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  1. August 2010, Volume 32, Number 3 New Mexico GeoloGy 79 The Woodford Shale in southeastern New Mexico

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    Borchers, Brian

    August 2010, Volume 32, Number 3 New Mexico GeoloGy 79 The Woodford Shale in southeastern New 87801, ron@gis.nmt.edu Abstract The Woodford Shale (Upper Devonian) is 0­300 ft thick in southeastern at depths of less than 7,000 ft as it rises out of the Permian Basin. The Woodford Shale is absent from

  2. POSTGRADUATE MONTEREY, CALIFORNIA

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    envisioned by the Global Information Grid (GIG). Multilevel security (MLS) is a key Information Assurance enabler for the GIG vision. The Monterey Security Architecture (MYSEA), a distributed MLS network

  3. NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL Monterey, California

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    #12;Thesis F2lJ6 NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL Monterey, California THESIS AN ANALYSIS OF HYPERSPECTRAL;DUDLEY K~OX LlRRARY NAVAL -0 SCHOOL MONTE"ev C.A ;:I3~~5101 #12;5. FlJNDING NUMBERS 8, PERFOR"TE IN SYSTEMS TF.CHNOLOGY (SPACE SYSTEMS OPERATJONS) from the NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL J. . . . Matthew

  4. Porosity reduction in Monterey Formation, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Compton, J.S.

    1987-05-01

    Porosity and grain density were determined for different lithologies from throughout a 1.2-km thick section of the Monterey and Sisquoc formations in the Santa Maria basin area, California. Porosity reduction by physical and chemical compaction in the predominantly siliceous sediment is controlled largely by the bulk sediment composition and silica phase transformations. Physical compaction of sediment grains from increasing overburden pressure is responsible for most of the gradual porosity reduction with increasing burial depth in opal-A siliceous ooze and diatomite. The porous, incompressible diatom frustule maintains a high porosity relative to clayey and calcareous sediment. Therefore, a positive correlation exists between porosity and biogenic silica (diatom) content of the sediment. During the opal-A to opal-CT silica phase transformation, solution of the porous diatom frustule and precipitation of cryptocrystalline opal-CT results in a porosity reduction that roughly correlates with the biogenic silica content of the sediment. Local porosity reduction occurs in pore-filling dolomite and chert nodules. Dry bulk density as well as porosity reduction tend to increase with sediment depth. Dolomite and organic matter have the most significant influence on the bulk density because of their respective high and low density. The maximum burial depth of the uplifted and eroded section is estimated by overlapping the porosity-depth relation of average deep-sea siliceous ooze.

  5. Seismic expressions of Monterey Formation diagenesis: examples from offshore California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roy, M.B.

    1988-03-01

    Diagenesis of the diatomaceous rocks in the Monterey Formation in California coastal and offshore basins involves changes from amorphous biogenic silica to a stable crystalline quartz facies. In the intermediate stage, the transformation undergoes passage from the Opal-A to the Opal-CT phase. Associated with this diagenetic process is a marked increase in bulk densities between the different silica phases, owing to loss of porosity from compaction and solution recrystallization caused by increase in burial load and other physical factors. The sharp density contrast between the silica phases is manifested by an acoustic impedance boundary that may be expressed on seismic records. This seismic event can be distinct and independent of structural configuration, and in many places cuts through stratigraphic boundaries. Several examples of seismic records from offshore California demonstrate the diagenetically caused reflection cutting through Monterey and post-Monterey formations. Current and future exploration efforts in offshore California will continue to center on the widespread Monterey Formation. In addition to being the main source rock, the Monterey is also the reservoir rock. Recent discoveries indicate that oil production is mainly from the highly permeable, fractured, silica-rich sections. It is therefore important to recognize the diagenetic boundaries on seismic records and to delineate the more brittle quartz-rich facies where the reservoir quality is expected to be better than the intermediate Opal-A or Opal-CT facies. Furthermore, these boundaries could also provide good diagenetic traps off the flanks of structures where updip unaltered impermeable rocks hinder fluid migration.

  6. Seasonal variation of diatoms and dinoflagellates in Monterey Bay, CA determined by Chemtax alanysis of HPLC pigment data

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    Keating, Kelene

    2013-01-01

    and Benguela), Vol. 1. Garrison, D.L. (1976). ContributionFishery Bulletin 74,183-194. Garrison, D.L. (1979). MontereyResearch 1, 241–265. Garrison, D.L. (1981). Monterey Bay

  7. Monterey County, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

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    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland: EnergyInformation Montana Watershed ProtectionMontauk, NewNewMonterey

  8. Phosphorus Cycling in the Red Tide Incubator Region of Monterey Bay in Response to Upwelling

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    Mackey, Katherine R. M; Mioni, Cecile E; Ryan, John P; Paytan, Adina

    2012-01-01

    of C. balechii from the RTI region of Monterey Bay differsThe red tide incubator (RTI) is a persistent feature ofspecies that incubate in the RTI may cause harmful effects

  9. Silica diagenesis in Monterey Formation: controls and application

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kablanow, R.I. II

    1987-05-01

    The factors controlling diagenesis of biogenic silica (opal-A to opal-CT to quartz) in the Monterey Formation of California has been an ongoing subject of study. The accepted concept proposes that a high detrital content inhibits the opal-A to opal-CT reaction, whereas it accelerates the opal-CT to quartz reaction. Others have suggested that clay minerals directly influence the rate of silica transformation by the adsorption of silica from solution. It is proposed that the primary control on silica diagenesis is the thermal regime of the basin. Important variables which influence the temperature development include time, sediment accumulation rate, burial depth, porosity, thermal conductivity, temperature of silica phase change, and heat flow. The Miocene Monterey Formation had fairly rapid sedimentation rates which produced a thick section of fine-grained sediments (up to 13,000 ft, 4 km, in the Salinas basin). As these sediments underwent progressive burial, both compaction and silica transformation reduced porosity, resulting in an increase in thermal conductivity. To simulate the thermal, depositional, and diagenetic events, detailed thermal models were used. These models clearly reflect the difference in the geologic history observed between the Huasna, Pismo, and Salinas basins. The thermal models used in this study strongly confirm that silica diagenesis is primarily dependent on the temperature structure of a basin and that any catalytic influence which detrital minerals may have on silica diagenesis is a second-order effect and does not alter the regional reaction boundaries. These models can also be used as powerful tools in hydrocarbon exploration by providing a clearer picture of the thermal development of the basin.

  10. Optimal Pollution Mitigation in Monterey Bay Based on Coastal Radar Data and Nonlinear

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    Marsden, Jerrold

    Optimal Pollution Mitigation in Monterey Bay Based on Coastal Radar Data and Nonlinear Dynamics run-off which is a typical source of pollution in the bay. We show that a HF radar-based pollution release scheme using this flow structure reduces the impact of pollution on the coastal envi- ronment

  11. Artificial lift with coiled tubing for flow testing the Monterey formation, offshore California

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    Peavy, M.A.; Fahel, R.A. )

    1991-05-01

    This paper provides a technical comparison of jet-pump and nitrogen lift during the drillstem tests (DST's) of a low-gravity, high-viscosity crude on a semisubmersible drilling vessel. Eight DST testing sequences are presented to demonstrate that jet-pump-lift operations are better suited than nitrogen-lift techniques for obtaining reservoir data during Monterey DST's.

  12. Incorporating Optics into a Coupled Physical-Biological Forecasting System in the Monterey Bay

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    Boss, Emmanuel S.

    Incorporating Optics into a Coupled Physical-Biological Forecasting System in the Monterey Bay Fei://www.marine.maine.edu/~eboss/index.html http://ourocean.jpl.nasa.gov/ LONG-TERM GOALS Modeling and predicting ocean optical properties for coastal waters requires linking optical properties with the physical, chemical, and biological processes

  13. Nitrification in the euphotic zone as evidenced by nitrate dual isotopic composition: Observations from Monterey Bay, California

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    Pennington, J. Timothy

    from Monterey Bay, California Scott D. Wankel,1,2,3 Carol Kendall,4 J. Timothy Pennington,5 Francisco P, and NO3 Ŕ assimilation in marine environments. Citation: Wankel, S. D., C. Kendall, J. T. Pennington, F

  14. Microsoft PowerPoint - 01_Schmid_AWG_Monterey_Intro.ppt [Compatibility Mode]

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shines light on darkMicroorganisms to Speed Production of Biofuels9STM, Monterey,

  15. On the bluffs overlooking Monterey Bay, the Seymour Marine Discovery Center is dedicated to educating people about the role

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    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    On the bluffs overlooking Monterey Bay, the Seymour Marine Discovery Center is dedicated · theadjacentYoungerLagoonNaturalReserve The Seymour Center is a self-funded program of the University of California,SantaCruz. seymour marine Discovery center at Long marine Laboratory university of California

  16. On the bluffs overlooking Monterey Bay, the Seymour Marine Discovery Center is dedicated to educating people about the role

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    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    On the bluffs overlooking Monterey Bay, the Seymour Marine Discovery Center is dedicated's oceans. Seymour Marine Discovery Center at Long Marine Laboratory Participate through inquiry · theadjacentYoungerLagoonNaturalReserve Located at Long Marine Laboratory, the Seymour Center is a self

  17. Implications from a study of the timing of oil entrapment in Monterey siliceous shales, Lost Hills, San Joaquin Valley, California

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    Julander, D.R. )

    1992-01-01

    The oil and gas-rich upper Miocene siliceous shales of the Monterey Group are the primary development target in the Lost Hills Oil Field, San Joaquin Valley, California. As a result of diagenesis, the siliceous shales can be subdivided by opal phase into three sections (from shallow to deep): the Opal-A diatomites which are rich in oil saturation; the Opal-CT porcellanites which are predominantly wet but include pockets of moderate oil saturation; and the Quartz cherts and porcellanites which in some places are highly oil saturated immediately below the Opal CT section. Productivity trends in each of the three sections have been established through drilling and production testing, but a predictive model was not available until a study of the timing of oil entrapment at Lost Hills was recently completed. The study included an analysis of the depositional history of the siliceous shales and timing of: (1) structural growth of the Lost Hills fold, (2) source-rock maturation, and (3) development of the opal-phase segregation of the Monterey shales. The study led to enhanced understanding of the known oil saturation and production trends in the three opal-phase sections and yielded a predictive model that is being used to identify areas in the field with remedial or delineation potential. The study also produced evidence of fold axis rotation during the Pliocene and Pleistocene that helps explain differences in fracture orientations within the Monterey shales.

  18. HRTEM of microcrystalline opal in chert and porcelanite from the Monterey Formation, California

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    Cady, S.L.; Wenk, H.R.; Downing, K.H.

    1996-11-01

    Microcrystalline opal was investigated using low-dose transmission electron microscopy (TEM) methods to identify microstructural characteristics and possible phase-transformation mechanisms that accommodate silica diagenesis. High-resolution TEM (HRTEM) revealed that microcrystalline opal in opal-CT chert (>90 wt% silica) and opal-CT porcelanite (50-90 wt% silica) from the Miocene Monterey Formation of California displays various amounts of structural disorder and coherent and incoherent lamellar intergrowths. Species of microfibrous opal identified by HRTEM in early-formed opal-CT chert include length-slow opal-C and unidimensionally disordered length-slow opal-CT ({open_quotes}lussatite{close_quotes}). These fibers often display a microstructure characterized by an aperiodic distribution of highly strained domains that separate ordered domains located at discrete positions along the direction of the fiber axes. Microfibrous opal occurs as several types of fiber-aggregation forms. TEM revealed that the siliceous matrix in later-formed opal-CT porcelanite consists of equidimensional, nanometer-size opal-CT crystallites and lussatite fibers. Pseudo-orthorhombic tridymite (PO-2) was identified by HRTEM in one sample of opal-CT porcelanite. Burial diagenesis of chert and porcelanite results in the precipitation of opal-C and the epitaxial growth of opal-C domains on opal-CT substrates. Diagenetic maturation of lussatite was identified by TEM in banded opal-CT-quartz chert to occur as a result of solid-state ordering. The primary diagenetic silica phase transformations between noncrystalline opal, microcrystalline opal, and quartz occur predominantly by a series of dissolution-precipitation reactions. However, TEM showed that in banded opal-CT-quartz chert, the epitaxial growth of quartz on microfibrous opal enhances the rate of silica diagenesis.

  19. Biogenic opal germanium/silicon ratios used to monitor upwelling intensity in Newport Lagoon section, Monterey Formation, California

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    Murnane, R.J.

    1986-04-01

    Empirical evidence and modeling of geochemical cycles of silicon (Si) and germanium (Ge) suggest that opal Ge/Si ratios record water Ge/Si ratios although some fractionation of germanium from silicon occurs during biogenic opal formation. Modeling results also suggest that opal Ge/Si ratios could record changes in upwelling intensity. In today's oceans, areas of high productivity associated with upwelling show relatively elevated surface-water nutrient concentrations, whereas areas of low productivity with restricted upwelling exhibit low surface-water nutrient concentrations. Fractionation of germanium from silicon during biogenic opal formation would cause the surface ocean's Ge/Si ratio to increase as surface-water nutrient concentrations are lowered. Diatomites from the Newport Lagoon section of the Monterey Formation were analyzed to test the hypothesis that biogenic opal Ge/Si ratios could be used to trace upwelling intensity. Diatom assemblages of the Monterey Formation vary with upwelling intensity over a time scale of millions of years. Samples collected from the middle and late Miocene have high ratios (up to 8 x 10/sup -7/) when diatom assemblages indicate relatively weak upwelling, and low ratios (less than 6 x 10/sup -7/) when diatom assemblages indicate relatively strong upwelling. These ratios agree with modeling predictions. Opal Ge/Si ratios may also record upwelling fluctuations on much shorter times scales. Adjacent, centimeter-scale, lighter and darker layers record past variations in biogenic and terrigenous inputs to ocean-bottom sediments. Opal Ge/Si ratios may indicate whether the darker layers result from a relative decrease in surface-water productivity in response to a reduction in upwelling intensity, or only from a relative increase in terrigenous detrital inputs.

  20. Characteristics of the C Shale and D Shale reservoirs, Monterey Formation, Elk Hills Field, Kern County, California

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    Reid, S.A.; McIntyre, J.L. [Bechtel Petroleum Operations, Inc., Tupman, CA (United States); McJannet, G.S. [Dept. of Energy, Tupman, CA (United States)

    1996-12-31

    The upper Miocene C Shale and D Shale reservoirs of the Elk Hills Shale Member of the Monterey Formation have cumulative oil and gas production much higher than the originally estimated recovery. These San Joaquin basin reservoirs are the lowest of the Stevens producing zones at Elk Hills and currently produce from a 2800-acre area on the 31 S anticline. The C Shale contains lower slope and basin plain deposits of very fine grained, thinly bedded, graded turbidites, pelagic and hemipelagic claystone, and slump deposits. Although all units are oil-bearing, only the lower parts of the graded turbidity intervals have sufficient horizontal permeability to produce oil. The D Shale consists of chart, claystone, carbonates and slump deposits, also originating in a lower slope to basin plain setting. All D Shale rock types contain oil, but the upper chart interval is the most productive. The chart has high matrix porosity, and due to a complex horizontal and vertical microfracture system, produces at a highly effective rate. Core samples indicate more oil-in-place is present in the thin, graded C Shale beds and in the porous D Shale chart than is identifiable from conventional electric logs. High gas recovery rates are attributed mostly to this larger volume of associated oil. Gas also enters the reservoirs from the adjacent 26R reservoir through a leaky normal fault. Significant gas volumes also may desorb from immature organic material common in the rock matrix.

  1. Characteristics of the C Shale and D Shale reservoirs, Monterey Formation, Elk Hills Field, Kern County, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reid, S.A.; McIntyre, J.L. (Bechtel Petroleum Operations, Inc., Tupman, CA (United States)); McJannet, G.S. (Dept. of Energy, Tupman, CA (United States))

    1996-01-01

    The upper Miocene C Shale and D Shale reservoirs of the Elk Hills Shale Member of the Monterey Formation have cumulative oil and gas production much higher than the originally estimated recovery. These San Joaquin basin reservoirs are the lowest of the Stevens producing zones at Elk Hills and currently produce from a 2800-acre area on the 31 S anticline. The C Shale contains lower slope and basin plain deposits of very fine grained, thinly bedded, graded turbidites, pelagic and hemipelagic claystone, and slump deposits. Although all units are oil-bearing, only the lower parts of the graded turbidity intervals have sufficient horizontal permeability to produce oil. The D Shale consists of chart, claystone, carbonates and slump deposits, also originating in a lower slope to basin plain setting. All D Shale rock types contain oil, but the upper chart interval is the most productive. The chart has high matrix porosity, and due to a complex horizontal and vertical microfracture system, produces at a highly effective rate. Core samples indicate more oil-in-place is present in the thin, graded C Shale beds and in the porous D Shale chart than is identifiable from conventional electric logs. High gas recovery rates are attributed mostly to this larger volume of associated oil. Gas also enters the reservoirs from the adjacent 26R reservoir through a leaky normal fault. Significant gas volumes also may desorb from immature organic material common in the rock matrix.

  2. Woodford County, Illinois: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

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    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-EnhancingEtGeorgia:Illinois:Wizard Power Pty Ltd JumpWoodcliff Lake,

  3. Woodford County, Kentucky: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

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    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-EnhancingEtGeorgia:Illinois:Wizard Power Pty Ltd JumpWoodcliff Lake,Kentucky: Energy

  4. POSTGRADUATE MONTEREY, CALIFORNIA

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    is unlimited SECURITY MODELING AND CORRECTNESS PROOF USING SPECWARE AND ISABELLE by Chuan Lian Koh Eng Siong Ng And Isabelle 6. AUTHOR(S) Chuan Lian Koh, Eng Siong Ng 5. FUNDING NUMBERS 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME; distribution is unlimited SECURITY MODELING AND CORRECTNESS PROOF USING SPECWARE AND ISABELLE Chuan Lian Koh

  5. POSTGRADUATE MONTEREY, CALIFORNIA

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    is unlimited NATIONAL AUTHENTICATION FRAMEWORK IMPLEMENTATION STUDY by Mok Chuan-Hao December 2009 Thesis Co AND SUBTITLE National Authentication Framework Implementation Study 6. AUTHOR(S) Mok Chuan-Hao 5. FUNDING IMPLEMENTATION STUDY Mok Chuan-Hao Captain, Singapore Army B.S., Nanyang Technological University, 2004 Submitted

  6. POSTGRADUATE MONTEREY, CALIFORNIA

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    is unlimited AUTOMATING CASE REPORTS FOR THE ANALYSIS OF DIGITAL EVIDENCE by Regis H. Friend Cassidy September COVERED Master's Thesis 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE: Automating Case Reports for the Analysis of Digital (maximum 200 words) The reporting process during computer analysis is critical in the practice of digital

  7. POSTGRADUATE MONTEREY, CALIFORNIA

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    such as orbit types, number of satellites, life-cycle and ground segment implementation. A coverage capability life cycle cost. Revisit time for mid-latitude targets was approximately one day at 10 inch resolution is unlimited A COMMERCIAL ARCHITECTURE FOR SATELLITE IMAGERY by Christopher J. Didier September 2006 Thesis

  8. POSTGRADUATE MONTEREY, CALIFORNIA

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    the potential for attracting foreign capital. Russia's economy is dependent on oil and natural gas exports OF PAGES 113 14. SUBJECT TERMS Russia, Capitalist Peace, Realism, Oil Industry, Natural Gas Industry, NSPD-66, Energy Strategy 16. PRICE CODE 17. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF REPORT Unclassified 18. SECURITY

  9. POSTGRADUATE MONTEREY, CALIFORNIA

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    power/energy density batteries and fuel cells technologies, as well as the potential benefit of applying Tracker (MPPT), Energy Storage Systems, Fuel Cells 16. PRICE CODE 17. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF REPORT-selenide (CIGS) semiconductor materials is considered. In order to achieve a higher efficiency, the simulation

  10. POSTGRADUATE MONTEREY, CALIFORNIA

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    is unlimited. THE USE OF COMMERCIAL REMOTE SENSING IN PREDICTING HELICOPTER BROWNOUT CONDITIONS by Christine Helicopter Brownout Conditions 6. AUTHOR Christine Kay Rabaja 5. FUNDING NUMBERS 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION) data from RADARSAT-2 is analyzed for detection of soils susceptible to helicopter brownout. Helicopter

  11. POSTGRADUATE MONTEREY, CALIFORNIA

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    is unlimited THE USE OF COMMERCIAL REMOTE SENSING IN PREDICTING HELICOPTER BROWNOUT CONDITIONS by Anthony Davis COVERED Master's Thesis 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE The Use of Commercial Remote Sensing Predicting Helicopter (maximum 200 words) Observations of potential helicopter landing zones are analyzed to determine

  12. POSTGRADUATE MONTEREY, CALIFORNIA

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    operating system environments (Fedora 7, RedHat 8, STOP OS 7 beta). This study also includes a functional

  13. POSTGRADUATE MONTEREY, CALIFORNIA

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    is unlimited. IDENTIFYING SUPERVISORY CONTROL AND DATA ACQUISITION (SCADA) SYSTEMS ON A NETWORK VIA REMOTE Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) Systems on a Network via Remote Reconnaissance 6. AUTHOR And Data Acquisition (SCADA) and other control systems which operate the critical infrastructure

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    is unlimited. AN ARCHITECTURAL FRAMEWORK FOR DESCRIBING SUPERVISORY CONTROL AND DATA ACQUISITION (SCADA Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) Systems 6. AUTHOR(S) Ward, Michael P. 5. FUNDING NUMBERS 7 and stability of Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) systems. The first is a move to define

  15. POSTGRADUATE MONTEREY, CALIFORNIA

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    (SCADA) SYTEMS by Dennis Hart September 2004 Thesis Advisor: Cynthia E. Irvine Co-Thesis Advisor: Karen to Vulnerability Assessment for Navy Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) Systems 6. AUTHOR(S) Hart's Critical Infrastructures. SCADA systems are relied upon in a large number of the sectors that make up

  16. POSTGRADUATE MONTEREY, CALIFORNIA

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    -0188) Washington DC 20503. 1. AGENCY USE ONLY (Leave blank) 2. REPORT DATE December 2005 3. REPORT TYPE AND DATES created for the 0.29 0.31µ- spectral range of the LINUS sensor. Field observations were made of a coal. Field observations were made of a coal burni

  17. POSTGRADUATE MONTEREY, CALIFORNIA

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    Shaffer, Alan

    AND VERIFICATION OF SOFTWARE SYSTEMS by Alan B. Shaffer December 2008 Dissertation Supervisor: Mikhail Auguston #12(S) Alan B. Shaffer 5. FUNDING NUMBERS 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) Naval

  18. POSTGRADUATE MONTEREY, CALIFORNIA

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    in Iraq ­ the largest single cause of death. One reason for their high rate of effectiveness Major, United States Marine Corps B.S., Arizona State University, 1996 Submitted in partial fulfillment

  19. POSTGRADUATE MONTEREY, CALIFORNIA

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    School (NPS), from the roof of Spanagel Hall. Field observations were conducted at a coal-burning factory Sulfur Dioxide (SO2), Remote Sensing, Ultraviolet (UV) Spectral Imaging, LINUS, 16. PRICE CODE 17

  20. POSTGRADUATE MONTEREY, CALIFORNIA

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    is unlimited GROWING AN IDEOLOGY: HOW THE MORMONS DO IT by Marshall F. Chalverus Michael A. Thomas December COVERED Master's Thesis 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Growing an Ideology: How the Mormons Do It 5. FUNDING, religious, religiosity, church, Mormon, Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, organizational

  1. POSTGRADUATE MONTEREY, CALIFORNIA

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    ), is developed to provide authentication services for open source information. A formal development process. TITLE AND SUBTITLE: Secure Distribution of Open Source Information 6. AUTHOR(S) Rogers, Jason 5. FUNDING open source information. Also, the Strand Space method is demonstrated as a viable option

  2. Advanced Reservoir Characterization in the Antelope Shale to Establish the Viability of CO{sub 2} Enhanced Oil Recovery in California's Monterey Formation Siliceous Shales

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael F. Morea

    1997-03-14

    The Buena Vista Hills field is located about 25 miles southwest of Bakersfield, in Kern County, California, about two miles north of the city of Taft, and five miles south of the Elk Hills field. The Antelope Shale zone was discovered at the Buena Vista Hills field in 1952, and has since been under primary production. Little research was done to improve the completion techniques during the development phase in the 1950s, so most of the wells are completed with about 1000 ft of slotted liner. The proposed pilot consists of four existing producers on 20 acre spacing with a new 10 acre infill well drilled as the pilot CO{sub 2} injector. Most of the reservoir characterization of the first phase of the project will be performed using data collected in the pilot pattern wells. This is the first annual report of the project. It covers the period February 12, 1996 to February 11, 1997. During this period the Chevron Murvale 653Z-26B well was drilled in Section 26-T31S/R23E in the Buena Vista Hills field, Kern County, California. The Monterey Formation equivalent Brown and Antelope Shales were continuously cored, the zone was logged with several different kinds of wireline logs, and the well was cased to a total depth of 4907 ft. Core recovery was 99.5%. Core analyses that have been performed include Dean Stark porosity, permeability and fluid saturations, field wettability, anelastic strain recovery, spectral core gamma, profile permeametry, and photographic imaging. Wireline log analysis includes mineral-based error minimization (ELAN), NMR T2 processing, and dipole shear wave anisotropy. A shear wave vertical seismic profile was acquired after casing was set and processing is nearly complete.

  3. An HRTEM investigation of the metastable low-temperature silica phase opal-CT in cherts and porcelanites from the Monterey Formation, CA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cady, S.L.; Wenk, H.R. )

    1992-01-01

    High resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) is used to investigate the metastable low-temperature silica phase opal-CT in cherts and porcelanites from the Miocene Monterey Formation of California. Low-dose imaging techniques developed to image highly beam sensitive proteins were used in this study and have resulted in good phase contrast images of this hydrous silica phase. Detailed X-ray powder diffraction studies of stratigraphically equivalent rocks along the Santa Barbara coast indicate that the primary d-spacing of newly formed opal-CT differs in rocks with different ratios of silica and detrital minerals. Opal-CT forms progressively later and with a smaller primary d-spacing in rocks with increasing amounts of detrital minerals. In siliceous cherts opal-CT occurs as long needles that most often form dense spherulitic fiber bundles which are randomly dispersed within the rock matrix. The random orientation of fiber bundle nucleation centers does not appear to be associated with any obvious nucleation site, unlike the length-slow opal-CT fibers known as lussatite. Opal-CT needles produce optical diffractogram patterns that are compatible with tridymite and crystobalite. Streaking in the diffraction pattern of individual needles is attributed to a high density of planar defects parallel to their length. Planar defects are not as abundant in opal-CT needles formed in detrital-rich rocks suggesting the rapid growth of opal-CT in highly siliceous environments results in a greater proportion of stacking disorder in the needles. HRTEM provides a method for investigating the development of the microstructure of opal-CT during diagenesis.

  4. NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL Monterey, California

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    -by-step fabrication of a thermonuclear device. Recognizing the potential for misuse as well as for informing

  5. NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL MONTEREY, CALIFORNIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OR unmanned OR U?V OR A?V OR drone OR (remotely piloted)) Reports (Technical Reports): 'naval postgraduate school' AND (robot$ OR autonomous OR unmanned OR U?V OR A?V OR drone OR (remotely piloted)) NOT (thesis OR U?$V OR A?$V OR drone* OR (remotely piloted))) AND (AD=((USN OR Nav*) AND (NPS OR NPGS OR post

  6. NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL Monterey, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CONTINUOUSAPPLICATIONS by Kendal V. Polk June 2000 Thesis Advisor: Cynthia Irvine Second Reader: Timothy LevinAuulications 5. FUNDING NUMBERS 5. AUTHOR(S) Polk, Kendal V. 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) 8; distributionis unlimited TRANSPARENTDETECTION OF QOS VIOLATIONSFOR CONTINUOUS APPLICATIONS Kendal V. Polk Captain

  7. NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL Monterey, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    authors (Kramer, 1994; Smith, 1995; and Brown, 1999)" Examples for two authors: "...Smith and White (1999

  8. NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL MONTEREY, CALIFORNIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    RESEA;l.CH IN MULTISE::.JSOR DATA ?US I ON . II I . THEO::RADIATION- MATTER INTERACTION . RADIATION-MATTER I NTE XACTION I N VIS I BLE WAV8L"NG7HS .. Crystal F ield Effect .. . ......... . .·. 2. Charge Transfer . 3 . Conjugate Bonds . RAD I AT I 8K - "'.A.TTER INTERACTION I N MICRO\\o,'AVE . ... 2 1

  9. NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL MONTEREY, CALIFORNIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OF SPECIAL SENSOR MICROWAVE/IMAGER OCEAN SURFACE WIND SPEED RETRlEVAL ALGORITHMS FOR THE PERlOD SEPTEMBER. Of particular interest is The ability to USt the SSMII to remmely seme ocean ~urfa~c winds For this srudy iourWlooii1ltt wind retricvalalgontbm, initiall,' proposed at tbe SSMIl Algorithm SYllljJ05lUm heid in Jooe

  10. NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL MONTEREY, CALIFORNIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    /IMAGER OCEAN SURFACE WIND RETRIEVALS IN EQUATORIAL REGIONS Thesis Advisor: Co-Advisor: by Elton G. Sayward/IMAGER OCEAN SURFACE WIND RETRIEVALS IN EQUATORIAL REGIONS 6. AUTHOR(S) Elton G. Sayward 7. PERFORMING, in particular the ability to remotely sense ocean surface winds. Currently, alternative SSM/I ocean surface wind

  11. McGrawMonterey1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shines light on dark matter By Sarah

  12. Advanced reservoir characterization in the Antelope Shale to establish the viability of CO{sub 2} enhanced oil recovery in California`s Monterey Formation siliceous shales. Annual report, February 12, 1996--February 11, 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Toronyi, R.M.

    1997-12-01

    The Buena Vista Hills field is located about 25 miles southwest of Bakersfield, in Kern County, California, about two miles north of the city of Taft, and five miles south of the Elk Hills field. The Antelope Shale zone was discovered at the Buena Vista Hills field in 1952, and has since been under primary production. Little research was done to improve the completion techniques during the development phase in the 1950s, so most of the wells are completed with about 1000 ft of slotted liner. The proposed pilot consists of four existing producers on 20 acre spacing with a new 10 acre infill well drilled as the pilot CO{sub 2} injector. Most of the reservoir characterization of the first phase of the project will be performed using data collected in the pilot pattern wells. This is the first annual report of the project. It covers the period February 12, 1996 to February 11, 1997. During this period the Chevron Murvale 653Z-26B well was drilled in Section 26-T31S/R23E in the Buena Vista Hills field, Kern County, California. The Monterey Formation equivalent Brown and Antelope Shales were continuously cored, the zone was logged with several different kinds of wireline logs, and the well was cased to a total depth of 4907 ft. Core recovery was 99.5%. Core analyses that have been performed include Dean Stark porosity, permeability and fluid saturations, field wettability, anelastic strain recovery, spectral core gamma, profile permeametry, and photographic imaging. Wireline log analysis includes mineral-based error minimization (ELAN), NMR T2 processing, and dipole shear wave anisotropy. A shear wave vertical seismic profile was acquired after casing was set and processing is nearly complete.

  13. Biomarker and Paleontological Investigations of the Late Devonian Extinctions, Woodford Shale, Southern Oklahoma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nowaczewski, Vincent Stephen

    2011-12-31

    that applied FTIR microspectroscopy and py- GC/MS to scolecodonts from the Devonian of Germany, the Ordovician of Ohio, U.S.A., and the Silurian of Sweden (Dutta et al., 2010). Dutta et al. (2010) found that his scolecodont samples did not contain signatures... that applied FTIR microspectroscopy and py- GC/MS to scolecodonts from the Devonian of Germany, the Ordovician of Ohio, U.S.A., and the Silurian of Sweden (Dutta et al., 2010). Dutta et al. (2010) found that his scolecodont samples did not contain signatures...

  14. Contraction Moves for Geometric Model Fitting Oliver J. Woodford, Minh-Tri Pham, Atsuto Maki,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stenger, Björn

    . This paper presents a new class of moves, called -expansion- contraction, which generalizes -expansion graph for optimizing the assignments in model fitting frameworks whose energies include Label Cost (LC), as well extensively in the early computer vision literature [1,2,3,4], has received renewed interest [5

  15. Monterey folio, Virginia-West Virginia 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Darton, Nelson Horatio, 1865-1948.

    1899-01-01

    Shale gas formation exhibits some unusual reservoir characteristics: nano-darcy matrix permeability, presence of natural fractures and gas storage on the matrix surface that makes it unique in many ways. It’s difficult to design an optimum fracture...

  16. Recent Sediments of Monterey Bay, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yancey, T. E.

    1968-01-01

    E. 4092,520 m. N. River sediment Lorenzo River. sample UTMDynamics of nearshore sediment movement: Geologists Bull. ,and Postma, H. 1954, Recent sediments of the Gulf of Paria:

  17. Monterey, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsourceII Jump to: navigation, searchsource History ViewMoe WindJumpJump

  18. Conflict at Monterey: Indian Horse Raiding, 1820-1850

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Broadbent, Sylvia M.

    1974-01-01

    writers of the period as Tulare Indians. This term probablyfrom the direction of the Tulare valley. They may have beenwas on the periphery of Tulare attacks and probably never

  19. Catherine Barr: Manager, Monterey Bay Certified Farmers' Markets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rabkin, Sarah

    2010-01-01

    They’ve gotten a lot of gigs through where they are. Andmorning, before he does his gig on the Pacific Garden Mall.

  20. MONTEREY CA 93943-5101 NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    employed to analyze field data taken of a coal-burning power plant. Analysis of this plume data yielded Dioxide, Pollution, Remote Sensing, Environmental Monitoring 15. NUMBER OF PAGES 104 16. PRICE CODE 17

  1. Monterey Park, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland: EnergyInformation Montana Watershed ProtectionMontauk,

  2. Microsoft Word - RSSkied_AWG_Monterey2007.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shines light on77 PAGE OFDetection of Hydrates onRHUBCAeronet Procedure 11 yes

  3. Microsoft PowerPoint - AAVP.ASTM.Monterey..ppt

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shines light on darkMicroorganisms to SpeedJacksonville, Illinois June 9,ARM

  4. New College MS 328 and `Jane the Quene' New College MS 328, presented to College in 1710 by Rev. John Woodford, Fellow,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flynn, E. Victor

    and fabrics for the Royal household. Hidden away in the middle, are two signed by an altogether more enigmatic, effectively making Jane his successor. The will was made official through letters patent on 21 June, signed

  5. Managing Projects with Strong Technological Rupture - Case of High-Speed Ground Transportation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Tiličre, Guillaume

    2002-01-01

    Factors in Power Plants, Monterey-California. Yamamoto M. &Factors in Power Plants, Monterey -California. Williams T.M.

  6. Inventory of Shale Formations in the US, Including Geologic, Hydrological, and Mechanical Characteristics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dobson, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    the Haynesville Shale, Gulf of Mexico Basin. Figure producedthe Haynesville Shale, Gulf of Mexico Basin. Figure producedThe Woodford Shale in southeastern New Mexico: distribution

  7. Wave Energy Converter (WEC) Array Effects on Wave Current and Sediment Circulation: Monterey Bay CA.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roberts, Jesse D.; Jones, Craig; Magalen, Jason

    2014-09-01

    The goal s of this study were to develop tools to quantitatively characterize environments where wave energy converter ( WEC ) devices may be installed and to assess e ffects on hydrodynamics and lo cal sediment transport. A large hypothetical WEC array was investigated using wave, hydrodynamic, and sediment transport models and site - specific average and storm conditions as input. The results indicated that there were significant changes in sediment s izes adjacent to and in the lee of the WEC array due to reduced wave energy. The circulation in the lee of the array was also altered; more intense onshore currents were generated in the lee of the WECs . In general, the storm case and the average case show ed the same qualitative patterns suggesting that these trends would be maintained throughout the year. The framework developed here can be used to design more efficient arrays while minimizing impacts on nearshore environmen ts.

  8. Ocean Odysseys: Jack O'Neill, Dan Haifley, and the Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Neill, Jack; Haifley, Dan; Reti, Irene; Regional History Project, UCSC Library

    2012-01-01

    fly the balloons and the airship off of. We found it down inflying the balloon off of it, getting the airship ready. Andthey had some trouble with the airship and we really weren’t

  9. Integrating Zooarchaeology and Modeling: Trans-Holocene Fishing in Monterey Bay, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boone, Cristie

    2012-01-01

    K. Dayton and M. B. Hatch 2009 Fishing from past to present:M. D. 1987 Women's fishing in Oceania. Human Ecology 15(3):341-351. Colten, R. H. 1991 Fishing during the Millingstone

  10. Ocean Odysseys: Jack O'Neill, Dan Haifley, and the Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Neill, Jack; Haifley, Dan; Reti, Irene; Regional History Project, UCSC Library

    2012-01-01

    well-organized posse of volunteers working since 1978 on coastal issues including offshore oil drillingoil drilling. What does that mean? Haifley: Well, I was justWell, it is another set of regulations but it is the reason we don’t have offshore drilling

  11. WECS7, Naval Postgraduate School Monterey, CA, January 4-6, 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Effect Analysis (FMEA) · Software error seeding and scenario analysis · Threat modeling--Microsoft Tool

  12. Ocean Odysseys: Jack O'Neill, Dan Haifley, and the Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Neill, Jack; Haifley, Dan; Reti, Irene; Regional History Project, UCSC Library

    2012-01-01

    416,598 gallons of crude oil. It was owned by British10.8 million gallons of crude oil into Prince William Sound,4.9 million barrels of crude oil. This is the largest

  13. Integrating Zooarchaeology and Modeling: Trans-Holocene Fishing in Monterey Bay, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boone, Cristie

    2012-01-01

    6050 BC, it was a high-energy tidal inlet at its mouth,described the high energy tidal environment as graduallyElkhorn Slough was a high-energy tidal inlet for thousands

  14. Integrating Zooarchaeology and Modeling: Trans-Holocene Fishing in Monterey Bay, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boone, Cristie

    2012-01-01

    1999:35). For example, at c. 7050 BC [“9000 years ago”], thein insolation was greatest c. 7050 BC (Kutzbach and Guetteracross the globe from 7050 to 6050 BC. The Northern

  15. Ocean Odysseys: Jack O'Neill, Dan Haifley, and the Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Neill, Jack; Haifley, Dan; Reti, Irene; Regional History Project, UCSC Library

    2012-01-01

    on the final blueprint: water pollution from storm drains,was water quality in terms of point source pollution, whichinto the water, for example. So stormwater pollution is very

  16. Ocean Odysseys: Jack O'Neill, Dan Haifley, and the Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Neill, Jack; Haifley, Dan; Reti, Irene; Regional History Project, UCSC Library

    2012-01-01

    on the building? Solar Panels on the O’Neill BuildingYes. We got a grant to do solar panels on our building. We

  17. Ocean Odysseys: Jack O'Neill, Dan Haifley, and the Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Neill, Jack; Haifley, Dan; Reti, Irene; Regional History Project, UCSC Library

    2012-01-01

    for cities and counties to control stormwater pollution,cities and counties have to upgrade their response to stormwater pollution.city or a miniature farm field and see how pollution comes

  18. Ocean Odysseys: Jack O'Neill, Dan Haifley, and the Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Neill, Jack; Haifley, Dan; Reti, Irene; Regional History Project, UCSC Library

    2012-01-01

    research things. I’d get on the phone— Reti: Public library?Haifley: The public library. I’d get on the phone, talk to

  19. Ocean Odysseys: Jack O'Neill, Dan Haifley, and the Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Neill, Jack; Haifley, Dan; Reti, Irene; Regional History Project, UCSC Library

    2012-01-01

    politics in the community, specifically the anti-nuclearpolitics by developing a ballot measure opposing Lockheed Santa Cruz’s role in building parts for the Trident nuclear

  20. Ocean Odysseys: Jack O'Neill, Dan Haifley, and the Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Neill, Jack; Haifley, Dan; Reti, Irene; Regional History Project, UCSC Library

    2012-01-01

    of 1969. Haifley attended West Valley Community College inand spent two years at West Valley College. I worked my way—very well academically at West Valley, a two-year college in

  1. Ocean Odysseys: Jack O'Neill, Dan Haifley, and the Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Neill, Jack; Haifley, Dan; Reti, Irene; Regional History Project, UCSC Library

    2012-01-01

    And then what about alternative energy questions. Did youpathway towards more alternative energy and less fossil fuelSo we need to look at alternative energy. When I was at Save

  2. Ocean Odysseys: Jack O'Neill, Dan Haifley, and the Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Neill, Jack; Haifley, Dan; Reti, Irene; Regional History Project, UCSC Library

    2012-01-01

    pathway towards more alternative energy and less fossil fuelAnd then what about alternative energy questions. Did youSo we need to look at alternative energy. When I was at Save

  3. ASILOMAR 32ND CONFERENCE ON `SIGNALS, SYSTEMS AND COMPUTERS', MONTEREY 1998 A Simple Statistical Analysis of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Riedi, Rudolf H.

    of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Rice University Houston, Texas 77005, USA Abstract The multifractal from a finite data record. In this paper, we derive asymptotic expressions for the bias and variance Consortium for Computational Seismic Interpretation. Email: paulo.goncalves@inria.fr, riedi@rice.edu, richb

  4. Ocean Odysseys: Jack O'Neill, Dan Haifley, and the Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Neill, Jack; Haifley, Dan; Reti, Irene; Regional History Project, UCSC Library

    2012-01-01

    words of green jobs, green energy, creating jobs in a badself-reliance and green energy, I think are key. Otherwise,

  5. Time-series analyses of Monterey Bay coastal microbial picoplankton using a ‘genome proxy’ microarray

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rich, Virginia I.

    To investigate the temporal, spatial and phylogenetic resolution of marine microbial community structure and variability, we designed and expanded a genome proxy array (an oligonucleotide microarray targeting marine microbial ...

  6. Ocean Odysseys: Jack O'Neill, Dan Haifley, and the Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Neill, Jack; Haifley, Dan; Reti, Irene; Regional History Project, UCSC Library

    2012-01-01

    company at this point but it still seems like a familythe family, all the siblings, have all worked in the companyfamily. And I was injecting an environmental ethic, which of course the company

  7. Ocean Odysseys: Jack O'Neill, Dan Haifley, and the Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Neill, Jack; Haifley, Dan; Reti, Irene; Regional History Project, UCSC Library

    2012-01-01

    we did with the Manhattan Project, we can make a difference.won that war. The Manhattan Project happened, not quickly,

  8. 12th INFORMS Computing Society Conference Monterey, California, January 911, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flener, Pierre

    macroprogramming for wireless sensor networks (WSNs). A task graph repres- enting the flow of data among tasks consists of at least a sensor, processor, radio transmitter, and a battery. It is of great concern of a WSN depends critically on the energy consumption of the nodes, especially in cases where the battery

  9. Microsoft PowerPoint - 02_A_AWG_Monterey_ALIVE_Schmid_short.ppt [Compatibility Mode]

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shines light on darkMicroorganisms to Speed Production of Biofuels9STM,Lustre

  10. Indefinite Deferral: Imagining Salinas Valley’s Subterranean Stream

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sarna-Wojcicki, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    County Flood Control and Water Conservation District Actthe Monterey Flood Control and Water Conservation District,49 Monterey County Flood Control and Water Conservation Act,

  11. Investigation of Wave Energy Converter Effects on Wave Fields: A Modeling Sensitivity Study in Monterey Bay CA.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roberts, Jesse D.; Grace Chang; Jason Magalen; Craig Jones

    2014-08-01

    A n indust ry standard wave modeling tool was utilized to investigate model sensitivity to input parameters and wave energy converter ( WEC ) array deploym ent scenarios. Wave propagation was investigated d ownstream of the WECs to evaluate overall near - and far - field effects of WEC arrays. The sensitivity study illustrate d that b oth wave height and near - bottom orbital velocity we re subject to the largest pote ntial variations, each decreas ed in sensitivity as transmission coefficient increase d , as number and spacing of WEC devices decrease d , and as the deployment location move d offshore. Wave direction wa s affected consistently for all parameters and wave perio d was not affected (or negligibly affected) by varying model parameters or WEC configuration .

  12. Wave Energy Converter Effects on Wave Fields: Evaluation of SNL-SWAN and Sensitivity Studies in Monterey Bay CA.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roberts, Jesse D.; Chang, Grace; Magalen, Jason; Jones, Craig

    2014-09-01

    A modified version of an indust ry standard wave modeling tool was evaluated, optimized, and utilized to investigate model sensitivity to input parameters a nd wave energy converter ( WEC ) array deployment scenarios. Wave propagation was investigated d ownstream of the WECs to evaluate overall near - and far - field effects of WEC arrays. The sensitivity study illustrate d that wave direction and WEC device type we r e most sensitive to the variation in the model parameters examined in this study . Generally, the changes in wave height we re the primary alteration caused by the presence of a WEC array. Specifically, W EC device type and subsequently their size directly re sult ed in wave height variations; however, it is important to utilize ongoing laboratory studies and future field tests to determine the most appropriate power matrix values for a particular WEC device and configuration in order to improve modeling results .

  13. Investigation of Wave Energy Converter Effects on the Nearshore Environment: A Month-Long Study in Monterey Bay CA.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roberts, Jesse D.; Chang, Grace; Magalen, Jason; Jones, Craig

    2014-09-01

    A modified version of an indust ry standard wave modeling tool, SNL - SWAN, was used to perform model simulations for hourly initial wave conditio ns measured during the month of October 2009. The model was run with an array of 50 wave energy converters (WECs) and compared with model runs without WECs. Maximum changes in H s were found in the lee of the WEC array along the angles of incident wave dire ction and minimal changes were found along the western side of the model domain due to wave shadowing by land. The largest wave height reductions occurred during observed typhoon conditions and resulted in 14% decreases in H s along the Santa Cruz shoreline . Shoreline reductions in H s were 5% during s outh swell wave conditions and negligible during average monthly wave conditions.

  14. Implementation of a Multilevel Wiki for Cross-Domain Collaboration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Information Grid (GIG) vision calls for a highly flexible multilevel environment. The Monterey Security

  15. Security Domain Model and Implementation Modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mikhail Auguston & Alan Shaffer Computer Science Department Naval Postgraduate School Monterey, CA #12

  16. Integrated Pest Management for Home Gardeners and Landscape Professionals Bagrada Bug

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ishida, Yuko

    was found in Fresno, Tulare, and Monterey counties. Other states where this stink bug is currently found

  17. Miniature netting system for endoscopic object retrieval from hard-to-reach area

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Choi, W; Rubtsov, V; Kim, CJ

    2013-01-01

    ASME Transactions on Mechatronics, vol. 9, pp. 334– S. W.Advanced Intelligent Mechatronics, pp. 54–59, Monterey, USA,

  18. Our Ocean Backyard Santa Cruz Sentinel columns by Gary Griggs, Director, Institute of Marine Sciences, UC Santa Cruz.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    be a better way to make cement. After months of laboratory scale work in Los Gatos, hauling Monterey Bay

  19. 11th AIAA/CEAS Aeroacoustics Conference, 23-25 May 2005, Monterey, CA, USA Acoustic Modes in a Ducted Shear Flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rienstra, Sjoerd W.

    in a Ducted Shear Flow Gregory Vilenski Sjoerd W. Rienstra Eindhoven University of Technology, 5600 MB inside a duct is considered. For isentropic flow in a circular duct with zero swirl and constant mean on the coordinate axes x,r and , p = density and pressure s = tip-to-hub ratio h = dimensional inner duct radius d

  20. 11th AIAA/CEAS Aeroacoustics Conference, 23-25 May 2005, Monterey, CA, USA An Analytic Green's Function for a Lined Circular Duct

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rienstra, Sjoerd W.

    's Function for a Lined Circular Duct Containing Uniform Mean Flow (corr.) Sjoerd W. Rienstra Eindhoven, Southampton S017 1BJ, UK. An analytic Green's function is derived for a lined circular duct, both hollow is not considered in the present study. We show that the analytic Green's function for a lined hollow circular duct

  1. Advanced Reservoir Characterization in the Antelope Shale to Establish the Viability of CO2 Enhanced Oil Recovery in California's Monterey Formation Siliceous Shales, Class III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perri, Pasquale R.; Cooney, John; Fong, Bill; Julander, Dale; Marasigan, Aleks; Morea, Mike; Piceno, Deborah; Stone, Bill; Emanuele, Mark; Sheffield, Jon; Wells, Jeff; Westbrook, Bill; Karnes, Karl; Pearson, Matt; Heisler, Stuart

    2000-04-24

    The primary objective of this project was to conduct advanced reservoir characterization and modeling studies in the Antelope Shale of the Bureau Vista Hills Field. Work was subdivided into two phases or budget periods. The first phase of the project focused on a variety of advanced reservoir characterization techniques to determine the production characteristics of the Antelope Shale reservoir. Reservoir models based on the results of the characterization work would then be used to evaluate how the reservoir would respond to enhanced oil recovery (EOR) processes such as of CO2 flooding. The second phase of the project would be to implement and evaluate a CO2 in the Buena Vista Hills Field. A successful project would demonstrate the economic viability and widespread applicability of CO2 flooding in siliceous shale reservoirs of the San Joaquin Valley.

  2. New insights into the origin, transport and behavior of noble gases : examples from Monterey Bay, Costa Rica, Iceland, and the Central Indian Ridge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fueri, Evelyn

    2010-01-01

    chemical species (e.g. , methane) at the mounds in the outer fore-arc region were based on observed methane

  3. Seventh International Symposium on Technology and Mine Problem, NPS, Monterey, California, USA, 2-4 May, 2006 1 Abstract -The Navy's Impact Burial Model (IMPACT35)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chu, Peter C.

    -4 May, 2006 1 1 Abstract - The Navy's Impact Burial Model (IMPACT35) predicts the cylindrical mine.S. Navy from "blue" water, anti-Soviet focus, towards a concentration on the regional littoral threats of the world. With the increasing number of regional and asymmetric threats, the Navy must operate effectively

  4. 555 Dyer Road, Ingersoll Hall, Monterey, CA 93950 (831) 656-3487 www.defensereform.org Best practices in the Navy's energy programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    practices in the Navy's energy programs Strategic communication factors operating in the tactical forces Abstract The Department of the Navy is the second largest consumer of petroleum within the Department of Defense and has been tasked by Navy leadership to reduce energy costs in the tactical forces. Energy

  5. Fish Bulletin No. 43. The Sizes of California Sardines Caught by the Different Fishing Gear and in the Different Localities of the Monterey and San Pedro Regions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California State Fisheries Laboratory

    1931-01-01

    9, 95 pp. 7. THE EFFECT OF GEAR AND LOCALITY ON THE SIZES OFuse of one type of fishing gear, nor is the fishing confinedby the different fishing gear? 2. Is there a difference in

  6. An assessment of lighter than air technology : the report of the Multi-agency Workshop on Lighter Than Air : Monterey California, September 9-13, 1974

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vittek, Joseph F.

    1974-01-01

    Summary: This document is a draft report of the Workshops' output - The Working Group Reports. It is for your review and comment which should be returned to me by January 1, 1975. With those comments and criticisms in hand, ...

  7. 11th Topical Conference on High-Temperature Plasma Diagnostics, Monterey, California, May 1996 Statistically robust linear and non-linear wavelet analysis applied to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Milligen, Boudewijn

    Milligen, C. Hidalgo, E. Sánchez, M.A. Pedrosa, R. Balbín and I. García-Cortés Asociacion Euratom-CIEMAT

  8. Development of a "genome-proxy" microarray for profiling marine microbial communities, and its application to a time series in Monterey Bay, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rich, Virginia Isabel

    2008-01-01

    This thesis describes the development and application of a new tool for profiling marine microbial communities. Chapter 1 places the tool in the context of the range of methods used currently. Chapter 2 describes the ...

  9. New insights into the origin, transport and behavior of noble gases : examples from Monterey Bay, Costa Rica, Iceland, and the Central Indian Ridge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fueri, Evelyn

    2010-01-01

    Figure IV.1: Map of Iceland showing the neovolcanic zonesfluids from Iceland . . . . . . . . . . . . .Table IV.3:a palaeo-rift in northwest Iceland. Earth Planet. Sci. Lett.

  10. Advanced Reservoir Characterization in the Antelope Shale to Establish the Viability of C02 Enhanced Oil Recovery in California's Monterey Formation Siliceous Shales

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael F. Morea

    1997-04-25

    The primary objective of this research is to conduct advanced reservoir characterization and modeling studies in the Antelope Shale reservoir. Characterization studies will be used to determine the technical feasibility of implementing a CO2 enhanced oil recovery project in the Antelope Shale in Buena Vista Hills Field. The Buena Vista Hills pilot CO2 project will demonstrate the economic viability and widespread applicability of CO2 flooding in fractured siliceous shale reservoirs of the San Joaquin Valley. The research consists of four primary work processes: Reservoir Matrix and Fluid Characterization; Fracture Characterization; Reservoir Modeling and Simulation; and CO2 Pilot Flood and Evaluation. Work done in these areas is subdivided into two phases or budget periods. The first phase of the project will focus on the application of a variety of advanced reservoir characterization techniques to determine the production characteristics of the Antelope Shale reservoir. Reservoir models based on the results of the characterization work will be used to evaluate how the reservoir will respond to secondary recovery and EOR processes. The second phase of the project will include the implementation and evaluation of an advanced enhanced oil recovery (EOR) pilot in the West Dome of the Buena Vista Hills Field.

  11. ADVANCED RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION IN THE ANTELOPE SHALE TO ESTABLISH THE VIABILITY OF CO2 ENHANCED OIL RECOVERY IN CALIFORNIA'S MONTEREY FORMATION SILICEOUS SHALES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pasquale R. Perri

    2003-05-15

    This report describes the evaluation, design, and implementation of a DOE funded CO{sub 2} pilot project in the Lost Hills Field, Kern County, California. The pilot consists of four inverted (injector-centered) 5-spot patterns covering approximately 10 acres, and is located in a portion of the field, which has been under waterflood since early 1992. The target reservoir for the CO{sub 2} pilot is the Belridge Diatomite. The pilot location was selected based on geologic considerations, reservoir quality and reservoir performance during the waterflood. A CO{sub 2} pilot was chosen, rather than full-field implementation, to investigate uncertainties associated with CO{sub 2} utilization rate and premature CO{sub 2} breakthrough, and overall uncertainty in the unproven CO{sub 2} flood process in the San Joaquin Valley. A summary of the design and objectives of the CO{sub 2} pilot are included along with an overview of the Lost Hills geology, discussion of pilot injection and production facilities, and discussion of new wells drilled and remedial work completed prior to commencing injection. Actual CO{sub 2} injection began on August 31, 2000 and a comprehensive pilot monitoring and surveillance program has been implemented. Since the initiation of CO{sub 2} injection, the pilot has been hampered by excessive sand production in the pilot producers due to casing damage related to subsidence and exacerbated by the injected CO{sub 2}. Therefore CO{sub 2} injection was very sporadic in 2001 and 2002 and we experienced long periods of time with no CO{sub 2} injection. As a result of the continued mechanical problems, the pilot project was terminated on January 30, 2003. This report summarizes the injection and production performance and the monitoring results through December 31, 2002 including oil geochemistry, CO{sub 2} injection tracers, crosswell electromagnetic surveys, crosswell seismic, CO{sub 2} injection profiling, cased hole resistivity, tiltmetering results, and corrosion monitoring results. Although the Lost Hills CO{sub 2} pilot was not successful, the results and lessons learned presented in this report may be applicable to evaluate and design other potential San Joaquin Valley CO{sub 2} floods.

  12. Advanced Reservoir Characterization in the Antelope Shale to Establish the Viability of CO2 Enhanced Oil Recovery in California's Monterey Formation Siliceous Shales, Class III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perri, Pasquale R.

    2001-04-04

    This report describes the evaluation, design, and implementation of a DOE funded CO2 pilot project in the Lost Hills Field, Kern County, California. The pilot consists of four inverted (injector-centered) 5-spot patterns covering approximately 10 acres, and is located in a portion of the field, which has been under waterflood since early 1992. The target reservoir for the CO2 pilot is the Belridge Diatomite. The pilot location was selected based on geology, reservoir quality and reservoir performance during the waterflood. A CO2 pilot was chosen, rather than full-field implementation, to investigate uncertainties associated with CO2 utilization rate and premature CO2 breakthrough, and overall uncertainty in the unproven CO2 flood process in the San Joaquin Valley.

  13. Advanced Reservoir Characterization in the Antelope Shale to Establish the Viability of CO2 Enhanced Oil Recovery in California's Monterey Formation Siliceous Shales

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morea, Michael F.

    1999-11-01

    The primary objective of this research is to conduct advanced reservoir characterization and modeling studies in the Antelope Shale reservoir. Characterization studies will be used to determine the technical feasibility of implementing a CO2 enhanced oil recovery project in the Antelope Shale in Buena Vista Hills Field. The Buena Vista Hills pilot CO2 project will demonstrate the economic viability and widespread applicability of CO2 flooding in fractured siliceous shale reservoirs of the San Joaquin Valley. The research consists of four primary work processes: (1) Reservoir Matrix and Fluid Characterization; (2) Fracture characterization; (3) reservoir Modeling and Simulation; and (4) CO2 Pilot Flood and Evaluation. Work done in these areas is subdivided into two phases or budget periods. The first phase of the project will focus on the application of a variety of advanced reservoir characterization techniques to determine the production characteristics of the Antelope Shale reservoir. Reservoir models based on the results of the characterization work will be used to evaluate how the reservoir will respond to secondary recovery and EOR processes. The second phase of the project will include the implementation and evaluation of an advanced enhanced oil recovery (EOR) pilot in the United Anticline (West Dome) of the Buena Vista Hills Field.

  14. Advanced Reservoir Characterization in the Antelope Shale to Establish the Viability of C02 Enhanced Oil Recovery in California's Monterey Formation Siliceous Shales

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael F. Morea.

    1998-04-23

    The primary objective of this research is to conduct advanced reservoir characterization and modeling studies in the Antelope Shale reservoir. Characterization studies will be used to determine the technical feasibility of implementing a CO2 enhanced oil recovery project in the Antelope Shale in Buena Vista Hills Field. The Buena Vista Hills pilot CO2 project will demonstrate the economic viability and widespread applicability of CO2 flooding in fractured siliceous shale reservoirs of the San Joaquin Valley. The research consists of four primary work processes: Reservoir Matrix and Fluid Characterization; Fracture Characterization; Reservoir Modeling and Simulation; and CO2 Pilot Flood and Evaluation. Work done in these areas is subdivided into two phases or budget periods. The first phase of the project will focus on the application of a variety of advanced reservoir characterization techniques to determine the production characteristics of the Antelope Shale reservoir. Reservoir models based on the results of the characterization work will be used to evaluate how the reservoir will respond to secondary recovery and EOR processes. The second phase of the project will include the implementation and evaluation of an advanced enhanced oil recovery (EOR) pilot in the United Anticline (West Dome) of the Buena Vista Hills Field.

  15. Advanced Reservoir Characterization in the Antelope Shale to Establish the Viability of CO2 Enhanced Oil Recovery in California's Monterey Formation Siliceous Shales

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morea, Michael F.

    1999-11-08

    The primary objective of this research is to conduct advanced reservoir characterization and modeling studies in the Antelope Shale reservoir. Characterization studies will be used to determine the technical feasibility of implementing a CO2 enhanced oil recovery project in the Antelope Shale in Buena Vista Hills Field. The Buena Vista Hills pilot CO2 project will demonstrate the economic viability and widespread applicability of CO2 flooding in fractured siliceous shale reservoirs of the San Joaquin Valley. The research consists of four primary work processes: (1) Reservoir Matrix and Fluid Characterization; (2) Fracture characterization; (3) reservoir Modeling and Simulation; and (4) CO2 Pilot Flood and Evaluation. Work done in these areas is subdivided into two phases or budget periods. The first phase of the project will focus on the application of a variety of advanced reservoir characterization techniques to determine the production characteristics of the Antelope Shale reservoir. Reservoir models based on the results of the characterization work will be used to evaluate how the reservoir will respond to secondary recovery and EOR processes. The second phase of the project will include the implementation and evaluation of an advanced enhanced oil recovery (EOR) pilot in the United Anticline (West Dome) of the Buena Vista Hills Field.

  16. Office of the Dean of Research Naval Postgraduate School Monterey, CA 93943-5138 www.nps.edu/research research@nps.edu Command and Control Initiatives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , and unmanned aerial vehicles (AUVs, USVs, and UAVs) and unattended ground (and un- derwater) sensors (UGS.nps.edu/research · research@nps.edu Command and Control Initiatives with Cooperating Unmanned Vehicles The utility of unmanned unmanned vehicles deployed in large areas will be less expensive than equivalent manned opera- tions

  17. New insights into the origin, transport and behavior of noble gases : examples from Monterey Bay, Costa Rica, Iceland, and the Central Indian Ridge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fueri, Evelyn

    2010-01-01

    isotope disequilibrium and geochronology of glassy submarineMcDougall I. (1971) Geochronology and evolution of youngMagnetostratigraphy and geochronology of northwest Iceland.

  18. New insights into the origin, transport and behavior of noble gases : examples from Monterey Bay, Costa Rica, Iceland, and the Central Indian Ridge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fueri, Evelyn

    2010-01-01

    geochemistry applied to earthquake prediction: an overview,1984), Prediction of central California earthquakes from

  19. New Mexico Bureau of Geology & Mineral Resources A DIVISION OF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borchers, Brian

    , The Barnett Shale in southeastern New Mexico: Distribution, thickness, and source rock characterization: New interpretation and mapping techniques. Broadhead, R.F., 2010, The Woodford Shale in southeastern New MexicoNew Mexico Bureau of Geology & Mineral Resources A DIVISION OF NEW MEXICO INSTITUTE OF MINING

  20. Selected Highlight 2013 Publications of CSU Geosciences CSU Faculty, students, and staff indicated in bold. Student authors are indicated with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , 83, 803-824, 2013. Gas storage in the Upper Devonian-Lower Mississippian Woodford Shale, Arbuckle.R. Boehlke, and S.O. Egenhoff Critical Assessment of Shale Resource Plays; Chatellier, J. and Jarvie, D. (eds--sedimentary processes and facies gradients in the upper shale member of the Upper Devonian-Lower Mississippian Bakken

  1. Geologic control of natural marine hydrocarbon seep emissions, Coal Oil Point seep field, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leifer, Ira; Kamerling, Marc J.; Luyendyk, Bruce P.; Wilson, Douglas S.

    2010-01-01

    initiated a modern reservoir characterization study of thecharacterization and well path navigation system for effective re-development and enhancement of ultimate recovery from the complex Monterey Reservoir

  2. SANDIA REPORT

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Current, and Sediment Circulation: Monterey Bay, CA Craig Jones and Jason Magalen Sea Engineering, Inc. 200 Washington Street, Suite 101 Santa Cruz, CA 95060 Jesse Roberts...

  3. Morse-Smale Regression

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gerber, Samuel

    2013-01-01

    1984). Classification and Regression Trees. Monterey, CA:Piecewise-polynomial regression trees. Statistica Sinica 4,BART: Bayesian additive regression trees. Ann. Appl. Stat.

  4. Microhabitat and Space Use Patterns of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosenberg, Daniel K.

    ), are not supported by the available data, and we caution against such an approach. #12;1 KERN TULARE KINGS MONTEREY

  5. Northern California For HD Patients, Families and Community

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferrara, Katherine W.

    -211-7826 Monterey 888-877-3211 Tulare 800-283-9323 Nevada 530-265-7094 #12;Northern California Resources If you need

  6. Emplacement and dewatering of the world's largest exposed sand injectite complex

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sherry, Timothy J.; Rowe, Christie D.; Kirkpatrick, James D.; Brodsky, Emily E.

    2012-01-01

    intrusions primed by silica diagenesis, Geology, 34, 917–R. E. Garrison (1990), Silica diagenesis in the Santa Cruzto the west. Silica diagenesis in the diatomaceous Monterey

  7. Adaptive Rejection of Narrow Band Disturbance in Hard Disk Drives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Qixing

    2009-01-01

    on Advanced Intelligent Mechatronics, Monterey, CA, pp.13-C. Bi. Hard Disk Drive: Mechatronics and Control. CRC Press,new servo method in mechatronics. Trans. Of Japanese Society

  8. SANDIA REPORT

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    840 Unlimited Release Printed Month and Year Investigation of Wave Energy Converter Effects on Wave Fields: A Modeling Sensitivity Study in Monterey Bay, CA Grace Chang, Jason...

  9. Solar discrepancies : Mars exploration and the curious problem of inter-planetary time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mirmalek, Zara Lenora

    2008-01-01

    Monterey, California. Solar Discrepancies: Mars explorationCALIFORNIA, SAN DIEGO Solar discrepancies: Mars explorationOF THE DISSERTATION Solar discrepancies: Mars exploration

  10. Solar Power Generates Big Savings in Salinas, California

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A new solar panel array at Monterey County's Laurel Yard Complex is expected to save the county thousands of dollars a year in energy costs.

  11. SANDIA REPORT

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 Unlimited Release Printed Month and Year Wave Energy Converter (WEC) Array Effects on Wave, Current, and Sediment Circulation: Monterey Bay, CA Craig Jones, Jason Magalen, and...

  12. Joint International Topical Meeting on Mathematics & Computation and Supercomputing in Nuclear Applications (M&C + SNA 2007) Monterey, California, April 15-19, 2007, on CD-ROM, American Nuclear Society, LaGrange Park, IL (2007)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fischer, Paul F.

    2007-01-01

    for advanced burner reactors call for liquid sodium coolant passing through subassemblies of hexagonally volumes. Subchannel models are relatively fast and will likely be the mainstay of reactor-scale analysis. There are hundreds of assemblies in the reactor. Most thermal-hydraulics analysis is therefore based on subchannel

  13. Advanced Reservoir Characterization in the Antelope Shale to Establish the Viability of CO(2) Enhanced Oil Recovery in California`s Monterey formation Siliceous Shales. Progress report, April 1-June 30, 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morea, M.F.

    1997-07-25

    The primary objective of this research is to conduct advanced reservoir characterization and modeling studies in the Antelope Shale reservoir. Characterization studies will be used to determine the technical feasibility of implementing a C0{sub 2} enhanced oil recovery project in the Antelope Shale in Buena Vista Hills Field. The Buena Vista Hills Pilot C0{sub 2} project will demonstrate the economic viability and widespread applicability of C0{sub 2} flooding in fractured siliceous shale reservoirs of the San Joaquin Valley. The research consists of four primary work processes: Reservoir Matrix and Fluid Characterization; Fracture Characterization; Reservoir Modeling and Simulation; and C0{sub 2} Pilot Flood and Evaluation. Work done in these areas is subdivided into two phases or budget periods. The first phase of the project will focus on the application of a variety of advanced reservoir characterization techniques to determine the production characteristics of the Antelope Shale reservoir. Reservoir models based on the results of the characterization work will be used to evaluate how the reservoir will respond to secondary recovery and EOR processes. The second phase of the project will include the implementation and evaluation of an advanced enhanced oil recovery (EOR) pilot in the United Anticline (West Dome) of the Buena Vista Hills Field.

  14. Advanced reservoir characterization in the Antelope Shale to establish the viability of CO{sub 2} enhanced oil recovery in California`s Monterey Formation siliceous shales. Quarterly report, October 1, 1996--December 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Toronyi, R.M.

    1996-12-31

    The primary objective of this research is to conduct advanced reservoir characterization and modeling studies in the Antelope Shale reservoir. Characterization studies will be used to determine the technical feasibility of implementing a CO{sub 2} enhanced oil recovery project in the Antelope Shale in Buena Vista Hills field. The Buena Vista Hills pilot CO{sub 2} project will demonstrate the economic viability and widespread applicability of CO{sub 2} flooding in fractured siliceous shales reservoirs of the San Joaquin Valley. The research consists of four primary work processes: reservoir matrix and fluid characterization: fracture characterization; reservoir modeling and simulation; and, CO{sub 2} pilot flood and evaluation. Work done in these areas is subdivided into two phases or budget periods. The first phase of the project will focus on the application of a variety of advanced reservoir characterization techniques to determine the production characteristics of the Antelope Shale reservoir. Reservoir models based on the results of the characterization work will be used to evaluate how the reservoir will respond to secondary recovery and EOR processes. The second phase of the project will include the implementation and evaluation of an advanced enhanced oil recovery pilot in the West Dome of the Buena Vista Hills field. In this report, accomplishments for this period are presented for: reservoir matrix and fluid characterization; fracture characterization; reservoir modeling and simulation; and technology transfer.

  15. Advanced reservoir characterization in the Antelope Shale to establish the viability of CO{sub 2} enhanced oil recovery in California`s Monterey formation siliceous shales. Quarterly report, April 1, 1997--June 30, 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morea, M.F.

    1997-07-25

    The primary objective of this research is to conduct advanced reservoir characterization and modeling studies in the Antelope Shale reservoir. Characterization studies will be used to determine the technical feasibility of implementing a CO{sub 2} enhanced oil recovery project in the Antelope Shale in Buena Vista Hills Field. The Buena Vista Hills pilot CO{sub 2} project will demonstrate the economic viability and widespread applicability of CO{sub 2} flooding in fractured siliceous shale reservoirs of the San Joaquin Valley. The research consists of four primary work processes: Reservoir Matrix and Fluid Characterization; Fracture Characterization; Reservoir Modeling and Simulation; and CO{sub 2} Pilot Flood and Evaluation. Work done in these areas is subdivided into two phases or budget periods. The first phase of the project will focus on the application of a variety of advanced reservoir characterization techniques to determine the production characteristics of the Antelope Shale reservoir. Reservoir models based on the results of the characterization work will be used to evaluate how the reservoir will respond to secondary recovery and EOR processes. The second phase of the project will include the implementation and evaluation of an advanced enhanced oil recovery (EOR) pilot in the United Anticline (West Dome) of the Buena Vista Hills Field.

  16. Advanced reservoir characterization in the Antelope Shale to establish the viability of CO2 enhanced oil recovery in California`s Monterey Formation siliceous shales. Annual report, February 7, 1997--February 6, 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morea, M.F.

    1998-06-01

    The primary objective of this research is to conduct advanced reservoir characterization and modeling studies in the Antelope Shale reservoir. Characterization studies will be used to determine the technical feasibility of implementing a CO{sub 2} enhanced oil recovery project in the antelope Shale in Buena Vista Hills Field. The proposed pilot consists of four existing producers on 20 acre spacing with a new 10 acre infill well drilled as the pilot CO{sub 2} injector. Most of the reservoir characterization during Phase 1 of the project will be performed using data collected in the pilot pattern wells. During this period the following tasks have been completed: laboratory wettability; specific permeability; mercury porosimetry; acoustic anisotropy; rock mechanics analysis; core description; fracture analysis; digital image analysis; mineralogical analysis; hydraulic flow unit analysis; petrographic and confocal thin section analysis; oil geochemical fingerprinting; production logging; carbon/oxygen logging; complex lithologic log analysis; NMR T2 processing; dipole shear wave anisotropy logging; shear wave vertical seismic profile processing; structural mapping; and regional tectonic synthesis. Noteworthy technological successes for this reporting period include: (1) first (ever) high resolution, crosswell reflection images of SJV sediments; (2) first successful application of the TomoSeis acquisition system in siliceous shales; (3) first detailed reservoir characterization of SJV siliceous shales; (4) first mineral based saturation algorithm for SJV siliceous shales, and (5) first CO{sub 2} coreflood experiments for siliceous shale. Preliminary results from the CO{sub 2} coreflood experiments (2,500 psi) suggest that significant oil is being produced from the siliceous shale.

  17. Paper 2H-03, in: A.R. Gavaskar and A.S.C. Chen (Eds.), Remediation of Chlorinated and Recalcitrant Compounds--2002. Proceedings of the Third International Conference on Remediation of Chlorinated and Recalcitrant Compounds (Monterey,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    was dependent on consistent acetate feed, effective backwash strategy, and sufficient hydraulic residence time. INTRODUCTION Recent detection of perchlorate in several surface waters and groundwater wells used to supply/L for drinking water. Subsequent monitoring of 232 groundwater wells by the CDHS indicated perchlorate

  18. Reclaimed Water as an Alternative Water Source for Crop Irrigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Etxeberria, Edgardo

    Reclaimed Water as an Alternative Water Source for Crop Irrigation Lawrence R. Parsons1 University Francisco, CA 94114 Robert Holden Monterey Regional Water Pollution Control Agency, 5 Harris Court, Building D, Monterey, CA 93940 David W. York York Water Circle, 3158 S. Fulmer Circle, Tallahassee, FL 32303

  19. Environmental Practicum Memo To: Laurie Fowler

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Radcliffe, David

    ); City of Monterey v. Del Monte Dunes at Monterey, Ltd., 526 U.S. 687 (1999); Lucas v. South Carolina Coastal Council, 505 U.S. 1003 (1992); Mann v. State, 278 Ga. 442 (2004)). 2 See, e.g., Reahard v. Lee) (challenging Metropolitan River Protection Act's Chattahoochee River fifty-foot vegetative buffer requirement

  20. MACEDONIA, PRATT, ZYDA A NETWORK ARCHITECTURE FOR LARGE SCALE VIRTUAL ENVIRONMENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zyda, Michael

    MACEDONIA, PRATT, ZYDA A NETWORK ARCHITECTURE FOR LARGE SCALE VIRTUAL ENVIRONMENTS *Major Michael R. Macedonia, U.S. Army Computer Science Department U.S. Naval Postgraduate School Monterey, California 93943-5118 macedonia@cs.nps.navy.mil David R. Pratt Computer Science Department U.S. Naval Postgraduate School Monterey

  1. Chronic Conditions of Californians: Findings from the 2003 Health Interview Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jhawar, Mona; Wallace, Steven P.

    2005-01-01

    County, LA SPA Metro and Tulare County (Exhibit 1, Map 3). •group, Kings County and Tulare County (Exhibit 1). • Accessito Madera Fresno Inyo Tulare Kings San Luis Obispo Monterey

  2. Public work projects cultivate youth in workforce development programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Campbell, D; Lamming, Jean; Lemp, Cathy; Brosnahan, Ann; Paterson, Carole; Pusey, John

    2008-01-01

    San Joaquin Solano Sonoma Tulare Child poverty rate (2002)Kern, Inyo, Mono Consortium Tulare Monterey Kings San LuisSolano, (6) Sonoma and (7) Tulare; and the cities of (8) Los

  3. Whither California Agriculture: Up, Down, or Out? Some Thoughts about the Future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnston, Warren E.; McCalla, Alex F.

    2004-01-01

    is now concentrated in Tulare and Merced Counties. Second,state’s production is in Tulare County, compared to nearlyFresno Santa Cruz Monterey Tulare Inyo San Luis Obispo Kern

  4. California Agriculture: Dimensions and Issues

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siebert,, Jerome Editor

    2003-01-01

    San Joaquin Valley (Fresno, Tulare and adjacent areas).Kearney. “The Health of Tulare County Farmworkers,” Mimeo.Increase 1. Fresno 2. Tulare 3. Monterey 4. Kern 5. Merced

  5. Economic Contributions of the California Nursery Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carman, Hoy; Rodriguez, Ana Maria

    2004-01-01

    Mono Fresno Monterey Tulare Kings Inyo San Luis Obispo KernCr uz, Stanislaus, and Tulare— accounted for 12.6 percent ofObispo Santa Cruz Stanislaus Tulare Top 15 County Total Rest

  6. Invited Talk US Navy Seaweb Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Shengli

    Invited Talk US Navy Seaweb Development Joe Rice Naval Postgraduate School Physics Department Monterey, CA 93943 USA Joe.Rice@navy.mil Abstract This talk traces the development of Seaweb through

  7. Baseball Field Tennis Court

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    STREET THIRD STREET FOURTH STREET FIRST STREET PO RTO LA AVEN U E NORTH STREET BOULDRY ROAD SECOND STREET NAVAL SUPPORT ACTIVITY MONTEREY 0 300 600 900150 Feet MAIN STATION MAP ALL EMERGENCIES DIAL 9-911 POLICE

  8. Acknowledgements: NOAA/NSF GLOBEC NEP project (Co-I w/Murphree); Dept. of Energy, Climate Change Prediction Program (Co-I w/ Semtner), NCAR for computing resources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tokmakian, Robin

    Acknowledgements: NOAA/NSF GLOBEC NEP project (Co-I w/Murphree); Dept. of Energy, Climate Change with a NEP focus Robin Tokmakian, Naval Postgraduate School, Monterey CA robint@ucar.edu #12;portland c

  9. Digital Frequency Domain Multiplexer for mm-Wavelength Telescopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dobbs, Matt

    2008-01-01

    for Large Scale Bolometer Arrays”, Monterey Far-IR, Sub-mmand mm Detector Technology Workshop proceedings, 2002, pp.Domain Multiplexer for mm-Wavelength Telescopes Matt Dobbs,

  10. Super Kid: Blake Guidice, Cascade High Article by: Julie Muhlstein, Herald Writer, Everett, Washington

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and track teams. You've had amazing experiences outside of school. Tell me Success: Blake Guidice, senior, Cascade High School, spent summer in a science at the Naval Postgraduate School in Monterey, Calif. It's called SEAP, the Science

  11. Handling Food and Drinks when Losing Power 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anding, Jenna

    2005-09-30

    (Monterey, Jack, Mozzarella, Brie, blue, cottage, cream, ricotta, Neufachatel and queso blanco fresco) ? Shredded cheese ? Low-fat cheese ? Milk, cream, sour cream, buttermilk, evapo- rated milk, yogurt, eggnog or soy milk ? Opened creamy-based salad...

  12. Sea-Level Rise, El Nińo, And The Future Of The California Coastline

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Russell, Nicole Lian

    2014-01-01

    Monterey Bay (deep-water offshore buoy) are shown. PredictedBay (deep-water offshore buoy)…………………………………………………………………21cdip.ucsd.edu/). The NDBC’s offshore deep- water buoys

  13. Life History Studies of California Chondrichthyans: Determining Essential Biological Information for Effective Management of Bycatch and Emerging Fisheries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ebert, David A.; Cailliet, Gregor M.

    2007-01-01

    D.A. , Cailliet, G.M. , Barnett, L.A.K. , Rinewalt, C.S. ,Laboratories, CSU Monterey Bay. Barnett, L.A.K. In progress.M.S. May Lewis A.K. Barnett, California State University

  14. Broken Information Feedback Loops Prevent Good Building Energy Performance—Integrated Technological and Sociological Fixes Are Needed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arens, Edward; Brown, Karl

    2012-01-01

    Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings, Monterey CAStudy of Energy Efficiency in Buildings. Panel 4 Paper 1130.Summer Study of Energy Efficiency in Buildings. 5:13-5:25.

  15. SANDIA REPORT

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    74 Unlimited Release Printed Month and Year Investigation of Wave Energy Converter Effects on the Nearshore Environment: A Month-Long Study in Monterey Bay, CA Grace Chang, Jason...

  16. The Benefits of Student Research in Information Systems Security Education

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for Information Systems Security Studies and Research Code CSIc Naval Postgraduate School Monterey, CA 93943 for the younger students. For example, in fourth grade I painted some cardboard boxes to look like houses

  17. Faculty Positions Heat Transfer and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Faculty Positions Heat Transfer and Thermal/Energy Sciences Naval Postgraduate School Monterey-track faculty position at the assistant professor level in the areas of Heat Transfer and Thermal/Fluid Sciences

  18. Sandia Energy - EC Publications

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Wave Energy Converter (WEC) Array Effects on Wave, Current, and Sediment Circulation: Monterey Bay, CATara Camacho-Lopez2015-04-06T22:15:34+00:00 Placeholder Download Filename...

  19. Family Care La Mesa Village Housing Area

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Family Care La Mesa Village Housing Area Child Care Development Center 2 La Mesa Way Bldg. 439 831 Recommendation 1 The Monterey Taxi Cab Company will provide Taxi Service from Herrmann Hall to your residence

  20. Field trip guide to selected outcrops, Arbuckle Mountains, Oklahoma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1991-11-17

    The Arbuckle Mountains, named for Brigadier General Matthew Arbuckle, are located in south-central Oklahoma. The formations that comprise the Arbuckle Mountains have been extensively studied for hydrocarbon source rock and reservoir rock characteristics that can be applied to the subsurface in the adjacent Anadarko and Ardmore basins. Numerous reports and guidebooks have been written concerning the Arbuckle Mountains. A few important general publications are provided in the list of selected references. The purpose of this handout is to provide general information on the geology of the Arbuckle Mountains and specific information on the four field trip stops, adapted from the literature. The four stops were at: (1) Sooner Rock and Sand Quarry; (2) Woodford Shale; (3) Hunton Anticline and Hunton Quarry; and (4) Tar Sands of Sulfur Area. As part of this report, two papers are included for more detail: Paleomagnetic dating of basinal fluid migration, base-metal mineralization, and hydrocarbon maturation in the Arbuckle Mountains, Oklahoma and Laminated black shale-bedded chert cyclicity in the Woodford Formation, southern Oklahoma.

  1. V E N T U R A B A S I N GEOTHERMAL DISTRICT 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , AND GEOTHERMAL RESOURCES WILLIAM F. GUERARD, JR., State Oil and Gas Supervisor 4443 2120 22 23 24 25 46 2 11 13 . Redding . .San Jose .Monterey .Salinas . Department of Conservation Division of Oil, Gas, and Geothermal Resources 801 K Street, MS 20-20 Sacramento, CA 95814-3530 (916) 445-9686 www.consrv.ca.govAlfred J. Zucca

  2. Does Stand Density Affect Mating System and Population Genetic Structure in Coast Live

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    genotypes of these individuals were identified using 13 neutral, nuclear, microsatellite markers Knowledge, January 18-21, 2005, Monterey, California 2 Department of Environmental Science Policy and Management, University of California, Berkeley CA 94720 K_beals@berkeley.edu #12;GENERAL TECHNICAL REPORT PSW

  3. SAN JOSE STATE Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Library

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Su, Xiao

    SAN JOSE STATE UNIVERSITY Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Library Office of the Dean Rut h Kifer One Washington Square San jose, California 95192-0028 Voice: 408-808-2419 Fax: 408-808-2141 Ruth.ademy, Monterey Bay, North~ ridge, Pomona, Sacramento, San Be rnu dino, San Diego, S.ln Fr.mdsco, San jose, San l

  4. D I G E S T Public Works

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    . 5 October/November/December 2012 Focus on Net Zero 3 Energy and Water Management 8 Energy Successes Simihtis 22 Fort Greely energy improvements, by Carl Ramos 23 Presidio of Monterey retrofits gym as net-zero on Net Zero_______________________________________________________________________________ 3 Becoming net

  5. BcBeaker's Caf Breakfastserved from 7 a.m. -10:30 a.m. Monday -Friday

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oklahoma, University of

    eggs made your way, choice of ham, bacon or sausage, with either white or wheat toast Breakfast Quesadilla $4.99 Choice of bacon, ham or sausage with scrambled eggs, diced tater tots and shredded Monterey your way, choice of ham, bacon or sausage, with cheese on either Texas toast or croissant Without ham/bacon

  6. Phylogenetic Screening of Ribosomal RNA Gene-Containing Clones in Bacterial Artificial Chromosome (BAC) Libraries from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de la Torre, José R.

    (BAC) Libraries from Different Depths in Monterey Bay M.T. Suzuki1 , C.M. Preston2 , O. Be´ja`2 , J processes, but much of their biology and ecology remains ill defined. One approach to better defining. Previously, we constructed and phylogenetically screened a Bacterial Artificial Chromosome (BAC) library from

  7. DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL 1 UNIVERSITY CIR MONTEREY, CA 93943-5000 IN REPLY FOR ADMINISTRATION AND MANAGEMENT OF NAVY FULLY-FUNDED GRADUATE EDUCATION PROGRAMS AT CIVILIAN INSTITUTIONS guidance for the U.S. Navy's fully funded graduate education programs at Civilian Institutions (CIVINS

  8. Three-Dimensional Hydrodynamic Model for Prediction of Falling Cylinder Through Water Column

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chu, Peter C.

    Peter C. Chu, chu@nps.navy.mil Chenwu Fan, fan@nps.navy.mil Ashley Evans, ashley.evans@navy.mil Anthony F. Gilles, anthony.gilles@navy.mil Naval Postgraduate School, Monterey, CA 93943 Peter Fleischer, fleischerp@navo.navy.mil Naval Oceanographic Office, Stennis Space Center, MS 39529 1 Abstract--A three

  9. USDA Forest Service Gen.Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-187. 2003. 327 VII. Assessment Area Summary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , there is some variation at the county level because the available county level projections from the State ASSESSMENT AREA SUMMARY · The proportion of LEP students in 1990 was highest in Imperial, Los Ange- les, Monterey, Orange, and San Francisco Counties. Across regions, SCAG showed the highest proportion

  10. Oceanography Vol.19, No. 4, Dec. 200646 S P E C I A L I S SU E F E AT U R E

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisher, Andrew

    Oceanography Vol.19, No. 4, Dec. 200646 S P E C I A L I S SU E F E AT U R E IMPORTANCE OF CRUSTAL, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California-San Diego, La Jolla, CA, USA. Keir Becker Instrumentation and Chemical Oceanography, Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute, Moss Landing, CA, USA. Evan A

  11. Our Ocean Backyard Santa Cruz Sentinel columns by Gary Griggs, Director, Institute of Marine Sciences, UC Santa Cruz.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    Our Ocean Backyard ­­ Santa Cruz Sentinel columns by Gary Griggs, Director, Institute of Marine the shoreline of southern Monterey Bay or at Pismo Beach, where wind transports the sand inland off the beach; or deep submarine canyons, where sand flows offshore and down slope to the deep sea floor 10,000 to 12

  12. A Cloud-Oriented Cross-Domain Security Architecture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A Cloud-Oriented Cross-Domain Security Architecture Thuy D. Nguyen, Mark A. Gondree, David J to support a cloud of cross-domain services, hosted within a federation of multilevel secure (MLS) MYSEA}@nps.edu Abstract--The Monterey Security Architecture addresses the need to share high-value data across multiple

  13. PUBLISHED OCCASIONALLY BY THE FRIENDS OF THE BANCROFT LIBRARY UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, BERKELEY, CALIFORNIA 94720

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    of people, on the coast --being close to Asia. ..." She reiterates on tape what she had discussed off career. The interviews began in 1973 with typical Douglas energy and commitment: she simul- taneously Francisco, Monterey, Santa Bar- bara, New York, and several in Vermont, where one interviewer taught each

  14. Quarterly Journal of the Royal Meteorological Society Q. J. R. Meteorol. Soc. 140: 792804, April 2014 Sensitivity of tropical-cyclone models to the surface drag

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Roger K.

    , University of Munich, Germany b Department of Meteorology, Naval Postgraduate School, Monterey, CA cHurricane in this direction. Key Words: hurricanes; tropical cyclones; typhoons; surface drag coefficient; frictional drag in deep rotating clouds. A fraction of the angular momentum drawn inwards is lost because

  15. Perceptions of Real Options in Large System Acquisition: Empirical Descriptions and Comparison with Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ford, David N.

    Perceptions of Real Options in Large System Acquisition: Empirical Descriptions and Comparison Postgraduate School Monterey, California May 18 - 19, 2005 #12;1 Perceptions of Real Options in Large System to meet performance, schedule, and cost targets. Flexibility in the form of real options can

  16. Proceedings of the Nuclear Criticality Technology and Safety Project Workshop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanchez, R.G. [comp.

    1994-01-01

    This report is the proceedings of the annual Nuclear Criticality Technology and Safety Project (NCTSP) Workshop held in Monterey, California, on April 16--28, 1993. The NCTSP was sponsored by the Department of Energy and organized by the Los Alamos Critical Experiments Facility. The report is divided into six sections reflecting the sessions outlined on the workshop agenda.

  17. U.S. Department of the Interior May 2013 U.S. Geological Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ,000-t/yr Hawesville, KY, smelter. Under the agreement, Big Rivers and Kenergy would purchase power than the amount in March 2012. Century Aluminum Co. (Monterey, CA) entered an agreement to purchase). Century reached a power supply agreement with Big Rivers Electric Corp. and Kenergy Corp. for the 244

  18. NASA Airborne AVIRIS and DCS Remote Sensing of Coral Reefs Liane Guild a,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbes, Fernando

    , 2000; Hochberg et al., 2003). Research has shown that spectral distinction of reef bottom types (i Bertholda b Foundation of CSU Monterey Bay, NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035, USA, PR 00681, USA ­ roy@cacique.uprm.edu d Center for Hemispherical Cooperation in Research and Education

  19. NPS-SE-10-003 POSTGRADUATE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NPS-SE-10-003 NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL MONTEREY, CALIFORNIA INTEGRATED PROJECT An Integrated Command and Control Architecture Concept for Unmanned Systems in the Year of 2030 By Omari D Buckley reporting burden for this collection of information is estimated to average 1 hour per response, including

  20. The 38th Annual MATERIALS SYMPOSIUM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Junqiao

    Injection in Racetrack Memory" Timothy Phung, Stanford University "Nano-composite metal/TiO2/Si anodes, Monterey "Cathodoluminescent Lighting Based on Carbon Nanotube Field Emitters" Jovita Tjahjadi, B. Ribaya Center "Science-based modeling of carbon nanotube ultracapacitor" Antonis Orphanou, T. Yamada, and C. Y

  1. Our Ocean Backyard Santa Cruz Sentinel columns by Gary Griggs, Director, Institute of Marine Sciences, UC Santa Cruz.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    - well some of us who played in sand boxes did. These dark minerals contain heavy elements such as iron owned nearly 2 miles of beach along the northern Monterey Bay shoreline and was mining the black sand to remove the magnetite and then used a furnace to produce a red iron oxide that was used in the manufacture

  2. PROVOST BOA PRESENTATION New Programs & Priorities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for Complex Operations 4 #12;Energy Activity at NPS Monterey In the two years since I came to the department, we have made a vigorous commitment to change how we get and how we use energy. We also now put an energy dimension in everything the Department of the Navy does. The reason is as clear

  3. Seymour Center at Long Marine Lab Science Sunday

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    Seymour Center at Long Marine Lab Science Sunday Public lecture Seymour Marine Discovery center supply system in California and Monterey Bay. Following Griggs' talk, the Seymour Center will present, Santa cruz SPONSORED BY: Redtree Partners LP Free with admission to the Seymour center ($8 Adults / $6

  4. Name __________________ Exploring Marine Science at the Seymour Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    Name __________________ Exploring Marine Science at the Seymour Center SH 9/08 Shipwreck Deck Science at the Seymour Center SH 9/08 Shipwreck Deck and Breezeway Page 2 of 2 Shipwreck Deck of the Monterey Bay, have you visited (or would like to visit)? Possible responses: Seymour Center, Long Marine

  5. Seymour Marine Discovery Center Open Seven Days a Week in August SANTA CRUZ, CA--The Seymour Marine Discovery Center will be open seven

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    Seymour Marine Discovery Center Open Seven Days a Week in August SANTA CRUZ, CA--The Seymour Marine. Typically closed on Mondays, this year the Seymour Center will throw open its doors for five additional around the world," says Julie Barrett Heffington, Seymour Center Director. Overlooking the Monterey Bay

  6. An Information Security Education Initiative for Engineering and Computer Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Center for INFOSEC Studies and Research Naval Postgraduate School Monterey, CA 93943 Deborah Frincke Department of Computer Science University of Idaho Moscow, ID 83844 Abstract This paper puts forward a case is on the need for such education, the desired educational outcomes, and how the outcomes may be assessed

  7. GENERAL TECHNICAL REPORT PSW-GTR-196 Sudden Oak Death Bike Tire Scrubber1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    transport by humans. Key words: Phytophthora ramorum, invasive species, mountain bikes 1 An abstract to 21, 2005, Monterey, California. 2 Department of Natural Sciences and Mathematics, Dominican University of California, San Rafael, California 94901; for correspondence: Peter.Thut@wwu.edu 3 Department

  8. Our Ocean Backyard Santa Cruz Sentinel columns by Gary Griggs, Director, Institute of Marine Sciences, UC Santa Cruz.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    of beach sand due to wind blowing onshore, sand was historically mined directly from some California and not expect some response. Waves expend a lot of energy on the southern Monterey Bay beaches; as the miner's draglines lowered the beach level, the waves began to break closer to shore, and expended their energy

  9. and Metro Rail January 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weinreb, Sander

    MONTE SIERRA MADRE MONROVIA BRADBURY DUARTE IRWINDALE BALDWIN PARK LA HABRA INDUSTRY HACIENDA HEIGHTS HILLS ENCINO BEVERLY HILLS WESTWOOD CENTURY CITY RANCHO PARK CHEVIOT HILLS PALMS WEST LOS ANGELES WEST PASADENA ALTADENA SAN MARINO SOUTH PASADENA MONTEREY PARK SAN GABRIEL GLENDALE LA CAŃADA FLINTRIDGE BURBANK

  10. BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCH LAURENCE C. BREAKER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McPhee-Shaw, Erika

    for Environmental Prediction, National Weather Service, NOAA 1986-1987 Visiting Scientist, Moss Landing Marine, California from the 1989 Loma Prieta Earthquake and the 1964 Great Alaskan Earthquake. Science of Tsunami Hazards 28: 255 ­ 271. Breaker, L.C. and J.K. Brewster. 2009. Predicting offshore temperatures in Monterey

  11. NASA ADMINISTRATOR'S SYMPOSIUM Risk and Exploration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rhoads, James

    NASA ADMINISTRATOR'S SYMPOSIUM Risk and Exploration E A R T H , S E A A N D T H E S TA R S STEVEN J, NASA administrator's symposium, September 26-29, 2004, Naval Postgraduate School Monterey, California 2005 910'.9--dc22 2005004470 #12;Risk and Exploration E A R T H , S E A A N D T H E S TA R S NASA

  12. ForPeerReview Channel formation by flow stripping: large-scale scour features along the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parker, Gary

    East Channel and their relation to sediment waves Journal: Sedimentology Manuscript ID: SED-2005-OM-049 1 of 63 Sedimentology #12;ForPeerReview Monterey East ms -- 2005 June 13, 2005 1 Channel formation it Page 2 of 63Sedimentology 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29

  13. Investigation summary and proposed alternative for lead remediation at a small arms trainfire range

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beekman, S.M.; Stemper, M.L. [Harding Lawson Associates, Novato, CA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    The small arms trainfire ranges are part of the former Fort Ord Army Base Superfund site in Monterey County, California. Trainees fired small caliber weapons at targets near the leeward dune faces along Monterey Bay. Monterey Bay is a National Marine Sanctuary and the dunes contain endangered species and endangered species habitat. This paper summarizes results of the remedial investigation, human health risk assessment, ecological risk assessment, and feasibility study, and presents the results of bench-scale studies and proposed pilot studies for the site. Results of the RI showed that lead is the primary chemical of concern in soil (i.e., dune sands) and was detected at the highest concentrations where surface coverage of spent ammunition was greater than 10 percent (areas of heavy bullet distribution). A regulatory-approved health-based level of 1,860 mg/kg was developed as an acceptable level for lead-bearing soil in areas of heavy deposition to be protective of human health and the environment for planned reuse. Concentrations near or above 1,860 mg/kg correspond to areas of heavy distribution of spent ammunition. Plant and animal species were sampled and tested to evaluate the potential risk to ecological receptors.

  14. SEISMIC AND ROCKPHYSICS DIAGNOSTICS OF MULTISCALE RESERVOIR TEXTURES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary Mavko

    2004-11-01

    As part of our study on ''Relationships between seismic properties and rock microstructure'', we have continued our work on analyzing microstructural constraints on seismic signatures. Our analysis is now extended to over 280 images of shales, giving us better statistics. The shales cover a range of depths and maturity. We estimate different statistical measures for characterizing heterogeneity and textures from scanning acoustic microscope (SAM) images of shale microstructures. Characterizing and understanding the microgeometry, their textures, scales, and textural anisotropy is important for better understanding the role of microgeometry on effective elastic properties. We analyzed SAM images from Bakken shale, Bazhenov shale, and Woodford shale. We observed quantifiable and consistent patterns linking texture, shale maturity, and elastic P-wave impedance. The textural heterogeneity and P-wave impedance increase with increasing maturity (decreasing kerogen content), while there is a general decrease in textural anisotropy with maturity. We also found a reasonably good match between elastic impedance estimated from SAM images and impedance computed from ultrasonic measurements.

  15. Seismic and Rockphysics Diagnostics of Multiscale Reservoir Textures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary Mavko

    2004-05-01

    As part of our study on ''Relationships between seismic properties and rock microstructure'', we have continued our work on analyzing shale textures from scanning acoustic microscope images. Our analysis is now extended to over 280 images of shales, giving us better statistics. The shales cover a range of depths and maturity. We estimate different statistical measures for characterizing heterogeneity and textures from scanning acoustic microscope (SAM) images of shale microstructures. Characterizing and understanding the microgeometry, their textures, scales, and textural anisotropy is important for better understanding the role of microgeometry on effective elastic properties. We analyzed SAM images from Bakken shale, Bazhenov shale, and Woodford shale. We observed quantifiable and consistent patterns linking texture, shale maturity, and elastic P-wave impedance. The textural heterogeneity and P-wave impedance increase with increasing maturity (decreasing kerogen content), while there is a general decrease in textural anisotropy with maturity. We also found a reasonably good match between elastic impedance estimated from SAM images and impedance computed from ultrasonic measurements.

  16. Oils and source rocks from the Anadarko Basin: Final report, March 1, 1985-March 15, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Philp, R. P. [School of Geology and Geophysics, Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States)

    1996-11-01

    The research project investigated various geochemical aspects of oils, suspected source rocks, and tar sands collected from the Anadarko Basin, Oklahoma. The information has been used, in general, to investigate possible sources for the oils in the basin, to study mechanisms of oil generation and migration, and characterization of depositional environments. The major thrust of the recent work involved characterization of potential source formations in the Basin in addition to the Woodford shale. The formations evaluated included the Morrow, Springer, Viola, Arbuckle, Oil Creek, and Sylvan shales. A good distribution of these samples was obtained from throughout the basin and were evaluated in terms of source potential and thermal maturity based on geochemical characteristics. The data were incorporated into a basin modelling program aimed at predicting the quantities of oil that could, potentially, have been generated from each formation. The study of crude oils was extended from our earlier work to cover a much wider area of the basin to determine the distribution of genetically-related oils, and whether or not they were derived from single or multiple sources, as well as attempting to correlate them with their suspected source formations. Recent studies in our laboratory also demonstrated the presence of high molecular weight components(C{sub 4}-C{sub 80}) in oils and waxes from drill pipes of various wells in the region. Results from such a study will have possible ramifications for enhanced oil recovery and reservoir engineering studies.

  17. The origin of the tsunami excited by the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake - Faulting or slumping

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuofong Ma; Satake, Kenji; Kanamori, Hiroo (California Inst. of Technology, Pasadena (United States))

    1991-04-01

    The authors investigated the tsunami recorded at Monterey, California, during the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake (M{sub w} = 6.9). The first arrival of the tsunami was about 10 min after the origin time of the earthquake. Using an elastic half space, they computed vertical ground displacements for many different fault models for the Loma Prieta earthquake, and used them as the initial condition for computation of tsunamis in Monterey Bay. The synthetic tsunami computed for the uniform dislocation model determined from seismic data can explain the arrival time, polarity, and amplitude of the beginning of the tsunami. However, the period of the synthetic tsunami is too long compared with the observed. The authors tested other fault models with more localized slip distribution. None of the models could explain the observed period. The residual waveform, the observed minus the synthetic waveform, begins as a downward motion at about 18 min after the origin time of the earthquake, and could be interpreted as due to a secondary source near Moss Landing. If the large scale slumping near Moss Landing suggested by an eyewitness observation occurred about 9 min after the origin time of the earthquake, it could explain the residual waveform. To account for the amplitude of the observed tsunami, the volume of sediments involved in the slumping is approximately 0.013 km{sup 3}. Thus the most likely cause of the tsunami observed at Monterey is the combination of the vertical uplift of the sea floor due to the main faulting and a large scale slumping near Moss Landing.

  18. TODs Result in Efficient Use of Land and Infrastructure 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morphis, A.

    2011-01-01

    9 7,110 Southwestern Pennsylvania Commission Pittsburgh, PA 10 6,489 Regional Transportation Commission of Washoe County Reno, NV 11 6,384 Puget Sound Regional Council Seattle, WA 12 6,189 Sacramento Area Council of Governments Sacramento, CA 13... 6,016 Council of Fresno County Governments Fresno, CA 14 5,522 Yuma MPO Yuma, AZ 15 5,151 Association of Monterey Bay Area Governments Salinas, CA 16 4,838 Tulare County Association of Governments Visalia, CA 17 4,608 Southeast Michigan COG...

  19. Analysis of Aquifer Response, Groundwater Flow, and PlumeEvolution at Site OU 1, Former Fort Ord, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jordan, Preston D.; Oldenburg, Curtis M.; Su, Grace W.

    2005-02-24

    This report presents a continuation from Oldenburg et al. (2002) of analysis of the hydrogeology, In-Situ Permeable Flow Sensor (ISPFS) results, aquifer response, and changes in the trichloroethylene (TCE) groundwater plume at Operational Unit 1 (OU 1) adjacent to the former Fritzsche Army Airfield at the former Fort Ord Army Base, located on Monterey Bay in northern Monterey County. Fuels and solvents were burned on a portion of OU 1 called the Fire Drill Area (FDA) during airport fire suppression training between 1962 and 1985. This activity resulted in soil and groundwater contamination in the unconfined A-aquifer. In the late 1980's, soil excavation and bioremediation were successful in remediating soil contamination at the site. Shortly thereafter, a groundwater pump, treat, and recharge system commenced operation. This system has been largely successful at remediating groundwater contamination at the head of the groundwater plume. However, a trichloroethylene (TCE) groundwater plume extends approximately 3000 ft (900 m) to the northwest away from the FDA. In the analyses presented here, we augment our prior work (Oldenburg et al., 2002) with new information including treatment-system totalizer data, recent water-level and chemistry data, and data collected from new wells to discern trends in contaminant migration and groundwater flow that may be useful for ongoing remediation efforts. Some conclusions from the prior study have been modified based on these new analyses, and these are pointed out clearly in this report.

  20. Beneficial Reuse of San Ardo Produced Water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert A. Liske

    2003-09-26

    This report summarizes the work performed from 1 April 2003 to 30 September 2003 and recommends the tasks to be performed during Phase II (Pilot Evaluation). During this period discussions were held with various water agencies regarding use of the treated produced water either directly or indirectly through a water trading arrangement. In particular, several discussions were held with Monterey County Water Resources Agency, that has been charged with the long-term management and preservation of water resources in Monterey County. The Agency is very supportive of the program. However, they would like to see water quality/cost estimate data for the treated produced water from the pilot study prior to evaluating water use/water trade options. The agency sent a letter encouraging the project team to perform the pilot study to evaluate feasibility of the project. In addition, the regulations related to use of the treated water for various applications were updated during this period. Finally, the work plan, health and safety plan and sample analyses plan for performing pilot study to treat the oilfield produced water were developed during this period.

  1. Extensional wave attenuation and velocity in partially-saturated sand in the sonic frequency range

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Z.; Rector, J.W.; Nihei, K.T.; Tomutsa, L.; Myer, L.R.; Nakagawa, S.

    2002-06-17

    Extensional wave attenuation and velocity measurements on a high permeability Monterey sand were performed over a range of gas saturations for imbibition and degassing conditions. These measurements were conducted using extensional wave pulse propagation and resonance over a 1 - 9 kHz frequency range for a hydrostatic confining pressure of 8.3 MPa. Analysis of the extensional wave data and the corresponding X-ray CT images of the gas saturation show strong attenuation resulting from the presence of the gas (QE dropped from 300 for the dry sand to 30 for the partially-saturated sand), with larger attenuation at a given saturation resulting from heterogeneous gas distributions. The extensional wave velocities are in agreement with Gassmann theory for the test with near-homogeneous gas saturation and with a patchy saturation model for the test with heterogeneous gas saturation. These results show that partially-saturated sands under moderate confining pressure can produce strong intrinsic attenuation for extensional waves.

  2. ICENES `91:Sixth international conference on emerging nuclear energy systems. Program and abstracts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-12-31

    This document contains the program and abstracts of the sessions at the Sixth International Conference on Emerging Nuclear Energy Systems held June 16--21, 1991 at Monterey, California. These sessions included: The plenary session, fission session, fission and nonelectric session, poster session 1P; (space propulsion, space nuclear power, electrostatic confined fusion, fusion miscellaneous, inertial confinement fusion, {mu}-catalyzed fusion, and cold fusion); Advanced fusion session, space nuclear session, poster session 2P, (nuclear reactions/data, isotope separation, direct energy conversion and exotic concepts, fusion-fission hybrids, nuclear desalting, accelerator waste-transmutation, and fusion-based chemical recycling); energy policy session, poster session 3P (energy policy, magnetic fusion reactors, fission reactors, magnetically insulated inertial fusion, and nuclear explosives for power generation); exotic energy storage and conversion session; and exotic energy storage and conversion; review and closing session.

  3. ICENES '91:Sixth international conference on emerging nuclear energy systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    This document contains the program and abstracts of the sessions at the Sixth International Conference on Emerging Nuclear Energy Systems held June 16--21, 1991 at Monterey, California. These sessions included: The plenary session, fission session, fission and nonelectric session, poster session 1P; (space propulsion, space nuclear power, electrostatic confined fusion, fusion miscellaneous, inertial confinement fusion, [mu]-catalyzed fusion, and cold fusion); Advanced fusion session, space nuclear session, poster session 2P, (nuclear reactions/data, isotope separation, direct energy conversion and exotic concepts, fusion-fission hybrids, nuclear desalting, accelerator waste-transmutation, and fusion-based chemical recycling); energy policy session, poster session 3P (energy policy, magnetic fusion reactors, fission reactors, magnetically insulated inertial fusion, and nuclear explosives for power generation); exotic energy storage and conversion session; and exotic energy storage and conversion; review and closing session.

  4. The Influence of deep-sea bed CO2 sequestration on small metazoan (meiofaunal) community structure and function

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carman, Kevin R; Fleeger, John W; Thistle, David

    2013-02-17

    We conducted a series of experiments in Monterey Submarine Canyon to examine potential ecological impacts of deep-ocean CO2 sequestration. Our focus was on responses of meiofaunal invertebrates (< 1 mm body length) living within the sediment at depths ranging between 3000-3600 m. Our particular emphasis was on harpacticoid copepods and nematodes. In the first phase of our DOE funding, we reported findings that suggest substantial (~80%) mortality to harpacticoid copepods. In the second phase of our funding we published additional findings from phase one and conducted follow-up experiments in the Monterey Canyon and in the laboratory. In one experiment we looked for evidence that meiofauna seek to escape areas where CO2 concentrations are elevated. �Emergence traps� near the source of the CO2-rich seawater caught significantly more harpacticoids than those far from it. The harpacticoids apparently attempted to escape from the advancing front of carbon dioxide-rich seawater and therefore presumably found exposure to it to be stressful. Although most were adversely affected, species differed significantly in the degree of their susceptibility. Unexpectedly, six species showed no effect and may be resistant. The hypothesis that harpacticoids could escape the effects of carbon dioxide-rich seawater by moving deeper into the seabed was not supported. Exposure to carbon dioxide-rich seawater created partially defaunated areas, but we found no evidence that disturbance-exploiting harpacticoid species invaded during the recovery of the affected area. Based on a detailed analysis of nematode biovolumes, we postulated that the nematode community in Monterey Canyon throughout the upper 3 cm suffered a high rate of mortality after exposure to CO2, and that nematodes were larger because postmortem expansions in body length and width occurred. Decomposition rates were probably low and corpses did not disintegrate in 30 days. The observable effects of a reduction in pH to about 7.0 after 30 days were as great as an extreme pH reduction (5.4), suggesting that �moderate� CO2 exposure, compared to the range of exposures possible following CO2 release, causes high mortality rates in the two most abundant sediment-dwelling metazoans (nematodes and copepods). While we found evidence for negative impacts on deep-sea benthos, we also observed that small-scale experiments with CO2 releases were difficult to replicate in the deep sea. Specifically, in one CO2-release experiment in the Monterey Canyon we did not detect an adverse impacts on benthic meiofauan. In laboratory experiments, we manipulated seawater acidity by addition of HCl and by increasing CO2 concentration and observed that two coastal harpacticoid copepod species were both more sensitive to increased acidity when generated by CO2. Copepods living in environments more prone to hypercapnia, such as mudflats, may be less sensitive to future acidification. Ocean acidification is also expected to alter the toxicity of waterborne metals by influencing their speciation in seawater. CO2 enrichment did not affect the free-ion concentration of Cd but did increase the free-ion concentration of Cu. Antagonistic toxicities were observed between CO2 with Cd, Cu and Cu free-ion. This interaction could be due to a competition for H+ and metals for binding sites.

  5. South Belridge fields, Borderland basin, U. S. , San Joaquin Valley

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, D.D. (Mobil Exploration and Producing U.S., Inc., Denver, CO (United States)); McPherson, J.G. (Mobil Research and Development Corp., Dallas, TX (United States))

    1991-03-01

    South Belridge is a giant field in the west San Joaquin Valley, Kern County. Cumulative field production is approximately 700 MMBO and 220 BCFG, with remaining recoverable reserves of approximately 500 MMBO. The daily production is nearly 180 MBO from over 6100 active wells. The focus of current field development and production is the shallow Tulare reservoir. Additional probable diatomite reserves have been conservatively estimated at 550 MMBO and 550 BCFG. South Belridge field has two principal reservoir horizons; the Mio-Pliocene Belridge diatomite of the upper Monterey Formation, and the overlying Plio-Pleistocene Tulare Formation. The field lies on the crest of a large southeast-plunging anticline, sub-parallel to the nearby San Andreas fault system. The reservoir trap in both the Tulare and diatomite reservoir horizons is a combination of structure, stratigraphic factors, and tar seals; the presumed source for the oil is the deeper Monterey Formation. The diatomite reservoir produces light oil (20-32{degree} API gravity) form deep-marine diatomite and diatomaceous shales with extremely high porosity (average 60%) and low permeability (average 1 md). In contrast, the shallow ({lt}1000 ft (305 m) deep) overlying Tulare reservoir produces heavy oil (13-14{degree} API gravity) from unconsolidated, arkosic, fluviodeltaic sands of high porosity (average 35%) and permeability (average 3000 md). The depositional model is that of a generally prograding fluviodeltaic system sourced in the nearby basin-margin highlands. More than 6000 closely spaced, shallow wells are the key to steamflood production from hundreds of layered and laterally discontinuous reservoir sands which create laterally and vertically discontinuous reservoir flow units.

  6. Beneficial Reuse of San Ardo Produced Water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert A. Liske

    2006-07-31

    This DOE funded study was performed to evaluate the potential for treatment and beneficial reuse of produced water from the San Ardo oilfield in Monterey County, CA. The potential benefits of a successful full-scale implementation of this project include improvements in oil production efficiency and additional recoverable oil reserves as well as the addition of a new reclaimed water resource. The overall project was conducted in two Phases. Phase I identified and evaluated potential end uses for the treated produced water, established treated water quality objectives, reviewed regulations related to treatment, transport, storage and use of the treated produced water, and investigated various water treatment technology options. Phase II involved the construction and operation of a small-scale water treatment pilot facility to evaluate the process's performance on produced water from the San Ardo oilfield. Cost estimates for a potential full-scale facility were also developed. Potential end uses identified for the treated water include (1) agricultural use near the oilfield, (2) use by Monterey County Water Resources Agency (MCWRA) for the Salinas Valley Water Project or Castroville Seawater Intrusion Project, (3) industrial or power plant use in King City, and (4) use for wetlands creation in the Salinas Basin. All of these uses were found to have major obstacles that prevent full-scale implementation. An additional option for potential reuse of the treated produced water was subsequently identified. That option involves using the treated produced water to recharge groundwater in the vicinity of the oil field. The recharge option may avoid the limitations that the other reuse options face. The water treatment pilot process utilized: (1) warm precipitation softening to remove hardness and silica, (2) evaporative cooling to meet downstream temperature limitations and facilitate removal of ammonia, and (3) reverse osmosis (RO) for removal of dissolved salts, boron, and organics. Pilot study results indicate that produced water from the San Ardo oilfield can be treated to meet project water quality goals. Approximately 600 mg/l of caustic and 100 mg/l magnesium dosing were required to meet the hardness and silica goals in the warm softening unit. Approximately 30% of the ammonia was removed in the cooling tower; additional ammonia could be removed by ion exchange or other methods if necessary. A brackish water reverse osmosis membrane was effective in removing total dissolved solids and organics at all pH levels evaluated; however, the boron treatment objective was only achieved at a pH of 10.5 and above.

  7. Extensional wave attenuation and velocity in partially saturated sand in the sonic frequency range

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Z.; Rector, J.W.; Nihei, K.T.; Tomutsa, L.; Myer, L.R.; Nakagawa, S.

    2001-08-10

    Extensional wave attenuation and velocity measurements on a high permeability Monterey sand were performed over a range of gas saturations for imbibition and degassing conditions. These measurements were conducted using extensional wave pulse propagation and resonance over a 1-9 kHz frequency range for a hydrostatic confining pressure of 8.3 MPa. Analysis of the extensional wave data and the corresponding X-ray CT images of the gas saturation show strong attenuation resulting from the presence of the gas (Q{sub E} dropped from 300 for the dry sand to 30 for the partially-saturated sand), with larger attenuation at a given saturation resulting from heterogeneous gas distributions. The extensional wave velocities are in agreement with Gassmann theory for the test with near-homogeneous gas saturation and with a patchy saturation model for the test with heterogeneous gas saturation. These results show that partially-saturated sands under moderate confining pressure can produce strong intrinsic attenuation for extensional waves.

  8. Summary Report of Summer 2009 NGSI Human Capital Development Efforts at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dougan, A; Dreicer, M; Essner, J; Gaffney, A; Reed, J; Williams, R

    2009-11-16

    In 2009, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) engaged in several activities to support NA-24's Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI). This report outlines LLNL's efforts to support Human Capital Development (HCD), one of five key components of NGSI managed by Dunbar Lockwood in the Office of International Regimes and Agreements (NA-243). There were five main LLNL summer safeguards HCD efforts sponsored by NGSI: (1) A joint Monterey Institute of International Studies/Center for Nonproliferation Studies-LLNL International Safeguards Policy and Information Analysis Course; (2) A Summer Safeguards Policy Internship Program at LLNL; (3) A Training in Environmental Sample Analysis for IAEA Safeguards Internship; (4) Safeguards Technology Internships; and (5) A joint LLNL-INL Summer Safeguards Lecture Series. In this report, we provide an overview of these five initiatives, an analysis of lessons learned, an update on the NGSI FY09 post-doc, and an update on students who participated in previous NGSI-sponsored LLNL safeguards HCD efforts.

  9. A {open_quotes}New{close_quotes} regime for nuclear weapons and materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sutcliffe, W.G.

    1994-02-15

    In this paper, I discuss the principal ideas that I covered in my presentation on December 8, 1993, at the Future of Foreign Nuclear Materials Symposium held by the Naval Postgraduate School in Monterey, California. I was asked to discuss issues related to military inventories of plutonium, and I took this opportunity to describe a possible declaratory regime that could encompass military as well as civilian inventories of plutonium. The {open_quote}new{close_quotes} in the title does not imply that the regime discussed here is an original idea. Rather, the regime will be {open_quotes}new,{close_quotes} when it is adopted. The regime proposed here and in other works is one in which all stocks of nuclear weapons and materials are declared. Originally, declarations were proposed as a traditional arms control measure. Here, declarations are proposed to support the prevention of misuse of nuclear weapons and materials, including support for the nonproliferation regime. In the following, I discuss: (1) Worldwide inventories of nuclear weapons and materials, including the fact that military plutonium must be viewed as part of that worldwide inventory. (2) Life cycles of nuclear weapons and materials, including the various stages from the creation of nuclear materials for weapons through deployment and retirement of weapons to the final disposition of the materials. (3) Mechanisms for making declarations. (4) Risks and benefits to be derived from declarations. (5) Possibilities for supporting evidence or verification.

  10. An evaluation of the contaminant impacts on plants serving as habitat for an endangered species

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeShields, B.R.; Stelljes, M.E.; Hawkins, E.T.; Alsop, W.R. [Harding Lawson Associates, Novato, CA (United States); Collins, W. [Dept. of the Army, Fort Ord, CA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    As part of an ecological risk assessment at a Superfund site in Monterey County, California, potential impacts on an endangered species, the Smith`s blue butterfly (Euphilotes enoptes smithi) were evaluated. This species of butterfly lives along beach dunes historically used as small arms trainfire ranges. Historical land use resulted in the accumulation of spent bullets and varying concentrations of metals in site soil. Two species of buckwheat occurring at the site (Erigonium parvifolium and E. latifolium) that serve as the sole habitat for the butterfly were evaluated. It was assumed that if there were no impacts to the habitat, there would be no impacts to the endangered species itself. Surface soil and collocated plants were sampled and chemically analyzed in order to correlate soil concentrations with plant tissue concentrations. Surface soil and collocated plants were also sampled at reference sites to determine background concentrations. Tissue concentrations were compared to benchmark concentrations to evaluate potential impacts. In addition, soil samples and seeds from buckwheat growing at the site were collected and used to conduct root elongation assays in the laboratory. The objective of the assays was to assess effects of metals associated with the spent bullets in soil on plant growth. Within the plants, higher concentrations of all metals except zinc were found in the roots; zinc was equally distributed throughout the plants. No chemical-related impacts to the plants were identified.

  11. Economic feasibility of biochemical processes for the upgrading of crudes and the removal of sulfur, nitrogen, and trace metals from crude oil -- Benchmark cost establishment of biochemical processes on the basis of conventional downstream technologies. Final report FY95

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Premuzic, E.T.

    1996-08-01

    During the past several years, a considerable amount of work has been carried out showing that microbially enhanced oil recovery (MEOR) is promising and the resulting biotechnology may be deliverable. At Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), systematic studies have been conducted which dealt with the effects of thermophilic and thermoadapted bacteria on the chemical and physical properties of selected types of crude oils at elevated temperatures and pressures. Current studies indicate that during the biotreatment several chemical and physical properties of crude oils are affected. The oils are (1) emulsified; (2) acidified; (3) there is a qualitative and quantitative change in light and heavy fractions of the crudes; (4) there are chemical changes in fractions containing sulfur compounds; (5) there is an apparent reduction in the concentration of trace metals; and (6) the qualitative and quantitative changes appear to be microbial species dependent; and (7) there is a distinction between biodegraded and biotreated oils. The downstream biotechnological crude oil processing research performed thus far is of laboratory scale and has focused on demonstrating the technical feasibility of downstream processing with different types of biocatalysts under a variety of processing conditions. Quantitative economic analysis is the topic of the present project which investigates the economic feasibility of the various biochemical downstream processes which hold promise in upgrading of heavy crudes, such as those found in California, e.g., Monterey-type, Midway Sunset, Honda crudes, and others.

  12. Influence of anticlinal growth on upper Miocene turbidite deposits, Elk Hills field, Kern County, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reid, S.A. (Bechtel Petroleum Operations, Inc., Tupman, CA (United States)); McJannet, G.S. (Dept. of Energy, Tupman, CA (United States))

    1991-02-01

    Growth of subsea anticlines during deposition of the upper Miocene 24Z and 26R sandstones at Elk Hills caused the development of several sinuous, lenticular sand bodies. later structural growth enhanced the trap characteristics of these sandstones. Both sandstones are in the uppermost portion of the Elk Hills Shale Member of the Monterey Formation and contain channel-fill and overbank deposits of sand-rich turbidite systems. At the onset of turbidite deposition, low relief subsea anticlines separated broad basins which progressively deepened to the northeast. Channel-fill deposits of coarse-grained sand generally followed the axes of these northwest-southeast-trending basins. At several sites, channel-fill deposits also spilled north across anticlinal axes into the next lower basins. Wide bands of overbank sand and mud were deposited at sand body edges on the flat basin floors. Midway through turbidite deposition, a period of anticlinal growth substantially raised subsea relief. Channel-fill deposits continued in narrower basins but passed north into deeper basin only around well-defined sites at the anticlines' downplunge termini. Narrow basin shapes and higher anticline relief prevented significant overbank deposition. With Pliocene to Holocene uplift of the late Miocene structural trends, stratigraphic mounding of the north-directed channel-fill deposits helped create structural domes at 24Z, 2B and Northwest Stevens pools. In sand bodies lacking significant overbank deposits prevented oil entrapment in sand bodies deposited at times of low anticlinal relief.

  13. Horizontal wells improve recovery at the Elk Hills Petroleum Reserve

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rintoul, B.

    1995-11-01

    In 1988 the US Department of Energy and Bechtel implemented a program to slow production declines in the Elk Hills 26R pool sand of the Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1. It was also hoped horizontal wells would increase the production rate, decrease gas production and extend economic life of the reservoir. The Stevens sand pool targeted for the project is a high-quality, sand-rich turbidite channel system encapsulated within Miocene Monterey siliceous shales, mudstones and associated sediments. The pool is about 3-miles long by 3/4-mile wide. The paper describes the specifications and drilling of the first four out of the 14 horizontal wells drilled at this facility. Horizontal drilling technology has completely altered the future of the 26R pool. In 1980 estimated ultimate recovery (EUR) from the sand was 211 million bbl. With the latest horizontal well drilling campaign, the pool is expected to pass that estimate in 1997 when oil production is forecasted to be at least 13,000 b/d. EUR form the 26R sand now is more than 250 million bbl, and even that estimate is being revised upward.

  14. Silica phase changes: Diagenetic agent for oil entrapment, Lost Hills field, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Julander, D.R.; Szymanski, D.L. )

    1991-02-01

    The siliceous shales of the Monterey Group are the primary development target at Lost Hills. Silica phase changes have influenced the distribution and entrapment of hydrocarbons. With increasing temperature, opal A phase diatomite is converted to opal CT and finally quartz phase rock. All phases are low in permeability. The opal A diatomite is characteristically high in oil saturation and productive saturation. Productivity from this phase is dependent on structural position and fieldwide variations in oil viscosity and biodegradation. The deeper chert reservoir coincides with the opal CT to quartz phase transition. Porosity is again reduced in this transition, but saturations in the quartz phase rocks increase. Tests in the chert reservoir indicate a single, low-permeability system, suggesting the importance of matric contribution. resistivity and porosity in the diatomite, and resistivity and velocity in the chert, are the physical properties which best reflect saturation. Methods exploiting these properties (FMS, BHTV, borehole, and surface shear wave studies) should be helpful in further characterizing the reservoirs and identifying future pay.

  15. Constitutive models for the Etchegoin Sands, Belridge Diatomite, and overburden formations at the Lost Hills oil field, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    FOSSUM,ARLO F.; FREDRICH,JOANNE T.

    2000-04-01

    This report documents the development of constitutive material models for the overburden formations, reservoir formations, and underlying strata at the Lost Hills oil field located about 45 miles northwest of Bakersfield in Kern County, California. Triaxial rock mechanics tests were performed on specimens prepared from cores recovered from the Lost Hills field, and included measurements of axial and radial stresses and strains under different load paths. The tested intervals comprise diatomaceous sands of the Etchegoin Formation and several diatomite types of the Belridge Diatomite Member of the Monterey Formation, including cycles both above and below the diagenetic phase boundary between opal-A and opal-CT. The laboratory data are used to drive constitutive parameters for the Extended Sandler-Rubin (ESR) cap model that is implemented in Sandia's structural mechanics finite element code JAS3D. Available data in the literature are also used to derive ESR shear failure parameters for overburden formations. The material models are being used in large-scale three-dimensional geomechanical simulations of the reservoir behavior during primary and secondary recovery.

  16. Application of Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy to silica diagenesis: The opal-A to opal-CT transformation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rice, S.B.; Freund, H.; Huang, W.L.; Clouse, J.A.; Isaacs, C.M.

    1995-10-02

    An important goal in silica diagenesis research is to understand the kinetics of opal transformation from noncrystalline opal-A to the disordered silica polymorph opal-CT. Because the conventional technique for monitoring the transformation, powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), is applicable only to phases with long-range order, the authors used Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) to monitor the transformation. They applied this technique, combined with XRD and TEM, to experimental run products and natural opals from the Monterey Formation and from siliceous deposits in the western Pacific Ocean. Using a ratio of two infrared absorption intensities ({omega} = I{sub 472 cm{sup {minus}1}}/I{sub 500 cm{sup {minus}1}}), the relative proportions of opal-A and opal-CT can be determined. The progress of the transformation is marked by changes in slope of {omega} vs. depth or time when a sufficient stratigraphic profile is available. There are three stages in the opal-A to opal-CT reaction: (1) opal-A dissolution; (2) opal-CT precipitation, whose end point is marked by completion of opal-A dissolution; and (3) opal-CT ordering, during which tridymite stacking is eliminated in favor of crystobalite stacking.

  17. Core description and analysis using X-radiography and cat-scanning: examples from Sacramento and San Joaquin basins, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fischer, P.J.; Setiawan, J.; Cherven, V.B.

    1986-04-01

    X-radiographs of cores from Forbes deep basin sands, the tar-saturated paralic sands of the Temblor and the Tulare fluvial sands and silts, as well as fractured siliceous units (the Monterey Formation and equivalents) reveal geologic features that are either not visible or barely discernible to the naked eye. These features include changes in grain size, grading, ripple lamination to cross-bedding, cyclic couplets in tidal sequences, bioturbation and burrowing, and fracture patterns and filling. Forbes core x-radiography from the northern Sacramento basin clearly shows a sequence of thinly bedded sand and mudstones that are microripple cross-laminated. Partial Bouma sequences (Ta-b or Tb with Ta-c) are characteristic of the thickly bedded sands below the ripple-laminated units. Cyclic sequences of mud-turbidites and finely laminated, very fine-grained sands to coarse silts characterize a sand-poor sequence that overlies a massive to indistinctly thin-bedded sand. Most of these features described above are barely discernible without x-radiography, yet all provide major input to the interpretation of the depositional environment of the Forbes Formation, as well as information regarding reservoir continuity. Tar or heavy-oil saturation of cores can be a severe problem when cores are examined. In a Tulare Formation core sequence that was x-radiographed, essentially no bedding was visible, even using UV photography. However, extensive fluvial cross-bedding throughout the core was revealed by the x-radiography. A similar, heavy oil masking problem in a Temblor Formation core near East Coalinga was also resolved by the x-ray technique. The reservoir is divided into multiple, thin, tidal couplets (4-6 in.) of oil-saturated sand separated by 1 to 3 in. thick mudstones.

  18. International Safeguards Technology and Policy Education and Training Pilot Programs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dreicer, M; Anzelon, G A; Essner, J T; Dougan, A D; Doyle, J; Boyer, B; Hypes, P; Sokava, E; Wehling, F; Martin, J; Charlton, W

    2009-06-16

    A major focus of the National Nuclear Security Administration-led Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI) is the development of human capital to meet present and future challenges to the safeguards regime. An effective university-level education in safeguards and related disciplines is an essential element in a layered strategy to rebuild the safeguards human resource capacity. NNSA launched two pilot programs in 2008 to develop university level courses and internships in association with James, Martin Center for Nonproliferation Studies (CNS) at the Monterey Institute of International Studies (MIIS) and Texas A&M University (TAMU). These pilot efforts involved 44 students in total and were closely linked to hands-on internships at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The Safeguards and Nuclear Material Management pilot program was a collaboration between TAMU, LANL, and LLNL. The LANL-based coursework was shared with the students undertaking internships at LLNL via video teleconferencing. A weeklong hands-on exercise was also conducted at LANL. A second pilot effort, the International Nuclear Safeguards Policy and Information Analysis pilot program was implemented at MIIS in cooperation with LLNL. Speakers from MIIS, LLNL, and other U.S. national laboratories (LANL, BNL) delivered lectures for the audience of 16 students. The majority of students were senior classmen or new master's degree graduates from MIIS specializing in nonproliferation policy studies. The two pilots programs concluded with an NGSI Summer Student Symposium, held at LLNL, where 20 students participated in LLNL facility tours and poster sessions. The value of bringing together the students from the technical and policy pilots was notable and will factor into the planning for the continued refinement of the two programs in the coming years.

  19. Domoic acid production near California coastal upwelling zones, June 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trainer, V L. (National Marine Fisheries Service); Adams, Nicolaus G. (National Marine Fisheries Service); Bill, Brian D. (National Marine Fisheries Service); Stehr, Carla M. (National Marine Fisheries Service); Wekell, John C. (National Marine Fisheries Service); Moeller, Peter (National Ocean Service, Marine Biotoxins Program); Busman, Mark (National Ocean Service, Marine Biotoxins Program); Woodruff, Dana L. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB))

    2000-01-01

    Sea lion mortalities in central California during May and June 1998 were traced to their ingestion of sardines and anchovies that had accumulated the neurotoxin domoic acid. The detection of toxin in urine, feces, and stomach contents of several sea lions represents the first proven occurrence of domoic acid transfer through the food chain to a marine mammal. The pennate diatoms, Pseudo-nitzschia multiseries and P. australis, were the dominant, toxin-producing phytoplankton constituting algal blooms near Monterey Bay, Half Moon Bay, and Oceano Dunes, areas where sea lions with neurological symptoms stranded. Toxic Pseudo-nitzschia were also found near Morrow Bay, Point Conception, Point Arguello, and Santa Barbara, demonstrating that these species were widespread along the central California coast in June 1998. Measurements of domoic acid during three cruises in early June showed the highest cellular toxin levels in P. multiseries near Point A?o Nuevo and in P. australis from Morro w Bay. Maximum cellular domoic acid levels were observed within 20 km of the coast between 0 and 5 m depth, although toxin was also measured to depths of 40 m. Hydrographic data indicated that the highest toxin levels and greatest numbers of toxic cells were positioned in water masses associated with upwelling zones near coastal headlands. Nutrient levels at these sites were less than those typically measured during periods of active upwelling, due to the 1998 El Ni?o event. The flow of cells and/or nutrients from coastal headlands into embayments where cells can multiply in a stratified environment is a possible mechanism of bloom development along the central California coast. This coupling of toxic Pseudo-nitzschia growth near upwelling zones with physical processes involved in cell transport will be understood only when long-term measurements are made at several key coastal locations, aiding in our capability to predict domoic-acid producing algal blooms.

  20. THE ESTABLISHMENT OF A U.S. SUPPORT PROGRAM INTERSHIP PROGRAM.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    PEPPER,S.E.

    2003-07-13

    In 2002, the U.S. Support Program to IAEA Safeguards established a program of one-year paid internships with the IAEA Department of Safeguards for students and recent graduates. Six interns are currently working with the IAEA in software development and information collection activities. The program is administered through the International Safeguards Project Office (ISPO) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). Software development assignments were considered to be most feasible because of the considerable abilities of many computer science students after a few years' education. Candidates in information science were also recruited because of an existing internship program managed by the Monterey Institute of International Studies. ISPO recruited students from US. colleges and other sources. Applications were collected and provided to the IAEA for review and selection. SGIT then identified the best applicants and, after confirming their intention to accept the position, tailored assignments based on their qualifications. Before the assignments started, ISPO conducted an orientation to provide the interns with information to ease their transition into working with the IAEA and living in Vienna. Four interns began their assignments in software development in June 2002 and two others began their assignments in information collection in July and August. The IAEA, the interns, and the Subgroup on Safeguards Technical Support have found the assignments to be beneficial. The internship program provides additional staff to the IAEA at low cost to the USSP, introduces young professionals to careers in the nuclear industry and international civil service, and provides the IAEA access to U.S. academic institutions. In 2003, the program will be expanded to include engineering and technical writing in support of the Division of Safeguards Technical Services. The paper will discuss the recruitment and selection of interns and the administration of the program.

  1. Application of horizontal drilling in the development of a complex turbidite sandstone reservoir, Elk Hills Field, Kern County, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reid, S.A. (Bechtel Petroleum Operations, Inc., Tupman, CA (USA)); McJannet, G.S. (Dept. of Energy, Tupman, CA (USA)); Hart, O.D. (Chevron Inc., Tupman, CA (USA))

    1990-05-01

    Horizontal drilling techniques have been used at the Elk Hills field, to more effectively produce the complex 26R reservoir. This Stevens zone reservoir of the Miocene Monterey Formation contains turbid sediments deposited in a deep-sea fan setting and consists of several distinct sandstone layers averaging 150 ft thick and usually separated by mudstone beds. Layers in the reservoir dip as much as 50{degree} southwest. An expanding gas cap makes many vertical wells less favorable to operate. Horizontal completions were thought ideal for the pool because (1) original oil-water contact is level and believed stable, (2) water production is low, (3) a horizontal well provides for a long production life; and (4) several sandstone layers can be produced through one well. For the first well, the plan was to redrill an idle well to horizontal along an arc with a radius of 350 ft. The horizontal section was to be up to 1,000 ft long and extend northeast slightly oblique to dip just above the average oil-water contact. The well was drilled in September 1988, reached horizontal nearly as planned, was completed after perforating 210 ft of oil sand, and produced a daily average of 1,000 bbl oil and 8 bbl of water. However, structural influence was stronger than expected, causing the horizontal drill path to turn directly updip away from the bottom-hole target area. The well also encountered variable oil-water contacts, with more than half the horizontal section possibly water productive. Geologic and drilling data from the first well were used for planning another well. This well was drilled in October 1989, and was highly successful with over 1,000 ft of productive interval.

  2. Silica diagenesis in Santa Cruz mudstone, Late Miocene, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    El-Sabbagh, D.

    1987-05-01

    The silica-rich upper Miocene Santa Cruz Mudstone is similar to the Miocene Monterey Formation. Previous studies have suggested the Santa Cruz Mudstone was not buried deeply nor had it undergone extensive diagenesis. Because opaline diagenesis is temperature dependent, the author examined the silica diagenesis of the Santa Cruz Mudstone using scanning electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction methods to study its burial history. In a series of samples from Santa Cruz to Davenport, California (over 16 km), opal-CT is the dominant silica phase present and clay minerals are notably absent. The d(101)-spacing values of opal-CT range from 4.11 A (Santa Cruz area) to 4.06 A (north of Santa Cruz), exhibiting the complete range of d(101)-spacing values found in opal-CT zones. Scanning electron micrographs of crystalline microtextures show rosettes of opal-CT (lepispheres) in cavities of samples with medium to high d(101)-spacing values. The morphology of lepisphere crystallites grades from bladed to spiny with decreasing d(101)-spacing values, reflecting an internal crystal ordering with increased diagenesis. Further diagenetic changes occurred in a sample with 4.06 A d(101)-spacing where incipient quartz crystals signal the initial conversion of opal-CT to microcrystalline quartz. Silica diagenesis demonstrates that burial temperatures surpassed the range of opal-A to opal-CT conversion and approached conversion temperatures (55/sup 0/C to 110/sup 0/C) of opal-CT to microcrystalline quartz. The conversion occurred when the Santa Cruz Mudstone was buried over 1900 m (depth calculated from a geohistory diagram). This burial temperature brings the Santa Cruz Mudstone within the oil generation window, and could account for the presence of hydrocarbons in the unit.

  3. Mixing of biogenic siliceous and terrigenous clastic sediments: South Belridge field and Beta field, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schwartz, D.E. )

    1990-05-01

    The intermixing and interbedding of biogenically derived siliceous sediment with terrigenous clastic sediment in reservoirs of upper Miocene age provides both reservoir rock and seal and influences productivity by affecting porosity and permeability. Miocene reservoirs commonly contain either biogenic-dominated cyclic diatomite, porcelanite, or chert (classic Monterey Formation) or clastic-dominated submarine fan sequences with interbedded or intermixed siliceous members of biogenic origin. Biogenic-clastic cycles, 30-180 ft thick, at South Belridge field were formed by episodic influx of clastic sediment from distant submarine fans mixing with slowly accumulating diatomaceous ooze. The cycles consist of basal silt and pelletized massive diatomaceous mudstone, overlain by burrowed, faintly bedded clayey diatomite and topped by laminated diatomite. Cycle tops have higher porosity and permeability, lower grain density, and higher oil saturation than clay and silt-rich portions of the cycles. Submarine fan sediments forming reservoirs at the Beta field are comprised of interbedded sands and silts deposited in a channelized middle fan to outer fan setting. Individual turbidites display fining-upward sequences, with oil-bearing sands capped by wet micaceous silts. Average sands are moderately to poorly sorted, fine- to medium-grained arkosic arenites. Sands contain pore-filling carbonate and porcelaneous cements. Porcelaneous cement consists of a mixture of opal-A, opal-CT, and chert with montmorillonite and minor zeolite. This cement is an authigenic material precipitated in intergranular pore space. The origin of the opal is biogenic, with recrystallization of diatom frustules (opal-A) into opal-CT lepispheres and quartz crystals. Porcelaneous cement comprises 4-21% of the bulk volume of the rock. Seventy percent of the bulk volume of the cement is micropore space.

  4. Geologic Investigation of a Potential Site for a Next-Generation Reactor Neutrino Oscillation Experiment -- Diablo Canyon, San Luis Obispo County, CA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Onishi, Celia Tiemi; Dobson, Patrick; Nakagawa, Seiji; Glaser, Steven; Galic, Dom

    2004-08-01

    This report provides information on the geology and selected physical and mechanical properties of surface rocks collected at Diablo Canyon, San Luis Obispo County, California as part of the design and engineering studies towards a future reactor neutrino oscillation experiment. The main objective of this neutrino project is to study the process of neutrino flavor transformation--or neutrino oscillation--by measuring neutrinos produced in the fission reactions of a nuclear power plant. Diablo Canyon was selected as a candidate site because it allows the detectors to be situated underground in a tunnel close to the source of neutrinos (i.e., at a distance of several hundred meters from the nuclear power plant) while having suitable topography for shielding against cosmic rays. The detectors have to be located underground to minimize the cosmic ray-related background noise that can mimic the signal of reactor neutrino interactions in the detector. Three Pliocene-Miocene marine sedimentary units dominate the geology of Diablo Canyon: the Pismo Formation, the Monterey Formation, and the Obispo Formation. The area is tectonically active, located east of the active Hosgri Fault and in the southern limb of the northwest trending Pismo Syncline. Most of the potential tunnel for the neutrino detector lies within the Obispo Formation. Review of previous geologic studies, observations from a field visit, and selected physical and mechanical properties of rock samples collected from the site provided baseline geological information used in developing a preliminary estimate for tunneling construction cost. Gamma-ray spectrometric results indicate low levels of radioactivity for uranium, thorium, and potassium. Grain density, bulk density, and porosity values for these rock samples range from 2.37 to 2.86 g/cc, 1.41 to 2.57 g/cc, and 1.94 to 68.5% respectively. Point load, unconfined compressive strength, and ultrasonic velocity tests were conducted to determine rock mechanical and acoustic properties. The rock strength values range from 23 to 219 MPa and the Poisson's ratio from 0.1 to 0.38. Potential geologic hazards in the Diablo Canyon area were identified and described to provide an overall picture of processes that may affect tunnel construction activities.

  5. Geologic Investigation of a Potential Site for a Next-Generation Reactor Neutrino Oscillation Experiment -- Diablo Canyon, San Luis Obispo County, CA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Onishi, Celia Tiemi; Dobson, Patrick; Nakagawa, Seiji; Glaser, Steven; Galic, Dom

    2004-06-11

    This report provides information on the geology and selected physical and mechanical properties of surface rocks collected at Diablo Canyon, San Luis Obispo County, California as part of the design and engineering studies towards a future reactor neutrino oscillation experiment. The main objective of this neutrino project is to study the process of neutrino flavor transformation or neutrino oscillation by measuring neutrinos produced in the fission reactions of a nuclear power plant. Diablo Canyon was selected as a candidate site because it allows the detectors to be situated underground in a tunnel close to the source of neutrinos (i.e., at a distance of several hundred meters from the nuclear power plant) while having suitable topography for shielding against cosmic rays. The detectors have to be located underground to minimize the cosmic ray-related background noise that can mimic the signal of reactor neutrino interactions in the detector. Three Pliocene-Miocene marine sedimentary units dominate the geology of Diablo Canyon: the Pismo Formation, the Monterey Formation, and the Obispo Formation. The area is tectonically active, located east of the active Hosgri Fault and in the southern limb of the northwest trending Pismo Syncline. Most of the potential tunnel for the neutrino detector lies within the Obispo Formation. Review of previous geologic studies, observations from a field visit, and selected physical and mechanical properties of rock samples collected from the site provided baseline geological information used in developing a preliminary estimate for tunneling construction cost. Gamma-ray spectrometric results indicate low levels of radioactivity for uranium, thorium, and potassium. Grain density, bulk density, and porosity values for these rock samples range from 2.37 to 2.86 g/cc, 1.41 to 2.57 g/cc, and 1.94 to 68.5 percent respectively. Point load, unconfined compressive strength, and ultrasonic velocity tests were conducted to determine rock mechanical and acoustic properties. The rock strength values range from 23 to 219 MPa and the Poisson's ratio from 0.1 to 0.38. Potential geologic hazards in the Diablo Canyon area were identified and described to provide an overall picture of processes that may affect tunnel construction activities.

  6. FY 2008 Next Generation Safeguards Initiative International Safeguards Education and Training Pilot Progerams Summary Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dreicer, M; Anzelon, G; Essner, J; Dougan, A; Doyle, J; Boyer, B; Hypes, P; Sokova, E; Wehling, F

    2008-10-17

    Key component of the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI) launched by the National Nuclear Security Administration is the development of human capital to meet present and future challenges to the safeguards regime. An effective university-level education in safeguards and related disciplines is an essential element in a layered strategy to rebuild the safeguards human resource capacity. Two pilot programs at university level, involving 44 students, were initiated and implemented in spring-summer 2008 and linked to hands-on internships at LANL or LLNL. During the internships, students worked on specific safeguards-related projects with a designated Laboratory Mentor to provide broader exposure to nuclear materials management and information analytical techniques. The Safeguards and Nuclear Material Management pilot program was a collaboration between the Texas A&M University (TAMU), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). It included a 16-lecture course held during a summer internship program. The instructors for the course were from LANL together with TAMU faculty and LLNL experts. The LANL-based course was shared with the students spending their internship at LLNL via video conference. A week-long table-top (or hands-on) exercise on was also conducted at LANL. The student population was a mix of 28 students from a 12 universities participating in a variety of summer internship programs held at LANL and LLNL. A large portion of the students were TAMU students participating in the NGSI pilot. The International Nuclear Safeguards Policy and Information Analysis pilot program was implemented at the Monterey Institute for International Studies (MIIS) in cooperation with LLNL. It included a two-week intensive course consisting of 20 lectures and two exercises. MIIS, LLNL, and speakers from other U.S. national laboratories (LANL, BNL) delivered lectures for the audience of 16 students. The majority of students were senior classmen or new master's degree graduates from MIIS specializing in nonproliferation policy studies. Other university/organizations represented: University of California in LA, Stanford University, and the IAEA. Four of the students that completed this intensive course participated in a 2-month internship at LLNL. The conclusions of the two pilot courses and internships was a NGSI Summer Student Symposium, held at LLNL, where 20 students participated in LLNL facility tours and poster sessions. The Poster sessions were designed to provide a forum for sharing the results of their summer projects and providing experience in presenting their work to a varied audience of students, faculty and laboratory staff. The success of bringing together the students from the technical and policy pilots was notable and will factor into the planning for the continued refinement of their two pilot efforts in the coming years.