Watershed Coordinator Program. The Focus Watershed Program is administered to KRN as of October 2001, through a Memorandum of Understanding. Katie Randall resigned her position as Watershed Coordinator in late January 2003 and Munson Consulting was contracted to fill that position through the BPA contract period ending May 30, 2003. To improve communications with in the Kootenai River watershed, the board and staff engaged watershed stakeholders in a full day KRN watershed conference on May 15 and 16 in Bonners Ferry, Idaho. This Annual General Meeting was a tremendous success with over 75 participants representing over 40 citizen groups, tribes and state/provincial/federal agencies from throughout northern Montana and Idaho as well as British Columbia and Alberta. Membership in the KRN increased during the course of the BPA 02/03 grant period. The board of directors grew in numbers during this same time frame and an Advisory Council was formed to assist in transboundary efforts while developing two reorganized KRN committees (Habitat/Restoration/Monitoring (HRM) and Communication/Education/Outreach (CEO)). These committees will serve pivotal roles in communications, outreach, and education about watershed issues, as well as habitat restoration work being accomplished throughout the entire watershed. During this BPA grant period, the KRN has capitalized on the transboundary interest in the Kootenai River watershed. Jim and Laura Duncan of Kimberley, British Columbia, have been instrumental volunteers who have acted as Canadian liaisons to the KRN. As a result, restoration work is in the planning stages for Canadian tributaries that flow into the Moyie River in northern Idaho and the Yaak River in northwest Montana.

  8. applying object oriented: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    developed LabFlow-1, the first version of a benchmark that con- cisely captures the DBMS Bonner, Anthony 157 An Annotated Bibliography Object--Orientation and Deduction...

  9. Fact Sheet Fact Sheet Fact Sheet Fact Sheet Fact Sheet Fact

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Clark Fork, Bonner County, Idaho (see map) acres: 132 Partners: The Idaho Department of Fish and Game Purpose: The Bonneville Power Administration is partnering with the Idaho...

  10. ORIGINAL PAPER Ionizing radiation induces DNA double-strand breaks in bystander primary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    fibroblasts Mykyta V Sokolov1,2 , Lubomir B Smilenov3 , Eric J Hall3 , Igor G Panyutin1 , William M Bonner*,4

  11. IEEE JOURNAL OF PHOTOVOLTAICS, VOL. 3, NO. 2, APRIL 2013 599 Accounting for Localized Defects in the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atwater, Harry

    in the Optoelectronic Design of Thin-Film Solar Cells Michael G. Deceglie, Vivian E. Ferry, A. Paul Alivisatos USA (e-mail: deceglie@caltech.edu; haa@caltech.edu). V. E. Ferry and A. P. Alivisatos

  12. Breaking Through the Bottleneck Transportation to Make Stewart a Viable New York Airport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    congested air and ground- based traffic: High Speed Commercial Ferries (HSCF), Sky- Cat 50 airships, and two

  13. Environmental Assessment of the Gering-Stegall 115-kV Transmission Line Consolidation Project, Scotts Bluff County, Nebraska

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy (DOE), Western Area Power Administration (Western) proposes to consolidate segments of two transmission lines near the Gering Substation in Gering, Nebraska. The transmission lines are both located in Scotts Bluff County, Nebraska. The transmission lines are both located in Scotts Bluff County, Nebraska, within the city of Gering. Presently, there are three parallel 115-kilovolt (kV) transmission lines on separate rights-of-way (ROW) that terminate at the Gering Substation. The project would include dismantling the Archer-Gering wood-pole transmission line and rebuilding the remaining two lines on single-pole steel double circuit structures. The project would consolidate the Gering-Stegall North and Gering-Stegall South 115-kV transmission lines on to one ROW for a 1.33-mile segment between the Gering Substation and a point west of the Gering Landfill. All existing wood-pole H-frame structures would be removed, and the Gering-Stegall North and South ROWs abandoned. Western is responsible for the design, construction, operation, and maintenance of the line. Western prepared an environmental assessment (EA) that analyzed the potential environmental impacts of the proposed construction, operation, and maintenance of the 115-kV transmission line consolidation. Based on the analyses in the EA, the DOE finds that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment, within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA).

  14. Big George to Carter Mountain 115-kV transmission line project, Park and Hot Springs Counties, Wyoming. Environmental Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Western Area Power Administration (Western) is proposing to rebuild, operate, and maintain a 115-kilovolt (kV) transmission line between the Big George and Carter Mountain Substations in northwest Wyoming (Park and Hot Springs Counties). This environmental assessment (EA) was prepared in compliance with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) and the regulations of the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) and the Department of Energy (DOE). The existing Big George to Carter Mountain 69-kV transmission line was constructed in 1941 by the US Department of Interior, Bureau of Reclamation, with 1/0 copper conductor on wood-pole H-frame structures without an overhead ground wire. The line should be replaced because of the deteriorated condition of the wood-pole H-frame structures. Because the line lacks an overhead ground wire, it is subject to numerous outages caused by lightning. The line will be 54 years old in 1995, which is the target date for line replacement. The normal service life of a wood-pole line is 45 years. Under the No Action Alternative, no new transmission lines would be built in the project area. The existing 69-kV transmission line would continue to operate with routine maintenance, with no provisions made for replacement.

  15. Kootenai River Focus Watershed Coordination, 2003-2004 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kootenai River Network, (Kootenai River Network, Libby, MT)

    2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Kootenai River Network (KRN) was contracted by the Bonneville Power Administration; PPA Project Number 96087200 for the period June 1, 2003 to May 31, 2004 to provide Kootenai River basin watershed coordination services. The prime focus of the KRN is coordinating activities and disseminating information related to watershed improvement and education and outreach with other interest groups in the Kootenai River basin. To this end, the KRN primarily focuses on maintaining communication networks among private and public watershed improvement groups in the Columbia River Basin. The KRN willing shares its resources with these groups. The 2003-2004 BPA contract extended the original Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks contract, which was transferred to the Kootenai River Network through a Memorandum of Understanding in November 2001. The KRN objectives of this contract were carried out through Watershed Coordinator position. The highly successful Kootenai River Network Annual General Meeting in Bonners Ferry in May 2003 demonstrated the tremendous gains that the Kootenai River Network has made in trans-boundary networking of watershed issues and accomplishments. The Annual General Meeting included seventy five participants representing more than forty US and Canadian citizen groups, tribes, first nations, agencies, ministries, businesses and private land owners from Montana, British Columbia, Idaho and Alberta. The International Restoration Tour in July 2004 featured the Grave Creek and Therriault Wetlands restoration projects in Montana and the Sand Creek and Wolf Creek restoration projects in British Columbia. The tour was attended by more than thirty people representing US and Canadian Federal and State/Provincial agencies, schools, colleges, conservation groups, private land owners, consultants, tribes, first nations, and politicians. These exciting trans-boundary successes encouraged the KRN to establish half-time Watershed Coordinator positions in both the United States and Canada. In September 2004 Kim Laub was hired as US-Watershed Coordinator and Jim and Laura Duncan were hired as Canadian Watershed Coordinators. To rejuvenate and revitalize the KRN, the Board conducted a strategic thinking and planning meeting in November 2004. All Board, staff and Advisory members participated in a combined effort to clearly define the goals of the KRN and to design ways of achieving those goals. Affirming and integrating board policy was a primary focus and it included writing accurate job descriptions for all KRN positions. KRN committee goals, the BPA contract and the Statement of Work plan were reviewed to establish future directions for a complex organization.

  16. DOCUMENT DE TRAVAIL -L.E.S.T.-UMR 6123 Universit de Provence (U1) et Universit de la Mditerrane (U2) -35 avenue J. FERRY -13626 AIX-EN-PROVENCE CEDEX

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    = être soldat. Jusqu'au XII ème siècle, « militer » c'est donc faire la guerre. Et si l'on s' « engageait militant est comme le soldat assujetti à une organisation hiérarchisée. La base délègue son pouvoir à un

  17. DOCUMENT DE TRAVAIL-L.E.S.T.-CNRS UMR 6123 Universit de Provence (U1) et Universit de la Mditerrane (U2) -35 avenue J. FERRY -13626 AIX-EN-PROVENCE CEDEX

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    of modern citizenship emerged in opposition to feudal notion of status, which defines the relations between the contract, which replaces the feudal notion of status inherited from a `condition'. The contract is thus) and equal (the principle of the equality of the parties). By abolishing the feudal orders, the French

  18. *Correspondence to: Kent T. Danielson, U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center, Waterways Experiment Station, 3909 Halls Ferry Road, CEERD-SD-R, Vicksburg, MS 39180-6199, U.S.A.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Shaofan

    -mail: danielk@wes.army.mil Contract/grant sponsor: Army High Performance Computing Research Center; contract and Shoafan Li Department of Mechanical Engineering and Army High Performance Computing Research Center

  19. DOCUMENT DE TRAVAIL -L.E.S.T.-CNRS UMR 6123 Universit de Provence (U1) et Universit de la Mditerrane (U2) -35 avenue J. FERRY -13626 AIX-EN-PROVENCE CEDEX

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    mobilisation. JONGLER AVEC LES TEMPS 1 87% des 400 000 infirmier-e-s sont des femmes, la moitié travaillent

  20. DOCUMENT DE TRAVAIL -L.E.S.T.-UMR 6123 Universit de Provence (U1) et Universit de la Mditerrane (U2) -35 avenue J. FERRY -13626 AIX-EN-PROVENCE CEDEX

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    : 04.42. 26.79.37 Email lest@univ-aix.fr http://lest.univ-aix.fr L'économie du système hospitalier ; Le Management Journal, Moscou. #12;2 Or, la question de la place du Marché revient en force aujourd'hui dans les, qui rejoint celle du "nouveau management public ", est relayée par nombre d'organismes internationaux

  1. Old Dominion University Teacher Candidates Fall 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thurgood Marshall Elem 757-558-8923 April Bonner-Coats Jack Baker 09/04/2012-10/19/2012 00415429 Fairfax.648.5300 Debbie Hague Richard Kyle 09/04/2012-12/07/2012 0

  2. Synergies in Natural Gas and Hydrogen Fuels

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    F presentation slides: synergies in Natural Gas and hydrogen Fuels Brian Bonner, Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. 1 OctOber 2011 | ArgOnne nAtiOnAl lAbOrAtOry NG Workshop summary...

  3. Dhanya Mary Abraham Reece Larson Adamson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lozano-Robledo, Alvaro

    James R Boivie John William Bojorquez Lindsey Elizabeth Bonitz Olivia Ann Bonner Dean's List Spring 2014 Curran Tapan Paresh Dalal Tara Lin D'Ambruoso Zachary James D'Amico David Clark Daniels Corey Danko Ian

  4. factsheet

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the Coeur d'Alene Tribe, Kootenai Tribes, Kalispell Tribe, and the Idaho Department of Fish and Game. Located in Bonner County, the property provides forested wetland and wetland...

  5. An Investigation of the Perceptions of Latino High School Males Who Were in Danger of Dropping Out but Persevered

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nell, Jan Elizabeth

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Chambers Fred Bonner Anita McCormick Head of Department, Fredrick Nafukho December 2010 Major Subject: Educational Administration iii ABSTRACT An Investigation of the Perceptions of Latino High School Males Who Were in Danger of Dropping.... Fred Bonner, Dr. Tara Venzant Chambers, and Dr. Anita McCormick, was insightful and invaluable. I never felt discouraged or criticized when they offered constructive comments to improve the study. For that, I am truly grateful. Dr. Jim Scheurich, my...

  6. Understanding Black Male Athlete Social Responsibility (BMASR): A Case Study of an NBA Franchise

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agyemang, Kwame Jesse Asamoah

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY Approved by: Chair of Committee, John N. Singer Committee Members, George B. Cunningham Gregg Bennett Fred Bonner Head... and wisdom, this would not have been possible. In addition, I would like to express appreciation for the remaining committee members, Dr. George B. Cunningham, Dr. Gregg Bennett, and Dr. Fred Bonner. The insight they provided paved the way for a better...

  7. Ashland Area Support Substation Project : Environmental Assessment.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) provides wholesale electric service to the City of Ashland (the City) by transferring power over Pacific Power & Light Company`s (PP&L) 115-kilovolt (kV) transmission lines and through PP&L`s Ashland and Oak Knoll Substations. The City distributes power over a 12.5-kV system which is heavily loaded during winter peak periods and which has reached the limit of its ability to serve peak loads in a reliable manner. Peak loads under normal winter conditions have exceeded the ratings of the transformers at both the Ashland and Oak Knoll Substations. In 1989, the City modified its distribution system at the request of PP&L to allow transfer of three megawatts (MW`s) of electric power from the overloaded Ashland Substation to the Oak Knoll Substation. In cooperation with PP&L, BPA installed a temporary 6-8 megavolt-amp (MVA) 115-12.5-kV transformer for this purpose. This additional transformer, however, is only a temporary remedy. BPA needs to provide additional, reliable long-term service to the Ashland area through additional transformation in order to keep similar power failures from occurring during upcoming winters in the Ashland area. The temporary installation of another 20-MVA mobile transformer at the Ashland Substation and additional load curtailment are currently being studied to provide for sustained electrical service by the peak winter period 1992. Two overall electrical plans-of-service are described and evaluated in this report. One of them is proposed for action. Within that proposed plan-of-service are location options for the substation. Note that descriptions of actions that may be taken by the City of Ashland are based on information provided by them.

  8. Ashland Area Support Substation Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) provides wholesale electric service to the City of Ashland (the City) by transferring power over Pacific Power Light Company's (PP L) 115-kilovolt (kV) transmission lines and through PP L's Ashland and Oak Knoll Substations. The City distributes power over a 12.5-kV system which is heavily loaded during winter peak periods and which has reached the limit of its ability to serve peak loads in a reliable manner. Peak loads under normal winter conditions have exceeded the ratings of the transformers at both the Ashland and Oak Knoll Substations. In 1989, the City modified its distribution system at the request of PP L to allow transfer of three megawatts (MW's) of electric power from the overloaded Ashland Substation to the Oak Knoll Substation. In cooperation with PP L, BPA installed a temporary 6-8 megavolt-amp (MVA) 115-12.5-kV transformer for this purpose. This additional transformer, however, is only a temporary remedy. BPA needs to provide additional, reliable long-term service to the Ashland area through additional transformation in order to keep similar power failures from occurring during upcoming winters in the Ashland area. The temporary installation of another 20-MVA mobile transformer at the Ashland Substation and additional load curtailment are currently being studied to provide for sustained electrical service by the peak winter period 1992. Two overall electrical plans-of-service are described and evaluated in this report. One of them is proposed for action. Within that proposed plan-of-service are location options for the substation. Note that descriptions of actions that may be taken by the City of Ashland are based on information provided by them.

  9. Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact: Wind Energy Center Edgeley/Kulm Project, North Dakota

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2003-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The proposed Edgeley/Kulm Project is a 21-megawatt (MW) wind generation project proposed by Florida Power and Light (FPL) Energy North Dakota Wind LLC (Dakota Wind) and Basin Electric Power Cooperative (Basin). The proposed windfarm would be located in La Moure County, south central North Dakota, near the rural farming communities of Kulm and Edgeley. The proposed windfarm is scheduled to be operational by the end of 2003. Dakota Wind and other project proponents are seeking to develop the proposed Edgeley/Kulm Project to provide utilities and, ultimately, electric energy consumers with electricity from a renewable energy source at the lowest possible cost. A new 115-kilovolt (kV) transmission line would be built to transmit power generated by the proposed windfarm to an existing US Department of Energy Western Area Power Administration (Western) substation located near Edgeley. The proposed interconnection would require modifying Western's Edgeley Substation. Modifying the Edgeley Substation is a Federal proposed action that requires Western to review the substation modification and the proposed windfarm project for compliance with Section 102(2) of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969, 42 U.S.C. 4332, and Department of Energy NEPA Implementing Procedures (10 CFR Part 1021). Western is the lead Federal agency for preparation of this Environmental Assessment (EA). The US Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) is a cooperating agency with Western in preparing the EA. This document follows regulation issued by the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) for implementing procedural provisions of NEPA (40 CFR 1500-1508), and is intended to disclose potential impacts on the quality of the human environment resulting from the proposed project. If potential impacts are determined to be significant, preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement would be required. If impacts are determined to be insignificant, Western would complete a Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI). Environmental protection measures that would be included in the design of the proposed project are included.

  10. inv1d_adjoin.ps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    rial testing (Burk and Weiss, 1979), polymer physics. (Ferry, 1970) and ocean acoustics (Stoll, 1977). The organization of the paper is as follows: in sec-.

  11. E-Print Network 3.0 - anhydrase viii deficiency Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    viii deficiency Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Prokaryotic carbonic anhydrases Kerry S. Smith *, James G. Ferry Summary: Prokaryotic carbonic anhydrases Kerry S. Smith *, James G....

  12. E-Print Network 3.0 - anhydrase ix correlates Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ix correlates Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Prokaryotic carbonic anhydrases Kerry S. Smith *, James G. Ferry Summary: Prokaryotic carbonic anhydrases Kerry S. Smith *, James G....

  13. E-Print Network 3.0 - anhydrase inhibitors glycosylsulfanilamides...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Prokaryotic carbonic anhydrases Kerry S. Smith *, James G. Ferry Summary: to acetazolamide, a car- bonic anhydrase inhibitor....

  14. E-Print Network 3.0 - anhydrase inhibitor induced Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    inhibitor induced Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Prokaryotic carbonic anhydrases Kerry S. Smith *, James G. Ferry Summary: to acetazolamide, a car- bonic anhydrase inhibitor....

  15. E-Print Network 3.0 - anhydrase ix biochemical Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ix biochemical Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Prokaryotic carbonic anhydrases Kerry S. Smith *, James G. Ferry Summary: Prokaryotic carbonic anhydrases Kerry S. Smith *, James G....

  16. EIS-0422: EPA Notice of Availability of the Draft Environmental...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Line, Garfield, Columbia and Walla Walla Counties, Washington. Notice of Availability of the Draft Environmental Impact Statement Central Ferry-Lower Monumental 500-kilovolt...

  17. Assessing microsite and regeneration niche preferences when introducing endangered species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peet, Robert K.

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    E-Print Network [OSTI]

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  1. Volunteer News U.S. Department of the Interior National Park Service

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

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  2. Comment on "How the result of a single coin toss can turn out to be 100 heads"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lev Vaidman

    2014-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

    In a recent Letter [PRL 113, 120404 (2014)] Ferrie and Combes claimed to show "that weak values are not inherently quantum, but rather a purely statistical feature of pre- and post-selection with disturbance." In this Comment I will show that this claim is not valid. It follows from Ferrie and Combes misunderstanding of the concept of weak value.

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    Napier, Terrence

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  1. Proton-Lambda correlations in central Au+Au collisions at root s(NN)=200 GeV 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adams, J.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Amonett, J.; Anderson, B. D.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G. S.; Badyal, S. K.; Bai, Y.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L. S.; Baudot, J.; Bekele, S.; Belaga, V. V.; Bellingeri-Laurikainen, A.; Bellwied, R.; Berger, J.; Bezverkhny, B. I.; Bharadwaj, S.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhatia, V. S.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Billmeier, A.; Bland, L. C.; Blyth, C. O.; Blyth, S. -L; Bonner, B. E.; Botje, M.; Boucham, A.; Bouchet, J.; Brandin, A. V.; Bravar, A.; Bystersky, M.; Cadman, R. V.; Cai, X. Z.; Caines, H.; Sanchez, M. Calderon de la Barca; Castillo, J.; Catu, O.; Cebra, D.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Choi, H. A.; Christie, W.; Coffin, J. P.; Cormier, T. M.; Cosentino, M. R.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Das, D.; Das, S.; Daugherity, M.; de Moura, M. M.; Dedovich, T. G.; DePhillips, M.; Derevschikov, A. A.; Didenko, L.; Dietel, T.; Dogra, S. M.; Dong, W. J.; Dong, X.; Draper, J. E.; Du, F.; Dubey, A. K.; Dunin, V. B.; Dunlop, J. C.; Mazumdar, M. R. Dutta; Eckardt, V.; Edwards, W. R.; Efimov, L. G.; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Fachini, P.; Faivre, J.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Filimonov, K.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Fornazier, K. S. F.; Fu, J.; Gagliardi, Carl A.; Gaillard, L.; Gans, J.; Ganti, M. S.; Geurts, F.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gonzalez, J. E.; Gos, H.; Grachov, O.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Guertin, S. M.; Guo, Y.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, N.; Gutierrez, T. D.; Hallman, T. J.; Hamed, A.; Hardtke, D.; Harris, J. W.; Heinz, M.; Henry, T. W.; Hepplemann, S.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Horner, M. J.; Huang, H. Z.; Huang, S. L.; Hughes, E. W.; Humanic, T. J.; Igo, G.; Ishihara, A.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jedynak, M.; Jiang, H.; Jones, P. G.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kang, K.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Khodyrev, V. Yu; Kim, B. C.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Kislov, E. M.; Klay, J.; Klein, S. R.; Koetke, D. D.; Kollegger, T.; Kopytine, M.; Kotchenda, L.; Kowalik, K. L.; Kramer, M.; Kravtsov, P.; Kravtsov, V. I.; Krueger, K.; Kuhn, C.; Kulikov, A. I.; Kumar, A.; Kutuev, R. Kh; Kuznetsov, A. A.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; Lange, S.; Laue, F.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, C. -H; Lehocka, S.; LeVine, M. J.; Li, C.; Li, Q.; Li, Y.; Lin, G.; Lindenbaum, S. J.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Liu, H.; Liu, J.; Liu, L.; Liu, Q. J.; Liu, Z.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Long, H.; Longacre, R. S.; Lopez-Noriega, M.; Love, W. A.; Lu, Y.; Ludlam, T.; Lynn, D.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, J. G.; Ma, Y. G.; Magestro, D.; Mahajan, S.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Majka, R.; Mangotra, L. K.; Manweiler, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Martin, L.; Marx, J. N.; Matis, H. S.; Matulenko, Yu A.; McClain, C. J.; McShane, T. S.; Meissner, F.; Melnick, Yu; Meschanin, A.; Miller, M. L.; Minaev, N. G.; Mironov, C.; Mischke, A.; Mishra, D. K.; Mitchell, J.; Mohanty, B.; Molnar, L.; Moore, C. F.; Morozov, D. A.; Munhoz, M. G.; Nandi, B. K.; Nayak, S. K.; Nayak, T. K.; Nelson, J. M.; Netrakanti, P. K.; Nikitin, V. A.; Nogach, L. V.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Okorokov, V.; Oldenburg, M.; Olson, D.; Pal, S. K.; Panebratsev, Y.; Panitkin, S. Y.; Pavlinov, A. I.; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Perevoztchikov, V.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Petrov, V. A.; Phatak, S. C.; Picha, R.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Porile, N.; Porter, J.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Potekhin, M.; Potrebenikova, E.; Potukuchi, B. V. K. S.; Prindle, D.; Pruneau, C.; Putschke, J.; Rakness, G.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ravel, O.; Ray, R. L.; Razin, S. V.; Reichhold, D.; Reid, J. G.; Reinnarth, J.; Renault, G.; Retiere, F.; Ridiger, A.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Rose, A.; Roy, C.; Ruan, L.; Russcher, M. J.; Sahoo, R.; Sakrejda, I.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sarsour, M.; Savin, I.; Sazhin, P. S.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmitz, N.; Schweda, K.; Seger, J.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Seyboth, P.; Shahaliev, E.; Shao, M.; Shao, W.; Sharma, M.; Shen, W. Q.; Shestermanov, K. E.; Shimanskiy, S. S.; Sichtermann, E.; Simon, F.; Singaraju, R. N.; Smirnov, N.; Snellings, R.; Sood, G.; Sorensen, P.; Sowinski, J.; Speltz, J.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stadnik, A.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Stock, R.; Stolpovsky, A.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Sugarbaker, E.; Sumbera, M.; Surrow, B.; Swanger, M.; Symons, T. J. M.; de Toledo, A. Szanto; Tai, A.; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A. H.; Tarnowsky, T.; Thein, D.; Thomas, J. H.; Timmins, A. R.; Timoshenko, S.; Tokarev, M.; Trainor, T. A.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, Robert E.; Tsai, O. D.; Ulery, J.; Ullrich, T.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Bielcikova,49 A. Billmeier,47 L. C. Bland,4 C. O. Blyth,3 S.-L. Blyth,21 B. E. Bonner,35 M. Botje,27 A. Boucham,39 J. Bouchet,39 A. V. Brandin,25 A. Bravar,4 M. Bystersky,11 R. V. Cadman,1 X. Z. Cai,38 H. Caines,49 M. Caldero?n de la Barca Sa?nchez,17 J...

  2. Forward Lambda production and nuclear stopping power in d+Au collisions at root s(NN)=200 GeV 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abelev, B. I.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Anderson, B. D.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G. S.; Bai, Y.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L. S.; Baudot, J.; Baumgart, S.; Belaga, V. V.; Bellingeri-Laurikainen, A.; Bellwied, R.; Benedosso, F.; Betts, R. R.; Bhardwaj, S.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L. C.; Blyth, S. -L; Bombara, M.; Bonner, B. E.; Botje, M.; Bouchet, J.; Brandin, A. V.; Bravar, A.; Burton, T. P.; Bystersky, M.; Cai, X. Z.; Caines, H.; Sanchez, M. Calderon de la Barca; Callner, J.; Catu, O.; Cebra, D.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, J. Y.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Christie, W.; Chung, S. U.; Clarke, R. F.; Codrington, M. J. M.; Coffin, J. P.; Cormier, T. M.; Cosentino, M. R.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Das, D.; Dash, S.; Daugherity, M.; de Moura, M. M.; Dedovich, T. G.; DePhillips, M.; Derevschikov, A. A.; Didenko, L.; Dietel, T.; Djawotho, P.; Dogra, S. M.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Du, F.; Dunin, V. B.; Dunlop, J. C.; Mazumdar, M. R. Dutta; Eckardt, V.; Edwards, W. R.; Efimov, L. G.; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Fachini, P.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Feng, A.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Fu, J.; Gagliardi, Carl A.; Gaillard, L.; Ganti, M. S.; Garcia-Solis, E.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gorbunov, Y. N.; Gos, H.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Grube, B.; Guertin, S. M.; Guimaraes, K. S. F. F.; Gupta, N.; Haag, B.; Hallman, T. J.; Hamed, A.; Harris, J. W.; He, W.; Heinz, M.; Henry, T. W.; Heppelmann, S.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffman, A. M.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Horner, M. J.; Huang, H. Z.; Hughes, E. W.; Humanic, T. J.; Igo, G.; Iordanova, A.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jakl, P.; Jia, F.; Jones, P. G.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kang, K.; Kapitan, J.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Kettler, D.; Khodyrev, V. Yu; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Kislov, E. M.; Klein, S. R.; Knospe, A. G.; Kocoloski, A.; Koetke, D. D.; Kollegger, T.; Kopytine, M.; Kotchenda, L.; Kouchpil, V.; Kowalik, K. L.; Kravtsov, P.; Kravtsov, V. I.; Krueger, K.; Kuhn, C.; Kulikov, A. I.; Kumar, A.; Kurnadi, P.; Kuznetsov, A. A.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; Lange, S.; LaPointe, S.; Laue, F.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, C. -H; Lehocka, S.; LeVine, M. J.; Li, C.; Li, Q.; Li, Y.; Lin, G.; Lin, X.; Lindenbaum, S. J.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Liu, H.; Liu, J.; Liu, L.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Longacre, R. S.; Love, W. A.; Lu, Y.; Ludlam, T.; Lynn, D.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, J. G.; Ma, Y. G.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Majka, R.; Mangotra, L. K.; Manweiler, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Martin, L.; Matis, H. S.; Matulenko, Yu A.; McClain, C. J.; McShane, T. S.; Melnick, Yu; Meschanin, A.; Millane, J.; Miller, M. L.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, Saskia; Mischke, A.; Mitchell, J.; Mohanty, B.; Morozov, D. A.; Munhoz, M. G.; Nandi, B. K.; Nattrass, C.; Nayak, T. K.; Nelson, J. M.; Nepali, C.; Netrakanti, P. K.; Nogach, L. V.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Okorokov, V.; Oldenburg, M.; Olson, D.; Pachr, M.; Pal, S. K.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pavlinov, A. I.; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Perevoztchikov, V.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Phatak, S. C.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Poljak, N.; Porile, N.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Potekhin, M.; Potrebenikova, E.; Potukuchi, B. V. K. S.; Prindle, D.; Pruneau, C.; Pruthi, N. K.; Putschke, J.; Qattan, I. A.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Relyea, D.; Ridiger, A.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Rose, A.; Roy, C.; Ruan, L.; Russcher, M. J.; Sahoo, R.; Sakrejda, I.; Sakuma, T.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sarsour, M.; Sazhin, P. S.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmitz, N.; Seger, J.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Seyboth, P.; Shabetai, A.; Shahaliev, E.; Shao, M.; Sharma, M.; Shen, W. Q.; Shimanskiy, S. S.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Simon, F.; Singaraju, R. N.; Smirnov, N.; Snellings, R.; Sorensen, P.; Sowinski, J.; Speltz, J.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stadnik, A.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Staszak, D.; Stock, R.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Suarez, M. C.; Subba, N. L.; Sumbera, M.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Z.; Surrow, B.; Symons, T. J. M.; De Toledo, A. Szanto; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A. H.; Tarnowsky, T.; Thomas, J. H.; Timmins, A. R.; Timoshenko, S.; Tokarev, M.; Trainor, T. A.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, Robert E.; Tsai, O. D.; Ulery, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Van Buren, G.; Van der Kolk, N.; Van Leeuwen, M.; Molen, A. M. Vander; Varma, R.; Vasilevski, I. M.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Vernet, R.; Vigdor, S. E.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, S. A.; Wada, M.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Bland,3 S.-L. Blyth,22 M. Bombara,2 B. E. Bonner,36 M. Botje,28 J. Bouchet,40 A. V. Brandin,26 A. Bravar,3 T. P. Burton,2 M. Bystersky,11 X. Z. Cai,39 H. Caines,50 M. Caldero?n de la Barca Sa?nchez,6 J. Callner,9 O. Catu,50 D. Cebra,6 M. C. Cervantes...

  3. Production of e(+)e(-) pairs accompanied by nuclear dissociation in ultraperipheral heavy-ion collisions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adams, J.; Aggarwal, MM; Ahammed, Z.; Amonett, J.; Anderson, BD; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, GS; Bai, Y.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, LS; Baudot, J.; Bekele, S.; Belaga, VV; Bellwied, R.; Berger, J.; Bezverkhny, BI; Bharadwaj, S.; Bhatia, VS; Bichsel, H.; Billmeier, A.; Bland, LC; Blyth, CO; Bonner, BE; Botje, M.; Boucham, A.; Brandin, A.; Bravar, A.; Bystersky, M.; Cadman, RV; Cai, XZ; Caines, H.; Sanchez, MCD; Carroll, J.; Castillo, J.; Cebra, D.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopdhyay, S.; Chen, HF; Chen, Y.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Christie, W.; Coffin, JP; Cormier, TM; Cramer, JG; Crawford, HJ; Das, D.; Das, S.; de Moura, MM; Derevschikov, AA; Didenko, L.; Dietel, T.; Dong, WJ; Dong, X.; Draper, JE; Du, F.; Dubey, AK; Dunin, VB; Dunlop, JC; Mazumdar, MRD; Eckardt, V.; Edwards, WR; Efimov, LG; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Fachini, P.; Faivre, J.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Filimonov, K.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Foley, KJ; Fomenko, K.; Fu, J.; Gagliardi, Carl A.; Gans, J.; Ganti, MS; Gaudichet, L.; Geurts, F.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gonzalez, JE; Grachov, O.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Guertin, SM; Guo, Y.; Gupta, A.; Gutierrez, TD; Hallman, TJ; Hamed, A.; Hardtke, D.; Harris, JW; Heinz, M.; Henry, TW; Hepplemann, S.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffmann, GW; Huang, HZ; Huang, SL; Hughes, EW; Humanic, TJ; Igo, G.; Ishihara, A.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, WW; Janik, M.; Jiang, H.; Jones, PG; Judd, EG; Kabana, S.; Kang, K.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Khodyrev, VY; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Kislov, EM; Klay, J.; Klein, SR; Klyachko, A.; Koetke, DD; Kollegger, T.; Kopytine, M.; Kotchenda, L.; Kramer, M.; Kravtsov, P.; Kravtsov, VI; Krueger, K.; Kuhn, C.; Kulikov, AI; Kumar, A.; Kunz, CL; Kutuev, RK; Kuznetsov, AA; Lamont, MAC; Landgraf, JM; Lange, S.; Laue, F.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lehocka, S.; LeVine, MJ; Li, C.; Li, Q.; Li, Y.; Lindenbaum, SJ; Lisa, MA; Liu, F.; Liu, L.; Liu, QJ; Liu, Z.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, WJ; Long, H.; Longacre, RS; Lopez-Noriega, M.; Love, WA; Lu, Y.; Ludlam, T.; Lynn, D.; Ma, GL; Ma, JG; Ma, YG; Magestro, D.; Mahajan, S.; Mahapatra, DP; Majka, R.; Mangotra, LK; Manweiler, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Martin, L.; Marx, JN; Matis, HS; Matulenko, YA; McClain, CJ; McShane, TS; Meissner, F.; Melnick, Y.; Meschanin, A.; Miller, ML; Milosevich, Z.; Minaev, NG; Mironov, C.; Mischke, A.; Mishra, D.; Mitchell, J.; Mohanty, B.; Molnar, L.; Moore, CF; Mora-Corral, MJ; Morozov, DA; Morozov, V.; Munhoz, MG; Nandi, BK; Nayak, TK; Nelson, JM; Netrakanti, PK; Nikitin, VA; Nogach, LV; Norman, B.; Nurushev, SB; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Okorokov, V.; Oldenburg, M.; Olson, D.; Pal, SK; Panebratsev, Y.; Panitkin, SY; Pavlinov, AI; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Perevoztchikov, V.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Petrov, VA; Phatak, SC; Picha, R.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Porile, N.; Porter, J.; Poskanzer, AM; Potekhin, M.; Potrebenikova, E.; Potukuchi, BVKS; Prindle, D.; Pruneau, C.; Putschke, J.; Rai, G.; Rakness, G.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ravel, O.; Ray, RL; Razin, SV; Reichhold, D.; Reid, JG; Renault, G.; Retiere, F.; Ridiger, A.; Ritter, HG; Roberts, JB; Rogachevskiy, OV; Romero, JL; Rose, A.; Roy, C.; Ruan, L.; Sakrejda, I.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Savin, I.; Sazhin, PS; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, RP; Schmitz, N.; Schroeder, LS; Schweda, K.; Seger, J.; Seyboth, P.; Shahaliev, E.; Shao, M.; Shao, W.; Sharma, M.; Shen, WQ; Shestermanov, KE; Shimanskiy, SS; Simon, F.; Singaraju, RN; Skoro, G.; Smirnov, N.; Snellings, R.; Sood, G.; Sorensen, P.; Sowinski, J.; Speltz, J.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stadnik, A.; Stanislaus, TDS; Stock, R.; Stolpovsky, A.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Suaide, AAP; Sugarbaker, E.; Suire, C.; Sumbera, M.; Surrow, B.; Symons, TJM; de Toledo, AS; Szarwas, P.; Tai, A.; Takahashi, J.; Tang, AH; Tarnowsky, T.; Thein, D.; Thomas, JH; Timoshenko, S.; Tokarev, M.; Trainor, TA; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, Robert E.; Tsai, O.; Ulery, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, DG; Urkinbaev, A.; Buren, GV; van Leeuwen, M.; Vander Molen, AM; Varma, R.; Vasilevski, IM; Vasiliev, AN; Vernet, R.; Vigdor, SE; Viyogi, VP; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, SA; Vznuzdaev, M.; Waggoner, B.; Wang, F.; Wang, G.; Wang, G.; Wang, XL; Wang, Y.; Wang, Y.; Wang, ZM; Ward, H.; Watson, JW; Webb, JC; Wells, R.; Westfall, GD; Wetzler, A.; Whitten, C.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, SW; Witt, R.; Wood, J.; Wu, J.; Xu, N.; Xu, Z.; Xu, ZZ; Yamamoto, E.; Yepes, P.; Yurevich, VI; Zanevsky, YV; Zhang, H.; Zhang, WM; Zhang, ZP; Zolnierczuk, PA; Zoulkarneev, R.; Zoulkarneeva, Y.; Zubarev, AN; STAR Collaboration.

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Barannikova,31 L. S. Barnby,2 J. Baudot,17 S. Bekele,27 V. V. Belaga,11 R. Bellwied,45 J. Berger,13 B. I. Bezverkhny,47 S. Bharadwaj,32 V. S. Bhatia,28 H. Bichsel,44 A. Billmeier,45 L. C. Bland,3 C. O. Blyth,2 B. E. Bonner,33 M. Botje,26 A. Boucham,37 A...

  4. Multiplicity and pseudorapidity distributions of charged particles and photons at forward pseudorapidity in Au plus Au collisons at root s(NN)=62.4 GeV 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adams, J.; Aggarwal, MM; Ahammed, Z.; Amonett, J.; Anderson, BD; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, GS; Badyal, SK; Bai, Y.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, LS; Baudot, J.; Bekele, S.; Belaga, VV; Bellingeri-Laurikainen, A.; Bellwied, R.; Berger, J.; Bezverkhny, BI; Bharadwaj, S.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, AK; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Billmeier, A.; Bland, LC; Blyth, CO; Blyth, SL; Bonner, BE; Botje, M.; Boucham, A.; Bouchet, J.; Brandin, AV; Bravar, A.; Bystersky, M.; Cadman, RV; Cai, XZ; Caines, H.; Sanchez, MCD; Castillo, J.; Catu, O.; Cebra, D.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, HF; Chen, JH; Chen, Y.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Choi, HA; Christie, W.; Coffin, JP; Cormier, TM; Cosentino, MR; Cramer, JG; Crawford, HJ; Das, D.; Das, S.; Daugherity, M.; de Moura, MM; Dedovich, TG; DePhillips, M.; Derevschikov, AA; Didenko, L.; Dietel, T.; Dogra, SM; Dong, WJ; Dong, X.; Draper, JE; Du, F.; Dunin, VB; Dunlop, JC; Majumdar, MRD; Eckardt, V.; Edwards, WR; Efimov, LG; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Fachini, P.; Faivre, J.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Filimonov, K.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Fornazier, KSF; Fu, J.; Gagliardi, Carl A.; Gaillard, L.; Gans, J.; Ganti, MS; Geurts, F.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gonzalez, JE; Gorbunov, YG; Gos, H.; Grachov, O.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Guertin, SM; Guo, Y.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, N.; Gutierrez, TD; Hallman, TJ; Hamed, A.; Hardtke, D.; Harris, JW; Heinz, M.; Henry, TW; Hepplemann, S.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffmann, GW; Horner, MJ; Huang, HZ; Huang, SL; Hughes, EW; Humanic, TJ; Igo, G.; Ishihara, A.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, WW; Jiang, H.; Jones, PG; Judd, EG; Kabana, S.; Kang, K.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Khodyrev, VY; Kim, BC; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Kislov, EM; Klay, J.; Klein, SR; Koetke, DD; Kollegger, T.; Kopytine, M.; Kotchenda, L.; Kowalik, KL; Kramer, M.; Kravtsov, P.; Kravtsov, VI; Krueger, K.; Kuhn, C.; Kulikov, AI; Kumar, A.; Kutuev, RK; Kuznetsov, AA; Lamont, MAC; Landgraf, JM; Lange, S.; Laue, F.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, CH; Lehocka, S.; LeVine, MJ; Li, C.; Li, Q.; Li, Y.; Lin, G.; Lindenbaum, SJ; Lisa, MA; Liu, F.; Liu, H.; Liu, J.; Liu, L.; Liu, QJ; Liu, Z.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, WJ; Long, H.; Longacre, RS; Lopez-Noriega, M.; Love, WA; Lu, Y.; Ludlam, T.; Lynn, D.; Ma, GL; Ma, JG; Ma, YG; Magestro, D.; Mahajan, S.; Mahapatra, DP; Majka, R.; Mangotra, LK; Manweiler, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Martin, L.; Marx, JN; Matis, HS; Matulenko, YA; McClain, CJ; McShane, TS; Meissner, F.; Melnick, Y.; Meschanin, A.; Miller, ML; Minaev, NG; Mironov, C.; Mischke, A.; Mishra, DK; Mitchell, J.; Mohanty, B.; Molnar, L.; Moore, CF; Morozov, DA; Munhoz, MG; Nandi, BK; Nayak, SK; Nayak, TK; Nelson, JM; Netrakanti, PK; Nikitin, VA; Nogach, LV; Nurushev, SB; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Okorokov, V.; Oldenburg, M.; Olson, D.; Pal, SK; Panebratsev, Y.; Panitkin, SY; Pavlinov, AI; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Perevoztchikov, V.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Petrov, VA; Phatak, SC; Picha, R.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Porile, N.; Porter, J.; Poskanzer, AM; Potekhin, M.; Potrebenikova, E.; Potukuchi, BVKS; Prindle, D.; Pruneau, C.; Putschke, J.; Rakness, G.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ravel, O.; Ray, RL; Razin, SV; Reichhold, D.; Reid, JG; Reinnarth, J.; Renault, G.; Retiere, F.; Ridiger, A.; Ritter, HG; Roberts, JB; Rogachevskiy, OV; Romero, JL; Rose, A.; Roy, C.; Ruan, L.; Russcher, MJ; Sahoo, R.; Sakrejda, I.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sarsour, M.; Savin, I.; Sazhin, PS; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, RP; Schmitz, N.; Schweda, K.; Seger, J.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Seyboth, P.; Shahaliev, E.; Shao, M.; Shao, W.; Sharma, M.; Shen, WQ; Shestermanov, KE; Shimanskiy, SS; Sichtermann, E.; Simon, F.; Singaraju, RN; Smirnov, N.; Snellings, R.; Sood, G.; Sorensen, P.; Sowinski, J.; Speltz, J.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stadnik, A.; Stanislaus, TDS; Stock, R.; Stolpovsky, A.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Suaide, AAP; Sugarbaker, E.; Sumbera, M.; Surrow, B.; Swanger, M.; Symons, TJM; de Toledo, AS; Tai, A.; Takahashi, J.; Tang, AH; Tarnowsky, T.; Thein, D.; Thomas, JH; Timmins, AR; Timoshenko, S.; Tokarev, M.; Trainor, TA; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, Robert E.; Tsai, OD; Ulery, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, DG; van Buren, G.; van der Kolk, N.; van Leeuwen, M.; Vander Molen, AM; Varma, R.; Vasilevski, IM; Vasiliev, AN; Vernet, R.; Vigdor, SE; Viyogi, YP; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, SA; Waggoner, WT; Wang, F.; Wang, G.; Wang, G.; Wang, XL; Wang, Y.; Wang, Y.; Wang, ZM; Ward, H.; Watson, JW; Webb, JC; Westfall, GD; Wetzler, A.; Whitten, C.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, SW; Witt, R.; Wood, J.; Wu, J.; Xu, N.; Xu, Z.; Xu, ZZ; Yamamoto, E.; Yepes, P.; Yoo, IK; Yurevich, VI; Zborovsky, I.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, WM; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, ZP; Zhong, C.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A. Bhasin,19 A. K. Bhati,29 H. Bichsel,46 J. Bielcik,49 J. Bielcikova,49 A. Billmeier,47 L. C. Bland,4 C. O. Blyth,3 S.-L. Blyth,21 B. E. Bonner,35 M. Botje,27 A. Boucham,39 J. Bouchet,39 A. V. Brandin,25 A. Bravar,4 M. Bystersky,11 R. V. Cadman,1...

  5. Elliptic flow from two- and four-particle correlations in Au+Au collisions at root s(NN)=130 GeV 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adler, C.; Ahammed, Z.; Allgower, C.; Amonett, J.; Anderson, BD; Anderson, M.; Averichev, GS; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, LS; Baudot, J.; Bekele, S.; Belaga, VV; Bellwied, R.; Berger, J.; Bichsel, H.; Billmeier, A.; Bland, LC; Blyth, CO; Bonner, BE; Boucham, A.; Brandin, A.; Bravar, A.; Cadman, RV; Caines, H.; de la Barca Sanchez, MC; Cardenas, A.; Carroll, J.; Castillo, J.; Castro, M.; Cebra, D.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, Y.; Chernenko, SP; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Choi, B.; Christie, W.; Coffin, JP; Cormier, TM; Cramer, JG; Crawford, HJ; Deng, WS; Derevschikov, AA; Didenko, L.; Dietel, T.; Draper, JE; Dunin, VB; Dunlop, JC; Eckardt, V.; Efimov, LG; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Fachini, P.; Faine, V.; Filimonov, K.; Finch, E.; Fisyak, Y.; Flierl, D.; Foley, KJ; Fu, J.; Gagliardi, Carl A.; Gagunashvili, N.; Gans, J.; Gaudichet, L.; Germain, M.; Geurts, F.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Grachov, O.; Grigoriev, V.; Guedon, M.; Gushin, E.; Hallman, TJ; Hardtke, D.; Harris, JW; Henry, TW; Heppelmann, S.; Herston, T.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffmann, GW; Horsley, M.; Huang, HZ; Humanic, TJ; Igo, G.; Ishihara, A.; Ivanshin, YI; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, WW; Janik, M.; Johnson, I.; Jones, PG; Judd, EG; Kaneta, M.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Klay, J.; Klein, SR; Klyachko, A.; Konstantinov, AS; Kopytine, M.; Kotchenda, L.; Kovalenko, AD; Kramer, M.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Kuhn, C.; Kulikov, AI; Kunde, GJ; Kunz, CL; Kutuev, RK; Kuznetsov, AA; Lakehal-Ayat, L.; Lamont, MAC; Landgraf, JM; Lange, S.; Lansdell, CP; Lasiuk, B.; Laue, F.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Leontiev, VM; LeVine, MJ; Li, Q.; Lindenbaum, SJ; Lisa, MA; Liu, F.; Liu, L.; Liu, Z.; Liu, QJ; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, WJ; LoCurto, G.; Long, H.; Longacre, RS; Lopez-Noriega, M.; Love, WA; Ludlam, T.; Lynn, D.; Ma, J.; Majka, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Martin, L.; Marx, J.; Matis, HS; Matulenko, YA; McShane, TS; Meissner, F.; Melnick, Y.; Meschanin, A.; Messer, M.; Miller, ML; Milosevich, Z.; Minaev, NG; Mitchell, J.; Moiseenko, VA; Moore, CF; Morozov, V.; de Moura, MM; Munhoz, MG; Nelson, JM; Nevski, P.; Nikitin, VA; Nogach, LV; Norman, B.; Nurushev, SB; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Okorokov, V.; Oldenburg, M.; Olson, D.; Paic, G.; Pandey, SU; Panebratsev, Y.; Panitkin, SY; Pavlinov, AI; Pawlak, T.; Perevoztchikov, V.; Peryt, W.; Petrov, VA; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Porile, N.; Porter, J.; Poskanzer, AM; Potrebenikova, E.; Prindle, D.; Pruneau, C.; Putschke, J.; Rai, G.; Rakness, G.; Ravel, O.; Ray, RL; Razin, SV; Reichhold, D.; Reid, JG; Renault, G.; Retiere, F.; Ridiger, A.; Ritter, HG; Roberts, JB; Rogachevski, OV; Romero, JL; Rose, A.; Roy, C.; Rykov, V.; Sakrejda, I.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Saulys, AC; Savin, I.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, RP; Schmitz, N.; Schroeder, LS; Schuttauf, A.; Schweda, K.; Seger, J.; Seliverstov, D.; Seyboth, P.; Shahaliev, E.; Shestermanov, KE; Shimanskii, SS; Shvetcov, VS; Skoro, G.; Smirnov, N.; Snellings, R.; Sorensen, P.; Sowinski, J.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stephenson, EJ; Stock, R.; Stolpovsky, A.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Struck, C.; Suaide, AAP; Sugarbaker, E.; Suire, C.; Sumbera, M.; Surrow, B.; Symons, TJM; de Toledo, AS; Szarwas, P.; Tai, A.; Takahashi, J.; Tang, AH; Thomas, JH; Thompson, M.; Tikhomirov, V.; Tokarev, M.; Tonjes, MB; Trainor, TA; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, Robert E.; Trofimov, V.; Tsai, O.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, DG; Van Buren, G.; VanderMolen, AM; Vasilevski, IM; Vasiliev, AN; Vigdor, SE; Voloshin, SA; Wang, F.; Ward, H.; Watson, JW; Wells, R.; Westfall, GD; Whitten, C.; Wieman, H.; Willson, R.; Wissink, SW; Witt, R.; Wood, J.; Xu, N.; Xu, Z.; Yakutin, AE; Yamamoto, E.; Yang, J.; Yepes, P.; Yurevich, VI; Zanevski, YV; Zborovsky, I.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, WM; Zoulkarneev, R.; Zubarev, AN; STAR Collaboration.

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    O. Barannikova,9,23 L. S. Barnby,14 J. Baudot,13 S. Bekele,20 V. V. Belaga,9 R. Bellwied,31 J. Berger,11 H. Bichsel,30 A. Billmeier,31 L. C. Bland,2 C. O. Blyth,3 B. E. Bonner,24 A. Boucham,26 A. Brandin,18 A. Bravar,2 R. V. Cadman,1 H. Caines,33 M...

  6. K-*(892)(0) production in relativistic heavy ion collisions at root s(NN)=130 GeV 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adler, C.; Ahammed, Z.; Allgower, C.; Amonett, J.; Anderson, BD; Anderson, M.; Averichev, GS; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, LS; Baudot, J.; Bekele, S.; Belaga, VV; Bellwied, R.; Berger, J.; Bichsel, H.; Billmeier, A.; Bland, LC; Blyth, CO; Bonner, BE; Boucham, A.; Brandin, A.; Bravar, A.; Cadman, RV; Caines, H.; Sanchez, MCD; Cardenas, A.; Carroll, J.; Castillo, J.; Castro, M.; Cebra, D.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, Y.; Chernenko, SP; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Choi, B.; Christie, W.; Coffin, JP; Cormier, TM; Cramer, JG; Crawford, HJ; Derevschikov, AA; Didenko, L.; Dietel, T.; Draper, JE; Dunin, VB; Dunlop, JC; Eckardt, V.; Efimov, LG; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Fachini, P.; Faine, V.; Faivre, J.; Fatemi, R.; Filimonov, K.; Finch, E.; Fisyak, Y.; Flierl, D.; Foley, KJ; Fu, J.; Gagliardi, Carl A.; Gagunashvili, N.; Gans, J.; Gaudichet, L.; Germain, M.; Geurts, F.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Grachov, O.; Grigoriev, V.; Guedon, M.; Gushin, E.; Hallman, TJ; Hardtke, D.; Harris, JW; Henry, TW; Heppelmann, S.; Herston, T.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffmann, GW; Horsley, M.; Huang, HZ; Humanic, TJ; Igo, G.; Ishihara, A.; Ivanshin, YI; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, WW; Janik, M.; Johnson, I.; Jones, PG; Judd, EG; Kaneta, M.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Klay, J.; Klein, SR; Klyachko, A.; Kollegger, T.; Konstantinov, AS; Kopytine, M.; Kotchenda, L.; Kovalenko, AD; Kramer, M.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Kuhn, C.; Kulikov, AI; Kunde, GJ; Kunz, CL; Kutuev, RK; Kuznetsov, AA; Lakehal-Ayat, L.; Lamont, MAC; Landgraf, JM; Lange, S.; Lansdell, CP; Lasiuk, B.; Laue, F.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Leontiev, VM; LeVine, MJ; Li, Q.; Lindenbaum, SJ; Lisa, MA; Liu, F.; Liu, L.; Liu, Z.; Liu, QJ; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, WJ; LoCurto, G.; Long, H.; Longacre, RS; Lopez-Noriega, M.; Love, WA; Ludlam, T.; Lynn, D.; Ma, J.; Majka, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Martin, L.; Marx, J.; Matis, HS; Matulenko, YA; McShane, TS; Meissner, F.; Melnick, Y.; Meschanin, A.; Messer, M.; Miller, ML; Milosevich, Z.; Minaev, NG; Mitchell, J.; Moore, CF; Morozov, V.; de Moura, MM; Munhoz, MG; Nelson, JM; Nevski, P.; Nikitin, VA; Nogach, LV; Norman, B.; Nurushev, SB; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Okorokov, V.; Oldenburg, M.; Olson, D.; Paic, G.; Pandey, SU; Panebratsev, Y.; Panitkin, SY; Pavlinov, AI; Pawlak, T.; Perevoztchikov, V.; Peryt, W.; Petrov, VA; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Porile, N.; Porter, J.; Poskanzer, AM; Potrebenikova, E.; Prindle, D.; Pruneau, C.; Putschke, J.; Rai, G.; Rakness, G.; Ravel, O.; Ray, RL; Razin, SV; Reichhold, D.; Reid, JG; Renault, G.; Retiere, F.; Ridiger, A.; Ritter, HG; Roberts, JB; Rogachevski, OV; Romero, JL; Rose, A.; Roy, C.; Rykov, V.; Sakrejda, I.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Savin, I.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, RP; Schmitz, N.; Schroeder, LS; Schuttauf, A.; Schweda, K.; Seger, J.; Seliverstov, D.; Seyboth, P.; Shahaliev, E.; Shestermanov, KE; Shimanskii, SS; Skoro, G.; Smirnov, N.; Snellings, R.; Sorensen, P.; Sowinski, J.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stephenson, EJ; Stock, R.; Stolpovsky, A.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Struck, C.; Suaide, AAP; Sugarbaker, E.; Suire, C.; Sumbera, M.; Surrow, B.; Symons, TJM; de Toledo, AS; Szarwas, P.; Tai, A.; Takahashi, J.; Tang, AH; Thein, D.; Thomas, JH; Thompson, M.; Tikhomirov, V.; Tokarev, M.; Tonjes, MB; Trainor, TA; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, Robert E.; Trofimov, V.; Tsai, O.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, DG; Van Buren, G.; VanderMolen, AM; Vasilevski, IM; Vasiliev, AN; Vigdor, SE; Voloshin, SA; Wang, F.; Ward, H.; Watson, JW; Wells, R.; Westfall, GD; Whitten, C.; Wieman, H.; Willson, R.; Wissink, SW; Witt, R.; Wood, J.; Xu, N.; Xu, Z.; Yakutin, AE; Yamamoto, E.; Yang, J.; Yepes, P.; Yurevich, VI; Zanevski, YV; Zborovsky, I.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, WM; Zoulkarneev, R.; Zubarev, AN; STAR Collaboration.

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Balewski,12 O. Barannikova,9,23 L. S. Barnby,14 J. Baudot,13 S. Bekele,20 V. V. Belaga,9 R. Bellwied,31 J. Berger,11 H. Bichsel,30 A. Billmeier,31 L. C. Bland,2 C. O. Blyth,3 B. E. Bonner,24 A. Boucham,26 A. Brandin,18 A. Bravar,2 R. V. Cadman,1 H...

  7. Incident energy dependence of p(t) correlations at relativistic energies 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adams, J.; Aggarwal, MM; Ahammed, Z.; Amonett, J.; Anderson, BD; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, GS; Badyal, SK; Bai, Y.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, LS; Baudot, J.; Bekele, S.; Belaga, VV; Bellingeri-Laurikainen, A.; Bellwied, R.; Berger, J.; Bezverkhny, BI; Bharadwaj, S.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, AK; Bhatia, VS; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Billmeier, A.; Bland, LC; Blyth, CO; Bonner, BE; Botje, M.; Boucham, A.; Bouchet, J.; Brandin, AV; Bravar, A.; Bystersky, M.; Cadman, RV; Cai, XZ; Caines, H.; Sanchez, MCDB; Castillo, J.; Catu, O.; Cebra, D.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, HF; Chen, Y.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Christie, W.; Coffin, JP; Cormier, TM; Cramer, JG; Crawford, HJ; Das, D.; Das, S.; Daugherity, M.; de Moura, MM; Dedovich, TG; Derevschikov, AA; Didenko, L.; Dietel, T.; Dogra, SM; Dong, WJ; Dong, X.; Draper, JE; Du, F.; Dubey, AK; Dunin, VB; Dunlop, JC; Mazumdar, MRD; Eckardt, V.; Edwards, WR; Efimov, LG; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Fachini, P.; Faivre, J.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Filimonov, K.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Fu, J.; Gagliardi, Carl A.; Gaillard, L.; Gans, J.; Ganti, MS; Geurts, F.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gonzalez, JE; Gos, H.; Grachov, O.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Guertin, SM; Guo, Y.; Gupta, A.; Gutierrez, TD; Hallman, TJ; Hamed, A.; Hardtke, D.; Harris, JW; Heinz, M.; Henry, TW; Hepplemann, S.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffmann, GW; Huang, HZ; Huang, SL; Hughes, EW; Humanic, TJ; Igo, G.; Ishihara, A.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, WW; Jedynak, M.; Jiang, H.; Jones, PG; Judd, EG; Kabana, S.; Kang, K.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Khodyrev, VY; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Kislov, EM; Klay, J.; Klein, SR; Koetke, DD; Kollegger, T.; Kopytine, M.; Kotchenda, L.; Kowalik, KL; Kramer, M.; Kravtsov, P.; Kravtsov, VI; Krueger, K.; Kuhn, C.; Kulikov, AI; Kumar, A.; Kutuev, RK; Kuznetsov, AA; Lamont, MAC; Landgraf, JM; Lange, S.; Laue, F.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lehocka, S.; LeVine, MJ; Li, C.; Li, Q.; Li, Y.; Lin, G.; Lindenbaum, SJ; Lisa, MA; Liu, F.; Liu, H.; Liu, L.; Liu, QJ; Liu, Z.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, WJ; Long, H.; Longacre, RS; Lopez-Noriega, M.; Love, WA; Lu, Y.; Ludlam, T.; Lynn, D.; Ma, GL; Ma, JG; Ma, YG; Magestro, D.; Mahajan, S.; Mahapatra, DP; Majka, R.; Mangotra, LK; Manweiler, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Martin, L.; Marx, JN; Matis, HS; Matulenko, YA; McClain, CJ; McShane, TS; Meissner, F.; Melnick, Y.; Meschanin, A.; Miller, ML; Minaev, NG; Mironov, C.; Mischke, A.; Mishra, DK; Mitchell, J.; Mohanty, B.; Molnar, L.; Moore, CF; Morozov, DA; Munhoz, MG; Nandi, BK; Nayak, SK; Nayak, TK; Nelson, JM; Netrakanti, PK; Nikitin, VA; Nogach, LV; Nurushev, SB; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Okorokov, V.; Oldenburg, M.; Olson, D.; Pal, SK; Panebratsev, Y.; Panitkin, SY; Pavlinov, AI; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Perevoztchikov, V.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Petrov, VA; Phatak, SC; Picha, R.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Porile, N.; Porter, J.; Poskanzer, AM; Potekhin, M.; Potrebenikova, E.; Potukuchi, BVKS; Prindle, D.; Pruneau, C.; Putschke, J.; Rakness, G.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ravel, O.; Ray, RL; Razin, SV; Reichhold, D.; Reid, JG; Reinnarth, J.; Renault, G.; Retiere, F.; Ridiger, A.; Ritter, HG; Roberts, JB; Rogachevskiy, OV; Romero, JL; Rose, A.; Roy, C.; Ruan, L.; Russcher, M.; Sahoo, R.; Sakrejda, I.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sarsour, M.; Savin, I.; Sazhin, PS; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, RP; Schmitz, N.; Schweda, K.; Seger, J.; Seyboth, P.; Shahaliev, E.; Shao, M.; Shao, W.; Sharma, M.; Shen, WQ; Shestermanov, KE; Shimanskiy, SS; Sichtermann, E.; Simon, F.; Singaraju, RN; Smirnov, N.; Snellings, R.; Sood, G.; Sorensen, P.; Sowinski, J.; Speltz, J.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stadnik, A.; Stanislaus, TDS; Stock, R.; Stolpovsky, A.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Suaide, AAP; Sugarbaker, E.; Suire, C.; Sumbera, M.; Surrow, B.; Swanger, M.; Symons, TJM; de Toledo, AS; Tai, A.; Takahashi, J.; Tang, AH; Tarnowsky, T.; Thein, D.; Thomas, JH; Timoshenko, S.; Tokarev, M.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, Robert E.; Tsai, OD; Ulery, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, DG; Buren, GV; Van Buren, G.; Vander Molen, AM; Varma, R.; Vasilevski, IM; Vasiliev, AN; Vernet, R.; Vigdor, SE; Viyogi, YP; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, SA; Waggoner, WT; Wang, F.; Wang, G.; Wang, XL; Wang, Y.; Wang, ZM; Ward, H.; Watson, JW; Webb, JC; Westfall, GD; Wetzler, A.; Whitten, C.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, SW; Witt, R.; Wood, J.; Wu, J.; Xu, N.; Xu, Z.; Xu, ZZ; Yamamoto, E.; Yepes, P.; Yurevich, VI; Zborovsky, I.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, WM; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, ZP; Zoulkarneev, R.; Zoulkarneeva, Y.; Zubarev, AN; STAR Collaboration.

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Bielcikova,48 A. Billmeier,46 L. C. Bland,4 C. O. Blyth,3 B. E. Bonner,34 M. Botje,27 A. Boucham,38 J. Bouchet,38 A. V. Brandin,25 A. Bravar,4 M. Bystersky,11 R. V. Cadman,1 X. Z. Cai,37 H. Caines,48 M. Caldero?n de la Barca Sa?nchez,17 J. Castillo,21 O...

  8. Transverse-momentum dependent modification of dynamic texture in central Au+Au collisions at root s(NN)=200 GeV RID B-7517-2009 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adams, J.; Aggarwal, MM; Ahammed, Z.; Amonett, J.; Anderson, BD; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, GS; Badyal, SK; Bai, Y.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, LS; Baudot, J.; Bekele, S.; Belaga, VV; Bellwied, R.; Berger, J.; Bezverkhny, BI; Bharadwaj, S.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, AK; Bhatia, VS; Bichsel, H.; Billmeier, A.; Bland, LC; Blyth, CO; Bonner, BE; Botje, M.; Boucham, A.; Brandin, A.; Bravar, A.; Bystersky, M.; Cadman, RV; Cai, XZ; Caines, H.; Sanchez, MCD; Castillo, J.; Cebra, D.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopdhyay, S.; Chen, HF; Chen, Y.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Christie, W.; Coffin, JP; Cormier, TM; Cramer, JG; Crawford, HJ; Das, D.; de Moura, MM; Derevschikov, AA; Didenko, L.; Dietel, T.; Dogra, SM; Dong, WJ; Dong, X.; Draper, JE; Du, F.; Dubey, AK; Dunin, VB; Dunlop, JC; Mazumder, MRD; Eckardt, V.; Edwards, WR; Efimov, LG; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Fachini, P.; Faivre, J.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Filimonov, K.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Fomenko, K.; Fu, J.; Gagliardi, Carl A.; Gans, J.; Ganti, MS; Gaudichet, L.; Geurts, F.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, G.; Gonzalez, JE; Grachov, O.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Guertin, SM; Guo, Y.; Gupta, A.; Gutierrez, TD; Hallman, TJ; Hamed, A.; Hardtke, D.; Harris, JW; Heinz, M.; Henry, TW; Hepplemann, S.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffmann, GW; Huang, HZ; Huang, SL; Hughes, EW; Humanic, TJ; Igo, G.; Ishihara, A.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, WW; Janik, M.; Jiang, H.; Jones, PG; Judd, EG; Kabana, S.; Kang, K.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Khodyrev, VY; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Kislov, EM; Klay, J.; Klein, SR; Klyachko, A.; Koetke, DD; Kollegger, T.; Kopytine, M.; Kotchenda, L.; Kramer, M.; Kravtsov, P.; Kravtsov, VI; Krueger, K.; Kuhn, C.; Kulikov, AI; Kumar, A.; Kutuev, RK; Kuznetsov, AA; Lamont, MAC; Landgraf, JM; Lange, S.; Laue, F.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lehocka, S.; LeVine, MJ; Li, C.; Li, Q.; Li, Y.; Lin, G.; Lindenbaum, SJ; Lisa, MA; Liu, F.; Liu, L.; Liu, QJ; Liu, Z.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, WJ; Long, H.; Longacre, RS; Lopez-Noriega, M.; Love, WA; Lu, Y.; Ludlam, T.; Lynn, D.; Ma, GL; Ma, JG; Ma, YG; Magestro, D.; Mahajan, S.; Mahapatra, DP; Majka, R.; Mangotra, LK; Manweiler, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Martin, L.; Marx, JN; Matis, HS; Matulenko, YA; McClain, CJ; McShane, TS; Meissner, F.; Melnick, Y.; Meschanin, A.; Miller, ML; Minaev, NG; Mironov, C.; Mischke, A.; Mishra, DK; Mitchell, J.; Mohanty, B.; Molnar, L.; Moore, CF; Morozov, DA; Munhoz, MG; Nandi, BK; Nayak, SK; Nayak, TK; Nelson, JM; Netrakanti, PK; Nikitin, VA; Nogach, LV; Nurushev, SB; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Okorokov, V.; Oldenburg, M.; Olson, D.; Pal, SK; Panebratsev, Y.; Panitkin, SY; Pavlinov, AI; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Perevoztchikov, V.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Petrov, VA; Phatak, SC; Picha, R.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Porile, N.; Porter, J.; Poskanzer, AM; Potekhin, M.; Potrebenikova, E.; Potukuchi, BVKS; Prindle, D.; Pruneau, C.; Putschke, J.; Rakness, G.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ravel, O.; Ray, RL; Razin, SV; Reichhold, D.; Reid, JG; Renault, G.; Retiere, F.; Ridiger, A.; Ritter, HG; Roberts, JB; Rogachevskiy, OV; Romero, JL; Rose, A.; Roy, C.; Ruan, L.; Sahoo, R.; Sakrejda, I.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Savin, I.; Sazhin, PS; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, RP; Schmitz, N.; Schweda, K.; Seger, J.; Seyboth, P.; Shahaliev, E.; Shao, M.; Shao, W.; Sharma, M.; Shen, WQ; Shestermanov, KE; Shimanskiy, SS; Sichtermann, E.; Simon, F.; Singaraju, RN; Skoro, G.; Smimov, N.; Snellings, R.; Sood, G.; Sorensen, P.; Sowinski, J.; Speltz, J.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stadnik, A.; Stanislaus, TDS; Stock, R.; Stolpovsky, A.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Suaide, AAP; Sugarbaker, E.; Suite, C.; Sumbera, M.; Surrow, B.; Symons, TJM; de Toledo, AS; Szarwas, P.; Tai, A.; Takahashi, J.; Tang, AH; Tarnowsky, T.; Thein, D.; Thomas, JH; Timoshenko, S.; Tokarev, M.; Trainor, TA; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, Robert E.; Tsai, OD; Ulery, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, DG; Urkinbaev, A.; Van Buren, G.; van Leeuwen, M.; Vander Molen, AM; Varma, R.; Vasilevski, IM; Vasiliev, AN; Vernet, R.; Vigdor, SE; Viyogi, YP; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, SA; Vznuzdaev, M.; Waggoner, WT; Wang, F.; Wang, G.; Wang, XL; Wang, Y.; Wang, ZM; Ward, H.; Watson, JW; Webb, JC; Weiis, R.; Westfall, GD; Wetzler, A.; Whitten, C.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, SW; Witt, R.; Wood, J.; Wu, J.; Xu, N.; Xu, Z.; Xu, ZZ; Yamamoto, E.; Yepes, P.; Yarevich, VI; Zanevsky, YV; Zhang, H.; Zhang, WM; Zhang, ZP; Zolnierczuk, PA; Zoulkarneev, R.; Zoulkarneeva, Y.; Zubarev, AN; STAR Collaboration.

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    H. Bichsel,45 A. Billmeier,46 L. C. Bland,4 C. O. Blyth,3 B. E. Bonner,34 M. Botje,27 A. Boucham,38 A. Brandin,25 A. Bravar,4 M. Bystersky,11 R. V. Cadman,1 X. Z. Cai,37 H. Caines,48 M. Caldero?n de la Barca Sa?nchez,17 J. Castillo,21 D. Cebra,7 Z...

  9. Centrality and pseudorapidity dependence of charged hadron production at intermediate p(T) in Au plus Au collisions at root s(NN)=130 GeV 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adams, J.; Aggarwal, MM; Ahammed, Z.; Amonett, J.; Anderson, BD; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, GS; Bai, Y.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, LS; Baudot, J.; Bekele, S.; Belaga, VV; Bellwied, R.; Berger, J.; Bezverkhny, BI; Bharadwaj, S.; Bhatia, VS; Bichsel, H.; Billmeier, A.; Bland, LC; Blyth, CO; Bonner, BE; Botje, M.; Boucham, A.; Brandin, A.; Bravar, A.; Bystersky, M.; Cadman, RV; Cai, XZ; Caines, H.; Sanchez, MCD; Carroll, J.; Castillo, J.; Cebra, D.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopdhyay, S.; Chen, HF; Chen, Y.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Christie, W.; Coffin, JP; Cormier, TM; Cramer, JG; Crawford, HJ; Das, D.; Das, S.; de Moura, MM; Derevschikov, AA; Didenko, L.; Dietel, T.; Dong, WJ; Dong, X.; Draper, JE; Du, F.; Dubey, AK; Dunin, VB; Dunlop, JC; Mazumdar, MRD; Eckardt, V.; Edwards, WR; Efimov, LG; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Fachini, P.; Faivre, J.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Filimonov, K.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Foley, KJ; Fomenko, K.; Fu, J.; Gagliardi, Carl A.; Gans, J.; Ganti, MS; Gaudichet, L.; Geurts, F.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gonzalez, JE; Grachov, O.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Guertin, SM; Gupta, A.; Gutierrez, TD; Hallman, TJ; Hamed, A.; Hardtke, D.; Harris, JW; Heinz, M.; Henry, TW; Hepplemann, S.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffmann, GW; Huang, HZ; Huang, SL; Hughes, EW; Humanic, TJ; Igo, G.; Ishihara, A.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, WW; Janik, M.; Jiang, H.; Jones, PG; Judd, EG; Kabana, S.; Kang, K.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Khodyrev, VY; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Kislov, EM; Klay, J.; Klein, SR; Klyachko, A.; Koetke, DD; Kollegger, T.; Kopytine, M.; Kotchenda, L.; Kramer, M.; Kravtsov, P.; Kravtsov, VI; Krueger, K.; Kuhn, C.; Kulikov, AI; Kumar, A.; Kunz, CL; Kutuev, RK; Kuznetsov, AA; Lamont, MAC; Landgraf, JM; Lange, S.; Laue, F.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lehocka, S.; LeVine, MJ; Li, C.; Li, Q.; Li, Y.; Lindenbaum, SJ; Lisa, MA; Liu, F.; Liu, L.; Liu, QJ; Liu, Z.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, WJ; Long, H.; Longacre, RS; Lopez-Noriega, M.; Love, WA; Lu, Y.; Ludlam, T.; Lynn, D.; Ma, GL; Ma, JG; Ma, YG; Magestro, D.; Mahajan, S.; Mahapatra, DP; Majka, R.; Mangotra, LK; Manweiler, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Martin, L.; Marx, JN; Matis, HS; Matulenko, YA; McClain, CJ; McShane, TS; Meissner, F.; Melnick, Y.; Meschanin, A.; Miller, ML; Milosevich, Z.; Minaev, NG; Mironov, C.; Mischke, A.; Mishra, D.; Mitchell, J.; Mohanty, B.; Molnar, L.; Moore, CF; Mora-Corral, MJ; Morozov, DA; Morozov, V.; Munhoz, MG; Nandi, BK; Nayak, TK; Nelson, JM; Netrakanti, PK; Nikitin, VA; Nogach, LV; Norman, B.; Nurushev, SB; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Okorokov, V.; Oldenburg, M.; Olson, D.; Pal, SK; Panebratsev, Y.; Panitkin, SY; Pavlinov, AI; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Perevoztchikov, V.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Petrov, VA; Phatak, SC; Picha, R.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Porile, N.; Porter, J.; Poskanzer, AM; Potekhin, M.; Potrebenikova, E.; Potukuchi, BVKS; Prindle, D.; Pruneau, C.; Putschke, J.; Rai, G.; Rakness, G.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ravel, O.; Ray, RL; Razin, SV; Reichhold, D.; Reid, JG; Renault, G.; Retiere, F.; Ridiger, A.; Ritter, HG; Roberts, JB; Rogachevskiy, OV; Romero, JL; Rose, A.; Roy, C.; Ruan, L.; Sahoo, R.; Sakrejda, I.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Savin, I.; Sazhin, PS; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, RP; Schmitz, N.; Schroeder, LS; Schweda, K.; Seger, J.; Seyboth, P.; Shahaliev, E.; Shao, M.; Shao, W.; Sharma, M.; Shen, WQ; Shestermanov, KE; Shimanskiy, SS; Simon, F.; Singaraju, RN; Skoro, G.; Smirnov, N.; Snellings, R.; Sood, G.; Sorensen, P.; Sowinski, J.; Speltz, J.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stadnik, A.; Stanislaus, TDS; Stock, R.; Stolpovsky, A.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Suaide, AAP; Sugarbaker, E.; Suire, C.; Sumbera, M.; Surrow, B.; Symons, TJM; Szanto de Toledo, A.; Szarwas, P.; Tai, A.; Takahashi, J.; Tang, AH; Tarnowsky, T.; Thein, D.; Thomas, JH; Timoshenko, S.; Tokarev, M.; Trainor, TA; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, Robert E.; Tsai, O.; Ulery, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, DG; Urkinbaev, A.; Van Buren, G.; Vander Molen, AM; Varma, R.; Vasilevski, IM; Vasiliev, AN; Vernet, R.; Vigdor, SE; Viyogi, YP; Vokal, S.; Vznuzdaev, M.; Waggoner, B.; Wang, F.; Wang, G.; Wang, G.; Wang, XL; Wang, Y.; Wang, Y.; Wang, ZM; Ward, H.; Watson, JW; Webb, JC; Wells, R.; Westfall, GD; Wetzler, A.; Whitten, C.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, SW; Witt, R.; Wood, J.; Wu, J.; Xu, N.; Xu, Z.; Xu, Z.; Yamamoto, E.; Yepes, P.; Yurevich, VI; Zanevsky, YV; Zhang, H.; Zhang, WM; Zhang, ZP; Zolnierczuk, PA; Zoulkarneev, R.; Zoulkarneeva, Y.; Zubarev, AN; STAR Collaboration.

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Balewski,16 O. Barannikova,31 L. S. Barnby,2 J. Baudot,17 S. Bekele,27 V. V. Belaga,11 R. Bellwied,45 J. Berger,13 B. I. Bezverkhny,47 S. Bharadwaj,32 V. S. Bhatia,28 H. Bichsel,44 A. Billmeier,45 L. C. Bland,3 C. O. Blyth,2 B. E. Bonner,33 M. Botje,26 A...

  10. Delta phi Delta eta correlations in central Au plus Au collisions at root S-NN = 200 GeV 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adams, J.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Amonett, J.; Anderson, B. D.; Anderson, M.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G. S.; Bai, Y.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L. S.; Baudot, J.; Bekele, S.; Belaga, V. V.; Bellingeri-Laurikainen, A.; Bellwied, R.; Bezverkhny, B. I.; Bharadwaj, S.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L. C.; Blyth, C. O.; Blyth, S. -L; Bonner, B. E.; Botje, M.; Bouchet, J.; Brandin, A. V.; Bravar, A.; Bystersky, M.; Cadman, R. V.; Cai, X. Z.; Caines, H.; Sanchez, M. Calderon de la Barca; Castillo, J.; Catu, O.; Cebra, D.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Choi, H. A.; Christie, W.; Coffin, J. P.; Cormier, T. M.; Cosentino, M. R.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Das, D.; Das, S.; Daugherity, M.; de Moura, M. M.; Dedovich, T. G.; DePhillips, M.; Derevschikov, A. A.; Didenko, L.; Dietel, T.; Djawotho, P.; Dogra, S. M.; Dong, W. J.; Dong, X.; Draper, J. E.; Du, F.; Dunin, V. B.; Dunlop, J. C.; Mazumdar, M. R. Dutta; Eckardt, V.; Edwards, W. R.; Efimov, L. G.; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Fachini, P.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Filimonov, K.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Fu, J.; Gagliardi, Carl A.; Gaillard, L.; Gans, J.; Ganti, M. S.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gonzalez, J. E.; Gorbunov, Y. G.; Gos, H.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Guertin, S. M.; Guimaraes, K. S. F. F.; Guo, Y.; Gupta, N.; Gutierrez, T. D.; Haag, B.; Hallman, T. J.; Hamed, A.; Harris, J. W.; He, W.; Heinz, M.; Henry, T. W.; Hepplemann, S.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Horner, M. J.; Huang, H. Z.; Huang, S. L.; Hughes, E. W.; Humanic, T. J.; Igo, G.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jakl, P.; Jia, F.; Jiang, H.; Jones, P. G.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kang, K.; Kapitan, J.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Khodyrev, V. Yu; Kim, B. C.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Kislov, E. M.; Klein, S. R.; Koetke, D. D.; Kollegger, T.; Kopytine, M.; Kotchenda, L.; Kouchpil, V.; Kowalik, K. L.; Kramer, M.; Kravtsov, P.; Kravtsov, V. I.; Krueger, K.; Kuhn, C.; Kulikov, A. I.; Kumar, A.; Kuznetsov, A. A.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; Lange, S.; LaPointe, S.; Laue, F.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, C. -H; Lehocka, S.; LeVine, M. J.; Li, C.; Li, Q.; Li, Y.; Lin, G.; Lindenbaum, S. J.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Liu, H.; Liu, J.; Liu, L.; Liu, Z.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Long, H.; Longacre, R. S.; Lopez-Noriega, M.; Love, W. A.; Lu, Y.; Ludlam, T.; Lynn, D.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, J. G.; Ma, Y. G.; Magestro, D.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Majka, R.; Mangotra, L. K.; Manweiler, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Martin, L.; Matis, H. S.; Matulenko, Yu A.; McClain, C. J.; McShane, T. S.; Melnick, Yu; Meschanin, A.; Miller, M. L.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, Saskia; Mironov, C.; Mischke, A.; Mishra, D. K.; Mitchell, J.; Mohanty, B.; Molnar, L.; Moore, C. F.; Morozov, D. A.; Munhoz, M. G.; Nandi, B. K.; Nattrass, C.; Nayak, T. K.; Nelson, J. M.; Netrakanti, P. K.; Nikitin, V. A.; Nogach, L. V.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Okorokov, V.; Oldenburg, M.; Olson, D.; Pachr, M.; Pal, S. K.; Panebratsev, Y.; Panitkin, S. Y.; Pavlinov, A. I.; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Perevoztchikov, V.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Petrov, V. A.; Phatak, S. C.; Picha, R.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Poljak, N.; Porile, N.; Porter, J.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Potekhin, M.; Potrebenikova, E.; Potukuchi, B. V. K. S.; Prindle, D.; Pruneau, C.; Putschke, J.; Rakness, G.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Razin, S. V.; Reinnarth, J.; Relyea, D.; Retiere, F.; Ridiger, A.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Rose, A.; Roy, C.; Ruan, L.; Russcher, M. J.; Sahoo, R.; Sakrejda, I.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sarsour, M.; Sazhin, P. S.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmitz, N.; Schweda, K.; Seger, J.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Seyboth, P.; Shabetai, A.; Shahaliev, E.; Shao, M.; Sharma, M.; Shen, W. Q.; Shimanskiy, S. S.; Sichtermann, E.; Simon, F.; Singaraju, R. N.; Smirnov, N.; Snellings, R.; Sood, G.; Sorensen, P.; Sowinski, J.; Speltz, J.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stadnik, A.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Stock, R.; Stolpovsky, A.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Sugarbaker, E.; Sumbera, M.; Sun, Z.; Surrow, B.; Swanger, M.; Symons, T. J. M.; de Toledo, A. Szanto; Takahashi, A. Tai J.; Tang, A. H.; Tarnowsky, T.; Thein, D.; Thomas, J. H.; Timmins, A. R.; Timoshenko, S.; Tokarev, M.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, Robert E.; Tsai, O. D.; Ulery, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Van Buren, G.; van der Kolk, N.; van Leeuwen, M.; Molen, A. M. Vander; Varma, R.; Vasilevski, I. M.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Vernet, R.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . O. Blyth,2 S.-L. Blyth,21 B. E. Bonner,35 M. Botje,27 J. Bouchet,39 A. V. Brandin,25 A. Bravar,3 M. Bystersky,10 R. V. Cadman,1 X. Z. Cai,38 H. Caines,49 M. Caldero?n de la Barca Sa?nchez,6 J. Castillo,27 O. Catu,49 D. Cebra,6 Z. Chajecki,28 P...

  11. Measurements of phi meson production in relativistic heavy-ion collisions at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abelev, B. I.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Anderson, B. D.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G. S.; Bai, Y.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L. S.; Baudot, J.; Baumgart, S.; Beavis, D. R.; Bellwied, R.; Benedosso, F.; Betts, R. R.; Bhardwaj, S.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Biritz, B.; Bland, L. C.; Blyth, S. -L; Bombara, M.; Bonner, B. E.; Botje, M.; Bouchet, J.; Braidot, E.; Brandin, A. V.; Bruna, E.; Bueltmann, S.; Burton, T. P.; Bystersky, M.; Cai, X. Z.; Caines, H.; Sanchez, M. Calderon de la Barca; Callner, J.; Catu, O.; Cebra, D.; Cendejas, R.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, J. Y.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Choi, K. E.; Christie, W.; Chung, S. U.; Clarke, R. F.; Codrington, M. J. M.; Coffin, J. P.; Cormier, T. M.; Cosentino, M. R.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Das, D.; Dash, S.; Daugherity, M.; De Silva, C.; Dedovich, T. G.; DePhillips, M.; Derevschikov, A. A.; de Souza, R. Derradi; Didenko, L.; Djawotho, P.; Dogra, S. M.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Du, F.; Dunlop, J. C.; Mazumdar, M. R. Dutta; Edwards, W. R.; Efimov, L. G.; Elhalhuli, E.; Elnimr, M.; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Eun, L.; Fachini, P.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Feng, A.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Gagliardi, Carl A.; Gaillard, L.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Ganti, M. S.; Garcia-Solis, E.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gorbunov, Y. N.; Gordon, A.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Grube, B.; Guertin, S. M.; Guimaraes, K. S. F. F.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, N.; Guryn, W.; Haag, B.; Hallman, T. J.; Hamed, A.; Harris, J. W.; He, W.; Heinz, M.; Heppelmann, S.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hoffman, A. M.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Huang, H. Z.; Humanic, T. J.; Igo, G.; Iordanova, A.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jakl, P.; Jin, F.; Jones, P. G.; Joseph, J.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kajimoto, K.; Kang, K.; Kapitan, J.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Kettler, D.; Khodyrev, V. Yu; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Klein, S. R.; Knospe, A. G.; Kocoloski, A.; Koetke, D. D.; Kopytine, M.; Kotchenda, L.; Kouchpil, V.; Kravtsov, P.; Kravtsov, V. I.; Krueger, K.; Krus, M.; Kuhn, C.; Kumar, L.; Kurnadi, P.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; LaPointe, S.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, C. -H; LeVine, M. J.; Li, C.; Li, Y.; Lin, G.; Lin, X.; Lindenbaum, S. J.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Liu, H.; Liu, J.; Liu, L.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Longacre, R. S.; Love, W. A.; Lu, Y.; Ludlam, T.; Lynn, D.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, J. G.; Ma, Y. G.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Majka, R.; Mall, M. I.; Mangotra, L. K.; Manweiler, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Matis, H. S.; Matulenko, Yu A.; McShane, T. S.; Meschanin, A.; Millane, J.; Miller, M. L.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, Saskia; Mischke, A.; Mitchell, J.; Mohanty, B.; Morozov, D. A.; Munhoz, M. G.; Nandi, B. K.; Nattrass, C.; Nayak, T. K.; Nelson, J. M.; Nepali, C.; Netrakanti, P. K.; Ng, M. J.; Nogach, L. V.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Okada, H.; Okorokov, V.; Olson, D.; Pachr, M.; Page, B. S.; Pal, S. K.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Perevoztchikov, V.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Phatak, S. C.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Poljak, N.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Potukuchi, B. V. K. S.; Prindle, D.; Pruneau, C.; Pruthi, N. K.; Putschke, J.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Reed, R.; Ridiger, A.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Rose, A.; Roy, C.; Ruan, L.; Russcher, M. J.; Rykov, V.; Sahoo, R.; Sakrejda, I.; Sakuma, T.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sarsour, M.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmitz, N.; Seger, J.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Seyboth, P.; Shabetai, A.; Shahaliev, E.; Shao, M.; Sharma, M.; Shi, S. S.; Shi, X. -H; Sichtermann, E. P.; Simon, F.; Singaraju, R. N.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, N.; Snellings, R.; Sorensen, P.; Sowinski, J.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stadnik, A.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Staszak, D.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Suarez, M. C.; Subba, N. L.; Sumbera, M.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Y.; Sun, Z.; Surrow, B.; Symons, T. J. M.; de Toledo, A. Szanto; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A. H.; Tang, Z.; Tarnowsky, T.; Thein, D.; Thomas, J. H.; Tian, J.; Timmins, A. R.; Timoshenko, S.; Tlusty; Tokarev, M.; Trainor, T. A.; Tram, V. N.; Trattner, A. L.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, Robert E.; Tsai, O. D.; Ulery, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Van Buren, G.; van Leeuwen, M.; Vander Molen, A. M.; Vanfossen, J. A.; Varma, R., Jr.; Vasconcelos, G. M. S.; Vasilevski, I. M.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Videbaek, F.; Vigdor, S. E.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, S. A.; Wada, M.; Waggoner, W. T.; Wang, F.; Wang, G.; Wang, J. S.; Wang, Q.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ,6 L. C. Bland,3 S.-L. Blyth,22 M. Bombara,2 B. E. Bonner,36 M. Botje,28 J. Bouchet,19 E. Braidot,28 A. V. Brandin,26 E. Bruna,51 S. Bueltmann,3 T. P. Burton,2 M. Bystersky,11 X. Z. Cai,39 H. Caines,51 M. Caldero?n de la Barca Sa?nchez,5 J. Callner...

  12. Directed flow in Au plus Au collisions at root s(NN)=62.4 GeV 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adams, J.; Aggarwal, MM; Ahammed, Z.; Amonett, J.; Anderson, BD; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, GS; Badyal, SK; Bai, Y.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, LS; Baudot, J.; Bekele, S.; Belaga, VV; Bellingeri-Laurikainen, A.; Bellwied, R.; Berger, J.; Bezverkhny, BI; Bharadwaj, S.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, AK; Bhatia, VS; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Billmeier, A.; Bland, LC; Blyth, CO; Blyth, SL; Bonner, BE; Botje, M.; Boucham, A.; Bouchet, J.; Brandin, AV; Bravar, A.; Bystersky, M.; Cadman, RV; Cai, XZ; Caines, H.; Sanchez, MCD; Castillo, J.; Catu, O.; Cebra, D.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, HF; Chen, JH; Chen, Y.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Choi, HA; Christie, W.; Coffin, JP; Cormier, TM; Cosentino, MR; Cramer, JG; Crawford, HJ; Das, D.; Das, S.; Daugherity, M.; de Moura, MM; Dedovich, TG; DePhillips, M.; Derevschikov, AA; Didenko, L.; Dietel, T.; Dogra, SM; Dong, WJ; Dong, X.; Draper, JE; Du, F.; Dubey, AK; Dunin, VB; Dunlop, JC; Mazumdar, MRD; Eckardt, V.; Edwards, WR; Efimov, LG; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Fachini, P.; Faivre, J.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Filimonov, K.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Fornazier, KSF; Fu, J.; Gagliardi, Carl A.; Gaillard, L.; Gans, J.; Ganti, MS; Geurts, F.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gonzalez, JE; Gos, H.; Grachov, O.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Guertin, SM; Guo, Y.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, N.; Gutierrez, TD; Hallman, TJ; Hamed, A.; Hardtke, D.; Harris, JW; Heinz, M.; Henry, TW; Hepplemann, S.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffmann, GW; Horner, MJ; Huang, HZ; Huang, SL; Hughes, EW; Humanic, TJ; Igo, G.; Ishihara, A.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, WW; Jedynak, M.; Jiang, H.; Jones, PG; Judd, EG; Kabana, S.; Kang, K.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Khodyrev, VY; Kim, BC; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Kislov, EM; Klay, J.; Klein, SR; Koetke, DD; Kollegger, T.; Kopytine, M.; Kotchenda, L.; Kowalik, KL; Kramer, M.; Kravtsov, P.; Kravtsov, VI; Krueger, K.; Kuhn, C.; Kulikov, AI; Kumar, A.; Kutuev, RK; Kuznetsov, AA; Lamont, MAC; Landgraf, JM; Lange, S.; Laue, F.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, CH; Lehocka, S.; LeVine, MJ; Li, C.; Li, Q.; Li, Y.; Lin, G.; Lindenbaum, SJ; Lisa, MA; Liu, F.; Liu, H.; Liu, J.; Liu, L.; Liu, QJ; Liu, Z.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, WJ; Long, H.; Longacre, RS; Lopez-Noriega, M.; Love, WA; Lu, Y.; Ludlam, T.; Lynn, D.; Ma, GL; Ma, JG; Ma, YG; Magestro, D.; Mahajan, S.; Mahapatra, DP; Majka, R.; Mangotra, LK; Manweiler, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Martin, L.; Marx, JN; Matis, HS; Matulenko, YA; McClain, CJ; McShane, TS; Meissner, F.; Melnick, Y.; Meschanin, A.; Miller, ML; Minaev, NG; Mironov, C.; Mischke, A.; Mishra, DK; Mitchell, J.; Mohanty, B.; Molnar, L.; Moore, CF; Morozov, DA; Munhoz, MG; Nandi, BK; Nayak, SK; Nayak, TK; Nelson, JM; Netrakanti, PK; Nikitin, VA; Nogach, LV; Nurushev, SB; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Okorokov, V.; Oldenburg, M.; Olson, D.; Pal, SK; Panebratsev, Y.; Panitkin, SY; Pavlinov, AI; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Perevoztchikov, V.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Petrov, VA; Phatak, SC; Picha, R.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Porile, N.; Porter, J.; Poskanzer, AM; Potekhin, M.; Potrebenikova, E.; Potukuchi, BVKS; Prindle, D.; Pruneau, C.; Putschke, J.; Rakness, G.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ravel, O.; Ray, RL; Razin, SV; Reichhold, D.; Reid, JG; Reinnarth, J.; Renault, G.; Retiere, F.; Ridiger, A.; Ritter, HG; Roberts, JB; Rogachevskiy, OV; Romero, JL; Rose, A.; Roy, C.; Ruan, L.; Russcher, MJ; Sahoo, R.; Sakrejda, I.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sarsour, M.; Savin, I.; Sazhin, PS; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, RP; Schmitz, N.; Schweda, K.; Seger, J.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Seyboth, P.; Shahaliev, E.; Shao, M.; Shao, W.; Sharma, M.; Shen, WQ; Shestermanov, KE; Shimanskiy, SS; Sichtermann, E.; Simon, F.; Singaraju, RN; Smirnov, N.; Snellings, R.; Sood, G.; Sorensen, P.; Sowinski, J.; Speltz, J.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stadnik, A.; Stanislaus, TDS; Stock, R.; Stolpovsky, A.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Suaide, AAP; Sugarbaker, E.; Sumbera, M.; Surrow, B.; Swanger, M.; Symons, TJM; de Toledo, AS; Tai, A.; Takahashi, J.; Tang, AH; Tarnowsky, T.; Thein, D.; Thomas, JH; Timmins, AR; Timoshenko, S.; Tokarev, M.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, Robert E.; Tsai, OD; Ulery, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, DG; van Buren, G.; van der Kolk, N.; van Leeuwen, M.; Vander Molen, AM; Varma, R.; Vasilevski, IM; Vasiliev, AN; Vernet, R.; Vigdor, SE; Viyogi, YP; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, SA; Waggoner, WT; Wang, F.; Wang, G.; Wang, G.; Wang, XL; Wang, Y.; Wang, Y.; Wang, ZM; Ward, H.; Watson, JW; Webb, JC; Westfall, GD; Wetzler, A.; Whitten, C.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, SW; Witt, R.; Wood, J.; Wu, J.; Xu, N.; Xu, Z.; Xu, ZZ; Yamamoto, E.; Yepes, P.; Yoo, IK; Yurevich, VI; Zborovsky, I.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, WM; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, ZP

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Billmeier,47 L. C. Bland,4 C. O. Blyth,3 S.-L. Blyth,21 B. E. Bonner,35 M. Botje,27 A. Boucham,39 J. Bouchet,39 A. V. Brandin,25 A. Bravar,4 M. Bystersky,11 R. V. Cadman,1 X. Z. Cai,38 H. Caines,49 M. Caldero?n de la Barca Sa?nchez,17 J. Castillo,21 O...

  13. Strange particle production in p+p collisions at root s=200 GeV 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abelev, B. I.; Adams, J.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Amonett, J.; Anderson, B. D.; Anderson, M.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G. S.; Bai, Y.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L. S.; Baudot, J.; Bekele, S.; Belaga, V. V.; Bellingeri-Laurikainen, A.; Bellwied, R.; Benedosso, F.; Bhardwaj, S.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L. C.; Blyth, S. -L; Bonner, B. E.; Botje, M.; Bouchet, J.; Brandin, A. V.; Bravar, A.; Burton, T. P.; Bystersky, M.; Cadman, R. V.; Cai, X. Z.; Caines, H.; Calderon de la Barca Sanchez,M.; Castillo, J.; Catu, O.; Cebra, D.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, J. H.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Christie, W.; Coffin, J. P.; Cormier, T. M.; Cosentino, M. R.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Das, D.; Das, S.; Dash, S.; Daugherity, M.; de Moura, M. M.; Dedovich, T. G.; DePhillips, M.; Derevschikov, A. A.; Didenko, L.; Dietel, T.; Djawotho, P.; Dogra, S. M.; Dong, W. J.; Dong, X.; Draper, J. E.; Du, F.; Dunin, V. B.; Dunlop, J. C.; Dutta Mazumdar, M. R.; Eckardt, V.; Edwards, W. R.; Efimov, L. G.; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Fachini, P.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Filimonov, K.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Fu, J.; Gagliardi, Carl A.; Gaillard, L.; Ganti, M. S.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gonzalez, J. E.; Gorbunov, Y. G.; Gos, H.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Guertin, S. M.; Guimaraes, K. S. F. F.; Gupta, A.; Gutierrez, T. D.; Haag, B.; Hallman, T. J.; Hamed, A.; Harris, J. W.; He, W.; Heinz, M.; Henry, T. W.; Hepplemann, S.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffman, A. M.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Horner, M. J.; Huang, H. Z.; Huang, S. L.; Hughes, E. W.; Humanic, T. J.; Igo, G.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jakl, P.; Jia, F.; Jiang, H.; Jones, P. G.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kang, K.; Kapitan, J.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Khodyrev, V. Yu; Kim, B. C.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Kislov, E. M.; Klein, S. R.; Kocoloski, A.; Koetke, D. D.; Kollegger, T.; Kopytine, M.; Kotchenda, L.; Kouchpil, V.; Kowalik, K. L.; Kramer, M.; Kravtsov, P.; Kravtsov, V. I.; Krueger, K.; Kuhn, C.; Kulikov, A. I.; Kumar, A.; Kuznetsov, A. A.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; Lange, S.; LaPointe, S.; Laue, F.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, C. -H; Lehocka, S.; LeVine, M. J.; Li, C.; Li, Q.; Li, Y.; Lin, G.; Lin, X.; Lindenbaum, S. J.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Liu, H.; Liu, J.; Liu, L.; Liu, Z.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Long, H.; Longacre, R. S.; Love, W. A.; Lu, Y.; Ludlam, T.; Lynn, D.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, J. G.; Ma, Y. G.; Magestro, D.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Majka, R.; Mangotra, L. K.; Manweiler, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Martin, L.; Matis, H. S.; Matulenko, Yu A.; McClain, C. J.; McShane, T. S.; Melnick, Yu; Meschanin, A.; Millane, J.; Miller, M. L.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, Saskia; Mironov, C.; Mischke, A.; Mishra, D. K.; Mitchell, J.; Mohanty, B.; Molnar, L.; Moore, C. F.; Morozov, D. A.; Munhoz, M. G.; Nandi, B. K.; Nattrass, C.; Nayak, T. K.; Nelson, J. M.; Netrakanti, P. K.; Nogach, L. V.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Okorokov, V.; Oldenburg, M.; Olson, D.; Pachr, M.; Pal, S. K.; Panebratsev, Y.; Panitkin, S. Y.; Pavlinov, A. I.; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Perevoztchikov, V.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Phatak, S. C.; Picha, R.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Poljak, N.; Porile, N.; Porter, J.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Potekhin, M.; Potrebenikova, E.; Potukuchi, B. V. K. S.; Prindle, D.; Pruneau, C.; Putschke, J.; Rakness, G.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Razin, S. V.; Reinnarth, J.; Relyea, D.; Retiere, F.; Ridiger, A.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Rose, A.; Roy, C.; Ruan, L.; Russcher, M. J.; Sahoo, R.; Sakuma, T.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sarsour, M.; Sazhin, P. S.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmitz, N.; Schweda, K.; Seger, J.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Seyboth, P.; Shabetai, A.; Shahaliev, E.; Shao, M.; Sharma, M.; Shen, W. Q.; Shimanskiy, S. S.; Sichtermann, E.; Simon, F.; Singaraju, R. N.; Smirnov, N.; Snellings, R.; Sood, G.; Sorensen, P.; Sowinski, J.; Speltz, J.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stadnik, A.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Stock, R.; Stolpovsky, A.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Sugarbaker, E.; Sumbera, M.; Sun, Z.; Surrow, B.; Swanger, M.; Symons, T. J. M.; de Toledo, A. Szanto; Tai, A.; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A. H.; Tarnowsky, T.; Thein, D.; Thomas, J. H.; Timmins, A. R.; Timoshenko, S.; Tokarev, M.; Trainor, T. A.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, Robert E.; Tsai, O. D.; Ulery, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Van Buren, G.; van der Kolk, N.; van Leeuwen, M.; Vander Molen, A. M.; Varma, R.; Vasilevski, I. M.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Vernet, R.; Vigdor, S. E.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Bland,3 S.-L. Blyth,22 B. E. Bonner,36 M. Botje,28 J. Bouchet,40 A. V. Brandin,26 A. Bravar,3 T. P. Burton,2 M. Bystersky,11 R. V. Cadman,1 X. Z. Cai,39 H. Caines,50 M. Caldero?n de la Barca Sa?nchez,6 J. Castillo,28 O. Catu,50 D. Cebra,6 Z. Chajecki...

  14. Neutral kaon interferometry in Au plus Au collisions at root(S)(NN) =200GeV 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abelev, B. I.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Amonett, J.; Anderson, B. D.; Anderson, M.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G. S.; Bai, Y.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L. S.; Baudot, J.; Bekele, S.; Belaga, V. V.; Bellingeri-Laurikainen, A.; Bellwied, R.; Benedosso, F.; Bhardwaj, S.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L. C.; Blyth, S. -L; Bonner, B. E.; Botje, M.; Bouchet, J.; Brandin, A. V.; Bravar, A.; Burton, T. P.; Bystersky, M.; Cadman, R. V.; Cai, X. Z.; Caines, H.; de la Barca Sanchez, M. Calderon; Castillo, J.; Catu, O.; Cebra, D.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, J. H.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Christie, W.; Coffin, J. P.; Cormier, T. M.; Cosentino, M. R.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Das, D.; Das, S.; Dash, S.; Daugherity, M.; de Moura, M. M.; Dedovich, T. G.; DePhillips, M.; Derevschikov, A. A.; Didenko, L.; Dietel, T.; Djawotho, P.; Dogra, S. M.; Dong, W. J.; Dong, X.; Draper, J. E.; Du, F.; Dunin, V. B.; Dunlop, J. C.; Mazumdar, M. R. Dutta; Eckardt, V.; Edwards, W. R.; Efimov, L. G.; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Fachini, P.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Filimonov, K.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Fu, J.; Gagliardi, Carl A.; Gaillard, L.; Ganti, M. S.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gonzalez, J. E.; Gorbunov, Y. G.; Gos, H.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Guertin, S. M.; Guimaraes, K. S. F. F.; Gupta, N.; Gutierrez, T. D.; Haag, B.; Hallman, T. J.; Hamed, A.; Harris, J. W.; He, W.; Heinz, M.; Henry, T. W.; Hepplemann, S.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffman, A. M.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Horner, M. J.; Huang, H. Z.; Huang, S. L.; Hughes, E. W.; Humanic, T. J.; Igo, G.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jakl, P.; Jia, F.; Jiang, H.; Jones, P. G.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kang, K.; Kapitan, J.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Khodyrev, V. Yu; Kim, B. C.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Kislov, E. M.; Klein, S. R.; Kocoloski, A.; Koetke, D. D.; Kollegger, T.; Kopytine, M.; Kotchenda, L.; Kouchpil, V.; Kowalik, K. L.; Kramer, M.; Kravtsov, P.; Kravtsov, V. I.; Krueger, K.; Kuhn, C.; Kulikov, A. I.; Kumar, A.; Kuznetsov, A. A.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; Lange, S.; LaPointe, S.; Laue, F.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, C. -H; Lehocka, S.; LeVine, M. J.; Li, C.; Li, Q.; Li, Y.; Lin, G.; Lin, X.; Lindenbaum, S. J.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Liu, H.; Liu, J.; Liu, L.; Liu, Z.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Long, H.; Longacre, R. S.; Love, W. A.; Lu, Y.; Ludlam, T.; Lynn, D.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, J. G.; Ma, Y. G.; Magestro, D.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Majka, R.; Mangotra, L. K.; Manweiler, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Martin, L.; Matis, H. S.; Matulenko, Yu A.; McClain, C. J.; McShane, T. S.; Melnick, Yu; Meschanin, A.; Millane, J.; Miller, M. L.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, Saskia; Mironov, C.; Mischke, A.; Mishra, D. K.; Mitchell, J.; Mohanty, B.; Molnar, L.; Moore, C. F.; Morozov, D. A.; Munhoz, M. G.; Nandi, B. K.; Nattrass, C.; Nayak, T. K.; Nelson, J. M.; Netrakanti, P. K.; Nogach, L. V.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Okorokov, V.; Oldenburg, M.; Olson, D.; Pachr, M.; Pal, S. K.; Panebratsev, Y.; Panitkin, S. Y.; Pavlinov, A. I.; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Perevoztchikov, V.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Phatak, S. C.; Picha, R.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Poljak, N.; Porile, N.; Porter, J.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Potekhin, M.; Potrebenikova, E.; Potukuchi, B. V. K. S.; Prindle, D.; Pruneau, C.; Putschke, J.; Rakness, G.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Razin, S. V.; Reinnarth, J.; Relyea, D.; Retiere, F.; Ridiger, A.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Rose, A.; Roy, C.; Ruan, L.; Russcher, M. J.; Sahoo, R.; Sakuma, T.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sarsour, M.; Sazhin, P. S.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmitz, N.; Schweda, K.; Seger, J.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Seyboth, P.; Shabetai, A.; Shahaliev, E.; Shao, M.; Sharma, M.; Shen, W. Q.; Shimanskiy, S. S.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Simon, F.; Singaraju, R. N.; Smirnov, N.; Snellings, R.; Sood, G.; Sorensen, P.; Sowinski, J.; Speltz, J.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stadnik, A.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Stock, R.; Stolpovsky, A.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Sugarbaker, E.; Sumbera, M.; Sun, Z.; Surrow, B.; Swanger, M.; Symons, T. J. M.; de Toledo, A. Szanto; Tai, A.; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A. H.; Tarnowsky, T.; Thein, D.; Thomas, J. H.; Timmins, A. R.; Timoshenko, S.; Tokarev, M.; Trainor, T. A.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, Robert E.; Tsai, O. D.; Ulery, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Van Buren, G.; van der Kolk, N.; van Leeuwen, M.; Molen, A. M. Vander; Varma, R.; Vasilevski, I. M.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Vernet, R.; Vigdor, S. E.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    .-L. Blyth,22 B. E. Bonner,36 M. Botje,28 J. Bouchet,40 A. V. Brandin,26 A. Bravar,3 T. P. Burton,2 M. Bystersky,11 R. V. Cadman,1 X. Z. Cai,39 H. Caines,50 M. Caldero?n de la Barca Sa?nchez,6 J. Castillo,28 O. Catu,50 D. Cebra,6 Z. Chajecki,29 P. Chaloupka...

  15. Minijet deformation and charge-independent angular correlations on momentum subspace (eta, phi) in Au-Au collisions at root S-NN=130 GeV 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adams, J.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Amonett, J.; Anderson, B. D.; Anderson, M.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G. S.; Bai, Y.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L. S.; Baudot, J.; Bekele, S.; Belaga, V. V.; Bellingeri-Laurikainen, A.; Bellwied, R.; Bezverkhny, B. I.; Bharadwaj, S.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L. C.; Blyth, C. O.; Blyth, S. -L; Bonner, B. E.; Botje, M.; Bouchet, J.; Brandin, A. V.; Bravar, A.; Bystersky, M.; Cadman, R. V.; Cai, X. Z.; Caines, H.; Sanchez, M. Calderon de la Barca; Castillo, J.; Catu, O.; Cebra, D.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Choi, H. A.; Christie, W.; Coffin, J. P.; Cormier, T. M.; Cosentino, M. R.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Das, D.; Das, S.; Daugherity, M.; de Moura, M. M.; Dedovich, T. G.; DePhillips, M.; Derevschikov, A. A.; Didenko, L.; Dietel, T.; Djawotho, P.; Dogra, S. M.; Dong, W. J.; Dong, X.; Draper, J. E.; Du, F.; Dunin, V. B.; Dunlop, J. C.; Mazumdar, M. R. Dutta; Eckardt, V.; Edwards, W. R.; Efimov, L. G.; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Fachini, P.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Filimonov, K.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Fu, J.; Gagliardi, Carl A.; Gaillard, L.; Gans, J.; Ganti, M. S.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gonzalez, J. E.; Gorbunov, Y. G.; Gos, H.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Guertin, S. M.; Guimaraes, K. S. F. F.; Guo, Y.; Gupta, A.; Gutierrez, T. D.; Haag, B.; Hallman, T. J.; Hamed, A.; Harris, J. W.; He, W.; Heinz, M.; Henry, T. W.; Hepplemann, S.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Horner, M. J.; Huang, H. Z.; Huang, S. L.; Hughes, E. W.; Humanic, T. J.; Igo, G.; Ishihara, A.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jakl, P.; Jia, F.; Jiang, H.; Jones, P. G.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kang, K.; Kapitan, J.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Khodyrev, V. Yu; Kim, B. C.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Kislov, E. M.; Klein, S. R.; Koetke, D. D.; Kollegger, T.; Kopytine, M.; Kotchenda, L.; Kouchpil, V.; Kowalik, K. L.; Kramer, M.; Kravtsov, P.; Kravtsov, V. I.; Krueger, K.; Kuhn, C.; Kulikov, A. I.; Kumar, A.; Kuznetsov, A. A.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; Lange, S.; LaPointe, S.; Laue, F.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, C. -H; Lehocka, S.; LeVine, M. J.; Li, C.; Li, Q.; Li, Y.; Lin, G.; Lindenbaum, S. J.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Liu, H.; Liu, J.; Liu, L.; Liu, Z.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Long, H.; Longacre, R. S.; Lopez-Noriega, M.; Love, W. A.; Lu, Y.; Ludlam, T.; Lynn, D.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, J. G.; Ma, Y. G.; Magestro, D.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Majka, R.; Mangotra, L. K.; Manweiler, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Martin, L.; Matis, H. S.; Matulenko, Yu A.; McClain, C. J.; McShane, T. S.; Melnick, Yu; Meschanin, A.; Miller, M. L.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, Saskia; Mironov, C.; Mischke, A.; Mishra, D. K.; Mitchell, J.; Mohanty, B.; Molnar, L.; Moore, C. F.; Morozov, D. A.; Munhoz, M. G.; Nandi, B. K.; Nattrass, C.; Nayak, T. K.; Nelson, J. M.; Netrakanti, P. K.; Nikitin, V. A.; Nogach, L. V.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Okorokov, V.; Oldenburg, M.; Olson, D.; Pachr, M.; Pal, S. K.; Panebratsev, Y.; Panitkin, S. Y.; Pavlinov, A. I.; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Perevoztchikov, V.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Petrov, V. A.; Phatak, S. C.; Picha, R.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Poljak, N.; Porile, N.; Porter, J.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Potekhin, M.; Potrebenikova, E.; Potukuchi, B. V. K. S.; Prindle, D.; Pruneau, C.; Putschke, J.; Rakness, G.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Razin, S. V.; Reid, J. G.; Reinnarth, J.; Relyea, D.; Retiere, F.; Ridiger, A.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Rose, A.; Roy, C.; Ruan, L.; Russcher, M. J.; Sahoo, R.; Sakrejda, I.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sarsour, M.; Sazhin, P. S.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmitz, N.; Schweda, K.; Seger, J.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Seyboth, P.; Shabetai, A.; Shahaliev, E.; Shao, M.; Sharma, M.; Shen, W. Q.; Shimanskiy, S. S.; Sichtermann, E.; Simon, F.; Singaraju, R. N.; Smirnov, N.; Snellings, R.; Sood, G.; Sorensen, P.; Sowinski, J.; Speltz, J.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stadnik, A.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Stock, R.; Stolpovsky, A.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Sugarbaker, E.; Sumbera, M.; Sun, Z.; Surrow, B.; Swanger, M.; Symons, T. J. M.; de Toledo, A. Szanto; Tai, A.; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A. H.; Tarnowsky, T.; Thein, D.; Thomas, J. H.; Timmins, A. R.; Timoshenko, S.; Tokarev, M.; Trainor, T. A.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, Robert E.; Tsai, O. D.; Ulery, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Van Buren, G.; van der Kolk, N.; van Leeuwen, M.; Molen, A. M. Vander; Varma, R.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Bichsel,46 J. Bielcik,49 J. Bielcikova,49 L. C. Bland,3 C. O. Blyth,2 S.-L. Blyth,21 B. E. Bonner,35 M. Botje,27 J. Bouchet,39 A. V. Brandin,25 A. Bravar,3 M. Bystersky,10 R. V. Cadman,1 X. Z. Cai,38 H. Caines,49 M. Caldero?n de la Barca Sa?nchez,6 J...

  16. Net charge fluctuations in Au+Au collisions at root s(NN)=130 GeV 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adams, J.; Adler, C.; Aggarwal, MM; Ahammed, Z.; Amonett, J.; Anderson, BD; Anderson, M.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, GS; Badyal, SK; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, LS; Baudot, J.; Bekele, S.; Belaga, VV; Bellwied, R.; Berger, J.; Bezverkhny, BI; Bhardwaj, S.; Bhaskar, P.; Bhati, AK; Bichsel, H.; Billmeier, A.; Bland, LC; Blyth, CO; Bonner, BE; Botje, M.; Boucham, A.; Brandin, A.; Bravar, A.; Cadman, RV; Cai, XZ; Caines, H.; Sanchez, MCD; Cardenas, A.; Carroll, J.; Castillo, J.; Castro, M.; Cebra, D.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, HF; Chen, Y.; Chernenko, SP; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Choi, B.; Christie, W.; Coffin, JP; Cormier, TM; Cramer, JG; Crawford, HJ; Das, D.; Das, S.; Derevschikov, AA; Didenko, L.; Dietel, T.; Dong, X.; Draper, JE; Du, F.; Dubey, AK; Dunin, VB; Dunlop, JC; Majumdar, MRD; Eckardt, V.; Efimov, LG; Emelianov, V.; Elage, JE; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Fachini, P.; Faine, V.; Faivre, J.; Fatemi, R.; Filimonov, K.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fisyak, Y.; Flierl, D.; Foley, KJ; Fu, J.; Gagliardi, Carl A.; Ganti, MS; Gutierrez, TD; Gagunashvili, N.; Gans, J.; Gaudichet, L.; Germain, M.; Geurts, E.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, R.; Gonzalez, JE; Grachov, O.; Grigoriev, V.; Gronstal, S.; Grosnick, D.; Guedon, M.; Guertin, SM; Gupta, A.; Gushin, E.; Hallman, TJ; Hardtke, D.; Harris, JW; Heinz, M.; Henry, TW; Heppelmann, S.; Herston, T.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffmann, GW; Horsley, M.; Huang, HZ; Huang, SL; Humanic, TJ; Igo, G.; Ishihara, A.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, WW; Janik, M.; Johnson, I.; Jones, PG; Judd, EG; Kabana, S.; Kaneta, M.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Klay, J.; Klein, SR; Klyachko, A.; Koetke, DD; Kolleger, T.; Konstantmov, AS; Kopytine, M.; Kotchenda, L.; Kovalenko, AD; Kramer, M.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Kuhn, C.; Kulikov, AI; Kumar, A.; Kunde, GJ; Kunz, CL; Kutuev, RK; Kuznetsov, AA; Lamont, MAC; Landgraf, JM; Lange, S.; Lansdell, CP; Lasiuk, B.; Laue, F.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Leontiev, VM; LeVine, MJ; Li, C.; Li, Q.; Lindenbatim, SJ; Lisa, MA; Liu, E.; Liu, L.; Liu, Z.; Liu, QJ; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, WJ; Long, H.; Longacre, RS; Lopez-Noriega, M.; Love, WA; Ludlam, T.; Lynn, D.; Ma, J.; Ma, YG; Maestro, D.; Mahajan, S.; Mangotra, LK; Mahapatra, DP; Majka, R.; Manweiler, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Martin, L.; Marx, J.; Matis, HS; Matulenko, YA; McShane, TS; Meissner, F.; Melnick, Y.; Meschanin, A.; Messer, M.; Miller, ML; Milosevich, Z.; Minaev, NG; Mironov, C.; Mishra, D.; Mitchell, J.; Mohanty, B.; Molnar, L.; Moore, CF; Mora-Corral, MJ; Morozov, V.; de Moura, MM; Munhoz, MG; Nandi, BK; Nayak, SK; Nayak, TK; Nelson, JM; Nevski, P.; Nikitin, VA; Nogach, LV; Norman, B.; Nurushev, SB; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Okorokov, V.; Oldenburg, M.; Olson, D.; Paic, G.; Pandey, SU; Pal, SK; Panebratsev, Y.; Panitkin, SY; Pavlinov, AI; Pawlak, T.; Perevoztchikov, V.; Peryt, W.; Petrov, VA; Phatak, SC; Picha, R.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Porile, N.; Porter, J.; Poskanzer, AM; Potekhin, M.; Potrebenikova, E.; Potukuchi, BVKS; Prindle, D.; Pruneau, C.; Putschke, J.; Rai, G.; Rakness, G.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ravel, O.; Razin, SV; Reichhold, D.; Reid, JG; Renault, G.; Retiere, F.; Ridiger, A.; Ritter, HG; Roberts, JB; Rogachevski, OV; Romero, JL; Rose, A.; Roy, C.; Ruan, LJ; Rykov, V.; Sahoo, R.; Sakrejda, I.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Savin, I.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, RP; Schmitz, N.; Schroeder, LS; Schweda, K.; Seger, J.; Seliverstov, D.; Seyboth, P.; Shahaliev, E.; Shao, M.; Sharma, M.; Shestermanov, KE; Shimanskii, SS; Singaraju, RN; Simon, F.; Skoro, G.; Smirnov, N.; Snellings, R.; Sood, G.; Sorensen, P.; Sowinski, J.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, S.; Stock, R.; Stolpovsky, A.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Struck, C.; Suaide, AAP; Sugarbaker, E.; Suite, C.; Sumbera, M.; Surrow, B.; Symons, TJM; de Toledo, AS; Szarwas, P.; Tai, A.; Takahashi, J.; Tang, AH; Thein, D.; Thomas, JH; Tikhomirov, V.; Tokarev, M.; Tonjes, MB; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, Robert E.; Trivedi, MD; Trofimov, V.; Tsai, O.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, DG; Van Buren, G.; VanderMolen, AM; Vasiliev, AN; Vasiliev, M.; Vigdor, SE; Viyogi, YP; Voloshin, SA; Waggoner, W.; Wang, F.; Wang, G.; Wang, XL; Wang, ZM; Ward, H.; Watson, JW; Wells, R.; Westfall, GD; Whitten, C.; Wieman, H.; Willson, R.; Wissink, SW; Witt, R.; Wood, J.; Wu, J.; Xu, N.; Xu, Z.; Xu, ZZ; Yakutin, AE; Yamamoto, E.; Yang, J.; Yepes, P.; Yurevich, VI; Zanevski, YV; Zborovsky, I.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, HY; Zhang, WM; Zhang, ZP; Zolnierczuk, PA; Zoulkarneev, R.; Zoulkarneeva, J.; Zubarev, AN; STAR Collaboration.

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ,10 L. S. Barnby,17 J. Baudot,15 S. Bekele,24 V. V. Belaga,10 R. Bellwied,41 J. Berger,12 B. I. Bezverkhny,43 S. Bhardwaj,29 P. Bhaskar,38 A. K. Bhati,25 H. Bichsel,40 A. Billmeier,41 L. C. Bland,2 C. O. Blyth,3 B. E. Bonner,30 M. Botje,23 A. Boucham...

  17. Mass, quark-number, and root s(NN) dependence of the second and fourth flow harmonics in ultrarelativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abelev, B. I.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Anderson, B. D.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G. S.; Bai, Y.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L. S.; Baudot, J.; Baumgart, S.; Bekele, S.; Belaga, V. V.; Bellingeri-Laurikainen, A.; Bellwied, R.; Benedosso, F.; Betts, R. R.; Bhardwaj, S.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L. C.; Blyth, S-L; Bombara, M.; Bonner, B. E.; Botje, M.; Bouchet, J.; Brandin, A. V.; Bravar, A.; Burton, T. P.; Bystersky, M.; Cadman, R. V.; Cai, X. Z.; Caines, H.; Sanchez, M. Calderon de la Barca; Callner, J.; Castillo, J.; Catu, O.; Cebra, D.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, J. H.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Christie, W.; Chung, S. U.; Coffin, J. P.; Cormier, T. M.; Cosentino, M. R.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Das, D.; Das, S.; Dash, S.; Daugherity, M.; de Moura, M. M.; Dedovich, T. G.; DePhillips, M.; Derevschikov, A. A.; Didenko, L.; Dietel, T.; Djawotho, P.; Dogra, S. M.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Du, F.; Dunin, V. B.; Dunlop, J. C.; Mazumdar, M. R. Dutta; Eckardt, V.; Edwards, W. R.; Efimov, L. G.; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Fachini, P.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Filimonov, K.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Fu, J.; Gagliardi, Carl A.; Gaillard, L.; Ganti, M. S.; Garcia-Solis, E.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gorbunov, Y. G.; Gos, H.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Guertin, S. M.; Guimaraes, K. S. F. F.; Gupta, N.; Haag, B.; Hallman, T. J.; Hamed, A.; Harris, J. W.; He, W.; Heinz, M.; Henry, T. W.; Hepplemann, S.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffman, A. M.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D.; Hollis, R.; Horner, M. J.; Huang, H. Z.; Huang, S. L.; Hughes, E. W.; Humanic, T. J.; Igo, G.; Iordanova, A.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jakl, P.; Jia, F.; Jones, P. G.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kang, K.; Kapitan, J.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Kettler, D.; Khodyrev, V. Yu; Kim, B. C.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Kislov, E. M.; Klein, S. R.; Knospe, A. G.; Kocoloski, A.; Koetke, D. D.; Kollegger, T.; Kopytine, M.; Kotchenda, L.; Kouchpil, V.; Kowalik, K. L.; Kravtsov, P.; Kravtsov, V. I.; Krueger, K.; Kuhn, C.; Kulikov, A. I.; Kumar, A.; Kurnadi, P.; Kuznetsov, A. A.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; Lange, S.; LaPointe, S.; Laue, F.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, C-H; Lehocka, S.; LeVine, M. J.; Li, C.; Li, Q.; Li, Y.; Lin, G.; Lin, X.; Lindenbaum, S. J.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Liu, H.; Liu, J.; Liu, L.; Liu, Z.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Long, H.; Longacre, R. S.; Love, W. A.; Lu, Y.; Ludlam, T.; Lynn, D.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, J. G.; Ma, Y. G.; Magestro, D.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Majka, R.; Mangotra, L. K.; Manweiler, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Martin, L.; Matis, H. S.; Matulenko, Yu A.; McClain, C. J.; McShane, T. S.; Melnick, Yu; Meschanin, A.; Millane, J.; Miller, M. L.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, Saskia; Mironov, C.; Mischke, A.; Mishra, D. K.; Mitchell, J.; Mohanty, B.; Molnar, L.; Moore, C. F.; Morozov, D. A.; Munhoz, M. G.; Nandi, B. K.; Nattrass, C.; Nayak, T. K.; Nelson, J. M.; Nepali, C.; Netrakanti, P. K.; Nogach, L. V.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Okorokov, V.; Oldenburg, M.; Olson, D.; Pachr, M.; Pal, S. K.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pavlinov, A. I.; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Perevoztchikov, V.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Phatak, S. C.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Poljak, N.; Porile, N.; Porter, J.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Potekhin, M.; Potrebenikova, E.; Potukuchi, B. V. K. S.; Prindle, D.; Pruneau, C.; Putschke, J.; Qattan, I. A.; Rakness, G.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Razin, S. V.; Reinnarth, J.; Relyea, D.; Ridiger, A.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Rose, A.; Roy, C.; Ruan, L.; Russcher, M. J.; Sahoo, R.; Sakuma, T.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sarsour, M.; Sazhin, P. S.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmitz, N.; Schweda, K.; Seger, J.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Seyboth, P.; Shabetai, A.; Shahaliev, E.; Shao, M.; Sharma, M.; Shen, W. Q.; Shimanskiy, S. S.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Simon, F.; Singaraju, R. N.; Smirnov, N.; Snellings, R.; Sorensen, P.; Sowinski, J.; Speltz, J.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stadnik, A.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Staszak, D.; Stock, R.; Stolpovsky, A.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Suarez, M. C.; Subba, N. L.; Sugarbaker, E.; Sumbera, M.; Sun, Z.; Surrow, B.; Swanger, M.; Symons, T. J. M.; de Toledo, A. Szanto; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A. H.; Tarnowsky, T.; Thomas, J. H.; Timmins, A. R.; Timoshenko, S.; Tokarev, M.; Trainor, T. A.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, Robert E.; Tsai, O. D.; Ulery, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Van Buren, G.; van der Kolk, N.; van Leeuwen, M.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Bichsel,47 J. Bielcik,50 J. Bielcikova,50 L. C. Bland,3 S-L. Blyth,22 M. Bombara,2 B. E. Bonner,36 M. Botje,28 J. Bouchet,40 A. V. Brandin,26 A. Bravar,3 T. P. Burton,2 M. Bystersky,11 R. V. Cadman,1 X. Z. Cai,39 H. Caines,50 M. Caldero?n de la Barca Sa...

  18. Pion interferometry in Au+Au collisions at root s(NN)=200 GeV 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adams, J.; Aggarwal, MM; Ahammed, Z.; Amonett, J.; Anderson, BD; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, GS; Badyal, SK; Bai, Y.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, LS; Baudot, J.; Bekele, S.; Belaga, VV; Bellwied, R.; Berger, J.; Bezverkhny, BI; Bharadwaj, S.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, AK; Bhatia, VS; Bichsel, H.; Billmeier, A.; Bland, LC; Blyth, CO; Bonner, BE; Botje, M.; Boucham, A.; Brandin, AV; Bravar, A.; Bystersky, M.; Cadman, RV; Cai, XZ; Caines, H.; Sanchez, MCD; Castillo, J.; Cebra, D.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, HF; Chen, Y.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Christie, W.; Coffin, JP; Cormier, TM; Cramer, JG; Crawford, HJ; Das, D.; Das, S.; de Moura, MM; Derevschikov, AA; Didenko, L.; Dietel, T.; Dogra, SM; Dong, WJ; Dong, X.; Draper, JE; Du, F.; Dubey, AK; Dunin, VB; Dunlop, JC; Mazumdar, MRD; Eckardt, V.; Edwards, WR; Efimov, LG; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Fachini, P.; Faivre, J.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Filimonov, K.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Fomenko, K.; Fu, J.; Gagliardi, Carl A.; Gans, J.; Ganti, MS; Gaudichet, L.; Geurts, F.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gonzalez, JE; Grachov, O.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Guertin, SM; Guo, Y.; Gupta, A.; Gutierrez, TD; Hallman, TJ; Hamed, A.; Hardtke, D.; Harris, JW; Heinz, M.; Henry, TW; Hepplemann, S.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffmann, GW; Huang, HZ; Huang, SL; Hughes, EW; Humanic, TJ; Igo, G.; Ishihara, A.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, WW; Janik, M.; Jiang, H.; Jones, PG; Judd, EG; Kabana, S.; Kang, K.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Khodyrev, VY; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Kislov, EM; Klay, J.; Klein, SR; Klyachko, A.; Koetke, DD; Kollegger, T.; Kopytine, M.; Kotchenda, L.; Kramer, M.; Kravtsov, P.; Kravtsov, VI; Krueger, K.; Kuhn, C.; Kulikov, AI; Kumar, A.; Kutuev, RK; Kuznetsov, AA; Lamont, MAC; Landgraf, JM; Lange, S.; Laue, F.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lehocka, S.; LeVine, MJ; Li, C.; Li, Q.; Li, Y.; Lin, G.; Lindenbaum, SJ; Lisa, MA; Liu, F.; Liu, L.; Liu, QJ; Liu, Z.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, WJ; Long, H.; Longacre, RS; Noriega, ML; Love, WA; Lu, Y.; Ludlam, T.; Lynn, D.; Ma, GL; Ma, JG; Ma, YG; Magestro, D.; Mahajan, S.; Mahapatra, DP; Majka, R.; Mangotra, LK; Manweiler, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Martin, L.; Marx, JN; Matis, HS; Matulenko, YA; McClain, CJ; McShane, TS; Meissner, F.; Melnick, Y.; Meschanin, A.; Miller, ML; Minaev, NG; Mironov, C.; Mischke, A.; Mishra, DK; Mitchell, J.; Mohanty, B.; Molnar, L.; Moore, CF; Morozov, DA; Munhoz, MG; Nandi, BK; Nayak, SK; Nayak, TK; Nelson, JM; Netrakanti, PK; Nikitin, VA; Nogach, LV; Nurushev, SB; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Okorokov, V.; Oldenburg, M.; Olson, D.; Pal, SK; Panebratsev, Y.; Panitkin, SY; Pavlinov, AI; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Perevoztchikov, V.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Petrov, VA; Phatak, SC; Picha, R.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Porile, N.; Porter, J.; Poskanzer, AM; Potekhin, M.; Potrebenikova, E.; Potukuchi, BVKS; Prindle, D.; Pruneau, C.; Putschke, J.; Rakness, G.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ravel, O.; Ray, RL; Razin, SV; Reichhold, D.; Reid, JG; Renault, G.; Retiere, F.; Ridiger, A.; Ritter, HG; Roberts, JB; Rogachevskiy, OV; Romero, JL; Rose, A.; Roy, C.; Ruan, L.; Sahoo, R.; Sakrejda, I.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Savin, I.; Sazhin, PS; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, RP; Schmitz, N.; Schweda, K.; Seger, J.; Seyboth, P.; Shahaliev, E.; Shao, M.; Shao, W.; Sharma, M.; Shen, WQ; Shestermanov, KE; Shimanskiy, SS; Sichtermann, E.; Simon, F.; Singaraju, RN; Skoro, G.; Smirnov, N.; Snellings, R.; Sood, G.; Sorensen, P.; Sowinski, J.; Speltz, J.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stadnik, A.; Stanislaus, TDS; Stock, R.; Stolpovsky, A.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Suaide, AAP; Sugarbaker, E.; Suire, C.; Sumbera, M.; Surrow, B.; Symons, TJM; de Toledo, AS; Szarwas, P.; Tai, A.; Takahashi, J.; Tang, AH; Tarnowsky, T.; Thein, D.; Thomas, JH; Timoshenko, S.; Tokarev, M.; Trainor, TA; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, Robert E.; Tsai, OD; Ulery, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, DG; Urkinbaev, A.; Van Buren, G.; van Leeuwen, M.; Vander Molen, AM; Varma, R.; Vasilevski, IM; Vasiliev, AN; Vernet, R.; Vigdor, SE; Viyogi, YP; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, SA; Vznuzdaev, M.; Waggoner, WT; Wang, F.; Wang, G.; Wang, G.; Wang, XL; Wang, Y.; Wang, Y.; Wang, ZM; Ward, H.; Watson, JW; Webb, JC; Wells, R.; Westfall, GD; Wetzler, A.; Whitten, C.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, SW; Witt, R.; Wood, J.; Wu, J.; Xu, N.; Xu, Z.; Xu, ZZ; Yamamoto, E.; Yepes, P.; Yurevich, VI; Zanevsky, YV; Zhang, H.; Zhang, WM; Zhang, ZP; Zolnierczuk, PA; Zoulkarneev, R.; Zoulkarneeva, Y.; Zubarev, AN; STAR Collaboration.

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Barannikova,32 L. S. Barnby,3 J. Baudot,18 S. Bekele,28 V. V. Belaga,12 R. Bellwied,46 J. Berger,14 B. I. Bezverkhny,48 S. Bharadwaj,33 A. Bhasin,19 A. K. Bhati,29 V. S. Bhatia,29 H. Bichsel,45 A. Billmeier,46 L. C. Bland,4 C. O. Blyth,3 B. E. Bonner,34 M...

  19. Rapidity and species dependence of particle production at large transverse momentum for d+Au collisions at root S(NN)=200 GeV 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abelev, B. I.; Adams, J.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Amonett, J.; Anderson, B. D.; Anderson, M.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G. S.; Bai, Y.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L. S.; Baudot, J.; Bekele, S.; Belaga, V. V.; Bellingeri-Laurikainen, A.; Bellwied, R.; Benedosso, F.; Bhardwaj, S.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L. C.; Blyth, S. -L; Bonner, B. E.; Botje, M.; Bouchet, J.; Brandin, A. V.; Bravar, A.; Bystersky, M.; Cadman, R. V.; Cai, X. Z.; Caines, H.; de la Barca Sanchez, M. Calderon; Castillo, J.; Catu, O.; Cebra, D.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, J. H.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Christie, W.; Coffin, J. P.; Cormier, T. M.; Cosentino, M. R.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Das, D.; Das, S.; Daugherity, M.; de Moura, M. M.; Dedovich, T. G.; DePhillips, M.; Derevschikov, A. A.; Didenko, L.; Dietel, T.; Djawotho, P.; Dogra, S. M.; Dong, W. J.; Dong, X.; Draper, J. E.; Du, F.; Dunin, V. B.; Dunlop, J. C.; Mazumdar, M. R. Dutta; Eckardt, V.; Edwards, W. R.; Efimov, L. G.; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Fachini, P.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Filimonov, K.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Fu, J.; Gagliardi, Carl A.; Gaillard, L.; Ganti, M. S.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gonzalez, J. E.; Gorbunov, Y. G.; Gos, H.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Guertin, S. M.; Guimaraes, K. S. F. F.; Guo, Y.; Gupta, N.; Gutierrez, T. D.; Haag, B.; Hallman, T. J.; Hamed, A.; Harris, J. W.; He, W.; Heinz, M.; Henry, T. W.; Hepplemann, S.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffman, A. M.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Horner, M. J.; Huang, H. Z.; Huang, S. L.; Hughes, E. W.; Humanic, T. J.; Igo, G.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jakl, P.; Jia, F.; Jiang, H.; Jones, P. G.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kang, K.; Kapitan, J.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Khodyrev, V. Yu; Kim, B. C.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Kislov, E. M.; Klein, S. R.; Kocoloski, A.; Koetke, D. D.; Kollegger, T.; Kopytine, M.; Kotchenda, L.; Kouchpil, V.; Kowalik, K. L.; Kramer, M.; Kravtsov, P.; Kravtsov, V. I.; Krueger, K.; Kuhn, C.; Kulikov, A. I.; Kumar, A.; Kuznetsov, A. A.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; Lange, S.; LaPointe, S.; Laue, F.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, C. -H; Lehocka, S.; LeVine, M. J.; Li, C.; Li, Q.; Li, Y.; Lin, G.; Lin, X.; Lindenbaum, S. J.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Liu, H.; Liu, J.; Liu, L.; Liu, Z.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Long, H.; Longacre, R. S.; Lopez-Noriega, M.; Love, W. A.; Lu, Y.; Ludlam, T.; Lynn, D.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, J. G.; Ma, Y. G.; Magestro, D.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Majka, R.; Mangotra, L. K.; Manweiler, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Martin, L.; Matis, H. S.; Matulenko, Yu A.; McClain, C. J.; McShane, T. S.; Melnick, Yu; Meschanin, A.; Millane, J.; Miller, M. L.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, Saskia; Mironov, C.; Mischke, A.; Mishra, D. K.; Mitchell, J.; Mohanty, B.; Molnar, L.; Moore, C. F.; Morozov, D. A.; Munhoz, M. G.; Nandi, B. K.; Nattrass, C.; Nayak, T. K.; Nelson, J. M.; Netrakanti, P. K.; Nikitin, V. A.; Nogach, L. V.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Okorokov, V.; Oldenburg, M.; Olson, D.; Pachr, M.; Pal, S. K.; Panebratsev, Y.; Panitkin, S. Y.; Pavlinov, A. I.; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Perevoztchikov, V.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Petrov, V. A.; Phatak, S. C.; Picha, R.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Poljak, N.; Porile, N.; Porter, J.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Potekhin, M.; Potrebenikova, E.; Potukuchi, B. V. K. S.; Prindle, D.; Pruneau, C.; Putschke, J.; Rakness, G.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Razin, S. V.; Reinnarth, J.; Relyea, D.; Retiere, F.; Ridiger, A.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Rose, A.; Roy, C.; Ruan, L.; Russcher, M. J.; Sahoo, R.; Sakuma, T.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sarsour, M.; Sazhin, P. S.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmitz, N.; Schweda, K.; Seger, J.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Seyboth, P.; Shabetai, A.; Shahaliev, E.; Shao, M.; Sharma, M.; Shen, W. Q.; Shimanskiy, S. S.; Sichtermann, E.; Simon, F.; Singaraju, R. N.; Smirnov, N.; Snellings, R.; Sood, G.; Sorensen, P.; Sowinski, J.; Speltz, J.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stadnik, A.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Stock, R.; Stolpovsky, A.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Sugarbaker, E.; Sumbera, M.; Sun, Z.; Surrow, B.; Swanger, M.; Symons, T. J. M.; de Toledo, A. Szanto; Tai, A.; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A. H.; Tarnowsky, T.; Thein, D.; Thomas, J. H.; Timmins, A. R.; Timoshenko, S.; Tokarev, M.; Trainor, T. A.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, Robert E.; Tsai, O. D.; Ulery, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Van Buren, G.; van der Kolk, N.; van Leeuwen, M.; Molen, A. M. Vander; Varma, R.; Vasilevski, I. M.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Bhati,30 H. Bichsel,47 J. Bielcik,50 J. Bielcikova,50 L. C. Bland,3 S.-L. Blyth,22 B. E. Bonner,36 M. Botje,28 J. Bouchet,40 A. V. Brandin,26 A. Bravar,3 M. Bystersky,11 R. V. Cadman,1 X. Z. Cai,39 H. Caines,50 M. Caldero?n de la Barca Sa?nchez,6 J...

  20. K(892)(*) resonance production in Au+Au and p+p collisions at root s(NN)=200 GeV 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adams, J.; Aggarwal, MM; Ahammed, Z.; Amonett, J.; Anderson, BD; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, GS; Badyal, SK; Bai, Y.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, LS; Baudot, J.; Bekele, S.; Belaga, VV; Bellwied, R.; Berger, J.; Bezverkhny, BI; Bharadwaj, S.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, AK; Bhatia, VS; Bichsel, H.; Billmeier, A.; Bland, LC; Blyth, CO; Bonner, BE; Botje, M.; Boucham, A.; Brandin, AV; Bravar, A.; Bystersky, M.; Cadman, RV; Cai, XZ; Caines, H.; Sanchez, MCDL; Castillo, J.; Cebra, D.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, HF; Chen, Y.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Christie, W.; Coffin, JP; Cormier, TM; Cramer, JG; Crawford, HJ; Das, D.; Das, S.; de Moura, MM; Derevschikov, AA; Didenko, L.; Dietel, T.; Dogra, SM; Dong, WJ; Dong, X.; Draper, JE; Du, F.; Dubey, AK; Dunin, VB; Dunlop, JC; Mazumdar, MRD; Eckardt, V.; Edwards, WR; Efimov, LG; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Fachini, P.; Faivre, J.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Filimonov, K.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Fomenko, K.; Fu, J.; Gagliardi, Carl A.; Gaillard, L.; Gans, J.; Ganti, MS; Gaudichet, L.; Geurts, F.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gonzalez, JE; Grachov, O.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Guertin, SM; Guo, Y.; Gupta, A.; Gutierrez, TD; Hallman, TJ; Hamed, A.; Hardtke, D.; Harris, JW; Heinz, M.; Henry, TW; Hepplemann, S.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffmann, GW; Huang, HZ; Huang, SL; Hughes, EW; Humanic, TJ; Igo, G.; Ishihara, A.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, WW; Janik, M.; Jiang, H.; Jones, PG; Judd, EG; Kabana, S.; Kang, K.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Khodyrev, VY; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Kislov, EM; Klay, J.; Klein, SR; Koetke, DD; Kollegger, T.; Kopytine, M.; Kotchenda, L.; Kramer, M.; Kravtsov, P.; Kravtsov, VI; Krueger, K.; Kuhn, C.; Kulikov, AI; Kumar, A.; Kutuev, RK; Kuznetsov, AA; Lamont, MAC; Landgraf, JM; Lange, S.; Laue, F.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lehocka, S.; LeVine, MJ; Li, C.; Li, Q.; Li, Y.; Lin, G.; Lindenbaum, SJ; Lisa, MA; Liu, F.; Liu, L.; Liu, QJ; Liu, Z.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, WJ; Long, H.; Longacre, RS; Lopez-Noriega, M.; Love, WA; Lu, Y.; Ludlam, T.; Lynn, D.; Ma, GL; Ma, JG; Ma, YG; Magestro, D.; Mahajan, S.; Mahapatra, DP; Majka, R.; Mangotra, LK; Manweiler, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Martin, L.; Marx, JN; Matis, HS; Matulenko, YA; McClain, CJ; McShane, TS; Meissner, F.; Melnick, Y.; Meschanin, A.; Miller, ML; Minaev, NG; Mironov, C.; Mischke, A.; Mishra, DK; Mitchell, J.; Mohanty, B.; Molnar, L.; Moore, CF; Morozov, DA; Munhoz, MG; Nandi, BK; Nayak, SK; Nayak, TK; Nelson, JM; Netrakanti, PK; Nikitin, VA; Nogach, LV; Nurushev, SB; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Okorokov, V.; Oldenburg, M.; Olson, D.; Pal, SK; Panebratsev, Y.; Panitkin, SY; Pavlinov, AI; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Perevoztchikov, V.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Petrov, VA; Phatak, SC; Picha, R.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Porile, N.; Porter, J.; Poskanzer, AM; Potekhin, M.; Potrebenikova, E.; Potukuchi, BVKS; Prindle, D.; Pruneau, C.; Putschke, J.; Rakness, G.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ravel, O.; Ray, RL; Razin, SV; Reichhold, D.; Reid, JG; Renault, G.; Retiere, F.; Ridiger, A.; Ritter, HG; Roberts, JB; Rogachevskiy, OV; Romero, JL; Rose, A.; Roy, C.; Ruan, L.; Sahoo, R.; Sakrejda, I.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sarsour, M.; Savin, I.; Sazhin, PS; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, RP; Schmitz, N.; Schweda, K.; Seger, J.; Seyboth, P.; Shahaliev, E.; Shao, M.; Shao, W.; Sharma, M.; Shen, WQ; Shestermanov, KE; Shimanskiy, SS; Sichtermann, E.; Simon, F.; Singaraju, RN; Skoro, G.; Smirnov, N.; Snellings, R.; Sood, G.; Sorensen, P.; Sowinski, J.; Speltz, J.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stadnik, A.; Stanislaus, TDS; Stock, R.; Stolpovsky, A.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Suaide, AAP; Sugarbaker, E.; Suire, C.; Sumbera, M.; Surrow, B.; Symons, TJM; Toledo, AS; Szarwas, P.; Tai, A.; Takahashi, J.; Tang, AH; Tarnowsky, T.; Thein, D.; Thomas, JH; Timoshenko, S.; Tokarev, M.; Trainor, TA; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, Robert E.; Tsai, OD; Ulery, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, DG; Urkinbaev, A.; Van Buren, G.; Van Leeuwen, M.; Vander Molen, AM; Varma, R.; Vasilevski, IM; Vasiliev, AN; Vernet, R.; Vigdor, SE; Viyogi, YP; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, SA; Vznuzdaev, M.; Waggoner, WT; Wang, F.; Wang, G.; Wang, G.; Wang, XL; Wang, Y.; Wang, Y.; Wang, ZM; Ward, H.; Watson, JW; Webb, JC; Wells, R.; Westfall, GD; Wetzler, A.; Whitten, C.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, SW; Witt, R.; Wood, J.; Wu, J.; Xu, N.; Xu, Z.; Xu, ZZ; Yamamoto, E.; Yepes, P.; Yurevich, VI; Zanevsky, YV; Zhang, H.; Zhang, WM; Zhang, ZP; Zoulkarneev, R.; Zoulkarneeva, Y.; Zubarev, AN.

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Blyth,3 B. E. Bonner,34 M. Botje,27 A. Boucham,38 A. V. Brandin,25 A. Bravar,4 M. Bystersky,11 R. V. Cadman,1 X. Z. Cai,37 H. Caines,48 M. Caldero?n de la Barca Sa?nchez,17 J. Castillo,21 D. Cebra,7 Z. Chajecki,44 P. Chaloupka,11 S. Chattopadhyay,43 H...

  1. Azimuthal anisotropy in Au plus Au collisions at root S-NN=200 GeV 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adams, J.; Aggarwal, MM; Ahammed, Z.; Amonett, J.; Anderson, BD; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, GS; Badyal, SK; Bai, Y.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, LS; Baudot, J.; Bekele, S.; Belaga, VV; Bellwied, R.; Berger, J.; Bezverkhny, BI; Bharadwaj, S.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, AK; Bhatia, VS; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Billmeier, A.; Bland, LC; Blyth, CO; Bonner, BE; Botje, M.; Boucham, A.; Brandin, AV; Bravar, A.; Bystersky, M.; Cadman, RV; Cai, XZ; Caines, H.; Sanchez, MCD; Castillo, J.; Catu, O.; Cebra, D.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, HF; Chen, Y.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Christie, W.; Coffin, JP; Cormier, TM; Cramer, JG; Crawford, HJ; Das, D.; Das, S.; de Moura, MM; Derevschikov, AA; Didenko, L.; Dietel, T.; Dogra, SM; Dong, WJ; Dong, X.; Draper, JE; Du, F.; Dubey, AK; Dunin, VB; Dunlop, JC; Mazumdar, MRD; Eckardt, V.; Edwards, WR; Efimov, LG; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Fachini, P.; Faivre, J.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Filimonov, K.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Fomenko, K.; Fu, J.; Gagliardi, Carl A.; Gaillard, L.; Gans, J.; Ganti, MS; Gaudichet, L.; Guerts, F.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gonzalez, JE; Grachov, O.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Guertin, SM; Guo, Y.; Gupta, A.; Gutierrez, TD; Hallman, TJ; Hamed, A.; Hardtke, D.; Harris, JW; Heinz, M.; Henry, TW; Hepplemann, S.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffmann, GW; Huang, HZ; Huang, SL; Hughes, EW; Humanic, TJ; Igo, G.; Ishihara, A.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, WW; Janik, M.; Jiang, H.; Jones, PG; Judd, EG; Kabana, S.; Kang, K.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Khodyrev, VY; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Kislov, EM; Klay, J.; Klein, SR; Koetke, DD; Kollegger, T.; Kopytine, M.; Kotchenda, L.; Kramer, M.; Kravtsov, P.; Kravtsov, VI; Krueger, K.; Kuhn, C.; Kulikov, AI; Kumar, A.; Kutuev, RK; Kuznetsov, AA; Lamont, MAC; Landgraf, JM; Lange, S.; Laue, F.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lehocka, S.; LeVine, MJ; Li, C.; Li, Q.; Li, Y.; Lin, G.; Lindenbaum, SJ; Lisa, MA; Liu, F.; Liu, L.; Liu, QJ; Liu, Z.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, WJ; Long, H.; Langacre, RS; Lopez-Noriega, M.; Love, WA; Lu, Y.; Ludlam, T.; Lynn, D.; Ma, GL; Ma, JG; Ma, YG; Magestro, D.; Mahajan, S.; Mahapatra, DP; Majka, R.; Mangotra, LK; Manweiler, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Martin, L.; Marx, JN; Matis, HS; Matulenko, YA; McClain, CJ; McShane, TS; Meissner, F.; Melnick, Y.; Meschanin, A.; Miller, ML; Minaev, NG; Mironov, C.; Mischke, A.; Mishra, DK; Mitchell, J.; Mohanty, B.; Molnar, L.; Moore, CF; Morozov, DA; Munhoz, MG; Nandi, BK; Nayak, SK; Nayak, TK; Nelson, JM; Netrakanti, PK; Nikitin, VA; Nogach, LV; Nurushev, SB; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Okorokov, V.; Oldenburg, M.; Olson, D.; Pal, SK; Panebratsev, Y.; Panitkin, SY; Pavlinov, AI; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Perevoztchikov, V.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Petrov, VA; Phatak, SC; Picha, R.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Porile, N.; Porter, J.; Poskanzer, AM; Potekhin, M.; Potrebenikova, E.; Potukuchi, BVKS; Prindle, D.; Pruneau, C.; Putschke, J.; Rakness, G.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ravel, O.; Ray, RL; Razin, SV; Reichhold, D.; Reid, JG; Renault, G.; Retiere, F.; Ridiger, A.; Ritter, HG; Roberts, JB; Rogachevskiy, OV; Romero, JL; Rose, A.; Roy, C.; Ruan, L.; Sahoo, R.; Sakrejda, I.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sarsour, M.; Savin, I.; Sazhin, PS; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, RP; Schmitz, N.; Schweda, K.; Seger, J.; Seyboth, P.; Shahaliev, E.; Shao, M.; Shao, W.; Sharma, M.; Shen, WQ; Shestermanov, KE; Shimanskiy, SS; Sichtermann, E.; Simon, F.; Singaraju, RN; Skoro, G.; Smirnov, N.; Snellings, R.; Sood, G.; Sorensen, P.; Sowinski, J.; Speltz, J.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stadnik, A.; Stanislaus, TDS; Stock, R.; Stolpovsky, A.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Suaide, AAP; Sugarbaker, E.; Suire, C.; Sumbera, M.; Surrow, B.; Symons, TJM; de Toledo, AS; Szarwas, P.; Tai, A.; Takahashi, J.; Tang, AH; Tarnowsky, T.; Thein, D.; Thomas, JH; Timoshenko, S.; Tokarev, M.; Trainor, TA; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, Robert E.; Tsai, OD; Ulery, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, DG; Urkinbaev, A.; van Buren, G.; van Leeuwen, M.; Molen, AMV; Varma, R.; Vasilevski, IM; Vasiliev, AN; Vernet, R.; Vigdor, SE; Viyogi, YP; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, SA; Vznuzdaev, M.; Waggoner, WT; Wang, F.; Wang, G.; Wang, G.; Wang, XL; Wang, Y.; Wang, Y.; Wang, ZM; Ward, H.; Watson, JW; Webb, JC; Wells, R.; Westfall, GD; Wetzler, A.; Whitten, C.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, SW; Witt, R.; Wood, J.; Wu, J.; Xu, N.; Xu, Z.; Xu, ZZ; Yamamoto, E.; Yepes, P.; Yurevich, VI; Zanevsky, YV; Zhang, H.; Zhang, WM; Zhang, ZP; Zoulkarneev, R.; Zoulkarneeva, Y.; Zubarev, AN; Braem, A.; Davenport, M.; Cataldo, GD; Bari, DD; Martinengo, P.; Nappi, E.; Paic, G.; Posa, E.; Puiz, F.; Schyns, E.; Star Collaboration; STAR-RICH Collaboration.

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . O. Blyth,3 B. E. Bonner,34 M. Botje,27 A. Boucham,38 A. V. Brandin,25 A. Bravar,4 M. Bystersky,11 R. V. Cadman,1 X. Z. Cai,37 H. Caines,48 M. Caldero?n de la Barca Sa?nchez,17 J. Castillo,21 O. Catu,48 D. Cebra,7 Z. Chajecki,44 P. Chaloupka,11 S...

  2. Measurements of transverse energy distributions in Au plus Au collisions at root s(NN)=200 GeV 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adams, J.; Aggarwal, MM; Ahammed, Z.; Amonett, J.; Anderson, BD; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, GS; Bai, Y.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, LS; Baudot, J.; Bekele, S.; Belaga, VV; Bellwied, R.; Berger, J.; Bezverkhny, BI; Bharadwaj, S.; Bhatia, VS; Bichsel, H.; Billmeier, A.; Bland, LC; Blyth, CO; Bonner, BE; Botje, M.; Boucham, A.; Brandin, A.; Bravar, A.; Bystersky, M.; Cadman, RV; Cai, XZ; Caines, H.; Sanchez, MCD; Carroll, J.; Castillo, J.; Cebra, D.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopdhyay, S.; Chen, HF; Chen, Y.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Christie, W.; Coffin, JP; Cormier, TM; Cramer, JG; Crawford, HJ; Das, D.; Das, S.; De Moura, MM; Derevschikov, AA; Didenko, L.; Dietel, T.; Dong, WJ; Dong, X.; Draper, JE; Du, F.; Dubey, AK; Dunin, VB; Dunlop, JC; Mazumdar, MRD; Eckardt, V.; Edwards, WR; Efimov, LG; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Fachini, P.; Faivre, J.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Filimonov, K.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Foley, KJ; Fomenko, K.; Fu, J.; Gagliardi, Carl A.; Gans, J.; Ganti, MS; Gaudichet, L.; Geurts, F.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gonzalez, JE; Grachov, O.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Guertin, SM; Guo, Y.; Gupta, A.; Gutierrez, TD; Hallman, TJ; Hamed, A.; Hardtke, D.; Harris, JW; Heinz, M.; Henry, TW; Hepplemann, S.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hiort, E.; Hoffmann, GW; Huang, HZ; Huang, SL; Hughes, EW; Humanic, TJ; Igo, G.; Ishihara, A.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, WW; Janik, M.; Jiang, H.; Jones, PG; Judd, EG; Kabana, S.; Kang, K.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Khodyrev, VY; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Kislov, EM; Klay, J.; Klein, SR; Klyachko, A.; Koetke, DD; Kollegger, T.; Kopytine, M.; Kotchenda, L.; Kramer, M.; Kravtsov, P.; Kravtsov, VI; Krueger, K.; Kuhn, C.; Kulikov, AI; Kumar, A.; Kunz, CL; Kutuev, RK; Kuznetsov, AA; Lamont, MAC; Landgraf, JM; Lange, S.; Lane, F.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lehocka, S.; LeVine, MJ; Li, C.; Li, Q.; Li, Y.; Lindenbaum, SJ; Lisa, MA; Liu, F.; Liu, L.; Liu, QJ; Liu, Z.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, WJ; Long, H.; Longacre, RS; Lopez-Noriega, M.; Love, WA; Lu, Y.; Ludlam, T.; Lynn, D.; Ma, GL; Ma, JG; Ma, YG; Magestro, D.; Mahajan, S.; Mahapatra, DP; Majka, R.; Mangotra, LK; Manweiler, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Martin, L.; Marx, JN; Matis, HS; Matulenko, YA; McClain, CJ; McShane, TS; Meissner, F.; Melnick, Y.; Meschanin, A.; Miller, ML; Milosevich, Z.; Minaev, NG; Mironov, C.; Mischke, A.; Mishra, D.; Mitchell, J.; Mohanty, B.; Molnar, L.; Moore, CF; Mora-Corral, MJ; Morozov, DA; Morozov, V.; Munhoz, MG; Nandi, BK; Nayak, TK; Nelson, JM; Netrakanti, PK; Nikitin, VA; Nogach, LV; Norman, B.; Nurushev, SB; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Okorokov, V.; Oldenburg, M.; Olson, D.; Pal, SK; Panebratsev, Y.; Panitkin, SY; Pavlinov, AI; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Perevoztchikov, V.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Petrov, VA; Phatak, SC; Picha, R.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Porile, N.; Porter, J.; Poskanzer, AM; Potekhin, M.; Potrebenikova, E.; Potukuchi, BVKS; Prindle, D.; Pruneau, C.; Putschke, J.; Rai, G.; Rakness, G.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ravel, O.; Ray, RL; Razin, SV; Reichhold, D.; Reid, JG; Renault, G.; Retiere, F.; Ridiger, A.; Ritter, HG; Roberts, JB; Rogachevskiy, OV; Romero, JL; Rose, A.; Roy, C.; Ruan, L.; Sakrejda, I.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Savin, I.; Sazhin, PS; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, RP; Schmitz, N.; Schroeder, LS; Schweda, K.; Seger, J.; Seyboth, P.; Shahaliev, E.; Shao, M.; Shao, W.; Sharma, M.; Shen, WQ; Shestermanov, KE; Shimanskiy, SS; Simon, F.; Singaraju, RN; Skoro, G.; Smirnov, N.; Snellings, R.; Sood, G.; Sorensen, P.; Sowinski, J.; Speltz, J.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stadnik, A.; Stanislaus, TDS; Stock, R.; Stolpovsky, A.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Suaide, AAP; Sugarbaker, E.; Suire, C.; Sumbera, M.; Surrow, B.; Symons, TJM; de Toledo, AS; Szarwas, P.; Tai, A.; Takahashi, J.; Tang, AH; Tarnowsky, T.; Thein, D.; Thomas, JH; Timoshenko, S.; Tokarev, M.; Trainor, TA; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, Robert E.; Tsai, O.; Ulery, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, DG; Urkinbaev, A.; Van Buren, G.; van Leeuwen, M.; Vander Molen, AM; Varma, R.; Vasilevski, IM; Vasiliev, AN; Vernet, R.; Vigdor, SE; Viyogi, VP; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, SA; Vznuzdaev, M.; Waggoner, B.; Wang, F.; Wang, G.; Wang, G.; Wang, XL; Wang, Y.; Wang, Y.; Wang, ZM; Ward, H.; Watson, JW; Webb, JC; Wells, R.; Westfall, GD; Wetzler, A.; Whitten, C.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, SW; Witt, R.; Wood, J.; Wu, J.; Xu, N.; Xu, Z.; Xu, ZZ; Yamamoto, E.; Yepes, P.; Yurevich, VI; Zanevsky, YV; Zhang, H.; Zhang, WM; Zhang, ZP; Zolnierezuk, PA; Zoulkarneev, R.; Zoulkarneeva, Y.; Zubarev, AN.

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Barnby,3 J. Baudot,18 S. Bekele,28 V. V. Belaga,12 R. Bellwied,46 J. Berger,14 B. I. Bezverkhny,48 S. Bharadwaj,33 V. S. Bhatia,29 H. Bichsel,45 A. Billmeier,46 L. C. Bland,4 C. O. Blyth,3 B. E. Bonner,34 M. Botje,27 A. Boucham,38 A. Brandin,25 A...

  3. Flocculation potential of New Bedford Harbor sediments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Malali, Ravindra Nagaraja

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Advisory Committee: Dr. J. S. Bonner Flocculation experiments were conducted on New Bedford Harbor (NBH) sediments contaminated with poly-chlorinated bi- phenyls (PCB's). The effect of varying ionic strength, sediment concentration and velocity gradient.... Industrial and municipal waste releases into the Acushnet River Estuary and Harbor areas adjacent to New Bedford, Massachusetts contaminated the bottom sediments with organic chemicals, principally chlorinated hydrocarbons (PCB's) and heavy This thesis...

  4. The determination of settling velocities for sewage sludge disposed at 106-Mile Site

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hernandez, Daniel Saul

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE DBTERMZNATZON OF SETTLING VELOCZTZES FOR SEWAGE SLUDGE DZSPOSED AT 106-MILE SITE A Thesis by DANIEL SAUL HERNANDEZ Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1991 Major Subject: Civil Engineering THB DETERMZNATZON OF SBTTLZNG VELOCZTZES FOR SEWAGE SLUDGE DZSPOSBD AT 106-MZLE SZTB A Thesis by DANIEL SAUL HERNANDEZ Approved as to style and content by: James S. Bonner '(Chair...

  5. Paleoecology and paleontology of the Lower Cretaceous Kiowa Formation, Kansas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott, R. W.

    1970-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    paleontologist at the University of Kansas, and by MYRL WALKER and ORVILLE BONNER, vertebrate paleontologists at Fort Hays Kansas State College, where my collection of vertebrates has been deposited. In general, the taxonomic diversity of plesiosaurs, sharks..., and fishes is moderate, and reptile species other than plesiosaurs are few. Rocks in southern Kansas have yielded the greatest number of specimens and species; central Kansas has yielded only a few species of crocodiles and sharks. Fish scales are relatively...

  6. Reduction of perturbation gas chromatographic data to equilibrium sorption isotherms with application to the ternary benzene / polybutadiene / cyclohexane system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ruff, William Arthur

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    on volume or segment fractions, the Flory equation-of-state theory and its simplication by Bonner and Prausnitz, and the lattice fluid theory of Sanchez and Lacombe. The determination involves a parameter estimation technique which simultaneously fits a... OF TABLES . LIST OF FIGURES . INTRODUCTION THEORY PERTURBATION GAS CHROMATOG~ THEORY POLYMER SOLUTION THEORY Flory-Huggins Lattice Theory Flory Equations-State Theory Simplified Flory Theory Sanchez and Lacombe Lattice Fluid Theory Brief Comparison...

  7. Part 3, Authors: C To Czygan 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farr, Marion M.; Bero, Dorothy; Carson, Gertrude B.; Hassall, Albert; Doss, Mildred A.

    1939-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    B. E. Bonner,30 M. Botje,23 A. Boucham,34 A. Brandin,21 A. Bravar,2 R. V. Cadman,1 X. Z. Cai,33 H. Caines,43 M. Caldero?n de la Barca Sa?nchez,2 J. Carroll,18 J. Castillo,18 M. Castro,41 D. Cebra,45 P. Chaloupka,9 S. Chattopadhyay,38 H. F. Chen,32... charged hadrons in |?| Carlo reference (solid curve underlying gamma reference), and broadened distribution (solid curve underlying data, not a fit?see text...

  8. Strangelet search in Au plus Au collisions at root s(NN)=200 GeV 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abelev, B. I.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Anderson, B. D.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G. S.; Bai, Y.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L. S.; Baudot, J.; Baumgart, S.; Belaga, V. V.; Bellingeri-Laurikainen, A.; Bellwied, R.; Benedosso, F.; Betts, R. R.; Bhardwaj, S.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L. C.; Blyth, S. -L; Bombara, M.; Bonner, B. E.; Botje, M.; Bouchet, J.; Brandin, A. V.; Bravar, A.; Burton, T. P.; Bystersky, M.; Cadman, R. V.; Cai, X. Z.; Caines, H.; Sanchez, M. Calderon de la Barca; Callner, J.; Catu, O.; Cebra, D.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, J. Y.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Christie, W.; Chung, S. U.; Coffin, J. P.; Cormier, T. M.; Cosentino, M. R.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Das, D.; Dash, S.; Daugherity, M.; de Moura, M. M.; Dedovich, T. G.; DePhillips, M.; Derevschikov, A. A.; Didenko, L.; Dietel, T.; Djawotho, P.; Dogra, S. M.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Du, F.; Dunin, V. B.; Dunlop, J. C.; Mazumdar, M. R. Dutta; Eckardt, V.; Edwards, W. R.; Efimov, L. G.; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Fachini, P.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Feng, A.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Fu, J.; Gagliardi, Carl A.; Gaillard, L.; Ganti, M. S.; Garcia-Solis, E.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gorbunov, Y. G.; Gos, H.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D. D.; Guertin, S. M.; Guimaraes, K. S. F. F.; Gupta, N.; Haag, B.; Hallman, T. J.; Hamed, A.; Harris, J. W.; He, W.; Heinz, M.; Henry, T. W.; Hepplemann, S.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffman, A. M.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D.; Hollis, R.; Horner, M. J.; Huang, H. Z.; Hughes, E. W.; Humanic, T. J.; Igo, G.; Iordanova, A.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jakl, P.; Jia, F.; Jones, P. G.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kang, K.; Kapitan, J.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Kettler, D.; Khodyrev, V. Yu; Kim, B. C.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Kislov, E. M.; Klein, S. R.; Knospe, A. G.; Kocoloski, A.; Koetke, D. D.; Kollegger, T.; Kopytine, M.; Kotchenda, L.; Kouchpil, V.; Kowalik, K. L.; Kravtsov, P.; Kravtsov, V. I.; Krueger, K.; Kuhn, C.; Kulikov, A. I.; Kumar, A.; Kurnadi, P.; Kuznetsov, A. A.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; Lange, S.; LaPointe, S.; Laue, F.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, C. -H; Lehocka, S.; LeVine, M. J.; Li, C.; Li, Q.; Li, Y.; Lin, G.; Lin, X.; Lindenbaum, S. J.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Liu, H.; Liu, J.; Liu, L.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Longacre, R. S.; Love, W. A.; Lu, Y.; Ludlam, T.; Lynn, D.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, J. G.; Ma, Y. G.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Majka, R.; Mangotra, L. K.; Manweiler, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Martin, L.; Matis, H. S.; Matulenko, Yu A.; McClain, C. J.; McShane, T. S.; Melnick, Yu; Meschanin, A.; Millane, J.; Miller, M. L.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, Saskia; Mironov, C.; Mischke, A.; Mitchell, J.; Mohanty, B.; Morozov, D. A.; Munhoz, M. G.; Nandi, B. K.; Nattrass, C.; Nayak, T. K.; Nelson, J. M.; Nepali, N. S.; Netrakanti, P. K.; Nogach, L. V.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Okorokov, V.; Oldenburg, M.; Olson, D.; Pachr, M.; Pal, S. K.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pavlinov, A. I.; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Perevoztchikov, V.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Phatak, S. C.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Poljak, N.; Porile, N.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Potekhin, M.; Potrebenikova, E.; Potukuchi, B. V. K. S.; Prindle, D.; Pruneau, C.; Putschke, J.; Qattan, I. A.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Relyea, D.; Ridiger, A.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Rose, A.; Roy, C.; Ruan, L.; Russcher, M. J.; Sahoo, R.; Sakrejda, I.; Sakuma, T.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sarsour, M.; Sazhin, P. S.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmitz, N.; Seger, J.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Seyboth, P.; Shabetai, A.; Shahaliev, E.; Shao, M.; Sharma, M.; Shen, W. Q.; Shimanskiy, S. S.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Simon, F.; Singaraju, R. N.; Smirnov, N.; Snellings, R.; Sorensen, P.; Sowinski, J.; Speltz, J.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stadnik, A.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Staszak, D.; Stock, R.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Suarez, M. C.; Subba, N. L.; Sumbera, M.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Z.; Surrow, B.; Symons, T. J. M.; de Toledo, A. Szanto; Szeliga, B.; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A. H.; Tarnowsky, T.; Thomas, J. H.; Timmins, A. R.; Timoshenko, S.; Tokarev, M.; Trainor, T. A.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, Robert E.; Tsai, O. D.; Ulery, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Van Buren, G.; van der Kolk, N.; van Leeuwen, M.; Vander Molen, A. M.; Varma, R.; Vasilevski, I. M.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Vernet, R.; Vigdor, S. E.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, S. A.; Waggoner, W. T.; Wang, F.; Wang, G.; Wang, J. S.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -L. Blyth,22 M. Bombara,2 B. E. Bonner,36 M. Botje,28 J. Bouchet,40 A. V. Brandin,52 A. Bravar,3 T. P. Burton,2 M. Bystersky,11 R. V. Cadman,1 X. Z. Cai,39 H. Caines,50 M. Caldero?n de la Barca Sa?nchez,6 J. Callner,9 O. Catu,50 D. Cebra,6 Z. Chajecki,29 P...

  9. Geology of north-central Burleson County, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kelly, Thomas Eugene

    1955-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the lignitic beus (' ueen Cxty). Kennedy compared the xxieasured sections oi tne Marine bocene xn Robertson County to the marin ~ be:"s at V. oseley's ferry (, "tone City-Crockett) and to Collier' s ferry (, eches forn. ation) six ~x'iles north. Yhree years... clay zones, and contains some thin stringers of brown to gray-black, silty, lignitic shale. At the few small exposures in north-central Burleson County, lignite is practically non-existent. However, considerable deposits were observed at Six Mile...

  10. LSRCP Response to ISRP Snake River Fall Chinook Program Review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M & E needs necessary to obtain an ESA section 10 permit to operate Lyons Ferry Hatchery. LSRCP assumes that the Section 10 permit will be consistent with the Snake River Fall Chinook Recovery Plan when Plans (HGMPs) and received ESA Section 10 Permit coverage. 2. Evaluate hatchery/wild salmon interactions

  11. July 2, 2007 1 Optimal Transmission Switching

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mangasarian, Olvi L.

    d to node n. zk: binary variable indicating whether transmission line k is removed from the system limit on number of open transmission lines Manuscript received July 2, 2007. This work was supported-mail: ferris@cs.wisc.edu). Sets : Set of all transmission lines L: Set of open transmission lines in solution

  12. JOURNAL OF LATEX CLASS FILES, VOL. 6, NO. 1, JANUARY 2007 1 Event-Driven User-Centric Middleware for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    , Pervasive Computing, event-driven middleware, web services, smart buildings, user-centred development, the existing buildings should be converted as much as possible into Smart Buildings, exploiting also a Living for Energy Efficient Buildings and Public Spaces Edoardo Patti, Andrea Acquaviva, Marco Jahn, Ferry

  13. Seasonal patterns of coarse sediment transport on a mixed sand and gravel beach due to vessel wakes, wind waves, and tidal currents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Talke, Stefan

    Seasonal patterns of coarse sediment transport on a mixed sand and gravel beach due to vessel wakes, wind waves, and tidal currents Gregory M. Curtiss a, , Philip D. Osborne b,1 , Alexander R. Horner December 2008 Accepted 29 December 2008 Keywords: mixed sand and gravel beach ferry wake wash beach

  14. This article appeared in a journal published by Elsevier. The attached copy is furnished to the author for internal non-commercial research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Rui

    institution and sharing with colleagues. Other uses, including reproduction and distribution, or selling a residual wrinkle whose amplitude depended on the loading rate. This is attributed to the viscoelastic methods (Segedin et al., 1988; Friedl et al., 2000; Jacques and Potier-Ferry, 2005; Zheng, 2009; Puntel et

  15. Human Capital Evolution and Economic Crisis: Minding `The Gap'*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Royal Holloway, University of London

    and aggregate demand. Ferri and Tae (1999) argue that this over-reaction by financial institution not always be the optimal response to crisis. At certain levels of human capital, maintaining the pre was responsible for worsening the crisis and if uninterrupted would have plunged the economies further

  16. Building Name 100 Antoinette 191 DTE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cinabro, David

    2-Jul-13 Building Name Bldg No Utility 100 Antoinette 191 DTE 1011 Ferry East 527 DTE 110 E. Warren Hancock West 074 DTE Academic/Administrative Building 062 DTE Alex Manoogian Hall 155 PLD Alumni House 042 PLD Art Building 040 PLD Atchison (South) Hall 104 DTE Athletic Multi-purpose Indoor Facility 091 PLD

  17. CURRICULUM VITAE Personal Information

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Merrick, Jason

    . Member of the Decision Analysis Society. Awards 2005 Excellence in Scholarship Award, College Procedure for the Washington State Ferries. Risk Analysis, Vol. 21, No. 1, pp. 127-142. 6. Merrick, J. R. W. (2003) A Bayesian Semi-parametric Analysis of the Reliability and Maintenance of Machine Tools

  18. Willamette Wildlife Mitigation Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ." Willamette Basin Hydro-Facilities Willamette Valley Cascade Mtns Big Cliff Detroit Foster Green Peter Hills Opportunity Areas #12;#12;Energy Development and Impacts on Wildlife #12;Allocation of Water Resources · Cost/Share #12;Canby Ferry Muddy Creek Green Island Mt Pisgah, Sorenson Meadows South Pasture

  19. author:j-hernandez-orallo -Google Scholar 1 of 15 10/01/2008 17:22

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hernández Orallo, José

    , J Hernandez-Orallo - Proceedings of the 19th International Conference on Machine ..., 2002 - dns2-Orallo, MA Salido - Machine Learning: Ecml 2003: 14th European Conference on ..., 2003 - books » C Ferri, P Flach, J Hernández-Orallo - ACM International Conference Proceeding Series, 2004 - portal

  20. Molecular evidence of Pleistocene bidirectional faunal exchange between1 Europe and the Near East: the case of the bicolored shrew (Crocidura2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alvarez, Nadir

    ; this expansion was not observed for the eastern clade. We10 hypothesise that the western population was confined to a small Italo-Balkanic refugium,11 whereas the eastern population subsisted in several refugia along and the Italo-Balkanic region in the east (e.g., Thorpe, 1984; Ferris et8 al., 1993, 1998; Dumolin-Lapegue et al

  1. Accomodation and Travel Accomodation: long term (30 days or over) with continuous occupancy No GST No PST

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Northern British Columbia, University of

    Accomodation and Travel GST PST Accomodation: long term (30 days or over) with continuous occupancy No GST No PST Accomodation: short term (less than 30 days) 5% 8% + 2% MRDT tax where applicable Accomodation: under $30 per day or $210 or less per week No GST No PST, no MRDT BC Ferry fares No GST No PST

  2. ERDC/ELTR-10-18 Recreation Management Support Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Perales Environmental Laboratory U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center 3909 Halls Ferry Road programs. This report provides estimates of annual visitor use levels, profiles of visitor spending, and the economic impact of visitor spending on the region surrounding the lakes. The report also examines visitor

  3. Stygologia 2 (112) 1986, E. J. Brill, Leiden MESOZOIC RELICTS IN MARINE CAVES OF BERMUDA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iliffe, Thomas M.

    .S.A. 2, Bermuda Biological Station, Ferry Reach 1-15, Bermuda. #12;lava tube in the Canary Islands (Yager, 1981) and later found in the same lava tube containing Munidopsis in the Canary Islands (Iliffe, occurring primarily on oceanic islands. One aspect of the findings of these and related, earlier studies has

  4. The Disk Covering Tour Problem for Wireless Sensor Networks Jia-Jiun Yang () Jehn-Ruey Jiang ()

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiang, Jehn-Ruey

    , WSN)DCTP (cost)(tour)(tour stop) (tour stop) (disk covering problem, DCP) decreasing k-means (Dk-means)(nearly) Lin-Kernighan heuristic(LKH) (covering salesman problem Qi-Ferry ) : k-means Abstract This paper is preferred. We propose the Decreasing K-means (DK-means) algorithm to find the nearly minimum number of tour

  5. Ecology 2004 18, 584591

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neher, Deborah A.

    organic matter also increases (Curtis et al. 1996; Reynolds et al. 1996). Thus soil processes may and the mineralization of nutrients in the detrital food web, both of which may be affected by change in carbon, nematodes are particularly convenient for investigating impacts of CO2 on soil food webs (Bongers & Ferris

  6. 7 July, 2012 Joe S. Mundy Learning Endowment Fund

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacobs, Laurence J.

    of energy are standard on every corner. Antique buildings host solar panels and wind turbines span the open the places I visited: Finland, Sweden, Norway and Denmark. The people of this region impressed upon me a way Jane Ivey #12;Ferry from Helsinki around in coast of Finland in the Baltic Sea towards St. Petersburg

  7. Comparison of Hazard Analysisp y Requirements of I&C

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) M di l D i A id tShip Accident (Ferry Sewol) Medical Device Accident (Therac-25) 3 NPP Accident­ Software Fault Tree Analysis ­ By AECL, Nancy Leveson Name of Software Hazards No % Remarks For construct hazard 4 7For construct hazard 4 7 Initialization hazard 4 7 IF-THEN-ELSE construct hazard 38 67 CASE

  8. Comment on: How the result of a single coin toss can turn out to be 100 heads

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aharon Brodutch

    2015-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Ferrie and Combes [PRL 113 120404 (2014)] produce a classical measurement scheme that supposedly exhibits `anomalous' weak values. I show that their model is flawed due to an incorrect definition of the weak value. As a consequence their claims are invalid.

  9. Towards the identification of siderite, rhodochrosite, and vivianite in sediments by their low-temperature magnetic properties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utrecht, Universiteit

    of Geosciences, University of Bremen, P.O. Box 330 440, D-28334 Bremen, Germany b Paleomagnetic Laboratory Fort, resulting in a progressively upward bending of the hysteresis curve in magnetic fields above 5 T. Vivianite et al., 1999; Maher and Thompson, 1999). In general, these studies refer to minerals that are ferri

  10. Products, weak topologies, quotients and strong topologies.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferri, Stefano

    Products, weak topologies, quotients and strong topologies. Stefano Ferri Abstract Again something from finite products of metric spaces, which are well known from the course Analysis I. Given two metric spaces (X, d) and (Y, ) we define the product space X Ã? Y in the following way. As a set we have

  11. Leiden Law School Department of Economics Research Memorandum 2010.01

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Galis, Frietson

    and Poverty Alleviation in OECD Countries. Koen Caminada, Kees Goudswaard and Ferry Koster L e i d e n U n i v.economie.leidenuniv.nl Editors Prof. dr. C.L.J. Caminada Dr. B.C.J. van Velthoven #12;Social Income Transfers and Poverty Economics Department Leiden University f.koster@law.leidenuniv.nl Abstract Poverty alleviation

  12. www.advmat.de www.MaterialsViews.com

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atwater, Harry

    , and at their current efficiency the technology is not scalable to meet world demand.[8­10] Most photovoltaic materials, and Harry A. Atwater* Design Considerations for Plasmonic Photovoltaics [] V. E. Ferry, Dr. J. N. Munday for Inexpensive, Ultrathin Film Photovoltaics One of the great challenges facing society today is the supply

  13. Plasmonic Nanostructure Design for Efficient Light Coupling into Solar Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atwater, Harry

    Plasmonic Nanostructure Design for Efficient Light Coupling into Solar Cells Vivian E. Ferry, Luke sunlight into guided modes in thin film Si and GaAs plasmonic solar cells whose back interface is coated. These findings show promise for the design of ultrathin solar cells that exhibit enhanced absorption

  14. #~i;:~~.:(' . AQUATIC PLANT CONTROL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    -4 EFFECTS OF WATER CHEMISTRY ON SUBMERSED AQUATIC PLANTS: A SYNTHESIS by R. Michael Smart Environmental. ADDRESS (City, State, and ZIP Code) 7b. ADDRESS (City. State, and ZIP Code) 3909 Halls Ferry Road IDENTIFICATION NUMBER ORGANIZATION (If applicable) US Army Corps of Engineers Be. ADDRESS (City, Stitte

  15. The reconstruction of the Lake Champlain sidewheel steamer Champlain II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baldwin, Elizabeth Robinson

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The steamship Champlain II, ex-Oakes Ames, was built as a railroad car transfer ferry in 1868 at Marks Bay, Burlington, Vermont in the private shipyard of Napoleon B. Proctor. The vessel was later converted to a passenger line boat in 1873...

  16. OPTIMIZATION TOPICS LIST Revised April 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Radeloff, Volker C.

    1 OPTIMIZATION TOPICS LIST Revised April 2012 For Fall 2012 and Spring 2013 we will adopt. Bertsimas and J. Tsitsiklis, Introduction to Linear Optimization, Athena Scientific, 1997 2. M. C. Ferris, O and mixed integer models · Existence of optimal solutions, optimality conditions · Branch and bound methods

  17. Oxidative metabolism of glucose-6-phosphate by enzyme systems of bovine erythrocytes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Harold Edward

    1962-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    study of ths reduction of mathemoglobin (ferri- hemoglobin) in the erythrocyte, found that this reduction was facilitated thx'ough the nicotinamide nucleoCide coensyme dehydx'ogenases in ths cell. He a+O suggested that the stimulated rate...

  18. Transit Rider Information King County Metro Transit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Queitsch, Christine

    works or roads department located in your city. Power Outages Seattle City Light (206) 684-7400 http://www.seattle.gov/light Puget Sound Energy 1 (888) 225-5773 http://www.pse.com Highway & Ferry Conditions Washington State waste container, not in the street. · When snow falls, shovel and de-ice your sidewalk. You can use salt

  19. Graduate School of Arts and Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Recipients Marsten Anderson Prize ashton lazarus Francis J. Anscombe Award zhao ren Henry Prentiss Becton anderson colton lynner Miguel Ferreyros Memorial Award amy mount Harry Burr Ferris Prize nina brahme ryan carolyn hoyle Mary Ellen Jones Prize david taylor Annie Le Fellowship ashley schloss deborah ayeni Elias

  20. 936.ps - Optimization Online

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2004-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Aug 16, 2004 ... the network is represented by a linearized direct-current (DC) load ... ground regarding the PJM power market and the USEPA NO x ...... [3] S. P. Dirkse and M. C. Ferris (1995), The PATH Solver: A Non-Monotone Stabilization.

  1. Monitoring and Evaluation of Yearling Fall Chinook Salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) Released from Acclimation Facilities Upstream of Lower Granite Dam; 2001 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rocklage, Stephen J.; Kellar, Dale S. (Nez Perce Tribe, Department of Fisheries Resource Management, ID)

    2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nez Perce Tribe, in cooperation with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, conducted monitoring and evaluation studies on Lyons Ferry Hatchery reared yearling fall Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha that were acclimated and released at three Fall Chinook Acclimation Project sites upstream of Lower Granite Dam along with yearlings released on-station from Lyons Ferry Hatchery in 2001. This was the sixth year of a long-term project to supplement natural spawning populations of Snake River stock fall Chinook salmon upstream of Lower Granite Dam. The 318,932 yearlings released from the Fall Chinook Acclimation Project facilities were short of the 450,000 fish quota. We use Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) tag technology to monitor the primary performance measures of survival to mainstem dams and migration timing. We also monitor size, condition and tag/mark retention at release. We released 7,503 PIT tagged yearlings from Pittsburg Landing, 7,499 from Big Canyon and 2,518 from Captain John Rapids. The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife released 991 PIT tagged yearlings from Lyons Ferry Hatchery. Fish health sampling indicated that, overall, bacterial kidney disease levels could be considered relatively low. Compared to prior years, Quantitative Health Assessment Indices were relatively low at Big Canyon and Captain John Rapids and about average at Pittsburg Landing and Lyons Ferry Hatchery. Mean fork lengths (95% confidence interval) of the PIT tagged groups ranged from 155.4 mm (154.7-156.1 mm) at Captain John Rapids to 171.6 mm (170.7-172.5 mm) at Lyons Ferry Hatchery. Mean condition factors ranged from 1.02 at Lyons Ferry Hatchery to 1.16 at Big Canyon and Captain John Rapids. Estimated survival (95% confidence interval) of PIT tagged yearlings from release to Lower Granite Dam ranged from 74.4% (73.2-75.5%) for Big Canyon to 85.2% (83.5-87.0%) for Captain John Rapids. Estimated survival from release to McNary Dam ranged from 37.9% (36.0-40.0%) for Pittsburg Landing to 57.9% (53.0-62.8%) for Lyons Ferry Hatchery. Median migration rates to Lower Granite Dam, based on all observations of PIT tagged yearlings from the FCAP facilities, ranged from 6.3 river kilometers per day (rkm/d) for Big Canyon to 10.8 rkm/d for Pittsburg Landing. Median migration rates to McNary Dam ranged from 5.2 rkm/d for Lyons Ferry Hatchery to 10.9 rkm/d for Pittsburg Landing. Median travel times from the FCAP facilities were about 13-17 days to Lower Granite Dam and 31-37 days to McNary Dam. Median arrival dates at Lower Granite Dam, based on all observations of PIT tagged yearling groups from Pittsburg Landing, Big Canyon and Captain John Rapids, were all from April 26-27. Median arrival dates at McNary Dam for Pittsburg Landing, Big Canyon and Captain John Rapids groups were all from May 14-18. The median arrival date at McNary Dam was May 13 for Lyons Ferry Hatchery yearlings.

  2. High energy. Progress report, March 1, 1992--February 28, 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bonner, B.E.; Roberts, J.B. Jr.

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Bonner Lab High Energy Group at Rice University has major hardware and software design and construction responsibilities in three of the flagship experiments of US High Energy Physics: D0, CMS, and KTeV. These commitments were undertaken after managing boards of the collaborations had evaluated the unique capabilities that Bonner Lab has to offer. Although fiscal constraints prohibited their participation in the final year of the SMC experiment (1996) on the spin dependent structure functions of nucleons, they played a major role there since it was proposed in 1988. The new results from the SMC data taken in previous years continue to generate a buzz of theoretical activity--and to increase understanding of the nucleon structure functions and their behavior as a function of Q{sup 2} and x. They have also spawned large new experimental spin physics programs at HERA and at RHIC that ultimately will provide answers to these fundamental questions. This is a direct result of the unprecedented precision and kinematic range of the SMC results. Such precision would not have been possible without the improvement in the knowledge of the muon beam polarization using the Rice-designed beam polarimeter. In D0 Bonner Lab has been active in data taking, data analysis, upgrade design, and upgrade construction projects. In CMS they are responsible for the design and construction of the trigger electronics for one of the crucial subsystems: the end cap muon detectors. Other responsibilities are fully expected as the US commitment to LHC projects becomes clearer. The technical capabilities are well matched to the enormous challenges posed by the physics measurements being contemplated for the CMS detector. KTeV will be taking data shortly. Rice made major contributions to the construction and commissioning of this experiment. The long list of publications and presentations during the past five years attests to the fact that the group has been working hard and productively.

  3. Application of the BINS superheated drop detector spectrometer to the {sup 9}Be(p,xn) neutron energy spectrum determination

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Di Fulvio, A.; Ciolini, R.; Mirzajani, N.; Romei, C.; D'Errico, F. [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Meccanica, Nucleare e della Produzione, Universita di Pisa, Pisa (Italy); Bedogni, R. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, Frascati (Roma) (Italy); Esposito, J.; Zafiropoulos, D.; Colautti, P. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, Legnaro (Padova) (Italy)

    2013-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

    In the framework of TRASCO-BNCT project, a Bubble Interactive Neutron Spectrometer (BINS) device was applied to the characterization of the angle-and energy-differential neutron spectra generated by the {sup 9}Be(p,xn)reaction. The BINS spectrometer uses two superheated emulsion detectors, sequentially operated at different temperatures and thus provides a series of six sharp threshold responses, covering the 0.1-10 MeV neutron energy range. Spectrum unfolding of the data was performed by means of MAXED code. The obtained angle, energy-differential spectra were compared with those measured with a Bonner sphere spectrometer, a silicon telescope spectrometer and literature data.

  4. Regional discrimination studies: Phase II. Scientific report No. 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bonner, J.; Hayward, C.; Herrin, E.; Sorrell, G.G.

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report consists of four parts and an appendix. Part (1) `Seismic Acoustic Studies at TXAR`, is by Eugene Herrin and C.G. Sorrells. Part (2) `Inversion of Surface Waves for Shallow Velocity Structure in the Fort Worth Basin,` is by Jessie Bonner. Part (3) `A Preliminary Investigation of the Use of Acoustic and Seismic Acoustic Observations to Identify Vented Explosive Seismic Sources`, is by C.G. Sorrells and Eugene Herrin. Part (4) consists of the Acknowledgments called for by the contract. Appendix 1 Preliminary Report` Characteristics of the Broadband Acoustic Sensors Installed in the SMU Lajitas CSE Array, is by Chris Hayward.

  5. Determination of phase equilibria for the binary systems polystyrene/cyclohexane and polystyrene/toluene and for the ternary system polystyrene/cyclohexane/toluene at 423 K, 433 K, and 448 K using perturbation gas chromatography / cby Kathryn Rion Hanneman

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hanneman, Kathryn Rion

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -of-state model, and the lattice-fluid model of Sanchez and Lacombe. The vapor-liquid equilibrium data were found to be insensitive to the cyclohexane/toluene fit parameter in the Flory's equation-of-state model, the Flory-Huggins (volume and segment fraction...) model and the Sanchez and Lacombe model. However, the vapor-liquid equilibrium data's sensitivity to the CH/T parameter in Bonner and Brockmeier's simplified Flory's model was not determined. At the temperatures and solvent partial pressures studied...

  6. Rapidity and centrality dependence of proton and antiproton production from Au-197+Au-197 collisions at root S-NN=130 GeV 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adams, J.; Adler, C.; Aggarwal, MM; Ahammed, Z.; Amonett, J.; Anderson, BD; Anderson, M.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, GS; Badyal, SK; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, LS; Baudot, J.; Bekele, S.; Belaga, VV; Bellwied, R.; Berger, J.; Bezverkhny, BI; Bhardwaj, S.; Bhaskar, P.; Bhati, AK; Bichsel, H.; Billmeier, A.; Bland, LC; Blyth, CO; Bonner, BE; Botje, M.; Boucham, A.; Brandin, A.; Bravar, A.; Cadman, RV; Cai, XZ; Caines, H.; Sanchez, MCD; Cardenas, A.; Carroll, J.; Castillo, J.; Castro, M.; Cebra, D.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, HF; Chen, Y.; Chernenko, SP; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Choi, B.; Christie, W.; Coffin, JP; Cormier, TM; Cramer, JG; Crawford, HJ; Das, D.; Das, S.; Derevschikov, AA; Didenko, L.; Dietel, T.; Dong, X.; Draper, JE; Du, F.; Dubey, AK; Dunin, VB; Dunlop, JC; Mazumdar, MRD; Eckardt, V.; Efimov, LG; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Fachini, P.; Faine, V.; Faivre, J.; Fatemi, R.; Filimonov, K.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fisyak, Y.; Flierl, D.; Foley, KJ; Fu, J.; Gagliardi, Carl A.; Ganti, MS; Gutierrez, TD; Gagunashvili, N.; Gans, J.; Gaudichet, L.; Germain, M.; Geurts, F.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gonzalez, JE; Grachov, O.; Grigoriev, V.; Grosnick, D.; Guedon, M.; Guertin, SM; Gupta, A.; Gushin, E.; Hallman, TJ; Hardtke, D.; Harris, JW; Heinz, M.; Henry, TW; Heppelmann, S.; Herston, T.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffmann, GW; Horsley, M.; Huang, HZ; Huang, SL; Humanic, TJ; Igo, G.; Ishihara, A.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, WW; Janik, M.; Johnson, I.; Jones, PG; Judd, EG; Kabana, S.; Kaneta, M.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Klay, J.; Klein, SR; Klyachko, A.; Koetke, DD; Kollegger, T.; Konstantinov, AS; Kopytine, M.; Kotchenda, L.; Kovalenko, AD; Kramer, M.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Kuhn, C.; Kulikov, AI; Kumar, A.; Kunde, GJ; Kunz, CL; Kutuev, RK; Kuznetsov, AA; Lamont, MAC; Landgraf, JM; Lange, S.; Lansdell, CP; Lasiuk, B.; Laue, F.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Leontiev, VM; LeVine, MJ; Li, C.; Li, Q.; Lindenbaum, SJ; Lisa, MA; Liu, F.; Liu, L.; Liu, Z.; Liu, QJ; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, WJ; Long, H.; Longacre, RS; Lopez-Noriega, M.; Love, WA; Ludlam, T.; Lynn, D.; Ma, J.; Ma, YG; Magestro, D.; Mahajan, S.; Mangotra, LK; Mahapatra, AP; Majka, R.; Manweiler, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Martin, L.; Marx, J.; Matis, HS; Matulenko, YA; McShane, TS; Meissner, F.; Melnick, Y.; Meschanin, A.; Messer, M.; Miller, ML; Milosevich, Z.; Minaev, NG; Mironov, C.; Mishra, D.; Mitchell, J.; Mohanty, B.; Molnar, L.; Moore, CF; Mora-Corral, MJ; Morozov, V.; de Moura, MM; Munhoz, MG; Nandi, BK; Nayak, SK; Nayak, TK; Nelson, JM; Nevski, P.; Nikitin, VA; Nogach, LV; Norman, B.; Nurushev, SB; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Okorokov, V.; Oldenburg, M.; Olson, D.; Paic, G.; Pandey, SU; Pal, S.; Panebratsev, Y.; Panitkin, SY; Pavlinov, AI; Pawlak, T.; Perevoztchikov, V.; Peryt, W.; Petrov, VA; Phatak, SC; Picha, R.; Pluta, J.; Porile, N.; Porter, J.; Poskanzer, AM; Potekhin, M.; Potrebenikova, E.; Potukuchi, BVKS; Prindle, D.; Pruneau, C.; Putschke, J.; Rai, G.; Rakness, G.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ravel, O.; Ray, RL; Razin, SV; Reichhold, D.; Reid, JG; Renault, G.; Retiere, F.; Ridiger, A.; Ritter, HG; Roberts, JB; Rogachevski, OV; Romero, JL; Rose, A.; Roy, C.; Ruan, LJ; Rykov, V.; Sahoo, R.; Sakrejda, I.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Savin, I.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, RP; Schmitz, N.; Schroeder, LS; Schweda, K.; Seger, J.; Seliverstov, D.; Seyboth, P.; Shahaliev, E.; Shao, M.; Sharma, M.; Shestermanov, KE; Shimanskii, SS; Singaraju, RN; Simon, F.; Skoro, G.; Smirnov, N.; Snellings, R.; Sood, G.; Sorensen, P.; Sowinski, J.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, S.; Stephenson, EJ; Stock, R.; Stolpovsky, A.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Struck, C.; Suaide, AAP; Sugarbaker, E.; Suire, C.; Sumbera, M.; Surrow, B.; Symons, TJM; de Toledo, AS; Szarwas, P.; Tai, A.; Takahashi, J.; Tang, AH; Sorensen, P.; Thein, D.; Thomas, JH; Tikhomirov, V.; Tokarev, M.; Tonjes, MB; Trainor, TA; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, Robert E.; Trivedi, MD; Trofimov, V.; Tsai, O.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, DG; Van Buren, G.; Vander Molen, AM; Vasiliev, AN; Vasiliev, M.; Vigdor, SE; Viyogi, YP; Voloshin, SA; Wang, F.; Wang, G.; Wang, XL; Wang, ZM; Ward, H.; Watson, JW; Wells, R.; Westfall, GD; Whitten, C.; Wieman, H.; Willson, R.; Wissink, SW; Witt, R.; Wood, J.; Wu, J.; Xu, N.; Xu, Z.; Xu, ZZ; Yakutin, AE; Yamamoto, E.; Yang, J.; Yepes, P.; Yurevich, VI; Zanevski, YV; Zborovsky, I.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, HY; Zhang, WM; Zhang, ZP; Zolnierczuk, PA; Zoulkarneev, R.; Zoulkarneeva, J.; Zubarev, AN; STAR Collaboration.

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ,2 C. O. Blyth,3 B. E. Bonner,26 M. Botje,21 A. Boucham,30 A. Brandin,19 A. Bravar,2 R. V. Cadman,1 X. Z. Cai,29 H. Caines,39 M. Calder?n de la Barca S?nchez,2 A. Cardenas,25 J. Carroll,16 J. Castillo,16 M. Castro,37 D. Cebra,5 P. Chaloupka,9 S... to those events. The propagation of single tracks was performed using the GEANT Monte Carlo code with a de- tailed model of the STAR geometry and a realistic simulation of the TPC response. The resulting track reconstruction effi- ciency is greater than...

  7. Bonneville County, Idaho: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:EzfeedflagBiomass ConversionsSouthby 2022 |BleckleyMotionBocaBondBonner County,

  8. Bonneville Power Admin | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:EzfeedflagBiomass ConversionsSouthby 2022 |BleckleyMotionBocaBondBonner County,Bonneville

  9. Bonneville Seabase Scuba Dive Pool Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:EzfeedflagBiomass ConversionsSouthby 2022 |BleckleyMotionBocaBondBonner

  10. Bonsall, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:EzfeedflagBiomass ConversionsSouthby 2022 |BleckleyMotionBocaBondBonnerBonsall, California:

  11. Book Review - Geochemical Exploration 1982 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  12. Booking Geothermal Energy Reserves | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:EzfeedflagBiomass ConversionsSouthby 2022 |BleckleyMotionBocaBondBonnerBonsall,Booking

  13. Boone County Rural EMC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  14. Monitoring and Evaluation of Yearling Fall Chinook Salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) Released from Acclimation Facilities Upstream of Lower Granite Dam; 2000 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rocklage, Stephen J.; Kellar, Dale S. (Nez Perce Tribe, Department of Fisheries Resource Management, ID)

    2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nez Perce Tribe, in cooperation with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, conducted monitoring and evaluation studies on Lyons Ferry Hatchery reared yearling fall Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha that were acclimated and released at three Fall Chinook Acclimation Project sites upstream of Lower Granite Dam along with yearlings released on-station from Lyons Ferry Hatchery in 2000. This was the fifth year of a long-term project to supplement natural spawning populations of Snake River stock fall Chinook salmon upstream of Lower Granite Dam. The 397,339 yearlings released from the Fall Chinook Acclimation Project facilities were short of the 450,000 fish quota. We use Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) tag technology to monitor the primary performance measures of survival to mainstem dams and migration timing. We also monitor size, condition and tag/mark retention at release. We released 7,477 PIT tagged yearlings from Pittsburg Landing, 7,421 from Big Canyon and 2,488 from Captain John Rapids. The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife released 980 PIT tagged yearlings from Lyons Ferry Hatchery. Fish health sampling indicated that, overall, bacterial kidney disease levels could be considered relatively low. Compared to prior years, Quantitative Health Assessment Indices were relatively low at Big Canyon and Captain John Rapids and about average at Pittsburg Landing and Lyons Ferry Hatchery. Mean fork lengths (95% confidence interval) of the PIT tagged groups ranged from 157.7 mm (157.3-158.1 mm) at Big Canyon to 172.9 mm (172.2-173.6 mm) at Captain John Rapids. Mean condition factors ranged from 1.06 at Captain John Rapids and Lyons Ferry Hatchery to 1.12 at Big Canyon. Estimated survival (95% confidence interval) of PIT tagged yearlings from release to Lower Granite Dam ranged from 87.0% (84.7-89.4%) for Pittsburg Landing to 95.2% (91.5-98.9%) for Captain John Rapids. Estimated survival from release to McNary Dam ranged from 65.8% (58.5-73.1%) for Lyons Ferry Hatchery to 84.0% (76.2-91.8%) for Captain John Rapids. Median migration rates to Lower Granite Dam, based on all observations of PIT tagged yearlings from the FCAP facilities, ranged from 10.1 river kilometers per day (rkm/d) for Captain John Rapids to 19.1 rkm/d for Pittsburg Landing. Median migration rates to McNary Dam ranged from 6.0 rkm/d for Lyons Ferry Hatchery to 17.3 rkm/d for Pittsburg Landing. Median travel times from the FCAP facilities were about 9-10 days to Lower Granite Dam and 22-25 days to McNary Dam. Median arrival dates at Lower Granite Dam, based on all observations of PIT tagged yearling groups from Pittsburg Landing, Big Canyon and Captain John Rapids, were all from April 21-22. Median arrival dates at McNary Dam for Pittsburg Landing, Big Canyon and Captain John Rapids groups were all from May 5-6. The median arrival date at McNary Dam was April 24 for Lyons Ferry Hatchery yearlings.

  15. Advanced Burners and Combustion Controls for Industrial Heat Recovery Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferri, J. L.

    ADVANCED BURNERS AND COMBUSTION CONTROLS FOR INDUSTRIAL HEAT RECOVERY SYSTEMS J.L.FERRI GTE PRODUCTS CORPORATION TOWANDA, PA ABSTRACT When recuperators are installed on indus trial furnaces, burners and ratio control systems must...ChieVi able not only through design, but also I because the burner internals are all;: ceramic and can wi thstand high tempera~ tures, particularly at low inputs (higih turndown) where the flame front recedes into the burner. A burner test furnace...

  16. Depositional environment of lower cretaceous Mitchell sandstone, St. Mary and Duty fields, Lafayette County, Arkansas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mazzullo, Elsa Kapitan

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    County, Arkansas. Series Group Subgroup Formation Field Number Washita Fredericksburg Paluxy Mooringsport Ferry Lake Comanchean Trinity Glen Rose Shale and limestone First lower anhydrite stringer Hill Sandstone Rodessa Second lower...DEPOSITIONAL ENVIRONMENT OF LOWER CRETACEOUS MITCHELL SANDSTONE, ST. MARY AND DUTY FIELDS, LAFAYETTE COUNTY, ARKANSAS A Thesis by ELSA KAPITAN MAZZULLO Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment...

  17. Economics of specialized integrated swine finishing operation in the Texas Panhandle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cavin, Guyle Earl

    1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Department (Member) (Member) C (Member) December 1971 ABSTRACT Economics of Specialized Swine Finishing Operation in the Texas Panhandle. (December 1971) Guyle Earl Cavin, B. S. , Texas Afd1 University Directed by: Dr. Donald E. Ferris The purpose... and finishing stage of production. The objectives of the study were to determine: (1) if a supply of good quality relatively disease-free feeder pigs is available in a supply sufficient to furnish an expanded increase in the swine finishing industry, (2...

  18. Assessing Overwater Structure-Related Predation on Juvenile Salmon: A Field Study and Protocol for Weighing the Evidence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, Greg D.; Thom, Ronald M.; Southard, John A.; Sargeant, Susan L.; Shreffler, David K.; Stamey, Mark T.

    2004-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Large overwater structures have often been cited as potential migratory barriers and areas of increased predation for juvenile salmon migrating along shallow shoreline habitats, although conclusive evidence has not been demonstrated to date in situ. To help resolve this issue, Washington State Ferries (WSF) sponsored directed research to determine whether WSF terminals affect predation on juvenile salmon. We used a combination of standardized surveys, stomach content analyses, and new observational technologies to assess fish, avian, and mammal predation on salmon fry at ferry terminals and paired reference sites during periods of pre- (early April) and peak (May) outmigration. We observed no significant aggregation of potential bird or mammal predators at six ferry terminal study sites. Few potential fish predators were documented in SCUBA surveys, beach seines, or with a Dual frequency IDentification SONar (DIDSON) camera at Mukilteo, our single underwater study location. Only one instance of salmon predation by fish (staghorn sculpin ? Leptocottus armatus) was confirmed, and this was at the corresponding reference site. A tiered protocol (Minimum/ Recommended/ Preferred actions) was developed for assessing potential predation at other overwater structures. Likewise, recommendations were developed for incorporating design features into WSF terminal improvement projects that could minimize future impacts.

  19. Monitoring and Evaluation of Yearling Fall Chinook Salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) Released from Acclimation Facilities Upstream of Lower Granite Dam; 1999 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rocklage, Stephen J.; Kellar, Dale S. (Nez Perce Tribe, Department of Fisheries Resource Management, ID)

    2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nez Perce Tribe, in cooperation with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, conducted monitoring and evaluation studies on Lyons Ferry Hatchery reared yearling fall Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha that were acclimated and released at three Fall Chinook Acclimation Project (FCAP) sites upstream of Lower Granite Dam along with yearlings released on-station from Lyons Ferry Hatchery in 1999. This was the fourth year of a long-term project to supplement natural spawning populations of Snake River stock fall Chinook salmon upstream of Lower Granite Dam. The 453,117 yearlings released from the Fall Chinook Acclimation Project facilities not only slightly exceeded the 450,000 fish quota, but a second release of 76,386 yearlings (hereafter called Surplus) were acclimated at the Big Canyon facility and released about two weeks after the primary releases. We use Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) tag technology to monitor the primary performance measures of survival to mainstem dams and migration timing. We also monitor size, condition and tag/mark retention at release. We released 9,941 PIT tagged yearlings from Pittsburg Landing, 9,583 from Big Canyon, 2,511 Big Canyon Surplus and 2,494 from Captain John Rapids. The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife released 983 PIT tagged yearlings from Lyons Ferry Hatchery. Fish health sampling indicated that, overall, bacterial kidney disease levels could be considered relatively low and did not appear to increase after transport to the acclimation facilities. Compared to prior years, Quantitative Health Assessment Indices were relatively low at Pittsburg Landing and Lyons Ferry Hatchery and relatively high at Big Canyon and Captain John Rapids. Mean fork lengths (95% confidence interval) of the release groups ranged from 147.4 mm (146.7-148.1 mm) at Captain John Rapids to 163.7 mm (163.3-164.1 mm) at Pittsburg Landing. Mean condition factors ranged from 1.04 at Pittsburg Landing to 1.23 at Captain John Rapids. Estimated survival (95% confidence interval) of PIT tagged yearlings from release to Lower Granite Dam ranged from 87.8% (82.1-93.4%) for Big Canyon Surplus to 94.1% (90.1-98.1%) for Captain John Rapids. Estimated survival from release to McNary Dam ranged from 58.7% (49.3-68.1%) for Big Canyon Surplus to 71.3% (60.1-82.5%) for Captain John Rapids. Median migration rates to Lower Granite Dam, based on all observations of PIT tagged yearlings from the FCAP facilities, ranged from 9.3 river kilometers per day (rkm/d) for Captain John Rapids to 18.7 rkm/d for Pittsburg Landing. Median migration rates to McNary Dam ranged from 9.0 rkm/d for Lyons Ferry Hatchery to 17.3 rkm/d for Pittsburg Landing. Median travel times from the FCAP facilities were about 7-10 days to Lower Granite Dam and 21-23 days to McNary Dam. Median arrival dates at Lower Granite Dam, based on all observations of PIT tagged yearling groups from the FCAP facilities, were all from April 23-25. The median arrival date for Big Canyon Surplus was May 4. Median arrival dates at McNary Dam for Pittsburg Landing, Big Canyon and Captain John Rapids groups were all from May 7-8. Median arrival dates at McNary Dam were May 17 for Big Canyon Surplus and April 26 for Lyons Ferry Hatchery.

  20. The correlation of carbohydrate/nitrogen ratios and rooting ability of Rosa multiflora stem cuttings 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hambrick, Carroll Edward

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ION ~KmU MEDICINE SOW FORMATION ~KIT LEWIS SHALE 8 IMT MESA VERDE GROUP FAULT ~--M. . . . . (DA5HEO WHERE APPROKIMATE, DOTTED WHERE CDNCEALEDI BASIN AXIS (APFROXIMATE) W Y 0 MING I I j-43 HANNA 845(N O &42 I I I 0 108 105 Figure l... the Medicine Bow Formation. It consists of 2000 m of 1 ate Cretaceous to Paleocene cong lomeratic sandstone, sandstone, shale, and coal (Bowen, 1918). Ryan (1977) suggested that the Ferris sediments were deposited by a fluv iatile system originating...

  1. ‘The Old Order Changeth’: The Aborted Evolution of the British Empire, 1917 to 1931 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kelly, Sean Patrick

    2014-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

    , see J. Curran, Curtin's Empire (Port Melbourne, Vic., 2011), pp. 84-116 and 131-4 and, particularly, W. Reynolds, Australia's Bid for the Atomic Bomb (Carlton, Vic., 2000). Although Ottawa broke the indivisibility of subjecthood within the British...: The British Empire and the World, 1780-1830 (London, 1989), p. 11 and J. Ferris, The Evolution of British Strategic Policy, 1919-26 (Basingstoke, 1989), p. xi. 35 P. Buckner, ?Was There a 'British' Empire? The Oxford History of the British Empire from a...

  2. Proximity coherence for chip-multiprocessors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrow-Williams, Nick

    2011-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

    applications, provided that the algorithm can be decomposed into parallel threads. Such parallel programs have existed for many years. In the past, they have primarily been used for high performance computing applications, and were almost exclusively run... $ In Order 4 threads SIMD-16 I$ D$ In Order 4 threads SIMD-16 I$ D$ M e m o r y C o n t r o l l e r Figure 2.3: Intel Larrabee. retargeted at high-performance computing applications, in an architecture code-named Knights Ferry. Although it is still...

  3. Price determination for breeding bulls

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Namken, Jerry Carl

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Oammittee) Ra A. ietrzch C. J ~) Daru. I (Heai of August l987 Price Detezlainatian for Breeding Bulls. (August 1987) Jerry Carl Namkan, B. S. , Texas A&M University; Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. Donald E. Ferris A study using two different data... sets was conducted to determine the factors affecting the price of zmg~ Hereford hulls. In the first data set, both ~ and lagged national ~ feeder steer, utility cow, and crude oil prices, and net farm income were analyzed in a regzmsion procedure...

  4. The correlation of carbohydrate/nitrogen ratios and rooting ability of Rosa multiflora stem cuttings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hambrick, Carroll Edward

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ION ~KmU MEDICINE SOW FORMATION ~KIT LEWIS SHALE 8 IMT MESA VERDE GROUP FAULT ~--M. . . . . (DA5HEO WHERE APPROKIMATE, DOTTED WHERE CDNCEALEDI BASIN AXIS (APFROXIMATE) W Y 0 MING I I j-43 HANNA 845(N O &42 I I I 0 108 105 Figure l... the Medicine Bow Formation. It consists of 2000 m of 1 ate Cretaceous to Paleocene cong lomeratic sandstone, sandstone, shale, and coal (Bowen, 1918). Ryan (1977) suggested that the Ferris sediments were deposited by a fluv iatile system originating...

  5. Late Antique Plague Ships: Sixth-Century C.E. Trade Routes and Their Role in Transmitting the Justinianic Plague

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kofahl, Meko

    2013-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    found with piecemeal cargoes (see Appendix B) but it is impossible to know whether the ship visited each port or whether the goods simply circulated by way of a network of short trips. Large scale cabotage, or opportunistic trade, in an uncertain... Fredegarius, iv. 45, 143-4. The annual amount was 12,000 gold solidi. 16 Boss 1993, 5-40. 17 Ferry 1990, 81. 18 Teall 1959, 95. 9 and the cargo tolls charged based on the carrying capacity of one?s ship further reduced the ability to profit...

  6. Electrical equipment performance under severe accident conditions (BWR/Mark 1 plant analysis): Summary report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bennett, P.R.; Kolaczkowski, A.M.; Medford, G.T.

    1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of the Performance Evaluation of Electrical Equipment during Severe Accident States Program is to determine the performance of electrical equipment, important to safety, under severe accident conditions. In FY85, a method was devised to identify important electrical equipment and the severe accident environments in which the equipment was likely to fail. This method was used to evaluate the equipment and severe accident environments for Browns Ferry Unit 1, a BWR/Mark I. Following this work, a test plan was written in FY86 to experimentally determine the performance of one selected component to two severe accident environments.

  7. Time period, birth cohort and prevalence of dementia in mainland China, Hong Kong and Taiwan: a meta-analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Yu-Tzu; Lee, Hsin-yi; Norton, Samuel; Prina, A. Matthew; Fleming, Jane; Matthews, Fiona E.; Brayne, Carol

    2014-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

    /1]. 26 Reference Albanese, E, Dangour AD, Uauy R, Acosta D, Guerra M., Guerra SSG, Huang Y, Jacob K, Rodriguez JLD, Noriega LH, Salas A, Sosa AL, Sousa RM, Williams J, Ferri CP & Prince MJ. 2009. Dietary Fish And Meat Intake And Dementia In Latin... : 63-75 Prince, MJ. 2013. Dementia in China: east–west collaboration bears fruit. Lancet 381: 1967-1968. Qiu C, Strauss Ev, Bäckman L, et al. 2013. Twenty-year changes in dementia occurrence suggest decreasing incidence in central Stockholm, Sweden...

  8. Central Plateau Cleanup Final Comments and Responses Document on Proposed Changes to Central Plateau Cleanup Page 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWPSuccessAlamos Laboratory NastasiPASTCentral AirCentral Ferry

  9. Central Plateau Inner Area Cleanup Principles

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWPSuccessAlamos Laboratory NastasiPASTCentral AirCentral FerryInner

  10. Central Florida Elec Coop, Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, click here.Telluric Survey asWest, NewCenterville, Ohio:Ferry Lower

  11. Central Illinois Pub Serv Co (Illinois) EIA Revenue and Sales - April 2008

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, click here.Telluric Survey asWest, NewCenterville, Ohio:Ferry Lower| Open Energy

  12. Central Illinois Pub Serv Co (Illinois) EIA Revenue and Sales - December

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, click here.Telluric Survey asWest, NewCenterville, Ohio:Ferry Lower| Open

  13. Central Illinois Pub Serv Co (Illinois) EIA Revenue and Sales - February

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, click here.Telluric Survey asWest, NewCenterville, Ohio:Ferry Lower| Open2008 |

  14. Central Illinois Pub Serv Co (Illinois) EIA Revenue and Sales - February

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, click here.Telluric Survey asWest, NewCenterville, Ohio:Ferry Lower| Open2008

  15. Central Illinois Pub Serv Co (Illinois) EIA Revenue and Sales - January

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, click here.Telluric Survey asWest, NewCenterville, Ohio:Ferry Lower|

  16. Central Illinois Pub Serv Co (Illinois) EIA Revenue and Sales - January

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, click here.Telluric Survey asWest, NewCenterville, Ohio:Ferry Lower|2009 | Open

  17. Central Illinois Pub Serv Co (Illinois) EIA Revenue and Sales - June 2008 |

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, click here.Telluric Survey asWest, NewCenterville, Ohio:Ferry Lower|2009 |

  18. Central Illinois Pub Serv Co (Illinois) EIA Revenue and Sales - March 2008

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, click here.Telluric Survey asWest, NewCenterville, Ohio:Ferry Lower|2009 || Open

  19. Central Illinois Pub Serv Co (Illinois) EIA Revenue and Sales - May 2008 |

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, click here.Telluric Survey asWest, NewCenterville, Ohio:Ferry Lower|2009 ||

  20. Central Illinois Pub Serv Co (Illinois) EIA Revenue and Sales - November

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, click here.Telluric Survey asWest, NewCenterville, Ohio:Ferry Lower|2009 ||2008

  1. Central Illinois Pub Serv Co (Illinois) EIA Revenue and Sales - October

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, click here.Telluric Survey asWest, NewCenterville, Ohio:Ferry Lower|2009

  2. Central Illinois Pub Serv Co (Illinois) EIA Revenue and Sales - September

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, click here.Telluric Survey asWest, NewCenterville, Ohio:Ferry Lower|20092008 |

  3. Central Indiana Ethanol LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, click here.Telluric Survey asWest, NewCenterville, Ohio:Ferry Lower|20092008

  4. Central Information and Business Agency CIBA | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, click here.Telluric Survey asWest, NewCenterville, Ohio:Ferry

  5. Central Iowa Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, click here.Telluric Survey asWest, NewCenterville, Ohio:FerryIowa Zip: 50208

  6. Central Islip, New York: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, click here.Telluric Survey asWest, NewCenterville, Ohio:FerryIowa Zip:

  7. Central Maine Power Co | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, click here.Telluric Survey asWest, NewCenterville, Ohio:FerryIowa Zip:Central

  8. Central Maine Power Company Smart Grid Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, click here.Telluric Survey asWest, NewCenterville, Ohio:FerryIowa

  9. Central Manchester, Connecticut: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, click here.Telluric Survey asWest, NewCenterville, Ohio:FerryIowaManchester,

  10. Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cn Sunnybank Ranch Cherries Box Label, White Bluffs, 1935Corn 74155-3Ferry

  11. Ferrisburgh, Vermont: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model,DOEHazelPennsylvania:57427°, -89.4742177°Fenwick,8464991°,Ferris,

  12. Ferro Corporation | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model,DOEHazelPennsylvania:57427°, -89.4742177°Fenwick,8464991°,Ferris,Ferro

  13. Ferrostaal eSolar JV | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model,DOEHazelPennsylvania:57427°, -89.4742177°Fenwick,8464991°,Ferris,FerroeSolar

  14. Ferrysburg, Michigan: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model,DOEHazelPennsylvania:57427°,Ferry County, Washington: Energy Resources Jump

  15. Fertile, Iowa: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model,DOEHazelPennsylvania:57427°,Ferry County, Washington: Energy Resources

  16. Fiberight LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model,DOEHazelPennsylvania:57427°,Ferry County, Washington: Energy ResourcesFiberight

  17. FibreGen plc formerly Libra Natural Resources plc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model,DOEHazelPennsylvania:57427°,Ferry County, Washington: Energy

  18. Fibrominn LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model,DOEHazelPennsylvania:57427°,Ferry County, Washington: EnergyFibrominn LLC Jump

  19. Fibrowatt LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model,DOEHazelPennsylvania:57427°,Ferry County, Washington: EnergyFibrominn LLC

  20. Fichtner GmbH Co KG | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model,DOEHazelPennsylvania:57427°,Ferry County, Washington: EnergyFibrominn

  1. Fidelis Energy Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model,DOEHazelPennsylvania:57427°,Ferry County, Washington: EnergyFibrominnFidelis

  2. Fideris Inc formerly Lynntech Industries | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model,DOEHazelPennsylvania:57427°,Ferry County, Washington:

  3. Field Mapping At Beowawe Hot Springs Area (Wesnousky, Et Al., 2003) | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model,DOEHazelPennsylvania:57427°,Ferry County, Washington:Energy Information

  4. Field Mapping At Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (Fairbank Engineering Ltd,

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model,DOEHazelPennsylvania:57427°,Ferry County, Washington:Energy Information2003)

  5. Field Mapping At Cascades Region (Ingebritsen & Mariner, 2010) | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model,DOEHazelPennsylvania:57427°,Ferry County, Washington:Energy

  6. Field Mapping At Chena Geothermal Area (Kolker, 2008) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model,DOEHazelPennsylvania:57427°,Ferry County, Washington:EnergyInformation 3 -

  7. Field Mapping At Chena Geothermal Area (Waring, Et Al., 1917) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model,DOEHazelPennsylvania:57427°,Ferry County, Washington:EnergyInformation 3

  8. Field Mapping At Colrado Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model,DOEHazelPennsylvania:57427°,Ferry County, Washington:EnergyInformation

  9. Field Mapping At Coso Geothermal Area (1968-1971) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model,DOEHazelPennsylvania:57427°,Ferry County, Washington:EnergyInformation68 -

  10. Field Mapping At Coso Geothermal Area (2001-2003) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model,DOEHazelPennsylvania:57427°,Ferry County, Washington:EnergyInformation68 -

  11. Field Mapping At Dixie Valley Geothermal Area (Smith, Et Al., 2001) | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model,DOEHazelPennsylvania:57427°,Ferry County, Washington:EnergyInformation68

  12. Field Mapping At Dixie Valley Geothermal Area (Wesnousky, Et Al., 2003) |

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model,DOEHazelPennsylvania:57427°,Ferry County, Washington:EnergyInformation68Open

  13. Field Mapping At Gabbs Valley Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model,DOEHazelPennsylvania:57427°,Ferry County,

  14. Field Mapping At Glass Buttes Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model,DOEHazelPennsylvania:57427°,Ferry County,Glass Buttes Area (DOE GTP) Exploration

  15. Field Mapping At Kilauea East Rift Geothermal Area (Thomas, 1986) | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model,DOEHazelPennsylvania:57427°,Ferry County,Glass Buttes Area (DOE GTP)

  16. Field Mapping At Northern Basin & Range Region (Blewitt, Et Al., 2003) |

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model,DOEHazelPennsylvania:57427°,Ferry County,Glass Buttes Area (DOE GTP)Open Energy

  17. Field Mapping At Reese River Area (Henkle, Et Al., 2005) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model,DOEHazelPennsylvania:57427°,Ferry County,Glass Buttes Area (DOE GTP)Open

  18. Field Mapping At Roosevelt Hot Springs Geothermal Area (Ward, Et Al., 1978)

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model,DOEHazelPennsylvania:57427°,Ferry County,Glass Buttes Area (DOE GTP)Open| Open

  19. Field Mapping At Salt Wells Area (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2006) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model,DOEHazelPennsylvania:57427°,Ferry County,Glass Buttes Area (DOE GTP)Open|

  20. Field Mapping At San Emidio Desert Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model,DOEHazelPennsylvania:57427°,Ferry County,Glass Buttes Area (DOE GTP)Open|San

  1. Field Mapping At Snake River Plain Region (DOE GTP) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model,DOEHazelPennsylvania:57427°,Ferry County,Glass Buttes Area (DOE

  2. Field Mapping At The Needles Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model,DOEHazelPennsylvania:57427°,Ferry County,Glass Buttes Area (DOEThe Needles Area

  3. Field Mapping At U.S. West Region (Laney, 2005) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model,DOEHazelPennsylvania:57427°,Ferry County,Glass Buttes Area (DOEThe Needles

  4. Field Mapping At Valles Caldera - Redondo Geothermal Area (Bailey, Et Al.,

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model,DOEHazelPennsylvania:57427°,Ferry County,Glass Buttes Area (DOEThe Needles1969)

  5. Field Mapping At Valles Caldera - Redondo Geothermal Area (Goff, Et Al.,

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model,DOEHazelPennsylvania:57427°,Ferry County,Glass Buttes Area (DOEThe

  6. Field Mapping At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Geothermal Area (Bailey,

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model,DOEHazelPennsylvania:57427°,Ferry County,Glass Buttes Area (DOETheEt Al., 1969)

  7. Field Mapping At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Geothermal Area (Goff, Et

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model,DOEHazelPennsylvania:57427°,Ferry County,Glass Buttes Area (DOETheEt Al.,

  8. Field Mapping At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Region (Blewitt Et Al, 2005)

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model,DOEHazelPennsylvania:57427°,Ferry County,Glass Buttes Area (DOETheEt Al.,| Open

  9. Field Mapping | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model,DOEHazelPennsylvania:57427°,Ferry County,Glass Buttes Area (DOETheEt Al.,| Open

  10. Field Sampling | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model,DOEHazelPennsylvania:57427°,Ferry County,Glass Buttes Area (DOETheEt Al.,|

  11. Field Studies of Geothermal Reservoirs: Rio Grande Rift, New Mexico | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model,DOEHazelPennsylvania:57427°,Ferry County,Glass Buttes Area (DOETheEt Al.,|Energy

  12. Field Techniques | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model,DOEHazelPennsylvania:57427°,Ferry County,Glass Buttes Area (DOETheEt

  13. Fife Lake, Michigan: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model,DOEHazelPennsylvania:57427°,Ferry County,Glass Buttes Area (DOETheEtFife Lake,

  14. Fifth Street, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model,DOEHazelPennsylvania:57427°,Ferry County,Glass Buttes Area (DOETheEtFife

  15. Fiji-Climate Finance Readiness Programme | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model,DOEHazelPennsylvania:57427°,Ferry County,Glass Buttes Area

  16. File:(131112) Presentacion LAC LEDs.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model,DOEHazelPennsylvania:57427°,Ferry County,Glass Buttes Area(131112) Presentacion

  17. File:(2010)2 full paper with cover LEDS FINAL (2).pdf | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model,DOEHazelPennsylvania:57427°,Ferry County,Glass Buttes Area(131112)

  18. File:(PECC) Special Program on Climate Change SUMMARY (english).pdf | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model,DOEHazelPennsylvania:57427°,Ferry County,Glass Buttes Area(131112)Energy

  19. File:0 - Overall Flow (Solar).pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model,DOEHazelPennsylvania:57427°,Ferry County,Glass Buttes

  20. File:0 - Overall Flow - Transmission.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  1. File:0 - OverallFlow-1.pdf | Open Energy Information

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  2. File:0 Overview - Hydro.pdf | Open Energy Information

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  3. File:00 BRRTP FEIS-EIR cover sheet FINAL-R.pdf | Open Energy Information

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  4. File:01-FD-a - LandUsePlanning.pdf | Open Energy Information

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  5. File:01-FD-b - LandUsePlanAmendmentProcess.pdf | Open Energy Information

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  6. File:01AKALandUseConsiderations.pdf | Open Energy Information

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  7. File:01CAALandUsePlanning.pdf | Open Energy Information

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  8. File:01HIALandUseConsiderations.pdf | Open Energy Information

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  9. File:01IDALandUseConsiderations.pdf | Open Energy Information

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  10. File:01LandUseOverview.pdf | Open Energy Information

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  11. File:01MTALandUseConsiderations.pdf | Open Energy Information

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  12. File:01NMALandUsePlanning.pdf | Open Energy Information

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  13. File:01NVAStateLandUsePlanning (1).pdf | Open Energy Information

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  14. File:01ORALandUseConsiderations.pdf | Open Energy Information

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  15. File:01ORALandUsePlanning.pdf | Open Energy Information

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  16. File:01TXALandUsePlanning.pdf | Open Energy Information

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  17. Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cn SunnybankD.jpg Gallery: VPPCompanyFebruary 2005 Weasel Pit PumpingFerry

  18. Evaluation of Methods to Increase Light under Large Overwater Structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sargeant, Susan L.; Thom, Ronald M.; Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Borde, Amy B.; Southard, John A.

    2003-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    To address resource agency concerns about potential impacts of ferry terminal expansion on habitat functions and resource use of nearshore areas, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, in partnership with the Washington State Department of Transportation, conducted field trials with several products that promote light passage through dock structures. Photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) measurements were compared with known minimum requirements for survival of eelgrass, Zostera marina, which provides critical habitat for the federally listed chinook salmon, Oncorhynchus tshawytscha. PAR measurements were also related to what is known about the effects of light on juvenile salmonid feeding and passage under overwater structures. In general, the products predicted to provide the most to the least light were the grating, SunTunnel, metal halide greenhouse light, and prisms. All the light technologies tested could provide enough light for eelgrass underneath a ferry terminal, though multiples of some devices would be required. Because less light is required for fish to feed than for photosynthesis, any of the products would provide enough light for juvenile salmon to feed under the structure. The number and placement of these devices could be arranged to maximize light penetration for particular purposes in different situations.

  19. Travelers in Antebellum San Antonio

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stroup, Candace Coleman

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , 11; Kendall, Narrative, vol. I, 29; 2'S. Lth, y 1 'h~dhl(11'*, d. hyd ldS. Pierce (Austin, 197~1 , 27-28. 48 David Woodman, Jr. , Guide to Texas Emigrants (Boston, 1835), 94. 24 At Stinson's Ferry, between Washington-on-the-Brazos and Crockett... (P ', 1819), IDO; Z b I M tS y P'k, yh ~8* d't' 2 Zb)~Mt Pk thLtt dtl dD, d. d annot. by Donald Jackson (Norman, Okl. , 1~966 , vol. II, 78. 23 Juan Nepomuceno Almonte, "Statistical Report on Texas, 1835, " by C I E. C t lid, ~ th 8' t. ' L...

  20. Correlation of Biological Characteristics of Smolts with Survival and Travel Time, 1987 Technical Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rondorf, Dennis W.; Beeman, John W.; Free, Mary E. (Seattle National Fishery Research Center, Columbia River Field Station, Cook, WA)

    1988-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The biological characteristics of smolts were examined to determine their effect on estimates of survival in the Columbia and Snake rivers. Freeze branded groups of steelhead trout (Salmo gairdneri) from Lyons Ferry State Fish Hatchery (SFH) and Wells SFH and spring chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) from Winthrop National Fish Hatchery (NFH) were used to estimate survival. Past estimates of survival, using a ratio of test and control fish recaptured at McNary Dam, have resulted in estimates > 100%, presumably due to some unknown bias. Study objectives were to determine if stress and descaling, degree of smoltification, and prevalence of bacterial kidney disease (BKD) differed among test and control groups of fish, thereby biasing survival estimates. 19 refs., 20 figs., 10 tabs.

  1. EA-1885: Boston Architectural College's Urban Sustainability Initiative Renovation of Green Alley #444, Boston, Massachusetts

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal to provide a grant to Boston Architectural College (BAC) to design, construct and implement the renovation of Public Alley #444 in Boston's Historic Back Bay District. The project would include the installation of 7 to 10 open loop geothermal wells to provide heating and cooling energy to BAC's facilities; the installation of a green screen trellis system, planting soils, concrete pavement, pavers, and landscaping; and mechanical upgrades (plumbing and electrical) to accommodate the geothermal solution into the benefiting facilities. Comment Period Ends: 01/13/2012 Comments should be marked "BAC Public Alley #444 Draft EA Comments" and sent to: Mr. Fred Pozzuto U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory 3610 Collins Ferry Road P.O. Box 880, MS B07 Morgantown, WV 26507-0880 Email: fred.pozzuto@netl.doe.gov Facsimile: 1-304-285-4403

  2. A comparative transport study of Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3} and Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3}/yttrium iron garnet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jiang, Zilong; Tang, Chi; Shi, Jing [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Riverside, California 92521 (United States); Katmis, Ferhat; Wei, Peng; Moodera, Jagadeesh S. [Francis Bitter Magnet Laboratory, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

    2014-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Bilayers of 20 quintuple layer Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3} on 30?nm thick yttrium iron garnet (YIG) have been grown with molecular beam epitaxy in conjunction with pulsed laser deposition. The presence of the ferri-magnetic insulator YIG causes additional scattering to the surface states of the Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3} topological insulator layer, as indicated by the temperature dependence of the resistivity. From the two-channel analysis of the Hall data, we find that the surface contribution in the bilayer samples is greatly reduced. Furthermore, the weak antilocalization effect from the surface states is clearly suppressed due to the presence of the YIG layer.

  3. Prestellar Core Formation, Evolution, and Accretion from Gravitational Fragmentation in Turbulent Converging Flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gong, Munan

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate prestellar core formation and accretion based on three-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations. Our simulations represent local $\\sim 1$pc regions within giant molecular clouds where a supersonic turbulent flow converges, triggering star formation in the post-shock layer. We include turbulence and self-gravity, applying sink particle techniques, and explore a range of inflow Mach number ${\\cal M}=2-16$. Two sets of cores are identified and compared: $t_1$-cores are identified of a time snapshot in each simulation, representing dense structures in a single cloud map; $t_\\mathrm{coll}$-cores are identified at their individual time of collapse, representing the initial mass reservoir for accretion. We find that cores and filaments form and evolve at the same time. At the stage of core collapse, there is a well-defined, converged characteristic mass for isothermal fragmentation that is comparable to the critical Bonner-Ebert mass at the post-shock pressure. The core mass functions (CMFs) of $t_\\mathrm...

  4. Performance of a Moderating Neutron Spectrometer That Uses Scintillating Fibers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bliss, Mary; Craig, Richard A.; Barnett, Debra S.; Anderson, Dale N.; Smart, John E.; Knopf, Michael A.; Hartley, Stacey A.

    2001-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The Bonner sphere is the canonical example of instruments that provide a measure of neutron spectra by using moderating and absorbing materials together with thermal-neutron detectors. For such spectrometers, the instrument response reflects a statistical average of the energy spectrum. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory has developed neutron-sensitive cerium-activated scintillating fibers composed of lithium-silicate glass. These fibers present an enabling technology for efficient neutron spectroscopy. A moderating spectrometer was built as a testbed for materials identification. Based on the results of Monte Carlo experiments, six fiber layers are separated by polyethylene layers whose thickness has been chosen to maximize neutron spectral information. The completed, self-contained instrument, including electronics and data logging computer has a mass less than 35 kg, slightly more than half of which is polyethylene. Measurements have been performed by this instrument with various sources representing hard and soft neutron spectra. Because this instrument is a technology testbed, the data are recorded as pulse-height spectra. Results and future directions are presented.

  5. The Disc-Jet Connection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ralph E. Pudritz; Robi Banerjee

    2005-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A large body of theoretical and computational work shows that jets - modelled as magnetized disk winds - exert an external torque on their underlying disks that can efficiently remove angular momentum and act as major drivers of disk accretion. These predictions have recently been confirmed in direct HST measurements of the jet rotation and angular momentum transport in low mass protostellar systems. We review the theory of disc winds and show that their physics is universal and scales to jets from both low and high mass star forming regions. This explains the observed properties of outflows in massive star forming regions, before the central massive star generates an ultracompact HII region. We also discuss the recent numerical studies on the formation of massive accretion disks and outflows through gravitational collapse, including our own work on 3D Adaptive Mesh simulations (using the FLASH code) of the hydromagnetic collapse of an initial rotating, and cooling Bonner-Ebert sphere. Magnetized collapse gives rise to outflows. Our own simulations show that both a jet-like disk wind on sub AU scales, and a larger scale molecular outflow occur (Banerjee and Pudritz 2005).

  6. Lake Roosevelt Rainbow Trout Habitat/Passage Improvement Project, Annual Report 2002-2003.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sears, Sheryl

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The construction of Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams completely and irrevocably blocked anadromous fish migrations to the Upper Columbia River. Historically this area hosted vast numbers of salmon returning to their natal waters to reproduce and die. For the native peoples of the region, salmon and steelhead were a principle food source, providing physical nourishment and spiritual sustenance, and contributing to the religious practices and the cultural basis of tribal communities. The decaying remains of spawned-out salmon carcasses contributed untold amounts of nutrients into the aquatic, aerial, and terrestrial ecosystems of tributary habitats in the upper basin. Near the present site of Kettle Falls, Washington, the second largest Indian fishery in the state existed for thousands of years. Returning salmon were caught in nets and baskets or speared on their migration to the headwater of the Columbia River in British Columbia. Catch estimates at Kettle Falls range from 600,000 in 1940 to two (2) million around the turn of the century (UCUT, Report No.2). The loss of anadromous fish limited the opportunities for fisheries management and enhancement exclusively to those actions addressed to resident fish. The Lake Roosevelt Rainbow Trout Habitat/Passage Improvement Project is a mitigation project intended to enhance resident fish populations and to partially mitigate for anadromous fish losses caused by hydropower system impacts. This substitution of resident fish for anadromous fish losses is considered in-place and out-of-kind mitigation. Upstream migration and passage barriers limit the amount of spawning and rearing habitat that might otherwise be utilized by rainbow trout. The results of even limited stream surveys and habitat inventories indicated that a potential for increased natural production exists. However, the lack of any comprehensive enhancement measures prompted the Upper Columbia United Tribes Fisheries Center (UCUT), Colville Confederated Tribes (CCT), Spokane Tribe of Indians (STI) and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) to develop and propose a comprehensive fishery management plan for Lake Roosevelt. The Rainbow Trout Habitat/Passage Improvement Project (LRHIP) was designed with goals directed towards increasing natural production while maintaining genetic integrity among current tributary stocks. The initial phase of the Lake Roosevelt Habitat Improvement Project (Phase I, baseline data collection: 1990-91) was focused on the assessment of limiting factors, including the quality and quantity of available spawning gravel, identification of passage barriers, and assessment of other constraints. After the initial assessment of stream parameters, five streams meeting specific criteria were selected for habitat/passage improvement projects (Phase II, implementation -1992-1995). Four of these projects were on the Colville Indian Reservation South Nanamkin, North Nanamkin, Louie and Iron Creeks and one Blue Creek was on the Spokane Indian Reservation. At the completion of project habitat improvements, the final phase (Phase III, monitoring-1996-2000) began. This phase assessed the changes and determined the success achieved through the improvements. Data analysis showed that passage improvements are successful for increasing habitat availability and use. The results of in-stream habitat improvements were inconclusive. Project streams, to the last monitoring date, have shown increases in fish density following implementation of the improvements. In 2000 Bridge Creek, on the Colville Reservation was selected for the next phase of improvements. Data collection, including baseline stream survey and population data collection, was carried out during 2001 in preparation for the design and implementation of stream habitat/passage improvements. Agencies cooperating on the project include the Colville Confederated Tribes (CCT), Natural Resource Conservation Service (NRCS, Ferry County District), Ferry County Conservation District, and Ferry County. The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) provided

  7. Lake Roosevelt Rainbow Trout Habitat/Passage Improvement Project, Annual Report 2001-2002.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sears, Sheryl

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The construction of Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams completely and irrevocably blocked anadromous fish migrations to the Upper Columbia River. Historically this area hosted vast numbers of salmon returning to their natal waters to reproduce and die. For the native peoples of the region, salmon and steelhead were a principle food source, providing physical nourishment and spiritual sustenance, and contributing to the religious practices and the cultural basis of tribal communities. The decaying remains of spawned-out salmon carcasses contributed untold amounts of nutrients into the aquatic, aerial, and terrestrial ecosystems of tributary habitats in the upper basin. Near the present site of Kettle Falls, Washington, the second largest Indian fishery in the state existed for thousands of years. Returning salmon were caught in nets and baskets or speared on their migration to the headwater of the Columbia River in British Columbia. Catch estimates at Kettle Falls range from 600,000 in 1940 to two (2) million around the turn of the century (UCUT, Report No.2). The loss of anadromous fish limited the opportunities for fisheries management and enhancement exclusively to those actions addressed to resident fish. The Lake Roosevelt Rainbow Trout Habitat/Passage Improvement Project is a mitigation project intended to enhance resident fish populations and to partially mitigate for anadromous fish losses caused by hydropower system impacts. This substitution of resident fish for anadromous fish losses is considered in-place and out-of-kind mitigation. Upstream migration and passage barriers limit the amount of spawning and rearing habitat that might otherwise be utilized by rainbow trout. The results of even limited stream surveys and habitat inventories indicated that a potential for increased natural production exists. However, the lack of any comprehensive enhancement measures prompted the Upper Columbia United Tribes Fisheries Center (UCUT), Colville Confederated Tribes (CCT), Spokane Tribe of Indians (STI) and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) to develop and propose a comprehensive fishery management plan for Lake Roosevelt. The Rainbow Trout Habitat/Passage Improvement Project (LRHIP) was designed with goals directed towards increasing natural production while maintaining genetic integrity among current tributary stocks. The initial phase of the Lake Roosevelt Habitat Improvement Project (Phase I, baseline data collection: 1990-91) was focused on the assessment of limiting factors, including the quality and quantity of available spawning gravel, identification of passage barriers, and assessment of other constraints. After the initial assessment of stream parameters, five streams meeting specific criteria were selected for habitat/passage improvement projects (Phase II, implementation -1992-1995). Four of these projects were on the Colville Indian Reservation South Nanamkin, North Nanamkin, Louie and Iron Creeks and one Blue Creek was on the Spokane Indian Reservation. At the completion of project habitat improvements, the final phase (Phase III, monitoring-1996-2000) began. This phase assessed the changes and determined the success achieved through the improvements. Data analysis showed that passage improvements are successful for increasing habitat availability and use. The results of in-stream habitat improvements were inconclusive. Project streams, to the last monitoring date, have shown increases in fish density following implementation of the improvements. In 2000 Bridge Creek, on the Colville Reservation was selected for the next phase of improvements. Data collection, including baseline stream survey and population data collection, was carried out during 2001 in preparation for the design and implementation of stream habitat/passage improvements. Agencies cooperating on the project include the Colville Confederated Tribes (CCT), Natural Resource Conservation Service (NRCS, Ferry County District), Ferry County Conservation District, and Ferry County. The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) provided

  8. Monitoring and Evaluation of Yearling Fall Chinook Salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) Released from Acclimation Facilities Upstream of Lower Granite Dam; 2002 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rocklage, Stephen J.; Kellar, Dale S. (Nez Perce Tribe, Department of Fisheries Resource Management, ID)

    2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nez Perce Tribe, in cooperation with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, conducted monitoring and evaluation studies on Lyons Ferry Hatchery reared yearling fall Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha that were acclimated and released at three Fall Chinook Acclimation Project sites upstream of Lower Granite Dam in 2002. This was the seventh year of a long-term project to supplement natural spawning populations of Snake River stock fall Chinook salmon upstream of Lower Granite Dam. The 479,358 yearlings released from the Fall Chinook Acclimation Project facilities exceeded the 450,000 fish quota. We use Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) tag technology to monitor the primary performance measures of survival to mainstem dams and migration timing. We also monitor size, condition and tag/mark retention at release. We released 7,545 PIT tagged yearlings from Pittsburg Landing, 7,482 from Big Canyon and 2,487 from Captain John Rapids. Fish health sampling indicated that, overall, bacterial kidney disease levels at the acclimation facilities could be considered medium to high with 43-62% of fish sampled rating medium to very high. Mean fork lengths (95% confidence interval) of the PIT tagged groups ranged from 146.7 mm (146.2-147.2 mm) at Captain John Rapids to 164.8 mm (163.5-166.1 mm) at Lyons Ferry Hatchery. Mean condition factors ranged from 1.06 at Lyons Ferry Hatchery to 1.14 at Pittsburg Landing and Captain John Rapids. Estimated survival (95% confidence interval) of PIT tagged yearlings from release to Lower Granite Dam ranged from 88.6% (86.0-91.1%) for Pittsburg Landing to 97.0% (92.4-101.7%) for Captain John Rapids. Estimated survival from release to McNary Dam ranged from 54.3% (50.2-58.3%) for Big Canyon to 70.5% (65.4-75.5%) for Pittsburg Landing. Median migration rates to Lower Granite Dam, based on all observations of PIT tagged yearlings from the FCAP facilities, ranged from 8.1 river kilometers per day (rkm/d) for Captain John Rapids to 14.1 rkm/d for Pittsburg Landing. Median migration rates to McNary Dam ranged from 10.9 rkm/d for Big Canyon to 15.9 rkm/d for Pittsburg Landing. Median travel times from the FCAP facilities were about 9-12 days to Lower Granite Dam and 25-30 days to McNary Dam. Median arrival dates at Lower Granite Dam, based on all observations of PIT tagged yearling groups from the FCAP facilities, ranged from April 20-28. Median arrival dates at McNary Dam for the FCAP groups were all May 11. The objectives of this project are to quantify and evaluate pre-release fish health, condition and mark retention as well as post-release survival, migration timing, migration rates, travel times and movement patterns of fall Chinook salmon from supplementation releases at the FCAP facilities, then provide feedback to co-managers for project specific and basin wide management decision-making.

  9. Novel alkaline earth copper germanates with ferro and antiferromagnetic S=1/2 chains

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brandao, Paula [University of Aveiro, Portugal; Reis, Mario S [Universidade Federal Fluminense, Brasil; Gai, Zheng [ORNL; Moreira Dos Santos, Antonio F [ORNL

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two new alkaline earth copper(II) germanates were hydrothermally synthesized: CaCuGeO4 center dot H2O (1) and BaCu2Ge3O9 center dot H2O (2), and their structures determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction. Compound (1) crystallizes in space group P2(1)/c with a=5.1320(2) angstrom, b=16.1637(5) angstrom, c=5.4818(2) angstrom, beta=102.609(2)degrees, V=443.76(3) angstrom(3) and Z=4. This copper germanate contains layers of composition [CuGeO4](infinity)(2-) comprising CuO4 square planes and GeO4 tetrahedra with calcium and water molecules in the inter-layer space. Compound (2) crystallizes in the Cmcm space group with a=5.5593(3) angstrom, b=10.8606(9) angstrom, c=13.5409(8) angstrom, V=817.56(9) angstrom(3) and Z=4. This structure contains GeO6 and CuO6 octahedra as well as GeO4 tetrahedra, forming a three-dimensional network of interconnecting six-membered ring channels. The magnetic susceptibility for both samples can be interpreted as S=1/2 chains, in agreement with the copper topology observed in the crystal structure. The susceptibility of (1) exhibits a Bonner-Fisher type behavior, resulting from antiferromagnetic intra-chain interactions without three-dimensional ordering down to 5 K-the lowest measured temperature. This observation, together with the absence of super-exchange paths between the copper chains, make this system particularly promising for the study of low dimensional magnetism. The magnetic properties of (2) show a very weak ferromagnetic near-neighbor interaction along the chain. In this compound a peak the chi T plot seems to indicate the onset of interchain antiferromagentic correlations. However, no ordering temperature is detected in the susceptibility data.

  10. Fall Chinook Acclimation Project; Pittsburg Landing, Captain John Rapids, and Big Canyon, Annual Report 2003.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McLeod, Bruce

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fisheries co-managers of U.S. v Oregon supported and directed the construction and operation of acclimation and release facilities for Snake River fall Chinook from Lyons Ferry Hatchery at three sites above Lower Granite Dam. In 1996, Congress instructed the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USCOE) to construct, under the Lower Snake River Compensation Plan (LSRCP), final rearing and acclimation facilities for fall Chinook in the Snake River basin to complement their activities and efforts in compensating for fish lost due to construction of the lower Snake River dams. The Nez Perce Tribe (NPT) played a key role in securing funding and selecting acclimation sites, then assumed responsibility for operation and maintenance of the facilities. In 1997, Bonneville Power Administrative (BPA) was directed to fund operations and maintenance (O&M) for the facilities. Two acclimation facilities, Captain John Rapids and Pittsburg Landing, were located on the Snake River between Asotin, WA and Hells Canyon Dam and one facility, Big Canyon, was located on the Clearwater River at Peck. The Capt. John Rapids facility is a single pond while the Pittsburg Landing and Big Canyon sites consist of portable fish rearing tanks assembled and disassembled each year. Acclimation of 450,000 yearling smolts (150,000 each facility) begins in March and ends 6 weeks later. When available, an additional 2,400,000 fall Chinook sub-yearlings may be acclimated for 6 weeks, following the smolt release. The project goal is to increase the naturally spawning population of Snake River fall Chinook salmon upstream of Lower Granite Dam. This is a supplementation project; in that hatchery produced fish are acclimated and released into the natural spawning habitat for the purpose of returning a greater number of spawners to increase natural production. Only Snake River stock is used and production of juveniles occurs at Lyons Ferry Hatchery. This is a long-term project, targeted to work towards achieving delisting goals established by National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS or NOAA Fisheries) and ultimately to provide fall Chinook adults through the Lower Snake River Compensation Plan program as mitigation for construction and operation of the four lower Snake River dams. Complete adult returns (all age classes) for all three acclimation facilities occurred in the year 2002. Progeny (which would then be natural origin fish) would be counted towards achieving Endangered Species Act delisting criteria. In 2003, a total of 2,138,391 fish weighing 66,201 pounds were released from the three acclimation facilities. The total includes 437,633 yearling fish weighing 44,330 pounds and 1,700,758 sub-yearling fish weighing 21,871 pounds.

  11. BNL ALARA Center: ALARA Notes, No. 9

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khan, T.A.; Xie, J.W.; Beckman, M.C. [eds.] [and others

    1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This issue of the Brookhaven National Laboratory`s Alara Notes includes the agenda for the Third International Workshop on ALARA and specific instructions on the use of the on-line fax-on-demand service provided by BNL. Other topics included in this issue are: (1) A discussion of low-level discharges from Canadian nuclear plants, (2) Safety issues at French nuclear plants, (3) Acoustic emission as a means of leak detection, (4) Replacement of steam generators at Doel-3, Beaznau, and North Anna-1, (5) Remote handling equipment at Bruce, (6) EPRI`s low level waste program, (7) Radiation protection during concrete repairs at Savannah River, (8) Reactor vessel stud removal/repair at Comanche Peak-1, (9) Rework of reactor coolant pump motors, (10) Restoration of service water at North Anna-1 and -2, (11) Steam generator tubing problems at Mihama-1, (12) Full system decontamination at Indian Point-2, (13) Chemical decontamination at Browns Ferry-2, and (14) Inspection methodolody in France and Japan.

  12. Biomass power for rural development. Technical progress report, April 1, 1997--June 30, 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neuhauser, E.

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Detailed task progress reports and schedules are provided for the DOE/USDA sponsored Biomass Power for Rural Development project. The focus of the project is on developing commercial energy crops for power generation by the year 2000. The New York based Salix Consortium project is a multi-partner endeavor, implemented in three stages. Phase-I, Final Design and Project Development, will conclude with the preparation of construction and/or operating permits, feedstock production plans, and contracts ready for signature. Field trials of willow (Salix) have been initiated at several locations in New York (Tully, Lockport, King Ferry, La Fayette, Massena, and Himrod) and co-firing tests are underway at Greenidge Station (NYSEG) and Dunkirk Station (NMPC). Phase-H of the project will focus on scale-up of willow crop acreage, construction of co-firing facilities at Dunkirk Station (NMPC), and final modifications for Greenidge Station. Cofiring willow is also under consideration for GPU`s Seward Station where testing is under way. There will be an evaluation of the energy crop as part of the gasification trials occurring at BED`s McNeill power station. Phase-III will represent fullscale commercialization of the energy crop and power generation on a sustainable basis.

  13. The Roles of Outer Membrane Cytochromes of Shewanella and Geobacter in Extracellular Electron Transfer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shi, Liang; Richardson, David; Wang, Zheming; Kerisit, Sebastien N.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Zachara, John M.; Fredrickson, Jim K.

    2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As key components of the electron transfer (ET) pathways used for dissimilatory reduction of solid iron [Fe(III)] and manganese [Mn(IV)] (hydr)oxides, outer membrane cytochromes MtrC and OmcA of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 and OmcE and OmcS of Geobacter sulfurreducens mediate ET reactions extracellularly. Cell surface-exposed MtrC and OmcA can transfer electrons directly to the metal oxides. S. oneidensis MR-1 cells also secrete flavins that can facilitate ET to the oxides. The secreted flavins are thought to serve either as chelators that form soluble Fe(III)/Mn(IV)-flavin complexes or as electron shuttles that ferry the electrons from cell-associated ET proteins to the metal oxides. Cell-surface localization may also permit MtrC and OmcA to transfer electrons extracellularly to either flavin-chelated Fe(III)/Mn(IV) or oxidized flavins. OmcE and OmcS are proposed to be located on the Geobacter cell surface where they are believed to function as the intermediates to relay electrons to type IV pili, which are then hypothesized to transfer electrons directly to the metal oxides. Thus, cell surface-localization positions these outer membrane cytochromes to transfer electrons to Fe(III)/Mn(IV) oxides external to the bacterial cells either directly, indirectly, or both, demonstrating a common strategy shared by Shewanella and Geobacter for extracellular reduction of the oxides.

  14. Exchange bias in Core-Shell Iron-Iron Oxide Nanoclusters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaur, Maninder; McCloy, John S.; Qiang, You

    2013-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

    An exchange bias study has been performed on core-shell iron-iron oxide (Fe-Fe3O4) nanoclusters (NCs) of size 11 nm and 14 nm carrying a different core to shell ratio. NCs show complicated behaviors due to competition between interfacial exchange and Zeeman energy in the presence of magnetic field during cooling. These behaviors are accompanied by the evolution of size- dependent cluster structures in the ferromagnetic-core/ferri- or antiferro-magnetic-shell. Smaller clusters have larger coercive field, exchange bias field, and vertical magnetization shift due to the greater contribution from frozen spins of shell/interfaces. These smaller clusters thus also show more dramatic changes with the training effect. Both sizes of clusters display an additional anomaly of the upper part of the hysteresis loop at 10 K under low cooling field (0.1 kOe). This anomaly decreases with number of loop cycles with same field, and disappear with large cooling field (> 0.1 kOe). It may be caused by the competition between the magnetization reversal and the magnetostatic interactions.

  15. Operation of the Lower Granite Dam Adult Trap, 2008.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harmon, Jerrel R.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During 2008 we operated the adult salmonid trap at Lower Granite Dam from 7 March through 25 November, except during a short summer period when water temperatures were too high to safely handle fish. We collected and handled a total of 20,463 steelhead Oncorhynchus mykiss and radio-tagged 34 of the hatchery steelhead. We took scale samples from 3,724 spring/summer Chinook salmon O. tshawytscha for age and genetic analysis. We collected and handled a total of 8,254 fall Chinook salmon. Of those fish, 2,520 adults and 942 jacks were transported to Lyons Ferry Hatchery on the Snake River in Washington. In addition, 961 adults and 107 jacks were transported to the Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery on the Clearwater River in Idaho. The remaining 3,724 fall Chinook salmon were passed upstream. Scales samples were taken from 780 fall Chinook salmon tagged with passive integrated transponder (PIT) tags and collected by the sort-by-code system.

  16. Monitoring and Evaluation of Yearling Fall Chinook Salmon Released from Acclimation Facilities Upstream of Lower Granite Dam; 1998 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rocklage, Stephen J. (Nez Perce Tribe, Department of Fisheries Resource Management, Lapwai, ID)

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nez Perce Tribe, in cooperation with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, conducted monitoring and evaluation studies on Lyons Ferry Hatchery (Snake River stock) yearling fall chinook salmon that were acclimated and released at three Fall Chinook Acclimation Project sites upstream of Lower Granite Dam along with yearlings released on-station from Lyons Ferry Hatchery in 1998. The three fall chinook acclimation facilities are operated by the Nez Perce Tribe and located at Pittsburg Landing and Captain John Rapids on the Snake River and at Big Canyon Creek on the Clearwater River. Yearlings at the Big Canyon facility consisted of two size classes that are referred to in this report as 9.5 fish per pound (fpp) and 30 fpp. The Big Canyon 9.5 fpp were comparable to the yearlings at Pittsburg Landing, Captain John Rapids and Lyons Ferry Hatchery. A total of 9,942 yearlings were PIT tagged and released at Pittsburg Landing. PIT tagged yearlings had a mean fork length of 159.9 mm and mean condition factor of 1.19. Of the 9,942 PIT tagged fish released, a total of 6,836 unique tags were detected at mainstem Snake and Columbia River dams (Lower Granite, Little Goose, Lower Monumental and McNary). A total of 4,926 9.5 fpp and 2,532 30 fpp yearlings were PIT tagged and released at Big Canyon. PIT tagged 9.5 fpp yearlings had a mean fork length of 156.9 mm and mean condition factor of 1.13. PIT tagged 30 fpp yearlings had a mean fork length of 113.1 mm and mean condition factor of 1.18. Of the 4,926 PIT tagged 9.5 fpp yearlings released, a total of 3,042 unique tags were detected at mainstem Snake and Columbia River dams. Of the 2,532 PIT tagged 30 fpp yearlings released, a total of 1,130 unique tags were detected at mainstem Snake and Columbia River dams. A total of 1,253 yearlings were PIT tagged and released at Captain John Rapids. PIT tagged yearlings had a mean fork length of 147.5 mm and mean condition factor of 1.09. Of the 1,253 PIT tagged fish released, a total of 719 unique tags were detected at mainstem Snake and Columbia River dams. A total of 2,420 yearlings were PIT tagged and released at Lyons Ferry Hatchery. PIT tagged yearlings had a mean fork length of 159.0 mm and mean condition factor of 1.10. Of the 2,420 PIT tagged fish released, a total of 979 unique tags were detected at mainstem Snake and Columbia River dams (Lower Monumental and McNary). Median travel times, based on all detections, of PIT tagged fish released from Pittsburg Landing were 10.5 days to Lower Granite Dam, 21.7 days to McNary Dam and 29.8 days to Bonneville Dam. Median migration rates were 16.4 rkm/d to Lower Granite Dam, 18.3 rkm/d to McNary Dam and 18.9 rkm/d to Bonneville Dam. The median arrival dates were April 25 at Lower Granite Dam, May 6 at McNary Dam and May 14 at Bonneville Dam. The 90% passage dates were May 5 at Lower Granite Dam, May 20 at McNary Dam and May 25 at Bonneville Dam. Median travel times, based on all detections, of PIT tagged 9.5 fpp yearlings released from Big Canyon were 13.3 days to Lower Granite Dam, 26.0 days to McNary Dam and 30.8 days to Bonneville Dam. Median migration rates were 13.0 rkm/d to Lower Granite Dam, 15.3 rkm/d to McNary Dam and 18.3 rkm/d to Bonneville Dam. The median arrival dates were April 27 at Lower Granite Dam, May 11 at McNary Dam and May 15 at Bonneville Dam. The 90% passage dates were May 9 at Lower Granite Dam, May 24 at McNary Dam and May 25 at Bonneville Dam. Median travel times, based on all detections, of PIT tagged 30 fpp yearlings released from Big Canyon were 20.8 days to Lower Granite Dam, 37.6 days to McNary Dam and 43.5 days to Bonneville Dam. Median migration rates were 8.3 rkm/d to Lower Granite Dam, 10.6 rkm/d to McNary Dam and 12.9 rkm/d to Bonneville Dam. The median arrival dates were May 5 at Lower Granite Dam, May 23 at McNary Dam and May 28 at Bonneville Dam. The 90% passage dates were May 22 at Lower Granite Dam, May 31 at McNary Dam and June 5 at Bonneville Dam. Median arrival dates, based on all detections, of PIT tagge

  17. Trace Assessment for BWR ATWS Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheng, L.Y.; Diamond, D.; Arantxa Cuadra, Gilad Raitses, Arnold Aronson

    2010-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A TRACE/PARCS input model has been developed in order to be able to analyze anticipated transients without scram (ATWS) in a boiling water reactor. The model is based on one developed previously for the Browns Ferry reactor for doing loss-of-coolant accident analysis. This model was updated by adding the control systems needed for ATWS and a core model using PARCS. The control systems were based on models previously developed for the TRAC-B code. The PARCS model is based on information (e.g., exposure and moderator density (void) history distributions) obtained from General Electric Hitachi and cross sections for GE14 fuel obtained from an independent source. The model is able to calculate an ATWS, initiated by the closure of main steam isolation valves, with recirculation pump trip, water level control, injection of borated water from the standby liquid control system and actuation of the automatic depres-surization system. The model is not considered complete and recommendations are made on how it should be improved.

  18. SCDAP/RELAP5/MOD 3.1 Code Manual: Developmental assessment. Volume 5

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hohorst, J.K.; Johnsen, E.C. [eds.; Allison, C.M. [Lockheed Idaho Technologies Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The SCDAP/RELAP5 code has been developed for best estimate transient simulation of Light Water Reactor coolant systems during a severe accident. The code models the coupled behavior of the reactor coolant system, the core, fission product released during a severe accident transient as well as large and small break loss of coolant accidents, operational transients such as anticipated transient without SCRAM, loss of offsite power, loss of feedwater, and loss of flow. A generic modeling approach is used that permits as much of a particular system to be modeled as necessary. Control system and secondary system components are included to permit modeling of plant controls, turbines, condensers, and secondary feedwater conditioning systems. This volume contains detailed code-to-data calculations performed using SCDAP/RELAP5/MOD3.1, as well as comparison calculations performed with earlier code versions. Results of full plant calculations which include Surry, TMI-2, and Browns Ferry are described. Results of a nodalization study, which accounted for both axial and radial nodalization of the core, are also reported.

  19. LNG -- A paradox of propulsion potential

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKay, D.J.

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Liquefied natural gas (LNG) has been demonstrating its viability as a clean-burning alternative fuel for buses and medium- and heavy-duty trucks for the past 30 years. The first known LNG vehicle project began in San Diego in 1965, When San Diego Gas and Electric converted 22 utility trucks and three passenger vehicles to dedicated LNG. A surge in LNG vehicle project activity over the past five years has led to a fairly robust variety of vehicles testing the fuel, from Class 8 tractors, refuse haulers and transit buses to railroad locomotives and ferry boats. Recent technology improvements in engine design, cryogenic tanks, fuel nozzles and other related equipment have made LNG more practical to use than in the 1960s. LNG delivers more than twice the driving range from the same-sized fuel tank as a vehicle powered by compressed natural gas (CNG). Although technical and economic hurdles must be overcome before this fuel can achieve widespread use, various ongoing demonstration projects are showing LNG`s practicality, while serving the vital role of pinpointing those areas of performance that are the prime candidates for improvement.

  20. A comparison of propulsion systems for potential space mission applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harvego, E.A.; Sulmeisters, T.K.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A derivative of the NERVA nuclear rocket engine was compared with a chemical propulsion system and a nuclear electric propulsion system to assess the relative capabilities of the different propulsion system options for three potential space missions. The missions considered were (1) orbital transfer from low earth orbit (LEO) to geosynchronous earth orbit (GEO), (2) LEO to a lunar base, and (3) LEO to Mars. The results of this comparison indicate that the direct-thrust NERVA-derivative nuclear rocket engine has the best performance characteristics for the missions considered. The combined high thrust and high specific impulse achievable with a direct-thrust nuclear stage permits short operating times (transfer times) comparable to chemical propulsion systems, but with considerably less required propellant. While nuclear-electric propulsion systems are more fuel efficient than either direct-nuclear or chemical propulsion, they are not stand-alone systems, since their relatively low thrust levels require the use of high-thrust ferry or lander stages in high gravity applications such as surface-to-orbit propulsion. The extremely long transfer times and inefficient trajectories associated with electric propulsion systems were also found to be a significant drawback.

  1. The changing face of Hanford security 1990--1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thielman, J.

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The meltdown of the Cold War was a shock to the systems built to cope with it. At the DOE`s Hanford Site in Washington State, a world-class safeguards and security system was suddenly out of step with the times. The level of protection for nuclear and classified materials was exceptional. But the cost was high and the defense facilities that funded security were closing down. The defense mission had created an umbrella of security over the sprawling Hanford Site. Helicopters designed to ferry special response teams to any trouble spot on the 1,456 square-kilometer site made the umbrella analogy almost literally true. Facilities were grouped into areas, fenced off like a military base, and entrance required a badge check for everyone. Within the fence, additional rings of protection were set up around security interests or targets. The security was effective, but costly to operate and inconvenient for employees and visitors alike. Moreover, the umbrella meant that virtually all employees needed a security clearance just to get to work, whether they worked on classified or unclassified projects. Clearly, some fundamental rethinking of safeguards and security was needed. The effort to meet that challenge is the story of transition at Hanford and documented here.

  2. Evaluating the performance of two neutron spectrum unfolding codes based on iterative procedures and artificial neural networks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ortiz-Rodriguez, J. M.; Reyes Alfaro, A.; Reyes Haro, A.; Solis Sanches, L. O.; Miranda, R. Castaneda; Cervantes Viramontes, J. M. [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Unidad Academica de Ingenieria Electrica. Av. Ramon Lopez Velarde 801. Col. Centro Zacatecas, Zac (Mexico); Vega-Carrillo, H. R. [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Unidad Academica de Ingenieria Electrica. Av. Ramon Lopez Velarde 801. Col. Centro Zacatecas, Zac., Mexico. and Unidad Academica de Estudios Nucleares. C. Cip (Mexico)

    2013-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work the performance of two neutron spectrum unfolding codes based on iterative procedures and artificial neural networks is evaluated. The first one code based on traditional iterative procedures and called Neutron spectrometry and dosimetry from the Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas (NSDUAZ) use the SPUNIT iterative algorithm and was designed to unfold neutron spectrum and calculate 15 dosimetric quantities and 7 IAEA survey meters. The main feature of this code is the automated selection of the initial guess spectrum trough a compendium of neutron spectrum compiled by the IAEA. The second one code known as Neutron spectrometry and dosimetry with artificial neural networks (NDSann) is a code designed using neural nets technology. The artificial intelligence approach of neural net does not solve mathematical equations. By using the knowledge stored at synaptic weights on a neural net properly trained, the code is capable to unfold neutron spectrum and to simultaneously calculate 15 dosimetric quantities, needing as entrance data, only the rate counts measured with a Bonner spheres system. Similarities of both NSDUAZ and NSDann codes are: they follow the same easy and intuitive user's philosophy and were designed in a graphical interface under the LabVIEW programming environment. Both codes unfold the neutron spectrum expressed in 60 energy bins, calculate 15 dosimetric quantities and generate a full report in HTML format. Differences of these codes are: NSDUAZ code was designed using classical iterative approaches and needs an initial guess spectrum in order to initiate the iterative procedure. In NSDUAZ, a programming routine was designed to calculate 7 IAEA instrument survey meters using the fluence-dose conversion coefficients. NSDann code use artificial neural networks for solving the ill-conditioned equation system of neutron spectrometry problem through synaptic weights of a properly trained neural network. Contrary to iterative procedures, in neural net approach it is possible to reduce the rate counts used to unfold the neutron spectrum. To evaluate these codes a computer tool called Neutron Spectrometry and dosimetry computer tool was designed. The results obtained with this package are showed. The codes here mentioned are freely available upon request to the authors.

  3. Fall Chinook Acclimation Project; Pittsburg Landing, Captain John Rapids, and Big Canyon, Annual Report 2002.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McLeod, Bruce

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fisheries co-managers of U.S. v Oregon supported and directed the construction and operation of acclimation and release facilities for Snake River fall Chinook from Lyons Ferry Hatchery at three sites above Lower Granite Dam. In 1996, Congress instructed the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USCOE) to construct, under the Lower Snake River Compensation Plan (LSRCP), final rearing and acclimation facilities for fall Chinook in the Snake River basin to complement their activities and efforts in compensating for fish lost due to construction of the lower Snake River dams. The Nez Perce Tribe (NPT) played a key role in securing funding and selecting acclimation sites, then assumed responsibility for operation and maintenance of the facilities. In 1997, Bonneville Power Administrative (BPA) was directed to fund operations and maintenance (O&M) for the facilities. Two acclimation facilities, Captain John Rapids and Pittsburg Landing, are located on the Snake River between Asotin, WA and Hells Canyon Dam and one facility, Big Canyon, is located on the Clearwater River at Peck. The Capt. John Rapids facility is a single pond while the Pittsburg Landing and Big Canyon sites consist of portable fish rearing tanks assembled and disassembled each year. Acclimation of 450,000 yearling smolts (150,000 each facility) begins in March and ends 6 weeks later. When available, an additional 2,400,000 fall Chinook sub-yearlings may be acclimated for 6 weeks, following the smolt release. The project goal is to increase the naturally spawning population of Snake River fall Chinook salmon upstream of Lower Granite Dam. This is a supplementation project; in that hatchery produced fish are acclimated and released into the natural spawning habitat for the purpose of returning a greater number of spawners to increase natural production. Only Snake River stock is used and production of juveniles occurs at Lyons Ferry Hatchery. This is a long-term project, targeted to work towards achieving delisting goals established by National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS or NOAA Fisheries) and ultimately to provide fall Chinook adults through the Lower Snake River Compensation Plan program as mitigation for construction and operation of the four lower Snake River dams. Complete adult returns (all age classes) for all three acclimation facilities occurred in the year 2002. Progeny (which would then be natural origin fish) would be counted towards achieving Endangered Species Act delisting criteria. In 2002, a total of 2,877,437 fish weighing 47,347 pounds were released from the three acclimation facilities. The total includes 479,358 yearling fish weighing 33,930 pounds and 2,398,079 sub-yearling fish weighing 19,115 pounds. This is the largest number of fish ever released in one year from the acclimation facilities.

  4. Monitoring and Evaluation of Yearling Fall Chinook Salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) Released from Acclimation Facilities Upstream of Lower Granite Dam; 2003 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rocklage, Stephen J. (Nez Perce Tribe, Department of Fisheries Resource Management, Lapwai, ID)

    2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nez Perce Tribe, in cooperation with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, conducted monitoring and evaluation studies on Lyons Ferry Hatchery reared yearling fall Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha that were acclimated and released at three Fall Chinook Acclimation Project (FCAP) sites upstream of Lower Granite Dam in 2003. This was the eighth year of a long-term project to supplement natural spawning populations of Snake River stock fall Chinook salmon upstream of Lower Granite Dam. The 437,633 yearlings released from the Fall Chinook Acclimation Project facilities were short of the 450,000 fish quota. We use Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) tag technology to monitor the primary performance measures of survival to mainstem dams and migration timing. We also monitor size, condition and tag/mark retention at release. We released 7,492 PIT tagged yearlings from Pittsburg Landing, 7,494 from Big Canyon and 2,497 from Captain John Rapids. Fish health sampling indicated that, overall, bacterial kidney disease levels at the acclimation facilities could be considered medium with 37-83% of the fish sampled rating medium to very high. Mean fork lengths (95% confidence interval) of the PIT tagged groups ranged from 153.7 mm (153.2-154.2 mm) at Captain John Rapids to 164.2 mm (163.9-164.5 mm) at Pittsburg Landing. Mean condition factors ranged from 1.06 at Lyons Ferry Hatchery to 1.22 at Captain John Rapids. Estimated survival (95% confidence interval) of PIT tagged yearlings from release to Lower Granite Dam ranged from 83.1% (80.7-85.5%) for Big Canyon to 91.7% (87.7-95.7%) for Captain John Rapids. Estimated survival from release to McNary Dam ranged from 59.9% (54.6-65.2%) for Big Canyon to 69.4% (60.5-78.4%) for Captain John Rapids. Median migration rates to Lower Granite Dam, based on all observations of PIT tagged yearlings from the FCAP facilities, ranged from 5.8 river kilometers per day (rkm/d) for Captain John Rapids to 16.2 rkm/d for Pittsburg Landing. Median migration rates to McNary Dam ranged from 11.7 rkm/d for Captain John Rapids to 17.6 rkm/d for Pittsburg Landing. Median travel times from the FCAP facilities were about 8-15 days to Lower Granite Dam and 22-27 days to McNary Dam. Median arrival dates at Lower Granite Dam, based on all observations of PIT tagged yearling groups from the FCAP facilities, ranged from April 23-25. Median arrival dates at McNary Dam for Pittsburg Landing, Big Canyon and Captain John Rapids groups ranged from May 4-10.

  5. Monitoring and Evaluation of Yearling Fall Chinook Salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) Released from Acclimation Facilities Upstream of Lower Granite Dam; 2004 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rocklage, Stephen J. Nez Perce Tribe, Department of Fisheries Resource Management, Lapawi, ID)

    2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nez Perce Tribe, in cooperation with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, conducted monitoring and evaluation studies on Lyons Ferry Hatchery reared yearling fall Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha that were acclimated and released at three Fall Chinook Acclimation Project (FCAP) sites upstream of Lower Granite Dam in 2004. This was the ninth year of a long-term project to supplement natural spawning populations of Snake River stock fall Chinook salmon upstream of Lower Granite Dam. The 414,452 yearlings released from the Fall Chinook Acclimation Project facilities were short of the 450,000 fish quota. We use Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) tag technology to monitor the primary performance measures of survival to mainstem dams and migration timing. We also monitor size, condition and tag/mark retention at release. We released 4,983 PIT tagged yearlings from Pittsburg Landing, 4,984 from Big Canyon and 4,982 from Captain John Rapids. Fish health sampling indicated that, overall, bacterial kidney disease levels could be considered low with 53-94% rating not detected to low. Mean fork lengths (95% confidence interval) of the PIT tagged groups ranged from 154.6 mm (154.0-155.2 mm) at Pittsburg Landing to 163.0 mm (162.6-163.4 mm) at Captain John Rapids. Mean condition factors ranged from 1.06 at Lyons Ferry Hatchery to 1.16 at Big Canyon. Estimated survival (95% confidence interval) of PIT tagged yearlings from release to Lower Granite Dam ranged from 74.7% (72.9-76.5%) for Big Canyon to 88.1% (85.7-90.6%) for Captain John Rapids. Estimated survival from release to McNary Dam ranged from 45.3% (39.2-51.5%) for Pittsburg Landing to 52.1% (42.9-61.2%) for Big Canyon. Median migration rates to Lower Granite Dam, based on all observations of PIT tagged yearlings from the FCAP facilities, ranged from 5.5 river kilometers per day (rkm/d) for Captain John Rapids to 12.8 rkm/d for Pittsburg Landing. Median migration rates to McNary Dam ranged from 10.9 rkm/d for Captain John Rapids to 17.6 rkm/d for Pittsburg Landing. Median travel times from the FCAP facilities were about 13-16 days to Lower Granite Dam and 23-29 days to McNary Dam. Median arrival dates at Lower Granite Dam, based on all observations of PIT tagged yearling groups from Pittsburg Landing, Big Canyon and Captain John Rapids, ranged from April 18-29. Median arrival dates at McNary Dam for Pittsburg Landing, Big Canyon and Captain John Rapids groups ranged from May 1-8.

  6. Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report : Hellsgate Project, 1999-2000 Technical Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berger, Matthew

    2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) study was conducted on lands acquired and/or managed (4,568 acres total) by the Hellsgate Big Game Winter Range Wildlife Mitigation Project (Hellsgate project) to mitigate some of the losses associated with the original construction and operation of Grand Coulee Dam and inundation of habitats behind the dams. Three separate properties, totaling 2,224 acres were purchased in 1998. One property composed of two separate parcels, mostly grassland lies southeast of the town of Nespelem in Okanogan County (770 acres) and was formerly called the Hinman property. The former Hinman property lies within an area the Tribes have set aside for the protection and preservation of the sharp-tailed grouse (Agency Butte unit). This special management area minus the Hinman acquisition contains 2,388 acres in a long-term lease with the Tribes. The second property lies just south of the Silver Creek turnoff (Ferry County) and is bisected by the Hellsgate Road (part of the Friedlander unit). This parcel contains 60 acres of riparian and conifer forest cover. The third property (now named the Sand Hills unit) acquired for mitigation (1,394 acres) lies within the Hellsgate Reserve in Ferry County. This new acquisition links two existing mitigation parcels (the old Sand Hills parcels and the Lundstrum Flat parcel, all former Kuehne purchases) together forming one large unit. HEP team members included individuals from the Colville Confederated Tribes Fish and Wildlife Department (CTCR), Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), and Bureau of Land Management (BLM). The HEP team conducted a baseline habitat survey using the following HEP species models: mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus), mink (Mustela vison), downy woodpecker (Picoides pubescens), bobcat (Lynx rufus), yellow warbler (Dendroica petechia), and sharp-tailed grouse (Tympanuchus phasianellus columbianus). HEP analysis and results are discussed within the body of the text. The cover types evaluated for this study were grasslands, shrub-steppe, rock, conifer forest and woodland, and riparian. These same cover types were evaluated for other Hellsgate Project acquisitions within the same geographic area. Mule deer habitat on the Sand Hills unit rated good overall for winter food and cover in the shrub-steppe and conifer woodland cover types. Sharp-tailed grouse habitat on the former Hinman property and special management area rated good for nesting and brood rearing in the grassland cover type. Mink habitat on the Friedlander parcel rated poor due to lack of food and cover in and along the riparian cover type. The Downy woodpecker rated poor for food and cover on the Friedlander parcel in the conifer forest cover type. This species also rated poor on the conifer woodland habitat on the Hinman parcel. Yellow warbler habitat on the Agency Butte Special Management area rated very poor due to lack of shrubs for cover and reproduction around the scattered semi/permanent ponds that occur on the area. Bobcat habitat on this same area rated poor due to lack of cover and food. Fragmentation of existing quality habitat is also a problem for both these species. This report is an analysis of baseline habitat conditions on mitigation and managed lands, and provides estimated habitat units for mitigation crediting purposes. In addition, this information will be used to manage these lands for the benefit of wildlife.

  7. Post-Release Performance of Natural and Hatchery Subyearling Fall Chinook Salmon in the Snake and Clearwater Rivers.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Connor, William P.

    2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2006, we continued a multi-year study to compare smolt-to-adult return rate (SAR) ratios between two groups of Snake River Basin fall Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha that reached the sea through a combination of either (1) transportation and inriver migration or (2) bypass and inriver migration. We captured natural subyearlings rearing along the Snake and Clearwater rivers and implanted them with passive integrated transponder (PIT) tags, but knew in advance that sample sizes of natural fish would not be large enough for precise comparisons of SAR ratios. To increase sample sizes, we also cultured Lyons Ferry Hatchery subyearlings under a surrogate rearing strategy, implanted them with PIT tags, and released them into the Snake and Clearwater rivers to migrate seaward. The surrogate rearing strategy involved slowing growth at Dworshak National Fish Hatchery to match natural subyearlings in size at release as closely as possible, while insuring that all of the surrogate subyearlings were large enough for tagging (i.e., 60-mm fork length). Surrogate subyearlings were released from late May to early July 2006 to coincide with the historical period of peak beach seine catch of natural parr in the Snake and Clearwater rivers. We also PIT tagged a large representative sample of hatchery subyearlings reared under a production rearing strategy and released them into the Snake and Clearwater rivers in 2006 as part of new research on dam passage experiences (i.e., transported from a dam, dam passage via bypass, dam passage via turbine intakes or spillways). The production rearing strategy involved accelerating growth at Lyons Ferry Hatchery, sometimes followed by a few weeks of acclimation at sites along the Snake and Clearwater rivers before release from May to June. Releasing production subyearlings has been suggested as a possible alternative for making inferences on the natural population if surrogate fish were not available. Smoltto-adult return rates are not reported here, but will be presented in future reports written after workshops and input by federal, state, and tribal researchers. In this report, we compared the postrelease performance of natural subyearlings to the postrelease performance of surrogate and production subyearlings. We made this comparison to help the fisheries community determine which of the two hatchery rearing strategies produced fish that were more similar to natural subyearlings. We compared the following attributes of postrelease performance (1) detection dates at dams, (2) detections during the implementation of summer spill, (3) travel times, (4) migrant sizes, and (5) the joint probability of migration and survival. Overall, we found that postrelease performance was more similar between natural and surrogate subyearlings than between natural and production subyearlings. Further, the similarity between natural and surrogate subyearlings was greater in 2006 than in 2005, partly as the result of changes in incubation and early rearing practices we recommended based on 2005 results.

  8. Biomass power for rural development. Technical progress report, May 1, 1996--December 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neuhauser, E.

    1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Developing commercial energy crops for power generation by the year 2000 is the focus of the DOE/USDA sponsored Biomass Power for Rural Development project. The New York based Salix Consortium project is a multi-partner endeavor, implemented in three stages. Phase-I, Final Design and Project Development, will conclude with the preparation of construction and/or operating permits, feedstock production plans, and contracts ready for signature. Field trials of willow (Salix) have been initiated at several locations in New York (Tully, Lockport, King Ferry, La Facette, Massena, and Himrod) and co-firing tests are underway at Greenidge Station (NYSEG). Phase-II of the project will focus on scale-up of willow crop acreage, construction of co-firing facilities at Dunkirk Station (NMPC), and final modifications for Greenidge Station. There will be testing of the energy crop as part of the gasification trials expected to occur at BED`s McNeill power station and potentially at one of GPU`s facilities. Phase-III will represent full-scale commercialization of the energy crop and power generation on a sustainable basis. Willow has been selected as the energy crop of choice for many reasons. Willow is well suited to the climate of the Northeastern United States, and initial field trials have demonstrated that the yields required for the success of the project are obtainable. Like other energy crops, willow has rural development benefits and could serve to diversify local crop production, provide new sources of income for participating growers, and create new jobs. Willow could be used to put a large base of idle acreage back into crop production. Additionally, the willow coppicing system integrates well with current farm operations and utilizes agricultural practices that are already familiar to farmers.

  9. Quantum effects and anharmonicity in the H{sub 2}-Li{sup +}-benzene complex: A model for hydrogen storage materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kolmann, Stephen J.; D'Arcy, Jordan H.; Jordan, Meredith J. T., E-mail: m.jordan@chem.usyd.edu.au [School of Chemistry, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia)] [School of Chemistry, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia)

    2013-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantum and anharmonic effects are investigated in H{sub 2}-Li{sup +}-benzene, a model for hydrogen adsorption in metal-organic frameworks and carbon-based materials. Three- and 8-dimensional quantum diffusion Monte Carlo (QDMC) and rigid-body diffusion Monte Carlo (RBDMC) simulations are performed on potential energy surfaces interpolated from electronic structure calculations at the M05-2X/6-31+G(d,p) and M05-2X/6-311+G(2df,p) levels of theory using a three-dimensional spline or a modified Shepard interpolation. These calculations investigate the intermolecular interactions in this system, with three- and 8-dimensional 0 K H{sub 2} binding enthalpy estimates, ?H{sub bind} (0 K), being 16.5 kJ mol{sup ?1} and 12.4 kJ mol{sup ?1}, respectively: 0.1 and 0.6 kJ mol{sup ?1} higher than harmonic values. Zero-point energy effects are 35% of the value of ?H{sub bind} (0 K) at M05-2X/6-311+G(2df,p) and cannot be neglected; uncorrected electronic binding energies overestimate ?H{sub bind} (0 K) by at least 6 kJ mol{sup ?1}. Harmonic intermolecular binding enthalpies can be corrected by treating the H{sub 2} “helicopter” and “ferris wheel” rotations as free and hindered rotations, respectively. These simple corrections yield results within 2% of the 8-dimensional anharmonic calculations. Nuclear ground state probability density histograms obtained from the QDMC and RBDMC simulations indicate the H{sub 2} molecule is delocalized above the Li{sup +}-benzene system at 0 K.

  10. Human factors review for Severe Accident Sequence Analysis (SASA)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krois, P.A.; Haas, P.M.; Manning, J.J.; Bovell, C.R.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper will discuss work being conducted during this human factors review including: (1) support of the Severe Accident Sequence Analysis (SASA) Program based on an assessment of operator actions, and (2) development of a descriptive model of operator severe accident management. Research by SASA analysts on the Browns Ferry Unit One (BF1) anticipated transient without scram (ATWS) was supported through a concurrent assessment of operator performance to demonstrate contributions to SASA analyses from human factors data and methods. A descriptive model was developed called the Function Oriented Accident Management (FOAM) model, which serves as a structure for bridging human factors, operations, and engineering expertise and which is useful for identifying needs/deficiencies in the area of accident management. The assessment of human factors issues related to ATWS required extensive coordination with SASA analysts. The analysis was consolidated primarily to six operator actions identified in the Emergency Procedure Guidelines (EPGs) as being the most critical to the accident sequence. These actions were assessed through simulator exercises, qualitative reviews, and quantitative human reliability analyses. The FOAM descriptive model assumes as a starting point that multiple operator/system failures exceed the scope of procedures and necessitates a knowledge-based emergency response by the operators. The FOAM model provides a functionally-oriented structure for assembling human factors, operations, and engineering data and expertise into operator guidance for unconventional emergency responses to mitigate severe accident progression and avoid/minimize core degradation. Operators must also respond to potential radiological release beyond plant protective barriers. Research needs in accident management and potential uses of the FOAM model are described. 11 references, 1 figure.

  11. Housing Archetype Analysis for Home Energy-Efficient Retrofit in the Great Lakes Region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, S. K.; Mrozowski, T.; Harrell-Seyburn, A.; Ehrlich, N.; Hembroff, L.; Bieburn, B.; Mazor, M.; McIntyre, A.; Mutton, C.; Parsons, G.; Syal, M. G.; Wilkinson, R.

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This project report details activities and results of the 'Market Characterization' project undertaken by the Cost Effective Energy Retrofit (CEER) team targeted toward the DOE goal of achieving 30%-50% reduction in existing building energy use. CEER consists of members from the Dow Chemical Company, Michigan State University, Ferris State University and Habitat for Humanity Kent County. The purpose of this market characterization project was to identify housing archetypes which are dominant within Great Lakes region and therefore offer significant potential for energy-efficient retrofit research and implementation due to the substantial number of homes possessing similar characteristics. Understanding the characteristics of housing groups referred to as 'archetypes' by vintage, style, and construction characteristics can allow research teams to focus their retrofit research and develop prescriptive solutions for those structure types which are prevalent and offer high potential uptake within a region or market. Key research activities included; literature review, statistical analysis of national and regional data of the American Housing Survey (AHS) collected by the U.S. Census Bureau, analysis of Michigan specific data, development of a housing taxonomy of architectural styles, case studies of two local markets (i.e., Ann Arbor and Grand Rapids in Michigan) and development of a suggested framework (or process) for characterizing local markets. In order to gain a high level perspective, national and regional data from the U.S. Census Bureau was analyzed using cross tabulations, multiple regression models, and logistic regression to characterize the housing stock and determine dominant house types using 21 variables.

  12. Depostional systems, provenance, and sequence stratigraphy, Carter and [open quotes]Millerella[close quotes] sandstones of northeast Mississippi

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cleaves, A.W. II (Oklahoma State Univ., Stillwater, OK (United States))

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The subsurface [open quotes]Millerella[close quotes] and Carter sandstones (middle Chesterian) of the Black Warrior basin represent the highest units of the thick Muldon clastics deltaic facies tract. Lowstand marine conditions during Carter deposition allowed for southeastwardly progradation of five distinct deltaic lobe complexes onto the stable northern shelf of the basin. With each of these lobes, both an [open quotes]A[close quotes] (upper) and a [open quotes]B[close quotes] (lower) reservoir unit can be identified. The [open quotes]B[close quotes] sandstone produces from delta-front sheet sands, channel-mouth bars, and possible bar fingers of river-dominated deltas. The more prolific [open quotes]A[close quotes] subdivision contains reservoirs in upper delta-plain point bars, crevasse splays, and distributary channel fills. The most easterly of the lobes, preserved in the Bean's Ferry field of Itawamba County, comprises an amalgamated valley-fill facies that removed a maximum of 250 ft (76 m) of lower Bangor platform carbonates. In contrast, the [open quotes]Millerella[close quotes] sandstone is a series of unconnected pods that formed as marine-reworked sand bodies during a eustatic rise in sea level. The average detrital sand grain composition for four cores taken in Monroe County is 94.7% monocrystalline quartz, 2.9% polycrystalline quartz, 1.6% albite feldspar, 0.1% low-rank metamorphic rock fragments, 0.5 chert, and 0.2% muscovite. These data indicate that neither the Ozark uplift nor the Ouachita orogen could have acted as the principal source area for the Carter and [open quotes]Millerella[close quotes] sandstones. More likely, the sedimentary-igneous terrains along the northern margin of the Illinois basin served this function. A major eustatic lowstand brought this mineralogically mature sediment across the Illinois basin through incised valleys to the northern self of the Black Warrior basin.

  13. Broadband Acoustic Environment at a Tidal Energy Site in Puget Sound

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Jinshan; Deng, Zhiqun; Martinez, Jayson J.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Myers, Joshua R.; Weiland, Mark A.

    2012-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Admiralty Inlet has been selected as a potential tidal energy site. It is located near shipping lanes, is a highly variable acoustic environment, and is frequented by the endangered southern resident killer whale (SRKW). Resolving environmental impacts is the first step to receiving approval to deploy tidal turbines. Several monitoring technologies are being considered to determine the presence of SRKW near the turbines. Broadband noise level measurements are critical for determining design and operational specifications of these technologies. Acoustic environment data at the proposed site was acquired at different depths using a cabled vertical line array from three different cruises during high tidal period in February, May, and June 2011. The ambient noise level decreases approximately 25 dB re 1 ?Pa per octave from frequency ranges of 1 kHz to 70 kHz, and increases approximately 20 dB re 1 ?Pa per octave for the frequency from 70 kHz to 200 kHz. The difference of noise pressure levels in different months varies from 10 to 30 dB re 1 ?Pa for the frequency range below 70 kHz. Commercial shipping and ferry vessel traffic were found to be the most significant contributors to sound pressure levels for the frequency range from 100 Hz to 70 kHz, and the variation could be as high as 30 dB re 1 ?Pa. These noise level measurements provide the basic information for designing and evaluating both active and passive monitoring systems proposed for deploying and operating for tidal power generation alert system.

  14. Application of the smart portal in transportation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kercel, S.W.; Baylor, V.M.; Dress, W.B.; Hickerson, T.W.; Jatko, W.B.; Labaj, L.E.; Muhs, J.D.; Pack, R.M.

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Under a program sponsored by the Department of Energy, the Oak Ridge complex is developed a ``Portal-of-the-Future``, or ``smart portal``. This is a security portal for vehicular traffic which is intended to quickly detect explosives, hidden passengers, etc. It uses several technologies, including microwaves, weigh-in-motion, digital image processing, and electroacoustic wavelet-based heartbeat detection. A novel component of particular interest is the Enclosed Space Detection System (ESDS), which detects the presence of persons hiding in a vehicle. The system operates by detecting the presence of a human ballistocardiographic signature. Each time the heart beats, it generates a small but measurable shock wave that propagates through the body. The wave, whose graph is called a ballistocardiogram, is the mechanical analog of the electrocardiogram, which is routinely used for medical diagnosis. The wave is, in turn, coupled to any surface or object with which the body is in contact. If the body is located in an enclosed space, this will result in a measurable deflection of the surface of the enclosure. Independent testing has shown ESDS to be highly reliable. The technologies used in the smart portal operate in real time and allow vehicles to be checked through the portal in much less time than would be required for human inspection. Although not originally developed for commercial transportation, the smart portal has the potential to solve several transportation problems. It could relieve congestion at international highway border crossings by reducing the time required to inspect each vehicle while increasing the level of security. It can reduce highway congestion at the entrance of secure facilities such as prisons. Also, it could provide security at intermodal transfer points, such as airport parking lots and car ferry terminals.

  15. Potential radiological impacts of upper-bound operational accidents during proposed waste disposal alternatives for Hanford defense waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mishima, J.; Sutter, S.L.; Hawley, K.A.; Jenkins, C.E.; Napier, B.A.

    1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Geologic Disposal Alternative, the In-Place Stabilization and Disposal Alternative, and the Reference Disposal Alternative are being evaluated for disposal of Hanford defense high-level, transuranic, and tank wastes. Environmental impacts associated with disposal of these wastes according to the alternatives listed above include potential doses to the downwind population from operation during the application of the handling and processing techniques comprising each disposal alternative. Scenarios for operational accident and abnormal operational events are postulated, on the basis of the currently available information, for the application of the techniques employed for each waste class for each disposal alternative. From these scenarios, an upper-bound airborne release of radioactive material was postulated for each waste class and disposal alternative. Potential downwind radiologic impacts were calculated from these upper-bound events. In all three alternatives, the single postulated event with the largest calculated radiologic impact for any waste class is an explosion of a mixture of ferri/ferro cyanide precipitates during the mechanical retrieval or microwave drying of the salt cake in single shell waste tanks. The anticipated downwind dose (70-year dose commitment) to the maximally exposed individual is 3 rem with a total population dose of 7000 man-rem. The same individual would receive 7 rem from natural background radiation during the same time period, and the same population would receive 3,000,000 man-rem. Radiological impacts to the public from all other postulated accidents would be less than that from this accident; furthermore, the radiological impacts resulting from this accident would be less than one-half that from the natural background radiation dose.

  16. Conformational Variability of Organophosphorus Hydrolase upon Soman and Paraoxon Binding

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gomes, Diego Eb; Lins, Roberto D.; Pascutti, Pedro G.; Lei, Chenghong; Soares, Thereza A.

    2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The bacterial enzyme organophosphorus hydrolase (OPH) exhibits both catalytic and substrate promiscuity. It hydrolyzes bonds in a variety of phosphotriester (P-O), phosphonothioate (P-S), phosphofluoridate (P-F) and phosphonocyanate (F-CN) compounds. However, its catalytic efficiency varies markedly for different substrates, limiting the broad-range application of OPH as catalyst in the bioremediation of pesticides and chemical war agents. In the present study, pK{sub a} calculations and multiple explicit-solvent molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were performed to characterize and contrast the structural dynamics of OPH bound to two substrates hydrolyzed with very distinct catalytic efficiencies: the nerve agent soman (O-pinacolyl-methyl-phosphonofluoridate) and the pesticide paraoxon (diethyl p-nitrophenyl phosphate). pK{sub a} calculations for the substrate-bound and unbound enzyme showed a significant pK{sub a} shift from standard values ({Delta}pK{sub a} = {+-} 3 units) for residues 254His and 275Arg. MD simulations of the doubly protonated 254His revealed a dynamic hydrogen bond network connecting the catalytic residue 301Asp via 254His to 232Asp, 233Asp, 275Arg and 235Asp, and is consistent with a previously postulated proton relay mechanism to ferry protons away from the active site with substrates that do not require activation of the leaving group. Hydrogen bonds between 301Asp and 254His were persistent in the OPH-paraoxon complex but not in the OPH-soman one, suggesting a potential role for such interaction in the more efficient hydrolysis of paraoxon over soman by OPH. These results are in line with previous mutational studies of residue 254His, which led to an increase of the catalytic efficiency of OPH over soman yet decreased its efficiency for paraoxon. In addition, comparative analysis of the molecular trajectories for OPH bound to soman and paraoxon suggests that binding of the latter facilitates the conformational transition of OPH from the open to the closed substate promoting a tighter binding of paraoxon.

  17. Adaptively Addressing Uncertainty in Estuarine and Near Coastal Restoration Projects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thom, Ronald M.; Williams, Greg D.; Borde, Amy B.; Southard, John A.; Sargeant, Susan L.; Woodruff, Dana L.; Laufle, Jeffrey C.; Glasoe, Stuart

    2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Restoration projects have an uncertain outcome because of a lack of information about current site conditions, historical disturbance levels, effects of landscape alterations on site development, unpredictable trajectories or patterns of ecosystem structural development, and many other factors. A poor understanding of the factors that control the development and dynamics of a system, such as hydrology, salinity, wave energies, can also lead to an unintended outcome. Finally, lack of experience in restoring certain types of systems (e.g., rare or very fragile habitats) or systems in highly modified situations (e.g., highly urbanized estuaries) makes project outcomes uncertain. Because of these uncertainties, project costs can rise dramatically in an attempt to come closer to project goals. All of the potential sources of error can be addressed to a certain degree through adaptive management. The first step is admitting that these uncertainties can exist, and addressing as many of the uncertainties with planning and directed research prior to implementing the project. The second step is to evaluate uncertainties through hypothesis-driven experiments during project implementation. The third step is to use the monitoring program to evaluate and adjust the project as needed to improve the probability of the project to reach is goal. The fourth and final step is to use the information gained in the project to improve future projects. A framework that includes a clear goal statement, a conceptual model, and an evaluation framework can help in this adaptive restoration process. Projects and programs vary in their application of adaptive management in restoration, and it is very difficult to be highly prescriptive in applying adaptive management to projects that necessarily vary widely in scope, goal, ecosystem characteristics, and uncertainties. Very large ecosystem restoration programs in the Mississippi River delta (Coastal Wetlands Planning, Protection, and Restoration Act; CWPPRA) have incorporated very specific and detailed elements in a more active adaptive management effort. In Puget Sound, the Puget Sound Action Team uses site-specific case studies, monitoring, and public involvement to direct actions to reduce microbial contamination of harvestable shellfish. Small-scale projects can also be improved through application of adaptive management. For example, directed research and site assessments resulted in successful restoration of seagrasses near a ferry terminal in Puget Sound. It is recommended that all restoration programs be conducted in an adaptive management framework, and where appropriate, a more active adaptive management approach be applied. The net effect should be less uncertainty, improved project success, advancement of the science of restoration, and cost savings.

  18. WSF Biodiesel Demonstration Project Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington State University; University of Idaho; The Glosten Associates, Inc.; Imperium Renewables, Inc.

    2009-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2004, WSF canceled a biodiesel fuel test because of “product quality issues” that caused the fuel purifiers to clog. The cancelation of this test and the poor results negatively impacted the use of biodiesel in marine application in the Pacific Northwest. In 2006, The U.S. Department of Energy awarded the Puget Sound Clean Air Agency a grant to manage a scientific study investigating appropriate fuel specifications for biodiesel, fuel handling procedures and to conduct a fuel test using biodiesel fuels in WSF operations. The Agency put together a project team comprised of experts in fields of biodiesel research and analysis, biodiesel production, marine engineering and WSF personnel. The team reviewed biodiesel technical papers, reviewed the 2004 fuel test results, designed a fuel test plan and provided technical assistance during the test. The research reviewed the available information on the 2004 fuel test and conducted mock laboratory experiments, but was not able to determine why the fuel filters clogged. The team then conducted a literature review and designed a fuel test plan. The team implemented a controlled introduction of biodiesel fuels to the test vessels while monitoring the environmental conditions on the vessels and checking fuel quality throughout the fuel distribution system. The fuel test was conducted on the same three vessels that participated in the canceled 2004 test using the same ferry routes. Each vessel used biodiesel produced from a different feedstock (i.e. soy, canola and yellow grease). The vessels all ran on ultra low sulfur diesel blended with biodiesel. The percentage of biodiesel was incrementally raised form from 5 to 20 percent. Once the vessels reached the 20 percent level, they continued at this blend ratio for the remainder of the test. Fuel samples were taken from the fuel manufacturer, during fueling operations and at several points onboard each vessel. WSF Engineers monitored the performance of the fuel systems and engines. Each test vessel did experience a microbial growth bloom that produced a build up of material in the fuel purifiers similar to material witnessed in the 2004 fuel test. A biocide was added with each fuel shipment and the problem subsided. In January of 2009, the WSF successfully completed an eleven month biodiesel fuel test using approximately 1,395,000 gallons of biodiesel blended fuels. The project demonstrated that biodiesel can be used successfully in marine vessels and that current ASTM specifications are satisfactory for marine vessels. Microbial growth in biodiesel diesel interface should be monitored. An inspection of the engines showed no signs of being negatively impacted by the test.

  19. Survival of Subyearling Fall Chinook Salmon in the Free-flowing Snake River and Lower Snake River Reservoirs in 2003 and from McNary Dam Tailrace to John Day Dam Tailrace in the Columbia River from 1999 to 2002, 1999-2003 Technical Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muir, William D.; Axel, Gordon A.; Smith, Steven G. (National Marine Fisheries Service, Northwest Fisheries Science Center, Fish Ecology Division, Seattle, WA)

    2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report results from an ongoing study of survival and travel time of subyearling fall Chinook salmon in the Snake River during 2003 and in the Columbia River during 1999-2002. Earlier years of the study included serial releases of PIT-tagged hatchery subyearling Chinook salmon upstream from Lower Granite Dam, but these were discontinued in 2003. Instead, we estimated survival from a large number of PIT-tagged fish released upstream from Lower Granite Dam to evaluate transportation from Snake River Dams. During late May and early June 2003, 68,572 hatchery-reared subyearling fall Chinook salmon were PIT tagged at Lyons Ferry Hatchery, trucked upstream, acclimated, and released at Couse Creek and Pittsburg Landing in the free-flowing Snake River. We estimated survival for these fish from release to Lower Granite Dam tailrace. In comparison to wild subyearling fall Chinook salmon PIT tagged and released in the free-flowing Snake River, the hatchery fish we released traveled faster and had higher survival to Lower Granite Dam, likely because of their larger size at release. For fish left in the river to migrate we estimated survival from Lower Granite Dam tailrace to McNary Dam tailrace. Each year, a small proportion of fish released are not detected until the following spring. However, the number of fish released in 2003 that overwintered in the river and were detected as they migrated seaward as yearlings in 2004 was small (<1.0%) and had minimal effect on survival estimates. We evaluated a prototype floating PIT-tag detector deployed upstream from Lower Granite reservoir to collect data for use in partitioning travel time and survival between free-flowing and reservoir habitats. The floating detector performed poorly, detecting only 27 PIT tags in 340 h of operation from a targeted release of 68,572; far too few to partition travel time and survival between habitats. We collected river-run subyearling Chinook salmon (mostly wild fish from the Hanford Reach) at McNary Dam, PIT tagged them, and released them to the tailrace as part of an evaluation of transportation from McNary Dam in 2002. Estimated survival in 2002 from the tailrace of McNary Dam to the tailrace of John Day Dam was 0.746 (s.e. 0.036). For migration years 1999-2002, we found that in the reach from McNary to John Day Dam reach, travel time was shorter (migration rate was greater) and survival probabilities were greater when flow volume was greater. Survival was also correlated with water temperature: warmer water was associated with decreased survival, and there was an apparent survival threshold at about 19.3 C (above this temperature survival decreased substantially).

  20. Study of the Acoustic Effects of Hydrokinetic Tidal Turbines in Admiralty Inlet, Puget Sound

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brian Polagye; Jim Thomson; Chris Bassett; Jason Wood; Dom Tollit; Robert Cavagnaro; Andrea Copping

    2012-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydrokinetic turbines will be a source of noise in the marine environment - both during operation and during installation/removal. High intensity sound can cause injury or behavioral changes in marine mammals and may also affect fish and invertebrates. These noise effects are, however, highly dependent on the individual marine animals; the intensity, frequency, and duration of the sound; and context in which the sound is received. In other words, production of sound is a necessary, but not sufficient, condition for an environmental impact. At a workshop on the environmental effects of tidal energy development, experts identified sound produced by turbines as an area of potentially significant impact, but also high uncertainty. The overall objectives of this project are to improve our understanding of the potential acoustic effects of tidal turbines by: (1) Characterizing sources of existing underwater noise; (2) Assessing the effectiveness of monitoring technologies to characterize underwater noise and marine mammal responsiveness to noise; (3) Evaluating the sound profile of an operating tidal turbine; and (4) Studying the effect of turbine sound on surrogate species in a laboratory environment. This study focuses on a specific case study for tidal energy development in Admiralty Inlet, Puget Sound, Washington (USA), but the methodologies and results are applicable to other turbine technologies and geographic locations. The project succeeded in achieving the above objectives and, in doing so, substantially contributed to the body of knowledge around the acoustic effects of tidal energy development in several ways: (1) Through collection of data from Admiralty Inlet, established the sources of sound generated by strong currents (mobilizations of sediment and gravel) and determined that low-frequency sound recorded during periods of strong currents is non-propagating pseudo-sound. This helped to advance the debate within the marine and hydrokinetics acoustic community as to whether strong currents produce propagating sound. (2) Analyzed data collected from a tidal turbine operating at the European Marine Energy Center to develop a profile of turbine sound and developed a framework to evaluate the acoustic effects of deploying similar devices in other locations. This framework has been applied to Public Utility District No. 1 of Snohomish Country's demonstration project in Admiralty Inlet to inform postinstallation acoustic and marine mammal monitoring plans. (3) Demonstrated passive acoustic techniques to characterize the ambient noise environment at tidal energy sites (fixed, long-term observations recommended) and characterize the sound from anthropogenic sources (drifting, short-term observations recommended). (4) Demonstrated the utility and limitations of instrumentation, including bottom mounted instrumentation packages, infrared cameras, and vessel monitoring systems. In doing so, also demonstrated how this type of comprehensive information is needed to interpret observations from each instrument (e.g., hydrophone data can be combined with vessel tracking data to evaluate the contribution of vessel sound to ambient noise). (5) Conducted a study that suggests harbor porpoise in Admiralty Inlet may be habituated to high levels of ambient noise due to omnipresent vessel traffic. The inability to detect behavioral changes associated with a high intensity source of opportunity (passenger ferry) has informed the approach for post-installation marine mammal monitoring. (6) Conducted laboratory exposure experiments of juvenile Chinook salmon and showed that exposure to a worse than worst case acoustic dose of turbine sound does not result in changes to hearing thresholds or biologically significant tissue damage. Collectively, this means that Chinook salmon may be at a relatively low risk of injury from sound produced by tidal turbines located in or near their migration path. In achieving these accomplishments, the project has significantly advanced the District's goals of developing a demonstration-scale tidal energy proj

  1. In-service Inspection Ultrasonic Testing of Reactor Pressure Vessel Welds for Assessing Flaw Density and Size Distribution per 10 CFR 50.61a, Alternate Fracture Toughness Requirements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sullivan, Edmund J.; Anderson, Michael T.; Norris, Wallace

    2012-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Pressurized thermal shock (PTS) events are system transients in a pressurized water reactor (PWR) in which there is a rapid operating temperature cool-down that results in cold vessel temperatures with or without repressurization of the vessel. The rapid cooling of the inside surface of the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) causes thermal stresses that can combine with stresses caused by high pressure. The aggregate effect of these stresses is an increase in the potential for fracture if a pre-existing flaw is present in a material susceptible to brittle failure. The ferritic, low alloy steel of the reactor vessel beltline adjacent to the core, where neutron radiation gradually embrittles the material over the lifetime of the plant, can be susceptible to brittle fracture. The PTS rule, described in the Code of Federal Regulations, Title 10, Section 50.61 (§50.61), “Fracture Toughness Requirements for Protection against Pressurized Thermal Shock Events,” adopted on July 23, 1985, establishes screening criteria to ensure that the potential for a reactor vessel to fail due to a PTS event is deemed to be acceptably low. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) completed a research program that concluded that the risk of through-wall cracking due to a PTS event is much lower than previously estimated. The NRC subsequently developed a rule, §50.61a, published on January 4, 2010, entitled “Alternate Fracture Toughness Requirements for Protection Against Pressurized Thermal Shock Events” (75 FR 13). Use of the new rule by licensees is optional. The §50.61a rule differs from §50.61 in that it requires licensees who choose to follow this alternate method to analyze the results from periodic volumetric examinations required by the ASME Code, Section XI, Rules for Inservice Inspection (ISI) of Nuclear Power Plants. These analyses are intended to determine if the actual flaw density and size distribution in the licensee’s reactor vessel beltline welds are bounded by the flaw density and size distribution values used in the PTS technical basis. Under a contract with the NRC, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has been working on a program to assess the ability of current inservice inspection (ISI)-ultrasonic testing (UT) techniques, as qualified through ASME Code, Appendix VIII, Supplements 4 and 6, to detect small fabrication or inservice-induced flaws located in RPV welds and adjacent base materials. As part of this effort, the investigators have pursued an evaluation, based on the available information, of the capability of UT to provide flaw density/distribution inputs for making RPV weld assessments in accordance with §50.61a. This paper presents the results of an evaluation of data from the 1993 Browns Ferry Nuclear Plant, Unit 3, Spirit of Appendix VIII reactor vessel examination, a comparison of the flaw density/distribution from this data with the distribution in §50.61a, possible reasons for differences, and plans and recommendations for further work in this area.

  2. Transportable Heavy Duty Emissions Testing Laboratory and Research Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Lyons

    2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this program was to quantify the emissions from heavy-duty vehicles operating on alternative fuels or advanced fuel blends, often with novel engine technology or aftertreatment. In the first year of the program West Virginia University (WVU) researchers determined that a transportable chassis dynamometer emissions measurement approach was required so that fleets of trucks and buses did not need to be ferried across the nation to a fixed facility. A Transportable Heavy-Duty Vehicle Emissions Testing Laboratory (Translab) was designed, constructed and verified. This laboratory consisted of a chassis dynamometer semi-trailer and an analytic trailer housing a full scale exhaust dilution tunnel and sampling system which mimicked closely the system described in the Code of Federal Regulations for engine certification. The Translab was first used to quantify emissions from natural gas and methanol fueled transit buses, and a second Translab unit was constructed to satisfy research demand. Subsequent emissions measurement was performed on trucks and buses using ethanol, Fischer-Tropsch fuel, and biodiesel. A medium-duty chassis dynamometer was also designed and constructed to facilitate research on delivery vehicles in the 10,000 to 20,000lb range. The Translab participated in major programs to evaluate low-sulfur diesel in conjunction with passively regenerating exhaust particulate filtration technology, and substantial reductions in particulate matter were recorded. The researchers also participated in programs to evaluate emissions from advanced natural gas engines with closed loop feedback control. These natural gas engines showed substantially reduced levels of oxides of nitrogen. For all of the trucks and buses characterized, the levels of carbon monoxide, oxides of nitrogen, hydrocarbons, carbon dioxide and particulate matter were quantified, and in many cases non-regulated species such as aldehydes were also sampled. Particle size was also quantified during selected studies. A laboratory was established at WVU to provide for studies which supported and augmented the Translab research, and to provide for development of superior emissions measurement systems. This laboratory research focused on engine control and fuel sulfur issues. In recent years, as engine and aftertreatment technologies advanced, emissions levels were reduced such that they were at or below the Translab detectable limits, and in the same time frame the US Environmental Protection Agency required improved measurement methodologies for engine emissions certification. To remain current and relevant, the researchers designed a new Translab analytic system, housed in a container which can be transported on a semi-trailer. The new system's dilution tunnel flow was designed to use a subsonic venturi with closed loop control of blower speed, and the secondary dilution and particulate matter filter capture were designed to follow new EPA engine certification procedures. A further contribution of the program has been the development of techniques for creating heavy-duty vehicle test schedules, and the creation of schedules to mimic a variety of truck and bus vocations.