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1

Bone marrow stromal cells increase oligodendrogenesis after stroke  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bone marrow stromal cells increase oligodendrogenesis after stroke Jing Zhang1 , Yi Li1 , Zheng cell (BMSC) treatment of stroke in rats. Rats were subjected to the middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAo). BMSCs have been shown to promote functional recovery post stroke. A therapeutic dose of BMSC (3

Cai, Long

2

Identification of a hypoxic population of bone marrow cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A technique using collagenase has been devised to release and separate, with reproducibility, hematopoietic cells (HC) from various microenvironments of mouse femurs. HC were assayed by an in vitro gel culture technique used traditionally to score granulocyte-macrophage precursor cells (CFU-C). CFU-C which resided in the medullary cavity and endosteal regions were sensitive to ionizing radiation and resistant to misonidazole (MISO) cytotoxicity. CFU-C which resided within the compact bone were resistant to ionizing radiation and sensitive to the cytotoxic action of MISO. These results suggest that HC which reside in the bone are hypoxic and retain clonogenic potential. When animals were exposed to various treatments with MISO followed by myelotoxic doses of cyclophosphamide (CTX) or total body irradiation (TBI), the LD/sub 50/ of both agents was significantly reduced. This result suggests that a hypoxic component of HC could be important in the regenerative process within the marrow after such myelotoxic trauma.

Allalunis, M.J.; Chapman, J.D.; Turner, A.R.

1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Discovery of novel anti-inflammatory proteins inspired by bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell secretions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) may soon become the first FDA-approved stem cell therapy for autoimmune and inflammatory disease. Our lab originally hypothesized that much of the therapeutic activity of MSCs may ...

Milwid, Jack Miles

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Self-assembling peptide hydrogels modulate in vitro chondrogenesis of bovine bone marrow stromal cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Our objective was to test the hypothesis that self-assembling peptide hydrogel scaffolds provide cues that enhance the chondrogenic differentiation of bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs). BMSCs were encapsulated within two ...

Kopesky, Paul Wayne

5

Suppressor cells in transplantation tolerance. II. maturation of suppressor cells in the bone marrow chimera  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Histoincompatible bone marrow allografts were established in lethally irradiated rats. At various times after transplantation, the spleen cells were harvested, subjected to mixed lymphocyte cultures, and assayed for suppressor cells in vitro and in vivo by adoptive transfer studies. Alloantigen-nonspecific suppressor cells appeared in the chimera at 40 days after grafting, coinciding with the resolution of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). At 250 days the nonspecific suppressor cells were replaced by suppressor cells specifically suppressing donor-versus-host alloantigen responses. At 720 days suppressor cells could no longer be identified by in vitro methods but were identified by in vivo adoptive transfer of transplantation tolerance. After injection of host-type antigen into chimeras, the suppressor cells could be again demonstrated by in vitro methods.

Tutschka, P.J.; Ki, P.F.; Beschorner, W.E.; Hess, A.D.; Santos, G.W.

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Suppressor cells in transplantation tolerance II. Maturation of suppressor cells in the bone marrow chimera  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Histoincompatible bone marrow allografts were established in lethally irradiated rats. At various times after transplantation, the spleen cells were harvested, subjected to mixed lymphocyte cultures, and assayed for suppressor cells in vitro and in vivo by adoptive transfer studies. Alloantigen-nonspecific suppressor cells appeared in the chimera at 40 days after grafting, coinciding with the resolution of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). At 250 days the nonspecific suppressor cells were replaced by suppressor cells specifically suppressing donor-versus-host alloantigen responses. At 720 days suppressor cells could no longer be identified by in vitro methods but were identified by in vivo adoptive transfer of transplantation tolerance. After injection of host-type antigen into chimeras, the suppressor cells could be again demonstrated by in vitro methods.

Tutschka, P.J.; Ki, P.F.; Beschorner, W.E.; Hess, A.D.; Santos, G.W.

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Characterization of host lymphoid cells in antibody-facilitated bone marrow chimeras  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors have produced stable murine antibody-facilitated (AF) chimeras by the simultaneous injection of P1 bone marrow cells and anti-P2 monoclonal antibody into normal (unirradiated) adult (P1 X P2)F1 recipients. These AF chimeras are healthy, long-lived, and exhibit no overt signs of graft-versus-host disease. They are immunocompetent and tolerant of host, P2-encoded alloantigens. Donor cell engraftment and takeover, monitored by glucosephosphate isomerase isozyme patterns, is usually complete (greater than 95%) in the peripheral blood, bone marrow, and hemopoietic stem cell compartments of long-term (greater than 3 months posttransplantation) AF chimeras. The authors report here, however, that splenic, lymph node, and thymic leukocytes of AF chimeras represent donor/host chimeric populations. Spleen cell populations of AF chimeras exhibit substantial chimera-to-chimera variation in the preponderant residual host cell type(s) present. Interpretations of the implications of these findings are discussed.

McCarthy, S.A.; Griffith, I.J.; Gambel, P.; Francescutti, L.H.; Wegmann, T.G.

1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Cellular and molecular immunotherapeutics derived from the bone marrow stroma  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The bone marrow contains a multipotent stromal cell, commonly referred to as a mesenchymal stem cell (MSC). There has been recent interest in the clinical use of MSCs for cell-based therapy because: (1) bone marrow aspiration ...

Parekkadan, Biju

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Intra-arterial Autologous Bone Marrow Cell Transplantation in a Patient with Upper-extremity Critical Limb Ischemia  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Induction of therapeutic angiogenesis by autologous bone marrow mononuclear cell transplantation has been identified as a potential new option in patients with advanced lower-limb ischemia. There is little evidence of the benefit of intra-arterial cell application in upper-limb critical ischemia. We describe a patient with upper-extremity critical limb ischemia with digital gangrene resulting from hypothenar hammer syndrome successfully treated by intra-arterial autologous bone marrow mononuclear cell transplantation.

Madaric, Juraj, E-mail: jurmad@hotmail.com [National Institute of Cardiovascular Diseases (NUSCH) and Slovak Medical University, Department of Cardiology and Angiology (Slovakia)] [National Institute of Cardiovascular Diseases (NUSCH) and Slovak Medical University, Department of Cardiology and Angiology (Slovakia); Klepanec, Andrej [National Institute of Cardiovascular Diseases, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology (Slovakia)] [National Institute of Cardiovascular Diseases, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology (Slovakia); Mistrik, Martin [Clinic of Hematology and Transfusiology, Faculty Hospital (Slovakia)] [Clinic of Hematology and Transfusiology, Faculty Hospital (Slovakia); Altaner, Cestmir [Slovak Academy of Science, Institute of Experimental Oncology (Slovakia)] [Slovak Academy of Science, Institute of Experimental Oncology (Slovakia); Vulev, Ivan [National Institute of Cardiovascular Diseases, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology (Slovakia)] [National Institute of Cardiovascular Diseases, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology (Slovakia)

2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

10

Expression of T cell antigen receptor genes in the thymus of irradiated mice after bone marrow transplantation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sequential appearance of the expression of T cell antigen receptor genes was investigated in the thymus of irradiated mice at the early stage after transplantation of Thy-1 congeneic H-2 compatible allogeneic bone marrow cells. The first cells to repopulate the thymus on day 7 after bone marrow transplantation were intrathymic radioresistant T cell precursors, which expanded mainly to CD4+CD8+ host-type thymocytes by day 14. A high level of gamma gene expression but a much reduced level of alpha and beta gene expression were detected in the host-type thymocytes on day 7. During regeneration of these cells, gamma-chain messages fell to low level and alpha and beta mRNA levels increased. The thymus of the recipients began to be repopulated by donor-derived T cells about 2 wk after bone marrow transplantation and was almost completely replaced by the third week. An ordered expression of gamma then beta and alpha-chain gene transcript was also observed in the donor-type thymocytes at the early stage after bone marrow transplantation. The use of thymocytes at early stage in whole-body irradiated bone marrow chimera provides a pertinent source for investigating the molecular mechanism of T cell differentiation in adult thymus.

Matsuzaki, G.; Yoshikai, Y.; Kishihara, K.; Nomoto, K.

1988-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

11

E-Print Network 3.0 - arthritis bone marrow Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

stem cells (MSCs; also Summary: -derived MSC; AT, adipose tissue; BM, bone marrow; CIA, collagen- induced arthritis; HGF, hepatocyte growth... in the bone marrow (BM) 2 but...

12

Essential requirement of I-A region-identical host bone marrow or bone marrow-derived cells for tumor neutralization by primed L3T4+ T cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The antitumor activity of Meth A-hyperimmunized BALB/c mouse spleen cells (Meth A-Im-SPL) was assayed by the Winn test in H-2 incompatible bone marrow chimeras in closed colony CD-1 (nu/nu), inbred DDD/1(nu/nu) (H-2s), or inbred BALB/c(nu/nu) (H-2d) mice as recipients. We found that Meth A-Im-SPL suppressed Meth A growth in the chimera nude mice which were reconstituted with bone marrow cells of the H-2d haplotype (i.e., BALB/c, DBA/2 and B10.D2), but not in the chimeras which were reconstituted with bone marrow cells of the H-2a, H-2b, or H-2k haplotype (i.e., B10.A, B10, and B10.BR). These results suggested that H-2 restriction occurred between Meth A-Im-SPL and bone marrow or bone marrow-derived cells in tumor neutralization. Furthermore, Meth A-Im-SPL did not suppress Meth 1 tumors (antigenically distinct from Meth A tumors) in the presence or absence of mitomycin C-treated Meth A in a Winn assay. These results suggested that there is tumor specificity in the effector phase as well as in the induction phase. The phenotype of the effectors in the Meth A-Im-SPL was Thy-1.2+ and L3T4+, because Meth A-Im-SPL lost their antitumor activity with pretreatment with anti-Thy-1.2 monoclonal antibody (mAb) and complement or anti-L3T4 mAb and complement, but not with anti-Lyt-2.2 mAb and complement or complement alone. Positively purified L3T4+ T cells from Meth A-Im-SPL (Meth A-Im-L3T4), obtained by the panning method, suppressed the tumor growth in the chimera nude mice which were reconstituted with bone marrow cells of B10.KEA2 mice (that were I-A region-identical with Meth A-Im-L3T4 cells but not others in H-2) as well as B10.D2 cells (that were fully identical with Meth A-Im-L3T4 cells in H-2). We conclude that Meth A-Im-SPL (L3T4+) neutralized the tumors in collaboration with I-A region-identical host bone marrow or bone marrow-derived cells, and the neutralization was not accompanied by the bystander effect.

Ozawa, H.; Iwaguchi, T.; Kataoka, T.

1987-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells enhance angiogenesis via their ?6?1 integrin receptor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) facilitate the angiogenic response of endothelial cells (ECs) within three-dimensional (3D) matrices in vivo and in engineered tissues in vitro in part through paracrine mediators and by acting as stabilizing pericytes. However, the molecular interactions between BMSCs and nascent tubules during the process of angiogenesis are not fully understood. In this study, we have used a tractable 3D co-culture model to explore the functional role of the ?6?1 integrin adhesion receptor on BMSCs in sprouting angiogenesis. We report that knockdown of the ?6 integrin subunit in BMSCs significantly reduces capillary sprouting, and causes their failure to associate with the nascent vessels. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the BMSCs with attenuated ?6 integrin proliferate at a significantly lower rate relative to either control cells expressing non-targeting shRNA or wild type BMSCs; however, despite adding more cells to compensate for this deficit in proliferation, deficient sprouting persists. Collectively, our findings demonstrate that the ?6 integrin subunit in BMSCs is important for their ability to stimulate vessel morphogenesis. This conclusion may have important implications in the optimization of cell-based strategies to promote angiogenesis. Highlights: • BMSCs stimulate angiogenesis, but the mechanisms remain unclear. • We silenced the expression of the ?6 integrin subunit in BMSCs. • Silencing this receptor subunit significantly inhibited angiogenic sprouting. • Knocking down ?6 integrin affected laminin and ?SMA expression. • Silencing ?6 integrin expression also reduced BMSC proliferation.

Carrion, Bita; Kong, Yen P. [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Kaigler, Darnell [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Department of Periodontics and Oral Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Putnam, Andrew J., E-mail: putnam@umich.edu [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)

2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

14

Efficient natural defense mechanisms against Listeria monocytogenes in T and B cell-deficient allogeneic bone marrow radiation chimeras. Preactivated macrophages are the main effector cells in an early phase after bone marrow transfer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Radiation chimeras in the early phase after bone marrow transplantation are a good model to study the efficiency of the body's nonspecific defense system represented by macrophages (M phi), polymorphonuclear cells (PMN), and NK cells. These cell types are present in large numbers in spleen and liver at that time, whereas the specific immune system represented by T and B cells is functionally deficient. We previously reported enhanced activities in vitro of M phi (and PMN) from recipient animals in an early phase after allogeneic bone marrow transfer. We here demonstrate that these activities result in enhanced spontaneous resistance against Listeria monocytogenes in vivo: CFU of L. monocytogenes in spleen and liver 48 h after infection were about 1 or 2 to 4 log steps less than in untreated control mice of donor or host haplotype. This enhanced resistance decreased over the 4-mo period after marrow transfer. Preactivated M phi were identified as the most important effector cells. Isolated from spleen and peritoneal cavity, they performed enhanced killing of phagocytosed Listeria. Such preactivated M phi occurred in recipient animals after transfer of allogeneic but not of syngeneic bone marrow. The precise mechanism of M phi activation in the allogeneic radiation chimera in the complete absence of any detectable T cell function is not clear at present. However, these preactivated M phi display an important protective effect against L. monocytogenes: chimeras could eliminate Listeria without acquisition of positive delayed-type sensitivity when infected with 10(3) bacteria. An inoculum of 5 . 10(3) L. monocytogenes resulted either in prolonged survival compared with normal mice of the recipient haplotype or in definitive survival accompanied by a positive delayed-type sensitivity.

Roesler, J.; Groettrup, E.B.; Baccarini, M.; Lohmann-Mattes, M.L. (Fraunhofer-Institut ITA, Hannover (Germany, F.R.))

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Effects of bone marrow-derived cells on monocrotaline-and hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension in mice  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

hypertension in mice William Raoul,1 Orianne Wagner-Ballon,6 Guitanouch Saber,1 Anne Hulin,5 Elisabeth Marcos the difference in their effects depends on the mechanism of pulmonary hypertension (PH) remains unknown of monocrotaline (MCT)- induced pulmonary hypertension, Zhao et al. [9] showed that bone marrow-derived endothelial

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

16

Clonal deletion of self-reactive T cells in irradiation bone marrow chimeras and neonatally tolerant mice. Evidence for intercellular transfer of Mlsa  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Tolerance to Mlsa has been shown to be associated with clonal deletion of cells carrying TCR beta chain variable regions V beta 6 or V beta 8.1 in mice possessing I-E antigens. To evaluate the rules of tolerance induction to Mlsa we prepared irradiation bone marrow chimeras expressing Mlsa or Mlsb and I-E by different cell types. Deletion of V beta 6+, Mlsa-reactive T cells required the presence of Mlsa and I-E products either on bone marrow-derived cells or on irradiated recipient cells. Tolerance was induced when Mlsa and I-E were expressed by distinct cells of the chimera. Also neonatally tolerized mice exhibited depletion of V beta 6+ cells after injection of I-E- Mlsa spleen cells (DBA/1) into newborn I-E+ Mlsb mice (BALB/c x B10.G)F1. These results suggest that the product of the Mlsa locus is soluble and/or may be transferred from cell to cell and bound to I-E antigens. The chimera experiments also showed that tolerance to Mlsa is H-2 allele independent, i.e., is apparently unrestricted. Differentiation of chimeric (H-2d/Mlsa x H-2q/Mlsb)F1 stem cells in either an H-2d or an H-2q thymus revealed that tolerance assessed by absence of V beta 6+ T cells is not dependent on the thymically determined restriction specificity of T cells.

Speiser, D.E.; Schneider, R.; Hengartner, H.; MacDonald, H.R.; Zinkernagel, R.M. (Univ. Hospital, Zuerich (Switzerland))

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Lead effects on development and function of bone marrow-derived dendritic cells promote Th2 immune responses  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Although lead (Pb) has significant effects on the development and function of macrophages, B cells, and T cells and has been suggested to promote allergic asthma in mice and humans, Pb modulation of bone marrow (BM)-derived dendritic cells (DCs) and the resultant DC effects on Th1 and Th2 development have not been examined. Accordingly, we cultured BM cells with murine granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (mGM-CSF) {+-} PbCl{sub 2}. At day 10, culture supernatant (SN) and non-adherent cells were harvested for analysis. Additionally, day 10 non-adherent BM-DCs were harvested and recultured with mGM-CSF + LPS {+-} Pb for 2 days. The day 10 Pb exposure significantly inhibited BM-DC generation, based on CD11c expression. Although fewer DCs were generated with Pb, the existing Pb-exposed DCs had significantly greater MHC-II expression than did the non-Pb-exposed DCs. However, these differences diminished upon LPS stimulation. After LPS stimulation, CD80, CD86, CD40, CD54, and MHC-II were all up-regulated on both Pb-DCs and DCs, but Pb-DCs expressed significantly less CD80 than did DCs. The CD86:CD80 ratio suggests a Pb-DC potential for Th2 cell development. After LPS stimulation, IL-6, IL-10, IL-12 (p70), and TNF-{alpha} levels significantly increased with both Pb-DCs and DCs, but Pb-DCs produced significantly less cytokines than did DCs, except for IL-10, which further supports Pb-DC preferential skewing toward type-2 immunity. In vitro studies confirm that Pb-DCs have the ability to polarize antigen-specific T cells to Th2 cells. Pb-DCs also enhanced allogeneic and autologous T cell proliferation in vitro, and in vivo studies suggested that Pb-DCs inhibited Th1 effects on humoral and cell-mediated immunity. The Pb effect was mainly on DCs, rather than on T cells, and Pb's modification of DC function appears to be the main cause of Pb's promotion of type-2-related immunity, which may relate to Pb's enhanced activation of the Erk/MAP kinase pathway.

Gao Donghong [Biggs Laboratory, Wadsworth Center, New York State Department of Health, Empire State Plaza, Albany, NY 12201-0509 (United States); Mondal, Tapan K. [Biggs Laboratory, Wadsworth Center, New York State Department of Health, Empire State Plaza, Albany, NY 12201-0509 (United States); Lawrence, David A. [Biggs Laboratory, Wadsworth Center, New York State Department of Health, Empire State Plaza, Albany, NY 12201-0509 (United States)]. E-mail: lawrencd@wadsworth.org

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

The effects of physiological age on bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Jaenisch. Treatment of sickle cell anemia mouse model withcan be used to treat sickle cell anemia in a mouse model 5 ,

Buckspan, Caitlin

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Effects of 810-nm Laser on Murine Bone-Marrow-Derived Dendritic Cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Objective: The purpose of this study was to Investigate the effect of 810-nm low level laser therapy (LLLT) on dendritic cells (DC) in vitro. Background data: LLLT can enhance wound healing and increase cell proliferation ...

Chen, Aaron Chih-Hao

20

Mutations in Bone Marrow-Derived Stromal Stem Cells Unmask Latent Malignancy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Neoplastic epithelia may remain dormant and clinically unapparent in human patients for decades. Multiple risk factors including mutations in tumor cells or the stromal cells may affect the switch from dormancy to malignancy. ...

Houghton, JeanMarie

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bone marrow cells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

E-Print Network 3.0 - antibody-facilitated bone marrow Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of off... marrow, manifested as artifactual broadening of bone micro-structures in the image. The resulting images... (B0) at bone and bone marrow ... Source: Southern...

22

Epitopes associated with the MHC restriction site of T cells. II. Somatic generation of Iat epitopes on T cells in radiation bone marrow chimeras  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We described in this paper systematic alterations in the expression of unique I region controlled epitopes on helper T cells (Th) in chimeras according to the changes in their H-2 restriction specificity. Taking advantage of the reactivity of monoclonal antibodies (anti-Iat) putatively specific for the epitopes indirectly controlled by I region and expressed in association with the Iak restriction site of Th, we examined the alterations of these epitopes on Th cells from various bone marrow chimeras. Iatk epitopes were physiologically expressed on Iak-restricted but not on Iab-restricted Th cells in (H-2k X H-2b)F1 mice. In the chimeric condition, the H-2k-restricted Th of B6----F1 chimera acquired the expression of Iatk even though B6 Th is unable to express Iatk when developed under the physiologic condition. Iatk are also found on Th of fully allogeneic chimera of B6----C3H, whereas Th cells of C3H----B6 completely lost the Iatk expression. These results indicate that Iat epitopes originally defined as unique I region-controlled determinants selectively expressed on T cells are not encoded by the I region genes but are associated with the T cell receptor that sees the self Ia. The epitopes undergo the adaptive alterations according to the acquisition of a new MHC restriction. This is the first example to demonstrate the epitope associated with T cell receptor which undergo the systematic adaptive differentiation.

Asano, Y.; Tada, T.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Differentiation and functional maturation of bone marrow-derived intestinal epithelial T cells expressing membrane T cell receptor in athymic radiation chimeras  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The thymus dependency of murine intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes (IEL) was studied in an athymic F1----parent radiation chimera model. IEL, although not splenic or lymph node lymphocytes, from athymic chimeras displayed normal levels of cells bearing the class-specific T cell Ag, CD4 and CD8; the TCR-associated molecule, CD3; and the Thy-1 Ag. Moreover, two-color flow cytometric analyses of IEL from athymic mice demonstrated regulated expression of T cell Ag characteristic of IEL subset populations from thymus-bearing mice. In immunoprecipitation experiments, surface TCR-alpha beta or TCR-gamma delta were expressed on IEL, although not on splenic lymphocytes, from athymic chimeras. That IEL from athymic chimeras constituted a population of functionally mature effector cells activated in situ, similar to IEL from thymus-bearing mice, was demonstrated by the presence of CD3-mediated lytic activity of athymic lethally irradiated bone marrow reconstituted IEL. These data provide compelling evidence that intestinal T cells do not require thymic influence for maturation and development, and demonstrate that the microenvironment of the intestinal epithelium is uniquely adapted to regulate IEL differentiation.

Mosley, R.L.; Styre, D.; Klein, J.R. (Univ. of Tulsa, OK (USA))

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

E-Print Network 3.0 - adult bone marrow-derived Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

32:69-77. 5. Garman R, Gaudette G, Donahue L, et al. 2007. Low... from bone marrow of young adult rats. Cell Tissue ... Source: You, Lidan - Department of Mechanical and...

25

Bone marrow transplantation after the Chernobyl nuclear accident  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On April 26, 1986, an accident at the Chernobyl nuclear power station in the Soviet Union exposed about 200 people to large doses of total-body radiation. Thirteen persons exposed to estimated total-body doses of 5.6 to 13.4 Gy received bone marrow transplants. Two transplant recipients, who received estimated doses of radiation of 5.6 and 8.7 Gy, are alive more than three years after the accident. The others died of various causes, including burns (the cause of death in five), interstitial pneumonitis (three), graft-versus-host disease (two), and acute renal failure and adult respiratory distress syndrome (one). There was hematopoietic (granulocytic) recovery in nine transplant recipients who could be evaluated, six of whom had transient partial engraftment before the recovery of their own marrow. Graft-versus-host disease was diagnosed clinically in four persons and suspected in two others. Although the recovery of endogenous hematopoiesis may occur after exposure to radiation doses of 5.6 to 13.4 Gy, we do not know whether it is more likely after the transient engraftment of transplanted stem cells. Because large doses of radiation affect multiple systems, bone marrow recovery does not necessarily ensure survival. Furthermore, the risk of graft-versus-host disease must be considered when the benefits of this treatment are being weighed.

Baranov, A.; Gale, R.P.; Guskova, A.; Piatkin, E.; Selidovkin, G.; Muravyova, L.; Champlin, R.E.; Danilova, N.; Yevseeva, L.; Petrosyan, L. (Institute of Biophysics of the Ministry of Health and Clinical Hospital, Moscow (USSR))

1989-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

26

Study on proliferative responses to host Ia antigens in allogeneic bone marrow chimera in mice: sequential analysis of the reactivity and characterization of the cells involved in the responses  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Irradiation bone marrow chimeras were established by reconstitution of lethally irradiated AKR mice with C57BL/10 marrow cells to permit serial analysis of the developing reactivities of lymphocytes from such chimeras, (B10----AKR), against donor, host, or third party antigens. We found that substantial proliferative responses to Ia antigens of the recipient strain and also to third party antigens were generated by the thymocytes obtained from the irradiation chimeras at an early stage after bone marrow reconstitution. The majority of the responding thymocytes had surfaces lacking demonstrable peanut agglutinin receptors and were donor type Thy-1+, Ly-2-, and L3T4+ in both anti-recipient and anti-third party MLR. In anti-host responses, however, Ly-2+ thymocytes seemed to be at least partially involved. This capacity of thymus cells to mount a response to antigens of the recipient strain declined shortly thereafter, whereas the capacity to mount MLR against third party antigens persisted. The spleen cells of (B10----AKR) chimeras at the same time developed a more durable capability to exhibit anti-host reactivities and a permanent capability of reacting to third party allo-antigens. The stimulator antigens were Ia molecules on the stimulator cells in both anti-recipient and anti-third party MLR. The responding splenocytes were of donor origin and most of them had Thy-1+, Ly-1+2-, and L3T4+ phenotype.

Iwabuchi, K.; Ogasawara, K.; Ogasawara, M.; Yasumizu, R.; Noguchi, M.; Geng, L.; Fujita, M.; Good, R.A.; Onoe, K.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Anti-bacterial immunity to Listeria monocytogenes in allogeneic bone marrow chimera in mice  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Protection and delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) to the facultative intracellular bacterium Listeria monocytogenes (L.m.) were studied in allogeneic and syngeneic bone marrow chimeras. Lethally irradiated AKR (H-2k) mice were successfully reconstituted with marrow cells from C57BL/10 (B10) (H-2b), B10 H-2-recombinant strains or syngeneic mice. Irradiated AKR mice reconstituted with marrow cells from H-2-compatible B10.BR mice, (BR----AKR), as well as syngeneic marrow cells, (AKR----AKR), showed a normal level of responsiveness to the challenge stimulation with the listeria antigens when DTH was evaluated by footpad reactions. These mice also showed vigorous activities in acquired resistance to the L.m. By contrast, chimeric mice that had total or partial histoincompatibility at the H-2 determinants between donor and recipient, (B10----AKR), (B10.AQR----AKR), (B10.A(4R)----AKR), or (B10.A(5R)----AKR), were almost completely unresponsive in DTH and antibacterial immunity. However, when (B10----AKR) H-2-incompatible chimeras had been immunized with killed L.m. before challenge with live L.m., these mice manifested considerable DTH and resistance to L.m. These observations suggest that compatibility at the entire MHC between donor and recipient is required for bone marrow chimeras to be able to manifest DTH and protection against L.m. after a short-term immunization schedule. However, this requirement is overcome by a preceding or more prolonged period of immunization with L.m. antigens. These antigens, together with marrow-derived antigen-presenting cells, can then stimulate and expand cell populations that are restricted to the MHC (H-2) products of the donor type.

Onoe, K.; Good, R.A.; Yamamoto, K.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Mechanisms of tolerance in murine radiation bone marrow chimeras. I. Nonspecific suppression of alloreactivity by spleen cells from early, but not late, chimeras  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Allogeneic chimeras were prepared using lethally irradiated B6 hosts and untreated marrow from exsanguinated BALB/c donors. For about two months after reconstitution, chimeras had very weak antihost cell-mediated lymphocytotoxicity (CML) reactivity and little third-party alloreactivity. During this time a cell population capable of suppressing CML reactivity against both host and third-party alloantigens (i.e., antigen-nonspecific) was demonstrated in chimera spleens by in vitro mixing experiments. The putative suppressor cells were Thy-1-negative and radiation-sensitive. Subsequently, mature chimeras showed host tolerance and strong third-party alloreactivity. At this point suppressor mechanisms could no longer be demonstrated. These data are consistent with a clonal elimination hypothesis in that they do not provide evidence to indicate that maintenance of specific immune tolerance is mediated by an active suppressor mechanism.

Auchincloss, H. Jr.; Sachs, D.H.

1983-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

E-Print Network 3.0 - adult bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

University of Washington at Seattle Collection: Biology and Medicine 34 Immobilized sonic hedgehog N-terminal signaling domain enhances differentiation of bone marrow-derived...

30

Adaptive differentiation of H-2- and Igh-restricted B lymphocyte in tetraparental bone marrow chimera  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Immunization of BALB/c mice with MOPC-104E myeloma protein induced idiotype-specific enhancing B cells that acted on anti-dextran antibody producing B cells. The enhancing cells have the surface phenotype of B cells. With the use of several H-2 or Igh congenic mice, it was found that the cooperation among B cells was controlled by both the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) and Igh. The capability to generate enhancing B cell activity was analyzed by using tetraparental bone marrow chimeras. (C57BL/6 X BALB/c)F1 mice, for example, were lethally irradiated and were reconstituted with C57BL/6 and BALB/c bone marrow cells. Nine to 12 wk after the reconstitution, the chimeras were immunized with the myeloma protein and were tested for their enhancing B cell activity. After the removal of C57BL/6 origin cells by treatment with anti-H-2b + complement, residual cells exhibited enhancing B cell activity on BALB.B, as well as BALB/c antidextran antibody response. This indicates that the generation of H-2-restricted, idiotype-specific enhancing B cell activity differentiated adaptively so as to recognize foreign MHC as self under chimeric conditions. On the other hand, splenic B cells treated with anti-H-2d + complement did not enhance the responses of BALB/c or BALB.B. Even in a chimeric environment, the B cells of C57BL/6 origin could not obtain the ability to generate enhancing B cell activity upon immunization of the idiotype. The results described here, taken in conjunction with our previous studies, suggest that the Ig heavy chain gene(s) predominantly control the Igh restriction properties of enhancing B cells, and the capability of MHC recognition by B cells is selected under chimeric conditions.

Yamamoto, H.; Bitoh, S.; Fujimoto, S.

1987-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

31

Booster irradiation to the spleen following total body irradiation. A new immunosuppressive approach for allogeneic bone marrow transplantation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Graft rejection presents a major obstacle for transplantation of T cell-depleted bone marrow in HLA-mismatched patients. In a primate model, after conditioning exactly as for leukemia patients, it was shown that over 99% of the residual host clonable T cells are concentrated in the spleen on day 5 after completion of cytoreduction. We have now corroborated these findings in a mouse model. After 9-Gy total body irradiation (TBI), the total number of Thy-1.2+ cells in the spleen reaches a peak between days 3 and 4 after TBI. The T cell population is composed of both L3T4 (helper) and Lyt-2 (suppressor) T cells, the former being the major subpopulation. Specific booster irradiation to the spleen (5 Gy twice) on days 2 and 4 after TBI greatly enhances production of donor-type chimera after transplantation of T cell-depleted allogeneic bone marrow. Similar enhancement can be achieved by splenectomy on day 3 or 4 after TBI but not if splenectomy is performed 1 day before TBI or 1 day after TBI, strengthening the hypothesis that, after lethal TBI in mice, the remaining host T cells migrate from the periphery to the spleen. These results suggest that a delayed booster irradiation to the spleen may be beneficial as an additional immunosuppressive agent in the conditioning of leukemia patients, in order to reduce the incidence of bone marrow allograft rejection.

Lapidot, T.; Singer, T.S.; Salomon, O.; Terenzi, A.; Schwartz, E.; Reisner, Y.

1988-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

32

L-type calcium channels play a crucial role in the proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We detect the functional Ca{sup 2+} currents and mRNA expression of VDCC{sub L} in rMSCs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Blockage of VDCC{sub L} exert antiproliferative and apoptosis-inducing effects on rMSCs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inhibiting VDCC{sub L} can suppress the ability of rMSCs to differentiate into osteoblasts. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer {alpha}1C of VDCC{sub L} may be a primary functional subunit in VDCC{sub L}-regulating rMSCs. -- Abstract: L-type voltage-dependent Ca{sup 2+} channels (VDCC{sub L}) play an important role in the maintenance of intracellular calcium homeostasis, and influence multiple cellular processes. They have been confirmed to contribute to the functional activities of osteoblasts. Recently, VDCC{sub L} expression was reported in mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), but the role of VDCC{sub L} in MSCs is still undetermined. The aim of this study was to determine whether VDCC{sub L} may be regarded as a new regulator in the proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of rat MSC (rMSCs). In this study, we examined functional Ca{sup 2+} currents (I{sub Ca}) and mRNA expression of VDCC{sub L} in rMSCs, and then suppressed VDCC{sub L} using nifedipine (Nif), a VDCC{sub L} blocker, to investigate its role in rMSCs. The proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of MSCs were analyzed by MTT, flow cytometry, alkaline phosphatase (ALP), Alizarin Red S staining, RT-PCR, and real-time PCR assays. We found that Nif exerts antiproliferative and apoptosis-inducing effects on rMSCs. ALP activity and mineralized nodules were significantly decreased after Nif treatment. Moreover, the mRNA levels of the osteogenic markers, osteocalcin (OCN), bone sialoprotein (BSP), and runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2), were also down-regulated. In addition, we transfected {alpha}1C-siRNA into the cells to further confirm the role of VDCC{sub L} in rMSCs, and a similar effect on osteogenesis was found. These results suggest that VDCC{sub L} plays a crucial role in the proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of rMSCs.

Wen, Li [Department of Orthodontics, School of Stomatology, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi'an 710032 (China)] [Department of Orthodontics, School of Stomatology, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi'an 710032 (China); Wang, Yu [Department of Oncology, Xijing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi'an 710032 (China)] [Department of Oncology, Xijing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi'an 710032 (China); Wang, Huan [Department of Orthodontics, School of Stomatology, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi'an 710032 (China)] [Department of Orthodontics, School of Stomatology, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi'an 710032 (China); Kong, Lingmin [Department of Fundamental Medicine, Cell Engineering Research Centre, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi'an 710032 (China)] [Department of Fundamental Medicine, Cell Engineering Research Centre, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi'an 710032 (China); Zhang, Liang [Department of Orthodontics, School of Stomatology, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi'an 710032 (China)] [Department of Orthodontics, School of Stomatology, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi'an 710032 (China); Chen, Xin [Department of General Dentistry, The 174th Hospital of Chinese PLA, Xiamen 361003 (China)] [Department of General Dentistry, The 174th Hospital of Chinese PLA, Xiamen 361003 (China); Ding, Yin, E-mail: dingyin@fmmu.edu.cn [Department of Orthodontics, School of Stomatology, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi'an 710032 (China)] [Department of Orthodontics, School of Stomatology, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi'an 710032 (China)

2012-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

33

Microfluidic purification and analysis of hematopoietic stem cells from bone Romana Schirhagl,a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Microfluidic purification and analysis of hematopoietic stem cells from bone marrow Romana to separate them from a whole-marrow sample. A microfluidic device was fabricated using an integrated membrane are restricted by the limited availability of stem cell sources.2,3 We believe that microfluidics can be used

Zare, Richard N.

34

Mandible versus Long Bone Marrow Cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

diseases, such as osteoporosis, hyperparathyroidism, orbone density and osteoporosis (Jeffcoat et al. 2000; Kribbsglucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis. Endocrinology, 140(10),

Chaichanasakul, Thawinee

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

acute bone marrow: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

hepatotoxicity is considered to be the cause of the diffuse liver uptake of 99m Tc-MDP. The mechanism of extraskeletal uptake of bone-seeking radiopharmaceuticals in...

36

Dynamic T{sub 2}-mapping during magnetic resonance guided high intensity focused ultrasound ablation of bone marrow  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Focal bone tumor treatments include amputation, limb-sparing surgical excision with bone reconstruction, and high-dose external-beam radiation therapy. Magnetic resonance guided high intensity focused ultrasound (MR-HIFU) is an effective non-invasive thermotherapy for palliative management of bone metastases pain. MR thermometry (MRT) measures the proton resonance frequency shift (PRFS) of water molecules and produces accurate (<1 Degree-Sign C) and dynamic (<5s) thermal maps in soft tissues. PRFS-MRT is ineffective in fatty tissues such as yellow bone marrow and, since accurate temperature measurements are required in the bone to ensure adequate thermal dose, MR-HIFU is not indicated for primary bone tumor treatments. Magnetic relaxation times are sensitive to lipid temperature and we hypothesize that bone marrow temperature can be determined accurately by measuring changes in T{sub 2}, since T{sub 2} increases linearly in fat during heating. T{sub 2}-mapping using dual echo times during a dynamic turbo spin-echo pulse sequence enabled rapid measurement of T{sub 2}. Calibration of T{sub 2}-based thermal maps involved heating the marrow in a bovine femur and simultaneously measuring T{sub 2} and temperature with a thermocouple. A positive T{sub 2} temperature dependence in bone marrow of 20 ms/ Degree-Sign C was observed. Dynamic T{sub 2}-mapping should enable accurate temperature monitoring during MR-HIFU treatment of bone marrow and shows promise for improving the safety and reducing the invasiveness of pediatric bone tumor treatments.

Waspe, Adam C.; Looi, Thomas; Mougenot, Charles; Amaral, Joao; Temple, Michael; Sivaloganathan, Siv; Drake, James M. [Centre for Image Guided Innovation and Therapeutic Intervention, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, ON, M5G 1X8 (Canada); Philips Healthcare Canada, Markham, ON, L6C 2S3 (Canada); Centre for Image Guided Innovation and Therapeutic Intervention, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, ON, M5G 1X8 (Canada); Department of Applied Mathematics, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON, N2L 3G1 (Canada); Centre for Image Guided Innovation and Therapeutic Intervention, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, ON, M5G 1X8 (Canada)

2012-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

37

Immobilized sonic hedgehog N-terminal signaling domain enhances differentiation of bone marrow-derived  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and immobilized onto interpenetrating polymer network (IPN) surfaces also grafted with a bone sialoprotein presented to cells using an intrinsically nonfouling interpenetrating polymer network (IPN).12,13 In spite

Schaffer, David V.

38

E-Print Network 3.0 - autologous marrow aspirate Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and to examine its effect Correspondence: Dr J Vredenburgh, Duke University... infusion was per- of tumor cells in bone marrow ... Source: Rabinowitz, Joshua D. -...

39

Towards functional regeneration of the central nervous system : glial calcium signaling in reactive gliosis and the therapeutic potential of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells for retinal degenerative diseases  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Petri dishes (MatTek Corp. , Ashland MA) at ~200,000 cells/Petri dishes (MatTek Corp. , Ashland MA) at ~200,000 cells/bottom dishes (MakTek, Ashland, MA). Cells were allowed to

Yu, Diana Xuan

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

In Vivo Evaluation of the Presence of Bone Marrow in Cortical Porosity in Postmenopausal Osteopenic Women  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

bone resorption in osteoporosis. Calcif. Tissue Int. Augat,Porosity in Women with Osteoporosis. Vienna, Austria:porosity in women with osteoporosis. J. Bone Miner. Res.

Goldenstein, Janet; Kazakia, Galateia; Majumdar, Sharmila

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bone marrow cells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Engineering tubular bone using mesenchymal stem cell sheets and coral particles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: • We developed a novel engineering strategy to solve the limitations of bone grafts. • We fabricated tubular constructs using cell sheets and coral particles. • The composite constructs showed high radiological density and compressive strength. • These characteristics were similar to those of native bone. -- Abstract: The development of bone tissue engineering has provided new solutions for bone defects. However, the cell-scaffold-based approaches currently in use have several limitations, including low cell seeding rates and poor bone formation capacity. In the present study, we developed a novel strategy to engineer bone grafts using mesenchymal stem cell sheets and coral particles. Rabbit bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells were continuously cultured to form a cell sheet with osteogenic potential and coral particles were integrated into the sheet. The composite sheet was then wrapped around a cylindrical mandrel to fabricate a tubular construct. The resultant tubular construct was cultured in a spinner-flask bioreactor and subsequently implanted into a subcutaneous pocket in a nude mouse for assessment of its histological characteristics, radiological density and mechanical property. A similar construct assembled from a cell sheet alone acted as a control. In vitro observations demonstrated that the composite construct maintained its tubular shape, and exhibited higher radiological density, compressive strength and greater extracellular matrix deposition than did the control construct. In vivo experiments further revealed that new bone formed ectopically on the composite constructs, so that the 8-week explants of the composite sheets displayed radiological density similar to that of native bone. These results indicate that the strategy of using a combination of a cell sheet and coral particles has great potential for bone tissue engineering and repairing bone defects.

Geng, Wenxin [Key Laboratory of Resource Biology and Biotechnology in Western China, Ministry of Education, College of Life Science, Northwest University, No.229 North Taibai Road, Xi’an 710069 (China)] [Key Laboratory of Resource Biology and Biotechnology in Western China, Ministry of Education, College of Life Science, Northwest University, No.229 North Taibai Road, Xi’an 710069 (China); Ma, Dongyang [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Lanzhou General Hospital, Lanzhou Command of PLA, BinHe 333 South Road, Lanzhou 730052 (China)] [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Lanzhou General Hospital, Lanzhou Command of PLA, BinHe 333 South Road, Lanzhou 730052 (China); Yan, Xingrong; Liu, Liangqi; Cui, Jihong; Xie, Xin; Li, Hongmin [Key Laboratory of Resource Biology and Biotechnology in Western China, Ministry of Education, College of Life Science, Northwest University, No.229 North Taibai Road, Xi’an 710069 (China)] [Key Laboratory of Resource Biology and Biotechnology in Western China, Ministry of Education, College of Life Science, Northwest University, No.229 North Taibai Road, Xi’an 710069 (China); Chen, Fulin, E-mail: chenfl@nwu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Resource Biology and Biotechnology in Western China, Ministry of Education, College of Life Science, Northwest University, No.229 North Taibai Road, Xi’an 710069 (China)] [Key Laboratory of Resource Biology and Biotechnology in Western China, Ministry of Education, College of Life Science, Northwest University, No.229 North Taibai Road, Xi’an 710069 (China)

2013-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

42

Effect of Insulators on the Expression of betaAS3 in Lentiviral Gene Therapy for Sickle Cell Disease  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

al. (2001). Correction of sickle cell disease in transgenicto human bone marrow for sickle cell disease. Journal ofal. (2011). Correction of sickle cell disease in adult mice

Wherley, Jennifer Patricia

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

A comparison of the concentrations of certain chlorinated hydrocarbons and polychlorinated biphenyls in bone marrow and fat tissue of children and their concentrations in breast milk  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Chlorinated hydrocarbon (CHC) and polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) concentrations in the bone marrow of 57 children were compared with the concentrations in adipose tissue of 50 children and the concentrations in breast milk in the Federal Republic of Germany from 1984 to 1991. The concentrations of hexachlorobenzene (HCB), the dichlorodiphenyl-trichlorethane (DDT)-metabolites, and polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners no. 138 and no. 153 were increased threefold, while the concentrations of several hexachloro-cyclohexane (HCH)-isomers and PCB congener no. 180 were only increased two fold. Because breast feeding is the primary source of CHC and PCB in toddlers and infants we also compared the concentrations in bone marrow of children with the concentrations in breast milk and found approximately fourfold higher concentrations for the most highly chlorinated PCB congener no. 180, but only threefold higher concentrations for PCB 138 and 153 and the DDT-metabolites. The concentrations of {beta}-HCH and HCB were only slightly higher in bone marrow. 15 refs., 2 figs.

Scheele, J.; Teufel, M.; Niessen, K.H. [Univ. of Heidelberg, Mannheim (Germany)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

44

E-Print Network 3.0 - accelerated marrow recovery Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of bone marrow haemodynamics has been developed. A decrease Summary: Abstract A human model allowing the non-invasive study of bone marrow haemodynamics has been... . In the...

45

Evaluation of dual energy quantitative CT for determining the spatial distributions of red marrow and bone for dosimetry in internal emitter radiation therapy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To evaluate a three-equation three-unknown dual-energy quantitative CT (DEQCT) technique for determining region specific variations in bone spongiosa composition for improved red marrow dose estimation in radionuclide therapy. Methods: The DEQCT method was applied to 80/140 kVp images of patient-simulating lumbar sectional body phantoms of three sizes (small, medium, and large). External calibration rods of bone, red marrow, and fat-simulating materials were placed beneath the body phantoms. Similar internal calibration inserts were placed at vertebral locations within the body phantoms. Six test inserts of known volume fractions of bone, fat, and red marrow were also scanned. External-to-internal calibration correction factors were derived. The effects of body phantom size, radiation dose, spongiosa region segmentation granularity [single (?17 × 17 mm) region of interest (ROI), 2 × 2, and 3 × 3 segmentation of that single ROI], and calibration method on the accuracy of the calculated volume fractions of red marrow (cellularity) and trabecular bone were evaluated. Results: For standard low dose DEQCT x-ray technique factors and the internal calibration method, the RMS errors of the estimated volume fractions of red marrow of the test inserts were 1.2–1.3 times greater in the medium body than in the small body phantom and 1.3–1.5 times greater in the large body than in the small body phantom. RMS errors of the calculated volume fractions of red marrow within 2 × 2 segmented subregions of the ROIs were 1.6–1.9 times greater than for no segmentation, and RMS errors for 3 × 3 segmented subregions were 2.3–2.7 times greater than those for no segmentation. Increasing the dose by a factor of 2 reduced the RMS errors of all constituent volume fractions by an average factor of 1.40 ± 0.29 for all segmentation schemes and body phantom sizes; increasing the dose by a factor of 4 reduced those RMS errors by an average factor of 1.71 ± 0.25. Results for external calibrations exhibited much larger RMS errors than size matched internal calibration. Use of an average body size external-to-internal calibration correction factor reduced the errors to closer to those for internal calibration. RMS errors of less than 30% or about 0.01 for the bone and 0.1 for the red marrow volume fractions would likely be satisfactory for human studies. Such accuracies were achieved for 3 × 3 segmentation of 5 mm slice images for: (a) internal calibration with 4 times dose for all size body phantoms, (b) internal calibration with 2 times dose for the small and medium size body phantoms, and (c) corrected external calibration with 4 times dose and all size body phantoms. Conclusions: Phantom studies are promising and demonstrate the potential to use dual energy quantitative CT to estimate the spatial distributions of red marrow and bone within the vertebral spongiosa.

Goodsitt, Mitchell M., E-mail: goodsitt@umich.edu; Shenoy, Apeksha; Howard, David; Christodoulou, Emmanuel; Dewaraja, Yuni K. [Department of Radiology, University of Michigan, 1500 East Medical Center Drive, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States)] [Department of Radiology, University of Michigan, 1500 East Medical Center Drive, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Shen, Jincheng [Department of Biostatistics, University of Michigan, 1415 Washington Heights, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States)] [Department of Biostatistics, University of Michigan, 1415 Washington Heights, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Schipper, Matthew J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, 1500 East Medical Center Drive, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, 1500 East Medical Center Drive, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Wilderman, Scott [Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of Michigan, 1500 East Medical Center Drive, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States)] [Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of Michigan, 1500 East Medical Center Drive, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Chun, Se Young [Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST), School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Ulsan 689-798 (Korea, Republic of)] [Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST), School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Ulsan 689-798 (Korea, Republic of)

2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

46

Cellular response of the primate (M. mulatta) spleen to bone marrow transplantation in gamma irradiated recipients  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. This monkey reminded the author of an animal that was sensitized to a foreign protein. E. Histo atholo of the S leen. Many of the follicles were hyperplastic. The capsule was small and distended. The reticulo- endothelial cells lining the sinusoids were... higher than the radiation con- trols. E. Histo atholo of the S leen. Both spleens had a reduced number of lyrnphocytes and poorly defined follicles. The reticulo- endothelial-like cells were more prominent in the follicles than normal donors...

Fraunfelter, Frank Clare

1966-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Immune transfer studies in canine allogeneic marrow graft donor-recipient pairs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Transfer of immunity occurring with bone marrow grafting was studied using the dog as a preclinical model. Allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT) was performed between DLA-identical beagle litter-mates. The donors were immunized with tetanus toxoid (TT) or sheep red blood cells (SRBC), and their humoral response was monitored by hemagglutination. The recipients of bone marrow from TT-immunized donors showed a marked increase of antibody titer one week posttransplantation, while in the recipients of marrow from SRBC immunized donors the antibody titers were considerably lower. Within the following 60 days the antibody titers in both groups diminished gradually to pregrafting levels. Control experiments in which cell-free plasma from donors immunized with TT and SRBC respectively was transfused indicated that the initial rise of specific antibody titers after marrow grafting is likely to be due to a passive transfer of humoral immunity. A single challenge of these marrow graft recipients with the respective antigen 15-18 weeks posttransplantation led to a secondary type of humoral immune response. It could be demonstrated that transfer of memory against TT or SRBC was independent from the actual antibody titer and the time of vaccination of the donor. One dog was immunized with TT after serving as marrow donor. When the donor had shown an antibody response, a peripheral blood leukocytes (PBL) transfusion was given to his chimera. Subsequent challenge of the latter resulted in a secondary type of specific antibody response. This indicates that specific cellular-bound immunological memory can be transferred after BMT from the donor to his allogeneic bone marrow chimera by transfusion of peripheral blood leukocytes. The data may be of importance in clinical BMT to protect patients during the phase of reduced immune reactivity by transfer of memory cells.

Grosse-Wilde, H.; Krumbacher, K.; Schuening, F.D.; Doxiadis, I.; Mahmoud, H.K.; Emde, C.; Schmidt-Weinmar, A.; Schaefer, U.W.

1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

T cells stimulate catabolic gene expression by the stromal cells from giant cell tumor of bone  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Two T cell lines stimulate PTHrP, RANKL, MMP13 gene expression in GCT cell cultures. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CD40 expressed by stromal cells; CD40L detected in whole tumor but not cultures. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Effect of CD40L treatment on GCT cells increased PTHrP and MMP13 gene expression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PTHrP treatment increased MMP13 expression, while inhibition decreased expression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer T cells may stimulate GCT stromal cells and promote the osteolysis of the tumor. -- Abstract: The factors that promote the localized bone resorption by giant cell tumor of bone (GCT) are not fully understood. We investigated whether T cells could contribute to bone resorption by stimulating expression of genes for parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP), matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-13, and the receptor activator of nuclear-factor {kappa}B ligand (RANKL). Two cell lines, Jurkat clone E6-1 and D1.1, were co-cultured with isolated GCT stromal cells. Real-time PCR analyses demonstrated a significant increase of all three genes following 48 h incubation, and PTHrP and MMP-13 gene expression was also increased at 24 h. Further, we examined the expression of CD40 ligand (CD40L), a protein expressed by activated T cells, and its receptor, CD40, in GCT. Immunohistochemistry results revealed expression of the CD40 receptor in both the stromal cells and giant cells of the tumor. RNA collected from whole GCT tissues showed expression of CD40LG, which was absent in cultured stromal cells, and suggests that CD40L is expressed within GCT. Stimulation of GCT stromal cells with CD40L significantly increased expression of the PTHrP and MMP-13 genes. Moreover, we show that inhibition of PTHrP with neutralizing antibodies significantly decreased MMP13 expression by the stromal cells compared to IgG-matched controls, whereas stimulation with PTHrP (1-34) increased MMP-13 gene expression. These results suggest that T cells may potentiate the catabolic effect of GCT.

Cowan, Robert W. [Department of Pathology and Molecular Medicine, McMaster University, 1280 Main St. W., Hamilton, ON, Canada L8S 4L8 (Canada) [Department of Pathology and Molecular Medicine, McMaster University, 1280 Main St. W., Hamilton, ON, Canada L8S 4L8 (Canada); Juravinski Cancer Centre, 699 Concession St., Hamilton, ON, Canada L8V 5C2 (Canada); Ghert, Michelle [Juravinski Cancer Centre, 699 Concession St., Hamilton, ON, Canada L8V 5C2 (Canada) [Juravinski Cancer Centre, 699 Concession St., Hamilton, ON, Canada L8V 5C2 (Canada); Department of Surgery, McMaster University, 1280 Main St. W., Hamilton, ON, Canada L8S 4L8 (Canada); Singh, Gurmit, E-mail: gurmit.singh@jcc.hhsc.ca [Department of Pathology and Molecular Medicine, McMaster University, 1280 Main St. W., Hamilton, ON, Canada L8S 4L8 (Canada) [Department of Pathology and Molecular Medicine, McMaster University, 1280 Main St. W., Hamilton, ON, Canada L8S 4L8 (Canada); Juravinski Cancer Centre, 699 Concession St., Hamilton, ON, Canada L8V 5C2 (Canada)

2012-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

49

The effects of physiological age on bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1548. 41. Marcus, R. Osteoporosis: Volume 1. Elsevier, 2008.and D.P. Kiel (Eds. ) Osteoporosis in Older Persons (p. 19-and in patients with osteoporosis. Biogerontology, 2001. 2:

Buckspan, Caitlin

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Secreted Factors from Bone Marrow Stromal Cells Upregulate IL-10 and Reverse Acute Kidney Injury  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Acute kidney injury is a devastating syndrome that afflicts over 2,000,000 people in the US per year, with an associated mortality of greater than 70% in severe cases. Unfortunately, standard-of-care treatments are not ...

Milwid, John Miles

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Transcriptome Analysis Identifies Regulators of Hematopoietic Stem and Progenitor Cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) maintain blood homeostasis and are the functional units of bone marrow transplantation. To improve the molecular understanding of HSCs and their proximal progenitors, we performed transcriptome ...

Gazit, Roi

52

Bilateral diffuse pulmonary ectopic ossification after marrow allograft in a dog. Evidence for allotransplantation of hemopoietic and mesenchymal stem cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In light of recent studies showing successful transplantation of both bony and stromal elements by marrow transplantation, we report an unexpected phenomenon occurring in a canine radiation chimera. Nine hundred fifty-six days after a successful and uneventful DLA-matched marrow allograft, a dog suddenly died of respiratory failure. Autopsy revealed extensive ossification of the lungs with multiple sites of trilineage marrow engraftment. The entire complement of bony elements can apparently be allografted using marrow grafting techniques.

Sale, G.E.; Storb, R.

1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Image-Guided Total-Marrow Irradiation Using Helical Tomotherapy in Patients With Multiple Myeloma and Acute Leukemia Undergoing Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: Total-body irradiation (TBI) has an important role in patients undergoing hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT), but is associated with significant toxicities. Targeted TBI using helical tomotherapy results in reduced doses to normal organs, which predicts for reduced toxicities compared with standard TBI. Methods and Materials: Thirteen patients with multiple myeloma were treated in an autologous tandem transplantation Phase I trial with high-dose melphalan, followed 6 weeks later by total-marrow irradiation (TMI) to skeletal bone. Dose levels were 10, 12, 14, and 16 Gy at 2 Gy daily/twice daily. In a separate allogeneic HCT trial, 8 patients (5 with acute myelogenous leukemia, 1 with acute lymphoblastic leukemia, 1 with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, and 1 with multiple myeloma) were treated with TMI plus total lymphoid irradiation plus splenic radiotherapy to 12 Gy (1.5 Gy twice daily) combined with fludarabine/melphalan. Results: For the 13 patients in the tandem autologous HCT trial, median age was 54 years (range, 42-66 years). Median organ doses were 15-65% that of the gross target volume dose. Primarily Grades 1-2 acute toxicities were observed. Six patients reported no vomiting; 9 patients, no mucositis; 6 patients, no fatigue; and 8 patients, no diarrhea. For the 8 patients in the allogeneic HCT trial, median age was 52 years (range, 24-61 years). Grades 2-3 nausea, vomiting, mucositis, and diarrhea were observed. In both trials, no Grade 4 nonhematologic toxicity was observed, and all patients underwent successful engraftment. Conclusions: This study shows that TMI using helical tomotherapy is clinically feasible. The reduced acute toxicities observed compare favorably with those seen with standard TBI. Initial results are encouraging and warrant further evaluation as a method to dose escalate with acceptable toxicity or to offer TBI-containing regimens to patients unable to tolerate standard approaches.

Wong, Jeffrey Y.C. [Division of Radiation Oncology and Radiation Research, City of Hope Cancer Center, Duarte, CA (United States)], E-mail: jwong@coh.org; Rosenthal, Joseph [Division of Hematology and Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation, City of Hope Cancer Center, Duarte, CA (United States); Liu An; Schultheiss, Timothy [Division of Radiation Oncology and Radiation Research, City of Hope Cancer Center, Duarte, CA (United States); Forman, Stephen; Somlo, George [Division of Hematology and Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation, City of Hope Cancer Center, Duarte, CA (United States)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

From a Dry Bone to a Genetic Portrait: A Case Study of Sickle Cell Anemia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

From a Dry Bone to a Genetic Portrait: A Case Study of Sickle Cell Anemia MARINA FAERMAN,1* ALMUT identification; Y chromosome polymorphic markers; sickle cell anemia ABSTRACT The potential and reliability sample, which represented a documented case of sickle cell anemia. -globin gene sequences obtained from

55

alveolar bone cells: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

uptake of 99m Tc-MDP. The mechanism of extraskeletal uptake of bone-seeking radiopharmaceuticals in damaged, inflamed, neoplastic or necrotic tissues may be due to dystrophic...

56

Origin of hemopoietic stromal progenitor cells in chimeras  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Intravenously injected bone marrow cells do not participate in the regeneration of hemopoietic stromal progenitors in irradiated mice, nor in the curetted parts of the recipient's marrow. The hemopoietic stromal progenitors in allogeneic chimeras are of recipient origin. The adherent cell layer (ACL) of long-term cultures of allogeneic chimera bone marrow contains only recipient hemopoietic stromal progenitors. However, in ectopic hemopoietic foci produced by marrow implantation under the renal capsule and repopulated by the recipient hemopoietic cells after irradiation and reconstitution by syngeneic hemopoietic cells, the stromal progenitors were of implant donor origin, as were stromal progenitors of the ACL in long-term cultures of hemopoietic cells from ectopic foci. Our results confirm that the stromal and hemopoietic progenitors differ in origin and that hemopoietic stromal progenitors are not transplantable by the intravenous route in mice.

Chertkov, J.L.; Drize, N.J.; Gurevitch, O.A.; Samoylova, R.S.

1985-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

E-Print Network 3.0 - anorganic bone clinical Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

predictor of bone mass... formation from bone marrow progenitors. Journal of ... Source: Brand, Paul H. - Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, University of Toledo...

58

Mechanical interaction between cells and fluid for bone tissue engineering scaffold: Modulation of the interfacial shear stress  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mechanical interaction between cells and fluid for bone tissue engineering scaffold: Modulation Analytical solution Bone tissue engineering a b s t r a c t An analytical model of the fluid/cell mechanical n f o Article history: Accepted 1 November 2009 Keywords: Cell fluid interaction Shear stress

Guerraoui, Rachid

59

The Application of Flow Cytometry to Examine Damage Clearance in Stem Cells From Whole-Body Irradiated Mice  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The bone marrow contains many types of cells. Approximately 1-2% of these cells are critical for life, these are the so-called ‘bone marrow stem cells’ which divide indefinitely to produce platelets, red blood cells and white blood cells. Death of the bone marrow stem cells results in a diminished ability of the organism to make new blood cell components and can be fatal without medical intervention, such as a bone marrow transplant. Bone marrow stem cells are considered to be particularly sensitive to radiation injury. Therefore, it is important to understand how these cells response to total body radiation exposure and how these cells can be protected from radiation damage. The aim of this project was to determine if these critical cells in the bone marrow are susceptible to short-term and long-term injury after a whole-body exposure to a sub-lethal low dose of ionizing radiation. The overall aims were to determine if the extent of injury produced by the sub-lethal radiation exposure would be cleared from the stem cells and therefore present no long- term genetic risk to the organism, or if the radiation injury persisted and had an adverse long-term consequences for the cell genome. This research question is of interest in order to define the risks to exposed persons after occupational, accidental or terrorism-related sub-lethal low-dose radiation exposures. The novel aspect of this project was the methodology used to obtain the bone marrow stem cell-like cells and examining the outcomes of sub-lethal low-dose radiation in a mammalian animal model. Four radiation treatments were used: single treatments of 0.01Gy, 0.1 Gy, 1 Gy and ten treatments of 0.1 Gy given over 10 days. Bone marrow stem cell-like cells were then harvested 6 hours, 24 hours and 24 days later. The levels of radiation-induced cell death, damage to DNA and permanent changes to cellular DNA were measured in the isolated stem cell-like cells after each radiation treatment and time point and then the results were compared. As expected, the largest radiation dose produced the greatest level of damage but a linear relationship did not exist between cellular effects and radiation dose. The low dose exposures appeared to be more efficient at producing damage than the highest dose when normalized for the initial extent of damage. Additionally, immune stimulation given prior to radiation exposure appeared to protect the critical bone marrow stem cell population from radiation injury. The data suggest that the response of bone marrow stem-cell like cells to radiation injury is dependent on the extent of the initial levels of damage and the effects of total-body low-dose exposures can not be predicted by extrapolating from high dose exposures. This research has provided new information about the radiation sensitivity of bone marrow stem cell-like cells following total-body exposures, and suggests that these critical cells might be more sensitive to radiation than more mature cells in the bone marrow. Further work is need with intermediate radiation doses to confirm this conclusion.

Marples, Brian; Kovalchuk, Olga; McGonagle, Michele; Martinez, Alvaro; Wilson, George, D.

2010-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

60

Organosilicate nanoparticles as gene delivery vehicles for bone cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(cont.) proliferation. The metabolic response of these cells after particle ingestion was also characterized in order to ensure that the osteoblasts retained their phenotype. The expression of various proteins involved in ...

Moudgil, Suniti, 1976-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bone marrow cells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Human adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells differentiate into insulin, somatostatin, and glucagon expressing cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) from mouse bone marrow were shown to adopt a pancreatic endocrine phenotype in vitro and to reverse diabetes in an animal model. MSC from human bone marrow and adipose tissue represent very similar cell populations with comparable phenotypes. Adipose tissue is abundant and easily accessible and could thus also harbor cells with the potential to differentiate in insulin producing cells. We isolated human adipose tissue-derived MSC from four healthy donors. During the proliferation period, the cells expressed the stem cell markers nestin, ABCG2, SCF, Thy-1 as well as the pancreatic endocrine transcription factor Isl-1. The cells were induced to differentiate into a pancreatic endocrine phenotype by defined culture conditions within 3 days. Using quantitative PCR a down-regulation of ABCG2 and up-regulation of pancreatic developmental transcription factors Isl-1, Ipf-1, and Ngn3 were observed together with induction of the islet hormones insulin, glucagon, and somatostatin.

Timper, Katharina [Department of Research, University Hospital, Basel (Switzerland); Seboek, Dalma [Department of Research, University Hospital, Basel (Switzerland); Eberhardt, Michael [Department of Research, University Hospital, Basel (Switzerland); Linscheid, Philippe [Department of Research, University Hospital, Basel (Switzerland); Christ-Crain, Mirjam [Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Clinical Nutrition, University Hospital, Basel (Switzerland); Keller, Ulrich [Department of Research, University Hospital, Basel (Switzerland); Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Clinical Nutrition, University Hospital, Basel (Switzerland); Mueller, Beat [Department of Research, University Hospital, Basel (Switzerland); Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Clinical Nutrition, University Hospital, Basel (Switzerland); Zulewski, Henryk [Department of Research, University Hospital, Basel (Switzerland) and Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Clinical Nutrition, University Hospital, Basel (Switzerland)]. E-mail: henryk.zulewski@unibas.ch

2006-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

62

E-Print Network 3.0 - adverse bone effects Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Engineering, Bioinformatics, Database, Data Mining, and Multimedia Group Collection: Computer Technologies and Information Sciences 48 Bone marrow fat has brown adipose tissue...

63

Effects of cyclic stretch on proliferation of mesenchymal stem cells and their differentiation to smooth muscle cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are capable of differentiating into a variety of cell types such as vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs). In this study, we investigated influence of cyclic stretch on proliferation of hMSCs for different loading conditions, alignment of actin filaments, and consequent differentiation to SMCs. Isolated cells from bone marrow were exposed to cyclic stretch utilizing a customized device. Cell proliferation was examined by MTT assay, alignment of actin fibers by a designed image processing code, and cell differentiation by fluorescence staining. Results indicated promoted proliferation of hMSCs by cyclic strain, enhanced by elevated strain amplitude and number of cycles. Such loading regulated smooth muscle {alpha}-actin, and reoriented actin fibers. Cyclic stretch led to differentiation of hMSCs to SMCs without addition of growth factor. It was concluded that applying appropriate loading treatment on hMSCs could enhance proliferation capability, and produce functional SMCs for engineered tissues.

Ghazanfari, Samane [Cardiovascular Engineering Lab., Faculty of Biomedical Engineering, Amirkabir University of Technology (Tehran Polytechnic), Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of) [Cardiovascular Engineering Lab., Faculty of Biomedical Engineering, Amirkabir University of Technology (Tehran Polytechnic), Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); National Cell Bank of Iran, Pasteur Institute of Iran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Tafazzoli-Shadpour, Mohammad, E-mail: tafazoli@aut.ac.ir [Cardiovascular Engineering Lab., Faculty of Biomedical Engineering, Amirkabir University of Technology (Tehran Polytechnic), Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Cardiovascular Engineering Lab., Faculty of Biomedical Engineering, Amirkabir University of Technology (Tehran Polytechnic), Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shokrgozar, Mohammad Ali [National Cell Bank of Iran, Pasteur Institute of Iran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [National Cell Bank of Iran, Pasteur Institute of Iran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2009-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

64

DU145 human prostate cancer cells express functional Receptor Activator of NF-B: New insights in the prostate cancer bone metastasis process.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 DU145 human prostate cancer cells express functional Receptor Activator of NF-B: New insights in the prostate cancer bone metastasis process. Mori K.1, 2, * , Le Goff B. 1, 2 , Charrier C. 1, 2 , Battaglia S;40(4):981-90" DOI : 10.1016/j.bone.2006.11.006 #12;2 Abstract Prostate cancer metastases to bone are observed

Boyer, Edmond

65

Immunosuppression prior to marrow transplantation for sensitized aplastic anemia patients: comparison of TLI with TBI  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

From May 1980 through July 1986, 26 patients with severe aplastic anemia, sensitized with multiple transfusions of blood products, were treated on either of two immunosuppressive regimens in preparation for bone marrow transplantation from a matched donor. There were 10 patients treated with total body irradiation (TBI), 200 cGy/fraction X 4 daily fractions (800 cGy total dose), followed by cyclophosphamide, 60 mg/kg/d X 2 d. An additional 16 patients were treated with total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) (or, if they were infants, a modified TLI or thoracoabdominal irradiation (TAI)), 100 cGy/fraction, 3 fractions/d X 2 d (600 cGy total dose), followed by cyclophosphamide, 40 mg/kg/d X 4 d. The extent of immunosuppression was similar in both groups as measured by peripheral blood lymphocyte depression at the completion of the course of irradiation (5% of initial concentration for TBI and 24% for TLI), neutrophil engraftment (10/10 for TBI and 15/16 for TLI), and time to neutrophil engraftment (median of 22 d for TBI and 17 d for TLI). Marrow and peripheral blood cytogenetic analysis for assessment of percent donor cells was also compared in those patients in whom it was available. 2/2 patients studied with TBI had 100% donor cells, whereas 6/11 with TLI had 100% donor cells. Of the five who did not, three were stable mixed chimeras with greater than or equal to 70% donor cells, one became a mixed chimera with about 50% donor cells, but became aplastic again after Cyclosporine A cessation 5 mo post-transplant, and the fifth reverted to all host cells by d. 18 post-transplant. Overall actuarial survival at 2 years was 56% in the TLI group compared with 30% in the TBI group although this was not statistically significant. No survival decrement has been seen after 2 years in either group.

Shank, B.; Brochstein, J.A.; Castro-Malaspina, H.; Yahalom, J.; Bonfiglio, P.; O'Reilly, R.J.

1988-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

In vitro and in vivo growth factor delivery to chondrocytes and bone-marrow-derived stromal cells in cartilage and in self-assembling peptide scaffolds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The inability of articular cartilage to repair itself after acute injury has been implicated in the development of osteoarthritis. The objective of this work was to develop methods for delivering growth factors to cartilage ...

Miller, Rachel E. (Rachel Elizabeth)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Radiobiological modelling with MarCell software  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Jones introduced a bone marrow radiation cell kinetics model with great potential for application in the fields of health physics, radiation research, and medicine. However, until recently, only the model developers have been able to apply it because of the complex array of biological and physical assignments needed for evaluation of a particular radiation exposure protocol. The purpose of this article is to illustrate the use of MarCell (MARrow CELL Kinetics) software for MS-DOS, a user-friendly computer implementation of that mathematical model that allows almost anyone with an elementary knowledge of radiation physics and/or medical procedures to apply the model. A hands-on demonstration of the software will be given by guiding the user through evaluation of a medical total body irradiation protocol and a nuclear fallout scenario. A brief overview of the software is given in the Appendix.

Hasan, J.S.; Jones, T.D.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

E-Print Network 3.0 - alveolar bone-derived cells Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Respiratory Physiology 2 Pulmonary Mechanics Summary: , 3rd Ed. Fig. 10.2 12;Surfactant Secretion by Type II Alveolar Epithelial Cells from multilamellar... basal laminabasement...

69

acquired bone marrow: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

S. , Oklahoma State University; D. V. M. , Oklahoma State University Directed by: Dr. Chester A. Gleiser The study was designed to determine... the effects of nutritional...

70

The X-ray attenuation characteristics and density of human calcaneal marrow do not change significantly during adulthood  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The X-ray attenuation characteristics and density of human calcaneal marrow do not change be a significant source of error in measurements of bone density when using X-ray and ultrasound imaging modalities calcanei (28 males, 6 females, ages 17­65 years). The density and energy-dependent linear X-ray attenuation

Stanford University

71

VEGF improves survival of mesenchymal stem cells in infarcted hearts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) are a promising source for cell-based treatment of myocardial infarction (MI), but existing strategies are restricted by low cell survival and engraftment. We examined whether vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) improve MSC viability in infracted hearts. We found long-term culture increased MSC-cellular stress: expressing more cell cycle inhibitors, p16{sup INK}, p21 and p19{sup ARF}. VEGF treatment reduced cellular stress, increased pro-survival factors, phosphorylated-Akt and Bcl-xL expression and cell proliferation. Co-injection of MSCs with VEGF to MI hearts increased cell engraftment and resulted in better improvement of cardiac function than that injected with MSCs or VEGF alone. In conclusion, VEGF protects MSCs from culture-induce cellular stress and improves their viability in ischemic myocardium, which results in improvements of their therapeutic effect for the treatment of MI.

Pons, Jennifer [Cardiovascular Research Institute, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States); Huang Yu; Arakawa-Hoyt, Janice; Washko, Daniel [Department of Medicine, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States); Takagawa, Junya; Ye, Jianqin [Division of Cardiology, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States); Grossman, William [Department of Medicine, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States); Division of Cardiology, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States); Su Hua [Cardiovascular Research Institute, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States); Department of Anesthesia and Perioperative, University of California, San Francisco, 1001 Potrero Avenue, Room 3C-38, San Francisco, CA 94110 (United States)], E-mail: hua.su@ucsf.edu

2008-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

72

E-Print Network 3.0 - adult gene therapy Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Summary: matched bone marrow donor. A clinical trial using stem cell gene therapy for sickle cell patients... team includes experts in stem cell gene therapy, clinical bone c...

73

Bone-derived mesenchymal stromal cells from HIV transgenic mice exhibit altered proliferation, differentiation capacity and paracrine functions along with impaired therapeutic potential in kidney injury  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) secrete paracrine factors that could be cytoprotective and serve roles in immunoregulation during tissue injury. Although MSCs express HIV receptors, and co-receptors, and are susceptible to HIV infection, whether HIV-1 may affect biological properties of MSCs needs more study. We evaluated cellular proliferation, differentiation and paracrine functions of MSCs isolated from compact bones of healthy control mice and Tg26 HIV-1 transgenic mice. The ability of MSCs to protect against cisplatin toxicity was studied in cultured renal tubular cells as well as in intact mice. We successfully isolated MSCs from healthy mice and Tg26 HIV-1 transgenic mice and found the latter expressed viral Nef, Vpu, NL4-3 and Vif genes. The proliferation and differentiation of Tg26 HIV-1 MSCs was inferior to MSCs from healthy mice. Moreover, transplantation of Tg26 HIV-1 MSCs less effectively improved outcomes compared with healthy MSCs in mice with acute kidney injury. Also, Tg26 HIV-1 MSCs secreted multiple cytokines, but at significantly lower levels than healthy MSCs, which resulted in failure of conditioned medium from these MSCs to protect cultured renal tubular cells from cisplatin toxicity. Therefore, HIV-1 had adverse biological effects on MSCs extending to their proliferation, differentiation, function, and therapeutic potential. These findings will help in advancing mechanistical insight in renal injury and repair in the setting of HIV-1 infection. -- Highlights: •MSCs isolated from HIV mice displayed HIV genes. •MSCs isolated from HIV mice exhibited attenuated growth and paracrine functions. •AKI mice with transplanted HIV-MSC displayed poor outcome. •HIV-1 MSC secreted multiple cytokines but at a lower level.

Cheng, Kang; Rai, Partab; Lan, Xiqian; Plagov, Andrei; Malhotra, Ashwani [Feinstein Institute for Medical Research, North Shore-Long Island Jewish Health System, Manhassett, NY (United States); Gupta, Sanjeev [Departments of Medicine and Pathology, Marion Bessin Liver Research Center, Diabetes Center, Cancer Center, Ruth L. and David S. Gottesman Institute for Stem Cell and Regenerative Medicine Research, Institute for Clinical and Translational Research, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY (United States); Singhal, Pravin C., E-mail: psinghal@nshs.edu [Feinstein Institute for Medical Research, North Shore-Long Island Jewish Health System, Manhassett, NY (United States)

2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

74

FGF-23 in bone biology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

6 REVIEW FGF-23 in bone biology Katherine Wesseling-Perryin impairments in bone biology. Although the defectiveof the protein on bone biology, a growing compendium of data

Wesseling-Perry, Katherine

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

INVEST IN YOUR BONES Bone Basics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

replace- ment at menopause may prevent bone loss and/or osteoporosis. Also find out if there is a need in your bones? Osteoporosis, a major health problem in America, affects over 10 million persons, with 34 million at a high risk of developing the disease (National Osteoporosis Foundation, 2010). Dubbed

76

Bone Canonical WNT/B-Catenin Signaling in Models of Reduced Microgravity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

translates into molecular osteogenic signals in bone cells is unknown. Radiation exposure is another potent inducer of bone loss, namely observed on Earth in the clinical setting following radiotherapy procedures. It is expected that long duration space...

Macias, Brandon 1979-

2012-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

77

Non-invasive shock wave stimulated periosteum for bone tissue engineering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The cambium cells of the periosteum, which are known osteoprogenitor cells, have limited suitability for clinical applications of bone tissue engineering due to their low cell number (2-5 cells thick). Extracorporeal shock ...

Kearney, Cathal (Cathal John)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Protocadherin-7 induces bone metastasis of breast cancer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: •PCDH7 is overexpression in high bone metastatic MDA-MB-231 cells. •PCDH7 is up-regulation in bone metastatic breast cancer tissues. •Suppression of PCDH7 inhibits cell proliferation, migration, and invasion in vitro. •PCDH7 induces breast cancer bone metastasis in vivo. -- Abstract: Breast cancer had a propensity to metastasize to bone, resulting in serious skeletal complications associated with poor outcome. Previous study showed that Protocadherin-7 (PCDH7) play an important role in brain metastatic breast cancer, however, the role of PCDH7 in bone metastatic breast cancer has never been explored. In the present study, we found that PCDH7 expression was up-regulation in bone metastatic breast cancer tissues by real-time PCR and immunohistochemistry assays. Furthermore, suppression of PCDH7 inhibits breast cancer cell proliferation, migration, and invasion in vitro by MTT, scratch, and transwell assays. Most importantly, overexpression of PCDH7 promotes breast cancer cell proliferation and invasion in vitro, and formation of bone metastasis in vivo. These data provide an important insight into the role of PCDH7 in bone metastasis of breast cancer.

Li, Ai-Min [Department of Orthopedics, The 5th Central Hospital of Tianjin, Tianjin (China)] [Department of Orthopedics, The 5th Central Hospital of Tianjin, Tianjin (China); Tian, Ai-Xian [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital, Tianjin (China)] [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital, Tianjin (China); Zhang, Rui-Xue [Department of Clinical Laboratory Diagnosis, Tianjin Medical University, Tianjin (China)] [Department of Clinical Laboratory Diagnosis, Tianjin Medical University, Tianjin (China); Ge, Jie [Department of Breast Surgery, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital, Tianjin (China) [Department of Breast Surgery, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital, Tianjin (China); Key Laboratory of Breast Cancer Prevention and Treatment of the Ministry of Education, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital, Tianjin (China); Sun, Xuan [Department of Breast Surgery, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital, Tianjin (China)] [Department of Breast Surgery, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital, Tianjin (China); Cao, Xu-Chen, E-mail: caoxuch@126.com [Department of Breast Surgery, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital, Tianjin (China) [Department of Breast Surgery, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital, Tianjin (China); Key Laboratory of Breast Cancer Prevention and Treatment of the Ministry of Education, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital, Tianjin (China)

2013-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

79

Research report Axon growth and recovery of function supported by human bone marrow  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

may be donor-dependent. Similarly, a battery of behavioral tests showed partial recovery in some would be readily obtainable, easy to expand and bank, and capable of surviving long enough to facilitate

Fischer, Itzhak

80

Application of in vitro erythropoiesis from bone marrow derived progenitors to detect and study genotoxicity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Assays that predict toxicity are an essential part of drug development and there is a demand for efficient models to better predict human responses. The in vivo micronucleus (MN) assay is a robust toxicity test that assesses ...

Shuga, Joseph F. (Joseph Francis)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bone marrow cells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Jefferson Lab Man Donates Bone Marrow to Save 12-Year-Old Boy | Jefferson  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFunInfraredJefferson Lab Click onLaser Twinkles in

82

Identification and enrichment of colony-forming cells from the adult murine pituitary  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Stem and progenitor cells have been identified in many adult tissues including bone marrow, the central nervous system, and skin. While there is direct evidence to indicate the activity of a progenitor cell population in the pituitary gland, this putative subpopulation has not yet been identified. Herein we describe the isolation and characterization of a novel clonogenic cell type in the adult murine pituitary, which we have termed Pituitary Colony-Forming Cells (PCFCs). PCFCs constitute 0.2% of pituitary cells, and generate heterogeneous colonies from single cells. PCFCs exhibit variable proliferative potential, and may exceed 11 population doublings in 14 days. Enrichment of PCFCs to 61.5-fold with 100% recovery can be obtained through the active uptake of the fluorescent dipeptide, {beta}-Ala-Lys-N{epsilon}-AMCA. PCFCs are mostly contained within the large, agranular subpopulation of AMCA{sup +} cells, and constitute 28% of this fraction, corresponding to 140.5-fold enrichment. Interestingly, the AMCA{sup +} population contains rare cells that are GH{sup +} or PRL{sup +}. GH{sup +} cells were also identified in PCFC single cell colonies, suggesting that PCFCs have the potential to differentiate into GH{sup +} cells. Together, these data show that the pituitary contains a rare clonogenic population which may correspond to the somatotrope/lactotrope progenitors suggested by previous experiments.

Lepore, D.A. [Pituitary Research Unit, Murdoch Childrens Research Institute, Royal Children's Hospital, Parkville, Victoria 3052 (Australia); Roeszler, K. [Pituitary Research Unit, Murdoch Childrens Research Institute, Royal Children's Hospital, Parkville, Victoria 3052 (Australia); Wagner, J. [Pituitary Research Unit, Murdoch Childrens Research Institute, Royal Children's Hospital, Parkville, Victoria 3052 (Australia); Department of Paediatrics, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Ross, S.A. [Pituitary Research Unit, Murdoch Childrens Research Institute, Royal Children's Hospital, Parkville, Victoria 3052 (Australia); Bauer, K. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Experimentelle Endokrinologie, Hannover (Germany); Thomas, P.Q. [Pituitary Research Unit, Murdoch Childrens Research Institute, Royal Children's Hospital, Parkville, Victoria 3052 (Australia)], E-Mail: paul.thomas@mcri.edu.au

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Accounting for beta-particle energy loss to cortical bone via paired-image radiation transport (PIRT)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Current methods of skeletal dose assessment in both medical physics (radionuclide therapy) and health physics (dose reconstruction and risk assessment) rely heavily on a single set of bone and marrow cavity chord-length distributions in which particle energy deposition is tracked within an infinite extent of trabecular spongiosa, with no allowance for particle escape to cortical bone. In the present study, we introduce a paired-image radiation transport (PIRT) model which provides a more realistic three-dimensional (3D) geometry for particle transport in the skeletal site at both microscopic and macroscopic levels of its histology. Ex vivo CT scans were acquired of the pelvis, cranial cap, and individual ribs excised from a 66-year male cadaver (BMI of 22.7 kg m{sup -2}). For the three skeletal sites, regions of trabecular spongiosa and cortical bone were identified and segmented. Physical sections of interior spongiosa were taken and subjected to microCT imaging. Voxels within the resulting microCT images were then segmented and labeled as regions of bone trabeculae, endosteum, active marrow, and inactive marrow through application of image processing algorithms. The PIRT methodology was then implemented within the EGSNRC radiation transport code whereby electrons of various initial energies are simultaneously tracked within both the ex vivo CT macroimage and the CT microimage of the skeletal site. At initial electron energies greater than 50-200 keV, a divergence in absorbed fractions to active marrow are noted between PIRT model simulations and those estimated under existing techniques of infinite spongiosa transport. Calculations of radionuclide S values under both methodologies imply that current chord-based models may overestimate the absorbed dose to active bone marrow in these skeletal sites by 0% to 27% for low-energy beta emitters ({sup 33}P, {sup 169}Er, and {sup 177}Lu), by {approx}4% to 49% for intermediate-energy beta emitters ({sup 153}Sm, {sup 186}Re, and {sup 89}Sr), and by {approx}14% to 76% for high-energy beta emitters ({sup 32}P, {sup 188}Re, and {sup 90}Y). The PIRT methodology allows for detailed modeling of the 3D macrostructure of individual marrow-containing bones within the skeleton thus permitting improved estimates of absorbed fractions and radionuclide S values for intermediate-to-high energy beta emitters.

Shah, Amish P.; Rajon, Didier A.; Patton, Phillip W.; Jokisch, Derek W.; Bolch, Wesley E. [Department of Biomedical Engineering and Department of Nuclear and Radiological Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States); Deparment of Neurosurgery, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States); Department of Health Physics, University of Nevada-Las Vegas, Las Vegas, Nevada (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Francis Marion University, Florence, South Carolina 29501-0547 (United States); Department of Biomedical Engineering and Department of Nuclear and Radiological Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States)

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Biodegradable synthetic bone composites  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention provides for a biodegradable synthetic bone composition comprising a biodegradable hydrogel polymer scaffold comprising a plurality of hydrolytically unstable linkages, and an inorganic component; such as a biodegradable poly(hydroxyethylmethacrylate)/hydroxyapatite (pHEMA/HA) hydrogel composite possessing mineral content approximately that of human bone.

Liu, Gao; Zhao, Dacheng; Saiz, Eduardo; Tomsia, Antoni P.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

SPECT Imaging for in vivo tracking of NIS containing stem cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The proposed study contains two groups of imaging experiments: 1) human mesenchymal stem cells supporting in vivo survival of unrelated donor hematopoietic stem cells; 2) gene transduction and selection of mutant MGMT genes on human hematopoietic stem cells conferring resistance to BC+BCNU. There is increasing evidence that adult human tissues harbor stem and progenitor cells that can be used for therapeutic purposes. We had focused on the Mesenchymal Stem Cells (MSCs) found in human bone marrow and investigated these cells in the context of autologous and allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation to a) facilitate rapid hematopoietic engraftment in cancer patients receiving high dose chemotherapy and b) to modulate the graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). We have demonstrated that culture-expanded autologous and allogeneic MSCs can be safely infused into humans and the preliminary results showed that MSCs facilitate hematopoietic engraftment and reduce GVHD. On the other hand, studies of gene transfer with drug resistant selection suggest major perturbations to the process of hematopoietic reconstitution and the confounding issue of organ toxicity and recovery that takes place in the host. We have found that limiting numbers of hematopoietic stem cells transduced with MGMT repopulate the bone marrow of primary and secondary recipient mice. We are also particularly interested in the dynamics of engraftment and selection in regions of bones, liver, spleen and lung, where we have previously seen marked evidence of engraftment. All the measurements have required animal sacrifice and single point determinations of engraftment in individual and cohorts of mice. Heretofore it has not been possible to study the dynamics of engraftment and enrichment. In the upcoming application, we propose to develop an imaging method to track intravenously infused stem cells in vivo at preset time points to understand their homing and proliferation. Specifically, we propose to use Na+/I- symporter (NIS) gene as a reporter gene (imagene) for non-invasive imaging of infused stem cells� distribution and persistence in vivo on small animal models. NIS is an intrinsic membrane glycoprotein that mediates active iodide (I-) uptake into normal thyroid follicular cells and other cells. The advantages of using NIS for non-invasive and repeated scintigraphic imaging in this application are: a) NIS is not a foreign gene and thus eliminate the immunoresponse problem; b) radiotracer or substrate for NIS is simply radioiodide (I-125, I- 123, I-124, and I-124) or [Tc-99m]-pertechnetate, no radiosynthesis is needed. It has been shown that NIS gene transfer can induce radioactive iodide uptake in a variety of cells and that xenografts expressing exogenous NIS could be imaged by non-invasive scintigraphic imaging. The specific aims are: 1.Determine the feasibility, stability and physiological effects of human NIS gene expression on human HSCs and MSCs in vitro. 2.Determine the engraftment of human HSC and MSC co-infused in NOD-SCID mice. 3.Transduce both a drug resistance gene and an imagene into bone marrow stem cells, and follow the dynamics of engraftment after selection in real time.

Lee, Zhenghong

2013-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

86

Children cortical bone characterisation: the ultrasonic J.-P. Berteaua  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

infantile osteo-pathologies. That is why there is a strong interest in the characterisation of the growing specific location (close to cancerous cells) or cadaveric bone. They indicate a lower Young's modulus

Boyer, Edmond

87

Functional clonal deletion versus suppressor cell-induced transplantation tolerance in chimeras prepared with a short course of total-lymphoid irradiation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Allogeneic bone marrow (BM) chimeras induced by infusion of BM cells into recipients conditioned with total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) were shown to develop humoral and cell-mediated tolerance to host and donor-type alloantigens by a number of in vitro and in vivo assays. Spleen cells of tolerant chimeras exhibited suppressive activity of mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR). MLR suppression was not abrogated by depletion of Lyt-2 cells, and neither could Lyt-2-positive cells sorted from the spleens of tolerant chimeras suppress MLR or attenuate graft-versus-host reactivity in vivo. Likewise, specifically unresponsive spleen cells obtained from chimeras could not be induced to respond in MLR against tolerizing host-type cells following depletion of Lyt-2 or passage through a nylon-wool column. Tolerance of chimera spleen cells to host alloantigens, best documented by permanent survival of donor-type skin allografts, could be adoptively transferred into syngeneic recipients treated by heavy irradiation but not into untreated or mildly irradiated recipients. Adoptive transfer of tolerance seemed to be associated with experimental conditions favoring engraftment of tolerant cells rather than suppression of host reactivity. We speculate that although host and/or donor-derived suppressor cells may be operating in reducing the pool of specific alloreactive clones by blocking cell proliferation in response to allogeneic challenge, the final outcome in tolerant chimeras is actual or functional deletion of alloreactive clones.

Slavin, S.; Morecki, S.; Weigensberg, M.; Bar, S.; Weiss, L.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Insulin-like growth factor 1 enhances the migratory capacity of mesenchymal stem cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are attractive candidates for cell based therapies. However, the mechanisms responsible for stem cell migration and homing after transplantation remain unknown. It has been shown that insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) induces proliferation and migration of some cell types, but its effects on stem cells have not been investigated. We isolated and cultured MSC from rat bone marrow, and found that IGF-1 increased the expression levels of the chemokine receptor CXCR4 (receptor for stromal cell-derived factor-1, SDF-1). Moreover, IGF-1 markedly increased the migratory response of MSC to SDF-1. The IGF-1-induced increase in MSC migration in response to SDF-1 was attenuated by PI3 kinase inhibitor (LY294002 and wortmannin) but not by mitogen-activated protein/ERK kinase inhibitor PD98059. Our data indicate that IGF-1 increases MSC migratory responses via CXCR4 chemokine receptor signaling which is PI3/Akt dependent. These findings provide a new paradigm for biological effects of IGF-1 on MSC and have implications for the development of novel stem cell therapeutic strategies.

Li, Yangxin [Laboratory of Heart Failure and Stem Cell, Texas Heart Institute, Houston, TX 77030 (United States)]. E-mail: Yangxin_li@yahoo.com; Yu, XiYong [Research Center of Medical Sciences, Guangdong Provincial People's Hospital, Guangdong Provincial Cardiovascular Institute, Guanzhou, Guandong 510080 (China)]. E-mail: yuxycn@hotmail.com; Lin, ShuGuang [Research Center of Medical Sciences, Guangdong Provincial People's Hospital, Guangdong Provincial Cardiovascular Institute, Guanzhou, Guandong 510080 (China); Li, XiaoHong [Research Center of Medical Sciences, Guangdong Provincial People's Hospital, Guangdong Provincial Cardiovascular Institute, Guanzhou, Guandong 510080 (China); Zhang, Saidan [Section of Cardiology, Xiangya Hospital of Central-South University, Changsha, Hunan 410008 (China); Song, Yao-Hua [Department of Molecular Pathology, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX 77030 (United States)

2007-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

89

Genetic deletion of Cxcl14 in mice alters uterine NK cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: •We first examined the expression of Cxcl14 in MLAp and DB of uterus. •We found the uNK cells in MLAp and decidua express Cxcl14. •In Cxcl14{sup ?/?} placenta, we found significantly decreased uNK cells. •We first performed microarray to compare the gene expression in MLAp and DB. -- Abstract: The uterine natural killer cells (uNK cells) are the major immune cells in pregnant uterus and the number of uNK cells is dramatically increased during placentation and embryo development. The uNK cells are necessary for the immune tolerance, cytokine secretion and angiogenesis of placenta. Former studies indicated that the population expansion of uNK cells was accomplished through recruitment of NK cell precursors from the spleen and bone marrow, but not proliferation of NK cells. However, the necessary molecules within this process were little understood. Here in our study, we found the co-localized expression of Cxcl14 protein with uNK cells in E13.5 pregnant uterus. Moreover, we used Cxcl14 knockout mice to examine uNK cells in mesometrial lymphoid aggregate of pregnancy (MLAp) and decidua basalis (DB) of E13.5 pregnant uterus and found significantly decreased uNK cells in Cxcl14{sup ?/?} pregnant uteri compared with Cxcl14{sup +/?} pregnant uteri. To further explorer the molecular change in MLAp and DB after Cxcl14 knockout, we isolated the MLAp and DB from Cxcl14{sup +/+} and Cxcl14{sup ?/?} pregnant uteri and performed microarray analysis. We found many genes were up and down regulated after Cxcl14 knockout. In conclusion, our results suggested the important function of Cxcl14 in uNK cells and the proper level of Cxcl14 protein were required to recruit NK cells to pregnant uterus.

Cao, Qichen [State Key Laboratory of Reproductive Biology, Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 1 Beichen West Road, Chaoyang, Beijing 100101 (China) [State Key Laboratory of Reproductive Biology, Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 1 Beichen West Road, Chaoyang, Beijing 100101 (China); Graduate School of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, 19 Yuquan Road, Shijingshan, Beijing 100049 (China); Chen, Hua [State Key Laboratory of Reproductive Biology, Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 1 Beichen West Road, Chaoyang, Beijing 100101 (China)] [State Key Laboratory of Reproductive Biology, Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 1 Beichen West Road, Chaoyang, Beijing 100101 (China); Deng, Zhili [State Key Laboratory of Reproductive Biology, Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 1 Beichen West Road, Chaoyang, Beijing 100101 (China) [State Key Laboratory of Reproductive Biology, Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 1 Beichen West Road, Chaoyang, Beijing 100101 (China); Graduate School of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, 19 Yuquan Road, Shijingshan, Beijing 100049 (China); Yue, Jingwen; Chen, Qi; Cao, Yujing; Ning, Lina; Lei, Xiaohua [State Key Laboratory of Reproductive Biology, Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 1 Beichen West Road, Chaoyang, Beijing 100101 (China)] [State Key Laboratory of Reproductive Biology, Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 1 Beichen West Road, Chaoyang, Beijing 100101 (China); Duan, Enkui, E-mail: duane@ioz.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Reproductive Biology, Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 1 Beichen West Road, Chaoyang, Beijing 100101 (China)] [State Key Laboratory of Reproductive Biology, Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 1 Beichen West Road, Chaoyang, Beijing 100101 (China)

2013-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

90

Digital electronic bone growth stimulator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A device is described for stimulating bone tissue by applying a low level alternating current signal directly to the patient`s skin. A crystal oscillator, a binary divider chain and digital logic gates are used to generate the desired waveforms that reproduce the natural electrical characteristics found in bone tissue needed for stimulating bone growth and treating osteoporosis. The device, powered by a battery, contains a switch allowing selection of the correct waveform for bone growth stimulation or osteoporosis treatment so that, when attached to the skin of the patient using standard skin contact electrodes, the correct signal is communicated to the underlying bone structures. 5 figs.

Kronberg, J.W.

1995-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

91

Digital electronic bone growth stimulator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A device for stimulating bone tissue by applying a low level alternating current signal directly to the patient's skin. A crystal oscillator, a binary divider chain and digital logic gates are used to generate the desired waveforms that reproduce the natural electrical characteristics found in bone tissue needed for stimulating bone growth and treating osteoporosis. The device, powered by a battery, contains a switch allowing selection of the correct waveform for bone growth stimulation or osteoporosis treatment so that, when attached to the skin of the patient using standard skin contact electrodes, the correct signal is communicated to the underlying bone structures.

Kronberg, James W. (Aiken, SC)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

A multiscale mechanobiological model of bone remodelling predicts site-specific bone loss in the femur during osteoporosis and mechanical disuse  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We propose a multiscale mechanobiological model of bone remodelling to investigate the site-specific evolution of bone volume fraction across the midshaft of a femur. The model includes hormonal regulation and biochemical coupling of bone cell populations, the influence of the microstructure on bone turnover rate, and mechanical adaptation of the tissue. Both microscopic and tissue-scale stress/strain states of the tissue are calculated from macroscopic loads by a combination of beam theory and micromechanical homogenisation. This model is applied to simulate the spatio-temporal evolution of a human midshaft femur scan subjected to two deregulating circumstances: (i) osteoporosis and (ii) mechanical disuse. Both simulated deregulations led to endocortical bone loss, cortical wall thinning and expansion of the medullary cavity, in accordance with experimental findings. Our model suggests that these observations are attributable to a large extent to the influence of the microstructure on bone turnover rate. Mec...

Lerebours, C; Scheiner, S; Pivonka, P

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

asialoglycoprotein receptor imaging: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

receptor A Abbreviations: Ad, adenovirus; BMDCs, bone marrow-derived dendritic cells; CFDA-SE, 5 Nicchitta, Chris 62 Glycosylation of b1-adrenergic receptors regulates receptor...

94

adenosine a2a receptor: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

receptor A Abbreviations: Ad, adenovirus; BMDCs, bone marrow-derived dendritic cells; CFDA-SE, 5 Nicchitta, Chris 102 Glycosylation of b1-adrenergic receptors regulates receptor...

95

anti-il-2 receptor tac: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

receptor A Abbreviations: Ad, adenovirus; BMDCs, bone marrow-derived dendritic cells; CFDA-SE, 5 Nicchitta, Chris 90 Glycosylation of b1-adrenergic receptors regulates receptor...

96

adenosine a2a receptors: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

receptor A Abbreviations: Ad, adenovirus; BMDCs, bone marrow-derived dendritic cells; CFDA-SE, 5 Nicchitta, Chris 102 Glycosylation of b1-adrenergic receptors regulates receptor...

97

acth receptor mc2r: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

receptor A Abbreviations: Ad, adenovirus; BMDCs, bone marrow-derived dendritic cells; CFDA-SE, 5 Nicchitta, Chris 31 Glycosylation of b1-adrenergic receptors regulates receptor...

98

a2a adenosine receptors: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

receptor A Abbreviations: Ad, adenovirus; BMDCs, bone marrow-derived dendritic cells; CFDA-SE, 5 Nicchitta, Chris 102 Glycosylation of b1-adrenergic receptors regulates receptor...

99

anti-n-methyl-d-aspartate receptor encephalitis: Topics by E...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

receptor A Abbreviations: Ad, adenovirus; BMDCs, bone marrow-derived dendritic cells; CFDA-SE, 5 Nicchitta, Chris 44 Glycosylation of b1-adrenergic receptors regulates receptor...

100

alpha-1 adrenergic receptors: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

receptor A Abbreviations: Ad, adenovirus; BMDCs, bone marrow-derived dendritic cells; CFDA-SE, 5 Nicchitta, Chris 108 PERSPECTIVE Orphan nuclear receptors--new ligands Biology...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bone marrow cells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

angiopoietin receptors tie-1: Topics by E-print Network  

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receptor A Abbreviations: Ad, adenovirus; BMDCs, bone marrow-derived dendritic cells; CFDA-SE, 5 Nicchitta, Chris 36 Glycosylation of b1-adrenergic receptors regulates receptor...

102

antagonista dos receptores: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

receptor A Abbreviations: Ad, adenovirus; BMDCs, bone marrow-derived dendritic cells; CFDA-SE, 5 Nicchitta, Chris 47 Glycosylation of b1-adrenergic receptors regulates receptor...

103

antagonista del receptor: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

receptor A Abbreviations: Ad, adenovirus; BMDCs, bone marrow-derived dendritic cells; CFDA-SE, 5 Nicchitta, Chris 50 Glycosylation of b1-adrenergic receptors regulates receptor...

104

aloe glycoprotein ny945: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

receptor A Abbreviations: Ad, adenovirus; BMDCs, bone marrow-derived dendritic cells; CFDA-SE, 5 Nicchitta, Chris 68 Electron tomography analysis of envelope glycoprotein trimers...

105

angiopoietin receptor stie-2: Topics by E-print Network  

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receptor A Abbreviations: Ad, adenovirus; BMDCs, bone marrow-derived dendritic cells; CFDA-SE, 5 Nicchitta, Chris 28 Glycosylation of b1-adrenergic receptors regulates receptor...

106

angiotensin at1 receptor: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

receptor A Abbreviations: Ad, adenovirus; BMDCs, bone marrow-derived dendritic cells; CFDA-SE, 5 Nicchitta, Chris 96 Glycosylation of b1-adrenergic receptors regulates receptor...

107

at1 receptor blocker: Topics by E-print Network  

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receptor A Abbreviations: Ad, adenovirus; BMDCs, bone marrow-derived dendritic cells; CFDA-SE, 5 Nicchitta, Chris 65 Glycosylation of b1-adrenergic receptors regulates receptor...

108

age receptor rage: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

receptor A Abbreviations: Ad, adenovirus; BMDCs, bone marrow-derived dendritic cells; CFDA-SE, 5 Nicchitta, Chris 90 Glycosylation of b1-adrenergic receptors regulates receptor...

109

a2b adenosine receptor: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

receptor A Abbreviations: Ad, adenovirus; BMDCs, bone marrow-derived dendritic cells; CFDA-SE, 5 Nicchitta, Chris 93 Glycosylation of b1-adrenergic receptors regulates receptor...

110

acoustic dispensing technology: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

receptor A Abbreviations: Ad, adenovirus; BMDCs, bone marrow-derived dendritic cells; CFDA-SE, 5 Nicchitta, Chris 82 Motivation Atmospheric Contamination Rejuvenation of a...

111

adenosine a2 receptors: Topics by E-print Network  

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receptor A Abbreviations: Ad, adenovirus; BMDCs, bone marrow-derived dendritic cells; CFDA-SE, 5 Nicchitta, Chris 102 Glycosylation of b1-adrenergic receptors regulates receptor...

112

anti-nmda receptor encephalitis: Topics by E-print Network  

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receptor A Abbreviations: Ad, adenovirus; BMDCs, bone marrow-derived dendritic cells; CFDA-SE, 5 Nicchitta, Chris 46 Glycosylation of b1-adrenergic receptors regulates receptor...

113

anaphylatoxin c5a receptor: Topics by E-print Network  

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receptor A Abbreviations: Ad, adenovirus; BMDCs, bone marrow-derived dendritic cells; CFDA-SE, 5 Nicchitta, Chris 36 Glycosylation of b1-adrenergic receptors regulates receptor...

114

a3 adenosine receptor: Topics by E-print Network  

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receptor A Abbreviations: Ad, adenovirus; BMDCs, bone marrow-derived dendritic cells; CFDA-SE, 5 Nicchitta, Chris 94 Glycosylation of b1-adrenergic receptors regulates receptor...

115

adenosine a3 receptor: Topics by E-print Network  

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receptor A Abbreviations: Ad, adenovirus; BMDCs, bone marrow-derived dendritic cells; CFDA-SE, 5 Nicchitta, Chris 94 Glycosylation of b1-adrenergic receptors regulates receptor...

116

a2a adenosine receptor: Topics by E-print Network  

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receptor A Abbreviations: Ad, adenovirus; BMDCs, bone marrow-derived dendritic cells; CFDA-SE, 5 Nicchitta, Chris 102 Glycosylation of b1-adrenergic receptors regulates receptor...

117

a3 adenosine receptors: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

receptor A Abbreviations: Ad, adenovirus; BMDCs, bone marrow-derived dendritic cells; CFDA-SE, 5 Nicchitta, Chris 94 Glycosylation of b1-adrenergic receptors regulates receptor...

118

amine-associated receptors taar3: Topics by E-print Network  

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receptor A Abbreviations: Ad, adenovirus; BMDCs, bone marrow-derived dendritic cells; CFDA-SE, 5 Nicchitta, Chris 19 Glycosylation of b1-adrenergic receptors regulates receptor...

119

adenosine a2b receptors: Topics by E-print Network  

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receptor A Abbreviations: Ad, adenovirus; BMDCs, bone marrow-derived dendritic cells; CFDA-SE, 5 Nicchitta, Chris 93 Glycosylation of b1-adrenergic receptors regulates receptor...

120

a2 adenosine receptor: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

receptor A Abbreviations: Ad, adenovirus; BMDCs, bone marrow-derived dendritic cells; CFDA-SE, 5 Nicchitta, Chris 102 Glycosylation of b1-adrenergic receptors regulates receptor...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bone marrow cells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

adenovirus receptor car: Topics by E-print Network  

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receptor A Abbreviations: Ad, adenovirus; BMDCs, bone marrow-derived dendritic cells; CFDA-SE, 5 Nicchitta, Chris 24 ORIGINAL ARTICLE Occurrence of adenovirus and other enteric...

122

aldosterone receptor antagonism: Topics by E-print Network  

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receptor A Abbreviations: Ad, adenovirus; BMDCs, bone marrow-derived dendritic cells; CFDA-SE, 5 Nicchitta, Chris 63 Glycosylation of b1-adrenergic receptors regulates receptor...

123

a1 adenosine receptors: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

receptor A Abbreviations: Ad, adenovirus; BMDCs, bone marrow-derived dendritic cells; CFDA-SE, 5 Nicchitta, Chris 103 Glycosylation of b1-adrenergic receptors regulates receptor...

124

alpha-1 adrenergic receptor: Topics by E-print Network  

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receptor A Abbreviations: Ad, adenovirus; BMDCs, bone marrow-derived dendritic cells; CFDA-SE, 5 Nicchitta, Chris 108 PERSPECTIVE Orphan nuclear receptors--new ligands Biology...

125

adenosine a1 receptor: Topics by E-print Network  

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receptor A Abbreviations: Ad, adenovirus; BMDCs, bone marrow-derived dendritic cells; CFDA-SE, 5 Nicchitta, Chris 103 Glycosylation of b1-adrenergic receptors regulates receptor...

126

a-1-acid glycoprotein concentration: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

receptor A Abbreviations: Ad, adenovirus; BMDCs, bone marrow-derived dendritic cells; CFDA-SE, 5 Nicchitta, Chris 55 Electron tomography analysis of envelope glycoprotein trimers...

127

ampa receptor glur1: Topics by E-print Network  

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receptor A Abbreviations: Ad, adenovirus; BMDCs, bone marrow-derived dendritic cells; CFDA-SE, 5 Nicchitta, Chris 111 Glycosylation of b1-adrenergic receptors regulates receptor...

128

adenosine a2b receptor: Topics by E-print Network  

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receptor A Abbreviations: Ad, adenovirus; BMDCs, bone marrow-derived dendritic cells; CFDA-SE, 5 Nicchitta, Chris 93 Glycosylation of b1-adrenergic receptors regulates receptor...

129

adenovirus receptor acts: Topics by E-print Network  

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receptor A Abbreviations: Ad, adenovirus; BMDCs, bone marrow-derived dendritic cells; CFDA-SE, 5 Nicchitta, Chris 13 ORIGINAL ARTICLE Occurrence of adenovirus and other enteric...

130

a2 adenosine receptors: Topics by E-print Network  

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receptor A Abbreviations: Ad, adenovirus; BMDCs, bone marrow-derived dendritic cells; CFDA-SE, 5 Nicchitta, Chris 102 Glycosylation of b1-adrenergic receptors regulates receptor...

131

acetylcholine receptor number: Topics by E-print Network  

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receptor A Abbreviations: Ad, adenovirus; BMDCs, bone marrow-derived dendritic cells; CFDA-SE, 5 Nicchitta, Chris 93 Formation and Stability of Synaptic Receptor Domains...

132

adenosine a2 receptor: Topics by E-print Network  

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receptor A Abbreviations: Ad, adenovirus; BMDCs, bone marrow-derived dendritic cells; CFDA-SE, 5 Nicchitta, Chris 102 Glycosylation of b1-adrenergic receptors regulates receptor...

133

adenosine a1 receptors: Topics by E-print Network  

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receptor A Abbreviations: Ad, adenovirus; BMDCs, bone marrow-derived dendritic cells; CFDA-SE, 5 Nicchitta, Chris 103 Glycosylation of b1-adrenergic receptors regulates receptor...

134

a2b receptor based: Topics by E-print Network  

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receptor A Abbreviations: Ad, adenovirus; BMDCs, bone marrow-derived dendritic cells; CFDA-SE, 5 Nicchitta, Chris 71 Glycosylation of b1-adrenergic receptors regulates receptor...

135

a1 adenosine receptor: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

receptor A Abbreviations: Ad, adenovirus; BMDCs, bone marrow-derived dendritic cells; CFDA-SE, 5 Nicchitta, Chris 103 Glycosylation of b1-adrenergic receptors regulates receptor...

136

a2a receptor antagonism: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

receptor A Abbreviations: Ad, adenovirus; BMDCs, bone marrow-derived dendritic cells; CFDA-SE, 5 Nicchitta, Chris 65 Glycosylation of b1-adrenergic receptors regulates receptor...

137

anti-apoptotic erbb receptors: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

receptor A Abbreviations: Ad, adenovirus; BMDCs, bone marrow-derived dendritic cells; CFDA-SE, 5 Nicchitta, Chris 60 Glycosylation of b1-adrenergic receptors regulates receptor...

138

anti-myelin-associated glycoprotein peripheral: Topics by E-print...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

receptor A Abbreviations: Ad, adenovirus; BMDCs, bone marrow-derived dendritic cells; CFDA-SE, 5 Nicchitta, Chris 103 Electron tomography analysis of envelope glycoprotein...

139

angiotensin at1 receptors: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

receptor A Abbreviations: Ad, adenovirus; BMDCs, bone marrow-derived dendritic cells; CFDA-SE, 5 Nicchitta, Chris 96 Glycosylation of b1-adrenergic receptors regulates receptor...

140

anaphylatoxin receptor cd88: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

receptor A Abbreviations: Ad, adenovirus; BMDCs, bone marrow-derived dendritic cells; CFDA-SE, 5 Nicchitta, Chris 22 Glycosylation of b1-adrenergic receptors regulates receptor...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bone marrow cells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

at1b angiotensin receptor: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

receptor A Abbreviations: Ad, adenovirus; BMDCs, bone marrow-derived dendritic cells; CFDA-SE, 5 Nicchitta, Chris 77 Glycosylation of b1-adrenergic receptors regulates receptor...

142

acetyl group-binding receptor: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

receptor A Abbreviations: Ad, adenovirus; BMDCs, bone marrow-derived dendritic cells; CFDA-SE, 5 Nicchitta, Chris 78 Glycosylation of b1-adrenergic receptors regulates receptor...

143

INVEST IN YOUR BONES Living with Osteoporosis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INVEST IN YOUR BONES Living with Osteoporosis Leaflet 5 Living with osteoporosis can be done environment safe to avoid falls. Early detection of bone loss or osteoporosis is now possible with bone to be most effective in reducing bone loss during the five to ten years following menopause, when bone loss

144

Targeted Gene Deletion Demonstrates that Cell Adhesion MoleculeICAM-4 is Critical for Erythroblastic Island Formation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Erythroid progenitors differentiate in erythroblastic islands, bone marrow niches composed of erythroblasts surrounding a central macrophage. Evidence suggests that within islands adhesive interactions regulate erythropoiesis and apoptosis. We are exploring whether erythroid intercellular adhesion molecule-4 (ICAM-4), animmunoglobulin superfamily member, participates in island formation. Earlier, we identified alpha V integrins as ICAM-4 counter receptors. Since macrophages express alpha V, ICAM-4 potentially mediates island attachments. To test this, we generated ICAM-4 knockout mice and developed quantitative, live cell techniques for harvesting intact islands and for reforming islands in vitro. We observed a 47 percent decrease in islands reconstituted from ICAM-4 null marrow compared to wild type. We also found a striking decrease in islands formed in vivo in knockout mice. Further, peptides that block ICAM-4 alpha V adhesion produced a 53-57 percent decrease in reconstituted islands, strongly suggesting that ICAM-4 binding to macrophage alpha V functions in island integrity. Importantly, we documented that alpha V integrin is expressed in macrophages isolated from erythro blastic islands. Collectively, these data provide convincing evidence that ICAM-4 is critical in erythroblastic island formation via ICAM-4/alpha V adhesion and also demonstrate that the novel experimental strategies we developed will be valuable in exploring molecular mechanisms of erythroblastic island formation and their functional role in regulating erythropoiesis.

Lee, Gloria; Lo, Annie; Short, Sarah A.; Mankelow, Tosti J.; Spring, Frances; Parsons, Stephen F.; Mohandas, Narla; Anstee, David J.; Chasis, Joel Anne

2006-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

145

Endocortical bone loss in osteoporosis: the role of bone surface availability  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Age-related bone loss and postmenopausal osteoporosis are disorders of bone remodelling, in which less bone is reformed than resorbed. Yet, this dysregulation of bone remodelling does not occur equally in all bone regions. Loss of bone is more pronounced near the endocortex, leading to cortical wall thinning and medullary cavity expansion, a process sometimes referred to as "trabecularisation" or "cancellisation". Cortical wall thinning is of primary concern in osteoporosis due to the strong reduction in bone mechanical properties that it is associated with. In this paper, we examine the possibility that the nonuniformity of microscopic bone surface availability could explain the nonuniformity of bone loss in osteoporosis. We use a simple computational model of bone remodelling, in which microscopic bone surface availability influences bone turnover rate, to simulate the evolution of the bone volume fraction profile across the midshaft of a long bone. We find that bone loss is accelerated near the endocortica...

Buenzli, Pascal R; Clement, John G; Pivonka, Peter

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Evolution of B-cell malignancy; Pre-B-cell leukemia resulting from MYC activation in a B-cell neoplasm with a rearranged BCL2 gene  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors have analyzed the molecular genetics of the breakpoints involved in the t(8;14) and t(14;18) translocations of an acute pre-B-cell leukemia from a patient with a history of follicular lymphoma. In this patient's leukemic cells, the breakpoint of the t(14;18) translocation occurred in the major breakpoint-cluster region of the BCL2 gene and became linked to the J{sub H}4 joining-region gene segment of the immunoglobulin heavy-chain locus on the 14q+ chromosome as previously observed in follicular lymphoma. An N region and heptamer and nonamer signal sequences indicated that this translocation occurred as a mistake in V{sub H}-D{sub H}-J{sub H} joining (where V{sub H} and D{sub H} are the variable and diversity segments). In the t(8;14) translocation, the breakpoint was located immediately 5' of the first exon of the MYC protooncogene, which was juxtaposed with the C{gamma}2 constant gene segment of the second 14q+ chromosome. The finding of repeated sequences typical of switch regions suggested that this translocation occurred during heavy-chain isotype switching, resulting in progression to pre-B-cell leukemia with both the 5(8;14) and the t(14;18) translocations. The terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferase-positive phenotype of the patient's leukemic cells further suggests that the pre-B-cell leukemia was derived from a pre-B cell carrying a t(14;18) translocation in the original follicular lymphoma. The polymerase chain reaction method was then used to identify cancer cells in the bone marrow of the patient.

Gauwerky, C.E.; Haluska, F.G.; Tsujimoto, Y.; Nowell, P.C.; Croce, C.M. (Wistar Institute of Anatomy and Biology, Philadelphia, PA (USA))

1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

IBMS BoneKEy. 2009 April;6(4):132-149 http://www.bonekey-ibms.org/cgi/content/full/ibmske;6/4/132  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and osteoporosis, yet uniquely ­ without targeting the resident fat or bone cell. IBMS BoneKEy. 2009 April;6(4):132-149. ©2009 International Bone & Mineral Society Introduction Osteoporosis and obesity, two of the most billion dollars in annual health service costs. (1) Osteoporosis, a disease characterized by diminished

148

Fracture, aging and disease in bone  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

separate during bone fracture. Nature Materials 4, 612 (on nonagenarians with hip fractures? Injury 30, 169 (1999).bone mass as predictors of fracture in a prospective study.

Ager, J.W.; Balooch, G.; Ritchie, R.O.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Hepatocyte growth factor regulated tyrosine kinase substrate in the peripheral development and function of B-cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: •ESCRT-0 protein regulates the development of peripheral B-cells. •BCR expression on cell surface should be controlled by the endosomal-sorting system. •Hrs plays important roles in responsiveness to Ag stimulation in B lymphocytes. -- Abstract: Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF)-regulated tyrosine kinase substrate (Hrs) is a vesicular sorting protein that functions as one of the endosomal-sorting proteins required for transport (ESCRT). Hrs, which binds to ubiquitinated proteins through its ubiquitin-interacting motif (UIM), contributes to the lysosomal transport and degradation of ubiquitinated membrane proteins. However, little is known about the relationship between B-cell functions and ESCRT proteins in vivo. Here we examined the immunological roles of Hrs in B-cell development and functions using B-cell-specific Hrs-deficient (Hrs{sup flox/flox};mb1{sup cre/+}:Hrs-cKO) mice, which were generated using a cre-LoxP recombination system. Hrs deficiency in B-cells significantly reduced T-cell-dependent antibody production in vivo and impaired the proliferation of B-cells treated in vitro with an anti-IgM monoclonal antibody but not with LPS. Although early development of B-cells in the bone marrow was normal in Hrs-cKO mice, there was a significant decrease in the number of the peripheral transitional B-cells and marginal zone B-cells in the spleen of Hrs-cKO mice. These results indicate that Hrs plays important roles during peripheral development and physiological functions of B lymphocytes.

Nagata, Takayuki [Department of Pharmacy, Iwaki Meisei University, 5-5-1 Chuodai Iino, Iwaki, Fukushima 970-8551 (Japan) [Department of Pharmacy, Iwaki Meisei University, 5-5-1 Chuodai Iino, Iwaki, Fukushima 970-8551 (Japan); Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, 2-1 Seiryo-machi, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8575 (Japan); Murata, Kazuko, E-mail: murata-k@iwakimu.ac.jp [Department of Pharmacy, Iwaki Meisei University, 5-5-1 Chuodai Iino, Iwaki, Fukushima 970-8551 (Japan)] [Department of Pharmacy, Iwaki Meisei University, 5-5-1 Chuodai Iino, Iwaki, Fukushima 970-8551 (Japan); Murata, Ryo [Department of Pharmacy, Iwaki Meisei University, 5-5-1 Chuodai Iino, Iwaki, Fukushima 970-8551 (Japan)] [Department of Pharmacy, Iwaki Meisei University, 5-5-1 Chuodai Iino, Iwaki, Fukushima 970-8551 (Japan); Sun, Shu-lan [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, 2-1 Seiryo-machi, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8575 (Japan)] [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, 2-1 Seiryo-machi, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8575 (Japan); Saito, Yutaro; Yamaga, Shuhei [Department of Pharmacy, Iwaki Meisei University, 5-5-1 Chuodai Iino, Iwaki, Fukushima 970-8551 (Japan)] [Department of Pharmacy, Iwaki Meisei University, 5-5-1 Chuodai Iino, Iwaki, Fukushima 970-8551 (Japan); Tanaka, Nobuyuki; Tamai, Keiichi [Division of Immunology, Miyagi Cancer Research Institute, 47-1 Nodayama, Medeshima-Shiode, Natori 981-1293 (Japan)] [Division of Immunology, Miyagi Cancer Research Institute, 47-1 Nodayama, Medeshima-Shiode, Natori 981-1293 (Japan); Moriya, Kunihiko [Department of Pediatrics, Tohoku University School of Medicine, 1-1 Seiryo-machi, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8575 (Japan)] [Department of Pediatrics, Tohoku University School of Medicine, 1-1 Seiryo-machi, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8575 (Japan); Kasai, Noriyuki [Institute for Animal Experimentation, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, 2-1 Seiryo-machi, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8575 (Japan)] [Institute for Animal Experimentation, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, 2-1 Seiryo-machi, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8575 (Japan); Sugamura, Kazuo [Division of Immunology, Miyagi Cancer Research Institute, 47-1 Nodayama, Medeshima-Shiode, Natori 981-1293 (Japan)] [Division of Immunology, Miyagi Cancer Research Institute, 47-1 Nodayama, Medeshima-Shiode, Natori 981-1293 (Japan); Ishii, Naoto [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, 2-1 Seiryo-machi, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8575 (Japan)] [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, 2-1 Seiryo-machi, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8575 (Japan)

2014-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

150

Irradiation Effects on Human Cortical Bone Fracture Behavior  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Irradiation Effects on Human Cortical Bone Fracture Behavior Print Human bone is strong but still fallible. To better predict fracturing in bone, researchers need a mechanistic...

151

Development of high strength hydroxyapatite for bone tissue regeneration using nanobioactive glass composites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With an increasing demand of biocompatible bone substitutes for the treatment of bone diseases and bone tissue regeneration, bioactive glass composites are being tested to improvise the osteoconductive as well as osteoinductive properties. Nanobioactive glass (nBG) composites, having composition of SiO{sub 2} 70 mol%, CaO 26 mol % and P{sub 2}O{sub 5} 4 mol% were prepared by Freeze drying method using PEG-PPG-PEG co-polymer. Polymer addition improves the mechanical strength and porosity of the scaffold of nBG. Nano Bioactive glass composites upon implantation undergo specific reactions leading to the formation of crystalline hydroxyapatite (HA). This is tested in vitro using Simulated Body Fluid (SBF). This high strength hydroxyapatite (HA) layer acts as osteoconductive in cellular environment, by acting as mineral base of bones, onto which new bone cells proliferate leading to new bone formation. Strength of the nBG composites as well as HA is in the range of cortical and cancellous bone, thus proving significant for bone tissue regeneration substitutes.

Shrivastava, Pragya; Dalai, Sridhar; Vijayalakshmi, S. [Centre for Research in Nanotechnology and Science, IIT Bombay (India); Sudera, Prerna; Sivam, Santosh Param [Amity Institute of Nanotechnology, Amity University, Noida, Uttar Pradesh-201303 (India); Sharma, Pratibha [Dept of Energy Science and Engineering, IIT Bombay (India)

2013-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

152

Lung cancer-derived Dickkopf1 is associated with bone metastasis and the mechanism involves the inhibition of osteoblast differentiation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: •DKK1 level was associated with NSCLC bone metastases. •Lung tumor cells derived DKK1 inhibited osteoblast differentiation. •Lung tumor cells derived DKK1 modulates ?-catenin and RUNX2. -- Abstract: Wnt/?-catenin signaling and Dickkopf1 (DKK1) play important roles in the progression of lung cancer, which preferably metastasizes to skeleton. But the role of them in bone dissemination is poorly understood. This study aims to define the role of DKK1 in lung cancer bone metastases and investigate the underlying mechanism. Our results demonstrated that DKK1 over-expression was a frequent event in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) blood samples, and serous DKK1 level was much higher in bone metastatic NSCLC compared to non-bone metastatic NSCLC. We also found that conditioned medium from DKK1 over-expressing lung cancer cells inhibited the differentiation of osteoblast, determined by alkaline phosphatase activity and osteocalcin secretion, whereas the conditioned medium from DKK1 silencing lung cancer cells exhibited the opposite effects. Mechanistically, DKK1 reduced the level of ?-catenin and RUNX2, as well as inhibiting the nuclear translocation of ?-catenin. Taken together, these results suggested that lung cancer-produced DKK1 may be an important mechanistic link between NSCLC and bone metastases, and targeting DKK1 may be an effective method to treat bone metastase of NSCLC.

Chu, Tianqing; Teng, Jiajun; Jiang, Liyan; Zhong, Hua; Han, Baohui, E-mail: baohuihan1@163.com

2014-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

153

Near-infrared emitting quantum dots for cellular and vascular fluorescent labeling in in vivo multiplexed imaging studies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In vivo multimodal, multiplexed microscopy allows real-time observation of hematopoietic cells, their stem and progenitor cells and metastatic cancer cells in their native bone marrow (BM) environment. Multiplexing has ...

Wu, Juwell Wendy

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Positive modulator of bone morphogenic protein-2  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Compounds of the present invention of formula I and formula II are disclosed in the specification and wherein the compounds are modulators of Bone Morphogenic Protein activity. Compounds are synthetic peptides having a non-growth factor heparin binding region, a linker, and sequences that bind specifically to a receptor for Bone Morphogenic Protein. Uses of compounds of the present invention in the treatment of bone lesions, degenerative joint disease and to enhance bone formation are disclosed.

Zamora, Paul O. (Gaithersburg, MD); Pena, Louis A. (Poquott, NY); Lin, Xinhua (Plainview, NY); Takahashi, Kazuyuki (Germantown, MD)

2009-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

155

BONE CARE FOR THE POSTMENOPAUSAL WOMAN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Osteoporosis is a disease characterized by low bone mass and deterioration in the microarchitecture of bone tissue, leading to an increased risk of fracture. Osteoporosis occurs when the bone mass decreases more fracture). Osteoporosis has no signs or symptoms until a fracture occurs ­ this is why it is often called

Shihadeh, Alan

156

Silencing stromal interaction molecule 1 by RNA interference inhibits the proliferation and migration of endothelial progenitor cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Research highlights: {yields} STIM1 and TRPC1 are expressed in EPCs. {yields} Knockdown of STIM1 inhibits the proliferation, migration and SOCE of EPCs. {yields} TRPC1-SOC cooperates with STIM1 to mediate the SOCE of EPCs. -- Abstract: Knockdown of stromal interaction molecule 1 (STIM1) significantly suppresses neointima hyperplasia after vascular injury. Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) are the major source of cells that respond to endothelium repair and contribute to re-endothelialization by reducing neointima formation after vascular injury. We hypothesized that the effect of STIM1 on neointima hyperplasia inhibition is mediated through its effect on the biological properties of EPCs. In this study, we investigated the effects of STIM1 on the proliferation and migration of EPCs and examined the effect of STIM1 knockdown using cultured rat bone marrow-derived EPCs. STIM1 was expressed in EPCs, and knockdown of STIM1 by adenoviral delivery of small interfering RNA (siRNA) significantly suppressed the proliferation and migration of EPCs. Furthermore, STIM1 knockdown decreased store-operated channel entry 48 h after transfection. Replenishment with recombinant human STIM1 reversed the effects of STIM1 knockdown. Our data suggest that the store-operated transient receptor potential canonical 1 channel is involved in regulating the biological properties of EPCs through STIM1. STIM1 is a potent regulator of cell proliferation and migration in rat EPCs and may play an important role in the biological properties of EPCs.

Kuang, Chun-yan; Yu, Yang [Institute of Cardiovascular Diseases of PLA, Xinqiao Hospital, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing 400037 (China)] [Institute of Cardiovascular Diseases of PLA, Xinqiao Hospital, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing 400037 (China); Guo, Rui-wei [Department of Cardiology, Kunming General Hospital of Chengdu Military Area, Yunnan 650032 (China)] [Department of Cardiology, Kunming General Hospital of Chengdu Military Area, Yunnan 650032 (China); Qian, De-hui; Wang, Kui; Den, Meng-yang; Shi, Yan-kun [Institute of Cardiovascular Diseases of PLA, Xinqiao Hospital, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing 400037 (China)] [Institute of Cardiovascular Diseases of PLA, Xinqiao Hospital, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing 400037 (China); Huang, Lan, E-mail: huanglans260@yahoo.cn [Institute of Cardiovascular Diseases of PLA, Xinqiao Hospital, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing 400037 (China)] [Institute of Cardiovascular Diseases of PLA, Xinqiao Hospital, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing 400037 (China)

2010-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

157

Mechanical regulation of signaling pathways in bone, William R. Thompson a,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Review Mechanical regulation of signaling pathways in bone, William R. Thompson a, , Clinton T A wide range of cell types depend on mechanically induced signals to enable appropriate physiological re- sponses. The skeleton is particularly dependent on mechanical information to guide the resident cell

158

Digital electronic bone growth stimulator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention relates to the electrical treatment of biological tissue. In particular, the present invention discloses a device that produces discrete electrical pulse trains for treating osteoporosis and accelerating bone growth. According to its major aspects and broadly stated, the present invention consists of an electrical circuit configuration capable of generating Bassett-type waveforms shown with alternative signals provide for the treatment of either fractured bones or osteoporosis. The signal generator comprises a quartz clock, an oscillator circuit, a binary divider chain, and a plurality of simple, digital logic gates. Signals are delivered efficiently, with little or no distortion, and uniformly distributed throughout the area of injury. Perferably, power is furnished by widely available and inexpensive radio batteries, needing replacement only once in several days. The present invention can be affixed to a medical cast without a great increase in either weight or bulk. Also, the disclosed stimulator can be used to treat osteoporosis or to strengthen a healing bone after the cast has been removed by attaching the device to the patient`s skin or clothing.

Kronberg, J.W.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Acquisition of repertoires of suppressor T cells under the influence of macrophages  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Acquisition of repertoires and genetic restriction specificities of suppressor T cells (Ts) and their factors were studied by using full allogeneic radiation bone marrow chimera and H-2 congenic pairs, B10.A(3R) and B10.A(5R), which received conventional or cloned macrophages by cell transfer. Suppressor T-cell factor (TsF) from C3H----C57BL/6 or C57BL/6----C3H chimera suppressed only donor but not host-type responses of either C3H or C57BL/6, in an antigen-specific fashion. However, if chimera mice were given conventional or cloned macrophages of the host type, the chimera TsF in turn suppressed both the responses of C3H and C57BL/6 mice but not those of the third party, BALB/c, indicating that macrophages are responsible for the acquisition of host restriction specificity. Similarly, B10.A(5R) mice developed I-Jb restricted Ts or TsF when the B10.A(3R) macrophage cell line was injected at the time of antigen priming. The reverse was also true. B10.A(3R) mice did generate I-Jk restricted Ts when they received the B10.A(5R) macrophage cell line. Thus, the results clearly demonstrated that B10.A(3R) or B10.A(5R) mice potentially possessed their ability to express both I-Jk and I-Jb determinants and that repertoires and genetic restriction specificity of Ts and their TsF were acquired at a macrophage level at the time of antigen-priming.

Soejima, T.; Nagayama, A.; Sado, T.; Taniguchi, M. (Chiba Univ. (Japan))

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

WRITTEN IN BONE: Bone Biographer's Casebook Douglas Owsley and Karin Bruwelheide  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

afflictions that would have made daily life miserable. In addition to dental disease and gout, his bones were

Mathis, Wayne N.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bone marrow cells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Composite bone substitutes prepared by two methods  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hydroxyapatite-polyethylene composites: effect of graftingof braded carbon/PEEK composite compression bone plates,”Koch, “Hydroxyapatite/SiO2 Composites via Freeze Casting for

Lee, Hoe Yun; Lee, Hoe Yun

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Ultrasound-Confirmed Frontal Bone Fracture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

table--frontal sinus fractures. Facial Plast Surg Clin NorthConfirmed Frontal Bone Fracture Jeremy N. Johnson, DO Danielan isolated comminuted fracture of the left frontal sinus

Johnson, Jeremy N; Crandall, Stephen; Kang, Christopher S

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

The role of SDF-1-CXCR4/CXCR7 axis in biological behaviors of adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells in vitro  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: •SDF-1 pretreating increased the levels of CXCR4, CXCR7 in ADSCs. •SDF-1 improved cells paracrine migration and proliferation abilities. •CXCR4 and CXCR7 could function in ADSCs paracrine, migration and proliferation. -- Abstract: Numerous studies have reported that CXCR4 and CXCR7 play an essential, but differential role in stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1)-inducing cell chemotaxis, viability and paracrine actions of BMSCs. Adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (ADSCs) have been suggested to be potential seed cells for clinical application instead of bone marrow derived stroma cell (BMSCs). However, the function of SDF-1/CXCR4 and SDF-1/CXCR7 in ADSCs is not well understood. This study was designed to analyze the effect of SDF-1/CXCR4 and SDF-1/CXCR7 axis on ADSCs biological behaviors in vitro. Using Flow cytometry and Western blot methods, we found for the first time that CXCR4/CXCR7 expression was increased after treatment with SDF-1 in ADSCs. SDF-1 promoted ADSCs paracrine, proliferation and migration abilities. CXCR4 or CXCR7 antibody suppressed ADSCs paracrine action induced by SDF-1. The migration of ADSCs can be abolished by CXCR4 antibody, while the proliferation of ADSCs was only downregulated by CXCR7 antibody. Our study indicated that the angiogenesis of ADSCs is, at least partly, mediated by SDF-1/CXCR4 and SDF-1/CXCR7 axis. However, only binding of SDF-1/CXCR7 was required for proliferation of ADSCs, and CXCR7 was required for migration of ADSCs induced by SDF-1. Our studies provide evidence that the activation of either axis may be helpful to improve the effectiveness of ADSCs-based stem cell therapy.

Li, Qiang; Zhang, Aijun; Tao, Changbo; Li, Xueyang; Jin, Peisheng, E-mail: jinps2006@163.com

2013-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

164

Shell Formation and Bone Strength Laying Hens  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Shell Formation and Bone Strength in Laying Hens Effects of Age, Daidzein and Exogenous Estrogen Cover aquarelle: E. Spörndly-Nees #12;Shell Formation and Bone Strength in Laying Hens Effects of Age eggshells as shell quality declines with age during the laying period. This is a concern for food safety

165

Curr Pharm Des . Author manuscript Bisphosphonates and bone diseases: past, present and future  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

involving excessive bone resorption which include post-menopausal osteoporosis, Paget s disease of bone

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

166

Structural Analysis of Human and Bovine Bone for Development of Synthetic Materials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

bones, as well as mimicking nature by developing a synthetic material to repair bones. Experimentally, bovine bone, tumor-free human bone, and cancerous human bone were studied via the small scale mechanical loading test. Failure analysis was conducted...

Jang, Eunhwa

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

167

Effect of Synthetic Marrow on Synthetic Open-Cell Foam Vertebrae  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

............................................................................................................................................ 40 3.2 Materials and Methods ........................................................................................................................ 41 3.2.1 Compression Testing... for a mechanically accurate model recommended by ASTM standard F2077. Reprinted with permission from ASTM International [39...

Good, Brian Victor

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

168

Steel Factorand c-kit Regulate Cell-Matrix Adhesion By Tatsuo Kinashi and Timothy A. Springer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Steel Factorand c-kit Regulate Cell-Matrix Adhesion By Tatsuo Kinashi and Timothy A. Springer Steel (SI) and white spotting (W) loci encode steel factor (c-kitligand) andthe c-kit tyrosine kinase adhesionusingbone marrow-derived mast cells as a model system.Steel factor stimulatesmast cells to bind

Springer, Timothy A.

169

E-Print Network 3.0 - autologous cell therapy Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2009 447 The new england Summary: of nonmyeloablative chemo- therapy followed by an infusion of autologous hematopoietic stem cells that had been trans... autologous CD34+ bone...

170

Think of your bones as a "bank" where  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

can get osteoporosis (ah-stee-oh-puh- ROH-sis) when you get older. Osteoporosis is a disease in which the bones become weak and more likely to break (fracture). People with osteoporosis most often break bones in the hip, spine, and wrist. 1 #12;Normal bone Bone with osteoporosis Reprinted from The Surgeon General

Baker, Chris I.

171

Composite gelatin delivery system for bone regeneration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this thesis, the chemical/mechanical properties and biocompatibility of gelatin were investigated to produce a gelatin scaffold for the release of bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) from composite particles. This delivery ...

Hager, Elizabeth A. (Elizabeth Ann)

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Microdamage accumulation in bovine trabecular bone  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

When bone is loaded beyond its failure point, it develops damage in the form of microcracks. Normally, microcracks are repaired by the remodeling process, limiting the number of in vivo microcracks. However, if the rate ...

Moore, Tara L. Arthur (Tara Lee Arthur), 1972-

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

CORTICAL BONE FRACTURE R. O. RITCHIE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with menopause in aging women, can lead to osteoporosis, a condition of low bone mass associated the therapeutic benefits of antiresorptive agents in treating osteoporosis (6,7) has re-emphasized the ne- cessity

Ritchie, Robert

174

adult adipose derived: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

clades that lack larvae or that have specialized larval feeding James C. O& apos; reilly; Stephen M. Deban; Kiisa C. Nishikawa 16 Bone Marrow-Derived Cells that Populate the...

175

adenovirus expressing glycoproteins: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

receptor A Abbreviations: Ad, adenovirus; BMDCs, bone marrow-derived dendritic cells; CFDA-SE, 5 Nicchitta, Chris 12 CXCR4 Mediated Chemotaxis Is Regulated by 5T4 Oncofetal...

176

analogs scavenge lipid-derived: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

receptor A Abbreviations: Ad, adenovirus; BMDCs, bone marrow-derived dendritic cells; CFDA-SE, 5 Nicchitta, Chris 59 An Ultra-Low-Power Power Management IC for Energy-Scavenged...

177

angiotensin receptor type: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

receptor A Abbreviations: Ad, adenovirus; BMDCs, bone marrow-derived dendritic cells; CFDA-SE, 5 Nicchitta, Chris 97 Subtype Receptor of Angiotensin II From Large Arteries to the...

178

E-Print Network 3.0 - areal bone mineral Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

(DXA)-derived areal bone mineral density (BMD) and reductions in vertebral fracture incidence... than the bone volume fraction (mineralized bone volumebulk volume).12...

179

E-Print Network 3.0 - assessing bone mass Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

on assessment of bone mass... the amount of bone mass and predict the risk for fracture. However, the cur- rently available techniques... - tive assessment of bone ......

180

E-Print Network 3.0 - adaptive bone remodelling Sample Search...  

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various sites and involves resorption by osteoclast, followed... mineral density and bone micro- architecture. Our paper focuses on bone microstructure and remodeling... in bone...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bone marrow cells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

OSTEOBLAST ADHESION OF BREAST CANCER CELLS WITH SCANNING ACOUSTIC MICROSCOPY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Breast cancer frequently metastasizes to the bone. Upon colonizing bone tissue, the cancer cells stimulate osteoclasts (cells that break bone down), resulting in large lesions in the bone. The breast cancer cells also affect osteoblasts (cells that build new bone). Conditioned medium was collected from a bone-metastatic breast cancer cell line, MDA-MB-231, and cultured with an immature osteoblast cell line, MC3T3-E1. Under these conditions the osteoblasts acquired a changed morphology and appeared to adherer in a different way to the substrate and to each other. To characterize cell adhesion, MC3T3-E1 osteoblasts were cultured with or without MDA-MB-231 conditioned medium for two days, and then assayed with a mechanical scanning acoustic reflection microscope (SAM). The SAM indicated that in normal medium the MC3T3-E1 osteoblasts were firmly attached to their plastic substrate. However, MC3T3-E1 cells cultured with MDA-MB-231 conditioned medium displayed both an abnormal shape and poor adhesion at the substrate interface. The cells were fixed and stained to visualize cytoskeletal components using optical microscopic techniques. We were not able to observe these differences until the cells were quite confluent after 7 days of culture. However, using the SAM, we were able to detect these changes within 2 days of culture with MDA-MB-231 conditioned medium

Chiaki Miyasaka; Robyn R. Mercer; Andrea M. Mastro; Ken L. Telschow

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

H-2 restriction of the T cell response to chemically induced tumors: evidence from F/sub 1/. -->. parent chimeras  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It has been well established that T cells that react to tumor antigen on virus-induced tumors must share H-2D or H-2K specificities with the tumor. It has been impossible to perform similar studies with chemically induced tumors because each chemically induced tumor expresses a unique tumor antigen that cannot be studied in association with other H-2 types. This study provies evidence that H-2 recognition is also necessary for recognition of chemically induced tumors. We have found that F/sub 1/ ..-->.. parent chimeras preferentially recognize chemically induced tumors of parental H-2 type. C3H/HeJ and C57BL/6 mice were lethally irradiated and restored with (C3H x C57BL/6) F/sub 1/ hybrid bone marrow. The F/sub 1/ ..-->.. C3H chimera but not the F/sub 1/ ..-->.. C57BL/6 chimera was able to respond to a C3H fibrosarcoma in mixed lymphocyte-tumor cell culture and also to neutralize the tumor in an in vivo tumor neutralization assay. On the other hand, the F/sub 1/ ..-->.. C57BL/6 chimera but not the F/sub 1/ ..-->.. C3H chimera was able to kill the C57BL/6 lymphoma EL4 in an in vitro cytotoxicity assay. Both chimeras were tolerant to C3H and C57BL/6 alloantigens but could respond normally to Con A and to BALB/c spleen cells in mixed lymphocyte cultures and cytotoxicity assay.

Lannin, D.R.; Yu, S.; McKhann, C.F.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Photoplethysmography for non-invasive measurement of bone hemodynamic responses to changes in external pressure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Adequate blood supply and circulation in bones is required to maintain a healthy skeleton, and inadequate blood perfusion is associated with numerous bone pathologies and a decrease in bone mineral density (BMD). Bone ...

Mateus, Jaime (Pereira de Mateus Silva)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Original article Analysis of muscle and bone weight variation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. The commonalities ranged from 0.76 (drumstick muscle) to 0.92 (neck bone) and the uniqueness (special size factors and drumstick bone factors. The correlation coefficient between the first factor score and carcass muscle was 0

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

185

Research Finds Vitamin D Deficiency Affects Bone Quality  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of vitamin D, the "sunshine vitamin," have been previously linked to the health and fracture risk of human bone on the basis of low calcium intake and reduced bone density. The...

186

Bisphosphonates and Bone diseases: past, present and future Bisphosphonates are stable analogues of the naturally-occuring inorganic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

involving excessive bone resorption which include post-menopausal osteoporosis, Paget's disease of bone

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

187

Revised estimates of electron absorbed fractions and radionuclide S-values in trabecular bone  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OF CONTENTS LIST OF TABLES LIST OF FIGURES CHAPTER vnt tX INTRODUCTION . Need for Trabecular Bone Dosimetry Trabecular Bon- Stntcture Cells at Risk . 1 3 5 II THE MIRD SCHEMA Absorbed Dose . Equation Parameters and Full Equations . . 9 11 III... most at risk, while for lower energy P- particles the osteogenic tissue and epithelial layer will be more at risk (ICRP 1968). CHAPTER H THE MIRD SCHEMA Absorbed Dose Radiopharmaceuticals in medicine are being used in imaging, therapy...

Parry, Robert Alan

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Building Strong Bones: Calcium Information for Health Care Providers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

intake of calcium.2 You can help children achieve lifelong bone health by talking to parents and young of calcium necessary for optimal bone development. Research suggests many parents don't know that children to three decades of life ·The rate at which bone is lost in the later years Although the consequences

Rau, Don C.

189

Prediction and Informative Risk Factor Selection of Bone Diseases  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

data and use these integrated features to effectively predict osteoporosis and bone fractures. We; disease memory; osteoporosis; bone fracture. ! 1 INTRODUCTION Risk factor (RF) analysis based on patients on the study of osteoporosis and bone fracture prediction. Over the past few decades, osteoporosis has been

Zhang, Aidong

190

The effects of eccentric training on muscle-bone function  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The purpose of this study was to determine if eccentric exercise training can attenuate or prevent bone loss associated with estrogen-deficiency in the mouse model. A secondary purpose was to determine if any bone changes were due to changes in bone...

Hubal, Monica Jeanne

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

INVEST IN YOUR BONES Daily Activities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INVEST IN YOUR BONES Daily Activities Leaflet 3 Another osteoporosis prevention step to decrease lifestyle. Let's see how you can do that. If you have osteoporosis, follow carefully the activity program. Remember the following about osteoporosis: is largely preventable and treatable is a serious

192

Adaptive scapula bone remodeling computational simulation: Relevance to regenerative medicine  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Shoulder arthroplasty success has been attributed to many factors including, bone quality, soft tissue balancing, surgeon experience, and implant design. Improved long-term success is primarily limited by glenoid implant loosening. Prosthesis design examines materials and shape and determines whether the design should withstand a lifetime of use. Finite element (FE) analyses have been extensively used to study stresses and strains produced in implants and bone. However, these static analyses only measure a moment in time and not the adaptive response to the altered environment produced by the therapeutic intervention. Computational analyses that integrate remodeling rules predict how bone will respond over time. Recent work has shown that subject-specific two- and three dimensional adaptive bone remodeling models are feasible and valid. Feasibility and validation were achieved computationally, simulating bone remodeling using an intact human scapula, initially resetting the scapular bone material properties to be uniform, numerically simulating sequential loading, and comparing the bone remodeling simulation results to the actual scapula’s material properties. Three-dimensional scapula FE bone model was created using volumetric computed tomography images. Muscle and joint load and boundary conditions were applied based on values reported in the literature. Internal bone remodeling was based on element strain-energy density. Initially, all bone elements were assigned a homogeneous density. All loads were applied for 10 iterations. After every iteration, each bone element’s remodeling stimulus was compared to its corresponding reference stimulus and its material properties modified. The simulation achieved convergence. At the end of the simulation the predicted and actual specimen bone apparent density were plotted and compared. Location of high and low predicted bone density was comparable to the actual specimen. High predicted bone density was greater than actual specimen. Low predicted bone density was lower than actual specimen. Differences were probably due to applied muscle and joint reaction loads, boundary conditions, and values of constants used. Work is underway to study this. Nonetheless, the results demonstrate three dimensional bone remodeling simulation validity and potential. Such adaptive predictions take physiological bone remodeling simulations one step closer to reality. Computational analyses are needed that integrate biological remodeling rules and predict how bone will respond over time. We expect the combination of computational static stress analyses together with adaptive bone remodeling simulations to become effective tools for regenerative medicine research.

Sharma, Gulshan B., E-mail: gbsharma@ucalgary.ca [Emory University, Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences, Spine and Orthopaedic Center, Atlanta, Georgia 30329 (United States); University of Pittsburgh, Swanson School of Engineering, Department of Bioengineering, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213 (United States); University of Calgary, Schulich School of Engineering, Department of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, Calgary, Alberta T2N 1N4 (Canada); Robertson, Douglas D., E-mail: douglas.d.robertson@emory.edu [Emory University, Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences, Spine and Orthopaedic Center, Atlanta, Georgia 30329 (United States); University of Pittsburgh, Swanson School of Engineering, Department of Bioengineering, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Blood Circulatory System The circulatory system consists of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

resulting from too few RBC's or hemoglobin that causes a run-down feeling Sickle-Cell Disease Sickle-cell sickle-shaped red blood cells that tend to rupture as they pass through the narrow capillaries. Disorders elements: produced in red bone marrow Red blood cells/erythrocytes (RBC) White blood cells

Cochran-Stafira, D. Liane

194

Bone Cancer Rates in Dinosaurs Compared with Modern Vertebrates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Data on the prevalence of bone cancer in dinosaurs is available from past radiological examination of preserved bones. We statistically test this data for consistency with rates extrapolated from information on bone cancer in modern vertebrates, and find that there is no evidence of a different rate. Thus, this test provides no support for a possible role of ionizing radiation in the K-T extinction event.

L. C. Natarajan; A. L. Melott; B. M. Rothschild; L. D. Martin

2007-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

195

BONE LOSS IN RELATION TO HYPOTHALAMIC ATROPHY IN ALZHEIMER'S DISEASE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

considerable burden on the health system, patients, and caregivers. 1.2 Alzheimer’s Disease and Bone Loss Bone health is an important issue in aging and AD. Osteoporosis–related fractures are among the major health and socioeconomic concerns in aging... of bone fractures, and a determining factor in clinical diagnosis of osteoporosis (Ammann and Rizzoli 2003). Several studies in women suggest that low BMD is associated with poorer cognitive function and subsequent cognitive decline (Yaffe, Browner et al...

Loskutova, Natalia Y.

2011-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

196

ancient human bones: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Reich, David 159 OsteoConduct: Wireless Body-Area Communication based on Bone Conduction Energy Storage, Conversion and Utilization Websites Summary: , Measurement, Human Factors....

197

On nano size structures for enhanced bone formation.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Purpose The general aim of the present thesis was to investigate early bone response to titanium implants modified with nano size structures. Therefore, 1. a… (more)

Meirelles, Luiz

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Physiological Stress, Bone Growth and Development in Imperial Rome  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Skeleton. In Bone Loss and Osteoporosis: An AnthropologicalThe radiological diagnosis of osteoporosis: A new approach.170. Birnbaum, E. 1992. Osteoporosis: A Summary of Recent

Beauchesne, Patrick Denis

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

arm bones: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

TO ENSURE HUMAN SAFETY Lingqi Zeng and Gary M. Bone Engineering Websites Summary: , and robot and human velocities. The impact experiments are performed with an apparatus...

200

Aging and Fracture of Human Cortical Bone and Tooth Dentin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mechanistic aspects of fracture and R-curve behavior inof failure of solid biomaterials and bone: `fracture' and `pre- fracture' toughness. Materials Science and Engineering:

Ager III, Joel W.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bone marrow cells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

allowing normal bone: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

assays. Correlations of fluoride levels between normal bone near the Nancy Medina; Chester W. Douglass; Gary M. Whitford; Robert N. Hoover; Thomas R. Fears 6 Differential...

202

A STUDY OF ULTRASONIC WAVE PROPAGATION IN BONES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Editions Technip, Paris, 1987. Buchanan J., Gilbert R., and Khashanah K. Deter- mination of the parameters of cancellous bone using low frequency acoustic ...

zyserman

203

Quantity and Quality of Trabecular Bone in the Femur Are Enhanced by a Strongly Anabolic, Noninvasive  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

serve as the basis for a biomechanically based intervention for osteoporosis. To evaluate intervention for osteoporosis. (J Bone Miner Res 2002;17:349­357) Key words: osteoporosis, osteogenic, anabolic, bone formation, bone quality, osteogenic INTRODUCTION OSTEOPOROSIS, A disease characterized

204

DOI: 10.1002/cmdc.201100381 Runaway ROS as a Selective Anticancer Strategy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

rapidly dividing normal cells, such as the intestinal lining and bone marrow, resulting in dose limiting) protein found in some non-small-cell lung cancers,[1,2] and trastuzumab (Her- ceptin), a monoclonal selectively induces death in cancer cell lines compared with normal cells--Raj et al. reported

Hergenrother, Paul J.

205

On the Estimation of Bone Status Rasmus Paulsen  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Osteoporosis Diagnostics. The subject of this thesis is medical image analysis with special attention to X Reinhold Paulsen Keywords Osteoporosis, bone status, radius, contact radiographs, cortical geometry, en algorithm developed by Torsana Osteoporosis Diagnostics. A simulated bone is made by simulated x

206

Therapeutic Agents for the Prevention and Restoration of Bone Mass  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

osteoporosis-related bone loss. According to the National Osteoporosis Foundation, osteoporosis is a major osteoporosis Advantages · Selectively blocks osteoclastic bone resorption by a novel mechanism, providing in post-menopausal women. This ultimately leads to fractures resulting from minimal falls and accidents

Slatton, Clint

207

E-Print Network 3.0 - adam12-s stimulates bone Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and computer... design (dimensions, profile shape and material properties) on the load sharing with adjacent bone... and consequent bone resorption was tested, using a set of...

208

E-Print Network 3.0 - antibiotic-loaded bone grafts Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

-based implants for bone reconstruction and repair. We have developed HA-coated carbon-fiber polymer composites... that match bone's elastic modulus and show advantageous in vitro...

209

E-Print Network 3.0 - augmenttm bone graft Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

-based implants for bone reconstruction and repair. We have developed HA-coated carbon-fiber polymer composites... that match bone's elastic modulus and show advantageous in vitro...

210

E-Print Network 3.0 - aspirate bone graft Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

-based implants for bone reconstruction and repair. We have developed HA-coated carbon-fiber polymer composites... that match bone's elastic modulus and show advantageous in...

211

Novel Techniques for High-Resolution Functional Imaging of Trabecular Bone  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

associated with osteoporosis (1, 2). Osteoporosis results in bone loss and deterioration in trabecular a primary endpoint in osteoporosis diagnosis and monitoring. Where strong correlations between bone density

Fygenson, Deborah Kuchnir

212

Bone Growth, Maintenance and Loss in the Neolithic Community of Çatalhöyük, Turkey: Preliminary Results  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Interpreting Bone Loss and Osteoporosis in Past Populations.2005. How many women have osteoporosis? Journal of Bone and1987. Postmenopausal osteoporosis: single screening method

Agarwal, Sabrina; Glencross, Bonnie; Beauchesne, Patrick

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

E-Print Network 3.0 - artificial bone substitute Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

interconnections in the nano-composite material bone: Fibrillar cross-links resist fracture on several length scales Summary: to its biomedical significance, bone has been used...

214

E-Print Network 3.0 - affecting bone mineral Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of remodeling on the mineralization of bone... of therapies that reduce the risk of fracture, increase bone mineral density or change the biochemical markers... mass and...

215

E-Print Network 3.0 - activity bone mineral Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of remodeling on the mineralization of bone... of therapies that reduce the risk of fracture, increase bone mineral density or change the biochemical markers... mass and...

216

E-Print Network 3.0 - adsorbed bone sialoprotein Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

mass Philipp J. Thurner a... 2010 Edited by: D. Burr Keywords: Osteopontin Rodent Fracture toughness Bone matrix properties... Mineralization The ability of bone to resist...

217

E-Print Network 3.0 - adverse events bone Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: adverse events bone Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Mechanoregulated bone adaptation in osteoarthritis This...

218

WOMEN'S GLOBAL HEALTH INSTITUTE NUTR59000/BMS59800: WOMEN'SHEALTH:BONE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

/remodeling, mechanics;Tools of assessment Epidemiology of osteoporosis Development of peak bone mass ­ nutrition/exercise Adult Bone: Women's reproductive choices ­ oral contraceptives, pregnancy, lactation Menopause: Biology

219

E-Print Network 3.0 - alveolar bone defects Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Wang's group aims to understand how mechanical forces... influence solute and fluid transport in bone. The knowledge helps our understanding of normal bone... adaptation and...

220

Differences in Bone Quality between High versus Low Turnover Renal Osteodystrophy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Abnormal bone turnover is common in chronic kidney disease (CKD), but its effects on bone quality remain unclear. This study sought to quantify the relationship between abnormal bone turnover and bone quality. Iliac crest bone biopsies were obtained from CKD-5 patients on dialysis with low (n=18) or high (n=17) turnover, and from volunteers (n=12) with normal turnover and normal kidney function. Histomorphometric methods were used to quantify the microstructural parameters; Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and nanoindentation were used to quantify the material and mechanical properties in bone. Reduced mineral-to-matrix ratio, mineral crystal size, stiffness and hardness were observed in bone with high turnover compared to bone with normal or low turnover. Decreased cancellous bone volume and trabecular thickness were seen in bone with low turnover compared to bone with normal or high turnover. Bone quality, as defined by its microstructural, material, and mechanical properties, is related to bone turnover. These data suggest that turnover related alterations in bone quality may contribute to the known diminished mechanical competence of bone in CKD patients, albeit from different mechanisms for bone with high (material abnormality) vs. low (microstructural alteration) turnover. The present findings suggest that improved treatments for renal osteodystrophy should seek to avoid low or high bone turnover and aim for turnover rates as close to normal as possible.

Porter, Daniel S. [University of Kentucky, Lexington; Pienkowski, David [University of Kentucky, Lexington; Faugere, Marie-Claude [Albert B. Chandler Medical Center; Malluche, Hartmut H. [Albert B. Chandler Medical Center

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bone marrow cells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Relation between hydrogen isotopic ratios of bone collagen and rain  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The hydrogen isotopic value ([delta]D) of deer bone collagen is related to both [delta]D of rain during the growing season and growing season relative humidity (RH). With correction for the effects of RH, bone [delta]D is related to growing season rain [delta]D in a simple manner with a slope of 1.0. This indicates that, with RH correction, there are no additional sources of bias in the [delta]D of bone due to unaccounted for biologic or climatic effects. Due to a low sensitivity of bone [delta]D to RH effects, both yearly and growing season rain [delta]D can be estimated with considerable accuracy (R = 0.97 and R = 0.96) from bone collagen [delta]D and [delta][sup 15]N. Here, [delta][sup 15]N is used to correct bone [delta]D for the effects of RH. From these estimates of rain [delta]D, it may then be possible to evaluate temperature since the [delta]D of rain primarily reflects local temperature. Therefore, the measurement of bone collagen [delta]D has good potential for evaluating paleoclimates.

Cormie, A.B.; Schwarcz, H.P. (McMaster Univ., Hamilton, Ontario (Canada)); Gray, J. (Univ. of Alberta, Edmonton (Canada))

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

The effects of low environmental cadmium exposure on bone density  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent epidemiological data indicate that low environmental exposure to cadmium, as shown by cadmium body burden (Cd-U), is associated with renal dysfunction as well as an increased risk of cadmium-induced bone disorders. The present study was designed to assess the effects of low environmental cadmium exposure, at the level sufficient to induce kidney damage, on bone metabolism and mineral density (BMD). The project was conducted in the area contaminated with cadmium, nearby a zinc smelter located in the region of Poland where heavy industry prevails. The study population comprised 170 women (mean age=39.7; 18-70 years) and 100 men (mean age=31.9; 18-76 years). Urinary and blood cadmium and the markers of renal tubular dysfunction ({beta}{sub 2}M-U RBP, NAG), glomerular dysfunction (Alb-U and {beta}{sub 2}M-S) and bone metabolism markers (BAP-S, CTX-S) as well as forearm BMD, were measured. The results of this study based on simple dose-effect analysis showed the relationship between increasing cadmium concentrations and an increased excretion of renal dysfunction markers and decreasing bone density. However, the results of the multivariate analysis did not indicate the association between exposure to cadmium and decrease in bone density. They showed that the most important factors that have impact on bone density are body weight and age in the female subjects and body weight and calcium excretion in males. Our investigation revealed that the excretion of low molecular weight proteins occurred at a lower level of cadmium exposure than the possible loss of bone mass. It seems that renal tubular markers are the most sensitive and significant indicators of early health effects of cadmium intoxication in the general population. The correlation of urinary cadmium concentration with markers of kidney dysfunction was observed in the absence of significant correlations with bone effects. Our findings did not indicate any effects of environmental cadmium exposure on bone density.

Trzcinka-Ochocka, M., E-mail: ochocka@imp.lodz.pl [Department of Chemical Hazards, Laboratory of Biomonitoring, Nofer Institute of Occupational Medicine, Lodz (Poland); Jakubowski, M. [Department of Chemical Hazards, Laboratory of Biomonitoring, Nofer Institute of Occupational Medicine, Lodz (Poland)] [Department of Chemical Hazards, Laboratory of Biomonitoring, Nofer Institute of Occupational Medicine, Lodz (Poland); Szymczak, W. [Department of Environmental Epidemiology, Nofer Institute of Occupational Medicine, Lodz (Poland) [Department of Environmental Epidemiology, Nofer Institute of Occupational Medicine, Lodz (Poland); Insitute of Psychology, University of Lodz (Poland); Janasik, B.; Brodzka, R. [Department of Chemical Hazards, Laboratory of Biomonitoring, Nofer Institute of Occupational Medicine, Lodz (Poland)] [Department of Chemical Hazards, Laboratory of Biomonitoring, Nofer Institute of Occupational Medicine, Lodz (Poland)

2010-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

223

Interaction of osteoblast-like cells with serum and fibronectin: effects on cell motility and proliferation in vitro  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Osteoblast migration and proliferation are believed to occur during bone remodelling, in particular after osteoclastic bone resorption and prior to osteoblastic bone formation. In order to study migration and proliferation in vitro, the model of Alessandri et al. (1983) was modified. The model entailed seeding osteoblast-like cells into wells cut in agar and quantifying migration and proliferation peripheral to the well. Cell morphology also was described. The data indicated that on growth surfaces enriched with varying concentrations of fetal calf serum (FSC), the quantification of migration and proliferation was related both to percent cell attachment and to FCS-concentration. Because few osteoblast-like cells incorporated (/sup 3/H-TdR), it was concluded that the appearance of cells peripheral to the well was due to migration, and not to proliferation. Cell morphology and myosin distribution and organization indicated that osteoblast-like cells at the periphery of the cell culture (i.e. leading edge) may have been directionally migrating whereas cells behind the leading edge may have been engaged in non-directional migration. The migration, proliferation, and morphology of osteoblast-like cells cultured on fibronectin (FN) enriched growth surfaces also was examined. The quantification of migration and proliferation was related to the FN-concentration applied to the growth surface. Because few osteoblast-like cells incorporated /sup 3/H-TdR and cell morphology indicated migration, it was concluded that osteoblast-like cells on FN-enriched growth surfaces are specialized, in part, for migration.

Zuk, A.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Bone density and geometry in juvenile racehorses fed differing amounts of minerals  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

designed as low, moderate, moderately high and high. Radiographs of the third metacarpal (MCIII) were taken on day 0, 28, 60, 92 and 124 to evaluate change in bone density and bone geometry. Bone density was expressed as radiographic bone aluminum...

Nolan, Meghan Muire

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Patients with Patellofemoral Pain Exhibit Elevated Bone Metabolic Activity at the Patellofemoral Joint  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for bone mineral,10 are injected intravenously. The 18 F fluoride ions exchange with hydroxl ions in bone and pain. Technetium-99m hydroxymethylene diphosphonate (Tc-99m MDP) bone scintigraphy previ- ously bone metabolic activity. In this imaging technique, 18 F fluoride ions, which have a high affinity

Delp, Scott

226

Patients with Patellofemoral Pain Exhibit Elevated Bone Metabolic Activity at the Patellofemoral Joint  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for bone mineral,10 are injected intravenously. The 18 F fluoride ions exchange with hydroxl ions in bone stress and pain. Technetium-99m hydroxymethylene diphosphonate (Tc-99m MDP) bone scintigraphy previ bone metabolic activity. In this imaging technique, 18 F fluoride ions, which have a high affinity

Delp, Scott

227

Evaluation of radionuclide bone-imaging for the early detection of sepsis in a model of equine neonatal osteomyelitis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

method of detecting bone abnormalities. The two main factors determining the degree of radiopharmaceutical uptake in bones, and thereby assessing the functional integrity of bone, have been identified as bone blood flow and bone turnover rates.... The resultant infection and induced metabolic changes should produce a positive Technetium-99m MDP ( Tc-MDP) 99m bone scan, a positive scan using Indium-111-oxine labeled leukocytes and radiographic changes characterized by decreased bone density . Seven...

Taylor, James Rutledge

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

affects bone tissue: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

hepatotoxicity is considered to be the cause of the diffuse liver uptake of 99m Tc-MDP. The mechanism of extraskeletal uptake of bone-seeking radiopharmaceuticals in...

229

abnormal bone growth: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

uptake of 99m Tc-MDP. The mechanism of extraskeletal uptake of bone-seeking radiopharmaceuticals in damaged, inflamed, neoplastic or necrotic tissues may be due to dystrophic...

230

acute bone crises: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

uptake of 99m Tc-MDP. The mechanism of extraskeletal uptake of bone-seeking radiopharmaceuticals in damaged, inflamed, neoplastic or necrotic tissues may be due to dystrophic...

231

abnormal bone development: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

uptake of 99m Tc-MDP. The mechanism of extraskeletal uptake of bone-seeking radiopharmaceuticals in damaged, inflamed, neoplastic or necrotic tissues may be due to dystrophic...

232

absorptiometry bone densitometer: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

hepatotoxicity is considered to be the cause of the diffuse liver uptake of 99m Tc-MDP. The mechanism of extraskeletal uptake of bone-seeking radiopharmaceuticals in...

233

acute bone infarcts: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

uptake of 99m Tc-MDP. The mechanism of extraskeletal uptake of bone-seeking radiopharmaceuticals in damaged, inflamed, neoplastic or necrotic tissues may be due to dystrophic...

234

acellular bone explants: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

hepatotoxicity is considered to be the cause of the diffuse liver uptake of 99m Tc-MDP. The mechanism of extraskeletal uptake of bone-seeking radiopharmaceuticals in...

235

ORIGINAL ARTICLE Effects of sequential osteoporosis treatments on trabecular bone  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ORIGINAL ARTICLE Effects of sequential osteoporosis treatments on trabecular bone in adult rats /Accepted: 3 September 2013 /Published online: 11 April 2014 # International Osteoporosis Foundation and National Osteoporosis Foundation 2014 Abstract Summary We used an osteopenic adult ovariectomized (OVX) rat

Ritchie, Robert

236

On the Mechanistic Origins of Toughness in Bone  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

One of the most intriguing protein materials found in nature is bone, a material composed of assemblies of tropocollagen molecules and tiny hydroxyapatite mineral crystals that form an extremely tough, yet lightweight, ...

Launey, Maximilien E.

237

Compact biomedical pulsed signal generator for bone tissue stimulation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus for stimulating bone tissue for stimulating bone growth or treating osteoporosis by applying directly to the skin of the patient an alternating current electrical signal comprising wave forms known to simulate the piezoelectric constituents in bone. The apparatus may, by moving a switch, stimulate bone growth or treat osteoporosis, as desired. Based on low-power CMOS technology and enclosed in a moisture-resistant case shaped to fit comfortably, two astable multivibrators produce the desired waveforms. The amplitude, pulse width and pulse frequency, and the subpulse width and subpulse frequency of the waveforms are adjustable. The apparatus, preferably powered by a standard 9-volt battery, includes signal amplitude sensors and warning signals indicate an output is being produced and the battery needs to be replaced.

Kronberg, J.W.

1993-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

238

Compact biomedical pulsed signal generator for bone tissue stimulation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus for stimulating bone tissue for stimulating bone growth or treating osteoporosis by applying directly to the skin of the patient an alternating current electrical signal comprising wave forms known to simulate the piezoelectric constituents in bone. The apparatus may, by moving a switch, stimulate bone growth or treat osteoporosis, as desired. Based on low-power CMOS technology and enclosed in a moisture-resistant case shaped to fit comfortably, two astable multivibrators produce the desired waveforms. The amplitude, pulse width and pulse frequency, and the subpulse width and subpulse frequency of the waveforms are adjustable. The apparatus, preferably powered by a standard 9-volt battery, includes signal amplitude sensors and warning signals indicate an output is being produced and the battery needs to be replaced.

Kronberg, James W. (108 Independent Blvd., Aiken, SC 29801)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Trabecular bone dosimetry using a Monte Carlo code  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The nuclear medicine community needs radiation ~ dose estimates to patients who are administered radiopharmaceuticals for therapy or diagnosis. These estimates should be as accurate as possible for any organ, and especially for the bone since the bone... of Nuclear Medicine formed a committee to fulfill the needs of the nuclear medicine community to determine the radiation absorbed dose to patients who are athninistered radiopharmaceuticals. The objectives of the Medical Internal Radiation Dose Committee...

Zuzarte de Mendonca, Anne

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Cyclophilin A (CypA) is associated with the inflammatory infiltration and alveolar bone destruction in an experimental periodontitis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Background and objective: CypA is able to regulate inflammatory responses and MMPs production via interaction with its cell surface receptor, EMMPRIN. This study aimed to address the possible association of CypA with pathological inflammation and destruction of periodontal tissues, and whether CypA-EMMPRIN interaction exists in periodontitis. Materials and methods: Experimental periodontitis was induced by ligation according to our previous method. Histological and radiographic examinations were performed. Western blot was used to detect CypA and EMMPRIN expressions in gingival tissues. Immunohistochemistry was applied for CypA, EMMPRIN, MMP-1, MMP-2, MMP-9, as well as cell markers of macrophage, lymphocyte and neutrophil. CypA expression, alveolar bone loss, and inflammatory infiltrations were quantified followed by correlation analyses. Results: Western blot revealed that CypA and EMMRPIN expressions were dramatically elevated in inflamed gingival tissues (ligature group) as compared to healthy gingival tissues (control group). The enhanced CypA and EMMPRIN expressions were highly consistent in cell localization on seriate sections. They were permanently co-localized in infiltrating macrophages and lymphocytes, as well as osteoclasts and osteoblasts in interradicular bone, but rarely expressed by infiltrating neutrophils. MMP-1, MMP-2, and MMP-9 expressions were also sharply increased in inflamed gingiva. MMP-2 and MMP-9 were mainly over-expressed by macrophages, while MMP-1 was over-produced by fibroblasts and infiltrating cells. The number of CypA-positive cells was strongly correlated with the ACJ-AC distance (r = 0.839, p = 0.000), the number of macrophages (r = 0.972, p = 0.000), and the number of lymphocytes (r = 0.951, p = 0.000). Conclusion: CypA is associated with the inflammatory infiltration and alveolar bone destruction of periodontitis. CypA-EMMPRIN interaction may exist in these pathological processes.

Liu, Lihua [Key Laboratory for Oral Biomedical Engineering of Ministry of Education, School and Hospital of Stomatology, Wuhan University, 237 Luo Yu Road, Hongshan District, Wuhan 430079 (China)] [Key Laboratory for Oral Biomedical Engineering of Ministry of Education, School and Hospital of Stomatology, Wuhan University, 237 Luo Yu Road, Hongshan District, Wuhan 430079 (China); Li, Chengzhang, E-mail: l56cz@hotmail.com [Key Laboratory for Oral Biomedical Engineering of Ministry of Education, School and Hospital of Stomatology, Wuhan University, 237 Luo Yu Road, Hongshan District, Wuhan 430079 (China) [Key Laboratory for Oral Biomedical Engineering of Ministry of Education, School and Hospital of Stomatology, Wuhan University, 237 Luo Yu Road, Hongshan District, Wuhan 430079 (China); Department of Periodontology, School and Hospital of Stomatology, Wuhan University, 237 Luo Yu Road, Hongshan District, Wuhan 430079 (China); Cai, Cia [Department of Periodontology, School and Hospital of Stomatology, Zhejiang University, 395 Yan An Road, Hangzhou 310006 (China)] [Department of Periodontology, School and Hospital of Stomatology, Zhejiang University, 395 Yan An Road, Hangzhou 310006 (China); Xiang, Junbo [Key Laboratory for Oral Biomedical Engineering of Ministry of Education, School and Hospital of Stomatology, Wuhan University, 237 Luo Yu Road, Hongshan District, Wuhan 430079 (China)] [Key Laboratory for Oral Biomedical Engineering of Ministry of Education, School and Hospital of Stomatology, Wuhan University, 237 Luo Yu Road, Hongshan District, Wuhan 430079 (China); Cao, Zhengguo, E-mail: jery7677@hotmail.com [Key Laboratory for Oral Biomedical Engineering of Ministry of Education, School and Hospital of Stomatology, Wuhan University, 237 Luo Yu Road, Hongshan District, Wuhan 430079 (China) [Key Laboratory for Oral Biomedical Engineering of Ministry of Education, School and Hospital of Stomatology, Wuhan University, 237 Luo Yu Road, Hongshan District, Wuhan 430079 (China); Department of Periodontology, School and Hospital of Stomatology, Wuhan University, 237 Luo Yu Road, Hongshan District, Wuhan 430079 (China)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bone marrow cells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Histologic Comparison of Regenerate Bone Produced from Dentate Versus Edentulous Transport Discs in Bone Transport Distraction Osteogenesis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

i HISTOLOGIC COMPARISON OF REGENERATE BONE PRODUCED FROM DENTATE VERSUS EDENTULOUS TRANSPORT DISCS IN BONE TRANSPORT DISTRACTION OSTEOGENESIS A Thesis by CARLOS SEVILLA GAITÁN Submitted to The Office of Graduate and Professional Studies... Paul Dechow Head of Department, William W. Nagy December 2013 Major Subject: Oral Biology Copyright 2013 Carlos Sevilla Gaitan ii ABSTRACT Purpose: The purpose of this research was to quantify the number of blood vessels...

Sevilla Gaitan, Carlos

2013-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

242

Modeling marrow damage from response data: Morphallaxis from radiation biology to benzene toxicity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Consensus principles from radiation biology were used to describe a generic set of nonlinear, first-order differential equations for modeling of toxicity-induced compensatory cell kinetics in terms of sublethal injury, repair, direct killing, killing of cells with unrepaired sublethal injury, and repopulation. This cellular model was linked to a probit model of hematopoietic mortality that describes death from infection and/or hemorrhage between {approximately} 5 and 30 days. Mortality data from 27 experiments with 851 doseresponse groups, in which doses were protracted by rate and/or fractionation, were used to simultaneously estimate all rate constants by maximum-likelihood methods. Data used represented 18,940 test animals distributed according to: (mice, 12,827); (rats, 2,925); (sheep, 1,676); (swine, 829); (dogs, 479); and (burros, 204). Although a long-term, repopulating hematopoietic stem cell is ancestral to all lineages needed to restore normal homeostasis, the dose-response data from the protracted irradiations indicate clearly that the particular lineage that is ``critical`` to hematopoietic recovery does not resemble stem-like cells with regard to radiosensitivity and repopulation rates. Instead, the weakest link in the chain of hematopoiesis was found to have an intrinsic radioresistance equal to or greater than stromal cells and to repopulate at the same rates. Model validation has been achieved by predicting the LD{sub 50} and/or fractional group mortality in 38 protracted-dose experiments (rats and mice) that were not used in the fitting of model coefficients.

Jones, T.D.; Morris, M.D.; Hasan, J.S.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Targeting of Osseous Sites with Alpha-emitting Ra-223: Comparison with the Beta-emitter Sr-89 in Mice  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The bone-seeking property of and the potential to irradiate red marrow by the alpha-particle emitter Ra-223 (t1/2 = 11.43 d) were compared to those of the beta-emitter Sr-89 (t1/2 = 50.53 d). Methods: The biodistributions of Ra-223 and Sr-89 were studied in mice. Tissue uptakes were determined at 1 h, 6 h, 1 d, 3 d, and 14 d after intravenous administration. The potential redistribution of progeny from Ra-223 located in bone was investigated. Radiation absorbed doses were calculated for soft tissues and bone. Doses were also estimated for marrow-containing cavities assuming spheric geometries. Results: We found that both Sr-89 and Ra-223 selectively concentrated on bone surfaces relative to soft tissues. The measured bone uptake of Ra-223 was slightly higher than that of Sr-89. At the 24 h time-point, the femur uptake of Ra-223 was 40.1% of the administered activity per gram tissue. The uptake in spleen and most other soft tissues was higher for Ra-223 than for Sr-89. We observed rapid clearance of Ra-223 from soft tissues within the first 24 hours, but the bone surface uptake of Ra-223 increased with time up to 24 h. Among the soft tissues, the spleen had the greatest accumulation and retention of Ra-223. The femur-to-spleen ratio increased with time, from 6.4 at 6 h to 23.7 at 3 days after injections. We found little redistribution of Ra-223 daughter products away from bone (about 2% at 6 h and less than 1% detectable at 3 d). Estimates of dose to marrow-containing cavities showed that the Ra-223 alpha-emitter might have a marrow-sparing advantage compared to beta-emitters due to high linear-energy-transfer and short alpha range targeting osteoid surfaces. The alpha-emitters irradiate a smaller fraction of the marrow-containing volumes--sparing marrow and enhancing survival of marrow cells. At the same time, the bone surfaces receives a therapeutically effective radiation dose. Conclusion: The results of this study indicate that Ra-223 is a promising candidate for high linear-energy-transfer alpha-particle irradiation of cancer cells on bone surfaces. Radium-223 can, together with its daughter radionuclides, deliver an intense and highly localized field of radiation to bone surfaces with substantially less irradiation of healthy bone marrow dose compared to standard, bone-seeking beta-emitters such as Sr-89.

Henriksen, Gjermund; Fisher, Darrell R.; Roeske, John C.; Bruland, Oyvind S.; Larsen, Roy H.

2003-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

244

Common variants in the region around Osterix are associated with bone mineral density and growth in childhood  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Peak bone mass achieved in adolescence is a determinant of bone mass in later life. In order to identify genetic variants affecting bone mineral density (BMD), we performed a genome-wide association study of BMD and related ...

Peltonen, Leena

245

Bone breakage in laying hens as affected by dietary supplements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BONE BREAKAGE IN LAYING HENS AS AFFECTED BY DIETARY SUPPLEMENTS A Thesis by DAVID JOE MOORE Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas Al!M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1975... Major Subject: Poultry Science (Physiology) BONE BREAKAGE IN LAYING HENS AS AFFECTED BY DIETARY SUPPLEMENTS A Thesis by DAVID JOE MOORE Approved as to style and content by: Chairman of Comm' ee ad o Department) Member Member '7 I ls&wr g ~, /0...

Moore, David Joe

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Detection of bone disease in dogs by radioisotope scanning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DETECTION OZ BONE DISEASE IN DOGS BY RADIOISOTOPE SCANNING A Thesis EARL LOUIS MORRIS Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A8cM University in partial fulfillment of' the requirement for the degree of MASTER OP SCIENCE May 1971 Major...' Bone Disease in Dogs by Radioisotope Scanning. (May 1971) Earl Louis Morris, B. S. , Texas Ad:I University; B. S. , Texas MM University; D. V. M. , Texas A8cM University; Directed by: Dan Eightower, D. V. M. The use of radioisotope scintiscanning...

Morris, Earl Louis

1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Effects of dietary silicon on bone characteristics of poultry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EFFECTS OF D ETARY SILICON GN BONE CNARACTERISTICS OF POULTRY A Thesis James Edward Plyler Submitted. to tl. e Graduate College ot Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1977... Major Subject. : Poultry Science L'FFECT OF DI TARY. SILICON QN BONE CEARACTER1STICS OF POULTPY A Thesis James Edward Plyier Approued as to style and content by. (Chairman of omm' tee) (Head of Dep tment) (Mem e ) (Mem. er ) gC~ r? (Membe...

Plyler, James Edward

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

E-Print Network 3.0 - alveolar bone quality Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

< 1 2 3 4 5 > >> Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 61 The Influence of Bone Volume Fraction and Ash Fraction on Bone Strength and Modulus Summary: assessment of the long-term effects of...

249

Impact of Omega-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids on Bone Adaptations to Simulated Resistance Training  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

properties of proximal tibia were measured using in vivo peripheral quantitative CT. Bone formation rate was quantified on the periosteal the surface by standard bone histomorphometry after intraperitoneal injections of calcein. There was a significant main...

Camp, Kaleigh Ann

2013-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

250

E-Print Network 3.0 - autotaxin controls bone Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

controls bone Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: autotaxin controls bone Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 MCB 02419-05 Revised Autotaxin, a...

251

E-Print Network 3.0 - air bone particles Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Influence of the degradation of the organic matrix on the microscopic fracture behavior of trabecular bone Summary: of trabecular bone Georg E. Fantnera,*, Henrik...

252

Apatite-polymer composites for the controlled delivery of bone morphogenetic proteins  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Current treatment of bone defects due to trauma, cancer, or degenerative spine diseases involves the implantation of a bone graft. Autografts, which are harvested from the patient's own body, are associated with problems ...

Yong, Tseh-Hwan

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

E-Print Network 3.0 - attenuates bone cancer Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

cancer Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: attenuates bone cancer Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Questions and Answers About Bone Cancer...

254

Methods for identifying cancellous bone specimen location and size for the Reduced Platen Compression Test  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and stimuli on the skeleton and its ability to perform these everyday functions. The current state of bone testing is focused on understanding the mechanical properties of bone through use of traditional mechanical testing procedures such as three point...

Cowen, Kyle Ray

2013-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

255

A Graph-based Approach for Computational Model of Bone Microstructure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

azhang@buffalo.edu ABSTRACT Osteoporosis, a condition in which bones become fragile and more likely bone due to osteoporosis. The diagnosis of osteoporosis is commonly done by tests that measure for the diagnosis of osteoporosis are limited due to the lack of good measurements of bone quality. In this paper

Buffalo, State University of New York

256

Fracture, aging, and disease in bone J.W. Ager III  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fracture, aging, and disease in bone J.W. Ager III Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley-known increase with age in fracture risk of human bone is essential. This also represents a challenge from materials science and fracture mechanics viewpoints. Bone has a complex, hierarchical structure

Ritchie, Robert

257

Fracture resistance of human cortical bone across multiple length-scales at physiological strain rates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fracture resistance of human cortical bone across multiple length-scales at physiological strain Accepted 22 March 2014 Available online 13 April 2014 Keywords: Bone Strain rate Fracture toughness Plasticity X-ray diffraction a b s t r a c t While most fracture-mechanics investigations on bone have been

Ritchie, Robert

258

A method for calibration of bone driver transducers to measure the mastoid impedance Reggie Weecea  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

bone vibrator transducers for clinical measurements, the transfer of energy from the bone driver by known masses. This absolute calibration is based upon a circuit model of the driver, describing specialized equipment not available in the clinic, and a refined bone driver circuit model is proposed

Allen, Jont

259

Refinement of the $n-?$ and $p-?$ fish-bone potential  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The fishbone potential of composite particles simulates the Pauli effect by nonlocal terms. We determine the $n-\\alpha$ and $p-\\alpha$ fish-bone potential by simultaneously fitting to the experimental phase shifts. We found that with a double Gaussian parametrization of the local potential can describe the $n-\\alpha$ and $p-\\alpha$ phase shifts for all partial waves.

E. Smith; R. Woodhouse; Z. Papp

2012-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

260

FSH Directly Regulates Bone Mass Yuanzhen Peng,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.01.051 SUMMARY Postmenopausal osteoporosis, a global public health problem, has for decades been attributed and function. We suggest that high circulating FSH causes hypogonadal bone loss. INTRODUCTION Osteoporosis., 1993; Manolagas and Jilka, 1995). After menopause, resorption significantly exceeds formation

Wisconsin at Madison, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bone marrow cells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Invest in Your Bones Osteoporosis--The Silent Disease  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Invest in Your Bones Osteoporosis--The Silent Disease Leaflet 2 Osteoporosis, a painful of State Health Services, 2008). Osteoporosis is preventable and/or treatable. Accordingly, osteoporosis of height, and chronic back pain. Hip fracture, the most serious consequence of osteoporosis, threatens one

262

Methods for testing the strength of cancellous bone and tested method effects on cortical bone in the ovariectomized rat  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this study, two mechanical testing procedures were developed to test the strength of cancellous bone from the proximal tibia of the rat, the "punch method" and the "whole slice method". These were used to quantify the effect of ovariectomy on rat...

Ruhmann, Sean Phillip

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Nukbone® promotes proliferation and osteoblastic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells from human amniotic membrane  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: •Nukbone showed to be a good scaffold for adhesion, proliferation and differentiation of stem cells. •Nukbone induced osteoblastic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells. •Results showed that Nukbone offer an excellent option for bone tissue regeneration due to properties. -- Abstract: Bovine bone matrix Nukbone® (NKB) is an osseous tissue-engineering biomaterial that retains its mineral and organic phases and its natural bone topography and has been used as a xenoimplant for bone regeneration in clinics. There are not studies regarding its influence of the NKB in the behavior of cells during the repairing processes. The aim of this research is to demonstrate that NKB has an osteoinductive effect in human mesenchymal stem cells from amniotic membrane (AM-hMSCs). Results indicated that NKB favors the AM-hMSCs adhesion and proliferation up to 7 days in culture as shown by the scanning electron microscopy and proliferation measures using an alamarBlue assay. Furthermore, as demonstrated by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction, it was detected that two gene expression markers of osteoblastic differentiation: the core binding factor and osteocalcin were higher for AM-hMSCs co-cultured with NKB in comparison with cultivated cells in absence of the biomaterial. As the results indicate, NKB possess the capability for inducing successfully the osteoblastic differentiation of AM-hMSC, so that, NKB is an excellent xenoimplant option for repairing bone tissue defects.

Rodríguez-Fuentes, Nayeli; Rodríguez-Hernández, Ana G. [Depto. Microbiología y Parasitología, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM), Mexico City 04510 (Mexico)] [Depto. Microbiología y Parasitología, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM), Mexico City 04510 (Mexico); Enríquez-Jiménez, Juana [Depto. Biología de la Reproducción, Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Médicas y Nutrición Salvador Zubirán (INCMNSZ), México City 14000 (Mexico)] [Depto. Biología de la Reproducción, Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Médicas y Nutrición Salvador Zubirán (INCMNSZ), México City 14000 (Mexico); Alcántara-Quintana, Luz E. [Subd. de Investigación, Centro Nacional de la Transfusión Sanguínea, Secretaria de Salud, Mexico City 07370 (Mexico)] [Subd. de Investigación, Centro Nacional de la Transfusión Sanguínea, Secretaria de Salud, Mexico City 07370 (Mexico); Fuentes-Mera, Lizeth [Depto. Biología Molecular e Histocompatibilidad, Hospital General “Dr. Manuel Gea González”, México City 4800 (Mexico)] [Depto. Biología Molecular e Histocompatibilidad, Hospital General “Dr. Manuel Gea González”, México City 4800 (Mexico); Piña-Barba, María C. [Depto. Materiales Metálicos y Cerámicos, Instituto de Investigaciones en Materiales, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM), México City 04510 (Mexico)] [Depto. Materiales Metálicos y Cerámicos, Instituto de Investigaciones en Materiales, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM), México City 04510 (Mexico); Zepeda-Rodríguez, Armando [Depto. Biología Celular y Tisular, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM), México City 04510 (Mexico)] [Depto. Biología Celular y Tisular, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM), México City 04510 (Mexico); and others

2013-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

264

Exposure to cadmium and persistent organochlorine pollutants and its association with bone mineral density and markers of bone metabolism on postmenopausal women  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Environmental contaminants such as cadmium and persistent organochlorine pollutants have been proposed as risk factors of osteoporosis, and women may be at an increased risk. To assess associations between exposure to cadmium and two different POPs (2,2',4,4',5,5'-hexachlorobiphenyl CB-153, 1,1-dichloro-2,2-bis(p-chlorophenyl)-ethylene p,p'-DDE), on one hand, and bone effects, on the other, in a population-based study among postmenopausal (60-70 years) Swedish women with biobanked blood samples. The study included 908 women and was designed to have a large contrast of bone mineral densities, measured with a single photon absorptiometry technique in the non-dominant forearm. Biochemical markers related to bone metabolism were analyzed in serum. Exposure assessment was based on cadmium concentrations in erythrocytes and serum concentrations of CB-153 and p,p'-DDE. Cadmium was negatively associated with bone mineral density and parathyroid hormone, positively with the marker of bone resorption. However, this association disappeared after adjustment for smoking. The major DDT metabolite (p,p'-DDE) was positively associated with bone mineral density, an association which remained after adjustment for confounders, but the effect was weak. There was no evidence that the estrogenic congener (CB-153) was associated with any of the bone markers. In conclusion, no convincing associations were observed between cadmium and POPs, on one hand, and bone metabolism markers and BMD, on the other.

Rignell-Hydbom, A., E-mail: anna.rignell-hydbom@med.lu.se [Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Lund University (Sweden); Skerfving, S.; Lundh, T.; Lindh, C.H. [Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Lund University (Sweden)] [Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Lund University (Sweden); Elmstahl, S. [Division of Geriatric Medicine, Department of Health Sciences, Lund University, Malmue University Hospital (Sweden)] [Division of Geriatric Medicine, Department of Health Sciences, Lund University, Malmue University Hospital (Sweden); Bjellerup, P. [Center for Clinical Research, Uppsala University, Department of Clinical Chemistry, Vaesteras (Sweden)] [Center for Clinical Research, Uppsala University, Department of Clinical Chemistry, Vaesteras (Sweden); Juensson, B.A.G.; Struemberg, U. [Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Lund University (Sweden)] [Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Lund University (Sweden); Akesson, A. [Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm (Sweden)] [Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm (Sweden)

2009-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

265

Porous coatings from wire mesh for bone implants  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of coating areas of bone implant elements and the resulting implant having a porous coating are described. Preselected surface areas are covered by a preform made from continuous woven lengths of wire. The preform is compressed and heated to assure that diffusion bonding occurs between the wire surfaces and between the surface boundaries of the implant element and the wire surfaces in contact with it. Porosity is achieved by control of the resulting voids between the bonded wire portions.

Sump, Kenneth R. (Richland, WA)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

A comparative histological study of fossil and recent bone tissues  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

? scopic inspection. A wet section, as viewed during trial grinding examinations, will appear more transparent than the dried, finished mount. Any of the standard laboratory abrasives, such as finely powdered carborundum, polishing alumina, or powdered... by hand with the bone section in direct contact with the revolving surface of a power-driven lap wheel. Finely powdered abrasive, such as carborundum or cleansing pov/der, is applied in the form of water paste to the wheel. Periodic inspection under a...

Enlow, Donald H.

1955-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Aging and Fracture of Human Cortical Bone and Tooth Dentin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Mineralized tissues, such as bone and tooth dentin, serve as structural materials in the human body and, as such, have evolved to resist fracture. In assessing their quantitative fracture resistance or toughness, it is important to distinguish between intrinsic toughening mechanisms which function ahead of the crack tip, such as plasticity in metals, and extrinsic mechanisms which function primarily behind the tip, such as crack bridging in ceramics. Bone and dentin derive their resistance to fracture principally from extrinsic toughening mechanisms which have their origins in the hierarchical microstructure of these mineralized tissues. Experimentally, quantification of these toughening mechanisms requires a crack-growth resistance approach, which can be achieved by measuring the crack-driving force, e.g., the stress intensity, as a function of crack extension ("R-curve approach"). Here this methodology is used to study of the effect of aging on the fracture properties of human cortical bone and human dentin in order to discern the microstructural origins of toughness in these materials.

Ager, Joel; Koester, Kurt J.; Ager III, Joel W.; Ritchie, Robert O.

2008-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

268

The Development of a Porcine Model to Evaluate Wound Healing and Infection of Transcutaneous Osseointegrated Weight-Bearing Prostheses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

focused on the circulation of bone marrow using a channeled titanium implant within the ear chamber of a rabbit [16]. After some time, Branemark was unable to remove the titanium screws from the bone because the interface had become completely fused... porous percutaneous post. Over time, the implant extrudes as the post fills with cell debris. Avulsion refers to a tearing away of the implant from the soft tissue due to externally applied mechanical forces. Infection is the most concerning mode...

Colbert, Kevin

2013-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

269

Enhancement of Growth Performance and Bone Mineralization in Market Broilers through Dietary Enzymes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. In Experiment 1, a 35-day grow out trial was conducted to investigate the effect of three commercially available phytase enzymes on growth performance and bone mineralization in phosphorus deficient corn/soy based diets. Increasing the level of available... phosphorus (aP) in the control diets resulted in improved bird performance and bone ash data. The presence of dietary phytase in phosphorus deficient diets resulted in improvements in growth parameters and bone mineralization. Regression analysis...

Coppedge, Jacob Ryan

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

270

E-Print Network 3.0 - alveolar bone loss Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

extended period of ossification. Most dermal bones begin ossification before ... Source: Smith, Kathleen K. - Department of Biology, Duke University Collection: Environmental...

271

E-Print Network 3.0 - anabolic bone hormone Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

in the Absence of Weight Bearing Can Enhance Trabecular Summary: two orders of magnitude smaller than those previously sug- gested, can be anabolic to bone when... ....

272

E-Print Network 3.0 - antler trabecular bone Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

for: antler trabecular bone Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Ndocrine relationships between rank -related behavior and antler growth in deer Ludek Bartos1 Summary: estradiol...

273

E-Print Network 3.0 - acetabular bone defect Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Journal of Arthroplasty Vol. 14 No. 7 1999 Case Report Summary: modular head and polyethylene liner. Bone defects were filled with morcellized allograft. Three months......

274

E-Print Network 3.0 - apparent trabecular bone Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

trabecular bone density in human... Trabecular ... Source: Gefen, Amit - Department of Biomedical Engineering, Tel Aviv University Collection: Engineering ; Biology and Medicine...

275

Bone mineral density and fractures in older men with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease or asthma  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

risk of vertebral osteoporosis compared to men with noto identify patients with osteoporosis. Keywords Bone loss .associated with COPD, osteoporosis is believed to affect 36%

Dam, T.-T.; Harrison, S.; Fink, H. A.; Ramsdell, J.; Barrett-Connor, E.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

E-Print Network 3.0 - age-related bone loss Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and Medicine 2 Influence of the degradation of the organic matrix on the microscopic fracture behavior of trabecular bone Summary: . Modeling the mechanical behavior of vertebral...

277

E-Print Network 3.0 - animal bone collagen Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

interconnections in the nano-composite material bone: Fibrillar cross-links resist fracture on several length scales Summary: of these cracks. 2005 Elsevier Ltd. All rights...

278

E-Print Network 3.0 - abnormally high bone Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

by small intestine & promotes bone deposition... and Their Repairs stress fracture - break caused by abnormal ... Source: Morrell, Thomas E. - Department of Biology,...

279

E-Print Network 3.0 - affects bone parameters Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of bone quality will ultimately affect physical and morpho- logic parameters... fracture rates are most closely associated with ... Source: Rubin, Clinton T.- Department of...

280

E-Print Network 3.0 - absolutely normal bone Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

females (N 49). The data set consisted of bone biopsies from normal and vertebral fracture subjects... microradiographic studies of normal and oste- oporotic ... Source: Ecole...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bone marrow cells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

E-Print Network 3.0 - anorganic bovine bone Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

interconnections in the nano-composite material bone: Fibrillar cross-links resist fracture on several length scales Summary: , Hobbs LW, Spector M. The ultrastructure of...

282

E-Print Network 3.0 - abdomen bone growth Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

factor I and bone... . Genetic strategies for elucidat- ing insulin-like ... Source: Brand, Paul H. - Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, University of Toledo...

283

E-Print Network 3.0 - attenuates bone cancer-induced Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

is incorrectly classified as bone when forming the linear attenuation coefficient image. We then investigate two... of attenuation coefficients of water (represent- ing...

284

E-Print Network 3.0 - agonist attenuates bone Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

unbalanced bone turnover that has been associated with a decreased number of ... Source: Brand, Paul H. - Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, University of Toledo...

285

E-Print Network 3.0 - animal bone biomechanics Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Sample search results for: animal bone biomechanics Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 MECHANICAL AND AEROSPACE ENGINEERING COLLOQUIUM SERIES Summary: fluorescent markers of...

286

A study to optimize the macroscopic structure of bone pylons used in direct skeletal attachment systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

studies, the direct chemical bonding of a material to bone has also received attention. Hench, et. al. (1971), introduced a bone-bonding calcia-phosphosilicate glass ceramic and included a theoretical model, based on in-viva studies in rat femurs... bone tissue. In this study, ceramics composed of CaO and A1203 were implanted in young adult rhesus monkeys with favorable results. Greenlee, et. al. (1972), and Greenlee and Beckham (1972) studied bone ingrowth into glass ceramics and reported good...

Trono, Ruben

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

E-Print Network 3.0 - altered bone material Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

FRAMEWORKS FOR ENGINEERS Session 20.1 m: Musculoskeletal System -Bones Summary: architecture, and equally definite secondary alterations in their external confirmation" VI....

288

E-Print Network 3.0 - asymptomatic local bone Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Collection: Engineering ; Biology and Medicine 42 Science Highlight June 2010 Figure 1: Micro-CT (left) shows trabecular structure inside of bone. Transmission X-ray Summary: ....

289

Journal of Biomechanics 41 (2008) 10621068 Nonlinear ultrasound can detect accumulated damage in human bone  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

due to the fact that osteoporosis and bone fragility are increasingly widespread diseases. Fracture increases exponentially with age, with a significant increase corresponding to the beginning of menopause

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

E-Print Network 3.0 - affects trabecular bone Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

at different structural... bone, are ... Source: Gefen, Amit - Department of Biomedical Engineering, Tel Aviv University Collection: Engineering ; Biology and Medicine 2...

291

E-Print Network 3.0 - assess 3d bone Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Technologies and Information Sciences 2 Combining High-resolution Micro computed Tomography with Material Summary: : Quantification of connectivity in cancellous bone, with...

292

Mechanical signal influence on mesenchymal stem cell fate is enhanced by incorporation of refractory periods into the loading regimen  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mechanical signal influence on mesenchymal stem cell fate is enhanced by incorporation Adipogenesis Obesity Osteoblastogenesis b-catenin a b s t r a c t Mechanical signals of both low and high mesenchymal stem cell pools from which fat and bone precursors emerge. To identify an idealized mechanical

293

Hydroxyapatite-binding peptides for bone growth and inhibition  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Hydroxyapatite (HA)-binding peptides are selected using combinatorial phage library display. Pseudo-repetitive consensus amino acid sequences possessing periodic hydroxyl side chains in every two or three amino acid sequences are obtained. These sequences resemble the (Gly-Pro-Hyp).sub.x repeat of human type I collagen, a major component of extracellular matrices of natural bone. A consistent presence of basic amino acid residues is also observed. The peptides are synthesized by the solid-phase synthetic method and then used for template-driven HA-mineralization. Microscopy reveal that the peptides template the growth of polycrystalline HA crystals .about.40 nm in size.

Bertozzi, Carolyn R. (Berkeley, CA); Song, Jie (Shrewsbury, MA); Lee, Seung-Wuk (Walnut Creek, CA)

2011-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

294

Bone status in high levels cyclists J Clin Densitom. 2012 Jan-Mar;15(1):103-7. Evaluation of the Bone Status in High-Level Cyclists  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

health Organization has defined osteoporosis in post-menopausal women as a T-score value less than -2) defines a "low bone density". In post-menopausal women as well as in elderly in general, results are more

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

295

Bone Surface Reconstruction From CT/MR Images Using Fast Marching and Level Set Methods1)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bone Surface Reconstruction From CT/MR Images Using Fast Marching and Level Set Methods1) Istv surfaces reconstructed from MR volumes are shown. 1 Outline of the project One of our current projects steps of bone surface reconstruction from CT/MR slice images. 2 Main steps of reconstruction 2.1

Chetverikov, Dmitry

296

Bone Loss in Diabetes: Use of Antidiabetic Thiazolidinediones and Secondary Osteoporosis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bone Loss in Diabetes: Use of Antidiabetic Thiazolidinediones and Secondary Osteoporosis Beata secondary osteoporosis. Risk factors for development of TZD-induced secondary osteoporosis are gender (women healing in T2DM patients on TZD therapy. Keywords Diabetes . Thiazolidinediones . Bone . Osteoporosis

Toledo, University of

297

A multi-scale bone study to estimate the risk of fracture related to osteoporosis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A multi-scale bone study to estimate the risk of fracture related to osteoporosis Abdelwahed' Orléans, 8, Rue Léonard de Vinci 45072 Orléans, France Objective: Osteoporosis is a disease marked. Bone fractures caused by the osteoporosis become increasingly important goal for both clinicians

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

298

Mixed-mode fracture of human cortical bone Elizabeth A. Zimmermann a,b  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mixed-mode fracture of human cortical bone Elizabeth A. Zimmermann a,b , Maximilien E. Launey Available online 1 July 2009 Keywords: Human cortical bone Mixed-mode fracture Fracture toughness Fracture mechanisms a b s t r a c t Although the mode I (tensile opening) fracture toughness has been the focus

Ritchie, Robert

299

Journal of Biomechanics 38 (2005) 15171525 Fracture in human cortical bone: local fracture criteria and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Journal of Biomechanics 38 (2005) 1517­1525 Fracture in human cortical bone: local fracture, Livermore, CA 94550 Accepted 19 July 2004 Abstract Micromechanical models for fracture initiation such micromechanical models have been developed for the fracture of bone. In fact, although the fracture event

Ritchie, Robert O.

300

Mineral bone composition and some elements of calcium metabolism in magnesium-deficient growing rats  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mineral bone composition and some elements of calcium metabolism in magnesium-deficient growing-Chomponelle, Theix, 63110 Beaumont, France. Summary. (1) Magnesium deficiency was induced in Sprague-Dawley male rats of deprivation. (3) The leg bones were fragmented as shown in figure 1. Their magnesium content had decreased

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bone marrow cells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

High-speed photography of compressed human trabecular bone correlates whitening to microscopic damage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of trabecular bone is mainly motivated by the huge impact of osteoporosis in post-menopausal women and the aged is mainly motivated by the reduction of bone strength due to osteoporosis, a systemic skeletal disease [10.elsevier.com/locate/engfracmech #12;comes with a concomitant increase of fracture risk. Post-menopausal women and the elderly

Fygenson, Deborah Kuchnir

302

High-Speed Photography of Human Trabecular Bone during Compression Philipp J. Thurner1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of this research is motivated by the immense costs of health care and social impacts due to osteoporosis in post-menopausal women and the aged. Osteoporosis results in bone loss and change of trabecular architecture, causing of osteoporosis, a systemic, skeletal disease2 , which comes with a reduction of bone strength and a concomitant

Fygenson, Deborah Kuchnir

303

Estrogen protects bone by inducing Fas ligand in osteoblasts to regulate osteoclast survival  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for post-menopausal osteoporosis (Sambrook and Cooper, 2006). Estrogen and ERs are important for bone and Musculoskeletal Biology, Wyeth Research, Collegeville, PA, USA Estrogen deficiency in menopause is a major cause of osteoporosis in women. Estrogen acts to maintain the appropriate ratio between bone-forming osteoblasts

Brown, Myles

304

Research Paper A method for calibration of bone driver transducers to measure the mastoid  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

vibrator transducers for clinical measurements, the transfer of energy from the bone driver depends. This absolute calibration is based upon a circuit model of the driver, describing it with three frequency in the clinic, and a refined bone driver circuit model is proposed to better capture the observed behaviors. Ã?

Allen, Jont

305

The bending and dynamic mechanical properties of cortical bone: the effects of sodium fluoride and the relationship to physical properties  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bone is a complex organic composite material. The graphics. interface between the mineral and organic phases of bone is significant both to medicine and to the biokinetics, a field which seeks to create advanced synthetic materials by copying...

McCurdy-Rahn, Megan Calista

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

The effect of alcohol on the bone growth spurt of rats at a time equivalent to adolescent females  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. The trabecular bone that remained was widely separated and reduced in thickness. These changes are similar to those observed in osteoporosis. The cause and mechanism of the reduced bone volume after alcohol abuse remains unclear. Alcohol consumption at an early...

Chaffin, Catherine Lee

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Single x-ray transmission system for bone mineral density determination  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Bones are the support of the body. They are composed of many inorganic compounds and other organic materials that all together can be used to determine the mineral density of the bones. The bone mineral density is a measure index that is widely used as an indicator of the health of the bone. A typical manner to evaluate the quality of the bone is a densitometry study; a dual x-ray absorptiometry system based study that has been widely used to assess the mineral density of some animals' bones. However, despite the success stories of utilizing these systems in many different applications, it is a very expensive method that requires frequent calibration processes to work properly. Moreover, its usage in small species applications (e.g., rodents) has not been quite demonstrated yet. Following this argument, it is suggested that there is a need for an instrument that would perform such a task in a more reliable and economical manner. Therefore, in this paper we explore the possibility to develop a new, affordable, and reliable single x-ray absorptiometry system. The method consists of utilizing a single x-ray source, an x-ray image sensor, and a computer platform that all together, as a whole, will allow us to calculate the mineral density of the bone. Utilizing an x-ray transmission theory modified through a version of the Lambert-Beer law equation, a law that expresses the relationship among the energy absorbed, the thickness, and the absorption coefficient of the sample at the x-rays wavelength to calculate the mineral density of the bone can be advantageous. Having determined the parameter equation that defines the ratio of the pixels in radiographies and the bone mineral density [measured in mass per unit of area (g/cm{sup 2})], we demonstrated the utility of our novel methodology by calculating the mineral density of Wistar rats' femur bones.

Jimenez-Mendoza, Daniel; Vargas-Vazquez, Damian [Division de Investigacion y Posgrado, Facultad de Ingenieria, Universidad Autonoma de Queretaro, Cerro de las Campanas s/n., C.P. 76010, Queretaro, Qro. (Mexico); Espinosa-Arbelaez, Diego G. [Posgrado en Ciencia e Ingenieria en Materiales, Instituto de Investigaciones en Materiales, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Av. Universidad 3000, C.P. 04510, Coyoacan, Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Departamento de Nanotecnologia, Centro de Fisica Aplicada y Tecnologia Avanzada, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Campus Juriquilla, Boulevard Juriquilla 3001, C.P. 76230, A.P. 1-1010, Juriquilla, Qro. (Mexico); Giraldo-Betancur, Astrid L. [Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados del Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Libramiento Norponiente 2000, C.P. 76230, Fracc. Real de Juriquilla, Qro. (Mexico); Hernandez-Urbiola, Margarita I. [Posgrado en Investigaciones Biomedicas, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Campus Juriquilla, Boulevard Juriquilla 3001, C.P. 76230, A.P. 1-1010, Juriquilla, Qro. (Mexico); Departamento de Nanotecnologia, Centro de Fisica Aplicada y Tecnologia Avanzada, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Campus Juriquilla, Boulevard Juriquilla 3001, C.P. 76230, A.P. 1-1010, Juriquilla, Qro. (Mexico); Rodriguez-Garcia, Mario E. [Departamento de Nanotecnologia, Centro de Fisica Aplicada y Tecnologia Avanzada, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Campus Juriquilla, Boulevard Juriquilla 3001, C.P. 76230, A.P. 1-1010, Juriquilla, Qro. (Mexico)

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

308

EARLY PREVENTIVE EFFECTS OF RISEDRONATE IN A RAT MODEL WITH MASSIVE BONE LOSS DUE TO ORCHIDECTOMY AND  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and disuse induced osteoporosis. ORX and BTX models were combined to see if their effects were cumulative on trabecular bone mass and bone architecture. KEY WORDS: Osteoporosis Orchidectomy Disuse Risedronate Bone-remodeling rate is observed in women after menopause or surgica

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

309

The role of cGMP-dependent protein kinases in bone cell growth and survival  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ablation of osteocytes induces osteoporosis with defectiveand the risk of osteoporosis. Expert Opin Drug Saf 2009, 8:formation in check. Osteoporosis: an overview Osteoporosis

Marathe, Nisha Madhav

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Mesenchymal Stem Cell Transplantation to Promote Bone Healing Chan Gao,1,2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in humans. The objective of the current study was to deter- mine if transplantation of mesenchymal stromal performed on reasonably young, active recipients in the past two decades have used implants with porous individuals as a result of treatment for cancer or graft versus host disease.5 The majority of joint

Buschmann, Michael

311

The role of E2f4 in cell cycle exit and bone development  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Members of the E2F family of transcription factors are critical downstream effectors of the pocket protein family and mediate the regulation of genes required for cellular proliferation. The repressive E2Fs act in association ...

Miller, Emily S. (Emily Sun Young)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Effect of cryo-induced microcracks on microindentation of hydrated cortical bone tissue  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Microcracks accumulate in cortical bone tissue as a consequence of everyday cyclic loading. However, it remains unclear to what extent microdamage accumulation contributes to an increase in fracture risk. A cryo-preparation technique was applied to induce microcracks in cortical bone tissue. Microcracks with lengths up to approximately 20 {mu}m, which were initiated mainly on the boundaries of haversian canals, were observed with cryo-scanning electron microscopy. A microindentation technique was applied to study the mechanical loading effect on the microcracked hydrated bone tissue. The microindentation patterns were section-scanned using confocal laser scanning microscopy to understand the deformation and bone damage mechanisms made by mechanical loading. The results show that there was no significant difference with respect to microhardness between the original and microcracked hydrated cortical bone tissues (ANOVA, p > 0.05). The cryo-induced microcracks in the bone tissue were not propagated further under the mechanical loads applied. The deformation mechanism of the microcracked cortical bone tissue was plastic deformation, not brittle fracture.

Yin Ling, E-mail: ling.yin@jcu.edu.au [School of Engineering, James Cook University, Townsville, QLD 4811 (Australia); Venkatesan, Sudharshan [Department of Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 Australia (Australia); Webb, Daryl [Electron Microscopy Unit, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia); Kalyanasundaram, Shankar; Qin Qinghua [Department of Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 Australia (Australia)

2009-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

313

Fatal lymphoreticular disease in the scurfy (sf) mouse requires T cells that mature in a sf thymic environment: Potential model for thymic education  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Characteristic lesions in mice hemi- or homozygous for the X-linked mutation scurfy (sf) include lymphohistiocytic proliferation in the skin and lymphoid organs, Coombs' test-positive anemia, hypergammaglobulinemia, and death by 24 days of age. The role of the thymus in the development of fatal lymphoreticular disease in the scurfy mouse was investigated. Neonatal thymectomy doubles the life span of scurfy mice, moderates the histologic lesions, and prevents anemia, despite the continued presence of high levels of serum IgG. Animals bred to be nude and scurfy (nu/nu;sf/Y) are viable, fertile, and free of scurfy lesions. Bone marrow from scurfy mice can reconstitute lethally irradiated, H-2-compatible animals but does not transmit scurfy disease. The authors conclude, from these data, that scurfy lesions are mediated by T lymphocytes that mature in an abnormal (sf) thymic environment.

Godfrey, V.L.; Rinchik, E.M.; Russell, L.B. (Oak Ridge National Lab., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)); Wilkinson, J.E. (Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville (United States))

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Inorganic-Organic Shape Memory Polymers and Foams for Bone Defect Repairs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

increased its bioactivity, giving rise to the formation of “bone-bonding” hydroxyapatite (HAp) when exposed to simulated body fluid (SBF). It was also shown that the coating largely enhanced the scaffold’s capacities to support osteoblasts adhesion...

Zhang, Dawei

2013-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

315

Effects of High Dietary Iron and Gamma Radiation on Oxidative Stress and Bone  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(induced by feeding a high iron diet) and gamma radiation exposure would independently increase markers of oxidative stress and markers of oxidative damage and result in loss of bone mass, with the combined treatment having additive or synergistic effects...

Yuen, Evelyn P

2013-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

316

E-Print Network 3.0 - alveolar bone formation Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Sutures to Deciduous Dentition in Nonhuman Primates K... .D., E.R. Dumont, Ph.D., T.D. Smith, Ph.D. Objective: The relationship of the human premaxillary bone Source: Dumont,...

317

E-Print Network 3.0 - arthritic bone loss Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Knee Arthroplasty in a Series of 48 Patients Summary: with the loss of thickness of polyethylene tibial bearings after knee arthroplasty. J Bone Joint Surg Am. 2007... -4 Optimal...

318

Pretreatment levels of bone turnover and the antifracture efficacy of alendronate: The fracture intervention trial  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in postmenopausal osteoporosis. Cal- cif Tissue Int 65:359–in postmeno- pausal osteoporosis. J Bone Miner Res 12:624–among women without osteoporosis at baseline. Although they

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Race/ethnic differences in bone mineral densities in older men  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the Baltimore men’s osteoporosis study. J Bone Miner Res 13.center genetic study of osteoporosis. Osteoporos Int 17:125–Leung Jockey Club Centre for Osteoporosis Care and Control,

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Method for palliation of pain in human bone cancer using therapeutic tin-117m compositions  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention provides a method for the palliation of bone pain due to cancer by the administration of a unique dosage of a tin-117m (Sn-117m) stannic chelate complex in a pharmaceutically acceptable composition. In addition, the invention provides a method for simultaneous palliation of bone pain and radiotherapy in cancer patients using compositions containing Sn-117m chelates. The invention also provides a method for palliating bone pain in cancer patients using Sn-117m-containing compositions and monitoring patient status by imaging the distribution of the Sn-117m in the patients. Also provided are pharmaceutically acceptable compositions containing Sn-117m chelate complexes for the palliation of bone pain in cancer patients.

Srivastava, Suresh C. (Setauket, NY); Meinken, George E. (Middle Island, NY); Mausner, Leonard F. (Stony Brook, NY); Atkins, Harold L. (Setauket, NY)

1998-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bone marrow cells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Method for palliation of pain in human bone cancer using therapeutic tin-117m compositions  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention provides a method for the palliation of bone pain due to cancer by the administration of a unique dosage of a tin-117m (Sn-117m) stannic chelate complex in a pharmaceutically acceptable composition. In addition, the invention provides a method for simultaneous palliation of bone pain and radiotherapy in cancer patients using compositions containing Sn-117m chelates. The invention also provides a method for palliating bone pain in cancer patients using Sn-117m-containing compositions and monitoring patient status by imaging the distribution of the Sn-117m in the patients. Also provided are pharmaceutically acceptable compositions containing Sn-117m chelate complexes for the palliation of bone pain in cancer patients. 5 figs.

Srivastava, S.C.; Meinken, G.E.; Mausner, L.F.; Atkins, H.L.

1998-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

322

Investigation of bone response to implant materials by electron microscopy and computer simulation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(cont.) implementation of this scintigraphic method for quantitative studies of osteoblast-mediated mineralization in vitro. A 2-D truss finite element model is used to study the remodeling of trabecular bone. Using strain ...

Wang, Hao, 1974-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

The petrous portion of the human temporal bone: potential for forensic individuation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are threefold: (1) To investigate variability in the shape of the petrous portion of the human temporal bone using two-dimensional morphometric analysis; (2) to evaluate the reliability of the resultant method in forensic identification; and (3) to consider...

Wiersema, Jason Matthew

2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

324

Growth and bone development in weanling quarter horses fed diets supplemented with sodium zeolite-A  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GROWTH AND BONE DEVELOPMENT IN WEANLING QUARTER HORSES FED DIETS SUPPLEMENTED WITH SODIUM ZEOLITE-A A Thesis by KIMBERLY SUZANNE FREY Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1991 Major Subject: Nutrition GROWTH AND BONE DEVELOPMENT IN WEANLING QUARTER HORSES FED DIETS SUPPLER WITH SODIUM ZEOLITE-A A Thesis by KIMBERLY SUZPZPK FREY Approved as to style and content by...

Frey, Kimberly Suzanne

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Analysis of a Fossil Bone from the Archaeological Settlement Malu Rosu, Romania by Accelerator Mass Spectrometry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A fossil bone from the archaeological site Malu Rosu Giurgiu, in Romania has been analyzed by accelerator mass spectrometry to estimate its age by determining its $^{14}$C content. The radiocarbon age of the bone is in agreement with the date obtained by the method for age determination, based on fluorine content. This is the first radiocarbon dating for the final Neolithic period, for this archaeological settlement in the Romanian region.

Agata Olariu; Ion V. Popescu; Ragnar Hellborg; Kristina Stenström; Mikko Faarinen; Per Persson; Bengt Erlandsson; Göran Skog; Emilian Alexandrescu

2001-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

326

The Effects of Multiple Unloading Exposures on Bone Properties in the Femur of Adult Male Rats  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to the National Osteoporosis Foundation, approximately 10 million people have the condition, with another 34 million currently at risk. It is estimated that half of all women over 50 and a quarter of all men will break a bone due to osteoporosis (10). Fractures....? During long term missions, such as to Mars, the astronauts may encounter situations where they could experience high impact forces relative to those experienced in transit. This, coupled with a potential reduction in bone strength due to microgravity...

Morgan, Derrick Scott

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

327

The distribution of electrical potential in long bone under mechanical stress  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nember N I December 19'75 ~a39326 ABSTRACT The Distribution of Electrical Potential in Long Bone Under Mechanical Stress. (December 1975) Chao-Jan Cheng, B. S. , Texas AkM University Chairman of Advi. sory Committee & Dr. Richard J, Jendrucko.... It was not until the early 1960's that Bassett, et al. (1964) presented the first convincing evidence for electr1cally induced bone formation, Subsequently, Minkin, et al. (1968) passed electrical currents through rabbit femur and observed varying degrees...

Cheng, Chao-Jan

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

328

Dickkopf-1 in Craniofacial Bone and Tooth Development  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

result in osteopenia. Targeted expression of Dkk1 in dental epithelial cells leads to the formation of dysfunctional enamel knots and subsequent tooth defects during embryonic development. However, the direct role of Dkk1 in post-natal dentinogenesis...

Rodgers, Anika Sarah

2014-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

329

Generation of insulin-producing cells from gnotobiotic porcine skin-derived stem cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A major problem in the treatment of type 1 diabetes mellitus is the limited availability of alternative sources of insulin-producing cells for islet transplantation. In this study, we investigated the effect of bone morphogenetic protein 4 (BMP-4) treatments of gnotobiotic porcine skin-derived stem cells (gSDSCs) on their reprogramming and subsequent differentiation into insulin-producing cells (IPCs). We isolated SDSCs from the ear skin of a gnotobiotic pig. During the proliferation period, the cells expressed stem-cell markers Oct-4, Sox-2, and CD90; nestin expression also increased significantly. The cells could differentiate into IPCs after treatments with activin-A, glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), and nicotinamide. After 15 days in the differentiation medium, controlled gSDSCs began expressing endocrine progenitor genes and proteins (Ngn3, Neuro-D, PDX-1, NKX2.2, NKX6.1, and insulin). The IPCs showed increased insulin synthesis after glucose stimulation. The results indicate that stem cells derived from the skin of gnotobiotic pigs can differentiate into IPCs under the appropriate conditions in vitro. Our three-stage induction protocol could be applied without genetic modification to source IPCs from stem cells in the skin of patients with diabetes for autologous transplantation.

Yang, Ji Hoon; Lee, Sung Ho; Heo, Young Tae [Department of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Bio-Organ Research Center, Konkuk University, Seoul 143-701 (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Bio-Organ Research Center, Konkuk University, Seoul 143-701 (Korea, Republic of); Uhm, Sang Jun [Department of Animal Biotechnology, Bio-Organ Research Center, Konkuk University, Seoul 143-701 (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Animal Biotechnology, Bio-Organ Research Center, Konkuk University, Seoul 143-701 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Hoon Taek, E-mail: htl3675@konkuk.ac.kr [Department of Animal Biotechnology, Bio-Organ Research Center, Konkuk University, Seoul 143-701 (Korea, Republic of)

2010-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

330

Effect of dietary calcium and phosphorus levels on performance and bone development of large-framed developing boars  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

quantitative carcass measurement among boars fed the six treatment diets. Bone breaking load (BKL) of the femurs increased quadratically (P&. 01) as mineral levels increased with a predicted maximum response at 1. 21X calcium and 1. 01X phosphorus. Breaking..., feed intake and feed efficiency for developing boars. However, higher dietary phosphorus levels were needed for maximum bone develop- ment. Maximum response was obtained from the following phosphorus levels: bone breaking load ranged from 1. 01X...

Robinson, Robert Glen

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Electron Microscopy and Analytical X-ray Characterization of Compositional and Nanoscale Structural Changes in Fossil Bone  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on the identification of surviving collagen in bulk bonebulk regions of bone. This fact might prove exceptionally true if the identification

Boatman, Elizabeth

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Automated simulation of areal bone mineral density assessment in the distal radius from high-resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bone mineral density . DXA . HR-pQCT . Osteoporosis .Simulation Introduction Osteoporosis is a conditionclinical assessment of osteoporosis status were identified

Burghardt, A. J.; Kazakia, G. J.; Link, T. M.; Majumdar, S.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Characterization of the effects of x-ray irradiation on the hierarchical structure and mechanical properties of human cortical bone  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in   bone   strength.   Osteoporosis  Int    2006;17:319-­??fragility   in   aging,   osteoporosis,   and   diabetes  mellitus.  Osteoporosis  Int    2010;21:195-­??214.  

Barth, Holly

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Automated 3D trabecular bone structure analysis of the proximal femur—prediction of biomechanical strength by CT and DXA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

z ORIGINAL ARTICLE Automated 3D trabecular bone structureIntroduction An automated 3D segmentation algorithm wasstudy was to use an automated 3D segmentation algorithm to

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

2008LANDESBIOSCIENCE.DONOTDISTRIBUTE. [Cell Cycle 7:10, 1348-1352; 15 May 2008]; 2008 Landes Bioscience  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bioscience 1348 Cell Cycle 2008; Vol. 7 Issue 10 A decrease in estrogen levels at menopause leads to a rapid on these differing models of the mechanism of estrogen-mediated osteoclast apoptosis. Introduction During menopause of full bone maturation with a failure of epiphyseal closure and osteoporosis at age 28.10 Several men

Brown, Myles

336

Clinical Assessment of Percutaneous Radiofrequency Ablation for Painful Metastatic Bone Tumors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose. To investigate the pain-alleviating effects of radiofrequency ablation (RFA) on metastatic bone tumors in relation to tumor size, combined therapy, and percent tumor necrosis rate following RFA. Methods. Subjects comprised 24 patients with 28 painful metastatic bone tumors. A 17G internally cooled electrode was inserted into the tumor for CT guidance and ablation was performed. Bone cement was injected following RFA for 4 tumors involving a weight-bearing bone, while 5 tumors were treated using combined RFA and external irradiation. Percent necrosis rate of the tumor was measured using contrast-enhanced computed tomography 1 week after RFA. Results. Improvement in the visual analog scale (VAS) score was 4.6 {+-} 2.2 for large tumors (>5 cm, n = 12), 3.7 {+-} 1.8 for medium-sized tumors (3.1-5.0 cm, n = 11), and 3.5 {+-} 1.7 for small tumors ({<=}3 cm, n = 4), with no significant differences noted among tumor sizes. Improvement in the VAS score was 3.5 {+-} 1.3 for the 4 tumors in the RFA + bone cement group, 3.2 {+-} 1.9 for the 5 tumors in the RFA + radiation therapy group, and 4.8 {+-} 2.2 for the 18 tumors in the RFA group. No significant differences were identified between groups. The improvement in the VAS score was 3.8 {+-} 2.3, 4.0 {+-} 1.9, and 4.7 {+-} 2.6 in patients with tumor necrosis rates of 0-49%, 50-74%, and 75-100%, respectively. No significant association was observed among these three groups. Conclusion. Percutaneous RFA therapy was effective in relieving pain due to metastatic bone tumors. No relationships appear to exist between initial response and tumor size, combined therapy, and percent tumor necrosis.

Kojima, Hiroyuki, E-mail: kojimah@takii.kmu.ac.jp; Tanigawa, Noboru; Kariya, Shuji; Komemushi, Atsushi; Shomura, Yuzo; Sawada, Satoshi [Kansai Medical University Takii Hospital, Department of Radiology (Japan)

2006-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

337

Feeding Bone Meal to Range Cattle on the Coastal Plains of Texas : Preliminary Report.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Troup, Smith County: M. S~.E~~~~~, M. S., ~nimil Husband- fV. k. HOTCHKISS, Superintendent man Charge of Farm No 3 Angleton Brazoria County: L, J. McCALL. Farm Superintendent I?. 1-IAFNER: B. S., Superintendent No 11 Nacogdoches Nacogdoches County... and salt mixtures and finely ground rock phosphate mixed with bone meal and salt to cattle in the Gulf Coast region of Texas. It was found that the bone-chewing habit exhibited by about seventy-five per cent of the range cattle in that region can...

Schmidt, H.

1926-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

J Bone Miner Res . Author manuscript Fracture risk prediction using BMD and clinical risk factors in early  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

,651 peri- and early post-menopausal women (mean age (± SD): 54 4 yr) with a mean follow-up period of 13 Density ; Female ; Fractures, Bone ; etiology ; Humans ; Middle Aged ; Osteoporosis, Postmenopausal definition of osteoporosis ( ), i.e. a bone mineral density (BMD) value less than 2.5 standard deviations

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

339

Development of a three-dimensional in vitro model to study the effect of vitamin D on bone metastatic breast cancer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Breast cancer has a high prevalence among women and most patients suffer from metastasis to bone. The mechanisms involved in breast cancer bone metastasis are poorly understood. Three-dimensional (3D) tissue culture systems are becoming a focus...

Li, Danda

2011-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

340

Electrochemical cell  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An electrochemical cell is described having a bimodal positive electrode, a negative electrode of an alkali metal, and a compatible electrolyte including an alkali metal salt molten at the cell operating temperature. The positive electrode has an electrochemically active layer of at least one transition metal chloride at least partially present as a charging product, and additives of bromide and/or iodide and sulfur in the positive electrode or the electrolyte. Electrode volumetric capacity is in excess of 400 Ah/cm[sup 3]; the cell can be 90% recharged in three hours and can operate at temperatures below 160 C. There is also disclosed a method of reducing the operating temperature and improving the overall volumetric capacity of an electrochemical cell and for producing a positive electrode having a BET area greater than 6[times]10[sup 4] cm[sup 2]/g of Ni. 8 figures.

Redey, L.I.; Vissers, D.R.; Prakash, J.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bone marrow cells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

USE OF CdTe DETECTORS IN BONE MINERAL MEASUREMENTS J. VOGEL, J. ULLMAN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

375 USE OF CdTe DETECTORS IN BONE MINERAL MEASUREMENTS J. VOGEL, J. ULLMAN Nuclear Medicine. Cet ensemble emploie des détecteurs CdTe mesurant la transmission d'un faisceau collimaté de rayons X periods of prolonged bedrest or weightlessness. The unit employs CdTe detectors to mea- sure

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

342

1174 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING, VOL. 53, NO. 6, JUNE 2006 Microwave Drilling of Bones  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1174 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING, VOL. 53, NO. 6, JUNE 2006 Microwave Drilling*, Member, IEEE Abstract--This paper presents a feasibility study of drilling in fresh wet bone tissue in vitro using the microwave drill method [Jerby et al., 2002], toward testing its applicability

Gefen, Amit

343

BONE DENSITOMETRY IN PEDIATRIC POPULATIONS: DISCREPANCIES IN THE DIAGNOSIS OF OSTEOPOROSIS BY DXA AND CT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BONE DENSITOMETRY IN PEDIATRIC POPULATIONS: DISCREPANCIES IN THE DIAGNOSIS OF OSTEOPOROSIS BY DXA, osteoporosis is frequently overdiagnosed in children when using dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA osteoporosis in pediatric populations. (J Pediatr 2005;146:776-9) D ual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA

Valero-Cuevas, Francisco

344

School of Architecture, Design and the Built Environment Project Title: Artificial bone for prosthetic hip joints  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

formation by the Additive Manufacturing (AM) direct printing process. The artificial bone must and the development of new additive manufacturing techniques for medical devices. The group has active links and structural gradients into the prosthesis. It is envisioned this could involve the use of additively

Evans, Paul

345

Estimated number of women likely to benefit from bone mineral density measurement in France  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

; Menopause Introduction The prevalence of osteoporosis is rising, most notably in postmenopausal women years of age with risk factors for osteoporosis likely to lead to bone mineral density measurement, an investigation reimbursed by the French national health insurance system in patients at risk for osteoporosis

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

346

Differential Maintenance of Cortical and Cancellous Bone Strength Following Discontinuation of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and with combination of osteoporosis medications are needed to improve our treatment of osteoporosis. ß 2011 American; RALOXIFENE Introduction A number of drugs offer some protection against post- menopausal bone loss and nonvertebral fractures in postmenopausal osteoporosis.(3) While bisphosphonates such as ALN may accumulate

Ritchie, Robert

347

A method for calibration of bone driver transducers to measure the mastoid Reggie Weece a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2010 Available online xxxx a b s t r a c t When using bone vibrator transducers for clinical a circuit model of the driver, describing it with three frequency-dependent parameters. Once these three circuit model is proposed to better capture the observed behaviors. Ã? 2010 Published by Elsevier B.V. 1

Allen, Jont

348

Stability and Three-Dimensional Analysis of Bone Formation in Longitudinally Fluted Miniscrew Implants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The purpose of the present study is to evaluate the effects of longitudinal flutes on mini-screw implant (MSI) bone healing and stability. Using 11 skeletally mature New Zealand White rabbits, 33 longitudinally fluted and 33 non-fluted MSIs were...

Truong, An Van

2014-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

349

Mechanical loading attenuates loss of bone mass and bone strength induced by immobilization and calcium-deficiency  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of mechanical regulation of the skeleton by examining the mechanisms of cell stimulation in a controlled in vivo loading environment (Raab- Cullen et al. 1994). I~obl to It is well established that the skeleton adapts to the level of stress which is placed... University, Omaha, Nebraska. 26 The loading device is designed to accommodate the anatomy of an adult rat's right tibia (Figure 1) (Raab-Cullen et al. 1994). The pads (Figure 2) are constructed of balsa wood and sheathed with surgical tubing to minimize...

Inman, Cynthia Lynn

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Electrochemical cell  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An electrochemical cell is described having an alkali metal negative electrode such as sodium and a positive electrode including Ni or transition metals, separated by a [beta] alumina electrolyte and NaAlCl[sub 4] or other compatible material. Various concentrations of a bromine, iodine and/or sulfur containing additive and pore formers are disclosed, which enhance cell capacity and power. The pore formers may be the ammonium salts of carbonic acid or a weak organic acid or oxamide or methylcellulose. 6 figs.

Redey, L.I.; Vissers, D.R.; Prakash, J.

1994-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

351

Electrochemical cell  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved secondary electrochemical cell is disclosed having a negative electrode of lithium aluminum, a positive electrode of iron sulfide, a molten electrolyte of lithium chloride and potassium chloride, and the combination that the fully charged theoretical capacity of the negative electrode is in the range of 0.5-1.0 that of the positive electrode. The cell thus is negative electrode limiting during discharge cycling. Preferably, the negative electrode contains therein, in the approximate range of 1-10 volume % of the electrode, an additive from the materials of graphitized carbon, aluminum-iron alloy, and/or magnesium oxide.

Kaun, Thomas D. (New Lenox, IL)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

E-Print Network 3.0 - articular cartilage lesions Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Necrosis during Bone-Marrow Stimulation for Cartilage Repair Summary: . 2005. The micro- fracture technique for the treatment of articular cartilage lesions in the knee... in the...

353

Photovoltaic cell  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

In a photovoltaic cell structure containing a visibly transparent, electrically conductive first layer of metal oxide, and a light-absorbing semiconductive photovoltaic second layer, the improvement comprising a thin layer of transition metal nitride, carbide or boride interposed between said first and second layers.

Gordon, Roy G. (Cambridge, MA); Kurtz, Sarah (Somerville, MA)

1984-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

354

Antibody responses in allogeneic radiation chimeras  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The construction of long-lived allogeneic radiation chimeras, free of graft-versus-host disease, has been achieved using serologic elimination of Thy 1/sup +/ cells from donor bone marrow. Humoral immune function was not restored in these animals as evidenced by lack of primary antibody responses to a T cell-dependent antigen, namely, sheep erythrocytes (SRBC) both in vivo and in vitro. No evidence for a suppressor cell-mediated mechanism was found. Using separated chimera spleen cell populations and specific helper cell soluble mediators, the functional capabilities of chimera B cells, T cells, and macrophages were assessed. These findings suggested that the failure of chimeras to produce antibody is not the result of impaired B cell, T cell, or macrophage function, but rather, that it is due to ineffective cellular interactions. Physiologic cellular interactions depend upon the sharing of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) determinants between interacting cells. However, the self-recognition repertoire of developing T cells may be influenced by the environment which these cells differentiate such that they learn to recognize host MHC determinants as self. These findings support the interpretation that the immunologic hyporeactivity of allogeneic bone marrow chimeras reflects the role of the host environment in restricting the interactive capabilities of donor-derived cells.

Coico, R.F.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Evaluation of the Effects of Green Tea Extracts on Bone Homeostasis in the Ts65Dn Down Syndrome Mouse Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Evaluation of the Effects of Green Tea Extracts on Bone Homeostasis in the Ts65Dn Down Syndrome- gallate (EGCG), an aromatic polyphenol found in high concentrations in green tea, is a known inhibitor

Zhou, Yaoqi

356

Gary M. Bone, Andrew Lambert and Mark Edwards Abstract This paper describes the development of a novel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gary M. Bone, Andrew Lambert and Mark Edwards Abstract ­ This paper describes the development from the top of a pile was described by Taylor, Blake and Cox [3]. They used a wrist-mounted camera

Bone, Gary

357

Potential commercial application of a bi-layer bone-ligament regeneration scaffold to anterior cruciate ligament replacement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A business model was created in order to explore the commercial application of a bi-layer bone-ligament scaffold to the treatment of torn anterior cruciate ligaments (ACL) requiring replacement. The two main keys in producing ...

Li, Jessica C. (Jessica Ching-Yi)

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Nanocrystal Solar Cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

research on organic photovoltaic cells since small molecule10 years prior (4). Photovoltaic cells with an active layerof the associated photovoltaic cells. 2.4 Charge transport

Gur, Ilan

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Nanocrystal Solar Cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nov, 2005). Chapter 4 Hybrid solar cells with 3-dimensionalinorganic nanocrystal solar cells 5.1 Introduction In recentoperation of organic based solar cells and distinguish them

Gur, Ilan

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Research Institute 1990 Fuel Cell Status," Proceedings ofMiller, "Introduction: Fuel-Cell-Powered Vehicle DevelopmentPrograms," presented at Fuel Cells for Transportation,

Delucchi, Mark

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bone marrow cells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Diagnostic Studies on Lithium Battery Cells and Cell Components...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Studies on Lithium Battery Cells and Cell Components Diagnostic Studies on Lithium Battery Cells and Cell Components 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle...

362

Fuel Cell Technologies Overview: 2011 Fuel Cell Seminar | Department...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Fuel Cell Technologies Overview: 2011 Fuel Cell Seminar Fuel Cell Technologies Overview: 2011 Fuel Cell Seminar Presentation by Sunita Satyapal at the Fuel Cell Seminar on November...

363

Stationary Fuel Cells: Overview of Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Activities...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Stationary Fuel Cells: Overview of Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Activities Stationary Fuel Cells: Overview of Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Activities Presentation covers stationary fuel cells...

364

Effect of irradiation on bone remodelling and the structural integrity of the vertebral column. Doctoral thesis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effects of therapeutic levels of radiation on the axial properties of the primate vertebral column were studied. Seven male rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) were irradiated with a single does of 1300 cGy to the specific lumbar vertebrae of L2, L3, and L4. Three additional animals served as controls. Radiographs were taken before the radiation treatment and just prior to sacrifice to determine density changes in the bone. The animal subjects were sacrificed 105 days following the radiation exposure. Biomechanical testing was completed on lumbar levels 2 and 3 to identify changes in strength characteristics following radiation treatment. Histomorphometric analysis of lumbar vertebrae level 4 was completed to identify volume and surface density changes as well as cellular changes. Tetracycline, dicarbomethylaminomethyl fluorescein (DCAF), and xylenol orange were used as bone labeling agents to aid in the histomorphometry and to obtain dynamic parameter changes.

Swenson, K.N.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Final Report for completed IPP Project:"Development of Plasma Ablation for Soft Tissue and Bone Surgery"  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

ArthroCare is a medical device company that develops, manufactures, and markets an advanced surgical tool, a plasma electro-surgical system for cutting and removing tissue. The hand-held electrical discharge device produces plasma in a biocompatible conductive fluid and tissue to which it is applied during surgery. Its products allow surgeons to operate with increased precision and accuracy, limiting damage to surrounding tissue thereby reducing pain and speeding recovery for the patient. In the past, the design of ArthfoCare's plasma wands has been an empirical undertaking. One goal of this R&D program was to put the phenomena involved on a sound scientific footing, allowing optimization of existing plasma based electro-surgery system technology, and the design and manufacture of new and improved kinds of scalpels, in particular for the surgical cutting of bone. Another important related goal of the program was to develop, through an experimental approach, new plasma wand approaches to the cutting ('shaving') of hard bone tissue. The goals of the CRADA were accomplished - computer models were used to predict important parameters of the plasma discharge and the bone environment, and several different approaches to bone-shaving were developed and demonstrated. The primary goal of the project was to develop and demonstrate an atmospheric-pressure plasma tool that is suitable for surgical use for shaving bone in humans. This goal was accomplished, in fact with several different alternative plasma approaches. High bone ablation speeds were measured. The use of probes ('plasma wand' - the surgical tool) with moving active electrodes was also explored, and there are advantages to this method. Another important feature is that the newly-exposed bone surface have only a very thin necrosis layer; this feature was demonstrated. This CRADA has greatly advanced our understanding of bone removal by atmospheric pressure plasmas in liquid, and puts ArthroCare in a good position to develop the techniques for commercial (surgical) application.

Brown, Ian

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Automatic detection of bone fragments in poultry using multi-energy x-rays  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

At least two linear arrays of x-ray detectors are placed below a conveyor belt in a poultry processing plant. Multiple-energy x-ray sources illuminate the poultry and are detected by the detectors. Laser profilometry is used to measure the poultry thickness as the x-ray data is acquired. The detector readout is processed in real time to detect the presence of small highly attenuating fragments in the poultry, i.e., bone, metal, and cartilage.

Gleason, Shaun S. (Knoxville, TN); Paulus, Michael J. (Knoxville, TN); Mullens, James A. (Knoxville, TN)

2002-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

367

Treatment of Extraspinal Painful Bone Metastases with Percutaneous Cementoplasty: A Prospective Study of 50 Patients  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy of percutaneous cementoplasty (PC) with polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) in painful extravertebral lytic bone metastases not responding to conventional therapy. Fifty patients (25 females), mean age 64.7 {+-} 11.2 years, underwent PC after giving informed consent. Procedures were performed under fluoroscopy (1/50) or combined fluoroscopy-CT (49/50) guidance in local anesthesia or under deep sedation in 7 patients with large metastases who underwent radiofrequency thermoablation (RFA) in the same session. Seventy lesions were treated (1-6 per patient; average, 1.4 {+-} 0.9), arranging in size from 1 to 10 cm (average, 3.6 {+-} 2.1 cm). Mean volume of PMMA per lesion was 5.9 {+-} 3.2 ml (range, 1.5-15.0 ml). Pain was prospectively evaluated on an 11-point visual analog scale (VAS) before and after the procedure (follow-up, 15 to 36 months). Mean VAS score dropped from 9.1 {+-} 1.2 (range: 6-10) to 2.1 {+-} 2.5 (range: 0-9). Mean VAS difference was 7.0 {+-} 2.3 (range, 1-10; p < 0.0001, Wilcoxon signed rank test). Forty-seven of the 50 patients (94%) suspended narcotic drugs, in 22 (44%) pain was controlled with a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug, in 25 (50%) analgesic therapy was suspended, and 13 of 50 (26%) had complete pain regression. In 3 of the 50 patients (6%) pain was not improved. No statistical difference between osteoplasty and osteoplasty plus RFA was found (p = 0.8338, Mann-Whitney test). No complications arose during the procedure. Two patients with metastases in the femoral diaphysis reported a fracture 1 month after treatment. PC is effective to obtain pain regression in painful bone metastases not responding to conventional analgesic therapy; bone consolidation cannot be obtained in the diaphysis of long weight-bearing bones.

Anselmetti, Giovanni Carlo, E-mail: giovanni.anselmetti@ircc.it; Manca, Antonio [Institute for Cancer Research and Treatment, Interventional Radiology Unit (Italy); Ortega, Cinzia; Grignani, Giovanni [Institute for Cancer Research and Treatment, Oncology Unit (Italy); DeBernardi, Felicino [Institute for Cancer Research and Treatment, Anesthesiology Unit (Italy); Regge, Daniele [Institute for Cancer Research and Treatment, Radiology Unit (Italy)

2008-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

368

Bone Implant Interface Investigation by Synchrotron Radiation X-Ray Microfluorescence  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Zinc is known to play a relevant role in growth and development; it has stimulatory effects on in vitro and in vivo bone formation and an inhibitory effect on in vitro osteoclastic bone resorption. The inorganic component of the bone tissue is nonstoichiometric apatite; changes in the composition of hidroxyapatite are subject of studies in order to improve the tissue response after implantation. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of 0.5% zinc-containing hydroxyapatite in comparison to hydroxyapatite on osseous repair of rabbit's tibia. Cylinders (2x6 mm) of both materials were produced according to the specification of the International Organization for Standardization. Ethics Commission on Teaching and Research in Animals approved this project (HUAP-195/06). Fifteen White New Zealand rabbits were submitted to general anesthesia and two perforations (2 mm) were made in each tibia for implantation of zinc-containing hydroxyapatite cylinders (left tibia) and hydroxyapatite cylinders (right tibia). After 1, 2 and 4 weeks, the animals were killed and one fragment of each tibia with the cylinder was collected and embedded in a methacrylate-based resin and cut into slices (approx200 {mu}m thickness), parallel to the implant's long axis with a precision diamond saw for Synchrotron Radiation X-ray Microfluorescence investigation. The accomplishment of the standard procedures helped the planning, execution and the comparative analysis of the results. The chemical and physical properties of the biomaterials were modified after its implantation and the incorporation of zinc. Both materials are biocompatible and promote osteoconduction and favored bone repair.

Calasans-Maia, M. [Odondology Department, Fluminense Federal Univeristy, Niteroi 24030-900, RJ (Brazil); Sales, E.; Lopes, R. T. [Nuclear Instrumentation Laboratory-PEN/COPPE, Federal Univeristy of Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro 21941-914, RJ (Brazil); Granjeiro, J. M. [Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Fluminense Federal University, Niteroi 24030-900, RJ (Brazil); Lima, I. [Odondology Department, Fluminense Federal Univeristy, Niteroi 24030-900, RJ (Brazil); Department of Mechanical Engineering and Energy, Rio de Janeiro State University, Regional Campus-Polytechnic Institute-Alberto Rangel, s/n, Vila Nova, room 308, 28630-050, Nova Friburgo, RJ (Brazil)

2010-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

369

Functional Interference Clusters in Cancer Patients With Bone Metastases: A Secondary Analysis of RTOG 9714  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To explore the relationships (clusters) among the functional interference items in the Brief Pain Inventory (BPI) in patients with bone metastases. Methods: Patients enrolled in the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 9714 bone metastases study were eligible. Patients were assessed at baseline and 4, 8, and 12 weeks after randomization for the palliative radiotherapy with the BPI, which consists of seven functional items: general activity, mood, walking ability, normal work, relations with others, sleep, and enjoyment of life. Principal component analysis with varimax rotation was used to determine the clusters between the functional items at baseline and the follow-up. Cronbach's alpha was used to determine the consistency and reliability of each cluster at baseline and follow-up. Results: There were 448 male and 461 female patients, with a median age of 67 years. There were two functional interference clusters at baseline, which accounted for 71% of the total variance. The first cluster (physical interference) included normal work and walking ability, which accounted for 58% of the total variance. The second cluster (psychosocial interference) included relations with others and sleep, which accounted for 13% of the total variance. The Cronbach's alpha statistics were 0.83 and 0.80, respectively. The functional clusters changed at week 12 in responders but persisted through week 12 in nonresponders. Conclusion: Palliative radiotherapy is effective in reducing bone pain. Functional interference component clusters exist in patients treated for bone metastases. These clusters changed over time in this study, possibly attributable to treatment. Further research is needed to examine these effects.

Chow, Edward, E-mail: Edward.Chow@sunnybrook.c [Odette Cancer Centre, Toronto, ON (Canada); James, Jennifer [RTOG Statistical Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Barsevick, Andrea [Fox Chase Cancer Center, Cheltenham, PA (United States); Hartsell, William [Good Samaritan Cancer Center, Downers Grove, IL (United States); Ratcliffe, Sarah [University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Scarantino, Charles [Rex Healthcare Cancer Center, Raleigh, NC (United States); Ivker, Robert [Newark Beth Israel Medical Center, Newark, NJ (Israel); Roach, Mack [UCSF Comprehensive Cancer Center, San Francisco, CA (United States); Suh, John [Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, OH (United States); Petersen, Ivy [Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Konski, Andre [Fox Chase Cancer Center, Cheltenham, PA (United States); Demas, William [Akron City Hospital Cancer Care Center, Inc., Akron, OH (United States); Bruner, Deborah [Abramson Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

2010-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

370

Immunization with FSH? fusion protein antigen prevents bone loss in a rat ovariectomy-induced osteoporosis model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: •A GST-FSH fusion protein was successfully expressed in E. coli. •Immunization with GST-FSH antigen can raise high-titer anti-FSH polyclonal sera. •Anti-FSH polyclonal sera can neutralize osteoclastogenic effect of FSH in vitro. •FSH immunization can prevent bone loss in a rat osteoporosis model. -- Abstract: Osteoporosis, a metabolic bone disease, threatens postmenopausal women globally. Hormone replacement therapy (HTR), especially estrogen replacement therapy (ERT), is used widely in the clinic because it has been generally accepted that postmenopausal osteoporosis is caused by estrogen deficiency. However, hypogonadal ? and ? estrogen receptor null mice were only mildly osteopenic, and mice with either receptor deleted had normal bone mass, indicating that estrogen may not be the only mediator that induces osteoporosis. Recently, follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), the serum concentration of which increases from the very beginning of menopause, has been found to play a key role in postmenopausal osteoporosis by promoting osteoclastogenesis. In this article, we confirmed that exogenous FSH can enhance osteoclast differentiation in vitro and that this effect can be neutralized by either an anti-FSH monoclonal antibody or anti-FSH polyclonal sera raised by immunizing animals with a recombinant GST-FSH? fusion protein antigen. Moreover, immunizing ovariectomized rats with the GST-FSH? antigen does significantly prevent trabecular bone loss and thereby enhance the bone strength, indicating that a FSH-based vaccine may be a promising therapeutic strategy to slow down bone loss in postmenopausal women.

Geng, Wenxin; Yan, Xingrong; Du, Huicong; Cui, Jihong; Li, Liwen, E-mail: liven@nwu.edu.cn; Chen, Fulin, E-mail: chenfl@nwu.edu.cn

2013-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

371

Tocopherol Succinate: Modulation of Antioxidant Enzymes and Oncogene Expression, and Hematopoietic Recovery  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: A class of naturally occurring isoforms of tocopherol (tocols) was shown to have varying degrees of protection when administered before radiation exposure. We recently demonstrated that {alpha}-tocopherol succinate (TS) is a potential radiation prophylactic agent. Our objective in this study was to further investigate the mechanism of action of TS in mice exposed to {sup 60}Co {gamma}-radiation. Methods and Materials: We evaluated the effects of TS on expression of antioxidant enzymes and oncogenes by quantitative RT-PCR in bone marrow cells of {sup 60}Co {gamma}-irradiated mice. Further, we tested the ability of TS to rescue and repopulate hematopoietic stem cells by analyzing bone marrow cellularity and spleen colony forming unit in spleen of TS-injected and irradiated mice. Results: Our results demonstrate that TS modulated the expression of antioxidant enzymes and inhibited expression of oncogenes in irradiated mice at different time points. TS also increased colony forming unit-spleen numbers and bone marrow cellularity in irradiated mice. Conclusions: Results provide additional support for the observed radioprotective efficacy of TS and insight into mechanisms.

Singh, Vijay K., E-mail: singh@afrri.usuhs.mi [Radiation Countermeasures Program, Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, MD (United States); Parekh, Vaishali I.; Brown, Darren S.; Kao, Tzu-Cheg [Radiation Countermeasures Program, Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, MD (United States); Mog, Steven R. [Veterinary Sciences Department, Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, MD (United States)

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Electrochemistry Cell Model  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

or exceeds all performance goals - Interpreting complex cell electrochemical phenomena - Identification of cell degradation mechanisms Partners (Collaborators) Daniel Abraham,...

373

Telecommunications International Cell Phone  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Telecommunications International Cell Phone 1. Fax completed form to 979.847.1111. 2. If you do will be charged. Date Cell Phone Needed Cell Phone Pick-Up Date Cell Phone User Travel Destination(s) United States Number Destination Country Number Cell Phone Type Digital Satellite Cell Phone Return Date Notes

374

Mechanisms of impaired osteoblast function during disuse  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

cancellous bone is rapidly formed throughout the marrow of a long bone while hindlimb unloading is the most common method used to produce skeletal unloading. The specific hypotheses of this study were aimed at determining if changes in osteoblast...

Allen, Matthew Robert

2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

375

Assessment of trabecular bone structure using MDCT: comparison of 64- and 320-slice CT using HR-pQCT as the reference standard  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

slice MDCT . HR-pQCT . Osteoporosis . Structure analysis .bone Introduction Osteoporosis is defined as a systemicmethod in current osteoporosis diagnosis is the assessment

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Photoelectrochemical cell  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A photoelectrochemical cell comprising a sealed container having a light-transmitting window for admitting light into the container across a light-admitting plane, an electrolyte in the container, a photoelectrode in the container having a light-absorbing surface arranged to receive light from the window and in contact with the electrolyte, the surface having a plurality of spaced portions oblique to the plane, each portion having dimensions at least an order of magnitude larger than the maximum wavelength of incident sunlight, the total surface area of the surface being larger than the area of the plane bounded by the container, and a counter electrode in the container in contact with the electrolyte.

Rauh, R. David (Newton, MA); Boudreau, Robert A. (Norton, MA)

1983-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

377

The reproducibility of [sup 109]Cd-based X-ray fluorescence measurements of bone lead  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We assessed the reproducibility of X-ray fluorescence-based lead measurements from multiple measurements made on a low-concentration plaster of paris phantom and in five subjects measured five times on two occasions. Over a 6-month period, 220 measurements of the same phantom were obtained and showed a standard deviation of 1.29 [mu]g Pb (g plaster of paris)[sup [minus]1]. The two sets of in vivo measurements were made 10 months apart and revealed a mean standard deviation of 3.4 [mu]Pb (g bone mineral)[sup [minus]1] and 5.1 [mu]g Pb (g bone mineral)[sup [minus]1] for males and females, respectively. Our measured standard deviation exceeded by 20-30% the calculated standard deviation associated with a single measurement both in the phantom and in subjects. This indicates that some variance is introduced during the measurement process. Operator learning and consistency significantly minimized this increased variability. Measured lead concentrations of the left and right tibia in 14 subjects showed no significant differences between legs. As a result, either tibia can be sampled and compared over time. The levels of reproducibility we report here mean that X-ray fluorescence-based determinations of bone lead concentrations are reliable both over the short and long term. Thus, reasonably sized confidence intervals can be placed on detected changes in concentration and should permit acquisition of longitudinal data within a reasonable length of time. 19 refs., 1 fig., 6 tabs.

Gordon, C.L. (Chedoke-McMaster Hospitals, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada)); Webber, C.E.; Chettle, D.R. (McMaster Univ., Hamilton, Ontario (Canada))

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

X-band EPR imaging as a tool for gradient dose reconstruction in irradiated bones  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: Various tools are currently available for dose reconstruction in individuals after accidental exposure to ionizing radiation. Among the available biological analyses, Monte Carlo simulations, and biophysical methods, such as electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), the latter has proved its usefulness for retrospective dosimetry. Although EPR spectroscopy is probably the most sensitive technique, it does not provide spatial dosimetric data. This information is, however, highly desirable when steep dose gradient irradiations are involved. The purpose of this work was to explore the possibilities of EPR imaging (EPRI) for spatial dose reconstruction in irradiated biological material. Methods: X-band EPRI was used to reconstruct ex vivo the relative dose distribution in human bone samples and hydroxyapatite phantoms after irradiation with brachytherapy seeds or x rays. Three situations were investigated: Homogeneous, stepwise gradient, and continuous gradient irradiation. Results: EPRI gave a faithful relative spin density distribution in bone samples and in hydroxyapatite phantoms. Measured dose ratios were in close agreement with the actual delivered dose ratios. EPRI was able to distinguish the dose gradients induced by two different sources ({sup 125}I and {sup 192}Ir). However, the measured spatial resolution of the system was 1.9 mm and this appeared to be a limiting factor. The method could be improved by using new signal postprocessing strategies. Conclusions: This study demonstrates that EPRI can be used to assess the regional relative dose distribution in irradiated bone samples. The method is currently applicable to ex vivo measurements of small size samples with low variation in tissue density but is likely to be adapted for in vivo application using L-band EPRI.

Leveque, Philippe; Godechal, Quentin; Bol, Anne; Trompier, Francois; Gallez, Bernard [Biomedical Magnetic Resonance Unit, Universite catholique de Louvain, B-1200 Brussels (Belgium); Molecular Imaging and Experimental Radiotherapy Unit, Universite catholique de Louvain, B-1200 Brussels (Belgium); Institut de Surete Nucleaire et de Radioprotection, F-92262 Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Biomedical Magnetic Resonance Unit, Universite catholique de Louvain, B-1200 Brussels (Belgium)

2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

379

Fuel cell arrangement  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A fuel cell arrangement is provided wherein cylindrical cells of the solid oxide electrolyte type are arranged in planar arrays where the cells within a plane are parallel. Planes of cells are stacked with cells of adjacent planes perpendicular to one another. Air is provided to the interior of the cells through feed tubes which pass through a preheat chamber. Fuel is provided to the fuel cells through a channel in the center of the cell stack; the fuel then passes the exterior of the cells and combines with the oxygen-depleted air in the preheat chamber. 3 figs.

Isenberg, A.O.

1987-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

380

Fuel cell arrangement  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A fuel cell arrangement is provided wherein cylindrical cells of the solid oxide electrolyte type are arranged in planar arrays where the cells within a plane are parallel. Planes of cells are stacked with cells of adjacent planes perpendicular to one another. Air is provided to the interior of the cells through feed tubes which pass through a preheat chamber. Fuel is provided to the fuel cells through a channel in the center of the cell stack; the fuel then passes the exterior of the cells and combines with the oxygen-depleted air in the preheat chamber.

Isenberg, Arnold O. (Forest Hills Boro, PA)

1987-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bone marrow cells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

A parametric analysis of bone fixation plates on fractured equine third metacarpal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of metallic materials, were also being investigated and tried clinically. The earliesr types of metal plates to be used were made of nickel-steel, iron, or silver (1). These early plates were generally attached to the fractured Numbers in parentheses...A P~TRIC ANALYSIS OI' BONE FIXATION PLATES ON FRACTURED EQUINE THIRD lKTACARPAL A Thesis by Donald Reagan Ray Submitted to tnk Graduate College of Texas A&N University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER...

Ray, Donald Reagan

1970-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Calcium balance and bone density in immature horses fed a high protein diet  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

injuries were also found to occur most often in animals aged 2-4 years (Johnson et al., 1994). Even in cases where complete bone failure does not occur, skeletal injuries are more common in young animals. Norwood (1978) reported as many as 70% of two...; however, protein- restricted diets may result in lower blood pH post-exercise (Graham-Theirs et al., 2001). No diet or diet*day effect was seen on blood pH at a significance of p < 0.05. While this does not seem to support an acidogenic effect...

Spooner, Holly Sue

2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

383

Long bone growth of Mimbres subadults from the NAN Ranch (LA15049), New Mexico  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of 559 skeletons from three time periods (Late Woodland, Mississippian Acculturated Late Woodland, and Table 2. 2. Indian Knoll maximum long bone length (cm) without epiphysis*. 10 13 14 15 16 17 18 2. 5 ? 3. 5 yr. 3. 5 ? 4. 5 yr. 4. 5 ? 5. 5... yr. 5. 5 ? 6. 5 yr. 6. 5 ? 8 yr. 8 ? 10. 5 yr. 10. 5 ? 11 yr. 11 ? 12 yr. 12 yl ~ 15 yr. + 6 mo. 15 yr. 16 yz' ~ 16. 5 ? 17 yr. 21 yr ~ Age Group Age 1 Birth ? 6 mo. 6 ? 15 mo. 15 ? 24 mo. 4 2 ? 2. 5 yr. Humerus N Mean SD Range 5...

Marek, Marianne

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

384

DOE Fuel Cell Technologies Office: 2013 Fuel Cell Seminar and...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

DOE Fuel Cell Technologies Office: 2013 Fuel Cell Seminar and Energy Exposition DOE Fuel Cell Technologies Office: 2013 Fuel Cell Seminar and Energy Exposition Overview of DOE's...

385

DOE Fuel Cell Technologies Office Record 13012: Fuel Cell System...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Fuel Cell Technologies Office Record 13012: Fuel Cell System Cost - 2013 DOE Fuel Cell Technologies Office Record 13012: Fuel Cell System Cost - 2013 This program record from the...

386

Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technologies Update: 2010 Fuel Cell Seminar...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technologies Update: 2010 Fuel Cell Seminar and Exposition Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technologies Update: 2010 Fuel Cell Seminar and Exposition Presentation by...

387

Fuel cell-fuel cell hybrid system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A device for converting chemical energy to electricity is provided, the device comprising a high temperature fuel cell with the ability for partially oxidizing and completely reforming fuel, and a low temperature fuel cell juxtaposed to said high temperature fuel cell so as to utilize remaining reformed fuel from the high temperature fuel cell. Also provided is a method for producing electricity comprising directing fuel to a first fuel cell, completely oxidizing a first portion of the fuel and partially oxidizing a second portion of the fuel, directing the second fuel portion to a second fuel cell, allowing the first fuel cell to utilize the first portion of the fuel to produce electricity; and allowing the second fuel cell to utilize the second portion of the fuel to produce electricity.

Geisbrecht, Rodney A.; Williams, Mark C.

2003-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

388

Nanocrystal Solar Cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nov, 2005). Chapter 4 Hybrid solar cells with 3-dimensional5 All-inorganic nanocrystal solar cells 5.1 Introduction Inoperation of organic based solar cells and distinguish them

Gur, Ilan

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the membrane for a PEM fuel cell would cost $5/ft (1990$) inmass-produced PEM fuel cell could cost $10/kW or less. Totalparameter for PEM fuel cells: thinner membranes cost less

Delucchi, Mark

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

$ b materials cost, % a Fuel cell stack cost only. Includesof the cost of fuel-cell stacks, 1990$° Cost item GE Swan cAnnual maintenance cost of fuel cell stack and auxiliaries (

Delucchi, Mark

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles UCD-ITS-RR-92-14 September bycost than both. Solar-hydrogen fuel- cell vehicles would becost than both. Solar-hydrogen fuel- cell vehicles would be

Delucchi, Mark

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles UCD-ITS-RR-92-14 September byet al. , 1988,1989 HYDROGEN FUEL-CELL VEHICLES: TECHNICALIn the FCEV, the hydrogen fuel cell could supply the "net"

Delucchi, Mark

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Thermal Management of Solar Cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

D. Mills, "Cooling of photovoltaic cells under concentratedelectric performance of a photovoltaic cells by cooling andSolar Cell A photovoltaic cell is a semiconductor that

Saadah, Mohammed Ahmed

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Characterization of the effects of x-ray irradiation on the hierarchical structure and mechanical properties of human cortical bone  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Bone comprises a complex structure of primarily collagen, hydroxyapatite and water, where each hierarchical structural level contributes to its strength, ductility and toughness. These properties, however, are degraded by irradiation, arising from medical therapy or bone-allograft sterilization. We provide here a mechanistic framework for how irradiation affects the nature and properties of human cortical bone over a range of characteristic (nano to macro) length-scales, following x-­ray exposures up to 630 kGy. Macroscopically, bone strength, ductility and fracture resistance are seen to be progressively degraded with increasing irradiation levels. At the micron-­scale, fracture properties, evaluated using in-situ scanning electron microscopy and synchrotron x-ray computed micro-tomography, provide mechanistic information on how cracks interact with the bone-matrix structure. At sub-micron scales, strength properties are evaluated with in-situ tensile tests in the synchrotron using small-/wide-angle x-ray scattering/diffraction, where strains are simultaneously measured in the macroscopic tissue, collagen fibrils and mineral. Compared to healthy bone, results show that the fibrillar strain is decreased by ~40% following 70 kGy exposures, consistent with significant stiffening and degradation of the collagen. We attribute the irradiation-­induced deterioration in mechanical properties to mechanisms at multiple length-scales, including changes in crack paths at micron-­scales, loss of plasticity from suppressed fibrillar sliding at sub-­micron scales, and the loss and damage of collagen at the nano-­scales, the latter being assessed using Raman and Fourier-Transform-Infrared spectroscopy and a fluorometric assay.

Barth, Holly; Zimmermann, Elizabeth; Schaible, Eric; Tang, Simon; Alliston, Tamara; Ritchie, Robert

2011-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

395

Chemopreventive activity of compounds extracted from Casearia sylvestris (Salicaceae) Sw against DNA damage induced by particulate matter emitted by sugarcane burning near Araraquara, Brazil  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ethanolic extract of Casearia sylvestris is thought to be antimutagenic. In this study, we attempted to determine whether this extract and casearin X (a clerodane diterpene from C. sylvestris) are protective against the harmful effects of airborne pollutants from sugarcane burning. To that end, we used the Tradescantia micronucleus test in meiotic pollen cells of Tradescantia pallida, the micronucleus test in mouse bone marrow cells, and the comet assay in mouse blood cells. The mutagenic compound was total suspended particulate (TSP) from air. For the Tradescantia micronucleus test, T. pallida cuttings were treated with the extract at 0.13, 0.25, or 0.50 mg/ml. Subsequently, TSP was added at 0.3 mg/ml, and tetrads from the inflorescences were examined for micronuclei. For the micronucleus test in mouse bone marrow cells and the comet assay in mouse blood cells, Balb/c mice were treated for 15 days with the extract—3.9, 7.5, or 15.0 mg/kg body weight (BW)—or with casearin X—0.3, 0.25, or 1.2 mg/kg BW—after which they received TSP (3.75 mg/kg BW). In T. pallida and mouse bone marrow cells, the extract was antimutagenic at all concentrations tested. In mouse blood cells, the extract was antigenotoxic at all concentrations, whereas casearin X was not antimutagenic but was antigenotoxic at all concentrations. We conclude that C. sylvestris ethanolic extract and casearin X protect DNA from damage induced by airborne pollutants from sugarcane burning. -- Highlights: ? We assessed DNA protection of C. sylvestris ethanolic extract. ? We assessed DNA protection of casearin X. ? We used Tradescantia pallida micronucleus test as screening. ? We used comet assay and micronucleus test in mice. ? The compounds protected DNA against sugar cane burning pollutants.

Prieto, A.M. [UNESP — Univ. Estadual Paulista, College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Department of Clinical Analysis, Rua Expedicionários do Brasil, 1621, Araraquara (Brazil)] [UNESP — Univ. Estadual Paulista, College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Department of Clinical Analysis, Rua Expedicionários do Brasil, 1621, Araraquara (Brazil); Santos, A.G. [UNESP — Univ. Estadual Paulista, College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Department of Natural Principles and Toxicology, Rodovia Araraquara-Jau, km 01, Araraquara (Brazil)] [UNESP — Univ. Estadual Paulista, College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Department of Natural Principles and Toxicology, Rodovia Araraquara-Jau, km 01, Araraquara (Brazil); Csipak, A.R.; Caliri, C.M.; Silva, I.C. [UNESP — Univ. Estadual Paulista, College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Department of Clinical Analysis, Rua Expedicionários do Brasil, 1621, Araraquara (Brazil)] [UNESP — Univ. Estadual Paulista, College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Department of Clinical Analysis, Rua Expedicionários do Brasil, 1621, Araraquara (Brazil); Arbex, M.A. [UNIFESP — Federal University of São Paulo, Paulista College of Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Rua Pedro de Toledo, 720, São Paulo (Brazil)] [UNIFESP — Federal University of São Paulo, Paulista College of Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Rua Pedro de Toledo, 720, São Paulo (Brazil); Silva, F.S.; Marchi, M.R.R. [UNESP — Univ. Estadual Paulista, Chemistry Institute, Department of Analytical Chemistry, Rua Francisco Degni, S/N, Araraquara (Brazil)] [UNESP — Univ. Estadual Paulista, Chemistry Institute, Department of Analytical Chemistry, Rua Francisco Degni, S/N, Araraquara (Brazil); Cavalheiro, A.J.; Silva, D.H.S.; Bolzani, V.S. [UNESP — Univ. Estadual Paulista, Chemistry Institute, Department of Organic Chemistry, Rua Francisco Degni, S/N, Araraquara (Brazil)] [UNESP — Univ. Estadual Paulista, Chemistry Institute, Department of Organic Chemistry, Rua Francisco Degni, S/N, Araraquara (Brazil); Soares, C.P., E-mail: soarescp@hotmail.com [UNESP — Univ. Estadual Paulista, College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Department of Clinical Analysis, Rua Expedicionários do Brasil, 1621, Araraquara (Brazil)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

396

Mechanosensitivity of human osteosarcoma cells and phospholipase C {beta}2 expression  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Bone adapts to mechanical load by osteosynthesis, suggesting that osteoblasts might respond to mechanical stimuli. We therefore investigated cell proliferation and phospholipase C (PLC) expression in osteoblasts. One Hertz uniaxial stretching at 4000 {mu}strains significantly increased the proliferation rates of human osteoblast-like osteosarcoma cell line MG-63 and primary human osteoblasts. However, U-2/OS, SaOS-2, OST, and MNNG/HOS cells showed no significant changes in proliferation rate. We investigated the expression pattern of different isoforms of PLC in these cell lines. We were able to detect PLC {beta}1, {beta}3, {gamma}1, {gamma}2, and {delta}1 in all cells, but PLC {beta}2 was only detectable in the mechanosensitive cells. We therefore investigated the possible role of PLC {beta}2 in mechanotransduction. Inducible antisense expression for 24 h inhibited the translation of PLC {beta}1 in U-2/OS cells by 35% and PLC {beta}2 in MG-63 by 29%. Fluid shear flow experiments with MG-63 lacking PLC {beta}2 revealed a significantly higher level of cells losing attachment to coverslips and a significantly lower number of cells increasing intracellular free calcium.

Hoberg, M. [Department of Orthopaedics, University of Tuebingen (Germany)]. E-mail: Maik.Hoberg@med.uni-tuebingen.de; Gratz, H.-H. [Experimental Orthopaedics and Biomechanics, Phillips-University of Marburg (Germany); Noll, M. [Experimental Orthopaedics and Biomechanics, Phillips-University of Marburg (Germany); Jones, D.B. [Experimental Orthopaedics and Biomechanics, Phillips-University of Marburg (Germany)

2005-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

397

C&EN: Latest News -Biopolymer Gives Strength To Bones http://pubs.acs.org/cen/news/83/i30/8330notw6.html 1 of 2 7/31/2005 2:51 PM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HALFORD STRETCHED When under stress, bone's biopolymeric glue stretches by breaking sacrificial bonds (red to healthy, fracture-resistant bones may lie within tiny bits of a shock- absorbing biopolymeric "glue

Hansma, Paul

398

SFTEL: Flow Cell | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Flow Cell EMSL's Subsurface Flow and Transport Experimental Laboratory offers several meter-scale flow cells and columns for research in saturated and unsaturated porous media....

399

Photovoltaic Cell Structure Basics  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The actual structural design of a photovoltaic (PV), or solar cell, depends on the limitations of the material used in the PV cell.

400

Microfluidic fuel cells.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Microfluidic fuel cell architectures are presented in this thesis. This work represents the mechanical and microfluidic portion of a microfluidic biofuel cell project. While the… (more)

Kjeang, Erik

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bone marrow cells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Effect of the {delta}-aminolevulinate dehydratase polymorphism on the accumulation of lead in bone and blood in lead smelter workers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Lead inhibition of the zinc metalloenzyme {delta}-aminolevulinate dehydratase (ALAD) is one of the most sensitive indicators of blood lead levels. Whole blood lead, serum lead, and ALAD genotype were determined for 381 lead smelter workers, including 70 workers expressing the ALAD allele, whose blood lead elevations were observed for more than 20 years of employment. The same employees demonstrated higher serum lead levels. Using a cumulative blood lead index (CBLI) for each worker, based on individual blood lead histories, and in vivo X-ray fluorescence measurements of bone lead to estimate total lead body burden, the slopes of linear relations of bone lead to CBLI were greater for workers homoallelic for ALAD, indicating more efficient uptake of lead from blood into bone. This effect was most significant in calcaneus bone and for workers hired since 1977. Decreased transfer of blood lead into bone in individuals expressing the ALAD allele contrasted with increased blood lead.

Fleming, D.E.B.; Chettle, D.R. [McMaster Univ., Hamilton, Ontario (Canada). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy] [McMaster Univ., Hamilton, Ontario (Canada). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy; Wetmur, J.G.; Desnick, R.J. [Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY (United States)] [Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY (United States); Robin, J.P. [Noranda Inc., Montreal, Quebec (Canada)] [Noranda Inc., Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Boulay, D.; Richard, N.S. [Brunswick Mining and Smelting Corp. Ltd., Belledune, New Brunswick (Canada). Occupational Health Services] [Brunswick Mining and Smelting Corp. Ltd., Belledune, New Brunswick (Canada). Occupational Health Services; Gordon, C.L.; Webber, C.E. [Hamilton Health Sciences Corp., Hamilton, Ontario (Canada). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine] [Hamilton Health Sciences Corp., Hamilton, Ontario (Canada). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

POLYMER ELECTROLYTE FUEL CELLS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

POLYMER ELECTROLYTE FUEL CELLS: The Gas Diffusion Layer Johannah Itescu Princeton University PRISM REU #12;PEM FUEL CELLS: A little background information I. What do fuel cells do? Generate electricity through chemical reaction #12;PEM FUEL CELLS: A little background information -+ + eHH 442 2 0244 22 He

Petta, Jason

403

Thermal Management of Solar Cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

cells by cooling and concentration techniques," inheat. Different techniques of cooling solar cells have been

Saadah, Mohammed Ahmed

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Interspecic scaling of the hindlimb skeleton in lizards, crocodilians, felids and canids: does limb bone shape correlate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

limb bone shape correlate with limb posture? Richard W. Blob* Committee on Evolutionary Biology-phylogenetic statistical methods and phylogenetically independent contrasts. Comparisons with theoretical models indicate to such an extent that for the femur and tibia safety factors in shear are approximately half as great as safety

Blob, Richard W.

405

Injectable Bone Substitute using a hydrophilic polymer Pierre Weiss, Olivier Gauthier, Jean-Michel Bouler, Gal Grimandi and Guy Daculsi  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

polymer as matrix and bioactive calcium phosphate (CaP) ceramics as fillers. This material is composed effects on this composite in a tube. The stability of the polymer and the mixture is essential between CaP ceramic granules and facilitate the role of the biological agents of bone substitution

Boyer, Edmond

406

The Wnt Co-receptor LRP5 Is Essential for Skeletal Mechanotransduction but Not for the Anabolic Bone  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- of-function mutations in LRP5 cause the human skeletal disease osteoporosis-pseudoglioma syndrome com- ponent of the skeletal fragility phenotype in individuals affected with osteoporosis in the regulation of bone mass and strength. For example, the autosomal recessive human disease osteoporosis

407

Physico-chemical characterization and in vitro biological evaluation of pure SiHA for bone tissue engineering application  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Supérieure des Mines de Saint-Etienne, CIS-EMSE, CNRS: FRE3312, F-42023 158 Cours Fauriel, SaintHA surface. Introduction Large bone defects resulting from trauma, cancer or malformations remain significant the real effects of Si substitution on the biological activity of HA in biological environment [6-8]. hal

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

408

Fracture Mechanisms of Bone: A Comparative Study between Antler and Bovine Femur , F.A. Sheppard2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fracture Mechanisms of Bone: A Comparative Study between Antler and Bovine Femur P.Y. Chen1 , F, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093-0411, U.S.A. ABSTRACT In this study, fracture conditions to study the effects of fiber orientation and hydration. Fracture toughness results

McKittrick, Joanna

409

Bone Acquisition in Healthy Children and Adolescents: Comparisons of Dual-Energy X-Ray Absorptiometry and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Radiology and Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Childrens Hospital Los Angeles, Los Angeles pediatric bone measurements using DXA. Height, weight, body mass index, skeletal age, and Tanner stageBMD in healthy children (2­13). Although DXA studies in pediatrics have provided much information re- garding

Valero-Cuevas, Francisco

410

Prevention of Postmenopausal Bone Loss by a Low-Magnitude, High-Frequency Mechanical Stimuli: A Clinical Trial Assessing Compliance,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, skeleton, aging, menopause, bone, antiresorptive INTRODUCTION OSTEOPOROSIS, A DISEASE CHARACTERIZED, double-blind, and placebo-controlled clinical trial in 70 women, 3­8 years past the menopause, examined the potential for a noninvasive, mechanically mediated intervention for osteoporosis. This non

411

Bone quality measurements Osteoporos Int. 2011 Aug;22(8):2225-40. New laboratory tools in the assessment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

,version1-1Jul2013 Author manuscript, published in "Osteoporosis International 22, 8 (2011) 2225-2240" DOI Force Microscopy FEA Finite Element Analysis Introduction Fragility fractures due to osteoporosis and affect ~30 % of women after the menopause and ~10 % of men. Dual Energy bone densitometry (DXA) has

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

412

Micro Fuel Cells Direct Methanol Fuel Cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

energy density of 1.5 Wh/cc; 1.5Wh/g = X5; x10 energy density of Li ion battery * Direct & complete Content (Wh) Volume(cm^3) Li-Ion Battery DMFC #12;Micro Fuel Cells TM State of MTI Micro Fuel Cells Energy Content (Wh) Volume(cm^3) Li-Ion Battery DMFC #12;Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Technology

413

On the effect of x-ray irradiation on the deformation and fracture behavior of human cortical bone  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In situ mechanical testing coupled with imaging using high-energy synchrotron x-ray diffraction or tomography imaging is gaining in popularity as a technique to investigate micrometer and even sub-micrometer deformation and fracture mechanisms in mineralized tissues, such as bone and teeth. However, the role of the irradiation in affecting the nature and properties of the tissue is not always taken into account. Accordingly, we examine here the effect of x-ray synchrotron-source irradiation on the mechanistic aspects of deformation and fracture in human cortical bone. Specifically, the strength, ductility and fracture resistance (both work-of-fracture and resistance-curve fracture toughness) of human femoral bone in the transverse (breaking) orientation were evaluated following exposures to 0.05, 70, 210 and 630 kGy irradiation. Our results show that the radiation typically used in tomography imaging can have a major and deleterious impact on the strength, post-yield behavior and fracture toughness of cortical bone, with the severity of the effect progressively increasing with higher doses of radiation. Plasticity was essentially suppressed after as little as 70 kGy of radiation; the fracture toughness was decreased by a factor of five after 210 kGy of radiation. Mechanistically, the irradiation was found to alter the salient toughening mechanisms, manifest by the progressive elimination of the bone's capacity for plastic deformation which restricts the intrinsic toughening from the formation 'plastic zones' around crack-like defects. Deep-ultraviolet Raman spectroscopy indicated that this behavior could be related to degradation in the collagen integrity.

Barth, Holly D.; Launey, Maximilien E.; McDowell, Alastair A.; Ager III, Joel W.; Ritchie, Robert O.

2010-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

414

Ibandronate promotes osteogenic differentiation of periodontal ligament stem cells by regulating the expression of microRNAs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Research highlights: {yields} Ibandronate significantly promote the proliferation of PDLSC cells. {yields} Ibandronate enhanced the expression of ALP, COL-1, OPG, OCN, Runx2. {yields} The expression of a class of miRNAs, e.g., miR-18a, miR-133a, miR-141 and miR-19a, was significantly modified in PDLSC cells cultured with ibandronate. {yields} Ibandronate regulates the expression of diverse bone formation-related genes via miRNAs in PDLSCs. {yields} Ibandronate can suppress the activity of osteoclast while promoting the proliferation of osteoblast by regulating the expression of microRNAs. -- Abstract: Bisphosphonates (BPs) have a profound effect on bone resorption and are widely used to treat osteoclast-mediated bone diseases. They suppress bone resorption by inhibiting the activity of mature osteoclasts and/or the formation of new osteoclasts. Osteoblasts may be an alternative target for BPs. Periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs) exhibit osteoblast-like features and are capable of differentiating into osteoblasts or cementoblasts. This study aimed to determine the effects of ibandronate, a nitrogen-containing BP, on the proliferation and the differentiation of PDLSCs and to identify the microRNAs (miRNAs) that mediate these effects. The PDLSCs were treated with ibandronate, and cell proliferation was measured using the MTT (3-dimethylthiazol-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) assay. The expression of genes and miRNAs involved in osteoblastic differentiation was assayed using quantitative real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). Ibandronate promoted the proliferation of PDLSCs and enhanced the expression of alkaline phosphatase (ALP), type I collagen (COL-1), osteoprotegerin (OPG), osteocalcin (OCN), and Runx2. The expression of miRNAs, including miR-18a, miR-133a, miR-141 and miR-19a, was significantly altered in the PDLSCs cultured with ibandronate. In PDLSCs, ibandronate regulates the expression of diverse bone formation-related genes via miRNAs. The exact mechanism underlying the role of ibandronate in osteoblasts has not been completely understood. Ibandronate may suppress the activity of osteoclasts while promoting the proliferation of osteoblasts by regulating the expression of miRNAs.

Zhou, Qiang [Department of General Dentistry and Emergency, College of Stomatology, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi'an, Shaanxi 710032 (China)] [Department of General Dentistry and Emergency, College of Stomatology, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi'an, Shaanxi 710032 (China); Zhao, Zhi-Ning [Clinical Laboratory, 451 Hospital of Chinese PLA, Xi'an 710054 (China)] [Clinical Laboratory, 451 Hospital of Chinese PLA, Xi'an 710054 (China); Cheng, Jing-Tao [Department of Special Dentistry, College of Stomatology, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi'an, Shaanxi 710032 (China)] [Department of Special Dentistry, College of Stomatology, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi'an, Shaanxi 710032 (China); Zhang, Bin [Department of Orthodontics, College of Stomatology, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi'an, Shaanxi 710032 (China)] [Department of Orthodontics, College of Stomatology, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi'an, Shaanxi 710032 (China); Xu, Jie [Department of Periodontology, College of Stomatology, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi'an, Shaanxi 710032 (China)] [Department of Periodontology, College of Stomatology, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi'an, Shaanxi 710032 (China); Huang, Fei; Zhao, Rui-Ni [Department of General Dentistry and Emergency, College of Stomatology, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi'an, Shaanxi 710032 (China)] [Department of General Dentistry and Emergency, College of Stomatology, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi'an, Shaanxi 710032 (China); Chen, Yong-Jin, E-mail: cyj1229@fmmu.edu.cn [Department of General Dentistry and Emergency, College of Stomatology, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi'an, Shaanxi 710032 (China)] [Department of General Dentistry and Emergency, College of Stomatology, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi'an, Shaanxi 710032 (China)

2011-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

415

Temperature Measurement During Polymerization of Bone Cement in Percutaneous Vertebroplasty: An In Vivo Study in Humans  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Aim of the study was to 'in vivo' measure temperature, during percutaneous vertebroplasty (PV), within a vertebral body injected with different bone cements. According to the declaration of Helsinki, 22 women (60-80 years; mean, 75 years) with painful osteoporotic vertebral collapse underwent bilateral transpedicular PV on 22 lumbar vertebrae. Two 10-G vertebroplasty needles were introduced into the vertebra under digital fluoroscopy; a 16-G radiofrequency thermoablation needle (Starburst XL; RITA Medical System Inc., USA), carrying five thermocouples, was than coaxially inserted. Eleven different bone cements were injected and temperatures were measured every 30 s until temperatures dropped under 45{sup o}C. After the thermocouple needle was withdrawn, bilateral PV was completed with cement injection through the vertebroplasty needle. Unpaired Student's t-tests, Kruskal-Wallis test, and Wilcoxon signed rank test were used to evaluate significant differences (p < 0.05) in peak temperatures, variations between cements, and clinical outcome. All procedures were completed without complications, achieving good clinical outcomes (p < 0.0001). Regarding average peak temperature, cements were divided into three groups: A (over 60{sup o}C), B (from 50{sup o} to 60{sup o}C), and C (below 50{sup o}C). Peak temperature in Group A (86.7 {+-} 10.7{sup o}C) was significantly higher (p = 0.0172) than that in Groups B (60.5 {+-} 3.7{sup o}C) and C (44.8 {+-} 2.6{sup o}C). The average of all thermocouples showed an extremely significant difference (p = 0.0002) between groups. None of the tested cements maintained a temperature {>=}45{sup o}C for more than 30 min. These data suggest that back-pain improvement is obtained not by thermal necrosis but by mechanical consolidation only. The relative necrotic thermal effect in vertebral metastases seems to confirm that analgesia must be considered the main intent of PV.

Anselmetti, Giovanni Carlo, E-mail: giovanni.anselmetti@ircc.it; Manca, Antonio [Institute for Cancer Research and Treatment (IRCC), Interventional Radiology Unit (Italy); Kanika, Khanna; Murphy, Kieran [Johns Hopkins Hospital, Radiology and Radiological Science (United States); Eminefendic, Haris [Institute for Cancer Research and Treatment (IRCC), Radiology Unit (Italy); Masala, Salvatore ['Tor Vergata' University General Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Molecular Imaging, Interventional Radiology and Radiotherapy (Italy); Regge, Daniele [Institute for Cancer Research and Treatment (IRCC), Radiology Unit (Italy)

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

416

MicroCT-Based Skeletal Models for Use in Tomographic Voxel Phantoms for Radiological Protection  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

ABSTRACT The University of Florida (UF) proposes to develop two high-resolution image-based skeletal dosimetry models for direct use by ICRP Committee 2’s Task Group on Dose Calculation in their forthcoming Reference Voxel Male (RVM) and Reference Voxel Female (RVF) whole-body dosimetry phantoms. These two phantoms are CT-based, and thus do not have the image resolution to delineate and perform radiation transport modeling of the individual marrow cavities and bone trabeculae throughout their skeletal structures. Furthermore, new and innovative 3D microimaging techniques will now be required for the skeletal tissues following Committee 2’s revision of the target tissues of relevance for radiogenic bone cancer induction. This target tissue had been defined in ICRP Publication 30 as a 10-?m cell layer on all bone surfaces of trabecular and cortical bone. The revised target tissue is now a 50-?m layer within the marrow cavities of trabecular bone only and is exclusive of the marrow adipocytes. Clearly, this new definition requires the use of 3D microimages of the trabecular architecture not available from past 2D optical studies of the adult skeleton. With our recent acquisition of two relatively young cadavers (males of age 18-years and 40-years), we will develop a series of reference skeletal models that can be directly applied to (1) the new ICRP reference voxel man and female phantoms developed for the ICRP, and (2) pediatric phantoms developed to target the ICRP reference children. Dosimetry data to be developed will include absorbed fractions for internal beta and alpha-particle sources, as well as photon and neutron fluence-to-dose response functions for direct use in external dosimetry studies of the ICRP reference workers and members of the general public

Wesley Bolch

2010-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

417

The effect of excitation and preparation pulses on nonslice selective 2D UTE bicomponent analysis of bound and free water in cortical bone at 3T  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of excitation, fat saturation, long T2 saturation, and adiabatic inversion pulses on ultrashort echo time (UTE) imaging with bicomponent analysis of bound and free water in cortical bone for potential applications in osteoporosis. Methods: Six bovine cortical bones and six human tibial midshaft samples were harvested for this study. Each bone sample was imaged with eight sequences using 2D UTE imaging at 3T with half and hard excitation pulses, without and with fat saturation, long T2 saturation, and adiabatic inversion recovery (IR) preparation pulses. Single- and bicomponent signal models were utilized to calculate the T2{sup *}s and/or relative fractions of short and long T2{sup *}s. Results: For all bone samples UTE T2{sup *} signal decay showed bicomponent behavior. A higher short T2{sup *} fraction was observed on UTE images with hard pulse excitation compared with half pulse excitation (75.6% vs 68.8% in bovine bone, 79.9% vs 73.2% in human bone). Fat saturation pulses slightly reduced the short T2{sup *} fraction relative to regular UTE sequences (5.0% and 2.0% reduction, respectively, with half and hard excitation pulses for bovine bone, 6.3% and 8.2% reduction, respectively, with half and hard excitation pulses for human bone). Long T2 saturation pulses significantly reduced the long T2{sup *} fraction relative to regular UTE sequence (18.9% and 17.2% reduction, respectively, with half and hard excitation pulses for bovine bone, 26.4% and 27.7% reduction, respectively, with half and hard excitation pulses for human bone). With IR-UTE preparation the long T2{sup *} components were significantly reduced relative to regular UTE sequence (75.3% and 66.4% reduction, respectively, with half and hard excitation pulses for bovine bone, 87.7% and 90.3% reduction, respectively, with half and hard excitation pulses for human bone). Conclusions: Bound and free water T2{sup *}s and relative fractions can be assessed using UTE bicomponent analysis. Long T2{sup *} components are affected more by long T2 saturation and IR pulses, and short T2{sup *} components are affected more by fat saturation pulses.

Li, Shihong [Department of Radiology, University of California, San Diego, California 92103-8226 (United States) [Department of Radiology, University of California, San Diego, California 92103-8226 (United States); Department of Radiology, Hua Dong Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai 200040 (China); Yancheng Medical College, Jiangsu (China); The First People's Hospital of Yancheng City, Jiangsu 224005 (China); Chang, Eric Y.; Chung, Christine B. [VA San Diego Healthcare System, San Diego, California 92161 and Department of Radiology, University of California, San Diego, California 92103-8226 (United States)] [VA San Diego Healthcare System, San Diego, California 92161 and Department of Radiology, University of California, San Diego, California 92103-8226 (United States); Bae, Won C.; Du, Jiang, E-mail: jiangdu@ucsd.edu [Department of Radiology, University of California, San Diego, California 92103-8226 (United States)] [Department of Radiology, University of California, San Diego, California 92103-8226 (United States); Hua, Yanqing [Department of Radiology, Hua Dong Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai 200040 (China)] [Department of Radiology, Hua Dong Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai 200040 (China); Zhou, Yi [The First People's Hospital of Yancheng City, Jiangsu 224005 (China)] [The First People's Hospital of Yancheng City, Jiangsu 224005 (China)

2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

418

Cell Stem Cell Highly Efficient Reprogramming  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Alexander Meissner,4,5,14 George Q. Daley,2,3,4,5,8,15,16 Andrew S. Brack,5,6 James J. Collins,11,12,15 Chad Children's Hospital Boston, Boston, MA 02115, USA 4Department of Stem Cell and Regenerative Biology 5Harvard Stem Cell Institute Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA 6Center of Regenerative Medicine

Collins, James J.

419

Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technologies Update: 2010 Fuel Cell Seminar...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Update: 2010 Fuel Cell Seminar and Exposition Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technologies Update: 2010 Fuel Cell Seminar and Exposition Presentation by Sunita Satyapal at the 2010 Fuel...

420

Cell Cycle and Apoptosis Regulatory Protein (CARP)-1 is Expressed inOsteoblasts and Regulated by PTH  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: •CARP-1 is identified for the first time in bone cells. •PTH downregulates CARP-1 expression in differentiated osteoblasts. •PTH displaces CARP-1 from nucleus to the cytoplasm in differentiated osteoblasts. •Downregulation of CARP-1 by PTH involves PKA, PKC and P-p38 MAPK pathways. -- Abstract: Bone mass is dependent on osteoblast proliferation, differentiation and life-span of osteoblasts. Parathyroid hormone (PTH) controls osteoblast cell cycle regulatory proteins and suppresses mature osteoblasts apoptosis. Intermittent administration of PTH increases bone mass but the mechanism of action are complex and incompletely understood. Cell Cycle and Apoptosis Regulatory Protein (CARP)-1 (aka CCAR1) is a novel transducer of signaling by diverse agents including cell growth and differentiation factors. To gain further insight into the molecular mechanism, we investigated involvement of CARP-1 in PTH signaling in osteoblasts. Immunostaining studies revealed presence of CARP-1 in osteoblasts and osteocytes, while a minimal to absent levels were noted in the chondrocytes of femora from 10 to 12-week old mice. Treatment of 7-day differentiated MC3T3-E1 clone-4 (MC-4) mouse osteoblastic cells and primary calvarial osteoblasts with PTH for 30 min to 5 h followed by Western blot analysis showed 2- to 3-fold down-regulation of CARP-1 protein expression in a dose- and time-dependent manner compared to the respective vehicle treated control cells. H-89, a Protein Kinase A (PKA) inhibitor, suppressed PTH action on CARP-1 protein expression indicating PKA-dependent mechanism. PMA, a Protein Kinase C (PKC) agonist, mimicked PTH action, and the PKC inhibitor, GF109203X, partially blocked PTH-dependent downregulation of CARP-1, implying involvement of PKC. U0126, a Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase (MAPK) Kinase (MEK) inhibitor, failed to interfere with CARP-1 suppression by PTH. In contrast, SB203580, p38 inhibitor, attenuated PTH down-regulation of CARP-1 suggesting that PTH utilized an Extracellular Signal Regulated Kinase (ERK)-independent but p38 dependent pathway to regulate CARP-1 protein expression in osteoblasts. Immunofluorescence staining of differentiated osteoblasts further revealed nuclear to cytoplasmic translocation of CARP-1 protein following PTH treatment. Collectively, our studies identified CARP-1 for the first time in osteoblasts and suggest its potential role in PTH signaling and bone anabolic action.

Sharma, Sonali; Mahalingam, Chandrika D.; Das, Varsha [Department of Internal Medicine/Endocrinology, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, MI 48201 (United States)] [Department of Internal Medicine/Endocrinology, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, MI 48201 (United States); Jamal, Shazia [Department of Oncology, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, MI 48201 (United States)] [Department of Oncology, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, MI 48201 (United States); Levi, Edi [Department of Oncology, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, MI 48201 (United States) [Department of Oncology, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, MI 48201 (United States); Department of Pathology, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, MI 48201 (United States); Rishi, Arun K. [Department of Oncology, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, MI 48201 (United States) [Department of Oncology, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, MI 48201 (United States); Barbara Ann Karmanos Cancer Institute, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, MI 48201 (United States); VA Medical Center, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, MI 48201 (United States); Datta, Nabanita S., E-mail: ndatta@med.wayne.edu [Department of Internal Medicine/Endocrinology, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, MI 48201 (United States); Barbara Ann Karmanos Cancer Institute, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, MI 48201 (United States); Cardiovascular Research Institute, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, MI 48201 (United States)

2013-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bone marrow cells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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421

Cell-cell and cell-medium interactions in the growth of mouse embryonic stem cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Embryonic stem cells serve as powerful models for the study of development and disease and hold enormous potential for future therapeutics. Due to the potential for embryonic stem cells (ESCs) to provide a variety of tissues ...

Mittal, Nikhil, 1979-

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Photovoltaic Cell Performance Basics  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Photovoltaic (PV), or solar cells use the energy in sunlight to produce electricity. However, the amount of electricity produced depends on the quality of the light available and the performance of the PV cell.

423

fuel cells | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

fuel cells fuel cells Leads No leads are available at this time. The Molecular Bond: October 2014 The Molecular Bond newsletter banner October 2014 FROM THE DIRECTOR Read more...

424

NANOCOMPOSITE ENABLED SENSITIZED SOLAR CELL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by Dye-Sensitized Photovoltaic cells. Inorganic Chemistry,by Dye-Sensitized Photovoltaic Cells. Inorganic ChemistryThe characteristics of a photovoltaic cell. Generally,

Phuyal, Dibya

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Hybrid direct methanol fuel cells.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??A new type of fuel cell that combines the advantages of a proton exchange membrane fuel cells and anion exchange membrane fuel cells operated with… (more)

Joseph, Krishna Sathyamurthy

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

NANOCOMPOSITE ENABLED SENSITIZED SOLAR CELL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

efficiency in dye-sensitized solar cells based on Tio2Conversion by Dye-Sensitized Photovoltaic cells. InorganicConversion by Dye-Sensitized Photovoltaic Cells. Inorganic

Phuyal, Dibya

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Electroluminescence in photovoltaic cell  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Here we propose two methods to get electroluminescence images from photovoltaic cells in a school or home lab.

Petraglia, Antonio; 10.1088/0031-9120/46/5/F01

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Webinar: Fuel Cell Buses  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Video recording and text version of the webinar titled, Fuel Cell Buses, originally presented on September 12, 2013.

429

Biomarkers of cell senescence  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention provides a biomarker system for the in vivo and in vitro assessment of cell senescence. In the method of the present invention, {beta}-galactosidase activity is utilized as a means by which cell senescence may be assessed either in in vitro cell cultures or in vivo. 1 fig.

Dirmi, G.P.; Campisi, J.; Peacocke, M.

1996-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

430

Biomarkers of cell senescence  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention provides a biomarker system for the in vivo and in vitro assessment of cell senescence. In the method of the present invention, {beta}-galactosidase activity is utilized as a means by which cell senescence may be assessed either in vitro cell cultures or in vivo. 1 fig.

Dimri, G.P.; Campisi, J.; Peacocke, M.

1998-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

431

FUEL CELLS FOR TRANSPORTATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

................................................................................................... 34 E. Cost Analyses of Fuel Cell Stacks/Systems ­ Arthur D. Little, Inc. ......................................... 40 F. DFMA Cost Estimates of Fuel-Cell/Reformer Systems at Low/Medium/High Production Rates&D of a Novel Breadboard Device Suitable for Carbon Monoxide Remediation in an Automotive PEM Fuel Cell Power

432

Rapidly refuelable fuel cell  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention is directed to a metal-air fuel cell where the consumable metal anode is movably positioned in the cell and an expandable enclosure, or bladder, is used to press the anode into contact with separating spacers between the cell electrodes. The bladder may be depressurized to allow replacement of the anode when consumed.

Joy, Richard W. (Santa Clara, CA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

California: TetraCell Silicon Solar Cell Improves Efficiency...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

California: TetraCell Silicon Solar Cell Improves Efficiency, Wins R&D 100 Award California: TetraCell Silicon Solar Cell Improves Efficiency, Wins R&D 100 Award August 16, 2013 -...

434

DOE Fuel Cell Technologies Office Record 14012: Fuel Cell System...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

2: Fuel Cell System Cost - 2013 DOE Fuel Cell Technologies Office Record 14012: Fuel Cell System Cost - 2013 This program record from the U.S. Department of Energy's Fuel Cell...

435

Please send suggestions for improvement to John Webster, webster@engr.wisc.edu, 608-263-1574 9.12 BONES AND JOINTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, like a chunk of rubber, and can even be bent into a loop. When collagen is removed from the bone by calcium varies rapidly with energy in this range of energies; the relatively large beam contains much

Lakes, Roderic

436

Nanomechanics and ultrastructural studies of cortical bone : fundamental insights regarding structure-function, mineral-organic force mechanics interactions, and heterogeneity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Although the mechanics of bone has been studied extensively at the micro- and macro-scale, the nano-scopic level is perhaps the most illuminating as this is the length scale at which the individual constituents interact. ...

Tai, Kuangshin

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Human {beta}-globin gene polymorphisms characterized in DNA extracted from ancient bones 12,000 years old  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Analyzing the nuclear DNA from ancient human bones is an essential step to the understanding of genetic diversity in current populations, provided that such systematic studies are experimentally feasible. This article reports the successful extraction and amplification of nuclear DNA from the P-globin region from 5 of 10 bone specimens up to 12,000 years old. These have been typed for P-globin frameworks by sequencing through two variable positions and for a polymorphic (AT){sub x}(T){sub y} microsatellite 500 bp upstream of the P-globin gene. These specimens of human remains are somewhat older than those analyzed in previous nuclear gene sequencing reports and considerably older than those used to study high-copy-number human mtDNA. These results show that the systematic study of nuclear DNA polymorphisms of ancient populations is feasible. 34 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

Beraud-Colomb, E. [Genetique Medicale et Developpement, Marseille (France)]|[Laboratoire d`Anthropologie, Marseille (France); Maroc, N. [Genetique Medicale et Developpement, Marseille (France); Roubin, R. [Institut Paoli-Calmettes, Marseille (France)] [and others

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

A Novel Method for the Evaluation of Mechanical Properties of Cancellous Bone in the Rat Distal Femur  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Walton Lucas, B.S., Lipscomb University Co-Chairs of Advisory Committee: Dr. Harry Hogan Dr. Susan Bloomfield The mechanical properties of the cancellous bone in the laboratory rat animal model... the cortical shell for 50 slices in a region starting ~0.5 mm below the most proximal portion of the growth plate for each animal. Images were binarized (threshold of 100 on a 0-255 scale) and the following parameters were assessed for the three- dimensional...

Lucas, Matthew W.

2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

439

INSECT TRACE FOSSILS ON DINOSAUR BONES FROM THE UPPER JURASSIC MORRISON FORMATION, NORTHEASTERN WYOMING, AND THEIR USE IN VERTEBRATE TAPHONOMY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

carcasses by their inability to excavate tunnels in sediment. In this thesis I apply the principles of forensic entomology to study the taphonomic history of sauropod skeletons at the KU-WY-121 quarry in the Upper Jurassic Morrison Formation... and Martin, 2002; West and Hasiotis, 2007). Fossil bone modification by arthropods has been reported from the Late Jurassic, Cretaceous, Paleogene, and Neogene (Table 2). Traces include circular to oval pits, scratches, tunnels, notches, and channels...

Bader, Kenneth Stephen

2008-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

440

A Signal-Inducing Bone Cement for Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Guided Spinal Surgery Based on Hydroxyapatite and Polymethylmethacrylate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The aim of this study was to develop a signal-inducing bone cement for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided cementoplasty of the spine. This MRI cement would allow precise and controlled injection of cement into pathologic lesions of the bone. We mixed conventional polymethylmethacrylate bone cement (PMMA; 5 ml methylmethacrylate and 12 g polymethylmethacrylate) with hydroxyapatite (HA) bone substitute (2-4 ml) and a gadolinium-based contrast agent (CA; 0-60 {mu}l). The contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) of different CA doses was measured in an open 1.0-Tesla scanner for fast T1W Turbo-Spin-Echo (TSE) and T1W TSE pulse sequences to determine the highest signal. We simulated MRI-guided cementoplasty in cadaveric spines. Compressive strength of the cements was tested. The highest CNR was (1) 87.3 (SD 2.9) in fast T1W TSE for cements with 4 {mu}l CA/ml HA (4 ml) and (2) 60.8 (SD 2.4) in T1W TSE for cements with 1 {mu}l CA/ml HA (4 ml). MRI-guided cementoplasty in cadaveric spine was feasible. Compressive strength decreased with increasing amounts of HA from 46.7 MPa (2 ml HA) to 28.0 MPa (4 ml HA). An MRI-compatible cement based on PMMA, HA, and CA is feasible and clearly visible on MRI images. MRI-guided spinal cementoplasty using this cement would permit direct visualization of the cement, the pathologic process, and the anatomical surroundings.

Wichlas, Florian, E-mail: florian.wichlas@charite.de; Seebauer, Christian J.; Schilling, Rene [University Charite, Center for Musculoskeletal Surgery (Germany); Rump, Jens [University Charite, Department of Radiology (Germany); Chopra, Sascha S. [University Charite, Center for Musculoskeletal Surgery (Germany); Walter, Thula; Teichgraeber, Ulf K. M. [University Charite, Department of Radiology (Germany); Bail, Hermann J. [University Charite, Center for Musculoskeletal Surgery (Germany)

2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bone marrow cells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Webinar: Fuel Cell Mobile Lighting  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Video recording of the Fuel Cell Technologies Office webinar, Fuel Cell Mobile Lighting, originally presented on November 13, 2012.

442

Pyrolysis and gasification of meat-and-bone-meal: Energy balance and GHG accounting  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: • GHG savings are in the order of 600–1000 kg CO{sub 2}-eq. per Mg of MBM treated. • Energy recovery differed in terms of energy products and efficiencies. • The results were largely determined by use of the products for energy purposes. - Abstract: Meat-and-bone-meal (MBM) produced from animal waste has become an increasingly important residual fraction needing management. As biodegradable waste is routed away from landfills, thermo-chemical treatments of MBM are considered promising solution for the future. Pyrolysis and gasification of MBM were assessed based on data from three experimental lab and pilot-scale plants. Energy balances were established for the three technologies, providing different outcomes for energy recovery: bio-oil was the main product for the pyrolysis system, while syngas and a solid fraction of biochar were the main products in the gasification system. These products can be used – eventually after upgrading – for energy production, thereby offsetting energy production elsewhere in the system. Greenhouse gases (GHG) accounting of the technologies showed that all three options provided overall GHG savings in the order of 600–1000 kg CO{sub 2}-eq. per Mg of MBM treated, mainly as a consequence of avoided fossil fuel consumption in the energy sector. Local conditions influencing the environmental performance of the three systems were identified, together with critical factors to be considered during decision-making regarding MBM management.

Cascarosa, Esther [Thermochemical Processes Group, Aragón Institute for Engineering Research (I3A), Universidad de Zaragoza (Spain); Boldrin, Alessio, E-mail: aleb@env.dtu.dk [Department of Environmental Engineering. Technical University of Denmark, Kongens Lyngby (Denmark); Astrup, Thomas [Department of Environmental Engineering. Technical University of Denmark, Kongens Lyngby (Denmark)

2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

443

Innovative Composites Through Reinforcement Morphology Design - a Bone-Shaped-Short-Fiber Composite  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The objective of this project is to improve the strength and toughness of conventional short-fiber composites by using innovative bone-shaped-short (BSS) fibers as reinforcement. We fabricated a model polyethylene BSS fiber-reinforced polyester-matrix composite to prove that fiber morphology, instead of interfacial strength, solves the problem. Experimental tensile and fracture toughness test results show that BSS fibers can bridge matrix cracks more effectively, and consume many times more energy when pulled out, than conventional-straight-short (CSS) fibers. This leads to both higher strength and fracture toughness for the BSS-fiber composites. A computational model was developed to simulate crack propagation in both BSS- and CSS-fiber composites, accounting for stress concentrations, interface debonding, and fiber pullout. Model predictions were validated by experimental results and will be useful in optimizing BSS-fiber morphology and other material system parameters.

Zhu, Y.T.; Valdez, J.A.; Beyerlain, I.J.; Stout, M.G.; Zhou, S.; Shi, N.; Lowe, T.C.

1999-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

444

Tritium: a model for low level long-term ionizing radiation exposure  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The somatic, cytogenetic and genetic effects of single and chronic tritiated water (HTO) ingestion in mice was investigated. This study serves not only as an evaluation of tritium toxicity (TRITOX) but due to its design involving long-term low concentration ingestion of HTO may serve as a model for low level long-term ionizing radiation exposure in general. Long-term studies involved animals maintained on HTO at concentrations of 0.3 ..mu..Ci/ml, 1.0 ..mu..Ci/ml, 3.0 ..mu..Ci/ml or depth dose equivalent chronic external exposures to /sup 137/Cs gamma rays. Maintenance on 3.0 ..mu..Ci/ml resulted in no effect on growth, life-time shortening or bone marrow cellularity, but did result in a reduction of bone marrow stem cells, an increase in DLM's in second generation animals maintained on this regimen and cytogenetic effects as indicated by increased sister chromatid exchanges (SCE's) in bone marrow cells, increased chromosome aberrations in the regenerating liver and an increase in micronuclei in red blood cells. Biochemical and microdosimetry studies showed that animals placed on the HTO regimen reached tritium equilibrium in the body water in approximately 17 to 21 days with a more gradual increase in bound tritium. When animals maintained for 180 days on 3.0 ..mu..Ci/ml HTO were placed on a tap water regimen, the tritium level in tissue dropped from the equilibrium value of 2.02 ..mu..Ci/ml before withdrawal to 0.001 ..mu..Ci/ml at 28 days. 18 references.

Carsten, A.L.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Concentrator silicon cell research  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project continued the developments of high-efficiency silicon concentrator solar cells with the goal of achieving a cell efficiency in the 26 to 27 percent range at a concentration level of 150 suns of greater. The target efficiency was achieved with the new PERL (passivated emitter, rear locally diffused) cell structure, but only at low concentration levels around 20 suns. The PERL structure combines oxide passivation of both top and rear surfaces of the cells with small area contact to heavily doped regions on the top and rear surfaces. Efficiency in the 22 to 23 percent range was also demonstrated for large-area concentrator cells fabricated with the buried contact solar cell processing sequence, either when combined with prismatic covers or with other innovative approaches to reduce top contact shadowing. 19 refs.

Green, M.A.; Wenham, S.R.; Zhang, F.; Zhao, J.; Wang, A. [New South Wales Univ., Kensington (Australia). Solar Photovoltaic Lab.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

E-Print Network 3.0 - autologous blood collection Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

stem Summary: after co-infusion of autologous blood stem cells and cul- ture-expanded marrow mesenchy- mal stem cells... hematopoietic stem cells from solid organs has...

447

Direct hydrocarbon fuel cells  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The direct electrochemical oxidation of hydrocarbons in solid oxide fuel cells, to generate greater power densities at lower temperatures without carbon deposition. The performance obtained is comparable to that of fuel cells used for hydrogen, and is achieved by using novel anode composites at low operating temperatures. Such solid oxide fuel cells, regardless of fuel source or operation, can be configured advantageously using the structural geometries of this invention.

Barnett, Scott A.; Lai, Tammy; Liu, Jiang

2010-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

448

Heterojunction solar cell  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A high-efficiency single heterojunction solar cell is described wherein a thin emitter layer (preferably Ga[sub 0.52]In[sub 0.48]P) forms a heterojunction with a GaAs absorber layer. The conversion efficiency of the solar cell is at least 25.7%. The solar cell preferably includes a passivating layer between the substrate and the absorber layer. An anti-reflection coating is preferably disposed over the emitter layer. 1 fig.

Olson, J.M.

1994-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

449

Microcomposite Fuel Cell Membranes  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Summary of microcomposite fuel cell membrane work presented to the High Temperature Membrane Working Group Meeting, Orlando FL, October 17, 2003

450

Molten salt lithium cells  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Lithium-based cells are promising for applications such as electric vehicles and load-leveling for power plants since lithium is very electropositive and light weight. One type of lithium-based cell utilizes a molten salt electrolyte and is operated in the temperature range of about 400.degree.-500.degree. C. Such high temperature operation accelerates corrosion problems and a substantial amount of energy is lost through heat transfer. The present invention provides an electrochemical cell (10) which may be operated at temperatures between about 100.degree.-170.degree. C. Cell (10) comprises an electrolyte (16), which preferably includes lithium nitrate, and a lithium or lithium alloy electrode (12).

Raistrick, Ian D. (Menlo Park, CA); Poris, Jaime (Portola Valley, CA); Huggins, Robert A. (Stanford, CA)

1982-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

451

Molten salt lithium cells  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Lithium-based cells are promising for applications such as electric vehicles and load-leveling for power plants since lithium is very electropositive and light weight. One type of lithium-based cell utilizes a molten salt electrolyte and is operated in the temperature range of about 400.degree.-500.degree. C. Such high temperature operation accelerates corrosion problems and a substantial amount of energy is lost through heat transfer. The present invention provides an electrochemical cell (10) which may be operated at temperatures between about 100.degree.-170.degree. C. Cell (10) comprises an electrolyte (16), which preferably includes lithium nitrate, and a lithium or lithium alloy electrode (12).

Raistrick, Ian D. (Menlo Park, CA); Poris, Jaime (Portola Valley, CA); Huggins, Robert A. (Stanford, CA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Molten salt lithium cells  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Lithium-based cells are promising for applications such as electric vehicles and load-leveling for power plants since lithium is very electropositive and light weight. One type of lithium-based cell utilizes a molten salt electrolyte and is operated in the temperature range of about 400 to 500/sup 0/C. Such high temperature operation accelerates corrosion problems and a substantial amount of energy is lost through heat transfer. The present invention provides an electrochemical cell which may be operated at temperatures between about 100 to 170/sup 0/C. The cell is comprised of an electrolyte, which preferably includes lithium nitrate, and a lithium or lithium alloy electrode.

Raistrick, I.D.; Poris, J.; Huggins, R.A.

1980-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

453

Modelling microscale fuel cells.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The focus of this work is to investigate transport phenomena in recently developed microscale fuel cell designs using computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Two microscale fuel… (more)

Bazylak, Aimy Ming Jii

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Fuel Cell Technologies Overview  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Cells Key Benefits Very High Efficiency Reduced CO 2 Emissions Reduced Oil Use Reduced Air Pollution Fuel Flexibility * 40 - 60% (electrical) * > 70% (electrical, hybrid fuel...

455

Hydrogen Fuel Cells  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

The fuel cell — an energy conversion device that can efficiently capture and use the power of hydrogen — is the key to making it happen.

456

Electrochemical cell method  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A secondary electrochemical cell is prepared by providing positive and negative electrodes having outer enclosures of rigid perforated electrically conductive material defining an internal compartment containing the electrode material in porous solid form. The electrodes are each immersed in molten electrolyte salt prior to cell assembly to incorporate the cell electrolyte. Following solidification of the electrolyte substantially throughout the porous volume of the electrode material, the electrodes are arranged in an alternating positive-negative array with interelectrode separators of porous frangible electrically insulative material. The completed array is assembled into the cell housing and sealed such that on heating the solidified electrolyte flows into the interelectrode separator.

Kaun, T.D.; Eshman, P.F.

1980-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

457

cell trait? Know your sickle cell trait status.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

What is sickle cell trait? Know your sickle cell trait status. Engage in a slow and gradual experiencing unusual physical distress. People at high risk for having sickle cell trait are those whose countries. sickle cell trait is not a disease. Sickle cell trait is the inheritance of one gene for sickle

Devoto, Stephen H.

458

Programmed cell death  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this conference to provide a multidisciplinary forum for exchange of state-of-the-art information on the role programmed cell death plays in normal development and homeostasis of many organisms. This volume contains abstracts of papers in the following areas: invertebrate development; immunology/neurology; bcl-2 family; biochemistry; programmed cell death in viruses; oncogenesis; vertebrate development; and diseases.

NONE

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

459

Fuel cell generator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

High temperature solid oxide electrolyte fuel cell generators which allow controlled leakage among plural chambers in a sealed housing. Depleted oxidant and fuel are directly reacted in one chamber to combust remaining fuel and preheat incoming reactants. The cells are preferably electrically arranged in a series-parallel configuration.

Isenberg, Arnold O. (Forest Hills, PA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Mesangial cell biology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Mesangial cells originate from the metanephric mesenchyme and maintain structural integrity of the glomerular microvascular bed and mesangial matrix homeostasis. In response to metabolic, immunologic or hemodynamic injury, these cells undergo apoptosis or acquire an activated phenotype and undergo hypertrophy, proliferation with excessive production of matrix proteins, growth factors, chemokines and cytokines. These soluble factors exert autocrine and paracrine effects on the cells or on other glomerular cells, respectively. MCs are primary targets of immune-mediated glomerular diseases such as IGA nephropathy or metabolic diseases such as diabetes. MCs may also respond to injury that primarily involves podocytes and endothelial cells or to structural and genetic abnormalities of the glomerular basement membrane. Signal transduction and oxidant stress pathways are activated in MCs and likely represent integrated input from multiple mediators. Such responses are convenient targets for therapeutic intervention. Studies in cultured MCs should be supplemented with in vivo studies as well as examination of freshly isolated cells from normal and diseases glomeruli. In addition to ex vivo morphologic studies in kidney cortex, cells should be studied in their natural environment, isolated glomeruli or even tissue slices. Identification of a specific marker of MCs should help genetic manipulation as well as selective therapeutic targeting of these cells. Identification of biological responses of MCs that are not mediated by the renin–angiotensin system should help development of novel and effective therapeutic strategies to treat diseases characterized by MC pathology.

Abboud, Hanna E., E-mail: Abboud@uthscsa.edu

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bone marrow cells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

FORENSIC TECHNIQUES FOR CELL PHONES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

June 2007 FORENSIC TECHNIQUES FOR CELL PHONES FORENSIC TECHNIQUES FOR CELL PHONES Shirley Radack cell phones are widely used for both personal and professional applications, the technology of cell forensics usually do not cover cell phones, especially those with advanced capabilities. The digital

462

Solid oxide fuel cell generator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A solid oxide fuel cell generator has a plenum containing at least two rows of spaced apart, annular, axially elongated fuel cells. An electrical conductor extending between adjacent rows of fuel cells connects the fuel cells of one row in parallel with each other and in series with the fuel cells of the adjacent row. 5 figures.

Di Croce, A.M.; Draper, R.

1993-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

463

Single-cell technologies for monitoring interactions between immune cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Immune cells participate in dynamic cellular interactions that play a critical role in the defense against pathogens and the destruction of malignant cells. The vast heterogeneity of immune cells motivates the study of ...

Yamanaka, Yvonne J. (Yvonne Joy)

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Fuel Cells Vehicle Systems Analysis (Fuel Cell Freeze Investigation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Presentation on Fuel Cells Vehicle Systems Analysis (Fuel Cell Freeze Investigation) for the 2005 Hydrogen, Fuel Cells & Infrastructure Technologies Program Annual Review held in Arlington, Virginia on May 23-26, 2005.

Pesaran, A.; Kim, G.; Markel, T.; Wipke, K.

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Cochlear hair cell regeneration from neonatal mouse supporting cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Unlike lower vertebrates, capable of spontaneous hair cell regeneration, mammals experience permanent sensorineural hearing loss following hair cell damage. Although low levels of hair cell regeneration have been demonstrated ...

Bramhall, Naomi F

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Diagnostic studies on Li-battery cells and cell components  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

cells Disassembly of New and Aged Cells Electrode Surface & Bulk Analyses (ANL, BNL, LBNL) Electrolyte & Separator study (ANL, LBNL) Electrochemistry (ANL) Reference Electrode...

467

Red blood cell malformations Cell shapes Modeling and simulation of red blood cell light scattering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that have a "sickle" appearance (see figure to left). This malformed geometry prevents cells from traveling Red blood cell malformations Cell shapes Modeling and simulation of red blood cell light to various diseases and acute conditions, the shape and composition of erythrocytes (red blood cells

California at Berkeley, University of

468

Cell Patterning with Mucin Biopolymers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The precise spatial control of cell adhesion to surfaces is an endeavor that has enabled discoveries in cell biology and new possibilities in tissue engineering. The generation of cell-repellent surfaces currently requires ...

Crouzier, T.

469

Thermal Management of Solar Cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nanostructured Silicon- Based Solar Cells, 2013. X. C. Tong,heat exchangers, and solar cells," Sci-Tech News, vol. 65,in crystalline silicon solar cells," Renewable Energy, vol.

Saadah, Mohammed Ahmed

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Imposed currents in galvanic cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We analyze the steady-state behavior of a general mathematical model for reversible galvanic cells, such as redox flow cells, reversible solid oxide fuel cells, and rechargeable batteries. We consider not only operation ...

Biesheuvel, P. M.

471

Power from the Fuel Cell  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Power for Buildings Using Fuel-Cell Cars,” Proceedings ofwell as to drive down fuel-cell system costs through productthe potential advantages of fuel cells as clean and reliable

Lipman, Timothy E.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Thermal Management of Solar Cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is the ratio of the solar cell output power to the incidentmaximum power output at: The fill factor of a solar cell FFsolar cell temperature by about 15°C, which increases the output power

Saadah, Mohammed Ahmed

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Energy 101: Fuel Cells | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Fuel Cells Energy 101: Fuel Cells Addthis Description Learn everything you need to know about fuel cells. Topic Hydrogen & Fuel Cells...

474

Limited Chemotherapy and Shrinking Field Radiotherapy for Osteolymphoma (Primary Bone Lymphoma): Results From the Trans-Tasman Radiation Oncology Group 99.04 and Australasian Leukaemia and Lymphoma Group LY02 Prospective Trial;Bone; Lymphoma; Radiotherapy; Chemotherapy; Clinical trial  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To establish benchmark outcomes for combined modality treatment to be used in future prospective studies of osteolymphoma (primary bone lymphoma). Methods and Materials: In 1999, the Trans-Tasman Radiation Oncology Group (TROG) invited the Australasian Leukemia and Lymphoma Group (ALLG) to collaborate on a prospective study of limited chemotherapy and radiotherapy for osteolymphoma. The treatment was designed to maintain efficacy but limit the risk of subsequent pathological fractures. Patient assessment included both functional imaging and isotope bone scanning. Treatment included three cycles of CHOP chemotherapy and radiation to a dose of 45 Gy in 25 fractions using a shrinking field technique. Results: The trial closed because of slow accrual after 33 patients had been entered. Accrual was noted to slow down after Rituximab became readily available in Australia. After a median follow-up of 4.3 years, the five-year overall survival and local control rates are estimated at 90% and 72% respectively. Three patients had fractures at presentation that persisted after treatment, one with recurrent lymphoma. Conclusions: Relatively high rates of survival were achieved but the number of local failures suggests that the dose of radiotherapy should remain higher than it is for other types of lymphoma. Disability after treatment due to pathological fracture was not seen.

Christie, David, E-mail: david.christie@premion.com.au [Premion and Bond University, Gold Coast, Queensland (Australia); Dear, Keith [Department of Epidemiology and Population Studies, Australian National University, Canberra, New South Wales (Australia); Le, Thai [BHB, Premion, Brisbane, Queensland (Australia); Barton, Michael [Collaboration for Cancer Outcomes and Research (CCORE) and University of NSW, Sydney, New South Wales (Australia); Wirth, Andrew [Peter MacCallum Cancer Institute, Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Porter, David [Auckland Hospital, Auckland (New Zealand); Roos, Daniel [Royal Adelaide Hospital, Adelaide, South Australia (Australia); Pratt, Gary [Royal Brisbane Hospital, Brisbane, Queensland (Australia)

2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

475

Fuel Cell Technologies Program Overview  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

CSD Workshop Washington, DC Fuel Cell Technologies Program Overview Dr. Sunita Satyapal Director, Fuel Cell Technologies Office Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy U.S....

476

Solar cell array interconnects  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Electrical interconnects are disclosed for solar cells or other electronic components using a silver-silicone paste or a lead-tin (Pb-Sn) no-clean fluxless solder cream, whereby the high breakage of thin (<6 mil thick) solar cells using conventional solder interconnect is eliminated. The interconnects of this invention employs copper strips which are secured to the solar cells by a silver-silicone conductive paste which can be used at room temperature, or by a Pb-Sn solder cream which eliminates undesired residue on the active surfaces of the solar cells. Electrical testing using the interconnects of this invention has shown that no degradation of the interconnects developed under high current testing, while providing a very low contact resistance value. 4 figs.

Carey, P.G.; Thompson, J.B.; Colella, N.J.; Williams, K.A.

1995-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

477

Thin film photovoltaic cells  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A solar cell has as its transparent electrical contact a grid made from a non-noble metal by providing a layer of copper oxide between the transparent electrical contact and the absorber-generator.

Rothwarf, Allen (Philadelphia, PA)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Solar cell array interconnects  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Electrical interconnects for solar cells or other electronic components using a silver-silicone paste or a lead-tin (Pb-Sn) no-clean fluxless solder cream, whereby the high breakage of thin (<6 mil thick) solar cells using conventional solder interconnect is eliminated. The interconnects of this invention employs copper strips which are secured to the solar cells by a silver-silicone conductive paste which can be used at room temperature, or by a Pb-Sn solder cream which eliminates undesired residue on the active surfaces of the solar cells. Electrical testing using the interconnects of this invention has shown that no degradation of the interconnects developed under high current testing, while providing a very low contact resistance value.

Carey, Paul G. (Mountain View, CA); Thompson, Jesse B. (Brentwood, CA); Colella, Nicolas J. (Livermore, CA); Williams, Kenneth A. (Livermore, CA)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

Photovoltaic solar cell  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A photovoltaic solar cell for generating electricity from sunlight is disclosed. The photovoltaic solar cell comprises a plurality of spaced-apart point contact junctions formed in a semiconductor body to receive the sunlight and generate the electicity therefrom, the plurality of spaced-apart point contact junctions having a first plurality of regions having a first doping type and a second plurality of regions having a second doping type. In addition, the photovoltaic solar cell comprises a first electrical contact electrically connected to each of the first plurality of regions and a second electrical contact electrically connected to each of the second plurality of regions, as well as a passivation layer covering major surfaces and sidewalls of the photovoltaic solar cell.

Nielson, Gregory N; Okandan, Murat; Cruz-Campa, Jose Luis; Resnick, Paul J

2013-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

480

Photovoltaic solar cell  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A photovoltaic solar cell for generating electricity from sunlight is disclosed. The photovoltaic solar cell comprises a plurality of spaced-apart point contact junctions formed in a semiconductor body to receive the sunlight and generate the electricity therefrom, the plurality of spaced-apart point contact junctions having a first plurality of regions having a first doping type and a second plurality of regions having a second doping type. In addition, the photovoltaic solar cell comprises a first electrical contact electrically connected to each of the first plurality of regions and a second electrical contact electrically connected to each of the second plurality of regions, as well as a passivation layer covering major surfaces and sidewalls of the photovoltaic solar cell.

Nielson, Gregory N; Cruz-Campa, Jose Luis; Okandan, Murat; Resnick, Paul J

2014-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bone marrow cells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Fuel cell water transport  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The moisture content and temperature of hydrogen and oxygen gases is regulated throughout traverse of the gases in a fuel cell incorporating a solid polymer membrane. At least one of the gases traverses a first flow field adjacent the solid polymer membrane, where chemical reactions occur to generate an electrical current. A second flow field is located sequential with the first flow field and incorporates a membrane for effective water transport. A control fluid is then circulated adjacent the second membrane on the face opposite the fuel cell gas wherein moisture is either transported from the control fluid to humidify a fuel gas, e.g., hydrogen, or to the control fluid to prevent excess water buildup in the oxidizer gas, e.g., oxygen. Evaporation of water into the control gas and the control gas temperature act to control the fuel cell gas temperatures throughout the traverse of the fuel cell by the gases.

Vanderborgh, Nicholas E. (Los Alamos, NM); Hedstrom, James C. (Los Alamos, NM)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

Microbubble cell actuator  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The field of microsystems technology is rapidly growing, and expanding its horizons to applications in bioengineering. Currently, there are no cell analysis systems that facilitate the collection of dynamic responses for ...

Braff, Rebecca A. (Rebecca Alice)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

Genetic determinants of heel bone properties: Genome-wide association meta-analysis and replication in the GEFOS/GENOMOS consortium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

†, [8,9] Carrie Nielson, [10] Priya Srikanth, [10] Sylvie Giroux, [11] Scott G Wilson, [2,12,13] Hou-Feng Zheng, [14] Albert V Smith, [15,16] Stephen R Pye, [17] Paul J Leo, [18] Alexander Teumer, [19] Joo-Yeon Hwang, [20] Claes Ohlsson, [21] Fiona Mc... Email: stephen@srl.cam.ac.uk Tel : +44 1223 748668 Fax: +44 1223 748658 5   ABSTRACT Quantitative ultrasound of the heel captures heel bone properties that independently predict fracture risk and, with bone mineral density (BMD) assessed by x...

Moayyeri, Alireza; Hsu, Yi-Hsiang; Karasik, David; Estrada, Karol; Xiao, Su-Mei; Nielson, Carrie; Srikanth, Priya; Giroux, Sylvie; Wilson, Scott G.; Zheng, Hou-Feng; Smith, Albert V.; Pye, Stephen R.; Leo, Paul J.; Teumer, Alexander; Hwang, Joo-Yeon; Ohlsson, Claes; McGuigan, Fiona; Minster, Ryan L.; Hayward, Caroline; Olmos, José M.; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Lewis, Joshua R.; Swart, Karin M. A.; Masi, Laura; Oldmeadow, Chris; Holliday, Elizabeth G.; Cheng, Sulin; van Schoor, Natasja M.; Harvey, Nicholas C.; Kruk, Marcin; Del Greco M, Fabiola; Igl, Wilmar; Trummer, Olivia; Grigoriou, Efi; Luben, Robert; Liu, Ching-Ti; Zhou, Yanhua; Oei, Ling; Medina-Gomez, Carolina; Zmuda, Joseph; Tranah, Greg; Brown, Suzanne J.; Williams, Frances M.; Soranzo, Nicole; Jakobsdottir, Johanna; Siggeirsdottir, Kristin; Holliday, Kate L.; Hannemann, Anke; Go, Min Jin; Garcia, Melissa; Polasek, Ozren; Laaksonen, Marika; Zhu, Kun; Enneman, Anke W.; McEvoy, Mark; Peel, Roseanne; Sham, Pak Chung; Jaworski, Maciej; Johansson, Åsa; Hicks, Andrew A.; Pludowski, Pawel; Scott, Rodney; Dhonukshe-Rutten, Rosalie A. M.; van der Velde, Nathalie; Kähönen, Mika; Viikari, Jorma S.; Sievänen, Harri; Raitakari, Olli T.; González-Macías, Jesús; Hernández, Jose L.; Mellström, Dan; Ljunggren, Östen; Cho, Yoon Shin; Völker, Uwe; Nauck, Matthias; Homuth, Georg; Völzke, Henry; Haring, Robin; Brown, Matthew A.; McCloskey, Eugene; Nicholson, Geoffrey C.; Eastell, Richard; Eisman, John A.; Jones, Graeme; Reid, Ian R.; Dennison, Elaine M.; Wark, John; Boonen, Steven; Vanderschueren, Dirk; Wu, Frederick C. W.; Aspelund, Thor; Richards, J. Brent; Bauer, Doug; Hofman, Albert; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Dedoussis, George; Obermayer-Pietsch, Barbara; Gyllensten, Ulf; Pramstaller, Peter P.; Lorenc, Roman S.; Cooper, Cyrus; Kung, Annie Wai Chee; Lips, Paul; Alen, Markku; Attia, John; Brandi, Maria Luisa; de Groot, Lisette C. P. G. M.; Lehtimäki, Terho; Riancho, José A.; Campbell, Harry; Liu, Yongmei; Harris, Tamara B.; Akesson, Kristina; Karlsson, Magnus; Lee, Jong-Young; Wallaschofski, Henri; Duncan, Emma L.; O'Neill, Terence W.; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Spector, Timothy D.; Rousseau, François; Orwoll, Eric; Cummings, Steve; Wareham, Nick J.; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Prince, Richard L.; Kiel, Douglas P.; Reeve, Jonathan; Kaptoge, Stephen K.

2014-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

484

Pin loosening in external skeletal fixation: a biomechanical and microstructural comparison of the near and far cortex pin-bone interfaces  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ANO FAR CORTEX PIN-BONE INTERFACES A Thesis by DARRYL EUGENE MCDONALD, JR. Approved as to style and content by: Donald . Hu se (Chair of Committee) Ross H. Palmer (Member) Wi)1 A. Hyman ember) Margaret R. Slater (Member) John R. ust (Head... of Department) August 1993 ABSTRACT Pin Loosening in External Skeletal Fixation: A Biomechanical and Microstructural Comparison of the Near and Far Cortex Pin-Bone Interfaces. (August 1993) Darryl Eugene McDonald, Jr. , B. S. ; B. S. ; D. V. M. , Texas...

McDonald, Darryl Eugene

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

485

Substitution of meat and bone meal and cottonseed meal for soybean meal on a digestible amino acid basis in growing pig diets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SUBSTITUTION OF MEAT AND BONE MEAL AND COTTONSEED AREAL FOR SOyBEAN MEAL ON A DIGESTIBLE AMINO ACID BASIS IN GROWING PIG DIETS A Thesis by CARL HEINZ DOBLER-MEHNER Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial... fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1982 Major Subject: Animal Science SUBSTITUTION OF MEAT AND BONE MEAL AND COTTONSEED MEAL FOR SOYBEAN MEAL ON A DIGESTIBLE AMINO ACID BASIS IN GROWING PIG DIETS A Thesis by CARL...

Dobler-Mehner, Carl Heinz

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

Compliant fuel cell system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A fuel cell assembly comprising at least one metallic component, at least one ceramic component and a structure disposed between the metallic component and the ceramic component. The structure is configured to have a lower stiffness compared to at least one of the metallic component and the ceramic component, to accommodate a difference in strain between the metallic component and the ceramic component of the fuel cell assembly.

Bourgeois, Richard Scott (Albany, NY); Gudlavalleti, Sauri (Albany, NY)

2009-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

487

Composite fuel cell membranes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A bilayer or trilayer composite ion exchange membrane suitable for use in a fuel cell. The composite membrane has a high equivalent weight thick layer in order to provide sufficient strength and low equivalent weight surface layers for improved electrical performance in a fuel cell. In use, the composite membrane is provided with electrode surface layers. The composite membrane can be composed of a sulfonic fluoropolymer in both core and surface layers.

Plowman, Keith R. (Lake Jackson, TX); Rehg, Timothy J. (Lake Jackson, TX); Davis, Larry W. (West Columbia, TX); Carl, William P. (Marble Falls, TX); Cisar, Alan J. (Cypress, TX); Eastland, Charles S. (West Columbia, TX)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

Ice electrode electrolytic cell  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention relates to a method and apparatus for removing heavy metals from waste water, soils, or process streams by electrolytic cell means. The method includes cooling a cell cathode to form an ice layer over the cathode and then applying an electric current to deposit a layer of the heavy metal over the ice. The metal is then easily removed after melting the ice. In a second embodiment, the same ice-covered electrode can be employed to form powdered metals.

Glenn, David F. (Idaho Falls, ID); Suciu, Dan F. (Idaho Falls, ID); Harris, Taryl L. (Idaho Falls, ID); Ingram, Jani C. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

489

Ice electrode electrolytic cell  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention relates to a method and apparatus for removing heavy metals from waste water, soils, or process streams by electrolytic cell means. The method includes cooling a cell cathode to form an ice layer over the cathode and then applying an electric current to deposit a layer of the heavy metal over the ice. The metal is then easily removed after melting the ice. In a second embodiment, the same ice-covered electrode can be employed to form powdered metals.

Glenn, D.F.; Suciu, D.F.; Harris, T.L.; Ingram, J.C.

1993-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

490

Composite fuel cell membranes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A bilayer or trilayer composite ion exchange membrane is described suitable for use in a fuel cell. The composite membrane has a high equivalent weight thick layer in order to provide sufficient strength and low equivalent weight surface layers for improved electrical performance in a fuel cell. In use, the composite membrane is provided with electrode surface layers. The composite membrane can be composed of a sulfonic fluoropolymer in both core and surface layers.

Plowman, K.R.; Rehg, T.J.; Davis, L.W.; Carl, W.P.; Cisar, A.J.; Eastland, C.S.

1997-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

491

Aluminum reduction cell electrode  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention is directed to cathode modules comprised of refractory hard metal materials, such as TiB[sub 2], for an electrolytic cell for the reduction of alumina wherein the modules may be installed and replaced during operation of the cell and wherein the structure of the cathode modules is such that the refractory hard metal materials are not subjected to externally applied forces or rigid constraints. 9 figs.

Goodnow, W.H.; Payne, J.R.

1982-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

492

Wnt antagonists influence cell fate decisions in hematopoiesis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

New treatment targets in osteoporosis. Joint Bone Spine 77:potential treatment of osteoporosis. Ann Rheum Dis 70 Supplfor treatments in osteoporosis, further demonstrating the

Cain, Corey Joseph

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

493

Nighttime solar cell  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Currently photovoltaic (PV) cells convert solar energy into electrical energy at an efficiency of about 18%, with the maximum conversion rate taking place around noon on a cloudless day. In many applications, the PV cells are utilized to recharge a stand-by battery pack that provides electrical energy at night or on cloudy days. Increasing the utilization of the panel array area by producing electrical power at night will reduce the amount of required electrical energy storage for a given array size and increase system reliability. Thermoelectric generators (TEG) are solid state devices that convert thermal energy into electrical energy. Using the nighttime sky, or deep space, with an effective temperature of 3.5 K as a cold sink, the TEG presented here can produce electrical power at night. The hot junction is supplied energy by the ambient air temperature or some other warm temperature source. The cold junction of the TEG is insulated from the surroundings by a vacuum cell, improving its overall effectiveness. Combining the TEG with the PV cell, a unique solid state device is developed that converts electromagnetic radiant energy into usable electrical energy. The thermoelectric-photovoltaic (TEPV) cell, or the Nighttime Solar Cell, is a direct energy conversion device that produces electrical energy both at night and during the day.

Parise, R.J.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

494

Monolithic tandem solar cell  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It is an object of the invention to provide a monolithic tandem photovoltaic solar cell which is highly radiation resistant and efficient; in which the energy bandgap of the lower subcell can be tailored for specific applications; solar cell comprising layers of InP and GaInAsP (or GaInAs), where said photovoltaic cell is useful, for example, in space power applications; having an improved power-to-mass ratio; in which subcells are lattice-matches; and are both two terminal and three terminal monolithic tandem photovoltaic solar cells. To achieve the foregoing and other objects and in accordance with the purpose of the present invention, as embodied and broadly described herein, the monolithic tandem photovoltaic solar cell may comprise; (a) an InP substrate having an upper surface; (b) a first photoactive subcell on the upper surface of the InP substrate; wherein the first subcell comprises GaInAs (which could include GaInAsP) and includes a homojunction; and (c) a second photoactive subcell on the first subcell; wherein the second subcell comprises InP and includes a homojunction. The cell is described in detail. 5 figs., 2 tabs.

Wanlass, M.W.

1989-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

495

What do grid cells contribute to place cell firing?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

What do grid cells contribute to place cell firing? Daniel Bush1,2 , Caswell Barry3 , and Neil to be generated by input from entorhinal grid cell modules with differing spatial scales. Here, we review recent and direction to environmental boundaries, while grid cells provide a complementary self-motion related input

Burgess, Neil

496

``In-bone'' Utricle CulturesVA Simplified, Atraumatic Technique for In Situ Cultures of the Adult Mouse  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

effectively in stud- ies of hair cell regeneration and hair cell death, as well as various agents that protect and protection. Background: The current in vitro technique for studying hair cells of the mature mouse utricle to the protective drug tacrine resulted in sig- nificant protection against neomycin (p G 0.05, 3-way analysis

Rubel, Edwin

497

FUEL CELL TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM Technologies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and fuel cells offer great promise for our energy future. Fuel cell vehicles are not yet commercially, such as a hydrogen fueling station or hydrogen fuel cell vehicle. Technology validation does not certify, and the Federal Government to evaluate hydrogen fuel cell vehicle and infrastructure technologies together in real

498

Seventh Edition Fuel Cell Handbook  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Provides an overview of fuel cell technology and research projects. Discusses the basic workings of fuel cells and their system components, main fuel cell types, their characteristics, and their development status, as well as a discussion of potential fuel cell applications.

NETL

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

499

National Fuel Cell Research Center  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

National Fuel Cell Research Center www.nfcrc.uci.edu MOLTEN CARBONATE FUEL CELLS STEADY STATE MODELING OF MOLTEN CARBONATE FUEL CELLS FOR SYSTEM PERFORMANCE ANALYSES OVERVIEW Development of steady state and dynamic simulation capabilities for molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) technology is being

Mease, Kenneth D.

500

Shipboard Fuel Cell Biofuel Introduction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Update FuelCell Energy (Frank Wolak) 1230 PNNL SOFC Power Systems Update PNNL (Larry Chick) 1300 PEM Lessons Learned · System Generic Concepts (PEM, HT PEM, MCFC, SOFC) · Shipboard Fuel Cell CharacteristicsShipboard Fuel Cell ­ Biofuel Introduction: This program will demonstrate a shipboard fuel cell